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Sample records for ap-3 transport vesicles

  1. Mutation in AP-3 delta in the mocha mouse links endosomal transport to storage deficiency in platelets, melanosomes, and synaptic vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantheti, P; Qiao, X; Diaz, M E; Peden, A A; Meyer, G E; Carskadon, S L; Kapfhamer, D; Sufalko, D; Robinson, M S; Noebels, J L; Burmeister, M

    1998-07-01

    The mouse mutant mocha, a model for the Hermansky-Pudlak storage pool deficiency syndrome, is characterized by defective platelets, coat and eye color dilution, lysosomal abnormalities, inner ear degeneration, and neurological deficits. Here, we show that mocha is a null allele of the delta subunit of the adaptor-like protein complex AP-3, which is associated with coated vesicles budding from the trans-Golgi network, and that AP-3 is missing in mocha tissues. In mocha brain, the ZnT-3 transporter is reduced, resulting in a lack of zinc-associated Timm historeactivity in hippocampal mossy fibers. Our results demonstrate that the AP-3 complex is responsible for cargo selection to lysosome-related organelles such as melanosomes and platelet dense granules as well as to neurotransmitter vesicles. PMID:9697856

  2. Enhancer of garnet/deltaAP-3 is a cryptic allele of the white gene and identifies the intracellular transport system for the white protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Vett K; Sinclair, D A R; Alperyn, M; Grigliatti, T A

    2002-04-01

    The white gene encodes an ABC-type transmembrane transporter that has a role in normal eye pigment deposition. In addition, overexpression in Drosophila leads to homosexual male courtship. Its human homologue has been implicated in cholesterol transport in macrophages and in mood disorders in human males. The garnet gene is a member of a group of other Drosophila eye colour genes that have been shown, or proposed, to function in intracellular protein transport. Recent molecular analysis indicates that it encodes the delta subunit of the AP-3 adaptin complex involved in vesicle transport from the trans-Golgi network to lysosomes and related organelles, such as pigment granules. This identification revealed a novel role for intracellular vesicular transport in Drosophila pigmentation. To further analyze this intracellular transport system, we examined the genetic interactions between garnet and a second site enhancer mutation, enhancer of garnet (e(g)). We show here that e(g) is a cryptic allele of the white gene. The white-garnet interaction is highly sensitive to the levels of both gene products but also shows some allele specificity for the white gene. The additive effect on pigmentation and the predicted protein products of these genes suggest that the garnet/AP-3 transport system ensures the correct intracellular localization of the white gene product. This model is further supported by the observation of homosexual male courtship behavior in garnet mutants, similar to that seen in flies overexpressing, and presumably mis-sorting, the white gene product. The w(e(g)) allele also enhances mutations in the subset of other eye-color genes with phenotypes similar to garnet. This observation supports a role for these genes in intracellular transport and leads to a model whereby incorrect sorting of the white gene product can explain the pigmentation phenotypes of an entire group of eye-color genes. PMID:11962627

  3. Intracellular transport of MHC class II and associated invariant chain in antigen presenting cells from AP-3-deficient mocha mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevilla, L M; Richter, S S; Miller, J

    2001-06-15

    MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation requires trafficking of newly synthesized class II-invariant chain complexes from the trans-Golgi network to endosomal, peptide-loading compartments. This transport is mediated by dileucine-like motifs within the cytosolic tail of the invariant chain. Although these signals have been well characterized, the cytosolic proteins that interact with these dileucine signals and mediate Golgi sorting and endosomal transport have not been identified. Recently, an adaptor complex, AP-3, has been identified that interacts with dileucine motifs and mediates endosomal/lysosomal transport in yeast, Drosophila, and mammals. In this report, we have assessed class II-invariant chain trafficking in a strain of mice (mocha) which lacks expression of AP-3. Our studies demonstrate that the lack of AP-3 does not affect the kinetics of invariant chain degradation, the route of class II-invariant chain transport, or the rate and extent of class II-peptide binding as assessed by the generation of SDS-stable dimers. The possible role of other known or unknown adaptor complexes in class II-invariant chain transport is discussed. PMID:11520080

  4. Mapping of the spontaneous deletion in the Ap3d1 gene of mocha mice: fast and reliable genotyping

    OpenAIRE

    Delenclos Marion; Holm Mai; Drasbek Kim; Jensen Kimmo

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The mocha mouse carries a spontaneous deletion in the Ap3d1 gene, encoding the delta 1 subunit of the adaptor related protein complex 3, (Ap3d1), and subsequently lack the expression of functional AP-3. This leads to a deficiency in vesicle transport and storage, which affects neurotransmitter vesicle turnover and release in the central nervous system. Since the genomic sequence of the Ap3d1 gene of mocha mouse is not known, precise mapping of the deletion as well as relia...

  5. Compartmentalization and Transport in Synthetic Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Christine; Lippert, Anna H; Bonakdar, Navid; Sandoghdar, Vahid; Voll, Lars M

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale vesicles have become a popular tool in life sciences. Besides liposomes that are generated from phospholipids of natural origin, polymersomes fabricated of synthetic block copolymers enjoy increasing popularity, as they represent more versatile membrane building blocks that can be selected based on their specific physicochemical properties, such as permeability, stability, or chemical reactivity. In this review, we focus on the application of simple and nested artificial vesicles in synthetic biology. First, we provide an introduction into the utilization of multicompartmented vesosomes as compartmentalized nanoscale bioreactors. In the bottom-up development of protocells from vesicular nanoreactors, the specific exchange of pathway intermediates across compartment boundaries represents a bottleneck for future studies. To date, most compartmented bioreactors rely on unspecific exchange of substrates and products. This is either based on changes in permeability of the coblock polymer shell by physicochemical triggers or by the incorporation of unspecific porin proteins into the vesicle membrane. Since the incorporation of membrane transport proteins into simple and nested artificial vesicles offers the potential for specific exchange of substances between subcompartments, it opens new vistas in the design of protocells. Therefore, we devote the main part of the review to summarize the technical advances in the use of phospholipids and block copolymers for the reconstitution of membrane proteins. PMID:26973834

  6. Compartmentalization and Transport in Synthetic Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine eSchmitt

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Nano-scale vesicles have become a popular tool in life sciences. Besides liposomes that are generated from phospholipids of natural origin, polymersomes fabricated of synthetic block copolymers enjoy increasing popularity, as they represent more versatile membrane building blocks that can be selected based on their specific physicochemical properties, like permeability, stability or chemical reactivity.In this review, we focus on the application of simple and nested artificial vesicles in synthetic biology. First, we provide an introduction into the utilization of multi-compartmented vesosomes as compartmentalized nano-scale bioreactors. In the bottom-up development of protocells from vesicular nano-reactors, the specific exchange of pathway intermediates across compartment boundaries represents a bottleneck for future studies. To date, most compartmented bioreactors rely on unspecific exchange of substrates and products. This is either based on changes in permeability of the coblock polymer shell by physicochemical triggers or by the incorporation of unspecific porin proteins into the vesicle membrane. Since the incorporation of membrane transport proteins into simple and nested artificial vesicles offers the potential for specific exchange of substances between subcompartments, it opens new vistas in the design of protocells. Therefore we devote the main part of the review to summarize the technical advances in the use of phospholipids and block copolymers for the reconstitution of membrane proteins.

  7. Altered retinal cell differentiation in the AP-3 delta mutant (Mocha) mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baguma-Nibasheka, Mark; Kablar, Boris

    2009-11-01

    Adaptor-related protein complex 3 delta 1 (Ap3d1) encodes the delta 1 subunit of an adaptor protein regulating intracellular vesicle-mediated transport, and the Ap3d-deletion mutant (Mocha) mouse undergoes rapid photoreceptor degeneration leading to blindness soon after birth. Previous microarray analysis revealed Ap3d down-regulation in the retina of mouse embryos specifically lacking cholinergic amacrine cells as a result of the absence of skeletal musculature. To investigate the role of Ap3d in the determination of retinal cell fate, the present study examined retinal morphology in newborn Ap3d-/- mice. The Ap3d-/- retina showed a complete absence of cholinergic amacrine cells and a decrease in parvalbumin-expressing amacrine cells and syntaxin- and VC1.1-expressing amacrine precursor cells, but had a normal number of cell layers and number of cells in each layer with no detectable difference in cell proliferation or apoptosis. These findings indicate that, despite having no apparent effect on the basic spatial organization of the retina at this stage of development, Ap3d could be involved in the regulation of progenitor cell competence and the eventual ratio of resulting differentiated cells. Finding the mouse mutant which phenocopies the eye defect seen in fetuses with no striated muscle was accomplished by the Systematic Subtractive Microarray Analysis Approach (SSMAA), explained in the discussion section. PMID:19631730

  8. Compartmentalization and Transport in Synthetic Vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt, Christine; Lippert, Anna H.; Bonakdar, Navid; Sandoghdar, Vahid; Voll, Lars M

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale vesicles have become a popular tool in life sciences. Besides liposomes that are generated from phospholipids of natural origin, polymersomes fabricated of synthetic block copolymers enjoy increasing popularity, as they represent more versatile membrane building blocks that can be selected based on their specific physicochemical properties, such as permeability, stability, or chemical reactivity. In this review, we focus on the application of simple and nested artificial vesicles in...

  9. The puzzle of chloroplast vesicle transport – involvement of GTPases

    OpenAIRE

    Karim, Sazzad; Aronsson, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    In the cytosol of plant cells vesicle transport occurs via secretory pathways among the endoplasmic reticulum network, Golgi bodies, secretory granules, endosome, and plasma membrane. Three systems transfer lipids, proteins and other important molecules through aqueous spaces to membrane-enclosed compartments, via vesicles that bud from donor membranes, being coated and uncoated before tethered and fused with acceptor membranes. In addition, molecular, biochemical and ultrastructural evidence...

  10. Mapping of the spontaneous deletion in the Ap3d1 gene of mocha mice: fast and reliable genotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delenclos Marion

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mocha mouse carries a spontaneous deletion in the Ap3d1 gene, encoding the delta 1 subunit of the adaptor related protein complex 3, (Ap3d1, and subsequently lack the expression of functional AP-3. This leads to a deficiency in vesicle transport and storage, which affects neurotransmitter vesicle turnover and release in the central nervous system. Since the genomic sequence of the Ap3d1 gene of mocha mouse is not known, precise mapping of the deletion as well as reliable genotyping protocols are lacking. Findings We sequenced the Ap3d1 gene (HGNC GeneID: 8943 around the deletion site in the mocha mouse and revealed a 10639 bp deletion covering exon 2 to 6. Subsequently, new PCR primers were designed yielding a reliable genotyping protocol of both newborn and adult tissue. To examine the genotypes further, hippocampal neurons were cultured from mocha and control mice. Patch-clamp recordings showed that mocha neurons had a higher input resistance, and that autaptic EPSC in mocha cultures depressed faster and stronger as compared with control cultures. Conclusion Our study reports the sequence of the deleted part of the Ap3d1 gene in mocha mice, as well as a reliable PCR-based genotyping protocol. We cultured hippocampal neurons from control and mocha mice, and found a difference in input resistance of the neurons, and in the synaptic short-term plasticity of glutamatergic autapses showing a larger synaptic depression than controls. The described procedures may be useful for the future utilization of the mocha mouse as a model of defective vesicle biogenesis. Importantly, as genotyping by eye color is complicated in newborn mice, the designed protocol is so fast and reliable that newborn mice could rapidly be genotyped and hippocampal neurons dissociated and cultured, which is normally best done at P0-P2.

  11. Calmodulin stimulation of calcium transport in carrot microsomal vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ATP-dependent 45Ca2+ uptake into microsomal vesicles isolated from cultured carrot cells (Daucus carota Danvers) was stimulated 2-3 fold by 5 ug/ml calmodulin (CaM). Microsomal vesicles separated with a linear sucrose gradient showed two peaks with CaM-stimulated Ca2+ uptake activities. One peak (at 1.12 g/cc) comigrated with the activity of the antimycin A-insensitive NADH-dependent cytochrome c reductase. This transport activity was enhanced 10-20 fold by 10 mM oxalate and appeared to be associates with vesicles derived primarily from the ER. The other peak of CaM-stimulated Ca2+ uptake (at 1.17 g/cc) was not affected by oxalate. These vesicles are probably derived from the plasma membrane. Preliminary experiments with the low-density vesicles (ER) vesicles, indicate that inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate caused a transient reduction in intravesicular Ca2+. These results are consistent with the ER being an important site of intracellular Ca2+ regulation

  12. Vesicular glutamate transporter 1 orchestrates recruitment of other synaptic vesicle cargo proteins during synaptic vesicle recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ping-Yue; Marrs, Julia; Ryan, Timothy A

    2015-09-11

    A long standing question in synaptic physiology is how neurotransmitter-filled vesicles are rebuilt after exocytosis. Among the first steps in this process is the endocytic retrieval of the transmembrane proteins that are enriched in synaptic vesicles (SVs). At least six types of transmembrane proteins must be recovered, but the rules for how this multiple cargo selection is accomplished are poorly understood. Among these SV cargos is the vesicular glutamate transporter (vGlut). We show here that vGlut1 has a strong influence on the kinetics of retrieval of half of the known SV cargos and that specifically impairing the endocytosis of vGlut1 in turn slows down other SV cargos, demonstrating that cargo retrieval is a collective cargo-driven process. Finally, we demonstrate that different cargos can be retrieved in the same synapse with different kinetics, suggesting that additional post-endocytic sorting steps likely occur in the nerve terminal. PMID:26224632

  13. Phospholipid flippases: building asymmetric membranes and transport vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastian, Tessy T.; Baldridge, Ryan D.; Xu, Peng; Graham, Todd R.

    2011-01-01

    Phospholipid flippases in the type IV P-type ATPase family (P4-ATPases) are essential components of the Golgi, plasma membrane and endosomal system that play critical roles in membrane biogenesis. These pumps flip phospholipid across the bilayer to create an asymmetric membrane structure with substrate phospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine, enriched within the cytosolic leaflet. The P4-ATPases also help form transport vesicles that bud from Golgi and endosomal...

  14. Mechanisms of equinatoxin II-induced transport through the membrane of a giant phospholipid vesicle.

    OpenAIRE

    Mally, M; Majhenc, J; Svetina, S; Zeks, B.

    2002-01-01

    Protein equinatoxin II from sea anemone Actinia equina L. was used to form pores in phospholipid membranes. We studied the effect of these pores on the net transmembrane transport of sucrose and glucose by observing single giant (cell-size) vesicles under the phase contrast microscope. Sugar composition in the vesicle was determined by measuring the width of the halo, which appears around the vesicle in the phase contrast image. The transport of sugars was induced when a vesicle, filled with ...

  15. Rab proteins: The key regulators of intracellular vesicle transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhuin, Tanmay [Cell and Developmental Biology Unit, Department of Zoology, The University of Burdwan, Golapbag 713104 (India); Roy, Jagat Kumar, E-mail: jkroy@bhu.ac.in [Cytogenetics Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2014-10-15

    Vesicular/membrane trafficking essentially regulates the compartmentalization and abundance of proteins within the cells and contributes in many signalling pathways. This membrane transport in eukaryotic cells is a complex process regulated by a large and diverse array of proteins. A large group of monomeric small GTPases; the Rabs are essential components of this membrane trafficking route. Most of the Rabs are ubiquitously expressed proteins and have been implicated in vesicle formation, vesicle motility/delivery along cytoskeleton elements and docking/fusion at target membranes through the recruitment of effectors. Functional impairments of Rabs affecting transport pathways manifest different diseases. Rab functions are accompanied by cyclical activation and inactivation of GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms between the cytosol and membranes which is regulated by upstream regulators. Rab proteins are characterized by their distinct sub-cellular localization and regulate a wide variety of endocytic, transcytic and exocytic transport pathways. Mutations of Rabs affect cell growth, motility and other biological processes. - Highlights: • Rab proteins regulate different signalling pathways. • Deregulation of Rabs is the fundamental causes of a variety of human diseases. • This paper gives potential directions in developing therapeutic targets. • This paper also gives ample directions for modulating pathways central to normal physiology. • These are the huge challenges for drug discovery and delivery in near future.

  16. Rab proteins: The key regulators of intracellular vesicle transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesicular/membrane trafficking essentially regulates the compartmentalization and abundance of proteins within the cells and contributes in many signalling pathways. This membrane transport in eukaryotic cells is a complex process regulated by a large and diverse array of proteins. A large group of monomeric small GTPases; the Rabs are essential components of this membrane trafficking route. Most of the Rabs are ubiquitously expressed proteins and have been implicated in vesicle formation, vesicle motility/delivery along cytoskeleton elements and docking/fusion at target membranes through the recruitment of effectors. Functional impairments of Rabs affecting transport pathways manifest different diseases. Rab functions are accompanied by cyclical activation and inactivation of GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms between the cytosol and membranes which is regulated by upstream regulators. Rab proteins are characterized by their distinct sub-cellular localization and regulate a wide variety of endocytic, transcytic and exocytic transport pathways. Mutations of Rabs affect cell growth, motility and other biological processes. - Highlights: • Rab proteins regulate different signalling pathways. • Deregulation of Rabs is the fundamental causes of a variety of human diseases. • This paper gives potential directions in developing therapeutic targets. • This paper also gives ample directions for modulating pathways central to normal physiology. • These are the huge challenges for drug discovery and delivery in near future

  17. Membrane vesicles: A simplified system for studying auxin transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsmith, M.H.M.

    1989-01-01

    Indoleacetic acid (IAA), the auxin responsible for regulation of growth, is transported polarly in plants. Several different models have been suggested to account for IAA transport by cells and its accumulation by membrane vesicles. One model sees diffusion of IAA driven by a pH gradient. The anion of a lipophilic weak acid like IAA or butyrate accumulates in an alkaline compartment in accord with the size of the pH gradient The accumulation of IAA may be diminished by the permeability of its lipophilic anion. This anion leak may be blocked by NPA. With anion efflux blocked, a gradient of two pH units would support an IAA accumulation of less than 50-fold at equilibrium (2) Another model sees diffusion of IAA in parallel with a saturable symport (IAA[sup [minus

  18. Amiloride transport in rabbit renal brush-border membrane vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabbit renal brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) were used to study amiloride transport across the luminal membrane of proximal tubular cells. An outwardly directed H+ gradient (pHi 6.0; pHo 7.5) stimulated 8 microM [14C]-amiloride uptake into BBMV and supported a transient active accumulation of substrate consistent with the presence of an amiloride-H+ exchange process. Uptake was inhibited, in the presence or absence of a pH gradient, by 1 mM unlabeled amiloride or 20 mM tetraethylammonium (TEA). Amiloride transport was not directly affected by the presence of 100 mM Na+ in the extravesicular medium, suggesting that Na-H exchange did not mediate amiloride flux. Amiloride transport was a saturable process with a maximal flux (under pH gradient conditions) of 3 nmol.mg-1.min-1 and an apparent Kt of 8 microM. TEA acted as a competitive inhibitor of this process with an apparent Ki of approximately 80 microM, similar to the Kt of TEA transport via the TEA-H+ exchanger. Likewise, amiloride acted as a competitive inhibitor of TEA uptake with an apparent Ki of approximately 11 microM. Preloading BBMV with 1-2 mM TEA stimulated the rate of amiloride uptake and supported a transient active accumulation of amiloride. We conclude that amiloride and TEA are transported by a common pathway in BBMV, which involves a carrier-mediated exchange with H+ and which may play a role in the tubular secretion of these compounds

  19. Yarrowia lipolytica vesicle-mediated protein transport pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beckerich Jean-Marie

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein secretion is a universal cellular process involving vesicles which bud and fuse between organelles to bring proteins to their final destination. Vesicle budding is mediated by protein coats; vesicle targeting and fusion depend on Rab GTPase, tethering factors and SNARE complexes. The Génolevures II sequencing project made available entire genome sequences of four hemiascomycetous yeasts, Yarrowia lipolytica, Debaryomyces hansenii, Kluyveromyces lactis and Candida glabrata. Y. lipolytica is a dimorphic yeast and has good capacities to secrete proteins. The translocation of nascent protein through the endoplasmic reticulum membrane was well studied in Y. lipolytica and is largely co-translational as in the mammalian protein secretion pathway. Results We identified S. cerevisiae proteins involved in vesicular secretion and these protein sequences were used for the BLAST searches against Génolevures protein database (Y. lipolytica, C. glabrata, K. lactis and D. hansenii. These proteins are well conserved between these yeasts and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We note several specificities of Y. lipolytica which may be related to its good protein secretion capacities and to its dimorphic aspect. An expansion of the Y. lipolytica Rab protein family was observed with autoBLAST and the Rab2- and Rab4-related members were identified with BLAST against NCBI protein database. An expansion of this family is also found in filamentous fungi and may reflect the greater complexity of the Y. lipolytica secretion pathway. The Rab4p-related protein may play a role in membrane recycling as rab4 deleted strain shows a modification of colony morphology, dimorphic transition and permeability. Similarly, we find three copies of the gene (SSO encoding the plasma membrane SNARE protein. Quantification of the percentages of proteins with the greatest homology between S. cerevisiae, Y. lipolytica and animal homologues involved in vesicular

  20. Vesicle Photonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Scott, E. A.; Roke, Sylvie; Hubbell, J. A.; Psaltis, D.

    2013-04-03

    Thin membranes, under appropriate boundary conditions, can self-assemble into vesicles, nanoscale bubbles that encapsulate and hence protect or transport molecular payloads. In this paper, we review the types and applications of light fields interacting with vesicles. By encapsulating light-emitting molecules (e.g. dyes, fluorescent proteins, or quantum dots), vesicles can act as particles and imaging agents. Vesicle imaging can take place also under second harmonic generation from vesicle membrane, as well as employing mass spectrometry. Light fields can also be employed to transport vesicles using optical tweezers (photon momentum) or directly pertrurbe the stability of vesicles and hence trigger the delivery of the encapsulated payload (photon energy).

  1. Oligomerization of a Cargo Receptor Directs Protein Sorting into COPII-coated Transport Vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Ken; Nakano, Akihiko

    2003-01-01

    Secretory proteins are transported from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi complex in vesicles coated with coat protein complex II (COPII). The incorporation of certain transport molecules (cargo) into the COPII vesicles is thought to be mediated by cargo receptors. Here we show that Emp47p, a type-I membrane protein, is specifically required for the transport of an integral membrane protein, Emp46p, from the ER. Exit of Emp46p from the ER was saturable and de...

  2. Calcium transport in vesicles energized by cytochrome oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosier, Randy N.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments on the reconstitution of cytochrome oxidase into phospholipid vesicles were carried out using techniques of selectivity energizing the suspensions with ascorbate and cytochrome c or ascorbate, PMS, and internally trapped cytochrome c. It was found that the K/sup +/ selective ionophore valinomycin stimulated the rate of respiration of cytochrome oxidase vesicles regardless of the direction of the K/sup +/ flux across the vesicle membranes. The stimulation occurred in the presence of protonophoric uncouplers and in the complete absence of potassium or in detergent-lysed suspensions. Gramicidin had similar effects and it was determined that the ionophores acted by specific interaction with cytochrome oxidase rather than by the previously assumed collapse of membrane potentials. When hydrophobic proteins and appropriate coupling factors were incorporated into the cytochrome oxidase, vesicles phosphorylation of ADP could be coupled to the oxidation reaction of cytochrome oxidase. Relatively low P:O, representing poor coupling of the system, were problematical and precluded measurements of protonmotive force. However the system was used to study ion translocation.

  3. NMR studies of 5-hydroxytryptamine transport through large unilamellar vesicle membranes.

    OpenAIRE

    Viscio, D B; Prestegard, J H

    1981-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance techniques developed to study membrane permeability in closed membrane systems have been used to investigate transport of 5-hydroxytryptamine across the phospholipid membranes of large unilamellar vesicles. The vesicles, modeling the 5-hydroxytryptamine storage organelles of blood platelets, contained a high internal level of ATP buffered at a pH low relative to the external solution. The resultant pH gradient drove accumulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine to a level con...

  4. Na+ and H+ transport in human jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have examined pH gradient-driven Na+ uptake and Na+-driven H+ transport in brush-border membrane vesicles prepared from jejunal tissue obtained from organ donors by measuring the influx of 22Na and the fluorescence quenching of acridine orange (AO). Vesicle preparation by either Ca2+ or Mg2+ precipitation showed no difference in 22Na uptake or AO fluorescence quenching and dissipation. An outward H+ gradient induced a Na+ uptake overshoot of threefold over equilibrium, whereas the absence of an H+ gradient did not produce an overshoot. The initial rate of pH-driven Na+ uptake in voltage-clamped vesicles was related to [Na+o]. Amiloride inhibited this uptake in voltage-clamped vesicles. Dissipation of AO fluorescence quench in vesicles with a preformed internal acid gradient was hastened by Na+o as well as voltage clamping in the absence of Na+. In vesicles without a pH gradient, internal Na+, as well as a diffusion potential in the absence of Na+, induced AO quenching. External Na+ and Li+, but not choline, acted to dissipate AO quenching induced by a diffusion potential, and the rate of dissipation was unaffected by the presence of Cl-. Li+ and NH+4, but not Cs+, K+, Rb+, or choline+, inhibited pH gradient-driven 22Na uptake. They conclude that human jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles contain conductive pathways for both Na+ and H+ and an Na+-H+ exchanger

  5. Lattice-gas model for active vesicle transport by molecular motors with opposite polarities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhuri, Sudipto; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio

    2010-08-01

    We introduce a multispecies lattice-gas model for motor protein driven collective cargo transport on cellular filaments. We use this model to describe and analyze the collective motion of interacting vesicle cargos being carried by oppositely directed molecular motors, moving on a single biofilament. Building on a totally asymmetric exclusion process to characterize the motion of the interacting cargos, we allow for mass exchange with the environment, input, and output at filament boundaries and focus on the role of interconversion rates and how they affect the directionality of the net cargo transport. We quantify the effect of the various different competing processes in terms of nonequilibrium phase diagrams. The interplay of interconversion rates, which allow for flux reversal and evaporation-deposition processes, introduces qualitatively unique features in the phase diagrams. We observe regimes of three-phase coexistence, the possibility of phase re-entrance, and a significant flexibility in how the different phase boundaries shift in response to changes in control parameters. The moving steady-state solutions of this model allows for different possibilities for the spatial distribution of cargo vesicles, ranging from homogeneous distribution of vesicles to polarized distributions, characterized by inhomogeneities or shocks. Current reversals due to internal regulation emerge naturally within the framework of this model. We believe that this minimal model will clarify the understanding of many features of collective vesicle transport, apart from serving as the basis for building more exact quantitative models for vesicle transport relevant to various in vivo situations.

  6. Transporting of a Cell-Sized Phospholipid Vesicle Across Water/Oil Interface

    CERN Document Server

    Hase, M; Hamada, T; Yoshikawa, K; Hase, Masahiko; Yamada, Ayako; Hamada, Tsutomu; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2006-01-01

    When a cell-sized water droplet, with a diameter of several tens of micro meter, is placed in oil containing phospholipids, a stable cell-sized vesicle is spontaneously formed as a water-in-oil phospholipid emulsion (W/O CE) with a phospholipid monolayer. We transferred the lipid vesicle thus formed in the oil phase to the water phase across the water/oil interface by micromanipulation, which suggests that the vesicle is transformed from a phospholipid monolayer as W/O CE into a bilayer. The lipid vesicle can then be transported back into the oil phase. This novel experimental procedure may be a useful tool for creating a model cellular system, which, together with a microreactor, is applicable as a micrometer-scale biochemical reaction field.

  7. The AP-3 adaptor complex is required for vacuolar function in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria Zwiewka; Elena Feraru; Barbara M(o)ller; Inhwan Hwang; Mugurel I Feraru; Jürgen Kleine-Vehn; Dolf Weijers; Ji(n) Friml

    2011-01-01

    Subcellular trafficking is required for a multitude of functions in eukaryotic cells.It involves regulation of cargo sorting,vesicle formation,trafficking and fusion processes at multiple levels.Adaptor protein (AP) complexes are key regulators of cargo sorting into vesicles in yeast and mammals but their existence and function in plants have not been demonstrated.Here we report the identification of the protein-affected trafficking 4 (pat4) mutant defective in the putative δ subunit of the AP-3 complex.pat4 and pat2,a mutant isolated from the same GFP imaging-based forward genetic screen that lacks a functional putative AP-3 β,as well as dominant negative AP-3 μ transgenic lines display undistinguishable phenotypes characterized by largely normal morphology and development,but strong intracellular accumulation of membrane proteins in aberrant vacuolar structures.All mutants are defective in morphology and function of lytic and protein storage vacuoles (PSVs) but show normal sorting of reserve proteins to PSVs.Immunoprecipitation experiments and genetic studies revealed tight functional and physical associations of putative AP-3 β and AP-3 δ subunits.Furthermore,both proteins are closely linked with putative AP-3 μ and σ subunits and several components of the clathrin and dynamin machineries.Taken together,these results demonstrate that AP complexes,similar to those in other eukaryotes,exist in plants,and that AP-3 plays a specific role in the regulation of biogenesis and function of vacuoles in plant cells.

  8. Ectopic expression of FaesAP3, a Fagopyrum esculentum (Polygonaceae) AP3 orthologous gene rescues stamen development in an Arabidopsis ap3 mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zheng-wu; Qi, Rui; Li, Xiao-fang; Liu, Zhi-xiong

    2014-10-25

    Arabidopsis thaliana APETALA3 (AP3) and Antirrhinum majus DEFICIENS (DEF) MADS box genes are required to specify petal and stamen identity. AP3 and DEF are members of the euAP3 lineage, which arose by gene duplication coincident with radiation of the core eudicots. In order to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying organ development in early diverging clades of core eudicots, we isolated and identified an AP3 homolog, FaesAP3, from Fagopyrum esculentum (buckwheat, Polygonaceae), a multi-food-use pseudocereal with healing benefits. Protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses revealed that FaesAP3 grouped into the euAP3 lineage. Expression analysis showed that FaesAP3 was transcribed only in developing stamens, and differed from AP3 and DEF, which expressed in developing petals and stamens. Moreover, ectopic expression of FaesAP3 rescued stamen development without complementation of petal development in an Arabidopsis ap3 mutant. Our results suggest that FaesAP3 is involved in the development of stamens in buckwheat. These results also suggest that FaesAP3 holds some potential for biotechnical engineering to create a male sterile line of F. esculentum. PMID:25149019

  9. A novel multiprotein complex is required to generate the prechylomicron transport vesicle from intestinal ER[S

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqi, Shahzad; Saleem, Umair; Abumrad, Nada A.; Davidson, Nicholas O.; Storch, Judith; Siddiqi, Shadab A.; Mansbach, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    Dietary lipid absorption is dependent on chylomicron production whose rate-limiting step across the intestinal absorptive cell is the exit of chylomicrons from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in its ER-to-Golgi transport vesicle, the prechylomicron transport vesicle (PCTV). This study addresses the composition of the budding complex for PCTV. Immunoprecipitation (IP) studies from rat intestinal ER solubilized in Triton X-100 suggested that vesicle-associated membrane protein 7 (VAMP7), apolipo...

  10. Mutations in AP3D1 associated with immunodeficiency and seizures define a new type of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammann, Sandra; Schulz, Ansgar; Krägeloh-Mann, Ingeborg; Dieckmann, Nele M G; Niethammer, Klaus; Fuchs, Sebastian; Eckl, Katja Martina; Plank, Roswitha; Werner, Roland; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Bank, Julia; Strauss, Anne; von Bernuth, Horst; Zur Stadt, Udo; Grieve, Samantha; Griffiths, Gillian M; Lehmberg, Kai; Hennies, Hans Christian; Ehl, Stephan

    2016-02-25

    Genetic disorders affecting biogenesis and transport of lysosome-related organelles are heterogeneous diseases frequently associated with albinism. We studied a patient with albinism, neutropenia, immunodeficiency, neurodevelopmental delay, generalized seizures, and impaired hearing but with no mutation in genes so far associated with albinism and immunodeficiency. Whole exome sequencing identified a homozygous mutation in AP3D1 that leads to destabilization of the adaptor protein 3 (AP3) complex. AP3 complex formation and the degranulation defect in patient T cells were restored by retroviral reconstitution. A previously described hypopigmented mouse mutant with an Ap3d1 null mutation (mocha strain) shares the neurologic phenotype with our patient and shows a platelet storage pool deficiency characteristic of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) that was not studied in our patient because of a lack of bleeding. HPS2 caused by mutations in AP3B1A leads to a highly overlapping phenotype without the neurologic symptoms. The AP3 complex exists in a ubiquitous and a neuronal form. AP3D1 codes for the AP3δ subunit of the complex, which is essential for both forms. In contrast, the AP3β3A subunit, affected in HPS2 patients, is substituted by AP3β3B in the neuron-specific heterotetramer. AP3δ deficiency thus causes a severe neurologic disorder with immunodeficiency and albinism that we propose to classify as HPS10. PMID:26744459

  11. Direct measurement of calcium transport across chloroplast inner-envelope vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, M.H.; Shingles, R.; Cleveland, M.J.; McCarty, R.E. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Biology

    1998-12-01

    The initial rate of Ca{sup 2+} movement across the inner-envelope membrane of pea (Pisum sativum L.) chloroplasts was directly measured by stopped-flow spectrofluorometry using membrane vesicles loaded with the Ca{sup 2+}-sensitive fluorophore fura-2. Calibration of fura-2 fluorescence was achieved by combining a ratiometric method with Ca{sup 2+}-selective minielectrodes to determine pCa values. The initial rate of Ca{sup 2+} influx in predominantly right-side-out inner-envelope membrane vesicles was greater than that in largely inside-out vesicles. Ca{sup 2+} movement was stimulated by an inwardly directed electrochemical proton gradient across the membrane vesicles, an effect that was diminished by the addition of valinomycin in the presence of K{sup +}. In addition, Ca{sup 2+} was shown to move across the membrane vesicles in the presence of K{sup +} diffusion potential gradient. The potential-stimulated rate of Ca{sup 2+} transport was slightly inhibited by diltiazem and greatly inhibited by ruthenium red. Other pharmacological agents such as LaCl{sub 3}, verapamil, and nifedipine had little or no effect. These results indicate that Ca{sup 2+} transport across the chloroplast inner envelope can occur by a potential-stimulated uniport mechanism.

  12. Uptake of auxins into membrane vesicles isolated from pea stems: an in vitro auxin transport system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slone, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this research was to test the applicability of the chemiosmotic theory of auxin transport to a subcellular system. Membrane vesicles were isolated from the basal portion of the third internode of etiolated pea plants (Pisum sativum L. var. Alaska) by differential centrifugation. Uptake of auxin was determined by adding /sup 14/C-labeled indoleacetic acid (IAA) to vesicles. Nigericin, a monovalent cation ionophore, and the electrogenic protonophore, carbonyl-cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), at micromolar concentrations abolished saturable uptake. Bursting vesicles by sonication, osmotic shock and freeze/thawing also eliminated saturable uptake. As the temperature increased from 0 to 30/sup 0/C, saturable uptake decreased markedly. Nonsaturable auxin uptake was less affected by these treatments. The pH gradient-dependent uptake of auxin appeared to be a transmembrane uptake of auxin into the vesicles rather than surface binding. Unlabeled IAA, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) at low concentrations reduced the saturable accumulation of (/sup 14/C)IAA in vesicles, while phenylacetic acid, benzoic acid, and 1-NAA were effective only at high concentrations. Kinetic analysis revealed two types of sites: a high affinity site with an uptake capacity of 25 to 40 pmoles/g tissue, and a low affinity site with an uptake capacity of 260 to 600 pmole/g tissue, fresh wt. In conclusion, several principal elements of an auxin transport system, as specific by the chemiosmotic theory of polar auxin transport, were present in membrane vesicles isolated from relatively mature pea stem tissue. However, one important aspect of the theory was not demonstrated in this in vitro system - a TIBA/NPA-sensitive auxin efflux. The kinetics and specificity of auxin uptake strongly suggested that this system was physiologically significant.

  13. A model of Stokesian peristalsis and vesicle transport in a three-dimensional closed cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, Vivian; Cortez, Ricardo; Fauci, Lisa

    2015-06-25

    The complexity of the mechanics involved in the mammalian reproductive process is evident. Neither an ovum nor an embryo is self-propelled, but move through the oviduct or uterus due to the peristaltic action of the tube walls, imposed pressure gradients, and perhaps ciliary motion. Here we use the method of regularized Stokeslets to model the transport of an ovum or an embryo within a peristaltic tube. We represent the ovum or the embryo as a spherical vesicle of finite volume - not a massless point particle. The outer membrane of the neutrally buoyant vesicle is discretized by nodes that are joined by a network of springs. The elastic moduli of these springs are chosen large enough so that a spherical shape is maintained. For simplicity, here we choose an axisymmetric tube where the geometry of the two-dimensional cross-section along the tube axis reflects that of the sagittal cross-section of the uterine cavity. Although the tube motion is axisymmetric, the presence of the vesicle within the tube requires a fully three-dimensional model. As was found in Yaniv et al. (2009, 2012) for a 2D closed channel, we find that the flow dynamics in a 3D peristaltic tube are strongly influenced by the closed end and the manner in which the peristaltic wave damps out towards the closure. In addition, we demonstrate that the trajectory of a vesicle of finite volume can greatly differ from the trajectory of a massless fluid particle initially placed at the vesicle׳s centroid. PMID:25817334

  14. Peri-Golgi vesicles contain retrograde but not anterograde proteins consistent with the cisternal progression model of intra-Golgi transport

    OpenAIRE

    José A Martínez-Menárguez; Prekeris, Rytis; Oorschot, Viola M J; Scheller, Richard; Slot, Jan W.; Geuze, Hans J.; Klumperman, Judith

    2001-01-01

    A cisternal progression mode of intra-Golgi transport requires that Golgi resident proteins recycle by peri-Golgi vesicles, whereas the alternative model of vesicular transport predicts anterograde cargo proteins to be present in such vesicles. We have used quantitative immuno-EM on NRK cells to distinguish peri-Golgi vesicles from other vesicles in the Golgi region. We found significant levels of the Golgi resident enzyme mannosidase II and the transport machinery proteins giantin, KDEL-rece...

  15. Effect of diet on insulin binding and glucose transport in rat sarcolemmal vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a high-fat, high-sucrose diet (HFS) and a low-fat, high-complex carbohydrate diet (LFC) on glucose tolerance, insulin binding, and glucose transport in rat skeletal muscle. During the intravenous glucose tolerance test, peak glucose values at 5 min were significantly higher in the HFS group; 0-, 20-, and 60-min values were similar. Insulin values were significantly higher in the HFS group at all time points (except 60 min), indicating whole-body insulin resistance. Skeletal muscle was responsible, in part, for this insulin resistance, because specific D-glucose transport in isolated sarcolemmal (SL) vesicles under basal conditions was similar between LFC and HFS rats, despite the higher plasma insulin levels. Scatchard analyses of insulin binding curves to sarcolemmal vesicles revealed that the K/sub a/ of the high-affinity binding sites was significantly reduced by the HFS diet; no other binding changes were noted. Specific D-glucose transport in SL vesicles after maximum insulin stimulation (1 U/kg) was significantly depressed in the HFS group, indicating that HFS feeding also caused a postbinding defect. These results indicate that the insulin resistance in skeletal muscle associated with a HFS diet is due to both a decrease in the K/sub a/ of the high-affinity insulin receptors and a postbinding defect

  16. Calcium transport in sealed vesicles from red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) storage tissue. II. Characterization of 45Ca2+ uptake into plasma membrane vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium uptake was examined in sealed plasma membrane vesicles isolated from red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) storage tissue using 45Ca2+. Uptake of 45Ca2+ by the vesicles was ATP-dependent and radiotracer accumulated by the vesicles could be released by the addition of the calcium ionophore A23187. The uptake was stimulated by gramicidin D but slightly inhibited by carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. Although the latter result might suggest some degree of indirect coupling of 45Ca2+ uptake to ATP utilization via ΔμH+, no evidence for a secondary H+/Ca2+ antiport in this vesicle system could be found. Following the imposition of an acid-interior pH gradient, proton efflux from the vesicle was not enhanced by the addition of Ca2+ and an imposed pH gradient could not drive 45Ca2+ uptake. Optimal uptake of 45Ca2+ occurred broadly between pH 7.0 and 7.5 and the transport was inhibited by orthovanadate, N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, and diethylstilbestrol but insensitive to nitrate and azide. The dependence of 45Ca2+ uptake on both calcium and Mg:ATP concentration demonstrated saturation kinetics with K/sub m/ values of 6 micromolar and 0.37 millimolar, respectively. While ATP was the preferred substrate for driving 45Ca2+ uptake, GTP could drive transport at about 50% of the level observed for ATP. The results of this study demonstrate the presence of a unique primary calcium transport system associated with the plasma membrane which could drive calcium efflux from the plant cell

  17. Calcium transport in sealed vesicles from red beet (Beta vulgaris L. ) storage tissue. II. Characterization of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake into plasma membrane vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannini, J.L.; Ruiz-Cristin, J.; Briskin, D.P.

    1987-12-01

    Calcium uptake was examined in sealed plasma membrane vesicles isolated from red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) storage tissue using /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/. Uptake of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ by the vesicles was ATP-dependent and radiotracer accumulated by the vesicles could be released by the addition of the calcium ionophore A23187. The uptake was stimulated by gramicidin D but slightly inhibited by carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. Although the latter result might suggest some degree of indirect coupling of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake to ATP utilization via ..delta mu..H/sup +/, no evidence for a secondary H/sup +//Ca/sup 2 +/ antiport in this vesicle system could be found. Following the imposition of an acid-interior pH gradient, proton efflux from the vesicle was not enhanced by the addition of Ca/sup 2 +/ and an imposed pH gradient could not drive /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake. Optimal uptake of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ occurred broadly between pH 7.0 and 7.5 and the transport was inhibited by orthovanadate, N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, and diethylstilbestrol but insensitive to nitrate and azide. The dependence of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake on both calcium and Mg:ATP concentration demonstrated saturation kinetics with K/sub m/ values of 6 micromolar and 0.37 millimolar, respectively. While ATP was the preferred substrate for driving /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake, GTP could drive transport at about 50% of the level observed for ATP. The results of this study demonstrate the presence of a unique primary calcium transport system associated with the plasma membrane which could drive calcium efflux from the plant cell.

  18. Cimetidine transport in isolated brush border membrane vesicles from bovine choroid plexus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the transport of cimetidine across the brush border membrane of choroid plexus epithelium. Brush border membrane vesicles were prepared from bovine choroid plexus and the uptake of [3H]cimetidine was studied using the methods of rapid vacuum filtration and scintillation counting. Cimetidine accumulated in the vesicles with time reaching equilibrium within 2 hr. The amount of cimetidine taken up by the vesicles at equilibrium decreased with increasing extravesicular media osmolarity suggesting that cimetidine accumulates in an osmotically reactive intravesicular space. Binding of cimetidine to the membrane was estimated to be less than 18%. Michaelis-Menten studies demonstrated that cimetidine transport involved both a saturable and a nonsaturable component. The Vmax and Km (mean +/- S.E.) were 16.7 +/- 5.9 pmol/sec/mg protein and 58.1 +/- 3.1 microM, respectively, suggesting that cimetidine is transported across the choroid plexus brush border membrane with a lower affinity and a higher capacity than across the renal brush border membrane. The organic cation, quinidine (0.1 mM), and the amino acid, histidine (20 mM), both significantly reduced the initial, but not the equilibrium, uptake of cimetidine. However, high concentrations (5 mM) of more polar organic cations including tetraethylammonium, as well as of several organic anions including salicylate did not inhibit cimetidine transport. Studies with unlabeled cimetidine revealed a countertransport phenomenon. Attempts to drive the concentrative uptake of cimetidine with various ion gradients were unsuccessful. Of note was the fact that an outwardly directed proton gradient could significantly accelerate the uptake of cimetidine

  19. Identification of retrograde transport vesicles containing nerve growth factor in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Survival, differentiation, and development of responsive neurons are regulated by neurotrophins secreted from the target cells that they innervate. These responsive neurons must meet the challenge of transporting the neurotrophins chemical message from the target tissue to the soma; the distance of which may be a few millimetres to many meters. One hypothesis involves the formation of a signalling organelle at the neurite tip and subsequent retrograde axonal transport to the soma. This signalling vesicle is derived from the endocytosis of the neurotrophin-receptor complex. By modifying a method developed to isolate signalling endosomes from PC12 cells, we are able to isolate signalling vesicles from rat and mouse sciatic tissue. Approximately, 4 mole of I125 -labelled neurotrophin was injected into the rodent foot pad and the sciatic nerve ligated under 88 μ/g ketamine and 16 μ/g rompun (i.p.) anaesthetic. All experiments had the approval of the ANU animal ethics committee. We achieved a recovery of 23% and 34% in the mouse and rat respectively of total transported iodinated neurotrophin accumulating on the distal side of the ligation. The homogenized tissue was characterized via differential centrifugation, blotted, and probed using antibodies to the neurotrophin receptors. Electron microscopy confirmed that the membrane pellet containing the transported neurotrophin from this in vivo preparation contained vesicular structures. Copyright (2002) Australian Neuroscience Society

  20. K-Cl transport systems in rabbit renal basolateral membrane vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transport pathways for chloride in basolateral membrane vesicles from the rabbit renal cortex were investigated. 36Cl uptake was stimulated by the presence of potassium in the uptake media compared with sodium of N-methyl-D-glucamine. In addition, potassium (86Rb) uptake was stimulated more by chloride than by nitrate or gluconate. Neither of these processes was further stimulated by potassium gradients plus valinomycin, suggesting the presence of an electrically neutral K-Cl cotransport system. A magnesium-induced chloride conductance was also found in the basolateral membrane vesicles. In the absence of magnesium, the chloride conductance was low; valinomycin and an inwardly directed potassium gradient did not stimulated 36Cl uptake, anthracene-9-carboxylic acid did not inhibit 36Cl uptake, and valinomycin did not stimulated chloride-dependent 86Rb uptake. However, in the presence of 1 mM magnesium, opposite results were obtained; valinomycin and an inwardly directed potassium gradient stimulated 36Cl uptake, anthracene-9-carboxylic acid inhibited 36Cl uptake, and valinomycin stimulated chloride-dependent 86Rb uptake. Therefore, an electrically neutral K-Cl cotransport and magnesium-induced chloride conductance were found in renal cortial basolateral membrane vesicles prepared from the rabbit renal cortex

  1. Effect of vanadate on glucose transporter (GLUT4) intrinsic activity in skeletal muscle plasma membrane giant vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, S; Youn, J; Richter, Erik

    1996-01-01

    vanadate (NaVO3) on glucose transporter (GLUT4) intrinsic activity (V(max) = intrinsic activity x [GLUT4 protein]) was studied in muscle plasma membrane giant vesicles. Giant vesicles (average diameter 7.6 microns) were produced by collagenase treatment of rat skeletal muscle. The vesicles were incubated......) 55% and 60%, respectively, compared with control. The plasma membrane GLUT4 protein content was not changed in response to vanadate. It is concluded that vanadate decreased glucose transport per GLUT4 (intrinsic activity). This finding suggests that regulation of glucose transport in skeletal muscle......Maximally effective concentrations of vanadate (a phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor) increase glucose transport in muscle less than maximal insulin stimulation. This might be due to vanadate-induced decreased intrinsic activity of GLUT4 accompanying GLUT4 translocation. Thus, the effect of...

  2. Vaccinia virus p37 interacts with host proteins associated with LE-derived transport vesicle biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harver Chris

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins associated with the late endosome (LE appear to play a central role in the envelopment of a number of taxonomically diverse viruses. How viral proteins interact with LE-associated proteins to facilitate envelopment is not well understood. LE-derived transport vesicles form through the interaction of Rab9 GTPase with cargo proteins, and TIP47, a Rab9-specific effector protein. Vaccinia virus (VV induces a wrapping complex derived from intracellular host membranes to envelope intracellular mature virus particles producing egress-competent forms of virus. Results We show that VV p37 protein associates with TIP47-, Rab9-, and CI-MPR-containing membranes. Mutation of a di-aromatic motif in p37 blocks association with TIP47 and inhibits plaque formation. ST-246, a specific inhibitor of p37 function, inhibits these interactions and also blocks wrapped virus particle formation. Vaccinia virus expressing p37 variants with reduced ST-246 susceptibility associates with Rab9 and co-localizes with CI-MPR in the presence and absence of compound. Conclusion These results suggest that p37 localizes to the LE and interacts with proteins associated with LE-derived transport vesicle biogenesis to facilitate assembly of extracellular forms of virus.

  3. Differential inactivation of two transport systems in E. coli membrane vesicles by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma-irradiation of membrane vesicles isolated from E. coli ML 308-225 is shown to decrease the active accumulation of α-methyl glucoside, glutamic acid, and proline. The phosphorylation and transport components of the phosphoenolpyruvate:glucose phosphotransferase system (PEP-PTS) are equally sensitive to radiation. Thus, the decrease in the uptake activity of the PEP-PTS is not due to radiation-induced permeability changes in the membrane, but to inactivation of the components by radiation. When the D-lactate dehydrogenase (D-LDH)-coupled amino-acid transport system was assayed for its permease and metabolic energy components, data showed that the permease system responsible for the active transport of amino acids is more radiosensitive than the electron transport chain, indicating that the radiosensitive component of the permease system is situated in a shunt outside the main flow of electrons in the electron transport chain. The dose-effect response curves for the two transport systems showed that the PEP-PTS is more sensitive to radiation than the amino-acid transport system. Observed changes in the activities of the two transport systems proved due to the action of free radicals. Cysteamine exerts greater radioprotective effect on the PEP-PTS than on the amino-acid transport system. A radiosensitivity gradient appears to exist in the membrane, further supported by spin-label results. The differential radiosensitivities of the two transport systems are due to differences in the radiosensitivities of their respective components and in their accessibility to free radicals in the aqueous medium. The spin-label study also revealed two populations of sulphydryl groups in the membrane which differ with respect to their location in the bilayer, sensitivity to radiation, and extent of protection by free radical scavengers

  4. PAQR3 regulates Golgi vesicle fission and transport via the Gβγ-PKD signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewavitharana, Thamara; Wedegaertner, Philip B

    2015-12-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins function at diverse subcellular locations, in addition to canonical signaling at the plasma membrane (PM). Gβγ signals at the Golgi, via protein kinase D (PKD), to regulate fission of PM-destined vesicles. However, the mechanism by which Gβγ is regulated at the Golgi in this process remains elusive. Recent studies have revealed that PAQR3 (Progestin and AdipoQ Receptor 3), also called RKTG (Raf Kinase Trapping to the Golgi), interacts with the Gβ subunit and localizes Gβ to the Golgi thereby inhibiting Gβγ signaling at the PM. Herein we show that, in contrast to this inhibition of canonical Gβγ signaling at the PM, PAQR3 promotes Gβγ signaling at the Golgi. Expression of PAQR3 causes fragmentation of the Golgi, while a Gβ binding-deficient mutant of PAQR3 does not cause Golgi fragmentation. Also, a C-terminal fragment of GRK2 (GRK2ct), which interacts with Gβγ and inhibits Gβγ signaling, and gallein, a small molecule inhibitor of Gβγ, are both able to inhibit PAQR3-mediated Golgi fragmentation. Furthermore, a dominant negative form of PKD (PKD-DN) and a pharmacological inhibitor of PKD, Gö6976, also inhibit PAQR3-mediated fragmentation of the Golgi. Importantly, expression of the Gβ binding-deficient mutant of PAQR3 inhibits the constitutive transport of the model cargo protein VSV-G from the Golgi to the PM, indicating the involvement of PAQR3 in Golgi-to PM vesicle transport and a dominant negative role for this mutant. Collectively, these results reveal a novel role for the newly characterized, Golgi-localized PAQR3 in regulating Gβγ at the non-canonical subcellular location of the Golgi and thus for controlling Golgi-to-PM protein transport via the Gβγ-PKD signaling pathway. PMID:26327583

  5. Use of membrane vesicles as a simplified system for studying auxin transport of auxin: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indoleacetic acid (IAA), the auxin regulating growth, is transported polarly in plants. IAA stimulates a rapid increase in the rate of electrogenic proton secretion by the plasma membrane. This not only increases the magnitude of the pH and electrical gradients providing the driving force for polar auxin transport and uptake of sugars, amino acids and inorganic ions, but, by acidifying the cell wall, also leads to growth. We find that auxin uptake by membrane vesicles isolated from actively growing plant tissues exhibits some of the same properties as by cells: the accumulation depends on the pH gradient, is saturable and specific for auxin, and enhanced by herbicides that inhibit polar auxin transport. We are using accumulation of a radioactive weak acid to quantify the pH gradient and distribution of fluorescent cyanine dyes to monitor the membrane potential. The magnitude of IAA accumulation exceeds that predicted from the pH gradient, and in the absence of a pH gradient, a membrane potential fails to support any auxin accumulation, leading to the conclusion that the transmembrane potential is not a significant driving force for auxin accumulation in this system. Since increasing the external ionic strength decreases saturable auxin accumulation, we are investigating how modifying the surface potential of the vesicles affects the interaction of the amphipathic IAA molecules with the membranes and whether protein modifying reagents affect the saturability and stimulation by NPA. These studies should provide information on the location and function of the auxin binding site and may enable us to identify the solubilized protein. 5 refs

  6. Use of membrane vesicles as a simplified system for studying auxin transport of auxin: Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsmith, M.H.M.

    1986-01-01

    Indoleacetic acid (IAA), the auxin regulating growth, is transported polarly in plants. IAA stimulates a rapid increase in the rate of electrogenic proton secretion by the plasma membrane. This not only increases the magnitude of the pH and electrical gradients providing the driving force for polar auxin transport and uptake of sugars, amino acids and inorganic ions, but, by acidifying the cell wall, also leads to growth. We find that auxin uptake by membrane vesicles isolated from actively growing plant tissues exhibits some of the same properties as by cells: the accumulation depends on the pH gradient, is saturable and specific for auxin, and enhanced by herbicides that inhibit polar auxin transport. We are using accumulation of a radioactive weak acid to quantify the pH gradient and distribution of fluorescent cyanine dyes to monitor the membrane potential. The magnitude of IAA accumulation exceeds that predicted from the pH gradient, and in the absence of a pH gradient, a membrane potential fails to support any auxin accumulation, leading to the conclusion that the transmembrane potential is not a significant driving force for auxin accumulation in this system. Since increasing the external ionic strength decreases saturable auxin accumulation, we are investigating how modifying the surface potential of the vesicles affects the interaction of the amphipathic IAA molecules with the membranes and whether protein modifying reagents affect the saturability and stimulation by NPA. These studies should provide information on the location and function of the auxin binding site and may enable us to identify the solubilized protein. 5 refs.

  7. Membrane vesicles: A simplified system for studying auxin transport. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsmith, M.H.M.

    1989-12-31

    Indoleacetic acid (IAA), the auxin responsible for regulation of growth, is transported polarly in plants. Several different models have been suggested to account for IAA transport by cells and its accumulation by membrane vesicles. One model sees diffusion of IAA driven by a pH gradient. The anion of a lipophilic weak acid like IAA or butyrate accumulates in an alkaline compartment in accord with the size of the pH gradient The accumulation of IAA may be diminished by the permeability of its lipophilic anion. This anion leak may be blocked by NPA. With anion efflux blocked, a gradient of two pH units would support an IAA accumulation of less than 50-fold at equilibrium (2) Another model sees diffusion of IAA in parallel with a saturable symport (IAA{sup {minus}} + nH{sup +}), driven by both the pH gradient and membrane voltage. Such a symport should be highly accumulative, however, with a lipophilic weak acid such as IAA, net diffusive efflux of IAAH whenever IAAHI{sub i} > IAAH{sub o} would constitute a leak. (3) A third model sees a pH change driven IAA uptake and saturable symport enhanced by internal binding sites. Following pH gradient-driven accumulation of IAA, the anion may bind to an intravesicular site, permitting further uptake of IAA. NPA, by blocking anion efflux, enhances this binding. We have reported that membrane vesicles isolated from actively growing plant tissues are a good system for studying the mechanisms involved in the transport and accumulation of auxin.

  8. Live-cell imaging of post-golgi transport vesicles in cultured hippocampal neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Camilla Stampe; Misonou, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    The subcellular localization of neuronal membrane signaling molecules such as receptors and ion channels depends on intracellular trafficking mechanisms. Essentially, vesicular trafficking mechanisms ensure that a large number of membrane proteins are correctly targeted to different subcellular...... compartments of neurons. In the past two decades, the establishment and advancement of fluorescent protein technology have provided us with opportunities to study how proteins are trafficked in living cells. However, live imaging of trafficking processes in neurons necessitate imaging tools to distinguish the...... several different routes that neurons use for protein trafficking. Here we provide a novel protocol to selectively visualize post-Golgi transport vesicles carrying fluorescent-labeled ion channel proteins in living neurons. Further, we provide a number of analytical tools we developed to quantify...

  9. ABC protein transport of MRI contrast agents in canalicular rat liver plasma vesicles and yeast vacuoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of excretion into bile of hepatospecific magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast media employed labeled Gd-reagents EOB.DTPA, BOPTA, B 20790 (iopanoate-linked), and B 21690 (glycocholate-linked) for measurement in rat liver canalicular plasma membrane vesicles and yeast vacuoles. The presence of ATP gave threefold greater transport of B 20790 and B 21690 than of EOB.DTPA and BOPTA. In yeast vacuoles the ATP stimulatory effect was eightfold with B 20790 and fivefold greater for B 21690, whereas in YCF1- or YLLO115w-deleted yeast cells the transport was significantly reduced and absent from double mutants, YCF1 and YLLO15w. The transport was similar in wild-type and deletant cells for B 21690; taurocholate gave 85% inhibition. These data suggest that bilary secretion of structurally related MRI agents depend on molecular structure. The findings are suggestive as of possible value for clinical diagnosis of inherited hyperbilirubinemias and other liver disorders

  10. Distinct stages in the recognition, sorting, and packaging of proTGFα into COPII-coated transport vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengcheng; Schekman, Randy

    2016-06-15

    In addition to its role in forming vesicles from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the coat protein complex II (COPII) is also responsible for selecting specific cargo proteins to be packaged into COPII transport vesicles. Comparison of COPII vesicle formation in mammalian systems and in yeast suggested that the former uses more elaborate mechanisms for cargo recognition, presumably to cope with a significantly expanded repertoire of cargo that transits the secretory pathway. Using proTGFα, the transmembrane precursor of transforming growth factor α (TGFα), as a model cargo protein, we demonstrate in cell-free assays that at least one auxiliary cytosolic factor is specifically required for the efficient packaging of proTGFα into COPII vesicles. Using a knockout HeLa cell line generated by CRISPR/Cas9, we provide functional evidence showing that a transmembrane protein, Cornichon-1 (CNIH), acts as a cargo receptor of proTGFα. We show that both CNIH and the auxiliary cytosolic factor(s) are required for efficient recruitment of proTGFα to the COPII coat in vitro. Moreover, we provide evidence that the recruitment of cargo protein by the COPII coat precedes and may be distinct from subsequent cargo packaging into COPII vesicles. PMID:27122606

  11. Evidence that coated vesicles transport acetylcholine receptors to the surface membrane of chick myotubes

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Coated vesicles are present in the myoplasm of embryonic chick myotubes grown in vitro. They are most numerous beneath regions of the surface membrane that contain a high density of acetylcholine receptors (AChR). Prolonged exposure of myotubes to saline extract of chick brain increases the number of intracellular AChR and the number of coated vesicles. This suggests that coated vesicles contain AChR, and this hypothesis was tested with horseradish peroxidase-alpha-bungarotoxin (HRP-alpha BTX...

