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Sample records for aortic wall structure

  1. Calcification of the aortic wall in hypercalcemic rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokita, E; Cichocki, T; Divoux, S; Gonsior, B; Höfert, M; Jarczyk, L; Strzałkowski, A

    1992-10-01

    The mineralization process was investigated in the aortic wall of hypercalcemic rabbits. The elevated calcium level in serum was induced by intramuscular injection of vitamin D3. The animals were killed at different times of the experiment (max. 246 d). The freeze-dried tissue homogenates were used for elemental composition studies by means of proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and atomic absorption spectroscopy. The structural information was obtained from infrared (IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra. Moreover, the ascending part of the aortic arch was separated and used for micro-PIXE (PIXE in combination with proton microprobe) and histochemical examinations. It was found that hypercalcemia (blood serum Ca content elevated by about 20%) induced calcification of the aortic wall. The mineral phase within the aortic wall consisted of Ca-P salts. The Ca/P ratio continuously increased during the experiment and approached 2 after 246 d of the vitamin D3 treatment. The IR and XRD studies made possible the identification of the complex phase composition of the samples. The hydroxyapatite crystals were detected after 196 days, however, in earlier phases of the experiment, amorphous calcium phosphate, dicalcium phosphate dihydrate and octacalcium phosphate were also observed. On the basis of the data obtained, the mechanism of the precipitation and growth of inorganic deposits in the tunica media of the aortic wall was discussed. PMID:1333314

  2. Using The Descending Aortic Wall Thickness Measured In Transesophageal Echocardiography As A Risk Marker For Aortic Dissection

    OpenAIRE

    Zaher Fanari; Sumaya Hammami; Muhammad Baraa Hammami; Safa Hammami; Chete Eze-Nliam; Weintraub, William S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to estimate whether aortic wall thickness is increased in patients with Aortic dissection (AD) compared to low risk control group and can be used in addition to aortic diameter as a risk marker of AD. Background: AD occurs due to pathologies that may increase thickness of the aortic wall. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has the ability to visualise both the thoracic aortic wall and lumen. Aortic diameter has been used to predict aortic dissection...

  3. Nonlinear spectral imaging microscopy of rabbit aortic wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quangang Liu; Jianxin Chen; Shuangmu Zhuo; Xingshan Jiang; Kecheng Lu

    2009-01-01

    Employing nonlinear spectral imaging technique based on two-photon-excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation (SHG) of biological tissue, we combine the image-guided spectral analysis method and multi-channel subsequent detection imaging to map and visualize the intrinsic species in a native rabbit aortic wall. A series of recorded nonlinear spectral images excited by a broad range of laser wavelengths (730-910 nm) are used to identify five components in the native rabbit aortic wall, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), elastic fiber, flavin, porphyrin derivatives, and collagen. Integrating multi-channel subsequent detection imaging technique, the high-resolution, high contrast images of collagen and elastic fiber in the aortic wall are obtained. Our results demonstrate that this method can yield complementary biochemical and morphological information about aortic tissues, which have the potential to determine the tissue pathology associated with mechanical properties of aortic wall and to evaluate the pharmacodynamical studies of vessels.

  4. Finite Element Implementation of a Structurally-Motivated Constitutive Relation for the Human Abdominal Aortic Wall with and without Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, Marie Sand; Henneberg, Kaj-Åge; Lönn, L;

    2011-01-01

    The structural integrity of the abdominal aorta is maintained by elastin, collagen, and vascular smooth muscle cells. Changes with age in the structure can lead to develop-ment of aneurysms. This paper presents initial work to capture these changes in a finite element model (FEM) of a structural-ly-motivated...... anisotropic constitutive relation for the “four fiber family” arterial model. First a 2D implementation is used for benchmarking the FEM implementation to fitted biaxial stress-strain data obtained experimentally from four different groups of persons; 19-29 years, 30-60 years, 61-79 years and abdominal aortic...... maximum axial and hoop stress in the group of AAA patients was 94.9 kPa (±0.283 kPa) and 94.3 kPa (±0.224 kPa) at maximum stretch ratios of 1.043 and 1.037, respectively. In the 3D simulations, the maximum stress is also found to occur in the AAA patient group, with the highest stress in the...

  5. The role of aortic wall CT attenuation measurements for the diagnosis of acute aortic syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To determine if measurements of aortic wall attenuation can improve the CT diagnosis of acute aortic syndromes. Methods: CT reports from a ten year period were searched for acute aortic syndromes (AAS). Studies with both an unenhanced and a contrast enhanced (CTA) series that had resulted in the diagnosis of intramural hematoma (IMH) were reviewed. Diagnoses were confirmed by medical records. The attenuation of aortic wall abnormalities was measured. The observed attenuation threshold was validated using studies from 39 new subjects with a variety of aortic conditions. Results: The term “aortic dissection” was identified in 1206, and IMH in 124 patients’ reports. IMH was confirmed in 31 patients, 21 of whom had both unenhanced and contrast enhanced images. All 21 had pathologic CTA findings, and no CTA with IMH was normal. Attenuation of the aortic wall was greater than 45 HUs on the CTA images in all patients with IMH. When this threshold was applied to the new group, sensitivity for diagnosing AAS was 100% (19/19), and specificity 94% (16/17). Addition of unenhanced images did not improve accuracy. Conclusions: Measurements of aortic wall attenuation in CTA have a high negative predictive value for the diagnosis of acute aortic syndromes

  6. Enhanced delineation of degradation in aortic walls through OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, Eusebio; Val-Bernal, José Fernando; Revuelta, José M.; Pontón, Alejandro; Calvo Díez, Marta; Mayorga, Marta; López-Higuera, José M.; Conde, Olga M.

    2015-03-01

    Degradation of the wall of human ascending thoracic aorta has been assessed through Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). OCT images of the media layer of the aortic wall exhibit micro-structure degradation in case of diseased aortas from aneurysmal vessels or in aortas prone to aortic dissections. The degeneration in vessel walls appears as low-reflectivity areas due to the invasive appearance of acidic polysaccharides and mucopolysaccharides within a typical ordered microstructure of parallel lamellae of smooth muscle cells, elastin and collagen fibers. An OCT indicator of wall degradation can be generated upon the spatial quantification of the extension of degraded areas in a similar way as conventional histopathology. This proposed OCT marker offers a real-time clinical insight of the vessel status to help cardiovascular surgeons in vessel repair interventions. However, the delineation of degraded areas on the B-scan image from OCT is sometimes difficult due to presence of speckle noise, variable SNR conditions on the measurement process, etc. Degraded areas could be outlined by basic thresholding techniques taking advantage of disorders evidences in B-scan images, but this delineation is not always optimum and requires complex additional processing stages. This work proposes an optimized delineation of degraded spots in vessel walls, robust to noisy environments, based on the analysis of the second order variation of image intensity of backreflection to determine the type of local structure. Results improve the delineation of wall anomalies providing a deeper physiological perception of the vessel wall conditions. Achievements could be also transferred to other clinical scenarios: carotid arteries, aorto-iliac or ilio-femoral sections, intracranial, etc.

  7. Structural and ultrastructural evaluation of the aortic wall after transplantation of bone marrow-derived cells (BMCs) in a model for atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Alyne Souza; Monteiro, Nemesis; Rocha, Vinícius Novaes; Oliveira, Genilza; Nascimento, Ana Lucia; de Carvalho, Laís; Thole, Alessandra; Carvalho, Jorge

    2015-08-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their ability to differentiate into multiple cell lineages and display the paracrine effect. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of therapy with bone marrow-derived cells (BMCs) on glucose, lipid metabolism, and aortic wall remodeling in mice through the administration of a high-fat diet and subsequent BMCs transplantation. C57BL/6 mice were fed a control diet (CO group) or an atherogenic diet (AT group). After 16 weeks, the AT group was divided into 4 subgroups: an AT 14 days group and AT 21 days group that were given an injection of vehicle and sacrificed after 14 and 21 days, respectively, and an AT-BMC 14 days group and AT-BMC 21 days group that were given an injection of BMCs and sacrificed after 14 and 21 days, respectively. The BMCs transplant had reduced blood glucose, triglycerides, and total cholesterol. There was no significant difference in relation to body mass between the transplanted groups and non-transplanted groups, and all were different than CO. There was no significant difference in the glycemic curve among AT 14 days, AT-BMC 14 days, and AT 21 days, and these were different than the CO and the AT-BMC 21 days groups. The increased thickness of the aortic wall was observed in all atherogenic groups, but was significantly smaller in group AT-BMC 21 days compared to AT 14 days and AT 21 days. Vacuoles in the media tunic, delamination and the thinning of the elastic lamellae were observed in AT 14 days and AT 21 days. The smallest number of these was displayed on the AT-BMC 14 days and AT-BMC 21 days. Marking to CD105, CD133, and CD68 were observed in AT 14 days and AT 21 days. These markings were not observed in AT-BMC 14 days or in AT-BMC 21 days. Electron micrographs show the beneficial remodeling in AT-BMC 14 days and AT-BMC 21 days, and the structural organization was similar to the CO group. Vesicles of pinocytosis, projection of smooth muscle cells, and delamination of the internal elastic lamina

  8. Impact of poroelasticity of intraluminal thrombus on wall stress of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    OpenAIRE

    Polzer Stanislav; Gasser T; Markert Bernd; Bursa Jiri; Skacel Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The predictions of stress fields in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) depend on constitutive descriptions of the aneurysm wall and the Intra-luminal Thrombus (ILT). ILT is a porous diluted structure (biphasic solid–fluid material) and its impact on AAA biomechanics is controversially discussed in the literature. Specifically, pressure measurements showed that the ILT cannot protect the wall from the arterial pressure, while other (numerical and experimental) studies showed t...

  9. Wall shear stress indicators in abnormal aortic geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; van Wyk, Stevin; Fuchs, Laszlo; Gutmark, Ephraim; Gutmark-Little, Iris

    2015-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease, such as atherosclerosis, occurs at specific locations in the arterial tree. Characterizing flow and forces at these locations is crucial to understanding the genesis of disease. Measures such as time average wall shear stress, oscillatory shear index, relative residence time and temporal wall shear stress gradients have been shown to identify plaque prone regions. The present paper examines these indices in three aortic geometries obtained from patients whose aortas are deformed due to a genetic pathology and compared to one normal geometry. This patient group is known to be prone to aortic dissection and our study aims to identify early indicators that will enable timely intervention. Data obtained from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is used to reconstruct the aortic arch. The local unsteady flow characteristics are calculated, fully resolving the flow field throughout the entire cardiac cycle. The Quemada model is applied to account for the non-Newtonian properties of blood, an empirical model valid for different red blood cell loading. The impact of the deformed aortic geometries is analyzed to identify flow patterns that could lead to arterial disease at certain locations.

  10. Biological Ferroelectricity Uncovered in Aortic Walls by Piezoresponse Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yuanming; Zhang, Yanhang; Chow, Ming-Jay; Chen, Qian Nataly; Li, Jiangyu

    2012-01-01

    Many biological tissues are piezoelectric and pyroelectric with spontaneous polarization. Ferroelectricity, however, has not been reported in soft biological tissues yet. Using piezoresponse force microscopy, we discover that the porcine aortic walls are not only piezoelectric, but also ferroelectric, with the piezoelectric coefficient in the order of 1 pm/V and coercive voltage approximately 10 V. Through detailed switching spectroscopy mapping and relaxation studies, we also find that the p...

  11. Using The Descending Aortic Wall Thickness Measured In Transesophageal Echocardiography As A Risk Marker For Aortic Dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaher Fanari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to estimate whether aortic wall thickness is increased in patients with Aortic dissection (AD compared to low risk control group and can be used in addition to aortic diameter as a risk marker of AD. Background: AD occurs due to pathologies that may increase thickness of the aortic wall. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE has the ability to visualise both the thoracic aortic wall and lumen. Aortic diameter has been used to predict aortic dissection and timing of surgery, but it is not always predictive of that risk. Methods: In 48 patients with AD who underwent TEE were examined retrospectively and compared to 48 control patients with patent foramen ovale (PFO. We measured aortic diameter at different levels, intimal/medial thickness (IMT and complete wall thickness (CMT. Demographic data and cardiovascular risk factors were reviewed. The data was analysed using ANOVA and student t test. Results: (AD patients were older [mean age 66 AD vs. 51 PFO], had more hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia and Coronary artery disease. Both IMT and CMT in the descending aorta were increased in AD group [(1.85 vs. 1.43 mm; P=0.03 and 2.93 vs. 2.46 mm; p=0.01. As expected the diameter of ascending aorta was also greater in AD (4.61 vs. 2.92 cm; P=0.004. Conclusions: CMT and IMT in the descending aorta detected by TEE is greater in patients with AD when compared to control and may add prognostic data to that of aortic diameter

  12. Using The Descending Aortic Wall Thickness Measured In Transesophageal Echocardiography As A Risk Marker For Aortic Dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanari, Zaher; Hammami, Sumaya; Hammami, Muhammad Baraa; Hammami, Safa; Eze-Nliam, Chete; Weintraub, William S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to estimate whether aortic wall thickness is increased in patients with Aortic dissection (AD) compared to low risk control group and can be used in addition to aortic diameter as a risk marker of AD. Background AD occurs due to pathologies that may increase thickness of the aortic wall. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has the ability to visualize both the thoracic aortic wall and lumen. Aortic diameter has been used to predict aortic dissection and timing of surgery, but it is not always predictive of that risk. Methods In 48 patients with AD who underwent TEE were examined retrospectively and compared to 48 control patients with patent foramen ovale (PFO). We measured aortic diameter at different levels, intimal/medial thickness (IMT) and complete wall thickness (CMT). Demographic data and cardiovascular risk factors were reviewed. The data was analyzed using ANOVA and student t test. Results (AD) patients were older [mean age 66 AD vs. 51 PFO], had more hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia and Coronary artery disease. Both IMT and CMT in the descending aorta were increased in AD group [(1.85 vs. 1.43 mm; P=0.03 and 2.93 vs. 2.46 mm; p=0.01). As expected the diameter of ascending aorta was also greater in AD (4.61 vs. 2.92 cm; P=0.004). Conclusions CMT and IMT in the descending aorta detected by TEE is greater in patients with AD when compared to control and may add prognostic data to that of aortic diameter. PMID:25984293

  13. Regulation of aortic wall mechanics and stress : An experimental study in man

    OpenAIRE

    Åstrand, Håkan

    2008-01-01

    The abdominal aorta (AA) in man is a vulnerable artery prone to atherosclerosis as well as aneurysmatic dilation. The underlying aortic composition, mechanical properties as well as the mechanisms responsible for age-related changes and vascular disease are however largely unknown. The aims of this study were 1) to characterize the age- and gender-related changes of the aortic wall components in vivo, using a mechanical model based on ultrasound measurements of pulsatile aortic diameter chang...

  14. Hessian analysis for the delineation of amorphous anomalies in optical coherence tomography images of the aortic wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, Eusebio; Val-Bernal, José Fernando; Revuelta, José M; Pontón, Alejandro; Díez, Marta Calvo; Mayorga, Marta; López-Higuera, José M; Conde, Olga M

    2016-04-01

    The aortic aneurysm is a disease originated mainly in the media layer of the aortic wall due to the occurrence of degraded areas of altered biological composition. These anomalous regions affect the structure and strength of the aorta artery, being their occurrence and extension proportional to the arterial vessel health. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is applied to obtain cross-sectional images of the artery wall. The backscattering mechanisms in tissue make aorta images difficult to analyze due to noise and strong attenuation with penetration. The morphology of anomalies in pathological specimens is also diverse with amorphous shapes and varied dimensions, being these factors strongly related with tissue degradation and the aorta physiological condition. Hessian analysis of OCT images from aortic walls is used to assess the accurate delineation of these anomalous regions. A specific metric of the Hessian determinant is used to delineate degraded regions under blurry conditions and noise. A multiscale approach, based on an anisotropic Gaussian kernel filter, is applied to highlight and aggregate all the heterogeneity present in the aortic wall. An accuracy estimator metric has been implemented to evaluate and optimize the delineation process avoiding subjectivity. Finally, a degradation quantification score has been developed to assess aorta wall condition by OCT with validation against common histology. PMID:27446665

  15. Impact of poroelasticity of intraluminal thrombus on wall stress of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polzer Stanislav

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The predictions of stress fields in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA depend on constitutive descriptions of the aneurysm wall and the Intra-luminal Thrombus (ILT. ILT is a porous diluted structure (biphasic solid–fluid material and its impact on AAA biomechanics is controversially discussed in the literature. Specifically, pressure measurements showed that the ILT cannot protect the wall from the arterial pressure, while other (numerical and experimental studies showed that at the same time it reduces the stress in the wall. Method To explore this phenomenon further a poroelastic description of the ILT was integrated in Finite Element (FE Models of the AAA. The AAA model was loaded by a pressure step and a cyclic pressure wave and their transition into wall tension was investigated. To this end ILT’s permeability was varied within a microstructurally motivated range. Results The two-phase model verified that the ILT transmits the entire mean arterial pressure to the wall while, at the same time, it significantly reduces the stress in the wall. The predicted mean stress in the AAA wall was insensitive to the permeability of the ILT and coincided with the results of AAA models using a single-phase ILT description. Conclusion At steady state, the biphasic ILT behaves like a single-phase material in an AAA model. Consequently, computational efficient FE single-phase models, as they have been exclusively used in the past, accurately predict the wall stress in AAA models.

  16. Oxygen Regulates the Effective Diffusion Distance of Nitric Oxide in the Aortic Wall

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiaoping; Srinivasan, Parthasarathy; Collard, Eric; Grajdeanu, Paula; Lok, Kevin; Boyle, Sarah E.; Friedman, Avner; Zweier, Jay L.

    2009-01-01

    Endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) is critical in maintaining vascular tone. Accumulating evidence shows that NO bioavailability is regulated by oxygen concentration. However, it is unclear to what extent the oxygen concentration regulates NO bioavailability in the vascular wall. In this study, a recently developed experimental setup was used to measure the NO diffusion fluxes across the aortic wall at different oxygen concentrations. It was observed that for a constant NO concentration at...

  17. Cellular regulation of the structure and function of aortic valves

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    Ismail El-Hamamsy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aortic valve was long considered a passive structure that opens and closes in response to changes in transvalvular pressure. Recent evidence suggests that the aortic valve performs highly sophisticated functions as a result of its unique microscopic structure. These functions allow it to adapt to its hemodynamic and mechanical environment. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in normal valve physiology is essential to elucidate the mechanisms behind valve disease. We here review the structure and developmental biology of aortic valves; we examine the role of its cellular parts in regulating its function and describe potential pathophysiological and clinical implications.

  18. Effects of aortic root motion on wall stress in the Marfan aorta before and after personalised aortic root support (PEARS) surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S D; Xu, X Y; Pepper, J R; Izgi, C; Treasure, T; Mohiaddin, R H

    2016-07-01

    Aortic root motion was previously identified as a risk factor for aortic dissection due to increased longitudinal stresses in the ascending aorta. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of aortic root motion on wall stress and strain in the ascending aorta and evaluate changes before and after implantation of personalised external aortic root support (PEARS). Finite element (FE) models of the aortic root and thoracic aorta were developed using patient-specific geometries reconstructed from pre- and post-PEARS cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) images in three Marfan patients. The wall and PEARS materials were assumed to be isotropic, incompressible and linearly elastic. A static load on the inner wall corresponding to the patients' pulse pressure was applied. Cardiovascular MR cine images were used to quantify aortic root motion, which was imposed at the aortic root boundary of the FE model, with zero-displacement constraints at the distal ends of the aortic branches and descending aorta. Measurements of the systolic downward motion of the aortic root revealed a significant reduction in the axial displacement in all three patients post-PEARS compared with its pre-PEARS counterparts. Higher longitudinal stresses were observed in the ascending aorta when compared with models without the root motion. Implantation of PEARS reduced the longitudinal stresses in the ascending aorta by up to 52%. In contrast, the circumferential stresses at the interface between the supported and unsupported aorta were increase by up to 82%. However, all peak stresses were less than half the known yield stress for the dilated thoracic aorta. PMID:27255604

  19. Spaceflight Affects Postnatal Development of the Aortic Wall in Rats

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    Shin-ichiro Katsuda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated effect of microgravity environment during spaceflight on postnatal development of the rheological properties of the aorta in rats. The neonate rats were randomly divided at 7 days of age into the spaceflight, asynchronous ground control, and vivarium control groups (8 pups for one dam. The spaceflight group rats at 9 days of age were exposed to microgravity environment for 16 days. A longitudinal wall strip of the proximal descending thoracic aorta was subjected to stress-strain and stress-relaxation tests. Wall tensile force was significantly smaller in the spaceflight group than in the two control groups, whereas there were no significant differences in wall stress or incremental elastic modulus at each strain among the three groups. Wall thickness and number of smooth muscle fibers were significantly smaller in the spaceflight group than in the two control groups, but there were no significant differences in amounts of either the elastin or collagen fibers among the three groups. The decreased thickness was mainly caused by the decreased number of smooth muscle cells. Plastic deformation was observed only in the spaceflight group in the stress-strain test. A microgravity environment during spaceflight could affect postnatal development of the morphological and rheological properties of the aorta.

  20. Spaceflight affects postnatal development of the aortic wall in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuda, Shin-ichiro; Yamasaki, Masao; Waki, Hidefumi; Miyake, Masao; O-ishi, Hirotaka; Katahira, Kiyoaki; Nagayama, Tadanori; Miyamoto, Yukako; Hasegawa, Masamitsu; Wago, Haruyuki; Okouchi, Toshiyasu; Shimizu, Tsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    We investigated effect of microgravity environment during spaceflight on postnatal development of the rheological properties of the aorta in rats. The neonate rats were randomly divided at 7 days of age into the spaceflight, asynchronous ground control, and vivarium control groups (8 pups for one dam). The spaceflight group rats at 9 days of age were exposed to microgravity environment for 16 days. A longitudinal wall strip of the proximal descending thoracic aorta was subjected to stress-strain and stress-relaxation tests. Wall tensile force was significantly smaller in the spaceflight group than in the two control groups, whereas there were no significant differences in wall stress or incremental elastic modulus at each strain among the three groups. Wall thickness and number of smooth muscle fibers were significantly smaller in the spaceflight group than in the two control groups, but there were no significant differences in amounts of either the elastin or collagen fibers among the three groups. The decreased thickness was mainly caused by the decreased number of smooth muscle cells. Plastic deformation was observed only in the spaceflight group in the stress-strain test. A microgravity environment during spaceflight could affect postnatal development of the morphological and rheological properties of the aorta. PMID:25210713

  1. Cine magnetic resonance imaging study of blood flow and wall motion of the aortic arch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aortic arch has 3D distortions in the transverse arch in the axial view, and we previously reported that this distortion is a risk factor in the pathogenesis of arch aneurysms. In this study, we evaluated blood flow and movement of the aortic arch. In 10 healthy young volunteers, ECG-gated cine magnetic resonance imaging was carried out in the axial plane of the transverse arch, the coronal plane of the ascending arch, and the long axial plane along the entire arch. Left anterolateral movements around the midpoint of the transverse arch in the systolic phase were observed in all of the men (6.3±1.59 mm) and women (4.8±0.73 mm). A jet flow was detected in the systolic phase along the right side of the aortic wall. At the top of the plane, this jet flow turned to the left in a clockwise rotation in the anterior view. In the long axial plane, a turbulent flow in the systolic phase was observed distal to the left subclavian arterial orifice in 6 of the 7 cases. In conclusion, this turbulent flow and left anterolateral wall motion of the transverse arch are due to anatomical three-dimensional distortion of the transverse arch. We propose that these phenomena may be important risk factors in the pathogenesis of arch aneurysms. (author)

  2. MRI-based Determination of Reference Values of Thoracic Aortic Wall Thickness in a General Population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mensel, Birger; Quadrat, Alexander; Schneider, Tobias; Kuehn, Jens-Peter; Hegenscheid, Katrin [University Medicine Greifswald, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology, Greifswald (Germany); Doerr, Marcus [University Medicine Greifswald, Department of Internal Medicine, Greifswald (Germany); DZHK (German Center for Cardiovascular Research), Greifswald (Germany); Voelzke, Henry [University Medicine Greifswald, Institute for Community Medicine, Greifswald (Germany); DZHK (German Center for Cardiovascular Research), Greifswald (Germany); Lieb, Wolfgang [Christian Albrechts University, Institute of Epidemiology, Kiel (Germany); Lorbeer, Roberto [University Medicine Greifswald, Institute for Community Medicine, Greifswald (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    To provide age- and sex-specific reference values for MRI-derived wall thickness of the ascending and descending aorta in the general population. Data of 753 subjects (311 females) aged 21-81 years were analysed. MRI was used to determine the aortic wall thickness (AWT). Equations for reference value calculation according to age were established for females and males. Median wall thickness of the ascending aorta was 1.46 mm (5th-95th range: 1.15-1.88 mm) for females and 1.56 mm (1.22-1.99 mm) for males. Median wall thickness of the descending aorta was 1.26 mm (0.97-1.58 mm) in females and 1.36 mm (1.04-1.75 mm) in males. While median and 5th and 95th percentiles for the ascending and descending aorta increased with age in both sexes, the association between age and median AWT was stronger in males than in females for both the ascending and descending aorta. Reference values for the ascending and descending AWT are provided. In a healthy sample from the general population, the wall of the ascending aorta is thicker than the wall of the descending aorta, and both walls are thicker in males than females. The increase in wall thickness with age is greater in males. (orig.)

  3. Fluid, solid and fluid-structure interaction simulations on patient-based abdominal aortic aneurysm models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sinead; O'Rourke, Malachy

    2012-04-01

    This article describes the use of fluid, solid and fluid-structure interaction simulations on three patient-based abdominal aortic aneurysm geometries. All simulations were carried out using OpenFOAM, which uses the finite volume method to solve both fluid and solid equations. Initially a fluid-only simulation was carried out on a single patient-based geometry and results from this simulation were compared with experimental results. There was good qualitative and quantitative agreement between the experimental and numerical results, suggesting that OpenFOAM is capable of predicting the main features of unsteady flow through a complex patient-based abdominal aortic aneurysm geometry. The intraluminal thrombus and arterial wall were then included, and solid stress and fluid-structure interaction simulations were performed on this, and two other patient-based abdominal aortic aneurysm geometries. It was found that the solid stress simulations resulted in an under-estimation of the maximum stress by up to 5.9% when compared with the fluid-structure interaction simulations. In the fluid-structure interaction simulations, flow induced pressure within the aneurysm was found to be up to 4.8% higher than the value of peak systolic pressure imposed in the solid stress simulations, which is likely to be the cause of the variation in the stress results. In comparing the results from the initial fluid-only simulation with results from the fluid-structure interaction simulation on the same patient, it was found that wall shear stress values varied by up to 35% between the two simulation methods. It was concluded that solid stress simulations are adequate to predict the maximum stress in an aneurysm wall, while fluid-structure interaction simulations should be performed if accurate prediction of the fluid wall shear stress is necessary. Therefore, the decision to perform fluid-structure interaction simulations should be based on the particular variables of interest in a given

  4. Motion characterization of aortic wall and intimal flap by ECG-gated CT in patients with chronic B-dissection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganten, Maria-Katharina [Department of Radiology, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Ruprecht-Karls-University of Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: m.ganten@dkfz-heidelberg.de; Weber, Tim F.; Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik von [Department of Radiology, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Boeckler, Dittmar [Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Ruprecht-Karls-University of Heidelberg (Germany); Stiller, Wolfram [Department of Medical Physics in Radiology, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Geisbuesch, Philipp [Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Ruprecht-Karls-University of Heidelberg (Germany); Kauffmann, Guenter W. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Ruprecht-Karls-University of Heidelberg (Germany); Delorme, Stefan [Department of Radiology, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bock, Michael [Department of Medical Physics in Radiology, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [Department of Radiology, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    Rationale and objectives: To evaluate whether dynamic computed tomography (CT)-imaging can provide functional vessel information in patients with chronic aortic dissection type Stanford-B (ADB). Materials and methods: In 32 patients, ECG-gated CT-angiography images were obtained. Cross-sectional area change and wall distensibility were investigated by semiautomatic vessel area segmentation at the end of aortic arch. Significance of distensibility differences was tested with regard to the aortic diameter, and the oscillation of the intimal flap was analyzed. Results: The aorta could be segmented successfully in all patients. These were separated into three subgroups: (A) 6 patients with an aortic diameter <4 cm and without a visible intimal flap, (B) 9 patients with an aortic diameter <4 cm, and (C) 17 individuals with an aortic diameter {>=}4 cm; (B) and (C) having a visible intimal flap. Differences in distensibility between the subgroups were not significant. Overall mean distensibility was D{sub tot} = (1.3 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup -5} Pa{sup -1}. Analysis of intimal flap oscillation showed a pulsatile short axis diameter decrease of the true lumen of up to 29%. Conclusion: Dynamic, ECG-gated CT-angiography can demonstrate pulsatile changes in aortic area and a highly variable motion of the intimal flap. Aortic distensibility appears independent of diameter or presence of a intimal flap. Follow-up studies may show correlation with possible complications.

  5. A comparison of modelling techniques for computing wall stress in abdominal aortic aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGloughlin Timothy M

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aneurysms, in particular abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA, form a significant portion of cardiovascular related deaths. There is much debate as to the most suitable tool for rupture prediction and interventional surgery of AAAs, and currently maximum diameter is used clinically as the determining factor for surgical intervention. Stress analysis techniques, such as finite element analysis (FEA to compute the wall stress in patient-specific AAAs, have been regarded by some authors to be more clinically important than the use of a "one-size-fits-all" maximum diameter criterion, since some small AAAs have been shown to have higher wall stress than larger AAAs and have been known to rupture. Methods A patient-specific AAA was selected from our AAA database and 3D reconstruction was performed. The AAA was then modelled in this study using three different approaches, namely, AAA(SIMP, AAA(MOD and AAA(COMP, with each model examined using linear and non-linear material properties. All models were analysed using the finite element method for wall stress distributions. Results Wall stress results show marked differences in peak wall stress results between the three methods. Peak wall stress was shown to reduce when more realistic parameters were utilised. It was also noted that wall stress was shown to reduce by 59% when modelled using the most accurate non-linear complex approach, compared to the same model without intraluminal thrombus. Conclusion The results here show that using more realistic parameters affect resulting wall stress. The use of simplified computational modelling methods can lead to inaccurate stress distributions. Care should be taken when examining stress results found using simplified techniques, in particular, if the wall stress results are to have clinical importance.

  6. A structural finite element model for lamellar unit of aortic media indicates heterogeneous stress field after collagen recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thunes, James R; Pal, Siladitya; Fortunato, Ronald N; Phillippi, Julie A; Gleason, Thomas G; Vorp, David A; Maiti, Spandan

    2016-06-14

    Incorporation of collagen structural information into the study of biomechanical behavior of ascending thoracic aortic (ATA) wall tissue should provide better insight into the pathophysiology of ATA. Structurally motivated constitutive models that include fiber dispersion and recruitment can successfully capture overall mechanical response of the arterial wall tissue. However, these models cannot examine local microarchitectural features of the collagen network, such as the effect of fiber disruptions and interaction between fibrous and non-fibrous components, which may influence emergent biomechanical properties of the tissue. Motivated by this need, we developed a finite element based three-dimensional structural model of the lamellar units of the ATA media that directly incorporates the collagen fiber microarchitecture. The fiber architecture was computer generated utilizing network features, namely fiber orientation distribution, intersection density and areal concentration, obtained from image analysis of multiphoton microscopy images taken from human aneurysmal ascending thoracic aortic media specimens with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) phenotype. Our model reproduces the typical J-shaped constitutive response of the aortic wall tissue. We found that the stress state in the non-fibrous matrix was homogeneous until the collagen fibers were recruited, but became highly heterogeneous after that event. The degree of heterogeneity was dependent upon local network architecture with high stresses observed near disrupted fibers. The magnitude of non-fibrous matrix stress at higher stretch levels was negatively correlated with local fiber density. The localized stress concentrations, elucidated by this model, may be a factor in the degenerative changes in aneurysmal ATA tissue. PMID:27113538

  7. Quantitative Assessment of Wall Shear Stress in an Aortic Coarctation - Impact of Virtual Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Matts; Andersson, Magnus; Lantz, Jonas

    2014-11-01

    Turbulent and wall impinging blood flow causes abnormal shear forces onto the lumen and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of numerous cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, wall shear stress (WSS) and related flow parameters were studied in a pre-treated aortic coarctation (CoA) as well as after several virtual interventions using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Patient-specific geometry and flow conditions were derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. Finite element analysis was performed to acquire six different dilated CoAs. The unsteady pulsatile flow was resolved by large eddy simulation (LES) including non-Newtonian blood rheology. Pre-intervention, the presence of jet flow wall impingement caused an elevated WSS zone, with a distal region of low and oscillatory WSS. After intervention, cases with a more favorable centralized jet showed reduced high WSS values at the opposed wall. Despite significant turbulence reduction post-treatment, enhanced regions of low and oscillatory WSS were observed for all cases. This numerical method has demonstrated the morphological impact on WSS distribution in an CoA. With the predictability and validation capabilities of a combined CFD/MRI approach, a step towards patient-specific intervention planning is taken.

  8. Adipocyte in vascular wall can induce the rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugo, Hirona; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Tanaka, Hiroki; Mouri, Youhei; Yanagimoto, Kenichi; Hayamizu, Kohsuke; Hashimoto, Keisuke; Sasaki, Takeshi; Sano, Masaki; Yata, Tatsuro; Urano, Tetsumei; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Unno, Naoki; Moriyama, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a vascular disease involving the gradual dilation of the abdominal aorta. It has been reported that development of AAA is associated with inflammation of the vascular wall; however, the mechanism of AAA rupture is not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the mechanism underlying AAA rupture using a hypoperfusion-induced animal model. We found that the administration of triolein increased the AAA rupture rate in the animal model and that the number of adipocytes was increased in ruptured vascular walls compared to non-ruptured walls. In the ruptured group, macrophage infiltration and the protein levels of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 were increased in the areas around adipocytes, while collagen-positive areas were decreased in the areas with adipocytes compared to those without adipocytes. The administration of fish oil, which suppresses adipocyte hypertrophy, decreased the number and size of adipocytes, as well as decreased the risk of AAA rupture ratio by 0.23 compared to the triolein administered group. In human AAA samples, the amount of triglyceride in the adventitia was correlated with the diameter of the AAA. These results suggest that AAA rupture is related to the abnormal appearance of adipocytes in the vascular wall. PMID:27499372

  9. Histochemical and immunohistochemical analysis of ruptured atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanasković Irena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The main complication of the atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurism (AAA is her rupture that begins with lesion in intima and rupture. The purpose of this work was to determine immunocytochemical and morphofunctional characteristics of the cells in aortic wall in ruptured atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm. Method. During the course of this study, 20 samples of atherosclerotic AAA were analyzed, all of them obtained during authopsy. The samples were fixed in 4% formalin and embedded in paraffin. Sections of 5 μm thickness were stained histochemically (of Heidenhain azan stain and Periodic acid Schiff - PAS stain and immunocytochemically using a DAKO LSAB+/HRP technique to identify α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA, vimentin, myosin heavy chains (MHC, desmin, S-100 protein, CD45 and CD68 (DAKO specification. Results. The results of our study showed that ruptured atherosclerotic AAA is characterized by a complete absence of endothelial cells, the disruption of basal membrane and internal elastic lamina, as well as a presence of the remains of hypocellular complicated atherosclerotic lesion in intima. On the plaque margins, as well as in the media, smooth muscle cells (SMCs are present, which express a α-SMA and vimentin (but without MHC or desmin expression, as well as leukocyte infiltration, and a large number of foam cells. Some of the foam cells show a CD68-immunoreactivity, while the others show vimentin- and S-100 protein-immunoreactivity. Media is thinned out with a disorganized elastic lamellas, while adventitia is characterized by inflammatory inflitrate (infection. Conclusion. Rupture of aneurysm occurs from the primary intimal disruption, which spreads into thinned out media and adventitia. Rupture is caused by unstable atherom, hypocellularity, loss of contractile characteristics of smooth muscle cells in intima and media, neovascularization of the media, as well as by the activity of the macrophages in the

  10. In vitro proton NMR study of collagen in human aortic wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinée, P; Meurer, B; Constantinesco, A; Kohlberger, B; Hauenstein, K H; Laubenberger, J

    1993-03-01

    The authors relate the findings in the 1H solid state line shape (at 60 MHz) of human aortic walls (n = 12) in native state and after histologically controlled selective lysis of collagen and elastin. An analysis of the line shape shows a composite free induction decay (FID) consisting of a low amplitude (3-7%) fast decaying component (T2 approximately 20 microseconds) and a slow decaying one (T2 > 1 ms). The fast component is identified as the protons of the collagen macromolecules. The second moment computed from the experimental fast component of the FID is in agreement with published studies examining the motional characteristics of collagen by multinuclear NMR employing spin labeling. A theoretical second moment is computed for the collagen macromolecular backbone from the atomic positions in the superhelix. Comparison with the observed experimental values allows determination of the step angle (29 degrees) of the fast rotational motion of the collagen strands along their long axis. PMID:8383787

  11. Fluid-structure interaction in axially symmetric models of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, K H; Li, M-X; Lee, W T; Easson, W J; Hoskins, P R

    2009-02-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm disease progression is probably influenced by tissue stresses and blood flow conditions and so accurate estimation of these will increase understanding of the disease and may lead to improved clinical practice. In this work the blood flow and tissue stresses in axially symmetric aneurysms are calculated using a complete fluid-structure interaction as a benchmark for calculating the error introduced by simpler calculations: rigid walled for the blood flow, homogeneous pressure for the tissue stress, as well as one-way-coupled interactions. The error in the peak von Mises stress in a homogeneous pressure calculation compared with a fluid-structure interaction calculation was less than 3.5 per cent for aneurysm diameters up to 7 cm. The error in the mean wall shear stress, in a rigid-walled calculation compared with a fluid-structure interaction calculation, varied from 30 per cent to 60 per cent with increasing aneurysm diameter. These results suggest that incorporation of the fluid-structure interaction is unnecessary for purely mechanical modelling, with the aim of evaluating the current rupture probability. However, for more complex biological modelling, perhaps with the aim of predicting the progress of the disease, where accurate estimation of the wall shear stress is essential, some form of fluid-structure interaction is necessary. PMID:19278197

  12. Aortic wall low density on chest CT: atheromatous plaque vs. thrombosed false lumen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A curvilinear or thick band-like low density on aortic wall on CT scan is sometimes problematic. The point is whether its represents atheromatous plaque of thrombosed false lumen of the dissecting aneurysm. We reviewed 212 randomly selected chest CT cases with regard to low density on the thoracic aorta. Thirty two patients showed visible low density on the aorta. Seven patients had dissecting aneurysm confirmed by aortography and/or CT scan. Atheromatous palque did not exceed 4mm in its maximum thickness and appeared as curvilinear rim, while thrombosed false lumen of the dissecting aneurysm exceeded 10mm in its maximum thickness in all cases with the shape of crescent, half-moon or thick band. Maximum transverse diameter of thoracic aorta was more than 4cm in all cases of dissecting aneurysm while none of the atheromatous plaque cases showed more than 4cm. Thrombosed false lumen of the dissecting aneurysm can reliably be distinguished from atheroma by its thicker low density region and larger size of the aorta.

  13. Ultrastructural characteristics of the vascular wall components of ruptured atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanasković Irena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the ultrastructural characteristics of cell populations and extracellular matrix components in the wall of ruptured atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. We analyzed 20 samples of ruptured AAA. For orientation to the light microscopy, we used routine histochemical techniques by standard procedures. For ultrastructural analysis, we applied transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Our results have shown that ruptured AAA is characterized by the remains of an advanced atherosclerotic lesion in the intima followed by a complete absence of endothelial cells, the disruption of basal membrane and disruption of internal elastic lamina. On plaque margins as well as in the inner media we observed smooth muscle cells (SMCs that posses a euchromatic nucleus, a well-developed granulated endoplasmic reticulum around the nucleus and reduced myofilaments. The remains of the ruptured lipid core were acellular in all samples; however, on the lateral sides of ruptured plaque we observed a presence of two types of foam cells (FCs, spindle- and star-shaped. Fusiform FCs possess a well-differentiated basal lamina, caveolae and electron dense bodies, followed by a small number of lipid droplets in the cytoplasm. Star-shaped FCs contain a large number of lipid droplets and do not possess basal lamina. On the inner margins of the plaque, we observed a large number of cells undergoing apoptosis and necrosis, extracellular lipid droplets as well as a large number of lymphocytes. The media was thinned out with disorganized elastic lamellas, while the adventitia exhibited leukocyte infiltration. The presented results suggest that atherosclerotic plaque in ruptured AAA contains vascular SMC synthetic phenotype and two different types of FCs: some were derived from monocyte/macrophage lineage, while others were derived from SMCs of synthetic phenotype. The striking plaque hypocellularity was the result of apoptosis and necrosis

  14. Heterogeneous distribution of a diffusional tracer in the aortic wall of normal and atherosclerotic rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracer distribution as an index of nutritional support across the thoracic and abdominal aortas in rabbits in the presence or absence of atherosclerotic lesions was evaluated using [14C]antipyrine, a metabolically inert, diffusible indicator. Intimal plaques were produced by endothelial balloon denudation of the thoracic aorta and a 1% cholesterol diet. After a steady intravenous infusion of 200 microCi of [14C]antipyrine for 60 seconds, thoracic and abdominal aortas and the heart were excised, and autoradiograms of 20-microns-thick sections were quantified, using microcomputer-aided densitometry. Regional radioactivity and regional diffusional support, as an index of nutritional flow estimated from the timed collections of arterial blood, was 367 and 421 nCi.g-1 (82 and 106 ml.min-1.100 g-1) in thoracic aortic media of the normal and atherosclerotic rabbits, respectively. Radioactivity at the thickened intima was 179 nCi.g-1 (p less than 0.01 versus media). The gruel was noted at a deeper site within the thickened intima, and diffusional support here was 110 nCi.g-1 (p less than 0.01 versus an average radioactivity at the thickened intima). After ligating the intercostal arteries, regional tracer distribution in the media beneath the fibrofatty lesion, but not the plaque-free intima, was reduced to 46%. Thus, in the presence of advanced intimal thickening, the heterogeneous distribution of diffusional flow is prominent across the vessel wall, and abluminal routes are crucial to meet the increased demands of nutritional requirements

  15. Immersed boundary-finite element model of fluid-structure interaction in the aortic root

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamini, Vittoria; DeAnda, Abe; Griffith, Boyce E.

    2016-04-01

    It has long been recognized that aortic root elasticity helps to ensure efficient aortic valve closure, but our understanding of the functional importance of the elasticity and geometry of the aortic root continues to evolve as increasingly detailed in vivo imaging data become available. Herein, we describe a fluid-structure interaction model of the aortic root, including the aortic valve leaflets, the sinuses of Valsalva, the aortic annulus, and the sinotubular junction, that employs a version of Peskin's immersed boundary (IB) method with a finite element description of the structural elasticity. As in earlier work, we use a fiber-based model of the valve leaflets, but this study extends earlier IB models of the aortic root by employing an incompressible hyperelastic model of the mechanics of the sinuses and ascending aorta using a constitutive law fit to experimental data from human aortic root tissue. In vivo pressure loading is accounted for by a backward displacement method that determines the unloaded configuration of the root model. Our model yields realistic cardiac output at physiological pressures, with low transvalvular pressure differences during forward flow, minimal regurgitation during valve closure, and realistic pressure loads when the valve is closed during diastole. Further, results from high-resolution computations indicate that although the detailed leaflet and root kinematics show some grid sensitivity, our IB model of the aortic root nonetheless produces essentially grid-converged flow rates and pressures at practical grid spacings for the high Reynolds number flows of the aortic root. These results thereby clarify minimum grid resolutions required by such models when used as stand-alone models of the aortic valve as well as when used to provide models of the outflow valves in models of left-ventricular fluid dynamics.

  16. Moss cell walls: structure and biosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Alison W. Roberts; Eric M Roberts; Haigler, Candace H.

    2012-01-01

    The genome sequence of the moss Physcomitrella patens has stimulated new research examining the cell wall polysaccharides of mosses and the glycosyl transferases that synthesize them as a means to understand fundamental processes of cell wall biosynthesis and plant cell wall evolution. The cell walls of mosses and vascular plants are composed of the same classes of polysaccharides, but with differences in side chain composition and structure. Similarly, the genomes of P. patens and angiosperm...

  17. Intrauterine growth restriction is associated with persistent aortic wall thickening and glomerular proteinuria during infancy

    OpenAIRE

    Zanardo, Vincenzo; Fanelli, Tiziana; Weiner, Gary; Fanos, Vassilios; Zaninotto, Martina; Visentin, Silvia; Cavallin, Francesco; Trevisanuto, Daniele; Cosmi, Erich

    2011-01-01

    Low birth weight, caused either by preterm birth or by intrauterine growth restriction, has recently been associated with increased rates of adult renal and cardiovascular disease. Since aortic intima–media thickening is a noninvasive marker of preclinical vascular disease, we compared abdominal aortic intima–media thickness among intrauterine growth restricted and equivalent gestational age fetuses in utero and at 18 months of age. The relationship between intrauterine growth restriction, fe...

  18. Clinical trial of doxycycline for matrix metalloproteinase-9 inhibition in patients with an abdominal aneurysm doxycycline selectively depletes aortic wall neutrophils and cytotoxic t cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lindeman, J. H. N.; Abdul-Hussien, H.; van Bockel, J H; Wolterbeek, R.; Kleemann, R.

    2009-01-01

    Background-Doxycycline has been shown to effectively inhibit aneurysm formation in animal models of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Although this effect is ascribed to matrix metalloproteinase-9 inhibition, such an effect is unclear in human studies. We reevaluated the effect of doxycycline on aortic wall protease content in a inical trial and found that doxycycline selectively reduces neutrophil-derived proteases. We thus hypothesized that doxycycline acts through an effect on ascular nflammation...

  19. Computed tomography of the venous structure along the aortic arch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography has proved useful in detecting enlarged aortic arch lymph nodes. Along the aortic arch are there veins which simulate lymph nodes. They include left superior intercostal vein, persistent left superior vena cava and vertical vein. Of 526 mediastinal computed tomograms, 23 (4.4%) showed one or more para-aortic nodular shadows. These shadows were classified into three types according to the shape and number. The left superior intercostal vein appeared as a curvilinear or rounded shadow. Two or more nodular shadows are most likely to be lymph nodes. A single nodular shadow represents either lymph node or vein. (author)

  20. Aneurysms: thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Kevin C; Lee, Eugene S

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) have many possible etiologies, including congenital heart defects (eg, bicuspid aortic valves, coarctation of the aorta), inherited connective tissue disorders (eg, Marfan, Ehlers-Danlos, Loeys-Dietz syndromes), and degenerative conditions (eg, medial necrosis, atherosclerosis of the aortic wall). Symptoms of rupture include a severe tearing pain in the chest, back, or neck, sometimes associated with cardiovascular collapse. Before rupture, TAAs may exert pressure on other thoracic structures, leading to a variety of symptoms. However, most TAAs are asymptomatic and are found incidentally during imaging for other conditions. Diagnosis is confirmed with computed tomography scan or echocardiography. Asymptomatic TAAs should be monitored with imaging at specified intervals and patients referred for repair if the TAAs are enlarging rapidly (greater than 0.5 cm in diameter over 6 months for heritable etiologies; greater than 0.5 cm over 1 year for degenerative etiologies) or reach a critical aortic diameter threshold for elective surgery (5.5 cm for TAAs due to degenerative etiologies, 5.0 cm when associated with inherited syndromes). Open surgery is used most often to treat asymptomatic TAAs in the ascending aorta and aortic arch. Asymptomatic TAAs in the descending aorta often are treated medically with aggressive blood pressure control, though recent data suggest that endovascular procedures may result in better long-term survival rates. PMID:25860136

  1. Computational 3D fluid-structure interaction for the aortic valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Haoxiang; Chen, Ye; Sun, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction (FSI) involving large deformations of flexible bodies is common in biological systems. A typical example is the heart valves. Accurate and efficient numerical approaches for modeling such systems are still lacking. In this work, we report a successful case of combining an immersed-boundary flow solver with a nonlinear finite-element solid-dynamics solver, both in-house programs, specifically for three-dimensional simulations. Based on the Cartesian grid, the viscous incompressible flow solver can handle boundaries of large displacements with simple mesh generation. The solid-dynamics solver has separate subroutines for analyzing general three-dimensional bodies and thin-walled structures composed of frames, membranes, and plates. Both geometric nonlinearity associated with large displacements and material nonlinearity associated with large strains are incorporated in the solver. The FSI is achieved through a strong coupling and partitioned approach. We have performed several benchmarking cases to validate the FSI solver. Application to the native aortic valve will be demonstrated. Supported by the NSF grant (CBET-1066962).

  2. Fluid-structure interaction of an aortic heart valve prosthesis driven by an animated anatomic left ventricle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Trung Bao; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2013-07-01

    We develop a novel large-scale kinematic model for animating the left ventricle (LV) wall and use this model to drive the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) between the ensuing blood flow and a mechanical heart valve prosthesis implanted in the aortic position of an anatomic LV/aorta configuration. The kinematic model is of lumped type and employs a cell-based, FitzHugh-Nagumo framework to simulate the motion of the LV wall in response to an excitation wavefront propagating along the heart wall. The emerging large-scale LV wall motion exhibits complex contractile mechanisms that include contraction (twist) and expansion (untwist). The kinematic model is shown to yield global LV motion parameters that are well within the physiologic range throughout the cardiac cycle. The FSI between the leaflets of the mechanical heart valve and the blood flow driven by the dynamic LV wall motion and mitral inflow is simulated using the curvilinear immersed boundary (CURVIB) method (Ge and Sotiropoulos, 2007; Borazjani et al., 2008) [1,2] implemented in conjunction with a domain decomposition approach. The computed results show that the simulated flow patterns are in good qualitative agreement with in vivo observations. The simulations also reveal complex kinematics of the valve leaflets, thus, underscoring the need for patient-specific simulations of heart valve prosthesis and other cardiac devices.

  3. Mechanical properties of the aortic arterial wall during 24 hours: a preliminary study in conscious sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous experiences in animals showed a different behavior between the variability of pressure, arterial diameter and elasticity when they were registered for a couple of hours. To better understand arterial mechanics variability, we propose to measure simultaneously aortic pressure and diameter during 24 hours in a sheep. For that purpose, we developed a portable prototype device. It allows continuously recording physiological signals throughout the day and storing them in a solid state memory for later analysis. Pulse wave velocity and Peterson modulus were assessed beat-to-beat as arterial stiffness indexes. We identified 53,762 heart beats during 24 hours that were separated into 2 groups: below or above median mean pressure (71 mmHg). Mean diameter, pulse wave velocity and Peterson modulus increased for higher pressure values (p<0.05) whereas heart rate slowed down (p<0.05). Pressure-diameter loops were successfully recreated all along the experience. This new methodology sets the basis for further experiences involving the estimation of 24 hours arterial mechanics variability.

  4. Hydrogen uptake in vanadium first wall structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonen, E.P.; Jones, R.H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Evaluation of hydrogen sources and transport are needed to assess the mechanical integrity of V structures. Two sources include implantation and transmutation. The proposed coatings for the DEMO and ITER first wall strongly influence retention of hydrogen isotopes. Upper limit calculations of hydrogen inventory were based on recycling to the plasma and an impermeable coolant-side coating. Hydrogen isotope concentrations in V approaching 1,000 appm may be activated.

  5. On coherent structure in wall turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, A S

    2013-01-01

    A new theory of coherent structure in wall turbulence is presented. The theory is the first to predict packets of hairpin vortices and other structure in turbulence, and their dynamics, based on an analysis of the Navier-Stokes equations, under an assumption of a turbulent mean profile. The assumption of the turbulent mean acts as a restriction on the class of possible structures. It is shown that the coherent structure is a manifestation of essentially low-dimensional flow dynamics, arising from a critical layer mechanism. Using the decomposition presented in McKeon & Sharma (J. Fluid Mech, 658, 2010), complex coherent structure is recreated from minimal superpositions of response modes predicted by the analysis, which take the form of radially-varying travelling waves. By way of example, simple combinations of these modes are offered that predicts hairpins and modulated hairpin packets. The phase interaction also predicts important skewness and correlation results known in the literature. It is also sho...

  6. Fluid-structure interaction of a patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm treated with an endovascular stent-graft.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Molony, David S

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are local dilatations of the infrarenal aorta. If left untreated they may rupture and lead to death. One form of treatment is the minimally invasive insertion of a stent-graft into the aneurysm. Despite this effective treatment aneurysms may occasionally continue to expand and this may eventually result in post-operative rupture of the aneurysm. Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) is a particularly useful tool for investigating aneurysm biomechanics as both the wall stresses and fluid forces can be examined. METHODS: Pre-op, Post-op and Follow-up models were reconstructed from CT scans of a single patient and FSI simulations were performed on each model. The FSI approach involved coupling Abaqus and Fluent via a third-party software - MpCCI. Aneurysm wall stress and compliance were investigated as well as the drag force acting on the stent-graft. RESULTS: Aneurysm wall stress was reduced from 0.38 MPa before surgery to a value of 0.03 MPa after insertion of the stent-graft. Higher stresses were seen in the aneurysm neck and iliac legs post-operatively. The compliance of the aneurysm was also reduced post-operatively. The peak Post-op axial drag force was found to be 4.85 N. This increased to 6.37 N in the Follow-up model. CONCLUSION: In a patient-specific case peak aneurysm wall stress was reduced by 92%. Such a reduction in aneurysm wall stress may lead to shrinkage of the aneurysm over time. Hence, post-operative stress patterns may help in determining the likelihood of aneurysm shrinkage post EVAR. Post-operative remodelling of the aneurysm may lead to increased drag forces.

  7. Fluid-structure interaction of a patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm treated with an endovascular stent-graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGloughlin Tim M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA are local dilatations of the infrarenal aorta. If left untreated they may rupture and lead to death. One form of treatment is the minimally invasive insertion of a stent-graft into the aneurysm. Despite this effective treatment aneurysms may occasionally continue to expand and this may eventually result in post-operative rupture of the aneurysm. Fluid-structure interaction (FSI is a particularly useful tool for investigating aneurysm biomechanics as both the wall stresses and fluid forces can be examined. Methods Pre-op, Post-op and Follow-up models were reconstructed from CT scans of a single patient and FSI simulations were performed on each model. The FSI approach involved coupling Abaqus and Fluent via a third-party software - MpCCI. Aneurysm wall stress and compliance were investigated as well as the drag force acting on the stent-graft. Results Aneurysm wall stress was reduced from 0.38 MPa before surgery to a value of 0.03 MPa after insertion of the stent-graft. Higher stresses were seen in the aneurysm neck and iliac legs post-operatively. The compliance of the aneurysm was also reduced post-operatively. The peak Post-op axial drag force was found to be 4.85 N. This increased to 6.37 N in the Follow-up model. Conclusion In a patient-specific case peak aneurysm wall stress was reduced by 92%. Such a reduction in aneurysm wall stress may lead to shrinkage of the aneurysm over time. Hence, post-operative stress patterns may help in determining the likelihood of aneurysm shrinkage post EVAR. Post-operative remodelling of the aneurysm may lead to increased drag forces.

  8. Immersed smoothed finite element method for fluid-structure interaction simulation of aortic valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianyao; Liu, G. R.; Narmoneva, Daria A.; Hinton, Robert B.; Zhang, Zhi-Qian

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a novel numerical method for simulating the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems when blood flows over aortic valves. The method uses the immersed boundary/element method and the smoothed finite element method and hence it is termed as IS-FEM. The IS-FEM is a partitioned approach and does not need a body-fitted mesh for FSI simulations. It consists of three main modules: the fluid solver, the solid solver and the FSI force solver. In this work, the blood is modeled as incompressible viscous flow and solved using the characteristic-based-split scheme with FEM for spacial discretization. The leaflets of the aortic valve are modeled as Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic materials and solved using smoothed finite element method (or S-FEM). The FSI force is calculated on the Lagrangian fictitious fluid mesh that is identical to the moving solid mesh. The octree search and neighbor-to-neighbor schemes are used to detect efficiently the FSI pairs of fluid and solid cells. As an example, a 3D idealized model of aortic valve is modeled, and the opening process of the valve is simulated using the proposed IS-FEM. Numerical results indicate that the IS-FEM can serve as an efficient tool in the study of aortic valve dynamics to reveal the details of stresses in the aortic valves, the flow velocities in the blood, and the shear forces on the interfaces. This tool can also be applied to animal models studying disease processes and may ultimately translate to a new adaptive methods working with magnetic resonance images, leading to improvements on diagnostic and prognostic paradigms, as well as surgical planning, in the care of patients.

