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Sample records for aortic valve surgery

  1. Aortic valve surgery - open

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Saunders; 2012:chap 61. Otton CM, Bowow RO. Valvular heart disease. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Heart Surgery Heart Valve Diseases Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  2. Reconstructive surgery of the aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendonça José Teles de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Lacking an ideal valve substitute and motivated by the good results of mitral valve repair since 1990, we faced with determination aortic valve reconstruction surgery. The objective of this paper is to show our experience with this procedure. METHOD: Between January of 1990 and December of 2001; 136 aortic valve repair surgeries were performed. Seventy-five (55.1% of the patients were female and the ages ranged from 4 to 70 years (mean 23.3 ± 1.2 years. Every patient had rheumatic valve disease and insufficiency was the most prevalent type (108 patients - 79.4%, followed by double aortic lesion in 16 (11.7% patients and stenosis in 12 (8.8%. The surgical techniques used were: subcommissural annuloplasty in 74 (54.4% patients, commissurotomy in 38 (27.9%, cusp extension with pericardium in 17 (12.5%, substitution of one cusp in 2 (1.4%, cusp suspension by annuloplasty in 37 (27.2% and Valsalva sinus remodeling in 27 (19.8%. The surgery exclusively involved the aortic valve in 57 (41.9% patients and was associated in 79 (mitral valve replacement in 12, mitral repair in 65, coronary artery bypass grafting in 1 and pulmonary commissurotomy in 1. RESULTS: Hospital mortality was 2.2% and 22 (16.2% patients underwent a new surgery during the follow-up period (57.7 ± 3.5 months. CONCLUSIONS: Aortic valve repair is a safe surgical procedure that can be used in an increasing number of patients with promising results.

  3. Aortic valve surgery - minimally invasive

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Saunders; 2012:chap 61. Otto CM, Bonow RO. Valvular heart disease. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Heart Valve Diseases Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  4. Aortic valve surgery: what is the future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudorović, Narcis

    2008-04-01

    Modern surgical treatment for aortic valve disease has undergone significant improvements in all areas of this procedure. Successful treatment strategies for cardiovascular diseases have often been initiated and driven by surgeons. Radical excision of diseased tissue, repair and replacement strategies lead to long-term successful treatment of the underlying diseases and clearly improved patient outcome. In highly developed nations, valve surgery will be increasing applied in older people, with more co-morbidities and a higher incidence of concomitant coronary artery disease. Cardiovascular surgeons will be facing increased competition from the catheter-based procedures; these are already applied clinically, and their numbers will rise in near future. Right now interventional cardiologists supported by some cardiac surgeons are on their way to transform some conventional open surgical procedures into catheter-based less invasive interventions, such as valve repair and replacement. Cardiovascular surgery is undergoing a rapid transformation; socio-economic factors and recent advances in medical technology contribute to these changes. Further developments will come, and surgeons with all their expertise in the treatment of valvular heart disease need to be part of it. Cardiovascular surgeons have to adapt the exciting new approaches of transapical and transfemoral transcatheter valve implantation techniques.

  5. Conservative aortic valve surgery in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casselman, F.P.A.

    2001-01-01

    118 Chapter 1 reviews the current knowledge of the aortic valve. The normal anatomy and possible variations are described. The different pathological conditions are explained as wel as their natural history and the indications for intervention. The various surgical options with regard to the patholo

  6. Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery: Transapical Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive cardiac surgery is less traumatic and therefore leads to quicker recovery. With the assistance of engineering technologies on devices, imaging, and robotics, in conjunction with surgical technique, minimally invasive cardiac surgery will improve clinical outcomes and expand the cohort of patients that can be treated. We used transapical aortic valve implantation as an example to demonstrate that minimally invasive cardiac surgery can be implemented with the integration of surgical techniques and engineering technologies. Feasibility studies and long-term evaluation results prove that transapical aortic valve implantation under MRI guidance is feasible and practical. We are investigating an MRI compatible robotic surgical system to further assist the surgeon to precisely deliver aortic valve prostheses via a transapical approach. Ex vivo experimentation results indicate that a robotic system can also be employed in in vivo models.

  7. SERUM MAGNESIUM LEVELS IN AORTIC AND MITRAL VALVE REPLACEMENT SURGERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa Rao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : The purpose of the study was to analyze serum magnesium concentration in patients undergoing Aortic and Mitral Valve replacement surgeries. METHODS: This prospective study was conducted in 60 patients who underwent elective Aortic and Mitral va lve replacement surgeries. Blood samples from radial artery were collected just before induction of anesthesia and three days post - operatively for estimation of serum magnesium. RESULTS: Magnesium level was 2.02mg/dl at baseline, 2.28mg/dl, 2.08mg/dl and 1 .90mg/dl respectively on three consecutive days post - operatively. CONCLUSION: The lowering of serum magnesium in Aortic and Mitral valve replacement surgeries postoperatively recommends the use of routine serum magnesium determination and administration to prevent post - operative arrhythmias.

  8. [Minimally invasive cardiac surgery for aortic valve disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Y; Katoh, T; Hamano, K; Gohra, H; Tsuboi, H; Esato, K

    1998-12-01

    Recent surgical advances leading to good operative results have contributed to the trend to useminimally invasive approaches, even in cardiac surgery. Smaller incisions are clearly more cosmetically acceptable to patients. When using a minimally invasive approach, it is most important to maintain surgical quality without jeopardizing patients. A good operative visual field leads to good surgical results. In the parasternal approach, we use a retractor to harvest an internal thoracic artery in coronary artery bypass surgery. Retracting the sternum upward allows for a good surgical view and permits the use of an arch cannula rather than femoral cannulation. When reoperating for aortic valve repair, the j-sternotomy approach requires less adhesiolysis compared with the traditional full sternotomy. No special technique is necessary to perform aortic valve surgery using the j-sternotomy approach. However, meticulous attention must be paid to avoiding left ventricular air embolisms to prevent postoperative stroke or neurocognitive deficits, especially when utilizing a minimally invasive approach. Transesophageal echo is useful not only for monitoring cardiac function but also for monitoring the persence of air in the left ventricle and atrium. This paper compare as the degree of invasion of minimally invasive cardiac surgery and the traditional full sternotomy. No differences were found in the occurrence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome between patients undergoing minimally invasive cardiac surgery and the traditional technique. Therefore it is concluded that minimally invasive surgery for patients with aortic valve disease may become the standard approach in the near future.

  9. Reoperation on aortic disease in patients with previous aortic valve surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Xiao-gang; ZHANG Liang; YU Cun-tao; QIAN Xiang-yang; CHANG Qian

    2013-01-01

    Background Aortic valve replacement (AVR) is a safe and effective method in the treatment of aortic valve diseases.This study aimed to increase the understanding on re-treatment of aortic diseases after aortic valve surgery through a retrospective analysis of 47 related cases.Methods Forty-seven patients (38 males and 9 females) with previous aortic valve surgery have received reoperation on aorta from January 2003 to June 2012,and the mean interval time of re-intervention to aortic disease was 6 years ((6.0± 3.8) years).The secondary aortic surgery included aortic root replacement (14 cases),ascending aorta replacement (10 cases),aortic root/ascending aorta plus total arch replacement with stented elephant trunk implantation (21 cases),and total thoracoabdominal aorta replacement (2 cases).All these patients have received outpatient re-exams or follow-up by phone calls.Results After the initial aortic valve replacement,patients suffered from aortic dissection (25 cases,53%),ascending aortic aneurysm (12 cases,26%) or aortic root aneurysm (10 cases,21%).Diameter in ascending aorta increased (5.2±7.1) mm per year and aortic sinus (3.3±3.1) mm per year.The annual growth value of diameter in ascending aorta was higher in patients with rheumatic heart disease than that in Marfan syndrome (P<0.05).All 47 patients have received reoperation on aorta.One patient died in operating room because aortic dissection seriously involved right coronary artery.Seven patients had renal insufficiency after operation; neurological complications occurred in 14 patients including 7 patients with stroke and the others with transient brain dysfunction.All patients were followed up,the mean survival time was (97.25±17.63) months,95% confidence interval was 55.24-73.33 months.Eight cases were died during follow-up and five-year survival rate was 83%.Conclusion To reduce the aortic adverse events after first aortic valve surgery,it is necessary to actively treat and strictly

  10. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement – pros and cons of keyhole aortic surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kaczmarczyk, Marcin; Szałański, Przemysław; Zembala, Michał; Filipiak, Krzysztof; Karolak, Wojciech; Wojarski, Jacek; Garbacz, Marcin; Kaczmarczyk, Aleksandra; Kwiecień, Anna; Zembala, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Over the last twenty years, minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) has evolved into a safe, well-tolerated and efficient surgical treatment option for aortic valve disease. It has been shown to reduce postoperative morbidity, providing faster recovery and rehabilitation, shorter hospital stay and better cosmetic results compared with conventional surgery. A variety of minimally invasive accesses have been developed and utilized to date. This concise review demonstrates and discus...

  11. Left ventricular outflow tract pseudoaneurysm formation following three aortic valve replacement surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrien E Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a pseudoaneurysm arising from the left ventricular outflow tract/aortic root as a complication of aortic valve surgery. A 45-year-old Nigerian female presented to our institution′s emergency department with chest discomfort. She had three bioprosthetic aortic valve replacements in the preceding year at an outside institution for aortic regurgitation and wanted a second opinion on remaining surgical options. The learning points relevant to this case are as follows: (1 Recognizing potential complications postmultiple valve surgeries, (2 screening patients for chronic infections and rheumatologic conditions that can contribute to failed valve surgeries.

  12. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement - pros and cons of keyhole aortic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarczyk, Marcin; Szałański, Przemysław; Zembala, Michał; Filipiak, Krzysztof; Karolak, Wojciech; Wojarski, Jacek; Garbacz, Marcin; Kaczmarczyk, Aleksandra; Kwiecień, Anna; Zembala, Marian

    2015-06-01

    Over the last twenty years, minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) has evolved into a safe, well-tolerated and efficient surgical treatment option for aortic valve disease. It has been shown to reduce postoperative morbidity, providing faster recovery and rehabilitation, shorter hospital stay and better cosmetic results compared with conventional surgery. A variety of minimally invasive accesses have been developed and utilized to date. This concise review demonstrates and discusses surgical techniques used in contemporary approaches to MIAVR and presents the most important results of MIAVR procedures.

  13. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement – pros and cons of keyhole aortic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szałański, Przemysław; Zembala, Michał; Filipiak, Krzysztof; Karolak, Wojciech; Wojarski, Jacek; Garbacz, Marcin; Kaczmarczyk, Aleksandra; Kwiecień, Anna; Zembala, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Over the last twenty years, minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) has evolved into a safe, well-tolerated and efficient surgical treatment option for aortic valve disease. It has been shown to reduce postoperative morbidity, providing faster recovery and rehabilitation, shorter hospital stay and better cosmetic results compared with conventional surgery. A variety of minimally invasive accesses have been developed and utilized to date. This concise review demonstrates and discusses surgical techniques used in contemporary approaches to MIAVR and presents the most important results of MIAVR procedures. PMID:26336491

  14. Aortic valve bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Jens T; Jensen, Maiken Brit; Arendrup, Henrik;

    2013-01-01

    In aortic valve bypass (AVB) a valve-containing conduit is connecting the apex of the left ventricle to the descending aorta. Candidates are patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis rejected for conventional aortic valve replacement (AVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI...

  15. Aortic Annular Enlargement during Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selman Dumani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the surgery of aortic valve replacement is always attempted, as much as possible, to implant the larger prosthesis with the mains goals to enhance the potential benefits, to minimise transvalvular gradient, decrease left ventricular size and avoid the phenomenon of patient-prosthesis mismatch. Implantation of an ideal prosthesis often it is not possible, due to a small aortic annulus. A variety of aortic annulus enlargement techniques is reported to avoid patient-prosthesis mismatch. We present the case that has submitted four three times open heart surgery. We used Manouguian technique to enlarge aortic anulus with excellent results during the fourth time of surgery.

  16. Valve selection in aortic valve endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrytska, Yana

    2016-01-01

    Aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) is a potentially life-threatening disease. Mortality and incidence of infective endocarditis have been reduced in the past 30 years. Medical treatment of aortic PVE may be successful in patients who have a prompt response after antibiotic treatment and who do not have prosthetic dysfunction. In advanced stages, antibiotic therapy alone is insufficient to control the disease, and surgical intervention is necessary. Surgical treatment may be lifesaving, but it is still associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. The aim of surgery is to perform a radical excision of all infected and necrotic tissue, reconstruction of the left ventricle outflow tract, and replacement of the aortic valve. There is no unanimous consensus on which is the optimal prosthesis to implant in this context, and several surgical techniques have been suggested. We aim to analyze the efficacy of the surgical treatment and discuss the issue of valve selection in patients with aortic valve endocarditis.

  17. Implantation of the CoreValve percutaneous aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, Yoan; Cartier, Raymond; Denault, André Y; Basmadjian, Arsène; Berry, Colin; Laborde, Jean-Claude; Bonan, Raoul

    2007-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement is the only recommended treatment for significant aortic valve stenosis. Percutaneous aortic valve replacement appears to be a novel option for high-risk patients. We report the implantation of the ReValving system (CoreValve, Paris, France) in a 64-year-old woman who was refused aortic valve replacement surgery for critical aortic stenosis and left ventricular dysfunction because of severe pulmonary fibrosis. After anesthesia, the patient was put on femorofemoral cardiopulmonary bypass, and underwent a balloon valvuloplasty with subsequent retrograde aortic valve replacement by the ReValving system. Transesophageal echocardiographic monitoring of the patient's hemodynamics showed immediate improvements of the valvular area and left ventricular ejection fraction and only traces of paravalvular leaks. The patient was easily weaned from ventilation and resumed activity soon after the surgery. A multidisciplinary approach is presently necessary to offer a reliable and safe procedure.

  18. [New aspects in aortic valve disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornos, P

    2001-01-01

    Renewed interest for aortic valve disease has evolved in recent years. Aortic valve replacement has become the second most frequent cause of cardiac surgery, following coronary bypass surgery. In addition, the etiologic and physiopathologic knowledge of this disorder has improved. In the present paper we analyze three aspects of the disease which are, at present, the subject of study and controversy: first, we discuss the possible relationship between degenerative aortic stenosis and atherosclerosis; second, the involvement of the aortic root in cases of bicuspid aortic valve; and third, the surgical indications in asymptomatic patients with either aortic stenosis or regurgitation.

  19. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foghsgaard, Signe; Schmidt, Thomas Andersen; Kjaergard, Henrik K

    2009-01-01

    In this descriptive prospective study, we evaluate the outcomes of surgery in 98 patients who were scheduled to undergo minimally invasive aortic valve replacement. These patients were compared with a group of 50 patients who underwent scheduled aortic valve replacement through a full sternotomy....... The 30-day mortality rate for the 98 patients was zero, although 14 of the 98 mini-sternotomies had to be converted to complete sternotomies intraoperatively due to technical problems. Such conversion doubled the operative time over that of the planned full sternotomies. In the group of patients whose...... is an excellent operation in selected patients, but its true advantages over conventional aortic valve replacement (other than a smaller scar) await evaluation by means of randomized clinical trial. The "extended mini-aortic valve replacement" operation, on the other hand, is a risky procedure that should...

  20. Aortic Valve Regurgitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inside your heart that involves heart valves. Rheumatic fever. Rheumatic fever — a complication of strep throat and once a ... the United States — can damage the aortic valve. Rheumatic fever is still prevalent in developing countries but rare ...

  1. Del Nido cardioplegia in the setting of minimally invasive aortic valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vistarini, Nicola; Laliberté, Eric; Beauchamp, Philippe; Bouhout, Ismail; Lamarche, Yoan; Cartier, Raymond; Carrier, Michel; Perrault, Louis; Bouchard, Denis; El-Hamamsy, Ismaïl; Pellerin, Michel; Demers, Philippe

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to report our experience with del Nido cardioplegia (DNC) in the setting of minimally invasive aortic valve surgery. Forty-six consecutive patients underwent minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (AVR) through a "J" ministernotomy: twenty-five patients received the DNC (Group 1) and 21 patients received standard blood cardioplegia (SBC) (Group 2). The rate of ventricular fibrillation at unclamping was significantly lower in the DNC group (12% vs 52%, p=0.004), as well as postoperative creatinine kinase-MB (CK-MB) values (11.4±5.2 vs 17.7±6.9 µg/L, p=0.004). There were no deaths, myocardial infarctions or major complications in either group. Less postoperative use of intravenous insulin (28% vs 81%, pDNC group. In conclusion, the DNC is easy to use and safe during minimally invasive AVR, providing a myocardial protection at least equivalent to our SBC, improved surgical efficiency, minimal cost and less blood glucose perturbations.

  2. 57. Aortic valve replacement with sutureless valve and mitral valve repair in patient with infected aortic homograft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. attia

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The approach of implanting aortic sutureless valve inside the calcific homograft is suitable in redo surgery especially if associated with mitral valve surgery. Aortic valve replacement in patients who have undergone previous aortic root replacement with an aortic homograft remains a technical challenge because of homograft degeneration and the need for a redo Bentall operation. We report a case of redo aortic valve replacement (valve in valve with a sutureless valve and mitral valve repair by miniband annuloplasty in a female patient aged 64 years old who underwent aortic valve replacement with homograft 14 years ago and presented by sever aortic valve regurge and sever mitral valve regurge because of infective endocarditis. This technique allows rapid aortic valve replacement in a heavily calcified aortic root. It also avoids aortic valve size affection after mitral valve repair by ordinary methods especially in patients with small aortic annulus. This technique is particularly suitable in redo procedures for homograft degeneration, it avoids performing a redo Bentall operation with its known problems as well as to avoid patient prosthesis mismatch.

  3. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement in elderly patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dimytri Siqueira; Alexandre Abizaid; Magaly Arrais J.; Eduardo Sousa

    2012-01-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common native valve disease, affecting up to 5% of the elderly population. Surgical aortic valve replacement reduces symptoms and improves survival, and is the definitive therapy in patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis. However, despite the good results of classic surgery, risk is markedly increased in elderly patients with co-morbidities. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) allows implantation of a prosthetic heart valve within the diseased native aortic valve without the need for open heart surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass, offering a new therapeutic option to elderly patients considered at high surgical risk or with contraindications to surgery. To date, several multicenter registries and a randomized trial have confirmed the safety and efficacy of TAVR in those patients. In this chapter, we review the background and clinical applications of TAVR in elderly patients.

  4. Aortic Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that is safest for you based on your individual symptoms and circumstances. Recovery Recovery Most aortic valve ... is safe to do so. You should anticipate spending several days, but likely not more than a ...

  5. Valve-in-Valve Replacement Using a Sutureless Aortic Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohmen, Pascal M.; Lehmkuhl, Lukas; Borger, Michael A.; Misfeld, Martin; Mohr, Friedrich W.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 61 Final Diagnosis: Tissue degeneration Symptoms: Dyspnea Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Redo valve replacement Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: We present a unique case of a 61-year-old female patient with homograft deterioration after redo surgery for prosthetic valve endocarditis with root abscess. Case Report: The first operation was performed for type A dissection with root, arch, and elephant trunk replacement of the thoracic aorta. The present re-redo surgery was performed as valve-in-valve with a sutureless aortic biopros-thesis. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on day 6. Conclusions: The current case report demonstrates that sutureless bioprostheses are an attractive option for surgical valve-in-valve procedures, which can reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:27694795

  6. Beating Heart Mitral Valve Replacement Surgery without Aortic Cross-Clamping via Right Thoracotomy in a Patient with Compromised Left Ventricular Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Baris-Durukan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Global myocardial ischemia and ischemia-reperfusion injury are potential adverse events related with cardioplegic arrest. Beating heart surgery has avoided such complications and adapted to valve surgery following successful results published on myocardial revascularization. Difficulty in weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass may be lessened by using on-pump beating heart surgery for mitral valve interventions. Here we describe a 64-year-old male patient with severe mitral regurgitation and dilated cardiomyopathy. Beating heart mitral valve replacement surgery was performed without aortic cross-clamping through a right thoracotomy approach. We believe that, particularly in patients with poor left ventricular functions, beating heart mitral valve surgery may be advantageous

  7. Minimally Invasive Mitral Valve Replacement and Transfemoral Aortic Valve Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustenbach, Christian; Baumbach, Hardy; Hill, Stephan; Franke, Ulrich F W

    2015-01-01

    The case is reported of a symptomatic elderly patient with severe mitral regurgitation, severe aortic valve stenosis, and coronary heart disease. The coronary artery disease had been interventionally treated four years previously with stent implantation into the right coronary artery. Published studies have shown that a combination of mitral and aortic valve surgery is associated with a significantly increased risk of mortality and morbidity, particularly in elderly patients. In the present patient, both valvular malformations were successfully treated with a single-step interdisciplinary approach, namely an initial surgical mitral valve replacement followed by transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

  8. Aortic Valve Stenosis and Atrial Fibrillation Influence Plasma Fibulin-1 Levels in Patients Treated with Coronary Bypass Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maria Lyck; Dahl, Jordi S; Argraves, W Scott;

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Aortic valve stenosis (AS) causes cardiac fibrosis and left ventricular hypertrophy, and over time heart failure can occur. To date, a reliable marker to predict progression of AS or the development of heart failure is still lacking. In this study, we addressed the hypothesis that fib......Objectives: Aortic valve stenosis (AS) causes cardiac fibrosis and left ventricular hypertrophy, and over time heart failure can occur. To date, a reliable marker to predict progression of AS or the development of heart failure is still lacking. In this study, we addressed the hypothesis...... that fibulin-1 levels reflect myocardial fibrosis. Methods: Patients undergoing heart surgery at the Odense University were investigated. By 2012 data on outcome were obtained. Results: In 293 patients, plasma fibulin-1 levels were measured. Patients with AS or atrial fibrillation (AF) had significantly higher...

  9. Aortic or Mitral Valve Replacement With the Biocor and Biocor Supra

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-09

    Aortic Valve Insufficiency; Aortic Valve Regurgitation; Aortic Valve Stenosis; Aortic Valve Incompetence; Mitral Valve Insufficiency; Mitral Valve Regurgitation; Mitral Valve Stenosis; Mitral Valve Incompetence

  10. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement and aortic valve repair in a patient with acromegaly and aortic root dilatation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Van Praet

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aortic regurgitation and dilatation of the aortic root and ascending aorta are severe complications of acromegaly. The current trend for management of an aortic root aneurysm is valve-sparing root replacement as well as restoring the diameter of the aortic sinotubular junction (STJ and annulus. Our case report supports the recommendation that in patients with acromegaly, severe aortic root involvement may indicate the need for surgery.

  11. Unstable angina early after aortic valve replacement surgery in a female patient with normal coronary arteries preoperatively – a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarz Christian

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angina pectoris early after aortic valve replacement surgery in patients with previously normal coronary arteries may be life threatening and has to be assessed immediately. Case report 12 weeks after aortic valve replacement surgery, a 60-year-old female patient was referred for evaluation of recent onset of severe chest pain on mild exertion and at rest. Coronary angiography showed severe stenosis nvolving the left coronary ostium and the left main stem. The patient was urgently referred for bypass surgery and had an uneventful postoperative recovery. Conclusion A high degree of suspicion is needed for early recognition and aggressive management of this rare but serious complication.

  12. Aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Athanasiou, Thanos; Mestres, Carlos A;

    2008-01-01

    mortality were collected. Group analysis by patient geographic distribution and by annular diameter of the prosthesis utilized was conducted. Patients with a manufacturer's labeled prosthesis size > or = 21 mm were assigned to the 'large' aortic size subset, while those with a prosthesis size ... assigned to the 'small' aortic size subset. Effective orifice area indices were calculated for all patients to assess the geographic distribution of patient-prosthesis mismatch. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses adjusting for possible confounding variables were performed. RESULTS...... differences in the distribution of either gender or BSA. In the multivariable model, south European patients were seven times more likely to receive a smaller-sized aortic valve (OR = 6.5, 95% CI = 4.82-8.83, p

  13. Transcatheter Aortic Heart Valve Thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Nicolaj C; Grove, Erik L; Andersen, Henning R;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is increasing focus on transcatheter heart valve (THV) thrombosis. However, there are limited data on incidence, clinical implications and predisposing factors of THV thrombosis following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). OBJECTIVES: We assessed the incidence...

  14. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Bicuspid Aortic Valve Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mylotte, Darren; Lefevre, Thierry; Søndergaard, Lars

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Limited information exists describing the results of transcatheter aortic valve (TAV) replacement in patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) disease (TAV-in-BAV). OBJECTIVES: This study sought to evaluate clinical outcomes of a large cohort of patients undergoing TAV-in-BAV. METHODS...

  15. [Aortic valve replacement for the small aortic annulus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, H; Usui, A; Akita, T; Ueda, Y

    2006-04-01

    Aortic valve surgery for the small aortic annulus is still challenging for surgeons. Recently, the new types of high performance prosthesis have been developed and the chance of an aortic root enlargement (ARE) is decreasing. In this study, we propose the ideal strategy of the aortic surgery for the small aortic annulus. We analyzed the clinical records of 158 patients who underwent aortic valve replacement from August 1999 to October 2005 in our institution. The small aortic annulus was observed in 38 patients (24%). Fourteen patients of this group underwent ARE. Patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) was less frequently observed in patients with ARE compared to those without ARE. The additional time required for ARE was not considerable, and neither ischemic time nor cardiopulmonary bypass time was significantly prolonged by ARE. In conclusion, we have to select a prosthesis with sufficient orifice area to avoid PPM, otherwise we should choose an option of ARE. For this consideration, we definitely need the chart that demonstrates the relationship between the nominal size of various types of prostheses and the size of a patient's annulus that those prostheses actually fit.

  16. CONGENITAL QUADRICUSPID AORTIC-VALVE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROUWER, MHJ; DEGRAAF, JJ; EBELS, T

    1993-01-01

    Two patients with a quadricuspid aortic valve are described, one of them with concomitant juxtaposed coronary orifices facing the right hand facing sinus. The etiology and incidence of this congenital anomaly will be discussed.

  17. From the ground up: building a minimally invasive aortic valve surgery program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tom C; Lamelas, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) is associated with numerous advantages including improved patient satisfaction, cosmesis, decreased transfusion requirements, and cost-effectiveness. Despite these advantages, little information exists on how to build a MIAVR program from the ground up. The steps to build a MIAVR program include compiling a multi-disciplinary team composed of surgeons, cardiologists, anesthesiologists, perfusionists, operating room (OR) technicians, and nurses. Once assembled, this team can then approach hospital administrators to present a cost-benefit analysis of MIAVR, emphasizing the importance of reduced resource utilization in the long-term to offset the initial financial investment that will be required. With hospital approval, training can commence to provide surgeons and other staff with the necessary knowledge and skills in MIAVR procedures and outcomes. Marketing and advertising of the program through the use of social media, educational conferences, grand rounds, and printed media will attract the initial patients. A dedicated website for the program can function as a "virtual lobby" for patients wanting to learn more. Initially, conservative selection criteria of cases that qualify for MIAVR will set the program up for success by avoiding complex co-morbidities and surgical techniques. During the learning curve phase of the program, patient safety should be a priority.

  18. Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    aortic valvular disease, endocarditis, ascending aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection.1-4 There is also an association of BAV with coarctation of...for aortic aneurysm , patients with BAV appear to have additional risks for aortic disease. Nistri et al.12 reported significant aortic root...Congenital heart disease in patients with Turner’s syndrome. Italian study group for Turner syndrome (ISGTS). J Pediatr 1998; 133:688-692. 7. Schmid

  19. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Comprehensive Review and Present Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misenheimer, Jacob A.; Ramaraj, Radhakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease in the developed world. About 7% of the population over age 65 years suffers from degenerative aortic stenosis. The prognosis of patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis is dismal without valve replacement. Even though the American College of Cardiology recommends aortic valve replacement to treat this condition as a class I recommendation, approximately one third of these patients over the age of 75 years are not referred for surgery. Typically, this is from concern about prohibitive surgical risk associated with patient frailty, comorbidities, age, and severe left ventricular dysfunction. The advent in France of transcatheter aortic valve replacement has raised the hope in the United States for an alternative, less invasive treatment for aortic stenosis. Two recent trials—the Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER Valve Trial Edwards SAPIEN Transcatheter Heart Valve (Partner) and the CoreValve US Pivotal—have established transcatheter aortic valve replacement as the preferred approach in patients who are at high or prohibitive surgical risk. The more recently published Partner 2 trial has shown the feasibility of transcatheter aortic valve replacement in intermediate-surgical-risk patients as well. With a profile that promises easier use and better valve performance and delivery, newer-generation valves have shown their potential for further improvement in safety profile and overall outcomes. We review the history and status of this topic. PMID:28265210

  20. Replacing the valve restoring the flow: Effects of transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerinck, E.M.A.

    2016-01-01

    When conventional surgery is not an option due to high surgical risk, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a firmly established alternative and an effective and safe treatment option in this patient population. This thesis focuses on treatment of aortic valve stenosis by TAVI. The aim i

  1. Outcomes of mitral valve repair compared with replacement in patients undergoing concomitant aortic valve surgery: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurav, Alok; Alla, Venkata Mahesh; Kaushik, Manu; Hunter, Claire C; Mooss, Aryan V

    2015-09-01

    Long-term superiority of mitral valve (MV) repair compared with replacement is well established in degenerative MV disease. In rheumatic heart disease, its advantages are unclear and it is often performed in conjunction with aortic valve (AV) replacement. Herein, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis comparing outcomes of MV repair vs replacement in patients undergoing concomitant AV replacement. PubMed, Cochrane and Web of Science databases were searched up to 25 January 2014 for English language studies comparing outcomes of MV repair vs replacement in patients undergoing simultaneous AV replacement. Data of selected studies were extracted. Study quality, publication bias and heterogeneity were assessed. Analysis was performed using a random effects model (meta-analysis of observational studies in epidemiology recommendation). A total of 1202 abstracts/titles were screened. Of these, 20 were selected for full text review and 8 studies (3924 patients) were included in the final analysis: 1255 underwent MV repair and 2669 underwent replacement. Late outcome data were available in seven studies (cumulative follow-up: 15 654 patient-years). The early (in hospital and up to 30 days post-surgery) mortality [risk ratio (RR): 0.68, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.53-0.87, P = 0.003] and late (>30 days post-surgery) mortality (RR: 0.76, 95% CI: 0.64-0.90 P = 0.001) were significantly lower in the MV repair group compared with the MV replacement group. The MV reoperation rate (RR: 1.89, 95% CI: 0.87-4.10, P = 0.108), thromboembolism (including valve thrombosis) (RR: 0.65, 95% CI: 0.38-1.13, P = 0.128) and major bleeding rates (RR: 0.88, 95% CI: 0.49-1.57, P = 0.659) were found to be comparable between the two groups. In a separate analysis of studies with exclusively rheumatic patients (n = 1106), the early as well as late mortality benefit of MV repair was lost (RR: 0.92, 95% CI: 0.44-1.90, P = 0.81 and RR: 0.69, 95% CI: 0.39-1.22, P = 0.199, respectively

  2. Mitral Valve Aneurysm: A Rare Complication of Aortic Valve Endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Moaref

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A 20-year-old intravenous drug abuser man, refered to our hospital with dyspnea and orthopnea. Tranesophagealechocardiography revealed severe aortic regurgitation, healed vegetation of aortic valve and an aneurysm of theanterior leaflet of the mitral valve. The patient was discharged after aortic valve replacement and mitral valverepair.

  3. Valve Replacement with a Sutureless Aortic Prosthesis in a Patient with Concomitant Mitral Valve Disease and Severe Aortic Root Calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lio, Antonio; Scafuri, Antonio; Nicolò, Francesca; Chiariello, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    Aortic valve replacement with concomitant mitral valve surgery in the presence of severe aortic root calcification is technically difficult, with long cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times. We performed sutureless aortic valve replacement and mitral valve annuloplasty in a 68-year-old man who had severe aortic stenosis and moderate-to-severe mitral regurgitation. Intraoperatively, we found severe calcification of the aortic root. We approached the aortic valve through a transverse aortotomy, performed in a higher position than usual, and we replaced the valve with a Sorin Perceval S sutureless prosthesis. In addition, we performed mitral annuloplasty with use of an open rigid ring. The aortic cross-clamp time was 63 minutes, and the cardiopulmonary bypass time was 83 minutes. No paravalvular leakage of the aortic prosthesis was detected 30 days postoperatively. Our case shows that the Perceval S sutureless bioprosthesis can be safely implanted in patients with aortic root calcification, even when mitral valve disease needs surgical correction.

  4. Statins for aortic valve stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Thiago

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Aortic valve stenosis is the most common type of valvular heart disease in the USA and Europe. Aortic valve stenosis is considered similar to atherosclerotic disease. Some studies have evaluated statins for aortic valve stenosis. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of statins in aortic valve stenosis. METHODS: Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS - IBECS, Web of Science and CINAHL Plus. These databases were searched from their inception to 24 November 2015. We also searched trials in registers for ongoing trials. We used no language restrictions. Selection criteria: Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs comparing statins alone or in association with other systemic drugs to reduce cholesterol levels versus placebo or usual care. Data collection and analysis: Primary outcomes were severity of aortic valve stenosis (evaluated by echocardiographic criteria: mean pressure gradient, valve area and aortic jet velocity, freedom from valve replacement and death from cardiovascular cause. Secondary outcomes were hospitalization for any reason, overall mortality, adverse events and patient quality of life. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. The GRADE methodology was employed to assess the quality of result findings and the GRADE profiler (GRADEPRO was used to import data from Review Manager 5.3 to create a 'Summary of findings' table. MAIN RESULTS: We included four RCTs with 2360 participants comparing statins (1185 participants with placebo (1175 participants. We found low-quality evidence for our primary outcome of severity of aortic valve stenosis, evaluated by mean pressure gradient (mean difference (MD -0.54, 95% confidence interval (CI -1.88 to 0.80; participants = 1935; studies = 2, valve area (MD -0.07, 95% CI -0.28 to 0.14; participants = 127; studies = 2

  5. Association between aortic valve calcification measured on non-contrast computed tomography and aortic valve stenosis in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Niels Herluf; Carlsen, Bjarke Bønløkke; Dahl, Jordi Sanchez;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aortic valve calcification (AVC) measured on non-contrast computed tomography (CT) has shown correlation to severity of aortic valve stenosis (AS) and mortality in patients with known AS. The aim of this study was to determine the association of CT verified AVC and subclinical...... group were invited for a supplementary echocardiography. AS was graded by indexed aortic valve area (AVAi) on echocardiography as moderate 0.6-0.85 cm(2)/m(2) and severe valve surgery, and artifacts from...

  6. [MINIMALLY INVASIVE AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabata, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) is defined as aortic valve replacement avoiding full sternotomy. Common approaches include a partial sternotomy right thoracotomy, and a parasternal approach. MIAVR has been shown to have advantages over conventional AVR such as shorter length of stay and smaller amount of blood transfusion and better cosmesis. However, it is also known to have disadvantages such as longer cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times and potential complications related to peripheral cannulation. Appropriate patient selection is very important. Since the procedure is more complex than conventional AVR, more intensive teamwork in the operating room is essential. Additionally, a team approach during postoperative management is critical to maximize the benefits of MIAVR.

  7. Bicuspid aortic valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aortic disease. In: Otto CM, Bonow RO, eds. Valvular Heart Disease: A Companion to Braunwald's Heart Disease . 4th ed. ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 13. Carabello BA. Valvular heart disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  8. Aortic Valve Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... evaluation of aortic stenosis in adults. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 29, 2014. Mohty D, ... Valvular heart disease in elderly adults. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 2, 2014. Bonow RO, ...

  9. Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation due to severe aortic regurgitation in a degenerated aortic homograft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lene Kjaer; Engstrøm, Thomas; Søndergaard, Lars

    2009-01-01

    a successful valve-in-valve implantation of a CoreValve aortic valve prosthesis through the right subclavian artery in a case of severe aortic regurgitation within a degenerated aortic homograft. The case exemplifies the possibilities of expanding the indications for TAVI, as well as other vascular access...

  10. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation vs. surgical aortic valve replacement for treatment of severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siontis, George C M; Praz, Fabien; Pilgrim, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: In view of the currently available evidence from randomized trials, we aimed to compare the collective safety and efficacy of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) vs. surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) across the spectrum of risk and in important subgroups. METHODS AND RESULTS...

  11. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation versus surgical aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis: a meta analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yi-cheng; ZHANG Jian-feng; SHEN Wei-feng; ZHAO Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has emerged as the treatment choice for non-operable patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) and may be a good alternative to surgery for those at very high or prohibitive surgical risk.We performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the comparative benefits of TAVI versus surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in patients with severe AS.Methods A comprehensive literature search of PubMed,Embase,ScienceDirect and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled trials was performed,and randomized trials as well as cohort studies with propensity score analysis were included.Results One randomized trial (n=699) and six retrospective cohort studies (n=781) were selected for meta-analysis.Mortality at 30-day and 1-year follow-up was comparable between TAVI and SAVR.Despite similar incidences of stroke,myocardial infarction,re-operation for bleeding,and renal failure requiring dialysis,TAVI was associated with a lower occurrence rate of new-onset atrial fibrillation (OR 0.51,95% CI 0.33-0.78) and shorter procedural time (mean difference -67.50 minutes,95% CI-87.20 to-47.81 minutes).Post-operative aortic regurgitation and permanent pacemaker implantation were more common in patients after TAVI than in those with SAVR (OR 5.53,95% CI 3.41-8.97; OR 1.71,95% Cl 1.02-2.84,respectively).Conclusion In patients with severe symptomatic AS,TAVI and SAVR did not differ with respect to short-and mid-term survival,but the incidence of permanent pacemaker implantation and post-procedural aortic regurgitation remain relatively high after TAVI.

  12. Aortic valve replacement in familial hypercholesterolemia: not an ordinary procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muretti, Mirko; Massi, Francesco; Coradduzza, Enrico; Portoghese, Michele

    2015-04-28

    Familial hypercholesterolemia is an inherited disorder with incidences of approximately 1:500 and 1:1,000,000 in heterozygous and homozygous form respectively. Affected patients usually show early coronary artery disease and severe aortic root calcification, despite optimization of therapy. We report a case of a 64-year-old woman affected by heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia which presented dyspnea and anginal symptoms due to a severely calcified aortic root causing valve stenosis and narrowed sinotubular junction. Aortic valve replacement and aortic root enlargement were performed using the Manougian procedure. Even for experiences surgeons, this surgery could prove challenging for this group of patients due to aggressive degenerative tissue calcification of the aortic root, which often presents an extremely calcified aortic valve with a small annulus associated to a narrowed sinotubular junction.

  13. Aortic Root Enlargement or Sutureless Valve Implantation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos G. Baikoussis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aortic valve replacement (AVR in patients with a small aortic annulus is a challenging issue. The importance of prosthesis–patient mismatch (PPM post aortic valve replacement (AVR is controversial but has to be avoided. Many studies support the fact that PPM has a negative impact on short and long term survival. In order to avoid PPM, aortic root enlargement may be performed. Alternatively and keeping in mind that often some comorbidities are present in old patients with small aortic root, the Perceval S suturelles valve implantation could be a perfect solution. The Perceval sutureless bioprosthesis provides reasonable hemodynamic performance avoiding the PPM and providing the maximum of aortic orifice area. We would like to see in the near future the role of the aortic root enlargement techniques in the era of surgical implantation of the sutureless valve (SAVR and the transcatheter valve implantation (TAVI.

  14. Robotic aortic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Cassidy; Kashef, Elika; El-Sayed, Hosam F; Bismuth, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Surgical robotics was first utilized to facilitate neurosurgical biopsies in 1985, and it has since found application in orthopedics, urology, gynecology, and cardiothoracic, general, and vascular surgery. Surgical assistance systems provide intelligent, versatile tools that augment the physician's ability to treat patients by eliminating hand tremor and enabling dexterous operation inside the patient's body. Surgical robotics systems have enabled surgeons to treat otherwise untreatable conditions while also reducing morbidity and error rates, shortening operative times, reducing radiation exposure, and improving overall workflow. These capabilities have begun to be realized in two important realms of aortic vascular surgery, namely, flexible robotics for exclusion of complex aortic aneurysms using branched endografts, and robot-assisted laparoscopic aortic surgery for occlusive and aneurysmal disease.

  15. Percutaneous implantation of the CoreValve aortic valve prosthesis in patients at high risk or rejected for surgical valve replacement: Clinical evaluation and feasibility of the procedure in the first 30 patients in the AMC-UvA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Baan; Z.Y. Yong; K.T. Koch; J.P.S. Henriques; B.J. Bouma; S.G. de Hert; J. van der Meulen; J.G.P. Tijssen; J.J. Piek; B.A.J.M. de Mol

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To report the feasibility, safety and efficacy of percutaneous aortic valve implantation (PAVI) with the CoreValve self-expanding aortic valve bioprosthesis in elderly patients with aortic valve stenosis who are rejected for surgery or have a high surgical risk.Methods. PAVI using the Cor

  16. New-onset atrial fibrillation after surgical aortic valve replacement and transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Troels Højsgaard; Thygesen, Julie Bjerre; Thyregod, Hans Gustav;

    2015-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and, more recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have been shown to be the only treatments that can improve the natural cause of severe aortic valve stenosis. However, after SAVR and TAVI, the incidence of new-onset atrial fibrillation...

  17. New-Onset Atrial Fibrillation After Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Troels Højsgaard; Thygesen, Julie Bjerre; Thyregod, Hans Gustav;

    2015-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and, more recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have been shown to be the only treatments that can improve the natural cause of severe aortic valve stenosis. However, after SAVR and TAVI, the incidence of new-onset atrial fibrillation...

  18. Aortic valve replacement in octogenarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dark John H

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Aims As our population ages and life expectancy increases the number of people aged over 80 and more referred for cardiac surgery is growing. This study sought to identify the outcome of aortic valve replacement (AVR in octogenarians. Methods 68 patients aged 80 years or more underwent AVR at the Freeman Hospital, between April 2001 and April 2004. A retrospective review of the notes and outcomes from the patients' GP and the NHS strategic tracking service was performed. 54% (37 underwent isolated AVR whilst 46% (31 underwent combined AVR and CABG. Results Follow up was 100% complete. The mean age was 83.1 ± s.d. 2.9 years, a mean gradient of 83 ± s.d. 31 mmHg and mean AVA of 0.56 cm2. The mean additive EuroSCORE was 8.6 ± s.d. 1.2, the logistic EuroSCORE mean 12.0 ± s.d. 5.9. In hospital 30 day mortality was 13 %. Survival was 80% at 1 year and 78% at 2 years. Median follow up was for 712 days. Stepwise logistic regression identified chronic obstructive airways disease as an independent predictor of mortality (p Conclusion Our study demonstrates that the operative mortality for AVR in the over eighties is good, whilst the mid to long term outcome is excellent There is a very low attrition rate with those undergoing the procedure living as long than their age matched population. This study confirms AVR is a safe, acceptable treatment for octogenarians with excellent mid term outcomes.

  19. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Degenerative Bioprosthetic Surgical Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvir, Danny; Webb, John; Brecker, Stephen;

    2012-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation is an emerging therapeutic alternative for patients with a failed surgical bioprosthesis and may obviate the need for reoperation. We evaluated the clinical results of this technique using a large, worldwide registry.......Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation is an emerging therapeutic alternative for patients with a failed surgical bioprosthesis and may obviate the need for reoperation. We evaluated the clinical results of this technique using a large, worldwide registry....

  20. Abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gefke, K; Schroeder, T V; Thisted, B

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify patients who need longer care in the ICU (more than 48 hours) following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery and to evaluate the influence of perioperative complications on short- and long-term survival and quality of life. AAA surgery was performed in 553......, 78% stated that their quality of life had improved or was unchanged after surgery and had resumed working. These data justify a therapeutically aggressive approach, including ICU therapy following AAA surgery, despite failure of one or more organ systems....

  1. Mitral valve surgery - open

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Saunders; 2012:chap 61. Otto CM, Bonow RO. Valvular heart disease. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Heart Surgery Heart Valve Diseases Mitral Valve Prolapse Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ...

  2. Two-Year Outcomes in Patients With Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis Randomized to Transcatheter Versus Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lars; Steinbrüchel, Daniel Andreas; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Nordic Aortic Valve Intervention (NOTION) trial was the first to randomize all-comers with severe native aortic valve stenosis to either transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) with the CoreValve self-expanding bioprosthesis or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR), inclu...... population. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01057173....

  3. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mylotte, Darren; Osnabrugge, Ruben L J; Windecker, Stephan;

    2013-01-01

    The authors sought to examine the adoption of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in Western Europe and investigate factors that may influence the heterogeneous use of this therapy.......The authors sought to examine the adoption of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in Western Europe and investigate factors that may influence the heterogeneous use of this therapy....

  4. [Modern aortic surgery in Marfan syndrome--2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallenbach, K; Schwill, S; Karck, M

    2011-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a hereditary disease with a prevalence of 2-3 in 10,000 births, leading to a fibrillin connective tissue disorder with manifestations in the skeleton, eye, skin, dura mater and in particular the cardiovascular system. Since other syndromes demonstrate similar vascular manifestations, but therapy may differ significantly, diagnosis should be established using the revised Ghent nosology in combination with genotypic analysis in specialized Marfan centres. The formation of aortic root aneurysms with the subsequent risk of acute aortic dissection type A (AADA) or aortic rupture limits life expectancy in patients with Marfan syndrome. Therefore, prophylactic replacement of the aortic root needs to be performed before the catastrophic event of AADA can occur. The goal of surgery is the complete resection of pathological aortic tissue. This can be achieved with excellent results by using a (mechanically) valved conduit that replaces both the aortic valve and the aortic root (Bentall operation). However, the need for lifelong anticoagulation with Coumadin can be avoided using the aortic valve sparing reimplantation technique according to David. The long-term durability of the reconstructed valve is favourable, and further technical improvements may improve longevity. Although results of prospective randomised long-term studies comparing surgical techniques are lacking, the David operation has become the surgical method of choice for aortic root aneurysms, not only at the Heidelberg Marfan Centre. Replacement of the aneurysmal dilated aortic arch is performed under moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest combined with antegrade cerebral perfusion using a heart-lung machine, which we also use in thoracic or thoracoabdominal aneurysms. Close post-operative follow-up in a Marfan centre is pivotal for the early detection of pathological changes on the diseased aorta.

  5. Combined surgical and catheter-based treatment of extensive thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Lönn, Lars; Søndergaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) has changed and extended management options in thoracic aorta disease, including in those patients deemed unfit or unsuitable for open surgery. Accordingly, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is increasingly used to treat patients with symptomatic severe aortic...... valve stenosis (AS) who are considered at high risk for surgical aortic valve replacement. In this report, we describe the combined surgical and catheter-based treatment of an extensive TAA and AS. To our knowledge, this is the first report of hybrid TAA repair combined with TAVR.......An extensive thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is a potentially life-threatening condition and remains a technical challenge to surgeons. Over the past decade, repair of aortic arch aneurysms has been accomplished using both hybrid (open and endovascular) and totally endovascular techniques. Thoracic...

  6. Quality of life after aortic valve repair is similar to Ross patients and superior to mechanical valve replacement: A cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Zacek (Pavel); T. Holubec; M. Vobornik; J. Dominik; J.J.M. Takkenberg (Hanneke); J. Harrer; J. Vojacek

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In patients after aortic valve surgery, the quality of life is hypothesized to be influenced by the type of the valve procedure. A cross-sectional study on the postoperative quality of life was carried out in patients after aortic valve-sparing surgery (with regards to the ag

  7. [New technique of concomitant replacement of the aortic valve and the ascending aorta with enlargement of the aortic annulus for congenital bicuspid aortic valve].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahara, Shingo; Fukasawa, Manabu; Kawahara, Yu; Suzuki, Kotaro; Kobayashi, Yuriko

    2012-12-01

    Congenital bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is one of the most common congenital heart diseases, with a high incidence of associated valvular lesions and aortic abnormalities including aortic stenosis( AS), aortic regurgitation, aortic dilatation, and aortic dissection. Patients with BAV and AS often have a small aortic annulus. We encountered a case of BAV in which a 51-year-old woman with severe AS having a small aortic annulus and a dilated ascending aorta required surgical intervention. We performed the surgery using new technique that involved concomitant replacement of the aortic valve and the ascending aorta with enlargement of the aortic annulus using a single uniquely-shaped graft to avoid prosthesis patient mismatch. We trimmed the proximal end of the straight graft in shape of 2 teardrops hanging on it to fit the cut annulus. It requires only a single suture line to replace the ascending aorta and enlarge the aortic annulus, which entails a decreased risk of bleeding during surgery. We believe that it could be applicable to many cases requiring concomitant surgery.

  8. Repair for acquired aortic valve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, M J

    1996-10-01

    The favorable results of mitral valvuloplasty when compared with valve replacement have renewed the interest of many surgeons in aortic valve repair. However, these efforts have, for the most part, been unsuccessful. Also, the results of aortic valve replacement are usually better than those of mitral valve replacement. Yet, some patients appear to derive benefit from a conservative aortic valve procedure. The best examples are mild or moderate aortic valve disease associated with mitral valve or coronary artery disease, which constitute the primary indication for operation, where "prophylactic" aortic valve replacement does not appear justifiable. Other possible indications for aortic valvuloplasty includes patient's lack of compliance or contraindication to anticoagulation in young patients. Senile aortic stenosis, in very old patients with a small annulus, preserved leaflet morphology and nonsignificant commissural fusion should be considered for repair. However, since the procedure is not easily reproducible and the results not uniformly predictable, it cannot be recommended for generalized use. Nonetheless, experienced surgeons should be encouraged to continue these efforts.

  9. Fulminant diffuse systemic sclerosis following aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasovic-Krstulovic, Daniela; Jurisic, Zrinka; Perkovic, Dijana; Aljinovic, Jure; Martinovic-Kaliterna, Dusanka

    2014-06-01

    We present a case of fulminant diffuse systemic sclerosis (dSSc) developed after the aortic valve replacement followed by fatal congestive heart failure within the 6 months from the initial symptoms. A 61-year-old male developed rapidly progressive diffuse systemic sclerosis following aortic valve replacement due to stenosis of bicuspid aortic valve. He presented with diarrhoea, weight loss, mialgia and arthralgia after cardiac surgery. Heart failure, due to myocardial fibrosis, was noted as a cause of death. We hypothesize that artificial materials like the ones used in mechanical valves or silicon materials in breast implants may induce fulminant course of pre-existing systemic sclerosis or create a new onset in predisposed individual.

  10. Transcatheter valve implantation for patients with aortic stenosis: A position statement from the European Association of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC), in collaboration with the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions (EAPCI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Vahanian (Alec); O. Alfieri (Ottavio); N. Al-Attar (Nawwar); M. Antunes (Manuel); J.J. Bax (Jeroen); B. Cormier (Bertrand); A. Cribier (Alain); P.P.T. de Jaegere (Peter); G. Fournial (Gerard); A.P. Kappetein (Arie Pieter); J. Kovac (Jan); S. Ludgate (Susanne); F. Maisano (Francesco); N. Moat (Neil); F.W. Mohr (Friedrich); P. Nataf (Patrick); L. Pié rard (Luc); J.L. Pomar (Jose); J. Schofer (Joachim); P. Tornos (Pilar); M. Tuzcu (Murat); B.A. van Hout (Ben); L.K. von Segesser (Ludwig); T. Walther (Thomas)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAims: To critically review the available transcatheter aortic valve implantation techniques and their results, as well as propose recommendations for their use and development. Methods and results: A committee of experts including European Association of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery and Europ

  11. Surgery of the aortic root: should we go for the valve-sparing root reconstruction or the composite graft-valve replacement is still the first choice of treatment for these patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando de Azevedo Lamana

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective:To compare the results of the root reconstruction with the aortic valve-sparing operation versus composite graftvalve replacement.Methods:From January 2002 to October 2013, 324 patients underwent aortic root reconstruction. They were 263 composite graft-valve replacement and 61 aortic valve-sparing operation (43 reimplantation and 18 remodeling. Twenty-six percent of the patients were NYHA functional class III and IV; 9.6% had Marfan syndrome, and 12% had bicuspid aortic valve. There was a predominance of aneurysms over dissections (81% vs. 19%, with 7% being acute dissections. The complete follow-up of 100% of the patients was performed with median follow-up time of 902 days for patients undergoing composite graft-valve replacement and 1492 for those undergoing aortic valve-sparing operation.Results:In-hospital mortality was 6.7% and 4.9%, respectively for composite graft-valve replacement and aortic valve-sparing operation (ns. During the late follow-up period, there was 0% moderate and 15.4% severe aortic regurgitation, and NYHA functional class I and II were 89.4% and 94%, respectively for composite graft-valve replacement and aortic valve-sparing operation (ns. Root reconstruction with aortic valve-sparing operation showed lower late mortality (P=0.001 and lower bleeding complications (P=0.006. There was no difference for thromboembolism, endocarditis, and need of reoperation.Conclusion:The aortic root reconstruction with preservation of the valve should be the operation being performed for presenting lower late mortality and survival free of bleeding events.

  12. Repositioning of an Intraventricular Dislocated Aortic Valve during Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Natour, Ehsan; Douglas, Yvonne L.; Jainandunsing, Jayant S.; Schurer, Remco A. J.; van der Werf, Hendrik W.; van den Heuvel, Ad F. M.

    2014-01-01

    The case is presented of a 75-year-old man referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. During the procedure the prosthetic aortic valve became dislocated into the left ventricle shortly after expansion. The subsequent steps taken to reposition the valve using only materials at hand are des

  13. Aortic valve replacement in geriatric patients with small aortic roots: are sutureless valves the future? †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Malakh; Maeding, Ilona; Höffler, Klaus; Koigeldiyev, Nurbol; Marsch, Georg; Siemeni, Thierry; Fleissner, Felix; Haverich, Axel

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Aortic valve replacement (AVR) in geriatric patients (>75 years) with small aortic roots is a challenge. Patient–prosthesis mismatch and the long cross-clamp time necessary for stentless valves or root enlargement are matters of concern. We compared the results of AVR with sutureless valves (Sorin Perceval), against those with conventional biological valves. METHODS Between April 2007 and December 2012, 120 isolated AVRs were performed in patients with a small annulus (<22 mm) at our centre. In 70 patients (68 females, age 77.4 ± 5.5 years), conventional valves (C group) and in 50 patients (47 females, age 79.8 ± 4.5 years), sutureless valves (P group) were implanted. The Logistic EuroSCORE of the C group was 16.7 ± 10.4 and that of the P group 20.4 ± 10.7, (P = 0.054). Minimal-access surgery was performed in 4.3% (3/70) patients in the C group and 72% (36/50) patients in the P group. RESULTS The cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and cross-clamp times of the C group were 75.3 ± 23 and 50.3 ± 14.2 min vs 58.7 ± 20.9 and 30.1 ± 9 min in the P group, (P < 0.001). In the C group, two annulus enlargements were performed. Thirty-day mortality was 4.3% (n = 3) in the C group and 0 in the P group, (n.s.). At follow-up (up to 5 years), mortalities were 17.4% (n = 12) in the C group and 14% (n = 7) in the P group, (n.s.). CONCLUSIONS This study highlights the advantages of sutureless valves for geriatric patients with small aortic roots reflected by shorter cross-clamp and CPB times, even though most of these patients were operated on via a minimally invasive access. Moreover, due to the absence of a sewing ring, these valves are also almost stentless, with greater effective orifice area (EOA) for any given size. This may potentially result in better haemodynamics even without the root enlargement. This is of advantage, as several studies have shown that aortic root enlargement can significantly increase the risks of AVR. Moreover, as seen in this series

  14. Computed tomography assessment for transcatheter aortic valve in valve implantation: The vancouver approach to predict anatomical risk for coronary obstruction and other considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanke, Philipp; Soon, Jeanette; Dvir, Danny; Park, Jong K; Naoum, Christopher; Kueh, Shaw-Hua; Wood, David A; Norgaard, Bjarne L; Selvakumar, Kapilan; Ye, Jian; Cheung, Anson; Webb, John G; Leipsic, Jonathon

    Valve-in-valve implantation of a transcatheter heart valve into a failed bioprosthetic heart valve has emerged as a treatment alternative to repeat conventional surgery. This requires careful pre-procedural assessment using non-invasive imaging to identify patients at risk for procedure related adverse events, such as ostial coronary occlusion. Herein we report how to comprehensively assess aortic root anatomy using computed tomography prior to transcatheter valve implantation for failed bioprosthetic aortic valves.

  15. Bacillus cereus endocarditis in native aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngow, H A; Wan Khairina, W M N

    2013-02-01

    Bacillus cereus endocarditis is rare. It has been implicated in immunocompromised individuals, especially in intravenous drug users as well as in those with a cardiac prosthesis. The patient was a 31-year-old ex-intravenous drug addict with a past history of staphylococcal pulmonary valve endocarditis, who presented with symptoms of decompensated cardiac failure. Echocardiography showed severe aortic regurgitation with an oscillating vegetation seen on the right coronary cusp of the aortic valve. The blood cultures grew Bacillus cereus. We report this as a rare case of Bacillus cereus endocarditis affecting a native aortic valve.

  16. Effect of permanent pacemaker on mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engborg, Jonathan; Riechel-Sarup, Casper; Gerke, Oke;

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an established treatment for high-grade aortic valve stenosis in patients found unfit for open heart surgery. The method may cause cardiac conduction disorders requiring permanent pacemaker (PPM) implantation, and the long-term effect...

  17. Minimally Invasive Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Watch a Broward Health surgeon perform a minimally invasive Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2017 BroadcastMed, Inc. ...

  18. Heart valve surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ACC guideline for the management of patients with valvular heart disease: executive summary: a report of the American College ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Heart Surgery Heart Valve Diseases Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  19. Surgical double valve replacement after transcatheter aortic valve implantation and interventional mitral valve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendeborn, Jens; Donndorf, Peter; Westphal, Bernd; Steinhoff, Gustav

    2013-11-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation, as well as interventional mitral valve repair, offer reasonable therapeutic options for high-risk surgical patients. We report a rare case of early post-interventional aortic valve prosthesis migration to the left ventricular outflow tract, with paravalvular leakage and causing severe mitral valve regurgitation. Initial successful interventional mitral valve repair using a clipped edge-to-edge technique revealed, in a subsequent procedure, the recurrence of mitral valve regurgitation leading to progressive heart failure and necessitating subsequent surgical aortic and mitral valve replacement.

  20. Transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis surgically replaced 4 months after implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Lund, Jens Teglgaard; Engstrøm, Thomas;

    2010-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a new and rapidly evolving treatment option for high-risk surgical patients with degenerative aortic valve stenosis. Long-term results with these new valve prostheses are lacking, and potential valve dysfunction and failure would require valve replacement....... We report the first case of surgical valve replacement in a patient with a dysfunctional transcatheter-implanted aortic valve prosthesis 4 months after implantation....