  12. Insulin-stimulated plasma membrane fusion of Glut4 glucose transporter-containing vesicles is regulated by phospholipase D1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ping; Altshuller, Yelena M; Hou, June Chunqiu; Pessin, Jeffrey E; Frohman, Michael A

    2005-06-01

    Insulin stimulates glucose uptake in fat and muscle by mobilizing Glut4 glucose transporters from intracellular membrane storage sites to the plasma membrane. This process requires the trafficking of Glut4-containing vesicles toward the cell periphery, docking at exocytic sites, and plasma membrane fusion. We show here that phospholipase D (PLD) production of the lipid phosphatidic acid (PA) is a key event in the fusion process. PLD1 is found on Glut4-containing vesicles, is activated by insulin signaling, and traffics with Glut4 to exocytic sites. Increasing PLD1 activity facilitates glucose uptake, whereas decreasing PLD1 activity is inhibitory. Diminished PA production does not substantially hinder trafficking of the vesicles or their docking at the plasma membrane, but it does impede fusion-mediated extracellular exposure of the transporter. The fusion block caused by RNA interference-mediated PLD1 deficiency is rescued by exogenous provision of a lipid that promotes fusion pore formation and expansion, suggesting that the step regulated by PA is late in the process of vesicle fusion. PMID:15772157

  13. Characterization of calcium transport by basolateral membrane vesicles of human small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present studies investigated the mechanism of Ca2+ transport across basolateral membrane vesicles (BLMVs) prepared from human small intestine. Ca2+ uptake represented transport into the intravesicular space as evident by osmolality study and by the demonstration of Ca2+ efflux from the intravesicular space by Ca2+ ionophore A23187. Ca2+ uptake was stimulated by Mg2+-ATP. Kinetic parameters for ATP-dependent Ca2+ uptake revealed a Michaelis constant (Km) of 0.02±0.01 μM and a maximum rate of uptake (Vmax) of 1.00±0.03 nmol·mg protein-1·min-1. Ca2+ uptake in the presence of Mg2+ was inhibited by 75%. The Km of ATP concentration required for half-maximal Ca2+ uptake was 0.50±0.1 mM. Basolateral membranes depleted of calmodulin by EDTA osmotic shock decreased ATP-dependent Ca2+ uptake by 65%. Trifluoperazine, an anticalmodulin drug, inhibited ATP-dependent Ca2+ uptake by 50%, while no inhibition was noted in calmodulin-depleted membranes. Efflux of Ca2+ in the BLMVs was stimulated by trans-Na+. Na+-dependent Ca2+ uptake was saturable with respect to Ca2+ concentration and exhibited a Km of 0.09±0.03 μM and a Vmax of 1.08±0.01 nmol·mg protein-1·min-1. These results are consistent with the existence of a Na+-Ca2+ exchange system and ATP and Mg2+-dependent, calmodulin-regulated Ca2+, transport mechanism in BLMVs of human enterocytes

  14. Dimethyltryptamine and other hallucinogenic tryptamines exhibit substrate behavior at the serotonin uptake transporter and the vesicle monoamine transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzi, Nicholas V; Gopalakrishnan, Anupama; Anderson, Lyndsey L; Feih, Joel T; Shulgin, Alexander T; Daley, Paul F; Ruoho, Arnold E

    2009-12-01

    N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) is a potent plant hallucinogen that has also been found in human tissues. When ingested, DMT and related N,N-dialkyltryptamines produce an intense hallucinogenic state. Behavioral effects are mediated through various neurochemical mechanisms including activity at sigma-1 and serotonin receptors, modification of monoamine uptake and release, and competition for metabolic enzymes. To further clarify the pharmacology of hallucinogenic tryptamines, we synthesized DMT, N-methyl-N-isopropyltryptamine (MIPT), N,N-dipropyltryptamine (DPT), and N,N-diisopropyltryptamine. We then tested the abilities of these N,N-dialkyltryptamines to inhibit [(3)H]5-HT uptake via the plasma membrane serotonin transporter (SERT) in human platelets and via the vesicle monoamine transporter (VMAT2) in Sf9 cells expressing the rat VMAT2. The tryptamines were also tested as inhibitors of [(3)H]paroxetine binding to the SERT and [(3)H]dihydrotetrabenazine binding to VMAT2. Our results show that DMT, MIPT, DPT, and DIPT inhibit [(3)H]5-HT transport at the SERT with K ( I ) values of 4.00 +/- 0.70, 8.88 +/- 4.7, 0.594 +/- 0.12, and 2.32 +/- 0.46 microM, respectively. At VMAT2, the tryptamines inhibited [(3)H]5-HT transport with K ( I ) values of 93 +/- 6.8, 20 +/- 4.3, 19 +/- 2.3, and 19 +/- 3.1 muM, respectively. On the other hand, the tryptamines were very poor inhibitors of [(3)H]paroxetine binding to SERT and of [(3)H]dihydrotetrabenazine binding to VMAT2, resulting in high binding-to-uptake ratios. High binding-to-uptake ratios support the hypothesis that the tryptamines are transporter substrates, not uptake blockers, at both SERT and VMAT2, and also indicate that there are separate substrate and inhibitor binding sites within these transporters. The transporters may allow the accumulation of tryptamines within neurons to reach relatively high levels for sigma-1 receptor activation and to function as releasable transmitters. PMID:19756361

  15. Preparation of wheat root plasma membrane vesicles and effect of water stress on 45Ca2+ transport activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wheat roots plasma membrane (PM) vesicles were obtained by sucrose gradient centrifugation. The experiment results shows that the wheat roots of Zhengyin No.1 PM H+-ATPase latent activity was 24%, and PM inside-out vesicle (IOV) accounts for 76%. With -1.0 MPa stress of 24h, PM Ca2+-ATPase activity of both orientation wheat roots were increased. Under normal water condition and PEG stress, 62% and 53% of the enzyme activity was inhibited respectively by EGTA, radioactive calcium-45 transport amount was 22.09 nmol/mg pro and 4.17 nmol/mg pro. respectively with PM-IOV.PEG stress results in a decrease of 45Ca2+ transport amount of wheat roots PM-IOV by 81%

  16. Vps10p Transport from the trans-Golgi Network to the Endosome Is Mediated by Clathrin-coated Vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Deloche, Olivier; Yeung, Bonny G.; Payne, Gregory S.; Schekman, Randy

    2001-01-01

    A native immunoisolation procedure has been used to investigate the role of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs) in the transport of vacuolar proteins between the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and the prevacuolar/endosome compartments in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We find that Apl2p, one large subunit of the adaptor protein-1 complex, and Vps10p, the carboxypeptidase Y vacuolar protein receptor, are associated with clathrin molecules. Vps10p packaging in CCVs is re...

  17. Transporting of a Cell-Sized Phospholipid Vesicle Across Water/Oil Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Hase, Masahiko; Yamada, Ayako; Hamada, Tsutomu; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2006-01-01

    When a cell-sized water droplet, with a diameter of several tens of micro meter, is placed in oil containing phospholipids, a stable cell-sized vesicle is spontaneously formed as a water-in-oil phospholipid emulsion (W/O CE) with a phospholipid monolayer. We transferred the lipid vesicle thus formed in the oil phase to the water phase across the water/oil interface by micromanipulation, which suggests that the vesicle is transformed from a phospholipid monolayer as W/O CE into a bilayer. The ...

  18. Functional characterization of the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine-resistance transporter (PfCRT in transformed Dictyostelium discoideum vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janni Papakrivos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chloroquine (CQ-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria has been a global health catastrophe, yet much about the CQ resistance (CQR mechanism remains unclear. Hallmarks of the CQR phenotype include reduced accumulation of protonated CQ as a weak base in the digestive vacuole of the erythrocyte-stage parasite, and chemosensitization of CQ-resistant (but not CQ-sensitive P. falciparum by agents such as verapamil. Mutations in the P. falciparum CQR transporter (PfCRT confer CQR; particularly important among these mutations is the charge-loss substitution K→T at position 76. Dictyostelium discoideum transformed with mutant PfCRT expresses key features of CQR including reduced drug accumulation and verapamil chemosensitization. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: We describe the isolation and characterization of PfCRT-transformed, hematin-free vesicles from D. discoideum cells. These vesicles permit assessments of drug accumulation, pH, and membrane potential that are difficult or impossible with hematin-containing digestive vacuoles from P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes. Mutant PfCRT-transformed D. discoideum vesicles show features of the CQR phenotype, and manipulations of vesicle membrane potential by agents including ionophores produce large changes of CQ accumulation that are dissociated from vesicular pH. PfCRT in its native or mutant form blunts the ability of valinomycin to reduce CQ accumulation in transformed vesicles and decreases the ability of K(+ to reverse membrane potential hyperpolarization caused by valinomycin treatment. CONCLUSION: Isolated vesicles from mutant-PfCRT-transformed D. discoideum exhibit features of the CQR phenotype, consistent with evidence that the drug resistance mechanism operates at the P. falciparum digestive vacuole membrane in malaria. Membrane potential apart from pH has a major effect on the PfCRT-mediated CQR phenotype of D. discoideum vesicles. These results support a model of PfCRT as an

  19. The cortical acto-myosin network: from diffusion barrier to functional gateway in the transport of neurosecretory vesicles to the plasma membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FredericAMeunier

    2013-10-01

    Here we discuss the functions of the cortical actin network, myosins and their effectors in controlling the processes that lead to tethering, directed transport, docking, and fusion of exocytotic vesicles in regulated exocytosis.

  20. Chemical-genetic disruption of clathrin function spares adaptor complex 3–dependent endosome vesicle biogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Zlatic, Stephanie A.; Grossniklaus, Emily J.; Ryder, Pearl V.; Salazar, Gloria; Mattheyses, Alexa L.; Peden, Andrew A.; Faundez, Victor

    2013-01-01

    A role for clathrin in AP-3–dependent vesicle biogenesis has been inferred from biochemical interactions and colocalization between this adaptor and clathrin. The functionality of these molecular associations, however, is controversial. We comprehensively explore the role of clathrin in AP-3–dependent vesicle budding, using rapid chemical-genetic perturbation of clathrin function with a clathrin light chain–FKBP chimera oligomerizable by the drug AP20187. We find that AP-3 interacts and coloc...

  1. Use of membrane vesicles as a simplified system for studying transport of auxin. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsmith, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    The accumulation of indoleacetic acid (IAA) inside microsomal vesicles depends on the presence of a pH gradient and is reversible when the ..delta..pH is collapsed by ionosphores. Accumulation is stimulated by either napthylphthalamic acid or TIBA. The accumulation of IAA by the vesicles can be saturated. At concentrations of 1 ..mu..M or less, IAA, synthetic auxins, or auxin antagonists do not affect the pH gradient, but decrease the accumulation of /sup 3/H-IAA, and therefore compete specifically for uptake. Concentrations of 10 ..mu..M and above, uptake of either the auxins or weak acids is sufficient to overcome the buffering capacity of the solution within the vesicles. The collapse of the pH gradient by such high concentrations affects uptake of either /sup 3/H-IAA or /sup 14/C-BA to similar extents and thus is nonspecific. 3 refs.

  2. Functional analysis of the two Brassica AP3 genes involved in apetalous and stamen carpelloid phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfeng Zhang

    Full Text Available The Arabidopsis homeotic genes APETALA3 (AP3 and PISTILLATA (PI are B genes which encode MADS-box transcription factors and specify petal and stamen identities. In the current study, the stamen carpelloid (SC mutants, HGMS and AMS, of B. rapa and B. napus were investigated and two types of AP3 genes, B.AP3.a and B.AP3.b, were functional characterized. B.AP3.a and B.AP3.b share high similarity in amino acid sequences except for 8 residues difference located at the C-terminus. Loss of this 8 residues in B.AP3.b led to the change of PI-derived motifs. Meanwhile, B.AP3.a specified petal and stamen development, whereas B.AP3.b only specified stamen development. In B. rapa, the mutations of both genes generated the SC mutant HGMS. In B. napus that contained two B.AP3.a and two B.AP3.b, loss of the two B.AP3.a functions was the key reason for the apetalous mutation, however, the loss-of-function in all four AP3 was related to the SC mutant AMS. We inferred that the 8 residues or the PI-derived motif in AP3 gene probably relates to petal formation.

  3. Insulin-stimulated Plasma Membrane Fusion of Glut4 Glucose Transporter-containing Vesicles Is Regulated by Phospholipase D1D⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Ping; Altshuller, Yelena M.; Hou, June Chunqiu; Jeffrey E Pessin; Frohman, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    Insulin stimulates glucose uptake in fat and muscle by mobilizing Glut4 glucose transporters from intracellular membrane storage sites to the plasma membrane. This process requires the trafficking of Glut4-containing vesicles toward the cell periphery, docking at exocytic sites, and plasma membrane fusion. We show here that phospholipase D (PLD) production of the lipid phosphatidic acid (PA) is a key event in the fusion process. PLD1 is found on Glut4-containing vesicles, is activated by insu...

  4. Functional Analysis of the Two Brassica AP3 Genes Involved in Apetalous and Stamen Carpelloid Phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Wang, Xuefang; Zhang, Wenxue; Yu, Fei; Tian, Jianhua; Li, Dianrong; Guo, Aiguang

    2011-01-01

    The Arabidopsis homeotic genes APETALA3 (AP3) and PISTILLATA (PI) are B genes which encode MADS-box transcription factors and specify petal and stamen identities. In the current study, the stamen carpelloid (SC) mutants, HGMS and AMS, of B. rapa and B. napus were investigated and two types of AP3 genes, B.AP3.a and B.AP3.b, were functional characterized. B.AP3.a and B.AP3.b share high similarity in amino acid sequences except for 8 residues difference located at the C-terminus. Loss of this 8...

  5. ACTIVE CALCIUM TRANSPORT IN PLASMA MEMBRANE VESICLES FROM DEVELOPING COTYLEDONS OF COMMON BEAN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄建中; 陈子元

    1995-01-01

    Plasma membrane vesicles were prepared from the developing cotyledons of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L cv Diyundou)by aqueous two-phase partitioning and characterized as to their purity by assaying marker enzymes for other membranes.The putative plasma membrane fraction was minimalyy contaminated by membranes other than plasma membrane and hence was of high purity,It exhibited a Ca2+-dependent ATPase activity,which was inhibited by 1umol/L EB and promoted by calcium ionophore A23187.Such an activity was responsible for the observed ATP dependent 45Ca2+ uptake into inside-out plasma membrane vesicles.This process was stimulated by 0.5μmol/L CaM and 20μmol/L IAA but inhibited by 2μmol/L ABA and abolished by A23187,Possible role of cytoplasmic Ca2+ in mediating phytohormones activity is discussed.

  6. Active calcium transport in plasma membrane vesicles from developing cotyledons of common bean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma membrane vesicles were prepared from the developing cotyledons of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L cv Diyundou) by aqueous two-phase partitioning and characterized as to their purity by assaying marker enzymes for other membranes. The putative plasma membrane fraction was minimally contaminated by membranes other than plasma membrane and hence was of high purity. It exhibited a Ca2+-dependent ATPase activity, which was inhibited by 1 μmol/L EB and promoted by calcium ionophore A23187. Such an activity was responsible for the observed ATP-dependent 45Ca2+ uptake into inside-out plasma membrane vesicles. This process was stimulated by 0.6 μmol/L CaM and 20 μmol/L IAA but inhibited by 2 μmol/L ABA and abolished by A23187. Possible role of cytoplasmic Ca2+ in mediating phytohormones activity is discussed

  7. MAA-1, a novel acyl-CoA-binding protein involved in endosomal vesicle transport in Caenorhabditis elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten K; Tuck, Simon; Færgeman, Nils J.;

    2006-01-01

    The budding and fission of vesicles during membrane trafficking requires many proteins, including those that coat the vesicles, adaptor proteins that recruit components of the coat, and small GTPases that initiate vesicle formation. In addition, vesicle formation in vitro is promoted by the hydro......The budding and fission of vesicles during membrane trafficking requires many proteins, including those that coat the vesicles, adaptor proteins that recruit components of the coat, and small GTPases that initiate vesicle formation. In addition, vesicle formation in vitro is promoted......-CoA in vitro and that this ligand-binding ability is important for its function in vivo. Our results are consistent with a role for MAA-1 in an acyl-CoA-dependent process during vesicle formation....

  8. Constitutive Expression of Sense & Antisense PtAP3, an AP3 Homologue Gene of Populus tomentosa, Affects Growth and Flowering Time in Transgenic Tobacco

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To analyze the function of PtAP3, an APETALA3 (AP3) homologue gene isolated from Populus tomentosa Carr., the full length sequence (1 797 bp) and a fragment (870 bp) of PtAP3 were fused to a CaMV 35S promoter of pBI121 to generate the sense and antisense constructs of PtAP3. These constructs were transformed into tobacco by Agrobacterium infection of leaf disks and selection on kanamycin medium. Some sense and antisense transgenic tobacco plants were obtained by PCR and Southern blot analysis. Great phenotypic differences in transgenic tobacco plants were observed. Almost all of sense PtAP3 to transgenic tobaccos showed a higher growth rate than those of antisense transformants and a few developed pregnancy earlier than wild type seedlings and antisense transformants under the same conditions.

  9. Differential recognition of a dileucine-based sorting signal by AP-1 and AP-3 reveals a requirement for both BLOC-1 and AP-3 in delivery of OCA2 to melanosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Sitaram, Anand; Dennis, Megan K.; Chaudhuri, Rittik; De Jesus-Rojas, Wilfredo; Tenza, Danièle; Setty, Subba Rao Gangi; Wood, Christopher S.; Sviderskaya, Elena V.; Bennett, Dorothy C.; Raposo, Graça; Bonifacino, Juan S.; Marks, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Cell types that generate unique lysosome-related organelles (LROs), such as melanosomes in melanocytes, populate nascent LROs with cargoes that are diverted from endosomes. Cargo sorting toward melanosomes correlates with binding via cytoplasmically exposed sorting signals to either heterotetrameric adaptor AP-1 or AP-3. Some cargoes bind both adaptors, but the relative contribution of each adaptor to cargo recognition and their functional interactions with other effectors during transport to...

  10. Tetrahymena gene encodes a protein that is homologous with the liver-specific F-antigen and associated with membranes of the Golgi apparatus and transport vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummel, R; Nørgaard, P; Andreasen, P H;

    1992-01-01

    associated with membranes of the Golgi apparatus and transport vesicles pointing to a role of TF-ag in membrane trafficking. Transcription of the TF-ag gene, as determined by run-on analyses, was only detectable in growing cells, and following transfer to starvation condition pre-existing TF-ag mRNA was...

  11. Transport of receptors, receptor signaling complexes and ion channels via neuropeptide-secretory vesicles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Zhao; Hai-Bo Wang; Ying-Jin Lu; Jian-Wen Hu; Lan Bao; Xu Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Stimulus-induced exocytosis of large dense-core vesicles(LDCVs)leads to discharge of neuropeptides and fusion of LDCV membranes with the plasma membrane. However, the contribution of LDCVs to the properties of the neuronal membrane remains largely unclear. The present study found that LDCVs were associated with multiple receptors, channels and signaling molecules, suggesting that neuronal sensitivity is modulated by an LDCV-mediated mechanism. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry combined with immunoblotting of subcellular fractions identified 298 proteins in LDCV membranes purified from the dorsal spinal cord, including Gprotein-coupled receptors, Gproteins and other signaling molecules, ion channels and trafficking-related proteins. Morphological assays showed that δ-opioid receptor 1(DORI), β2 adrenergic receptor(AR), Gα12,voltage-gated calcium channel a2δ1subunit and P2X purinoceptor 2 were localized in substance P(SP)-positive LDCVs in small-diameter dorsal root ganglion neurons, whereas β1 AR, Wnt receptor frizzled 8 and dishevelled 1 were present in SP-negative LDCVs.Furthermore, DOR1/α12/Gβ1γ5/phospholipase C β2 complexes were associated with LDCVs. Blockade of the DOR1/Gαi2 interaction largely abolished the LDCV localization of Gαi2 and impaired stimulation-induced surface expression of Gαi2. Thus, LDCVs serve as carriers of receptors, ion channels and preassembled receptor signaling complexes, enabling a rapid, activity-dependent modulation of neuronal sensitivity.

  12. Effect of alpha interferon on glucose and alanine transport by rat renal brush border membrane vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the pathogenetic mechanisms of interferon nephrotoxicity, we studied the effect of recombinant interferon alfa-2b on the uptake of 14C-D-glucose and 14C-L-alanine by rat renal brush-border-membrane vesicles. Interferon significantly inhibited 20 sec. sodium-dependent and 5 and 10 min. equilibrium uptake of both glucose and alanine. The inhibitory effect was dose dependent with maximum effect achieved at interferon concentration of 5 x 10-8M in the uptake media. The half-maximal inhibitory concentrations, IC50, of interferon on glucose uptake was 1.8 x 10-8M, and 5.4 x 10-9M on alanine uptake. Dixon plot analysis of uptake data was consistent with pure non-competitive inhibition. The inhibition constants, Ki, 1.5 x 10-8M for glucose uptake, and 7.3 x 10-9M for alanine uptake, derived from Dixon plots were in close agreement with the IC50s calculated from the semilog dose response curves. These observations reveal that direct interactions at the proximal tubule cell membrane are involved in the pathogenesis of interferon nephrotoxicity, and that its mechanism of nephrotoxicity is similar to that of other low molecular weight proteins

  13. Chloroquine causes similar electroretinogram modifications, neuronal phospholipidosis and marked impairment of synaptic vesicle transport in Albino and Pigmented Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retinal toxicity of chloroquine has been known for several years, but the mechanism(s) of toxicity remain controversial; some author support the idea that the binding of chloroquine to melanin pigments in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) play a major toxic role by concentrating the drug in the eye. In our study, 12 albinos Sprague-Dawley (SD) and 12 pigmented Brown Norway (BN) rats were treated orally for 3 months with chloroquine to compare functional and pathological findings. On Flash electroretinograms (ERG) performed in scotopic conditions, similar and progressive (time-dependent) delayed onset and decreased amplitudes of oscillatory potentials (from Day 71) and b-waves (on Day 92) were identified in both BN and SD rats. In both strains, identical morphological changes consisted of neuronal phospholipidosis associated with UV auto-fluorescence without evidence of retinal degeneration and gliosis; the RPE did not show any morphological lesions or autofluorescence. IHC analyses demonstrated a decrease in GABA expression in the inner nuclear layer. In addition, a marked accumulation of synaptic vesicles coupled with a marked disruption of neurofilaments in the optic nerve fibers was identified. In conclusion, ERG observations were very similar to those described in humans. Comparable ERG modifications, histopathology and immunohistochemistry findings were observed in the retina of both rat strains suggesting that melanin pigment is unlikely involved. chloroquine-induced impairment of synaptic vesicle transport, likely related to disruption of neurofilaments was identified and non-previously reported. This new mechanism of toxicity may also be responsible for the burry vision described in humans chronically treated with chloroquine

  14. 78 kDa receptor for Man6P-independent lysosomal enzyme targeting: Biosynthetic transport from endoplasmic reticulum to 'high-density vesicles'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent work has shown that the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate and the 78 kDa receptors for lysosomal enzyme targeting are located in different cell compartments. While the mannose 6-phosphate receptor is enriched in the Percoll fractions that contain Golgi apparatus, most of the 78 kDa receptor is localized in a heavy fraction at the bottom of the Percoll gradient. This report presents the biosynthetic transport of the 78 kDa receptor. Newly synthesized 78 kDa receptor was transported to Golgi from endoplasmic reticulum with a half life of 5 min. From the Golgi apparatus, the receptor takes two routes; about 15-25% is transported to the plasma membrane, and the rest migrates to late endosomes, subsequently to prelysosomes and finally to the dense vesicles. The 78 kDa receptor starts appearing at the dense vesicles 120 min after biosynthesis and reaches a maximum of 40-50% of the total receptor. Treatment of cells with NH4Cl causes depletion of the receptor from the dense vesicles and prelysosomes and corresponding augmentation in endosomes and plasma membrane. These results suggest that the 78 kDa receptor cycles between compartments and that the dense vesicles seem to represent the most distal compartment in the biosynthetic pathway of this receptor

  15. Role of Golgi derived clathrin coated vesicles in the transport of calsequestrin to the sarcoplasmic reticulum of developing myotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) is the major intracellular calcium sequestering organelle in skeletal and heart muscle. Calsequestrin (CSQ) is a glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 42,000. This protein is located in the lumen of the SR and it binds Ca2+ to maintain the concentration of this cation in the lumen at 10/sup /minus/3/M. Highly purified coated vesicles (CVs) were isolated from chick muscle and a Western blot using polyclonal anti-CSQ revealed the presence of CSQ within the CVs. Another major protein in the SR, the Ca2+-ATPase, was not contained in CVs suggesting different routes of insertion into the SR. Cultured chick myotubes were labelled with Trans35S-label contain [35S]-methionine and [35S]-cysteine to follow the transport of CSQ. Labelled CSQ remained high in the CVs until after 45 minutes of chase, then declined. The amount of labelled CSQ in the SR continued to rise over the chase period. No CSQ was secreted. All the CSQ in CVs and SR was sensitive to the activity of endoglycosidase H, and a significant fraction also bound wheat germ agglutinin. A small amount of CSQ was also co-transported with the muscle protein acetylcholinesterase within CVs. Non-secreted forms of acetylcholinesterase had the same carbohydrate structure as CSQ and were shown to be degraded in the SR

  16. NINL and DZANK1 Co-function in Vesicle Transport and Are Essential for Photoreceptor Development in Zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margo Dona

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ciliopathies are Mendelian disorders caused by dysfunction of cilia, ubiquitous organelles involved in fluid propulsion (motile cilia or signal transduction (primary cilia. Retinal dystrophy is a common phenotypic characteristic of ciliopathies since photoreceptor outer segments are specialized primary cilia. These ciliary structures heavily rely on intracellular minus-end directed transport of cargo, mediated at least in part by the cytoplasmic dynein 1 motor complex, for their formation, maintenance and function. Ninein-like protein (NINL is known to associate with this motor complex and is an important interaction partner of the ciliopathy-associated proteins lebercilin, USH2A and CC2D2A. Here, we scrutinize the function of NINL with combined proteomic and zebrafish in vivo approaches. We identify Double Zinc Ribbon and Ankyrin Repeat domains 1 (DZANK1 as a novel interaction partner of NINL and show that loss of Ninl, Dzank1 or both synergistically leads to dysmorphic photoreceptor outer segments, accumulation of trans-Golgi-derived vesicles and mislocalization of Rhodopsin and Ush2a in zebrafish. In addition, retrograde melanosome transport is severely impaired in zebrafish lacking Ninl or Dzank1. We further demonstrate that NINL and DZANK1 are essential for intracellular dynein-based transport by associating with complementary subunits of the cytoplasmic dynein 1 motor complex, thus shedding light on the structure and stoichiometry of this important motor complex. Altogether, our results support a model in which the NINL-DZANK1 protein module is involved in the proper assembly and folding of the cytoplasmic dynein 1 motor complex in photoreceptor cells, a process essential for outer segment formation and function.

  17. Genetic and phenotypic analysis of the mouse mutant mh2J, an Ap3d allele caused by IAP element insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantheti, Prameela; Diaz, Maria E; Peden, Andrew E; Seong, Eunju E; Dolan, David F; Robinson, Margaret S; Noebels, Jeffrey L; Burmeister, Margit L

    2003-03-01

    Mocha (mh), a mouse model for Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS), is characterized by platelet storage pool deficiency, pigment dilution, and deafness as well as neurological abnormalities. The trans-Golgi/endosome adaptor-related complex AP-3 is missing in mh mice owing to a deletion in the gene encoding the delta subunit. Mice mutant for a second allele, mh(2J), are as hyperactive as mh, and display both spike wave absence and generalized tonic clonic seizures, but have less coat color dilution, no hearing loss, and no hypersynchronized EEG. Here we show that the mh(2J) mutation is due to an IAP element insertion in the Ap3d gene leading to a C-terminally truncated protein. Despite correct assembly of the AP-3 complex and localization to the trans-Golgi network and endosomes, AP-3 function in neurons remains impaired. While mh mice show a severe reduction of vesicular zinc (TIMM staining) owing to mislocalization and degradation of the Zinc transporter ZnT-3, the TIMM and ZnT-3 staining patterns in mh(2J) varies, with normal expression in hippocampal mossy fibers, but abnormal patterns in neocortex. These results indicate that the N-terminal portion of the delta subunit is sufficient for AP-3 complex assembly and subcellular localization to the TGN/endosomes, while subsequent function is regulated in part by cell-specific interactions with the C-terminal portion. PMID:12647238

  18. Properties of the mitochondrial carrier of adenine-nucleotide after purification. Study of the transport protein under isolated form and reincorporated form in phospho-lipidic vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first part of this research thesis addresses the reconstitution of the ADP/ATP transport by incorporation of the specific carrier, isolated in presence of detergent, in phospholipids vesicles. Fundamental properties of the reconstituted transport are identical to that of transport in mitochondria, notably as far as the exchange stoichiometry, the turn over and the transport Km are concerned, as well as the asymmetric orientation of the carrier in the membrane. The second part of this research addresses the study of interactions of specific ligands with the ADP/ATP transport protein in presence of detergent. The study of the variations of the intrinsic fluorescence of the isolated ADP/ATP carrier highlights conformational changes exclusively induced by the presence of transportable nucleotides which are modulated in a different manner by carboxy-atractyloside or bongkrekic acid. Moreover, by using the isolated protein, a detailed analysis of binding parameters of fluorescent analogues of ATP is reported

  19. Vesicle transport in oligodendrocytes: probable role of Rab40c protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Gabin, A G; Almazan, G; Larocca, J N

    2004-06-15

    Intracellular membrane trafficking plays an essential role in the structural and functional organization of oligodendrocytes, which synthesize a large amount of membrane to form myelin. Rab proteins are key components in intracellular vesicular transport. We cloned a novel Rab protein from an oligodendrocyte cDNA library, designating it Rab40c because of its homology with Rab40a and Rab40b. The DNA sequence of Rab40c shows an 843-base pair open reading frame. The deduced amino acid sequence is a protein with 281 amino acids, with a molecular weight of 31,466 Da and an isoelectric point of 9.83. Rab40c presents a number of distinct structural features including a carboxyl terminal extension and amino acid substitutions in the consensus sequence of the GTP-binding motifs. The carboxyl terminal region contains motifs that permit isoprenylation and palmitoylation. Binding studies indicate that Rab40c binds guanosine 5'-0-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP gamma S) with a K(d) of 21 microM and has a higher affinity for guanosine triphosphate (GTP) than for guanosine diphosphate (GDP). Rab40c is localized in the perinuclear recycling compartment, suggesting its involvement in endocytic events such as receptor recycling. The importance of this recycling in myelin formation is suggested by the increase in both Rab40c mRNA and Rab40c protein as oligodendrocytes differentiate. PMID:15160388

  20. The prokaryotic V4R domain is the likely ancestor of a key component of the eukaryotic vesicle transport system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makarova Kira S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Intracellular vesicle traffic that enables delivery of proteins between the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi and various endosomal subcompartments is one of the hallmarks of the eukaryotic cell. Its evolutionary history is not well understood but the process itself and the core vesicle traffic machinery are believed to be ancient. We show here that the 4-vinyl reductase (V4R protein domain present in bacteria and archaea is homologous to the Bet3 subunit of the TRAPP1 vesicle-tethering complex that is conserved in all eukaryotes. This suggests, for the first time, a prokaryotic origin for one of the key eukaryotic trafficking proteins. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Gaspar Jekely and Mark A. Ragan

  1. AP-3 and Rabip4' coordinately regulate spatial distribution of lysosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorica Ivan

    Full Text Available The RUN and FYVE domain proteins rabip4 and rabip4' are encoded by RUFY1 and differ in a 108 amino acid N-terminal extension in rabip4'. Their identical C terminus binds rab5 and rab4, but the function of rabip4s is incompletely understood. We here found that silencing RUFY1 gene products promoted outgrowth of plasma membrane protrusions, and polarized distribution and clustering of lysosomes at their tips. An interactor screen for proteins that function together with rabip4' yielded the adaptor protein complex AP-3, of which the hinge region in the β3 subunit bound directly to the FYVE domain of rabip4'. Rabip4' colocalized with AP-3 on a tubular subdomain of early endosomes and the extent of colocalization was increased by a dominant negative rab4 mutant. Knock-down of AP-3 had an ever more dramatic effect and caused accumulation of lysosomes in protrusions at the plasma membrane. The most peripheral lysosomes were localized beyond microtubules, within the cortical actin network. Our results uncover a novel function for AP-3 and rabip4' in regulating lysosome positioning through an interorganellar pathway.

  2. The AP-3 adaptor complex is required for vacuolar function in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwiewka, M.; Feraru, E.; Moller, B.K.; Hwang, I.; Feraru, M.I.; Kleine-Vehn, J.; Weijers, D.; Friml, J.

    2011-01-01

    Subcellular trafficking is required for a multitude of functions in eukaryotic cells. It involves regulation of cargo sorting, vesicle formation, trafficking and fusion processes at multiple levels. Adaptor protein (AP) complexes are key regulators of cargo sorting into vesicles in yeast and mammals

  3. Dynamics of intracellular clathrin/AP1 and clathrin/AP3 containing carriers

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Clathrin/AP1 and clathrin/AP3 coated vesicular carriers originate from endosomes and the TGN. We report here the real-time visualization of these structures in living cells reliably tracked by using rapid, three-dimensional imaging with a spinning-disk confocal microscope. We imaged relatively sparse, diffraction-limited, fluorescent objects containing chimeric fluorescent protein (clathrin light chain, σ adaptor subunits or dynamin2) with a spatial precision of up to ~ 30 nm and a temporal r...

  4. Phylogenetic utility of the AP3/DEF K-domain and its molecular evolution in Impatiens (Balsaminaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Janssens, S.; Geuten, K.; Viaene, T.; Yong-Ming, Y.; Yi, S; Smets, E.

    2007-01-01

    APETALA3 (AP3)/DEFICIENS (DEF) is a MADS-box transcription factor that is involved in establishing the identity of petal and stamen floral organs. The AP3/DEF gene lineage has been extensively examined throughout the angiosperms in order to better understand its role in floral diversity and evolution. As a result, a large number of cloned AP3/DEF orthologues are available, which can be used for the design of taxon specific primers for phylogeny reconstruction of close relatives of the group o...

  5. Trafficking of astrocytic vesicles in hippocampal slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasingly appreciated role of astrocytes in neurophysiology dictates a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying the communication between astrocytes and neurons. In particular, the uptake and release of signaling substances into/from astrocytes is considered as crucial. The release of different gliotransmitters involves regulated exocytosis, consisting of the fusion between the vesicle and the plasma membranes. After fusion with the plasma membrane vesicles may be retrieved into the cytoplasm and may continue to recycle. To study the mobility implicated in the retrieval of secretory vesicles, these structures have been previously efficiently and specifically labeled in cultured astrocytes, by exposing live cells to primary and secondary antibodies. Since the vesicle labeling and the vesicle mobility properties may be an artifact of cell culture conditions, we here asked whether the retrieving exocytotic vesicles can be labeled in brain tissue slices and whether their mobility differs to that observed in cell cultures. We labeled astrocytic vesicles and recorded their mobility with two-photon microscopy in hippocampal slices from transgenic mice with fluorescently tagged astrocytes (GFP mice) and in wild-type mice with astrocytes labeled by Fluo4 fluorescence indicator. Glutamatergic vesicles and peptidergic granules were labeled by the anti-vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (vGlut1) and anti-atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) antibodies, respectively. We report that the vesicle mobility parameters (velocity, maximal displacement and track length) recorded in astrocytes from tissue slices are similar to those reported previously in cultured astrocytes.

  6. Trafficking of astrocytic vesicles in hippocampal slices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potokar, Maja; Kreft, Marko [Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology-Molecular Cell Physiology, Institute of Pathophysiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Zaloska 4, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Celica Biomedical Center, Technology Park 24, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Lee, So-Young; Takano, Hajime; Haydon, Philip G. [Department of Neuroscience, Room 215, Stemmler Hall, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Zorec, Robert, E-mail: Robert.Zorec@mf.uni-lj.si [Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology-Molecular Cell Physiology, Institute of Pathophysiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Zaloska 4, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Celica Biomedical Center, Technology Park 24, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2009-12-25

    The increasingly appreciated role of astrocytes in neurophysiology dictates a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying the communication between astrocytes and neurons. In particular, the uptake and release of signaling substances into/from astrocytes is considered as crucial. The release of different gliotransmitters involves regulated exocytosis, consisting of the fusion between the vesicle and the plasma membranes. After fusion with the plasma membrane vesicles may be retrieved into the cytoplasm and may continue to recycle. To study the mobility implicated in the retrieval of secretory vesicles, these structures have been previously efficiently and specifically labeled in cultured astrocytes, by exposing live cells to primary and secondary antibodies. Since the vesicle labeling and the vesicle mobility properties may be an artifact of cell culture conditions, we here asked whether the retrieving exocytotic vesicles can be labeled in brain tissue slices and whether their mobility differs to that observed in cell cultures. We labeled astrocytic vesicles and recorded their mobility with two-photon microscopy in hippocampal slices from transgenic mice with fluorescently tagged astrocytes (GFP mice) and in wild-type mice with astrocytes labeled by Fluo4 fluorescence indicator. Glutamatergic vesicles and peptidergic granules were labeled by the anti-vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (vGlut1) and anti-atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) antibodies, respectively. We report that the vesicle mobility parameters (velocity, maximal displacement and track length) recorded in astrocytes from tissue slices are similar to those reported previously in cultured astrocytes.

  7. The putative Cationic Amino acid Transporter 9 is targeted to vesicles and may be involved in plant amino acid homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaiyu eYang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Amino acids are major primary metabolites. Their uptake, translocation, compartmentation and re-mobilization require a diverse set of cellular transporters. Here, the broadly expressed gene product of CATIONIC AMINO ACID TRANSPORTER 9 (CAT9 was identified as mainly localized to vesicular membranes that are involved in vacuolar trafficking, including those of the trans-Golgi network. In order to probe whether and how these compartments are involved in amino acid homeostasis, a loss-of-function cat9-1 mutant and ectopic over-expressor plants were isolated. Under restricted nitrogen supply in soil, cat9-1 showed a chlorotic phenotype, which was reversed in the over-expressors. The total soluble amino acid pools were affected in the mutants, but this was only significant under poor nitrogen supply. Upon nitrogen starvation, the major soluble amino acid leaf pools decreased. This decrease was lower in cat9-1 and augmented in the over-expressor. Over-expression generally affected total soluble amino acid concentrations and finally improved the survival upon severe nitrogen starvation. The results potentially identify a novel function of vesicular amino acid transport mediated by CAT9 in the cellular nitrogen-dependent amino acid homeostasis.

  8. Analysis of the Petunia TM6 MADS box gene reveals functional divergence within the DEF/AP3 lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijpkema, Anneke S; Royaert, Stefan; Zethof, Jan; van der Weerden, Gerard; Gerats, Tom; Vandenbussche, Michiel

    2006-08-01

    Antirrhinum majus DEFICIENS (DEF) and Arabidopsis thaliana APETALA3 (AP3) MADS box proteins are required to specify petal and stamen identity. Sampling of DEF/AP3 homologs revealed two types of DEF/AP3 proteins, euAP3 and TOMATO MADS BOX GENE6 (TM6), within core eudicots, and we show functional divergence in Petunia hybrida euAP3 and TM6 proteins. Petunia DEF (also known as GREEN PETALS [GP]) is expressed mainly in whorls 2 and 3, and its expression pattern remains unchanged in a blind (bl) mutant background, in which the cadastral C-repression function in the perianth is impaired. Petunia TM6 functions as a B-class organ identity protein only in the determination of stamen identity. Atypically, Petunia TM6 is regulated like a C-class rather than a B-class gene, is expressed mainly in whorls 3 and 4, and is repressed by BL in the perianth, thereby preventing involvement in petal development. A promoter comparison between DEF and TM6 indicates an important change in regulatory elements during or after the duplication that resulted in euAP3- and TM6-type genes. Surprisingly, although TM6 normally is not involved in petal development, 35S-driven TM6 expression can restore petal development in a def (gp) mutant background. Finally, we isolated both euAP3 and TM6 genes from seven solanaceous species, suggesting that a dual euAP3/TM6 B-function system might be the rule in the Solanaceae. PMID:16844905

  9. Improved Pharmacological and Structural Properties of HIV Fusion Inhibitor AP3 over Enfuvirtide: Highlighting Advantages of Artificial Peptide Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaojie; Zhu, Yun; Ye, Sheng; Wang, Qian; Xu, Wei; Su, Shan; Sun, Zhiwu; Yu, Fei; Liu, Qi; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Tianhong; Zhang, Zhenqing; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Jianqing; Du, Lanying; Liu, Keliang; Lu, Lu; Zhang, Rongguang; Jiang, Shibo

    2015-01-01

    Enfuvirtide (T20), is the first HIV fusion inhibitor approved for treatment of HIV/AIDS patients who fail to respond to the current antiretroviral drugs. However, its clinical application is limited because of short half-life, drug resistance and cross-reactivity with the preexisting antibodies in HIV-infected patients. Using an artificial peptide strategy, we designed a peptide with non-native protein sequence, AP3, which exhibited potent antiviral activity against a broad spectrum of HIV-1 strains, including those resistant to T20, and had remarkably longer in vivo half-life than T20. While the preexisting antibodies in HIV-infected patients significantly suppressed T20's antiviral activity, these antibodies neither recognized AP3, nor attenuated its anti-HIV-1 activity. Structurally different from T20, AP3 could fold into single-helix and interact with gp41 NHR. The two residues, Met and Thr, at the N-terminus of AP3 form a hook-like structure to stabilize interaction between AP3 and NHR helices. Therefore, AP3 has potential for further development as a new HIV fusion inhibitor with improved antiviral efficacy, resistance profile and pharmacological properties over enfuvirtide. Meanwhile, this study highlighted the advantages of artificially designed peptides, and confirmed that this strategy could be used in developing artificial peptide-based viral fusion inhibitors against HIV and other enveloped viruses. PMID:26286358

  10. Engineered Asymmetric Synthetic Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Li; Chiarot, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Synthetic vesicles are small, fluid-filled spheres that are enclosed by a bilayer of lipid molecules. They can be used as models for investigating membrane biology and as delivery vehicles for pharmaceuticals. In practice, it is difficult to simultaneously control membrane asymmetry, unilamellarity, vesicle size, vesicle-to-vesicle uniformity, and luminal content. Membrane asymmetry, where each leaflet of the bilayer is composed of different lipids, is of particular importance as it is a feature of most natural membranes. In this study, we leverage microfluidic technology to build asymmetric vesicles at high-throughput. We use the precise flow control offered by microfluidic devices to make highly uniform emulsions, with controlled internal content, that serve as templates to build the synthetic vesicles. Flow focusing, dielectrophoretic steering, and interfacial lipid self-assembly are critical procedures performed on-chip to produce the vesicles. Fluorescent and confocal microscopy are used to evaluate the vesicle characteristics.

  11. POLYELEOSTEARIC ACID VESICLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zichen; XIE Ximng; FAN Qinghua; FANG Yifei

    1992-01-01

    α-Eleostearic acid and β-eleostearic acid formed vesicles in aqueous medium when an ethanol solutionofeleostearic acid was injected rapidly into a vigorously vortexed aqueous phase. Formation of the vesicles was demonstrated by electron microscopic observation and bromothymol blue encapsulation experiments. Polymerizations of the eleostearic acids in the formed vesicles carried out by UV irradiation produced poly-α-eleostearic acid and poly-β-eleostearic acid vesicles.

  12. Demyelination induces transport of ribosome-containing vesicles from glia to axons: evidence from animal models and MS patient brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakhbazau, Antos; Schenk, Geert J; Hay, Curtis; Kawasoe, Jean; Klaver, Roel; Yong, V Wee; Geurts, Jeroen J G; van Minnen, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Glial cells were previously proven capable of trafficking polyribosomes to injured axons. However, the occurrence of such transfer in the general pathological context, such as demyelination-related diseases, needs further evidence. Since this may be a yet unidentified universal contributor to axonal survival, we study putative glia-axonal ribosome transport in response to demyelination in animal models and patients in both peripheral and central nervous system. In the PNS we investigate whether demyelination in a rodent model has the potential to induce ribosome transfer. We also probe the glia-axonal ribosome supply by implantation of transgenic Schwann cells engineered to produce fluorescent ribosomes in the same demyelination model. We furthermore examine the presence of axonal ribosomes in mouse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a well-established model for multiple sclerosis (MS), and in human MS autopsy brain material. We provide evidence for increased axonal ribosome content in a pharmacologically demyelinated sciatic nerve, and demonstrate that at least part of these ribosomes originate in the transgenic Schwann cells. In the CNS one of the hallmarks of MS is demyelination, which is associated with severe disruption of oligodendrocyte-axon interaction. Here, we provide evidence that axons from spinal cords of EAE mice, and in the MS human brain contain an elevated amount of axonal ribosomes compared to controls. Our data provide evidence that increased axonal ribosome content in pathological axons is at least partly due to glia-to-axon transfer of ribosomes, and that demyelination in the PNS and in the CNS is one of the triggers capable to initiate this process. PMID:27115494

  13. Characterization of sodium transport in Acholeplasma laidlawii B cells and in lipid vesicles containing purified A. laidlawii (Na+-Mg2+)-ATPase by using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and 22Na tracer techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The active transport of sodium ions in live Acholeplasma laidlawii B cells and in lipid vesicles containing the (Na+-Mg2+)-ATPase from the plasma membrane of this microorganism was studied by 23Na nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic and 22Na tracer techniques, respectively. In live A. laidlawii B cells, the transport of sodium was an active process in which metabolic energy was harnessed for the extrusion of sodium ions against a concentration gradient. The process was inhibited by low temperatures and by the formation of gel state lipid in the plasma membrane of this organism. In reconstituted proteoliposomes containing the purified (Na+-Mg2+)-ATPase, the hydrolysis of ATP was accompanied by the transport of sodium ions into the lipid vesicles, and the transport process was impaired by reagents known to inhibit ATPase activity. At the normal growth temperature (37 degrees C), this transport process required a maximum of 1 mol of ATP per mol of sodium ion transported. Together, these results provide direct experimental evidence that the (Na+-Mg2+)-ATPase of the Acholeplasma laidlawii B membrane is the cation pump which maintains the low levels of intracellular sodium characteristic of this microorganism

  14. Using FM4-64 FX to Lable Transport Vesicles of Rat Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells%利用FM4-64FX标记大鼠血管平滑肌细胞的囊泡运输

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜隽; 王勇; 李涛; 聂利霞

    2015-01-01

    囊泡运输是大分子物质进入细胞的途径,血管平滑肌细胞(vascular smooth muscle cells,VSMCs)与外界存在频繁的信息和物质交换,该研究通过标识内吞囊泡来研究VSMCs的囊泡运输.体外培养大鼠胸主动脉VSMCs,用血管紧张素Ⅱ(angiotensin Ⅱ,Ang Ⅱ)刺激,加入FM4-64FX短暂孵育后固定.通过免疫组化方法标记VSMCs血管紧张素Ⅱ 1型受体(angiotensin Ⅱ receptor type 1,AT1R),检测内吞囊泡和AR1R转运之间的关系.受到Ang Ⅱ的激活后,VSMC快速形成内吞囊泡,将AT1R转运至胞质;存在血管紧张素受体阻断剂(angiotensin receptor blocker,ARB)时,内吞囊泡数量少,AT1R较少进入胞质.通过FM4-64 FX对胞内囊泡进行标识可以显示VSMCs的大分子物质运输,可观察特定的分子在内吞囊泡上的分布和运输情况.%This study aims to investigate vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) vesicle transport by endocytic vesicles labeling.Rat VSMCs from the thoracic aortic were cultivated in vitro.VSMCs were stimulated with angiotensin Ⅱ (Ang Ⅱ) and incubated with FM4-64 FX shortly.Then VSMCs were fixed with paraformaldehyde and marked with angiotensin Ⅱ type 1 receptor (AT1R) antibody by immunohistochemistry.With Ang Ⅱ stimu-lation,VSMCs rapid formed endocytic vesicles and with it,AT1R was transported into the cytoplasm.Presence of an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) inhibited the number of endocytic vesicles formation and less AT1R entered the cytoplasm.Macromolecules transport of VSMCs can be illustrated by labeling the intracellular vesicles with FM4-64 FX dye.With this method,early endocytosis of VSMCs when the external environment changed can be investigated.

  15. Kinetic regulation of coated vesicle secretion

    CERN Document Server

    Foret, Lionel

    2008-01-01

    The secretion of vesicles for intracellular transport often rely on the aggregation of specialized membrane-bound proteins into a coat able to curve cell membranes. The nucleation and growth of a protein coat is a kinetic process that competes with the energy-consuming turnover of coat components between the membrane and the cytosol. We propose a generic kinetic description of coat assembly and the formation of coated vesicles, and discuss its implication to the dynamics of COP vesicles that traffic within the Golgi and with the Endoplasmic Reticulum. We show that stationary coats of fixed area emerge from the competition between coat growth and the recycling of coat components, in a fashion resembling the treadmilling of cytoskeletal filaments. We further show that the turnover of coat components allows for a highly sensitive switching mechanism between a quiescent and a vesicle producing membrane, upon a slowing down of the exchange kinetics. We claim that the existence of this switching behaviour, also tri...

  16. Vesicle Size Regulates Nanotube Formation in the Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Qian Peter Su; Wanqing Du; Qinghua Ji; Boxin Xue; Dong Jiang; Yueyao Zhu; Jizhong Lou; Li Yu; Yujie Sun

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular membrane nanotube formation and its dynamics play important roles for cargo transportation and organelle biogenesis. Regarding the regulation mechanisms, while much attention has been paid on the lipid composition and its associated protein molecules, effects of the vesicle size has not been studied in the cell. Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) are often used for in vitro membrane deformation studies, but they are much larger than most intracellular vesicles and the in vitro st...

  17. Thermodynamics and dynamics of the formation of spherical lipidic vesicles

    CERN Document Server

    Zapata, E Hernandez; Santamaría-Holek, I

    2009-01-01

    We propose a free energy expression accounting for the formation of spherical vesicles from planar lipidic membranes and derive a Fokker-Planck equation for the probability distribution describing the dynamics of vesicle formation. We found that formation may occur as an activated process for small membranes and as a transport process for sufficiently large membranes. We give explicit expressions for the transition rates and the characteristic time of vesicle formation in terms of the relevant physical parameters.

  18. Extracellular Vesicle (EV) Array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Malene; Bæk, Rikke; Pedersen, Shona;

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are one of the several types of cell-derived vesicles with a diameter of 30-100 nm. These extracellular vesicles are recognized as potential markers of human diseases such as cancer. However, their use in diagnostic tests requires an objective and high-throughput method to define...

  19. Fusion of Nonionic Vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulut, Sanja; Oskolkova, M. Z.; Schweins, R.;

    2010-01-01

    We present an experimental study of vesicle fusion using light and neutron scattering to monitor fusion events. Vesicles are reproducibly formed with an extrusion procedure using an single amphiphile triethylene glycol mono-n-decyl ether in water. They show long-term stability for temperatures...... around 20 C, but at temperatures above 26 C we observe an increase in the scattered intensity due to fusion. The system is unusually well suited for the study of basic mechanisms of vesicle fusion. The vesicles are flexible with a bending rigidity of only a few k(H)T. The monolayer spontaneous curvature......, Ho, depends strongly on temperature in a known way and is thus tunable. For temperatures where H-0 > 0 vesicles tyre long-term stable, while in the range H-0 fusion rate increases the more negative the Spontaneous curvature Through a quantitative;analysis of the fusion rate we arrive tit...

  20. Induction and transport of Wnt 5a during macrophage-induced malignant invasion is mediated by two types of extracellular vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Julia Christina; Pukrop, Tobias; Wenzel, Dirk; Binder, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we have shown that macrophage (MΦ)-induced invasion of breast cancer cells requires upregulation of Wnt 5a in MΦ leading to activation of β-Catenin-independent Wnt signaling in the tumor cells. However, it remained unclear, how malignant cells induce Wnt 5a in MΦ and how it is transferred back to the cancer cells. Here we identify two types of extracellular particles as essential for this intercellular interaction in both directions. Plasma membrane-derived microvesicles (MV) as well as exosomes from breast cancer cells, although biologically distinct populations, both induce Wnt 5a in MΦ. In contrast, the particle-free supernatant and vesicles from benign cells, such as platelets, have no such effect. Induction is antagonized by the Wnt inhibitor Dickkopf-1. Subsequently, Wnt 5a is shuttled via responding MΦ-MV and exosomes to the tumor cells enhancing their invasion. Wnt 5a export on both vesicle fractions depends at least partially on the cargo protein Evenness interrupted (Evi). Its knockdown leads to Wnt 5a depletion of both particle populations and reduced vesicle-mediated invasion. In conclusion, MV and exosomes are critical for MΦ-induced invasion of cancer cells since they are responsible for upregulation of MΦ-Wnt 5a as well as for its delivery to the recipient cells via a reciprocal loop. Although of different biogenesis, both populations share common features regarding function and Evi-dependent secretion of non-canonical Wnts. PMID:24185202

  1. Preparation of large monodisperse vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting F Zhu

    Full Text Available Preparation of monodisperse vesicles is important both for research purposes and for practical applications. While the extrusion of vesicles through small pores (approximately 100 nm in diameter results in relatively uniform populations of vesicles, extrusion to larger sizes results in very heterogeneous populations of vesicles. Here we report a simple method for preparing large monodisperse multilamellar vesicles through a combination of extrusion and large-pore dialysis. For example, extrusion of polydisperse vesicles through 5-microm-diameter pores eliminates vesicles larger than 5 microm in diameter. Dialysis of extruded vesicles against 3-microm-pore-size polycarbonate membranes eliminates vesicles smaller than 3 microm in diameter, leaving behind a population of monodisperse vesicles with a mean diameter of approximately 4 microm. The simplicity of this method makes it an effective tool for laboratory vesicle preparation with potential applications in preparing large monodisperse liposomes for drug delivery.

  2. Na+ uptake into colonic enterocyte membrane vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na+ uptake was studied in colonic enterocyte membrane vesicles prepared from normal and dexamethasone-treated rats. Vesicles from rats treated with dexamethasone demonstrated a fivefold greater 22Na+ uptake compared with vesicles from normal rats. Most of the tracer uptake in membranes derived from treated rats occurred through a conductive, amiloride-blockable pathway located in vesicles with low native K+ permeability and high Cl- permeability. Kinetic analysis of the amiloride inhibition curve revealed the presence of two amiloride-blockable pathways, one with a high affinity accounting for 85% of the uptake, and one with a low affinity accounting for only 12% of the uptake. Only the low-affinity pathway was detected with vesicles from normal rats. The high sensitivity to amiloride, the dependence on dexamethasone pretreatment, and the relative permeabilities to K+ and Cl- indicate that most of the 22Na+ uptake in membranes derived from treated rats is through a Na+-specific channel located in apical membrane vesicles. Preincubation of the isolated cells from dexamethasone-treated rats at 37 degree C in Ca2+-free solutions before homogenization and membrane vesicle purification caused a 5- to 10-fold increase in amiloride-blockable 22Na+ uptake compared with vesicles derived from cells maintained at 0 degree C. The addition of Ca2+, but not of Mg2+, to the incubation solution markedly reduced this temperature-dependent enhancement in 22Na+ uptake. These results suggest that Na+ transport in colonic enterocytes from dexamethasone-treated rats is regulated by a Ca2+-dependent, temperature-sensitive process which causes a sustained change in the apical membrane

  3. Na(+)-I- symport activity is present in membrane vesicles from thyrotropin-deprived non-I(-)-transporting cultured thyroid cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Kaminsky, S. M.; Levy, O.; Salvador, C.; Dai, G.; Carrasco, N.

    1994-01-01

    The active accumulation of I- in the thyroid gland is mediated by the Na(+)-I- symporter and driven by the Na+ gradient generated by the Na+/K(+)-ATPase. Thyrotropin (TSH) stimulates thyroidal I- accumulation. Rat thyroid-derived FRTL-5 cells require TSH to accumulate I-. TSH withdrawal for over 7 days results in complete loss of Na(+)-I-symport activity in these cells [Weiss, S. J., Philp, N. J. and Grollman, E. F. (1984) Endocrinology 114, 1090-1098]. Surprisingly, membrane vesicles prepare...

  4. Lipid trafficking sans Vesicles: where, why, how?

    OpenAIRE

    Prinz, William A.

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells possess a remarkable diversity of lipids, which distribute among cellular membranes by well-characterized vesicle trafficking pathways. However, transport of lipids by alternate or “nonvesicular” routes is also critical for lipid synthesis, metabolism, and proper membrane partitioning. In the past few years, considerable progress has been made in characterizing the mechanisms of nonvesicular lipid transport and how it may go awry in particular diseases, but many fundamental q...

  5. Identification of minor components of coated vesicles by use of permeation chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    Coated vesicles are thought to be vehicles for the intracellular transport of membranes. Clathrin is the major protein component of coated vesicles. Minor components of these organelles can be identified in highly purified preparations if they can be shown to copurify with clathrin. To show copurification we have made use of the relatively uniform diameter of coated vesicles (50-150 nm) to fractionate conventionally purified coated vesicles according to size in glass bead columns of 200-nm po...

  6. Astrocytic Vesicle Mobility in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Zorec

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes are no longer considered subservient to neurons, and are, instead, now understood to play an active role in brain signaling. The intercellular communication of astrocytes with neurons and other non-neuronal cells involves the exchange of molecules by exocytotic and endocytotic processes through the trafficking of intracellular vesicles. Recent studies of single vesicle mobility in astrocytes have prompted new views of how astrocytes contribute to information processing in nervous tissue. Here, we review the trafficking of several types of membrane-bound vesicles that are specifically involved in the processes of (i intercellular communication by gliotransmitters (glutamate, adenosine 5'-triphosphate, atrial natriuretic peptide, (ii plasma membrane exchange of transporters and receptors (EAAT2, MHC-II, and (iii the involvement of vesicle mobility carrying aquaporins (AQP4 in water homeostasis. The properties of vesicle traffic in astrocytes are discussed in respect to networking with neighboring cells in physiologic and pathologic conditions, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, and states in which astrocytes contribute to neuroinflammatory conditions.

  7. The MIK region rather than the C-terminal domain of AP3-like class B floral homeotic proteins determines functional specificity in the development and evolution of petals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Kunmei; Zhao, Suzhen; Shan, Hongyan; Kong, Hongzhi; Lu, Wenliang; Theissen, Günter; Chen, Zhiduan; Meng, Zheng

    2008-01-01

    In core eudicots, euAP3-type MADS-box genes encode a PISTILLATA (PI)-derived motif, as well as a C-terminal euAP3 motif that originated from a paleoAP3 motif of an ancestral APETALA3 (AP3)-like protein through a translational frameshift mutation. To determine the functional and evolutionary relevance of these motifs, a series of point mutation and domain-swap constructs were generated, involving CsAP3, a paleoAP3-type gene from the basal angiosperm Chloranthus spicatus encoding a truncated paleoAP3 motif, and AtAP3, a euAP3-type gene from the core eudicot Arabidopsis thaliana. The chimeric constructs were expressed in A. thaliana under the control of the AP3 promoter or the CaMV 35S promoter in an ap3 mutant or wild-type background, respectively. Significant recovery of AP3 function was obtained in both complementation and ectopic expression experiments whenever the region upstream of the C-terminal motifs (MIK region) from A. thaliana was taken, even when the PI-derived motif and the truncated paleoAP3 motif of CsAP3 substituted for the corresponding sequences from AtAP3. However, no or very weak complementation or gain-of-function was seen when the MIK region was from CsAP3. Our data suggest that changes in the MIK region rather than mutations in the C-terminal domain were of crucial importance for the evolution of the functional specificity of euAP3-type proteins in stamen and petal development. PMID:18298432

  8. Open Syntaxin Docks Synaptic Vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Marc Hammarlund; Mark T Palfreyman; Shigeki Watanabe; Shawn Olsen; Erik M. Jorgensen

    2007-01-01

    Author Summary Like Olympic swimmers crouched on their starting blocks, synaptic vesicles prepare for fusion with the neuronal plasma membrane long before the starting gun fires. This preparation enables vesicles to fuse rapidly, synchronously, and in the correct place when the signal finally arrives. A well-known but poorly understood part of vesicle preparation is docking, in which vesicles prepare for release by attaching to the plasma membrane at the eventual site of release. Here, we out...

  9. Membrane Protrusion Coarsening and Nanotubulation within Giant Unilamellar Vesicles

    KAUST Repository

    Węgrzyn, Ilona

    2011-11-16

    Hydrophobic side groups on a stimuli-responsive polymer, encapsulated within a single giant unilamellar vesicle, enable membrane attachment during compartment formation at elevated temperatures. We thermally modulated the vesicle through implementation of an IR laser via an optical fiber, enabling localized directed heating. Polymer-membrane interactions were monitored using confocal imaging techniques as subsequent membrane protrusions occurred and lipid nanotubes formed in response to the polymer hydrogel contraction. These nanotubes, bridging the vesicle membrane to the contracting hydrogel, were retained on the surface of the polymer compartment, where they were transformed into smaller vesicles in a process reminiscent of cellular endocytosis. This development of a synthetic vesicle system containing a stimuli-responsive polymer could lead to a new platform for studying inter/intramembrane transport through lipid nanotubes. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  10. Interaction between silicon dioxide and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohd, Hur Munawar Kabir; Ahmad, Ainee Fatimah; Radiman, Shahidan; Mohamed, Faizal; Rosli, Nur Ratasha Alia Md; Ayob, Muhammad Taqiyuddin Mawardi; Rahman, Irman Abdul [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, University Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    Many of the cellular process depend on the ability of the membrane to separate areas while allowing exchange and tightly regulated transport of material within and across the membrane to occur, which is the driving principle behind cell communication. The complexity of biological membranes has motivated the development of a wide variety of simpler model systems whose size, geometry and composition can be tailored with precision. This study was conducted to investigate the interactions between silica nanoparticles and Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) vesicles. The size range of DPPC vesicles formed was from 50 to 150 nm. Concentration of silica added to the vesicles was varied from 0.25 to 1.5 mg/ml. The change in vesicle size distribution, localization and positioning of silica nanoparticles in vesicles was studied via transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)

  11. Adaptor protein complexes AP-1 and AP-3 are required by the HHV-7 Immunoevasin U21 for rerouting of class I MHC molecules to the lysosomal compartment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A Kimpler

    Full Text Available The human herpesvirus-7 (HHV-7 U21 gene product binds to class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules and reroutes them to a lysosomal compartment. Trafficking of integral membrane proteins to lysosomes is mediated through cytoplasmic sorting signals that recruit heterotetrameric clathrin adaptor protein (AP complexes, which in turn mediate protein sorting in post-Golgi vesicular transport. Since U21 can mediate rerouting of class I molecules to lysosomes even when lacking its cytoplasmic tail, we hypothesize the existence of a cellular protein that contains the lysosomal sorting information required to escort class I molecules to the lysosomal compartment. If such a protein exists, we expect that it might recruit clathrin adaptor protein complexes as a means of lysosomal sorting. Here we describe experiments demonstrating that the μ adaptins from AP-1 and AP-3 are involved in U21-mediated trafficking of class I molecules to lysosomes. These experiments support the idea that a cellular protein(s is necessary for U21-mediated lysosomal sorting of class I molecules. We also examine the impact of transient versus chronic knockdown of these adaptor protein complexes, and show that the few remaining μ subunits in the cells are eventually able to reroute class I molecules to lysosomes.