  9. Aortic stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stenosis; Valvular aortic stenosis; Congenital heart - aortic stenosis; Rheumatic fever - aortic stenosis Images Aortic stenosis Heart valves References Carabello BA. Valvular heart disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  10. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... wall will actually thin out. And the big risk here is that if this gets too big ... to the aging baby boomers. Next slide. The risk factors for abdominal aortic aneurysms are males over ...

  11. The prevalence of Chlamydia pneumoniae in the aortic wall and in peripheral blood of patients scheduled for coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczaj, A; Stryjewski, P J; Fudal, M; Domal-Kwiatkowska, D; Ryfiński, B; Sliupkas-Dyrda, E; Smolik, S; Węglarz, L; Mazurek, U; Nowalany-Kozielska, E

    2016-01-01

    Some reports confirm a potential role of Chlamydia pneumoniae (ChP) in atherogenesis. In order to explore possible association between ChP and atherosclerosis, investigations were carried out in which the frequency of ChP in the arterial wall and peripheral blood was assessed in a group of patients with chronic coronary artery disease (CAD). Fifty-seven patients were enrolled in the study, 13 women and 44 men aged 61.8±6.5 (47-74), with previously diagnosed CAD, scheduled for planned coronary artery bypass grafting due to clinical indications. Vessel specimens retrieved from the ascending aorta (as a part of routine proximal venous graft development procedure) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from venous blood were evaluated for the presence of ChP DNA. Genomic DNA was extracted from PBMCs and vessel specimens. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed to detect ChP DNA. A statistically more frequent occurrence of ChP was observed in aortic tissues compared to blood samples (70.2% vs 56.1%, respectively). Similarly, the number of ChP DNA genomic copies [n/1μg genomic DNA] was significantly higher in tissue specimens compared to blood samples (89±91 vs 41±77, respectively; p=0.0046). In patients without ChP in blood specimens, we observed significantly higher amounts of ChP in tissue specimens compared to patients with ChP in blood specimens (156±71 vs 107±88, respectively; p=0.0453). No correlation was found between the number of ChP DNA copies [n/1μg genomic DNA] in blood and in aortic specimens. The infection of ChP in the aortic wall was connected with hypercholesterolemia (p=0.029) and diabetes (p=0.03). We conclude that Chlamydia pneumoniae is a pathogen frequently occurring in the aortic wall of patients with CAD. The occurrence of ChP DNA in the aortic tissue is related to classic CAD risk factors such as diabetes and dyslipidemia. PMID:27358129

  12. Wall grid structure for interior scene synthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Wenzhuo

    2015-02-01

    We present a system for automatically synthesizing a diverse set of semantically valid, and well-arranged 3D interior scenes for a given empty room shape. Unlike existing work on layout synthesis, that typically knows potentially needed 3D models and optimizes their location through cost functions, our technique performs the retrieval and placement of 3D models by discovering the relationships between the room space and the models\\' categories. This is enabled by a new analytical structure, called Wall Grid Structure, which jointly considers the categories and locations of 3D models. Our technique greatly reduces the amount of user intervention and provides users with suggestions and inspirations. We demonstrate the applicability of our approach on three types of scenarios: conference rooms, living rooms and bedrooms.

  13. A two-system, single-analysis, fluid-structure interaction technique for modelling abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, S C; O'Rourke, M J

    2010-01-01

    This work reports on the implementation and validation of a two-system, single-analysis, fluid-structure interaction (FSI) technique that uses the finite volume (FV) method for performing simulations on abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) geometries. This FSI technique, which was implemented in OpenFOAM, included fluid and solid mesh motion and incorporated a non-linear material model to represent AAA tissue. Fully implicit coupling was implemented, ensuring that both the fluid and solid domains reached convergence within each time step. The fluid and solid parts of the FSI code were validated independently through comparison with experimental data, before performing a complete FSI simulation on an idealized AAA geometry. Results from the FSI simulation showed that a vortex formed at the proximal end of the aneurysm during systolic acceleration, and moved towards the distal end of the aneurysm during diastole. Wall shear stress (WSS) values were found to peak at both the proximal and distal ends of the aneurysm and remain low along the centre of the aneurysm. The maximum von Mises stress in the aneurysm wall was found to be 408kPa, and this occurred at the proximal end of the aneurysm, while the maximum displacement of 2.31 mm occurred in the centre of the aneurysm. These results were found to be consistent with results from other FSI studies in the literature. PMID:20923114

  14. Fluorescent tags to explore cell wall structure and dynamics.

    OpenAIRE

    Martine eGonneau; Herman eHöfte; Samantha eVernhettes

    2012-01-01

    Plant cell walls are highly dynamic and heterogeneic structures, which vary between celltypes, growth stages but also between microdomains within a single cell wall. In this review, we summarize the imaging techniques using fluorescent tags that are currently being used and which should in the coming years revolutionize our understanding of the dynamics of cell wall architecture and the cellular processes involved in synthesis of cell wall components.

  15. Fluorescent tags to explore cell wall structure and dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Gonneau, Martine; Höfte, Herman; Vernhettes, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    Plant cell walls are highly dynamic and heterogeneous structures, which vary between cell types, growth stages but also between microdomains within a single cell wall. In this review, we summarize the imaging techniques using fluorescent tags that are currently being used and which should in the coming years revolutionize our understanding of the dynamics of cell wall architecture and the cellular processes involved in the synthesis of cell wall components.

  16. Experimental validation of the fluid-structure interaction simulation of a bioprosthetic aortic heart valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, I; Dellimore, K; Rodriguez, R; Scheffer, C; Blaine, D; Weich, H; Doubell, A

    2013-09-01

    Experiments performed on a 19 mm diameter bioprosthetic valve were used to successfully validate the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulation of an aortic valve at 72 bpm. The FSI simulation was initialized via a novel approach utilizing a Doppler sonogram of the experimentally tested valve. Using this approach very close quantitative agreement (≤12.5%) between the numerical predictions and experimental values for several key valve performance parameters, including the peak systolic transvalvular pressure gradient, rapid valve opening time and rapid valve closing time, was obtained. The predicted valve leaflet kinematics during opening and closing were also in good agreement with the experimental measurements. PMID:23907849

  17. Experimental validation of the fluid–structure interaction simulation of a bioprosthetic aortic heart valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments performed on a 19 mm diameter bioprosthetic valve were used to successfully validate the fluid–structure interaction (FSI) simulation of an aortic valve at 72 bpm. The FSI simulation was initialized via a novel approach utilizing a Doppler sonogram of the experimentally tested valve. Using this approach very close quantitative agreement (≤12.5 %) between the numerical predictions and experimental values for several key valve performance parameters, including the peak systolic transvalvular pressure gradient, rapid valve opening time and rapid valve closing time, was obtained. The predicted valve leaflet kinematics during opening and closing were also in good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  18. 18F-FDG PET-CT uptake is a feature of both normal diameter and aneurysmal aortic wall and is not related to aneurysm size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barwick, Tara D. [Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Charing Cross Hospital, Department of Radiology/Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Hammersmith Hospital, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Lyons, O.T.A.; Waltham, M. [King' s College London, BHF Centre of Research Excellence and NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at King' s Health Partners, Academic Department of Surgery, London (United Kingdom); Mikhaeel, N.G. [Guy' s and St Thomas' Foundation NHS Trust, Department of Oncology, London (United Kingdom); O' Doherty, M.J. [King' s Health Partners, Clinical PET Centre, St Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Aortic metabolic activity is suggested to correlate with presence and progression of aneurysmal disease, but has been inadequately studied. This study investigates the 2-[{sup 18}F] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) uptake in a population of infra-renal abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), compared to a matched non-aneurysmal control group. The Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography (PET/CT) database was searched for infra-renal AAA. Exclusion criteria were prior repair, vasculitis, and saccular/mycotic thoracic or thoraco-abdominal aneurysms. Matching of 159 non-aneurysmal (<3 cm diameter) controls from the same population was assessed. Infra-renal aortic wall FDG uptake was assessed using visual analysis; maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) and target to background mediastinal blood pool ratio (TBR) were documented. Predictors of FDG uptake (age, sex, aortic diameter, hypertension, statin use, and diabetes) were assessed using univariate analysis. Follow-up questionnaires were sent to referring clinicians. Aneurysms (n = 151) and controls (n = 159) were matched (p > 0.05) for age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, smoking status, statin use, and indication for PET/CT. Median aneurysm diameter was 5.0 cm (range 3.2-10.4). On visual analysis there was no significant difference in the overall numbers with increased visual uptake 24 % (36/151) in the aneurysm group vs. 19 % (30/159) in the controls, p = ns. SUV{sub max} was slightly lower in the aneurysm group vs. controls (mean (2 SD) 1.75(0.79) vs. 1.84(0.58), p = 0.02). However there was no difference in TBR between the AAA group and controls (mean (2 SD) 1.03 (0.46) vs. 1.05(0.31), p = 0.36). During a median 18 (interquartile range 8-35) months' follow-up 20 were repaired and four were confirmed ruptured. The level of metabolic activity as assessed by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in infra-renal AAA does not correlate with aortic size and does not differ between aneurysms and matched controls

  19. Aortic insufficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart valve - aortic regurgitation; Valvular disease - aortic regurgitation; AI - aortic insufficiency ... BA. Valvular heart disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  20. Tunable conductance of magnetic nanowires with structured domain walls

    OpenAIRE

    Dugaev, V. K.; Berakdar, J.; Barnas, J.

    2006-01-01

    We show that in a magnetic nanowire with double magnetic domain walls, quantum interference results in spin-split quasistationary states localized mainly between the domain walls. Spin-flip-assisted transmission through the domain structure increases strongly when these size-quantized states are tuned on resonance with the Fermi energy, e.g. upon varying the distance between the domain walls which results in resonance-type peaks of the wire conductance. This novel phenomena is shown to be uti...

  1. Thin-walled compliant plastic structures for mesoscale fluidic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Robin R.; Schumann, Daniel L.

    1999-06-01

    Thin-walled, compliant plastic structures for meso-scale fluidic systems were fabricated, tested and used to demonstrate valving, pumping, metering and mixing. These structures permit the isolation of actuators and sensors form the working fluid, thereby reducing chemical compatibility issues. The thin-walled, compliant plastic structures can be used in either a permanent, reusable system or as an inexpensive disposable for single-use assay systems. The implementation of valving, pumping, mixing and metering operations involve only an elastic change in the mechanical shape of various portions of the structure. Advantages provided by the thin-walled plastic structures include reduced dead volume and rapid mixing. Five different methods for fabricating the thin-walled plastic structures discussed including laser welding, molding, vacuum forming, thermal heat staking and photolithographic patterning techniques.

  2. Structural Studies of Complex Carbohydrates of Plant Cell Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darvill, Alan [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Hahn, Michael G. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); O' Neill, Malcolm A. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); York, William S. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    2015-02-17

    Most of the solar energy captured by land plants is converted into the polysaccharides (cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin) that are the predominant components of the cell wall. These walls, which account for the bulk of plant biomass, have numerous roles in the growth and development of plants. Moreover, these walls have a major impact on human life as they are a renewable source of biomass, a source of diverse commercially useful polymers, a major component of wood, and a source of nutrition for humans and livestock. Thus, understanding the molecular mechanisms that lead to wall assembly and how cell walls and their component polysaccharides contribute to plant growth and development is essential to improve and extend the productivity and value of plant materials. The proposed research will develop and apply advanced analytical and immunological techniques to study specific changes in the structures and interactions of the hemicellulosic and pectic polysaccharides that occur during differentiation and in response to genetic modification and chemical treatments that affect wall biosynthesis. These new techniques will make it possible to accurately characterize minute amounts of cell wall polysaccharides so that subtle changes in structure that occur in individual cell types can be identified and correlated to the physiological or developmental state of the plant. Successful implementation of this research will reveal fundamental relationships between polysaccharide structure, cell wall architecture, and cell wall functions.

  3. Tunable conductance of magnetic nanowires with structured domain walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugaev, V K; Berakdar, J; Barnaś, J

    2006-02-01

    We show that in a magnetic nanowire with double magnetic domain walls, quantum interference results in spin-split quasistationary states localized mainly between the domain walls. Spin-flip-assisted transmission through the domain structure increases strongly when these size-quantized states are tuned on resonance with the Fermi energy, e.g., upon varying the distance between the domain walls which results in resonance-type peaks of the wire conductance. This novel phenomenon is shown to be utilizable to manipulate the spin density in the domain vicinity. The domain wall parameters are readily controllable, and the predicted effect is hence exploitable in spintronic devices. PMID:16486888

  4. Effects of candesartan cilexetil and amlodipine orotate on receptor for advanced glycation end products expression in the aortic wall of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OETFF) type 2 diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min-Kyu; Chung, Woo-Baek; Hong, Seul-Ki; Kim, Ok-Ran; Ihm, Sang-Hyun; Chang, Kiyuk; Seung, Ki-Bae

    2016-04-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) plays a key role in the development of vascular inflammation and acceleration of atherosclerosis in type 2 diabetes. We investigated the effect of candesartan cilexetil (CDRT) and amlodipine orotate (AMDP) on the expression of RAGE in the aortic walls of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats and AGE-treated endothelial cells. Twenty five-week-old OLETF rats were randomized to 8 week treatments consisting of CDRT (n = 8), AMDP (n = 8) or saline (control, n = 8). Immunohistochemical and dihydroethidine staining revealed reduced RAGE and reactive oxygen species (ROS) signals in rats treated with CDRT or AMDP compared with control rats. Both CDRT and AMDP suppressed the expression of p22phox and p47phox NADPH oxidase subunits. However, only CDRT significantly reduced expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase (pERK)1/2 in the aortic wall of OLETF rats. In addition, both drugs reduced RAGE expression and total and mitochondrial ROS production in the AGE-treated endothelial cells. Both ARBs and CCBs reduced RAGE expression in the aortic walls of OLETF rats, which was attributed to decreased ROS production through inhibition of NADPH oxidase. In addition, only CDRT reduced aortic expression of RAGE via suppression of the ERK1/2 pathway unlike AMDP. PMID:26960737

  5. The adventitia: essential regulator of vascular wall structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenmark, Kurt R; Yeager, Michael E; El Kasmi, Karim C; Nozik-Grayck, Eva; Gerasimovskaya, Evgenia V; Li, Min; Riddle, Suzette R; Frid, Maria G

    2013-01-01

    The vascular adventitia acts as a biological processing center for the retrieval, integration, storage, and release of key regulators of vessel wall function. It is the most complex compartment of the vessel wall and is composed of a variety of cells, including fibroblasts, immunomodulatory cells (dendritic cells and macrophages), progenitor cells, vasa vasorum endothelial cells and pericytes, and adrenergic nerves. In response to vascular stress or injury, resident adventitial cells are often the first to be activated and reprogrammed to influence the tone and structure of the vessel wall; to initiate and perpetuate chronic vascular inflammation; and to stimulate expansion of the vasa vasorum, which can act as a conduit for continued inflammatory and progenitor cell delivery to the vessel wall. This review presents the current evidence demonstrating that the adventitia acts as a key regulator of vascular wall function and structure from the outside in. PMID:23216413

  6. Cell wall structure and biogenesis in Aspergillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimi, Akira; Miyazawa, Ken; Abe, Keietsu

    2016-09-01

    Aspergillus species are among the most important filamentous fungi from the viewpoints of industry, pathogenesis, and mycotoxin production. Fungal cells are exposed to a variety of environmental stimuli, including changes in osmolality, temperature, and pH, which create stresses that primarily act on fungal cell walls. In addition, fungal cell walls are the first interactions with host cells in either human or plants. Thus, understanding cell wall structure and the mechanism of their biogenesis is important for the industrial, medical, and agricultural fields. Here, we provide a systematic review of fungal cell wall structure and recent findings regarding the cell wall integrity signaling pathways in aspergilli. This accumulated knowledge will be useful for understanding and improving the use of industrial aspergilli fermentation processes as well as treatments for some fungal infections. PMID:27140698

  7. Global structure of moduli space for BPS walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the global structure of the moduli space of BPS walls in the Higgs branch of supersymmetric theories with eight supercharges. We examine the structure in the neighborhood of a special Lagrangian submanifold M, and find that the dimension of the moduli space can be larger than that naively suggested by the index theorem, contrary to previous examples of BPS solitons. We investigate BPS wall solutions in an explicit example of M using Abelian gauge theory. Its Higgs branch turns out to contain several special Lagrangian submanifolds including M. We show that the total moduli space of BPS walls is the union of these submanifolds. We also find interesting dynamics between BPS walls as a by-product of the analysis. Namely, mutual repulsion and attraction between BPS walls sometimes forbid a movement of a wall and lock it in a certain position; we also find that a pair of walls can transmute to another pair of walls with different tension after they pass through

  8. Lagrangian coherent structures and turbulence characteristics downstream of prosthetic aortic valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tullio, Marco D.

    2015-11-01

    The flowfield through prosthetic heart valves is investigated by means of direct numerical simulations, considering the fully coupled fluid-structure interaction problem. Two different aortic valve models are modeled: a bileaflet mechanical and a biological one. In order to reveal fluid flow structures and to better understand the transport mechanics, Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) are used. LCS are distinguished material surfaces that can be identified as boundaries to regions with dynamically distinct behavior, and are revealed as hypersurfaces that locally maximize the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields. Post-processing the flow simulation data, first FTLE fields are calculated integrating dense meshes of Lagrangian particles backward in time, and then attracting LCS are extracted. A three-jet configuration is distinctive of bi-leaflet mechanical valves, with higher turbulent shear stresses immediately distal to the valve leaflets, while a jet-like flow emerges from the central orifice of bio-prosthetic valves, with high turbulent shear stresses occurring at the edge of the jet. Details of the numerical methodology along with a thorough analysis of the different flow structures developing during the cardiac cycle for the two configurations will be provided.

  9. Domain and wall structures in films with helical magnetization profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubuget, Vincent [Laboratoire d' Electrodynamique des Materiaux Avances, Universite Francois Rabelais, CNRS UMR 6157, Parc de Grandmont, F-37200 Tours (France); CEA, DAM, Le Ripault, F-37260 Monts (France); Thiaville, Andre [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS UMR 8502, Bat. 510, F-91405 Orsay (France); Adenot-Engelvin, Anne-Lise, E-mail: anne-lise.adenot-engelvin@cea.f [CEA, DAM, Le Ripault, F-37260 Monts (France); Duverger, Francois; Dubourg, Sebastien [CEA, DAM, Le Ripault, F-37260 Monts (France)

    2011-06-15

    We study soft magnetic bilayers having orthogonal, in-plane easy axes. The layers are thicker than the Bloch wall width linked to the anisotropy, so that a helical magnetization with a large angle exists across the sample thickness. The magnetic domains structure has been investigated at both sample surfaces, using magneto-optical microscopy. The domain structure is found to be similar to that of double films with biquadratic coupling. Two kinds of domain walls are identified, namely with a 90{sup o} and 180{sup o} rotation of the average magnetization. The detailed structure and energy of these walls are studied by micromagnetic calculations. - Research highlights: This paper is devoted to the peculiar domain structure resulting from an anisotropy distribution in the thickness of the sample, realized through specific elaboration conditions. The helical magnetization profile obtained leads to a complex dynamic behaviour described and modelled in Phys.Rev. B 80, 134412 (published in October 2009) which has been already cited three times. This paper sheds light on of the demagnetized state of such samples: a variety of domains structure has been observed by Kerr microscopy, under various saturation fields. The most striking conclusion is driven by the analysis of the magnetization process which implies the co-existence of two types of domain walls in the sample, with four possible directions for the mean magnetization. The magnetization profile of the two walls has been confirmed by numerical simulation.

  10. Seismic strengthening of RC structures with exterior shear walls

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hasan Kaplan; Salih Yilmaz; Nihat Cetinkaya; Ergin Atimtay

    2011-02-01

    Vulnerable buildings and their rehabilitation are important problems for earthquake regions. In recent decades the goal of building rehabilitation and strengthening has gained research attention and numerous techniques have been developed to achieve this. However, most of these strengthening techniques disturb the occupants, who must vacate the building during renovation. In this study, a new strengthening alternative for RC structures, namely exterior shear walls, has been experimentally investigated under reversed cyclic loading. Using the proposed technique, it is possible to strengthen structures without disturbing their users or vacating the building during renovation. In this technique, shear walls are installed in parallel to the building’s exterior sides. It has been observed that the usage of exterior shear walls considerably improve the capacity and sway stiffness of RC structures. The experimental results have also been compared and found to be in agreement with the numerical solutions. Post attached exterior shear walls behaved as a monolithic member of the structure. Design considerations for the exterior shear wall-strengthened buildings have also been discussed in the paper.

  11. Congenital aortic regurgitation in a child with a tricuspid non-stenotic aortic valve.

    OpenAIRE

    Hashimoto, R; Miyamura, H; Eguchi, S

    1984-01-01

    After follow up for seven years a 10 year old boy with congenital aortic regurgitation was found to have a tricuspid non-stenotic aortic valve at operation. The right coronary cusp was dysplastic, thickened, and contracted; the gap between its free margin and aortic wall was bridged with two fibrous bands; and the left coronary and non-coronary cusps were almost normal. The aortic valve was replaced with a prosthesis (St Jude Medical No 23), and the postoperative course was uneventful.

  12. Structure of ductile iron in thin walled castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Górny

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available It this work it has been shown that it is possible to produce thin wall ductile iron (TWDI castings with considerably length using Archimedes spiral with wall thickness of 1, 2 and 3 mm. Inmould technique was used to produce TWDI. It has been estimated castability and metallographic investigations were made using different moulding materials. From castability measurements result that it is possible to obtain thin wall ductile iron castings with wall thickness down to 1 mm with castability of 200 mm. Using mould with small ability to absorb heat castability increases twice. At wall thickness equal 3 mm castability reaches 1000 mm and using LDASC sand its value increases to over 1500 mm. Structure parameters for different wall thickness and moulding materials (graphite nodule count, ferrite and cementite fraction are plotted versus distance from the beginning of spiral. It is shown strong influence of LDASC sand (material with small ability to absorb heat on structure parameters (NF, Vf i VC revealing gradient character of TWDI.

  13. Effect of age on aortic atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael A. Chen; Miwa Kawakubo; Patrick M. Colletti; Dongxiang Xu; Laurie LaBree Dustin; Robert Detrano; Stanley P Azen; Nathan D. Wong; Xue-Qiao Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the association of atherosclerosis burden in the survivors of an asymptomatic elderly cohort study and its relationship to other coronary risk factors (specifically, age) by evaluating aortic atherosclerotic wall burden by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods A total of 312 participants in an ongoing observational cohort study underwent cardiac and descending thoracic aorta imaging by MRI. Maximum wall thickness was measured and the mean wall thickness calculated. Wall/outer wall ratio was used as a normalized wall index (NWI) adjusted for artery size difference among participants. Percent wall volume (PWV) was calculated as NWI × 100. Results In this asymptomatic cohort (mean age: 76 years), the mean (SD) aortic wall area and wall thickness were 222 ± 45 mm2 and 2.7 ± 0.4 mm, respectively. Maximum wall thickness was 3.4 ± 0.6 mm, and PWV was 32% ± 4%. Women appeared to have smaller wall area, but after correcting for their smaller artery size, had significantly higher PWV than men (P = 0.03). Older age was associated with larger wall area (P = 0.04 for trend) with similar PWVs. However, there were no statistically significant associations between standard risk factors, Framingham global risk, or metabolic syndrome status, therapy for cholesterol or hypertension, coronary or aortic calcium score, and the aortic wall burden. Aortic calcification was associated with coronary calcification. Conclusions Asymptomatic elderly in this cohort had a greater descending thoracic aortic wall volume that correlated with age, and women had a significantly increased PWV compared to men. In these survivors, the atherosclerotic aortic wall burden was not significantly associated with traditional risk factors or with coronary or aortic calcium scores or coronary calcium progression. Results suggest that age, or as yet unidentified risk factor(s), may be responsible for the increase in atherosclerosis.

  14. Partition wall structure in spent fuel storage pool and construction method for the partition wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A partitioning wall for forming cask pits as radiation shielding regions by partitioning inside of a spent fuel storage pool is prepared by covering both surface of a concrete body by shielding metal plates. The metal plate comprises opposed plate units integrated by welding while sandwiching a metal frame as a reinforcing material for the concrete body, the lower end of the units is connected to a floor of a pool by fastening members, and concrete is set while using the metal plate of the units as a frame to form the concrete body. The shielding metal plate has a double walled structure formed by welding a lining plate disposed on the outer surface of the partition wall and a shield plate disposed to the inner side. Then the term for construction can be shortened, and the capacity for storing spent fuels can be increased. (N.H.)

  15. Glucuronoarabinoxylan structure in the walls of Aechmea leaf chlorenchyma cells is related to wall strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceusters, Johan; Londers, Elsje; Brijs, Kristof; Delcour, Jan A; De Proft, Maurice P

    2008-09-01

    In CAM-plants rising levels of malic acid in the early morning cause elevated turgor pressures in leaf chlorenchyma cells. Under specific conditions this process is lethal for sensitive plants resulting in chlorenchyma cell burst while other species can cope with these high pressures and do not show cell burst under comparable conditions. The non-cellulosic polysaccharide composition of chlorenchyma cell walls was investigated and compared in three cultivars of Aechmea with high sensitivity for chlorenchyma cell burst and three cultivars with low sensitivity. Chlorenchyma layers were cut from the leaf and the non-cellulosic carbohydrate fraction of the cell wall fraction was analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography. Glucuronoarabinoxylans (GAXs) were the major non-cellulosic polysaccharides in Aechmea. The fine structure of these GAXs was strongly related to chlorenchyma wall strength. Chlorenchyma cell walls from cultivars with low sensitivity to cell burst were characterized by an A/X ratio of ca. 0.13 while those from cultivars with high sensitivity showed an A/X ratio of ca. 0.23. Xylose chains from cultivars with high cell burst sensitivity were ca. 40% more substituted with arabinose compared to cultivars with low sensitivity for cell burst. The results indicate a relationship in vivo between glucuronoarabinoxylan fine structure and chlorenchyma cell wall strength in Aechmea. The evidence obtained supports the hypothesis that GAXs with low degrees of substitution cross-link cellulose microfibrils, while GAXs with high degrees of substitution do not. A lower degree of arabinose substitution on the xylose backbone implies stronger cell walls and the possibility of withstanding higher internal turgor pressures without cell bursting. PMID:18632122

  16. Durability of thin-walled concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present document is to draw up a survey of knowledge of the problems of ageing of reinforced concrete shell structure atmospheric coolers. The exposure conditions are particularly favourable to the induction and development of degradation which, because of the thinness of the reinforced concrete can compromise the stability and the durability of coolers. The study will be axed on the link between the specific characteristics of coolers from the point of view of operation, design and environment, also the durability of reinforced concrete. The set of factors exerting their influence on the reinforced concrete of the shell structure (condensates, rain water, temperature and humidity gradients, dynamic loads, weathering, etc.) is particularly complex. The principal degradation reactions involved are classified according to the chemical and physical action on concrete and on the reinforcement. Particular emphasis is placed on the analysis of degradation processes and the influence of the characteristics of the materials and of the medium. The aim is to determine the mechanisms which present the greatest risk for coolers. The interaction between the degradation to concrete and the change in mechanical characteristics is also studied

  17. Hydatid cyst involving the aortic arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apaydin, Anil Z; Oguz, Emrah; Zoghi, Mehdi

    2007-03-01

    We report a very rare case of primary mediastinal hydatid cyst which invaded the ascending aorta and the aortic arch which initially presented as a cranial mass. Aortic wall is a very unusual site for the hydatid cysts. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of hydatid cyst located within the aortic arch lumen. Patient underwent ascending aortic and hemiarch replacement under hypothermic circulatory arrest and removal of the cyst. Patient had an uneventful recovery and has been on follow-up. Although the literature data are very limited, we believe that the aortic procedure of choice should be graft interpositon rather than patch repair. PMID:17215134

  18. Primary Cell Wall Structure in the Evolution of Land Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Investigation of the primary cell walls of lower plants improves our understanding of the cell biology of these organisms but also has the potential to improve our understanding of cell wall structure and function in angiosperms that evolved from lower plants. Cell walls were prepared from eight species, ranging from a moss to advanced gymnosperms, and subjected to sequential chemical extraction to separate the main polysaccharide fractions. The glycosyl compositions of these fractions were then determined by gas chromatography. The results were compared among the eight plants and among data from related studies reported in the existing published reports to identify structural features that have been either highly conserved or clearly modified during evolution. Among the highly conserved features are the presence of a cellulose framework, the presence of certain hemicelluloses such as xyloglucan, and the presence of rhamnogalacturonan Ⅱ, a domain in pectic polysaccharides. Among the modified features are the abundance of mannosyl-containing hemicelluloses and the presence of methylated sugars.

  19. Mirror Domain Structures Induced by Interlayer Magnetic Wall Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, W. S.; Li, S. P.; Lopez-Diaz, L.; Hatton, D. C.; Bland, J. A.

    2003-05-01

    We have found that during giant magnetoresistance measurements in ˜10×10 mm2 NiFe/Cu/Co continuous film spin-valve structures, the resistance value suddenly drops to its absolute minimum during the NiFe reversal. The results reveal that the alignment of all magnetic domains in the NiFe film follow exactly that of corresponding domains in the Co film for an appropriate applied field strength. This phenomenon is caused by trapping of the NiFe domain walls through the magnetostatic interaction with the Co domain-wall stray fields. Consequently, the interlayer domain-wall coupling induces a mirror domain structure in the magnetic trilayer.

  20. Double-walled carbon nanocones: stability and electronic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Elias; Freitas, Aliliane; Silva, Thiago; Guerra, Thiago; Azevedo, Sergio

    2015-06-01

    We have applied first-principles calculations, based on the density functional theory, to investigate the stability and electronic properties of double-walled carbon nanocones, 60°60°, 120°120° and 60°120° with different rotation angles between the walls. We have shown that the most favorable double-walled nanocone studied here is that of angles of 60°60°, with rotation angle of 36° and distance between apexes of 4.22 Å. We have found that, the interaction between the walls of rotated double-walled nanocones introduce geometric distortion in gap states, such as in Fermi level. These results should have consequences on the field emission properties of double-walled carbon nanocones. Additionally, we also investigated the spin polarization of such structures, and we have found unpaired electrons, which induces a total spin from 1 and 1/2 for 60°60° and 60°120° double cones, respectively.

  1. Structural characterization of heparan sulfate proteoglycan subclasses isolated from bovine aortic endothelial cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinsella, M.G.; Wight, T.N.

    1988-03-22

    Labeled heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) were isolated from wounded and confluent cultures of bovine aortic endothelial cells by nondegradative extraction with 4 M guanidine hydrochloride and detergent. HSPG were separated from more highly charged chondroitin or dermatan sulfate proteoglycans by ion-exchange chromatography, and subclasses of different hydrodynamic size were isolated by gel filtration. Three major subclasses of HSPG were characterized structurally with respect to the presence and relative size of protein core, the presence and amount of nonsulfated oligosaccharide, and size and structure of heparan sulfate (HS) chains. The largest (600-800-kDa) HSPG subclass (I), isolated from cell layers and media of confluent cultures, bears 38-kDa HS chains on an apparently heterogeneous class of relatively large glycoprotein cores. HSPG II (150-200 kDa), isolated from cell layer or media, has 22-kDa HS chains and smaller core glycoproteins (less than 50 kDa). HSPG III, the subclass of smallest hydrodynamic size, has 13-kDa HS chains and a glycopeptide core of less than 15 kDa. All subclasses bear varying proportions of non-sulfated oligosaccharides of similar sizes. Comparisons of HS chain structure indicated that the different subclasses have similar proportions (49-55%) of N-sulfate, with both O-sulfate and highly N-sulfated blocks of disaccharide distributed similarly along HS chains. In addition, HS chains from subclasses II and III contain sequences that are insensitive to periodate oxidation or heparitinase digestion, suggesting that they contain increased proportions of iduronate.

  2. Structural characterization of heparan sulfate proteoglycan subclasses isolated from bovine aortic endothelial cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labeled heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) were isolated from wounded and confluent cultures of bovine aortic endothelial cells by nondegradative extraction with 4 M guanidine hydrochloride and detergent. HSPG were separated from more highly charged chondroitin or dermatan sulfate proteoglycans by ion-exchange chromatography, and subclasses of different hydrodynamic size were isolated by gel filtration. Three major subclasses of HSPG were characterized structurally with respect to the presence and relative size of protein core, the presence and amount of nonsulfated oligosaccharide, and size and structure of heparan sulfate (HS) chains. The largest (600-800-kDa) HSPG subclass (I), isolated from cell layers and media of confluent cultures, bears 38-kDa HS chains on an apparently heterogeneous class of relatively large glycoprotein cores. HSPG II (150-200 kDa), isolated from cell layer or media, has 22-kDa HS chains and smaller core glycoproteins (less than 50 kDa). HSPG III, the subclass of smallest hydrodynamic size, has 13-kDa HS chains and a glycopeptide core of less than 15 kDa. All subclasses bear varying proportions of non-sulfated oligosaccharides of similar sizes. Comparisons of HS chain structure indicated that the different subclasses have similar proportions (49-55%) of N-sulfate, with both O-sulfate and highly N-sulfated blocks of disaccharide distributed similarly along HS chains. In addition, HS chains from subclasses II and III contain sequences that are insensitive to periodate oxidation or heparitinase digestion, suggesting that they contain increased proportions of iduronate

  3. X-ray structure of engineered human Aortic Preferentially Expressed Protein-1 (APEG-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheich Christoph

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Aortic Preferentially Expressed Protein-1 (APEG-1 is a novel specific smooth muscle differentiation marker thought to play a role in the growth and differentiation of arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs. Results Good quality crystals that were suitable for X-ray crystallographic studies were obtained following the truncation of the 14 N-terminal amino acids of APEG-1, a region predicted to be disordered. The truncated protein (termed ΔAPEG-1 consists of a single immunoglobulin (Ig like domain which includes an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD adhesion recognition motif. The RGD motif is crucial for the interaction of extracellular proteins and plays a role in cell adhesion. The X-ray structure of ΔAPEG-1 was determined and was refined to sub-atomic resolution (0.96 Å. This is the best resolution for an immunoglobulin domain structure so far. The structure adopts a Greek-key β-sandwich fold and belongs to the I (intermediate set of the immunoglobulin superfamily. The residues lying between the β-sheets form a hydrophobic core. The RGD motif folds into a 310 helix that is involved in the formation of a homodimer in the crystal which is mainly stabilized by salt bridges. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies revealed a moderate dissociation constant of 20 μM at physiological ionic strength, suggesting that APEG-1 dimerisation is only transient in the cell. The binding constant is strongly dependent on ionic strength. Conclusion Our data suggests that the RGD motif might play a role not only in the adhesion of extracellular proteins but also in intracellular protein-protein interactions. However, it remains to be established whether the rather weak dimerisation of APEG-1 involving this motif is physiogically relevant.

  4. Phenotypic and Functional Changes of Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Cells in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Malashicheva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic aortic aneurysm develops as a result of complex series of events that alter the cellular structure and the composition of the extracellular matrix of the aortic wall. The purpose of the present work was to study the cellular functions of endothelial and smooth muscle cells from the patients with aneurysms of the thoracic aorta. We studied endothelial and smooth muscle cells from aneurysms in patients with bicuspid aortic valve and with tricuspid aortic valve. The expression of key markers of endothelial (CD31, vWF, and VE-cadherin and smooth muscle (SMA, SM22α, calponin, and vimentin cells as well extracellular matrix and MMP activity was studied as well as and apoptosis and cell proliferation. Expression of functional markers of endothelial and smooth muscle cells was reduced in patient cells. Cellular proliferation, migration, and synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins are attenuated in the cells of the patients. We show for the first time that aortic endothelial cell phenotype is changed in the thoracic aortic aneurysms compared to normal aortic wall. In conclusion both endothelial and smooth muscle cells from aneurysms of the ascending aorta have downregulated specific cellular markers and altered functional properties, such as growth rate, apoptosis induction, and extracellular matrix synthesis.

  5. Clinical trial of doxycycline for matrix metalloproteinase-9 inhibition in patients with an abdominal aneurysm doxycycline selectively depletes aortic wall neutrophils and cytotoxic t cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeman, J.H.N.; Abdul-Hussien, H.; Bockel, J.H. van; Wolterbeek, R.; Kleemann, R.

    2009-01-01

    Background-Doxycycline has been shown to effectively inhibit aneurysm formation in animal models of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Although this effect is ascribed to matrix metalloproteinase-9 inhibition, such an effect is unclear in human studies. We reevaluated the effect of doxycycline on aortic wal

  6. Structure of cellulose microfibrils in primary cell walls from Collenchyma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Thomas, L. H.; Forsyth, V. T.; Šturcová, Adriana; Kennedy, C. J.; May, R. P.; Altaner, C. M.; Apperley, D. C.; Wess, T. J.; Jarvis, M. C.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 161, č. 1 (2013), s. 465-476. ISSN 0032-0889 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/12/0703 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : primary cell wall * cellulose microfibril structure * chain packing disorder Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 7.394, year: 2013

  7. Magnetoresistance due to domain walls in semiconducting magnetic nano structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetoresistance of a semiconducting ferromagnetic nano structure with a laterally constrained domain wall is analyzed theoretically in the limit of sharp domain walls and fully polarized electron gas is considered. The spin-orbit interaction of Rash ba type is included into considerations. It is shown that the magnetoresistance in such a case can be relatively large, which is in a qualitative agreement with recent experimental observations. It is also shown that spin-orbit interaction can enhance the magnetoresistance. The role of localization corrections is also briefly discussed

  8. Magnetoresistance due to domain walls in semiconducting magnetic nano structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dugaev, V.K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany) and Institute for Problems of Materials Science, Vilde 5, 58001 Chernovtsy (Ukraine)]. E-mail: vdugaev@mpi-halle.de; Berakdar, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany); Barnas, J. [Department of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, ul. Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan, and Institute of Molecular Physics PAN, ul. M. Smoluchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznan (Poland); Dobrowolski, W. [Institute of Physics PAN, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Mitin, V.F. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, NANU, pr. Nauki, 03108 Kiev (Ukraine); Vieira, M. [ISEL-DEETC, Rua Cons. Emidio Navarro, 1950-062 Lisbon (Portugal)

    2005-12-15

    Magnetoresistance of a semiconducting ferromagnetic nano structure with a laterally constrained domain wall is analyzed theoretically in the limit of sharp domain walls and fully polarized electron gas is considered. The spin-orbit interaction of Rash ba type is included into considerations. It is shown that the magnetoresistance in such a case can be relatively large, which is in a qualitative agreement with recent experimental observations. It is also shown that spin-orbit interaction can enhance the magnetoresistance. The role of localization corrections is also briefly discussed.

  9. Material and structural instabilities of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Wu; K. C. Hwang; J. Song; Y. Huang

    2008-01-01

    The nonlinear atomistic interactions usually involve softening behavior. Instability resulting directly from this softening are called the material instability, while those unrelated to this softening are called the structural instability. We use the finite-deformation shell theory based on the interatomic potential to show that the tension instability of single-wall carbon nanotubes is the material instability, while the compression and torsion instabilities are structural instability.

  10. Cell wall structure and function in lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre; Kulakauskas, Saulius

    2014-08-29

    The cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria is a complex assemblage of glycopolymers and proteins. It consists of a thick peptidoglycan sacculus that surrounds the cytoplasmic membrane and that is decorated with teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. It plays a major role in bacterial physiology since it maintains cell shape and integrity during growth and division; in addition, it acts as the interface between the bacterium and its environment. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are traditionally and widely used to ferment food, and they are also the subject of more and more research because of their potential health-related benefits. It is now recognized that understanding the composition, structure, and properties of LAB cell walls is a crucial part of developing technological and health applications using these bacteria. In this review, we examine the different components of the Gram-positive cell wall: peptidoglycan, teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. We present recent findings regarding the structure and function of these complex compounds, results that have emerged thanks to the tandem development of structural analysis and whole genome sequencing. Although general structures and biosynthesis pathways are conserved among Gram-positive bacteria, studies have revealed that LAB cell walls demonstrate unique properties; these studies have yielded some notable, fundamental, and novel findings. Given the potential of this research to contribute to future applied strategies, in our discussion of the role played by cell wall components in LAB physiology, we pay special attention to the mechanisms controlling bacterial autolysis, bacterial sensitivity to bacteriophages and the mechanisms underlying interactions between probiotic bacteria and their hosts. PMID:25186919

  11. Structure of single-wall carbon nanotubes: a graphene helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Kap; Lee, Sohyung; Kim, Jin-Gyu; Min, Bong-Ki; Kim, Yong-Il; Lee, Kyung-Il; An, Kay Hyeok; John, Phillip

    2014-08-27

    Evidence is presented in this paper that certain single-wall carbon nanotubes are not seamless tubes, but rather adopt a graphene helix resulting from the spiral growth of a nano-graphene ribbon. The residual traces of the helices are confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The analysis also shows that the tubular graphene material may exhibit a unique armchair structure and the chirality is not a necessary condition for the growth of carbon nanotubes. The description of the structure of the helical carbon nanomaterials is generalized using the plane indices of hexagonal space groups instead of using chiral vectors. It is also proposed that the growth model, via a graphene helix, results in a ubiquitous structure of single-wall carbon nanotubes. PMID:24838196

  12. Ultrasound Evaluation of an Abdominal Aortic Fluid-Structure Interaction Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traberg, Marie Sand; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    Ultrasound measurements are used for evaluating biomechanics of the abdominal aorta (AA) predicted by a fluid- structure interaction (FSI) simulation model. FSI simulation models describe the complete arterial physiology by quantify- ing the mechanical response in the vessel wall caused by the...... agreement except for 1 volunteer (Male, 23 yrs.). The magnitude of the displacement in simulation, u fsi , and in vivo , u iv , is within the same order of magnitude for the young ( u iv = 1 : 48 mm, u fsi = 1 : 12 mm) and middle-aged volunteer ( u iv = 0 : 783 mm, u fsi = 1 : 31 mm). For the elderly...

  13. SSI response of a typical shear wall structure. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Simplified Methods project of the US NRC-funded Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) has as its goal the development of a methodology to perform routine seismic probabilistic risk assessments of commercial nuclear power plants. The study reported here develops calibration factors to relate best estimate response to design values accounting for approximations and simplifications in SSI analysis procedures. Nineteen cases were analyzed and in-structure response compared. The structure of interest was a typical shear wall structure. 6 references, 44 figures, 22 tables

  14. Electromagnetic simulation study of dielectric wall accelerator structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Quan-Tang; ZHANG Zi-Min; YUAN Ping; CAO Shu-Chun; SHEN Xiao-Kang; JING Yi; LIU Ming; ZHAO Hong-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Two types of dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) structures,a bi-polar Blumlein line and zero integral pulse line (ZIP) structures were investigated.The high gradient insulator simulated by the particle in cell code confirms that it has little influence on the axial electric field.The results of simulations using CST microwave studio indicate how the axial electric field is formed,and the electric field waveforms agree with the theoretical one very well.The influence of layer-to-layer coupling in a ZIP structure is much smaller and the electric field waveform is much better.The axial of the Blumlein structure's electric field has better axial stability.From both of the above,it found that for a shorter pulse width,the axial electric field is much higher and the pulse stability and fidelity are much better.The CST simulation is very helpful for designing DWA structures.

  15. SSI response of a typical shear wall structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seismic response of a typical shear structure in a commercial nuclear power plant was investigated for a series of site and foundation conditions using best estimate and design procedures. The structure selected is a part of the Zion AFT complex which is a connected group of reinforced concrete shear wall buildings, typical of nuclear power plant structures. Comparisons between best estimate responses quantified the effects of placing the structure on different sites and founding it in different manners. Calibration factors were developed by comparing simplified SSI design procedure responses to responses calculated by best estimate procedures. Nineteen basic cases were analyzed - each case was analyzed for ten earthquakes targeted to the NRC R.G. 1.60 design response spectra. The structure is a part of the Zion auxiliary-fuel handling turbine building (AFT) complex to the Zion nuclear power plants. (orig./HP)

  16. Aortic wall proteomic analysis in spontaneously hypertensive rats with a blood pressure decrease induced by 6-week load-free swimming

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Hong; Li, Haiying; ZHANG, DERONG; ZHAO, YUNGANG; Jiang, Ning; Zhao, Xiaoling; Zhang, Yu; TAN, JUNZHEN; Fang, Wen; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Decreased arterial compliance is one of the earliest detectable manifestations of adverse structural and functional changes within the vessel wall in hypertension. The proteomic approach is a powerful technique to analyze a complex mixture of proteins in various settings. Physical activity level was negatively associated with blood pressure. Sixteen 4-week-old male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and 16 Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were randomly divided into four groups: i) SHR exercise grou...

  17. Study on Seismic Behavior of Recycled Concrete Energy-efficient Homes Structure Wall

    OpenAIRE

    Dong Lan

    2016-01-01

    The main point is to study the seismic behavior of the lattice type recycled concrete energy saving wall under low-cyclic loading,to provide the basis for the seismic performance of application of recycled concrete lattice wall in energy-saving residential structure. Design two walls with the same structure measures, include Lattice type recycled concrete wall and natural concrete wall, they are tested under low-cycle repetitive loading, compared failure mode and seismic performance in differ...

  18. The structure and material composition of ossified aortic valves identified using a set of scientific methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zeman, Antonín; Šmíd, M.; Havelcová, Martina; Coufalová, L.; Kučková, S.; Velčovská, M.; Hynek, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 77, November (2013), s. 311-317. ISSN 1367-9120 Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) GA205/09/1162 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 ; RVO:67985891 Keywords : aortic stenosis * degenerative (calcification–sclerotic) changes * hydroxyapatite * proteins * cholesterol Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 2.831, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/13679120/77

  19. Acute aortic intramural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Oh Keun; Choi, Yo Won; Kim, Kwon Hyung; Jeon, Seok Chol; Park, Choong Kee; Seo, Heung Suk; Hahm, Chang Kok [Hanyang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-02-01

    To evaluate the radiologic findings of acute intramural hematoma of the aorta, and the clinical follow up thereof. Among 34 cases confirmed clinically and radiologically as aortic dissection, and analysis was carried out based on 15 cases in which intramural hematoma without false lumen was demonstrated, on initial CT, 12 cases of in which follow up CT was used and five cases involving an aortogram. Elements such as the shape of the thickened aortic wall, ulcer-like intimal defects, and intimal calcification were examined. Changes in these elements were also examined on follow-up CT. DeBackey types 1 and 3 accounted for one and 14 cases, respectively. Initial precontrast CT demonstrated continuous, crescentic high attenuation areas along the wall of the descending aorta. In postcontrast scans, the crescentic areas were of relatively lower-attenuation and appeared along the aorta wall. Displaced intimal calcifications were seen in nine of fifteen patients. There was no intimal flap on all five aortogram, while aortic wall thickening and atherosclerotic change were demonstrated in four cases and in one case, respectively. Focal ulcers were seen in three cases. Ulcer-like intimal defects were demonstrated in a total of eleven cases (eight on CT, two on aortogram, and one on both). In ten of the twelve cases seen on follow up CT, the thickness of the intramural hematoma was seen to be reduced. Among the 15 cases, the operation was performed in two cases, and the remaining 13 received conservative treatment. In ten cases observed for more than twelve months, a recurrence of symptoms did not occur. Eccentric aortic wall thickening in patients who complain of acute chest pain is the result of acute aortic dissection with intramural hematoma, or a penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer of the aorta. The later may be differentiated from the former by the presence of on ulcer-like intimal defect. When both diseases are limited to the descending aorta, conservative treatment may

  20. Acute aortic intramural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the radiologic findings of acute intramural hematoma of the aorta, and the clinical follow up thereof. Among 34 cases confirmed clinically and radiologically as aortic dissection, and analysis was carried out based on 15 cases in which intramural hematoma without false lumen was demonstrated, on initial CT, 12 cases of in which follow up CT was used and five cases involving an aortogram. Elements such as the shape of the thickened aortic wall, ulcer-like intimal defects, and intimal calcification were examined. Changes in these elements were also examined on follow-up CT. DeBackey types 1 and 3 accounted for one and 14 cases, respectively. Initial precontrast CT demonstrated continuous, crescentic high attenuation areas along the wall of the descending aorta. In postcontrast scans, the crescentic areas were of relatively lower-attenuation and appeared along the aorta wall. Displaced intimal calcifications were seen in nine of fifteen patients. There was no intimal flap on all five aortogram, while aortic wall thickening and atherosclerotic change were demonstrated in four cases and in one case, respectively. Focal ulcers were seen in three cases. Ulcer-like intimal defects were demonstrated in a total of eleven cases (eight on CT, two on aortogram, and one on both). In ten of the twelve cases seen on follow up CT, the thickness of the intramural hematoma was seen to be reduced. Among the 15 cases, the operation was performed in two cases, and the remaining 13 received conservative treatment. In ten cases observed for more than twelve months, a recurrence of symptoms did not occur. Eccentric aortic wall thickening in patients who complain of acute chest pain is the result of acute aortic dissection with intramural hematoma, or a penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer of the aorta. The later may be differentiated from the former by the presence of on ulcer-like intimal defect. When both diseases are limited to the descending aorta, conservative treatment may

  1. Domain wall structure transformations in epitaxial ferrite garnet films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic characteristics of domain walls (DW) in the process of the transformation of their structure occuring under the static field effect in the film plane are investigated. The epitaxiat ferrite-garnet film of the (YSmBa)3(FeGa)5O12 composition with parameters: 4πM=178 Gs (M=saturation magnetization), quality factor approximately equal to 10, thickness = 6.5 μm, band domain structure period = 13.5 μm has been studied. The signal of DW resonance oscillations excited by radio-frequency field with amplitude 0.01:1 Oe, oscillating along the slight magnetization axis perpendicular to the film plane has been observed. The constant magnetic field, H, in the film plane is oriented along the DW and is used not only for the transformation of DW structure but also for changing its resonance frequency by changing it effective mass. The results presented testify to the fact that the resonance methods may be successfully used not only for studying the DW dynamics but also for investigating into the domain wall structure and the process of its transformation

  2. Aortic stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droc, Ionel; Calinescu, Francisca Blanca; Droc, Gabriela; Blaj, Catalin; Dammrau, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    The approach to aortic pathology is nowadays more and more endovascular at both thoracic and abdominal levels. Thoracic stenting has gained worldwide acceptance as first intention to treat pathologies of the descending thoracic aorta. Indications have been extended to aortic arch aneurysms and also to diseases of the ascending aorta. The current devices in use for thoracic endovascular repair (TEVAR) are Medtronic Valiant, Gore TAG, Cook Tx2 and Jotec. The choice of the endograft depends on the thoracic aortic pathology and the anatomical suitability. The technological evolution of the abdominal aortic endografts was very rapid, arriving now at the fourth generation. We report the results of 55 elective cases of endovascular abdominal aortic repair (EVAR) performed in two vascular surgical centers in Romania and Germany. The prostheses used were 16 E-vita Abdominal XT, 12 Excluder, eight Talent, seven PowerLink, three Endurant and nine custom-made, fenestrated or branched from Jotec. The mean follow-up was 18 months with CT-scan, duplex ultrasound and contrast-enhanced ultrasound. The mortality was 2%. EVAR tends to become the gold standard for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Technological development of the devices with lowest profile introduction systems will permit to extend the anatomical indications to new frontiers. PMID:26200430

  3. The Dynamic Similitude Design Method of Thin Walled Structures and Experimental Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Luo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For the applicability of dynamic similitude models of thin walled structures, such as engine blades, turbine discs, and cylindrical shells, the dynamic similitude design of typical thin walled structures is investigated. The governing equation of typical thin walled structures is firstly unified, which guides to establishing dynamic scaling laws of typical thin walled structures. Based on the governing equation, geometrically complete scaling law of the typical thin walled structure is derived. In order to determine accurate distorted scaling laws of typical thin walled structures, three principles are proposed and theoretically proved by combining the sensitivity analysis and governing equation. Taking the thin walled annular plate as an example, geometrically complete and distorted scaling laws can be obtained based on the principles of determining dynamic scaling laws. Furthermore, the previous five orders’ accurate distorted scaling laws of thin walled annular plates are presented and numerically validated. Finally, the effectiveness of the similitude design method is validated by experimental annular plates.

  4. Cyclic creep damage in thin-walled structures

    OpenAIRE

    Altenbach, H.; Breslavsky, D.; Morachkovsky, O.; Naumenko, K.

    2000-01-01

    Thin-walled structural elements are often subjected to cyclic loadings. This paper presents a material model describing creep behaviour under high-cycle loading conditions (N greater than or equal to 5 x 10(4)-10(5)). Assuming that the load can be split into two joint acting parts (a static and a superposed, rapidly varying small cyclic component), the asymptotic expansion of two time-scales has been applied to the governing equations of the initial-boundary value creep problem. The system of...

  5. Stress analysis for wall structure in mobile hot cell design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahrin, Muhammad Hannan, E-mail: hannan@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Rahman, Anwar Abdul, E-mail: anwar@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Hamzah, Mohd Arif, E-mail: arif@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Mamat, Mohd Rizal; Azman, Azraf; Hasan, Hasni [Prototype and Plant Development Centre, Technical Services Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    Malaysian Nuclear Agency is developing a Mobile Hot Cell (MHC) in order to handle and manage Spent High Activity Radioactive Sources (SHARS) such as teletherapy heads and irradiators. At present, there are only two units of MHC in the world, in South Africa and China. Malaysian Mobile Hot cell is developed by Malaysian Nuclear Agency with the assistance of IAEA expert, based on the design of South Africa and China, but with improved features. Stress analysis has been performed on the design in order to fulfil the safety requirement in operation of MHC. This paper discusses the loading analysis effect from the sand to the MHC wall structure.

  6. Spectrum of Aortic Valve Abnormalities Associated with Aortic Dilation Across Age Groups in Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, Laura J.; Baba, Ridhwan Y.; Arai, Andrew E.; Bandettini, W. Patricia; Rosing, Douglas R.; Bakalov, Vladimir; Sachdev, Vandana; Bondy, Carolyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Congenital aortic valve fusion is associated with aortic dilation, aneurysm and rupture in girls and women with Turner syndrome (TS). Our objective was to characterize aortic valve structure in subjects with TS, and determine the prevalence of aortic dilation and valve dysfunction associated with different types of aortic valves. Methods and Results The aortic valve and thoracic aorta were characterized by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in 208 subjects with TS in an IRB-approved natural history study. Echocardiography was used to measure peak velocities across the aortic valve, and the degree of aortic regurgitation. Four distinct valve morphologies were identified: tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) 64%(n=133), partially fused aortic valve (PF) 12%(n=25), bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) 23%(n=47), and unicuspid aortic valve (UAV) 1%(n=3). Age and body surface area (BSA) were similar in the 4 valve morphology groups. There was a significant trend, independent of age, towards larger BSA-indexed ascending aortic diameters (AADi) with increasing valve fusion. AADi were (mean +/− SD) 16.9 +/− 3.3 mm/m2, 18.3 +/− 3.3 mm/m2, and 19.8 +/− 3.9 mm/m2 (p<0.0001) for TAV, PF and BAV+UAV respectively. PF, BAV, and UAV were significantly associated with mild aortic regurgitation and elevated peak velocities across the aortic valve. Conclusions Aortic valve abnormalities in TS occur with a spectrum of severity, and are associated with aortic root dilation across age groups. Partial fusion of the aortic valve, traditionally regarded as an acquired valve problem, had an equal age distribution and was associated with an increased AADi. PMID:24084490

  7. Clinical application of CT virtual endoscopy in the diagnosis of aortic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the display ability and the clinical application of CT virtual endoscopy (CTVE) in the diagnosis of aortic disease. Methods: In this group, 147 cases with clinically suspected aortic disease (113 males, 34 females) underwent CTVE and 58 cases had DSA for comparison. 37 cases were confirmed by operation. Results: (1) In the 147 cases, 139 cases showed successful CTVE images. (2) CTVE images could clearly show the inner wall and inner structures of the vessels, the true and false luminal of aortic dissections, and the lesion of false aneurysm. Conclusion: CTVE could provide more information of the vessel by displaying the inner wall and allowing users to map the vessels in a display. It is helpful in correct diagnosis and guiding surgery

  8. Developmental programming of aortic and renal structure in offspring of rats fed fat-rich diets in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armitage, James A.; Lakasing, Lorin; Taylor, Paul D.;

    2005-01-01

    weight, glomerular number or volume in OHF compared with OC, but renin and Na+,K+-ATPase activity were significantly reduced in OHF compared with controls. Programmed alterations to aortic structure and function are consistent with previous observations that exposure to maternal high fat diets produces......Evidence from human and animal studies suggests that maternal nutrition can induce developmental programming of adult hypertension in offspring. We have previously described a model of maternal dietary imbalance in Sprague-Dawley rats whereby administration of a maternal diet rich in animal lard...... programmes the development of increased blood pressure, insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia, obesity and mesenteric artery endothelial dysfunction in adult offspring. To further characterize the mechanism of hypertension in this model we have examined vascular and renal structure in adult offspring of Sprague...