  1. Aortic valve reconstruction with use of pericardial leaflets in adults with bicuspid aortic valve disease: early and midterm outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Meong Gun; Yang, Hyun Suk; Choi, Jong Bum; Shin, Je Kyoun; Chee, Hyun Keun; Kim, Jun Seok

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we retrospectively analyzed the outcomes of adults with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) disease who underwent aortic valve reconstructive surgery (AVRS), consisting of replacement of the diseased BAV with 2 or 3 pericardial leaflets plus fixation of the sinotubular junction for accurate and constant leaflet coaptation. From December 2007 through April 2013, 135 consecutive patients (mean age, 49.2 ± 13.1 yr; 73.3% men) with symptomatic BAV disease underwent AVRS. Raphe was observed in 84 patients (62.2%), and the remaining 51 patients had pure BAV without raphe. A total of 122 patients (90.4%) underwent 3-leaflet reconstruction, and 13 (9.6%) underwent 2-leaflet reconstruction. Concomitant aortic wrapping with an artificial graft was performed in 63 patients (46.7%). There were no in-hospital deaths and 2 late deaths (1.5%); 6 patients (4.4%) needed valve-related reoperation. The 5-year cumulative survival rate was 98% ± 1.5%, and freedom from valve-related reoperation at 5 years was 92.7% ± 3.6%. In the last available echocardiograms, aortic regurgitation was absent or trivial in 116 patients (85.9%), mild in 16 (11.9%), moderate in 2 (1.5%), and severe in one (0.7%). The mean aortic valve gradient was 10.2 ± 4.5 mmHg, and the mean aortic valve orifice area index was 1.3 ± 0.3 cm(2)/m(2). The 3-leaflet technique resulted in lower valve gradients and greater valve areas than did the 2-leaflet technique. Thus, in patients with BAV, AVRS yielded satisfactory early and midterm results with low mortality rates and low reoperation risk after the initial procedure.

  2. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With Early- and New-Generation Devices in Bicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoon, Sung-Han; Lefèvre, Thierry; Ahn, Jung-Ming

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few studies have evaluated the clinical outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis (AS). Particularly, limited data exist comparing the results of TAVR with new-generation devices versus early-generation devices. OBJECTIVE...

  3. A prospective, randomised trial of transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation vs. surgical aortic valve replacement in operable elderly patients with aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Henrik Møller; Klaaborg, Kaj E; Nissen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    In a prospective randomised trial we aimed to compare transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation (a-TAVI) with surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in operable elderly patients.......In a prospective randomised trial we aimed to compare transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation (a-TAVI) with surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in operable elderly patients....

  4. Infective endocarditis following transcatheter aortic valve replacement-

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loh, Poay Huan; Bundgaard, Henning; S�ndergaard, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) can improve the symptoms and prognosis of patients with severe aortic stenosis who, due to a high expected operative risk, would not have otherwise been treated surgically. If these patients develop prosthetic valve endocarditis, their presentations may...... be atypical causing a delay in the diagnosis and treatment. The management is also complicated by their comorbidities, and surgical treatment may not be feasible leading to a significant morbidity and mortality. We describe a case of an 85-year-old man with TAVI prosthetic valve endocarditis successfully...

  5. Comparison of outcomes after aortic valve replacement with a mechanical valve or a bioprosthesis using microsimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P.A. Puvimanasinghe (John); M.B. Edwards; M.J.C. Eijkemans (René); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); L.A. van Herwerden (Lex); K.M. Taylor; G.L. Grunkemeier (Gary); J.D.F. Habbema (Dik); A.J.J.C. Bogers (Ad); J.J.M. Takkenberg (Hanneke)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Mechanical valves and bioprostheses are widely used for aortic valve replacement. Though previous randomised studies indicate that there is no important difference in outcome after implantation with either type of valve, knowledge of outcomes after aortic va

  6. Prosthetic valve endocarditis after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Thue; De Backer, Ole; Thyregod, Hans G H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an advancing mode of treatment for inoperable or high-risk patients with aortic stenosis. Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) after TAVI is a serious complication, but only limited data exist on its incidence, outcome, and procedural...... risk factors. METHODS AND RESULTS: Observational single-center study of 509 consecutive patients treated with a transcatheter implanted self-expandable aortic valve prosthesis (Medtronic CoreValve). We identified 18 patients diagnosed with TAVI-PVE during a median follow-up period of 1.4 years...... (interquartile range, 0.5-2.5 years; longest follow-up was 6.3 years). TAVI-PVE was most frequent in the first year after implantation (first-year incidence, 3.1% [confidence interval, 1.4%-4.8%]); the overall annualized rate was 2.1% per patient-year (confidence interval, 1.2%-3.3%). Seventeen patients (94...

  7. Heritable retinoblastoma and accelerated aortic valve disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeyratne, L R; Kingston, J E; Onadim, Z; Dubrey, S W

    2013-01-01

    Heritable retinoblastoma is associated with a germline mutation in the tumour suppressor gene RBI. The Rb protein (pRb) arises from the RB1 gene, which was the first demonstrated cancer susceptibility gene in humans. 1 Second primary malignancies are recognised complications of retinoblastoma. Furthermore, pRb is implicated in valve remodelling in calcific aortic valve disease. 2 3 We report a family with hereditary retinoblastoma and associated secondary primary malignancies. There are two interesting aspects to this family. The first is the concept of ‘cancer susceptibility genes’; the RBI gene being the first reported in humans. A further feature of note is that two family members also have bicuspid aortic valves. We discuss a potential association between the gene defect responsible for retinoblastoma (with its associated propensity for further malignancies) and accelerated deterioration of the bicuspid aortic valve in the proband carrying this gene defect. PMID:23595191

  8. Quadricuspid aortic valve complicated with infective endocarditis: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoguchi, Hiroki; Sakaki, Masayuki; Inoue, Kazushige; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Iwata, Takashi; Suehiro, Yasuo; Miura, Takuya

    2014-12-01

    Congenital quadricuspid aortic valve is a rare cardiac malformation with an unknown risk of infective endocarditis. We report a case of quadricuspid aortic valve complicated with infective endocarditis. A 53-year-old Japanese woman was hospitalized with leg edema and a fever of unknown origin. Corynebacterium striatum was detected in the blood culture. Echocardiography demonstrated a quadricuspid aortic valve with vegetation and severe functional regurgitation. The condition was diagnosed as a quadricuspid aortic valve with infective endocarditis, for which surgery was performed. The quadricuspid aortic valve had three equal-sized cusps and one smaller cusp (type B according to Hurwitz classification). We dissected the vegetation and infectious focus and implanted a mechanical valve. Following the case report, we review the literature.

  9. Acute Right Coronary Ostial Stenosis during Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarwar Umran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of acute right coronary artery stenosis developing in a patient undergoing aortic valve replacement. We present a case report with a brief overview of the literature relating to coronary artery occlusion associated with cardiac valve surgery - the theories and treatments are discussed. A 85 year-old female was admitted under the care of the cardiothoracic team with signs and symptoms of heart failure. Investigations, including cardiac echocardiography and coronary angiography, indicated a critical aortic valve stenosis. Intraoperative right ventricular failure ensued post aortic valve replacement. Subsequent investigations revealed an acute occlusion of the proximal right coronary artery with resultant absence of distal flow supplying the right ventricle. An immediate right coronary artery bypass procedure was performed with resolution of the right ventricular failure. Subsequent weaning off cardiopulmonary bypass was uneventful and the patient continued to make excellent recovery in the postoperative phase. To our knowledge this is one of the few documented cases of intraoperative acute coronary artery occlusion developing during valve surgery. However, surgeons should be aware of the potential for acute occlusion so that early recognition and rapid intervention can be instituted.

  10. Patient-prosthesis mismatch: surgical aortic valve replacement versus transcatheter aortic valve replacement in high risk patients with aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanta, Ravi K; Kron, Irving L

    2016-10-01

    Patient prosthesis mismatch (PPM) can occur when a prosthetic aortic valve has an effective orifice area (EOA) less than that of a native valve. A recent study by Zorn and colleagues evaluated the incidence and significance of PPM in high risk patients with severe aortic stenosis who were randomized to transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). TAVR is associated with decreased incidence of severe PPM compared to traditional SAVR valves. Severe PPM increases risk for death at 1 year postoperatively in high risk patients. The increased incidence of PPM is largely due to differences in valve design and should encourage development of newer SAVR valves to reduce risk for PPM. In addition more vigorous approaches to root enlargement in small annulus should be performed with SAVR to prevent PPM.

  11. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in failed bioprosthetic surgical valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvir, Danny; Webb, John G; Bleiziffer, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Owing to a considerable shift toward bioprosthesis implantation rather than mechanical valves, it is expected that patients will increasingly present with degenerated bioprostheses in the next few years. Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation is a less invasive approach......, stroke, and New York Heart Association functional class. RESULTS: Modes of bioprosthesis failure were stenosis (n = 181 [39.4%]), regurgitation (n = 139 [30.3%]), and combined (n = 139 [30.3%]). The stenosis group had a higher percentage of small valves (37% vs 20.9% and 26.6% in the regurgitation...

  12. Role of concomitant tricuspid surgery in moderate functional tricuspid regurgitation in patients undergoing left heart valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahesh, Balakrishnan; Wells, Francis; Nashef, Samer; Nair, Sukumaran

    2013-01-01

    Functional tricuspid regurgitation (FTR) is frequently present in patients undergoing aortic, and particularly mitral valve, surgery. Untreated FTR may lead to right heart failure. Reoperative cardiac surgery for late FTR is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Therefore, severe FTR has emerged as a Class I indication for concomitant tricuspid valve surgery in patients undergoing left valve surgery. Concomitant tricuspid valve surgery during left heart valve surgery to address moderate and mild FTR is controversial. This review addresses this issue and proposes an algorithm for the treatment of FTR in patients undergoing left heart valve surgery.

  13. Spectrum of Aortic Valve Abnormalities Associated with Aortic Dilation Across Age Groups in Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, Laura J.; Baba, Ridhwan Y.; Arai, Andrew E.; Bandettini, W. Patricia; Rosing, Douglas R.; Bakalov, Vladimir; Sachdev, Vandana; Bondy, Carolyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Congenital aortic valve fusion is associated with aortic dilation, aneurysm and rupture in girls and women with Turner syndrome (TS). Our objective was to characterize aortic valve structure in subjects with TS, and determine the prevalence of aortic dilation and valve dysfunction associated with different types of aortic valves. Methods and Results The aortic valve and thoracic aorta were characterized by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in 208 subjects with TS in an IRB-approved natural history study. Echocardiography was used to measure peak velocities across the aortic valve, and the degree of aortic regurgitation. Four distinct valve morphologies were identified: tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) 64%(n=133), partially fused aortic valve (PF) 12%(n=25), bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) 23%(n=47), and unicuspid aortic valve (UAV) 1%(n=3). Age and body surface area (BSA) were similar in the 4 valve morphology groups. There was a significant trend, independent of age, towards larger BSA-indexed ascending aortic diameters (AADi) with increasing valve fusion. AADi were (mean +/− SD) 16.9 +/− 3.3 mm/m2, 18.3 +/− 3.3 mm/m2, and 19.8 +/− 3.9 mm/m2 (p<0.0001) for TAV, PF and BAV+UAV respectively. PF, BAV, and UAV were significantly associated with mild aortic regurgitation and elevated peak velocities across the aortic valve. Conclusions Aortic valve abnormalities in TS occur with a spectrum of severity, and are associated with aortic root dilation across age groups. Partial fusion of the aortic valve, traditionally regarded as an acquired valve problem, had an equal age distribution and was associated with an increased AADi. PMID:24084490

  14. The nordic aortic valve intervention (NOTION) trial comparing transcatheter versus surgical valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Søndergaard, Lars; Ihlemann, Nikolaj;

    2013-01-01

    Degenerative aortic valve (AV) stenosis is the most prevalent heart valve disease in the western world. Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) has until recently been the standard of treatment for patients with severe AV stenosis. Whether transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) can...

  15. A Clinicopathological Study on Aortic Valves in Children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Ping; WANG Hongwei; ZHANG Zhenlu; HU Xiufen; LI Yanping; CHENG Peixuan; LIU Jianying

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the clinicopathological characteristics of aortic valve disease in children, all the native surgically excised aortic valves obtained between January 2003 and December 2005 were studied macroscopically and microscopically. The patients' medical records were reviewed and the clinical information was extracted. According to preoperative echocardiography, intraoperative assessment, and postoperative pathology, combined with clinical symptoms and signs, aortic valve diseases were divided into three categories: aortic stenosis (AS), aortic insufficiency (AI), and aortic stenosis with insufficiency (AS-AI). The etiology was determined according to the macroscopic, microscopic and clinical findings. The results showed that among 70 aortic valves, patient age ranged from 6 to 18 years, with a mean of 15.4 years, and there were 56 boys and 14 girts (male: female=4:1). Forty-four children only had pure aortic valve disease, and the other 26 children had aortic valve disease associated with other heart valve diseases. There were 5 cases of AS (7.14%), 60 cases of AI (85.71%) and 5 cases of AS-AI (7.14%). The causes were congenital aortic valve malformation (32 cases, 45.71%), rheumatic disease (28 cases, 40%), infective endocarditis (7 cases,10%), Marfan syndrome (2 cases, 2.86%), and undetermined (1 case, 1.43%). It was concluded that the common causes of aortic valve disease in order of frequency in children were congenital aortic valve malformation, rheumatic disease, infective endocarditis, and Marfan syndrome. AI was more common in children with aortic valve disease. Compared with adult patients, congenital bicuspid aortic valve in children was often AI. Histologically, the leaflets of congenital bicuspid aortic valve were mainly myxomatous, fibrosis and calcification less seen. AI was frequently found in rheumatic disease, mostly associated with other heart valve diseases. Macroscopic and microscopic examinations together with clinical

  16. Robotic mitral valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kypson, Alan P; Nifong, L Wiley; Chitwood, W Randolph

    2003-12-01

    A renaissance in cardiac surgery has begun. The early clinical experience with computer-enhanced telemanipulation systems outlines the limitations of this approach despite some procedural success. Technologic advancements, such as the use of nitinol U-clips (Coalescent Surgical Inc., Sunnyvale, CA) instead of sutures requiring manual knot tying, have been shown to decrease operative times significantly. It is expected that with further refinements and development of adjunct technologies, the technique of computer-enhanced endoscopic cardiac surgery will evolve and may prove to be beneficial for many patients. Robotic technology has provided benefits to cardiac surgery. With improved optics and instrumentation, incisions are smaller. The ergometric movements and simulated three-dimensional optics project hand-eye coordination for the surgeon. The placement of the wristlike articulations at the end of the instruments moves the pivoting action to the plane of the mitral annulus. This improves dexterity in tight spaces and allows for ambidextrous suture placement. Sutures can be placed more accurately because of tremor filtration and high-resolution video magnification. Furthermore, the robotic system may have potential as an educational tool. In the near future, surgical vision and training systems might be able to model most surgical procedures through immersive technology. Thus, a "flight simulator" concept emerges where surgeons may be able to practice and perform the operation without a patient. Already, effective curricula for training teams in robotic surgery exist. Nevertheless, certain constraints continue to limit the advancement to a totally endoscopic computer-enhanced mitral valve operation. The current size of the instruments, intrathoracic instrument collisions, and extrathoracic "elbow" conflicts still can limit dexterity. When smaller instruments are developed, these restraints may be resolved. Furthermore, a working port incision is still required for

  17. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation: status and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishbein, Gregory A; Schoen, Frederick J; Fishbein, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease of the elderly is the most prevalent hemodynamically-significant valvular disease, and the most common lesion requiring valve replacement in industrialized countries. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a less invasive alternative to classical aortic valve replacement that can provide a therapeutic option for high-risk or inoperable patients with aortic stenosis. These devices must be biocompatible, have excellent hemodynamic performance, be easy to insert, be securely anchored without sutures, and be durable, without increased risk of thrombosis or infection. To date, complications are related to the site of entry for insertion, the site of implantation (aorta, coronary ostia, base of left ventricle), and to the structure and design of the inserted device. However, as with any novel technology unanticipated complications will develop. Goals for future development will be to make the devices more effective, more durable, safer, and easier to implant, so as to further improve outcome for patients with severe aortic stenosis. The pathologist participating in research and development, and examination of excised devices will have a critical role in improving outcome for these patients.

  18. Surgery for aortic dilatation in patients with bicuspid aortic valves: A statement of clarification from the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratzka, Loren F; Creager, Mark A; Isselbacher, Eric M; Svensson, Lars G; Nishimura, Rick A; Bonow, Robert O; Guyton, Robert A; Sundt, Thoralf M

    2016-04-01

    Two guidelines from the American College of Cardiology (ACC), the American Heart Association (AHA), and collaborating societies address the risk of aortic dissection in patients with bicuspid aortic valves and severe aortic enlargement: The "2010 ACCF/AHA/AATS/ACR/ASA/SCA/SCAI/SIR/STS/SVM Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Patients With Thoracic Aortic Disease" (J Am Coll Cardiol. 2010;55:e27-130) and the "2014 AHA/ACC Guideline for the Management of Patients With Valvular Heart Disease" (J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014;63:e57-185). However, the 2 guidelines differ with regard to the recommended threshold of aortic root or ascending aortic dilatation that would justify surgical intervention in patients with bicuspid aortic valves. The ACC and AHA therefore convened a subcommittee representing members of the 2 guideline writing committees to review the evidence, reach consensus, and draft a statement of clarification for both guidelines. This statement of clarification uses the ACC/AHA revised structure for delineating the Class of Recommendation and Level of Evidence to provide recommendations that replace those contained in Section 9.2.2.1 of the thoracic aortic disease guideline and Section 5.1.3 of the valvular heart disease guideline.

  19. Severe aortic valve stenosis and nosebleed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoedel, Johannes; Obergfell, Achim; Maass, Alexander H.; Schodel, Johannes

    2007-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is known to be associated with loss of high molecular von Willebrand multimers. This can lead to gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with gastrointestinal angiodysplasia, the Heyde syndrome. Here we present a case of anaemia and severe epistaxis associated with acquired von W

  20. Transcatheter, valve-in-valve transapical aortic and mitral valve implantation, in a high risk patient with aortic and mitral prosthetic valve stenoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter valve implantation continues to grow worldwide and has been used principally for the nonsurgical management of native aortic valvular disease-as a potentially less invasive method of valve replacement in high-risk and inoperable patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. Given the burden of valvular heart disease in the general population and the increasing numbers of patients who have had previous valve operations, we are now seeing a growing number of high-risk patients presenting with prosthetic valve stenosis, who are not potential surgical candidates. For this high-risk subset transcatheter valve delivery may be the only option. Here, we present an inoperable patient with severe, prosthetic valve aortic and mitral stenosis who was successfully treated with a trans catheter based approach, with a valve-in-valve implantation procedure of both aortic and mitral valves.

  1. Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation of a CoreValve in a degenerated aortic bioprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, Giuseppe; DeMarco, Federico; Oreglia, Jacopo; Colombo, Paola; Fratto, Pasquale; Lullo, Francesca; Paino, Roberto; Martinelli, Luigi; Klugmann, Silvio

    2010-03-01

    In recent years percutaneous aortic valve implantation has emerged as an alternative therapy to treat patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis considered to be high-risk surgical candidates. We report our experience of a percutaneous retrograde CoreValve implantation in a 77-year-old female with aortic bioprosthesis structural degeneration. The patient underwent aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis in 1999 with the implantation of a 23 mm Carpentier-Edwards; her last echocardiography showed a severe bioprosthesis stenosis. After evaluation by cardiac surgeons and cardiologist, considering the high risk re-do surgical procedure (Logistic Euroscore 30%) and severe comorbidities (severe pulmonary hypertension, hepatocellular carcinoma and severe osteoporosis), a percutaneous aortic valve-in-valve replacement was preferred. A successful percutaneous 26 mm CoreValve prosthesis implantation was performed with the patient awake with local anesthesia and mild sedation. The patient was discharged after 10 days of hospitalization and she is in NYHA functional class I at follow-up. Our experience, characterized by a multidisciplinary approach, necessary to offer the safest conditions and care for patients, demonstrates the feasibility of a new, promising indication for the use of a transcatheter valve implantation: percutaneous treatment of a degenerated aortic bioprosthesis.

  2. Surgical treatment of aortic valve endocarditis: a 26-year experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylan Adademir

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We have retrospectively analyzed the results of the operations made for aortic valve endocarditis in a single center in 26 years. Methods: From June 1985 to January 2011, 174 patients were operated for aortic valve endocarditis. One hundred and thirty-eight (79.3% patients were male and the mean age was 39.3±14.4 (9-77 years. Twenty-seven (15.5% patients had prosthetic valve endocarditis. The mean duration of follow-up was 7.3±4.2 years (0.1-18.2 adding up to a total of 1030.8 patient/years. Results: Two hundred and eighty-two procedures were performed. The most frequently performed procedure was aortic valve replacement with mechanical prosthesis (81.6%. In-hospital mortality occurred in 27 (15.5% cases. Postoperatively, 25 (14.4% patients had low cardiac output and 17 (9.8% heart block. The actuarial survival rates for 10 and 15 years were 74.6±3.7% and 61.1±10.3%, respectively. In-hospital mortality was found to be associated with female gender, emergency operation, postoperative renal failure and low cardiac output. The long term mortality was significantly associated with mitral valve involvement. Male gender was found to be a significant risk factor for recurrence in the follow-up. Conclusion: Surgery for aortic valve endocarditis has significant mortality. Emergency operation, female gender, postoperative renal failure and low cardiac output are significant risk factors. Risk for recurrence and need for reoperation is low.

  3. Apicoaortic conduit for severe hemolytic anemia after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatori, Kyohei; Ohki, Satoshi; Obayashi, Tamiyuki; Koyano, Tetsuya; Yasuhara, Kiyomitsu; Hirai, Hanako

    2015-06-01

    We describe the case of an 82-year-old woman who had undergone aortic mechanical valve replacement for aortic stenosis with a small annulus, and coronary artery bypass grafting. Four years after the operation, she began to experience hemolysis. Prosthetic valve obstruction was observed but there was no paravalvular leakage or aortic regurgitation through the mechanical valve. We elected to perform apicoaortic bypass in this patient with severe hemolytic anemia secondary to a mechanical valve malfunction.

  4. Treatment of aortic stenosis with a self-expanding transcatheter valve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linke, Axel; Wenaweser, Peter; Gerckens, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation has become an alternative to surgery in higher risk patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis. The aim of the ADVANCE study was to evaluate outcomes following implantation of a self-expanding transcatheter aortic valve system in a fully monitored, multi......-centre 'real-world' patient population in highly experienced centres. METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients with severe aortic stenosis at a higher surgical risk in whom implantation of the CoreValve System was decided by the Heart Team were included. Endpoints were a composite of major adverse cardiovascular......Valve System with low mortality and stroke rates in higher risk real-world patients with severe aortic stenosis....

  5. Global Strain in Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbæk, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: -Global longitudinal systolic strain (GLS) is often reduced in aortic stenosis despite normal ejection fraction. The importance of reduced preoperative GLS on long-term outcome after aortic valve replacement (AVR) is unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: -A total of 125 patients with severe...... aortic stenosis and ejection fraction >40% scheduled for AVR were evaluated preoperatively and divided into 4 groups according to GLS quartiles. Patients were followed up for 4 years. The primary endpoint was major adverse cardiac events (MACE) defined as cardiovascular mortality and cardiac......Score, history with ischemic heart disease and ejection fraction. CONCLUSIONS: -In patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis undergoing AVR reduced GLS provides important prognostic information beyond standard risk factors. Clinical Trial Registration-URL: http://www.clinicaltrial.gov. Unique identifier...

  6. Management of bicuspid aortic valve with or without involvement of ascending aorta and aortic root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neragi-Miandoab, S

    2014-06-01

    Patients with a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) constitute a heterogeneous population with variable clinical presentation and complications. More than 50% of the patients who require aortic valve replacement have a BAV, a condition that may be associated with dilation of ascending aorta and aortic insufficiency caused by cusp disease or aortic root pathology. Of the potential BAV-related complications, dilation of the aortic root and ascending aorta are among the most serious. The dilation of ascending aorta and aortic root have been the subject of controversy. Whereas some surgeons believe that the dilation of the aorta is caused by the hemodynamic properties of the BAV, others believe that the dilation of the aortic root is secondary to genetic defects associated with the BAV. Management of a BAV should be tailored to each patient's clinical condition. The surgical approach varies from aortic valve replacement to combined aortic valve and root replacement to aortic-valve-sparing root replacement.

  7. Distortion of the CoreValve during transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation due to valve dislocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souteyrand, Geraud, E-mail: gsouteyrand@chu-clermontferrand.fr [Department of Cardiology, Gabriel Montpied Hospital, CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Clermont-Ferrand (France); ERIM-EA3295, University of Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Wilczek, Krzysztof [Department of Cardiology, Medical University of Silesia, Silesian Centre for Herat Diseases, Zabrze (Poland); Innorta, Andrea; Camilleri, Lionel [Department of Cardiology, Gabriel Montpied Hospital, CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Clermont-Ferrand (France); ERIM-EA3295, University of Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Chodor, Piotr [Department of Cardiology, Medical University of Silesia, Silesian Centre for Herat Diseases, Zabrze (Poland); Lusson, Jean-René; Motreff, Pascal [Department of Cardiology, Gabriel Montpied Hospital, CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Clermont-Ferrand (France); ERIM-EA3295, University of Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Laborde, Jean-Claude [St. George' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Chabrot, Pascal; Durel, Nicolas [Department of Cardiology, Gabriel Montpied Hospital, CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Clermont-Ferrand (France); ERIM-EA3295, University of Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand (France)

    2013-09-15

    Nowadays transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an accepted alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement for high-risk patients (pts). Successful TAVI procedures for failed aortic surgical bioprosthesis (TAV-in-SAV) have already been reported. In the presented two cases of TAV-in-SAV implantation a strut distortion of the stent was revealed on angiographic imaging and confirmed on control CT scan. In both procedures, a dislocation of the medtronic core valve (MCV) prosthesis during implantation led to valve retrieval, with a necessity of reloading it in the 18F introducer before subsequent implantation of the same valve in correct position.

  8. Fused aortic valve without an elliptical-shaped systolic orifice in patients with severe aortic stenosis: cardiac computed tomography is useful for differentiation between bicuspid aortic valve with raphe and tricuspid aortic valve with commissural fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bak, So Hyeon; Ko, Sung Min [Konkuk University School of Medicine, Departments of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Meong Gun; Shin, Je Kyoun; Chee, Hyun Kun; Kim, Jun Suk [Konkuk University School of Medicine, Departments of Thoracic Surgery, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-01

    The objective is to determine cardiac computed tomography (CCT) features capable of differentiating between bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) and tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) in severe aortic stenosis (AS) patients with fused cusp and without elliptical-shaped systolic orifices. We retrospectively enrolled 53 patients who had severe AS with fused cusps and without an elliptical-shaped systolic orifice on CCT and who had undergone surgery. CCT features were analyzed using: (1) aortic valve findings including cusp size, cusp area, opening shape, midline calcification, fusion length, calcium volume score, and calcium grade; (2) diameters of ascending and descending aorta, and main pulmonary artery; and (3) rheumatic mitral valve findings. The variables were evaluated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. At surgery, 19 patients had BAV and 34 had TAV. CCT features including uneven cusp size, uneven cusp area, round-shaped systolic orifice, longer cusp fusion, and dilatation of ascending aorta were significantly associated with BAV (P < 0.05). In particular, fusion length (OR, 1.76; P = 0.001), uneven cusp area (OR, 10.46; P = 0.012), and midline calcification (OR, 0.08; P = 0.013) were strongly associated with BAV. CCT provides diagnostic clues that helps differentiate between BAV with raphe and TAV with commissural fusion in patients with severe AS. (orig.)

  9. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: Insights into Clinical Complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M.A. van der Boon (Robert)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) has emerged as a viable and safe treatment for patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) who are considered ineligible or at prohibitive risk for Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement (SAVR)1–4. The aim of the present thesis wa

  10. Minimally Invasive Transaortic Mitral Decalcification During Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totsugawa, Toshinori; Sakaguchi, Taichi; Hiraoka, Arudo; Matsushita, Hiroshi; Hirai, Yuki; Yoshitaka, Hidenori

    2015-01-01

    Mitral annular calcification accompanied by aortic stenosis is hazardous for both double-valve replacement and transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Less invasive mitral procedure is required in this condition, and minimally invasive approach may further reduce the operative risk in high-risk patients. Here, we report minimally invasive transaortic mitral decalcification during aortic valve replacement through minithoracotomy. We believe that this option is feasible in patients who are at prohibitive risk for double-valve replacement or transcatheter aortic valve implantation because of severe mitral annular calcification.

  11. Inhibitory role of Notch1 in calcific aortic valve disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Acharya

    Full Text Available Aortic valve calcification is the most common form of valvular heart disease, but the mechanisms of calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD are unknown. NOTCH1 mutations are associated with aortic valve malformations and adult-onset calcification in families with inherited disease. The Notch signaling pathway is critical for multiple cell differentiation processes, but its role in the development of CAVD is not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular changes that occur with inhibition of Notch signaling in the aortic valve. Notch signaling pathway members are expressed in adult aortic valve cusps, and examination of diseased human aortic valves revealed decreased expression of NOTCH1 in areas of calcium deposition. To identify downstream mediators of Notch1, we examined gene expression changes that occur with chemical inhibition of Notch signaling in rat aortic valve interstitial cells (AVICs. We found significant downregulation of Sox9 along with several cartilage-specific genes that were direct targets of the transcription factor, Sox9. Loss of Sox9 expression has been published to be associated with aortic valve calcification. Utilizing an in vitro porcine aortic valve calcification model system, inhibition of Notch activity resulted in accelerated calcification while stimulation of Notch signaling attenuated the calcific process. Finally, the addition of Sox9 was able to prevent the calcification of porcine AVICs that occurs with Notch inhibition. In conclusion, loss of Notch signaling contributes to aortic valve calcification via a Sox9-dependent mechanism.

  12. Reoperation on aortic disease in patients with previous aortic valve surgery%主动脉瓣置换术后患者再次主动脉外科干预47例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张良; 常谦; 孙晓刚; 于存涛; 钱向阳

    2013-01-01

    Objective Retrospectively analyze 47 cases received reoperation with aortic disease after aortic valve replacement to deepen the understanding of aortic valve disease.Methods From January 2003 to June 2012,47 patients with previous aortic valve replacement received aortic root or other aortic operation because of new aortic disease.38 male and 9 female,the interval (6.0 ± 3.8) years. All cases with new aortic disease were diagnosed by cardiac ultrasound and aortic computed tomography.Bentall's procedure were operated on 14 patients,total aortic arch replacement with elephant trunk procedure on 14 patients,aortic root and aortic arch with elephant trunk procedure on 7 patients,ascending aortic replacement on 10patients,total thoracic and abdominal aorta replacement on 2 cases.All patients were followed by clinic interview or telephone.Results Aortic dissection and aneurysmal dilatation were occurred on ascending aorta,each account for 50%,in patients with previous aortic valve replacement because of rheumatic valve disease and bicuspid aortic valve; 3 cases with Marfan syndrome occurred ascending aortic dilatation and 4 cases occurred aortic dissection.Diameter in ascending aorta increased (5.2 + 7.1)mm per year and aortic sinus (3.3 ± 3.1)mm per year.The value of ascending aortic dilatation per year in patients with rheumatic disease was higher than patients with Marfan syndrome(P < 0.05).47 patients were re-operated in fuwai hospital,1 patients died in operating room because aortic dissection seriously involved right coronary artery.7 patients have renal insufficiency after operation and all were cured by hemofiltration; neurological complication occurred in 14 patients including that 7 patients stroked and 7 patients had transient brain dysfunciotn.There were no postoperative spinal cord deficits occurred.All patients were followed up,the mean follow up time were(53.49 +33.79) months.8 cases were died during follow-up and threeyear survival rate was 83

  13. Early impact of aortic wrapping on patients undergoing aortic valve replacement with mild to moderate ascending aorta dilatation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sosnowski Andrzej

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The management of mild to moderate dilatation of the ascending aorta of less than 5 cm is controversial, particularly when concomitant surgical correction of aortic valve is required. We investigate the impact of a simple method of aorta reduction using Dacron graft wrapping during aortic valve replacement on the rest of the aorta. Methods We studied 14 patients who had ascending aorta dilatation of 4-5 cm before undergoing aortic wrapping during their aortic valve replacement and compared with their post-operative imaging within a month. Results The diameters of the ascending aorta wrapped with the Dacron graft were significantly reduced within 4 weeks after surgery from 44.7 ± 2.6 to 33.6 ± 3.9 mm (p Conclusions Reduction of ascending aortic dilatation by wrapping with a Dacron graft in this preliminary study is associated with favourable early reversed aortic remodelling. This supports the hypothesis that correction of mild-moderate dilatation of the ascending aorta with Dacron wrapping at the time of aortic valve surgery may prevent the progression of the dilatation, although the long-term study on a larger population is needed to confirm its benefits.

  14. Surgical technique: establishing a pre-clinical large animal model to test aortic valve leaflet substitute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knirsch, Walter; Cesarovic, Niko; Krüger, Bernard; Schmiady, Martin; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Frese, Laura; Dave, Hitendu; Hoerstrup, Simon Philipp; Hübler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    To overcome current limitations of valve substitutes and tissue substitutes the technology of tissue engineering (TE) continues to offer new perspectives in congenital cardiac surgery. We report our experiences and results implanting a decellularized TE patch in nine sheep in orthotropic position as aortic valve leaflet substitute. Establishing the animal model, feasibility, cardiopulmonary bypass issues and operative technique are highlighted. PMID:28149571

  15. Prosthetic valve endocarditis with valvular obstruction after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabilona, Christine; Gitler, Bernard; Lederman, Jeffrey A; Miller, Donald; Keltz, Theodore N

    2015-04-01

    Patients with severe aortic stenosis who are at high risk for open-heart surgery might be candidates for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). To our knowledge, this is the first report of Streptococcus viridans endocarditis that caused prosthetic valve obstruction after TAVR. A 77-year-old man who had undergone TAVR 17 months earlier was admitted because of evidence of prosthetic valve endocarditis. A transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a substantial increase in the transvalvular peak gradient and mean gradient in comparison with an echocardiogram of 7 months earlier. A transesophageal echocardiogram showed a 1.5-cm vegetation obstructing the valve. Blood cultures yielded penicillin-sensitive S. viridans. The patient was hemodynamically stable and was initially treated with vancomycin because of his previous penicillin allergy. Subsequent therapy with levofloxacin, oral penicillin (after a negative penicillin skin test), and intravenous penicillin eliminated the symptoms of the infection. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement is a relatively new procedure, and sequelae are still being discovered. We recommend that physicians consider obstructive endocarditis as one of these.

  16. Incidental necropsy finding of a quadricuspid aortic valve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijswijk, Jan Willem; Willemink, Martin; Kluin, Jolanda; Vink, Aryan

    2015-01-01

    Quadricuspid aortic valve is a rare congenital cardiac malformation often associated with abnormal valve function. In this article, we present a case of quadricuspid aortic valve only diagnosed at the time of post-mortem examination. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Aortic valve replacement with the Nicks annulus enlargement procedure 12 years after mitral valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazama, S; Kurata, A; Yamashita, Y

    1999-10-01

    An aortic valve replacement was successfully performed employing the Nicks annulus enlargement procedure in a case of aortic valve stenosis with small annulus 12 years after mitral valve replacement. Previous mitral valve replacement does not preclude feasibility of the Nicks procedure.

  18. Initial Surgical Experience with Aortic Valve Repair: Clinical and Echocardiographic Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Francisco Diniz Affonso; Colatusso, Daniele de Fátima Fornazari; da Costa, Ana Claudia Brenner Affonso; Balbi Filho, Eduardo Mendel; Cavicchioli, Vinicius Nesi; Lopes, Sergio Augusto Veiga; Ferreira, Andrea Dumsch de Aragon; Collatusso, Claudinei

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Due to late complications associated with the use of conventional prosthetic heart valves, several centers have advocated aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root replacement for patients with aortic valve insufficiency, in order to enhance late survival and minimize adverse postoperative events. Methods From March/2012 thru March 2015, 37 patients consecutively underwent conservative operations of the aortic valve and/or aortic root. Mean age was 48±16 years and 81% were males. The aortic valve was bicuspid in 54% and tricuspid in the remaining. All were operated with the aid of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography. Surgical techniques consisted of replacing the aortic root with a Dacron graft whenever it was dilated or aneurysmatic, using either the remodeling or the reimplantation technique, besides correcting leaflet prolapse when present. Patients were sequentially evaluated with clinical and echocardiographic studies and mean follow-up time was 16±5 months. Results Thirty-day mortality was 2.7%. In addition there were two late deaths, with late survival being 85% (CI 95% - 68%-95%) at two years. Two patients were reoperated due to primary structural valve failure. Freedom from reoperation or from primary structural valve failure was 90% (CI 95% - 66%-97%) and 91% (CI 95% - 69%-97%) at 2 years, respectively. During clinical follow-up up to 3 years, there were no cases of thromboembolism, hemorrhage or endocarditis. Conclusions Although this represents an initial series, these data demonstrates that aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root surgery can be performed with satisfactory immediate and short-term results. PMID:27556321

  19. Automatic aorta segmentation and valve landmark detection in C-arm CT: application to aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yefeng; John, Matthias; Liao, Rui; Boese, Jan; Kirschstein, Uwe; Georgescu, Bogdan; Zhou, S Kevin; Kempfert, Jörg; Walther, Thomas; Brockmann, Gernot; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2010-01-01

    C-arm CT is an emerging imaging technique in transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) surgery. Automatic aorta segmentation and valve landmark detection in a C-arm CT volume has important applications in TAVI by providing valuable 3D measurements for surgery planning. Overlaying 3D segmentation onto 2D real time fluoroscopic images also provides critical visual guidance during the surgery. In this paper, we present a part-based aorta segmentation approach, which can handle aorta structure variation in case that the aortic arch and descending aorta are missing in the volume. The whole aorta model is split into four parts: aortic root, ascending aorta, aortic arch, and descending aorta. Discriminative learning is applied to train a detector for each part separately to exploit the rich domain knowledge embedded in an expert-annotated dataset. Eight important aortic valve landmarks (three aortic hinge points, three commissure points, and two coronary ostia) are also detected automatically in our system. Under the guidance of the detected landmarks, the physicians can deploy the prosthetic valve properly. Our approach is robust under variations of contrast agent. Taking about 1.4 seconds to process one volume, it is also computationally efficient.

  20. Mitral valve surgery - minimally invasive

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Saunders; 2012:chap 61. Otto CM, Bonow RO. Valvular heart disease. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Heart Surgery Heart Valve Diseases Mitral Valve Prolapse Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ...

  1. Factors influencing long-term survival after aortic valve replacement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigenobu,Masaharu

    1980-06-01

    Full Text Available In the aortic stenosis group, the left ventricular (LV muscle mass index was a good parameter for predicting the prognosis. Associated mitral valve disease had no influence on long term survival after aortic valve replacement. In the aortic insufficiency group, associated mitral valve disease had a marked influence on the results of aortic valve replacement. In general, the aortic insufficiency group had less clinical improvement postoperatively than the aortic stenosis group. In the annuloaortic ectasia group, left ventricular enddiastolic pressure (LVEDP might be the predictor to the prognosis. This group had the worst prognosis, of the three groups. Early operation should be considered for patients who have no, or only mild symptoms of, aortic valve disease.

  2. Quantitative image analysis for planning of aortic valve replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elattar, M.A.I.M.

    2016-01-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common and frequent cause of sudden death among all valvular heart diseases. Symptomatic aortic stenosis is considered to be a fatal disease if left untreated. Aortic valve replacement is the mainstay of treatment of symptomatic aortic stenosis. Traditional treatment of s

  3. Cirurgia da endocardite em valva aórtica: opção para tratamento de abscesso aórtico Surgery for Aortic Valve endocarditis: treatment options for aortic abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoninho Sanfins Arnoni

    2008-08-01

    fistulae. For this reason, surgeons have been developing tactical options to repair it. There is consensus around the fact that the removal of infected tissue promotes radical cleaning, and that the outcome of the treatment has been improved by the manufacture of biological glues which facilitate the closure of abscesses and by the creation of new valve replacements. OBJECTIVE:To demonstrate yet one more treatment option for aortic abscess for selected cases: a valved conduit placed in infra-coronary position. METHODS: We employed the technique in three patients: in two of them we employed a valved conduit with a mechanical prosthesis and in one of them a valved conduit with a biological prosthesis. Two patients needed associated procedures such as replacement of mitral valve in one of them and tricuspid valvoplasty in the other. All cases involved reoperation of prostheses in aortic position. RESULTS: The progression during surgery and in the early postoperative period was satisfactory and the three patients were discharged from the Intensive Care Unit and were sent to hospital rooms. One of the patients progressed to death during hospital stay due to severe comorbidities which were present in the preoperative period, and which related to esophageal varices and hepatic involvement. The other two progressed well in the late postoperative period. CONCLUSION: We believe that this option is yet one more alternative for the treatment of abscesses with great involvement of aortic ring structures and mitro-aortic continuity.

  4. Apyrexic Brucella melitensis aortic valve endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Mudallal, D S; Mousa, A R; Marafie, A A

    1989-10-01

    The case of a young shepherd with Brucella melitensis aortic valve endocarditis is presented. His illness ran an afebrile course and was also complicated by disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), nephritis, hepatitis and peritonitis, all of which responded well to supportive measures and a combination of tetracycline, trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole and amikacin sulphate. The fact that even the most severe case of brucellosis can present without fever is stressed.

  5. The future of transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Christian W; Arsalan, Mani; Mack, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Since the introduction of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) into clinical practice, the treatment of aortic stenosis has changed dramatically. In the past, medical therapy with or without balloon aortic valvuloplasty was the only option for inoperable patients. More recently, TAVI has become the treatment of choice for these patients and the preferred alternative for high-risk operable patients. Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) currently remains the gold standard for patients at low or intermediate operative risk. As randomized trials have demonstrated comparable results between TAVI and SAVR in the high-risk population, there is now a clear trend towards performing TAVI even in intermediate-risk patients while awaiting the results of randomized trials in that population. Nevertheless, there are still questions regarding TAVI involving paravalvular leak (PVL), stroke, pacemaker requirements, and durability that remain to be more definitively answered before TAVI can routinely be performed in a broader, lower risk population. Improvements in patient selection, imaging, and second and third generation devices have decreased the incidence of PVLs and vascular complications that followed the earliest TAVI procedures, but the rates of perioperative stroke and permanent pacemaker implantation must still be addressed. Furthermore, the long-term durability of TAVI devices and a role for post-procedure antithrombotic management remain unanswered. Until these questions are more clearly answered, it is the Heart Team's task to determine the optimal treatment for each patient based on risk scores, frailty metrics, comorbidities, patient preference, and potential for improvement in quality of life.

  6. [Redo Aortic and Mitral Valve Replacement by Manouguian's Procedure for Active Prosthetic Valve Infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunitomo, Ryuji; Okamoto, Ken; Moriyama, Shuji; Sakaguchi, Hisashi; Tazume, Hirokazu; Yoshinaga, Takashi; Kawasuji, Michio

    2016-03-01

    The damage to the intervalvular fibrous trigone (IVFT) by infective endocarditis makes combined aortic and mitral valve replacement difficult. We performed Manouguian's double valve replacement for such a case and obtained a good result. A 81-year-old male underwent emergency operation due to active prosthetic valve endocarditis. He had a history of receiving combined aortic and mitral valve replacement because of active infective endocarditis at the age of 74 and redo aortic valve replacement 3 years after that. The infectious lesion extended from the mitral annulus to the IVFT and the aortic annulus, and it caused the prosthetic valve detachment from the aortic annulus. Manouguian's double valve replacement was required for radical resection and reconstruction of the IVFT. No recurrent infection or paravalvular leakage was observed during 49months follow up period. Manouguian's procedure is useful for complete resection of the infected IVFT and makes combined aortic and mitral valve replacement safer.

  7. Transcatheter Versus Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Steinbrüchel, Daniel Andreas; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2015-01-01

    outcome was the composite rate of death from any cause, stroke, or myocardial infarction (MI) at 1 year. RESULTS: A total of 280 patients were randomized at 3 Nordic centers. Mean age was 79.1 years, and 81.8% were considered low-risk patients. In the intention-to-treat population, no significant...... difference in the primary endpoint was found (13.1% vs. 16.3%; p = 0.43 for superiority). The result did not change in the as-treated population. No difference in the rate of cardiovascular death or prosthesis reintervention was found. Compared with SAVR-treated patients, TAVR-treated patients had more......BACKGROUND: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an option in certain high-risk surgical patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. It is unknown whether TAVR can be safely introduced to lower-risk patients. OBJECTIVES: The NOTION (Nordic Aortic Valve Intervention Trial) randomized...

  8. Hemolytic Anemia after Aortic Valve Replacement: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feridoun Sabzi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic anemia is exceedingly rare and an underestimated complication after aortic valve replacement (AVR.The mechanism responsible for hemolysis most commonly involves a regurgitated flow or jet that related to paravalvar leak or turbulence of subvalvar stenosis. It appears to be independent of its severity as assessed by echocardiography. We present a case of a 24-year-old man with a history of AVR in 10 year ago that developed severe hemolytic anemia due to a mild subvalvar stenosis caused by pannus formation and mild hypertrophic septum. After exclusion of other causes of hemolytic anemia and the lack of clinical and laboratory improvement, the patient underwent redo valve surgery with pannus and subvalvar hypertrophic septum resection. Anemia and heart failure symptoms gradually resolved after surgery

  9. Congenital quadricuspid aortic valve: analysis of 11 surgical cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Yang-feng; XU Ji-bin; HAN Lin; LU Fang-lin; LANG Xi-long; SONG Zhi-gang; XU Zhi-yun

    2011-01-01

    Background Congenital quadricuspid aortic valve is rarely seen during aortic valve replacement (AVR).The diagnosis and treatment of the disease were reported in 11 cases.Methods Eleven patients (nine men and two women,mean age 33.4 years) with quadricuspid aortic valve were retrospectively evaluated.Medical records,echocardiograms and surgical treatment were reviewed.Results In accordance with the Hurwitz and Roberts classification,the patients were classified as type A (n=2),type B (n=7),type F (n=1) and type G (n=1).Three patients were associated with other heart diseases,including infective endocarditis and mitral prolaps,left superior vena cava,aortic aneurysm.All had aortic regurgitation (AR) except two with aortic stenosis (AS),detected by color-flow Doppler echocardiography.The congenital quadricuspid aortic valve deformity in seven patients was diagnosed by echocardiography.All patients underwent successful aortic valve replacement.Conclusion Quadricuspid aortic valve is a rare cause of aortic insufficiency,while echocardiography plays an important role in diagnosing the disease.Aortic valve replacement is the major therapy for the disease.

  10. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement for bicuspid aortic stenosis 13years post heart transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, Maureen B; Desai, Nimesh; Brozena, Susan; Herrmann, Howard C

    2016-12-16

    Despite the widespread use of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) for moderate and high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis, it is utilized less frequently in patients with bicuspid aortic valves (BAV). Orthotopic heart transplant (OHT) donors tend to be younger and may have undiagnosed BAV. We present a case of successful TAVR in a patient with BAV thirteen years after OHT.

  11. Comparison of outcomes and presentation in men-versus-women with bicuspid aortic valves undergoing aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrei, Adin-Cristian; Yadlapati, Ajay; Malaisrie, S Chris; Puthumana, Jyothy J; Li, Zhi; Rigolin, Vera H; Mendelson, Marla; Clennon, Colleen; Kruse, Jane; Fedak, Paul W M; Thomas, James D; Higgins, Jennifer A; Rinewalt, Daniel; Bonow, Robert O; McCarthy, Patrick M

    2015-07-15

    Gender disparities in short- and long-term outcomes have been documented in cardiac and valvular heart surgery. However, there is a paucity of data regarding these differences in the bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) population. The aim of this study was to examine gender-specific differences in short- and long-term outcomes after surgical aortic valve (AV) replacement in patients with BAV. A retrospective analysis was performed in 628 consecutive patients with BAV who underwent AV surgery from April 2004 to December 2013. To reduce bias when comparing outcomes by gender, propensity score matching obtained on the basis of potential confounders was used. Women with BAV who underwent AV surgery presented with more advanced age (mean 60.7 ± 13.8 vs 56.3 ± 13.6 years, p <0.001) and less aortic regurgitation (29% vs 44%, p <0.001) and had a higher risk for in-hospital mortality (mean Ambler score 3.4 ± 4.4 vs 2.5 ± 4.0, p = 0.015). After propensity score matching, women received more blood products postoperatively (48% vs 34%, p = 0.028) and had more prolonged postoperative lengths of stay (median 5 days [interquartile range 5 to 7] vs 5 days [interquartile range 4 to 6], p = 0.027). Operative, discharge, and 30-day mortality and overall survival were not significantly different. In conclusion, women with BAV who underwent AV surgery were older, presented with less aortic regurgitation, and had increased co-morbidities, lending higher operative risk. Although women received more blood products and had significantly longer lengths of stay, short- and long-term outcomes were similar.

  12. Cellular regulation of the structure and function of aortic valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail El-Hamamsy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aortic valve was long considered a passive structure that opens and closes in response to changes in transvalvular pressure. Recent evidence suggests that the aortic valve performs highly sophisticated functions as a result of its unique microscopic structure. These functions allow it to adapt to its hemodynamic and mechanical environment. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in normal valve physiology is essential to elucidate the mechanisms behind valve disease. We here review the structure and developmental biology of aortic valves; we examine the role of its cellular parts in regulating its function and describe potential pathophysiological and clinical implications.

  13. [Surgical technique of aortic valve replacement for small aortic annulus in elderly patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, T; Fujiwara, K; Furukawa, H; Tsushima, Y; Yoshitaka, H; Kuinose, M; Minami, H; Ishida, A; Tamura, K; Totsugawa, T; Kanemitsu, H; Ozawa, M

    2006-04-01

    Recent reports have shown that aortic valve replacement in elderly patients over 65 years with atherosclerotic aortic stenosis and a small aortic annulus is possible by using a small sized bioprosthesis (Carpentier-Edwards pericardial valve). Here we present out surgical technique. Firstly, the native calcified aortic valve was removed completely to gain total exposure of the surrounding aortic root and sinus of Valsalva like Bentall procedure. Secondly, a small sized bioprosthesis was implanted with intermittent noneverting mattress 2-0 sutures with spaghetti and small polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) felt. Aortic annulus is the dilated by inserting Hegar dilator sizing from 25 to 27 mm. Therefore, aortic valve replacement for small aortic annulus in intra- or supra-annular position should be easily accomplished. Good surgical results and hemodynamic state were achieved in 25 consecutive cases using this technique.

  14. Indexing aortic valve area by body surface area increases the prevalence of severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jander, Nikolaus; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa; Bahlmann, Edda

    2014-01-01

    To account for differences in body size in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is divided by body surface area (BSA) to calculate indexed AVA (AVAindex). Cut-off values for severe stenosis are......To account for differences in body size in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is divided by body surface area (BSA) to calculate indexed AVA (AVAindex). Cut-off values for severe stenosis are...

  15. Awake transapical aortic valve implantation using thoracic epidural anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Chirojit; Walther, Thomas; Borger, Michael Andrew; Kempfert, Joerg; Schuler, Gerhard; Mohr, Friedrich Wilhelm; Ender, Joerg

    2009-09-01

    Transapical aortic valve implantation is a minimally invasive, beating-heart procedure that normally requires a general anesthetic. We herein report an 85-year-old patient with impaired pulmonary function who underwent successful transapical aortic valve implantation while awake, using a thoracic epidural anesthetic.

  16. Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a patient with a severe aortic stenosis and cardiogenic shock requiring intra-aortic balloon pump support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodór, Piotr; Wilczek, Krzysztof; Przybylski, Roman; Świątkowski, Andrzej; Głowacki, Jan; Kalarus, Zbigniew; Zembala, Marian

    2015-01-01

    The following paper presents a patient with severe aortic stenosis and severely reduced left ventricular ejection fraction with intra-aortic balloon pump counterpulsation support, who underwent transfemoral aortic valve implantation of a CoreValve prosthesis.

  17. Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a patient with a severe aortic stenosis and cardiogenic shock requiring intra-aortic balloon pump support

    OpenAIRE

    Chodór, Piotr; Wilczek, Krzysztof; Przybylski, Roman; Świątkowski, Andrzej; Głowacki, Jan; Kalarus, Zbigniew; Zembala, Marian

    2015-01-01

    The following paper presents a patient with severe aortic stenosis and severely reduced left ventricular ejection fraction with intra-aortic balloon pump counterpulsation support, who underwent transfemoral aortic valve implantation of a CoreValve prosthesis.

  18. Aortic Valve Replacement: Treatment by Sternotomy versus Minimally Invasive Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Tosoni Rodrigues Ferreira

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To compare the results of aortic valve replacement with access by sternotomy or minimally invasive approach. Methods: Retrospective analysis of medical records of 37 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement by sternotomy or minimally invasive approach, with emphasis on the comparison of time of cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic clamping, volume of surgical bleeding, time of mechanical ventilation, need for blood transfusion, incidence of atrial fibrillation, length of stay in intensive care unit, time of hospital discharge, short-term mortality and presence of surgical wound infection. Results: Sternotomy was used in 22 patients and minimally invasive surgery in 15 patients. The minimally invasive approach had significantly higher time values of cardiopulmonary bypass (114.3±23.9 versus 86.7±19.8min.; P=0.003, aortic clamping (87.4±19.2 versus 61.4±12.9 min.; P<0.001 and mechanical ventilation (287.3±138.9 versus 153.9±118.6 min.; P=0.003. No difference was found in outcomes surgical bleeding volume, need for blood transfusion, incidence of atrial fibrillation, length of stay in intensive care unit and time of hospital discharge. No cases of short-term mortality or surgical wound infection were documented. Conclusion: The less invasive approach presented with longer times of cardiopulmonary bypass, aortic clamping and mechanical ventilation than sternotomy, however without prejudice to the length of stay in intensive care unit, time of hospital discharge and morbidity.

  19. Feature identification for image-guided transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Pencilla; Rajchl, Martin; McLeod, A. Jonathan; Chu, Michael W.; Peters, Terry M.

    2012-02-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a less invasive alternative to open-heart surgery, and is critically dependent on imaging for accurate placement of the new valve. Augmented image-guidance for TAVI can be provided by registering together intra-operative transesophageal echo (TEE) ultrasound and a model derived from pre-operative CT. Automatic contour delineation on TEE images of the aortic root is required for real-time registration. This study develops an algorithm to automatically extract contours on simultaneous cross-plane short-axis and long-axis (XPlane) TEE views, and register these features to a 3D pre-operative model. A continuous max-flow approach is used to segment the aortic root, followed by analysis of curvature to select appropriate contours for use in registration. Results demonstrate a mean contour boundary distance error of 1.3 and 2.8mm for the short and long-axis views respectively, and a mean target registration error of 5.9mm. Real-time image guidance has the potential to increase accuracy and reduce complications in TAVI.

  20. [Aortic valve replacement as an independent predictive factor for later development of aortic dissection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kodolitsch, Y; Simic, O; Bregenzer, T; Dresler, C; Haverich, A; Nienaber, C A

    1998-08-01

    Dissection of the ascending aorta (type A) following later after aortic valve replacement has been described with increasing frequency. This study analyzes the role of aortic valve replacement for the evolution of late dissection. In a series of 80 consecutive patients with type A dissection, a previous aortic valve replacement had been performed in 12 cases (15%). In addition to arterial hypertension (p syndrome (p factor for type A dissection. Dissection occurred 3 +/- 4 years after aortic valve replacement with a clinical and anatomical profile similar to classic dissection as proven by comparison to a group of 62 patients with classic dissection associated with arterial hypertension or Marfan syndrome. With 75% and 66%, respectively, 30 day and 1 year survival of patients with dissection following later after aortic valve replacement was similar to patients with classic type A dissection. Extensive thinning and/or fragility (p associated with a high risk for late dissection; this finding was substantiated by comparison to a control group of 10 consecutive patients with a similarly dilated aortic root but no dissection. Type and diameter of valve prostheses, cross-clamp time, NYHA functional class, and left ventricular ejection fraction were unrelated to late dissection. Previous aortic valve replacement is an independent predisposing factor for a dissection of the ascending aorta later. At the time of aortic valve replacement, prophylactic replacement or wrapping of the ascending aorta should be considered in patients with a thinned/fragile aortic wall even without a markedly dilated aortic root.

  1. Simulation for transthoracic echocardiography of aortic valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Navin C.; Kapur, K. K.; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra

    2016-01-01

    Simulation allows interactive transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) learning using a virtual three-dimensional model of the heart and may aid in the acquisition of the cognitive and technical skills needed to perform TTE. The ability to link probe manipulation, cardiac anatomy, and echocardiographic images using a simulator has been shown to be an effective model for training anesthesiology residents in transesophageal echocardiography. A proposed alternative to real-time reality patient-based learning is simulation-based training that allows anesthesiologists to learn complex concepts and procedures, especially for specific structures such as aortic valve. PMID:27397455

  2. Small aortic valve annulus in children with fixed subaortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thilenius, O G; Campbell, D; Bharati, S; Lev, M; Arcilla, R A

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-one hearts with fixed subaortic stenosis (FSAS) were examined pathologically. Thirty children with no hemodynamically significant heart disease, 31 children with valvar aortic stenosis, and 25 children with FSAS were studied by echo- and angiocardiography. The following conclusions were drawn: (1) Patients with FSAS often have abnormal aortic valve leaflets as well as small aortic valve annulus. (2) A small aortic annulus/descending aorta ratio is probably present at birth, and may decrease with increasing age. (3) In some patients with FSAS the aortic valve annulus is too small for simple resection of the fibroelastic tissue. A Konno operation is needed for these patients. (4) M-mode echocardiography has not been useful in identifying abnormally small aortic valve annulus in FSAS patients.

  3. Heart valve surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... techniques are used: Percutaneous surgery (through the skin) Robot-assisted surgery If your surgeon can repair your ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  4. Nasal valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apaydin, Fazil

    2011-04-01

    Nasal obstruction can be due to internal and external valve problems that can be seen before and after rhinoplasty. The main scope of this article is to concentrate on surgical solutions to these problems. To overcome nasal obstruction at the internal valve, spreader grafts, spreader flaps, upper lateral splay graft, butterfly graft, flaring suture, M-plasty, Z-plasty, and suspension sutures have been described. The management of the external valve problems is possible by using lateral crural dissection and repositioning, lateral crural strut grafts, alar battens, lateral crural turn-in flap, alar rim grafts, and various other methods. It is not easy to decide which techniques would work best in every case. After a thorough examination and analysis, the underlying cause of the nasal obstruction can be understood, and one or multiple procedures can be chosen according to each individual problem.

  5. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement: techniques, complications, and bailout strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vikas; Macon, Conrad J; Scot Shaw, Eric; Londoño, Juan C; Martinez, Claudia A

    2013-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement has emerged as an alternative option for inoperable or very high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis-however, there are serious complications associated with the procedure, such as patient mortality, stroke, conduction disturbances, paravalvular regurgitation, and vascular concerns. Our review focuses on the most common complications related to transcatheter aortic valve replacement procedures and potential bailout strategies and techniques.

  6. Acute aortic and mitral valve regurgitation following blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabeu, Eduardo; Mestres, Carlos A; Loma-Osorio, Pablo; Josa, Miguel

    2004-03-01

    Traumatic rupture of intracardiac structures is an uncommon phenomenon although there are a number of reports with regards to rupture of the tricuspid, mitral and aortic valves. We report the case of a 25-year-old patient who presented with acute aortic and mitral valve regurgitation of traumatic origin. Both lesions were seen separated by 2 weeks. Pathophysiology is reviewed. The combination of both aortic and mitral lesions following blunt chest trauma is almost exceptional.

  7. When operable patients become inoperable: conversion of a surgical aortic valve replacement into transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lene Kjaer; Arendrup, Henrik; Engstrøm, Thomas;

    2009-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a relatively new treatment option for inoperable patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS). This case describes how a planned conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) on a 73-year-old woman was successfully converted to a TAVI procedure....... On extracorporal circulation it was reconized that the aortic annulus, the coronary ostiae and the proximal part of the ascending aorta were severely calcified making valve implantation impossible. Surgical closure without valve substitution was estimated to be associated with a high risk of mortality due......, and the prosthesis was sutured to the ascending aorta. With some manipulation of the prosthesis it was possible to suture the aorta circumferentially around the fully expanded upper part of the prosthesis. Post-procedurally the patient recovered successfully, with improved function capacity, aortic valve area...

