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Sample records for aortic valve stenosis

  1. Global Strain in Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbæk, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: -Global longitudinal systolic strain (GLS) is often reduced in aortic stenosis despite normal ejection fraction. The importance of reduced preoperative GLS on long-term outcome after aortic valve replacement (AVR) is unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: -A total of 125 patients with severe...

  2. Transcatheter Versus Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Steinbrüchel, Daniel Andreas; Ihlemann, Nikolaj;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an option in certain high-risk surgical patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. It is unknown whether TAVR can be safely introduced to lower-risk patients. OBJECTIVES: The NOTION (Nordic Aortic Valve Intervention Trial) randomized...... clinical trial compared TAVR with surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in an all-comers patient cohort. METHODS: Patients ≥ 70 years old with severe aortic valve stenosis and no significant coronary artery disease were randomized 1:1 to TAVR using a self-expanding bioprosthesis versus SAVR. The primary...... conduction abnormalities requiring pacemaker implantation, larger improvement in effective orifice area, more total aortic valve regurgitation, and higher New York Heart Association functional class at 1 year. SAVR-treated patients had more major or life-threatening bleeding, cardiogenic shock, acute kidney...

  3. Indexing aortic valve area by body surface area increases the prevalence of severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jander, Nikolaus; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa; Bahlmann, Edda;

    2014-01-01

    To account for differences in body size in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is divided by body surface area (BSA) to calculate indexed AVA (AVAindex). Cut-off values for severe stenosis are......To account for differences in body size in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is divided by body surface area (BSA) to calculate indexed AVA (AVAindex). Cut-off values for severe stenosis are...

  4. Adjusting parameters of aortic valve stenosis severity by body size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minners, Jan; Gohlke-Baerwolf, Christa; Kaufmann, Beat A;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adjustment of cardiac dimensions by measures of body size appears intuitively convincing and in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is commonly adjusted by body surface area (BSA). However, there is little evidence to support such an approach. OBJECTIVE: To identify...... the adequate measure of body size for the adjustment of aortic stenosis severity. METHODS: Parameters of aortic stenosis severity (jet velocity, mean pressure gradient (MPG) and AVA) and measures of body size (height, weight, BSA and body mass index (BMI)) were analysed in 2843 consecutive patients with aortic...... stenosis (jet velocity ≥2.5 m/s) and related to outcomes in a second cohort of 1525 patients from the Simvastatin/Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study. RESULTS: Whereas jet velocity and MPG were independent of body size, AVA was significantly correlated with height, weight, BSA and BMI (Pearson...

  5. Small aortic valve annulus in children with fixed subaortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thilenius, O G; Campbell, D; Bharati, S; Lev, M; Arcilla, R A

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-one hearts with fixed subaortic stenosis (FSAS) were examined pathologically. Thirty children with no hemodynamically significant heart disease, 31 children with valvar aortic stenosis, and 25 children with FSAS were studied by echo- and angiocardiography. The following conclusions were drawn: (1) Patients with FSAS often have abnormal aortic valve leaflets as well as small aortic valve annulus. (2) A small aortic annulus/descending aorta ratio is probably present at birth, and may decrease with increasing age. (3) In some patients with FSAS the aortic valve annulus is too small for simple resection of the fibroelastic tissue. A Konno operation is needed for these patients. (4) M-mode echocardiography has not been useful in identifying abnormally small aortic valve annulus in FSAS patients.

  6. Molecular mechanisms of inflammation and calcification in aortic valve stenosis

    OpenAIRE

    Nagy, Edit

    2012-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is a slowly progressive disorder with a spectrum of disease ranging from aortic sclerosis to severe destroyed valvular architecture leading to critical outflow obstruction. The diseased valve is characterized by inflammation, as an initiating event, pathological remodeling of extracellular matrix and pronounced calcification, which all eventually cause restricted leaflet mobility. Compelling evidence obtained from both experimental animal models and human studies provide...

  7. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation versus surgical aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis: a meta analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yi-cheng; ZHANG Jian-feng; SHEN Wei-feng; ZHAO Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has emerged as the treatment choice for non-operable patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) and may be a good alternative to surgery for those at very high or prohibitive surgical risk.We performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the comparative benefits of TAVI versus surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in patients with severe AS.Methods A comprehensive literature search of PubMed,Embase,ScienceDirect and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled trials was performed,and randomized trials as well as cohort studies with propensity score analysis were included.Results One randomized trial (n=699) and six retrospective cohort studies (n=781) were selected for meta-analysis.Mortality at 30-day and 1-year follow-up was comparable between TAVI and SAVR.Despite similar incidences of stroke,myocardial infarction,re-operation for bleeding,and renal failure requiring dialysis,TAVI was associated with a lower occurrence rate of new-onset atrial fibrillation (OR 0.51,95% CI 0.33-0.78) and shorter procedural time (mean difference -67.50 minutes,95% CI-87.20 to-47.81 minutes).Post-operative aortic regurgitation and permanent pacemaker implantation were more common in patients after TAVI than in those with SAVR (OR 5.53,95% CI 3.41-8.97; OR 1.71,95% Cl 1.02-2.84,respectively).Conclusion In patients with severe symptomatic AS,TAVI and SAVR did not differ with respect to short-and mid-term survival,but the incidence of permanent pacemaker implantation and post-procedural aortic regurgitation remain relatively high after TAVI.

  8. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty as a bridge to aortic valve surgery for severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwaejike, Nnamdi; Mills, Keith; Stables, Rod; Field, Mark

    2015-03-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was, in patients with severe aortic stenosis, can balloon valvuloplasty be used as a bridge to aortic valve replacement? Altogether 463 papers were found using the reported search, of which 11 papers represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. We conclude that balloon aortic valvuloplasty is recommended as a bridge to aortic valve replacement (AVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. Institutional practices, local and logistic factors can affect patient selection and management approaches to severe aortic stenosis, but having the facility to offer balloon aortic valvuloplasty (especially in the TAVI era) provides another management option for patients who would otherwise have been considered unacceptably high risk for aortic valve surgery. The increased incidence of balloon aortic valvuloplasty mirrors the increase in the use of TAVI with a sharp increase in activity from 2006. Success rates for bridging from balloon aortic valvuloplasty to definite surgical intervention are in the range 26.3-74%, with AVR or TAVI occurring within 8 weeks to 7 months. Complications from balloon aortic valvuloplasty such as aortic regurgitation (AR) can be managed successfully. Up to 40% of patients selected by balloon aortic valvuloplasty to have TAVI or AVR do not have these procedures within 2 years. While most of these patients are excluded for objective clinical reasons such as terminal disease/malignancy or other persistent contraindication, some patients refuse definitive treatment and others die while on the waiting list. Outcomes in patients bridged to AVR/TAVI are better than in patients treated with balloon aortic valvuloplasty

  9. Acute Right Coronary Ostial Stenosis during Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarwar Umran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of acute right coronary artery stenosis developing in a patient undergoing aortic valve replacement. We present a case report with a brief overview of the literature relating to coronary artery occlusion associated with cardiac valve surgery - the theories and treatments are discussed. A 85 year-old female was admitted under the care of the cardiothoracic team with signs and symptoms of heart failure. Investigations, including cardiac echocardiography and coronary angiography, indicated a critical aortic valve stenosis. Intraoperative right ventricular failure ensued post aortic valve replacement. Subsequent investigations revealed an acute occlusion of the proximal right coronary artery with resultant absence of distal flow supplying the right ventricle. An immediate right coronary artery bypass procedure was performed with resolution of the right ventricular failure. Subsequent weaning off cardiopulmonary bypass was uneventful and the patient continued to make excellent recovery in the postoperative phase. To our knowledge this is one of the few documented cases of intraoperative acute coronary artery occlusion developing during valve surgery. However, surgeons should be aware of the potential for acute occlusion so that early recognition and rapid intervention can be instituted.

  10. Aortic root, not valve, calcification correlates with coronary artery calcification in patients with severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henein, Michael; Hällgren, Peter; Holmgren, Anders;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The underlying pathology in aortic stenosis (AS) and coronary artery stenosis (CAS) is similar including atherosclerosis and calcification. We hypothesize that coronary artery calcification (CAC) is likely to correlate with aortic root calcification (ARC) rather than with aortic valve...... calcification (AVC), due to tissue similarity between the two types of vessel rather than with the valve leaflet tissue. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We studied 212 consecutive patients (age 72.5 ± 7.9 years, 91 females) with AS requiring aortic valve replacement (AVR) in two Heart Centers, who underwent multidetector...... even after adjusting for age (p = 0.01). AVC score was associated with BAV after adjusting for age (p = 0.03) but ARC was not. Of the total cohort, 82 patients (39%) had significant coronary stenosis (>50%), but these were not different in the pattern of calcification from those without CAS. CAC...

  11. Case Report: Calcific Aortic Valve Stenosis Due to Central Retinal Artery Occlusion

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    Ender Sener

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this case, it was reported that a 48 year old male patient with spontaneous central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO due to calcific aortic valve stenosis. He had no other systemic disease. CRAO usually occurs in elder patients with systemic risk factors. CRAO results in sudden, painless and severe vision loss. Altough, CRAO is seen rarely under 50 year old, it may appear in younger patient with aortic valve disease and calcific aortic valve stenosis caused cardiac disease.

  12. Effects of preemptive enoximone on left ventricular diastolic function after valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Maaten, Joost M. A. A.; de Vries, Adrianus J.; Rietman, Gerrit W.; Gallandat Huet, Rolf C. G.; De Hert, Stefan G.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy is associated with increased diastolic chamber stiffness early after aortic valve replacement for valve stenosis. Enoximone, a phosphodiesterase III inhibitor, has been shown to improve myocardial contractility and relaxation when administered as a single

  13. Treatment of aortic stenosis with a self-expanding transcatheter valve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linke, Axel; Wenaweser, Peter; Gerckens, Ulrich;

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation has become an alternative to surgery in higher risk patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis. The aim of the ADVANCE study was to evaluate outcomes following implantation of a self-expanding transcatheter aortic valve system in a fully monitored, mult...

  14. Influence of obesity on left ventricular adaptation, grading and outcome in aortic valve stenosis

    OpenAIRE

    Rogge, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim: Obesity is associated with hemodynamic changes characterized by volume overload adding to the progressive pressure overload induced by aortic valve stenosis (AS). This thesis investigated whether concomitant obesity in patients with AS independently impacts left ventricular (LV) adaptation, grading and outcome during progression of the valve stenosis.Methods: The project was a planned substudy of the Simvastin Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study (SEAS), a prospec...

  15. Increased risk of aortic valve stenosis in patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalid, Usman; Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar;

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease including atherosclerosis. The pathogenesis of aortic valve stenosis (AS) also includes an inflammatory component. We therefore investigated the risk of AS in patients with psoriasis compared...... with the general population in a nationwide cohort. METHODS: The study comprised the entire Danish population aged ≥18 years followed from 1 January 1997 until diagnosis of AS, 31 December 2011, or death. Information on comorbidity, concomitant medication, and socioeconomic status was identified by individual......-level linkage of administrative registers. Incidence rates for AS were calculated and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) adjusted for age, gender, calendar year, comorbidity, medications, and socioeconomic status, were estimated in Poisson regression models. RESULTS: A total of 5 107 624 subjects were eligible...

  16. Low‐gradient aortic valve stenosis: value and limitations of dobutamine stress testing

    OpenAIRE

    J. Bermejo; Yotti, R.

    2006-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis has already reached endemic proportions in Western countries. As the prognosis of low‐flow aortic valve stenosis under medical treatment is dismal, surgery is recommended in most patients. Preoperative dobutamine stress testing may help to assess surgical risk, but there is no strong scientific evidence to deny surgery based exclusively on the results of this test. The problems associated with clinical decision making in this condition are reviewed.

  17. Clinical predictors of prosthesis-patient mismatch after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    OpenAIRE

    Luis M Astudillo; Orlando Santana; Urbandt, Pablo A.; Benjo, Alexandre M.; Lior U Elkayam; Nascimento, Francisco O.; Lamas, Gervasio A.; Joseph Lamelas

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We sought to ascertain predictors of Patient Prosthesis Mismatch, an independent predictor of mortality, in patients with aortic stenosis using bioprosthetic valves. METHOD: We analyzed 2,107 sequential surgeries. Patient Prosthesis Mismatch was calculated using the effective orifice area of the prosthesis divided by the patient's body surface area. We defined nonsignificant, moderate, and severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch as effective orifice area indexes of >0.85 cm2/m, 0.85-0.6...

  18. Aortic valve bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Jens T; Jensen, Maiken Brit; Arendrup, Henrik;

    2013-01-01

    In aortic valve bypass (AVB) a valve-containing conduit is connecting the apex of the left ventricle to the descending aorta. Candidates are patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis rejected for conventional aortic valve replacement (AVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI...

  19. Association between aortic valve calcification measured on non-contrast computed tomography and aortic valve stenosis in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Niels Herluf; Carlsen, Bjarke Bønløkke; Dahl, Jordi Sanchez;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aortic valve calcification (AVC) measured on non-contrast computed tomography (CT) has shown correlation to severity of aortic valve stenosis (AS) and mortality in patients with known AS. The aim of this study was to determine the association of CT verified AVC and subclinical...... group were invited for a supplementary echocardiography. AS was graded by indexed aortic valve area (AVAi) on echocardiography as moderate 0.6-0.85 cm(2)/m(2) and severe valve surgery, and artifacts from...

  20. The vitamin D receptor genotype predisposes to the development of calcific aortic valve stenosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ortlepp, J; Hoffmann, R.; Ohme, F.; Lauscher, J; Bleckmann, F; Hanrath, P

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To test the hypothesis that vitamin D receptor polymorphism is associated with calcific aortic valve stenosis.
DESIGN—The distribution of one polymorphism of the vitamin D receptor (BsmI B/b) was examined in 100 consecutive patients with calcific valvar aortic stenosis and compared with a control group of 100 patients (paired match for age, sex, and the presence of coronary artery disease from a total of 630 patients without calcified aortic valves). Polymerase chain reaction and re...

  1. Coronary artery disease and symptomatic severe aortic valve stenosis: clinical outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eMancio

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The impact of coronary artery disease (CAD on outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI has not been clarified. Furthermore, less is known about the indication and strategy of revascularization in these high risk patients. Aims: This study sought to determine the prevalence and prognostic impact of CAD in patients undergoing TAVI, and to assess the safety and feasibility of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI before TAVI.Methods: Patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS undergoing TAVI were included into a prospective single centre registry from 2007 to 2012. Clinical outcomes were compared between patients with and without CAD. In some patients with CAD it was decided to perform elective PCI before TAVI after decision by the Heart Team. The primary endpoints were 30-day and 2-year all-cause mortality.Results: A total of 91 consecutive patients with mean age of 79±9 years (52% men underwent TAVI with a median follow-up duration of 16 months (interquartile range of 27.6 months. CAD was present on 46 patients (51%. At 30-day, the incidences of death were similar between CAD and non-CAD patients (9% and 5%, p=0.44, but at 2 years were 50% in CAD patients and 24% in non-CAD patients (crude hazard ratio with CAD, 2.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1 to 4.6; p=0.04. Adjusting for age, gender, left ventricular ejection fraction and glomerular filtration rate the hazard of death was 2.6-fold higher in patients with CAD (95% CI, 1.1 to 6.0; p=0.03. Elective PCI before TAVI was performed in 13 patients (28% of CAD patients. There were no more adverse events in patients who underwent TAVI+PCI when compared with those who underwent isolated TAVI. Conclusions: In severe symptomatic AS who underwent TAVI, CAD is frequent and adversely impacts long-term outcomes, but not procedure outcomes. In selected patients, PCI before TAVI appears to be feasible and safe.

  2. Noninvasive assessment of filling pressure and left atrial pressure overload in severe aortic valve stenosis: relation to ventricular remodeling and clinical outcome after aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbæk, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K;

    2011-01-01

    One of the hemodynamic consequences of aortic valve stenosis is pressure overload leading to left atrial dilatation. Left atrial size is a known risk factor providing prognostic information in several cardiac conditions. It is not known if this is also the case in patients with aortic valve...

  3. Effect of candesartan treatment on left ventricular remodeling after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbaek, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K;

    2010-01-01

    group had greater improvement in longitudinal LV systolic function assessed by tissue Doppler S' wave (0.6 +/- 0.1-cm/s increase in control group vs 1.4 +/- 0.1 cm/s in candesartan group, p = 0.01, p for trend = 0.02) and a decrease in LA volume (p for trend = 0.01). Treatment had no effect on diastolic......In hypertension, angiotensin receptor blockers can augment regression of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy. It is not known whether this also is the case after aortic valve replacement (AVR) for severe aortic stenosis (AS). To test the hypothesis that treatment with candesartan in addition...... to conventional treatment is able to augment LV and left atrial (LA) reverse remodeling in patients with AS undergoing AVR, we studied 114 patients scheduled for AVR. Patients were randomized to treatment with candesartan 32 mg 1 time/day or conventional therapy immediately after AVR. Patients were followed...

  4. Microparticle-Induced Coagulation Relates to Coronary Artery Atherosclerosis in Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis.

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    Patrick Horn

    Full Text Available Circulating microparticles (MPs derived from endothelial cells and blood cells bear procoagulant activity and promote thrombin generation. Thrombin exerts proinflammatory effects mediating the progression of atherosclerosis. Aortic valve stenosis may represent an atherosclerosis-like process involving both the aortic valve and the vascular system. The aim of this study was to investigate whether MP-induced thrombin generation is related to coronary atherosclerosis and aortic valve calcification.In a cross-sectional study of 55 patients with severe aortic valve stenosis, we assessed the coronary calcification score (CAC as indicator of total coronary atherosclerosis burden, and aortic valve calcification (AVC by computed tomography. Thrombin-antithrombin complex (TATc levels were measured as a marker for thrombin formation. Circulating MPs were characterized by flow cytometry according to the expression of established surface antigens and by measuring MP-induced thrombin generation.Patients with CAC score below the median were classified as patients with low CAC, patients with CAC Score above the median as high CAC. In patients with high CAC compared to patients with low CAC we detected higher levels of TATc, platelet-derived MPs (PMPs, endothelial-derived MPs (EMPs and MP-induced thrombin generation. Increased level of PMPs and MP-induced thrombin generation were independent predictors for the severity of CAC. In contrast, AVC Score did not differ between patients with high and low CAC and did neither correlate with MPs levels nor with MP-induced thrombin generation.In patients with severe aortic valve stenosis MP-induced thrombin generation was independently associated with the severity of CAC but not AVC indicating different pathomechanisms involved in coronary artery and aortic valve calcification.

  5. A hybrid approach for quantifying aortic valve stenosis using impedance cardiography and echocardiography

    OpenAIRE

    Daralammouri, Yunis; Ayoub, Khubaib; Badrieh, Najwan; Lauer, Bernward

    2016-01-01

    Background Impedance cardiography (IC) is a noninvasive modality that utilizes changes in impedance across the thorax to assess hemodynamic parameters, including stroke volume (SV). This study compared aortic valve area (AVA) as assessed by a hybrid approach of transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and impedance cardiography (IC) to AVA determined at cardiac catheterization using the Gorlin equation. Methods A total of 30 patients with moderate to severe aortic stenosis underwent AVA measureme...

  6. Severe aortic valve stenosis in the elderly: high prevalence of sleep-related breathing disorders

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    Keymel S

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Stefanie Keymel,1 Katharina Hellhammer,1 Tobias Zeus,1 Marc Merx,2 Malte Kelm,1 Stephan Steiner3 1Department of Cardiology, Pneumology, and Vascular Diseases, Medical Faculty, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, 2Department of Cardiology, Vascular Diseases and Intensive Care Medicine, KRHKlinikum Robert Koch Gehrden, Gehrden, 3Department of Cardiology, Pneumology and Intensive Care Medicine, St Vincenz Hospital, Limburg, Germany Background: Aortic valve stenosis is common in the elderly, with a prevalence of nearly 3% in patients aged 75 years or older. Despite the fact that sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBD are thought to be associated with cardiac disease, little is known about their prevalence in this patient cohort. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of SRBD in older patients with aortic valve stenosis admitted for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.Methods: Forty-eight consecutive patients (mean age 81±6 years; 37.5% male with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis and considered for transcatheter aortic valve replacement were screened for SRBD. Sleep studies were performed by in-hospital unattended cardiorespiratory polygraphy measuring nasal air flow, chest and abdominal efforts, as well as oxygen saturation and body position. The patients were divided in subgroups dependent on the documented apnea–hypopnea index (AHI; no SRBD was defined as an AHI of <5 events/hour; mild SRBD as AHI 5–15 events/hour, and moderate to severe SRBD as AHI ≥15 events/hour.Results: Thirty-seven patients (77% had SRBD defined as an AHI of ≥5 events/hour. Eleven patients had an unremarkable investigation, with AHI <5 events/hour (mean 3.0±1.3 events/hour. Among patients with sleep apnea, 19 patients had mild SRBD, with an AHI of 5–15 events/hour (mean 9.9±3.4 events/hour and 18 patients had moderate to severe SRBD (mean 26.6±11.3 events/hour. Mainly, obstructive apneas were found. Subgroups were not

  7. Patient values and preferences on transcatheter or surgical aortic valve replacement therapy for aortic stenosis: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytvyn, Lyubov; Guyatt, Gordon H; Manja, Veena; Siemieniuk, Reed A; Zhang, Yuan; Agoritsas, Thomas; Vandvik, Per O

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate patients' values and preferences regarding aortic valve replacement therapy for aortic stenosis. Setting Studies published after transcatheter aortic valve insertion (TAVI) became available (2002). Participants Adults with aortic stenosis who are considering or have had valve replacement, either TAVI or via surgery (surgical aortic valve replacement, SAVR). Outcome measures We sought quantitative measurements, or qualitative descriptions, of values and preferences. When reported, we examined correlations between preferences and objective (eg, ejection fraction) or subjective (eg, health-related quality of life) measures of health. Results We reviewed 1348 unique citations, of which 2 studies proved eligible. One study of patients with severe aortic stenosis used a standard gamble study to ascertain that the median hypothetical mortality risk patients were willing to tolerate to achieve full health was 25% (IQR 25–50%). However, there was considerable variability; for mortality risk levels defined by current guidelines, 130 participants (30%) were willing to accept low-to-intermediate risk (≤8%), 224 (51%) high risk (>8–50%) and 85 (19%) a risk that guidelines would consider prohibitive (>50%). Study authors did not, however, assess participants' understanding of the exercise, resulting in a potential risk of bias. A second qualitative study of 15 patients identified the following factors that influence patients to undergo assessment for TAVI: symptom burden; expectations; information support; logistical barriers; facilitators; obligations and responsibilities. The study was limited by serious risk of bias due to authors' conflict of interest (5/9 authors industry-funded). Conclusions Current evidence on patient values and preferences of adults with aortic stenosis is very limited, and no studies have enrolled patients deciding between TAVI and SAVR. On the basis of the data available, there is evidence of variability in individual

  8. Impact of Aortic Valve Calcification, as Measured by MDCT, on Survival in Patients With Aortic Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavel, Marie-Annick; Pibarot, Philippe; Messika-Zeitoun, David; Capoulade, Romain; Malouf, Joseph; Aggarval, Shivani; Araoz, Phillip A.; Michelena, Hector I.; Cueff, Caroline; Larose, Eric; Miller, Jordan D.; Vahanian, Alec; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Aortic valve calcification (AVC) load measures lesion severity in aortic stenosis (AS) and is useful for diagnostic purposes. Whether AVC predicts survival after diagnosis, independent of clinical and Doppler echocardiographic AS characteristics, has not been studied. OBJECTIVES This study evaluated the impact of AVC load, absolute and relative to aortic annulus size (AVCdensity), on overall mortality in patients with AS under conservative treatment and without regard to treatment. METHODS In 3 academic centers, we enrolled 794 patients (mean age, 73 ± 12 years; 274 women) diagnosed with AS by Doppler echocardiography who underwent multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) within the same episode of care. Absolute AVC load and AVCdensity (ratio of absolute AVC to cross-sectional area of aortic annulus) were measured, and severe AVC was separately defined in men and women. RESULTS During follow-up, there were 440 aortic valve implantations (AVIs) and 194 deaths (115 under medical treatment). Univariate analysis showed strong association of absolute AVC and AVCdensity with survival (both, p < 0.0001) with a spline curve analysis pattern of threshold and plateau of risk. After adjustment for age, sex, coronary artery disease, diabetes, symptoms, AS severity on hemodynamic assessment, and LV ejection fraction, severe absolute AVC (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 1.75; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04 to 2.92; p = 0.03) or severe AVCdensity (adjusted HR: 2.44; 95% CI: 1.37 to 4.37; p = 0.002) independently predicted mortality under medical treatment, with additive model predictive value (all, p ≤ 0.04) and a net reclassification index of 12.5% (p = 0.04). Severe absolute AVC (adjusted HR: 1.71; 95% CI: 1.12 to 2.62; p = 0.01) and severe AVCdensity (adjusted HR: 2.22; 95% CI: 1.40 to 3.52; p = 0.001) also independently predicted overall mortality, even with adjustment for time-dependent AVI. CONCLUSIONS This large-scale, multicenter outcomes study of

  9. Evaluation of aortic valve stenosis by cardiac multislice computed tomography compared with echocardiography: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivertsen, Jacob; Køber, Lars Valeur; Abdulla, Jawdat;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY: It has not yet been established whether multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) is reliable for the quantification of aortic valve area (AVA) in patients with aortic valve stenosis (AVS) and simultaneously for assessment of the coronary anatomy. The study aim, via ...

  10. Acute regional improvement of myocardial function after interventional transfemoral aortic valve replacement in aortic stenosis: A speckle tracking echocardiography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schattke Sebastian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI is a promising therapy for patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS and high perioperative risk. New echocardiographic methods, including 2D Strain analysis, allow the more accurate measurement of left ventricular (LV systolic function. The goal of this study was to describe the course of LV reverse remodelling immediately after TAVI in a broad spectrum of patients with symptomatic severe aortic valve stenosis. Methods Thirty consecutive patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis and preserved LVEF underwent transfemoral aortic valve implantation. We performed echocardiography at baseline and one week after TAVI. Echocardiography included standard 2D and Doppler analysis of global systolic and diastolic function as well as 2D Strain measurements of longitudinal, radial and circumferential LV motion and Tissue Doppler echocardiography. Results The baseline biplane LVEF was 57 ± 8.2%, the mean pressure gradient was 46.8 ± 17.2 mmHg and the mean valve area was 0.73 ± 0.27 cm2. The average global longitudinal 2D strain of the left ventricle improved significantly from -15.1 (± 3.0 to -17.5 (± 2.4 % (p Conclusion There is an acute improvement of myocardial longitudinal systolic function of the basal and medial segments measured by 2D Strain analysis immediately after TAVI. The radial, circumferential strain and LVEF does not change significantly in all patients acutely after TAVI. These data suggest that sensitive new echo methods can reliably detect early regional changes of myocardial function after TAVI before benefits in LVEF are detectable.

  11. Discrete subaortic stenosis. Operative age and gradient as predictors of late aortic valve incompetence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzoli, G; Tiso, E; Mazzucco, A; Daliento, L; Rubino, M; Tursi, V; Fracasso, A

    1993-07-01

    Between January 1969 and May 1990, 100 patients were operated on for discrete subaortic stenosis. Three patients died in the perioperative period. Patients with intrinsic lesions, prosthetic replacement, or extensive operative remodeling of the aortic valve were excluded from the analysis. The 67 remaining patients had a median follow-up of 62 months. Preoperatively, 8 patients had aortic valve competence, 51 had mild incompetence, and 8 patients moderate aortic valve incompetence. At follow-up mild incompetence persisted in 27 and moderate incompetence in 6 patients. In 1 patient it worsened from no incompetence to mild and in another patient from mild to moderate. The probability of aortic incompetence at follow-up was significantly and simultaneously related (multivariate ordinal logistic model) to (1) older age at operation (logarithm of months, p = 0.007), (2) higher preoperative gradient (third power of milligrams of mercury, p = 0.0004), (3) preoperative cardiomegaly (p = 0.04), and (4) surgical myectomy (p = 0.002). There was an interaction between age and gradient (p = 0.03). Two nomograms are proposed as a generalizable aid to decision making. The data support the policy of early repair of subaortic stenosis. PMID:8321008

  12. Combined surgical and catheter-based treatment of extensive thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Lönn, Lars; Søndergaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) has changed and extended management options in thoracic aorta disease, including in those patients deemed unfit or unsuitable for open surgery. Accordingly, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is increasingly used to treat patients with symptomatic severe aortic......An extensive thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is a potentially life-threatening condition and remains a technical challenge to surgeons. Over the past decade, repair of aortic arch aneurysms has been accomplished using both hybrid (open and endovascular) and totally endovascular techniques. Thoracic...

  13. Initial non-opioid based anesthesia in a parturient having severe aortic stenosis undergoing cesarean section with aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata Podder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy in presence of severe aortic stenosis (AS causes worsening of symptoms needing further intervention. In the advanced stages of pregnancy, some patients may even require aortic valve replacement (AVR and cesarean delivery in the same sitting. Opioid based general anesthesia for combined lower segment cesarean section (LSCS with AVR has been described. However, the use of opioid may lead to fetal morbidity and need of respiratory support for the baby. We describe successful anesthetic management for LSCS with AVR in a >33 week gravida with severe AS and congestive heart failure. We avoided opioids till delivery of the baby AVR; the delivered neonate showed a normal APGAR score.

  14. Valve area and cardiac output in aortic stenosis: quantification by magnetic resonance velocity mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Hildebrandt, P; Lindvig, K;

    1993-01-01

    Valve area and cardiac output were determined with magnetic resonance (MR) velocity mapping in 12 patients with aortic stenosis. Heart catheterization, Doppler echocardiography, and indicator dilution were performed for comparison. Left ventricle could be catheterized in only nine patients; in...... material, MR measured a mean area of 1.1 cm2 compared with 1.2 cm2 derived from Doppler echocardiography data, with a mean difference of 0.1 cm2 and [-0.5, +0.6] cm2 as limits of agreement. In 11 patients the cardiac output was quantified by MR to a mean of 4.9 L/min and by indicator dilution to 5.0 L......--the valvular area and the cardiac output--may be quantified, MR has potential to become a clinical tool in assessment of severity in aortic stenosis....

  15. Left ventricular diastolic function is associated with symptom status in severe aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Christensen, Nicolaj L; Videbæk, Lars;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In aortic valve stenosis (AS), the occurrence of heart failure symptoms does not always correlate with severity of valve stenosis and left ventricular (LV) function. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that symptomatic patients with AS have impaired diastolic, longitudinal systolic......%. Independent predictors of symptomatic state were identified using logistic regression analysis. Symptomatic patients were younger (72±10 versus 76±12 years of age; P=0.002), presented less often with atrial fibrillation (13% versus 24%; P=0.05) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (2% versus 19%; P<0......±58 versus 268±62 ms; P<0.0001), and increased left atrial volume index (49±18 versus 42±15 mL/m2; P=0.02). When adjusting for age, history of hypertension, atrial fibrillation, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in a multivariable logistic regression analysis, LV mass index, relative wall thickness...

  16. Basal longitudinal strain predicts future aortic valve replacement in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Helle Gervig; Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Hassager, Christian;

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the prognostic value of global longitudinal strain (GLS) and basal longitudinal strain (BLS) with the knowledge of coexisting coronary pathology evaluated by multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) coronary angiography. BACKGROUND: GLS and BLS are both sensitive markers of myo......: In contrast to GLS, reduced BLS is a significant predictor of future AVR in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis, independently of clinical characteristics, conventional echocardiographic measures, and coronary pathology....

  17. Aortic coarctation associated with aortic valve stenosis and mitral regurgitation in an adult patient: a two-stage approach using a large-diameter stent graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novosel, Luka; Perkov, Dražen; Dobrota, Savko; Ćorić, Vedran; Štern Padovan, Ranka

    2014-02-01

    We report a case of a staged surgical and endovascular management in a 62-year-old woman with aortic coarctation associated with aortic valve stenosis and mitral regurgitation. The patient was admitted for severe aortic valve stenosis and mitral valve incompetence. During hospitalization and preoperative imaging, a previously undiagnosed aortic coarctation was discovered. The patient underwent a 2-stage approach that combined a Bentall procedure and mitral valve replacement in the first stage, followed by correction of the aortic coarctation by percutaneous placement of an Advanta V12 large-diameter stent graft (Atrium, Mijdrecht, The Netherlands) which to our knowledge has not been used in an adult patient with this combination of additional cardiac comorbidities. A staged approach combining surgical treatment first and endovascular placement of an Advanta V12 stent graft in the second stage can be effective and safe in adult patients with coarctation of the aorta and additional cardiac comorbidities.

  18. Myocardial Injury Following Aortic Valve Replacement for Severe Aortic Stenosis: Risk Factor of Postoperative Myocardial Injury and Its Impact on Long-Term Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chee-Hoon; Ju, Min Ho; Kim, Joon Bum; Chung, Cheol Hyun; Jung, Sung Ho; Choo, Suk Jung; Lee, Jae Won

    2014-01-01

    Background As hypertrophied myocardium predisposes the patient to decreased tolerance to ischemia and increased reperfusion injury, myocardial protection is of utmost importance in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR) for severe aortic valve stenosis (AS). Methods Consecutive 314 patients (mean age, 62.5±10.8 years; 143 females) with severe AS undergoing isolated AVR were included. Postoperative myocardial injury (PMI) was defined as 1) maximum postoperative creatinine kinase is...

  19. Fused aortic valve without an elliptical-shaped systolic orifice in patients with severe aortic stenosis: cardiac computed tomography is useful for differentiation between bicuspid aortic valve with raphe and tricuspid aortic valve with commissural fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bak, So Hyeon; Ko, Sung Min [Konkuk University School of Medicine, Departments of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Meong Gun; Shin, Je Kyoun; Chee, Hyun Kun; Kim, Jun Suk [Konkuk University School of Medicine, Departments of Thoracic Surgery, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-01

    The objective is to determine cardiac computed tomography (CCT) features capable of differentiating between bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) and tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) in severe aortic stenosis (AS) patients with fused cusp and without elliptical-shaped systolic orifices. We retrospectively enrolled 53 patients who had severe AS with fused cusps and without an elliptical-shaped systolic orifice on CCT and who had undergone surgery. CCT features were analyzed using: (1) aortic valve findings including cusp size, cusp area, opening shape, midline calcification, fusion length, calcium volume score, and calcium grade; (2) diameters of ascending and descending aorta, and main pulmonary artery; and (3) rheumatic mitral valve findings. The variables were evaluated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. At surgery, 19 patients had BAV and 34 had TAV. CCT features including uneven cusp size, uneven cusp area, round-shaped systolic orifice, longer cusp fusion, and dilatation of ascending aorta were significantly associated with BAV (P < 0.05). In particular, fusion length (OR, 1.76; P = 0.001), uneven cusp area (OR, 10.46; P = 0.012), and midline calcification (OR, 0.08; P = 0.013) were strongly associated with BAV. CCT provides diagnostic clues that helps differentiate between BAV with raphe and TAV with commissural fusion in patients with severe AS. (orig.)

  20. Recovery from anemia in patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation--prevalence, predictors and clinical outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Arnous, Samer; Lønborg, Jacob;

    2014-01-01

    -recovery, while blood transfusion (OR 0.31, P = 0.038) and chronic kidney disease (CKD, OR 0.33, P = 0.043) were identified as negative predictors at, respectively, one and two years after TAVI. When compared to patients without baseline anemia, those anemic patients with Hb-recovery had a similar functional......INTRODUCTION: Preoperative anemia is common in patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and has been linked to a poorer outcome--including a higher 1-year mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of successful TAVI...... on baseline anemia. METHODS: A total of 253 patients who survived at least 1 year following TAVI were included in this study. The prevalence, predictors and clinical outcome of hemoglobin (Hb)-recovery were assessed. RESULTS: The prevalence of baseline anemia was 49% (n = 124)--recovery from anemia occurred...

  1. Percutaneous Implantation of the self-expanding valve Prosthesis a patient with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia severe aortic stenosis and porcelain aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahiner, Levent; Asil, Serkan; Kaya, Ergün Baris; Ozer, Necla; Aytemir, Kudret

    2016-10-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has shown favorable outcomes in patients with severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis who are at high surgical risk or inappropriate for open heart surgery. However, concerns exist over treating patients who have porcelain aorta and familial hypercholesterolemia, due to the potential complications of aortic root and aortic annulus. In this case report, we present a patient with familial hypercholesterolemia, symptomatic severe aortic stenosis, previous coronary artery bypass grafting and porcelain aorta, who was successfully treated with TAVI using a CoreValve. PMID:27393846

  2. Transfemoral aortic valve implantation for severe aortic stenosis in a patient with dextrocardia situs inversus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Richard I S; Morgan, Kenneth P; Brydie, Alan; Beydoun, Hussein K; Nadeem, S Najaf

    2014-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVR) has grown rapidly over the past 10 years. Device and delivery catheter systems have evolved to facilitate the procedure and reduce the risk of associated complications, including those related to vascular access. It is important to understand the utility of the TAVR equipment in patients with more challenging anatomy to select the most appropriate technique for this complex procedure. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of a patient with dextrocardia situs inversus and previous coronary artery bypass grafting who underwent TAVR from the femoral route using the Edwards SAPIEN XT Novaflex+ Transfemoral System (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA).

  3. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... conditions or other significant medical problems, the American College of Cardiology recommends aortic valve replacement for basically ... more likely we see aortic stenosis. Again, patient education is part of the evaluation and management of ...

  4. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... North Carolina. My name is John Streitman and I'm a cardiothoracic surgeon here at the Heart ... the corrective surgery of aortic valve replacement. If I have aortic stenosis, are there any activities that ...

  5. Aortic stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... has received chest radiation (such as for cancer treatment). Another cause is rheumatic fever. This condition can develop after strep throat or scarlet fever. Valve problems do not develop for 5 ...