  9. Structural optimization of the blanket first wall to reduce thermal stress using the Taguchi method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first wall of a fusion reactor blanket faces the core plasma directly. The first wall endures high heat loads that lead to high thermal stresses. To ensure the reliability of the first wall structure, it is desirable to reduce the thermal stress. In this study, structural optimization of the blanket first wall was carried out using the Taguchi method. The finite element method was used to conduct a numerical simulation to investigate the thermo-mechanical responses of the blanket first wall. The optimal configuration of the blanket first wall was derived. (author)

  10. Contemporary Management of Type B Aortic Dissection in the Endovascular Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannazadeh, Mohsen; Tadros, Rami O; McKinsey, James; Chander, Rajiv; Marin, Michael L; Faries, Peter L

    2016-04-01

    Aortic dissection (AD) is one of the most common catastrophic pathologies affecting the aorta. Anatomic classification is based on the origin of entry tear and its extension. Type A dissections originate in the ascending aorta, whereas the entry tear in Type B dissections starts distal to the left subclavian artery. The patients with aortic dissection who manifest complications such as rupture, malperfusion, aneurysmal degeneration, and intractable pain are classified as complicated AD. Risk factors for developing aortic dissection include age, male gender, and aortic wall structural abnormalities. The most common presenting symptom of acute aortic dissection is pain. Malperfusion occurs as a result of end-organ ischemia due to involvement of aortic branches from the dissecting process. This can happen in various locations causing mesenteric ischemia (mesenteric vessels), stroke (aortic arch vessels), renal failure (renal arteries), spinal ischemia, and limb ischemia (iliac or subclavian arteries). Aneurysmal degeneration is the most common complication of patients with chronic Type B dissection who are managed with medical therapy. Management of Type B aortic dissection (TBAD) remains controversial. Many groups recommend conservative therapy for newly diagnosed TBAD and reserve surgical management for patients who develop complications such as rupture, malperfusion, aneurysmal dilatation, and refractory pain. The mainstay of medical therapy includes antihypertensive medication to reduced ΔP/ ΔT by lowering blood pressure and heart rate. With the continued success of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR), this procedure has been extended to treat TBAD in selected patients. The outcomes of TEVAR are promising, with early mortality rates from 10% to 20%. With promising results from these series, some groups recommend early TEVAR in uncomplicated TBAD to prevent future adverse events. The goals of endovascular treatment of TBAD are to cover the entry tear

  11. Structure-property relationships in vegetable cell wall suspensions

    OpenAIRE

    Sankaran, Ashwin Karthik

    2015-01-01

    Plant cell wall suspensions are widely present in daily food, such as soups, dressings and sauces. Cell walls of edible plants are made up of an intricate biopolymer network of mainly cellulose microfibrils, pectins, and hemicelluloses. Foodsnbsp;as soups, ketchup, etc are made up of cell wall components. Modern processing methods alter the chemical and physical nature of the cell wall which in turn affect the properties of the end product. There is a need in the industry to build a fundament...

  12. Experimental Study and Numerical Simulation of Hypervelocity Projectile Impact on Double-Wall Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈沿海; 张庆明; 黄风雷

    2004-01-01

    Tests of hypervelocity projectile impact on double-wall structure were performed with the front wall ranging from 0.5 mm to 2.0 mm thick and different impact velocities. Smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code in LS-DYNA was employed for the simulation of hypervelocity impact on the double-wall structure. By using elementary shock wave theory, the experimental results above are analyzed. The analysis can provide an explanation for the penetration mechanism of hypervelocity projectile impact on double-wall structure about the effect of front wall thickness and impact velocity.

  13. Effect of wall structure on pebble stagnation behavior in pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • DEM study of wall structure role in preventing near wall crystallization is carried out. • Suggestions on pebble’s kinematic parameters and wall structure design are provided. • Triangle is better than arc and sawtooth shapes for wall structure design. • Wall structure size should be close to the scale of pebble diameter. • Suitable intervals can prevent crystallization without significantly increasing the flow resistance. - Abstract: Crystallization of pebbles in pebble bed is a crucial problem in high temperature gas-cooled pebble-bed reactors. This phenomenon usually happens along the internal surface and leads to a large number of stagnated pebbles, which poses a threat to reactor safety. In real reactor engineering, wall structures have been utilized to avoid this problem. This article verifies the crystallization phenomenon through DEM (discrete element method) simulation, and explains how wall structures work in preventing crystallization. Moreover, several kinematic parameters have been adopted to evaluate wall structures with different shapes, sizes and intervals. Detailed information shows the impact of wall structure on flow field in pebble bed. Lastly, the preferred characteristics of an effective wall structure are suggested for reactor engineering

  14. 18F-FDG PET-CT uptake is a feature of both normal diameter and aneurysmal aortic wall and is not related to aneurysm size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aortic metabolic activity is suggested to correlate with presence and progression of aneurysmal disease, but has been inadequately studied. This study investigates the 2-[18F] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) uptake in a population of infra-renal abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), compared to a matched non-aneurysmal control group. The Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography (PET/CT) database was searched for infra-renal AAA. Exclusion criteria were prior repair, vasculitis, and saccular/mycotic thoracic or thoraco-abdominal aneurysms. Matching of 159 non-aneurysmal (max) and target to background mediastinal blood pool ratio (TBR) were documented. Predictors of FDG uptake (age, sex, aortic diameter, hypertension, statin use, and diabetes) were assessed using univariate analysis. Follow-up questionnaires were sent to referring clinicians. Aneurysms (n = 151) and controls (n = 159) were matched (p > 0.05) for age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, smoking status, statin use, and indication for PET/CT. Median aneurysm diameter was 5.0 cm (range 3.2-10.4). On visual analysis there was no significant difference in the overall numbers with increased visual uptake 24 % (36/151) in the aneurysm group vs. 19 % (30/159) in the controls, p = ns. SUVmax was slightly lower in the aneurysm group vs. controls (mean (2 SD) 1.75(0.79) vs. 1.84(0.58), p = 0.02). However there was no difference in TBR between the AAA group and controls (mean (2 SD) 1.03 (0.46) vs. 1.05(0.31), p = 0.36). During a median 18 (interquartile range 8-35) months' follow-up 20 were repaired and four were confirmed ruptured. The level of metabolic activity as assessed by 18F-FDG PET/CT in infra-renal AAA does not correlate with aortic size and does not differ between aneurysms and matched controls. (orig.)

  15. Elastoplastic analysis of thin-walled structures in reservoir area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段绍伟; 罗迎社; 朱育雄

    2008-01-01

    In the structural design of the high pier,in order to analyze the strength and structure stability,the pier was often considered a thin-walled structure.Elastoplastic incremental theory was used to establish the model of elastoplastic stability of high pier.By considering the combined action of pile,soil and pier together,the destabilization bearing capacity was calculated by using 3-D finite element method(3-D FEM) for piers with different pile and section height.Meanwhile,the equivalent stress in different sections of pier was computed and the processor of destabilization was discussed.When the pier is lower,the bearing capacity under mutual effect of pile,soil and pier is less than the situation when mutual effect is not considered;when the pier is higher,their differences are not conspicuous.Along with the increase of the cross-sectional height,the direction of destabilization bearing capacity is varied and the ultimate capacity is buildup.The results of a stability analysis example are almost identical with the practice.

  16. wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad Kashif

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining indoor climatic conditions of buildings compatible with the occupant comfort by consuming minimum energy, especially in a tropical climate becomes a challenging problem for researchers. This paper aims to investigate this problem by evaluating the effect of different kind of Photovoltaic Trombe wall system (PV-TW on thermal comfort, energy consumption and CO2 emission. A detailed simulation model of a single room building integrated with PV-TW was modelled using TRNSYS software. Results show that 14-35% PMV index and 26-38% PPD index reduces as system shifted from SPV-TW to DGPV-TW as compared to normal buildings. Thermal comfort indexes (PMV and PPD lie in the recommended range of ASHARE for both DPV-TW and DGPV-TW except for the few months when RH%, solar radiation intensity and ambient temperature were high. Moreover PVTW system significantly reduces energy consumption and CO2 emission of the building and also 2-4.8 °C of temperature differences between indoor and outdoor climate of building was examined.

  17. Ang II enhances noradrenaline release from sympathetic nerve endings thus contributing to the up-regulation of metalloprotease-2 in aortic dissection patients' aorta wall.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhipeng Hu

    Full Text Available OBJECT: To test the hypothesis that angiotensin II (Ang II could enhance noradrenaline (NA release from sympathetic nerve endings of the aorta thus contributing to the up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2 during the formation of aortic dissection (AD. METHODS: Ang II, NA, MMP-2, MMP-9 of the aorta sample obtained during operation from aortic dissection patients were detected by High Performance Liquid Chromatography and ELISA and compared with controls. Isotope labelling method was used to test the impact of exogenous Ang II and noradrenaline on the NA release and MMP-2, MMP-9 expression on Sprague Dawley (SD rat aorta rings in vitro. Two kidneys, one clip, models were replicated for further check of that impact in SD rats in vivo. RESULTS: The concentration of Ang II, MMP-2, 9 was increased and NA concentration was decreased in aorta samples from AD patients. Exogenous Ang II enhanced while exogenous NA restrained NA release from aortic sympathetic endings. The Ang II stimulated NA release and the following MMP-2 up-regulation could be weakened by Losartan and chemical sympathectomy. Beta blocker did not influence NA release but down-regulated MMP-2. Long term in vivo experiments confirmed that Ang II could enhance NA release and up-regulate MMP-2. CONCLUSIONS: AD is initiated by MMP-2 overexpression as a result of increased NA release from sympathetic nervous endings in response to Ang II. This indicates an interaction of RAS and SAS during the formation of AD.

  18. Earthquake-induced shear concentration in shear walls above transfer structures

    OpenAIRE

    Su, RKL; Cheng, MH

    2009-01-01

    Due to various architectural constraints and multi-functional requirements for modern buildings, combined structural forms, which typically include shear wall systems in higher zones and moment-resisting frames together with core walls in lower zones, are commonly used for these buildings. Transfer structures are often introduced to transfer the loads from higher to lower zones. Previous experimental and numerical studies have demonstrated that the exterior walls above the transfer structure ...

  19. Xyloglucans from flaxseed kernel cell wall: Structural and conformational characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Huihuang H; Cui, Steve W; Goff, H Douglas; Chen, Jie; Guo, Qingbin; Wang, Qi

    2016-10-20

    The structure of ethanol precipitated fraction from 1M KOH extracted flaxseed kernel polysaccharides (KPI-EPF) was studied for better understanding the molecular structures of flaxseed kernel cell wall polysaccharides. Based on methylation/GC-MS, NMR spectroscopy, and MALDI-TOF-MS analysis, the dominate sugar residues of KPI-EPF fraction comprised of (1,4,6)-linked-β-d-glucopyranose (24.1mol%), terminal α-d-xylopyranose (16.2mol%), (1,2)-α-d-linked-xylopyranose (10.7mol%), (1,4)-β-d-linked-glucopyranose (10.7mol%), and terminal β-d-galactopyranose (8.5mol%). KPI-EPF was proposed as xyloglucans: The substitution rate of the backbone is 69.3%; R1 could be T-α-d-Xylp-(1→, or none; R2 could be T-α-d-Xylp-(1→, T-β-d-Galp-(1→2)-α-d-Xylp-(1→, or T-α-l-Araf-(1→2)-α-d-Xylp-(1→; R3 could be T-α-d-Xylp-(1→, T-β-d-Galp-(1→2)-α-d-Xylp-(1→, T-α-l-Fucp-(1→2)-β-d-Galp-(1→2)-α-d-Xylp-(1→, or none. The Mw of KPI-EPF was calculated to be 1506kDa by static light scattering (SLS). The structure-sensitive parameter (ρ) of KPI-EPF was calculated as 1.44, which confirmed the highly branched structure of extracted xyloglucans. This new findings on flaxseed kernel xyloglucans will be helpful for understanding its fermentation properties and potential applications. PMID:27474598

  20. DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF HIGH RISE STRUCTURES UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF DISCRETE STAGGERED SHEAR WALLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. B. KAMESHWARI

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available It is well-established fact that shear walls are quite effective in lateral load resistance of low-rise to medium-rise reinforced concrete buildings. Restriction in the architectural design by the presence of the shear walls may contribute to discourage the engineers from adopting the shear walls. Due to this a new concept ofproviding storey deep and bay wide discrete staggered shear wall panels have been introduced. In this study, the effect of various configurations of shear walls on high-rise structure is analysed. The drift and inter-storey drift of the structure in the following configurations of shear wall panels is studied and is compared with that of bare frame: (1 Conventional shear walls. (2 Alternate arrangement of shear walls. (3 Diagonal arrangement of shear walls. (4 Zigzag arrangement of shear walls. (5 Influence of lift core walls. Of the configurations studied, the zigzag shear wall configuration is found to be better than the other systems studied in controlling the response to earthquake loading. The diagonal configuration is found to be having significant role in controlling the response of structures to earthquake.

  1. [Sudden deaths due to non-traumatic aortic aneurysms rupture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bury, Anna; Meissner, Ewa; Szram, Stefan; Berent, Jarosław

    2011-01-01

    In this work we review two cases of ruptured aortic aneurysms which arose from congenital abnormalities of the aortic wall structure. In the first case, a 16-year old, previously untreated boy died, with no previous symptoms of an aortic aneurysm. The boy was suspected of taking drugs and even of committing suicide. A young couple found the boy's body in the wood close to the bus stop. There were no signs of violence on the corpse and the body was fully and properly dressed. The autopsy revealed enlarged (true aneurysm) and ruptured ascending aorta with about 700 ml of blood in the pericardial sac. Toxicological examination was negative. Histopathology showed abnormalities in the structure of the wall of aorta in the place of the rupture. All other body organs and vessels seemed to be normal and properly developed except the thoracic aorta, and no other morphologic abnormalities were present. In the second case, the corpse of a 30-year-old man was found in his apartment (he lived with his parents). The parents claimed he did not use drugs or alcohol. The autopsy, as in the previous case, revealed a ruptured true aneurysm of the ascending aorta with 370 g of blood in the pericardial sac. The concaved thoracic cavity was also observed. After the autopsy, the man's parents reported that in childhood, their son was diagnosed to suffer from Marfan syndrome. PMID:22715682

  2. Study the Effectiveof Seismic load on Behavior of Shear Wall in Frame Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.Hadi Hosseini

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Structural walls, or shear walls, are elements used to resist lateral loads, such as those generated by wind and earthquakes. Structural walls are considerably deeper than typical beams or columns. This attribute gives structural walls considerable in-plane stiffness which makes structural walls a natural choice for resisting lateral loads. In addition to considerable strength, structural walls can dissipate a great deal of energy if detailed properly. Walls are an invaluable structural element when protecting buildings from seismic events. Buildings often rely on structural walls as the main lateral force resisting system. Shear walls are required to perform in multiple ways. Shear walls can then be designed to limit building damage to the specified degree. The load-deformation response of the structural walls must be accurately predicted and related to structural damage in order to achieve these performance goals under loading events of various magnitudes. The applied load is generally transferred to the wall by a diaphragm or collector or drag member. The performance of the framed buildings depends on the structural system adopted for the structure The term structural system or structural frame in structural engineering refers to load-resisting sub-system of a structure. The structural system transfers loads through interconnected structural components or members. These structural systems need to be chosen based on its height and loads and need to be carried out, etc. The selection of appropriate structural systems for building must satisfy both strength and stiffness requirements. The structural system must be adequate to resist lateral and gravity loads that cause horizontal shear deformation and overturning deformation. The efficiency of a structural system is measured in terms of their ability to resist lateral load, which increases with the height of the frame. A building can be considered as tall when the effect of lateral loads is

  3. An abdominal aortic calcification as a RISK FACTOR FOR cardio -cerebral events in patients with peripheral arterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Zelinskiy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. The patients with abdominal aortic calcification have a high risk of cardiocerebral events, but the pathways of them have not been reported so far. The goal of our study was to assess the structure and function of myocardium and to determine the morphological features of carotid artery atherosclerosis in patients with abdominal aortic calcification.Materials and methods. A total of 167 executive patients with peripheral arterial disease were enrolled in study. The study group included 85 patients with abdominal aortic calcification (men – 95.3 %; age median was – 66.6 ± 12. Control group included 82 patients without objective signs of abdominal aortic calcification. Abdominal aortic calcification was detected by CT imaging. All patients have undergone echocardiography and duplex scanning of carotid arteries.Results. Prevalence and severity of ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease were statistically significant higher in patients with abdominal aortic calcification (91.7, 65.8 % vs. 67, 37.3 % (р < 0.01. We have found statistically significant differences between groupsin heart structure and function. A high left ventricular wall thickness (р < 0.01, left atrium dilation (р < 0.01 and enhanced of left ventricular mass (р < 0.05, ejection fraction reduction (р < 0.05 and more common diastolic dysfunction (р < 0.05 were determined inpatients with abdominal aortic calcification. An intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery was significantly higher in study group patients (1.38 ± 0.07 mm vs. 1.14 ± 0.06 mm (р < 0.001.Conclusion. Our findings suggested that abdominal aortic calcification is main reason of hypertrophy and dilation in the left heart due to enhanced peripheral resistance. Hypertrophy and dilation in the left heart is provided a high risk of cardiovascular events in patients withabdominal aortic calcification.

  4. [Esophageal wall structure in people of elderly and senile age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    aminova, G G; Grigorenko, D E; Sapin, M R; Mkhitarov, V A

    2014-01-01

    Using histological methods, the esophageal wall structure and the cytoarchitectonics of mucous membrane were studied in the individuals of elderly (n = 5) and senile (n = 10) age. The control group included the individuals of I (n = 3) and II (n = 3) periods of mature age. It was demonstrated that with advancing age in most cases the destructive processes took place in the epithelium (delamination of the layer, separation of large fragments, formation of microerosions etc.) in most of the studied cases. Lymphocytes, neutrophils and eosinophils were found between the epithelial cells; the numbers of infiltrating cells was increased 2-3 times during aging. Mucosal lamina propria and the submucosa, in particular, were characterized by the thickening of the bundles of collagen fibers. A two-fold increase in the number of the cells of the fibroblast lineage was found. The number of leukocytes in the lamina propria was increased by the eldery age in the upper and lower parts of the esophagus (3.5 and 1.75 times respectively). The changes in lamina muscularis were manifested by its thinning, delamination and myocyte dissociation. Remodeling of the muscular tunic was less pronounced. The degree of changes increased distally and varied widely depending on the individual peculiarities. PMID:25282822

  5. Structural finite element analysis of ITER In-wall shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The In-wall shielding (IWS) located between two shells of the vacuum vessel is part of the vacuum vessel of ITER. The function of the IWS is to provide neutron shielding and to reduce toroidal field ripple. The IWS plates are fastened using M30 bolts to hold them securely and the IWS blocks are mounted to the support ribs using the brackets and M20 bolts. The paper presents a structural finite element analysis of one sample IWS block carried out using ANSYS* to establish the benchmark analysis procedure of the IWS blocks. Boundary conditions are set taking into account the assembly procedure of the IWS blocks. The analysis is carried out in three load steps (1). Pretension on M30 (2). Pretension on M30 and M20 and (3) pretension on M30 and M20 plus Electromagnetic forces, dynamic forces, Seismic forces, etc. The stresses and displacements of individual IWS components are evaluated against their allowable stress limits as per an ASME guideline. The ITER-India’s results of analysis are compared with the ITER-IO’s results for the worst category 3-load step 3 and they are found comparable. This establishes the analysis procedure to be used for all of the IWS blocks

  6. Limit load analysis of thick-walled concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper illustrates the interaction of constitutive modeling and finite element solution techniques for limit load prediction of concrete structures. On the constitutive side, an engineering model of concrete fracture is developed in which the Mohr-Coulomb criterion is augmented by tension cut-off to describe incipient failure. Upon intersection with the stress path the failure surface collapses for brittle behaviour according to one of three softening rules, no-tension, no-cohesion, and no-friction. The stress transfer accompanying the energy dissipation during local failure is modelled by several fracture rules which are examined with regard to ultimate load prediction. On the numerical side the effect of finite element idealization is studied first as far as ultimate load convergence is concerned. Subsequently, incremental tangential and initial load techniques are compared together with the effect of step size. Limit load analyses of a thick-walled concrete ring and a lined concrete reactor closure conclude the paper with examples from practical engineering. (orig.)

  7. Elucidation of the chemical fine structure of polysaccharides from soybean and maize kernel cell walls

    OpenAIRE

    Huisman, M.M.H.

    2000-01-01

    The subject of this thesis was the elucidation of the chemical fine structure of polysaccharides from cell walls of soybean and maize kernel. The two species investigated represent different taxonomic groups, soybean belonging to the dicotyledonous and maize to the monocotyledonous plants. Besides representing the most important structures present in cell wall material, these raw materials are of great importance in food and feed industry.The characterisation of the soybean cell wall polysacc...

  8. [Surgical aspects of acute aortic dissection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laas, J; Heinemann, M; Jurmann, M; Borst, H G

    1992-12-01

    This paper highlights some of the surgical aspects of acute aortic dissections such as: emergency diagnosis, indications for surgery, reconstructive operative techniques, malperfusion phenomena and necessity for follow-up. Aortic dissection is caused by an intimal tear, called the "entry", and subsequent splitting of the media by the stream of blood. Two lumina are thus created, which may communicate through "re-entries". As this creates severe weakness of the aortic wall, rupture and/or dilatation are the imminent dangers of acute aortic dissection. Acute aortic dissection type A, by definition involving the ascending aorta (Figures 1 and 2), is an absolute indication for emergency surgical treatment, because its natural history shows an extremely poor outcome (Figure 3). Due to impending (intrapericardial) aortic rupture, it may be necessary to limit diagnostic procedures to a minimum. Transesophageal echocardiography is the method of choice for establishing a quick, precise and reliable diagnosis (Figure 4). In stable patients, computed tomography gives additional information about aortic diameters or sites of extrapericardial perforation. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) shows perfusion of the lumina and dependent organs. The surgical strategy in acute aortic dissection type A aims at replacement of the ascending aorta. Reconstructive techniques have to be considered, especially in aortic valve regurgitation without annuloectasia (Figures 5 and 6). In recent times, the use of GRF tissue glue has reduced the need for teflon felt. Involvement of the aortic arch should be treated aggressively up to the point of total arch replacement in deep hypothermic circulatory arrest as part of the primary procedure (Figure 7). Malperfusion phenomena of aortic branches remain risk-factors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1483624

  9. Structural characterization of macroscopic single-walled carbon nanotube materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei

    In this thesis, we studied the structural properties of macroscopic materials of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in the form of fibers, films and suspensions. We characterized the preferred orientations in partially aligned SWNT fibers and films, combining x-ray fiber diagram and polarized Raman scattering. Our texture model consists of an aligned fraction, characterized by the angular distribution width of tube axes, plus a completely unaligned fraction. For neat fibers extruded from SWNT/superacid suspensions through a small orifice, the distribution width and the aligned fraction both improve with decreasing orifice diameter. For magnetic field-aligned SWNT films deposited from surfactant suspensions, the aligning effects of deposition and external magnetic field force in the film plane are additive, the out-of-plane mosaic being narrower than the in-plane one. SWNTs dispersed in superacid or aqueous surfactant solutions are precursors for many applications. In oleum, SWNTs can be charged and protonated by H 2SO4 molecules. X-ray scattering indicates that H2SO 4 molecules align along nanotube axes to form cylindrical shells wrapped around nanotubes. This finding establishes the validity of a long-standing important but still debated physical chemistry concept, "structured solvent shells surrounding dissolved ions". Differential scanning calorimetry confirms that the partly ordered H2SO4 molecules are a new phase, with distinct freezing/melting behavior. X-ray scattering at low temperature further shows that crystallization of the bulk-like acid surrounding the structured shells is templated by the SWNTs. The specific orientation of the acid crystallites provides solid evidence for direct protonation of SWNT. We studied the morphologies of SWNT suspensions using small-angle neutron scattering. We observed rigid rod behavior from SWNTs dispersed in water using sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate surfactant, suggesting that SWNTs exist mainly as individual tube

  10. Introducing transapical aortic valve implantation (part 1): Effect of a structured training program on clinical outcome in a series of 500 procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Pasic, Miralem; Unbehaun, Axel; Dreysse, Stephan; Buz, Semih; Drews, Thorsten; Kukucka, Marian; Mladenow, Alexander; D'Ancona, Giuseppe; Hetzer, Roland; Seifert, Burkhardt

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the present study was to test whether the cumulative knowledge from the field of transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation, when incorporated into a structured training and then gradually dispersed by internal proctoring, might eliminate the negative effect of the learning curve on the clinical outcomes. METHODS: The present study was a retrospective, single-center, observational cohort study of prospectively collected data from all 500 consecutive high-ri...

  11. Optimized pulse sequences for the accurate measurement of aortic compliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aortic compliance is potentially an important cardiovascular diagnostic parameter by virtue of a proposed correlation with cardiovascular fitness. Measurement requires cross-sectional images of the ascending and descending aorta in systole and diastole for measurement of aortic lumen areas. Diastolic images have poor vessel- wall delineation due to signal from slow-flowing blood. A comparison has been carried out using presaturation (SAT) RF pulses, transparent RF pulses, and flow-compensated gradients in standard pulse sequences to improve vessel-wall delineation in diastole. Properly timed SAT pulses provide the most consistent vessel-wall delineation and the most accurate measurement of aortic compliance

  12. Aortic valve bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Jens T; Jensen, Maiken Brit; Arendrup, Henrik; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2013-01-01

    In aortic valve bypass (AVB) a valve-containing conduit is connecting the apex of the left ventricle to the descending aorta. Candidates are patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis rejected for conventional aortic valve replacement (AVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI...

  13. Calpain-1 Regulation of Matrix Metalloprotease 2 Activity in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Facilitates age-associated aortic wall Calcification and Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Liqun; Zhang, Jing; Monticone, Robert E.; Telljohann, Richard; Wu, James; Wang, Mingyi; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2012-01-01

    Age-associated central arterial wall stiffness is linked to extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling, including fibrosis and vascular calcification. Angiotensin II induces both matrix metalloproteinase type 2 (MMP2) and calpain-1 expression and activity in the arterial wall. But the role of calpain-1 in MMP2 activation and ECM remodeling remains unknown. Dual histo-immunolabeling demonstrates co-localization of calpain-1 and MMP2 within old rat vascular smooth muscle cells. Over-expression of ca...

  14. DCB-adapted plant cells possess unique wall structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shedletzky, E.; Shmuel, M. (Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel)); Delmer, D. (Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel) Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (USA)); Lamport, D. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Suspension-cultured cells of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum VF 36) haven been adapted to growth on high concentrations of 2,6-dichloro-benzonitrile (DCB), an herbicide which inhibits cellulose biosynthesis. The mechanism of adaptation appears to rest largely on the ability of thee cells to divide and expand in the virtual absence of a cellulose-xyloglucan network. Walls of adapted cells growing on DCB also differ from non-adapted cells by having reduced levels of hydroxyproline in protein, both in bound and salt-elutable form, and in having a much higher proportion of homogalacturonon and rhamnogalacturonan-like polymers. Most of these latter polymers are apparently cross-linked in the wall via phenolic-esters and/or phenolic ether linkages, and these polymers appear to represent the major load-bearing network in thee unusual cell walls. The surprising finding that plant cells can survive in the virtual absence of a major load-bearing network in their primary cell walls indicates that plants possess remarkable flexibility for tolerating changes in wall composition.

  15. Methods of first wall structural analysis with applications to the long pulse commercial tokamak reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods of analysis for fusion first wall design are developed. Several design limits have been evaluated and combined to present trade-offs in the form of design windows. These considerations include limits related to thermal fatigue, primary membrane strength, displacement under loading, ratcheting, radiation damage, and plasma-wall interactions. Special emphasis is placed on the investigation of thermal fatigue using a two dimensional treatment of a tubular first wall configuration. The work is motivated by the proposal of the Ultra Long Pulse Commercial Reactor (ULTR), a machine capable of delivering plasma burn pulses of up to 24 hours in length. The present work looks in detail at the impact of pertinent characteristics of the ULTR design such as pulse length, coolant pressure, first wall thickness and first wall lifetime on the structural effects considered. Computer programs are developed and consider several major structural effects on a cylindrical first wall element for both 316 stainless steel and vanadium alloy

  16. Structural ordering of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) caused by gamma (γ)-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were irradiated by Gamma (γ)-rays in air with absorbed doses of 25 and 50 kGy. As a result of γ-ray irradiation, the inter-wall distance of MWCNTs was decreased and their graphitic order was improved. The reduction in inter-wall distance and structural ordering was improved with the increasing dosage of irradiation. Experimental evidences are provided by powder XRD and micro-Raman analyses

  17. Solidified structure of thin-walled titanium parts by vertical centrifugal casting

    OpenAIRE

    Wu Shiping; Xu Qin; Zhang Jun

    2011-01-01

    The solidified structure of the thin-walled and complicated Ti-6Al-4V castings produced by the vertical centrifugal casting process was studied in the present work. The results show that the wall thickness of the section is featured with homogeneously distributed fine equiaxial grains, compared with the microstructure of the thick-walled section. The grain size of the castings has a tendency to decrease gradually with the increasing of the centrifugal radius. The inter-lamellar space in thick...

  18. Correlation between arterial wall stiffness, N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide, functional and structural myocardial abnormalities in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiac autonomic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoriya Aleksandrovna Serhiyenko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess arterial wall stiffness, plasma levels of of N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP, as well as functional state and structure of the myocardium in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN.Materials and Methods. The study involved a total of 65 patients with T2DM. 12 had no evidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD or CAN, 14 were diagnosed with subclinical stage of CAN, 18 – with functional stage, and 21 – with organic stage. We measured aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV, aortic augmentation index (AIx, brachial artery AIx, ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI and plasma levels of NT-proBNP. Clinical examination included ECG, Holter monitoring, ambulatory BP measurement and echocardiography.Results. Patients with isolated T2DM showed a trend for increased vascular wall stiffness. PWV was increased in patients with subclinical stage of CAN. Aortic and brachial AIx, PWV and AASI were elevated in patients with functional stage of CAN, PWV being significantly higher vs. subclinical CAN subgroup. Organic stage was characterized by pathologically increased values of all primary parameters; PWV and AASI were significantly higher compared with other groups. Development and progression of CAN was accompanied by an increase in NT-proBNP plasma levels. Concentration of NT-proBNP was in direct correlation with left ventricular mass (LVM and PWV. PWV and LVM values also directly correlated between themselves.Conclusion. Development and progression of CAN in patients with T2DM is accompanied by an increase in vascular wall stiffness. The elevation of plasma NT-proBNP in patients with T2DM correlates with the development of CAN and is significantly and independently associated with an increase in LVM and PWV. Our data suggests the pathophysiological interconnection between metabolic, functional and structural myocardial abnormalities in patients with T2DM and CAN.

  19. Degree of coupling in high-rise mixed shear walls structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J C D Hoenderkamp

    2012-08-01

    A simple method of analysis is presented to determine the influence of single shear walls (SSW) on the degree of coupling DoC and on the peak shear demand PSD for beams of coupled shear walls (CSW) in mixed shear wall structures (MSW). Non-coupled lateral load resisting structures such as singular planar walls and cores will reduce primary bending moments in the coupled shear wall bents of MSW structures thereby increasing the degree of coupling. They will also change the location and magnitude of the maximum shear in and rotation of the coupling beams. These changes in the coupled wall bents may increase the demand on their performance beyond capacity. It is, therefore, important to have an indication of the change in the coupling beam design parameters at an early stage of the design. The proposed graphical method is based on the continuous medium theory and allows a rapid assessment of the structural behaviour of coupled shear wall bents in mixed shear wall structures that are subject to horizontal loading.

  20. Local Impact Simulation of SC Wall Structures using Aircraft Engine Projectile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SC wall structure developed for nuclear power plant buildings consists of plain concrete and two steel plates on both surface of the concrete, while RC structure consists of re bar and concrete. SC structure has higher scabbing resistance than RC structure due to the action of steel plate on the rear side of impact. Therefore SC structure is known as more effective structure from the viewpoint of aircraft crash than RC structure. However, most of the recent researches and experiments about local impact damage deal with RC structures, and the effect of re bar and steel plate is not considered reasonably. Although Walter et al. and Make-work et al. suggested a formula for evaluating perforation depth of steel plate covered RC walls, most of the previous researches about SC structure are focused on perforation and scabbing due to the impact of hard projectile, rather than soft projectile such as an aircraft. In this research a soft projectile, i. e. aircraft engine, is utilized for impact simulation of RC and SC walls. To evaluate local damage of SC wall structures, parametric study with the variables of wall thickness and steel ratio of the cover plate is performed, and the results are compared with those of RC structures. Since scabbing was prevented by the steel plates, penetration mode of damage was observed in SC walls while scabbing damage was occurred in RC walls. It is confirmed that the rear steel plate not only contains concrete debris, but also reduces the internal damage of the concrete walls. Penetration depth of SC walls did not largely vary due to the increasing steel ratio, and similar results to RC walls were observed when the wall thickness is larger than a certain value since the impact resistance of SC wall is mainly governed by the thickness of concrete part. Therefore, it is expected that similar level of impact resistance to RC structure can be produced with the minimum thickness of steel plates of SC structure. According to these results, SC

  1. Seismic Behavior of Multi-story Structural Walls under Cyclic Lateral Loading: Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyang Wang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the seismic force resisting mechanisms of structural walls considering the interaction with the foundation beam, ground floor slabs and piles that supported the walls. Experimental tests were conducted on two 15% scale sub-assemblage specimens of the bottom three stories of a twenty-story structural wall. The structural walls were of monolithic construction for one specimen and of precast shear wall construction for the other. Cyclic lateral loads were applied with proportionally varying vertical loads to simulate loading conditions for the twenty-story prototype building. Conclusions were drawn concerning the deformation capacity and the strength deterioration after maximum strength shown by the walls. Contrary to the design, the yielding of the shear wall preceded the yielding of the foundation beam. Flexure-shear cracks of the shear wall penetrated the slabs transversely and developed to the foundation beam. At the ultimate state, the shear wall separated along these cracks involving the parts of the foundation beam, the pile, the transverse foundation beam and the slabs. These experimental phenomena clarified the monolithic action between the foundation beam and peripheral members.

  2. Study on Seismic Behavior of Recycled Concrete Energy-efficient Homes Structure Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Lan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main point is to study the seismic behavior of the lattice type recycled concrete energy saving wall under low-cyclic loading,to provide the basis for the seismic performance of application of recycled concrete lattice wall in energy-saving residential structure. Design two walls with the same structure measures, include Lattice type recycled concrete wall and natural concrete wall, they are tested under low-cycle repetitive loading, compared failure mode and seismic performance in different reinforcement conditions of side column. The bearing capacity and ductility of recycled aggregate concrete are better than natural aggregate concrete, The stiffness degradation curves and the skeleton curves of the walls are basically the same, both of them have better seismic energy dissipation capacity. Lattice type concrete wall is good at seismic performance, recycled aggregate concrete is good at plastic deformation ability, it is advantageous to seismic energy dissipation of wall, it can be applied in energy efficient residential structure wall.

  3. Shaking table experimental study of recycled concrete frame-shear wall structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianwei; Cao, Wanlin; Meng, Shaobin; Yu, Cheng; Dong, Hongying

    2014-06-01

    In this study, four 1/5 scaled shaking table tests were conducted to investigate the seismic performance of recycled concrete frame-shear wall structures with different recycled aggregates replacement rates and concealed bracing detail. The four tested structures included one normal concrete model, one recycled coarse aggregate concrete model, and two recycled coarse and fine aggregate concrete models with or without concealed bracings inside the shear walls. The dynamic characteristics, dynamic response and failure mode of each model were compared and analyzed. Finite element models were also developed and nonlinear time-history response analysis was conducted. The test and analysis results show that the seismic performance of the recycled coarse aggregate concrete frame-shear wall structure is slightly worse than the normal concrete structure. The seismic resistance capacity of the recycled concrete frame-shear wall structure can be greatly improved by setting up concealed bracings inside the walls. With appropriate design, the recycled coarse aggregate concrete frame-shear wall structure and recycled concrete structure with concealed bracings inside the walls can be applied in buildings.

  4. Load-carrying capacity of lightly reinforced, prefabricated walls of lightweight aggregate concrete with open structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Per

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents and evaluates the results of a coordinated testing of prefabricated, lightly reinforced walls of lightweight aggregate concrete with open structure. The coordinated testing covers all wall productions in Denmark and will therefore provide a representative assessment of the...

  5. Study the Effective of Shear Wall on Behavior of Beam in Frame Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr, Hadihosseini

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Shear walls are a type of structural system that provides lateral resistance to a building or structure. They resist in-plane loads that are applied along its height. The applied load is generally transferred to the wall by a diaphragm or collector or drag member. The performance of the framed buildings depends on the structural system adopted for the structure The term structural system or structural frame in structural engineering refers to load-resisting sub-system of a structure. The structural system transfers loads through interconnected structural components or members. These structural systems need to be chosen based on its height and loads and need to be carried out, etc. The selection of appropriate structural systems for building must satisfy both strength and stiffness requirements. The structural system must be adequate to resist lateral and gravity loads that cause horizontal shear deformation and overturning deformation. Other important issues that must be considered in planning the structural schemes and layouts are the requirements for architectural details, building services like vertical transportation and fire safety among others. Each of the structural system will be having its own prospects and considerations. The efficiency of a structural system is measured in terms of their ability to resist lateral load, which increases with the height of the frame. A building can be considered as tall when the effect of lateral loads is reflected in the design. Lateral deflections of framed buildings should be limited to prevent damage to both structural and nonstructural elements. In the present study, the structural performance of the framed building with shear wall will be analysis. The importance of the shear wall in resist the wind and earthquake load are study, the effect of the shear walls on the conventional frame system. The improvement in the structural performance of the building with frame system by using shear wall is

  6. Application of manufacturing constraints to structural optimization of thin-walled structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczek, T.

    2016-02-01

    Topology optimization can be a very useful tool for creating conceptual designs for vehicles. Structures suggested by topology optimization often turn out to be difficult to implement in manufacturing processes. Presently, rail vehicle structures are made by welding sheet metal parts. This leads to many complications and increased weight of the vehicle. This article presents a new design concept for modern rail vehicle structures made of standardized, thin-walled, closed, steel profiles that fulfil the stress and manufacturing requirements. For this purpose, standard software for topology optimization was used with a new way of preprocessing the design space. The design methodology is illustrated by an example of the topology optimization of a freight railcar. It is shown that the methodology turns out to be a useful tool for obtaining optimal structure design that fulfils the assumed manufacturing constraints.

  7. Waste management of first wall and blanket structural materials for tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison has been made of the induced radioactivities in the first wall and structural materials of the breeder blanket in the high-flux region for two different fusion-reactor types. One system is the STARFIRE, a tokamak reactor with PCA, a modified stainless steel, as a first wall and a LiAlO2 breeder blanket; the other is a reactor based on the STARFIRE design with a vanadium alloy as the first wall and structural material, and circulating molten lithium as the breeder/coolant. The recycling or disposal of these structural materials is evaluated

  8. Structure of the cell wall of mango after application of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cells of the mesocarp of mango cultivar Tommy Atkins were analyzed by Transmission Electron Microscope—TEM to evaluate the effects of doses of 0.5 and 1.0 kGy applied immediately after the fruit and after storage for twenty days at a temperature of 12 °C followed by 5 days of simulated marketing at a temperature of 21 °C. No alteration was found in the structure of the cell wall, middle lamella, and plasma membrane of fruits when analyzed immediately after application of doses. The mesocarp cell structure of the cell wall, middle lamella, and the plasma membrane did however undergo changes after storage. Fruits that received a dose of 0.5 kGy displayed slight changes in cell wall structure and slight disintegration of the middle lamella. Fruits that received a dose of 1.0 kGy displayed more severe changes in the structure of the cell wall, greater middle lamella degradation, and displacement of the plasma membrane. - Highlights: ► Mesocarp cells were analyzed by Transmission Electron Microscope—TEM. ► No change in cell wall structure, middle lamella and plasma membrane was found in fruits immediately after irradiation. ► Changes in cell wall structure, middle lamella and plasma membrane happened after storage. ► Fruits subjected to 0.5 kGy showed smaller cell wall change.

  9. Anatomics Knowledges of Aortic Root in the Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelo Cerezo; Omar Bertani; Gisela Panciroli; Sebastián Duhalde; Karina Ferreira; Luciano Honaine

    2010-01-01

    The Aortic Valve is a valvular system that bears different high pressure forces. It takes part of a complex structure called Aortic Root. Nowadays, anatomic knowledge has taken a preponderant role, due to the use of the Transcatether Aortic Valve Implant (TAVI). To describe the patient´s characteristics which exclude them of the TAVI for anatomic reasons in cadaveric dissections and transthoracic echocardiograms. A descriptive retrospective analysis of 67 individuals was performed and divided...

  10. Study on electromagnetic-structural behavior of first wall/blanket structure for tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electromagnetic problems related to the structural design of the first wall/blanket structure, which is a major component of Fusion Reactor, have been studied. The electromagnetic load, which is characteristic and very important of Tokamak type, is necessary for the evaluation of the structural integrity at the last item of the design process. A transient electromagnetic phenomena, which include the measurement of the eddy current obtained by the simulated plasma disruption experiment, the vibration behavior of the beam-plate by the dynamic electromagnetic load and the verification of the numerical codes, have been clarified. A static electromagnetic phenomena have been studied to evaluate the applicability of the ferromagnetic material to the first wall/blanket structure of Tokamak Power Reactor. The numerical code, which can calculate the magnetic field of the finite ferromagnetic body, has been developed and the magnetic field distortions inside and outside the materials has been studied. The deformation by the magnetic torque, which generates inside the ferromagnetic material placed in the magnetic field, has been studied. The effects of the magnetic stiffness and the saturated magnetic field to the deformation has been also clarified. (author)

  11. Bicuspid Aortic Valve Disease and Ascending Aortic Aneurysms: Gaps in Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie L. Losenno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The bicuspid aortic valve is the most common congenital cardiac anomaly in developed nations. The abnormal bicuspid morphology of the aortic valve results in valvular dysfunction and subsequent hemodynamic derangements. However, the clinical presentation of bicuspid aortic valve disease remains quite heterogeneous with patients presenting from infancy to late adulthood with variable degrees of valvular stenosis and insufficiency and associated abnormalities including aortic coarctation, hypoplastic left heart structures, and ascending aortic dilatation. Emerging evidence suggests that the heterogeneous presentation of bicuspid aortic valve phenotypes may be a more complex matter related to congenital, genetic, and/or connective tissue abnormalities. Optimal management of patients with BAV disease and associated ascending aortic aneurysms often requires a thoughtful approach, carefully assessing various risk factors of the aortic valve and the aorta and discerning individual indications for ongoing surveillance, medical management, and operative intervention. We review current concepts of anatomic classification, pathophysiology, natural history, and clinical management of bicuspid aortic valve disease with associated ascending aortic aneurysms.

  12. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the primary reason that we end up offering patients aortic valve surgery in our community. Aortic stenosis ... a picture of the aortic valve from a patient who had a very diseased aortic valve. And ...

  13. The diagnosing value of reconstruction and virtual endoscopy of spiral CT angiography on aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the value of reconstruction and virtual endoscopy of spiral CT angiography in diagnosing aortic dissection. Methods: Seventeen patients with aortic dissection were examined by spiral CT with contrast agent and the post processing included shaded surface display (SSD), maximum intensity projection (MIP), multiplanar reconstruction (MPR), curved planar reconstruction (CPR) and CT virtual endoscopy (CTVE). Results: The true and false lumen, exfoliate intima, calcification, and thrombus could be seen on axial imaging, SCTA, MPR and CTVE. Both the panorama of aortic lesion including exfoliate intima, true and false lumen and its extent, size and involvement of vascular branches could be preferably shown on MIP, CPR and SSD. Calcification of vascular wall could be clearly displayed on MIP. The true and false lumen, exfoliate intima, calcification, thrombus and crevasse could be revealed on MPR because the whole lesion could be reconstructed and observed from any angle on it. Some structures, which were not on the same plane, could be shown on the same two-dimensional plane, but their deep relations could not be done. The true and false lumen, exfoliate intima and crevasse could also be seen on CTVE. Conclusion: axial imaging combined with other imaging techniques of SCTA including MPR, MIP, CPR, SSD and CTVE will roundly display aortic dissection. SCTA will be a reliable and safe method in diagnosing aortic dissection and be able to replace invasive DSA on a certain extent

  14. Effects of magnetized walls on the particle structure and the yield stress of magnetorheological fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jianfeng, E-mail: zhoujianfeng@njtech.edu.cn [School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816, Jiangsu (China); Mo, Jingwen [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Shao, Chunlei [School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816, Jiangsu (China); Li, Zhigang [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we investigate the quasi-static shear deformation of magnetic particles (MPs) in a Couette flow of magnetorheological (MR) fluids through Stokesian dynamic simulations. The magnetized walls are modeled by a congregation of magnetic dipoles and their effects on the MPs are considered. The simple shear flow of the base fluid with linear velocity distribution is used to generate the shear deformation of the MP structure and the yield stresses under different shear rates are obtained. Comparing with the relatively long chains forming in base fluid without the effect of magnetized walls, the initial structure of MPs is mainly in the form of short chains due to the attractive force of walls. At the beginning of the shear deformation of the MP structure, the concentration of MPs near the walls is found. As the shear deformation develops, however, the chains concentrate at the center of the simulation domain and the MPs near wall boundaries are attracted to the center. The yield stress depends on the initial structure of MPs which is affected by the magnetized walls. It is revealed that the larger shear rate of base fluid results in the larger yield stress, and the effects of the magnetization intensity of the walls and their space distance on the yield stress are also investigated. - Highlights: • We model a Couette flow of magnetorheological fluid considering magnetized walls. • The walls are modeled by a congregation of magnetic dipoles. • Initial structure of MPs is remarkably affected by the walls, so is yield stress. • Larger base fluid shear rate causes the larger shear deformation and larger yield stress.

  15. Effects of magnetized walls on the particle structure and the yield stress of magnetorheological fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we investigate the quasi-static shear deformation of magnetic particles (MPs) in a Couette flow of magnetorheological (MR) fluids through Stokesian dynamic simulations. The magnetized walls are modeled by a congregation of magnetic dipoles and their effects on the MPs are considered. The simple shear flow of the base fluid with linear velocity distribution is used to generate the shear deformation of the MP structure and the yield stresses under different shear rates are obtained. Comparing with the relatively long chains forming in base fluid without the effect of magnetized walls, the initial structure of MPs is mainly in the form of short chains due to the attractive force of walls. At the beginning of the shear deformation of the MP structure, the concentration of MPs near the walls is found. As the shear deformation develops, however, the chains concentrate at the center of the simulation domain and the MPs near wall boundaries are attracted to the center. The yield stress depends on the initial structure of MPs which is affected by the magnetized walls. It is revealed that the larger shear rate of base fluid results in the larger yield stress, and the effects of the magnetization intensity of the walls and their space distance on the yield stress are also investigated. - Highlights: • We model a Couette flow of magnetorheological fluid considering magnetized walls. • The walls are modeled by a congregation of magnetic dipoles. • Initial structure of MPs is remarkably affected by the walls, so is yield stress. • Larger base fluid shear rate causes the larger shear deformation and larger yield stress

  16. Distortional Mechanics of Thin-Walled Structural Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Michael Joachim

    number of degrees of freedom. This means that the classical Vlasov thin-walled beam theory for open and closed cross sections is generalized as part of a semi-discretization process by including distortional displacement fields. A novel finite-element-based displacement approach is used in combination...... homogeneous and non-homogeneous differential equations and the related solutions. The developed semi-discretization approach to Generalized Beam Theory (GBT) is furthermore extended to include the geometrical stiffness terms for column buckling analysis based on an initial stress approach. Through variations......-section displacement mode shapes and buckling load factor are given. In order to handle arbitrary boundary conditions as well as the possibility to add concentrated loads as nodal loads the formulation of a generalized onedimensional semi-discretized thin-walled beam element including distortional contributions is...

  17. Left ventricular outflow tract false aneurysm late after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzarri, Federico; Braconi, Lucio; Rossi, Alessandra; Sorbara, Carlo; Stefano, Pier Luigi

    2005-01-01

    We describe an unusual case of left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) pseudoaneurysm late after aortic valve replacement. A 77-year-old man, who had undergone aortic valve replacement with mechanical prosthesis 7 years ago, presented, asymptomatic, with a transesophageal echocardiography (TTE) diagnosis of a large cavitary mass arising behind the aortic wall. The orifice of the pseudoaneurysm was successfully surgically closed and the aortic root reconstructed with cryopreserved homograft. PMID:15870043

  18. Cell wall structure and function in lactic acid bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Kulakauskas, Saulius

    2014-01-01

    The cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria is a complex assemblage of glycopolymers and proteins. It consists of a thick peptidoglycan sacculus that surrounds the cytoplasmic membrane and that is decorated with teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. It plays a major role in bacterial physiology since it maintains cell shape and integrity during growth and division; in addition, it acts as the interface between the bacterium and its environment. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are traditionall...

  19. Changes in alfalfa cell wall structure during vegetation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božičković Aleksa Đ.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The investigation was done on 141 samples of one alfalfa cultivar, collected from the same location during the first three growth cycles: spring growth, the first and the second regrowth. Within each growth cycle, sampling was done during the whole growing period, commencing when plant height was below 150 mm and continuing until plants were bearing ripe seeds. On all collected samples the following cell wall characteristics were determined: neutral detergent fibre (NDF, acid detergent fibre (ADF, acid detergent lignin (ADL, neutral detergent insoluble crude protein (NDICP, acid detergent insoluble crude protein (ADICP. Cellulose and hemicellulose were detected on the base of the mentioned chemical parameters. Significantly lower (p<0.01 content of aNDF, ADF, ADL, ADICP and cellulose is found in the second regrowth, while there were no significant differences between the other two growth cycles. Except in NDICP and ADICP, the increase in all accompanying components of the cell wall was observed, and expressed in average daily changes. There was no consistent trend in NDICP and ADICP. During the spring growth from late bud to full-bloom stage the ’plateau’ was observed. The plateau was represented as almost constant content of aNDF, ADF, ADL and cellulose. The correlations between all components of the cell wall were shown. The equation aNDF = 36.713 + 1.181 × ADF is recommended for conversion of ADF into aNDF in alfalfa. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 46012

  20. Mitigation of blast loadings on structures by an anti-blast plastic water wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张力; 陈力; 方秦; 张亚栋

    2016-01-01

    Seven in-situ tests were carried out in far field to study the blast mitigation effect of a kind of water filled plastic wall. Test results show that the mitigation effect of water filled plastic wall is remarkable. The maximum reduction of peak reflected overpressure reaches up to 94.53%, as well as 36.3% of the minimum peak reflected overpressure reduction in the scaled distance ranging from 1.71 m/kg1/3 to 3.42 m/kg1/3. Parametric studies were also carried out. The effects of the scaled gauge height, water/charge scaled distance (the distance between the explosive charge and the water wall), water wall scaled height and water/structure scaled distance (the distance between the water wall and the structure) were systematically investigated and compared with the usual rigid anti-blast wall. It is concluded that these parameters affect the mitigation effects of plastic water wall on blast loadings significantly, which is basically consistent to the trend of usual rigid anti-blast wall. Some formulae are also derived based on the numerical and test results, providing a simple but reliable prediction model to evaluate the peak overpressure of mitigated blast loadings on the structures.

  1. Abdominal aortic aneurysm and histological, clinical, radiological correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodella, Luigi Fabrizio; Rezzani, Rita; Bonomini, Francesca; Peroni, Michele; Cocchi, Marco Angelo; Hirtler, Lena; Bonardelli, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    To date, the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurism (AAA) still remains unclear. As such, the aim of this study was to evaluate changes of the aortic structure during AAA. We analysed the microscopic frame of vessels sections, starting from the primum movens leading to abnormal dilatation. AAA samples were collected and processed through various staining methods (Verhoeff-Van Gieson, Masson Goldner, Sirius Red). Subsequently, the vessel morphology and collagenic web of the tunica media and adventitia were determined and the amount of type I and type III collagen was measured. We also applied immune-histochemistry markers for CD34 and PGP 9.5 in order to identify vascular and nerve structures in the aorta. Immune-positivity quantification was used to calculate the percentage of the stained area. We found increasing deposition of type I collagen and reduced type III collagen in both tunica media and adventitia of AAA. The total amount of vasa vasorum, marked with CD34, and nerva vasorum, marked with PGP 9.5, was also higher in AAA samples. Cardiovascular risk factors (blood pressure, dyslipidemia, cigarette smoking) and radiological data (maximum aneurism diameter, intra-luminal thrombus, aortic wall calcification) increased these changes. These results suggest that the tunica adventitia may have a central role in the pathogenesis of AAA as clearly there are major changes characterized by rooted inflammatory infiltration. The presence of immune components could explain these modifications within the framework of the aorta. PMID:26858185

  2. The three-dimensional structure of the cell wall glycoprotein of Chlorogonium elongatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, P J; Hills, G J

    1984-06-01

    The green alga Chlorogonium elongatum, a member of the Volvocales, possesses a crystalline cell wall composed of hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein similar to the primary cell wall glycoproteins of higher plants. Electron microscopy and computer image processing have been used to determine the crystal structure of the Chlorogonium cell wall in three dimensions to a resolution of 2.0 nm. The structure is composed of heterologous dimers. Each subunit of the dimer comprises a long, thin spacer domain and a large globular domain, which is the site of the intra- and inter-dimer interactions. There are also sites of intersubunit interactions at the opposite ends of the rod domains. We suggest that the rods are composed predominantly of glycosylated polyproline helix, as has been suggested for higher plant cell wall glycoproteins and has been shown for the cell wall glycoprotein of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which is closely related to Chlorogonium. PMID:6490737

  3. Power Efficiency of Systems Applied for Heating Building and Structure External Walls with Ventilated Air Spaces

    OpenAIRE

    I. F. Fialko; A. S. Statsenko

    2014-01-01

    The paper considers power-efficient systems applied for heating building and structure external walls with ventilated air spaces and prescribes directions and problems pertaining to power-efficiency improvement of such systems.

  4. Development and prospect of nano-structured ODS steels for fusion reactor first wall application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first wall structural material of fusion reactors must meet extremely rigorous operation environment requirements and it is one of the key factors restricting the development of fusion reactors. Nano-structured oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are the leading candidates for fusion first wall due to their excellent irradiation resistance coming from their characteristic microstructures. This paper described briefly the current state of development and understanding of ODS steels. (author)

  5. Effect of Yeast Cell Morphology, Cell Wall Physical Structure and Chemical Composition on Patulin Adsorption

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Ying; Wang, Jianguo; Liu, Bin; Wang, Zhouli; Yuan, Yahong; Yue, Tianli

    2015-01-01

    The capability of yeast to adsorb patulin in fruit juice can aid in substantially reducing the patulin toxic effect on human health. This study aimed to investigate the capability of yeast cell morphology and cell wall internal structure and composition to adsorb patulin. To compare different yeast cell morphologies, cell wall internal structure and composition, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and ion chromatography were used. The results indicated that patulin ...

  6. Strategies To Discover the Structural Components of Cyst and Oocyst Walls

    OpenAIRE

    Samuelson, John; Bushkin, G. Guy; Chatterjee, Aparajita; Robbins, Phillips W.

    2013-01-01

    Cysts of Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba histolytica and oocysts of Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum are the infectious and sometimes diagnostic forms of these parasites. To discover the structural components of cyst and oocyst walls, we have developed strategies based upon a few simple assumptions. Briefly, the most abundant wall proteins are identified by monoclonal antibodies or mass spectrometry. Structural components include a sugar polysaccharide (chitin for Entamoeba, β-1,3-l...