  8. Octogenarian with an untreated femoral neck fracture: upright position during the postoperative course after aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Polastri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe a patient with a femoral neck fracture undergoing an aortic valve replacement. The study design was a case report. An 82-year-old female with an untreated right femoral neck fracture, and a severe aortic valve stenosis was admitted to a cardiac surgery department for surgical treatment of the valve disease. She underwent aortic valve replacement with a sutureless biological valve prosthesis through a partial sternotomy. At an early stage, the patient was instructed to make postural changes in the standing position. As a result, she was able to perform body movements associated with either a sitting or standing position. This case shows that appropriate early mobilization of a patient with a femoral neck fracture is feasible after aortic valve replacement, even though this does not necessarily mean that the patient needs to walk.

  9. Percutaneous implantation of CoreValve aortic prostheses in patients with a mechanical mitral valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, Giuseppe; De Marco, Federico; Oreglia, Jacopo; Colombo, Paola; Fratto, Pasquale; Lullo, Francesca; Paino, Roberto; Frigerio, Maria; Martinelli, Luigi; Klugmann, Silvio

    2009-11-01

    Concerns exist in the field of transcatheter aortic valve implantation regarding the treatment of patients with mechanical mitral valve for possible interference between the percutaneous aortic valve and the mechanical mitral prosthesis. We report our experience with percutaneous aortic valve implantation in 4 patients with severe aortic stenosis, previously operated on for mitral valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis. All patients underwent uneventful percutaneous retrograde CoreValve implantation (CoreValve Inc, Irvine, CA). No deformation of the nitinol tubing of the prostheses (ie, neither distortion nor malfunction of the mechanical valve in the mitral position) occurred in any of the patients. All patients are alive and asymptomatic at a mean follow-up of 171 days.

  10. Elevated transaortic valvular gradients after combined aortic valve and mitral valve replacement: an intraoperative dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essandoh, Michael; Portillo, Juan; Zuleta-Alarcon, Alix; Castellon-Larios, Karina; Otey, Andrew; Sai-Sudhakar, Chittoor B

    2015-03-01

    High transaortic valvular gradients, after combined aortic valve and mitral valve replacement, require prompt intraoperative diagnosis and appropriate management. The presence of high transaortic valvular gradients after cardiopulmonary bypass, in this setting, can be secondary to the following conditions: prosthesis dysfunction, left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, supravalvular obstruction, prosthesis-patient mismatch, hyperkinetic left ventricle from administration of inotropes, left ventricular intracavitary gradients, pressure recovery phenomenon, and increased transvalvular blood flow resulting from hyperdynamic circulation or anemia. Transesophageal echocardiography is an extremely useful tool for timely diagnosis and treatment of this complication. We describe a case of a critically ill patient with endocarditis and acute lung injury, who presented for combined aortic valve and mitral valve replacement. Transesophageal echocardiographic assessment, post-cardiopulmonary bypass, revealed high transaortic valvular gradients due to encroachment of the mitral prosthesis strut on the left ventricular outflow tract, which was compounded by a small, hypertrophied, and hyperkinetic left ventricle. Discontinuation of inotropic support, administration of fluids, phenylephrine, and esmolol led to resolution of the high gradients and prevented further surgery.

  11. 经主动脉切口治疗主动脉根部瘤合并二尖瓣病变%Surgery for aortic root aneurysm and mitral valve disease through the aortic incision

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王韧; 陈雷; 王晓龙; 孙立忠; 朱俊明; 张宏家; 刘永民; 郑斯宏; 郑军; 刘愚勇; 薛金熔

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the experiences of treatment of aortic root aneurysm and mitral valve disease through the incision of aorta.Methods From Mar.2009 to Dec.2010, sixteen patients with aortic root aneurysm and mitral valve disease were operated by transaortic incision.After the leaflets of aortic valve were excised, mitral valve replacement or plasty was performed.There were 13 males and 3 females.The age ranged from 18 to 75 years old with a mean of (40 ± 10) years.The operation procedures included Bentall plus mitral valve replacement in 12 patients, Bentall plus mitral valve plasty in 1,Bentall + total arch replacement + stent elephant trunk + mitral valve plasty in 1, Bentall plus mitral valve plasty and CABG in 1.In 12 patients underwent mitral valve replacement, 11 were using continuous suture and interrupt mattress suture in 1.Four patients underwent mitral valve plasty, the procedure of banding mitral valve leaflets junctions was used.All patients were followed up through telephone and out-patient service.Transthoracic echocardiogram was performed before discharge and 3-, 6-,12-months after operation.Follow-up including cardiac function, valvular and perioperative complications.Results There were 2 re-thoractomy because of bleeding.One patient with pulmonary infection was cured by antibiotics.No death occurred in hospital.Patients were followed-up for 1 to 19 months with a mean of (7 ±5) months.No death occurred during follow-up period.There were no valve-related complications (embolism, bleeding, mitral valve dysfunction).Heart function was improved in all patients and graded as class Ⅰ to Ⅱ (NYHA).Two patients had trace regurgitation after mitral valve plasty when discharged.One patient had mild mitral valve regurgitation was found after mitral valve replacement.There was no further valve exacerbation for above 3 patients during follow-up period.Conclusion Transanrtic mitral valve operation is feasible in patients with aortic root aneurysm and

  12. Infective Endocarditis of the Aortic Valve with Anterior Mitral Valve Leaflet Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsic, Anton; Li, Wilson W L; van Paridon, Marieke; Bindraban, Navin R; de Mol, Bas A J M

    2016-08-01

    Mitral valve leaflet aneurysm is a rare and potentially devastating complication of aortic valve endocarditis. We report the case of a 48-year-old man who had endocarditis of the native aortic valve and a concomitant aneurysm of the anterior mitral valve leaflet. Severe mitral regurgitation occurred after the aneurysm perforated. The patient showed no signs of heart failure and completed a 6-week regimen of antibiotic therapy before undergoing successful aortic and mitral valve replacement. In addition to the patient's case, we review the relevant medical literature.

  13. Incidental moderate mitral regurgitation in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis: review of guidelines and current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishna, Harish; Kohl, Benjamin A; Jassar, Arminder S; Augoustides, John G T

    2014-04-01

    Recent evidence has shown that moderate mitral regurgitation is common and clinically relevant in patients presenting for surgical and transcatheter aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis. Prospective multicenter clinical trials are now indicated to resolve the clinical equipoise about whether or not mitral valve intervention also is indicated at the time of aortic valve intervention. Advances in three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography, transcatheter mitral interventions, and surgical aortic valve replacement, including the advent of sutureless valves, likely will expand the therapeutic possibilities for moderate mitral regurgitation in the setting of aortic valve interventions for severe aortic stenosis.

  14. Anesthetic management for combined mitral valve replacement and aortic valve repair in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Jiapeng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenesis imperfecta is a rare disorder of connective tissues and presents multiple challenges, including difficult airway, hyperthermia, coagulopathy and respiratory dysfunction, for anesthesiologists, especially during cardiac surgery. We present anesthetic management of a patient with osteogenesis impertecta during double valve surgery. Dexmedetomidine infusion minimized the risks of malignant hyperthermia. Glidescope and in-line stabilization facilitated endotracheal intubation and protected his oral structures and cervical spine. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE diagnosed a flail A3 segment and redundant left coronary cusp causing mitral and aortic regurgitation. The mitral valve was replaced and the aortic valve repaired. Coagulopathy was corrected according to comprehensive coagulation analysis. Glidescope, dexmedetomidine, coagulation analysis and TEE could facilitate anesthetic management in these patients.

  15. Paradoxical low flow aortic valve stenosis: incidence, evaluation, and clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavel, Marie-Annick; Pibarot, Philippe; Dumesnil, Jean G

    2014-01-01

    Paradoxical low-flow (PLF) aortic stenosis is defined by a stroke volume index <35 ml/m(2) despite the presence of preserved LV ejection fraction (≥ 50 %). This entity is typically characterized by pronounced LV concentric remodeling with small LV cavity, impaired LV filling, increased arterial load, and reduced LV longitudinal shortening. Patients with PLF also have a worse prognosis compared to patients with normal flow. Because of the low flow state, these patients often have a low gradient despite the presence of severe stenosis, thus leading to discordant AS grading (i.e., aortic valve area < 1.0 cm(2) but mean gradient < 40 mmHg) and thus uncertainty about the indication of aortic valve replacement. Stress echocardiography and aortic valve calcium score by computed tomography may be helpful to differentiate true from pseudo severe stenosis and thereby guide therapeutic management in these patients. Aortic valve replacement improves outcomes in patients with PLF low gradient AS having evidence of severe stenosis. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement may provide an interesting alternative to surgery in these patients.

  16. Bicuspid Aortic Valve Disease and Ascending Aortic Aneurysms: Gaps in Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie L. Losenno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The bicuspid aortic valve is the most common congenital cardiac anomaly in developed nations. The abnormal bicuspid morphology of the aortic valve results in valvular dysfunction and subsequent hemodynamic derangements. However, the clinical presentation of bicuspid aortic valve disease remains quite heterogeneous with patients presenting from infancy to late adulthood with variable degrees of valvular stenosis and insufficiency and associated abnormalities including aortic coarctation, hypoplastic left heart structures, and ascending aortic dilatation. Emerging evidence suggests that the heterogeneous presentation of bicuspid aortic valve phenotypes may be a more complex matter related to congenital, genetic, and/or connective tissue abnormalities. Optimal management of patients with BAV disease and associated ascending aortic aneurysms often requires a thoughtful approach, carefully assessing various risk factors of the aortic valve and the aorta and discerning individual indications for ongoing surveillance, medical management, and operative intervention. We review current concepts of anatomic classification, pathophysiology, natural history, and clinical management of bicuspid aortic valve disease with associated ascending aortic aneurysms.

  17. Histopathological study of congenital aortic valve malformations in 32 children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Ping; WANG Hongwei; LI Yanping; CHENG Peixuan; LIU Qingjun; ZHANG Zhenlu; LIU Jianying

    2007-01-01

    The histopathological characteristics of congenital aortic valve malformations in children were investigated.All the native surgically excised aortic valves from 32 pediatric patients suffering from symptomatic aortic valve dysfunction due to congenital aortic valve malformations between January 2003 and December 2005 were studied macroscopically and microscopically.The patients' medical records were reviewed and the clinical information was extracted.The diagnosis was made by the clinical presentation,preoperative echocardiography,intraoperative examination,and postoperative histopathological study,excluding rheumatic ot degenerative aortic valve diseases,infective endocarditis and primary connective tissue disorders,e.g.Marfan syndrome.Among 32 children with congenital aortic valve malformations,the age was ranged from six to 18 years,with a mean of 14.9 years,and there were 27 boys and five girls (male:female = 5.4:1).There were five cases of aortic stenosis (AS,15.62%),25 cases of aortic insufficiency (AI,78.13 %)and two cases of AS-AI (6.25%),without other valve diseases.Twenty cases still had other congenital heart diseases:ventricular septal defect (19 cases),patent ductus arteriosus (two cases),double-chambered right ventricle (one case),aneurysm of the right anterior aortic sinus of valsalva (three cases).Histopathological examination indicated that the cusps became thickening with unequal size,irregular shape (coiling and prolapse edge),enhanced hardness,and partly calcification.Microscopic investigation revealed the unsharp structure of valve tissue,fibrosis,myxomatous,reduced collagen fiber,rupture of elastic fibers,different degrees of infiltration of inflammatory cells,secondary calcareous and lipid deposit,and secondary fibrosis.Congenital aortic valve malformations in children involve males more than females,mostly associated with other congenital heart diseases.Aortic insufficiency is more common in children with congenital aortic valve

  18. Aortic valve area assessed with 320-detector computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Kofoed, Klaus Fuglsang; Carstensen, Helle Gervig;

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of aortic valve area (AVA) assessment with 320-detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) compared to transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) in a population with mild to severe aortic valve stenosis. AVA was estimated in 169 patients by planimetry on MDCT images (AVAMDCT......) and by the continuity equation with TTE (AVATTE). To generate a reference AVA (AVAREF) we used the stroke volume from MDCT divided by the velocity time integral from CW Doppler by TTE (according to the continuity equation: stroke volume in LVOT = stroke volume passing the aortic valve). AVAREF was used as the reference...

  19. Dynamic heart phantom with functional mitral and aortic valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannelli, Claire; Moore, John; McLeod, Jonathan; Ceh, Dennis; Peters, Terry

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac valvular stenosis, prolapse and regurgitation are increasingly common conditions, particularly in an elderly population with limited potential for on-pump cardiac surgery. NeoChord©, MitraClipand numerous stent-based transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) devices provide an alternative to intrusive cardiac operations; performed while the heart is beating, these procedures require surgeons and cardiologists to learn new image-guidance based techniques. Developing these visual aids and protocols is a challenging task that benefits from sophisticated simulators. Existing models lack features needed to simulate off-pump valvular procedures: functional, dynamic valves, apical and vascular access, and user flexibility for different activation patterns such as variable heart rates and rapid pacing. We present a left ventricle phantom with these characteristics. The phantom can be used to simulate valvular repair and replacement procedures with magnetic tracking, augmented reality, fluoroscopy and ultrasound guidance. This tool serves as a platform to develop image-guidance and image processing techniques required for a range of minimally invasive cardiac interventions. The phantom mimics in vivo mitral and aortic valve motion, permitting realistic ultrasound images of these components to be acquired. It also has a physiological realistic left ventricular ejection fraction of 50%. Given its realistic imaging properties and non-biodegradable composition—silicone for tissue, water for blood—the system promises to reduce the number of animal trials required to develop image guidance applications for valvular repair and replacement. The phantom has been used in validation studies for both TAVI image-guidance techniques1, and image-based mitral valve tracking algorithms2.

  20. Interventional valve surgery: building a team and working together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruel, Marc; Dickie, Sean; Chow, Benjamin J W; Labinaz, Marino

    2010-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a new modality that may change the therapeutic landscape in the management of aortic valve stenosis. Despite the excellent results of surgical aortic valve replacement, TAVI has the potential to revolutionize the treatment of elderly and high-risk patients with aortic stenosis. It therefore constitutes a new reality that cardiac surgeons have to acknowledge. As TAVI indications and techniques become better defined, the importance of a team approach to the implementation and performance of TAVI is becoming increasingly evident. The surgeon has a crucial role to play in the introduction, development, and sustainability of TAVI at any institution. In this article, we discuss the procedural technique involved in TAVI, as well as the cardiologist and heart surgeon individualities and team dynamics. We make a case for judicious team-based adoption of TAVI technologies, considering that evidence-based and health economics data are not yet available. We also illustrate how a team approach may lead to improved outcomes, better patient and institutional acceptance, and a better definition of the therapeutic niche of TAVI modalities, amid the excellent results of conventional aortic valve replacement surgery.

  1. Aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis with a small aortic annulus in a patient having Werner's syndrome and liver cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogawa, M; Kasuya, S; Yamamoto, K; Koshika, M; Oguma, F; Hayashi, J

    2001-12-01

    Werner's syndrome is a rare genetic disease characterized by premature aging and scleroderma-like involvement of the skin. We report a case of aortic valve replacement for severely calcified aortic valve stenosis with a small annulus in a patient suffering from Werner's syndrome and liver cirrhosis

  2. [Unicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis Combined with Aortic Coarctation;Report of a Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Takehiro; Wakasa, Satoru; Shingu, Yasushige; Matsui, Yoshiro

    2016-06-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve in an adult is extremely rare. In addition, 90% of the patients with aortic coarctation are reported to die before the age 50. A 60-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for further examination of exertional dyspnea which had begun one year before. She had been under medical treatment for hypertension since early thirties, and had been also diagnosed with moderate aortic stenosis at 50 years of age. She was at 1st diagnosed with aortic coarctation combined with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis. The aortic valve was then found unicuspid and was replaced under cardiopulmonary bypass with perfusion to both the ascending aorta and the femoral artery. Repair of aortic coarctation was performed 3 months later through left thoracotomy without extracorporeal circulation due to the rich collateral circulation. She had no postoperative complications, and hypertension as well as ankle-brachial index improved to the normal levels.

  3. Aortic and Mitral Valve Replacement Through a Single Transverse Aortotomy: A Useful Approach in Difficult Mitral Valve Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Carmichael, Michael J.; Cooley, Denton A.; Favor, Arsenio S.

    1983-01-01

    Replacement of the mitral valve through a standard vertical left atriotomy in patients requiring both aortic and mitral valve replacement can be very difficult. This is especially true in patients who have undergone previous median sternotomy. Replacement of the mitral valve through the aortic root after excision of the aortic valve is described in two case reports. This is a convenient approach when traditional exposure of the mitral valve is impractical in patients requiring double valve re...

  4. [Management of aortic stenosis in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbé, Vincent; Ederhy, Stéphane; Szymkiewicz, Olga; Cohen, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    There is a significant risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with severe aortic stenosis (valve area angina, syncope, or heart failure). Before any surgery, clinical assessment should search for signs of aortic stenosis which justifies echocardiographic examination, particularly in the elderly. A systematic rest echocardiography with searching aortic stenosis should be considered in patients undergoing high risk surgery. The key points of pre-operative cardiac risk assessment are: assessment of the severity of aortic stenosis, measurement of the functional capacity, evaluation of the left ventricular systolic function, search of associated coronary artery disease, estimate of the surgical risk of cardiac events, and achievement of risk indices. In symptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis, only urgent non-cardiac surgery should be performed under careful haemodynamic monitoring. Aortic valve replacement should be considered before elective non-cardiac surgery. In asymptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis, aortic valve replacement should be considered before non-cardiac high risk surgery. Non-cardiac surgery at low/intermediate risk can be performed provided an adapted anaesthetic technique.

  5. [The assessment of mechanical heart valves stenosis in adults after aortic valve replacement: the advantage of full-flow design of mechanical valve].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokeria, L A; Bokeria, O L; Fadeev, A A; Makhachev, O A; Kosareva, T I; Averina, I I

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of transprosthetic hemodynamics in adults after aortic valve replacement in the Bakoulev Center for Cardiovascular Surgery in 2007-2010 demonstrated the hemodynamic advantage of the concept of new full-flow mechanical aortic valve prosthesis "CorBeat". Having the same size of internal orifice and tissue annulus diameters, the values of transprosthetic parameters (peak and mean gradients, blood flow velocities) through "CorBeat" were close to physiological values of transvalvular native aortic parameters and had a tendency to be not dependent on the size of prosthesis (p = 0.63). In the article for the first time a morphometric database of geometric values of internal orifice area of normal native aortic valves in adults was used taking into account both the gender and the body surface area's of a patient. There was also used the standardized prosthesis size Z-score which represents the number of SDs by which the internal prosthesis area differs from the mean normal native aortic valve area for the patient's body surface area. The article emphasizes the need of the personal selection of the size and the type of prosthesis for any patient as well as the need for new design development of prosthetic heart valves.

  6. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement reduces atelectasis in cardiac intensive care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foghsgaard, Signe; Gazi, Dunia; Bach, Karen;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Respiratory failure is a major complication after cardiac surgery. The purpose was to evaluate the impact of minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (mini AVR) on the occurrence of left lower lobe atelectasis (LLLA) in the cardiac intensive care unit (ICU). PATIENTS AND METHODS: 98...

  7. Design of Bioprosthetic Aortic Valves using biaxial test data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabiri, Y; Paulson, K; Tyberg, J; Ronsky, J; Ali, I; Di Martino, E; Narine, K

    2015-01-01

    Bioprosthetic Aortic Valves (BAVs) do not have the serious limitations of mechanical aortic valves in terms of thrombosis. However, the lifetime of BAVs is too short, often requiring repeated surgeries. The lifetime of BAVs might be improved by using computer simulations of the structural behavior of the leaflets. The goal of this study was to develop a numerical model applicable to the optimization of durability of BAVs. The constitutive equations were derived using biaxial tensile tests. Using a Fung model, stress and strain data were computed from biaxial test data. SolidWorks was used to develop the geometry of the leaflets, and ABAQUS finite element software package was used for finite element calculations. Results showed the model is consistent with experimental observations. Reaction forces computed by the model corresponded with experimental measurements when the biaxial test was simulated. As well, the location of maximum stresses corresponded to the locations of frequent tearing of BAV leaflets. Results suggest that BAV design can be optimized with respect to durability.

  8. [Calcified aortic valve disease: association with atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Rocío; Mangas, Alipio; Gómez, Francisco

    2011-05-14

    Calcified aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a prevalent condition, affecting 25% of people older than 65 years. CAVD and atherosclerosis share common risk factors and pathogenic mechanisms. Nevertheless, they present different pathologic lesions. The main factors involved in the pathogenesis of CAVD are genetic predisposition, the process of valvular calcification, deposition of lipoproteins, and chronic inflammation. Studies have suggested a potential benefit from early treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-II receptor blockers, and particularly with statins. Observational studies on risk factors for the CAVD, and randomized clinical trials on primary and secondary prevention in subjects with high risk for the disease, would be necessary to improve the clinical management of CAVD.

  9. Unicuspid aortic valve disease: a magnetic resonance imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debl, K.; Buchner, S.; Heinicke, N.; Riegger, G.; Luchner, A. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Innere Medizin II, Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg (Germany); Djavidani, B.; Poschenrieder, F.; Feuerbach, S. [Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg (Germany); Schmid, C.; Kobuch, R. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Herz-, Thorax- und herznahe Gefaesschirurgie, Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg (Germany)

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: congenitally malformed aortic valves are a common finding in adults with aortic valve disease. Most of these patients have bicuspid aortic valve disease. Unicuspid aortic valve disease (UAV) is rare. The aim of our study was to describe valve morphology and the dimensions of the proximal aorta in a cohort of 12 patients with UAV in comparison to tricuspid aortic valve disease (TAV) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods/results: MRI studies were performed on a 1.5 T scanner in a total of 288 consecutive patients with aortic valve disease. 12 aortic valves were retrospectively classified as UAV. Annulus areas and dimensions of the thoracic aorta were retrospectively compared to a cohort of 103 patients with TAV. In UAV, valve morphology was unicuspid unicommissural with a posterior commissure in all patients. Mean annulus areas and mean diameters of the ascending aorta were significantly greater in UAV compared to TAV (12.6 {+-} 4.7 cm{sup 2} vs. 8.7 {+-} 2.3 cm{sup 2}, p < 0.01 and 4.6 {+-} 0.7 cm vs. 3.6 {+-} 0.5 cm, p < 0.0001, respectively), while no differences were observed in the mean diameters of the aortic arch (2.3 {+-} 0.6 cm vs. 2.3 {+-} 0.4 cm, p = 0.69). The diameters of the descending aorta were slightly smaller in UAV compared to TAV (2.2 {+-} 0.5 cm vs. 2.6 {+-} 0.3 cm, p < 0.05). (orig.)

  10. Aortic valve and ascending aortic root modeling from 3D and 3D+t CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grbic, Saša; Ionasec, Razvan I.; Zäuner, Dominik; Zheng, Yefeng; Georgescu, Bogdan; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2010-02-01

    Aortic valve disorders are the most frequent form of valvular heart disorders (VHD) affecting nearly 3% of the global population. A large fraction among them are aortic root diseases, such as aortic root aneurysm, often requiring surgical procedures (valve-sparing) as a treatment. Visual non-invasive assessment techniques could assist during pre-selection of adequate patients, planning procedures and afterward evaluation of the same. However state of the art approaches try to model a rather short part of the aortic root, insufficient to assist the physician during intervention planning. In this paper we propose a novel approach for morphological and functional quantification of both the aortic valve and the ascending aortic root. A novel physiological shape model is introduced, consisting of the aortic valve root, leaflets and the ascending aortic root. The model parameters are hierarchically estimated using robust and fast learning-based methods. Experiments performed on 63 CT sequences (630 Volumes) and 20 single phase CT volumes demonstrated an accuracy of 1.45mm and an performance of 30 seconds (3D+t) for this approach. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time a complete model of the aortic valve (including leaflets) and the ascending aortic root, estimated from CT, has been proposed.

  11. Influence of St. Jude medical valve in patients with aortic stenosis and small aortic annulus on cardiac function and late survival result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsuaki, Masafumi; Itoh, Tsuyoshi; Okazaki, Yukio; Takarabe, Kyoumi; Furukawa, Koujirou; Rikitake, Kazuhisa; Ohtubo, Satoshi

    2002-10-01

    This clinical study analyzes our experience of postoperative cardiac function and long-term survival rate in patients with aortic stenosis and small-size St. Jude Medical (SJM) valve. Sixty-eight patients who underwent aortic valve replacement by SJM valve were divided into two groups by preoperative aortic annulus diameter. Group 1 consisted of 44 patients with small aortic annulus and small-size SJM valve (19 mm or 21 mm). In Group 1, small SJM standard valves were implanted in 16 patients, and small SJM Hemodynamic Plus (HP) valves were implanted in 28 patients. Group 2 consisted of 24 patients with large-size SJM standard valve (23 mm or larger). Preoperative left ventricular mass index, left ventricular dimension, the dimension of ascending aorta, and body surface area were significantly smaller in Group 1 than in Group 2. Average age at surgery was older in Group 1 than in Group 2. Effective orifice area index of the SJM valve measured by the manufacturer's data was smaller in Group 1 than in Group 2. Postoperative left ventricular mass indexes of Group 1 (standard valve or HP valve) and Group 2 significantly decreased in comparison with the preoperative mass indexes. Postoperative left ventricular ejection fraction and the peak ejection rate of Group 1 were not different from those of Group 2. The 10 year survival rate of Group 1 was 79%, and the rate of Group 2 was 77%. At 10 years after surgery, freedom from valve-related complication of Group 1 was 80%, and freedom from complication of Group 2 was 81%. Our results demonstrated that small-size SJM valve afforded satisfactory long-term survival rate and valve-related event-free rate for elderly patients with small body surface area and small aortic annulus.

  12. Anesthetic management of transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Franco

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI is an emergent technique for high-risk patients with aortic stenosis. TAVI poses significant challenges about its management because of the procedure itself and the population who undergo the implantation. Two devices are currently available and marketed in Europe and several other technologies are being developed. The retrograde transfemoral approach is the most popular procedure; nevertheless, it may not be feasible in patients with significant aortic or ileo-femoral arterial disease. Alternatives include a transaxillary approach, transapical approach, open surgical access to the retroperitoneal iliac artery and the ascending aorta. A complementary approach using both devices and alternative routes tailored to the anatomy and the comorbidities of the single patient is a main component for the successful implementation of a TAVI program. Anesthetic strategies vary in different centers. Local anesthesia or general anesthesia are both valid alternatives and can be applied according to the patient′s characteristics and procedural instances. General anesthesia offers many advantages, mainly regarding the possibility of an early diagnosis and treatment of possible complications through the use of transesophageal echocardiography. However, after the initial experiences, many groups began to employ, routinely, sedation plus local anesthesia for TAVI, and their procedural and periprocedural success demonstrates that it is feasible. TAVI is burdened with potential important complications: vascular injuries, arrhythmias, renal impairment, neurological complications, cardiac tamponade, prosthesis malpositioning and embolization and left main coronary artery occlusion. The aim of this work is to review the anesthetic management of TAVI based on the available literature.

  13. Midterm Results of Aortic Valve Replacement with Cryopreserved Homografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Özker

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the midterm clinical results of aortic valve replacement with cryopreserved homografts.Materials and Methods: Aortic valve replacement was performed in 40 patients with cryopreserved homograft. The indications were aortic valve endocarditis in 20 patients (50%, truncus arteriosus in 6 patients (15%, and re-stenosis or regurtitation after aortic valve reconstruction in 14 (35% patients. The valve sizes ranged from 10 to 27mm. A full root replacement technique was used for homograft replacement in all patients.Results: The 30-day postoperative mortality rate was 12.5% (5 patients. There were four late deaths. Only one of them was related to cardiac events. Overall mortality was 22.5%. Thirty-three patients were followed up for 67±26 months. Two patients needed reoperation due to aortic aneurysm caused by endocarditis. The mean transvalvular gradient significantly decreased after valve replacement (p<0.003. The last follow up showed that the 27 (82% patients had a normal left ventricular function.Conclusion: Cryopreserved homografts are safe alternatives to mechanical valves that can be used when there are proper indications. Although it has a high perioperative mortality rate, cryopreserved homograft implantation is an alternative for valve replacement, particularly in younger patients and for complex surgical problems such as endocarditis that must be minimalized.

  14. Increased risk of aortic valve stenosis in patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalid, Usman; Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar;

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease including atherosclerosis. The pathogenesis of aortic valve stenosis (AS) also includes an inflammatory component. We therefore investigated the risk of AS in patients with psoriasis compared...

  15. Possible Subclinical Leaflet Thrombosis in Bioprosthetic Aortic Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makkar, Raj R; Fontana, Gregory; Jilaihawi, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    -rendered CT scans along with data on anticoagulation and clinical outcomes (including strokes and transient ischemic attacks [TIAs]). RESULTS: Reduced leaflet motion was noted on CT in 22 of 55 patients (40%) in the clinical trial and in 17 of 132 patients (13%) in the two registries. Reduced leaflet motion...... patients and 1 of 115 patients, respectively; P=0.007). CONCLUSIONS: Reduced aortic-valve leaflet motion was shown in patients with bioprosthetic aortic valves. The condition resolved with therapeutic anticoagulation. The effect of this finding on clinical outcomes including stroke needs further......BACKGROUND: A finding of reduced aortic-valve leaflet motion was noted on computed tomography (CT) in a patient who had a stroke after transcatheter aortic-valve replacement (TAVR) during an ongoing clinical trial. This finding raised a concern about possible subclinical leaflet thrombosis...

  16. The Early Variation of Left Ventricular Strain after Aortic Valve Replacement by Three-Dimensional Echocardiography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongle Chen

    Full Text Available Aortic stenosis (AS and aortic incompetence (AI are common aortic valve diseases. Both may deteriorate into irreversible myocardial dysfunction and will increase the risk of sudden death. In this study, we aimed to investigate the early variation trend of left ventricular function by three-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (3D-STE in the patients who underwent cardiac surgeries for aortic valve disease. Twenty patients with severe aortic AS and 16 patients with severe AI were enrolled. All of them underwent the aortic valve replacement (AVR procedures. The patients' global longitudinal strain (GLS and global circumferential strain (GCS were evaluated by 3D-STE before surgery and at 1 week after surgery. In addition, GLS and GCS were followed at 1 month as well as 3 months after AVR. In AS patients, the GCS after AVR altered little both at 1 week (p = 0.562 and at 1 month (p = 0.953 compared with the data before the surgery. And it increased significantly at 3 months of follow-up observation compared to that before AVR (p<0.05. Meanwhile, GLS increased progressively after AVR and improved significantly at 3 months after surgery (p<0.05. For the AI patients, GLS as well as GCS decreased at 1 week after AVR compared to those data at baseline (p<0.05. However, these two parameters recovered at 1 month after AVR. Furthermore, GLS and GCS improved significantly at 3 months after the surgery (p<0.05. Therefore, both GLS and GCS were influenced by AVR and would be improved at 3 months after surgery both in AS patients or AI patients. GLS and GCS can be finely evaluated by 3D-STE, and they are helpful to determine the variation tendency of left ventricular function in patients with AVR.

  17. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation of the direct flow medical aortic valve with minimal or no contrast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latib, Azeem, E-mail: alatib@gmail.com [Interventional Cardiology Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute and EMO-GVM Centro Cuore Columbus, Milan (Italy); Maisano, Francesco; Colombo, Antonio [Interventional Cardiology Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute and EMO-GVM Centro Cuore Columbus, Milan (Italy); Klugmann, Silvio [Azienda Ospedaliera Niguarda Ca Granda, Piazza Ospedale Maggiore 3, Milan (Italy); Low, Reginald; Smith, Thomas [University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Davidson, Charles [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Harreld, John H. [Clinical Imaging Analytics, Guerneville, CA (United States); Bruschi, Giuseppe; DeMarco, Federico [Azienda Ospedaliera Niguarda Ca Granda, Piazza Ospedale Maggiore 3, Milan (Italy)

    2014-06-15

    The 18F Direct Flow Medical (DFM) THV has conformable sealing rings, which minimizes aortic regurgitation and permits full hemodynamic assessment of valve performance prior to permanent implantation. During the DISCOVER trial, three patients who were at risk for receiving contrast media, two due to severe CKD and one due to a recent hyperthyroid reaction to contrast, underwent DFM implantation under fluoroscopic and transesophageal guidance without aortography during either positioning or to confirm the final position. Valve positioning was based on the optimal angiographic projection as calculated by the pre-procedural multislice CT scan. Precise optimization of valve position was performed to minimize transvalve gradient and aortic regurgitation. Prior to final implantation, transvalve hemodynamics were assessed invasively and by TEE. The post-procedure mean gradients were 7, 10, 11 mm Hg. The final AVA by echo was 1.70, 1.40 and 1.68 cm{sup 2}. Total aortic regurgitation post-procedure was none or trace in all three patients. Total positioning and assessment of valve performance time was 4, 6, and 12 minutes. Contrast was only used to confirm successful percutaneous closure of the femoral access site. The total contrast dose was 5, 8, 12 cc. Baseline eGFR and creatinine was 28, 22, 74 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2} and 2.35, 2.98, and 1.03 mg/dL, respectively. Renal function was unchanged post-procedure: eGFR = 25, 35, and 96 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2} and creatinine = 2.58, 1.99, and 1.03 mg/dL, respectively. In conclusion, the DFM THV provides the ability to perform TAVI with minimal or no contrast. The precise and predictable implantation technique can be performed with fluoro and echo guidance.

  18. Mitral annular calcification in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement for aortic valve stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takami, Yoshiyuki; Tajima, Kazuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Limited data exis t on clinical relevance of aortic valve stenosis (AVS) and mitral annular calcification (MAC), although with similar pathophysiologic basis. We sought to reveal the prevalence of MAC and its clinical features in the patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR) for AVS. We reviewed 106 consecutive patients who underwent isolated AVR from 2004 to 2010. Before AVR, CT scans were performed to identify MAC, whose severity was graded on a scale of 0-4, with grade 0 denoting no MAC and grade 4 indicating severe MAC. Echocardiography was performed before AVR and at follow-up over 2 years after AVR. MAC was identified in 56 patients with grade 1 (30 %), 2 (39 %), 3 (18 %), and 4 (13 %), respectively. Patients with MAC presented older age (72 ± 8 versus 66 ± 11 years), higher rate of dialysis-dependent renal failure (43 versus 4 %), and less frequency of bicuspid aortic valve (9 versus 36 %), when compared to those without MAC. No significant differences were seen in short- and mid-term mortality after AVR between the groups. In patients with MAC, progression of neither mitral regurgitation nor stenosis was observed at follow-up of 53 ± 23 months for 102 survivors, although the transmitral flow velocities were higher than in those without MAC. In conclusion, MAC represented 53 % of the patients undergoing isolated AVR for AVS, usually appeared in dialysis-dependent elder patients with tricuspid AVS. MAC does not affect adversely upon the survival, without progression of mitral valve disease, at least within 2 years after AVR.

  19. Characteristics of aortic valve dysfunction and ascending aorta dimensions according to bicuspid aortic valve morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hong Ju [Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Je Kyoun; Chee, Hyun Kun; Kim, Jun Suk [Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Sung Min [Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    To characterize aortic valve dysfunction and ascending aorta dimensions according to bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) morphology using computed tomography (CT) and surgical findings. We retrospectively enrolled 209 patients with BAVs who underwent transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and CT. BAVs were classified as anterior-posterior (BAV-AP) or lateral (BAV-LA) orientation of the cusps and divided according to the presence (raphe+) or absence (raphe-) of a raphe. Ascending aortic dimensions were measured by CT at four levels. BAV-AP was present in 129 patients (61.7 %) and raphe+ in 120 (57.4 %). Sixty-nine patients (33.0 %) had aortic regurgitation (AR), 70 (33.5 %) had aortic stenosis (AS), and 58 (27.8 %) had combined AS and AR. AR was more common in patients with BAV-AP and raphe+; AS was more common with BAV-LA and raphe-.Annulus/body surface area and tubular portion/body surface area diameters in patients with BAV-AP (17.1 ± 2.3 mm/m{sup 2} and 24.2 ± 5.3 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively) and raphe+ (17.3 ± 2.2 mm/m{sup 2} and 24.2 ± 5.5 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively) were significantly different from those with BAV-LA (15.8 ± 1.9 mm/m{sup 2} and 26.4 ± 5.5 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively) and raphe- (15.7 ± 1.9 mm/m{sup 2} and 26.2 ± 5.4 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively). The morphological characteristics of BAV might be associated with the type of valvular dysfunction, and degree and location of an ascending aorta dilatation. (orig.)

  20. Surgical repair of a pseudoaneurysm of the ascending aorta after aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Rui Manuel Sequeira de

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a patient with a pseudoaneurysm of the ascending aortic clinically diagnosed 5 months after surgical replacement of the aortic valve. Diagnosis was confirmed with the aid of two-dimensional echocardiography and helicoidal angiotomography. The corrective surgery, which consisted of a reinforced suture of the communication with the ascending aorta after opening and aspiration of the cavity of the pseudoaneurysm, was successfully performed through a complete sternotomy using extracorporeal circulation, femorofemoral cannulation, and moderate hypothermia, with no aortic clamping.

  1. Patient values and preferences on transcatheter or surgical aortic valve replacement therapy for aortic stenosis: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytvyn, Lyubov; Guyatt, Gordon H; Manja, Veena; Siemieniuk, Reed A; Zhang, Yuan; Agoritsas, Thomas; Vandvik, Per O

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate patients' values and preferences regarding aortic valve replacement therapy for aortic stenosis. Setting Studies published after transcatheter aortic valve insertion (TAVI) became available (2002). Participants Adults with aortic stenosis who are considering or have had valve replacement, either TAVI or via surgery (surgical aortic valve replacement, SAVR). Outcome measures We sought quantitative measurements, or qualitative descriptions, of values and preferences. When reported, we examined correlations between preferences and objective (eg, ejection fraction) or subjective (eg, health-related quality of life) measures of health. Results We reviewed 1348 unique citations, of which 2 studies proved eligible. One study of patients with severe aortic stenosis used a standard gamble study to ascertain that the median hypothetical mortality risk patients were willing to tolerate to achieve full health was 25% (IQR 25–50%). However, there was considerable variability; for mortality risk levels defined by current guidelines, 130 participants (30%) were willing to accept low-to-intermediate risk (≤8%), 224 (51%) high risk (>8–50%) and 85 (19%) a risk that guidelines would consider prohibitive (>50%). Study authors did not, however, assess participants' understanding of the exercise, resulting in a potential risk of bias. A second qualitative study of 15 patients identified the following factors that influence patients to undergo assessment for TAVI: symptom burden; expectations; information support; logistical barriers; facilitators; obligations and responsibilities. The study was limited by serious risk of bias due to authors' conflict of interest (5/9 authors industry-funded). Conclusions Current evidence on patient values and preferences of adults with aortic stenosis is very limited, and no studies have enrolled patients deciding between TAVI and SAVR. On the basis of the data available, there is evidence of variability in individual

  2. Basal longitudinal strain predicts future aortic valve replacement in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Helle Gervig; Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Hassager, Christian

    2016-01-01

    of myocardial dysfunction and predictors of outcome in asymptomatic aortic stenosis. Aortic stenosis and ischaemic heart disease share risk factors and longitudinal function can be severely reduced in both conditions, why some of the previous findings of impaired regional longitudinal function in asymptomatic...... aortic stenosis could in fact be explained by silent ischaemic heart disease. METHODS AND RESULTS: Prospective follow-up of 104 asymptomatic patients with moderate-severe aortic stenosis defined as an aortic valve area ...: In contrast to GLS, reduced BLS is a significant predictor of future AVR in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis, independently of clinical characteristics, conventional echocardiographic measures, and coronary pathology....

  3. Aortenklappeninsuffizienz – Operationsindikationen und Möglichkeiten der Aortenklappenrekonstruktion // Aortic Regurgitation – Aortic Valve Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schachner T

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aortic valve repair for aortic regurgitation has evolved at dedicated centres. It is a valuable alternative to aortic valve replacement and offers good long term results. Tricuspid, as well as bicuspid aortic valves, are suitable for repair. These techniques of aortic valve repair can be combined with reconstruction of concomitant aneurysmal disease of the ascending aorta or the sinus valsalvae. In particular, younger patients can benefit from a life without oral anticoagulation. p bKurzfassung: /bDie Aortenklappenrekonstruktion bei bestehender Aortenklappeninsuffizienz hat sich in spezialisierten Zentren zu einer guten Behandlungsalternative zum Aortenklappenersatz entwickelt. Es können sowohl bikuspide als auch trikuspide Aortenklappen rekonstruiert werden. Bei Vorliegen eines Aortenaneurysmas können Techniken der Aortenklappenrekonstruktion mit dem Ersatz von Aorta ascendens oder Sinus valsalvae kombiniert werden. In spezialisierten Zentren können gute Langzeitergebnisse erzielt werden, die vor allem jüngeren Patienten ein Leben ohne orale Antikoagulation ermöglichen.

  4. Aortic root, not valve, calcification correlates with coronary artery calcification in patients with severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henein, Michael; Hällgren, Peter; Holmgren, Anders

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The underlying pathology in aortic stenosis (AS) and coronary artery stenosis (CAS) is similar including atherosclerosis and calcification. We hypothesize that coronary artery calcification (CAC) is likely to correlate with aortic root calcification (ARC) rather than with aortic valve...... calcification (AVC), due to tissue similarity between the two types of vessel rather than with the valve leaflet tissue. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We studied 212 consecutive patients (age 72.5 ± 7.9 years, 91 females) with AS requiring aortic valve replacement (AVR) in two Heart Centers, who underwent multidetector...... cardiac CT preoperatively. CAC, AVC and ARC were quantified using Agatston scoring. Correlations were tested by Spearman's test and Mann-Whitney U-test was used for comparing different subgroups; bicuspid (BAV) vs tricuspid (TAV) aortic valve. RESULTS: CAC was present in 92%, AVC in 100% and ARC in 82...

  5. Imaging of aortic valve dynamics in 4D OCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schnabel Christian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical components of the heart, especially the valves and leaflets, are enormous stressed during lifetime. Therefore, those structures undergo different pathophysiological tissue transformations which affect cardiac output and in consequence living comfort of affected patients. These changes may lead to calcific aortic valve stenosis (AVS, the major heart valve disease in humans. The knowledge about changes of the dynamic behaviour during the course of this disease and the possibility of early stage diagnosis is of particular interest and could lead to the development of new treatment strategies and drug based options of prevention or therapy. 4D optical coherence tomography (OCT in combination with high-speed video microscopy were applied to characterize dynamic behaviour of the murine aortic valve and to characterize dynamic properties during artificial stimulation. We present a promising tool to investigate the aortic valve dynamics in an ex vivo disease model with a high spatial and temporal resolution using a multimodal imaging setup.

  6. A computerized system for video analysis of the aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesely, I; Menkis, A; Campbell, G

    1990-10-01

    A novel technique was developed to study the dynamic behavior of the porcine aortic valve in an isolated heart preparation. Under the control of a personal computer, a video frame grabber board continuously acquired and digitized images of the aortic valve, and an analog-to-digital (A/D) converter read four channels of physiological data (flow rate, aortic and ventricular pressure, and aortic root diameter). The valve was illuminated with a strobe light synchronized to fire at the field acquisition rate of the CCD video camera. Using the overlay bits in the video board, the measured parameters were super-imposed over the live video as graphical tracing, and the resultant composite images were recorded on-line to video tape. The overlaying of the valve images with the graphical tracings of acquired data enabled the data tracings to be precisely synchronized with the video images of the aortic valve. This technique enabled us to observe the relationship between aortic root expansion and valve function.

  7. PERFORMING TRANSCATHETER AORTIC VALVE IMPLANTATION IN PATIENTS WITH CAROTID STENOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veselin Valkov

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The management of carotid artery disease in patients with severe aortic stenosis referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation is challenging. By reviewing the very limited amount of literature we will try to answer the question should we perform carotid revascularization before or after the TAVI procedure.

  8. Maximizing prosthetic valve size with the Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jan; Geha, Alexander S.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY: The CarboMedics Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve allows a one-size (and often two-size) increase over the standard intra-annular valve. This advantage should minimize the risk of patient-prosthesis mismatch, where the effective prosthetic valve orifice area...

  9. Recently patented transcatheter aortic valves in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neragi-Miandoab, Siyamek; Skripochnik, Edvard; Salemi, Arash; Girardi, Leonard

    2013-12-01

    The most widely used heart valve worldwide is the Edwards Sapien, which currently has 60% of the worldwide transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) market. The CoreValve is next in line in popularity, encompassing 35% of the worldwide TAVI market. Although these two valves dominate the TAVI market, a number of newer transcatheter valves have been introduced and others are in early clinical evaluation. The new valves are designed to reduce catheter delivery diameter, improve ease of positioning and sealing, and facilitate repositioning or removal. The most recent transcatheter valves for transapical use include Acurate TA (Symetis), Engager (Medtronic), and JenaValve the Portico (St Jude), Sadra Lotus Medical (Boston Scientific), and the Direct Flow Medical. These new inventions may introduce more effective treatment options for high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. Improvements in transcatheter valves and the developing variability among them may allow for more tailored approaches with respect to patient's anatomy, while giving operators the opportunity to choose devices they feel more comfortable with. Moreover, introducing new devices to the market will create a competitive environment among producers that will reduce high prices and expand availability. The present review article includes a discussion of recent patents related to Transcatheter Aortic Valves.

  10. Surgical aortic-valve replacement with a transcatheter implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowell, Justin L; Dewhurst, Alex; van Besouw, Jean-Pierre; Jahangiri, Marjan

    2011-04-01

    We describe a bailout procedure when surgical aortic-valve replacement was not possible due to severe calcification of the ascending aorta and the root and a very small annulus. A 21-mm CoreValve Revalving prosthesis was inserted via the aortotomy in the presence of a mitral prosthesis.

  11. An Adult Case of Unicommissural Unicuspid Aortic Valve Diagnosed Based on the Intraoperative Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Tetsuo; Fukatsu, Toru; Ichinohe, Yoshimaro; Komatsu, Hirotaka; Seki, Masahiro; Sasaki, Kenichi; Takai, Hideaki; Kunihara, Takashi; Hirata, Yasunobu

    2016-01-01

    We herein report an adult case of unicommissural unicuspid aortic valve (UAV). A 59-year-old man, who was noted to have a cardiac murmur at 31 years of age, was admitted to our hospital due to acute heart failure. Severe calcification in the aortic valve with severe low-flow/low-gradient aortic stenosis and moderate aortic regurgitation was observed and thought to be the cause of heart failure, however, the etiology of aortic valve dysfunction was not clear. Aortic valve replacement was subsequently performed, and unicommissural UAV was diagnosed according to the intraoperative findings. UAV is very rare congenital aortic valve disease which is rarely diagnosed preoperatively.

  12. Determination of oxidation state of iron in normal and pathologically altered human aortic valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czapla-Masztafiak, J. [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Kraków (Poland); Lis, G.J.; Gajda, M.; Jasek, E. [Department of Histology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kopernika 7, 31-034 Kraków (Poland); Czubek, U. [Department of Coronary Disease, Jagiellonian University Medical College, John Paul II Hospital, Prądnicka 80, 31-202 Kraków (Poland); Bolechała, F. [Department of Forensic Medicine, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Grzegórzecka 16, 31-531 Kraków (Poland); Borca, C. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Kwiatek, W.M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Kraków (Poland)

    2015-12-01

    In order to investigate changes in chemical state of iron in normal and pathologically altered human aortic valves X-ray absorption spectroscopy was applied. Since Fe is suspected to play detrimental role in aortic valve stenosis pathogenesis the oxidation state of this element has been determined. The experimental material consisted of 10 μm sections of valves excised during routine surgery and from autopsies. The experiment was performed at the MicroXAS beamline of the SLS synchrotron facility in Villigen (Switzerland). The Fe K-edge XANES spectra obtained from tissue samples were carefully analyzed and compared with the spectra of reference compounds containing iron in various chemical structures. The analysis of absorption edge position and shape of the spectra revealed that both chemical forms of iron are presented in valve tissue but Fe{sup 3+} is the predominant form. Small shift of the absorption edge toward higher energy in the spectra from stenotic valve samples indicates higher content of the Fe{sup 3+} form in pathological tissue. Such a phenomenon suggests the role of Fenton reaction and reactive oxygen species in the etiology of aortic valve stenosis. The comparison of pre-edge regions of XANES spectra for control and stenotic valve tissue confirmed no differences in local symmetry or spin state of iron in analyzed samples.

  13. Bicuspid aortic valves: Diagnostic accuracy of standard axial 64-slice chest CT compared to aortic valve image plane ECG-gated cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, David J., E-mail: david.murphy@st-vincents.ie [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); McEvoy, Sinead H., E-mail: s.mcevoy@st-vincents.ie [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Iyengar, Sri, E-mail: sri.iyengar@nhs.net [Department of Radiology, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth Devon PL6 8DH (United Kingdom); Feuchtner, Gudrun, E-mail: Gudrun.Feuchtner@i-med.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Cury, Ricardo C., E-mail: r.cury@baptisthealth.net [Department of Radiology, Baptist Cardiac and Vascular Institute, 8900 North Kendall Drive, Miami, FL 33176 (United States); Roobottom, Carl, E-mail: carl.roobottom@nhs.net [Department of Radiology, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth Devon PL6 8DH (United Kingdom); Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry (United Kingdom); Baumueller, Stephan, E-mail: Hatem.Alkadhi@usz.ch [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Alkadhi, Hatem, E-mail: stephan.baumueller@usz.ch [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Dodd, Jonathan D., E-mail: jonniedodd@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of standard axial 64-slice chest CT compared to aortic valve image plane ECG-gated cardiac CT for bicuspid aortic valves. Materials and methods: The standard axial chest CT scans of 20 patients with known bicuspid aortic valves were blindly, randomly analyzed for (i) the appearance of the valve cusps, (ii) the largest aortic sinus area, (iii) the longest aortic cusp length, (iv) the thickest aortic valve cusp and (v) valve calcification. A second blinded reader independently analyzed the appearance of the valve cusps. Forty-two age- and sex-matched patients with known tricuspid aortic valves were used as controls. Retrospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT multiphase reconstructions of the aortic valve were used as the gold-standard. Results: Fourteen (21%) scans were scored as unevaluable (7 bicuspid, 7 tricuspid). Of the remainder, there were 13 evaluable bicuspid valves, ten of which showed an aortic valve line sign, while the remaining three showed a normal Mercedes-Benz appearance owing to fused valve cusps. The 35 evaluable tricuspid aortic valves all showed a normal Mercedes-Benz appearance (P = 0.001). Kappa analysis = 0.62 indicating good interobserver agreement for the aortic valve cusp appearance. Aortic sinus areas, aortic cusp lengths and aortic cusp thicknesses of ≥3.8 cm{sup 2}, 3.2 cm and 1.6 mm respectively on standard axial chest CT best distinguished bicuspid from tricuspid aortic valves (P < 0.0001 for all). Of evaluable scans, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of standard axial chest CT in diagnosing bicuspid aortic valves was 77% (CI 0.54–1.0), 100%, 100% and 70% respectively. Conclusion: The aortic valve is evaluable in approximately 80% of standard chest 64-slice CT scans. Bicuspid aortic valves may be diagnosed on evaluable scans with good diagnostic accuracy. An aortic valve line sign, enlarged aortic sinuses and elongated, thickened valve cusps are specific CT

  14. Aortic valve replacement for Libman-Sacks endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Jack B; Janardhanan, Rajesh; Larsen, Brandon T; Khalpey, Zain

    2016-01-01

    A 24-year-old man with systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid syndrome complicated by lupus nephritis presented with acute limb ischaemia secondary to an embolus. Following embolectomy, the patient underwent a transthoracic echocardiogram which revealed a large vegetation on all three cusps of the aortic valve. The patient was taken for an urgent aortic valve replacement with a mechanical valve. Cultures of one cusp remained sterile. Histopathological examination of the remaining two cusps revealed sterile fibrin-rich thrombotic vegetations characteristic of non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis. PMID:27702929

  15. Particle Image Velocimetry studies of bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yap, Choon-Hwai; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2010-11-01

    Bicuspid aortic valves (BAVs) are a congenital anomaly of the aortic valve with two fused leaflets, affecting about 1-2% of the population. BAV patients have much higher incidence of valve calcification & aortic dilatation, which may be related to altered mechanical forces from BAV hemodynamics. This study aims to characterize BAV hemodynamics using Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV). BAV models are constructed from normal explanted porcine aortic valves by suturing two leaflets together. The valves are mounted in an acrylic chamber with two sinuses & tested in a pulsatile flow loop at physiological conditions. 2D PIV is performed to obtain flow fields in three planes downstream of the valve. The stenosed BAV causes an eccentric jet, resulting in a very strong vortex in the normal sinus. The bicuspid sinus vortex appears much weaker, but more unstable. Unsteady oscillatory shear stresses are also observed, which have been associated with adverse biological response; characterization of the hemodynamics of BAVs will provide the first step to understanding these processes better. Results from multiple BAV models of varying levels of stenosis will be presented & higher stenosis corresponded to stronger jets & increased aortic wall shear stresses.

  16. Anesthesia Maintenance During Mini-Invasive Cardiac Valve Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Krichevsky

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on own experience and published data the authors analyze the features and specific components of anesthesia maintenance during mini-invasive cardiac valve surgery. The following clinically relevant aspects of anesthesia and perioperative intensive care were identified: preoperative patient selection and surgical and anesthesia risk prediction; one-lung ventilation; peripheral connection of circulation and specific features of its performance; control of oxygen delivery in the bed of aortic arch branches; and echocardiographic monitoring. The main risks and probable complications due to these interventions, such as cerebral hypoxia, respiratory failure, pulmonary hypertension, etc., are described. The mechanisms of their development and the modes of prevention and treatment are shown. Key words: anesthesia in cardiac surgery, mini-invasive cardiac surgery, one-lung ventilation, anesthesia during cardiac valve surgery.

  17. [Evaluation of aortic valve replacement involving small severely calcified aortic annulus in elderly patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwahashi, M; Nishimura, Y; Hiramatsu, K; Komori, S; Shibata, M; Yuzaki, M; Okamura, Y

    2006-04-01

    We performed aortic valve replacement in 24 patients aged over 70 with small calcified valves. The surgical management of such patients remains controversial as the extensive calcification compromises implantation. Hence, we used an ultrasonic debridement instrument to remove calcium and selected a small prosthesis with the largest possible orifice without enlargement of the aortic annulus. Echocardiography showed significant reductions in left ventricular mass index compared with preoperative values. Early and mid-term prognosis has been relatively good.

  18. [Isolated Pulmonary Valve Endocarditis in a Patient with Aortic Regurgitation and Patent Foramen Ovale;Report of a Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Toshio; Gyoten, Takayuki; Sakata, Kimimasa; Nagura, Saori; Yamashita, Akio; Fukahara, Kazuaki; Kotoh, Keiju; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2016-07-01

    Isolated pulmonary valve endocarditis is an extremely rare clinical condition. Here, we report a case of pulmonary valve endocarditis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). An 84-year-old man with a history of aortic regurgitation and patent foramen ovale was admitted to our hospital due to fever of unknown origin for 4 weeks' duration. MRSA was detected in his blood cultures. Transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated a mobile vegetation attached to the pulmonary valve, moderate to severe aortic regurgitation, and patent foramen ovale with left-to-right shunt. After 30-days' treatment with vancomycin, gentamicin and rifampicin, he defervesced and blood cultures became negative. At surgery, a large vegetation was still attached to the pulmonary valve, but the leaflets remained with minimum damage. Aortic valve replacement, direct closure of the patent foramen ovale, and simple resection of the vegetation were performed. The postoperative course was uneventful.

  19. Aortic valve leaflet replacement with bovine pericardium to preserve native dynamic capabilities of the aortic annulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Hwa; Choi, Jong Bum; Kim, Min Ho; Kim, Won Ho; Lee, Mi Kyung; Lee, Sam Youn

    2014-02-01

    Valve replacement is typically the most appropriate option for treating aortic valve stenotic insufficiency. However, neither mechanical nor bioprosthetic replacement components preserve the circumferential expansion and contraction of a native aortic annulus during the cardiac cycle, because the prosthetic ring is affixed to the annulus. A 64-year-old man presented with a bicuspid and stenotic aortic valve, and the native annulus was too small to accommodate a porcine replacement valve. We fashioned new aortic leaflets from bovine pericardium with use of a template, and we affixed the sinotubular junction with use of inner and outer stabilization rings. Postoperative echocardiograms revealed coaptation of the 3 new leaflets with no regurgitation. At the patient's 5.5-year follow-up examination, echocardiograms showed flexible leaflet movement with a coaptation height of 7 mm, and expansion and contraction of the aortic annulus similar to that of a normal native annulus. The transvalvular pressure gradient was insignificant. If long-term durability of the new leaflets is confirmed, this method of leaflet replacement and fixation of the sinotubular junction might serve as an acceptable alternative to valve replacement in the treatment of aortic valve stenosis. We describe the patient's case and present our methods and observations.

  20. Effect of candesartan treatment on left ventricular remodeling after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbaek, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K

    2010-01-01

    In hypertension, angiotensin receptor blockers can augment regression of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy. It is not known whether this also is the case after aortic valve replacement (AVR) for severe aortic stenosis (AS). To test the hypothesis that treatment with candesartan in addition...

  1. Computerized intraoperative calculation of instantaneous prosthetic aortic valve area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSesa, V J; Lachman, P; Collins, J J; Cohn, L H

    1988-01-01

    Improved assessment of valve area is essential to understanding the performance of prosthetic valves. The authors studied six patients undergoing aortic valve replacement using mechanical (ME) or porcine (PO) prostheses. Instantaneous cardiac output (CO) (L/min) was measured in the aorta using an ultrasonic flow probe. Left ventricular and aortic pressures (mmHg) were measured using Millar catheters. Data were analyzed using an IBM PC-AT. Valve area (cm2) was determined using Gorlin's formula (AG) and a new formula for instantaneous area derived mathematically and using a theoretic constant. AG, mean (AI) and peak (Apk) instantaneous areas were compared to geometric measures of area (Aactual) in vitro. Peak instantaneous area correlates best with measured area. Intraoperative assessment using the ultrasonic flow probe and computer analysis is helpful in understanding the dynamic properties of prosthetic valves in vivo.

