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  1. Survival and outcome prediction using the Apache III and the out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) score in patients treated in the intensive care unit (ICU) following out-of-hospital, in-hospital or ICU cardiac arrest.

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    Skrifvars, M B; Varghese, B; Parr, M J

    2012-06-01

    There are few data comparing outcome and the utility of severity of illness scoring systems following intensive care after out-of-hospital (OHCA), in-hospital (IHCA) and intensive care unit (ICUCA) cardiac arrest. We investigated survival, factors associated with survival and the correlation and accuracy of general and specific scoring systems, including the Apache III score and the OHCA score in OHCA, IHCA and ICUCA patients. Prospective analysis of data on all cardiac arrest patients treated in a tertiary hospital between August 1st 2008 and July 30th 2010. Collected data included resuscitation and post-resuscitation care data as defined by the Utstein Guidelines, Apache III on admission and the OHCA score on admission in OHCA and IHCA patients and after the arrest in ICUCA patients. Statistical methods were used to identify factors associated with outcome and the predictive ability and correlation of the aforementioned scores. Of a total of 3931 patients treated in the ICU, 51 were admitted following OHCA, 50 following IHCA and 22 suffered an ICUCA and had sustained return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Survival at 30 days was highest among ICUCAs (67%) followed by IHCAs (38%) and OHCAs (29%). Using multivariate analysis delay ROSC was the only independent predictor of survival. The OHCA score performed with moderate accuracy for predicting 30-day mortality (area under the curve 0.77 [0.69-0.86] and was slightly better than the Apache III score 0.71 (0.61-0.80). Using multiple logistic regression the Apache III and the OHCA score were both independent predictors of hospital survival and correlation between these two scores was weak (correlation coefficient of 0.244). Latency to ROSC seems to be the most important determinant of survival in patients following ICU care after a cardiac arrest in this single center trial. The OHCA score and the Apache III score offer moderate predictive accuracy in ICU cardiac arrest patients but correlated weakly with each

  2. A Modified APACHE II Score for Predicting Mortality of Variceal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Modified APACHE II score is effective in predicting outcome of patients with variceal bleeding. Score of L 15 points and long ICU stay are associated with high mortality. Keywords: liver cirrhosis, periportal fibrosis, portal hypertension, schistosomiasis udan Journal of Medical Sciences Vol. 2 (2) 2007: pp. 105- ...

  3. APACHE III Outcome Prediction in Patients Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit with Sepsis Associated Acute Lung Injury.

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    Zhang, Zhongheng; Chen, Kun; Chen, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) III score has been widely used for prediction of clinical outcomes in mixed critically ill patients. However, it has not been validated in patients with sepsis-associated acute lung injury (ALI). The aim of the study was to explore the calibration and predictive value of APACHE III in patients with sepsis-associated ALI. The study was a secondary analysis of a prospective randomized controlled trial investigating the efficacy of rosuvastatin in sepsis-associated ALI (Statins for Acutely Injured Lungs from Sepsis, SAILS). The study population was sepsis-related ALI patients. The primary outcome of the current study was the same as in the original trial, 60-day in-hospital mortality, defined as death before hospital discharge, censored 60 days after enrollment. Discrimination of APACHE III was assessed by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) with its 95% CI. Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit statistic was used to assess the calibration of APACHE III. The Brier score was reported to represent the overall performance of APACHE III in predicting outcome. A total of 745 patients were included in the study, including 540 survivors and 205 non-survivors. Non-survivors were significantly older than survivors (59.71 ± 16.17 vs 52.00 ± 15.92 years, p predict mortality in ALI patients was moderate with an AUC of 0.68 (95% confidence interval: 0.64-0.73). this study for the first time validated the discrimination of APACHE III in sepsis associated ALI patients. The result shows that APACHE III score has moderate predictive value for in-hospital mortality among adults with sepsis-associated acute lung injury.

  4. Validating the use of the APACHE II score in a tertiary South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to evaluate both outcome of intensive care unit (ICU) patients and ICU care, the riskadjusted mortality can be calculated using the APACHE II equation. ... to our ICU; (ii) investigate the impact of such variation on outcome; and (iii) validate the use of the APACHE II risk prediction model in a developing country.

  5. Comparison of APACHE II and SAPS II Scoring Systems in Prediction of Critically ill Patients’ Outcome

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    Hamed Aminiahidashti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Using physiologic scoring systems for identifying high-risk patients for mortality has been considered recently. This study was designed to evaluate the values of Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II and Simplified Acute Physiologic Score (SAPS II models in prediction of 1-month mortality of critically ill patients.Methods: The present prospective cross sectional study was performed on critically ill patients presented to emergency department during 6 months. Data required for calculation of the scores were gathered and performance of the models in prediction of 1-month mortality were assessed using STATA software 11.0.Results: 82 critically ill patients with the mean age of 53.45 ± 20.37 years were included (65.9% male. Their mortality rate was 48%. Mean SAPS II (p < 0.0001 and APACHE II (p = 0.0007 scores were significantly higher in dead patients. Area under the ROC curve of SAPS II and APACHE II for prediction of mortality were 0.75 (95% CI: 0.64 - 0.86 and 0.72 (95% CI: 0.60 - 0.83, respectively (p = 0.24. The slope and intercept of SAPS II were 1.02 and 0.04, respectively. In addition, these values were 0.92 and 0.09 for APACHE II, respectively.Conclusion: The findings of the present study showed that APACHE II and SAPS II had similar value in predicting 1-month mortality of patients. Discriminatory powers of the mentioned models were acceptable but their calibration had some amount of lack of fit, which reveals that APACHE II and SAPS II are partially perfect.

  6. Evaluation of a modified APACHE II Scoring System in the Intensive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MAPA II format was designed from the APA II. The APA II score consists of 12 sets of acute physiological variables (A), age points (B) and chronic health points (C). Total APACHE II score of 71 was generated by adding A, B and C. (Appendix I). MAPA II score was generated by adding A, B and C but substituting PaO2 with ...

  7. Mortality Probability Model III and Simplified Acute Physiology Score II

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    Vasilevskis, Eduard E.; Kuzniewicz, Michael W.; Cason, Brian A.; Lane, Rondall K.; Dean, Mitzi L.; Clay, Ted; Rennie, Deborah J.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Dudley, R. Adams

    2009-01-01

    Background: To develop and compare ICU length-of-stay (LOS) risk-adjustment models using three commonly used mortality or LOS prediction models. Methods: Between 2001 and 2004, we performed a retrospective, observational study of 11,295 ICU patients from 35 hospitals in the California Intensive Care Outcomes Project. We compared the accuracy of the following three LOS models: a recalibrated acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) IV-LOS model; and models developed using risk factors in the mortality probability model III at zero hours (MPM0) and the simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II mortality prediction model. We evaluated models by calculating the following: (1) grouped coefficients of determination; (2) differences between observed and predicted LOS across subgroups; and (3) intraclass correlations of observed/expected LOS ratios between models. Results: The grouped coefficients of determination were APACHE IV with coefficients recalibrated to the LOS values of the study cohort (APACHE IVrecal) [R2 = 0.422], mortality probability model III at zero hours (MPM0 III) [R2 = 0.279], and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS II) [R2 = 0.008]. For each decile of predicted ICU LOS, the mean predicted LOS vs the observed LOS was significantly different (p ≤ 0.05) for three, two, and six deciles using APACHE IVrecal, MPM0 III, and SAPS II, respectively. Plots of the predicted vs the observed LOS ratios of the hospitals revealed a threefold variation in LOS among hospitals with high model correlations. Conclusions: APACHE IV and MPM0 III were more accurate than SAPS II for the prediction of ICU LOS. APACHE IV is the most accurate and best calibrated model. Although it is less accurate, MPM0 III may be a reasonable option if the data collection burden or the treatment effect bias is a consideration. PMID:19363210

  8. Comparison of Charlson comorbidity index with SAPS and APACHE scores for prediction of mortality following intensive care

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    Christensen S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Steffen Christensen1, Martin Berg Johansen1, Christian Fynbo Christiansen1, Reinhold Jensen2, Stanley Lemeshow1,31Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 2Department of Intensive Care, Skejby Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 3Division of Biostatistics, College of Public Health, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USABackground: Physiology-based severity of illness scores are often used for risk adjustment in observational studies of intensive care unit (ICU outcome. However, the complexity and time constraints of these scoring systems may limit their use in administrative databases. Comorbidity is a main determinant of ICU outcome, and comorbidity scores can be computed based on data from most administrative databases. However, limited data exist on the performance of comorbidity scores in predicting mortality of ICU patients.Objectives: To examine the performance of the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI alone and in combination with other readily available administrative data and three physiology-based scores (acute physiology and chronic health evaluations [APACHE] II, simplified acute physiology score [SAPS] II, and SAPS III in predicting short- and long-term mortality following intensive care.Methods: For all adult patients (n = 469 admitted to a tertiary university–affiliated ICU in 2007, we computed APACHE II, SAPS II, and SAPS III scores based on data from medical records. Data on CCI score age and gender, surgical/medical status, social factors, mechanical ventilation and renal replacement therapy, primary diagnosis, and complete follow-up for 1-year mortality was obtained from administrative databases. We computed goodness-of-fit statistics and c-statistics (area under ROC [receiver operating characteristic] curve as measures of model calibration (ability to predict mortality proportions over classes of risk and discrimination (ability to discriminate among the patients

  9. The Usefulness of the APACHE II Score in Obstetric Critical Care: A Structured Review.

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    Ryan, Helen M; Sharma, Sumedha; Magee, Laura A; Ansermino, J Mark; MacDonell, Karen; Payne, Beth A; Walley, Keith R; von Dadelszen, Peter

    2016-10-01

    To assess the performance of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) mortality prediction model in pregnant and recently pregnant women receiving critical care in low-, middle-, and high-income countries during the study period (1985-2015), using a structured literature review. Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science, and Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews, searched for articles published between 1985 and 2015. Twenty-five studies (24 publications), of which two were prospective, were included in the analyses. Ten studies were from high-income countries (HICs), and 15 were from low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Median study duration and size were six years and 124 women, respectively. ICU admission complicates 0.48% of deliveries, and pregnant and recently pregnant women account for 1.49% of ICU admissions. One quarter were admitted while pregnant, three quarters of these for an obstetric indication and for a median of three days. The median APACHE II score was 10.9, with a median APACHE II-predicted mortality of 16.6%. Observed mortality was 4.6%, and the median standardized mortality ratio was 0.36 (interquartile range 0.23 to 0.73). The standardized mortality ratio was critical care, whether they reside in HICs or LMICs. There is a need for a pregnancy-specific outcome prediction model for these women. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Predictive value of SAPS II and APACHE II scoring systems for patient outcome in a medical intensive care unit

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    Amina Godinjak

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim is to determine SAPS II and APACHE II scores in medical intensive care unit (MICU patients, to compare them for prediction of patient outcome, and to compare with actual hospital mortality rates for different subgroups of patients. Methods. One hundred and seventy-four patients were included in this analysis over a oneyear period in the MICU, Clinical Center, University of Sarajevo. The following patient data were obtained: demographics, admission diagnosis, SAPS II, APACHE II scores and final outcome. Results. Out of 174 patients, 70 patients (40.2% died. Mean SAPS II and APACHE II scores in all patients were 48.4±17.0 and 21.6±10.3 respectively, and they were significantly different between survivors and non-survivors. SAPS II >50.5 and APACHE II >27.5 can predict the risk of mortality in these patients. There was no statistically significant difference in the clinical values of SAPS II vs APACHE II (p=0.501. A statistically significant positive correlation was established between the values of SAPS II and APACHE II (r=0.708; p=0.001. Patients with an admission diagnosis of sepsis/septic shock had the highest values of both SAPS II and APACHE II scores, and also the highest hospital mortality rate of 55.1%. Conclusion. Both APACHE II and SAPS II had an excellent ability to discriminate between survivors and non-survivors. There was no significant difference in the clinical values of SAPS II and APACHE II. A positive correlation was established between them. Sepsis/septic shock patients had the highest predicted and observed hospital mortality rate.

  11. Comparison of the APACHE II, GCS and MRC scores in predicting outcomes in patients with tuberculous meningitis.

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    Chou, C-H; Lin, G-M; Ku, C-H; Chang, F-Y

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate different scoring systems, including Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II, the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and the Medical Research Council (MRC) staging system, as well as other prognostic factors, in predicting the discharge outcomes of adult patients with tuberculous meningitis (TBM). We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients admitted with a diagnosis of TBM to a tertiary hospital in northern Taiwan from March 1996 to February 2006. We used APACHE II, GCS, MRC and a variety of factors within 24 h of admission to predict discharge outcomes recorded by the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). Among 43 TBM patients, 33 had a favourable outcome (GOS 4-5), and 10 had an unfavourable outcome (GOS 1-3). The severity of APACHE II, GCS, MRC and presence of hydrocephalus correlated well with the neurological outcomes (P MRC in receiver operating characteristic analysis. Furthermore, in-hospital mortality could be predicted accurately with APACHE II and GCS. The APACHE II scoring system is at least as effective as GCS and superior to MRC in predicting the discharge outcomes of adult patients with TBM.

  12. Predictive value of the APACHE II, SAPS II, SOFA and GCS scoring systems in patients with severe purulent bacterial meningitis.

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    Pietraszek-Grzywaczewska, Iwona; Bernas, Szymon; Łojko, Piotr; Piechota, Anna; Piechota, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Scoring systems in critical care patients are essential for predicting of the patient outcome and evaluating the therapy. In this study, we determined the value of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II), Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II), Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scoring systems in the prediction of mortality in adult patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with severe purulent bacterial meningitis. We retrospectively analysed data from 98 adult patients with severe purulent bacterial meningitis who were admitted to the single ICU between March 2006 and September 2015. Univariate logistic regression identified the following risk factors of death in patients with severe purulent bacterial meningitis: APACHE II, SAPS II, SOFA, and GCS scores, and the lengths of ICU stay and hospital stay. The independent risk factors of patient death in multivariate analysis were the SAPS II score, the length of ICU stay and the length of hospital stay. In the prediction of mortality according to the area under the curve, the SAPS II score had the highest accuracy followed by the APACHE II, GCS and SOFA scores. For the prediction of mortality in a patient with severe purulent bacterial meningitis, SAPS II had the highest accuracy.

  13. APACHE II SCORING SYSTEM AND ITS MODIFICATION FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF DISEASE SEVERITY IN CHILDREN WHO UNDERWENT POLYCHEMOTHERAPY

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    А. V. Sotnikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Short-term disease prognosis should be considered for the appropriate treatment policy based on the assessment of disease severity in patients with acute disease. The adequate assessment of disease severity and prognosis allows the indications for transferring patients to the resuscitation and intensive care department to be defined more precisely. Disease severity of patients who underwent polychemotherapy was assessed using APACHE II scoring system.

  14. The Ability of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE IV Score to Predict Mortality in a Single Tertiary Hospital

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    Jae Woo Choi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background The Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II model has been widely used in Korea. However, there have been few studies on the APACHE IV model in Korean intensive care units (ICUs. The aim of this study was to compare the ability of APACHE IV and APACHE II in predicting hospital mortality, and to investigate the ability of APACHE IV as a critical care triage criterion. Methods The study was designed as a prospective cohort study. Measurements of discrimination and calibration were performed using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC and the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test respectively. We also calculated the standardized mortality ratio (SMR. Results The APACHE IV score, the Charlson Comorbidity index (CCI score, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and unplanned ICU admissions were independently associated with hospital mortality. The calibration, discrimination, and SMR of APACHE IV were good (H = 7.67, P = 0.465; C = 3.42, P = 0.905; AUROC = 0.759; SMR = 1.00. However, the explanatory power of an APACHE IV score >93 alone on hospital mortality was low at 44.1%. The explanatory power was increased to 53.8% when the hospital mortality was predicted using a model that considers APACHE IV >93 scores, medical admission, and risk factors for CCI >3 coincidentally. However, the discriminative ability of the prediction model was unsatisfactory (C index <0.70. Conclusions The APACHE IV presented good discrimination, calibration, and SMR for hospital mortality.

  15. Predictive ability of the ISS, NISS, and APACHE II score for SIRS and sepsis in polytrauma patients.

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    Mica, L; Furrer, E; Keel, M; Trentz, O

    2012-12-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis as causes of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) remain challenging to treat in polytrauma patients. In this study, the focus was set on widely used scoring systems to assess their diagnostic quality. A total of 512 patients (mean age: 39.2 ± 16.2, range: 16-88 years) who had an Injury Severity Score (ISS) ≥17 were included in this retrospective study. The patients were subdivided into four groups: no SIRS, slight SIRS, severe SIRS, and sepsis. The ISS, New Injury Severity Score (NISS), Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scores, and prothrombin time were collected at admission. The Kruskal-Wallis test and χ(2)-test, multinomial regression analysis, and kernel density estimates were performed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis is reported as the area under the curve (AUC). Data were considered as significant if p SIRS severity for NISS (slight vs. no SIRS, 1.06, p = 0.07; severe vs. no SIRS, 1.07, p = 0.04; and sepsis vs. no SIRS, 1.11, p = 0.0028) and APACHE II score (slight vs. no SIRS, 0.97, p = 0.44; severe vs. no SIRS, 1.08, p = 0.02; and sepsis vs. no SIRS, 1.12, p = 0.0028). ROC analysis revealed that the NISS (slight vs. no SIRS, AUC 0.61; severe vs. no SIRS, AUC 0.67; and sepsis vs. no SIRS, AUC 0.77) and APACHE II score (slight vs. no SIRS, AUC 0.60; severe vs. no SIRS, AUC 0.74; and sepsis vs. no SIRS, AUC 0.82) had the best predictive ability for SIRS and sepsis. Quick assessment with the NISS or APACHE II score could preselect possible candidates for sepsis following polytrauma and provide guidance in trauma surgeons' decision-making.

  16. Initial dosing regimen of vancomycin to achieve early therapeutic plasma concentration in critically ill patients with MRSA infection based on APACHE II score.

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    Imaura, Masaharu; Yokoyama, Haruko; Kohata, Yuji; Kanai, Riichiro; Kohyama, Tomoki; Idemitsu, Wataru; Maki, Yuichi; Igarashi, Takashi; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Kanno, Hiroshi; Yamada, Yasuhiko

    2016-06-01

    It is essential to assure the efficacy of antimicrobials at the initial phase of therapy. However, increasing the volume of distribution (Vd) of hydrophilic antimicrobials in critically ill patients leads to reduced antimicrobial concentration in plasma and tissue, which may adversely affect the efficacy of that therapy. The aim of the present study was to establish a theoretical methodology for setting an appropriate level for initial vancomycin therapy in individual patients based on Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score. We obtained data from patients who received intravenous vancomycin for a suspected or definitively diagnosed Gram-positive bacterial infection within 72 h after admission to the intensive care unit. The Vd and elimination half-life (t 1/2) of vancomycin values were calculated using the Bayesian method, and we investigated the relationship between them and APACHE II score. There were significant correlations between APACHE II scores and Vd/actual body weight (ABW), as well as t 1/2 (r = 0.58, p vancomycin could be estimated using the following regression equations using APACHE II score.[Formula: see text] [Formula: see text]We found that APACHE II score was a useful index for predicting the Vd and t 1/2 of vancomycin, and used that to establish an initial vancomycin dosing regimen comprised of initial dose and administration interval for individual patients.

  17. Apache Kafka

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    Garg, Nishant

    2013-01-01

    The book will follow a step-by-step tutorial approach which will show the readers how to use Apache Kafka for messaging from scratch.Apache Kafka is for readers with software development experience, but no prior exposure to Apache Kafka or similar technologies is assumed. This book is also for enterprise application developers and big data enthusiasts who have worked with other publisher-subscriber based systems and now want to explore Apache Kafka as a futuristic scalable solution.

  18. Prediction of Mortality after Emergent Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Placement: Use of APACHE II, Child-Pugh and MELD Scores in Asian Patients with Refractory Variceal Hemorrhage

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    Tzeng, Wen Sheng; Wu, Reng Hong; Lin, Ching Yih; Chen, Jyh Jou; Sheu, Ming Juen; Koay, Lok Beng; Lee, Chuan [Chi-Mei Foundation Medical Center, Tainan (China)

    2009-10-15

    This study was designed to determine if existing methods of grading liver function that have been developed in non-Asian patients with cirrhosis can be used to predict mortality in Asian patients treated for refractory variceal hemorrhage by the use of the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedure. Data for 107 consecutive patients who underwent an emergency TIPS procedure were retrospectively analyzed. Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE II), Child-Pugh and model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) scores were calculated. Survival analyses were performed to evaluate the ability of the various models to predict 30-day, 60-day and 360-day mortality. The ability of stratified APACHE II, Child-Pugh, and MELD scores to predict survival was assessed by the use of Kaplan-Meier analysis with the log-rank test. No patient died during the TIPS procedure, but 82 patients died during the follow-up period. Thirty patients died within 30 days after the TIPS procedure; 37 patients died within 60 days and 53 patients died within 360 days. Univariate analysis indicated that hepatorenal syndrome, use of inotropic agents and mechanical ventilation were associated with elevated 30-day mortality (p < 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that a Child-Pugh score > 11 or an MELD score > 20 predicted increased risk of death at 30, 60 and 360 days (p < 0.05). APACHE II scores could only predict mortality at 360 days (p < 0.05). A Child-Pugh score > 11 or an MELD score > 20 are predictive of mortality in Asian patients with refractory variceal hemorrhage treated with the TIPS procedure. An APACHE II score is not predictive of early mortality in this patient population.

  19. APACHE score, Severity Index of Paraquat Poisoning, and serum lactic acid concentration in the prognosis of paraquat poisoning of Chinese Patients.

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    Xu, Shuyun; Hu, Hai; Jiang, Zhen; Tang, Shiyuan; Zhou, Yuangao; Sheng, Jie; Chen, Jinggang; Cao, Yu

    2015-02-01

    Many prognostic indictors have been studied to evaluate the prognosis of paraquat poisoning. However, the optimal indicator remains unclear. To determine the value of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score, the Severity Index of Paraquat Poisoning (SIPP), and serum lactate levels in the prognosis of paraquat poisoning, we performed a prospective study that enrolled 143 paraquat patients. Data were collected from patients (161) at West China Hospital in Chengdu, China, including details about the patients' general conditions, laboratory examinations, and treatment. Receiver operating characteristic curves for predicting inpatient mortality based on APACHE II score, SIPP, and lactate levels were generated. To analyze the best cutoff values for lactate levels, APACHE II scores, and SIPP in predicting the prognosis of paraquat poisoning, the initial parameters on admission and 7-day survival curves of patients with lactate levels greater than or equal to 2.95 mmol/L, APACHE II score greater than or equal to 15.22, and SIPP greater than or equal to 5.50 h · mg/L at the time of arrival at West China Hospital were compared using the 1-way analysis of variance and the log-rank test. The APACHE II score (5.45 [3.67] vs 11.29 [4.31]), SIPP (2.78 [1.89] vs 7.63 [2.46] h · mg/L), and lactate level (2.78 [1.89] vs 7.63 [2.46] mmol/L) were significantly lower in survivors (77) after oral ingestion of paraquat, compared with nonsurvivors (66). The APACHE II score, SIPP, and lactate level had different areas under the curve (0.847, 0.789, and 0.916, respectively) and accuracy (0.64, 0.84, and 0.89, respectively). Respiratory rate, serum creatinine level, Paco2, and mortality rate at 7 days after admission in patients with lactate levels greater than or equal to 2.95 mmol/L were markedly different compared with those of other patients (P paraquat poisoning.

  20. Prediction of Mortality after Emergent Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Placement: Use of APACHE II, Child-Pugh and MELD Scores in Asian Patients with Refractory Variceal Hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzeng, Wen Sheng; Wu, Reng Hong; Lin, Ching Yih; Chen, Jyh Jou; Sheu, Ming Juen; Koay, Lok Beng; Lee, Chuan

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to determine if existing methods of grading liver function that have been developed in non-Asian patients with cirrhosis can be used to predict mortality in Asian patients treated for refractory variceal hemorrhage by the use of the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedure. Data for 107 consecutive patients who underwent an emergency TIPS procedure were retrospectively analyzed. Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE II), Child-Pugh and model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) scores were calculated. Survival analyses were performed to evaluate the ability of the various models to predict 30-day, 60-day and 360-day mortality. The ability of stratified APACHE II, Child-Pugh, and MELD scores to predict survival was assessed by the use of Kaplan-Meier analysis with the log-rank test. No patient died during the TIPS procedure, but 82 patients died during the follow-up period. Thirty patients died within 30 days after the TIPS procedure; 37 patients died within 60 days and 53 patients died within 360 days. Univariate analysis indicated that hepatorenal syndrome, use of inotropic agents and mechanical ventilation were associated with elevated 30-day mortality (p 11 or an MELD score > 20 predicted increased risk of death at 30, 60 and 360 days (p 11 or an MELD score > 20 are predictive of mortality in Asian patients with refractory variceal hemorrhage treated with the TIPS procedure. An APACHE II score is not predictive of early mortality in this patient population

  1. Validation of APACHE II scoring system at 24 hours after admission as a prognostic tool in urosepsis: A prospective observational study

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    Sundaramoorthy VijayGanapathy

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Urosepsis implies clinically evident severe infection of urinary tract with features of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS. We validate the role of a single Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II score at 24 hours after admission in predicting mortality in urosepsis. Materials and Methods: A prospective observational study was done in 178 patients admitted with urosepsis in the Department of Urology, in a tertiary care institute from January 2015 to August 2016. Patients >18 years diagnosed as urosepsis using SIRS criteria with positive urine or blood culture for bacteria were included. At 24 hours after admission to intensive care unit, APACHE II score was calculated using 12 physiological variables, age and chronic health. Results: Mean±standard deviation (SD APACHE II score was 26.03±7.03. It was 24.31±6.48 in survivors and 32.39±5.09 in those expired (p<0.001. Among patients undergoing surgery, mean±SD score was higher (30.74±4.85 than among survivors (24.30±6.54 (p<0.001. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis revealed area under curve (AUC of 0.825 with cutoff 25.5 being 94.7% sensitive and 56.4% specific to predict mortality. Mean±SD score in those undergoing surgery was 25.22±6.70 and was lesser than those who did not undergo surgery (28.44±7.49 (p=0.007. ROC analysis revealed AUC of 0.760 with cutoff 25.5 being 94.7% sensitive and 45.6% specific to predict mortality even after surgery. Conclusions: A single APACHE II score assessed at 24 hours after admission was able to predict morbidity, mortality, need for surgical intervention, length of hospitalization, treatment success and outcome in urosepsis patients.

  2. Predictive values of urine paraquat concentration, dose of poison, arterial blood lactate and APACHE II score in the prognosis of patients with acute paraquat poisoning.

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    Liu, Xiao-Wei; Ma, Tao; Li, Lu-Lu; Qu, Bo; Liu, Zhi

    2017-07-01

    The present study investigated the predictive values of urine paraquat (PQ) concentration, dose of poison, arterial blood lactate and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score in the prognosis of patients with acute PQ poisoning. A total of 194 patients with acute PQ poisoning, hospitalized between April 2012 and January 2014 at the First Affiliated Hospital of P.R. China Medical University (Shenyang, China), were selected and divided into survival and mortality groups. Logistic regression analysis, receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis and Kaplan-Meier curve were applied to evaluate the values of urine paraquat (PQ) concentration, dose of poison, arterial blood lactate and (APACHE) II score for predicting the prognosis of patients with acute PQ poisoning. Initial urine PQ concentration (C0), dose of poison, arterial blood lactate and APACHE II score of patients in the mortality group were significantly higher compared with the survival group (all Ppoison and arterial blood lactate correlated with mortality risk of acute PQ poisoning (all Ppoison, arterial blood lactate and APACHE II score in predicting the mortality of patients within 28 days were 0.921, 0.887, 0.808 and 0.648, respectively. The AUC of C0 for predicting early and delayed mortality were 0.890 and 0.764, respectively. The AUC values of urine paraquat concentration the day after poisoning (Csec) and the rebound rate of urine paraquat concentration in predicting the mortality of patients within 28 days were 0.919 and 0.805, respectively. The 28-day survival rate of patients with C0 ≤32.2 µg/ml (42/71; 59.2%) was significantly higher when compared with patients with C0 >32.2 µg/ml (38/123; 30.9%). These results suggest that the initial urine PQ concentration may be the optimal index for predicting the prognosis of patients with acute PQ poisoning. Additionally, dose of poison, arterial blood lactate, Csec and rebound rate also have referential significance.

  3. NCEP ATP III dan Framingham score

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan, Refli; Fahila, Reny

    2016-01-01

    Laporan ini merupakan Program Pendidikan Kolesterol National yang diperbaharui yaitu pedoman klinis untuk melakukan pengujian kolesterol dan manajemen. ATP III dibuat berdasarkan bukti dan laporan ekstensif yang akan menjadi referensi dan rekomendasi ilmiah. Laporan ATP III dapat dijadikan pedoman untuk pemberian terapi penurun kolesterol yang intensif dalam praktek. Pedoman ini hanya sebagai informasi , tidak dapat mempengaruhi secara mutlak dalam penilaian klinis dokter yang akhirnya menent...

  4. Correlación entre índices de bioimpedancia eléctrica y score Apache II en pacientes con shock séptico

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz-De Los Santos, Manuel; Cieza, Javier; Valenzuela, Raúl

    2011-01-01

    Objetivo: Determinar la correlación entre diversos índices de bioimpedancia eléctrica (IBE) y el score APACHE II (sAII) en pacientes con shock séptico. Material y métodos: Se incluyeron 30 pacientes >14 años con shock séptico de la unidad de cuidados intensivos (UCI) adultos del Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia-Perú a quienes se calculó el (sAII) y se midió el ángulo de fase, índice de impedancia y relación LIC/LEC, correlacionándolos posteriormente mediante Pearson y regresión lineal...

  5. Various scoring systems for predicting mortality in Intensive Care Unit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-12-07

    Dec 7, 2015 ... require updating these critical scoring systems. Considering the possibility of a superiority of one system to others, the present study aimed to compare the third generation scoring systems (APACHE IV and SAPS III) with the commonly used system; APACHE II in our critically ill patients. ICU mortality rates ...

  6. Correlación entre índices de bioimpedancia eléctrica y score Apache II en pacientes con shock séptico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Díaz-De Los Santos

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Determinar la correlación entre diversos índices de bioimpedancia eléctrica (IBE y el score APACHE II (sAII en pacientes con shock séptico. Material y métodos: Se incluyeron 30 pacientes >14 años con shock séptico de la unidad de cuidados intensivos (UCI adultos del Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia-Perú a quienes se calculó el (sAII y se midió el ángulo de fase, índice de impedancia y relación LIC/LEC, correlacionándolos posteriormente mediante Pearson y regresión lineal múltiple. Resultados: El 60% fueron varones, la edad promedio fue 60 ± 20,92 años, talla 1,61 ± 0,06m, peso 65,46 ± 8,7 Kg. y tiempo de ingreso a UCI 8,4 ± 5,99 horas. El 86,6% requirió ventilación mecánica, el foco infeccioso más frecuente fue respiratorio (63,3%. El promedio del sAII fue 18,83 ± 9,23, la permanencia en UCI 8,4 ± 5,99 días y la letalidad al mes 50%. Solamente se encontró correlación negativa con significancia estadística (r = -0,46; p = 0,01 entre el ángulo de fase (AF y el (sAII. Ni el índice de impedancia ni la relación LIC/LEC tuvieron correlación significativa. El mejor predictor de mortalidad fue el AF: todos los que fallecieron tuvieron un AF<6grados (promedio 3,67 ± 0,63, p<0,05. Conclusiones: Únicamente el AF se correlacionó con el score (sAII y fue el índice que mejor predijo mortalidad en pacientes con shock séptico, siendo superior al score APACHE II (sAII. (Rev Med Hered 2010;21:111-117.

  7. Apache Maven cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Bharathan, Raghuram

    2015-01-01

    If you are a Java developer or a manager who has experience with Apache Maven and want to extend your knowledge, then this is the ideal book for you. Apache Maven Cookbook is for those who want to learn how Apache Maven can be used for build automation. It is also meant for those familiar with Apache Maven, but want to understand the finer nuances of Maven and solve specific problems.

  8. Various scoring systems for predicting mortality in Intensive Care Unit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Age, gender, body weight, initial diagnosis, clinic of referral, intubation, comorbidities, APACHE II, APACHE IV, Glasgow coma scale, SAPS III scores, length of hospitalization before referral to ICU, length of stay in ICU, mechanical ventilation were recorded. Results: Most of the patients (54.6%) were consulted from ...

  9. Development of WAIS-III General Ability Index Minus WMS-III memory discrepancy scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Rael T; Chelune, Gordon J; Tulsky, David S

    2006-09-01

    Analysis of the discrepancy between intellectual functioning and memory ability has received some support as a useful means for evaluating memory impairment. In recent additions to Wechlser scale interpretation, the WAIS-III General Ability Index (GAI) and the WMS-III Delayed Memory Index (DMI) were developed. The purpose of this investigation is to develop base rate data for GAI-IMI, GAI-GMI, and GAI-DMI discrepancy scores using data from the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample (weighted N = 1250). Base rate tables were developed using the predicted-difference method and two simple-difference methods (i.e., stratified and non-stratified). These tables provide valuable data for clinical reference purposes to determine the frequency of GAI-IMI, GAI-GMI, and GAI-DMI discrepancy scores in the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample.

  10. THE TENTH DATA RELEASE OF THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY: FIRST SPECTROSCOPIC DATA FROM THE SDSS-III APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY GALACTIC EVOLUTION EXPERIMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Christopher P.; Anderton, Timothy [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Alexandroff, Rachael [Center for Astrophysical Sciences, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Allende Prieto, Carlos [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), C/Vía Láctea, s/n, E-38200, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Anders, Friedrich [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Anderson, Scott F.; Bhardwaj, Vaishali [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Andrews, Brett H. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Aubourg, Éric; Bautista, Julian E. [APC, University of Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité, F-75205 Paris (France); Bailey, Stephen; Beutler, Florian [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bastien, Fabienne A.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Bird, Jonathan C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, VU Station 1807, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Beers, Timothy C. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Beifiori, Alessandra [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstraße, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Bender, Chad F. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Bizyaev, Dmitry [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Blake, Cullen H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 219 S. 33rd St., Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); and others

    2014-04-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) has been in operation since 2000 April. This paper presents the Tenth Public Data Release (DR10) from its current incarnation, SDSS-III. This data release includes the first spectroscopic data from the Apache Point Observatory Galaxy Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), along with spectroscopic data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) taken through 2012 July. The APOGEE instrument is a near-infrared R ∼ 22,500 300 fiber spectrograph covering 1.514-1.696 μm. The APOGEE survey is studying the chemical abundances and radial velocities of roughly 100,000 red giant star candidates in the bulge, bar, disk, and halo of the Milky Way. DR10 includes 178,397 spectra of 57,454 stars, each typically observed three or more times, from APOGEE. Derived quantities from these spectra (radial velocities, effective temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities) are also included. DR10 also roughly doubles the number of BOSS spectra over those included in the Ninth Data Release. DR10 includes a total of 1,507,954 BOSS spectra comprising 927,844 galaxy spectra, 182,009 quasar spectra, and 159,327 stellar spectra selected over 6373.2 deg{sup 2}.

  11. Combination of Mean Platelet Volume/Platelet Count Ratio and the APACHE II Score Better Predicts the Short-Term Outcome in Patients with Acute Kidney Injury Receiving Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junhui; Li, Yingchuan; Sheng, Xiaohua; Wang, Feng; Cheng, Dongsheng; Jian, Guihua; Li, Yongguang; Feng, Liang; Wang, Niansong

    2018-03-29

    Both the Acute physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II) score and mean platelet volume/platelet count Ratio (MPR) can independently predict adverse outcomes in critically ill patients. This study was aimed to investigate whether the combination of them could have a better performance in predicting prognosis of patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) who received continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). Two hundred twenty-three patients with AKI who underwent CRRT between January 2009 and December 2014 in a Chinese university hospital were enrolled. They were divided into survivals group and non-survivals group based on the situation at discharge. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve was used for MPR and APACHE II score, and to determine the optimal cut-off value of MPR for in-hospital mortality. Factors associated with mortality were identified by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. The mean age of the patients was 61.4 years, and the overall in-hospital mortality was 48.4%. Acute cardiorenal syndrome (ACRS) was the most common cause of AKI. The optimal cut-off value of MPR for mortality was 0.099 with an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.636. The AUC increased to 0.851 with the addition of the APACHE II score. The mortality of patients with of MPR > 0.099 was 56.4%, which was significantly higher than that of the control group with of ≤ 0.099 (39.6%, P= 0.012). Logistic regression analysis showed that average number of organ failure (OR = 2.372), APACHE II score (OR = 1.187), age (OR = 1.028) and vasopressors administration (OR = 38.130) were significantly associated with poor prognosis. Severity of illness was significantly associated with prognosis of patients with AKI. The combination of MPR and APACHE II score may be helpful in predicting the short-term outcome of AKI. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Combination of Mean Platelet Volume/Platelet Count Ratio and the APACHE II Score Better Predicts the Short-Term Outcome in Patients with Acute Kidney Injury Receiving Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhui Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Both the Acute physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II score and mean platelet volume/platelet count Ratio (MPR can independently predict adverse outcomes in critically ill patients. This study was aimed to investigate whether the combination of them could have a better performance in predicting prognosis of patients with acute kidney injury (AKI who received continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT. Methods: Two hundred twenty-three patients with AKI who underwent CRRT between January 2009 and December 2014 in a Chinese university hospital were enrolled. They were divided into survivals group and non-survivals group based on the situation at discharge. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curve was used for MPR and APACHE II score, and to determine the optimal cut-off value of MPR for in-hospital mortality. Factors associated with mortality were identified by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: The mean age of the patients was 61.4 years, and the overall in-hospital mortality was 48.4%. Acute cardiorenal syndrome (ACRS was the most common cause of AKI. The optimal cut-off value of MPR for mortality was 0.099 with an area under the ROC curve (AUC of 0.636. The AUC increased to 0.851 with the addition of the APACHE II score. The mortality of patients with of MPR > 0.099 was 56.4%, which was significantly higher than that of the control group with of ≤ 0.099 (39.6%, P= 0.012. Logistic regression analysis showed that average number of organ failure (OR = 2.372, APACHE II score (OR = 1.187, age (OR = 1.028 and vasopressors administration (OR = 38.130 were significantly associated with poor prognosis. Conclusion: Severity of illness was significantly associated with prognosis of patients with AKI. The combination of MPR and APACHE II score may be helpful in predicting the short-term outcome of AKI.

  13. Sensitivity and specificity of WAIS-III/WMS-III demographically corrected factor scores in neuropsychological assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, M J; Heaton, R K

    2001-11-01

    This study explored the neurodiagnostic utility of 6 factor scores identified by recent exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of the WAIS-III and WMS-III: Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Organization, Processing Speed, Working Memory, Auditory Memory and Visual Memory. Factor scores were corrected for age. education, sex and ethnicity to minimize their influences on diagnostic accuracy. Cut-offs at 1, 1.5 and 2 standard deviations (SDs) below the standardization sample mean were applied to data from the overlapping test normative samples (N = 1073) and 6 clinical samples described in the WAIS-III/WMS-III Technical Manual (N = 126). The analyses suggest that a I SD cut-off yields the most balanced levels of sensitivity and specificity; more strict (1.5 or 2 SD) cut-offs generally result in trading modest gains in specificity for larger losses in sensitivity. Finally, using combinations of WAIS-III/WMS-III factors together as test batteries, we explored the sensitivity and specificity implications of varying diagnostic decision rules (e.g.,1 vs. 2 impaired factors = "impairment"). For most of the disorders considered here, even a small (e.g., 3 factor) WAIS-III/WMS-III battery provides quite good overall diagnostic accuracy.

  14. Learning Apache Kafka

    CERN Document Server

    Garg, Nishant

    2015-01-01

    This book is for readers who want to know more about Apache Kafka at a hands-on level; the key audience is those with software development experience but no prior exposure to Apache Kafka or similar technologies. It is also useful for enterprise application developers and big data enthusiasts who have worked with other publisher-subscriber-based systems and want to explore Apache Kafka as a futuristic solution.

  15. Apache The Definitive Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Laurie, Ben

    2003-01-01

    Apache is far and away the most widely used web server platform in the world. This versatile server runs more than half of the world's existing web sites. Apache is both free and rock-solid, running more than 21 million web sites ranging from huge e-commerce operations to corporate intranets and smaller hobby sites. With this new third edition of Apache: The Definitive Guide, web administrators new to Apache will come up to speed quickly, and experienced administrators will find the logically organized, concise reference sections indispensable, and system programmers interested in customizin

  16. Learning Apache Karaf

    CERN Document Server

    Edstrom, Johan; Kesler, Heath

    2013-01-01

    The book is a fast-paced guide full of step-by-step instructions covering all aspects of application development using Apache Karaf.Learning Apache Karaf will benefit all Java developers and system administrators who need to develop for and/or operate Karaf's OSGi-based runtime. Basic knowledge of Java is assumed.

  17. The APACHE Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacobbe P.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available First, we summarize the four-year long efforts undertaken to build the final setup of the APACHE Project, a photometric transit search for small-size planets orbiting bright, low-mass M dwarfs. Next, we describe the present status of the APACHE survey, officially started in July 2012 at the site of the Astronomical Observatory of the Autonomous Region of the Aosta Valley, in the Western Italian Alps. Finally, we briefly discuss the potentially far-reaching consequences of a multi-technique characterization program of the (potentially planet-bearing APACHE targets.

  18. Apache Solr beginner's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Serafini, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Written in a friendly, example-driven format, the book includes plenty of step-by-step instructions and examples that are designed to help you get started with Apache Solr.This book is an entry level text into the wonderful world of Apache Solr. The book will center around a couple of simple projects such as setting up Solr and all the stuff that comes with customizing the Solr schema and configuration. This book is for developers looking to start using Apache Solr who are stuck or intimidated by the difficulty of setting it up and using it.For anyone wanting to embed a search engine in their

  19. Instant Apache Wicket 6

    CERN Document Server

    Longo, João Sávio Ceregatti

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. This Starter style guide takes the reader through the basic workflow of Apache Wicket in a practical and friendly style.Instant Apache Wicket 6 is for people who want to learn the basics of Apache Wicket 6 and who already have some experience with Java and object-oriented programming. Basic knowledge of web concepts like HTTP and Ajax will be an added advantage.

  20. Apache Solr essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Gazzarini, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    If you are a competent developer with experience of working with technologies similar to Apache Solr and want to develop efficient search applications, then this book is for you. Familiarity with the Java programming language is required.

  1. Apache Mahout essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Withanawasam, Jayani

    2015-01-01

    If you are a Java developer or data scientist, haven't worked with Apache Mahout before, and want to get up to speed on implementing machine learning on big data, then this is the perfect guide for you.

  2. Apache Mahout cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Giacomelli, Piero

    2013-01-01

    Apache Mahout Cookbook uses over 35 recipes packed with illustrations and real-world examples to help beginners as well as advanced programmers get acquainted with the features of Mahout.""Apache Mahout Cookbook"" is great for developers who want to have a fresh and fast introduction to Mahout coding. No previous knowledge of Mahout is required, and even skilled developers or system administrators will benefit from the various recipes presented

  3. Apache Tomcat 7 Essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Khare, Tanuj

    2012-01-01

    This book is a step-by-step tutorial for anyone wanting to learn Apache Tomcat 7 from scratch. There are plenty of illustrations and examples to escalate you from a novice to an expert with minimal strain. If you are a J2EE administrator, migration administrator, technical architect, or a project manager for a web hosting domain, and are interested in Apache Tomcat 7, then this book is for you. If you are someone responsible for installation, configuration, and management of Tomcat 7, then too, this book will be of help to you.

  4. Instant Apache Stanbol

    CERN Document Server

    Bachmann-Gmür, Reto

    2013-01-01

    Filled with practical, step-by-step instructions and clear explanations for the most important and useful tasks. Instant Apache Stanbol How-to will enable you to become an expert in content management with semantics at the core, with the help of practical recipes. Instant Apache Stanbol How-to is for Java developers who would like to extend Stanbol or would just like to use Stanbol without caring about its internals. A few recipes that show how to extend Stanbol require some familiarity with Java and JavaScript.

  5. Instant Apache Maven starter

    CERN Document Server

    Turatti, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks.The book follows a starter approach for using Maven to create and build a new Java application or Web project from scratch.Instant Apache Maven Starter is great for Java developers new to Apache Maven, but also for experts looking for immediate information. Moreover, only 20% of the necessary information about Maven is used in 80% of the activities. This book aims to focus on the most important information, those pragmatic parts you actually use

  6. Apaches push privatization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, S.

    1994-01-01

    Trying to drum up business for what would be the first private temporary storage facility for spent nuclear fuel rods, the Mescalero Apaches are inviting officials of 30 utilities to convene March 10 at the tribe's New Mexico reservation. The state public utilities commission will also attend the meeting, which grew from an agreement the tribe signed last month with Minneapolis-based Northern States Power Co

  7. Mastering Apache Cassandra

    CERN Document Server

    Neeraj, Nishant

    2013-01-01

    Mastering Apache Cassandra is a practical, hands-on guide with step-by-step instructions. The smooth and easy tutorial approach focuses on showing people how to utilize Cassandra to its full potential.This book is aimed at intermediate Cassandra users. It is best suited for startups where developers have to wear multiple hats: programmer, DevOps, release manager, convincing clients, and handling failures. No prior knowledge of Cassandra is required.

  8. Apache 2 Pocket Reference For Apache Programmers & Administrators

    CERN Document Server

    Ford, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Even if you know the Apache web server inside and out, you still need an occasional on-the-job reminder -- especially if you're moving to the newer Apache 2.x. Apache 2 Pocket Reference gives you exactly what you need to get the job done without forcing you to plow through a cumbersome, doorstop-sized reference. This Book provides essential information to help you configure and maintain the server quickly, with brief explanations that get directly to the point. It covers Apache 2.x, giving web masters, web administrators, and programmers a quick and easy reference solution. This pocket r

  9. Instant Apache Sqoop

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Ankit

    2013-01-01

    Filled with practical, step-by-step instructions and clear explanations for the most important and useful tasks. Instant Apache Sqoop is full of step-by-step instructions and practical examples along with challenges to test and improve your knowledge.This book is great for developers who are looking to get a good grounding in how to effectively and efficiently move data between RDBMS and the Hadoop ecosystem. It's assumed that you will have some experience in Hadoop already as well as some familiarity with HBase and Hive.

  10. Application of new WAIS-III/WMS-III discrepancy scores for evaluating memory functioning: relationship between intellectual and memory ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Rael T; Chelune, Gordon J

    2006-05-01

    Analysis of the discrepancy between memory and intellectual ability has received some support as a means for evaluating memory impairment. Recently, comprehensive base rate tables for General Ability Index (GAI) minus memory discrepancy scores (i.e., GAI-memory) were developed using the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample (Lange, Chelune, & Tulsky, in press). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of GAI-memory discrepancy scores to identify memory impairment in 34 patients with Alzheimer's type dementia (DAT) versus a sample of 34 demographically matched healthy participants. On average, patients with DAT obtained significantly lower scores on all WAIS-III and WMS-III indexes and had larger GAI-memory discrepancy scores. Clinical outcome analyses revealed that GAI-memory scores were useful at identifying memory impairment in patients with DAT versus matched healthy participants. However, GAI-memory discrepancy scores failed to provide unique interpretive information beyond that which is gained from the memory indexes alone. Implications and future research directions are discussed.

  11. Apache Cordova 3 programming

    CERN Document Server

    Wargo, John M

    2013-01-01

    Written for experienced mobile developers, Apache Cordova 3 Programming is a complete introduction to Apache Cordova 3 and Adobe PhoneGap 3. It describes what makes Cordova important and shows how to install and use the tools, the new Cordova CLI, the native SDKs, and more. If you’re brand new to Cordova, this book will be just what you need to get started. If you’re familiar with an older version of Cordova, this book will show you in detail how to use all of the new stuff that’s in Cordova 3 plus stuff that has been around for a while (like the Cordova core APIs). After walking you through the process of downloading and setting up the framework, mobile expert John M. Wargo shows you how to install and use the command line tools to manage the Cordova application lifecycle and how to set up and use development environments for several of the more popular Cordova supported mobile device platforms. Of special interest to new developers are the chapters on the anatomy of a Cordova application, as well ...

  12. The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majewski, Steven R.; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Frinchaboy, Peter M.

    2017-01-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), one of the programs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), has now completed its systematic, homogeneous spectroscopic survey sampling all major populations of the Milky Way. After a three-year observing campaign on the...

  13. An Exploration of the Base Rate Scores of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, William M.; Vrieze, Scott I.

    2009-01-01

    The Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (3rd ed.; MCMI-III) is a widely used psychological assessment of clinical and personality disorders. Unlike typical tests, the MCMI-III uses a base-rate score transformation to incorporate prior probabilities of disorder (i.e., base rates) in test output and diagnostic thresholds. The authors describe the…

  14. Three-dimensional (3-D) Circumplex Model and revised scoring of FACES III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, D H

    1991-03-01

    FACES III can, however, continue to be a useful scale now that the Circumplex Model has been expanded into a three-dimensional design. Past and future studies would benefit from using FACES III as a linear dimension with high scores representing Balanced types and low scores representing Extreme types. This approach means that many past studies with FACES III need to be re-analyzed and/or re-interpreted in light of this 3-D Model. This revised scoring will significantly increase the number of studies that support the basic hypotheses of the Circumplex model, that Balanced families tend to function in more effective ways. It is clear from more recent work with the Clinical Rating Scale (CRS) that the lack of support for the curvilinear hypotheses of the Circumplex Model is due to the limitations of the FACES instrument and not the underlying theoretical model. The CRS clearly demonstrated the curvilinear pattern that has been hypothesized. It is important that future studies using FACES III analyze data in a linear way that fits with the three-dimensional model. In this way, there is a better match conceptually and methodologically between FACES III and the Circumplex Model. It is also highly recommended that future studies use both the self-report of FACES and the observational approaches to family assessment of the Clinical Rating Scale. This combined approach will help advance the field conceptually, methodologically, and clinically.

  15. Co-norming the WAIS-III and WMS-III: Is there a test-order effect on IQ and memory scores?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J; Tulsky, D S

    2000-11-01

    Test-order effect on the WAIS-III and WMS-III scores was evaluated using the WMS-III standardization sample. Participants completed the standardization editions of the WAIS-III and WMS-III in one session, with the tests administered in roughly counterbalanced order. Repeated measure MANOVA analyses were conducted to determine if there was an overall test-order effect for subtest, index, or IQ scores. No significant test-order effects were found for either the WAIS-III index or IQ scores or for the WMS-III index scores. At the subtest level, the majority of the WAIS-III and WMS-III subtests did not show a significant test-order effect. The exceptions were Digit Span and Digit Symbol-Coding on the WAIS-III and Faces II and Logical Memory II on the WMS-III. Although statistically significant test-order effects were found on these subtests, the effect sizes were small. This study indicates that the test-order effect is not a potential threat to the internal validity of the WAIS-III and WMS-III normative data. The practical implications of the current study are discussed.

  16. Apache Flink: Distributed Stream Data Processing

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobs, Kevin; CERN. Geneva. IT Department

    2016-01-01

    The amount of data is growing significantly over the past few years. Therefore, the need for distributed data processing frameworks is growing. Currently, there are two well-known data processing frameworks with an API for data batches and an API for data streams which are named Apache Flink and Apache Spark. Both Apache Spark and Apache Flink are improving upon the MapReduce implementation of the Apache Hadoop framework. MapReduce is the first programming model for distributed processing on large scale that is available in Apache Hadoop. This report compares the Stream API and the Batch API for both frameworks.

  17. MR imaging of acute pancreatitis: Correlation of abdominal wall edema with severity scores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ru, E-mail: yangru0904@163.com [Sichuan Key laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong 637000 (China); Jing, Zong Lin, E-mail: jzl325@163.com [Sichuan Key laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong 637000 (China); Zhang, Xiao Ming, E-mail: zhangxm@nsmc.edu.cn [Sichuan Key laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong 637000 (China); Tang, Wei, E-mail: tw-n-g-up@163.com [Sichuan Key laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong 637000 (China); Xiao, Bo, E-mail: xiaoboimaging@163.com [Sichuan Key laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong 637000 (China); Huang, Xiao Hua, E-mail: nc_hxh1966@yahoo.com.cn [Sichuan Key laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong 637000 (China); Yang, Lin, E-mail: llinyangmd@163.com [Sichuan Key laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong 637000 (China); Feng, Zhi Song, E-mail: fengzhisong@medmail.com.cn [Department of Gastroenterology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong 637000 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: To study MRI findings of abdominal wall edema (AWE) in acute pancreatitis as well as correlations between AWE and the severity of acute pancreatitis according to the MR severity index (MRSI) and the Acute Physiology And Chronic Healthy Evaluation III (APACHE III) scoring system. Materials and methods: A total of 160 patients with AP admitted to our institution between December 2009 and March 2011 were included in this study. MRI was performed within 48 h after admission. MRI findings of acute pancreatitis were noted, including AWE on the MRI. The abdominal wall area was divided into quarters, and each area involved was recorded as 1 point to score the severity of AWE. The severity of acute pancreatitis was studied using both the MRSI and the APACHE III scoring system. Spearman correlation of AWE with the MRSI and the APACHE III scoring system was analyzed. Results: In 160 patients with acute pancreatitis, 53.8% had AWE on MRI. The average AWE score was 1.2 {+-} 1.4 points. The prevalence of AWE was 30.5%, 64.5% and 100% in mild, moderate and severe AP, respectively, according to MRSI. AWE on MRI was correlated with MRSI scores (r = 0.441, p = 0.000). According to APACHE III scores, the averages were 2.0 {+-} 1.1 and 2.6 {+-} 1.1 points in mild AP and severe AP, respectively (P = 0.016). AWE was slightly correlated with the APACHE III scores (r = 0.222, p = 0.005). Conclusion: AWE on MRI in acute pancreatitis is common, which may be a supplementary indicator in determining the severity of AP.

  18. Apache ZooKeeper essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Haloi, Saurav

    2015-01-01

    Whether you are a novice to ZooKeeper or already have some experience, you will be able to master the concepts of ZooKeeper and its usage with ease. This book assumes you to have some prior knowledge of distributed systems and high-level programming knowledge of C, Java, or Python, but no experience with Apache ZooKeeper is required.

  19. Instant Apache Camel message routing

    CERN Document Server

    Ibryam, Bilgin

    2013-01-01

    Filled with practical, step-by-step instructions and clear explanations for the most important and useful tasks. This short, instruction-based guide shows you how to perform application integration using the industry standard Enterprise Integration Patterns.This book is intended for Java developers who are new to Apache Camel and message- oriented applications.

  20. Examination of various WMS-III logical memory scores in the assessment of response bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortnik, Kirsty E; Boone, Kyle B; Marion, Sarah D; Amano, Stacy; Ziegler, Elizabeth; Cottingham, Maria E; Victor, Tara L; Zeller, Michelle A

    2010-02-01

    The assessment of response validity during neuropsychological evaluation is an integral part of the testing process. Research has increasingly focused on the use of "embedded" effort measures (derived from standard neuropsychological tasks) because they do not require additional administration time and are less likely to be identified as effort indicators by test takers because of their primary focus as measures of cognitive function. The current study examined the clinical utility of various WMS-III Logical Memory scores in detecting response bias, as well as the Rarely Missed Index, an embedded effort indicator derived from the WMS-III Logical Memory Delayed Recognition subtest. The Rarely Missed Index cut-off only identified 24.1% of 63 non-credible participants (at >/=90% specificity in 125 credible patients), and cut-offs for other Logical Memory variables were in fact found to be more sensitive to non-credible performance. A new indicator, consisting of the weighted combination of the two most sensitive Logical Memory subtest scores (Logical Memory II raw score and Logical Memory Delayed Recognition raw score), was associated with 53% to 60% sensitivity, and thus may be an effective adjunct when utilized in conjunction with other validated effort indicators and collateral information in identifying non-credible performance.

  1. Intensive care unit scoring systems outperform emergency department scoring systems for mortality prediction in critically ill patients: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseson, Erika M; Zhuo, Hanjing; Chu, Jeff; Stein, John C; Matthay, Michael A; Kangelaris, Kirsten N; Liu, Kathleen D; Calfee, Carolyn S

    2014-01-01

    Multiple scoring systems have been developed for both the intensive care unit (ICU) and the emergency department (ED) to risk stratify patients and predict mortality. However, it remains unclear whether the additional data needed to compute ICU scores improves mortality prediction for critically ill patients compared to the simpler ED scores. We studied a prospective observational cohort of 227 critically ill patients admitted to the ICU directly from the ED at an academic, tertiary care medical center. We compared Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II, APACHE III, Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II, Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS), Rapid Emergency Medicine Score (REMS), Prince of Wales Emergency Department Score (PEDS), and a pre-hospital critical illness prediction score developed by Seymour et al. (JAMA 2010, 304(7):747-754). The primary endpoint was 60-day mortality. We compared the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of the different scores and their calibration using the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test and visual assessment. The ICU scores outperformed the ED scores with higher area under the curve (AUC) values (p = 0.01). There were no differences in discrimination among the ED-based scoring systems (AUC 0.698 to 0.742; p = 0.45) or among the ICU-based scoring systems (AUC 0.779 to 0.799; p = 0.60). With the exception of the Seymour score, the ED-based scoring systems did not discriminate as well as the best-performing ICU-based scoring system, APACHE III (p = 0.005 to 0.01 for comparison of ED scores to APACHE III). The Seymour score had a superior AUC to other ED scores and, despite a lower AUC than all the ICU scores, was not significantly different than APACHE III (p = 0.09). When data from the first 24 h in the ICU was used to calculate the ED scores, the AUC for the ED scores improved numerically, but this improvement was not statistically significant. All scores had acceptable

  2. Learning Apache Solr high performance

    CERN Document Server

    Mohan, Surendra

    2014-01-01

    This book is an easy-to-follow guide, full of hands-on, real-world examples. Each topic is explained and demonstrated in a specific and user-friendly flow, from search optimization using Solr to Deployment of Zookeeper applications. This book is ideal for Apache Solr developers and want to learn different techniques to optimize Solr performance with utmost efficiency, along with effectively troubleshooting the problems that usually occur while trying to boost performance. Familiarity with search servers and database querying is expected.

  3. Instant Apache Camel messaging system

    CERN Document Server

    Sharapov, Evgeniy

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. A beginner's guide to Apache Camel that walks you through basic operations like installation and setup right through to developing simple applications.This book is a good starting point for Java developers who have to work on an application dealing with various systems and interfaces but who haven't yet started using Enterprise System Buses or Java Business Integration frameworks.

  4. Could test length or order affect scores on letter number sequencing of the WAIS-III and WMS-III? Ruling out effects of fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulsky, D S; Zhu, J

    2000-11-01

    The Letter Number Sequencing subtest of the WAIS-III and WMS-III was administered at the end of the standardization edition of the WMS-III. It was not administered as part of the WAIS-III standardization battery. Nevertheless, the subtest was included in the published version of the WAIS-III. This study examines differences between examinees administered the Letter Number Sequencing subtest at three different times during a psychological battery: (1) as part of the published battery, (2) as part of the WMS-III when the WMS-III was administered as the first test in a sequence, and (3) as part of the WMS-III standardization when the WAIS-III was administered immediately preceding the WMS-III. The participants were 372 examinees ( n = 124 in each condition) who were matched on key demographic variables. A repeated measures MANOVA yielded no difference in subtest scores when administered in any of these conditions. The results show no evidence of fatigue or ordering effects on the Letter Number Sequencing subtest.

  5. Mortality Prediction in Patients Admitted in Surgical Intensive Care Unit by Using APACHE IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetr, Wetwet Wetw; Shoukat, Hassan; Muhammad, Yar; Gondal, Khalid Masood; Aslam, Imran

    2016-11-01

    To predict the mortality by the mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) IV score of all the patients admitted in a Surgical Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and comparing the score of the survivors and non-survivors. Descriptive study. Surgical Intensive Care Unit, Mayo Hospital, Lahore, from June 2013 to November 2014. All adult patients admitted in the Surgical ICU were included in this study. The demographics and other data of the patients were recorded. The APACHE IV scores of all patients were calculated at the time of admission. The scores of the survivors and the non-survivors were compared for prediction of survival and mortality. The age of these patients ranged from 13 to 70 (mean 38.39) years with 86 (55.48%) males and 69 (44.52%) females. The mean APACHE IV score of these patients was 34.96 ±14.93 ranging from 11 to 63 years. Eighty-three (53.55%) patients survived and 72 (46.45%) died. With respect to gender, 41 (47.67%) males out of 86 and 31 (44.92%) females out of 69 did not survive. The mortality increased with an increase in APACHE IV score and all the patients with score more than 39 did not survive. The predicted mortality can be assessed by APACHE IV score, so it is good for application among the surgical ICU patients.

  6. An integrated framework for outsourcing using balanced score card and ELECTRE III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sareh Namazi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available During the past few decades, many organizations have attempted to increase their productivity through outsourcing parts of their responsibilities. Outsourcing helps firms reduce their low value added activities and focus on their high value added activities. It also helps organization save their time and energy which leads to more efficient units. The idea of outsourcing is more important for project based organizations where the nature of works is different from a particular project to another one. This paper presents an integrated balanced score card system with an adaptation of ELECTRE III method to select suitable resources for outsourcing. The proposed model of the paper is implemented for a case study of subway system in Iran and the results are discussed.

  7. Apache Flume distributed log collection for Hadoop

    CERN Document Server

    D'Souza, Subas

    2013-01-01

    A starter guide that covers Apache Flume in detail.Apache Flume: Distributed Log Collection for Hadoop is intended for people who are responsible for moving datasets into Hadoop in a timely and reliable manner like software engineers, database administrators, and data warehouse administrators

  8. Random Decision Forests on Apache Spark

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    About the speaker Tom White has been an Apache Hadoop committer since February 2007, and is a member of the Apache Software Foundation. He works for Cloudera, a company set up to offer Hadoop support and training. Previously he was as an independent Hadoop consultant, work...

  9. What's New in Apache Web Server 22?

    CERN Document Server

    Bowen, Rich

    2007-01-01

    What's New in Apache Web Server 2.2? shows you all the new features you'll know to set up and administer the Apache 2.2 web server. Learn how to take advantage of its improved caching, proxying, authentication, and other improvements in your Web 2.0 applications.

  10. Predictive Value of the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Score for Mortality in a Contemporary Cardiac Intensive Care Unit Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentzer, Jacob C; Bennett, Courtney; Wiley, Brandon M; Murphree, Dennis H; Keegan, Mark T; Gajic, Ognjen; Wright, R Scott; Barsness, Gregory W

    2018-03-10

    Optimal methods of mortality risk stratification in patients in the cardiac intensive care unit (CICU) remain uncertain. We evaluated the ability of the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score to predict mortality in a large cohort of unselected patients in the CICU. Adult patients admitted to the CICU from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2015, at a single tertiary care hospital were retrospectively reviewed. SOFA scores were calculated daily, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE)-III and APACHE-IV scores were calculated on CICU day 1. Discrimination of hospital mortality was assessed using area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve values. We included 9961 patients, with a mean age of 67.5±15.2 years; all-cause hospital mortality was 9.0%. Day 1 SOFA score predicted hospital mortality, with an area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve value of 0.83; area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve values were similar for the APACHE-III score, and APACHE-IV predicted mortality ( P >0.05). Mean and maximum SOFA scores over multiple CICU days had greater discrimination for hospital mortality ( P predicted higher long-term mortality ( P prediction of long-term mortality. © 2018 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  11. Malingering in Toxic Exposure. Classification Accuracy of Reliable Digit Span and WAIS-III Digit Span Scaled Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, Kevin W.; Springer, Steven; Bianchini, Kevin J.; Black, F. William; Heinly, Matthew T.; Love, Jeffrey M.; Swift, Douglas A.; Ciota, Megan A.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the sensitivity and false-positive error rate of reliable digit span (RDS) and the WAIS-III Digit Span (DS) scaled score in persons alleging toxic exposure and determined whether error rates differed from published rates in traumatic brain injury (TBI) and chronic pain (CP). Data were obtained from the files of 123 persons…

  12. Acute Kidney Injury Enhances Outcome Prediction Ability of Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Score in Critically Ill Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Chih-Hsiang; Fan, Pei-Chun; Chang, Ming-Yang; Tian, Ya-Chung; Hung, Cheng-Chieh; Fang, Ji-Tseng; Yang, Chih-Wei; Chen, Yung-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and serious complication in intensive care unit (ICU) patients and also often part of a multiple organ failure syndrome. The sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score is an excellent tool for assessing the extent of organ dysfunction in critically ill patients. This study aimed to evaluate the outcome prediction ability of SOFA and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) III score in ICU patients with AKI. Methods A tot...