  7. Vortex structures and heat transfer in a wall-bounded pin matrix: LES with a RANS wall-treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delibra, G. [Department of Mechanics and Aeronautics, ' Sapienza' University of Rome, Via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome (Italy); Hanjalic, K. [Department of Mechanics and Aeronautics, ' Sapienza' University of Rome, Via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome (Italy); Department of Multiscale Physics, Delft University of Technology (Netherlands); Borello, D., E-mail: borello@dma.ing.uniroma1.i [Department of Mechanics and Aeronautics, ' Sapienza' University of Rome, Via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome (Italy); Rispoli, F. [Department of Mechanics and Aeronautics, ' Sapienza' University of Rome, Via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome (Italy)

    2010-10-15

    A hybrid LES/RANS simulation is applied to study the velocity, vorticity and thermal fields in flow over a staggered matrix of cylindrical pins bounded by a cold and a heated plane endwall approximating the typical configuration of internal cooling of gas-turbine blades. The hybrid approach considered is in fact a coarse-grid conventional LES coupled with the elliptic relaxation {zeta}-f RANS model that prevails in the wall-adjacent regions. Two Reynolds numbers have been considered, 10.000 and 30.000, based on the pin diameter and mean velocity between the two pins. First the performance of the hybrid approach was evaluated in comparison with the earlier reported URANS using the same RANS model throughout the whole flow, as well as with wall-resolved LES. The results of the hybrid method, found to recover with acceptable accuracy the dominant large-scale vortical patterns and the averaged flow parameters, were then used to analyse the effects of vortex structures on the velocity and thermal fields and their role in wall heat transfer using graphical visualisation. In addition to the temperature contours, the thermal field is also visualized by heat-flux lines, which make it possible to identify heat 'corridors' and distinguish regions dominated by stochastic turbulent transport and those of large-scale vortical convection.

  8. Vortex structures and heat transfer in a wall-bounded pin matrix: LES with a RANS wall-treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hybrid LES/RANS simulation is applied to study the velocity, vorticity and thermal fields in flow over a staggered matrix of cylindrical pins bounded by a cold and a heated plane endwall approximating the typical configuration of internal cooling of gas-turbine blades. The hybrid approach considered is in fact a coarse-grid conventional LES coupled with the elliptic relaxation ζ-f RANS model that prevails in the wall-adjacent regions. Two Reynolds numbers have been considered, 10.000 and 30.000, based on the pin diameter and mean velocity between the two pins. First the performance of the hybrid approach was evaluated in comparison with the earlier reported URANS using the same RANS model throughout the whole flow, as well as with wall-resolved LES. The results of the hybrid method, found to recover with acceptable accuracy the dominant large-scale vortical patterns and the averaged flow parameters, were then used to analyse the effects of vortex structures on the velocity and thermal fields and their role in wall heat transfer using graphical visualisation. In addition to the temperature contours, the thermal field is also visualized by heat-flux lines, which make it possible to identify heat 'corridors' and distinguish regions dominated by stochastic turbulent transport and those of large-scale vortical convection.

  9. Structure and Phase State of Bone Apatite of Calcified Aortic Fragments with Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya.V. Khyzhnya

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper represents the results of the study on the structure and phase composition of bone apatite and fragments of calcified aorta of the same experimental animal with model osteoporosis. Examination by the X-ray and electron diffraction, electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy reveals that pathological calcification of rabbit aorta with model osteoporosis in crystal-chemical terms is the imperfect calcium apatite Ca10(PO46(OH2. Temperature growth of ectopic apatite crystals during annealing at 900C is similar to bioapatite of bone.

  10. Engineering tissue constructs to mimic native aortic and pulmonary valve leaflets' structures and mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoumi, Nafiseh

    There are several disadvantages correlated with current heart valve replacement, including anticoagulation therapy for patients with mechanical valves and the low durability of bioprosthetic valves. The non-viable nature of such devices is a critical drawback especially for pediatric cases due to the inability of the graft to grow in vivo with the patients. A tissue engineered heart valve (TEHV) with remodeling and growth ability, is conceptually appealing to use in the surgical repair and could serve as a permanent replacements when operating for pediatric valvular lesions. It is critical that scaffolds for functional heart valve tissue engineering, be capable of mimicking the native leaflet's structure and mechanical properties at the time of implantation. Meanwhile, the scaffolds should be able to support cellular proliferation and native-like tissue formation as the TEHV remodels toward a scaffold-free state. Our overall hypothesis is that an "ideal" engineered construct, designed based on native leaflet's structure and mechanics, will complement a native heart valve leaflet in providing benchmarks for use in the design of clinically-applicable TEHV. This hypothesis was addressed through several experiments conducted in the present study. To establish a functional biomimetic TEHV, we developed scaffolds capable of matching the anisotropic stiffness of native leaflet while promoting native-like cell and collagen content and supporting the ECM generation. Scaffolds with various polymer contents (e.g., poly (glycerol sebacate) (PGS) and poly (epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL)) and structural designs (e.g., microfabricated and microfibrous scaffolds), were fabricated based on native leaflet's structure and mechanics. It was found that the tri-layered scaffold, designed with assembly of microfabricated PGS and microfibrous PGS/PCL was a functional leaflet capable of promoting tissue formation. Furthermore, to investigate the effect of cyclic stress and flexure

  11. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to become you to our live webcast. Today we’re going to repair an abdominal aortic aneurysm ... and together as a team of multidisciplinary physicians, we’re going to repair an abdominal aortic aneurysm ...

  12. Aortic Aneurysm Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... connective tissue disorders, such as Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, get thoracic aortic aneurysms. Signs and symptoms of thoracic aortic aneurysm can include Sharp, sudden pain in the chest or upper back. Shortness of ...

  13. Evaluation of seismic induced wall pressures for deeply embedded NPP structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extent to which finite element models of partially buried nuclear power plant structures may be used to compute seismic induced wall pressures is investigated in this paper. Stresses in three dimensional finite elements modeling the soil adjacent to the structure are used and stresses in these elements are used to evaluate wall pressures. Depths of burial of the structure varying from 1/4 to 1 times the height of the structure are considered. The SASSI computer code is used to perform the analyses. The wall pressures for the shallower depths of burial are found to depend on the inertial interaction loads, while the pressures for the deeper embedded structures are found to depend on kinematic interaction loads. The input ground motion for the study has a ZPA equal to 0.3 g. The maximum wall pressures are examined to determine whether non linear effects (separation of the wall and soil or slippage of the soil relative to the wall) are important. Non-linear effects are found to occur for depths of burial less than one half of the height and are found to occur over one half of the buried depth. (authors)

  14. Out-of-plane wall behavior in seismic analysis of rectangular reinforced concrete containment structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this paper is to present the out-of-plane vibrational behavior of flange walls of R/C box type containment structures. The structure to be studied is composed of two portions, the upper portion which is the box substructure of 64 m in length by 64 m in width by 30 m in height, and the lower portion which is the stiff substructure with plenty of walls placed inside, of 110 m in length by 110 m in width by 49 m in height including thick mat foundation. Dynamic behavior of this structure is investigated by two types of models. One is the well known single stick lumped mass model. The other is the gridwork lumped mass model. In the gridwork lumped mass model, the web wall of the box substructure is modeled to be lumped mass system, whereas the flange wall of it is modeled by a uniform gridwork which consists of mutually orthogonal members rigidly connected at the intersections. The gridwork members are evaluated in order that the stiffness of the gridwork structure is similar to that of an orthotropic wall plate. Responses under strong earthquake motions are obtained by numerically integrating the equations of motion in a step by step procedure. For the cases considered, the response results between the single stick lumped mass model and the web wall portion of the gridwork lumped mass model are generally in good agreement, whereas the response results of the flange wall portion of the gridwork lumped mass model show large local amplification out-of-plane vibrational behavior. The single stick lumped mass model cannot reveal this type of phenomenon. It can be concluded that when designing R/C huge box type structures for earthquake resistance, much attention should be made on the out-of-plane vibrational behavior of flange walls of the structures. (orig.)

  15. Aortic growth rates in chronic aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To determine and compare rates of descending aortic enlargement and complications in chronic aortic dissection with and without a proximal aortic graft. Methods and materials: Fifty-two patients with dissection involving the descending aorta and who had undergone at least two computed tomography (CT) examinations at our institution between November, 1993 and February, 2004 were identified, including 24 non-operated patients (four type A, 20 type B) and 28 operated patients (type A). CT examinations per patient ranged from two to 10, and follow-up ranged from 1-123 months (mean 49 months, median 38.5 months). On each CT image, the aortic short axis (SA), false lumen (FL), and true lumen (TL) diameters were measured at the longitudinal midpoint of the dissection and at the point of maximum aortic diameter. Complications were tabulated, including aortic rupture and aortic enlargement requiring surgery. Results: For non-operated patients, the midpoint and maximum point SA, TL, and FL diameters increased significantly over time. For operated patients, the midpoint and maximum point SA and FL diameters increased significantly over time. In both groups, aortic enlargement was predominantly due to FL expansion. Diameter increases in non-operated patients were significantly larger than those in operated patients. The rate of change in aortic diameter was constant, regardless of aortic size. Four non-operated and six operated patients developed aortic complications. Conclusions: In patients with a dissection involving the descending thoracic aorta, the FL increased in diameter over time, at a constant rate, and to a greater degree in non-operated patients (mostly type B) compared with operated patients (all type A)

  16. Solidified structure of thin-walled titanium parts by vertical centrifugal casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Shiping

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The solidified structure of the thin-walled and complicated Ti-6Al-4V castings produced by the vertical centrifugal casting process was studied in the present work. The results show that the wall thickness of the section is featured with homogeneously distributed fine equiaxial grains, compared with the microstructure of the thick-walled section. The grain size of the castings has a tendency to decrease gradually with the increasing of the centrifugal radius. The inter-lamellar space in thick-walled casting parts is bigger than that of the thin-walled parts, and the profile of inter-lamellar space is not susceptible to the centrifugal radius.

  17. Wing walls for enhancing the seismic performance of reinforced concrete frame structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weisong; Guo, Xun; Xu, Weixiao; Yuan, Xin

    2016-06-01

    A building retrofitted with wing walls in the bottom story, which was damaged during the 2008 M8.0 Wenchuan earthquake in China, is introduced and a corresponding 1/4 scale wing wall-frame model was subjected to shake table motions to study the seismic behavior of this retrofitted structural system. The results show that wing walls can effectively protect columns from damage by moving areas that bear reciprocating tension and compression to the sections of the wing walls, thus achieving an extra measure of seismic fortification. A `strong column-weak beam' mechanism was realized, the flexural rigidity of the vertical member was strengthened, and a more uniform distribution of deformation among all the stories was measured. In addition, the joint between the wing walls and the beams suffered severe damage during the tests, due to an area of local stress concentration. A longer area of intensive stirrup is suggested in the end of the beams.

  18. Soya beans and Maize : The effect of chemical and physical structure of cell wall polysaccharides on fermentation kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Laar, van, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    The analysis of the relationship between cell wall composition and fermentation of endosperm cell walls of soya beans and maize was approached from three different angles. Firstly, the fermentation (rate and extent of fermentation, the sugar degradation pattern, and volatile fatty acid production) of soya bean and maize cell walls was analysed, both in situ and in vitro. This analysis revealed that the physical structure of the cell wall (particle size and cell wall thickness) influences cell...

  19. The excluded minor structure theorem with planarly embedded wall

    CERN Document Server

    Mohar, Bojan

    2009-01-01

    A graph is nearly embedded in a surface if it consists of graph $G_0$ that is embedded in the surface, together with a bounded number of vortices having no large transactions. It is shown that every large wall (or grid minor) in a nearly embedded graph, many rows of which intersect the embedded subgraph $G_0$ of the near-embedding, contains a large subwall that is planarly embedded within $G_0$. This result provides some hidden details needed for a strong version of the Robertson and Seymour's excluded minor theorem as presented in [K. Kawarabayashi, B. Mohar, Some recent progress and applications in graph minor theory, Graphs Combin. 23 (2007) 1-46].

  20. Structural anisotropy of magnetically aligned single wall carbon nanotube films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thick films of aligned single wall carbon nanotubes and ropes have been produced by filtration/deposition from suspension in strong magnetic fields. We measured mosaic distributions of rope orientations in the film plane, for samples of different thicknesses. For an ∼1 μm film the full width at half maximum (FWHM) derived from electron diffraction is 25 degree sign -28 degree sign . The FWHM of a thicker film (∼7 μm) measured by x-ray diffraction is slightly broader, 35±3 degree sign . Aligned films are denser than ordinary filter-deposited ones, and much denser than as-grown material. Optimization of the process is expected to yield smaller FWHMs and higher densities. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  1. Free torsion of thin-walled structural members of open- and closed-sections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long-yuan LI; D. EASTERBROOK

    2014-01-01

    Free torsion of thin-walled structures of open- and closed-sections is a classical elastic mechanics problem, which, in literature, is often solved by the method of membrane analogy. The method of membrane analogy, however, can be only applied to structures of a single material. If the structure consists of both open-and closed-sections, the method of membrane analogy is difficult to be applied. In this paper, a new method is presented for solving the free torsion of thin-walled structures of open- and/or closed-sections with multiple materials. By utilizing a simple statically indeterminate concept, torsional equations are derived based on the equilibrium and compatibility conditions. The method presented here not only is very simple and easy to understand but also can be applied to thin-walled structures of combined open-and closed-sections with multiple materials.

  2. Incidence of patients with acute aortic dissection

    OpenAIRE

    Salkovski, Safet; Panova, Gordana; Velickova, Nevenka; Panova, Blagica; Panov, Nenad; Nikolovska, Lence; Dzidrova, Violeta

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Acute aortic dissection (AAD) e life-threatening condition that characterizes the high mortality worldwide (7-8%). When AAD is split in the wall of the aorta where the blood circulates between layers of the wall which can lead to its rupture. Early recognition of symptoms and appropriate response to the medical team is crucial to the outcome of the patient. On receipt of a patient with chest pain to bear in mind the possibility of AAD. Standard diagnostics when fasti...

  3. Structural Insight into Cell Wall Architecture of Micanthus sinensis cv. using Correlative Microscopy Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jianfeng; Lv, Xunli; Yang, Shumin; Tian, Genlin; Liu, Xing'e

    2015-10-01

    Structural organization of the plant cell wall is a key parameter for understanding anisotropic plant growth and mechanical behavior. Four imaging platforms were used to investigate the cell wall architecture of Miscanthus sinensis cv. internode tissue. Using transmission electron microscopy with potassium permanganate, we found a great degree of inhomogeneity in the layering structure (4-9 layers) of the sclerenchymatic fiber (Sf). However, the xylem vessel showed a single layer. Atomic force microscopy images revealed that the cellulose microfibrils (Mfs) deposited in the primary wall of the protoxylem vessel (Pxv) were disordered, while the secondary wall was composed of Mfs oriented in parallel in the cross and longitudinal section. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy images indicated no variation in the Mf orientation of Pxv and the Mfs in Pxv were oriented more perpendicular to the cell axis than that of Sfs. Based on the integrated results, we have proposed an architectural model of Pxv composed of two layers: an outermost primary wall composed of a meshwork of Mfs and inner secondary wall containing parallel Mfs. This proposed model will support future ultrastructural analysis of plant cell walls in heterogeneous tissues, an area of increasing scientific interest particularly for liquid biofuel processing. PMID:26358178

  4. A New Rule-Based Strategy to Determine The Failure modes of Structural Walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parameters affecting types of failure of reinforced concrete structural walls with arbitrary aspect ratios and cross section are investigated using data from numerous wall tests. Basically there are three known primary failure modes that covers prominent behavior of wall at the failure load. Shear failure is known by diagonal tension cracks and premature yielding of shear reinforcement that leads to abrupt none-ductile failure. To insure a ductile flexural failure, it is recommended that strength in shear be equal or grater than strength in flexure. Flexural-shear failure is another type of failure that needs to more details to identify explicitly and it is divided to two different cases namely web crushing or sliding shear failure. A new model is proposed to predict the failure modes of structural walls in terms of shear strength, nominal shear stress, shear force related to flexural capacity, the level of compression in concrete and control of sliding shear failure.

  5. Wall shear stress manifolds and near wall flow topology in aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Gambaruto, Alberto M.; Chen, Guoning; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2015-11-01

    Transport of atherogenic and thrombogenic chemicals near the vessel wall highly influences atherosclerosis and thrombosis. The high Schmidt number of these species leads to a thin concentration boundary layer near the wall. The wall shear stress (WSS) vector field can be scaled to obtain the near wall velocity in this region, thus providing first order approximation to near wall transport. In this study, the complex blood flow in patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysms was considered. Lagrangian tracking of surface-bound tracers representing near wall species was employed to identify Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) for the WSS surface vector field. The WSS LCS matched the stable and unstable manifolds of saddle type fixed points of the time-average WSS vector field, due to the quasi-steady nature of these near wall transport processes. A WSS exposure time measure is introduced to quantify the concentration of near wall species. The effect of diffusion and normal flow on these structures is investigated. The WSS LCS highly influence the concentration of near wall species, and provide a template for near-wall transport.

  6. Numerical Comparison of Active Acoustic and Structural Noise Control in a Stiffened Double Wall Cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    1996-01-01

    The active acoustic and structural noise control characteristics of a double wall cylinder with and without ring stiffeners were numerically evaluated. An exterior monopole was assumed to acoustically excite the outside of the double wall cylinder at an acoustic cavity resonance frequency. Structural modal vibration properties of the inner and outer shells were analyzed by post-processing the results from a finite element analysis. A boundary element approach was used to calculate the acoustic cavity response and the coupled structural-acoustic interaction. In the frequency region of interest, below 500 Hz, all structural resonant modes were found to be acoustically slow and the nonresonant modal response to be dominant. Active sound transmission control was achieved by control forces applied to the inner or outer shell, or acoustic control monopoles placed just outside the inner or outer shell. A least mean square technique was used to minimize the interior sound pressures at the nodes of a data recovery mesh. Results showed that single acoustic control monopoles placed just outside the inner or outer shells resulted in better sound transmission control than six distributed point forces applied to either one of the shells. Adding stiffeners to the double wall structure constrained the modal vibrations of the shells, making the double wall stiffer with associated higher modal frequencies. Active noise control obtained for the stiffened double wall configurations was less than for the unstiffened cylinder. In all cases, the acoustic control monopoles controlled the sound transmission into the interior better than the structural control forces.

  7. THE STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF STEEL SILOS WITH CYLINDRICAL-WALL BEARING AND PROFILE-STEEL BEARING

    OpenAIRE

    Zhengjun Tang; Daibiao Zhou; Chenwei Peng; Wenping Wu

    2015-01-01

    The silos are widely used in bulk material in many fields such as agriculture, mining, chemical, electric power storage, etc. Thin metal cylindrical silo shells are vulnerable to buckling failure caused by the compressive wall friction force. In this paper, the structural analysis of two types of steel silo with cylindrical-wall bearing and profile-steel bearing is implemented by Abaqus finite element analysis. The results indicate that under the same loading conditions, steel silos with prof...

  8. The effect of oxidation on structural and electrical properties of single wall carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Marković Zoran M.; Peruško Davor B.; Tošić Dragana D.; Romčević Nebojša Z.; Dramićanin Miroslav D.; Nikolić Zoran M.; Marković Todorović Biljana M.

    2011-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) represent an important group of nanomaterials with attractive electrical, chemical, and mechanical properties. In this work we have investigated the structural, optical and electrical properties of single wall carbon nanotube films deposited on copper substrate and then transferred to polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). The properties of deposited films were varied by changing different parameters: substrate temperature, deposition time and electric fie...

  9. High-R Walls for New Construction Structural Performance: Wind Pressure Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeRenzis, A.; Kochkin, V.

    2013-01-01

    This technical report is focused primarily on laboratory testing that evaluates wind pressure performance characteristics for wall systems constructed with exterior insulating sheathing. This research and test activity will help to facilitate the ongoing use of non-structural sheathing options and provide a more in-depth understanding of how wall system layers perform in response to high wind perturbations normal to the surface.

  10. High-R Walls for New Construction Structural Performance. Wind Pressure Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeRenzis, A. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Kochkin, V. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This technical report is focused primarily on laboratory testing that evaluates wind pressure performance characteristics for wall systems constructed with exterior insulating sheathing. This research and test activity will help to facilitate the ongoing use of non-structural sheathing options and provide a more in-depth understanding of how wall system layers perform in response to high wind perturbations normal to the surface.

  11. Effect of Yeast Cell Morphology, Cell Wall Physical Structure and Chemical Composition on Patulin Adsorption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Luo

    Full Text Available The capability of yeast to adsorb patulin in fruit juice can aid in substantially reducing the patulin toxic effect on human health. This study aimed to investigate the capability of yeast cell morphology and cell wall internal structure and composition to adsorb patulin. To compare different yeast cell morphologies, cell wall internal structure and composition, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and ion chromatography were used. The results indicated that patulin adsorption capability of yeast was influenced by cell surface areas, volume, and cell wall thickness, as well as 1,3-β-glucan content. Among these factors, cell wall thickness and 1,3-β-glucan content serve significant functions. The investigation revealed that patulin adsorption capability was mainly affected by the three-dimensional network structure of the cell wall composed of 1,3-β-glucan. Finally, patulin adsorption in commercial kiwi fruit juice was investigated, and the results indicated that yeast cells could adsorb patulin from commercial kiwi fruit juice efficiently. This study can potentially simulate in vitro cell walls to enhance patulin adsorption capability and successfully apply to fruit juice industry.

  12. COUPLED VIBRATION OF STRUCTURAL THIN-WALLED CORES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiu Cho; J.S. Kuang

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the coupled vibration of asymmetric core structures in tall buildings. The governing equation of free vibration and its corresponding eigenvalue problem, which is a set of equations for laterally flexural vibrations in two different directions coupled by a warping-St. Venant torsional vibration, are derived. Based on the Calerkin method, a generalized approximate method is developed for the analysis of coupled vibration and thus proposed for determining the natural fiequeneies and mode shapes of the structure in triply-coupled vibration. The results of the proposed method for the example structure show good agreement with those of the FEM analysis. The proposed method has been shown to provide a sim ple and rapid, yet accurate, means for coupled vibration analysis of core structures.

  13. Numerical Analysis of Composite Steel Concrete Structural Shear Walls with Steel Encased Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Dan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of common reinforced concrete shear walls in high rise buildings is sometimes limited because of the large amount of reinforcement localized at the end of the element. A good alternative in avoiding this disadvantage is to use composite steel concrete structural shear walls with steel encased profiles. This solution used for high rise buildings, offers to designers lateral stiffness, shear capacity and high bending resisting moment of structural walls. The encasement of the steel shapes in concrete is applied also for the following purposes: flexural stiffening and strengthening of compression elements; fire protection; potentially easier repairs after moderate damage; economy with respect both to material and construction. Until now in the national and international literature poor information about nonlinear behaviour of composite steel concrete structural shear walls with steel encased profiles is available. A theoretical and experimental program related to the behaviour of steel concrete structural shear walls with steel encased profiles is developed at “Politehnica” University of Timişoara. The program refers to six different elements, which differ by the shape of the steel encased profile and also by the arrangement of steel shapes on the cross section of the element. In order to calibrate the elements for experimental study some numerical analysis were made. The paper presents the results of numerical analysis with details of stress distribution, crack distribution, structural stiffness at various loads, and load bearing capacity of the elements.

  14. Congenital anomalies of aortic arch: CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Yung; Kim, Yang Min; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Mi Young [Sejong General hospial, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Young [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Seok [Cheju Medical Center, Cheju (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-01-01

    Aortic arch anomalies result from the failure of an embryonic vascular structure to persists and regress in the usual manner during formation of the aortic arch. The anomalous aortic arch may encircle and compress the trachea and esophagus as a form of a vascular ring. The diagnosis of aortic arch anomaly and the recognition of airway compression are important because they are conditions which complicate the natural and surgical course of related diseases. CT can demonstrate the nature of anatomic structures such as thr treachea and esophagus not revealed by angiogrphy, simultaneosuly disclosing the relationship of stenotic airways and offending mediastinal vessels. Volumetric data acquisition by means of spiral CT enables three dimensional reconstruction, which can provide easy global understanding for the complex anatomy and spatial relationship of airway and cardiovascular structures. Three dimensional imaging is very useful for the physician and surgeon who are not accustomed to mentally reconstructing axial images, and can facilitate surgical planning.

  15. A case of megadolichobasilar anomaly complicated with abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 41 year-old hypertensive male was admitted because of progressing left hemiparesis and dysarthria. CT demonstrated hyperdense mass with partial contast enhancement, extending from the level of lower pons to that of suprasellar cistern. Reconstructed imaging of CT showed a huge mass lesion, in which a wide curvilinear hyperdensity was demonstrated by contrast enhancement. Cerebral angiography revealed markedly elongated and dilated basilar and carotid arteries. From these findings, the prepontine hyperdense mass lesion was diagnosed as megadolichobasilar anomaly with marked wall thickening. Findings of abdominal aortic angiography and abdominal CT suggested the presence of marked atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysm with mural thrombi. Six months after initial admission, neurological symptoms gradually deteriorated and CT showed dilatation of the 3rd and lateral ventricles, suggesting the development of hydrocephalus due to compression of the aqueduct by the megadolichobasilar anomaly. Magnetic resonance imaging at this time demonstrated more details of the lesion and the deformity of the brain stem, which was not detected by conventional CT. Complications of vascular anomalies other than intracranial vasculature, such as aortic aneurysm, have also been repoted. After the introduction of CT, demonstration of a long, wide, curvilinear structure with abnormal density in the prepontine region has been reported to be diagnostic for the megadolichobasilar anomaly. This patient has had hypertension for 10 years, which probably due to chronic nephritis. He had no definite findings for angitis, but had abdominal aortic aneurysm with mural thrombi. From these findings, atherosclerosis of large vessels may have played one of the roles in the pathogenesis of this anomaly in the present case. (J.P.N.)

  16. Influence of the myocardial bridging phenomenon on the myocardial structure and the coronary arteries wall structure changes

    OpenAIRE

    Tomanović-Koković Jelena; Teofilovski-Parapid Gordana; Oklobdžija Mirjana; Kanjuh Vladimir; Kovačević Slobodan; Parapid Biljana; Koković Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    Background/Aim. Our research was performed to evaluate the influences of the myocardial bridging of coronary arteries on the myocardial and coronary arteries wall structure changes, that could be a reason for multiple heart malfunctions. Methods. We analyzed the autopsy material, collected during a five-years period, and especially the group of 575 cases with the major aim to diagnose mors naturalis. In all cases with the presence of myocardial bridge over the arterial coronary wall revealed ...

  17. A Perspective Review on Numerical Simulations of Hemodynamics in Aortic Dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Naimah Wan Ab Naim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aortic dissection, characterized by separation of the layers of the aortic wall, poses a significant challenge for clinicians. While type A aortic dissection patients are normally managed using surgical treatment, optimal treatment strategy for type B aortic dissection remains controversial and requires further evaluation. Although aortic diameter measured by CT angiography has been clinically used as a guideline to predict dilation in aortic dissection, hemodynamic parameters (e.g., pressure and wall shear stress, geometrical factors, and composition of the aorta wall are known to substantially affect disease progression. Due to the limitations of cardiac imaging modalities, numerical simulations have been widely used for the prediction of disease progression and therapeutic outcomes, by providing detailed insights into the hemodynamics. This paper presents a comprehensive review of the existing numerical models developed to investigate reasons behind tear initiation and progression, as well as the effectiveness of various treatment strategies, particularly the stent graft treatment.

  18. Aortic root dynamics and surgery: from craft to science

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Allen; Dagum, Paul; Miller, D. Craig

    2007-01-01

    Since the fifteenth century beginning with Leonardo da Vinci's studies, the precise structure and functional dynamics of the aortic root throughout the cardiac cycle continues to elude investigators. The last five decades of experimental work have contributed substantially to our current understanding of aortic root dynamics. In this article, we review and summarize the relevant structural analyses, using radiopaque markers and sonomicrometric crystals, concerning aortic root three-dimensiona...

  19. Isogeometric analysis for thin-walled composite structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, Y.

    2016-01-01

    The conceptual ideas behind isogeometric analysis (IGA) are aimed at unifying computer aided design (CAD) and finite element analysis (FEA). Isogeometric analysis employs the non-uniform rational B-spline functions (NURBS) used for the geometric description of a structure to approximate its physical

  20. Experimental Investigation on Near-wall Turbulent Flow Structures over Deformable Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toloui, Mostafa; John, Nolan; Hong, Jiarong

    2015-11-01

    Wall-bounded turbulent flows over rough surfaces have been studied for almost a century. However, in most of the prior studies, little attention has been paid to the role of roughness mechanical properties, e.g. deformability, in altering the flow characteristics including both general turbulent statistics and near-wall flow structures. In this study, high resolution time-resolved digital in-line holographic PIV is employed to investigate the near-wall turbulent structures as well as turbulent statistics around and above deforming roughness structures. The rough wall samples consisting of tapered cylinders of size 0.5 mm in diameter and 3 mm in height are manufactured from transparent PDMS with similar geometrical features but various deformability levels. The experiments are conducted within an optically index-matched facility (using NaI solution) operating with different Reynolds numbers where roughness samples of different deformability are placed downstream of a 1.2 m long acrylic channel of 50 mm square cross section. The follow-up research envisions a large dataset including various Reynolds numbers and deformability to elucidate the role of roughness deformability on near-wall coherent structures and turbulent energy transport within and above the roughness sublayer. This work is supported by the startup package of Jiarong Hong and the MnDrive Fellowship of Mostafa Toloui from University of Minnesota.

  1. Thermo-hydraulic and structural analysis for finger-based concept of ITER blanket first wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The blanket first wall is one of the main plasma facing components in ITER tokamak. The finger-typed first wall was proposed through the current design progress by ITER organization. In this concept, each first wall module is composed of a beam and twenty fingers. The main function of the first wall is to remove efficiently the high heat flux loading from the fusion plasma during its operation. Therefore, the thermal and structural performance should be investigated for the proposed finger-based design concept of first wall. The various case studies were performed for a unit finger model considering different loading conditions. The finite element model was made for a half of a module using symmetric boundary conditions to reduce the computational effort. The thermo-hydraulic analysis was performed to obtain the pressure drop and temperature profiles. Then the structural analysis was carried out using the maximum temperature distribution obtained in thermo-hydraulic analysis. Finally, the transient thermo-hydraulic analysis was performed for the generic first wall module to obtain the temperature evolution history considering cyclic heat flux loading with nuclear heating. After that, the thermo-mechanical analysis was performed at the time step when the maximum temperature gradient was occurred. Also, the stress analysis was performed for the component with a finger and a beam to check the residual stress of the component after thermal shrinkage assembly.

  2. Organised structures in wall turbulence as deduced from stability theory-based methods

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Sen; S V Veeravalli; P W Carpenter; G Joshi; P S Josan

    2007-02-01

    In earlier work, we have explored the relevance of hydrodynamic stability theory to fully developed turbulent wall flows. Using an extended Orr-Summerfeld Equation, based on an anisotropic eddy-viscosity model, it was shown that there exists a wide range of unstable wave numbers (wall modes), which mimic some of the key features of turbulent wall flows. Here we present experimental confirmation for the same. There is good qualitative and quantitative agreement between theory and experiment. Once the dominant coherent structure is obtained from stability theory, control of turbulence would be the next logical step. As shown, the use of a compliant wall shows considerable promise. We also present some theoretical work for bypass transition (Klebanoff/K-modes), wherein the receptivity of a laminar boundary layer to a vortex sheet in the freestream has been studied. Further, it is shown that triadic interaction between K-modes, 2D TS waves and 3D TS waves can lead to rapid algebraic growth. A similar mechanism seems to carry over to inner wall structures in wall turbulence and perhaps this is the “root cause” for sustenance of turbulence.

  3. Turbine airfoil with dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a compliant structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell; Christian X. , Morrison; Jay A.

    2011-12-20

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a compliant structure. The compliant structure may be configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand without limitation by the inner layer. The compliant structure may be formed from a plurality of pedestals positioned generally parallel with each other. The pedestals may include a first foot attached to a first end of the pedestal and extending in a first direction aligned with the outer layer, and may include a second foot attached to a second end of the pedestal and extending in a second direction aligned with the inner layer.

  4. In-service inspections of thick walled concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ageing management and renewal of the operating license of existing NPP's are at present the main problems of nuclear energy. For the ageing management of concrete structures the OECD-Nuclear Energy Agency, Committee on the Safety on Nuclear Installations defined as the first priority ISI technigues for reinforced concrete structures having thick sections and areas not directly accessible for inspections. In this paper is described the NRI Rez research and development programme in this field. Three ISI techniques were selected: Impact-Echo ultrasound and high frequency radar or betatron 7 MeV. In the period from 2004 to 2005 the mathematical studies of efficiency of Impact-Echo method for detecting of reinforcing bars, deep surface cracks and internal voids were done. In 2005 will be manufactured the 2 × 2 × 1 m concrete specimens with reinforcing bars, crack and holes which represent possible defects. Results of the solution will be used for qualification of ISI techniques

  5. Isogeometric analysis for thin-walled composite structures

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Y

    2016-01-01

    The conceptual ideas behind isogeometric analysis (IGA) are aimed at unifying computer aided design (CAD) and finite element analysis (FEA). Isogeometric analysis employs the non-uniform rational B-spline functions (NURBS) used for the geometric description of a structure to approximate its physical response in an isoparametric sense. Due to the tensor product property of multi-variate NURBS, it is difficult to represent complex topological shapes with a single NURBS patch. Multiple, often no...

  6. Concrete with Nano-Additives in Thin Wall Shell Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Lūsis, V; Krasņikovs, A; I. Boiko; Geriņa-Ancāne, A

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper physical and mechanical properties of glass fibre fibrous concrete as well as its technological possibilities in the production of definite shells have been studied. Production technology patented by RTU Concrete Mechanics Laboratory was used. This technology allows developing and obtaining different shells from fibrous concrete, including also dome structures and two-plane bended shells with smooth inner and outer surfaces. Concrete is spread in the necessary thickness o...

  7. Aortic Valve Sparing in Different Aortic Valve and Aortic Root Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Tirone E

    2016-08-01

    The development of aortic valve-sparing operations (reimplantation of the aortic valve and remodeling of the aortic root) expanded the surgical armamentarium for treating patients with aortic root dilation caused by a variety of disorders. Young adults with aortic root aneurysms associated with genetic syndromes are ideal candidates for reimplantation of the aortic valve, and the long-term results have been excellent. Incompetent bicuspid aortic valves with dilated aortic annuli are also satisfactorily treated with the same type of operation. Older patients with ascending aortic aneurysm and aortic insufficiency secondary to dilated sinotubular junction and a normal aortic annulus can be treated with remodeling of the aortic root or with reimplantation of the aortic valve. The first procedure is simpler, and both procedures are likely equally effective. As with any heart valve-preserving procedure, patient selection and surgical expertise are keys to successful and durable repairs. PMID:27491910

  8. Graft Copolymerization of Acrylic Acid onto Fungal Cell Wall Structural Polysaccharide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Acrylic acid was graft-copolymerized onto Rhi. oryzae's cell wall structural polysacchaxide directly and efficiently in aqueous solution with ceric ammonium nitrate as initiator. The maximal grafting percentage of 135.5% was obtained under the condition of [Ce4+]=5mmol.L-1, [AA]=1mol.L-1, T=60°C and t=3h. Graft copolymerization was suggested to proceed through free radical reaction mechanism. Grafting occurred primarily on chitosan. Acrylic acid was also attempted to be grafted onto Asp. niger cell wall structural polysaccharide, and only 44.2% of grafting percentage was resulted.

  9. Seismic Performance Evaluation of Multistory Reinforced Concrete Moment Resisting Frame Structure with Shear Walls

    OpenAIRE

    Junwon Seo; Jong Wan Hu; Burte Davaajamts

    2015-01-01

    This paper is intended to evaluate the seismic performance of a twelve-story reinforced concrete moment-resisting frame structure with shear walls using 3D finite element models according to such seismic design regulations as Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) guideline and seismic building codes including Los Angeles Tall Building Structural Design Council (LATBSDC) code. The structure is located in Seismic Zone 4, considered the highest-seismic-risk classification established by the...

  10. Modelling and analysis of a wall-frame structure according to EC8

    OpenAIRE

    Bašič, Sara

    2005-01-01

    In order to harmonize the standards for design of structures in Europe the family of Eurocode standards has been developed. Eurocode 8 (EC8) represents the standard for design of earthquake resistant structures. This standard has been translated and will soon be adopted as Slovenian standard SIST EN 1998-1. The application of this standard for analysis of a reinforced concrete frame-wall building was the main goal of this diploma work. We focused on chapters on structural analysis. The analys...

  11. Influence of liquid environment and bounding wall structure on fluid flow through carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramyan, A.K.; Bessonov, N.M.; Mirantsev, L.V.; Reinberg, N.A., E-mail: miran@mail.ru

    2015-06-26

    Flows of different fluids through single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with boundary walls having the perfect and defective graphene structures have been investigated by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. It has been shown that the boundary wall structure has a very strong influence on not only an average fluid flow rate but also on shapes of trajectories of individual fluid atoms (molecules) and fluid centres of mass. The fluid flows through SWCNTs surrounded by different liquid environments have been also simulated and an influence of these environments on the average fluid flow rates have been studied. It has been revealed a strong dependence of the average fluid flow rate on a molecular polarity of fluids flowing through SWCNTs and those surrounding the tubes. It has been shown that, for multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), an effect of liquid environment on the fluid flow can be significantly suppressed. - Highlights: • Equilibrium structures of polar and nonpolar fluids in CNTs. • Trajectories of fluid particles flowing through CNTs. • Influence of liquid environments. • Influence of defects of the walls.

  12. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to help prevent aortic stenosis? There's no prophylactic methods that anybody can take to prevent aortic stenosis ... to progression and aortic sclerosis is not a reason to need an operation or aggressive management at ...

  13. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... opens freely when the heart contracts. On the right, we see a picture of the aortic valve ... the aortic valve because the probe is sitting right behind the aortic valve. Lots of patients on ...

  14. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... surgery in our community. Aortic stenosis is a process by which the aortic valve, which is the ... and does not open easily or appropriately. This process starts out as a disease we call aortic ...

  15. Valvular Aortic Stenosis: A Proteomic Insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Vivanco

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Calcified aortic valve disease is a slowly progressive disorder that ranges from mild valve thickening with no obstruction of blood flow, known as aortic sclerosis, to severe calcification with impaired leaflet motion or aortic stenosis. In the present work we describe a rapid, reproducible and effective method to carry out proteomic analysis of stenotic human valves by conventional 2-DE and 2D-DIGE, minimizing the interference due to high calcium concentrations. Furthermore, the protocol permits the aortic stenosis proteome to be analysed, advancing our knowledge in this area. Summary: Until recently, aortic stenosis (AS was considered a passive process secondary to calcium deposition in the aortic valves. However, it has recently been highlighted that the risk factors associated with the development of calcified AS in the elderly are similar to those of coronary artery disease. Furthermore, degenerative AS shares histological characteristics with atherosclerotic plaques, leading to the suggestion that calcified aortic valve disease is a chronic inflammatory process similar to atherosclerosis. Nevertheless, certain data does not fit with this theory making it necessary to further study this pathology. The aim of this study is to develop an effective protein extraction protocol for aortic stenosis valves such that proteomic analyses can be performed on these structures. In the present work we have defined a rapid, reproducible and effective method to extract proteins and that is compatible with 2-DE, 2D-DIGE and MS techniques. Defining the protein profile of this tissue is an important and challenging task that will help to understand the mechanisms of physiological/pathological processes in aortic stenosis valves.

  16. X-ray and back-wall echo ultrasonic examination of wrought iron building structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidovszky István

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The wrought iron building structures constituting part of the architectural heritage, e. g. handrails, gate hinges, columns, arch ties and wall ties represent incorporeal value, but operate as load bearing structures as well. There are few information on their mechanical properties and quality. Due to the inhomogeneity of the material of wrought iron building structures generated during the production, the known metal testing methods, as the tensile and hardness tests or metallographic examination, are not enough to survey the properties of such structures in depth. For the further and more accurate examinations, the application of X-ray and back-wall echo ultrasonic tests are essential. The goal of our paper is the presentation of the application of the examinations used extensively in the machine industry for the testing of wrought iron building structures.

  17. Thermal-structural response and low-cycle fatigue damage of channel wall nozzle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Cheng; Wang Yibai; Liu Yu; Liu Dawei; Lu Xingyu

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the thermo-mechanical response of channel wall nozzle under cyclic work-ing loads, the finite volume fluid-thermal coupling calculation method and the finite element thermal-structural coupling analysis technique are applied. In combination with the material low-cycle fatigue behavior, the modified continuous damage model on the basics of local strain approach is adopted to analyze the fatigue damage distribution and accumulation with increasing nozzle work cycles. Simulation results have shown that the variation of the non-uniform temperature distribution of channel wall nozzle during cyclic work plays a significant role in the thermal-structural response by altering the material properties;the thermal-mechanical loads interaction results in serious defor-mation mainly in the front region of slotted liner. In particular, the maximal cyclic strains appear in the intersecting regions of liner gas side wall and symmetric planes of channel and rib, where the fatigue failure takes place initially;with the increase in nozzle work cycles, the residual plastic strain accumulates linearly, and the strain amplitude and increment in each work cycle are separately equal, but the fatigue damage grows up nonlinearly. As a result, a simplified nonlinear damage accumulation approach has been suggested to estimate the fatigue service life of channel wall nozzle. The predicted node life is obviously conservative to the Miner’s life. In addition, several workable methods have also been proposed to improve the channel wall nozzle durability.

  18. Spiral plume structures in turbulent natural convection between two vertical walls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    By means of direct numerical simulation, coherent structures are investigated in turbulent natural convection between two vertical differentially heated walls. It is observed that large-scale spanwise vortices and spiral plume structures exist together in the flow. Spiral plume structures appear at the positions with relatively large helicity, large normal vorticity and high fluctuating temperature. In this note, the shape, the characteristics and formation of the spiral structures are studied and compared with those in Rayleigh-Bénard convection. The conditional sampling analysis indicates the main properties of the spiral structures.

  19. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... access catheters Vertebroplasty Women and vascular disease Women's health Social Media Facebook Twitter ... Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Interventional Radiologists Treat Abdominal Aneurysms Nonsurgically Interventional radiologists are vascular ...

  20. Interrelation of Shape and Structure of Domain Walls with Magnetic Inhomogeneities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P. Kuzmenko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available By using atomic force microscopy (resolution of 40 nm the effect of surface roughness and internal inhomogeneities on the fine structure of domain walls of different types in thin transparent orthoferrite samples cut perpendicular to the optic axis for YFeO3 and axis [001] for DyFeO3 has been studied.

  1. Structure of the cell wall of mango after application of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Josenilda M.; Villar, Heldio P.; Pimentel, Rejane M. M.

    2012-11-01

    Cells of the mesocarp of mango cultivar Tommy Atkins were analyzed by Transmission Electron Microscope—TEM to evaluate the effects of doses of 0.5 and 1.0 kGy applied immediately after the fruit and after storage for twenty days at a temperature of 12 °C followed by 5 days of simulated marketing at a temperature of 21 °C. No alteration was found in the structure of the cell wall, middle lamella, and plasma membrane of fruits when analyzed immediately after application of doses. The mesocarp cell structure of the cell wall, middle lamella, and the plasma membrane did however undergo changes after storage. Fruits that received a dose of 0.5 kGy displayed slight changes in cell wall structure and slight disintegration of the middle lamella. Fruits that received a dose of 1.0 kGy displayed more severe changes in the structure of the cell wall, greater middle lamella degradation, and displacement of the plasma membrane.

  2. Soil-structure Interaction in the Seismic Response of Coupled Wall-frame Structures on Pile Foundations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonari, S.; Dezi, F.; Leoni, G.

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents a study on the seismic response of coupled wall-frame structures founded on piles. A complete soil-structure interaction analysis is carried out with reference to a case study. Three different soils and seven real accelerograms are considered. Local site response analyses are performed in order to evaluate the incoming free-field motion at different depths and the ground motion amplifications. A numerical model, accounting for the pile-soil-pile interaction and for material and radiation damping, is used to evaluate the impedance matrix and the foundation input motion. The domain decomposition technique is adopted to perform time-domain seismic analyses introducing Lumped Parameter Models to take into account the impedance of the soil-structure system. Applications show that the rocking phenomena affect the behaviour of the structure by changing the base shear distribution within the wall and the frame and by increasing the structural displacements.

  3. Ultrasonic delineation of aortic microstructure: The relative contribution of elastin and collagen to aortic elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Jon N.; Takiuchi, Shin; Lin, Shiow Jiuan; Lanza, Gregory M.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2004-05-01

    Aortic elasticity is an important factor in hemodynamic health, and compromised aortic compliance affects not only arterial dynamics but also myocardial function. A variety of pathologic processes (e.g., diabetes, Marfan's syndrome, hypertension) can affect aortic elasticity by altering the microstructure and composition of the elastin and collagen fiber networks within the tunica media. Ultrasound tissue characterization techniques can be used to obtain direct measurements of the stiffness coefficients of aorta by measurement of the speed of sound in specific directions. In this study we sought to define the contributions of elastin and collagen to the mechanical properties of aortic media by measuring the magnitude and directional dependence of the speed of sound before and after selective isolation of either the collagen or elastin fiber matrix. Formalin-fixed porcine aortas were sectioned for insonification in the circumferential, longitudinal, or radial direction and examined using high-frequency (50 MHz) ultrasound microscopy. Isolation of the collagen or elastin fiber matrices was accomplished through treatment with NaOH or formic acid, respectively. The results suggest that elastin is the primary contributor to aortic medial stiffness in the unloaded state, and that there is relatively little anisotropy in the speed of sound or stiffness in the aortic wall.

  4. Structural evaluation of W-211 flexible receiver platforms and tank pit walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is a structural analysis of the Flexible Receiver Platforms and the tank-pit wall during removal of equipment and during a accidental drop of that equipment. The platform and the pit walls must withstand a accidental drop of a mixer and transfer pumps in specific pits in tanks 102-AP and 104-AP. A mixer pump will be removed from riser 11 in pit 2A on tank 241-AP-102. A transfer pump will be removed from riser 13 in pit 2D on tank 241-AP-102 and another transfer pump will be removed from riser 3A in pit 4A on tank 241-AP-104

  5. Stress and lifetime calculations for first wall and blanket structural components. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report the lifetime of first wall and blanket structures of fusion reactors is investigated. The extension of small pre-existing cracks by the cyclic operation of a fusion reactor seems to be the most important failure mode. The special application of the present investigation are tubes acting directly as parts of the first wall and affected by various radiation effects. The outer surface is asymmetrically heated and by combination of thermal extension, swelling, irradiation creep and internal pressure a complex time dependent stress distribution results. Crack growth until failure caused by cyclic operation of the reactor is computed by application of fracture mechanical methods. (orig.)

  6. Vibrational behavior of adaptive aircraft wing structures modelled as composite thin-walled beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, O.; Librescu, L.; Rogers, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    The vibrational behavior of cantilevered aircraft wings modeled as thin-walled beams and incorporating piezoelectric effects is studied. Based on the converse piezoelectric effect, the system of piezoelectric actuators conveniently located on the wing yield the control of its associated vertical and lateral bending eigenfrequencies. The possibility revealed by this study enabling one to increase adaptively the eigenfrequencies of thin-walled cantilevered beams could play a significant role in the control of the dynamic response and flutter of wing and rotor blade structures.

  7. Structural performance of new thin-walled concrete sandwich panel system reinforced with bfrp shear connectors

    OpenAIRE

    Hodicky, Kamil; Hulin, Thomas; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup; Stang, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new thin-walled concrete sandwich panel system reinforced with basalt fiber-reinforced plastic (BFRP) with optimum structural performances and a high thermal resistance developed by Connovate and Technical University of Denmark. The shear connecting system made of a BFRP grid is described and provides information on the structural design with its advantages. Experimental and numerical investigations of the BFRP connecting systems were performed. The experimental program ...

  8. Effects of phosphorus-doping upon the electronic structures of single wall carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Aqing; Shao, QingYi; Lin, Zhicheng

    2011-01-01

    The phosphorus-doped single wall carbon nanotube (PSWCNT) is studied by using First-Principle methods based on Density Function Theory (DFT). The formation energy, total energy, band structure, geometry structure and density of states are calculated. It is found that the formation energy of the P-doped single carbon nanotubes increases with diameters; the total energy of carbon nanotubes with the same diameter decreases as the doping rate increases. The effects of impurity position on the im-...

  9. Dynamic Response of High Rise Structures Under The Influence of Shear Walls

    OpenAIRE

    Syed Khasim Mutwalli; Dr. Shaik Kamal Mohammed Azam

    2014-01-01

    This study presents the procedure for seismic performance estimation of high-rise buildings based on a concept of the capacity spectrum method. In 3D analytical model of thirty storied buildings have been generated for symmetric buildings Models and analyzed using structural analysis tool ETABS. The analytical model of the building includes all important components that influence the mass, strength, stiffness and deformability of the structure. To study the effect of concrete core wall & shea...

  10. A Migrated Aortic Stent Graft Causing Erosive Spondylopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gestrich, Christopher, E-mail: christopher.gestrich@ukb.uni-bonn.de; Probst, Chris, E-mail: chris.probst@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Department of Cardiac Surgery (Germany); Wilhelm, Kai, E-mail: kai.wilhelm@ek-bonn.de [Johanniterkrankenhaus Bonn, Department of Radiology (Germany); Schiller, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.schiller@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Department of Cardiac Surgery (Germany)

    2013-12-15

    We report about a patient presenting with back pain 4 months after an uneventful endovascular implantation of an aortic stent graft. Computed tomography scan revealed a migration of the stent with consecutive endoleakage, kink formation, and movement of the stent toward the spine, which caused destruction of the aortic wall as well as vertebral necrosis. Explantation of the stent and replacement of the native aorta relieved the patient of his symptoms.

  11. The Influence of Infill Wall Topology and Seismic Characteristics on the Response and Damage Distribution in Frame Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos Nanos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper identifies the effects of infill wall existence and arrangement in the seismic response of frame structures utilising the global structural damage index after Park/Ang (GDIPA and the maximum interstorey drift ratio (MISDR to express structural seismic response. Five different infill wall topologies of a 10-storey frame structure have been selected and analysed presenting an improved damage distribution model for infill wall bearing frames, hence promoting the use of nonstructural elements as a means of improving frame structural seismic behaviour and highlighting important aspects of structural response, demonstrating the suitability of such element implementation beyond their intended architectural scope.

  12. 8th Annual Glycoscience Symposium: Integrating Models of Plant Cell Wall Structure, Biosynthesis and Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azadi, Paratoo [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    2015-09-24

    The Complex Carbohydrate Research Center (CCRC) of the University of Georgia holds a symposium yearly that highlights a broad range of carbohydrate research topics. The 8th Annual Georgia Glycoscience Symposium entitled “Integrating Models of Plant Cell Wall Structure, Biosynthesis and Assembly” was held on April 7, 2014 at the CCRC. The focus of symposium was on the role of glycans in plant cell wall structure and synthesis. The goal was to have world leaders in conjunction with graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and research scientists to propose the newest plant cell wall models. The symposium program closely followed the DOE’s mission and was specifically designed to highlight chemical and biochemical structures and processes important for the formation and modification of renewable plant cell walls which serve as the basis for biomaterial and biofuels. The symposium was attended by both senior investigators in the field as well as students including a total attendance of 103, which included 80 faculty/research scientists, 11 graduate students and 12 Postdoctoral students.

  13. Connections between density, wall-normal velocity, and coherent structure in a heated turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxton-Fox, Theresa; Gordeyev, Stanislav; Smith, Adam; McKeon, Beverley

    2015-11-01

    Strong density gradients associated with turbulent structure were measured in a mildly heated turbulent boundary layer using an optical sensor (Malley probe). The Malley probe measured index of refraction gradients integrated along the wall-normal direction, which, due to the proportionality of index of refraction and density in air, was equivalently an integral measure of density gradients. The integral output was observed to be dominated by strong, localized density gradients. Conditional averaging and Pearson correlations identified connections between the streamwise gradient of density and the streamwise gradient of wall-normal velocity. The trends were suggestive of a process of pick-up and transport of heat away from the wall. Additionally, by considering the density field as a passive marker of structure, the role of the wall-normal velocity in shaping turbulent structure in a sheared flow was examined. Connections were developed between sharp gradients in the density and flow fields and strong vertical velocity fluctuations. This research is made possible by the Department of Defense through the National Defense & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program and by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research Grant # FA9550-12-1-0060.

  14. Tools and procedures for structural lifetime evaluation of NET first wall design concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problems, the available technology and the needed advances on the theoretical evaluation of the NET First Wall design concepts with respect to the structural lifetime are described. Major areas are: Computational methods to determine the First Wall deformations, stresses and strains under conditions of cyclic elasto-plasticity, swelling, irradiation and thermal creep and computational fracture mechanics in situations of inelasticity and high thermal gradients; Criteria for the evaluation of the calculated thermostructural response with respect to the integrity and functional requirements; Approaches to handle very complex First Wall geometries through a combination of 2 and 3 dimensional models. Uncertainties and open questions in these lifetime analyses tools and procedures are discussed and an example of first simple localized studies is given. (author)

  15. Properties of cellulose/pectins composites: implication for structural and mechanical properties of cell wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agoda-Tandjawa, G; Durand, S; Gaillard, C; Garnier, C; Doublier, J L

    2012-10-01

    The primary cell wall of dicotyledonous plants can be considered as a concentrated polymer assembly, containing in particular polysaccharides among which cellulose and pectins are known to be the major components. In order to understand and control the textural quality of plant-derived foods, it is highly important to elucidate the rheological and microstructural properties of these components, individually and in mixture, in order to define their implication for structural and mechanical properties of primary plant cell wall. In this study, the rheological and microstructural properties of model systems composed of sugar-beet microfibrillated cellulose and HM pectins from various sources, with varied degrees of methylation and containing different amounts of neutral sugar side chains, were investigated. The influence of the presence of calcium and/or sodium ions and the biopolymer concentrations on the properties of the mixed systems were also studied. The characterizations of the mixed system, considered as a simplified model of primary plant cell wall, showed that whatever the structural characteristics of the pectins, the ionic conditions of the medium and the biopolymer concentrations, the gelation of the composite was mainly controlled by cellulose. Thus, the cellulose network would be the principal component governing the mechanical properties of the cell walls. However, the neutral sugar side chains of the pectins seem to play a part in the interactions with cellulose, as shown by the interesting viscoelastic properties of cellulose/apple HM pectins systems. The rigidity of cellulose/pectins composite was strongly influenced by the structural characteristics of pectins. The particular properties of primary plant cell walls would thus result from the solid viscoelastic properties of cellulose, its interactions with pectins according to their structural characteristics (implication of the neutral sugar side chains and the specific potential calcic

  16. Simulations of super-structure domain walls in two dimensional assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We simulate the formation of domain walls in two-dimensional assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles. Particle parameters are chosen to match recent electron holography and Lorentz microscopy studies of almost monodisperse cobalt nanoparticles assembled into regular, elongated lattices. As the particles are small enough to consist of a single magnetic domain each, their magnetic interactions can be described by a spin model in which each particle is assigned a macroscopic “superspin.” Thus, the magnetic behaviour of these lattices may be compared to magnetic crystals with nanoparticle superspins taking the role of the atomic spins. The coupling is, however, different. The superspins interact only by dipolar interactions as exchange coupling between individual nanoparticles may be neglected due to interparticle spacing. We observe that it is energetically favorable to introduce domain walls oriented along the long dimension of nanoparticle assemblies rather than along the short dimension. This is unlike what is typically observed in continuous magnetic materials, where the exchange interaction introduces an energetic cost proportional to the area of the domain walls. Structural disorder, which will always be present in realistic assemblies, pins longitudinal domain walls when the external field is reversed, and makes a gradual reversal of the magnetization by migration of longitudinal domain walls possible, in agreement with previous experimental results

  17. Fluid dynamics of aortic root dilation in Marfan syndrome

    CERN Document Server

    Querzoli, Giorgio; Espa, Stefania; Costantini, Martina; Sorgini, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Aortic root dilation and propensity to dissection are typical manifestations of the Marfan Syndrome (MS), a genetic defect leading to the degeneration of the elastic fibres. Dilation affects the structure of the flow and, in turn, altered flow may play a role in vessel dilation, generation of aneurysms, and dissection. The aim of the present work is the investigation in-vitro of the fluid dynamic modifications occurring as a consequence of the morphological changes typically induced in the aortic root by MS. A mock-loop reproducing the left ventricle outflow tract and the aortic root was used to measure time resolved velocity maps on a longitudinal symmetry plane of the aortic root. Two dilated model aortas, designed to resemble morphological characteristics typically observed in MS patients, have been compared to a reference, healthy geometry. The aortic model was designed to quantitatively reproduce the change of aortic distensibility caused by MS. Results demonstrate that vorticity released from the valve ...