  6. Structural and Histochemical Alterations in the Aortic Valves of Elderly Patients: A Comparative Study of Aortic Stenosis, Aortic Regurgitation, and Normal Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal the pathogenesis of aortic stenosis (AS) and regurgitation (AR) by comparing differences in mechanical and biochemical alterations. We applied scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) to measure the speed of sound (SOS) through valves to estimate the elasticity and monitor sensitivity to protease treatment, as the SOS is correlated with the stiffness of materials, which is reduced after digestion by proteases. The fibrosa of both the AS and AR groups were stiffer than the fibrosa of the normal group. The AR group displayed significantly stiffer fibrosa than the AS group, with the exception of calcified areas. The AS group showed significantly decreased SOS values following protease digestion, whereas the AR showed little reduction. The AS group presented type III collagen in the fibrosa and the ventricularis. In the AR group, both type I collagen and type III collagen coexisted in the fibrosa and the ventricularis. Upon immunostaining for advanced glycation end-products, the AS group showed sparse, weak staining, whereas the AR group presented a strong, band-like positive reaction in the fibrosa. In conclusion, tissue remodelling associated with damage and repair is associated with AS pathogenesis, whereas static chemical alterations with slow collagen turnover induce AR. PMID:27747234

  7. Modification of the secretion pattern of proteases, inflammatory mediators, and extracellular matrix proteins by human aortic valve is key in severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria; Martín-Rojas, Tatiana; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Calvo, Enrique; Gil-Dones, Felix; Dardé, Veronica M; Lopez-Almodovar, Luis F; Padial, Luis R; Lopez, Juan-Antonio; Vivanco, Fernando; Barderas, Maria G

    2013-09-01

    One of the major challenges in cardiovascular medicine is to identify candidate biomarker proteins. Secretome analysis is particularly relevant in this search as it focuses on a subset of proteins released by a cell or tissue under certain conditions. The sample can be considered as a plasma subproteome and it provides a more direct approximation to the in vivo situation. Degenerative aortic stenosis is the most common worldwide cause of valve replacement. Using a proteomic analysis of the secretome from aortic stenosis valves we could identify candidate markers related to this pathology, which may facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. For this purpose, we have designed a method to validate the origin of secreted proteins, demonstrating their synthesis and release by the tissue and ruling out blood origin. The nLC-MS/MS analysis showed the labeling of 61 proteins, 82% of which incorporated the label in only one group. Western blot and selective reaction monitoring differential analysis, revealed a notable role of the extracellular matrix. Variation in particular proteins such as PEDF, cystatin and clusterin emphasizes the link between aortic stenosis and atherosclerosis. In particular, certain proteins variation in secretome levels correlates well, not only with label incorporation trend (only labeled in aortic stenosis group) but, more importantly, with alterations found in plasma from an independent cohort of samples, pointing to specific candidate markers to follow up in diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic intervention.

  8. Modification of the secretion pattern of proteases, inflammatory mediators, and extracellular matrix proteins by human aortic valve is key in severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria; Martín-Rojas, Tatiana; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Calvo, Enrique; Gil-Dones, Felix; Dardé, Veronica M; Lopez-Almodovar, Luis F; Padial, Luis R; Lopez, Juan-Antonio; Vivanco, Fernando; Barderas, Maria G

    2013-09-01

    One of the major challenges in cardiovascular medicine is to identify candidate biomarker proteins. Secretome analysis is particularly relevant in this search as it focuses on a subset of proteins released by a cell or tissue under certain conditions. The sample can be considered as a plasma subproteome and it provides a more direct approximation to the in vivo situation. Degenerative aortic stenosis is the most common worldwide cause of valve replacement. Using a proteomic analysis of the secretome from aortic stenosis valves we could identify candidate markers related to this pathology, which may facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. For this purpose, we have designed a method to validate the origin of secreted proteins, demonstrating their synthesis and release by the tissue and ruling out blood origin. The nLC-MS/MS analysis showed the labeling of 61 proteins, 82% of which incorporated the label in only one group. Western blot and selective reaction monitoring differential analysis, revealed a notable role of the extracellular matrix. Variation in particular proteins such as PEDF, cystatin and clusterin emphasizes the link between aortic stenosis and atherosclerosis. In particular, certain proteins variation in secretome levels correlates well, not only with label incorporation trend (only labeled in aortic stenosis group) but, more importantly, with alterations found in plasma from an independent cohort of samples, pointing to specific candidate markers to follow up in diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic intervention. PMID:23704777

  9. Modification of the Secretion Pattern of Proteases, Inflammatory Mediators, and Extracellular Matrix Proteins by Human Aortic Valve is Key in Severe Aortic Stenosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria; Martín-Rojas, Tatiana; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Calvo, Enrique; Gil-Dones, Felix; Dardé, Veronica M.; Lopez-Almodovar, Luis F.; Padial, Luis R.; Lopez, Juan-Antonio; Vivanco, Fernando; Barderas, Maria G.

    2013-01-01

    One of the major challenges in cardiovascular medicine is to identify candidate biomarker proteins. Secretome analysis is particularly relevant in this search as it focuses on a subset of proteins released by a cell or tissue under certain conditions. The sample can be considered as a plasma subproteome and it provides a more direct approximation to the in vivo situation. Degenerative aortic stenosis is the most common worldwide cause of valve replacement. Using a proteomic analysis of the secretome from aortic stenosis valves we could identify candidate markers related to this pathology, which may facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. For this purpose, we have designed a method to validate the origin of secreted proteins, demonstrating their synthesis and release by the tissue and ruling out blood origin. The nLC-MS/MS analysis showed the labeling of 61 proteins, 82% of which incorporated the label in only one group. Western blot and selective reaction monitoring differential analysis, revealed a notable role of the extracellular matrix. Variation in particular proteins such as PEDF, cystatin and clusterin emphasizes the link between aortic stenosis and atherosclerosis. In particular, certain proteins variation in secretome levels correlates well, not only with label incorporation trend (only labeled in aortic stenosis group) but, more importantly, with alterations found in plasma from an independent cohort of samples, pointing to specific candidate markers to follow up in diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic intervention. PMID:23704777

  10. Externalization of a stiff guide wire via the radial artery: a new technique to facilitate advancement of an Inoue balloon across the aortic valve in patients with aortic stenosis undergoing antegrade balloon aortic valvuloplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hiroshi; Kubota, Shoichi; Goto, Takuya; Haba, Toshihiro; Yamamoto, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    An 84-year-old woman with aortic stenosis underwent antegrade balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV). After transseptal puncture, we introduced a 7-Fr wedge catheter into the left ventricle and across the aortic valve. We then inserted a 0.032-inch soft guide wire, and the tip of the guide wire was advanced into the brachial artery and exchanged for a stiff guide wire. We externalized the tip of the stiff guide wire from the radial artery. Finally, we advanced an Inoue balloon (Toray, Tokyo, Japan) across the aortic valve and inflated the balloon. Transradial externalization makes antegrade BAV an even less invasive procedure. PMID:25862651

  11. Left ventricular filling pressure estimation at rest and during exercise in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis: comparison of echocardiographic and invasive measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Morten; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Pecini, Redi;

    2009-01-01

    , measured invasively as pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), at rest and during exercise to describe the relation with E/e' in patients with severe aortic stenosis. METHODS: Twenty-eight patients with an aortic valve areascm(2) performed a multistage supine bicycle exercise test until exhaustion...

  12. Interventional treatment of common congenital heart diseases: the common view of Chinese medical experts. Part Four: Percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty for pulmonary and aortic valve stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty has become the treatment of first choice for pulmonary valve stenosis. Congenital aortic valve stenosis can also be relieved by percutaneous balloon dilatation. Percutaneous valvuloplasty is indicated for patients with isolated pulmonary valve stenosis when the transvalvular peak systolic pressure gradient is over 40 mmHg and for patients with aortic valve stenosis when the pressure gradient exceeds 60 mmHg. A careful selection of patients, standardized procedure, individualized selection of the balloon type, size and length, and careful avoidance of any damage to chorda tendineae and to surrounding tissue are keys to achieving a successful procedure. Balloon valvuloplasty should be selectively performed in new-born and in infant since complications of the procedure are inversely related to age. (authors)

  13. Commercial versus PARTNER study experience with the transfemoral Edwards SAPIEN valve for inoperable patients with severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendyala, Lakshmana K; Minha, Sa'ar; Barbash, Israel M; Torguson, Rebecca; Magalhaes, Marco A; Okubagzi, Petros; Loh, Joshua P; Chen, Fang; Satler, Lowell F; Pichard, Augusto D; Waksman, Ron

    2014-01-15

    In patients with aortic stenosis who cannot have surgery, transcatheter aortic valve replacement using the Edwards SAPIEN valve has been shown to improve survival rate and is approved for commercial use in the United States. This study aims to assess the clinical profile, procedural characteristics, and in-hospital complications in patients treated with a commercial SAPIEN valve outside the clinical trial context. We retrospectively analyzed 69 consecutive patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement with a commercial SAPIEN valve compared with 55 Placement of AoRTic traNscathetER valves (PARTNER) trial patients from cohort B enrolled in the same institution by the same Heart Team. Compared with the commercial group, patients in the PARTNER cohort B had higher mean Society of Thoracic Surgeons score (10 ± 5 vs 9 ± 4, p = 0.04) and a lower rate of peripheral arterial disease (19% vs 44%, p = 0.004). Most patients in the commercial group had the procedure under conscious sedation (83% vs 66%, p = 0.03). Planned surgical cut down for vascular access was rare in the commercial group (1.4% vs 46%, p length of hospitalization (p length of stay (p = 0.01) was shorter in the commercial group. In conclusion, transfemoral commercial use of the Edwards SAPIEN valve for inoperable patients shows similar in-hospital mortality and stroke rates compared with PARTNER cohort B. The refinements in the procedure such as more conscious sedation, experience of the operators, and careful vascular planning in the commercial group led to lesser vascular and bleeding complications and shorter length of stay. PMID:24220281

  14. Evaluation of aortic valve stenosis by cardiac multislice computed tomography compared with echocardiography: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdulla, Jawdat; Sivertsen, Jacob Christian; Kofoed, Klaus Fuglsang;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY: It has not yet been established whether multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) is reliable for the quantification of aortic valve area (AVA) in patients with aortic valve stenosis (AVS) and simultaneously for assessment of the coronary anatomy. The study aim, via...... a systematic literature review and meta-analysis, was to explore whether MSCT is a reliable method for AVA quantification, and simultaneously to assess the coronary anatomy in patients with AVS. METHODS: A comprehensive systematic literature search and meta-analysis was conducted that included 14 studies...... with invasive coronary angiography. RESULTS: The AVA was measured by MSCT and TTE in all 14 studies, and by TEE in four studies. The results of the meta-analyses showed that planimetry by MSCT overestimated the AVA, with a bias of 0.08 (95% CI 0.04, 0.13) cm2) (p = 0.0001) compared to TTE. The MSCT measurement...

  15. A comparison of echocardiographic and electron beam computed tomographic assessment of aortic valve area in patients with valvular aortic stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piers, Lieuwe H.; Dikkers, Riksta; Tio, Rene A.; van den Berg, Maarten P.; Willems, Tineke P.; Zijlstra, Felix; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare electron beam computed tomography (EBT) with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) in determining aortic valve area (AVA). Thirty patients (9 females, 21 males) underwent a contrast-enhanced EBT scan (e-Speed, GE, San Francisco, CA, USA) and TTE within 17 +/-

  16. Prognostic value of multi-detector computed tomography in asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Kofoed, Klaus Fuglsang; Carstensen, Helle Gervig;

    2016-01-01

    was defined as indication for aortic valve replacement (AVR) determined by the treating physician or sudden cardiac death. RESULTS: The mean age was 72 (8) years, 27% were women, mean AVA by TTE was 1.01 (0.30) cm(2). Median follow up time was 27 (IQR 19-44) months. Forty seven patients (41%) developed...... indication for AVR. No patients suffered a sudden cardiac death. AVA and aortic valve calcification were significant univariable predictors of AVR when measured by both TTE and MDCT, whereas left ventricular mass was only significant measured by MDCT. Significant coronary artery disease by MDCT tended...... to predict future indication for AVR, but this did not reach statistical significance (HR: 1.79 (95% CI 0.96-3.44), p=0.08). CONCLUSION: MDCT derived AVA can be of use as an alternative to TTE derived AVA in patients with asymptomatic AS to predict future clinical indication for AVR....

  17. Recent developments for surgical aortic valve replacement: the concept of sutureless valve technology

    OpenAIRE

    Carrel, Thierry; Englberger, Lars; Stalder, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Aortic stenosis has become the most frequent type of valvular heart disease in Europe and North America and presents in the large majority of patients as calcified aortic stenosis in adults of advanced age. Surgical aortic valve replacement has been recognized to be the definitive therapy which improves considerably survival for severe aortic stenosis since more than 40 years. In the most recent period, operative mortality of isolated aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis varies betwee...

  18. Valvular Aortic Stenosis: A Proteomic Insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Vivanco

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Calcified aortic valve disease is a slowly progressive disorder that ranges from mild valve thickening with no obstruction of blood flow, known as aortic sclerosis, to severe calcification with impaired leaflet motion or aortic stenosis. In the present work we describe a rapid, reproducible and effective method to carry out proteomic analysis of stenotic human valves by conventional 2-DE and 2D-DIGE, minimizing the interference due to high calcium concentrations. Furthermore, the protocol permits the aortic stenosis proteome to be analysed, advancing our knowledge in this area. Summary: Until recently, aortic stenosis (AS was considered a passive process secondary to calcium deposition in the aortic valves. However, it has recently been highlighted that the risk factors associated with the development of calcified AS in the elderly are similar to those of coronary artery disease. Furthermore, degenerative AS shares histological characteristics with atherosclerotic plaques, leading to the suggestion that calcified aortic valve disease is a chronic inflammatory process similar to atherosclerosis. Nevertheless, certain data does not fit with this theory making it necessary to further study this pathology. The aim of this study is to develop an effective protein extraction protocol for aortic stenosis valves such that proteomic analyses can be performed on these structures. In the present work we have defined a rapid, reproducible and effective method to extract proteins and that is compatible with 2-DE, 2D-DIGE and MS techniques. Defining the protein profile of this tissue is an important and challenging task that will help to understand the mechanisms of physiological/pathological processes in aortic stenosis valves.

  19. Stroke in Patients With Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders Møller; Dalsgaard, Morten; Bang, Casper N;

    2014-01-01

    , and poststroke survival a secondary outcome. Cox models treating AVR as a time-varying covariate were adjusted for atrial fibrillation and congestive heart failure, hypertension, age≥75 years, diabetes mellitus, stroke/transient ischemic attack, vascular disease, age 65-74 years and female sex (CHA2DS2-VASc......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: There are limited data on risk stratification of stroke in aortic stenosis. This study examined predictors of stroke in aortic stenosis, the prognostic implications of stroke, and how aortic valve replacement (AVR) with or without concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting...... influenced the predicted outcomes. METHODS: Patients with mild-to-moderate aortic stenosis enrolled in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study. Diabetes mellitus, known atherosclerotic disease, and oral anticoagulation were exclusion criteria. Ischemic stroke was the primary end point...

  20. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a patient with bicuspid aortic stenosis and a borderline-sized annulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colkesen, Yucel; Baykan, Oytun; Dagdelen, Sinan; Cayli, Murat

    2015-11-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is currently considered an exclusion criterion for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The risk of adverse aortic events such as incomplete sealing, severe paravalvular regurgitation or dislocation due to elliptic shape and asymmetric calcifications in annulus are higher in TAVI. In this case report, we detailed a case of successful trans-femoral TAVI in a 51-year old male with BAV and its management without in-hospital and 30-day complications. The challenge in this case was the patient's anatomy with a 27-mm annulus for balloon expandable device. The applied strategy was balloon sizing and overdilating the 29-mm stented valve with additional volume that obviated re-ballooning. Trans-femoral TAVI was performed uneventfully under fluoroscopic and transoesophageal echocardiography guidance. A multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) evaluation at 1 month did not show device dislodgement or any other complications. Evidence for evaluation post-TAVI is not sufficient in BAV. We believe patients with BAV should undergo a comprehensive assessment after TAVI including MDCT evaluation. PMID:26265070

  1. New-Onset Atrial Fibrillation After Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Troels Højsgaard; Thygesen, Julie Bjerre; Thyregod, Hans Gustav;

    2015-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and, more recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have been shown to be the only treatments that can improve the natural cause of severe aortic valve stenosis. However, after SAVR and TAVI, the incidence of new-onset atrial fibrillation...

  2. New-onset atrial fibrillation after surgical aortic valve replacement and transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Troels Højsgaard; Thygesen, Julie Bjerre; Thyregod, Hans Gustav;

    2015-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and, more recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have been shown to be the only treatments that can improve the natural cause of severe aortic valve stenosis. However, after SAVR and TAVI, the incidence of new-onset atrial fibrillation...

  3. The nordic aortic valve intervention (NOTION) trial comparing transcatheter versus surgical valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Søndergaard, Lars; Ihlemann, Nikolaj;

    2013-01-01

    Degenerative aortic valve (AV) stenosis is the most prevalent heart valve disease in the western world. Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) has until recently been the standard of treatment for patients with severe AV stenosis. Whether transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) can...

  4. Heart Team therapeutic decision-making and treatment in severe aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav Hørsted; Holmberg, Fredrik; Gerds, Thomas Alexander;

    2016-01-01

    %), and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in 392 (81%) of patients. In patients referred to intervention, TAVI compared with SAVR patients were older (OR = 1.17 per year, 95% CI 1.09-1.26; p coronary artery bypass surgery (OR = 385, 79-2738; p obesity (OR = 4.69, 1.......51-13.77; p disease (COPD) (OR = 3.66, 1.21-10.75; p = 0.02). MT patients compared with patients referred to any intervention were older, had a higher prevalence of COPD, peripheral arterial disease, previous myocardial infarction, and cerebrovascular disease...

  5. Percutaneous implantation of self-expandable aortic valve in high risk patients with severe aortic stenosis: The first experiences in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedeljković Milan A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Aortic stenosis (AS is the most common valvular heart disease in elderly people, with rather poor prognosis in symptomatic patients. Surgical valve replacement is the therapy of choice, but a significant number of patients cannot undergo surgical procedure. We presented initial experience of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI performed in Catheterization Laboratory of the Clinic for Cardiology, Clinical Center of Serbia. Methods. The procedures were performed in 5 patients (mean age 76 ± 6 years, 2 males, 3 female with severe and symptomatic AS with contraindication to surgery or high surgical risk. The decision to perform TAVI was made by the heart team. Pre-procedure screening included detailed clinical and echocardiographic evaluation, coronary angiography and computed tomography scan. In all the patients we implanted a self-expandable aortic valve (Core Valve, Medtronic, USA. Six months follow-up was available for all the patients. Results. All interventions were successfully performed without significant periprocedural complications. Immediate hemodynamic improvement was obtained in all the patients (peak gradient 94.2 ± 27.6 to 17.6 ± 5.2 mmHg, p < 0.001, mean pressure gradient 52.8 ± 14.5 to 8.0 ± 2.1 mmHg, p < 0.001. None of the patients developed heart block, stroke, vascular complication or significant aortic regurgitation. After 6 months, the survival was 100% with New York Heart Association (NYHA functional improvement in all the patients. Conclusion. This successful initial experience provides a solid basis to treat larger number of patients with symptomatic AS and high surgical risk who are left untreated. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON 175 020

  6. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in a Nonagenarian

    OpenAIRE

    Kneitz, Abby; Clifton, William; Kar, Biswajit; Delgado, Reynolds M.

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 30% to 40% of elderly patients with severe, symptomatic aortic valve stenosis are deemed ineligible for surgery because of high perioperative risk. We describe the use of an alternative transfemoral approach known as transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a nonagenarian patient with severe aortic stenosis. Our patient recovered successfully, and by the time of her most recent follow-up visit, 7 months after the procedure, she had regained a substantial degree of function. Th...

  7. High sensitivity C reactive protein as a prognostic marker in patients with mild to moderate aortic valve stenosis during lipid-lowering treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blyme, Adam; Asferg, Camilla; Nielsen, Olav W;

    2015-01-01

    measured lipids and hsCRP at baseline and after 1 year of treatment and registered during 4 years of follow-up major cardiovascular events (MCE) composed of ischaemic cardiovascular events (ICE) and aortic valve-related events (AVE). Simvastatin/ezetimibe reduced low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (3......AIMS: To assess the prognostic importance of high-sensitive C reactive protein (hsCRP) in patients with mild to moderate aortic valve stenosis during placebo or simvastatin/ezetimibe treatment in Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS). METHODS AND RESULTS: In 1620 SEAS patients, we...... of MCE (HR=1.34(1.09 to 1.64), p=0.02). The prognostic benefit of reduction in hsCRP after 1 year was significantly larger (phigh versus low baseline hsCRP; hence, a reduction in hsCRP abolished the difference in incidence of MCE between high versus low baseline hs...

  8. Left Atrial Volume as Predictor of Valve Replacement and Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Asymptomatic Mild to Moderate Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Morten; Egstrup, Kenneth; Wachtell, Kristian;

    2013-01-01

    Left atrial (LA) size is known to increase with chronically increased left ventricular (LV) filling pressure. We hypothesized that LA volume was predictive of aortic valve replacement (AVR) and cardiovascular events in a large cohort of patients with asymptomatic mild to moderate aortic valve ste...

  9. Intensive lipid lowering with simvastatin and ezetimibe in aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossebo, A.B.; Pedersen, T.R.; Boman, K.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hyperlipidemia has been suggested as a risk factor for stenosis of the aortic valve, but lipid-lowering studies have had conflicting results. METHODS: We conducted a randomized, double-blind trial involving 1873 patients with mild-to-moderate, asymptomatic aortic stenosis. The patients...

  10. Comparison of 1-Year Outcome in Patients With Severe Aorta Stenosis Treated Conservatively or by Aortic Valve Replacement or by Percutaneous Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (Data from a Multicenter Spanish Registry).

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Saldivar, Hugo; Rodriguez-Pascual, Carlos; de la Morena, Gonzalo; Fernández-Golfín, Covadonga; Amorós, Carmen; Alonso, Mario Baquero; Dolz, Luis Martínez; Solé, Albert Ariza; Guzmán-Martínez, Gabriela; Gómez-Doblas, Juan José; Jiménez, Antonio Arribas; Fuentes, María Eugenia; Gay, Laura Galian; Ortiz, Martin Ruiz; Avanzas, Pablo; Abu-Assi, Emad; Ripoll-Vera, Tomás; Díaz-Castro, Oscar; Osinalde, Eduardo P; Martínez-Sellés, Manuel

    2016-07-15

    The factors that influence decision making in severe aortic stenosis (AS) are unknown. Our aim was to assess, in patients with severe AS, the determinants of management and prognosis in a multicenter registry that enrolled all consecutive adults with severe AS during a 1-month period. One-year follow-up was obtained in all patients and included vital status and aortic valve intervention (aortic valve replacement [AVR] and transcatheter aortic valve implantation [TAVI]). A total of 726 patients were included, mean age was 77.3 ± 10.6 years, and 377 were women (51.8%). The most common management was conservative therapy in 468 (64.5%) followed by AVR in 199 (27.4%) and TAVI in 59 (8.1%). The strongest association with aortic valve intervention was patient management in a tertiary hospital with cardiac surgery (odds ratio 2.7, 95% confidence interval 1.8 to 4.1, p <0.001). The 2 main reasons to choose conservative management were the absence of significant symptoms (136% to 29.1%) and the presence of co-morbidity (128% to 27.4%). During 1-year follow-up, 132 patients died (18.2%). The main causes of death were heart failure (60% to 45.5%) and noncardiac diseases (46% to 34.9%). One-year survival for patients treated conservatively, with TAVI, and with AVR was 76.3%, 94.9%, and 92.5%, respectively, p <0.001. One-year survival of patients treated conservatively in the absence of significant symptoms was 97.1%. In conclusion, most patients with severe AS are treated conservatively. The outcome in asymptomatic patients managed conservatively was acceptable. Management in tertiary hospitals is associated with valve intervention. One-year survival was similar with both interventional strategies.

  11. Comparison of 1-Year Outcome in Patients With Severe Aorta Stenosis Treated Conservatively or by Aortic Valve Replacement or by Percutaneous Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (Data from a Multicenter Spanish Registry).

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Saldivar, Hugo; Rodriguez-Pascual, Carlos; de la Morena, Gonzalo; Fernández-Golfín, Covadonga; Amorós, Carmen; Alonso, Mario Baquero; Dolz, Luis Martínez; Solé, Albert Ariza; Guzmán-Martínez, Gabriela; Gómez-Doblas, Juan José; Jiménez, Antonio Arribas; Fuentes, María Eugenia; Gay, Laura Galian; Ortiz, Martin Ruiz; Avanzas, Pablo; Abu-Assi, Emad; Ripoll-Vera, Tomás; Díaz-Castro, Oscar; Osinalde, Eduardo P; Martínez-Sellés, Manuel

    2016-07-15

    The factors that influence decision making in severe aortic stenosis (AS) are unknown. Our aim was to assess, in patients with severe AS, the determinants of management and prognosis in a multicenter registry that enrolled all consecutive adults with severe AS during a 1-month period. One-year follow-up was obtained in all patients and included vital status and aortic valve intervention (aortic valve replacement [AVR] and transcatheter aortic valve implantation [TAVI]). A total of 726 patients were included, mean age was 77.3 ± 10.6 years, and 377 were women (51.8%). The most common management was conservative therapy in 468 (64.5%) followed by AVR in 199 (27.4%) and TAVI in 59 (8.1%). The strongest association with aortic valve intervention was patient management in a tertiary hospital with cardiac surgery (odds ratio 2.7, 95% confidence interval 1.8 to 4.1, p <0.001). The 2 main reasons to choose conservative management were the absence of significant symptoms (136% to 29.1%) and the presence of co-morbidity (128% to 27.4%). During 1-year follow-up, 132 patients died (18.2%). The main causes of death were heart failure (60% to 45.5%) and noncardiac diseases (46% to 34.9%). One-year survival for patients treated conservatively, with TAVI, and with AVR was 76.3%, 94.9%, and 92.5%, respectively, p <0.001. One-year survival of patients treated conservatively in the absence of significant symptoms was 97.1%. In conclusion, most patients with severe AS are treated conservatively. The outcome in asymptomatic patients managed conservatively was acceptable. Management in tertiary hospitals is associated with valve intervention. One-year survival was similar with both interventional strategies. PMID:27239021

  12. Transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis surgically replaced 4 months after implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Lund, Jens Teglgaard; Engstrøm, Thomas;

    2010-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a new and rapidly evolving treatment option for high-risk surgical patients with degenerative aortic valve stenosis. Long-term results with these new valve prostheses are lacking, and potential valve dysfunction and failure would require valve replacement....... We report the first case of surgical valve replacement in a patient with a dysfunctional transcatheter-implanted aortic valve prosthesis 4 months after implantation....

  13. Transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis surgically replaced 4 months after implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Lund, Jens Teglgaard; Engstrøm, Thomas;

    2010-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a new and rapidly evolving treatment option for high-risk surgical patients with degenerative aortic valve stenosis. Long-term results with these new valve prostheses are lacking, and potential valve dysfunction and failure would require valve replacemen....... We report the first case of surgical valve replacement in a patient with a dysfunctional transcatheter-implanted aortic valve prosthesis 4 months after implantation....

  14. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement in elderly patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dimytri Siqueira; Alexandre Abizaid; Magaly Arrais J.; Eduardo Sousa

    2012-01-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common native valve disease, affecting up to 5% of the elderly population. Surgical aortic valve replacement reduces symptoms and improves survival, and is the definitive therapy in patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis. However, despite the good results of classic surgery, risk is markedly increased in elderly patients with co-morbidities. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) allows implantation of a prosthetic heart valve within the diseased native aortic valve without the need for open heart surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass, offering a new therapeutic option to elderly patients considered at high surgical risk or with contraindications to surgery. To date, several multicenter registries and a randomized trial have confirmed the safety and efficacy of TAVR in those patients. In this chapter, we review the background and clinical applications of TAVR in elderly patients.

  15. Flow and peak velocity measurements in patients with aortic valve stenosis using phase contrast MR accelerated with k-t BLAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the accuracy of velocity measurements in patients with aortic valve stenosis using phase contrast (PC) imaging accelerated with SENSE (Sensitivity Encoding) and k-t BLAST (Broad-use Linear Acquisition Speed-up Technique). Methods: Accelerated quantitative breath hold PC measurements, using SENSE and k-t BLAST, were performed in twelve patients whose aortic valve stenosis had been initially diagnosed using echocardiography. Stroke volume (SV) and peak velocity measurements were performed on each subject in three adjacent slices using both accelerating methods. Results: The peak velocities measured with PC MRI using SENSE were −8.0 ± 9.5% lower (p 0.05). Conclusions: In this study higher peak velocities were measured in patients with aortic stenosis when combining k-t BLAST with PC MRI compared to PC MRI using SENSE. A probable explanation of this difference is the higher temporal resolution achieved in the k-t BLAST measurement. There was, however, no significant difference between calculated SV based on PC MRI using SENSE and k-t BLAST, respectively

  16. Predictors of exercise capacity and symptoms in severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Morten; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Pecini, Redi;

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the association between invasive and non-invasive estimates of left ventricular (LV) filling pressure and exercise capacity, in order to find new potential candidates for risk markers in severe aortic valve stenosis (AS).......This study investigated the association between invasive and non-invasive estimates of left ventricular (LV) filling pressure and exercise capacity, in order to find new potential candidates for risk markers in severe aortic valve stenosis (AS)....

  17. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... opens freely when the heart contracts. On the right, we see a picture of the aortic valve ... the aortic valve because the probe is sitting right behind the aortic valve. Lots of patients on ...

  18. Diffuse Supravalvular Aortic Stenosis: Surgical Repair in Adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Ferlan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 54-year-old woman in which a diffuse congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS was associated with a severe aortic valve incompetence and heavy calcification of the aortic annulus. Repair consisted in resection of the ascending aorta, patch augmentation of the hypoplastic aortic root and annulus, placement of a 20 mm Dacron tubular graft (Vascutek, Renfrewshire, UK and aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis (Sorin, Turin, Italy. Follow-up echocardiography demonstrated normal prosthetic valve function and a postoperative three-dimensional computed tomographic scan showed a normal shape of the reconstructed ascending aorta.

  19. Outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation: transfemoral versus transapical approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ewe, S.H.; Delgado, V.; Ng, A.C.; Antoni, M.L.; Kley, F. van der; Marsan, N.A.; Weger, A. de; Tavilla, G.; Holman, E.R.; Schalij, M.J.; Bax, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is commonly implanted through a transfemoral (TFA) or transapical approach (TAA) for patients with severe aortic stenosis. This study aimed to describe the clinical and echocardiographic outcomes of TFA versus TAA. METHODS: Clinical and echocardiog

  20. Transcatheter, valve-in-valve transapical aortic and mitral valve implantation, in a high risk patient with aortic and mitral prosthetic valve stenoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter valve implantation continues to grow worldwide and has been used principally for the nonsurgical management of native aortic valvular disease-as a potentially less invasive method of valve replacement in high-risk and inoperable patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. Given the burden of valvular heart disease in the general population and the increasing numbers of patients who have had previous valve operations, we are now seeing a growing number of high-risk patients presenting with prosthetic valve stenosis, who are not potential surgical candidates. For this high-risk subset transcatheter valve delivery may be the only option. Here, we present an inoperable patient with severe, prosthetic valve aortic and mitral stenosis who was successfully treated with a trans catheter based approach, with a valve-in-valve implantation procedure of both aortic and mitral valves.

  1. DEGENERATIVE AORTIC STENOSIS: PATHOGENESIS AND NEW PRINCIPLES OF TREATMENT

    OpenAIRE

    O. V. Andropova; V. N. Anokhin

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To reveal of markers of inflammation and progression of calcification in patients with degenerative aortic stenosis (DAS). Material and methods. A single-stage study was done in 85 patients with degenerative calcification of aortic valve (42 patients with DAS and 43 patients without DAS). The techniques for assessing the severity of aortic valve calcification included ultrasonic diagnostics and multislice spiral computed tomography. Markers of inflammation and lipid profile were investig...

  2. LV reverse remodeling imparted by aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis; is it durable? A cardiovascular MRI study sponsored by the American Heart Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caruppannan Ketheswaram

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS, long-term data tracking surgically induced effects of afterload reduction on reverse LV remodeling are not available. Echocardiographic data is available short term, but in limited fashion beyond one year. Cardiovascular MRI (CMR offers the ability to serially track changes in LV metrics with small numbers due to its inherent high spatial resolution and low variability. Hypothesis We hypothesize that changes in LV structure and function following aortic valve replacement (AVR are detectable by CMR and once triggered by AVR, continue for an extended period. Methods Tweny-four patients of which ten (67 ± 12 years, 6 female with severe, but compensated AS underwent CMR pre-AVR, 6 months, 1 year and up to 4 years post-AVR. 3D LV mass index, volumetrics, LV geometry, and EF were measured. Results All patients survived AVR and underwent CMR 4 serial CMR's. LVMI markedly decreased by 6 months (157 ± 42 to 134 ± 32 g/m2, p 2. Similarly, EF increased pre to post-AVR (55 ± 22 to 65 ± 11%,(p 2. LV stroke volume increased rapidly from pre to post-AVR (40 ± 11 to 44 ± 7 ml, p Conclusion After initial beneficial effects imparted by AVR in severe AS patients, there are, as expected, marked improvements in LV reverse remodeling. Via CMR, surgically induced benefits to LV structure and function are durable and, unexpectedly express continued, albeit markedly incomplete improvement through 4 years post-AVR concordant with sustained improved clinical status. This supports down-regulation of both mRNA and MMP activity acutely with robust suppression long term.

  3. Immunological markers of frailty predict outcomes beyond current risk scores in aortic stenosis following transcatheter aortic valve replacement: Role of neopterin and tryptophan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Csordas

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: Increased immune activation and associated tryptophan degradation serve as hallmarks of frailty underscoring the prognostic role of baseline inflammation for outcome in patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing TAVR, and thus may provide a future therapeuthic target in this elderly patient population.

  4. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to help prevent aortic stenosis? There's no prophylactic methods that anybody can take to prevent aortic stenosis ... it will be archived on the ORlive Web site and ORlive.com and, of course, a link ...

  5. Immediate post-operative responses to transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Nielsen, Susanne; Lisby, Karen H.;

    2015-01-01

    Background:Conventional treatment for patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis is surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR), but transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become a reliable alternative in high-risk patients.Aims:The aim of our study was to describe the post...

  6. The German Aortic Valve Registry (GARY): in-hospital outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Hamm, Christian W.; Möllmann, Helge; Holzhey, David; Beckmann, Andreas; Veit, Christof; Figulla, Hans-Reiner; Cremer, J; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Lange, Rüdiger; Zahn, Ralf; Sack, Stefan; Schuler, Gerhard; Walther, Thomas; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Böhm, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background Aortic stenosis is a frequent valvular disease especially in elderly patients. Catheter-based valve implantation has emerged as a valuable treatment approach for these patients being either at very high risk for conventional surgery or even deemed inoperable. The German Aortic Valve Registry (GARY) provides data on conventional and catheter-based aortic procedures on an all-comers basis. Methods and results A total of 13 860 consecutive patients undergoing repair for aortic valve d...

  7. Has percutaneous aortic valve replacement taken center stage in the treatment of aortic valve disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Gideon Praveen; Cui, Fangsen; Mathew, Lazar; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2013-01-01

    Modern biomedical advances have propelled percutaneous valve replacement into an effective and powerful therapy for many heart valve diseases, especially aortic valve stenosis. Experiences so far suggest that outcomes for new percutaneous valve replacement surgery compare favorably with that of traditional valve surgery in selected patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. The inception of percutaneous aortic valve replacement (PAVR) began in 1992 when the potential for treating valve diseases was demonstrated through a modern technique of endoluminal deployment of a catheter-mounted crimped stented heart valve in an animal model. The first successful demonstration of such novel technique of surgical replacement of a heart valve was performed in 2002, when valve implantation in a patient with aortic stenosis was reported. Despite initial stumbles and a perception of being an uphill task, PAVR has emerged as one of the breakthroughs in surgical procedures. More than 1500 citations were found in PubMed, half of which were available after 2011. This is primarily because more than 50,000 procedures are being performed in more than 40 countries worldwide, with encouraging outcomes, and several stented valves have been launched in the market. This review provides a detailed analysis of the current state of the art of PAVR. Moreover, a competitive landscape of various devices available in the market and their design considerations, biomaterial selections, and overall hemodynamic performance are presented. PMID:24941416

  8. A Clinicopathological Study on Aortic Valves in Children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Ping; WANG Hongwei; ZHANG Zhenlu; HU Xiufen; LI Yanping; CHENG Peixuan; LIU Jianying

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the clinicopathological characteristics of aortic valve disease in children, all the native surgically excised aortic valves obtained between January 2003 and December 2005 were studied macroscopically and microscopically. The patients' medical records were reviewed and the clinical information was extracted. According to preoperative echocardiography, intraoperative assessment, and postoperative pathology, combined with clinical symptoms and signs, aortic valve diseases were divided into three categories: aortic stenosis (AS), aortic insufficiency (AI), and aortic stenosis with insufficiency (AS-AI). The etiology was determined according to the macroscopic, microscopic and clinical findings. The results showed that among 70 aortic valves, patient age ranged from 6 to 18 years, with a mean of 15.4 years, and there were 56 boys and 14 girts (male: female=4:1). Forty-four children only had pure aortic valve disease, and the other 26 children had aortic valve disease associated with other heart valve diseases. There were 5 cases of AS (7.14%), 60 cases of AI (85.71%) and 5 cases of AS-AI (7.14%). The causes were congenital aortic valve malformation (32 cases, 45.71%), rheumatic disease (28 cases, 40%), infective endocarditis (7 cases,10%), Marfan syndrome (2 cases, 2.86%), and undetermined (1 case, 1.43%). It was concluded that the common causes of aortic valve disease in order of frequency in children were congenital aortic valve malformation, rheumatic disease, infective endocarditis, and Marfan syndrome. AI was more common in children with aortic valve disease. Compared with adult patients, congenital bicuspid aortic valve in children was often AI. Histologically, the leaflets of congenital bicuspid aortic valve were mainly myxomatous, fibrosis and calcification less seen. AI was frequently found in rheumatic disease, mostly associated with other heart valve diseases. Macroscopic and microscopic examinations together with clinical

  9. Detection of coronary artery disease by thallium imaging using a combined intravenous dipyridamole and isometric handgrip test in patients with aortic valve stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huikuri, H.V.; Korhonen, U.R.; Ikaeheimo, M.J.H.; Heikkilae, J.T.; Takkunen, J.T.