  13. Validation of the APACHE IV model and its comparison with the APACHE II, SAPS 3, and Korean SAPS 3 models for the prediction of hospital mortality in a Korean surgical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hannah; Shon, Yoon-Jung; Kim, Hyerim; Paik, Hyesun; Park, Hee-Pyoung

    2014-08-01

    The Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) IV model has not yet been validated in Korea. The aim of this study was to compare the ability of the APACHE IV with those of APACHE II, Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) 3, and Korean SAPS 3 in predicting hospital mortality in a surgical intensive care unit (SICU) population. We retrospectively reviewed electronic medical records for patients admitted to the SICU from March 2011 to February 2012 in a university hospital. Measurements of discrimination and calibration were performed using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and the Hosmer-Lemeshow test, respectively. We calculated the standardized mortality ratio (SMR, actual mortality predicted mortality) for the four models. The study included 1,314 patients. The hospital mortality rate was 3.3%. The discriminative powers of all models were similar and very reliable. The AUCs were 0.80 for APACHE IV, 0.85 for APACHE II, 0.86 for SAPS 3, and 0.86 for Korean SAPS 3. Hosmer and Lemeshow C and H statistics showed poor calibration for all of the models (P < 0.05). The SMRs of APACHE IV, APACHE II, SAPS 3, and Korean SAPS 3 were 0.21, 0.11 0.23, 0.34, and 0.25, respectively. The APACHE IV revealed good discrimination but poor calibration. The overall discrimination and calibration of APACHE IV were similar to those of APACHE II, SAPS 3, and Korean SAPS 3 in this study. A high level of customization is required to improve calibration in this study setting.

  14. APACHE II as an indicator of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelser de Souza Kock

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: strategies for risk stratification in severe pathologies are extremely important. The aim of this study was to analyze the accuracy of the APACHE II score as an indicator of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia (VAP in ICU patient sat Hospital Nossa Senhora da Conceição (HNSC Tubarão-SC. Methods: It was conducted a prospective cohort study with 120 patients admitted between March and August 2013, being held APACHE II in the first 24 hours of mechanical ventilation (MV. Patients were followed until the following gout comes: discharge or death. It was also analyzed the cause of ICU admission, age, gender, days of mechanical ventilation, length of ICU and outcome. Results: The incidence of VAP was 31.8% (38/120. Two variables showed a relative riskin the development of VAP, APACHE II above average (RR = 1,62; IC 95% 1,03-2,55 and males (RR = 1,56; IC 95 % 1,18-2,08. The duration of mechanical ventilation (days above average18.4± 14.9(p =0.001, ICU stay (days above average 20.4± 15.3(p =0.003 presented the development of VAP. The accuracy of APACHE II in predicting VAP score >23, showed a sensitivity of 84% and specificity of 33%. Inrelation to death, two variables showed relative risk, age above average (RR=2.08; 95% CI =1.34 to 3.23 and ICU stay above average (RR=2.05; CI 95 =1.28 to 3.28%. Conclusion: The APACHE II score above or equal 23 might to indicate the risk of VAP. Keywords: Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated, Intensive Care Units, APACHE. Prognosis

  15. Relative Influence of Capillary Index Score, Revascularization and Time on Stroke Outcomes from the IMS III Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ali, Firas; Elias, John J.; Tomsick, Thomas A.; Liebeskind, David S; Broderick, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Until recently, acute ischemic stroke (AIS) trials have failed to show a benefit of endovascular therapy (EVT) compared to standard therapy, leading some authors to recommend decreasing the time from ictus to revascularization (TIR) to improve outcomes. We hypothesize that improving patient selection using the capillary index score (CIS) may also be a useful strategy. Methods CIS was calculated, blinded to outcome, from pre-treatment diagnostic cerebral angiograms for 78 subjects in the Interventional Management of Stroke (IMS) III database with internal carotid artery (ICA) and middle cerebral artery trunk (M1) occlusion. The CIS was dichotomized into favorable (fCIS = 2 or 3) and poor (pCIS = 0 or 1). Outcomes were categorized based on the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score at 90-days (0 to 2 considered a good outcome). Modified thrombolysis in cerebral infarction (mTICI) score 2b or 3 was considered good revascularization. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to relate CIS, TIR, mTICI score, and NIH Stroke Scale score to good outcomes. Results Only CIS and mTICI score were correlated with good outcomes (p < 0.01). Patients with fCIS and good revascularization achieved 71% mRS ≤ 2, compared to 13% for patients with pCIS and good revascularization. Conclusions In this subset of patients from the IMS III Trial, CIS and mTICI were strong predictors of outcome after endovascular reperfusion. Using the CIS to improve patient selection could be a powerful strategy to improve rate of good outcomes in EVT. A randomized trial is needed. Clinical Trial Registration: www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00359424 PMID:25953374

  16. Apache Flume distributed log collection for Hadoop

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffman, Steve

    2015-01-01

    If you are a Hadoop programmer who wants to learn about Flume to be able to move datasets into Hadoop in a timely and replicable manner, then this book is ideal for you. No prior knowledge about Apache Flume is necessary, but a basic knowledge of Hadoop and the Hadoop File System (HDFS) is assumed.

  17. Conservation priorities in the Apache Highlands ecoregion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale Turner; Rob Marshall; Carolyn A. F. Enquist; Anne Gondor; David F. Gori; Eduardo Lopez; Gonzalo Luna; Rafaela Paredes Aguilar; Chris Watts; Sabra Schwartz

    2005-01-01

    The Apache Highlands ecoregion incorporates the entire Madrean Archipelago/Sky Island region. We analyzed the current distribution of 223 target species and 26 terrestrial ecological systems there, and compared them with constraints on ecosystem integrity (e.g., road density) to determine the most efficient set of areas needed to maintain current biodiversity. The...

  18. Prognostic factors and scoring system for survival in colonic perforation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Shuhei; Shimomatsuya, Takumi; Nakajima, Masayuki; Amaya, Hirokazu; Kobuchi, Taketsune; Shiraishi, Susumu; Konishi, Sayuri; Ono, Susumu; Maruhashi, Kazuhiro

    2005-01-01

    No ideal and generally accepted prognostic factors and scoring systems exist to determine the prognosis of peritonitis associated with colonic perforation. This study was designed to investigate prognostic factors and evaluate the various scoring systems to allow identification of high-risk patients. Between 1996 and 2003, excluding iatrogenic and trauma cases, 26 consecutive patients underwent emergency operations for colorectal perforation and were selected for this retrospective study. Several clinical factors were analyzed as possible predictive factors, and APACHE II, SOFA, MPI, and MOF scores were calculated. The overall mortality was 26.9%. Compared with the survivors, non-survivors were found more frequently in Hinchey's stage III-IV, a low preoperative marker of pH, base excess (BE), and a low postoperative marker of white blood cell count, PaO2/FiO2 ratio, and renal output (24h). According to the logistic regression model, BE was a significant independent variable. Concerning the prognostic scoring systems, an APACHE II score of 19, a SOFA score of 8, an MPI score of 30, and an MOF score of 7 or more were significantly related to poor prognosis. Preoperative BE and postoperative white blood cell count were reliable prognostic factors and early classification using prognostic scoring systems at specific points in the disease process are useful to improve our understanding of the problems involved.

  19. Outcomes in Older Patients with Grade III Cholecystitis and Cholecystostomy Tube Placement: A Propensity Score Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimou, Francesca M; Adhikari, Deepak; Mehta, Hemalkumar B; Riall, Taylor S

    2017-04-01

    The Tokyo Guidelines recommend initial cholecystostomy tube drainage, antibiotics, and delayed cholecystectomy in patients with grade III cholecystitis. We used Medicare data (1996 to 2010) to identify patients 66 years and older who were admitted with grade III acute cholecystitis. We evaluated adherence to the Tokyo Guidelines and compared mortality, readmission, and complication rates with and without cholecystostomy tube placement in a propensity-matched (1:3) cohort of patients with grade III cholecystitis. There were 8,818 patients admitted with grade III cholecystitis; 565 patients (6.4%) had a cholecystostomy tube placed. Cholecystostomy tube placement increased from 3.9% to 9.7% during the study period. Compared with 1,689 propensity-matched controls, patients with cholecystostomy tube placement had higher 30-day (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.26; 95% CI 1.05 to 1.50), 90-day (HR = 1.26; 95% CI 1.08 to 1.46), and 2-year mortality (HR = 1.19; 95% CI 1.04 to 1.36) and were less likely to undergo cholecystectomy in the 2 years after initial hospitalization (33.4% vs 64.4%; HR = 0.26; 95% CI 0.21 to 0.31). Readmissions were also higher at 30 days (HR = 2.93; 95% CI 2.12 to 4.05), 90 days (HR = 3.48; 95% CI 2.60 to 4.64), and 2 years (HR = 3.08; 95% CI 2.87 to 4.90). Since the introduction of the Tokyo Guidelines (2007), use of cholecystostomy tubes in patients with grade III cholecystitis has increased, but the majority of patients do not get cholecystostomy tube drainage as first-line therapy. Cholecystostomy tube placement was associated with lower rates of definitive treatment with cholecystectomy, higher mortality, and higher readmission rates. These data suggest a need for additional evaluation and refinement of the Tokyo Guidelines. Copyright © 2017 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Screening for Voice Disorders in Older Adults (RAVI)-Part III: Cutoff Score and Clinical Consistency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernambuco, Leandro; Espelt, Albert; Costa de Lima, Kenio

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the cutoff score and clinical consistency of "Screening for Voice Disorders in Older Adults" (RAVI-Rastreamento de Alterações Vocais em Idosos). This is a prospective, nonrandomized, cross-sectional diagnostic study. A sample of 301 subjects, including both sexes, aged 60 and more, and all of whom were living in either a community or an institution, was studied. To determine which subjects had or did not have voice problems, we used a composite reference standard (auditory-perceptual analysis of sustained vowel phonation, auditory-perceptual analysis of connected speech, and vocal self-assessment). The best cutoff score was identified using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. The clinical consistency indicators were co-positivity, co-negativity, positive and negative predictive values, positive and negative likelihood ratio, and test efficiency. The significance level was 5%. The area under the ROC curve was 0.763 (95% confidence interval: 0.706-0.821), and the best cutoff score for determining which older adults had or did not have a voice disorder was 2. All clinical consistency indicators were satisfactory: co-positivity (79%), co-negativity (60%), predictive positive value (51%), negative predictive value (84%), positive likelihood ratio (2.01), negative likelihood ratio (0.34), and test efficiency (69%). RAVI has satisfactory indicators of clinical consistency and is able to determine which older adults have voice disorders by a cutoff score of 2. The use of RAVI as a screening tool is recommended to help determine the prevalence of voice disorders in older adults. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Optimizing CMS build infrastructure via Apache Mesos

    CERN Document Server

    Abduracmanov, David; Degano, Alessandro; Elmer, Peter; Eulisse, Giulio; Mendez, David; Muzaffar, Shahzad

    2015-12-23

    The Offline Software of the CMS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN consists of 6M lines of in-house code, developed over a decade by nearly 1000 physicists, as well as a comparable amount of general use open-source code. A critical ingredient to the success of the construction and early operation of the WLCG was the convergence, around the year 2000, on the use of a homogeneous environment of commodity x86-64 processors and Linux. Apache Mesos is a cluster manager that provides efficient resource isolation and sharing across distributed applications, or frameworks. It can run Hadoop, Jenkins, Spark, Aurora, and other applications on a dynamically shared pool of nodes. We present how we migrated our continuos integration system to schedule jobs on a relatively small Apache Mesos enabled cluster and how this resulted in better resource usage, higher peak performance and lower latency thanks to the dynamic scheduling capabilities of Mesos.

  2. Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John C.; Hearty, F.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Majewski, S. R.; Schiavon, R.; Eisenstein, D.; Gunn, J.; Gillespie, B.; Weinberg, D.; Blank, B.; Henderson, C.; Smee, S.; Barkhouser, R.; Harding, A.; Hope, S.; Fitzgerald, G.; Stolberg, T.; Arns, J.; Nelson, M.; Brunner, S.; Burton, A.; Walker, E.; Lam, C.; Maseman, P.; Barr, J.; Leger, F.; Carey, L.; MacDonald, N.; Ebelke, G.; Beland, S.; Horne, T.; Young, E.; Rieke, G.; Rieke, M.; O'Brien, T.; Crane, J.; Carr, M.; Harrison, C.; Stoll, R.; Vernieri, M.; Holtzman, J.; Nidever, D.; Shetrone, M.; Allende-Prieto, C.; Johnson, J.; Frinchaboy, P.; Zasowski, G.; Garcia Perez, A.; Bizyaev, D.; Zhao, B.

    2012-01-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) will observe approximately 100,000 giant stars in the Milky Way with a dedicated fiber-fed (300 fibers from the Sloan 2.5-m telescope) near-infrared (1.5-1.7 micron) high resolution (R 22,500) spectrograph as part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III). By observing in the near-infrared, APOGEE can uniformly sample all Milky Way stellar populations (bulge, thin/thick disks and halo) in the same survey to dramatically improve our understanding of the kinematical and chemical enrichment history of our galaxy. The instrument design includes several innovations: a novel fiber gang connector that allows simultaneous optical connection of 300 fibers from the instrument into swappable plug plate cartridges, the first deployed mosaic volume phase holographic (VPH) grating, and a very large ( 0.4-m) aperture six-element refractive camera incorporating crystalline silicon elements to image 300 spectra onto three HAWAII-IIRG detectors simultaneously.

  3. Network Intrusion Detection System using Apache Storm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Asif Manzoor

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Network security implements various strategies for the identification and prevention of security breaches. Network intrusion detection is a critical component of network management for security, quality of service and other purposes. These systems allow early detection of network intrusion and malicious activities; so that the Network Security infrastructure can react to mitigate these threats. Various systems are proposed to enhance the network security. We are proposing to use anomaly based network intrusion detection system in this work. Anomaly based intrusion detection system can identify the new network threats. We also propose to use Real-time Big Data Stream Processing Framework, Apache Storm, for the implementation of network intrusion detection system. Apache Storm can help to manage the network traffic which is generated at enormous speed and size and the network traffic speed and size is constantly increasing. We have used Support Vector Machine in this work. We use Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining 1999 (KDD’99 dataset to test and evaluate our proposed solution.

  4. San Carlos Apache Tribe - Energy Organizational Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, James; Albert, Steve

    2012-04-01

    The San Carlos Apache Tribe (SCAT) was awarded $164,000 in late-2011 by the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Tribal Energy Program's "First Steps Toward Developing Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency on Tribal Lands" Grant Program. This grant funded:  The analysis and selection of preferred form(s) of tribal energy organization (this Energy Organization Analysis, hereinafter referred to as "EOA").  Start-up staffing and other costs associated with the Phase 1 SCAT energy organization.  An intern program.  Staff training.  Tribal outreach and workshops regarding the new organization and SCAT energy programs and projects, including two annual tribal energy summits (2011 and 2012). This report documents the analysis and selection of preferred form(s) of a tribal energy organization.

  5. LHCbDIRAC as Apache Mesos microservices

    CERN Multimedia

    Couturier, Ben

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb experiment relies on LHCbDIRAC, an extension of DIRAC, to drive its offline computing. This middleware provides a development framework and a complete set of components for building distributed computing systems. These components are currently installed and ran on virtual machines (VM) or bare metal hardware. Due to the increased load of work, high availability is becoming more and more important for the LHCbDIRAC services, and the current installation model is showing its limitations. Apache Mesos is a cluster manager which aims at abstracting heterogeneous physical resources on which various tasks can be distributed thanks to so called "framework". The Marathon framework is suitable for long running tasks such as the DIRAC services, while the Chronos framework meets the needs of cron-like tasks like the DIRAC agents. A combination of the service discovery tool Consul together with HAProxy allows to expose the running containers to the outside world while hiding their dynamic placements. Such an arc...

  6. The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majewski, Steven R.; Brunner, Sophia; Burton, Adam; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Pérez, Ana E. García; Hearty, Fred R.; Lam, Charles R.; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Carrera, Ricardo; Barkhouser, Robert; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blank, Basil; Henderson, Chuck; Cunha, Kátia; Epstein, Courtney; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Fitzgerald, Greg; Holtzman, Jon A.

    2017-01-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), one of the programs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), has now completed its systematic, homogeneous spectroscopic survey sampling all major populations of the Milky Way. After a three-year observing campaign on the Sloan 2.5 m Telescope, APOGEE has collected a half million high-resolution ( R  ∼ 22,500), high signal-to-noise ratio (>100), infrared (1.51–1.70 μ m) spectra for 146,000 stars, with time series information via repeat visits to most of these stars. This paper describes the motivations for the survey and its overall design—hardware, field placement, target selection, operations—and gives an overview of these aspects as well as the data reduction, analysis, and products. An index is also given to the complement of technical papers that describe various critical survey components in detail. Finally, we discuss the achieved survey performance and illustrate the variety of potential uses of the data products by way of a number of science demonstrations, which span from time series analysis of stellar spectral variations and radial velocity variations from stellar companions, to spatial maps of kinematics, metallicity, and abundance patterns across the Galaxy and as a function of age, to new views of the interstellar medium, the chemistry of star clusters, and the discovery of rare stellar species. As part of SDSS-III Data Release 12 and later releases, all of the APOGEE data products are publicly available.

  7. The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majewski, Steven R.; Brunner, Sophia; Burton, Adam; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Pérez, Ana E. García; Hearty, Fred R.; Lam, Charles R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Schiavon, Ricardo P. [Gemini Observatory, 670 N. A’Ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Frinchaboy, Peter M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX 76129 (United States); Prieto, Carlos Allende; Carrera, Ricardo [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Barkhouser, Robert [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bizyaev, Dmitry [Apache Point Observatory and New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM, 88349-0059 (United States); Blank, Basil; Henderson, Chuck [Pulse Ray Machining and Design, 4583 State Route 414, Beaver Dams, NY 14812 (United States); Cunha, Kátia [Observatório Nacional, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 20921-400 (Brazil); Epstein, Courtney; Johnson, Jennifer A. [The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Fitzgerald, Greg [New England Optical Systems, 237 Cedar Hill Street, Marlborough, MA 01752 (United States); Holtzman, Jon A. [New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); and others

    2017-09-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), one of the programs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), has now completed its systematic, homogeneous spectroscopic survey sampling all major populations of the Milky Way. After a three-year observing campaign on the Sloan 2.5 m Telescope, APOGEE has collected a half million high-resolution ( R  ∼ 22,500), high signal-to-noise ratio (>100), infrared (1.51–1.70 μ m) spectra for 146,000 stars, with time series information via repeat visits to most of these stars. This paper describes the motivations for the survey and its overall design—hardware, field placement, target selection, operations—and gives an overview of these aspects as well as the data reduction, analysis, and products. An index is also given to the complement of technical papers that describe various critical survey components in detail. Finally, we discuss the achieved survey performance and illustrate the variety of potential uses of the data products by way of a number of science demonstrations, which span from time series analysis of stellar spectral variations and radial velocity variations from stellar companions, to spatial maps of kinematics, metallicity, and abundance patterns across the Galaxy and as a function of age, to new views of the interstellar medium, the chemistry of star clusters, and the discovery of rare stellar species. As part of SDSS-III Data Release 12 and later releases, all of the APOGEE data products are publicly available.

  8. Prevalence of multiple organ dysfunction in the pediatric intensive care unit: Pediatric Risk of Mortality III versus Pediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction scores for mortality prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamshary, Azza Abd Elkader El; Sherbini, Seham Awad El; Elgebaly, HebatAllah Fadel; Amin, Samah Abdelkrim

    2017-01-01

    To assess the frequency of primary multiple organ failure and the role of sepsis as a causative agent in critically ill pediatric patients; and calculate and evaluate the accuracy of the Pediatric Risk of Mortality III (PRISM III) and Pediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction (PELOD) scores to predict the outcomes of critically ill children. Retrospective study, which evaluated data from patients admitted from January to December 2011 in the pediatric intensive care unit of the Children's Hospital of the University of Cairo. Out of 237 patients in the study, 72% had multiple organ dysfunctions, and 45% had sepsis with multiple organ dysfunctions. The mortality rate in patients with multiple organ dysfunction was 73%. Independent risk factors for death were mechanical ventilation and neurological failure [OR: 36 and 3.3, respectively]. The PRISM III score was more accurate than the PELOD score in predicting death, with a Hosmer-Lemeshow X2 (Chi-square value) of 7.3 (df = 8, p = 0.5). The area under the curve was 0.723 for PRISM III and 0.78 for PELOD. A multiple organ dysfunctions was associated with high mortality. Sepsis was the major cause. Pneumonia, diarrhea and central nervous system infections were the major causes of sepsis. PRISM III had a better calibration than the PELOD for prognosis of the patients, despite the high frequency of the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome.

  9. LHCbDIRAC as Apache Mesos microservices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haen, Christophe; Couturier, Benjamin

    2017-10-01

    The LHCb experiment relies on LHCbDIRAC, an extension of DIRAC, to drive its offline computing. This middleware provides a development framework and a complete set of components for building distributed computing systems. These components are currently installed and run on virtual machines (VM) or bare metal hardware. Due to the increased workload, high availability is becoming more and more important for the LHCbDIRAC services, and the current installation model is showing its limitations. Apache Mesos is a cluster manager which aims at abstracting heterogeneous physical resources on which various tasks can be distributed thanks to so called “frameworks” The Marathon framework is suitable for long running tasks such as the DIRAC services, while the Chronos framework meets the needs of cron-like tasks like the DIRAC agents. A combination of the service discovery tool Consul together with HAProxy allows to expose the running containers to the outside world while hiding their dynamic placements. Such an architecture brings a greater flexibility in the deployment of LHCbDirac services, allowing for easier deployment maintenance and scaling of services on demand (e..g LHCbDirac relies on 138 services and 116 agents). Higher reliability is also easier, as clustering is part of the toolset, which allows constraints on the location of the services. This paper describes the investigations carried out to package the LHCbDIRAC and DIRAC components into Docker containers and orchestrate them using the previously described set of tools.

  10. [Combination of NAFLD Fibrosis Score and liver stiffness measurement for identification of moderate fibrosis stages (II & III) in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drolz, Andreas; Wehmeyer, Malte; Diedrich, Tom; Piecha, Felix; Schulze Zur Wiesch, Julian; Kluwe, Johannes

    2018-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become one of the most frequent causes of chronic liver disease. Currently, therapeutic options for NAFLD patients are limited, but new pharmacologic agents are being investigated in the course of clinical trials. Because most of these studies are focusing on patients with fibrosis stages II and III (according to Kleiner), non-invasive identification of patients with intermediate fibrosis stages (II and III) is of increasing interest. Evaluation of NAFLD Fibrosis Score (NFS) and liver stiffness measurement (LSM) for prediction of fibrosis stages II/III. Patients with histologically confirmed NAFLD diagnosis were included in the study. All patients underwent a clinical and laboratory examination as well as a LSM prior to liver biopsy. Predictive value of NFS and LSM with respect to identification of fibrosis stages II/III was assessed. 134 NAFLD patients were included and analyzed. Median age was 53 (IQR 36 - 60) years, 55 patients (41 %) were female. 82 % of our patients were overweight/obese with typical aspects of metabolic syndrome. 84 patients (66 %) had liver fibrosis, 42 (50 %) advanced fibrosis. LSM and NFS correlated with fibrosis stage (r = 0.696 and r = 0.685, respectively; p stages II/III. If both criteria were met, probability of fibrosis stage II/III was 61 %. If none of the two criteria was met, chance for fibrosis stage II/III was only 6 % (negative predictive value 94 %). Combination of LSM and NFS enables identification of patients with significant probability of fibrosis stage II/III. Accordingly, these tests, especially in combination, may be a suitable screening tool for fibrosis stages II/III in NAFLD. The use of these non-invasive methods might also help to avoid unnecessary biopsies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Development of a helmet/helmet-display-unit alignment tool (HAT) for the Apache helmet and display unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, William; Statz, Jonathan; Estes, Victor; Booms, Shawn; Martin, John S.; Harding, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Project Manager (PM) Apache Block III contacted the U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory (USAARL), Fort Rucker, Alabama, requesting assistance to evaluate and find solutions to a government-developed Helmet Display Unit (HDU) device called the Mock HDU for helmet alignment of the Apache Advanced Integrated Helmet (AAIH). The AAIH is a modified Head Gear Unit No. 56 for Personnel (HGU-56/P) to replace the current Integrated Helmet and Sighting System (IHADSS). The current flashlight-based HDU simulator for helmet/HDU alignment was no longer in production or available. Proper helmet/HDU alignment is critical to position the right eye in the small HDU eye box to obtain image alignment and full field of view (FOV). The initial approach of the PM to developing a helmet/HDU fitting device (Mock HDU) was to duplicate the optical characteristics of the current tactical HDU using less complex optics. However, the results produced questionable alignment, FOV, and distortion issues, with cost and development time overruns. After evaluating the Mock HDU, USAARL proposed a cost effective, less complex optical design called the Helmet/HDU Alignment Tool (HAT). This paper will show the development, components, and evaluations of the HAT compared to the current flashlight HDU simulator device. The laboratory evaluations included FOV measurements and alignment accuracies compared to tactical HDUs. The Apache helmet fitter technicians and Apache pilots compared the HAT to the current flashlight based HDU and ranked the HAT superior.

  12. Mescalero Apache Tribe Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peso, F.

    1992-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended, authorizes the siting, construction and operation of a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. The MRS is intended to be used for the temporary storage of spent nuclear fuel from the nation's nuclear power plants beginning as early as 1998. Pursuant to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the Office of the Nuclear Waste Negotiator was created. On October 7, 1991, the Nuclear Waste Negotiator invited the governors of states and the Presidents of Indian tribes to apply for government grants in order to conduct a study to assess under what conditions, if any, they might consider hosting an MRS facility. Pursuant to this invitation, on October 11, 1991 the Mescalero Apache Indian Tribe of Mescalero, NM applied for a grant to conduct a phased, preliminary study of the safety, technical, political, environmental, social and economic feasibility of hosting an MRS. The preliminary study included: (1) An investigative education process to facilitate the Tribe's comprehensive understanding of the safety, environmental, technical, social, political, and economic aspects of hosting an MRS, and; (2) The development of an extensive program that is enabling the Tribe, in collaboration with the Negotiator, to reach an informed and carefully researched decision regarding the conditions, (if any), under which further pursuit of the MRS would be considered. The Phase 1 grant application enabled the Tribe to begin the initial activities necessary to determine whether further consideration is warranted for hosting the MRS facility. The Tribe intends to pursue continued study of the MRS in order to meet the following objectives: (1) Continuing the education process towards a comprehensive understanding of the safety, environmental, technical, social and economic aspects of the MRS; (2) Conducting an effective public participation and information program; (3) Participating in MRS meetings

  13. Discordance between WMS-III Word Lists subtest and RAVLT scores in older patients: four case examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Johnny H; Boone, Kyle

    2006-07-01

    To examine the adequacy of the WMS-III in the identification of memory deficits in older individuals, we administered the Word Lists subtest, along with a comparison measure, the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT), to four patients referred for assessment of dementia. Although the number of words recalled by the patients on the delayed trials of the Word Lists subtest and RAVLT were nearly identical, norms for the Word Lists subtest indicated that memory performance was within normal limits (i.e., low average or higher), while the RAVLT norms accurately characterized performance as impaired. We suspect that normative data for the WMS-III were compromised by inadvertent inclusion of older subjects with dementia or mild cognitive impairment. The findings from our cases call into question the use of the WMS-III Word Lists for older patients.

  14. Preformulation considerations for controlled release dosage forms. Part III. Candidate form selection using numerical weighting and scoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrzanowski, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Two numerical methods, Decision Analysis (DA) and Potential Problem Analysis (PPA) are presented as alternative selection methods to the logical method presented in Part I. In DA properties are weighted and outcomes are scored. The weighted scores for each candidate are totaled and final selection is based on the totals. Higher scores indicate better candidates. In PPA potential problems are assigned a seriousness factor and test outcomes are used to define the probability of occurrence. The seriousness-probability products are totaled and forms with minimal scores are preferred. DA and PPA have never been compared to the logical-elimination method. Additional data were available for two forms of McN-5707 to provide complete preformulation data for five candidate forms. Weight and seriousness factors (independent variables) were obtained from a survey of experienced formulators. Scores and probabilities (dependent variables) were provided independently by Preformulation. The rankings of the five candidate forms, best to worst, were similar for all three methods. These results validate the applicability of DA and PPA for candidate form selection. DA and PPA are particularly applicable in cases where there are many candidate forms and where each form has some degree of unfavorable properties.

  15. Interrupting White Mountain Apache Language Shift: An Insider's View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adley-SantaMaria, Bernadette

    1999-01-01

    A White Mountain Apache (WMA) doctoral student collaborating with a non-Indian linguist on a grammar book project discusses the status of the WMA language; causes of WMA language shift; aspects of insider-outsider collaboration; implications for revitalization and maintenance of indigenous languages; and the responsibilities of individuals,…

  16. Ergonomic and anthropometric issues of the forward Apache crew station

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudenhuijzen, A.J.K.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the anthropometric accommodation in the Apache crew systems. These activities are part of a comprehensive project, in a cooperative effort from the Armstrong Laboratory at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (Dayton, Ohio, USA) and TNO Human Factors Research Institute (TNO HFRI) in

  17. Performance evaluation of Apache Mahout for mining large datasets

    OpenAIRE

    Bogza, Adriana Maria

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this project is to evaluate the performance of the Apache Mahout library, that contains data mining algorithms for data processing, using a twitter dataset. Performance is evaluated in terms of processing time, in-memory usage, I/O performance and algorithmic accuracy.

  18. Accuracy of the ABC/2 Score for Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Systematic Review and Analysis of MISTIE, CLEAR-IVH, and CLEAR III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Alastair J S; Ullman, Natalie L; Morgan, Tim C; Muschelli, John; Kornbluth, Joshua; Awad, Issam A; Mayo, Stephen; Rosenblum, Michael; Ziai, Wendy; Zuccarrello, Mario; Aldrich, Francois; John, Sayona; Harnof, Sagi; Lopez, George; Broaddus, William C; Wijman, Christine; Vespa, Paul; Bullock, Ross; Haines, Stephen J; Cruz-Flores, Salvador; Tuhrim, Stan; Hill, Michael D; Narayan, Raj; Hanley, Daniel F

    2015-09-01

    The ABC/2 score estimates intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) volume, yet validations have been limited by small samples and inappropriate outcome measures. We determined accuracy of the ABC/2 score calculated at a specialized reading center (RC-ABC) or local site (site-ABC) versus the reference-standard computed tomography-based planimetry (CTP). In Minimally Invasive Surgery Plus Recombinant Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator for Intracerebral Hemorrhage Evacuation-II (MISTIE-II), Clot Lysis Evaluation of Accelerated Resolution of Intraventricular Hemorrhage (CLEAR-IVH) and CLEAR-III trials. ICH volume was prospectively calculated by CTP, RC-ABC, and site-ABC. Agreement between CTP and ABC/2 was defined as an absolute difference up to 5 mL and relative difference within 20%. Determinants of ABC/2 accuracy were assessed by logistic regression. In 4369 scans from 507 patients, CTP was more strongly correlated with RC-ABC (r(2)=0.93) than with site-ABC (r(2)=0.87). Although RC-ABC overestimated CTP-based volume on average (RC-ABC, 15.2 cm(3); CTP, 12.7 cm3), agreement was reasonable when categorized into mild, moderate, and severe ICH (κ=0.75; PABC (84% within 5 mL; 48% of scans within 20%) than for site-ABC (81% within 5 mL; 41% within 20%). RC-ABC had moderate accuracy for detecting ≥5 mL change in CTP volume between consecutive scans (sensitivity, 0.76; specificity, 0.86) and was more accurate with smaller ICH, thalamic hemorrhage, and homogeneous clots. ABC/2 scores at local or central sites are sufficiently accurate to categorize ICH volume and assess eligibility for the CLEAR-III and MISTIE III studies and moderately accurate for change in ICH volume. However, accuracy decreases with large, irregular, or lobar clots. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: MISTIE-II NCT00224770; CLEAR-III NCT00784134. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Geologic influences on Apache trout habitat in the White Mountains of Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan W. Long; Alvin L. Medina

    2006-01-01

    Geologic variation has important influences on habitat quality for species of concern, but it can be difficult to evaluate due to subtle variations, complex terminology, and inadequate maps. To better understand habitat of the Apache trout (Onchorhynchus apache or O. gilae apache Miller), a threatened endemic species of the White...

  20. Effectiveness of the sequential organ failure assessment, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II, and simplified acute physiology score II prognostic scoring systems in paraquat-poisoned patients in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Ho; Hwang, Seong Youn; Kim, Hye Ran; Kim, Yang Won; Kang, Mun Ju; Cho, Kwang Won; Lee, Dong Woo; Kim, Yong Hwan

    2017-05-01

    This study was conducted to assess the ability of the sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) and acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II scoring systems, as well as the simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II method to predict group mortality in intensive care unit (ICU) patients who were poisoned with paraquat. This will assist physicians with risk stratification. The medical records of 244 paraquat-poisoned patients admitted to the ICU from January 2010 to April 2015 were examined retrospectively. The SOFA, APACHE II, and SAPS II scores were calculated based on initial laboratory data in the emergency department and during the first 24 h of ICU admission. The probability of death was calculated for each patient based on the SOFA score, APACHE II score, and SAPS II. The ability of the SOFA score, APACHE II score, and SAPS II method to predict group mortality was assessed using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and calibration analyses. A total of 219 patients (mean age, 63 years) were enrolled. Sensitivities, specificities, and accuracies were 58.5%, 86.1%, and 64.0% for the SOFA, respectively; 75.1%, 86.1%, and 77.6% for the APACHE II scoring systems, respectively; and 76.1%, 79.1%, and 76.7% for the SAPS II, respectively. The areas under the curve in the ROC curve analysis for the SOFA score, APACHE II scoring system, and SAPS II were 0.716, 0.850, and 0.835, respectively. The SOFA, APACHE II, and SAPS II had different capabilities to discriminate and estimate early in-hospital mortality of paraquat-poisoned patients. Our results show that although the SOFA and SAPS II are easier and more quickly calculated than APACHE II, the APACHE II is superior for predicting mortality. We recommend use of the APACHE II for outcome predictions and risk stratification in paraquat-poisoned patients in the ICU.

  1. Prognostic score for second-line chemotherapy of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: external validation in a phase III trial comparing vinflunine with docetaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Maio, Massimo; Krzakowski, Maciej; Fougeray, Ronan; Kowalski, Dariusz M; Gridelli, Cesare

    2012-07-01

    A prognostic index for second-line chemotherapy of NSCLC was previously developed, based on individual patient data (IPD) of nine randomized trials. In order to validate the prognostic score in an external dataset, we analysed IPD of a non-inferiority phase III trial comparing vinflunine vs. docetaxel in second-line treatment of advanced NSCLC. Primary endpoint of this analysis was overall survival (OS). The following variables were considered for survival analysis and score calculation: gender, performance status, stage of disease, tumour histology, type of first-line treatment, response to first-line treatment. Cox model, stratified by treatment arm, was used for multivariate analysis. Individual prognostic scores were derived, and patients were divided into 3 categories: best), 5-9 (intermediate), >9 (worst). All 551 patients enrolled in the trial had complete information for the calculation of prognostic score. Median OS in the whole group was 6.9 months, with similar efficacy in the two treatment arms. Median OS was 12.9, 6.9 and 3.8 months in the best, intermediate and worst category, respectively. Cox model showed a significant effect comparing intermediate vs. best category (Hazard Ratio 1.79, 95%CI 1.31-2.47, p=0.0003) and comparing worst vs. best category (Hazard Ratio 3.25, 95%CI 2.18-4.83, ppractise, because a better understanding of factors conditioning life expectancy of patients could greatly help a careful evaluation of risks and benefits associated with therapeutic decisions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. AH-64E Apache Remanufacture (AH-64E Remanufacture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    64E, is the heavy attack helicopter of the current and future force. It is a twin engine, four-bladed, tandem seat, attack helicopter with 30... Digital Communications, Unmanned Aircraft Systems Data Links and Joint networking waveforms. The AH-64E is an Apache attack helicopter modified as...increases power and provides substantial performance gains. The AH-64E is fully network-centric capable with current digitized forces and FMF-equipped

  3. Satellite Imagery Production and Processing Using Apache Hadoop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, D. V.; Werpy, J.

    2011-12-01

    The United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center Land Science Research and Development (LSRD) project has devised a method to fulfill its processing needs for Essential Climate Variable (ECV) production from the Landsat archive using Apache Hadoop. Apache Hadoop is the distributed processing technology at the heart of many large-scale, processing solutions implemented at well-known companies such as Yahoo, Amazon, and Facebook. It is a proven framework and can be used to process petabytes of data on thousands of processors concurrently. It is a natural fit for producing satellite imagery and requires only a few simple modifications to serve the needs of science data processing. This presentation provides an invaluable learning opportunity and should be heard by anyone doing large scale image processing today. The session will cover a description of the problem space, evaluation of alternatives, feature set overview, configuration of Hadoop for satellite image processing, real-world performance results, tuning recommendations and finally challenges and ongoing activities. It will also present how the LSRD project built a 102 core processing cluster with no financial hardware investment and achieved ten times the initial daily throughput requirements with a full time staff of only one engineer. Satellite Imagery Production and Processing Using Apache Hadoop is presented by David V. Hill, Principal Software Architect for USGS LSRD.

  4. Solar Feasibility Study May 2013 - San Carlos Apache Tribe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, Jim [Parametrix; Duncan, Ken [San Carlos Apache Tribe; Albert, Steve [Parametrix

    2013-05-01

    The San Carlos Apache Tribe (Tribe) in the interests of strengthening tribal sovereignty, becoming more energy self-sufficient, and providing improved services and economic opportunities to tribal members and San Carlos Apache Reservation (Reservation) residents and businesses, has explored a variety of options for renewable energy development. The development of renewable energy technologies and generation is consistent with the Tribe’s 2011 Strategic Plan. This Study assessed the possibilities for both commercial-scale and community-scale solar development within the southwestern portions of the Reservation around the communities of San Carlos, Peridot, and Cutter, and in the southeastern Reservation around the community of Bylas. Based on the lack of any commercial-scale electric power transmission between the Reservation and the regional transmission grid, Phase 2 of this Study greatly expanded consideration of community-scale options. Three smaller sites (Point of Pines, Dudleyville/Winkleman, and Seneca Lake) were also evaluated for community-scale solar potential. Three building complexes were identified within the Reservation where the development of site-specific facility-scale solar power would be the most beneficial and cost-effective: Apache Gold Casino/Resort, Tribal College/Skill Center, and the Dudleyville (Winkleman) Casino.

  5. The Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation IV, a New Scoring System for Predicting Mortality and Complications of Severe Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Shaffer R S; Mohan, Sachin; Elfant, Adam B; Judge, Thomas A

    2015-11-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis is associated with significant morbidity/mortality; thus, the ability to predict hospital course is imperative. An updated version of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE), APACHE IV, has recently been validated. Unlike other versions, APACHE IV uses hepatobiliary parameters and accounts for multiple comorbid conditions and sedation. The intention of this study was to examine APACHE IV for predicting mortality and secondary outcomes for pancreatitis in a prospective cohort. In addition, we compared APACHE IV to APACHE II, Bedside Index for Severity in Acute Pancreatitis, and Ranson criterion. We prospectively collected physiologic parameters for each scoring system in 266 patients with severe acute pancreatitis from August 2011 to April 2014. Prognostic value of each score was determined using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Among 266 patients, 59% were men, 52% were white, and 36.5% had alcohol-induced pancreatitis. Mortality occurred in 15 (5.6%), and an APACHE IV of 44 or greater predicted mortality in 100% of cases. The receiver operating characteristic curve for APACHE IV was 0.93 (confidence interval [CI], 0.88-0.97); APACHE II, 0.87 (CI, 0.80-0.94); Bedside Index for Severity in Acute Pancreatitis, 0.86 (CI, 0.78-0.94); and Ranson criterion, 0.90 (CI, 0.94-0.96). The APACHE IV is a valid means for predicting mortality and disease-related complications in acute pancreatitis.

  6. The Value of Botox-A in Acute Radiation Proctitis: Results From a Phase I/II Study Using a Three-Dimensional Scoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuong, Te; Waschke, Kevin; Niazi, Tamim; Richard, Carole; Parent, Josee; Liberman, Sender; Mayrand, Serge; Loungnarath, Rasmy; Stein, Barry; Devic, Slobodan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Acute radiation proctitis (ARP) is a common side effect of pelvic radiotherapy, and its management is challenging in daily practice. The present phase I/II study evaluates the safety and efficacy of the botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) in ARP treatment for rectal cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant high-dose-rate endorectal brachytherapy (HDREBT). Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients, treated with neoadjuvant HDREBT, 26-Gy in 4 fractions, received the study treatment that consisted of a single injection of BTX-A into the rectal wall. The injection was performed post-HDREBT and prior to the development of ARP. The control group, 20 such patients, did not receive the BTX-A injection. Both groups had access to standard treatment with hydrocortisone rectal aerosol foam (Cortifoam) and anti-inflammatory and narcotic medication. The ARP was clinically evaluated by self-administered daily questionnaires using visual analog scores to document frequency and urgency of bowel movements, rectal burning/tenesmus, and pain symptoms before and after HDREBT. Results: At the time of this analysis, there was no observed systemic toxicity. Patient compliance with the self-administered questionnaire was 100% from week 1 to 4, 70% during week 5, and 40% during week 6. The maximum tolerated dose was established at the 100-U dose level, and noticeable mean differences were observed in bowel frequency (p = 0.016), urgency (p = 0.007), and pain (p = 0.078). Conclusions: This study confirms the feasibility and efficacy of BTX-A intervention at 100-U dose level for study patients compared to control patients. A phase III study with this dose level is planned to validate these results.

  7. Mechanical characterization of densely welded Apache Leap tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuenkajorn, K.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1991-06-01

    An empirical criterion is formulated to describe the compressive strength of the densely welded Apache Leap tuff. The criterion incorporates the effects of size, L/D ratio, loading rate and density variations. The criterion improves the correlation between the test results and the failure envelope. Uniaxial and triaxial compressive strengths, Brazilian tensile strength and elastic properties of the densely welded brown unit of the Apache Leap tuff have been determined using the ASTM standard test methods. All tuff samples are tested dry at room temperature (22 ± 2 degrees C), and have the core axis normal to the flow layers. The uniaxial compressive strength is 73.2 ± 16.5 MPa. The Brazilian tensile strength is 5.12 ± 1.2 MPa. The Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio are 22.6 ± 5.7 GPa and 0.20 ± 0.03. Smoothness and perpendicularity do not fully meet the ASTM requirements for all samples, due to the presence of voids and inclusions on the sample surfaces and the sample preparation methods. The investigations of loading rate, L/D radio and cyclic loading effects on the compressive strength and of the size effect on the tensile strength are not conclusive. The Coulomb strength criterion adequately represents the failure envelope of the tuff under confining pressures from 0 to 62 MPa. Cohesion and internal friction angle are 16 MPa and 43 degrees. The brown unit of the Apache Leap tuff is highly heterogeneous as suggested by large variations of the test results. The high intrinsic variability of the tuff is probably caused by the presence of flow layers and by nonuniform distributions of inclusions, voids and degree of welding. Similar variability of the properties has been found in publications on the Topopah Spring tuff at Yucca Mountain. 57 refs., 32 figs., 29 tabs

  8. Beginning PHP, Apache, MySQL web development

    CERN Document Server

    Glass, Michael K; Naramore, Elizabeth; Mailer, Gary; Stolz, Jeremy; Gerner, Jason

    2004-01-01

    An ideal introduction to the entire process of setting up a Web site using PHP (a scripting language), MySQL (a database management system), and Apache (a Web server)* Programmers will be up and running in no time, whether they're using Linux or Windows servers* Shows readers step by step how to create several Web sites that share common themes, enabling readers to use these examples in real-world projects* Invaluable reading for even the experienced programmer whose current site has outgrown the traditional static structure and who is looking for a way to upgrade to a more efficient, user-f

  9. Large-Scale Graph Processing Using Apache Giraph

    KAUST Repository

    Sakr, Sherif

    2017-01-07

    This book takes its reader on a journey through Apache Giraph, a popular distributed graph processing platform designed to bring the power of big data processing to graph data. Designed as a step-by-step self-study guide for everyone interested in large-scale graph processing, it describes the fundamental abstractions of the system, its programming models and various techniques for using the system to process graph data at scale, including the implementation of several popular and advanced graph analytics algorithms.

  10. Is Intermediate Radiation Dose Escalation With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Stage III Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Beneficial? A Multi-Institutional Propensity Score Matched Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, George, E-mail: george.rodrigues@lhsc.on.ca [London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Oberije, Cary [MAASTRO Clinic, Maastricht (Netherlands); Senan, Suresh [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tsujino, Kayoko [Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi (Japan); Wiersma, Terry [MAASTRO Clinic, Maastricht (Netherlands); Moreno-Jimenez, Marta [Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Kim, Tae Hyun [National Cancer Center, Goyang-si, Gy eonggi (Korea, Republic of); Marks, Lawrence B. [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Rengan, Ramesh [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); De Petris, Luigi [Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Ramella, Sara [Campus Bio-Medico University, Rome (Italy); DeRuyck, Kim [Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); De Dios, Núria Rodriguez [Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Warner, Andrew [London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Palma, David A. [London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The clinical benefits and risks of dose escalation (DE) for stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remain uncertain despite the results from Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 0617. There is significant heterogeneity of practice, with many clinicians prescribing intermediate dose levels between the 0617 study arms of 60 and 74 Gy. This study investigated whether this strategy is associated with any survival benefits/risks by analyzing a large multi-institutional database. Methods and Materials: An individual patient database of stage III NSCLC patients treated with radical intent concurrent chemoradiation therapy was created (13 institutions, n=1274 patients). Patients were divided into 2 groups based on tumor Biological Effective Dose at 10 Gy (BED 10): those receiving standard dose (SD; n=552), consisting of 72Gy ≤ BED 10 ≤ 76.8 Gy (eg 60-64 Gy/30-32 fractions [fr]), and those receiving intermediate dose (ID; n=497), consisting of 76.8Gy < BED 10 < 100.8 Gy (eg >64 Gy/32 fr and <74 Gy/37 fr), with lower-dose patients (n=225) excluded from consideration. Patients were then matched using propensity scores, leading to 2 matched groups of 196 patients. Outcomes were compared using various statistics including interquartile range (IQR), Kaplan-Meier curves, and adjusted Cox regression analysis. Results: Matched groups were found to be balanced except for N stage (more N3 disease in SD), median treatment year (SD in 2003; ID in 2007), platinum and taxane chemotherapy (SD in 28%; ID in 39%), and median follow-up (SD were 89 months; ID were 40 months). Median dose fractionation was 60 Gy/30 fr in SD (BED 10 IQR: 72.0-75.5 Gy) and 66 Gy/33 fr (BED 10 IQR: 78.6-79.2 Gy) in ID. Survival curves for SD and ID matched cohorts were statistically similar (P=.27); however, a nonstatistically significant trend toward better survival for ID was observed after 15 months (median survival SD: 19.3 months; ID: 21.0

  11. THE DATA REDUCTION PIPELINE FOR THE APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY GALACTIC EVOLUTION EXPERIMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nidever, David L.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Mészáros, Szabolcs; Beland, Stephane; Bender, Chad; Desphande, Rohit; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Burton, Adam; García Pérez, Ana E.; Hearty, Fred R.; Majewski, Steven R.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Sobeck, Jennifer S.; Wilson, John C.; Fleming, Scott W.; Muna, Demitri; Nguyen, Duy; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Shetrone, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III, explores the stellar populations of the Milky Way using the Sloan 2.5-m telescope linked to a high resolution (R ∼ 22,500), near-infrared (1.51–1.70 μm) spectrograph with 300 optical fibers. For over 150,000 predominantly red giant branch stars that APOGEE targeted across the Galactic bulge, disks and halo, the collected high signal-to-noise ratio (>100 per half-resolution element) spectra provide accurate (∼0.1 km s −1 ) RVs, stellar atmospheric parameters, and precise (≲0.1 dex) chemical abundances for about 15 chemical species. Here we describe the basic APOGEE data reduction software that reduces multiple 3D raw data cubes into calibrated, well-sampled, combined 1D spectra, as implemented for the SDSS-III/APOGEE data releases (DR10, DR11 and DR12). The processing of the near-IR spectral data of APOGEE presents some challenges for reduction, including automated sky subtraction and telluric correction over a 3°-diameter field and the combination of spectrally dithered spectra. We also discuss areas for future improvement

  12. THE DATA REDUCTION PIPELINE FOR THE APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY GALACTIC EVOLUTION EXPERIMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nidever, David L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Holtzman, Jon A. [New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Prieto, Carlos Allende; Mészáros, Szabolcs [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Via Láctea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Beland, Stephane [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO (United States); Bender, Chad; Desphande, Rohit [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Bizyaev, Dmitry [Apache Point Observatory and New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 59, sunspot, NM 88349-0059 (United States); Burton, Adam; García Pérez, Ana E.; Hearty, Fred R.; Majewski, Steven R.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Sobeck, Jennifer S.; Wilson, John C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Fleming, Scott W. [Computer Sciences Corporation, 3700 San Martin Dr, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Muna, Demitri [Department of Astronomy and the Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Nguyen, Duy [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3H4 (Canada); Schiavon, Ricardo P. [Gemini Observatory, 670 N. A’Ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Shetrone, Matthew, E-mail: dnidever@umich.edu [University of Texas at Austin, McDonald Observatory, Fort Davis, TX 79734 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III, explores the stellar populations of the Milky Way using the Sloan 2.5-m telescope linked to a high resolution (R ∼ 22,500), near-infrared (1.51–1.70 μm) spectrograph with 300 optical fibers. For over 150,000 predominantly red giant branch stars that APOGEE targeted across the Galactic bulge, disks and halo, the collected high signal-to-noise ratio (>100 per half-resolution element) spectra provide accurate (∼0.1 km s{sup −1}) RVs, stellar atmospheric parameters, and precise (≲0.1 dex) chemical abundances for about 15 chemical species. Here we describe the basic APOGEE data reduction software that reduces multiple 3D raw data cubes into calibrated, well-sampled, combined 1D spectra, as implemented for the SDSS-III/APOGEE data releases (DR10, DR11 and DR12). The processing of the near-IR spectral data of APOGEE presents some challenges for reduction, including automated sky subtraction and telluric correction over a 3°-diameter field and the combination of spectrally dithered spectra. We also discuss areas for future improvement.

  13. Evaluation of Apache Hadoop for parallel data analysis with ROOT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehrack, S; Duckeck, G; Ebke, J

    2014-01-01

    The Apache Hadoop software is a Java based framework for distributed processing of large data sets across clusters of computers, using the Hadoop file system (HDFS) for data storage and backup and MapReduce as a processing platform. Hadoop is primarily designed for processing large textual data sets which can be processed in arbitrary chunks, and must be adapted to the use case of processing binary data files which cannot be split automatically. However, Hadoop offers attractive features in terms of fault tolerance, task supervision and control, multi-user functionality and job management. For this reason, we evaluated Apache Hadoop as an alternative approach to PROOF for ROOT data analysis. Two alternatives in distributing analysis data were discussed: either the data was stored in HDFS and processed with MapReduce, or the data was accessed via a standard Grid storage system (dCache Tier-2) and MapReduce was used only as execution back-end. The focus in the measurements were on the one hand to safely store analysis data on HDFS with reasonable data rates and on the other hand to process data fast and reliably with MapReduce. In the evaluation of the HDFS, read/write data rates from local Hadoop cluster have been measured and compared to standard data rates from the local NFS installation. In the evaluation of MapReduce, realistic ROOT analyses have been used and event rates have been compared to PROOF.

  14. Biology and distribution of Lutzomyia apache as it relates to VSV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phlebotomine sand flies are vectors of bacteria, parasites, and viruses. Lutzomyia apache was incriminated as a vector of vesicular stomatitis viruses(VSV)due to overlapping ranges of the sand fly and outbreaks of VSV. I report on newly discovered populations of L. apache in Wyoming from Albany and ...

  15. Managing Variant Calling Files the Big Data Way: Using HDFS and Apache Parquet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boufea, Aikaterini; Finkers, H.J.; Kaauwen, van M.P.W.; Kramer, M.R.; Athanasiadis, I.N.

    2017-01-01

    Big Data has been seen as a remedy for the efficient management of the ever-increasing genomic data. In this paper, we investigate the use of Apache Spark to store and process Variant Calling Files (VCF) on a Hadoop cluster. We demonstrate Tomatula, a software tool for converting VCF files to Apache

  16. 75 FR 68607 - BP Canada Energy Marketing Corp. Apache Corporation; Notice for Temporary Waivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-08

    ... Energy Marketing Corp. Apache Corporation; Notice for Temporary Waivers November 1, 2010. Take notice that on October 29, 2010, BP Canada Energy Marketing Corp. and Apache Corporation filed with the... assistance with any FERC Online service, please e-mail [email protected] , or call (866) 208-3676...

  17. Comparison of intensive care outcome prediction models based on admission scores with those based on 24-hour data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, G J; Piercy, M; DiGiantomasso, D; Green, J V

    2008-11-01

    We compared the performance of six outcome prediction models--three based on 24-hour data and three based on admission-only data--in a metropolitan university-affiliated teaching hospital with a 10-bed intensive care unit. The Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation models, version II (APACHE II) and version III-J, and the Simplified Acute Physiology Score version II (SAPS II) are based on 24-hour data and were compared with the Mortality Prediction Model version II and the SAPS version III using international and Australian coefficients (SAPS IIIA). Data were collected prospectively according to the standard methodologies for each model. Calibration and discrimination for each model were assessed by the standardised mortality ratio, area under the receiver operating characteristic plot and Hosmer-Lemeshow contingency tables and chi-squared statistics (C10 and H10). Predetermined criteria were area under the receiver operating characteristic plot > 0.8, standardised mortality ratio 95% confidence interval includes 1.0, and C10 and H10 P values >0.05. Between October 1, 2005 and December 31, 2007, 1843 consecutive admissions were screened and after the standard exclusions, 1741 were included in the analysis. The SAPS II and SAPS IIIA models fulfilled and the APACHE II model failed all criteria. The other models satisfied the discrimination criterion but significantly over-predicted mortality risk and require recalibration. Outcome prediction models based on admission-only data compared favourably to those based on 24-hour data.

  18. A Photometricity and Extinction Monitor at the Apache Point Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, David W.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Schlegel, David J.; Gunn, James E.

    2001-10-01

    An unsupervised software ``robot'' that automatically and robustly reduces and analyzes CCD observations of photometric standard stars is described. The robot measures extinction coefficients and other photometric parameters in real time and, more carefully, on the next day. It also reduces and analyzes data from an all-sky 10 μm camera to detect clouds; photometric data taken during cloudy periods are automatically rejected. The robot reports its findings to observers and data analysts via the World Wide Web. It can be used to assess photometricity and to build data on site conditions. The robot's automated and uniform site monitoring represents a minimum standard for any observing site with queue scheduling, a public data archive, or likely participation in any future National Virtual Observatory. Based on observations obtained at the Apache Point Observatory, which is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium.

  19. CMS Analysis and Data Reduction with Apache Spark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutsche, Oliver [Fermilab; Canali, Luca [CERN; Cremer, Illia [Magnetic Corp., Waltham; Cremonesi, Matteo [Fermilab; Elmer, Peter [Princeton U.; Fisk, Ian [Flatiron Inst., New York; Girone, Maria [CERN; Jayatilaka, Bo [Fermilab; Kowalkowski, Jim [Fermilab; Khristenko, Viktor [CERN; Motesnitsalis, Evangelos [CERN; Pivarski, Jim [Princeton U.; Sehrish, Saba [Fermilab; Surdy, Kacper [CERN; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey [Princeton U.

    2017-10-31

    Experimental Particle Physics has been at the forefront of analyzing the world's largest datasets for decades. The HEP community was among the first to develop suitable software and computing tools for this task. In recent times, new toolkits and systems for distributed data processing, collectively called "Big Data" technologies have emerged from industry and open source projects to support the analysis of Petabyte and Exabyte datasets in industry. While the principles of data analysis in HEP have not changed (filtering and transforming experiment-specific data formats), these new technologies use different approaches and tools, promising a fresh look at analysis of very large datasets that could potentially reduce the time-to-physics with increased interactivity. Moreover these new tools are typically actively developed by large communities, often profiting of industry resources, and under open source licensing. These factors result in a boost for adoption and maturity of the tools and for the communities supporting them, at the same time helping in reducing the cost of ownership for the end-users. In this talk, we are presenting studies of using Apache Spark for end user data analysis. We are studying the HEP analysis workflow separated into two thrusts: the reduction of centrally produced experiment datasets and the end-analysis up to the publication plot. Studying the first thrust, CMS is working together with CERN openlab and Intel on the CMS Big Data Reduction Facility. The goal is to reduce 1 PB of official CMS data to 1 TB of ntuple output for analysis. We are presenting the progress of this 2-year project with first results of scaling up Spark-based HEP analysis. Studying the second thrust, we are presenting studies on using Apache Spark for a CMS Dark Matter physics search, comparing Spark's feasibility, usability and performance to the ROOT-based analysis.

  20. Acute kidney injury enhances outcome prediction ability of sequential organ failure assessment score in critically ill patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hsiang Chang

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common and serious complication in intensive care unit (ICU patients and also often part of a multiple organ failure syndrome. The sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA score is an excellent tool for assessing the extent of organ dysfunction in critically ill patients. This study aimed to evaluate the outcome prediction ability of SOFA and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE III score in ICU patients with AKI.A total of 543 critically ill patients were admitted to the medical ICU of a tertiary-care hospital from July 2007 to June 2008. Demographic, clinical and laboratory variables were prospectively recorded for post hoc analysis as predictors of survival on the first day of ICU admission.One hundred and eighty-seven (34.4% patients presented with AKI on the first day of ICU admission based on the risk of renal failure, injury to kidney, failure of kidney function, loss of kidney function, and end-stage renal failure (RIFLE classification. Major causes of the ICU admissions involved respiratory failure (58%. Overall in-ICU mortality was 37.9% and the hospital mortality was 44.7%. The predictive accuracy for ICU mortality of SOFA (areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves: 0.815±0.032 was as good as APACHE III in the AKI group. However, cumulative survival rates at 6-month follow-up following hospital discharge differed significantly (p<0.001 for SOFA score ≤10 vs. ≥11 in these ICU patients with AKI.For patients coexisting with AKI admitted to ICU, this work recommends application of SOFA by physicians to assess ICU mortality because of its practicality and low cost. A SOFA score of ≥ "11" on ICU day 1 should be considered an indicator of negative short-term outcome.

  1. The Rotation of M Dwarfs Observed by the Apache Point Galactic Evolution Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilhool, Steven H.; Blake, Cullen H.; Terrien, Ryan C.; Bender, Chad; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Deshpande, Rohit

    2018-01-01

    We present the results of a spectroscopic analysis of rotational velocities in 714 M-dwarf stars observed by the SDSS-III Apache Point Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) survey. We use a template-fitting technique to estimate v\\sin i while simultaneously estimating {log}g, [{{M}}/{{H}}], and {T}{eff}. We conservatively estimate that our detection limit is 8 km s‑1. We compare our results to M-dwarf rotation studies in the literature based on both spectroscopic and photometric measurements. Like other authors, we find an increase in the fraction of rapid rotators with decreasing stellar temperature, exemplified by a sharp increase in rotation near the M4 transition to fully convective stellar interiors, which is consistent with the hypothesis that fully convective stars are unable to shed angular momentum as efficiently as those with radiative cores. We compare a sample of targets observed both by APOGEE and the MEarth transiting planet survey and find no cases where the measured v\\sin i and rotation period are physically inconsistent, requiring \\sin i> 1. We compare our spectroscopic results to the fraction of rotators inferred from photometric surveys and find that while the results are broadly consistent, the photometric surveys exhibit a smaller fraction of rotators beyond the M4 transition by a factor of ∼2. We discuss possible reasons for this discrepancy. Given our detection limit, our results are consistent with a bimodal distribution in rotation that is seen in photometric surveys.

  2. APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY 3.5M AGILE OBSERVATIONS OF LCROSS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This archive contains observations of the 2009-10-09 impact of the LCROSS spacecraft on the moon by the AGILE instrument on the Apache Point Observatory 3.5m...

  3. Apache Trail, Tonto National Forest : Observations, Considerations, and Recommendations from the Interagency Transportation Assistance Group (TAG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-03

    This report summarizes the observations and findings of an interagency transportation assistance group (TAG) convened to discuss the long-term future of Arizona State Route 88, also known as the Apache Trail, a historic road on the Tonto Nation...

  4. Prediction of heart disease using apache spark analysing decision trees and gradient boosting algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chugh, Saryu; Arivu Selvan, K.; Nadesh, RK

    2017-11-01

    Numerous destructive things influence the working arrangement of human body as hypertension, smoking, obesity, inappropriate medication taking which causes many contrasting diseases as diabetes, thyroid, strokes and coronary diseases. The impermanence and horribleness of the environment situation is also the reason for the coronary disease. The structure of Apache start relies on the evolution which requires gathering of the data. To break down the significance of use programming focused on data structure the Apache stop ought to be utilized and it gives various central focuses as it is fast in light as it uses memory worked in preparing. Apache Spark continues running on dispersed environment and chops down the data in bunches giving a high profitability rate. Utilizing mining procedure as a part of the determination of coronary disease has been exhaustively examined indicating worthy levels of precision. Decision trees, Neural Network, Gradient Boosting Algorithm are the various apache spark proficiencies which help in collecting the information.

  5. Analyzing large data sets from XGC1 magnetic fusion simulations using apache spark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churchill, R. Michael [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2016-11-21

    Apache Spark is explored as a tool for analyzing large data sets from the magnetic fusion simulation code XGCI. Implementation details of Apache Spark on the NERSC Edison supercomputer are discussed, including binary file reading, and parameter setup. Here, an unsupervised machine learning algorithm, k-means clustering, is applied to XGCI particle distribution function data, showing that highly turbulent spatial regions do not have common coherent structures, but rather broad, ring-like structures in velocity space.

  6. Administration, Scoring, & Procedures Manual for the DSMPTSD III-R & DSMPTSD IV. A Measure of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Structured to Meet DSM-III-R & DSM-IV Diagnostic Criteria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ursano, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Since many trauma and disaster studies include the Impact of Events Scale (lES) and the SCL-9O-R as core instruments, the DSMPTSD-III-R has been developed to identify PTSD with the addition of only 12 Supplemental Items to these two scales...