  18. Estudo comparativo da eficácia do etanol e do ácido L-glutâmico na prevenção da calcificação das cúspides e parede aórtica porcina: estudo experimental em ratos Comparative study on the efficacy of ethanol and of l-glutamic acid for preventing calcification of pig cusps and aortic wall: experimental study in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Ronald Soncini da ROSA

    2002-06-01

    pouches for each rat. We called each group as follows: GDA (control group, E80% (the group whose structures were previously prepared with ethanol 80% and GA 0.8% (group previously prepared with L-glutamic acid 0.8%; in those groups we measured calcium and performed a microscopic analysis seeking for any calcification, its location and intensity; inflammatory infiltrate, location and type, during a 15, 30, and 60-day period after the implant. RESULTS: Calcium was found in the aortic cusp in the E80% group (1.30±0.21 mg calcium/mg tissue at day 15, (1.05±0.22 mg calcium/mg tissue at day 30, and (0.53±0.42 mg calcium/mg tissue at day 60; in the GA 0.8% group (12.17±0.66 mg calcium/mg tissue at day 15, (15.31±2.82 mg calcium/mg tissue at day 30, and (34.24±16.28 mg calcium/mg tissue at day 60; and in the control group, GDA at day 15 (12.44±2.26 mg calcium/mg tissue, at day 30 (13.44±3.34 mg calcium/mg tissue, and at day 60 (50.85±8.71 µg calcium/mg tissue. As for the calcium measured in the aortic wall, in the E80% group we found (4.62±0.68 µg calcium/mg tissue at day 15, (9.47±2.59 µg calcium/mg tissue at day 30, and (23.56±7.75 µg calcium/mg tissue at day 60; in the GA 0.8% group at day 15 (4.31±0.85 µg calcium/mg tissue, at day 30 (7.69±1.48 µg calcium/mg tissue, and at day 60 (20.50±1.22 µg calcium/mg tissue; and in the control group (GDA at day 15 (7.34±1.32 µg calcium/mg tissue, at day 30 (9.28±0.76 µg calcium/mg tissue, at day 60 (27.60±1.08 µg calcium/mg tissue. Microscopic evaluation of the aortic cusp, showed a progressive calcification in those fixed with GDA. Such process was found partially in the GA 0.8% group, and totally absent in the E80% group. As for the assessment of the aortic wall segments, we also observed progressive calcification, which was not inhibited by the treatment with either GA 0.8% or E80%. CONCLUSIONS: We concluded that a pre-treatment with ethanol at 80% inhibited calcification in pig aortic cusps, however it was

  19. Ag-silica composite nanotube with controlled wall structures for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Haiyan; Wang, Juan; Gao, Qian; Chang, Mingwei; Ren, Zhaohui; Zhang, Xiwen; Li, Xiang; Weng, Wenjian; Han, Gaorong

    2013-11-01

    A range of Ag-silica composite nanotubes with tailored wall structures were successfully synthesized in situ by single-nozzle electrospinning. By increasing AgNO3 concentration, the wall structure of Ag-silica tubes changes from dense to porous, and eventually turns into a 'lace-like' structure. This is attributed to Ag ions doping into the SiOSi network of precursors, as illustrated in FTIR study. More importantly, Ag-silica composite nanotubes show robust antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative Escherichia coli microorganisms. Therefore, it is a breakthrough of the nanostructure biomaterial research for future medical applications that require strong antibacterial properties. PMID:23907057

  20. Aortic arch malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellenberger, Christian J. [University Children' s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2010-06-15

    Although anomalies of the aortic arch and its branches are relatively uncommon malformations, they are often associated with congenital heart disease. Isolated lesions may be clinically significant when the airways are compromised by a vascular ring. In this article, the development and imaging appearance of the aortic arch system and its various malformations are reviewed. (orig.)

  1. Imaging in aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aortic dissection (AD) is a catastrophic aortic disease. Imaging techniques play an invaluable role in the diagnostic evaluation and management of patients with AD. Major signs of AD with different imaging modalities are described in this article with a pertinent discussion on guidelines for the optimized approach of imaging study (13 refs.)

  2. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Aortic Aneurysm Repair May 7, 2009 Good afternoon. Welcome to the Baptist Cardiac and Vascular Institute here in Miami. My name ... our live webcast. Today we’re going to repair an abdominal aortic aneurysm using a technology called ...

  3. Rotation effect on near-wall turbulence statistics and flow structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Nansheng; LU Xiyun; ZHUANG Lixian

    2005-01-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent flow through an axially rotating pipe, coupled with nonlinear dynamic subgrid-scale (SGS) model, is carried out to investigate rotation effect on the near-wall turbulence characteristics and flow structures. In the rotating turbulent pipe flow, it is found that the tendency towards a relaminarized flow appears and the axial velocity fluctuation is suppressed; however, the azimuthal fluctuation is enhanced due to the presence of the pipe wall rotation. The joint probability density function (joint PDF) of the velocity fluctuations and the probability density function (PDF) of the helicity fluctuation are analyzed in detail. It is revealed that the resolved Reynolds stress and helicity fluctuation in the wall region are closely related to the correlation between the velocity and vorticity fluctuations and affected significantly by the rotation-induced azimuthal mean flow. Further, the budgets of resolved Reynolds stresses indicate that the rotation effect is responsible for the more active turbulent energy redistribution and the production of the azimuthal turbulence fluctuation. The near-wall inclined streaky structures with respect to the axial direction are ascribed to the spiral motion of the fluid induced by the rotating pipe. The turbulence characteristics revealed in this study are of great help for the understanding of physical fundamentals in the rotating turbulent flows and for the development of reliable turbulence model.

  4. Vibro-acoustic modelling of aircraft double-walls with structural links using Statistical Energy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campolina, Bruno L.

    The prediction of aircraft interior noise involves the vibroacoustic modelling of the fuselage with noise control treatments. This structure is composed of a stiffened metallic or composite panel, lined with a thermal and acoustic insulation layer (glass wool), and structurally connected via vibration isolators to a commercial lining panel (trim). The goal of this work aims at tailoring the noise control treatments taking design constraints such as weight and space optimization into account. For this purpose, a representative aircraft double-wall is modelled using the Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) method. Laboratory excitations such as diffuse acoustic field and point force are addressed and trends are derived for applications under in-flight conditions, considering turbulent boundary layer excitation. The effect of the porous layer compression is firstly addressed. In aeronautical applications, compression can result from the installation of equipment and cables. It is studied analytically and experimentally, using a single panel and a fibrous uniformly compressed over 100% of its surface. When compression increases, a degradation of the transmission loss up to 5 dB for a 50% compression of the porous thickness is observed mainly in the mid-frequency range (around 800 Hz). However, for realistic cases, the effect should be reduced since the compression rate is lower and compression occurs locally. Then the transmission through structural connections between panels is addressed using a four-pole approach that links the force-velocity pair at each side of the connection. The modelling integrates experimental dynamic stiffness of isolators, derived using an adapted test rig. The structural transmission is then experimentally validated and included in the double-wall SEA model as an equivalent coupling loss factor (CLF) between panels. The tested structures being flat, only axial transmission is addressed. Finally, the dominant sound transmission paths are

  5. Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Prosthetic Aortic Valves: Comparison between Immersed Boundary and Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Techniques for the Mesh Representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavo, Alessandra M; Rocatello, Giorgia; Iannaccone, Francesco; Degroote, Joris; Vierendeels, Jan; Segers, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    In recent years the role of FSI (fluid-structure interaction) simulations in the analysis of the fluid-mechanics of heart valves is becoming more and more important, being able to capture the interaction between the blood and both the surrounding biological tissues and the valve itself. When setting up an FSI simulation, several choices have to be made to select the most suitable approach for the case of interest: in particular, to simulate flexible leaflet cardiac valves, the type of discretization of the fluid domain is crucial, which can be described with an ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) or an Eulerian formulation. The majority of the reported 3D heart valve FSI simulations are performed with the Eulerian formulation, allowing for large deformations of the domains without compromising the quality of the fluid grid. Nevertheless, it is known that the ALE-FSI approach guarantees more accurate results at the interface between the solid and the fluid. The goal of this paper is to describe the same aortic valve model in the two cases, comparing the performances of an ALE-based FSI solution and an Eulerian-based FSI approach. After a first simplified 2D case, the aortic geometry was considered in a full 3D set-up. The model was kept as similar as possible in the two settings, to better compare the simulations' outcomes. Although for the 2D case the differences were unsubstantial, in our experience the performance of a full 3D ALE-FSI simulation was significantly limited by the technical problems and requirements inherent to the ALE formulation, mainly related to the mesh motion and deformation of the fluid domain. As a secondary outcome of this work, it is important to point out that the choice of the solver also influenced the reliability of the final results. PMID:27128798

  6. Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Prosthetic Aortic Valves: Comparison between Immersed Boundary and Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Techniques for the Mesh Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannaccone, Francesco; Degroote, Joris; Vierendeels, Jan; Segers, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    In recent years the role of FSI (fluid-structure interaction) simulations in the analysis of the fluid-mechanics of heart valves is becoming more and more important, being able to capture the interaction between the blood and both the surrounding biological tissues and the valve itself. When setting up an FSI simulation, several choices have to be made to select the most suitable approach for the case of interest: in particular, to simulate flexible leaflet cardiac valves, the type of discretization of the fluid domain is crucial, which can be described with an ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) or an Eulerian formulation. The majority of the reported 3D heart valve FSI simulations are performed with the Eulerian formulation, allowing for large deformations of the domains without compromising the quality of the fluid grid. Nevertheless, it is known that the ALE-FSI approach guarantees more accurate results at the interface between the solid and the fluid. The goal of this paper is to describe the same aortic valve model in the two cases, comparing the performances of an ALE-based FSI solution and an Eulerian-based FSI approach. After a first simplified 2D case, the aortic geometry was considered in a full 3D set-up. The model was kept as similar as possible in the two settings, to better compare the simulations’ outcomes. Although for the 2D case the differences were unsubstantial, in our experience the performance of a full 3D ALE-FSI simulation was significantly limited by the technical problems and requirements inherent to the ALE formulation, mainly related to the mesh motion and deformation of the fluid domain. As a secondary outcome of this work, it is important to point out that the choice of the solver also influenced the reliability of the final results. PMID:27128798

  7. Bicuspid aortic valve and severe aortic stenosis in a newborn exposed to carbamazapine during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karataş, Zehra; Karataş, Ahmet; Özlü, Tülay; Goksugur, Sevil B; Varan, Birgül

    2014-01-01

    The use of antiepileptic drugs increases the risk of major congenital malformations during pregnancy. Here, we report an infant who had a history of in-utero carbamazepine exposure and who was born with a cardiac malformation. The infant was born at 39 weeks of gestation vaginally to an epileptic mother who had been treated with carbamazepine throughout her pregnancy. He was referred due to cardiac murmur in the second week of his life. The mother had not received folic acid supplementation. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed bicuspid aortic valve, mild aortic stenosis, patent ductus arteriosus, patent foramen ovale and the renal ultrasound revealed mild left hydronephrosis. Follow-up echocardiography performed 14 weeks later showed increased severity of aortic stenosis and percutaneous balloon aortic valvuloplasty was performed. To our knowledge, there is only one case report in the literature mentioning the association of a bicuspid aortic valve and aortic stenosis with oxcarbazepine exposure, which is a structural derivative of carbamazepine. However, there are no reports for association with carbamazepine itself. Bicuspid aorta and aortic stenosis may be among the cardiac malformations that result from the teratogenic effect of carbamazepine. PMID:25584038

  8. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS (CFD) SIMULATIONS OF DRAG REDUCTION WITH PERIODIC MICRO-STRUCTURED WALL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gang; ZHOU Ming; WU Bo; YE Xia; CAI Lan

    2008-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics(CFD) simulations are adopted to investigate rectangular microchannel flows with various periodic micro-structured wall by introducing velocity slip boundary condition at low Reynolds number. The purpose of the current study is to numerically find out the effects of periodic micro-structured wall on the flow resistance in rectangular microchannel with the different spacings between microridges ranging from 15 to 60 μm. The simulative results indicate that pressure drop with different spacing between microridges increases linearly with flow velocity and decreases monotonically with slip velocity; Pressure drop reduction also increases with the spacing between microridges at the same condition of slip velocity and flow velocity. The results of numerical simulation are compared with theoretical predictions and experimental results in the literatures. It is found that there is qualitative agreement between them.

  9. Low field domain wall dynamics in artificial spin-ice basis structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, J. [School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 21 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Goolaup, S.; Lim, G. J.; Kerk, I. S.; Lew, W. S., E-mail: wensiang@ntu.edu.sg [School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 21 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Chang, C. H., E-mail: echchang@ntu.edu.sg [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Roy, K. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Artificial magnetic spin-ice nanostructures provide an ideal platform for the observation of magnetic monopoles. The formation of a magnetic monopole is governed by the motion of a magnetic charge carrier via the propagation of domain walls (DWs) in a lattice. To date, most experiments have been on the static visualization of DW propagation in the lattice. In this paper, we report on the low field dynamics of DW in a unit spin-ice structure measured by magnetoresistance changes. Our results show that reversible DW propagation can be initiated within the spin-ice basis. The initial magnetization configuration of the unit structure strongly influences the direction of DW motion in the branches. Single or multiple domain wall nucleation can be induced in the respective branches of the unit spin ice by the direction of the applied field.

  10. Low field domain wall dynamics in artificial spin-ice basis structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artificial magnetic spin-ice nanostructures provide an ideal platform for the observation of magnetic monopoles. The formation of a magnetic monopole is governed by the motion of a magnetic charge carrier via the propagation of domain walls (DWs) in a lattice. To date, most experiments have been on the static visualization of DW propagation in the lattice. In this paper, we report on the low field dynamics of DW in a unit spin-ice structure measured by magnetoresistance changes. Our results show that reversible DW propagation can be initiated within the spin-ice basis. The initial magnetization configuration of the unit structure strongly influences the direction of DW motion in the branches. Single or multiple domain wall nucleation can be induced in the respective branches of the unit spin ice by the direction of the applied field

  11. Manifestation of Structure of Electron Bands in Double-Resonant Raman Spectra of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubrov, Yurii; Nikolenko, Andrii; Gubanov, Viktor; Strelchuk, Viktor

    2016-12-01

    Micro-Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes in the range of two-phonon 2D bands are investigated in detail. The fine structure of two-phonon 2D bands in the low-temperature Raman spectra of the mixture and individual single-walled carbon nanotubes is considered as the reflection of structure of their π-electron zones. The dispersion behavior of 2D band fine structure components in the resonant Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotube mixture is studied depending on the energy of excitating photons. The role of incoming and outgoing electron-phonon resonances in the formation of 2D band fine structure in Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes is analyzed. The similarity of dispersion behavior of 2D phonon bands in single-walled carbon nanotubes, one-layer graphene, and bulk graphite is discussed. PMID:26729220

  12. A structural analysis in seismic archaeology: the walls of Noto and the 1693 earthquake

    OpenAIRE

    Guidoboni, E.; SGA, Storia Geofisica Ambiente, Bologna, Italy; Riva, P.; Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Universitá di Brescia, Italy; Petrini, V.; Dipartimento di Ingegneria Strutturale, Politecnico di Milano, Italy; Madini Moretti, A.; ENGI.CO., Engineering & Consulting, Milano, Italy; Lombardini, G.; Facoltà di Architettura, Università di Ferrara, Italy

    1995-01-01

    A crucial problenl for seismic archeology is how to recognize seismic effects and how to date them. On an experimental basis. we proposed that the problem be reversed, and that we begin at the other end: i.e. by analyzing already known seismic effects on ancient structures, testified by written sources. to be able to .calibrate>> the types or possible observations and any subsequent elaborations. The choice of the walls of Noto was suggested by the fact that Noto was abandoned fol...

  13. Analytical Modeling of Cyclic Shear - Flexure Interaction in Reinforced Concrete Structural Walls

    OpenAIRE

    Kolozvari, Kristijan

    2013-01-01

    A study was conducted to develop a modeling approach that integrates flexure and shear interaction under cyclic loading conditions to obtain reliable predictions of inelastic responses of reinforced concrete (RC) structural walls. The proposed modeling approach incorporates cyclic RC panel constitutive behavior based on an interpretation of the fixed-strut-angle approach into a two-dimensional fiber-based macroscopic model. Coupling of axial and shear responses under cyclic loading is achieve...

  14. Synthesis, electronic structure, and Raman scattering of phosphorus-doped single-wall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Substitutional phosphorus doping in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is investigated by density functional theory and resonance Raman spectroscopy. Electronic structure calculations predict charge localization on the phosphorus atom, which is also responsible of generating non-dispersive valence and conduction bands close to the Fermi level. Analysis of electron and phonon renormalization in the double-resonance Raman process confirms the different nature of the phosphorus donor doping (localized) when compared to nitrogen substitutional doping (non-localized) in SWNTs

  15. CALCULATION OF ADAPTIVE MULTILAYERED THIN-WALLED STRUCTURES SUBJECTED TO TEMPERATURE LOADING

    OpenAIRE

    Plotnikova, S. V.; KULIKOV M.G.

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement. A number of difficult problems centre around the application of 3D isoparametric finite elements to compensate the strains and to control the shape of thin-walled structures. One of these problems is decreasing efficiency of the finite element code.Results. This paper presents a new 3D geometrically exact four-node solid-shell element based on the 7-parameter theory of thermoelectroelastic shells, which gives the possibility to use 3D constitutive equations of thermopiezoel...

  16. Polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein is a structural component of plant cell wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protsenko, M A; Buza, N L; Krinitsyna, A A; Bulantseva, E A; Korableva, N P

    2008-10-01

    It is generally believed that plants "evolved a strategy of defending themselves from a phytopathogen attack" during evolution. This metaphor is used frequently, but it does not facilitate understanding of the mechanisms providing plant resistance to the invasion of foreign organisms and to other unfavorable external factors, as well as the role of these mechanisms in plant growth and development. Information on processes involving one of the plant resistance factors--polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (PGIP)--is considered in this review. The data presented here indicate that PGIP, being an extracellular leucine-rich repeat-containing protein, performs important functions in the structure of plant cell wall. Amino acid residues participating in PGIP binding to homogalacturonan in the cell wall have been determined. The degree of methylation and the mode of distribution of homogalacturonan methyl groups are responsible for the formation of a complex structure, which perhaps determines the specificity of PGIP binding to pectin. PGIP is apparently one of the components of plant cell wall determining some of its mechanical properties; it is involved in biochemical processes related to growth, expansion, and maceration, and it influences plant morphology. Polygalacturonase (PG) is present within practically all plant tissues, but the manifestation of its activity varies significantly depending on physiological conditions in the tissue. Apparently, the regulation of PG functioning in apoplast significantly affects the development of processes associated with the modification of the structure of plant cell wall. PGIP can regulate PG activity through binding to homogalacturonan. The genetically determined structure of PGIP in plants determines the mode of its interaction with an invader and perhaps is one of the factors responsible for the set of pathogens causing diseases in a given plant species. PMID:18991551

  17. The Plant Cell Wall: A Complex and Dynamic Structure As Revealed by the Responses of Genes under Stress Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Kelly; Tucker, Matthew R.; Chowdhury, Jamil; Shirley, Neil; Little, Alan

    2016-01-01

    The plant cell wall has a diversity of functions. It provides a structural framework to support plant growth and acts as the first line of defense when the plant encounters pathogens. The cell wall must also retain some flexibility, such that when subjected to developmental, biotic, or abiotic stimuli it can be rapidly remodeled in response. Genes encoding enzymes capable of synthesizing or hydrolyzing components of the plant cell wall show differential expression when subjected to different stresses, suggesting they may facilitate stress tolerance through changes in cell wall composition. In this review we summarize recent genetic and transcriptomic data from the literature supporting a role for specific cell wall-related genes in stress responses, in both dicot and monocot systems. These studies highlight that the molecular signatures of cell wall modification are often complex and dynamic, with multiple genes appearing to respond to a given stimulus. Despite this, comparisons between publically available datasets indicate that in many instances cell wall-related genes respond similarly to different pathogens and abiotic stresses, even across the monocot-dicot boundary. We propose that the emerging picture of cell wall remodeling during stress is one that utilizes a common toolkit of cell wall-related genes, multiple modifications to cell wall structure, and a defined set of stress-responsive transcription factors that regulate them. PMID:27559336

  18. Selectively Structural Determination of Cellulose and Hemicellulose in Plant Cell Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Chun; Park, Yong; Cosgrove, Daniel; Maranas, Janna; Janna Maranas Team; Daniel Cosgrove Team

    2013-03-01

    Primary plant cell walls support the plant body, and regulate cell size, and plant growth. It contains several biopolymers that can be categorized into three groups: cellulose, hemicellulose and pectin. To determine the structure of plant cell wall, we use small angle neutron scattering in combination with selective deuteration and contrast matching method. We compare the structure between wild Arabidopsis thaliana and its xyloglucan-deficient mutant. Hemicellulose in both samples forms coil with similar radii of gyration, and weak scattering from the mutant suggests a limited amount of hemicellulose in the xyloglucan-deficient mutant. We observe good amount of hemicellulose coating on cellulose microfibrils only in wild Arabidopsis. The absence of coating in its xyloglucan-deficient mutation suggests the other polysaccharides do not have comparable interaction with cellulose. This highlights the importance of xyloglucan in plant cell wall. At larger scale, the average distance between cellulose fibril is found smaller than reported value, which directly reflects on their smaller matured plant size. U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Center for LignoCellulose Structure and Formation

  19. Sensitivity to fuel diesel oil and cell wall structure of some Scenedesmus (Chlorococcales strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Tukaj

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Sensitivity of three Scenedesmus strains exposed to aqueous fuel-oil extract (AFOE is strongly strain-dependent S. quadricauda is the most resistant, S. armatus moderately tolerant whereas the most sensitive appears to be S. microspina. The sensitivity of tested species increases parallel with decreasing of cell size and cell number in coenobium. The values of the cell surface/cell volumes ratios only partly explain the above relationships. Electron microscope investigations reveal that the sensitivity may depend on cell wall structure of the strains. Cell wall of all here investigated strains is built of two layers: the inner so-called cellulosic layer and the outer one showing a three-laminar structure (TLS. The latter contains an acetolysis-resistant biopolymer (ARB. These two layers are similar in thickness in the three strains tested, but the surface of Scenedesmus is covered with various epistructures that are characteristic of strains. Some of them as the tightly fitting warty layer of S. armatus and especially the loosely fitting reticulate layer of S. quadricauda may contribute to lower permeability of cell wall. The structure of the rosettes also appears to be correlated with the sensitivity of strains. Presence of invaginations of plasmalemma in areas under rosettes indicates their role in transport processes inside/outside the cells.

  20. CALCULATION OF ADAPTIVE MULTILAYERED THIN-WALLED STRUCTURES SUBJECTED TO TEMPERATURE LOADING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Plotnikova

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement. A number of difficult problems centre around the application of 3D isoparametric finite elements to compensate the strains and to control the shape of thin-walled structures. One of these problems is decreasing efficiency of the finite element code.Results. This paper presents a new 3D geometrically exact four-node solid-shell element based on the 7-parameter theory of thermoelectroelastic shells, which gives the possibility to use 3D constitutive equations of thermopiezoelectricity. As unknown functions, six tangential and transverse displacements of outer surfaces and the transverse displacement of the middle surface are chosen.Conclusions. Analytical integration used for deriving a stiffness matrix, as well as the fact that displacement vectors of outer and middle surfaces are represented in a local basis related to the reference shell surface permit one to increase the performance of a finite element code and to utilize it efficiently into controllers of adaptive thin-walled structures with segmented piezoceramic patches. Numerical examples are presented to substantiate the possibility of controlling the temperature strains in thin-walled composite structures by employing the converse piezoelectric effect.

  1. Fast Ion Power Loads on ITER First Wall Structures in the Presence of NTMs and Microturbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We have already studied the wall loads caused by fast ions in a variety of ITER plasmas using the 5D Monte Carlo guiding-center code ASCOT. The simulations were performed for different magnetic configurations including FIs and none or more TBMs. In earlier simulations, the fast ion transport was assumed purely neoclassical. In MHD quiescent plasmas this was believed to be true until the first NBI current drive experiments with the AUG tangential beams failed to demonstrate the predicted levels of off-axis current. The subsequent theoretical work has revealed that microturbulence can induce additional transport even for the fast ions. Furthermore, it is highly unlikely that the ITER plasmas will be MHD quiescent: the massive fast ion population consisting of the fusion alphas with energies up to 3.5 MeV drive a multitude of energetic particle modes. Furthermore, ITER is prone to NTMs with substantial island structures. All these MHD phenomena can contribute to increased transport of fast ions in the core plasma. We are incorporating non-neoclassical effects into ASCOT. Here we present the first simulation results of fast ion power loads to ITER plasma facing components where realistic 3D magnetic field and most recent 3D wall structure are used, and the fast ion redistribution due to microturbulence and NTMs is included. The simulations are carried out for ITER Scenario 2 (standard H-mode) and Scenario 4 (steady-state operation). In the neoclassical study, the wall power loads were found insignificant in Scenario 4 and much larger but still easily tolerable in Scenario 2. This is due to the different plasma profiles: in Scenario 4, thermal fusions and ionization of NBI particles occur closer to the plasma core. Thus the redistribution of fast ions due to non-neoclassical effects can be particularly treacherous in Scenario 4: drift islands and anomalous transport lead energetic ions to the edge where ripple and TBM induced transport processes rapidly take

  2. FOXE3 mutations predispose to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shao-Qing; Medina-Martinez, Olga; Guo, Dong-chuan; Gong, Limin; Regalado, Ellen S.; Reynolds, Corey L.; Boileau, Catherine; Jondeau, Guillaume; Prakash, Siddharth K.; Kwartler, Callie S.; Zhu, Lawrence Yang; Peters, Andrew M.; Duan, Xue-Yan; Bamshad, Michael J.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Debbie A.; Santos-Cortez, Regie L.; Dong, Xiurong; Leal, Suzanne M.; Majesky, Mark W.; Swindell, Eric C.; Jamrich, Milan; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2016-01-01

    The ascending thoracic aorta is designed to withstand biomechanical forces from pulsatile blood. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections (TAADs) occur as a result of genetically triggered defects in aortic structure and a dysfunctional response to these forces. Here, we describe mutations in the forkhead transcription factor FOXE3 that predispose mutation-bearing individuals to TAAD. We performed exome sequencing of a large family with multiple members with TAADs and identified a rare variant in FOXE3 with an altered amino acid in the DNA-binding domain (p.Asp153His) that segregated with disease in this family. Additional pathogenic FOXE3 variants were identified in unrelated TAAD families. In mice, Foxe3 deficiency reduced smooth muscle cell (SMC) density and impaired SMC differentiation in the ascending aorta. Foxe3 expression was induced in aortic SMCs after transverse aortic constriction, and Foxe3 deficiency increased SMC apoptosis and ascending aortic rupture with increased aortic pressure. These phenotypes were rescued by inhibiting p53 activity, either by administration of a p53 inhibitor (pifithrin-α), or by crossing Foxe3–/– mice with p53–/– mice. Our data demonstrate that FOXE3 mutations lead to a reduced number of aortic SMCs during development and increased SMC apoptosis in the ascending aorta in response to increased biomechanical forces, thus defining an additional molecular pathway that leads to familial thoracic aortic disease. PMID:26854927

  3. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Thoracic Aortic Dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yik; Fan, Yi; Cheng, Stephen; Chow, Kwok

    2011-11-01

    Thoracic Aortic Dissection (TAD) is a cardiovascular disease with high mortality. An aortic dissection is formed when blood infiltrates the layers of the vascular wall, and a new artificial channel, the false lumen, is created. The expansion of the blood vessel due to the weakened wall enhances the risk of rupture. Computational fluid dynamics analysis is performed to study the hemodynamics of this pathological condition. Both idealized geometry and realistic patient configurations from computed tomography (CT) images are investigated. Physiological boundary conditions from in vivo measurements are employed. Flow configuration and biomechanical forces are studied. Quantitative analysis allows clinicians to assess the risk of rupture in making decision regarding surgical intervention.

  4. Structure-related effects on the domain wall migration in atomic point contacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the interplay between magnetic and structural dynamics in magnetic point contacts under current-carrying conditions. In particular we address the dependence of the results upon the specific parameterization of the elastic properties of the material. Our analysis shows a strong influence of the structural relaxation on the energy barrier for domain wall migration, but a negligible dependence of the mechanical properties on the magnetic state. These results are stable against the various material specific choices of parameters describing different transition metals

  5. Mould resistance design for external wood frame wall systems : Simulation and evaluation of wall structures under varying conditions of exposure using the MRD model

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlström, Carl; Giesen, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Moisture induced damages to building envelopes can result in microbial growth possibly affecting the health and wellbeing of occupants. Recent failing structures and damaged buildings indicate a lack of tools to estimate risk of mould growth and moisture damage. In this work a so-called mould resistance design (MRD) model has been applied for mapping the risk for mould growth on a number of wood-containing wall structures. The MRD model introduces an engineering approach to moisture safety de...

  6. Local structure and shaping of ferroelectric domain walls for photonic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrymgeour, David

    Ferroelectric lithium niobate (LiNbO3) and lithium tantalate (LiTaO3) have emerged as key technological materials for use in photonic applications, due to the high quality of crystal growth, optical transparency over a wide frequency range (240nm--4.5 mum), and their large electro-optic and nonlinear optical coefficients. Emerging fields of optical communications, optical data storage, displays, biomedical devices, sensing, and defense applications will all rely heavily on such ferroelectrics as a versatile solid-state photonic platform. Diverse functionalities can be created in these materials simply through the patterning of the ferroelectric domains. By creating specific domain features in these materials, it is possible to create new laser wavelengths from existing sources as well as active electro-optic structures that can dynamically focus, shape and steer light. However, the process of domain shaping today is mostly empirical, based on trial-and-error rather than sound, predictive science. The central focus of this thesis work is to develop a fundamental understanding of how to shape and control domain walls in ferroelectrics, specifically in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate, for photonic applications. An understanding of the domain wall phenomena is being approached at two levels: the macroscale and the nanoscale. On the macroscale, different electric field poling techniques are developed and used to create domain shapes of arbitrary orientation. A theoretical framework based on Ginzburg-Landau-Devonshire theory is developed to determine the preferred domain wall shapes. Differences in the poling characteristics and domain wall shapes between the two materials as well as differences in material composition relates to nonstoichiometric defects in the crystal. At the nanoscale, these defects influence the local electromechanical properties of the domain wall. Understanding from both of these approaches has been used to design and create photonic devices

  7. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rua, and together as a team of multidisciplinary physicians, we’re going to repair an abdominal aortic ... takes a special type of training. Both the doctors in the room are board certified and highly ...

  8. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the age of 65. It’s most common in males. There is an increasing number, due to the ... The risk factors for abdominal aortic aneurysms are males over 60, hardening of the arteries, which is ...

  9. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this procedure. So let’s go back now and learn a little bit about abdominal aortic aneurysms. Great. ... And one of the things that I’m learning from this movie as we looking at these ...

  10. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... atherosclerosis, high blood pressure, smokers, or a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Today’s patient is a ... screened. In fact, patients who have a family history of aneurysm, men who are smoking over the ...

  11. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to the aging baby boomers. Next slide. The risk factors for abdominal aortic aneurysms are males over 60, ... doing a good examination and also accessing for risk factors. So we have a very integrated team here, ...

  12. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as atherosclerosis, high blood pressure, smokers, or a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Today’s patient is ... be screened. In fact, patients who have a family history of aneurysm, men who are smoking over ...

  13. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this is to prevent rupture and to prevent death from rupture. This area just underneath the renal ... Okay. Abdominal aortic aneurysms cause approximately 15,000 deaths in the United States each year. It affects ...

  14. Physical, functional and structural characterization of the cell wall fractions from baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchani, Chema; Fonteyn, Fabienne; Jamin, Guilhem; Paquot, Michel; Thonart, Philippe; Blecker, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    The yeast cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important source of β-d-glucan, a glucose homopolymer with many functional, nutritional and human health benefits. In the present study, the yeast cell wall fractionation process involving enzymatic treatments (savinase and lipolase enzymes) affected most of the physical and functional characteristics of extracted fractions. Thus, the fractionation process showed that β-d-glucan fraction F4 had significantly higher swelling power and fat binding capacity compared to other fractions (F1, F2 and F3). It also exhibited a viscosity of 652.12mPas and a high degree of brightness of extracted β-d-glucan fraction. Moreover, the fractionation process seemed to have an effect on structural and thermal properties of extracted fractions. Overall, results showed that yeast β-d-glucan had good potential for use as a prebiotic ingredient in food, as well as medicinal and pharmaceutical products. PMID:26471666

  15. Structures, nanomechanics, and disintegration of single-walled GaN nanotubes: atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jeong Won; Hwang, Ho Jung; Song, Ki Oh; Choi, Won Young; Byun, Ki Ryang [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Oh Keun [Semyung University, Jecheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun Ha [Sangmyung University, Chonan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Won Woo [Juseong College, Cheongwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-15

    We have investigated the structural, mechanical, and thermal properties of single-walled GaN nanotubes by using atomistic simulations and a Tersoff-type potential. The Tersoff potential for GaN effectively describes the properties of GaN nanotubes. The nanomechanics of GaN nanotubes under tensile and compressive loadings have also been investigated, and Young's modulus has been calculated. The caloric curves of single-walled GaN nanotubes can be divided into three regions corresponding to nanotubes, the disintegrating range, and vapor. Since the stability or the stiffness of a tube decreases with increasing curving sheet-to-tube strain energy, the disintegration temperatures of GaN nanotubes are closely related to the curving sheet-to-tube strain energy.

  16. Structures, nanomechanics, and disintegration of single-walled GaN nanotubes: atomistic simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the structural, mechanical, and thermal properties of single-walled GaN nanotubes by using atomistic simulations and a Tersoff-type potential. The Tersoff potential for GaN effectively describes the properties of GaN nanotubes. The nanomechanics of GaN nanotubes under tensile and compressive loadings have also been investigated, and Young's modulus has been calculated. The caloric curves of single-walled GaN nanotubes can be divided into three regions corresponding to nanotubes, the disintegrating range, and vapor. Since the stability or the stiffness of a tube decreases with increasing curving sheet-to-tube strain energy, the disintegration temperatures of GaN nanotubes are closely related to the curving sheet-to-tube strain energy.

  17. Properties of the wall structures made of autoclaved cellular concrete products on the polyurethane foam adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Gorshkov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The article presents information on a test experiment for the construction of masonry fragments made of autoclaved cellular concrete products (ААС blocks on the polyurethane adhesive and the ensuing structural, thermal and technological tests of this type of masonry in specialized laboratories and testing facilities. It is shown that the use of polyurethane foam adhesive to bond the concrete blocks in the masonry walls is technically and economically feasible. On the basis of the tests it was concluded that the laying of concrete blocks on the polyurethane adhesive may be used in the construction of non-load bearing interior and exterior walls of buildings, including the filling of the external frame openings of monolithic buildings with floor bearing of the masonry on load bearing monolithic floors (with appropriate justification of the settlement.

  18. Aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Athanasiou, Thanos; Mestres, Carlos A;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS OF THE STUDY: Prompted by anecdotal evidence and observations by surgeons, an investigation was undertaken into the potential differences in implanted aortic valve prosthesis sizes, during aortic valve replacement (AVR) procedures, between northern and southern European countr...... southern European countries. Imbalances in the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease, health resource availability and variations in surgical practice throughout Europe might be possible etiological causes....

  19. Reproducibility of ECG-gated Ultrasound Diameter Assessment of Small Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredahl, K; Eldrup, N; Meyer, C;

    2013-01-01

    No standardised ultrasound procedure to obtain reliable growth estimates for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is currently available. We investigated the feasibility and reproducibility of a novel approach controlling for a combination of vessel wall delineation and cardiac cycle variation....

  20. Study of the ruining behaviour of a structure with reinforced concrete carrying walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear facility buildings must be constructed with the respect of para-seismic rules. These rules are defined according to the most probable seismic risk estimated for the sites. This study concerns the ruining behaviour of a structure made of reinforced concrete walls. In a first part, a preliminary study on reinforced concrete is performed with the Castem 2000 finite elements code. This study emphasizes the non-linear phenomena that take place inside the material, such as the cracking of concrete and the plasticization of steels. In a second part, predictive calculations were performed on a U-shape structure. This structure was submitted to earthquakes of various magnitudes and the response of the structure was analyzed and interpreted. (J.S.)

  1. Water structures inside and outside single-walled carbon nanotubes under perpendicular electric field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen XU; Guo-hui HU; Zhi-liang WANG; Zhe-wei ZHOU

    2014-01-01

    The structures of water inside and outside (6,6), (8,8), and (10,10) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) under an electric field perpendicular to the tube axis are investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that dipole reorientation induced by electric field plays a significant role on the structures of confined water inside and outside SWCNTs. Inside SWCNTs, the average water occupancy and the average number of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) per water molecule decrease as the electric intensity increases. Because the field intensity is sufficiently strong, the initial water structures inside the SWCNTs are destroyed, and the isolated water clusters are found. Outside SWCNTs, the azimuthal distributions of the density and the average number of H-bonds per water molecule around the solid walls become more and more asymmetric as the electric intensity increases. The percentages of water molecules involved in 0-5 H-bonds for all the three types of SWCNTs under different field intensities are displayed. The results show that those water molecules involved with most H-bonds are the most important to hold the original structures. When the electric field direction is parallel with the original preferred orientation, the density and the H-bond connections in water will be increased; when the electric field direction is perpendicular to the original preferred orientation, the density and the H-bond connections in water will be decreased.

  2. The Importance of Hydraulic Structures for Society: Quay Walls and Dikes in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Gijt J.G.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Since mankind exists, men have undertaken engineering activities to make their life more pleasant and secure. However this has not been an easy task, especially in the past. The knowledge of mathematics and physics to describe engineering problems became available only since 1400-1500. Nevertheless, great achievements have been made by man before that time, e.g. the pyramids in Egypt, the first sluice in China, the Borobudur temple in Indonesia, and the design and building activities of the Inca’s in South America. To illustrate this development, also the world economy, world ecology will be shortly mentioned. The structures that are briefly discussed in this paper are: soil and concrete dams for generating electricity, reservoirs for irrigation and drinking water, dikes, sluices, inland and sea, tunnels, and quay walls. This paper presents an overview of hydraulic structures in general with the emphasis on quay walls and dikes in the Netherlands. Examples of these structures will be discussed illustrating present state of the art and also with a view to the future. Conclusions and recommendations are given to enhance the knowledge of hydraulic structures.

  3. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs are associated with increased aortic stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Claridge

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Martin Claridge1, Simon Hobbs1, Clive Quick2, Nick Day3, Andrew Bradbury1, Teun Wilmink11Department of Vascular Surgery, University of Birmingham, Birmingham Heartlands Hospital Birmingham, UK; 2Department of Surgery, Hinchingbrooke Hospital, Huntingdon, UK; 3Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UKObjectives: Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDS have been shown to retard aneurysm growth in animal models. In vitro studies have shown an inhibitory effect of NSAIDS on matrix metalloproteinase-9, interleukin-1β, and IL-6 mediated arterial wall elastolysis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of NSAIDs on arterial stiffness, a surrogate marker of elastolysis.Methods: 447 subjects enrolled in a community-based abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA screening program were assessed for age, blood pressure, smoking status, and drug history. Aortic diameter and stiffness were measured by M-Mode ultrasound. The concentration of the amino-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen was used as a proxy measurement of type III collagen turnover.Results: NSAID ingestion was significantly (p = 0.006 associated with increased aortic wall stiffness after adjusting for age, aortic diameter, blood pressure, and smoking status. No such effect was seen for β-blockers, calcium channel antagonists, nitrates, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, diuretics, or antiplatelet agents.Discussion: These novel data show that NSAIDS are associated with increased aortic stiffness, possibly through the effects of cytokine mediated elastolysis. This in turn may prevent aortic expansion and the development of AAA.Keywords: nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, abdominal aortic aneurysm, aortic stiffness, elastolysis

  4. Are Aortic Stent Grafts Safe in Pregnancy?

    OpenAIRE

    Nader Khandanpour; Mehta, Tapan A.; Adiseshiah, M; Meyer, Felicity J.

    2015-01-01

    Aortic stent grafts are increasingly used to treat aortic aneurysms and also other aortic pathologies. The safety of aortic stent grafts in pregnancy has never been studied or reported. We report on two cases of aortic stent grafts in pregnant women and discuss the effect of pregnancy on these aortic stent grafts.

  5. Quantitative expression and localization of cysteine and aspartic proteases in human abdominal aortic aneurysms

    OpenAIRE

    Lohoefer, Fabian; Reeps, Christian; Lipp, Christina; Rudelius, Martina; Haertl, Felix; Matevossian, Edouard; Zernecke, Alma; Eckstein, Hans-Henning; Pelisek, Jaroslav

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine and aspartic proteases possess high elastolytic activity and might contribute to the degradation of the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) wall. The aim of this study was to analyze, in detail, the proteases (cathepsins B, D, K, L and S, and inhibitor cystatin C) found in human AAA and healthy aortic tissue samples. The vessel walls from AAA patients (n=36) and nonaneurysmal aortae (n=10) were retrieved using conventional surgical repair and autopsy methods. Serum samples from the same ...

  6. Insights into plant cell wall structure, architecture, and integrity using glycome profiling of native and AFEXTM-pre-treated biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Pattathil, Sivakumar; Hahn, Michael G.; Dale, Bruce E; Chundawat, Shishir P. S.

    2015-01-01

    Cell walls, which constitute the bulk of plant biomass, vary considerably in their structure, composition, and architecture. Studies on plant cell walls can be conducted on both native and pre-treated plant biomass samples, allowing an enhanced understanding of these structural and compositional variations. Here glycome profiling was employed to determine the relative abundance of matrix polysaccharides in several phylogenetically distinct native and pre-treated plant biomasses. Eight distinc...

  7. Anatomics Knowledges of Aortic Root in the Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cerezo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The Aortic Valve is a valvular system that bears different high pressure forces. It takes part of a complex structure called Aortic Root. Nowadays, anatomic knowledge has taken a preponderant role, due to the use of the Transcatether Aortic Valve Implant (TAVI. To describe the patient´s characteristics which exclude them of the TAVI for anatomic reasons in cadaveric dissections and transthoracic echocardiograms. A descriptive retrospective analysis of 67 individuals was performed and divided into two groups. Group A: Formalized cadaveric dissections with hypertrofic hearts and aortic sclerosis signs from the Chair A of Anatomy of the University of La Plata (UNLP. Group B: Transthoracic Echocardiograms realized at the San Martín Hospital of La Plata between January 2005 and December 2009. Out of 67 individuals assessed, 17 (25% had one or more contraindications for TAVI. Five on Group A (36%, and 12 on Group B (23%. The most common anatomic contraindication was the Ascending Aortic diameter less than 30mm and the aortic annulus less than 20mm, following to the RAo-TSVI Angle more than 145° (2 to Group A, and 4 to Group B and the Septal thickness more than 17mm (no one to Group A, and 3 to Group B. Only just one individual was found with a low implant left coronary artery in the Group A avoiding TAVI. According to this study, the anatomic contraindications to realize TAVI are frequent due to the diagnosis devices available at the moment. The anatomic aortic root knowledge and the aortic valve interindividual variability will allow the improvement of the manufactured devices made in the market.

  8. Multiscale, structure-based modeling for the elastic mechanical behavior of arterial walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos; Barocas, Victor H

    2007-08-01

    Passive elastic behavior of arterial wall remains difficult to model. Although phenomenological and structural models exist, the question of how the three-dimensional network structure of the collagen in the artery determines its mechanical properties is still open. A model is presented that incorporates a collagen network as well as the noncollagenous material that comprise the artery. The collagen architecture is represented as a network of interconnected fibers, and a neo-Hookean constitutive equation is used to describe the contribution of the noncollagenous matrix. The model is multiscale in that volume-averaging theory is applied to the collagen network, and it is structural in that parameters of the microstructure of the collagen network were considered instead of a macroscopic constitutive law. The computational results provided a good fit to published experimental data for decellularized porcine carotid arteries. The model predicted increased circumferential compliance for increased axial stretch, consistent with previously published reports, and a relatively small sensitivity to open angle. Even at large extensions, the model predicted that the noncollagenous matrix would be in compression, preventing collapse of the collagen network. The incorporation of fiber-fiber interactions led to an accurate model of artery wall behavior with relatively few parameters. The counterintuitive result that the noncollagenous component is in compression during extension and inflation of the tissue suggests that the collagen is important even at small strains, with the noncollagenous components supporting the network, but not resisting the load directly. More accurate representation of the microstructure of the artery wall is needed to explore this issue further. PMID:17655483

  9. Aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Nikos; Sinning, Jan-Malte

    2014-01-01

    Paravalvular aortic regurgitation (AR) negatively affects prognosis following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). As transcatheter heart valves (THV) are anchored using a certain degree of oversizing at the level of the aortic annulus, incomplete stent frame expansion because of heavily annular calcifications, suboptimal placement of the prosthesis, and/or annulus-prosthesis size-mismatch can contribute to paravalvular AR with subsequent increased mortality risk. Echocardiography is essential to differentiate between transvalvular and paravalvular AR and to further elucidate the etiology of AR during the procedure. However, because echocardiographic quantification of AR in TAVR patients remains challenging, especially in the implantation situation, a multimodal approach to the evaluation of AR with use of hemodynamic measurements and imaging modalities is useful to precisely quantify the severity of AR immediately after valve deployment. "Next-generation" THVs are already on the market and first results show that paravalvular AR related to design modifications (eg, paravalvular space-fillers, full repositionability) are rarely seen in these valve types.  PMID:24632758

  10. Aluminum 2219-T87 and 5456-H116 - A comparative study of spacecraft wall materials in dual-wall structures under hypervelocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonberg, William P.

    1992-01-01

    All earth-orbiting spacecraft are susceptible to high-speed impacts by pieces of orbital debris. To prevent mission failure and possibly loss of life, protection against perforation by high-speed orbital debris particles must be included in the spacecraft design. Although any number of materials can be used to manufacture perforation-resistant structures, aluminum is often used in such systems because of its relatively high strength-to-weight ratio. This paper presents the results of a study in which the high speed impact response characteristics of dual-wall structures made from two different aluminum alloys were analyzed to determine which alloy would be more suitable for use in a perforation-resistant dual-wall structural system that is to be exposed to the orbital debris environment. Impact response characteristics were obtained numerically and experimentally. At impact speeds below 7 km/s, it was found that the two aluminum alloys considered contributed similar levels of perforation resistance; at speeds in excess of 7 km/s, aluminum 2219-T87 was superior to aluminum 5546-H116 in preventing perforation of dual-wall structural systems.

  11. Current Structural Design of Side Wall in KO HCCR TBM for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, K. I.; Lee, D. W.; Gon, J. H.; Lee, E. H.; Kim, S. K.; Yoon, J. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, S. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    To accomplish the test and validation of the tritium self-sufficiency and a heat transfer extraction during ITER operation, the KO HCCR TBM (Korean Helium Cooled Ceramic Reflector Test Blanket Module) has been developed considering the unique concept of using a graphite reflector. The TBM consists of four sub-modules and one Back Manifold (BM), and each sub-module is composed of a First Wall (FW), Breeding Zone (BZ), Side Wall (SW), and BZ (Breeding Zone) box, which contains beryllium (Be), lithium (Li), and graphite pebbles. Among them, SW has functions as a manifold for the cooling flow distribution from FW cooling channels to BZ, and it should sustain the internal coolant pressure. In this study, the structural design of the SW was performed according to the RCC-MR design code to confirm the design requirement for ITER. To satisfy the KO HCCR TBM design requirements, structural analyses were performed for the preliminary SW design in the TBM. A design channel pressure of 10MPa was considered in the structural design progress of the SW. The stress breakdown was evaluated through PATH in SW. It was concluded that the results satisfy the design requirements in the RCC-MR codes for the ITER.

  12. Electronic structure of single-walled carbon nanotubes inside helical DNA wraps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Stacy; Rotkin, Slava

    2007-03-01

    Single stranded DNA can helically wrap a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) leading to changes in electronic structure, which is the subject of our study. Other charged polymers may produce band gap modulation similar to that observed for DNA-SWNT complexes. For these hybrids we assume a regular helical wrap, the potential of which breaks the symmetry of the pristine SWNT. Band structure changes are modeled quantum mechanically using the tight binding method together with self-consistent electrostatics. Gap modulation and band structure symmetry-lowering effects may result in variation of the optical spectra, especially for (slightly forbidden) transverse optical transitions. The effect of environmental screening of charges is investigated. Self-consistent electrostatic calculations yield cohesion energy between a charged, regular wrap and a SWNT of the order of tenths of eV per DNA base [1]. [1] Snyder, S. E., and Rotkin, S. V., Polarization Component of Cohesion Energy in Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube-DNA Complexes, JETP Letters 84, 348 (2006).

  13. Dynamic Response of High Rise Structures Under The Influence of Shear Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Khasim Mutwalli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the procedure for seismic performance estimation of high-rise buildings based on a concept of the capacity spectrum method. In 3D analytical model of thirty storied buildings have been generated for symmetric buildings Models and analyzed using structural analysis tool ETABS. The analytical model of the building includes all important components that influence the mass, strength, stiffness and deformability of the structure. To study the effect of concrete core wall & shear wall at different positions during earthquake, seismic analysis using both linear static, linear dynamic and non-linear static procedure has been performed. The deflections at each storey level has been compared by performing Equivalent static, response spectrum method as well as pushover method has also been performed to determine capacity, demand and performance level of the considered building models. From the below studies it has been observed that non-linear pushover analysis provide good estimate of global as well as local inelastic deformation demands and also reveals design weakness that may remain hidden in an elastic analysis and also the performance level of the structure. Storey drifts are found within the limit as specified by code (IS: 1893-2002 in Equivalent static, linear dynamic & non-linear static analysis.

  14. Extraction and verification of coherent structures in near-wall turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Hai-Bao; Du Peng; Huang Su-He; Wang Ying

    2013-01-01

    According to the characteristics of coherent structures in near-wall turbulence,an accurate extraction and verification method is developed based on wavelet transform (WT) and correlation analysis in this paper.At first,the fluid field of a turbulent boundary layer is measured precisely in a gravitational low-speed water tunnel.On the basis of the distribution of the coherent structures,velocity data of three test points are selected and analyzed,whose dimensionless heights are 20.8,33.5,and 42.6.According to the frequency range of power spectrum density (PSD),coherent and incoherent structures are both extracted from the original signals using continuous and orthogonal wavelet transforms.To confirm the validity of the extracted signals,the probability density function (PDF) of each extracted signal is calculated.The result demonstrates that the incoherent structures obey the Gaussian distribution,while the coherent structures deviate from the Gaussian distribution.The PDFs of the coherent structures and the original signals are similar,which shows that the coherent structures make most contributions to the turbulence.For further verification,a correlation parameter between coherent and incoherent structures is defined,which evidently proves the validity of the extraction method in this paper.

  15. Crystal structure of MraY, an essential membrane enzyme for bacterial cell wall synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ben C; Zhao, Jinshi; Gillespie, Robert A; Kwon, Do-Yeon; Guan, Ziqiang; Hong, Jiyong; Zhou, Pei; Lee, Seok-Yong

    2013-08-30

    MraY (phospho-MurNAc-pentapeptide translocase) is an integral membrane enzyme that catalyzes an essential step of bacterial cell wall biosynthesis: the transfer of the peptidoglycan precursor phospho-MurNAc-pentapeptide to the lipid carrier undecaprenyl phosphate. MraY has long been considered a promising target for the development of antibiotics, but the lack of a structure has hindered mechanistic understanding of this critical enzyme and the enzyme superfamily in general. The superfamily includes enzymes involved in bacterial lipopolysaccharide/teichoic acid formation and eukaryotic N-linked glycosylation, modifications that are central in many biological processes. We present the crystal structure of MraY from Aquifex aeolicus (MraYAA) at 3.3 Å resolution, which allows us to visualize the overall architecture, locate Mg(2+) within the active site, and provide a structural basis of catalysis for this class of enzyme. PMID:23990562

  16. Impact of structural design criteria on first wall surface heat flux limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumdar, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The irradiation environment experienced by the in-vessel components of fusion reactors presents structural design challenges not envisioned in the development of existing structural design criteria such as the ASME Code or RCC-MR. From the standpoint of design criteria, the most significant issues stem from the irradiation-induced changes in material properties, specifically the reduction of ductility, strain hardening capability, and fracture toughness with neutron irradiation. Recently, Draft 7 of the ITER structural design criteria (ISDC), which provide new rules for guarding against such problems, was released for trial use by the ITER designers. The new rules, which were derived from a simple model based on the concept of elastic follow up factor, provide primary and secondary stress limits as functions of uniform elongation and ductility. The implication of these rules on the allowable surface heat flux on typical first walls made of type 316 stainless steel and vanadium alloys are discussed.

  17. Nucleon structure in the chiral regime with domain wall fermions on an improved staggered sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moments of unpolarized, helicity, and transversity distributions, electromagnetic form factors, and generalized form factors of the nucleon are presented from a preliminary analysis of lattice results using pion masses down to 359 MeV. The twist two matrix elements are calculated using a mixed action of domain wall valence quarks and asqtad staggered sea quarks and are renormalized perturbatively. Several observables are extrapolated to the physical limit using chiral perturbation theory. Results are compared with experimental moments of quark distributions and electromagnetic form factors and phenomenologically determined generalized form factors, and the implications on the transverse structure and spin content of the nucleon are discussed. (orig.)

  18. The structural materials for the first wall and plasma facing components of NET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SA 316 and high-strength high-conductivity Cu and Mo based alloys have been selected as structural materials for the first wall and divertor plates of NET, respectively. The effects of irradiation on their bulk properties and behaviour: tensile properties, low-cycle fatigue, fracture toughness, irradiation creep, stress corrosion cracking, H-embrittlement and microstructural stability are discussed in terms of the proposed NET operating conditions with a special emphasis on the possible effect of the neutron spectrum. Finally microstructural instabilities of the intermetallic compounds of the brazed joints due to recoil effects are mentioned. (orig.)

  19. Status of nucleon structure calculations with 2+1 flavors of domain wall fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Meifeng

    2013-01-01

    We report the status of our nucleon structure calculations with 2+1 flavors of domain wall fermions on the RBC-UKQCD $32^3\\times64$ gauge ensembles with the Iwasaki+DSDR action. These ensembles have a fixed lattice scale of 1/a = 1.37 GeV, and two pion masses of about 170 and 250 MeV. Preliminary results for the isovector electromagnectic form factors and their corresponding root-mean-squared (r.m.s.) radii will be presented.

  20. Lifetime predictions for the first wall and blanket structure of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lifetime analysis of the first wall including the divertor and limiter is an important subject for the design of fusion reactors. These components are exposed to severe mechanical, thermal, and irradiation effects that limit their useful structural life, and their design lifetime has a large influence on the selection of major reactor design parameters. Particular attention (at the meeting whose papers are included in this report) was given to different approaches and models for the prediction of component lifetimes. Topics covered include life-limiting mechanisms, stress analysis and lifetime evaluation, and erosion and deposition effects

  1. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... aortic stenosis, are there any activities that I should avoid doing? That's a great question, Jim. Generally ... do not have symptoms but have aortic stenosis should be considered for surgery. Age, in and of ...

  2. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... who have symptomatic aortic stenosis of a severe nature. It's even been liberalized in some patient populations ... the heart. The aortic valve, because of its nature being in back of the heart, is not ...

  3. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... up offering patients aortic valve surgery in our community. Aortic stenosis is a process by which the ... basic valve types that we use in our practice, those being tissue valves and mechanical valves. Tissue ...

  4. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... North Carolina. My name is John Streitman and I'm a cardiothoracic surgeon here at the Heart ... the corrective surgery of aortic valve replacement. If I have aortic stenosis, are there any activities that ...

  5. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of that slide, that demonstrates that patients with New York Heart Association class heart failure 1 and ... right down the aortic valve and that's the new aortic valve that Dr. Streitman's placed. And you ...

  6. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to help prevent aortic stenosis? There's no prophylactic methods that anybody can take to prevent aortic stenosis ... it will be archived on the ORlive Web site and ORlive.com and, of course, a link ...

  7. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... conditions or other significant medical problems, the American College of Cardiology recommends aortic valve replacement for basically ... more likely we see aortic stenosis. Again, patient education is part of the evaluation and management of ...

  8. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... see aortic stenosis in patients younger, in their 40s and 50s, if they have congenitally bicuspid, or ... a year and, you know, probably 30 to 40 minimally invasive aortic valve replacements a year. So ...