  2. Left main coronary artery obstruction by dislodged native-valve calculus after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmaz, Tahir; Ayhan, Huseyin; Keles, Telat; Aslan, Abdullah Nabi; Erdogan, Kemal Esref; Sari, Cenk; Bilen, Emine; Akcay, Murat; Bozkurt, Engin

    2014-08-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement can be an effective, reliable treatment for severe aortic stenosis in surgically high-risk or ineligible patients. However, various sequelae like coronary artery obstruction can occur, not only in the long term, but also immediately after the procedure. We present the case of a 78-year-old woman whose left main coronary artery became obstructed with calculus 2 hours after the transfemoral implantation of an Edwards Sapien XT aortic valve. Despite percutaneous coronary intervention in that artery, the patient died. This case reminds us that early recognition of acute coronary obstruction and prompt intervention are crucial in patients with aortic stenosis who have undergone transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

  3. Blood flow characteristics in the ascending aorta after TAVI compared to surgical aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trauzeddel, Ralf Felix; Löbe, Ulrike; Barker, Alex J; Gelsinger, Carmen; Butter, Christian; Markl, Michael; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian

    2016-03-01

    Ascending aortic blood flow characteristics are altered after aortic valve surgery, but the effect of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is unknown. Abnormal flow may be associated with aortic and cardiac remodeling. We analyzed blood flow characteristics in the ascending aorta after TAVI in comparison to conventional stented aortic bioprostheses (AVR) and healthy subjects using time-resolved three-dimensional flow-sensitive cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (4D-flow MRI). Seventeen patients with TAVI (Edwards Sapien XT), 12 with AVR and 9 healthy controls underwent 4D-flow MRI of the ascending aorta. Target parameters were: severity of vortical and helical flow pattern (semiquantitative grading from 0 = none to 3 = severe) and the local distribution of systolic wall shear stress (WSSsystole). AVR revealed significantly more extensive vortical and helical flow pattern than TAVI (p = 0.042 and p = 0.002) and controls (p flow than controls (p blood flow eccentricity (64.7 and 66.7%, respectively), whereas controls showed central blood flow (88.9%). TAVI and AVR exhibited an asymmetric distribution of WSSsystole in the mid-ascending aorta with local maxima at the right anterior aortic wall and local minima at the left posterior wall. In contrast, controls showed a symmetric distribution of WSSsystole along the aortic circumference. Blood flow was significantly altered in the ascending aorta after TAVI and AVR. Changes were similar regarding WSSsystole distribution, while TAVI resulted in less helical and vortical blood flow.

  4. Deformation of Congenital Bicuspid Aortic Valves in Systole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeto, Kai; Pastuszko, Peter; Nigam, Vishal; Lasheras, Juan

    2012-11-01

    Clinical studies have shown that patients with congenital bicuspid aortic valves (CBAVs) develop degenerative calcification of the leaflets at young ages compared to normal tricuspid aortic valves (TAVs). It has been hypothesized that the asymmetrical geometry of the leaflets in CBAVs and the associate changes in flow shear stresses and excessive strain rate levels are possible causes for the early calcification. Central to the validation of this hypothesis is the need to quantify the differences in strain rate levels between the BAVs and TAVs. We simulate the CBAVs by surgically stitching two of the leaflets of a porcine aortic valve together. To quantify strain differences, we performed in-vitro experiments in both BAVs and TAVs by tracking the 3-D motion of small dots marked on each leaflet surface. We then used phase-locked stereo photogrammetry to measure the strain rates in both radial and circumferential directions during the whole cardiac cycle. In the BAVs' case, the fused leaflet experiences an almost 30% increase in the radial stretching when fully open. RNA profiling of human aortic valve interstitial cells exposed to cyclic stretch shows that the increased stretch experienced by the BAVs results in increased levels of INTERLEUKINS (ILs) and other known inflammatory markers associated with aortic valve calcification. Together, these observations suggest that the abnormal stretch experienced by BAVs activates inflammation gene expression.

  5. Impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on survival and symptoms of severe aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Mikael K; Dahl, Jordi S; Kjeldsen, Bo J;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (AS) develop symptoms their survival decreases rapidly, if treated conservatively. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has been introduced as a less invasive treatment alternative, especially in inoperable patients, who often have...

  6. Ascending aortic wall cohesion: comparison of bicuspid and tricuspid valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedik, Jaroslav; Pilarczyk, Kevin; Wendt, Daniel; Indruch, Jiri; Flek, Radek; Tsagakis, Konstantinos; Alaeddine, Savvas; Jakob, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Bicuspid aortic valve (AV) represents the most common form of congenital AV malformation, which is frequently associated with pathologies of the ascending aorta. We compared the mechanical properties of the aortic wall between patients with bicuspid and tricuspid AV using a new custom-made device mimicking transversal aortic wall shear stress. Methods. Between 03/2010 and 07/2011, 190 consecutive patients undergoing open aortic valve replacement at our institution were prospectively enrolled, presenting either with a bicuspid (group 1, n = 44) or a tricuspid (group 2, n = 146) AV. Aortic wall specimen were examined with the "dissectometer" resulting in nine specific aortic-wall parameters derived from tensile strength curves (TSC). Results. Patients with a bicuspid AV showed significantly more calcified valves (43.2% versus 15.8%, P group (P = 0.003, P = 0.02, P = 0.01). We found no difference in the aortic wall cohesion between both groups as revealed by shear stress testing (P = 0.72, P = 0.40, P = 0.41). Conclusion. We observed no differences of TSC in patients presenting with tricuspid or bicuspid AVs. These results may allow us to assume that the morphology of the AV and the pathology of the ascending aorta are independent.

  7. Adjusting parameters of aortic valve stenosis severity by body size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minners, Jan; Gohlke-Baerwolf, Christa; Kaufmann, Beat A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adjustment of cardiac dimensions by measures of body size appears intuitively convincing and in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is commonly adjusted by body surface area (BSA). However, there is little evidence to support such an approach. OBJECTIVE: To identify...... the adequate measure of body size for the adjustment of aortic stenosis severity. METHODS: Parameters of aortic stenosis severity (jet velocity, mean pressure gradient (MPG) and AVA) and measures of body size (height, weight, BSA and body mass index (BMI)) were analysed in 2843 consecutive patients with aortic...... stenosis (jet velocity ≥2.5 m/s) and related to outcomes in a second cohort of 1525 patients from the Simvastatin/Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study. RESULTS: Whereas jet velocity and MPG were independent of body size, AVA was significantly correlated with height, weight, BSA and BMI (Pearson...

  8. Single coronary artery with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis and aneurysm of the ascending aorta: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Narihiro; Shimabukuro, Katsuya; Matsuno, Yukihiro; Ogura, Hiroki; Takemura, Hirofumi

    2014-03-01

    A 73-year-old man with a severely stenosed bicuspid valve and an aneurysm of the ascending aorta underwent valve and aortic surgery. Preoperative imaging revealed a single coronary artery arising from the right side of the sinus of Valsalva and a branch that perfused into the left side of the heart to pass through the front of the pulmonary artery. We replaced the aortic valve and ascending aorta, painstakingly avoiding damage to the coronary artery and obstruction of the sole coronary ostium.

  9. Combined aortic valve replacement and coronary artery bypass grafting for a calcified ascending aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Hironori; Umesue, Masayoshi; Matsui, Kanzi

    2012-04-01

    Although a severely calcified ascending aorta is encountered infrequently, it presents formidable problems during cardiac surgery. We describe a case of severe aortic valve stenosis and coronary artery disease combined with a severely calcified ascending aorta. The patient was an 80-year-old man with a calcified ascending aorta. He successfully underwent an aortic valve replacement and a single coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) using a saphenous vein graft with the proximal end connected on a Dacron patch, which was used for aortoplasty of the calcified plate along the aortotomy. These procedures were performed under moderate hypothermia with aortic clamping. This patch aortoplasty can be a useful alternative in cases that require aortotomy and proximal anastomoses of a CABG on a calcified ascending aorta.

  10. [Giant pseudoaneurysm of the ascending aorta following the aortic valve replacement;report of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Yu; Inage, Yuichi; Masaki, Naoki; Toyama, Shuji; Fukasawa, Manabu

    2013-08-01

    56-year-old male, who had undergone re-aortic valve replacement (AVR) 33 years ago, received preoperative study for pancreatic surgery. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a giant pseudoaneurysm (7 cm diameter) of the ascending aorta. The ascending aorta was not dilated. A midline skin incision was performed, followed by full sternotomy. A tight pericardial adhesion was carefully dissected. Cardiopulmonary bypass was established by femoral arterial and bicaval venous cannulation. The pseudoaneurysm was incised under the retrograde cardioplegic protection. A communication between ascending aorta and aneurysm was found 1 cm distal to the previous aortic suture line. This communication coincided with the cardioplegic root cannulation site. The aortic prosthetic valve was intact. The ascending aorta was replaced with 26 mm prosthetic graft. Postoperative course was uneventful. In this case, CT was useful to select the approach to the complicated postoperative surgical site.

  11. Long-term Mortality Predictors in Patients with Small Aortic Annulus Undergoing Aortic Valve Replacement with a 19- or 21-mm Bioprosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Lourdes Rivas de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Replacement of the aortic valve in patients with a small aortic annulus is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. A prosthesis-patient mismatch is one of the main problems associated with failed valves in this patient population. Objective: To evaluate the long-term mortality predictors in patients with a small aortic annulus undergoing aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis. Methods: In this retrospective observational study, a total of 101 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement from January 2000 to December 2010 were studied. There were 81 (80.19% women with a mean age of 52.81±18.4 years. Severe aortic stenosis was the main indication for surgery in 54 (53.4% patients. Posterior annulus enlargement was performed in 16 (15.8% patients. Overall, 54 (53.41% patients underwent concomitant surgery: 28 (27.5% underwent mitral valve replacement, and 13 (12.7% underwent coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Results: Mean valve index was 0.82±0.08 cm2/m2. Overall, 17 (16.83% patients had a valve index lower than 0.75 cm2/m2, without statistical significance for mortality (P=0.12. The overall 10-year survival rate was 83.17%. The rate for patients who underwent isolated aortic valve replacement was 91.3% and 73.1% (P=0.02 for patients who underwent concomitant surgery. In the univariate analysis, the main predictors of mortality were preoperative ejection fraction (P=0.02; HR 0.01 and EuroSCORE II results (P=0.00000042; HR 1.13. In the multivariate analysis, the main predictors of mortality were age (P=0.01, HR 1.04 and concomitant surgery (P=0.01, HR 5.04. Those relationships were statistically significant. Conclusion: A valve index of < 0.75 cm2/m2 did not affect 10-year survival. However, concomitant surgery and age significantly affected mortality.

  12. Spontaneous Thrombosis of a Bicuspid Aortic valve due to Primary Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Farrell

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 51-year-old man who was admitted as an emergency with spontaneous thrombosis of the aortic valve and ascending aorta. At operation he was found to have a congenitally bicuspid aortic valve and subsequent investigation revealed primary antiphospholipid syndrome. He underwent successful removal of the thrombus combined with mechanical replacement of the aortic valve.

  13. Remodelling of the aortic root in severe tricuspid aortic stenosis: implications for transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolzmann, Paul; Desbiolles, Lotus; Scheffel, Hans; Leschka, Sebastian; Marincek, Borut; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Knight, Joseph; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan; Poulikakos, Dimos [Laboratory of Thermodynamics in Emerging Technologies, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Maier, Willibald [University Hospital Zurich, Cardiovascular Center, Zurich (Switzerland); Plass, Andre [University Hospital Zurich, Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2009-06-15

    Detailed knowledge of aortic root geometry is a prerequisite to anticipate complications of transcatheter aortic valve (TAV) implantation. We determined coronary ostial locations and aortic root dimensions in patients with aortic stenosis (AS) and compared these values with normal subjects using computed tomography (CT). One hundred consecutive patients with severe tricuspid AS and 100 consecutive patients without valvular pathology (referred to as the controls) undergoing cardiac dual-source CT were included. Distances from the aortic annulus (AA) to the left coronary ostium (LCO), right coronary ostium (RCO), the height of the left coronary sinus (HLS), right coronary sinus (HRS), and aortic root dimensions [diameters of AA, sinus of Valsalva (SV), and sino-tubular junction(STJ)] were measured. LCO and RCO were 14.9 {+-} 3.2 mm (8.2-25.9) and 16.8 {+-} 3.6 mm (12.0-25.7) in the controls, 15.5 {+-} 2.9 mm (8.8-24.3) and 17.3 {+-} 3.6 mm (7.3-26.0) in patients with AS. Controls and patients with AS had similar values for LCO (P = 0.18), RCO (P = 0.33) and HLS (P = 0.88), whereas HRS (P < 0.05) was significantly larger in patients with AS. AA (r = 0.55,P < 0.001), SV (r = 0.54,P < 0.001), and STJ (r = 0.52,P < 0.001) significantly correlated with the body surface area in the controls; whereas no correlation was found in patients with AS. Patients with AS had significantly larger AA (P < 0.01) and STJ (P < 0.01) diameters when compared with the controls. In patients with severe tricuspid AS, coronary ostial locations were similar to the controls, but a transverse remodelling of the aortic root was recognized. Owing to the large distribution of ostial locations and the dilatation of the aortic root, CT is recommended before TAV implantation in each patient. (orig.)

  14. The future of aortic surgery in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czerny, Martin; Bachet, Jean; Bavaria, Joseph;

    2012-01-01

    the interested reader with an overview of how aortic surgery and (perhaps more accurately) aortic medicine has evolved in Europe, and its present standing; also to provide a glimpse into the future, trying to disseminate the thoughts of a group of people actively involved in the development of aortic medicine......At least every ten years, each specialty should reflect upon its past, its present and its future, in order to be able to reconfirm the direction in which it is headed, to adopt suggestions from inside and outside and, consequently, to improve. As such, the aim of this manuscript is to provide...

  15. Perceval S aortic valve implantation in an achondroplastic Dwarf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos G Baikoussis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite cardiovascular disease in patients with dwarfism is not rare; there is a lack of reports referring to cardiac interventions in such patients. Dwarfism may be due to achondroplasia or hormonal growth disorders. We present a 58-year-old woman with episodes of dyspnea for several months. She underwent on transthoracic echocardiography, and she diagnosed with severe aortic valve stenosis. She referred to our department for surgical treatment of this finding. In accordance of her anthropometric characteristics and her very small aortic annulus, we had the dilemma of prosthesis selection. We decided to implant a stentless valve to optimize her effective orifice area. Our aim is to present the successful Perceval S valve implantation and the descriptions of the problems coming across in operating on these special patients. To our knowledge, this is the first case patient in which a Perceval S valve is implanted according to the international bibliography.

  16. A Quantitative Study of Simulated Bicuspid Aortic Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeto, Kai; Nguyen, Tran; Rodriguez, Javier; Pastuszko, Peter; Nigam, Vishal; Lasheras, Juan

    2010-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that congentially bicuspid aortic valves develop degenerative diseases earlier than the standard trileaflet, but the causes are not well understood. It has been hypothesized that the asymmetrical flow patterns and turbulence found in the bileaflet valves together with abnormally high levels of strain may result in an early thickening and eventually calcification and stenosis. Central to this hypothesis is the need for a precise quantification of the differences in the strain rate levels between bileaflets and trileaflet valves. We present here some in-vitro dynamic measurements of the spatial variation of the strain rate in pig aortic vales conducted in a left ventricular heart flow simulator device. We measure the strain rate of each leaflet during the whole cardiac cycle using phase-locked stereoscopic three-dimensional image surface reconstruction techniques. The bicuspid case is simulated by surgically stitching two of the leaflets in a normal valve.

  17. Análise do tratamento cirúrgico da raiz da aorta com o tubo valvulado e com a preservação da valva aórtica Analysis of aortic root surgery with composite mechanical aortic valve conduit and valve-sparing reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Ribeiro Dias

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Análise comparativa dos resultados imediatos e tardios da reconstrução da raiz da aorta com o tubo valvulado e com a preservação da valva aórtica. MÉTODOS: No período de novembro de 2002 a setembro de 2009, 164 pacientes com idade média de 54 ± 15 anos, sendo 115 do sexo masculino, foram submetidos ao tratamento cirúrgico da raiz da aorta. Foram 125 tubos valvulados e 39 reconstruções da raiz da aorta com preservação da valva aórtica. Dezesseis por cento dos pacientes eram portadores de síndrome de Marfan e 4,3% apresentavam valva aórtica bivalvulada. Cento e quarenta e quatro (88% pacientes foram acompanhados durante tempo médio de seguimento de 41,1 ± 20,8 meses. RESULTADOS: A mortalidade hospitalar total foi de 4,9%; sendo 5,6% nas operações com tubo valvulado e 2,6% nas preservações da valva aórtica (POBJECTIVE: Comparative analysis of early and late results of aortic root reconstruction with aortic valve sparing operations and the composite mechanical valve conduit replacement. METHODS: From November 2002 to September 2009, 164 consecutive patients with mean age 54 ± 15 years, 115 male, underwent the aortic root reconstruction (125 mechanical valve conduit replacements and 39 valve sparing operations. Sixteen percent of patients had Marfan syndrome and 4.3% had bicuspid aortic valve. One hundred and forty-four patients (88% were followed for a mean period of 41.1 ± 20.8 months. RESULTS: The hospital mortality was 4.9%, 5.6% in operations with valved conduits and 2.6% in the valve sparing procedures (P <0.05. There was no difference neither in survival (95% CI = 86% - 96%, P= 0.1 nor in reoperation-free survival (95% CI = 85% - 90%, P = 0.29. The survival free of complications such as bleeding, thromboembolism and endocarditis were favorable to the valve sparing operations, respectively (95% CI = 70% - 95%, P = 0.001, (95% CI = 82% - 95% P = 0.03 and (95% CI = 81% - 95%, P = 0.03. Multivariate analysis

  18. Carotid artery access for transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, Robert A; Block, Peter C; Thourani, Vinod H; Lerakis, Stamatios; Babaliaros, Vasilis

    2013-10-01

    We report three patients who had successful transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) via carotid artery access. None were candidates for thoracotomy (including minimal access incisions) and had no other vascular access sites that would accommodate the transcatheter valve sheath. Antegrade carotid perfusion and retrograde insertion of the delivery sheath maintained cerebral blood flow without sequelae. Carotid access for TAVR is an option for unusual patients without other access.

  19. Lactococcus garvieae Endocarditis on a Prosthetic Biological Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsur, A; Slutzki, T; Flusser, D

    2015-09-01

    Lactococcus garvieae (LG) endocarditis is a rare disease in humans. There are only about 16 reported cases in the world. We report a 76-year-old male patient with LG endocarditis. In depth interview with the patient revealed that 2 weeks prior to admission, he had eaten sushi containing raw fish. Unlike many of the other infections reported, which were on a native mitral valve, our patient's vegetation was on a prosthetic aortic valve.

  20. Congenital bicuspid aortic valve in an English bulldog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Lance C; Scansen, Brian A

    2013-03-01

    A bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) demonstrating moderate valvular stenosis and mild insufficiency was identified in an asymptomatic 1-year-old male cryptorchid English bulldog by transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography. The BAV was most consistent with type 3 morphology, based upon human classification. Pulmonary valve dysplasia with mild pulmonary stenosis and a suspected persistent left cranial vena cava were also identified. Although BAV is the most common congenital cardiac malformation in humans, it is rare in the dog.

  1. Salvage Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Prior to "Bridge" Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Peter; Fearon, William F; Raleigh, Lindsay A; Burdon, Grayson; Rao, Vidya; Boyd, Jack H; Yeung, Alan C; Miller, David Craig; Fischbein, Michael P

    2016-06-01

    We describe a patient who presented in profound cardiogenic shock due to bioprosthetic aortic valve stenosis requiring salvage Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation followed by a "bridge" valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve replacement. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12750 (J Card Surg 2016;31:403-405).

  2. Aortic annulus eccentricity before and after transcatheter aortic valve implantation: Comparison of balloon-expandable and self-expanding prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuhbaeck, Annika, E-mail: annika.schuhbaeck@uk-erlangen.de [Department of Cardiology, University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Weingartner, Christina [Department of Cardiology, University of Gießen, Giessen (Germany); Arnold, Martin; Schmid, Jasmin; Pflederer, Tobias; Marwan, Mohamed [Department of Cardiology, University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Rixe, Johannes; Nef, Holger [Department of Cardiology, University of Gießen, Giessen (Germany); Schneider, Christian [Department of Radiology, University of Gießen, Giessen (Germany); Lell, Michael; Uder, Michael [Department of Radiology, University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Ensminger, Stephan [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Heart and Diabetes Center NRW, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bad Oeynhausen (Germany); Feyrer, Richard; Weyand, Michael [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Achenbach, Stephan [Department of Cardiology, University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Post-implant geometry of catheter-based aortic valve prostheses is influenced by aortic valve calcification. • Balloon-expandable prostheses are more circular as compared to self-expanding prostheses. • The impact of post-implant geometry on valve function needs to be investigated. - Abstract: Introduction: The geometry of the aortic annulus and implanted transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis might influence valve function. We investigated the influence of valve type and aortic valve calcification on post-implant geometry of catheter-based aortic valve prostheses. Methods: Eighty consecutive patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (mean age 82 ± 6 years) underwent computed tomography before and after TAVI. Aortic annulus diameters were determined. Influence of prosthesis type and degree of aortic valve calcification on post-implant eccentricity were analysed. Results: Aortic annulus eccentricity was reduced in patients after TAVI (0.21 ± 0.06 vs. 0.08 ± 0.06, p < 0.0001). Post-TAVI eccentricity was significantly lower in 65 patients following implantation of a balloon-expandable prosthesis as compared to 15 patients who received a self-expanding prosthesis (0.06 ± 0.05 vs. 0.15 ± 0.07, p < 0.0001), even though the extent of aortic valve calcification was not different. After TAVI, patients with a higher calcium amount retained a significantly higher eccentricity compared to patients with lower amounts of calcium. Conclusions: Patients undergoing TAVI with a balloon-expandable prosthesis show a more circular shape of the implanted prosthesis as compared to patients with a self-expanding prosthesis. Eccentricity of the deployed prosthesis is affected by the extent of aortic valve calcification.

  3. Effect of transcatheter aortic valve implantation on QT dispersion in patients with aortic stenosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hakan Erkan; kr elik; Engin Hatem; Mustafa Tark Aa; Levent Korkmaz; Teyyar Gkdeniz; Ahmet arAykan; Ezgi Kalaycolu; Faruk Boyac; mer Faruk rakolu

    2014-01-01

    Background QT dispersion (QTd) is a predictor of ventricular arrhythmia. Ventricular arrhythmia is an important factor influencing morbidity and mortality in patients with aortic stenosis. Surgical aortic valve replacement reduced the QTd in this patients group. However, the effect of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) on QTd in patients with aortic stenosis is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of TAVI on QTd in patients with aortic stenosis. Methods Patients with severe aortic stenosis, who were not candi-dates for surgical aortic valve replacement due to contraindications or high surgical risk, were included in the study. All patients underwent electrocardiographic and echocardiographic evaluation before, and at the 6th month after TAVI, computed QTd and left ventricular mass index (LVMI). Results A total 30 patients were admitted to the study (mean age 83.2 ± 1.0 years, female 21 and male 9, mean valve area 0.7 ± 3 mm2). Edwards SAPIEN heart valves, 23 mm (21 patients) and 26 mm (9 patients), by the transfemoral approach were used in the TAVI procedures. All TAVI procedures were successful. Both QTd and LVMI at the 6th month after TAVI were significantly reduced com-pared with baseline values of QTd and LVMI before TAVI (73.8 ± 4 ms vs. 68 ± 2 ms, P=0.001 and 198 ± 51 g/m² vs. 184 ± 40 g/m², P=0.04, respectively). There was a significant correlation between QTd and LVMI (r=0.646, P<0.001). Conclusions QTd, which malign ventricular arrhythmia marker, and LVMI were significantly reduced after TAVI procedure. TAVI may decrease the possibility of ventricu-lar arrhythmia in patients with aortic stenosis.

  4. Percutaneous aortic valve replacement using a W-model valved stent: a preliminary feasibility study in sheep

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Yuan; ZONG Gang-jun; WANG Yan-yan; JIANG Hai-bin; LI Wei-ping; WU Hong; ZHAO Xian-xian; QIN Yong-wen

    2009-01-01

    Background Percutaneous aortic valve replacement is a promising strategy in the treatment of patients with aortic valve stenosis. And many kinds of valved stents have been implanted in selected patients worldwide. However, the clinical experience is still limited. We developed a W-model valved stent and evaluated the feasibility and safety of percutaneous implantation of the device in the native aortic valve position.Methods A self expanding nitinol stent with W-model, containing porcine pericardium valves in its proximal part, was implanted in six sheep by means of a 14 French catheter through the right common lilac artery under guidance of fluoroscopy. During stent deployment the original aortic valve was pushed against the aortic wall by the self expanding force of the stent while the new valve was expanded. These sheep were followed up shortly after procedure with supra-aortic angiogram and left ventriculography. Additionally, one sheep was sacrificed after the procedure for anatomic evaluation.Results It was possible to replace the aortic valve in the beating heart in four sheep. The procedure failed in two sheep due to coronary orifice occlusion in one case and severe aortic valve regurgitation in the other case. One sheep was killed one hour after percutaneous aortic valve replacement for anatomic evaluation. There were no signs of damage of the aortic intima, or of obstruction of the coronary orifice.Conclusions Percutaneous aortic valve replacement with a W-model valved stent in the beating heart is possible. Further studies are mandatory to assess safety and efficacy of this kind of valved stent in larger sample size and by longer follow-up period.

  5. Surgical outcomes in native valve infectious endocarditis: the experience of the Cardiovascular Surgery Department – Cluj-Napoca Heart Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    MOLNAR, ADRIAN; MURESAN, IOAN; TRIFAN, CATALIN; POP, DANA; SACUI, DIANA

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims The introduction of Duke’s criteria and the improvement of imaging methods has lead to an earlier and a more accurate diagnosis of infectious endocarditis (IE). The options for the best therapeutic approach and the timing of surgery are still a matter of debate and require a close colaboration between the cardiologist, the infectionist and the cardiac surgeon. Methods We undertook a retrospective, descriptive study, spanning over a period of five years (from January 1st, 2007 to December 31st, 2012), on 100 patients who underwent surgery for native valve infectious endocarditis in our unit. Results The patients’ age varied between 13 and 77 years (with a mean of 54 years), of which 85 were males (85%). The main microorganisms responsible for IE were: Streptococcus Spp. (21 cases – 21%), Staphylococcus Spp. (15 cases – 15%), and Enterococcus Spp. (9 cases – 9%). The potential source of infection was identified in 26 patients (26%), with most cases being in the dental area (16 cases – 16%). The lesions caused by IE were situated in the left heart in 96 patients (96%), mostly on the aortic valve (50 cases – 50%). In most cases (82%) we found preexisting endocardial lesions which predisposed to the development of IE, most of them being degenerative valvular lesions (38 cases – 38%). We performed the following surgical procedures: surgery on a single valve - aortic valve replacement (40 cases), mitral valve replacement (19 cases), mitral valve repair (1 case), surgery on more than one valve – mitral and aortic valve replacement (20 cases), aortic and tricuspid valve replacement (1 case), aortic valve replacement with a mechanical valve associated with mitral valve repair (5 cases), aortic valve replacement with a biological valve associated with mitral valve repair (2 cases), and mitral valve replacement with a mechanical valve combined with De Vega procedure on the tricuspid valve (1 case). In 5 patients (5%) the bacteriological

  6. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Assisted with Microcatheter: A New Method to Avoid Coronary Artery Obstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Chen; Guo-Jun Chu; Fei-Yu Wang; Yu-Feng Zhu; Ben Zhang; Xian-Xian Zhao; Yong-Wen Qin

    2015-01-01

    Background:Lack of fluoroscopic landmarks can make valve deployment more difficult in patients with absent aortic valve (AV)calcification.The goal of this article was to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness oftranscatheter implantation of a valved stent into the AV position of a goat,assisted with a microcatheter which provides accurate positioning of coronary artery ostia to help valved stent deployment.Methods:The subjects were 10 healthy goats in this study.A microcatheter was introduced into the distal site of right coronary artery (RCA)through femoral artery sheath.A minimal thoracic surgery approach was used to access the apex of the heart.The apex of the left ventricle was punctured; a delivery catheter equipped with the valved stent was introduced over a stiffguidewire into the aorta arch.We could accurately locate the RCA ostia through the microcatheter placed in the RCA under fluoroscopy.After correct valve position was confirmed,the valved stent was implanted after rapid inflation of the balloon.The immediate outcome of the function of the valved stents was evaluated after implantation.Results:All ten devices were successfully implanted into the AV position of the goats.Immediate observation after the procedure showed that the valved stents were in the desired position after implantation by angiography,echocardiogram.No obstruction of coronary artery ostia occurred,and no moderate to severe aortic regurgitation was observed.Conclusions:When the procedure of transcatheter implantation of a balloon-expandable valved stent into the AV position of goats is assisted with microcatheter positioning coronary artery ostia,the success rate of operation can be increased in those with noncalcified AV.

  7. Bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics: a fluid-structure interaction study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Santanu; Seaman, Clara; Sucosky, Philippe

    2011-11-01

    The bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is a congenital defect in which the aortic valve forms with two leaflets instead of three. While calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) also develops in the normal tricuspid aortic valve (TAV), its progression in the BAV is more rapid. Although studies have suggested a mechano-potential root for the disease, the native BAV hemodynamics remains largely unknown. This study aimed at characterizing BAV hemodynamics and quantifying the degree of wall-shear stress (WSS) abnormality on BAV leaflets. Fluid-structure interaction models validated with particle-image velocimetry were designed to predict the flow and leaflet dynamics in idealized TAV and BAV anatomies. Valvular function was quantified in terms of the effective orifice area. The regional leaflet WSS was characterized in terms of oscillatory shear index, temporal shear magnitude and temporal shear gradient. The predictions indicate the intrinsic degree of stenosis of the BAV anatomy, reveal drastic differences in shear stress magnitude and pulsatility on BAV and TAV leaflets and confirm the side- and site-specificity of the leaflet WSS. Given the ability of abnormal fluid shear stress to trigger valvular inflammation, these results support the existence of a mechano-etiology of CAVD in the BAV.

  8. Sudden death in infancy due to bicuspid aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayel, Ferah; Ozaslan, Abdi; Turan, Arzu Akcay; Pakis, Isil; Ketenci, Cetin; Eroglu, Ayse Guler

    2006-09-01

    Symptoms of bicuspid aortic valve usually occur in the age group of 50-70 years, but rarely, it can also lead to sudden unexpected death in infancy and early childhood. The autopsy of a 2-month-old baby boy, found dead in his cot, revealed the heart weight as 25 g, and the macroscopic examination showed the circumference of the aortic valve consisting of two leaflets as 8 mm. The thickness of the left ventricle, right ventricle, and septum was measured as 8, 7, and 10 mm, respectively. Microscopically, the heart revealed hypertrophic changes of myocytes. Subendocardial areas displayed necrosis of myocytes, and severe and diffuse ischemic changes characterized by loss of myofibers and vacuolization. Interstitial pneumonia was identified in the lungs. Death occurred as a result of a congenital bicuspid aortic valve obstructing the left ventricular outflow tract complicated by lung infection. As there are only a few reported cases in infancy, and congenital bicuspid aortic valve can lead to sudden unexpected death, this case is presented to the forensic community.

  9. Ruptured aortic valve cusp: a complication of the Heimlich maneuver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, J H; Menapace, F J; Howell, R R

    1983-07-01

    A case of traumatic rupture of the aortic valve as a complication of the Heimlich maneuver is presented. Conformation was made by comparative echocardiographic studies available from three months before and immediately following the incident. The patient refused surgical intervention and died one month later with severe congestive heart failure despite vigorous medical therapy.

  10. Aortic valve disease : novel imaging insights from diagnosis to therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ewe, See Hooi

    2016-01-01

    The general introduction of this thesis outlines the epidemiology and the impact of aortic valve disease in the western world. The thesis further discusses the current and future role of advanced cardiac imaging modalities, using 3D echocardiography and speckle tracking echocardiography strain imagi

  11. Idiopathic mitral valve prolapse with tricuspid, aortic and pulmonary valve involvement: An autopsy case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heena M Desai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitral valve prolapse (MVP is usually asymptomatic, but can be associated with complications such as infective endocarditis, mitral regurgitation, thromboembolism and sudden cardiac death. It has been very rarely reported to occur in association with other valvular involvement. A 55-year-old male patient was brought dead and at autopsy the mitral valve orifice was stenotic and the leaflets were enlarged, myxoid and bulging suggestive of MVP and chordae tendinae were thickened, stretched and elongated. Similar changes were seen in the tricuspid valve. The pulmonary and aortic valves also showed myxomatous degeneration of their cusps. Myxomatous degeneration is the most common cause of MVP and it can be associated with involvement of the other valves. Concomitant involvement of the aortic valve has been reported, however it is very rare and simultaneous involvement of the pulmonary valve has not been reported in the literature so far. We report a case of MVP associated with myxomatous degeneration of the tricuspid, pulmonary and aortic valves.

  12. Annular management during aortic valve repair: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunihara, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Annuloplasty is considered to play a key role to control aortic valve regurgitation (AR) and prevent recurrence of AR after aortic valve repair, because aortic root dilatation has emerged as a risk factor for recurrence of AR. Various modifications of annuloplasty have been advocated, however, none of them has become standardized. Thus in this review they are outlined and classified (internal/external, with/without ring, rigid/flexible ring), and their advantages and disadvantages are clarified. Their clinical outcomes seem currently acceptable in general, and external flexible annuloplasty has been performed more frequently with favorable outcomes. However, they are still performed for a minority of patients by special experienced teams with limited follow-up periods. Therefore, it seems too early to determine the superiority or inferiority of each approach. We must carefully conduct evaluation to clarify which approach will become reproducible, effective, and standardized.

  13. Current role of endovascular therapy in Marfan patients with previous aortic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Akin

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim Akin, Stephan Kische, Tim C Rehders, Tushar Chatterjee, Henrik Schneider, Thomas Körber, Christoph A Nienaber, Hüseyin InceDepartment of Medicine, Division of Cardiology at the University Hospital Rostock, Rostock School of Medicine, Ernst-Heydemann-Str. 6, 18057 Rostock, GermanyAbstract: The Marfan syndrome is a heritable disorder of the connective tissue which affects the cardiovascular, ocular, and skeletal system. The cardiovascular manifestation with aortic root dilatation, aortic valve regurgitation, and aortic dissection has a prevalence of 60% to 90% and determines the premature death of these patients. Thirty-four percent of the patients with Marfan syndrome will have serious cardiovascular complications requiring surgery in the first 10 years after diagnosis. Before aortic surgery became available, the majority of the patients died by the age of 32 years. Introduction in the aortic surgery techniques caused an increase of the 10 year survival rate up to 97%. The purpose of this article is to give an overview about the feasibility and outcome of stent-graft placement in the descending thoracic aorta in Marfan patients with previous aortic surgery.Keywords: Marfan syndrome, aortic dissection, root replacement, stent-graft, previous aortic surgery

  14. The role of balloon aortic valvuloplasty in the era of transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczek, Krzysztof; Pres, Damian; Krajewski, Adam; Poloński, Lech; Zembala, Marian; Gąsior, Mariusz

    2015-01-01

    Balloon aortic valvuloplasty is recommended in patients not suitable for transcatheter aortic valve implantation/aortic valve replacement (TAVI/AVR) or when such interventions are temporarily contraindicated. The number of performed balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) procedures has been increasing in recent years. Valvuloplasty enables the selection of individuals with severe left ventricular dysfunction or with symptoms of uncertain origin resulting from concomitant disorders (including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD]) who can benefit from destination therapy (AVR/TAVI). Thanks to improved equipment, the number of adverse effects is now lower than it was in the first years after the advent of BAV. Valvuloplasty can be safely performed even in unstable patients, but long-term results remain poor. In view of the limited availability of TAVI in Poland, it is reasonable to qualify patients for BAV more often, as it is a relatively safe procedure improving the clinical condition of patients awaiting AVR/TAVI. PMID:26336471

  15. Noncardiac surgery in patients with aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Charlotte; Jørgensen, Mads Emil; Martinsson, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Past research has identified aortic stenosis (AS) as a major risk factor for adverse outcomes in noncardiac surgery; however, more contemporary studies have questioned the grave prognosis. To further our understanding of this, the risks of a 30-day major adverse cardiovascular event...

  16. Raloxifene attenuates Gas6 and apoptosis in experimental aortic valve disease in renal failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedat, Suzan; Beeri, Ronen; Valitsky, Michael; Daher, Sameh; Kott-Gutkowski, Miriam; Gal-Moscovici, Anca; Sosna, Jacob; Rajamannan, Nalini M.; Lotan, Chaim

    2011-01-01

    Renal failure is associated with aortic valve calcification. Using our rat model of uremia-induced reversible aortic valve calcification, we assessed the role of apoptosis and survival pathways in that disease. We also explored the effects of raloxifene, an estrogen receptor modulator, on valvular calcification. Gene array analysis was performed in aortic valves obtained from three groups of rats (n = 7 rats/group): calcified valves obtained from rats fed with uremic diet, valves after calcification resolution following diet cessation, and control. In addition, four groups of rats (n = 10 rats/group) were used to evaluate the effect of raloxifene in aortic valve calcification: three groups as mentioned above and a fourth group fed with the uremic diet that also received daily raloxifene. Evaluation included imaging, histology, and antigen expression analysis. Gene array results showed that the majority of the altered expressed genes were in diet group valves. Most apoptosis-related genes were changed in a proapoptotic direction in calcified valves. Apoptosis and decreases in several survival pathways were confirmed in calcified valves. Resolution of aortic valve calcification was accompanied by decreased apoptosis and upregulation of survival pathways. Imaging and histology demonstrated that raloxifene significantly decreased aortic valve calcification. In conclusion, downregulation of several survival pathways and apoptosis are involved in the pathogenesis of aortic valve calcification. The beneficial effect of raloxifene in valve calcification is related to apoptosis modulation. This novel observation is important for developing remedies for aortic valve calcification in patients with renal failure. PMID:21335463

  17. Fluid dynamics of coarctation of the aorta and effect of bicuspid aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarz-Motamed, Zahra; Garcia, Julio; Kadem, Lyes

    2013-01-01

    Up to 80% of patients with coarctation of the aorta (COA) have a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV). Patients with COA and BAV have elevated risks of aortic complications despite successful surgical repair. The development of such complications involves the interplay between the mechanical forces applied on the artery and the biological processes occurring at the cellular level. The focus of this study is on hemodynamic modifications induced in the aorta in the presence of a COA and a BAV. For this purpose, numerical investigations and magnetic resonance imaging measurements were conducted with different configurations: (1) normal: normal aorta and normal aortic valve; (2) isolated COA: aorta with COA (75% reduction by area) and normal aortic valve; (3) complex COA: aorta with the same severity of COA (75% reduction by area) and BAV. The results show that the coexistence of COA and BAV significantly alters blood flow in the aorta with a significant increase in the maximal velocity, secondary flow, pressure loss, time-averaged wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index downstream of the COA. These findings can contribute to a better understanding of why patients with complex COA have adverse outcome even following a successful surgery.

  18. [Ascending aorta replacement late after aortic valve replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yasunari; Ito, Toshiaki; Maekawa, Atsuo; Sawaki, Sadanari; Fujii, Genyo; Hoshino, Satoshi; Tokoro, Masayoshi; Yanagisawa, Junji

    2013-07-01

    Replacement of the asceding aorta is indicated in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement( AVR), if the diameter of the ascending aorta is greater than 5.0 cm. If the diameter of the asceding aorta is from 4.0 to 5.0 cm, it was arguable whether replacement of the ascending aorta should be performed. Nine patients who underwent reoperative ascending aorta replacement after AVR were reviewed retrospectively. Reoperation on the asending aorta replacement was performed 11.8±7.2 years (range 1y5m~23y3m) after AVR. Mean patient age was 69.9±6.3 (range 60~81). In 2 cases, reoperations were performed early year after AVR. Although ascending aorta was dilated at the 1st operation, replacement wasn't performed for the age and minimally invasive cardiac surgery (MICS). In 3 cases, reoperations were performed more than 10 years later. On these cases, ascending aorta aneurysm and dissection occurred with no pain and were pointed out by computed tomography(CT) or ultrasonic cardiogram(UCG). We think that patients with dilatation of the ascending aorta should undergo AVR and aorta replacement at the 1st operation regardness of age. It is important that patients who underwent AVR should undergo a regular checkup on the ascending aorta.

  19. Continuous normothermic retrograde cardioplegia for valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martella, A T; Hoffman, D M; Nakao, T; Frater, R W

    1994-07-01

    We have studied warm heart surgery, deemed as continuous warm blood cardioplegia and normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), as an alternative to the technique of intermittent cold cardioplegia for valvular surgery. Between August 1990 and January 1994, 137 consecutive patients underwent valve repair or replacement using normothermic CPB. Eighty-six of these patients received continuous normothermic retrograde blood cardioplegia via the coronary sinus (CNRC). Fifty-one patients received intermittent cold blood cardioplegia (ICBC). All procedures were performed by the same surgeon (RWMF). The two groups were matched for age, sex, NYHA class, preoperative ejection fraction, diagnosis, procedure and activated clotting time. Warm blood cardioplegia was delivered continuously via the coronary sinus after antegrade arrest (oxygenated blood 1:4 to 1:3, 37 degrees C, 250-300 ml/min, maintaining coronary sinus pressures of 40-60 mmHg. Perioperative myocardial infarction was significantly less prevalent (4.6 vs. 8.0%; p < 0.05) in the warm cardioplegia group. Cardiac output immediately after bypass was significantly higher than before bypass only in the CNRC group (4.1 +/- 0.8 to 5.2 +/- 0.9 L/min; p < 0.01). CNRC patients had significantly higher incidence of spontaneous resumption of sinus rhythm at cross-clamp removal (80 of 86, 93%) compared to the hypothermic patients (14 of 51, 27%, p < 0.001). The time from removal of the aortic cross-clamp to discontinuation of CPB (reperfusion time) was significantly shorter in the warm cardioplegia group (43 +/- 7.4 versus 75 +/- 10.2 min; p < 0.001.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. TAVI: Results with the transapical aortic valve implantation%TAVA:经皮主动脉瓣置换术后结果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.-G.Wollert

    2010-01-01

    @@ The number of older patients presenting any form of degenerative aortic valve disease growths constantly due to increasing life expectancy.For many patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis,advanced age and extensive co-morbidity make the risk of conventional surgery unacceptably high.

  1. A tetrad of bicuspid aortic valve association: A single-stage repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Ramachandra; Patnaik, A. N.; Mishra, Ramesh C.; Kumari, N. Rama; Gulati, A. S.

    2012-01-01

    We report a 27 years old male who presented with a combination of both congenital and acquired cardiac defects. This syndrome complex includes congenital bicuspid aortic valve, Seller's grade II aortic regurgitation, juxta- subclavian coarctation, stenosis of ostium of left subclavian artery and ruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysm without any evidence of infective endocarditis. This type of constellation is extremely rare. Neither coarctation of aorta with left subclavian artery stenosis nor the rupture of sinus Valsalva had a favorable pathology for percutaneus intervention. Taking account into morbidity associated with repeated surgery and anesthesia patient underwent a single stage surgical repair of both the defects by two surgical incisions. The approaches include median sternotomy for rupture of sinus of Valsalva and lateral thoracotomy for coarctation with left subclavian artery stenosis. The surgery was uneventful. After three months follow up echocardiography showed mild residual gradient across the repaired coarctation segment, mild aortic regurgitation and no residual left to right shunt. This patient is under follow up. This is an extremely rare case of single stage successful repair of coarctation and rupture of sinus of Valsalva associated with congenital bicuspid aortic valve. PMID:22629035

  2. No clinical effect of prosthesis-patient mismatch after transcatheter versus surgical aortic valve replacement in intermediate- and low-risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis at mid-term follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav Hørsted; Steinbrüchel, Daniel Andreas; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) after surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) for severe aortic valve stenosis (AVS) is common, but less common after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients considered at high risk for death after surgery. The objectives...... of this study were to determine incidence and clinical effect of PPM after SAVR and TAVR in a primarily low-risk patient group. METHODS: Patients 70 years or older with severe isolated AVS, regardless of predicted operative mortality risk, were consecutively randomized 1:1 to TAVR using a self......-expandable bioprosthesis (n = 145) or SAVR (n = 135). Post-procedure PPM was graded after 3 months as follows: Not present-mild, if indexed effective orifice area (iEOA) >0.85 cm(2)/m(2), moderate, if 0.65 cm(2)/m(2) Outcomes were major adverse cardiac...

  3. Simulation study and function analysis of the dynamic aortic valve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Dongdong; BAI Jing

    2006-01-01

    The dynamic aortic valve (DAV) is a new left ventricular assist device, a micro-axial blood pump implemented at the position of the aortic valve, pumping blood from the left ventricle into the aortic artery. The present dynamic aortic valve operates at 7 different rotation speeds, ranging from 3000 r/min (speed 1) to 9000 r/min (speed 7). Because in vivo experiments need a lot of live animals and take a long period of time, modeling and simulation have been widely used to simulate and analyze hydra-dynamic property of the DAV and its assisting effects. With the measurements from the mock circulatory loop, a mathematic model of the DAV is established and embedded into the previously developed canine circulatory system. Using this model, the effect of the DAV on the failing heart at each rotation speed level is investigated. The vital cardiac variables are computed and compared with in vivo experimental results, which are in good agreement with an acceptable difference mostly 15 %. The establishment of the DAV model and its simulation are useful for further improvement of the DAV device.

  4. Deformation Differences between Tricuspid and Bicuspid Aortic Valves in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeto, Kai; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Pastuszko, Peter; Nigam, Vishal; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2011-11-01

    It has been shown in clinical studies that patients with congenital bicuspid aortic valves (CBAVs) develop degenerative calcification of the leaflets at young ages compared to patients with the normal tricuspid aortic valves (TAVs). It has been hypothesized that the asymmetrical geometry of the leaflets in CBAVs, flow shear stresses (SS), disturbed flow, and excessive strain rate levels are possible causes for the early calcification and stenosis. Central to the validation of this hypothesis is the need to quantify the differences in strain rate levels between the BAVs and TAVs. We simulate the CBAVs by surgically stitching two of the leaflets of a porcine aortic valve together. To quantify strain differences, we performed in-vitro experiments in both trileaflet and bileaflet valves by tracking the motion of small ink dots marked on each leaflet surface. We then used phase-locked stereo photogrammetry to reconstruct at each instant of time the 3D surface of the leaflets and measure the strain rates in both radial and circumferential directions during the whole cardiac cycle. Our results indicate that the total strain rate of the simulated BAVs is about 15 to 20% higher than the normal leaflets of TAVs at systole. In the BAVs' case, the fused leaflet stretches radially up to 25% higher than the reference length. The excessive stretching in both directions in the fused leaflet results in large changes in the flow patterns and associated wall SS.

  5. Noninvasive assessment of filling pressure and left atrial pressure overload in severe aortic valve stenosis: relation to ventricular remodeling and clinical outcome after aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbæk, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K

    2011-01-01

    One of the hemodynamic consequences of aortic valve stenosis is pressure overload leading to left atrial dilatation. Left atrial size is a known risk factor providing prognostic information in several cardiac conditions. It is not known if this is also the case in patients with aortic valve...

  6. Impact of different aortic valve calcification patterns on the outcome of transcatheter aortic valve implantation: A finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturla, Francesco; Ronzoni, Mattia; Vitali, Mattia; Dimasi, Annalisa; Vismara, Riccardo; Preston-Maher, Georgia; Burriesci, Gaetano; Votta, Emiliano; Redaelli, Alberto

    2016-08-16

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) can treat symptomatic patients with calcific aortic stenosis. However, the severity and distribution of the calcification of valve leaflets can impair the TAVI efficacy. Here we tackle this issue from a biomechanical standpoint, by finite element simulation of a widely adopted balloon-expandable TAVI in three models representing the aortic root with different scenarios of calcific aortic stenosis. We developed a modeling approach realistically accounting for aortic root pressurization and complex anatomy, detailed calcification patterns, and for the actual stent deployment through balloon-expansion. Numerical results highlighted the dependency on the specific calcification pattern of the "dog-boning" of the stent. Also, local stent distortions were associated with leaflet calcifications, and led to localized gaps between the TAVI stent and the aortic tissues, with potential implications in terms of paravalvular leakage. High stresses were found on calcium deposits, which may be a risk factor for stroke; their magnitude and the extent of the affected regions substantially increased for the case of an "arc-shaped" calcification, running from commissure to commissure. Moreover, high stresses due to the interaction between the aortic wall and the leaflet calcifications were computed in the annular region, suggesting an increased risk for annular damage. Our analyses suggest a relation between the alteration of the stresses in the native anatomical components and prosthetic implant with the presence and distribution of relevant calcifications. This alteration is dependent on the patient-specific features of the calcific aortic stenosis and may be a relevant indicator of suboptimal TAVI results.

  7. Transcatheter aortic valve repair for management of aortic insufficiency in patients supported with left ventricular assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Jay D; McCabe, James M; Dardas, Todd; Aldea, Gabriel S; Mokadam, Nahush A

    2016-10-01

    The development of new aortic insufficiency after a period of support with a left ventricular assist device can result in progressive heart failure symptoms. Transcatheter aortic valve repair can be an effective treatment in selected patients, but the lack of aortic valve calcification can result in unstable prostheses or paravalvular leak. We describe a technique of deploying a self-expanding CoreValve (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN, USA) into the aortic annulus, followed by a balloon-expandable SAPIEN-3 (Edwards, Irvine, CA, USA).

  8. Significant mitral regurgitation left untreated at the time of aortic valve replacement: a comprehensive review of a frequent entity in the transcatheter aortic valve replacement era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nombela-Franco, Luis; Ribeiro, Henrique Barbosa; Urena, Marina; Allende, Ricardo; Amat-Santos, Ignacio; DeLarochellière, Robert; Dumont, Eric; Doyle, Daniel; DeLarochellière, Hugo; Laflamme, Jerôme; Laflamme, Louis; García, Eulogio; Macaya, Carlos; Jiménez-Quevedo, Pilar; Côté, Mélanie; Bergeron, Sebastien; Beaudoin, Jonathan; Pibarot, Philippe; Rodés-Cabau, Josep

    2014-06-24

    Significant mitral regurgitation (MR) is frequent in patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS). In these cases, concomitant mitral valve repair or replacement is usually performed at the time of surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has recently been considered as an alternative for patients at high or prohibitive surgical risk. However, concomitant significant MR in this setting is typically left untreated. Moderate to severe MR after aortic valve replacement is therefore a relevant entity in the TAVR era. The purpose of this review is to present the current knowledge on the clinical impact and post-procedural evolution of concomitant significant MR in patients with severe AS who have undergone aortic valve replacement (SAVR and TAVR). This information could contribute to improving both the clinical decision-making process in and management of this challenging group of patients.

  9. 2. Minimally invasive mitral valve surgery why do you take the risks?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Attia

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available During recent years, minimally invasive mitral valve surgery (MIMVS become the preferred method of mitral valve repair and replacement in many institutions worldwide with excellent results, in spite of there is no clear difinition of minimally invasive surgery and we do not have efficient studies about the risks of MIMVS comparing to conventional mitral valve surgery. Many studies are needed to clarify the need for either conventional or minimally invasive mitral valve surgery instead of personal preference. The patient’s demographic profile, intraoperative data and postoperative outcomes of patients undergoing minimally invasive mitral valve surgery were retrospectively collected from our database from May 2011 to April 2014. We will present early and mid-term outcomes of patients undergoing minimally invasive mitral valve surgery in our institution. Seventy consecutive patients (45 male and 25 female, age 35 ± 12 years, underwent MIMVS surgery. Mean preoperative New York Heart Association function class was 2.6 ± 0.7. Mean ejection fraction was 50 ± 8. Cardiopulmonary bypass was instituted through femoral cannulation (28 of 70, 40%, or direct aortic cannulation (42 of 70, 25%. Aortic cross-clamp used in (66 of 70, 94.2%. Without aortic cross-clamp in (4 of 70, 5.7%, mitral valve repair has been done in (52 of 70, 74.2%, mitral valve replacement (18 of 70, 25.7%. Concomitant procedures included AF ablation (24 of 70, 34.2%, and tricuspid valve repair (33 of 70, 47.1%. No mortality recorded, residual mitral regurge was found in (6 of 70, 8.5% during 1 year follow up. Cardiopulmonary bypass, and “skin to skin” surgery were 95 ± 35 and 250 ± 74 min, respectively. 4 patients (5.7% underwent reexploration for bleeding and (57 of 70, 81.4% did not receive any blood transfusions. Six patients (8.5% sustained face oedema. Mean length of hospital stay was 7 ± 3.8 days. 18 patients (25.7% did not feel any interest regarding

  10. Aortic Valve Replacement in Young Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M.A. Klieverik (Loes Maria Anne)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractWorldwide the incidence and burden of heart valve disease is increasing due to aging of the world population and the problem of rheumatic cardiac disease in developing countries and in parts of the population in the developed world.1 Between 2007 and 2050 the world population will increa

  11. Relation of thoracic aortic and aortic valve calcium to coronary artery calcium and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Nathan D; Sciammarella, Maria; Arad, Yadon; Miranda-Peats, Romalisa; Polk, Donna; Hachamovich, Rory; Friedman, John; Hayes, Sean; Daniell, Anthony; Berman, Daniel S

    2003-10-15

    Aortic calcium, aortic valve calcium (AVC), and coronary artery calcium (CAC) have been associated with cardiovascular event risk. We examined the prevalence of thoracic aortic calcium (TAC) and AVC in relation to the presence and extent of CAC, cardiovascular risk factors, and estimated risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). In 2,740 persons without known CHD aged 20 to 79 years, CAC was assessed by electron beam- or multidetector-computed tomography. We determined the prevalence of TAC and AVC in relation to CAC, CHD risk factors, and predicted 10-year risk of CHD. A close correspondence of TAC and AVC was observed with CAC. TAC and AVC increased with age; by the eighth decade of life, the prevalence of TAC was similar to that of CAC (>80%), and 36% of men and 24% of women had AVC. Age, male gender, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were directly related to the likelihood of CAC, TAC, and AVC; higher diastolic blood pressure and cigarette smoking additionally predicted CAC. Body mass index and higher systolic and lower diastolic blood pressures were also related to TAC, and higher body mass index and lower diastolic blood pressure were related to AVC. Calculated risk of CHD increased with the presence of AVC and TAC across levels of CAC. TAC and AVC provided incremental value over CAC in association with the 10-year calculated risk of CHD. If longitudinal studies show an incremental value of aortic and aortic valve calcium over that of CAC for prediction of cardiovascular events, future guidelines for risk assessment incorporating CAC assessment may additionally incorporate the measurement of aortic and/or aortic valve calcium.

  12. Advanced age and the clinical outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve implan-tation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Osama Alsara; Ahmad Alsarah; Heather Laird-Fick

    2014-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis (AS) is common in the elderly. Although surgical replacement of the valve has been the gold standard of management, many patients have been excluded from surgery because they were very old, frail, or had co-morbidities that increased operative risks. In the last decade, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has emerged as a new treatment option suitable for these patients. This article reviews the available literature on the role of TAVI in elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis. Published studies showed that elderly individuals who underwent TAVI experienced better in-hospital recovery, and similar short and mid-term mortality compared to those underwent surgical treatment of AS. However, long-term outcomes of TAVI in elderly patients are still unknown. The available data in the literature on the ef-fect of advanced age on clinical outcomes of TAVI are limited, but the data that are available suggest that TAVI is a beneficial and tolerable procedure in very old patients. Some of the expected complications after TAVI are reported more in the oldest patients such as vascular in-jures. Other complications were comparable in TAVI patients regardless of their age group. However, very old patients may need closer monitoring to avoid further morbidities and mortality.

  13. Successful treatment by transcatheter aortic valve implantation of severe aortic regurgitation in a patient with ascending aorta prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Marco Luciano; Bocchi, Roberto; Barbaro, Cristina; Pagnotta, Paolo; Mennuni, Marco; Zavalloni, Dennis; Gasparini, Gabriele; Presbitero, Patrizia

    2013-05-01

    Severe aortic regurgitation (AR), when intervention is required, is managed by surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Recently, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) for severe aortic stenosis (AS) has shown non-inferiority to SAVR and superiority to medical management. TAVR could be a valid "off label" option to treat severe AR for patients unsuitable for SAVR due to their high surgical risk. Among aortic pathologies leading to severe AR, those involving the aortic root are considered as high risk procedures and thus prohibit TAVR. For these reasons TAVR is not an option for severe AR due to concomitant aortic root dilatation and degeneration. We report a successful case of TAVR for severe AR due to dilatation of degenerated tract of aortic root.

  14. Interleukin-37 suppresses the osteogenic responses of human aortic valve interstitial cells in vitro and alleviates valve lesions in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qingchun; Song, Rui; Fullerton, David A.; Ao, Lihua; Zhai, Yufeng; Li, Suzhao; Ballak, Dov B.; Cleveland, Joseph C.; Reece, T. Brett; McKinsey, Timothy A.; Xu, Dingli; Dinarello, Charles A.; Meng, Xianzhong

    2017-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease is a chronic inflammatory process, and aortic valve interstitial cells (AVICs) from diseased aortic valves express greater levels of osteogenic factors in response to proinflammatory stimulation. Here, we report that lower cellular levels of IL-37 in AVICs of diseased human aortic valves likely account for augmented expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) following stimulation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 or 4. Treatment of diseased AVICs with recombinant human IL-37 suppresses the levels of BMP-2 and ALP as well as calcium deposit formation. In mice, aortic valve thickening is observed when exposed to a TLR4 agonist or a high fat diet for a prolonged period; however, mice expressing human IL-37 exhibit significantly lower BMP-2 levels and less aortic valve thickening when subjected to the same regimens. A high fat diet in mice results in oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) deposition in aortic valve leaflets. Moreover, the osteogenic responses in human AVICs induced by oxLDL are suppressed by recombinant IL-37. Mechanistically, reduced osteogenic responses to oxLDL in human AVICs are associated with the ability of IL-37 to inhibit NF-κB and ERK1/2. These findings suggest that augmented expression of osteogenic factors in AVICs of diseased aortic valves from humans is at least partly due to a relative IL-37 deficiency. Because recombinant IL-37 suppresses the osteogenic responses in human AVICs and alleviates aortic valve lesions in mice exposed to high fat diet or a proinflammatory stimulus, IL-37 has therapeutic potential for progressive calcific aortic valve disease. PMID:28137840

  15. Case Report: Calcific Aortic Valve Stenosis Due to Central Retinal Artery Occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ender Sener

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this case, it was reported that a 48 year old male patient with spontaneous central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO due to calcific aortic valve stenosis. He had no other systemic disease. CRAO usually occurs in elder patients with systemic risk factors. CRAO results in sudden, painless and severe vision loss. Altough, CRAO is seen rarely under 50 year old, it may appear in younger patient with aortic valve disease and calcific aortic valve stenosis caused cardiac disease.

  16. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in a Patient With a Previous Bioprosthetic Mitral Valve Replacement: Report of a Delayed Fatal Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Frédéric; Lamarche, Yoan; Le, Van Hoai Viet; Doucet, Michel; Roméo, Philippe; Généreux, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    We report on a man with bioprosthetic mitral valve perforation who presented late after transcatheter aortic valve replacement with a balloon-expandable transcatheter heart valve (THV). The protrusion of the commissural strut of the bioprosthetic mitral valve coupled with the low implanted THV resulted in repetitive trauma leading to rupture of a mitral leaflet. Potential preventive strategies are discussed. This case illustrates the importance of preprocedural imaging screening and cautious THV deployment in patients with a bioprosthetic mitral valve.

  17. Rapid prototyping in aortic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangeas, Petros; Voulalas, Grigorios; Ktenidis, Kiriakos

    2016-04-01

    3D printing provides the sequential addition of material layers and, thus, the opportunity to print parts and components made of different materials with variable mechanical and physical properties. It helps us create 3D anatomical models for the better planning of surgical procedures when needed, since it can reveal any complex anatomical feature. Images of abdominal aortic aneurysms received by computed tomographic angiography were converted into 3D images using a Google SketchUp free software and saved in stereolithography format. Using a 3D printer (Makerbot), a model made of polylactic acid material (thermoplastic filament) was printed. A 3D model of an abdominal aorta aneurysm was created in 138 min, while the model was a precise copy of the aorta visualized in the computed tomographic images. The total cost (including the initial cost of the printer) reached 1303.00 euros. 3D imaging and modelling using different materials can be very useful in cases when anatomical difficulties are recognized through the computed tomographic images and a tactile approach is demanded preoperatively. In this way, major complications during abdominal aorta aneurysm management can be predicted and prevented. Furthermore, the model can be used as a mould; the development of new, more biocompatible, less antigenic and individualized can become a challenge in the future.