  7. Generation of a Social Network Graph by Using Apache Spark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. A. Belov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We plan to create a method of clustering a social network graph. For testing the method there is a need to generate a graph similar in structure to existing social networks. The article presents an algorithm for the graph distributed generation. We took into account basic properties such as power-law distribution of the users communities number, dense intersections of the social networks and others. This algorithm also considers the problems that are present in similar works of other authors, for example, the multiple edges problem in the generation process. A special feature of the created algorithm is the implementation depending on the communities number parameter rather than on the connected users number as it is done in other works. It is connected with a peculiarity of progressing the existing social network structure. There are properties of its graph in the paper. We described a table containing the variables needed for the algorithm. A step-by-step generation algorithm was compiled. Appropriate mathematical parameters were calculated for it. A generation is performed in a distributed way by Apache Spark framework. It was described in detail how the tasks division with the help of this framework runs. The Erdos-Renyi model for random graphs is used in the algorithm. It is the most suitable and easy one to implement. The main advantages of the created method are the small amount of resources in comparison with other similar generators and execution speed. Speed is achieved through distributed work and the fact that in any time network users have their own unique numbers and are ordered by these numbers, so there is no need to sort them out. The designed algorithm will promote not only the efficient clustering method creation. It can be useful in other development areas connected, for example, with the social networks search engines.

  8. Significance of baseline and change in quality of life scores in predicting clinical outcomes in an international phase III trial of advanced pancreatic cancer: NCIC CTG PA.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, M M; Lee, C; Tu, D; Wheatley-Price, P; Parulekar, W; Brundage, M D; Moore, M J; Au, H; O'Callaghan, C J; Jonker, D J; Ringash, J; Goldstein, D

    There is insufficient information regarding the prognostic significance of baseline and change in quality of life (QoL) scores on overall survival (OS) in advanced pancreatic cancer. QoL was assessed prospectively using the EORTC QLQ-C30 as part of the PA.3 trial of gemcitabine + erlotinib (G + E) vs. gemcitabine + placebo (G + P). Relevant variables and QoL scores at baseline and change at 8 weeks were analyzed by Cox stepwise regression to determine predictors of OS. 222 of 285 patients (pts) treated with G + E and 220 of 284 pts treated with G + P completed baseline QoL assessments. In a multivariable Cox analysis combining all pts, better QoL physical functioning (PF) score independently predicted longer OS (HR 0.86; CI: 0.80-0.93), as did non-white race (HR 0.64; CI: 0.44-0.95), PS 0-1 (HR 0.65; CI: 0.50-0.85), locally advanced disease (HR 0.55; CI: 0.43-0.71) and G + E (HR 0.78; CI: 0.64-0.96). Improvement in physical function at week 8 also predicted for improved survival (HR 0.89; CI: 0.81-0.97 for 10 point increase in score, p = 0.02). In addition to clinical variables, patient reported QoL scores at baseline and change from baseline to week 8 added incremental predictive information regarding survival for advanced pancreatic cancer patients. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Validation of acute physiologic and chronic health evaluation II scoring system software developed at The Aga Khan University, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashmi, M; Asghar, A; Shamim, F; Khan, F H

    2016-01-01

    To assess the predictive performance of Acute Physiologic and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) software available on the hospital intranet and analyze interrater reliability of calculating the APACHE II score by the gold standard manual method or automatically using the software. An expert scorer not involved in the data collection had calculated APACHE II score of 213 patients admitted to surgical Intensive Care Unit using the gold standard manual method for a previous study performed in the department. The same data were entered into the computer software available on the hospital intranet (http://intranet/apacheii) to recalculate the APACHE II score automatically along with the predicted mortality. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC), Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit statistical test and Pearson's correlation coefficient was computed. The 213 patients had an average APACHE II score of 17.20 ± 8.24, the overall mortality rate was 32.8% and standardized mortality ratio was 1.00. The area under the ROC curve of 0.827 was significantly >0.5 (P test showed a good calibration (H = 5.46, P = 0.71). Interrater reliability using Pearson's product moment correlations demonstrated a strong positive relationship between the computer and the manual expert scorer (r = 0.98, P = 0.0005). APACHE II software available on the hospital's intranet has satisfactory calibration and discrimination and interrater reliability is good when compared with the gold standard manual method.

  10. Jicarilla Apache Utility Authority Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Strategic Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabago, K.R.

    2008-06-28

    The purpose of this Strategic Plan Report is to provide an introduction and in-depth analysis of the issues and opportunities, resources, and technologies of energy efficiency and renewable energy that have potential beneficial application for the people of the Jicarilla Apache Nation and surrounding communities. The Report seeks to draw on the best available information that existed at the time of writing, and where necessary, draws on new research to assess this potential. This study provides a strategic assessment of opportunities for maximizing the potential for electrical energy efficiency and renewable energy development by the Jicarilla Apache Nation. The report analyzes electricity use on the Jicarilla Apache Reservation in buildings. The report also assesses particular resources and technologies in detail, including energy efficiency, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, and small hydropower. The closing sections set out the elements of a multi-year, multi-phase strategy for development of resources to the maximum benefit of the Nation.

  11. Observations of the larval stages of Diceroprocta apache Davis (Homoptera: Tibicinidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingson, A.R.; Andersen, D.C.; Kondratieff, B.C.

    2002-01-01

    Diceroprocta apache Davis is a locally abundant cicada in the riparian woodlands of the southwestern United States. While its ecological importance has often been hypothesized, very little is known of its specific life history. This paper presents preliminary information on life history of D. apache from larvae collected in the field at seasonal intervals as well as a smaller number of reared specimens. Morphological development of the fore-femoral comb closely parallels growth through distinct size classes. The data indicate the presence of five larval instars in D. apache. Development times from greenhouse-reared specimens suggest a 3-4 year life span and overlapping broods were present in the field. Sex ratios among pre-emergent larvae suggest the asynchronous emergence of sexes.

  12. Jicarilla Apache Utility Authority. Strategic Plan for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabago, K.R.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this Strategic Plan Report is to provide an introduction and in-depth analysis of the issues and opportunities, resources, and technologies of energy efficiency and renewable energy that have potential beneficial application for the people of the Jicarilla Apache Nation and surrounding communities. The Report seeks to draw on the best available information that existed at the time of writing, and where necessary, draws on new research to assess this potential. This study provides a strategic assessment of opportunities for maximizing the potential for electrical energy efficiency and renewable energy development by the Jicarilla Apache Nation. The report analyzes electricity use on the Jicarilla Apache Reservation in buildings. The report also assesses particular resources and technologies in detail, including energy efficiency, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, and small hydropower. The closing sections set out the elements of a multi-year, multi-phase strategy for development of resources to the maximum benefit of the Nation

  13. Kelayakan Raspberry Pi sebagai Web Server: Perbandingan Kinerja Nginx, Apache, dan Lighttpd pada Platform Raspberry Pi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmad Dawood

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Raspberry Pi is a small-sized computer, but it can function like an ordinary computer. Because it can function like a regular PC then it is also possible to run a web server application on the Raspberry Pi. This paper will report results from testing the feasibility and performance of running a web server on the Raspberry Pi. The test was conducted on the current top three most popular web servers, which are: Apache, Nginx, and Lighttpd. The parameters used to evaluate the feasibility and performance of these web servers were: maximum request and reply time. The results from the test showed that it is feasible to run all three web servers on the Raspberry Pi but Nginx gave the best performance followed by Lighttpd and Apache.Keywords: Raspberry Pi, web server, Apache, Lighttpd, Nginx, web server performance

  14. Comparison of the diagnostic ability of Moorfield′s regression analysis and glaucoma probability score using Heidelberg retinal tomograph III in eyes with primary open angle glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jindal Shveta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the diagnostic performance of the Heidelberg retinal tomograph (HRT glaucoma probability score (GPS with that of Moorfield′s regression analysis (MRA. Materials and Methods: The study included 50 eyes of normal subjects and 50 eyes of subjects with early-to-moderate primary open angle glaucoma. Images were obtained by using HRT version 3.0. Results: The agreement coefficient (weighted k for the overall MRA and GPS classification was 0.216 (95% CI: 0.119 - 0.315. The sensitivity and specificity were evaluated using the most specific (borderline results included as test negatives and least specific criteria (borderline results included as test positives. The MRA sensitivity and specificity were 30.61 and 98% (most specific and 57.14 and 98% (least specific. The GPS sensitivity and specificity were 81.63 and 73.47% (most specific and 95.92 and 34.69% (least specific. The MRA gave a higher positive likelihood ratio (28.57 vs. 3.08 and the GPS gave a higher negative likelihood ratio (0.25 vs. 0.44.The sensitivity increased with increasing disc size for both MRA and GPS. Conclusions: There was a poor agreement between the overall MRA and GPS classifications. GPS tended to have higher sensitivities, lower specificities, and lower likelihood ratios than the MRA. The disc size should be taken into consideration when interpreting the results of HRT, as both the GPS and MRA showed decreased sensitivity for smaller discs and the GPS showed decreased specificity for larger discs.

  15. Evaluation of illness severity scoring systems and risk prediction in vascular intensive care admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dover, M; Tawfick, Wael; Hynes, Niamh; Sultan, Sherif

    2016-08-01

    This study examines the predictive value of intensive care unit (ICU) scoring systems in a vascular ICU population. From April 2005 to September 2011, we examined 363 consecutive ICU admissions. Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II), Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II), APACHE IV, Multiple Organ Dysfunction Score (MODS), organ dysfunctions and/or infection (ODIN), mortality prediction model (MPM) and physiologic and operative severity score for the enumeration of mortality and morbidity (POSSUM) were calculated. The Glasgow Aneurysm Score (GAS) was calculated for patients with aneurysm-related admissions. Overall mortality for complex vascular intervention was 11.6%. At admission, the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUCs) was 0.884 for SAPS II, 0.894 for APACHE II, 0.895 for APACHE IV, 0.902 for MODS, 0.891 for ODIN and 0.903 for MPM. At 24 h, model discrimination was best for POSSUM (AUC = 0.906) and MPM (AUC = 0.912). The good discrimination of these scoring systems indicates their value as an adjunct to clinical assessment but should not be used on an individual basis as a clinical decision-making tool. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. 77 FR 18997 - Rim Lakes Forest Restoration Project; Apache-Sitgreavese National Forest, Black Mesa Ranger...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Rim Lakes Forest Restoration Project; Apache-Sitgreavese... intends to conserve and restore the Rim Lakes Project Area to make--over time--the forest ecosystem more... concerns and contentions. The proposed Rim Lakes Forest Restoration Project is subject to the HFRA pre...

  17. Lutzomyia (Helcocyrtomyia) Apache Young and Perkins (Diptera: Psychodidae) feeds on reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phlebotomine sand flies are vectors of bacteria, parasites, and viruses. In the western USA a sand fly, Lutzomyia apache Young and Perkins, was initially associated with epizootics of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), because sand flies were trapped at sites of an outbreak. Additional studies indica...

  18. Cloud Computing: A model Construct of Real-Time Monitoring for Big Dataset Analytics Using Apache Spark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkasem, Ameen; Liu, Hongwei; Zuo, Decheng; Algarash, Basheer

    2018-01-01

    The volume of data being collected, analyzed, and stored has exploded in recent years, in particular in relation to the activity on the cloud computing. While large-scale data processing, analysis, storage, and platform model such as cloud computing were previously and currently are increasingly. Today, the major challenge is it address how to monitor and control these massive amounts of data and perform analysis in real-time at scale. The traditional methods and model systems are unable to cope with these quantities of data in real-time. Here we present a new methodology for constructing a model for optimizing the performance of real-time monitoring of big datasets, which includes a machine learning algorithms and Apache Spark Streaming to accomplish fine-grained fault diagnosis and repair of big dataset. As a case study, we use the failure of Virtual Machines (VMs) to start-up. The methodology proposition ensures that the most sensible action is carried out during the procedure of fine-grained monitoring and generates the highest efficacy and cost-saving fault repair through three construction control steps: (I) data collection; (II) analysis engine and (III) decision engine. We found that running this novel methodology can save a considerate amount of time compared to the Hadoop model, without sacrificing the classification accuracy or optimization of performance. The accuracy of the proposed method (92.13%) is an improvement on traditional approaches.

  19. In of illness severIty scorIng care Systems for IntensIve

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1989-07-01

    Jul 1, 1989 ... failure secondary to sepsis) or delayed effects (paraquat poisoning). In certain individual diseases, notably pneumonia, the rela- tion between severity of illness scores and mortality is excellent. However, in the group of patients with ARDS the relation between organ failure and APACHE 11 is very poor.

  20. Propensity Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luellen, Jason K.; Shadish, William R.; Clark, M. H.

    2005-01-01

    Propensity score analysis is a relatively recent statistical innovation that is useful in the analysis of data from quasi-experiments. The goal of propensity score analysis is to balance two non-equivalent groups on observed covariates to get more accurate estimates of the effects of a treatment on which the two groups differ. This article…

  1. Skin scoring in systemic sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariae, Hugh; Bjerring, Peter; Halkier-Sørensen, Lars

    1994-01-01

    Forty-one patients with systemic sclerosis were investigated with a new and simple skin score method measuring the degree of thickening and pliability in seven regions together with area involvement in each region. The highest values were, as expected, found in diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis...... (type III SS) and the lowest in limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis (type I SS) with no lesions extending above wrists and ancles. A positive correlation was found to the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen, a serological marker for synthesis of type III collagen. The skin score...

  2. Bernard Organ Failure Score in estimation of most severe forms of acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glišić Tijana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Despite intensive research, efforts and clinical investigations on pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis (AP and system morbidity during the illness onset, mortality is still very high in the group of severe forms. A significantly high number of patients show moderate, self-limited forms of illness, with a minimal degree of systemic or local complications, with full recovery. However, some of them have a severe form, followed by a high percent of morbidity and mortality, and system organ failure. The distinction between mild and severe forms of AP within 24-48 hours of hospital admission is very important for the treatment of these patients. The usage of multifactorial scoring systems holds a lot of promise, reaching reliability in the disease severity estimation of approximately 70-80%. Objective. The main purpose of this prospective study was to assess the correlation of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II and the Bernard Organ Failure Score (BOFS scoring systems in estimation of disease severity and outcome prediction. Methods. Sixty patients with AP participated in the study, all of them scored with the APACHE II and BOFS scores. The results were used for integration of laboratory and clinical parameters. Results. In our study, we had a highly significant correlation between the APACHE II and BOFS scores from the disease onset until the end of treatment. There was a highly significant correlation between these two scores and the serum C-reactive protein concentration level. Conclusion. The concept of the BOFS score has more advantages than the APACHE II score in the patients with severe forms of AP with organ dysfunction.

  3. Score Correlation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fabián, Zdeněk

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 6 (2010), s. 793-798 ISSN 1210-0552 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/09/1079 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : score function * correlation * rank correlation coefficient * heavy tails Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 0.511, year: 2010

  4. Seguridad en la configuración del servidor web Apache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Gómez Montoya

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Apache es el servidor Web con mayor presencia en el mercado mundial. Aunque su configuración es relativamente sencilla, fortalecer sus condiciones de seguridad implica entender y aplicar un conjunto de reglas generales conocidas, aceptadas y disponibles. Por otra parte, a pesar de ser un tema aparentemente resuelto, la seguridad en los servidores HTTP constituye un problema en aumento, y no todas las compañías lo toman en serio. Este artículo identifica y verifica un conjunto de buenas prácticas de seguridad informática aplicadas a la configuración de Apache. Para alcanzar los objetivos, y con el fin de garantizar un proceso adecuado, se eligió una metodología basada en el Círculo de Calidad de Deming, el cual comprende cuatro fases: planear, hacer, verificar y actuar, y su aplicación condujo el desarrollo del proyecto. Este artículo consta de cinco secciones: Introducción, Marco de referencia, Metodología, Resultados y discusión, y Conclusiones.

  5. Nonsuicidal Self-Injury in an American Indian Reservation Community: Results from the White Mountain Apache Surveillance System, 2007-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwik, Mary F.; Barlow, Allison; Tingey, Lauren; Larzelere-Hinton, Francene; Goklish, Novalene; Walkup, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To describe characteristics and correlates of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) among the White Mountain Apache Tribe. NSSI has not been studied before in American Indian samples despite associated risks for suicide, which disproportionately affect American Indian youth. Method: Apache case managers collected data through a tribally…

  6. The piloting of a culturally centered American Indian family prevention program: a CBPR partnership between Mescalero Apache and the University of New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belone, Lorenda; Orosco, Ardena; Damon, Eloise; Smith-McNeal, Willymae; Rae, Rebecca; Sherpa, Mingma L; Myers, Orrin B; Omeh, Anslem O; Wallerstein, Nina

    2017-01-01

    The Mescalero Apache Family Listening Program (MAFLP) is a culturally centered family prevention program with third, fourth, and fifth graders; a parent/caregiver; and a family elder. The program follows a positive youth development model to develop stronger communication and shared cultural practices between elders, parents, and youth in the tribe to reduce substance initiation of use among the youth. The MAFLP was created using a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach in partnership with the University of New Mexico. The research focus of MAFLP is centered on the adaptation of a family curriculum from a Navajo and Pueblo version of the Family Listening Program to an Apache version, the establishment of a (Apache) Tribal Research Team, and the piloting of the curriculum with Apache families. MAFLP was piloted twice, and evaluation measures were collected focused on formative and impact evaluation. This article provides a background on Mescalero Apache then introduces the Navajo and Pueblo version of a Family Listening and Family Circle Program, respectively, next, the CBPR research partnership between Mescalero Apache and the University of New Mexico and the creation of a Mescalero Apache Tribal Research Team followed by the development and adaptation of a Mescalero Apache Family Listening Program including implementation and evaluation, and concluding with preliminary findings.

  7. Serial evaluation of the SOFA score is reliable for predicting mortality in acute severe pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Yu-San; Fang, Hsin-Yueh; Kuo, I-Ming; Lin, Yann-Sheng; Huang, Song-Fong; Yu, Ming-Chin

    2018-02-01

    Acute severe pancreatitis caused high mortality, and several scoring systems for predicting mortality are available. We evaluated the effectiveness of serial measurement of several scoring systems in patients with acute severe pancreatitis.We retrospectively obtained serial measurements of Ranson, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Assessment (APACHE) II, and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores of 159 patients with acute severe pancreatitis.The overall mortality rate was 20%, and early mortality (in the first 2 weeks) occurred in 10 (7.4%) patients, while late mortality occurred in 17 (12.6%).All scoring systems were reliable for predicting overall and intensive care unit mortality, while the SOFA score on day 7 presented the largest area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve (0.858, SE 0.055). Changes in scores over time were evaluated for predicting the progression of organ failure, and the change in SOFA score on hospital day 7 or no interval change in SOFA score was associated with higher mortality rates.APACHE II and SOFA scores are both sensitive for predicting mortality in acute pancreatitis. The serial SOFA scores showed reliable for predicting mortality. Hospital day 7 is a reasonable time for SOFA score reassessment to predict late mortality in acute severe pancreatitis.

  8. Outcrop Analysis of the Cretaceous Mesaverde Group: Jicarilla Apache Reservation, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridgley, Jennie; Dunbar, Robin Wright

    2001-04-24

    Field work for this project was conducted during July and April 1998, at which time fourteen measured sections were described and correlated on or adjacent to Jicarilla Apache Reservation lands. A fifteenth section, described east of the main field area, is included in this report, although its distant location precluded use in the correlations and cross sections presented herein. Ground-based photo mosaics were shot for much of the exposed Mesaverde outcrop belt and were used to assist in correlation. Outcrop gamma-ray surveys at six of the fifteen measured sections using a GAD-6 scintillometer was conducted. The raw gamma-ray data are included in this report, however, analysis of those data is part of the ongoing Phase Two of this project.

  9. Inequalities in Open Source Software Development: Analysis of Contributor's Commits in Apache Software Foundation Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chełkowski, Tadeusz; Gloor, Peter; Jemielniak, Dariusz

    2016-01-01

    While researchers are becoming increasingly interested in studying OSS phenomenon, there is still a small number of studies analyzing larger samples of projects investigating the structure of activities among OSS developers. The significant amount of information that has been gathered in the publicly available open-source software repositories and mailing-list archives offers an opportunity to analyze projects structures and participant involvement. In this article, using on commits data from 263 Apache projects repositories (nearly all), we show that although OSS development is often described as collaborative, but it in fact predominantly relies on radically solitary input and individual, non-collaborative contributions. We also show, in the first published study of this magnitude, that the engagement of contributors is based on a power-law distribution.

  10. Extraction of UMLS® Concepts Using Apache cTAKES™ for German Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Matthias; Böckmann, Britta

    2016-01-01

    Automatic information extraction of medical concepts and classification with semantic standards from medical reports is useful for standardization and for clinical research. This paper presents an approach for an UMLS concept extraction with a customized natural language processing pipeline for German clinical notes using Apache cTAKES. The objectives are, to test the natural language processing tool for German language if it is suitable to identify UMLS concepts and map these with SNOMED-CT. The German UMLS database and German OpenNLP models extended the natural language processing pipeline, so the pipeline can normalize to domain ontologies such as SNOMED-CT using the German concepts. For testing, the ShARe/CLEF eHealth 2013 training dataset translated into German was used. The implemented algorithms are tested with a set of 199 German reports, obtaining a result of average 0.36 F1 measure without German stemming, pre- and post-processing of the reports.

  11. 76 FR 47441 - Safety Zone; Apache Pier Labor Day Weekend Fireworks Display, Atlantic Ocean, Myrtle Beach, SC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-05

    ... Display, Atlantic Ocean, Myrtle Beach, SC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY... vicinity of Apache Pier in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina during a Labor Day weekend fireworks display on... fireworks display is scheduled to take place in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. The fireworks will be launched...

  12. Post-High School Careers of Apache Special Education and Regular Education Subjects: A Five Year Follow-Up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangasamy, Ramasamy

    This study analyzed the employment situation of 106 Apache youth, of whom 52 had been special education students. All students had exited high school between 1987 and 1992. Findings indicate that 65 percent of the regular education students and 73 percent of special education students were unemployed, that 50 percent of working special education…

  13. Are cicadas (Diceroprocta apache) both a "keystone" and a "critical-link" species in lower Colorado River riparian communities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Douglas C.

    1994-01-01

    Apache cicada (Homoptera: Cicadidae: Diceroprocta apache Davis) densities were estimated to be 10 individuals/m2 within a closed-canopy stand of Fremont cottonwood (Populus fremontii) and Goodding willow (Salix gooddingii) in a revegetated site adjacent to the Colorado River near Parker, Arizona. Coupled with data drawn from the literature, I estimate that up to 1.3 cm (13 1/m2) of water may be added to the upper soil layers annually through the feeding activities of cicada nymphs. This is equivalent to 12% of the annual precipitation received in the study area. Apache cicadas may have significant effects on ecosystem functioning via effects on water transport and thus act as a critical-link species in this southwest desert riverine ecosystem. Cicadas emerged later within the cottonwood-willow stand than in relatively open saltcedar-mesquite stands; this difference in temporal dynamics would affect their availability to several insectivorous bird species and may help explain the birds' recent declines. Resource managers in this region should be sensitive to the multiple and strong effects that Apache cicadas may have on ecosystem structure and functioning.

  14. Genetic analysis of resistance to septoria tritici blotch in the French winter wheat cultivars Balance and Apache

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabib Ghaffary, M.S.; Robert, O.; Laurent, V.; Lonnet, P.; Margalé, E.; Lee, van der T.A.J.; Visser, R.G.F.; Kema, G.H.J.

    2011-01-01

    The ascomycete Mycosphaerella graminicola is the causal agent of septoria tritici blotch (STB), one of the most destructive foliar diseases of bread and durum wheat globally, particularly in temperate humid areas. A screening of the French bread wheat cultivars Apache and Balance with 30 M.

  15. Overview of the SDSS-IV MaNGA Survey: Mapping nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bundy, Kevin; Bershady, Matthew A.; Law, David R.; Yan, Renbin; Drory, Niv; MacDonald, Nicholas; Wake, David A.; Cherinka, Brian; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Thomas, Daniel; Tremonti, Christy; Masters, Karen; Coccato, Lodovico; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Falcón-Barroso, Jésus; Belfiore, Francesco; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Blanton, Michael R.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Byler, Nell; Cappellari, Michele; Conroy, Charlie; Dutton, Aaron A.; Emsellem, Eric; Etherington, James; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Fu, Hai; Gunn, James E.; Harding, Paul; Johnston, Evelyn J.; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Kinemuchi, Karen; Klaene, Mark A.; Knapen, Johan H.; Leauthaud, Alexie; Li, Cheng; Lin, Lihwai; Maiolino, Roberto; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Mao, Shude; Maraston, Claudia; McDermid, Richard M.; Merrifield, Michael R.; Nichol, Robert C.; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John K.; Sanchez, Sebastian F.; Schlegel, David; Simmons, Audrey; Steele, Oliver; Steinmetz, Matthias; Thanjavur, Karun; Thompson, Benjamin A.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; van den Bosch, Remco C. E.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Wilkinson, David; Wright, Shelley; Xiao, Ting; Zhang, Kai

    We present an overview of a new integral field spectroscopic survey called MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory), one of three core programs in the fourth-generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) that began on 2014 July 1. MaNGA will investigate the internal kinematic

  16. Next Generation Astronomical Data Processing using Big Data Technologies from the Apache Software Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattmann, Chris

    2014-04-01

    In this era of exascale instruments for astronomy we must naturally develop next generation capabilities for the unprecedented data volume and velocity that will arrive due to the veracity of these ground-based sensor and observatories. Integrating scientific algorithms stewarded by scientific groups unobtrusively and rapidly; intelligently selecting data movement technologies; making use of cloud computing for storage and processing; and automatically extracting text and metadata and science from any type of file are all needed capabilities in this exciting time. Our group at NASA JPL has promoted the use of open source data management technologies available from the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) in pursuit of constructing next generation data management and processing systems for astronomical instruments including the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA) in Socorro, NM and the Atacama Large Milimetre/Sub Milimetre Array (ALMA); as well as for the KAT-7 project led by SKA South Africa as a precursor to the full MeerKAT telescope. In addition we are funded currently by the National Science Foundation in the US to work with MIT Haystack Observatory and the University of Cambridge in the UK to construct a Radio Array of Portable Interferometric Devices (RAPID) that will undoubtedly draw from the rich technology advances underway. NASA JPL is investing in a strategic initiative for Big Data that is pulling in these capabilities and technologies for astronomical instruments and also for Earth science remote sensing. In this talk I will describe the above collaborative efforts underway and point to solutions in open source from the Apache Software Foundation that can be deployed and used today and that are already bringing our teams and projects benefits. I will describe how others can take advantage of our experience and point towards future application and contribution of these tools.

  17. Vegetative response to water availability on the San Carlos Apache Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrakis, Roy; Wu, Zhuoting; McVay, Jason; Middleton, Barry R.; Dye, Dennis G.; Vogel, John M.

    2016-01-01

    On the San Carlos Apache Reservation in east-central Arizona, U.S.A., vegetation types such as ponderosa pine forests, pinyon-juniper woodlands, and grasslands have significant ecological, cultural, and economic value for the Tribe. This value extends beyond the tribal lands and across the Western United States. Vegetation across the Southwestern United States is susceptible to drought conditions and fluctuating water availability. Remotely sensed vegetation indices can be used to measure and monitor spatial and temporal vegetative response to fluctuating water availability conditions. We used the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-derived Modified Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index II (MSAVI2) to measure the condition of three dominant vegetation types (ponderosa pine forest, woodland, and grassland) in response to two fluctuating environmental variables: precipitation and the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI). The study period covered 2002 through 2014 and focused on a region within the San Carlos Apache Reservation. We determined that grassland and woodland had a similar moderate to strong, year-round, positive relationship with precipitation as well as with summer SPEI. This suggests that these vegetation types respond negatively to drought conditions and are more susceptible to initial precipitation deficits. Ponderosa pine forest had a comparatively weaker relationship with monthly precipitation and summer SPEI, indicating that it is more buffered against short-term drought conditions. This research highlights the response of multiple, dominant vegetation types to seasonal and inter-annual water availability. This research demonstrates that multi-temporal remote sensing imagery can be an effective tool for the large scale detection of vegetation response to adverse impacts from climate change and support potential management practices such as increased monitoring and management of drought-affected areas. Different

  18. Development of demographic norms for four new WAIS-III/WMS-III indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Rael T; Chelune, Gordon J; Taylor, Michael J; Woodward, Todd S; Heaton, Robert K

    2006-06-01

    Following the publication of the third edition Wechsler scales (i.e., WAIS-III and WMS-III), demographically corrected norms were made available in the form of a computerized scoring program (i.e., WAIS-III/WMS-III/WIAT-II Scoring Assistant). These norms correct for age, gender, ethnicity, and education. Since then, four new indexes have been developed: the WAIS-III General Ability Index, the WMS-III Delayed Memory Index, and the two alternate Immediate and Delayed Memory Indexes. The purpose of this study was to develop demographically corrected norms for the four new indexes using the standardization sample and education oversample from the WAIS-III and WMS-III. These norms were developed using the same methodology as the demographically corrected norms made available in the WAIS-III/WMS-III/WIAT-II Scoring Assistant. Copyright 2006 APA, all rights reserved.

  19. SIRS score on admission and initial concentration of IL-6 as severe acute pancreatitis outcome predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoric, Pavle; Pavle, Gregoric; Sijacki, Ana; Ana, Sijacki; Stankovic, Sanja; Sanja, Stankovic; Radenkovic, Dejan; Dejan, Radenkovic; Ivancevic, Nenad; Nenad, Ivancevic; Karamarkovic, Aleksandar; Aleksandar, Karamarkovic; Popovic, Nada; Nada, Popovic; Karadzic, Borivoje; Borivoje, Karadzic; Stijak, Lazar; Stefanovic, Branislav; Branislav, Stefanovic; Milosevic, Zoran; Zoran, Milosević; Bajec, Djordje; Djordje, Bajec

    2010-01-01

    Early recognition of severe form of acute pancreatitis is important because these patients need more agressive diagnostic and therapeutical approach an can develope systemic complications such as: sepsis, coagulopathy, Acute Lung Injury (ALI), Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome (MODS), Multiple Organ Failure (MOF). To determine role of the combination of Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) score and serum Interleukin-6 (IL-6) level on admission as predictor of illness severity and outcome of Severe Acute Pancreatitis (SAP). We evaluated 234 patients with first onset of SAP appears in last twenty four hours. A total of 77 (33%) patients died. SIRS score and serum IL-6 concentration were measured in first hour after admission. In 105 patients with SIRS score 3 and higher, initial measured IL-6 levels were significantly higher than in the group of remaining 129 patients (72 +/- 67 pg/mL, vs 18 +/- 15 pg/mL). All nonsurvivals were in the first group, with SIRS score 3 and 4 and initial IL-6 concentration 113 +/- 27 pg/mL. The values of C-reactive Protein (CRP) measured after 48h, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II) score on admission and Ranson score showed the similar correlation, but serum amylase level did not correlate significantly with Ranson score, IL-6 concentration and APACHE II score. The combination of SIRS score on admission and IL-6 serum concentration can be early, predictor of illness severity and outcome in SAP.

  20. Performance of the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) high-resolution near-infrared multi-object fiber spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John C.; Hearty, F.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Majewski, S. R.; Schiavon, R.; Eisenstein, D.; Gunn, J.; Holtzman, J.; Nidever, D.; Gillespie, B.; Weinberg, D.; Blank, B.; Henderson, C.; Smee, S.; Barkhouser, R.; Harding, A.; Hope, S.; Fitzgerald, G.; Stolberg, T.; Arns, J.; Nelson, M.; Brunner, S.; Burton, A.; Walker, E.; Lam, C.; Maseman, P.; Barr, J.; Leger, F.; Carey, L.; MacDonald, N.; Ebelke, G.; Beland, S.; Horne, T.; Young, E.; Rieke, G.; Rieke, M.; O'Brien, T.; Crane, J.; Carr, M.; Harrison, C.; Stoll, R.; Vernieri, M.; Shetrone, M.; Allende-Prieto, C.; Johnson, J.; Frinchaboy, P.; Zasowski, G.; Garcia Perez, A.; Bizyaev, D.; Cunha, K.; Smith, V. V.; Meszaros, Sz.; Zhao, B.; Hayden, M.; Chojnowski, S. D.; Andrews, B.; Loomis, C.; Owen, R.; Klaene, M.; Brinkmann, J.; Stauffer, F.; Long, D.; Jordan, W.; Holder, D.; Cope, F.; Naugle, T.; Pfaffenberger, B.; Schlegel, D.; Blanton, M.; Muna, D.; Weaver, B.; Snedden, S.; Pan, K.; Brewington, H.; Malanushenko, E.; Malanushenko, V.; Simmons, A.; Oravetz, D.; Mahadevan, S.; Halverson, S.

    2012-09-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) uses a dedicated 300-fiber, narrow-band near-infrared (1.51-1.7 μm), high resolution (R~22,500) spectrograph to survey approximately 100,000 giant stars across the Milky Way. This three-year survey, in operation since late-summer 2011 as part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS III), will revolutionize our understanding of the kinematical and chemical enrichment histories of all Galactic stellar populations. We present the performance of the instrument from its first year in operation. The instrument is housed in a separate building adjacent to the 2.5-m SDSS telescope and fed light via approximately 45-meter fiber runs from the telescope. The instrument design includes numerous innovations including a gang connector that allows simultaneous connection of all fibers with a single plug to a telescope cartridge that positions the fibers on the sky, numerous places in the fiber train in which focal ratio degradation had to be minimized, a large mosaic-VPH (290 mm x 475 mm elliptically-shaped recorded area), an f/1.4 six-element refractive camera featuring silicon and fused silica elements with diameters as large as 393 mm, three near-infrared detectors mounted in a 1 x 3 mosaic with sub-pixel translation capability, and all of these components housed within a custom, LN2-cooled, stainless steel vacuum cryostat with dimensions 1.4-m x 2.3-m x 1.3-m.

  1. The 13th Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Spectroscopic Data from the SDSS-IV Survey Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albareti, Franco D.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Almeida, Andres; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott; Andrews, Brett H.; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Argudo-Fernández, Maria; Armengaud, Eric; Aubourg, Eric; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Bailey, Stephen; Barbuy, Beatriz; Barger, Kat; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge; Bartosz, Curtis; Basu, Sarbani; Bates, Dominic; Battaglia, Giuseppina; Baumgarten, Falk; Baur, Julien; Bautista, Julian; Beers, Timothy C.; Belfiore, Francesco; Bershady, Matthew; Bertran de Lis, Sara; Bird, Jonathan C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blanton, Michael; Blomqvist, Michael; Bolton, Adam S.; Borissova, J.; Bovy, Jo; Nielsen Brandt, William; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Burtin, Etienne; Busca, Nicolás G.; Camacho Chavez, Hugo Orlando; Cano Díaz, M.; Cappellari, Michele; Carrera, Ricardo; Chen, Yanping; Cherinka, Brian; Cheung, Edmond; Chiappini, Cristina; Chojnowski, Drew; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Chung, Haeun; Cirolini, Rafael Fernando; Clerc, Nicolas; Cohen, Roger E.; Comerford, Julia M.; Comparat, Johan; Correa do Nascimento, Janaina; Cousinou, Marie-Claude; Covey, Kevin; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Croft, Rupert; Cunha, Katia; Darling, Jeremy; Davidson, James W., Jr.; Dawson, Kyle; Da Costa, Luiz; Da Silva Ilha, Gabriele; Deconto Machado, Alice; Delubac, Timothée; De Lee, Nathan; De la Macorra, Axel; De la Torre, Sylvain; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Donor, John; Downes, Juan Jose; Drory, Niv; Du, Cheng; Du Mas des Bourboux, Hélion; Dwelly, Tom; Ebelke, Garrett; Eigenbrot, Arthur; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Elsworth, Yvonne P.; Emsellem, Eric; Eracleous, Michael; Escoffier, Stephanie; Evans, Michael L.; Falcón-Barroso, Jesús; Fan, Xiaohui; Favole, Ginevra; Fernandez-Alvar, Emma; Fernandez-Trincado, J. G.; Feuillet, Diane; Fleming, Scott W.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Freischlad, Gordon; Frinchaboy, Peter; Fu, Hai; Gao, Yang; Garcia, Rafael A.; Garcia-Dias, R.; Garcia-Hernández, D. A.; Garcia Pérez, Ana E.; Gaulme, Patrick; Ge, Junqiang; Geisler, Douglas; Gillespie, Bruce; Gil Marin, Hector; Girardi, Léo; Goddard, Daniel; Gomez Maqueo Chew, Yilen; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Grabowski, Kathleen; Green, Paul; Grier, Catherine J.; Grier, Thomas; Guo, Hong; Guy, Julien; Hagen, Alex; Hall, Matt; Harding, Paul; Harley, R. E.; Hasselquist, Sten; Hawley, Suzanne; Hayes, Christian R.; Hearty, Fred; Hekker, Saskia; Hernandez Toledo, Hector; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Holtzman, Jon A.; Holzer, Parker H.; Hu, Jian; Huber, Daniel; Hutchinson, Timothy Alan; Hwang, Ho Seong; Ibarra-Medel, Héctor J.; Ivans, Inese I.; Ivory, KeShawn; Jaehnig, Kurt; Jensen, Trey W.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Jones, Amy; Jullo, Eric; Kallinger, T.; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Klaene, Mark; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Lacerna, Ivan; Lane, Richard R.; Lang, Dustin; Laurent, Pierre; Law, David R.; Leauthaud, Alexie; Le Goff, Jean-Marc; Li, Chen; Li, Cheng; Li, Niu; Li, Ran; Liang, Fu-Heng; Liang, Yu; Lima, Marcos; Lin, Lihwai; Lin, Lin; Lin, Yen-Ting; Liu, Chao; Long, Dan; Lucatello, Sara; MacDonald, Nicholas; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Mackereth, J. Ted; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Geimba Maia, Marcio Antonio; Maiolino, Roberto; Majewski, Steven R.; Malanushenko, Olena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Dullius Mallmann, Nícolas; Manchado, Arturo; Maraston, Claudia; Marques-Chaves, Rui; Martinez Valpuesta, Inma; Masters, Karen L.; Mathur, Savita; McGreer, Ian D.; Merloni, Andrea; Merrifield, Michael R.; Meszáros, Szabolcs; Meza, Andres; Miglio, Andrea; Minchev, Ivan; Molaverdikhani, Karan; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Mosser, Benoit; Muna, Demitri; Myers, Adam; Nair, Preethi; Nandra, Kirpal; Ness, Melissa; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Nichol, Robert C.; Nidever, David L.; Nitschelm, Christian; O’Connell, Julia; Oravetz, Audrey; Oravetz, Daniel J.; Pace, Zachary; Padilla, Nelson; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John; Paris, Isabelle; Park, Changbom; Peacock, John A.; Peirani, Sebastien; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Penny, Samantha; Percival, Will J.; Percival, Jeffrey W.; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Pisani, Alice; Prada, Francisco; Prakash, Abhishek; Price-Jones, Natalie; Raddick, M. Jordan; Rahman, Mubdi; Raichoor, Anand; Barboza Rembold, Sandro; Reyna, A. M.; Rich, James; Richstein, Hannah; Ridl, Jethro; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Riffel, Rogério; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robin, Annie C.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Rodrigues, Thaíse S.; Roe, Natalie; Roman Lopes, A.; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos; Ross, Ashley J.; Rossi, Graziano; Ruan, John; Ruggeri, Rossana; Runnoe, Jessie C.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Salvato, Mara; Sanchez, Sebastian F.; Sanchez, Ariel G.; Sanchez-Gallego, José R.; Santiago, Basílio Xavier; Schiavon, Ricardo; Schimoia, Jaderson S.; Schlafly, Eddie; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Schönrich, Ralph; Schultheis, Mathias; Schwope, Axel; Seo, Hee-Jong; Serenelli, Aldo; Sesar, Branimir; Shao, Zhengyi; Shetrone, Matthew; Shull, Michael; Silva Aguirre, Victor; Skrutskie, M. F.; Slosar, Anže; Smith, Michael; Smith, Verne V.; Sobeck, Jennifer; Somers, Garrett; Souto, Diogo; Stark, David V.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Steinmetz, Matthias; Stello, Dennis; Storchi Bergmann, Thaisa; Strauss, Michael A.; Streblyanska, Alina; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Suarez, Genaro; Sun, Jing; Taghizadeh-Popp, Manuchehr; Tang, Baitian; Tao, Charling; Tayar, Jamie; Tembe, Mita; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Tremonti, Christy; Troup, Nicholas; Trump, Jonathan R.; Unda-Sanzana, Eduardo; Valenzuela, O.; Van den Bosch, Remco; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Villanova, Sandro; Vivek, M.; Vogt, Nicole; Wake, David; Walterbos, Rene; Wang, Yuting; Wang, Enci; Weaver, Benjamin Alan; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Weinberg, David H.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Whelan, David G.; Wilcots, Eric; Wild, Vivienne; Williams, Rob A.; Wilson, John; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Wylezalek, Dominika; Xiao, Ting; Yan, Renbin; Yang, Meng; Ybarra, Jason E.; Yeche, Christophe; Yuan, Fang-Ting; Zakamska, Nadia; Zamora, Olga; Zasowski, Gail; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Cheng; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Zheng; Zheng, Zheng; Zhou, Zhi-Min; Zhu, Guangtun; Zinn, Joel C.; Zou, Hu

    2017-12-01

    The fourth generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) began observations in 2014 July. It pursues three core programs: the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment 2 (APOGEE-2), Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA), and the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS). As well as its core program, eBOSS contains two major subprograms: the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS) and the SPectroscopic IDentification of ERosita Sources (SPIDERS). This paper describes the first data release from SDSS-IV, Data Release 13 (DR13). DR13 makes publicly available the first 1390 spatially resolved integral field unit observations of nearby galaxies from MaNGA. It includes new observations from eBOSS, completing the Sloan Extended QUasar, Emission-line galaxy, Luminous red galaxy Survey (SEQUELS), which also targeted variability-selected objects and X-ray-selected objects. DR13 includes new reductions of the SDSS-III BOSS data, improving the spectrophotometric calibration and redshift classification, and new reductions of the SDSS-III APOGEE-1 data, improving stellar parameters for dwarf stars and cooler stars. DR13 provides more robust and precise photometric calibrations. Value-added target catalogs relevant for eBOSS, TDSS, and SPIDERS and an updated red-clump catalog for APOGEE are also available. This paper describes the location and format of the data and provides references to important technical papers. The SDSS web site, http://www.sdss.org, provides links to the data, tutorials, examples of data access, and extensive documentation of the reduction and analysis procedures. DR13 is the first of a scheduled set that will contain new data and analyses from the planned ∼6 yr operations of SDSS-IV.

  2. The APACHE survey hardware and software design: Tools for an automatic search of small-size transiting exoplanets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lattanzi M.G.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Small-size ground-based telescopes can effectively be used to look for transiting rocky planets around nearby low-mass M stars using the photometric transit method, as recently demonstrated for example by the MEarth project. Since 2008 at the Astronomical Observatory of the Autonomous Region of Aosta Valley (OAVdA, we have been preparing for the long-term photometric survey APACHE, aimed at finding transiting small-size planets around thousands of nearby early and mid-M dwarfs. APACHE (A PAthway toward the Characterization of Habitable Earths is designed to use an array of five dedicated and identical 40-cm Ritchey-Chretien telescopes and its observations started at the beginning of summer 2012. The main characteristics of the survey final set up and the preliminary results from the first weeks of observations will be discussed.

  3. Detection of attack-targeted scans from the Apache HTTP Server access logs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merve Baş Seyyar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A web application could be visited for different purposes. It is possible for a web site to be visited by a regular user as a normal (natural visit, to be viewed by crawlers, bots, spiders, etc. for indexing purposes, lastly to be exploratory scanned by malicious users prior to an attack. An attack targeted web scan can be viewed as a phase of a potential attack and can lead to more attack detection as compared to traditional detection methods. In this work, we propose a method to detect attack-oriented scans and to distinguish them from other types of visits. In this context, we use access log files of Apache (or ISS web servers and try to determine attack situations through examination of the past data. In addition to web scan detections, we insert a rule set to detect SQL Injection and XSS attacks. Our approach has been applied on sample data sets and results have been analyzed in terms of performance measures to compare our method and other commonly used detection techniques. Furthermore, various tests have been made on log samples from real systems. Lastly, several suggestions about further development have been also discussed.

  4. Cultural Foundations for Ecological Restoration on the White Mountain Apache Reservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Long

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Myths, metaphors, and social norms that facilitate collective action and understanding of restoration dynamics serve as foundations for ecological restoration. The experience of the White Mountain Apache Tribe demonstrates how such cultural foundations can permeate and motivate ecological restoration efforts. Through interviews with tribal cultural advisors and restoration practitioners, we examined how various traditions inform their understanding of restoration processes. Creation stories reveal the time-honored importance and functions of water bodies within the landscape, while place names yield insights into their historical and present conditions. Traditional healing principles and agricultural traditions help guide modern restoration techniques. A metaphor of stability illustrates how restoration practitioners see links among ecological, social, and personal dimensions of health. These views inspire reciprocal relationships focused on caretaking of sites, learning from elders, and passing knowledge on to youths. Woven together, these cultural traditions uphold a system of adaptive management that has withstood the imposition of non-indigenous management schemes in the 20th century, and now provides hope for restoring health and productivity of ecosystems through individual and collective efforts. Although these traditions are adapted to the particular ecosystems of the Tribe, they demonstrate the value of understanding and promoting the diverse cultural foundations of restoration.

  5. The Goddard Integral Field Spectrograph at Apache Point Observatory: Current Status and Progress Towards Photon Counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElwain, Michael W.; Grady, Carol A.; Bally, John; Brinkmann, Jonathan V.; Bubeck, James; Gong, Qian; Hilton, George M.; Ketzeback, William F.; Lindler, Don; Llop Sayson, Jorge; Malatesta, Michael A.; Norton, Timothy; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Rothe, Johannes; Straka, Lorrie; Wilkins, Ashlee N.; Wisniewski, John P.; Woodgate, Bruce E.; York, Donald G.

    2015-01-01

    We present the current status and progress towards photon counting with the Goddard Integral Field Spectrograph (GIFS), a new instrument at the Apache Point Observatory's ARC 3.5m telescope. GIFS is a visible light imager and integral field spectrograph operating from 400-1000 nm over a 2.8' x 2.8' and 14' x 14' field of view, respectively. As an IFS, GIFS obtains over 1000 spectra simultaneously and its data reduction pipeline reconstructs them into an image cube that has 32 x 32 spatial elements and more than 200 spectral channels. The IFS mode can be applied to a wide variety of science programs including exoplanet transit spectroscopy, protostellar jets, the galactic interstellar medium probed by background quasars, Lyman-alpha emission line objects, and spectral imaging of galactic winds. An electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD) detector enables photon counting in the high spectral resolution mode to be demonstrated at the ARC 3.5m in early 2015. The EMCCD work builds upon successful operational and characterization tests that have been conducted in the IFS laboratory at NASA Goddard. GIFS sets out to demonstrate an IFS photon-counting capability on-sky in preparation for future exoplanet direct imaging missions such as the AFTA-Coronagraph, Exo-C, and ATLAST mission concepts. This work is supported by the NASA APRA program under RTOP 10-APRA10-0103.

  6. High performance Spark best practices for scaling and optimizing Apache Spark

    CERN Document Server

    Karau, Holden

    2017-01-01

    Apache Spark is amazing when everything clicks. But if you haven’t seen the performance improvements you expected, or still don’t feel confident enough to use Spark in production, this practical book is for you. Authors Holden Karau and Rachel Warren demonstrate performance optimizations to help your Spark queries run faster and handle larger data sizes, while using fewer resources. Ideal for software engineers, data engineers, developers, and system administrators working with large-scale data applications, this book describes techniques that can reduce data infrastructure costs and developer hours. Not only will you gain a more comprehensive understanding of Spark, you’ll also learn how to make it sing. With this book, you’ll explore: How Spark SQL’s new interfaces improve performance over SQL’s RDD data structure The choice between data joins in Core Spark and Spark SQL Techniques for getting the most out of standard RDD transformations How to work around performance issues i...

  7. The dimensionality of stellar chemical space using spectra from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price-Jones, Natalie; Bovy, Jo

    2018-03-01

    Chemical tagging of stars based on their similar compositions can offer new insights about the star formation and dynamical history of the Milky Way. We investigate the feasibility of identifying groups of stars in chemical space by forgoing the use of model derived abundances in favour of direct analysis of spectra. This facilitates the propagation of measurement uncertainties and does not pre-suppose knowledge of which elements are important for distinguishing stars in chemical space. We use ˜16 000 red giant and red clump H-band spectra from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) and perform polynomial fits to remove trends not due to abundance-ratio variations. Using expectation maximized principal component analysis, we find principal components with high signal in the wavelength regions most important for distinguishing between stars. Different subsamples of red giant and red clump stars are all consistent with needing about 10 principal components to accurately model the spectra above the level of the measurement uncertainties. The dimensionality of stellar chemical space that can be investigated in the H band is therefore ≲10. For APOGEE observations with typical signal-to-noise ratios of 100, the number of chemical space cells within which stars cannot be distinguished is approximately 1010±2 × (5 ± 2)n - 10 with n the number of principal components. This high dimensionality and the fine-grained sampling of chemical space are a promising first step towards chemical tagging based on spectra alone.

  8. FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR A PETROLEUM REFINERY FOR THE JICARILLA APACHE TRIBE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, John D.

    2004-01-01

    A feasibility study for a proposed petroleum refinery for the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation was performed. The available crude oil production was identified and characterized. There is 6,000 barrels per day of crude oil production available for processing in the proposed refinery. The proposed refinery will utilize a lower temperature, smaller crude fractionation unit. It will have a Naphtha Hydrodesulfurizer and Reformer to produce high octane gasoline. The surplus hydrogen from the reformer will be used in a specialized hydrocracker to convert the heavier crude oil fractions to ultra low sulfur gasoline and diesel fuel products. The proposed refinery will produce gasoline, jet fuel, diesel fuel, and a minimal amount of lube oil. The refinery will require about $86,700,000 to construct. It will have net annual pre-tax profit of about $17,000,000. The estimated return on investment is 20%. The feasibility is positive subject to confirmation of long term crude supply. The study also identified procedures for evaluating processing options as a means for American Indian Tribes and Native American Corporations to maximize the value of their crude oil production

  9. Monitor III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisham, D.L.; Lambert, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    Monitor III is a totally portable version of the Monitor I and II systems in use at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) since 1976. The Monitor III system differs from the other systems in that it is capable of operating in any location accessible by truck. Although Monitor III was designed primarily for the handling and disposal of radioactive materials, it is also capable of performing the more sophisticated operations normally performed by the other Monitor systems. The development and operational capabilities of the Monitor remote handling system have been thoroughly reported since 1978. This paper reports on the commissioning of a new system with unique capabilities

  10. Efficient Streaming Mass Spatio-Temporal Vehicle Data Access in Urban Sensor Networks Based on Apache Storm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lianjie; Chen, Nengcheng; Chen, Zeqiang

    2017-04-10

    The efficient data access of streaming vehicle data is the foundation of analyzing, using and mining vehicle data in smart cities, which is an approach to understand traffic environments. However, the number of vehicles in urban cities has grown rapidly, reaching hundreds of thousands in number. Accessing the mass streaming data of vehicles is hard and takes a long time due to limited computation capability and backward modes. We propose an efficient streaming spatio-temporal data access based on Apache Storm (ESDAS) to achieve real-time streaming data access and data cleaning. As a popular streaming data processing tool, Apache Storm can be applied to streaming mass data access and real time data cleaning. By designing the Spout/bolt workflow of topology in ESDAS and by developing the speeding bolt and other bolts, Apache Storm can achieve the prospective aim. In our experiments, Taiyuan BeiDou bus location data is selected as the mass spatio-temporal data source. In the experiments, the data access results with different bolts are shown in map form, and the filtered buses' aggregation forms are different. In terms of performance evaluation, the consumption time in ESDAS for ten thousand records per second for a speeding bolt is approximately 300 milliseconds, and that for MongoDB is approximately 1300 milliseconds. The efficiency of ESDAS is approximately three times higher than that of MongoDB.

  11. Redskins in Bluecoats: A Strategic and Cultural Analysis of General George Crooks Use of Apache Scouts in the Second Apache Campaign, 1882-1886

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    it t t t l f l t ti s , r t . i , lifi t t i i i i t t t ENDNOTES 1 Charles M. Robinson III...t i t e i il t i i I i i i t st f re i . r lifi rit r, i first- ri ce ll ti r lif f r t e ri tr ers t . l i l t

  12. A comparison of Simplified Acute Physiology Score II, Acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparison of Simplified Acute Physiology Score II, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III scoring system in predicting mortality and length of stay at surgical intensive care unit.

  13. Time to Definitive Health-Related Quality of Life Score Deterioration in Patients with Resectable Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treated with FOLFOX4 versus Sequential Dose-Dense FOLFOX7 followed by FOLFIRI: The MIROX Randomized Phase III Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab Hamidou

    Full Text Available We previously showed that a sequential chemotherapy with dose-dense oxaliplatin (FOLFOX7 and irinotecan (FOLFIRI; irinotecan plus 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin is not superior to FOLFOX4 in patients at advanced stage of colorectal cancer with liver metastases. Here we aimed to determine whether time to health-related quality of life (HRQoL score definitive deterioration (TUDD differs by study arm.HRQoL was evaluated using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC QLQ-C30 at baseline and every 4 cycles until the end of the study or death. Functional scale, symptom scale, global health status, and financial difficulties were analyzed. The TUDD was defined as the time interval between randomization and the first decrease in HRQoL score ≥ 5-point with no further improvement in HRQoL score ≥ 5 points or any further HRQoL data. TUDD was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and the long-rank test. Cox regression analyses were used to identify HRQoL items influencing TUDD. Sensitivity analyses were done using a multiple imputation method and different definitions of TUDD.Of the 284 patients, 171 (60.2% completed HRQoL questionnaires. Cox multivariate analysis showed no statistically significant difference in TUDD for most of the QLQ-C30 scales between treatments. Patients with dyspnea and those without symptoms at baseline had a significantly longer TUDD when there was a delay >12 months between diagnosis of the primary tumor and metastases (HR 0.48 [0.26-0.89] and when there was diarrhea (HR 0.59 [0.36-0.96], respectively.This study shows that TUDD does not differ significantly according to type of treatment. The TUDD method produces meaningful longitudinal HRQoL results that may facilitate effective clinical decision making in patients with mCRC.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00268398.

  14. Field studies at the Apache Leap Research Site in support of alternative conceptual models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodhouse, E.G.; Davidson, G.R.; Theis, C.

    1997-08-01

    This is a final technical report for a project of the U.S Nuclear Regulatory Commission (sponsored contract NRC-04-090-51) with the University of Arizona. The contract was an optional extension that was initiated on July 21, 1994 and that expired on May 31, 1995. The project manager was Thomas J. Nicholson, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The objectives of this contract were to examine hypotheses and conceptual models concerning unsaturated flow and transport through fractured rock, and to design and execute confirmatory field and laboratory experiments to test these hypotheses and conceptual models at the Apache Leap Research Site near Superior, Arizona. The results discussed here are products of specific tasks that address a broad spectrum of issues related to flow and transport through fractures. Each chapter in this final report summarizes research related to a specific set of objectives and can be read and interpreted as a separate entity. The tasks include detection and characterization of historical rapid fluid flow through fractured rock and the relationship to perched water systems using environmental isotopic tracers of 3 H and 14 C, fluid- and rock-derived 2343 U/ 238 U measurements, and geophysical data. The water balance in a small watershed at the ALRS demonstrates the methods of acounting for ET, and estimating the quantity of water available for infiltration through fracture networks. Grain density measurements were made for core-sized samples using a newly designed gas pycnometer. The distribution and magnitude of air permeability measurements have been measured in a three-dimensional setting; the subsequent geostatistical analysis is presented. Electronic versions of the data presented here are available from authors; more detailed discussions and analyses are available in technical publications referenced herein, or soon to appear in the professional literature

  15. Field studies at the Apache Leap Research Site in support of alternative conceptual models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodhouse, E.G.; Davidson, G.R.; Theis, C. [eds.] [and others

    1997-08-01

    This is a final technical report for a project of the U.S Nuclear Regulatory Commission (sponsored contract NRC-04-090-51) with the University of Arizona. The contract was an optional extension that was initiated on July 21, 1994 and that expired on May 31, 1995. The project manager was Thomas J. Nicholson, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The objectives of this contract were to examine hypotheses and conceptual models concerning unsaturated flow and transport through fractured rock, and to design and execute confirmatory field and laboratory experiments to test these hypotheses and conceptual models at the Apache Leap Research Site near Superior, Arizona. The results discussed here are products of specific tasks that address a broad spectrum of issues related to flow and transport through fractures. Each chapter in this final report summarizes research related to a specific set of objectives and can be read and interpreted as a separate entity. The tasks include detection and characterization of historical rapid fluid flow through fractured rock and the relationship to perched water systems using environmental isotopic tracers of {sup 3}H and {sup 14}C, fluid- and rock-derived {sup 2343}U/{sup 238}U measurements, and geophysical data. The water balance in a small watershed at the ALRS demonstrates the methods of acounting for ET, and estimating the quantity of water available for infiltration through fracture networks. Grain density measurements were made for core-sized samples using a newly designed gas pycnometer. The distribution and magnitude of air permeability measurements have been measured in a three-dimensional setting; the subsequent geostatistical analysis is presented. Electronic versions of the data presented here are available from authors; more detailed discussions and analyses are available in technical publications referenced herein, or soon to appear in the professional literature.

  16. Temporal Variations of Telluric Water Vapor Absorption at Apache Point Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Blake, Cullen H.; Nidever, David; Halverson, Samuel P.

    2018-01-01

    Time-variable absorption by water vapor in Earth’s atmosphere presents an important source of systematic error for a wide range of ground-based astronomical measurements, particularly at near-infrared wavelengths. We present results from the first study on the temporal and spatial variability of water vapor absorption at Apache Point Observatory (APO). We analyze ∼400,000 high-resolution, near-infrared (H-band) spectra of hot stars collected as calibration data for the APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) survey. We fit for the optical depths of telluric water vapor absorption features in APOGEE spectra and convert these optical depths to Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) using contemporaneous data from a GPS-based PWV monitoring station at APO. Based on simultaneous measurements obtained over a 3° field of view, we estimate that our PWV measurement precision is ±0.11 mm. We explore the statistics of PWV variations over a range of timescales from less than an hour to days. We find that the amplitude of PWV variations within an hour is less than 1 mm for most (96.5%) APOGEE field visits. By considering APOGEE observations that are close in time but separated by large distances on the sky, we find that PWV is homogeneous across the sky at a given epoch, with 90% of measurements taken up to 70° apart within 1.5 hr having ΔPWV < 1.0 mm. Our results can be used to help simulate the impact of water vapor absorption on upcoming surveys at continental observing sites like APO, and also to help plan for simultaneous water vapor metrology that may be carried out in support of upcoming photometric and spectroscopic surveys.

  17. Richard III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Palle Schantz

    2017-01-01

    Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"......Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"...

  18. Common intensive care scoring systems do not outperform age and glasgow coma scale score in predicting mid-term mortality in patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage treated in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallenius, Marika; Skrifvars, Markus B; Reinikainen, Matti; Bendel, Stepani; Raj, Rahul

    2017-10-25

    Intensive care scoring systems are widely used in intensive care units (ICU) around the world for case-mix adjustment in research and benchmarking. The aim of our study was to investigate the usefulness of common intensive care scoring systems in predicting mid-term mortality in patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) treated in intensive care units (ICU). We performed a retrospective observational study including adult patients with spontaneous ICH treated in Finnish ICUs during 2003-2012. We used six-month mortality as the primary outcome of interest. We used logistic regression to customize Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II, Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) for six-month mortality prediction. To assess the usefulness of the scoring systems, we compared their discrimination and calibration with two simpler models consisting of age, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, and premorbid functional status. Totally 3218 patients were included. Overall six-month mortality was 48%. APACHE II and SAPS II outperformed SOFA (area under the receiver operator curve [AUC] 0.83 and 0.84, respectively, vs. 0.73) but did not show any benefit over the simpler models in terms of discrimination (AUC 0.84, p > 0.05 for all models). SAPS II showed satisfactory calibration (p = 0.058 in the Hosmer-Lemeshow test), whereas all other models showed poor calibration (p predictive ability of APACHE II and SAPS II comes from their age and GCS score components. SOFA performed significantly poorer than the other models and is not applicable as a prognostic model for ICH patients. All models displayed poor calibration, highlighting the need for improved prognostic models for ICH patients. The common intensive care scoring systems did not outperform a simpler model based on only age and GCS score. Thus, the use of previous intensive care scoring systems is not warranted in ICH patients.

  19. WAIS-III and WMS-III profiles of mildly to severely brain-injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, D C; Ledbetter, M F; Cohen, N J; Marmor, D; Tulsky, D S

    2000-01-01

    Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III) and Wechsler Memory Scale-III (WMS-III; The Psychological Corporation, 1997) scores of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI, n = 23) to moderate-severe traumatic brain injury (M-S TBI, n = 22) were compared to those of 45 matched normal control patients. WAIS-III results revealed that IQ and index scores of MTBI patients did not significantly differ from those of controls, whereas M-S TBI patients received significantly lower mean scores on all measures. All M-S TBI patients' WMS-III index scores also revealed significantly lower scores in comparison to those of control participants, with the exception of Delayed Auditory Recognition. MTBI patients showed significantly lower mean index scores compared to normal controls on measures of immediate and delayed auditory memory, immediate memory, visual delayed memory, and general memory. Eta-squared analyses revealed that WMS-III visual indexes and WAIS-III processing speed showed particularly large effect sizes. These results suggest that symptomatic MTBI patients obtain some low WMS-III test scores comparable to those of more severely injured patients.

  20. General prognostic scores in outcome prediction for cancer patients admitted to the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopterides, Petros; Liberopoulos, Panayiotis; Ilias, Ioannis; Anthi, Anastasia; Pragkastis, Dimitrios; Tsangaris, Iraklis; Tsaknis, Georgios; Armaganidis, Apostolos; Dimopoulou, Ioanna

    2011-01-01

    Intensivists and nursing staff are often reluctant to admit patients with cancer to the intensive care unit even though these patients' survival rate has improved since the 1980s. To identify factors associated with mortality in cancer patients admitted to the intensive care unit and to assess and compare the effectiveness of 3 general prognostic models: the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II, the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS II), and the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA). A prospective observational cohort study was performed in 2 general intensive care units. Discrimination was assessed by using area under the receiver operating characteristic curves, and calibration was evaluated by using Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit tests. A total of 126 patients were included during a 3-year period. The observed mortality was 46.8%. All 3 general models showed excellent discrimination (area under the curve >0.8) and good calibration (P = .17, .14, and .22 for APACHE II, SAPS II, and SOFA, respectively). However, discrimination was significantly better with APACHE II scores than with SOFA scores (P = .02). Multivariate analyses indicated that independent of the 3 severity-of-illness scores, unfavorable risk factors for mortality included a patient's preadmission performance status, source of admission (internal medicine vs surgery department), and the presence of septic shock, infection, or anemia. Combining SOFA and SAPS II scores with these variables created prognostic models with improved calibration and discrimination. The general prognostic models seem fairly accurate in the prediction of mortality in critically ill cancer patients in the intensive care unit.