    1987-02-01

    Detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with aortic valve stenosis (AS) is clinically difficult. Thallium-201 images were generated in 27 patients with AS during combined intravenous dipyridamole and handgrip test, which induces a marked acute increase in coronary blood flow. Isolated AS was noted in 21 patients and combined AS and aortic regurgitation in 6. Thirteen patients had more than 50% diameter stenosis in 1 or more coronary arteries on angiography. Eleven of them had reversible perfusion defects on post-stress thallium scans (sensitivity 85%). Two patients had thallium defects without angiographic evidence of significant CAD (specificity 86%). In the other 12 patients with normal coronary angiographic findings, the thallium scans were normal. Two patients had dizziness and hypotension after dipyridamole infusion, which disappeared during the handgrip test; 2 others had chest pain during handgrip. One of them was treated with aminophylline and the other with aminophylline and nitroglycerin. No other adverse effects were reported by the patients and no major complications occurred during stress testing. Thus, thallium imaging during combined intravenous dipyridamole and handgrip test appears to be a promising noninvasive method of revealing CAD in patients with AS.

  10. Factors influencing long-term survival after aortic valve replacement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigenobu,Masaharu

    1980-06-01

    Full Text Available In the aortic stenosis group, the left ventricular (LV muscle mass index was a good parameter for predicting the prognosis. Associated mitral valve disease had no influence on long term survival after aortic valve replacement. In the aortic insufficiency group, associated mitral valve disease had a marked influence on the results of aortic valve replacement. In general, the aortic insufficiency group had less clinical improvement postoperatively than the aortic stenosis group. In the annuloaortic ectasia group, left ventricular enddiastolic pressure (LVEDP might be the predictor to the prognosis. This group had the worst prognosis, of the three groups. Early operation should be considered for patients who have no, or only mild symptoms of, aortic valve disease.

  11. Prognostic utility of biomarkers in predicting of one-year outcomes in patients with aortic stenosis treated with transcatheter or surgical aortic valve implantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Parenica

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of the work was to find biomarkers identifying patients at high risk of adverse clinical outcomes after TAVI and SAVR in addition to currently used predictive model (EuroSCORE. BACKGROUND: There is limited data about the role of biomarkers in predicting prognosis, especially when TAVI is available. METHODS: The multi-biomarker sub-study included 42 consecutive high-risk patients (average age 82.0 years; logistic EuroSCORE 21.0% allocated to TAVI transfemoral and transapical using the Edwards-Sapien valve (n = 29, or SAVR with the Edwards Perimount bioprosthesis (n = 13. Standardized endpoints were prospectively followed during the 12-month follow-up. RESULTS: The clinical outcomes after both TAVI and SAVR were comparable. Malondialdehyde served as the best predictor of a combined endpoint at 1 year with AUC (ROC analysis = 0.872 for TAVI group, resp. 0.765 (p<0.05 for both TAVI and SAVR groups. Increased levels of MDA, matrix metalloproteinase 2, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP1, ferritin-reducing ability of plasma, homocysteine, cysteine and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine were all predictors of the occurrence of combined safety endpoints at 30 days (AUC 0.750-0.948; p<0.05 for all. The addition of MDA to a currently used clinical model (EuroSCORE significantly improved prediction of a combined safety endpoint at 30 days and a combined endpoint (0-365 days by the net reclassification improvement (NRI and the integrated discrimination improvement (IDI (p<0.05. Cystatin C, glutathione, cysteinylglycine, asymmetric dimethylarginine, nitrite/nitrate and MMP9 did not prove to be significant. Total of 14.3% died during 1-year follow-up. CONCLUSION: We identified malondialdehyde, a marker of oxidative stress, as the most promising predictor of adverse outcomes during the 30-day and 1-year follow-up in high-risk patients with symptomatic, severe aortic stenosis treated with TAVI. The development of a clinical

  12. Infective endocarditis following transcatheter aortic valve replacement-

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loh, Poay Huan; Bundgaard, Henning; S�ndergaard, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) can improve the symptoms and prognosis of patients with severe aortic stenosis who, due to a high expected operative risk, would not have otherwise been treated surgically. If these patients develop prosthetic valve endocarditis, their presentations may...... be atypical causing a delay in the diagnosis and treatment. The management is also complicated by their comorbidities, and surgical treatment may not be feasible leading to a significant morbidity and mortality. We describe a case of an 85-year-old man with TAVI prosthetic valve endocarditis successfully...

  13. Assessment of coronary artery disease using coronary computed tomography angiography in patients with aortic valve stenosis referred for surgical aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Kofoed, K Fuglsang; Dalsgaard, M;

    2013-01-01

    were performed blinded to each other. RESULTS: The mean±SD age of the included patients was 71±9years and 59% were male. The prevalence of significant coronary artery stenosis >70% by ICA was 36%. Average heart rate during coronary CTA was 65±16bpm. In a patient based analysis 94% of the patients (171...

  14. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of that slide, that demonstrates that patients with New York Heart Association class heart failure 1 and ... right down the aortic valve and that's the new aortic valve that Dr. Streitman's placed. And you ...

  15. Prosthetic valve endocarditis after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Thue; De Backer, Ole; Thyregod, Hans G H;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an advancing mode of treatment for inoperable or high-risk patients with aortic stenosis. Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) after TAVI is a serious complication, but only limited data exist on its incidence, outcome, and procedural...... risk factors. METHODS AND RESULTS: Observational single-center study of 509 consecutive patients treated with a transcatheter implanted self-expandable aortic valve prosthesis (Medtronic CoreValve). We identified 18 patients diagnosed with TAVI-PVE during a median follow-up period of 1.4 years......%) were treated conservatively and 1 with surgery. Four patients (22%) died from endocarditis or complications to treatment, 2 of those (11%) during initial hospitalization for PVE. An increased risk of TAVI-PVE was seen in patients with low implanted valve position (hazard ratio, 2.8 [1.1-7.2]), moderate...

  16. Anesthetic management of transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    OpenAIRE

    Annalisa Franco; Chiara Gerli; Laura Ruggeri; Fabrizio Monaco

    2012-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an emergent technique for high-risk patients with aortic stenosis. TAVI poses significant challenges about its management because of the procedure itself and the population who undergo the implantation. Two devices are currently available and marketed in Europe and several other technologies are being developed. The retrograde transfemoral approach is the most popular procedure; nevertheless, it may not be feasible in patients with significant ...

  17. 老年人主动脉瓣置换术后病死率分析%Mortality analysis after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis in elderly patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高夏; 刘占峰; 朱汝军; 张瑞成; 梁志强; 徐宏耀; 王平凡; 白希玲; 王建伟

    2011-01-01

    目的 对年龄≥70岁的主动脉瓣狭窄患者主动脉瓣置换术后的病死率进行分析.方法 回顾性分析246例年龄≥70岁、并接受主动脉瓣置换的主动脉瓣狭窄患者的临床资料.其中高血压144例(58.5%),心房颤动42例(17.1%),肥胖27例(11.0%),有心脏手术史18例(7.3%).结果 手术30 d内死亡29例,病死率为11.8%.其中单纯主动脉瓣置换死亡15例,病死率为8.8%;复合手术死亡14例,病死率为18.7%.两种手术方式比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).手术并发症发生率为24.4%.常见的并发症为低心排出量综合征48例(19.5%),肾衰竭24例(9.8%),呼吸机辅助时间延长52例(21.1%),败血症12例(4.9%).Possion回归分析结果显示,死亡的预后因素是低心排、肾衰竭、败血症及复合手术.并发症发生的主要危险因素为体外循环时间>120 min、心房颤动与慢性阻塞性肺疾病.结论 主动脉瓣狭窄的老年患者在决定主动脉瓣置换手术前需慎重评估手术获益与手术风险.%Objective To analyze the mortality in people aged 70 years and over who had undergone aortic valve replacement (AVR) for aortic stenosis.Methods The clinical data of 246consecutive cases aged 70 years and over,who had received AVR,were retrospectively analyzed.The 144 cases (58.5 % ) had hypertension,42 cases ( 17.1 %) had atrial fibrillation,27 cases ( 11.0 % )were obeses,and 18 cases (7.3%) had undergone previous heart surgery.Results The 29 cases (11.8%) were dead within 30 days after operation.Among them,15 cases (8.8%) were with isolated AVR and the other 14 cases (18.7%) were with an associate procedure,the difference was significant (P < 0.05).The rate of postoperative complication was 24 .4%.The commoncomplications were:48 cases (19.5%) with low cardiac output,24 cases (9.8%) with renal dysfunction,52 cases (21.1% ) with prolonged ventilatory support and 12 cases (4.9%) with sepsis.In the Poisson regression analysis,the main predictors of

  18. Endovascular resection of the native aortic valve before transcatheter aortic valve implantation: state of the art and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarra, Emiliano; Mosala Nezhad, Zahra; Bollen, Xavier; Gielen, Charles-Edouard; Mastrobuoni, Stefano; De Kerchove, Laurent; Raucent, Benoit; Astarci, Parla

    2016-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was introduced into clinical practice in 2002 as a rescue approach in patients presenting with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis but not eligible for conventional aortic valve replacement. This technique allows implantation of a balloon expandable bioprosthesis without resection of the native aortic valve. Several complications are described as a consequence of the residual highly calcified valve being squeezed against the aortic wall by the stent of the implant. This can result in deformation of the metal stent and paravalvular leakage, risk of occlusion of the coronary ostia, or central and peripheral embolization of valvular debris. To avoid these complications, many authors suggest the possibility to resect and remove the native aortic valve before transcatheter aortic valve implantation. In this field, different authors have described possible techniques and different sources of energy to resect the calcified valve. In this article, we review the development of these experimental techniques and discuss future prospects in this field. PMID:27032472

  19. Association of ischemic heart disease to global and regional longitudinal strain in asymptomatic aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Helle Gervig; Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Hassager, Christian;

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal deformation has been shown to deteriorate with progressive aortic stenosis as well as ischemic heart disease. Despite that both conditions share risk factors and are often coexisting, studies have not assessed the influence on longitudinal deformation for both conditions simultaneously....... Thus the purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between subclinical ischemic heart disease and global and regional longitudinal strain in asymptomatic patients with significant aortic stenosis. Prevalent patients with a diagnosis of aortic stenosis at six hospitals in the Greater...... coronary stenosis but not aortic valve area. Conversely, basal longitudinal strain was significantly associated to aortic valve area (p = 0.001), but not to significant coronary stenosis. Subclinical coronary artery disease is frequent in moderate and severe aortic stenosis, and should be suspected when...

  20. Aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Athanasiou, Thanos; Mestres, Carlos A;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS OF THE STUDY: Prompted by anecdotal evidence and observations by surgeons, an investigation was undertaken into the potential differences in implanted aortic valve prosthesis sizes, during aortic valve replacement (AVR) procedures, between northern and southern European...... countries. METHODS: A multi-institutional, non-randomized, retrospective analysis was conducted among 2,932 patients who underwent AVR surgery at seven tertiary cardiac surgery centers throughout Europe. Demographic and perioperative variables including valve size and type, body surface area (BSA) and early......: Prostheses with diameter valve size was also smaller in southern compared to northern European patients (21.6 +/- 2.1 mm versus 23.4 +/- 2.2 mm, p

  1. Left ventricular muscle mass regression after aortic valve replacement.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, J. W.; Choi, K. J.; Lee, S G; Choo, S. J.; Kim, J.O.; Kang, D H; Song, J.K.; Song, M. G.

    1999-01-01

    Implanting a valve that will reduce left ventricular mass is critical in aortic stenosis. Regression of left ventricular hypertrophy in 46 aortic valve replacement (AVR) patients receiving a St. Jude Medical (SJM) valve was assessed by serial electrocardiographic and echocardiographic studies during the preoperative, immediate, and late postoperative periods. The patients were divided into three groups according to valve size; 19 mm group (n=9), 21 mm group (n=20), and 23+mm group (n=17). The...

  2. FTO Is Associated with Aortic Valve Stenosis in a Gender Specific Manner of Heterozygote Advantage: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Thron

    Full Text Available Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within the Fat mass and obesity associated (FTO gene have been linked with increased body weight. However, the data on an association of FTO with cardiovascular diseases remains conflicting. Therefore, we ascertained whether FTO is associated with aortic valve stenosis (AVS, one of the most frequent cardiovascular diseases in the Western world.In this population-based case-control study the FTO SNP rs9939609 was analyzed in 300 German patients with AVS and 429 German controls of the KORA survey S4, representing a random population. Blood samples were collected prior to aortic valve replacement in AVS cases and FTO rs9939609 was genotyped via ARMS-PCR. Genotype frequencies differed significantly between AVS cases and KORA controls (p = 0.004. Separate gender-analyses uncovered an association of FTO with AVS exclusively in males; homozygote carriers for the risk-allele (A had a higher risk to develop AVS (p = 0.017, odds ratio (OR 1.727; 95% confidence interval (CI 1.087-2.747, recessive model, whereas heterozygote carriers for the risk-allele showed a lower risk (p = 0.002, OR 0.565, 95% CI 0.384-0.828, overdominant model. After adjustment for multiple co-variables, the odds ratios of heterozygotes remained significant for an association with AVS (p = 0.008, OR 0.565, 95% CI 0.369-0.861.This study revealed an association of FTO rs9939609 with AVS. Furthermore, this association was restricted to men, with heterozygotes having a significantly lower chance to develop AVS. Lastly, the association between FTO and AVS was independent of BMI and other variables such as diabetes mellitus.

  3. Calcific Aortic Stenosis: Lessons Learned from Experimental and Clinical Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Rajamannan, Nalini M

    2008-01-01

    Calcific aortic stenosis is the most common indication for surgical valve replacement in the United States. For years this disease has been described as a passive degenerative process during which serum calcium attaches to the valve surface and binds to the leaflet to form nodules. Therefore, surgical treatment of this disease has been the approach towards relieving outflow obstruction in these patients. Recent studies demonstrate an association between atherosclerosis and its risk factors fo...

  4. DEGENERATIVE AORTIC STENOSIS: PATHOGENESIS AND NEW PRINCIPLES OF TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Andropova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To reveal of markers of inflammation and progression of calcification in patients with degenerative aortic stenosis (DAS. Material and methods. A single-stage study was done in 85 patients with degenerative calcification of aortic valve (42 patients with DAS and 43 patients without DAS. The techniques for assessing the severity of aortic valve calcification included ultrasonic diagnostics and multislice spiral computed tomography. Markers of inflammation and lipid profile were investigated.    Results. Higher blood levels of total holesterol and holesterol of low density lipoprotein were revealed in patients with DAS in comparison with patients without DAS. They also had higher levels of inflammation markers: C-reactive protein and interleukin-6. There were significant correlations between DAS severity, lipid metabolism disturbances and inflammation markers. Conclusion. Atherogenesis and inflammation may have pathogenic influence on progression of aortic valve calcification and DAS development by lipid infiltration and endothelium cells damage.

  5. An Adult Case of Unicommissural Unicuspid Aortic Valve Diagnosed Based on the Intraoperative Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Tetsuo; Fukatsu, Toru; Ichinohe, Yoshimaro; Komatsu, Hirotaka; Seki, Masahiro; Sasaki, Kenichi; Takai, Hideaki; Kunihara, Takashi; Hirata, Yasunobu

    2016-01-01

    We herein report an adult case of unicommissural unicuspid aortic valve (UAV). A 59-year-old man, who was noted to have a cardiac murmur at 31 years of age, was admitted to our hospital due to acute heart failure. Severe calcification in the aortic valve with severe low-flow/low-gradient aortic stenosis and moderate aortic regurgitation was observed and thought to be the cause of heart failure, however, the etiology of aortic valve dysfunction was not clear. Aortic valve replacement was subsequently performed, and unicommissural UAV was diagnosed according to the intraoperative findings. UAV is very rare congenital aortic valve disease which is rarely diagnosed preoperatively.

  6. Transcatheter Aortic Heart Valve Thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Nicolaj C; Grove, Erik L; Andersen, Henning R;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is increasing focus on transcatheter heart valve (THV) thrombosis. However, there are limited data on incidence, clinical implications and predisposing factors of THV thrombosis following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). OBJECTIVES: We assessed the incidence...

  7. Aortic Valve Sparing in Different Aortic Valve and Aortic Root Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Tirone E

    2016-08-01

    The development of aortic valve-sparing operations (reimplantation of the aortic valve and remodeling of the aortic root) expanded the surgical armamentarium for treating patients with aortic root dilation caused by a variety of disorders. Young adults with aortic root aneurysms associated with genetic syndromes are ideal candidates for reimplantation of the aortic valve, and the long-term results have been excellent. Incompetent bicuspid aortic valves with dilated aortic annuli are also satisfactorily treated with the same type of operation. Older patients with ascending aortic aneurysm and aortic insufficiency secondary to dilated sinotubular junction and a normal aortic annulus can be treated with remodeling of the aortic root or with reimplantation of the aortic valve. The first procedure is simpler, and both procedures are likely equally effective. As with any heart valve-preserving procedure, patient selection and surgical expertise are keys to successful and durable repairs. PMID:27491910

  8. Left atrial systolic force and outcome in asymptomatic mild to moderate aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cioffi, Giovanni; Cramariuc, Dana; Dalsgaard, Morten;

    2012-01-01

    In patients with chronic pressure overload due to hypertension or aortic valve stenosis (AS), higher left atrial systolic force (LASF) is associated with a high-risk cardiovascular (CV) phenotype. We tested LASF as prognostic marker in patients with AS....

  9. [Use of sutureless prosthetic aortic valves in cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarpino, Giuseppe; Fischlein, Theodor

    2014-03-01

    In the last years, an increasing proportion of high-risk patients undergo surgical aortic valve replacement. In order to reduce the risk associated with cross-clamp time or cardioplegic ischemic time, sutureless aortic prostheses have been developed. These bioprosthetic valves are not hand sewn, and this technological advance translates into reduced implantation times, thus improving outcome of patients referred for aortic valve replacement. At present, three sutureless bioprostheses are available on the market: 3f Enable (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA), Perceval (Sorin Group, Saluggia, Italy) and Intuity (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, California, USA). This article provides an overview of the available literature on sutureless aortic valves with the aim to better define current role and future perspectives of sutureless aortic bioprostheses for the treatment of aortic valve stenosis. PMID:24770430

  10. Extracellular Matrix Biomarker, Fibulin-1, Is Closely Related to NT-proBNP and Soluble Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor in Patients with Aortic Valve Stenosis (The SEAS Study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruger, Ruan; Rasmussen, Lars M; Argraves, William S;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fibulin-1, a circulating extracellular matrix glycoprotein, has been associated with arterial disease and elevated N-terminal prohormone B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in diabetes. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), a marker of inflammation, has been...... associated with subclinical atherosclerosis. Therefore, we aimed to explore the interplay between these biomarkers and mild to moderate aortic valve stenosis (AS). METHODS: In 374 patients with mild to moderate AS, we investigated the relationship of fibulin-1 with NT-proBNP, levels of suPAR and the degree...... of AS at baseline and after one and four years of treatment with Simvastatin 40 mg and Ezetimibe 10 mg or placebo. RESULTS: During treatment, fibulin-1 became more closely associated with NT-proBNP (βyear0 = 0.10, p = 0.08, βyear1 = 0.16, p = 0.005, βyear4 = 0.22, p

  11. Medical treatments in aortic stenosis: Role of statins and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davičević Žaklina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcific arotic stenosis and atherosclerosis. Aortic stenosis is the most frequent valvular heart disease in-western world and its incidence continues to rise. Aortic sclerosis is the first characteristic lesion of the cusps, which is today considered a process similar to atherosclerosis. The progression of the disease is an active process leading to forming of bone matrix and heavily calcified stiff cusps by inflammatory cells and osteopontin. Aortic stenosis is a chronic, progressive disease which can remain asymptomatic for a long time even in the presence of severe aortic stenosis. Medical treatment for aortic stenosis. The need for alternative to aortic valve surgery is highlighted by increasing longevity of the population and new therapeutic strategies to limit disease progression are needed to delay or potentially avoid, the need for valve surgery. Currently, there are no established disease modifying treatments in regard to the progression of aortic stenosis. The first results about influence of angiotenzin-converting enzyme inhibitors and statins on aortic sclerosis and stenosis progression are promising. Statins are likely to reduce cardiovascular events rather than disease progression, but may be potentially a valuable preventive treatment in these patients. The prejudice against the use of angiotenzin-converting enzyme inhibitors by patients with aortic stenosis is changing. The cautious use of angiotenzin-converting enzyme inhibition by patients with concomitant hypertension, coronary artery disease, and heart failure seems appropriate. Definite evidence from large clinical trials is awaited.

  12. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... No medications as such have been proven to slow that disease path life. Again, it's a progressive ... no medical therapy that has been proven to slow or reverse the process of aortic stenosis. Clearly, ...

  13. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to minimize their symptoms, but that doesn't impact the course of the disease itself. When I' ... more likely we see aortic stenosis. Again, patient education is part of the evaluation and management of ...

  14. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... symptoms and ultimately surgery may be in the future. The symptoms seen primarily with aortic stenosis at ... echocardiography is? Echocardiography is the use of ultrasound technology. Ultrasound technology is a form of the same ...

  15. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... somebody for this operation. Again, there's no medical therapy that has been proven to slow or reverse ... to their physician. This may lead to earlier treatment and better outcomes as well. Aortic stenosis, as ...

  16. Chronic atrial fibrillation in presence of aortic stenosis in a patient with polysplenia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronte, E; Trovato, Rl; Di Miceli, R; Sucato, V; Candela, P; Brancatelli, G; Novo, S

    2013-01-01

    We report a rare case of "situs viscerum ambiguous" with polysplenia syndrome, in a 69 year old female patient with aortic stenosis and chronic atrial fibrillation. The presenting symptom was dyspnoea on moderate exertion and an ECG showed supra ventricular arrhythmia. Patients trans-thoracic echocardiogram revealed a dilated left atrium, reduced ejection fraction, mild tricuspid regurgitation, moderate-severe pulmonary hypertension and severe aortic stenosis. The patient was successfully treated with a replacement of her aortic valve and ascending aorta.

  17. Congenital quadricuspid aortic valve: analysis of 11 surgical cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Yang-feng; XU Ji-bin; HAN Lin; LU Fang-lin; LANG Xi-long; SONG Zhi-gang; XU Zhi-yun

    2011-01-01

    Background Congenital quadricuspid aortic valve is rarely seen during aortic valve replacement (AVR).The diagnosis and treatment of the disease were reported in 11 cases.Methods Eleven patients (nine men and two women,mean age 33.4 years) with quadricuspid aortic valve were retrospectively evaluated.Medical records,echocardiograms and surgical treatment were reviewed.Results In accordance with the Hurwitz and Roberts classification,the patients were classified as type A (n=2),type B (n=7),type F (n=1) and type G (n=1).Three patients were associated with other heart diseases,including infective endocarditis and mitral prolaps,left superior vena cava,aortic aneurysm.All had aortic regurgitation (AR) except two with aortic stenosis (AS),detected by color-flow Doppler echocardiography.The congenital quadricuspid aortic valve deformity in seven patients was diagnosed by echocardiography.All patients underwent successful aortic valve replacement.Conclusion Quadricuspid aortic valve is a rare cause of aortic insufficiency,while echocardiography plays an important role in diagnosing the disease.Aortic valve replacement is the major therapy for the disease.

  18. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foghsgaard, Signe; Schmidt, Thomas Andersen; Kjaergard, Henrik K

    2009-01-01

    In this descriptive prospective study, we evaluate the outcomes of surgery in 98 patients who were scheduled to undergo minimally invasive aortic valve replacement. These patients were compared with a group of 50 patients who underwent scheduled aortic valve replacement through a full sternotomy...... operations were completed as mini-sternotomies, 4 died later of noncardiac causes. The aortic cross-clamp and perfusion times were significantly different across all groups (P valve replacement...... is an excellent operation in selected patients, but its true advantages over conventional aortic valve replacement (other than a smaller scar) await evaluation by means of randomized clinical trial. The "extended mini-aortic valve replacement" operation, on the other hand, is a risky procedure that should...

  19. Reconstructive surgery of the aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendonça José Teles de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Lacking an ideal valve substitute and motivated by the good results of mitral valve repair since 1990, we faced with determination aortic valve reconstruction surgery. The objective of this paper is to show our experience with this procedure. METHOD: Between January of 1990 and December of 2001; 136 aortic valve repair surgeries were performed. Seventy-five (55.1% of the patients were female and the ages ranged from 4 to 70 years (mean 23.3 ± 1.2 years. Every patient had rheumatic valve disease and insufficiency was the most prevalent type (108 patients - 79.4%, followed by double aortic lesion in 16 (11.7% patients and stenosis in 12 (8.8%. The surgical techniques used were: subcommissural annuloplasty in 74 (54.4% patients, commissurotomy in 38 (27.9%, cusp extension with pericardium in 17 (12.5%, substitution of one cusp in 2 (1.4%, cusp suspension by annuloplasty in 37 (27.2% and Valsalva sinus remodeling in 27 (19.8%. The surgery exclusively involved the aortic valve in 57 (41.9% patients and was associated in 79 (mitral valve replacement in 12, mitral repair in 65, coronary artery bypass grafting in 1 and pulmonary commissurotomy in 1. RESULTS: Hospital mortality was 2.2% and 22 (16.2% patients underwent a new surgery during the follow-up period (57.7 ± 3.5 months. CONCLUSIONS: Aortic valve repair is a safe surgical procedure that can be used in an increasing number of patients with promising results.

  20. Valve selection in aortic valve endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrytska, Yana

    2016-01-01

    Aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) is a potentially life-threatening disease. Mortality and incidence of infective endocarditis have been reduced in the past 30 years. Medical treatment of aortic PVE may be successful in patients who have a prompt response after antibiotic treatment and who do not have prosthetic dysfunction. In advanced stages, antibiotic therapy alone is insufficient to control the disease, and surgical intervention is necessary. Surgical treatment may be lifesaving, but it is still associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. The aim of surgery is to perform a radical excision of all infected and necrotic tissue, reconstruction of the left ventricle outflow tract, and replacement of the aortic valve. There is no unanimous consensus on which is the optimal prosthesis to implant in this context, and several surgical techniques have been suggested. We aim to analyze the efficacy of the surgical treatment and discuss the issue of valve selection in patients with aortic valve endocarditis.

  1. Velocity ratio predicts outcomes in patients with low gradient severe aortic stenosis and preserved EF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jander, Nikolaus; Hochholzer, Willibald; Kaufmann, Beat A;

    2014-01-01

    as has been reported in the context of paradoxical low flow, LGSAS. On the other hand, grading of stenosis severity by aortic valve area (AVA) may overrate stenosis severity due to erroneous underestimation of LV outflow tract (LVOT) diameter, small body size or inconsistencies in cut-off values...... for severe stenosis. We hypothesised that VR may have conceptual advantages over MPG and AVA, predict clinical outcomes and thereby be useful in the management of patients with LGSAS. METHODS: Patients from the prospective Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study with an AVA... of aortic valve events (pAVA by VR increased predictive accuracy for aortic valve events (area under the receiver operating curve 0.62 (95% CI 0.57 to 0.67) vs 0.56 (95% CI 0.51 to 0.61) for AVA, p=0.02) with net reclassification improvement calculated at 0.36 (95...

  2. Aortic Annular Enlargement during Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selman Dumani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the surgery of aortic valve replacement is always attempted, as much as possible, to implant the larger prosthesis with the mains goals to enhance the potential benefits, to minimise transvalvular gradient, decrease left ventricular size and avoid the phenomenon of patient-prosthesis mismatch. Implantation of an ideal prosthesis often it is not possible, due to a small aortic annulus. A variety of aortic annulus enlargement techniques is reported to avoid patient-prosthesis mismatch. We present the case that has submitted four three times open heart surgery. We used Manouguian technique to enlarge aortic anulus with excellent results during the fourth time of surgery.

  3. Percutaneous implantation of the CoreValve aortic valve prosthesis in patients at high risk or rejected for surgical valve replacement: Clinical evaluation and feasibility of the procedure in the first 30 patients in the AMC-UvA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Baan; Z.Y. Yong; K.T. Koch; J.P.S. Henriques; B.J. Bouma; S.G. de Hert; J. van der Meulen; J.G.P. Tijssen; J.J. Piek; B.A.J.M. de Mol

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To report the feasibility, safety and efficacy of percutaneous aortic valve implantation (PAVI) with the CoreValve self-expanding aortic valve bioprosthesis in elderly patients with aortic valve stenosis who are rejected for surgery or have a high surgical risk.Methods. PAVI using the Cor

  4. New-onset atrial fibrillation after surgical aortic valve replacement and transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a concise review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Troels Højsgaard; Thygesen, Julie Bjerre; Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Søndergaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and, more recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have been shown to be the only treatments that can improve the natural cause of severe aortic valve stenosis. However, after SAVR and TAVI, the incidence of new-onset atrial fibrillation (NOAF) is 31%-64% and 4%-32%, respectively. NOAF is independently associated with adverse events such as stroke, death, and increased length of hospital stay. Increasing the knowledge of predisposing factors, optimal postprocedural monitoring, and prophylactic antiarrhythmic and antithrombotic therapy may reduce the risk of complications secondary to NOAF. PMID:25589700

  5. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... see we've used the cautery to achieve access to the sternum. On the left hand side ... wound, which allows us to get more ready access to the aorta and the aortic valve. The ...

  6. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for patients who would not tolerate well a traditional open operation or a less invasive operation, as ... physical reserve. So Barbara Bush recently had a traditional aortic valve replacement surgery. What makes a patient ...

  7. CONGENITAL QUADRICUSPID AORTIC-VALVE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROUWER, MHJ; DEGRAAF, JJ; EBELS, T

    1993-01-01

    Two patients with a quadricuspid aortic valve are described, one of them with concomitant juxtaposed coronary orifices facing the right hand facing sinus. The etiology and incidence of this congenital anomaly will be discussed.

  8. Abnormal Two-Dimensional Strain Echocardiography Findings in Children with Congenital Valvar Aortic Stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcus, K.A.; Korte, C.L. de; Feuth, T.; Thijssen, J.M.; Kapusta, L.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Congenital valvar aortic stenosis (VAS) causes a pressure overload to the left ventricle. In the clinical setting, the severity of stenosis is graded by the pressure drop over the stenotic valve (pressure gradient). This parameter is dependent on the hemodynamic status and does not provide

  9. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty in pregnancy with severe aortic stenosis and infective endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinotha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Twenty seven year old lady, previously diagnosed to have aortic stenosis, presented to the obstetric outpatient department at 19 weeks of gestation with fever and breathlessness, NYHA class 4, for one week. Two D Echo revealed left ventricular hypertrophy, a severely stenosed, calcified bicuspid aortic valve, with vegetations on aortic and mitral valves and severe mitral regurgitation. Blood cultures grew nutrionally variant streptococci and she was treated with crystalline penicillin and gentamicin. She stabilised clinically by 21 weeks, by which time, the risk of termination of pregnancy was comparable to continuing the pregnancy. She underwent balloon aortic valvuloplasty. Post balloon aortic valvuloplasty, she was stable. At 34+2 weeks, she underwent emergency LSCS, the indication being intrauterine growth restriction with fetal compromise and breech presentation. She delivered a baby girl, 1.6 kg, Apgar 9 & 10. Our case report highlights the fact that a timely, balloon aortic valvuloplasty can be life saving for patients with pregnancy complicated by severe aortic stenosis and infective endocarditis. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2012; 1(1.000: 69-71

  10. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Bicuspid Aortic Valve Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mylotte, Darren; Lefevre, Thierry; Søndergaard, Lars;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Limited information exists describing the results of transcatheter aortic valve (TAV) replacement in patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) disease (TAV-in-BAV). OBJECTIVES: This study sought to evaluate clinical outcomes of a large cohort of patients undergoing TAV-in-BAV. METHODS......: We retrospectively collected baseline characteristics, procedural data, and clinical follow-up findings from 12 centers in Europe and Canada that had performed TAV-in-BAV. RESULTS: A total of 139 patients underwent TAV-in-BAV with the balloon-expandable transcatheter heart valve (THV) (n = 48...

  11. [Pannus Formation Two Years after Bioprosthetic Aortic Valve Implantation;Report of a Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Kimiyo; Kuroda, Hiroaki

    2015-08-01

    We report a case of early deterioration of the bioprosthetic aortic valve 23 months postoperatively. A 77-year-old man who had undergone aortic valve replacement with a 23-mm Epic valve( St. Jude Medical [SJM])presented to us after a syncopal episode. Echocardiography revealed severe aortic stenosis, and redo aortic valve replacement with a 21-mm SJM mechanical valve was performed. All 3 cusps of the tissue valve were thickened by fibrous pannus overgrowth. Neither calcification nor invasion of inflammatory cells was observed. The cause of pannus formation at such an early stage after implantation remains unknown. PMID:26329714

  12. Low-flow aortic stenosis in asymptomatic patients: valvular-arterial impedance and systolic function from the SEAS Substudy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramariuc, Dana; Cioffi, Giovanni; Rieck, Ashild E;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study sought to assess the impact of valvuloarterial impedance on left ventricular (LV) myocardial systolic function in asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis (AS). BACKGROUND: In atherosclerotic AS, LV global load consists of combined valvular and arterial resistance to LV ejection....... preserved. (An Investigational Drug on Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Aortic Stenosis [Narrowing of the Major Blood Vessel of the Heart]; NCT00092677)....

  13. Bicuspid Aortic Valve Disease and Ascending Aortic Aneurysms: Gaps in Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie L. Losenno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The bicuspid aortic valve is the most common congenital cardiac anomaly in developed nations. The abnormal bicuspid morphology of the aortic valve results in valvular dysfunction and subsequent hemodynamic derangements. However, the clinical presentation of bicuspid aortic valve disease remains quite heterogeneous with patients presenting from infancy to late adulthood with variable degrees of valvular stenosis and insufficiency and associated abnormalities including aortic coarctation, hypoplastic left heart structures, and ascending aortic dilatation. Emerging evidence suggests that the heterogeneous presentation of bicuspid aortic valve phenotypes may be a more complex matter related to congenital, genetic, and/or connective tissue abnormalities. Optimal management of patients with BAV disease and associated ascending aortic aneurysms often requires a thoughtful approach, carefully assessing various risk factors of the aortic valve and the aorta and discerning individual indications for ongoing surveillance, medical management, and operative intervention. We review current concepts of anatomic classification, pathophysiology, natural history, and clinical management of bicuspid aortic valve disease with associated ascending aortic aneurysms.

  14. Transcatheter CoreValve valve-in-valve implantation in a stentless porcine aortic valve for severe aortic regurgitation

    OpenAIRE

    Yong, Celina M; Buchbinder, Maurice; Giacomini, John C

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We describe the first valve-in-valve Corevalve transcatheter aortic valve replacement in the St. Jude Toronto stentless porcine aortic valve in the United States, which enabled this 59-year-old patient with a history of bacterial endocarditis and aortic regurgitation to avoid heart transplant with complete resolution of his severe left ventricular dysfunction.

  15. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more likely we see aortic stenosis. Again, patient education is part of the evaluation and management of ... want to embrace less invasive or more progressive technology, you want to make ... with that information and certainly shouldn't be insulted by that. ...

  16. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... well. I want to underscore again that exercise testing is really not recommended in patient with classic symptoms in severe aortic stenosis, as it's probably more stress than the patient's heart should have to undergo. Once again, serial evaluations, as with any chronic disease process, are ...

  17. Aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Nikos; Sinning, Jan-Malte

    2014-01-01

    Paravalvular aortic regurgitation (AR) negatively affects prognosis following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). As transcatheter heart valves (THV) are anchored using a certain degree of oversizing at the level of the aortic annulus, incomplete stent frame expansion because of heavily annular calcifications, suboptimal placement of the prosthesis, and/or annulus-prosthesis size-mismatch can contribute to paravalvular AR with subsequent increased mortality risk. Echocardiography is essential to differentiate between transvalvular and paravalvular AR and to further elucidate the etiology of AR during the procedure. However, because echocardiographic quantification of AR in TAVR patients remains challenging, especially in the implantation situation, a multimodal approach to the evaluation of AR with use of hemodynamic measurements and imaging modalities is useful to precisely quantify the severity of AR immediately after valve deployment. "Next-generation" THVs are already on the market and first results show that paravalvular AR related to design modifications (eg, paravalvular space-fillers, full repositionability) are rarely seen in these valve types.  PMID:24632758

  18. Is it time for medical therapy for aortic valve disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Rajamannan, Nalini M

    2004-01-01

    Calcific aortic stenosis is the most common indication for surgical valve replacement. Currently there are no medical therapies approved for the treatment of this disease. This review will summarize the clinical and experimental studies published over the past 5 years that indicate that medical therapy may be an option for this patient population.