  12. How pure are your vesicles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Jason; Clayton, Aled

    2013-01-01

    We propose a straightforward method to estimate the purity of vesicle preparations by comparing the ratio of nano-vesicle counts to protein concentration, using tools such as the increasingly available NanoSight platform and a colorimetric protein assay such as the BCA-assay. Such an approach is simple enough to apply to every vesicle preparation within a given laboratory, assisting researchers as a routine quality control step. Also, the approach may aid in comparing/standardising vesicle purity across diverse studies, and may be of particular importance in evaluating vesicular biomarkers. We herein propose some criteria to aid in the definition of pure vesicles. PMID:24009896

  13. How pure are your vesicles?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Webber

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a straightforward method to estimate the purity of vesicle preparations by comparing the ratio of nano-vesicle counts to protein concentration, using tools such as the increasingly available NanoSight platform and a colorimetric protein assay such as the BCA-assay. Such an approach is simple enough to apply to every vesicle preparation within a given laboratory, assisting researchers as a routine quality control step. Also, the approach may aid in comparing/standardising vesicle purity across diverse studies, and may be of particular importance in evaluating vesicular biomarkers. We herein propose some criteria to aid in the definition of pure vesicles.

  14. Synaptic Vesicle Exocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Südhof, Thomas C; Rizo, Josep

    2011-01-01

    Presynaptic nerve terminals release neurotransmitters by synaptic vesicle exocytosis. Membrane fusion mediating synaptic exocytosis and other intracellular membrane traffic is affected by a universal machinery that includes SNARE (for “soluble NSF-attachment protein receptor”) and SM (for “Sec1/Munc18-like”) proteins. During fusion, vesicular and target SNARE proteins assemble into an α-helical trans-SNARE complex that forces the two membranes tightly together, and SM proteins likely wrap aro...

  15. Sorting of Dendritic and Axonal Vesicles at the Pre-axonal Exclusion Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginny G. Farías

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Polarized sorting of newly synthesized proteins to the somatodendritic and axonal domains of neurons occurs by selective incorporation into distinct populations of vesicular transport carriers. An unresolved issue is how the vesicles themselves are sorted to their corresponding neuronal domains. Previous studies concluded that the axon initial segment (AIS is an actin-based filter that selectively prevents passage of somatodendritic vesicles into the axon. We find, however, that most somatodendritic vesicles fail to enter the axon at a more proximal region in the axon hillock, herein referred to as the pre-axonal exclusion zone (PAEZ. Forced coupling of a somatodendritic cargo protein to an axonally directed kinesin is sufficient to drive transport of whole somatodendritic vesicles through the PAEZ toward the distal axon. Based on these findings, we propose that polarized sorting of transport vesicles occurs at the PAEZ and depends on the ability of the vesicles to acquire an appropriately directed microtubule motor.

  16. Erv41p and Erv46p: New components of COPII vesicles involved in transport between the ER and Golgi complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otte, S; Belden, W J; Heidtman, M;

    2001-01-01

    but display cold sensitivity. The expression levels of Erv41p and Erv46p are interdependent such that Erv46p was reduced in an erv41Delta strain, and Erv41p was not detected in an erv46Delta strain. When the erv41Delta or ev46Delta alleles were combined with other mutations in the early secretory...... pathway, altered growth phenotypes were observed in some of the double mutant strains. A cell-free assay that reproduces transport between the ER and Golgi indicates that deletion of the Erv41p-Erv46p complex influences the membrane fusion stage of transport....

  17. Astrocytic vesicles and gliotransmitters: Slowness of vesicular release and synaptobrevin2-laden vesicle nanoarchitecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorec, R; Verkhratsky, A; Rodríguez, J J; Parpura, V

    2016-05-26

    Neurotransmitters released at synapses activate neighboring astrocytes, which in turn, modulate neuronal activity by the release of diverse neuroactive substances that include classical neurotransmitters such as glutamate, GABA or ATP. Neuroactive substances are released from astrocytes through several distinct molecular mechanisms, for example, by diffusion through membrane channels, by translocation via plasmalemmal transporters or by vesicular exocytosis. Vesicular release regulated by a stimulus-mediated increase in cytosolic calcium involves soluble N-ethyl maleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptor (SNARE)-dependent merger of the vesicle membrane with the plasmalemma. Up to 25 molecules of synaptobrevin 2 (Sb2), a SNARE complex protein, reside at a single astroglial vesicle; an individual neuronal, i.e. synaptic, vesicle contains ∼70 Sb2 molecules. It is proposed that this paucity of Sb2 molecules in astrocytic vesicles may determine the slow secretion. In the present essay we shall overview multiple aspects of vesicular architecture and types of vesicles based on their cargo and dynamics in astroglial cells. PMID:25727638

  18. Studies of matrix vesicle-induced mineralization in a gelatin gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boskey, A. L.; Boyan, B. D.; Doty, S. B.; Feliciano, A.; Greer, K.; Weiland, D.; Swain, L. D.; Schwartz, Z.

    1992-01-01

    Matrix vesicles isolated from fourth-passage cultures of chondrocytes were tested for their ability to induce hydroxyapatite formation in a gelatin gel in order to gain insight into the function of matrix vesicles in in situ mineralization. These matrix vesicles did not appear to be hydroxyapatite nucleators per se since the extent of mineral accumulation in the gel diffusion system was not altered by the presence of matrix vesicles alone, and in the vesicle containing gels, mineral crystals were formed whether associated with vesicles or not. In gels with these matrix vesicles and beta-glycerophosphate, despite the presence of alkaline phosphatase activity, there was no increase in mineral deposition. This suggested that in the gel system these culture-derived vesicles did not increase local phosphate concentrations. However, when known inhibitors of mineral crystal formation and growth (proteoglycan aggregates [4 mg/ml], or ATP [1 mM], or both proteoglycan and ATP) were included in the gel, more mineral was deposited in gels with the vesicles than in comparable gels without vesicles, indicating that enzymes within these vesicles were functioning to remove the inhibition. These data support the suggestion that one function of the extracellular matrix vesicles is to transport enzymes for matrix modification.

  19. Spontaneous Vesicles Modulated by Polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Ortega; M. Mercedes Velázquez; Margarita Valero

    2011-01-01

    Vesicles are widely used in technological applications including cosmetic products, in microencapsulation for drug delivery, as anticancer agents and in the technology of adhesives, paints and inks. The vesicle size and the surface charge are very important properties from a technological point of view. Thus, the challenge in formulation is to find inexpensive stable vesicles with well-defined sizes and to modulate the surface charge of these aggregates. In this work we analyze the effect of ...

  20. Vesicles in a Poiseuille flow

    CERN Document Server

    Danker, Gerrit; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2008-01-01

    Vesicle dynamics in unbounded Poiseuille flow is analyzed using a small-deformation theory. Our analytical results quantitatively describe vesicle migration and provide new physical insights. At low ratio between the inner and outer viscosity $\\lambda$ (i.e. in the tank-treading regime), the vesicle always migrates towards the flow centerline, unlike other soft particles such as drops. Above a critical $\\lambda$, vesicle tumbles and cross-stream migration vanishes. A novel feature is predicted, namely the coexistence of two types of nonequilibrium configurations at the centreline, a bullet-like and a parachute-like shapes.

  1. Freeze-thaw and high-voltage discharge allow macromolecule uptake into ileal brush-border vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-voltage discharge or one cycle of freeze-thawing are shown to transiently permeabilize rabbit ileal brush-border membrane vesicles to macromolecules. Uptake of the radiolabeled macromolecule dextran, mol wt 70,000, used as a marker for vesicle permeability, was determined by a rapid filtration technique, with uptake defined as substrate associated with the vesicle and releasable after incubation of vesicles with 0.1% saponin. Dextran added immediately after electric shock (2000 V) or at the beginning of one cycle of freeze-thawing was taken up approximately eightfold compared with control. ATP also was taken up into freeze-thawed vesicles, whereas there was no significant uptake into control vesicles. The increase in vesicle permeability was reversible, based on Na-dependent D-glucose uptake being decreased when studied 5 but not 15 min after electric shock, and was not significantly decreased after completion of one cycle of freeze-thawing. In addition, adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate and Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase activity were similar in control vesicles and vesicles exposed to high-voltage discharge or freeze-thawing. Also, vesicles freeze-thawed with [32P]ATP demonstrated increased phosphorylation compared with nonfrozen vesicles, while freeze-thawing did not alter vesicle protein as judged by Coomassie blue staining. These techniques should allow intestinal membrane vesicles to be used for studies of intracellular control of transport processes, for instance, studies of protein kinase regulation of transport

  2. Freeze-thaw and high-voltage discharge allow macromolecule uptake into ileal brush-border vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donowitz, M.; Emmer, E.; McCullen, J.; Reinlib, L.; Cohen, M.E.; Rood, R.P.; Madara, J.; Sharp, G.W.G.; Murer, H.; Malmstrom, K.

    1987-06-01

    High-voltage discharge or one cycle of freeze-thawing are shown to transiently permeabilize rabbit ileal brush-border membrane vesicles to macromolecules. Uptake of the radiolabeled macromolecule dextran, mol wt 70,000, used as a marker for vesicle permeability, was determined by a rapid filtration technique, with uptake defined as substrate associated with the vesicle and releasable after incubation of vesicles with 0.1% saponin. Dextran added immediately after electric shock (2000 V) or at the beginning of one cycle of freeze-thawing was taken up approximately eightfold compared with control. ATP also was taken up into freeze-thawed vesicles, whereas there was no significant uptake into control vesicles. The increase in vesicle permeability was reversible, based on Na-dependent D-glucose uptake being decreased when studied 5 but not 15 min after electric shock, and was not significantly decreased after completion of one cycle of freeze-thawing. In addition, adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate and Ca/sup 2 +/-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase activity were similar in control vesicles and vesicles exposed to high-voltage discharge or freeze-thawing. Also, vesicles freeze-thawed with (/sup 32/P)ATP demonstrated increased phosphorylation compared with nonfrozen vesicles, while freeze-thawing did not alter vesicle protein as judged by Coomassie blue staining. These techniques should allow intestinal membrane vesicles to be used for studies of intracellular control of transport processes, for instance, studies of protein kinase regulation of transport.

  3. 牛磺酸跨膜转运的研究进展%Research progress of taurine transport in membrane vesicles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘虹; 刘贺; 王新; 胡建民; 姚鹏杰; 陈永生

    2007-01-01

    牛磺酸(taurine,TAU)是动物组织细胞内含量丰富的游离β-氨基酸,具有广泛的生物学效应,而牛磺酸跨膜转运是其发挥生物学效应的基础.本文综述了牛磺酸转运体(taurine transporter,TAUT)的特征、分布、影响因素等方面,阐明了牛磺酸转运体在牛磺酸跨膜转运中的重要作用.

  4. Vesicle Size Regulates Nanotube Formation in the Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Qian Peter; Du, Wanqing; Ji, Qinghua; Xue, Boxin; Jiang, Dong; Zhu, Yueyao; Lou, Jizhong; Yu, Li; Sun, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular membrane nanotube formation and its dynamics play important roles for cargo transportation and organelle biogenesis. Regarding the regulation mechanisms, while much attention has been paid on the lipid composition and its associated protein molecules, effects of the vesicle size has not been studied in the cell. Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) are often used for in vitro membrane deformation studies, but they are much larger than most intracellular vesicles and the in vitro studies also lack physiological relevance. Here, we use lysosomes and autolysosomes, whose sizes range between 100 nm and 1 μm, as model systems to study the size effects on nanotube formation both in vivo and in vitro. Single molecule observations indicate that driven by kinesin motors, small vesicles (100–200 nm) are mainly transported along the tracks while a remarkable portion of large vesicles (500–1000 nm) form nanotubes. This size effect is further confirmed by in vitro reconstitution assays on liposomes and purified lysosomes and autolysosomes. We also apply Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to measure the initiation force for nanotube formation. These results suggest that the size-dependence may be one of the mechanisms for cells to regulate cellular processes involving membrane-deformation, such as the timing of tubulation-mediated vesicle recycling. PMID:27052881

  5. Concurrent imaging of synaptic vesicle recycling and calcium dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan eLi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic transmission involves the calcium-dependent release of neurotransmitter from synaptic vesicles. Genetically encoded optical probes emitting different wavelengths of fluorescent light in response to neuronal activity offer a powerful approach to understand the spatial and temporal relationship of calcium dynamics to the release of neurotransmitter in defined neuronal populations. To simultaneously image synaptic vesicle recycling and changes in cytosolic calcium, we developed a red-shifted reporter of vesicle recycling based on a vesicular glutamate transporter, VGLUT1-mOrange2 (VGLUT1-mOr2, and a presynaptically-localized green calcium indicator, synaptophysin-GCaMP3 (SyGCaMP3 with a large dynamic range. The fluorescence of VGLUT1-mOr2 is quenched by the low pH of synaptic vesicles. Exocytosis upon electrical stimulation exposes the luminal mOr2 to the neutral extracellular pH and relieves fluorescence quenching. Re-acidification of the vesicle upon endocytosis again reduces fluorescence intensity. Changes in fluorescence intensity thus monitor synaptic vesicle exo- and endocytosis, as demonstrated previously for the green VGLUT1-pHluorin. To monitor changes in calcium, we fused the synaptic vesicle protein synaptophysin to the recently improved calcium indicator GCaMP3. SyGCaMP3 is targeted to presynaptic varicosities, and exhibits changes in fluorescence in response to electrical stimulation consistent with changes in calcium concentration. Using real-time imaging of both reporters expressed in the same synapses, we determine the time course of changes in VGLUT1 recycling in relation to changes in presynaptic calcium concentration. Inhibition of P/Q- and N-type calcium channels reduces calcium levels, as well as the rate of synaptic vesicle exocytosis and the fraction of vesicles released.

  6. Concurrent Imaging of Synaptic Vesicle Recycling and Calcium Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiyan; Foss, Sarah M.; Dobryy, Yuriy L.; Park, C. Kevin; Hires, Samuel Andrew; Shaner, Nathan C.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Osborne, Leslie C.; Voglmaier, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Synaptic transmission involves the calcium dependent release of neurotransmitter from synaptic vesicles. Genetically encoded optical probes emitting different wavelengths of fluorescent light in response to neuronal activity offer a powerful approach to understand the spatial and temporal relationship of calcium dynamics to the release of neurotransmitter in defined neuronal populations. To simultaneously image synaptic vesicle recycling and changes in cytosolic calcium, we developed a red-shifted reporter of vesicle recycling based on a vesicular glutamate transporter, VGLUT1-mOrange2 (VGLUT1-mOr2), and a presynaptically localized green calcium indicator, synaptophysin-GCaMP3 (SyGCaMP3) with a large dynamic range. The fluorescence of VGLUT1-mOr2 is quenched by the low pH of synaptic vesicles. Exocytosis upon electrical stimulation exposes the luminal mOr2 to the neutral extracellular pH and relieves fluorescence quenching. Reacidification of the vesicle upon endocytosis again reduces fluorescence intensity. Changes in fluorescence intensity thus monitor synaptic vesicle exo- and endocytosis, as demonstrated previously for the green VGLUT1-pHluorin. To monitor changes in calcium, we fused the synaptic vesicle protein synaptophysin to the recently improved calcium indicator GCaMP3. SyGCaMP3 is targeted to presynaptic varicosities, and exhibits changes in fluorescence in response to electrical stimulation consistent with changes in calcium concentration. Using real time imaging of both reporters expressed in the same synapses, we determine the time course of changes in VGLUT1 recycling in relation to changes in presynaptic calcium concentration. Inhibition of P/Q- and N-type calcium channels reduces calcium levels, as well as the rate of synaptic vesicle exocytosis and the fraction of vesicles released. PMID:22065946

  7. Ca2+-dependent mobility of vesicles capturing anti-VGLUT1 antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several aspects of secretory vesicle cycle have been studied in the past, but vesicle trafficking in relation to the fusion site is less well understood. In particular, the mobility of recaptured vesicles that traffic back toward the central cytoplasm is still poorly defined. We exposed astrocytes to antibodies against the vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1), a marker of glutamatergic vesicles, to fluorescently label vesicles undergoing Ca2+-dependent exocytosis and examined their number, fluorescence intensity, and mobility by confocal microscopy. In nonstimulated cells, immunolabeling revealed discrete fluorescent puncta, indicating that VGLUT1 vesicles, which are approximately 50 nm in diameter, cycle slowly between the plasma membrane and the cytoplasm. When the cytosolic Ca2+ level was raised with ionomycin, the number and fluorescence intensity of the puncta increased, likely because the VGLUT1 epitopes were more accessible to the extracellularly applied antibodies following Ca2+-triggered exocytosis. In nonstimulated cells, the mobility of labeled vesicles was limited. In stimulated cells, many vesicles exhibited directional mobility that was abolished by cytoskeleton-disrupting agents, indicating dependence on intact cytoskeleton. Our findings show that postfusion vesicle mobility is regulated and may likely play a role in synaptic vesicle cycle, and also more generally in the genesis and removal of endocytic vesicles

  8. Vesicle Priming in a SNAP

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Martin; Davis, Graeme W.

    2010-01-01

    In this issue of Neuron, Burgalossi et al. (2010) investigate synaptic vesicle priming using presynaptic Ca2+ uncaging at a small, glutamatergic, central synapse. Combining this technique with mouse genetics, the authors demonstrate that vesicle priming during ongoing neural activity can be limited by the recycling of recently used SNARE complexes.

  9. Cooperative stabilization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis rrnAP3 promoter open complexes by RbpA and CarD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammohan, Jayan; Ruiz Manzano, Ana; Garner, Ashley L; Prusa, Jerome; Stallings, Christina L; Galburt, Eric A

    2016-09-01

    The essential mycobacterial transcriptional regulators RbpA and CarD act to modulate transcription by associating to the initiation complex and increasing the flux of transcript production. Each of these factors interacts directly with the promoter DNA template and with RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme. We recently reported on the energetics of CarD-mediated open complex stabilization on the Mycobacterium tuberculosis rrnAP3 ribosomal promoter using a stopped-flow fluorescence assay. Here, we apply this approach to RbpA and show that RbpA stabilizes RNAP-promoter open complexes (RPo) via a distinct mechanism from that of CarD. Furthermore, concentration-dependent stopped-flow experiments with both factors reveal positive linkage (cooperativity) between RbpA and CarD with regard to their ability to stabilize RPo The observation of positive linkage between RbpA and CarD demonstrates that the two factors can act on the same transcription initiation complex simultaneously. Lastly, with both factors present, the kinetics of open complex formation is significantly faster than in the presence of either factor alone and approaches that of E. coli RNAP on the same promoter. This work provides a quantitative framework for the molecular mechanisms of these two essential transcription factors and the critical roles they play in the biology and pathology of mycobacteria. PMID:27342278

  10. DNA-mediated self-assembly of artificial vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maik Hadorn

    bioreactors in versatility and productivity. (iii Personalized medicine. Transport and targeting of long-lived, pharmacologically inert prodrugs and their conversion to short-lived, active drug molecules directly at the site of action may be accomplished if multi-vesicle assemblies of predefined architecture are used.

  11. Vesicles and vesicle fusion: coarse-grained simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2010-01-01

    compounds inside vesicles delays their clearance from the blood stream. In this chapter, we survey the biological role and physico-chemical properties of phospholipids, and describe progress in coarse-grained simulations of vesicles and vesicle fusion. Because coarse-grained simulations retain only those...... molecular details that are thought to influence the large-scale processes of interest, they act as a model embodying our current understanding. Comparing the predictions of these models with experiments reveals the importance of the retained microscopic details and also the deficiencies that can suggest...

  12. Nanotube-Enabled Vesicle-Vesicle Communication: A Computational Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liuyang; Wang, Xianqiao

    2015-07-01

    Cell-to-cell communications via the tunneling nanotubes or gap junction channels are vital for the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Instead of these intrinsic communication pathways, how to design artificial communication channels between cells remains a challenging but interesting problem. Here, we perform dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations to analyze the interaction between rotational nanotubes (RNTs) and vesicles so as to provide a novel design mechanism for cell-to-cell communication. Simulation results have demonstrated that the RNTs are capable of generating local disturbance and promote vesicle translocation toward the RNTs. Through ligand pattern designing on the RNTs, we can find a suitable nanotube candidate with a specific ligand coating pattern for forming the RNT-vesicle network. The results also show that a RNT can act as a bridged channel between vesicles, which facilitates substance transfer. Our findings provide useful guidelines for the molecular design of patterned RNTs for creating a synthetic channel between cells. PMID:26266730

  13. Impaired recycling of synaptic vesicles after acute perturbation of the presynaptic actin cytoskeleton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shupliakov, Oleg; Bloom, Ona; Gustafsson, Jenny S;

    2002-01-01

    the site of synaptic vesicle recycling, the endocytic zone. Compounds interfering with actin function, including phalloidin, the catalytic subunit of Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin, and N-ethylmaleimide-treated myosin S1 fragments were microinjected into the axon. In unstimulated, phalloidin...... fragments caused accumulation of aggregates of synaptic vesicles between the endocytic zone and the vesicle cluster, suggesting that vesicle transport was inhibited. Phalloidin, as well as C2 toxin, also caused changes in the structure of clathrin-coated pits in stimulated synapses. Our data provide...

  14. Morphogenesis of the Acrosomal Vesicle During Spermiogenesis in the House Gecko Ptyodactylus hasselquisti (Squamata, Reptilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Al-Dokhi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to describe the morphogenesis of the acrosomal vesicle during spermiogenesis in the lizard Ptyodactylus hasselquisti. Five adult male lizards were captured during the period of sexual activity (April and May, 2005 from old houses in the city of Riyadh (25 10' N, 46 50' E, Saudi Arabia. Ultrastructural examination revealed proliferation and hypertrophy of Golgi complex elements as the initial event in formation of the acrosomal vesicle. Numerous small vesicles were released from Golgi complex and then coalesced to form a large proacrosomal vesicle which later attached to the proximal surface of spermatid nucleus. A proximal concavity appeared in the spermatid nucleus to completely lodge the acrosomal vesicle, then the spermatid nucleus with the lodged vesicle were transported to be directly apposed to the spermatid plasmalemma. This was associated with the appearance of a single acrosomal granule at the vesicle base. Subsequently, the progressively pushed acrosomal vesicle was flattened on the proximal nuclear surface. Some acrosomal vesicle deformities were also illustrated. The successive morphogenetic stages of the acrosomal vesicle were discussed in comparison with that reported in the previous studies concerned with spermiogenesis in other reptile species.

  15. Spontaneous Vesicles Modulated by Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Ortega

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Vesicles are widely used in technological applications including cosmetic products, in microencapsulation for drug delivery, as anticancer agents and in the technology of adhesives, paints and inks. The vesicle size and the surface charge are very important properties from a technological point of view. Thus, the challenge in formulation is to find inexpensive stable vesicles with well-defined sizes and to modulate the surface charge of these aggregates. In this work we analyze the effect of different polymers on the structural properties of vesicles of the biodegradable surfactant sodium bis(2-ethyl-hexyl sulfosuccinate, Aerosol OT. Using fluorescence, conductivity, electrophoretic mobility and dynamic light scattering measurements we study the effect of the polymer nature, molecular weight and polymer concentration on the stability and the vesicle size properties. Results demonstrate that it is possible to modulate both the size and the electric surface charge of spontaneous vesicles of Aerosol OT by the addition of very small percentages of poly(allylamine and poly(maleic anhydride-alt-1-octadecen.

  16. From Self-Assembled Vesicles to Protocells

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Irene A.; Walde, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Self-assembled vesicles are essential components of primitive cells. We review the importance of vesicles during the origins of life, fundamental thermodynamics and kinetics of self-assembly, and experimental models of simple vesicles, focusing on prebiotically plausible fatty acids and their derivatives. We review recent work on interactions of simple vesicles with RNA and other studies of the transition from vesicles to protocells. Finally we discuss current challenges in understanding the ...

  17. The protein machinery of vesicle budding and fusion.

    OpenAIRE

    Rothman, J E

    1996-01-01

    A general protein machinery that buds and fuses transport vesicles is harnessed to generate the complex web of intracellular transport pathways critical for such diverse processes as cell growth, endocytosis, hormone release, and neurotransmission. With this appreciation, the challenge of understanding the precise molecular mechanisms of these many facets of cell biology has been reduced to a series of problems in protein structure and chemistry.

  18. Nonmuscle Myosin II helps regulate synaptic vesicle mobility at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Xinping

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the mechanistic details of the vesicle transport process from the cell body to the nerve terminal are well described, the mechanisms underlying vesicle traffic within nerve terminal boutons is relatively unknown. The actin cytoskeleton has been implicated but exactly how actin or actin-binding proteins participate in vesicle movement is not clear. Results In the present study we have identified Nonmuscle Myosin II as a candidate molecule important for synaptic vesicle traffic within Drosophila larval neuromuscular boutons. Nonmuscle Myosin II was found to be localized at the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction; genetics and pharmacology combined with the time-lapse imaging technique FRAP were used to reveal a contribution of Nonmuscle Myosin II to synaptic vesicle movement. FRAP analysis showed that vesicle dynamics were highly dependent on the expression level of Nonmuscle Myosin II. Conclusion Our results provide evidence that Nonmuscle Myosin II is present presynaptically, is important for synaptic vesicle mobility and suggests a role for Nonmuscle Myosin II in shuttling vesicles at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction. This work begins to reveal the process by which synaptic vesicles traverse within the bouton.

  19. Variation in PTCHD2, CRISP3, NAP1L4, FSCB, and AP3B2 associated with spherical equivalent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei; Duggal, Priya; Klein, Barbara E.K.; Lee, Kristine E.; Truitt, Barbara; Klein, Ronald; Iyengar, Sudha K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Ocular refraction is measured in spherical equivalent as the power of the external lens required to focus images on the retina. Myopia (nearsightedness) and hyperopia (farsightedness) are the most common refractive errors, and the leading causes of visual impairment and blindness in the world. The goal of this study is to identify rare and low-frequency variants that influence spherical equivalent. Methods We conducted variant-level and gene-level quantitative trait association analyses for mean spherical equivalent, using data from 1,560 individuals in the Beaver Dam Eye Study. Genotyping was conducted using the Illumina exome array. We analyzed 34,976 single nucleotide variants and 11,571 autosomal genes across the genome, using single-variant tests as well as gene-based tests. Results Spherical equivalent was significantly associated with five genes in gene-based analysis: PTCHD2 at 1p36.22 (p = 3.6 × 10−7), CRISP3 at 6p12.3 (p = 4.3 × 10−6), NAP1L4 at 11p15.5 (p = 3.6 × 10−6), FSCB at 14q21.2 (p = 1.5 × 10−7), and AP3B2 at 15q25.2 (p = 1.6 × 10−7). The variant-based tests identified evidence suggestive of association with two novel variants in linkage disequilibrium (pairwise r2 = 0.80) in the TCTE1 gene region at 6p21.1 (rs2297336, minor allele frequency (MAF) = 14.1%, β = –0.62 p = 3.7 × 10−6; rs324146, MAF = 16.9%, β = –0.55, p = 1.4 × 10−5). In addition to these novel findings, we successfully replicated a previously reported association with rs634990 near GJD2 at 15q14 (MAF = 47%, β = –0.29, p=1.8 × 10−3). We also found evidence of association with spherical equivalent on 2q37.1 in PRSS56 at rs1550094 (MAF = 31%, β = –0.33, p = 1.7 × 10−3), a region previously associated with myopia. Conclusions We identified several novel candidate genes that may play a role in the control of spherical equivalent. However, further studies are needed to replicate these findings. In addition, our results contribute to the

  20. Transferring intercellular signals and traits between cancer cells: extracellular vesicles as "homing pigeons".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesi, Giulia; Walbrecq, Geoffroy; Margue, Christiane; Kreis, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles are cell-derived vesicles, which can transport various cargos out of cells. From their cell of origin, the content molecules (proteins, non-coding RNAs including miRNAs, DNA and others) can be delivered to neighboring or distant cells and as such extracellular vesicles can be regarded as vehicles of intercellular communication or "homing pigeons". Extracellular vesicle shuttling is able to actively modulate the tumor microenvironment and can partake in tumor dissemination. In various diseases, including cancer, levels of extracellular vesicle secretion are altered resulting in different amounts and/or profiles of detectable vesicular cargo molecules and these distinct content profiles are currently being evaluated as biomarkers. Apart from their potential as blood-derived containers of specific biomarkers, the transfer of extracellular vesicles to surrounding cells also appears to be involved in the propagation of phenotypic traits. These interesting properties have put extracellular vesicles into the focus of many recent studies.Here we review findings on the involvement of extracellular vesicles in transferring traits of cancer cells to their surroundings and briefly discuss new data on oncosomes, a larger type of vesicle. A pressing issue in cancer treatment is rapidly evolving resistance to many initially efficient drug therapies. Studies investigating the role of extracellular vesicles in this phenomenon together with a summary of the technical challenges that this field is still facing, are also presented. Finally, emerging areas of research such as the analysis of the lipid composition on extracellular vesicles and cutting-edge techniques to visualise the trafficking of extracellular vesicles are discussed. PMID:27282631

  1. Physicochemical characterization and cytotoxic studies of nonionic surfactant vesicles using sucrose esters as oral delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés, Karina; Morilla, María José; Romero, Eder; Chávez, Jorge

    2014-05-01

    Several nanotechnological solutions for mucosal immunization have been proposed, such as nanoparticles, liposomes, solid lipidic particles, micelles, and surfactant vesicles. In recent years, surfactant vesicles have gained increasing scientific attention as an alternative potential drug delivery system to the conventional liposome. This type of vesicle known as niosomes or nonionic surfactant vesicles (NSVs) has a structure and properties similar to those of liposomes. Both of them can transport hydrophilic drugs by encapsulation in the aqueous inner pool or hydrophobic drugs by intercalation into hydrophobic domains. The aim of this study was to prepare and characterize vesicles formed by sucrose esters as protective systems of bioactive molecules for oral administration. Vesicles were prepared using two commercial products formed by mixtures of mono and diesters S-570 and S-770, respectively. Determined parameters were size and zeta potential; the stability of formulations was tested in presence of increasing concentrations of a surfactant, and at several pH values observed in the gastrointestinal tract. Solubilization experiences showed an initial decrease in size for vesicles of both ester mixtures, samples showed detergent resistance at higher Triton X-100 concentrations. Vesicles showed stability at pH 5-7.4 up to 90 min; however, both formulations showed colloidal instability at pH=2, which corresponds to the isoelectric point of these vesicles. To evaluate the cytotoxicity of both vesicle formulations and separately each pure ester, Caco-2 cells were used. Cytotoxic evaluation indicated that both types of vesicles and free sucrose distearate were safe for Caco-2 viability; however, free sucrose monostearate was toxic for the cells. As a conclusion of these preliminary studies, it can be stated that vesicles formed with mixtures of sucrose esters showed a size in the range of 200 nm maintaining their size when exposed to the action of a surfactant, but

  2. Regulation of vesicular traffic by a GTP-binding protein on the cytoplasmic surface of secretory vesicles in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesicular transport is an important mechanism for the intracellular traffic of proteins and lipids in eukaryotic cells. Vesicles mediate the passage of proteins between the various organelles of the secretory pathway and the exocytic release of these proteins into the extracellular environment. Vesicles also mediate the uptake of proteins and fluid from the external environment, delivering them to endosomes. Despite the generality of the vesicular transport mechanism, the process is not yet understood at a molecular level. The key questions that are addressed are (1) How are vesicles formed from the membrane of the donor organelle? (2) How are these vesicles transported? (3) How do the vesicles recognize the membrane of the target (acceptor) organelle? (4) How is membrane fusion accomplished? The genetic flexibility of yeast has been exploited to identify components of the cellular machinery required for vesicular transport

  3. Proteomic analysis of secreted membrane vesicles of archaeal Sulfolobus species reveals the presence of endosome sorting complex components

    OpenAIRE

    Ellen, Albert F.; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Huibers, Wim; Pitcher, Angela; Hobel, Cedric F. V.; Schwarz, Heinz; Folea, Mihaela; Schouten, Stefan; Boekema, Egbert J.; Poolman, Bert; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2009-01-01

    The crenarchaea Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, S. solfataricus and S. tokodaii, release membrane vesicles into the medium. These membrane vesicles consist of tetraether lipids and are coated with an S-layer. A proteomic analysis reveals the presence of proteins homologous to subunits of the eukaryotic endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT). Immunodetection of one of these homologs suggest a cell surface localization in intact cells. These data suggest that the membrane vesicles ...

  4. Identification of three coated vesicle components as alpha- and beta- tubulin linked to a phosphorylated 50,000-dalton polypeptide

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    Coated vesicles are involved in the intracellular transport of membrane proteins between a variety of membrane compartments. The coats of bovine brain coated vesicles contain at least six polypeptides in addition to an 180,000-dalton polypeptide called clathrin. In this report we show that the 54,000- and 56,000-dalton coated vesicle polypeptides are alpha- and beta-tubulin, determined by immunoblotting and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. An affinity-purified tubulin antiserum can precip...

  5. Plasmadesmatal frequency, apoplast-symplast ratio, and photosynthetic transfer in grapefruit juice vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structure and function were examined in phloem-free vesicles and vesicle stalks of grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) by light and electron microscopy and 14C-photosynthate transport in intact and dissected tissues. Plasmodesmatal frequencies were approximately 0.3 to 0.5 μm-1 cell wall interface (3 to 5 μm-2), less than that of known secretory structures but similar to root parenchyma. Cell wall or apoplast comprised 18 to 24% of the total cross-sectional area of the vesicle stalk. The mass of total photosynthate transfer through individual vesicle stalks was ca. 0.5 μg C h-1 and rate of 14C-movement 0.1 to 0.4 mm h-1. Transport continued in rows of vesicles dissected in association with a vascular bundle. If isolated from fully-expanded fruit, translocation was similar for systems with frozen vs. non-frozen vesicle stalks. Similar freezing treatment decreased transport in vesicles from younger fruit. Symplastic and apoplastic pathways may therefore both operate in this system

  6. Seminal vesicle schwannoma presenting with left hydroureteronephrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gopalakrishnan Arun; Shrijeet Chakraborti; Santosh Rai; Gurupur Guni Laxman Prabhu

    2014-01-01

    We report a very rare case of seminal vesicle schwannoma in a 50-year-old male, with left hydroureteronephrosis. Only five cases of seminal vesicle schwannomas have been reported in medical literature until date.

  7. Recombination of vesicles during freeze-drying

    OpenAIRE

    Cabane, Bernard; Blanchon, Sylvène; Neves, Carole

    2006-01-01

    Concentrated dispersions of nanometric lipid vesicles (mean diameter 20 nm) in water/maltose solutions have been freeze-dried, and then redispersed in water, yielding again dispersions of lipid vesicles. At each stage of the freeze-drying process, the organization of the vesicles in the dispersion and their size distribution were examined through Small Angle Neutron Scattering and Gel Permeation Chromatography. It was found that the osmotic deswelling of the vesicles caused them to recombine ...

  8. Signaling for Vesicle Mobilization and Synaptic Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Levitan, Edwin S.

    2008-01-01

    The hypothesis that release of classical neurotransmitters and neuropeptides is facilitated by increasing the mobility of small synaptic vesicles (SSVs) and dense core vesicles (DCVs) could not be tested until the advent of methods for visualizing these secretory vesicles in living nerve terminals. In fact, fluorescence imaging studies have only since 2005 established that activity increases secretory vesicle mobility in motoneuron terminals and chromaffin cells. Mobilization of DCVs and SSVs...

  9. Impermeability effects in three-dimensional vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyse the effects of the impermeability constraint on the equilibrium shapes of a three-dimensional vesicle hosting a rigid inclusion. A given alteration of the inclusion and/or vesicle parameters leads to shape modifications of different orders of magnitude, when applied to permeable or impermeable vesicles. Moreover, the enclosed-volume constraint wrecks the uniqueness of stationary equilibrium shapes, and gives rise to pear-shaped or stomatocyte-like vesicles

  10. Clathrin-coated vesicles in nervous tissue are involved primarily in synaptic vesicle recycling

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    The recycling of synaptic vesicles in nerve terminals is thought to involve clathrin-coated vesicles. However, the properties of nerve terminal coated vesicles have not been characterized. Starting from a preparation of purified nerve terminals obtained from rat brain, we isolated clathrin-coated vesicles by a series of differential and density gradient centrifugation steps. The enrichment of coated vesicles during fractionation was monitored by EM. The final fraction consisted of greater tha...

  11. Biomimetic proteolipid vesicles for targeting inflamed tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinaro, R; Corbo, C; Martinez, J O; Taraballi, F; Evangelopoulos, M; Minardi, S; Yazdi, I K; Zhao, P; De Rosa, E; Sherman, M B; De Vita, A; Toledano Furman, N E; Wang, X; Parodi, A; Tasciotti, E

    2016-09-01

    A multitude of micro- and nanoparticles have been developed to improve the delivery of systemically administered pharmaceuticals, which are subject to a number of biological barriers that limit their optimal biodistribution. Bioinspired drug-delivery carriers formulated by bottom-up or top-down strategies have emerged as an alternative approach to evade the mononuclear phagocytic system and facilitate transport across the endothelial vessel wall. Here, we describe a method that leverages the advantages of bottom-up and top-down strategies to incorporate proteins derived from the leukocyte plasma membrane into lipid nanoparticles. The resulting proteolipid vesicles-which we refer to as leukosomes-retained the versatility and physicochemical properties typical of liposomal formulations, preferentially targeted inflamed vasculature, enabled the selective and effective delivery of dexamethasone to inflamed tissues, and reduced phlogosis in a localized model of inflammation. PMID:27213956

  12. From self-assembled vesicles to protocells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Irene A; Walde, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Self-assembled vesicles are essential components of primitive cells. We review the importance of vesicles during the origins of life, fundamental thermodynamics and kinetics of self-assembly, and experimental models of simple vesicles, focusing on prebiotically plausible fatty acids and their derivatives. We review recent work on interactions of simple vesicles with RNA and other studies of the transition from vesicles to protocells. Finally we discuss current challenges in understanding the biophysics of protocells, as well as conceptual questions in information transmission and self-replication. PMID:20519344

  13. Vesicle Geometries Enabled by Dynamically Trapped States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jiaye; Yao, Zhenwei; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2016-02-23

    Understanding and controlling vesicle shapes is a fundamental challenge in biophysics and materials design. In this paper, we design dynamic protocols for enlarging the shape space of both fluid and crystalline vesicles beyond the equilibrium zone. By removing water from within the vesicle at different rates, we numerically produced a series of dynamically trapped stable vesicle shapes for both fluid and crystalline vesicles in a highly controllable fashion. In crystalline vesicles that are continuously dehydrated, simulations show the initial appearance of small flat areas over the surface of the vesicles that ultimately merge to form fewer flat faces. In this way, the vesicles transform from a fullerene-like shape into various faceted polyhedrons. We perform analytical elasticity analysis to show that these salient features are attributable to the crystalline nature of the vesicle. The potential to use dynamic protocols, such as those used in this study, to engineer vesicle shape transformations is helpful for exploiting the richness of vesicle geometries for desired applications. PMID:26795199

  14. Formation of Oligovesicular Vesicles by Micromanipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihisa Okumura

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cell-sized lipid bilayer membrane vesicles (giant vesicles, GVs or semi-vesicles were formed from egg yolk phosphatidylcholine on a platinum electrode under applied electric voltage by electroformation. Micromanipulation of the semi-vesicle by first pressing its membrane with a glass microneedle and then withdrawing the needle left a GV in the interior of the vesicle. During the process, an aqueous solution of Ficoll that filled the needle was introduced into the newly formed inner vesicle and remained encapsulated. Approximately 50% of attempted micromanipulation resulted in the formation of an inner daughter vesicle, “microvesiculation”. By repeating the microvesiculation process, multiple inner GVs could be formed in a single parent semi-vesicle. A semi-vesicle with inner GVs could be detached from the electrode by scraping with a microneedle, yielding an oligovesicular vesicle (OVV with desired inner aqueous contents. Microvesiculation of a GV held on the tip of a glass micropipette was also possible, and this also produced an OVV. Breaking the membrane of the parent semi-vesicle by micromanipulation with a glass needle after microvesiculation, released the inner GVs. This protocol may be used for controlled formation of GVs with desired contents.

  15. Reversibly formed bilayer vesicles: Energetics and polydispersity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstöm, M.

    Model calculations based on the multiple equilibrium approach indicate that the spontaneous formation of geometrically closed bilayer vesicles is geared primarily by the bilayer tension which in turn is largely determined by the work of bending the bilayer into a spherical vesicle. and a statisti......Model calculations based on the multiple equilibrium approach indicate that the spontaneous formation of geometrically closed bilayer vesicles is geared primarily by the bilayer tension which in turn is largely determined by the work of bending the bilayer into a spherical vesicle. and a...... orders of magnitude larger than where the local free energy minima of the equilibrium vesicle actually occur. Moreover, according to our analysis, the relative width of a vesicle size distribution, sigma(R)/R-max, is generally at full equilibrium equal to 0.283, independently of the energetic vesicle...

  16. Analysing the distribution of synaptic vesicles using a spatial point process model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khanmohammadi, Mahdieh; Waagepetersen, Rasmus Plenge; Nava, Nicoletta; Nyengaard, Jens; Sporring, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Stress can affect the brain functionality in many ways. As the synaptic vesicles have a major role in nervous signal transportation in synapses, their distribution in relationship to the active zone is very important in studying the neuron responses. We study the effect of stress on brain...... functionality by statistically modelling the distribution of the synaptic vesicles in two groups of rats: a control group subjected to sham stress and a stressed group subjected to a single acute foot-shock (FS)-stress episode. We hypothesize that the synaptic vesicles have different spatial distributions in...

  17. Analysing the distribution of synaptic vesicles using a spatial point process model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khanmohammadi, Mahdieh; Waagepetersen, Rasmus; Nava, Nicoletta; Nyengaard, Jens; Sporring, Jon

    Stress can affect the brain functionality in many ways. As the synaptic vesicles have a major role in nervous signal transportation in synapses, their distribution in relationship to the active zone is very important in studying the neuron responses. We study the effect of stress on brain...... functionality by statistically modelling the distribution of the synaptic vesicles in two groups of rats: a control group subjected to sham stress and a stressed group subjected to a single acute foot-shock (FS)-stress episode. We hypothesize that the synaptic vesicles have different spatial distributions in...

  18. Functional interactions between OCA2 and the protein complexes BLOC-1, BLOC-2, and AP-3 inferred from epistatic analyses of mouse coat pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, Diego J; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Imilce A; Dell'angelica, Esteban C

    2011-04-01

    The biogenesis of melanosomes is a multistage process that requires the function of cell-type-specific and ubiquitously expressed proteins. OCA2, the product of the gene defective in oculocutaneous albinism type 2, is a melanosomal membrane protein with restricted expression pattern and a potential role in the trafficking of other proteins to melanosomes. The ubiquitous protein complexes AP-3, BLOC-1, and BLOC-2, which contain as subunits the products of genes defective in various types of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, have been likewise implicated in trafficking to melanosomes. We have tested for genetic interactions between mutant alleles causing deficiency in OCA2 (pink-eyed dilution unstable), AP-3 (pearl), BLOC-1 (pallid), and BLOC-2 (cocoa) in C57BL/6J mice. The pallid allele was epistatic to pink-eyed dilution, and the latter behaved as a semi-dominant phenotypic enhancer of cocoa and, to a lesser extent, of pearl. These observations suggest functional links between OCA2 and these three protein complexes involved in melanosome biogenesis. PMID:21392365

  19. Preparation and characterisation of pheroid vesicles / Charlene Ethel Uys

    OpenAIRE

    Uys, Charlene Ethel

    2006-01-01

    Pheroid is a patented system comprising of a unique submicron emulsion type formulation. Pheroid vesicles consist mainly of plant and essential fatty acids and can entrap, transport and deliver pharmacologically active compounds and other useful molecules. The aim of this study was to show that a modulation of components and parameters is necessary to obtain the optimum formula to be used in pharmaceutical preparations. Non-optimal or non-predictable stability properties of ...

  20. Immunotherapeutic potential of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin eZhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles or EVs is a term that encompasses all classes of secreted lipid membrane vesicles. Despite being scientific novelties, EVs are gaining importance as a mediator of important physiological and pathological intercellular activities possibly through the transfer of their cargo of protein and RNA between cells. In particular, exosomes the currently best characterized EVs have been notable for their in vitro and in vivo immunomodulatory activities. Exosomes are nanometer-sized endosome-derived vesicles secreted by many cell types and their immunomodulatory potential is independent of their cell source. Besides immune cells such as dendritic cells, macrophages and T cells, cancer and stem cells also secrete immunologically active exosomes that could influence both physiological and pathological processes. The immunological activities of exosomes affect both innate and adaptive immunity and include antigen presentation, T cell activation, T cell polarisation to Tregs, immune suppression and anti-inflammation. As such, exosomes carry much immunotherapeutic potential as a therapeutic agent and a therapeutic target.

  1. Ornithine decarboxylase antizyme inhibitor 2 regulates intracellular vesicle trafficking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanerva, Kristiina; Maekitie, Laura T. [Department of Pathology, Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Baeck, Nils [Department of Anatomy, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Andersson, Leif C., E-mail: leif.andersson@helsinki.fi [Department of Pathology, Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); HUSLAB, Helsinki (Finland); Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-07-01

    Antizyme inhibitor 1 (AZIN1) and 2 (AZIN2) are proteins that activate ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the key enzyme of polyamine biosynthesis. Both AZINs release ODC from its inactive complex with antizyme (AZ), leading to formation of the catalytically active ODC. The ubiquitously expressed AZIN1 is involved in cell proliferation and transformation whereas the role of the recently found AZIN2 in cellular functions is unknown. Here we report the intracellular localization of AZIN2 and present novel evidence indicating that it acts as a regulator of vesicle trafficking. We used immunostaining to demonstrate that both endogenous and FLAG-tagged AZIN2 localize to post-Golgi vesicles of the secretory pathway. Immuno-electron microscopy revealed that the vesicles associate mainly with the trans-Golgi network (TGN). RNAi-mediated knockdown of AZIN2 or depletion of cellular polyamines caused selective fragmentation of the TGN and retarded the exocytotic release of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein. Exogenous addition of polyamines normalized the morphological changes and reversed the inhibition of protein secretion. Our findings demonstrate that AZIN2 regulates the transport of secretory vesicles by locally activating ODC and polyamine biosynthesis.

  2. Active uptake of tetracycline by membrane vesicles from susceptible Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    McMurry, L M; Cullinane, J C; Petrucci, R E; Levy, S. B.

    1981-01-01

    A major portion of tetracycline accumulation by susceptible bacterial cells is energy dependent. Inner membrane vesicles prepared from susceptible Escherichia coli cells concentrated tetracycline 2.5 to 5 times above the external concentration when the electron transport substrate D-lactate or reduced phenazine methosulfate was added. This stimulation was reversed by cyanide, 2,4-dinitrophenol, and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone. These vesicles data showed that proton motive force ...

  3. A novel class of clathrin-coated vesicles budding from endosomes

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Clathrin-coated vesicles transport selective integral membrane proteins from the plasma membrane to endosomes and from the TGN to endosomes. Recycling of proteins from endosomes to the plasma membrane occurs via unidentified vesicles. To study this pathway, we used a novel technique that allows for the immunoelectron microscopic examination of transferrin receptor-containing endosomes in nonsectioned cells. Endosomes were identified as separate discontinuous tubular-vesicular entities. Each e...

  4. Development and characterization of nanopore system for nano-vesicle analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Gaurav

    Nano-vesicles have recently attracted a lot of attention in research and medical communities and are very promising next-generation drug delivery vehicles. This is due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability and their ability to protect drug cargo and deliver it to site-specific locations, while maintaining the desired pharmacokinetic profile. The interaction of these drug loaded vesicles with the recipient cells via adsorption, endocytosis or receptor mediated internalization involve significant bending and deformation and is governed by mechanical properties of the nano-vesicles. Currently, the mechanical characteristics of nano-vesicles are left unexplored because of the difficulties associated with vesicle analysis at sub-100 nm length scale. The need for a complete understanding of nano-vesicle interaction with each other and the recipient cells warrants development of an analytical tool capable of mechanical investigation of individual vesicles at sub-100 nm scale. This dissertation presents investigation of nano-vesicle deformability using resistive pulse sensing and solid-state nanopore devices. The dissertation is divided into four chapters. Chapter 1 discusses the motivation, specific aims and presents an overview of nanoparticle characterization techniques, resistive pulse sensing background and principles, techniques for fabricating solid-state nanopores, as well the deformation behavior of giant vesicles when placed in electric field. Chapter 2 is dedicated to understanding of the scientific principles governing transport of sub-100 nm particles in dilute solutions. We investigated the translocation of rigid nanoparticles through nanopores at salt concentrations exosomes derived from human breast cancer cell line. Exosomes also exhibit co-translocational deformation behavior; however, they appear to be less affected by the deforming force inside the nanopore compared to the DOPC liposomes. We believe, the results of this research will bring about a

  5. Quantifying mixing in vesicle suspensions using numerical simulations in two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabacaoglu, Gokberk; Biros, George; Quaife, Bryan

    2015-11-01

    Vesicles, which resist bending and are locally inextensible, serve as an experimental and numerical proxy for red blood cells. In this work, we study the effect of the presence of vesicles to mixing. The motivating application is the study of transport phenomena in microcirculation. We investigate transport specifically in a Couette apparatus, which is governed by an advection-diffusion equation, and we consider mixing in the absence and presence of vesicles using numerical simulations in two dimensions. The advection-diffusion equation is discretized spectrally in space, and with a second-order L-stable Strang splitting in time. To our knowledge, there are no universally accepted measures of mixing. Here, we study two measures: the ``mix-norm'' defined by a Sobolev norm of negative index and a standard moment fluctuation of the transported species. We define mixing efficiency in terms of mixing measure in the absence of vesicles relative to the measure in the presence of vesicles. We then study the correlation of mixing efficiency with the Peclet number, the volume fraction of the vesicle suspension, and the type of initial conditions.

  6. Occurrence and Characteristics of a Rapid Exchange of Phosphate Oxygens Catalyzed by Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, T.; Boyer, P. D.

    1972-01-01

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from skeletal muscle actively take up Ca{sup ++} from the medium in the presence of Mg{sup ++} and ATP. This transport is coupled to ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by membrane-bound Ca{sup++}, Mg{sup ++}-ATPase which is activated by concurrent presence of Ca{sup ++} and Mg{sup ++}. Considerable informations have accumulated that give insight into the ATPase and its coupling to the calcium transport. The hydrolysis of ATP by this enzyme occurs through a phosphorylated intermediate. Formation and decomposition of the intermediate show vectorial requirements for Ca{sup ++} and Mg{sup ++}, suggesting an intimate involvement of the intermediate in the transport process. ATP synthesis from P{sub i} and ADP coupled to outflow of Ca{sup ++} from sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles has recently been demonstrated. This indicates the reversibility of the entire process of calcium transport in sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles.

  7. Resident CAPS on dense-core vesicles docks and primes vesicles for fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabachinski, Greg; Kielar-Grevstad, D Michelle; Zhang, Xingmin; James, Declan J; Martin, Thomas F J

    2016-02-15

    The Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis of dense-core vesicles in neuroendocrine cells requires a priming step during which SNARE protein complexes assemble. CAPS (aka CADPS) is one of several factors required for vesicle priming; however, the localization and dynamics of CAPS at sites of exocytosis in live neuroendocrine cells has not been determined. We imaged CAPS before, during, and after single-vesicle fusion events in PC12 cells by TIRF micro-scopy. In addition to being a resident on cytoplasmic dense-core vesicles, CAPS was present in clusters of approximately nine molecules near the plasma membrane that corresponded to docked/tethered vesicles. CAPS accompanied vesicles to the plasma membrane and was present at all vesicle exocytic events. The knockdown of CAPS by shRNA eliminated the VAMP-2-dependent docking and evoked exocytosis of fusion-competent vesicles. A CAPS(ΔC135) protein that does not localize to vesicles failed to rescue vesicle docking and evoked exocytosis in CAPS-depleted cells, showing that CAPS residence on vesicles is essential. Our results indicate that dense-core vesicles carry CAPS to sites of exocytosis, where CAPS promotes vesicle docking and fusion competence, probably by initiating SNARE complex assembly. PMID:26700319

  8. Synaptic Vesicle Proteins and Active Zone Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, Robert J.; Heckmann, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter is released from synaptic vesicles at the highly specialized presynaptic active zone (AZ). The complex molecular architecture of AZs mediates the speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Importantly, structural and functional properties of AZs vary significantly, even for a given connection. Thus, there appear to be distinct AZ states, which fundamentally influence neuronal communication by controlling the positioning and release of synaptic vesicles. Vice versa, recent evidence has revealed that synaptic vesicle components also modulate organizational states of the AZ. The protein-rich cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ) provides a structural platform for molecular interactions guiding vesicle exocytosis. Studies in Drosophila have now demonstrated that the vesicle proteins Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1) and Rab3 also regulate glutamate release by shaping differentiation of the CAZ ultrastructure. We review these unexpected findings and discuss mechanistic interpretations of the reciprocal relationship between synaptic vesicles and AZ states, which has heretofore received little attention.

  9. Phase Transition Induced Fission in Lipid Vesicles

    CERN Document Server

    Leirer, C; Myles, V M; Schneider, M F

    2010-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate how the first order phase transition in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) can function as a trigger for membrane fission. When driven through their gel-fluid phase transition GUVs exhibit budding or pearl formation. These buds remain connected to the mother vesicle presumably by a small neck. Cooling these vesicles from the fluid phase (T>Tm) through the phase transition into the gel state (Tvesicle remains intact. Pearling tubes which formed upon heating break-up and decay into multiple individual vesicles which then diffuse freely. Finally we demonstrate that mimicking the intracellular bulk viscosity by increasing the bulk viscosity to 40cP does not affect the overall fission process, but leads to a significant decrease in size of the released vesicles.

  10. Ultrasound-responsive ultrathin multiblock copolyamide vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Yu, Chunyang; Huang, Tong; Xu, Shuting; Bai, Yongping; Zhou, Yongfeng

    2016-02-01

    This study reports the self-assembly of novel polymer vesicles from an amphiphilic multiblock copolyamide, and the vesicles show a special structure with an ultrathin wall thickness of about 4.5 nm and a combined bilayer and monolayer packing model. Most interestingly, the vesicles are ultrasound-responsive and can release the encapsulated model drugs in response to ultrasonic irradiation.This study reports the self-assembly of novel polymer vesicles from an amphiphilic multiblock copolyamide, and the vesicles show a special structure with an ultrathin wall thickness of about 4.5 nm and a combined bilayer and monolayer packing model. Most interestingly, the vesicles are ultrasound-responsive and can release the encapsulated model drugs in response to ultrasonic irradiation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of experiments and characterization, and FT-IR, TEM, DPD, FL and micro-DSC results. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08596a

  11. Phase Transition Induced Fission in Lipid Vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Leirer, C.; Wunderlich, B.; Myles, V.M.; Schneider, M F

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In this work we demonstrate how the first order phase transition in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) can function as a trigger for membrane fission. When driven through their gel-fluid phase transition GUVs exhibit budding or pearl formation. These buds remain connected to the mother vesicle presumably by a small neck. Cooling these vesicles from the fluid phase (T>Tm) through the phase transition into the gel state (T

  12. Identification of coated vesicles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Clathrin-coated vesicles were found in yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and enriched from spheroplasts by a rapid procedure utilizing gel filtration on Sephacryl S-1000. The coated vesicles (62-nm diam) were visualized by negative stain electron microscopy and clathrin triskelions were observed by rotary shadowing. The contour length of a triskelion leg was 490 nm. Coated vesicle fractions contain a prominent band with molecular weight of approximately 185,000 when analyzed by SDS PAGE. The p...

  13. Isolation of functional, coated, endocytic vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    Brief internalization of [125I]transferrin was used to label coated endocytic vesicles, which were then purified using a combination of 2H2O and 2H2O/Ficoll density gradients. Purification was monitored using an assay measuring fusion of endocytic organelles, so as to isolate functional vesicles. Isolated vesicles had all the properties of clathrin-coated vesicles, being enriched for the major components of clathrin coats and uncoated by either 1 M Tris-HCl or an uncoating ATPase. Nearly half...

  14. OVARIAN CALCIFICATION MIMICKING VESICLE CALCULUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Calcification in ovary is usually dystrophic in natu re, forming secondary to degeneration of the epithelium or in association wit h areas of necrosis. It may occur in cases of endometriosis [1] or in some ovarian tumor eg. Fibro thecoma [2] , Brenner’s tumor [3] , cavernous hemangioma [4] etc. Benign unilateral densely calcified ovary wit hout any association with tumor or endometriosis has not been reported previously. We report a case of heavily calcified left ovary which mimicked as vesicle calculus on X- ray leading to confusion in diagnosis.

  15. Vesicle Motion during Sustained Exocytosis in Chromaffin Cells: Numerical Model Based on Amperometric Measurements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daungruthai Jarukanont

    Full Text Available Chromaffin cells release catecholamines by exocytosis, a process that includes vesicle docking, priming and fusion. Although all these steps have been intensively studied, some aspects of their mechanisms, particularly those regarding vesicle transport to the active sites situated at the membrane, are still unclear. In this work, we show that it is possible to extract information on vesicle motion in Chromaffin cells from the combination of Langevin simulations and amperometric measurements. We developed a numerical model based on Langevin simulations of vesicle motion towards the cell membrane and on the statistical analysis of vesicle arrival times. We also performed amperometric experiments in bovine-adrenal Chromaffin cells under Ba2+ stimulation to capture neurotransmitter releases during sustained exocytosis. In the sustained phase, each amperometric peak can be related to a single release from a new vesicle arriving at the active site. The amperometric signal can then be mapped into a spike-series of release events. We normalized the spike-series resulting from the current peaks using a time-rescaling transformation, thus making signals coming from different cells comparable. We discuss why the obtained spike-series may contain information about the motion of all vesicles leading to release of catecholamines. We show that the release statistics in our experiments considerably deviate from Poisson processes. Moreover, the interspike-time probability is reasonably well described by two-parameter gamma distributions. In order to interpret this result we computed the vesicles' arrival statistics from our Langevin simulations. As expected, assuming purely diffusive vesicle motion we obtain Poisson statistics. However, if we assume that all vesicles are guided toward the membrane by an attractive harmonic potential, simulations also lead to gamma distributions of the interspike-time probability, in remarkably good agreement with experiment. We

  16. Binding and Unbinding of Vesicles and Capsules in Axisymmetric Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, L. Gary; Keh, Martin

    2014-11-01

    Prof. Andreas Acrivos pioneered the use of scaling and asymptotic analysis, as well as the use of boundary integral methods, by chemical engineers in fluid flow and transport problems. These are skills that have been used by many of his former students in their own research. Here we consider the title problem using a combination of boundary-integral based numerical methods and scaling analysis to study the dynamics and mechanisms of adhesion and de-adhesion of vesicles at a solid boundary in the presence of flow. The adhesion process is dominated by drainage of the thin film down to a point where non-hydrodynamic attractive forces cause adherence. The unbinding process is dominated by peeling, though the final force to pull a vesicle from a solid surface is larger than expected due to lubrication effects.

  17. Amyloglucosidase enzymatic reactivity inside lipid vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jin-Woo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Efficient functioning of enzymes inside liposomes would open new avenues for applications in biocatalysis and bioanalytical tools. In this study, the entrapment of amyloglucosidase (AMG (EC 3.2.1.3 from Aspergillus niger into dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC multilamellar vesicles (MLVs and large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs was investigated. Negative-stain, freeze-fracture, and cryo-transmission electron microscopy images verified vesicle formation in the presence of AMG. Vesicles with entrapped AMG were isolated from the solution by centrifugation, and vesicle lamellarity was identified using fluorescence laser confocal microscopy. The kinetics of starch hydrolysis by AMG was modeled for two different systems, free enzyme in aqueous solution and entrapped enzyme within vesicles in aqueous suspension. For the free enzyme system, intrinsic kinetics were described by a Michaelis-Menten kinetic model with product inhibition. The kinetic constants, Vmax and Km, were determined by initial velocity measurements, and Ki was obtained by fitting the model to experimental data of glucose concentration-time curves. Predicted concentration-time curves using these kinetic constants were in good agreement with experimental measurements. In the case of the vesicles, the time-dependence of product (glucose formation was experimentally determined and simulated by considering the kinetic behavior of the enzyme and the permeation of substrate into the vesicle. Experimental results demonstrated that entrapped enzymes were much more stable than free enyzme. The entrapped enzyme could be recycled with retention of 60% activity after 3 cycles. These methodologies can be useful in evaluating other liposomal catalysis operations.

  18. Reversibly formed bilayer vesicles: Energetics and polydispersity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstöm, M.

    1997-01-01

    statistical-mechanical factor that accounts for the fluctuations in composition, chain packing density and shape. We demonstrate that the free energy required to form a spherical vesicle is made up of two main contributions: the (size-independent) work of bending the constituent monolayers and the work of......Model calculations based on the multiple equilibrium approach indicate that the spontaneous formation of geometrically closed bilayer vesicles is geared primarily by the bilayer tension which in turn is largely determined by the work of bending the bilayer into a spherical vesicle. and a...... stretching the bilayer that is determined by the planar bilayer tension. A previously undiscovered contribution to the work of bending a vesicle bilayer, originating from geometrical packing constraints, is presented. On this basis we obtain vesicle size distributions with maxima located at radii several...

  19. Alternative methods for characterization of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh eMomen-Heravi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles are nano-sized vesicles released by all cells in vitro as well as in vivo. Their role has been implicated mainly in cell-cell communication, but also in disease biomarkers and more recently in gene delivery. They represent a snapshot of the cell status at the moment of release and carry bioreactive macromolecules such as nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. A major limitation in this emerging new field is the availability/awareness of techniques to isolate and properly characterize Extracellular vesicles. The lack of gold standards makes comparing different studies very difficult and may potentially hinder some Extracellular vesicles -specific evidence. Characterization of Extracellular vesicles has also recently seen many advances with the use of Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA, flow cytometry, cryo-EM instruments and proteomic technologies. In this review, we discuss the latest developments in translational technologies involving characterization methods including the facts in their support and the challenges they face.