  1. Fermilab III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The total ongoing plans for Fermilab are wrapped up in the Fermilab III scheme, centrepiece of which is the proposal for a new Main Injector. The Laboratory has been awarded a $200,000 Illinois grant which will be used to initiate environmental assessment and engineering design of the Main Injector, while a state review panel recommended that the project should also benefit from $2 million of funding

  2. Efficacy of Various Scoring Systems for Predicting the 28-Day Survival Rate among Patients with Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Requiring Emergency Intensive Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihong Feng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to investigate the efficacy of four severity-of-disease scoring systems in predicting the 28-day survival rate among patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD requiring emergency care. Clinical data of patients with AECOPD who required emergency care were recorded over 2 years. APACHE II, SAPS II, SOFA, and MEDS scores were calculated from severity-of-disease indicators recorded at admission and compared between patients who died within 28 days of admission (death group; 46 patients and those who did not (survival group; 336 patients. Compared to the survival group, the death group had a significantly higher GCS score, frequency of comorbidities including hypertension and heart failure, and age (P<0.05 for all. With all four systems, scores of age, gender, renal inadequacy, hypertension, coronary heart disease, heart failure, arrhythmia, anemia, fracture leading to bedridden status, tumor, and the GCS were significantly higher in the death group than the survival group. The prediction efficacy of the APACHE II and SAPS II scores was 88.4%. The survival rates did not differ significantly between APACHE II and SAPS II (P=1.519. Our results may guide triage for early identification of critically ill patients with AECOPD in the emergency department.

  3. Scoring Systems for Outcome Prediction in a Cardiac Surgical Intensive Care Unit: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exarchopoulos, Themistocles; Charitidou, Efstratia; Dedeilias, Panagiotis; Charitos, Christos; Routsi, Christina

    2015-07-01

    Most scoring systems used to predict clinical outcome in critical care were not designed for application in cardiac surgery patients. To compare the predictive ability of the most widely used scoring systems (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation [APACHE] II, Simplified Acute Physiology Score [SAPS] II, and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment [SOFA]) and of 2 specialized systems (European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation [EuroSCORE] II and the cardiac surgery score [CASUS]) for clinical outcome in patients after cardiac surgery. Consecutive patients admitted to a cardiac surgical intensive care unit (CSICU) were prospectively studied. Data on the preoperative condition, intraoperative parameters, and postoperative course were collected. EuroSCORE II, CASUS, and scores from 3 general severity-scoring systems (APACHE II, SAPS II, and SOFA) were calculated on the first postoperative day. Clinical outcome was defined as 30-day mortality and in-hospital morbidity. A total of 150 patients were included. Thirty-day mortality was 6%. CASUS was superior in outcome prediction, both in relation to discrimination (area under curve, 0.89) and calibration (Brier score = 0.043, χ(2) = 2.2, P = .89), followed by EuroSCORE II for 30-day mortality (area under curve, 0.87) and SOFA for morbidity (Spearman ρ= 0.37 and 0.35 for the CSICU length of stay and duration of mechanical ventilation, respectively; Wilcoxon W = 367.5, P = .03 for probability of readmission to CSICU). CASUS can be recommended as the most reliable and beneficial option for benchmarking and risk stratification in cardiac surgery patients. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  4. The Apache Longbow-Hellfire Missile Test at Yuma Proving Ground: Ecological Risk Assessment for Helicopter Overflight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Hargrove, William Walter [ORNL; Suter, Glenn [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    2008-01-01

    A multi-stressor risk assessment was conducted at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, as a demonstration of the Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework. The focus of the assessment was a testing program at Cibola Range, which involved an Apache Longbow helicopter firing Hellfire missiles at moving targets, M60-A1 tanks. This paper focuses on the wildlife risk assessment for the helicopter overflight. The primary stressors were sound and the view of the aircraft. Exposure to desert mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus crooki) was quantified using Air Force sound contour programs NOISEMAP and MR_NMAP, which gave very different results. Slant distance from helicopters to deer was also used as a measure of exposure that integrated risk from sound and view of the aircraft. Exposure-response models for the characterization of effects consisted of behavioral thresholds in sound exposure level or maximum sound level units or slant distance. Available sound thresholds were limited for desert mule deer, but a distribution of slant-distance thresholds was available for ungulates. The risk characterization used a weight-of-evidence approach and concluded that risk to mule deer behavior from the Apache overflight is uncertain, but that no risk to mule deer abundance and reproduction is expected.

  5. Allegheny County Walk Scores

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Walk Score measures the walkability of any address using a patented system developed by the Walk Score company. For each 2010 Census Tract centroid, Walk Score...

  6. [Predictive values of different critical scoring systems for mortality in patients with severe acute respiratory failure supported by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R; Sun, B; Li, X Y; He, H Y; Tang, X; Zhan, Q Y; Tong, Z H

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the predictive values of different critical scoring systems for mortality in patients with severe acute respiratory failure (ARF) supported by venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO). Forty-two patients with severe ARF supported by VV-ECMO were enrolled from November 2009 to July 2015.There were 25 males and 17 females. The mean age was (44±18) years (rang 18-69 years). Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) Ⅱ, Ⅲ, Ⅳ, Simplified Acute Physiology Score Ⅱ (SAPS) Ⅱ, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA), ECMO net, PRedicting dEath for SEvere ARDS on VVECMO (PRESERVE), and Respiratory ECMO Survival Prediction (RESP) scores were collected within 6 hours before VV-ECMO support. The patients were divided into the survivors group (n=17) and the nonsurvivors group (n=25) by survival at 180 d after receiving VV-ECMO. The patient clinical characteristics and aforementioned scoring systems were compared between groups. Scoring systems for predicting prognosis were assessed using the area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to draw the surviving curve, and the survival of the patients was analyzed by the Log-rank test. The risk factors were assessed for prognosis by multiple logistic regression analysis. (1) Positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) 6 hours prior to VV-ECMO support in the survivors group [(9.7±5.0)cmH2O, (1 cmH2O=0.098 kPa)] was lower than that in the nonsurvivors group [(13.2±5.4)cmH2O, t=-2.134, P=0.039]. VV-ECMO combination with continuous renal replacement therapy(CRRT) in the nonsurvivors group (32%) was used more than in the survivors group (6%, χ(2)=4.100, P=0.043). Duration of VV-ECMO support in the nonsurvivors group [(15±13) d] was longer than that in the survivors group [(12±11)d, t=-2.123, P=0.041]. APACHE Ⅱ, APACHE Ⅲ, APACHE Ⅳ, ECMO net, PRESERVE, and RESP scores in the survivors group were superior to the nonsurvivors

  7. Prognostic capability of different liver disease scoring systems for prediction of early mortality after transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt creation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaba, Ron C; Couture, Patrick M; Bui, James T; Knuttinen, M Grace; Walzer, Natasha M; Kallwitz, Eric R; Berkes, Jamie L; Cotler, Scott J

    2013-03-01

    To compare the performance of various liver disease scoring systems in predicting early mortality after transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation. In this single-institution retrospective study, eight scoring systems were used to grade liver disease in 211 patients (male-to-female ratio = 131:80; mean age, 54 y) before TIPS creation from 1999-2011. Scoring systems included bilirubin level, Child-Pugh (CP) score, Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) and Model for End-Stage Liver Disease sodium (MELD-Na) score, Emory score, prognostic index (PI), Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) 2 score, and Bonn TIPS early mortality (BOTEM) score. Medical record review was used to identify 30-day and 90-day clinical outcomes. The relationship of scoring parameters with mortality outcomes was assessed with multivariate analysis, and the relative ability of systems to predict mortality after TIPS creation was evaluated by comparing area under receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curves. TIPS were successfully created for variceal hemorrhage (n = 121), ascites (n = 72), hepatic hydrothorax (n = 15), and portal vein thrombosis (n = 3). All scoring systems had a significant association with 30-day and 90-day mortality (P<.050 in each case) on multivariate analysis. Based on 30-day and 90-day AUROC, MELD (0.878, 0.816) and MELD-Na (0.863, 0.823) scores had the best capability to predict early mortality compared with bilirubin (0.786, 0.749), CP (0.822, 0.771), Emory (0.786, 0.681), PI (0.854, 0.760), APACHE 2 (0.836, 0.735), and BOTEM (0.798, 0.698), with statistical superiority over bilirubin, Emory, and BOTEM scores. Several liver disease scoring systems have prognostic value for early mortality after TIPS creation. MELD and MELD-Na scores most effectively predict survival after TIPS creation. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Inequalities in Open Source Software Development: Analysis of Contributor’s Commits in Apache Software Foundation Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    While researchers are becoming increasingly interested in studying OSS phenomenon, there is still a small number of studies analyzing larger samples of projects investigating the structure of activities among OSS developers. The significant amount of information that has been gathered in the publicly available open-source software repositories and mailing-list archives offers an opportunity to analyze projects structures and participant involvement. In this article, using on commits data from 263 Apache projects repositories (nearly all), we show that although OSS development is often described as collaborative, but it in fact predominantly relies on radically solitary input and individual, non-collaborative contributions. We also show, in the first published study of this magnitude, that the engagement of contributors is based on a power-law distribution. PMID:27096157

  9. The 13th Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Spectroscopic Data from the SDSS-IV Survey Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albareti, Franco D.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Almeida, Andres

    2017-01-01

    The fourth generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) began observations in 2014 July. It pursues three core programs: the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment 2 (APOGEE-2), Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA), and the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Surve...

  10. APOGEE-2: The Second Phase of the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment in SDSS-IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobeck, Jennifer; Majewski, S.; Hearty, F.; Schiavon, R. P.; Holtzman, J. A.; Johnson, J.; Frinchaboy, P. M.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Munoz, R.; Pinsonneault, M. H.; Nidever, D. L.; Zasowski, G.; Garcia Perez, A.; Fabbian, D.; Meza Cofre, A.; Cunha, K. M.; Smith, V. V.; Chiappini, C.; Beers, T. C.; Steinmetz, M.; Anders, F.; Bizyaev, D.; Roman, A.; Fleming, S. W.; Crane, J. D.; SDSS-IV/APOGEE-2 Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The second phase of the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE-2), a part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV (SDSS-IV), will commence operations in 2014. APOGEE-2 represents a significant expansion over APOGEE-1, not only in the size of the stellar sample, but also in the coverage of the sky through observations in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Observations on the 2.5m Sloan Foundation Telescope of the Apache Point Observatory (APOGEE-2N) will continue immediately after the conclusion of APOGEE-1, to be followed by observations with the 2.5m du Pont Telescope of the Las Campanas Observatory (APOGEE-2S) within three years. Over the six-year lifetime of the project, high resolution (R˜22,500), high signal-to-noise (≥100) spectroscopic data in the H-band wavelength regime (1.51-1.69 μm) will be obtained for several hundred thousand stars, more than tripling the total APOGEE-1 sample. Accurate radial velocities and detailed chemical compositions will be generated for target stars in the main Galactic components (bulge, disk, and halo), open/globular clusters, and satellite dwarf galaxies. The spectroscopic follow-up program of Kepler targets with the APOGEE-2N instrument will be continued and expanded. APOGEE-2 will significantly extend and enhance the APOGEE-1 legacy of scientific contributions to understanding the origin and evolution of the elements, the assembly and formation history of galaxies like the Milky Way, and fundamental stellar astrophysics.

  11. Demonstration of the Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework (MERAF): Apache Longbow - Hell Missile Test at Yuma Proving Ground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efroymson, R.A.

    2002-05-09

    This ecological risk assessment for a testing program at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, is a demonstration of the Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework (MERAF; Suter et al. 2001). The demonstration is intended to illustrate how risk assessment guidance concerning-generic military training and testing activities and guidance concerning a specific type of activity (e.g., low-altitude aircraft overflights) may be implemented at a military installation. MERAF was developed with funding from the Strategic Research and Development Program (SERDP) of the Department of Defense. Novel aspects of MERAF include: (1) the assessment of risks from physical stressors using an ecological risk assessment framework, (2) the consideration of contingent or indirect effects of stressors (e.g., population-level effects that are derived from habitat or hydrological changes), (3) the integration of risks associated with different component activities or stressors, (4) the emphasis on quantitative risk estimates and estimates of uncertainty, and (5) the modularity of design, permitting components of the framework to be used in various military risk assessments that include similar activities. The particular subject of this report is the assessment of ecological risks associated with a testing program at Cibola Range of Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona. The program involves an Apache Longbow helicopter firing Hellfire missiles at moving targets, i.e., M60-A1 tanks. Thus, the three component activities of the Apache-Hellfire test were: (1) helicopter overflight, (2) missile firing, and (3) tracked vehicle movement. The demonstration was limited, to two ecological endpoint entities (i.e., potentially susceptible and valued populations or communities): woody desert wash communities and mule deer populations. The core assessment area is composed of about 126 km{sup 2} between the Chocolate and Middle Mountains. The core time of the program is a three-week period, including fourteen days of

  12. Demonstration of the Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework (MERAF): Apache Longbow - Hell Missile Test at Yuma Proving Ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efroymson, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    This ecological risk assessment for a testing program at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, is a demonstration of the Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework (MERAF; Suter et al. 2001). The demonstration is intended to illustrate how risk assessment guidance concerning-generic military training and testing activities and guidance concerning a specific type of activity (e.g., low-altitude aircraft overflights) may be implemented at a military installation. MERAF was developed with funding from the Strategic Research and Development Program (SERDP) of the Department of Defense. Novel aspects of MERAF include: (1) the assessment of risks from physical stressors using an ecological risk assessment framework, (2) the consideration of contingent or indirect effects of stressors (e.g., population-level effects that are derived from habitat or hydrological changes), (3) the integration of risks associated with different component activities or stressors, (4) the emphasis on quantitative risk estimates and estimates of uncertainty, and (5) the modularity of design, permitting components of the framework to be used in various military risk assessments that include similar activities. The particular subject of this report is the assessment of ecological risks associated with a testing program at Cibola Range of Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona. The program involves an Apache Longbow helicopter firing Hellfire missiles at moving targets, i.e., M60-A1 tanks. Thus, the three component activities of the Apache-Hellfire test were: (1) helicopter overflight, (2) missile firing, and (3) tracked vehicle movement. The demonstration was limited, to two ecological endpoint entities (i.e., potentially susceptible and valued populations or communities): woody desert wash communities and mule deer populations. The core assessment area is composed of about 126 km 2 between the Chocolate and Middle Mountains. The core time of the program is a three-week period, including fourteen days of

  13. AND Dy(III)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    userpc

    ACTIVITIES OF Sm(III) AND Dy(III) COMPLEXES WITH SCHIFF BASE DERIVED FROM ... and spectral analysis show that ligand coordinate to the central lanthanide(III)ion by its imine nitrogen, phenolic oxygen and carboxylic oxygen in 1:1 stoichemetry. The complexes were ... instance iron (III) and cobalt (III) complexes.

  14. Global Positioning System III (GPS III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-292 Global Positioning System III ( GPS III) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget Defense...Acquisition Management Information Retrieval (DAMIR) March 23, 2016 16:15:29 UNCLASSIFIED GPS III December 2015 SAR March 23, 2016 16:15:29 UNCLASSIFIED 2...Document OSD - Office of the Secretary of Defense O&S - Operating and Support PAUC - Program Acquisition Unit Cost GPS III December 2015 SAR March 23

  15. South African Scoring System

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-11-18

    Nov 18, 2014 ... suitability of the rapid macroinvertebrate biomonitoring tool (the South African Scoring System) was investigated by determining the ... for 80% (SASS score) and 75% (NOT) of the variation in the regression model. Consequently ... et al., 2012), while settled sediments can alter habitat (Wood and Armitage ...

  16. SCORE - A DESCRIPTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SLACK, CHARLES W.

    REINFORCEMENT AND ROLE-REVERSAL TECHNIQUES ARE USED IN THE SCORE PROJECT, A LOW-COST PROGRAM OF DELINQUENCY PREVENTION FOR HARD-CORE TEENAGE STREET CORNER BOYS. COMMITTED TO THE BELIEF THAT THE BOYS HAVE THE POTENTIAL FOR ETHICAL BEHAVIOR, THE SCORE WORKER FOLLOWS B.F. SKINNER'S THEORY OF OPERANT CONDITIONING AND REINFORCES THE DELINQUENT'S GOOD…

  17. Development and Comparison of Open Source based Web GIS Frameworks on WAMP and Apache Tomcat Web Servers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, S.; Gupta, R. D.

    2014-04-01

    Geographic Information System (GIS) is a tool used for capture, storage, manipulation, query and presentation of spatial data that have applicability in diverse fields. Web GIS has put GIS on Web, that made it available to common public which was earlier used by few elite users. In the present paper, development of Web GIS frameworks has been explained that provide the requisite knowledge for creating Web based GIS applications. Open Source Software (OSS) have been used to develop two Web GIS frameworks. In first Web GIS framework, WAMP server, ALOV, Quantum GIS and MySQL have been used while in second Web GIS framework, Apache Tomcat server, GeoServer, Quantum GIS, PostgreSQL and PostGIS have been used. These two Web GIS frameworks have been critically compared to bring out the suitability of each for a particular application as well as their performance. This will assist users in selecting the most suitable one for a particular Web GIS application.

  18. Data collection and field experiments at the Apache Leap research site. Annual report, May 1995--1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodhouse, E.G. [ed.; Bassett, R.L.; Neuman, S.P.; Chen, G. [and others

    1997-08-01

    This report documents the research performed during the period May 1995-May 1996 for a project of the U.S. Regulatory Commission (sponsored contract NRC-04-090-051) by the University of Arizona. The project manager for this research in Thomas J. Nicholson, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The objectives of this research were to examine hypotheses and test alternative conceptual models concerning unsaturated flow and transport through fractured rock, and to design and execute confirmatory field and laboratory experiments to test these hypotheses and conceptual models at the Apache Leap Research Site near Superior, Arizona. Each chapter in this report summarizes research related to a specific set of objectives and can be read and interpreted as a separate entity. Topics include: crosshole pneumatic and gaseous tracer field and modeling experiments designed to help validate the applicability of contiuum geostatistical and stochastic concepts, theories, models, and scaling relations relevant to unsaturated flow and transport in fractured porous tuffs; use of geochemistry and aquifer testing to evaluate fracture flow and perching mechanisms; investigations of {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U fractionation to evaluate leaching selectivity; and transport and modeling of both conservative and non-conservative tracers.

  19. Data collection and field experiments at the Apache Leap research site. Annual report, May 1995--1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodhouse, E.G.; Bassett, R.L.; Neuman, S.P.; Chen, G.

    1997-08-01

    This report documents the research performed during the period May 1995-May 1996 for a project of the U.S. Regulatory Commission (sponsored contract NRC-04-090-051) by the University of Arizona. The project manager for this research in Thomas J. Nicholson, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The objectives of this research were to examine hypotheses and test alternative conceptual models concerning unsaturated flow and transport through fractured rock, and to design and execute confirmatory field and laboratory experiments to test these hypotheses and conceptual models at the Apache Leap Research Site near Superior, Arizona. Each chapter in this report summarizes research related to a specific set of objectives and can be read and interpreted as a separate entity. Topics include: crosshole pneumatic and gaseous tracer field and modeling experiments designed to help validate the applicability of contiuum geostatistical and stochastic concepts, theories, models, and scaling relations relevant to unsaturated flow and transport in fractured porous tuffs; use of geochemistry and aquifer testing to evaluate fracture flow and perching mechanisms; investigations of 234 U/ 238 U fractionation to evaluate leaching selectivity; and transport and modeling of both conservative and non-conservative tracers

  20. Effect of Climate Conditions on Land Surface Productivity Across the Mojave, Sonoran, and Chihuahua Deserts and Apache Highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. C., Pratima

    Understanding the patterns and relationships between land surface productivity and the climatic condition is essential to predict the impact of climate change. This study aims to understand spatial temporal variability and relationships of land surface productivity using Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and drought indices, mainly Standard Precipitation Index (SPI) and Standard Precipitation Evaporation Index (SPEI) across four ecoregions: Mojave, Sonoran, Apache Highlands and Chihuahua of the Southwest United States. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and land cover data, and Parameter Regression on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) precipitation and temperature data were used for analysis. Using Mann-Kendall, I calculated the trends in annual and seasonal NDVI, SPI and SPEI datasets. I used the Pearson Correlation Coefficients to examine the response of integrated and monthly NDVI values to SPI and SPEI values. The positive and negative trends were found during the annual and monsoon seasons whereas only negative trends were found during the spring season for NDVI, SPI and SPEI values. The relationship between NDVI and coincident and antecedent SPEI values changed significantly by area and season for each of the ecoregions across the east-west seasonal precipitation gradient.

  1. Comparative Study of Load Testing Tools: Apache JMeter, HP LoadRunner, Microsoft Visual Studio (TFS, Siege

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabiya Abbas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Software testing is the process of verifying and validating the user’s requirements. Testing is ongoing process during whole software development. Software testing is characterized into three main types. That is, in Black box testing, user doesn’t know domestic knowledge, internal logics and design of system. In white box testing, Tester knows the domestic logic of code. In Grey box testing, Tester has little bit knowledge about the internal structure and working of the system. It is commonly used in case of Integration testing.Load testing helps us to analyze the performance of the system under heavy load or under Zero load. This is achieved with the help of a Load Testing Tool. The intention for writing this research is to carry out a comparison of four load testing tools i.e. Apache JMeter, LoadRunner, Microsoft Visual Studio (TFS, Siege based on certain criteria  i.e. test scripts generation , result reports, application support, plug-in supports, and cost . The main focus is to study these load testing tools and identify which tool is better and more efficient . We assume this comparison can help in selecting the most appropriate tool and motivates the use of open source load testing tools.

  2. Developing Online Communities with LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) - the IMIA OSNI and CHIRAD Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Peter J; Oyri, Karl

    2005-01-01

    Many health informatics organisations do not seem to use, on a practical basis, for the benefit of their activities and interaction with their members, the very technologies that they often promote for use within healthcare environments. In particular, many organisations seem to be slow to take up the benefits of interactive web technologies. This paper presents an introduction to some of the many free/libre and open source (FLOSS) applications currently available and using the LAMP - Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP architecture - as a way of cheaply deploying reliable, scalable, and secure web applications. The experience of moving to applications using LAMP architecture, in particular that of the Open Source Nursing Informatics (OSNI) Working Group of the Special Interest Group in Nursing Informatics of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA-NI), in using PostNuke, a FLOSS Content Management System (CMS) illustrates many of the benefits of such applications. The experiences of the authors in installing and maintaining a large number of websites using FLOSS CMS to develop dynamic, interactive websites that facilitate real engagement with the members of IMIA-NI OSNI, the IMIA Open Source Working Group, and the Centre for Health Informatics Research and Development (CHIRAD), as well as other organisations, is used as the basis for discussing the potential benefits that could be realised by others within the health informatics community.

  3. The piloting of a culturally centered American Indian family prevention program: a CBPR partnership between Mescalero Apache and the University of New Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Belone, Lorenda; Orosco, Ardena; Damon, Eloise; Smith-McNeal, Willymae; Rae, Rebecca; Sherpa, Mingma L.; Myers, Orrin B.; Omeh, Anslem O.; Wallerstein, Nina

    2017-01-01

    The Mescalero Apache Family Listening Program (MAFLP) is a culturally centered family prevention program with third, fourth, and fifth graders; a parent/caregiver; and a family elder. The program follows a positive youth development model to develop stronger communication and shared cultural practices between elders, parents, and youth in the tribe to reduce substance initiation of use among the youth. The MAFLP was created using a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach in par...

  4. Syncope diagnostic scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of syncope poses unique challenges. Syncope has multiple etiologies, with most carrying benign prognoses, and a few less common causes carrying a risk of serious morbidity or death. The history at first glance carries few clues. Faced with this many patients are heavily investigated with tests known to be both useless and expensive. For these reasons considerable emphasis has been placed on developing evidence-based and quantitative histories that might distinguish among the main causes of syncope. Quantitative histories were first developed in populations of several hundred patients with definite diagnoses of various losses of consciousness. Their derivation and use mirror those of experienced clinicians. The first score - the Calgary Syncope Seizures Score - discriminates between epileptic convulsions and syncope with a sensitivity and specificity of about 94%. The second score, the Calgary Syncope Score for normal hearts, discriminates between vasovagal syncope and other causes of syncope with a sensitivity and specificity of about 90%. The third score, the Calgary Syncope Score for Structural Heart Disease, diagnoses ventricular tachycardia with 98% sensitivity and 71% specificity. It also accurately predicts serious arrhythmic outcomes and all cause death. Gaps in the accuracy of the second score have been identified and are being addressed. These scores are proving useful in the clinic, and as entry criteria for observation studies, genetic studies, and randomized clinical trials. A very simple score predicts vasovagal syncope recurrences, based on the number of faints in the preceding year. Work from several centres indicates that scores will distinguish among competing causes of syncope in select populations, such as those with bifascicular heart block, Brugada syndrome, and Long QT syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Rating the quality of intensive care units: is it a function of the intensive care unit scoring system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glance, Laurent G; Osler, Turner M; Dick, Andrew

    2002-09-01

    Intensive care units (ICUs) use severity-adjusted mortality measures such as the standardized mortality ratio to benchmark their performance. Prognostic scoring systems such as Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II, Simplified Acute Physiology Score II, and Mortality Probability Model II0 permit performance-based comparisons of ICUs by adjusting for severity of disease and case mix. Whether different risk-adjustment methods agree on the identity of ICU quality outliers within a single database has not been previously investigated. The objective of this study was to determine whether the identity of ICU quality outliers depends on the ICU scoring system used to calculate the standardized mortality ratio. Retrospective cohort study of 16,604 patients from 32 hospitals based on the outcomes database (Project IMPACT) created by the Society of Critical Care Medicine. The ICUs were a mixture of medical, surgical, and mixed medical-surgical ICUs in urban and nonurban settings. Standardized mortality ratios for each ICU were calculated using APACHE II, Simplified Acute Physiology Score II, and Mortality Probability Model II. ICU quality outliers were defined as ICUs whose standardized mortality ratio was statistically different from 1. Kappa analysis was used to determine the extent of agreement between the scoring systems on the identity of hospital quality outliers. The intraclass correlation coefficient was calculated to estimate the reliability of standardized mortality ratios obtained using the three risk-adjustment methods. Kappa analysis showed fair to moderate agreement among the three scoring systems in identifying ICU quality outliers; the intraclass correlation coefficient suggested moderate to substantial agreement between the scoring systems. The majority of ICUs were classified as high-performance ICUs by all three scoring systems. All three scoring systems exhibited good discrimination and poor calibration in this data set. APACHE II

  6. Increased Resistin Levels in Intra-abdominal Sepsis: Correlation with proinflammatory cytokines & Acute Physiology & Chronic Health Evaluation II scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonguç U. Yilmaz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Resistin, a hormone secreted from adipocytes and considered to be a likely cause of insulin resistance, has recently been accepted as a proinflammatory cytokine. This study aimed to determine the correlation between resistin levels in patients with intra-abdominal sepsis and mortality. Methods: Of 45 patients with intraabdominal sepsis, a total of 35 adult patients were included in the study. This study was undertaken from December 2011 to December 2012 and included patients who had no history of diabetes mellitus and who were admitted to the general surgery intensive care units of Gazi University and Bülent Ecevit University School of Medicine, Turkey. Evaluations were performed on 12 patients with sepsis, 10 patients with severe sepsis, 13 patients with septic shock and 15 healthy controls. The patients’ plasma resistin, interleukin-6 (IL-6, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β, procalcitonin, lactate and glucose levels and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II scores were studied daily for the first five days after admission. A correlation analysis of serum resistin levels with cytokine levels and APACHE II scores was performed. Results: Serum resistin levels in patients with sepsis were significantly higher than in the healthy controls (P <0.001. A significant correlation was found between serum resistin levels and APACHE II scores, serum IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, procalcitonin, lactate and glucose levels. Furthermore, a significant correlation was found between serum resistin levels and all-cause mortality (P = 0.02. Conclusion: The levels of resistin were significantly positively correlated with the severity of disease and were a possible mediator of a prolonged inflammatory state in patients with intra-abdominal sepsis.

  7. The Bandim tuberculosis score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolf, Frauke; Joaquim, Luis Carlos; Vieira, Cesaltina

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study was carried out in Guinea-Bissau ’ s capital Bissau among inpatients and outpatients attending for tuberculosis (TB) treatment within the study area of the Bandim Health Project, a Health and Demographic Surveillance Site. Our aim was to assess the variability between 2...... physicians in performing the Bandim tuberculosis score (TBscore), a clinical severity score for pulmonary TB (PTB), and to compare it to the Karnofsky performance score (KPS). Method : From December 2008 to July 2009 we assessed the TBscore and the KPS of 100 PTB patients at inclusion in the TB cohort and...

  8. Volleyball Scoring Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, William; Dargahi-Noubary, G. R.; Shi, Yixun

    2002-01-01

    The widespread interest in sports in our culture provides an excellent opportunity to catch students' attention in mathematics and statistics classes. One mathematically interesting aspect of volleyball, which can be used to motivate students, is the scoring system. (MM)

  9. Assessment of PANC3 score in predicting severity of acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avreen Singh Shah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute pancreatitis is inflammatory process of the pancreas associated with local and systemic complications. At present, there are lots of scores (such as Ransons, APACHE II, bedside index for severity in acute pancreatitis that help us in predicting severity at the time of admission but these are time consuming or require complex calculation and are costly. Material and Methods: PANC3 Scoring System is one of the better systems because the three criteria used (hematocrit, body mass index, and pleural effusion are simple, easy to assess, readily available, and economic. In this prospective study, 100 cases were evaluated to see the prospects of PANC3 scoring in predicting the severity of acute pancreatitis as decided by modified Marshals score. Results: The results showed that PANC3 score had a 96.43% specificity, 75% sensitivity, 80% positive predictive value, and 95.29% negative predictive value. Conclusion: Hence, the PANC3 score is a cost-effective, promising score that helps in predicting the severity of acute pancreatitis leading to prompt treatment and early referral to higher center.

  10. OVERVIEW OF THE SDSS-IV MaNGA SURVEY: MAPPING NEARBY GALAXIES AT APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundy, Kevin; Bershady, Matthew A.; Wake, David A.; Tremonti, Christy; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Law, David R.; Cherinka, Brian; Yan, Renbin; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Drory, Niv; MacDonald, Nicholas; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Thomas, Daniel; Masters, Karen; Coccato, Lodovico; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Falcón-Barroso, Jésus; Belfiore, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We present an overview of a new integral field spectroscopic survey called MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory), one of three core programs in the fourth-generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) that began on 2014 July 1. MaNGA will investigate the internal kinematic structure and composition of gas and stars in an unprecedented sample of 10,000 nearby galaxies. We summarize essential characteristics of the instrument and survey design in the context of MaNGA's key science goals and present prototype observations to demonstrate MaNGA's scientific potential. MaNGA employs dithered observations with 17 fiber-bundle integral field units that vary in diameter from 12'' (19 fibers) to 32'' (127 fibers). Two dual-channel spectrographs provide simultaneous wavelength coverage over 3600-10300 Å at R ∼ 2000. With a typical integration time of 3 hr, MaNGA reaches a target r-band signal-to-noise ratio of 4-8 (Å –1 per 2'' fiber) at 23 AB mag arcsec –2 , which is typical for the outskirts of MaNGA galaxies. Targets are selected with M * ≳ 10 9 M ☉ using SDSS-I redshifts and i-band luminosity to achieve uniform radial coverage in terms of the effective radius, an approximately flat distribution in stellar mass, and a sample spanning a wide range of environments. Analysis of our prototype observations demonstrates MaNGA's ability to probe gas ionization, shed light on recent star formation and quenching, enable dynamical modeling, decompose constituent components, and map the composition of stellar populations. MaNGA's spatially resolved spectra will enable an unprecedented study of the astrophysics of nearby galaxies in the coming 6 yr

  11. OVERVIEW OF THE SDSS-IV MaNGA SURVEY: MAPPING NEARBY GALAXIES AT APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bundy, Kevin [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU, WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Bershady, Matthew A.; Wake, David A.; Tremonti, Christy; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Law, David R.; Cherinka, Brian [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H4 (Canada); Yan, Renbin; Sánchez-Gallego, José R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, 505 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40506-0055 (United States); Drory, Niv [McDonald Observatory, Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); MacDonald, Nicholas [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Weijmans, Anne-Marie [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Thomas, Daniel; Masters, Karen; Coccato, Lodovico [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth (United Kingdom); Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Avila-Reese, Vladimir [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-264, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Badenes, Carles [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Pittsburgh Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology Center (PITT PACC), University of Pittsburgh, 3941 OHara St, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Falcón-Barroso, Jésus [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Belfiore, Francesco [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 19 J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); and others

    2015-01-01

    We present an overview of a new integral field spectroscopic survey called MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory), one of three core programs in the fourth-generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) that began on 2014 July 1. MaNGA will investigate the internal kinematic structure and composition of gas and stars in an unprecedented sample of 10,000 nearby galaxies. We summarize essential characteristics of the instrument and survey design in the context of MaNGA's key science goals and present prototype observations to demonstrate MaNGA's scientific potential. MaNGA employs dithered observations with 17 fiber-bundle integral field units that vary in diameter from 12'' (19 fibers) to 32'' (127 fibers). Two dual-channel spectrographs provide simultaneous wavelength coverage over 3600-10300 Å at R ∼ 2000. With a typical integration time of 3 hr, MaNGA reaches a target r-band signal-to-noise ratio of 4-8 (Å{sup –1} per 2'' fiber) at 23 AB mag arcsec{sup –2}, which is typical for the outskirts of MaNGA galaxies. Targets are selected with M {sub *} ≳ 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} using SDSS-I redshifts and i-band luminosity to achieve uniform radial coverage in terms of the effective radius, an approximately flat distribution in stellar mass, and a sample spanning a wide range of environments. Analysis of our prototype observations demonstrates MaNGA's ability to probe gas ionization, shed light on recent star formation and quenching, enable dynamical modeling, decompose constituent components, and map the composition of stellar populations. MaNGA's spatially resolved spectra will enable an unprecedented study of the astrophysics of nearby galaxies in the coming 6 yr.

  12. Interpreting change on the WAIS-III/WMS-III in clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, G L

    2001-02-01

    Clinicians should note that there is considerable variability in the reliabilities of the index and subtest scores derived from the third editions of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III) and the Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS-III). The purpose of this article is to review these reliabilities and to illustrate how they can be used to interpret change in patients' performances from test to retest. The WAIS-III IQ and Index scores are consistently the most reliable scores, in terms of both internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The most internally consistent WAIS-III subtests are Vocabulary, Information, Digit Span, Matrix Reasoning, and Arithmetic. Information and Vocabulary have the highest test-retest reliability. On the WMS-III, the Auditory Immediate Index, Immediate Memory Index, Auditory Delayed Index, and General Memory Index are the most reliable, in terms of both internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The Logical Memory I and Verbal Paired Associates I subtests are the most reliable. Data from three clinical groups (i.e., Alzheimer's disease, chronic alcohol abuse, and schizophrenia) were extracted from the Technical Manual [Psychological Corporation (1997). WAIS-III/WMS-III Technical Manual. San Antonio: Harcourt Brace] for the purpose of calculating reliable change estimates. A table of confidence intervals for test-retest measurement error is provided to help the clinician determine if patients have reliably improved or deteriorated on follow-up testing.

  13. Antithrombin III blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003661.htm Antithrombin III blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... a protein that helps control blood clotting. A blood test can determine the amount of AT III present ...

  14. Instant MuseScore

    CERN Document Server

    Shinn, Maxwell

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. Instant MuseScore is written in an easy-to follow format, packed with illustrations that will help you get started with this music composition software.This book is for musicians who would like to learn how to notate music digitally with MuseScore. Readers should already have some knowledge about musical terminology; however, no prior experience with music notation software is necessary.

  15. Examining the relationship between WAIS-III premorbid intellectual functioning and WMS-III memory ability to evaluate memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Rael T; Chelune, Gordon J

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to extend previous research by Lange and Chelune (2006) by evaluating the clinical utility of GAI-memory discrepancy scores to detect memory impairment using estimated premorbid GAI scores (i.e., GAI-E) rather than obtained GAI scores. Participants were 34 patients with Alzheimer's-type dementia and a sub-sample of 34 demographically matched participants from the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample. GAI-memory discrepancy scores were more effective at differentiating Alzheimer's patients versus healthy controls when using estimated premorbid GAI scores than obtained GAI scores. However, GAI(E)-memory discrepancy scores failed to provide unique interpretive information beyond that which is gained from interpretation of the memory index scores alone. This was most likely due to the prevalence of obvious memory impairment in this patient population. Future research directions are discussed.

  16. Nursing activities score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda, DR; Nap, R; de Rijk, A; Schaufeli, W; Lapichino, G

    Objectives. The instruments used for measuring nursing workload in the intensive care unit (e.g., Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System-28) are based on therapeutic interventions related to severity of illness. Many nursing activities are not necessarily related to severity of illness, and

  17. The Bayesian Score Statistic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleibergen, F.R.; Kleijn, R.; Paap, R.

    2000-01-01

    We propose a novel Bayesian test under a (noninformative) Jeffreys'priorspecification. We check whether the fixed scalar value of the so-calledBayesian Score Statistic (BSS) under the null hypothesis is aplausiblerealization from its known and standardized distribution under thealternative. Unlike

  18. Developing Scoring Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    We developed scoring procedures to convert screener responses to estimates of individual dietary intake for fruits and vegetables, dairy, added sugars, whole grains, fiber, and calcium using the What We Eat in America 24-hour dietary recall data from the 2003-2006 NHANES.

  19. South African Scoring System

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-11-18

    Nov 18, 2014 ... for 80% (SASS score) and 75% (NOT) of the variation in the regression model. Consequently, SASS ... further investigation: spatial analyses of macroinvertebrate assemblages; and the use of structural and functional metrics. Keywords: .... conductivity levels was assessed using multiple linear regres- sion.

  20. Comparison of physician prediction with 2 prognostic scoring systems in predicting 2-year mortality after intensive care admission: a linked-data cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litton, Edward; Ho, Kwok M; Webb, Steven A R

    2012-08-01

    Patients who survive an episode of critical illness continue to experience significant mortality after hospital discharge. This study assessed the accuracy of physician prediction of 2-year mortality and compared it with 2 objective prognostic models. Sensitivity (probability of a prediction of death in patients who died within 2 years) and specificity (probability of a prediction of survival in patients who survived at least 2 years) of physicians' 2-year prediction were compared with those from 2 objective prognostic models, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II and Predicted Risk Existing Disease Intensive Care Therapy (PREDICT). Physician prediction of 2-year mortality was available for 2497 (94.8%) intensive care unit admissions. Specificity was high (85.2%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 83.7-86.4), but sensitivity (65.0%; 95% CI, 61.1-68.8) and positive predictive value (57.4%; 95% CI, 53.6-61.2) were relatively low, suggesting overpessimistic prediction of 2-year mortality. Age, Charlson comorbidity index, and APACHE score were independent risk factors for an inaccurate physician prediction. The diagnostic odds ratio for the physician predictions was at least comparable with the APACHE and PREDICT models, which both had very good discrimination of mortality at 2-year follow-up. Physicians tended to overpredict the risk of 2-year mortality of critically ill patients, but accuracy was comparable with 2 objective prognostic models. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Automated Essay Scoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semire DIKLI

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Automated Essay Scoring Semire DIKLI Florida State University Tallahassee, FL, USA ABSTRACT The impacts of computers on writing have been widely studied for three decades. Even basic computers functions, i.e. word processing, have been of great assistance to writers in modifying their essays. The research on Automated Essay Scoring (AES has revealed that computers have the capacity to function as a more effective cognitive tool (Attali, 2004. AES is defined as the computer technology that evaluates and scores the written prose (Shermis & Barrera, 2002; Shermis & Burstein, 2003; Shermis, Raymat, & Barrera, 2003. Revision and feedback are essential aspects of the writing process. Students need to receive feedback in order to increase their writing quality. However, responding to student papers can be a burden for teachers. Particularly if they have large number of students and if they assign frequent writing assignments, providing individual feedback to student essays might be quite time consuming. AES systems can be very useful because they can provide the student with a score as well as feedback within seconds (Page, 2003. Four types of AES systems, which are widely used by testing companies, universities, and public schools: Project Essay Grader (PEG, Intelligent Essay Assessor (IEA, E-rater, and IntelliMetric. AES is a developing technology. Many AES systems are used to overcome time, cost, and generalizability issues in writing assessment. The accuracy and reliability of these systems have been proven to be high. The search for excellence in machine scoring of essays is continuing and numerous studies are being conducted to improve the effectiveness of the AES systems.

  2. [Severity of disease scoring systems and mortality after non-cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Pedro Videira; Sousa, Gabriela; Lopes, Ana Martins; Costa, Ana Vera; Santos, Alice; Abelha, Fernando José

    2018-04-05

    Mortality after surgery is frequent and severity of disease scoring systems are used for prediction. Our aim was to evaluate predictors for mortality after non-cardiac surgery. Adult patients admitted at our surgical intensive care unit between January 2006 and July 2013 was included. Univariate analysis was carried using Mann-Whitney, Chi-square or Fisher's exact test. Logistic regression was performed to assess independent factors with calculation of odds ratio and 95% confidence interval (95% CI). 4398 patients were included. Mortality was 1.4% in surgical intensive care unit and 7.4% during hospital stay. Independent predictors of mortality in surgical intensive care unit were APACHE II (OR=1.24); emergent surgery (OR=4.10), serum sodium (OR=1.06) and FiO 2 at admission (OR=14.31). Serum bicarbonate at admission (OR=0.89) was considered a protective factor. Independent predictors of hospital mortality were age (OR=1.02), APACHE II (OR=1.09), emergency surgery (OR=1.82), high-risk surgery (OR=1.61), FiO 2 at admission (OR=1.02), postoperative acute renal failure (OR=1.96), heart rate (OR=1.01) and serum sodium (OR=1.04). Dying patients had higher scores in severity of disease scoring systems and longer surgical intensive care unit stay. Some factors influenced both surgical intensive care unit and hospital mortality. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Apache hive essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Dayong

    2015-01-01

    If you are a data analyst, developer, or simply someone who wants to use Hive to explore and analyze data in Hadoop, this is the book for you. Whether you are new to big data or an expert, with this book, you will be able to master both the basic and the advanced features of Hive. Since Hive is an SQL-like language, some previous experience with the SQL language and databases is useful to have a better understanding of this book.

  4. Mastering Apache Maven 3

    CERN Document Server

    Siriwardena, Prabath

    2014-01-01

    If you are working with Java or Java EE projects and you want to take full advantage of Maven in designing, executing, and maintaining your build system for optimal developer productivity, then this book is ideal for you. You should be well versed with Maven and its basic functionality if you wish to get the most out of the book.

  5. Apache SMART Briefing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-01

    Relative States ● Fuzing Range ● Bodying Bending Parameters ● Pressures ● Body Accel. ● Total Impulse ● Detector Material ● Optical Diameter MSC NASTRAN ...Design (IMD) System Boeing (McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Systems) • Rotary Wing Structures Technology Demonstration Program (RWSTDP) • DMAPS  A Suite...Lines Nitrogen Inerting Unit SUBSYSTEMS IN CENTER FUSELAGE Flow Chart Of DMAPS Process Conceptual Layouts Assembly Layouts CLO ALO BTP Objectives 33

  6. Learning Apache Mahout

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwary, Chandramani

    2015-01-01

    If you are a Java developer and want to use Mahout and machine learning to solve Big Data Analytics use cases then this book is for you. Familiarity with shell scripts is assumed but no prior experience is required.

  7. Apache Accumulo for developers

    CERN Document Server

    Halldórsson, Guðmundur Jón

    2013-01-01

    The book will have a tutorial-based approach that will show the readers how to start from scratch with building an Accumulo cluster and learning how to monitor the system and implement aspects such as security.This book is great for developers new to Accumulo, who are looking to get a good grounding in how to use Accumulo. It's assumed that you have an understanding of how Hadoop works, both HDFS and the Map/Reduce. No prior knowledge of ZooKeeper is assumed.

  8. Learning Apache Cassandra

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Mat

    2015-01-01

    If you're an application developer familiar with SQL databases such as MySQL or Postgres, and you want to explore distributed databases such as Cassandra, this is the perfect guide for you. Even if you've never worked with a distributed database before, Cassandra's intuitive programming interface coupled with the step-by-step examples in this book will have you building highly scalable persistence layers for your applications in no time.

  9. Apache Maven dependency management

    CERN Document Server

    Lalou, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    An easy-to-follow, tutorial-based guide with chapters progressing from basic to advanced dependency management.If you are working with Java or Java EE projects and you want to take advantage of Maven dependency management, then this book is ideal for you. This book is also particularly useful if you are a developer or an architect. You should be well versed with Maven and its basic functionalities if you wish to get the most out of this book.

  10. Learning Apache Mahout classification

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    If you are a data scientist who has some experience with the Hadoop ecosystem and machine learning methods and want to try out classification on large datasets using Mahout, this book is ideal for you. Knowledge of Java is essential.

  11. Apache Solr PHP integration

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Jayant

    2013-01-01

    This book is full of step-by-step example-oriented tutorials which will show readers how to integrate Solr in PHP applications using the available libraries, and boost the inherent search facilities that Solr offers.If you are a developer who knows PHP and is interested in integrating search into your applications, this is the book for you. No advanced knowledge of Solr is required. Very basic knowledge of system commands and the command-line interface on both Linux and Windows is required. You should also be familiar with the concept of Web servers.

  12. NeuroPigPen: A Scalable Toolkit for Processing Electrophysiological Signal Data in Neuroscience Applications Using Apache Pig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Satya S.; Wei, Annan; Valdez, Joshua; Wang, Li; Zonjy, Bilal; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Loparo, Kenneth A.; Lhatoo, Samden D.

    2016-01-01

    The recent advances in neurological imaging and sensing technologies have led to rapid increase in the volume, rate of data generation, and variety of neuroscience data. This “neuroscience Big data” represents a significant opportunity for the biomedical research community to design experiments using data with greater timescale, large number of attributes, and statistically significant data size. The results from these new data-driven research techniques can advance our understanding of complex neurological disorders, help model long-term effects of brain injuries, and provide new insights into dynamics of brain networks. However, many existing neuroinformatics data processing and analysis tools were not built to manage large volume of data, which makes it difficult for researchers to effectively leverage this available data to advance their research. We introduce a new toolkit called NeuroPigPen that was developed using Apache Hadoop and Pig data flow language to address the challenges posed by large-scale electrophysiological signal data. NeuroPigPen is a modular toolkit that can process large volumes of electrophysiological signal data, such as Electroencephalogram (EEG), Electrocardiogram (ECG), and blood oxygen levels (SpO2), using a new distributed storage model called Cloudwave Signal Format (CSF) that supports easy partitioning and storage of signal data on commodity hardware. NeuroPigPen was developed with three design principles: (a) Scalability—the ability to efficiently process increasing volumes of data; (b) Adaptability—the toolkit can be deployed across different computing configurations; and (c) Ease of programming—the toolkit can be easily used to compose multi-step data processing pipelines using high-level programming constructs. The NeuroPigPen toolkit was evaluated using 750 GB of electrophysiological signal data over a variety of Hadoop cluster configurations ranging from 3 to 30 Data nodes. The evaluation results demonstrate that

  13. NeuroPigPen: A Scalable Toolkit for Processing Electrophysiological Signal Data in Neuroscience Applications Using Apache Pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Satya S; Wei, Annan; Valdez, Joshua; Wang, Li; Zonjy, Bilal; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Loparo, Kenneth A; Lhatoo, Samden D

    2016-01-01

    The recent advances in neurological imaging and sensing technologies have led to rapid increase in the volume, rate of data generation, and variety of neuroscience data. This "neuroscience Big data" represents a significant opportunity for the biomedical research community to design experiments using data with greater timescale, large number of attributes, and statistically significant data size. The results from these new data-driven research techniques can advance our understanding of complex neurological disorders, help model long-term effects of brain injuries, and provide new insights into dynamics of brain networks. However, many existing neuroinformatics data processing and analysis tools were not built to manage large volume of data, which makes it difficult for researchers to effectively leverage this available data to advance their research. We introduce a new toolkit called NeuroPigPen that was developed using Apache Hadoop and Pig data flow language to address the challenges posed by large-scale electrophysiological signal data. NeuroPigPen is a modular toolkit that can process large volumes of electrophysiological signal data, such as Electroencephalogram (EEG), Electrocardiogram (ECG), and blood oxygen levels (SpO2), using a new distributed storage model called Cloudwave Signal Format (CSF) that supports easy partitioning and storage of signal data on commodity hardware. NeuroPigPen was developed with three design principles: (a) Scalability-the ability to efficiently process increasing volumes of data; (b) Adaptability-the toolkit can be deployed across different computing configurations; and (c) Ease of programming-the toolkit can be easily used to compose multi-step data processing pipelines using high-level programming constructs. The NeuroPigPen toolkit was evaluated using 750 GB of electrophysiological signal data over a variety of Hadoop cluster configurations ranging from 3 to 30 Data nodes. The evaluation results demonstrate that the toolkit

  14. Metallothionein (MT)-III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrasco, J; Giralt, M; Molinero, A

    1999-01-01

    and renamed as MT-III. In this study we have raised polyclonal antibodies in rabbits against recombinant rat MT-III (rMT-III). The sera obtained reacted specifically against recombinant zinc-and cadmium-saturated rMT-III, and did not cross-react with native rat MT-I and MT-II purified from the liver of zinc...... astrocyte migration in vitro, rMT-III promoted migration to a higher extent than MT-I+II. Thus, MT-III could not only affect neuronal sprouting as previously suggested, but also astrocyte function. Finally, MT-III protein levels of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) were, if anything, increased when...

  15. Test of an 0.8-Scale Model of the AH-64 Apache in the NASA Langley Full- Scale Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    available test rigs - the NASA Generalized Rotor Model System (GRMS) and the Navy Hub and Pylon Evaluation Rig (HPER). Computer programs studying the...I, USAAVSCOM TM-87-D-5 V US ARMY AVIATION SYSTEMS COMMAND TEST OF AN 0.8-SCALE MODEL OF THE AH-64 APACHE IN THE NASA LANGLEY FULL-SCALE WIND TUNNEL...I% DTIC TAB [ Unan~nounced %] J st f iaton By- PDistributIon / . . AvnI1qbIlitV C -Idns... Dist l SP cI~o: *5* % , -- 5 ~V . - ~5 \\ .\\% TABLE OF

  16. Visually scoring hirsutism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Bulent O; Bolour, Sheila; Woods, Keslie; Moore, April; Azziz, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Hirsutism is the presence of excess body or facial terminal (coarse) hair growth in females in a male-like pattern, affects 5-15% of women, and is an important sign of underlying androgen excess. Different methods are available for the assessment of hair growth in women. We conducted a literature search and analyzed the published studies that reported methods for the assessment of hair growth. We review the basic physiology of hair growth, the development of methods for visually quantifying hair growth, the comparison of these methods with objective measurements of hair growth, how hirsutism may be defined using a visual scoring method, the influence of race and ethnicity on hirsutism, and the impact of hirsutism in diagnosing androgen excess and polycystic ovary syndrome. Objective methods for the assessment of hair growth including photographic evaluations and microscopic measurements are available but these techniques have limitations for clinical use, including a significant degree of complexity and a high cost. Alternatively, methods for visually scoring or quantifying the amount of terminal body and facial hair growth have been in use since the early 1920s; these methods are semi-quantitative at best and subject to significant inter-observer variability. The most common visual method of scoring the extent of body and facial terminal hair growth in use today is based on a modification of the method originally described by Ferriman and Gallwey in 1961 (i.e. the mFG method). Overall, the mFG scoring method is a useful visual instrument for assessing excess terminal hair growth, and the presence of hirsutism, in women.

  17. Credit scoring methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vojtek, Martin; Kočenda, Evžen

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 56, 3-4 (2006), s. 152-167 ISSN 0015-1920 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA402/05/0931 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : banking sector * credit scoring * discrimination analysis Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 0.190, year: 2006 http://journal.fsv.cuni.cz/storage/1050_s_152_167.pdf

  18. SCIM III (Spinal Cord Independence Measure version III): reliability of assessment by interview and comparison with assessment by observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itzkovich, M; Shefler, H; Front, L; Gur-Pollack, R; Elkayam, K; Bluvshtein, V; Gelernter, I; Catz, A

    2018-01-01

    Psychometric study. The objective of this study was to examine the reliability of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure III (SCIM III) by interview and compare the findings with those of assessment by observation. This study was conducted at Loewenstein Rehabilitation Hospital, Israel. Thirty-five spinal cord lesion (SCL) patients who underwent rehabilitation at Loewenstein Rehabilitation Hospital in Israel were assessed during the last week before discharge with SCIM III by observation and by interview. Nineteen of the patients were also assessed by interview by a third rater to examine inter-rater reliability. Total agreement, kappa, Bland-Altman plots and intraclass correlation (ICC) were used for comparison between interviewers and between interviews and observations. Total agreement between the interviewers' scores and between interviews and observations was low to moderate (kappa coefficient 0.11-0.80). Bland-Altman analysis revealed good agreement, with low mean difference for almost all SCIM III subscales and total scores, between pairs of interviewers (bias -4.15, limits of agreement -22.51 to 14.19, for total score) and between interviews and observations (bias 1.62, limits of agreement -20.55 to 23.81, for total score). ICC coefficients for the SCIM III subscales and total scores were high (0.637-0.916). The findings of this study support the reliability and validity of SCIM III by interview, which appears to be useful for research of SCL patient groups. Individual scoring of SCIM III by interview, however, varied prominently between raters. Therefore, SCIM III by interview should be used with caution for clinical purposes, probably by raters whose scoring deviation, in relation to observation scores, is known.

  19. Performance characteristics of postacute traumatic brain injury patients on the WAIS-III and WMS-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, B N; Fichtenberg, N L; Liethen, P C; Czarnota, M A; Stucky, K

    2001-12-01

    Publication of the third editions of the Wechsler intelligence and memory batteries in 1997 created a need for research identifying Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition/Wechsler Memory Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III/WMS-III) profile patterns associated with neuropathology. The WAIS-III/WMS-III Technical Manual offers data on various diagnostic groups, including traumatic brain injury (TBI). Hawkins (1998) employed Technical Manual data to propose certain diagnostic guidelines. In order to validate the conclusions put forth by Hawkins as they apply to brain injury, we examined WAIS-III and WMS-III profiles in an independent sample of 46 TBI cases. As expected, the WAIS-III Processing Speed Index (PSI) was more sensitive to brain injury than other WAIS-III composites; and specific WAIS-III scores were stronger than certain WMS-III scores. On the other hand, the predicted relationship for WMS-III auditory and visual indexes was not found. The lack of specificity for TBI of the proposed index comparisons confirms the need to validate such hypotheses in independent samples.

  20. The APACHE II measured on patients' discharge from the Intensive Care Unit in the prediction of mortality APACHE II medido en la salida de los pacientes de la Unidad de Terapia Intensiva en la previsión de la mortalidad APACHE II medido na saída dos pacientes da Unidade de Terapia Intensiva na previsão da mortalidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Gonzaga dos Santos Cardoso

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to analyze the performance of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II, measured based on the data from the last 24 hours of hospitalization in ICU, for patients transferred to the wards. METHOD: an observational, prospective and quantitative study using the data from 355 patients admitted to the ICU between January and July 2010, who were transferred to the wards. RESULTS: the discriminatory power of the AII-OUT prognostic index showed a statistically significant area beneath the ROC curve. The mortality observed in the sample was slightly greater than that predicted by the AII-OUT, with a Standardized Mortality Ratio of 1.12. In the calibration curve the linear regression analysis showed the R2 value to be statistically significant. CONCLUSION: the AII-OUT could predict mortality after discharge from ICU, with the observed mortality being slightly greater than that predicted, which shows good discrimination and good calibration. This system was shown to be useful for stratifying the patients at greater risk of death after discharge from ICU. This fact deserves special attention from health professionals, particularly nurses, in managing human and technological resources for this group of patients. OBJETIVO: analizar el desempeño del Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II, medido con base en los datos de la últims 24 horas de internación en la UTI, en los pacientes con transferencia para las enfermerías. MÉTODO: estudio observacional, prospectivo y cuantitativo con datos de 355 pacientes admitidos en la UTI entre enero y julio de 2010 que fueron transferidos para las enfermerías. RESULTADOS: el poder discriminatorio del índice pronóstico AII-SALIDA demostró un área debajo de la curva ROC estadísticamente significativa. La mortalidad observada en la muestra fue discretamente mayor que la prevista por el AII-SALIDA, con una Razón de Mortalidad Estandarizada de 1,12. En la curva de

  1. Maxillofacial trauma scoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, Vaibhav

    2016-07-01

    The changing complexity of maxillofacial fractures in recent years has created a situation where classical systems of classification of maxillofacial injuries fall short of defining trauma particularly that observed with high-velocity collisions where more than one region of the maxillofacial skeleton is affected. Trauma scoring systems designed specifically for the maxillofacial region are aimed to provide a more accurate assessment of the injury, its prognosis, the possible treatment outcomes, economics, length of hospital stay, and triage. The evolution and logic of such systems along with their merits and demerits are discussed. The author also proposes a new system to aid users in quickly and methodically choosing the system best suited to their needs without having to study a plethora of literature available in order to isolate their choice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Convergent validity of MCMI-III clinical syndrome scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Morten; Guldager, Steen; Linneberg, Inger Holm

    2012-06-01

    This study tested the convergent validity of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III) clinical syndrome scales. Cross-sectional survey. Using a sample of 186 substance abusers from one single town referred for assessment, convergent and discriminant validity of the MCMI-III and Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) diagnoses was conducted. Additional measures included the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale and the Beck Anxiety Inventory. A single Axis I factor based on the raw scores correlated adequately with the factor based on the other scales (r= .85), whereas the correlation between the factor based on the MCMI-III baserate scores was somewhat lower (r= .74), but still indicated substantial convergent validity. For individual disorders, area under the curve (AUC) analyses suggested that the convergent validity of the MCMI-III and the MINI was adequate. The raw score scales were superior to the baserate adjusted scores in all but one case. Discriminant validity was good for alcohol and drug dependence, moderate for major depression and delusion, and poor for thought disorder and anxiety. The MCMI-III clinical syndrome scales generally measure the constructs they were intended for. The data did not support that the adjustments used in calculating the baserate scores improved validity. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

  3. Are the MDS-UPDRS-based composite scores clinically applicable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkos, Attila; Kovács, Márton; Aschermann, Zsuzsanna; Harmat, Márk; Janszky, József; Karádi, Kázmér; Kovács, Norbert

    2018-02-28

    The International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society-sponsored UPDRS (MDS-UPDRS) is a powerful clinical outcome measure. To evaluate the feasibility of various MDS-UPDRS-based composite scores and determine their minimal clinically important difference threshold values. Overall, 1,113 paired investigations of 452 patients were reviewed implementing three different techniques simultaneously. Based on the ordinal regression modeling, the MDS-UPDRS II+III, MDS-UPDRS I+II+III, and the total score of MDS-UPDRS are clinically applicable outcome measures. Any improvement greater than 4.9 points or any worsening more than 4.2 points on MDS-UPDRS II+III represent a minimal, yet clinically meaningful, change. In reference to MDS-UPDRS I+II+III, the smallest changes considered clinically relevant were 6.7 and 5.2 points for improvement and deterioration, respectively. The thresholds for the total score of MDS-UPDRS were 7.1 points for improvement and 6.3 points for worsening. Our findings support the application of various MDS-UPDRS-based composite scores. © 2018 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2018 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  4. Credit Scoring Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siana Halim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is generally easier to predict defaults accurately if a large data set (including defaults is available for estimating the prediction model. This puts not only small banks, which tend to have smaller data sets, at disadvantage. It can also pose a problem for large banks that began to collect their own historical data only recently, or banks that recently introduced a new rating system. We used a Bayesian methodology that enables banks with small data sets to improve their default probability. Another advantage of the Bayesian method is that it provides a natural way for dealing with structural differences between a bank’s internal data and additional, external data. In practice, the true scoring function may differ across the data sets, the small internal data set may contain information that is missing in the larger external data set, or the variables in the two data sets are not exactly the same but related. Bayesian method can handle such kind of problem.

  5. Evaluation of the Apache II and the oncologic history, as indicative predictions of mortality in the unit of intensive care of the INC September 1996 -December 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, David O; Gomez, Clara; Martinez, Teresa

    1999-01-01

    They are multiple the indexes of severity that have been carried out to value the predict and the quality of a patient's life, especially when this it enters to the unit of intensive care (UIC); however, the oncologic patient presents particularities in their mobility, that it supposes a different behavior in the results of the Indexes. Presently work is compared the Apache scale and the oncologic history like morbid mortality as predictors in the UCI. 207 patients were included that entered the UCI between September of 1996 and December of 1997. It was a mortality of 29%, the stay of most of this group of patient smaller than 24 hours or bigger than 8 days. To the entrance, 50% of the patients presented superior averages at 15 in the Apache Scale and at the 48 hours, alone 30.4% continued with this value. The patients with hematologic neoplasia presented superior average at 15 in 87%, with a mortality of 63.3% with average between 15 and 24 to the entrance, the risk of dying was 9.8 times but that with inferior average. In the hematologic patient, the risk of dying was 5.7 times but regarding the solid tumors. The system but altered it was the breathing one, with an increase in the risk of dying from 2,8 times for each increment utility in the scale. Contrary to described in the literature, the oncologic diagnoses and the neoplasia statistic they didn't influence in the mortality of the patients

  6. NNDSS - Table III. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table III. Tuberculosis - 2017.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  7. Workshop 96. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    Part III of the proceedings contain 155 contributions in various fields of science and technology including nuclear engineering, environmental science, and biomedical engineering. Out of these, 10 were selected to be inputted in INIS. (P.A.)

  8. Do Test Scores Buy Happiness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluskey, Neal

    2017-01-01

    Since at least the enactment of No Child Left Behind in 2002, standardized test scores have served as the primary measures of public school effectiveness. Yet, such scores fail to measure the ultimate goal of education: maximizing happiness. This exploratory analysis assesses nation level associations between test scores and happiness, controlling…

  9. Differences of wells scores accuracy, caprini scores and padua scores in deep vein thrombosis diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatot, D.; Mardia, A. I.

    2018-03-01

    Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) is the venous thrombus in lower limbs. Diagnosis is by using venography or ultrasound compression. However, these examinations are not available yet in some health facilities. Therefore many scoring systems are developed for the diagnosis of DVT. The scoring method is practical and safe to use in addition to efficacy, and effectiveness in terms of treatment and costs. The existing scoring systems are wells, caprini and padua score. There have been many studies comparing the accuracy of this score but not in Medan. Therefore, we are interested in comparative research of wells, capriniand padua score in Medan.An observational, analytical, case-control study was conducted to perform diagnostic tests on the wells, caprini and padua score to predict the risk of DVT. The study was at H. Adam Malik Hospital in Medan.From a total of 72 subjects, 39 people (54.2%) are men and the mean age are 53.14 years. Wells score, caprini score and padua score has a sensitivity of 80.6%; 61.1%, 50% respectively; specificity of 80.65; 66.7%; 75% respectively, and accuracy of 87.5%; 64.3%; 65.7% respectively.Wells score has better sensitivity, specificity and accuracy than caprini and padua score in diagnosing DVT.