  19. The future of transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Christian W; Arsalan, Mani; Mack, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Since the introduction of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) into clinical practice, the treatment of aortic stenosis has changed dramatically. In the past, medical therapy with or without balloon aortic valvuloplasty was the only option for inoperable patients. More recently, TAVI has become the treatment of choice for these patients and the preferred alternative for high-risk operable patients. Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) currently remains the gold standard for patients at low or intermediate operative risk. As randomized trials have demonstrated comparable results between TAVI and SAVR in the high-risk population, there is now a clear trend towards performing TAVI even in intermediate-risk patients while awaiting the results of randomized trials in that population. Nevertheless, there are still questions regarding TAVI involving paravalvular leak (PVL), stroke, pacemaker requirements, and durability that remain to be more definitively answered before TAVI can routinely be performed in a broader, lower risk population. Improvements in patient selection, imaging, and second and third generation devices have decreased the incidence of PVLs and vascular complications that followed the earliest TAVI procedures, but the rates of perioperative stroke and permanent pacemaker implantation must still be addressed. Furthermore, the long-term durability of TAVI devices and a role for post-procedure antithrombotic management remain unanswered. Until these questions are more clearly answered, it is the Heart Team's task to determine the optimal treatment for each patient based on risk scores, frailty metrics, comorbidities, patient preference, and potential for improvement in quality of life.

  20. Sedation or general anesthesia for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI)

    OpenAIRE

    Mayr, N. Patrick; Michel, Jonathan; Bleiziffer, Sabine; Tassani, Peter; Martin, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is nowadays a routine therapy for elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) and high perioperative risk. With growing experience, further development of the devices, and the expansion to “intermediate-risk” patients, there is increasing interest in performing this procedure under conscious sedation (TAVI-S) rather than the previously favoured approach of general anesthesia (TAVI-GA). The proposed benefits of TAVI-S include; r...

  1. Inside human aortic stenosis: a proteomic analysis of plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Dones, Félix; Darde, Verónica M; Alonso-Orgaz, Sergio; Lopez-Almodovar, Luis F; Mourino-Alvarez, Laura; Padial, Luis R; Vivanco, Fernando; Barderas, Maria G

    2012-02-16

    Valvular aortic stenosis (AS) produces a slowly progressive obstruction in left ventricular outflow track. For this reason, aortic valve replacement is warranted when the valvular stenosis is hemodinamically significant, becoming the most common worldwide cause of aortic valve surgery. Recent epidemiologic studies have revealed an association between degenerative AS and cardiovascular risk factors for atherosclerosis, althought reducing the exposure to such factors and statin therapies both fail to delay or reverse the pathology. Hence, a deeper understanding of the pathophysiology of this disease is required to identify appropriate preventive measures. A proteomic analysis of plasma will permit to know and identify the changes in protein expression induced by AS in this tissue. Using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) followed by mass spectrometry (MS), we compared the crude (not pre-fractioned) and pre-fractioned plasma from AS patients and control subjects. We sought to identify plasma proteins whose expression is modified in AS. In addition we investigated if crude plasma presented some alterations in the more abundant proteins since to date, has never been studied before. We also further investigated the link between this disease and atherosclerosis with a view to identifying new potential markers and therapeutic targets. PMID:22178735

  2. Aortic Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... valve opens when the left ventricle squeezes to pump out blood, and closes in between heart beats to keep ... the left ventricle has to work harder to pump blood out through the valve. To do this extra ...

  3. Reoperative transapical transcatheter aortic valve replacement for central aortic regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuanjia; Kapadia, Samir; Krishnaswamy, Amar; Svensson, Lars G; Mick, Stephanie

    2016-09-01

    Paravalvular leak-related aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a common complication and is associated with increased short- and long-term mortality. However, the impact of isolated central aortic regurgitation is unknown. We report a case of transapical (TA) TAVR with postprocedural central aortic regurgitation, who returned after two years with progression of regurgitation. A reoperative valve-in-valve TA-TAVR was performed. PMID:27405799

  4. Midterm Results of Aortic Valve Replacement with Cryopreserved Homografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Özker

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the midterm clinical results of aortic valve replacement with cryopreserved homografts.Materials and Methods: Aortic valve replacement was performed in 40 patients with cryopreserved homograft. The indications were aortic valve endocarditis in 20 patients (50%, truncus arteriosus in 6 patients (15%, and re-stenosis or regurtitation after aortic valve reconstruction in 14 (35% patients. The valve sizes ranged from 10 to 27mm. A full root replacement technique was used for homograft replacement in all patients.Results: The 30-day postoperative mortality rate was 12.5% (5 patients. There were four late deaths. Only one of them was related to cardiac events. Overall mortality was 22.5%. Thirty-three patients were followed up for 67±26 months. Two patients needed reoperation due to aortic aneurysm caused by endocarditis. The mean transvalvular gradient significantly decreased after valve replacement (p<0.003. The last follow up showed that the 27 (82% patients had a normal left ventricular function.Conclusion: Cryopreserved homografts are safe alternatives to mechanical valves that can be used when there are proper indications. Although it has a high perioperative mortality rate, cryopreserved homograft implantation is an alternative for valve replacement, particularly in younger patients and for complex surgical problems such as endocarditis that must be minimalized.

  5. Giant Thoracic Aneurysm Following Valve Replacement for Bicuspid Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Cao; Ul Haq, Ehtesham; Nguyen, Ngoc; Omar, Bassam

    2015-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve is a common congenital anomaly associated with aortopathy, which can cause aortic root dilatation, necessitating regular screening if the aortic root is > 4.0 cm. Despite the low absolute incidence of aortic complications associated with bicuspid aortic valve in the general population, the consequences of such complications for an individual patient can be devastating. Herein we propose a balanced algorithm that incorporates recommendations from the three major guidelines for follow-up imaging of the aortic root and ascending thoracic aorta in patients with a bicuspid aortic valve, maintaining the current recommendations with regard to surgical thresholds. PMID:26827748

  6. Transfemoral Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Mixed Aortic Valve Disease in Child's Class C Liver Disease Prior to Orthotopic Liver Transplantation: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkey, Barbara J; Hanson, Ross; Reece, T Brett; Forman, Lisa; Burton, James R; Messenger, John C; Kim, Michael S; Cleveland, Joseph C; Fiegel, Matt J; Nydam, Trevor L; Mandell, M Susan

    2016-06-01

    The American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases practice guidelines list severe cardiac disease as a contraindication to liver transplantation. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement has been shown to decrease all-cause mortality in patients with severe aortic stenosis who are not considered candidates for surgical aortic valve replacement. We report our experience of liver transplantation in a patient with severe aortic stenosis and moderate aortic insufficiency who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement with Child-Pugh Class C disease at a Model For End-Stage Liver Disease score of 29. The patient had a difficult post procedure course that was successfully medically managed. After liver transplantation the patient was discharged to home on postoperative day 11. The combination of cardiac disease and end stage liver disease is challenging but these patients can have a successful outcome despite very severe illness.

  7. Histopathological study of congenital aortic valve malformations in 32 children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Ping; WANG Hongwei; LI Yanping; CHENG Peixuan; LIU Qingjun; ZHANG Zhenlu; LIU Jianying

    2007-01-01

    The histopathological characteristics of congenital aortic valve malformations in children were investigated.All the native surgically excised aortic valves from 32 pediatric patients suffering from symptomatic aortic valve dysfunction due to congenital aortic valve malformations between January 2003 and December 2005 were studied macroscopically and microscopically.The patients' medical records were reviewed and the clinical information was extracted.The diagnosis was made by the clinical presentation,preoperative echocardiography,intraoperative examination,and postoperative histopathological study,excluding rheumatic ot degenerative aortic valve diseases,infective endocarditis and primary connective tissue disorders,e.g.Marfan syndrome.Among 32 children with congenital aortic valve malformations,the age was ranged from six to 18 years,with a mean of 14.9 years,and there were 27 boys and five girls (male:female = 5.4:1).There were five cases of aortic stenosis (AS,15.62%),25 cases of aortic insufficiency (AI,78.13 %)and two cases of AS-AI (6.25%),without other valve diseases.Twenty cases still had other congenital heart diseases:ventricular septal defect (19 cases),patent ductus arteriosus (two cases),double-chambered right ventricle (one case),aneurysm of the right anterior aortic sinus of valsalva (three cases).Histopathological examination indicated that the cusps became thickening with unequal size,irregular shape (coiling and prolapse edge),enhanced hardness,and partly calcification.Microscopic investigation revealed the unsharp structure of valve tissue,fibrosis,myxomatous,reduced collagen fiber,rupture of elastic fibers,different degrees of infiltration of inflammatory cells,secondary calcareous and lipid deposit,and secondary fibrosis.Congenital aortic valve malformations in children involve males more than females,mostly associated with other congenital heart diseases.Aortic insufficiency is more common in children with congenital aortic valve

  8. [MINIMALLY INVASIVE AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabata, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) is defined as aortic valve replacement avoiding full sternotomy. Common approaches include a partial sternotomy right thoracotomy, and a parasternal approach. MIAVR has been shown to have advantages over conventional AVR such as shorter length of stay and smaller amount of blood transfusion and better cosmesis. However, it is also known to have disadvantages such as longer cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times and potential complications related to peripheral cannulation. Appropriate patient selection is very important. Since the procedure is more complex than conventional AVR, more intensive teamwork in the operating room is essential. Additionally, a team approach during postoperative management is critical to maximize the benefits of MIAVR. PMID:27295772

  9. [MINIMALLY INVASIVE AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabata, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) is defined as aortic valve replacement avoiding full sternotomy. Common approaches include a partial sternotomy right thoracotomy, and a parasternal approach. MIAVR has been shown to have advantages over conventional AVR such as shorter length of stay and smaller amount of blood transfusion and better cosmesis. However, it is also known to have disadvantages such as longer cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times and potential complications related to peripheral cannulation. Appropriate patient selection is very important. Since the procedure is more complex than conventional AVR, more intensive teamwork in the operating room is essential. Additionally, a team approach during postoperative management is critical to maximize the benefits of MIAVR.

  10. Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation due to severe aortic regurgitation in a degenerated aortic homograft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lene Kjaer; Engstrøm, Thomas; Søndergaard, Lars

    2009-01-01

    a successful valve-in-valve implantation of a CoreValve aortic valve prosthesis through the right subclavian artery in a case of severe aortic regurgitation within a degenerated aortic homograft. The case exemplifies the possibilities of expanding the indications for TAVI, as well as other vascular access...

  11. Left ventricular remodeling and hypertrophy in patients with aortic stenosis: insights from cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dweck Marc R

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR is the gold standard non-invasive method for determining left ventricular (LV mass and volume but has not been used previously to characterise the LV remodeling response in aortic stenosis. We sought to investigate the degree and patterns of hypertrophy in aortic stenosis using CMR. Methods Patients with moderate or severe aortic stenosis, normal coronary arteries and no other significant valve lesions or cardiomyopathy were scanned by CMR with valve severity assessed by planimetry and velocity mapping. The extent and patterns of hypertrophy were investigated using measurements of the LV mass index, indexed LV volumes and the LV mass/volume ratio. Asymmetric forms of remodeling and hypertrophy were defined by a regional wall thickening ≥13 mm and >1.5-fold the thickness of the opposing myocardial segment. Results Ninety-one patients (61±21 years; 57 male with aortic stenosis (aortic valve area 0.93±0.32cm2 were recruited. The severity of aortic stenosis was unrelated to the degree (r2=0.012, P=0.43 and pattern (P=0.22 of hypertrophy. By univariate analysis, only male sex demonstrated an association with LV mass index (P=0.02. Six patterns of LV adaption were observed: normal ventricular geometry (n=11, concentric remodeling (n=11, asymmetric remodeling (n=11, concentric hypertrophy (n=34, asymmetric hypertrophy (n=14 and LV decompensation (n=10. Asymmetric patterns displayed considerable overlap in appearances (wall thickness 17±2mm with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Conclusions We have demonstrated that in patients with moderate and severe aortic stenosis, the pattern of LV adaption and degree of hypertrophy do not closely correlate with the severity of valve narrowing and that asymmetric patterns of wall thickening are common. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Reference Number: NCT00930735

  12. Recently patented transcatheter aortic valves in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neragi-Miandoab, Siyamek; Skripochnik, Edvard; Salemi, Arash; Girardi, Leonard

    2013-12-01

    The most widely used heart valve worldwide is the Edwards Sapien, which currently has 60% of the worldwide transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) market. The CoreValve is next in line in popularity, encompassing 35% of the worldwide TAVI market. Although these two valves dominate the TAVI market, a number of newer transcatheter valves have been introduced and others are in early clinical evaluation. The new valves are designed to reduce catheter delivery diameter, improve ease of positioning and sealing, and facilitate repositioning or removal. The most recent transcatheter valves for transapical use include Acurate TA (Symetis), Engager (Medtronic), and JenaValve the Portico (St Jude), Sadra Lotus Medical (Boston Scientific), and the Direct Flow Medical. These new inventions may introduce more effective treatment options for high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. Improvements in transcatheter valves and the developing variability among them may allow for more tailored approaches with respect to patient's anatomy, while giving operators the opportunity to choose devices they feel more comfortable with. Moreover, introducing new devices to the market will create a competitive environment among producers that will reduce high prices and expand availability. The present review article includes a discussion of recent patents related to Transcatheter Aortic Valves. PMID:24279506

  13. Circulating CD14+ monocytes in patients with aortic stenosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sara Shimoni; Valery Meledin; Iris Bar; Jacob Fabricant; Gera Gandelman; Jacob George

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundCalcific aortic stenosis (AS) is an active process sharing similarities with atherosclerosis and chronic inflammation. The pathophysiology of AS is notable for three cardinal components: inflammation, fibrosis and calcification. Monocytes play a role in each of these processes. The role of circulating monocytes in AS is not clear. The aim of the present study was to study an association between cir-culating apoptotic and non apoptotic CD14+ monocytes and AS features.MethodsWe assessed the number of CD14+ monocytes and apoptotic monocytes in 54 patients with significant AS (aortic valve area 0.74 ± 0.27 cm2) and compared them to 33 patients with similar risk factors and no valvular disease. The level of CD14+ monocytes and apoptotic monocytes was assessed by flow cytometry.ResultsThere was no difference in the risk factor profile and known coronary or peripheral vascular diseases between patients with AS and controls.Pa-tients with AS exhibited increased numbers of CD14+ monocytes as compared to controls (9.9% ± 4.9%vs. 7.7% ± 3.9%,P= 0.03). CD14+ monocyte number was related to age and the presence and severity of AS. In patients with AS, both CD14+ monocytes and apoptotic mono-cytes were inversely related to aortic valve area.ConclusionsPatients with significant AS have increased number of circulating CD14+ monocytes and there is an inverse correlation between monocyte count and aortic valve area. These findings may suggest that inflammation is operative not only in early valve injury phase, but also at later developed stages such as calcification when AS is severe.

  14. Valve-in-Valve Replacement Using a Sutureless Aortic Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohmen, Pascal M.; Lehmkuhl, Lukas; Borger, Michael A.; Misfeld, Martin; Mohr, Friedrich W.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 61 Final Diagnosis: Tissue degeneration Symptoms: Dyspnea Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Redo valve replacement Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: We present a unique case of a 61-year-old female patient with homograft deterioration after redo surgery for prosthetic valve endocarditis with root abscess. Case Report: The first operation was performed for type A dissection with root, arch, and elephant trunk replacement of the thoracic aorta. The present re-redo surgery was performed as valve-in-valve with a sutureless aortic biopros-thesis. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on day 6. Conclusions: The current case report demonstrates that sutureless bioprostheses are an attractive option for surgical valve-in-valve procedures, which can reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:27694795

  15. Aortic annulus eccentricity before and after transcatheter aortic valve implantation: Comparison of balloon-expandable and self-expanding prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Post-implant geometry of catheter-based aortic valve prostheses is influenced by aortic valve calcification. • Balloon-expandable prostheses are more circular as compared to self-expanding prostheses. • The impact of post-implant geometry on valve function needs to be investigated. - Abstract: Introduction: The geometry of the aortic annulus and implanted transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis might influence valve function. We investigated the influence of valve type and aortic valve calcification on post-implant geometry of catheter-based aortic valve prostheses. Methods: Eighty consecutive patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (mean age 82 ± 6 years) underwent computed tomography before and after TAVI. Aortic annulus diameters were determined. Influence of prosthesis type and degree of aortic valve calcification on post-implant eccentricity were analysed. Results: Aortic annulus eccentricity was reduced in patients after TAVI (0.21 ± 0.06 vs. 0.08 ± 0.06, p < 0.0001). Post-TAVI eccentricity was significantly lower in 65 patients following implantation of a balloon-expandable prosthesis as compared to 15 patients who received a self-expanding prosthesis (0.06 ± 0.05 vs. 0.15 ± 0.07, p < 0.0001), even though the extent of aortic valve calcification was not different. After TAVI, patients with a higher calcium amount retained a significantly higher eccentricity compared to patients with lower amounts of calcium. Conclusions: Patients undergoing TAVI with a balloon-expandable prosthesis show a more circular shape of the implanted prosthesis as compared to patients with a self-expanding prosthesis. Eccentricity of the deployed prosthesis is affected by the extent of aortic valve calcification

  16. Aortic annulus eccentricity before and after transcatheter aortic valve implantation: Comparison of balloon-expandable and self-expanding prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuhbaeck, Annika, E-mail: annika.schuhbaeck@uk-erlangen.de [Department of Cardiology, University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Weingartner, Christina [Department of Cardiology, University of Gießen, Giessen (Germany); Arnold, Martin; Schmid, Jasmin; Pflederer, Tobias; Marwan, Mohamed [Department of Cardiology, University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Rixe, Johannes; Nef, Holger [Department of Cardiology, University of Gießen, Giessen (Germany); Schneider, Christian [Department of Radiology, University of Gießen, Giessen (Germany); Lell, Michael; Uder, Michael [Department of Radiology, University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Ensminger, Stephan [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Heart and Diabetes Center NRW, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bad Oeynhausen (Germany); Feyrer, Richard; Weyand, Michael [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Achenbach, Stephan [Department of Cardiology, University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Post-implant geometry of catheter-based aortic valve prostheses is influenced by aortic valve calcification. • Balloon-expandable prostheses are more circular as compared to self-expanding prostheses. • The impact of post-implant geometry on valve function needs to be investigated. - Abstract: Introduction: The geometry of the aortic annulus and implanted transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis might influence valve function. We investigated the influence of valve type and aortic valve calcification on post-implant geometry of catheter-based aortic valve prostheses. Methods: Eighty consecutive patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (mean age 82 ± 6 years) underwent computed tomography before and after TAVI. Aortic annulus diameters were determined. Influence of prosthesis type and degree of aortic valve calcification on post-implant eccentricity were analysed. Results: Aortic annulus eccentricity was reduced in patients after TAVI (0.21 ± 0.06 vs. 0.08 ± 0.06, p < 0.0001). Post-TAVI eccentricity was significantly lower in 65 patients following implantation of a balloon-expandable prosthesis as compared to 15 patients who received a self-expanding prosthesis (0.06 ± 0.05 vs. 0.15 ± 0.07, p < 0.0001), even though the extent of aortic valve calcification was not different. After TAVI, patients with a higher calcium amount retained a significantly higher eccentricity compared to patients with lower amounts of calcium. Conclusions: Patients undergoing TAVI with a balloon-expandable prosthesis show a more circular shape of the implanted prosthesis as compared to patients with a self-expanding prosthesis. Eccentricity of the deployed prosthesis is affected by the extent of aortic valve calcification.

  17. Acute aortic valve prolapse in Marfan's syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, N J; Cullen, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    A 22 year old man with Marfan's syndrome died suddenly following acute aortic valve prolapse. Although aortic root involvement in Marfan's syndrome is common, we have found no previous description of this particular complication in the literature.

  18. Percutaneous aortic valve replacement using a W-model valved stent: a preliminary feasibility study in sheep

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Yuan; ZONG Gang-jun; WANG Yan-yan; JIANG Hai-bin; LI Wei-ping; WU Hong; ZHAO Xian-xian; QIN Yong-wen

    2009-01-01

    Background Percutaneous aortic valve replacement is a promising strategy in the treatment of patients with aortic valve stenosis. And many kinds of valved stents have been implanted in selected patients worldwide. However, the clinical experience is still limited. We developed a W-model valved stent and evaluated the feasibility and safety of percutaneous implantation of the device in the native aortic valve position.Methods A self expanding nitinol stent with W-model, containing porcine pericardium valves in its proximal part, was implanted in six sheep by means of a 14 French catheter through the right common lilac artery under guidance of fluoroscopy. During stent deployment the original aortic valve was pushed against the aortic wall by the self expanding force of the stent while the new valve was expanded. These sheep were followed up shortly after procedure with supra-aortic angiogram and left ventriculography. Additionally, one sheep was sacrificed after the procedure for anatomic evaluation.Results It was possible to replace the aortic valve in the beating heart in four sheep. The procedure failed in two sheep due to coronary orifice occlusion in one case and severe aortic valve regurgitation in the other case. One sheep was killed one hour after percutaneous aortic valve replacement for anatomic evaluation. There were no signs of damage of the aortic intima, or of obstruction of the coronary orifice.Conclusions Percutaneous aortic valve replacement with a W-model valved stent in the beating heart is possible. Further studies are mandatory to assess safety and efficacy of this kind of valved stent in larger sample size and by longer follow-up period.

  19. MARFAN SYNDROME AND QUADRICUSPID AORTIC VALVE

    OpenAIRE

    Sürücü, Hüseyin; ÇİMEN, Sadi

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACTWhile the major cardiovascular manifestation in Marfan syndrome is a progressive dilatation of the ascending aorta, leading to aortic aneurysm formation and eventually to fatal aortic rupture or dissection, mitral valve prolapse and calcification of the mitral valve annulus, dilatation of the main pulmonary artery may be seen. There was no knowledge about the association of Marfan syndrome and quadricuspid aortic valve. In this case report, we aimed to declare this association between...

  20. Comparison between three types of stented pericardial aortic valves (Trivalve trial): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Azarnoush, Kasra; Pereira, Bruno; Dualé, Christian; Dorigo, Enrica; Farhat, Mehdi; Innorta, Andrea; Dauphin, Nicolas; Geoffroy, Etienne; Chabrot, Pascal; Camilleri, Lionel

    2013-01-01

    International audience BackgroundAortic valve stenosis is one of the most common heart diseases in older patients. Nowadays, surgical aortic valve replacement is the 'gold standard' treatment for this pathology and the most implanted prostheses are biological ones. The three most implanted bovine bioprostheses are the Trifecta valve (St. Jude Medical, Minneapolis, MN, USA), the Mitroflow valve (Sorin Group, Saluggia, Italy), and the Carpentier-Edwards Magna Ease valve (Edwards Lifesciences...

  1. Sirt1 inhibits resistin expression in aortic stenosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Carter

    Full Text Available The development of human calcified aortic stenosis (AS includes age-dependent processes that have been involved in atherosclerosis, such as infiltration of macrophages in aortic valves, which then promote production of many pro-inflammatory cytokines, including resistin. However, the molecular mechanisms contributing to these processes are not established. Since Sirt1 has been shown to modulate macrophage biology and inflammation, we examined its levels in human AS and tested its impact on resistin expression. Sirt1 mRNA (p = 0.01 and protein (p<0.05 levels were reduced in explanted valves from AS patients (n = 51 compared to those from control (n = 11 patients. Sirt1 mRNA levels were negatively associated with resistin mRNA levels quantified in AS valves (p = 0.02. Stimulation of Sirt1 by resveratrol or virus-driven overexpression robustly diminished resistin mRNA and protein expression in macrophages, whereas down-regulation of Sirt1 triggered a large increase in resistin expression. These effects were direct, as chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that Sirt1 physically interacted with the resistin promoter region at an AP-1 response element. Moreover, Sirt1 blocked c-jun-induced resistin transactivation in gene reporter assays. These findings demonstrate that, in calcified AS, levels of Sirt1 are reduced whereas those of resistin are increased within aortic valve leaflets. Our results also suggest that this loss of Sirt1 expression alleviates its inhibition of resistin transcription in macrophages. Although the overall contribution of this process to the underlying mechanisms for AS disease development remains unresolved, these observations suggest that modification of Sirt1 expression and/or activity could represent a novel approach against inflammation in AS.

  2. Recently patented and widely used valves for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neragi-Miandoab, Siyamek; Skripochnik, Edvard; Michler, Robert E

    2012-12-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is a serious condition in the aging US and European populations. Management of a stenotic valve is crucial as it can become symptomatic quickly leading to ventricular deterioration and overall poor quality of life. Considering that AS is a disease of the elderly patient population, surgical intervention may not be well tolerated by some patients. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has emerged as an alternative approach for patients who are unsuitable surgical candidates. Since the first balloon-expandable Edwards SAPIEN valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA) was implanted by Dr. Cribier, many other valves have been introduced into clinical practice. Self-expanding valves such as the CoreValve ReValving system (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) for retrograde implantation and Symetis TX for antegrade and transapical implantation are the most frequently used self-expanding valves. The SAPIEN valve, on the other hand can be implanted both antegrade as well as retrograde. Overall, the most widely used valves are the Edwards SAPIEN and the CoreValve, which have been implanted in more than 40,000 patients worldwide. The Symetis valve has shown promising results in small series in Europe and may be introduced to the US market in the near future. This manuscript will review these 3 recently patented valves and discuss some of the clinical results that are available. PMID:23095028

  3. Internal mammary artery dilatation in a patient with aortic coarctation, aortic stenosis, and coronary disease. Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez Cereijo Jose M

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The ideal surgical approach is unclear in adult patients with coarctation of the aorta that is associated with other cardiovascular pathologies that require intervention. Standard median sternotomy allows simultaneous, coronary revascularization surgery, valve replacement and repair of aortic coarctation. However the collateral circulation and the anatomy of the mammary arteries must be determined, to avoid possible complications. We report a case of a 69 year-old man with aortic coarctation, aortic stenosis, coronary artery disease and internal mammary artery dilatation who underwent concomitant surgical procedures through a median sternotomy.

  4. A planning system for transapical aortic valve implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessat, Michael; Merk, Denis R.; Falk, Volkmar; Walther, Thomas; Jacobs, Stefan; Nöttling, Alois; Burgert, Oliver

    2009-02-01

    Stenosis of the aortic valve is a common cardiac disease. It is usually corrected surgically by replacing the valve with a mechanical or biological prosthesis. Transapical aortic valve implantation is an experimental minimally invasive surgical technique that is applied to patients with high operative risk to avoid pulmonary arrest. A stented biological prosthesis is mounted on a catheter. Through small incisions in the fifth intercostal space and the apex of the heart, the catheter is positioned under flouroscopy in the aortic root. The stent is expanded and unfolds the valve which is thereby implanted into the aortic root. Exact targeting is crucial, since major complications can arise from a misplaced valve. Planning software for the perioperative use is presented that allows for selection of the best fitting implant and calculation of the safe target area for that implant. The software uses contrast enhanced perioperative DynaCT images acquired under rapid pacing. In a semiautomatic process, a surface segmentation of the aortic root is created. User selected anatomical landmarks are used to calculate the geometric constraints for the size and position of the implant. The software is integrated into a PACS network based on DICOM communication to query and receive the images and implants templates from a PACS server. The planning results can be exported to the same server and from there can be rertieved by an intraoperative catheter guidance device.

  5. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Degenerative Bioprosthetic Surgical Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvir, Danny; Webb, John; Brecker, Stephen;

    2012-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation is an emerging therapeutic alternative for patients with a failed surgical bioprosthesis and may obviate the need for reoperation. We evaluated the clinical results of this technique using a large, worldwide registry.......Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation is an emerging therapeutic alternative for patients with a failed surgical bioprosthesis and may obviate the need for reoperation. We evaluated the clinical results of this technique using a large, worldwide registry....

  6. Calcific aortic valve damage as a risk factor for cardiovascular events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aortic valve calcification (AVC) is a common disease of the elderly. It is a progressive disease ranging from mild valve thickening to severe calcification with aortic valve stenosis. Risk factors for AVC are similar to those for atherosclerosis: age, gender, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, hypertension, smoking and renal failure. AVC shares many similarities to atherosclerosis, including inflammatory cells and calcium deposits, and correlates with coronary plaque burden. Presence of AVC is associated with increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events. The objective for this review is to discuss the clinical features, natural history and prognostic significance of aortic valve calcifications, including mechanical and hemodynamic factors of flow distribution

  7. Deficient signaling via Alk2 (Acvr1 leads to bicuspid aortic valve development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penny S Thomas

    Full Text Available Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV is the most common congenital cardiac anomaly in humans. Despite recent advances, the molecular basis of BAV development is poorly understood. Previously it has been shown that mutations in the Notch1 gene lead to BAV and valve calcification both in human and mice, and mice deficient in Gata5 or its downstream target Nos3 have been shown to display BAVs. Here we show that tissue-specific deletion of the gene encoding Activin Receptor Type I (Alk2 or Acvr1 in the cushion mesenchyme results in formation of aortic valve defects including BAV. These defects are largely due to a failure of normal development of the embryonic aortic valve leaflet precursor cushions in the outflow tract resulting in either a fused right- and non-coronary leaflet, or the presence of only a very small, rudimentary non-coronary leaflet. The surviving adult mutant mice display aortic stenosis with high frequency and occasional aortic valve insufficiency. The thickened aortic valve leaflets in such animals do not show changes in Bmp signaling activity, while Map kinase pathways are activated. Although dysfunction correlated with some pro-osteogenic differences in gene expression, neither calcification nor inflammation were detected in aortic valves of Alk2 mutants with stenosis. We conclude that signaling via Alk2 is required for appropriate aortic valve development in utero, and that defects in this process lead to indirect secondary complications later in life.

  8. Design and baseline characteristics of the simvastatin and ezetimibe in aortic stenosis (SEAS) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossebø, Anne B; Pedersen, Terje R; Allen, Christopher;

    2007-01-01

    stenosis (AS) is unclear, and there are no randomized treatment trials evaluating cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in such patients. The Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) Study is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study of a minimum 4 years' duration...... investigating the effect of lipid lowering with ezetimibe/simvastatin 10/40 mg/day in patients with asymptomatic AS with peak transvalvular jet velocity 2.5 to 4.0 m/s. Primary efficacy variables include aortic valve surgery and ischemic vascular events, including cardiovascular mortality, and second...

  9. Symptomatic obstruction of the brachiocephalic and left subclavian arteries obscured by aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Peter W; Assi, Roland; Grecu, Loreta; Dardik, Alan

    2014-04-01

    Stenosis or occlusion of the brachiocephalic artery represents an uncommon cause of cerebrovascular insufficiency. We report a patient with combined brachiocephalic and left subclavian obstruction with clinical manifestations of lightheadedness, syncope, and left-sided weakness who remained misdiagnosed essentially because of symmetrical pressures in the upper extremities. Aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis failed to provide symptomatic relief. Eventual stenting of the brachiocephalic trunk resolved the patient's symptoms. Our report highlights the diagnostic challenges in this case of bilateral supraaortic vessel disease and shows that equal upper extremity pressures do not rule out brachiocephalic artery obstruction.

  10. Electrocardiographic imaging-based recognition of possible induced bundle branch blocks during transcatheter aortic valve implantations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, P.M. van; Proniewska, K.; Maugenest, A.M.; Mieghem, N.M. van; Maan, A.C.; Jaegere, P.P. de; Bruining, N.

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Conventional electrocardiogram (ECG)-based diagnosis of left bundle branch block (LBBB) in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is ambiguous. Left ventricular hypertrophy is often seen in patients with severe aortic stenosis in which a transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI)

  11. Proteomic profile of human aortic stenosis: insights into the degenerative process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Rojas, Tatiana; Gil-Dones, Felix; Lopez-Almodovar, Luis F; Padial, Luis R; Vivanco, Fernando; Barderas, Maria G

    2012-03-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis is the most common worldwide cause of valve replacement. While it shares certain risk factors with coronary artery disease, it is not delayed or reversed by reducing exposure to risk factors (e.g., therapies that lower lipids). Therefore, it is necessary to better understand its pathophysiology for preventive measures to be taken. In this work, aortic valve samples were collected from 20 patients that underwent aortic valve replacement (55% males, mean age of 74 years) and 20 normal control valves were obtained from necropsies (40% males, mean age of 69 years). The proteome of the samples was analyzed by quantitative differential electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry, and 35 protein species were clearly increased in aortic valves, including apolipoprotein AI, alpha-1-antitrypsin, serum albumin, lumican, alfa-1-glycoprotein, vimentin, superoxide dismutase Cu-Zn, serum amyloid P-component, glutathione S-transferase-P, fatty acid-binding protein, transthyretin, and fibrinogen gamma. By contrast, 8 protein species were decreased (transgelin, haptoglobin, glutathione peroxidase 3, HSP27, and calreticulin). All of the proteins identified play a significant role in cardiovascular processes, such as fibrosis, homeostasis, and coagulation. The significant changes observed in the abundance of key cardiovascular proteins strongly suggest that they can be involved in the pathogenesis of degenerative aortic stenosis. Further studies are warranted to better understand this process before we can attempt to modulate it. PMID:22276806

  12. A rare presentation of late right coronary artery spasm following aortic valve replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Alizadeh-Ghavidel, Alireza; Basiri, Hosseinali; Totonchi, Ziae; Mirmesdagh, Yalda; Jalili-Shahandashti, Farshad; Gholizadeh, Behnam

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Coronary artery spasm (CAS) is defined as a reversible, sudden epicardial coronary artery stenosis that causes vessel occlusion or near occlusion. CASE REPORT In this article, we present a clinical case of CAS in a 48-year-old woman undergoing elective aortic valve replacement surgery for aortic stenosis. On the 3rd post-operative day, the patient suffered from chest pain and dyspnea. Emergent coronary angiography demonstrated a significant spasm of the ostium portion of the right ...

  13. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mylotte, Darren; Osnabrugge, Ruben L J; Windecker, Stephan;

    2013-01-01

    The authors sought to examine the adoption of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in Western Europe and investigate factors that may influence the heterogeneous use of this therapy.......The authors sought to examine the adoption of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in Western Europe and investigate factors that may influence the heterogeneous use of this therapy....

  14. Clinical Implications of Electrocardiographic Left Ventricular Strain and Hypertrophy in Asymptomatic Patients with Aortic Stenosis: The Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders M; Boman, Kurt; Gohlke-Baerwolf, Christa;

    2012-01-01

    in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study. Primary endpoint was the first of myocardial infarction, non-hemorrhagic stroke, heart failure, aortic valve replacement (AVR) or cardiovascular death. Predictive value of electrocardiographic LV strain (defined as T-wave inversion in leads V(4.......1, both p=0.001) and 2.5-fold higher risk of a combined endpoint of myocardial infarction, heart failure or cardiovascular death (95% CI, 1.3 to 4.9, p=0.008). CONCLUSIONS: Electrocardiographic LV strain and LVH were independently predictive of poor prognosis in asymptomatic AS. CLINICAL TRIAL......BACKGROUND: The prognostic impact of electrocardiographic left ventricular (LV) strain and hypertrophy (LVH) in asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) is not well described. METHODS AND RESULTS: Data were obtained in asymptomatic patients randomized to simvastatin/ezetimibe combination vs. placebo...

  15. Expanding TAVI options: elective rotational atherectomy during trans-catheter aortic valve implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piccoli, Anna; Lunardi, Mattia; Ariotti, Sara; Ferrero, Valeria; Vassanelli, Corrado; Ribichini, Flavio, E-mail: flavio.ribichini@univr.it

    2015-01-15

    Summary: Aortic valve stenosis (AVS) in the elderly is frequently associated to coronary artery disease (CAD). In patients with significant coronary stenosis surgical valve replacement is associated to coronary bypass grafting, but whether coronary angioplasty is needed in patients receiving trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is unknown. Given the frequent complexity of CAD in the elderly with calcific AVS, rotational atherectomy (RA) may be needed in some cases. No data are available about feasibility and safety of RA during TAVI. The need for myocardial revascularization in TAVI candidates is discussed, and a series of RA cases performed during TAVI is described.

  16. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Experience with SAPIEN 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Y; Tamburino, C; Barbanti, M

    2015-06-01

    Based on randomized trials with first generation devices, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVI) has been included into the treatment strategy for high-risk and inoperable patients with severe aortic stenosis. Procedural complications remain a concern with TAVI, including stroke, vascular complications, paravalvular leak (PVL) and conduction disturbances. Addressing these limitations will support TAVI use in lower risk populations. This review discussed features and most recent clinical evidence of the new balloon-expandable THV (SAPIEN 3, Edwards Lifescience, Irvine, CA, USA). PMID:25900559

  17. Intraoperative tracking of aortic valve plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc Long Hung; Garreau, Mireille; Auffret, Vincent; Le Breton, Hervé; Verhoye, Jean-Philippe; Haigron, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to track the aortic valve plane in intra-operative fluoroscopic images in order to optimize and secure Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) procedure. This paper is focused on the issue of aortic valve calcifications tracking in fluoroscopic images. We propose a new method based on the Tracking-Learning-Detection approach, applied to the aortic valve calcifications in order to determine the position of the aortic valve plane in intra-operative TAVI images. This main contribution concerns the improvement of object detection by updating the recursive tracker in which all features are tracked jointly. The approach has been evaluated on four patient databases, providing an absolute mean displacement error less than 10 pixels ≈ 2mm). Its suitability for the TAVI procedure has been analyzed. PMID:24110703

  18. Characteristics of aortic valve dysfunction and ascending aorta dimensions according to bicuspid aortic valve morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hong Ju [Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Je Kyoun; Chee, Hyun Kun; Kim, Jun Suk [Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Sung Min [Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    To characterize aortic valve dysfunction and ascending aorta dimensions according to bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) morphology using computed tomography (CT) and surgical findings. We retrospectively enrolled 209 patients with BAVs who underwent transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and CT. BAVs were classified as anterior-posterior (BAV-AP) or lateral (BAV-LA) orientation of the cusps and divided according to the presence (raphe+) or absence (raphe-) of a raphe. Ascending aortic dimensions were measured by CT at four levels. BAV-AP was present in 129 patients (61.7 %) and raphe+ in 120 (57.4 %). Sixty-nine patients (33.0 %) had aortic regurgitation (AR), 70 (33.5 %) had aortic stenosis (AS), and 58 (27.8 %) had combined AS and AR. AR was more common in patients with BAV-AP and raphe+; AS was more common with BAV-LA and raphe-.Annulus/body surface area and tubular portion/body surface area diameters in patients with BAV-AP (17.1 ± 2.3 mm/m{sup 2} and 24.2 ± 5.3 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively) and raphe+ (17.3 ± 2.2 mm/m{sup 2} and 24.2 ± 5.5 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively) were significantly different from those with BAV-LA (15.8 ± 1.9 mm/m{sup 2} and 26.4 ± 5.5 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively) and raphe- (15.7 ± 1.9 mm/m{sup 2} and 26.2 ± 5.4 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively). The morphological characteristics of BAV might be associated with the type of valvular dysfunction, and degree and location of an ascending aorta dilatation. (orig.)