  20. Spontaneous transfer of gangliotetraosylceramide between phospholipid vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transfer kinetics of the neutral glycosphingolipid gangliotetraosylceramide (asialo-GM1) were investigated by monitoring tritiated asialo-GM1 movement from donor to acceptor vesicles. Two different methods were employed to separate donor and acceptor vesicles at desired time intervals. In one method, a negative charge was imparted to dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine donor vesicles by including 10 mol% dipalmitoylphosphatidic acid. Donors were separated from neutral dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine acceptor vesicles by ion-exchange chromatography. In the other method, small, unilamellar donor vesicles and large, unilamellar acceptor vesicles were coincubated at 45 degrees C and then separated at desired time intervals by molecular sieve chromatography. The majority of asialo-GM1 transfer to acceptor vesicles occurred as a slow first-order process with a half-time of about 24 days assuming that the relative concentration of asialo-GM1 in the phospholipid matrix was identical in each half of the donor bilayer and that no glycolipid flip-flop occurred. Asialo-GM1 net transfer was calculated relative to that of [14C]cholesteryl oleate, which served as a nontransferable marker in the donor vesicles. A nearly identical transfer half-time was obtained when the phospholipid matrix was changed from dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine to palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine. Varying the acceptor vesicle concentration did not significantly alter the asialo-GM1 transfer half-time. This result is consistent with a transfer mechanism involving diffusion of glycolipid through the aqueous phase rather than movement of glycolipid following formation of collisional complexes between donor and acceptor vesicles. (Abstract Truncated)

  1. Development and characterization of nanopore system for nano-vesicle analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Gaurav

    Nano-vesicles have recently attracted a lot of attention in research and medical communities and are very promising next-generation drug delivery vehicles. This is due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability and their ability to protect drug cargo and deliver it to site-specific locations, while maintaining the desired pharmacokinetic profile. The interaction of these drug loaded vesicles with the recipient cells via adsorption, endocytosis or receptor mediated internalization involve significant bending and deformation and is governed by mechanical properties of the nano-vesicles. Currently, the mechanical characteristics of nano-vesicles are left unexplored because of the difficulties associated with vesicle analysis at sub-100 nm length scale. The need for a complete understanding of nano-vesicle interaction with each other and the recipient cells warrants development of an analytical tool capable of mechanical investigation of individual vesicles at sub-100 nm scale. This dissertation presents investigation of nano-vesicle deformability using resistive pulse sensing and solid-state nanopore devices. The dissertation is divided into four chapters. Chapter 1 discusses the motivation, specific aims and presents an overview of nanoparticle characterization techniques, resistive pulse sensing background and principles, techniques for fabricating solid-state nanopores, as well the deformation behavior of giant vesicles when placed in electric field. Chapter 2 is dedicated to understanding of the scientific principles governing transport of sub-100 nm particles in dilute solutions. We investigated the translocation of rigid nanoparticles through nanopores at salt concentrations nano-vesicle detection and analysis. Chapter 3, discusses translocation of ~85 nm DOPC liposomes through the nanopore and their co-translocational deformation due to high field strength and confinement/ flow induced strain inside the nanopore. The behavior of liposomes was compared to the

  2. Three-dimensional flow in Kupffer's Vesicle

    CERN Document Server

    Montenegro-Johnson, Thomas D; Smith, David J; Lopes, Susana S

    2016-01-01

    Whilst many vertebrates appear externally left-right symmetric, the arrangement of internal organs is asymmetric. In zebrafish, the breaking of left-right symmetry is organised by Kupffer's Vesicle (KV): an approximately spherical, fluid-filled structure that begins to form in the embryo 10 hours post fertilisation. A crucial component of zebrafish symmetry breaking is the establishment of a cilia-driven fluid flow within KV. However, it is still unclear (a) how dorsal, ventral and equatorial cilia contribute to the global vortical flow, and (b) if this flow breaks left-right symmetry through mechanical transduction or morphogen transport. Fully answering these questions requires knowledge of the three-dimensional flow patterns within KV, which have not been quantified in previous work. In this study, we calculate and analyse the three-dimensional flow in KV. We consider flow from both individual and groups of cilia, and (a) find anticlockwise flow can arise purely from excess of cilia on the dorsal roof over...

  3. Coordinated trafficking of synaptic vesicle and active zone proteins prior to synapse formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabo Shasta L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The proteins required for synaptic transmission are rapidly assembled at nascent synapses, but the mechanisms through which these proteins are delivered to developing presynaptic terminals are not understood. Prior to synapse formation, active zone proteins and synaptic vesicle proteins are transported along axons in distinct organelles referred to as piccolo-bassoon transport vesicles (PTVs and synaptic vesicle protein transport vesicles (STVs, respectively. Although both PTVs and STVs are recruited to the same site in the axon, often within minutes of axo-dendritic contact, it is not known whether or how PTV and STV trafficking is coordinated before synapse formation. Results Here, using time-lapse confocal imaging of the dynamics of PTVs and STVs in the same axon, we show that vesicle trafficking is coordinated through at least two mechanisms. First, a significant proportion of STVs and PTVs are transported together before forming a stable terminal. Second, individual PTVs and STVs share pause sites within the axon. Importantly, for both STVs and PTVs, encountering the other type of vesicle increases their propensity to pause. To determine if PTV-STV interactions are important for pausing, PTV density was reduced in axons by expression of a dominant negative construct corresponding to the syntaxin binding domain of syntabulin, which links PTVs with their KIF5B motor. This reduction in PTVs had a minimal effect on STV pausing and movement, suggesting that an interaction between STVs and PTVs is not responsible for enhancing STV pausing. Conclusions Our results indicate that trafficking of STVs and PTVs is coordinated even prior to synapse development. This novel coordination of transport and pausing might provide mechanisms through which all of the components of a presynaptic terminal can be rapidly accumulated at sites of synapse formation.

  4. On the Computing Potential of Intracellular Vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Mayne

    Full Text Available Collision-based computing (CBC is a form of unconventional computing in which travelling localisations represent data and conditional routing of signals determines the output state; collisions between localisations represent logical operations. We investigated patterns of Ca2+-containing vesicle distribution within a live organism, slime mould Physarum polycephalum, with confocal microscopy and observed them colliding regularly. Vesicles travel down cytoskeletal 'circuitry' and their collisions may result in reflection, fusion or annihilation. We demonstrate through experimental observations that naturally-occurring vesicle dynamics may be characterised as a computationally-universal set of Boolean logical operations and present a 'vesicle modification' of the archetypal CBC 'billiard ball model' of computation. We proceed to discuss the viability of intracellular vesicles as an unconventional computing substrate in which we delineate practical considerations for reliable vesicle 'programming' in both in vivo and in vitro vesicle computing architectures and present optimised designs for both single logical gates and combinatorial logic circuits based on cytoskeletal network conformations. The results presented here demonstrate the first characterisation of intracelluar phenomena as collision-based computing and hence the viability of biological substrates for computing.

  5. Structural Evidence for Common Ancestry of the Nuclear Pore Complex and Vesicle Coats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brohawn, S.; Leksa, N; Spear, E; Rajashankar, K; Schwartz, T

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) facilitate nucleocytoplasmic transport. These massive assemblies comprise an eightfold symmetric scaffold of architectural proteins and central-channel phenylalanine-glycine-repeat proteins forming the transport barrier. We determined the nucleoporin 85 (Nup85)bulletSeh1 structure, a module in the heptameric Nup84 complex, at 3.5 angstroms resolution. Structural, biochemical, and genetic analyses position the Nup84 complex in two peripheral NPC rings. We establish a conserved tripartite element, the ancestral coatomer element ACE1, that reoccurs in several nucleoporins and vesicle coat proteins, providing structural evidence of coevolution from a common ancestor. We identified interactions that define the organization of the Nup84 complex on the basis of comparison with vesicle coats and confirmed the sites by mutagenesis. We propose that the NPC scaffold, like vesicle coats, is composed of polygons with vertices and edges forming a membrane-proximal lattice that provides docking sites for additional nucleoporins.

  6. Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transport is one of the major causes of environmental damage in Austria. Energy consumption, pollutants emissions, noise emissions, use of surfaces, sealing of surfaces, dissection of ecosystems and impact on landscape are the most significant environmental impacts caused by it. An overview of the transport development of passengers and freight in Austria is presented. Especially the energy consumption growth, carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide emissions by type of transport, and the emissions development (HC, particle and carbon monoxide) of goods and passengers transport are analyzed covering the years 1980 - 1999. The health cost resulting from transport-related air pollution in Austria is given and measures to be taken for an effective control of the transport sector are mentioned. Figs. 8, Table 1. (nevyjel)

  7. Overexpression of the lily p70(s6k) gene in Arabidopsis affects elongation of flower organs and indicates TOR-dependent regulation of AP3, PI and SUP translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Tsai-Yu; Kong, Lih-Ren; Chen, Chun-Hung; Shaw, Chih-Chi; Yang, Chang-Hsien

    2009-09-01

    The p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (p70(s6k)) signaling pathway plays a key role in regulating the cell cycle via translational regulation of specific 5'TOP mRNAs. However, the function of this signaling pathway is still poorly understood in plants. Ectopic expression of the lily putative p70(s6k) gene, LS6K1, resulted in up-regulation of NAP (NAC-LIKE, ACTIVATED BY AP3/PI) and PISTILLATA (PI) expression, and significantly inhibited cell expansion for petals and stamens, resulting in the male sterility phenotype in transgenic Arabidopsis. Sequence analysis revealed that the genes involved in petal and stamen development, such as APETALA3 (AP3), PI and SUPERMAN (SUP), probably encode 5'TOP mRNAs. Green fluorescent protein (GFP), fused to oligopyrimidine tract sequences that were identified in the 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of AP3, PI and SUP, was translationally regulated in human cells in response to mitogen stimulation and inhibition by the macrolide antibiotic rapamycin. Furthermore, 35S::LS6K1 significantly up-regulated beta-glucuronidase (GUS) activity in the flower buds of transgenic plants carrying the GUS transgene fused to the AP3 promoter and the 5' UTR. These results have identified a novel role for the p70(s6k) gene in regulating cell division and the expansion of petals and stamens by translational regulation of the 5'TOP mRNAs once ectopically expressed in Arabidopsis. PMID:19651701

  8. Long-term, repeated dose in vitro neurotoxicity of the glutamate receptor antagonist L-AP3, demonstrated in rat hippocampal slice cultures by using continuous propidium iodide incubation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bjarne W; Blaabjerg, Morten; Noraberg, Jens;

    2007-01-01

    Most in vitro models are only used to assess short-term effects of test compounds. However, as demonstrated here, hippocampal slice cultures can be used for long-term studies. The test compound used was the metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist, L(+)-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid (L-AP3...

  9. Dynamics of a compound vesicle: numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerapaneni, Shravan; Young, Yuan-Nan; Vlahovska, Petia; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy

    2010-11-01

    Vesicles (self-enclosing lipid membranes) in simple linear flows are known to exhibit rich dynamics such as tank-treading, tumbling, trembling (swinging), and vacillating breathing. Recently, vesicles have been used as a multi-functional platform for drug-delivery. In this work, the dynamics of simplified models for such compound vesicles is investigated numerically using a state-of-the-art boundary-integral code that has been validated with high accuracy and efficiency. Results show that for a vesicle enclosing a rigid particle in a simple shear flow, transition from tank-treading to tumbling is possible even in the absence of viscosity mismatch in the interior and exterior fluids. We will discuss the shape transformations, multiple particle interactions and the flow properties. Comparison with results from analytical modeling gives insights to the underlying physics for such novel dynamics.

  10. Hybrid, Nanoscale Phospholipid/Block Copolymer Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liedberg

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid phospholipid/block copolymer vesicles, in which the polymeric membrane is blended with phospholipids, display interesting self-assembly behavior, incorporating the robustness and chemical versatility of polymersomes with the softness and biocompatibility of liposomes. Such structures can be conveniently characterized by preparing giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs via electroformation. Here, we are interested in exploring the self-assembly and properties of the analogous nanoscale hybrid vesicles (ca. 100 nm in diameter of the same composition prepared by film-hydration and extrusion. We show that the self-assembly and content-release behavior of nanoscale polybutadiene-b-poly(ethylene oxide (PB-PEO/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC hybrid phospholipid/block copolymer vesicles can be tuned by the mixing ratio of the amphiphiles. In brief, these hybrids may provide alternative tools for drug delivery purposes and molecular imaging/sensing applications and clearly open up new avenues for further investigation.

  11. Arabidopsis myosin XI-K localizes to the motile endomembrane vesicles associated with F-actin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valera V. Peremyslov

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Plant myosins XI were implicated in cell growth, F-actin organization, and organelle transport, with myosin XI-K being a critical contributor to each of these processes. However, subcellular localization of myosins and the identity of their principal cargoes remain poorly understood. Here, we generated a functionally competent, fluorescent protein-tagged, myosin XI-K, and investigated its spatial distribution within Arabidopsis cells. This myosin was found to associate primarily not with larger organelles (e.g., Golgi as was broadly assumed, but with endomembrane vesicles trafficking along F-actin. Subcellular localization and fractionation experiments indicated that the nature of myosin-associated vesicles is organ- and cell type-specific. In leaves, a large proportion of these vesicles aligned and co-fractionated with a motile ER subdomain. In roots, non-ER vesicles were a dominant myosin cargo. Myosin XI-K showed a striking polar localization at the tips of growing, but not mature, root hairs. These results strongly suggest that a major mechanism whereby myosins contribute to plant cell physiology is vesicle transport, and that this activity can be regulated depending on the growth phase of a cell.

  12. New mechanisms of vesicles migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aursulesei, Viviana; Vasincu, Decebal; Timofte, Daniel; Vrajitoriu, Lucia; Gatu, Irina; Iacob, Dan D; Ghizdovat, Vlad; Buzea, Calin; Agop, Maricel

    2016-07-01

    In multicellular organisms, both health and disease are defined by means of communication patterns involving the component cells. Despite the intricate networks of soluble mediators, cells are also programed to exchange complex messages pre-assembled as multimolecular cargo of membranous structures known as extracellular vesicles (EVs). Several biogenetic pathways produce EVs with different properties able to orchestrate neighboring cell reactions or to establish an environment ripe for spreading tumor cells. Such an effect is in fact an extension of similar physiological roles played by exosomes in guiding cell migration under nontumoral tissue remodeling and organogenesis. We start with a biological thought experiment equivalent to Bénard's experiment, involving a fluid layer of EVs adherent to an extracellular matrix, in a haptotactic gradient, then, we build and present the first Lorenz model for EVs migration. Using Galerkin's method of reducing a system of partial differential equations to a system of ordinary differential equations, a biological Lorenz system is developed. Such a physical frame distributing individual molecular or exosomal type cell-guiding cues in the extracellular matrix space could serve as a guide for tissue neoformation of the budding pattern in nontumoral or tumoral instances. PMID:27045674

  13. A possible route to prebiotic vesicle reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luisi, Pier Luigi; Rasi, Pasquale Stano Silvia; Mavelli, Fabio

    2004-01-01

    Spherical bounded structures such as those formed by surfactant aggregates (mostly micelles and vesicles), with an inside that is chemically and physically different from the outside medium, can be seen as primitive cell models. As such, they are fundamental structures for the theory of autopoiesis as originally formulated by Varela and Maturana. In particular, since self-reproduction is a very important feature of minimal cellular life, the study of self-reproduction of micelles and vesicles represents a quite challenging bio-mimetic approach. Our laboratory has put much effort in recent years into implementing self-reproduction of vesicles as models for self-reproduction of cellular bounded structures, and this article is a further contribution in this direction. In particular, we deal with the so-called matrix effect of vesicles, related to the fact that when fresh surfactant is added to an aqueous solution containing preformed vesicles of a very narrow size distribution, the newly formed vesicles (instead of being polydisperse, as is usually the case) have dimensions very close to those of the preformed ones. In practice, this corresponds to a mechanism of reproduction of vesicles of the same size. In this article, the matrix effect is re-elaborated in the perspective of the origin of life, and in particular in terms of the prebiotic mechanisms that might permit the growth and reproduction of vesicles. The data are analyzed by dynamic light scattering with a new program that permits the calculation of the number-weighted size distribution. It is shown that, on adding a stoichiometric amount of oleate micelles to preformed oleate vesicles extruded at 50 and 100 nm, the final distribution contains about twice the initial number of particles, centered around 50 and 100 nm. The same holds when oleate is added to preformed phospholipid liposomes. By contrast, when the same amount of oleate is added to an aqueous solution (as a control experiment), a very broad

  14. Cell mediated calcification and matrix vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication on calcification and the sequence of events directed by the cell to facilitate this process contains the following topics: New Ultrastructural Techniques for Study of Calcification; Mechanisms of Matrix Vesicle Calcification; Role of Mitochondria, Matrix Proteins and Cytokines in Calcification; Role of Phospholipids and Membranes in Calcification; Biogenesis of Matrix Vesicles in Vivo and in Vitro; Calcification and Ossification in Vitro; Calcific Diseases and Abnormal Bone Mineralization. (Auth.)

  15. Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles and Vaccine Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Acevedo, Reinaldo; Fernández, Sonsire; Zayas, Caridad; Acosta, Armando; Sarmiento, Maria Elena; Valerie A. Ferro; Rosenqvist, Einar; Campa, Concepcion; Cardoso, Daniel; Garcia, Luis; Perez, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles (OMV) were developed more than 20 years ago against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. These nano-sized structures exhibit remarkable potential for immunomodulation of immune responses and delivery of meningococcal antigens or unrelated antigens incorporated into the vesicle structure. This paper reviews different applications in OMV Research and Development (R&D) and provides examples of OMV developed and evaluated at the Finlay Institute in Cuba. A...

  16. BACTERIAL OUTER MEMBRANE VESICLES AND VACCINE APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Reinaldo eAcevedo; Sonsire eFernandez; Caridad eZayas; Armando eAcosta; Maria Elena Sarmiento; Valerie A. Ferro; Einar eRosenqvist; Concepcion eCampa; Daniel eCardoso; Luis eGarcia; Jose Luis Perez

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles (OMV) were developed more than 20 years ago against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. These nano-sized structures exhibit remarkable potential for immunomodulation of immune responses and delivery of self meningococcal antigens or unrelated antigens incorporated into the vesicle structure. This paper reviews different applications in OMV Research and Development (R&D) and provides examples of OMV developed and evaluated at the Finlay Institute in Cu...

  17. Vesicle-associated melanization in Cryptococcus neoformans

    OpenAIRE

    Eisenman, Helene C; FRASES, SUSANA; Nicola, André M; Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    Recently, several pathogenic fungi were shown to produce extracellular vesicles that contain various components associated with virulence. In the human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans, these components included laccase, an enzyme that catalyses melanin synthesis. Spherical melanin granules have been observed in the cell wall of C. neoformans. Given that melanin granules have dimensions that are comparable to those of extracellular vesicles, and that metazoan organisms produce melani...

  18. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation in synaptic vesicles.

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, D T; Wang, J K; Valtorta, F; Benfenati, F; Greengard, P.

    1988-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation in purified synaptic vesicles from rat forebrain has been studied in the presence of Mn2+ and orthovanadate. High levels of endogenous protein tyrosine phosphorylation were observed. Four major phosphoproteins, with apparent molecular masses of 105, 94, 38, and 30 kDa, were shown to contain phosphotyrosine. The 38-kDa phosphoprotein was identified as synaptophysin (p38), a well-characterized integral membrane protein of synaptic vesicles. The three other phosp...

  19. Role of Matrix Vesicles in Biomineralization

    OpenAIRE

    Golub, Ellis E.

    2009-01-01

    Matrix vesicles have been implicated in the mineralization of calcified cartilage, bone and dentin for more than 40 years. During this period, their exact role, if any in the nucleation of hydroxyapatite mineral, and its subsequent association with the collagen fibrils in the organic matrix has been debated and remains controversial. Several hypotheses have been recently introduced to explain in greater detail how matrix vesicles function in biomineralization. This review will summarize recen...

  20. Aquaporins in Urinary Extracellular Vesicles (Exosomes)

    OpenAIRE

    Sayaka Oshikawa; Hiroko Sonoda; Masahiro Ikeda

    2016-01-01

    Since the successful characterization of urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs) by Knepper’s group in 2004, these vesicles have been a focus of intense basic and translational research worldwide, with the aim of developing novel biomarkers and therapeutics for renal disease. Along with these studies, there is growing evidence that aquaporins (AQPs), water channel proteins, in uEVs have the potential to be diagnostically useful. In this review, we highlight current knowledge of AQPs in uEVs fro...

  1. Uptake of Helicobacter pylori Vesicles Is Facilitated by Clathrin-Dependent and Clathrin-Independent Endocytic Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Olofsson, Annelie; Nygård Skalman, Lars; Obi, Ikenna; Lundmark, Richard; Arnqvist, Anna

    2014-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Bacteria shed a diverse set of outer membrane vesicles that function as transport vehicles to deliver effector molecules and virulence factors to host cells. Helicobacter pylori is a gastric pathogen that infects half of the world's population, and in some individuals the infection progresses into peptic ulcer disease or gastric cancer. Here we report that intact vesicles from H. pylori are internalized by clathrin-dependent endocytosis and further dynamin-dependent processes, as ...

  2. Hierarchical unilamellar vesicles of controlled compositional heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maik Hadorn

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic life contains hierarchical vesicular architectures (i.e. organelles that are crucial for material production and trafficking, information storage and access, as well as energy production. In order to perform specific tasks, these compartments differ among each other in their membrane composition and their internal cargo and also differ from the cell membrane and the cytosol. Man-made structures that reproduce this nested architecture not only offer a deeper understanding of the functionalities and evolution of organelle-bearing eukaryotic life but also allow the engineering of novel biomimetic technologies. Here, we show the newly developed vesicle-in-water-in-oil emulsion transfer preparation technique to result in giant unilamellar vesicles internally compartmentalized by unilamellar vesicles of different membrane composition and internal cargo, i.e. hierarchical unilamellar vesicles of controlled compositional heterogeneity. The compartmentalized giant unilamellar vesicles were subsequently isolated by a separation step exploiting the heterogeneity of the membrane composition and the encapsulated cargo. Due to the controlled, efficient, and technically straightforward character of the new preparation technique, this study allows the hierarchical fabrication of compartmentalized giant unilamellar vesicles of controlled compositional heterogeneity and will ease the development of eukaryotic cell mimics that resemble their natural templates as well as the fabrication of novel multi-agent drug delivery systems for combination therapies and complex artificial microreactors.

  3. Phase-Field Modeling of Lipid Vesicles With Pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifi, Saman; Salac, David

    2013-11-01

    The formation and annihilation of pores in a lipid vesicle membrane is critical to a number of biotechnologies, such as drug delivery. Previous models of vesicle behavior have ignored the influence of topological changes in the vesicle membrane. Here the entire Helfrich model of a vesicle membrane is considered. Topological changes in the vesicle membrane, such as the formation of a pore, are captured through the use of an embedded phase-field model. The numerical method and sample results will be presented.

  4. Purification of coated vesicles by agarose gel electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    We have applied agarose gel electrophoresis as a novel step in the purification of clathrin-coated vesicles. Preparations of coated vesicles obtained by sedimentation velocity and isopycnic centrifugation are resolved into two distinct fractions upon electrophoresis. The slower migrating fraction contains smooth vesicles, whereas the faster contains only coated vesicles and empty clathrin coats. The faster mobility of the coated vesicles is primarily caused by the acidic nature of clathrin. C...

  5. Mobility and Turnover of Vesicles at the Synaptic Ribbon

    OpenAIRE

    LoGiudice, Lisamarie; Sterling, Peter; Matthews, Gary

    2008-01-01

    Ribbon synapses release neurotransmitter continuously at high rates, and the ribbons tether a large pool of synaptic vesicles. To determine if the tethered vesicles are actually released, we tracked vesicles labeled with FM4-64 dye in mouse retinal bipolar cell terminals whose ribbons had been labeled with a fluorescent peptide. We photobleached vesicles in regions with ribbons and without them and then followed recovery of fluorescence as bleached regions were repopulated by labeled vesicles...

  6. Secretory vesicles in live cells are not free-floating but tethered to filamentous structures: A study using photonic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well established that actin and microtubule cytoskeletal systems are involved in organelle transport and membrane trafficking in cells. This is also true for the transport of secretory vesicles in neuroendocrine cells and neurons. It was however unclear whether secretory vesicles remain free-floating, only to associate with such cytoskeletal systems when needing transport. This hypothesis was tested using live pancreatic acinar cells in physiological buffer solutions, using the photonic force microscope (PFM). When membrane-bound secretory vesicles (0.2-1.2 μm in diameter) in live pancreatic acinar cells were trapped at the laser focus of the PFM and pulled, they were all found tethered to filamentous structures. Mild exposure of cells to nocodazole and cytochalasin B, disrupts the tether. Immunoblot analysis of isolated secretory vesicles, further demonstrated the association of actin, myosin V, and kinesin. These studies demonstrate for the first time that secretory vesicles in live pancreatic acinar cells are tethered and not free-floating, suggesting that following vesicle biogenesis, they are placed on their own railroad track, ready to be transported to their final destination within the cell when required. This makes sense, since precision and regulation are the hallmarks of all cellular process, and therefore would hold true for the transport and localization of subcellular organelles such as secretory vesicles

  7. Phosphorylcholine substituted polyolefins: New syntheses, solution assemblies, and polymer vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, Katrina A.

    This thesis describes the synthesis and applications of a new series of amphiphilic homopolymers and copolymers consisting of hydrophobic polyolefin backbone and hydrophilic phosphorylcholine (PC) pendant groups. These polymers are synthesized by ring opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) of a novel PC- cyclooctene monomer, and copolymerization of various functionalized cyclooctene comonomers. Incorporation of different comonomers into the PC-polyolefin backbone affords copolymers with different functionalities, including crosslinkers, fluorophores, and other reactive groups, that tune the range of applications of these polymers, and their hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance. The amphiphilic nature of PC-polyolefins was exploited in oil-water interfacial assembly, providing robust polymer capsules to encapsulate and deliver nanoparticles to damaged regions of a substrate in a project termed `repair-and-go.' In repair-and-go, a flexible microcapsule filled with a solution of nanoparticles probes an imperfection-riddled substrate as it rolls over the surface. The thin capsule wall allows the nanoparticles to escape the capsules and enter into the cracks, driven in part by favorable interactions between the nanoparticle ligands and the cracked surface (i.e., hydrophobic-hydrophobic interactions). The capsules then continue their transport along the surface, filling more cracks and depositing particles into them. The amphiphilic nature of PC-polyolefins was also exploited in aqueous assembly, forming novel polymer vesicles in water. PC-polyolefin vesicles ranged in size from 50 nm to 30 µm. The mechanical properties of PC-polyolefin vesicles were measured by micropipette aspiration techniques, and found to be more robust than conventional liposomes or polymersomes prepared from block copolymers. PC-polyolefin vesicles have potential use in drug delivery; it was found that the cancer drug doxorubicin could be encapsulated efficiently in PC-polyolefin vesicles. In

  8. Universal relationships to determine adhesion energy from vesicle-substrate interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Irajizad, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion molecules play an integral role in diverse biological functions ranging from cellular growth to transport. Estimation of their binding affinity, therefore, becomes important to quantify their biophysical impact on these phenomena. In this paper, we use curvature elasticity to present non-intuitive, yet remarkably simple, universal relationships to tease out adhesion energy from vesicle-substrate experiments. Our study reveals that the inverse of the height, exponential of the contact area, and the force required to detach the vesicle from the substrate vary linearly with the square root of the adhesion energy. We validate the modeling predictions with experimental data from two previous studies.

  9. Analysis of the role of p200-containing vesicles in post-Golgi traffic.

    OpenAIRE

    Ikonen, E.; Parton, R.G. (Robert G.); Lafont, F.; Simons, K

    1996-01-01

    p200 is a cytoplasmic protein that associates with vesicles budding from the trans-golgi network (TGN). The protein was identified by a monoclonal antibody AD7. We have used this antibody to analyze whether p200 functions in exocytic transport from the TGN to the apical or basolateral plasma membrane in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. We found that transport of the viral marker proteins, influenza hemagglutinin (HA) to the apical surface or vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV G) to ...

  10. Characterization of GLUT4-containing vesicles in 3T3-L1 adipocytes by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Insulin-responsive GLUT4(glucose transporter 4) translocation plays a major role in regulating glucose uptake in adipose tissue and muscle.Whether or not there is a specialized secretory GSV(GLUT4 storage vesicle) pool,and more importantly how GSVs are translocated to the PM(plasma membrane) under insulin stimulation is still under debate.In the present study,we systematically analyzed the dynamics of a large number of single GLUT4-containing vesicles in 3T3-L1 adipocytes by TIRFM(total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy).We found that GLUT4-containing vesicles can be classified into three groups according to their mobility,namely vertical,stable,and lateral GLUT4-containing vesicles.Among these groups,vertical GLUT4-containing vesicles exclude transferrin receptors and move towards the PM specifically in response to insulin stimulation,while stable and lateral GLUT4-containing vesicles contain transferrin receptors and show no insulin responsiveness.These data demonstrate that vertical GLUT4-containing vesicles correspond to specialized secretory GSVs,which approach the PM directly and bypass the constitutive recycling pathway.

  11. Size distribution and radial density profile of synaptic vesicles by SAXS and light scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castorph, Simon; Salditt, Tim [Institute for X-ray Physics, Goettingen (Germany); Holt, Matthew; Jahn, Reinhard [Max Plank Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen (Germany); Sztucki, Michael [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)

    2008-07-01

    Synaptic vesicles are small membraneous organelles within the nerve terminal, encapsulating neurotransmitters by a lipid bilayer. The transport of the neurotransmitter, the fusion at the plasma membrane, and the release of the stored neurotransmitters into the synaptic cleft are since long know as essential step in nerve conduction of the chemical synapse. A detailed structural view of these molecular mechanisms is still lacking, not withstanding the enormous progress in the field during recent years. From measurements and quantitative fitting of small angle X-ray scattering curves and dynamic light scattering the averaged structural properties of synaptic vesicles can be determined. We present SAXS measurements and fits revealing the width of the size distribution function and details of the radial scattering length profile of synaptic vesicles from rat brain. Representative values for the inner and outer radius and the size polydispersity as well as the density and width of the outer protein layer are obtained.

  12. Endocytic proteins drive vesicle growth via instability in high membrane tension environment

    CERN Document Server

    Walani, Nikhil; Agrawal, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is a key pathway for transporting cargo into cells via membrane vesicles. It plays an integral role in nutrient import, signal transduction, neurotransmission and cellular entry of pathogens and drug-carrying nanoparticles. As CME entails substantial local remodeling of the plasma membrane, the presence of membrane tension offers resistance to bending and hence, vesicle formation. Experiments show that in such high tension conditions, actin dynamics is required to carry out CME successfully. In this study, we build upon these pioneering experimental studies to provide fundamental mechanistic insights into the roles of two key endocytic proteins, namely, actin and BAR proteins in driving vesicle formation in high membrane tension environment. Our study reveals a new actin force induced `snap-through instability' that triggers a rapid shape transition from a shallow invagination to a highly invaginated tubular structure. We show that the association of BAR proteins stabilizes...

  13. Segregation of sphingolipids and sterols during formation of secretory vesicles at the trans-Golgi network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Robin W; Ejsing, Christer S.; Surma, Michal A; Kaiser, Hermann-Josef; Gerl, Mathias J; Sampaio, Julio L; de Robillard, Quentin; Ferguson, Charles; Proszynski, Tomasz J; Shevchenko, Andrej; Simons, Kai

    2009-01-01

    The trans-Golgi network (TGN) is the major sorting station in the secretory pathway of all eukaryotic cells. How the TGN sorts proteins and lipids to generate the enrichment of sphingolipids and sterols at the plasma membrane is poorly understood. To address this fundamental question in membrane...... trafficking, we devised an immunoisolation procedure for specific recovery of post-Golgi secretory vesicles transporting a transmembrane raft protein from the TGN to the cell surface in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using a novel quantitative shotgun lipidomics approach, we could demonstrate that TGN...... sorting selectively enriched ergosterol and sphingolipid species in the immunoisolated secretory vesicles. This finding, for the first time, indicates that the TGN exhibits the capacity to sort membrane lipids. Furthermore, the observation that the immunoisolated vesicles exhibited a higher membrane order...

  14. Activation of calcineurin by phosphotidylserine containing vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Politino, M.; King, M.M.

    1986-05-01

    Calcineurin (CaN) is a Ca/sup 2 +/- and calmodulin-regulated phosphatase. Recent findings suggested an association of CaN with biological membranes and prompted the present investigation into the interactions of the phosphatase with phospholipids in vitro. In the absence of calmodulin, sonicated preparations of phosphatidylserine (PS) provided a five-fold activation of the Ni- and Mn-supported activities of CaN towards (/sup 32/P) histone Hl; activation in the presence of calmodulin was much less pronounced. Half-maximal activation in the absence of calmodulin required approximately 0.1 mg/ml of PS. Activation of CaN was also observed with mixed vesicles of phosphatidylcholine (PC) containing 20% PS but not with PC alone, or with phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Molecular sieve chromatography on Ultrogel AcA 34 provided further evidence that CaN associates with phospholipid vesicles composed of PS, or PC containing 20% PS, but not with vesicles of PC or PE. Complete association with medium sized vesicles of PS and PC/PS required Ca/sup 2 +/ ions; in the absence of the metal ion at least 60% of the enzyme failed to interact with the lipids while the remainder preferentially migrated with larger vesicles. These results suggest a role for Ca/sup 2 +/ in regulating CaN's interaction with phospholipids.

  15. Continuous microfluidic fabrication of synthetic asymmetric vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Li; Schertzer, Jeffrey W; Chiarot, Paul R

    2015-09-01

    We report on a novel microfluidic strategy for the continuous fabrication of monodisperse asymmetric vesicles with customized membrane composition, size, and luminal content. The microfluidic device encompasses a triangular post region and two flow-focusing regions. The major steps involved in the vesicle fabrication process include: (1) forming highly uniform water emulsions in an oil/inner-leaflet-lipid solution, (2) replacing the inner-leaflet-lipid solution with an outer-leaflet-lipid solution inside the microchannel network, (3) forming water-in-oil-in-water double emulsions, and (4) extracting excess oil/outer-leaflet-lipid solution from the double emulsions. Bilayer membrane asymmetry and unilamellarity are evaluated using a fluorescence quenching assay and a transmembrane protein insertion assay, respectively. Our approach addresses many of the deficiencies found in existing technologies for building vesicles, and yields strong membrane asymmetry. The ability to create and sustain membrane asymmetry is an important feature, as it is a characteristic of nearly all natural membranes. Over 80% of the vesicles remain stable for at least 6 weeks and the membrane asymmetry is maintained for over 30 hours. The asymmetric vesicles built using this strategy are collected off-chip and hold the potential to be used as model systems in membrane biology or as vehicles for drug delivery. PMID:26220822

  16. EXTRACELLULAR VESICLES: CLASSIFICATION, FUNCTIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Oberemko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This review presents a generalized definition of vesicles as bilayer extracellular organelles of all celular forms of life: not only eu-, but also prokaryotic. The structure and composition of extracellular vesicles, history of research, nomenclature, their impact on life processes in health and disease are discussed. Moreover, vesicles may be useful as clinical instruments for biomarkers, and they are promising as biotechnological drug. However, many questions in this area are still unresolved and need to be addressed in the future. The most interesting from the point of view of practical health care represents a direction to study the effect of exosomes and microvesicles in the development and progression of a particular disease, the possibility of adjusting the pathological process by means of extracellular vesicles of a particular type, acting as an active ingredient. Relevant is the further elucidation of the role and importance of exosomes to the surrounding cells, tissues and organs at the molecular level, the prospects for the use of non-cellular vesicles as biomarkers of disease.

  17. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons storage by Fusarium solani in intracellular lipid vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdin, Anthony [Laboratoire de Mycologie/Phytopathologie/Environnement, Universite du Littoral-Cote d' Opale, 17 avenue Bleriot, BP 699, 62228 Calais Cedex (France); Lounes-Hadj Sahraoui, Anissa [Laboratoire de Mycologie/Phytopathologie/Environnement, Universite du Littoral-Cote d' Opale, 17 avenue Bleriot, BP 699, 62228 Calais Cedex (France)]. E-mail: lounes@univ-littoral.fr; Newsam, Ray [Department of Biosciences, University of Kent, Canterbury CT2 7NJ (United Kingdom); Robinson, Gary [Department of Biosciences, University of Kent, Canterbury CT2 7NJ (United Kingdom); Durand, Roger [Laboratoire de Mycologie/Phytopathologie/Environnement, Universite du Littoral-Cote d' Opale, 17 avenue Bleriot, BP 699, 62228 Calais Cedex (France)

    2005-01-01

    Accumulation and elimination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were studied in the fungus Fusarium solani. When the fungus was grown on a synthetic medium containing benzo[a]pyrene, hyphae of F. solani contained numerous lipid vesicles which could be stained by the lipid-specific dyes: Sudan III and Rhodamine B. The fluorescence produced by Rhodamine B and PAH benzo[a]pyrene were at the same locations in the fungal hyphae, indicating that F. solani stored PAH in pre-existing lipid vesicles. A passive temperature-independent process is involved in the benzo[a]pyrene uptake and storage. Sodium azide, a cytochrome c oxidation inhibitor, and the two cytoskeleton inhibitors colchicine and cytochalasin did not prevent the transport and accumulation of PAH in lipid vesicles of F. solani hyphae. F. solani degraded a large range of PAHs at different rates. PAH intracellular storage in lipid vesicles was not necessarily accompanied by degradation and was common to numerous other fungi. - Fungi can store PAHs intracellularly in lipid vesicles independently of their PAH degradation abilities.

  18. Budding and Fission of a multiphase vesicle

    CERN Document Server

    Allain, J M; Allain, Jean-Marc; Amar, Martine Ben

    2005-01-01

    We present a model of bi-phasic vesicle in the limit of large surface tension. In this regime, the vesicle is completely stretched and well described by two spherical caps with a fold which concentrates the membrane stress. The conservation laws and geometric constraints restrict the space of possible shapes to a pair of solutions labeled by a parameter $\\tau$ given by {\\it line tension/pressure}. For a given $\\tau$ value, the two solutions differ by the length of the interface between domains. For a critical value $\\tau\\_c$, the two vesicle shapes become identical and no solution exists above this critical value. This model sheds new light on two proposed mechanisms (osmotic shocks and molecule absorption) to explain the budding and the fission in recent experiments.

  19. Computational algorithms for vesicle electrohydrodyna- mics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerapaneni, Shravan

    2015-11-01

    In this talk, we discuss a new integral equation method for simulating the electrohydrodynamics of a suspension of vesicles. The classical Taylor-Melcher leaky-dielectric model is employed for the electric response of each vesicle and the Helfrich energy model combined with local inextensibility is employed for its elastic response. The coupled governing equations for the vesicle position and its transmembrane electric potential are solved using a numerical method that is spectrally accurate in space and first-order in time. The method uses a semi-implicit time-stepping scheme to overcome the numerical stiffness associated with the governing equations. We will present new results on the suspension rheology, two-body interactions and pattern formation. This is joint work with Bowei Wu. This work was sponsored by NSF under grants DMS-1224656 and DMS-1418964.

  20. Functionalization of Block Copolymer Vesicle Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Meier

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In dilute aqueous solutions certain amphiphilic block copolymers self-assemble into vesicles that enclose a small pool of water with a membrane. Such polymersomes have promising applications ranging from targeted drug-delivery devices, to biosensors, and nanoreactors. Interactions between block copolymer membranes and their surroundings are important factors that determine their potential biomedical applications. Such interactions are influenced predominantly by the membrane surface. We review methods to functionalize block copolymer vesicle surfaces by chemical means with ligands such as antibodies, adhesion moieties, enzymes, carbohydrates and fluorophores. Furthermore, surface-functionalization can be achieved by self-assembly of polymers that carry ligands at their chain ends or in their hydrophilic blocks. While this review focuses on the strategies to functionalize vesicle surfaces, the applications realized by, and envisioned for, such functional polymersomes are also highlighted.

  1. Aquaporins in Urinary Extracellular Vesicles (Exosomes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshikawa, Sayaka; Sonoda, Hiroko; Ikeda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Since the successful characterization of urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs) by Knepper’s group in 2004, these vesicles have been a focus of intense basic and translational research worldwide, with the aim of developing novel biomarkers and therapeutics for renal disease. Along with these studies, there is growing evidence that aquaporins (AQPs), water channel proteins, in uEVs have the potential to be diagnostically useful. In this review, we highlight current knowledge of AQPs in uEVs from their discovery to clinical application. PMID:27322253

  2. Toroidal membrane vesicles in spherical confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Bouzar, Lila; Müller, Martin Michael

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the morphology of a toroidal fluid membrane vesicle confined inside a spherical container. The equilibrium shapes are assembled in a geometrical phase diagram as a function of scaled area and reduced volume of the membrane. For small area the vesicle can adopt its free form. When increasing the area, the membrane cannot avoid contact and touches the confining sphere along a circular contact line, which extends to a zone of contact for higher area. The elastic energies of the equilibrium shapes are compared to those of their confined counterparts of spherical topology to predict under which conditions a topology change is favored energetically.

  3. Toroidal membrane vesicles in spherical confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzar, Lila; Menas, Ferhat; Müller, Martin Michael

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the morphology of a toroidal fluid membrane vesicle confined inside a spherical container. The equilibrium shapes are assembled in a geometrical phase diagram as a function of scaled area and reduced volume of the membrane. For small area the vesicle can adopt its free form. When increasing the area, the membrane cannot avoid contact and touches the confining sphere along a circular contact line, which extends to a zone of contact for higher area. The elastic energies of the equilibrium shapes are compared to those of their confined counterparts of spherical topology to predict under which conditions a topology change is favored energetically. PMID:26465512

  4. Aquaporins in Urinary Extracellular Vesicles (Exosomes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshikawa, Sayaka; Sonoda, Hiroko; Ikeda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Since the successful characterization of urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs) by Knepper's group in 2004, these vesicles have been a focus of intense basic and translational research worldwide, with the aim of developing novel biomarkers and therapeutics for renal disease. Along with these studies, there is growing evidence that aquaporins (AQPs), water channel proteins, in uEVs have the potential to be diagnostically useful. In this review, we highlight current knowledge of AQPs in uEVs from their discovery to clinical application. PMID:27322253

  5. Vesicle-MaNiA: extracellular vesicles in liquid biopsy and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrano, Veronica; Royo, Felix; Peinado, Héctor; Loizaga-Iriarte, Ana; Unda, Miguel; Falcón-Perez, Juan M; Carracedo, Arkaitz

    2016-08-01

    Normal and tumor cells shed vesicles to the environment. Within the large family of extracellular vesicles, exosomes and microvesicles have attracted much attention in the recent years. Their interest ranges from mediators of cancer progression, inflammation, immune regulation and metastatic niche regulation, to non-invasive biomarkers of disease. In this respect, the procedures to purify and analyze extracellular vesicles have quickly evolved and represent a source of variability for data integration in the field. In this review, we provide an updated view of the potential of exosomes and microvesicles as biomarkers and the available technologies for their isolation. PMID:27366992

  6. Latent acetylcholinesterase in secretory vesicles isolated from adrenal medulla

    OpenAIRE

    Gratzl, Manfred; Krieger-Brauer, H.; Ekerdt, R

    1981-01-01

    A new procedure is described for the preparation of highly purified and stable secretory vesicles from adrenal medulla. Two forms of acetylcholinesterase, a membrane bound form as well as a soluble form, were found within these vesicles. The secretory vesicles, isolated by differential centrifugation, were further purified on a continuous isotonic Percoll™ gradient. In this way, secretory vesicles were separated from mitochondrial, microsomal and cell membrane contamination. The secretory ves...

  7. Bacteroides gingivalis vesicles bind to and aggregate Actinomyces viscosus.

    OpenAIRE

    Ellen, R P; Grove, D A

    1989-01-01

    Isolated Bacteroides gingivalis 2561 vesicles aggregated suspensions of Actinomyces viscosus and Actinomyces naeslundii of all taxonomy clusters. Vesicles bound near A. viscosus cell walls and among its surface fibrils. Tritiated vesicles bound slightly better to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite (SHA) than to SHA coated with A. viscosus; saturation was approached at the concentrations that were tested. Pretreatment of A. viscosus-coated SHA with vesicles impaired the subsequent adherence of B. gi...

  8. Vesicle Pools: Lessons from Adrenal Chromaffin Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Stevens

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The adrenal chromaffin cell serves as a model system to study fast Ca2+-dependent exocytosis. Membrane capacitance measurements in combination with Ca2+ uncaging offers a temporal resolution in the millisecond range and reveals that catecholamine release occurs in three distinct phases. Release of a readily releasable (RRP and a slowly releasable (SRP pool are followed by sustained release, due to maturation and release of vesicles which were not release-ready at the start of the stimulus. Trains of depolarizations, a more physiological stimulus, induce release from a small immediately releasable pool of vesicles residing adjacent to calcium channels, as well as from the RRP. The SRP is poorly activated by depolarization. A sequential model, in which non-releasable docked vesicles are primed to a slowly releasable state, and then further mature to the readily releasable state, has been proposed. The docked state, dependent on membrane proximity, requires SNAP-25, synaptotagmin and syntaxin. The ablation or modification of SNAP-25 and syntaxin, components of the SNARE complex, as well as of synaptotagmin, the calcium sensor, and modulators such complexins and Snapin alter the properties and/or magnitudes of different phases of release, and in particular can ablate the RRP. These results indicate that the composition of the SNARE complex and its interaction with modulatory molecules drives priming and provides a molecular basis for different pools of releasable vesicles.

  9. Preparation of vesicles entrapped lycopene extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxsuwong, Dhitaree; Indranupakorn, Ratana; Wongtrakul, Paveena

    2014-01-01

    Lycopene, a lipophilic carotenoid, has been known as an effective antioxidant in supporting the cutaneous defensive system. However, it is unstable when exposed to light and water. In this study, lycopene was isolated from tomatoes and a vesicular delivery system was developed to entrap and stabilize the lycopene in the aqueous system. A simple process, maceration in ethyl acetate, was used to extract lycopene from the tomatoes. The extract was then chromatographed on the Sephadex LH20 column using acetone as a solvent system to yield 995 μg of lycopene per gram of dried tomato weight. The vesicular delivery system was prepared from a combination of ascorbic acid-6-palmitate (AP), cholesterol and dicetyl phosphate using a thin film hydration method. The formulation was composed of AP, cholesterol and dicetyl phosphate at a 44:44:12 molar ratio and with 2.12 μmol/ml of the isolated lycopene. Both blank vesicles and lycopene loaded vesicles were kept for a period of 3 months at 4±2°C and at the room temperature (28±2°C) to evaluate the effect of the encapsulation on the characteristic of the vesicles and on the antioxidant activity of the encapsulated lycopene. The result implied that lycopene could be stabilized in the vesicles and its scavenging activity against DPPH free radicals was superior to that of the free lycopene solution. PMID:24829133

  10. Hyperviscosity and hypofunction of the seminal vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, G F; Kortebani, G; Mazzolli, A B

    1993-01-01

    The study was designed to determine whether hyperviscosity of the semen sample is related to dysfunction of the male accessory glands. It was carried out on men who consecutively attended an infertility clinic between June 1989 and June 1991, and the men were grouped according to viscosity of semen samples (normal viscosity or higher viscosity). Semen samples from 229 infertility patients were studied. From these, 155 had normal viscosity and 74 showed hyperviscosity. The effect of hyperviscosity of semen samples on seminal quality and the function of the prostate was evaluated by acid phosphatase measurement, and the seminal vesicles by measurement of corrected fructose. Sperm motility (grades II-III), sperm vitality, and corrected fructose were significantly reduced in samples with high viscosity (p hyperviscosity in semen samples was associated with only hypofunction of the seminal vesicles. In fact, 36.5% of subjects with hyperviscosity showed reduced levels of corrected fructose. The same association with hyperviscosity was not observed when only hypofunction of the prostate was present, or when hypofunction of both prostate and seminal vesicles was present (P:NS). Further analysis showed that high viscosity is observed mainly when corrected seminal fructose levels were below 1.5 mg/mL x 10(6) spz/mL. It would appear that hyperviscosity affects sperm motility and is associated with hypofunction of the seminal vesicles. PMID:8420506

  11. Formation of Giant Protein Vesicles by a Lipid Cosolvent Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper S.; Vararattanavech, Ardcharaporn; Vissing, Thomas;

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a method to create giant protein vesicles (GPVs) of ≥10 μm by solvent‐driven fusion of large vesicles (0.1–0.2 μm) with reconstituted membrane proteins. We found that formation of GPVs proceeded from rotational mixing of protein‐reconstituted large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs...

  12. Ca2+ pump and Ca2+/H+ antiporter in plasma membrane vesicles isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning from corn leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma membrane vesicles, which are mostly right side-out, were isolated from corn leaves by aqueous two-phase partitioning method. Characteristics of Ca2+ transport were investigated after preparing inside-out vesicles by Triton X-100 treatment. 45Ca2+ transport was assayed by membrane filtration technique. Results showed that Ca2+ transport into the plasma membrane vesicles was Mg-ATP dependent. The active Ca2+ transport system had a high affinity for Ca2+(Km(Ca2+) = 0.4 microM) and ATP(Km(ATP) = 3.9 microM), and showed pH optimum at 7.5. ATP-dependent Ca2+ uptake in the plasma membrane vesicles was stimulated in the presence of Cl- or NO3-. Quenching of quinacrine fluorescence showed that these anions also induced H+ transport into the vesicles. The Ca2+ uptake stimulated by Cl- was dependent on the activity of H+ transport into the vesicles. However, carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) and VO4(3-) which is known to inhibit the H+ pump associated with the plasma membrane, canceled almost all of the Cl(-)-stimulated Ca2+ uptake. Furthermore, artificially imposed pH gradient (acid inside) caused Ca2+ uptake into the vesicles. These results suggest that the Cl(-)-stimulated Ca2+ uptake is caused by the efflux of H+ from the vesicles by the operation of Ca2+/H+ antiport system in the plasma membrane. In Cl(-)-free medium, H+ transport into the vesicles scarcely occurred and the addition of CCCP caused only a slight inhibition of the active Ca2+ uptake into the vesicles. These results suggest that two Ca2+ transport systems are operating in the plasma membrane from corn leaves, i.e., one is an ATP-dependent active Ca2+ transport system (Ca2+ pump) and the other is a Ca2+/H+ antiport system. Little difference in characteristics of Ca2+ transport was observed between the plasma membranes isolated from etiolated and green corn leaves

  13. Mechanisms, pools, and sites of spontaneous vesicle release at synapses of rod and cone photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cork, Karlene M; Van Hook, Matthew J; Thoreson, Wallace B

    2016-08-01

    Photoreceptors have depolarized resting potentials that stimulate calcium-dependent release continuously from a large vesicle pool but neurons can also release vesicles without stimulation. We characterized the Ca(2+) dependence, vesicle pools, and release sites involved in spontaneous release at photoreceptor ribbon synapses. In whole-cell recordings from light-adapted horizontal cells (HCs) of tiger salamander retina, we detected miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents (mEPSCs) when no stimulation was applied to promote exocytosis. Blocking Ca(2+) influx by lowering extracellular Ca(2+) , by application of Cd(2+) and other agents reduced the frequency of mEPSCs but did not eliminate them, indicating that mEPSCs can occur independently of Ca(2+) . We also measured release presynaptically from rods and cones by examining quantal glutamate transporter anion currents. Presynaptic quantal event frequency was reduced by Cd(2+) or by increased intracellular Ca(2+) buffering in rods, but not in cones, that were voltage clamped at -70 mV. By inhibiting the vesicle cycle with bafilomycin, we found the frequency of mEPSCs declined more rapidly than the amplitude of evoked excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) suggesting a possible separation between vesicle pools in evoked and spontaneous exocytosis. We mapped sites of Ca(2+) -independent release using total internal reflectance fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to visualize fusion of individual vesicles loaded with dextran-conjugated pHrodo. Spontaneous release in rods occurred more frequently at non-ribbon sites than evoked release events. The function of Ca(2+) -independent spontaneous release at continuously active photoreceptor synapses remains unclear, but the low frequency of spontaneous quanta limits their impact on noise. PMID:27255664

  14. Vesicles as tools for the modulation of skin permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Vaibhav; Mishra, Dinesh; Nahar, Manoj; Jain, Narendra K

    2007-11-01

    Human skin is a remarkably efficient barrier designed to keep our insides in and the outside out. The modulation of this efficient barrier's properties, including its permeability to chemicals, drugs and biologically active agents is the prime target for various dermal, transdermal, drug, antigen and gene delivery approaches. Therefore, several methods have been attempted to enhance the permeation rate of biologically active agents, temporarily and locally. One of the approaches is the application of drug-laden vesicular formulations. This review presents various mechanisms involved in increasing drug transport across the skin via different vesicular approaches, such as liposomes, elastic vesicles and ethosomes, along with compiling the research work conducted in this field. PMID:17970662

  15. Salt-free vesicle-phases and their template effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Researches on the construction, structure, and formation of vesicles formed from surfactants have attracted great attention from colloid and interface chemists. The vesicles formed from salt-free cationic-anionic surfactant systems are very different from those with excess salts, having many particular properties. In this paper, we introduce the properties of vesicles prepared from salt-free surfactant systems, according to our own results, especially the vesicles formed from surfactants with divalent metal ions as counterions in aqueous solutions and room temperature ionic liquids. Moreover, the primary results on template effect of the metal-ligand vesicles have also been summarized.

  16. Genetically Controlled Fusion, Exocytosis and Fission of Artificial Vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bönzli, Eva; Hadorn, Maik; De Lucrezia, Davide; Girke Jørgensen, Mikkel; Hotz, Peter Eggenberger; Hanczyc, Martin; Yomo, Tetsuya

    special class of viral proteins, termed fusogenic peptides, were added to the external medium. In the present work, we intend to develop genetically controlled fusion, fission and exocytosis of vesicles by the synthesis of peptides within vesicles. First, we enclosed synthesized peptides in vesicles to...... induce in a next step fusion of adjacent vesicles, fission and exocytosis of nested vesicles. Second, we will replace the peptides by an enclosed cell-free expression system to internally synthesize fusion peptides. To control the gene expression, different mechanisms are available, e.g. addition of...... fusion, fission and exocytosis....

  17. Endosomal accumulation of APP in wobbler motor neurons reflects impaired vesicle trafficking: Implications for human motor neuron disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troakes Claire

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cause of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is largely unknown but hypotheses about disease mechanisms include oxidative stress, defective axonal transport, mitochondrial dysfunction and disrupted RNA processing. Whereas familial ALS is well represented by transgenic mutant SOD1 mouse models, the mouse mutant wobbler (WR develops progressive motor neuron degeneration due to a point mutation in the Vps54 gene, and provides an animal model for sporadic ALS. VPS54 protein as a component of a protein complex is involved in vesicular Golgi trafficking; impaired vesicle trafficking might also be mechanistic in the pathogenesis of human ALS. Results In motor neurons of homozygous symptomatic WR mice, a massive number of endosomal vesicles significantly enlarged (up to 3 μm in diameter were subjected to ultrastructural analysis and immunohistochemistry for the endosome-specific small GTPase protein Rab7 and for amyloid precursor protein (APP. Enlarged vesicles were neither detected in heterozygous WR nor in transgenic SOD1(G93A mice; in WR motor neurons, numerous APP/Rab7-positive vesicles were observed which were mostly LC3-negative, suggesting they are not autophagosomes. Conclusions We conclude that endosomal APP/Rab7 staining reflects impaired vesicle trafficking in WR mouse motor neurons. Based on these findings human ALS tissues were analysed for APP in enlarged vesicles and were detected in spinal cord motor neurons in six out of fourteen sporadic ALS cases. These enlarged vesicles were not detected in any of the familial ALS cases. Thus our study provides the first evidence for wobbler-like aetiologies in human ALS and suggests that the genes encoding proteins involved in vesicle trafficking should be screened for pathogenic mutations.

  18. Interaction of insulin with SDS/CTAB catanionic Vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, a novel method was used for entrapping the protein, insulin into the catanionic SDS/CTAB vesicle membrane. The anionic SDS and cationic CTAB formed catanionic vesicles at particular concentration (35:65 by volume). In this study, vesicle membrane can be considered as model membrane. The vesicle formation and entrapment efficiency depend on the pH of the aqueous solution. The insulin molecules have attached with the vesicular membrane at pH 7.0. However, at acidic pH, the vesicles were ruptured and the insulin did not entrap into the vesicle membrane, whereas at alkaline pH insulin became fibriller. The scanning electron microscope (SEM), Dynamic light scattering (DLS), and Zeta potential studies established the self-assembled structure formation of insulin and catanionic vesicles. To know the protein confirmations, Circular dichroism (CD) was also employed. The temperature dependent steady state and time resolved emission spectroscopy show that at room temperature (25 °C), apart from the 305 nm tyrosine fluorescence, a new emission peak at 450 nm was observed only in case of insulin-vesicle system, and was assigned as the tyrosine phosphorescence. This phosphorescence peak is the signature of the entrapment of insulin into the vesicle membrane. Highlights: • SDS-CTAB based catanionic vesicle has been fabricated. • Insulin has been successfully immobilized on these vesicles. • Immobilized insulin shows room temperature phosphorescence

  19. An intracellular motif of GLUT4 regulates fusion of GLUT4-containing vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welsh Gavin I

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin stimulates glucose uptake by adipocytes through increasing translocation of the glucose transporter GLUT4 from an intracellular compartment to the plasma membrane. Fusion of GLUT4-containing vesicles at the cell surface is thought to involve phospholipase D activity, generating the signalling lipid phosphatidic acid, although the mechanism of action is not yet clear. Results Here we report the identification of a putative phosphatidic acid-binding motif in a GLUT4 intracellular loop. Mutation of this motif causes a decrease in the insulin-induced exposure of GLUT4 at the cell surface of 3T3-L1 adipocytes via an effect on vesicle fusion. Conclusion The potential phosphatidic acid-binding motif identified in this study is unique to GLUT4 among the sugar transporters, therefore this motif may provide a unique mechanism for regulating insulin-induced translocation by phospholipase D signalling.

  20. Anti-inflammatory effects of locally applied enzyme-loaded ultradeformable vesicles on an acute cutaneous model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Sandra; Marques, Cláudia; Cruz, Maria Eugénia; Martins, Maria Bárbara Figueira

    2009-11-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) are active scavengers of reactive oxygen species and were incorporated into ultradeformable vesicles with the aim of increasing enzyme bioavailability (skin delivery). These special very adaptable vesicles have been formulated and optimized for enzyme transport in order to penetrate into or across the intact skin barrier. Anti-inflammatory activity of SOD-loaded, CAT-loaded and of SOD- and CAT-loaded ultradeformable vesicles applied epicutaneously was measured using different protein doses on the skin, on an arachidonic acid-induced mouse ear oedema. The biological anti-oedema activity is a measurement of drug-targeting potentiation in the organ. Delivery by means of deformable vesicles was compared to conventional vesicles or the absence of an enzyme carrier mediated transport. This was done at various times following prophylactic application of the test formulations. Positive reference groups were treated epicutaneously with several low molecular weight non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The latter included indomethacin (3 mg kg(-1)), etofenamate (30 mg kg(-1)) and piroxicam (1 mg kg(-1)) and reduced the oedema by 94 +/- 4%, 81 +/- 4% and 42 +/- 5%, respectively, if measured 30 min after ear treatment with a NSAID. Of the enzyme-loaded carriers tested, only the enzyme-loaded ultradeformable vesicles reduced the swelling of ears significantly: SOD (90 microg kg(-1)), CAT (250 microg kg(-1)) and SOD (90 microg kg(-1)) plus CAT (250 microg kg(-1)) reduced the oedema by 70 +/- 12%, 65 +/- 10% and 61 +/- 19%, respectively, at t = 30 min. Aqueous enzyme solutions and empty carriers had no such effect. The combination of two enzymes resulted in no increased therapeutic effect, but the results are inconclusive since only two dose combinations were tested. The results presented in this study suggest that antioxidant enzymes delivered by means of ultradeformable lipid vesicles can serve as a novel region

  1. Linking Phospholipid flippases to vesicle-mediated protein transport

    OpenAIRE

    Muthusamy, Baby-Periyanayaki; Natarajan, Paramasivam; Zhou, Xiaoming; Graham, Todd R.

    2009-01-01

    Type IV P-type ATPases (P4-ATPases) are a large family of putative phospholipid translocases (flippases) implicated in the generation of phospholipid asymmetry in biological membranes. P4-ATPases are typically the largest P-type ATPase subgroup found in eukaryotic cells, with five members in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, six members in Caenorhabditis elegans, 12 members in Arabidopsis thaliani and 14 members in humans. In addition, many of the P4-ATPases require interaction with a noncatalytic su...

  2. Pulsatile lipid vesicles under osmotic stress

    CERN Document Server

    Chabanon, Morgan; Liedberg, Bo; Parikh, Atul N; Rangamani, Padmini

    2016-01-01

    The response of lipid bilayers to osmotic stress is an important part of cellular function. Previously, in [Oglecka et al. 2014], we reported that cell-sized giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) exposed to hypotonic media, respond to the osmotic assault by undergoing a cyclical sequence of swelling and bursting events, coupled to the membrane's compositional degrees of freedom. Here, we seek to deepen our quantitative understanding of the essential pulsatile behavior of GUVs under hypotonic conditions, by advancing a comprehensive theoretical model for vesicle dynamics. The model quantitatively captures our experimentally measured swell-burst parameters for single-component GUVs, and reveals that thermal fluctuations enable rate dependent pore nucleation, driving the dynamics of the swell-burst cycles. We further identify new scaling relationships between the pulsatile dynamics and GUV properties. Our findings provide a fundamental framework that has the potential to guide future investigations on the non-equili...