  10. Expression of EGFRvIII in Glioblastoma: Prognostic Significance Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Montano

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII is associated with increased proliferation of glioma cells. However, the impact of EGFRvIII on survival of patients with glioblastoma (GBM has not been definitively established. In the present study, we prospectively evaluated 73 patients with primary GBM treated with surgical resection and standard radio/chemotherapy. The EGFRvIII was assessed by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (PCR, O6-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT promoter methylation was assessed by methylation-specific PCR, and phosphatase and tension homolog (PTEN expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry. In 14 patients of this series, who presented with tumor recurrence, EGFRvIII was determined by real-time PCR. Sensitivity to temozolomide (TMZ was assessed in vitro on GBM neurosphere cell cultures with different patterns of EGFRvIII expression. Age 60 years or younger, preoperative Karnofsky Performance Status score of 70 or higher, recursive partitioning analysis score III and IV, methylated MGMT, and Ki67 index of 20% or less were significantly associated with longer overall survival (OS; P = .0069, P =.0035, P = .0007, P = .0437, and P = .0286, respectively. EGFRvIII identified patients with significantly longer OS (P = .0023 and the association of EGFRvIII/Ki67 of 20% or less, EGFRvIII/normal PTEN, EGFRvIII/methylated MGMT, and EGFRvIII/normal PTEN/methylated MGMT identified subgroups of GBM patients with better prognosis. In recurred GBMs, EGFRvIII expression was approximately two-fold lower than in primary tumors. In vitro, the EGFRvIII-negative GBM neurosphere cells were more resistant to TMZ than the positive ones. In conclusion, in contrast with previous studies, we found that EGFRvIII is associated with prolonged survival of GBM patients treated with surgery and radio/chemotherapy. Depletion of EGFRvIII in recurrent GBMs as well as differential sensitivity to TMZ in vitro indicates that

  11. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.

    1985-07-01

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report

  12. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.D. (ed.)

    1985-07-01

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report.

  13. III-V microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Nougier, JP

    1991-01-01

    As is well known, Silicon widely dominates the market of semiconductor devices and circuits, and in particular is well suited for Ultra Large Scale Integration processes. However, a number of III-V compound semiconductor devices and circuits have recently been built, and the contributions in this volume are devoted to those types of materials, which offer a number of interesting properties. Taking into account the great variety of problems encountered and of their mutual correlations when fabricating a circuit or even a device, most of the aspects of III-V microelectronics, from fundamental p

  14. [Propensity score matching in SPSS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fuqiang; DU, Chunlin; Sun, Menghui; Ning, Bing; Luo, Ying; An, Shengli

    2015-11-01

    To realize propensity score matching in PS Matching module of SPSS and interpret the analysis results. The R software and plug-in that could link with the corresponding versions of SPSS and propensity score matching package were installed. A PS matching module was added in the SPSS interface, and its use was demonstrated with test data. Score estimation and nearest neighbor matching was achieved with the PS matching module, and the results of qualitative and quantitative statistical description and evaluation were presented in the form of a graph matching. Propensity score matching can be accomplished conveniently using SPSS software.

  15. Cobalt(III) complex

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    CO. –. 2 radi- cals with [Co(III)(phendione)2Cl2]Cl (complex) have been studied by electron pulse radiolysis. Time resolved transient absorption spectra for all the four species show two peaks which match with those of phendione anion radical produced by the reaction of e. – aq with phendione. However, there are some ...

  16. Summary of Session III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    This is a summary of the talks presented in Session III ''Simulations of Electron-Cloud Build Up'' of the Mini-Workshop on Electron-Cloud Simulations for Proton and Positron Beams ECLOUD-02, held at CERN, 15-18 April 2002

  17. (Afrique francophone) - Phase III

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Programme de troisième cycle interuniversitaire en économie (Afrique francophone) - Phase III. Les deux premières phases du projet ... L'Initiative des conseils subventionnaires de la recherche scientifique en Afrique subsaharienne remporte le prix de la diplomatie scientifique. L'Initiative des conseils subventionnaires de ...

  18. The sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score is an effective triage marker following staggered paracetamol (acetaminophen) overdose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, D G; Zafar, S; Reid, T W D J; Martin, K G; Davidson, J S; Hayes, P C; Simpson, K J

    2012-06-01

    The sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score is an effective triage marker following single time point paracetamol (acetaminophen) overdose, but has not been evaluated following staggered (multiple supratherapeutic doses over >8 h, resulting in cumulative dose of >4 g/day) overdoses. To evaluate the prognostic accuracy of the SOFA score following staggered paracetamol overdose. Time-course analysis of 50 staggered paracetamol overdoses admitted to a tertiary liver centre. Individual timed laboratory samples were correlated with corresponding clinical parameters and the daily SOFA scores were calculated. A total of 39/50 (78%) patients developed hepatic encephalopathy. The area under the SOFA receiver operator characteristic for death/liver transplantation was 87.4 (95% CI 73.2-95.7), 94.3 (95% CI 82.5-99.1), and 98.4 (95% CI 84.3-100.0) at 0, 24 and 48 h, respectively, postadmission. A SOFA score of paracetamol overdose, is associated with a good prognosis. Both the SOFA and APACHE II scores could improve triage of high-risk staggered paracetamol overdose patients. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. D-score: a search engine independent MD-score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaudel, Marc; Breiter, Daniela; Beck, Florian; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Martens, Lennart; Zahedi, René P

    2013-03-01

    While peptides carrying PTMs are routinely identified in gel-free MS, the localization of the PTMs onto the peptide sequences remains challenging. Search engine scores of secondary peptide matches have been used in different approaches in order to infer the quality of site inference, by penalizing the localization whenever the search engine similarly scored two candidate peptides with different site assignments. In the present work, we show how the estimation of posterior error probabilities for peptide candidates allows the estimation of a PTM score called the D-score, for multiple search engine studies. We demonstrate the applicability of this score to three popular search engines: Mascot, OMSSA, and X!Tandem, and evaluate its performance using an already published high resolution data set of synthetic phosphopeptides. For those peptides with phosphorylation site inference uncertainty, the number of spectrum matches with correctly localized phosphorylation increased by up to 25.7% when compared to using Mascot alone, although the actual increase depended on the fragmentation method used. Since this method relies only on search engine scores, it can be readily applied to the scoring of the localization of virtually any modification at no additional experimental or in silico cost. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Quadratic prediction of factor scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wansbeek, T

    1999-01-01

    Factor scores are naturally predicted by means of their conditional expectation given the indicators y. Under normality this expectation is linear in y but in general it is an unknown function of y. II is discussed that under nonnormality factor scores can be more precisely predicted by a quadratic

  1. Peer Scores for Group Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, Linda; Malone, Virginia

    1992-01-01

    Explains how peer scores can be used to constitute one part of students' grades on group projects. Contributions students make to a project are defined in four categories: creativity/ideas contributed, research/data collection, writing/typing/artwork, and organizing/collating. A scoring rubric for these categories is presented. (PR)

  2. Matching score based face recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, B.J.; Beumer, G.M.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    2006-01-01

    Accurate face registration is of vital importance to the performance of a face recognition algorithm. We propose a new method: matching score based face registration, which searches for optimal alignment by maximizing the matching score output of a classifier as a function of the different

  3. The Machine Scoring of Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurry, Doug

    2010-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to the kind of computer software that is used to score student writing in some high stakes testing programs, and that is being promoted as a teaching and learning tool to schools. It sketches the state of play with machines for the scoring of writing, and describes how these machines work and what they do.…

  4. The Effect of Age-Correction on IQ Scores among School-Aged Children Born Preterm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Rachel M.; George, Wing Man; Cole, Carolyn; Marshall, Peter; Ellison, Vanessa; Fabel, Helen

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effect of age-correction on IQ scores among preterm school-aged children. Data from the Flinders Medical Centre Neonatal Unit Follow-up Program for 81 children aged five years and assessed with the WPPSI-III, and 177 children aged eight years and assessed with the WISC-IV, were analysed. Corrected IQ scores were…

  5. High-Throughput Scoring of Seed Germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligterink, Wilco; Hilhorst, Henk W M

    2017-01-01

    High-throughput analysis of seed germination for phenotyping large genetic populations or mutant collections is very labor intensive and would highly benefit from an automated setup. Although very often used, the total germination percentage after a nominated period of time is not very informative as it lacks information about start, rate, and uniformity of germination, which are highly indicative of such traits as dormancy, stress tolerance, and seed longevity. The calculation of cumulative germination curves requires information about germination percentage at various time points. We developed the GERMINATOR package: a simple, highly cost-efficient, and flexible procedure for high-throughput automatic scoring and evaluation of germination that can be implemented without the use of complex robotics. The GERMINATOR package contains three modules: (I) design of experimental setup with various options to replicate and randomize samples; (II) automatic scoring of germination based on the color contrast between the protruding radicle and seed coat on a single image; and (III) curve fitting of cumulative germination data and the extraction, recap, and visualization of the various germination parameters. GERMINATOR is a freely available package that allows the monitoring and analysis of several thousands of germination tests, several times a day by a single person.

  6. Mesospheric Temperatures over Apache Point Observatory (32°N, 105°W Derived from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawon Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We retrieved rotational temperatures from emission lines of the OH airglow (8-3 band in the sky spectra of the Sloan digital sky survey (SDSS for the period 2000-2014, as part of the astronomical observation project conducted at the Apache Point observatory (32°N, 105°W. The SDSS temperatures show a typical seasonal variation of mesospheric temperature: low in summer and high in winter. We find that the temperatures respond to solar activity by as much as 1.2 K ±0.8 K per 100 solar flux units, which is consistent with other studies in mid-latitude regions. After the seasonal variation and solar response were subtracted, the SDSS temperature is fairly constant over the 15 year period, unlike cooling trends suggested by some studies. This temperature analysis using SDSS spectra is a unique contribution to the global monitoring of climate change because the SDSS project was established for astronomical purposes and is independent from climate studies. The SDSS temperatures are also compared with mesospheric temperatures measured by the microwave limb sounder (MLS instrument on board the Aura satellite and the differences are discussed.

  7. Subsurface Analysis of the Mesaverde Group on and near the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New Mexico-its implication on Sites of Oil and Gas Accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridgley, Jennie

    2001-08-21

    The purpose of the phase 2 Mesaverde study part of the Department of Energy funded project ''Analysis of oil-bearing Cretaceous Sandstone Hydrocarbon Reservoirs, exclusive of the Dakota Sandstone, on the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New Mexico'' was to define the facies of the oil-producing units within the subsurface units of the Mesaverde Group and integrate these results with outcrop studies that defined the depositional environments of these facies within a sequence stratigraphic context. The focus of this report will center on (1) integration of subsurface correlations with outcrop correlations of components of the Mesaverde, (2) application of the sequence stratigraphic model determined in the phase one study to these correlations, (3) determination of the facies distribution of the Mesaverde Group and their relationship to sites of oil and gas accumulation, (4) evaluation of the thermal maturity and potential source rocks for oil and gas in the Mesaverde Group, and (5) evaluation of the structural features on the Reservation as they may control sites of oil accumulation.

  8. Mark III spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, D.; Bernstein, J.; Bunnell, K.; Burgueno, G.; Cassell, R.; Collins, B.; Coward, D.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisele, R.; Haber, B.

    1984-10-01

    This paper describes the design, construction and performance of the Mark III, a new general purpose large solid angle spectrometer at SPEAR, the SLAC 2-8 GeV e/sup +/e storage ring. The detector has been designed for the study of exclusive final states in e/sup +/e annihilation, which requires large solid angle coverage combined with charged particle momentum resolution, particle identification, and photon detection efficiency at low energies. (orig.).

  9. Mark III spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, D.; Bernstein, J.; Bunnell, K.; Burgueno, G.; Cassell, R.; Collins, B.; Coward, D.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisele, R.; Haber, B. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, CA (USA))

    1984-10-01

    This paper describes the design, construction and performance of the Mark III, a new general purpose large solid angle spectrometer at SPEAR, the SLAC 2-8 GeV e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring. The detector has been designed for the study of exclusive final states in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, which requires large solid angle coverage combined with charged particle momentum resolution, particle identification, and photon detection efficiency at low energies.

  10. Calculus III essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Calculus III includes vector analysis, real valued functions, partial differentiation, multiple integrations, vector fields, and infinite series.

  11. Cobalt(III) complex

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    e, 40 µM complex, 10 hrs after dissolution, f, 40 µM complex, after irradiation dose 15 Gy. and H-atoms result in reduction of Co(III) to Co. (II). 6. It is interesting to see in complex containing multiple ligands what is the fate of electron adduct species formed by electron addition. Reduction to. Co(II) and intramolecular transfer ...

  12. Hubungan Derajat Skor CURB-65 Saat Awal Masuk dan Nilai Antitrombin III pada Pasien Pneumonia Komunitas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sari Andriyani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of the level of severity in patients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP is very important to determine the next steps in the disease management. Antithrombin III (AT-III is known as one of the coagulation biomarkers that may be useful for predicting the severity of CAP at early admission in hospital. The AT-III is known to be used in diagnosis to help clinicians decide the antibiotic treatment to be given and to make prognosis. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine the correlation between confusion, urea, respiratory rate, blood pressure, age >65 years (CURB-65 score and AT-III in CAP patients at early admission in hospital. The method of study . The data were collected in Adam Malik Hospital from February to March 2013. CAP subjects were examined with CURB-65 score, AT-III, other laboratory assessments, sputum, and blood cultures at the early admission in the emergency room and outpatient clinic. The CURB-65 score was correlated with AT-III to determine the prognostic use of AT-III. A total of CAP 55 subjects were assessed with 23 subjects (42% with severe CURB-65 scores (3–5, 17 subjects (31% with moderate scores (2 , and15 subjects (27% with mild scores (0–1. A significant correlation between CURB-65 and AT-III was found through the use of Spearman correlation test (p=0.0001. In conclusion, AT-III is a coagulation biomarker that correlates with the CURB-65 clinical scoring system. AT-III can be used to determine the prognosis in CAP at early admission in hospital.

  13. From Rasch scores to regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Karl Bang

    2006-01-01

    Rasch models provide a framework for measurement and modelling latent variables. Having measured a latent variable in a population a comparison of groups will often be of interest. For this purpose the use of observed raw scores will often be inadequate because these lack interval scale propertie....... This paper compares two approaches to group comparison: linear regression models using estimated person locations as outcome variables and latent regression models based on the distribution of the score....

  14. Can score databanks help teaching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mendonça, Vitor Rosa Ramos; Andrade, Bruno Bezerril; Almeida, Alessandro; Barral-Netto, Manoel

    2011-01-05

    Basic courses in most medical schools assess students' performance by conferring scores. The objective of this work is to use a large score databank for the early identification of students with low performance and to identify course trends based on the mean of students' grades. We studied scores from 2,398 medical students registered in courses over a period of 10 years. Students in the first semester were grouped into those whose ratings remained in the lower quartile in two or more courses (low-performance) and students who had up to one course in the lower quartile (high-performance). ROC curves were built, aimed at the identification of a cut-off average score in the first semesters that would be able to predict low performances in future semesters. Moreover, to follow the long-term pattern of each course, the mean of all scores conferred in a semester was compared to the overall course mean obtained by averaging 10 years of data. Individuals in the low-performance group had a higher risk of being in the lower quartile of at least one course in the second semester (relative risk 3.907; 95% CI: 3.378-4.519) and in the eighth semester (relative risk 2.873; 95% CI: 2.495-3.308). The prediction analysis revealed that an average score of 7.188 in the first semester could identify students that presented scores below the lower quartiles in both the second and eighth semesters (pstudents with low performance may be useful in promoting pedagogical strategies for these individuals. Evaluation of the time trend of scores conferred by courses may help departments monitoring changes in personnel and methodology that may affect a student's performance.

  15. Supplementary WMS-III tables for determining primary subtest strengths and weaknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J J; Arb, J D; Ament, P A

    2000-06-01

    It is common practice to evaluate the age-adjusted subtest scores from the Wechsler intelligence scales to determine strengths and weaknesses within a profile. The Wechsler Memory Scale-III (WMS-III; D. Wechsler, 1997a) represents a significant improvement over its predecessors and, for the first time, provides age-adjusted subtest scores for interpretation, just as the Wechsler intelligence scales have done for 60 years. It is reasonable to assume that examiners will evaluate the WMS-III subtest profiles for strengths and weaknesses. However, the WMS-III Administration and Scoring Manual and the WAIS-III-WMS-III Technical Manual (The Psychological Corporation, 1997) provide no assistance for accomplishing this goal. Data from the WMS-III standardization sample, as described in the WAIS-III-WMS-III Technical Manual, were used to develop tables for determining both confidence levels and infrequency of differences between individual subtest scores and the means of 5 subtest combinations that may be clinically relevant for individual cases.

  16. Determining reliable cognitive change after epilepsy surgery: development of reliable change indices and standardized regression-based change norms for the WMS-III and WAIS-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roy; Sawrie, Stephen; Gilliam, Frank; Mackey, Melissa; Faught, Edward; Knowlton, Robert; Kuzniekcy, Ruben

    2002-12-01

    Reliable change indices (RCIs) and standardized regression-based (SRB) change scores norms were established for the recently revised Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III) and Wechsler Memory Scale-III (WMS-III) in patients with complex partial seizures. Establishment of such standardized change scores can be useful in determining the effects of epilepsy surgery on cognitive functioning independent of test-retest artifacts including practice effects. Forty-two nonoperated-on adult patients with complex partial seizures (primarily of temporal lobe onset) were administered the WMS-III and WAIS-III on two occasions (mean 7-month interval). All patients were receiving stable antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment at both testings. RCI and SRB change scores were calculated. Confidence interval cutoff scores (90% and 80%) and standardized regression equations were calculated for each of the WAIS-III and WMS-III Primary Indices and individual subtests. Age, gender, education, test-retest interval, preoperative test performance, seizure onset, and seizure duration were predictor variables for the SRB equations. Test-retest reliabilities for the WAIS-III and WMS-III Primary Indices were within acceptable ranges, although considerable individual subtest variability was found. Preoperative performance was the single largest contributor to each of the predictive regression equations. Age, gender, education, seizure onset, and seizure duration contributed modest variance to several of the regression equations. We calculated both RCI and SRB change score indices for the recently revised Wechsler instruments. These formulas help control for test-retest methodologic artifacts and provide a standardized method with which to examine both individual and group level cognitive change after epilepsy surgery.

  17. MMPI profile of DSM-III borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, S; Pitts, W M; Goodpaster, W A; Sajadi, C; Gustin, Q

    1982-08-01

    The authors compared the MMPI profile of 26 patients with DSM-III borderline personality disorder with than of 19 patients with dysthymic disorder. The clinical scales on which the borderline patients scored highest were psychasthenia and schizophrenia, but discriminant function analyses indicated that the L and F validity scales provided the model that best discriminated between the borderline and dysthymic groups.

  18. Location, Reprocessing, and Analysis of Two Dimensional Seismic Reflection Data on the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New Mexico, Final Report, September 1, 1997-February 1, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridgley, Jennie; Taylor, David J.; Huffman, Jr., A. Curtis

    2000-06-08

    Multichannel surface seismic reflection data recording is a standard industry tool used to examine various aspects of geology, especially the stratigraphic characteristics and structural style of sedimentary formations in the subsurface. With the help of the Jicarilla Apache Tribe and the Bureau of Indian Affairs we were able to locate over 800 kilometers (500 miles) of multichannel seismic reflection data located on the Jicarilla Apache Indian reservation. Most of the data was received in hardcopy form, but there were data sets where either the demultiplexed digital field data or the processed data accompanied the hardcopy sections. The seismic data was acquired from the mid 1960's to the early 1990's. The most extensive seismic coverage is in the southern part of the reservation, although there are two good surveys located on the northeastern and northwestern parts of the reservation. Most of the data show that subsurface formations are generally flat-lying in the southern and western portion of the reservation. There is, however, a significant amount of structure imaged on seismic data located over the San Juan Basin margin along the east-central and northern part of the reservation. Several west to east trending lines in these areas show a highly faulted monoclinal structure from the deep basin in the west up onto the basin margin to the east. Hydrocarbon exploration in flat lying formations is mostly stratigraphic in nature. Where there is structure in the subsurface and indications are that rocks have been folded, faulted, and fractured, exploration has concentrated on structural traps and porosity/permeability "sweet spots" caused by fracturing. Therefore, an understanding of the tectonics influencing the entire section is critical in understanding mechanisms for generating faults and fractures in the Cretaceous. It is apparent that much of the hydrocarbon production on the reservation is from fracture porosity in either source or reservoir

  19. The international INTRAVAL project. Phase 2, working group 1 report. Flow and tracer experiments in unsaturated tuff and soil. Las Cruces trench and Apache Leap tuff studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, T.J.; Guzman-Guzman, A.; Hills, R.; Rasmussen, T.C.

    1997-01-01

    The Working Group 1 final report summaries two test case studies, the Las Cruces Trench (LCT), and Apache Leap Tuff Site (ALTS) experiments. The objectives of these two field studies were to evaluate models for water flow and contaminant transport in unsaturated, heterogeneous soils and fractured tuff. The LCT experiments were specifically designed to test various deterministic and stochastic models of water flow and solute transport in heterogeneous, unsaturated soils. Experimental data from the first tow LCT experiments, and detailed field characterisation studies provided information for developing and calibrating the models. Experimental results from the third experiment were held confidential from the modellers, and were used for model comparison. Comparative analyses included: point comparisons of water content; predicted mean behavior for water flow; point comparisons of solute concentrations; and predicted mean behavior for tritium transport. These analyses indicated that no model, whether uniform or heterogeneous, proved superior. Since the INTRAVAL study, however, a new method has been developed for conditioning the hydraulic properties used for flow and transport modelling based on the initial field-measured water content distributions and a set of scale-mean hydraulic parameters. Very good matches between the observed and simulated flow and transport behavior were obtained using the conditioning procedure, without model calibration. The ALTS experiments were designed to evaluate characterisation methods and their associated conceptual models for coupled matrix-fracture continua over a range of scales (i.e., 2.5 centimeter rock samples; 10 centimeter cores; 1 meter block; and 30 meter boreholes). Within these spatial scales, laboratory and field tests were conducted for estimating pneumatic, thermal, hydraulic, and transport property values for different conceptual models. The analyses included testing of current conceptual, mathematical and physical

  20. The Apache Longbow-Hellfire Missile Test at Yuma Proving Ground: Ecological Risk Assessment for Tracked Vehicle Movement across Desert Pavement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, Mark J; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann; Hargrove, William Walter

    2008-01-01

    A multiple stressor risk assessment was conducted at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, as a demonstration of the Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework. The focus was a testing program at Cibola Range, which involved an Apache Longbow helicopter firing Hellfire missiles at moving targets, M60-A1 tanks. This paper describes the ecological risk assessment for the tracked vehicle movement component of the testing program. The principal stressor associated with tracked vehicle movement was soil disturbance, and a resulting, secondary stressor was hydrological change. Water loss to washes and wash vegetation was expected to result from increased infiltration and/or evaporation associated with disturbances to desert pavement. The simulated exposure of wash vegetation to water loss was quantified using estimates of exposed land area from a digital ortho quarter quad aerial photo and field observations, a 30 30 m digital elevation model, the flow accumulation feature of ESRI ArcInfo, and a two-step process in which runoff was estimated from direct precipitation to a land area and from water that flowed from upgradient to a land area. In all simulated scenarios, absolute water loss decreased with distance from the disturbance, downgradient in the washes; however, percentage water loss was greatest in land areas immediately downgradient of a disturbance. Potential effects on growth and survival of wash trees were quantified by using an empirical relationship derived from a local unpublished study of water infiltration rates. The risk characterization concluded that neither risk to wash vegetation growth or survival nor risk to mule deer abundance and reproduction was expected. The risk characterization was negative for both the incremental risk of the test program and the combination of the test and pretest disturbances

  1. Assessing PTSD with the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, R J; Olson, R

    1997-12-01

    We studied the utility of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III) in assessing substance-abusing (n = 228), combat-related PTSD patients (n = 32). The MCMI-III produced a code type (16A) that was quite different from MCMI-I and MCMI-II code types (8A2) among similar populations. The PTSD Scale (R) successfully differentiated between a PTSD and non-PTSD substance-abusing group using mean Base Rate scores, was the best predictor of PTSD in a multiple regression equation, and the scale's sensitivity and specificity in detecting and/or ruling out the disorder was above that provided by chance alone and higher than the values reported in the test manual for that scale. The MCMI-III may be used as a broad band screening instrument for PTSD, at least among patients with combat-related stress.

  2. From Rasch scores to regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Karl Bang

    2006-01-01

    Rasch models provide a framework for measurement and modelling latent variables. Having measured a latent variable in a population a comparison of groups will often be of interest. For this purpose the use of observed raw scores will often be inadequate because these lack interval scale propertie...

  3. Developing Scoring Algorithms (Earlier Methods)

    Science.gov (United States)

    We developed scoring procedures to convert screener responses to estimates of individual dietary intake for fruits and vegetables, dairy, added sugars, whole grains, fiber, and calcium using the What We Eat in America 24-hour dietary recall data from the 2003-2006 NHANES.

  4. Statistical methodology for age-adjustment of the GH-2000 score detecting growth hormone misuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dankmar Böhning

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The GH-2000 score has been developed as a powerful and unique technique for the detection of growth hormone misuse by sportsmen and women. The score depends upon the measurement of two growth hormone (GH sensitive markers, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I and the amino-terminal pro-peptide of type III collagen (P-III-NP. With the collection and establishment of an increasingly large database it has become apparent that the score shows a positive age effect in the male athlete population, which could potentially place older male athletes at a disadvantage. Methods We have used results from residual analysis of the general linear model to show that the residual of the GH-2000 score when regressed on the mean-age centred age is an appropriate way to proceed to correct this bias. As six GH-2000 scores are possible depending on the assays used for determining IGF-I and P-III-NP, methodology had to be explored for including six different age effects into a unique residual. Meta-analytic techniques have been utilized to find a summary age effect. Results The age-adjusted GH-2000 score, a form of residual, has similar mean and variance as the original GH-2000 score and, hence, the developed decision limits show negligible change when compared to the decision limits based on the original score. We also show that any further scale-transformation will not change the adjusted score. Hence the suggested adjustment is optimal for the given data. The summary age effect is homogeneous across the six scores, and so the generic adjustment of the GH-2000 score formula is justified. Conclusions A final revised GH-2000 score formula is provided which is independent of the age of the athlete under consideration.

  5. Statistical methodology for age-adjustment of the GH-2000 score detecting growth hormone misuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhning, Dankmar; Böhning, Walailuck; Guha, Nishan; Cowan, David A; Sönksen, Peter H; Holt, Richard I G

    2016-10-28

    The GH-2000 score has been developed as a powerful and unique technique for the detection of growth hormone misuse by sportsmen and women. The score depends upon the measurement of two growth hormone (GH) sensitive markers, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and the amino-terminal pro-peptide of type III collagen (P-III-NP). With the collection and establishment of an increasingly large database it has become apparent that the score shows a positive age effect in the male athlete population, which could potentially place older male athletes at a disadvantage. We have used results from residual analysis of the general linear model to show that the residual of the GH-2000 score when regressed on the mean-age centred age is an appropriate way to proceed to correct this bias. As six GH-2000 scores are possible depending on the assays used for determining IGF-I and P-III-NP, methodology had to be explored for including six different age effects into a unique residual. Meta-analytic techniques have been utilized to find a summary age effect. The age-adjusted GH-2000 score, a form of residual, has similar mean and variance as the original GH-2000 score and, hence, the developed decision limits show negligible change when compared to the decision limits based on the original score. We also show that any further scale-transformation will not change the adjusted score. Hence the suggested adjustment is optimal for the given data. The summary age effect is homogeneous across the six scores, and so the generic adjustment of the GH-2000 score formula is justified. A final revised GH-2000 score formula is provided which is independent of the age of the athlete under consideration.

  6. Re-Scoring the Game’s Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gasselseder, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    This study explores immersive presence as well as emotional valence and arousal in the context of dynamic and non-dynamic music scores in the 3rd person action-adventure video game genre while also considering relevant personality traits of the player. 60 subjects answered self-report questionnai......This study explores immersive presence as well as emotional valence and arousal in the context of dynamic and non-dynamic music scores in the 3rd person action-adventure video game genre while also considering relevant personality traits of the player. 60 subjects answered self......-report questionnaires of experiential states each time after playing the game 'Batman: Arkham City' in one of three randomized conditions accounting for [1] dynamic music, [2] non-dynamic music/low arousal potential and [3] non-dynamic music/high arousal potential, aiming to manipulate emotional arousal and structural......-temporal alignment in the resulting emotional congruency of nondiegetic music. Whereas imaginary aspects of immersive presence are systemically affected by the presentation of dynamic music, sensory spatial aspects show higher sensitivity towards the arousal potential of the music score. It is argued...

  7. Pseudo Class III malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadia M. Al-Hummayani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of deep anterior crossbite is technically challenging due to the difficulty of placing traditional brackets with fixed appliances. This case report represents a none traditional treatment modality to treat deep anterior crossbite in an adult pseudo class III malocclusion complicated by severely retruded, supraerupted upper and lower incisors. Treatment was carried out in 2 phases. Phase I treatment was performed by removable appliance “modified Hawley appliance with inverted labial bow,” some modifications were carried out to it to suit the presented case. Positive overbite and overjet was accomplished in one month, in this phase with minimal forces exerted on the lower incisors. Whereas, phase II treatment was performed with fixed appliances (braces to align teeth and have proper over bite and overjet and to close posterior open bite, this phase was accomplished within 11 month.

  8. Ammonium diphosphitoindate(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida Hamchaoui

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title compound, NH4[In(HPO32], is built up from InIII cations (site symmetry 3m. adopting an octahedral environment and two different phosphite anions (each with site symmetry 3m. exhibiting a triangular–pyramidal geometry. Each InO6 octahedron shares its six apices with hydrogen phosphite groups. Reciprocally, each HPO3 group shares all its O atoms with three different metal cations, leading to [In(HPO32]− layers which propagate in the ab plane. The ammonium cation likewise has site symmetry 3m.. In the structure, the cations are located between the [In(HPO32]− layers of the host framework. The sheets are held together by hydrogen bonds formed between the NH4+ cations and the O atoms of the framework.

  9. Fast ejendom III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Hansen, Carsten

    Bogen er det tredje bind af tre planlagte bind om fast ejendom: I Overdragelsen, II Bolighandlen og III Ejerbeføjelsen. Fremstillingens giver et grundigt overblik over centrale områder af en omfattende regulering af fast ejendom, med angivelse af litteratur, hvor læseren kan søge yderligere...... oplysning. En ejer af fast ejendom er på særdeles mange områder begrænset i sin råden sammenlignet med ejeren af et formuegode i almindelighed. Fremstillingen tager udgangspunkt i ejerens perspektiv (fremfor samfundets eller myndighedernes). Både den privatretlige og offentligretlige regulering behandles......, eksempelvis ejendomsdannelsen, servitutter, naboretten, hævd, zoneinddelingen, den fysiske planlægning, beskyttelse af natur, beskyttelse af kultur, forurening fra fast ejendom, erstatning for forurening, jordforurening, ekspropriation, byggeri og adgang til fast ejendom....

  10. Genetic effect on apgar score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Franchi-Pinto

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Intraclass correlation coefficients for one- and five-min Apgar scores of 604 twin pairs born at a southeastern Brazilian hospital were calculated, after adjusting these scores for gestational age and sex. The data support a genetic hypothesis only for 1-min Apgar score, probably because it is less affected by the environment than 4 min later, after the newborns have been under the care of a neonatology team. First-born twins exhibited, on average, better clinical conditions than second-born twins. The former showed a significantly lower proportion of Apgar scores under seven than second-born twins, both at 1 min (17.5% vs. 29.8% and at 5 min (7.2% vs. 11.9%. The proportion of children born with "good" Apgar scores was significantly smaller among twins than among 1,522 singletons born at the same hospital. Among the latter, 1- and 5-min Apgar scores under seven were exhibited by 9.2% and 3.4% newborns, respectively.Os coeficientes de correlação intraclasse foram calculados para os índices de Apgar 1 e 5 minutos após o nascimento de 604 pares de gêmeos em uma maternidade do sudeste brasileiro, depois que esses índices foram ajustados para idade gestacional e sexo. Os dados obtidos apoiaram a hipótese genética apenas em relação ao primeiro índice de Apgar, provavelmente porque ele é menos influenciado pelo ambiente do que 4 minutos depois, quando os recém-nascidos já estiveram sob os cuidados de uma equipe de neonatologistas. Os gêmeos nascidos em primeiro lugar apresentaram, em média, melhor estado clínico que os nascidos em segundo lugar, visto que os primeiros mostraram uma proporção de índices de Apgar inferiores a 7 significativamente menor do que os nascidos em segundo lugar, tanto um minuto (17,5% contra 29,8% quanto cinco minutos após o nascimento (7,2% contra 11,9%. A proporção de recém-nascidos com índices de Apgar que indicam bom prognóstico foi significativamente menor nos gêmeos do que em 1.522 conceptos

  11. A Bootstrap Procedure of Propensity Score Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Haiyan

    2013-01-01

    Propensity score estimation plays a fundamental role in propensity score matching for reducing group selection bias in observational data. To increase the accuracy of propensity score estimation, the author developed a bootstrap propensity score. The commonly used propensity score matching methods: nearest neighbor matching, caliper matching, and…

  12. The Ninth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Spectroscopic Data from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Christopher P.; Alexandroff, Rachael; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Anderson, Scott F.; Anderton, Timothy; Andrews, Brett H.; Aubourg, Éric; Bailey, Stephen; Balbinot, Eduardo; Barnes, Rory; Bautista, Julian; Beers, Timothy C.; Beifiori, Alessandra; Berlind, Andreas A.; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blake, Cullen H.; Blanton, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Michael; Bochanski, John J.; Bolton, Adam S.; Borde, Arnaud; Bovy, Jo; Brandt, W. N.; Brinkmann, J.; Brown, Peter J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Busca, N. G.; Carithers, William; Carnero, Aurelio R.; Carr, Michael A.; Casetti-Dinescu, Dana I.; Chen, Yanmei; Chiappini, Cristina; Comparat, Johan; Connolly, Natalia; Crepp, Justin R.; Cristiani, Stefano; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; da Costa, Luiz N.; Davenport, James R. A.; Dawson, Kyle S.; de Putter, Roland; De Lee, Nathan; Delubac, Timothée; Dhital, Saurav; Ealet, Anne; Ebelke, Garrett L.; Edmondson, Edward M.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Escoffier, S.; Esposito, Massimiliano; Evans, Michael L.; Fan, Xiaohui; Femenía Castellá, Bruno; Fernández Alvar, Emma; Ferreira, Leticia D.; Filiz Ak, N.; Finley, Hayley; Fleming, Scott W.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Pérez, A. E. García; Ge, Jian; Génova-Santos, R.; Gillespie, Bruce A.; Girardi, Léo; González Hernández, Jonay I.; Grebel, Eva K.; Gunn, James E.; Guo, Hong; Haggard, Daryl; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Harris, David W.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hearty, Frederick R.; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Honscheid, Klaus; Huehnerhoff, J.; Ivans, Inese I.; Ivezić, Željko; Jacobson, Heather R.; Jiang, Linhua; Johansson, Jonas; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Kirkby, David; Kirkpatrick, Jessica A.; Klaene, Mark A.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Le Goff, Jean-Marc; Leauthaud, Alexie; Lee, Khee-Gan; Lee, Young Sun; Long, Daniel C.; Loomis, Craig P.; Lucatello, Sara; Lundgren, Britt; Lupton, Robert H.; Ma, Bo; Ma, Zhibo; MacDonald, Nicholas; Mack, Claude E.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Majewski, Steven R.; Makler, Martin; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Manchado, A.; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Manera, Marc; Maraston, Claudia; Margala, Daniel; Martell, Sarah L.; McBride, Cameron K.; McGreer, Ian D.; McMahon, Richard G.; Ménard, Brice; Meszaros, Sz.; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Montesano, Francesco; Morrison, Heather L.; Muna, Demitri; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Murayama, Hitoshi; Myers, Adam D.; Neto, A. F.; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; Nichol, Robert C.; Nidever, David L.; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Nuza, Sebastián E.; Ogando, Ricardo L. C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel J.; Owen, Russell; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John K.; Parihar, Prachi; Pâris, Isabelle; Pattarakijwanich, Petchara; Pepper, Joshua; Percival, Will J.; Pérez-Fournon, Ismael; Pérez-Ràfols, Ignasi; Petitjean, Patrick; Pforr, Janine; Pieri, Matthew M.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Porto de Mello, G. F.; Prada, Francisco; Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Raddick, M. Jordan; Rebolo, Rafael; Rich, James; Richards, Gordon T.; Robin, Annie C.; Rocha-Pinto, Helio J.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Rubiño-Martin, J. A.; Samushia, Lado; Sanchez Almeida, J.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Santiago, Basílio; Sayres, Conor; Schlegel, David J.; Schlesinger, Katharine J.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Schultheis, Mathias; Schwope, Axel D.; Scóccola, C. G.; Seljak, Uros; Sheldon, Erin; Shen, Yue; Shu, Yiping; Simmerer, Jennifer; Simmons, Audrey E.; Skibba, Ramin A.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Slosar, A.; Sobreira, Flavia; Sobeck, Jennifer S.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Steele, Oliver; Steinmetz, Matthias; Strauss, Michael A.; Streblyanska, Alina; Suzuki, Nao; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Tal, Tomer; Thakar, Aniruddha R.; Thomas, Daniel; Thompson, Benjamin A.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Tremonti, Christy A.; Vargas Magaña, M.; Verde, Licia; Viel, Matteo; Vikas, Shailendra K.; Vogt, Nicole P.; Wake, David A.; Wang, Ji; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Weinberg, David H.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; West, Andrew A.; White, Martin; Wilson, John C.; Wisniewski, John P.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Yanny, Brian; Yèche, Christophe; York, Donald G.; Zamora, O.; Zasowski, Gail; Zehavi, Idit; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Zheng; Zhu, Guangtun; Zinn, Joel C.

    2012-11-19

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) presents the first spectroscopic data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). This ninth data release (DR9) of the SDSS project includes 535,995 new galaxy spectra (median z=0.52), 102,100 new quasar spectra (median z=2.32), and 90,897 new stellar spectra, along with the data presented in previous data releases. These spectra were obtained with the new BOSS spectrograph and were taken between 2009 December and 2011 July. In addition, the stellar parameters pipeline, which determines radial velocities, surface temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities of stars, has been updated and refined with improvements in temperature estimates for stars with T_eff<5000 K and in metallicity estimates for stars with [Fe/H]>-0.5. DR9 includes new stellar parameters for all stars presented in DR8, including stars from SDSS-I and II, as well as those observed as part of the SDSS-III Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration-2 (SEGUE-2). The astrometry error introduced in the DR8 imaging catalogs has been corrected in the DR9 data products. The next data release for SDSS-III will be in Summer 2013, which will present the first data from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) along with another year of data from BOSS, followed by the final SDSS-III data release in December 2014.

  13. Objectives and methodology of BIOBADASER phase iii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Piedra, Carlos; Hernández Miguel, M Victoria; Manero, Javier; Roselló, Rosa; Sánchez-Costa, Jesús Tomás; Rodríguez-Lozano, Carlos; Campos, Cristina; Cuende, Eduardo; Fernández-Lopez, Jesús Carlos; Bustabad, Sagrario; Martín Domenech, Raquel; Pérez-Pampín, Eva; Del Pino-Montes, Javier; Millan-Arcineas, Ana Milena; Díaz-González, Federico; Gómez-Reino, Juan Jesús

    2017-09-18

    Describe the objectives, methods and results of the first year of the new version of the Spanish registry of adverse events involving biological therapies and synthetic drugs with an identifiable target in rheumatic diseases (BIOBADASER III). Multicenter prospective registry of patients with rheumatic inflammatory diseases being treated with biological drugs or synthetic drugs with an identifiable target in rheumatology departments in Spain. The main objective of BIOBADASER Phase III is the registry and analysis of adverse events; moreover, a secondary objective was added consisting of assessing the effectiveness by means of the registry of activity indexes. Patients in the registry are evaluated at least once every year and whenever they experience an adverse event or a change in treatment. The collection of data for phase iii began on 17 December 2015. During the first year, 35 centers participated. The number of patients included in this new phase in December 2016 was 2,664. The mean age was 53.7 years and the median duration of treatment was 8.1 years. In all, 40.4% of the patients were diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. The most frequent adverse events were infections and infestations. BIOBADASER Phase III has been launched to adapt to a changing pharmacological environment, with the introduction of biosimilars and small molecules in the treatment of rheumatic diseases. This new stage is adapted to the changes in the reporting of adverse events and now includes information related to activity scores. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  14. Semiconducting III-V compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Hilsum, C; Henisch, Heinz R

    1961-01-01

    Semiconducting III-V Compounds deals with the properties of III-V compounds as a family of semiconducting crystals and relates these compounds to the monatomic semiconductors silicon and germanium. Emphasis is placed on physical processes that are peculiar to III-V compounds, particularly those that combine boron, aluminum, gallium, and indium with phosphorus, arsenic, and antimony (for example, indium antimonide, indium arsenide, gallium antimonide, and gallium arsenide).Comprised of eight chapters, this book begins with an assessment of the crystal structure and binding of III-V compounds, f

  15. Interpreting force concept inventory scores: Normalized gain and SAT scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J. Steinert

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Preinstruction SAT scores and normalized gains (G on the force concept inventory (FCI were examined for individual students in interactive engagement (IE courses in introductory mechanics at one high school (N=335 and one university (N=292 , and strong, positive correlations were found for both populations ( r=0.57 and r=0.46 , respectively. These correlations are likely due to the importance of cognitive skills and abstract reasoning in learning physics. The larger correlation coefficient for the high school population may be a result of the much shorter time interval between taking the SAT and studying mechanics, because the SAT may provide a more current measure of abilities when high school students begin the study of mechanics than it does for college students, who begin mechanics years after the test is taken. In prior research a strong correlation between FCI G and scores on Lawson’s Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning for students from the same two schools was observed. Our results suggest that, when interpreting class average normalized FCI gains and comparing different classes, it is important to take into account the variation of students’ cognitive skills, as measured either by the SAT or by Lawson’s test. While Lawson’s test is not commonly given to students in most introductory mechanics courses, SAT scores provide a readily available alternative means of taking account of students’ reasoning abilities. Knowing the students’ cognitive level before instruction also allows one to alter instruction or to use an intervention designed to improve students’ cognitive level.

  16. Bank liquidity-stress testing and Basel III implementation in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Adam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the possibility of the implementation of the Basel III, namely the rules of banking sector. The population analyzed in this study comprises the 120 banks in Indonesia. The result shows that Indonesian banking sector has tremendous value if the Basel III standards is applied in Indonesia. Bank BCA has the lowest values with a score of 8.89 while Bank BRI has the highest value with a score of 9.68. This study concludes that the standard rules of Basel III would be able to be implemented in Indonesia.

  17. Apache Solr enterprise search server

    CERN Document Server

    Smiley, David; Parisa, Kranti; Mitchell, Matt

    2015-01-01

    This book is for developers who want to learn how to get the most out of Solr in their applications, whether you are new to the field, have used Solr but don't know everything, or simply want a good reference. It would be helpful to have some familiarity with basic programming concepts, but no prior experience is required.

  18. Effectively Engaging in Tribal Consultation to protect Traditional Cultural Properties while navigating the 1872 Mining Law - Tonto National Forest, Western Apache Tribes, & Resolution Copper Mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nez, N.

    2017-12-01

    By effectively engaging in government-to-government consultation the Tonto National Forest is able to consider oral histories and tribal cultural knowledge in decision making. These conversations often have the potential to lead to the protection and preservation of public lands. Discussed here is one example of successful tribal consultation and how it let to the protection of Traditional Cultural Properties (TCPs). One hour east of Phoenix, Arizona on the Tonto National Forest, Resolution Copper Mine, is working to access a rich copper vein more than 7,000 feet deep. As part of the mining plan of operation they are investigating viable locations to store the earth removed from the mine site. One proposed storage location required hydrologic and geotechnical studies to determine viability. This constituted a significant amount of ground disturbance in an area that is of known importance to local Indian tribes. To ensure proper consideration of tribal concerns, the Forest engaged nine local tribes in government-government consultation. Consultation resulted in the identification of five springs in the project area considered (TCPs) by the Western Apache tribes. Due to the presence of identified TCPs, the Forest asked tribes to assist in the development of mitigation measures to minimize effects of this project on the TCPs identified. The goal of this partnership was to find a way for the Mine to still be able to gather data, while protecting TCPs. During field visits and consultations, a wide range of concerns were shared which were recorded and considered by Tonto National Forest. The Forest developed a proposed mitigation approach to protect springs, which would prevent (not permit) the installation of water monitoring wells, geotechnical borings or trench excavations within 1,200 feet of perennial springs in the project area. As an added mitigation measure, a cultural resources specialist would be on-site during all ground-disturbing activities. Diligent work on

  19. Open-source web-enabled data management, analyses, and visualization of very large data in geosciences using Jupyter, Apache Spark, and community tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, A.

    2017-12-01

    Current simulation models and sensors are producing high-resolution, high-velocity data in geosciences domain. Knowledge discovery from these complex and large size datasets require tools that are capable of handling very large data and providing interactive data analytics features to researchers. To this end, Kitware and its collaborators are producing open-source tools GeoNotebook, GeoJS, Gaia, and Minerva for geosciences that are using hardware accelerated graphics and advancements in parallel and distributed processing (Celery and Apache Spark) and can be loosely coupled to solve real-world use-cases. GeoNotebook (https://github.com/OpenGeoscience/geonotebook) is co-developed by Kitware and NASA-Ames and is an extension to the Jupyter Notebook. It provides interactive visualization and python-based analysis of geospatial data and depending the backend (KTile or GeoPySpark) can handle data sizes of Hundreds of Gigabytes to Terabytes. GeoNotebook uses GeoJS (https://github.com/OpenGeoscience/geojs) to render very large geospatial data on the map using WebGL and Canvas2D API. GeoJS is more than just a GIS library as users can create scientific plots such as vector and contour and can embed InfoVis plots using D3.js. GeoJS aims for high-performance visualization and interactive data exploration of scientific and geospatial location aware datasets and supports features such as Point, Line, Polygon, and advanced features such as Pixelmap, Contour, Heatmap, and Choropleth. Our another open-source tool Minerva ((https://github.com/kitware/minerva) is a geospatial application that is built on top of open-source web-based data management system Girder (https://github.com/girder/girder) which provides an ability to access data from HDFS or Amazon S3 buckets and provides capabilities to perform visualization and analyses on geosciences data in a web environment using GDAL and GeoPandas wrapped in a unified API provided by Gaia (https

  20. Dark matter detection - III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacek, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The quest for the missing mass of the universe has become one of the big challenges of todays particle physics and cosmology. Astronomical observations show that only 1% of the matter of the Universe is luminous. Moreover there is now convincing evidence that 85% of all gravitationally observable matter in the Universe is of a new exotic kind, different from the 'ordinary' matter surrounding us. In a series of three lectures we discuss past, recent and future efforts made world- wide to detect and/or decipher the nature of Dark Matter. In Lecture I we review our present knowledge of the Dark Matter content of the Universe and how experimenters search for it's candidates; In Lecture II we discuss so-called 'direct detection' techniques which allow to search for scattering of galactic dark matter particles with detectors in deep-underground laboratories; we discuss the interpretation of experimental results and the challenges posed by different backgrounds; In Lecture III we take a look at the 'indirect detection' of the annihilation of dark matter candidates in astrophysical objects, such as our sun or the center of the Milky Way; In addition we will have a look at efforts to produce Dark Matter particles directly at accelerators and we shall close with a look at alternative nonparticle searches and future prospects. (author)

  1. Blind Grid Scoring Record No. 290

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry; Robitaille, George

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid. Scoring Records have been coordinated by Larry Overbay and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  2. Blind Grid Scoring Record No. 293

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry; Robitaille, George; Archiable, Robert; Fling, Rick; McClung, Christina

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the YPG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid. Scoring Records have been coordinated by Larry Overbay and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  3. Fungal type III polyketide synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Makoto; Nonaka, Takamasa; Fujii, Isao

    2014-10-01

    This article covers the literature on fungal type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) published from 2005 to 2014. Since the first discovery of fungal type III PKS genes in Aspergillus oryzae, reported in 2005, putative genes for type III PKSs have been discovered in fungal genomes. Compared with type I PKSs, type III PKSs are much less abundant in fungi. However, type III PKSs could have some critical roles in fungi. This article summarizes the studies on fungal type III PKS functional analysis, including Neurospora crassa ORAS, Aspergillus niger AnPKS, Botrytis cinerea BPKS and Aspergillus oryzae CsyA and CsyB. It is mostly in vitro analysis using their recombinant enzymes that has revealed their starter and product specificities. Of these, CsyB was found to be a new kind of type III PKS that catalyses the coupling of two β-keto fatty acyl CoAs. Homology modelling reported in this article supports the importance of the capacity of the acyl binding tunnel and active site cavity in fungal type III PKSs.

  4. A new look at the WMS-III: new research to guide clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulsky, David S

    2004-06-01

    The Wechsler Memory Scale, Third Edition (WMS-III) was published in 1997 and marked an ambitious and substantial revision of the traditional memory scale. Since publication, however, clinical experience has led many practitioners to raise questions about the validity and clinical utility of the new subtests and new index scores. The impetus of this special issue was to address some of the questions with which clinicians have been struggling. The articles contained in this special issue present new empirical research on the WMS-III, and several include new methods and scoring techniques that go beyond what has been published in the WAIS-III-WMS-III Technical Manual (The Psychological Corporation, 1997, 2002). It is hoped that the new scores and techniques will prove useful in clinical practice and that this research will benefit future revisions of the Wechsler Memory Scale.

  5. Evaluation of the Mangled Extremity Severity Score in Combat-Related Type III Tibia Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The mean MESS values for amputees and patients treated with limb salvage were 5.8 and 5.3 (P = 0.057), respectively. The sensitivity and specificity...Conclusions: There was no significant difference between MESS values of amputees and those treated with limb salvage. Moreover, these data demonstrate...would be particu- larly disappointing in the setting of some of the promising prosthetic and rehabilitation options that are being developed currently for

  6. Interval Coded Scoring: a toolbox for interpretable scoring systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieven Billiet

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades, clinical decision support systems have been gaining importance. They help clinicians to make effective use of the overload of available information to obtain correct diagnoses and appropriate treatments. However, their power often comes at the cost of a black box model which cannot be interpreted easily. This interpretability is of paramount importance in a medical setting with regard to trust and (legal responsibility. In contrast, existing medical scoring systems are easy to understand and use, but they are often a simplified rule-of-thumb summary of previous medical experience rather than a well-founded system based on available data. Interval Coded Scoring (ICS connects these two approaches, exploiting the power of sparse optimization to derive scoring systems from training data. The presented toolbox interface makes this theory easily applicable to both small and large datasets. It contains two possible problem formulations based on linear programming or elastic net. Both allow to construct a model for a binary classification problem and establish risk profiles that can be used for future diagnosis. All of this requires only a few lines of code. ICS differs from standard machine learning through its model consisting of interpretable main effects and interactions. Furthermore, insertion of expert knowledge is possible because the training can be semi-automatic. This allows end users to make a trade-off between complexity and performance based on cross-validation results and expert knowledge. Additionally, the toolbox offers an accessible way to assess classification performance via accuracy and the ROC curve, whereas the calibration of the risk profile can be evaluated via a calibration curve. Finally, the colour-coded model visualization has particular appeal if one wants to apply ICS manually on new observations, as well as for validation by experts in the specific application domains. The validity and applicability

  7. PREFACE: Quantum Optics III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orszag, M.; Retamal, J. C.; Saavedra, C.; Wallentowitz, S.

    2007-06-01

    All the 50 years of conscious pondering did not bring me nearer to an answer to the question `what is light quanta?'. Nowadays, every rascal believes, he knows it, however, he is mistaken. (A Einstein, 1951 in a letter to M Besso) Quantum optics has played a key role in physics in the last several decades. On the other hand, in these early decades of the information age, the flow of information is becoming more and more central to our daily life. Thus, the related fields of quantum information theory as well as Bose-Einstein condensation have acquired tremendous importance in the last couple of decades. In Quantum Optics III, a fusion of these fields appears in a natural way. Quantum Optics III was held in Pucón, Chile, in 27-30 of November, 2006. This beautiful location in the south of Chile is near the lake Villarrica and below the snow covered volcano of the same name. This fantastic environment contributed to a relaxed atmosphere, suitable for informal discussion and for the students to have a chance to meet the key figures in the field. The previous Quantum Optics conferences took place in Santiago, Chile (Quantum Optics I, 2000) and Cozumel, Mexico (Quantum Optics II, 2004). About 115 participants from 19 countries attended and participated in the meeting to discuss a wide variety of topics such as quantum-information processing, experiments related to non-linear optics and squeezing, various aspects of entanglement including its sudden death, correlated twin-photon experiments, light storage, decoherence-free subspaces, Bose-Einstein condensation, discrete Wigner functions and many more. There was a strong Latin-American participation from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela and Mexico, as well as from Europe, USA, China, and Australia. New experimental and theoretical results were presented at the conference. In Latin-America a quiet revolution has taken place in the last twenty years. Several groups working in quantum optics and

  8. Exploring a Source of Uneven Score Equity across the Test Score Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins-Manley, Anne Corinne; Qiu, Yuxi; Penfield, Randall D.

    2018-01-01

    Score equity assessment (SEA) refers to an examination of population invariance of equating across two or more subpopulations of test examinees. Previous SEA studies have shown that score equity may be present for examinees scoring at particular test score ranges but absent for examinees scoring at other score ranges. No studies to date have…

  9. OUTCOME OF RESULTS WITH CONSERVATIVE MANAGEMENT OF ROCKWOOD TYPE III ACROMIOCLAVICULAR DISLOCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Mitra R. P

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The acromioclavicular joint is commonly involved in traumatic injuries that affect the shoulder. Treatment of these injuries has been controversial and continues to evolve. The aim of the study is to evaluate clinical outcome in patients with type III acromioclavicular dislocation managed conservatively. MATERIALS AND METHODS Clinical outcome in 12 patients with type III acromioclavicular dislocation treated conservatively is evaluated 6-8 months after injury. Functional outcome was done using Constant-Murley score and pain was measured using Visual Analogue Score (VAS. RESULTS There is 75% excellent result and 25% good functional outcome as assessed by Constant-Murley score. The average pain as assessed by visual analogue score is 1.7 mm. CONCLUSION Conservative management of type III acromioclavicular dislocation gives excellent/good outcome, but the cosmetic appearance is not improved by conservative treatment.

  10. Scoring Models of Bank Credit Policy Management

    OpenAIRE

    Aida Hanic; Emina Zunic; Adnan Dzelihodzic

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present how credit scoring models can be used in financial institutions, in this case in banks, in order to simplify credit lending. Unlike traditional models of credit analysis, scoring models provides valuation based on numerical score who represent clients’ possibility to fulfil their obligation. Using credit scoring models, bank can create a numerical snapshot of consumers risk profile. One of the most important characteristic of scoring models is objectivity w...

  11. Basel III D: Swiss Finish to Basel III

    OpenAIRE

    Christian M. McNamara; Natalia Tente; Andrew Metrick

    2014-01-01

    After the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS) introduced the Basel III framework in 2010, individual countries confronted the question of how best to implement the framework given their unique circumstances. Switzerland, with a banking industry that is both heavily concentrated and very large relative to the size of its overall economy, faced a special challenge. It ultimately adopted what is sometimes referred to as the “Swiss Finish” to Basel III – enhanced requirements applicable...

  12. Confidence scores for prediction models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerds, Thomas Alexander; van de Wiel, MA

    2011-01-01

    In medical statistics, many alternative strategies are available for building a prediction model based on training data. Prediction models are routinely compared by means of their prediction performance in independent validation data. If only one data set is available for training and validation......, then rival strategies can still be compared based on repeated bootstraps of the same data. Often, however, the overall performance of rival strategies is similar and it is thus difficult to decide for one model. Here, we investigate the variability of the prediction models that results when the same...... to distinguish rival prediction models with similar prediction performances. Furthermore, on the subject level a confidence score may provide useful supplementary information for new patients who want to base a medical decision on predicted risk. The ideas are illustrated and discussed using data from cancer...

  13. The Effect of a Monocular Helmet-Mounted Display on Aircrew Health: A Cohort Study of Apache AH Mk 1 Pilots Four-Year Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    manifested itself only during the last measurement cycle. Its impact is unknown at this time. At this phase in the study, there is no evidence that...with regard to confidentiality. A secure long-term storage system for paper and electronic copies of the data has been identified as being...activities, e.g., writing, throwing, using a toothbrush , etc. Both absolute and relative scores were computed for each subject. The absolute score was

  14. The Effect of a Monocular Helmet-Mounted Display on Aircrew Health: A Longitudinal Cohort Study of Apache AH Mk 1 Pilots -(Vision and Handedness)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-19

    engineering technology limitations of the era, the HMD was constructed to present pilotage imagery only to one eye, the right eye. This monocular... toothbrush . Both absolute and relative scores were computed for each subject. The absolute score was based on the majority of the 10 responses for the...OBJECT LEFT RIGHT 1. Writing 2. Drawing 3. Throwing 4. Scissors 5. Toothbrush 6. Knife (without fork) 7. Spoon 8. Broom (upper hand

  15. Thermodecomposition of lanthanides (III) and ytrium (III) glucoheptonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giolito, J.

    1987-01-01

    The lanthanides (III) and yttrium (III) glucoheptonates as well the D-glucoheptono 1-4 lactone were studied using common analytical methods, elemental microanalysis of carbon and hydrogen, thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. These compounds were prepared from the reaction between the lanthanides (III) and yttrium (III) hydroxides and glucoheptonic acid aqueous solution obtained by means of the delta lactone hydrolysis of this acid. After stoichiometric reaction the compounds were precipitated by the addition of absolute ethanol, washed with the same solvent and dried in desiccator. Thermogravimetric the (TG) curves of the lanthanides glucoheptonates of the ceric group present thermal profiles with enough differences permitting an easy caracterization of each compound and the yttrium (III) glucoheptonate TG curve showed a great similarity with the erbium (III) compound TG curve. The differential scanning calometry (DSC) curves showed endothermic and exothermic peaks by their shape, height and position (temperature) permit an easy and rapid identification of each compound specially if DSC and TG curves were examined simultaneously. (author) [pt

  16. Rating Pregnancy Wheel Applications Using the APPLICATIONS Scoring System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyjek, Kathy; Farag, Sara; Chen, Katherine T

    2015-06-01

    To identify the top-rated pregnancy wheel applications (apps) using a newly developed APPLICATIONS scoring system. A list of pregnancy wheel apps was identified. Consumer-based and inaccurate apps were excluded. The APPLICATIONS scoring system was developed to rate the remaining apps. Application comprehensiveness was evaluated. Objective rating components included price, paid subscription, literature used, in-app purchases, connectivity to the Internet, advertisements, text search field, interdevice compatibility, and other components such as images or figures, videos, and special features. Subjective rating components were ease of navigation and subjective presentation. A complete list of 55 pregnancy wheel apps was created from three sources. Thirty-nine (71%) were consumer-based, inaccurate, or both, leaving 16 (29%) for analysis using the APPLICATIONS scoring system. More than two thirds of pregnancy wheel apps were excluded from our study secondary to being consumer-based, inaccurate, or both. This highlights the importance of identifying systematically, reviewing critically, and rating the thousands of available apps to health care providers to ensure accuracy and applicability. We propose that our APPLICATIONS scoring system be used to rate apps in all specialties with the goal of improving health care provider performance and thereby patient outcomes. III.

  17. Celestine III and the North

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Kjersgaard

    2008-01-01

    Artiklen gennemgår pave Cølestin IIIs forhold til de nordiske kongeriger i perioden 1191-1198. Artiklen viser, at paven, som i forskningen traditionelt år har stået i skyggen af sin berømte, energiske og især: yngre efterfølger, Innocens III, har været på forkant med udviklingen i de nordiske rig...

  18. Normal variability of children's scaled scores on subtests of the Dutch Wechsler Preschool and Primary scale of Intelligence - third edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurks, P P M; Hendriksen, J G M; Dek, J E; Kooij, A P

    2013-01-01

    Intelligence tests are included in millions of assessments of children and adults each year (Watkins, Glutting, & Lei, 2007a , Applied Neuropsychology, 14, 13). Clinicians often interpret large amounts of subtest scatter, or large differences between the highest and lowest scaled subtest scores, on an intelligence test battery as an index for abnormality or cognitive impairment. The purpose of the present study is to characterize "normal" patterns of variability among subtests of the Dutch Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence - Third Edition (WPPSI-III-NL; Wechsler, 2010 ). Therefore, the frequencies of WPPSI-III-NL scaled subtest scatter were reported for 1039 healthy children aged 4:0-7:11 years. Results indicated that large differences between highest and lowest scaled subtest scores (or subtest scatter) were common in this sample. Furthermore, degree of subtest scatter was related to: (a) the magnitude of the highest scaled subtest score, i.e., more scatter was seen in children with the highest WPPSI-III-NL scaled subtest scores, (b) Full Scale IQ (FSIQ) scores, i.e., higher FSIQ scores were associated with an increase in subtest scatter, and (c) sex differences, with boys showing a tendency to display more scatter than girls. In conclusion, viewing subtest scatter as an index for abnormality in WPPSI-III-NL scores is an oversimplification as this fails to recognize disparate subtest heterogeneity that occurs within a population of healthy children aged 4:0-7:11 years.

  19. New clinical score to diagnose nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pulzi Fernanda BU

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the most frequent disease associated with abnormal liver tests that is characterized by a wide spectrum of liver damage, ranging from simple macro vesicular steatosis to steatohepatitis (NASH, cirrhosis or liver carcinoma. Liver biopsy is the most precise test to differentiate NASH from other stages of NAFLD, but it is an invasive and expensive method. This study aimed to create a clinical laboratory score capable of identify individual with NASH in severely obese patients submitted to bariatric surgery. Methods The medical records from 66 patients submitted to gastroplasty were reviewed. Their chemistry profile, abdominal ultrasound (US and liver biopsy done during the surgical procedure were analyzed. Patients were classified into 2 groups according to liver biopsy: Non-NASH group - those patients without NAFLD or with grade I, II or III steatosis; and NASH group - those with steatohepatitis or fibrosis. The t-test was used to compare each variable with normal distribution between NASH and Non-NASH groups. When comparing proportions of categorical variables, we used chi-square or z-test, where appropriate. A p-value Results 83% of patients with obesity grades II or III showed NAFLD, and the majority was asymptomatic. Total Cholesterol (TC≥200 mg/dL, alanine aminotransferase (ALT ≥30, AST/ALT ratio (AAR≤ 1, gammaglutaril-transferase (γGT≥30 U/L and abdominal US, compatible with steatosis, showed association with NASH group. We proposed 2 scores: Complete score (TC, ALT, AAR, γGT and US and the simplified score, where US was not included. The combination of biochemical and imaging results improved accuracy to 84.4% the recognition of NASH (sensitivity 70%, specificity 88.6%, NPV 91.2%, PPV 63. 6%. Conclusion Alterations in TC, ALT, AAR, γGT and US are related to the most risk for NASH. The combination of biochemical and imaging results improved accuracy to 84.4% the

  20. Relationship Between Periodontal Screening and Recording Index Scores and Need for Periodontal Access Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rams, Thomas E; Loesche, Walter J

    2017-10-01

    The validity of using pretreatment Periodontal Screening and Recording (PSR) index sextant scores to estimate periodontal access surgery needs is evaluated in patients with chronic periodontitis before and after completion of non-surgical periodontal therapy. In 110 adults, pretreatment probing data identified 486 sextants with PSR scores of 4 and 125 sextants with PSR scores of 3. Periodontal access surgery needs for all sextants were determined prior to treatment and after completion of non-surgical periodontal therapy for 213 sextants in 38 patients by two experienced periodontist examiners. PSR scores of 4 identified untreated sextants with periodontal access surgery needs significantly better than PSR scores of 3 (odds ratio = 27.8; P periodontal access surgery need continued to have surgical access needs after completion of non-surgical periodontal therapy. A higher percentage of sextants with PSR scores of 4 or 3 revealed periodontal access surgical needs when Class II or III furcation involvements and/or Grade II or III tooth mobility were also detected in the sextant than when these parameters were not detected. Pretreatment PSR index scores of 4 were a strong indicator of periodontal access surgery needs in untreated dentition sextants but markedly overestimated surgical access needs remaining after completion of non-surgical periodontal therapy. These findings raise questions about the usefulness of pretreatment PSR evaluations for estimating potential periodontal access surgery needs in patients to be initially treated with non-surgical periodontal therapy.