  18. The Perceval S Aortic Valve Implantation in Patients with Porcelain Aorta; is this Ideal Option?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikoussis, Nikolaos G; Dedeilias, Panagiotis; Prappa, Efstathia; Argiriou, Michalis

    2017-01-01

    We would like to present in this paper a patient with severe aortic valve stenosis referred to our department for surgical aortic valve replacement. In this patient, it was intraoperatively detected an unexpected heavily calcified porcelain ascending aorta. We present the treatment options in this situation, the difficulties affronted intraoperatively, the significance of the preoperative chest computed tomography scan and the use of the Perceval S aortic valve as ideal bioprosthesis implantation. This is a self-expanding, self-anchoring, and sutureless valve with a wide indication in all patients requiring aortic bioprosthesis. PMID:28074827

  19. Late Paravalvular Aortic Regurgitation: Migration of the Valve or Late Recoil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Ashkan; Pourafshar, Negiin; Park, Ki E; Choi, Calvin Y; Mogali, Kiran; Stinson, Wade W; Manning, Eddie W; Bavry, Anthony A

    2017-01-02

    A 79-year-old man underwent trans-catheter aortic valve replacement for symptomatic severe aortic stenosis with a 26-mm Edwards SAPIEN XT valve. Immediately after valve deployment there was moderate amount of paravalvular leak. Post-dilation was performed with an additional 2 cc of volume, and the paravalvular leak was reduced to trace. Nine months later, trans-thoracic echocardiography revealed moderate to severe paravalvular leak and possible aortic migration of the valve. The patient was brought back for the treatment of the paravalvular leak which was suspected to be due to valve migration. However, fluoroscopy and trans-esophageal echocardiography showed good valve position. Measurement of late valve recoil in the Coplanar view using cine-angiographic analysis software showed that the lower third of the valve had the greatest late recoil (-1.74 mm, 6.55%), which presumably accounted for the progression of the paravalvular leak. Valve-in-valve trans-catheter aortic valve replacement was performed with a 26-mm SAPIEN 3 valve and the paravalvular leak was reduced to trace. This case displays late recoil as a likely mechanism for development of paravalvular leak after SAPIEN XT valve implantation. Our case illustrates that late recoil needs to be systematically evaluated in future studies, especially when trans-catheter aortic valve replacement is being expanded to lower risk and younger patients for whom the longevity and long-term performance of these valves is of critical importance.

  20. Bovine Pericardial Patch Augmentation of One Insufficient Aortic Valve Cusp with Twenty-three-year Positive Clinical Follow-up Independent of the Patch Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evora, Paulo Roberto Barbosa; Arcêncio, Lívia; Evora, Patrícia Martinez; Menardi, Antônio Carlos; Chahud, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Scientific progress shall ultimately boost the current acceptance level for conservative aortic valve surgery. The present text aimed to report the 23-year long-term follow-up of one patient operated with bovine pericardium cusp extension. Growing confidence in the efficacy of the operation will allow a more expeditious indication for surgical treatment, as is already the case in mitral valve repair. This change of attitude will certainly make it possible for patients to be sent for operation in mild aortic valve regurgitation. The present report reinforces the concept and highlights the impression that the aortic valvoplasty, independent of the progressive bovine pericardium degeneration, may positively change the natural history of the aortic valve insufficiency.

  1. Three-year outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation with the CoreValve prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotzmann, Michael; Czauderna, Anna; Hehnen, Tobias; Aweimer, Assem; Lind, Alexander; Kloppe, Axel; Bösche, Leif; Mügge, Andreas; Ewers, Aydan

    2014-08-15

    There is little known about the long-term results of the CoreValve prosthesis. The aim of this study was to assess the 3-year clinical and hemodynamic outcomes of the CoreValve prosthesis. One hundred fifty consecutive patients with severe aortic stenosis successfully underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) with the CoreValve prosthesis. The primary study end point was death from any cause after TAVI. The secondary end points were defined as (1) cardiovascular death and (2) prosthesis-related mortality and morbidity. At 1 to 3 years, all-cause mortality rates were 25%, 32%, and 41%, respectively, and cardiovascular mortality rates were 14%, 21%, and 27%, respectively. Before TAVI, 95% of patients were in New York Heart Association class III or IV. Of the surviving patients, rates of New York Heart Association class III or IV at 1 to 3 years were 33%, 39%, and 38%, respectively. There was an annual decrease of the valve area of approximately 0.1 cm². Aortic restenosis occurred in 2 patients. Moderate or severe aortic regurgitation (AR) occurred in 15% of patients immediately after TAVI. Twenty patients (13%) had a slight worsening of AR within 3 years. New severe AR did not occur. The incidence of prosthesis-related endocarditis was 0.66% per year. Overall, 7 patients (incidence of 1.5% per year) had a clinically relevant problem of the prosthesis. In conclusion, TAVI with the CoreValve prosthesis had favorable effects on symptoms and outcomes even after 3 years. These results are clouded by side effects, such as AR and prosthesis-related mortality and morbidity.

  2. Effects of preemptive enoximone on left ventricular diastolic function after valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Maaten, Joost M. A. A.; de Vries, Adrianus J.; Rietman, Gerrit W.; Gallandat Huet, Rolf C. G.; De Hert, Stefan G.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy is associated with increased diastolic chamber stiffness early after aortic valve replacement for valve stenosis. Enoximone, a phosphodiesterase III inhibitor, has been shown to improve myocardial contractility and relaxation when administered as a single

  3. Midterm evaluation of hemodynamics of the Top Hat supraannular aortic valve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jan; Nissen, Henrik; Geha, Alexander S

    2010-01-01

    The CarboMedics Top Hat supraannular aortic valve provides an orifice-to-annulus ratio of 1:1 in most patients, and enhances patient outcomes. This study compared the midterm echocardiographic parameters of 52 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement with a Top Hat valve with those in other...... measurements were compared in 38 patients with aortic valve stenosis. Hemodynamic data were comparable to those of other studies, but the Top Hat prosthesis implanted was significantly larger (by a mean of 3.29 mm) than the valve size indicated using an intraannular valve sizer in 48 patients. Mean effective...... orifice area improved significantly from 0.73 cm(2) preoperatively to 2.04 cm(2) postoperatively. In patients with preoperative aortic valve stenosis, postoperative mean peak gradient was significantly reduced. The larger orifice-to-annulus ratio of the Top Hat valve improved hemodynamic parameters...

  4. Anterior valve of the pulmonary valve transplantation in the treatment of single aortic valve disease%肺动脉瓣前瓣移植治疗主动脉瓣单瓣病变

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李斌; 赵文增

    2015-01-01

    Objective To discuss the partial pulmonary artery with front valve for aortic root transplantation in the treatment of aortic valve of a single valve lesions.Methods Complete animal experiments in vitro pig heart valve model 18 cases.10 cases of aortic valve group:using part of the pulmonary artery with front disc,a single aortic valve replacement for aortic root transplantation.8 cases pulmonary valve group:Taking part of the pulmonary artery with front disc,pericardial patch shape after pulmonary artery.Results Preoperative aortic cross valve differential pressure pulsation flow state of 2.08 kPa,continuous flow condition of 1.70 kPa.Postoperative aortic cross valve differential pressure pulsation flow state of 3.10 kPa,continuous flow condition of 2.46 kPa.Aortic cross valve pressure difference before and after surgery had no significant change (P > 0.05).Preoperative pulmonary valve across valve differential pressure pulsation flow state of 1.00 kPa,continuous flow condition of 0.77 kPa.Postoperative pulmonary valve across valve differential pressure pulsation flow state of 1.29 kPa,continuous flow condition of 1.04 kPa.Across pulmonary valve differential pressure tban before surgery had no significant change (P > 0.05).Aortic valve and pulmonary valve function well after the surgery,no more than mild reflux.Conclusion Part of the pulmonary artery with front disc showed good hemodynamic status.%目的 探讨肺动脉瓣前瓣移植治疗主动脉瓣单瓣病变的手术方法.方法 完成猪心瓣膜模型18例.主动脉瓣组10例:利用肺动脉瓣前瓣作主动脉根部移植、置换单个主动脉瓣.肺动脉瓣组8例:切取肺动脉瓣前瓣、利用心包修补成形肺动脉.结果 主动脉瓣组术前主动脉瓣跨瓣压差脉动流为2.08 kPa、连续流为1.70 kPa,术后主动脉瓣跨瓣压差脉动流为3.10 kPa、连续流为2.46 kPa,手术前后差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).肺动脉瓣组术前肺动脉瓣跨瓣压差脉动流为1

  5. Enlargement of the aortic annulus during aortic valve replacement: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolotti, Uberto; Celiento, Michele; Milano, Aldo D

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of aortic valve replacement (AVR) is to obtain relief from the fixed left ventricular (LV) obstruction by replacing the aortic valve with a prosthesis, either mechanical or biological, of adequate size. Most currently available prostheses provide satisfactory hemodynamic performance, but small-sized prostheses may be associated with high transvalvular gradients and suboptimal effective orifice area that result in prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM), and thus are far from ideal for use in young, active patients. The avoidance of PPM is advisable as it has been repeatedly associated with increased mortality, decreased exercise tolerance and an impaired regression of LV hypertrophy after AVR for severe aortic stenosis. Enlargement of the aortic annulus (EAA) has proved to be a valuable method to prevent PPM in the presence of a diminutive aortic root. This review outlines the various techniques described for EAA, presenting technical details, long-term results and major procedure-related complications, and discussing the current role of EAA in patients requiring AVR.

  6. Transfemoral Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Mixed Aortic Valve Disease in Child's Class C Liver Disease Prior to Orthotopic Liver Transplantation: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkey, Barbara J; Hanson, Ross; Reece, T Brett; Forman, Lisa; Burton, James R; Messenger, John C; Kim, Michael S; Cleveland, Joseph C; Fiegel, Matt J; Nydam, Trevor L; Mandell, M Susan

    2016-06-01

    The American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases practice guidelines list severe cardiac disease as a contraindication to liver transplantation. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement has been shown to decrease all-cause mortality in patients with severe aortic stenosis who are not considered candidates for surgical aortic valve replacement. We report our experience of liver transplantation in a patient with severe aortic stenosis and moderate aortic insufficiency who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement with Child-Pugh Class C disease at a Model For End-Stage Liver Disease score of 29. The patient had a difficult post procedure course that was successfully medically managed. After liver transplantation the patient was discharged to home on postoperative day 11. The combination of cardiac disease and end stage liver disease is challenging but these patients can have a successful outcome despite very severe illness.

  7. Aortic valve prosthesis selection in dialysis patients based on the patient's condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Shinya; Yamamura, Mitsuhiro; Mitsuno, Masataka; Tanaka, Hiroe; Ryomoto, Masaaki; Miyamoto, Yuji

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies have examined outcomes in dialysis patients undergoing cardiac surgery. However, only a few studies have solely focused on outcomes after aortic valve replacement (AVR). This study aimed to clarify independent predictors of the long-term survival of dialysis patients with AVR and to determine whether a mechanical valve or bioprosthesis is suitable based on the patient's condition. A total of 38 consecutive dialysis patients who underwent AVR at our institute were reviewed (mean age 69.1 ± 9.4 years). There were 23 bioprostheses and 15 mechanical valve replacements. The operative mortality and the long-term survival were not different between the bioprosthesis and the mechanical valve group (13.0 vs. 13.3%). The significant multivariate predictors for long-term survival were concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and prosthesis size. Valve types and age at operation did not affect long-term survival. Five-year survival of patients with small prosthetic valves and concomitant CABG was 0%. When the patient's quality of life is taken into account, it may be appropriate to use a bioprosthesis in a dialysis patient with a small annulus and concomitant CABG even if the patient is young.

  8. Mini-sternotomy for the treatment of aortic valve lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dias Altamiro Ribeiro

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare inverted-L mini-sternotomy performed above the sternal furcula with conventional sternotomy in patients with aortic valve diseases who undergo surgical treatment. METHODS: We operated upon 30 patients who had aortic valve lesions that had clinical and hemodynamic findings. All patients underwent inverted-L sternotomy, which extended from above the manubrium of the sternum to the 3rd right intercostal space, without opening the pleural cavity. Their ages ranged from 32 to 76 years, and 18 were males and 12 were females. We used negative pressure in a venous ¼-inch cannula, and the patients were maintained in Trendelemburg's position. Twenty-seven patients received bioprostheses with diameters ranging from 23 to 29mm. Three patients underwent only removal of the calcifications of the aortic valve leaflets and aortic commissurotomy. RESULTS: The mean duration of anoxic cardiac arrest was 63.11min. Access was considered good in all patients. One death was due to pulmonary and renal problems not related to the incision. All patients had a better recovery in the intensive care unit, got out of bed sooner, coughed more easily, and performed prophylactic physiotherapeutic maneuvers for respiratory problems more easily and with less pain in the incision. Early ambulation was more easily carried out by all patients. CONCLUSION: Mini-sternotomy proved to be better than the conventional sternotomy because it provided morecomfort for the patients in the early postoperative period, with less pain and greater desire for early ambulation and all its inherent advantages.

  9. Abdominal aortic surgery and renal anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Nikola

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Kidney anomalies present a challenge even for the most experienced vascular surgeon in the reconstruction of the aortoilliac segment. The most significant anomalies described in the surgery of the aortoilliac segment are a horse-shoe and ectopic kidney. Objective. The aim of this retrospective study was to analyze experience on 40 patients with renal anomalies, who underwent surgery of the aortoilliac segment and to determine attitudes on conventional surgical treatment. Methods. In the period from 1992 to 2009, at the Clinic for Vascular Surgery of the Clinical Centre of Belgrade we operated on 40 patients with renal anomalies and aortic disease (aneurysmatic and obstructive. The retrospective analysis involved standard epidemiological data of each patient (gender, age, risk factors for atherosclerosis, type of anomaly, type of aortic disease, presurgical parameter values of renal function, type of surgical approach (laparatomy or retroperitoneal approach, classification of the renal isthmus, reimplantation of renal arteries and perioperative morbidity and mortality. Results. Twenty patients were males In 30 (70% patients we diagnosed a horse-shoe kidney and in 10 (30% ectopic kidney. In the cases of ruptured aneurysm of the abdominal aorta the diagnosis was made by ultrasound findings. Pre-surgically, renal anomalies were confirmed in all patients, except in those with a ruptured aneurysm who underwent urgent surgery. In all patients we applied medial laparatomy, except in those with a thoracoabdominal aneurysm type IV, when the retroperitonal approach was necessary. On average the patients were under follow-up for 6.2 years (from 6 months to 17 years. Conclusion. Under our conditions, the so-called double clamp technique with the preservation of the kidney gave best results in the patients with renal anomalies and aortic disease.

  10. Minimally invasive approach for redo mitral valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, Luca; Cannata, Aldo; Bruschi, Giuseppe; Fratto, Pasquale; Taglieri, Corrado; Russo, Claudio Francesco; Martinelli, Luigi

    2013-11-01

    Redo cardiac surgery represents a clinical challenge due to a higher rate of peri-operative morbidity and mortality. Mitral valve re-operations can be particularly demanding in patients with patent coronary artery bypass grafts, previous aortic valve replacement, calcified aorta or complications following a previous operation (abscesses, perivalvular leaks, or thrombosis). Risk of graft injuries, hemorrhage, the presence of dense adhesions and complex valve exposure can make redo valve operations challenging through a median sternotomy. In this review article we provide an overview of minimally invasive approaches for redo mitral valve surgery discussing indications, techniques, outcomes, concerns and controversies. Scientific literature about minimally invasive approach for redo mitral surgery was reviewed with a MEDLINE search strategy combining "mitral valve" with the following terms: 'minimally invasive', 'reoperation', and 'alternative approach'. The search was limited to the last ten years. A total of 168 papers were found using the reported search. From these, ten papers were identified to provide the best evidence on the subject. Mitral valve reoperations can be safely and effectively performed through a smaller right thoracotomy in the fourth intercostal space termed "mini" thoracotomy or "port access". The greatest potential benefit of a right mini-thoracotomy is the avoidance of sternal re-entry and limited dissection of adhesions, avoiding the risk of injury to cardiac structures or patent grafts. Good percentages of valve repair can be achieved. Mortality is low as well as major complications. Minimally invasive procedures with an unclamped aorta have the potential to combine the benefits of minimally invasive access and continuous myocardial perfusion. Less invasive trans-catheter techniques could be considered as the natural future evolution for management of structural heart disease and mitral reoperations. The safety and efficacy of these

  11. Role of transesophageal echocardiography in percutaneous aortic valve replacement with the CoreValve Revalving system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Colin; Oukerraj, Latifa; Asgar, Anita; Lamarche, Yoan; Marcheix, Bertrand; Denault, André Y; Laborde, Jean-Claude; Cartier, Raymond; Ducharme, Anique; Bonan, Raoul; Basmadjian, Arsène J

    2008-09-01

    Percutaneous aortic valve replacement (PAVR) is an emerging therapy for nonsurgical patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS). We examined the role of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) in PAVR. TEE was used initially to assess the native valve and aortic root, and served as a guide during PAVR. Following prosthetic valve deployment, TEE was used to assess valve function. Eleven patients aged 82 +/- 10 years with NYHA III-IV underwent PAVR. Periprocedural TEE gave immediate information on prosthetic position and function, LV function, mitral regurgitation, pericardium, and thoracic aorta anatomy. There was excellent visual agreement between fluoroscopic and TEE images of prosthetic positioning and deployment. TEE facilitated the detection and management of procedure-related complications. Compared with pre-PAVR, AV area (0.56 +/- 0.19 cm(2) vs. 1.3 +/- 0.4 cm(2); P < 0.001) and LVEF (49 +/- 17% vs. 56 +/- 11%; P < 0.001) increased. TEE provides key anatomical and functional information, and serves as a diagnostic guide for complications, which may arise during PAVR.

  12. The utility of trans-catheter aortic valve replacement after commercialization: does the European experience provide a glimpse into the future use of this technology in the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linke, Axel; Walther, Thomas; Schuler, Gerhard

    2010-03-01

    Treatment of aortic stenosis remains challenging in older individuals, as their perioperative mortality for open heart surgery is increased due to comorbidities. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation using the CoreValve ReValving System (Medtronic, Minneapolis, USA) and the Edwards SAPIEN transcatheter heart valve (THV; Edwards Lifescience, Irvine, California, USA) represents an alternative to conventional valve replacement in elderly patients that have a high risk for conventional surgery. This article summarizes the evidence-base from recent clinical trials. The early results of these landmark studies suggest that transcatheter aortic valve implantation with either one of the prosthesis is feasible, safe, improves hemodynamics and, therefore, might be an alternative to conventional aortic valve replacement in very high-risk patients. However, all of the available transcatheter heart valves have certain disadvantages, limiting their use in daily clinical practice. The process of decision making, which valve to use and which access route to choose is illustrated in this article through clinical case scenarios. Additionally, the lessons learned thus far from the European perspective and the potential impact on the future use in the US are discussed. Despite of the progress in this field, we are still lacking an optimal transcatheter heart valve. Once it is available, we can take the plunge to compare transcatheter valve implantation with convention surgery in severe aortic stenosis!

  13. Immediate post-operative responses to transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Nielsen, Susanne; Lisby, Karen H.;

    2015-01-01

    Background:Conventional treatment for patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis is surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR), but transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become a reliable alternative in high-risk patients.Aims:The aim of our study was to describe the post-operati......, predominantly continuous and at rest. We recommend the development of an evidence-based pathway to address the immediate post-operative issues in TAVI patients. Non-pharmacological interventions to prevent pain and promote sleep need to be explored.......-operative patient response to TAVI on the evening of the procedure and the following day before discharge from the coronary care unit. A secondary aim was to compare responses of patients younger and older than 80 years of age.Methods:A prospective, comparative observational study triangulating nurse assessment...... and structured interviews on a cohort of 54 Danish patients: 28/26 male/female, 26/28 younger/older than 80. Mean age in the younger/older group was 73/85 years.Results:After TAVI pain was experienced by 47 (87%) patients; 29 (62%) were restricted by pain, and 24 (44%) had discomfort at the femoral insertion...

  14. Aorta measurements are heritable and influenced by bicuspid aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa J Martin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Word Count 266, 1609 charactersObjectives: To determine whether the contributions of genetics and bicuspid aortic valve (BAV independently influence aortic (Ao dimensions.Background: Ao dilation is a risk factor for aneurysm, dissection, and sudden cardiac death. Frequent association of BAV with Ao dilation implicates a common underlying defect possibly due to genetic factors. Methods: Families enriched for BAV underwent standardized transthoracic echocardiography. In addition to BAV status, echocardiographic measures of Ao (annulus to descending Ao, pulmonary artery and mitral valve annulus diameters were obtained. Using variance components analysis, heritability was estimated with and without BAV status. Additionally, bivariate genetic analyses between Ao dimensions and BAV were performed.Results: Our cohort was obtained from 209 families enriched for BAV. After adjusting for age, body surface area and sex, individuals with BAV had a statistically significant increase in all echocardiographic measurements (p < 0.006 except descending Ao and mitral valve annulus. Individuals with BAV were at greater odds of having Ao dilation (OR = 4.44, 95% CI 2.93 – 6.72 than family members without BAV. All echocardiographic measurements exhibited moderate to strong heritability (0.25 to 0.53, and these estimates were not influenced by inclusion of BAV as a covariate. Bivariate genetic analyses supported that the genetic correlation between BAV and echo measures were not significantly different from zero.Conclusions: We show for the first time that echocardiographic measurements of Ao, pulmonary artery and mitral valve annulus diameters are quantitative traits that exhibit significant heritability. In addition, our results suggest the presence of BAV independently influences the proximal Ao and pulmonary artery measures but not those in the descending Ao or mitral valve annulus.

  15. [Surgical treatment of traumatic rupture of the aortic valve with dove-coo murmur--case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemitsu, O; Hadama, T; Mori, Y; Miyamoto, S; Sako, H; Uchida, Y

    1995-03-01

    Aortic regurgitation due to traumatic rupture of the aortic valve with dove-coo murmur is rare. A 71-year-old man was admitted for cardiac failure due to aortic regurgitation with dove-coo murmur, 4 years after the traffic accident. The aortic valve replacement was performed and his postoperative course was good. The aortic valve was tricuspid valve with the tear in the left side of right coronary cusp, and the size of the tear was 7 mm. The aortic valve was not recognized the findings of inflammatory or rheumatic change in the pathological study.

  16. Aortic valve replacement with concomitant annular enlargement for small aortic annulus of less than 19 mm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, H; Sasaki, T; Hashimoto, K; Hachiya, T; Onoguchi, K; Oshiumi, M; Takeuchi, S

    2000-06-01

    Three female patients with aortic stenosis associated with a severely small annulus underwent aortic valve replacement. In intraoperative measurements, a 19-mm obtulator could not pass through the aortic annulus in each case. We therefore concluded that it would be difficult to implant an appropriate-sized prosthesis in a routine fashion, so we performed an annular enlargement in a modified Nicks procedure. By using a wide teardrop-shaped patch for enlargement and slightly tilting insertion of a prosthesis, a 21 mm bileaflet mechanical prosthesis could be inserted into the enlarged annulus. Despite being a simpler method than other enlarging procedures, a two- or three-sizes larger prosthesis than the native annulus can be inserted with relative ease. Thus, the use of a 19 mm mechanical prosthesis may be avoidable in most adult cases.

  17. [Long-term results of conventional aortic valve replacement for small aortic annulus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Y; Miyairi, T; Kitamura, T; Kigawa, I; Fukuda, S

    2006-04-01

    We studied cardiac function, clinical outcome and quality of life (QOL) long after aortic valve replacement for pure aortic stenosis. Forty-four patients in small group [St. Jude Medical (SJM) 17 HP, 19 A], and 69 patients in non-small group (19 HP, 21 A, 23 A) operated on from 1984 to 2004 were enrolled in this study. We assessed the clinical data, aortic pressure gradient, left ventricular mass index (LVMI), and ejection fraction (EF) by preoperative and postoperative echocardiography. Moreover to evaluate QOL after the operation, we performed SF-36 used for the evaluation of health and QOL worldwide. Mean follow-up is 7.1 +/- 4.8 years in small group, and 6.8 +/- 4.6 years in non-small group. There were 2 hospital deaths in small group, and 1 in non-small group. The actual survival rate at 10-year were 89.2% in small group, and 85.6% in non-small group. There was no significant difference in hospital mortality, LVMI, long-term survival rate, and the scores of SF-36 between the 2 groups. The use of small sized prosthetic valves in patients with small aortic annulus might be justified when there is no patient-prosthesis mismatch.

  18. Acquired Aorto-Right Ventricular Fistula following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Tariq Shakoor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR techniques are rapidly evolving, and results of published trials suggest that TAVR is emerging as the standard of care in certain patient subsets and a viable alternative to surgery in others. As TAVR is a relatively new procedure and continues to gain its acceptance, rare procedural complications will continue to appear. Our case is about an 89-year-old male with extensive past medical history who presented with progressive exertional dyspnea and angina secondary to severe aortic stenosis. Patient got TAVR and his postoperative course was complicated by complete heart block, aorto-RV fistula, and ventricular septal defect (VSD formation as a complication of TAVR. To the best of our knowledge, this is the third reported case of aorto-RV fistula following TAVR as a procedural complication but the first one to show three complications all together in one patient.

  19. Hemodynamic predictors of aortic dilatation in bicuspid aortic valve by velocity-encoded cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramamurthy Senthil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital Bicuspid Aortic Valve (BAV is a significant risk factor for serious complications including valve dysfunction, aortic dilatation, dissection, and sudden death. Clinical tools for identification and monitoring of BAV patients at high risk for development of aortic dilatation, an early complication, are not available. Methods This paper reports an investigation in 18 pediatric BAV patients and 10 normal controls of links between abnormal blood flow patterns in the ascending aorta and aortic dilatation using velocity-encoded cardiovascular magnetic resonance. Blood flow patterns were quantitatively expressed in the angle between systolic left ventricular outflow and the aortic root channel axis, and also correlated with known biochemical markers of vessel wall disease. Results The data confirm larger ascending aortas in BAV patients than in controls, and show more angled LV outflow in BAV (17.54 ± 0.87 degrees than controls (10.01 ± 1.29 (p = 0.01. Significant correlation of systolic LV outflow jet angles with dilatation was found at different levels of the aorta in BAV patients STJ: r = 0.386 (N = 18, p = 0.048, AAO: r = 0.536 (N = 18, p = 0.022, and stronger correlation was found with patients and controls combined into one population: SOV: r = 0.405 (N = 28, p = 0.033, STJ: r = 0.562 (N = 28, p = 0.002, and AAO r = 0.645 (N = 28, p Conclusions The results of this study provide new insights into the pathophysiological processes underlying aortic dilatation in BAV patients. These results show a possible path towards the development of clinical risk stratification protocols in order to reduce morbidity and mortality for this common congenital heart defect.

  20. Aortic Valve Replacement for Infective Endocarditis in a Renal Transplant Recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masmoudi Sayda

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal transplant recipients are more prone to developing infections. We report a 37-year old renal transplant recipient who developed infective endocarditis of the aortic valve, heart failure and renal allograft dysfunction. He underwent aortic valve replacement which was followed by improvement in cardiac as well as allograft function.

  1. Endograft failure in an adult patient with coarctation and bicuspid aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimarakis, Ioannis; Grant, Stuart; Kadir, Isaac

    2013-06-01

    A 25-year-old man presented with associated bicuspid aortic valve and coarctation of the aorta. Following aortic valve replacement, he underwent endovascular stenting of his native coarctation. We describe early failure of the latter procedure that necessitated definitive surgical correction.

  2. Isolated spontaneous dissection of the celiac trunk in a patient with bicuspid aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Rauf Zeina

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abdel-Rauf Zeina1, Alicia Nachtigal1, Anton Troitsa2, Gil Admon2, Nina Avshovich31Department of Radiology, 2Department of Surgery A, 3Department of Internal Medicine C, Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, Hadera, Israel. Hillel Yaffe Medical Center is affiliated with the Faculty of Medicine, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, IsraelAbstract: Isolated spontaneous dissection of celiac trunk is a rare entity. The spontaneous dissection of the visceral artery occurs without aortic dissection. The most consistent presenting symptom is acute onset abdominal pain. Complications consist of ischemia, aneurysm formation, and rupture. We report an exceptional case of an isolated spontaneous dissection of the celiac trunk which occurred in a 49 year old male with a previously undiagnosed bicuspid aortic valve (BAV. We also describe the classical appearance in different imaging modalities with a particular emphasis on multidetector computed tomography, and discuss the clinical manifestation and its relationship to BAV.Keywords: celiac trunk dissection, isolated spontaneous dissection, CT angiography, bicuspid aortic valve, MRA

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  15. Multimodality Imaging of a Giant Aortic Valve Papillary Fibroelastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowell M. Fine

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Papillary fibroelastomas (PFEs are benign cardiac tumors arising from endocardium. They are commonly found on valvular surfaces and average 1.0–1.5 cm in size. Though often asymptomatic, PFEs can lead to potentially severe complications, primarily due to their embolic potential. Surgical resection is recommended for all symptomatic or large PFEs. We report the case of a patient presenting with cardiovascular symptoms who was found to have a very large aortic valve PFE, as diagnosed by histopathologic examination following surgical resection. Multimodality cardiovascular imaging demonstrates the classic morphologic findings, including a pedunculated appearance and oscillating “frond-like” surface projections.

  16. Aortic valve endocarditis complicated by ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenny, Benjamin E; Almanaseer, Yassar

    2014-12-01

    Infective endocarditis complicated by abscess formation and coronary artery compression is a rare clinical event with a high mortality rate, and diagnosis requires a heightened degree of suspicion. We present the clinical, angiographic, and echocardiographic features of a 73-year-old woman who presented with dyspnea and was found to have right coronary artery compression that was secondary to abscess formation resulting from diffuse infectious endocarditis. We discuss the patient's case and briefly review the relevant medical literature. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of abscess formation involving a native aortic valve and the right coronary artery.

  17. Calcific aortic valve damage as a risk factor for cardiovascular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski, Jarosław; Mirota, Kryspin; Wilczek, Krzysztof; Głowacki, Jan; Poloński, Lech

    2012-10-01

    Aortic valve calcification (AVC) is a common disease of the elderly. It is a progressive disease ranging from mild valve thickening to severe calcification with aortic valve stenosis. Risk factors for AVC are similar to those for atherosclerosis: age, gender, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, hypertension, smoking and renal failure. AVC shares many similarities to atherosclerosis, including inflammatory cells and calcium deposits, and correlates with coronary plaque burden. Presence of AVC is associated with increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events. The objective for this review is to discuss the clinical features, natural history and prognostic significance of aortic valve calcifications, including mechanical and hemodynamic factors of flow distribution.

  18. [Neuroleptic malignant syndrome after aortic valve replacement; report of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiba, T; Takemoto, N

    2003-09-01

    A 64-year-old male with treated Parkinson's disease underwent mechanical valve replacement for aortic valve regurgitation. The antiparkinsonian drugs for internal use were interrupted on the morning of the operative day. After the operation, the patient developed fervescence, muscle rigidity, hidropoiesis and a rise in creatine kinase. The patient was diagnosed as neuroleptic malignant syndrome and given medication dantrolene sodium and antiparkinsonian drugs on the 5th postoperative day. The symptom of neuroleptic malignant syndrome disappeared on 12 postoperative days. As the stress of open heart surgery with extracorporeal circulation trigger off neuroleptic malignant syndrome, the patient with Parkinson's disease need early beginning of antiparkinsonian drugs on account of prevention of neuroleptic malignant syndrome after operation.

  19. Morphology of the bicuspid aortic valve and elasticity of the adjacent aorta in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pees, Christiane; Michel-Behnke, Ina

    2012-11-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is a common congenital malformation with the known sequela of ascending aortic dilation. The morphology of the BAV and the elasticity of the adjacent ascending aorta appear to influence the outcome. We prospectively examined 48 pediatric patients with an isolated, native BAV for the morphology and size of the aortic valve, aortic root, sinotubular junction, and ascending aorta and their elasticity indexes. A cohort of 48 matching subjects with tricuspid aortic valves was investigated as controls. A comparison of the aortic valve subtypes showed normal-size aortic dimensions in the tricuspid aortic valves. In contrast, in the BAVs, the ascending aorta and aortic valve itself tended to dilate with age and aortic elasticity deteriorated. In the BAVs, the stiffness was significantly greater (4.43 ± 1.82 vs 3.43 ± 0.81 in the tricuspid aortic valves; p = 0.001). The distensibility indexes decreased inversely in the BAVs (6.57 ± 2.83 vs 7.84 ± 2.04 cm(2) × dynes(-1) × 10(-6), p = 0.013; and 53.5 ± 26.0 versus 64.3 ± 17.9 kPa(-1) × 10(-3), p = 0.020). The anteroposterior-oriented phenotype of BAVs showed significantly stiffer and less distensible elasticity even after correction for congenital valve dysfunction, which was more frequent in the left-right-oriented phenotype. In conclusion, the morphology of the BAV seems to play a major role in the outcome of BAV disease, although the left-right phenotype is more prone to congenital valve dysfunction, the anteroposterior phenotype showed worse elasticity quality.

  20. High-risk pregnancy in a woman with Marfan syndrome, a bicuspid aortic valve, and a dilated aortic sinus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Kristian Ambjørn; Greisen, Jacob Raben; Nielsen, Birgitte Bruun;

    2015-01-01

    A 29-year-old woman with Marfan syndrome, a bicuspid aortic valve, and a dilated aortic sinus (5.2 cm) presented herself in clinic 14 weeks pregnant. She was advised to discontinue the pregnancy due to risk of dissection; however, she decided to continue. She was treated with labetalol (300 mg...

  1. Recovery from anemia in patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation--prevalence, predictors and clinical outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Arnous, Samer; Lønborg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Preoperative anemia is common in patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and has been linked to a poorer outcome--including a higher 1-year mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of successful TAVI...

  2. Incidence, Predictors, and Clinical Outcomes of Postoperative Cardiac Tamponade in Patients Undergoing Heart Valve Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Seng Chan; Shim, Chi Young; Hong, Geu-Ru; Kim, Darae; Cho, In Jeong; Lee, Sak; Chang, Hyuck-Jae; Ha, Jong-Won; Chang, Byung-Chul; Chung, Namsik

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the incidence, predictors, and clinical outcomes of cardiac tamponade after heart valve surgery. A total of 556 patients who underwent heart valve surgery in a single tertiary center between January 2010 and March 2012 were studied. All patients underwent transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) about 5 days after surgery and TTE was repeated regularly. Patients with suspected acute pericardial hemorrhage were excluded. Cardiac tamponade occurred in twenty-four (4.3%) patients and all underwent surgical or percutaneous pericardial drainage. The median time of pericardial drainage after surgery was 17 (interquartile range, IQR, 13-30) days. Infective endocarditis, mechanical valve replacement of aortic or mitral valve, and any amount of pericardial effusion (PE) on the first postoperative TTE were related to the occurrence of cardiac tamponade (all ptamponade was associated with any amount of PE on the first postoperative TTE (hazard ratio, HR, 14.00, ptamponade was higher than those without (34.9 vs. 13.5, p = 0.031). After pericardial drainage, there was no echocardiographic recurrence of significant PE during a median of 34.8 (IQR 14.9-43.7) months after surgery. Cardiac tamponade after heart valve surgery is not uncommon. Patients with any amount of PE at the first postoperative TTE or mechanical valve replacement should receive higher attention with regard to the occurrence of cardiac tamponade. Although it prolongs hospital stay, cardiac tamponade exhibits a benign clinical course without recurrence after timely intervention.

  3. Controversies and complications in the perioperative management of transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Andrew A; Skubas, Nikolas J; Ender, Joerg

    2014-10-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is performed with increasing frequency in the United States since Food and Drug Administration approval in 2011. The procedure involves the replacement of a severely stenosed native or bioprosthetic aortic valve with a specially constructed valvular prosthesis that is mounted onto a stent, without the use of cardiopulmonary bypass and the complications of a major open surgical procedure. TAVR has been performed mostly in elderly patients with multiple comorbidities or who have undergone previous cardiac surgery. The most commonly used access routes are the femoral artery (transfemoral) or the cardiac apex (transapical), but the transaortic and transubclavian approaches are also used with varying frequency. Conscious sedation may be used in patients undergoing transfemoral TAVR, but the use of general anesthesia has not been shown to carry greater risk and permits the use of transesophageal echocardiography to assist in valve positioning and diagnose complications. Cardiovascular instability during TAVR is relatively common, necessitating invasive monitoring and frequent use of vasoactive medications. Complications of the procedure are still relatively common and the most frequent is vascular injury to the access sites or the aorta. Cardiovascular collapse may be the result of major hemorrhage pericardial effusion with tamponade or coronary occlusion due to incorrect valve placement. Persistent hypotension, myocardial stunning, or injury requiring open surgical intervention may necessitate the use of cardiopulmonary bypass, the facilities for which should always be immediately available. Ongoing and planned trials comparing conventional surgery with TAVR in lower risk and younger patients should determine the place of TAVR in the medium- to long-term future.

  4. Increased transcript level of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1) in human tricuspid compared with bicuspid aortic valves correlates with the stenosis severity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Edit, E-mail: edit.nagy@karolinska.se [Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Cardiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Caidahl, Kenneth [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Franco-Cereceda, Anders [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Throracic Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Baeck, Magnus [Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Cardiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathomechanism of calcific aortic valve stenosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We assessed the transcript levels for PARP-1 (poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase), acts as a DNA damage nick sensor in stenotic valves. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Early stage of diseased tricuspid valves exhibited higher mRNA levels for PARP-1 compared to bicuspid valves. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mRNA levels for PARP-1 inversely correlated with the clinical stenosis severity in tricuspid valves. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our data demonstrated that DNA damage pathways might be associated with stenosis severity only in tricuspid valves. -- Abstract: Oxidative stress may contribute to the hemodynamic progression of aortic valve stenosis, and is associated with activation of the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1. The aim of the present study was to assess the transcriptional profile and the topological distribution of PARP-1 in human aortic valves, and its relation to the stenosis severity. Human stenotic aortic valves were obtained from 46 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement surgery and used for mRNA extraction followed by quantitative real-time PCR to correlate the PARP-1 expression levels with the non invasive hemodynamic parameters quantifying the stenosis severity. Primary isolated valvular interstitial cells (VICs) were used to explore the effects of cytokines and leukotriene C{sub 4} (LTC{sub 4}) on valvular PARP-1 expression. The thickened areas of stenotic valves with tricuspid morphology expressed significantly higher levels of PARP-1 mRNA compared with the corresponding part of bicuspid valves (0.501 vs 0.243, P = 0.01). Furthermore, the quantitative gene expression levels of PARP-1 were inversely correlated with the aortic valve area (AVA) (r = -0.46, P = 0.0469) and AVA indexed for body surface area (BSA) (r = -0.498; P = 0.0298) only in tricuspid aortic valves

  5. Traumatic rupture of Ionescu-Shiley aortic valve after the Heimlich maneuver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passik, C S; Ackermann, D M; Piehler, J M; Edwards, W D

    1987-05-01

    A 74-year-old woman who had undergone aortic valve replacement with an Ionescu-Shiley bioprosthesis was evaluated and treated because aortic insufficiency developed after the application of the Heimlich maneuver. Pathologic examination of the explanted valve disclosed a cuspid perforation and an adjacent tear of a second cusp at its insertion into the valve strut. Patients with unexplained acute prosthetic insufficiency should be questioned as to whether the Heimlich maneuver has been previously performed.

  6. Evidence, lack of evidence, controversy, and debate in the provision and performance of the surgery of acute type A aortic dissection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonser, Robert S; Ranasinghe, Aaron M; Loubani, Mahmoud;

    2011-01-01

    for malperfusion complications are necessary. The goals of surgery are to save life by prevention of pericardial tamponade or intra-pericardial aortic rupture, to resect the primary entry tear, to correct or prevent any malperfusion and aortic valve regurgitation, and if possible to prevent late dissection...

  7. Tricuspid regurgitation after successful mitral valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsi, Vasiliki; Raftopoulos, Leonidas; Aggeli, Constantina; Vlasseros, Ioannis; Felekos, Ioannis; Tousoulis, Dimitrios; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Kallikazaros, Ioannis

    2012-07-01

    The tricuspid valve (TV) is inseparably connected with the mitral valve (MV) in terms of function. Any pathophysiological condition concerning the MV is potentially a threat for the normal function of the TV as well. One of the most challenging cases is functional tricuspid regurgitation (TR) after surgical MV correction. In the past, TR was considered to progressively revert with time after left-sided valve restoration. Nevertheless, more recent studies showed that TR could develop and evolve postoperatively over time, as well as being closely associated with a poorer prognosis in terms of morbidity and mortality. Pressure and volume overload are usually the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms; structural alterations, like tricuspid annulus dilatation, increased leaflet tethering and right ventricular remodelling are almost always present when regurgitation develops. The most important risk factors associated with a higher probability of late TR development involve the elderly, female gender, larger left atrial size, atrial fibrillation, right chamber dilatation, higher pulmonary artery systolic pressures, longer times from the onset of MV disease to surgery, history of rheumatic heart disease, ischaemic heart disease and prosthetic valve malfunction. The time of TR manifestation can be up to 10 years or more after an MV surgery. Echocardiography, including the novel 3D Echo techniques, is crucial in the early diagnosis and prognosis of future TV disease development. Appropriate surgical technique and timing still need to be clarified.

  8. The power of disruptive technological innovation: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, David B; Davidson, Michael J; Schoen, Frederick J

    2015-11-01

    We sought to evaluate the principles of disruptive innovation, defined as technology innovation that fundamentally shifts performance and utility metrics, as applied to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). In particular, we considered implantation procedure, device design, cost, and patient population. Generally cheaper and lower performing, classical disruptive innovations are first commercialized in insignificant markets, promise lower margins, and often parasitize existing usage, representing unattractive investments for established market participants. However, despite presently high unit cost, TAVI is less invasive, treats a "new," generally high risk, patient population, and is generally done by a multidisciplinary integrated heart team. Moreover, at least in the short-term TAVI has not been lower-performing than open surgical aortic valve replacement in high-risk patients. We conclude that TAVI extends the paradigm of disruptive innovation and represents an attractive commercial opportunity space. Moreover, should the long-term performance and durability of TAVI approach that of conventional prostheses, TAVI will be an increasingly attractive commercial opportunity.

  9. Practical update on imaging and transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gisela; Feltes; Iván; J; Nú?ez-Gil

    2015-01-01

    After very rapid advances in the development of the technique and devices,transcatheter aortic valve implantation(named TAVI or TAVR),is today a reality that is here to stay.It has become the minimallyinvasive treatment option for high-risk and non-surgical patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis.Requiring the participation of a multidisciplinary team for its implementation,cardiac imaging plays an important role.From pre-assessment to determine the suitability of the patient,the access site,the type of device,to the guidance during the procedure,and ultimately the long term monitoring of the patient.Correct selection of the patient and device,correct placement of the stent-valve and early detection of complications are of paramount importance for procedural success and for patient outcome.Each technique has advantages and disadvantages,being the cardiologist who will determine the best approach according to the type of patient and the expertise of the center in each one of them.This article summarizes the last contributions of the most common used imaging techniques,in each step of the procedure.

  10. Comparison of 1-Year Outcome in Patients With Severe Aorta Stenosis Treated Conservatively or by Aortic Valve Replacement or by Percutaneous Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (Data from a Multicenter Spanish Registry).

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Saldivar, Hugo; Rodriguez-Pascual, Carlos; de la Morena, Gonzalo; Fernández-Golfín, Covadonga; Amorós, Carmen; Alonso, Mario Baquero; Dolz, Luis Martínez; Solé, Albert Ariza; Guzmán-Martínez, Gabriela; Gómez-Doblas, Juan José; Jiménez, Antonio Arribas; Fuentes, María Eugenia; Gay, Laura Galian; Ortiz, Martin Ruiz; Avanzas, Pablo; Abu-Assi, Emad; Ripoll-Vera, Tomás; Díaz-Castro, Oscar; Osinalde, Eduardo P; Martínez-Sellés, Manuel

    2016-07-15

    The factors that influence decision making in severe aortic stenosis (AS) are unknown. Our aim was to assess, in patients with severe AS, the determinants of management and prognosis in a multicenter registry that enrolled all consecutive adults with severe AS during a 1-month period. One-year follow-up was obtained in all patients and included vital status and aortic valve intervention (aortic valve replacement [AVR] and transcatheter aortic valve implantation [TAVI]). A total of 726 patients were included, mean age was 77.3 ± 10.6 years, and 377 were women (51.8%). The most common management was conservative therapy in 468 (64.5%) followed by AVR in 199 (27.4%) and TAVI in 59 (8.1%). The strongest association with aortic valve intervention was patient management in a tertiary hospital with cardiac surgery (odds ratio 2.7, 95% confidence interval 1.8 to 4.1, p <0.001). The 2 main reasons to choose conservative management were the absence of significant symptoms (136% to 29.1%) and the presence of co-morbidity (128% to 27.4%). During 1-year follow-up, 132 patients died (18.2%). The main causes of death were heart failure (60% to 45.5%) and noncardiac diseases (46% to 34.9%). One-year survival for patients treated conservatively, with TAVI, and with AVR was 76.3%, 94.9%, and 92.5%, respectively, p <0.001. One-year survival of patients treated conservatively in the absence of significant symptoms was 97.1%. In conclusion, most patients with severe AS are treated conservatively. The outcome in asymptomatic patients managed conservatively was acceptable. Management in tertiary hospitals is associated with valve intervention. One-year survival was similar with both interventional strategies.

  11. Extra-coronary calcification (aortic valve calcification, mitral annular calcification, aortic valve ring calcification and thoracic aortic calcification) in HIV seropositive and seronegative men: Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study.

    OpenAIRE

    Rezaeian, P.; Miller, PE; Haberlen, SA; Razipour, A; Bahrami, H; Castillo, R.; Witt, MD; Kingsley, L; Palella, FJ; Nakanishi, R; Matsumoto, S.; Alani, A; Jacobson, LP; Post, WS; Budoff, MJ

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated an association between HIV infection and coronary artery disease (CAD); little is known about potential associations between HIV infection and extra-coronary calcification (ECC).We analyzed 621 HIV infected (HIV+) and 384 HIV uninfected (HIV-) men from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study who underwent non-contrast computed tomography (CT) from 2010-2013. Agatston scores were calculated for mitral annular calcification (MAC), aortic valve calcification (AVC), a...

  12. Quantification of aortic valve area at 256-slice computed tomography: Comparison with transesophageal echocardiography and cardiac catheterization in subjects with high-grade aortic valve stenosis prior to percutaneous valve replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klass, Oliver, E-mail: oliver.klass@uniklinik-ulm.de [University Hospital of Ulm, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Steinhoevelstr. 9, 89075 Ulm (Germany); Walker, Matthew J.; Olszewski, Mark E. [Philips Healthcare, CT Clinical Science, Cleveland, OH (United States); Bahner, Johannes; Feuerlein, Sebastian; Hoffmann, Martin H.K.; Lang, Alexandra [University Hospital of Ulm, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Steinhoevelstr. 9, 89075 Ulm (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare planimetric aortic valve area (AVA) measurements from 256-slice CT to those derived from transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and cardiac catheterization in high-risk subjects with known high-grade calcified aortic stenosis. Methods and materials: The study included 26 subjects (10 males, mean age: 79 {+-} 6; range, 61-88 years). All subjects were clinically referred for aortic valve imaging prior to percutaneous aortic valve replacement from April 2008 to March 2009. Two radiologists, blinded to the results of TEE and cardiac catheterization, independently selected the systolic cardiac phase of maximum aortic valve area and independently performed manual CT AVA planimetry for all subjects. Repeated AVA measurements were made to establish CT intra- and interobserver repeatability. In addition, the image quality of the aortic valve was rated by both observers. Aortic valve calcification was also quantified. Results: All 26 subjects had a high-grade aortic valve stenosis (systolic opening area <1.0 cm{sup 2}) via CT-based planimetry, with a mean AVA of 0.62 {+-} 0.18. In four subjects, TEE planimetry was precluded due to severe aortic valve calcification, but CT-planimetry was successfully performed with a mean AVA of 0.46 {+-} 0.23 cm{sup 2}. Mean aortic valve calcium mass score was 563.8 {+-} 526.2 mg. Aortic valve area by CT was not correlated with aortic valve calcium mass score. A bias and limits of agreement among CT and TEE, CT and cardiac catheterization, and TEE and cardiac catheterization were -0.07 [-0.37 to 0.24], 0.03 [-0.49 to 0.55], 0.12 [-0.39 to 0.63] cm{sup 2}, respectively. Differences in AVA among CT and TEE or cardiac catheterization did not differ systematically over the range of measurements and were not correlated with aortic valve calcium mass score. Conclusion: Planimetric aortic valve area measurements from 256-slice CT agree well with those derived from TEE and cardiac catheterization in

  13. Left atrial volume in patients with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis (the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Morten; Egstrup, K.; Wachtell, K.

    2008-01-01

    Left atrial (LA) size is known to increase with persistently increased left ventricular (LV) filling pressure. We therefore hypothesized that LA volume might reflect the severity of aortic valve stenosis (AS). Transthoracic echocardiography was performed in 1,758 patients with asymptomatic...... AS (transaortic Doppler velocity > or =2.5 and Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study. LA volume was measured in end-systole in the apical 4-chamber view in 1,503 patients (85%), and aortic valve area (AVA) was estimated by the continuity equation and indexed by body surface...

  14. Cost effectiveness of robotic mitral valve surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Significant technological advances have led to an impressive evolution in mitral valve surgery over the last two decades, allowing surgeons to safely perform less invasive operations through the right chest. Most new technology comes with an increased upfront cost that must be measured against postoperative savings and other advantages such as decreased perioperative complications, faster recovery, and earlier return to preoperative level of functioning. The Da Vinci robot is an example of such a technology, combining the significant benefits of minimally invasive surgery with a “gold standard” valve repair. Although some have reported that robotic surgery is associated with increased overall costs, there is literature suggesting that efficient perioperative care and shorter lengths of stay can offset the increased capital and intraoperative expenses. While data on current cost is important to consider, one must also take into account future potential value resulting from technological advancement when evaluating cost-effectiveness. Future refinements that will facilitate more effective surgery, coupled with declining cost of technology will further increase the value of robotic surgery compared to traditional approaches. PMID:28203539

  15. Sudden cardiac death and mitral and aortic valve disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bockeria O.L.

    2013-09-01

    Independent determinants of sudden death were left ventricular ejection fraction and atrial fibrillation. The main cause of death in patients with mitral valve stenosis is a thromboembolism from the left heart chambers to systemic circulation, and the risk of the latter increases with atrial fibrillation. There is no sudden cardiac death in mitral valve stenosis. The absence of left ventricular remodeling in mitral valve stenosis probably explains this finding. Onset of symptoms and signs of left ventricular dysfunction are the main predictors of sudden death and are indications for surgery. It should be emphasized that the database of sudden cardiac death in patients with valvular heart disease is very limited compared to patients with coronary heart disease and cardiomyopathies. Some issues related to predictors and mechanisms of SCD are currently poorly understood, therefore prevention of sudden cardiac death is difficult, especially in asymptomatic patients.

  16. Valve morphology effect in aortic coarctation flow using realistic silicon models and magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrufo, Oscar; Solis-Najera, Sergio; Pibarot, Philippe; Kadem, Lyes; Kesharvarz-Motamed, Zahra; Rodriguez, Alfredo O.; Garcia, Julio

    2014-11-01

    Aortic valve morphology and phenotype may alter the aortic wall structure and its normal flow hemodynamics. However, the relationship between altered flow patterns and progression of wall pathology is often not fully understood in patients with aortic coartation and needs larger experimental work. In this study, we introduced a compatible experimental setup with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a realistic aortic coarctation (AoCo) silicon model which can replicate physiological flow conditions (pressure, flow-wave, and systemic load). We evaluated the aortic valve hemodynamics of a normal tricuspid valve and a stenotic bicuspid valve using valve effective orifice area (EOA), peak and mean transvalvular pressure gradient (TPG). AoCo severity was assessed by the AoCo pressure gradient. For the tricuspid valve we obtained an EOA = 1.89 cm2, a peak TPG = 10 mmHg, and a mean TPG = 5 mmHg. For the bicuspid valve we obtained an EOA = 1.03 cm2, a peak TPG = 37 mmHg and a mean TPG = 13 mmHg. Furthermore, AoCo with tricuspid valve led to a peak AoCo pressure gradient (PG) = 11 mmHg and a mean PG = 5 mmHg. AoCo with bicuspid valve led to a peak PG = 6 mmHg and a mean PG = 3 mmHg. Aortic flow reattachment was more evident in presence of bicuspid valve and helical flow was present in all cases. This study showed that silicon prototyping in combination with MRI velocity measurements could successfully be used to assess hemodynamic effects of aortic valve morphology in aortic coarctation flow.

  17. RNA expression profile of calcified bicuspid, tricuspid, and normal human aortic valves by RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guauque-Olarte, Sandra; Droit, Arnaud; Tremblay-Marchand, Joël; Gaudreault, Nathalie; Kalavrouziotis, Dimitri; Dagenais, Francois; Seidman, Jonathan G; Body, Simon C; Pibarot, Philippe; Mathieu, Patrick; Bossé, Yohan

    2016-10-01

    The molecular mechanisms leading to premature development of aortic valve stenosis (AS) in individuals with a bicuspid aortic valve are unknown. The objective of this study was to identify genes differentially expressed between calcified bicuspid aortic valves (BAVc) and tricuspid valves with (TAVc) and without (TAVn) AS using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). We collected 10 human BAVc and nine TAVc from men who underwent primary aortic valve replacement. Eight TAVn were obtained from men who underwent heart transplantation. mRNA levels were measured by RNA-Seq and compared between valve groups. Two genes were upregulated, and none were downregulated in BAVc compared with TAVc, suggesting a similar gene expression response to AS in individuals with bicuspid and tricuspid valves. There were 462 genes upregulated and 282 downregulated in BAVc compared with TAVn. In TAVc compared with TAVn, 329 genes were up- and 170 were downregulated. A total of 273 upregulated and 147 downregulated genes were concordantly altered between BAVc vs. TAVn and TAVc vs. TAVn, which represent 56 and 84% of significant genes in the first and second comparisons, respectively. This indicates that extra genes and pathways were altered in BAVc. Shared pathways between calcified (BAVc and TAVc) and normal (TAVn) aortic valves were also more extensively altered in BAVc. The top pathway enriched for genes differentially expressed in calcified compared with normal valves was fibrosis, which support the remodeling process as a therapeutic target. These findings are relevant to understand the molecular basis of AS in patients with bicuspid and tricuspid valves.

  18. Automatic aorta segmentation and valve landmark detection in C-arm CT for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yefeng; John, Matthias; Liao, Rui; Nöttling, Alois; Boese, Jan; Kempfert, Jörg; Walther, Thomas; Brockmann, Gernot; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2012-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a minimally invasive procedure to treat severe aortic valve stenosis. As an emerging imaging technique, C-arm computed tomography (CT) plays a more and more important role in TAVI on both pre-operative surgical planning (e.g., providing 3-D valve measurements) and intra-operative guidance (e.g., determining a proper C-arm angulation). Automatic aorta segmentation and aortic valve landmark detection in a C-arm CT volume facilitate the seamless integration of C-arm CT into the TAVI workflow and improve the patient care. In this paper, we present a part-based aorta segmentation approach, which can handle structural variation of the aorta in case that the aortic arch and descending aorta are missing in the volume. The whole aorta model is split into four parts: aortic root, ascending aorta, aortic arch, and descending aorta. Discriminative learning is applied to train a detector for each part separately to exploit the rich domain knowledge embedded in an expert-annotated dataset. Eight important aortic valve landmarks (three hinges, three commissures, and two coronary ostia) are also detected automatically with an efficient hierarchical approach. Our approach is robust under all kinds of variations observed in a real clinical setting, including changes in the field-of-view, contrast agent injection, scan timing, and aortic valve regurgitation. Taking about 1.1 s to process a volume, it is also computationally efficient. Under the guidance of the automatically extracted patient-specific aorta model, the physicians can properly determine the C-arm angulation and deploy the prosthetic valve. Promising outcomes have been achieved in real clinical applications.

  19. Successful implantation of a second-generation aortic valve in severe aortic regurgitation secondary to a traumatic cusp lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangieri, Antonio [Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Institute, Milan (Italy); Latib, Azeem, E-mail: info@emocolumbus.it [Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Institute, Milan (Italy); EMO-GVM Centro Cuore Columbus, Milan (Italy); Aurelio, Andrea [Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Institute, Milan (Italy); Figini, Filippo [Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Institute, Milan (Italy); EMO-GVM Centro Cuore Columbus, Milan (Italy); Agricola, Eustachio; Rosa, Isabella; Stella, Stefano; Spagnolo, Pietro; Castiglioni, Alessandro [Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Institute, Milan (Italy); Colombo, Antonio [Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Institute, Milan (Italy); EMO-GVM Centro Cuore Columbus, Milan (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    A 67-year-old man with a dilated cardiomyopathy and severe aortic regurgitation (AR) secondary to a traumatic cusp lesion was referred to our institution because of progressive worsening of dyspnea. After formal discussion in the heart team, the patient was scheduled for TAVI (transcatheter aortic valve implantation). The pre procedural computed tomography scan revealed a minimum amount of calcium on the aortic valve and low position of coronary ostia. The TAVI procedure was performed with the implantation of a fully retrievable and repositionable aortic valve prosthesis (Direct Flow 29 mm, Direct Flow Medical, Santa Rosa, California) with an excellent result and no paravalvular leak. The TAVI devices designed for the treatment of calcific aortic stenosis have numerous limitations for the treatment of pure AR such as the risk of residual AR, the lack of repositionability and retrievability, and the need for valve- in-valve implantation. We believe that treatment of selected cases of pure AR with the Direct Flow valve is feasible and takes advantage of the retrievability of the prosthesis.

  20. The impact of age and severity of comorbid illness on outcomes after isolated aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russo MJ

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mark J Russo,1,2 Alexander Iribarne,3 Emily Chen,2 Ashwin Karanam,2 Chris Pettit,2 Fabio Barili,4 Atman P Shah,5 Craig R Saunders1,2 1Barnabas Health Hospital, Newark/Livingston, NJ, USA; 2Barnabas Health Cardiovascular Clinical Research Center, Newark, NJ, USA; 3Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 4Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, S Croce Hospital, Cuneo, Italy; 5University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA Objectives: This study examines outcomes in a national sample of patients undergoing isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR for aortic stenosis, with particular focus on advanced-age patients and those with extreme severity of comorbid illness (SOI. Methods: Data were obtained from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample and included all patients undergoing AVRs performed from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2008. Patients with major concomitant cardiac procedures, as well as those aged <20 years, and those with infective endocarditis or aortic insufficiency without aortic stenosis, were excluded from analysis. The analysis included 13,497 patients. Patients were stratified by age and further stratified by All Patient Refined Diagnosis Related Group SOI into mild/moderate, major, and extreme subgroups. Results: Overall in-hospital mortality was 2.96% (n=399; in-hospital mortality for the ≥80-year-old group (n=139, 4.78% was significantly higher than the 20- to 49-year-old (n=9, 0.84%, P<0.001 or 50- to 79-year-old (n=251, 2.64%, P<0.001 groups. In-hospital mortality was significantly higher in the extreme SOI group (n=296, 15.33% than in the minor/moderate (n=22, 0.35%, P<0.001 and major SOI groups (n=81, 1.51%, P<0.001. Median in-hospital costs in the mild/moderate, major, and extreme SOI strata were $29,202.08, $36,035.13, and $57,572.92, respectively. Conclusion: In the minor, moderate, and major SOI groups, in-hospital mortality and costs are low regardless of age; these groups represent >85% of patients undergoing isolated AVR for aortic

  1. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation: role of multi-detector row computed tomography to evaluate prosthesis positioning and deployment in relation to valve function.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delgado, V.; Ng, A.C.; Veire, N.R. van de; Kley, F. van der; Schuijf, J.D.; Tops, L.F.; Weger, A. de; Tavilla, G.; Roos, A. de; Kroft, L.J.; Schalij, M.J.; Bax, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: Aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is one of the most frequent complications. However, the underlying mechanisms of this complication remain unclear. The present evaluation studied the anatomic and morphological features of the aortic valve annulus that m

  2. Assessing Optimal Blood Pressure in Patients With Asymptomatic Aortic Valve Stenosis The Simvastatin Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis Study (SEAS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O. W.; Sajadieh, A.; Sabbah, M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence for treating hypertension in patients with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis is scarce. We used data from the SEAS trial (Simvastatin Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis) to assess what blood pressure (BP) would be optimal. METHODS: A total of 1767 patients with asymptomatic aortic...... stenosis and no manifest atherosclerotic disease were analyzed. Outcomes were all-cause mortality, cardiovascular death, heart failure, stroke, myocardial infarction, and aortic valve replacement. BP was analyzed in Cox models as the cumulative average of serially measured BP and a time-varying covariate...... to 69 mm Hg taken as reference. Low systolic and diastolic BPs increased risk in patients with moderate aortic stenosis. With a time-varying systolic BP from 130 to 139 mm Hg used as reference, mortality was increased for systolic BP ≥160 mm Hg (HR, 1.7; P=0.033) and BP of 120 to 129 mm Hg (HR, 1.6; P=0...