  19. Medial arterial calcification, calcific aortic stenosis and mitral annular calcification in a diabetic patient with severe autonomic neuropathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, C C

    2012-02-03

    Medial arterial calcification (Monckeberg\\'s arteriosclerosis) is well described in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy. There is also a high prevalence of diabetes mellitus among subjects with calcific aortic stenosis and mitral annular calcification. We describe a diabetic patient with autonomic neuropathy and extensive medial arterial calcification who also had calcification of the aortic valve and of the mitral valve annulus. We propose that autonomic neuropathy may play a role in calcification of these structures at the base of the heart.

  20. An up-to-date overview of the most recent transcatheter implantable aortic valve prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegerinck, Esther M A; Van Kesteren, Floortje; Van Mourik, Martijn S; Vis, Marije M; Baan, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has evolved towards the routine therapy for high-risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. Technical refinements in TAVI are rapidly evolving with a simultaneous expansion of the number of available devices. This review will present an overview of the current status of development of TAVI-prostheses; describes the technical features and applicability of each device and the clinical data available.

  1. Combined elective percutaneous coronary intervention and transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    OpenAIRE

    Pasic, Miralem; Dreysse, Stephan; Unbehaun, Axel; Buz, Semih; Drews, Thorsten; Klein, Christoph; D'Ancona, Giuseppe; Hetzer, Roland

    2012-01-01

    There is no established strategy of how and when to treat coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Simultaneous, single-stage treatment of both pathologies is a possible solution. We report our initial results of simultaneously performed transapical TAVI and elective percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) in high-risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. Between April 2008 and July 2011, a total of 419 patients underwent ...

  2. Repositioning of an Intraventricular Dislocated Aortic Valve during Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Natour, Ehsan; Douglas, Yvonne L.; Jainandunsing, Jayant S.; Schurer, Remco A. J.; van der Werf, Hendrik W.; van den Heuvel, Ad F. M.

    2014-01-01

    The case is presented of a 75-year-old man referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. During the procedure the prosthetic aortic valve became dislocated into the left ventricle shortly after expansion. The subsequent steps taken to reposition the valve using only materials at hand are des

  3. Extended aortic valvuloplasty: a new approach for the management of congenital valvar aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilbawi, M N; DeLeon, S Y; Wilson, W R; Roberson, D A; Husayni, T S; Quinones, J A; Arcilla, R A

    1991-09-01

    A new technique for the treatment of congenital valvar aortic stenosis is described. It consists of augmenting the aortic cusp by extending the commissurotomy incision into the aortic wall around the leaflet insertion, mobilizing the valve cusp attachment at the commissures, and freeing the aortic insertion of the rudimentary commissure. The results of standard valvotomy performed on 48 patients (group 1) were compared with those of the new extended valvuloplasty carried out on 16 patients (group 2). The two groups were comparable in age at operation (2.7 +/- 2.1 years for group 1 versus 2.1 +/- 1.7 years for group 2; p = not significant) and in preoperative pressure gradient (58 +/- 25 mm Hg for group 1 versus 61 +/- 36 mm Hg for group 2; p = not significant). There was no operative mortality in either group. Follow-up is available on all patients, with a mean of 4.3 +/- 2.6 years for group 1 versus 1.7 +/- 0.5 years for group 2 (p = 0.05). There was one late death in group 1. Postoperative gradient was 47 +/- 13 mm Hg in group 1 versus 19 +/- 13 mm Hg in group 2 (p = 0.05). Moderate or severe regurgitation was present in 18 patients (38%) in group 1 and 2 patients (13%) in group 2 (p = not significant). Reoperation was needed in 8 patients (17%) in group 1 versus 2 patients (13%) in group 2 (p = not significant). The described valvuloplasty procedure addresses the unique pathological features of valvar aortic stenosis and provides better relief of the obstruction than the presently available techniques. Longer follow-up is needed to determine the late results of this approach.

  4. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in failed bioprosthetic surgical valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvir, Danny; Webb, John G; Bleiziffer, Sabine;

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Owing to a considerable shift toward bioprosthesis implantation rather than mechanical valves, it is expected that patients will increasingly present with degenerated bioprostheses in the next few years. Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation is a less invasive approach...... for patients with structural valve deterioration; however, a comprehensive evaluation of survival after the procedure has not yet been performed. OBJECTIVE: To determine the survival of patients after transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation inside failed surgical bioprosthetic valves. DESIGN, SETTING......, AND PARTICIPANTS: Correlates for survival were evaluated using a multinational valve-in-valve registry that included 459 patients with degenerated bioprosthetic valves undergoing valve-in-valve implantation between 2007 and May 2013 in 55 centers (mean age, 77.6 [SD, 9.8] years; 56% men; median Society of Thoracic...

  5. [Surgical aortic valve replacement for acute Streptococcus viridans endocarditis with simultaneous moderate hemophilia A].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawietz, W; Loracher, C; Struck, E; Schlimok, G; Falk, H

    1988-07-01

    This is a report of a 25-year-old patient with known aortic valve stenosis since early youth and hemophilia A, showing recurrent joint bleeding. Acute Streptococcus endocarditis induced aortic valve insufficiency resulting in cardiac failure. Aortic valve replacement was performed after substitution of factor VIII, during which intra- and postoperative bleeding was prolonged by pericardial adhesions. Heparin was administered during cardiopulmonary-bypass as usual, but usual postoperative cumarin therapy was not initiated due to prolonged PTT time. One year postoperatively, the patient was in an excellent condition and fully rehabilitated. PMID:3145652

  6. Bicuspid Aortic Valve Disease: The Role of Oxidative Stress in Lrp5 Bone Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Rajamannan, Nalini M

    2011-01-01

    The bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is a common congenital cardiac anomaly, having a prevalence of 0.9% to 1.37% in the general population and a male preponderance ratio of 2:1. The recognition of a BAV is clinically relevant because of its association with aortic stenosis or regurgitation, aortic aneurysm or dissection, and infective endocarditis. Although some patients with a BAV may go undetected without clinical complications for a lifetime, the vast majority will require intervention, most o...

  7. Anesthetic management of transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Franco

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI is an emergent technique for high-risk patients with aortic stenosis. TAVI poses significant challenges about its management because of the procedure itself and the population who undergo the implantation. Two devices are currently available and marketed in Europe and several other technologies are being developed. The retrograde transfemoral approach is the most popular procedure; nevertheless, it may not be feasible in patients with significant aortic or ileo-femoral arterial disease. Alternatives include a transaxillary approach, transapical approach, open surgical access to the retroperitoneal iliac artery and the ascending aorta. A complementary approach using both devices and alternative routes tailored to the anatomy and the comorbidities of the single patient is a main component for the successful implementation of a TAVI program. Anesthetic strategies vary in different centers. Local anesthesia or general anesthesia are both valid alternatives and can be applied according to the patient′s characteristics and procedural instances. General anesthesia offers many advantages, mainly regarding the possibility of an early diagnosis and treatment of possible complications through the use of transesophageal echocardiography. However, after the initial experiences, many groups began to employ, routinely, sedation plus local anesthesia for TAVI, and their procedural and periprocedural success demonstrates that it is feasible. TAVI is burdened with potential important complications: vascular injuries, arrhythmias, renal impairment, neurological complications, cardiac tamponade, prosthesis malpositioning and embolization and left main coronary artery occlusion. The aim of this work is to review the anesthetic management of TAVI based on the available literature.

  8. Quadricuspid aortic valve with ruptured sinus of Valsalva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerem Khan, Shamruz Khan; Tamin, Syahidah Syed; Burkhart, Harold M; Araoz, Philip A; Young, Phillip M

    2013-02-01

    We present a case of a 24-year-old woman who was diagnosed with quadricuspid aortic valve with ruptured sinus of Valsalva. Quadricuspid aortic valve is a rare congenital cardiac anomaly. The recognition of quadricuspid aortic valve has clinical significance as it causes aortic valve dysfunction, and is often associated with other congenital cardiac abnormalities. We showed the important role of multimodality imaging in diagnosing a quadricuspid aortic valve associated with ruptured sinus of Valsalva. PMID:22874066

  9. Cognitive Outcomes following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ka Sing Paris Lai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease in the elderly in the Western world and contributes to a large proportion of all deaths over the age of 70. Severe aortic stenosis is conventionally treated with surgical aortic valve replacement; however, the less invasive transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI is suggested for those at high surgical risk. While TAVI has been associated with improved survival and favourable outcomes, there is a higher incidence of cerebral microembolisms in TAVI patients. This finding is of concern given mechanistic links with cognitive decline, a symptom highly prevalent in those with cardiovascular disease. This paper reviews the literature assessing the possible link between TAVI and cognitive changes. Studies to date have shown that global cognition improves or remains unchanged over 3 months following TAVI while individual cognitive domains remain preserved over time. However, the association between TAVI and cognition remains unclear due to methodological limitations. Furthermore, while these studies have largely focused on memory, cognitive impairment in this population may be predominantly of vascular origin. Therefore, cognitive assessment focusing on domains important in vascular cognitive impairment, such as executive dysfunction, may be more helpful in elucidating the association between TAVI and cognition in the long term.

  10. Intra-operative Vector Flow Imaging Using Ultrasound of the Ascending Aorta among 40 Patients with Normal, Stenotic and Replaced Aortic Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse; Kjaergaard, Jesper;

    2016-01-01

    Stenosis of the aortic valve gives rise to more complex blood flows with increased velocities. The angleindependent vector flow ultrasound technique transverse oscillation was employed intra-operatively on the ascending aorta of (I) 20 patients with a healthy aortic valve and 20 patients...... with aortic stenosis before (IIa) and after (IIb) valve replacement. The results indicate that aortic stenosis increased flow complexity (p , 0.0001), induced systolic backflow (p , 0.003) and reduced systolic jet width (p , 0.0001). After valve replacement, the systolic backflow and jet width were normalized...... (p , 0.52 and p , 0.22), but flow complexity was not (p , 0.0001). Flow complexity (p , 0.0001), systolic jet width (p , 0.0001) and systolic backflow (p , 0.001) were associated with peak systolic velocity. The study found that aortic stenosis changes blood flow in the ascending aorta and valve...

  11. First direct aortic retrievable transcatheter aortic valve implantation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, Jaya; Glover, Chris; Labinaz, Marino; Ruel, Marc

    2014-11-01

    We describe 2 cases in which transcatheter aortic valve implantation was performed with a Portico prosthesis (St Jude Medical, St Paul, MN) through a direct aortic approach. In 1 of the cases, prosthesis retrieval was needed during the procedure and was essential to the successful outcome. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of direct aortic Portico prosthesis implantation, and it highlights the significance of the retrievable nature of this device. PMID:25442452

  12. Hemolytic Anemia after Aortic Valve Replacement: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feridoun Sabzi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic anemia is exceedingly rare and an underestimated complication after aortic valve replacement (AVR.The mechanism responsible for hemolysis most commonly involves a regurgitated flow or jet that related to paravalvar leak or turbulence of subvalvar stenosis. It appears to be independent of its severity as assessed by echocardiography. We present a case of a 24-year-old man with a history of AVR in 10 year ago that developed severe hemolytic anemia due to a mild subvalvar stenosis caused by pannus formation and mild hypertrophic septum. After exclusion of other causes of hemolytic anemia and the lack of clinical and laboratory improvement, the patient underwent redo valve surgery with pannus and subvalvar hypertrophic septum resection. Anemia and heart failure symptoms gradually resolved after surgery

  13. Asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis: challenges in diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Chisato

    2016-08-01

    Optimal management for asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS) remains controversial. Considering the increase in elderly patients, improved surgical outcomes and the introduction of transcatheter aortic valve implantation, we must reconsider the optimal management of asymptomatic severe AS. In this article, previous studies regarding the natural history of asymptomatic severe AS were reviewed to obtain a clinical perspective of AS in the growing elderly patient population. The incidence of sudden death in asymptomatic severe AS varies among studies from 0.25% to 1.7% per year, with differences related to study design and patient background. Except for very severe AS, sudden death or AS-related cardiac death without preceding symptoms is uncommon if 'watchful' waiting strategy is possible. Therefore, early operation is reasonable in very severe AS, but it is not recommended for all patients with severe AS. Using exercise tests, plasma levels of natriuretic peptides and other parameters, risk stratification of asymptomatic severe AS is needed to select patients who may have greater benefit following early operation. On the other hand, 'watchful' waiting is not always possible in real world of our practice. Patient education and periodic echocardiography are essential in 'watchful' waiting, which is not simply waiting strategy without careful monitoring. Individualised discussion regarding the indication for early operation is necessary, considering age, clinical background, predicted natural history and operative risk in each patient. PMID:27091844

  14. CT and MR imaging of the aortic valve: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Christopher J; Maleszewski, Joseph J; Araoz, Philip A

    2012-01-01

    Valvular disease is estimated to account for as many as 20% of cardiac surgical procedures performed in the United States. It may be congenital in origin or secondary to another disease process. One congenital anomaly, bicuspid aortic valve, is associated with increased incidence of stenosis, regurgitation, endocarditis, and aneurysmal dilatation of the aorta. A bicuspid valve has two cusps instead of the normal three; resultant fusion or poor excursion of the valve leaflets may lead to aortic stenosis, the presence of which is signaled by dephasing jets on magnetic resonance (MR) images. Surgery is generally recommended for patients with severe stenosis who are symptomatic or who have significant ventricular dysfunction; transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an emerging therapeutic option for patients who are not eligible for surgical treatment. Computed tomography (CT) is an essential component of preoperative planning for TAVI; it is used to determine the aortic root dimensions, severity of peripheral vascular disease, and status of the coronary arteries. Aortic regurgitation, which is caused by incompetent closure of the aortic valve, likewise leads to the appearance of jets on MR images. The severity of regurgitation is graded on the basis of valvular morphologic parameters; qualitative assessment of dephasing jets at Doppler ultrasonography; or measurements of the regurgitant fraction, volume, and orifice area. Mild regurgitation is managed conservatively, whereas severe or symptomatic regurgitation usually leads to valve replacement surgery, especially in the presence of substantial left ventricular enlargement or dysfunction. Bacterial endocarditis, although less common than aortic stenosis and regurgitation, is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Electrocardiographically gated CT reliably demonstrates infectious vegetations and benign excrescences of 1 cm or more on the valve surface, allowing the assessment of any embolic

  15. Left Ventricular Dynamics after Aortic Valve Replacement: A Long-term, Combined Radionuclide Angiographic and Ultrasonographic Study

    OpenAIRE

    Masotti, Claudio S.; Bonfranceschi, Paola; Rusticali, Guido; Rusticali, Franco; Pierangeli, Angelo

    1992-01-01

    Between January 1985 and July 1990, we studied 71 patients at our institution who underwent aortic valve replacement for either aortic valve regurgitation (40 patients) or stenosis (31 patients). The following prostheses were implanted: 25 St. Jude Medical valves (bileaflet), 16 Björk-Shiley (monoleaflet, tilting disc, 60° convexo-concave), 16 Medtronic-Hall (monoleaflet, tilting disc), and 14 Starr-Edwards (caged ball). The patients were evaluated pre-and postoperatively by means of gated bl...

  16. Congenital valvular aortic stenosis in young adults : Predictors for rate of progression of stenosis and aortic dilatation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linde, Denise; Andrinopoulou, Elini-Rosalina; Oechslin, Erwin N.; Budts, Werner; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Pieper, Petronella G.; Wajon, Elly M. C. J.; Post, Marco C.; Witsenburg, Maarten; Silversides, Candice K.; Oxenius, Angela; Bogers, Ad J. J. C.; Takkenberg, Johanna J. M.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Congenital aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common obstructive left-sided cardiac lesion in young adults, however little is known about the progression in adults. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the progression rate of AS and aortic dilatation in a large multicenter retrospective cohort

  17. iTRAQ proteomic analysis of extracellular matrix remodeling in aortic valve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Rojas, Tatiana; Mourino-Alvarez, Laura; Alonso-Orgaz, Sergio; Rosello-Lleti, Esther; Calvo, Enrique; Lopez-Almodovar, Luis Fernando; Rivera, Miguel; Padial, Luis R; Lopez, Juan Antonio; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Barderas, Maria G

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common worldwide cause of valve replacement. The aortic valve is a thin, complex, layered connective tissue with compartmentalized extracellular matrix (ECM) produced by specialized cell types, which directs blood flow in one direction through the heart. There is evidence suggesting remodeling of such ECM during aortic stenosis development. Thus, a better characterization of the role of ECM proteins in this disease would increase our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms. Aortic valve samples were collected from 18 patients which underwent aortic valve replacement (50% males, mean age of 74 years) and 18 normal control valves were obtained from necropsies (40% males, mean age of 69 years). The proteome of the samples was analyzed by 2D-LC MS/MS iTRAQ methodology. The results showed an altered expression of 13 ECM proteins of which 3 (biglycan, periostin, prolargin) were validated by Western blotting and/or SRM analyses. These findings are substantiated by our previous results demonstrating differential ECM protein expression. The present study has demonstrated a differential ECM protein pattern in individuals with AS, therefore supporting previous evidence of a dynamic ECM remodeling in human aortic valves during AS development. PMID:26620461

  18. Cost effectiveness of aortic valve therapies: a systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Battaglia

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: we performed a systematic review on the cost effectiveness of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI to standard aortic valve replacement and medical management in high-risk elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis.Methods: in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses, a systematic review on current literature for cost-effectiveness of TAVI, standard aortic valve replacement, and medical management for elderly patients with high-risk severe aortic stenosis was performed. Incremental cost effectiveness ratio is used to measure effectiveness through life years gained or quality adjusted life years. Drummond checklist was used to further assess the quality of the included studies.Results: the systematic literature search identified 4 primary publications (derived from 52 citations that fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Tremendous discrepancy in incremental cost effectiveness ratio is demonstrated with operable patients similar to Cohort A of the PARTNER trial (€ 749 416 and € 39 577. Inoperable patients similar to Cohort B of the PARTNER trial suggest notable differences in favour for transcatheter aortic valve implantation with an increase in quality adjusted life years (0.06 versus 1.6, respectively. With lifetime horizon to transcatheter aortic valve implantation there is a more comparable incremental cost effectiveness ratio in the literature (€ 38 260 and € 37 432. Lowest incremental cost effectiveness ratio witnessed in the technical inoperable group at € 26 482. Lifetime horizon of 10 years with transcatheter aortic valve implantation differ (€ 39 388 versus € 19 947. Overall, a review of the literature suggests TAVI usage in patients for severe aortic stenosis whom are not eligible for surgery. All the studies were overall judged of medium-high quality.Conclusions: transcatheter aortic valve replacement is more cost effective with a lifetime horizon for the

  19. Catheterization-Doppler discrepancies in nonsimultaneous evaluations of aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghassi, Payam; Aurigemma, Gerard P; Folland, Edward D; Tighe, Dennis A

    2005-05-01

    Prior validation studies have established that simultaneously measured catheter (cath) and Doppler mean pressure gradients (MPG) correlate closely in evaluation of aortic stenosis (AS). In clinical practice, however, cath and Doppler are rarely performed simultaneously; which may lead to discrepant results. Accordingly, our aim was to ascertain agreement between these methods and investigate factors associated with discrepant results. We reviewed findings in 100 consecutive evaluations for AS performed in 97 patients (mean age 72 +/- 10 yr) in which cath and Doppler were performed within 6 weeks. We recorded MPG, aortic valve area (AVA), cardiac output, and ejection fraction (EF) by both methods. Aortic root diameter, left ventricular end-diastolic dimension (LVIDd) and posterior wall thickness (PWT) were measured by echocardiography and gender, heart rate, and heart rhythm were also recorded. An MPG discrepancy was defined as an intrapatient difference > 10 mmHg. Mean pressure gradients by cath and Doppler were 36 +/- 22 mmHg and 37 +/- 20 mmHg, respectively (P = 0.73). Linear regression showed good correlation (r = 0.82) between the techniques. An MPG discrepancy was found in 36 (36%) of 100 evaluations; in 19 (53%) of 36 evaluations MPG by Doppler was higher than cath, and in 17 (47%) of 36, it was lower. In 33 evaluations, EF differed by >10% between techniques. Linear regression analyses revealed that EF difference between studies was a significant predictor of MPG discrepancy (P = 0.004). Women had significantly higher MPG than men by both cath and Doppler (43 +/- 25 mmHg versus 29 +/- 15 mmHg [P = 0.001]; 42 +/- 23 mmHg versus 32 +/- 15 mmHg [P = 0.014], respectively). Women exhibited discrepant results in 23 (47%) of 49 evaluations versus 13 (25%) of 51 evaluations in men (P = 0.037). After adjustment for women's higher MPG, there was no statistically significant difference in MPG discrepancy between genders (P = 0.22). No significant interactions between

  20. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement and aortic valve repair in a patient with acromegaly and aortic root dilatation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Van Praet

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aortic regurgitation and dilatation of the aortic root and ascending aorta are severe complications of acromegaly. The current trend for management of an aortic root aneurysm is valve-sparing root replacement as well as restoring the diameter of the aortic sinotubular junction (STJ and annulus. Our case report supports the recommendation that in patients with acromegaly, severe aortic root involvement may indicate the need for surgery.

  1. Prosthetic valve endocarditis with valvular obstruction after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabilona, Christine; Gitler, Bernard; Lederman, Jeffrey A; Miller, Donald; Keltz, Theodore N

    2015-04-01

    Patients with severe aortic stenosis who are at high risk for open-heart surgery might be candidates for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). To our knowledge, this is the first report of Streptococcus viridans endocarditis that caused prosthetic valve obstruction after TAVR. A 77-year-old man who had undergone TAVR 17 months earlier was admitted because of evidence of prosthetic valve endocarditis. A transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a substantial increase in the transvalvular peak gradient and mean gradient in comparison with an echocardiogram of 7 months earlier. A transesophageal echocardiogram showed a 1.5-cm vegetation obstructing the valve. Blood cultures yielded penicillin-sensitive S. viridans. The patient was hemodynamically stable and was initially treated with vancomycin because of his previous penicillin allergy. Subsequent therapy with levofloxacin, oral penicillin (after a negative penicillin skin test), and intravenous penicillin eliminated the symptoms of the infection. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement is a relatively new procedure, and sequelae are still being discovered. We recommend that physicians consider obstructive endocarditis as one of these.

  2. Vascular Complications Associated with Transfemoral Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, George L; Jaspan, Vita; Kelly, Brian J; Calixte, Rose

    2016-06-01

    Background Transfemoral aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a novel technique for treating aortic stenosis, yet vascular complications are yet to be delineated. Objectives This study aims to study the vascular complications of TAVR with Edwards Sapien valves (Edwards Lifesciences Corp., Irvine, CA). Methods We performed a retrospective evaluation of TAVR patients. Standard demographics, femoral vessel and sheath size, access type (femoral cut-down [FC], percutaneous access [PFA], and iliac conduit [IC]), and treatment method were recorded. Complications were defined by the Valve Academic Research Consortium Criteria. Logistic regression was used for statistical analysis. Results A total of 99 patients underwent TAVR between February 15, 2012 and July 17, 2013 with an Edwards Sapien valve. Out of which, 48 were males with a mean age of 83 ± 7 years. Overall, 33 had FC, 58 had PFA, and 6 had an IC. A total of 17 major (2 aortic and 15 iliac) and 38 minor complications (36 access and 2 emboli) occurred. Aortic complications were managed by open repair (OR, 1) or percutaneous repair (PR, 1). Overall, 12 iliac injuries were managed by PR and 3 by OR. Out of the 33 groin complications in FC patients 8 (24%) were treated by OR, whereas 30 (52%) of the 58 groin complications in PTA patients were treated by PR. There were no differences in transfusion requirements or length of stay. Conclusion Vascular complications of TAVR are common with most being minor, related to access site and causing no immediate sequelae. Iliac injury can be managed by PR or OR. Aortic injury is associated with significant mortality. These findings increase vascular surgeons' awareness of these complications and how to manage them. PMID:27231425

  3. Asymmetric septal hypertrophy - a marker of hypertension in aortic stenosis (a SEAS substudy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuseth, Nora; Cramariuc, Dana; Rieck, Ashild E;

    2010-01-01

    Some patients with aortic stenosis develop asymmetric septal hypertrophy (ASH) that may influence the surgical approach and is associated with higher perioperative morbidity. The aim of this analysis was to characterize further this subtype of aortic stenosis patients.......Some patients with aortic stenosis develop asymmetric septal hypertrophy (ASH) that may influence the surgical approach and is associated with higher perioperative morbidity. The aim of this analysis was to characterize further this subtype of aortic stenosis patients....

  4. Regional aortic distensibility and its relationship with age and aortic stenosis: a computed tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Dennis T L; Narayan, Om; Leong, Darryl P; Bertaso, Angela G; Maia, Murilo G; Ko, Brian S H; Baillie, Timothy; Seneviratne, Sujith K; Worthley, Matthew I; Meredith, Ian T; Cameron, James D

    2015-06-01

    Aortic distensibility (AD) decreases with age and increased aortic stiffness is independently associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The association of severe aortic stenosis (AS) with AD in different aortic regions has not been evaluated. Elderly subjects with severe AS and a cohort of patients without AS of similar age were studied. Proximal aortic cross-sectional-area changes during the cardiac cycle were determined using retrospective-ECG-gating on 128-detector row computed-tomography. Using oscillometric-brachial-blood-pressure measurements, the AD at the ascending-aorta (AA), proximal-descending-aorta (PDA) and distal-descending-aorta (DDA) was determined. Linear mixed effects modelling was used to determine the association of age and aortic stenosis on regional AD. 102 patients were evaluated: 36 AS patients (70-85 years), 24 AS patients (>85 years) and 42 patients without AS (9 patients DDA (1.1 ± 1.2 vs. 1.2 ± 0.8, P = 0.97). In patients without AS, AD decreased with age in all aortic regions (P < 0.001). The AA in patients <50 years were the most distensible compared to other aortic regions. There is regional variation in aortic distensibility with aging. Patients with aortic stenosis demonstrated regional differences in aortic distensibility with lower distensibility demonstrated in the proximal ascending aorta compared to an age-matched cohort. PMID:25855464

  5. Aortic valve area assessed with 320-detector computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Kofoed, Klaus Fuglsang; Carstensen, Helle Gervig;

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of aortic valve area (AVA) assessment with 320-detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) compared to transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) in a population with mild to severe aortic valve stenosis. AVA was estimated in 169 patients by planimetry on MDCT images (AVA......(MDCT)) and by the continuity equation with TTE (AVA(TTE)). To generate a reference AVA (AVA(REF)) we used the stroke volume from MDCT divided by the velocity time integral from CW Doppler by TTE (according to the continuity equation: stroke volume in LVOT = stroke volume passing the aortic valve). AVA(REF) was used...... as the reference to compare both measures against, since it bypasses the assumption of LVOT being circular in the continuity equation and the potential placement error of PW Doppler in the LVOT. The mean (±SD) age of the patients was 71 (±9) years, 113 (67%) were males. Mean AVA(TTE) was 0.93 (±0.33) cm(2), mean...

  6. Spectrum of Aortic Valve Abnormalities Associated with Aortic Dilation Across Age Groups in Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, Laura J.; Baba, Ridhwan Y.; Arai, Andrew E.; Bandettini, W. Patricia; Rosing, Douglas R.; Bakalov, Vladimir; Sachdev, Vandana; Bondy, Carolyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Congenital aortic valve fusion is associated with aortic dilation, aneurysm and rupture in girls and women with Turner syndrome (TS). Our objective was to characterize aortic valve structure in subjects with TS, and determine the prevalence of aortic dilation and valve dysfunction associated with different types of aortic valves. Methods and Results The aortic valve and thoracic aorta were characterized by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in 208 subjects with TS in an IRB-approved natural history study. Echocardiography was used to measure peak velocities across the aortic valve, and the degree of aortic regurgitation. Four distinct valve morphologies were identified: tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) 64%(n=133), partially fused aortic valve (PF) 12%(n=25), bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) 23%(n=47), and unicuspid aortic valve (UAV) 1%(n=3). Age and body surface area (BSA) were similar in the 4 valve morphology groups. There was a significant trend, independent of age, towards larger BSA-indexed ascending aortic diameters (AADi) with increasing valve fusion. AADi were (mean +/− SD) 16.9 +/− 3.3 mm/m2, 18.3 +/− 3.3 mm/m2, and 19.8 +/− 3.9 mm/m2 (p<0.0001) for TAV, PF and BAV+UAV respectively. PF, BAV, and UAV were significantly associated with mild aortic regurgitation and elevated peak velocities across the aortic valve. Conclusions Aortic valve abnormalities in TS occur with a spectrum of severity, and are associated with aortic root dilation across age groups. Partial fusion of the aortic valve, traditionally regarded as an acquired valve problem, had an equal age distribution and was associated with an increased AADi. PMID:24084490

  7. Aortic valve replacement in octogenarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dark John H

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Aims As our population ages and life expectancy increases the number of people aged over 80 and more referred for cardiac surgery is growing. This study sought to identify the outcome of aortic valve replacement (AVR in octogenarians. Methods 68 patients aged 80 years or more underwent AVR at the Freeman Hospital, between April 2001 and April 2004. A retrospective review of the notes and outcomes from the patients' GP and the NHS strategic tracking service was performed. 54% (37 underwent isolated AVR whilst 46% (31 underwent combined AVR and CABG. Results Follow up was 100% complete. The mean age was 83.1 ± s.d. 2.9 years, a mean gradient of 83 ± s.d. 31 mmHg and mean AVA of 0.56 cm2. The mean additive EuroSCORE was 8.6 ± s.d. 1.2, the logistic EuroSCORE mean 12.0 ± s.d. 5.9. In hospital 30 day mortality was 13 %. Survival was 80% at 1 year and 78% at 2 years. Median follow up was for 712 days. Stepwise logistic regression identified chronic obstructive airways disease as an independent predictor of mortality (p Conclusion Our study demonstrates that the operative mortality for AVR in the over eighties is good, whilst the mid to long term outcome is excellent There is a very low attrition rate with those undergoing the procedure living as long than their age matched population. This study confirms AVR is a safe, acceptable treatment for octogenarians with excellent mid term outcomes.

  8. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a significant number of mitral valve repairs utilizing robotic techniques as well, which is really outside the ... no significant bleeding. Terry asks if you do robotic valve replacement surgeries. I do not. It's a ...

  9. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... which is made out of pyrolitic carbon, basically metal and plastic. Again, blood flows through this valve. ... has a prosthetic valve should let all their treating physicians, dentists, et cetera, know that so that ...

  10. Turner's syndrome associated with bicuspid aortic stenosis and dissecting aortic aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Slater, D N; Grundman, M. J.; Mitchell, L

    1982-01-01

    A case of Turner's syndrome is described associated with bicuspid aortic stenosis and fatal rupture of a thoracic dissecting aortic aneurysm. Histology of the aneurysm showed severe cystic medial necrosis. This association has not been previously described in the absence of coarctation.

  11. Subvalvular aortic stenosis as a cause of sudden death: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Arzu Akcay; Guven, Taner; Karayel, Ferah; Pakis, Isil; Gurpinar, Kagan; Ozaslan, Abdi

    2006-03-01

    Sudden death is defined as a death that occurs suddenly, develops during an unpredictable course, and is due to natural or unnatural causes. Although there is no universally standardized definition on how "sudden" a sudden death is, WHO defines sudden death as a death that occurs within 24 hours after the onset of symptoms. The aim of this study is to present 2 rarely reported autopsy cases and to emphasize the importance of systemic autopsy at sudden death. On macroscopic examination, crescent-shaped, thick, fibrous membranes, located 5 mm and 3 mm away from the aortic valves, were detected. Fibrous membranes extended from the ventricular septum to the left ventricular outflow tract, thus apparently narrowing this region. Left ventricular wall and septum were slightly thickened, and there were scattered grayish-white areas of a small diameter. These became more intense in the septum and myocardium of the left ventricle on the anterior plane of the myocardial sections. In both cases, the aortic valves of were thickened and also markedly narrowed on one of them. In this case, the fibrous membrane adhered to the aortic valve and extended to the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve at one side. Both aortic valves comprised 3 leaflets. Other valves and coronary arteries showed no macroscopic pathologic findings. Microscopic examination of both cases demonstrated that the fibrous membrane comprising abundant collagen fibers was situated on the ventricular septum. Hypertrophy, moderate to severe interstitial fibrosis, and focal areas of scarring were observed in the specimens taken from the septal and ventricular myocardium. No abnormality was found on the conduction system examinations. Toxicologic analysis results in blood were negative. Based on the findings, membranous-type (discrete type) subvalvular aortic stenosis, diagnosed during the autopsy, was considered as the cause of sudden death in both cases.

  12. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement: current application and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassa, Amir-Ali; Himbert, Dominique; Vahanian, Alec

    2013-04-01

    During the last decade, the rapid evolution of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has revolutionized the treatment of severe aortic stenosis. Since the PARTNER A and B trials, this technique has become the treatment of reference for inoperable patients, and an attractive alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement in those at high risk for surgery. Large multicenter registries conducted since 2007, mainly in Europe, confirmed the excellent hemodynamic performances of the 2 percutaneous valves currently available on the market, the Edwards SAPIEN, and the Medtronic CoreValve, as well as their benefits in terms of symptom relief and survival. The whole process of TAVR, from patient selection to post-procedural care and result evaluation, should be conducted by a dedicated multidisciplinary "heart team," within centers with expertise in valve disease. Though currently limited to those deemed at high risk for surgery or inoperable, indications for TAVR will likely be extended to a broader spectrum of patients, in particular those with surgical bioprosthetic failure or at intermediate risk for surgery. Beforehand, it will be essential to obtain more extensive data on the durability of percutaneous prostheses, since the available follow-up is seldom longer than 5 years, and in order to further decrease the rate of complications, mainly stroke, paravalvular regurgitation, and access site complications. Furthermore, the use of the transfemoral route will undoubtedly increase because of the miniaturization of the devices, at the expense of other approaches. Above all, multidisciplinary approach, excellent imaging, and careful evaluation will remain key to the success of this technique. PMID:23420448

  13. Modified lipoprotein-derived lipid particles accumulate in human stenotic aortic valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehti, Satu; Käkelä, Reijo; Hörkkö, Sohvi; Kummu, Outi; Helske-Suihko, Satu; Kupari, Markku; Werkkala, Kalervo; Kovanen, Petri T; Oörni, Katariina

    2013-01-01

    In aortic stenosis plasma lipoprotein-derived lipids accumulate in aortic valves. Here, we first compared the lipid compositions of stenotic aortic valves and atherosclerotic plaque cores. Both pathological tissues were found to be enriched in cholesteryl linoleate, a marker of extracellularly accumulated lipoproteins. In addition, a large proportion of the phospholipids were found to contain arachidonic acid, the common precursor of a number of proinflammatory lipid mediators. Next, we isolated and characterized extracellular lipid particles from human stenotic and non-stenotic control valves, and compared them to plasma lipoproteins from the same subjects. The extracellular valvular lipid particles were isolated from 15 stenotic and 14 non-stenotic aortic valves. Significantly more apoB-100-containing lipid particles were found in the stenotic than in the non-stenotic valves. The majority of the lipid particles isolated from the non-stenotic valves had sizes (23±6.2 nm in diameter) similar to those of plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL) (22±1.5 nm), while the lipid particles from stenotic valves were not of uniform size, their sizes ranging from 18 to more than 500 nm. The lipid particles showed signs of oxidative modifications, and when compared to isolated plasma LDL particles, the lipid particles isolated from the stenotic valves had a higher sphingomyelin/phosphatidylcholine -ratio, and also higher contents of lysophosphatidylcholine and unesterified cholesterol. The findings of the present study reveal, for the first time, that in stenotic human aortic valves, infiltrated plasma lipoproteins have undergone oxidative and lipolytic modifications, and become fused and aggregated. The generated large lipid particles may contribute to the pathogenesis of human aortic stenosis.

  14. The Nordic Aortic Valve Intervention (NOTION trial comparing transcatheter versus surgical valve implantation: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thyregod Hans Gustav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Degenerative aortic valve (AV stenosis is the most prevalent heart valve disease in the western world. Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR has until recently been the standard of treatment for patients with severe AV stenosis. Whether transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI can be offered with improved safety and similar effectiveness in a population including low-risk patients has yet to be examined in a randomised setting. Methods/Design This randomised clinical trial will evaluate the benefits and risks of TAVI using the transarterial CoreValve System (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA (intervention group compared with SAVR (control group in patients with severe degenerative AV stenosis. Randomisation ratio is 1:1, enrolling a total of 280 patients aged 70 years or older without significant coronary artery disease and with a low, moderate, or high surgical risk profile. Trial outcomes include a primary composite outcome of myocardial infarction, stroke, or all-cause mortality within the first year after intervention (expected rates 5% for TAVI, 15% for SAVR. Exploratory safety outcomes include procedure complications, valve re-intervention, and cardiovascular death, as well as cardiac, cerebral, pulmonary, renal, and vascular complications. Exploratory efficacy outcomes include New York Heart Association functional status, quality of life, and valve prosthesis and cardiac performance. Enrolment began in December 2009, and 269 patients have been enrolled up to December 2012. Discussion The trial is designed to evaluate the performance of TAVI in comparison with SAVR. The trial results may influence the choice of treatment modality for patients with severe degenerative AV stenosis. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01057173

  15. Carotid plaque, intima-media thickness, and incident aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsson, Andreas; Östling, Gerd; Persson, Margaretha;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Aortic stenosis (AS) shares risk factors with atherosclerotic vascular disease. Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and plaque may reflect the cumulative damage from exposure to different atherosclerotic risk factors. We examined the relationship of carotid IMT and plaque with inciden...