  1. 30-day readmission score after cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Espinoza

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: The present study provides a clinical score to predict early readmission after open-heart surgery and validates that score in a comparable population, which can help in planning future interventions to avoid unnecessary readmissions.

  2. Cardiovascular risk scores for coronary atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Murat; Kardesoglu, Ejder; Aparci, Mustafa; Isilak, Zafer; Uz, Omer; Yiginer, Omer; Ozmen, Namik; Cingozbay, Bekir Yilmaz; Uzun, Mehmet; Cebeci, Bekir Sitki

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare frequently used cardiovascular risk scores in predicting the presence of coronary artery disease (CAD) and 3-vessel disease. In 350 consecutive patients (218 men and 132 women) who underwent coronary angiography, the cardiovascular risk level was determined using the Framingham Risk Score (FRS), the Modified Framingham Risk Score (MFRS), the Prospective Cardiovascular Münster (PROCAM) score, and the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE). The area under the curve for receiver operating characteristic curves showed that FRS had more predictive value than the other scores for CAD (area under curve, 0.76, P MFRS, PROCAM, and SCORE) may predict the presence and severity of coronary atherosclerosis.The FRS had better predictive value than the other scores.

  3. Codominant scoring of AFLP in association panels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gort, G.; Eeuwijk, van F.A.

    2010-01-01

    A study on the codominant scoring of AFLP markers in association panels without prior knowledge on genotype probabilities is described. Bands are scored codominantly by fitting normal mixture models to band intensities, illustrating and optimizing existing methodology, which employs the

  4. Turkish adaptation of Spinal Cord Independence Measure--version III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesiktas, Nur; Paker, Nurdan; Bugdayci, Derya; Sencan, Sureyya; Karan, Ayse; Muslumanoglu, Lutfiye

    2012-03-01

    Various rating scales have been used to assess ability in individuals with spinal cord injury. There is no specific functional assessment scale for Turkish patients with spinal cord injury. The Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) is a specific test, which has become popular in the last decade. A study was conducted to validate and evaluate the Turkish adaptation of the SCIM III (T-SCIM III). The SCIM III was translated into Turkish. Reliability, (internal consistency, interrater reliability, and test-retest reliability), validity (with Functional Independence Measurement), and sensitivity (changes in 8-week exercise program) were studied. Internal consistency for total score was sufficient (Cronbach α=0.79). The interrater reliability was moderate to high (Cohen κ between 0.72 and 1). Convergent validity was high (r=0.89, PSCIM III was found to be more sensitive than the Functional Independence Measurement to changes in function. Hence, we recommend the use of T-SCIM III in clinical practice as a reliable, valid, and easy-to-use tool.

  5. PRSice: Polygenic Risk Score software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euesden, Jack; Lewis, Cathryn M; O'Reilly, Paul F

    2015-05-01

    A polygenic risk score (PRS) is a sum of trait-associated alleles across many genetic loci, typically weighted by effect sizes estimated from a genome-wide association study. The application of PRS has grown in recent years as their utility for detecting shared genetic aetiology among traits has become appreciated; PRS can also be used to establish the presence of a genetic signal in underpowered studies, to infer the genetic architecture of a trait, for screening in clinical trials, and can act as a biomarker for a phenotype. Here we present the first dedicated PRS software, PRSice ('precise'), for calculating, applying, evaluating and plotting the results of PRS. PRSice can calculate PRS at a large number of thresholds ("high resolution") to provide the best-fit PRS, as well as provide results calculated at broad P-value thresholds, can thin Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) according to linkage disequilibrium and P-value or use all SNPs, handles genotyped and imputed data, can calculate and incorporate ancestry-informative variables, and can apply PRS across multiple traits in a single run. We exemplify the use of PRSice via application to data on schizophrenia, major depressive disorder and smoking, illustrate the importance of identifying the best-fit PRS and estimate a P-value significance threshold for high-resolution PRS studies. PRSice is written in R, including wrappers for bash data management scripts and PLINK-1.9 to minimize computational time. PRSice runs as a command-line program with a variety of user-options, and is freely available for download from http://PRSice.info jack.euesden@kcl.ac.uk or paul.oreilly@kcl.ac.uk Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. OPeNDAP servers like Hyrax and TDS can easily support common single-sign-on authentication protocols using the Apache httpd and related software; adding support for these protocols to clients can be more challenging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, J. H. R.; Potter, N.; Evans, B. J. K.

    2016-12-01

    OPeNDAP, in conjunction with the Australian National University, documented the installation process needed to add authentication to OPeNDAP-enabled data servers (Hyrax, TDS, etc.) and examined 13 OPeNDAP clients to determine how best to add authentication using LDAP, Shibboleth and OAuth2 (we used NASA's URS). We settled on a server configuration (architecture) that uses the Apache web server and a collection of open-source modules to perform the authentication and authorization actions. This is not the only way to accomplish those goals, but using Apache represents a good balance between functionality, leveraging existing work that has been well vetted and includes support for a wide variety of web services, include those that depend on a servlet engine such as tomcat (which both Hyrax and TDS do). Or work shows how LDAP, OAuth2 and Shibboleth can all be accommodated using this readily available software stack. Also important is that the Apache software is very widely used and is fairly robust - extremely important for security software components. In order to make use of a server requiring authentication, clients must support the authentication process. Because HTTP has included authentication for well over a decade, and because HTTP/HTTPS can be used by simply linking programs with a library, both the LDAP and OAuth2/URS authentication schemes have almost universal support within the OPeNDAP client base. The clients, i.e. the HTTP client libraries they employ, understand how to submit the credentials to the correct server when confronted by an HTTP/S Unauthorized (401) response. Interestingly OAuth2 can achieve it's SSO objectives while relying entirely on normative HTTP transport. All 13 of the clients examined worked.The situation with Shibboleth is different. While Shibboleth does use HTTP, it also requires the client to either scrape a web page or support the SAML2.0 ECP profile, which, for programmatic clients, means using SOAP messages. Since working with

  7. WMS-III performance in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy: group differences and individual classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, N; Strauss, E; Chelune, G J; Loring, D W; Martin, R C; Hermann, B P; Sherman, E; Hunter, M

    2001-11-01

    The utility of the WMS-III in detecting lateralized impairment was examined in a large sample of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Methods of analysis included evaluation of group means on the various indexes and subtest scores, the use of ROC curves, and an examination of Auditory-Visual Index discrepancy scores. In addition, performance on immediate and delayed indexes in the auditory and the visual modality was compared within each group. Of the WMS-III scores, the Auditory-Visual Delayed Index difference score appeared most sensitive to side of temporal dysfunction, although patient classification rates were not within an acceptable range to have clinical utility. The ability to predict laterality based on statistically significant index score differences was particularly weak for those with left temporal dysfunction. The use of unusually large discrepancies led to improved prediction, however, the rarity of such scores in this population limits their usefulness. Although the utility of the WMS-III in detecting laterality may be limited in preoperative cases, the WMS-III may still hold considerable promise as a measure of memory in documenting baseline performance and in detecting those that may be at risk following surgery.

  8. Semiparametric score level fusion: Gaussian copula approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susyanyo, N.; Klaassen, C.A.J.; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan

    2015-01-01

    Score level fusion is an appealing method for combining multi-algorithms, multi- representations, and multi-modality biometrics due to its simplicity. Often, scores are assumed to be independent, but even for dependent scores, accord- ing to the Neyman-Pearson lemma, the likelihood ratio is the

  9. Credit Scores, Race, and Residential Sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ashlyn Aiko

    2010-01-01

    Credit scores have a profound impact on home purchasing power and mortgage pricing, yet little is known about how credit scores influence households' residential location decisions. This study estimates the effects of credit scores on residential sorting behavior using a novel mortgage industry data set combining household demographic, credit, and…

  10. Surgical Apgar Score predicts postoperative complications in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Predicting complications in neurotrauma patients by using an effective scoring system can reduce morbidity and mortality while facilitating objective clinical decision making during recovery. Compared to existing morbidity and mortality predictive scores, the Surgical Apgar Score (SAS) is simple and effective.

  11. An Objective Fluctuation Score for Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Malcolm K.; McGregor, Sarah; Bergquist, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Establishing the presence and severity of fluctuations is important in managing Parkinson’s Disease yet there is no reliable, objective means of doing this. In this study we have evaluated a Fluctuation Score derived from variations in dyskinesia and bradykinesia scores produced by an accelerometry based system. Methods The Fluctuation Score was produced by summing the interquartile range of bradykinesia scores and dyskinesia scores produced every 2 minutes between 0900-1800 for at least 6 days by the accelerometry based system and expressing it as an algorithm. Results This Score could distinguish between fluctuating and non-fluctuating patients with high sensitivity and selectivity and was significant lower following activation of deep brain stimulators. The scores following deep brain stimulation lay in a band just above the score separating fluctuators from non-fluctuators, suggesting a range representing adequate motor control. When compared with control subjects the score of newly diagnosed patients show a loss of fluctuation with onset of PD. The score was calculated in subjects whose duration of disease was known and this showed that newly diagnosed patients soon develop higher scores which either fall under or within the range representing adequate motor control or instead go on to develop more severe fluctuations. Conclusion The Fluctuation Score described here promises to be a useful tool for identifying patients whose fluctuations are progressing and may require therapeutic changes. It also shows promise as a useful research tool. Further studies are required to more accurately identify therapeutic targets and ranges. PMID:25928634

  12. "Score Choice": A Tempest in a Teapot?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Eric

    2009-01-01

    A new option that allows students to choose which of their test scores to send to colleges has generated renewed criticism of the College Board. College Board officials tout the option, called Score Choice, as a way to ease test taker anxiety. Some prominent admissions officials have publicly described Score Choice as a sales tactic that will…

  13. Breaking of scored tablets : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Santen, E; Barends, D M; Frijlink, H W

    The literature was reviewed regarding advantages, problems and performance indicators of score lines. Scored tablets provide dose flexibility, ease of swallowing and may reduce the costs of medication. However, many patients are confronted with scored tablets that are broken unequally and with

  14. Validation of Automated Scoring of Science Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ou Lydia; Rios, Joseph A.; Heilman, Michael; Gerard, Libby; Linn, Marcia C.

    2016-01-01

    Constructed response items can both measure the coherence of student ideas and serve as reflective experiences to strengthen instruction. We report on new automated scoring technologies that can reduce the cost and complexity of scoring constructed-response items. This study explored the accuracy of c-rater-ML, an automated scoring engine…

  15. The eleventh and twelfth data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: Final data from SDSS-III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Shadab; Albareti, Franco D.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Anders, F.; Anderson, Scott F.; Anderton, Timothy; Andrews, Brett H.; Armengaud, Eric; Aubourg, Éric; Bailey, Stephen; Basu, Sarbani; Bautista, Julian E.; Beaton, Rachael L.; Beers, Timothy C.; Bender, Chad F.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Beutler, Florian; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bird, Jonathan C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blake, Cullen H.; Blanton, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Michael; Bochanski, John J.; Bolton, Adam S.; Bovy, Jo; Bradley, A. Shelden; Brandt, W. N.; Brauer, D. E.; Brinkmann, J.; Brown, Peter J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Burtin, Etienne; Busca, Nicolás G.; Cai, Zheng; Capozzi, Diego; Rosell, Aurelio Carnero; Carr, Michael A.; Carrera, Ricardo; Chambers, K. C.; Chaplin, William James; Chen, Yen-Chi; Chiappini, Cristina; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Clerc, Nicolas; Comparat, Johan; Covey, Kevin; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Cunha, Katia; Costa, Luiz N. da; Rio, Nicola Da; Davenport, James R. A.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Lee, Nathan De; Delubac, Timothée; Deshpande, Rohit; Dhital, Saurav; Dutra-Ferreira, Letícia; Dwelly, Tom; Ealet, Anne; Ebelke, Garrett L.; Edmondson, Edward M.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Ellsworth, Tristan; Elsworth, Yvonne; Epstein, Courtney R.; Eracleous, Michael; Escoffier, Stephanie; Esposito, Massimiliano; Evans, Michael L.; Fan, Xiaohui; Fernández-Alvar, Emma; Feuillet, Diane; Ak, Nurten Filiz; Finley, Hayley; Finoguenov, Alexis; Flaherty, Kevin; Fleming, Scott W.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Foster, Jonathan; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Galbraith-Frew, J. G.; García, Rafael A.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Pérez, Ana E. García; Gaulme, Patrick; Ge, Jian; Génova-Santos, R.; Georgakakis, A.; Ghezzi, Luan; Gillespie, Bruce A.; Girardi, Léo; Goddard, Daniel; Gontcho, Satya Gontcho A.; Hernández, Jonay I. González; Grebel, Eva K.; Green, Paul J.; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Grieves, Nolan; Gunn, James E.; Guo, Hong; Harding, Paul; Hasselquist, Sten; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hayden, Michael; Hearty, Fred R.; Hekker, Saskia; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Holtzman, Jon A.; Honscheid, Klaus; Huber, Daniel; Huehnerhoff, Joseph; Ivans, Inese I.; Jiang, Linhua; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco; Klaene, Mark A.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Koenig, Xavier P.; Lam, Charles R.; Lan, Ting-Wen; Lang, Dustin; Laurent, Pierre; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Leauthaud, Alexie; Lee, Khee-Gan; Lee, Young Sun; Licquia, Timothy C.; Liu, Jian; Long, Daniel C.; López-Corredoira, Martín; Lorenzo-Oliveira, Diego; Lucatello, Sara; Lundgren, Britt; Lupton, Robert H.; III, Claude E. Mack; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Majewski, Steven R.; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Manchado, A.; Manera, Marc; Mao, Qingqing; Maraston, Claudia; Marchwinski, Robert C.; Margala, Daniel; Martell, Sarah L.; Martig, Marie; Masters, Karen L.; Mathur, Savita; McBride, Cameron K.; McGehee, Peregrine M.; McGreer, Ian D.; McMahon, Richard G.; Ménard, Brice; Menzel, Marie-Luise; Merloni, Andrea; Mészáros, Szabolcs; Miller, Adam A.; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Miyatake, Hironao; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; More, Surhud; Morganson, Eric; Morice-Atkinson, Xan; Morrison, Heather L.; Mosser, Benôit; Muna, Demitri; Myers, Adam D.; Nandra, Kirpal; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Neyrinck, Mark; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; Nichol, Robert C.; Nidever, David L.; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Nuza, Sebastián E.; O’Connell, Julia E.; O’Connell, Robert W.; O’Connell, Ross; Ogando, Ricardo L. C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Audrey E.; Oravetz, Daniel J.; Osumi, Keisuke; Owen, Russell; Padgett, Deborah L.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Paegert, Martin; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John K.; Pâris, Isabelle; Park, Changbom; Pattarakijwanich, Petchara; Pellejero-Ibanez, M.; Pepper, Joshua; Percival, Will J.; Pérez-Fournon, Ismael; Pe´rez-Ra`fols, Ignasi; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Mello, Gustavo F. Porto de; Prada, Francisco; Prakash, Abhishek; Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Protopapas, Pavlos; Raddick, M. Jordan; Rahman, Mubdi; Reid, Beth A.; Rich, James; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robin, Annie C.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Rodrigues, Thaíse S.; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Ruan, John J.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Salvato, Mara; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Santiago, Basílio; Sayres, Conor; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Schlegel, David J.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Schultheis, Mathias; Schwope, Axel D.; Scóccola, C. G.; Scott, Caroline; Sellgren, Kris; Seo, Hee-Jong; Serenelli, Aldo; Shane, Neville; Shen, Yue; Shetrone, Matthew; Shu, Yiping; Aguirre, V. Silva; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Skrutskie, M. F.; Slosar, Anže; Smith, Verne V.; Sobreira, Flávia; Souto, Diogo; Stassun, Keivan G.; Steinmetz, Matthias; Stello, Dennis; Strauss, Michael A.; Streblyanska, Alina; Suzuki, Nao; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Tan, Jonathan C.; Tayar, Jamie; Terrien, Ryan C.; Thakar, Aniruddha R.; Thomas, Daniel; Thomas, Neil; Thompson, Benjamin A.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Troup, Nicholas W.; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose A.; Verde, Licia; Viel, Matteo; Vogt, Nicole P.; Wake, David A.; Wang, Ji; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Weinberg, David H.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; White, Martin; Wilson, John C.; Wisniewski, John P.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Ye`che, Christophe; York, Donald G.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Zamora, O.; Zasowski, Gail; Zehavi, Idit; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Zheng; Zhou (周旭), Xu; Zhou (周志民), Zhimin; Zou (邹虎), Hu; Zhu, Guangtun

    2015-07-20

    The third generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) took data from 2008 to 2014 using the original SDSS wide-field imager, the original and an upgraded multi-object fiber-fed optical spectrograph, a new near-infrared high-resolution spectrograph, and a novel optical interferometer. All of the data from SDSS-III are now made public. In particular, this paper describes Data Release 11 (DR11) including all data acquired through 2013 July, and Data Release 12 (DR12) adding data acquired through 2014 July (including all data included in previous data releases), marking the end of SDSS-III observing. Relative to our previous public release (DR10), DR12 adds one million new spectra of galaxies and quasars from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) over an additional 3000 deg2 of sky, more than triples the number of H-band spectra of stars as part of the Apache Point Observatory (APO) Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), and includes repeated accurate radial velocity measurements of 5500 stars from the Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). The APOGEE outputs now include the measured abundances of 15 different elements for each star. In total, SDSS-III added 5200 deg2 of ugriz imaging; 155,520 spectra of 138,099 stars as part of the Sloan Exploration of Galactic Understanding and Evolution 2 (SEGUE-2) survey; 2,497,484 BOSS spectra of 1,372,737 galaxies, 294,512 quasars, and 247,216 stars over 9376 deg2; 618,080 APOGEE spectra of 156,593 stars; and 197,040 MARVELS spectra of 5513 stars. Since its first light in 1998, SDSS has imaged over 1/3 of the Celestial sphere in five bands and obtained over five million astronomical spectra.

  16. THE ELEVENTH AND TWELFTH DATA RELEASES OF THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY: FINAL DATA FROM SDSS-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, Shadab; Albareti, Franco D.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Anders, F.; Anderson, Scott F.; Anderton, Timothy; Andrews, Brett H.; Armengaud, Eric; Aubourg, Éric; Bautista, Julian E.; Bailey, Stephen; Basu, Sarbani; Beaton, Rachael L.; Beers, Timothy C.

    2015-01-01

    The third generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) took data from 2008 to 2014 using the original SDSS wide-field imager, the original and an upgraded multi-object fiber-fed optical spectrograph, a new near-infrared high-resolution spectrograph, and a novel optical interferometer. All of the data from SDSS-III are now made public. In particular, this paper describes Data Release 11 (DR11) including all data acquired through 2013 July, and Data Release 12 (DR12) adding data acquired through 2014 July (including all data included in previous data releases), marking the end of SDSS-III observing. Relative to our previous public release (DR10), DR12 adds one million new spectra of galaxies and quasars from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) over an additional 3000 deg 2 of sky, more than triples the number of H-band spectra of stars as part of the Apache Point Observatory (APO) Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), and includes repeated accurate radial velocity measurements of 5500 stars from the Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). The APOGEE outputs now include the measured abundances of 15 different elements for each star. In total, SDSS-III added 5200 deg 2 of ugriz imaging; 155,520 spectra of 138,099 stars as part of the Sloan Exploration of Galactic Understanding and Evolution 2 (SEGUE-2) survey; 2,497,484 BOSS spectra of 1,372,737 galaxies, 294,512 quasars, and 247,216 stars over 9376 deg 2 ; 618,080 APOGEE spectra of 156,593 stars; and 197,040 MARVELS spectra of 5513 stars. Since its first light in 1998, SDSS has imaged over 1/3 of the Celestial sphere in five bands and obtained over five million astronomical spectra

  17. Spectrophotometric and pH-Metric Studies of Ce(III, Dy(III, Gd(III,Yb(III and Pr(III Metal Complexes with Rifampicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Sonar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The metal-ligand and proton-ligand stability constant of Ce(III, Dy(III, Gd(III,Yb(III and Pr(III metals with substituted heterocyclic drug (Rifampicin were determined at various ionic strength by pH metric titration. NaClO4 was used to maintain ionic strength of solution. The results obtained were extrapolated to the zero ionic strength using an equation with one individual parameter. The thermodynamic stability constant of the complexes were also calculated. The formation of complexes has been studied by Job’s method. The results obtained were of stability constants by pH metric method is confirmed by Job’s method.

  18. Breast Diagnosis: Concordance Analysis Between the BI-RADS Classification and Tsukuba Sonoelastography Score

    Science.gov (United States)

    DUMA, MARIA MAGDALENA; CHIOREAN, ANGELICA RITA; CHIOREAN, MARCO; BOLBOACA, SORANA DANIELA; FLOREA, MADALINA; FEIER, DIANA SORINA; RUSU, GEORGETA MIHAELA; SFRANGEU, SILVIU ANDREI

    2014-01-01

    Aims. To establish the correlations between the ultrasound (US) BI-RADS classification and Tsukuba elastography score when assessing breast lesions. To determine which type of breast lesion (BI-RADS category) would benefit most from an elastographic assessment. Patients and methods. The investigated sample of imaging comprised a number of 129 images belonging to 92 subjects examined with a Hitachi 8500 US device. Each lesion was assessed according to the BI-RADS and Tsukuba elastography score. Histopathology was obtained by means of percutaneous biopsy or post-surgery. Fibroadenoma-like lesions unchanged over a period of 3 years were considered benign. Results. The 1, 2 and BGR Tsukuba scores mostly correlated with BI-RADS II and III lesions such as cysts, hamartomas, lipomas, hematomas, non-palpable fibroadenomas. Palpable fibroadenomas initially included in BI-RADS IVa/b category, usually received benign elasticity scores (1 or 2), the exception being represented by a minority of cases of old, fibrotic or calcified lesions (elastic score 3 or 4). Non-specific BI-RADS IVa/b lesions, such as mastopathic nodules demonstrated rather soft, elastic properties on elastogram (score 1 or 2). The 4 and 5 Ueno-Itoh scores were predominantly correlated with BI-RADS IVc and V categories represented by high risk lesions (radial scar, papillomas, atypical epithelial ductal hyperplasia) and in situ or invasive carcinomas. Conclusions. Generally the BI-RADS classification correlates well with the Tsukuba elasticity score, the main exception being represented by fibrotic, calcified lesions which falsely appear more suspicious post-elastography. BI-RADS III and IV lesions would benefit most from an elastographic assessment, a low Tsukuba score allowing a less invasive approach, while a high score imposes histopathological evaluation. PMID:26528032

  19. Breast Diagnosis: Concordance Analysis Between the BI-RADS Classification and Tsukuba Sonoelastography Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duma, Maria Magdalena; Chiorean, Angelica Rita; Chiorean, Marco; Bolboaca, Sorana Daniela; Florea, Madalina; Feier, Diana Sorina; Rusu, Georgeta Mihaela; Sfrangeu, Silviu Andrei

    2014-01-01

    To establish the correlations between the ultrasound (US) BI-RADS classification and Tsukuba elastography score when assessing breast lesions. To determine which type of breast lesion (BI-RADS category) would benefit most from an elastographic assessment. The investigated sample of imaging comprised a number of 129 images belonging to 92 subjects examined with a Hitachi 8500 US device. Each lesion was assessed according to the BI-RADS and Tsukuba elastography score. Histopathology was obtained by means of percutaneous biopsy or post-surgery. Fibroadenoma-like lesions unchanged over a period of 3 years were considered benign. The 1, 2 and BGR Tsukuba scores mostly correlated with BI-RADS II and III lesions such as cysts, hamartomas, lipomas, hematomas, non-palpable fibroadenomas. Palpable fibroadenomas initially included in BI-RADS IVa/b category, usually received benign elasticity scores (1 or 2), the exception being represented by a minority of cases of old, fibrotic or calcified lesions (elastic score 3 or 4). Non-specific BI-RADS IVa/b lesions, such as mastopathic nodules demonstrated rather soft, elastic properties on elastogram (score 1 or 2). The 4 and 5 Ueno-Itoh scores were predominantly correlated with BI-RADS IVc and V categories represented by high risk lesions (radial scar, papillomas, atypical epithelial ductal hyperplasia) and in situ or invasive carcinomas. Generally the BI-RADS classification correlates well with the Tsukuba elasticity score, the main exception being represented by fibrotic, calcified lesions which falsely appear more suspicious post-elastography. BI-RADS III and IV lesions would benefit most from an elastographic assessment, a low Tsukuba score allowing a less invasive approach, while a high score imposes histopathological evaluation.

  20. Graphics Gems III IBM version

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, David

    1994-01-01

    This sequel to Graphics Gems (Academic Press, 1990), and Graphics Gems II (Academic Press, 1991) is a practical collection of computer graphics programming tools and techniques. Graphics Gems III contains a larger percentage of gems related to modeling and rendering, particularly lighting and shading. This new edition also covers image processing, numerical and programming techniques, modeling and transformations, 2D and 3D geometry and algorithms,ray tracing and radiosity, rendering, and more clever new tools and tricks for graphics programming. Volume III also includes a

  1. Risk prediction of hospital mortality for adult patients admitted to Australian and New Zealand intensive care units: development and validation of the Australian and New Zealand Risk of Death model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Eldho; Bailey, Michael; Pilcher, David

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and validate a new mortality prediction model (Australian and New Zealand Risk of Death [ANZROD]) for Australian and New Zealand intensive care units (ICUs) and compare its performance with the existing Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) III-j. All ICU admissions from 2004 to 2009 were extracted from the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Adult Patient Database. Hospital mortality was modeled using logistic regression with training (two third) and validation (one third) data sets. Predictor variables included APACHE III score components, source of admission to ICU and hospital, lead time, elective surgery, treatment limitation, ventilation status, and APACHE III diagnoses. Model performance was assessed by standardized mortality ratio, Hosmer-Lemeshow C and H statistics, Brier score, Cox calibration regression, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, and calibration curves. There were 456605 patients available for model development and validation. Observed mortality was 11.3%. Performance measures (standardized mortality ratio, Hosmer-Lemeshow C and H statistics, and receiver operating characteristic curve) for the ANZROD and APACHE III-j model in the validation data set were 1.01, 104.9 and 111.4, and 0.902; 0.84, 1596.6 and 2087.3, and 0.885, respectively. The ANZROD has better calibration; discrimination compared with the APACHE III-j. Further research is required to validate performance over time and in specific subgroups of ICU population. © 2013.

  2. Cardiac risk scores in high-risk Hispanics and the predictive value of BNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macabasco-O'Connell, Aurelia; Danwalder, Sara; Sinha, Karabi

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to calculate cardiac risk scores in Hispanic subjects and to determine the predictive value of adding B-type natriuretic peptide in identifying those with asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction as a measure of cardiovascular disease. Hispanics have higher rates of cardiovascular risk factors leading to coronary heart disease, asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction and cardiovascular events. Assessing cardiac risk in these groups is important to identify those at high risk for future cardiovascular events. The use of biomarkers such as B-type natriuretic peptide may increase the accuracy of risk prediction. This study used a descriptive, cross-sectional study design to determine the utility of the standard risk assessment tools (Adult Treatment Panel III and the Framingham Risk Scores risk calculator) and the B-type natriuretic peptide biomarker to estimate coronary heart disease risk in low-income, Hispanic participants. A sample of 71 patients (age 52 SD 11, 69% female) with multiple cardiovascular risk factors seen at an ambulatory clinic at a county facility was enrolled in the study. Sociodemographic and medical history information were obtained. Two widely used risk calculators (Adult Treatment Panel III and Framingham Risk Scores) were used to estimate 10-year coronary heart disease risk in each subject. Baseline B-type natriuretic peptide measurement and echocardiography were performed with each subject to evaluate presence of asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction. Receiver operating curve analyses were performed to compare predictability, sensitivity and specificity of the traditional risk scores against the B-type natriuretic peptide level to detect asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction. Overall mean risk scores were 5% (SD 5%) (Adult Treatment Panel III) and 10% (SD 7%) (Framingham Risk Scores). Mean B-type natriuretic peptide levels were 108·5 (SD 191·5) pg/ml. Echocardiogram results revealed a high

  3. Timely management of developing class III malocclusion

    OpenAIRE

    M R Yelampalli; M R Rachala

    2012-01-01

    Timing of orthodontic treatment, especially for children with developing class III malocclusions, has always been somewhat controversial, and definitive treatment tends to be delayed for severe class III cases. Developing class III patients with moderate to severe anterior crossbite and deep bite may need early intervention in some selected cases. Class III malocclusion may develop in children as a result of an inherent growth abnormality, i.e. true class III malocclusion, or as a result of p...

  4. Performance of children with epilepsy and normal age-matched controls on the WISC-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Stephanie D; Burns, Thomas G; Borden, Kristine A

    2006-06-01

    Research findings regarding the effects of childhood epilepsy on general intelligence have produced variable results. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of epilepsy, age of seizure onset, and Antiepileptic Drugs (AED) on intellectual ability as assessed by the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, 3rd Edition (WISC-III; Wechsler, 1991). This study included children with epilepsy assessed with the WISC-III who achieved either a Full Scale, Verbal Scale, or Performance Scale IQ score >or= 70. A clinical sample of children diagnosed with epilepsy (n = 32) were age- and gender-matched with subjects from the normative standardization sample for the WISC-III, yielding a total sample of 64 subjects. Comparison using a MANOVA revealed significant differences across WISC-III Index standard scores (p = 0.0005) and subtest scaled scores (p = 0.0013), with control participants performing better than epileptic participants. Secondary analyses were also conducted considering monotherapy (n = 14) versus polytherapy (n = 11), and age of seizure onset ( years, n = 15). MANOVA comparisons revealed no significant differences between groups across WISC-III Index standard scores.

  5. Combination of scoring schemes for protein docking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schomburg Dietmar

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Docking algorithms are developed to predict in which orientation two proteins are likely to bind under natural conditions. The currently used methods usually consist of a sampling step followed by a scoring step. We developed a weighted geometric correlation based on optimised atom specific weighting factors and combined them with our previously published amino acid specific scoring and with a comprehensive SVM-based scoring function. Results The scoring with the atom specific weighting factors yields better results than the amino acid specific scoring. In combination with SVM-based scoring functions the percentage of complexes for which a near native structure can be predicted within the top 100 ranks increased from 14% with the geometric scoring to 54% with the combination of all scoring functions. Especially for the enzyme-inhibitor complexes the results of the ranking are excellent. For half of these complexes a near-native structure can be predicted within the first 10 proposed structures and for more than 86% of all enzyme-inhibitor complexes within the first 50 predicted structures. Conclusion We were able to develop a combination of different scoring schemes which considers a series of previously described and some new scoring criteria yielding a remarkable improvement of prediction quality.

  6. Oswestry Disability Index scoring made easy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, A; Baker, D; Disney, S; Pynsent, P B

    2008-09-01

    Low back pain effects up to 80% of the population at some time during their active life. Questionnaires are available to help measure pain and disability. The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) is the most commonly used outcome measure for low back pain. The aim of this study was to see if training in completing the ODI forms improved the scoring accuracy. The last 100 ODI forms completed in a hospital's spinal clinic were reviewed retrospectively and errors in the scoring were identified. Staff members involved in scoring the questionnaire were made aware of the errors and the correct method of scoring explained. A chart was created with all possible scores to aid the staff with scoring. A prospective audit on 50 questionnaires was subsequently performed. The retrospective study showed that 33 of the 100 forms had been incorrectly scored. All questionnaires where one or more sections were not completed by the patient were incorrectly scored. A scoring chart was developed and staff training was implemented. This reduced the error rate to 14% in the prospective audit. Clinicians applying outcome measures should read the appropriate literature to ensure they understand the scoring system. Staff must then be given adequate training in the application of the questionnaires.

  7. Forecasting the value of credit scoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Shakila; Ahmad, Noryati; Jaffar, Maheran Mohd

    2017-08-01

    Nowadays, credit scoring system plays an important role in banking sector. This process is important in assessing the creditworthiness of customers requesting credit from banks or other financial institutions. Usually, the credit scoring is used when customers send the application for credit facilities. Based on the score from credit scoring, bank will be able to segregate the "good" clients from "bad" clients. However, in most cases the score is useful at that specific time only and cannot be used to forecast the credit worthiness of the same applicant after that. Hence, bank will not know if "good" clients will always be good all the time or "bad" clients may become "good" clients after certain time. To fill up the gap, this study proposes an equation to forecast the credit scoring of the potential borrowers at a certain time by using the historical score related to the assumption. The Mean Absolute Percentage Error (MAPE) is used to measure the accuracy of the forecast scoring. Result shows the forecast scoring is highly accurate as compared to actual credit scoring.

  8. The Mystery of the Z-Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Alexander E; Smith, Tanya A; Ziganshin, Bulat A; Elefteriades, John A

    2016-08-01

    Reliable methods for measuring the thoracic aorta are critical for determining treatment strategies in aneurysmal disease. Z-scores are a pragmatic alternative to raw diameter sizes commonly used in adult medicine. They are particularly valuable in the pediatric population, who undergo rapid changes in physical development. The advantage of the Z-score is its inclusion of body surface area (BSA) in determining whether an aorta is within normal size limits. Therefore, Z-scores allow us to determine whether true pathology exists, which can be challenging in growing children. In addition, Z-scores allow for thoughtful interpretation of aortic size in different genders, ethnicities, and geographical regions. Despite the advantages of using Z-scores, there are limitations. These include intra- and inter-observer bias, measurement error, and variations between alternative Z-score nomograms and BSA equations. Furthermore, it is unclear how Z-scores change in the normal population over time, which is essential when interpreting serial values. Guidelines for measuring aortic parameters have been developed by the American Society of Echocardiography Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Council, which may reduce measurement bias when calculating Z-scores for the aortic root. In addition, web-based Z-score calculators have been developed to aid in efficient Z-score calculations. Despite these advances, clinicians must be mindful of the limitations of Z-scores, especially when used to demonstrate beneficial treatment effect. This review looks to unravel the mystery of the Z-score, with a focus on the thoracic aorta. Here, we will discuss how Z-scores are calculated and the limitations of their use.

  9. Development of the siriraj clinical asthma score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichyanond, Pakit; Veskitkul, Jittima; Rienmanee, Nuanphong; Pacharn, Punchama; Jirapongsananuruk, Orathai; Visitsunthorn, Nualanong

    2013-09-01

    Acute asthmatic attack in children commonly occurs despite the introduction of effective controllers such as inhaled corticosteroids and leukotriene modifiers. Treatment of acute asthmatic attack requires proper evaluation of attack severity and appropriate selection of medical therapy. In children, measurement of lung function is difficult during acute attack and thus clinical asthma scoring may aid physician in making further decision regarding treatment and admission. We enrolled 70 children with acute asthmatic attack with age range from 1 to 12 years (mean ± SD = 51.5 ± 31.8 months) into the study. Twelve selected asthma severity items were assessed by 2 independent observers prior to administration of salbutamol nebulization (up to 3 doses at 20 minutes interval). Decision for further therapy and admission was made by emergency department physician. Three different scoring systems were constructed from items with best validity. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of these scores were assessed. Inter-rater reliability was assessed for each score. Review of previous scoring systems was also conducted and reported. Three severity items had poor validity, i.e., cyanosis, depressed cerebral function, and I:E ratio (p > 0.05). Three items had poor inter-rater reliability, i.e., breath sound quality, air entry, and I:E ratio. These items were omitted and three new clinical scores were constructed from the remaining items. Clinical scoring system comprised retractions, dyspnea, O2 saturation, respiratory rate and wheezing (rangeof score 0-10) gave the best accuracy and inter-rater variability and were chosen for clinical use-Siriraj Clinical Asthma Score (SCAS). A Clinical Asthma Score that is simple, relatively easy to administer and with good validity and variability is essential for treatment of acute asthma in children. Several good candidate scores have been introduced in the past. We described the development of the Siriraj Clinical Asthma Score (SCAS) in

  10. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S; Farnaby, Joy H; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G; Love, Jason B; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal-ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on U(III) and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to Np(IV). Here we report the synthesis of three new Np(III) organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that Np(III) complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of Np(II) is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key Np(III) orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements.

  11. Comparative study of four maxillofacial trauma scoring systems and expert score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Zhang, Yi; An, Jin-gang; He, Yang; Gong, Xi

    2014-11-01

    To select a scoring system suitable for the scoring of maxillofacial trauma by comparing 4 commonly used scoring systems according to expert scoring. Twenty-eight subjects who had experienced maxillofacial trauma constituted the study cohort. Four commonly used systems were selected: New Injury Severity Score (NISS), Facial Injury Severity Scale (FISS), Maxillofacial Injury Severity Score (MFISS), and Maxillofacial Injury Severity Score (MISS). Each patient was graded using these 4 systems. From the experience of our trauma center, an expert scoring table was created. After the purpose and scheme of the study had been explained, 35 experts in maxillofacial surgery were invited to grade the injury of the 28 patients using the expert scoring table according to their clinical experience. The results of the 4 scoring systems and expert score were compared. The results of the 4 scoring systems and expert score demonstrated a normal distribution. All results demonstrated significant differences (P expert score was the greatest (0.801). The correlation coefficient between the NISS, FISS, and MISS and the expert score was 0.714, 0.699, and 0.729, respectively. Agreement between the standardized scores and the expert score was evaluated using Bland-Altman plots; the agreement between the standardized MFISS and expert score was the best. Compared with the other 3 scoring systems, the correlation and agreement between the MFISS and expert score was greater. This finding suggests that the MFISS is more suitable for scoring maxillofacial injuries. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Correlation between Single Assessment Numerical Evaluation score and Lysholm score in primary total knee arthroplasty patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted Sueyoshi, ATC, PES

    2018-03-01

    Conclusions: The results of the investigation showed that there was a statistically significant, however relatively weak, correlation between SANE score and Lysholm score. SANE score may serve as an alternative method to assess TKA patients' subjective post-operative outcomes to Lysholm score.

  13. Evaluation of the effects of implementing an electronic early warning score system: protocol for a stepped wedge study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnici, Timothy; Gerry, Stephen; Wong, David; Knight, Julia; Watkinson, Peter

    2016-02-09

    An Early Warning Score is a clinical risk score based upon vital signs intended to aid recognition of patients in need of urgent medical attention. The use of an escalation of care policy based upon an Early Warning Score is mandated as the standard of practice in British hospitals. Electronic systems for recording vital sign observations and Early Warning Score calculation offer theoretical benefits over paper-based systems. However, the evidence for their clinical benefit is limited. Previous studies have shown inconsistent results. The majority have employed a "before and after" study design, which may be strongly confounded by simultaneously occurring events. This study aims to examine how the implementation of an electronic early warning score system, System for Notification and Documentation (SEND), affects the recognition of clinical deterioration occurring in hospitalised adult patients. This study is a non-randomised stepped wedge evaluation carried out across the four hospitals of the Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, comparing charting on paper and charting using SEND. We assume that more frequent monitoring of acutely ill patients is associated with better recognition of patient deterioration. The primary outcome measure is the time between a patient's first observations set with an Early Warning Score above the alerting threshold and their subsequent set of observations. Secondary outcome measures are in-hospital mortality, cardiac arrest and Intensive Care admission rates, hospital length of stay and system usability measured using the System Usability Scale. We will also measure Intensive Care length of stay, Intensive Care mortality, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II acute physiology score on admission, to examine whether the introduction of SEND has any effect on Intensive Care-related outcomes. The development of this protocol has been informed by guidance from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ

  14. Structural Validity of the Dutch-Language Version of the WAIS-III in a Psychiatric Sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, P.T. van der; Bos, P. van den; Mol, B.A.W.; Kessels, R.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV; Wechsler, 2008) no longer provides the traditional Verbal IQ and Performance IQ deviation scores. In the current study, we investigated the structural validity of these scores in the scale's predecessor, the WAIS-Third Edition (WAIS-III;

  15. The Bayley-III accommodated for motor and/or visual impairment : “Low motor/vision version”

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Linda; van der Meulen, Bieuwe; Ruiter, Selma; Timmerman, Marieke; Ruijssenaars, Wied; Visser, Linda; van der Meulen, B.F.

    The Bayley-III has worldwide attention from researchers. We consider three examples of current research, which focus in some way on over- or underestimation. Susan Milne will make a strong case for the use of developmental quotient scores instead of the usual standardized scores. Linda Visser will

  16. Regulatory activity based risk model identifies survival of stage II and III colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Dong, Chuanpeng; Wang, Xing; Hou, Guojun; Zheng, Yu; Xu, Huilin; Zhan, Xiaohui; Liu, Lei

    2017-11-17

    Clinical and pathological indicators are inadequate for prognosis of stage II and III colorectal carcinoma (CRC). In this study, we utilized the activity of regulatory factors, univariate Cox regression and random forest for variable selection and developed a multivariate Cox model to predict the overall survival of Stage II/III colorectal carcinoma in GSE39582 datasets (469 samples). Patients in low-risk group showed a significant longer overall survival and recurrence-free survival time than those in high-risk group. This finding was further validated in five other independent datasets (GSE14333, GSE17536, GSE17537, GSE33113, and GSE37892). Besides, associations between clinicopathological information and risk score were analyzed. A nomogram including risk score was plotted to facilitate the utilization of risk score. The risk score model is also demonstrated to be effective on predicting both overall and recurrence-free survival of chemotherapy received patients. After performing Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) between high and low risk groups, we found that several cell-cell interaction KEGG pathways were identified. Funnel plot results showed that there was no publication bias in these datasets. In summary, by utilizing the regulatory activity in stage II and III colorectal carcinoma, the risk score successfully predicts the survival of 1021 stage II/III CRC patients in six independent datasets.

  17. The development and evaluation of a new shoulder scoring system based on the view of patients and physicians: the Fudan University shoulder score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yunshen; Chen, Shiyi; Chen, Jiwu; Hua, Yinghui; Li, Yunxia

    2013-04-01

    greater than 0.7. In addition, the intraclass correlation coefficient was greater than 0.9 during a 2-week test-retest interval, indicating high reliability, and the standardized response mean of the new system was greater than that of the other 3 scoring systems, indicating sensitive responsiveness. A new shoulder scoring system has been developed based on patients' and physicians' points of view and worldwide applicability and was verified to be valid, reliable, and responsive. The new scoring system includes a 2-dimensional visual analog scale, night pain subscale, and patient-physician satisfaction scale, which are not included in the existing scoring systems. Level III, development of diagnostic criteria. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Building Energy Asset Score for Building Owners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Building Technologies Office

    2015-01-01

    The Building Energy Asset Score is a national standardized tool for evaluating the physical and structural energy efficiency of commercial and multifamily residential buildings. The Asset Score generates a simple energy efficiency rating that enables comparison among buildings, and identifies opportunities for users to invest in energy efficiency upgrades. It is web-based and free to use. This fact sheet discusses the value of the score for building owners.

  19. Building Energy Asset Score for Architects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Building Technologies Office

    2015-01-01

    The Building Energy Asset Score is a national standardized tool for evaluating the physical and structural energy efficiency of commercial and multifamily residential buildings. The Asset Score generates a simple energy efficiency rating that enables comparison among buildings, and identifies opportunities for users to invest in energy efficiency upgrades. It is web-based and free to use. This fact sheet discusses the value of the score for architects.

  20. Updating to the WAIS-III and WMS-III: considerations for research and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulsky, David S; Ledbetter, Mark F

    2000-09-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) and the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) are the most commonly used intelligence and memory scales in both clinical and neuropsychology. In 1997, updated versions of these instruments (the WAIS-III and WMS-III) were published. Because of the extensive use of the WAIS-R and WMS-R in the field and the body of accumulated research, there is naturally some reluctance by clinicians and researchers to update to the new versions. It is sometimes difficult for clinicians who test individuals on repeated occasions to switch over to the new versions of the scales because of the difficulty of interpreting score discrepancy between the 2 versions. Researchers, especially those conducting longitudinal research, have a similar difficulty in changing measurement devices because of the possible threat of internal validity. This article reviews the substantive revisions of the scales and outlines those issues that users should take into consideration when updating to the new versions.

  1. Recognition Using Classification and Segmentation Scoring

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kimball, Owen; Ostendorf, Mari; Rohlicek, Robin

    1992-01-01

    .... We describe an approach to connected word recognition that allows the use of segmental information through an explicit decomposition of the recognition criterion into classification and segmentation scoring...

  2. Reliability Assessment of an Innovative Wound Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Michael B; Moon, Hojin; Busch, Jeremy A; Jones, Christopher K; Nhan, Lisa; Miller, Stuart; Le, Phi-Nga Jeannie

    2016-06-01

    The authors describe an innovative wound score and demonstrate its versatility for scoring a variety of wound types in addition to diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). To further test its merits, they determined its interobserver reliability in a prospective series of patients. The Wound Score system the authors created integrates the most important features of 4 predominantly used wound scoring systems. It utilizes a logical 0 to 10 format based on 5 assessments each graded from 2 (best) to 0 (worst). The versatility and reliability of the Wound Score were studied in a prospective series of 94 patients with lower extremity wounds. The Wound Score was quick to determine, applicable to a variety of wound types and locations, and highly objective for grading the severity of each of the 5 assessments. The Wound Score categorized wound types as "healthy," "problem," or "futile" for evaluation and management. Diabetes was present in 75.9%, with 70% of the DFUs scoring in the "problem" wound range. Interobserver reli- ability was high (r = 0.81). The objectivity, versatility, and reliability of the Wound Score system facilitates making decisions about the management of wounds, whether DFUs or not, and provides quantification for compara- tive effectiveness research for wound management.

  3. French adaptation of the new Knee Society Scoring System for total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debette, C; Parratte, S; Maucort-Boulch, D; Blanc, G; Pauly, V; Lustig, S; Servien, E; Neyret, P; Argenson, J N

    2014-09-01

    In November 2011, the Knee Society published its new KSS score to evaluate objective clinical data and also patient expectations, satisfaction and knee function during various physical activities before and after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We undertook the French cross-cultural adaptation of this scoring system according to current recommendations. The French version of the new KSS score is a consistent, feasible, reliable and discriminating score. Eighty patients with knee osteoarthritis were recruited from two centers: one group of 40 patients had a TKA indication, while the other group of 40 patients had an indication for conservative treatment. After the new KSS score was translated and back-translated, it was compared to three other validated instruments (KOOS, AMIQUAL and SF-12) to determine construct validity, discriminating power, feasibility in terms of response rate and existence of floor or ceiling effect, internal consistency with Chronbach's alpha and reliability based on reproducibility and sensitivity to change (responsiveness). Due to missing data, two cases were eliminated. We found that the score could discriminate between groups; it had a nearly 100% response rate, a ceiling effect in the "expectations" domain, satisfactory Chronbach's alpha, excellent reproducibility and good responsiveness. These results confirm that the French version of the new KSS score is reliable, feasible, discriminating, consistent and responsive. The novelty of this scoring system resides in the "expectations" and "satisfaction" domains, its availability as a self-assessment questionnaire and the evaluation of function during various activities. Level III. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Sorption of trace amounts of gallium (III) on iron (III) oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.; Gessner, M.; Wolf, R.H.H.

    1979-01-01

    The sorption of trace amounts of gallium(III) on iron(III) oxide has been studied as a function of pH. Optimum conditions have been found for the preconcentration of traces of gallium(III) by iron(III) oxide. The influence of surface active substances and of complexing agents on the sorption of trace amounts of gallium(III) on iron(III) oxide has been also studied. (orig.) [de

  5. Bayesian Model Averaging for Propensity Score Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, David; Chen, Jianshen

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore Bayesian model averaging in the propensity score context. Previous research on Bayesian propensity score analysis does not take into account model uncertainty. In this regard, an internally consistent Bayesian framework for model building and estimation must also account for model uncertainty. The…

  6. The Absolute Normal Scores Test for Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penfield, Douglas A.; Sachdeva, Darshan

    1976-01-01

    The absolute normal scores test is described as a test for the symmetry of a distribution of scores about a location parameter. The test is compared to the sign test and the Wilcoxon test as an alternative to the "t"-test. (Editor/RK)

  7. Comparability of IQ scores over time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Must, O.; te Nijenhuis, J.; Must, A.; van Vianen, A.E.M.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the comparability of IQ scores. Three cohorts (1933/36, 1997/98, 2006) of Estonian students (N = 2173) are compared using the Estonian National Intelligence Test. After 72 years the secular rise of the IQ test scores is.79 SD. The mean .16 SD increase in the last 8 years

  8. Correlating continuous assessment scores to junior secondary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the relationship between continuous assessment scores and junior secondary school certificate examination(JSCE) final scores in Imo State. A sample of four hundred students were purposively selected from thirty eight thousand students who took the 1997 JSCE in Imo State. The data used were ...

  9. Semiparametric Copula Models for Biometric Score Level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caselli, M.

    2016-01-01

    In biometric recognition systems, biometric samples (images of faces, finger- prints, voices, gaits, etc.) of people are compared and classifiers (matchers) indicate the level of similarity between any pair of samples by a score. If two samples of the same person are compared, a genuine score is

  10. School Inputs, Household Substitution, and Test Scores

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Jishnu; Dercon, Stefan; Krishnan, Pramila; Sundararaman, Venkatesh; Muralidharan, Karthik; Habyarimana, James

    2013-01-01

    Empirical studies of the relationship between school inputs and test scores typically do not account for the fact that households will respond to changes in school inputs. This paper presents a dynamic household optimization model relating test scores to school and household inputs, and tests its predictions in two very different low-income country settings -- Zambia and India. The authors...

  11. Surgical Apgar Score Predicts Post- Laparatomy Complications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The Surgical Apgar score (SAS) presents a simple, immediate and an objective means of determining surgical outcomes. The score has not been widely validated in low resource settings where it would be most valuable. This study aimed to evaluate its accuracy and applicability for patients undergoing ...

  12. Bayesian Model Averaging for Propensity Score Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, David; Chen, Jianshen

    2014-01-01

    This article considers Bayesian model averaging as a means of addressing uncertainty in the selection of variables in the propensity score equation. We investigate an approximate Bayesian model averaging approach based on the model-averaged propensity score estimates produced by the R package BMA but that ignores uncertainty in the propensity score. We also provide a fully Bayesian model averaging approach via Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling (MCMC) to account for uncertainty in both parameters and models. A detailed study of our approach examines the differences in the causal estimate when incorporating noninformative versus informative priors in the model averaging stage. We examine these approaches under common methods of propensity score implementation. In addition, we evaluate the impact of changing the size of Occam's window used to narrow down the range of possible models. We also assess the predictive performance of both Bayesian model averaging propensity score approaches and compare it with the case without Bayesian model averaging. Overall, results show that both Bayesian model averaging propensity score approaches recover the treatment effect estimates well and generally provide larger uncertainty estimates, as expected. Both Bayesian model averaging approaches offer slightly better prediction of the propensity score compared with the Bayesian approach with a single propensity score equation. Covariate balance checks for the case study show that both Bayesian model averaging approaches offer good balance. The fully Bayesian model averaging approach also provides posterior probability intervals of the balance indices.

  13. 24 CFR 902.63 - PHAS scoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... audit firm that will perform the audit of the PHA and may serve as the audit committee for the audit in... indicators. (b) Adjustments to the PHAS score. (1) Adjustments to the score may be made after a PHA's audit... changed by HUD in accordance with data included in the independent audit report, or obtained through such...

  14. Mechatronic systems and materials III

    CERN Document Server

    Gosiewski, Zdzislaw

    2009-01-01

    This very interesting volume is divided into 24 sections; each of which covers, in detail, one aspect of the subject-matter: I. Industrial robots; II. Microrobotics; III. Mobile robots; IV. Teleoperation, telerobotics, teleoperated semi-autonomous systems; V. Sensors and actuators in mechatronics; VI. Control of mechatronic systems; VII. Analysis of vibration and deformation; VIII. Optimization, optimal design; IX. Integrated diagnostics; X. Failure analysis; XI. Tribology in mechatronic systems; XII. Analysis of signals; XIII. Measurement techniques; XIV. Multifunctional and smart materials;

  15. Revised SNAP III Training Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, Calvin Elroy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gonzales, Samuel M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Myers, William L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nelson, Mark Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rothrock, Richard Brian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Salazar, Samuel A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sorensen, Eric Byron [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sundby, Gary M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-21

    The Shielded Neutron Assay Probe (SNAP) technique was developed to determine the leakage neutron source strength of a radioactive object. The original system consisted of an EberlineTM Mini-scaler and discrete neutron detector. The system was operated by obtaining the count rate with the EberlineTM instrument, determining the absolute efficiency from a graph, and calculating the neutron source strength by hand. In 2003 the SNAP III, shown in Figure 1, was designed and built. It required the operator to position the SNAP, and then measure the source-to-detector and detectorto- reflector distances. Next the operator entered the distance measurements and started the data acquisition. The SNAP acquired the required count rate and then calculated and displayed the leakage neutron source strength (NSS). The original design of the SNAP III is described in SNAP III Training Manual (ER-TRN-PLN-0258, Rev. 0, January 2004, prepared by William Baird) This report describes some changes that have been made to the SNAP III. One important change is the addition of a LEMO connector to provide neutron detection output pulses for input to the MC-15. This feature is useful in active interrogation with a neutron generator because the MC-15 has the capability to only record data when it is not gated off by a pulse from the neutron generator. This avoids recording of a lot of data during the generator pulses that are not useful. Another change was the replacement of the infrared RS-232 serial communication output by a similar output via a 4-pin LEMO connector. The current document includes a more complete explanation of how to estimate the amount of moderation around a neutron-emitting source.

  16. The Negotiation of Basel III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Just, Sine Nørholm

    2015-01-01

    While the Basel Accords of 1988 and 2004 (Basel I and Basel II) ostensibly set out to regulate bank risk at the international level, they were effectively in the grip of neoliberal beliefs in the self-regulating potential of free markets. In 2009–2011, the Basel Accords were revised once more wit...... agency, the empirical argument is substantiated through textual–intertextual analysis of the rhetorical circulation of affective signs in the Basel III negotiations....

  17. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S.; Farnaby, Joy H.; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G.; Love, Jason B.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L.

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal-ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on UIII and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to NpIV. Here we report the synthesis of three new NpIII organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that NpIII complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of NpII is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key NpIII orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements.

  18. RAId_aPS: MS/MS analysis with multiple scoring functions and spectrum-specific statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Gelio; Ogurtsov, Aleksey Y; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2010-11-16

    Statistically meaningful comparison/combination of peptide identification results from various search methods is impeded by the lack of a universal statistical standard. Providing an E-value calibration protocol, we demonstrated earlier the feasibility of translating either the score or heuristic E-value reported by any method into the textbook-defined E-value, which may serve as the universal statistical standard. This protocol, although robust, may lose spectrum-specific statistics and might require a new calibration when changes in experimental setup occur. To mitigate these issues, we developed a new MS/MS search tool, RAId_aPS, that is able to provide spectrum-specific-values for additive scoring functions. Given a selection of scoring functions out of RAId score, K-score, Hyperscore and XCorr, RAId_aPS generates the corresponding score histograms of all possible peptides using dynamic programming. Using these score histograms to assign E-values enables a calibration-free protocol for accurate significance assignment for each scoring function. RAId_aPS features four different modes: (i) compute the total number of possible peptides for a given molecular mass range, (ii) generate the score histogram given a MS/MS spectrum and a scoring function, (iii) reassign E-values for a list of candidate peptides given a MS/MS spectrum and the scoring functions chosen, and (iv) perform database searches using selected scoring functions. In modes (iii) and (iv), RAId_aPS is also capable of combining results from different scoring functions using spectrum-specific statistics. The web link is http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Yu/raid_aps/index.html. Relevant binaries for Linux, Windows, and Mac OS X are available from the same page.

  19. A STUDY OF PREDICTION OF DIFFICULT INTUBATION USING MALLAMPATI AND WILSON SCORE CORRELATING WITH CORMACK LEHANE GRADING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishali Chandrashekhar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : This study was carried out to evaluate usefulness of preoperative Mallampati & Wilson’s score grading as a predictor for difficult laryngoscopy & intubation . AIMS : To determine the accuracy of the modified Mallampati test and Wilson score for predicting difficult tracheal intubation and correlation with Cormack Lehane grading . METHODS : This prospective randomized cross sectional Study carried out in 200 patients , posted for surgical procedure under GA with ETT intubation. Preoperative airway assessment using Mallampati grading (MPG & Wilson score done. Conventional anesthesia t echnique followed. Cormack Lehane grading done at laryngoscopy & correlated with previous scores for each patient. RESULTS : A MPG of I/II was found in 140 patients (70% , while 60 patients (30% were class III/IV. 138 patients (69% had a Wilson score of 0 /1 , while 60(30% had a score of 2/3 and 2 patients (1% scored ≥4. One hundred & eighty patients (90% were classified as Cormack - Lehane grade I/II , while 20 patients (10% were considered grade III/IV. Of the 60 patients with a Wilson score of 2/3 , 6 cas es (10% two attempts were required and in 2 cases (3.3% in spite of more than two attempts intubation proved impossible with the conventional laryngoscope , articulated McCoy blade was used. Two patients with a Wilson score ≥4 were intubated with gum elas tic bougie , using articulated McCoy blade. Overall , out of 200 , in 6 patients (3% two attempts of intubation was required and 4 patients (2% intubation required the use of some kind of gadget other than conventional laryngoscope and more than 2 attempts. The correlation between the Cormack - Lehane classification and the number of endotracheal intubation attempts showed that of the 180 patients with I / II grade , 4 patients (1.3% two attempts were required. Of the 20 patients classified as Cormack - Lehane III/IV , 4 cases (20% intubation proved impossible with conventional technique. This

  20. THE EFFICIENCY OF TENNIS DOUBLES SCORING SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoff Pollard

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a family of scoring systems for tennis doubles for testing the hypothesis that pair A is better than pair B versus the alternative hypothesis that pair B is better than A, is established. This family or benchmark of scoring systems can be used as a benchmark against which the efficiency of any doubles scoring system can be assessed. Thus, the formula for the efficiency of any doubles scoring system is derived. As in tennis singles, one scoring system based on the play-the-loser structure is shown to be more efficient than the benchmark systems. An expression for the relative efficiency of two doubles scoring systems is derived. Thus, the relative efficiency of the various scoring systems presently used in doubles can be assessed. The methods of this paper can be extended to a match between two teams of 2, 4, 8, …doubles pairs, so that it is possible to establish a measure for the relative efficiency of the various systems used for tennis contests between teams of players.

  1. The quantile score and its decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentzien, Sabrina; Friederichs, Petra

    2014-05-01

    Forecast verification for probabilistic weather and climate predictions gain more and more importance due to the increasing number of ensemble prediction systems. The predictive performance of probabilistic forecasts is generally assessed using proper score functions, which are applied to a set of forecast-observation pairs. The propriety of a score guarantees honesty and prevents hedging. A variety of proper scores exist for different types of probabilistic forecasts. Moreover, proper scoring functions can be decomposed into the three parts reliability, resolution, and uncertainty, which describe main characteristics of a forecasting scheme. This decomposition is well known for the Brier score and the continuous ranked probability score. This study expands the pool of verification methods for probabilistic forecasts by a decomposition of the quantile score (QS). Quantiles are suitable probabilistic measures especially for extreme forecast events, since they do not depend on an apriori defined threshold. The QS is a weighted absolute error between quantile forecasts and observations. We derive a decomposition of the QS in reliability, resolution, and uncertainty, and give a brief description of potential biases. A quantile reliability plot is presented. The quantile verification within this framework is illustrated on precipitation forecasts derived from the mesoscale ensemble prediction system COSMO-DE-EPS of the German Meteorological Service.

  2. A comparison between modified Alvarado score and RIPASA score in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Anand; Singla, Satpaul; Singh, Mohinder; Singla, Deeksha

    2016-12-01

    Acute appendicitis is a common but elusive surgical condition and remains a diagnostic dilemma. It has many clinical mimickers and diagnosis is primarily made on clinical grounds, leading to the evolution of clinical scoring systems for pin pointing the right diagnosis. The modified Alvarado and RIPASA scoring systems are two important scoring systems, for diagnosis of acute appendicitis. We prospectively compared the two scoring systems for diagnosing acute appendicitis in 50 patients presenting with right iliac fossa pain. The RIPASA score correctly classified 88 % of patients with histologically confirmed acute appendicitis compared with 48.0 % with modified Alvarado score, indicating that RIPASA score is more superior to Modified Alvarado score in our clinical settings.

  3. Comparability of the expanded WMS-III standardization protocol to the published WMS-III among right and left temporal lobectomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doss, R C; Chelune, G J; Naugle, R I

    2000-11-01

    We examined whether differences between the expanded standardization protocol (SP) used to derive norms for the final published version (PB) of the Wechsler Memory Scale - Third Edition (WMS-III; Wechsler, 1997a) would result in differences on the Primary Indexes in a neurologic sample. Specifically, we examined the comparability of the performances of 63 patients with temporal lobectomy (TL) who were administered either the expanded SP protocol (n = 33: 22 left TL and 11 right TL) or the PB battery (n = 30: 11 left TL and 19 right TL). Patients who were administered the SP or PB were comparable in terms of age, sex, education, seizure duration, postsurgical seizure status, and Full Scale IQ. Postoperative intervals were significantly longer for the SP group, although correlational analyses demonstrated no significant relationship between postoperative follow-up interval and WMS-III performance. A series of t tests revealed no significant differences on any of the eight Primary Index scores between patients taking the two versions of the WMS-III for either left or right TL groups. Furthermore, repeated measures analyses of variance failed to show significant differences on modality-specific memory scores between the SP and PB for the left and right TL groups. The current study indicates that temporal lobectomy patients obtained comparable scores on the two versions of the WMS-III.

  4. Scoring biosecurity in European conventional broiler production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Limbergen, T; Dewulf, J; Klinkenberg, M; Ducatelle, R; Gelaude, P; Méndez, J; Heinola, K; Papasolomontos, S; Szeleszczuk, P; Maes, D

    2018-01-01

    Good biosecurity procedures are crucial for healthy animal production. The aim of this study was to quantify the level of biosecurity on conventional broiler farms in Europe, following a standardized procedure, thereby trying to identify factors that are amenable to improvement. The current study used a risk-based weighted scoring system (biocheck.ugent ®) to assess the level of biosecurity on 399 conventional broiler farms in 5 EU member states. The scoring system consisted of 2 main categories, namely external and internal biosecurity, which had 8 and 3 subcategories, respectively. Biosecurity was quantified by converting the answers to 97 questions into a score from 0 to 100. The minimum score, "0," represents total absence of any biosecurity measure on the broiler farm, whereas the maximum score, "100," means full application of all investigated biosecurity measures. A possible correlation between biosecurity and farm characteristics was investigated by multivariate linear regression analysis. The participating broiler farms scored better for internal biosecurity (mean score of 76.6) than for external biosecurity (mean 68.4). There was variation between the mean biosecurity scores for the different member states, ranging from 59.8 to 78.0 for external biosecurity and from 63.0 to 85.6 for internal biosecurity. Within the category of external biosecurity, the subcategory related to "infrastructure and vectors" had the highest mean score (82.4), while the subcategory with the lowest score related to biosecurity procedures for "visitors and staff" (mean 51.5). Within the category of internal biosecurity, the subcategory "disease management" had the highest mean score (65.8). In the multivariate regression model a significant negative correlation was found between internal biosecurity and the number of employees and farm size. These findings indicate that there is a lot of variation for external and internal biosecurity on the participating broiler farms

  5. Exercise Testing Score for Myocardial Ischemia Gradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres Ricardo P. Riera

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Scores aimed at contributing to the optimization of exercise testing (ET have been developed and the experience with their application in coronary artery disease (CAD has proven to be favorable1. Although there is debate on the use of scores in clinical practice, those that stand for it argue that they may decrease the rate of undiagnosed CAD, besides reducing the number of patients without disease that undergo highly expensive tests2. Additionally, scores may be helpful, in a more consistent and organized fashion, in prognosis evaluation and in the adoption of an appropriate plan of action for the triage of this disease in the general population.