  3. Effect of etomidate and propofol induction on hemodynamic and endocrine response in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting/mitral valve and aortic valve replacement surgery on cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Prasad Kaushal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The concerns for induction of anaesthesia in patients undergoing cardiac surgery include hemodynamic stability, attenuation of stress response and maintenance of balance between myocardial oxygen demand and supply. Various Intravenous anaesthetic agents like Thiopentone, Etomidate, Propofol, Midazolam, and Ketamine have been used for anesthetizing patients for cardiac surgeries. However, many authors have expressed concerns regarding induction with thiopentone, midazolam and ketamine. Hence, Propofol and Etomidate are preferred for induction in these patients. However, these two drugs have different characteristics. Etomidate is preferred for patients with poor left ventricular (LV function as it provides stable cardiovascular profile. But there are concerns about reduction in adrenal suppression and serum cortisol levels. Propofol, on the other hand may cause a reduction in systemic vascular resistance and subsequent hypotension. Thus, this study was conducted to compare induction with these two agents in cardiac surgeries. Methods: Baseline categorical and continuous variables were compared using Fisher′s exact test and student′s t test respectively. Hemodynamic variables were compared using student′s t test for independent samples. The primary outcome (serum cortisol and blood sugar of the study was compared using Wilcoxon Rank Sum test. The P value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Etomidate provides more stable hemodynamic parameters as compared to Propofol. Propofol causes vasodilation and may result in drop of systematic BP. Etomidate can therefore be safely used for induction in patients with good LV function for CABG/MVR/AVR on CPB without serious cortisol suppression lasting more than twenty-four hours.

  4. Transfemoral aortic valve implantation for severe aortic stenosis in a patient with dextrocardia situs inversus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Richard I S; Morgan, Kenneth P; Brydie, Alan; Beydoun, Hussein K; Nadeem, S Najaf

    2014-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVR) has grown rapidly over the past 10 years. Device and delivery catheter systems have evolved to facilitate the procedure and reduce the risk of associated complications, including those related to vascular access. It is important to understand the utility of the TAVR equipment in patients with more challenging anatomy to select the most appropriate technique for this complex procedure. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of a patient with dextrocardia situs inversus and previous coronary artery bypass grafting who underwent TAVR from the femoral route using the Edwards SAPIEN XT Novaflex+ Transfemoral System (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA).

  5. Type F Congenital Quadricuspid Aortic Valve: A Very Rare Case Diagnosed by 3-dimenional Transoesophageal Echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Pankaj; Kamaruddin, Hazlyna; Orme, Rachel; Watt, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Congenital quadricuspid aortic valve (QAV) is a rare cardiac anomaly. Several different anatomical variations of a quadricuspid aortic valve have been described. Aortic regurgitation is the predominant valvular dysfunction associated with QAV and patients tend to present in their 5th or 6th decade of life. This anomaly is rarely picked up by transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE). A comprehensive transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE) study is more likely to diagnose it. We describe a very rare type of QAV – Type F in a 52-year-old lady who presented with symptoms of shortness of breath and pre-syncope. We include TOE images and intra-operative valve images. PMID:24707324

  6. High readmission rate after heart valve surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibilitz, K L; Berg, S K; Thygesen, Lau Caspar;

    2015-01-01

    of anxiety and depression were present in 13.6% and 13.8%, respectively (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale score ≥ 8). Twelve months following discharge, 483 persons (56%) were readmitted. Readmission was associated with lower self-reported health (SF-36 PCS: 46.5 vs. 43.9, and MCS 52.2 vs. 50.7). Higher...... after surgery (3.2 (1.2-8.9)) predicted mortality. CONCLUSIONS: 6-12 months after heart valve surgery the readmission rate is high and the self-reported health status is low. Readmission is associated with low self-reported health. Therefore, targeted follow-up strategies post-surgery are needed....

  7. Asymptomatic papillary fibroelastoma of the Aortic valve in a young woman - a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitsis Antonis

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Echocardiography represents an invaluable diagnostic tool for the detection of intracardiac masses while simultaneously provides information about their size, location, mobility and attachment site as well as the presence and extent of any consequent hemodynamic derangement. A 29-year-old asymptomatic young woman with incidental transthoracic echocardiographic (TTE discovery of an aortic valve mass is presented. The 2-dimensional TTE showed a mobile, pedunculated mass, attached by a thin stalk to the aortic surface of the right coronary aortic cusp at the junction of its base with the anterior aortic wall. The importance of valve sparing tumour resection even in asymptomatic patients is emphasised.

  8. Application of Regent mechanical valve in patients with small aortic annulus: 3-year follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao Dong; Wang Chunsheng; Hong Tao; Pan Cuizhen; Guo Changfa

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Aortic valve replacement (AVR) with a small aortic annulus is always challenging for the cardiac surgeon. In this study, we sought to evaluate the midterm performance of implantation with a 17-mm or 19-mm St. Jude Medical Regent (SJM Regent) mechanical valve in retrospective consecutive cohort of patients with small aortic annulus (diameter ≤ 19 mm). Methods From January 2008 to April 2011, 40 patients (31 female, mean age = 47.2 ± 5.8 years) with small aortic annulus (≤19...

  9. Basal and Oxidative Stress–Induced Expression of Metallothionein Is Decreased in Ascending Aortic Aneurysms of Bicuspid Aortic Valve Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillippi, Julie A.; Klyachko, Ekaterina A.; Kenny, John P.; Eskay, Michael A.; Gorman, Robert C.; Gleason, Thomas G.

    2017-01-01

    Background Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is a heritable condition that has been linked by an unknown mechanism to a predisposition for ascending aortic aneurysm. Matrix metalloproteinases have been implicated in this predisposition. Metallothionein is a poorly characterized, metal-binding protein that regulates matrix metalloproteinases and is an antioxidant known to be upregulated under oxidative stress. Methods and Results To determine putative factors involved in the pathogenesis of aortic aneurysm in BAV patients, our first goal was to identify genes that are dysregulated in ascending aortic aneurysms of BAV patients compared with tricuspid aortic valve patients and nondiseased (control) donors. By microarray analysis (22 000 probe sets), 110 dysregulated genes were identified in BAV compared with tricuspid aortic valve patients and control donors; 8 were genes of the metallothionein family. Metallothionein gene expression and protein expression were significantly lower in aortic tissue and cultured aortic smooth muscle cells from BAV patients compared with control subjects. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression was increased in BAV aortic samples relative to controls. BAV aorta was more susceptible to oxidative stress, and induction of metallothionein under oxidative stress was reduced in BAV patients compared with control subjects. Conclusions These results demonstrate dysregulated metallothionein expression in ascending aortic smooth muscle cells of BAV patients that may contribute to an inadequate response to oxidative stress and provoke aneurysm formation. We hypothesize that metallothionein plays a pivotal role in the response of ascending aortic smooth muscle cells to oxidative stress cues normally involved in the maintenance of the extracellular matrix, including the regulation of matrix metalloproteinase expression. PMID:19398671

  10. First-in-man transcatheter aortic valve implantation of a 20-mm Edwards SAPIEN XT valve: one step forward for the treatment of patients with severe aortic stenosis and small aortic annulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodés-Cabau, Josep; DeLarochellière, Robert; Dumont, Eric

    2012-04-01

    We present the case of an 85-year-old woman diagnosed with severe aortic stenosis, porcelain aorta, and a small aortic annulus (17.3 mm), who underwent successful transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) with a 20-mm Edwards SAPIEN XT valve using the NovaFlex+ delivery system. At 1-month follow-up the patient was in NYHA functional class I, and Doppler echocardiography showed a mean residual gradient of 15 mm Hg and trivial paravalvular aortic regurgitation. This case, which shows for the first time the feasibility of TAVI with a 20-mm valve, opens a new avenue for the challenging treatment of patients with aortic stenosis and a small aortic annulus.

  11. The development of transcatheter aortic valve replacement in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvir, Danny; Barbash, Israel M; Ben-Dor, Itsik; Okubagzi, Petros; Satler, Lowell F; Waksman, Ron; Pichard, Augusto D

    2012-03-01

    The penetration rate of devices in general, and in transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) specifically, is significantly delayed in the United States of America (USA) compared with in Europe. This is mostly due to the mission statement of the regulatory agencies in the USA, which requires very rigorous clinical testing of a device prior to its approval. The USA had a major role in the development and evaluation of this technology and USA research has enabled clinicians inside and outside of the USA to conduct a concise scientifically based assessment of the performance of TAVR devices in terms of safety and efficacy. In the following review, we provide data on the development of TAVR in the USA, revealing the critical role the USA has played in this extraordinary process.

  12. Lowering plasma cholesterol levels halts progression of aortic valve disease in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jordan D.; Weiss, Robert M.; Serrano, Kristine M.; Brooks, Robert M.; Berry, Christopher J.; Zimmerman, Kathy; Young, Stephen G.; Heistad, Donald D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Treatment of hyperlipidemia produces functional and structural improvements in atherosclerotic vessels. However, the effects of treating hyperlipidemia on the structure and function of the aortic valve has been controversial, and any effects could be confounded by pleiotropic effects of hypolipidemic treatment. The goal of this study was to determine whether reducing elevated plasma lipid levels with a “genetic switch” in Reversa mice (Ldlr−/−/Apob100/100/Mttpfl/fl/Mx1Cre+/+) reduces oxidative stress, reduces proosteogenic signaling, and retards the progression of aortic valve disease. Methods and Results After 6 months of hypercholesterolemia, Reversa mice exhibited increases in superoxide, lipid deposition, myofibroblast activation, calcium deposition, and pro-osteogenic protein expression in the aortic valve. Maximum aortic valve cusp separation, as judged by echocardiography, was not altered. During an additional 6 months of hypercholesterolemia, superoxide levels, valvular lipid deposition, and myofibroblast activation remained elevated. Furthermore, calcium deposition and pro-osteogenic gene expression became more pronounced and the aortic cusp separation decreased from 0.85 ± 0.04 to 0.70 ± 0.04 mm (mean ± SE; p < 0.05). Rapid normalization of cholesterol levels at 6 months of age (by inducing expression of Cre recombinase) normalized aortic valve superoxide levels, decreased myofibroblast activation, reduced valvular calcium burden, suppressed pro-osteogenic signaling cascades, and prevented the reductions in aortic valve cusp separation. Conclusions Collectively, these data indicate that reducing plasma lipid levels by genetic inactivation of the mttp gene in hypercholesterolemic mice with early aortic valve disease normalizes oxidative stress, reduces pro-osteogenic signaling, and halts the progression of aortic valve stenosis. PMID:19433756

  13. Effect of pulmonary autograft transplantation in the surgical treatment of aortic valve disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wen-bin; LIU Hai-yan; ZHOU Qi-wen; XU Xiu-fang; ZHANG Jian-qun; SONG Shi-qiu; PENG Jin-feng; WANG Sheng-xun; LIU Wei; ZHOU Hai-po; WANG Zhu-heng

    2008-01-01

    Background Aortic root replacement with pulmonary autograft (Ross procedure) has the advantages of good haemodynamics and growth potential without the need for anticoagulation.In this study,we reviewed our expedence of the Ross procedure for patients with aortic valve disease.Methods From October 1994 to January 2005,42 Ross procedures were performed in our centre.There were 30 males and 12 females.The mean age was 28+15 years (range,5-56 years).Congenital heart disease (CHD) with aortic valve stenosis (AS) and/or aortic valve insufficiency (A1) in 40 cases including one associated with ventdcular septal defect (VSD),degenerated aortic valve disease with AS in 1 and subacutive bacterial endocarditis (SBE) with A1 in 1 were studied.The diagnosis was made by ultracardiography (UCG) in all patients.The mean aortic valve annulus diameter (AVD) was (2.45±0.31) cm and pulmonary valve annulus diameter (MPVD) was (2.34±0.21) cm.All patients had normal pulmonary valves.The New York Heart Association (NYHA) function class was Ⅱ in 36 cases and Ⅲ in 6 cases.The operation was performed under moderate hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) with aortic root replacement using pulmonary autograft and pulmonary valve replacement with a homograft.Results There was no early hospital mortality.Postoperative UCG showed normal aortic valve function in all our patients.The mean gradient across the aortic valve was (6.11±0.12) mmHg.The left ventricular diastole diameter (LVDD)decreased significantly from (62±5) mm to (56±3) mm (P<0.001).The mean postoperative left ventricular ejective fraction (LVEF) was 0.49±0.23.All patients were in NYHA class Ⅰ-Ⅱ.Follow-up was completed in 38 cases for a mean period of 3.2 years (range 1-10 years).All survivors were in NYHA class Ⅰ with normal neo-aortic and pulmonary valve function.One patient died after secondary operation due to homograft fungal endocarditis 1 year after the Ross procedure.The cause of death was uncontrolled

  14. Percutaneous implantation of self-expandable aortic valve in high risk patients with severe aortic stenosis: The first experiences in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedeljković Milan A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Aortic stenosis (AS is the most common valvular heart disease in elderly people, with rather poor prognosis in symptomatic patients. Surgical valve replacement is the therapy of choice, but a significant number of patients cannot undergo surgical procedure. We presented initial experience of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI performed in Catheterization Laboratory of the Clinic for Cardiology, Clinical Center of Serbia. Methods. The procedures were performed in 5 patients (mean age 76 ± 6 years, 2 males, 3 female with severe and symptomatic AS with contraindication to surgery or high surgical risk. The decision to perform TAVI was made by the heart team. Pre-procedure screening included detailed clinical and echocardiographic evaluation, coronary angiography and computed tomography scan. In all the patients we implanted a self-expandable aortic valve (Core Valve, Medtronic, USA. Six months follow-up was available for all the patients. Results. All interventions were successfully performed without significant periprocedural complications. Immediate hemodynamic improvement was obtained in all the patients (peak gradient 94.2 ± 27.6 to 17.6 ± 5.2 mmHg, p < 0.001, mean pressure gradient 52.8 ± 14.5 to 8.0 ± 2.1 mmHg, p < 0.001. None of the patients developed heart block, stroke, vascular complication or significant aortic regurgitation. After 6 months, the survival was 100% with New York Heart Association (NYHA functional improvement in all the patients. Conclusion. This successful initial experience provides a solid basis to treat larger number of patients with symptomatic AS and high surgical risk who are left untreated. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON 175 020

  15. Gallium-SPECT in the detection of prosthetic valve endocarditis and aortic ring abscess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, K.; Barnes, D.; Martin, R.H.; Rae, J.R. (Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Victoria General Hospital Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada))

    1991-09-01

    A 52-yr-old man who had a bioprosthetic aortic valve developed Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Despite antibiotic therapy he had persistent pyrexia and developed new conduction system disturbances. Echocardiography did not demonstrate vegetations on the valve or an abscess, but gallium scintigraphy using SPECT clearly identified a focus of intense activity in the region of the aortic valve. The presence of valvular vegetations and a septal abscess was confirmed at autopsy. Gallium scintigraphy, using SPECT, provided a useful noninvasive method for the demonstration of endocarditis and the associated valve ring abscess.

  16. Efficacy of serial electrical cardioversion therapy in patients with chronic atrial fibrillation after valve replacement and implications for surgery to cure atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crijns, HJGM; VanGelder, IC; VanderWoude, HJ; Grandjean, JG; Tieleman, RG; Brugemann, J; DeKam, PJ; Ebels, T

    1996-01-01

    Chronic atrial fibrillation (AF) occurs often in the setting of mitral and aortic valve disease. Eventually, these patients undergo valve replacement which improves cardiac function but does not prevent AF. This study investigates which patient may benefit from additional surgery for the cure of AF

  17. Bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics does not promote remodeling in porcine aortic wall concavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Samantha K Atkins; Alison N Moore; Philippe Sucosky

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of type-I left-right bicuspid aortic valve(LR-BAV) hemodynamic stresses in the remodeling of the thoracic ascending aorta(AA) concavity, in the absence of underlying genetic or structural defects.METHODS: Transient wall shear stress(WSS) profiles in the concavity of tricuspid aortic valve(TAV) and LR-BAV AAs were obtained computationally. Tissue specimens excised from the concavity of normal(nondilated) porcine AAs were subjected for 48 h to those stress environments using a shear stress bioreactor. Tissue remodeling was characterized in terms of matrix metalloproteinase(MMP) expression and activity via immunostaining and gelatin zymography.RESULTS: Immunostaining semi-quantification results indicated no significant difference in MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression between the tissue groups exposed to TAV and LR-BAV AA WSS(P = 0.80 and P = 0.19, respectively). Zymography densitometry revealed no difference in MMP-2 activity(total activity, active form and latent form) between the groups subjected to TAV AA and LR-BAV AA WSS(P = 0.08, P = 0.15 and P = 0.59, respectively).CONCLUSION: The hemodynamic stress environment present in the concavity of type-I LR-BAV AA does not cause any significant change in proteolytic enzyme expression and activity as compared to that present in the TAV AA.

  18. Association of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis and aortic valve sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto O. Orden

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The principal objective of this investigation was to analyze the association between diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH and the presence of aortic valve sclerosis (AVS. For this study we used results from 1000 consecutive outpatients (473 males, older than 50 years of age (average 67.6 years, that had been examined with Doppler echocardiogram and anterior and lateral chest radiographs. Overall, 195 patients (19.5% were diagnosed with DISH and 283 (28.3% with AVS. DISH was more prevalent than AVS in males (66.7% vs. 42.6%, p< 0.0001 and in older patients (73.6 ± 9 years vs. 66.1 ± 9 years, p < 0.0001. Furthermore, 55.4% of patients with dorsal DISH presented aortic sclerosis calcification vs. 21.7% of patients free of DISH (OR = 4.47; 95% CI = 3.22-6.21. The adjusted odds ratio (OR was calculated by sex and age resulting in 3.04 (95% CI = 2.12-4.36; p < .0001. A statistically significant association was found between DISH and AVS in accordance to age and sex. The biological plausibility of this association is based on similar risk factors, pathogenic mechanisms and vascular complications.

  19. Cardiac Rehabilitation After Heart Valve Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pollmann, Agathe Gerwina Elena; Frederiksen, Marianne; Prescott, Eva

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Evidence of the effect of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) after heart valve surgery is scarce, but nevertheless CR is recommended for this group of patients. Therefore, this study assessed the effect of CR on exercise capacity, cardiovascular risk factors, and long-term mortality and morbidity......·O2peak) or 6-minute walk test (6MWT). A composite endpoint of all-cause mortality and hospital admission due to myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, endocarditis, revascularization, or reoperation was used to assess the hazard ratio between CR attenders and nonattenders. Multivariable...

  20. Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Society of Cardiac Surgeons/Canadian Society for Vascular Surgery Joint Position Statement on Open and Endovascular Surgery for Thoracic Aortic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appoo, Jehangir J; Bozinovski, John; Chu, Michael W A; El-Hamamsy, Ismail; Forbes, Thomas L; Moon, Michael; Ouzounian, Maral; Peterson, Mark D; Tittley, Jacques; Boodhwani, Munir

    2016-06-01

    In 2014, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) published a position statement on the management of thoracic aortic disease addressing size thresholds for surgery, imaging modalities, medical therapy, and genetics. It did not address issues related to surgical intervention. This joint Position Statement on behalf of the CCS, Canadian Society of Cardiac Surgeons, and the Canadian Society for Vascular Surgery provides recommendations about thoracic aortic disease interventions, including: aortic valve repair, perfusion strategies for arch repair, extended arch hybrid reconstruction for acute type A dissection, endovascular management of arch and descending aortic aneurysms, and type B dissection. The position statement is constructed using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology, and has been approved by the primary panel, an international secondary panel, and the CCS Guidelines Committee. Advent of endovascular technology has improved aortic surgery safety and extended the indications of minimally invasive thoracic aortic surgery. The combination of safer open surgery with endovascular treatment has improved patient outcomes in this rapidly evolving subspecialty field of cardiovascular surgery.

  1. ACE inhibition attenuates uremia-induced aortic valve thickening in a novel mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simolin, Mikko A; Pedersen, Tanja X; Bro, Susanne;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We examined whether impaired renal function causes thickening of the aortic valve leaflets in hyperlipidemic apoE-knockout (apoE-/-) mice, and whether the putative effect on the aortic valves could be prevented by inhibiting the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) with enalapril....... METHODS: Thickening of the aortic valve leaflets in apoE-/- mice was induced by producing mild or moderate chronic renal failure resulting from unilateral nephrectomy (1/2 NX, n = 18) or subtotal nephrectomy (5/6 NX, n = 22), respectively. Additionally, the 5/6 NX mice were randomized to no treatment (n...... treated with enalapril had significantly thinner leaflets than did the untreated 5/6 NX mice (P = 0.014). CONCLUSION: Moderate uremia causes thickening of the aortic valves in apoE-/- mice, which can be attenuated by ACE inhibition. The nephrectomized apoE-/- mouse constitutes a new model...

  2. Increased hsCRP is associated with higher risk of aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blyme, Adam; Asferg, Camilla; Nielsen, O. W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate relations between inflammation and aortic valve stenosis (AS) by measuring high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, at baseline (hsCRP(0)) and after 1year (hsCRP(1)) and exploring associations with aortic valve replacement (AVR). Design We examined 1423 patients from...... the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study. Results During first year of treatment, hsCRP was reduced both in patients later receiving AVR (2.3 [0.9-4.9] to 1.8 [0.8-5.4] mg/l, p...) predicted later AVR (HR=1.17, paortic valve area (AVA) and other risk factors. A higher rate of AVR was observed in the group with high hsCRP(0) and an increase during the first year (AVR(highCRP0CRP1inc)=47.3% versus AVR(highCRP0CRP1dec)=27.5%, p

  3. Assessment of coronary artery disease using coronary computed tomography angiography in patients with aortic valve stenosis referred for surgical aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Kofoed, K Fuglsang; Dalsgaard, M;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients referred for aortic valve replacement (AVR) a pre-surgical assessment of coronary artery disease is mandatory to determine the possible need for additional coronary artery bypass grafting. The diagnostic accuracy of coronary computed tomography angiography (coronary CTA......) was evaluated in patients with aortic valve stenosis referred for surgical AVR. METHODS: Between March 2008 and March 2010 a total of 181 consecutive patients were included. All patients underwent pre-surgical coronary CTA (64- or 320-detector CT scanner) and invasive coronary angiography (ICA). The analyses...... with disagreement between ICA and coronary CTA in univariate analysis. CONCLUSION: In patients with aortic valve stenosis referred for surgical AVR the diagnostic accuracy of coronary CTA to identify significant coronary artery disease is moderate. Coronary CTA may be used successfully in a subset of patients...

  4. MATERNAL DISTRESS, F OR EMERGENCY CAESARI AN SECTION : IN A PATIENT WITH CRYPTOG ENIC CIRRHOSIS, BICU SPID AORTIC VALVE, SEVERE PREECLAMPSIA AND SUPERADDED RESPI RATORY INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathee Devi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A 29 – year old parturient at 35weeks of gestation, a known case of cryptogenic cirrhosis with mild pre - eclampsia, bicuspid aortic valve, aortic stenosis, aortic regurgitation and, breathlessness with superadded respiratory infection was scheduled for an emergency lower segment caesarean section in view of maternal distress. Emergent surgery was conducted with a graded dose lumbar epidural anaesthesia under adequate precautions and stringent intraoperative monitoring, extending analgesia for 48 hours postoperatively with epidural infusion. This re port describes the management of a rare case of maternal distress for emergency caesarean section.

  5. Comparison of the aortic valve calcium content in the bicuspid and tricuspid stenotic aortic valve using non-enhanced 64-detector-row-computed tomography with prospective ECG-triggering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferda, Jiri [Department of Radiology, Charles University Hospital Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, CZ-306 40 Plzen (Czech Republic)], E-mail: ferda@fnplzen.cz; Linhartova, Katerina [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Charles University Hospital Motol, V Uvalu 84, Prague (Czech Republic); Kreuzberg, Boris [Department of Radiology, Charles University Hospital Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, CZ-306 40 Plzen (Czech Republic)

    2008-12-15

    Purpose: The aim of our study was to compare the calcium content measured by non-enhanced multidetector-row-computed tomography (MDCT) between patients with significant stenosis of bicuspid (BAV) and tricuspid aortic valve (TAV). Another aim of our study was to assess the accuracy of the non-enhanced MDCT to distinguish BAV and TAV based on the calcified plaque morphology, and to compare the results with the transesophageal echocardiography. Subjects and methods: A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data was performed. Consecutive patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) admitted to hospital for evaluation before valve surgery underwent clinical evaluation, transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography, and non-enhanced examination with the 64-detector-row CT using prospective ECG triggering with data acquisition in diastolic phase. The data acquisition started at 55% of the R-R interval. The patients were examined in the supine position in mild inspiration. Data were evaluated using dedicated software for calcium scoring, the volume of calcifications and calcium content were obtained. Results: Thirty-seven patients (20 males, age 48-83 years) were enrolled. BAV was present in 13 patients, TAV in 24 patients. The calcium score in patients with severe AS (mean gradient >50 mmHg) was higher than in those with moderate AS (1123 {+-} 616 mg versus 634 {+-} 475, P = 0.011). Significant correlation between the calcium scores and transaortic gradients was found (r = 0.53, P = 0.002). The patients with BAV did not differ significantly from those with TAV in the AS severity (58 {+-} 13 versus 53 {+-} 20 mmHg), nor in the valve calcium score (1168 {+-} 717 versus 795 {+-} 530 mg, P = 0.093). The overall sensitivity to detect BAV in patients with calcified severe AS was 0.923 (12/13) and specificity 0.958 (23/24). The overall accuracy was 0.945 (35/37). Conclusion: We observed higher calcium score in patients with severe AS than with moderate AS

  6. An up-to-date overview of the most recent transcatheter implantable aortic valve prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegerinck, Esther M A; Van Kesteren, Floortje; Van Mourik, Martijn S; Vis, Marije M; Baan, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has evolved towards the routine therapy for high-risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. Technical refinements in TAVI are rapidly evolving with a simultaneous expansion of the number of available devices. This review will present an overview of the current status of development of TAVI-prostheses; describes the technical features and applicability of each device and the clinical data available.

  7. Aorto-right ventricular fistula: a complication of aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najib, Mohammad Q; Ng, Daniel; Vinales, Karyne L; Chaliki, Hari P

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of aorto-right ventricular (aorto-RV) fistula after prosthetic aortic valve replacement is rare. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) with color-flow Doppler, transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), or both may be required for diagnosis. A 42-year-old woman sought care for palpitations and dyspnea due to atrial flutter 2 weeks after prosthetic aortic valve replacement and graft replacement of the ascending aorta. TTE and TEE revealed left-to-right shunt due to aorto-RV fistula.

  8. Patient-prosthesis mismatch and reduction in left ventricular mass after aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandler, Kristian; Møller, Christian H; Hassager, Christian;

    2013-01-01

    The presence of patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) after aortic valve replacement may influence patient survival. We examined the relationship between PPM and changes in left ventricular mass index at 3 months follow-up and also overall survival.......The presence of patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) after aortic valve replacement may influence patient survival. We examined the relationship between PPM and changes in left ventricular mass index at 3 months follow-up and also overall survival....

  9. Right Minithoracotomy Approach for Replacement of the Ascending Aorta, Hemiarch, and Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamelas, Joseph; LaPietra, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    A minimally invasive right anterior thoracotomy approach is the preferred technique used at our institution for isolated aortic valve pathology. We have recently introduced more complex concomitant minimally invasive procedures through this access site. Here, we describe how we perform a replacement of the ascending aorta and aortic valve with and without the use of circulatory arrest through a 6-cm right minimally invasive thoracotomy incision.

  10. Factors affecting computed tomography image quality for assessment of mechanical aortic valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Young Joo; Kim, Young Jin; Hong, Yoo Jin; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Hur, Jin; Hong, Sae Rom; Im, Dong Jin; Kim, Yun Jung; Choi, Byoung Wook

    2016-06-01

    Evaluating mechanical valves with computed tomography (CT) can be problematic because artifacts from the metallic components of valves can hamper image quality. The purpose of this study was to determine factors affecting the image quality of cardiac CT to improve assessment of mechanical aortic valves. A total of 144 patients who underwent aortic valve replacement with mechanical valves (ten different types) and who underwent cardiac CT were included. Using a four-point grading system, the image quality of the CT scans was assessed for visibility of the valve leaflets and the subvalvular regions. Data regarding the type of mechanical valve, tube voltage, average heart rate (HR), and HR variability during CT scanning were compared between the non-diagnostic (overall image quality score ≤2) and diagnostic (overall image quality score >2) image quality groups. Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of non-diagnostic image quality. The percentage of valve types that incorporated a cobalt-chrome component (two types in total) and HR variability were significantly higher in the non-diagnostic image group than in the diagnostic group (P  0.05). Valve type was the only independent predictor of non-diagnostic quality. The CT image quality for patients with mechanical aortic valves differed significantly depending on the type of mechanical valve used and on the degree of HR variability.

  11. [A case report of aortic valvuloplasty by rasping technique for aortic stenosis with small annulus simultaneously performed with mitral valve replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniyasu, N; Kou, E; Hiramatsu, T; Yokoyama, S; Takenaka, A; Ikawa, O

    1997-02-01

    The patient was a 48-year-old woman with aortic stenosis and regurgitation and mitral stenosis. Preoperative cardiac catheterization revealed LV-Ao pressure gradient of 30 mmHg and regurgitation of Sellers III. The aortic annulus was measured less than 19 mm. As operative findings, the aortic annulus seemed to be too small to be replaced with 19 mm prosthetic valve. Aortic valvuloplasty (AVP) with rasping technique was performed for the aortic valve and valve replacement was carried out for the mitral valve. After aortic declamping and occurring her beat, the transesophageal echocardiographic evaluation for AVP was effective. Postoperative course was uneventful. Postoperative cardiac catheterization have shown decreased transvalvular pressure gradient up to 10 mmHg and aortic regurgitation of Sellers I.

  12. Alternative transarterial access for CoreValve transcatheter aortic bioprosthesis implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, Giuseppe; De Marco, Federico; Modine, Thomas; Botta, Luca; Colombo, Paola; Mauri, Silvia; Cannata, Aldo; Fratto, Pasquale; Klugmann, Silvio

    2015-05-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is used to treat elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis who are considered extremely high-risk surgical candidates. The safety and effectiveness of TAVI have been demonstrated in numerous studies. The self-expanding CoreValve bioprosthesis (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA) was the first transcatheter aortic valve to be granted the Conformité Européene (CE) mark in May 2007 for retrograde transfemoral implantation. However, TAVI patients are also often affected by severe iliofemoral arteriopathy. In these patients, the retrograde transfemoral approach carries a high risk of vascular injury, making this approach unusable. Alternative arterial access sites, such as the subclavian artery, the ascending aorta, and the carotid artery, have been used for retrograde implantation of the CoreValve bioprosthesis. In the present report, we present the procedural considerations, risks, and benefits of the different types of arterial access used to implant the CoreValve bioprosthesis.

  13. Aortic insufficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page, please enable JavaScript. Aortic insufficiency is a heart valve disease in which the aortic valve does not close ... aortic insufficiency Images Aortic insufficiency References Carabello BA. Valvular heart disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  14. Open aortic surgery after thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coselli, Joseph S; Spiliotopoulos, Konstantinos; Preventza, Ourania; de la Cruz, Kim I; Amarasekara, Hiruni; Green, Susan Y

    2016-08-01

    In the last decade, thoracic endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (TEVAR) has emerged as an appealing alternative to the traditional open aortic aneurysm repair. This is largely due to generally improved early outcomes associated with TEVAR, including lower perioperative mortality and morbidity. However, it is relatively common for patients who undergo TEVAR to need a secondary intervention. In select circumstances, these secondary interventions are performed as an open procedure. Although it is difficult to assess the rate of open repairs after TEVAR, the rates in large series of TEVAR cases (>300) have ranged from 0.4 to 7.9 %. Major complications of TEVAR that typically necessitates open distal aortic repair (i.e., repair of the descending thoracic or thoracoabdominal aorta) include endoleak (especially type I), aortic fistula, endograft infection, device collapse or migration, and continued expansion of the aneurysm sac. Conversion to open repair of the distal aorta may be either elective (as for many endoleaks) or emergent (as for rupture, retrograde complicated dissection, malperfusion, and endograft infection). In addition, in select patients (e.g., those with a chronic aortic dissection), unrepaired sections of the aorta may progressively dilate, resulting in the need for multiple distal aortic repairs. Open repairs after TEVAR can be broadly classified as full extraction, partial extraction, or full salvage of the stent-graft. Although full and partial stent-graft extraction imply failure of TEVAR, such failure is generally absent in cases where the stent-graft can be fully salvaged. We review the literature regarding open repair after TEVAR and highlight operative strategies.

  15. A randomized study of combining maze surgery for atrial fibrillation with mitral valve surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jessurun, ER; Van Hemel, NM; Defauw, JJ; De La Riviere, AB; Stofmeel, MAM; Kingma, JH; Ernst, JMPG

    2003-01-01

    Aim Mitral valve surgery seldom suppresses atrial fibrillation (AF), present prior to surgery. Maze III surgery eliminates AF in >80% of cases, the reason why combining this procedure with mitral valve surgery in patients with AF seems worthwhile. We prospectively studied the outcome of combining th

  16. Three-Dimensional Echocardiography of the Aortic Valve: Feasibility, Clinical Potential, and Limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprzak, Jaroslaw D.; Salustri, Alessandro; Roelandt, Jos R.T.C.; Ten Cate, Folkert J.

    1998-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of our study was to assess the feasibility and potential clinical utility of three-dimensional echocardiography for evaluation of the aortic valve. BACKGROUND: The value of three-dimensional echocardiographic assessment of the aortic valve has not been established yet. METHODS: The study group comprised 32 patients (11 women, 21 men), mean age 56.1 (range 20-82). Seven morphologically normal valves, 5 homografts, 6 mechanical prostheses, and 14 valves of abnormal morphology were evaluated. Images were acquired during a routine multiplane transesophageal echocardiographic examination (rotational scan with 2 degrees interval, respiration, and electrocardiogram [ECG] gating) and postprocessed off-line. A selection of reconstructed cutplanes (anyplane mode) and volume-rendered three-dimensional views of aortic valve anatomy were analyzed by two observers and compared with two-dimensional echocardiography findings. RESULTS: The quality of reconstructions was scored excellent when permitting unrestricted assessment of aortic valve anatomy with optimized planimetric measurements (19 patients, 59%), adequate when aortic valve was partially visualized (7 patients, 22%), or inadequate when no assessment was possible (6 patients, 19%, including 5 with prosthetic valves). Three-dimensional echocardiography provided additional information in ten (31%) patients as compared with the two-dimensional echocardiographic findings. CONCLUSIONS: It can be concluded that three-dimensional echocardiographic reconstruction of the aortic valve is feasible, with excellent or adequate quality in 81% of patients, more frequently in native than in prosthetic valves, P < 0.05. Morphologic information additional to that provided by two-dimensional echocardiography is obtained in a significant proportion of patients.

  17. 3D bioprinting of heterogeneous aortic valve conduits with alginate/gelatin hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Bin; Hockaday, Laura A; Kang, Kevin H; Butcher, Jonathan T

    2013-05-01

    Heart valve disease is a serious and growing public health problem for which prosthetic replacement is most commonly indicated. Current prosthetic devices are inadequate for younger adults and growing children. Tissue engineered living aortic valve conduits have potential for remodeling, regeneration, and growth, but fabricating natural anatomical complexity with cellular heterogeneity remain challenging. In the current study, we implement 3D bioprinting to fabricate living alginate/gelatin hydrogel valve conduits with anatomical architecture and direct incorporation of dual cell types in a regionally constrained manner. Encapsulated aortic root sinus smooth muscle cells (SMC) and aortic valve leaflet interstitial cells (VIC) were viable within alginate/gelatin hydrogel discs over 7 days in culture. Acellular 3D printed hydrogels exhibited reduced modulus, ultimate strength, and peak strain reducing slightly over 7-day culture, while the tensile biomechanics of cell-laden hydrogels were maintained. Aortic valve conduits were successfully bioprinted with direct encapsulation of SMC in the valve root and VIC in the leaflets. Both cell types were viable (81.4 ± 3.4% for SMC and 83.2 ± 4.0% for VIC) within 3D printed tissues. Encapsulated SMC expressed elevated alpha-smooth muscle actin, while VIC expressed elevated vimentin. These results demonstrate that anatomically complex, heterogeneously encapsulated aortic valve hydrogel conduits can be fabricated with 3D bioprinting.

  18. [Aortic valve replacement in patients older than 75 years of age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamoto, M; Yamazaki, F; Nakamura, T; Yoshimura, T; Ueno, T; Shinozaki, T

    1994-12-01

    From 1988 to 1992, 16 patients older than 75 years underwent AVR (14 cases) or AVR+MVR (two cases). All patients were followed up for an average of 2.4 years after the operation and follow-up totaled to 38 patient-years. There were no hospital death and one late death. The survival rate was 93.8% through 1 to 5 years and 15 patients are now in NYHA class I or II. The problems of AVR for elderly patients were calcification and small annulus. Decalcification using CUSA was effective technique and supraannular fixing of bioprosthetic valve avoided from aortic annular enlargement. The improved quality of life after AVR supports the aggressive surgery in elderly population.

  19. Determinants and Prognostic Significance of Symptomatic Status in Patients with Moderately Dysfunctional Bicuspid Aortic Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Youn; Shim, Chi Young; Hong, Geu-Ru; Cho, In Jeong; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Ha, Jong-Won; Chung, Namsik

    2017-01-01

    Background We aimed to identify the clinical and echocardiographic determinants of symptoms and their prognostic implications in patients with moderately dysfunctional bicuspid aortic valves (BAVs). Methods Among 1,019 subjects in the BAV registry treated in a single tertiary care center, the records of 127 patients (85 men, age 58±13 years) with moderately dysfunctional BAVs were comprehensively reviewed. The patients were divided into two groups based on symptom status: asymptomatic (n = 80) vs. symptomatic (n = 47). The primary end-point was defined as a composite of aortic valve surgery, hospitalization for heart failure, and any cause of death. Results The symptomatic group had a higher proportion of females, hypertension, aortic stenosis, and aortopathy than did the asymptomatic group. The symptomatic group showed lower e′ (5.5±1.7 vs. 6.5±2.2 cm/s, p = 0.003), higher E/e′ (13.3 ± 4.9 vs. 10.9±3.7, p = 0.002), and larger left atrial volume index (29.9±11.4 vs. 24.6±9.1 ml/m2, p = 0.006) than did the asymptomatic group. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, female gender (odds ratio [OR] 2.84, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10–7.36, p = 0.031), hypertension (OR 3.07, 95% CI 1.20–7.82, p = 0.019), moderate aortic stenosis (OR 5.33 5.78, 95% CI 1.99–16.83, p = 0.001), E/e′ >15 (OR 3.82, 95% CI 1.03–11.19, p = 0.015), and aortopathy (OR 2.76, 95% CI 1.07–7.10, p = 0.035) were independently correlated with symptom status. The symptomatic group showed a significantly lower rate of event-free survival during the 8-year follow-up period (54±9% vs. 68±10%, p = 0.001). Conclusions In patients with moderately dysfunctional BAVs, the presence of moderate aortic stenosis, aortopathy, and diastolic dysfunction determines symptom status, along with female gender and hypertension. Symptom status was associated with clinical outcomes. PMID:28060855

  20. Coronary Emboli in a Young Patient with Mechanical Aortic Valve: A Rare Cause of Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Gholoobi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery embolism is an uncommon cause of Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI. Herein, we reported a 24-year-old male who was admitted with acute infero-posterior myocardial infarction and cerebral Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA. He had undergone mechanical Aortic Valve Replacement (AVR surgery 6 years ago. Surprisingly, the patient had decided to stop taking his medication (warfarin 20 days earlier without any medical advice. Coronary angiography revealed a thrombus located at the distal part of the left circumflex artery. Discontinuation of anticoagulant therapy in the presence of mechanical valve prosthesis, clinical evidence of coincidental TIA, and lack of atherosclerotic risk factors were highly suggestive of coronary thromboembolism as the cause of AMI. Overall, this case report emphasized the necessity of continuous education in patients with mechanical heart valves to prevent such undesired events.

  1. ECG-gated computed tomography: a new role for patients with suspected aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagman, Erika; Flinck, Agneta; Lamm, Carl [Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Perrotta, Sossio [Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery and Anaesthesia, Gothenburg (Sweden); Bech-Hanssen, Odd [Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Olaison, Lars [Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Infectious Diseases, Gothenburg (Sweden); Svensson, Gunnar [Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery and Anaesthesia, Gothenburg (Sweden); The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2012-11-15

    The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the agreement in findings between ECG-gated CT and transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE) in patients with aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE). Twenty-seven consecutive patients with PVE underwent 64-slice ECG-gated CT and TEE and the results were compared. Imaging was compared with surgical findings (surgery was performed in 16 patients). TEE suggested the presence of PVE in all patients [thickened aortic wall (n = 17), vegetation (n = 13), abscess (n = 16), valvular dehiscence (n = 10)]. ECG-gated CT was positive in 25 patients (93 %) [thickened aortic wall (n = 19), vegetation (n = 7), abscess (n = 18), valvular dehiscence (n = 7)]. The strength of agreement [kappa (95 % CI)] between ECG-gated CT and TEE was very good for thickened wall [0.83 (0.62-1.0)], good for abscess [0.68 (0.40-0.97)] and dehiscence [0.75 (0.48-1.0)], and moderate for vegetation [0.55 (0.26-0.88)]. The agreement was good between surgical findings (abscess, vegetation and dehiscence) and imaging for ECG-gated CT [0.66 (0.49-0.87)] and TEE [0.79 (0.62-0.96)] and very good for the combination of ECG-gated CT and TEE [0.88 (0.74-1.0)]. Our results indicate that ECG-gated CT has comparable diagnostic performance to TEE and may be a valuable complement in the preoperative evaluation of patients with aortic PVE. (orig.)

  2. Left ventricular diastolic function is associated with symptom status in severe aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Christensen, Nicolaj L; Videbæk, Lars

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In aortic valve stenosis (AS), the occurrence of heart failure symptoms does not always correlate with severity of valve stenosis and left ventricular (LV) function. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that symptomatic patients with AS have impaired diastolic, longitudinal systolic fu...... for indices of AS severity. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00294775....

  3. [Discrete type subaortic stenosis disclosed by hemolytic anemia after aortic and mitral valve replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Yu; Inage, Yuichi; Masaki, Naoki; Kobayashi, Yuriko; Jinbu, Ryota; Toyama, Shuji; Fukasawa, Manabu

    2014-03-01

    We report a case of discrete type subaortic stenosis disclosed by hemolytic anemia 7 years after aortic and mitral prosthetic valve replacement. A 53-year-old female complained of general fatigue, dyspnea, macrohematuria and hemolysis. She had undergone aortic valve replacement for non-coronary cusp perforation 15 years before, and mitral valve replacement and tricuspid annuloplasty 7 years before. Echocardiography showed mitral prosthetic valve regurgitation (III/IV degree) and symptomatic hemolysis might be caused by accelerated blood flow through the prosthetic valve. A mild aortic stenosis (peak flow verocity:3.73 m/s) was also pointed out. The redo double valve replacement was performed. Intraoperative findings showed discrete type subaortic stenosis due to extensive pannus formation, but that the previously implanted prosthetic valves were intact. The blood flow biased by the interference of the subaortic stenosis might have obstructed closure of the mitral prosthetic valve and caused mitral regurgitation. Postoperatively, hemolysis and mitral regurgitation were diminished, and aortic stenosis was improved.

  4. Heart valve surgery in China: past and present%中国心脏瓣膜外科的发展与现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宝仁

    2001-01-01

    @@ Heart valve surgery in China dates back to 4 to 5 decades ago. In 1954, the first closed mitral commissurotomy was successfully performed in a patient with mitral stenosis. In 1960, with the advent of transventricular dilator and by the route of left ventricle, the efficacy of mitral commissurotomy was improved. The procedure was rapidly adopted by many centers in this country[1]. In 1958, the first open heart surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass was performed in China. This was an epoch-making event, which opened up a new era in the field of cardiac surgery in China. Thereafter, in cities like Beijing and Shanghai, direct repairs of mitral lesions under CPB were made with good results. In 1965, the development of the first totally home-made ball valve prosthesis and its successful application in mitral valve replacement was another landmark in the history of heart valve surgery in China. In 1976, aortic valve replacement with glutaraldehyde-preserved bovine pericardial valve prosthesis was carried out successfully. The next year, the first porcine aortic valve prosthesis was produced and introduced to clinical use, which greatly accelerated the progress of heart valve surgery in China. During the last 2 decades, heart valve surgery and its techniques have been widely applied throughout China.

  5. Severe non-valve-related hemolytic anemia following aortic root replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanger, Olaf; Hammerer, Matthias; Datz, Lidwina

    2010-12-01

    Aortic interposition grafting combined with aortic root replacement (conduit) is widely performed to manage thoracic aortic aneurysms. Intravascular hemolysis without clinical significance is occasionally observed as a complication after prosthetic valve replacement. Symptomatic lysis of red blood cells (RBCs) is rare and primarily attributed to mechanical damage as result of high shear stress, turbulent flow, and physical interaction. We report a case of severe hemolytic anemia shortly after mechanical conduit implantation. The RBC damage was not related to the valve prosthesis and resolved completely after replacement of a section of the kinked Dacron tube graft to correct a fold.

  6. CPB-assisted aortic valve replacement in a pregnant 27-year-old with endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcoux, J; Rosin, M; Mycyk, T

    2009-09-01

    A 27-year-old, G(3)P( 2)A(0) female with acute Staph aureus (SA) endocarditis successfully underwent CPB-assisted aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthetic aortic valve at 22 weeks' gestation. This patient's presentation of acute endocarditis complicated by septic shock, congestive heart failure, severe aortic insufficiency, multiple septic embolic events and borderline renal failure appeared on the daunting background of chronic heavy tobacco usage, hepatitis C positivity, long-term IV drug abuse and a pregnancy into its twenty-second week. Optimal treatment strategies implemented for both mother and fetus throughout the perioperative period contributed to a successful outcome for both.

  7. Hemodynamic function of the standard St. Jude bileaflet disc valve has no clinical impact 10 years after aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Dorup, Inge; Emmertsen, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    in the survivors of a prospective series 10 years after AVR for aortic stenosis. DESIGN: Forty-three survivors aged 32-90 years from a prospective series attended a follow-up study with Doppler echo and radionuclide cardiography 10 years after AVR for aortic stenosis. Six patients with significant left sided valve...... regurgitation were excluded from further analysis: they had significantly lower St. Jude valve gradient and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and larger mass index (LVMi) than 37 without. RESULTS: In the 37 patients without left sided valve regurgitation peak and mean gradients were inversely related...... to St. Jude valve geometric orifice area (GOA) indexed for either body surface area or left ventricular end-diastolic dimension (LVEDD). The gradients correlated directly with LVEDD but not with LVEF or LVMi. Eleven patients with hypertension had higher peak gradients (31+/-13 versus 22+/-8 mmHg, p

  8. Effect of prophylactic amiodarone in patients with rheumatic valve disease undergoing valve replacement surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kar Sandeep

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to evaluate the effect of prophylactic single-dose intravenous amiodarone in patients undergoing valve replacement surgery. Maintenance of sinus rhythm is better than maintenance of fixed ventricular rate in atrial fibrillation (AF especially in the presence of irritable left or right atrium because of enlargement. Fifty-six patients with valvular heart disease with or without AF were randomly divided into two groups. Group I or the amiodarone group (n=28 received amiodarone (3 mg/kg in 100 ml normal saline and group II or the control group received same volume of normal saline. The standardized protocol for cardiopulmonary bypass was maintained for all the patients. AF occurred in 7.14% patients in group I, and in group II, 28.57% (P=0.035; ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation was observed in 21.43% patients in group I and 46.43% patients in group II (P=0.089 after release of aortic clamp. Most of the patients in group I (92.86% maintained sinus rhythm without cardioversion or defibrillation after release of aortic cross clamp (P=0.002. Defibrillation or cardio version was needed in 7.14% patients in group I and 28.57% patients in group II (P=0.078. A single prophylactic intraoperative dose of intravenous amiodarone decreased post bypass arrhythmia in this study in comparison to the control group. Single dose of intraoperative amiodarone may be used to decrease postoperative arrhythmia in open heart surgery.

  9. Reliability and Identification of Aortic Valve Prolapse in the Horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hallowell Gayle D

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objectives were to determine and assess the reliability of criteria for identification of aortic valve prolapse (AVP using echocardiography in the horse. Results Opinion of equine cardiologists indicated that a long-axis view of the aortic valve (AoV was most commonly used for identification of AVP (46%; n=13. There was consensus that AVP could be mimicked by ultrasound probe malignment. This was confirmed in 7 healthy horses, where the appearance of AVP could be induced by malalignment. In a study of a further 8 healthy horses (5 with AVP examined daily for 5 days, by two echocardiographers standardized imaging guidelines gave good to excellent agreement for the assessment of AVP (kappa>0.80 and good agreement between days and observers (kappa >0.6. The technique allowed for assessment of the degree of prolapse and measurement of the prolapse distance that provided excellent agreement between echocardiographers, days and observers (kappa/ICC>0.8. Assessments made using real-time zoomed images provided similar measurements to the standard views (ICC=0.9, with agreement for the identification of AVP (kappa>0.8. Short axis views of the AoV were used for identification of AVP by fewer respondents (23%, however provided less agreement for the identification of AVP (kappa>0.6 and only adequate agreement with observations made in long axis (kappa>0.5, with AVP being identified more often in short axis (92% compared to long axis (76%. Orthogonal views were used by 31% of respondents to identify the presence of AVP, and 85% to identify cusp. Its identification on both views on 4 days was used to categorise horses as having AVP, providing a positive predictive value of 79% and negative predictive value of 18%. Only the non-coronary cusp (NCC of the AoV was observed to prolapse in these studies. Prolapse of the NCC was confirmed during the optimisation study using four-dimensional echocardiography, which concurred with the findings

  10. Modified lipoprotein-derived lipid particles accumulate in human stenotic aortic valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehti, Satu; Käkelä, Reijo; Hörkkö, Sohvi; Kummu, Outi; Helske-Suihko, Satu; Kupari, Markku; Werkkala, Kalervo; Kovanen, Petri T; Oörni, Katariina

    2013-01-01

    In aortic stenosis plasma lipoprotein-derived lipids accumulate in aortic valves. Here, we first compared the lipid compositions of stenotic aortic valves and atherosclerotic plaque cores. Both pathological tissues were found to be enriched in cholesteryl linoleate, a marker of extracellularly accumulated lipoproteins. In addition, a large proportion of the phospholipids were found to contain arachidonic acid, the common precursor of a number of proinflammatory lipid mediators. Next, we isolated and characterized extracellular lipid particles from human stenotic and non-stenotic control valves, and compared them to plasma lipoproteins from the same subjects. The extracellular valvular lipid particles were isolated from 15 stenotic and 14 non-stenotic aortic valves. Significantly more apoB-100-containing lipid particles were found in the stenotic than in the non-stenotic valves. The majority of the lipid particles isolated from the non-stenotic valves had sizes (23±6.2 nm in diameter) similar to those of plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL) (22±1.5 nm), while the lipid particles from stenotic valves were not of uniform size, their sizes ranging from 18 to more than 500 nm. The lipid particles showed signs of oxidative modifications, and when compared to isolated plasma LDL particles, the lipid particles isolated from the stenotic valves had a higher sphingomyelin/phosphatidylcholine -ratio, and also higher contents of lysophosphatidylcholine and unesterified cholesterol. The findings of the present study reveal, for the first time, that in stenotic human aortic valves, infiltrated plasma lipoproteins have undergone oxidative and lipolytic modifications, and become fused and aggregated. The generated large lipid particles may contribute to the pathogenesis of human aortic stenosis.

  11. Physical activity increases survival after heart valve surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, K.; Sibilitz, Kirstine Lærum; Kikkenborg berg, Selina;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Increased physical activity predicts survival and reduces risk of readmission in patients with coronary heart disease. However, few data show how physical activity is associated with survival and readmission after heart valve surgery. Objective were to assess the association between...... physical activity levels 6-12 months after heart valve surgery and (1) survival, (2) hospital readmission 18-24 months after surgery and (3) participation in exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation. METHODS: Prospective cohort study with registry data from The CopenHeart survey, The Danish National Patient...... of physical activity after heart valve surgery are positively associated with higher survival rates and participation in cardiac rehabilitation....

  12. Balloon-expanding stent and delivery system for transcatheter aortic valve implantation:An animal study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Chen; Fei-Yu Wang; Guo-Jun Chu; Yu-Feng Zhu; Hong-Wen Tan; Xian-Xian Zhao; Yong-Wen Qin; Jun-Bo Ge

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility and satefy of transcatheter aortic valve implantation in animals by using a new balloon-expanding valved stent. Methods: The balloon-expandable stent is made from cobalt-based alloy material and designed with a tubular, slotted structure. Fresh bovine pericardium was treated, sutured and fixed on the balloon-expandable stent. Ten healthy sheep (five males and five females), weighing an average of (25.16 ± 1.83) kg, were selected to undergo transcatheter implantation of the valve stents. The function of the valve stent was evaluated by angiography, echocardiography, and histology six months after the procedure. Results: Of the ten experimental sheep, two sheep died during the operation because the higher position of the artificial valve affected the opening of the coronary artery. We successfully implanted the aortic valve stent in other eight sheep;however, one sheep died of heart failure two weeks after the operation due to the lower position of the valve stent. The valve stents were implanted in the desired position in seven sheep. Ascending aortic angiographic and autoptic findings immediately after the operation confirmed the satisfactory location and function of the valved stent. Echocardiography, angiography, and histology at six post-operative months confirmed the satisfactory location and function of the valve stent. Conclusion: We successfully implanted our new valve stent as a replacement of native aortic valve via the transcatheter route with satisfactory outcome. Copyright © 2015, Chinese Medical Association Production. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of KeAi Communications Co., Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

  13. Automated segmentation and geometrical modeling of the tricuspid aortic valve in 3D echocardiographic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouch, Alison M; Wang, Hongzhi; Takabe, Manabu; Jackson, Benjamin M; Sehgal, Chandra M; Gorman, Joseph H; Gorman, Robert C; Yushkevich, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    The aortic valve has been described with variable anatomical definitions, and the consistency of 2D manual measurement of valve dimensions in medical image data has been questionable. Given the importance of image-based morphological assessment in the diagnosis and surgical treatment of aortic valve disease, there is considerable need to develop a standardized framework for 3D valve segmentation and shape representation. Towards this goal, this work integrates template-based medial modeling and multi-atlas label fusion techniques to automatically delineate and quantitatively describe aortic leaflet geometry in 3D echocardiographic (3DE) images, a challenging task that has been explored only to a limited extent. The method makes use of expert knowledge of aortic leaflet image appearance, generates segmentations with consistent topology, and establishes a shape-based coordinate system on the aortic leaflets that enables standardized automated measurements. In this study, the algorithm is evaluated on 11 3DE images of normal human aortic leaflets acquired at mid systole. The clinical relevance of the method is its ability to capture leaflet geometry in 3DE image data with minimal user interaction while producing consistent measurements of 3D aortic leaflet geometry.

  14. Robotic excision of aortic valve papillary fibroelastoma and concomitant Maze procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward T Murphy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiothoracic surgeons have utilized the surgical robot to provide a minimally invasive approach to a number of intracardiac operations, including tumor resection, valve repair, and ablation of atrial arrhythmia. We report the case of a 58 year-old woman who was found to have a mobile mass on her aortic valve during evaluation of atrial fibrillation. Both of these conditions were addressed when she underwent a combined robotic biatrial Maze procedure and excision of the mass, which proved to be a papillary fibroelastoma of the aortic valve.

  15. Expanding TAVI options: elective rotational atherectomy during trans-catheter aortic valve implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piccoli, Anna; Lunardi, Mattia; Ariotti, Sara; Ferrero, Valeria; Vassanelli, Corrado; Ribichini, Flavio, E-mail: flavio.ribichini@univr.it

    2015-01-15

    Summary: Aortic valve stenosis (AVS) in the elderly is frequently associated to coronary artery disease (CAD). In patients with significant coronary stenosis surgical valve replacement is associated to coronary bypass grafting, but whether coronary angioplasty is needed in patients receiving trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is unknown. Given the frequent complexity of CAD in the elderly with calcific AVS, rotational atherectomy (RA) may be needed in some cases. No data are available about feasibility and safety of RA during TAVI. The need for myocardial revascularization in TAVI candidates is discussed, and a series of RA cases performed during TAVI is described.

  16. Double valve replacement for acute spontaneous left chordal rupture secondary to chronic aortic incompetence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLenachan Jim

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A 54 years old male with undiagnosed chronic calcific degenerative aortic valve incompetence presented with acute left anterior chordae tendinae rupture resulting in severe left heart failure and cardiogenic shock. He was successfully treated with emergency double valve replacement using mechanical valves. The pathogenesis of acute rupture of the anterior chordae tendinae, without any evidence of infective endocarditis or ischemic heart disease seems to have been attrition of the subvalvular mitral apparatus by the chronic regurgitant jet of aortic incompetence with chronic volume overload. We review the literature with specific focus on the occurrence of this unusual event.