  3. Docking of secretory vesicles is syntaxin dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi de Wit

    Full Text Available Secretory vesicles dock at the plasma membrane before they undergo fusion. Molecular docking mechanisms are poorly defined but believed to be independent of SNARE proteins. Here, we challenged this hypothesis by acute deletion of the target SNARE, syntaxin, in vertebrate neurons and neuroendocrine cells. Deletion resulted in fusion arrest in both systems. No docking defects were observed in synapses, in line with previous observations. However, a drastic reduction in morphologically docked secretory vesicles was observed in chromaffin cells. Syntaxin-deficient chromaffin cells showed a small reduction in total and plasma membrane staining for the docking factor Munc18-1, which appears insufficient to explain the drastic reduction in docking. The sub-membrane cortical actin network was unaffected by syntaxin deletion. These observations expose a docking role for syntaxin in the neuroendocrine system. Additional layers of regulation may have evolved to make syntaxin redundant for docking in highly specialized systems like synaptic active zones.

  4. Display of GPI-anchored anti-EGFR nanobodies on extracellular vesicles promotes tumour cell targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Sander A. A. Kooijmans; Gómez Aleza, Clara; Roffler, Steve R; van Solinge, Wouter W.; Vader, Pieter; Schiffelers, Raymond M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are attractive candidate drug delivery systems due to their ability to functionally transport biological cargo to recipient cells. However, the apparent lack of target cell specificity of exogenously administered EVs limits their therapeutic applicability. In this study, we propose a novel method to equip EVs with targeting properties, in order to improve their interaction with tumour cells.Methods: EV producing cells were transfected with vectors enco...

  5. Mutations in human dynamin block an intermediate stage in coated vesicle formation

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    The role of human dynamin in receptor-mediated endocytosis was investigated by transient expression of GTP-binding domain mutants in mammalian cells. Using assays which detect intermediates in coated vesicle formation, the dynamin mutants were found to block endocytosis at a stage after the initiation of coat assembly and preceding the sequestration of ligands into deeply invaginated coated pits. Membrane transport from the ER to the Golgi complex was unaffected indicating that dynamin mutant...

  6. Extracellular Vesicles and a Novel Form of Communication in the Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Basso, Manuela; Bonetto, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    In numerous neurodegenerative diseases, the interplay between neurons and glia modulates the outcome and progression of pathology. One particularly intriguing mode of interaction between neurons, astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes is characterized by the release of extracellular vesicles that transport proteins, lipids, and nucleotides from one cell to another. Notably, several proteins that cause disease, including the prion protein and mutant SOD1, have been detected in glia-derive...

  7. Exosomes : Nano-vesicles in immune regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, Sara M

    2008-01-01

    Nano-vesicles (30-100 nm) with an endosome-derived limiting membrane are called exosomes. These are released from the cell when the endosome fuses with the outer cell membrane. Exosomes from antigen presenting cells (APC) carry MHC class I and class II as well as integrins, tetraspanins and co-stimulatory molecules. They can either stimulate T cell responses or induce tolerance. Exosomes are presently being evaluated as therapeutic tools but still little is known about their...

  8. A microscopic model for mixed surfactant vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    D Duque; Tarazona, P.; Chacon, E.

    1998-01-01

    A microscopic model which has proven useful in describing amphiphilic aggregates as inhomogeneities of a fluid is extended here to study the case of a two component surfactant mixture. We have chosen an effective interaction between the amphiphiles that mimics the mixture of cationic--anionic surfactants. In agreement with experiments, and other theoretical approaches, we find regions where spherical vesicles are stable, with a well defined radius. The experimental dependence of the radius on...

  9. Ciliary extracellular vesicles: Txt msg orgnlls

    OpenAIRE

    WANG, Juan; Barr, Maureen M.

    2016-01-01

    Cilia are sensory organelles that protrude from cell surfaces to monitor the surrounding environment. In addition to its role as sensory receiver, the cilium also releases extracellular vesicles (EVs). The release of sub-micron sized EVs is a conserved form of intercellular communication used by all three kingdoms of life. These extracellular organelles play important roles in both short and long range signaling between donor and target cells and may coordinate systemic responses within an or...

  10. Routes and mechanisms of extracellular vesicle uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ann Mulcahy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are small vesicles released by donor cells that can be taken up by recipient cells. Despite their discovery decades ago, it has only recently become apparent that EVs play an important role in cell-to-cell communication. EVs can carry a range of nucleic acids and proteins which can have a significant impact on the phenotype of the recipient. For this phenotypic effect to occur, EVs need to fuse with target cell membranes, either directly with the plasma membrane or with the endosomal membrane after endocytic uptake. EVs are of therapeutic interest because they are deregulated in diseases such as cancer and they could be harnessed to deliver drugs to target cells. It is therefore important to understand the molecular mechanisms by which EVs are taken up into cells. This comprehensive review summarizes current knowledge of EV uptake mechanisms. Cells appear to take up EVs by a variety of endocytic pathways, including clathrin-dependent endocytosis, and clathrin-independent pathways such as caveolin-mediated uptake, macropinocytosis, phagocytosis, and lipid raft–mediated internalization. Indeed, it seems likely that a heterogeneous population of EVs may gain entry into a cell via more than one route. The uptake mechanism used by a given EV may depend on proteins and glycoproteins found on the surface of both the vesicle and the target cell. Further research is needed to understand the precise rules that underpin EV entry into cells.

  11. Membrane-elasticity model of Coatless vesicle budding induced by ESCRT complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosz Różycki

    Full Text Available The formation of vesicles is essential for many biological processes, in particular for the trafficking of membrane proteins within cells. The Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT directs membrane budding away from the cytosol. Unlike other vesicle formation pathways, the ESCRT-mediated budding occurs without a protein coat. Here, we propose a minimal model of ESCRT-induced vesicle budding. Our model is based on recent experimental observations from direct fluorescence microscopy imaging that show ESCRT proteins colocalized only in the neck region of membrane buds. The model, cast in the framework of membrane elasticity theory, reproduces the experimentally observed vesicle morphologies with physically meaningful parameters. In this parameter range, the minimum energy configurations of the membrane are coatless buds with ESCRTs localized in the bud neck, consistent with experiment. The minimum energy configurations agree with those seen in the fluorescence images, with respect to both bud shapes and ESCRT protein localization. On the basis of our model, we identify distinct mechanistic pathways for the ESCRT-mediated budding process. The bud size is determined by membrane material parameters, explaining the narrow yet different bud size distributions in vitro and in vivo. Our membrane elasticity model thus sheds light on the energetics and possible mechanisms of ESCRT-induced membrane budding.

  12. The role of Arabidopsis 5PTase13 in root gravitropism through modulation of vesicle trafficking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Wang; Wen-Hui Lin; Xu Chen; Hong-Wei Xue

    2009-01-01

    Inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatases (5PTases) are enzymes of phosphatidylinositoi metabolism that affect various aspects of plant growth and development. Arabidopsis 5PTasel3 regulates auxin homeostasis and hormone-related cotyledon vein development, and here we demonstrate that its knockout mutant 5pt13 has elevated sensitivity to gravistimulation in root gravitropic responses. The altered responses of 5pt13 mutants to 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid (an auxin transport inhibitor) indicate that 5PTasel3 might be involved in the regulation of auxin transport. Indeed, the auxin efflux carrier PIN2 is expressed more broadly under 5PTasel3 deficiency, and observations of the internalization of the membrane-selective dye FM4-64 reveal altered vesicle trafficking in 5pt13 mutants. Compared with wild-type, 5pt13 mutant seedlings are less sensitive to the inhibition by brefeldin A of vesicle cycling, seedling growth, and the intracellular cycling of the PINI and PIN2 proteins. Further, auxin redistribution upon gravitropic stimulation is stimulated under 5PTasel3 deficiency. These results suggest that 5PTasel3 may modulate auxin trans-port by regulating vesicle trafficking and thereby play a role in root gravitropism.

  13. Release of canine parvovirus from endocytic vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is a small nonenveloped virus with a single-stranded DNA genome. CPV enters cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and requires an acidic endosomal step for productive infection. Virion contains a potential nuclear localization signal as well as a phospholipase A2 like domain in N-terminus of VP1. In this study we characterized the role of PLA2 activity on CPV entry process. PLA2 activity of CPV capsids was triggered in vitro by heat or acidic pH. PLA2 inhibitors inhibited the viral proliferation suggesting that PLA2 activity is needed for productive infection. The N-terminus of VP1 was exposed during the entry, suggesting that PLA2 activity might have a role during endocytic entry. The presence of drugs modifying endocytosis (amiloride, bafilomycin A1, brefeldin A, and monensin) caused viral proteins to remain in endosomal/lysosomal vesicles, even though the drugs were not able to inhibit the exposure of VP1 N-terminal end. These results indicate that the exposure of N-terminus of VP1 alone is not sufficient to allow CPV to proliferate. Some other pH-dependent changes are needed for productive infection. In addition to blocking endocytic entry, amiloride was able to block some postendocytic steps. The ability of CPV to permeabilize endosomal membranes was demonstrated by feeding cells with differently sized rhodamine-conjugated dextrans together with the CPV in the presence or in the absence of amiloride, bafilomycin A1, brefeldin A, or monensin. Dextran with a molecular weight of 3000 was released from vesicles after 8 h of infection, while dextran with a molecular weight of 10,000 was mainly retained in vesicles. The results suggest that CPV infection does not cause disruption of endosomal vesicles. However, the permeability of endosomal membranes apparently changes during CPV infection, probably due to the PLA2 activity of the virus. These results suggest that parvoviral PLA2 activity is essential for productive infection and presumably

  14. Adaptor protein complexes and intracellular transport

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The AP (adaptor protein) complexes are heterotetrameric protein complexes that mediate intracellular membrane trafficking along endocytic and secretory transport pathways. There are five different AP complexes: AP-1, AP-2 and AP-3 are clathrin-associated complexes; whereas AP-4 and AP-5 are not. These five AP complexes localize to different intracellular compartments and mediate membrane trafficking in distinct pathways. They recognize and concentrate cargo proteins into vesicular carriers th...

  15. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: Development of Extracellular Vesicle-Based Therapeutic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichiro Ohno

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Many types of cells release phospholipid membrane vesicles thought to play key roles in cell-cell communication, antigen presentation, and the spread of infectious agents. Extracellular vesicles (EVs carry various proteins, messenger RNAs (mRNAs, and microRNAs (miRNAs, like a “message in a bottle” to cells in remote locations. The encapsulated molecules are protected from multiple types of degradative enzymes in body fluids, making EVs ideal for delivering drugs. This review presents an overview of the potential roles of EVs as natural drugs and novel drug-delivery systems.

  16. Metabolic and Signaling Functions of Cancer Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, P; Vardaki, I; Occhionero, A; Panaretakis, T

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles have gained tremendous attention in the recent years as a novel mechanism of cell to cell communication. There are several types of extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, microvesicles, exosome, like vesicles, apoptotic bodies that differ mainly in the mechanism of biogenesis and secretion. The most well studied type of extracellular vesicles are the exosomes which are endosome-derived vesicles with a diameter of 50-150nm and enriched in ESCRT proteins including Alix, TSG101, Hsp70, and tetraspanins. It is now well established that exosomes promote tumor growth, alter the tumor microenvironment, facilitate the dissemination of cancer cells in an organotropic manner, modulate immune responses, and mediate resistance to therapy. Exosomes have also been recently implicated in an emerging hallmark of cancer, the cancer cell metabolism. The metabolic state of the cell defines, to a certain extent, both the rate of secretion and the molecular content of tumor-derived exosomes. Furthermore, exosomes have been shown to possess intrinsic metabolic activity since they can synthesize ATP by glycolysis. It follows that exosomes carry a number of metabolic enzymes and metabolites, including lactate, PGE, LDH isoforms, pyruvate, and monocarboxylate transporters. Last but not the least, exosomes are implicated in fatty acid synthesis and cholesterol metabolism and are thought to be crucial for the transcellular metabolism procedure. Uptake of exosomes is thought to alter the intracellular metabolic state of the cell. In summary, we describe the state of the art on the role of metabolism in the secretion, uptake, and the biological effects of exosomes in the metabolism of recipient cells. PMID:27572129

  17. Development and Characterization of Non-Ionic Surfactant Vesicles (Niosomes for Oral delivery of Lornoxicam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K B Bini

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Niosomes are non-ionic surfactant vesicles obtained on hydration of synthetic nonionic surfactants, with or without incorporation of cholesterol or other lipids. They are vesicular systems similar to liposomes that can be used as carriers of amphiphilic and lipophilic drugs. Niosomes are promising vehicle for drug delivery and being non-ionic, it is less toxic and improves the therapeutic index of drug by restricting its action to target cells. They are lamellar structures that are microscopic in size. They are now widely used as alternative to liposomes. Niosomal dispersion in an aqueous phase can be emulsified in a non-aqueous phase to regulate the delivery rate of drug and administer normal vesicle in external non-aqueous phase. Stable niosome dispersion must exhibit a constant particle size and a constant level of entrapped drug. Span 60 is the better surfactant of all because it is having high phase transition temperature and low HLB (Hydrophilic Lipophilic Balance so it will form vesicles of good size.one more reason for the selection of span 60 and that was the critical packing factor which is between 0.5 and 1 for this surfactant so it forms spherical vesicles. If CPP factor is below 0.5 it cause micelles to form and if it was above 1 it will form inverted vesicles. Lornoxicam loaded niosomes were prepared by Lipid film hydration method with different surfactant to cholesterol ratio. The niosome formulations were evaluated for FT-IR study,microscopy. The niosomal suspensions were further evaluated for entrapment efficiency, In vitro release study, Kinetic data analysis, Stability study. The formulation F4 which showed higher entrapment efficiency of 80.54 ±0.99. Release was best explained by the zero order kinetics. Kinetic analysis shows that the drug release follows super case II transport diffusion. Niosome formulation has showed appropriate stability for 90 days.

  18. ETHOSOMES AS ELASTIC VESICLES IN TRANSDERMAL DRUG DELIVERY: AN OVERVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    N. B. Gupta et al.

    2012-01-01

    Ethosomes are as novel vesicles in transdermal drug delivery show significant effects of drug penetration through the biological membrane with slight modification of well established drug carrier liposomes. Ethosomes are soft, malleable vesicles composed mainly of phospholipids, ethanol and water. The size of ethosome vesicles can be modulated from tens of nanometer to microns. The ethosomes can be prepared by Hot as well as Cold method. The evaluation parameters of ethosomes include visualiz...

  19. Deformation of giant lipid bilayer vesicles in shear flow

    OpenAIRE

    Haas,; Blom, C.; Ende, van den, D.; Duits, M. H. G.; Mellema, J.

    1997-01-01

    We describe experimental studies of the deformation of giant lipid bilayer vesicles in shear flow. The experiments are carried out with a counterrotating Couette apparatus. The deformation depends on the mechanical properties of the lipid bilayer, the vesicle radius, and the viscosity of the surrounding Newtonian liquid. We show that the relevant mechanical parameter is the bending rigidity. A simple model has been developed that describes the deformation of a vesicle. This model takes therma...

  20. A scenario for a genetically controlled fission of artificial vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bönzli, Eva; Hadorn, Maik; Jørgensen, Mikkel Girke;

    2011-01-01

    Artificial vesicles have been used for decades as model systems of biological cells to investigate scientific questions in simulacra. In recent years, the significance of artificial vesicles further increased because they represent ideal candidates to become the building block of a de novo constr...... transfer method to prepare vesicles, the base for the development of a protocol to induce fission in artificial cell may be available....

  1. Solid-State NMR Characterization of Gas Vesicle Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Sivertsen, Astrid C.; Bayro, Marvin J.; Belenky, Marina; Griffin, Robert G.; Herzfeld, Judith

    2010-01-01

    Gas vesicles are gas-filled buoyancy organelles with walls that consist almost exclusively of gas vesicle protein A (GvpA). Intact, collapsed gas vesicles from the cyanobacterium Anabaena flos-aquae were studied by solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and most of the GvpA sequence was assigned. Chemical shift analysis indicates a coil-α-β-β-α-coil peptide backbone, consistent with secondary-structure-prediction algorithms, and complementary information about mobility and solvent exposure yields a pi...

  2. From Vesicles to Protocells: The Roles of Amphiphilic Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Yuka Sakuma; Masayuki Imai

    2015-01-01

    It is very challenging to construct protocells from molecular assemblies. An important step in this challenge is the achievement of vesicle dynamics that are relevant to cellular functions, such as membrane trafficking and self-reproduction, using amphiphilic molecules. Soft matter physics will play an important role in the development of vesicles that have these functions. Here, we show that simple binary phospholipid vesicles have the potential to reproduce the relevant functions of adhes...

  3. SpatTrack: an imaging toolbox for analysis of vesicle motility and distribution in living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Frederik Wendelboe; Jensen, Marie Louise; Christensen, Tanja;

    2014-01-01

    The endocytic pathway is a complex network of highly dynamic organelles, which has been traditionally studied by quantitative fluorescence microscopy. The data generated by this method can be overwhelming and its analysis, even for the skilled microscopist, is tedious and error-prone. We develope...... subpopulation of late endosomes/lysosomes (LE/LYSs). This was paralleled by repositioning and active transport of NPC2-containing vesicles to the cell surface. The potential of SpatTrack for other applications in intracellular transport studies will be discussed....

  4. From vesicles to protocells: the roles of amphiphilic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Yuka; Imai, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    It is very challenging to construct protocells from molecular assemblies. An important step in this challenge is the achievement of vesicle dynamics that are relevant to cellular functions, such as membrane trafficking and self-reproduction, using amphiphilic molecules. Soft matter physics will play an important role in the development of vesicles that have these functions. Here, we show that simple binary phospholipid vesicles have the potential to reproduce the relevant functions of adhesion, pore formation and self-reproduction of vesicles, by coupling the lipid geometries (spontaneous curvatures) and the phase separation. This achievement will elucidate the pathway from molecular assembly to cellular life. PMID:25738256

  5. Aminosilane/oleic acid vesicles as model membranes of protocells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douliez, Jean-Paul; Zhendre, Vanessa; Grélard, Axelle; Dufourc, Erick J

    2014-12-16

    Oleic acid vesicles represent good models of membrane protocells that could have existed in prebiotic times. Here, we report the formation, growth polymorphism, and dynamics of oleic acid spherical vesicles (1-10 μm), stable elongated vesicles (>50 μm length; 1-3 μm diameter), and chains of vesicles (pearl necklaces, >50 μm length; 1-3 μm diameter) in the presence of aminopropyl triethoxysilane and guanidine hydrochloride. These vesicles exhibit a remarkable behavior with temperature: spherical vesicles only are observed when keeping the sample at 4 °C for 2 h, and self-aggregated spherical vesicles occur upon freezing/unfreezing (-20/20 °C) samples. Rather homogeneous elongated vesicles are reformed upon heating samples at 80 °C. The phenomenon is reversible through cycles of freezing/heating or cooling/heating of the same sample. Deuterium NMR evidences a chain packing rigidity similar to that of phospholipid bilayers in cellular biomembranes. We expect these bilayered vesicles to be surrounded by a layer of aminosilane oligomers, offering a variant model for membrane protocells. PMID:25420203

  6. From Vesicles to Protocells: The Roles of Amphiphilic Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Sakuma

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available It is very challenging to construct protocells from molecular assemblies. An important step in this challenge is the achievement of vesicle dynamics that are relevant to cellular functions, such as membrane trafficking and self-reproduction, using amphiphilic molecules. Soft matter physics will play an important role in the development of vesicles that have these functions. Here, we show that simple binary phospholipid vesicles have the potential to reproduce the relevant functions of adhesion, pore formation and self-reproduction of vesicles, by coupling the lipid geometries (spontaneous curvatures and the phase separation. This achievement will elucidate the pathway from molecular assembly to cellular life.

  7. Sugar-Decorated Sugar Vesicles : Lectin-Carbohydrate Recognition at the Surface of Cyclodextrin Vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voskuhl, Jens; Stuart, Marc C. A.; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2010-01-01

    An artificial glycocalix self-assembles when unilamellar bilayer vesicles of amphiphilic beta-cyclodextrins are decorated with maltose and lactose by host-guest interactions. To this end, maltose and lactose were conjugated with adamantane through a tetra(ethyleneglycol) spacer. Both carbohydrate-ad

  8. Additive effects on the energy barrier for synaptic vesicle fusion cause supralinear effects on the vesicle fusion rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schotten, Sebastiaan; Meijer, Marieke; Walter, Alexander Matthias;

    2015-01-01

    supralinear effects on the fusion rate. To test this prediction experimentally, we developed a method to assess the number of releasable vesicles, rate constants for vesicle priming, unpriming, and fusion, and the activation energy for fusion by fitting a vesicle state model to synaptic responses induced by......-linear effects of genetic/pharmacological perturbations on synaptic transmission and a novel interpretation of the cooperative nature of Ca2+-dependent release....

  9. Vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 mediates trafficking of α5β1 integrin to the plasma membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integrins are major receptors for cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM). As transmembrane proteins, the levels of integrins at the plasma membrane or the cell surface are ultimately determined by the balance between two vesicle trafficking events: endocytosis of integrins at the plasma membrane and exocytosis of the vesicles that transport integrins. Here, we report that vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2), a SNARE protein that mediates vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane, is involved in the trafficking of α5β1 integrin. VAMP2 was present on vesicles containing endocytosed β1 integrin. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing of VAMP2 markedly reduced cell surface α5β1 and inhibited cell adhesion and chemotactic migration to fibronectin, the ECM ligand of α5β1, without altering cell surface expression of α2β1 integrin or α3β1 integrin. By contrast, silencing of VAMP8, another SNARE protein, had no effect on cell surface expression of the integrins or cell adhesion to fibronectin. In addition, VAMP2-mediated trafficking is involved in cell adhesion to collagen but not to laminin. Consistent with disruption of integrin functions in cell proliferation and survival, VAMP2 silencing diminished proliferation and triggered apoptosis. Collectively, these data indicate that VAMP2 mediates the trafficking of α5β1 integrin to the plasma membrane and VAMP2-dependent integrin trafficking is critical in cell adhesion, migration and survival.

  10. Evidence that the ZNT3 protein controls the total amount of elemental zinc in synaptic vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkous, D.H.; Flinn, J.M.; Koh, J.Y.; Lanzirotti, A.; Bertsch, P.M.; Jones, B.F.; Giblin, L.J.; Frederickson, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    The ZNT3 protein decorates the presynaptic vesicles of central neurons harboring vesicular zinc, and deletion of this protein removes staining for zinc. However, it has been unclear whether only histochemically reactive zinc is lacking or if, indeed, total elemental zinc is missing from neurons lacking the Slc30a3 gene, which encodes the ZNT3 protein. The limitations of conventional histochemical procedures have contributed to this enigma. However, a novel technique, microprobe synchrotron X-ray fluorescence, reveals that the normal 2- to 3-fold elevation of zinc concentration normally present in the hippocampal mossy fibers is absent in Slc30a3 knockout (ZNT3) mice. Thus, the ZNT3 protein evidently controls not only the "stainability" but also the actual mass of zinc in mossy-fiber synaptic vesicles. This work thus confirms the metal-transporting role of the ZNT3 protein in the brain. ?? The Histochemical Society, Inc.

  11. Role of Extracellular Vesicles in Hematological Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Raimondo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the role of tumor microenvironment in the progression of hematological malignancies has been widely recognized. Recent studies have focused on how cancer cells communicate within the microenvironment. Among several factors (cytokines, growth factors, and ECM molecules, a key role has been attributed to extracellular vesicles (EV, released from different cell types. EV (microvesicles and exosomes may affect stroma remodeling, host cell functions, and tumor angiogenesis by inducing gene expression modulation in target cells, thus promoting cancer progression and metastasis. Microvesicles and exosomes can be recovered from the blood and other body fluids of cancer patients and contain and deliver genetic and proteomic contents that reflect the cell of origin, thus constituting a source of new predictive biomarkers involved in cancer development and serving as possible targets for therapies. Moreover, due to their specific cell-tropism and bioavailability, EV can be considered natural vehicles suitable for drug delivery. Here we will discuss the recent advances in the field of EV as actors in hematological cancer progression, pointing out the role of these vesicles in the tumor-host interplay and in their use as biomarkers for hematological malignancies.

  12. Coated vesicles contain a phosphatidylinositol kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When coated vesicles (CVs) are incubated with [gamma-32P]ATP, radioactivity is rapidly incorporated into a compound identified by thin layer chromatography as phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate. This activity has been identified in CVs isolated from bovine brain as well as from rat liver and chick embryo skeletal muscle. Phosphatidylinositol (PI) kinase is not separated from CVs during agarose electrophoresis, which produces CVs of greater than 95% purity, indicating that the activity present does not derive from contamination. The specific activity of these highly purified CVs was demonstrated to be approximately twice that of synaptic plasma membranes, further ruling out contamination from this source. The PI kinase remains associated with the vesicle upon removal of clathrin and its associated proteins and is solubilized by nonionic detergents, suggesting it is an integral membrane protein. The authors have been unable to demonstrate the formation of significant amounts of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate in any of the CV preparations. In the presence of exogenous PI, activity is stimulated, with maximal phosphorylation occurring at 0.1 mM. The enzyme appears to be maximally stimulated by 200 mM MgCl2 and 1 mM ATP and is most active at pH 7.25. Calculations indicate that, under optimal conditions, approximately 25 molecules of PIP are produced per CV within 60 s, suggesting that these structures may play an important role in cellular PI metabolism

  13. Bacterial outer membrane vesicles and vaccine applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Reinaldo; Fernández, Sonsire; Zayas, Caridad; Acosta, Armando; Sarmiento, Maria Elena; Ferro, Valerie A; Rosenqvist, Einar; Campa, Concepcion; Cardoso, Daniel; Garcia, Luis; Perez, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles (OMV) were developed more than 20 years ago against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. These nano-sized structures exhibit remarkable potential for immunomodulation of immune responses and delivery of meningococcal antigens or unrelated antigens incorporated into the vesicle structure. This paper reviews different applications in OMV Research and Development (R&D) and provides examples of OMV developed and evaluated at the Finlay Institute in Cuba. A Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) process was developed at the Finlay Institute to produce OMV from N. meningitidis serogroup B (dOMVB) using detergent extraction. Subsequently, OMV from N. meningitidis, serogroup A (dOMVA), serogroup W (dOMVW), and serogroup X (dOMVX) were obtained using this process. More recently, the extraction process has also been applied effectively for obtaining OMV on a research scale from Vibrio cholerae (dOMVC), Bordetella pertussis (dOMVBP), Mycobacterium smegmatis (dOMVSM), and BCG (dOMVBCG). The immunogenicity of the OMV has been evaluated for specific antibody induction, and together with functional bactericidal and challenge assays in mice has shown their protective potential. dOMVB has been evaluated with non-neisserial antigens, including with a herpes virus type 2 glycoprotein, ovalbumin, and allergens. In conclusion, OMV are proving to be more versatile than first conceived and remain an important technology for development of vaccine candidates. PMID:24715891

  14. BACTERIAL OUTER MEMBRANE VESICLES AND VACCINE APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinaldo eAcevedo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles (OMV were developed more than 20 years ago against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. These nano-sized structures exhibit remarkable potential for immunomodulation of immune responses and delivery of self meningococcal antigens or unrelated antigens incorporated into the vesicle structure. This paper reviews different applications in OMV Research and Development (R&D and provides examples of OMV developed and evaluated at the Finlay Institute in Cuba. A Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP process was developed at the Finlay Institute to produce OMV from N. meningitidis serogroup B (dOMVB using detergent extraction. Subsequently, OMV from N. meningitidis, serogroup A (dOMVA, serogroup W (dOMVW and serogroup X (dOMVX were obtained using this process. More recently, the extraction process has also been applied effectively for obtaining OMV on a research scale from Vibrio cholerae (dOMVC, Bordetella pertussis (dOMVBP, Mycobacterium smegmatis (dOMVSM and BCG (dOMVBCG. The immunogenicity of the OMV have been evaluated for specific antibody induction, and together with functional bactericidal and challenge assays in mice have shown their protective potential. dOMVB has been evaluated with non-self neisserial antigens, including with a herpes virus type 2 glycoprotein, ovalbumin and allergens. In conclusion, OMV are proving to be more versatile than first conceived and remain an important technology for development of vaccine candidates.

  15. Nonenzymatic glycation of phosphatidylethanolamine in erythrocyte vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unsealed inside-out and right-side out vesicles were prepared from human red cells. The vesicles were incubated with D-glucose [14C(U)] and sodium cyanoborohydride in phosphate buffer, pH 7.4. After incubation, lipids were extracted with 1-butanol and non-lipid contaminants removed by Sephadex G-25 chromatography. Phosphatidylethanolamine-sorbitol was purified by chromatography on columns of silicic acid and phenylboronate agarose gel. Phospholipase C (B. cereus) liberated phosphoethanolamine-sorbitol (I) which comigrated on TLC with synthetic I prepared by reductive condensation of phosphoethanolamine and D-glucose and also with the product of phospholipase C (B. cereus) hydrolysis of reference phosphatidylethanolamine-sorbitol. Exposure of I to alkaline phosphatase (E. coli) gave P/sub i/ and ethanolamine-sorbitol (II) which comigrated on TLC with synthetic II prepared by reductive condensation of ethanolamine and D-glucose or by phospholipase D hydrolysis of reference phosphatidylethanolamine-sorbitol. These studies demonstrate that vesicular phosphatidylethanolamine can be reductively glycated and illustrate the applicability of both phospholipase C and phospholipase D in characterizing glycated phosphoglycerides

  16. Deformation of giant lipid bilayer vesicles in shear flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, de K.H.; Blom, C.; Ende, van den D.; Duits, M.H.G.; Mellema, J.

    1997-01-01

    We describe experimental studies of the deformation of giant lipid bilayer vesicles in shear flow. The experiments are carried out with a counterrotating Couette apparatus. The deformation depends on the mechanical properties of the lipid bilayer, the vesicle radius, and the viscosity of the surroun

  17. Model of separated form factors for unilamellar vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Kiselev, M A; Lesieur, P; Kisselev, A. M.; D. Lombardo; Aksenov, V. L.

    2001-01-01

    New model of separated form factors is proposed for the evaluation of small-angle neutron scattering curves from large unilamellar vesicles. The validity of the model was checked by comparison to the model of hollow sphere. The model of separated form factors and hollow sphere model give reasonable agreement in the evaluation of vesicle parameters.

  18. Schwannoma, a rare tumor of the seminal vesicle

    OpenAIRE

    Furtado, AM; Carrasquinho, E. (Eduardo); Ferreira, M; Afonso, A.; Ferrito, F

    2011-01-01

    We present a rare case of a schwannoma of the seminal vesicle that occurred in a 43-year-old male with symptoms of the lower urinary tract. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging documented a solid mass in the patient's left seminal vesicle. A transvesical approach with a transtrigonal midline incision was successfully performed. The microscopic aspect was compatible with schwannoma.

  19. Slow sedimentation and deformability of charged lipid vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Rey Suárez

    Full Text Available The study of vesicles in suspension is important to understand the complicated dynamics exhibited by cells in in vivo and in vitro. We developed a computer simulation based on the boundary-integral method to model the three dimensional gravity-driven sedimentation of charged vesicles towards a flat surface. The membrane mechanical behavior was modeled using the Helfrich Hamiltonian and near incompressibility of the membrane was enforced via a model which accounts for the thermal fluctuations of the membrane. The simulations were verified and compared to experimental data obtained using suspended vesicles labelled with a fluorescent probe, which allows visualization using fluorescence microscopy and confers the membrane with a negative surface charge. The electrostatic interaction between the vesicle and the surface was modeled using the linear Derjaguin approximation for a low ionic concentration solution. The sedimentation rate as a function of the distance of the vesicle to the surface was determined both experimentally and from the computer simulations. The gap between the vesicle and the surface, as well as the shape of the vesicle at equilibrium were also studied. It was determined that inclusion of the electrostatic interaction is fundamental to accurately predict the sedimentation rate as the vesicle approaches the surface and the size of the gap at equilibrium, we also observed that the presence of charge in the membrane increases its rigidity.

  20. Polydiacetylene vesicles as a novel drug sustained-release system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Caixin; Liu, Shaoqin; Dai, Zhifei; Jiang, Chang; Li, Wenyuan

    2010-03-01

    Aiming at the enhancement of the physicochemical stability as well as the sustained-release property of conventional liposomes, a novel polymerized vesicular carrier, 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid (PCDA) vesicles, loaded with paclitaxel as a model hydrophobic drug has been successfully constituted by incorporation of a polymerizable diacetylene into the lipid bilayer vesicles. The polymerized vesicles have been characterized in terms of particle size distribution and zeta-potential. Altering their lipid composition causes the zeta-potential to change from -3+/-1mV to more than -25mV, with a concomitant change in particle size distribution from 29+/-4nm to 149+/-18nm. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) showed that the stability of polymerized vesicles against Triton X-100 was improved greatly compared with the conventional liposomes. In vitro drug release studies show that PCDA-incorporating vesicles reduce the paclitaxel release over the conventional phospholipids vesicles. 69+/-6% paclitaxel is released within 24h from the conventional vesicles, but the insertion of 50% and 75% molar ratio of PCDA changes the amount to 57+/-1% and 32+/-4%, respectively. Our results demonstrate that such novel polymerized vesicles have very good prospect as an anticancer drug carrier. PMID:19896808

  1. Tension-induced vesicle fusion: pathways and pore dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics of tension-induced fusion of two vesicles is studied using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. The vesicle membranes use an improved DPD parameter set that results in their sustaining only a 10–30% relative area stretch before rupturing on the microsecond timescale...

  2. Encapsulation of antitumor drug methotrexate in liposome vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liposome vesicles containing antitumor drug methotrexate (MTX) were prepared. MTX was labelled by the tritium ion beam method. After purification by TLC, the specific radioactivity of 3H-MTX was 1.19 GBq/mmol with radiochemical purity orver 95%. Under various forming conditions of liposome vesicles, the efficiency of encapsulation was 21-53%

  3. ISEV position paper: extracellular vesicle RNA analysis and bioinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew F. Hill

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are the collective term for the various vesicles that are released by cells into the extracellular space. Such vesicles include exosomes and microvesicles, which vary by their size and/or protein and genetic cargo. With the discovery that EVs contain genetic material in the form of RNA (evRNA has come the increased interest in these vesicles for their potential use as sources of disease biomarkers and potential therapeutic agents. Rapid developments in the availability of deep sequencing technologies have enabled the study of EV-related RNA in detail. In October 2012, the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV held a workshop on “evRNA analysis and bioinformatics.” Here, we report the conclusions of one of the roundtable discussions where we discussed evRNA analysis technologies and provide some guidelines to researchers in the field to consider when performing such analysis.

  4. ETHOSOMES AS ELASTIC VESICLES IN TRANSDERMAL DRUG DELIVERY: AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. B. Gupta et al.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Ethosomes are as novel vesicles in transdermal drug delivery show significant effects of drug penetration through the biological membrane with slight modification of well established drug carrier liposomes. Ethosomes are soft, malleable vesicles composed mainly of phospholipids, ethanol and water. The size of ethosome vesicles can be modulated from tens of nanometer to microns. The ethosomes can be prepared by Hot as well as Cold method. The evaluation parameters of ethosomes include visualization, vesicle size and zeta potential, transition temperature, surface tension activity measurement, vesicle stability, drug content, penetration and permeation studies. Ethosomes have been found to be much more efficient at delivering drug to the skin than either liposomes or hydroalcoholic solution. Thus, it can be a logical conclusion that ethosomal formulation possesses promising future in effective dermal/transdermal delivery of bioactive agents.

  5. A transient solution for vesicle electrodeformation and relaxation

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jia; Tan, Wenchang; Lin, Hao

    2012-01-01

    A transient analysis for vesicle deformation under DC electric fields is developed. The theory extends from a droplet model, with the additional consideration of a lipid membrane separating two fluids of arbitrary properties. For the latter, both a membrane-charging and a membrane-mechanical model are supplied. The vesicle is assumed to remain spheroidal in shape for all times. The main result is an ODE governing the evolution of the vesicle aspect ratio. The effects of initial membrane tension and pulse length are examined. The model prediction is extensively compared with experimental data, and is shown to accurately capture the system behavior in the regime of no or weak electroporation. More importantly, the comparison reveals that vesicle relaxation obeys a universal behavior regardless of the means of deformation. The process is governed by a single timescale that is a function of the vesicle initial radius, the fluid viscosity, and the initial membrane tension. This universal scaling law can be used to...

  6. Translocation of an Incompressible Vesicle through a Pore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaei, Hamid R; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2016-07-01

    We have derived the free energy landscape for the translocation of a single vesicle through a narrow pore by accounting for bending and stretching of the vesicle, and the deformation of the vesicle by the pore. Emergence of a free energy barrier for translocation is a general result, and the magnitude of the barrier is calculated in terms of the various material parameters. The extent of the reduction in the barrier by the presence of an external constant force is calculated. Using the Fokker-Planck formalism, we have calculated the average translocation time corresponding to the various free energy landscapes representing different parameter sets. The dependencies of the average translocation time on the strength of the external force, vesicle size, bending and stretching moduli of the vesicle, and radius and length of the pore are derived, and the computed results are discussed. PMID:27089012

  7. Integration of transport pathways in Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Alfaro, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Cell polarity is maintained via a balance of exocytosis and endocytosis; the protein machinery that mediates these transport processes must be co-ordinated with membrane lipid signals. This lipid signalling is, in part, dependent on the establishment of membrane domains through lipid transport. Cholesterol is transported via a poorly defined route that is independent of vesicle-mediated secretory protein transport. This “non-vesicular” sterol transport is postulated to involve the conserved f...

  8. Gas Vesicle Nanoparticles for Antigen Display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiladitya DasSarma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms like the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 produce gas-filled buoyant organelles, which are easily purified as protein nanoparticles (called gas vesicles or GVNPs. GVNPs are non-toxic, exceptionally stable, bioengineerable, and self-adjuvanting. A large gene cluster encoding more than a dozen proteins has been implicated in their biogenesis. One protein, GvpC, found on the exterior surface of the nanoparticles, can accommodate insertions near the C-terminal region and results in GVNPs displaying the inserted sequences on the surface of the nanoparticles. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on GVNP structure and biogenesis as well as available studies on immunogenicity of pathogenic viral, bacterial, and eukaryotic proteins and peptides displayed on the nanoparticles. Recent improvements in genetic tools for bioengineering of GVNPs are discussed, along with future opportunities and challenges for development of vaccines and other applications.

  9. Extracellular vesicles in lung microenvironment and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Yu; Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Araya, Jun; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2015-09-01

    Increasing attention is being paid to the role of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in various lung diseases. EVs are released by a variety of cells, including respiratory cells and immune cells, and they encapsulate various molecules, such as proteins and microRNAs, as modulators of intercellular communication. Cancer cell-derived EVs play crucial roles in promoting tumor progression and modifying their microenvironment. By contrast, noncancerous cell-derived EVs demonstrate protective functions against injury, such as tissue recovery and repair, to maintain physiological homeostasis. Airway cells in contact with harmful substances may alter their EV composition and modify the balanced reciprocal interactions with surrounding mesenchymal cells. We summarize the novel findings of EV function in various lung diseases, primarily chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer. PMID:26231094

  10. Proteomics of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Outer Membrane Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieselbach, Thomas; Zijnge, Vincent; Granström, Elisabeth; Oscarsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by this species have been demonstrated to deliver effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and leukotoxin (LtxA) into human host cells and to act as triggers of innate immunity upon carriage of NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). To improve our understanding of the pathogenicity-associated functions that A. actinomycetemcomitans exports via OMVs, we studied the proteome of density gradient-purified OMVs from a rough-colony type clinical isolate, strain 173 (serotype e) using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This analysis yielded the identification of 151 proteins, which were found in at least three out of four independent experiments. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002509. Through this study, we not only confirmed the vesicle-associated release of LtxA, and the presence of proteins, which are known to act as immunoreactive antigens in the human host, but we also identified numerous additional putative virulence-related proteins in the A. actinomycetemcomitans OMV proteome. The known and putative functions of these proteins include immune evasion, drug targeting, and iron/nutrient acquisition. In summary, our findings are consistent with an OMV-associated proteome that exhibits several offensive and defensive functions, and they provide a comprehensive basis to further disclose roles of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMVs in periodontal and systemic disease. PMID:26381655

  11. Physicochemical characterization of surfactant incorporating vesicles that incorporate colloidal magnetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo Barbosa, Raquel; Luna Finkler, Christine L; Bentley, Maria Vitória L B; Santana, Maria Helena A

    2013-03-01

    Drug administration through the transdermal route has optimized for the comfort of patients and easy application. However, the main limitation of transdermal drug delivery is the impermeability of the human skin. Recent advances on improvement of drug transport through the skin include elastic liposomes as a penetration enhancer. Entrapment of ferrofluids in the core of liposomes produces magnetoliposomes, which can be driven by a high-gradient magnetic field. The association of both strategies could enhance the penetration of elastic liposomes. This work relies on the preparation and characterization of elastic-magnetic liposomes designed to permeate through the skin. The incorporation of colloidal magnetite and the elastic component, octaethylene glycol laurate (PEG-8-L), in the structure of liposomes were evaluated. The capability of the elastic magnetoliposomes for permeation through nanopores of two stacked polycarbonate membranes was compared to conventional and elastic liposomes. Magnetite incorporation was dependent on vesicle diameter and size distribution as well as PEG-8-L incorporation into liposomes, demonstrating the capability of the fluid bilayer to accommodate the surfactant without disruption. On the contrary, PEG-8-L incorporation into magnetoliposomes promoted a decrease of average diameter and a lower PEG-8-L incorporation percentage as a result of reduction on the fluidity of the bilayer imparted by iron incorporation into the lipid structure. Elastic liposomes demonstrated an enhancement of the deformation capability, as compared with conventional liposomes. Conventional and elastic magnetoliposomes presented a reduced capability for deformation and permeation. PMID:23363304

  12. Isolation of extracellular vesicles: Determining the correct approach (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szatanek, Rafal; Baran, Jarek; Siedlar, Maciej; Baj-Krzyworzeka, Monika

    2015-07-01

    The discovery of extracellular vesicles (EVs) has revised the interpretation of intercellular communication. It is now well established that EVs play a significant role in coagulation, inflammation, cancer and stem cell renewal and expansion. Their release presents an intriguing, transporting/trafficking network of biologically active molecules, which are able to reach and modulate the function/behavior of the target cells in a variety of ways. Moreover, the presence of EVs in various body fluids points to their potential for use as biomarkers and prognostic indicators in the surveillance/monitoring of a variety of diseases. Although vast knowledge on the subject of EVs has accumulated over the years, there are still fundamental issues associated with the correct approach for their isolation. This review comprises the knowledge on EV isolation techniques that are currently available. The aim of this reveiw was to make both experienced researchers and newcomers to the field aware that different types of EVs require unique isolation approaches. The realization of this 'uniqueness' is the first step in the right direction for the complete assessment of EVs. PMID:25902369

  13. A single vesicle-vesicle fusion assay for in vitro studies of SNAREs and accessory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Jiajie; Ishitsuka, Yuji; Lee, Hanki; Joo, Chirlmin; Su, Zengliu; Syed, Salman; Shin, Yeon-Kyun; Yoon, Tae-Young; Ha, Taekjip

    2012-05-01

    SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins are a highly regulated class of membrane proteins that drive the efficient merger of two distinct lipid bilayers into one interconnected structure. This protocol describes our fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based single vesicle-vesicle fusion assays for SNAREs and accessory proteins. Both lipid-mixing (with FRET pairs acting as lipophilic dyes in the membranes) and content-mixing assays (with FRET pairs present on a DNA hairpin that becomes linear via hybridization to a complementary DNA) are described. These assays can be used to detect substages such as docking, hemifusion, and pore expansion and full fusion. The details of flow cell preparation, protein-reconstituted vesicle preparation, data acquisition and analysis are described. These assays can be used to study the roles of various SNARE proteins, accessory proteins and effects of different lipid compositions on specific fusion steps. The total time required to finish one round of this protocol is 3–6 d. PMID:22582418

  14. Seminal vesicle intrafraction motion analysed with cinematic magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study analyses seminal vesicle displacement relative to the prostate and in relation to treatment time. A group of eleven patients undergoing prostate cancer radiotherapy were imaged with a continuous 3 T cine-MRI in the standard treatment setup position. Four images were recorded every 4 seconds for 15 minutes in the sagittal plane and every 6.5 seconds for 12 minutes in the coronal plane. The prostate gland and seminal vesicles were contoured on each MRI image. The coordinates of the centroid of the prostate and seminal vesicles on each image was analysed for displacement against time. Displacements between the 2.5 percentile and 97.5 percentile (i.e. the 2.5% trimmed range) for prostate and seminal vesicle centroid displacements were measured for 3, 5, 10 and 15 minutes time intervals in the anterior-posterior (AP), left-right (LR) and superior-inferior (SI) directions. Real time prostate and seminal vesicle displacement was compared for individual patients. The 2.5% trimmed range for 3, 5, 10 and 15 minutes for the seminal vesicle centroids in the SI direction measured 4.7 mm; 5.8 mm; 6.5 mm and 7.2 mm respectively. In the AP direction, it was 4.0 mm, 4.5 mm, 6.5 mm, and 7.0 mm. In the LR direction for 3, 5 and 10 minutes; for the left seminal vesicle, it was 2.7 mm, 2.8 mm, 3.4 mm and for the right seminal vesicle, it was 3.4 mm, 3.3 mm, and 3.4 mm. The correlation between the real-time prostate and seminal vesicle displacement varied substantially between patients indicating that the relationship between prostate displacement and seminal vesicles displacement is patient specific with the majority of the patients not having a strong relationship. Our study shows that seminal vesicle motion increases with treatment time, and that the prostate and seminal vesicle centroids do not move in unison in real time, and that an additional margin is required for independent seminal vesicle motion if treatment localisation is to the prostate

  15. Exosomes and other extracellular vesicles in neural cells and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janas, Anna M; Sapoń, Karolina; Janas, Teresa; Stowell, Michael H B; Janas, Tadeusz

    2016-06-01

    The function of human nervous system is critically dependent on proper interneuronal communication. Exosomes and other extracellular vesicles are emerging as a novel form of information exchange within the nervous system. Intraluminal vesicles within multivesicular bodies (MVBs) can be transported in neural cells anterogradely or retrogradely in order to be released into the extracellular space as exosomes. RNA loading into exosomes can be either via an interaction between RNA and the raft-like region of the MVB limiting membrane, or via an interaction between an RNA-binding protein-RNA complex with this raft-like region. Outflow of exosomes from neural cells and inflow of exosomes into neural cells presumably take place on a continuous basis. Exosomes can play both neuro-protective and neuro-toxic roles. In this review, we characterize the role of exosomes and microvesicles in normal nervous system function, and summarize evidence for defective signaling of these vesicles in disease pathogenesis of some neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26874206

  16. The interactions between surfactants and vesicles: Dissipative particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuei-Chun; Lin, Chun-Min; Tsao, Heng-Kwong; Sheng, Yu-Jane

    2009-06-01

    The interactions between surfactants and vesicles formed by double-tail amphiphiles are investigated by the dissipative particle dynamics. As the surfactant concentration is increased, vesicle solubilization can be generally described by the three-stage hypothesis including vesicular region, vesicle-micelle coexistence, and mixed micellar region. We study the partition of surfactants between the bilayer phase and the aqueous phase where a higher value of K indicates that more surfactant molecules are incorporated in the bilayer. It is found that ln(K-1) is proportional to the hydrophile-lipophile balance (HLB), which depicts the degree of hydrophilicity associated with a surfactant. As the overall hydrophilicity of surfactants increases, i.e., higher HLB, K declines and vice versa. When the amounts of surfactants reach a critical point, the solubilization begins and the coexistence of vesicles and mixed micelles is observed. Further increase in the surfactant concentration results in total collapse of the vesicle. Consistent with experimental observations, the three stages are identified through the vesicle size-surfactant concentration relation. Our simulations clearly demonstrate the process of the vesicle solubilization and confirm the validity of the three-stage hypothesis.

  17. Development, characterization, and skin delivery studies of related ultradeformable vesicles: transfersomes, ethosomes, and transethosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascenso, Andreia; Raposo, Sara; Batista, Cátia; Cardoso, Pedro; Mendes, Tiago; Praça, Fabíola Garcia; Bentley, Maria Vitória Lopes Badra; Simões, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Ultradeformable vesicles (UDV) have recently become a promising tool for the development of improved and innovative dermal and transdermal therapies. The aim of this work was to study three related UDV: transfersomes, ethosomes, and transethosomes for the incorporation of actives of distinct polarities, namely, vitamin E and caffeine, and to evaluate the effect of the carrier on skin permeation and penetration. These actives were incorporated in UDV formulations further characterized for vesicles imaging by transmission electron microscopy; mean vesicle size and polydispersity index by photon correlation spectroscopy; zeta potential by laser-Doppler anemometry; deformability by pressure-driven transport; and incorporation efficiency (IE) after actives quantification by high-performance liquid chromatography. Topical delivery studies were performed in order to compare UDV formulations regarding the release, skin permeation, and penetration profiles. All UDV formulations showed size values within the expected range, except transethosomes prepared by "transfersomal method", for which size was smaller than 100 nm in contrast to that obtained for vesicles prepared by "ethosomal method". Zeta potential was negative and higher for formulations containing sodium cholate. The IE was much higher for vitamin E- than caffeine-loaded UDV as expected. For flux measurements, the following order was obtained: transethosomes (TE) > ethosomes (E) ≥ transfersomes (T). This result was consistent with the release and skin penetration profiles for Vitamin E-loaded UDV. However, the releasing results were totally the opposite for caffeine-loaded UDV, which might be explained by the solubility and thermodynamic activity of this active in each formulation instead of the UDV deformability attending to the higher non-incorporated fraction of caffeine. Anyway, a high skin penetration and permeation for all caffeine-loaded UDV were obtained. Transethosomes were more deformable than ethosomes

  18. Reconstitution of mitochondria derived vesicle formation demonstrates selective enrichment of oxidized cargo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Soubannier

    Full Text Available The mechanisms that ensure the removal of damaged mitochondrial proteins and lipids are critical for the health of the cell, and errors in these pathways are implicated in numerous degenerative diseases. We recently uncovered a new pathway for the selective removal of proteins mediated by mitochondrial derived vesicular carriers (MDVs that transit to the lysosome. However, it was not determined whether these vesicles were selectively enriched for oxidized, or damaged proteins, and the extent to which the complexes of the electron transport chain and the mtDNA-containing nucloids may have been incorporated. In this study, we have developed a cell-free mitochondrial budding reaction in vitro in order to better dissect the pathway. Our data confirm that MDVs are stimulated upon various forms of mitochondrial stress, and the vesicles incorporated quantitative amounts of cargo, whose identity depended upon the nature of the stress. Under the conditions examined, MDVs did not incorporate complexes I and V, nor were any nucleoids present, demonstrating the specificity of cargo incorporation. Stress-induced MDVs are selectively enriched for oxidized proteins, suggesting that conformational changes induced by oxidation may initiate their incorporation into the vesicles. Ultrastructural analyses of MDVs isolated on sucrose flotation gradients revealed the formation of both single and double membranes vesicles of unique densities and uniform diameter. This work provides a framework for a reductionist approach towards a detailed examination of the mechanisms of MDV formation and cargo incorporation, and supports the emerging concept that MDVs are critical contributors to mitochondrial quality control.

  19. Extracellular Vesicles as Novel Delivery Tools for Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkan, Erdogan Pekcan; Saydam, Okay

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are different types of membrane-derived vesicles that originate from the endosomal pathway or the plasma membrane. These vesicles are used as "carriers" in intercellular communication, and are responsible for the transfer of biological cargo (lipids, proteins, RNA species, and DNA) between different cells. Despite the shortcomings in our knowledge of EV biology, attempts to employ EVs as natural delivery tools for therapeutic purposes have been partly successful in different settings. In this review, we highlight this unique potential of EVs, and discuss previous examples and future scenarios. PMID:26412464

  20. Colocalization of synapsin and actin during synaptic vesicle recycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloom, Ona; Evergren, Emma; Tomilin, Nikolay;

    2003-01-01

    activity, however, synapsin was detected in the pool of vesicles proximal to the active zone. In addition, actin and synapsin were found colocalized in a dynamic filamentous cytomatrix at the sites of synaptic vesicle recycling, endocytic zones. Synapsin immunolabeling was not associated with clathrin......-coated intermediates but was found on vesicles that appeared to be recycling back to the cluster. Disruption of synapsin function by microinjection of antisynapsin antibodies resulted in a prominent reduction of the cytomatrix at endocytic zones of active synapses. Our data suggest that in addition to its known...

  1. Extracellular vesicles round off communication in the nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budnik, Vivian; Ruiz-Cañada, Catalina; Wendler, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Functional neural competence and integrity require interactive exchanges among sensory and motor neurons, interneurons and glial cells. Recent studies have attributed some of the tasks needed for these exchanges to extracellular vesicles (such as exosomes and microvesicles), which are most prominently involved in shuttling reciprocal signals between myelinating glia and neurons, thus promoting neuronal survival, the immune response mediated by microglia, and synapse assembly and plasticity. Such vesicles have also been identified as important factors in the spread of neurodegenerative disorders and brain cancer. These extracellular vesicle functions add a previously unrecognized level of complexity to transcellular interactions within the nervous system. PMID:26891626

  2. Extracellular vesicles are the Trojan horses of viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altan-Bonnet, Nihal

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular vesicles have recently emerged as a novel mode of viral propagation exploited by both enveloped and non-enveloped viruses. In particular non-enveloped viruses utilize the hosts' production of extracellular vesicles to exit from cells non-lytically and to hide and manipulate the immune system. Moreover, challenging the long held idea that viruses behave as independent genetic units, extracellular vesicles enable multiple viral particles and genomes to collectively traffic in and out of cells, which can promote genetic cooperativity among viral quasispecies and enhance the fitness of the overall viral population. PMID:27232382

  3. The Emp24 complex recruits a specific cargo molecule into endoplasmic reticulum-derived vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Muniz, M.; Nuoffer, C; Hauri, H P; Riezman, H

    2000-01-01

    Members of the yeast p24 family, including Emp24p and Erv25p, form a heteromeric complex re- quired for the efficient transport of selected proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi ap- paratus. The specific functions and sites of action of this complex are unknown. We show that Emp24p is di- rectly required for efficient packaging of a lumenal cargo protein, Gas1p, into ER-derived vesicles. Emp24p and Erv25p can be directly cross-linked to Gas...

  4. Glioblastoma extracellular vesicles: reservoirs of potential biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redzic JS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Jasmina S Redzic,1 Timothy H Ung,2 Michael W Graner2 1Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most frequent and most devastating of the primary central nervous system tumors, with few patients living beyond 2 years postdiagnosis. The damage caused by the disease and our treatments for the patients often leave them physically and cognitively debilitated. Generally, GBMs appear after very short clinical histories and are discovered by imaging (using magnetic resonance imaging [MRI], and the diagnosis is validated by pathology, following surgical resection. The treatment response and diagnosis of tumor recurrence are also tracked by MRI, but there are numerous problems encountered with these monitoring modalities, such as ambiguous interpretation and forms of pseudoprogression. Diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive biomarkers would be an immense boon in following treatment schemes and in determining recurrence, which often requires an invasive intracranial biopsy to verify imaging data. Extracellular vesicles (EVs are stable, membrane-enclosed, virus-sized particles released from either the cell surface or from endosomal pathways that lead to the systemic release of EVs into accessible biofluids, such as serum/plasma, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and saliva. EVs carry a wide variety of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and other metabolites, with many common features but with enough individuality to be able to identify the cell of origin of the vesicles. These components, if properly interrogated, could allow for the identification of tumor-derived EVs in biofluids, indicating tumor progression, relapse, or treatment failure. That knowledge would allow clinicians to continue with treatment regimens that were actually effective or to change course if the therapies were failing. Here, we review

  5. Advances in transport phenomena 2011

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This new volume of the annual review “Advances in Transport Phenomena” series contains three in-depth review articles on the microfluidic fabrication of vesicles, the dielectrophoresis field-flow fractionation for continuous-flow separation of particles and cells in microfluidic devices, and the thermodynamic analysis and optimization of heat exchangers, respectively.

  6. A v-SNARE implicated in intra-Golgi transport

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    We report the identification of a putative v-SNARE (GOS-28), localized primarily to transport vesicles at the terminal rims of Golgi stacks. In vitro, GOS-28, A Golgi SNARE of 28 kD, is efficiently packaged into Golgi-derived vesicles, which are most likely COPI coated. Antibodies directed against GOS-28 block its ability to bind alpha-SNAP, partially inhibit transport from the cis to the medial cisternae, and do not inhibit budding of COP-coated vesicles, but do accumulate docked uncoated ve...

  7. ATP-binding cassette-like transporters are involved in the transport of lignin precursors across plasma and vacuolar membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Y.C.; Liu, C.

    2010-12-28

    Lignin is a complex biopolymer derived primarily from the condensation of three monomeric precursors, the monolignols. The synthesis of monolignols occurs in the cytoplasm. To reach the cell wall where they are oxidized and polymerized, they must be transported across the cell membrane. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the transport process are unclear. There are conflicting views about whether the transport of these precursors occurs by passive diffusion or is an energized active process; further, we know little about what chemical forms are required. Using isolated plasma and vacuolar membrane vesicles prepared from Arabidopsis, together with applying different transporter inhibitors in the assays, we examined the uptake of monolignols and their derivatives by these native membrane vesicles. We demonstrate that the transport of lignin precursors across plasmalemma and their sequestration into vacuoles are ATP-dependent primary-transport processes, involving ATP-binding cassette-like transporters. Moreover, we show that both plasma and vacuolar membrane vesicles selectively transport different forms of lignin precursors. In the presence of ATP, the inverted plasma membrane vesicles preferentially take up monolignol aglycones, whereas the vacuolar vesicles are more specific for glucoconjugates, suggesting that the different ATP-binding cassette-like transporters recognize different chemical forms in conveying them to distinct sites, and that glucosylation of monolignols is necessary for their vacuolar storage but not required for direct transport into the cell wall in Arabidopsis.

  8. Function of seminal vesicles and their role on male fertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gustavo F. Gonzales

    2001-01-01

    The present review has been designed to update the recent developments on the function of seminal vesicles and their role on male fertility. It is indicated that the true corrected fructose level is a simple method for the assessment of the seminal vesicular function. Measurement of seminal fructose used universally as a marker of the seminal vesicle function is not an appropriate approach due to its inverse relationship with the sperm count. The true corrected fructose defined as [ log. motile sperm concentration ] multiplied by [ seminal fructose concentration ] has been shown to be a better marker of the seminal vesicle function.Seminal vesicular secretion is important for semen coagulation, sperm motility, and stability of sperm chromatin andsuppression of the immune activity in the female reproductive tract.In conclusion, the function of seminal vesicle is important for fertility. Parameters as sperm motility, sperm chromatin stability, and immuno-protection may be changed in case of its hypofunction.

  9. Electro-hydrodynamic effects on lipid membranes in giant vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staykova, Margarita; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Dimova, Rumiana

    2009-11-01

    Electric fields are widely applied for cell manipulation in numerous micron-scale systems. Here, we show for the first time that alternating electric fields may cause pronounced flows in the membrane of giant lipid vesicles as well as in the surrounding fluid media.^ The lipid vesicles are not only biomimetic model for the cell membrane but also have many potential biotechnological applications, e.g. as drug-delivery systems and micro-reactors. The reported effects should be considered in electric micro-manipulation procedures on cells and vesicles. They might be useful for applications in microfluidic technologies, for lipid mixing, trapping and displacement, as will be demonstrated. We also believe that our method for visualization of the lipid flows by fluorescently labeled intra-membrane domains will be helpful for studies on membrane behavior in vesicles subjected to shear or mechanical stresses.

  10. Generic sorting of raft lipids into secretory vesicles in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Surma, Michal A; Klose, Christian; Klemm, Robin W; Ejsing, Christer S.; Simons, Kai

    2011-01-01

    Previous work has showed that ergosterol and sphingolipids become sorted to secretory vesicles immunoisolated using a chimeric, artificial raft membrane protein as bait. In this study, we have extended this analysis to three populations of secretory vesicles isolated using natural yeast plasma...... membrane (PM) proteins: Pma1p, Mid2p and Gap1*p as baits. We compared the lipidomes of the immunoisolated vesicles with each other and with the lipidomes of the donor compartment, the trans-Golgi network, and the acceptor compartment, the PM, using a quantitative mass spectrometry approach that provided a...... complete lipid overview of the yeast late secretory pathway. We could show that vesicles captured with different baits carry the same cargo and have almost identical lipid compositions; being highly enriched in ergosterol and sphingolipids. This finding indicates that lipid raft sorting is a generic...