  16. Lowering plasma cholesterol levels halts progression of aortic valve disease in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jordan D.; Weiss, Robert M.; Serrano, Kristine M.; Brooks, Robert M.; Berry, Christopher J.; Zimmerman, Kathy; Young, Stephen G.; Heistad, Donald D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Treatment of hyperlipidemia produces functional and structural improvements in atherosclerotic vessels. However, the effects of treating hyperlipidemia on the structure and function of the aortic valve has been controversial, and any effects could be confounded by pleiotropic effects of hypolipidemic treatment. The goal of this study was to determine whether reducing elevated plasma lipid levels with a “genetic switch” in Reversa mice (Ldlr−/−/Apob100/100/Mttpfl/fl/Mx1Cre+/+) reduces oxidative stress, reduces proosteogenic signaling, and retards the progression of aortic valve disease. Methods and Results After 6 months of hypercholesterolemia, Reversa mice exhibited increases in superoxide, lipid deposition, myofibroblast activation, calcium deposition, and pro-osteogenic protein expression in the aortic valve. Maximum aortic valve cusp separation, as judged by echocardiography, was not altered. During an additional 6 months of hypercholesterolemia, superoxide levels, valvular lipid deposition, and myofibroblast activation remained elevated. Furthermore, calcium deposition and pro-osteogenic gene expression became more pronounced and the aortic cusp separation decreased from 0.85 ± 0.04 to 0.70 ± 0.04 mm (mean ± SE; p < 0.05). Rapid normalization of cholesterol levels at 6 months of age (by inducing expression of Cre recombinase) normalized aortic valve superoxide levels, decreased myofibroblast activation, reduced valvular calcium burden, suppressed pro-osteogenic signaling cascades, and prevented the reductions in aortic valve cusp separation. Conclusions Collectively, these data indicate that reducing plasma lipid levels by genetic inactivation of the mttp gene in hypercholesterolemic mice with early aortic valve disease normalizes oxidative stress, reduces pro-osteogenic signaling, and halts the progression of aortic valve stenosis. PMID:19433756

  17. Octogenarian with an untreated femoral neck fracture: upright position during the postoperative course after aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Polastri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe a patient with a femoral neck fracture undergoing an aortic valve replacement. The study design was a case report. An 82-year-old female with an untreated right femoral neck fracture, and a severe aortic valve stenosis was admitted to a cardiac surgery department for surgical treatment of the valve disease. She underwent aortic valve replacement with a sutureless biological valve prosthesis through a partial sternotomy. At an early stage, the patient was instructed to make postural changes in the standing position. As a result, she was able to perform body movements associated with either a sitting or standing position. This case shows that appropriate early mobilization of a patient with a femoral neck fracture is feasible after aortic valve replacement, even though this does not necessarily mean that the patient needs to walk.

  18. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a patient with circulatory collapse, using the lucas® chest compression system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Blom; Andersen, Claus; Nissen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) using the LUCAS® Chest Compression System in an elderly high risk patient with severe aortic stenosis and heart failure. In this case, the patient developed severe aortic regurgitation following predilatation of the native aortic...... valve and automated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (A-CPR) was initiated. The procedure was performed under ongoing A-CPR for a total of 28 min. The patient was transferred to the intensive care unit and to a step down unit the following day. At follow-up 30 days later, she showed no signs of neurologic...

  19. Distortion of the CoreValve during transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation due to valve dislocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souteyrand, Geraud, E-mail: gsouteyrand@chu-clermontferrand.fr [Department of Cardiology, Gabriel Montpied Hospital, CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Clermont-Ferrand (France); ERIM-EA3295, University of Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Wilczek, Krzysztof [Department of Cardiology, Medical University of Silesia, Silesian Centre for Herat Diseases, Zabrze (Poland); Innorta, Andrea; Camilleri, Lionel [Department of Cardiology, Gabriel Montpied Hospital, CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Clermont-Ferrand (France); ERIM-EA3295, University of Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Chodor, Piotr [Department of Cardiology, Medical University of Silesia, Silesian Centre for Herat Diseases, Zabrze (Poland); Lusson, Jean-René; Motreff, Pascal [Department of Cardiology, Gabriel Montpied Hospital, CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Clermont-Ferrand (France); ERIM-EA3295, University of Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Laborde, Jean-Claude [St. George' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Chabrot, Pascal; Durel, Nicolas [Department of Cardiology, Gabriel Montpied Hospital, CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Clermont-Ferrand (France); ERIM-EA3295, University of Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand (France)

    2013-09-15

    Nowadays transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an accepted alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement for high-risk patients (pts). Successful TAVI procedures for failed aortic surgical bioprosthesis (TAV-in-SAV) have already been reported. In the presented two cases of TAV-in-SAV implantation a strut distortion of the stent was revealed on angiographic imaging and confirmed on control CT scan. In both procedures, a dislocation of the medtronic core valve (MCV) prosthesis during implantation led to valve retrieval, with a necessity of reloading it in the 18F introducer before subsequent implantation of the same valve in correct position.

  20. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a rare problem where the patient's own immune system will attack cardiac valve structures, causing them to ... it be heart, lung et cetera, the immune system recognizes those living issues as not being from ...

  1. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as represented by the red and the blue color. Typically, blood flowing through a valve should be ... and smooth. We shouldn't see very much color such as we're seeing here. To the ...

  2. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... heart valve which is made out of pyrolitic carbon, basically metal and plastic. Again, blood flows through ... heart surgery here, we actually insufflate, or instill carbon dioxide gas into the field, which we think ...

  3. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Winkley nor myself have any financial or professional relationships with the manufacturers or the devices used in ... John, just to interrupt for moment, Charles, Charles V., asks can the mitral valve also be replaced ...

  4. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Jim. Those are coming. There are several valve companies in this country and in Europe that have ... that we've had customized by an instrument company for this approach that really works nicely for ...

  5. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... surgery. I think as physicians we owe a responsibility to our patients to try to make procedures ... patients back annually, which we feel is our responsibility any time we do valve replacement or repair ...

  6. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patients in the sixth and seventh decades of life. Again, some areas of the valve appear normal ... have been proven to slow that disease path life. Again, it's a progressive disease from sclerosis, or ...

  7. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to prevent such a problem. Is there a higher risk in someone with a biological valve for ... there but in my experience they're no higher than in someone who's had a full sternotomy. ...

  8. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... back in World War II to look for things in the water. Basically, you use sound waves ... valve replacements a year. So one of the things I 10 would counsel anybody is before they ...

  9. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Dr. Jim Winkley, who's a cardiac anesthesiologist that works here with us. Before we begin, viewers need ... the valve itself has narrowed, that puts more work on the heart when a patient's at rest. ...

  10. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or the devices used in this continuing medical educational activity. Thanks, John, we want to remind the ... a rare problem where the patient's own immune system will attack cardiac valve structures, causing them to ...

  11. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... valve, it's just 1 sort of a normal aging process that we see in a certain segment ... this country is primarily a disease of the aging population. And, of course, we are a country ...

  12. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at the body's surface area. We, in the operating room, have a set of sizers which allow ... proves a nice replacement. However, that's sort of operating on two valves to fix one valvular problem. ...

  13. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a patient less post-operative pain, blood loss, lung dysfunction. Certainly we can get these patients up ... thorocotomy is an incision we generally use for lung operations and for some valve operations in which ...

  14. Transfemoral Valve-in-Valve Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) in a Patient With Previous Endovascular Aortic Repair (EVAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruparelia, Neil; Panoulas, Vasileios F; Frame, Angela; Nathan, Anthony W; Ariff, Ben; Jaffer, Usman; Sutaria, Nilesh; Chukwuemeka, Andrew; Mikhail, Ghada W; Malik, Iqbal S

    2016-07-01

    A 90-year-old man presented with increasing exertional breathlessness. He had previous implantation of a Perimount bioprosthetic aortic valve (Edwards Lifesciences) and coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Due to severe transvalvular bioprosthetic regurgitation with preserved left ventricular dimensions and ejection fraction, the heart team decided on valve-in- valve transcatheter aortic valve implantation via the transfemoral route in view of the patient's prohibitively high surgical and anesthetic risk. The patient had an uncomplicated recovery and was symptomatically much improved at 3-month follow-up. PMID:27342209

  15. Incidental necropsy finding of a quadricuspid aortic valve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijswijk, Jan Willem; Willemink, Martin; Kluin, Jolanda; Vink, Aryan

    2015-01-01

    Quadricuspid aortic valve is a rare congenital cardiac malformation often associated with abnormal valve function. In this article, we present a case of quadricuspid aortic valve only diagnosed at the time of post-mortem examination. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... polyester material that's used for -- it's basically a medical grade fabric. And again, I want to underscore that these tissue valves are hand-made in factories and undergo quite a bit of testing and tolerance before they ever reach our shelf. ...

  17. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to know the human dynamic or blood pressure effects of a valvular problem and is also important with regards to determining coronary artery anatomy, as some patients may need coronary bypass surgery in addition to valve surgery. Exercise testing, as I mentioned previously, is a nice ...

  18. Animal Models of Calcific Aortic Valve Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sider, Krista L.; Blaser, Mark C.; Simmons, Craig A.

    2011-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD), once thought to be a degenerative disease, is now recognized to be an active pathobiological process, with chronic inflammation emerging as a predominant, and possibly driving, factor. However, many details of the pathobiological mechanisms of CAVD remain to be described, and new approaches to treat CAVD need to be identified. Animal models are emerging as vital tools to this end, facilitated by the advent of new models and improved understanding of the u...

  19. Classification of Aortic Stenosis by Flow and Gradient Patterns Provides Insights into the Pathophysiology of Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sanjeev; Mittal, Tarun; Abayalingam, Mayavan; Kabir, Tito; Dalby, Miles; Cleland, John G; Baltabaeva, Aigul; Rahman Haley, Shelley

    2016-08-01

    Different patterns of flow and valve gradients can lead to diagnostic uncertainty about the severity of aortic stenosis (AS). Consecutive patients with severe AS (valve area <1 cm(2)) underwent echocardiography and computed tomography. Patients were classified into 4 groups (high-gradient/normal flow [HGNF], high-gradient/low flow [HGLF], low-gradient/normal flow [LGNF], and low-gradient/low flow [LGLF]). Low flow was defined as stroke volume index <35 mL/m(2) and low gradient as a mean aortic gradient <40 mm Hg. Aortic valve calcification (AVC) was calculated using the Agatston score. Of 181 patients, 56, 30, 46, and 49 had HGNF, HGLF, LGNF and LGLF with median AVC of 2048, 2015, 1366, and 1178 AU/m(2) (P < .0001) and valvuloarterial impedance of 4.5, 6.4, 4.2, and 5.9, respectively (P < .0001). Among those with LGLF, AVC was lower in patients with preserved compared to reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (1018 vs 2550 AU/m(2); P < .0001), but valvuloarterial impedance was similar (P = .33). The LGLF AS with preserved ejection fraction is associated with lower AVC and may identify patients with less severe AS in association with an adaptive ventricular response to high afterload. PMID:26475710

  20. Practical update on imaging and transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gisela; Feltes; Iván; J; Nú?ez-Gil

    2015-01-01

    After very rapid advances in the development of the technique and devices,transcatheter aortic valve implantation(named TAVI or TAVR),is today a reality that is here to stay.It has become the minimallyinvasive treatment option for high-risk and non-surgical patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis.Requiring the participation of a multidisciplinary team for its implementation,cardiac imaging plays an important role.From pre-assessment to determine the suitability of the patient,the access site,the type of device,to the guidance during the procedure,and ultimately the long term monitoring of the patient.Correct selection of the patient and device,correct placement of the stent-valve and early detection of complications are of paramount importance for procedural success and for patient outcome.Each technique has advantages and disadvantages,being the cardiologist who will determine the best approach according to the type of patient and the expertise of the center in each one of them.This article summarizes the last contributions of the most common used imaging techniques,in each step of the procedure.

  1. Thrombocytosis following splenectomy and aortic valve replacement for idiopathic thrombocytopaenic purpura with bicuspid aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarika Katiyar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic thrombocytopaenic purpura (ITP patients are at high risk for complications during and after cardiac surgeries involving cardiopulmonary bypass. The main clinical problem of primary ITP is an increased risk of bleeding although bleeding may not always be present. More recently, thrombosis has become appreciated as another potential complication of the procedure. We report a 22-year-old female patient with ITP with bicuspid aortic valve and splenomegaly, who underwent uncomplicated aortic valve replacement and splenectomy simultaneously. She was readmitted with chest pain due to coronary thrombosis following splenectomy which made the management difficult. We describe our experience in managing this patient who presented with thrombotic complication rather than bleeding in post-operative period and the challenges met in maintaining appropriate anticoagulation for aortic valve replacement as well as thrombosis, post-splenectomy

  2. Dynamic heart phantom with functional mitral and aortic valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannelli, Claire; Moore, John; McLeod, Jonathan; Ceh, Dennis; Peters, Terry

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac valvular stenosis, prolapse and regurgitation are increasingly common conditions, particularly in an elderly population with limited potential for on-pump cardiac surgery. NeoChord©, MitraClipand numerous stent-based transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) devices provide an alternative to intrusive cardiac operations; performed while the heart is beating, these procedures require surgeons and cardiologists to learn new image-guidance based techniques. Developing these visual aids and protocols is a challenging task that benefits from sophisticated simulators. Existing models lack features needed to simulate off-pump valvular procedures: functional, dynamic valves, apical and vascular access, and user flexibility for different activation patterns such as variable heart rates and rapid pacing. We present a left ventricle phantom with these characteristics. The phantom can be used to simulate valvular repair and replacement procedures with magnetic tracking, augmented reality, fluoroscopy and ultrasound guidance. This tool serves as a platform to develop image-guidance and image processing techniques required for a range of minimally invasive cardiac interventions. The phantom mimics in vivo mitral and aortic valve motion, permitting realistic ultrasound images of these components to be acquired. It also has a physiological realistic left ventricular ejection fraction of 50%. Given its realistic imaging properties and non-biodegradable composition—silicone for tissue, water for blood—the system promises to reduce the number of animal trials required to develop image guidance applications for valvular repair and replacement. The phantom has been used in validation studies for both TAVI image-guidance techniques1, and image-based mitral valve tracking algorithms2.

  3. Aortopathy in patients with a bicuspid aortic valve : determining susceptibility for aortic complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grewal, Nimrat

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of aortic dilation and related complications as rupture and dissection is higher in patients with a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) as compared to patients with a tricuspid aortic valve (TAV), although not every individual carries this increased risk. It is therefore essential to identify

  4. Direct transcatheter aortic valve implantation with self-expandable bioprosthesis: Feasibility and safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorina, Claudia, E-mail: clafiorina@yahoo.it [Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Maffeo, Diego; Curello, Salvatore [Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Lipartiti, Felicia [Division of Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Chizzola, Giuliano [Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); D' Aloia, Antonio [Division of Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Adamo, Marianna [Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Mastropierro, Rosy [Division of Cardiothoracic Anestesiology, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Gavazzi, Emanuele [Department of Radiology, University of Brescia, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Ciccarese, Camilla; Chiari, Ermanna [Division of Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Ettori, Federica [Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy)

    2014-06-15

    Background: Balloon valvuloplasty has been considered a mandatory step of the transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), although it is not without risk. The aim of this work was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of TAVI performed without pre-dilation (direct TAVI) of the stenosed aortic valve. Material and Methods: Between June 2012 and June 2013, 55 consecutive TAVI performed without pre-dilation at our institution using the self-expandable CoreValve prosthesis (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) were analyzed and compared with 45 pre-dilated TAVI performed the previous year. Inclusion criteria were a symptomatic and severe aortic stenosis. Exclusion criteria were defined as presence of pure aortic regurgitation, degenerated surgical bioprosthesis or bicuspid aortic valve and prior procedure of balloon aortic valvuloplasty performed as a bridge to TAVI. Results: High-burden calcification in the device landing zone, assessed by CT scan, was found in most of the patients. The valve size implanted was similar in both groups. Device success was higher in direct TAVI (85% vs. 64%, p = 0.014), mostly driven by a significant lower incidence of paravalvular leak (PVL ≥2; 9% vs. 33%, p = 0.02). Safety combined end point at 30 days was similar in both groups. Conclusion: Compared to TAVI with pre-dilation, direct TAVI is feasible regardless of the presence of bulky calcified aortic valve and the valve size implanted. Device success was higher in direct TAVI, mostly driven by a lower incidence of paravalvular leak. Safety at 30 days was similar in two groups.

  5. Pulmonary valve regurgitation following balloon valvuloplasty for pulmonary valve stenosis: Single center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asim Yousuf Al Balushi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pulmonary valve regurgitation following balloon valvuloplasty for moderate to severe pulmonary valve stenosis is a known late outcome of this procedure. Objective: The aim of the study was to characterise the status of pulmonary regurgitation on follow up after pulmonary valve balloon dilatation (PVBD, and to study the determinant of the severity of PR. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 50 consecutive patients, aged 2 days to 18 years, with isolated pulmonary valve stenosis, who had undergone PVBD in 2004-2009 and were assessed with follow-up Doppler echocardiography. The impact of balloon to annulus ratio, age, and valve anatomy on the late development of moderate and severe pulmonary valve regurgitation following balloon valvuloplasty was analysed. Results: Six patients (12% had no pulmonary valve regurgitation; 32 (64% had mild, 9 (18% had moderate, and 3 (6% had severe pulmonary valve regurgitation at a mean follow-up of 4 years. Balloon to annulus ratio, age, and valve anatomy were not statistically significant predictors for moderate and severe pulmonary valve regurgitation. Conclusions: The majority of patients in our population had mild pulmonary valve regurgitation. Moderate to severe pulmonary valve regurgitation was well tolerated at midterm follow-up. Age, balloon to annulus ratio, and valve anatomy were not statistically significant predictors for the late development of moderate and severe valve regurgitation. Large and longer follow-up studies are needed to address this question.

  6. Cellular regulation of the structure and function of aortic valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail El-Hamamsy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aortic valve was long considered a passive structure that opens and closes in response to changes in transvalvular pressure. Recent evidence suggests that the aortic valve performs highly sophisticated functions as a result of its unique microscopic structure. These functions allow it to adapt to its hemodynamic and mechanical environment. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in normal valve physiology is essential to elucidate the mechanisms behind valve disease. We here review the structure and developmental biology of aortic valves; we examine the role of its cellular parts in regulating its function and describe potential pathophysiological and clinical implications.

  7. Bicuspid aortic valves: Diagnostic accuracy of standard axial 64-slice chest CT compared to aortic valve image plane ECG-gated cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of standard axial 64-slice chest CT compared to aortic valve image plane ECG-gated cardiac CT for bicuspid aortic valves. Materials and methods: The standard axial chest CT scans of 20 patients with known bicuspid aortic valves were blindly, randomly analyzed for (i) the appearance of the valve cusps, (ii) the largest aortic sinus area, (iii) the longest aortic cusp length, (iv) the thickest aortic valve cusp and (v) valve calcification. A second blinded reader independently analyzed the appearance of the valve cusps. Forty-two age- and sex-matched patients with known tricuspid aortic valves were used as controls. Retrospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT multiphase reconstructions of the aortic valve were used as the gold-standard. Results: Fourteen (21%) scans were scored as unevaluable (7 bicuspid, 7 tricuspid). Of the remainder, there were 13 evaluable bicuspid valves, ten of which showed an aortic valve line sign, while the remaining three showed a normal Mercedes-Benz appearance owing to fused valve cusps. The 35 evaluable tricuspid aortic valves all showed a normal Mercedes-Benz appearance (P = 0.001). Kappa analysis = 0.62 indicating good interobserver agreement for the aortic valve cusp appearance. Aortic sinus areas, aortic cusp lengths and aortic cusp thicknesses of ≥3.8 cm2, 3.2 cm and 1.6 mm respectively on standard axial chest CT best distinguished bicuspid from tricuspid aortic valves (P < 0.0001 for all). Of evaluable scans, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of standard axial chest CT in diagnosing bicuspid aortic valves was 77% (CI 0.54–1.0), 100%, 100% and 70% respectively. Conclusion: The aortic valve is evaluable in approximately 80% of standard chest 64-slice CT scans. Bicuspid aortic valves may be diagnosed on evaluable scans with good diagnostic accuracy. An aortic valve line sign, enlarged aortic sinuses and elongated, thickened valve cusps are specific CT

  8. Successful resuscitation from two cardiac arrests in a female patient with critical aortic stenosis, severe mitral regurgitation and coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijušković Dragan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The incidence of sudden cardiac death in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis is up to 34% and resuscitation is described as highly unsuccessful. Case report. A 72-year-old female patient with severe aortic stenosis combined with severe mitral regurgitation and three-vessel coronary artery disease was successfully resuscitated following two in-hospital cardiac arrests. The first cardiac arrest occurred immediately after intraarterial injection of low osmolar iodinated agent during coronary angiography. Angiography revealed 90% occlusion of the proximal left main coronary artery and circumflex branch. The second arrest followed induction of anesthesia. Following successful open-chest resuscitation, aortic valve replacement, mitral valvuloplasty and three-vessel aortocoronary bypass were performed. Postoperative pericardial tamponade required surgical revision. The patient recovered completely. Conclusion. Decision to start resuscitation may be justified in selected patients with critical aortic stenosis, even though cardiopulmonary resuscitation in such cases is generally considered futile.

  9. Congenital aortic regurgitation in a child with a tricuspid non-stenotic aortic valve.

    OpenAIRE

    Hashimoto, R; Miyamura, H; Eguchi, S

    1984-01-01

    After follow up for seven years a 10 year old boy with congenital aortic regurgitation was found to have a tricuspid non-stenotic aortic valve at operation. The right coronary cusp was dysplastic, thickened, and contracted; the gap between its free margin and aortic wall was bridged with two fibrous bands; and the left coronary and non-coronary cusps were almost normal. The aortic valve was replaced with a prosthesis (St Jude Medical No 23), and the postoperative course was uneventful.

  10. Temporal Trends in Disease Severity and Predicted Surgical Risk at the Time of Referral for Echocardiography in Patients Diagnosed with Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ersboll, Mads; Samad, Zainab; Al Enezi, Fawaz;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcific aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common underlying pathology in patients undergoing heart valve surgery, with an expected increasing prevalence among the aging population. METHODS AND RESULTS: We identified the temporal trends in referral patterns, disease severity, and assoc...

  11. Possible Subclinical Leaflet Thrombosis in Bioprosthetic Aortic Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makkar, Raj R; Fontana, Gregory; Jilaihawi, Hasan;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A finding of reduced aortic-valve leaflet motion was noted on computed tomography (CT) in a patient who had a stroke after transcatheter aortic-valve replacement (TAVR) during an ongoing clinical trial. This finding raised a concern about possible subclinical leaflet thrombosis...

  12. Access Options for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients with Unfavorable Aortoiliofemoral Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jayendrakumar S; Krishnaswamy, Amar; Svensson, Lars G; Tuzcu, E Murat; Mick, Stephanie; Kapadia, Samir R

    2016-11-01

    In the current era, 10-15 % of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR)-eligible high and prohibitive risk patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis are not candidates for transfemoral arterial access. Knowledge of the various alternative access options can enable TAVR teams to provide improved quality of life and potentially life-saving treatment for a group of patients who otherwise have no viable options. In this article, we review approach to patients with unfavorable femoral arterial anatomy and provide an in-depth discussion on the various alternative routes for TAVR. PMID:27650782

  13. Drivers of healthcare costs associated with the episode of care for surgical aortic valve replacement versus transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijeysundera, Harindra C; Li, Lindsay; Braga, Vevien; Pazhaniappan, Nandhaa; Pardhan, Anar M; Lian, Dana; Leeksma, Aric; Peterson, Ben; Cohen, Eric A; Forsey, Anne; Kingsbury, Kori J

    2016-01-01

    Objective Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is generally more expensive than surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) due to the high cost of the device. Our objective was to understand the patient and procedural drivers of cumulative healthcare costs during the index hospitalisation for these procedures. Design All patients undergoing TAVI, isolated SAVR or combined SAVR+coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) at 7 hospitals in Ontario, Canada were identified during the fiscal year 2012–2013. Data were obtained from a prospective registry. Cumulative healthcare costs during the episode of care were determined using microcosting. To identify drivers of healthcare costs, multivariable hierarchical generalised linear models with a logarithmic link and γ distribution were developed for TAVI, SAVR and SAVR+CABG separately. Results Our cohort consisted of 1310 patients with aortic stenosis, of whom 585 underwent isolated SAVR, 518 had SAVR+CABG and 207 underwent TAVI. The median costs for the index hospitalisation for isolated SAVR were $21 811 (IQR $18 148–$30 498), while those for SAVR+CABG were $27 256 (IQR $21 741–$39 000), compared with $42 742 (IQR $37 295–$56 196) for TAVI. For SAVR, the major patient-level drivers of costs were age >75 years, renal dysfunction and active endocarditis. For TAVI, chronic lung disease was a major patient-level driver. Procedural drivers of cost for TAVI included a non-transfemoral approach. A prolonged intensive care unit stay was associated with increased costs for all procedures. Conclusions We found wide variation in healthcare costs for SAVR compared with TAVI, with different patient-level drivers as well as potentially modifiable procedural factors. These highlight areas of further study to optimise healthcare delivery.

  14. Simulation for transthoracic echocardiography of aortic valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Navin C.; Kapur, K. K.; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra

    2016-01-01

    Simulation allows interactive transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) learning using a virtual three-dimensional model of the heart and may aid in the acquisition of the cognitive and technical skills needed to perform TTE. The ability to link probe manipulation, cardiac anatomy, and echocardiographic images using a simulator has been shown to be an effective model for training anesthesiology residents in transesophageal echocardiography. A proposed alternative to real-time reality patient-based learning is simulation-based training that allows anesthesiologists to learn complex concepts and procedures, especially for specific structures such as aortic valve. PMID:27397455

  15. Substituição valvar aórtica percutânea para o tratamento da estenose aórtica: experiência inicial no Brasil Sustitución percutánea de la válvula aórtica para el tratamiento de la estenosis aórtica: experiencia inicial en Brasil Percutaneous aortic valve replacement for the treatment of aortic stenosis: early experience in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Perin

    2009-09-01

    la reducción del gradiente transvalvular aórtico (de 82 para 50 mmHg e de 94 para 31 mmHg inmediatamente después de la intervención. Durante la internación hospitalaria se hizo necesario implantar marcapasos definitivos en ambos pacientes, a causa de bloqueo atrioventricular. Se observó seis meses después una queda aún más grande del gradiente transvalvular aórtico (gradiente BACKGROUND: Percutaneous aortic valve replacement for the treatment of aortic stenosis is an available and efficient alternative for patients at high surgical risk, especially those with advanced age and comorbidities. OBJECTIVE: The authors report the first experience made in our midst with the use of the CoreValve endoprosthesis. METHODS: In January 2008, two patients underwent percutaneous aortic valve replacement due to symptomatic aortic stenosis. They were selected for being elderly (77 and 87 years and presenting comorbidities and a high surgical risk (EuroScore 7.7% and 12.1%. RESULTS: Percutaneous implantations of the CoreValve device were successfully performed. Enlargement of the valve area (from 0.7 to 1.5 cm² and from 0.5 to 1.3 cm² and reduction of the aortic transvalvular gradient (from 82 to 50 mmHg and from 94 to 31 mmHg were observed immediately after the intervention. During hospital stay, permanent pacemaker implantation was required in both patients due to atrioventricular block. At six months, an even greater drop in the aortic transvalvular gradient (gradient < 20 mmHg and remission of symptoms of heart failure (NYHA III to NYHA I were observed. CONCLUSION: The use of the CoreValve endoprosthesis for the treatment of aortic stenosis proved to be feasible and showed encouraging results in this early experience made in our midst.

  16. Impact of pressure recovery on echocardiographic assessment of asymptomatic aortic stenosis: a SEAS substudy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahlmann, Edda; Cramariuc, Dana; Gerdts, Eva;

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this analysis was to assess the diagnostic importance of pressure recovery in evaluation of aortic stenosis (AS) severity.......The aim of this analysis was to assess the diagnostic importance of pressure recovery in evaluation of aortic stenosis (AS) severity....

  17. Acute aortic and mitral valve regurgitation following blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabeu, Eduardo; Mestres, Carlos A; Loma-Osorio, Pablo; Josa, Miguel

    2004-03-01

    Traumatic rupture of intracardiac structures is an uncommon phenomenon although there are a number of reports with regards to rupture of the tricuspid, mitral and aortic valves. We report the case of a 25-year-old patient who presented with acute aortic and mitral valve regurgitation of traumatic origin. Both lesions were seen separated by 2 weeks. Pathophysiology is reviewed. The combination of both aortic and mitral lesions following blunt chest trauma is almost exceptional.

  18. Left Atrial Systolic Force in Asymptomatic Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cioffi, Giovanni; Cramariuc, Dana; Dalsgaard, Morten;

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is a limited knowledge about left atrial (LA) systolic force (LASF) and its key determinants in patients with asymptomatic mild-moderate aortic stenosis (AS). Methods: We used baseline clinic and echocardiographic data from 1,566 patients recruited in the simvastatin ezetimibe...... LASF in the total study population was 21 ± 14 kdynes/cm(2) . The determinants of LASF were higher age, heart rate, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, left ventricular (LV) mass, mitral peak early velocity, maximal LA volume, and longer mitral deceleration time (multiple R(2) = 0.37, P

  19. Aortic valve surgery: what is the future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudorović, Narcis

    2008-04-01

    Modern surgical treatment for aortic valve disease has undergone significant improvements in all areas of this procedure. Successful treatment strategies for cardiovascular diseases have often been initiated and driven by surgeons. Radical excision of diseased tissue, repair and replacement strategies lead to long-term successful treatment of the underlying diseases and clearly improved patient outcome. In highly developed nations, valve surgery will be increasing applied in older people, with more co-morbidities and a higher incidence of concomitant coronary artery disease. Cardiovascular surgeons will be facing increased competition from the catheter-based procedures; these are already applied clinically, and their numbers will rise in near future. Right now interventional cardiologists supported by some cardiac surgeons are on their way to transform some conventional open surgical procedures into catheter-based less invasive interventions, such as valve repair and replacement. Cardiovascular surgery is undergoing a rapid transformation; socio-economic factors and recent advances in medical technology contribute to these changes. Further developments will come, and surgeons with all their expertise in the treatment of valvular heart disease need to be part of it. Cardiovascular surgeons have to adapt the exciting new approaches of transapical and transfemoral transcatheter valve implantation techniques. PMID:17573248

  20. Familial Hypercholesterolemia Complicated with Aortic Valve Stenosis and Carotid Stenosis:A Case Report and Lit-erature Review%家族性高胆固醇血症并发主动脉瓣上及颈动脉狭窄报告并文献复习

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周佳君; 邵森

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨家族性高胆固醇血症( familial hypercholesterolemia, FH)的临床特点及诊治要点。方法对我院收治的1例FH临床资料进行回顾性分析。结果本例17岁女性,因活动后胸闷、气促5年,加重1个月入院。4岁时皮肤出现黄色瘤,手术治疗后复发。病程中于外院就诊,考虑先天性心脏病及高脂血症,并予降血脂治疗未见明显效果入我院。经查血脂升高,心脏及颈动脉超声检查示主动脉瓣上狭窄及颈动脉狭窄,并结合有黄色瘤病史,确诊为纯合子型FH,给予降血脂、强心、利尿、抗血小板聚集等治疗,病情好转,因拒绝血浆置换治疗,继续上述治疗,随访1年血脂控制不佳,症状反复发作。结论 FH易出现心血管并发症,预后差,早期容易漏诊,早期诊断与治疗是延缓疾病进展的关键。%Objective To explore the clinical characteristics, and key points of diagnosis and treatment of familial hypercholesterolemia ( FH) . Methods Clinical date of one patient with FH in our hospital was retrospectively analyzed, and related literature was reviewed. Results A 17-year-old female patient was admitted for chest distress and shortness of breath after exercise for 5 years and aggravated for 1 month. The patient developed xanthomas at the elbows at the age of 4 and under-went surgery. However, one year later, the xanthomas relapsed. The patient was diagnosed as having congenital heart disease and hyperglycemia before admission to our hospital. Although she had been given by, the patient failed to respond to lipid-low-ering treatment. After transfer to our hospital, her concentration of cholesterol was elevated significantly. The ultrasound ex-amination indicated aortic valve stenosis and carotid stenosis. In addition, her family members were found to have hyperglyce-mia or xanthoma, then the diagnosis of homozygous FH was made. The symptoms were alleviated after the treatment of cardio-tonic, diuretic, lipid

  1. 家族性高胆固醇血症并发主动脉瓣上及颈动脉狭窄报告并文献复习%Familial Hypercholesterolemia Complicated with Aortic Valve Stenosis and Carotid Stenosis:A Case Report and Lit-erature Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周佳君; 邵森

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨家族性高胆固醇血症( familial hypercholesterolemia, FH)的临床特点及诊治要点。方法对我院收治的1例FH临床资料进行回顾性分析。结果本例17岁女性,因活动后胸闷、气促5年,加重1个月入院。4岁时皮肤出现黄色瘤,手术治疗后复发。病程中于外院就诊,考虑先天性心脏病及高脂血症,并予降血脂治疗未见明显效果入我院。经查血脂升高,心脏及颈动脉超声检查示主动脉瓣上狭窄及颈动脉狭窄,并结合有黄色瘤病史,确诊为纯合子型FH,给予降血脂、强心、利尿、抗血小板聚集等治疗,病情好转,因拒绝血浆置换治疗,继续上述治疗,随访1年血脂控制不佳,症状反复发作。结论 FH易出现心血管并发症,预后差,早期容易漏诊,早期诊断与治疗是延缓疾病进展的关键。%Objective To explore the clinical characteristics, and key points of diagnosis and treatment of familial hypercholesterolemia ( FH) . Methods Clinical date of one patient with FH in our hospital was retrospectively analyzed, and related literature was reviewed. Results A 17-year-old female patient was admitted for chest distress and shortness of breath after exercise for 5 years and aggravated for 1 month. The patient developed xanthomas at the elbows at the age of 4 and under-went surgery. However, one year later, the xanthomas relapsed. The patient was diagnosed as having congenital heart disease and hyperglycemia before admission to our hospital. Although she had been given by, the patient failed to respond to lipid-low-ering treatment. After transfer to our hospital, her concentration of cholesterol was elevated significantly. The ultrasound ex-amination indicated aortic valve stenosis and carotid stenosis. In addition, her family members were found to have hyperglyce-mia or xanthoma, then the diagnosis of homozygous FH was made. The symptoms were alleviated after the treatment of cardio-tonic, diuretic, lipid

  2. Case report of Streptomyces endocarditis of a prosthetic aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossad, S B; Tomford, J W; Stewart, R; Ratliff, N B; Hall, G S

    1995-01-01

    We describe the first case of prosthetic valve endocarditis due to a Streptomyces sp. The patient presented with fever, cutaneous embolic lesions, and bacteremia 3 months after aortic valve replacement. Treatment required valve replacement and a long course of parenteral imipenem. PMID:8586732

  3. Case report of Streptomyces endocarditis of a prosthetic aortic valve.

    OpenAIRE

    Mossad, S B; Tomford, J W; Stewart, R; Ratliff, N B; Hall, G. S.

    1995-01-01

    We describe the first case of prosthetic valve endocarditis due to a Streptomyces sp. The patient presented with fever, cutaneous embolic lesions, and bacteremia 3 months after aortic valve replacement. Treatment required valve replacement and a long course of parenteral imipenem.

  4. Results of surgery for aortic regurgitation due to aortic valve prolapse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigenobu,Masaharu

    1988-12-01

    Full Text Available The clinical, hemodynamic and pathological findings of 13 patients with aortic regurgitation due to aortic valve prolapse caused by advanced myxomatous degeneration were evaluated. Eleven patients showed a favorable outcome with no complications resulting from surgery. One patient died from aortic dissection, and another died suddenly from an unknown cause. Five patients had mitral valve prolapse as a complication. Ten patients (77% had a long-standing history of hypertension. Twelve patients (92% were male. None of the patients had the stigmata of Marfan's syndrome. All patients had marked myxomatous degeneration of the aortic valves without any inflammatory changes. Two patients showed microcalcification; 7 demonstrated moderate fibrosis. Five patients showed severe fragility of the cusps which appeared redundant, gelatinous and softened by degenerative changes. Myxomatous degeneration of the aortic valve is not rare, and, in fact, it may be one of the most common pathologic and clinical entities associated with pure aortic insufficiency.

  5. Twenty-Two-Year Experience with Aortic Valve Replacement: Starr-Edwards Ball Valves versus Disc Valves

    OpenAIRE

    Pilegaard, Hans K.; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Torsten T; Magnussen, Karin; Knudsen, Mary A; Albrechtsen, Ole K.

    1991-01-01

    From 1965 through 1986, 817 patients underwent aortic valve replacement at our institution. Six hundred forty-five patients received Starr-Edwards ball valves, including 286 Silastic ball valves (Models 1200/1260), 165 cloth-covered caged-ball prostheses (Models 2300/2310/2320), and 194 track-valve prostheses (Model 2400). In contrast, 172 patients received disc-valve prostheses, including 126 St. Jude Medical aortic bi-leaflet disc valves, 32 Lillehei-Kaster pivoting disc valves, and 14 Björ...

  6. Anatomics Knowledges of Aortic Root in the Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelo Cerezo; Omar Bertani; Gisela Panciroli; Sebastián Duhalde; Karina Ferreira; Luciano Honaine

    2010-01-01

    The Aortic Valve is a valvular system that bears different high pressure forces. It takes part of a complex structure called Aortic Root. Nowadays, anatomic knowledge has taken a preponderant role, due to the use of the Transcatether Aortic Valve Implant (TAVI). To describe the patient´s characteristics which exclude them of the TAVI for anatomic reasons in cadaveric dissections and transthoracic echocardiograms. A descriptive retrospective analysis of 67 individuals was performed and divided...