  9. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hospital in Pinehurst, North Carolina. During the program, it's easy for you to learn about the procedure. ... the aortic valve, and proceeds to aortic stenosis. It's really not felt to be due to wear ...

  10. Influence of the myocardial bridging phenomenon on the myocardial structure and the coronary arteries wall structure changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomanović-Koković Jelena

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Our research was performed to evaluate the influences of the myocardial bridging of coronary arteries on the myocardial and coronary arteries wall structure changes, that could be a reason for multiple heart malfunctions. Methods. We analyzed the autopsy material, collected during a five-years period, and especially the group of 575 cases with the major aim to diagnose mors naturalis. In all cases with the presence of myocardial bridge over the arterial coronary wall revealed at autopsy, samples were taken for microscopic verification and examination. Results. We found myocardial bridges over the coronary arteries or their major branches in 27 of the cases (4.70%. We believe that myocardial bridges compromise coronary perfusion by cyclic compression of the overbridged vessels, and that it could be the initial factor in the pathogenesis of arteriosclerotic degeneration processes on the coronary artery wall. We found different grades of arteriosclerotic changes in 88.89% of the cases, as well as fibrosis of myocardium in 88.89% and lipomatosis in 66.67% of the cases with the present myocardial bridges. Conclusion. Our results suggested that myocardial bridging of coronary arteries and/or their branches was the pathological and even lethal phenomenon that deserves more intensive clinical evaluation.

  11. Spontaneous aortic dissecting hematoma in two dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulineau, Theresa Marie; Andrews-Jones, Lydia; Van Alstine, William

    2005-09-01

    This report describes 2 cases of spontaneous aortic dissecting hematoma in young Border Collie and Border Collie crossbred dogs. Histology was performed in one of the cases involving an unusual splitting of the elastin present within the wall of the aorta, consistent with elastin dysplasia as described in Marfan syndrome in humans. The first case involved a young purebred Border Collie that died suddenly and the second case involved a Border Collie crossbred dog that died after a 1-month history of seizures. Gross lesions included pericardial tamponade with dissection of the ascending aorta in the former case and thoracic cavity hemorrhage, mediastinal hematoma, and aortic dissection in the latter. Histologic lesions in the case of the Border Collie crossbred dog included a dissecting hematoma of the ascending aorta with elastin dysplasia and right axillary arterial intimal proliferation. PMID:16312247

  12. Structure, function, and biosynthesis of plant cell walls: proceedings of the seventh annual symposium in botany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dugger, W.M.; Bartnicki-Garcia, S. (eds.)

    1984-01-01

    Papers in the following areas were included in these symposium proceedings: (1) cell wall chemistry and biosynthesis; (2) cell wall hydrolysis and associated physiology; (3) cellular events associated with cell wall biosynthesis; and (4) interactions of plant cell walls with pathogens and related responses. Papers have been individually abstracted for the data base. (ACR)

  13. Effect of the hydroaffinity and topology of pore walls on the structure and dynamics of confined water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrach, Michael F., E-mail: harrach@fkp.tu-darmstadt.de; Klameth, Felix; Drossel, Barbara; Vogel, Michael, E-mail: michael.vogel@physik.tu-darmstadt.de [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Hochschulstr. 6, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-01-21

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to observe the structure and dynamics of SPC/E water in amorphous silica pores and amorphous ice pores with radii slightly larger than 10 Å. In addition to atomically rough pores, we construct completely smooth pores such that the potential felt at a given distance from the pore wall is an averaged atomic potential. As compared to rough walls, smooth walls induce stronger distortions of water structure for both silica and ice confinements. On the other hand, unlike the smooth pores, the rough pores strongly slow down water dynamics at the pore wall. The slowdown vanishes when reducing the atomic charges in the wall, i.e., when varying the hydroaffinity, while keeping the surface topology, indicating that it is not a geometric effect. Rather, it is due to the fact that the wall atoms provide a static energy landscape along the surface, e.g., fixed anchor-points for hydrogen bonds, to which the water molecules need to adapt, blocking channels for structural rearrangement. In the smooth pores, water dynamics can be faster than in the bulk liquid not only at the pore wall but also in the pore center. Changes in the tetrahedral order rather than in the local density are identified as the main cause for this change of the dynamical behavior in the center of smooth pores.

  14. USAGE OF MICRO-MODULAR HEAT-INSULATION LAYER IN STRUCTURES OF WALL PANELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Sizov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an analysis of requirements to existing heat-insulation layers in enclosure structures of wall panels has been carried out, a general principles on development of thermal insulation systems, substantiation on the necessity to develop a new wall panel design with improved thermal characteristics. The proposed design of the wall panel differs from the existing one in the fact that its external layer is made of protective sheets being perforated in their top and bottom parts with perforated aluminum foil layer placed on them. Air layer performs function of one of thermal insulation layers, and the second layer is made up in the form of several micro-modular sub-layers which are divided by perforated aluminum foil and a grid. An inner concrete layer is also separated from micro-modular layers by aluminum foil. Protective sheets and the grid can be made of aluminum or polyethylene.The arrangement of hollow micro-modular cells in the zone of negative temperatures prevents condensate accumulation. The arrangement of the perforated aluminum foil layers between micro- modular layers leads to increase in thermal resistance of the panel due to decrease of a radiant component in presence of several screens and does not interfere with a vapor permeability of thermal insulation layers from micro-modules. At the same time placement of a non-perforated foil layer on an inside panel layer interferes with penetration of water vapor from rooms in micro-modular thermal insulation layers.Technological principles lie in the arrangement of perforation slots in the top and bottom zones of protective sheets that allows to delete excess moisture from thermal insulation layers and air layer and also leads to improvement of thermo-technical characteristics, durability and reliability in construction operation as a whole. The executed calculations of heat and humidity fields in external enclosure structures confirm advantages of the presented technical

  15. Integration of the computational fluid dynamics technique with MRI in aortic dissections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmonik, Christof; Partovi, Sasan; Davies, Mark G; Bismuth, Jean; Shah, Dipan J; Bilecen, Deniz; Staub, Daniel; Noon, George P; Loebe, Matthias; Bongartz, Georg; Lumsden, Alan B

    2013-05-01

    Short-term and long-term prognosis and their determining factors of Type III/Stanford B aortic dissections (TB-AD), which separate the aorta distal at the origin of the subclavian artery into a true lumen and false lumen, have been elusive: One quarter of patients thought to be treated successfully, either by medical or by surgical means, do not survive 3 years. Unfavorable hemodynamic conditions are believed to lead to false lumen pressure increases and complications. A better characterization of TB-AD hemodynamics may therefore impact therapeutic decision making and improve outcome. The large variations in TB-AD morphology and hemodynamics favor a patient-specific approach. Magnetic resonance imaging with its capability to provide high-resolution structural images of the lumen and aortic wall and also to quantify aortic flow and kinetics of an exogenous tracer is a promising clinical modality for developing a deeper understanding of TB-AD hemodynamics in an individual patient. With the information obtained with magnetic resonance imaging, computational fluid dynamics simulations can be performed to augment the image information. Here, an overview of the interplay of magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics techniques is given illustrating the synergy of these two approaches toward a comprehensive morphological and hemodynamic characterization of TB-AD. PMID:22700326

  16. Hemodynamic predictors of aortic dilatation in bicuspid aortic valve by velocity-encoded cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramamurthy Senthil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital Bicuspid Aortic Valve (BAV is a significant risk factor for serious complications including valve dysfunction, aortic dilatation, dissection, and sudden death. Clinical tools for identification and monitoring of BAV patients at high risk for development of aortic dilatation, an early complication, are not available. Methods This paper reports an investigation in 18 pediatric BAV patients and 10 normal controls of links between abnormal blood flow patterns in the ascending aorta and aortic dilatation using velocity-encoded cardiovascular magnetic resonance. Blood flow patterns were quantitatively expressed in the angle between systolic left ventricular outflow and the aortic root channel axis, and also correlated with known biochemical markers of vessel wall disease. Results The data confirm larger ascending aortas in BAV patients than in controls, and show more angled LV outflow in BAV (17.54 ± 0.87 degrees than controls (10.01 ± 1.29 (p = 0.01. Significant correlation of systolic LV outflow jet angles with dilatation was found at different levels of the aorta in BAV patients STJ: r = 0.386 (N = 18, p = 0.048, AAO: r = 0.536 (N = 18, p = 0.022, and stronger correlation was found with patients and controls combined into one population: SOV: r = 0.405 (N = 28, p = 0.033, STJ: r = 0.562 (N = 28, p = 0.002, and AAO r = 0.645 (N = 28, p Conclusions The results of this study provide new insights into the pathophysiological processes underlying aortic dilatation in BAV patients. These results show a possible path towards the development of clinical risk stratification protocols in order to reduce morbidity and mortality for this common congenital heart defect.

  17. Histopathology of aortic complications in bicuspid aortic valve versus Marfan syndrome: relevance for therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, Nimrat; Franken, Romy; Mulder, Barbara J M; Goumans, Marie-José; Lindeman, Johannes H N; Jongbloed, Monique R M; DeRuiter, Marco C; Klautz, Robert J M; Bogers, Ad J J C; Poelmann, Robert E; Groot, Adriana C Gittenberger-de

    2016-05-01

    Patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) and patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) are more prone to develop aortic dilation and dissection compared to persons with a tricuspid aortic valve (TAV). To elucidate potential common and distinct pathways of clinical relevance, we compared the histopathological substrates of aortopathy. Ascending aortic wall biopsies were divided in five groups: BAV (n = 36) and TAV (n = 23) without and with dilation and non-dilated MFS (n = 8). General histologic features, apoptosis, the expression of markers for vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) maturation, markers predictive for ascending aortic dilation in BAV, and expression of fibrillin-1 were investigated. Both MFS and BAV showed an altered distribution and decreased fibrillin-1 expression in the aorta and a significantly lower level of differentiated VSMC markers. Interestingly, markers predictive for aortic dilation in BAV were not expressed in the MFS aorta. The aorta in MFS was similar to the aorta in dilated TAV with regard to the presence of medial degeneration and apoptosis, while other markers for degeneration and aging like inflammation and progerin expression were low in MFS, comparable to BAV. Both MFS and BAV aortas have immature VSMCs, while MFS and TAV patients have a similar increased rate of medial degeneration. However, the mechanism leading to apoptosis is expected to be different, being fibrillin-1 mutation induced increased angiotensin-receptor-pathway signaling in MFS and cardiovascular aging and increased progerin in TAV. Our findings could explain why angiotensin inhibition is successful in MFS and less effective in TAV and BAV patients. PMID:26129868

  18. Seismic Performance Evaluation of Multistory Reinforced Concrete Moment Resisting Frame Structure with Shear Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junwon Seo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper is intended to evaluate the seismic performance of a twelve-story reinforced concrete moment-resisting frame structure with shear walls using 3D finite element models according to such seismic design regulations as Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA guideline and seismic building codes including Los Angeles Tall Building Structural Design Council (LATBSDC code. The structure is located in Seismic Zone 4, considered the highest-seismic-risk classification established by the U.S. Geological Survey. 3D finite element model was created in commercially available finite element software. As part of the seismic performance evaluation, two standard approaches for the structure seismic analysis were used; response spectrum analysis and nonlinear time-history analysis. Both approaches were used to compute inter-story drift ratios of the structure. Seismic fragility curves for each floor of the structure were generated using the ratios from the time history analysis with the FEMA guideline so as to evaluate their seismic vulnerability. The ratios from both approaches were compared to FEMA and LATBSDC limits. The findings revealed that the floor-level fragility mostly decreased for all the FEMA performance levels with an increase in height and the ratios from both approaches mostly satisfied the codified limits.

  19. Direct observation of deterministic domain wall trajectory in magnetic network structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, P.; Murapaka, C.; Goolaup, S.; Chen, Y. J.; Leong, S. H.; Lew, W. S.

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the domain wall (DW) trajectory in magnetic network structures is crucial for spin-based device related applications. The understanding of DW dynamics in network structures is also important for study of fundamental properties like observation of magnetic monopoles at room temperature in artificial spin ice lattice. The trajectory of DW in magnetic network structures has been shown to be chirality dependent. However, the DW chirality periodically oscillates as it propagates a distance longer than its fidelity length due to Walker breakdown phenomenon. This leads to a stochastic behavior in the DW propagation through the network structure. In this study, we show that the DW trajectory can be deterministically controlled in the magnetic network structures irrespective of its chirality by introducing a potential barrier. The DW propagation in the network structure is governed by the geometrically induced potential barrier and pinning strength against the propagation. This technique can be extended for controlling the trajectory of magnetic charge carriers in an artificial spin ice lattice.

  20. Severe edge effects and simple complimentary interior solutions for thin-walled anisotropic and composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horgan, C. O.; Simmonds, J. G.

    1994-12-01

    Many useful thin-walled structures of interest to the U.S. Army, such as rifle barrels, automotive parts, rocket casings, helicopter blades, driveshafts, and containment vessels, are often constructed of layers of anisotropic, filament or fiber-reinforced materials. While many of these structures are subject to severe mechanical, inertial, or thermal loads, they often must be designed to remain elastic. This means that it is particularly important to be able to compute accurately global characteristics, such as buckling loads and natural frequencies, as well as local information such as stresses near holes or edges. Two important, complementary regions of such structures, have been studied, namely, the interior where there are no steep stress gradients, and the edge zone(s) where stress gradients are high. For both regions, simplified, cost-effective asymptotic methods have been developed. These considerations are particularly important in layered, anisotropic structures because many investigators have (1) claimed that higher-order (and hence computationally expensive) beam, plate, or shell theories are needed for such structures and (2) not paid sufficient attention to the particularly severe end effects (breakdown of Saint-Venant's principle) such structures engender.

  1. Effects of phosphorus-doping upon the electronic structures of single wall carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN AQing; SHAO QingYi; LIN ZhiCheng

    2009-01-01

    The phosphorus-doped single wall carbon nanotube (PSWCNT) is studied by using First-Principle methods based on Density Function Theory (DFT). The formation energy, total energy, band structure, geometry structure and density of states are calculated. It is found that the formation energy of the P-doped single carbon nanotubes increases with diameters; the total energy of carbon nanotubes with the same diameter decreases as the doping rate increases. The effects of impurity position on the im-purity level are discussed. It illustrates that the position of the impurity level may depend on the C-P-C bond angle. According to the above results, it is feasible to substitute a carbon atom with a phosphorus atom in SWCNT. It is also found that P-doped carbon nanotubes are N type semiconductor.

  2. Effects of phosphorus-doping upon the electronic structures of single wall carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The phosphorus-doped single wall carbon nanotube(PSWCNT) is studied by using First-Principle methods based on Density Function Theory(DFT).The formation energy,total energy,band structure,geometry structure and density of states are calculated.It is found that the formation energy of the P-doped single carbon nanotubes increases with diameters;the total energy of carbon nanotubes with the same diameter decreases as the doping rate increases.The effects of impurity position on the impurity level are discussed.It illustrates that the position of the impurity level may depend on the C-P-C bond angle.According to the above results,it is feasible to substitute a carbon atom with a phosphorus atom in SWCNT.It is also found that P-doped carbon nanotubes are N type semiconductor.

  3. Structural performance of new thin-walled concrete sandwich panel system reinforced with bfrp shear connectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hodicky, Kamil; Hulin, Thomas; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup;

    2013-01-01

    is described and provides information on the structural design with its advantages. Experimental and numerical investigations of the BFRP connecting systems were performed. The experimental program included testing of small scale specimens by applying shear (push-off) loading and semi-full scale...... specimens by flexural loading. Numerical investigations were based on 3-D linear elastic finite element analysis. Results from the numerical investigations were compared with experimental results of small and semi-scale specimens for the validation of the design procedure. Experimental and numerical results......This paper presents a new thin-walled concrete sandwich panel system reinforced with basalt fiber-reinforced plastic (BFRP) with optimum structural performances and a high thermal resistance developed by Connovate and Technical University of Denmark. The shear connecting system made of a BFRP grid...

  4. Elasto-plastic response of multi-story shear wall structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Monte Carlo simulation study is carried out. The relationship between the elastoplastic and linear response for multi-DOF systems is developed based on the results of the simulation study. Several 6-story shear wall structures are considered as structural models which represent typical nuclear power plant buildings. A bilinear force-displacement relationship is assumed for each story. A number of artificial earthquakes based on the Kanai-Tajimi power spectrum and trapezoidal envelope function are used as the input ground motion. The least square method is introduced for the purpose of evaluating the median relationship between the ductility factor and linear response from the simulated data and also evaluating the deviation from this median relationship. This relationship derived for the 6-story buildings is compared with the currently used energy absorption factor and the simulation results for Zion auxiliary building model. (orig./HP)

  5. Aortic dissection: case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavana Venkata Nagabhushana Rao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aortic dissection may not be attended by a physician in his lifetime, but he should possess all the clinical acumen to deal with as it is a catastrophic disease. Early and accurate diagnosis will save a life. Here we present three cases we faced in sequence over a period of two months. A case of extensive dissection arch to thoracic aorta, its display in detail. Second case eliciting ambiguity between coronary ischemia and aortic dissection. Management difficulties of such clinician situation are discussed. Third case, the fracture of a renal artery stent leading to severe hypertension, abdominal pain, and aortic dissection. Such case was not described in the literature to our knowledge. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(4.000: 1268-1271

  6. Evolutionary divergence of β-expansin structure and function in grasses parallels emergence of distinctive primary cell wall traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampedro, Javier; Guttman, Mara; Li, Lian-Chao; Cosgrove, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Expansins are wall-loosening proteins that promote the extension of primary cell walls without the hydrolysis of major structural components. Previously, proteins from the EXPA (α-expansin) family were found to loosen eudicot cell walls but to be less effective on grass cell walls, whereas the reverse pattern was found for EXPB (β-expansin) proteins obtained from grass pollen. To understand the evolutionary and structural bases for the selectivity of EXPB action, we assessed the extension (creep) response of cell walls from diverse monocot families to EXPA and EXPB treatments. Cell walls from Cyperaceae and Juncaceae (families closely related to grasses) displayed a typical grass response ('β-response'). Walls from more distant monocots, including some species that share with grasses high levels of arabinoxylan, responded preferentially to α-expansins ('α-response'), behaving in this regard like eudicots. An expansin with selective activity for grass cell walls was detected in Cyperaceae pollen, coinciding with the expression of genes from the divergent EXPB-I branch that includes grass pollen β-expansins. The evolutionary origin of this branch was located within Poales on the basis of phylogenetic analyses and its association with the 'sigma' whole-genome duplication. Accelerated evolution in this branch has remodeled the protein surface in contact with the substrate, potentially for binding highly substituted arabinoxylan. We propose that the evolution of the divergent EXPB-I group made a fundamental change in the target and mechanism of wall loosening in the grass lineage possible, involving a new structural role for xylans and the expansins that target them. PMID:25353668

  7. Structure and machinability of thin-walled parts made of titanium alloy powder using electron beam melting technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaev, A.; Grechishnikov, V.; Kozochkin, M.; Volosova, M.; Petuhov, Yu; Peretyagin, P.

    2016-04-01

    The present study aims at study of structure and properties of raw and thermal treated titanium-based powder material used to produce the thin-walled components by electron beam melting technology. Producing the end product means also studying the finishing cutting process. Examining the quality of end product in terms of geometric tolerance and thin walls thickness stability consists of control the surface roughness is also included in this study.

  8. Including aortic valve morphology in computational fluid dynamics simulations: initial findings and application to aortic coarctation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendell, David C; Samyn, Margaret M; Cava, Joseph R; Ellwein, Laura M; Krolikowski, Mary M; Gandy, Kimberly L; Pelech, Andrew N; Shadden, Shawn C; LaDisa, John F

    2013-06-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations quantifying thoracic aortic flow patterns have not included disturbances from the aortic valve (AoV). 80% of patients with aortic coarctation (CoA) have a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) which may cause adverse flow patterns contributing to morbidity. Our objectives were to develop a method to account for the AoV in CFD simulations, and quantify its impact on local hemodynamics. The method developed facilitates segmentation of the AoV, spatiotemporal interpolation of segments, and anatomic positioning of segments at the CFD model inlet. The AoV was included in CFD model examples of a normal (tricuspid AoV) and a post-surgical CoA patient (BAV). Velocity, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), time-averaged wall shear stress (TAWSS), and oscillatory shear index (OSI) results were compared to equivalent simulations using a plug inlet profile. The plug inlet greatly underestimated TKE for both examples. TAWSS differences extended throughout the thoracic aorta for the CoA BAV, but were limited to the arch for the normal example. OSI differences existed mainly in the ascending aorta for both cases. The impact of AoV can now be included with CFD simulations to identify regions of deleterious hemodynamics thereby advancing simulations of the thoracic aorta one step closer to reality. PMID:22917990

  9. The effect of oxidation on structural and electrical properties of single wall carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Zoran M.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs represent an important group of nanomaterials with attractive electrical, chemical, and mechanical properties. In this work we have investigated the structural, optical and electrical properties of single wall carbon nanotube films deposited on copper substrate and then transferred to polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA. The properties of deposited films were varied by changing different parameters: substrate temperature, deposition time and electric field strength. Atomic force microscopy (AFM has been used to study the deposition process of SWCNT films on copper substrate. AFM analysis has shown that sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS micellas were deposited on copper substrate before carbon nanotubes because of their higher mobility. Raman spectroscopy revealed that SWCNTs deposited at elevated temperatures are oxidized. FTIR results showed that COOH groups and Cu2O were generated during electrophoretic process. The SWCNT films were transferred to PMMA substrate and they achieved a sheet resistance of 360 Ω/sq with 79% transparency at 550 nm wavelength and a strong adhesion to the substrate. The main reasons for higher values of sheet resistances of SWCNT thin films compared to those of other authors are oxidation of carbon nanotubes during electrophoresis and the presence of used surfactans in carbon matrix of deposited films.

  10. Cell-wall structural changes in wheat straw pretreated for bioethanol production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jørgensen Henning

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pretreatment is an essential step in the enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass and subsequent production of bioethanol. Recent results indicate that only a mild pretreatment is necessary in an industrial, economically feasible system. The Integrated Biomass Utilisation System hydrothermal pretreatment process has previously been shown to be effective in preparing wheat straw for these processes without the application of additional chemicals. In the current work, the effect of the pretreatment on the straw cell-wall matrix and its components are characterised microscopically (atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy and spectroscopically (attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in order to understand this increase in digestibility. Results The hydrothermal pretreatment does not degrade the fibrillar structure of cellulose but causes profound lignin re-localisation. Results from the current work indicate that wax has been removed and hemicellulose has been partially removed. Similar changes were found in wheat straw pretreated by steam explosion. Conclusion Results indicate that hydrothermal pretreatment increases the digestibility by increasing the accessibility of the cellulose through a re-localisation of lignin and a partial removal of hemicellulose, rather than by disruption of the cell wall.

  11. Cell-wall structural changes in wheat straw pretreated for bioethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Jan B; Thygesen, Lisbeth G; Felby, Claus; Jørgensen, Henning; Elder, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Background Pretreatment is an essential step in the enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass and subsequent production of bioethanol. Recent results indicate that only a mild pretreatment is necessary in an industrial, economically feasible system. The Integrated Biomass Utilisation System hydrothermal pretreatment process has previously been shown to be effective in preparing wheat straw for these processes without the application of additional chemicals. In the current work, the effect of the pretreatment on the straw cell-wall matrix and its components are characterised microscopically (atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy) and spectroscopically (attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) in order to understand this increase in digestibility. Results The hydrothermal pretreatment does not degrade the fibrillar structure of cellulose but causes profound lignin re-localisation. Results from the current work indicate that wax has been removed and hemicellulose has been partially removed. Similar changes were found in wheat straw pretreated by steam explosion. Conclusion Results indicate that hydrothermal pretreatment increases the digestibility by increasing the accessibility of the cellulose through a re-localisation of lignin and a partial removal of hemicellulose, rather than by disruption of the cell wall. PMID:18471316

  12. Intactness of cell wall structure controls the in vitro digestion of starch in legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhital, Sushil; Bhattarai, Rewati R; Gorham, John; Gidley, Michael J

    2016-03-16

    Increasing the level of starch that is not digested by the end of the small intestine and therefore enters the colon ('resistant starch') is a major opportunity for improving the nutritional profile of foods. One mechanism that has been shown to be successful is entrapment of starch within an intact plant tissue structure. However, the level of tissue intactness required for resistance to amylase digestion has not been defined. In this study, intact cells were isolated from a range of legumes after thermal treatment at 60 °C (starch not gelatinised) or 95 °C (starch gelatinised) followed by hydrolysis using pancreatic alpha amylase. It was found that intact cells, isolated at either temperature, were impervious to amylase. However, application of mechanical force damaged the cell wall and made starch accessible to digestive enzymes. This shows that the access of enzymes to the entrapped swollen starch is the rate limiting step controlling hydrolysis of starch in cooked legumes. The results suggest that a single cell wall could be sufficient to provide an effective delivery of starch to the large intestine with consequent nutritional benefits, provided that mechanical damage during digestion is avoided. PMID:26786854

  13. Pulsatile blood flow in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Lasheras, Juan C.; Singel, Soeren; Varga, Chris

    2001-11-01

    We discuss the results of combined in-vitro laboratory measurements and clinical observations aimed at determining the effect that the unsteady wall shear stresses and the pressure may have on the growth and eventual rupturing of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA), a permanent bulging-like dilatation occurring near the aortic bifurcation. In recent years, new non-invasive techniques, such as stenting, have been used to treat these AAAs. However, the development of these implants, aimed at stopping the growth of the aneurysm, has been hampered by the lack of understanding of the effect that the hemodynamic forces have on the growth mechanism. Since current in-vivo measuring techniques lack the precision and the necessary resolution, we have performed measurements of the pressure and shear stresses in laboratory models. The models of the AAA were obtained from high resolution three-dimensional CAT/SCANS performed in patients at early stages of the disease. Preliminary DPIV measurements show that the pulsatile blood flow discharging into the cavity of the aneurysm leads to large spikes of pressure and wall shear stresses near and around its distal end, indicating a possible correlation between the regions of high wall shear stresses and the observed location of the growth of the aneurysm.

  14. Infilled masonry walls contribution in mitigating progressive collapse of multistory reinforced concrete structures according to UFC guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmy, Huda; Hadhoud, Hamed; Mourad, Sherif

    2015-09-01

    A structure is subjected to progressive collapse when an element fails, resulting in failure of adjoining structural elements which, in their turn, cause further structural failure leading eventually to partial or total collapse. The failure of a primary vertical support might occur due to extreme loadings such as bomb explosion in a terrorist attack, gas explosion and huge impact of a car in the parking area. Different guidelines such as the General Services Administration (GSA 2003) and the Unified Facilities Criteria (UFC 2009) addressed the structural progressive collapse due to the sudden loss of a main vertical support. In the current study, a progressive collapse assessment according to the UFC guidelines is carried out for a typical ten-story reinforced concrete framed structure designed according to codes [(ACI 318-08) and (ASCE 7-10)] for minimum design loads for buildings and other structures. Fully nonlinear dynamic analysis for the structure was carried out using Applied Element Method (AEM). The investigated cases included the removal of a corner column, an edge column, an edge shear wall, internal columns and internal shear wall. The numerical analysis showed that simplification of the problem into 3D bare frames would lead to uneconomical design. It was found for the studied case that, the infilled masonry walls have a valuable contribution in mitigating progressive collapse of the reinforced concrete framed structures. Neglecting these walls would lead to uneconomical design.

  15. Crystal structure of kiwellin, a major cell-wall protein from kiwifruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamiaux, Cyril; Maddumage, Ratnasiri; Middleditch, Martin J; Prakash, Roneel; Brummell, David A; Baker, Edward N; Atkinson, Ross G

    2014-09-01

    Kiwellin is a cysteine-rich, cell wall-associated protein with no known structural homologues. It is one of the most abundant proteins in kiwifruit (Actinidia spp.), and has been shown to be recognised by IgE of some patients allergic to kiwifruit. Cleavage of kiwellin into an N-terminal 4 kDa peptide called kissper and a core domain called KiTH is mediated by actinidin in vitro, and isolation of the kissper peptide from green-fleshed kiwifruit extracts suggested it may result from in vivo processing of kiwellin. In solution, kissper is highly flexible and displays pore-forming activity in synthetic lipid-bilayers. We present here the 2.05 Å resolution crystal structure of full-length kiwellin, purified from its native source, Actinidia chinensis (gold-fleshed kiwifruit). The structure confirms the modularity of the protein and the intrinsic flexibility of kissper and reveals that KiTH harbours a double-psi β-barrel fold hooked to an N-terminal β hairpin. Comparisons with structurally-related proteins suggest that a deep gorge located at the protein surface forms a binding site for endogenous ligands. PMID:25093947

  16. Structure, physicochemical properties and in vitro fermentation of enzymatically degraded cell wall materials from apples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, S; Dongowski, G; Kunzek, H

    2002-06-01

    Cell wall materials (CWM) prepared from apple parenchyma tissue by treatment with commercial enzymes for maceration, mash fermentation and liquefaction were characterised with regard to their composition and structure as well as their physicochemical and physiological properties. Increasing enzymatic degradation of the CWM resulted in growing loss of the pectin matrix, decreasing porosity as well as increasing particle aggregation. Due to these structural alterations the water binding, the viscoelastic properties of the CWM-water-suspensions and the in vitro fermentation, forming short chain fatty acids, were reduced. The investigations showed that interrelations exist between enzymatic treatment and changes of (i) structure and state of matrices (evaluated by means of thermal analysis), (ii) physicochemical properties and (iii) physiological properties. So the application of liquefying enzymes can lead to a complete removal of the pectin matrix, causing an essentially improved thermal stability of the CWM preparation, but strongly reduced water binding and reduced structure-forming properties into the CWM-water-suspensions. The formation of short-chain fatty acids during in vitro fermentation of the CWM preparations by fresh human faeces flora depended on the portion and the state of the pectin matrix and the cellulose network, respectively. PMID:12108214

  17. Deuteron electromagnetic structure functions and polarization properties in soft-wall AdS/QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Gutsche, Thomas; Schmidt, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    We apply a soft-wall AdS/QCD approach to the description of deuteron structure functions and tensor polarized properties. Present work is a completion of our previous study on electromagnetic form factors. By the appropriate choice of two couplings in the effective action we are able to reproduce both the form factors and structure functions in full consistency with model-independent constraints set by perturbative QCD. Our framework is based on a five-dimensional action in AdS space formulated in terms of vector fields dual to the deuteron and the electromagnetic fields. The AdS fields depend on four Minkowski and one holographic coordinate $z$. The scale dependence of the form factors and structure functions is consistent with quark counting rules implying the $1/Q^{10}$ behavior of the charge form factor $G_C(Q^2)$, structure functions $A(Q^2)$ and $B(Q^2)$, and the $1/Q^{12}$ behavior of the magnetic $G_M(Q^2)$ and quadrupole $G_Q(Q^2)$ form factors.

  18. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to repair an abdominal aortic aneurysm using a technology called an “endograft,” which is sometimes called the “ ... separate area, and it’s because of this small technology that allows you to do this. Exactly. So ...

  19. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the arteries, which is known as atherosclerosis, high blood pressure, smokers, or a family history of abdominal aortic ... imaging. We can integrate ultrasound imaging, the patient’s blood pressure, and so it’s a little bit like being ...

  20. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an abdominal aortic aneurysm. Normally this procedure takes us about 45 minutes to an hour of doctor work time, which is, I think, a fairly quick procedure to replace a major life-threatening problem in the patient’s abdomen. So you can see ...

  1. Enhancing 4D PC-MRI in an aortic phantom considering numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzke, Jonas; Schoch, Nicolai; Weis, Christian; Müller-Eschner, Matthias; Speidel, Stefanie; Farag, Mina; Beller, Carsten J.; Heuveline, Vincent

    2015-03-01

    To date, cardiovascular surgery enables the treatment of a wide range of aortic pathologies. One of the current challenges in this field is given by the detection of high-risk patients for adverse aortic events, who should be treated electively. Reliable diagnostic parameters, which indicate the urge of treatment, have to be determined. Functional imaging by means of 4D phase contrast-magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) enables the time-resolved measurement of blood flow velocity in 3D. Applied to aortic phantoms, three dimensional blood flow properties and their relation to adverse dynamics can be investigated in vitro. Emerging "in silico" methods of numerical simulation can supplement these measurements in computing additional information on crucial parameters. We propose a framework that complements 4D PC-MRI imaging by means of numerical simulation based on the Finite Element Method (FEM). The framework is developed on the basis of a prototypic aortic phantom and validated by 4D PC-MRI measurements of the phantom. Based on physical principles of biomechanics, the derived simulation depicts aortic blood flow properties and characteristics. The framework might help identifying factors that induce aortic pathologies such as aortic dilatation or aortic dissection. Alarming thresholds of parameters such as wall shear stress distribution can be evaluated. The combined techniques of 4D PC-MRI and numerical simulation can be used as complementary tools for risk-stratification of aortic pathology.

  2. Nonlinear mechanics of thin-walled structures asymptotics, direct approach and numerical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Vetyukov, Yury

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a hybrid approach to the mechanics of thin bodies. Classical theories of rods, plates and shells with constrained shear are based on asymptotic splitting of the equations and boundary conditions of three-dimensional elasticity. The asymptotic solutions become accurate as the thickness decreases, and the three-dimensional fields of stresses and displacements can be determined. The analysis includes practically important effects of electromechanical coupling and material inhomogeneity. The extension to the geometrically nonlinear range uses the direct approach based on the principle of virtual work. Vibrations and buckling of pre-stressed structures are studied with the help of linearized incremental formulations, and direct tensor calculus rounds out the list of analytical techniques used throughout the book. A novel theory of thin-walled rods of open profile is subsequently developed from the models of rods and shells, and traditionally applied equations are proven to be asymptotically exa...

  3. Computation of macro-fiber composite integrated thin-walled smart structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S. Q.; Zhang, S. Y.; Chen, M.; Bai, J.; Li, J.

    2016-07-01

    Due to high flexibility, reliability, and strong actuation forces, piezo fiber based composite smart material, macro-fiber composite (MFC), is increasingly applied in various fields for vibration suppression, shape control, and health monitoring. The complexity arrangement of MFC materials makes them difficult in numerical simulations. This paper develops a linear electro-mechanically coupled finite element (FE) model for composite laminated thin-walled smart structures bonded with MFC patches considering arbitrary piezo fiber orientation. Two types of MFCs are considered, namely, MFC-d31 in which the d 31 effect dominates the actuation forces, and MFC-d33 which mainly uses the d 33 effect. The proposed FE model is validated by static analysis of an MFC bonded smart plate.

  4. The Effect of Shear Wall Distribution on the Dynamics of Reinforced Concrete Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inclusion of a soft storey in multistory concrete buildings is a feature gaining popularity in urban areas where land is of exorbitant cost. In earthquake prone zones, this feature has been observed in post earthquake investigations. Although engineers are prepared to accept the notion that a soft storey poses a weak link in Seismic Design, yet the idea demands better understanding. The following study illustrates the importance of the judicious distribution of shear walls. The selected building is analyzed through nine numerical models which address the behavior of framed structures. The parameters discussed include, inter alias, the fundamental period of vibration, lateral displacements, axial and shear forces. It is noticed that an abrupt change in stiffness between the soft storey and the level above is responsible for increasing the strength demand on first storey columns. Extending the elevator shafts throughout the soft storey is strongly recommended

  5. Tuning Electronic Structures of BN and C Double-Wall Hetero-Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueran Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available First principle calculations based on density functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation were carried out to investigate the energetic and electronic properties of carbon and boron nitride double-wall hetero-nanotubes (C/BN-DWHNTs with different chirality and size, including an armchair (n, n carbon nanotube (CNT enclosed in (m, m boron nitride nanotube (BNNT and a zigzag (n, 0 CNT enclosed in (m, 0 BNNT. The electronic structure of these DWHNTs under a transverse electric field was also investigated. The ability to tune the band gap with changing the intertube distance (di and imposing an external electric field (F of zigzag DWHNTs provides the possibility for future electronic and electrooptic nanodevice applications.

  6. Phase transitions, interfacial fluctuations and hidden symmetries for fluids near structured walls

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A O Parry; J M Romero-Enrique

    2005-05-01

    Fluids adsorbed at micro-patterned and geometrically structured substrates can exhibit novel phase transitions and interfacial fluctuation effects distinct from those characteristic of wetting at planar, homogeneous walls. We review recent theoretical progress in this area paying particular attention to filling transitions pertinent to fluid adsorption near wedges, which have highlighted a deep connection between geometrical and contact angles. We show that filling transitions are not only characterized by large scale interfacial fluctuations leading to universal critical singularities but also reveal hidden symmetries with short-ranged critical wetting transitions and properties of dimensional reduction. We propose a non-local interfacial model which fulfills all these properties and throws light on long-standing problems regarding the order of the 3D short-range critical wetting transition.

  7. Structural studies of the major polysaccharide in the cell wall of Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørum, U; Robertsen, B; Kenne, L

    1998-01-01

    The galactose-rich polysaccharide (GPS) in the cell wall of the Gram-positive bacterium Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent in of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) of salmonids, has been studied by sugar and methylation analysis, partial acid hydrolysis, Smith degradation, FABMS, and 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The data show that the GPS has a heptasaccharide repeating unit with the following structure: alpha-D-Rhap-(1-->3)-alpha-L-FucpNAc-(1-->)-beta-D-GlcpNAc 1 decreases 2 -->3)-beta-D-Galf-(1-->6)-beta-D-Galf-(1-->3)-beta-D-Galf -(1-->6) -beta-D-Galf-(1-->. PMID:9691455

  8. Fracture toughness of irradiated candidate materials for ITER first wall/blanket structures: Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, D.J.; Pawel, J.E.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Disk compact specimens of candidate materials for first wall/blanket structures in ITER have been irradiated to damage levels of about 3 dpa at nominal irradiation temperatures of either 90 250{degrees}C. These specimens have been tested over a temperature range from 20 to 250{degrees}C to determine J-integral values and tearing moduli. The results show that irradiation at these temperatures reduces the fracture toughness of austenic stainless steels, but the toughness remains quite high. The toughness decreases as the temperature increases. Irradiation at 250{degrees}C is more damaging that at 90{degrees}C, causing larger decreases in the fracture toughness. The ferritic-martensitic steels HT-9 and F82H show significantly greater reductions in fracture toughness that the austenitic stainless steels.

  9. Aortic valve annuloplasty: new single suture technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöllhorn, Joachim; Rylski, Bartosz; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm

    2014-06-01

    Reconstruction strategies for aortic valve insufficiency in the presence of aortic annulus dilatation are usually surgically challenging. We demonstrate a simple, modified Taylor technique of downsizing and stabilization of the aortic annulus using a single internal base suture. Since April 2011, 22 consecutive patients have undergone safe aortic valve annuloplasty. No reoperations for aortic valve insufficiency and no deaths occurred. PMID:24882316

  10. Myocardial Infarction in a Patient with Prosthetic Aortic Valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Kianoosh Hoseini

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A 45- year old man with a history of Aortic Valve replacement presented with acute chest pain which was diagnosed to be anterior wall myocardial infarction. He received thrombolytic therapy with streptokinase. Echocardiography and fluoroscopy showed normally functioning ball and cage aortic prosthesis. Coronary arteriography showed globular filling defect in midportion of left anterior descending coronary artery, most probably embolized thrombus. The patient underwent medical treatment especially warfarin with higher range of INR without any intervention. He had a smooth in-hospital course and uneventful recovery.

  11. A structural analysis in seismic archaeology: the walls of Noto and the 1693 earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lombardini

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available A crucial problenl for seismic archeology is how to recognize seismic effects and how to date them. On an experimental basis. we proposed that the problem be reversed, and that we begin at the other end: i.e. by analyzing already known seismic effects on ancient structures, testified by written sources. to be able to .calibrate>> the types or possible observations and any subsequent elaborations. The choice of the walls of Noto was suggested by the fact that Noto was abandoned following the earthquake of l693 (I,= XI MCS. Me 7.5 which had already been studied in depth as part of an ING research programme (1988-92. Moreover, just after recent research, this event proved to be reconstructed with a high quality standard. Photogrammetric measurements were made on several parts of the town walls to plot a numerical model aimed at ascertaining specific aspects of the earthquake damage. An estimate of the ground acceleration during the earthquake has been attempted via non-linear finite-element analyses of a building located by the main city gate. The analyses show that. in order to obtain the building vault collapse, a ground acceleration of 0.5 to 0.7 g had to be reached during the earthquake. This result, typical of a strong earthquake such as the one of 1693, proves that an approach based on finite element analysis and a sound engineering judgment Inay be systematically applied to historical earthquake sites to obtain some estimates of ground acceleration in historical earthquakes. On the whole, this work aimed at starting up the second development phase of the great event of 1693 of which the macroseismic erfects are known. In the meantime, some possibilities of tackling structural analyses in seismic archaeology are being explored.

  12. Characteristic turbulent structure of a modified drag-reduced surfactant solution flow via dosing water from channel wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Modulation of near wall turbulence was conducted on a viscoelastic drag-reduced flow. • Flow of coexisting Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids was realized. • Drag reduction is enhanced, although the Reynolds shear stress increases. • An obvious regional characteristic structure is presented. • Anisotropy of near-wall turbulence was discussed. - Abstract: The modification of the near-wall structure is very important for the control of wall turbulence. To ascertain the effect of near-wall modulation on the viscoelastic drag-reduced flow, the modified characteristics of a surfactant solution channel flow were investigated experimentally. The modulation was conducted on the boundary of the channel flow by injecting water from the whole surface of one side of the channel wall. The diffusion process of the injected water was observed by using the planar laser-induced fluorescence technique. The velocity statistics and characteristic structure including the spatial distributions of instantaneous streamwise velocity, swirling strength, and Reynolds shear stress were analyzed based on the velocity vectors acquired in the streamwise wall-normal plane by using the particle imaging velocimetry technique. The results indicated that the disturbance of the injected water was constricted within a finite range very near the dosing wall, and the Reynolds shear stress was increased in this region. However, the eventual drag reduction rate was found to be increased due to a relatively large decrement of viscoelastic shear stress in this near-wall region. Moreover, the flow structure under this modulation presented obvious regional characteristics. In the unstable disturbed region, the mixing of high-speed and low-speed fluids and the motions of ejection and sweep occurred actively. Many clockwise vortex cores were also found to be generated. This characteristic structure was similar to that in the ordinary turbulence of Newtonian fluid. Nevertheless, outside

  13. Histopathological study of congenital aortic valve malformations in 32 children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Ping; WANG Hongwei; LI Yanping; CHENG Peixuan; LIU Qingjun; ZHANG Zhenlu; LIU Jianying

    2007-01-01

    The histopathological characteristics of congenital aortic valve malformations in children were investigated.All the native surgically excised aortic valves from 32 pediatric patients suffering from symptomatic aortic valve dysfunction due to congenital aortic valve malformations between January 2003 and December 2005 were studied macroscopically and microscopically.The patients' medical records were reviewed and the clinical information was extracted.The diagnosis was made by the clinical presentation,preoperative echocardiography,intraoperative examination,and postoperative histopathological study,excluding rheumatic ot degenerative aortic valve diseases,infective endocarditis and primary connective tissue disorders,e.g.Marfan syndrome.Among 32 children with congenital aortic valve malformations,the age was ranged from six to 18 years,with a mean of 14.9 years,and there were 27 boys and five girls (male:female = 5.4:1).There were five cases of aortic stenosis (AS,15.62%),25 cases of aortic insufficiency (AI,78.13 %)and two cases of AS-AI (6.25%),without other valve diseases.Twenty cases still had other congenital heart diseases:ventricular septal defect (19 cases),patent ductus arteriosus (two cases),double-chambered right ventricle (one case),aneurysm of the right anterior aortic sinus of valsalva (three cases).Histopathological examination indicated that the cusps became thickening with unequal size,irregular shape (coiling and prolapse edge),enhanced hardness,and partly calcification.Microscopic investigation revealed the unsharp structure of valve tissue,fibrosis,myxomatous,reduced collagen fiber,rupture of elastic fibers,different degrees of infiltration of inflammatory cells,secondary calcareous and lipid deposit,and secondary fibrosis.Congenital aortic valve malformations in children involve males more than females,mostly associated with other congenital heart diseases.Aortic insufficiency is more common in children with congenital aortic valve

  14. Computer modeling of tasks in dynamics of viscoelastic thin-walled elements in structures of variable thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Abdikarimov

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a numerical method and algorithm for solving tasks in dynamics of viscoelastic thin-walled elements in structures of variable thickness. The equations of motion concerning deflections are described by partial integro-differential equations (PIDE. Using Bubnov-Galerkin’s method, based on the polynomial approximation of deflections, the task is limited to the study of the system of ordinary IDEs, where the independent variable is time. The solution to the system of IDEs is obtained by the offered numerical method, which results into the algorithm of the numerical solution and the program in the Delphi algorithmic language. The study of nonlinear vibrations of thin-walled elements in structures, allowing for variable thickness in the geometrical nonlinear statement, has enabled revealing a number of mechanical effects. Depending on physico-mechanical and geometrical parameters of the considered viscoelastic thin-walled elements in structures, the authors reccommend how to use the rigidity of the system.

  15. Structures tubulaires minces en matériaux composites. Principes de calcul Thin-Walled Composite Tubular Structures. Calculation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odru P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Cet article présente une méthode de calcul des structures composites fibres-résine appliquée aux cas des tubes minces. Outre l'établissement des relations contraintes - déformations généralisées des tubes à partir des caractéristiques des matériaux de base et de leur orientation, on pose les relations permettant de calculer leur comportement et leur dimensionnement sous des charges axisymétriques combinées de traction, pression et flexion. Une méthode simplifiée applicable au cas des composites microfissurés est aussi présentée. On montre ensuite, à travers quelques exemples concrets d'applications, les propriétés intéressantes ou inhabituelles que le matériau permet de conférer aux structures. This article presents a method of calculation of composite structures applied to thin-walled tubes. Starting from the characteristics and orientation of the basic materials, the generalized stress-strain equations of the tubes are determined ; then the relationship allowing the calculation of their design and behavior under combined axisymmetrical loads of tension, pressure and bending are established. A simplified method applicable to microcracked composite materials is also described. Several complete examples of applications illustrate the interesting or unusual properties that this material can impart to structures

  16. Energy efficiency of the Rural Wall multi-layer structure in low-rise building design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.A. Golova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the study on energy efficiency of various wall design solutions and a new multi-layer wall design for low-rise construction as well as the results of television studies on multi-layer and single-layer envelopes. Indoor climate parameters for various wall design solutions are determined. The study reveals the optimal wall design solutions and specifies the theoretical assessment of their energy efficiency in compliance with Russia's national building code 23-02-2003. The paper presents calculations of building heat loss through the exterior building envelope, reduced resistance to heat transfer of walls and total heat loss of the building with the selected outer wall design during the heating season. Recommendations on the application of the new multi-layer wall design using local wall materials in the construction of energy-efficient low-rise buildings are developed. The recommendations include requirements for wall materials, thermal calculations, production guidelines, properties of layers in a multi-layer walls and physical and mechanical properties of wall layers.

  17. Assessment of thermo-mechanical behavior in CLAM steel first wall structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Fubin, E-mail: liufubin_1216@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, Liaoning (China); Yao Man, E-mail: yaoman@dlut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, Liaoning (China)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer China Low Activation Martensitic steel (CLAM) as FW the structural material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The thermo-mechanical behavior of the FW was analyzed under the condition of normal ITER operation combined effect of plasma heat flux and neutron heating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The temperature dependence of the material physical properties of CLAM is summarized. - Abstract: The temperature and strain distributions of the mockup with distinct structural material (SS316L or China Low Activation Martensitic steel (CLAM)) in two-dimensional model were calculated and analyzed, based on a high heat flux (HHF) test recently reported with heat flux of 3.2 MW/m{sup 2}. The calculated temperature and strain results in the first wall (FW), in which SS316L is as the structural material, showed good agreement with HHF test. By substituting CLAM steel for SS316L the contrast analysis indicates that the thermo-mechanical property for CLAM steel is better than that of SS316 at the same condition. Furthermore, the thermo-mechanical behavior of the FW was analyzed under the condition of normal ITER operation combined effect of plasma heat flux and neutron heating.

  18. First direct aortic retrievable transcatheter aortic valve implantation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, Jaya; Glover, Chris; Labinaz, Marino; Ruel, Marc

    2014-11-01

    We describe 2 cases in which transcatheter aortic valve implantation was performed with a Portico prosthesis (St Jude Medical, St Paul, MN) through a direct aortic approach. In 1 of the cases, prosthesis retrieval was needed during the procedure and was essential to the successful outcome. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of direct aortic Portico prosthesis implantation, and it highlights the significance of the retrievable nature of this device. PMID:25442452

  19. Flow dynamics in anatomical models of abdominal aortic aneurysms: computational analysis of pulsatile flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finol, Ender A; Amon, Cristina H

    2003-01-01

    Blood flow in human arteries is dominated by time-dependent transport phenomena. In particular, in the abdominal segment of the aorta under a patient's average resting conditions, blood exhibits laminar flow patterns that are influenced by secondary flows induced by adjacent branches and in irregular vessel geometries. The flow dynamics becomes more complex when there is a pathological condition that causes changes in the normal structural composition of the vessel wall, for example, in the presence of an aneurysm. An aneurysm is an irreversible dilation of a blood vessel accompanied by weakening of the vessel wall. This work examines the importance of hemodynamics in the characterization of pulsatile blood flow patterns in individual Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) models. These patient-specific computational models have been developed for the numerical simulation of the momentum transport equations utilizing the Finite Element Method (FEM) for the spatial and temporal discretization. We characterize pulsatile flow dynamics in AAAs for average resting conditions by means of identifying regions of disturbed flow and quantifying the disturbance by evaluating wall pressure and wall shear stresses at the aneurysm wall. PMID:14515766

  20. Blunt Traumatic Aortic Injury of Right Aortic Arch in a Patient with an Aberrant Left Subclavian Artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Daryl Li-Tian; Haider, Sajjad; Zhen, Claire Alexandra Chew

    2015-01-01

    Right-sided aortic arch (RAA) is a rare congenital developmental variant present in about 0.1 percent of the population. This anatomical anomaly is commonly associated with congenital heart disease and complications from compression of mediastinal structures. However, it is unknown if patients are at a higher risk of blunt thoracic aortic injury (BTAI). We report a case of a 20-year-old man admitted to the hospital after being hit by an automobile. Computed tomographic scan revealed an RAA with an aberrant left subclavian artery originating from a Kommerell’s diverticulum. A pseudo-aneurysm was also seen along the aortic arch. A diagnosis of blunt traumatic aortic injury was made. The patient was successfully treated with a 26mm Vascutek hybrid stentgraft using the frozen elephant trunk technique. A literature review of the pathophysiology of BTAI was performed to investigate if patients with right-sided aortic arch are at a higher risk of suffering from BTAI. Results from the review suggest that although theoretically there may be a higher risk of BTAI in RAA patients, the rarity of this condition has prevented large studies to be conducted. Previously reported cases of BTAI in RAA have highlighted the possibility that the aortic isthmus may be anatomically weak and therefore prone to injury. We have explored this possibility by reviewing current literature of the embryological origins of the aortic arch and descending aorta. PMID:25745378

  1. Evolution of Endovascular Treatment for Complex Thoracic Aortic Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Roselli, Eric E.

    2008-01-01

    In a relatively short period of time, transcatheter and endovascular approaches to treat thoracic aortic and structural heart disease have exploded onto the scene. New device frontiers already being forged in the experimental stages include expanded indications and variations of fenestrated and branch stentgrafting to treat thoracoabdominal and arch disease, endovascular ascending and aortic root repair, and all of the cardiac valves. A fundamental concept to optimize durability of endovascul...

  2. Simulation of bifurcated stent grafts to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA)

    CERN Document Server

    Egger, Jan; Freisleben, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a method is introduced, to visualize bifurcated stent grafts in CT-Data. The aim is to improve therapy planning for minimal invasive treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Due to precise measurement of the abdominal aortic aneurysm and exact simulation of the bifurcated stent graft, physicians are supported in choosing a suitable stent prior to an intervention. The presented method can be used to measure the dimensions of the abdominal aortic aneurysm as well as simulate a bifurcated stent graft. Both of these procedures are based on a preceding segmentation and skeletonization of the aortic, right and left iliac. Using these centerlines (aortic, right and left iliac) a bifurcated initial stent is constructed. Through the implementation of an ACM method the initial stent is fit iteratively to the vessel walls - due to the influence of external forces (distance- as well as balloonforce). Following the fitting process, the crucial values for choosing a bifurcated stent graft are measured, ...

  3. Study on a concrete filled steel structure for nuclear power plants (part 3). Shear and bending loading tests on wall member

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bending shear tests were performed using H-section wall test specimens to determine the bending shear characteristics of an earthquake resisting wall made of concrete filled steel structure (S C structure). The test parameters were shear span ration, steel ratio, and axial stress. Comparison with a reinforced concrete earthquake resisting wall having the same steel ratio confirmed that the S C structure was superior in terms of both yield strength and stiffness. (author). 5 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Assessment of Analytical Prediction of JNES Seismic Wall Pressure Data for ABWR Model Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior to the establishment of the Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES), the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan conducted a series of large-scale field tests for the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) of Japan to address various aspects of the soil-structure interaction (SSI) effect on the seismic response of nuclear power plant (NPP) structures. The experimental studies used several scaled models of advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) structures, which were constructed at field sites typical of an actual NPP site. As part of the US-Japan collaboration effort on the soil-structure interaction (SSI) phenomenon, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) performed a study to correlate the recorded earthquake induced wall pressures using commercial programs. The purpose of this study is to assess the adequacy and performance of the analytical SSI methods in predicting recorded data, and to determine the effect and breadth of the soil uncertainty on the seismic response computations to capture seismic induced passive soil pressures. The commercial programs used for the correlation study are SASSI and LS-DYNA. SASSI uses the sub-structuring method, which treats SSI responses by superimposing the finite element model of the structure with the analytical solution of wave propagation in the half-space. LS-DYNA is an explicit finite element program, and is only appropriate to treating problems which can be defined with finite boundaries. Therefore, the half-space SSI problem is approximately modeled using LS-DYNA with explicit finite elements for both structure and the surrounding soil to the extent that the scattered waves resulting from the structural vibration will not be reflected at the soil boundaries. This is further ensured by placing the Lysmer transmitting elements at the soil mesh boundaries to absorb the outgoing waves. This paper presents an overview of the NRC

  5. Thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfinger, Judith Z; Halperin, Jonathan L; Marin, Michael L; Stewart, Allan S; Eagle, Kim A; Fuster, Valentin

    2014-10-21

    Aortic dissection is the most devastating complication of thoracic aortic disease. In the more than 250 years since thoracic aortic dissection was first described, much has been learned about diseases of the thoracic aorta. In this review, we describe normal thoracic aortic size; risk factors for dissection, including genetic and inflammatory conditions; the underpinnings of genetic diseases associated with aneurysm and dissection, including Marfan syndrome and the role of transforming growth factor beta signaling; data on the role for medical therapies in aneurysmal disease, including beta-blockers, angiotensin receptor blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors; prophylactic surgery for aneurysm; surgical techniques for the aortic root; and surgical and endovascular management of aneurysm and dissection for different aortic segments. PMID:25323262

  6. Structure of the complex between teicoplanin and a bacterial cell-wall peptide: use of a carrier-protein approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Economou, Nicoleta J.; Zentner, Isaac J. [Drexel University College of Medicine, 245 North 15th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102 (United States); Lazo, Edwin; Jakoncic, Jean; Stojanoff, Vivian [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Weeks, Stephen D.; Grasty, Kimberly C.; Cocklin, Simon; Loll, Patrick J. [Drexel University College of Medicine, 245 North 15th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Using a carrier-protein strategy, the structure of teicoplanin bound to its bacterial cell-wall target has been determined. The structure reveals the molecular determinants of target recognition, flexibility in the antibiotic backbone and intrinsic radiation sensitivity of teicoplanin. Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections are commonly treated with glycopeptide antibiotics such as teicoplanin. This drug inhibits bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis by binding and sequestering a cell-wall precursor: a d-alanine-containing peptide. A carrier-protein strategy was used to crystallize the complex of teicoplanin and its target peptide by fusing the cell-wall peptide to either MBP or ubiquitin via native chemical ligation and subsequently crystallizing the protein–peptide–antibiotic complex. The 2.05 Å resolution MBP–peptide–teicoplanin structure shows that teicoplanin recognizes its ligand through a combination of five hydrogen bonds and multiple van der Waals interactions. Comparison of this teicoplanin structure with that of unliganded teicoplanin reveals a flexibility in the antibiotic peptide backbone that has significant implications for ligand recognition. Diffraction experiments revealed an X-ray-induced dechlorination of the sixth amino acid of the antibiotic; it is shown that teicoplanin is significantly more radiation-sensitive than other similar antibiotics and that ligand binding increases radiosensitivity. Insights derived from this new teicoplanin structure may contribute to the development of next-generation antibacterials designed to overcome bacterial resistance.