  11. Lipid-Targeting Peptide Probes for Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Aaron D; Yin, Hang

    2016-11-01

    Extracellular vesicles released from cells are under intense investigation for their roles in cell-cell communication and cancer progression. However, individual vesicles have been difficult to probe as their small size renders them invisible by conventional light microscopy. However, as a consequence of their small size these vesicles possess highly curved lipid membranes that offer an unconventional target for curvature-sensing probes. In this article, we present a strategy for using peptide-based biosensors to detect highly curved membranes and the negatively charged membrane lipid phosphatidylserine, we delineate several assays used to validate curvature- and lipid-targeting mechanisms, and we explore potential applications in probing extracellular vesicles released from sources such as apoptotic cells, cancer cells, or activated platelets. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2327-2332, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26909741

  12. EVpedia : A community web portal for extracellular vesicles research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Dae Kyum; Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Sae Rom; Choi, Dong Sic; Yoon, Yae Jin; Kim, Ji Hyun; Go, Gyeongyun; Nhung, Dinh; Hong, Kahye; Jang, Su Chul; Kim, Si Hyun; Park, Kyong Su; Kim, Oh Youn; Park, Hyun Taek; Seo, Ji Hye; Aikawa, Elena; Baj-Krzyworzeka, Monika; Van Balkom, Bas W M; Belting, Mattias; Blanc, Lionel; Bond, Vincent; Bongiovanni, Antonella; Borràs, Francesc E.; Buée, Luc; Buzás, Edit I.; Cheng, Lesley; Clayton, Aled; Cocucci, Emanuele; Dela Cruz, Charles S.; Desiderio, Dominic M.; Di Vizio, Dolores; Ekström, Karin; Falcon-Perez, Juan M.; Gardiner, Chris; Giebel, Bernd; Greening, David W.; Christina Gross, Julia; Gupta, Dwijendra; Hendrix, An; Hill, Andrew F.; Hill, Michelle M.; Nolte-'T Hoen, Esther; Hwang, Do Won; Inal, Jameel; Jagannadham, Medicharla V.; Jayachandran, Muthuvel; Jee, Young Koo; Jørgensen, Malene; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Kim, Yoon Keun; Kislinger, Thomas; Lässer, Cecilia; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Hakmo; Van Leeuwen, Johannes; Lener, Thomas; Liu, Ming Lin; Lötvall, Jan; Marcilla, Antonio; Mathivanan, Suresh; Möller, Andreas; Morhayim, Jess; Mullier, Francois; Nazarenko, Irina; Nieuwland, Rienk; Nunes, Diana N.; Pang, Ken; Park, Jaesung; Patel, Tushar; Pocsfalvi, Gabriella; Del Portillo, Hernando; Putz, Ulrich; Ramirez, Marcel I.; Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Roh, Tae Young; Royo, Felix; Sahoo, Susmita; Schiffelers, Raymond; Sharma, Shivani; Siljander, Pia; Simpson, Richard J.; Soekmadji, Carolina; Stahl, Philip; Stensballe, Allan; Stepień, Ewa; Tahara, Hidetoshi; Trummer, Arne; Valadi, Hadi; Vella, Laura J.; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Witwer, Kenneth; Yánez-Mó, Maria; Youn, Hyewon; Zeidler, Reinhard; Gho, Yong Song

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are spherical bilayered proteolipids, harboring various bioactive molecules. Due to the complexity of the vesicular nomenclatures and components, online searches for EV-related publications and vesicular components are currently challenging. Results: We prese

  13. Assembly of cells and vesicles for organ engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of materials and technologies for the assembly of cells and/or vesicles is a key for the next generation of tissue engineering. Since the introduction of the tissue engineering concept in 1993, various types of scaffolds have been developed for the regeneration of connective tissues in vitro and in vivo. Cartilage, bone and skin have been successfully regenerated in vitro, and these regenerated tissues have been applied clinically. However, organs such as the liver and pancreas constitute numerous cell types, contain small amounts of extracellular matrix, and are highly vascularized. Therefore, organ engineering will require the assembly of cells and/or vesicles. In particular, adhesion between cells/vesicles will be required for regeneration of organs in vitro. This review introduces and discusses the key technologies and materials for the assembly of cells/vesicles for organ regeneration. (topical review)

  14. Assembly of cells and vesicles for organ engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsushi Taguchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of materials and technologies for the assembly of cells and/or vesicles is a key for the next generation of tissue engineering. Since the introduction of the tissue engineering concept in 1993, various types of scaffolds have been developed for the regeneration of connective tissues in vitro and in vivo. Cartilage, bone and skin have been successfully regenerated in vitro, and these regenerated tissues have been applied clinically. However, organs such as the liver and pancreas constitute numerous cell types, contain small amounts of extracellular matrix, and are highly vascularized. Therefore, organ engineering will require the assembly of cells and/or vesicles. In particular, adhesion between cells/vesicles will be required for regeneration of organs in vitro. This review introduces and discusses the key technologies and materials for the assembly of cells/vesicles for organ regeneration.

  15. Assembly of cells and vesicles for organ engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, Tetsushi, E-mail: taguchi.tetsushi@nims.go.jp [Biofunctional Materials Unit, Nano-Bio Field, Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    The development of materials and technologies for the assembly of cells and/or vesicles is a key for the next generation of tissue engineering. Since the introduction of the tissue engineering concept in 1993, various types of scaffolds have been developed for the regeneration of connective tissues in vitro and in vivo. Cartilage, bone and skin have been successfully regenerated in vitro, and these regenerated tissues have been applied clinically. However, organs such as the liver and pancreas constitute numerous cell types, contain small amounts of extracellular matrix, and are highly vascularized. Therefore, organ engineering will require the assembly of cells and/or vesicles. In particular, adhesion between cells/vesicles will be required for regeneration of organs in vitro. This review introduces and discusses the key technologies and materials for the assembly of cells/vesicles for organ regeneration. (topical review)

  16. Assembly of cells and vesicles for organ engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Tetsushi

    2011-12-01

    The development of materials and technologies for the assembly of cells and/or vesicles is a key for the next generation of tissue engineering. Since the introduction of the tissue engineering concept in 1993, various types of scaffolds have been developed for the regeneration of connective tissues in vitro and in vivo. Cartilage, bone and skin have been successfully regenerated in vitro, and these regenerated tissues have been applied clinically. However, organs such as the liver and pancreas constitute numerous cell types, contain small amounts of extracellular matrix, and are highly vascularized. Therefore, organ engineering will require the assembly of cells and/or vesicles. In particular, adhesion between cells/vesicles will be required for regeneration of organs in vitro. This review introduces and discusses the key technologies and materials for the assembly of cells/vesicles for organ regeneration.

  17. [Extracellular vesicles and their role in hematological malignancies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzepiel, Andrea; Kutszegi, Nóra; Cs Sági, Judit; Kelemen, Andrea; Pálóczi, Krisztina; F Semsei, Ágnes; Buzás, Edit; Erdélyi, Dániel János

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular vesicles are produced in all organisms. The most intensively investigated categories of extracellular vesicles include apoptotic bodies, microvesicles and exosomes. Among a very wide range of areas, their role has been confirmed in intercellular communication, immune response and angiogenesis (in both physiological and pathological conditions). Their alterations suggest the potential use of them as biomarkers. In this paper the authors give an insight into the research of extracellular vesicles in general, and then focus on published findings in hematological malignancies. Quantitative and qualitative changes of microvesicles and exosomes may have value in diagnostics, prognostics and minimal residual disease monitoring of hematological malignancies. The function of extracellular vesicles in downregulation of natural killer cells' activity has been demonstrated in acute myeloid leukemia. In chronic lymphocytic leukemia, microvesicles seem to play a role in drug resistance. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(35), 1379-1384. PMID:27569460

  18. Dysregulations of Synaptic Vesicle Trafficking in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbujo, Chijioke N; Sinclair, Duncan; Hahn, Chang-Gyu

    2016-08-01

    Schizophrenia is a serious psychiatric illness which is experienced by about 1 % of individuals worldwide and has a debilitating impact on perception, cognition, and social function. Over the years, several models/hypotheses have been developed which link schizophrenia to dysregulations of the dopamine, glutamate, and serotonin receptor pathways. An important segment of these pathways that have been extensively studied for the pathophysiology of schizophrenia is the presynaptic neurotransmitter release mechanism. This set of molecular events is an evolutionarily well-conserved process that involves vesicle recruitment, docking, membrane fusion, and recycling, leading to efficient neurotransmitter delivery at the synapse. Accumulated evidence indicate dysregulation of this mechanism impacting postsynaptic signal transduction via different neurotransmitters in key brain regions implicated in schizophrenia. In recent years, after ground-breaking work that elucidated the operations of this mechanism, research efforts have focused on the alterations in the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression of presynaptic neurotransmitter release molecules in schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric conditions. In this review article, we present recent evidence from schizophrenia human postmortem studies that key proteins involved in the presynaptic release mechanism are dysregulated in the disorder. We also discuss the potential impact of dysfunctional presynaptic neurotransmitter release on the various neurotransmitter systems implicated in schizophrenia. PMID:27371030

  19. Dolichol phosphate induces non-bilayer structures, vesicle fusion and transbilayer movements of lipids in model membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Kruijff, B.; Van Duijn, G.; Valtersson, C.; Chojnacki, T.; Verkleij, A.J.; Dallner, G.

    1987-05-01

    The effect of dolichols, polyprenols, dolichol esterified with fatty acids, and dolichol phosphate on the structure and fluidity of model membranes was studied using different biophysical techniques. These studies suggest that (1) dolichol and dolichol derivatives destabilize unsaturated PE-containing bilayers and promote hexagonal II phase formation; (2) high concentrations of dolichol induce lipid structures characterized by isotropic T P NMR and particulate fracture faces. The effect of dolichol and dolichyl phosphate on fusion between large unilamellar vesicles of DOPC and DOPE was studied using a fluroescence resonance energy transfer assay. The influence of dolichyl phosphate on the transbilary movement of DOPC in multilamellar vesicles (MLV) and large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) composed of DOPC and DOPE (1:2) was investigated by using the PC-specified transfer protein. The results indicate that: (1) both dolichol and dolichyl phosphate enhance vesicle fusion in a comparable and concentration-dependent way; (2) the amount of exchangeable PC from MLVs is increased by dolichyl phosphate probably as a result of fusion processes. It thus appears that these polyprenols are potent destabilizers of bilayer structure and that this process is accompanied by membrane fusion and transbilayer transport of phospholipids.

  20. Dolichol phosphate induces non-bilayer structures, vesicle fusion and transbilayer movements of lipids in model membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of dolichols, polyprenols, dolichol esterified with fatty acids, and dolichol phosphate on the structure and fluidity of model membranes was studied using different biophysical techniques. These studies suggest that (1) dolichol and dolichol derivatives destabilize unsaturated PE-containing bilayers and promote hexagonal II phase formation; (2) high concentrations of dolichol induce lipid structures characterized by isotropic 31P NMR and particulate fracture faces. The effect of dolichol and dolichyl phosphate on fusion between large unilamellar vesicles of DOPC and DOPE was studied using a fluroescence resonance energy transfer assay. The influence of dolichyl phosphate on the transbilary movement of DOPC in multilamellar vesicles (MLV) and large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) composed of DOPC and DOPE (1:2) was investigated by using the PC-specified transfer protein. The results indicate that: (1) both dolichol and dolichyl phosphate enhance vesicle fusion in a comparable and concentration-dependent way; (2) the amount of exchangeable PC from MLVs is increased by dolichyl phosphate probably as a result of fusion processes. It thus appears that these polyprenols are potent destabilizers of bilayer structure and that this process is accompanied by membrane fusion and transbilayer transport of phospholipids

  1. Semi-permeable vesicles composed of natural clay

    OpenAIRE

    Subramaniam, Anand B.; Wan, Jiandi; Gopinath, Arvind; Stone, Howard A.

    2010-01-01

    We report a simple route to form robust, inorganic, semi-permeable compartments composed of montmorillonite, a natural plate-like clay mineral that occurs widely in the environment. Mechanical forces due to shear in a narrow gap assemble clay nanoplates from an aqueous suspension onto air bubbles. Translucent vesicles suspended in a single-phase liquid are produced when the clay-covered air bubbles are exposed to a variety of water-miscible organic liquids. These vesicles of clay are mechanic...

  2. Photoresponsive vesicle permeability based on intramolecular host-guest inclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauscher, Ulrike; Samanta, Avik; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2014-01-28

    This article describes light-responsive vesicles that can release their contents in response to a light-sensitive molecular trigger. To this end, liposomes were equipped with amphiphilic β-cyclodextrin that was covalently labeled with azobenzene. Using dye encapsulation and confocal laser scanning microscopy, we show that the permeability of these vesicles strongly increases upon UV irradiation (λ = 350 nm) with concomitant isomerization of apolar trans-azobenzene to polar cis-azobenzene on the liposome surface. PMID:24287588

  3. Ultradeformable phospholipid vesicles as a drug delivery system: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Eder Lilia

    2015-01-01

    Maria Jose Morilla, Eder Lilia RomeroNanomedicine Research Program, Department of Science and Technology, National University of Quilmes, Buenos Aires, Argentina Abstract: Ultradeformable vesicles are highly deformable (elastic/flexible) liposomes made of phospholipids plus highly mobile hydrophilic detergents capable of penetrating the intact skin across the stratum corneum and reaching the viable epidermis. Ultradeformable vesicles are more effective than conventional liposomes in deliveri...

  4. ELECTRICALLY ADDRESSABLE VESICLES – TOOLS FOR DIELECTROPHORESIS METROLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Desai, Salil P.; Vahey, Michael D.; Voldman, Joel

    2009-01-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) has emerged as an important tool for the manipulation of bioparticles ranging from the submicron to the tens of microns in size. Here we show the use of phospholipid vesicle electroformation techniques to develop a new class of test particles with specifically engineered electrical propserties to enable identifiable dielectrophoretic responses in microfabricated systems. These electrically addressable vesicles (EAVs) enable the creation of electrically distinct populat...

  5. Rheological properties of sheared vesicle and cell suspensions

    OpenAIRE

    Lamura, A.; Gompper, G.

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulations of vesicle suspensions are performed in two dimensions to study their dynamical and rheological properties. An hybrid method is adopted, which combines a mesoscopic approach for the solvent with a curvature-elasticity model for the membrane. Shear flow is induced by two counter-sliding parallel walls, which generate a linear flow profile. The flow behavior is studied for various vesicle concentrations and viscosity ratios between the internal and the external fluid. Both...

  6. Cell behaviour during optic vesicle morphogenesis in medaka

    OpenAIRE

    Rembold, Martina

    2005-01-01

    Vertebrate eye morphogenesis starts with the bilateral evagination of optic vesicles from the forebrain. A failure of evagination leads to the complete absence of eyes. Despite a good knowledge about patterning and retina differentiation, the mechanism underlying evagination remained largely unknown. Studies on optic vesicle morphogenesis and its underlying cellular basis were missing. I therefore used an in vivo imaging approach in medaka fish to investigate the cellular movements and dynami...

  7. Studies on the incorporation of lipase in synthetic polymerisable vesicles.

    OpenAIRE

    Mosmuller, E.W.J.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis describes studies on the suitability of synthetic polymerisable vesicles for the incorporation and stabilisation of lipase for the bioconversion of organic chemical compounds.In chapter 1 , some characteristics are reviewed of hydrolytic enzymes, and more specific those of lipases. In chapter 2 an overview is presented of the features and properties of surfactants and vesicles.In chapter 3 , the incorporation is described of lipase from Candida cylindracea (CCL) into polymerisable...

  8. Three-dimensional visualization of coated vesicle formation in fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    Fibroblasts apparently ingest low density lipoproteins (LDL) by a selective mechanism of receptor-mediated endocytosis involving the formation of coated vesicles from the plasma membrane. However, it is not known exactly how coated vesicles collect LDL receptors and pinch off from the plasma membrane. In this report, the quick-freeze, deep- etch, rotary-replication method has been applied to fibroblasts; it displays with unusual clarity the coats that appear under the plasma membrane at the s...

  9. Concurrent Imaging of Synaptic Vesicle Recycling and Calcium Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Haiyan; Foss, Sarah M.; Dobryy, Yuriy L.; Park, C. Kevin; Hires, Samuel Andrew; Shaner, Nathan C.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Osborne, Leslie C.; Voglmaier, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Synaptic transmission involves the calcium dependent release of neurotransmitter from synaptic vesicles. Genetically encoded optical probes emitting different wavelengths of fluorescent light in response to neuronal activity offer a powerful approach to understand the spatial and temporal relationship of calcium dynamics to the release of neurotransmitter in defined neuronal populations. To simultaneously image synaptic vesicle recycling and changes in cytosolic calcium, we developed a red-sh...

  10. Concurrent imaging of synaptic vesicle recycling and calcium dynamics.

    OpenAIRE

    Haiyan eLi; Foss, Sarah M.; Yuriy eDobryy; C. Kevin ePark; Samuel Andrew Hires; Shaner, Nathan C.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Osborne, Leslie C.; Voglmaier, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Synaptic transmission involves the calcium-dependent release of neurotransmitter from synaptic vesicles. Genetically encoded optical probes emitting different wavelengths of fluorescent light in response to neuronal activity offer a powerful approach to understand the spatial and temporal relationship of calcium dynamics to the release of neurotransmitter in defined neuronal populations. To simultaneously image synaptic vesicle recycling and changes in cytosolic calcium, we developed a red-...

  11. Dielectric Spectroscopy Study on Vesicles of CTAB/SDBS System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Amphiphilic molecules can form into different structures, such as micelle, microemulsion, vesicle, liposome, liquid crystals, and so on by self-associating. The Dielectric Spectroscopy (DS) method has been applied to the systems of micelle and microemulsion successfully. For the first time the author put the method to the system of vesicle of CTAB/SDBS. The experiments show clear dielectric relaxation and the results were discussed primarily.

  12. Distinct N-terminal regions of the exomer secretory vesicle cargo Chs3 regulate its trafficking itinerary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. ChristopherFromme

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cells transport integral membrane proteins between organelles by sorting them into vesicles. Cargo adaptors act to recognize sorting signals in transmembrane cargos and to interact with coat complexes that aid in vesicle biogenesis. No coat proteins have yet been identified that generate secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network (TGN to the plasma membrane, but the exomer complex has been identified as a cargo adaptor complex that mediates transport of several proteins in this pathway. Chs3, the most well-studied exomer cargo, cycles between the TGN and the plasma membrane in synchrony with the cell cycle, providing an opportunity to study regulation of proteins that cycle in response to signaling. Here we show that different segments of the Chs3 N-terminus mediate distinct trafficking steps. Residues 10-27, known to mediate retention, also appear to play a role in internalization. Residues 28-52 are involved in transport to the plasma membrane and recycling out of endosomes to prevent degradation in the vacuole. We also present the crystal structure of residues 10-27 bound to the exomer complex, suggesting different cargo adaptors could compete for binding to this segment, providing a potential mechanism for regulation.

  13. Vesicles prepared with the complex salts dioctadecyldimethylammonium polyacrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Fernanda Rosa; Loh, Watson

    2012-02-15

    The effect of a polymeric counterion on the thermotropic behavior of sonicated vesicles formed by complex salts in aqueous solution and with decanol (C(10)OH) and tetradecanol (C(14)OH) was investigated. The complex salts were prepared with dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB) and polyacrylic acids (PAA, containing 30 or 6000 repeating units), being referred to as DODAPA(30) and DODAPA(6000). Vesicles containing polymeric counterions presented higher contents of multilamellar vesicles that were dependent on the complex salt concentration and on the counterion chain length. For comparison, studies were performed with DODAAc, with the counterion acetate, resulting in the formation of mostly unilamellar vesicles, as expected due greater dissociation, leading to greater electrical repulsion between bilayers. Mixtures of these complex salts and DODAX (where X=acetate or bromide) were also investigated with respect to their vesicles thermotropic behavior and size. This study opens the possibility of applying the methodology of direct complex salt preparation (as opposed to mixing the surfactant and polymeric components) to produce vesicles with controlled composition and properties. PMID:22172692

  14. Kinetics of a Multilamellar Lipid Vesicle Ripening: Simulation and Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rui; He, Xuehao

    2016-03-10

    Lipid vesicle ripening via unimolecular diffusion and exchange greatly influences the evolution of complex vesicle structure. However, this behavior is difficult to capture using conventional experimental technology and molecular simulation. In the present work, the ripening of a multilamellar lipid vesicle (MLV) is effectively explored using a mesoscale coarse-grained molecular model. The simulation reveals that a small MLV evolves into a unilamellar vesicle over a very long time period. In this process, only the outermost bilayer inflates, and the inner bilayers shrink. With increasing MLV size, the ripening process becomes complex and depends on competition between a series of adjacent bilayers in the MLV. To understand the diffusion behavior of the unimolecule, the potentials of mean force (PMFs) of a single lipid molecule across unilamellar vesicles with different sizes are calculated. It is found that the PMF of lipid dissociation from the inner layer is different than that of the outer layer, and the dissociation energy barrier sensitively depends on the curvature of the bilayer. A kinetics theoretical model of MLV ripening that considers the lipid dissociation energy for curved bilayers is proposed. The model successfully interprets the MLV ripening process with various numbers of bilayers and shows potential to predict the ripening kinetics of complex lipid vesicles. PMID:26882997

  15. Studies of vesicle distribution patterns in Hawaiian lavas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basaltic lava flows are generally vesicular, and the broader facts relating to vesicle distribution have long been established; few studies have yet been made with a view to determining how and when vesicles form in the cooling history of the lava, explaining vesicle shape and size distribution, and gaining enough understanding to employ vesicles as a geological tool. Various avenues of approach exist by which one may seek to gain a better understanding of these ubiquitous structures and make a start towards developing a general theory, and three such avenues have recently been explored. One avenue involves the study of pipe vesicles; these are a well known feature of lava flows and are narrow pipes which occur near the base of many pahoehoe flow units. Another avenue of approach is that presented by the distinctive spongy pahoehoe facies of lava that is common in distal locations on Hawaiian volcanoes. A third avenue of approach is that of the study of gas blisters in lava. Gas blisters are voids, which can be as much as tens of meters wide, where the lava split along a vesicle-rich layer and the roof up-arched by gas pressure. These three avenues are briefly discussed

  16. Extracellular Membrane Vesicles and Phytopathogenicity of Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav M. Chernov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For the first time, the phytopathogenicity of extracellular vesicles of Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8 (a ubiquitous mycoplasma that is one of the five common species of cell culture contaminants and is a causative agent for phytomycoplasmoses in Oryza sativa L. plants was studied. Data on the ability of extracellular vesicles of Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8 to penetrate from the nutrient medium into overground parts of Oryza sativa L. through the root system and to cause alterations in ultrastructural organization of the plants were presented. As a result of the analysis of ultrathin leaf sections of plants grown in medium with A. laidlawii PG8 vesicles, we detected significant changes in tissue ultrastructure characteristic to oxidative stress in plants as well as their cultivation along with bacterial cells. The presence of nucleotide sequences of some mycoplasma genes within extracellular vesicles of Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8 allowed a possibility to use PCR (with the following sequencing to perform differential detection of cells and bacterial vesicles in samples under study. The obtained data may suggest the ability of extracellular vesicles of the mycoplasma to display in plants the features of infection from the viewpoint of virulence criteria—invasivity, infectivity—and toxigenicity—and to favor to bacterial phytopathogenicity.

  17. Bubble-induced microstreaming: guiding and destroying lipid vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmottant, Philippe; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2002-11-01

    Micron-sized bubbles respond with strong oscillations when submitted to ultrasound. This has led to their use as echographic contrast enhancers. The large energy and force densities generated by the collapsing bubbles also make them non-invasive mechanical tools: Recently, it has been reported that the interaction of cavitating bubbles with nearby cells can render the latter permeable to large molecules (sonoporation), suggesting prospects for drug delivery and gene transfection. We have developed a laboratory setup that allows for a controlled study of the interaction of single microbubbles with single lipid bilayer vesicles. Substituting vesicles for cell membranes is advantageous because the mechanical properties of vesicles are well-known. Microscopic observations reveal that vesicles near a bubble follow the vivid streaming motion set up by the bubble. The vesicles "bounce" off the bubble, being periodically accelerated towards and away from it, and undergo well-defined shape deformations along their trajectory in accordance with fluid-dynamical theory. Break-up of vesicles could also be observed.

  18. Polarized exocyst-mediated vesicle fusion directs intracellular lumenogenesis within the C. elegans excretory cell

    OpenAIRE

    Armenti, Stephen T.; Chan, Emily; Nance, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Lumenogenesis of small seamless tubes occurs through intracellular membrane growth and directed vesicle fusion events. Within the C. elegans excretory cell, which forms seamless intracellular tubes (canals) that mediate osmoregulation, lumens grow in length and diameter when vesicles fuse with the expanding lumenal surface. Here, we show that lumenal vesicle fusion depends on the small GTPase RAL-1, which localizes to vesicles and acts through the exocyst vesicle-tethering complex. Loss of ei...

  19. GTP hydrolysis is required for vesicle fusion during nuclear envelope assembly in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear envelope assembly was studied in vitro using extracts from Xenopus eggs. Nuclear-specific vesicles bound to demembranated sperm chromatin but did not fuse in the absence of cytosol. Addition of cytosol stimulated vesicle fusion, pore complex assembly, and eventual nuclear envelope growth. Vesicle binding and fusion were assayed by light and electron microscopy. Addition of ATP and GTP to bound vesicles caused limited vesicle fusion, but enclosure of the chromatin was not observed. Thi...

  20. Coated vesicles participate in the receptor-mediated endocytosis of insulin

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    We have purified coated vesicles from rat liver by differential ultracentrifugation. Electron micrographs of these preparations reveal only the polyhedral structures typical of coated vesicles. SDS PAGE of the coated vesicle preparation followed by Coomassie Blue staining of proteins reveals a protein composition also typical of coated vesicles. We determined that these rat liver coated vesicles possess a latent insulin binding capability. That is, little if any specific binding of 125I-insul...

  1. Development, characterization, and skin delivery studies of related ultradeformable vesicles: transfersomes, ethosomes, and transethosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ascenso A

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Andreia Ascenso,1 Sara Raposo,1 Cátia Batista,2 Pedro Cardoso,2 Tiago Mendes,2 Fabíola Garcia Praça,3 Maria Vitória Lopes Badra Bentley,3 Sandra Simões1 1Instituto de Investigação do Medicamento (iMed.ULisboa, 2Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal; 3Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Monte Alegre, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Ultradeformable vesicles (UDV have recently become a promising tool for the development of improved and innovative dermal and transdermal therapies. The aim of this work was to study three related UDV: transfersomes, ethosomes, and transethosomes for the incorporation of actives of distinct polarities, namely, vitamin E and caffeine, and to evaluate the effect of the carrier on skin permeation and penetration. These actives were incorporated in UDV formulations further characterized for vesicles imaging by transmission electron microscopy; mean vesicle size and polydispersity index by photon correlation spectroscopy; zeta potential by laser-Doppler anemometry; deformability by pressure-driven transport; and incorporation efficiency (IE after actives quantification by high-performance liquid chromatography. Topical delivery studies were performed in order to compare UDV formulations regarding the release, skin permeation, and penetration profiles. All UDV formulations showed size values within the expected range, except transethosomes prepared by “transfersomal method”, for which size was smaller than 100 nm in contrast to that obtained for vesicles prepared by “ethosomal method”. Zeta potential was negative and higher for formulations containing sodium cholate. The IE was much higher for vitamin E- than caffeine-loaded UDV as expected. For flux measurements, the following order was obtained: transethosomes (TE > ethosomes (E ≥ transfersomes (T. This result was consistent with the release and skin penetration

  2. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: Physiological Role and Signalling Properties of Extracellular Membrane Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunzio Iraci

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are a heterogeneous population of secreted membrane vesicles, with distinct biogenesis routes, biophysical properties and different functions both in physiological conditions and in disease. The release of EVs is a widespread biological process, which is conserved across species. In recent years, numerous studies have demonstrated that several bioactive molecules are trafficked with(in EVs, such as microRNAs, mRNAs, proteins and lipids. The understanding of their final impact on the biology of specific target cells remains matter of intense debate in the field. Also, EVs have attracted great interest as potential novel cell-free therapeutics. Here we describe the proposed physiological and pathological functions of EVs, with a particular focus on their molecular content. Also, we discuss the advances in the knowledge of the mechanisms regulating the secretion of EV-associated molecules and the specific pathways activated upon interaction with the target cell, highlighting the role of EVs in the context of the immune system and as mediators of the intercellular signalling in the brain.

  3. Oncogenic extracellular vesicles in brain tumour progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esterina eD'Asti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The brain is a frequent site of neoplastic growth, including both primary and metastatic tumours. The clinical intractability of many brain tumours and their distinct biology are implicitly linked to the unique microenvironment of the central nervous system (CNS and cellular interactions within. Among the most intriguing forms of cellular interactions is that mediated by membrane-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs. Their biogenesis (vesiculation and uptake by recipient cells serves as a unique mechanism of intercellular trafficking of complex biological messages including the exchange of molecules that cannot be released through classical secretory pathways, or that are prone to extracellular degradation. Tumour cells produce EVs containing molecular effectors of several cancer-related processes such as growth, invasion, drug resistance, angiogenesis, and coagulopathy. Notably, tumour-derived EVs (oncosomes also contain oncogenic proteins, transcripts, DNA and microRNA (miR. Uptake of this material may change properties of the recipient cells and impact the tumour microenvironment. Examples of transformation-related molecules found in the cargo of tumour-derived EVs include the oncogenic epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII, tumour suppressors (PTEN and oncomirs (miR-520g. It is postulated that EVs circulating in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of brain tumour patients may be used to decipher molecular features (mutations of the underlying malignancy, reflect responses to therapy or molecular subtypes of primary brain tumours (e.g. glioma or medulloblastoma. It is possible that metastases to the brain may also emit EVs with clinically relevant oncogenic signatures. Thus EVs emerge as a novel and functionally important vehicle of intercellular communication that can mediate multiple biological effects. In addition, they provide a unique platform to develop molecular biomarkers in brain malignancies.

  4. Surface glycosylation profiles of urine extracellular vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared Q Gerlach

    Full Text Available Urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs are released by cells throughout the nephron and contain biomolecules from their cells of origin. Although uEV-associated proteins and RNA have been studied in detail, little information exists regarding uEV glycosylation characteristics. Surface glycosylation profiling by flow cytometry and lectin microarray was applied to uEVs enriched from urine of healthy adults by ultracentrifugation and centrifugal filtration. The carbohydrate specificity of lectin microarray profiles was confirmed by competitive sugar inhibition and carbohydrate-specific enzyme hydrolysis. Glycosylation profiles of uEVs and purified Tamm Horsfall protein were compared. In both flow cytometry and lectin microarray assays, uEVs demonstrated surface binding, at low to moderate intensities, of a broad range of lectins whether prepared by ultracentrifugation or centrifugal filtration. In general, ultracentrifugation-prepared uEVs demonstrated higher lectin binding intensities than centrifugal filtration-prepared uEVs consistent with lesser amounts of co-purified non-vesicular proteins. The surface glycosylation profiles of uEVs showed little inter-individual variation and were distinct from those of Tamm Horsfall protein, which bound a limited number of lectins. In a pilot study, lectin microarray was used to compare uEVs from individuals with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease to those of age-matched controls. The lectin microarray profiles of polycystic kidney disease and healthy uEVs showed differences in binding intensity of 6/43 lectins. Our results reveal a complex surface glycosylation profile of uEVs that is accessible to lectin-based analysis following multiple uEV enrichment techniques, is distinct from co-purified Tamm Horsfall protein and may demonstrate disease-specific modifications.

  5. Brush border membrane vesicles from dipteran midgut: a tool for studies on nutrient absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MG Leonardi

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV from insects midgut can be successfully used to study several membrane phenomena, including nutrient absorption, ions permeability and insecticides mode of action. Midgut BBMV, purified from Musca domestica whole larvae, were used for the functional characterization of leucine transport. The amino acid uptake was accelerated in the presence of sodium or potassium and increased significantly when the extravesicular pH was 5.0, in agreement with the luminal pH in vivo. Radiolabelled leucine uptake was significantly reduced by an excess of cold leucine, histidine, serine and glycine, suggesting that the amino acid transporter is a broad scope carrier that does not recognize proline, glutamine and the dibasic amino acids lysine and arginine.Midgut BBMV were also obtained from homogenization of M. domestica and Bactrocera oleae adults. The final preparations showed a high enrichment in the specific activity of the BBM marker enzymes aminopeptidase N and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, and were poorly contaminated by basolateral membranes, as indicated by the low specific activities of their marker enzyme Na+/K+ ATPase. Electron microscopy of B. oleae BBM fraction showed the presence of closed vesicles. Similar SDS-PAGE patterns, with numerous distinct bands, were detected for both B. oleae and M. domestica BBMV.

  6. Sugar-based gemini surfactant with a vesicle-to-micelle transition at acidic pH and a reversible vesicle flocculation near neutral pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnsson, M; Wagenaar, A; Engberts, JBFN

    2003-01-01

    A sugar-based (reduced glucose) gemini surfactant forms vesicles in dilute aqueous solution near neutral pH. At lower pH, there is a vesicle-to-micelle transition within a narrow pH region (pH 6.0-5.6). The vesicles are transformed into large cylindrical micelles that in turn are transformed into sm

  7. Extracellular Vesicles in Brain Tumor Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Asti, Esterina; Chennakrishnaiah, Shilpa; Lee, Tae Hoon; Rak, Janusz

    2016-04-01

    Brain tumors can be viewed as multicellular 'ecosystems' with increasingly recognized cellular complexity and systemic impact. While the emerging diversity of malignant disease entities affecting brain tissues is often described in reference to their signature alterations within the cellular genome and epigenome, arguably these cell-intrinsic changes can be regarded as hardwired adaptations to a variety of cell-extrinsic microenvironmental circumstances. Conversely, oncogenic events influence the microenvironment through their impact on the cellular secretome, including emission of membranous structures known as extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs serve as unique carriers of bioactive lipids, secretable and non-secretable proteins, mRNA, non-coding RNA, and DNA and constitute pathway(s) of extracellular exit of molecules into the intercellular space, biofluids, and blood. EVs are also highly heterogeneous as reflected in their nomenclature (exosomes, microvesicles, microparticles) attempting to capture their diverse origin, as well as structural, molecular, and functional properties. While EVs may act as a mechanism of molecular expulsion, their non-random uptake by heterologous cellular recipients defines their unique roles in the intercellular communication, horizontal molecular transfer, and biological activity. In the central nervous system, EVs have been implicated as mediators of homeostasis and repair, while in cancer they may act as regulators of cell growth, clonogenicity, angiogenesis, thrombosis, and reciprocal tumor-stromal interactions. EVs produced by specific brain tumor cell types may contain the corresponding oncogenic drivers, such as epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) in glioblastoma (and hence are often referred to as 'oncosomes'). Through this mechanism, mutant oncoproteins and nucleic acids may be transferred horizontally between cellular populations altering their individual and collective phenotypes. Oncogenic pathways

  8. The phospholipid vesicles coating on metal chelated inorganic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work showed the formation of phospholipid vesicle coating on inorganic sericite surface with characterization by combining electron microscopy of FE-SEM, TEM, AFM, and qualitatively evaluated the coated phospholipid vesicle by XPS as a function of etching time. The possibility of phospholipid vesicle mobility on the surface was restrained by the chelation effect of magnesium cation. The stabilization properties of phospholipid vesicles on sericite surface were demonstrated by the various concentration of magnesium cation. The presence of magnesium was found to have a much more pronounced influence on the lipid deposition process. The Mg cation plays an important role for attaching the phospholipids with optimum concentration of 7 mM. Totally, the phospholipid vesicles coating on inorganic powder could be useful for bio-related fields such as cosmetics and drug delivery system as the key functional compounds. We hope this basic result lead to a general and simple approach to prepare a wide a range of controlled releasing materials including an encapsulation with cosmetics or drugs

  9. Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Seminal Vesicle Cystadenoma Excision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourmouris, Panagiotis; Tufek, İlter; Saglican, Yesim; Obek, Can; Kural, Ali Riza

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cystadenoma is an extremely rare benign tumor of the seminal vesicle. Diagnosis of these tumors and differential diagnosis from malignant ones may be challenging since most of the time symptoms do not occur. Management of these tumors remains debatable due to the limited data in the literature. We present the first robot-assisted laparoscopic excision of a cystadenoma of the seminal vesicle. Case Presentation: A 48-year-old man presented with diminished ejaculate volume and a 3.5 cm right seminal vesicle mass, which increased its size at 6 cm after the 3-month period. Transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy revealed no malignancy. Robot-assisted laparoscopic excision of the tumor was performed. Port placement was the same as robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Operative time and estimated blood loss were 240 minutes and 200 mL, respectively. Patient was discharged on postoperative day 3 without any complications. Final histopathologic examination revealed cystadenoma of the seminal vesicle. Conclusion: Surgical intervention may be considered when a cystadenoma of the seminal vesicle is diagnosed and symptoms or tumor growth occurs. Robot-assisted laparoscopic excision is an alternative in the management of these rare tumors.

  10. Pairwise hydrodynamic interactions and diffusion in a vesicle suspension

    CERN Document Server

    Gires, Pierre-Yves; Misbah, Chaouqi; Podgorski, Thomas; Coupier, Gwennou

    2014-01-01

    The hydrodynamic interaction of two deformable vesicles in shear flow induces a net displacement, in most cases an increase of their distance in the transverse direction. The statistical average of these interactions leads to shear-induced diffusion in the suspension, both at the level of individual particles which experience a random walk made of successive interactions, and at the level of suspension where a non-linear down-gradient diffusion takes place, an important ingredient in the structuring of suspension flows. We make an experimental and computational study of the interaction of a pair of lipid vesicles in shear flow by varying physical parameters, and investigate the decay of the net lateral displacement with the distance between the streamlines on which the vesicles are initially located. This decay and its dependency upon vesicle properties can be accounted for by a simple model based on the well established law for the lateral drift of a vesicle in the vicinity of a wall. In the semi-dilute regi...

  11. Curvature Elasticity and Refolding of OmpA in Large Unilamellar Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocanschi, Cosmin L.; Patel, Geetika J.; Marsh, Derek; Kleinschmidt, Jörg H.

    2006-01-01

    The stability of OmpA in large unilamellar vesicles of dilauroyl phosphatidylcholine was studied using different concentrations of urea. The effective energy of unfolding, as determined from refolding experiments, is greater than that for small sonicated unilamellar vesicles by an amount that is compatible with estimates of the elastic energy of highly curved vesicles. The on-rate for refolding and insertion is slower for large unilamellar vesicles than for small unilamellar vesicles, which indicates a contribution of vesicle strain also to the free energy of the transition state. PMID:16891370

  12. Shear-stress sensitive lenticular vesicles for targeted drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Margaret N.; Fedotenko, Illya A.; Abegg, Daniel; Althaus, Jasmin; Babel, Lucille; Favarger, France; Reiter, Renate; Tanasescu, Radu; Zaffalon, Pierre-Léonard; Ziegler, André; Müller, Bert; Saxer, Till; Zumbuehl, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    Atherosclerosis results in the narrowing of arterial blood vessels and this causes significant changes in the endogenous shear stress between healthy and constricted arteries. Nanocontainers that can release drugs locally with such rheological changes can be very useful. Here, we show that vesicles made from an artificial 1,3-diaminophospholipid are stable under static conditions but release their contents at elevated shear stress. These vesicles have a lenticular morphology, which potentially leads to instabilities along their equator. Using a model cardiovascular system based on polymer tubes and an external pump to represent shear stress in healthy and constricted vessels of the heart, we show that drugs preferentially release from the vesicles in constricted vessels that have high shear stress.

  13. Inhibition of skin inflammation by baicalin ultradeformable vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir-Palomo, Silvia; Nácher, Amparo; Díez-Sales, Octavio; Ofelia Vila Busó, M A; Caddeo, Carla; Manca, Maria Letizia; Manconi, Maria; Fadda, Anna Maria; Saurí, Amparo Ruiz

    2016-09-10

    The topical efficacy of baicalin, a natural flavonoid isolated from Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, which has several beneficial properties, such as antioxidative, antiviral, anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative, is hindered by its poor aqueous solubility and low skin permeability. Therefore, its incorporation into appropriate phospholipid vesicles could be a useful tool to improve its local activity. To this purpose, baicalin at increasing concentrations up to saturation, was incorporated in ultradeformable vesicles, which were small in size (∼67nm), monodispersed (PIhuman epidermis was concentration dependent. The in vivo results showed the significant anti-inflammatory activity of baicalin loaded nanovesicles irrespective of the concentration used, as they were able to reduce the skin damage induced by the phorbol ester (TPA) application, even in comparison with dexamethasone, a synthetic drug with anti-inflammatory properties. Overall results indicate that ultradeformable vesicles are promising nanosystems for the improvement of cutaneous delivery of baicalin in the treatment of skin inflammation. PMID:27374324

  14. Ectopic Prostatic and Seminal Vesicle Tissue Confusing as Metastatic Adenocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotsna Wader

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic prostatic tissue and seminal vesicle at pericolic fat is extremely rare. The nodules in the pericolic fat could raise a dilemma of metastatic deposits in cases of rectal adenocarcinoma. A 61 years old male underwent abdomino-perineal resection for rectal carcinoma. Nodules along with lymph nodes from pericolic fat were sampled to assess the spread. Histopathological and immunohistochemical staining of one nodule confirmed it to be the prostatic tissue while another nodule to be seminal vesicle. Seminal vesicle and prostatic heterotopia is significant in several respects, either symptomatic or asymptomatic, as the ectopic tissue can be endoscopically and histologically confused with malignancy of urinary or lower gastrointestinal system and may reflect divergent differentiation or a malformative process.

  15. Elastic vesicles as topical/transdermal drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, M J; Maibach, H I

    2005-08-01

    Skin acts a major target as well as a principle barrier for topical/transdermal drug delivery. Despite the many advantages of this system, the major obstacle is the low diffusion rate of drugs across the stratum corneum. Several methods have been assessed to increase the permeation rate of drugs temporarily. One simple and convenient approach is application of drugs in formulation with elastic vesicles or skin enhancers. Elastic vesicles are classified with phospholipid (Transfersomes((R)) and ethosomes) and detergent-based types. Elastic vesicles were more efficient at delivering a low and high molecular weight drug to the skin in terms of quantity and depth. Their effectiveness strongly depends on their physicochemical properties: composition, duration and application volume, and entrapment efficiency and application methods. This review focuses on the effect of elastic liposomes for enhancing the drug penetration and defines the action mechanism of penetration into deeper skin. PMID:18492190

  16. Mechanism of mercurial inhibition of sodium-coupled alanine uptake in liver plasma membrane vesicles from Raja erinacea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In mammalian hepatocytes the L-alanine carrier contains a sulfhydryl group that is essential for its activity and is inhibited by mercurials. In hepatocytes of the evolutionarily primitive little skate (Raja erinacea), HgCl2 inhibits Na(+)-dependent alanine uptake and Na+/K(+)-ATPase and increase K+ permeability. To distinguish between direct effects of HgCl2 on the Na(+)-alanine cotransporter and indirect effects on membrane permeability, [3H]alanine transport was studied in plasma membrane vesicles. [3H]Alanine uptake was stimulated by an out-to-in Na+ but not K+ gradient and was saturable confirming the presence of Na(+)-alanine cotransport in liver plasma membranes from this species. Preincubation of the vesicles with HgCl2 for 5 min reduced initial rates of Na(+)-dependent but not Na(+)-independent alanine uptake in a dose-dependent manner (10-200 microM). In the presence of equal concentrations of NaCl or KCl inside and outside of the vesicles, 75 microM HgCl2 directly inhibited sodium-dependent alanine-[3H]alanine exchange, demonstrating that HgCl2 directly affected the alanine cotransporter. Inhibition of Na(+)-dependent alanine uptake by 30 microM HgCl2 was reversed by dithiothreitol (1 mM). HgCl2 (10-30 microM) also increased initial rates of 22Na uptake (at 5 sec), whereas 22Na uptake rates were decreased at HgCl2 concentrations greater than 50 microM. Higher concentrations of HgCl2 (100-200 microM) produced nonspecific effects on vesicle integrity. These studies indicate that HgCl2 inhibits Na(+)-dependent alanine uptake in skate hepatocytes by three different concentration-dependent mechanisms: direct interaction with the transporters, dissipation of the driving force (Na+ gradient), and loss of membrane integrity

  17. Preparation of pure and intact Plasmodium falciparum plasma membrane vesicles and partial characterisation of the plasma membrane ATPase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Pete J

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In host erythrocytes, the malaria parasite must contend with ion and drug transport across three membranes; its own plasma membrane, the parasitophorous membrane and the host plasma membrane. Isolation of pure and intact Plasmodium falciparum plasma membrane would provide a suitable model to elucidate the possible role played by the parasite plasma membrane in ion balance and drug transport. Results This study describes a procedure for isolating parasite plasma membrane from P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes. With this method, the trophozoites released by saponin treatment were cleansed of erythrocyte membranes using anti-erythrocyte antibodies fixed to polystyrene beads. These trophozoites were then biotinylated and the parasite plasma membrane was disrupted by nitrogen cavitation. This process allows the membranes to reform into vesicles. The magnetic streptavidin beads bind specifically to the biotinylated parasite plasma membrane vesicles facilitating their recovery with a magnet. These vesicles can then be easily released from the magnetic beads by treatment with dithiotreithol. The parasite plasma membrane showed optimal ATPase activity at 2 mM ATP and 2 mM Mg2+. It was also found that Ca2+ could not substitute for Mg2+ ATPase activity in parasite plasma membranes whereas activity was completely preserved when Mn2+ was used instead of Mg2+. Other nucleoside triphosphates tested were hydrolysed as efficiently as ATP, while the nucleoside monophosphate AMP was not. Conclusions We have described the successful isolation of intact P. falciparum plasma membrane vesicles free of contaminating organelles and determined the experimental conditions for optimum ATPase activity.

  18. Assets of the non-pathogenic microorganism Dictyostelium discoideum as a model for the study of eukaryotic extracellular vesicles [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/pa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irène Tatischeff

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Dictyostelium discoideum microvesicles have recently been presented as a valuable model for eukaryotic extracellular vesicles. Here, the advantages of D. discoideum for unraveling important biological functions of extracellular vesicles in general are detailed. D. discoideum, a non-pathogenic eukaryotic microorganism, belongs to a billion-year-old Amoeboza lineage, which diverged from the animal-fungal lineage after the plant animal-split. During growth and early starvation-induced development, it presents analogies with lymphocytes and macrophages with regard to motility and phagocytosis capability, respectively. Its 6-chromosome genome codes for about 12,500 genes, some showing analogies with human genes. The presence of extracellular vesicles during cell growth has been evidenced as a detoxification mechanism of various structurally unrelated drugs. Controls led to the discovery of constitutive extracellular vesicle secretion in this microorganism, which was an important point. It means that the secretion of extracellular vesicles occurs, in the absence of any drug, during both cell growth and early development. This constitutive secretion of D. discoideum cells is very likely to play a role in intercellular communication. The detoxifying secreted vesicles, which can transport drugs outside the cells, can also act as "Trojan horses", capable of transferring these drugs not only into naïve D. discoideum cells, but into human cells as well. Therefore, these extracellular vesicles were proposed as a new biological drug delivery tool. Moreover, Dictyostelium, chosen by the NIH (USA as a new model organism for biomedical research, has already been used for studying some human diseases. These cells, which are much easier to manipulate than human cells, can be easily designed in simple conditioned medium experiments. Owing to the increasing consensus that extracellular vesicles are probably important mediators of intercellular communication, D

  19. Biogenesis and Functions of Exosomes and Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Florian; Baur, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Research on extracellular vesicles (EVs) is a new and emerging field that is rapidly growing. Many features of these structures still need to be described and discovered. This concerns their biogenesis, their release and cellular entrance mechanisms, as well as their functions, particularly in vivo. Hence our knowledge on EV is constantly evolving and sometimes changing. In our review we summarize the most important facts of our current knowledge about extracellular vesicles and described some of the assumed functions in the context of cancer and HIV infection. PMID:27317183

  20. Potentials and capabilities of the Extracellular Vesicle (EV Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malene Møller Jørgensen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs and exosomes are difficult to enrich or purify from biofluids, hence quantification and phenotyping of these are tedious and inaccurate. The multiplexed, highly sensitive and high-throughput platform of the EV Array presented by Jørgensen et al., (J Extracell Vesicles, 2013; 2: 10 has been refined regarding the capabilities of the method for characterization and molecular profiling of EV surface markers. Here, we present an extended microarray platform to detect and phenotype plasma-derived EVs (optimized for exosomes for up to 60 antigens without any enrichment or purification prior to analysis.

  1. Potentials and capabilities of the Extracellular Vesicle (EV) Array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Malene Møller; Bæk, Rikke; Varming, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) and exosomes are difficult to enrich or purify from biofluids, hence quantification and phenotyping of these are tedious and inaccurate. The multiplexed, highly sensitive and high-throughput platform of the EV Array presented by Jørgensen et al., (J Extracell Vesicles......, 2013; 2: 10) has been refined regarding the capabilities of the method for characterization and molecular profiling of EV surface markers. Here, we present an extended microarray platform to detect and phenotype plasma-derived EVs (optimized for exosomes) for up to 60 antigens without any enrichment...

  2. Shape transitions of high-genus fluid vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    The morphologies of genus-2 to -8 fluid vesicles are studied by using dynamically triangulated membrane simulations with area-difference elasticity. It is revealed that the alignments of the membrane pores alter the vesicle shapes and the types of shape transitions for the genus g ≥ 3 . At a high reduced volume, a stomatocyte with a circular alignment of g + 1 pores continuously transforms into a discocyte with a line of g pores with increasing intrinsic area difference. In contrast, at a low volume, a stomatocyte transforms into a (g+1) -hedral shape and subsequently exhibits a discrete phase transition to a discocyte.

  3. Postcoital Hemorrhage of a Recurrent Seminal Vesicle Cyst Requiring Embolization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Royston

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Herein is a case of a 23-year-old man with recurrence of a seminal vesicle cyst after percutaneous drainage and laparoscopic excision complicated by hemorrhage requiring embolization. He presented to the emergency department for pain after ejaculation. Computed tomographic scan of his pelvis revealed extravasation of contrast near his cyst and pelvic fluid collection suspicious for a hematoma. The patient had steadily decreasing hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. An interventional radiologist performed an embolization of the left seminal vesicle cystic arteries. Hemoglobin and hematocrit values improved and he was discharged. Hemorrhage resolved with embolization procedure and pain dissipated over the course of follow up care.

  4. Postcoital Hemorrhage of a Recurrent Seminal Vesicle Cyst Requiring Embolization☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royston, Eric; Walker, Marc; Ching, Brian; Morilla, Daniel; Sterbis, Joseph; McMann, Leah

    2014-01-01

    Herein is a case of a 23-year-old man with recurrence of a seminal vesicle cyst after percutaneous drainage and laparoscopic excision complicated by hemorrhage requiring embolization. He presented to the emergency department for pain after ejaculation. Computed tomographic scan of his pelvis revealed extravasation of contrast near his cyst and pelvic fluid collection suspicious for a hematoma. The patient had steadily decreasing hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. An interventional radiologist performed an embolization of the left seminal vesicle cystic arteries. Hemoglobin and hematocrit values improved and he was discharged. Hemorrhage resolved with embolization procedure and pain dissipated over the course of follow up care. PMID:26958478

  5. Postcoital Hemorrhage of a Recurrent Seminal Vesicle Cyst Requiring Embolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royston, Eric; Walker, Marc; Ching, Brian; Morilla, Daniel; Sterbis, Joseph; McMann, Leah

    2014-09-01

    Herein is a case of a 23-year-old man with recurrence of a seminal vesicle cyst after percutaneous drainage and laparoscopic excision complicated by hemorrhage requiring embolization. He presented to the emergency department for pain after ejaculation. Computed tomographic scan of his pelvis revealed extravasation of contrast near his cyst and pelvic fluid collection suspicious for a hematoma. The patient had steadily decreasing hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. An interventional radiologist performed an embolization of the left seminal vesicle cystic arteries. Hemoglobin and hematocrit values improved and he was discharged. Hemorrhage resolved with embolization procedure and pain dissipated over the course of follow up care. PMID:26958478

  6. Erythrocyte-derived optical nano-vesicles as theranostic agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac, Jenny T.; Nunez, Vicente; Bahmani, Baharak; Guerrero, Yadir; Tang, Jack; Vullev, Valentine I.; Anvari, Bahman

    2015-07-01

    We have engineered nano-vesicles, derived from erythrocytes, which can be doped with various near infrared (NIR) organic chromophores, including the FDA-approved indocyanine green (ICG). We refer to these vesicles as NIR erythrocyte-mimicking transducers (NETS) since in response to NIR photo-excitation they can generate heat or emit fluorescent light. Using biochemical methods based on reduction amination, we have functionalized the surface of NET with antibodies to target specific biomolecules. We present results that demonstrate the effectiveness of NETs in targeted imaging of cancer cells that over-express the human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2).

  7. Extracellular Vesicles as Biomarkers of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Perez-Hernandez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease that predominantly affects women and typically manifests in multiple organs. The damage caused by this disorder is characterized by a chronic inflammatory state. Extracellular vesicles (EVs, including microvesicles (also known as microparticles, apoptotic bodies, and exosomes, are recognized vehicles of intercellular communication, carrying autoantigens, cytokines, and surface receptors. Therefore, the evidence of EVs and their cargo as biomarkers of autoimmune disease is rapidly expanding. This review will focus on biogenesis of extracellular vesicles, their pathophysiological roles, and their potential as biomarkers and therapeutics in inflammatory disease, especially in systemic lupus erythematosus.

  8. Vesicle interactions with polyamino acids and antibody: in vitro and in vivo studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artificial spherules or vesicles of 900 A in diameter formed from phosphatidylcholine and gangliosides and enclosing /sup 99m/TcO4- (standard preparation) survive intact in the circulation of the mouse. Polyamino acids and protein have been incorporated into and onto the vesicles; such vesicles remain intact as determined by diffusion dialysis studies and by electron paramagnetic resonance studies of vesicles enclosing spin label. In studying the distribution of polyamino acid-vesicles and protein vesicles in vivo, it was found that the latter distribute differently from standard vesicles or free protein alone whereas aromatic polyamino acid-vesicles concentrate in the liver and spleen to a greater extent than standard vesicles. The permeability and stability characteristics of vesicles may be preserved when they are modified by the addition of protein or polyamino acids and that such modification of vesicles may be associated with an alteration of their fate in vivo. The potential exists to use vesicles as carriers of radiopharmaceuticals and other drugs and to direct the vesicles preferentially to tissue targets in vivo. (U.S.)

  9. Ba2+-inhibitable 86Rb+ fluxes across membranes of vesicles from toad urinary bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    86Rb+ fluxes have been measured in suspensions of vesicles prepared from the epithelium of toad urinary bladder. A readily measurable barium-sensitive, ouabain-insensitive component has been identified; the concentration of external Ba2+ required for half-maximal inhibition was 0.6 mM. The effects of externally added cations on 86Rb+ influx and efflux have established that this pathway is conductive, with a selectivity for K+, Rb+ and Cs+ over Na+ and Li+. The Rb+ uptake is inversely dependent on external pH, but not significantly affected by internal Ca2+ or external amiloride, quinine, quinidine or lidocaine. It is likely, albeit not yet certain, that the conductive Rb+ pathway is incorporated in basolateral vesicles oriented right-side-out. It is also not yet clear whether this pathway comprises the principle basolateral K+ channel in vivo, and that its properties have been unchanged during the preparative procedures. Subject to these caveats, the data suggest that the inhibition by quinidine of Na+ transport across toad bladder does not arise primarily from membrane depolarization produced by a direct blockage of the basolateral channels. It now seems more likely that the quinidine-induced elevation of intracellular Ca2+ activity directly blocks apical Na+ entry

  10. Components of coated vesicles and nuclear pore complexes share a common molecular architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Devos

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerous features distinguish prokaryotes from eukaryotes, chief among which are the distinctive internal membrane systems of eukaryotic cells. These membrane systems form elaborate compartments and vesicular trafficking pathways, and sequester the chromatin within the nuclear envelope. The nuclear pore complex is the portal that specifically mediates macromolecular trafficking across the nuclear envelope. Although it is generally understood that these internal membrane systems evolved from specialized invaginations of the prokaryotic plasma membrane, it is not clear how the nuclear pore complex could have evolved from organisms with no analogous transport system. Here we use computational and biochemical methods to perform a structural analysis of the seven proteins comprising the yNup84/vNup107-160 subcomplex, a core building block of the nuclear pore complex. Our analysis indicates that all seven proteins contain either a beta-propeller fold, an alpha-solenoid fold, or a distinctive arrangement of both, revealing close similarities between the structures comprising the yNup84/vNup107-160 subcomplex and those comprising the major types of vesicle coating complexes that maintain vesicular trafficking pathways. These similarities suggest a common evolutionary origin for nuclear pore complexes and coated vesicles in an early membrane-curving module that led to the formation of the internal membrane systems in modern eukaryotes.

  11. Calcium uptake by brush-border and basolateral membrane vesicles in chick duodenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takito, J.; Shinki, T.; Sasaki, T.; Suda, T. (Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-01-01

    Calcium uptake was compared between duodenal brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) and basolateral membrane vesicles (BLMV) isolated from vitamin D-deficient chicks and those injected with 625 ng of 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1 alpha,25(OH)2D3). The uptake by BBMV in the 1 alpha,25-(OH)2D3-treated birds attained a maximum (280% of the control) at 12 h and was maintained at an elevated level (210%) at 24 h after the injection of the vitamin. In contrast, ATP-dependent calcium uptake by BLMV reached a maximum (185% of the control) at 6 h and decreased to the control level at 24 h. The kinetic analysis revealed that 1 alpha,25(OH)2D3 increased Vmax values without any changes in apparent Km values in both BBMV and BLMV. The activity of ATP-dependent calcium uptake was localized exclusively in the basolateral membrane, and the activity was inhibited by vanadate (IC50, 1 microM), but not by oligomycin, theophylline, calmodulin, trifluoperazine, or calbindin D28K. These results indicate that calcium transport through both the brush-border and basolateral membranes is involved in the 1 alpha,25(OH)2D3-dependent intestinal calcium absorption. The initiation of calcium absorption by 1 alpha,25(OH)2D3 appears to be due to an increase in the rate of calcium efflux at the basolateral membrane rather than the rate at the brush-border membrane.

  12. Calcium uptake by brush-border and basolateral membrane vesicles in chick duodenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium uptake was compared between duodenal brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) and basolateral membrane vesicles (BLMV) isolated from vitamin D-deficient chicks and those injected with 625 ng of 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1 alpha,25(OH)2D3]. The uptake by BBMV in the 1 alpha,25-(OH)2D3-treated birds attained a maximum (280% of the control) at 12 h and was maintained at an elevated level (210%) at 24 h after the injection of the vitamin. In contrast, ATP-dependent calcium uptake by BLMV reached a maximum (185% of the control) at 6 h and decreased to the control level at 24 h. The kinetic analysis revealed that 1 alpha,25(OH)2D3 increased Vmax values without any changes in apparent Km values in both BBMV and BLMV. The activity of ATP-dependent calcium uptake was localized exclusively in the basolateral membrane, and the activity was inhibited by vanadate (IC50, 1 microM), but not by oligomycin, theophylline, calmodulin, trifluoperazine, or calbindin D28K. These results indicate that calcium transport through both the brush-border and basolateral membranes is involved in the 1 alpha,25(OH)2D3-dependent intestinal calcium absorption. The initiation of calcium absorption by 1 alpha,25(OH)2D3 appears to be due to an increase in the rate of calcium efflux at the basolateral membrane rather than the rate at the brush-border membrane

  13. Enhancement of Lateral Diffusion in Catanionic Vesicles during Multilamellar-to-Unilamellar Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, S; Sharma, V K; Garcia-Sakai, V; Orecchini, A; Seydel, T; Johnson, M; Mukhopadhyay, R

    2016-04-21

    Catanionic vesicles are formed spontaneously by mixing cationic and anionic dispersions in aqueous solution in suitable conditions. Because of spontaneity in formation, long-term stability, and easy modulation of size and charge, they have numerous advantages over conventional lipid-based vesicles. The dynamics of such vesicles is of interest in the field of biomedicine, as they can be used to deliver drug molecules into the cell membrane. Dynamics of catanionic vesicles based on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) have been studied using incoherent elastic and quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) techniques. Neutron scattering experiments have been carried out on two backscattering spectrometers, IRIS and IN16B, which have different energy resolutions and energy transfer windows. An elastic fixed-window scan carried out using IN16B shows a phase transition at ∼307 K during the heating cycle, whereas on cooling the transition occurred at ∼294 K. DSC results are found to be in close agreement with the elastic scan data. This transition is ascribed to a structural rearrangement from a multilamellar to a unilamellar phase [ Andreozzi J. Phys. Chem. B 2010 , 114 , 8056 - 8060 ]. It is found that a model in which the surfactant molecules undergo both lateral and internal motions can describe the QENS data quite well. While the data from IRIS have contributions from both dynamical processes, the data from IN16B probe only lateral motions, as the internal motions are too fast for the energy window of the spectrometer. It is found that, through the transition, the fraction of surfactant molecules undergoing lateral motion increases of a factor of 2 from the multilamellar to the unilamellar phase, indicating an enhanced fluidity of the latter. The lateral motion is found to be Fickian in nature, while the internal motion has been described by a localized translational diffusion model. The results reported here could have direct

  14. Electron microscopic observation and rotational diffusion measurement of bacteriorhodopsin in lipid vesicles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The morphology of bacteriorhodopsin reconstituted into dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and egg-phosphatidylcholine vesicles was observed by freeze-fracture electron microscopy. The rotational diffusion of bacteriorhodopsin at different concentrations of melittin was measured by observing flash-induced transient dichroism in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine vesicles. In the presence of melittin, bacteriorhodopsin molecules in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine vesicles were aggregated into large particles or patches, and the ability of rotational diffusion of bacteriorhodop sin in vesicles was decreased. This suggests that melittin produces its effect via direct electrostatic interaction with bacteriorhodopsin. Low temperature-induced aggregation of bacteriorhodopsin was also observed in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine vesicles. Low temperature may cause phase separation. Bacteriorhodopsin was also successfully reconstituted into egg-phosphatidylcholine vesicles, but Iow temperature-induced aggregation of bacteriorhodopsin in dimyristoylphosphati dylcholine cannot appear in egg-phosphatidylcholine vesicles. This suggests that different lipids have different effects on bacteriorhodopsin in vesicles.