  7. [Neuroendovascular Treatment for Cerebral Embolism in a Patient just after Aortic Valve Replacement;Report of a Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Motoyuki; Nishizawa, Junichiro; Heima, Daisuke; Takatoku, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Yoshihiko; Matsui, Yasuzumi; Miyake, Hidenori

    2015-12-01

    A 67-year-old woman suffered from severe aortic stenosis and atrial fibrillation, and underwent aortic valve replacement with a St. Jude Medical Regent 23-mm valve and pulmonary vein isolation using an AtriCure Isolator Synergy.At 6 days after the operation, she experienced sudden onset of atrial fibrillation, left side paralysis, and dysarthria. Right internal carotid artery embolism was diagnosed via magnetic resonance imaging, and we promptly performed neuroendovascular therapy with a Solitaire FR. Neuroendovascular treatment succeeded, and her neurological function was restored to near-normal. Her post-treatment course was uneventful, and she is currently well without neurological dysfunction. PMID:26759947

  8. In vitro characterization of bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics using particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yap, Choon-Hwai; Milligan, Nicole C; Vasilyev, Nikolay V; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2012-08-01

    The congenital bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is associated with increased leaflet calcification, ascending aortic dilatation, aortic stenosis (AS) and regurgitation (AR). Although underlying genetic factors have been primarily implicated for these complications, the altered mechanical environment of BAVs could potentially accelerate these pathologies. The objective of the current study is to characterize BAV hemodynamics in an in vitro system. Two BAV models of varying stenosis and jet eccentricity and a trileaflet AV (TAV) were constructed from excised porcine AVs. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) experiments were conducted at physiological flow and pressure conditions to characterize fluid velocity fields in the aorta and sinus regions, and ensemble averaged Reynolds shear stress and 2D turbulent kinetic energy were calculated for all models. The dynamics of the BAV and TAV models matched the characteristics of these valves which are observed clinically. The eccentric and stenotic BAV showed the strongest systolic jet (V = 4.2 m/s), which impinged on the aortic wall on the non-fused leaflet side, causing a strong vortex in the non-fused leaflet sinus. The magnitudes of TKE and Reynolds stresses in both BAV models were almost twice as large as comparable values for TAV, and these maximum values were primarily concentrated around the central jet through the valve orifice. The in vitro model described here enables detailed characterization of BAV flow characteristics, which is currently challenging in clinical practice. This model can prove to be useful in studying the effects of altered BAV geometry on fluid dynamics in the valve and ascending aorta. These altered flows can be potentially linked to increased calcific responses from the valve endothelium in stenotic and eccentric BAVs, independent of concomitant genetic factors.

  9. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty as a bridge-to-decision in high risk patients with aortic stenosis: a new paradigm for the heart team decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saia, Francesco; Moretti, Carolina; Dall'Ara, Gianni; Ciuca, Cristina; Taglieri, Nevio; Berardini, Alessandra; Gallo, Pamela; Cannizzo, Marina; Chiarabelli, Matteo; Ramponi, Niccolò; Taffani, Linda; Bacchi-Reggiani, Maria Letizia; Marrozzini, Cinzia; Rapezzi, Claudio; Marzocchi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background Whilst the majority of the patients with severe aortic stenosis can be directly addressed to surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), in some instances additional information may be needed to complete the diagnostic workout. We evaluated the role of balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) as a bridge-to-decision (BTD) in selected high-risk patients. Methods Between 2007 and 2012, the heart team in our Institution required BTD BAV in 202 patients. Very low left ventricular ejection fraction, mitral regurgitation grade ≥ 3, frailty, hemodynamic instability, serious comorbidity, or a combination of these factors were the main drivers for this strategy. We evaluated how BAV influenced the final treatment strategy in the whole patient group and in each specific subgroup. Results Mean logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) was 23.5% ± 15.3%, age 81 ± 7 years. In-hospital mortality was 4.5%, cerebrovascular accident 1% and overall vascular complications 4% (0.5% major; 3.5% minor). Of the 193 patients with BTD BAV who survived and received a second heart team evaluation, 72.6% were finally deemed eligible for definitive treatment (25.4% for AVR; 47.2% for TAVI): 96.7% of patients with left ventricular ejection fraction recovery; 70.5% of patients with mitral regurgitation reduction; 75.7% of patients who underwent BAV in clinical hemodynamic instability; 69.2% of frail patients and 68% of patients who presented serious comorbidities. Conclusions Balloon aortic valvuloplasty can be considered as bridge-to-decision in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis who cannot be immediate candidates for definitive transcatheter or surgical treatment. PMID:27582761

  10. Advanced age and the clinical outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve implan-tation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Osama Alsara; Ahmad Alsarah; Heather Laird-Fick

    2014-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis (AS) is common in the elderly. Although surgical replacement of the valve has been the gold standard of management, many patients have been excluded from surgery because they were very old, frail, or had co-morbidities that increased operative risks. In the last decade, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has emerged as a new treatment option suitable for these patients. This article reviews the available literature on the role of TAVI in elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis. Published studies showed that elderly individuals who underwent TAVI experienced better in-hospital recovery, and similar short and mid-term mortality compared to those underwent surgical treatment of AS. However, long-term outcomes of TAVI in elderly patients are still unknown. The available data in the literature on the ef-fect of advanced age on clinical outcomes of TAVI are limited, but the data that are available suggest that TAVI is a beneficial and tolerable procedure in very old patients. Some of the expected complications after TAVI are reported more in the oldest patients such as vascular in-jures. Other complications were comparable in TAVI patients regardless of their age group. However, very old patients may need closer monitoring to avoid further morbidities and mortality.

  11. Aortic valve and ascending aortic root modeling from 3D and 3D+t CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grbic, Saša; Ionasec, Razvan I.; Zäuner, Dominik; Zheng, Yefeng; Georgescu, Bogdan; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2010-02-01

    Aortic valve disorders are the most frequent form of valvular heart disorders (VHD) affecting nearly 3% of the global population. A large fraction among them are aortic root diseases, such as aortic root aneurysm, often requiring surgical procedures (valve-sparing) as a treatment. Visual non-invasive assessment techniques could assist during pre-selection of adequate patients, planning procedures and afterward evaluation of the same. However state of the art approaches try to model a rather short part of the aortic root, insufficient to assist the physician during intervention planning. In this paper we propose a novel approach for morphological and functional quantification of both the aortic valve and the ascending aortic root. A novel physiological shape model is introduced, consisting of the aortic valve root, leaflets and the ascending aortic root. The model parameters are hierarchically estimated using robust and fast learning-based methods. Experiments performed on 63 CT sequences (630 Volumes) and 20 single phase CT volumes demonstrated an accuracy of 1.45mm and an performance of 30 seconds (3D+t) for this approach. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time a complete model of the aortic valve (including leaflets) and the ascending aortic root, estimated from CT, has been proposed.

  12. Unicuspid aortic valve disease: a magnetic resonance imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: congenitally malformed aortic valves are a common finding in adults with aortic valve disease. Most of these patients have bicuspid aortic valve disease. Unicuspid aortic valve disease (UAV) is rare. The aim of our study was to describe valve morphology and the dimensions of the proximal aorta in a cohort of 12 patients with UAV in comparison to tricuspid aortic valve disease (TAV) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods/results: MRI studies were performed on a 1.5 T scanner in a total of 288 consecutive patients with aortic valve disease. 12 aortic valves were retrospectively classified as UAV. Annulus areas and dimensions of the thoracic aorta were retrospectively compared to a cohort of 103 patients with TAV. In UAV, valve morphology was unicuspid unicommissural with a posterior commissure in all patients. Mean annulus areas and mean diameters of the ascending aorta were significantly greater in UAV compared to TAV (12.6 ± 4.7 cm2 vs. 8.7 ± 2.3 cm2, p < 0.01 and 4.6 ± 0.7 cm vs. 3.6 ± 0.5 cm, p < 0.0001, respectively), while no differences were observed in the mean diameters of the aortic arch (2.3 ± 0.6 cm vs. 2.3 ± 0.4 cm, p = 0.69). The diameters of the descending aorta were slightly smaller in UAV compared to TAV (2.2 ± 0.5 cm vs. 2.6 ± 0.3 cm, p < 0.05). (orig.)

  13. Maximizing prosthetic valve size with the Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jan; Geha, Alexander S.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY: The CarboMedics Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve allows a one-size (and often two-size) increase over the standard intra-annular valve. This advantage should minimize the risk of patient-prosthesis mismatch, where the effective prosthetic valve orifice area...... is less than that of a normal valve. It is suggested that the ability to implant Top Hat valves having greater size, relative to standard intra-annular valves, may currently be under-utilized. Further, there has been some concern that Top Hat implantation can cause obstruction of the coronary ostia....... This study evaluates the authors' clinical experience with Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve size selection, and the technical aspects of implantation. METHODS: Between January 1999 and October 2005, a total of 251 consecutive patients underwent 252 aortic valve replacements with Top Hat supra...

  14. Valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve implantation overcoming hostile anatomy: Evolut R for the treatment of Mitroflow bioprosthesis dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruparelia, Neil; Colombo, Antonio; Latib, Azeem

    2016-10-01

    Redo surgery is regarded as the first-line treatment option for patients presenting with prosthetic valve degeneration. However, many patients have concomitant co-morbidities and this option is associated with significant risk. Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation is an alternative strategy depending on the bioprosthetic valve that is being treated. The Sorin Mitroflow bioprosthetic aortic valve has been regarded as a contraindication to valve-in-valve treatment due to the high risk of coronary obstruction. We here present the case of a patient with small peripheral vasculature who underwent successful transfemoral valve-in-valve implantation and subsequently discuss the challenges and technical aspects that require consideration.

  15. Haemostasis monitoring during sequential aortic valve replacement and liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieders, E.; De Somer, F.; Bouchez, S.; Szegedi, L.; Van Belleghem, Y.; Colle, I.; Troisi, R.

    2010-01-01

    Despite advances in anaesthesiological and surgical techniques, cardiac surgery in cirrhotic patients remains hazardous. This report outlines our experience with haemostasis monitoring in two consecutive cases of sequential aortic valve replacement and liver transplantation. Clotting disturbances pr

  16. Cardiac Hemodynamics in the Pathogenesis of Congenital Heart Disease and Aortic Valve Calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Vishal

    2011-11-01

    An improved understanding of the roles of hemodynamic forces play in cardiac development and the pathogenesis of cardiac disease will have significant scientific and clinical impact. I will focus on the role of fluid dynamics in congenital heart disease and aortic valve calcification. Congenital heart defects are the most common form of birth defect. Aortic valve calcification/stenosis is the third leading cause of adult heart disease and the most common form of acquired valvular disease in developed countries. Given the high incidence of these diseases and their associated morbidity and mortality, the potential translational impact of an improved understanding of cardiac hemodynamic forces is very large. Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego

  17. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation of the direct flow medical aortic valve with minimal or no contrast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latib, Azeem, E-mail: alatib@gmail.com [Interventional Cardiology Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute and EMO-GVM Centro Cuore Columbus, Milan (Italy); Maisano, Francesco; Colombo, Antonio [Interventional Cardiology Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute and EMO-GVM Centro Cuore Columbus, Milan (Italy); Klugmann, Silvio [Azienda Ospedaliera Niguarda Ca Granda, Piazza Ospedale Maggiore 3, Milan (Italy); Low, Reginald; Smith, Thomas [University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Davidson, Charles [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Harreld, John H. [Clinical Imaging Analytics, Guerneville, CA (United States); Bruschi, Giuseppe; DeMarco, Federico [Azienda Ospedaliera Niguarda Ca Granda, Piazza Ospedale Maggiore 3, Milan (Italy)

    2014-06-15

    The 18F Direct Flow Medical (DFM) THV has conformable sealing rings, which minimizes aortic regurgitation and permits full hemodynamic assessment of valve performance prior to permanent implantation. During the DISCOVER trial, three patients who were at risk for receiving contrast media, two due to severe CKD and one due to a recent hyperthyroid reaction to contrast, underwent DFM implantation under fluoroscopic and transesophageal guidance without aortography during either positioning or to confirm the final position. Valve positioning was based on the optimal angiographic projection as calculated by the pre-procedural multislice CT scan. Precise optimization of valve position was performed to minimize transvalve gradient and aortic regurgitation. Prior to final implantation, transvalve hemodynamics were assessed invasively and by TEE. The post-procedure mean gradients were 7, 10, 11 mm Hg. The final AVA by echo was 1.70, 1.40 and 1.68 cm{sup 2}. Total aortic regurgitation post-procedure was none or trace in all three patients. Total positioning and assessment of valve performance time was 4, 6, and 12 minutes. Contrast was only used to confirm successful percutaneous closure of the femoral access site. The total contrast dose was 5, 8, 12 cc. Baseline eGFR and creatinine was 28, 22, 74 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2} and 2.35, 2.98, and 1.03 mg/dL, respectively. Renal function was unchanged post-procedure: eGFR = 25, 35, and 96 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2} and creatinine = 2.58, 1.99, and 1.03 mg/dL, respectively. In conclusion, the DFM THV provides the ability to perform TAVI with minimal or no contrast. The precise and predictable implantation technique can be performed with fluoro and echo guidance.

  18. The pathology and pathobiology of bicuspid aortic valve: State of the art and novel research perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Patrick; Bossé, Yohan; Huggins, Gordon S; Corte, Alessandro Della; Pibarot, Philippe; Michelena, Hector I; Limongelli, Giuseppe; Boulanger, Marie-Chloé; Evangelista, Arturo; Bédard, Elisabeth; Citro, Rodolfo; Body, Simon C; Nemer, Mona; Schoen, Frederick J

    2015-10-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve is the most prevalent cardiac valvular malformation. It is associated with a high rate of long-term morbidity including development of calcific aortic valve disease, aortic regurgitation and concomitant thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection. Recently, basic and translational studies have identified some key processes involved in the development of bicuspid aortic valve and its morbidity. The development of aortic valve disease and thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection is the result of complex interactions between genotypes, environmental risk factors and specific haemodynamic conditions created by bicuspid aortic valve anatomy. Herein, we review the pathobiology of bicuspid aortic valve with a special emphasis on translational aspects of these basic findings. Important but unresolved problems in the pathology of bicuspid aortic valve and thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection are discussed, along with the molecular processes involved. PMID:27499904

  19. Shape-based diagnosis of the aortic valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionasec, Razvan Ioan; Tsymbal, Alexey; Vitanovski, Dime; Georgescu, Bogdan; Zhou, S. Kevin; Navab, Nassir; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2009-02-01

    Disorders of the aortic valve represent a common cardiovascular disease and an important public-health problem worldwide. Pathological valves are currently determined from 2D images through elaborate qualitative evalu- ations and complex measurements, potentially inaccurate and tedious to acquire. This paper presents a novel diagnostic method, which identies diseased valves based on 3D geometrical models constructed from volumetric data. A parametric model, which includes relevant anatomic landmarks as well as the aortic root and lea ets, represents the morphology of the aortic valve. Recently developed robust segmentation methods are applied to estimate the patient specic model parameters from end-diastolic cardiac CT volumes. A discriminative distance function, learned from equivalence constraints in the product space of shape coordinates, determines the corresponding pathology class based on the shape information encoded by the model. Experiments on a heterogeneous set of 63 patients aected by various diseases demonstrated the performance of our method with 94% correctly classied valves.

  20. A computerized system for video analysis of the aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesely, I; Menkis, A; Campbell, G

    1990-10-01

    A novel technique was developed to study the dynamic behavior of the porcine aortic valve in an isolated heart preparation. Under the control of a personal computer, a video frame grabber board continuously acquired and digitized images of the aortic valve, and an analog-to-digital (A/D) converter read four channels of physiological data (flow rate, aortic and ventricular pressure, and aortic root diameter). The valve was illuminated with a strobe light synchronized to fire at the field acquisition rate of the CCD video camera. Using the overlay bits in the video board, the measured parameters were super-imposed over the live video as graphical tracing, and the resultant composite images were recorded on-line to video tape. The overlaying of the valve images with the graphical tracings of acquired data enabled the data tracings to be precisely synchronized with the video images of the aortic valve. This technique enabled us to observe the relationship between aortic root expansion and valve function.

  1. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Lower Surgical Risk Patients: Review of Major Trials and Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saji, Mike; Lim, D Scott

    2016-10-01

    Following the first successful transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in 2002, TAVR has globally evolved to become a standard procedure in high-risk patients. Surgical aortic valve replacement in non-high-risk patients remains the gold standard for treatment of severe aortic stenosis. However, a paradigm shift appears to be occurring in the direction of treating lower-risk patients, and several studies have suggested its impact on clinical outcomes. In this review, we highlight the current status of TAVR in intermediate-risk patients and review major trials including Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER (PARTNER) 2A randomized intermediate-risk trial using SAPIEN XT (Edwards Lifesciences Corp, Irvine, CA) recently presented with excellent outcomes and the lowest major complications rate at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session in Chicago. Clinical trials in low-risk patients using SAPIEN 3 and CoreValve Evolut R have just been launched, and they are going to be important milestones in the TAVR field.

  2. Matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, doxycycline and progression of calcific aortic valve disease in hyperlipidemic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae-Joon; Razavian, Mahmoud; Kim, Hye-Yeong; Ye, Yunpeng; Golestani, Reza; Toczek, Jakub; Zhang, Jiasheng; Sadeghi, Mehran M

    2016-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is the most common cause of aortic stenosis. Currently, there is no non-invasive medical therapy for CAVD. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are upregulated in CAVD and play a role in its pathogenesis. Here, we evaluated the effect of doxycycline, a nonselective MMP inhibitor on CAVD progression in the mouse. Apolipoprotein (apo)E(-/-) mice (n = 20) were fed a Western diet (WD) to induce CAVD. After 3 months, half of the animals was treated with doxycycline, while the others continued WD alone. After 6 months, we evaluated the effect of doxycycline on CAVD progression by echocardiography, MMP-targeted micro single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT), and tissue analysis. Despite therapeutic blood levels, doxycycline had no significant effect on MMP activation, aortic valve leaflet separation or flow velocity. This lack of effect on in vivo images was confirmed on tissue analysis which showed a similar level of aortic valve gelatinase activity, and inflammation between the two groups of animals. In conclusion, doxycycline (100 mg/kg/day) had no effect on CAVD progression in apoE(-/-) mice with early disease. Studies with more potent and specific inhibitors are needed to establish any potential role of MMP inhibition in CAVD development and progression. PMID:27619752

  3. Mechanism and Correlated Factors of SAM Phenomenon after Aortic Valve Replacement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jing; WEN Jianguo; SHU Liliang; LIU Chao; ZHANG Jingchao; ZHAO Wenzeng

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism and correlated factors of systolic anterior motion (SAM) phenomenon after aortic valve replacement, 48 patients with severe aortic valvular stenosis were studied. Tested by echo-Doppler one week after aortic valve replacement, the patients were divided into two groups: SAM group and non-SAM group. The data of the left ventricular end-diastolic diameters, the left ventricular end-systolic diameters, the left ventricular outflow diameters, the thickness of the interventricular septum, the posterior wall of left ventricle, the blood velocities of left ventricular outflow and intra-cavitary gradients were recorded and compared. The results showed that no patients died during or after the operation. The blood velocities of left ventricular outflow was increased significantly in 9 patients (>2.5 m/s), and 6 of them developed SAM phenomenon. There was significant difference in all indexes (P<0.05 or P<0.01) except the posterior wall of left ventricle (P>0.05) between two groups. These indicated that the present of SAM phenomenon after aortic valve replacement may be directly related to the increase of blood velocities of left ventricular outflow and intra-cavitary gradients. It is also suggested that smaller left ventricular diastolic diameters, left ventricular systolic diameters, left ventricular outflow diameters and hypertrophy of interventricular septum may be the anatomy basis of SAM phenomenon.

  4. Predictors and progression of aortic stenosis in patients with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ersboll, Mads; Schulte, Phillip J; Al Enezi, Fawaz;

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to characterize the hemodynamic progression of aortic stenosis (AS) in a contemporary unselected cohort of patients with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. Current guidelines recommend echocardiographic surveillance of hemodynamic progression. However, limited data exist on th...

  5. Sedation or general anesthesia for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, N Patrick; Michel, Jonathan; Bleiziffer, Sabine; Tassani, Peter; Martin, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is nowadays a routine therapy for elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) and high perioperative risk. With growing experience, further development of the devices, and the expansion to "intermediate-risk" patients, there is increasing interest in performing this procedure under conscious sedation (TAVI-S) rather than the previously favoured approach of general anesthesia (TAVI-GA). The proposed benefits of TAVI-S include; reduced procedure time, shorter intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay, reduced need for intraprocedural vasopressor support, and the potential to perform the procedure without the direct presence of an anesthetist for cost-saving reasons. To date, no randomized trial data exists. We reviewed 13 non-randomized studies/registries reporting data from 6,718 patients undergoing TAVI (3,227 performed under sedation). Patient selection, study methods, and endpoints have differed considerably between published studies. Reported rates of in-hospital and longer-term mortality are similar for both groups. Up to 17% of patients undergoing TAVI-S require conversion to general anesthesia during the procedure, primarily due to vascular complications, and urgent intubation is frequently associated with hemodynamic instability. Procedure related factors, including hypotension, may compound preexisting age-specific renal impairment and enhance the risk of acute kidney injury. Hypotonia of the hypopharyngeal muscles in elderly patients, intraprocedural hypercarbia, and certain anesthetic drugs, may increase the aspiration risk in sedated patients. General anesthesia and conscious sedation have both been used successfully to treat patients with severe AS undergoing TAVI with similar reported short and long-term mortality outcomes. The authors believe that the significant incidence of complications and unplanned conversion to general anesthesia during TAVI-S mandates the start-to-finish presence

  6. Aortic Valve Repair: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Published Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Fok, Matthew; Shaw, Matthew; Sancho, Elena; Abello, David; Bashir, Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is widely accepted that aortic valve disease is surgically managed with aortic valve replacement (AVR) using different available prostheses. The long-term survival, durability of the valve, and freedom from reoperation after AVR are well established in published literature. Over the past two decades, aortic valve repair (AVr) has evolved into an accepted surgical option for patients with aortic valve disease. We review and analyze the published literature on AVr. Methods: A sys...

  7. Surgery for severe aortic stenosis with low transvalvular gradient and poor left ventricular function – a single centre experience and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vchivkov Ilja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A retrospective comparative study was designed to determine whether the transvalvular gradient has a predictive value in the assessment of operative outcome in patients with severe aortic stenosis and poor left ventricular function. Methods From a surgical database, a series of 30 consecutive patients, who underwent isolated aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis with depressed left ventricular (LV function (EF 40 mmHg (n = 17. Both groups were then comparatively assessed with respect to perioperative organ functions and mortality. Results Both groups were well matched with respect to the preoperative clinical status. LG-Group had a larger aortic valve area, higher LVEDP, larger LVESD and LVEDD, and higher mean pulmonary pressures. The immediate postoperative outcome, hospital morbidity and mortality did not differ significantly among the groups. Conclusion In patients with severe aortic stenosis and poor LV function, the mean transvalvular gradient, although corresponds to reduced LV performance, has a limited prognostic value in the assessment of surgical outcome. Generally, operating on this select group of patients is safe.

  8. Reoperation on aortic disease in patients with previous aortic valve surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Xiao-gang; ZHANG Liang; YU Cun-tao; QIAN Xiang-yang; CHANG Qian

    2013-01-01

    Background Aortic valve replacement (AVR) is a safe and effective method in the treatment of aortic valve diseases.This study aimed to increase the understanding on re-treatment of aortic diseases after aortic valve surgery through a retrospective analysis of 47 related cases.Methods Forty-seven patients (38 males and 9 females) with previous aortic valve surgery have received reoperation on aorta from January 2003 to June 2012,and the mean interval time of re-intervention to aortic disease was 6 years ((6.0± 3.8) years).The secondary aortic surgery included aortic root replacement (14 cases),ascending aorta replacement (10 cases),aortic root/ascending aorta plus total arch replacement with stented elephant trunk implantation (21 cases),and total thoracoabdominal aorta replacement (2 cases).All these patients have received outpatient re-exams or follow-up by phone calls.Results After the initial aortic valve replacement,patients suffered from aortic dissection (25 cases,53%),ascending aortic aneurysm (12 cases,26%) or aortic root aneurysm (10 cases,21%).Diameter in ascending aorta increased (5.2±7.1) mm per year and aortic sinus (3.3±3.1) mm per year.The annual growth value of diameter in ascending aorta was higher in patients with rheumatic heart disease than that in Marfan syndrome (P<0.05).All 47 patients have received reoperation on aorta.One patient died in operating room because aortic dissection seriously involved right coronary artery.Seven patients had renal insufficiency after operation; neurological complications occurred in 14 patients including 7 patients with stroke and the others with transient brain dysfunction.All patients were followed up,the mean survival time was (97.25±17.63) months,95% confidence interval was 55.24-73.33 months.Eight cases were died during follow-up and five-year survival rate was 83%.Conclusion To reduce the aortic adverse events after first aortic valve surgery,it is necessary to actively treat and strictly

  9. Effect of lipid lowering on new-onset atrial fibrillation in patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Casper N; Greve, Anders; Boman, Kurt;

    2012-01-01

    Lipid-lowering drugs, particularly statins, have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that may prevent atrial fibrillation (AF). This effect has not been investigated on new-onset AF in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (AS).......Lipid-lowering drugs, particularly statins, have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that may prevent atrial fibrillation (AF). This effect has not been investigated on new-onset AF in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (AS)....

  10. Outcome of patients with low-gradient "severe" aortic stenosis and preserved ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jander, Nikolaus; Minners, Jan; Holme, Ingar;

    2011-01-01

    Retrospective studies have suggested that patients with a low transvalvular gradient in the presence of an aortic valve area <1.0 cm² and normal ejection fraction may represent a subgroup with an advanced stage of aortic valve disease, reduced stroke volume, and poor prognosis requiring early sur...

  11. Bicuspid aortic valves: Diagnostic accuracy of standard axial 64-slice chest CT compared to aortic valve image plane ECG-gated cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, David J., E-mail: david.murphy@st-vincents.ie [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); McEvoy, Sinead H., E-mail: s.mcevoy@st-vincents.ie [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Iyengar, Sri, E-mail: sri.iyengar@nhs.net [Department of Radiology, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth Devon PL6 8DH (United Kingdom); Feuchtner, Gudrun, E-mail: Gudrun.Feuchtner@i-med.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Cury, Ricardo C., E-mail: r.cury@baptisthealth.net [Department of Radiology, Baptist Cardiac and Vascular Institute, 8900 North Kendall Drive, Miami, FL 33176 (United States); Roobottom, Carl, E-mail: carl.roobottom@nhs.net [Department of Radiology, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth Devon PL6 8DH (United Kingdom); Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry (United Kingdom); Baumueller, Stephan, E-mail: Hatem.Alkadhi@usz.ch [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Alkadhi, Hatem, E-mail: stephan.baumueller@usz.ch [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Dodd, Jonathan D., E-mail: jonniedodd@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of standard axial 64-slice chest CT compared to aortic valve image plane ECG-gated cardiac CT for bicuspid aortic valves. Materials and methods: The standard axial chest CT scans of 20 patients with known bicuspid aortic valves were blindly, randomly analyzed for (i) the appearance of the valve cusps, (ii) the largest aortic sinus area, (iii) the longest aortic cusp length, (iv) the thickest aortic valve cusp and (v) valve calcification. A second blinded reader independently analyzed the appearance of the valve cusps. Forty-two age- and sex-matched patients with known tricuspid aortic valves were used as controls. Retrospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT multiphase reconstructions of the aortic valve were used as the gold-standard. Results: Fourteen (21%) scans were scored as unevaluable (7 bicuspid, 7 tricuspid). Of the remainder, there were 13 evaluable bicuspid valves, ten of which showed an aortic valve line sign, while the remaining three showed a normal Mercedes-Benz appearance owing to fused valve cusps. The 35 evaluable tricuspid aortic valves all showed a normal Mercedes-Benz appearance (P = 0.001). Kappa analysis = 0.62 indicating good interobserver agreement for the aortic valve cusp appearance. Aortic sinus areas, aortic cusp lengths and aortic cusp thicknesses of ≥3.8 cm{sup 2}, 3.2 cm and 1.6 mm respectively on standard axial chest CT best distinguished bicuspid from tricuspid aortic valves (P < 0.0001 for all). Of evaluable scans, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of standard axial chest CT in diagnosing bicuspid aortic valves was 77% (CI 0.54–1.0), 100%, 100% and 70% respectively. Conclusion: The aortic valve is evaluable in approximately 80% of standard chest 64-slice CT scans. Bicuspid aortic valves may be diagnosed on evaluable scans with good diagnostic accuracy. An aortic valve line sign, enlarged aortic sinuses and elongated, thickened valve cusps are specific CT

  12. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of quinticuspid aortic valve with aortic regurgitation and dilated ascending aorta

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Zhaoqi; Zhang Lijun; Meng Yanfeng; Wang Yongmei; Yang Xiaoming

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We report a rare case of a quinticuspid aortic valve associated with regurgitation and dilation of the ascending aorta, which was diagnosed and post-surgically followed up by cardiovascular magnetic resonance and dual source computed tomography.

  13. Interventional Treatment of Pulmonary Valve Stenosis: A Single Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shpend Idrizi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Percutaneous pulmonary valvuloplasty is well established treatment of choice in pulmonary valve stenosis. AIM: The aim of our study was to present our experience with the interventional technique, its immediate and mid-term effectiveness as well as its complication rate. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study included 43 patients, where 33 (74% of them were children between the age of 1 month and 15 years. RESULTS: The procedure was successful in 38 patients or 90%. Mean peak to peak transvalvular gradient was reduced from 91.2 mmHg (55-150 mmHg to 39.1 mmHg (20-80 mmHg. Follow- up of patients was between 2 and 13 years and included echocardiographic evaluation of pulmonary valve gradient, right heart dimensions and function as well as assessment of pulmonary regurgitation. We experienced one major complication pericardial effusion in a 5 months old child that required pericardiocenthesis. Six patients (13.9% required a second intervention. During the follow up period there was significant improvement of right heart function and echocardiography parameters. Mild pulmonary regurgitation was noted in 24 (55% patients, and four (9% patients developed moderate regurgitation, without affecting the function of the right ventricle. CONCLUSIONS: Percutaneous pulmonary valvuloplasty is an effective procedure in treatment of pulmonary stenosis with good short and mid-term results.

  14. [Heart valves after 22 years - good long-term function of aortic homograft, advanced impairment in function of atrioventricular valves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Błazej; Chrzanowski, Lukasz; Krzemińska-Pakula, Maria; Kasprzak, Jarosław D

    2010-03-01

    We report a case of a 61-year-old female patient with a history of aortic valve replacement, who was admitted to our hospital with symptoms and signs of decompensated heart failure (NYHA class III). Transthoracic echocardiogram revealed mitral valve and tricuspid valve regurgitation (III grade) with normal function of aortic valve homograft implanted 22 years ago. The patient underwent cardiosurgical mitral valve replacement and tricuspid valve annuloplasty with very good result. An aortic valve homograft may be the best alternative to a mechanical valves for a young female patients. PMID:20411462

  15. Incidence of coronary artery disease before valvular surgery in isolated severe aortic stenosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eun Jeong Cho; Sung-Ji Park; Sung-A Chang; Dong Seop Jeong; Sang-Chol Lee; Seung Woo Park; Pyo Won Park

    2014-01-01

    Background Angina pectoris has been recognized as one of the principal symptoms of aortic valve stenosis (AS),even in patients without significant coronary artery disease (CAD).However,the incidence of angina pectoris and related CAD in such patients is controversial.There is continuing debate as to whether coronary angiography is necessary before aortic valve replacement (AVR) in patients with severe AS.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence and predictors of CAD in patients with severe AS in a Korean population.Methods Data from all consecutive patients with severe AS undergoing AVR at a major tertiary cardiac and vascular center in Korea were entered in a prospective registry beginning in 1995.Clinical and echocardiographic follow-up data were recorded into the database annually.Significant CAD was defined as one or more major coronary arteries having an estimated narrowing of ≥70% and left main coronary arteries having an estimated narrowing of ≥50% on coronary angiography.We excluded patients with multiple valve disease,significant aortic regurgitation,or prior CAD or valve surgery.Results Totally 574 patients with severe AS (mean age,(65.9±9.6) years) were enrolled in this study.Significant CAD was found in 61 patients (10.6%).Factors associated with increased likelihood of CAD were age,hypertension,diabetes mellitus,chronic renal failure,carotid disease,and aorta calcification.In Logistic regression analysis,the independent predictor of the presence of CAD was age (P=0.011).The incidence of CAD increased significantly at 69.2 years of age.Having two risk factors for cardiovascular disease was the most useful cutoff to predict whether a patient was going to have significant CAD.Conclusions There was a low incidence of significant CAD in a population of Korean patients with severe AS.Therefore,coronary angiography before AVR will be considered in patients with multiple risk factors for cardiovascular disease or in patients more than

  16. Temporal trends in the incidence and prognosis of aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsson, Andreas; Li, Xinjun; Andersson, Charlotte;

    2015-01-01

    for AS in Sweden. METHODS AND RESULTS: With the use of nationwide registers, all adult patients in the Swedish population with a first diagnosis of AS, heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, and aortic valve replacement for AS between 1989 and 2009 were identified and followed up until the end of 2010 for all......- and 3-year mortality in 2007 to 2009 was 0.58 (95% confidence interval, 0.53-0.63) and 0.60 (95% confidence interval, 0.56-0.65), respectively, compared with 1989 to 1991. Similar improvements were observed for heart failure and acute myocardial infarction. Findings were broadly consistent across...... subgroups. Postoperative mortality at 30 days declined despite increased median age at diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: Incidence and mortality rates in AS in Sweden declined between 1989 and 2009 to an extent similar to that observed for heart failure and acute myocardial infarction. These findings could suggest...

  17. Mid-term results of 17-mm St. Jude Medical Regent prosthetic valves in elder patients with small aortic annuli: comparison with 19-mm bioprosthetic valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teshima, Hideki; Ikebuchi, Masahiko; Sano, Toshikazu; Tai, Ryuta; Horio, Naohiro; Irie, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    This study was designed to compare the mid-term outcomes after aortic valve replacement (AVR) between 17-mm mechanical heart valves (MV) and 19-mm bioprosthetic valves (BV) in elderly patients with small aortic annuli. Between 2000 and 2011, 127 consecutive patients (mean age 79 years; 87 % female) underwent AVR for aortic valve stenosis with a small aortic annulus. 19-mm BV (n = 67) was implanted. When the 19-mm BV did not fit the annulus, 17-mm St. Jude Medical Regent prosthetic mechanical valve (n = 60) was used instead of an aortic root-enlargement procedure. The follow-up rate was 94.0 % in the BV group, and 98.5 % in the MV group. No significant differences in survival rate and valve-related complications were found between the 2 groups. In-hospital mortality rates were 1.5 % (n = 1) in the BV group and 5.0 % (n = 3) in the MV group. Late mortality rates were 3.9 % per patient-years (p-y; n = 8) in the BV group, and 6.0 % per p-y (n = 10) in the MV group. Five-year Kaplan-Meier survival rates were 62 % in the BV group, and 72 % in the MV group (log-rank P = 0.280). Freedom from major adverse valve-related stroke and cerebral bleeding events was 92.5 and 98.5 % in the BV group, and 94.7 and 100 % in the MV group. AVR using 17-mm MV in elder patients with small aortic annuli provided equivalent mid-term clinical results to that with 19-mm BV. PMID:24878870

  18. Sudden cardiac death and mitral and aortic valve disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bockeria O.L.

    2013-09-01

    Independent determinants of sudden death were left ventricular ejection fraction and atrial fibrillation. The main cause of death in patients with mitral valve stenosis is a thromboembolism from the left heart chambers to systemic circulation, and the risk of the latter increases with atrial fibrillation. There is no sudden cardiac death in mitral valve stenosis. The absence of left ventricular remodeling in mitral valve stenosis probably explains this finding. Onset of symptoms and signs of left ventricular dysfunction are the main predictors of sudden death and are indications for surgery. It should be emphasized that the database of sudden cardiac death in patients with valvular heart disease is very limited compared to patients with coronary heart disease and cardiomyopathies. Some issues related to predictors and mechanisms of SCD are currently poorly understood, therefore prevention of sudden cardiac death is difficult, especially in asymptomatic patients.

  19. The influence of the aortic valve angle on the hemodynamic features of the thoracic aorta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Hojin; Kim, Guk Bae; Kweon, Jihoon; Lee, Sang Joon; Kim, Young-Hak; Kim, Namkug; Yang, Dong Hyun

    2016-08-01

    Since the first observation of a helical flow pattern in aortic blood flow, the existence of helical blood flow has been found to be associated with various pathological conditions such as bicuspid aortic valve, aortic stenosis, and aortic dilatation. However, an understanding of the development of helical blood flow and its clinical implications are still lacking. In our present study, we hypothesized that the direction and angle of aortic inflow can influence helical flow patterns and related hemodynamic features in the thoracic aorta. Therefore, we investigated the hemodynamic features in the thoracic aorta and various aortic inflow angles using patient-specific vascular phantoms that were generated using a 3D printer and time-resolved, 3D, phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI). The results show that the rotational direction and strength of helical blood flow in the thoracic aorta largely vary according to the inflow direction of the aorta, and a higher helical velocity results in higher wall shear stress distributions. In addition, right-handed rotational flow conditions with higher rotational velocities imply a larger total kinetic energy than left-handed rotational flow conditions with lower rotational velocities.