  6. Performance of an Automated Polysomnography Scoring System Versus Computer-Assisted Manual Scoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Atul; Younes, Magdy; Kuna, Samuel T.; Benca, Ruth; Kushida, Clete A.; Walsh, James; Hanlon, Alexandra; Staley, Bethany; Pack, Allan I.; Pien, Grace W.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Manual scoring of polysomnograms (PSG) is labor intensive and has considerable variance between scorers. Automation of scoring could reduce cost and improve reproducibility. The purpose of this study was to compare a new automated scoring system (YST-Limited, Winnipeg, Canada) with computer-assisted manual scoring. Design: Technical assessment. Setting: Five academic medical centers. Participants: N/A. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Seventy PSG files were selected at University of Pennsylvania (Penn) and distributed to five US academic sleep centers. Two blinded technologists from each center scored each file. Automatic scoring was performed at Penn by a YST Limited technician using a laptop containing the software. Variables examined were sleep stages, arousals, and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) using three methods of identifying hypopneas. Automatic scores were not edited and were compared to the average scores of the 10 technologists. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was obtained for the 70 pairs and compared to across-sites ICCs for manually scored results. ICCs for automatic versus manual scoring were > 0.8 for total sleep time, stage N2, and nonrapid eye movement arousals and > 0.9 for AHI scored by primary and secondary American Academy of Sleep Medicine criteria. ICCs for other variables were not as high but were comparable to the across-site ICCs for manually scored results. Conclusion: The automatic system yielded results that were similar to those obtained by experienced technologists. Very good ICCs were obtained for many primary PSG outcome measures. This automated scoring software, particularly if supplemented with manual editing, may increase laboratory efficiency and standardize PSG scoring results within and across sleep centers. Citation: Malhotra A; Younes M; Kuna ST; Benca R; Kushida CA; Walsh J; Hanlon A; Staley B; Pack AI; Pien GW. Performance of an automated polysomnography scoring system versus computer

  7. Do MCAT scores predict USMLE scores? An analysis on 5 years of medical student data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline L. Gauer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to determine the associations and predictive values of Medical College Admission Test (MCAT component and composite scores prior to 2015 with U.S. Medical Licensure Exam (USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 Clinical Knowledge (CK scores, with a focus on whether students scoring low on the MCAT were particularly likely to continue to score low on the USMLE exams. Method: Multiple linear regression, correlation, and chi-square analyses were performed to determine the relationship between MCAT component and composite scores and USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 CK scores from five graduating classes (2011–2015 at the University of Minnesota Medical School (N=1,065. Results: The multiple linear regression analyses were both significant (p<0.001. The three MCAT component scores together explained 17.7% of the variance in Step 1 scores (p<0.001 and 12.0% of the variance in Step 2 CK scores (p<0.001. In the chi-square analyses, significant, albeit weak associations were observed between almost all MCAT component scores and USMLE scores (Cramer's V ranged from 0.05 to 0.24. Discussion: Each of the MCAT component scores was significantly associated with USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 CK scores, although the effect size was small. Being in the top or bottom scoring range of the MCAT exam was predictive of being in the top or bottom scoring range of the USMLE exams, although the strengths of the associations were weak to moderate. These results indicate that MCAT scores are predictive of student performance on the USMLE exams, but, given the small effect sizes, should be considered as part of the holistic view of the student.

  8. Biculturalism and Native American College Students' Performance on the WAIS-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducheneaux, Teton; McDonald, J. D.

    This study investigated the impact of cultural identification of Native American college students on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III). It assessed the relationship between cultural identification and cognitive-testing scores between a group of off-reservation students attending the University of North Dakota (UND) and…

  9. Europium (III) and americium (III) stability constants with humic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, R.A.; Choppin, G.R.

    1984-01-01

    The stability constants for tracer concentrations of Eu(III) and Am(III) complexes with a humic acid extracted from a lake-bottom sediment were measured using a solvent extraction system. The organic extractant was di(2-ethylhexyl)-phosphoric acid in toluene while the humate aqueous phase had a constant ionic strength of 0.1 M (NaClO 4 ). Aqueous humic acid concentrations were monitored by measuring uv-visible absorbances at approx.= 380 nm. The total carboxylate capacity of the humic acid was determined by direct potentiometric titration to be 3.86 +- 0.03 meq/g. The humic acid displayed typical characteristics of a polyelectrolyte - the apparent pKsub(a), as well as the calculated metal ion stability constants increased as the degree of ionization (α) increased. The binding data required a fit of two stability constants, β 1 and β 2 , such that for Eu, log β 1 = 8.86 α + 4.39, log β 2 = 3.55 α + 11.06 while for Am, log β 1 = 10.58 α + 3.84, log β 2 = 5.32 α + 10.42. With hydroxide, carbonate, and humate as competing ligands, the humate complex associated with the β 1 constant is calculated to be the dominant species for the trivalent actinides and lanthanides under conditions present in natural waters. (orig.)

  10. Model for End-stage Liver Disease excluding INR (MELD-XI score in critically ill patients: Easily available and of prognostic relevance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Wernly

    Full Text Available MELD-XI, an adapted version of Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD score excluding INR, was reported to predict outcomes e.g. in patients with acute heart failure. We aimed to evaluate MELD-XI in critically ill patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU for prognostic relevance.A total of 4381 medical patients (66±14 years, 2862 male admitted to a German ICU between 2004 and 2009 were included and retrospectively investigated. Admission diagnoses were e.g. myocardial infarction (n = 2034, sepsis (n = 694 and heart failure (n = 688. We divided our patients in two cohorts basing on their MELD-XI score and evaluated the MELD-XI score for its prognostic relevance regarding short-term and long-term survival. Optimal cut-offs were calculated by means of the Youden-Index.Patients with a MELD-XI score >12 had pronounced laboratory signs of organ failure and more comorbidities. MELD-XI >12 was associated with an increase in short-term (27% vs 6%; HR 4.82, 95%CI 3.93-5.93; p<0.001 and long-term (HR 3.69, 95%CI 3.20-4.25; p<0.001 mortality. In a univariate Cox regression analysis for all patients MELD-XI was associated with increased long-term mortality (changes per score point: HR 1.06, 95%CI 1.05-1.07; p<0.001 and remained to be associated with increased mortality after correction in a multivariate regression analysis for renal failure, liver failure, lactate concentration, blood glucose concentration, oxygenation and white blood count (HR 1.04, 95%CI 1.03-1.06; p<0.001. Optimal cut-off for the overall cohort was 11 and varied remarkably depending on the admission diagnosis: myocardial infarction (9, pulmonary embolism (9, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (17 and pneumonia (17. We performed ROC-analysis and compared the AUC: SAPS2 (0.78, 95%CI 0.76-0.80; p<0.0001 and APACHE (0.76, 95%CI 0.74-0.78; p<0.003 score were superior to MELD-XI (0.71, 95%CI 0.68-0.73 for prediction of mortality.The easily calculable MELD-XI score is a robust and reliable

  11. Facilitating the Interpretation of English Language Proficiency Scores: Combining Scale Anchoring and Test Score Mapping Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Donald; Schedl, Mary; Papageorgiou, Spiros

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop, for the benefit of both test takers and test score users, enhanced "TOEFL ITP"® test score reports that go beyond the simple numerical scores that are currently reported. To do so, we applied traditional scale anchoring (proficiency scaling) to item difficulty data in order to develop performance…

  12. Acute decompensation boosts hepatic collagen type III deposition and deteriorates experimental and human cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Praktiknjo, Michael; Lehmann, Jennifer; Nielsen, Mette J

    2018-01-01

    Patients with end-stage liver disease develop acute decompensation (AD) episodes, which become more frequent and might develop into acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). However, it remains unknown how AD induces acceleration of liver disease. We hypothesized that remodeling of collagen type III...... Pro-C3 levels were associated with injury, disease severity scores (Model for End-Stage Liver Disease, Child-Pugh, chronic liver failure-C AD), ACLF development, and mortality. C3M decreased with AD and the chronic liver failure-C AD score. Collagen type III deposition ratio increased with the risk...... plays a role in the acceleration of liver cirrhosis after AD and analyzed its formation (Pro-C3) and degradation (matrix metalloproteinase-degraded type III collagen [C3M]) markers in animal models and human disease. Bile duct ligation induced different stages of liver fibrosis in rats. Fibrosis...

  13. Cardiovascular Risk Stratification in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome Without Diabetes or Cardiovascular Disease: Usefulness of Metabolic Syndrome Severity Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Walter; Epstein, Teo; Huerín, Melina; Lobo, Lorenzo Martín; Molinero, Graciela; Angel, Adriana; Masson, Gerardo; Millán, Diana; De Francesca, Salvador; Vitagliano, Laura; Cafferata, Alberto; Losada, Pablo

    2017-09-01

    The estimated cardiovascular risk determined by the different risk scores, could be heterogeneous in patients with metabolic syndrome without diabetes or vascular disease. This risk stratification could be improved by detecting subclinical carotid atheromatosis. To estimate the cardiovascular risk measured by different scores in patients with metabolic syndrome and analyze its association with the presence of carotid plaque. Non-diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome (Adult Treatment Panel III definition) without cardiovascular disease were enrolled. The Framingham score, the Reynolds score, the new score proposed by the 2013 ACC/AHA Guidelines and the Metabolic Syndrome Severity Calculator were calculated. Prevalence of carotid plaque was determined by ultrasound examination. A Receiver Operating Characteristic analysis was performed. A total of 238 patients were enrolled. Most patients were stratified as "low risk" by Framingham score (64%) and Reynolds score (70.1%). Using the 2013 ACC/AHA score, 45.3% of the population had a risk ≥7.5%. A significant correlation was found between classic scores but the agreement (concordance) was moderate. The correlation between classical scores and the Metabolic Syndrome Severity Calculator was poor. Overall, the prevalence of carotid plaque was 28.2%. The continuous metabolic syndrome score used in our study showed a good predictive power to detect carotid plaque (area under the curve 0.752). In this population, the calculated cardiovascular risk was heterogenic. The prevalence of carotid plaque was high. The Metabolic Syndrome Severity Calculator showed a good predictive power to detect carotid plaque.

  14. The relationship between performances on neuropsychological symptom validity testing and the MCMI-III in patients with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Larry; Johnson-Greene, Doug; Lattie, Emily; Ference, Tamar

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a disorder that frequently presents with both cognitive complaints and psychiatric symptoms. This study investigated the association between Symptom Validity Test (SVT) performance and psychiatric symptoms as measured by the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III), a common measure of psychopathology. A total of 72 fibromyalgia patients at a tertiary care clinic completed the MCMI-III, an embedded cognitive symptom validity test (Reliable Digit Span), and a stand-alone cognitive symptom validity test (the Word Memory Test or Test of Memory Malingering). Of these patients, 21% failed a stand-alone SVT, whereas an additional 15% failed both a stand-alone and embedded SVT. Individuals who failed both stand-alone and embedded cognitive SVTs had higher scores on a number of MCMI-III personality subscales and had elevated scores on MCMI-III modifying indices compared to individuals who passed cognitive SVTs. Moreover, SVT performance was significantly correlated with multiple MCMI-III scores, including modifying indices, as well as the somatoform, depression, and anxiety subscales. In sum, cognitive and psychological symptom validity scores were significantly related. Given the new emphasis on cognitive complaints as part of the fibromyalgia diagnostic criteria, neuropsychological evaluation of both cognitive and psychological symptom validity should be a part of a comprehensive diagnostic assessment.

  15. Recent results for Mark III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brient, J.C.

    1987-12-01

    This paper presents recent results from the Mark III detector at SPEAR, in the open charm sector. The first topic discussed is the reanalysis of the direct measurement of the D hadronic branching fractions, where a detailed study has been made of the Cabibbo suppressed and multi-π 0 's D decays backgrounds in the double tag sample. Next, the Dalitz plot analysis of the D decays to Kππ is presented, leading to the relative fractions of three-body versus pseudoscalarvector decays. 7 refs., 5 figs

  16. The use of perioperative serial blood lactate levels, the APACHE II and the postoperative MELD as predictors of early mortality after liver transplantation O uso da dosagem seriada do lactato sérico no perioperatório, do APACHE II e do MELD pós-operatório como preditores de mortalidade precoce após transplante hepático

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anibal Basile-Filho

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the accuracy of different parameters in predicting early (one-month mortality of patients submitted to orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of forty-four patients (38 males and 10 females, mean age of 52.2 ± 8.9 years admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary hospital. Serial lactate blood levels, APACHE II, MELD post-OLT, creatinine, bilirubin and INR parameters were analyzed by receiver-operator characteristic (ROC curves as evidenced by the area under the curve (AUC. The level of significance was set at 0.05. RESULTS: The mortality of OLT patients within one month was 17.3%. Differences in blood lactate levels became statistically significant between survivors and nonsurvivors at the end of the surgery (pOBJETIVO: Avaliar qual parâmetro é o mais eficiente na predição de mortalidade precoce (um mês de pacientes submetidos a transplante ortotópico de fígado (OLT. MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo em cinqüenta e oito pacientes adultos (44 homens e 14 mulheres, com uma idade média de 51,7 ± 10,1 anos admitidos na Unidade de Terapia Intensiva de um hospital terciário. Os parâmetros como a dosagem seriada de lactato no sangue, APACHE II, MELD pós-OLT, creatinina, bilirrubina e INR foram analisados por curvas ROC (Receiver-operator characteristic, evidenciado pela área abaixo da curva (AUC. O nível de significância foi definido em 0,05. RESULTADOS: A mortalidade dos pacientes OLT em até um mês foi de 17,3%. As diferenças no nível de lactato no sangue tornaram-se estatisticamente significantes entre sobreviventes e não sobreviventes no final da cirurgia (p < 0,05. A AUC foi de 0,726 (95%CI = 0,593-0,835 para APACHE II (p = 0,02; 0,770 (95%CI = 0,596-0,849 para o lactato sérico (L7-L8 (p = 0,03; 0,814 (95%CI = 0,690-0,904 para MELD post-OLT (p < 0,01; 0,550 (95%CI = 0,414-0,651 de creatinina (p = 0,64; 0,705 (95%CI = 0,571-0,818 de bilirrubina (p = 0,05 e 0

  17. Budget Scoring: An Impediment to Alternative Financing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Summers, Donald E; San Miguel, Joseph G

    2007-01-01

    .... One of the major impediments to using alternative forms of procurement financing for acquiring defense capabilities is in the budgetary treatment, or scoring, of these initiatives by the Congressional Budget Office (CBO...

  18. Climiate Resilience Screening Index and Domain Scores

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — CRSI and related-domain scores for all 50 states and 3135 counties in the U.S. This dataset is not publicly accessible because: They are already available within the...

  19. Film scoring today - Theory, practice and analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Flach, Paula Sophie

    2012-01-01

    This thesis considers film scoring by taking a closer look at the theoretical discourse throughout the last decades, examining current production practice of film music and showcasing a musical analysis of the film Inception (2010).

  20. The FAt Spondyloarthritis Spine Score (FASSS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne Juhl; Zhao, Zheng; Lambert, Robert Gw

    2013-01-01

    an important measure of treatment efficacy as well as a surrogate marker for new bone formation. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a new scoring method for fat lesions in the spine, the Fat SpA Spine Score (FASSS), which in contrast to the existing scoring method addresses the localization......Studies have shown that fat lesions follow resolution of inflammation in the spine of patients with axial spondyloarthritis (SpA). Fat lesions at vertebral corners have also been shown to predict development of new syndesmophytes. Therefore, scoring of fat lesions in the spine may constitute both...... and phenotypic diversity of fat lesions in patients with axial SpA....

  1. (IPSS) and Visual Prostate Symptoms Score

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    O.O. Abiola

    2016-01-12

    VPSS) and International Prostate. Symptoms Score (IPSS) questionnaires for the assessment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in. Nigerian men, with special emphasis on the ease of administration and the time needed ...

  2. Budget Scoring: An Impediment to Alternative Financing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Summers, Donald E; San Miguel, Joseph G

    2007-01-01

    ...), the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and the congressional Budget Committees. The current scoring policy that has been applied to many initiatives essentially negates the advantages from using alternative forms of financing...

  3. STRUCTURE OF Co(III) AND Fe(III) TRANSITION METAL IONS IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Ethiopia ... The hydration structures of Co(III) and Fe(III) ions have been investigated by Metropolis Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using only ion-water pair interaction ... KEY WORDS: Metropolis Monte Carlo simulation, Hydration structure, Fe(III) and Co(III) ions, Three-body corrections

  4. Comparability of IQ Scores over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Must, Olev; te Nijenhuis, Jan; Must, Aasa; van Vianen, Annelies E. M.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the comparability of IQ scores. Three cohorts (1933/36, 1997/98, 2006) of Estonian students (N = 2173) are compared using the Estonian National Intelligence Test. After 72 years the secular rise of the IQ test scores is 0.79 SD. The mean 0.16 SD increase in the last 8 years suggests a rapid increase of the Flynn Effect (FE)…

  5. F18-choline PET/CT guided surgery in primary hyperparathyroidism when ultrasound and MIBI SPECT/CT are negative or inconclusive: the APACH1 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quak, Elske; Blanchard, David; Houdu, Benjamin; Le Roux, Yannick; Ciappuccini, Renaud; Lireux, Barbara; de Raucourt, Dominique; Grellard, Jean-Michel; Licaj, Idlir; Bardet, Stéphane; Reznik, Yves; Clarisse, Bénédicte; Aide, Nicolas

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate the sensitivity of F18-choline (FCH) PET/CT for parathyroid adenoma detection prior to surgery in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and negative or inconclusive cervical ultrasound and Tc99m-sestaMIBI SPECT/CT. We conducted a prospective bicentric study (NCT02432599). All patients underwent FCH PET/CT. The result was scored positive, inconclusive or negative. The number of uptakes and their sites were recorded. The FCH PET/CT result guided the surgical procedure (minimally invasive parathyroidectomy, bilateral cervical exploration, or other in case of multiple or ectopic foci). FCH PET/CT results were compared to the surgical and pathological findings and the follow-up. Twenty-five patients were included. Mean calcium and PTH levels prior to surgery were 2.76 ± 0.17 mmol/l and 94.8 ± 37.4 ng/l. Nineteen (76%) FCH PET/CTs were scored positive, 3 (12%) inconclusive and 3 (12%) negative, showing 21 cases of uniglandular disease, including 1 ectopic localization and 1 case of multiglandular (3 foci) disease. Mean lesion size was 13.1 ± 8.6 mm. Twenty-four patients underwent surgery. FCH PET/CT guided surgery in 22 (88%) patients, allowing for 17 minimally invasive parathyroidectomies, 1 bilateral cervical exploration for multifocality and 4 other surgical procedures. Two patients with negative FCH-PET/CT underwent bilateral cervical exploration. When dichotomizing the FCH PET/CT results, thereby classifying the inconclusive FCH PET/CT results as positive, the per lesion and per patient sensitivities were 91.3% (95%CI: 72.0-98.9) and 90.5% (95%CI: 69.6-98.8) and the corresponding positive predictive values were 87.5% (95%CI: 67.6-97.3) and 86.4% (95%CI: 65.1-97.1), respectively. Twenty-one (88%) patients were considered cured after surgery. Their mean calcium level after surgery was 2.36 ± 0.17 mmol/l. Preoperative FCH PET/CT has a high sensitivity and positive predictive value for parathyroid adenoma detection in patients

  6. F18-choline PET/CT guided surgery in primary hyperparathyroidism when ultrasound and MIBI SPECT/CT are negative or inconclusive. The APACH1 study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quak, Elske; Lireux, Barbara; Bardet, Stephane; Blanchard, David; Raucourt, Dominique de; Houdu, Benjamin; Le Roux, Yannick; Ciappuccini, Renaud; Grellard, Jean-Michel; Licaj, Idlir; Clarisse, Benedicte; Reznik, Yves; Aide, Nicolas

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the sensitivity of F18-choline (FCH) PET/CT for parathyroid adenoma detection prior to surgery in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and negative or inconclusive cervical ultrasound and Tc99m-sestaMIBI SPECT/CT. We conducted a prospective bicentric study (NCT02432599). All patients underwent FCH PET/CT. The result was scored positive, inconclusive or negative. The number of uptakes and their sites were recorded. The FCH PET/CT result guided the surgical procedure (minimally invasive parathyroidectomy, bilateral cervical exploration, or other in case of multiple or ectopic foci). FCH PET/CT results were compared to the surgical and pathological findings and the follow-up. Twenty-five patients were included. Mean calcium and PTH levels prior to surgery were 2.76 ± 0.17 mmol/l and 94.8 ± 37.4 ng/l. Nineteen (76%) FCH PET/CTs were scored positive, 3 (12%) inconclusive and 3 (12%) negative, showing 21 cases of uniglandular disease, including 1 ectopic localization and 1 case of multiglandular (3 foci) disease. Mean lesion size was 13.1 ± 8.6 mm. Twenty-four patients underwent surgery. FCH PET/CT guided surgery in 22 (88%) patients, allowing for 17 minimally invasive parathyroidectomies, 1 bilateral cervical exploration for multifocality and 4 other surgical procedures. Two patients with negative FCH-PET/CT underwent bilateral cervical exploration. When dichotomizing the FCH PET/CT results, thereby classifying the inconclusive FCH PET/CT results as positive, the per lesion and per patient sensitivities were 91.3% (95%CI: 72.0-98.9) and 90.5% (95%CI: 69.6-98.8) and the corresponding positive predictive values were 87.5% (95%CI: 67.6-97.3) and 86.4% (95%CI: 65.1-97.1), respectively. Twenty-one (88%) patients were considered cured after surgery. Their mean calcium level after surgery was 2.36 ± 0.17 mmol/l. Preoperative FCH PET/CT has a high sensitivity and positive predictive value for parathyroid adenoma detection in patients with primary

  7. Technology Performance Level (TPL) Scoring Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Jochem [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Roberts, Jesse D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Costello, Ronan [Wave Venture, Penstraze (United Kingdom); Bull, Diana L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Babarit, Aurelien [Ecole Centrale de Nantes (France). Lab. of Research in Hydrodynamics, Energetics, and Atmospheric Environment (LHEEA); Neilson, Kim [Ramboll, Copenhagen (Denmark); Bittencourt, Claudio [DNV GL, London (United Kingdom); Kennedy, Ben [Wave Venture, Penstraze (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    Three different ways of combining scores are used in the revised formulation. These are arithmetic mean, geometric mean and multiplication with normalisation. Arithmetic mean is used when combining scores that measure similar attributes, e.g. used for combining costs. The arithmetic mean has the property that it is similar to a logical OR, e.g. when combining costs it does not matter what the individual costs are only what the combined cost is. Geometric mean and Multiplication are used when combining scores that measure disparate attributes. Multiplication is similar to a logical AND, it is used to combine ‘must haves.’ As a result, this method is more punitive than the geometric mean; to get a good score in the combined result it is necessary to have a good score in ALL of the inputs. e.g. the different types of survivability are ‘must haves.’ On balance, the revised TPL is probably less punitive than the previous spreadsheet, multiplication is used sparingly as a method of combining scores. This is in line with the feedback of the Wave Energy Prize judges.

  8. Model for predicting the injury severity score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Shuichi; Oshima, Kiyohiro; Murata, Masato; Kaneko, Minoru; Aoki, Makoto; Kanbe, Masahiko; Nakamura, Takuro; Ohyama, Yoshio; Tamura, Jun'ichi

    2015-07-01

    To determine the formula that predicts the injury severity score from parameters that are obtained in the emergency department at arrival. We reviewed the medical records of trauma patients who were transferred to the emergency department of Gunma University Hospital between January 2010 and December 2010. The injury severity score, age, mean blood pressure, heart rate, Glasgow coma scale, hemoglobin, hematocrit, red blood cell count, platelet count, fibrinogen, international normalized ratio of prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and fibrin degradation products, were examined in those patients on arrival. To determine the formula that predicts the injury severity score, multiple linear regression analysis was carried out. The injury severity score was set as the dependent variable, and the other parameters were set as candidate objective variables. IBM spss Statistics 20 was used for the statistical analysis. Statistical significance was set at P  Watson ratio was 2.200. A formula for predicting the injury severity score in trauma patients was developed with ordinary parameters such as fibrin degradation products and mean blood pressure. This formula is useful because we can predict the injury severity score easily in the emergency department.

  9. Pharmacophore-based similarity scoring for DOCK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lingling; Rizzo, Robert C

    2015-01-22

    Pharmacophore modeling incorporates geometric and chemical features of known inhibitors and/or targeted binding sites to rationally identify and design new drug leads. In this study, we have encoded a three-dimensional pharmacophore matching similarity (FMS) scoring function into the structure-based design program DOCK. Validation and characterization of the method are presented through pose reproduction, crossdocking, and enrichment studies. When used alone, FMS scoring dramatically improves pose reproduction success to 93.5% (∼20% increase) and reduces sampling failures to 3.7% (∼6% drop) compared to the standard energy score (SGE) across 1043 protein-ligand complexes. The combined FMS+SGE function further improves success to 98.3%. Crossdocking experiments using FMS and FMS+SGE scoring, for six diverse protein families, similarly showed improvements in success, provided proper pharmacophore references are employed. For enrichment, incorporating pharmacophores during sampling and scoring, in most cases, also yield improved outcomes when docking and rank-ordering libraries of known actives and decoys to 15 systems. Retrospective analyses of virtual screenings to three clinical drug targets (EGFR, IGF-1R, and HIVgp41) using X-ray structures of known inhibitors as pharmacophore references are also reported, including a customized FMS scoring protocol to bias on selected regions in the reference. Overall, the results and fundamental insights gained from this study should benefit the docking community in general, particularly researchers using the new FMS method to guide computational drug discovery with DOCK.

  10. [Comparison of the Disease Activity Score-28 and Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score in the juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capela, Renata Campos; Corrente, José Eduardo; Magalhães, Claudia Saad

    2015-01-01

    the assessment of the activity of rheumatoid arthritis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis is made by means of different tools, respectively DAS-28 and JADAS. To compare DAS-28 and JADAS with scores of 71, 27 and 10 joint counts in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. A secondary analysis of a phase III placebo-controlled trial, testing safety and efficacy of abatacept was conducted in 8 patients with 178 assessment visits. Joint count scores for active and limited joints, physician's and parents' global assessment by 0-10cm Visual Analog Scale, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate normalized to 0-10 scale, in all visits. The comparison among the activity indices in different observations was made through Anova or adjusted gamma model. The paired observations between DAS-28 and JADAS 71, 27 and 10, respectively, were analyzed by linear regression. There were significant differences among individual measures, except for ESR, in the first four months of biological treatment, when five of the eight patients reached ACR-Pedi 30, with improvement. The indices of DAS-28, JADAS 71, 27 and 10 also showed significant difference during follow-up. Linear regression adjusted model between DAS-28 and JADAS resulted in mathematical formulas for conversion: [DAS-28=0.0709 (JADAS 71)+1.267] (R(2)=0.49); [DAS-28=0.084 (JADAS 27) +1.7404] (R(2)=0.47) and [DAS-28=0.1129 (JADAS-10) +1.5748] (R(2)=0.50). The conversion of scores of DAS-28 and JADAS 71, 27 and 10 for this mathematical model would allow equivalent application of both in adolescents with arthritis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Displaced articular calcaneus fractures: classification and fracture scores: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnroongroj, Thos; Chuckpaiwong, Bavornrit; Angthong, Chayanin; Nanakorn, Pongtep; Sudjai, Narumol; Harnroongroj, Thossart

    2012-03-01

    To review and group configurations of displaced articular calcaneal fracture advantaged for classification and radiographic fracture scores. Between 2002 and 2011, medical records and radiographs of patients who sustained acute displaced articular calcaneal fractures were reviewed. The calcanealfracture configurations were grouped as avulsion, bending, burst, or combination. Radiographic displaced articular calcaneal fracture score was designed to include Bohler and Gissane angles, degrees of posterior subtalar joint line parallel, degrees of varus, and burst. The calcaneal fracture score was modified as power of the fracture response to treatment (PFRT). Prevalence of the fracture types, pre- and post-reduction fracture scores including PFRT were studied and statistically analyzed. Sixty-four patients had 77 acute displaced articular calcaneal fractures. The classification consisted of type I avulsion, type II compression bending, type III compression burst, type IV avulsion burst, and type V bending burst. Type IV is the most common. The radiographic calcaneal fracture scores were 10 points. Pre-, post-reduction calcaneal fracture scores and PFRTof type I, II, III, IV, and V were 4.17 (0.41), 0 and 1 (0), 4.63 (2.13), 0.50 (0.93) and 0.84 (0.35), 6.94 (2.05), 3.18 (1.38) and 0.50 (0.27), 8.03 (1.12), 3.03 (2.42) and 0.62 (0.30), and 7.22 (2.11), 3.00 (2.50) and 0.59 (0.29) respectively. Statistical analysis showed significant difference (p fracture scores contained 10 points and were used for determining complexity of the fractures. PFRT was used for evaluating efficacy of fracture treatment.

  12. Predicting the need for massive transfusion in trauma patients: the Traumatic Bleeding Severity Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Takayuki; Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Nakano, Minoru; Izawa, Yoshimitsu; Nakamura, Mitsunobu; Fujizuka, Kenji; Suzukawa, Masayuki; Lefor, Alan T

    2014-05-01

    The ability to easily predict the need for massive transfusion may improve the process of care, allowing early mobilization of resources. There are currently no clear criteria to activate massive transfusion in severely injured trauma patients. The aims of this study were to create a scoring system to predict the need for massive transfusion and then to validate this scoring system. We reviewed the records of 119 severely injured trauma patients and identified massive transfusion predictors using statistical methods. Each predictor was converted into a simple score based on the odds ratio in a multivariate logistic regression analysis. The Traumatic Bleeding Severity Score (TBSS) was defined as the sum of the component scores. The predictive value of the TBSS for massive transfusion was then validated, using data from 113 severely injured trauma patients. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to compare the results of TBSS with the Trauma-Associated Severe Hemorrhage score and the Assessment of Blood Consumption score. In the development phase, five predictors of massive transfusion were identified, including age, systolic blood pressure, the Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma scan, severity of pelvic fracture, and lactate level. The maximum TBSS is 57 points. In the validation study, the average TBSS in patients who received massive transfusion was significantly greater (24.2 [6.7]) than the score of patients who did not (6.2 [4.7]) (p operating characteristic curve, sensitivity, and specificity for a TBSS greater than 15 points was 0.985 (significantly higher than the other scoring systems evaluated at 0.892 and 0.813, respectively), 97.4%, and 96.2%, respectively. The TBSS is simple to calculate using an available iOS application and is accurate in predicting the need for massive transfusion. Additional multicenter studies are needed to further validate this scoring system and further assess its utility. Prognostic study

  13. GalaxyDock BP2 score: a hybrid scoring function for accurate protein-ligand docking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Minkyung; Shin, Woong-Hee; Chung, Hwan Won; Seok, Chaok

    2017-07-01

    Protein-ligand docking is a useful tool for providing atomic-level understanding of protein functions in nature and design principles for artificial ligands or proteins with desired properties. The ability to identify the true binding pose of a ligand to a target protein among numerous possible candidate poses is an essential requirement for successful protein-ligand docking. Many previously developed docking scoring functions were trained to reproduce experimental binding affinities and were also used for scoring binding poses. However, in this study, we developed a new docking scoring function, called GalaxyDock BP2 Score, by directly training the scoring power of binding poses. This function is a hybrid of physics-based, empirical, and knowledge-based score terms that are balanced to strengthen the advantages of each component. The performance of the new scoring function exhibits significant improvement over existing scoring functions in decoy pose discrimination tests. In addition, when the score is used with the GalaxyDock2 protein-ligand docking program, it outperformed other state-of-the-art docking programs in docking tests on the Astex diverse set, the Cross2009 benchmark set, and the Astex non-native set. GalaxyDock BP2 Score and GalaxyDock2 with this score are freely available at http://galaxy.seoklab.org/softwares/galaxydock.html.

  14. Transformational III-V Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Nour, Maha A.

    2014-04-01

    Flexible electronics using III-V materials for nano-electronics with high electron mobility and optoelectronics with direct band gap are attractive for many applications. This thesis describes a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible process for transforming traditional III-V materials based electronics into flexible one. The thesis reports releasing 200 nm of Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) from 200 nm GaAs / 300 nm Aluminum Arsenide (AlAs) stack on GaAs substrate using diluted hydrofluoric acid (HF). This process enables releasing a single top layer compared to peeling off all layers with small sizes at the same time. This is done utilizing a network of release holes that contributes to the better transparency (45 % at 724 nm wavelengths) observed. Fabrication of metal oxide semiconductor capacitor (MOSCAPs) on GaAs is followed by releasing it to have devices on flexible 200 nm GaAs. Similarly, flexible GaSb and InP fabrication process is also reported to transform traditional electronics into large-area flexible electronics.

  15. Extraction of Nd(III), Tb(III) and Lu(III) with picrolonic acid in methylisobutylketone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, A.

    2004-01-01

    The extraction of Nd(III), Tb(III) and Lu(III) as representatives of lanthanide(III) ions with picrolonic acid (HPA) in methylisobutylketone (MIBK) has been studied from pH 1-2 buffer solutions. The composition of the organic species formed in the organic phase after extraction has been determined by slope analysis to be M(PA) 3 [M = Nd(III), Tb(III) and Lu(III)]. The equilibrium constant values, log k ex , were deduced to be 2.96±0.02, 2.52±0.05 and 1.52±0.07 for Nd(III), Tb(III) and Lu(III), respectively. The effect of various anions and cations on the extraction of these metal ions has also been studied. Among the masking anions, fluoride, oxalate, citrate and cyanide ions lowered the extraction, whereas presence of Zn(II) Cu(II), Fe(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) has only reduced to 25.87%. The extraction of various other divalent metal ions from pH 2 buffer solution was also studied and high separation factors (10 3 ) for the three selected rare earth metal ions were obtained with good selectivity. (author)

  16. Validation of the Italian version of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM III) Self-Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonavita, J; Torre, M; China, S; Bressi, F; Bonatti, E; Capirossi, R; Tiberti, S; Olivi, S; Musumeci, G; Maietti, E; Fekete, C; Baroncini, I; Brinkhof, M W G; Molinari, M; Scivoletto, G

    2016-07-01

    Cross-sectional validation study. To validate the Italian version of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure Self-Report (SCIM SR). Two spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation facilities in Italy. The SCIM III comprises items on 19 daily tasks, grouped into three subscales: 'Self-care,' 'Respiration and sphincter management' and 'Mobility'. The total SCIM score ranges between 0 and 100. The Italian self-reported version (SCIM SR) was translated from the German tool. We studied 116 patients on their first hospitalization for rehabilitation after an SCI. At the time of discharge, patients were evaluated by the rehabilitation team using the SCIM III and self-assessed their independence with regard to activities of daily living using the SCIM SR. Pearson's correlation, Bland-Altman method, and stratified and regression analyses were used to examine the differences between evaluations. On the basis of Pearson's correlation, there was good agreement between the data from the SCIM III and SCIM SR (r=0.918 for 'Self-care,' 0.806 for 'Respiration and sphincter management,' 0.906 for 'Mobility' and 0.934 for total scores). By Bland-Altman analysis, patients rated their functioning nearly the same as professionals-the mean difference between SCIM III and SCIM SR scores was approximately 0 for all subscales and total scores. The stratified and regression analyses failed to identify any specific factor that was associated with differences between SCIM III and SCIM SR scores. These results support the validity of the Italian version of the SCIM SR, which can facilitate longer-term evaluations of the independence of individuals with SCIs.

  17. Suppressed working memory on the WMS-III as a marker for poor effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Rael T; Iverson, Grant L; Sullivan, Karen; Anderson, Debbie

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical utility of memory minus Working Memory Index (memory-WMI) discrepancy scores on the WMS-III for detecting poor effort in 145 personal injury litigants (19 poor effort, 126 adequate effort). On average, participants in the poor effort group performed significantly lower on all WMS-III memory indexes and demonstrated larger memory-WMI discrepancy scores compared to participants in the adequate effort group. Discriminant function analyses using memory-WMI discrepancy scores as independent variables revealed poor overall classification rates (60.0% to 63.4%). Based on the prevalence of unusually suppressed attention-concentration ability relative to memory functioning using unidirectional memory-WMI discrepancy scores, high specificity and negative predictive power values were found. However, there was unacceptably low sensitivity and positive predictive power. These results suggest that memory-WMI discrepancy scores on the WMS-III do not provide clinically useful information regarding response set and should be used cautiously as an indicator of poor effort.

  18. Performance of an automated polysomnography scoring system versus computer-assisted manual scoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Atul; Younes, Magdy; Kuna, Samuel T; Benca, Ruth; Kushida, Clete A; Walsh, James; Hanlon, Alexandra; Staley, Bethany; Pack, Allan I; Pien, Grace W

    2013-04-01

    Manual scoring of polysomnograms (PSG) is labor intensive and has considerable variance between scorers. Automation of scoring could reduce cost and improve reproducibility. The purpose of this study was to compare a new automated scoring system (YST-Limited, Winnipeg, Canada) with computer-assisted manual scoring. Technical assessment. Five academic medical centers. N/A. N/A. Seventy PSG files were selected at University of Pennsylvania (Penn) and distributed to five US academic sleep centers. Two blinded technologists from each center scored each file. Automatic scoring was performed at Penn by a YST Limited technician using a laptop containing the software. Variables examined were sleep stages, arousals, and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) using three methods of identifying hypopneas. Automatic scores were not edited and were compared to the average scores of the 10 technologists. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was obtained for the 70 pairs and compared to across-sites ICCs for manually scored results. ICCs for automatic versus manual scoring were > 0.8 for total sleep time, stage N2, and nonrapid eye movement arousals and > 0.9 for AHI scored by primary and secondary American Academy of Sleep Medicine criteria. ICCs for other variables were not as high but were comparable to the across-site ICCs for manually scored results. The automatic system yielded results that were similar to those obtained by experienced technologists. Very good ICCs were obtained for many primary PSG outcome measures. This automated scoring software, particularly if supplemented with manual editing, may increase laboratory efficiency and standardize PSG scoring results within and across sleep centers.

  19. Performance of prognostic models in critically ill cancer patients - a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Boer, Sylvia; de Keizer, Nicolette F.; de Jonge, Evert

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Prognostic models, such as the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II or III, the Simplified Acute Physiology Score ( SAPS) II, and the Mortality Probability Models (MPM) II were developed to quantify the severity of illness and the likelihood of hospital survival

  20. Sequence Stratigraphic Analysis and Facies Architecture of the Cretaceous Mancos Shale on and Near the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New Mexico-their relation to Sites of Oil Accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridgley, Jennie

    2001-08-21

    The purpose of phase 1 and phase 2 of the Department of Energy funded project Analysis of oil- bearing Cretaceous Sandstone Hydrocarbon Reservoirs, exclusive of the Dakota Sandstone, on the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New Mexico was to define the facies of the oil producing units within the Mancos Shale and interpret the depositional environments of these facies within a sequence stratigraphic context. The focus of this report will center on (1) redefinition of the area and vertical extent of the ''Gallup sandstone'' or El Vado Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale, (2) determination of the facies distribution within the ''Gallup sandstone'' and other oil-producing sandstones within the lower Mancos, placing these facies within the overall depositional history of the San Juan Basin, (3) application of the principals of sequence stratigraphy to the depositional units that comprise the Mancos Shale, and (4) evaluation of the structural features on the Reservation as they may control sites of oil accumulation.

  1. Heart valve surgery: EuroSCORE vs. EuroSCORE II vs. Society of Thoracic Surgeons score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Sharoz Rabbani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background This is a validation study comparing the European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE II with the previous additive (AES and logistic EuroSCORE (LES and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons’ (STS risk prediction algorithm, for patients undergoing valve replacement with or without bypass in Pakistan. Patients and Methods Clinical data of 576 patients undergoing valve replacement surgery between 2006 and 2013 were retrospectively collected and individual expected risks of death were calculated by all four risk prediction algorithms. Performance of these risk algorithms was evaluated in terms of discrimination and calibration. Results There were 28 deaths (4.8% among 576 patients, which was lower than the predicted mortality of 5.16%, 6.96% and 4.94% by AES, LES and EuroSCORE II but was higher than 2.13% predicted by STS scoring system. For single and double valve replacement procedures, EuroSCORE II was the best predictor of mortality with highest Hosmer and Lemmeshow test (H-L p value (0.346 to 0.689 and area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve (0.637 to 0.898. For valve plus concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG patients actual mortality was 1.88%. STS calculator came out to be the best predictor of mortality for this subgroup with H-L p value (0.480 to 0.884 and ROC (0.657 to 0.775. Conclusions For Pakistani population EuroSCORE II is an accurate predictor for individual operative risk in patients undergoing isolated valve surgery, whereas STS performs better in the valve plus CABG group.

  2. RISK FACTOR DIAGNOSTIC SCORE IN DIABETIC FOOT

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    Mohamed Shameem P. M

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Diabetic foot ulcers vary in their clinical presentation and nature of severity and therefore create a challenging problem to the treating surgeon regarding the prediction of the clinical course and the end result of the treatment. Clinical studies have shown that there are certain risk factors for the progression of foot ulcers in diabetics and it may therefore be possible to predict the course of an ulcer foot at presentation itself, thus instituting proper therapy without delay. Spoken otherwise clinical scoring may tell that this particular ulcer is having highest chance of amputation, then one may be able to take an early decision for the same and avoid the septic complications, inconvenience to the patient, long hospital stay and cost of treatments. AIM OF THE STUDY Aim of the study is to evaluate the above-mentioned scoring system in predicting the course the diabetic foot ulcers. MATERIALS AND METHODS 50 patients with Diabetic Foot attending the OPD of Department of Surgery of Government Hospital attached to Calicut Medical College are included in the present study. After thorough history taking and clinical examination, six risk factors like Age, pedal vessels, renal function, neuropathy, radiological findings and ulcers were observed in the patients by giving certain scoring points to each of them. The total number of points scored by the patients at the time of admission or OPD treatment was correlated with the final outcome in these patients, whether leading to amputation or conservative management. All the data was analysed using standard statistical methods. OBSERVATIONS AND RESULTS There were 12 females and 38 males with a female to male ratio 1:3.1. All were aged above 30 years. Twenty-four (48% of them were between 30-60 years and twenty six (52% were above 60 years. 10 patients were treated conservatively with risk score range: 10 to 35. Six had single toe loss with risk score: 25 to 35. Six had multiple toe loss

  3. WebScore: An Effective Page Scoring Approach for Uncertain Web Social Networks

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    Shaojie Qiao

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available To effectively score pages with uncertainty in web social networks, we first proposed a new concept called transition probability matrix and formally defined the uncertainty in web social networks. Second, we proposed a hybrid page scoring algorithm, called WebScore, based on the PageRank algorithm and three centrality measures including degree, betweenness, and closeness. Particularly,WebScore takes into a full consideration of the uncertainty of web social networks by computing the transition probability from one page to another. The basic idea ofWebScore is to: (1 integrate uncertainty into PageRank in order to accurately rank pages, and (2 apply the centrality measures to calculate the importance of pages in web social networks. In order to verify the performance of WebScore, we developed a web social network analysis system which can partition web pages into distinct groups and score them in an effective fashion. Finally, we conducted extensive experiments on real data and the results show that WebScore is effective at scoring uncertain pages with less time deficiency than PageRank and centrality measures based page scoring algorithms.

  4. Disease severity scoring systems in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemal Bilaç

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Scoring systems have been developed to interpret the disease severity objectively by evaluating the parameters of the disease. Body surface area, visual analogue scale, and physician global assessment are the most frequently used scoring systems for evaluating the clinical severity of the dermatological diseases. Apart from these scoring systems, many specific scoring systems for many dermatological diseases, including acne (acne vulgaris, acne scars, alopecia (androgenetic alopecia, tractional alopecia, bullous diseases (autoimmune bullous diseases, toxic epidermal necrolysis, dermatitis (atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, dyshidrotic eczema, hidradenitis suppurativa, hirsutismus, connective tissue diseases (dermatomyositis, skin involvement of systemic lupus erythematosus (LE, discoid LE, scleroderma, lichen planoplaris, mastocytosis, melanocytic lesions, melasma, onychomycosis, oral lichen planus, pityriasis rosea, psoriasis (psoriasis vulgaris, psoriatic arthritis, nail psoriasis, sarcoidosis, urticaria, and vitiligo, have also been developed. Disease severity scoring methods are ever more extensively used in the field of dermatology for clinical practice to form an opinion about the prognosis by determining the disease severity; to decide on the most suitable treatment modality for the patient; to evaluate the efficacy of the applied medication; and to compare the efficiency of different treatment methods in clinical studies.

  5. Comparison of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Prognostic Scoring Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlen Bektaş

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS is a clonal hematopoietic stem cell disease. Patients are at risk of developing cytopenias or progression to acute myeloid leukemia. Different classifications and prognostic scoring systems have been developed. The aim of this study was to compare the different prognostic scoring systems. Materials and Methods: One hundred and one patients who were diagnosed with primary MDS in 2003-2011 in a tertiary care university hospital’s hematology department were included in the study. Results: As the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS, World Health Organization Classification-Based Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS, MD Anderson Prognostic Scoring System (MPSS, and revised IPSS (IPSS-R risk categories increased, leukemia-free survival and overall survival decreased (p<0.001. When the IPSS, WPSS, MPSS, and IPSS-R prognostic systems were compared by Cox regression analysis, the WPSS was the best in predicting leukemia-free survival (p<0.001, and the WPSS (p<0.001 and IPSS-R (p=0.037 were better in predicting overall survival. Conclusion: All 4 prognostic systems were successful in predicting overall survival and leukemia-free survival (p<0.001. The WPSS was found to be the best predictor for leukemia-free survival, while the WPSS and IPSS-R were found to be the best predictors for overall survival.

  6. Gambling scores for earthquake predictions and forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Jiancang

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents a new method, namely the gambling score, for scoring the performance earthquake forecasts or predictions. Unlike most other scoring procedures that require a regular scheme of forecast and treat each earthquake equally, regardless their magnitude, this new scoring method compensates the risk that the forecaster has taken. Starting with a certain number of reputation points, once a forecaster makes a prediction or forecast, he is assumed to have betted some points of his reputation. The reference model, which plays the role of the house, determines how many reputation points the forecaster can gain if he succeeds, according to a fair rule, and also takes away the reputation points betted by the forecaster if he loses. This method is also extended to the continuous case of point process models, where the reputation points betted by the forecaster become a continuous mass on the space-time-magnitude range of interest. We also calculate the upper bound of the gambling score when the true model is a renewal process, the stress release model or the ETAS model and when the reference model is the Poisson model.

  7. Assessment of Preterm Infants Using the Bayley-III Scales in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sung Ho; Kim, Soo A

    2017-10-01

    To assess the well-being of preterm newborns using the Bayley-III scales in a Korean-based population, and to evaluate the perinatal risk factors influencing developmental outcome. Using the Bayley-III scales, we assessed 120 preterm infants who were referred for evaluation of neurodevelopmental performance. We subdivided them into an extremely preterm group (n=18) and a very/moderate to late preterm group (n=102). Bayley-III mean scores and the rate of infants showing a delay were compared for both groups. The relationship between perinatal risk factors and Bayley-III scores was analyzed. The risk factors were considered as very low birth weight, history of neonatal medical problems, and abnormal radiologic findings in brain magnetic resonance images (MRIs). Although no significant differences in mean scores were observed between the extremely preterm group and the very/moderate to late preterm group, the rate of babies showing developmental delay in motor composite scores was significantly higher in the extremely preterm group. The proportions of preterm infants with cognitive, language, and motor delays were 38.3%, 26.7%, and 35.0%, respectively. Very low birth weight was a significant risk factor for low cognitive, language, and motor composite scores. Also, abnormal radiologic findings on brain MRI were significant indicators of lower motor composite scores. Cognitive development was the most frequently delayed domain in preterm infants and motor development was more frequently delayed in the extremely preterm group. The very low birth weight and abnormal radiologic findings in brain MRI were predictive factors for neurodevelopmental outcome.

  8. [Sustentaculum tali screw fixation for the treatment of Sanders type II and III calcaneal fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zhi-qian; Pang, Qing-jiang; Yu, Xiao; Chen, Liang; Guo, Zong-hui

    2015-01-01

    To explore the clinical outcomes of open reduction and internal fixation with calcaneal locking plates in treating Sanders type II and III calcaneal fractures. From January 2010 and October 2012, 38 calcaneal fractures with Sanders type II or III were treated with open reduction and internal fixation with calcaneal locking plate. According to the Sanders classification, 15 fractures were classified as type II, 23 fractures as type III. The patients were divided into two groups (group A and B) according to the different fixed methods. Sustentaculum tali was fixed with one screw in group A, including 13 males and 5 females, with a mean age of (38.56±8.03) years old (ranged, 25 to 55). And sustentaculum tali was not fixed in group B, including 16 males and 4 females, with a mean age of (42.35±8.29) years old (ranged, 29 to 53). Clinical effects were evaluated according to the changes of Böhler's angle and the Maryland Foot Score and VAS score. All patients were followed up from 12 to 20 months with a mean of 14 months. Böhler's angles and subtalar joints obtained satisfactory reconstruction in all patients. One year after operation, the mean Maryland Foot Score was 88.61±7.59 in group A; and was 82.40±9.24 in group B; Maryland Foot Score of group A was higher and foot functional rehabilitation was better than group B. The mean VAS score was 13.39±11.47 in group A; and was 22.50±13.10 in group B; VAS score of group A was lower and foot pain was less than group B. Sustentaculum tall screw fixation has advantages of strong fixed strength, high stability, less postoperative pain, rapid functional recovery in treating Sanders type II and III calcaneal fractures.

  9. Comparison of the Framingham and Reynolds Risk scores for global cardiovascular risk prediction in the multiethnic Women's Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Nancy R; Paynter, Nina P; Eaton, Charles B; Manson, JoAnn E; Martin, Lisa W; Robinson, Jennifer G; Rossouw, Jacques E; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Ridker, Paul M

    2012-04-10

    Framingham-based and Reynolds Risk scores for cardiovascular disease (CVD) prediction have not been directly compared in an independent validation cohort. We selected a case-cohort sample of the multiethnic Women's Health Initiative Observational Cohort, comprising 1722 cases of major CVD (752 myocardial infarctions, 754 ischemic strokes, and 216 other CVD deaths) and a random subcohort of 1994 women without prior CVD. We estimated risk using the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP-III) score, the Reynolds Risk Score, and the Framingham CVD model, reweighting to reflect cohort frequencies. Predicted 10-year risk varied widely between models, with ≥10% risk in 6%, 10%, and 41% of women with the ATP-III, Reynolds, and Framingham CVD models, respectively. Calibration was adequate for the Reynolds model, but the ATP-III and Framingham CVD models overestimated risk for coronary heart disease and major CVD, respectively. After recalibration, the Reynolds model demonstrated improved discrimination over the ATP-III model through a higher c statistic (0.765 versus 0.757; P=0.03), positive net reclassification improvement (NRI; 4.9%; P=0.02), and positive integrated discrimination improvement (4.1%; PNRI=4.2%; P=0.01), and in white (NRI=4.3%; P=0.04) and black (NRI=11.4%; P=0.13) women. The Reynolds (NRI=12.9%; PNRI=5.9%; P=0.0001) models demonstrated better discrimination than the Framingham CVD model. The Reynolds Risk Score was better calibrated than the Framingham-based models in this large external validation cohort. The Reynolds score also showed improved discrimination overall and in black and white women. Large differences in risk estimates exist between models, with clinical implications for statin therapy.

  10. Dens invaginatus (Type III B).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallianpur, Shreenivas; Sudheendra, Us; Kasetty, Sowmya; Joshi, Prathamesh

    2012-05-01

    Dens invaginatus or 'dens in dente' is a developmental malformation of the tooth resulting from infolding of the dental papilla before calcification. This article presents a case of dens invaginatus occurring in maxillary right lateral incisor of a 45-year-old male patient. The patient presented with pain and clinically missing maxillary right canine. The tooth was found to be non-vital. Radiographic examination revealed the tooth-in-tooth appearance of lateral incisor with a dilated pulp chamber. The crown of impacted canine was found within the pulp chamber of lateral incisor. Owing to this unique clinical presentation, both the lateral incisor and the impacted canine were extracted. Histopathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of Dens invaginatus Type III B. A brief review on etiopathogenesis, radiographic features and treatment of dens invaginatus has also been included.

  11. The SINTRAN III NODAL system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaali, T.B.

    1980-10-01

    NODAL is a high level programming language based on FOCAL and SNOBOL4, with some influence from BASIC. The language was developed to operate on the computer network controlling the SPS accelerator at CERN. NODAL is an interpretive language designed for interactive use. This is the most important aspect of the language, and is reflected in its structure. The interactive facilities make it possible to write, debug and modify programs much faster than with compiler based languages like FORTRAN and ALGOL. Apart from a few minor modifications, the basic part of the Oslo University NODAL system does not differ from the CERN version. However, the Oslo University implementation has been expanded with new functions which enable the user to execute many of the SINTRAN III monitor calls from the NODAL level. In particular the most important RT monitor calls have been implemented in this way, a property which renders possible the use of NODAL as a RT program administrator. (JIW)

  12. Solvent effects on extraction of aluminum(III), gallium(III), and indium(III), with decanoic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Hiromichi; Hayashi, Hisao; Fujii, Yukio; Mizuta, Masateru

    1986-01-01

    Extraction of aluminum(III) and indium(III) with decanoic acid in 1-octanol was carried out at 25 deg C and at an aqueous ionic strength of 0.1 mol dm -3 (NaClO 4 ). Monomeric and tetrameric aluminum(III) decanoates and monomeric indium(III) decanoate are responsible for the extraction. From a comparison of the present results with those obtained from the previous works, the polymerization of the extracted species was found to be more extensive in benzene than in 1-octanol, and the metal decanoates were highly polymerized in the following order in both solvents: Al > Ga > In. (author)

  13. Chiari III malformation: imaging features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, M; Quencer, R M; Dominguez, R

    1992-01-01

    To analyze and discuss the MR and CT features of Chiari type III malformations. MR and CT studies in nine neonates born at term with Chiari type III malformations were retrospectively reviewed. High cervical/low occipital encephaloceles were present in all cases. Hypoplasia of the low and midline aspects of the parietal bones was seen in four patients. The encephaloceles contained varying amounts of brain (cerebellum and occipital lobes, six cases; cerebellum only, three cases), ventricles (fourth, six cases; lateral, three cases), cisterns, and in one case, the medulla and pons. Associated anomalies included: petrous and clivus scalloping (five cases/nine cases), cerebellar hemisphere overgrowth (two cases/nine cases), cerebellar tonsillar herniation (three cases/seven cases), deformed midbrain (nine cases), hydrocephalus (two cases/nine cases), dysgenesis of the corpus callosum (six cases/nine cases), posterior cervical vertebral agenesis (three cases/eight cases), and spinal cord syrinxes (two cases/seven cases). In four patients who underwent surgical resection and closure, aberrant deep draining veins and ectopic venous sinuses within the encephaloceles were found. Pathology examination of the encephalocele (four cases/nine cases) showed multiple anomalies (necrosis, gliosis, heterotopias, meningeal fibrosis) that were not demonstrable by either MR or CT. The marked disorganization of the tissues contained within the cephalocele may account for the lack of MR sensitivity to these abnormalities. Preoperative determination of the position of the medulla and pons is essential and is easily accomplished by MR. To avoid surgical complications, the high incidence of venous anomalies should be kept in mind.

  14. Validation of a literature-based adherence score to Mediterranean diet: the MEDI-LITE score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofi, Francesco; Dinu, Monica; Pagliai, Giuditta; Marcucci, Rossella; Casini, Alessandro

    2017-09-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated a relationship between adherence to Mediterranean diet and prevention of chronic degenerative diseases. The aim of this study was to validate a novel instrument to measure adherence to Mediterranean diet based on the literature (the MEDI-LITE score). Two-hundred-and-four clinically healthy subjects completed both the MEDI-LITE score and the validated MedDietScore (MDS). Significant positive correlation between the MEDI-LITE and the MDS scores was found in the study population (R = .70; p MEDI-LITE evidenced a significant discriminative capacity between adherents and non-adherents to the Mediterranean diet pattern (optimal cut-off point = 8.50; sensitivity = 96%; specificity = 38%). In conclusion, our findings show that the MEDI-LITE score well correlate with MDS in both global score and in most of the items related to the specific food categories.

  15. IQ and scores on the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE): controlling for effort and education among geriatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Kriscinda A; Maoz, Omry; Hook, Julie N; Steiner, Amy R; Bieliauskas, Linas A

    2007-09-01

    The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Third Edition (PPVT-III) were administered to 76 Extended Care Center inpatients of a Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 56 of whom did not carry a diagnosis associated with brain impairment, and 20 of whom had a diagnosis associated with degenerative or cerebrovascular conditions. MMSE and PPVT-III scores, the latter of which estimates verbal IQ, were significantly correlated in both groups, even when controlling for the effects of education. This correlation was attenuated, but remained significant, in the face of varying levels of patient effort. The findings of this study support earlier findings, which also suggest that interpretation of "impaired" performance on the MMSE for those with IQ scores below 90 should be interpreted with caution. Average MMSE scores for Wechsler IQ classifications are provided.

  16. Hemophilic arthropathy. A scoring system for magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soler, R.; Rodriguez, E.; Marini, M. [Department of Radiology, Hospital Juan Canalejo, Coruna (Spain); Lopez-Fernandez, F. [Department of Hematology, Hospital Juan Canalejo, Coruna (Spain)

    2002-04-01

    The aim of this study was to define a system for scoring hemophilic arthropathy (HA) based on MR findings, providing for objective evaluation of the degree of joint involvement and evolution after on-demand administration of FVIII substitutional therapy or prophylactic treatment. A total of 133 MR examinations (89 basal and 44 during follow-up) were performed in 25 patients. Patients were divided in two groups depending on the therapy received and the length of time that the disease had been evolving at the start of the study. Group I was composed of 10 patients with secondary prophylaxis and group II was composed by 15 treated on demand. T1-weighted and T2*-weighted images performed on a 0.5-T unit were prospectively evaluated. The joint involvement was established on a scale of 0 (no abnormalities), I (minimal amount of hemosiderin), II (large amount of hemosiderin and isolated cartilaginous erosion), III (cartilage destruction, bone erosions, and subchondral cysts) to IV (large internal joint derangement, secondary osteoarthritis and/or ankylosis). At basal MR examination, patients of group I showed no abnormalities (n=28, 75.6%), grade I (n=3), and grade II (n=6) of HA. Patients of group II corresponded to MR grades III (n=21) and IV (n=11) of HA. The MR follow-up showed improvement in three joints of group I and worsening in 5 joints in group I and 2 joints in group II. Early signs of HA were detected in 10 joints with MR imaging but were underestimated on plain radiographs. Advanced degrees of HA were classified as severe under both imaging techniques. Magnetic resonance is the preferred imaging technique to assess HA. The earliest signs of joint damage, detected by MR, are overlooked by plain radiography. The MR scoring system can be used for evaluating HA. Follow-up MR should be performed to evaluate regression or worsening of the abnormalities, primarily in the case of patients with prophylaxis who usually suffer normal or early joint involvement not

  17. Hemophilic arthropathy. A scoring system for magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soler, R.; Rodriguez, E.; Marini, M.; Lopez-Fernandez, F.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define a system for scoring hemophilic arthropathy (HA) based on MR findings, providing for objective evaluation of the degree of joint involvement and evolution after on-demand administration of FVIII substitutional therapy or prophylactic treatment. A total of 133 MR examinations (89 basal and 44 during follow-up) were performed in 25 patients. Patients were divided in two groups depending on the therapy received and the length of time that the disease had been evolving at the start of the study. Group I was composed of 10 patients with secondary prophylaxis and group II was composed by 15 treated on demand. T1-weighted and T2*-weighted images performed on a 0.5-T unit were prospectively evaluated. The joint involvement was established on a scale of 0 (no abnormalities), I (minimal amount of hemosiderin), II (large amount of hemosiderin and isolated cartilaginous erosion), III (cartilage destruction, bone erosions, and subchondral cysts) to IV (large internal joint derangement, secondary osteoarthritis and/or ankylosis). At basal MR examination, patients of group I showed no abnormalities (n=28, 75.6%), grade I (n=3), and grade II (n=6) of HA. Patients of group II corresponded to MR grades III (n=21) and IV (n=11) of HA. The MR follow-up showed improvement in three joints of group I and worsening in 5 joints in group I and 2 joints in group II. Early signs of HA were detected in 10 joints with MR imaging but were underestimated on plain radiographs. Advanced degrees of HA were classified as severe under both imaging techniques. Magnetic resonance is the preferred imaging technique to assess HA. The earliest signs of joint damage, detected by MR, are overlooked by plain radiography. The MR scoring system can be used for evaluating HA. Follow-up MR should be performed to evaluate regression or worsening of the abnormalities, primarily in the case of patients with prophylaxis who usually suffer normal or early joint involvement not

  18. Separation studies of La(III) and Ce(III)/Nd(III)/Pr(III)/Sm(III) from chloride solution using DEHPA/PC88A in petrofin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, Sagarika; Mishra, Sujata; Bhatta, B.C.

    2017-01-01

    The separation of La(III) and four other lanthanides. Ce, Nd, Pr and Sm from chloride solution has been studied using the two acidic organophosphorous extractants, DEHPA and PC88A in petrofin at pH 4.3. The metal content analysis was done using an ICP-OES spectrophotometer. The separation factors (β) was calculated and for La-Sm pair highest value of 9.7 was obtained. (author)

  19. Assigning Numerical Scores to Linguistic Expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Jesús Campión

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study different methods of scoring linguistic expressions defined on a finite set, in the search for a linear order that ranks all those possible expressions. Among them, particular attention is paid to the canonical extension, and its representability through distances in a graph plus some suitable penalization of imprecision. The relationship between this setting and the classical problems of numerical representability of orderings, as well as extension of orderings from a set to a superset is also explored. Finally, aggregation procedures of qualitative rankings and scorings are also analyzed.

  20. Overall Survival in Spine Myeloma Metastases: Difficulties in Predicting With Prognostic Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelot, Aymeric; Cristini, Joseph; Salaud, Céline; Moles, Alexis; Hamel, Olivier; Moreau, Philippe; Bord, Eric; Buffenoir, Kevin

    2017-03-15

    Fifty-one patients with spinal multiple myeloma (MM) metastases were operated and followed between January 2004 and July 2014. The aim of this study was to consider the efficiency of surgical prognosis scores in the management of spinal metastases myelomas. The spine is the most common site of bone metastases in MM. Surgery in spine metastases MM is a matter of debate and its impact on the increase of a patient's survival time is not clear. Several surgical survival scores have been developed to determine the best treatment in these patients. We studied 51 patients operated for spinal MM metastases between January 2004 and July 2014. We determined the Tokuhashi and Tomita survival scores and compared them with documented patient survivals. The two scores were also compared with the International Staging System (ISS). Median survival (MS) was 108 months [standard deviation (SD) 62] for ISS I, 132.2 (SD 40) for ISS II, and 45.5 months (SD 16.3) for ISS III (P = 0.09). According to Tokuhashi survival score, 21 patients (41.2%) will survive 12 months. According to Tomita et al., 50 patients (98%) will survive >49.9 months and 1 patient (2%) spine surgical prognosis scores are not accurate and are not able to predict the survival of patients with spine myeloma metastases. Spine surgeons have to be guided not by the initial ISS stage but rather by spinal instability and neurological status. N/A.