  15. Introduction to Extracellular Vesicles: Biogenesis, RNA Cargo Selection, Content, Release, and Uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abels, Erik R; Breakefield, Xandra O

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles are a heterogeneous group of membrane-limited vesicles loaded with various proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Release of extracellular vesicles from its cell of origin occurs either through the outward budding of the plasma membrane or through the inward budding of the endosomal membrane, resulting in the formation of multivesicular bodies, which release vesicles upon fusion with the plasma membrane. The release of vesicles can facilitate intercellular communication by contact with or by internalization of contents, either by fusion with the plasma membrane or by endocytosis into "recipient" cells. Although the interest in extracellular vesicle research is increasing, there are still no real standards in place to separate or classify the different types of vesicles. This review provides an introduction into this expanding and complex field of research focusing on the biogenesis, nucleic acid cargo loading, content, release, and uptake of extracellular vesicles. PMID:27053351

  16. Biochemical and morphological characterization of light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Kevin Peter

    1978-01-01

    Light (30 to 32.5% sucrose) and heavy (38.5 to 42% sucrose) sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles (LSR, HSR) were isolated from rabbit leg muscle. They were then diluted and washed with sucrose or KCl and referred to as sucrose or KCl washed vesicles. Thin-section electron microscopy of LSR vesicles reveals empty vesicles of various sizes and shapes where as the HSR vesicles appear as rounded vesicles of uniform size filled with electron dense material. The LSR consists of predominantly Ca/sup 2 +/ + Mg/sup 2 +/ ATPase (80 to 90%), a small amount of the high affinity Ca binding protein (5%), and a 5000 dalton proteolipid. The sucrose HSR vesicles contain the Ca/sup 2 +/ + Mg/sup 2 +/ ATPase (50%), Calsequestrin (25%), high affinity Ca binding protein (5%), one extrinsic 34,000 dalton protein (3%), one intrinsic 30,000 dalton protein (3%), a 9000 dalton proteolipid, and a 5000 dalton proteolipid. The sucrose--washed HSR vesicles contain greater than three times the calcium content of the sucrose washed LSR vesicles where as the KCl--washed vesicles contain less than 15 nmoles Ca/sup 2 +//mg of protein each. The light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles were both able to accumulate calcium in the presence of ATP. Exchange of methanesulfonate for chloride resulted in the release of calcium from both the light and heavy SR vesicles. Sucrose causes a slight inhibition of chloride--induced calcium release from the heavy SR vesicles but it greatly reduces the release of calcium from the light SR vesicles. Sodium dantrolene (20 uM) has no effect on the release of calcium from the light SR vesicles but it inhibits the release of calcium from the heavy SR vesicles. The results indicate that the chloride--induced release of calcium may be acting by two mechanisms, osmotic swelling and depolarization.

  17. Concentration-Dependent Staining of Lactotroph Vesicles by FM 4-64

    OpenAIRE

    Stenovec, Matjaž; Poberaj, Igor; Kreft, Marko; Zorec, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Hormones are released from neuroendocrine cells by passing through an exocytotic pore that forms after vesicle and plasma membrane fusion. An elegant way to study this process at the single-vesicle level is to use styryl dyes, which stain not only the membrane, but also the matrix of individual vesicles in some neuroendocrine cells. However, the mechanism by which the vesicle matrix is stained is not completely clear. One possibility is that molecules of the styryl dye in the bath solution di...

  18. Magnetosome vesicles are present before magnetite formation, and MamA is required for their activation

    OpenAIRE

    Komeili, Arash; Vali, Hojatollah; Beveridge, Terrance J.; Newman, Dianne K.

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial magnetosomes are intracellular compartments that house highly ordered magnetite crystals. By using Magnetospirillum sp. AMB-1 as a model system, we show that magnetosome vesicles exist in the absence of magnetite, biomineralization of magnetite proceeds simultaneously in multiple vesicles, and biomineralization proceeds from the same location in each vesicle. The magnetosome-associated protein, MamA, is required for the formation of functional magnetosome vesicles and displays a dyn...

  19. Preparation and Properties of Vesicles from Condensable Amphiphilic Amino Acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊向源; 何巍; 李子臣; 李福绵

    2001-01-01

    Three double-chain amphiphiles with amino acid groups as hydrphilic moiety were synthesized. These amphiphiles can be easily dispersed in buffer solution to form transparent dispersion. Examination of the dispersion by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the formation of stable vesicular aggregates, which was also confirmed by the ability to encapsulate water-soluble dyes. Since amino acid groups are located on the surface of the vesicles, water-soluble carbodiimide can induce the condensation of these groups to form peptide. The phase transition temperatures of these vesicles were estimated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and a decrease of phase transition temperature was observed after polycondensation due to the disturbance of the ordered arrangement of the hydrophobic chains. The leakage rate of the vesicles before and after condensation was studied by monitoring the increase of fluorescence intensity of water-soluble dye. These vesicles belong to the least permeable ones and the leakage rate can be controlled by varying the degree of condensation or the temperature.

  20. Cdk5 is essential for synaptic vesicle endocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Timothy C; Valova, Valentina A; Malladi, Chandra S;

    2003-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle endocytosis (SVE) is triggered by calcineurin-mediated dephosphorylation of the dephosphin proteins. SVE is maintained by the subsequent rephosphorylation of the dephosphins by unidentified protein kinases. Here, we show that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) phosphorylates dynami...

  1. Packing states of multilamellar vesicles in a nonionic surfactant system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le, T.D.; Olsson, U.; Mortensen, K.

    2001-01-01

    under shear. Here, we focused only in the MLV region, L-alpha(*), of a temperature sensitive surfactant system (C12E4-water) to investigate the packing of multilamellar vesicles as a function of temperature under constant shear. Two sets of temperature scan experiments were performed in the L...

  2. A Pathogenic Potential of Acinetobacter baumannii-Derived Membrane Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Suk Jin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii secretes outer membrane vesicles (OMVs. A. baumannii OMVs deliver many virulence factors to host cells and then induce cytotoxicity and innate immune response. OMVs secreted from bacteria contribute directly to host pathology during A. baumannii infection.

  3. Studies on the incorporation of lipase in synthetic polymerisable vesicles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mosmuller, E.W.J.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis describes studies on the suitability of synthetic polymerisable vesicles for the incorporation and stabilisation of lipase for the bioconversion of organic chemical compounds.In chapter 1 , some characteristics are reviewed of hydrolytic enzymes, and more specific those

  4. Reconciling Ligase Ribozyme Activity with Fatty Acid Vesicle Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Anella

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The “RNA world” and the “Lipid world” theories for the origin of cellular life are often considered incompatible due to the differences in the environmental conditions at which they can emerge. One obstacle resides in the conflicting requirements for divalent metal ions, in particular Mg2+, with respect to optimal ribozyme activity, fatty acid vesicle stability and protection against RNA strand cleavage. Here, we report on the activity of a short L1 ligase ribozyme in the presence of myristoleic acid (MA vesicles at varying concentrations of Mg2+. The ligation rate is significantly lower at low-Mg2+ conditions. However, the loss of activity is overcompensated by the increased stability of RNA leading to a larger amount of intact ligated substrate after long reaction periods. Combining RNA ligation assays with fatty acid vesicles we found that MA vesicles made of 5 mM amphiphile are stable and do not impair ligase ribozyme activity in the presence of approximately 2 mM Mg2+. These results provide a scenario in which catalytic RNA and primordial membrane assembly can coexist in the same environment.

  5. Preparation, Stability, and Bio-Compatability of Block Copolymer Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discher, Dennis; Lee, James C.-M.; Bermudez, Harry; Bates, Frank; Discher, Bohdana

    2001-03-01

    Vesicles made completely from diblock copolymers polymersomes can be stably prepared by a wide range of techniques common to liposomes. Processes such as film rehydration, sonication, and extrusion can generate many micron giants as well as monodisperse, 100 nm vesicles of PEO-PEE (polyethyleneoxide polyethylethylene) or PEO PBD (polyethyleneoxide polybutadiene). These thick-walled vesicles of polymer can encapsulate macromolecules just as liposomes can, but, unlike many pure liposome systems, these polymersomes exhibit no in-surface thermal transitions and a sub-population even survive autoclaving. Suspension in blood plasma has no immediate ill-effect on vesicle stability, and neither adhesion nor stimulation of phagocytes are apparent when giant polymersomes are held in direct, protracted contact. Proliferating cells, in addition, are unaffected when cultured for an extended time with an excess of polymersomes, and several injections of 10 mg doses into rats show no ill-effect. The results are consistent with the steric stabilization that PEG-lipid can impart to liposomes, but the present single-component polymersomes are far more stable mechanically and are not limited by PEG driven micellization.

  6. Thermal undulations of quasi-spherical vesicles stabilized by gravity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Ipsen, John Hjorth

    2002-01-01

    The classical treatment of quasi-spherical vesicle undulations has, in the present work, been reviewed and extended to systems, which are affected by a gravitational field caused by a density difference across the membrane. The effects have been studied by the use of perturbation theory leading to...

  7. Vesicles, amygdales and similar structures in fault-generated pseudotachylytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maddock, R.H.; Grocott, J.; Nes, M. van

    1987-01-01

    Amygdales in fault-generated pseudotachylytes from the Outer Hebrides Thrust, Scotland, and the Ikertôq Shear Belt, West Greenland, contain mineral assemblages dominated by K-spar + sphene + epidote + quartz and carbonates respectively. These contrasting assemblages indicate that vesicle infilling t

  8. Dynamics of Shape Fluctuations of Quasi-spherical Vesicles Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miao, L.; Lomholt, Michael Andersen; Kleis, J.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the dynamics of spontaneous shape fluctuations of a single, giant quasi-spherical vesicle formed from a single lipid species is revisited theoretically. A coherent physical theory for the dynamics is developed based on a number of fundamental principles and considerations, and a sy...

  9. Intermedin inhibits norepinephrine-induced contraction of rat seminal vesicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.F. Wong

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: The results demonstrated that the inhibitory action of IMD on NE-induced seminal vesicle contraction was mediated via the ADM receptor(s and the nitric oxide production pathway, partially by the IMD receptor, but not by the CGRP receptor and the cAMP-PKA pathway.

  10. Hyperthermophilic archaea produce membrane vesicles that can transfer DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaudin, M.; Gauliard, E.; Schouten, S.; Houel-Renault, L.; Lenormand, P.; Marguet, E.; Forterre, P.

    2013-01-01

    Thermococcales are hyperthermophilic archaea found in deep-sea hydrothermal vents. They have been recently reported to produce membrane vesicles (MVs) into their culture medium. Here, we have characterized the mode of production and determined the biochemical composition of MVs from two species of T

  11. Genetically controlled fusion, exocytosis and fission of artificial vesicles-a roadmap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bönzli, Eva; Hadorn, Maik; de Lucrezia, Davide;

    2011-01-01

    Artificial vesicles represent ideal candidates as a model for artificial cells. It was shown that artificial genetic programs and the required cellular machinery (cell-free expression systems) can be incorporated into vesicles and allow the synthesis of proteins (Noireaux et al. 2005). Vesicles w...

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa vesicles associate with and are internalized by human lung epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuehn Meta J

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the major pathogen associated with chronic and ultimately fatal lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. To investigate how P. aeruginosa-derived vesicles may contribute to lung disease, we explored their ability to associate with human lung cells. Results Purified vesicles associated with lung cells and were internalized in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Vesicles from a CF isolate exhibited a 3- to 4-fold greater association with lung cells than vesicles from the lab strain PAO1. Vesicle internalization was temperature-dependent and was inhibited by hypertonic sucrose and cyclodextrins. Surface-bound vesicles rarely colocalized with clathrin. Internalized vesicles colocalized with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER marker, TRAPα, as well as with ER-localized pools of cholera toxin and transferrin. CF isolates of P. aeruginosa abundantly secrete PaAP (PA2939, an aminopeptidase that associates with the surface of vesicles. Vesicles from a PaAP knockout strain exhibited a 40% decrease in cell association. Likewise, vesicles from PAO1 overexpressing PaAP displayed a significant increase in cell association. Conclusion These data reveal that PaAP promotes the association of vesicles with lung cells. Taken together, these results suggest that P. aeruginosa vesicles can interact with and be internalized by lung epithelial cells and contribute to the inflammatory response during infection.

  13. The aminosterol antibiotic squalamine permeabilizes large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selinsky, B S; Zhou, Z; Fojtik, K G; Jones, S R; Dollahon, N R; Shinnar, A E

    1998-03-13

    The ability of the shark antimicrobial aminosterol squalamine to induce the leakage of polar fluorescent dyes from large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles (LUVs) has been measured. Micromolar squalamine causes leakage of carboxyfluorescein (CF) from vesicles prepared from the anionic phospholipids phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylserine (PS), and cardiolipin. Binding analyses based on the leakage data show that squalamine has its highest affinity to phosphatidylglycerol membranes, followed by phosphatidylserine and cardiolipin membranes. Squalamine will also induce the leakage of CF from phosphatidylcholine (PC) LUVs at low phospholipid concentrations. At high phospholipid concentrations, the leakage of CF from PC LUVs deviates from a simple dose-response relationship, and it appears that some of the squalamine can no longer cause leakage. Fluorescent dye leakage generated by squalamine is graded, suggesting the formation of a discrete membrane pore rather than a generalized disruption of vesicular membranes. By using fluorescently labeled dextrans of different molecular weight, material with molecular weight squalamine, but material with molecular weight >/=10,000 is retained. Negative stain electron microscopy of squalamine-treated LUVs shows that squalamine decreases the average vesicular size in a concentration-dependent manner. Squalamine decreases the size of vesicles containing anionic phospholipid at a lower squalamine/lipid molar ratio than pure PC LUVs. In a centrifugation assay, squalamine solubilizes phospholipid, but only at significantly higher squalamine/phospholipid ratios than required for either dye leakage or vesicle size reduction. Squalamine solubilizes PC at lower squalamine/phospholipid ratios than PG. We suggest that squalamine complexes with phospholipid to form a discrete structure within the bilayers of LUVs, resulting in the transient leakage of small encapsulated molecules. At higher squalamine/phospholipid ratios, these

  14. Importance of the N-Terminal Domain of the Qb-SNARE Vti1p for Different Membrane Transport Steps in the Yeast Endosomal System

    OpenAIRE

    Gossing, Michael; Chidambaram, Subbulakshmi; Fischer Von Mollard, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) on transport vesicles and target membranes are crucial for vesicle targeting and fusion. They form SNARE complexes, which contain four α-helical SNARE motifs contributed by three or four different SNAREs. Most SNAREs function only in a single transport step. The yeast SNARE Vti1p participates in four distinct SNARE complexes in transport from the trans Golgi network to late endosomes, in transport to the vacuole, i...

  15. The early postnatal pattern of vesicle formation in different regions of the porcien small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elbrønd, Vibeke Sødring; Weström, B.R.

    2007-01-01

    applied to visualize cytoplasmatic subcellular components such as fat (Oil red O) and carbohydrates (PAS). Appearance and morphology of the epithelial vesicles were compared. In the proximal region several small supranuclear and a single large subnuclear electron dense, eosinophilic and PAS+ vesicle were...... present. They disappeared after 2 days (gut closure) and on day 6 adult-looking epithelial cells were present. In the distal region of day 0 pigs digestion vesicles/flocculent vesicles were observed in the cytoplasma. The vesicles appeared empty but with eosinophilic, PAS+ and electron dense...

  16. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: Therapeutic Potential of Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The intense research focus on stem and progenitor cells could be attributed to their differentiation potential to generate new cells to replace diseased or lost cells in many highly intractable degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease, multiple sclerosis, and heart diseases. However, experimental and clinical studies have increasingly attributed the therapeutic efficacy of these cells to their secretion. While stem and progenitor cells secreted many therapeutic molecules, none of these molecules singly or in combination could recapitulate the functional effects of stem cell transplantations. Recently, it was reported that extracellular vesicles (EVs could recapitulate the therapeutic effects of stem cell transplantation. Based on the observations reported thus far, the prevailing hypothesis is that stem cell EVs exert their therapeutic effects by transferring biologically active molecules such as proteins, lipids, mRNA, and microRNA from the stem cells to injured or diseased cells. In this respect, stem cell EVs are similar to EVs from other cell types. They are both primarily vehicles for intercellular communication. Therefore, the differentiating factor is likely due to the composition of their cargo. The cargo of EVs from different cell types are known to include a common set of proteins and also proteins that reflect the cell source of the EVs and the physiological or pathological state of the cell source. Hence, elucidation of the stem cell EV cargo would provide an insight into the multiple physiological or biochemical changes necessary to affect the many reported stem cell-based therapeutic outcomes in a variety of experimental models and clinical trials.

  17. Oxidative stress inhibits axonal transport: implications for neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Cheng

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS released by microglia and other inflammatory cells can cause axonal degeneration. A reduction in axonal transport has also been implicated as a cause of axonal dystrophies and neurodegeneration, but there is a paucity of experimental data concerning the effects of ROS on axonal transport. We used live cell imaging to examine the effects of hydrogen peroxide on the axonal transport of mitochondria and Golgi-derived vesicles in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Results Hydrogen peroxide rapidly inhibited axonal transport, hours before any detectable changes in mitochondrial morphology or signs of axonal degeneration. Mitochondrial transport was affected earlier and was more severely inhibited than the transport of Golgi-derived vesicles. Anterograde vesicle transport was more susceptible to peroxide inhibition than retrograde transport. Axonal transport partially recovered following removal of hydrogen peroxide and local application of hydrogen peroxide inhibited transport, suggesting that the effects were not simply a result of nerve cell death. Sodium azide, an ATP synthesis blocker, had similar effects on axonal transport, suggesting that ATP depletion may contribute to the transport inhibition due to hydrogen peroxide. Conclusions These results indicate that inhibition of axonal transport is an early consequence of exposure to ROS and may contribute to subsequent axonal degeneration.

  18. Layer-by-layer deposition of vesicles mediated by supramolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roling, Oliver; Wendeln, Christian; Kauscher, Ulrike; Seelheim, Patrick; Galla, Hans-Joachim; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2013-08-13

    Vesicles are dynamic supramolecular structures with a bilayer membrane consisting of lipids or synthetic amphiphiles enclosing an aqueous compartment. Lipid vesicles have often been considered as mimics for biological cells. In this paper, we present a novel strategy for the preparation of three-dimensional multilayered structures in which vesicles containing amphiphilic β-cyclodextrin are interconnected by proteins using cyclodextrin guests as bifunctional linker molecules. We compared two pairs of adhesion molecules for the immobilization of vesicles: mannose-concanavalin A and biotin-streptavidin. Microcontact printing and thiol-ene click chemistry were used to prepare suitable substrates for the vesicles. Successful immobilization of intact vesicles through the mannose-concanavalin A and biotin-streptavidin motifs was verified by fluorescence microscopy imaging and dynamic light scattering, while the vesicle adlayer was characterized by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. In the case of the biotin-streptavidin motif, up to six layers of intact vesicles could be immobilized in a layer-by-layer fashion using supramolecular interactions. The construction of vesicle multilayers guided by noncovalent vesicle-vesicle junctions can be taken as a minimal model for artificial biological tissue. PMID:23898918

  19. Attachment of 99mTc to lipid vesicles containing the lipophilic chelate dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine-DTPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The binding of 99mTc to negatively-charged and neutral unilamellar lipid vesicles was investigated in the absence and presence of the ligand diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) covalently attached to the headgroup of phosphatidylethanolamine at the surface of the membrane. Even in the absence of DTPA on the membrane surface, 99mTc reduced by Sn bound to the membrane surface but rapidly dissociated from the vesicles in the presence of plasma in vitro. When DTPA was present on the membrane surface, dissociation of 99mTc from the vesicle surface in plasma was much reduced. The dissociation of 99mTc from the surface of negatively-charged vesicles was less than for neutral vesicles in the absence of ligand but was markedly greater than for vesicles containing the ligand DTPA, suggesting that the binding of 99mTc to vesicles with surface-attached DTPA could not be explained solely on the basis of the negative charge provided by the DTPA. In vitro experiments using 14C-labeled lipids as well as in vivo imaging studies indicated that dissociation of 99mTc from the surface of the vesicle did not arise predominantly because of lipid exchange with plasma components or due to cleavage of Tc-DTPA from the vesicle surface. For vesicles with surface-attached DTPA, 99mTc dissociation from the vesicle surface in plasma was further reduced by addition of the antioxidant ascorbate. (author)

  20. Dynamics of fatty acid vesicles in response to pH stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikari, Keita; Sakuma, Yuka; Jimbo, Takehiro; Kodama, Atsuji; Imai, Masayuki; Monnard, Pierre-Alain; Rasmussen, Steen

    2015-08-21

    We investigate the dynamics of decanoic acid/decanoate (DA) vesicles in response to pH stimuli. Two types of dynamic processes induced by the micro-injection of NaOH solutions are sequentially observed: deformations and topological transitions. In the deformation stage, DA vesicles show a series of shape deformations, i.e., prolate-oblate-stomatocyte-sphere. In the topological transition stage, spherical DA vesicles follow either of the two pathways, pore formation and vesicle fusion. The pH stimuli modify a critical aggregation concentration of DA molecules, which causes the solubilization of DA molecules in the outer leaflet of the vesicle bilayers. This solubilization decreases the outer surface area of the vesicle, thereby increasing surface tension. A kinetic model based on area difference elasticity theory can accurately describe the dynamics of DA vesicles triggered by pH stimuli. PMID:26166464

  1. Lipid vesicle shape analysis from populations using light video microscopy and computer vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupanc, Jernej; Drašler, Barbara; Boljte, Sabina; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika; Iglič, Aleš; Erdogmus, Deniz; Drobne, Damjana

    2014-01-01

    We present a method for giant lipid vesicle shape analysis that combines manually guided large-scale video microscopy and computer vision algorithms to enable analyzing vesicle populations. The method retains the benefits of light microscopy and enables non-destructive analysis of vesicles from suspensions containing up to several thousands of lipid vesicles (1-50 µm in diameter). For each sample, image analysis was employed to extract data on vesicle quantity and size distributions of their projected diameters and isoperimetric quotients (measure of contour roundness). This process enables a comparison of samples from the same population over time, or the comparison of a treated population to a control. Although vesicles in suspensions are heterogeneous in sizes and shapes and have distinctively non-homogeneous distribution throughout the suspension, this method allows for the capture and analysis of repeatable vesicle samples that are representative of the population inspected. PMID:25426933

  2. Structure formation in binary mixtures of lipids and detergents: Self-assembly and vesicle division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Self-assembly dynamics in binary surfactant mixtures and structure changes of lipid vesicles induced by detergent solution are studied using coarse-grained molecular simulations. Disk-shaped micelles, the bicelles, are stabilized by detergents surrounding the rim of a bilayer disk of lipids. The self-assembled bicelles are considerably smaller than bicelles formed from vesicle rupture, and their size is determined by the concentrations of lipids and detergents and the interactions between the two species. The detergent-adsorption induces spontaneous curvature of the vesicle bilayer and results in vesicle division into two vesicles or vesicle rupture into worm-like micelles. The division occurs mainly via the inverse pathway of the modified stalk model. For large spontaneous curvature of the monolayers of the detergents, a pore is often opened, thereby leading to vesicle division or worm-like micelle formation.

  3. Rab3 proteins involved in vesicle biogenesis and priming in embryonic mouse chromaffin cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schonn, Jean-Sébastien; van Weering, Jan R T; Mohrmann, Ralf;

    2010-01-01

    the size of the releasable vesicle pools but does not alter their fusion kinetics, consistent with an altered function in vesicle priming. The sustained release component has a sigmoid shape in ABCD(-/-) cells when normalized to the releasable pool size, indicating that vesicle priming follows at a...... higher rate after an initial delay. Rescue experiments showed that short-term (4-6 hours) overexpression of Rab3A or Rab3C suffices to rescue vesicle priming and secretion, but it does not restore the number of secretory vesicles. We conclude that Rab3 proteins play two distinct stimulating roles for...... LDCV fusion in embryonic chromaffin cells, by facilitating vesicle biogenesis and stabilizing the primed vesicle state....

  4. Lipid vesicle shape analysis from populations using light video microscopy and computer vision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernej Zupanc

    Full Text Available We present a method for giant lipid vesicle shape analysis that combines manually guided large-scale video microscopy and computer vision algorithms to enable analyzing vesicle populations. The method retains the benefits of light microscopy and enables non-destructive analysis of vesicles from suspensions containing up to several thousands of lipid vesicles (1-50 µm in diameter. For each sample, image analysis was employed to extract data on vesicle quantity and size distributions of their projected diameters and isoperimetric quotients (measure of contour roundness. This process enables a comparison of samples from the same population over time, or the comparison of a treated population to a control. Although vesicles in suspensions are heterogeneous in sizes and shapes and have distinctively non-homogeneous distribution throughout the suspension, this method allows for the capture and analysis of repeatable vesicle samples that are representative of the population inspected.

  5. Imaging Exocytosis of Single Synaptic Vesicles at a Fast CNS Presynaptic Terminal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midorikawa, Mitsuharu; Sakaba, Takeshi

    2015-11-01

    Synaptic vesicles are tethered to the active zone where they are docked/primed so that they can fuse rapidly upon Ca(2+) influx. To directly study these steps at a CNS presynaptic terminal, we used total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy at the live isolated calyx of Held terminal and measured the movements of single synaptic vesicle just beneath the plasma membrane. Only a subset of vesicles within the TIRF field underwent exocytosis. Following exocytosis, new vesicles (newcomers) approached the membrane and refilled the release sites slowly with a time constant of several seconds. Uniform elevation of the intracellular Ca(2+) using flash photolysis elicited an exocytotic burst followed by the sustained component, representing release of the readily releasable vesicles and vesicle replenishment, respectively. Surprisingly, newcomers were not released within a second of high Ca(2+). Instead, already-tethered vesicles became release-ready and mediated the replenishment. Our results reveal an important feature of conventional synapses. PMID:26539890

  6. Comparative Study of Extracellular Vesicles from the Urine of Healthy Individuals and Prostate Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryzgunova, Olga E; Zaripov, Marat M; Skvortsova, Tatyana E; Lekchnov, Evgeny A; Grigor'eva, Alina E; Zaporozhchenko, Ivan A; Morozkin, Evgeny S; Ryabchikova, Elena I; Yurchenko, Yuri B; Voitsitskiy, Vladimir E; Laktionov, Pavel P

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that extracellular vesicles may be the key to timely diagnosis and monitoring of genito-urological malignancies. In this study we investigated the composition and content of extracellular vesicles found in the urine of healthy donors and prostate cancer patients. Urine of 14 PCa patients and 20 healthy volunteers was clarified by low-speed centrifugation and total extracellular vesicles fraction was obtain by high-speed centrifugation. The exosome-enriched fraction was obtained by filtration of total extracellular vesicles through a 0.1 μm pore filter. Transmission electron microscopy showed that cell-free urine in both groups contained vesicles from 20 to 230 nm. Immunogold staining after ultrafiltration demonstrated that 95% and 90% of extracellular vesicles in healthy individuals and cancer patients, respectively, were exosomes. Protein, DNA and RNA concentrations as well as size distribution of extracellular vesicles in both fractions were analyzed. Only 75% of the total protein content of extracellular vesicles was associated with exosomes which amounted to 90-95% of all vesicles. Median DNA concentrations in total extracellular vesicles and exosome-enriched fractions were 18 pg/ml and 2.6 pg/ml urine, correspondingly. Urine extracellular vesicles carried a population of RNA molecules 25 nt to 200 nt in concentration of no more than 290 pg/ml of urine. Additionally, concentrations of miR-19b, miR-25, miR-125b, and miR-205 were quantified by qRT-PCR. MiRNAs were shown to be differently distributed between different fractions of extracellular vesicles. Detection of miR-19b versus miR-16 in total vesicles and exosome-enriched fractions achieved 100%/93% and 95%/79% specificity/sensitivity in distinguishing cancer patients from healthy individuals, respectively, demonstrating the diagnostic value of urine extracellular vesicles. PMID:27305142

  7. Lipid lateral organization on giant unilamellar vesicles containing lipopolysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kubiak, Jakub; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Hansen, Søren; Bagatolli, Luis

    2011-01-01

    We developed a new (to our knowledge) protocol to generate giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) composed of mixtures of single lipopolysaccharide (LPS) species and Escherichia coli polar lipid extracts. Four different LPSs that differed in the size of the polar headgroup (i.e., LPS smooth > LPS...... no more than 15 mol % for LPS-smooth and LPS-Ra, and up to 25 mol % for LPS-Rc and LPS-Rd (with respect to total lipids). We used the GUVs to evaluate the impact of different LPS species on the lateral structure of the host membrane (i.e., E. coli polar lipid extract). Rhodamine-DPPE-labeled GUVs......-Ra > LPS-Rc > LPS-Rd) were selected to generate GUVs composed of different LPS/E. coli polar lipid mixtures. Our procedure consists of two main steps: 1), generation and purification of oligolamellar liposomes containing LPSs; and 2), electroformation of GUVs using the LPS-containing oligolamellar vesicles...

  8. Pressure exerted by a vesicle on a surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several recent works have considered the pressure exerted on a wall by a model polymer. We extend this consideration to vesicles attached to a wall, and hence include osmotic pressure. We do this by considering a two-dimensional directed model, namely that of area-weighted Dyck paths. Not surprisingly, the pressure exerted by the vesicle on the wall depends on the osmotic pressure inside, especially its sign. Here, we discuss the scaling of this pressure in the different regimes, paying particular attention to the crossover between positive and negative osmotic pressure. In our directed model, there exists an underlying Airy function scaling form, from which we extract the dependence of the bulk pressure on small osmotic pressures. (paper)

  9. Synthesis of ultrafine, multicomponent particles using phospholipid vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that because of their unique properties of self-assembly and selective ion permeability across the lipid bilayers, phospholipid vesicles were used as reaction vessels for the synthesis of ultrafine, multicomponent ceramic particles containing Y, Ba, Cu, and Ag. Chemical inhomogeneities in the system were limited to the individual particle size (2O particles before and after the removal of the phospholipid molecules. Particle packing was greatly improved in the surfactant coated particles. This demonstrates the multifunctionality of this biomimetic system in which the vesicle membrane simultaneously acts as: a reaction cell for particle precipitation, an ion selective membrane that affects precipitation kinetics, a barrier to prevent spontaneous agglomeration of the ultrafine particles, and a lubricant dispersant that facilitates particle rearrangement during consolidation

  10. Shear-Induced Deformation of Surfactant Multilamellar Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommella, Angelo; Caserta, Sergio; Guida, Vincenzo; Guido, Stefano

    2012-03-01

    Surfactant multilamellar vesicles (SMLVs) play a key role in the formulation of many industrial products, such as detergents, foodstuff, and cosmetics. In this Letter, we present the first quantitative investigation of the flow behavior of single SMLVs in a shearing parallel plate apparatus. We found that SMLVs are deformed and oriented by the action of shear flow while keeping constant volume and exhibit complex dynamic modes (i.e., tumbling, breathing, and tank treading). This behavior can be explained in terms of an excess area (as compared to a sphere of the same volume) and of microstructural defects, which were observed by 3D shape reconstruction through confocal microscopy. Furthermore, the deformation and orientation of SMLVs scale with radius R in analogy with emulsion droplets and elastic capsules (instead of R3, such as in unilamellar vesicles). A possible application of the physical insight provided by this Letter is in the rationale design of processing methods of surfactant-based systems.

  11. CAPS and Munc13: CATCHRs that SNARE vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Declan J James

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. CAPS (Calcium-dependent Activator Protein for Secretion, aka CADPS and Munc13 (Mammalian Unc-13 proteins function to prime vesicles for Ca2+-triggered exocytosis in neurons and neuroendocrine cells. CAPS and Munc13 proteins contain conserved C-terminal domains that promote the assembly of SNARE complexes for vesicle priming. Similarities of the C-terminal domains of CAPS/Munc13 proteins with CATCHR (Complex Associated with Tethering Containing Helical Rods domains in multi-subunit tethering complexes have been reported. Multi-subunit tethering complexes coordinate multiple interactions for SNARE complex assembly at constitutive membrane fusion steps. We review aspects of these diverse tethering and priming factors to identify common operating principles.

  12. Numerical observation of non-axisymmetric vesicles in fluid membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Jie, Y; Ji Xing Liu; Zhong Can Ou Yang; Jie, Yan; Quan-Hui, Liu; Ji-Xing, Liu; Zhong-Can, Ou-Yang

    1998-01-01

    By means of Surface Evolver (Exp. Math,1,141 1992), a software package of brute-force energy minimization over a triangulated surface developed by the geometry center of University of Minnesota, we have numerically searched the non-axisymmetric shapes under the Helfrich spontaneous curvature (SC) energy model. We show for the first time there are abundant mechanically stable non-axisymmetric vesicles in SC model, including regular ones with intrinsic geometric symmetry and complex irregular ones. We report in this paper several interesting shapes including a corniculate shape with six corns, a quadri-concave shape, a shape resembling sickle cells, and a shape resembling acanthocytes. As far as we know, these shapes have not been theoretically obtained by any curvature model before. In addition, the role of the spontaneous curvature in the formation of irregular crenated vesicles has been studied. The results shows a positive spontaneous curvature may be a necessary condition to keep an irregular crenated shap...

  13. Lesions of the Seminal Vesicles and their MRI Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, Mahati N; Sadhna Verma

    2014-01-01

    Over the past few decades, MRI of the prostate has made great strides in improving cancer detection and is being embraced by more clinicians each day. This article aims to review the imaging characteristics of common and uncommon, but consequential lesions involving the seminal vesicles (SV), as seen predominantly on MRI. Many of these findings are seen incidentally during imaging of the prostate. Anatomy and embryology of the SV will be described which will help illustrate the associations o...

  14. Aggregation state of melittin in lipid vesicle membranes

    OpenAIRE

    John, Edgar; Jähnig, Fritz

    1991-01-01

    We have performed time-resolved fluorescence energy transfer measurements using melittin as donor and a modified melittin as acceptor. The melittin molecules were bound to fluid vesicle membranes of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine. Analysis of the temporal decay of the energy transfer and of its variation with the donor and acceptor concentrations led to the conclusion that melittin in fluid membranes is usually monomeric. Only at the high melittin/lipid molar ratio of 1/200 and high ionic str...

  15. Electrochemical proton gradient in Micrococcus lysodeikticus cells and membrane vesicles.

    OpenAIRE

    Friedberg, I.; Kaback, H R

    1980-01-01

    Using the distribution of weak acids to measure the pH gradient (delta pH; interior alkaline) and the distribution of the lipophilic cation [3H]tetraphenylphosphonium+ to monitor the membrane potential (delta psi; interior negative), we studied the electrochemical gradient or protons (delta mu- H+) across the membrane of Micrococcus lysodeikticus cells and plasma membrane vesicles. With reduced phenazine methosulfate as electron donor, intact cells exhibited a relatively constant delta mu- H+...

  16. Interplay between microdynamics and macrorheology in vesicle suspensions

    OpenAIRE

    Kaoui, Badr; Jonk, Ruben J. W.; Harting, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The microscopic dynamics of objects suspended in a fluid determines the macroscopic rheology of a suspension. For example, as shown by Danker and Misbah [Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 98}, 088104 (2007)], the viscosity of a dilute suspension of fluid-filled vesicles is a non-monotonic function of the viscosity contrast (the ratio between the viscosities of the internal encapsulated and the external suspending fluids) and exhibits a minimum at the critical point of the tank-treading-to-tumbling transi...

  17. Stealth Polymeric Vesicles via Metal-free Click Coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Isaacman, Michael J.; Corigliano, Eleonora M.; Theogarajan, Luke S.

    2013-01-01

    The strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition represents an optimal metal-free method for the modular coupling of amphiphilic polymer blocks. Hydrophilic poly(oxazoline) (PMOXA) or poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEG) A-blocks were coupled with a hydrophobic poly(siloxane) B-block to provide triblock copolymers capable of self-assembling into vesicular nanostructures. Stealth properties investigated via a complement activation assay revealed the superior in vitro stealth attributes of polymeric vesicl...

  18. Polymer Release out of a Spherical Vesicle through a Pore

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Pyeong Jun; Sung, Wokyung

    1998-01-01

    Translocation of a polymer out of curved surface or membrane is studied via mean first passage time approach. Membrane curvature gives rise to a constraint on polymer conformation, which effectively drives the polymer to the outside of membrane where the available volume of polymer conformational fluctuation is larger. Considering a polymer release out of spherical vesicle, polymer translocation time $\\tau$ is changed to the scaling behavior $\\tau\\sim L^2$ for $R

  19. Induction of mutant dynamin specifically blocks endocytic coated vesicle formation

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    Dynamin is the mammalian homologue to the Drosophila shibire gene product. Mutations in this 100-kD GTPase cause a pleiotropic defect in endocytosis. To further investigate its role, we generated stable HeLa cell lines expressing either wild-type dynamin or a mutant defective in GTP binding and hydrolysis driven by a tightly controlled, tetracycline- inducible promoter. Overexpression of wild-type dynamin had no effect. In contrast, coated pits failed to become constricted and coated vesicles...

  20. Tubulin as a molecular component of coated vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    Two proteins of 53,000 and 56,000 mol wt have been found to be associated with coated vesicles (CV) purified from bovine brain and chicken liver. These proteins share molecular weights, isoelectric points, and antigenic determinants with alpha- and beta-tubulins purified from bovine brain. Based on SDS PAGE and electron microscopic analysis of controlled pore glass bead exclusion column fractions, both the tubulins and the major CV polypeptide clathrin were found to chromatograph as component...

  1. Coated vesicle isolation by immunoadsorption on Staphylococcus aureus cells

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    Porcine brain coated vesicles were isolated from crude fractions of tissue homogenates by affinity separation using anticlathrin-coated STaphylococcus aureus (Staph A) cells as a solid-phase immunoadsorbent. The specificity of the immunoadsorption was monitored by SDS PAGE analysis and by competitive ELISA assays. SDS PAGE of the material immunoadsorbed from a fraction of porcine bran smooth microsomes showed a selective enrichment in a 180,000 mol wt protein. In an ELISA assay, this protein ...

  2. Immunocytochemical localization of coated vesicle protein in rodent nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    Immunocytochemistry has been used to study the distribution of the major 180,000-mol wt protein of coated vesicles in rodent cerebellum. An antibody to the coat protein was prepared in rabbits and characterized by immunodiffusion and immunofixation of polyacrylamide gels. At the light microscope level the protein was primarily localized in punctate profiles surrounding Purkinje cells and within the cerebellar glomeruli. At the electron microscope level the punctate distribution was confined t...

  3. Dynamic Theory of Pearling Instability in Cylindrical Vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Philip; Powers, Thomas; Seifert, Udo

    1994-01-01

    We give a simple theory for recent experiments of Bar-Ziv and Moses% Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf73} (1994) 1392, in which tubular vesicles are excited using laser tweezers to a ``peristaltic'' state. Considering the hydrodynamics of a bilayer membrane under tension, we reproduce some of the qualitative behavior seen and find a value for the wavelength of the instability in terms of independently measured material parameters, in rough agreement with the experimental values.

  4. Therapeutic Applications of Extracellular Vesicles: Clinical Promise and Open Questions

    OpenAIRE

    György, Bence; Hung, Michelle E.; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Leonard, Joshua N.

    2014-01-01

    This review provides an updated perspective on rapidly proliferating efforts to harness extracellular vesicles (EVs) for therapeutic applications. We summarize current knowledge, emerging strategies, and open questions pertaining to clinical potential and translation. Potentially useful EVs comprise diverse products of various cell types and species. EV components may also be combined with liposomes and nanoparticles to facilitate manufacturing as well as product safety and evaluation. Potent...

  5. Synapsin IIa controls the reserve pool of glutamatergic synaptic vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Gitler, Daniel; Cheng, Qing; Greengard, Paul; Augustine, George J.

    2008-01-01

    Synapsins regulate synaptic transmission by controlling the reserve pool of synaptic vesicles. Each of the three mammalian synapsin genes is subject to alternative splicing, yielding several isoforms whose roles are unknown. To investigate the function of these isoforms, we examined the synaptic effects of introducing each isoform into glutamatergic cultured hippocampal neurons from synapsin triple knock-out mice. Remarkably, we found that synapsin IIa was the only isoform that could rescue t...

  6. A vesicle surface tyrosine kinase regulates phagosome maturation

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Jun; Brzostowski, Joseph A.; Ou, Stephen; Isik, Nilgun; Nair, Vinod; Jin, Tian

    2007-01-01

    Phagocytosis is crucial for host defense against microbial pathogens and for obtaining nutrients in Dictyostelium discoideum. Phagocytosed particles are delivered via a complex route from phagosomes to lysosomes for degradation, but the molecular mechanisms involved in the phagosome maturation process are not well understood. Here, we identify a novel vesicle-associated receptor tyrosine kinase-like protein, VSK3, in D. discoideum. We demonstrate how VSK3 is involved in phagosome maturation. ...

  7. Cardiac Extracellular Vesicles in Normal and Infarcted Heart

    OpenAIRE

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A.; Alexander N. Orekhov; Yuri V Bobryshev

    2016-01-01

    Heart is a complex assembly of many cell types constituting myocardium, endocardium and epicardium that intensively communicate to each other in order to maintain the proper cardiac function. There are many types of intercellular intracardiac signals, with a prominent role of extracellular vesicles (EVs), such as exosomes and microvesicles, for long-distant delivering of complex messages. Cardiomyocytes release EVs, whose content could significantly vary depending on the stimulus. In stress, ...

  8. Molecular recognition and organizational and polyvalent effects in vesicles induce the formation of artificial multicompartment cells as model systems of eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paleos, Constantinos M; Pantos, A

    2014-05-20

    Researchers have become increasingly interested in the preparation and characterization of artificial cells based on amphiphilic molecules. In particular, artificial cells with multiple compartments are primitive mimics of the structure of eukaryotic cells. Endosymbiotic theory, widely accepted among biologists, states that eukaryotic cells arose from the assembly of prokaryotic cells inside other cells. Therefore, replicating this process in a synthetic system could allow researchers to model molecular and supramolecular processes that occur in living cells, shed light on mass and energy transport through cell membranes, and provide a unique, isolated space for conducting chemical reactions. In addition, such structures can serve as drug delivery systems that encapsulate both bioactive and nonbiocompatible compounds. In this Account, we present various coating, incubation, and electrofusion strategies for forming multicompartment vesicle systems, and we are focusing on strategies that rely on involving molecular recognition of complementary vesicles. All these methods afforded multicompartment systems with similar structures, and these nanoparticles have potential applications as drug delivery systems or nanoreactors for conducting diverse reactions. The complementarity of interacting vesicles allows these artificial cells to form, and the organization and polyvalency of these interacting vesicles further promote their formation. The incorporation of cholesterol in the bilayer membrane and the introduction of PEG chains at the surface of the interacting vesicles also support the structure of these multicompartment systems. PEG chains appear to destabilize the bilayers, which facilitates the fusion and transport of the small vesicles to the larger ones. Potential applications of these well-structured and reproducibly produced multicompartment systems include drug delivery, where researchers could load a cocktail of drugs within the encapsulated vesicles, a process

  9. Extracellular Vesicles and Their Convergence with Viral Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wurdinger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (microvesicles, such as exosomes and shed microvesicles, contain a variety of molecules including proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Microvesicles appear mostly to originate from multivesicular bodies or to bud from the plasma membrane. Here, we review the convergence of microvesicle biogenesis and aspects of viral assembly and release pathways. Herpesviruses and retroviruses, amongst others, recruit several elements from the microvesicle biogenesis pathways for functional virus release. In addition, noninfectious pleiotropic virus-like vesicles can be released, containing viral and cellular components. We highlight the heterogeneity of microvesicle function during viral infection, addressing microvesicles that can either block or enhance infection, or cause immune dysregulation through bystander action in the immune system. Finally, endogenous retrovirus and retrotransposon elements deposited in our genomes millions of years ago can be released from cells within microvesicles, suggestive of a viral origin of the microvesicle system or perhaps of an evolutionary conserved system of virus-vesicle codependence. More research is needed to further elucidate the complex function of the various microvesicles produced during viral infection, possibly revealing new therapeutic intervention strategies.

  10. Microfluidic Fabrication of Pluronic Vesicles with Controlled Permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento, Débora F; Arriaga, Laura R; Eggersdorfer, Max; Ziblat, Roy; Marques, Maria de Fátima V; Reynaud, Franceline; Koehler, Stephan A; Weitz, David A

    2016-05-31

    Block copolymers with a low hydrophilic-to-lipophilic balance form membranes that are highly permeable to hydrophilic molecules. Polymersomes with this type of membrane enable the controllable release of molecules without membrane rupture. However, these polymersomes are difficult to assemble because of their low hydrophobicity. Here, we report a microfluidic approach to the production of these polymersomes using double-emulsion drops with ultrathin shells as templates. The small thickness of the middle oil phase enables the attraction of the hydrophobic blocks of the polymers adsorbed at each of the oil/water interfaces of the double emulsions; this results in the dewetting of the oil from the surface of the innermost water drops of the double emulsions and the ultimate formation of the polymersome. This approach to polymersome fabrication enables control of the vesicle size and results in the efficient encapsulation of hydrophilic ingredients that can be released through the polymer membrane without membrane rupture. We apply our approach to the fabrication of Pluronic L121 vesicles and characterize the permeability of their membranes. Furthermore, we show that membrane permeability can be tuned by blending different Pluronic polymers. Our work thus describes a route to producing Pluronic vesicles that are useful for the controlled release of hydrophilic ingredients. PMID:27192611

  11. Origin of life: LUCA and extracellular membrane vesicles (EMVs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, S.; Forterre, P.

    2016-01-01

    Cells from the three domains of life produce extracellular membrane vesicles (EMVs), suggesting that EMV production is an important aspect of cellular physiology. EMVs have been implicated in many aspects of cellular life in all domains, including stress response, toxicity against competing strains, pathogenicity, detoxification and resistance against viral attack. These EMVs represent an important mode of inter-cellular communication by serving as vehicles for transfer of DNA, RNA, proteins and lipids between cells. Here, we review recent progress in the understanding of EMV biology and their various roles. We focus on the role of membrane vesicles in early cellular evolution and how they would have helped shape the nature of the last universal common ancestor. A membrane-protected micro-environment would have been a key to the survival of spontaneous molecular systems and efficient metabolic reactions. Interestingly, the morphology of EMVs is strongly reminiscent of the morphology of some virions. It is thus tempting to make a link between the origin of the first protocell via the formation of vesicles and the origin of viruses.

  12. Myeloid extracellular vesicles: messengers from the demented brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria eNigro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood-borne monocyte derived cells play a pivotal, initially unrecognized, role in most central nervous system disorders, including diseases initially classified as purely neurodegenerative (i.e. AD, PD, and ALS. Their trafficking to the brain and spinal cord has been extensively studied in classical neuroinflammatory disorders such as multiple sclerosis. Central nervous system resident myeloid cells, namely microglia and perivascular macrophages, also are in the spotlight of investigations on neurological disorders. Myeloid cells, such as infiltrating macrophages and microglia, have been described as having both protective and destructive features in neurological disorders, thus identification of their functional phenotype during disease evolution would be of paramount importance. Extracellular vesicles, namely exosomes and shed vesicles, are released by virtually any cell type and can be detected and identified in terms of cell origin in biological fluids. They therefore constitute an ideal tool to access information on cells residing in an inaccessible site such as the brain. We will review here available information on extracellular vesicles detection in neurological disorders with special emphasis on neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Formation of supported lipid bilayers by vesicle fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Tania Kjellerup; Cardenas Gomez, Marite; Wacklin, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of deposition temperature on supported lipid bilayer formation via vesicle fusion. By using several complementary surface-sensitive techniques, we demonstrate that despite contradicting literature on the subject, high-quality bilayers can be formed below the main p...... observed during the deposition process by QCM-D correspond to vesicles absorbed on top of a continuous bilayer and not to a surface-supported vesicular layer as previously reported. © 2014 American Chemical Society.......We have investigated the effect of deposition temperature on supported lipid bilayer formation via vesicle fusion. By using several complementary surface-sensitive techniques, we demonstrate that despite contradicting literature on the subject, high-quality bilayers can be formed below the main...... phase-transition temperature of the lipid. We have carefully studied the formation mechanism of supported DPPC bilayers below and above the lipid melting temperature (Tm) by quartz crystal microbalance and atomic force microscopy under continuous flow conditions. We also measured the structure of lipid...

  14. Expression of Vesicular Nucleotide Transporter in Rat Odontoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Erina; Goto, Tetsuya; Gunjigake, Kaori; Kuroishi, Kayoko; Ueda, Masae; Kataoka, Shinji; Toyono, Takashi; Nakatomi, Mitsushiro; Seta, Yuji; Kitamura, Chiaki; Nishihara, Tatsuji; Kawamoto, Tatsuo

    2016-02-27

    Several theories have been proposed regarding pain transmission mechanisms in tooth. However, the exact signaling mechanism from odontoblasts to pulp nerves remains to be clarified. Recently, ATP-associated pain transmission has been reported, but it is unclear whether ATP is involved in tooth pain transmission. In the present study, we focused on the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT), a transporter of ATP into vesicles, and examined whether VNUT was involved in ATP release from odontoblasts. We examined the expression of VNUT in rat pulp by RT-PCR and immunostaining. ATP release from cultured odontoblast-like cells with heat stimulation was evaluated using ATP luciferase methods. VNUT was expressed in pulp tissue, and the distribution of VNUT-immunopositive vesicles was confirmed in odontoblasts. In odontoblasts, some VNUT-immunopositive vesicles were colocalized with membrane fusion proteins. Additionally P2X3, an ATP receptor, immunopositive axons were distributed between odontoblasts. The ATP release by thermal stimulation from odontoblast-like cells was inhibited by the addition of siRNA for VNUT. These findings suggest that cytosolic ATP is transported by VNUT and that the ATP in the vesicles is then released from odontoblasts to ATP receptors on axons. ATP vesicle transport in odontoblasts seems to be a key mechanism for signal transduction from odontoblasts to axons in the pulp. PMID:27006518

  15. Molecular genetic and physical analysis of gas vesicles in buoyant enterobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Yosuke; Monson, Rita E; Ramsay, Joshua P; Salmond, George P C

    2016-04-01

    Different modes of bacterial taxis play important roles in environmental adaptation, survival, colonization and dissemination of disease. One mode of taxis is flotation due to the production of gas vesicles. Gas vesicles are proteinaceous intracellular organelles, permeable only to gas, that enable flotation in aquatic niches. Gene clusters for gas vesicle biosynthesis are partially conserved in various archaea, cyanobacteria, and some proteobacteria, such as the enterobacterium, Serratia sp. ATCC 39006 (S39006). Here we present the first systematic analysis of the genes required to produce gas vesicles in S39006, identifying how this differs from the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum. We define 11 proteins essential for gas vesicle production. Mutation of gvpN or gvpV produced small bicone gas vesicles, suggesting that the cognate proteins are involved in the morphogenetic assembly pathway from bicones to mature cylindrical forms. Using volumetric compression, gas vesicles were shown to comprise 17% of S39006 cells, whereas in Escherichia coli heterologously expressing the gas vesicle cluster in a deregulated environment, gas vesicles can occupy around half of cellular volume. Gas vesicle production in S39006 and E. coli was exploited to calculate the instantaneous turgor pressure within cultured bacterial cells; the first time this has been performed in either strain. PMID:26743231

  16. Self-Reproduction of Fatty Acid Vesicles: A Combined Experimental and Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markvoort, Albert J.; Pfleger, Nicole; Staffhorst, Rutger; Hilbers, Peter A.J.; van Santen, Rutger A.; Killian, J. Antoinette; de Kruijff, Ben

    2010-01-01

    Dilution of a fatty acid micellar solution at basic pH toward neutrality results in spontaneous formation of vesicles with a broad size distribution. However, when vesicles of a defined size are present before dilution, the size distribution of the newly formed vesicles is strongly biased toward that of the seed vesicles. This so-called matrix effect is believed to be a key feature of early life. Here we reproduced this effect for oleate micelles and seed vesicles of either oleate or dioleoylphosphatidylcholine. Fluorescence measurements showed that the vesicle contents do not leak out during the replication process. We hypothesized that the matrix effect results from vesicle fission induced by an imbalance of material across both leaflets of the vesicle upon initial insertion of fatty acids into the outer leaflet of the seed vesicle. This was supported by experiments that showed a significant increase in vesicle size when the equilibration of oleate over both leaflets was enhanced by either slowing down the rate of fatty acid addition or increasing the rate of fatty acid transbilayer movement. Coarse-grained molecular-dynamics simulations showed excellent agreement with the experimental results and provided further mechanistic details of the replication process. PMID:20816064

  17. Self-reproduction of fatty acid vesicles: a combined experimental and simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markvoort, Albert J; Pfleger, Nicole; Staffhorst, Rutger; Hilbers, Peter A J; van Santen, Rutger A; Killian, J Antoinette; de Kruijff, Ben

    2010-09-01

    Dilution of a fatty acid micellar solution at basic pH toward neutrality results in spontaneous formation of vesicles with a broad size distribution. However, when vesicles of a defined size are present before dilution, the size distribution of the newly formed vesicles is strongly biased toward that of the seed vesicles. This so-called matrix effect is believed to be a key feature of early life. Here we reproduced this effect for oleate micelles and seed vesicles of either oleate or dioleoylphosphatidylcholine. Fluorescence measurements showed that the vesicle contents do not leak out during the replication process. We hypothesized that the matrix effect results from vesicle fission induced by an imbalance of material across both leaflets of the vesicle upon initial insertion of fatty acids into the outer leaflet of the seed vesicle. This was supported by experiments that showed a significant increase in vesicle size when the equilibration of oleate over both leaflets was enhanced by either slowing down the rate of fatty acid addition or increasing the rate of fatty acid transbilayer movement. Coarse-grained molecular-dynamics simulations showed excellent agreement with the experimental results and provided further mechanistic details of the replication process. PMID:20816064

  18. Outer membrane vesicles of Lysobacter sp. XL1: biogenesis, functions, and applied prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryakova, Irina V; Shishkova, Nina A; Vasilyeva, Natalia V

    2016-06-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) produced by Gram-negative bacteria have been intensively investigated in recent times. Vesicle formation models have been proposed, some factors affecting the process were established, and important roles vesicles play in vital activities of their producing cells were determined. Studies of pathogenic bacterial vesicles contribute to understanding the causes of acute infection and developing drugs on their basis. Despite intensive research, issues associated with the understanding of vesicle biogenesis, the mechanisms of bacterium-bacterium and pathogen-host interactions with participation of vesicles, still remain unresolved. This review discusses some results obtained in the research into OMVs of Lysobacter sp. XL1 VKM B-1576. This bacterium secretes into the environment a spectrum of bacteriolytic enzymes that hydrolyze peptidoglycan of competing bacteria, thus leading to their lysis. One of these enzymes, lytic endopeptidase L5, has been shown not only to be secreted by means of vesicles but also to be involved in their formation. As part of vesicles, the antimicrobial potential of L5 enzyme has been found to be considerably expanded. Vesicles have been shown to have a therapeutic effect in respect of anthrax infection and staphylococcal sepsis modelled in mice. The scientific basis for constructing liposomal antimicrobial preparations from vesicle phospholipids and recombinant bacteriolytic enzyme L5 has been formed. PMID:27098257

  19. Molecular characterization of exosome-like vesicles from breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Membrane vesicles released by neoplastic cells into extracellular medium contain potential of carrying arrays of oncogenic molecules including proteins and microRNAs (miRNA). Extracellular (exosome-like) vesicles play a major role in cell-to-cell communication. Thus, the characterization of proteins and miRNAs of exosome-like vesicles is imperative in clarifying intercellular signaling as well as identifying disease markers. Exosome-like vesicles were isolated using gradient centrifugation from MCF-7 and MDA-MB 231 cultures. Proteomic profiling of vesicles using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) revealed different protein profiles of exosome-like vesicles derived from MCF-7 cells (MCF-Exo) than those from MDA-MB 231 cells (MDA-Exo). The protein database search has identified 88 proteins in MDA-Exo and 59 proteins from MCF-Exo. Analysis showed that among all, 27 proteins were common between the two exosome-like vesicle types. Additionally, MDA-Exo contains a higher amount of matrix-metalloproteinases, which might be linked to the enhanced metastatic property of MDA-MB 231 cells. In addition, microarray analysis identified several oncogenic miRNA between the two types vesicles. Identification of the oncogenic factors in exosome-like vesicles is important since such vesicles could convey signals to non-malignant cells and could have an implication in tumor progression and metastasis

  20. Cycling of dense core vesicles involved in somatic exocytosis of serotonin by leech neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Citlali eTrueta

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We studied the cycling of dense core vesicles producing somatic exocytosis of serotonin. Our experiments were made using electron microscopy and vesicle staining with fluorescent dye FM1-43 in Retzius neurons of the leech, which secrete serotonin from clusters of dense core vesicles in a frequency-dependent manner. Electron micrographs of neurons at rest or after 1 Hz stimulation showed two pools of dense core vesicles. A perinuclear pool near Golgi apparatuses, from which vesicles apparently form, and a peripheral pool with vesicle clusters at a distance from the plasma membrane. By contrast, after 20 Hz electrical stimulation 47% of the vesicle clusters were apposed to the plasma membrane, with some omega exocytosis structures. Dense core and small clear vesicles apparently originating from endocytosis were incorporated in multivesicular bodies. In another series of experiments, neurons were stimulated at 20 Hz while bathed in a solution containing peroxidase. Electron micrographs of these neurons contained gold particles coupled to anti-peroxidase antibodies in dense core vesicles and multivesicular bodies located near the plasma membrane. Cultured neurons depolarized with high potassium in the presence of FM1-43 displayed superficial fluorescent spots, each reflecting a vesicle cluster. A partial bleaching of the spots followed by another depolarization in the presence of FM1-43 produced restaining of some spots, other spots disappeared, some remained without restaining and new spots were formed. Several hours after electrical stimulation the FM1-43 spots accumulated at the center of the somata. This correlated with electron micrographs of multivesicular bodies releasing their contents near Golgi apparatuses. Our results suggest that dense core vesicle cycling related to somatic serotonin release involves two steps: the production of clear vesicles and multivesicular bodies after exocytosis, and the formation of new dense core vesicles in

  1. Model of reversible vesicular transport with exclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Karamched, Bhargav R.

    2016-08-01

    A major question in neurobiology concerns the mechanics behind the motor-driven transport and delivery of vesicles to synaptic targets along the axon of a neuron. Experimental evidence suggests that the distribution of vesicles along the axon is relatively uniform and that vesicular delivery to synapses is reversible. A recent modeling study has made explicit the crucial role that reversibility in vesicular delivery to synapses plays in achieving uniformity in vesicle distribution, so called synaptic democracy (Bressloff et al 2015 Phys. Rev. Lett. 114 168101). In this paper we generalize the previous model by accounting for exclusion effects (hard-core repulsion) that may occur between molecular motor-cargo complexes (particles) moving along the same microtubule track. The resulting model takes the form of an exclusion process with four internal states, which distinguish between motile and stationary particles, and whether or not a particle is carrying vesicles. By applying a mean field approximation and an adiabatic approximation we reduce the system of ODEs describing the evolution of occupation numbers of the sites on a 1D lattice to a system of hydrodynamic equations in the continuum limit. We find that reversibility in vesicular delivery allows for synaptic democracy even in the presence of exclusion effects, although exclusion does exacerbate nonuniform distributions of vesicles in an axon when compared with a model without exclusion. We also uncover the relationship between our model and other models of exclusion processes with internal states.

  2. Effects of Lipid Composition on the Entry of Cell-Penetrating Peptide Oligoarginine into Single Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharmin, Sabrina; Islam, Md Zahidul; Karal, Mohammad Abu Sayem; Alam Shibly, Sayed Ul; Dohra, Hideo; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-08-01

    The cell-penetrating peptide R9, an oligoarginine comprising nine arginines, has been used to transport biological cargos into cells. However, the mechanisms underlying its translocation across membranes remain unclear. In this report, we investigated the entry of carboxyfluorescein (CF)-labeled R9 (CF-R9) into single giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) of various lipid compositions and the CF-R9-induced leakage of a fluorescent probe, Alexa Fluor 647 hydrazide (AF647), using a method developed recently by us. First, we investigated the interaction of CF-R9 with dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (DOPG)/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) GUVs containing AF647 and small DOPG/DOPC vesicles. The fluorescence intensity of the GUV membrane due to CF-R9 (i.e., the rim intensity) increased with time to a steady-state value, and then the fluorescence intensity of the membranes of the small vesicles in the GUV lumen increased without leakage of AF647. This result indicates that CF-R9 entered the GUV lumen from the outside by translocating across the lipid membrane without forming pores through which AF647 could leak. The fraction of entry of CF-R9 at 6 min in the absence of pore formation, Pentry (6 min), increased with an increase in CF-R9 concentration, but the CF-R9 concentration in the lumen was low. We obtained similar results for dilauroyl-PG (DLPG)/ditridecanoyl-PC (DTPC) (2/8) GUVs. The values of Pentry (6 min) of CF-R9 for DLPG/DTPC (2/8) GUVs were larger than those obtained with DOPG/DOPC (2/8) GUVs at the same CF-R9 concentrations. In contrast, a high concentration of CF-R9 induced pores in DLPG/DTPC (4/6) GUVs through which CF-R9 entered the GUV lumen, so the CF-R9 concentration in the lumen was higher. However, CF-R9 could not enter DOPG/DOPC/cholesterol (2/6/4) GUVs. Analysis of the rim intensity showed that CF-R9 was located only in the outer monolayer of the DOPG/DOPC/cholesterol (2/6/4) GUVs. On the basis of analyses of these results, we discuss the elementary

  3. Ca2+ transport properties of ionophores A23187, ionomycin, and 4-BrA23187 in a well defined model system.

    OpenAIRE

    Erdahl, W L; Chapman, C J; Taylor, R.W.; Pfeiffer, D R

    1994-01-01

    Models for the electroneutral transport of Ca2+ by ionophores A23187, ionomycin, and 4-BrA23187 have been tested in a defined system comprised of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycerophosphatidylcholine vesicles prepared by freeze-thaw extrusion. Quin-2-loaded and CaCl2-loaded vesicles were employed to allow the investigation of transport in both directions. Simultaneous or parallel measurements of H+ transport and membrane potential, respectively, indicate that for any of these ionophores, electro...