  7. Structure of the complex between teicoplanin and a bacterial cell-wall peptide: use of a carrier-protein approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a carrier-protein strategy, the structure of teicoplanin bound to its bacterial cell-wall target has been determined. The structure reveals the molecular determinants of target recognition, flexibility in the antibiotic backbone and intrinsic radiation sensitivity of teicoplanin. Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections are commonly treated with glycopeptide antibiotics such as teicoplanin. This drug inhibits bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis by binding and sequestering a cell-wall precursor: a d-alanine-containing peptide. A carrier-protein strategy was used to crystallize the complex of teicoplanin and its target peptide by fusing the cell-wall peptide to either MBP or ubiquitin via native chemical ligation and subsequently crystallizing the protein–peptide–antibiotic complex. The 2.05 Å resolution MBP–peptide–teicoplanin structure shows that teicoplanin recognizes its ligand through a combination of five hydrogen bonds and multiple van der Waals interactions. Comparison of this teicoplanin structure with that of unliganded teicoplanin reveals a flexibility in the antibiotic peptide backbone that has significant implications for ligand recognition. Diffraction experiments revealed an X-ray-induced dechlorination of the sixth amino acid of the antibiotic; it is shown that teicoplanin is significantly more radiation-sensitive than other similar antibiotics and that ligand binding increases radiosensitivity. Insights derived from this new teicoplanin structure may contribute to the development of next-generation antibacterials designed to overcome bacterial resistance

  8. Structure of the plasma-wall interaction in an oblique magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of the magnetic field strength B and angle of incidence ψ on the one-dimensional (1-D) structure of a weakly collisional plasma near a charged wall is investigated. The models of Chodura [Phys. Fluids 25, 1628 (1982)] and Riemann [Phys. Plasmas 1, 552 (1994)] are recovered as particular cases: intermediate-B and weak-B cases, respectively, of the model presented here, and are compared with a third, strong-B case, where the space-charge sheath is partially magnetized. A triple structure comprising (collisional) presheath, Chodura layer, and sheath, exists only for the intermediate-B case. For weaker and stronger ranges of B, the Chodura layer disappears immersed into the presheath and the sheath, respectively, recovering a classical double-structure. In the Chodura model the importance of the collisional presheath to characterize completely the perturbation region is discussed. For the weak-B case: results for the whole range of angles of incidence are presented and compared; for grazing incidence and a near-collisionless plasma, an approximate analytical solution is derived; and, the asymptotic convergence to the triple-structure is shown. For the strong-B case, the analysis includes: (i) an involved derivation of the local behavior around the entrance point to the sheath, and (ii), for a certain range of ψ, to cross, with a regular solution, an internal singular point of the sheath equations. The similarities between the entrance conditions to the different plasma regions are pointed out. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  9. Storage of hydrogen on single-walled carbon nanotubes and other carbon structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, E.; Chahine, R.; Benard, P.; Cossement, D.; Lafi, L.; Melancon, E.; Bose, T.K. [Institut de recherche sur l' hydrogene, Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres, C.P. 500, G9A 5H7, Trois-Rivieres, Quebec (Canada); Desilets, S. [R and D pour la defense Canada - Valcartier, 2459, boulevard Pie-XI Nord, G3J 1X5, Val-Belair, Quebec (Canada)

    2004-04-01

    The sorption of hydrogen on carbon structures and nanostructures offers a way to reduce the storage pressure of hydrogen with respect to compression storage while achieving interesting gravimetric storage densities. The most readily available carbon structures, activated carbons, can achieve reproducible, high gravimetric storage densities under cryogenic operating conditions: 5-6% at 35 bar and 77 K, in excess of the normal density that would be present in the pore volume under compression at the same temperature and pressure. We discuss and compare the adsorption of hydrogen on high specific surface activated carbons, nanofibres and nanotubes from experimental and theoretical considerations. In particular, we present gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen sorption measurements on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) at (1 bar, 77 K) and (1 bar, 295 K) within the context of our ongoing work on the storage of hydrogen on activated carbon and carbon nanostructures. BET surface area and XRD characterization results on SWNTs are also presented. The experiments were performed on as received, chemically treated and metal-incorporated SWNT samples. Hydrogen sorption capacities measured on treated samples ranged from {proportional_to}0 to about 1 wt. % at 1 bar and 295 K and reached about 4 wt. % at 1 bar and 77 K. Our results show that under certain conditions, SWNTs have better hydrogen uptake performance than large surface area activated carbons. (orig.)

  10. Influence of structural heterogeneity of nanoporous sorbent walls on hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heterogeneity is an ubiquitous aspect of adsorption, often modifying substantially the observed behaviour of the adsorbate-adsorbent system. In this paper, the influence of heterogeneity is explicitly analyzed for the case of the adsorption of molecular hydrogen onto nanoporous carbon. Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations were used to study the mechanism of adsorption in the models of the adsorbate that include both energetic and structural modifications of graphene-based slit pores. In particular, a partial substitution of carbons by boron modifies both the symmetry of the energy landscape and the strength of hydrogen physisorption; which results in considerable increases of the amount of adsorbed gas without major modification of the mechanism of adsorption. Additional heterogeneity arises from structural modifications of the adsorbent by neutron irradiation of boron-doped samples, where the boron fission products generate additional surface area for adsorption. Simulations of adsorption in such pores show that hydrogen uptake is strongly dependent on the chemical nature of the modified pore walls.

  11. Nucleon Structure from 2+1 Flavor Domain Wall QCD at Nearly Physical Pion Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Shigemi

    2011-05-01

    The RBC and UKQCD collaborations have been investigating hadron physics in numerical lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) with (2+1) flavors of dynamical domain wall fermions (DWF) quarks that preserves continuum-like chiral and flavor symmetries. The strange quark mass is adjusted to physical value via reweighting and degenerate up and down quark masses are set as light as possible. In a recent study of nucleon structure we found a strong dependence on pion mass and lattice spatial extent in isovector axialvector-current form factors. This is likely the first credible evidence for the pion cloud surrounding nucleon. Here we report the status of nucleon structure calculations with a new (2+1)-flavor dynamical DWF ensembles with much lighter pion mass of 180 and 250 MeV and a much larger lattice spatial exent of 4.6 fm. A combination of the Iwasaki and dislocation-suppressing-determinant-ratio (I+DSDR) gauge action and DWF fermion action allows us to generate these ensembles at cutoff of about 1.4 GeV while keeping the residual breaking of chiral symmetry sufficiently small. Nucleon source Gaussian smearing has been optimized. Preliminary nucleon mass estimates are 0.98 and 1.05 GeV.

  12. Nucleon structure from 2+1 flavor domain wall QCD at nearly physical pion mass

    CERN Document Server

    Ohta, Shigemi

    2011-01-01

    The RBC and UKQCD collaborations have been investigating hadron physics in numerical lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) with (2+1) flavors of dynamical domain wall fermions (DWF) quarks that preserves continuum-like chiral and flavor symmetries. The strange quark mass is adjusted to physical value via reweighting and degenerate up and down quark masses are set as light as possible. In a recent study of nucleon structure we found a strong dependence on pion mass and lattice spatial extent in isovector axialvector-current form factors. This is likely the first credible evidence for the pion cloud surrounding nucleon. Here we report the status of nucleon structure calculations with a new (2+1)-flavor dynamical DWF ensembles with much lighter pion mass of 180 and 250 MeV and a much larger lattice spatial exent of 4.6 fm. A combination of the Iwasaki and dislocation-suppressing-determinant-ratio (I+DSDR) gauge action and DWF fermion action allows us to generate these ensembles at cutoff of about 1.4 GeV while ke...

  13. Reconfigurable logic via gate controlled domain wall trajectory in magnetic network structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murapaka, C.; Sethi, P.; Goolaup, S.; Lew, W. S.

    2016-02-01

    An all-magnetic logic scheme has the advantages of being non-volatile and energy efficient over the conventional transistor based logic devices. In this work, we present a reconfigurable magnetic logic device which is capable of performing all basic logic operations in a single device. The device exploits the deterministic trajectory of domain wall (DW) in ferromagnetic asymmetric branch structure for obtaining different output combinations. The programmability of the device is achieved by using a current-controlled magnetic gate, which generates a local Oersted field. The field generated at the magnetic gate influences the trajectory of the DW within the structure by exploiting its inherent transverse charge distribution. DW transformation from vortex to transverse configuration close to the output branch plays a pivotal role in governing the DW chirality and hence the output. By simply switching the current direction through the magnetic gate, two universal logic gate functionalities can be obtained in this device. Using magnetic force microscopy imaging and magnetoresistance measurements, all basic logic functionalities are demonstrated.

  14. Structural model for the first wall W-based material in ITER project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dehua Xu; Xinkui He; Shuiquan Deng; Yong Zhao

    2014-01-01

    The preparation, characterization, and test of the first wall materials designed to be used in the fusion reactor have remained challenging problems in the material science. This work uses the first-principles method as implemented in the CASTEP package to study the influ-ences of the doped titanium carbide on the structural sta-bility of the W–TiC material. The calculated total energy and enthalpy have been used as criteria to judge the structural models built with consideration of symmetry. Our simulation indicates that the doped TiC tends to form its own domain up to the investigated nano-scale, which implies a possible phase separation. This result reveals the intrinsic reason for the composite nature of the W–TiC material and provides an explanation for the experimen-tally observed phase separation at the nano-scale. Our approach also sheds a light on explaining the enhancing effects of doped components on the durability, reliability, corrosion resistance, etc., in many special steels.

  15. The diagnosis and management of abdominal aortic aneurysms: a comparison of computed tomography, ultrasound and aortography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is suggested that all clinically significant abdominal aneurysms can be shown by infusion C.T. or ultrasound and routine aortography is no longer indicated. These methods give more information about wall thickness and wall thrombus but do not give detailed information about the extent of an aneurysm and its exact relationship to important aortic branches. They should complement rather than replace aortography

  16. CT diagnosis of aortic disorders, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of 176 persons (95 male and 81 female) exclusive of those with disease of the heart or great vessels or diabetes mellitus were examined by CT for the diameter, tortousity and calcification of the wall of the aorta. The results are summarized as follows: 1. The diameter of the aorta at any of its levels studied was found to be larger in males than in females and tended to increase with advancing age. In males, the diameter of the ascending aorta increased significantly between the 40 s and 50 s age groups, while in females it showed a significant increase during a period from the 50 s to 60 s. Moreover, it should be noted that this age-related increase in diameter was more marked in its more proximal portions. 2. The upper limits of normal values of aortic calibers were 40 mm at the ascending aorta, 30 mm at the descending aorta and 30 mm and 25 mm, respectively, at those levels of the abdominal aorta just above and below the origin of the renal artery. 3. The ascending aorta tended to displace rightwards with aging while the descending aorta went somewhat leftwards. The abdominal aorta showed no consistent tendency in this respect. 4. The calcification of aortic walls was noted in none of the subjects less than 40 years of age. However, its incidence increased with advancing age (11.5 % in the 40 s, 20.6 % in the 50 s, 60.0 % in the 60 s, 81.8 % in the 70 s and 87.5 % in the 80 s) and was higher in males than in females. of all portions of the aorta studied, the aortic arch had the highest incidence of calcification, followed by the abdominal aorta, descending aorta and ascending aorta. These results indicate that CT proved to be more effective and non-invasive than conventional angiographical study in delineating the caliber and tortuosity of the aorta as well as the calcification of its walls, thus providing a useful means of diagnosing aortic diseases. (author)

  17. Abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gefke, K; Schroeder, T V; Thisted, B; Olsen, P S; Perko, M J; Agerskov, Kim; Røder, O; Lorentzen, Jørgen Ewald

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify patients who need longer care in the ICU (more than 48 hours) following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery and to evaluate the influence of perioperative complications on short- and long-term survival and quality of life. AAA surgery was performed in 55......, 78% stated that their quality of life had improved or was unchanged after surgery and had resumed working. These data justify a therapeutically aggressive approach, including ICU therapy following AAA surgery, despite failure of one or more organ systems.......The goal of this study was to identify patients who need longer care in the ICU (more than 48 hours) following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery and to evaluate the influence of perioperative complications on short- and long-term survival and quality of life. AAA surgery was performed in 553...

  18. Tissue Responses to Stent Grafts with Endo-Exo-Skeleton for Saccular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in a Canine Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Il Young; Chung, Jin Wook; Kim, Hyo Cheol [Dept. of Radiology and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Clinical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young Ho; So Young Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Beom [Dept. of Radiology, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Min, Seung Kee [Dept. of Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Hyung [Dept. of Radiology, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    We evaluated the effect of close contact between the stent and the graft on the induction of endothelial covering on the stent graft placed over an aneurysm. Saccular abdominal aortic aneurysms were made with Dacron patch in eight dogs. The stent graft consisted of an inner stent, a expanded polytetrafluoroethylene graft, and an outer stent. After sacrificing the animals, the aortas with an embedded stent graft were excised. The aortas were inspected grossly and evaluated microscopically. The animals were sacrificed at two (n = 3), six (n = 3), and eight months (n = 2) after endovascular repair. In two dogs, the aortic lumen was occluded at two months after the placement. On gross inspection of specimens from the other six dogs with a patent aortic lumen, stent grafts placed over the normal aortic wall were covered by glossy white neointima, whereas, stent grafts placed over the aneurysmal aortic wall were covered by brownish neointima. On microscopic inspection, stent grafts placed over the normal aortic wall were covered by thin neointima (0.27 ± 0.05 mm, mean ± standard deviation) with an endothelial layer, and stent grafts placed over the aneurysmal aortic wall were covered by thick neointima (0.62 ± 0.17 mm) without any endothelial lining. Transgraft cell migration at the normal aortic wall was more active than that at the aneurysmal aortic wall. Close contact between the stent and the graft, which was achieved with stent grafts with endo-exo-skeleton, could not enhance endothelial covering on the stent graft placed over the aneurysms.

  19. Tissue Responses to Stent Grafts with Endo-Exo-Skeleton for Saccular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in a Canine Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated the effect of close contact between the stent and the graft on the induction of endothelial covering on the stent graft placed over an aneurysm. Saccular abdominal aortic aneurysms were made with Dacron patch in eight dogs. The stent graft consisted of an inner stent, a expanded polytetrafluoroethylene graft, and an outer stent. After sacrificing the animals, the aortas with an embedded stent graft were excised. The aortas were inspected grossly and evaluated microscopically. The animals were sacrificed at two (n = 3), six (n = 3), and eight months (n = 2) after endovascular repair. In two dogs, the aortic lumen was occluded at two months after the placement. On gross inspection of specimens from the other six dogs with a patent aortic lumen, stent grafts placed over the normal aortic wall were covered by glossy white neointima, whereas, stent grafts placed over the aneurysmal aortic wall were covered by brownish neointima. On microscopic inspection, stent grafts placed over the normal aortic wall were covered by thin neointima (0.27 ± 0.05 mm, mean ± standard deviation) with an endothelial layer, and stent grafts placed over the aneurysmal aortic wall were covered by thick neointima (0.62 ± 0.17 mm) without any endothelial lining. Transgraft cell migration at the normal aortic wall was more active than that at the aneurysmal aortic wall. Close contact between the stent and the graft, which was achieved with stent grafts with endo-exo-skeleton, could not enhance endothelial covering on the stent graft placed over the aneurysms.

  20. Influence of Zn ion implantation on structures and field emission properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The structures and field emission properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays implanted with Zn+ by MEVVA ion implanter have been investigated.The results revealed that Zn+implantation induced structural damage and that the top of carbon nanotubes with multi-layered graphite structure were transformed into carbon nanowires with amorphous structure.Meanwhile,C:Zn solid solution was synthesized after Zn+ implantation.The turn-on field and threshold field were 0.80 and 1.31 V/μm,respectively for original multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays and were reduced to 0.66 and 1.04 V/μm due to the synthesis of C and Zn composite,in which the work function was reduced after low doses of Zn+implantation.It is indicated that low doses of Zn+implantation can improve field emission performance of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays.Otherwise,high doses of Zn+implantation can reduce field emission properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays,because radiation damage reduces the electric field enhancement factor.

  1. Electron irradiation-induced change of structure and damage mechanisms in multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian-Qun; Li, Xing-Ji; Liu, Chao-Ming; Ma, Guo-Liang; Gao, Feng

    2015-11-01

    Owing to their unique structure and excellent electrical property, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as an ideal candidate for making future electronic components have great application potentiality. In order to meet the requirements for space application in electronic components, it is necessary to study structural changes and damage mechanisms of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), caused by the irradiations of 70 and 110 keV electrons. In the paper, the changes of structure and damage mechanisms in the irradiated MWCNTs, induced by the irradiations of 70 and 110 keV electrons, are investigated. The changes in surface morphology and structure of the irradiated MWCNT film are characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. It is found that the MWCNTs show different behaviors in structural changes after 70 and 110 keV electron irradiation due to different damage mechanisms. SEM results reveal that the irradiation of 70 keV electrons does not change surface morphology of the MWCNT film, while the irradiation of 110 keV electrons with a high fluence of 5 × 1015 cm-2 leads to evident morphological changes, such as the formation of a rough surface, the entanglement of nanotubes and the shrinkage of nanotubes. Based on Raman spectroscopy, XPS, and XRD analyses, it is confirmed that the irradiation of 70 keV electrons increases the interlayer spacing of the MWCNTs and disorders their structure through electronic excitations and ionization effects, while the irradiation of 110 keV electrons obviously reduces the interlayer spacing of the MWCNTs and improves their graphitic order through knock-on atom displacements. The improvement of the irradiated MWCNTs by 110 keV electrons is attributed to the restructuring of defect sites induced by knock-on atom displacements. EPR spectroscopic analyses reveal that the MWCNTs exposed

  2. Electron irradiation-induced change of structure and damage mechanisms in multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨剑群; 李兴冀; 刘超铭; 马国亮; 高峰

    2015-01-01

    Owing to their unique structure and excellent electrical property, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as an ideal candidate for making future electronic components have great application potentiality. In order to meet the requirements for space appli-cation in electronic components, it is necessary to study structural changes and damage mechanisms of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), caused by the irradiations of 70 and 110 keV electrons. In the paper, the changes of structure and damage mechanisms in the irradiated MWCNTs, induced by the irradiations of 70 and 110 keV electrons, are investigated. The changes in surface morphology and structure of the irradiated MWCNT film are characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. It is found that the MWCNTs show different behaviors in structural changes after 70 and 110 keV electron irradiation due to different damage mechanisms. SEM results reveal that the irra-diation of 70 keV electrons does not change surface morphology of the MWCNT film, while the irradiation of 110 keV electrons with a high fluence of 5 × 1015 cm−2 leads to evident morphological changes, such as the formation of a rough surface, the entanglement of nanotubes and the shrinkage of nanotubes. Based on Raman spectroscopy, XPS, and XRD analyses, it is confirmed that the irradiation of 70 keV electrons increases the interlayer spacing of the MWCNTs and disorders their structure through electronic excitations and ionization effects, while the irradiation of 110 keV electrons obviously reduces the interlayer spacing of the MWCNTs and improves their graphitic order through knock-on atom dis-placements. The improvement of the irradiated MWCNTs by 110 keV electrons is attributed to the restructuring of defect sites induced by knock-on atom displacements. EPR spectroscopic analyses reveal that the MWCNTs

  3. Aortic Dissection of Unknown Origin in a Young Patient: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Majid Hajimaghsoudi; Faeze Zeinali; Mehdi Bagherabadi; Morteza Saeedi

    2016-01-01

    Aortic dissection occurs when a tear develops in the wall of the aorta, which is rare in the young population. This fatal disorder is hard to diagnose, especially in young patients. We present the case of aortic dissection in a 15-year-old boy referred to the Emergency Department of Yazd University of Medical Sciences in November 2015. The patient presented to our department with sudden acute chest pain. Emergent computed tomography (CT) scanning of the brain, chest, and abdomen reflected bil...

  4. Contemporary Role of Computational Analysis in Endovascular Treatment for Thoracic Aortic Disease

    OpenAIRE

    van Bogerijen, Guido H.W.; Tolenaar, Jip L.; Conti, Michele; Auricchio, Ferdinando; Secchi, Francesco; Sardanelli, Francesco; Moll, Frans L; van Herwaarden, Joost A.; Rampoldi, Vincenzo; Trimarchi, Santi

    2013-01-01

    In the past decade, thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has become the primary treatment option in descending aneurysm and dissection. The clinical outcome of this minimally invasive technique is strictly related to an appropriate patient/stent graft selection, hemodynamic interactions, and operator skills. In this context, a quantitative assessment of the biomechanical stress induced in the aortic wall due to the stent graft may support the planning of the procedure. Different techni...

  5. Invasive aspergillosis in the aortic arch with infectious Aspergillus lesions in pulmonary bullae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isao Watanabe

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A patient with pulmonary bullae died of massive hemoptysis. At autopsy a hole was observed in the aortic wall. A microscopic examination indicated small Aspergillus lesions in pulmonary bullae and extensive necrotic lesions with Aspergillus hyphae in the media of the thoracic aorta. These findings led to a diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis in the aortic arch. This is a rare case in which Aspergillus invaded the aorta in a patient without hematologic neoplasms or neutropenia.

  6. Capnocytophaga canimorsus endocarditis with root abscess in a patient with a bicuspid aortic valve

    OpenAIRE

    Guillaume Coutance; Olivier Lepage; Christophe Bachelet; Michèle Hamon; Damien Legallois; Arnaud Pellissier; Fabien Labombarda

    2009-01-01

    Infective endocarditis caused by a zoonotic micro organism is a rare clinical condition. Capnocytophaga canimorsus is a commensal bacterium living in the saliva of dogs and cats which produces rarely reported endocarditis whose incidence may be underestimated, considering its failure to grow on standard media. We reported the case of a 65-year-old man with bicuspid aortic valve endocarditis and multiple abscesses of the aortic wall caused by the canine bacteria C. canimorsus.

  7. Capnocytophaga canimorsus endocarditis with root abscess in a patient with a bicuspid aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michèle Hamon

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis caused by a zoonotic micro organism is a rare clinical condition. Capnocytophaga canimorsus is a commensal bacterium living in the saliva of dogs and cats which produces rarely reported endocarditis whose incidence may be underestimated, considering its failure to grow on standard media. We reported the case of a 65-year-old man with bicuspid aortic valve endocarditis and multiple abscesses of the aortic wall caused by the canine bacteria C. canimorsus.

  8. First-principles calculations on the structure and electronic properties of boron doping zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Calculations have been made for single-walled zigzag(n,0) carbon nanotubes containing substitutional boron impurity atoms using ab initio density functional theory.It is found that the formation energies of these nanotubes depend on the tube diameter,as do the electronic properties,and show periodic fea-ture that results from their different π bonding structures compared to those of perfect zigzag carbon nanotubes.When more boron atoms are incorporated into a single-walled zigzag carbon nanotube,the substitutional boron atoms tend to come together to form structure of BC3 nanodomains,and B-doped tubes have striking acceptor states above the top of the valence bands.For the structure of BC3,there are two kinds of configurations with different electronic structures.

  9. The everyday used nomenclature of the aortic root components: the tower of Babel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievers, Hans-Hinrich; Hemmer, Wolfgang; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Moritz, Anton; Moosdorf, Rainer; Lichtenberg, Artur; Misfeld, Martin; Charitos, Efstratios I

    2012-03-01

    Modern analyses of data for scientific reporting and healthcare management purposes require standardized and consistent definitions, something which also holds true for aortic root surgery, as part of the cardiovascular surgery spectrum. The aim of the present study was to investigate the currently employed nomenclature of the aortic root components. A questionnaire was constructed on the terminology of aortic root components, providing a list of common definitions including anatomical descriptions, as well as fields for custom responses. Responses were received from 534 cardiothoracic surgeons registered at www.ctsnet.org. Remarkable variations in definitions were detected. The most unanimously accepted terms were: 'aortic leaflets', the freely moving parts (52.6% of responses); 'commissures', the distal part of the leaflet attachments plus the peripheral area of the free edges of the leaflets (52.2%); 'semi-lunar leaflet attachment', the anatomic site of leaflet attachment (58%); 'annulus', the circular line defined by the nadirs of the leaflets (38%); 'interleaflet triangle', the tissue between two leaflets and annulus (23%); 'aortic valve', the three leaflets only (55%); 'aortic root' as composed of sinuses, tissue between the leaflets, sinutubular junction, leaflets and their wall attachment (63%). The remarkable variability on the everyday-used definitions of the aortic root components can potentially lead to misinterpretation of data. More stringent adoption of consistent, standardized definitions of aortic root components is necessary in the modern era of data collection and management. PMID:22345173

  10. Structural and magnetic characterization of batch-fabricated nickel encapsulated multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the growth and fabrication of Ni-filled multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Ni-MWNTs) with an average diameter of 115 nm and variable length of 400 nm-1 μm. The Ni-MWNTs were grown using template-assisted electrodeposition and low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) techniques. Anodized alumina oxide (AAO) templates were fabricated on Si using a current controlled process. This was followed by the electrodeposition of Ni nanowires (NWs) using galvanostatic pulsed current (PC) electrodeposition. Ni NWs served as the catalyst to grow Ni-MWNTs in an atmosphere of H2/C2H2 at a temperature of 700 0C. Time dependent depositions were carried out to understand the diffusion and growth mechanism of Ni-MWNTs. Characterization was carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), focused ion beam (FIB) milling, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). TEM analysis revealed that the Ni nanowires possess a fcc structure. To understand the effects of the electrodeposition parameters, and also the effects of the high temperatures encountered during MWNT growth on the magnetic properties of the Ni-MWNTs, vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) measurements were performed. The template-based fabrication method is repeatable, efficient, enables batch fabrication and provides good control on the dimensions of the Ni-MWNTs.

  11. Manufacturing and maintenance technologies developed for a thick-wall structure of the ITER vacuum vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of welding, cutting and non-destructive testing (NDT) techniques, and development of remotized systems have been carried out for on-site manufacturing and maintenance of the thick-wall structure of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) vacuum vessel (VV). Conventional techniques, including tungsten inert gas welding, plasma cutting, and ultrasonic inspection, have been improved and optimized for the application to thick austenitic stainless steel plates. In addition, advanced methods have been investigated, including reduced-pressure electron-beam and multi-pass neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (NdYAG) laser welding, NdYAG laser cutting, and electro-magnetic acoustic transducer inspection, to improve cost and technical performance. Two types of remotized systems with different payloads have been investigated and one of them has been fabricated and demonstrated in field joint welding, cutting, and NDT tests on test mockups and full-scale ITER VV sector models. The progress and results of this development to date provide a high level of confidence that the manufacturing and maintenance of the ITER VV is feasible

  12. Tensile Characterization of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Helical Structural Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhon, Young I.; Kim, Chulki; Seo, Minah; Cho, Woon Jo; Lee, Seok; Jhon, Young Min

    2016-02-01

    Recently, evidence was presented that certain single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) possess helical defective traces, exhibiting distinct cleaved lines, yet their mechanical characterization remains a challenge. On the basis of the spiral growth model of SWNTs, here we present atomic details of helical defects and investigate how the tensile behaviors of SWNTs change with their presence using molecular dynamics simulations. SWNTs have exhibited substantially lower tensile strength and strain than theoretical results obtained from a seamless tubular structure, whose physical origin cannot be explained either by any known SWNT defects so far. We find that this long-lasting puzzle could be explained by assuming helical defects in SWNTs, exhibiting excellent agreement with experimental observation. The mechanism of this tensile process is elucidated by analyzing atomic stress distribution and evolution, and the effects of the chirality and diameter of SWNTs on this phenomenon are examined based on linear elastic fracture mechanics. This work contributes significantly to our understanding of the growth mechanism, defect hierarchies, and mechanical properties of SWNTs.

  13. Quadrilateral shell finite element for analysis of thin-walled reinforced concrete structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Yu. Fialko

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the quadrilateral finite element for analysis of thin-walled reinforced concrete structures. The deformation theory of plasticity, formulated in terms of residual strains, is applied for behavior simulation of the both: concrete and steel. Such an approach allows us to simulate a cyclic loading as well as a dynamic one. The stress – strain diagram, proposed by the European Committee on concrete, is used for the compressed zone of concrete. The degradation, caused by the formation of cracks in the tensile zone, is described by the descending branch of the diagram. The symmetric stress-strain diagram, or its exponential approximation, is applied for steel. The compatibility of strains for concrete and steel is adopted. Reinforcements of the given direction are considered as a layer, which works only for compression-tension in this direction. The reinforcements of each direction are presented as a separate layer. We allow for the discrete placement of rods over thickness of the cross section. The Mindlin - Reissner shell theory is used for the reduction of a 3D problem to a 2D one; and the mixed interpolation of shear tensorial components is applied to overcome a shear locking effect.

  14. Templated Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Specific Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng; Wang, Xiao; Li, Meihui; Liu, Xiyan; Zhao, Xiulan; Zhang, Daqi; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Juan; Li, Yan

    2016-04-19

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have shown great potential in various applications attributed to their unique structure-dependent properties. Therefore, the controlled preparation of chemically and structurally pristine SWNTs is a crucial issue for their advanced applications (e.g., nanoelectronics) and has been a great challenge for two decades. Epitaxial growth from well-defined seeds has been shown to be a promising strategy to control the structure of SWNTs. Segments of carbon nanotubes, including short pipes from cutting of preformed nanotubes and caps from opening of fullerenes or cyclodehydrogenation of polycyclic hydrocarbon precursors, have been used as the seeds to grow SWNTs. Single-chirality SWNTs were obtained with both presorted chirality-pure SWNT segments and end caps obtained from polycyclic hydrocarbon molecules with designed structure. The main challenges of nanocarbon-segment-seeded processes are the stability of the seeds, yield, and efficiency. Catalyst-mediated SWNT growth is believed to be more efficient. The composition and morphology of the catalyst nanoparticles have been widely reported to affect the chirality distribution of SWNTs. However, chirality-specific SWNT growth is hard to achieve by alternating catalysts. The specificity of enzyme-catalyzed reactions brings us an awareness of the essentiality of a unique catalyst structure for the chirality-selective growth of SWNTs. Only catalysts with the desired atomic arrangements in their crystal planes can act as structural templates for chirality-specific growth of SWNTs. We have developed a new family of catalysts, tungsten-based intermetallic compounds, which have high melting points and very special crystal structures, to facilitate the growth of SWNTs with designed chirality. By the use of W6Co7 catalysts, (12,6) SWNTs were directly grown with purity higher than 92%. Both high-resolution transmission electron microscopy measurements and density functional theory simulations

  15. Nucleon structure in lattice QCD with dynamical domain-wall fermions quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huey-Wen Lin; Shigemi Ohta

    2006-07-23

    We report RBC and RBC/UKQCD lattice QCD numerical calculations of nucleon electroweak matrix elements with dynamical domain-wall fermions (DWF) quarks. The first, RBC, set of dynamical DWF ensembles employs two degenerate flavors of DWF quarks and the DBW2 gauge action. Three sea quark mass values of 0.04, 0.03 and 0.02 in lattice units are used with about 200 gauge configurations each. The lattice cutoff is about 1.7 GeV and the spatial volume is about (1.9 fm){sup 3}. Despite the small volume, the ratio of the isovector vector and axial charges g{sub A}/g{sub V} and that of structure function moments {sub u-d}/{sub {Delta} u - {Delta} d} are in agreement with experiment, and show only very mild quark mass dependence. The second, RBC/UK, set of ensembles employs one strange and two degenerate (up and down) dynamical DWF quarks and Iwasaki gauge action. The strange quark mass is set at 0.04, and three up/down mass values of 0.03, 0.02 and 0.01 in lattice units are used. The lattice cutoff is about 1.6 GeV and the spatial volume is about (3.0 fm){sup 3}. Even with preliminary statistics of 25-30 gauge configurations, the ratios g{sub A}/g{sub V} and {sub u-d}/{sub {Delta} u - {Delta} d} are consistent with experiment and show only very mild quark mass dependence. Another structure function moment, d{sub 1}, though yet to be renormalized, appears small in both sets.

  16. NUCLEON STRUCTURE IN LATTICE QCD WITH DYNAMICAL DOMAIN--WALL FERMIONS QUARKS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LIN H.-W.; OHTA, S.

    2006-10-02

    We report RBC and RBC/UKQCD lattice QCD numerical calculations of nucleon electroweak matrix elements with dynamical domain-wall fermions (DWF) quarks. The first, RBC, set of dynamical DWF ensembles employs two degenerate flavors of DWF quarks and the DBW2 gauge action. Three sea quark mass values of 0.04, 0.03 and 0.02 in lattice units are used with 220 gauge configurations each. The lattice cutoff is a{sup -1} {approx} 1.7GeV and the spatial volume is about (1.9fm){sup 3}. Despite the small volume, the ratio of the isovector vector and axial charges g{sub A}/g{sub V} and that of structure function moments {sub u-d}/{sub {Delta}u-{Delta}d} are in agreement with experiment, and show only very mild quark mass dependence. The second, RBC/UK, set of ensembles employs one strange and two degenerate (up and down) dynamical DWF quarks and Iwasaki gauge action. The strange quark mass is set at 0.04, and three up/down mass values of 0.03, 0.02 and 0.01 in lattice units are used. The lattice cutoff is a{sup -1} {approx} 1.6GeV and the spatial volume is about (3.0fm){sup 3}. Even with preliminary statistics of 25-30 gauge configurations, the ratios g{sub A}/g{sub V} and {sub u-d}/{sub {Delta}u-{Delta}d} are consistent with experiment and show only very mild quark mass dependence. Another structure function moment, d{sub 1}, though yet to be renormalized, appears small in both sets.

  17. Intracardiac echocardiography to diagnose pannus formation after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yoshiya; Ohara, Takahiro; Funada, Akira; Takahama, Hiroyuki; Amaki, Makoto; Hasegawa, Takuya; Sugano, Yasuo; Kanzaki, Hideaki; Anzai, Toshihisa

    2016-03-01

    A 66-year-old female, under regular follow-up for 20 years after aortic valve replacement (19-mm Carbomedics), presented dyspnea on effort and hypotension during hemodialysis. A transthoracic echocardiogram showed elevation of transvalvular velocity up to 4 m/s, but the structure around the aortic prosthesis was difficult to observe due to artifacts. Fluoroscopy revealed normal motion of the leaflets of the mechanical valve. Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) revealed a pannus-like structure in the left ventricular outflow tract. Transesophageal echocardiogram also revealed this structure. ICE can visualize structural abnormalities around a prosthetic valve after cardiac surgery even in patients in whom conventional imaging modalities failed. PMID:26732266

  18. LIFE Materials: Topical Assessment Report for LIFE Volume 1 TOPIC: Solid First Wall and Structural Components TASK: Radiation Effects on First Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caro, A

    2008-11-26

    This report consists of the following chapters: CHAPTER A: LIFE Requirements for Materials. Part 1: The structure of the First Wall--Basic requirements; A qualitative view of the challenge; The candidate materials; and Base-line material's properties. CHAPTER B: Summary of Existing Knowledge--Brief historical introduction; Design window; The temperature window; Evolution of the design window with damage; Damage calculations; He and H production; Swelling resistance; Incubation dose for swelling; Design criterion No. 1, Strength; Design criterion No. 2, Corrosion resistance; Design criterion No. 3, Creep resistance; Design criterion No. 4, Radiation induced embrittlement; and Conclusions. CHAPTER C: Identification of Gaps in Knowledge & Vulnerabilities. CHAPTER D: Strategy and Future Work.

  19. Tobacco smoking and aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Birgitte F; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Grønbæk, Morten;

    2012-01-01

    from the Copenhagen City Heart Study followed for up to 34years and in 56,211 individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study followed for up to 7years. RESULTS: During follow-up, 335 and 169 individuals developed aortic aneurysm outcomes in the Copenhagen City Heart Study and Copenhagen...... General Population Study, respectively. According to the magnitude of the hazard ratios, tobacco consumption was the most important risk factor for hospitalization and death from aortic aneurysm, followed by male sex and hypertension in both cohorts. The population attributable risk of aortic aneurysm...... outcomes due to tobacco consumption was 64% and 47% in the Copenhagen City Heart Study and Copenhagen General Population Study, respectively, and ranked highest among population attributable risks of aortic aneurysm in both cohorts. The absolute 10-year risk for hospitalization or death from aortic...

  20. More about structures localized on domain walls: strings, skyrmions, analytic solutions for orientational moduli, symmetry analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Bychkov, Vladimir; Kurianovych, Evgeniy

    2016-01-01

    We further discuss properties of a simple model, which allows existence of domain walls with orientational moduli, localized on them. We review an analytic solution of such a model and discuss properties of that solution in a context of previous results. We discuss an existence of one-dimensional domain walls, localized on two-dimensional ones, and construct a corresponding effective action. Then in low-energy limit, which is $O(3)$ sigma-model, we discuss existence of skyrmions, localized on domain walls, and provide a solution for a skyrmion configuration, based on the analogy with instantons. We perform a symmetry analysis of the initial model and low-energy theory on the domain wall world volume.

  1. Simulation of low rigidity part machining applied to thin-walled structures

    OpenAIRE

    Arnaud, Lionel; Gonzalo, Oscar; Seguy, Sébastien; Jauregi, Haritz; Peigné, Grégoire

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the modelling of machining vibrations of thin-walled aluminium work- pieces at high productivity rate. The use of numerical simulation is generally aimed at giving optimal cutting conditions for the precision and the surface finish needed. The proposed modelling includes all the ingredients needed for real productive machining of thin-walled parts. It has been tested with a specially designed machining test with high cutting engagement and taking into acco...

  2. Structural stability of exposed gully wall in Central Eastern Nigeria as affected by soil properties

    OpenAIRE

    N. Ejiofor; C. A. Igwe

    2005-01-01

    We studied the soil stability of a gully wall in a gully erosion prone area of Central Eastern Nigeria. The objective was to investigate the physicochemical properties of the gully wall soils and to relate them to the collapsing and stability of the gullies. Ten soil layers were sampled for analysis. The bulk density was high while the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) was moderately high resulting in rapid permeability for the soil layers. The liquid limits (LL) and plastic limits (PL) w...

  3. Fruit wall anatomical structure of the genus Betula section Lenta (Betulaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Olga V. Yatsenko; Igor O. Yatsenko

    2014-01-01

    The fruits of the Lentae are referred to lower syncarpous nuts. Unlike most birches, the three-lobed scales in section Lentae stay attached to the axis for a long time. The fruit wall is differentiated into epicarp (derivative of outer tissues of inferior ovary, the tissues of receptacular origin) and the pericarp itself (mesocarp and the endocarp derivating from the ovary wall). The epicarp consists of two zones: epidermis and subepidermal zone. Two-four layers of larger sclerenchymatous cel...

  4. External wall structure of green rural houses in Daqing, China, based on life cycle and ecological footprint theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Jin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Daqing is situated in one of the severely cold regions of China. The living environment in this region is extremely poor because of the harsh climate and the backward economy. The external wall is an important component of the external envelope of buildings, and it greatly contributes to the indoor thermal environment. By taking the external wall as the research object, this study summarizes the characteristics of the external wall structure and analyzes the common materials used in existing rural residences. Specifically, we combine life cycle theory and ecological footprint (EF theory and introduce the green external wall structure, as well as its application in practice, in accordance with the local ecosystem. Results show that anecological residence offers a better environment and greater economic benefits than a traditional residence. The annual energy consumption, CO2 consumption, and EF of the ecological residence in this study are lower than those of the traditional residence by 69.61%, 17.5 t, and 99.47%, respectively.

  5. Changes in Water Filtration Velocity and Wall Structure of the Rabbit Common Carotid Artery after Removal of the Adventitia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Shigeo; Kaichi, Masashi; Karino, Takeshi

    To investigate the effect of the changes in water filtration velocity on the structure of an arterial wall, measurements of water filtration velocity and microscopic observation of histological specimens of the rabbit common carotid arteries were carried out by surgically removing the adventitia of the arteries and harvesting them at different times postoperatively. It was found that by removal of the adventitia, water filtration velocity at the arterial wall increased temporarily, and then as healing of the adventitia progressed, it decreased gradually until water filtration velocity attained almost the same value as that obtained with intact arteries. Intimal thickening was observed in those vessels harvested at 7 and 14 days postoperatively. Furthermore, it was shown by theoretical calculations that the concentration of low-density lipoprotein, which is a main carrier of cholesterol in blood, was locally elevated at the luminal surface of the segment where water filtration velocity was increased by removal of the adventitia. These results indicate that the change in water filtration velocity at the vessel wall brings about certain changes in the structure of the vessel wall.

  6. Influence of the structural properties on the pseudocritical magnetic behavior of single-wall ferromagnetic nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar-Enriquez, C.D. [PCM Computational Applications, Universidad Nacional de Colombia - Sede Manizales, A.A. 127 Manizales (Colombia); Restrepo-Parra, E., E-mail: erestrepopa@unal.edu.co [PCM Computational Applications, Universidad Nacional de Colombia - Sede Manizales, A.A. 127 Manizales (Colombia); Restrepo, J. [Grupo de Magnetismo y Simulacion Gplus, Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Antioquia, A.A. 1226 Medellin (Colombia)

    2012-04-15

    In this work we address the influence of the crystalline structure, concretely when the system under study is formed by square or hexagonal unit cells, upon the magnetic properties and pseudocritical behavior of single-wall ferromagnetic nanotubes. We focus not only on the effect of the geometrical shape of the unit cell but also on their dimensions. The model employed is based on the Monte Carlo method, the Metropolis dynamics and a nearest neighbors classical Heisenberg Hamiltonian. Magnetization per magnetic site, magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and magnetic energy were computed. These properties were computed varying the system size, unit cell dimension and temperature. The dependence of the nearest neighbor exchange integral on the nanotubes geometrical characteristics is also discussed. Results revealed a strong influence of the system topology on the magnetic properties caused by the difference in the coordination number between square and hexagonal unit cell. Moreover, the nanotubes diameter influence on magnetic properties is only observed at very low values, when the distance between atoms is less than it, presented by the 2D sheet. On the other hand, it was concluded that the surface-related finite-size effects do not influence the magnetic nanotubes properties, contrary to the case of other nano-systems as thin films and nanoparticles among others. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit cell geometry has strong influence on the magnetic properties in ferromagnetic nanotubes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nanotube diameter increase produces a decrease of interaction between nearest neighbor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface-related finite-size effects do not influence the magnetic nanotubes properties.

  7. Assessment and structural analysis of a PCPV with hot liner and adjustable wall temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The great adaptability of the concept with elastic hot liner and adjustable wall temperature can be seen in design and assessment of the PCPV for different reactor types. The first part of the paper presents an overview of the influence and possible reactions on the main existing assumptions for this special concept. One of the most essential features - the limitation of liner stresses for elastic compression - can be attained by balancing liner and structural concrete temperatures. The temperature difference between these two components mainly influences the stress-state of the liner. Transient conditions mostly extend only to the region of liner and thermal barrier. The knowledge of material properties is a fundamental requirement of every analysis. A study demostrates how temperature and long-term behaviour of materials influence the stress and strain history of the vessel. The concept offers the possibility of vessel stabilization before operation. This method which anticipates visco-elastic deformations has particular importance for high operating temperatures. The decision whether to stabilize or not depends both on the thermal assessment and on the long-term restraints of the liner and requires an optimization of these effects. The second part of the paper deals with the analysis methods and their results used in the development of the Austrian PCPV. By means of two- and three-dimensional calculations for the reference design of a PWR with 1500 MWe some of the above mentioned aspects are explained. Stress and deformation diagrams indicate the possibility of safe operation. These extensive investigations and analyses also yielded a feeling on analytical possibilities for vessel design and their costs. (orig.)

  8. Positron emission tomography (PET) evaluation of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA)

    OpenAIRE

    SakalihasanN, Natzi; Van Damme, Hendrik; Gomez, P.; RIGO, PIERRE; Lapiere, C. M.; Nusgens, Betty; Limet, Raymond

    2002-01-01

    Background: aneurysmal disease is associated with all inflammatory Cell infiltrate and enzymatic degradation of the vessel wall. Aim of the study: to detect increased metabolic activity in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) by means of positron emission tomography (PET-imaging). Study design: twenty-six patients with AAA underwent PET-imaging Results: in tell patients, PET-imaging revealed increased, fluoro-deoxy-glucose (18-FDG) uptake at the level of the aneurysm. Patients with positive PET-i...

  9. Doxycycline inhibition of proteases and inflammation in abdominal aortic aneurysms

    OpenAIRE

    Khawaja, Hazem Al-

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to evaluate the effect of doxycycline on the proteolytic and inflammatory processes in abdominal aneurysms. This data is essential for the development of pharmaceutical strategies for the stabilization of an AAA. Such an approach could reduce the need for elective surgery and endovascular repair. It has repeatedly been shown that AAA progression and rupture is related to the failure of collagen in the aortic wall. Yet the exact mechanism underlying this failure remai...

  10. Flow-sensitive in-vivo 4D MR imaging at 3T for the analysis of aortic hemodynamics and derived vessel wall parameters; Die Analyse aortaler Haemodynamik und Gefaesswandparameter mittels fluss-sensitiver in-vivo 4D-MRT bei 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frydrychowicz, A.; Markl, M.; Stalder, A.F.; Bock, J.; Bley, T.A.; Berger, A.; Russe, M.F.; Hennig, J.; Langer, M. [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Abt. Roentgendiagnostik; Harloff, A. [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Abt. Klinische Neurologie und Neurophysiologie; Schlensak, C. [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Abt. Herz- und Gefaesschirurgie

    2007-05-15

    Modern phase contrast MR imaging at 3 Tesla allows the depiction of 3D morphology as well as the acquisition of time-resolved blood flow velocities in 3 directions. In combination with state-of-the-art visualization and data processing software, the qualitative and quantitative analysis of hemodynamic changes associated with vascular pathologies is possible. The 4D nature of the acquired data permits free orientation within the vascular system of interest and offers the opportunity to quantify blood flow and derived vessel wall parameters at any desired location within the data volume without being dependent on predefined 2D slices. The technique has the potential of overcoming the limitations of current diagnostic strategies and of implementing new diagnostic parameters. In light of the recent discussions regarding the influence of the wall shear stress and the oscillatory shear index on the genesis of arteriosclerosis and dilatative vascular processes, flow-sensitive 4D MRI may provide the missing diagnostic link. Instead of relying on experience-based parameters such as aneurysm size, new hemodynamic considerations can deepen our understanding of vascular pathologies. This overview reviews the underlying methodology at 3T, the literature on time-resolved 3D MR velocity mapping, and presents case examples. By presenting the pre- and postoperative assessment of hemodynamics in a thoracic aortic aneurysm and the detailed analysis of blood flow in a patient with coarctation we underline the potential of time-resolved 3D phase contrast MR at 3T for hemodynamic assessment of vascular pathologies, especially in the thoracic aorta. (orig.)

  11. Seismic Behaviour of an Experimental Model Made of Thin-Walled Cold Formed Steel Profiles - Hardell Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionuţ-Ovidiu Toma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental results of the shaking table test of a Hardell structure made of thin-walled cold formed steel profiles are presented. The structure has the in-plane dimensions of 4x4 m and a height of 6 m, being classified as a P+1E type of structure. The dynamic characteristics of the structure were determined during the first stage of the experiment. Afterwards, the structure was subjected to different types of dynamic loadings such as sine-sweep functions and to seismic actions simulating the El Centro and Vrancea earthquakes. The damages induced by the seismic excitations consisted of local buckling of the steel profiles and breaking of two anchorage bolts holding the structure to the shaking table. Based on the experimental results it can be concluded that the structure can safely withstand seismic loads up to certain intensity, provided that some requirements are met.

  12. Unusual Case of Overt Aortic Dissection Mimicking Aortic Intramural Hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disha, Kushtrim; Kuntze, Thomas; Girdauskas, Evaldas

    2016-04-01

    We report an interesting case in which overt aortic dissection mimicked two episodes of aortic intramural hematoma (IMH) (Stanford A, DeBakey I). This took place over the course of four days and had a major influence on the surgical treatment strategy. The first episode of IMH regressed completely within 15 hours after it was clinically diagnosed and verified using imaging techniques. The recurrence of IMH was detected three days thereafter, resulting in an urgent surgical intervention. Overt aortic dissection with evidence of an intimal tear was diagnosed intraoperatively. PMID:27066437

  13. Reinforced aortic root reconstruction for acute type A aortic dissection involving the aortic root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Qing-qi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: There are debates regarding the optimal approach for AAAD involving the aortic root. We described a modified reinforced aortic root reconstruction approach for treating AAAD involving the aortic root. METHODS: A total of 161 patients with AAAD involving the aortic root were treated by our modified reinforced aortic root reconstruction approach from January 1998 to December 2008. Key features of our modified approach were placement of an autologous pericardial patch in the false lumen, lining of the sinotubular junction lumen with a polyester vascular ring, and wrapping of the vessel with Teflon strips. Outcome measures included post-operative mortality, survival, complications, and level of aortic regurgitation. RESULTS: A total of 161 patients were included in the study (mean age: 43.3 1 15.5 years. The mean duration of follow-up was 5.1 1 2.96 years (2-12 years. A total of 10 (6.2% and 11 (6.8% patients died during hospitalization and during follow-up, respectively. Thirty-one (19.3% patients experienced postoperative complications. The 1-, 3-, 5-, and 10-year survival rates were 99.3%, 98%, 93.8%, and 75.5%, respectively. There were no instances of recurrent aortic dissection, aortic aneurysm, or pseudoaneurysm during the entire study period. The severity of aortic regurgitation dramatically decreased immediately after surgery (from 28.6% to 0% grade 3-4 and thereafter slightly increased (from 0% to 7.2% at 5 years and 9.1% at 10 years. CONCLUSION: This modified reinforced aortic root reconstruction was feasible, safe and durable/effective, as indicated by its low mortality, low postoperative complications and high survival rate.

  14. Effect of end-wall boundary layer and inlet turbulence on the flow field structures in the turbine stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinek, Tomas; Straka, Petr; Uruba, Vaclav

    2016-06-01

    The article deals with the effects of the inlet flow parameters on the flow field structures in axial turbine stage. The experiment was performed on the axial turbine stage rig with an air as a working medium. The variable inlet channel produced the different inlet turbulence intensity and different inlet end-wall boundary layer thickness, resp. different inlet velocity distribution was applied. The turbulence was measured by CTA probes. The measured parameters of the inlet velocity distribution and turbulence intensity across the inlet channel height are presented. Based on the experimental inlet parameters the CFD fully turbulent calculation of the flow field was made. The differences in outlet kinetic energy loss, outlet vane angle and the turbulence distribution in the vane mid-span section are depicted. Changes of secondary flow structures with the different inlet end-wall boundary layer thickness were observed on the vane outlet parameters.

  15. Discrimination of the wall effect in a thin counter with micro-gap structure for neutron position sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakae, Takeji; Manabe, Tohru; Kitamura, Yasunori; Nohtomi, Akihiro [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Sakamoto, Sigeyasu

    1996-07-01

    Simulation by the Monte Carlo method is applied to estimate the wall effect in a thermal neutron counter having a new function for discriminating the effect. The counter is designed to have paralleled electrodes with micro-gap structure. A resistive anode is used for position sensing on the center of a set of the three electrode. The structure can be made by simple arrangement of anode and cathode wires on an insulator plane. The calculation shows discrimination of the wall effect can be achieved by coincident counting of two or three elements included in the counter. By using the coincident counting, the thickness of the neutron counter can be made into 1 mm with the information of the total energy created in the neutron detection. (author)

  16. Nonlinear Modeling of Autoclaved Aerated Concrete Masonry Wall Strengthened using Ferrocement Sandwich Structure

    KAUST Repository

    M., Abdel-Mooty

    2011-01-01

    Autoclaved Aerated Concrete (AAC) block are used mainly as non-load-bearing walls that provide heat insulation. This results in considerable saving in cooling energy particularly in hot desert environment with large variation of daily and seasonal temperatures. However, due to the relatively low strength there use load bearing walls is limited to single storey and low-rise construction. A system to enhance the strength of the AAC masonry wall in resisting both inplane vertical and combined vertical and lateral loads using ferrocement technology is proposed in this research. The proposed system significantly enhances the load carrying capacity and stiffness of the AAC wall without affecting its insulation characteristics. Ferrocement is made of cement mortar reinforced with closely spaced wire mesh. Full scale wall specimens with height of 2100mm and width of 1820mm were tested with different configuration of ferrocement. A finite elementmodel is developed and verified against the experimentalwork. The results of the finite element model correlates well with the experimental results.

  17. Plant cell wall proteomics: mass spectrometry data, a trove for research on protein structure/function relationships.

    OpenAIRE

    Albenne, Cécile; Canut, Hervé; Boudart, Georges; Zhang, Yu; San Clemente, Hélène; Pont-Lezica, Rafael; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    International audience Proteomics allows the large-scale study of protein expression either in whole organisms or in purified organelles. In particular, mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of gel-separated proteins produces data not only for protein identification, but for protein structure, location, and processing as well. An in-depth analysis was performed on MS data from etiolated hypocotyl cell wall proteomics of Arabidopsis thaliana. These analyses show that highly homologous members of ...

  18. Lorentz microscopy mapping for domain wall structure study in L10 FePd thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin film alloys with perpendicular anisotropy were studied using Lorentz transmission electron microscopy (LTEM). This work focuses on the configuration of domain walls and demonstrates the suitability and accuracy of LTEM for the magnetic characterization of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy materials. Thin films of chemically ordered (L10) FePd alloys were investigated by micro-magnetic modeling and LTEM phase retrieval approach. The different components of magnetization described by the modeling were studied on experimental images and confirmed by LTEM contrast simulation. Furthermore, quantitative measurements of magnetic induction inside the domain walls were made by using an original method to separate the electrical and magnetical contributions to the phase information. Irregularities were also observed along the domain walls which could play a major role during the magnetization processes.

  19. Simulations of super-structure domain walls in two dimensional assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordanovic, Jelena; Beleggia, Marco; Schiøtz, Jakob;

    2015-01-01

    , which will always be present in realistic assemblies, pins longitudinal domain walls when the external field is reversed, and makes a gradual reversal of the magnetization by migration of longitudinal domain walls possible, in agreement with previous experimental results.......We simulate the formation of domain walls in two-dimensional assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles. Particle parameters are chosen to match recent electron holography and Lorentz microscopy studies of almost monodisperse cobalt nanoparticles assembled into regular, elongated lattices. As the...... particles are small enough to consist of a single magnetic domain each, their magnetic interactions can be described by a spin model in which each particle is assigned a macroscopic "superspin." Thus, the magnetic behaviour of these lattices may be compared to magnetic crystals with nanoparticle superspins...