  17. A comparison of echocardiographic and electron beam computed tomographic assessment of aortic valve area in patients with valvular aortic stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piers, Lieuwe H.; Dikkers, Riksta; Tio, Rene A.; van den Berg, Maarten P.; Willems, Tineke P.; Zijlstra, Felix; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare electron beam computed tomography (EBT) with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) in determining aortic valve area (AVA). Thirty patients (9 females, 21 males) underwent a contrast-enhanced EBT scan (e-Speed, GE, San Francisco, CA, USA) and TTE within 17 +/-

  18. Microparticle-Induced Coagulation Relates to Coronary Artery Atherosclerosis in Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Horn

    Full Text Available Circulating microparticles (MPs derived from endothelial cells and blood cells bear procoagulant activity and promote thrombin generation. Thrombin exerts proinflammatory effects mediating the progression of atherosclerosis. Aortic valve stenosis may represent an atherosclerosis-like process involving both the aortic valve and the vascular system. The aim of this study was to investigate whether MP-induced thrombin generation is related to coronary atherosclerosis and aortic valve calcification.In a cross-sectional study of 55 patients with severe aortic valve stenosis, we assessed the coronary calcification score (CAC as indicator of total coronary atherosclerosis burden, and aortic valve calcification (AVC by computed tomography. Thrombin-antithrombin complex (TATc levels were measured as a marker for thrombin formation. Circulating MPs were characterized by flow cytometry according to the expression of established surface antigens and by measuring MP-induced thrombin generation.Patients with CAC score below the median were classified as patients with low CAC, patients with CAC Score above the median as high CAC. In patients with high CAC compared to patients with low CAC we detected higher levels of TATc, platelet-derived MPs (PMPs, endothelial-derived MPs (EMPs and MP-induced thrombin generation. Increased level of PMPs and MP-induced thrombin generation were independent predictors for the severity of CAC. In contrast, AVC Score did not differ between patients with high and low CAC and did neither correlate with MPs levels nor with MP-induced thrombin generation.In patients with severe aortic valve stenosis MP-induced thrombin generation was independently associated with the severity of CAC but not AVC indicating different pathomechanisms involved in coronary artery and aortic valve calcification.

  19. Direct transcatheter aortic valve implantation with self-expandable bioprosthesis: Feasibility and safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorina, Claudia, E-mail: clafiorina@yahoo.it [Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Maffeo, Diego; Curello, Salvatore [Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Lipartiti, Felicia [Division of Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Chizzola, Giuliano [Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); D' Aloia, Antonio [Division of Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Adamo, Marianna [Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Mastropierro, Rosy [Division of Cardiothoracic Anestesiology, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Gavazzi, Emanuele [Department of Radiology, University of Brescia, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Ciccarese, Camilla; Chiari, Ermanna [Division of Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Ettori, Federica [Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy)

    2014-06-15

    Background: Balloon valvuloplasty has been considered a mandatory step of the transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), although it is not without risk. The aim of this work was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of TAVI performed without pre-dilation (direct TAVI) of the stenosed aortic valve. Material and Methods: Between June 2012 and June 2013, 55 consecutive TAVI performed without pre-dilation at our institution using the self-expandable CoreValve prosthesis (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) were analyzed and compared with 45 pre-dilated TAVI performed the previous year. Inclusion criteria were a symptomatic and severe aortic stenosis. Exclusion criteria were defined as presence of pure aortic regurgitation, degenerated surgical bioprosthesis or bicuspid aortic valve and prior procedure of balloon aortic valvuloplasty performed as a bridge to TAVI. Results: High-burden calcification in the device landing zone, assessed by CT scan, was found in most of the patients. The valve size implanted was similar in both groups. Device success was higher in direct TAVI (85% vs. 64%, p = 0.014), mostly driven by a significant lower incidence of paravalvular leak (PVL ≥2; 9% vs. 33%, p = 0.02). Safety combined end point at 30 days was similar in both groups. Conclusion: Compared to TAVI with pre-dilation, direct TAVI is feasible regardless of the presence of bulky calcified aortic valve and the valve size implanted. Device success was higher in direct TAVI, mostly driven by a lower incidence of paravalvular leak. Safety at 30 days was similar in two groups.

  20. Valve surgery in octogenarians: In-hospital and long-term outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossone, Eduardo; Di Benedetto, Giuseppe; Frigiola, Alessandro; Carbone, Giannignazio Luigi; Panza, Antonello; Cirri, Silvia; Ballotta, Andrea; Messina, Stefano; Rega, Saverio; Citro, Rodolfo; Trimarchi, Santi; Fang, Jianming; Righini, Paolo; Distante, Alessandro; Eagle, Kim A; Mehta, Rajendra H

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Global population aging and greater age-related incidence of ischemic, degenerative and calcific valve disease have led to an increasing number of very elderly patients being referred for valve surgery. However, their preoperative risk factors, and in-hospital and long-term outcomes have not been thoroughly investigated. METHODS: Three hundred seven consecutive patients 80 years and older (60% female; mean age 83±2.4 years) attending three major Italian cardiac centres to undergo valve surgery were evaluated. Seventy-nine patients underwent mitral valve surgery (isolated n=30, combined n=49) and 228 underwent aortic valve surgery (isolated n=134, combined n=94). RESULTS: The most frequent in-hospital complications were atrial arrhythmias, need for inotropic support for more than 48 h, renal insufficiency, congestive heart failure, respiratory failure, and stroke or transient ischemic attack. The in-hospital mortality rate was 9.7% (30 of 307). Multivariate logistic regression identified the following clinical variables as predictors of in-hospital death: New York Heart Association functional class IV, diabetes, hypertension, renal insufficiency at presentation, rheumatic etiology and left ventricular ejection fraction of less than 45%. Late mortality occurred in 45 of 277 patients (16.2%), but there was a substantial improvement in the New York Heart Association functional class of the 232 long-term survivors (from 3.0±0.7 to 1.7±0.6; P<0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Surgery seems to be an effective therapeutic option for selected symptomatic octogenarians with valve disease, associated with good long-term survival and an improved functional class. Operative mortality is related more to patients’ preoperative clinical status and increased comorbidity than the type of surgery per se. PMID:17347695

  1. Detecting Aortic Valve Opening and Closing from Distal Body Vibrations

    CERN Document Server

    Wiens, Andrew D; Inan, Omer T

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Proximal and whole-body vibrations are well studied in seismocardiography and ballistocardiography, yet distal vibrations are still poorly understood. In this paper we develop two methods to measure aortic valve opening (AVO) and closing (AVC) from distal vibrations. Methods: AVO and AVC were detected for each heartbeat with accelerometers on the upper arm (A), wrist (W), and knee (K) of 22 consenting adults following isometric exercise. Exercise-induced changes were recorded with impedance cardiography, and nine-beat ensemble averaging was applied. Our first method, FilterBCG, detects peaks in distal vibrations after filtering with individually-tuned bandpass filters while RidgeBCG uses ridge regression to estimate AVO and AVC without peaks. Pseudocode is provided. Results: In agreement with recent studies, we did not find peaks at AVO and AVC in distal vibrations, and the conventional R-J interval method from the literature also correlated poorly with AVO (r2 = 0.22 A, 0.14 W, 0.12 K). Interestin...

  2. Bicuspid aortic valve aortopathy in adults: Incidence, etiology, and clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelena, Hector I; Della Corte, Alessandro; Prakash, Siddharth K; Milewicz, Dianna M; Evangelista, Artur; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice

    2015-12-15

    Bicuspid aortic valve is the most common congenital heart defect and is associated with an aortopathy manifested by dilatation of the ascending thoracic aorta. The clinical consequences of this aortopathy are the need for periodic monitoring of aortic diameters, elective prophylactic surgical aortic repair, and the occurrence of aortic dissection or rupture. This review describes the current knowledge of BAV aortopathy in adults, including incidence, pathophysiologic insights into its etiology, contemporary hypothesis-generating observations into its complications, and recommendations for monitoring and intervention.

  3. Autologous adventitial overlay method reinforces anastomoses in aortic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minato, Naoki; Okada, Takayuki; Sumida, Tomohiko; Watanabe, Kenichi; Maruyama, Takahiro; Kusunose, Takashi

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we present an inexpensive and effective method for providing a secure and hemostatic anastomosis using autologous adventitia obtained from a dissected or aneurysmal wall. The resected aortic wall is separated between the adventitia and media, and a soft, 2 × 10-cm adventitial strip is overlaid to cover the anastomotic margin. A graft is sutured to the aortic stump. This autologous adventitial overlay method can inexpensively and strongly reinforce the anastomosis during aortic surgery for dissection or aneurysm and will contribute to anastomotic hemostasis and long-term stability.

  4. Acute regional improvement of myocardial function after interventional transfemoral aortic valve replacement in aortic stenosis: A speckle tracking echocardiography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schattke Sebastian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI is a promising therapy for patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS and high perioperative risk. New echocardiographic methods, including 2D Strain analysis, allow the more accurate measurement of left ventricular (LV systolic function. The goal of this study was to describe the course of LV reverse remodelling immediately after TAVI in a broad spectrum of patients with symptomatic severe aortic valve stenosis. Methods Thirty consecutive patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis and preserved LVEF underwent transfemoral aortic valve implantation. We performed echocardiography at baseline and one week after TAVI. Echocardiography included standard 2D and Doppler analysis of global systolic and diastolic function as well as 2D Strain measurements of longitudinal, radial and circumferential LV motion and Tissue Doppler echocardiography. Results The baseline biplane LVEF was 57 ± 8.2%, the mean pressure gradient was 46.8 ± 17.2 mmHg and the mean valve area was 0.73 ± 0.27 cm2. The average global longitudinal 2D strain of the left ventricle improved significantly from -15.1 (± 3.0 to -17.5 (± 2.4 % (p Conclusion There is an acute improvement of myocardial longitudinal systolic function of the basal and medial segments measured by 2D Strain analysis immediately after TAVI. The radial, circumferential strain and LVEF does not change significantly in all patients acutely after TAVI. These data suggest that sensitive new echo methods can reliably detect early regional changes of myocardial function after TAVI before benefits in LVEF are detectable.

  5. Echocardiographic and electron beam tomographic assessment of stenosis in patients with aortic valve disease: Gradient versus valve area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piers, Lieuwe Hendrik; Dikkers, Riksta; Tio, R.A.; van den Berg, M.P.; Willems, Els; Oudkerk, M.; Zijlstra, F.

    2006-01-01

    Background. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is routinely used to evaluate aortic valve stenosis. However, it does not give reliable results in every patient. There is growing interest in electron-beam tomography (EBT) as a noninvasive cardiac imaging technique. The usefulness of EBT to evaluate

  6. Updated standardized endpoint definitions for transcatheter aortic valve implantation: The Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 consensus document

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.P. Kappetein (Arie Pieter); S.J. Head (Stuart); P. Généreux (Philippe); N. Piazza (Nicolo); N.M. van Mieghem (Nicolas); E.H. Blackstone (Eugene); T.G. Brott (Thomas); D.J. Cohen (David J.); D.E. Cutlip (Donald); G.A. van Es (Gerrit Anne); R.T. Hahn (Rebecca); A.J. Kirtane (Ajay); M. Krucoff (Mitchell); S. Kodali (Susheel); M.J. Mack (Michael); R. Mehran (Roxana); J. Rodés-Cabau (Josep); P. Vranckx (Pascal); J.G. Webb (John); S. Windecker (Stephan); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); M.B. Leon (Martin)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: The aim of the current Valvular Academic Research Consortium (VARC)-2 initiative was to revisit the selection and definitions of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI)- clinical endpoints to make them more suitable to the present and future needs of clinical trials. I

  7. Clinical and economic outcomes after surgical aortic valve replacement in Medicare patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark MA

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mary Ann Clark,1 Francis G Duhay,2 Ann K Thompson,2 Michelle J Keyes,3 Lars G Svensson,4 Robert O Bonow,5 Benjamin T Stockwell,3 David J Cohen61The Neocure Group LLC, Washington, DC, 2Edwards Lifesciences Corporation, Irvine, CA, 3The Burgess Group LLC, Alexandria, VA, 4Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, 5Center for Cardiovascular Innovation, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, 6Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute, Kansas City, MO, USABackground: Aortic valve replacement (AVR is the standard of care for patients with severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis who are suitable surgical candidates, benefiting both non-high-risk and high-risk patients. The purpose of this study was to report long-term medical resource use and costs for patients following AVR and validate our assumption that high-risk patients have worse outcomes and are more costly than non-high-risk patients in this population.Methods: Patients with aortic stenosis who underwent AVR were identified in the 2003 Medicare 5% Standard Analytic Files and tracked over 5 years to measure clinical outcomes, medical resource use, and costs. An approximation to the logistic EuroSCORE (European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation based on administrative data was used to assess surgical risk, with a computed logistic EuroSCORE > 20% considered high-risk.Results: We identified 1474 patients with aortic stenosis who underwent AVR, of whom 1222 (82.9% were non-high-risk and 252 (17.1% were high-risk. Among those who were non-high-risk, the mean age was 73.3 years, 464 (38.2% were women, and the mean logistic EuroSCORE was 7%, whereas in those who were high-risk, the mean age was 77.6 years, 134 (52.8% were women, and the mean logistic EuroSCORE was 37%. All-cause mortality was 33.2% for non-high-risk and 66.7% for high-risk patients at 5 years. Over this time period, non

  8. Iatrogenic coronary ostial stenosis of left main stem following aortic valve replacement: Visualization with optical coherence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Muhammad A. [Department of Cardiology, Manchester Heart Centre, Manchester Royal Infirmary, M13 9WL Manchester (United Kingdom); Prati, Francesco [Interventional Cardiology, San Giovanni Hospital, Via dell’Amba Aradam 8, 00184 Rome (Italy); El-Omar, Magdi, E-mail: magdi.el-omar@cmft.nhs.uk [Department of Cardiology, Manchester Heart Centre, Manchester Royal Infirmary, M13 9WL Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-15

    Iatrogenic coronary ostial stenosis following aortic valve replacement (AVR) occurs in up to 3.4% of cases and usually presents within the first 6 months following surgery. We present the case of an 85 year old man who developed an acute coronary syndrome 2 months following AVR. Coronary angiography revealed a severe de novo lesion in the left main stem, which, on optical coherence tomography, was shown to be due to severe intimal hyperplasia. The most likely underlying mechanism is vessel wall trauma caused by the rigid tip cannula used for administration of cardioplegia solution. Surgeons should be aware of this possibility when administering this solution via the antegrade approach.

  9. Early outcome of minimally invasive mitral valve surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawky Fareed

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: Right anterolateral mini-thoracotomy minimally invasive technique provides excellent exposure of the mitral valve, even with a small atrium and offers a better cosmetic lateral scar which is less prone to keloid formation. In addition, minimally invasive right anterolateral mini-thoracotomy is as safe as median sternotomy for mitral valve surgery, with fewer complications and postoperative pain, less ICU and hospital stay, fast recovery to work with no movement restriction after surgery. It should be used as an initial approach for mitral valve surgery. Furthermore, it was believed that less spreading of the incision, no interference with the diaphragm and less tissue dissection might improve outcomes, particularly respiratory function.

  10. Nursing cooperation for patients with severe aortic stenosis receiving transcatheter aortic valve replacement using balloon-expandable aortic valve stent%球扩式主动脉瓣支架治疗严重主动脉瓣狭窄的手术配合

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张峥; 高嵩芹; 王馨; 毛燕君

    2014-01-01

    Objective To discuss the nursing cooperation for patients with severe aortic stenosis who are receiving transcatheter aortic valve replacement using balloon-expandable aortic valve stent. Methods Percutaneous interventional transcatheter aortic valve replacement was employed in 9 patients with severe aortic stenosis. Active preoperative preparation, sufficient psychological care, close observation of vital signs and effective surgery cooperation during the operation were carried out. The clinical results were analyzed. Results Successful operation was accomplished in all the nine patients. After the surgery, all patients were in good condition, and no nursing-related complications occurred. Conclusion Correct understanding of the cooperation with the procedure of transcatheter aortic valve replacement using balloon-expandable aortic valve stent, excellent preoperative psychological care and active preoperative preparation, etc. are the most important things to ensure a successful surgery.%目的:探讨球扩式主动脉瓣支架经导管治疗主动脉瓣狭窄的手术配合方法。方法对9例严重退行性主动脉瓣狭窄患者行经导管介入手术治疗,积极术前准备,充分的心理护理,术中密切观察生命体征,积极配合手术。结果9例手术均顺利完成,患者术后生存良好,无护理相关并发症。结论介入手术室护士正确掌握经导管主动脉瓣膜置换术的手术配合方法,术前做好患者的心理护理以及各项术前准备,术中与医师密切配合,是手术成功的保证。

  11. Assessment of aortic stenosis after aortic valve replacement. Comparative evaluation of dual-source CT and echocardiography; Quantitative Evaluation der Aortenklappenoeffnungsflaeche mit der Dual-Source-CT und Korrelation mit der 2D-Echokardiografie. Initiale Ergebnisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saam, T.; Minaifar, N.; Becker, C.; Reiser, M.; Nikolaou, K. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Oberhoffer, M.; Rist, C.; Vogt, F.; Reichart, B. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Herzchirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik

    2008-06-15

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate whether planimetric measurements of aortic valve area (AVA) with dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) correlate with measurements obtained by echocardiography and to correlate the amount of calcification of the aortic valve with AVA in a group of patients after aortic valve replacement. Materials and Method: 23 patients underwent dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) of the heart (Somatom Definition, Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim, Germany), without heart rate control (heart rate 52-113 beats/minute). All patients had undergone aortic valve replacement (homografts, mean time after surgery: 7{+-}3 years). The AVA of the transplanted aortic valve graft was measured planimetrically by means of DSCT and compared with echocardiography as a standard of reference, to exclude post-surgical restenosis of the valve. Maximum AVA in systole planimetrically measured with CT was compared with calculated AVA values determined with the continuity equation, using transvalvular pressure gradients. The amount of calcification of the aortic valve was quantified and correlated (Spearman's R) with the AVA. To assess intra- and inter-reader reproducibility, the DCST data was re-analyzed by two readers 4 weeks after the initial review. Results: All DSCT datasets were of diagnostic image quality concerning valve depiction. The mean AVA as measured by DSCT was 2.7{+-}0.9 cm{sup 2} compared to 1.8{+-}0.5 cm{sup 2} by echocardiography (p<0.05). The planimetric evaluation of the CT data as compared to results of echocardiography showed a significant correlation of the results (Pearson's correlation coefficient R=0.78, p<0.001). Intra- and inter-reader reproducibility was good with intra-class correlation coefficients of 0.86 and 0.81, respectively (p<0.001). There was a significant negative correlation between the amount of aortic valve calcification and AVA as measured by echocardiography (R=-0.42; p<0.05) and as measured by DSCT (R=-0

  12. Rapid 3D printing of anatomically accurate and mechanically heterogeneous aortic valve hydrogel scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockaday, L A; Kang, K H; Colangelo, N W; Cheung, P Y C; Duan, B; Malone, E; Wu, J; Girardi, L N; Bonassar, L J; Lipson, H; Chu, C C; Butcher, J T

    2013-01-01

    The aortic valve exhibits complex three-dimensional (3D) anatomy and heterogeneity essential for long-term efficient biomechanical function. These are, however, challenging to mimic in de novo engineered living tissue valve strategies. We present a novel simultaneous 3D-printing/photocrosslinking technique for rapidly engineering complex, heterogeneous aortic valve scaffolds. Native anatomic and axisymmetric aortic valve geometries (root wall and tri-leaflets) with 12 to 22 mm inner diameters (ID) were 3D printed with poly-ethylene glycol-diacrylate (PEG-DA) hydrogels (700 or 8000 MW) supplemented with alginate. 3D printing geometric accuracy was quantified and compared using Micro-CT. Porcine aortic valve interstitial cells (PAVIC) seeded scaffolds were cultured for up to 21 days. Results showed that blended PEG-DA scaffolds could achieve over 10-fold range in elastic modulus (5.3±0.9 to 74.6±1.5 kPa). 3D printing times for valve conduits with mechanically contrasting hydrogels were optimized to 14 to 45 minutes, increasing linearly with conduit diameter. Larger printed valves had greater shape fidelity (93.3±2.6, 85.1±2.0, and 73.3±5.2% for 22, 17, and 12 mm ID porcine valves; 89.1±4.0, 84.1±5.6, and 66.6±5.2% for simplified valves). PAVIC seeded scaffolds maintained near 100% viability over 21 days. These results demonstrate that 3D hydrogel printing with controlled photocrosslinking can rapidly fabricate anatomical heterogeneous valve conduits that support cell engraftment. PMID:22914604

  13. SU-C-18C-02: Specifcation of X-Ray Projection Angles Which Are Aligned with the Aortic Valve Plane From a Planar Image of a Valvuloplasty Balloon Inflated Across the Aortic Valve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fetterly, K; Mathew, V [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures provide a method to implant a prosthetic aortic valve via a minimallyinvasive, catheter-based procedure. TAVR procedures require use of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane to minimize prosthetic valve positioning error due to x-ray imaging parallax. The purpose of this work is to calculate the continuous range of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane from a single planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve. Methods: Computational methods to measure the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve were developed. Required inputs include a planar x-ray image of a known valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and specifications of x-ray imaging geometry from the DICOM header of the image. A-priori knowledge of the species-specific typical range of aortic orientation is required to specify the sign of the angle of the long axis of the balloon with respect to the x-ray beam. The methods were validated ex-vivo and in a live pig. Results: Ex-vivo experiments demonstrated that the angular orientation of a stationary inflated valvuloplasty balloon can be measured with precision less than 1 degree. In-vivo pig experiments demonstrated that cardiac motion contributed to measurement variability, with precision less than 3 degrees. Error in specification of x-ray geometry directly influences measurement accuracy. Conclusion: This work demonstrates that the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve can be calculated precisely from a planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and known x-ray geometry. This method could be used to determine appropriate c-arm angular projections during TAVR procedures to minimize x-ray imaging parallax and thereby minimize prosthetic valve positioning errors.

  14. Spontaneous retrograde dissection of the ascending aorta in a patient with a bicuspid aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgullu, Cagdas; Hekim, Tolga; Eryilmaz, Ufuk; Kurtoğlu, Tünay; Gürcün, Uğur

    2013-06-23

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is a congenital anomaly associated with structural weakness of the aortic wall. Sudden onset of symptoms in patients with BAV, such as sudden severe back pain, and pulse inequality between the extremities or tension disparity should alert clinicians to acute aortic syndromes, as they require prompt diagnosis and management. Retrograde aortic dissection, which is a rare form of acute aortic syndrome, is an uncommon life-threatening entity and may produce atypical computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging findings, leading to difficulty in diagnosis. We report on a 51-year-old male patient with BAV and spontaneous retrograde ascending aortic dissection. CT findings were confusing and the diagnosis was made via transoesophageal echocardiography. After the diagnosis, the patient was treated with a modified Bentall procedure. He did not have any complications and was stable four months after the operation.

  15. Incidence, Causes, and Impact of In-Hospital Infections After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirado-Conte, Gabriela; Freitas-Ferraz, Afonso B; Nombela-Franco, Luis; Jimenez-Quevedo, Pilar; Biagioni, Corina; Cuadrado, Ana; Nuñez-Gil, Ivan; Salinas, Pablo; Gonzalo, Nieves; Ferrera, Carlos; Vivas, David; Higueras, Javier; Viana-Tejedor, Ana; Perez-Vizcayno, Maria Jose; Vilacosta, Isidre; Escaned, Javier; Fernandez-Ortiz, Antonio; Macaya, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    In-hospital infections (IHI) are one of the most common and serious problems after invasive procedures. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an increasingly used alternative to surgery in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence, origin, risk factors, and clinical outcomes of IHI after TAVI. A total of 303 consecutive patients with severe aortic stenosis who underwent transfemoral TAVI were included and followed during a median time of 21 months. We examined the occurrence, types, origin, and timing of infections during hospital stay as well as short- and long-term clinical outcomes according to the occurrence of IHI. A total of 51 patients (17%; 62 infectious episodes) experienced IHI after TAVI. Respiratory and urinary tract infections were the most frequent type of infections (44% and 34%, respectively), followed by surgical site infection (8%) and bloodstream infection (5%). Positive cultures were obtained in 74% of the samples, of which 65% were gram-negative bacilli. Modifiable factors such as bleeding (p = 0.005) and length of coronary care unit stay (p <0.001) were independently associated with an increased infection risk. Patients with IHI had a longer hospital stay (14 vs 6 days, p <0.001), an increased mortality (hazard ratio 2.48, 95% CI 1.45 to 4.23) and readmission rate (hazard ratio 2.0, 95% CI 1.27 to 3.14) during the follow-up. In conclusion, IHI is a frequent complication after TAVI with a significant impact on short- and long-term clinical outcomes. The most important risk factors associated with the development of this complication were modifiable periprocedural aspects. These results underline the importance to implement specific preventive strategies to reduce in-hospital-acquired infections after TAVI.

  16. Patents and heart valve surgery - II: tissue valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheema, Faisal H; Kossar, Alexander P; Rehman, Atiq; Younas, Fahad; Polvani, Gianluca

    2013-08-01

    Valvular heart disease affects millions of Americans yearly and currently requires surgical intervention to repair or replace the defective valves. Through a close-knit collaboration between physicians, scientists and biomedical engineers, a vast degree of research and development has been aimed towards the optimization of prosthetic heart valves. Although various methods have made fantastic strides in producing durable prostheses, the therapeutic efficacy of prosthetic valves is inherently limited by a dependency upon lifelong anticoagulant regimens for recipients - a difficult challenge for many in clinical setting. Thus, biological tissue valves have been developed to circumvent vascular and immunemediated complications by incorporating biological materials to mimic native valves while still maintaining a necessary level of structural integrity. Over the past decade, a multitude of patents pertaining to the refinement of designs as well as the advancement in methodologies and technologies associated with biological tissue valves have been issued. This review seeks to chronicle and characterize such patents in an effort to track the past, present, and future progress as well as project the trajectory of tissue valves in the years to come.

  17. Aortic coarctation associated with aortic valve stenosis and mitral regurgitation in an adult patient: a two-stage approach using a large-diameter stent graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novosel, Luka; Perkov, Dražen; Dobrota, Savko; Ćorić, Vedran; Štern Padovan, Ranka

    2014-02-01

    We report a case of a staged surgical and endovascular management in a 62-year-old woman with aortic coarctation associated with aortic valve stenosis and mitral regurgitation. The patient was admitted for severe aortic valve stenosis and mitral valve incompetence. During hospitalization and preoperative imaging, a previously undiagnosed aortic coarctation was discovered. The patient underwent a 2-stage approach that combined a Bentall procedure and mitral valve replacement in the first stage, followed by correction of the aortic coarctation by percutaneous placement of an Advanta V12 large-diameter stent graft (Atrium, Mijdrecht, The Netherlands) which to our knowledge has not been used in an adult patient with this combination of additional cardiac comorbidities. A staged approach combining surgical treatment first and endovascular placement of an Advanta V12 stent graft in the second stage can be effective and safe in adult patients with coarctation of the aorta and additional cardiac comorbidities.

  18. CMR assessment after a transapical-transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biere, Loïc, E-mail: lobiere@chu-angers.fr [L’UNAM Université, Angers (France); Université d’Angers, Laboratoire Cardioprotection, Remodelage et Thrombose, CHU d’Angers, Service de Cardiologie, Angers (France); Pinaud, Frédéric [L’UNAM Université, Angers (France); Université d’Angers, CHU d’Angers, Service de Chirurgie Cardio-vasculaire et Thoracique, Angers (France); UMR-CNRS 6214, INSERM 1083, faculté de médecine, Angers (France); Delépine, Stéphane; Grall, Sylvain; Viot, Nathalie; Mateus, Victor; Rouleau, Frédéric [L’UNAM Université, Angers (France); Université d’Angers, Laboratoire Cardioprotection, Remodelage et Thrombose, CHU d’Angers, Service de Cardiologie, Angers (France); Corbeau, Jean-Jacques [Université d’Angers, CHU d’Angers, Département d’anesthésie-réanimation, Angers (France); Prunier, Fabrice [L’UNAM Université, Angers (France); Université d’Angers, Laboratoire Cardioprotection, Remodelage et Thrombose, CHU d’Angers, Service de Cardiologie, Angers (France); and others

    2014-02-15

    Aims: To describe the time course of myocardial scarring after transapical-transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TA-TAVI) with the Edwards SAPIEN XT™ and the Edwards SAPIEN™ prosthesis in a 3-month follow-up study using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). Methods: In 20 TA-TAVI patients, CMR was performed at discharge and 3 months (3M). Cine-MRI was used for left ventricular (LV) functional assessment, and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging was employed for detecting the presence of myocardial scarring. Special attention was given to any artifacts caused by the prosthesis, which were consequently defined using a three-grade artifact scale. Results: We systematically reported the presence of small LGE hyperintensity relating to the apical segment, with no variation found between discharge and 3 M (2.8 ± 1.6 g vs. 2.35 ± 1.1 g). LV ejection fraction, end-diastolic, and end-systolic volumes did not significantly vary. A small area of apical akinesia was observed, with no improvement at follow-up. Whereas the Edwards SAPIEN XT™ prosthesis and the Edwards SAPIEN™ prosthesis are both constituted by metallic stenting structure, the Edwards SAPIEN™ was responsible for a larger signal void, thus potentially limiting the diagnostic performance of CMR. Conclusions: CMR may be performed safely in the context of TA-TAVI. The presence of a very small apical infarction correlating with focal akinesia was observed. As expected, the Edwards SAPIEN XT™ prosthesis was shown to be particularly suitable for CMR assessment.

  19. Evaluation of aortic valve stenosis by cardiac multislice computed tomography compared with echocardiography: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivertsen, Jacob; Køber, Lars Valeur; Abdulla, Jawdat

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY: It has not yet been established whether multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) is reliable for the quantification of aortic valve area (AVA) in patients with aortic valve stenosis (AVS) and simultaneously for assessment of the coronary anatomy. The study aim, via...

  20. Cardiologist and cardiac surgeon view on decision-making in prosthetic aortic valve selection: Does profession matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.M. Korteland; J. Kluin (Jolanda); R.J.M. Klautz (Robert); J.W. Roos-Hesselink (Jolien); M. Versteegh (Michel); A.J.J.C. Bogers (Ad); J.J.M. Takkenberg (Hanneke)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAims Assess and compare among Dutch cardiothoracic surgeons and cardiologists: opinion on (1) patient involvement, (2) conveying risk in aortic valve selection, and (3) aortic valve preferences. Methods and results A survey among 117 cardiothoracic surgeons and cardiologists was conducte

  1. Left Atrial Volume as Predictor of Valve Replacement and Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Asymptomatic Mild to Moderate Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Morten; Egstrup, Kenneth; Wachtell, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Left atrial (LA) size is known to increase with chronically increased left ventricular (LV) filling pressure. We hypothesized that LA volume was predictive of aortic valve replacement (AVR) and cardiovascular events in a large cohort of patients with asymptomatic mild to moderate aortic valve...... stenosis....

  2. Clinical and echocardiographic assessment of the Medtronic Advantage aortic valve prosthesis: the Scandinavian multicentre, prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaverstad, Rune; Vitale, Nicola; Karevold, Asbjørn;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this report is the prospective, multicentre evaluation of clinical results and haemodynamic performance of the Medtronic Advantage aortic valve prosthesis. METHODS: From April 2001 to June 2003, 166 patients (male:female 125:41; mean (SD) age 61.8 (11.8) years) received...... an aortic advantage valve prosthesis. Complete cumulative follow-up was 242.7 patient-years (maximum 3.2; mean 1.6 years). Postoperatively, patients underwent early (within 30 days) and 1 year transthoracic echocardiography. RESULTS: 30 day mortality was 2.4% (n = 4). Kaplan-Meier estimates of freedom from...... echocardiography. CONCLUSIONS: Haemodynamic performance and early clinical results of Medtronic advantage in the aortic position were satisfactory and comparable with those of other bileaflet valves in current clinical use....

  3. Heart Team therapeutic decision-making and treatment in severe aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav Hørsted; Holmberg, Fredrik; Gerds, Thomas Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: After transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has been available for high-risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (AVS), the decision-making of the Heart Team (HT) has not been examined. Design: All adult patients with severe AVS referred to a large tertiary medical......%), and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in 392 (81%) of patients. In patients referred to intervention, TAVI compared with SAVR patients were older (OR = 1.17 per year, 95% CI 1.09-1.26; p obesity (OR = 4.69, 1.......51-13.77; p disease (COPD) (OR = 3.66, 1.21-10.75; p = 0.02). MT patients compared with patients referred to any intervention were older, had a higher prevalence of COPD, peripheral arterial disease, previous myocardial infarction, and cerebrovascular disease...

  4. POL-TAVI – Polish Registry of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation – simple tool, great value, rationale and design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczek, Krzysztof; Tobota, Zdzisław; Chodór, Piotr; Cieśla, Daniel; Jaźwiec, Tomasz; Banasiak, Waldemar; Stępińska, Janina; Kalarus, Zbigniew; Opolski, Grzegorz; Zembala, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common valvular heart disease in adults in Europe and North America. Management of AS patients depends on accurate diagnosis of the cause and stage of the disease process: the first and definitive therapeutic choice for a growing number of elderly patients with symptomatic AS is surgical treatment. In patients not eligible for surgery, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) constitutes a safe and effective alternative. As an innovative, costly method of treatment, it requires however careful monitoring of its course, documenting its early and long-term results, and assessment of its safety and medical-economic cost-effectiveness. A medical registry seems to be an excellent tool to perform such analysis. The aim of this paper is to present the design and rationale for creation of the first National Cardiac-Cardiac Surgical Registry of Percutaneous Aortic Valve Treatment POL-TAVI, to describe its genesis and to highlight its key assumptions and aims. Despite its recent beginnings, the POL-TAVI Registry has already demonstrated its value and usability in monitoring and assessment of TAVI procedures, leading to further improvement and development of this new method in Poland. It constitutes an important and valuable tool for patients, the medical community and the payer. PMID:28096826

  5. Initial non-opioid based anesthesia in a parturient having severe aortic stenosis undergoing cesarean section with aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata Podder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy in presence of severe aortic stenosis (AS causes worsening of symptoms needing further intervention. In the advanced stages of pregnancy, some patients may even require aortic valve replacement (AVR and cesarean delivery in the same sitting. Opioid based general anesthesia for combined lower segment cesarean section (LSCS with AVR has been described. However, the use of opioid may lead to fetal morbidity and need of respiratory support for the baby. We describe successful anesthetic management for LSCS with AVR in a >33 week gravida with severe AS and congestive heart failure. We avoided opioids till delivery of the baby AVR; the delivered neonate showed a normal APGAR score.

  6. The Nordic Aortic Valve Intervention (NOTION trial comparing transcatheter versus surgical valve implantation: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thyregod Hans Gustav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Degenerative aortic valve (AV stenosis is the most prevalent heart valve disease in the western world. Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR has until recently been the standard of treatment for patients with severe AV stenosis. Whether transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI can be offered with improved safety and similar effectiveness in a population including low-risk patients has yet to be examined in a randomised setting. Methods/Design This randomised clinical trial will evaluate the benefits and risks of TAVI using the transarterial CoreValve System (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA (intervention group compared with SAVR (control group in patients with severe degenerative AV stenosis. Randomisation ratio is 1:1, enrolling a total of 280 patients aged 70 years or older without significant coronary artery disease and with a low, moderate, or high surgical risk profile. Trial outcomes include a primary composite outcome of myocardial infarction, stroke, or all-cause mortality within the first year after intervention (expected rates 5% for TAVI, 15% for SAVR. Exploratory safety outcomes include procedure complications, valve re-intervention, and cardiovascular death, as well as cardiac, cerebral, pulmonary, renal, and vascular complications. Exploratory efficacy outcomes include New York Heart Association functional status, quality of life, and valve prosthesis and cardiac performance. Enrolment began in December 2009, and 269 patients have been enrolled up to December 2012. Discussion The trial is designed to evaluate the performance of TAVI in comparison with SAVR. The trial results may influence the choice of treatment modality for patients with severe degenerative AV stenosis. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01057173

  7. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation after heart valve surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T B; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Berg, S K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Owing to a lack of evidence, patients undergoing heart valve surgery have been offered exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) since 2009 based on recommendations for patients with ischaemic heart disease in Denmark. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of CR...... expensive outpatient visits. Further studies should investigate the benefits of CR to heart valve surgery patients as part of a formal cost-utility analysis....

  8. Bleb incarceration following Ahmed valve surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gross FJ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fredric J Gross, Giovanni DiSandro Department of Ophthalmology, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA, USA Abstract: Globe luxation is a painful and potentially vision-threatening condition in which the globe becomes trapped behind the eyelids requiring physician intervention in the emergency department or eye clinic. On presentation, the patient typically complains of an inability to close their eye, severe foreign body sensation, decreased vision, and significant eye pain. Although most visual symptoms are reversible and primarily result from exposure keratopathy, optic nerve damage, and permanent vision loss can occur from repeat or prolonged episodes of globe luxation. Risk factors include any congenital or acquired conditions that displace the globe anteriorly in the orbit and increased eyelid laxity that allows the globe to prolapse through the lid aperture. Typically, the precipitating event involves eyelid retraction during ophthalmic examination or an event that increases intraorbital pressure such as coughing or sneezing. Once the globe has luxated, the condition is typically worsened by blepharospasm and patients’ attempts to close the eye that worsen the entrapment. In the current case, the patient had a large superotemporal filtering bleb following Ahmed valve surgery for uncontrolled glaucoma. While instilling her glaucoma medication, she retracted her eyelids sufficiently to pull the upper lid over her filtering bleb where it became entrapped causing a similar presentation to globe luxation. Traditional methods of repositioning the globe were unsuccessful. Bleb needling was ultimately required to return the globe to a normal position. Keywords: luxation, globe, glaucoma

  9. Aortic annulus dimension assessment by computed tomography for transcatheter aortic valve implantation: differences between systole and diastole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertaso, Angela G; Wong, Dennis T L; Liew, Gary Y H; Cunnington, Michael S; Richardson, James D; Thomson, Viji S; Lorraine, Brett; Kourlis, George; Leech, Diana; Worthley, Matthew I; Worthley, Stephen G

    2012-12-01

    Accurate assessment of aortic annular dimensions is essential for successful transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Annular dimensions are conventionally measured in mid-systole by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), echocardiography and angiography. Significant differences in systolic and diastolic aortic annular dimensions have been demonstrated in cohorts without aortic stenosis (AS), but it is unknown whether similar dynamic variation in annular dimensions exists in patients with severe calcific AS in whom aortic compliance is likely to be substantially reduced. We investigated the variation in aortic annular dimensions between systole and diastole in patients with severe calcific AS. Patients with severe calcific AS referred for TAVI were evaluated by 128-slice MDCT. Aortic annular diameter was measured during diastole and systole in the modified coronal, modified sagittal, and basal ring planes (maximal, minimal and mean diameters). Differences between systole and diastole were analysed by paired t test. Fifty-nine patients were included in the analysis. Three of the five aortic dimensions measured increased significantly during systole. The largest change was a 0.75 mm (3.4%) mean increase in the minimal diameter of the basal ring during systole (p = 0.004). This corresponds closely to the modified sagittal view, which also increased by mean 0.42 mm (1.9%) during systole (p = 0.008). There was no significant change in the maximal diameter of the basal ring or the modified coronal view during systole (p > 0.05). There is a small magnitude but statistically significant difference in aortic annulus dimensions of patients with severe AS referred for TAVI when measured in diastole and systole. This small difference is unlikely to alter clinical decisions regarding prosthesis size or suitability for TAVI.

  10. Aortic valve debridement by ultrasonic surgical aspirator: a word of caution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craver, J M

    1990-05-01

    Aortic stenosis was relieved in 11 patients by ultrasonic debridement of the valve and annulus, while 102 other patients underwent valve replacement for aortic stenosis during 1988. Debridement was selectively applied based on findings of small annulus size (19 mm or less) and extensive calcification. Additional patient characteristics were mean transvalvular gradient of 78 mm Hg, advanced age, and marked left ventricular hypertrophy. Six patients had no residual gradient and 5 others a mean gradient less than 10 mm Hg. There were no complications related to the debridement process. Intraoperative transesophageal Doppler echocardiography demonstrated improved leaflet mobility and elimination of the gradient in all patients and elimination of associated valvular insufficiency in 2 patients. Follow-up echocardiography demonstrated late onset of new valvular regurgitation in 5 patients that was progressive and required reoperation in 3. Thickened, hardened, and retracted valve leaflets with loss of central coaptation were found in all 3 patients who underwent reoperation. Ultrasonic debridement can effectively relieve aortic stenosis, provide an excellent immediate hemodynamic result, and decrease operative time. However, the early occurrence of aortic insufficiency in a high percentage of patients makes it an unacceptable alternative to valve replacement, and the technique should be abandoned as a treatment for severe calcific aortic stenosis.

  11. [Mortality and morbidity in surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banke, A.B.; Andersen, Jakob Steen; Heslet, L.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Patients undergoing surgery for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) have a mortality of 40-50%. The purpose of the present investigation is to document the mortality and morbidity of such patients at Rigshospitalet (RH) in 2005. The results are compared with the best results...

  12. Effect of transcatheter aortic valve implantation on intraoperative left ventricular end-diastolic pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Kosaku; Ota, Takashi; Nagamine, Katsutoshi; Koide, Yasuhiro; Nomura, Takeshi; Yamanaka, Futoshi; Shishido, Koki; Tanaka, Masashi; Saito, Shigeru

    2016-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) for patients with aortic stenosis is a less invasive alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement. Despite this, careful anesthetic management, especially strict control of blood pressure and fluid management, is necessary. During TAVI, normalization of left ventricular afterload due to aortic balloon valvuloplasty and prosthetic valve deployment is expected to result in rapid improvement of systolic function and consequent improvement in diastolic function. However, the early effect of TAVI on left ventricular diastolic function is less clear. We hypothesized that TAVI induces a rapid decrease in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) after valve deployment. This retrospective observational study included 71 patients who had undergone TAVI using the transfemoral approach with a balloon-expandable valve under general anesthesia. Intraoperative LVEDP was measured using an intracardiac catheter. The severity of residual aortic regurgitation (AR) was assessed using the Sellers criteria. The mean (SD) LVEDP was 17.8 (5.3) mmHg just before TAVI and increased significantly to 27.3 (8.2) mmHg immediately after prosthetic valve deployment (p < 0.0001). The change in LVEDP was 8.7 (8.6) mmHg in patients with low residual AR (Sellers ≤1) and 11.0 (7.1) mmHg in those with high residual AR (Sellers ≥2); however, this difference was not significant. No correlation was found between the LVEDP change and intraoperative fluid balance. In conclusion, LVEDP increased significantly in the early period after valve deployment during TAVI, regardless of residual AR severity. It was suggested that the tolerability of fluid load could be reduced at that time.

  13. [Aorta-associated complications after prosthetic repair of the aortic valve].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazylev, V V; Vachev, S A; Karnakhin, V A; Bartosh, F L; Rosseĭkin, E V

    2015-01-01

    The authors analyzed dependence between the presence of preoperative predictors of aorta-associated complications and risk for the development of these complications in the remote period after prosthetic repair of the aortic valve. The study included a total of 231 patients subjected to aortic valve prosthetic repair with no additional intervention on the root and ascending portion of the aorta. The follow up duration varied from 12 to 62 months. As predictors of the development of aorta-associated complications we examined such factors as the bicuspid structure of the aortic valve, dilatation of the aortic ascending portion relative to the upper border of the individually calculated norm, disordered configuration of the complex "aortic root - ascending portion of the aorta", resistant arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus. Depending on the number of predictors for the development of aorta-associated complications the patients were subdivided into 2 groups: Group One consisting of 105 patients with two and more predictors of the development of aorta-associated complications, and Group Two comprising 126 patients with not more than one predictor of the development of aorta-associated complications. It was determined that in the first group of patients the total number of aorta-associated complications in the remote period after prosthetic repair of the aortic valve amounted to 25.7% (27 of 105 patients). The total number of aorta-associated complications in the second group amounted to 1.6% (2 of 126 patients). All detected aorta-associated complications were divided into "critical" and "noncritical". The critical complications were those the detection of which required performing a second operation in the patient: formation of an ascending aortic aneurysm and type A aortic dissection. To the "noncritical" aorta-associated complications belonged dilatation of the ascending portion of the aorta progressing at a rate of 2 mm/year. Resulting from the performed study

  14. Severe aortic valve stenosis in the elderly: high prevalence of sleep-related breathing disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keymel S

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Stefanie Keymel,1 Katharina Hellhammer,1 Tobias Zeus,1 Marc Merx,2 Malte Kelm,1 Stephan Steiner3 1Department of Cardiology, Pneumology, and Vascular Diseases, Medical Faculty, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, 2Department of Cardiology, Vascular Diseases and Intensive Care Medicine, KRHKlinikum Robert Koch Gehrden, Gehrden, 3Department of Cardiology, Pneumology and Intensive Care Medicine, St Vincenz Hospital, Limburg, Germany Background: Aortic valve stenosis is common in the elderly, with a prevalence of nearly 3% in patients aged 75 years or older. Despite the fact that sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBD are thought to be associated with cardiac disease, little is known about their prevalence in this patient cohort. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of SRBD in older patients with aortic valve stenosis admitted for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.Methods: Forty-eight consecutive patients (mean age 81±6 years; 37.5% male with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis and considered for transcatheter aortic valve replacement were screened for SRBD. Sleep studies were performed by in-hospital unattended cardiorespiratory polygraphy measuring nasal air flow, chest and abdominal efforts, as well as oxygen saturation and body position. The patients were divided in subgroups dependent on the documented apnea–hypopnea index (AHI; no SRBD was defined as an AHI of <5 events/hour; mild SRBD as AHI 5–15 events/hour, and moderate to severe SRBD as AHI ≥15 events/hour.Results: Thirty-seven patients (77% had SRBD defined as an AHI of ≥5 events/hour. Eleven patients had an unremarkable investigation, with AHI <5 events/hour (mean 3.0±1.3 events/hour. Among patients with sleep apnea, 19 patients had mild SRBD, with an AHI of 5–15 events/hour (mean 9.9±3.4 events/hour and 18 patients had moderate to severe SRBD (mean 26.6±11.3 events/hour. Mainly, obstructive apneas were found. Subgroups were not

  15. Acute myocardial ischemia after aortic valve replacement: A comprehensive diagnostic evaluation using dynamic multislice spiral computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lembcke, Alexander [Department of Radiology, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Freie Universitaet Berlin and Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany)]. E-mail: alexander.lembcke@gmx.de; Hein, Patrick A. [Department of Radiology, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Freie Universitaet Berlin and Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Enzweiler, Christian N.H. [Department of Radiology, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Freie Universitaet Berlin and Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Hoffmann, Udo [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Klessen, Christian [Department of Radiology, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Freie Universitaet Berlin and Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Dohmen, Pascal M. [Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Freie Universitaet Berlin and Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    We describe the case of a 72-year-old man presenting with endocarditis and clinical signs of acute myocardial ischemia after biological aortic valve replacement. A comprehensive cardiac dynamic multislice spiral computed tomography demonstrated: (1) an endocarditic vegetation of the aortic valve; (2) a subvalvular leakage feeding a paravalvular pseudoaneurysm based on an aortic root abscess with subsequent compromise of the systolic blood flow in the left main coronary artery and the resulting myocardial perfusion deficit.

  16. Heart Surgery: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Is a Pediatric Heart Surgeon? (American Academy of Pediatrics) Also in Spanish Patient Handouts Aortic valve surgery - open (Medical Encyclopedia) ... Spanish Open heart surgery (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish ... heart surgery Pediatric heart surgery - discharge Sternal exploration or closure Related ...

  17. Feasibility of transapical aortic valve replacement through a left ventricular apical diverticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrari Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transapical aortic valve replacement is an established technique performed in high-risk patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis and vascular disease contraindicating trans-vascular and trans-aortic procedures. The presence of a left ventricular apical diverticulum is a rare event and the treatment depends on dimensions and estimated risk of embolisation, rupture, or onset of ventricular arrhythmias. The diagnosis is based on standard cardiac imaging and symptoms are very rare. In this case report we illustrate our experience with a 81 years old female patient suffering from symptomatic aortic valve stenosis, respiratory disease, chronic renal failure and severe peripheral vascular disease (logistic euroscore: 42%, who successfully underwent a transapical 23 mm balloon-expandable stent-valve implantation through an apical diverticulum of the left ventricle. Intra-luminal thrombi were absent and during the same procedure were able to treat the valve disease and to successfully exclude the apical diverticulum without complications and through a mini thoracotomy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a transapical procedure is successfully performed through an apical diverticulum.

  18. Transapical perfusion for peri-arrest salvage during transcutaneous aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göbölös, L; Tsang, G M; Curzen, N; Calver, A L; Ohri, S K

    2015-11-01

    An 80-year-old man developed severe haemodynamic instability during a transapical aortic valve implantation. He was not suitable for a conventional surgical approach due to comorbidities and patent aortocoronary bypass grafts also limited further stabilizing actions. As a bail-out procedure, we demonstrate the feasibility of transapical arterial cannulation by crossing a newly implanted TAVI valve in order to establish an emergency bypass circuit.

  19. A roadmap to investigate the genetic basis of bicuspid aortic valve and its complications: insights from the International BAVCon (Bicuspid Aortic Valve Consortium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Siddharth K; Bossé, Yohan; Muehlschlegel, Jochen D; Michelena, Hector I; Limongelli, Giuseppe; Della Corte, Alessandro; Pluchinotta, Francesca R; Russo, Maria Giovanna; Evangelista, Artur; Benson, D Woodrow; Body, Simon C; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2014-08-26

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most common adult congenital heart defect and is found in 0.5% to 2.0% of the general population. The term "BAV" refers to a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by diverse aortic valve malformations with associated aortopathy, congenital heart defects, and genetic syndromes. Even after decades of investigation, the genetic determinants of BAV and its complications remain largely undefined. Just as BAV phenotypes are highly variable, the genetic etiologies of BAV are equally diverse and vary from complex inheritance in families to sporadic cases without any evidence of inheritance. In this paper, the authors discuss current concepts in BAV genetics and propose a roadmap for unraveling unanswered questions about BAV through the integrated analysis of genetic and clinical data.

  20. Review of molecular and mechanical interactions in the aortic valve and aorta: implications for the shared pathogenesis of aortic valve disease and aortopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Varun K; Godby, Richard C; Liu, G R; Smith, J Michael; Hiratzka, Loren F; Narmoneva, Daria A; Hinton, Robert B

    2014-12-01

    Aortic valve disease (AVD) and aortopathy are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality, representing a significant cardiovascular healthcare burden worldwide. These mechanobiological structures are morphogenetically related and function in unison from embryonic development through mature adult tissue homeostasis, serving both coordinated and distinct roles. In addition to sharing common developmental origins, diseases of the aortic valve and proximal thoracic aorta often present together clinically. Current research efforts are focused on identifying etiologic factors and elucidating pathogenesis, including genetic predisposition, maladaptive cell-matrix remodeling processes, and hemodynamic and biomechanical perturbations. Here, we review the impact of these processes as they pertain to translational research efforts, emphasizing the overlapping relationship of these two disease processes. The successful application of new therapeutic strategies and novel tissue bioprostheses for AVD and/or aortopathy will require an understanding and integration of molecular and biomechanical processes for both diseases.

  1. High-pitch dual-source CT angiography of the aortic valve-aortic root complex without ECG-synchronization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlo, Christoph; Leschka, Sebastian; Goetti, Robert Paul; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Desbiolles, Lotus; Stolzmann, Paul; Marincek, Borut; Baumueller, Stephan [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Plass, Andre; Falk, Volkmar [University Hospital Zurich, Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Group, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-01-15

    To compare image quality and radiation dose of high-pitch computed tomography angiography(CTA) of the aortic valve-aortic root complex with and without prospective ECG-gating compared to a retrospectively ECG-gated standard-pitch acquisition. 120 patients(mean age 68 {+-} 13 years) were examined using a 128-slice dual-source CT system using prospectively ECG-gated high-pitch(group A; n = 40), non-ECG-gated high-pitch(group B; n = 40) or retrospectively ECG-gated standard-pitch(C; n = 40) acquisition techniques. Image quality of the aortic root, valve and ascending aorta including the coronary ostia was assessed by two independent readers. Image noise was measured, radiation dose estimates were calculated. Interobserver agreement was good({kappa} = 0.64-0.78). Image quality was diagnostic in 38/40 patients(group A), 37/40(B) and 38/40(C) with no significant difference in number of patients with diagnostic image quality among all groups (p = 0.56). Significantly more patients showed excellent image quality in group A compared to groups B and C(each, p < 0.01). Average image noise was significantly different between all groups(p < 0.05). Mean radiation dose estimates in groups A and B(each; 2.4 {+-} 0.3 mSv) were significantly lower compared to group C(17.5 {+-} 4.4 mSv; p < 0.01). High-pitch dual-source CTA provides diagnostic image quality of the aortic valve-aortic root complex even without ECG-gating at 86% less radiation dose when compared to a standard-pitch ECG-gated acquisition. (orig.)

  2. Multi-detector computed tomography is equivalent to trans-oesophageal echocardiography for the assessment of the aortic annulus before transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rixe, Johannes; Schmitt, Joern; Neumann, Thomas; Hamm, Christian W.; Rolf, Andreas [Kerckhoff Heart and Thorax Center, Department of Cardiology, Bad Nauheim (Germany); University Hospital of Giessen and Marburg, Site Giessen, Department of Internal Medicine I (Cardiology, Angiology), Giessen (Germany); Schuhbaeck, Annika; Nef, Holger M.; Achenbach, Stephan [University Hospital of Giessen and Marburg, Site Giessen, Department of Internal Medicine I (Cardiology, Angiology), Giessen (Germany); Liebetrau, Christoph; Moellmann, Helge; Szardien, Sebastian; Brandt, Roland [Kerckhoff Heart and Thorax Center, Department of Cardiology, Bad Nauheim (Germany); Schneider, Christian; Krombach, Gabriele [University Hospital of Giessen and Marburg, Department of Radiology, Giessen (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    In transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), assessment of the aortic annulus is mandatory. We sought to investigate the correlation between trans-oesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) for annulus diameter assessment before TAVI. A total of 122 patients (67 male, mean age 84 {+-} 6 years) underwent MDCT and TEE for TAVI planning. In TEE annulus diameters were obtained in a long-axis view at diastole. MDCT data were evaluated using MPR images, and corresponding projections were adjusted for MDCT and TEE. Patients were classified by the predominant localisation of aortic valve calcifications, and annulus diameters between TEE and MDCT were correlated. Additionally, the eccentricity of the aortic annulus was calculated. Mean eccentricity of the aortic annulus determined by MDCT was 0.34 {+-} 0.17, with no difference according to valve calcification. Regarding the aortic annulus diameter, the mean values measured were 24.3 {+-} 2.1 mm in MDCT and 24.0 {+-} 2.5 mm in TEE (P < 0.0001 for agreement). Independent of the pattern of aortic valve calcification, close correlation is found between CT and TEE measurements of the aortic annulus diameter. In addition, CT demonstrates the non-circular shape of the aortic annulus. (orig.)

  3. 4. Suture-less bio-prosthetic aortic valve replacement: Early clinical and hemodynamic outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arifi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Suture-less bio-prostheses (SBP are a recent addition in the surgical armamentarium in the surgical treatment of sever aortic valve disease that offer rapid deployment, shorter bypass & ischemic times and excellent hemodynamic performance even in small aortic annulus. We present our initial experience and short-term clinical and hemodynamic results with the use of suture-less bio-prostheses. Between May 2011 and August 2015, 61 patients, with mean age of 72.6 years and severe aortic stenosis underwent aortic valve replacement with a SBP. 28 were males and 19 were females. Mean euroSCORE was 11.5. 55% had coronary artery disease, 8.5% had severe mitral regurgitation and 6.4% had severe tricuspid regurgitation. Left ventricular dysfunction was present in 28% patients and 83% had elevated right ventricular systolic pressure. Average size of aortic annulus was 21.7 mm. 42.5% patients underwent isolated aortic valve replacement while 57.5% had concomitant procedures including coronary artery bypass grafting (25 patients. Average cross clamp time in isolated aortic valve replacement was 34 min and total bypass time was 46 min. Mean gradient across the prostheses was an average of 8.9 mmHg intra-operatively with 4.3% prevalence of mild para-prosthetic leak and 10.6% prevalence of mild prosthetic regurgitation. In-hospital mortality was 2.1% (1 patient. At follow-up, average mean trans-aortic gradients were 15 mmHg and prevalence of mild prosthetic and para-prosthetic leak was 10.5%. Average left ventricular diastolic dimensions changed from 4.93 mm pre-operatively to 4.42 mm post-operatively (p = 0.023 and left ventricular systolic dimensions changed from 3.39 mm pre-operatively to 3.05 mm post-operatively (p = 0.124. Use of suture-less bio-prosthesis for aortic valve replacement produces excellent hemodynamic results with low incidence of para-prosthetic leakage and prosthetic regurgitation. Persistent low trans-aortic gradients and

  4. Immersed smoothed finite element method for fluid-structure interaction simulation of aortic valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianyao; Liu, G. R.; Narmoneva, Daria A.; Hinton, Robert B.; Zhang, Zhi-Qian

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a novel numerical method for simulating the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems when blood flows over aortic valves. The method uses the immersed boundary/element method and the smoothed finite element method and hence it is termed as IS-FEM. The IS-FEM is a partitioned approach and does not need a body-fitted mesh for FSI simulations. It consists of three main modules: the fluid solver, the solid solver and the FSI force solver. In this work, the blood is modeled as incompressible viscous flow and solved using the characteristic-based-split scheme with FEM for spacial discretization. The leaflets of the aortic valve are modeled as Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic materials and solved using smoothed finite element method (or S-FEM). The FSI force is calculated on the Lagrangian fictitious fluid mesh that is identical to the moving solid mesh. The octree search and neighbor-to-neighbor schemes are used to detect efficiently the FSI pairs of fluid and solid cells. As an example, a 3D idealized model of aortic valve is modeled, and the opening process of the valve is simulated using the proposed IS-FEM. Numerical results indicate that the IS-FEM can serve as an efficient tool in the study of aortic valve dynamics to reveal the details of stresses in the aortic valves, the flow velocities in the blood, and the shear forces on the interfaces. This tool can also be applied to animal models studying disease processes and may ultimately translate to a new adaptive methods working with magnetic resonance images, leading to improvements on diagnostic and prognostic paradigms, as well as surgical planning, in the care of patients.

  5. Interobserver variability of CT angiography for evaluation of aortic annulus dimensions prior to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidkonz, C., E-mail: christian.schmidkonz@gmail.com [Department of Internal Medicine 2 (Cardiology), University of Erlangen, Ulmenweg 18, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Marwan, M.; Klinghammer, L.; Mitschke, M.; Schuhbaeck, A.; Arnold, M. [Department of Internal Medicine 2 (Cardiology), University of Erlangen, Ulmenweg 18, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Lell, M. [Radiological Institute, University of Erlangen, Maximiliansplatz 1, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Achenbach, S.; Pflederer, T. [Department of Internal Medicine 2 (Cardiology), University of Erlangen, Ulmenweg 18, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Cardiac CT provides highly reproducible measurements of aortic annulus and root dimensions prior to TAVI. • The perimeter-derived aortic annulus diameter shows the lowest interobserver variability. • If all three CT sizing methods are considered and stated as a “consensus result”, mismatches in prosthesis size selection can be further reduced. - Abstract: Objective: Assessment of aortic annulus dimensions prior to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is crucial for accurate prosthesis sizing in order to avoid prosthesis–annulus-mismatch possibly resulting in complications like valve dislodgement, paravalvular regurgitation or annulus rupture. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography allows 3-dimensional assessment of aortic annulus dimensions. Only limited data exist about its interobserver variability. Methods: In 100 consecutive patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis (51 male, BMI 27 ± 5 kg/m{sup 2}, age 81 ± 7 years, heart rate 72 ± 15 bpm, Logistic Euroscore 31 ± 14%, STS-Score 7 ± 4%), pre-interventional aortic annulus assessment was performed by dual source computed tomography (collimation 2 × 128 × 0.6 mm, high pitch spiral data acquisition mode, 40–60 ml contrast agents, radiation dose 3.5 ± 0.9 mSv). The following aortic annulus characteristics were determined by three independent observers: aortic annulus maximum, minimum and mean diameters (D{sub max}, D{sub min}, D{sub mean}), eccentricity index (EI), effective aortic annulus diameter according to its circumference (D{sub circ}), effective aortic annulus diameter according to its area (D{sub area}), distance from the aortic annulus plane to the left (LCA) and right coronary artery (RCA) ostia, maximum (D{sub max}AR) and minimum aortic root diameter (D{sub min}AR), maximum (D{sub max}STJ) and minimum diameter of the sinotubular junction (D{sub min}STJ). Subsequently, interobserver variabilities were assessed. Results: Correlation between

  6. Mast Cells Might Have a Protective Role against the Development of Calcification and Hyalinisation in Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milutinovic, A; Petrovič, D; Zorc, M; Vraspir Porenta, O; Arko, M; Pleskovič, A; Alibegovic, A; Zorc-Pleskovic, R

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is characterized by inflammation and extracellular matrix remodelling. The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of mast cells on the occurrence of histopathological changes of aortic valves in patients with severe grade, non-rheumatic degenerative aortic valve stenosis. Valve specimens were obtained from 38 patients undergoing valve replacement. The role of mast cells was analysed by dividing the specimens into two groups, characterized by the presence (group A, N = 13) or absence of mast cells (group B, N = 25). There were no significant differences in clinical data between the two groups. In group A, T cells and macrophages were present in all aortic valves, as compared to a significantly lower proportion of valves with T cells and macrophages in group B. Valves in group A were less often calcified and hyaline-degenerated than valves in group B. There were no changes in fibrosis between the two groups. We found a positive correlation between the presence of mast cells and macrophages/T cells, a negative correlation between the presence of mast cells and calcification/ hyaline degeneration, and no correlation between the presence of mast cells and fibrosis. There was also a negative correlation between the presence of macrophages/T cells and calcification. The linear regression model identified only the presence of mast cells as an independent negative prediction value for calcification. In conclusion, mast cells might have a protective role against the development of calcification and hyaline degeneration in severe grade, non-rheumatic aortic valve stenosis.