  1. Association of mallampatti score as a risk factor for obstructive sleep apnea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, S.U.; Shahab, A.; Zia, S.; Adil, S.O.; Tariq, S.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the association of Mallampatti Score as a risk factor for Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). Methodology: This is a prospective questionnaire based survey included 103 individuals Results: Mean BMI of patients was 23.83+-6.03 kg/m2. There were 28 (27.2%) overweight and 22 (21.4%) obese patients. High risk on Berlin questionnaire was found in 12 (11.7%) patients. Both Berlin Questionnaire and Epworth questioner showed a negative association with Mallampati; the low risk group of these variables in our study with a p-value of 0.034 and 0.016 respectively i.e they are good for exclusion of OSA if found negative. Comparison of general characteristics with Mallampatti score and snoring showed significant association among patients with >25 years of age (p=0.02), low risk of Berlin score (p=0.034) and normal Epworth Sleep Score (p=0.016). Fifteen (14.5%) of overweight and obese individuals had higher Mallampatti score III and lV but the P-values were not significant (0.283 and 0.386). Conclusion: There is strong association between high Mallampatti score and O.S.A. Therefore we suggest that high mallampatti can be taken as a risk factor / screening tool limitation for O.S.A. (author)

  2. Clinical use of the ABO-Scoring Index: reliability and subtraction frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieber, William S; Carlson, Sean K; Baumrind, Sheldon; Poulton, Donald R

    2003-10-01

    This study tested the reliability and subtraction frequency of the study model-scoring system of the American Board of Orthodontists (ABO). We used a sample of 36 posttreatment study models that were selected randomly from six different orthodontic offices. Intrajudge and interjudge reliability was calculated using nonparametric statistics (Spearman rank coefficient, Wilcoxon, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann-Whitney tests). We found differences ranging from 3 to 6 subtraction points (total score) for intrajudge scoring between two sessions. For overall total ABO score, the average correlation was .77. Intrajudge correlation was greatest for occlusal relationships and least for interproximal contacts. Interjudge correlation for ABO score averaged r = .85. Correlation was greatest for buccolingual inclination and least for overjet. The data show that some judges, on average, were much more lenient than others and that this resulted in a range of total scores between 19.7 and 27.5. Most of the deductions were found in the buccal segments and most were related to the second molars. We present these findings in the context of clinicians preparing for the ABO phase III examination and for orthodontists in their ongoing evaluation of clinical results.

  3. Replacement of the Faces subtest by Visual Reproductions within Wechsler Memory Scale-Third Edition (WMS-III) visual memory indexes: implications for discrepancy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Keith A; Tulsky, David S

    2004-06-01

    Within discrepancy analysis differences between scores are examined for abnormality. Although larger differences are generally associated with rising impairment probabilities, the relationship between discrepancy size and abnormality varies across score pairs in relation to the correlation between the contrasted scores in normal subjects. Examinee ability level also affects the size of discrepancies observed normally. Wechsler Memory Scale-Third Edition (WMS-III) visual index scores correlate only modestly with other Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) and WMS-III index scores; consequently, differences between these scores and others have to be very large before they become unusual, especially for subjects of higher intelligence. The substitution of the Faces subtest by Visual Reproductions within visual memory indexes formed by the combination of WMS-III visual subtests (creating immediate recall, delayed recall, and combined immediate and delayed index scores) results in higher correlation coefficients, and a decline in the discrepancy size required to surpass base rate thresholds for probable impairment. This gain appears not to occur at the cost of a diminished sensitivity to diverse pathologies. New WMS-III discrepancy base rate data are supplied to complement those currently available to clinicians.

  4. Algorithm Improvement Program Nuclide Identification Algorithm Scoring Criteria And Scoring Application - DNDO.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enghauser, Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The goal of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) Algorithm Improvement Program (AIP) is to facilitate gamma-radiation detector nuclide identification algorithm development, improvement, and validation. Accordingly, scoring criteria have been developed to objectively assess the performance of nuclide identification algorithms. In addition, a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet application for automated nuclide identification scoring has been developed. This report provides an overview of the equations, nuclide weighting factors, nuclide equivalencies, and configuration weighting factors used by the application for scoring nuclide identification algorithm performance. Furthermore, this report presents a general overview of the nuclide identification algorithm scoring application including illustrative examples.

  5. Algorithm improvement program nuclide identification algorithm scoring criteria and scoring application.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enghauser, Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The goal of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) Algorithm Improvement Program (AIP) is to facilitate gamma-radiation detector nuclide identification algorithm development, improvement, and validation. Accordingly, scoring criteria have been developed to objectively assess the performance of nuclide identification algorithms. In addition, a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet application for automated nuclide identification scoring has been developed. This report provides an overview of the equations, nuclide weighting factors, nuclide equivalencies, and configuration weighting factors used by the application for scoring nuclide identification algorithm performance. Furthermore, this report presents a general overview of the nuclide identification algorithm scoring application including illustrative examples.

  6. NCACO-score: An effective main-chain dependent scoring function for structure modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Xiaoxi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of effective scoring functions is a critical component to the success of protein structure modeling. Previously, many efforts have been dedicated to the development of scoring functions. Despite these efforts, development of an effective scoring function that can achieve both good accuracy and fast speed still presents a grand challenge. Results Based on a coarse-grained representation of a protein structure by using only four main-chain atoms: N, Cα, C and O, we develop a knowledge-based scoring function, called NCACO-score, that integrates different structural information to rapidly model protein structure from sequence. In testing on the Decoys'R'Us sets, we found that NCACO-score can effectively recognize native conformers from their decoys. Furthermore, we demonstrate that NCACO-score can effectively guide fragment assembly for protein structure prediction, which has achieved a good performance in building the structure models for hard targets from CASP8 in terms of both accuracy and speed. Conclusions Although NCACO-score is developed based on a coarse-grained model, it is able to discriminate native conformers from decoy conformers with high accuracy. NCACO is a very effective scoring function for structure modeling.

  7. DSM-III-R and religion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, S G

    1992-07-01

    The interpretation of religion in DSM-III-R contains considerable negative bias and contributes to unfair stereotypes of religious persons. Particularly new religious movements and religious conversion are unfairly interpreted under the DSM-III-R heading, 'Dissociative Disorder Not Otherwise Specified'. It is suggested that a more balanced and respectful interpretation of religion is needed in DSM-III-R, since psychiatry through its official nomenclature should not contribute to social intolerance of religious nonconformity.

  8. Sorption of small amounts of europium(III) on iron(III) hydroxide and oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.; Gessner, M.; Wolf, R.H.H.

    1979-01-01

    The sorption of small amounts of europium(III) on iron(III) hydroxide and oxide has been studied as a function of pH. The mechanism of sorption is discussed. Optimum conditions have been found for the preconcentration of small or trace amounts of europium(III) by iron(III) hydroxide and oxide. The influence of complexing agents (EDTA, oxalate, tartrate and 5-sulfosalicylic acid) on the sorption of small amounts of europium(III) on iron(III) oxide has also been studied. (author)

  9. DOE/NNSA perspective safeguard by design: GEN III/III+ light water reactors and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Paul Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-10

    An overview of key issues relevant to safeguards by design (SBD) for GEN III/IV nuclear reactors is provided. Lessons learned from construction of typical GEN III+ water reactors with respect to SBD are highlighted. Details of SBD for safeguards guidance development for GEN III/III+ light water reactors are developed and reported. This paper also identifies technical challenges to extend SBD including proliferation resistance methodologies to other GEN III/III+ reactors (except HWRs) and GEN IV reactors because of their immaturity in designs.

  10. Diagnostic efficiency of demographically corrected Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III and Wechsler Memory Scale-III indices in moderate to severe traumatic brain injury and lower education levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Alexandra J; Batchelor, Jennifer; Shores, E Arthur; Jones, Mike

    2009-11-01

    Despite the sensitivity of neuropsychological tests to educational level, improved diagnostic accuracy for demographically corrected scores has yet to be established. Diagnostic efficiency statistics of Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III) and Wechsler Memory Scale-III (WMS-III) indices that were corrected for education, sex, and age (demographically corrected) were compared with age corrected indices in individuals aged 16 to 75 years with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and 12 years or less education. TBI participants (n = 100) were consecutive referrals to an outpatient rehabilitation service and met careful selection criteria. Controls (n = 100) were obtained from the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample. Demographically corrected indices did not provide higher diagnostic efficiency than age corrected indices and this result was supported by reanalysis of the TBI group against a larger and unmatched control group. Processing Speed Index provided comparable diagnostic accuracy to that of combined indices. Demographically corrected indices were associated with higher cut-scores to maximize overall classification, reflecting the upward adjustment of those scores in a lower education sample. This suggests that, in clinical practice, the test results of individuals with limited education may be more accurately interpreted with the application of demographic corrections. Diagnostic efficiency statistics are presented, and future research directions are discussed.

  11. Characterization of ribonuclease III from Brucella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chang-Xian; Xu, Xian-Jin; Zheng, Ke; Liu, Fang; Yang, Xu-Dong; Chen, Chuang-Fu; Chen, Huan-Chun; Liu, Zheng-Fei

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial ribonuclease III (RNase III) is a highly conserved endonuclease, which plays pivotal roles in RNA maturation and decay pathways by cleaving double-stranded structure of RNAs. Here we cloned rncS gene from the genomic DNA of Brucella melitensis, and analyzed the cleavage properties of RNase III from Brucella. We identified Brucella-encoding small RNA (sRNA) by high-throughput sequencing and northern blot, and found that sRNA of Brucella and Homo miRNA precursor (pre-miRNA) can be bound and cleaved by B.melitensis ribonuclease III (Bm-RNase III). Cleavage activity of Bm-RNase III is bivalent metal cations- and alkaline buffer-dependent. We constructed several point mutations in Bm-RNase III, whose cleavage activity indicated that the 133th Glutamic acid residue was required for catalytic activity. Western blot revealed that Bm-RNase III was differently expressed in Brucella virulence strain 027 and vaccine strain M5-90. Collectively, our data suggest that Brucella RNase III can efficiently bind and cleave stem-loop structure of small RNA, and might participate in regulation of virulence in Brucella. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Equilibrium studies on some binary complexes of La(III), Ce(III), Pr(III) and Nd(III) with ligands containing N-N donor atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pabreja, D.S.; Patel, Rashmikant A.; Sharma, Sangita; Vora, Jabali; Joshi, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    The present paper describes a potentiometric study on formation constants of binary complexes of inner transition 4f metal ions La(III), Ce(III), Pr(III) and Nd(III) with amines such as ethylenediamine, N-N-dimethyl ethylenediamine, N-N-diethyl ethylenediamine, 1,2-diaminopropane and 1,3-diaminopropane carried out at constant temperature 30± 0.1deg C and ionic strength μ 0.2 M dm -3 (NaClO 4 ). Various factors influencing the formation and stabilities of binary complexes have been discussed. (author)

  13. Thoracic irrigation prevents retained hemothorax: A prospective propensity scored analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugler, Nathan W; Carver, Thomas W; Milia, David; Paul, Jasmeet S

    2017-12-01

    Thoracic trauma resulting in hemothorax (HTx) is typically managed with thoracostomy tube (TT) placement; however, up to 20% of patients develop retained HTx which may necessitate further intervention for definitive management. Although optimal management of retained HTx has been extensively researched, little is known about prevention of this complication. We hypothesized that thoracic irrigation at the time of TT placement would significantly decrease the rate of retained HTx necessitating secondary intervention. A prospective, comparative study of patients with traumatic HTx who underwent bedside TT placement was conducted. The control group consisted of patients who underwent standard TT placement, whereas the irrigation group underwent standard TT placement with immediate irrigation using 1 L of warmed sterile 0.9% saline. Patients who underwent emergency thoracotomy, those with TTs removed within 24 hours, or those who died within 30 days of discharge were excluded. The primary end point was secondary intervention defined by additional TT placement or operative management for retained HTx. A propensity-matched analysis was performed with scores estimated using a logistic regression model based on age, sex, mechanism of injury, Abbreviated Injury Scale chest score, and TT size. In over a 30-month period, a total of 296 patients underwent TT placement for the management of traumatic HTx. Patients were predominantly male (79.6%) at a median age of 40 years and were evenly split between blunt (48.8%) and penetrating (51.2%) mechanisms. Sixty (20%) patients underwent thoracic irrigation at time of initial TT placement. The secondary intervention rate was significantly lower within the study group (5.6% vs. 21.8%; OR, 0.16; p irrigation and control cohort. Thoracic irrigation at the time of initial TT placement for traumatic HTx significantly reduced the need for secondary intervention for retained HTx. Therapeutic Study, Level III.

  14. Treatment of comminuted fractures of the proximal humerus in elderly patients with the Delta III reverse shoulder prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michael; Juschka, Miriam; Hinkenjann, Bernd; Scherger, Bernhard; Ostermann, Peter A W

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate clinical and radiologic results after implantation of the Delta III reverse shoulder prosthesis in elderly patients with comminuted fractures of the proximal humerus. Prospective, single-center-based cohort study. Level II Trauma Center. Patients undergoing insertion of Delta III reverse shoulder prosthesis for the treatment of comminuted fractures of the proximal humerus between July 2002 and December 2004. Surgery with the Delta III reverse shoulder prosthesis through a juxta-acromial approach. Duration of surgery, x-ray evaluation by Nerot's Score, complications, and functional outcome based on the Constant Score, the modified American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Score, the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Score, and the 36-item short-form health survey (SF-36) Score. Twenty patients (14 females, 6 males) with a mean age of 74.85 +/- 5.73 years were included into the study followed up for 33.29 +/- 9.6 months. The average range of motion was for abduction 112.5 +/- 38.19 degrees and for anterior elevation 122.67 +/- 32.84 degrees. The mean Constant Score was 67.85 +/- 13.56. The mean Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Score was 46.85 +/- 15.68, and the mean modified American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Score was 68 +/- 11.83. The Physical Component Scale of the SF-36 was 38 +/- 11.94. The Mental Component Scale of the SF-36 score was 52.59 +/- 10.92. Operations were performed 10.05 +/- 8.78 days (3-41) after trauma, and the average operation time was 75.7 +/- 18.11 minutes. The good functional outcome and the short intervention time in our present study and not needing a sufficient rotator cuff for implementation purposes suggest the use of the Delta III reverse shoulder prosthesis as a treatment option for elderly patients with comminuted fractures of the proximal humerus.

  15. A validated clinical MRI injury scoring system in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, Shamik B.; Vesoulis, Zachary A.; Rao, Rakesh; Liao, Steve M.; Mathur, Amit M. [Washington University School of Medicine, Division of Newborn Medicine, Edward Mallinckrodt Department of Pediatrics, St. Louis, MO (United States); Shimony, Joshua S.; McKinstry, Robert C. [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2017-10-15

    Deep nuclear gray matter injury in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is associated with worse neurodevelopmental outcomes. We previously published a qualitative MRI injury scoring system utilizing serial T1-weighted, T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), weighted for deep nuclear gray matter injury. To establish the validity of the MRI scoring system with neurodevelopmental outcome at 18-24 months. MRI scans from neonates with moderate to severe HIE treated with therapeutic hypothermia were evaluated. Signal abnormality was scored on T1-weighted, T2-weighted and DWI sequences and assessed using an established system in five regions: (a) subcortical: caudate nucleus, globus pallidus and putamen, thalamus and the posterior limb of the internal capsule; (b) white matter; (c) cortex, (d) cerebellum and (e) brainstem. MRI injury was graded as none, mild, moderate or severe. Inter-rater reliability was tested on a subset of scans by two independent and blinded neuroradiologists. Surviving infants underwent the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development-III (Bayley-III) at 18-24 months. Data were analyzed using univariate and multivariate linear and logistic regression. Fifty-seven eligible neonates underwent at least one MRI scan in the first 2 weeks of life. Mean postnatal age at scan 1 was 4±2 days in 50/57 (88%) neonates and 48/54 (89%) surviving infants underwent scan 2 at 10±2 days. In 54/57 (95%) survivors, higher MRI injury grades were significantly associated with worse outcomes in the cognitive, motor and language domains of the Bayley-III. A qualitative MRI injury scoring system weighted for deep nuclear gray matter injury is a significant predictor of neurodevelopmental outcome at 18-24 months in neonates with HIE. (orig.)

  16. A validated clinical MRI injury scoring system in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, Shamik B.; Vesoulis, Zachary A.; Rao, Rakesh; Liao, Steve M.; Mathur, Amit M.; Shimony, Joshua S.; McKinstry, Robert C.

    2017-01-01

    Deep nuclear gray matter injury in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is associated with worse neurodevelopmental outcomes. We previously published a qualitative MRI injury scoring system utilizing serial T1-weighted, T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), weighted for deep nuclear gray matter injury. To establish the validity of the MRI scoring system with neurodevelopmental outcome at 18-24 months. MRI scans from neonates with moderate to severe HIE treated with therapeutic hypothermia were evaluated. Signal abnormality was scored on T1-weighted, T2-weighted and DWI sequences and assessed using an established system in five regions: (a) subcortical: caudate nucleus, globus pallidus and putamen, thalamus and the posterior limb of the internal capsule; (b) white matter; (c) cortex, (d) cerebellum and (e) brainstem. MRI injury was graded as none, mild, moderate or severe. Inter-rater reliability was tested on a subset of scans by two independent and blinded neuroradiologists. Surviving infants underwent the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development-III (Bayley-III) at 18-24 months. Data were analyzed using univariate and multivariate linear and logistic regression. Fifty-seven eligible neonates underwent at least one MRI scan in the first 2 weeks of life. Mean postnatal age at scan 1 was 4±2 days in 50/57 (88%) neonates and 48/54 (89%) surviving infants underwent scan 2 at 10±2 days. In 54/57 (95%) survivors, higher MRI injury grades were significantly associated with worse outcomes in the cognitive, motor and language domains of the Bayley-III. A qualitative MRI injury scoring system weighted for deep nuclear gray matter injury is a significant predictor of neurodevelopmental outcome at 18-24 months in neonates with HIE. (orig.)

  17. What do educational test scores really measure?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIntosh, James; D. Munk, Martin

    Latent class Poisson count models are used to analyze a sample of Danish test score results from a cohort of individuals born in 1954-55 and tested in 1968. The procedure takes account of unobservable effects as well as excessive zeros in the data. The bulk of unobservable effects are uncorrelate...

  18. 7 CFR 52.3764 - Score sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946... 24-26 (C) 1 21-23 (SStd.) 1 0-20 Total Score 100 Flavor: () Good() Reasonably good() Off Grade −−s0 1...

  19. Effects of heterogeneity on bank efficiency scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J. W. B.; Koetter, M.; Kolari, J. W.; Kool, C. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Bank efficiency estimates often serve as a proxy of managerial skill since they quantify sub-optimal production choices. But such deviations can also be due to omitted systematic differences among banks. In this study, we examine the effects of heterogeneity on bank efficiency scores. We compare

  20. Correlation between International Prostate Symptom Score and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-07-23

    Jul 23, 2016 ... International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and uroflowmetry in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms-benign prostatic ... cause of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) in the male geriatric population.[1] ... age and results in LUTS in about 10% of elderly men.[1]. BPH causes morbidity through the urinary ...

  1. Incorporating Quality Scores in Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Soyeon; Becker, Betsy Jane

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of quality-score weights in meta-analysis. A simulation examines the roles of study characteristics such as population effect size (ES) and its variance on the bias and mean square errors (MSEs) of the estimators for several patterns of relationship between quality and ES, and for specific patterns of systematic…

  2. Scoring ultrasound synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta; Terslev, Lene; Aegerter, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop a consensus-based ultrasound (US) definition and quantification system for synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: A multistep, iterative approach was used to: (1) evaluate the baseline agreement on defining and scoring synovitis according to the usual practice...

  3. Correlation between international prostate symptom score and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the correlation between severity of symptoms using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and uroflowmetry in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms-benign prostatic hyperplasia (LUTS-BPH). Patients and Methods: We prospectively collected data from 51 consecutive men, who ...

  4. Psychometric properties of the Cumulated Ambulation Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferriero, Giorgio; Kristensen, Morten T; Invernizzi, Marco

    2018-01-01

    . EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: A literature search was conducted on research articles published between 2006 and June 2016 in journals indexed by MEDLINE and Scopus databases using as search item: "Cumulated Ambulation Score"[All Fields], and selecting studies that presented a psychometric analysis of the scale...

  5. Tanzania River Scoring System (TARISS): a macroinvertebrate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The biological assessment of rivers using aquatic macroinvertebrates is an internationally recognised approach for the determination of riverine ecological conditions. In this study a Tanzanian macroinvertebrate-based biotic method, Tanzania River Scoring System (TARISS), was developed in 2012, based on the South ...

  6. Using the Spinal Cord Independence Measure III to measure functional recovery in a post-acute spinal cord injury program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, P; Morrison, S A; McDowell, S; Vazquez, L

    2010-05-01

    A prospective design was conducted using admission and discharge Spinal Cord Independence Measure III (SCIM-III) data for persons discharged from a post-acute rehabilitation program. The purpose of this study is to analyze the functional gains as measured by the SCIM-III that occur during a post-acute rehabilitation program. Shepherd Center, Atlanta, GA, USA. Participants were included if they had a motor complete spinal cord injury (SCI), were within 12 months from the date of injury and completed the recommended length of stay. Median SCIM-III changes between admission and discharge were calculated by subgroups (C1-4, C5, C6, C7-8, T1-6 and T7-12) based on the American Spinal Injury Association motor injury levels. Ceiling and floor effects were examined by item and the percentage of participants showing change between admission and discharge were calculated. In all, 114 participants were included in the analysis. The median total SCIM-III score at admission was 42 (range 13-68), whereas the median total SCIM-III score at discharge was 50 (range 16-72). The median improvement of 5 points in total SCIM-III score between admission and discharge was statistically significant. Significant improvements were also observed between admission and discharge across all subgroups except C1-4. Ceiling and floor effects were noted in some subgroups. The SCIM-III seems to be an effective measure for functional assessment of persons with SCI in a post-acute rehabilitation program. There are some ceiling and floor effects noted; however, the SCIM-III seems to be sensitive enough to capture functional changes during a post-acute rehabilitation program.

  7. Comparative adsorption of Eu(III) and Am(III) on TPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Q H; Zhao, X L; Ma, X X; Yang, Y B; Wu, W S; Zheng, G D; Wang, D L

    2015-09-01

    Comparative adsorption behaviors of Eu(III) and Am(III) on thorium phosphate diphosphate (TPD), i.e., Th4(PO4)4P2O7, have been studied using a batch approach and surface complexation model (SCM) in this study. The results showed that Eu(III) and Am(III) adsorption increased to a large extent with the increase in TPD dose. Strong pH-dependence was observed in both Eu(III) and Am(III) adsorption processes, suggesting that inner-sphere complexes (ISCs) were possibly responsible for the adsorption of Eu(III) and Am(III). Meanwhile, the adsorption of Eu(III) and Am(III) decreased to a different extent with the increase in ion strength, which was possibly related to outer-sphere complexes and/or ion exchange. In the presence of fulvic acid (FA), the adsorption of Eu(III) and Am(III) showed high enhancement mainly due to the ternary surface complexes of TPD-FA-Eu(3+) and TPD-FA-Am(3+). The SCM showed that one ion exchange (≡S3Am/Eu) and two ISCs (≡(XO)2Am/EuNO3 and ≡(YO)2Am/EuNO3) seemed more reasonable to quantitatively describe the adsorption edges of both Eu(III) and Am(III). Our findings obviously showed that Eu(III) could be a good analogue to study actinide behaviors in practical terms. However, it should be kept in mind that there are still obvious differences between the characteristics of Eu(III) and Am(III) in some special cases, for instance, the complex ability with organic matter and adsorption affinity to a solid surface.

  8. The scoring of movements in sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Arthur S; Lavigne, Gilles; Hening, Wayne; Picchietti, Daniel L; Allen, Richard P; Chokroverty, Sudhansu; Kushida, Clete A; Bliwise, Donald L; Mahowald, Mark W; Schenck, Carlos H; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia

    2007-03-15

    The International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD-2) has separated sleep-related movement disorders into simple, repetitive movement disorders (such as periodic limb movements in sleep [PLMS], sleep bruxism, and rhythmic movement disorder) and parasomnias (such as REM sleep behavior disorder and disorders of partial arousal, e.g., sleep walking, confusional arousals, night terrors). Many of the parasomnias are characterized by complex behaviors in sleep that appear purposeful, goal directed and voluntary but are outside the conscious awareness of the individual and therefore inappropriate. All of the sleep-related movement disorders described here have specific polysomnographic findings. For the purposes of developing and/or revising specifications and polysomnographic scoring rules, the AASM Scoring Manual Task Force on Movements in Sleep reviewed background literature and executed evidence grading of 81 relevant articles obtained by a literature search of published articles between 1966 and 2004. Subsequent evidence grading identified limited evidence for reliability and/or validity for polysomnographic scoring criteria for periodic limb movements in sleep, REM sleep behavior disorder, and sleep bruxism. Published scoring criteria for rhythmic movement disorder, excessive fragmentary myoclonus, and hypnagogic foot tremor/alternating leg muscle activation were empirical and based on descriptive studies. The literature review disclosed no published evidence defining clinical consequences of excessive fragmentary myoclonus or hypnagogic foot tremor/alternating leg muscle activation. Because of limited or absent evidence for reliability and/or validity, a standardized RAND/UCLA consensus process was employed for recommendation of specific rules for the scoring of sleep-associated movements.

  9. The Moessbauer effect in Fe(III) HEDTA, Fe(III) EDTA, and Fe(III) CDTA compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prado, F.R.

    1989-01-01

    The dependence of Moessbauer spectra with pH value of Fe(III)HEDTA and Fe(III)CDTA compounds is studied. Informations on formation processes of LFe-O-FeL (L=ligand) type dimers by the relation of titration curves of Fe(III)EDTA, Fe(III)HEDTA and Fe(III)CDTA compounds with the series of Moessbauer spectra, are obtained. Some informations on Fe-O-Fe bond structure are also obtained. Comparing the titration curves with the series of Moessbauer spectra, it is concluded that the dimerization process begins when a specie of the form FeXOH α (X = EDTA, HEDTA, CDTA; α = -1, -2) arises. (M.C.K.) [pt

  10. Relationship between Students' Scores on Research Methods and Statistics, and Undergraduate Project Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossai, Peter Agbadobi Uloku

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between students' scores on Research Methods and statistics, and undergraduate project at the final year. The purpose was to find out whether students matched knowledge of research with project-writing skill. The study adopted an expost facto correlational design. Scores on Research Methods and Statistics for…

  11. Multidimensional Linking for Domain Scores and Overall Scores for Nonequivalent Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lihua

    2011-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind Act requires state assessments to report not only overall scores but also domain scores. To see the information on students' overall achievement, progress, and detailed strengths and weaknesses, and thereby identify areas for improvement in educational quality, students' performances across years or across forms need to be…

  12. Multidimensional CAT Item Selection Methods for Domain Scores and Composite Scores: Theory and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lihua

    2012-01-01

    Multidimensional computer adaptive testing (MCAT) can provide higher precision and reliability or reduce test length when compared with unidimensional CAT or with the paper-and-pencil test. This study compared five item selection procedures in the MCAT framework for both domain scores and overall scores through simulation by varying the structure…

  13. Extraction and stripping of neodymium (III) and dysprosium (III) by TRUEX solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rout, Alok; Venkatesan, K.A.; Antony, M.P.; Srinivasan, T.G.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    McCabe-Thiele diagram for the extraction and stripping of Nd (III) and Dy (III) by TRUEX solvent has been constructed to determine the number of stages required for complete extraction and stripping. (author)

  14. [Predictive value of four pediatric scores of critical illness and mortality on evaluating mortality risk in pediatric critical patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lidan; Huang, Huimin; Cheng, Yucai; Xu, Lingling; Huang, Xueqiong; Pei, Yuxin; Tang, Wen; Qin, Zhaoyuan

    2018-01-01

    To assess the performance of pediatric clinical illness score (PCIS), pediatric risk of mortality score III (PRISM III), pediatric logistic organ dysfunction score 2 (PELOD-2), and pediatric multiple organ dysfunction score (P-MODS) in predicting mortality in critically ill pediatric patients. The data of critically ill pediatric patients admitted to Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) of First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University from August 2012 to May 2017 were retrospectively analyzed. The gender, age, basic diseases, the length of PICU stay were collected. The children were divided into survival group and non-survival group according to the clinical outcome during hospitalization. The variables of PCIS, PRISM III, PELOD-2, and P-MODS were collected and scored. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was plotted, the efficiency of PCIS, PRISM III, PELOD-2, and P-MODS for predicting death were evaluated by the area under ROC curve (AUC). Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness of fit test was used to evaluate the fitting degree of each scoring system to predict the mortality and the actual mortality. Of 461 critically ill children, 35 children were excluded because of serious data loss, hospital stay not exceeding 24 hours, and death within 8 hours after admission. Finally, a total of 426 pediatric patients were enrolled in this study. 355 pediatric patients were survived, while 71 were not survived during hospitalization, with the mortality of 16.7%. There was no significant difference in gender, age, underlying diseases or length of PICU stay between the two groups. PCIS score in non-survival group was significantly lower than that of survival group [80 (76, 88) vs. 86 (80, 92)], and PRISM III, PELOD-2 and P-MODS scores were significantly increased [PRISM III: 16 (13, 22) vs. 12 (10, 15), PELOD-2: 6 (5, 9) vs. 4 (2, 5), P-MODS: 6 (4, 9) vs. 3 (2, 6), all P < 0.01]. ROC curve analysis showed that the AUCs of PCIS, PRISM III, PELOD-2, and P-MODS for predicting

  15. The Fourteenth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Spectroscopic Data from the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and from the Second Phase of the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolfathi, Bela; Aguado, D. S.; Aguilar, Gabriela; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Almeida, Andres; Tasnim Ananna, Tonima; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott F.; Andrews, Brett H.; Anguiano, Borja; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Argudo-Fernández, Maria; Armengaud, Eric; Ata, Metin; Aubourg, Eric; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Bailey, Stephen; Balland, Christophe; Barger, Kathleen A.; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge; Bartosz, Curtis; Bastien, Fabienne; Bates, Dominic; Baumgarten, Falk; Bautista, Julian; Beaton, Rachael; Beers, Timothy C.; Belfiore, Francesco; Bender, Chad F.; Bernardi, Mariangela; Bershady, Matthew A.; Beutler, Florian; Bird, Jonathan C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blanton, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Michael; Bolton, Adam S.; Boquien, Médéric; Borissova, Jura; Bovy, Jo; Andres Bradna Diaz, Christian; Nielsen Brandt, William; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Burgasser, Adam J.; Burtin, Etienne; Busca, Nicolás G.; Cañas, Caleb I.; Cano-Díaz, Mariana; Cappellari, Michele; Carrera, Ricardo; Casey, Andrew R.; Cervantes Sodi, Bernardo; Chen, Yanping; Cherinka, Brian; Chiappini, Cristina; Doohyun Choi, Peter; Chojnowski, Drew; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Chung, Haeun; Clerc, Nicolas; Cohen, Roger E.; Comerford, Julia M.; Comparat, Johan; Correa do Nascimento, Janaina; da Costa, Luiz; Cousinou, Marie-Claude; Covey, Kevin; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Cruz-Gonzalez, Irene; Cunha, Katia; da Silva Ilha, Gabriele; Damke, Guillermo J.; Darling, Jeremy; Davidson, James W., Jr.; Dawson, Kyle; de Icaza Lizaola, Miguel Angel C.; de la Macorra, Axel; de la Torre, Sylvain; De Lee, Nathan; de Sainte Agathe, Victoria; Deconto Machado, Alice; Dell’Agli, Flavia; Delubac, Timothée; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Donor, John; José Downes, Juan; Drory, Niv; du Mas des Bourboux, Hélion; Duckworth, Christopher J.; Dwelly, Tom; Dyer, Jamie; Ebelke, Garrett; Davis Eigenbrot, Arthur; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Elsworth, Yvonne P.; Emsellem, Eric; Eracleous, Michael; Erfanianfar, Ghazaleh; Escoffier, Stephanie; Fan, Xiaohui; Fernández Alvar, Emma; Fernandez-Trincado, J. G.; Cirolini, Rafael Fernando; Feuillet, Diane; Finoguenov, Alexis; Fleming, Scott W.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Freischlad, Gordon; Frinchaboy, Peter; Fu, Hai; Gómez Maqueo Chew, Yilen; Galbany, Lluís; García Pérez, Ana E.; Garcia-Dias, R.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Garma Oehmichen, Luis Alberto; Gaulme, Patrick; Gelfand, Joseph; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Gillespie, Bruce A.; Goddard, Daniel; González Hernández, Jonay I.; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Grabowski, Kathleen; Green, Paul J.; Grier, Catherine J.; Gueguen, Alain; Guo, Hong; Guy, Julien; Hagen, Alex; Hall, Patrick; Harding, Paul; Hasselquist, Sten; Hawley, Suzanne; Hayes, Christian R.; Hearty, Fred; Hekker, Saskia; Hernandez, Jesus; Hernandez Toledo, Hector; Hogg, David W.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Holtzman, Jon A.; Hou, Jiamin; Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Hunt, Jason A. S.; Hutchinson, Timothy A.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Jimenez Angel, Camilo Eduardo; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Jones, Amy; Jönsson, Henrik; Jullo, Eric; Sakil Khan, Fahim; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Kirkpatrick, Charles C., IV; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Lacerna, Ivan; Lane, Richard R.; Lang, Dustin; Law, David R.; Le Goff, Jean-Marc; Lee, Young-Bae; Li, Hongyu; Li, Cheng; Lian, Jianhui; Liang, Yu; Lima, Marcos; Lin, Lihwai; Long, Dan; Lucatello, Sara; Lundgren, Britt; Mackereth, J. Ted; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Geimba Maia, Marcio Antonio; Majewski, Steven; Manchado, Arturo; Maraston, Claudia; Mariappan, Vivek; Marques-Chaves, Rui; Masseron, Thomas; Masters, Karen L.; McDermid, Richard M.; McGreer, Ian D.; Melendez, Matthew; Meneses-Goytia, Sofia; Merloni, Andrea; Merrifield, Michael R.; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Meza, Andres; Minchev, Ivan; Minniti, Dante; Mueller, Eva-Maria; Muller-Sanchez, Francisco; Muna, Demitri; Muñoz, Ricardo R.; Myers, Adam D.; Nair, Preethi; Nandra, Kirpal; Ness, Melissa; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Nichol, Robert C.; Nidever, David L.; Nitschelm, Christian; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; O’Connell, Julia; Oelkers, Ryan James; Oravetz, Audrey; Oravetz, Daniel; Aquino Ortíz, Erik; Osorio, Yeisson; Pace, Zach; Padilla, Nelson; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Alonso Palicio, Pedro; Pan, Hsi-An; Pan, Kaike; Parikh, Taniya; Pâris, Isabelle; Park, Changbom; Peirani, Sebastien; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Penny, Samantha; Percival, Will J.; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M.; Pinsonneault, Marc; Pisani, Alice; Prada, Francisco; Prakash, Abhishek; Queiroz, Anna Bárbara de Andrade; Raddick, M. Jordan; Raichoor, Anand; Barboza Rembold, Sandro; Richstein, Hannah; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Riffel, Rogério; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robin, Annie C.; Rodríguez Torres, Sergio; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos; Ross, Ashley J.; Rossi, Graziano; Ruan, John; Ruggeri, Rossana; Ruiz, Jose; Salvato, Mara; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Sánchez, Sebastián F.; Sanchez Almeida, Jorge; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Santana Rojas, Felipe Antonio; Santiago, Basílio Xavier; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Schimoia, Jaderson S.; Schlafly, Edward; Schlegel, David; Schneider, Donald P.; Schuster, William J.; Schwope, Axel; Seo, Hee-Jong; Serenelli, Aldo; Shen, Shiyin; Shen, Yue; Shetrone, Matthew; Shull, Michael; Silva Aguirre, Víctor; Simon, Joshua D.; Skrutskie, Mike; Slosar, Anže; Smethurst, Rebecca; Smith, Verne; Sobeck, Jennifer; Somers, Garrett; Souter, Barbara J.; Souto, Diogo; Spindler, Ashley; Stark, David V.; Stassun, Keivan; Steinmetz, Matthias; Stello, Dennis; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Streblyanska, Alina; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Suárez, Genaro; Sun, Jing; Szigeti, Laszlo; Taghizadeh-Popp, Manuchehr; Talbot, Michael S.; Tang, Baitian; Tao, Charling; Tayar, Jamie; Tembe, Mita; Teske, Johanna; Thakar, Aniruddha R.; Thomas, Daniel; Tissera, Patricia; Tojeiro, Rita; Tremonti, Christy; Troup, Nicholas W.; Urry, Meg; Valenzuela, O.; van den Bosch, Remco; Vargas-González, Jaime; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Villanova, Sandro; Vogt, Nicole; Wake, David; Wang, Yuting; Weaver, Benjamin Alan; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Weinberg, David H.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Whelan, David G.; Wilcots, Eric; Wild, Vivienne; Williams, Rob A.; Wilson, John; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Wylezalek, Dominika; Xiao, Ting; Yan, Renbin; Yang, Meng; Ybarra, Jason E.; Yèche, Christophe; Zakamska, Nadia; Zamora, Olga; Zarrouk, Pauline; Zasowski, Gail; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Cheng; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Zheng; Zheng, Zheng; Zhou, Zhi-Min; Zhu, Guangtun; Zinn, Joel C.; Zou, Hu

    2018-04-01

    The fourth generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) has been in operation since 2014 July. This paper describes the second data release from this phase, and the 14th from SDSS overall (making this Data Release Fourteen or DR14). This release makes the data taken by SDSS-IV in its first two years of operation (2014–2016 July) public. Like all previous SDSS releases, DR14 is cumulative, including the most recent reductions and calibrations of all data taken by SDSS since the first phase began operations in 2000. New in DR14 is the first public release of data from the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey; the first data from the second phase of the Apache Point Observatory (APO) Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE-2), including stellar parameter estimates from an innovative data-driven machine-learning algorithm known as “The Cannon” and almost twice as many data cubes from the Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA) survey as were in the previous release (N = 2812 in total). This paper describes the location and format of the publicly available data from the SDSS-IV surveys. We provide references to the important technical papers describing how these data have been taken (both targeting and observation details) and processed for scientific use. The SDSS web site (www.sdss.org) has been updated for this release and provides links to data downloads, as well as tutorials and examples of data use. SDSS-IV is planning to continue to collect astronomical data until 2020 and will be followed by SDSS-V.

  16. Comparing Computer-Derived and Human-Observed Scores for the Balance Error Scoring System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccese, Jaclyn B; Kaminski, Thomas W

    2016-05-01

    The Balance Error Scoring System (BESS) is the current standard for assessing postural stability in concussed athletes on the sideline. However, research has questioned the objectivity and validity of the BESS, suggesting that while certain subcategories of the BESS have sufficient reliability to be used in evaluation of postural stability, the total score is not reliable, demonstrating limited interrater and intrarater reliability. Recently, a computerized BESS test was developed to automate scoring. To compare computer-derived BESS scores with those taken from 3 trained human scorers. Interrater reliability study. Athletic training room. NCAA Division I student athletes (53 male, 58 female; 19 ± 2 y, 168 ± 41 cm, 69 ± 4 kg). Subjects were asked to perform the BESS while standing on the Tekscan (Boston, MA) MobileMat® BESS. The MobileMat BESS software displayed an error score at the end of each trial. Simultaneously, errors were recorded by 3 separate examiners. Errors were counted using the standard BESS scoring criteria. The number of BESS errors was computed for the 6 stances from the software and each of the 3 human scorers. Interclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to compare errors for each stance scored by the MobileMat BESS software with each of 3 raters individually. The ICC values were converted to Fisher Z scores, averaged, and converted back into ICC values. The double-leg, single-leg, and tandem-firm stances resulted in good agreement with human scorers (ICC = .999, .731, and .648). All foam stances resulted in fair agreement. Our results suggest that the MobileMat BESS is suitable for identifying BESS errors involving each of the 6 stances of the BESS protocol. Because the MobileMat BESS scores consistently and reliably, this system can be used with confidence by clinicians as an effective alternative to scoring the BESS.

  17. The RIPASA score for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis: A comparison with the modified Alvarado score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Barrientos, C Z; Aquino-González, A; Heredia-Montaño, M; Navarro-Tovar, F; Pineda-Espinosa, M A; Espinosa de Santillana, I A

    2018-02-06

    Acute appendicitis is the first cause of surgical emergencies. It is still a difficult diagnosis to make, especially in young persons, the elderly, and in reproductive-age women, in whom a series of inflammatory conditions can have signs and symptoms similar to those of acute appendicitis. Different scoring systems have been created to increase diagnostic accuracy, and they are inexpensive, noninvasive, and easy to use and reproduce. The modified Alvarado score is probably the most widely used and accepted in emergency services worldwide. On the other hand, the RIPASA score was formulated in 2010 and has greater sensitivity and specificity. There are very few studies conducted in Mexico that compare the different scoring systems for appendicitis. The aim of our article was to compare the modified Alvarado score and the RIPASA score in the diagnosis of patients with abdominal pain and suspected acute appendicitis. An observational, analytic, and prolective study was conducted within the time frame of July 2002 and February 2014 at the Hospital Universitario de Puebla. The questionnaires used for the evaluation process were applied to the patients suspected of having appendicitis. The RIPASA score with 8.5 as the optimal cutoff value: ROC curve (area .595), sensitivity (93.3%), specificity (8.3%), PPV (91.8%), NPV (10.1%). Modified Alvarado score with 6 as the optimal cutoff value: ROC curve (area .719), sensitivity (75%), specificity (41.6%), PPV (93.7%), NPV (12.5%). The RIPASA score showed no advantages over the modified Alvarado score when applied to patients presenting with suspected acute appendicitis. Copyright © 2018 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  18. A Prognostic Scoring Tool for Cesarean Organ/Space Surgical Site Infections: Derivation and Internal Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assawapalanggool, Srisuda; Kasatpibal, Nongyao; Sirichotiyakul, Supatra; Arora, Rajin; Suntornlimsiri, Watcharin

    Organ/space surgical site infections (SSIs) are serious complications after cesarean delivery. However, no scoring tool to predict these complications has yet been developed. This study sought to develop and validate a prognostic scoring tool for cesarean organ/space SSIs. Data for case and non-case of cesarean organ/space SSI between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012 from a tertiary care hospital in Thailand were analyzed. Stepwise multivariable logistic regression was used to select the best predictor combination and their coefficients were transformed to a risk scoring tool. The likelihood ratio of positive for each risk category and the area under receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curves were analyzed on total scores. Internal validation using bootstrap re-sampling was tested for reproducibility. The predictors of 243 organ/space SSIs from 4,988 eligible cesarean delivery cases comprised the presence of foul-smelling amniotic fluid (four points), vaginal examination five or more times before incision (two points), wound class III or greater (two points), being referred from local setting (two points), hemoglobin less than 11 g/dL (one point), and ethnic minorities (one point). The likelihood ratio of cesarean organ/space SSIs with 95% confidence interval among low (total score of 0-1 point), medium (total score of 2-5 points), and high risk (total score of ≥6 points) categories were 0.11 (0.07-0.19), 1.03 (0.89-1.18), and 13.25 (10.87-16.14), respectively. Both AUROCs of the derivation and validation data were comparable (87.57% versus 86.08%; p = 0.418). This scoring tool showed a high predictive ability regarding cesarean organ/space SSIs on the derivation data and reproducibility was demonstrated on internal validation. It could assist practitioners prioritize patient care and management depending on risk category and decrease SSI rates in cesarean deliveries.

  19. A Confirmatory Factor Analytic Study of the Wechsler Memory Scale-III in an Elderly Norwegian Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosnes, Ole; Troland, Kari; Torsheim, Torbjoern

    2016-02-01

    This study compared the factor structure of the translated Wechsler Memory Scale-III (WMS-III), which is the latest available version in Norway, with the original U.S. version. A sample of 122 healthy, elderly Norwegians (mean age: 74; standard deviation = 8.8) completed the WMS-III. The factor structure of the translated WMS-III was tested, using Confirmatory Factor Analysis, with comparison of model fit based on five a priori hypothesized models. Several model fit indices pointed to a three-factor model (working memory, visual memory, and auditory memory) providing the best fit to the data. Our study supports updated findings of the original WMS-III in nonclinical samples and suggests that the translated version is structurally equal to the original. The study supports the cross-cultural validity of the WMS-III. However, based on the present data, one might expect scores on the Family Pictures subtest to fall below scores on other WMS-III subtests in elderly Norwegians. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Correlation of clinical and echo-cardiographic scores with blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty four younger children (88%) and 29 older children (85%) had a high clinical score (severe CHF). Twenty one out of 23 younger children with high echo score (91%) had a high clinical score as well (p-value 0.001). In patients with RHD (all with a high clinical score), 81 % had a high echo score. (p-value 0.001).

  1. Integrated Test Scoring, Performance Rating and Assessment Records Keeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Gerald J.; And Others

    The Objective Test Scoring and Performance Rating (OTS-PR) system is a fully integrated set of 70 modular FORTRAN programs run on a VAX-8530 computer. Even with no knowledge of computers, the user can implement OTS-PR to score multiple-choice tests, include scores from external sources such as hand-scored essays or scores from nationally…

  2. Pemberian Antitrombin III pada Sepsis Neonatal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathanne Septhiandi

    2016-11-01

    Kesimpulan. Secara statistik penggunaan AT III apabila dibandingkan dengan plasebo pada keadaan sepsis neonatal tidak memperbaiki prognosis dalam hal menurunkan tingkat mortalitas selama 28-30 hari. Walaupun demikian, tingkat mortalitas kelompok AT III lebih rendah dibandingkan dengan placebo.

  3. Grant Administration Manual for Title III Coordinators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, Emily Duncan; Ashmore, Frances W.

    Guidelines for coordinators of programs under Title III of the Higher Education Act of 1965 are presented, based on a national survey of Title III program coordinators. The responsibilities of the coordinator and information on administering the Strengthening Developing Institutions Program (SDIP) grant are covered. The program can either be a…

  4. III-nitride devices and nanoengineering

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Feng, Zhe Chuan

    2008-01-01

    ... devices applications. III-Nitrides-based industry is forming up and new economic developments these materials are promising. It is expected that III-Nitrides-based LEDs might replace the traditional light bulbs to a revolution in lightings and change entire human life in this century, similar to Edison's invention of the electric lig...

  5. Teachers' Potpourri: Public Speaking For Consciousness III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangervere, Robert J.

    1971-01-01

    The author discusses the interests and attitudes of present day students. The III's, students of consciousness III, reject the entire concept of academic rewards. Their interest in public speaking classes is not to learn to win others over but rather as a means to improve communication. (MS)

  6. Synthesis, spectroscopic and antimicrobial studies of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) Metformin HCl chelates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refat, Moamen S; Al-Azab, Fathi M; Al-Maydama, Hussein M A; Amin, Ragab R; Jamil, Yasmin M S; Kobeasy, Mohamed I

    2015-05-05

    Metal complexes of Metformin hydrochloride were prepared using La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III). The resulting complexes were discussed and synthesized to serve as potential insulin-mimetic. Some physical properties and analytical data of the four complexes were checked. The elemental analysis shows that La(III), Ce(III) Sm(III) and Y(III) formed complexes with Metformin in 1:3 (metal:MF) molar ratio. All the synthesized complexes are white and possess high melting points. These complexes are soluble in dimethylsulfoxide and dimethylformamide, partially soluble in hot methanol and insoluble in water and some other organic solvents. From the spectroscopic (infrared, UV-vis and florescence), effective magnetic moment and elemental analyses data, the formula structures are suggested. The results obtained suggested that Metformin reacted with metal ions as a bidentate ligand through its two imino groups. The molar conductance measurements proved that the Metformin complexes are slightly electrolytic in nature. The kinetic thermodynamic parameters such as: E(∗), ΔH(∗), ΔS(∗) and ΔG(∗) were estimated from the DTG curves. The antibacterial evaluations of the Metformin and their complexes were also performed against some gram positive, negative bacteria as well as fungi. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Antithrombin III for critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allingstrup, Mikkel; Wetterslev, Jørn; Ravn, Frederikke B

    2016-01-01

    Background: Critical illness is associated with uncontrolled inflammation and vascular damage which can result in multiple organ failure and death. Antithrombin III (AT III) is an anticoagulant with anti-inflammatory properties but the efficacy and any harmful effects of AT III supplementation...... in critically ill patients are unknown. This review was published in 2008 and updated in 2015.  Objectives: To examine: 1. The effect of AT III on mortality in critically ill participants. 2. The benefits and harms of AT III. We investigated complications specific and not specific to the trial intervention......, bleeding events, the effect on sepsis and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and the length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) and in hospital in general.  Search methods: We searched the following databases from inception to 27 August 2015: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials...

  8. Rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury: creatine kinase as a prognostic marker and validation of the McMahon Score in a 10-year cohort: A retrospective observational evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Joanna P; Taylor, Andrew; Sudhan, Nazneen; Menon, David K; Lavinio, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    High-volume fluid resuscitation and the administration of sodium bicarbonate and diuretics have a theoretical renoprotective role in patients at high risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) following rhabdomyolysis. Abnormally elevated creatine kinase has previously been used as a biological marker for the identification of patients at high risk of AKI following rhabdomyolysis. To assess the sensitivity and specificity of plasma creatine kinase (admission and peak values) for the prediction of AKI requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT) or of death in patients with confirmed rhabdomyolysis. To compare the diagnostic performance of creatine kinase with the McMahon score. Retrospective observational study. Data collection included McMahon and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scores; daily creatine kinase; daily creatinine and electrolytes; ICU length of stay and mortality. Neurosciences and Trauma Critical Care Unit (Cambridge, UK). In total, 232 adults with confirmed rhabdomyolysis (creatine kinase > 1000 Ul) admitted to Neurosciences and Trauma Critical Care Unit between 2002 and 2012. AKI, RRT and mortality. Forty-five (19%) patients developed AKI and 29 (12.5%) patients required RRT. Mortality was significantly higher in patients who developed AKI (62 vs. 18%, P rhabdomyolysis. Although a PEAK creatine kinase of at least 5000 Ul has sensitivity acceptable for screening purposes, this is often a delayed finding. A McMahon score of at least 6 calculated on admission allows for a more sensitive, specific and timely identification of patients who may benefit from high-volume fluid resuscitation.

  9. Live Score Following on Sheet Music Images

    OpenAIRE

    Dorfer, Matthias; Arzt, Andreas; Böck, Sebastian; Durand, Amaury; Widmer, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    In this demo we show a novel approach to score following. Instead of relying on some symbolic representation, we are using a multi-modal convolutional neural network to match the incoming audio stream directly to sheet music images. This approach is in an early stage and should be seen as proof of concept. Nonetheless, the audience will have the opportunity to test our implementation themselves via 3 simple piano pieces.

  10. North Korean refugee doctors' preliminary examination scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Uk Chae

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Although there have been studies emphasizing the re-education of North Korean (NK doctors for post-unification of the Korean Peninsula, study on the content and scope of such re-education has yet to be conducted. Researchers intended to set the content and scope of re-education by a comparative analysis for the scores of the preliminary examination, which is comparable to the Korean Medical Licensing Examination (KMLE. Methods The scores of the first and second preliminary exams were analyzed by subject using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The passing status of the group of NK doctors for KMLE in recent 3 years were investigated. The multiple-choice-question (MCQ items of which difficulty indexes of NK doctors were lower than those of South Korean (SK medical students by two times of the standard deviation of the scores of SK medical students were selected to investigate the relevant reasons. Results The average scores of nearly all subjects were improved in the second exam compared with the first exam. The passing rate of the group of NK doctors was 75%. The number of MCQ items of which difficulty indexes of NK doctors were lower than those of SK medical students was 51 (6.38%. NK doctors’ lack of understandings for Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures, Therapeutics, Prenatal Care, and Managed Care Programs was suggested as the possible reason. Conclusion The education of integrated courses focusing on Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures and Therapeutics, and apprenticeship-style training for clinical practice of core subjects are needed. Special lectures on the Preventive Medicine are likely to be required also.

  11. Optical syntactic pattern recognition by fuzzy scoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, R.; Kinser, J.; Schamschula, M.; Shamir, J.; Caulfield, H.J. [Center for Applied Optical Sciences, Department of Physics, Alabama A& M University, Normal, Alabama 35762 (United States)

    1996-06-01

    A novel syntactic approach is introduced to treat particular problems in pattern recognition. The procedure is implemented by the use of optical correlation methods for identifying the various primitives that appear in the input pattern, and their importance is determined by fuzzy relational scoring. Robust pattern recognition with tolerance to normal variations is demonstrated, indicating an efficient new approach for optical pattern recognition. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  12. MODELING CREDIT RISK THROUGH CREDIT SCORING

    OpenAIRE

    Adrian Cantemir CALIN; Oana Cristina POPOVICI

    2014-01-01

    Credit risk governs all financial transactions and it is defined as the risk of suffering a loss due to certain shifts in the credit quality of a counterpart. Credit risk literature gravitates around two main modeling approaches: the structural approach and the reduced form approach. In addition to these perspectives, credit risk assessment has been conducted through a series of techniques such as credit scoring models, which form the traditional approach. This paper examines the evolution of...

  13. Quality scores for 32,000 genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Land, Miriam L.; Hyatt, Doug; Jun, Se-Ran

    2014-01-01

    or not applicable. The scores highlighted organisms for which commonly used tools do not perform well. This information can be used to improve tools and to serve a broad group of users as more diverse organisms are sequenced. Unexpectedly, the comparison of predicted tRNAs across 15,000 high quality genomes showed......Background More than 80% of the microbial genomes in GenBank are of ‘draft’ quality (12,553 draft vs. 2,679 finished, as of October, 2013). We have examined all the microbial DNA sequences available for complete, draft, and Sequence Read Archive genomes in GenBank as well as three other major...... public databases, and assigned quality scores for more than 30,000 prokaryotic genome sequences. Results Scores were assigned using four categories: the completeness of the assembly, the presence of full-length rRNA genes, tRNA composition and the presence of a set of 102 conserved genes in prokaryotes...

  14. Resiliency scoring for business continuity plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Anna; Anderson, Jamie

    Through this paper readers will learn of a scoring methodology, referred to as resiliency scoring, which enables the evaluation of business continuity plans based upon analysis of their alignment with a predefined set of criteria that can be customised and are adaptable to the needs of any organisation. This patent pending tool has been successful in driving engagement and is a powerful resource to improve reporting capabilities, identify risks and gauge organisational resilience. The role of business continuity professionals is to aid their organisations in planning and preparedness activities aimed at mitigating the impacts of potential disruptions and ensuring critical business functions can continue in the event of unforeseen circumstances. This may seem like a daunting task for what can typically be a small team of individuals. For this reason, it is important to be able to leverage industry standards, documented best practices and effective tools to streamline and support your continuity programme. The resiliency scoring methodology developed and implemented at Target has proven to be a valuable tool in taking the organisation's continuity programme to the next level. This paper will detail how the tool was developed and provide guidance on how it can be customised to fit your organisation's unique needs.

  15. High throughput sample processing and automated scoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar eBrunborg

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The comet assay is a sensitive and versatile method for assessing DNA damage in cells. In the traditional version of the assay, there are many manual steps involved and few samples can be treated in one experiment. High throughput modifications have been developed during recent years, and they are reviewed and discussed. These modifications include accelerated scoring of comets; other important elements that have been studied and adapted to high throughput are cultivation and manipulation of cells or tissues before and after exposure, and freezing of treated samples until comet analysis and scoring. High throughput methods save time and money but they are useful also for other reasons: large-scale experiments may be performed which are otherwise not practicable (e.g., analysis of many organs from exposed animals, and human biomonitoring studies, and automation gives more uniform sample treatment and less dependence on operator performance. The high throughput modifications now available vary largely in their versatility, capacity, complexity and costs. The bottleneck for further increase of throughput appears to be the scoring.

  16. Scoring ordinal variables for constructing composite indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marica Manisera

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to provide composite indicators of latent variables, for example of customer satisfaction, it is opportune to identify the structure of the latent variable, in terms of the assignment of items to the subscales defining the latent variable. Adopting the reflective model, the impact of four different methods of scoring ordinal variables on the identification of the true structure of latent variables is investigated. A simulation study composed of 5 steps is conducted: (1 simulation of population data with continuous variables measuring a two-dimensional latent variable with known structure; (2 draw of a number of random samples; (3 discretization of the continuous variables according to different distributional forms; (4 quantification of the ordinal variables obtained in step (3 according to different methods; (5 construction of composite indicators and verification of the correct assignment of variables to subscales by the multiple group method and the factor analysis. Results show that the considered scoring methods have similar performances in assigning items to subscales, and that, when the latent variable is multinormal, the distributional form of the observed ordinal variables is not determinant in suggesting the best scoring method to use.

  17. Modelling the predictive performance of credit scoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Wei Shen

    2013-07-01

    Research purpose: The purpose of this empirical paper was to examine the predictive performance of credit scoring systems in Taiwan. Motivation for the study: Corporate lending remains a major business line for financial institutions. However, in light of the recent global financial crises, it has become extremely important for financial institutions to implement rigorous means of assessing clients seeking access to credit facilities. Research design, approach and method: Using a data sample of 10 349 observations drawn between 1992 and 2010, logistic regression models were utilised to examine the predictive performance of credit scoring systems. Main findings: A test of Goodness of fit demonstrated that credit scoring models that incorporated the Taiwan Corporate Credit Risk Index (TCRI, micro- and also macroeconomic variables possessed greater predictive power. This suggests that macroeconomic variables do have explanatory power for default credit risk. Practical/managerial implications: The originality in the study was that three models were developed to predict corporate firms’ defaults based on different microeconomic and macroeconomic factors such as the TCRI, asset growth rates, stock index and gross domestic product. Contribution/value-add: The study utilises different goodness of fits and receiver operator characteristics during the examination of the robustness of the predictive power of these factors.

  18. A classification prognostic score to predict OS in stage IV well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusceddu, Sara; Barretta, Francesco; Trama, Annalisa; Botta, Laura; Milione, Massimo; Buzzoni, Roberto; de Braud, Filipppo; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Pastorino, Ugo; Seregni, Ettore; Mariani, Luigi; Gatta, Gemma; Di Bartolomeo, Maria; Femia, Daniela; Prinzi, Natalie; Coppa, Jorgelina; Panzuto, Francesco; Antonuzzo, Lorenzo; Bajetta, Emilio; Maria, Brizzi Pia; Campana, Davide; Catena, Laura; Comber, Harry; Dwane, Fiona; Fazio, Nicola; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Giuffrida, Dario; Henau, Kris; Ibrahim, Toni; Marconcini, Riccardo; Massironi, Sara; Žakelj, Maja Primic; Spada, Francesca; Tafuto, Salvatore; Van Eycken, Elizabeth; Van der Zwan, Jan Maaten; Žagar, Tina; Giacomelli, Luca; Miceli, Rosalba

    2018-03-20

    No validated prognostic tool is available for predicting overall survival (OS) of patients with well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors (WDNETs). This study, conducted in three independent cohorts of patients from five different European countries, aimed to develop and validate a classification prognostic score for OS in patients with stage IV WDNETs. We retrospectively collected data on 1387 patients: (i) patients treated at the Istituto Nazionale Tumori (Milan, Italy; n=515); (ii) European cohort of rare NET patients included in the European RARECAREnet database (n=457); (iii) Italian multicentric cohort of pancreatic NET (pNETs) patients treated at 24 Italian institutions (n=415). The score was developed using data from patients included in cohort (i) (training set); external validation was performed by applying the score to the data of the two independent cohorts (ii) and (iii) evaluating both calibration and discriminative ability (Harrell C statistic). We used data on age, primary tumor site, metastasis (synchronous vs metachronous), Ki67, functional status and primary surgery to build the score, which was developed for classifying patients into three groups with differential 10-year OS: I) Favorable-risk group: 10-year OS ≥70%; II) Intermediate-risk group: 30% ≤10-year OS OS <30%. The Harrell C statistic was 0.661 in the training set, and 0.626 and 0.601 in the RARECAREnet and Italian multicentric validation sets, respectively. In conclusion, based on the analysis of three 'field-practice' cohorts collected in different settings, we defined and validated a prognostic score to classify patients into three groups with different long-term prognoses.

  19. Dementia Screening Accuracy is Robust to Premorbid IQ Variation: Evidence from the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-III and the Test of Premorbid Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, Joshua; Scior, Katrina; Mandy, William; Charlesworth, Georgina

    2017-01-01

    Scores on cognitive screening tools for dementia are associated with premorbid IQ. It has been suggested that screening scores should be adjusted accordingly. However, no study has examined whether premorbid IQ variation affects screening accuracy. To investigate whether the screening accuracy of a widely used cognitive screening tool for dementia, the Addenbrooke's cognitive examination-III (ACE-III), is improved by adjusting for premorbid IQ. 171 UK based adults (96 memory service attendees diagnosed with dementia and 75 healthy volunteers over the age of 65 without subjective memory impairments) completed the ACE-III and the Test of Premorbid Function (TOPF). The difference in screening performance between the ACE-III alone and the ACE-III adjusted for TOPF was assessed against a reference standard; the presence or absence of a diagnosis of dementia (Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, or others). Logistic regression and receiver operating curve analyses indicated that the ACE-III has excellent screening accuracy (93% sensitivity, 94% specificity) in distinguishing those with and without a dementia diagnosis. Although ACE-III scores were associated with TOPF scores, TOPF scores may be affected by having dementia and screening accuracy was not improved by accounting for premorbid IQ, age, or years of education. ACE-III screening accuracy is high and screening performance is robust to variation in premorbid IQ, age, and years of education. Adjustment of ACE-III cut-offs for premorbid IQ is not recommended in clinical practice. The analytic strategy used here may be useful to assess the impact of premorbid IQ on other screening tools.

  20. Validation of a new scoring system: Rapid assessment faecal incontinence score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Portilla, Fernando; Calero-Lillo, Arantxa; Jiménez-Rodríguez, Rosa M; Reyes, Maria L; Segovia-González, Manuela; Maestre, María Victoria; García-Cabrera, Ana M

    2015-09-27

    To implement a quick and simple test - rapid assessment faecal incontinence score (RAFIS) and show its reliability and validity. From March 2008 through March 2010, we evaluated a total of 261 consecutive patients, including 53 patients with faecal incontinence. Demographic and comorbidity information was collected. In a single visit, patients were administered the RAFIS. The results obtained with the new score were compared with those of both Wexner score and faecal incontinence quality of life scale (FIQL) questionnaire. The patient without influence of the surgeon completed the test. The role of surgeon was explaining the meaning of each section and how he had to fill. Reliability of the RAFIS score was measured using intra-observer agreement and Cronbach's alpha (internal consistency) coefficient. Multivariate analysis of the main components within the different scores was performed in order to determine whether all the scores measured the same factor and to conclude whether the information could be encompassed in a single factor. A sample size of 50 patients with faecal incontinence was estimated to be enough to detect a correlation of 0.55 or better at 5% level of significance with 80% power. We analysed the results obtained by 53 consecutive patients with faecal incontinence (median age 61.55 ± 12.49 years) in the three scoring systems. A total of 208 healthy volunteers (median age 58.41 ± 18.41 years) without faecal incontinence were included in the study as negative controls. Pearson's correlation coefficient between "state" and "leaks" was excellent (r = 0.92, P < 0.005). Internal consistency in the comparison of "state" and "leaks" yielded also excellent correlation (Cronbach's α = 0.93). Results in each score were compared using regression analysis and a correlation value of r = 0.98 was obtained with Wexner score. As regards FIQL questionnaire, the values of "r" for the different subscales of the questionnaire were: "lifestyle" r = -0.87, "coping