  20. Use of chemical fractionation and proton nuclear magnetic resonance to probe the physical structure of the primary plant cell wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton magnetic resonance has been used to monitor the microscopic physical properties of etiolated hypocotyl cell walls from Phaseolus vulgaris L. at all stages in a series of chemical fractionations with ammonium oxalate and potassium hydroxide. Solid echo measurements indicate that 75% of the polymers in the intact cell wall, including the cellulose and most of the hemicelluloses, are arranged such that there is almost complete restraint of molecular motion. The chemical fractionations generally altered the physical structures of the remaining cell wall components. Digestion with 0.25% ammonium oxalate/oxalic acid solubilized the pectin and increased the mobility of the hemicellulose I component. Extraction with 4% potassium hydroxide removed the hemicellulose I component and loosened the hemicellulose II. Further extraction with 24% potassium hydroxide removed the hemicellulose II and loosened some of the cellulose. The cellulose crystallinity, as monitored by Jeener echo measurements decreased from 83% to 63% during these fractionations. We conclude that, while hemicellulose I is firmly attached to hemicellulose II, it is not in a closely packed structure. Hemicellulose II is strongly bound to cellulose and has a much more closely packed structure

  1. Assessment of titanium for use in the 1st wall/blanket structure of fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a portion of the work that was performed as part of a First Wall/Blanket Systems Analysis Study. The objective of this part of the study was to assess the suitability of using titanium alloys in the first wall/blanket structure of commercial controlled thermonuclear reactors (CTR). While the purpose of this study was not to recommend a specific titanium alloy, but to examine titanium alloys, in general, two near-alpha titanium alloys were selected for an indepth examination. These alloys were Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo. Using properties important to the CTR first wall/blanket structures application, these titanium alloys were compared with five other candidate structural materials (2219 aluminum, 316 stainless steel, V-20 Ti, Nb-1Zr, and Mo-0.5 Ti-0.08 Zr (TZM)). The results of this study revealed that titanium offers potential for use in a CTR from strength, minimum radioactivity, and resources standpoints and should be considered in future fusion reactor studies

  2. 3D Effect of Ferromagnetic Materials on Alpha Particle Power Loads on First Wall Structures and Equilibrium on ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The finite number and limited toroidal extent of the TF coils cause a periodic variation of the toroidal field called the magnetic ripple. This ripple can provide a significant channel for fast particle leakage, leading to very localized fast particle loads on the walls. Ferromagnetic inserts will be embedded in the double wall structure of the vacuum vessel in order to reduce the ripple. In ITER the toroidal field deviations are locally further enhanced by the presence of discrete ferromagnetic structures, e.g. TBM. Thus, there are complex symmetry-breaking effects. It is not yet fully understood how superimposing the periodic ripple and a local perturbation affect the fast ion confinement and concerns have been voiced that the combined effect might lead to significant channelling of the alpha power. In this work, the wall power loads due to fusion-born alpha particles were restudied for a variety of cases addressing issues such as different wall configurations, proper inclusion of the TBM effect on the magnetic background, and the possible corrections to 3D equilibrium introduced by the ferromagnetic materials using the 3D equilibrium code, VMEC, since 3D corrections to the equilibrium might enhance the alpha particle loss. To properly include the TBM effect on the magnetic background, the FEMAG code was used, and the effect was calculated on the total field including the poloidal field by the plasma current as well as the vacuum field. In the VMEC analysis, it was found that the difference between a full 3D equilibrium reconstruction and 'an axisymmetric equilibrium + vacuum fields' was small. Thus, it was concluded that no 3D equilibrium reconstruction was needed and that it was sufficient to add the vacuum field perturbations onto an axisymmetric equilibrium. Under the new boundary condition, the wall load calculation was carried out by using ASCOT, DELTA5D, and F3D OFMC code. Including the plasma current contribution in the magnetic field

  3. Introduction: Scaling and structure in high Reynolds number wall-bounded flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The papers discussed in this report are dealing with the following aspects: Fundamental scaling relations for canonical flows and asymptotic approach to infinite Reynolds numbers; large and very large scales in near-wall turbulences; the influence of roughness and finite Reynolds number effects; comparison between internal and external flows and the universality of the near-wall region; qualitative and quantitative models of the turbulent boundary layer; the neutrally stable atmospheric surface layer as a model for a canonical zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer (author)

  4. Energy Dissipating Structures Produced by Walls in Two-Dimensional Flows at Vanishing Viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen van yen, Romain; Farge, Marie; Schneider, Kai

    2011-01-01

    We perform numerical experiments of a dipole crashing into a wall, a generic event in two-dimensional incompressible flows with solid boundaries. The Reynolds number (Re) is varied from 985 to 7880, and no-slip boundary conditions are approximated by Navier boundary conditions with a slip length proportional to Re−1. Energy dissipation is shown to first set up within a vorticity sheet of thickness proportional to Re−1 in the neighborhood of the wall, and to continue as this sheet rolls up int...

  5. Non-metals as structural materials in the first wall of a thermonuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphites and carbon fiber reinforced materials currently are tested and used as materials for protecting the first wall of existing or planned magnetic confinement experiments. Apart from the strongly exposed components such as limiters, divertors or deflecting plates, also other first-wall components now are increasingly protected or tested for protection by CFC materials. Due to their very good thermal shock resistance and the low atomic mass Z, graphites and CFC materials together with beryllium are quite superior over all other candidate materials. In addition, graphites and CFC materials have good resistance to thermal cycling. (orig./GG)

  6. Influence on fluid dynamics of coronary artery outlet angle variation in artificial aortic root prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verhey Janko F

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because of higher life expectancy, the number of elderly patients today with degenerative aortic diseases is on the increase. Often artificial aortic roots are needed to replace the native tissue. This surgical procedure requires re-implantation of the previous separated coronary arteries into the wall of the prosthesis. Regardless of the prosthesis type, changes in the reinsertion technique, e.g., the variation of the outlet angle of the coronary arteries, could influence the coronary blood flow. Whether the prosthesis type or the outlet angle variation significantly improves the blood circulation and lowers the risk of coronary insufficiency is still an open question. The numerical calculations presented can help to clear up these disputable questions. Methods Two simplified base geometries are used for simulating the blood flow in order to determine velocity and pressure distributions. One model uses a straight cylindrical tube to approximate the aortic root geometry; the other uses a sinus design with pseudosinuses of Valsalva. The coronary outlet angle of the right coronary artery was discretely modified in both models in the range from 60° to 120°. The pressure and velocity distributions of both models are compared in the ascending aorta as well as in the right and the left coronary artery. Results The potentially allowed and anatomic limited variation of the outlet angle influences the pressure only a little bit and shows a very slight relative maximum between 70° and 90°. The sinus design and variations of the outlet angle of the coronary arteries were able to minimally optimize the perfusion pressure and the velocities in the coronary circulation, although the degree of such changes is rather low and would probably not achieve any clinical influence. Conclusion Our results show that surgeons should feel relatively free to vary the outlet angle within the anatomic structural conditions when employing the technique

  7. Human coronary plaque wall thickness correlated positively with flow shear stress and negatively with plaque wall stress: an IVUS-based fluid-structure interaction multi-patient study

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Rui; Tang, Dalin; Yang, Chun; Zheng, Jie; Bach, Richard; WANG, LIANG; Muccigrosso, David; Billiar, Kristen; Zhu, Jian; Ma, Genshan; Maehara, Akiko; Mintz, Gary S

    2014-01-01

    Background Atherosclerotic plaque progression and rupture are believed to be associated with mechanical stress conditions. In this paper, patient-specific in vivo intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) coronary plaque image data were used to construct computational models with fluid-structure interaction (FSI) and cyclic bending to investigate correlations between plaque wall thickness and both flow shear stress and plaque wall stress conditions. Methods IVUS data were acquired from 10 patients afte...

  8. In vitro flow assessment: from PC-MRI to computational fluid dynamics including fluid-structure interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzke, Jonas; Rengier, Fabian; Weis, Christian; Beller, Carsten J.; Heuveline, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Initiation and development of cardiovascular diseases can be highly correlated to specific biomechanical parameters. To examine and assess biomechanical parameters, numerical simulation of cardiovascular dynamics has the potential to complement and enhance medical measurement and imaging techniques. As such, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have shown to be suitable to evaluate blood velocity and pressure in scenarios, where vessel wall deformation plays a minor role. However, there is a need for further validation studies and the inclusion of vessel wall elasticity for morphologies being subject to large displacement. In this work, we consider a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model including the full elasticity equation to take the deformability of aortic wall soft tissue into account. We present a numerical framework, in which either a CFD study can be performed for less deformable aortic segments or an FSI simulation for regions of large displacement such as the aortic root and arch. Both of the methods are validated by means of an aortic phantom experiment. The computational results are in good agreement with 2D phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) velocity measurements as well as catheter-based pressure measurements. The FSI simulation shows a characteristic vessel compliance effect on the flow field induced by the elasticity of the vessel wall, which the CFD model is not capable of. The in vitro validated FSI simulation framework can enable the computation of complementary biomechanical parameters such as the stress distribution within the vessel wall.

  9. Three-band decomposition analysis in multiscale FSI models of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestola, Maria G. C.; Gizzi, Alessio; Cherubini, Christian; Filippi, Simonetta

    2016-07-01

    Computational modeling plays an important role in biology and medicine to assess the effects of hemodynamic alterations in the onset and development of vascular pathologies. Synthetic analytic indices are of primary importance for a reliable and effective a priori identification of the risk. In this scenario, we propose a multiscale fluid-structure interaction (FSI) modeling approach of hemodynamic flows, extending the recently introduced three-band decomposition (TBD) analysis for moving domains. A quantitative comparison is performed with respect to the most common hemodynamic risk indicators in a systematic manner. We demonstrate the reliability of the TBD methodology also for deformable domains by assuming a hyperelastic formulation of the arterial wall and a Newtonian approximation of the blood flow. Numerical simulations are performed for physiologic and pathologic axially symmetric geometry models with particular attention to abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Risk assessment, limitations and perspectives are finally discussed.

  10. Structure of steroids and their diffusion through blood vessel walls in a counter-current system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several substances including prostaglandin F2 alpha, progesterone and 85krypton have been shown to be transferred from the venous side to the arterial side of the circulation in the ovarian vascular pedicle. Experiments were therefore carried out to study the transfer of three pairs of steroids (progesterone and 20 alpha-dihydroprogesterone, C-21; androstenedione and testosterone, C-19; and estrone and estradiol-17 beta, C-18) in which each member of a pair differed by one hydroxyl group. Each pair of steroids, one labeled with 3H and the other with 14C, were infused in sequence for 30 minutes into a side branch of an ovarian vein near the hilus of the ovary with a rest period of 90 minutes between infusions. An increase in radioactivity in ovarian arterial plasma compared to the radioactivity in an equal volume of aortic plasma sampled simultaneously was used as the index for a direct transfer of steroids from the ovarian vein to the adjacent ovarian artery. All six steroids showed such a transfer which began 3 to 6 minutes after the start of each infusion and decreased rapidly after the infusion was stopped. The results of this study also showed that a larger quantity of the less polar (ketonic) form of each steroid pair examined was transferred than its hydroxyl counterpart

  11. The effect of fibronectin on structural and biological properties of single walled carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mottaghitalab, Fatemeh [Department of Nanobiotechnology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farokhi, Mehdi [National cell bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Atyabi, Fatemeh [Department of Pharmaceutical Nanoechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Omidvar, Ramin [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali, E-mail: mashokrgozar@pasteur.ac.ir [National cell bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghizadeh, Majid, E-mail: sadeghma@modares.ac.ir [Department Genetics, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-01

    Highlights: • Increasing the cytocompatibility of single walled carbon nanotube by loading fibronectin. • Enhancing the hydrophilicity and nanosurface roughness of single walled carbon nanotube after loading fibronectin. • Fibronectin makes the surface properties of single walled carbon nanotube more suitable for cell proliferation and growth. - Abstract: Despite the attractive properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), cytoxicity and hydrophobicity are two main considerable features which limit their application in biomedical fields. It was well established that treating CNTs with extracellular matrix components could reduce these unfavourable characteristics. In an attempt to address these issues, fibronectin (FN) with different concentrations was loaded on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) substrate. Scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angles and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were preformed in order to characterize FN loaded SWCNTs substrates. According to XPS and AFM results, FN could interact with SWCNTs and for this, the hydrophilicity of SWCNTs was improved. Additionally, SWCNT modified with FN showed less cytotoxicity compared with neat SWCNT. Finally, FN was shown to act as an interesting extracellular component for enhancing the biological properties of SWCNT.

  12. Structural profiling and biological performance of phospholipid-hyaluronan functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvash, Ram; Khatchatouriants, Artium; Solmesky, Leonardo J;

    2013-01-01

    In spite of significant insolubility and toxicity, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) erupt into the biomedical research, and create an increasing interest in the field of nanomedicine. Single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) are highly hydrophobic and have been shown to be toxic while systemically administrated. Thus,...

  13. The effect of fibronectin on structural and biological properties of single walled carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Increasing the cytocompatibility of single walled carbon nanotube by loading fibronectin. • Enhancing the hydrophilicity and nanosurface roughness of single walled carbon nanotube after loading fibronectin. • Fibronectin makes the surface properties of single walled carbon nanotube more suitable for cell proliferation and growth. - Abstract: Despite the attractive properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), cytoxicity and hydrophobicity are two main considerable features which limit their application in biomedical fields. It was well established that treating CNTs with extracellular matrix components could reduce these unfavourable characteristics. In an attempt to address these issues, fibronectin (FN) with different concentrations was loaded on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) substrate. Scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angles and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were preformed in order to characterize FN loaded SWCNTs substrates. According to XPS and AFM results, FN could interact with SWCNTs and for this, the hydrophilicity of SWCNTs was improved. Additionally, SWCNT modified with FN showed less cytotoxicity compared with neat SWCNT. Finally, FN was shown to act as an interesting extracellular component for enhancing the biological properties of SWCNT

  14. Photoemission and inverse photoemission study of the electronic structure of C60 fullerenes encapsulated in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Shiozawa, Hidetsugu; Ishii, Hiroyoshi; Kihara, Hideo; Sasaki, Naoya; Nakamura, Satoshi; Yoshida, Tetsuo; Takayama, Yasuhiro; Miyahara, Tsuneaki; Suzuki, Shinzo; Achiba, Yohji; Kodama, Takeshi; Higashiguchi, Mitsuharu; Chi, Xiaoyu; Nakatake, Masashi; Shimada, Kenya

    2006-01-01

    We have measured the valence-band photoemission and inverse photoemission spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with mean radii of 0.7 and 0.64 nm encapsulating C60 fullerenes (peas), so-called "peapods." The photoemission spectrum of the C60 peas in the SWNTs is obtained by subtracting the spectrum of empty SWNTs from the spectrum of the peapod. The structures in the C60 pea spectra correspond well to those in the spectrum of a C60 face-centered-cubic solid. No structure is obser...

  15. Controlling Structural Characteristics of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNT) by Tailoring Catalyst Composition and Synthesis Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report shows the extensive research on the mechanism responsible for the formation of single walled carbon nanotubes in order to get control over their structural parameters (diameter and chirality). Catalyst formulations, pre-treatment conditions, and reaction conditions are described in detail as well as mechanisms to produce nanotubes structures of specific arrays (vertical forest, nanotube pillars). Applications of SWNT in different fields are also described in this report. In relation to this project five students have graduated (3 PhD and 2 MS) and 35 papers have been published.

  16. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... see we've used the cautery to achieve access to the sternum. On the left hand side ... wound, which allows us to get more ready access to the aorta and the aortic valve. The ...

  17. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to requiring surgery for aortic stenosis, left ventricular hypertrophy is a common manifestation. By that, I mean generally speaking any muscle that works harder in the body gets thicker ...

  18. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... symptoms and ultimately surgery may be in the future. The symptoms seen primarily with aortic stenosis at ... echocardiography is? Echocardiography is the use of ultrasound technology. Ultrasound technology is a form of the same ...

  19. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... thank you, Jim. This is obviously just a model of the heart just to give some perspective ... aortic repair, he would have had a cardiac evaluation prior to that and they probably would have ...

  20. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for patients who would not tolerate well a traditional open operation or a less invasive operation, as ... physical reserve. So Barbara Bush recently had a traditional aortic valve replacement surgery. What makes a patient ...

  1. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in severe aortic stenosis, as it's probably more stress than the patient's heart should have to undergo. ... There's been a lot of work done by academic cardiac surgeons and cardiologists to try to define ...

  2. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other cardiovascular diseases including heart attack and increased risk of cardiovascular death. John, is there anything you ... with time. This highlights the mortality or the risk of death associated with aortic valve replacement and ...

  3. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... aortic stenosis and even tricuspid stenosis from rheumatic causes are much more common. To expand upon that ... out of the bloodstream and is thought to cause less untoward effects to the brain and other ...

  4. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foghsgaard, Signe; Schmidt, Thomas Andersen; Kjaergard, Henrik K

    2009-01-01

    . The 30-day mortality rate for the 98 patients was zero, although 14 of the 98 mini-sternotomies had to be converted to complete sternotomies intraoperatively due to technical problems. Such conversion doubled the operative time over that of the planned full sternotomies. In the group of patients whose......In this descriptive prospective study, we evaluate the outcomes of surgery in 98 patients who were scheduled to undergo minimally invasive aortic valve replacement. These patients were compared with a group of 50 patients who underwent scheduled aortic valve replacement through a full sternotomy...... operations were completed as mini-sternotomies, 4 died later of noncardiac causes. The aortic cross-clamp and perfusion times were significantly different across all groups (P < 0.001), with the intended full-sternotomy group having the shortest times. In conclusion, the mini-aortic valve replacement is an...

  5. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more likely we see aortic stenosis. Again, patient education is part of the evaluation and management of ... for patients who would not tolerate well a traditional open operation or a less invasive operation, as ...

  6. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more likely we see aortic stenosis. Again, patient education is part of the evaluation and management of ... likely than patients who don't have other cardiovascular conditions: coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, et ...

  7. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in severe aortic stenosis, as it's probably more stress than the patient's heart should have to undergo. ... these series, when you critically look at the literature, the operative times can be significantly longer and ...

  8. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to minimize their symptoms, but that doesn't impact the course of the disease itself. When I' ... more likely we see aortic stenosis. Again, patient education is part of the evaluation and management of ...

  9. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... starts out as a disease we call aortic sclerosis, which is the beginning of the process of ... path life. Again, it's a progressive disease from sclerosis, or the beginning of thickening of the valve, ...

  10. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... thank you, Jim. This is obviously just a model of the heart just to give some perspective ... the aorta at this point. 9 Earlier this month Robin Williams had his aortic valve replaced and ...

  11. Transcatheter Aortic Heart Valve Thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Nicolaj C; Grove, Erik L; Andersen, Henning R;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is increasing focus on transcatheter heart valve (THV) thrombosis. However, there are limited data on incidence, clinical implications and predisposing factors of THV thrombosis following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). OBJECTIVES: We assessed the incidence...

  12. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... somebody for this operation. Again, there's no medical therapy that has been proven to slow or reverse ... to their physician. This may lead to earlier treatment and better outcomes as well. Aortic stenosis, as ...

  13. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more likely we see aortic stenosis. Again, patient education is part of the evaluation and management of ... surgery we, as surgeons, know from our anatomy training during our course of training, we know where ...

  14. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... John, is there anything you can do to help prevent aortic stenosis? There's no prophylactic methods that ... very good looks. It's a great tool to help cardiac surgeons. Thanks, Jim. And I would underscore ...

  15. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... able to look at the aortic valve very well. In fact, transesophageal echocardiography is the best modality ... use to help evaluate both cardiac function as well as anatomy in patients who need heart surgery. ...

  16. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a series of charts that we have, historical data, to know really what the best size is ... heart and lung circulation, so that we can open the aorta safely and replace this patient's aortic ...

  17. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in severe aortic stenosis, as it's probably more stress than the patient's heart should have to undergo. ... in younger patients who want to return to work and activity more quickly, we feel that this ...

  18. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... uncommon to have more problems with their tissue quality and so we do have to be careful ... does not have an aortic aneurysm in the first part of their aorta there, their ascending aorta. ...

  19. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... No medications as such have been proven to slow that disease path life. Again, it's a progressive ... no medical therapy that has been proven to slow or reverse the process of aortic stenosis. Clearly, ...

  20. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This process starts out as a disease we call aortic sclerosis, which is the beginning of the ... either tissues from cows or pigs, what we call porcine for pigs and bovine for cows. Essentially, ...

  1. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... including heart attack and increased risk of cardiovascular death. John, is there anything you can do to ... aortic stenosis, there's a pretty rapid progression into death if no intervention is taken. We feel that ...

  2. The usefulness of MRI-CT for aortic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report here the results of our study of four recent aortic disease patients with a clinical evaluation of the efficacy of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging-computed tomography (MRI-CT). This new technique is noninvasive and particularly suited to the assessment of cardiovascular diseases. The following conclusions were obtained. 1) The MRI-CT produces a definite and clear contrast between flowing blood, mural thrombosis, and the vessel wall. A certain diagnosis can be facilitated for aortic dissection, aneurysm formation, and of atherosclerotic changes, in any of the cross-sectional, coronal, and saggital planes. 2) Repeated preoperative check-up and long-term postoperative follow-up is enabled, even at an outpatients' department. 3) MRI-CT is useful as a noninvasive method for screening of aortic abnormalities, especially so in cases of poor general conditions. We also identify the following areas where research could improve the clinical advantage of MRI-CT. 1) The physiologic effects related to an artificial valve in magnetic field must be clarified. 2) Faster and finer imaging should be developed for MRI-CT use as a choice method for cases of aortic dissection or impending aneurysm rupture. 3) Clear distinction on imaging between blood pooling, fresh thrombosis and soft tissue tumor must be developed. (author)

  3. Haemostatic factors, atherosclerosis and risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A J; Fowkes, F G; Lowe, G D; Rumley, A

    1996-10-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms have traditionally been thought to be a consequence of severe atherosclerosis of the arterial wall. To date, the role of haemostatic factors in aneurysmal disease has not been extensively researched. The aim of this study was to see if such factors were independently related to the occurrence of aortic aneurysm. Furthermore, were the associations maintained after taking into account the presence of underlying atherosclerotic disease? Using data from the Edinburgh Artery Study, a nested case-control design was used involving 40 cases of aortic aneurysm, each being matched to five controls by sex and within a 5-year age band. After adjustment for age and sex, both fibrinogen (P D-dimer (P aneurysm. Further adjustment for packyears, history of cardiovascular disease and the ankle brachial pressure index resulted in odds ratios of 1.51 (95% CI 1.05 to 2.16, P D-dimer. These associations probably arise as a consequence of fibrin deposition and turnover within the aneurysmal sac, although further prospective studies are needed before thrombotic factors can be used in the identification of a group who are at high risk of developing an abdominal aortic aneurysm. PMID:8958392

  4. Endovascular aortic injury repair after thoracic pedicle screw placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesenti, S; Bartoli, M A; Blondel, B; Peltier, E; Adetchessi, T; Fuentes, S

    2014-09-01

    Our objective was to describe the management and prevention of thoracic aortic injuries caused by a malposition of pedicle screws in corrective surgery of major spine deformities. Positioning pedicle screws in thoracic vertebras by posterior approach exposes to the risk of injury of the elements placed ahead of the thoracic spine, as the descending thoracic aorta. This complication can result in a cataclysmic bleeding, needing urgent vascular care, but it can also be totally asymptomatic, resulting in the long run in a pseudoaneurysm, justifying the systematic removal of the hardware. We report the case of a 76-year-old woman who underwent spinal correction surgery for thoraco-lumbar degenerative kypho-scoliosis. Immediately after the surgery, a thoracic aortic injury caused by the left T7 pedicle screw was diagnosed. The patient underwent a two-step surgery. The first step was realized by vascular surgeons and aimed to secure the aortic wall by short endovascular aortic grafting. During the second step, spine surgeons removed the responsible screw by posterior approach. The patient was discharged in a rehabilitation center 7 days after the second surgery. When such a complication occurs, a co-management by vascular and spine surgeons is necessary to avoid major complications. Endovascular management of this kind of vascular injuries permits to avoid an open surgery that have a great rate of morbi-mortality in frail patients. Nowadays, technologies exist to prevent this kind of event and may improve the security when positioning pedicle screws. PMID:25023930

  5. Aortic periannular abscess invading into the central fibrous body, mitral valve, and tricuspid valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyun Kong; Kim, Nan Yeol; Kang, Min-Woong; Kang, Shin Kwang; Yu, Jae Hyeon; Lim, Seung Pyung; Choi, Jae Sung; Na, Myung Hoon

    2014-06-01

    A 61-year-old man was diagnosed with aortic stenoinsufficiency with periannular abscess, which involved the aortic root of noncoronary sinus (NCS) that invaded down to the central fibrous body, whole membranous septum, mitral valve (MV), and tricuspid valve (TV). The open complete debridement was executed from the aortic annulus at NCS down to the central fibrous body and annulus of the MV and the TV, followed by the left ventricular outflow tract reconstruction with implantation of a mechanical aortic valve by using a leaflet of the half-folded elliptical bovine pericardial patch. Another leaflet of this patch was used for the repair of the right atrial wall with a defect and the TV. PMID:25207228

  6. Adiabatic surface temperature as thermal/structural parameter in fire modeling: Thermal analysis for different wall conductivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new useful concept of “Adiabatic Surface Temperature” or more commonly known as AST, introduced by Wickström et al. in 2007, is investigated in this study. Adiabatic surface temperature can be used for bridging the gap between fire models and temperature models; for example, it offers the opportunity to transfer both thermal information of the gas and the net heat flux to the solid phase model, obtained by CFD analysis. In this study two numerical analyses are carried out in order to evaluate the effect of wall thermal conductivity and of convective heat transfer coefficient on the adiabatic surface temperature as thermal/structural parameter in fire modeling. First one CFD analysis simulating a fire scenario, “conjugate heat transfer”, with a square beam exposed to hot surface, is carried out to calculate AST, convective heat transfer coefficient and temperature field in the beam. In the second one, a conductive analysis is carried out on “standalone beam” imposing a third type boundary condition on its boundaries assuming the AST, evaluated in the conjugate analysis, as external temperature. Different convective heat transfer coefficients are imposed on the beam walls; the beam is of concrete or steel. Results are presented in terms of net heat flux on beam surfaces, convective heat transfer coefficients and temperature profiles on the beam walls, temperature fields for the two, CFD and conductive, analyses and the relative temperature and net heat flux percent errors. Results underline that convective heat transfer coefficient profiles and adiabatic surface temperatures on the bottom and lateral beam walls are independent of the wall thermal conductivity value, whereas the net heat flux values increase as wall thermal conductivity increases, fixed the emissivity. - Highlights: •The new useful concept of “adiabatic surface temperature” (AST) is investigated. •The effect of wall thermal conductivity and of convective heat transfer

  7. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... They carry oxygen and blood to various organs. These arteries have muscular walls, and when they get ... continue to expand, and they can rupture. And these aneurysms can occur in a lot of different ...

  8. Analysis of Multi-Loop Control Structures of Dividing-Wall Distillation Columns Using a Fundamental Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Tututi-Avila

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Dividing-wall columns (DWCs have significant potential as energy-efficient processes for the separation of multicomponent mixtures. However, in addition to an efficient steady state design, dynamics and control also play a major part for the success of a technology. This is especially so for complex distillation systems. This paper investigates the dynamics of a dividing wall column used for the separation of ternary mixtures. A detailed dynamic first principles-based model of the column I s developed in gPROMS. The model is used to generate data used for control loop pairing via the Relative Gain Array (RGA, and controller parameters are found by using Internal Model Control (IMC tuning. The best control structures for DWC systems, involving four different ternary mixtures, and two different feed compositions for each mixture, are investigated.

  9. Loss of function mutation in LOX causes thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Vivian S; Halabi, Carmen M; Hoffman, Erin P; Carmichael, Nikkola; Leshchiner, Ignaty; Lian, Christine G; Bierhals, Andrew J; Vuzman, Dana; Mecham, Robert P; Frank, Natasha Y; Stitziel, Nathan O

    2016-08-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD) represent a substantial cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Many individuals presenting with an inherited form of TAAD do not have causal mutations in the set of genes known to underlie disease. Using whole-genome sequencing in two first cousins with TAAD, we identified a missense mutation in the lysyl oxidase (LOX) gene (c.893T > G encoding p.Met298Arg) that cosegregated with disease in the family. Using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-associated protein-9 nuclease (Cas9) genome engineering tools, we introduced the human mutation into the homologous position in the mouse genome, creating mice that were heterozygous and homozygous for the human allele. Mutant mice that were heterozygous for the human allele displayed disorganized ultrastructural properties of the aortic wall characterized by fragmented elastic lamellae, whereas mice homozygous for the human allele died shortly after parturition from ascending aortic aneurysm and spontaneous hemorrhage. These data suggest that a missense mutation in LOX is associated with aortic disease in humans, likely through insufficient cross-linking of elastin and collagen in the aortic wall. Mutation carriers may be predisposed to vascular diseases because of weakened vessel walls under stress conditions. LOX sequencing for clinical TAAD may identify additional mutation carriers in the future. Additional studies using our mouse model of LOX-associated TAAD have the potential to clarify the mechanism of disease and identify novel therapeutics specific to this genetic cause. PMID:27432961

  10. Storage of very cold neutrons in a trap with nano-structured walls

    OpenAIRE

    E. V. Lychagin; Muzychka, A. Yu.; Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; G. Pignol; Protasov, K. V.; Strelkov, A. V.

    2008-01-01

    We report on storage of Very Cold Neutrons (VCN) in a trap with walls containing powder of diamond nanoparticles. The efficient VCN reflection is provided by multiple diffusive elastic scattering of VCN at single nanoparticles in powder. The VCN storage times are sufficiently long for accumulating large density of neutrons with complete VCN energy range of up to a few times 10(-4) eV. Methods for further improvements of VCN storage times are discussed.

  11. Hierarchical structure and dynamics of plant cell wall studied using x-rays

    OpenAIRE

    Svedström, Kirsi

    2012-01-01

    The interest in wood and its main constituent, cellulose, is growing continuously. This can be explained by the demands of sustainable development and the extending scope of applications enabled by novel materials like nanocrystalline cellulose. Outstanding mechanical properties are one of the main reasons for the usability of wood. However, details on the ultrastructure of wood cell wall are still lacking, and thus also the origin for the mechanical properties is partly unknown. The various ...

  12. Post-buckled behaviour and breathing-induced fatigue in thin-walled steel plated structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Škaloud, Miroslav; Zörnerová, Marie; Urushadze, Shota

    Lisbon : University of Lisbon, 2015 - (Camotim, D.; Dinis, P.; Chan, S.; Wang, C.; Conçalves, R.; Silvestre, N.; Basaglia, C.; Landesmann, A.; Bebiano, R.) R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC13-34405J Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : saving steel * saving fabrication expenses * thin-walled plated construction * effect of initial imperfections * stability * post-buckled behaviour * repeated loading Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering

  13. Structural characteristics of polysaccharides from olive fruit cell walls in relation to ripening and processing

    OpenAIRE

    Vierhuis, E.

    2002-01-01

    Key words: Olive fruit; olive oil; pectic polysaccharides; xyloglucans; xylans; enzyme preparations; phenolic compounds; processing; ripening Technical enzyme preparations can be used as processing aids in the olive oil industry to obtain a higher yield and a better quality of the oil. These technical enzyme preparations degrade the plant cell wall, thus enhancing the permeability for oil. However, still very little is known about the specific role of the various constituent enzymes present i...

  14. A Study of the Mean Force Structure of Rough-Wall Turbulent Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdi, Faraz; Klewicki, Joseph

    2011-11-01

    Analysis of existing data by Mehdi, Klewicki & White [Physica D 239(2010)] provides evidence that the traditional classifications do not fully account for the combined effects of roughness and Reynolds number. We continue to explore this further, and in the present talk report on experiments that used 24-grit sandpaper and pea gravel for roughness over an 8m fetch. Two-component LDV measurements are used to acquire well-resolved mean velocity and Reynolds stress profiles over a modest range of Reynolds numbers. These data are used to estimate the terms in the appropriate mean statement of dynamics, which directly reveals the operative time-averaged balance of forces. The present results further reinforce the previous observation that the mean viscous force retains dominant order above (and often well-above) the roughness elements. Force balance data are shown to be usefully organized relative to the length scale that defines the region from the wall to where the leading order mean dynamics are described by a balance between mean advection and the mean effect of turbulent inertia. In the smooth-wall flow, this length scale is only a function of Reynolds number. In rough-wall flows, the data indicate it to be a function of roughness and Reynolds number. The support of the ONR (N000140810836, grant monitor Ronald Joslin) is gratefully acknowledged.

  15. Shear-stress-induced structural arrangement of water molecules in nanoscale Couette flow with slipping at wall boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the structuring of water molecules in a nanoscale Couette flow with the upper plate subjected to lateral forces with various magnitudes and water slipping against a metal wall. It was found that when the upper plate is subjected to a force, the water body deforms into a parallelepiped. Water molecules in the channel are then gradually arranged into lattice positions, creating a layered structure. The structural arrangement of water molecules is caused by the water molecules accommodating themselves to the increase in energy under the application of a lateral force on the moving plate. The ordering arrangement of water molecules increases the rotational degree of freedom, allowing the molecules to increase their Coulomb potential energy through polar rotation that accounts for the energy input through the upper plate. With a force continuously applied to the upper plate, the water molecules in contact with the upper plate move forward until slip between the water and upper plate occurs. The relation between the structural arrangement of water molecules, slip at the wall, and the shear force is studied. The relation between the slip and the locking/unlocking of water molecules to metal atoms is also studied

  16. Left ventricular remodeling and hypertrophy in patients with aortic stenosis: insights from cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dweck Marc R

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR is the gold standard non-invasive method for determining left ventricular (LV mass and volume but has not been used previously to characterise the LV remodeling response in aortic stenosis. We sought to investigate the degree and patterns of hypertrophy in aortic stenosis using CMR. Methods Patients with moderate or severe aortic stenosis, normal coronary arteries and no other significant valve lesions or cardiomyopathy were scanned by CMR with valve severity assessed by planimetry and velocity mapping. The extent and patterns of hypertrophy were investigated using measurements of the LV mass index, indexed LV volumes and the LV mass/volume ratio. Asymmetric forms of remodeling and hypertrophy were defined by a regional wall thickening ≥13 mm and >1.5-fold the thickness of the opposing myocardial segment. Results Ninety-one patients (61±21 years; 57 male with aortic stenosis (aortic valve area 0.93±0.32cm2 were recruited. The severity of aortic stenosis was unrelated to the degree (r2=0.012, P=0.43 and pattern (P=0.22 of hypertrophy. By univariate analysis, only male sex demonstrated an association with LV mass index (P=0.02. Six patterns of LV adaption were observed: normal ventricular geometry (n=11, concentric remodeling (n=11, asymmetric remodeling (n=11, concentric hypertrophy (n=34, asymmetric hypertrophy (n=14 and LV decompensation (n=10. Asymmetric patterns displayed considerable overlap in appearances (wall thickness 17±2mm with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Conclusions We have demonstrated that in patients with moderate and severe aortic stenosis, the pattern of LV adaption and degree of hypertrophy do not closely correlate with the severity of valve narrowing and that asymmetric patterns of wall thickening are common. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Reference Number: NCT00930735

  17. Conservative treatment of type B aortic intramural hematoma with no calcification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the effect of conservative treatment for type B aortic intramural hematoma with no calcification, and to discuss the medium-term follow-up results. Methods: During the period from March 2009 to March 2012, a total of 21 patients with type B aortic intramural hematoma without calcification on the aortic wall were admitted to authors' hospital. The diagnosis was confirmed by CT angiography in all patients. Drug therapy was carried out in all the 21 patients, and all the patients were followed up for one year. At 3, 6 and 12 months after the treatment, CT angiography of the aorta was performed to check the results. Results: Of the 21 patients, one received TEVAR therapy one week after the start of drug therapy and the remaining 20 accomplished the whole medication course. At the time of discharge, all the patients were asymptomatic. All the patients were alive up to the end of the following-up period and no recurrence was observed. Three months after the treatment, complete disappearance of the left pleural effusion was obtained in 11 patients, and complete absorption of the intramural hematoma was seen in 3 patients. Six months after the treatment, complete absorption of the intramural hematoma was found in 13 cases. One year after the treatment, complete absorption of the intramural hematoma was confirmed in 19 patients, and in the remaining two patients both the thickness and extent of the intramural hematoma were markedly improved. Conclusion: It is easy to determine whether there is calcification or not in aortic wall of the diseased segment in patients with Stanford type B aortic intramural hematoma. Strict conservative treatment has satisfactory medium-term therapeutic results for type B aortic intramural hematoma with no calcification on the aortic wall. (authors)

  18. [Completion pneumonectomy combined with graft replacement of thoracic aortic aneurysm by simple clamping].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamoto, A; Takao, M; Kanemitsu, S; Fujinaga, K; Yan, G; Cruz, B P; Onoda, K; Shimono, T; Shimpo, H; Namikawa, S; Yuasa, H; Yada, I

    1999-01-01

    A 59-years-old male patient who had left upper lobe partial resection 30 years ago. He was seen at the family physician because of cough. A chest X-ray was showing an abnormal mass shadow measuring 3 x 4 cm in left lower lobe like honey comb. And squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) was detected in his sputum. He was diagnosed as primary lung cancer and introduced to our department to have operation. Chest CT-scan was showing lung tumor suspected SCC measuring 4.3 x 2.6 cm in segment 8 faced chest wall. At the same time, we detected thoracic aortic aneurysm and subcarinal lymph node, but could not see where the boundary is, so it was hard to distinguish between parietal thrombus with thoracic aortic aneurysm and swelling subcarinal lymph node. We decided it swelling subcarinal lymph node by three-dimensional treated CT-scan. Aortic angiography was showing proximal descending aortic aneurysm measuring diameter was 4.5 cm. Abdominal CT-scan was showing infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm measuring diameter was 5.5 cm. He was diagnosed as primary lung cancer (It. S8, SCC) (cT2N2M0, Stage IIIB), thoracic aortic aneurysm, abdominal aortic aneurysm, and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, and had completion pneumonectomy (R 2 b) for primary lung cancer and graft replacement with aneurysm dissection for thoracic aortic aneurysm without extracorporeal circulation. In this operation, we could find swelling subcarinal lymph node measuring 5 x 3 cm instead of parietal thrombus with thoracic aortic aneurysm. Pathological examination diagnosed middle differential SCC and no metastasis from dissected lymph node (PT2N0M0, Stage I A). PMID:10024802

  19. Surface carbohydrates and cell wall structure of in vitro-induced uredospore infection structures of Uromyces riciae-fabae before and after treatment with enzymes and alkali

    OpenAIRE

    Freytag, Sibylle; Mendgen, Kurt

    1991-01-01

    Uredospores of Uromyces viciae-fabae differentiate to form germ tubes, appressoria, infection hyphae and haustorial mother cells on oil-containing collodion membranes. The cell walls of these infection structures were studied with the electron microscope and with FITC-labeled lectins before and after treatment with enzymes and inorganic solvents. Binding of the FITC-labeled lectins was measured with a microscope photometer. The enzymes pronase E, aminarinase, chitinase and lipase had differe...

  20. Experimental observation of the interaction of propagating spin waves with Néel domain walls in a Landau domain structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirro, P.; Sebastian, T.; Leven, B.; Hillebrands, B. [Fachbereich Physik and Landesforschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Koyama, T. [Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Brächer, T. [Fachbereich Physik and Landesforschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Graduate School Materials Science in Mainz, Gottlieb-Daimler-Strasse 47, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2015-06-08

    The interaction of propagating dipolar spin waves with magnetic domain walls is investigated in square-shaped microstructures patterned from the Heusler compound Co{sub 2}Mn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 0.4}Si. Using magnetic force microscopy, the reversible preparation of a Landau state with four magnetic domains separated by Néel domain walls is confirmed. A local spin-wave excitation using a microstructured antenna is realized in one of the domains. It is shown by Brillouin light scattering microscopy that the domain structure in the remanence state has a strong influence on the spin-wave excitation and propagation. The domain walls strongly reflect the spin waves and can be used as spin-wave reflectors. A comparison with micromagnetic simulations shows that the strong reflection is due to the long-range dipolar interaction which has important implications for the use of these spin waves for exerting an all-magnonic spin-transfer torque.

  1. Bovine aortic arch: A novel association with thoracic aortic dilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To investigate whether there is a link between bovine arch and thoracic aortic aneurysm. Materials and methods: Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images of the thorax of 191 patients with dilated thoracic aortas and 391 consecutive, unselected patients as controls were retrospectively reviewed. Bovine arch was considered present if either a shared origin of the left common carotid and innominate arteries or an origin of the left common carotid from the innominate artery was identified. A chi-square test was used to evaluate the significance of differences between subgroups. Results: A trend towards increased prevalence of bovine arch was seen in patients with dilated aortas (26.2%) compared to controls (20.5%, p = 0.12). The association was statistically significant in patients over 70 years old (31.9%, p = 0.019) and when dilation involved the aortic arch (47.6%, p = 0.003). Conclusions: An association between bovine arch and aortic dilation is seen in older patients, and when dilation involves the aortic arch. Bovine arch should be considered a potential risk factor for thoracic aortic aneurysm.

  2. Endoluminal treatment of aortic dissection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavan, Ajay; Lotz, Joachim; Galanski, Michael [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Hannover Medical School, Carl Neuberg Strasse 1, 30625, Hannover (Germany); Oelert, Frank; Haverich, Axel; Karck, Matthias [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Carl Neuberg Strasse 1, 30625, Hannover (Germany)

    2003-11-01

    Aortic dissection is most often a catastrophic medical emergency which, if untreated, can be potentially fatal. The intention of therapy in patients with aortic dissection is to prevent aortic rupture or aneurysm formation as well as to relieve branch vessel ischaemia. Patients with aortic dissection are often poor candidates for anaesthesia and surgery and the surgical procedure itself is challenging requiring thoracotomy, aortic cross clamping, blood transfusion as well as prolonged hospital stay in some cases. Operative mortality is especially high in patients with critical mesenteric or renal ischaemia. The past decade has experienced the emergence of a number of interventional radiological or minimally invasive techniques which have significantly improved the management of patients with aortic dissection. These include stent grafting for entry site closure to prevent aneurysmatic widening of the false lumen as well as percutaneous techniques such as balloon fenestration of the intimal flap and aortic true lumen stenting to alleviate branch vessel ischaemia. False lumen thrombosis following entry closure with stent grafts has been observed in 86-100% of patients, whereas percutaneous interventions are able to effectively relieve organ ischaemia in approximately 90% of the cases. In the years to come, it is to be expected that these endoluminal techniques will become the method of choice for treating most type-B dissections and will assist in significantly reducing the number of open surgical procedures required for type-A dissections. The intention of this article is to provide an overview of the current status of these endoluminal techniques based on our own experience as well as on a review of the relevant literature. (orig.)

  3. Endoluminal treatment of aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aortic dissection is most often a catastrophic medical emergency which, if untreated, can be potentially fatal. The intention of therapy in patients with aortic dissection is to prevent aortic rupture or aneurysm formation as well as to relieve branch vessel ischaemia. Patients with aortic dissection are often poor candidates for anaesthesia and surgery and the surgical procedure itself is challenging requiring thoracotomy, aortic cross clamping, blood transfusion as well as prolonged hospital stay in some cases. Operative mortality is especially high in patients with critical mesenteric or renal ischaemia. The past decade has experienced the emergence of a number of interventional radiological or minimally invasive techniques which have significantly improved the management of patients with aortic dissection. These include stent grafting for entry site closure to prevent aneurysmatic widening of the false lumen as well as percutaneous techniques such as balloon fenestration of the intimal flap and aortic true lumen stenting to alleviate branch vessel ischaemia. False lumen thrombosis following entry closure with stent grafts has been observed in 86-100% of patients, whereas percutaneous interventions are able to effectively relieve organ ischaemia in approximately 90% of the cases. In the years to come, it is to be expected that these endoluminal techniques will become the method of choice for treating most type-B dissections and will assist in significantly reducing the number of open surgical procedures required for type-A dissections. The intention of this article is to provide an overview of the current status of these endoluminal techniques based on our own experience as well as on a review of the relevant literature. (orig.)

  4. Wall Painting Investigation by Means of Non-invasive Terahertz Time-Domain Imaging (THz-TDI): Inspection of Subsurface Structures Buried in Historical Plasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandolo, Corinna Ludovica Koch; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2016-02-01

    Characterization of subsurface features of wall paintings is important in conservation and technical art history as well as in building archaeology and architecture fields. In this study, an area of the apsidal wall painting of Nebbelunde Church (Rødby, Denmark) has been investigated by means of terahertz time-domain imaging (THz-TDI). Subsurface structures have been detected at different depths inside the lime-based plaster of the wall painting until approximately 1 cm from the surface. The surface morphology of the buried structures has been 3D imaged in detail, providing a substantial contribution in their characterization.

  5. Randomized clinical trial of mast cell inhibition in patients with a medium-sized abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, H; Eldrup, N; Hultgren, R;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is thought to develop as a result of inflammatory processes in the aortic wall. In particular, mast cells are believed to play a central role. The AORTA trial was undertaken to investigate whether the mast cell inhibitor, pemirolast, could retard the...... surgery, diabetes mellitus, and severe concomitant disease with a life expectancy of less than 2 years. Included patients were treated with 10, 25 or 40 mg pemirolast, or matching placebo for 52 weeks. The primary endpoint was change in aortic diameter as measured from leading edge adventitia at the...

  6. Enhanced Aortic Macrophage Lipid Accumulation and Inflammatory Response in LDL Receptor Null Mice Fed an Atherogenic Diet

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Shu; Wu, Dayong; Matthan, Nirupa R.; Lamon-Fava, Stefania; Lecker, Jaime L; Lichtenstein, Alice H

    2010-01-01

    The effect of an atherogenic diet on inflammatory response and elicited peritoneal macrophage (Mφ) cholesterol accumulation in relation to aortic lesion formation was assessed in LDL receptor null (LDLr−/−) mice. Mice were fed an atherogenic or control diet for 32 weeks. The atherogenic relative to control diet resulted in significantly higher plasma monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentrations, more aortic wall Mφ depo...

  7. Relationship between Enhanced Intensity of Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound and Microvessel Density of Aortic Atherosclerostic Plaque in Rabbit Model

    OpenAIRE

    Xiangdong You; Pintong Huang; Chao Zhang; Minghui Wang; Ying Zhang; Yurong Hong; Shumei Wei; Chunmei Liu; Zhaoxia Pu; Jianmin Zhang; Shuyuan Chen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between enhanced intensity of contrast enhanced ultrasound and microvessel density of aortic atherosclerotic plaque in rabbit model. The abdominal aortas of thirty-six male New Zealand rabbits were damaged by balloon expansion and the animals were then fed a high fat diet for 12 weeks. Twenty-seven plaques on the near aortic wall were detected using conventional ultrasound examination. The maximum thickness of each plaque was recorded. CE...

  8. Acute aortic valve prolapse in Marfan's syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, N J; Cullen, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    A 22 year old man with Marfan's syndrome died suddenly following acute aortic valve prolapse. Although aortic root involvement in Marfan's syndrome is common, we have found no previous description of this particular complication in the literature.

  9. Investigations on structural phase transition in hot wall deposited CdSe xTe1-x thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CdSe xTe1-x (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) compound has been prepared by direct reaction of elemental cadmium, selenium and tellurium and thin films of CdSe xTe1-x have been deposited onto well-cleaned glass substrates by hot wall deposition technique. CdSe xTe1-x thin films have been deposited using a hot wall arrangement consisting of a quartz tube of 6.5 cm length and 1 cm diameter. The composition of the deposited films has been identified using energy dispersive analysis of X-rays. X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the prepared CdSe xTe1-x bulk and deposited thin films are polycrystalline in nature with cubic zinc blende or hexagonal structure or both depending on the composition. CdSe xTe1-x was found to exhibit a structural phase transition as a function of composition. The micro-structural parameters such as grain size, dislocation density and strain have been evaluated and their thickness dependence has been analysed. Photoluminescence spectra of the deposited films have been studied

  10. Plant Cell Wall Proteomics: Mass Spectrometry Data, a Trove for Research on Protein Structure/Function Relationships

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cécile Albenne; Hervé Canut; Georges Boudart; Yu Zhang; Héléne San Clemente; Rafael Pont-Lezica; Elisabeth Jamet

    2009-01-01

    Proteomics allows the large-scale study of protein expression either in whole organisms or in purified organ-elles. In particular, mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of gel-separated proteins produces data not only for protein identi-fication, but for protein structure, location, and processing as well. An in-depth analysis was performed on MS data from etiolated hypocotyl cell wall proteomics of Arabidopsis thaliana. These analyses show that highly homologous members of multigene families can be differentiated. Two lectins presenting 93% amino acid identity were identified using peptide mass fingerprinting. Although the identification of structural proteins such as extensins or hydroxyproline/proline-rich proteins (H/PRPs) is arduous, different types of MS spectra were exploited to identify and characterize an H/PRR Matu-ration events in a couple of cell wall proteins (CWPs) were analyzed using site mapping. N-glycosylation of CWPs as well as the hydroxylation or oxidation of amino acids were also explored, adding information to improve our understanding of CWP structure/function relationships. A bioinformatic tool was developed to locate by means of MS the N-terminus of mature secreted proteins and N-glycosylation.

  11. Out-of-plane (SH) soil-structure interaction: a shear wall with rigid and flexible ring foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Thang; Lee, Vincent W.; Luo, Hao

    2016-02-01

    Soil-structure interaction (SSI) of a building and shear wall above a foundation in an elastic half-space has long been an important research subject for earthquake engineers and strong-motion seismologists. Numerous papers have been published since the early 1970s; however, very few of these papers have analytic closed-form solutions available. The soil-structure interaction problem is one of the most classic problems connecting the two disciplines of earthquake engineering and civil engineering. The interaction effect represents the mechanism of energy transfer and dissipation among the elements of the dynamic system, namely the soil subgrade, foundation, and superstructure. This interaction effect is important across many structure, foundation, and subgrade types but is most pronounced when a rigid superstructure is founded on a relatively soft lower foundation and subgrade. This effect may only be ignored when the subgrade is much harder than a flexible superstructure: for instance a flexible moment frame superstructure founded on a thin compacted soil layer on top of very stiff bedrock below. This paper will study the interaction effect of the subgrade and the superstructure. The analytical solution of the interaction of a shear wall, flexible-rigid foundation, and an elastic half-space is derived for incident SH waves with various angles of incidence. It found that the flexible ring (soft layer) cannot be used as an isolation mechanism to decouple a superstructure from its substructure resting on a shaking half-space.

  12. Developing LBM Process Parameters for Ti-6Al-4V Thin Wall Structures and Determining the Corresponding Mechanical Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Bhrigu; Schaub, Adam; Karg, Michael; Lechner, Michael; Merklein, Marion; Schmidt, Michael

    The Laser Beam Melting (LBM) process technology within the family of Additive Manufacturing technology is characterized by its ability to fabricate fully dense 3D structures directly from micro-sized metal powder. With the current state of the art, Ti-6Al-4V has been processed using LBM machine systems constituting a laser with a beam diameter of about 100 μm. In order to fabricate structures with smaller wall thicknesses, processing of Ti-6Al-4V is attempted on the LBM machine system, Realizer SLM 50 consisting of a laser with a beam diameter 10 μm. The proposed paper presents the development of process parameters for fabricating fully dense Ti-6Al-4V 3D structures using the LBM machine system, Realizer SLM 50. Further experiments are carried out to determine the wall thickness and mechanical properties achievable using the selected process parameters. Analysis and scientific arguments are presented to explain the influence of building direction and heat treatment on mechanical properties.

  13. The investigation of coherent structures in the wall region of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer based on DNS database

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG ZhangFeng; ZHOU Heng; LUO JiSheng

    2007-01-01

    Through temporal mode direct numerical simulation, flow field database of a fully developed turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate with Mach number 4.5 and Reynolds number Reθ=1094 has been obtained. Commonly used detection methods in experiments are applied to detecting coherent structures in the flow field,and it is found that coherent structures do exist in the wall region of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer. The detected results show that a low-speed streak is detected by using the Mu-level method, the rising parts of this streak are detected by using the second quadrant method, and the crossing regions from a low-speed streak to the high-speed one are detected by using the VITA method respectively.Notwithstanding that different regions are detected by different methods, they are all accompanied by quasi-stream-wise vortex structures.

  14. The investigation of coherent structures in the wall region of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer based on DNS database

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Through temporal mode direct numerical simulation, flow field database of a fully developed turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate with Mach number 4.5 and Reynolds number Reθ =1094 has been obtained. Commonly used detection meth- ods in experiments are applied to detecting coherent structures in the flow field, and it is found that coherent structures do exist in the wall region of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer. The detected results show that a low-speed streak is de- tected by using the Mu-level method, the rising parts of this streak are detected by using the second quadrant method, and the crossing regions from a low-speed streak to the high-speed one are detected by using the VITA method respectively. Notwithstanding that different regions are detected by different methods, they are all accompanied by quasi-stream-wise vortex structures.

  15. Nucleon structure from mixed action calculations using 2+1 flavors of asqtad sea and domain wall valence fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present high statistics results for the structure of the nucleon from a mixed-action calculation using 2+1 flavors of asqtad sea and domain-wall valence fermions. We perform extrapolations of our data based on different chiral effective field theory schemes and compare our results with available information from phenomenology. We discuss vector and axial form factors of the nucleon, moments of generalized parton distributions, including moments of forward parton distributions, and implications for the decomposition of the nucleon spin.

  16. Structural studies of O-acetylglucuronoxylans and their modifications in plant cell walls

    OpenAIRE

    Chong, Sun-Li

    2014-01-01

    O-acetylglucuronoxylans (AcGX) are the major hemicelluloses found in the secondary cell wall of dicotyledon species. The backbone is formed by β(1→4)-linked xylopyranosyl (Xylp) residues, which are substituted by α(1→2)-linked (4-O-methyl)glucopyranosyluronic acid ((Me)GlcpA). The AcGX are also highly acetylated on the 2-O or 3-O; or both positions of Xylp units. Notably, acetylation patterns in AcGX are not well understood since they are typically destroyed during the alkaline isolatio...

  17. Czech contribution to the solution of the limit states of thin-walled structural systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Škaloud, Miroslav; Zörnerová, Marie

    Praha : ČVUT, 2008 - (Kohoutková, A.), s. 17-26 ISBN 978-80-01-04143-7. [Beton 08. Praha (CZ), 23.09.2008-24.09.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA103/06/0064; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200710603 Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) GA103/08/0275 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : thin-walled construction * post-buckled behaviour * repeated loading Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering

  18. An experimental and clinical study on the dissecting aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the treatment of dissecting aortic aneurysm, it is important to understand the exact conditions of the disease. For this purpose Aortography (AOG) and X-ray computorized tomography (CT) have been used. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and the ultrasonic pulsed Doppler duplex system are completely non-invasive and may be used instead of AOG and CT. Experimental aortic dissection was done surgically using modified Blanton's method in 8 mongrel dogs. MRI and the ultrasonic pulsed Doppler duplex system were used on these dogs before and after surgery which consisted of surgical closure of entry and insertion of Ivalon Sponge to false lumen. MRI patterns were classified into three: i.e, low, middle, and high intensity. The ultrasonic pulsed Doppler duplex system patterns were classified into four: i.e, normal flow, to and fro, turbulent flow and wall motion patterns respectively. These patterns of MRI and the ultrasonic pulsed Doppler duplex system were closely correlated to autopsy findings. These results indicated that MRI and the ultrasonic pulsed Doppler duplex system are useful to evaluate the changes of figures and hemodynamics of the false lumen. In the clinical study, MRI was performed on 26 patients of dissecting aortic aneurysm before and after surgery. These results were compared with those of AOG and CT. In the detection of the intimal flap, the main arterial branches, and the location of the entry and reentry, MRI was superior to CT and almost equal to AOG. key words: dissecting aortic aneurysm, hemodynamics of aortic dissection, the Ivalon Sponge Occlusion method, MRI, the ultrasonic pulsed Doppler duplex system. (author)

  19. EXPRESSION OF MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASE-9 IN HUMAN ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURYSMAL TISSUES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Zhong; Wang Ling; Qi Guangyu; Joerg. Heckenkamp

    2006-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of MMP-9 (Matrix Metalloproteinase-9, MMP-9) in the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) by localizing the expression of MMP-9 in the aneurysmal tissues. Methods By means of immunohistochemistry, the frozen sections (5 μm) with aneurysmal tissues (n = 10) were incubated with MMP-9 antibody-added agents, then the sections were stained and observed under the microscope to localize the expression of MMP-9, which displayed a brown precipitate within the arterial walls. The normal arterial wall tissues(n= 10)and the diseased arterial wall tissues from the arterial occlusive diseases (AODs) (n= 15) were also immunized exactly the same way as control. Results A quantity of positive granules which appeared within the aortic media showed the strong expression of MMP-9 in the AAAs, with the positive rate reaching 95%(19/20), while no expression of MMP-9 was observed in the normal artery. However, the scattered distributed positive granules were scen within the arterial wall of some cases of the AODs, implying the weak positive expression of MMP-9 in this disease with the positive rate of 26.7%(4/15). There was a significant difference of the expression of MMP-9 within the arterial wall between the AAAs and AODs(P<0. 01). Conclusion High expression of MMP-9 within the aortic media faciliatates the degradation of collagen and elastin fibres and subsequent dilation of the aortic artery , thus playing an important role in the pathogenesis of AAAs. To refrain MMP-9 from enhanced expressing within the aortic wall is of clinical significance in the prevention and treatment of AAAs.

  20. Aortic valve replacement through right thoracotomy.

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, P N; A S Kumar

    1993-01-01

    There has never, to our knowledge, been a report of aortic valve replacement via a right thoracotomy. However, we recently used this approach in 2 young women with severe aortic stenosis. Exposure of the aortic valve was excellent, and we encountered neither technical difficulties nor sequelae related to the right thoracotomy. We believe that right thoracotomy provides adequate access for safe aortic valve replacement and yields cosmetically more appealing results than does median sternotomy.