  7. Live three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography in mitral valve surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Ning; LI Zhi-an; MENG Xu; YANG Ya

    2008-01-01

    Background Live three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (live-3D-TEE) is a new technique, but its clinical value is unclear at present. This study aimed to investigate the feasibility, imaging quality and accuracy of live-3D-TEE for assessing mitral valve morphology to determine if live-3D-TEE has important value in mitral valve surgery.Methods Twenty-four patients with mitral valve disease (mean age (47.1 rdiography (2D-TEE) before and after mitral valve surgery. Sensitivity, specificity, and total consistency rates of live-3D-TEE for diagnosing ruptured chordae were calculated and compared to surgeon's findings. We also compared the diagnostic accuracy of mitral valve disease between live-3D-TEE and 2D-TEE.Results Live-3D-TEE allowed visualization of the anatomic structure of the heart online and clearly identified the valvular apparatus and their defects. Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of ruptured chordae by live-3D-TEE were 87.5% and 100% respectively, and the total consistency rate was 95.8%. Additional defects not diagnosted by 2D-TEE were found in three cases (12.5%) preoperatively by live-3D-TEE. Live-3D-TEE could evaluate the function of prosthetic or native valves immediately after operation. One case was re-repaired (4.2%) using guidance by live-3D-TEE. Conclusion Live-3D-TEE enabled evaluation of mitral valve function and provided adequate valuable information before and after mitral valve surgery. We conclude that live-3D-TEE can play an important role in mitral valve surgery.

  8. Computational analysis of an aortic valve jet with Lagrangian coherent structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadden, Shawn C.; Astorino, Matteo; Gerbeau, Jean-Frédéric

    2010-03-01

    Important progress has been achieved in recent years in simulating the fluid-structure interaction around cardiac valves. An important step in making these computational tools useful to clinical practice is the development of postprocessing techniques to extract clinically relevant information from these simulations. This work focuses on flow through the aortic valve and illustrates how the computation of Lagrangian coherent structures can be used to improve insight into the transport mechanics of the flow downstream of the valve, toward the goal of aiding clinical decision making and the understanding of pathophysiology.

  9. An unusual case of multiple aortic abnormalities: total occlusion of aortic arch, left external iliac artery, and bicuspid aortic valve in a 21-year-old man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanindi, Asli; Tavil, Yusuf; Mutluay, Ruya; Taktak, Hacer; Cengel, Atiye

    2007-03-01

    An unusual case of total occlusion of aorta just distal to the left subclavian artery, bicuspid aortic valve, and occluded left external iliac artery in a 21-year-old man who was admitted with headache and severe hypertension is presented. We wish to report this case because so far there have been none reported with such multiple aortic abnormalities, although several documented cases of isolated total occlusion of aorta exist. Our patient underwent a successful surgical correction, i.e., patch plasty to the coarcted segment and end to side - end to side aortal-aortal bypass with Dacron graft.

  10. Univariate Risk Factors for Prolonged Mechanical Ventilation in Patients Undergoing Prosthetic Heart Valves Replacement Surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Data from 736 patients undergoing prosthetic heart valve replacement surgery and concomitant surgery (combined surgery) from January 1998 to January 2004 at Union Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. Univariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify risk factors for prolonged mechanical ventilation. The results showed that prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass duration, prolonged aortic cross clamp time and low ejection fraction less than 50 percent (50 %)were found to be independent predictors for prolonged mechanical ventilation. Meanwhile age,weight, and preoperative hospital stay (days) were not found to be associated with prolonged mechanical ventilation. It was concluded that, for age and weight, this might be due to the lower number of old age patients (70 years and above) included in our study and genetic body structure of majority Chinese population that favor them to be in normal weight, respectively.

  11. Intima-media thickness of the descending aorta in patients with bicuspid aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Petrini

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: Intima-media thickness of the descending aorta is not affected by aortic valve morphology (BAV/TAV; age is the main determinant of AoIMT. Genetic markers (SNPs known to influence IMT in the carotid artery seem to correlate to IMT in the descending aorta only in patients with TAV.

  12. Total left main coronary artery occlusion after aortic aneurysm repair and valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePace, N L; Lemole, G M; Wolf, N W; Dowinsky, S; Untereker, W; Spagna, P M

    1991-02-01

    A 38-year-old woman with complete occlusion of the left main coronary artery secondary to cannulation during aortic valve replacement is presented. The clinical course was characterized by progressive left ventricular dysfunction and congestive heart failure. Recognition of this potential problem when it occurs is important as to institute therapeutic measures which may interrupt a patient's progressive clinical deterioration.

  13. Elevated lipoprotein(a) and risk of aortic valve stenosis in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, Pia R; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine whether elevated lipoprotein(a) levels and corresponding LPA risk genotypes (rs10455872, rs3798220, kringle IV type 2 repeat polymorphism) prospectively associate with increased risk of aortic valve stenosis (AVS). BACKGROUND: The etiologic...

  14. Giant Aneursym of the Ascending Aorta 37 Years after Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Sansone

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Giant ascending aorta aneurysms (AAA, which are larger than 10 cm, are rare. We hereby present the case of a giant AAA of about 13 cm, incidentally detected several years after aortic valve replacement and treated according to the Cabrol technique without postoperative complications. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2013; 2(2.000: 129-131

  15. Semiautomatic, Quantitative Measurement of Aortic Valve Area Using CTA : Validation and Comparison with Transthoracic Echocardiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuncay, V.; Prakken, N.; van Ooijen, P. M. A.; Budde, R. P. J.; Leiner, T.; Oudkerk, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this work was to develop a fast and robust (semi) automatic segmentation technique of the aortic valve area (AVA) MDCT datasets. Methods. The algorithm starts with detection and cropping of Sinus of Valsalva on MPR image. The cropped image is then binarized and seed points are

  16. Cross Talk between NOTCH Signaling and Biomechanics in Human Aortic Valve Disease Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Godby

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aortic valve disease is a burgeoning public health problem associated with significant mortality. Loss of function mutations in NOTCH1 cause bicuspid aortic valve (BAV and calcific aortic valve disease. Because calcific nodules manifest on the fibrosa side of the cusp in low fluidic oscillatory shear stress (OSS, elucidating pathogenesis requires approaches that consider both molecular and mechanical factors. Therefore, we examined the relationship between NOTCH loss of function (LOF and biomechanical indices in healthy and diseased human aortic valve interstitial cells (AVICs. An orbital shaker system was used to apply cyclic OSS, which mimics the cardiac cycle and hemodynamics experienced by AVICs in vivo. NOTCH LOF blocked OSS-induced cell alignment in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs, whereas AVICs did not align when subjected to OSS under any conditions. In healthy AVICs, OSS resulted in decreased elastin (ELN and α-SMA (ACTA2. NOTCH LOF was associated with similar changes, but in diseased AVICs, NOTCH LOF combined with OSS was associated with increased α-SMA expression. Interestingly, AVICs showed relatively higher expression of NOTCH2 compared to NOTCH1. Biomechanical interactions between endothelial and interstitial cells involve complex NOTCH signaling that contributes to matrix homeostasis in health and disorganization in disease.

  17. Reevaluation of the indications for permanent pacemaker implantation after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre Thygesen, Julie; Loh, Poay Huan; Cholteesupachai, Jiranut

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Conduction abnormalities (CA) requiring permanent pacemaker (PPM) are a well-known complication after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). This study aimed to determine the incidence of TAVI-related PPM and reevaluate the indications for PPM after the periprocedural period. METHO...

  18. Impact of prosthesis-patient mismatch on early and late mortality after aortic valve replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koene, Bart M.; Hamad, Mohamed A. Soliman; Bouma, Wobbe; Mariani, Massimo A.; Peels, Kathinka C.; van Dantzig, Jan-Melle; van Straten, Albert H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The influence of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) on survival after aortic valve replacement (AVR) remains controversial. In this study, we sought to determine the effect of PPM on early (30 days) after AVR or AVR combined with coronary artery bypass grafting (AVR with CABG). Methods: B

  19. Identification of Gender-Specific Genetic Variants in Patients With Bicuspid Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargis, Natasha; Lamontagne, Maxime; Gaudreault, Nathalie; Sbarra, Laura; Henry, Cyndi; Pibarot, Philippe; Mathieu, Patrick; Bossé, Yohan

    2016-02-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most frequent congenital heart defect and has a male predominance of 3 to 1. A large proportion of patients develop valvular and aortic complications. Despite the high prevalence of BAV, its cause and genetic origins remain elusive. The goal of this study was to identify genetic variants associated with BAV. Nine genes previously associated with BAV (NOTCH1, AXIN1, EGFR, ENG, GATA5, NKX2-5, NOS3, PDIA2, and TGFBR2) were sequenced in 48 patients with BAV using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. Pathogenicity of genetic variants was evaluated with the Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion framework. A selection of 89 variants identified by sequencing or in previous BAV genetic studies was genotyped, and allele frequencies were compared in 323 patients with BAV confirmed at surgery and 584 controls. Analyses were also performed by gender. Nine novel and 19 potentially pathogenic variants were identified by next-generation sequencing and confirmed by Sanger sequencing, but they were not associated with BAV in the case-control population. A significant association was observed between an in silico-predicted benign EGFR intronic variant (rs17290301) and BAV. Analyses performed by gender revealed different variants associated with BAV in men (EGFR rs533525993 and TEX26 rs12857479) and women (NOTCH1 rs61751489, TGFBR2 rs1155705, and NKX2-5 rs2277923). In conclusion, these results constitute the first association between EGFR genetic variants and BAV in humans and support a possible role of gender-specific polymorphisms in the development of BAV.

  20. Statins for progression of aortic valve stenosis and the best evidence for making decisions in health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Thiago

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Western world, calcified aortic valve stenosis is the most common form of valvular heart disease, affecting up to 3% of adults over the age of 75 years. It is a gradually progressive disease, characterized by a long asymptomatic phase that may last for several decades, followed by a short symptomatic phase associated with severe restriction of the valve orifice. Investigations on treatments for aortic valve stenosis are still in progress. Thus, it is believed that calcification of aortic valve stenosis is similar to the process of atherosclerosis that occurs in coronary artery disease. Recent studies have suggested that cholesterol lowering through the use of statins may have a salutary effect on the progression of aortic valve stenosis

  1. Transesophageal echocardiography measurements of aortic annulus diameter using biplane mode in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahgaldi Kambiz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aortic stenosis (AS is a relevant common valve disorder. Severe AS and symptoms and/or left ventricular dysfunction (EF Aim of the study is to assess the aortic annulus diameter in patients undergoing TAVI by biplane (BP mode using transesophageal echocardiography (TEE and compare it to two-dimensional (2D transthoracic echocardiography (TTE and 2DTEE using three-dimensional (3D TEE as reference method. Methods The study population consisted of 50 patients retrospectively (24 men and 26 women, mean age 85±8 years of age who all had undergone echocardiography examination prior to TAVI. Results The mean aortic annulus diameter was 20.4±2.2 mm with TTE, 22.3±2.5 mm with 2DTEE, 22.9±1.9 mm with BP-mode and 23.1±1.9 mm with 3DTEE. TTE underestimated the mean aortic annulus diameter in comparison to transesophageal imaging modalities (p Conclusion A multi-dimensional method is preferred to assess aortic annulus diameter in TAVI patients since there is risk of underestimation using single plane. Biplane mode is the method of choice in view of speedy post-processing with no need for expensive dedicated software. Lastly, single plane methods lead to misclassification of patients as unsuitable for TAVI. This may be of major clinical importance.

  2. Patient evaluation and selection for transcatheter aortic valve replacement: the heart team approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sintek, Marc; Zajarias, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been shown to significantly impact mortality and quality of life in patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) who are deemed high risk for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Essential to these outcomes is proper patient selection. The multidisciplinary TAVR heart team was created to provide comprehensive patient evaluation and aid in proper selection. This review with outline the history and components of the heart team, and delineate the team's role in risk and frailty assessment, evaluation of common co-morbidities that impact outcomes, and the complex multi-modality imaging necessary for procedural planning and patient selection. The heart team is critical in determining patient eligibility and benefit and the optimal operative approach for TAVR. The future of structural heart disease will certainly require a team approach, and the TAVR heart team will serve as the successful model.

  3. Aortic rupture during reoperative bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin Hostiuc

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Morbid obesity has become a very common problem worldwide, causing severe health-related consequences including cardiovascular or metabolic diseases, arthritis, sleep apnea, or an increased risk of cancer. Bariatric surgery was shown to be the only way to achieve sustainable weight loss and to decrease the frequency and severity of metabolic and cardiovascular comorbidities. The purpose of this article is to present a case of bariatric surgery complicated with lesion of the aorta with a lethal outcome.

  4. Fluid-structure interaction analysis of the flow through a stenotic aortic valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Hoda; Labrosse, Michel R.; Durand, Louis-Gilles; Kadem, Lyes

    2009-11-01

    In Europe and North America, aortic stenosis (AS) is the most frequent valvular heart disease and cardiovascular disease after systemic hypertension and coronary artery disease. Understanding blood flow through an aortic stenosis and developing new accurate non-invasive diagnostic parameters is, therefore, of primarily importance. However, simulating such flows is highly challenging. In this study, we considered the interaction between blood flow and the valve leaflets and compared the results obtained in healthy valves with stenotic ones. One effective method to model the interaction between the fluid and the structure is to use Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) approach. Our two-dimensional model includes appropriate nonlinear and anisotropic materials. It is loaded during the systolic phase by applying pressure curves to the fluid domain at the inflow. For modeling the calcified stenotic valve, calcium will be added on the aortic side of valve leaflets. Such simulations allow us to determine the effective orifice area of the valve, one of the main parameters used clinically to evaluate the severity of an AS, and to correlate it with changes in the structure of the leaflets.

  5. Comparison of tricuspid and bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics under steady flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Clara; Ward, James; Sucosky, Philippe

    2011-11-01

    The bicuspid aortic valve (BAV), a congenital valvular defect consisting of two leaflets instead of three, is associated with a high prevalence of calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD). CAVD also develops in the normal tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) but its progression in the BAV is more severe and rapid. Although hemodynamic abnormalities are increasingly considered potential pathogenic contributor, the native BAV hemodynamics remain largely unknown. Therefore, this study aims at comparing experimentally the hemodynamic environments in TAV and BAV anatomies. Particle-image velocimetry was used to characterize the flow downstream of a native TAV and a model BAV mounted in a left-heart simulator and subjected to three steady flow rates characterizing different phases of the cardiac cycle. While the TAV developed a jet aligned along the valve axis, the BAV was shown to develop a skewed systolic jet with skewness decreasing with increasing flow rate. Measurement of the transvalvular pressure revealed a valvular resistance up to 50% larger in the BAV than in the TAV. The increase in velocity between the TAV and BAV leads to an increase in shear stress downstream of the valve. This study reveals strong hemodynamic abnormalities in the BAV, which may contribute to CAVD pathogenesis.

  6. Structural and Histochemical Alterations in the Aortic Valves of Elderly Patients: A Comparative Study of Aortic Stenosis, Aortic Regurgitation, and Normal Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal the pathogenesis of aortic stenosis (AS) and regurgitation (AR) by comparing differences in mechanical and biochemical alterations. We applied scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) to measure the speed of sound (SOS) through valves to estimate the elasticity and monitor sensitivity to protease treatment, as the SOS is correlated with the stiffness of materials, which is reduced after digestion by proteases. The fibrosa of both the AS and AR groups were stiffer than the fibrosa of the normal group. The AR group displayed significantly stiffer fibrosa than the AS group, with the exception of calcified areas. The AS group showed significantly decreased SOS values following protease digestion, whereas the AR showed little reduction. The AS group presented type III collagen in the fibrosa and the ventricularis. In the AR group, both type I collagen and type III collagen coexisted in the fibrosa and the ventricularis. Upon immunostaining for advanced glycation end-products, the AS group showed sparse, weak staining, whereas the AR group presented a strong, band-like positive reaction in the fibrosa. In conclusion, tissue remodelling associated with damage and repair is associated with AS pathogenesis, whereas static chemical alterations with slow collagen turnover induce AR. PMID:27747234

  7. Mitral Valve Surgery in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnoosh Foroughi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Valvular heart disease is the common cardiac manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE with a tendency for mitral valve regurgitation. In this study we report a case of mitral valve replacement for mitral stenosis caused by Libman-Sacks endocarditis in the setting of SLE. In addition, we provide a systematic review of the literature on mitral valve surgery in the presence of Libman-Sacks endocarditis because its challenge on surgical options continues. Surgical decision depends on structural involvement of mitral valve and presence of active lupus nephritis and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. Review of the literature has also shown that outcome is good in most SLE patients who have undergone valvular surgery, but association of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with SLE has negative impact on the outcome.

  8. Effect of coarctation of the aorta and bicuspid aortic valve on flow dynamics and turbulence in the aorta using particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarz-Motamed, Zahra; Garcia, Julio; Gaillard, Emmanuel; Maftoon, Nima; Di Labbio, Giuseppe; Cloutier, Guy; Kadem, Lyes

    2014-03-01

    L/min: complex COA: = 84.6 N/m2; isolated COA = 44 N/m2) and TKE (e.g., average peak value in the entire aorta for a total flow of 5 L/min: complex COA: = 215 N/m2; isolated COA = 100 N/m2). This demonstrates that the pathological aortic valve strongly interacts with the COA. Findings of this study indicate that the presence of both a COA and a pathological aortic valve significantly alters hemodynamics in the aorta and thus might contribute to the progression of the disease in this region. This study can partially explain the complications associated in patients with COA, in the presence of a pathological aortic valve and the consequent adverse outcome post-surgery.

  9. Novel Use of an Apical-Femoral Wire Rail to Assist With Transfemoral Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Don, Creighton W.; Kim, Michael S.; Verrier, Edward D.; Aldea, Gabriel S.; Dean, Larry S.; Reisman, Mark; Mokadam, Nahush A.

    2015-01-01

    The inability to reposition or retrieve balloon-expandable transcatheter aortic valves once they have been deployed requires implantation of the valve in the descending aorta or open surgical procedures to extract the valve. We describe the challenging transfemoral delivery of an Edwards Lifesciences Sapien valve wherein we had difficulty crossing the aortic valve and the guidewire position was compromised. We performed a transapical puncture to snare the guidewire and create a left ventricular to femoral wire rail, allowing us to deliver the transfemoral transcatheter valve, salvaging a situation where we would have been required to implant the valve in the descending aorta. We believe this is the first time this technique has been reported and represents an important method to facilitate delivery of transcatheter valves where guidewire support is insufficient or lost. PMID:24907088

  10. Resultados de pacientes submetidos à cirurgia de substituição valvar aórtica usando próteses mecânicas ou biológicas Outcomes of patients subjected to aortic valve replacement surgery using mechanical or biological prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Silveira de Almeida

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Esse estudo avalia resultados em pacientes submetidos à cirurgia para troca valvar aórtica utilizando substituto biológico ou mecânico, com poder de relevância na seleção do tipo da prótese. MÉTODOS: Foram selecionados, randomicamente, 301 pacientes submetidos à cirurgia para troca valvar aórtica entre 1990 e 2005, com seguimento máximo de 20 anos. RESULTADOS: Sobrevivência em 5, 10 e 15 anos após cirurgia utilizando substituto mecânico foi de 83,9%, 75,4% e 60,2% e, para substituto biológico, foi de 89,3%, 70,4% e 58,4%, respectivamente (P=0,939. Fatores associados com óbito foram: idade, obesidade, doença pulmonar, arritmias, eventos hemorrágicos e insuficiência valvar aórtica. Probabilidade livre de reoperação desses pacientes em 5, 10 e 15 anos após cirurgia utilizando substituto mecânico foi de 97,9%, 95,8% e 95,8% e, para bioprótese, foi de 94,6%, 91,0% e 83,3%, respectivamente (P=0,057. Fatores associados com reoperação foram: insuficiência renal, endocardite de prótese e idade. Probabilidade livre de eventos hemorrágicos em 5, 10 e 15 anos após cirurgia utilizando substituto mecânico foi de 94,5%, 91,7% e 91,7% e, para bioprótese, foi de 98,6%, 97,8% e 97,8%, respectivamente (P=0,047. Fatores associados com eventos hemorrágicos foram: insuficiência renal e prótese mecânica. CONCLUSÕES: Os autores concluíram que: 1 mortalidade foi estatisticamente semelhante entre os grupos; 2 características basais dos pacientes foram os maiores determinantes de mortalidade tardia após a cirurgia; 3 houve tendência à reoperação para o grupo com bioprótese; 4 pacientes com prótese mecânica tiveram mais eventos hemorrágicos ao longo do tempo; 5 dados encontrados no presente estudo são concordantes com a literatura atualOBJECTIVE: This paper evaluates outcomes in patients subjected to surgery for replacement of the aortic valve using biological or mechanical substitutes, where selection of the

  11. Approaches for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayak Nagaraja

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Retrograde transfemoral and antegrade transapical approaches are mostly used for transcatheter aortic valve replacement. This meta-analysis is designed to assess the performance of the transfemoral and transapical approach. Methods: A systematic search was conducted using MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, Current Contents Connect, Cochrane library, Google Scholar, Science Direct, and Web of Science. Original data was abstracted from each study and used to calculate a pooled odd ratio (OR and 95% confidence interval (95% CI. Results: Only 14 studies comprising of 6965 patients met full criteria for analysis. The mean duration of hospitalisation and procedure duration were similar among the 2 cohorts. The 30 days mortality (OR: 0.70, 95% CI: 0.531-0.921, the need for haemodialysis (OR: 0.29, 95% CI: 0.157-0.525 and one year mortality (OR: 0.72, 95% CI: 0.564-0.927 were lower in the transfemoral cohort. The frequency of stroke at 30 days and new pacemaker insertion were comparable. However, the prevalence of vascular complication (OR: 2.88, 95% CI: 1.821-4.563 was higher in the transfemoral group. The incidence of aortic regurgitation (OR: 1.25, 95% CI: 0.844-1.855, valve embolization (OR: 2.00, 95% CI: 0.622-6.448, major bleeding incidence rates (OR:0.77, 95% CI: 0.488-1.225, coronary obstruction (OR:0.74, 95% CI:0.234-2.311, myocardial infarction (OR: 0.75, 95% CI: 0.28-2.00, conversion to open cardiac surgery (OR: 0.29, 95% CI: 0.062-1.343 and successful implantation (OR: 0.67, 95% CI: 0.394-1.149 were comparable in the two cohorts. Conclusions: In the absence of a randomized controlled study, the ability to discriminate true differences is challenging. Even though the complications rate was much lower in transfemoral group as compared to transapical group, the current literature does not support a clear superiority of one approach to TAVR over the other.

  12. Comparison of Aortic Valve Area Measured by Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Dual-Source Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruder, O.; Jochims, M.; Jensen, C.; Sabin, G.V. (Dept. of Cardiology and Angiology, Elisabeth Hospital Essen (Germany)); Hunold, P.; Forsting, M.; Barkhausen, J.; Schlosser, T. (Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Univ. Hospital Essen, Univ. of Duisburg-Essen (Germany))

    2009-07-15

    Background: Aortic valve stenosis is the most common type of valve lesion in Europe and North America. Patient treatment is based on disease severity, which is classified by determining the aortic valve area (AVA). Purpose: To compare dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for quantifying AVA. Material and Methods: Thirty-two patients, 28 with normal aortic valve function and four with aortic valve stenosis, who underwent DSCT coronary angiography (Somatom Definition; Siemens, Erlangen, Germany), were included in this study. Retrospective ECG-gated contrast-enhanced DSCT scans with dose-reducing tube current modulation were performed, and data sets were reconstructed in 3% steps of the R-R interval (slice thickness 0.75 mm, increment 0.6 mm). Planimetry of the AVA in systole was assessed on cross-sectional images by multiplanar reformations. Within 48 hours, MR was performed with a 1.5T scanner (Magnetom Sonata; Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) using a balanced steady-state free-precession cine sequence (repetition/echo time 3/1.5 ms, flip angle 60 deg, spatial resolution 1.4x1.4 mm2). Cine sequences of the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) were obtained in two orthogonal planes, and MR planimetry was performed on cross-sectional images of the aortic valve perpendicular to the LVOT images. Results: AVA assessment by DSCT and MR was feasible in all 32 patients. Mean AVA values determined by DSCT and MR were 4.73+-1.5 cm2 and 4.69+-1.4 cm2, respectively. A strong positive correlation was found between both imaging modalities (R=0.98, P<0.001). Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated an excellent intermodality agreement, with a slight underestimation of AVA by DSCT. The mean difference was -0.04 cm2, with a standard deviation of 0.32 cm2. Conclusion: Retrospective ECG-gated contrast-enhanced DSCT with tube current modulation provides an accurate imaging technique for the assessment of the AVA. Further studies are required to determine

  13. Estimation of the shear stress on the surface of an aortic valve leaflet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, M W; LaBorde, D V; Yoganathan, A P

    1999-01-01

    The limited durability of xenograft heart valves and the limited supply of allografts have sparked interest in tissue engineered replacement valves. A bioreactor for tissue engineered valves must operate at conditions that optimize the biosynthetic abilities of seeded cells while promoting their adherence to the leaflet matrix. An important parameter is shear stress, which is known to influence cellular behavior and may thus be crucial in bioreactor optimization. Therefore, an accurate estimate of the shear stress on the leaflet surface would not only improve our understanding of the mechanical environment of aortic valve leaflets, but it would also aid in bioreactor design. To estimate the shear stress on the leaflet surface, two-component laser-Doppler velocimetry measurements have been conducted inside a transparent polyurethane valve with a trileaflet structure similar to the native aortic valve. Steady flow rates of 7.5, 15.0, and 22.5 L/min were examined to cover the complete range possible during the cardiac cycle. The laminar shear stresses were calculated by linear regression of four axial velocity measurements near the surface of the leaflet. The maximum shear stress recorded was 79 dyne/cm2, in agreement with boundary layer theory and previous experimental and computational studies. This study has provided a range of shear stresses to be explored in bioreactor design and has defined a maximum shear stress at which cells must remain adherent upon a tissue engineered construct.

  14. 经股动脉球囊扩张式主动脉瓣置换术的初步经验%Aortic valve replacement via transfemoral balloon dilation: an initial experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆清声; 景在平; 洪毅; 吴宏; 王志农; 李卫萍; 张勇学; 李南; 马宇; 秦永文

    2011-01-01

    Objective To discuss the feasibility of treating patients with severe aortic valve stenosis by aortic valve replacement via transfemoral balloon dilation. Methods Three patients with severe aortic valve stenosis, who could not tolerate traditional open surgery, were chosen to receive aortic valve replacement via transfemoral balloon dilation. Results All the three operations were successfully done by transfemoral approach, including one assisted by transapical puncture. The aortic valve function of patients was improved, and there was no related complication or death. Conclusion Aortic valve replacement via transfemoral balloon dilation can be used for treatment of Chinese patients with severe aortic valve stenosis; but which demands more detailed preoperative preparation, evaluation, and surgical manipulation.%目的 探讨经股动脉球囊扩张式主动脉瓣置换术治疗严重主动脉瓣狭窄患者的可行性.方法 选取3例严重主动脉瓣钙化狭窄的患者,术前评估无法耐受传统开放手术,行经股动脉球扩式主动脉瓣置换术.结果 3例均经股动脉完成,其中1例经心尖穿刺辅助完成.3例手术全部成功,术后患者主动脉瓣功能显著改善,无并发症,无死亡.结论 经股动脉球扩式主动脉瓣置换术可用于国人严重主动脉瓣狭窄患者,但在术前准备与评估、术中操作等方面提出了更高的要求.

  15. Thoracic aortopathy in Turner syndrome and the influence of bicuspid aortic valves and blood pressure: a CMR study

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    Hager Alfred

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate aortic dimensions in women with Turner syndrome (TS in relation to aortic valve morphology, blood pressure, karyotype, and clinical characteristics. Methods and results A cross sectional study of 102 women with TS (mean age 37.7; 18-62 years examined by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR- successful in 95, echocardiography, and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure. Aortic diameters were measured by CMR at 8 positions along the thoracic aorta. Twenty-four healthy females were recruited as controls. In TS, aortic dilatation was present at one or more positions in 22 (23%. Aortic diameter in women with TS and bicuspid aortic valve was significantly larger than in TS with tricuspid valves in both the ascending (32.4 ± 6.7 vs. 26.0 ± 4.4 mm; p Conclusions Aortic dilatation was present in 23% of adult TS women, where aortic valve morphology, age and blood pressure were major determinants of the aortic diameter.

  16. Methodological inaccuracies in clinical aortic valve severity assessment: insights from computational fluid dynamic modeling of CT-derived aortic valve anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traeger, Brad; Srivatsa, Sanjay S.; Beussman, Kevin M.; Wang, Yechun; Suzen, Yildirim B.; Rybicki, Frank J.; Mazur, Wojciech; Miszalski-Jamka, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease. Assessing the contribution of the valve as a portion to total ventricular load is essential for the aging population. A CT scan for one patient was used to create one in vivo tricuspid aortic valve geometry and assessed with computational fluid dynamics (CFD). CFD simulated the pressure, velocity, and flow rate, which were used to assess the Gorlin formula and continuity equation, current clinical diagnostic standards. The results demonstrate an underestimation of the anatomic orifice area (AOA) by Gorlin formula and overestimation of AOA by the continuity equation, using peak velocities, as would be measured clinically by Doppler echocardiography. As a result, we suggest that the Gorlin formula is unable to achieve the intended estimation of AOA and largely underestimates AOA at the critical low-flow states present in heart failure. The disparity in the use of echocardiography with the continuity equation is due to the variation in velocity profile between the outflow tract and the valve orifice. Comparison of time-averaged orifice areas by Gorlin and continuity with instantaneous orifice areas by planimetry can mask the errors of these methods, which is a result of the assumption that the blood flow is inviscid.

  17. Mechanism and Correlated Factors of SAM Phenomenon after Aortic Valve Replacement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jing; WEN Jianguo; SHU Liliang; LIU Chao; ZHANG Jingchao; ZHAO Wenzeng

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism and correlated factors of systolic anterior motion (SAM) phenomenon after aortic valve replacement, 48 patients with severe aortic valvular stenosis were studied. Tested by echo-Doppler one week after aortic valve replacement, the patients were divided into two groups: SAM group and non-SAM group. The data of the left ventricular end-diastolic diameters, the left ventricular end-systolic diameters, the left ventricular outflow diameters, the thickness of the interventricular septum, the posterior wall of left ventricle, the blood velocities of left ventricular outflow and intra-cavitary gradients were recorded and compared. The results showed that no patients died during or after the operation. The blood velocities of left ventricular outflow was increased significantly in 9 patients (>2.5 m/s), and 6 of them developed SAM phenomenon. There was significant difference in all indexes (P<0.05 or P<0.01) except the posterior wall of left ventricle (P>0.05) between two groups. These indicated that the present of SAM phenomenon after aortic valve replacement may be directly related to the increase of blood velocities of left ventricular outflow and intra-cavitary gradients. It is also suggested that smaller left ventricular diastolic diameters, left ventricular systolic diameters, left ventricular outflow diameters and hypertrophy of interventricular septum may be the anatomy basis of SAM phenomenon.

  18. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Lower Surgical Risk Patients: Review of Major Trials and Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saji, Mike; Lim, D Scott

    2016-10-01

    Following the first successful transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in 2002, TAVR has globally evolved to become a standard procedure in high-risk patients. Surgical aortic valve replacement in non-high-risk patients remains the gold standard for treatment of severe aortic stenosis. However, a paradigm shift appears to be occurring in the direction of treating lower-risk patients, and several studies have suggested its impact on clinical outcomes. In this review, we highlight the current status of TAVR in intermediate-risk patients and review major trials including Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER (PARTNER) 2A randomized intermediate-risk trial using SAPIEN XT (Edwards Lifesciences Corp, Irvine, CA) recently presented with excellent outcomes and the lowest major complications rate at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session in Chicago. Clinical trials in low-risk patients using SAPIEN 3 and CoreValve Evolut R have just been launched, and they are going to be important milestones in the TAVR field.

  19. Exercise Hemodynamics and Quality of Life after Aortic Valve Replacement for Aortic Stenosis in the Elderly Using the Hancock II Bioprosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Theodore; Lopez, Becky M.; Berberian, Christopher; Cunningham, Mark J.; Starnes, Vaughn A.; Cohen, Robbin G.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim. While aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis can be performed safely in elderly patients, there is a need for hemodynamic and quality of life evaluation to determine the value of aortic valve replacement in older patients who may have age-related activity limitation. Materials and Methods. We conducted a prospective evaluation of patients who underwent aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis with the Hancock II porcine bioprosthesis. All patients underwent transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and completed the RAND 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36) preoperatively and six months postoperatively. Results. From 2004 to 2007, 33 patients were enrolled with an average age of 75.3 ± 5.3 years (24 men and 9 women). Preoperatively, 27/33 (82%) were New York Heart Association (NYHA) Functional Classification 3, and postoperatively 27/33 (82%) were NYHA Functional Classification 1. Patients had a mean predicted maximum VO2 (mL/kg/min) of 19.5 ± 4.3 and an actual max VO2 of 15.5 ± 3.9, which was 80% of the predicted VO2. Patients were found to have significant improvements (P ≤ 0.01) in six of the nine SF-36 health parameters. Conclusions. In our sample of elderly patients with aortic stenosis, replacing the aortic valve with a Hancock II bioprosthesis resulted in improved hemodynamics and quality of life. PMID:25544931

  20. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging and transthoracic echocardiography in the assessment of stenotic aortic valve area: a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitriou, Praxitelis; Kaehaeri, Anders [Dept. of Radiology, Oerebro Univ. Hospital, Oerebro (Sweden); Emilsson, Kent [Dept. of Clinical Physiology, Oerebro Univ. Hospital, Oerebro (Sweden); School of Health and Medical Sciences, Oerebro Univ., Oerebro (Sweden); Thunberg, Per [School of Health and Medical Sciences, Oerebro Univ., Oerebro (Sweden); Dept. of Medical Physics, Oerebro Univ. Hospital, Oerebro (Sweden)], E-mail: per.thunberg@orebroll.se

    2012-11-15

    Background Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and echocardiography both allow assessment of aortic valve stenosis. In MR the aortic valve area (AvA) is measured using planimetry while in transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) AvA is usually calculated by applying the continuity equation. Purpose To compare the measured stenotic aortic valve areas using five different MR-acquisition alternatives with the corresponding area values calculated by TTE. Material and Methods The aortic valve was imaged in 14 patients, with diagnosed aortic valve stenosis, using balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) gradient echo (GE) and phase contrast imaging (PC). Three adjacent slices were planned to encompass the aortic valve and the aortic valve area was measured using planimetry. The two sets of complex valued images generated by the PC sequence formed three kinds of images that could be used for aortic valve area measurements: the magnitude image (PC/Mag), the modulus (PCA/M), and phase difference (PCA/P) between the two complex images, respectively. The valve area from TTE was calculated using the continuity equation. A cut-off of <1.0 cm{sup 2} was used as a criteria for severe stenosis. Results The mean area differences between the different MR acquisitions and TTE method were -0.05 {+-} 0.37 cm{sup 2} (GE), -0.18 {+-} 0.46 cm{sup 2} (bSSFP), 0.27 {+-} 0.43 cm{sup 2} (PC/Mag), 0.15 {+-} 0.32 cm{sup 2} (PCA/P), and 0.26 {+-} 0.27 cm{sup 2} (PCA/M). The valve area was significantly overestimated using PCA/M that, in turn, implied a significant underestimation of the aortic valve stenosis severity compared to the assessments using TTE. Conclusion The smallest area valve difference between TTE and an MR-acquisition alternative is obtained with gradient echo images. The use of PCA/M leads to significant differences in planimetry measurements of the aortic valve orifice and the gradation of the stenosis severity compared to TTE.

  1. Estimation of aortic valve leaflets from 3D CT images using local shape dictionaries and linear coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liang; Martin, Caitlin; Wang, Qian; Sun, Wei; Duncan, James

    2016-03-01

    Aortic valve (AV) disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The preferred treatment modality for severe AV disease is surgical resection and replacement of the native valve with either a mechanical or tissue prosthetic. In order to develop effective and long-lasting treatment methods, computational analyses, e.g., structural finite element (FE) and computational fluid dynamic simulations, are very effective for studying valve biomechanics. These computational analyses are based on mesh models of the aortic valve, which are usually constructed from 3D CT images though many hours of manual annotation, and therefore an automatic valve shape reconstruction method is desired. In this paper, we present a method for estimating the aortic valve shape from 3D cardiac CT images, which is represented by triangle meshes. We propose a pipeline for aortic valve shape estimation which includes novel algorithms for building local shape dictionaries and for building landmark detectors and curve detectors using local shape dictionaries. The method is evaluated on real patient image dataset using a leave-one-out approach and achieves an average accuracy of 0.69 mm. The work will facilitate automatic patient-specific computational modeling of the aortic valve.

  2. Availability of, referral to and participation in exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation after heart valve surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tina B; Berg, Selina K; Sibilitz, Kirstine L;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As with ischaemic heart disease, cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is recommended for patients undergoing heart valve surgery; recommendations are based on limited evidence. The organization of CR programmes and factors associated with uptake among patients undergoing heart valve surgery have...

  3. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a patient with circulatory collapse, using the lucas® chest compression system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Blom; Andersen, Claus; Nissen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) using the LUCAS® Chest Compression System in an elderly high risk patient with severe aortic stenosis and heart failure. In this case, the patient developed severe aortic regurgitation following predilatation of the native aortic...... or cardiac damage. This case report shows, that it is possible to perform the TAVI procedure under ongoing A-CPR and that A-CPR, judged by invasive blood pressures, was capable of maintaining a satisfactory perfusion pressure even with a damaged aortic valve. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....... valve and automated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (A-CPR) was initiated. The procedure was performed under ongoing A-CPR for a total of 28 min. The patient was transferred to the intensive care unit and to a step down unit the following day. At follow-up 30 days later, she showed no signs of neurologic...

  4. In vitro characterization of bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics using particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yap, Choon-Hwai; Milligan, Nicole C; Vasilyev, Nikolay V; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2012-08-01

    The congenital bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is associated with increased leaflet calcification, ascending aortic dilatation, aortic stenosis (AS) and regurgitation (AR). Although underlying genetic factors have been primarily implicated for these complications, the altered mechanical environment of BAVs could potentially accelerate these pathologies. The objective of the current study is to characterize BAV hemodynamics in an in vitro system. Two BAV models of varying stenosis and jet eccentricity and a trileaflet AV (TAV) were constructed from excised porcine AVs. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) experiments were conducted at physiological flow and pressure conditions to characterize fluid velocity fields in the aorta and sinus regions, and ensemble averaged Reynolds shear stress and 2D turbulent kinetic energy were calculated for all models. The dynamics of the BAV and TAV models matched the characteristics of these valves which are observed clinically. The eccentric and stenotic BAV showed the strongest systolic jet (V = 4.2 m/s), which impinged on the aortic wall on the non-fused leaflet side, causing a strong vortex in the non-fused leaflet sinus. The magnitudes of TKE and Reynolds stresses in both BAV models were almost twice as large as comparable values for TAV, and these maximum values were primarily concentrated around the central jet through the valve orifice. The in vitro model described here enables detailed characterization of BAV flow characteristics, which is currently challenging in clinical practice. This model can prove to be useful in studying the effects of altered BAV geometry on fluid dynamics in the valve and ascending aorta. These altered flows can be potentially linked to increased calcific responses from the valve endothelium in stenotic and eccentric BAVs, independent of concomitant genetic factors.

  5. Is valve choice a significant determinant of paravalular leak post-transcatheter aortic valve implantation? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, Katie E

    2013-11-01

    Paravalvular regurgitation (PVR) following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is associated with poor survival. The two main valve delivery systems used to date differ significantly in both structure and deployment technique. The primary objective of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies identifying PVR in patients post-TAVI using Medtronic CoreValve (MCV) and Edward Sapien (ES) valves in order to identify whether a significant difference exists between valve types. The secondary objective was to identify additional factors predisposing to PVR to provide an overview of the other associated considerations.

  6. Bicuspid aortic valve and aortic coarctation are linked to deletion of the X chromosome short arm in Turner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondy, Carolyn; Bakalov, Vladimir K; Cheng, Clara; Olivieri, Laura; Rosing, Douglas R; Arai, Andrew E

    2013-01-01

    Background Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a cardinal feature of X chromosome monosomy, or Turner syndrome (TS). Haploinsufficiency for gene(s) located on Xp have been implicated in the short stature characteristic of the syndrome, but the chromosomal region related to the CHD phenotype has not been established. Design We used cardiac MRI to diagnose cardiovascular abnormalities in four non-mosaic karyotype groups based on 50-metaphase analyses: 45,X (n=152); 46,X,del(Xp) (n=15); 46,X,del(Xq) (n=4); and 46,X,i(Xq) (n=14) from peripheral blood cells. Results Bicuspid aortic valves (BAV) were found in 52/152 (34%) 45,X study subjects and aortic coarctation (COA) in 19/152 (12.5%). Isolated anomalous pulmonary veins (APV) were detected in 15/152 (10%) for the 45,X study group, and this defect was not correlated with the presence of BAV or COA. BAVs were present in 28.6% of subjects with Xp deletions and COA in 6.7%. APV were not found in subjects with Xp deletions. The most distal break associated with the BAV/COA trait was at cytologic band Xp11.4 and ChrX:41,500 000. One of 14 subjects (7%) with the 46,X,i(Xq) karyotype had a BAV and no cases of COA or APV were found in this group. No cardiovascular defects were found among four patients with Xq deletions. Conclusions The high prevalence of BAV and COA in subjects missing only the X chromosome short arm indicates that haploinsufficiency for Xp genes contributes to abnormal aortic valve and aortic arch development in TS. PMID:23825392

  7. Speckle-tracking echocardiography for predicting outcome in chronic aortic regurgitation during conservative management and after surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Thue; Søgaard, Peter; Larsson, Henrik B W;

    2011-01-01

    >15%, or decrease in LV ejection fraction >10%). Results Reduced myocardial systolic strain, systolic strain rate, and early diastolic strain rate by speckle-tracking echocardiography was associated with disease progression during conservative management (-16.3% vs. -19.0%, p = 0.02; -1.04 vs. -1.19 s......Objectives The aim of this study was to test myocardial deformation imaging using speckle-tracking echocardiography for predicting outcomes in chronic aortic regurgitation. Background In chronic aortic regurgitation, left ventricular (LV) dysfunction must be detected early to allow timely surgery...... conservatively with frequent clinical visits and sequential echocardiography and followed for an average of 19 ± 8 months, while 29 patients underwent surgery for the valve lesion and were followed for 6 months post-operatively. Baseline LV function by speckle-tracking and conventional echocardiography...

  8. Cellular Changes during Renal Failure-Induced Inflammatory Aortic Valve Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mony Shuvy

    Full Text Available Aortic valve calcification (AVC secondary to renal failure (RF is an inflammation-regulated process, but its pathogenesis remains unknown. We sought to assess the cellular processes that are involved in the early phases of aortic valve disease using a unique animal model of RF-associated AVC.Aortic valves were obtained from rats that were fed a uremia-inducing diet exclusively for 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 weeks as well as from controls. Pathological examination of the valves included histological characterization, von Kossa staining, and antigen expression analyses.After 2 weeks, we noted a significant increase in urea and creatinine levels, reflecting RF. RF parameters exacerbated until the Week 5 and plateaued. Whereas no histological changes or calcification was observed in the valves of any study group, macrophage accumulation became apparent as early as 2 weeks after the diet was started and rose after 3 weeks. By western blot, osteoblast markers were expressed after 2 weeks on the diet and decreased after 6 weeks. Collagen 3 was up-regulated after 3 weeks, plateauing at 4 weeks, whereas collagen 1 levels peaked at 2 and 4 weeks. Fibronectin levels increased gradually until Week 5 and decreased at 6 weeks. We observed early activation of the ERK pathway, whereas other pathways remained unchanged.We concluded that RF induces dramatic changes at the cellular level, including macrophage accumulation, activation of cell signaling pathway and extracellular matrix modification. These changes precede valve calcification and may increase propensity for calcification, and have to be investigated further.

  9. Acute gastrointestinal bleeding following aortic valve replacement in a patient with Heyde's sindrome. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Palma, G D; Salvatori, F; Masone, S; Simeoli, I; Rega, M; Celiento, M; Persico, G

    2007-09-01

    A 58-year old man was admitted to the hospital because of melena. He had a 1-year history of mechanical aortic valve replacement and coronary stent placement because of myocardial infarction and he was taking warfarin and clopidogrel. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy were negative for bleeding. Capsule endoscopy showed bleeding diffuse angiodysplasia of the small bowel. The patient was treated with octreotide 20 mg, at monthly interval. After 25 months there had been no recurrence of gastrointestinal bleeding. The case suggests that mechanical valve replacement may not prevent gastrointestinal bleeding in Heyde syndrome and that octreotide treatment should be considered in these cases.

  10. Current treatment status in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis and outcome of long term follow-up at advanced age:a Chinese single center study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PEI Han-jun; YUAN Jin-qing; CHEN Jue; LIU Hai-bo; YOU Shi-jie; GAO Run-lin; WU Yong-jian; YANG Yue-jin; XU Bo; CHEN Ji-lin; QIAO Shu-bin; LI Jian-jun; QIN Xue-wen; YAO Min

    2011-01-01

    years old, there was a significant difference between patients who had surgery and those who had conservative treatment in the total deaths and cardiac deaths (21.4% vs. 63.3%, /=0.007 and 14.3% vs. 46.9%, P=0.033). The total deaths in the patients aged between 65 and 74 years were significantly fewer compared with ≥75 years old patients (25.4% vs. 54.0%, P<0.001 ). Cox regression revealed that aortic valve replacement was the only independent predictor of mortality (HR 0.183; 95% CI, 0.101-0.332, P<0.001).Conclusions This single centre study showed that surgical aortic valve replacement was still the standard treatment for the patients with severe aortic stenosis and had a satisfying prognosis. However, the high risk patients with advanced age and comorbidities usually selected conservative treatment and had an unfavorable prognosis.

  11. The influence of the aortic valve angle on the hemodynamic features of the thoracic aorta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Hojin; Kim, Guk Bae; Kweon, Jihoon; Lee, Sang Joon; Kim, Young-Hak; Kim, Namkug; Yang, Dong Hyun

    2016-08-01

    Since the first observation of a helical flow pattern in aortic blood flow, the existence of helical blood flow has been found to be associated with various pathological conditions such as bicuspid aortic valve, aortic stenosis, and aortic dilatation. However, an understanding of the development of helical blood flow and its clinical implications are still lacking. In our present study, we hypothesized that the direction and angle of aortic inflow can influence helical flow patterns and related hemodynamic features in the thoracic aorta. Therefore, we investigated the hemodynamic features in the thoracic aorta and various aortic inflow angles using patient-specific vascular phantoms that were generated using a 3D printer and time-resolved, 3D, phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI). The results show that the rotational direction and strength of helical blood flow in the thoracic aorta largely vary according to the inflow direction of the aorta, and a higher helical velocity results in higher wall shear stress distributions. In addition, right-handed rotational flow conditions with higher rotational velocities imply a larger total kinetic energy than left-handed rotational flow conditions with lower rotational velocities.

  12. Application of Regent mechanical valve in patients with small aortic annulus: 3-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Dong

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aortic valve replacement (AVR with a small aortic annulus is always challenging for the cardiac surgeon. In this study, we sought to evaluate the midterm performance of implantation with a 17-mm or 19-mm St. Jude Medical Regent (SJM Regent mechanical valve in retrospective consecutive cohort of patients with small aortic annulus (diameter ≤ 19 mm. Methods From January 2008 to April 2011, 40 patients (31 female, mean age = 47.2 ± 5.8 years with small aortic annulus (≤19 mm in diameter underwent aortic valve replacement with a 17-mm or 19-mm St. Jude Medical Regent (SJM Regent mechanical valve. Preoperative mean body surface area, New York Heart Association class, and mean aortic annulus were 1.61 ± 0.26 m2, 3.2 ± 0.4, and 18 ± 1.4 mm respectively. Patients were divided into two groups, according to the implantation of 17 mm SJM Regent mechanical valve (group 1, n = 18 or 19 mm SJM Regent valve (group 2, n = 22. All patients underwent echocardiography examination preoperatively and at one year post-operation. Results There were no early deaths in either group. Follow-up time averaged 36 ± 17.6 months. The mean postoperative New York Heart Association class was 1.3 ± 0.6 (p 2/m2 to 69.8 ± 9.3%, 41.4 ± 8.3%, and 0.92 ± 0.10 cm2/m2 respectively (P 2, 46.1 ± 8.5 mmHg to 86.7 ± 18.2 g/m2 , 13.7 ± 5.2 mmHg respectively. In group 2, the LVEF, LVFS and EOAI increased from 45.9% ± 9.7%, 30.7% ± 8.0%, and 0.81 ± 0.09 cm2/m2 to 77.4% ± 9.7%, 44.5% ± 9.6%, and 1.27 ± 0.11 cm2/m2 respectively, while the LVMI, and the aortic transvalvular pressure gradient decreased from 118.3 ± 27.6 g/m2, 44.0 ± 6.7 mmHg to 80.1 ± 19.7 g/m2, 10.8 ± 4.1 mmHg as well. The prevalence of PPM was documented in 2 patients in Group 1. Conclusions Patients with small aortic annulus and body surface

  13. Patient prosthesis mismatch after aortic valve replacement: An Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreedhar S Joshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Perioperative period. Aims: Occurrence of PPM after AVR, factors associated with PPM, impact on mortality. Settings and Design: Teritary Care Referral Cardiac Centre. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of AVR procedures at a single centre over 4 years was conducted. Demographic, echocardiographic and outcome data were collected from institute database. Rahimtoola criteria of indexed effective orifice area (iEOA were used to stratify patients into PPM categories. Patients with and without PPM were compared for associated factors. Statistical Analysis Used: Independent t-test, chi-square test, logistic regression analysis, ROC-AUC, Youden index. Results: 606 patients with complete data were analysed for PPM. The incidence of mild, moderate and severe PPM was 6.1% (37, 2.5% (15 and 0.5% (3 respectively. There was no impact of PPM on all-cause in-hospital mortality. PPM was observed more with Aortic Stenosis (AS compared to Aortic Regurgitation (AR as etiology. Aortic annulus indexed to BSA (iAA had a very good predictive ability for PPM at <16mm/m 2 BSA. Conclusions: PPM has lower incidence after AVR in this Indian population and does not increase early mortality. Patients with AS and iAA<16mm/m2BSA should be cautiously dealt with to prevent PPM.

  14. A Roadmap to Investigate the Genetic Basis of Bicuspid Aortic Valve and its Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Siddharth K.; Bossé, Yohan; Muehlschlegel, Jochen D.; Michelena, Hector I.; Limongelli, Giuseppe; Della Corte, Alessandro; Pluchinotta, Francesca R.; Russo, Maria Giovanna; Evangelista, Artur; Benson, D. Woodrow; Body, Simon C.; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2015-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most common adult congenital heart defect and is found in 0.5% to 2.0% of the general population. The term “BAV” refers to a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by diverse aortic valve malformations with associated aortopathy, congenital heart defects, and genetic syndromes. Even after decades of investigation, the genetic determinants of BAV and its complications remain largely undefined. Just as BAV phenotypes are highly variable, the genetic etiologies of BAV are equally diverse and vary from complex inheritance in families to sporadic cases without any evidence of inheritance. In this paper, the authors discuss current concepts in BAV genetics and propose a roadmap for unraveling unanswered questions about BAV through the integrated analysis of genetic and clinical data. PMID:25145529

  15. Cardiac Hemodynamics in the Pathogenesis of Congenital Heart Disease and Aortic Valve Calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Vishal

    2011-11-01

    An improved understanding of the roles of hemodynamic forces play in cardiac development and the pathogenesis of cardiac disease will have significant scientific and clinical impact. I will focus on the role of fluid dynamics in congenital heart disease and aortic valve calcification. Congenital heart defects are the most common form of birth defect. Aortic valve calcification/stenosis is the third leading cause of adult heart disease and the most common form of acquired valvular disease in developed countries. Given the high incidence of these diseases and their associated morbidity and mortality, the potential translational impact of an improved understanding of cardiac hemodynamic forces is very large. Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego

  16. Prognostic value of multi-detector computed tomography in asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Kofoed, Klaus Fuglsang; Carstensen, Helle Gervig;

    2016-01-01

    was defined as indication for aortic valve replacement (AVR) determined by the treating physician or sudden cardiac death. RESULTS: The mean age was 72 (8) years, 27% were women, mean AVA by TTE was 1.01 (0.30) cm(2). Median follow up time was 27 (IQR 19-44) months. Forty seven patients (41%) developed...... indication for AVR. No patients suffered a sudden cardiac death. AVA and aortic valve calcification were significant univariable predictors of AVR when measured by both TTE and MDCT, whereas left ventricular mass was only significant measured by MDCT. Significant coronary artery disease by MDCT tended...... to predict future indication for AVR, but this did not reach statistical significance (HR: 1.79 (95% CI 0.96-3.44), p=0.08). CONCLUSION: MDCT derived AVA can be of use as an alternative to TTE derived AVA in patients with asymptomatic AS to predict future clinical indication for AVR....

  17. Study of Coronary Artery Disease in Single Aortic Valvular Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张斌; 杨伟民; 占亚平

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To analyze the results of coronary angiographies (GAG) in patients with single aortic valvular heart disease; To study the relationship between aortic valve diseases and coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods 105 patients with single aortic valvular heart disease before surgery underwent angiography. The data of clinical characteristics and angiographies were analyzed. Results 51 patients had symptoms of angina pectoris among 105 patients with single aortic valvular heart disease. Seven of them were confirmed coronary artery disease by angiographies. Although the incidence of angina in aortic valve stenosis group was significantly higher than that in aortic valve regurgitation, the probability of combination of CAD in aortic valve stenosis group was similar to the later. However, the probability of combination of CAD in degenerative aortic valve group was significantly higher than the groups of rheumatic, congenitally bicuspid aortic valves, and other causes (p <0.01).Conclusions Angina pectoris is not sensitive for diagnosis of CAD in single aortic valve heart disease.The probability of combination of CAD in degenerative aortic valve disease is higher than that in aortic valve disease with other causes. Coronary angiography is strongly suggested for these patients.

  18. Unicuspid Aortic Stenosis in a Patient with Turner Syndrome: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essandoh, Michael; Castellon-Larios, Karina; Zuleta-Alarcon, Alix; Portillo, Juan Guillermo; Crestanello, Juan A

    2014-01-01

    Congenital aortic valve anomalies are the cause of premature aortic stenosis in pediatric and younger adult populations. Despite being very rare, unicuspid aortic valves account for approximately 5% of isolated aortic valve replacements. Patients with aortic stenosis, present with the same symptomatology independent of leaflet morphology. However, the presence of bicuspid and unicuspid aortic stenosis is associated with a higher incidence of aortopathy, especially in Turner syndrome patients. Turner syndrome, an X monosomy, is associated with aortic valve anomalies, aortopathy, and hypertension. These risk factors lead to a higher incidence of aortic dissection in this population. Patients with Turner syndrome and aortic stenosis that present for aortic valve replacement should therefore undergo extensive aortic imaging prior to surgery. Transthoracic echocardiography is the diagnostic tool of choice for valvular pathology, yet it can misdiagnose unicuspid aortic valves as bicuspid valves due to certain similarities on imaging. Transesophageal echocardiography is a better tool for distinguishing between the two valvular abnormalities, although diagnostic errors can still occur. We present a case of a 50-year-old female with history of Turner syndrome and bicuspid aortic stenosis presenting for aortic valve replacement and ascending aorta replacement. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography revealed a stenotic unicommissural unicuspid aortic valve with an eccentric orifice, which was missed on preoperative imaging. This case highlights the importance of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography in confirming preoperative findings, diagnosing further cardiac pathology, and ensuring adequate surgical repair.

  19. Unicuspid Aortic Stenosis in a Patient with Turner Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eEssandoh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Congenital aortic valve anomalies are the cause of premature aortic stenosis in pediatric and younger adult populations. Despite being very rare, unicuspid aortic valves account for approximately 5% of isolated aortic valve replacements. Patients with aortic stenosis, present with the same symptomatology independent of leaflet morphology. However, the presence of bicuspid and unicuspid aortic stenosis is associated with a higher incidence of aortopathy, especially in Turner syndrome patients. Turner syndrome, an X monosomy, is associated with aortic valve anomalies, aortopathy, and hypertension. These risk factors lead to a higher incidence of aortic dissection in this population. Patients with Turner syndrome and aortic stenosis that present for aortic valve replacement should therefore undergo extensive aortic imaging prior to surgery.Transthoracic echocardiography is the diagnostic tool of choice for valvular pathology, yet it can misdiagnose unicuspid aortic valves as bicuspid valves due to certain similarities on imaging. Transesophageal echocardiography is a better tool for distinguishing between the two valvular abnormalities, although diagnostic errors can still occur. We present a case of a 50-year-old female with history of Turner syndrome and bicuspid aortic stenosis presenting for aortic valve replacement and ascending aorta replacement. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography revealed a stenotic unicommissural unicuspid aortic valve with an eccentric orifice, which was missed on preoperative imaging. This case highlights the importance of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography in confirming preoperative findings, diagnosing further cardiac pathology, and ensuring adequate surgical repair.

  20. Rare complication of circumflex artery occlusion during transfemoral aortic valve replacement (TAVR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Chirojit; Banusch, Joergen; Ender, Joerg

    2014-12-01

    Circumflex artery occlusion is an unusual but grave complication that can be intra-operatively challenging to identify. Various modalities of imaging are possible during transfemoral aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Fluoroscopy and/or transesophageal echocardiography maybe used for assessment during and after TAVR. Imaging dilemma can cause delay or alter diagnosis. We report a case of an imaging complication during TAVR which might have modified the outcome of the procedure.