  4. Analysis of outer membrane vesicle associated proteins isolated from the plant pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niehaus Karsten

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs are released from the outer membrane of many Gram-negative bacteria. These extracellular compartments are known to transport compounds involved in cell-cell signalling as well as virulence associated proteins, e.g. the cytolysine from enterotoxic E. coli. Results We have demonstrated that Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc releases OMVs into the culture supernatant during growth. A proteome study identified 31 different proteins that associate with the OMV fraction of which half are virulence-associated. A comparison with the most abundant outer membrane (OM proteins revealed that some proteins are enriched in the OMV fraction. This may be connected to differences in the LPS composition between the OMVs and the OM. Furthermore, a comparison of the OMV proteomes from two different culture media indicated that the culture conditions have an impact on the protein composition. Interestingly, the proteins that are common to both culture conditions are mainly involved in virulence. Conclusion Outer membrane vesicles released from the OM of Xcc contain membrane- and virulence-associated proteins. Future experiments will prove whether these structures can serve as "vehicles" for the transport of virulence factors into the host membrane.

  5. Actin- and Myosin-Dependent Vesicle Loading of Presynaptic Docking Sites Prior to Exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Takafumi; Malagon, Gerardo; Pulido, Camila; Llano, Isabel; Neher, Erwin; Marty, Alain

    2016-08-17

    Variance analysis of postsynaptic current amplitudes suggests the presence of distinct docking sites (also called release sites) where vesicles pause before exocytosis. Docked vesicles participate in the readily releasable pool (RRP), but the relation between docking site number and RRP size remains unclear. It is also unclear whether all vesicles of the RRP are equally release competent, and what cellular mechanisms underlie RRP renewal. We address here these questions at single glutamatergic synapses, counting released vesicles using deconvolution. We find a remarkably low variance of cumulative vesicle counts during action potential trains. This, combined with Monte Carlo simulations, indicates that vesicles transit through two successive states before exocytosis, so that the RRP is up to 2-fold higher than the docking site number. The transition to the second state has a very rapid rate constant, and is specifically inhibited by latrunculin B and blebbistatin, suggesting the involvement of actin and myosin. PMID:27537485

  6. Wolbachia bacteria reside in host Golgi-related vesicles whose position is regulated by polarity proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Ok Cho

    Full Text Available Wolbachia pipientis are intracellular symbiotic bacteria extremely common in various organisms including Drosophila melanogaster, and are known for their ability to induce changes in host reproduction. These bacteria are present in astral microtubule-associated vesicular structures in host cytoplasm, but little is known about the identity of these vesicles. We report here that Wolbachia are restricted only to a group of Golgi-related vesicles concentrated near the site of membrane biogenesis and minus-ends of microtubules. The Wolbachia vesicles were significantly mislocalized in mutant embryos defective in cell/planar polarity genes suggesting that cell/tissue polarity genes are required for apical localization of these Golgi-related vesicles. Furthermore, two of the polarity proteins, Van Gogh/Strabismus and Scribble, appeared to be present in these Golgi-related vesicles. Thus, establishment of polarity may be closely linked to the precise insertion of Golgi vesicles into the new membrane addition site.

  7. Preparation and characterization of unilamellar vesicles from cholate-phospholipid micelle treated with cholestyramine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventimiglia, J B; Levesque, M C; Chang, T Y

    1986-09-01

    Cholestyramine, a well-known bile-salt sequestrant, can be used effectively to remove cholate or deoxycholate from a solution of phosphatidylcholine-bile salt mixed micelle. Upon removal of the bile salt, unilamellar phospholipid vesicles form essentially instantaneously. Cholestyramine resin could be pelleted and removed from the vesicle solution after a low speed centrifugation. Based on phosphate analyses, the recovery of vesicles was approximately 60% of the starting material. The average diameter of these vesicles, as estimated by gel exclusion chromatography on sephacryl S-1000 beads and by trapped volume measurement using [3H]sucrose, ranged between 85 to 121 nm. Phosphatidylethanolamine, cholesterol, or n-alkane such as tetradecane can be incorporated into the vesicles without any selective loss; however, selective loss was experienced when negatively charged phospholipid species such as phosphatidylglycerol or phosphatidylserine was included in vesicle formation. PMID:3777436

  8. Replication of simulated prebiotic amphiphile vesicles controlled by experimental lipid physicochemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a new embodiment of the graded autocatalysis replication domain (GARD) for the growth, replication and evolution of lipid vesicles based on a semi-empirical foundation using experimentally measured kinetic values of selected extant lipid species. Extensive simulations using this formalism elucidated the details of the dependence of the replication and properties of the vesicles on the physicochemical properties and concentrations of the lipids, both in the environment and in the vesicle. As expected, the overall concentration and number of amphiphilic components strongly affect average replication time. Furthermore, variations in acyl chain length and unsaturation of vesicles also influence replication rate, as do the relative concentrations of individual lipid types. Understanding of the dependence of replication rates on physicochemical parameters opens a new direction in the study of prebiotic vesicles and lays the groundwork for future studies involving the competition between lipid vesicles for available amphiphilic monomers

  9. Gold nanoparticles covalently assembled onto vesicle structures as possible biosensing platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, M Fátima; Luna, M Alejandra; Tabares, Juan S Flores; Delerue-Matos, Cristina; Correa, N Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Summary In this contribution a strategy is shown to covalently immobilize gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) onto vesicle bilayers with the aim of using this nanomaterial as platform for the future design of immunosensors. A novel methodology for the self-assembly of AuNPs onto large unilamellar vesicle structures is described. The vesicles were formed with 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and 1-undecanethiol (SH). After, the AuNPs photochemically synthesized in pure glycerol were mixed and anchored onto SH–DOPC vesicles. The data provided by voltammetry, spectrometry and microscopy techniques indicated that the AuNPs were successfully covalently anchored onto the vesicle bilayer and decorated vesicles exhibit a spherical shape with a size of 190 ± 10 nm. The developed procedure is easy, rapid and reproducible to start designing a possible immunosensor by using environmentally friendly procedures. PMID:27335755

  10. Microfluidic-enabled liposomes elucidate size-dependent transdermal transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renee R Hood

    Full Text Available Microfluidic synthesis of small and nearly-monodisperse liposomes is used to investigate the size-dependent passive transdermal transport of nanoscale lipid vesicles. While large liposomes with diameters above 105 nm are found to be excluded from deeper skin layers past the stratum corneum, the primary barrier to nanoparticle transport, liposomes with mean diameters between 31-41 nm exhibit significantly enhanced penetration. Furthermore, multicolor fluorescence imaging reveals that the smaller liposomes pass rapidly through the stratum corneum without vesicle rupture. These findings reveal that nanoscale liposomes with well-controlled size and minimal size variance are excellent vehicles for transdermal delivery of functional nanoparticle drugs.

  11. Extracellular Vesicles as Shuttles of Tumor Biomarkers and Anti-Tumor Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Zocco, Davide; Ferruzzi, Pietro; Cappello, Francesco; Kuo, Winston Patrick; Fais, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) include vesicles released by either normal or tumor cells. EV may exceed the nanometric scale (microvesicles), or to be within the nanoscale, also called exosomes. Thus, it appears that only exosomes and larger vesicles may have the size for potential applications in nanomedicine, in either disease diagnosis or therapy. This is of particular interest for research in cancer, also because the vast majority of existing data on EV are coming from pre-clinical and clini...

  12. Kinetics of synaptic depression and vesicle recycling after tetanic stimulation of frog motor nerve terminals.

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, L G; Betz, W J

    1998-01-01

    We measured the time courses of two key components of the synaptic vesicle cycle during recovery from synaptic depression under different conditions, and used this and other information to create a kinetic model of the vesicle cycle. End plate potential (EPP) amplitudes were used to follow recovery from synaptic depression after different amounts of tetanic stimulation. This provided an estimate of the time course of vesicle mobilization from the reserve pool to the docked (readily releasable...

  13. Okadaic acid disrupts clusters of synaptic vesicles in frog motor nerve terminals

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    The fluorophore FM1-43 appears to stain membranes of recycled synaptic vesicles. We used FM1-43 to study mechanisms of synaptic vesicle clustering and mobilization in living frog motor nerve terminals. FM1- 43 staining of these terminals produces a linear series of fluorescent spots, each spot marking the cluster of several hundred synaptic vesicles at an active zone. Most agents we tested did not affect staining, but the phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid (OA) disrupted the fluorescent spots...

  14. Dynamics and Rheology of Vesicle Suspensions in Wall-Bounded Shear Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Lamura, A.; Gompper, G.

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics and rheology of suspensions of fluid vesicles or red blood cells is investigated by a combination of molecular dynamics and mesoscale hydrodynamics simulations in two dimensions. The vesicle suspension is confined between two no-slip walls, which are driven externally to generate a shear flow with shear rate $\\dot\\gamma$. The flow behavior is studied as a function of $\\dot\\gamma$, the volume fraction of vesicles, and the viscosity contrast between inside and outside fluids. Resul...

  15. Metal ion responsive adhesion of vesicles by conformational switching of a non-covalent linker

    OpenAIRE

    Nalluri, Siva Krishna Mohan; Bultema, Jelle B.; Boekema, Egbert J.; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2011-01-01

    This contribution describes the metal ion responsive adhesion of vesicles induced by a conformational switch of a non-covalent linker molecule. A p-tert-butylbenzyl dimer with a flexible N,N'-bis(3-aminopropyl)ethylenediamine spacer was used as a non-covalent linker, which induces aggregation and adhesion (but not fusion) of host bilayer vesicles composed of amphiphilic beta-cyclodextrins by the formation of hydrophobic inclusion complexes. The aggregation and adhesion of the vesicles in dilu...

  16. The transbilayer movement of phosphatidylcholine in vesicles reconstituted with intrinsic proteins from the human erythrocyte membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Gerritsen, W.J.; Henricks, P. A. J.; de Kruijff, B.; Van Deenen, L. L. M.

    1980-01-01

    Vesicles have been prepared from 18 : 1c/18 : 1c-phosphatidylcholine with or without purified glycophorin or partially purified band 3 (obtained by organomercurial gel chromatography). The vesicles have been characterized by freeze-fracture electron microscopy, binding studies to DEAE-cellulose, 31P-NMR and K+ trap measurements. Pools of phosphatidylcholine available for exchange have been investigated using phosphatidylcholine exchange protein from bovine liver. The protein-containing vesicl...

  17. Vesicle recycling at ribbon synapses in the finely branched axon terminals of mouse retinal bipolar neurons

    OpenAIRE

    LoGiudice, Lisamarie; Sterling, Peter; Matthews, Gary

    2009-01-01

    In retinal bipolar neurons, synaptic ribbons mark the presence of exocytotic active zones in the synaptic terminal. It is unknown, however, where compensatory vesicle retrieval is localized in this cell type and by what mechanism(s) excess membrane is recaptured. To determine whether endocytosis is localized or diffuse in mouse bipolar neurons, we imaged FM4-64 to track vesicles in cells whose synaptic ribbons were tagged with a fluorescent peptide. In synaptic terminals, vesicle retrieval oc...

  18. Extracellular vesicles during Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 infection: an inquire

    OpenAIRE

    Kalamvoki, Maria; Deschamps, Thibaut

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles are defined as a heterogeneous group of vesicles that are released by prokaryotic to higher eukaryotic cells and by plant cells in an evolutionary conserved manner. The significance of these vesicles lies in their capacity to transfer selected cargo composed of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids to both recipient and parent cells and to influence various physiological and pathological functions. Microorganisms such as parasites, fungi and protozoa and even single cell o...

  19. PICK1 deficiency impairs secretory vesicle biogenesis and leads to growth retardation and decreased glucose tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Holst, Birgitte; Madsen, Kenneth L.; Jansen, Anna M.; Jin, Chunyu; Rickhag, Karl Mattias; Lund, Viktor K.; Jensen, Morten; Bhatia, Vikram; Sørensen, Gunnar; Madsen, Andreas N.; Xue, Zhichao; Møller, Siri K; Woldbye, David; Qvortrup, Klaus; Huganir, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Secretory vesicles in endocrine cells store hormones such as growth hormone (GH) and insulin before their release into the bloodstream. The molecular mechanisms governing budding of immature secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and their subsequent maturation remain unclear. Here, we identify the lipid binding BAR (Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs) domain protein PICK1 (protein interacting with C kinase 1) as a key component early in the biogenesis of secretory vesicles in GH-producing ce...

  20. Chromosomal beta-lactamase is packaged into membrane vesicles and secreted from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, O; Beveridge, T J; Kadurugamuwa, J; Walther-Rasmussen, J; Høiby, N

    2000-01-01

    Membrane vesicles were isolated from one beta-lactam-sensitive and three beta-lactam-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis. The presence of the chromosomally encoded beta-lactamase in the membrane vesicles was shown by electron microscopy and...... enzymatic studies. This is the first report of extracellular secretion of beta-lactamase in P. aeruginosa and it seems that the enzyme is packaged into membrane vesicles....

  1. Auxin regulation of a proton translocating ATPase in pea root plasma membrane vesicles. [Pisum sativum. L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabathuler, R.; Cleland, R.E.

    1985-12-01

    Pea root microsomal vesicles have been fractionated on a Dextran step gradient to give three fractions, each of which carries out ATP-dependent proton accumulation as measured by fluorescence quenching of quinacrine. The fraction at the 4/6% Dextran interface is enriched in plasma membrane, as determined by UDPG sterol glucosyltransferase and vanadate-inhibited ATPase. The vanadate-sensitive phosphohydrolase is not specific for ATP, has a K/sub m/ of about 0.23 millimolar for MgATP, is only slightly affected by K/sup +/ or Cl/sup -/ and is insensitive to auxin. Proton transport, on the other hand, is more specific for ATP, enhanced by anions (NO/sub 3//sup -/ > Cl/sup -/) and has a K/sub m/ of about 0.7 millimolar. Auxins decrease the K/sub m/ to about 0.35 millimolar, with no significant effect on the V/sub max/, while antiauxins or weak acids have no such effect. It appears that auxin has the ability to alter the efficiency of the ATP-driven proton transport.

  2. Synthesis of Copper nanoparticles through vesicle template using gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nano technology has gained attention for its application in life. This study was conducted to produce copper (Cu) nanoparticles using gamma ray irradiation through template vesicles. Cu nanoparticle has a variety of applications such as capacitor materials, catalyst, conductive coating, high thermal conductivity materials as well as lubricant additives. this study used gamma radiation compared to other methods because the use of gamma rays in producing nanoparticle is safer and environmental friendly. The purpose of this study was to see the effects of radiation on the formation of Cu nanoparticles. The radiation dose used was 80 kGy and 100 kGy. The vesicles were formed by mixing water, sodium n-lauroyl sarcosinat hydrated, 1-decanol and polyethylene glycol with certain ratio (85 %: 5 %: 7 %: 3 %). Analysis from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the production of multilammelar vesicles in size between 30 nm-80 nm. The formation of nanoparticles was analyzed using UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Analysis of UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy showed no resonance peak around 600 nm. XRD analysis confirmed the presence of Cu, Cu2O and CuO. Analysis and characterisation using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) also confirmed that nanoparticles were produced with different sizes according to the radiation dose. At the radiation dose of 80 kGy, nanoparticles size is found vary between 30 nm to 90 nm. While at the radiation dose of 100 kGy, nanoparticles size is found vary between 3 nm to 7 nm. From this study it can be concluded that higher radiation dse will produce smaller nanoparticles. (author)

  3. Isolation and characterization of platelet-derived extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria T. Aatonen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Platelet-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs participate, for example, in haemostasis, immunity and development. Most studies of platelet EVs have targeted microparticles, whereas exosomes and EV characterization under various conditions have been less analyzed. Studies have been hampered by the difficulty in obtaining EVs free from contaminating cells and platelet remnants. Therefore, we optimized an EV isolation protocol and compared the quantity and protein content of EVs induced by different agonists. Methods: Platelets isolated with iodixanol gradient were activated by thrombin and collagen, lipopolysaccharide (LPS or Ca2+ ionophore. Microparticles and exosomes were isolated by differential centrifugations. EVs were quantitated by nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA and total protein. Size distributions were determined by NTA and electron microscopy. Proteomics was used to characterize the differentially induced EVs. Results: The main EV populations were 100–250 nm and over 90% were <500 nm irrespective of the activation. However, activation pathways differentially regulated the quantity and the quality of EVs, which also formed constitutively. Thrombogenic activation was the most potent physiological EV-generator. LPS was a weak inducer of EVs, which had a selective protein content from the thrombogenic EVs. Ca2+ ionophore generated a large population of protein-poor and unselectively packed EVs. By proteomic analysis, EVs were highly heterogeneous after the different activations and between the vesicle subpopulations. Conclusions: Although platelets constitutively release EVs, vesiculation can be increased, and the activation pathway determines the number and the cargo of the formed EVs. These activation-dependent variations render the use of protein content in sample normalization invalid. Since most platelet EVs are 100–250 nm, only a fraction has been analyzed by previously used methods, for example, flow cytometry. As

  4. A preliminary proteomic characterisation of extracellular vesicles released by the ovine parasitic nematode, Teladorsagia circumcincta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzelos, Thomas; Matthews, Jacqueline B.; Buck, Amy H.; Simbari, Fabio; Frew, David; Inglis, Neil F.; McLean, Kevin; Nisbet, Alasdair J.; Whitelaw, C. Bruce A.; Knox, David P.; McNeilly, Tom N.

    2016-01-01

    Teladorsagia circumcincta is a major cause of ovine parasitic gastroenteritis in temperate climatic regions. The development of high levels of anthelmintic resistance in this nematode species challenges its future control. Recent research indicates that many parasite species release extracellular vesicles into their environment, many of which have been classified as endocytic in origin, termed exosomes. These vesicles are considered to play important roles in the intercellular communication between parasites and their hosts, and thus represent potentially useful targets for novel control strategies. Here, we demonstrate that exosome-like extracellular vesicles can be isolated from excretory-secretory (ES) products released by T. circumcincta fourth stage larvae (Tci-L4ES). Furthermore, we perform a comparative proteomic analysis of vesicle-enriched and vesicle-free Tci-L4ES. Approximately 73% of the proteins identified in the vesicle-enriched fraction were unique to this fraction, whilst the remaining 27% were present in both vesicle-enriched and vesicle-free fraction. These unique proteins included structural proteins, nuclear proteins, metabolic proteins, proteolytic enzymes and activation-associated secreted proteins. Finally, we demonstrate that molecules present within the vesicles-enriched material are targets of the IgA and IgG response in T. circumcincta infected sheep, and could potentially represent useful targets for future vaccine intervention studies. PMID:27084478

  5. Colorimetric response of azobenzene-terminated polydiacetylene vesicles under thermal and photic stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Xian; Chen, Xin; Zou, Gang; Su, Wei; Zhang, Qijin; He, Pingsheng

    2009-11-01

    We study the colorimetric reversibility of pure polymerized p-nitro azobenzene moiety-substituted diacetylene (PNADA) and PNADA/polymerized 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid (PDA) complex vesicles under thermal and photic stimuli. Because of the strong intermolecular interaction among azobenzene mesogens within the vesicles, PNADA vesicles show enhanced stability and completely reversible thermochromic response. Polydiacetylene based complex vesicles with partial reversible chromatic properties under both thermal and photonic stimuli were reported for the first time, which provided a novel model system for the understanding of the chromatic transition mechanism of polydiacetylene materials.

  6. Dynamics of coarsening in multicomponent lipid vesicles with non-uniform mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funkhouser, Chloe M.; Solis, Francisco J.; Thornton, K.

    2014-04-01

    Multicomponent lipid vesicles are commonly used as a model system for the complex plasma membrane. One phenomenon that is studied using such model systems is phase separation. Vesicles composed of simple lipid mixtures can phase-separate into liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases, and since these phases can have different mechanical properties, this separation can lead to changes in the shape of the vesicle. In this work, we investigate the dynamics of phase separation in multicomponent lipid vesicles, using a model that couples composition to mechanical properties such as bending rigidity and spontaneous curvature. The model allows the vesicle surface to deform while conserving surface area and composition. For vesicles initialized as spheres, we study the effects of phase fraction and spontaneous curvature. We additionally initialize two systems with elongated, spheroidal shapes. Dynamic behavior is contrasted in systems where only one phase has a spontaneous curvature similar to the overall vesicle surface curvature and systems where the spontaneous curvatures of both phases are similar to the overall curvature. The bending energy contribution is typically found to slow the dynamics by stabilizing configurations with multiple domains. Such multiple-domain configurations are found more often in vesicles with spheroidal shapes than in nearly spherical vesicles.

  7. Proteomic analysis of a podocyte vesicle-enriched fraction from human normal and pathological urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lescuyer, Pierre; Pernin, Agnès; Hainard, Alexandre; Bigeire, Caty; Burgess, Jennifer A; Zimmermann-Ivol, Catherine; Sanchez, Jean-Charles; Schifferli, Jürg A; Hochstrasser, Denis F; Moll, Solange

    2008-07-01

    Podocytes (glomerular visceral epithelial cells) release vesicles into urine. Podocyte vesicle-enriched fractions from normal and pathological human urine samples were prepared for proteomic analysis. An immunoadsorption method was applied and enrichment of podocyte vesicles was assessed. We identified 76 unique proteins. One protein, serum paraoxonase/arylesterase 1 (PON-1), was newly identified in normal human urine sample. We confirmed this result and showed PON-1 expression in normal human kidney. These results demonstrated the potential for using the urine samples enriched in podocyte vesicles as a starting material in studies aimed at discovery of biomarkers for diseases. PMID:21136901

  8. Dissipative particle dynamics simulation study of the bilayer-vesicle transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A bilayer structure is an important immediate for the vesicle formation. However,the mechanism for the bilayer-vesicle transition remains unclear. In this work,a dissipative particle dynamics(DPD) simulation method was employed to study the mechanism of the bilayer-vesicle transition. A coarse-grained model was built based on a lipid molecule termed dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine(DMPC). Simulations were performed from two different initial configurations:a random dispersed solution and a tensionless bilayer. It was found that the bilayer-vesicle transition was driven by the minimization of the water-tail hydrophobic interaction energy,and was accompanied with the increase of the position entropy due to the redistribution of water molecules. The bulk pressure was reduced during the bilayer-vesicle transition,suggesting the evolved vesicle morphology was at the relatively low free energy state. The membrane in the product vesicle was a two-dimensional fluid. It can be concluded that the membrane of a vesicle is not interdigitated and most of the bonds in lipid chains are inclined to orient along the radical axis of the vesicle.

  9. Dissipative particle dynamics simulation study of the bilayer-vesicle transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU ShaoGui; GUO HongXia

    2008-01-01

    A bilayer structure is an important immediate for the vesicle formation. However, the mechanism for the bilayer-vesicle transition remains unclear. In this work, a dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simula-tion method was employed to study the mechanism of the bilayer-vesicle transition. A coarse-grained model was built based on a lipid molecule termed dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). Simulations were performed from two different initial configurations: a random dispersed solution and a ten-sionless bilayer. It was found that the bilayer-vesicle transition was driven by the minimization of the water-tail hydrophobic interaction energy, and was accompanied with the increase of the position en-tropy due to the redistribution of water molecules. The bulk pressure was reduced during the bi-layer-vesicle transition, suggesting the evolved vesicle morphology was at the relatively low free en-ergy state. The membrane in the product vesicle was a two-dimensional fluid. It can be concluded that the membrane of a vesicle is not interdigitated and most of the bonds in lipid chains are inclined to orient along the radical axis of the vesicle.

  10. Antibody Binding Alters the Characteristics and Contents of Extracellular Vesicles Released by Histoplasma capsulatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos Baltazar, Ludmila; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Sobreira, Tiago J P; Choi, Hyungwon; Casadevall, Arturo; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Nosanchuk, Joshua D

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum produces extracellular vesicles containing virulence-associated molecules capable of modulating host machinery, benefiting the pathogen. Treatment of H. capsulatum cells with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) can change the outcome of infection in mice. We evaluated the sizes, enzymatic contents, and proteomic profiles of the vesicles released by fungal cells treated with either protective MAb 6B7 (IgG1) or nonprotective MAb 7B6 (IgG2b), both of which bind H. capsulatum heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60). Our results showed that treatment with either MAb was associated with changes in size and vesicle loading. MAb treatments reduced vesicle phosphatase and catalase activities compared to those of vesicles from untreated controls. We identified 1,125 proteins in vesicles, and 250 of these manifested differences in abundance relative to that of proteins in vesicles isolated from yeast cells exposed to Hsp60-binding MAbs, indicating that surface binding of fungal cells by MAbs modified protein loading in the vesicles. The abundance of upregulated proteins in vesicles upon MAb 7B6 treatment was 44.8% of the protein quantities in vesicles from fungal cells treated with MAb 6B7. Analysis of orthologous proteins previously identified in vesicles from other fungi showed that different ascomycete fungi have similar proteins in their extracellular milieu, many of which are associated with virulence. Our results demonstrate that antibody binding can modulate fungal cell responses, resulting in differential loading of vesicles, which could alter fungal cell susceptibility to host defenses. This finding provides additional evidence that antibody binding modulates microbial physiology and suggests a new function for specific immunoglobulins through alterations of fungal secretion. IMPORTANCE Diverse fungal species release extracellular vesicles, indicating that this is a common pathway for the delivery of molecules to the extracellular space. However, there has

  11. A preliminary proteomic characterisation of extracellular vesicles released by the ovine parasitic nematode, Teladorsagia circumcincta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzelos, Thomas; Matthews, Jacqueline B; Buck, Amy H; Simbari, Fabio; Frew, David; Inglis, Neil F; McLean, Kevin; Nisbet, Alasdair J; Whitelaw, C Bruce A; Knox, David P; McNeilly, Tom N

    2016-05-15

    Teladorsagia circumcincta is a major cause of ovine parasitic gastroenteritis in temperate climatic regions. The development of high levels of anthelmintic resistance in this nematode species challenges its future control. Recent research indicates that many parasite species release extracellular vesicles into their environment, many of which have been classified as endocytic in origin, termed exosomes. These vesicles are considered to play important roles in the intercellular communication between parasites and their hosts, and thus represent potentially useful targets for novel control strategies. Here, we demonstrate that exosome-like extracellular vesicles can be isolated from excretory-secretory (ES) products released by T. circumcincta fourth stage larvae (Tci-L4ES). Furthermore, we perform a comparative proteomic analysis of vesicle-enriched and vesicle-free Tci-L4ES. Approximately 73% of the proteins identified in the vesicle-enriched fraction were unique to this fraction, whilst the remaining 27% were present in both vesicle-enriched and vesicle-free fraction. These unique proteins included structural proteins, nuclear proteins, metabolic proteins, proteolytic enzymes and activation-associated secreted proteins. Finally, we demonstrate that molecules present within the vesicles-enriched material are targets of the IgA and IgG response in T. circumcincta infected sheep, and could potentially represent useful targets for future vaccine intervention studies. PMID:27084478

  12. Analysis of Extracellular Vesicles in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nedawi, Khalid; Read, Jolene

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (ECV) are membrane compartments shed from all types of cells in various physiological and pathological states. In recent years, ECV have gained an increasing interest from the scientific community for their role as an intercellular communicator that plays important roles in modifying the tumor microenvironment. Multiple techniques have been established to collect ECV from conditioned media of cell culture or physiological fluids. The gold standard methodology is differential centrifugation. Although alternative techniques exist to collect ECV, these techniques have not proven suitable as a substitution for the ultracentrifugation procedure. PMID:27581023

  13. Reconciling Ligase Ribozyme Activity with Fatty Acid Vesicle Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Fabrizio Anella; Christophe Danelon

    2014-01-01

    The “RNA world” and the “Lipid world” theories for the origin of cellular life are often considered incompatible due to the differences in the environmental conditions at which they can emerge. One obstacle resides in the conflicting requirements for divalent metal ions, in particular Mg2+, with respect to optimal ribozyme activity, fatty acid vesicle stability and protection against RNA strand cleavage. Here, we report on the activity of a short L1 ligase ribozyme in the presence of myristol...

  14. Giant vesicles functionally expressing membrane receptors for an insect pheromone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Satoshi; Tabuchi, Masashi; Toyota, Taro; Sakurai, Takeshi; Hosoi, Tomohiro; Nomoto, Tomonori; Nakatani, Kei; Fujinami, Masanori; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2014-03-18

    To date, biochemical approaches to membrane receptors have been limited to the following methods: knockout or overexpression of membrane receptors by gene introduction and genome engineering or extraction of membrane receptor-surfactant complexes from innate cells and their introduction into model biomembranes. Here, we describe the development of a third method involving gene expression using cell-free in situ protein synthesis inside model biomembrane capsules. We verified this method by synthesizing olfactory receptors from the silkmoth Bombyx mori inside giant vesicles and found that they were excited in the presence of their ligand the Bombyx mori sex pheromone. PMID:24509495

  15. Lactate/H+ transport kinetics in rat skeletal muscle related to fibre type and changes in transport capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel; Pilegaard

    1998-01-01

    Lactate/H+ transport kinetics were determined by means of the pH-sensitive probe BCECF in sarcolemmal giant vesicles, obtained from rat skeletal muscle, and related to variations in lactate/H+ transport capacity. Vesicle preparations were made from red and white muscles, mixed muscles, denervated...... muscles, muscles of old rats and rats that had been subjected to high-intensity training, endurance training, repeated exposure to hypoxia, and hypothyroid or hyperthyroid treatments. The lactate/H+ transport capacity of red muscles was greater than that of white muscles, and this difference was...... associated with a higher maximal transport rate (Vmax) in red muscles, whereas the Km was similar in the two muscle types. High-intensity training and hyperthyroidism increased the lactate/H+ transport capacity by enhancing Vmax without affecting Km. Similarly, a reduced transport capacity with old age and...

  16. Expression of Neurotransmitter Transporters for Structural and Biochemical Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Elbaz, Yael; Danieli, Tsafi; Kanner, Baruch I.; Schuldiner, Shimon

    2010-01-01

    Neurotransmitter transporters play essential roles in the process of neurotransmission. Vesicular neurotransmitter transporters mediate storage inside secretory vesicles in a process that involves the exchange of lumenal H+ for cytoplasmic transmitter. Retrieval of the neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft catalyzed by sodium-coupled transporters is critical for the termination of the synaptic actions of the released neurotransmitter. Our current understanding of the mechanism of these tra...

  17. Protective role of E. coli outer membrane vesicles against antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Heramb M; Nagaraj, R; Jagannadham, Medicharla V

    2015-12-01

    The outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from bacteria are known to posses both defensive and protective functions and thus participate in community related functions. In the present study, outer membrane vesicles have been shown to protect the producer bacterium and two other bacterial species from the growth inhibitory effects of some antibiotics. The OMVs isolated from E. coli MG1655 protected the bacteria against membrane-active antibiotics colistin, melittin. The OMVs of E. coli MG1655 could also protect P. aeruginosa NCTC6751 and A. radiodioresistens MMC5 against these membrane-active antibiotics. However, OMVs could not protect any of these bacteria against the other antibiotics ciprofloxacin, streptomycin and trimethoprim. Hence, OMVs appears to protect the bacterial community against membrane-active antibiotics and not other antibiotics, which have different mechanism of actions. The OMVs of E. coli MG1655 sequester the antibiotic colistin, whereas their protein components degrade the antimicrobial peptide melittin. Proteomic analysis of OMVs revealed the presence of proteases and peptidases which appear to be involved in this process. Thus, the protection of bacteria by OMVs against antibiotics is situation dependent and the mechanism differs for different situations. These studies suggest that OMVs of bacteria form a common defense for the bacterial community against specific antibiotics. PMID:26640046

  18. Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles Induce Plant Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar, Ofir; Mordukhovich, Gideon; Luu, Dee Dee; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Daudi, Arsalan; Jehle, Anna Kristina; Felix, Georg; Ronald, Pamela C

    2016-05-01

    Gram-negative bacteria continuously pinch off portions of their outer membrane, releasing membrane vesicles. These outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are involved in multiple processes including cell-to-cell communication, biofilm formation, stress tolerance, horizontal gene transfer, and virulence. OMVs are also known modulators of the mammalian immune response. Despite the well-documented role of OMVs in mammalian-bacterial communication, their interaction with plants is not well studied. To examine whether OMVs of plant pathogens modulate the plant immune response, we purified OMVs from four different plant pathogens and used them to treat Arabidopsis thaliana. OMVs rapidly induced a reactive oxygen species burst, medium alkalinization, and defense gene expression in A. thaliana leaf discs, cell cultures, and seedlings, respectively. Western blot analysis revealed that EF-Tu is present in OMVs and that it serves as an elicitor of the plant immune response in this form. Our results further show that the immune coreceptors BAK1 and SOBIR1 mediate OMV perception and response. Taken together, our results demonstrate that plants can detect and respond to OMV-associated molecules by activation of their immune system, revealing a new facet of plant-bacterial interactions. PMID:26926999

  19. Current methods for the isolation of extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momen-Heravi, Fatemeh; Balaj, Leonora; Alian, Sara; Mantel, Pierre-Yves; Halleck, Allison E; Trachtenberg, Alexander J; Soria, Cesar E; Oquin, Shanice; Bonebreak, Christina M; Saracoglu, Elif; Skog, Johan; Kuo, Winston Patrick

    2013-10-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs), including microvesicles and exosomes, are nano- to micron-sized vesicles, which may deliver bioactive cargos that include lipids, growth factors and their receptors, proteases, signaling molecules, as well as mRNA and non-coding RNA, released from the cell of origin, to target cells. EVs are released by all cell types and likely induced by mechanisms involved in oncogenic transformation, environmental stimulation, cellular activation, oxidative stress, or death. Ongoing studies investigate the molecular mechanisms and mediators of EVs-based intercellular communication at physiological and oncogenic conditions with the hope of using this information as a possible source for explaining physiological processes in addition to using them as therapeutic targets and disease biomarkers in a variety of diseases. A major limitation in this evolving discipline is the hardship and the lack of standardization for already challenging techniques to isolate EVs. Technical advances have been accomplished in the field of isolation with improving knowledge and emerging novel technologies, including ultracentrifugation, microfluidics, magnetic beads and filtration-based isolation methods. In this review, we will discuss the latest advances in methods of isolation methods and production of clinical grade EVs as well as their advantages and disadvantages, and the justification for their support and the challenges that they encounter. PMID:23770532

  20. A titration microcalorimeter and the vesicle of mixed surfactants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A titration microcalorimeter with the sample cells of 1 mL and 3 mL volume was constructed by combining LKB-2107 ampule microcalorimeter with an improved Thermometric titration microcalorimeter. Its sensitivity and precision were tested with the baseline noise and stability, the measurement of energy equivalent, and the linear relation of electric energy and integral area as the function of voltage (V )-time (t ). Its accuracy was demonstrated by measuring the dilution enthalpy of a concentrated sucrose solution and the micelle-forming enthalpy of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in aqueous solution respectively. At the same time, the enthalpy of interaction between SDS and didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB) was measured by using the titration microcalorimeter, and the phase behavior of SDS-DDAB aqueous mixture was discussed. The microcalorimetric results show that the enthalpy of interaction between SDS and DDAB micelles is ?29.53 kJ/mol, the enthalpy of formation of 1:1 SDS-DDAB salt is ?125.8 kJ/mol, the vesicle-forming enthalpy of SDS-DDAB is 41.23 kJ/mol, and the enthalpy of phase transition from vesicles to SDS rich micelle is 32.10 kJ/mol.

  1. Facile preparation of salivary extracellular vesicles for cancer proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Xia, Zhijun; Shang, Zhi; Sun, Kaibo; Niu, Xiaomin; Qian, Liqiang; Fan, Liu-Yin; Cao, Cheng-Xi; Xiao, Hua

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are membrane surrounded structures released by cells, which have been increasingly recognized as mediators of intercellular communication. Recent reports indicate that EVs participate in important biological processes and could serve as potential source for cancer biomarkers. As an attractive EVs source with merit of non-invasiveness, human saliva is a unique medium for clinical diagnostics. Thus, we proposed a facile approach to prepare salivary extracellular vesicles (SEVs). Affinity chromatography column combined with filter system (ACCF) was developed to efficiently remove the high abundant proteins and viscous interferences of saliva. Protein profiling in the SEVs obtained by this strategy was compared with conventional centrifugation method, which demonstrated that about 70% more SEVs proteins could be revealed. To explore its utility for cancer proteomics, we analyzed the proteome of SEVs in lung cancer patients and normal controls. Shotgun proteomic analysis illustrated that 113 and 95 proteins have been identified in cancer group and control group, respectively. Among those 63 proteins that have been consistently discovered only in cancer group, 12 proteins are lung cancer related. Our results demonstrated that SEVs prepared through the developed strategy are valuable samples for proteomics and could serve as a promising liquid biopsy for cancer.

  2. Ciprofloxacin encapsulation into giant unilamellar vesicles: membrane binding and release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszás, Nóra; Bozó, Tamás; Budai, Marianna; Gróf, Pál

    2013-02-01

    This study aimed at investigating some respects of binding and interaction between water-soluble drugs and liposomal carrier systems depending on their size and lamellarity. As model substance, ciprofloxacin hydrochloride (CPFX) was incorporated into giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) to study their CPFX encapsulation/binding capacity. To characterize molecular interactions of various CPFX microspecies with lipid bilayer, zeta potential and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy measurements were performed. The increase of the zeta potential at pH 5.4 but no change at pH 7.2 was interpreted in terms of the CPFX microspecies' distribution at the two pH values. EPR observations showed an increased fluidity because of CPFX binding to GUVs. We worked out and applied a three-compartment dialysis model to separately determine the rate of drug diffusion through the liposomal membrane. Equilibrium dialysis showed (a) different permeation of CPFX through the membranes of GUVs and multilamellar vesicles (MLVs), with characteristic half-lives of 54.4 and 18.1 h, respectively; and (b) increased retention of CPFX in case of GUVs with released amounts of 70% compared with about 97% in case of MLVs. Our results may provide further details for efficient design of liposomal formulations incorporating water-soluble drugs. PMID:23233199

  3. Electroformation of Giant Vesicles on a Polymer Mesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihisa Okumura

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Electroformation of cell-sized lipid membrane vesicles (giant vesicles, GVs from egg yolk phosphatidylcholine under applied electric voltage was examined on a substrate of a polymer mesh placed between two planar indium tin oxide coated glass electrodes. Under appropriate conditions, GVs were formed in good yield on meshes of various polymer materials, namely, hydrophobic poly(propylene, poly(ethylene terephthalate, a carbon fiber/nylon composite, and relatively hydrophilic nylon. Arranging threads in a mesh structure with appropriate openings improved GV formation compared to simply increasing the number of threads. For optimal electroformation of GVs, the size and shape of a mesh opening were crucial. With a too large opening, GV formation deteriorated. When the sides of an opening were partially missing, GV formation did not occur efficiently. With an adequate opening, a deposited lipid solution could fill the opening, and a relatively uniform lipid deposit formed on the surface of threads after evaporation of the solvent. This could supply a sufficient amount of lipids to the opening and also prevent a lipid deposit from becoming too thick for electroformation. As a result, good GV formation was often observed in openings filled with swelled lipid.

  4. Effect of Counter Electrode in Electroformation of Giant Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuuhei Oana

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Electroformation of cell-sized lipid membrane vesicles (giant vesicles, GVs, from egg yolk phosphatidylcholine, was examined varying the shape of the counter electrode. Instead of a planar ITO (indium tin oxide electrode commonly used, platinum wire mesh was employed as a counter electrode facing lipid deposit on a planar formation electrode. The modification did not significantly alter GV formation, and many GVs of 30–50 µm, some as large as 100 µm, formed as with the standard setup, indicating that a counter electrode does not have to be a complete plane. When the counter electrode was reduced to a set of two parallel platinum wires, GV formation deteriorated. Some GVs formed, but only in close proximity to the counter electrode. Lower electric voltage with this setup no longer yielded GVs. Instead, a large onion-like multilamellar structure was observed. The deteriorated GV formation and the formation of a multilamellar structure seemed to indicate the weakened effect of the electric field on lipid deposit due to insufficient coverage with a small counter electrode. Irregular membranous objects formed by spontaneous swelling of lipid without electric voltage gradually turned into multilamellar structure upon following application of voltage. No particular enhancement of GV formation was observed when lipid deposit on a wire formation electrode was used in combination with a large planar counter electrode.

  5. Numerical computations of the dynamics of fluidic membranes and vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, John W.; Garcke, Harald; Nürnberg, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Vesicles and many biological membranes are made of two monolayers of lipid molecules and form closed lipid bilayers. The dynamical behavior of vesicles is very complex and a variety of forms and shapes appear. Lipid bilayers can be considered as a surface fluid and hence the governing equations for the evolution include the surface (Navier-)Stokes equations, which in particular take the membrane viscosity into account. The evolution is driven by forces stemming from the curvature elasticity of the membrane. In addition, the surface fluid equations are coupled to bulk (Navier-)Stokes equations. We introduce a parametric finite-element method to solve this complex free boundary problem and present the first three-dimensional numerical computations based on the full (Navier-)Stokes system for several different scenarios. For example, the effects of the membrane viscosity, spontaneous curvature, and area difference elasticity (ADE) are studied. In particular, it turns out, that even in the case of no viscosity contrast between the bulk fluids, the tank treading to tumbling transition can be obtained by increasing the membrane viscosity. Besides the classical tank treading and tumbling motions, another mode (called the transition mode in this paper, but originally called the vacillating-breathing mode and subsequently also called trembling, transition, and swinging mode) separating these classical modes appears and is studied by us numerically. We also study how features of equilibrium shapes in the ADE and spontaneous curvature models, like budding behavior or starfish forms, behave in a shear flow.

  6. Vesiclepedia: a compendium for extracellular vesicles with continuous community annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Hina; Simpson, Richard J; Ji, Hong; Aikawa, Elena; Altevogt, Peter; Askenase, Philip; Bond, Vincent C; Borràs, Francesc E; Breakefield, Xandra; Budnik, Vivian; Buzas, Edit; Camussi, Giovanni; Clayton, Aled; Cocucci, Emanuele; Falcon-Perez, Juan M; Gabrielsson, Susanne; Gho, Yong Song; Gupta, Dwijendra; Harsha, H C; Hendrix, An; Hill, Andrew F; Inal, Jameel M; Jenster, Guido; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria; Lim, Sai Kiang; Llorente, Alicia; Lötvall, Jan; Marcilla, Antonio; Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia; Nazarenko, Irina; Nieuwland, Rienk; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther N M; Pandey, Akhilesh; Patel, Tushar; Piper, Melissa G; Pluchino, Stefano; Prasad, T S Keshava; Rajendran, Lawrence; Raposo, Graca; Record, Michel; Reid, Gavin E; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Schiffelers, Raymond M; Siljander, Pia; Stensballe, Allan; Stoorvogel, Willem; Taylor, Douglas; Thery, Clotilde; Valadi, Hadi; van Balkom, Bas W M; Vázquez, Jesús; Vidal, Michel; Wauben, Marca H M; Yáñez-Mó, María; Zoeller, Margot; Mathivanan, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are membraneous vesicles released by a variety of cells into their microenvironment. Recent studies have elucidated the role of EVs in intercellular communication, pathogenesis, drug, vaccine and gene-vector delivery, and as possible reservoirs of biomarkers. These findings have generated immense interest, along with an exponential increase in molecular data pertaining to EVs. Here, we describe Vesiclepedia, a manually curated compendium of molecular data (lipid, RNA, and protein) identified in different classes of EVs from more than 300 independent studies published over the past several years. Even though databases are indispensable resources for the scientific community, recent studies have shown that more than 50% of the databases are not regularly updated. In addition, more than 20% of the database links are inactive. To prevent such database and link decay, we have initiated a continuous community annotation project with the active involvement of EV researchers. The EV research community can set a gold standard in data sharing with Vesiclepedia, which could evolve as a primary resource for the field. PMID:23271954

  7. Anionic micelles and vesicles induce tau fibrillization in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirita, Carmen N; Necula, Mihaela; Kuret, Jeff

    2003-07-11

    Alzheimer's disease is defined in part by the intraneuronal accumulation of filaments comprised of the microtubule-associated protein tau. In vitro, fibrillization of recombinant tau can be induced by treatment with various agents, including phosphotransferases, polyanionic compounds, and fatty acids. Here we characterize the structural features required for the fatty acid class of tau fibrillization inducer using recombinant full-length tau protein, arachidonic acid, and a series of straight chain anionic, cationic, and nonionic detergents. Induction of measurable tau fibrillization required an alkyl chain length of at least 12 carbons and a negative charge consisting of carboxylate, sulfonate, or sulfate moieties. All detergents and fatty acids were micellar at active concentrations, due to a profound, taudependent depression of their critical micelle concentrations. Anionic surfaces larger than detergent micelles, such as those supplied by phosphatidylserine vesicles, also induced tau fibrillization with resultant filaments originating from their surface. These data suggest that anionic surfaces presented as micelles or vesicles can serve to nucleate tau fibrillization, that this mechanism underlies the activity of fatty acid inducers, and that anionic membranes may serve this function in vivo. PMID:12730214

  8. Extracellular Vesicles from Ovarian Carcinoma Cells Display Specific Glycosignatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Gomes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cells release vesicles to the extracellular environment with characteristic nucleic acid, protein, lipid, and glycan composition. Here we have isolated and characterized extracellular vesicles (EVs and total cell membranes (MBs from ovarian carcinoma OVMz cells. EVs were enriched in specific markers, including Tsg101, CD63, CD9, annexin-I, and MBs contained markers of cellular membrane compartments, including calnexin, GRASP65, GS28, LAMP-1, and L1CAM. The glycoprotein galectin-3 binding protein (LGALS3BP was strongly enriched in EVs and it contained sialylated complex N-glycans. Lectin blotting with a panel of lectins showed that EVs had specific glycosignatures relative to MBs. Furthermore, the presence of glycoproteins bearing complex N-glycans with α2,3-linked sialic acid, fucose, bisecting-GlcNAc and LacdiNAc structures, and O-glycans with the T-antigen were detected. The inhibition of N-glycosylation processing from high mannose to complex glycans using kifunensine caused changes in the composition of EVs and induced a decrease of several glycoproteins. In conclusion, the results showed that glycosignatures of EVs were specific and altered glycosylation within the cell affected the composition and/or dynamics of EVs release. Furthermore, the identified glycosignatures of EVs could provide novel biomarkers for ovarian cancer.

  9. Differential regulation of synaptic vesicle tethering and docking by UNC-18 and TOM-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena O Gracheva

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The assembly of SNARE complexes between syntaxin, SNAP-25 and synaptobrevin is required to prime synaptic vesicles for fusion. Since Munc18 and tomosyn compete for syntaxin interactions, the interplay between these proteins is predicted to be important in regulating synaptic transmission. We explored this possibility, by examining genetic interactions between C. elegans unc-18(Munc18, unc-64(syntaxin and tom-1(tomosyn. We have previously demonstrated that unc-18 mutants have reduced synaptic transmission, whereas tom-1 mutants exhibit enhanced release. Here we show that the unc-18 mutant release defect is associated with loss of two morphologically distinct vesicle pools; those tethered within 25nm of the plasma membrane and those docked with the plasma membrane. In contrast, priming defective unc-13 mutants accumulate tethered vesicles, while docked vesicles are greatly reduced, indicating tethering is UNC-18-dependent and occurs in the absence of priming. C. elegans unc-64 mutants phenocopy unc-18 mutants, losing both tethered and docked vesicles, whereas overexpression of open syntaxin preferentially increases vesicle docking, suggesting UNC-18/closed syntaxin interactions are responsible for vesicle tethering. Given the competition between vertebrate tomosyn and Munc18, for syntaxin binding, we hypothesized that C. elegans TOM-1 may inhibit both UNC-18-dependent vesicle targeting steps. Consistent with this hypothesis, tom-1 mutants exhibit enhanced UNC-18 plasma membrane localization and a concomitant increase in both tethered and docked synaptic vesicles. Furthermore, in tom-1;unc-18 double mutants the docked, primed vesicle pool is preferentially rescued relative to unc-18 single mutants. Together these data provide evidence for the differential regulation of two vesicle targeting steps by UNC-18 and TOM-1 through competitive interactions with syntaxin

  10. Faceted fatty acid vesicles formed from single-tailed perfluorinated surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juan; Xu, Guiying; Song, Aixin; Wang, Lin; Lin, Meiqin; Dong, Zhaoxia; Yang, Zihao

    2015-09-28

    The aggregation behavior and rheological properties of two mixtures of perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA)/NaOH and perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA)/NaOH were investigated in aqueous solutions. Interestingly, pH-sensitive polyhedral fatty acid vesicles were spontaneously formed in both systems, which were determined by freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy (FF-TEM) measurements. Especially, a phase transition from faceted vesicles to the L3 phase with the increase of pH was observed in the PFNA/NaOH system while it was not observed in the PFDA/NaOH system. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) measurements confirmed that the bilayers of the faceted vesicles were in the crystalline station indicating that the crystallization of fluorocarbon chains was the main driving force for their formation. Besides, the two systems of faceted perfluorofatty acid vesicles exhibit interesting rheological properties, for instance, they showed high viscoelasticity and shear-thinning behaviour, and the elastic modulus (G') and viscous modulus (G'') of PFDA/NaOH vesicles were much higher than those of PFNA/NaOH vesicles. Conversely, the solution of the L3 phase with fluid bilayers did not present viscoelastic properties. Therefore, the viscoelastic properties of vesicles resulted from the crystalline fluorinated alkyl chains with high rigidity at room temperature and the dense packing of vesicles. As far as we know, such faceted fatty acid vesicles formed from single-tailed perfluorinated surfactants have been rarely reported. Our work successfully constructs polyhedral fatty acid vesicles and proposes their formation mechanism, which should be a great advance in the fundamental research of fatty acid vesicles. PMID:26252803

  11. Abundance of zinc ions in synaptic terminals of mocha mutant mice: zinc transporter 3 immunohistochemistry and zinc sulphide autometallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltenberg, Meredin; Nejsum, Lene N; Larsen, Agnete; Danscher, Gorm

    2004-02-01

    The mocha mouse is an autosomal recessive pigment mutant on mouse chromosome 10 caused by a deletion in the gene for the delta subunit of the adaptor-like complex AP-3. Based on zinc transporter 3 (ZnT3) immunohistochemistry, zinc TSQ fluorescence and a modified Timm method, previous studies found a lack of histochemically-detectable zinc and a substantial reduction in the ZnT3 immunoreactivity. It has, therefore, been suggested that the mocha mouse could serve as a model for studies of the significance of zinc ions in zinc-enriched (ZEN) neurons. We have chosen the mocha-zinc-model in a study of the significance of ZEN neurons in hypoxia-caused damage in mouse brain. In order to establish that the model was either void of zinc ions or had a significantly decreased level of zinc ions in their ZEN terminals, we repeated the studies that had lead to the above assumption, the only methodology difference being that we used the zinc specific Neo-Timm method instead of the Timm method applied in the original study. We found that, although the ZnS autometallography (AMG) technique revealed a reduction in staining intensity as compared to the littermate controls, there were still plenty of zinc ions in the ZEN terminals, in particular visible in telencephalic structures like neocortex and hippocampus. At ultrastructural levels the zinc ions were found in a pool of vesicles of the ZEN terminals as in the control animals, but additionally zinc ions could be traced in ZEN neuronal somata in the neocortex and hippocampus. The mossy fibres in the hippocampus of mocha mice also bind with TSQ, though less than in the controls. We found ZnS AMG grains in ZEN neuronal somata, which were also immunoreactive for ZnT3. Our study confirmed the decreased ZnT3 immunoreactivity in ZEN terminals of the mocha mouse found in the original study. Based on these findings, we suggest that the mocha mouse may not be an ideal model for studies of the histochemically-detectable zinc ion pool of the

  12. Minimal experimental requirements for definition of extracellular vesicles and their functions: a position statement from the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Lötvall

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Secreted membrane-enclosed vesicles, collectively called extracellular vesicles (EVs, which include exosomes, ectosomes, microvesicles, microparticles, apoptotic bodies and other EV subsets, encompass a very rapidly growing scientific field in biology and medicine. Importantly, it is currently technically challenging to obtain a totally pure EV fraction free from non-vesicular components for functional studies, and therefore there is a need to establish guidelines for analyses of these vesicles and reporting of scientific studies on EV biology. Here, the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV provides researchers with a minimal set of biochemical, biophysical and functional standards that should be used to attribute any specific biological cargo or functions to EVs.

  13. Identification of a transport mechanism for NH4+ in the symbiosome membrane of pea root nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritzen, P.; Rosendahl, L.

    1997-01-01

    Symbiosome membrane vesicles, facing bacteroid-side-out, were purified from pea (Pisum sativum L.) root nodules and used to study NH4+ transport across the membrane by recording vesicle uptake of the NH4+ analog [C-14]methylamine (MA). Membrane potentials (Delta psi) were imposed on the vesicles...... using K+ concentration gradients and valinomycin, and the size of the imposed Delta psi was determined by measuring vesicle uptake of [C-14]tetraphenylphosphonium. Vesicle uptake of MA was driven by a negative Delta psi and was stimulated by a low extravesicular pH. Protonophore-induced collapse of the...... pH gradient indicated that uptake of MA was not related to the presence of a pH gradient. The MA-uptake mechanism appeared to have a large capacity for transport, and saturation was not observed at MA concentrations in the range of 25 mu M to 150 mM. MA uptake could be inhibited by NH4+, which...

  14. L-alanine uptake in membrane vesicles from Mytilus edulis gills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies have shown that gills from M. edulis can accumulate L-alanine from seawater by a saturable process specific for α-neutral amino acids. This uptake occurs against chemical gradients in excess of 106 to 1. To further characterize this uptake, membrane vesicles were prepared from M. edulis gill tissue by differential centrifugation. Enrichments of putative enzyme markers (relative to that in combined initial fractions) were as follows: γ-Glutamyltranspeptidase, 25-30x; Alkaline Phosphatase, 5-6x; K+-dependent para-Nitrophenyl Phosphatase, 3-5x; Succinate Dehydrogenase 0.1-0.2x. These results suggest that the preparation is enriched in plasma membranes, although histochemical studies will be needed to verify this. The time course of 14C-L-alanine uptake in the presence of inwardly-directed Na+ gradient showed a transient overshoot (3-5 fold) at 10 minutes which decreased to equilibrium after six hours. The size of the overshoot and early uptake rates depended on the size of the inwardly-directed Na+ gradient. No overshoot was seen in the presence of inwardly-directed gradients of LiCl or choline-Cl, or with equilibrium concentrations NaCl or mannitol. A reduced overshoot was seen with a gradient of NaSCN. A small overshoot was seen with an inwardly-directed gradient of KCl. Transport of L-alanine included saturable and diffusive components. Uptake of 6 μM L-alanine was inhibited more than 80% by 100 μM α-zwitterionic amino acids (alanine, leucine, glycine); by 30 to 75% by proline, aspartate and lysine; and less than 20% by a β-amino acid, taurine. The results of these experiments agree with those from intact gill studies and support the hypothesis that L-alanine is transported into gill epithelial cells by a secondary active transport process involving Na+

  15. Biochemical and morphological characterization of light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Kevin Peter

    1978-01-01

    Light (30 to 32.5% sucrose) and heavy (38.5 to 42% sucrose) sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles (LSR,HSR) were isolated from rabbit leg muscle using a combination of differential centrifugation and isopycnic zonal ultracentrifugation. Thin-section electron microscopy of LSR vesicles reveals empty vesicles of various sizes and shapes whereas the HSR vesicles appear as rounded vesicles of uniform size filled with electron dense material, similar to that seen in the terminal cisternae of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The sucrose HSR vesicles have an additional morphological feature which appears as membrane projections that resemble the SR feet. The freeze-fracture morphology of either type of SR reveals an asymmetric distribution of intramembraneous particles in the same orientation and distribution as the sarcoplasmic reticulum in vivo. Biochemical studies were made on the content of Ca, Mg, ATPase, and protein of the vesicles and phosphorylation of the vesicles. The biochemical and morphological data indicate that the LSR is derived from the longitudinal sarcoplasmic reticulum and the HSR is derived from the terminal cisternae of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, contains junctional SR membrane and has three unique proteins (calsequestrin, an intrinsic 30,000 dalton protein and a 9000 dalton proteolipid).

  16. Needle-free jet injection of intact phospholipid vesicles across the skin: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlich, Michele; Lai, Francesco; Murgia, Sergio; Valenti, Donatella; Fadda, Anna Maria; Sinico, Chiara

    2016-08-01

    Needle-free liquid jet injectors are devices developed for the delivery of pharmaceutical solutions through the skin. In this paper, we investigated for the first time the ability of these devices to deliver intact lipid vesicles. Diclofenac sodium loaded phospholipid vesicles of two types, namely liposomes and transfersomes, were prepared and fully characterized. The lipid vesicles were delivered through a skin specimen using a jet injector and the collected samples were analyzed to assess vesicle structural integrity, drug retention and release kinetics after the injection. In this regard, data concerning size, size distribution, surface charge of vesicles and bilayer integrity and thickness, before and after the injections, were measured by dynamic light scattering experiments, cryo-electron microscopy, and X-ray scattering techniques. Finally, the effect of vesicle fast jet injection through the skin on drug release kinetics was checked by in vitro experiments. The retention of the morphological, physico-chemical, and technological features after injection, proved the integrity of vesicles after skin crossing as a high-speed liquid jet. The delivery of undamaged vesicular carriers beneath the skin is of utmost importance to create a controlled release drug depot in the hypoderm, which may be beneficial for several localized therapies. Overall results reported in this paper may broaden the range of application of liquid jet injectors to lipid vesicle based formulations thus combining beneficial performance of painless devices with those of liposomal drug delivery systems. PMID:27422107

  17. Magnetic resonance of seminal vesicles: a noninvasive study of seminal way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetic resonance without endorectal coil is an excellent diagnostic tool for studying the entire route of seminal non-invasive way in a single step diagnosis. We call magnetic resonance of seminal vesicles, but includes both the study of the seminal vesicles as the channels of the seminal way.

  18. A new approach to follow a single extracellular vesicle-cell interaction using optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, Ilaria; Amin, Ladan; Furlan, Roberto; Legname, Giuseppe; Verderio, Claudia; Cojoc, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are spherical membrane structures released by most cells. These highly conserved mediators of intercellular communication carry proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, and transfer these cellular components between cells by different mechanisms, such as endocytosis, macropinocytosis, or fusion. However, the temporal and spatial dynamics of vesicle-cell interactions still remain largely unexplored. Here we used optical tweezers to drive single EVs produced by microglial cells onto the surface of astrocytes or microglia in primary culture. By visualizing single EV-cell contacts, we observed that microglial vesicles displayed different motilities on the surface of astrocytes compared with microglia. After contact, EVs positioned on astrocytes displayed some minor oscillatory motion around the point of adhesion, while vesicles dragged to microglia displayed quite regular directional movement on the plasma membrane. Both the adhesion and motion of vesicles on glial cells were strongly reduced by cloaking phosphatidylserine (PS) residues, which are externalized on the vesicle membrane and act as determinants for vesicle recognition by target cells. These data identify optical manipulation as a powerful tool to monitor in vitro vesicle-cell dynamics with high temporal and spatial resolution and to determine in a quantitative manner the contribution of surface receptors/extracellular protein ligands to the contact. PMID:26757810

  19. Dynamics of fatty acid vesicles in response to pH stimuli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ikari, Keita; Sakuma, Yuka; Jimbo, Takehiro; Kodama, Atsuji; Imai, Masayuki; Monnard, Pierre-Alain; Rasmussen, Steen

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of decanoic acid/decanoate (DA) vesicles in response to pH stimuli. Two types of dynamic processes induced by the micro injection of NaOH solutions are sequentially observed: deformations and topological transitions. In the deformation stage, DA vesicles show a series ...

  20. Frequency-dependent electrodeformation of giant phospholipid vesicles in AC electric field

    CERN Document Server

    Peterlin, Primoz

    2010-01-01

    A model of vesicle electrodeformation is described which obtains a parametrized vesicle shape by minimizing the sum of the membrane bending energy and the energy due to the electric field. Both the vesicle membrane and the aqueous media inside and outside the vesicle are treated as leaky dielectrics, and the vesicle itself is modelled as a nearly spherical shape enclosed within a thin membrane. It is demonstrated (a) that the model achieves a good quantitative agreement with the experimentally determined prolate-to-oblate transition frequencies in the kHz range, and (b) that the model can explain a phase diagram of shapes of giant phospholipid vesicles with respect to two parameters: the frequency of the applied AC electric field and the ratio of the electrical conductivities of the aqueous media inside and outside the vesicle, explored in a recent paper (S. Aranda et al., Biophys. J. 95:L19--L21, 2008). A possible use of the frequency-dependent shape transitions of phospholipid vesicles in conductometry of m...