  20. The Early Variation of Left Ventricular Strain after Aortic Valve Replacement by Three-Dimensional Echocardiography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongle Chen

    Full Text Available Aortic stenosis (AS and aortic incompetence (AI are common aortic valve diseases. Both may deteriorate into irreversible myocardial dysfunction and will increase the risk of sudden death. In this study, we aimed to investigate the early variation trend of left ventricular function by three-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (3D-STE in the patients who underwent cardiac surgeries for aortic valve disease. Twenty patients with severe aortic AS and 16 patients with severe AI were enrolled. All of them underwent the aortic valve replacement (AVR procedures. The patients' global longitudinal strain (GLS and global circumferential strain (GCS were evaluated by 3D-STE before surgery and at 1 week after surgery. In addition, GLS and GCS were followed at 1 month as well as 3 months after AVR. In AS patients, the GCS after AVR altered little both at 1 week (p = 0.562 and at 1 month (p = 0.953 compared with the data before the surgery. And it increased significantly at 3 months of follow-up observation compared to that before AVR (p<0.05. Meanwhile, GLS increased progressively after AVR and improved significantly at 3 months after surgery (p<0.05. For the AI patients, GLS as well as GCS decreased at 1 week after AVR compared to those data at baseline (p<0.05. However, these two parameters recovered at 1 month after AVR. Furthermore, GLS and GCS improved significantly at 3 months after the surgery (p<0.05. Therefore, both GLS and GCS were influenced by AVR and would be improved at 3 months after surgery both in AS patients or AI patients. GLS and GCS can be finely evaluated by 3D-STE, and they are helpful to determine the variation tendency of left ventricular function in patients with AVR.

  1. Methodological inaccuracies in clinical aortic valve severity assessment: insights from computational fluid dynamic modeling of CT-derived aortic valve anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traeger, Brad; Srivatsa, Sanjay S.; Beussman, Kevin M.; Wang, Yechun; Suzen, Yildirim B.; Rybicki, Frank J.; Mazur, Wojciech; Miszalski-Jamka, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease. Assessing the contribution of the valve as a portion to total ventricular load is essential for the aging population. A CT scan for one patient was used to create one in vivo tricuspid aortic valve geometry and assessed with computational fluid dynamics (CFD). CFD simulated the pressure, velocity, and flow rate, which were used to assess the Gorlin formula and continuity equation, current clinical diagnostic standards. The results demonstrate an underestimation of the anatomic orifice area (AOA) by Gorlin formula and overestimation of AOA by the continuity equation, using peak velocities, as would be measured clinically by Doppler echocardiography. As a result, we suggest that the Gorlin formula is unable to achieve the intended estimation of AOA and largely underestimates AOA at the critical low-flow states present in heart failure. The disparity in the use of echocardiography with the continuity equation is due to the variation in velocity profile between the outflow tract and the valve orifice. Comparison of time-averaged orifice areas by Gorlin and continuity with instantaneous orifice areas by planimetry can mask the errors of these methods, which is a result of the assumption that the blood flow is inviscid.

  2. Radiotherapy-induced aortic valve disease associated with porcelain aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mediastinal irradiation has been reported to induce cardiac disease such as pericarditis, valvular dysfunction, conduction abnormalities, accelerated arteriosclerosis of the coronary arteries, and also calcifications of the ascending aorta. We herein describe a case of radiotherapy-induced porcelain aorta and aortic valve disease and their surgical treatment. The patient was diagnosed with myasthenia gravis (MG) in 1965 (Osserman's type II), and mediastinal irradiation was performed in 1970 for treatment of thymic tumor associated with MG. Thirty years after radiation therapy, complete atrioventricular block and aortic valve disease with severe calcification of the ascending aorta and aortic arch (porcelain aorta) were detected on echo cardiogram and cardiac catheterization. A permanent pacemaker was implanted via the left subclavian vein and aortic valve replacement was performed under extracorporeal circulation established by selective cerebral perfusion and balloon occlusion instead of aortic cross-clamping. As no risk factors of arteriosclerosis such as hypercholesterolemia, hyperglycemia and hypertension were apparent, we concluded that the aortic valve disease and porcelain aorta were primarily induced by radiotherapy. (author)

  3. A doença coronária aumenta a mortalidade hospitalar de portadores de estenose aórtica submetidos à substituição valvar? Does the coronary disease increase the hospital mortality in patients with aortic stenosis undergoing valve replacement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José de Lima Oliveira Júnior

    2009-12-01

    revascularização completa do miocárdio (Grupo IIA e 20,9% (nove óbitos nos com revascularização incompleta do miocárdio (Grupo IIB. CONCLUSÕES: Nos pacientes submetidos à substituição valvar aórtica isolada, a presença de doença aterosclerótica arterial coronária crítica associada, em pelo menos duas artérias, influenciou a mortalidade hospitalar. Nos pacientes submetidos ao tratamento cirúrgico combinado, o número de artérias coronárias com doença aterosclerótica crítica e a extensão da revascularização do miocárdio (RM completa ou incompleta, não influenciaram a mortalidade hospitalar, mas a realização de mais de três anastomoses distais interferiu.OBJECTIVES: With the increase in life expectancy occurred in recent decades, it has been noted the concomitant increase in the prevalence of aortic stenosis and degenerative disease of atherosclerotic coronary artery. This study aims to evaluate the influence of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease in patients with critical aortic stenosis undergoing isolated or combined implant valve prosthesis and coronary artery by pass grafting. METHODS: In the period of January 2001 to March 2006, there were analyzed 448 patients undergoing isolated implant aortic valve prosthesis (Group I and 167 patients undergoing aortic valve prosthesis implant combined with coronary artery bypass grafting (Group II. Pre- and intra-operative variables elected for analysis were: age, gender, body mass index, stroke, diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, rheumatic fever, hypertension, endocarditis, acute myocardial infarction, smoking, Fraction of the left ventricular ejection, critical atherosclerotic coronary artery disease, chronic atrial fibrillation, aortic valve operation prior (conservative, functional class of congestive heart failure, value serum creatinine, total cholesterol, size of the prosthesis used, length and number of distal anastomoses held in myocardial revascularization, duration of

  4. Prognostic importance of atrial fibrillation in asymptomatic aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders; Gerdts, Eva; Boman, Kurt;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The frequency and prognostic importance of atrial fibrillation (AF) in asymptomatic mild-to-moderate aortic stenosis (AS) has not been well described. METHODS: Clinical examination, electrocardiography and echocardiography were obtained in asymptomatic patients with mild-to-moderate AS...... in 55 (3.5%) and no AF in 1,421 (90.9%). Incidence of new-onset AF was 1.2%/year; highest in those with impaired LV function. In multivariable analysis, longstanding AF was compared to no AF at baseline, associated with a 4.1-fold higher risk of heart failure (CI 1.2 to 13.8, p=0.02) and a 4.8-fold...... higher risk of non-hemorrhagic stroke (CI 1.7 to 13.6, p=0.003). CONCLUSION: Rate of AF is moderate in asymptomatic AS. Longstanding but not episodic AF was, independently predictive of increased risk of heart failure and non-hemorrhagic stroke. New-onset AF was associated with cardiac decompensation....

  5. What is the real practice of exercise echocardiographic testing inasymptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eun Jeong Cho; Sung-Ji Park; Jung-Eun Song; Seol-Hwa Kim; Yung-Joo Lee; Ji-Hye Gak; Sung-A Chang

    2013-01-01

    Background Although exercise testing has been suggested to help predict clinical outcome,limited data are available to guide how exercise Doppler echocardiography (ECG) can be used clinically in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (AS).The aim of this study was to assess the clinical value of exercise echocardiographic testing in asymptomatic patients with severe AS.Methods Symptom-limited treadmill exercise testing using the modified Bruce protocol was performed in 31 asymptomatic patients (mean age (62±11) years) with severe AS (aortic valve area <1 cm2,peak aortic velocity (AV Vmax) >4 m/sec,or a mean transaortic pressure gradient (AV mean PG) >40 mmHg (1 mmHg=0.133 kPa)) with normal left ventricular (LV)systolic function (LV ejection fraction (EF) >50%).Clinical symptoms,vital signs,ECG,and Doppler hemodynamics were obtained during and/or immediately after exercise.Results Aortic valve replacement (AVR) was performed in 18 patients during follow-up.The patients who had AVR exhibited higher baseline AV mean PG (51 (35-84) vs.44 (25.2-57.0) mmHg; P=0.031).There were no significant differences between the AVR group and non-AVR group including exercise duration (7.47 (2.32-11.59) vs.7.25 (4.06-10.52) minutes,P=0.917),exercise capacity (10.1 (4.6-12.8) vs.10.1 (7.0-12.8) metabolic equivalents,P=0.675),and an increment in AV mean PG by exercise (18.5 (3.2-48.0) vs.12.6 (4.4-32.1) mmHg,P=0.366).Univariate regression analysis revealed that independent determinant of AVR was the baseline AV mean PG (P=0.031).Conclusions Although additional value of exercise ECG was demonstrated,baseline transaortic mean pressure gradient is the major determinant of AVR.Further large-scale prospective studies are required to determine whether surgery should be recommended in the presence of an abnormal exercise ECG in asymptomatic severe AS.

  6. Interobserver variability of CT angiography for evaluation of aortic annulus dimensions prior to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidkonz, C., E-mail: christian.schmidkonz@gmail.com [Department of Internal Medicine 2 (Cardiology), University of Erlangen, Ulmenweg 18, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Marwan, M.; Klinghammer, L.; Mitschke, M.; Schuhbaeck, A.; Arnold, M. [Department of Internal Medicine 2 (Cardiology), University of Erlangen, Ulmenweg 18, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Lell, M. [Radiological Institute, University of Erlangen, Maximiliansplatz 1, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Achenbach, S.; Pflederer, T. [Department of Internal Medicine 2 (Cardiology), University of Erlangen, Ulmenweg 18, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Cardiac CT provides highly reproducible measurements of aortic annulus and root dimensions prior to TAVI. • The perimeter-derived aortic annulus diameter shows the lowest interobserver variability. • If all three CT sizing methods are considered and stated as a “consensus result”, mismatches in prosthesis size selection can be further reduced. - Abstract: Objective: Assessment of aortic annulus dimensions prior to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is crucial for accurate prosthesis sizing in order to avoid prosthesis–annulus-mismatch possibly resulting in complications like valve dislodgement, paravalvular regurgitation or annulus rupture. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography allows 3-dimensional assessment of aortic annulus dimensions. Only limited data exist about its interobserver variability. Methods: In 100 consecutive patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis (51 male, BMI 27 ± 5 kg/m{sup 2}, age 81 ± 7 years, heart rate 72 ± 15 bpm, Logistic Euroscore 31 ± 14%, STS-Score 7 ± 4%), pre-interventional aortic annulus assessment was performed by dual source computed tomography (collimation 2 × 128 × 0.6 mm, high pitch spiral data acquisition mode, 40–60 ml contrast agents, radiation dose 3.5 ± 0.9 mSv). The following aortic annulus characteristics were determined by three independent observers: aortic annulus maximum, minimum and mean diameters (D{sub max}, D{sub min}, D{sub mean}), eccentricity index (EI), effective aortic annulus diameter according to its circumference (D{sub circ}), effective aortic annulus diameter according to its area (D{sub area}), distance from the aortic annulus plane to the left (LCA) and right coronary artery (RCA) ostia, maximum (D{sub max}AR) and minimum aortic root diameter (D{sub min}AR), maximum (D{sub max}STJ) and minimum diameter of the sinotubular junction (D{sub min}STJ). Subsequently, interobserver variabilities were assessed. Results: Correlation between

  7. Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery: Transapical Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive cardiac surgery is less traumatic and therefore leads to quicker recovery. With the assistance of engineering technologies on devices, imaging, and robotics, in conjunction with surgical technique, minimally invasive cardiac surgery will improve clinical outcomes and expand the cohort of patients that can be treated. We used transapical aortic valve implantation as an example to demonstrate that minimally invasive cardiac surgery can be implemented with the integration of surgical techniques and engineering technologies. Feasibility studies and long-term evaluation results prove that transapical aortic valve implantation under MRI guidance is feasible and practical. We are investigating an MRI compatible robotic surgical system to further assist the surgeon to precisely deliver aortic valve prostheses via a transapical approach. Ex vivo experimentation results indicate that a robotic system can also be employed in in vivo models.

  8. Crystalline Ultrastructures, Inflammatory Elements, and Neoangiogenesis Are Present in Inconspicuous Aortic Valve Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Morbidity from calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is increasing. Recent studies suggest early reversible changes involving inflammation and neoangiogenesis. We hypothesized that microcalcifications, chemokines, and growth factors are present in unaffected regions of calcific aortic valves. We studied aortic valves from 4 patients with CAVD and from 1 control, using immunohistochemistry, scanning electron microscopy, and infrared spectrography. We revealed clusters of capillary neovessels in...

  9. Crystalline Ultrastructures, Inflammatory Elements, and Neoangiogenesis Are Present in Inconspicuous Aortic Valve Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    P. Dorfmüller; Bazin, D.(National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA); Aubert, S; Weil, R.; Brisset, F.; Daudon, M.; Capron, F; Brochériou, I

    2010-01-01

    Morbidity from calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is increasing. Recent studies suggest early reversible changes involving inflammation and neoangiogenesis. We hypothesized that microcalcifications, chemokines, and growth factors are present in unaffected regions of calcific aortic valves. We studied aortic valves from 4 patients with CAVD and from 1 control, using immunohistochemistry, scanning electron microscopy, and infrared spectrography. We revealed clusters of capillary neovessel...

  10. Medially constrained deformable modeling for segmentation of branching medial structures: Application to aortic valve segmentation and morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouch, Alison M; Tian, Sijie; Takebe, Manabu; Yuan, Jiefu; Gorman, Robert; Cheung, Albert T; Wang, Hongzhi; Jackson, Benjamin M; Gorman, Joseph H; Gorman, Robert C; Yushkevich, Paul A

    2015-12-01

    Deformable modeling with medial axis representation is a useful means of segmenting and parametrically describing the shape of anatomical structures in medical images. Continuous medial representation (cm-rep) is a "skeleton-first" approach to deformable medial modeling that explicitly parameterizes an object's medial axis and derives the object's boundary algorithmically. Although cm-rep has effectively been used to segment and model a number of anatomical structures with non-branching medial topologies, the framework is challenging to apply to objects with branching medial geometries since branch curves in the medial axis are difficult to parameterize. In this work, we demonstrate the first clinical application of a new "boundary-first" deformable medial modeling paradigm, wherein an object's boundary is explicitly described and constraints are imposed on boundary geometry to preserve the branching configuration of the medial axis during model deformation. This "boundary-first" framework is leveraged to segment and morphologically analyze the aortic valve apparatus in 3D echocardiographic images. Relative to manual tracing, segmentation with deformable medial modeling achieves a mean boundary error of 0.41 ± 0.10 mm (approximately one voxel) in 22 3DE images of normal aortic valves at systole. Deformable medial modeling is additionally demonstrated on pathological cases, including aortic stenosis, Marfan syndrome, and bicuspid aortic valve disease. This study demonstrates a promising approach for quantitative 3DE analysis of aortic valve morphology.

  11. Infective endocarditis of the aortic valve in a Border collie dog with patent ductus arteriosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Takuma; Sunahara, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Keisuke; Ito, Tetsuro; Kanai, Eiichi; Fujii, Yoko

    2015-03-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) in dogs with cardiac shunts has not been reported previously. However, we encountered a dog with concurrent patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) and IE. The dog was a 1-year-old, 13.9-kg female Border collie and presented with anorexia, weight loss, pyrexia (40.4 °C) and lameness. A continuous murmur with maximal intensity over the left heart base (Levine 5/6) was detected on auscultation. Echocardiography revealed a PDA and severe aortic stenosis (AS) caused by aortic-valve vegetative lesions. Corynebacterium spp. and Bacillus subtilis were isolated from blood cultures. The dog responded to aggressive antibiotic therapy, and the PDA was subsequently surgically corrected. After a series of treatments, the dog showed long-term improvement in clinical status. PMID:25391395

  12. Acquired Aorto-Right Ventricular Fistula following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Tariq Shakoor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR techniques are rapidly evolving, and results of published trials suggest that TAVR is emerging as the standard of care in certain patient subsets and a viable alternative to surgery in others. As TAVR is a relatively new procedure and continues to gain its acceptance, rare procedural complications will continue to appear. Our case is about an 89-year-old male with extensive past medical history who presented with progressive exertional dyspnea and angina secondary to severe aortic stenosis. Patient got TAVR and his postoperative course was complicated by complete heart block, aorto-RV fistula, and ventricular septal defect (VSD formation as a complication of TAVR. To the best of our knowledge, this is the third reported case of aorto-RV fistula following TAVR as a procedural complication but the first one to show three complications all together in one patient.

  13. Viscoelastic Properties of the Aortic Valve Interstitial Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Merryman, W. David; Bieniek, Paul D.; Guilak, Farshid; Michael S Sacks

    2009-01-01

    There has been growing interest in the mechanobiological function of the aortic valve interstitial cell (AVIC), due to its role in valve tissue homeostasis and remodeling. In a recent study we determined the relation between diastolic loading of the AV leaflet and the resulting AVIC deformation, which was found to be substantial. However, due to the rapid loading time of the AV leaflets during closure (~0.05 s), time-dependent effects may play a role in AVIC deformation during physiological f...

  14. Lactococcus garvieae Endocarditis on a Prosthetic Biological Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsur, A; Slutzki, T; Flusser, D

    2015-09-01

    Lactococcus garvieae (LG) endocarditis is a rare disease in humans. There are only about 16 reported cases in the world. We report a 76-year-old male patient with LG endocarditis. In depth interview with the patient revealed that 2 weeks prior to admission, he had eaten sushi containing raw fish. Unlike many of the other infections reported, which were on a native mitral valve, our patient's vegetation was on a prosthetic aortic valve.

  15. Lactococcus garvieae Endocarditis on a Prosthetic Biological Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsur, A; Slutzki, T; Flusser, D

    2015-09-01

    Lactococcus garvieae (LG) endocarditis is a rare disease in humans. There are only about 16 reported cases in the world. We report a 76-year-old male patient with LG endocarditis. In depth interview with the patient revealed that 2 weeks prior to admission, he had eaten sushi containing raw fish. Unlike many of the other infections reported, which were on a native mitral valve, our patient's vegetation was on a prosthetic aortic valve. PMID:25295408

  16. MicroRNA Expression Signature in Degenerative Aortic Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis, characterized by narrowing of the exit of the left ventricle of the heart, has become the most common valvular heart disease in the elderly. The aim of this study was to investigate the microRNA (miRNA) signature in degenerative AS. Through microarray analysis, we identified the miRNA expression signature in the tissue samples from healthy individuals (n = 4) and patients with degenerative AS (n = 4). Six miRNAs (hsa-miR-193a-3p, hsa-miR-29b-1-5p, hsa-miR-505-5p, hsa-miR-194-5p, hsa-miR-99b-3p, and hsa-miR-200b-3p) were overexpressed and 14 (hsa-miR-3663-3p, hsa-miR-513a-5p, hsa-miR-146b-5p, hsa-miR-1972, hsa-miR-718, hsa-miR-3138, hsa-miR-21-5p, hsa-miR-630, hsa-miR-575, hsa-miR-301a-3p, hsa-miR-636, hsa-miR-34a-3p, hsa-miR-21-3p, and hsa-miR-516a-5p) were downregulated in aortic tissue from AS patients. GeneSpring 13.1 was used to identify potential human miRNA target genes by comparing a 3-way comparison of predictions from TargetScan, PITA, and microRNAorg databases. Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis were performed to identify potential pathways and functional annotations associated with AS. Twenty miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed between patients with AS samples and normal controls and identified potential miRNA targets and molecular pathways associated with this morbidity. This study describes the miRNA expression signature in degenerative AS and provides an improved understanding of the molecular pathobiology of this disease.

  17. Shape of the dilated aorta in children with bicuspid aortic valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dilated aorta in adults with bicuspid aortic valve has been shown to have different shapes, but it is not known if this occurs in children. This observational study was performed to determine if there are different shapes of the dilated aorta in children with bicuspid aortic valve and their association with age, gender, hemodynamic alterations, and degree of aortic enlargement. One hundred and eighty-seven echocardiograms done on pediatric patients (0 – 18 years) for bicuspid aortic valve, during 2008, were reviewed. Aortic valve morphology, shape/size of the aorta, and pertinent hemodynamic alterations were documented. Aortic dilation was felt to be present when at least one aortic segment had a z-score > 2.0; global aortic enlargement was determined by summing the aortic segment z-scores. The aortic shape was assessed by age, gender, valve morphology, and hemodynamic alterations. Aortic dilation was present in 104/187 patients. The aorta had six different shapes designated from S1 through S6. There was no association between the aortic shape and gender, aortic valve morphology, or hemodynamic abnormalities. S3 was the most common after the age of six years and was associated with the most significant degree of global aortic enlargement. The shape of the dilated aorta in children with bicuspid aortic valve does not occur in a uniform manner and multiple shapes are seen. S2 and S3 are most commonly seen. As aortic dilation becomes more significant, a single shape (S3) becomes the dominant pattern

  18. Transition to palliative care when transcatheter aortic valve implantation is not an option: opportunities and recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauck, Sandra B.; Gibson, Jennifer A.; Baumbusch, Jennifer; Carroll, Sandra L.; Achtem, Leslie; Kimel, Gil; Nordquist, Cindy; Cheung, Anson; Boone, Robert H.; Ye, Jian; Wood, David A.; Webb, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is the recommended treatment for most patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis at high surgical risk. However, TAVI may be clinically futile for patients who have multiple comorbidities and excessive frailty. This group benefits from transition to palliative care to maximize quality of life, improve symptoms, and ensure continuity of health services. We discuss the clinical determination of utility and futility, explore the current evidence guiding the integration of palliative care in procedure-focused cardiac programs, and outline recommendations for TAVI programs. Recent findings The determination of futility of treatment in elderly patients with aortic stenosis is challenging. There is a paucity of research available to guide best practices when TAVI is not an option. Opportunities exist to build on the evidence gained in the management of end of life and heart failure. TAVI programs and primary care providers can facilitate improved communication and processes of care to provide decision support and transition to palliative care. Summary The increased availability of transcatheter options for the management of valvular heart disease will increase the assessment of people with life-limiting conditions for whom treatment may not be an option. It is pivotal to bridge cardiac innovation and palliation to optimize patient outcomes. PMID:26716394

  19. Coronary artery dissection with rupture of aortic valve commissure following type A aortic dissection: the role of 64-slice MDCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, K M; Abdou, Sayed M; El-Menyar, Ayman; Ayman, El Menyar; Khulaifi, A A; Nabti, A L

    2008-01-01

    A rare case of bilateral coronary artery dissection with rupture of aortic valve commissure following type A aortic dissection is described. 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) was able to demonstrate both this findings along with involvement of other neck vessels. TEE demonstrated the severity and mechanisms of aortic valve damage and assisted the surgeon in valve repair. MDCT has played an invaluable role in the diagnosis of the abnormal details of such life-threatening vascular complications. PMID:18384568

  20. Percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation for degenerated surgical bioprostheses: the first case series in Asia with one-year follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiam, Paul Toon Lim; Ewe, See Hooi; Soon, Jia Lin; Ho, Kay Woon; Sin, Yong Koong; Tan, Swee Yaw; Lim, Soo Teik; Koh, Tian Hai; Chua, Yeow Leng

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become an established therapy for inoperable and high-surgical-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. Although TAVI in patients with degenerated surgical aortic bioprostheses (i.e. valve-in-valve TAVI) is increasingly reported in Western studies, such data is lacking in Asian patients. We describe the initial experience of valve-in-valve TAVI in Asia. METHODS Eight patients who underwent valve-in-valve TAVI due to degenerated aortic bioprostheses were enrolled. The mechanism of bioprosthetic valve failure was stenotic, regurgitation or mixed. All procedures were performed via transfemoral arterial access, using the self-expanding CoreValve prosthesis or balloon-expandable SAPIEN XT prosthesis. RESULTS The mean age of the patients was 71.6 ± 13.2 years and five were male. Mean duration to surgical bioprosthesis degeneration was 10.2 ± 4.1 years. Valve-in-valve TAVI was successfully performed in all patients. CoreValve and SAPIEN XT prostheses were used in six and two patients, respectively. There were no deaths, strokes or permanent pacemaker requirement at 30 days, with one noncardiac mortality at one year. All patients experienced New York Heart Association functional class improvement. Post-procedure mean pressure gradients were 20 ± 11 mmHg and 22 ± 8 mmHg at 30 days and one year, respectively. Residual aortic regurgitation (AR) of more than mild severity occurred in one patient at 30 days. At one year, only one patient had mild residual AR. CONCLUSION In our experience of valve-in-valve TAVI, procedural success was achieved in all patients without adverse events at 30 days. Good clinical and haemodynamic outcomes were sustained at one year. PMID:27193081

  1. Left ventricular myocardial function in congenital valvar aortic stenosis assessed by ultrasound tissue-velocity and strain-rate techniques.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiraly, P.; Kapusta, L.; Thijssen, J.M.; Daniëls, O.

    2003-01-01

    A pilot study was performed to reveal the potentials of new echo Doppler techniques for the detection of myocardial changes due to congenital valvar aortic stenosis. A total of 24 patients, (age range 0.1 to 17 years), with various degrees of aortic stenosis, and 24 age- and gender-matched, healthy

  2. Impact of QRS duration and morphology on the risk of sudden cardiac death in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders M; Gerdts, Eva; Boman, Kurt;

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the predictive value of QRS duration and morphology during watchful waiting in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (AS).......The aim of the study was to examine the predictive value of QRS duration and morphology during watchful waiting in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (AS)....

  3. Tissue Velocities and Myocardial Deformation in Asymptomatic and Symptomatic Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Helle Gervig; Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Hassager, Christian;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assessment of myocardial longitudinal function has proved to be a sensitive marker of deteriorating myocardial function in aortic stenosis, demonstrated by both color Doppler tissue imaging and recently by two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography. The aim of this study...... was to compare velocity (color Doppler tissue imaging) and deformation (two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography) in relation to global and regional longitudinal function in asymptomatic and severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. METHODS: In a cross-sectional design, 231 patients with aortic stenosis were...... = 59). RESULTS: Among all global (peak systolic s', diastolic e' and a', longitudinal displacement, and global longitudinal strain and strain rate) and regional longitudinal (basal, middle, and apical longitudinal strain and strain rate) parameters, only diastolic e', longitudinal displacement...

  4. Sudden death in infancy due to bicuspid aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayel, Ferah; Ozaslan, Abdi; Turan, Arzu Akcay; Pakis, Isil; Ketenci, Cetin; Eroglu, Ayse Guler

    2006-09-01

    Symptoms of bicuspid aortic valve usually occur in the age group of 50-70 years, but rarely, it can also lead to sudden unexpected death in infancy and early childhood. The autopsy of a 2-month-old baby boy, found dead in his cot, revealed the heart weight as 25 g, and the macroscopic examination showed the circumference of the aortic valve consisting of two leaflets as 8 mm. The thickness of the left ventricle, right ventricle, and septum was measured as 8, 7, and 10 mm, respectively. Microscopically, the heart revealed hypertrophic changes of myocytes. Subendocardial areas displayed necrosis of myocytes, and severe and diffuse ischemic changes characterized by loss of myofibers and vacuolization. Interstitial pneumonia was identified in the lungs. Death occurred as a result of a congenital bicuspid aortic valve obstructing the left ventricular outflow tract complicated by lung infection. As there are only a few reported cases in infancy, and congenital bicuspid aortic valve can lead to sudden unexpected death, this case is presented to the forensic community.

  5. Heart failure after aortic valve substitution due to severe hypothyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Kim; Sørensen, Stine Heidenheim; Andersen, Niels Holmark;

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of a 70-year-old female with considerable co-morbidities (Type 2 diabetes, Leiden factor V mutation, mild to moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) and a recent biological aortic valve substitution, who was admitted due to circulatory collapse caused by severe heart fail...

  6. SERUM MAGNESIUM LEVELS IN AORTIC AND MITRAL VALVE REPLACEMENT SURGERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa Rao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : The purpose of the study was to analyze serum magnesium concentration in patients undergoing Aortic and Mitral Valve replacement surgeries. METHODS: This prospective study was conducted in 60 patients who underwent elective Aortic and Mitral va lve replacement surgeries. Blood samples from radial artery were collected just before induction of anesthesia and three days post - operatively for estimation of serum magnesium. RESULTS: Magnesium level was 2.02mg/dl at baseline, 2.28mg/dl, 2.08mg/dl and 1 .90mg/dl respectively on three consecutive days post - operatively. CONCLUSION: The lowering of serum magnesium in Aortic and Mitral valve replacement surgeries postoperatively recommends the use of routine serum magnesium determination and administration to prevent post - operative arrhythmias.

  7. Annular management during aortic valve repair: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunihara, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Annuloplasty is considered to play a key role to control aortic valve regurgitation (AR) and prevent recurrence of AR after aortic valve repair, because aortic root dilatation has emerged as a risk factor for recurrence of AR. Various modifications of annuloplasty have been advocated, however, none of them has become standardized. Thus in this review they are outlined and classified (internal/external, with/without ring, rigid/flexible ring), and their advantages and disadvantages are clarified. Their clinical outcomes seem currently acceptable in general, and external flexible annuloplasty has been performed more frequently with favorable outcomes. However, they are still performed for a minority of patients by special experienced teams with limited follow-up periods. Therefore, it seems too early to determine the superiority or inferiority of each approach. We must carefully conduct evaluation to clarify which approach will become reproducible, effective, and standardized.

  8. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation: the transfemoral access route is the default access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stortecky, Stefan; O'Sullivan, Crochan J; Buellesfeld, Lutz; Windecker, Stephan; Wenaweser, Peter

    2013-09-10

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a widely accepted alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) among non-operable patients or selected high-risk patients with degenerative, severe aortic stenosis. TAVI is considered less invasive when compared with SAVR; however, there remain significant differences between different TAVI access routes. The transfemoral approach is considered the least invasive access route, and can be performed as a fully percutaneous procedure in a spontaneously breathing patient under local anaesthesia and mild sedation only. Moreover, transfemoral TAVI patients are typically transferred to coronary care rather than to an intensive care unit after the procedure, and benefit from early ambulation and a reduction in overall length of hospital stay. Considering these patient-specific and health-economic advantages, several TAVI centres follow the least invasive strategy for their patients and have implemented the transfemoral access route as the default access in their institutions. This article provides an overview on the prerequisites for a successful transfemoral TAVI procedure, describes the procedural advantages compared to alternative access routes, and highlights differences in clinical outcomes. PMID:24025952

  9. Annular sizing using real-time three-dimensional intracardiac echocardiography-guided trans-catheter aortic valve replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendon, Alejandro; Hamid, Tahir; Kanaganayagam, Gajen; Karunaratne, Devinda; Mahadevan, Vaikom S

    2016-01-01

    Objective Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been established as an alternative therapy for patients with severe aortic stenosis who are unfit for the surgical aortic valve replacements. Pre and periprocedural imaging for the TAVR procedure is the key to procedural success. Currently transesophageal echocardiography (TOE), including real-time three-dimensional (RT-3D) imaging TOE, has been used for peri-interventional monitoring and guidance for TAVR. We describe our initial experience with real-time three-dimensional intracardiac echocardiography (RT-3DICE), imaging technology for the use in the TAVR procedure. Methods We used RT-3DICE using an ACUSON SC2000 2.0v (Siemens Medical Solution), and a 10F AcuNav V catheter (Siemens-Acuson, Inc, Mountain View, California, USA) in addition to preoperative multislice CT (MSCT) in total of five patients undergoing TAVR procedure. Results Aortic annulus and sinus of valsalva diameters were measured using RT-3DICE. Aortic valve measurements obtained using RT-3DICE are comparable to those obtained using MSCT with no significant difference in our patients. Conclusions This small study of five patients shows the safe use of RT-3DICE in TAVR Procedure and may help the procedures performed under local anaesthesia without the need for TOE. PMID:27158522

  10. Gender difference in ventricular response to aortic stenosis: insight from cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo Myung Lee

    Full Text Available Although left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH and remodeling is associated with cardiac mortality and morbidity, little is known about the impact of gender on the ventricular response in aortic stenosis (AS patients. This study aimed to analyze the differential effect of gender on ventricular remodeling in moderate to severe AS patients.A total of 118 consecutive patients (67±9 years; 63 males with moderate or severe AS (severe 81.4% underwent transthoracic echocardiography and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR within a 1-month period in this two-center prospective registry. The pattern of LV remodeling was assessed using the LV mass index (LVMI and LV remodeling index (LVRI; LV mass/LV end-diastolic volume by CMR. Although there were no differences in AS severity parameters nor baseline characteristics between genders, males showed a significantly higher LVMI (102.6±29.1 g/m2 vs. 86.1±29.2 g/m2, p=0.003 and LVRI (1.1±0.2 vs. 1.0±0.3, p=0.018, regardless of AS severity. The LVMI was significantly associated with aortic valve area (AVA index and valvuloarterial impedance in females, whereas it was not in males, resulting in significant interaction between genders (PInteraction=0.007/0.014 for AVA index/valvuloarterial impedance, respectively. Similarly, the LVRI also showed a significantly different association between male and female subjects with the change in AS severity parameters (PInteraction=0.033/<0.001/0.029 for AVA index/transaortic mean pressure gradient/valvuloarterial impedance, respectively.Males are associated with greater degree of LVH and higher LVRI compared to females at moderate to severe AS. However, females showed a more exaggerated LV remodeling response, with increased severity of AS and hemodynamic loads, than males.

  11. Surgical treatment of aortic valve endocarditis: a 26-year experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylan Adademir

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We have retrospectively analyzed the results of the operations made for aortic valve endocarditis in a single center in 26 years. Methods: From June 1985 to January 2011, 174 patients were operated for aortic valve endocarditis. One hundred and thirty-eight (79.3% patients were male and the mean age was 39.3±14.4 (9-77 years. Twenty-seven (15.5% patients had prosthetic valve endocarditis. The mean duration of follow-up was 7.3±4.2 years (0.1-18.2 adding up to a total of 1030.8 patient/years. Results: Two hundred and eighty-two procedures were performed. The most frequently performed procedure was aortic valve replacement with mechanical prosthesis (81.6%. In-hospital mortality occurred in 27 (15.5% cases. Postoperatively, 25 (14.4% patients had low cardiac output and 17 (9.8% heart block. The actuarial survival rates for 10 and 15 years were 74.6±3.7% and 61.1±10.3%, respectively. In-hospital mortality was found to be associated with female gender, emergency operation, postoperative renal failure and low cardiac output. The long term mortality was significantly associated with mitral valve involvement. Male gender was found to be a significant risk factor for recurrence in the follow-up. Conclusion: Surgery for aortic valve endocarditis has significant mortality. Emergency operation, female gender, postoperative renal failure and low cardiac output are significant risk factors. Risk for recurrence and need for reoperation is low.

  12. BR 02-1 MANAGEMENT OF HYPERTENSION IN SEVERE AORTIC STENOSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is a common valve disease, affecting nearly 5% of elderly individuals. Because most common etiology of AS is degenerative valve disease, hypertension (HT) is not rare in patients with AS. It was reported that more than 30% of patients with AS had systemic hypertension. Therefore, management of hypertension is an important issue for these patients. There are several effects of combined AS and HT. First, HT increases hemodynamic load of left ventricle and peak systolic left ventricular wall stress. Valvulo-arterial impedance (Zva) has been suggested as a marker of global left ventricular hemodynamic load that represents the cost in mmHg for each ml of blood pumped by left ventricle during systole. Zva is calculated as follows; (systolic blood pressure+mean transportic pressure gradinet)/stroke index. It has been reported that Zva is an important prognostic marker in AS patients. Paradoxical low-flow low-gradient AS is a typical example. Despite relative low pressure gradient less than 40mmHg, those patients shows high Zva and worse prognosis, and may need valvular replacement. Second, HT affects transaortic pressure gradient. In animal experiment, increase of systemic blood pressure itself lowers transaortic pressure gradient in AS. Therefore, measurement of blood pressure is essential in the assessment of AS. Traditionally, active blood pressure loweing was not recommended becasue of the risk of syncope. Currently, no published guidelines provide strong recommendation for the management of HT in AS patients. However, several recent studies demonstrated that the risk of stroke is low and similar to that seen in AS patients without HT. In conclusion, HT is not uncommon in AS patients. Because it increases hemodynamic load of left ventricle and may affect badly in long-term prognosis, careful but active lowering of blood pressure may be warranted for those patients. PMID:27643098

  13. Technical Approach Determines Inflammatory Response after Surgical and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabor Erdoes

    Full Text Available To investigate the periprocedural inflammatory response in patients with isolated aortic valve stenosis undergoing surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI with different technical approaches.Patients were prospectively allocated to one of the following treatments: SAVR using conventional extracorporeal circulation (CECC, n = 47 or minimized extracorporeal circulation (MECC, n = 15, or TAVI using either transapical (TA, n = 15 or transfemoral (TF, n = 24 access. Exclusion criteria included infection, pre-procedural immunosuppressive or antibiotic drug therapy and emergency indications. We investigated interleukin (IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DR, white blood cell count, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP and soluble L-selectin (sCD62L levels before the procedure and at 4, 24, and 48 h after aortic valve replacement. Data are presented for group interaction (p-values for inter-group comparison as determined by the Greenhouse-Geisser correction.SAVR on CECC was associated with the highest levels of IL-8 and hs-CRP (p<0.017, and 0.007, respectively. SAVR on MECC showed the highest descent in levels of HLA-DR and sCD62L (both p<0.001 in the perioperative period. TA-TAVI showed increased intraprocedural concentration and the highest peak of IL-6 (p = 0.017. Significantly smaller changes in the inflammatory markers were observed in TF-TAVI.Surgical and interventional approaches to aortic valve replacement result in inflammatory modulation which differs according to the invasiveness of the procedure. As expected, extracorporeal circulation is associated with the most marked pro-inflammatory activation, whereas TF-TAVI emerges as the approach with the most attenuated inflammatory response. Factors such as the pre-treatment patient condition and the extent of myocardial injury also significantly affect inflammatory biomarker patterns. Accordingly, TA-TAVI is to be classified not

  14. Simulation study and function analysis of the dynamic aortic valve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Dongdong; BAI Jing

    2006-01-01

    The dynamic aortic valve (DAV) is a new left ventricular assist device, a micro-axial blood pump implemented at the position of the aortic valve, pumping blood from the left ventricle into the aortic artery. The present dynamic aortic valve operates at 7 different rotation speeds, ranging from 3000 r/min (speed 1) to 9000 r/min (speed 7). Because in vivo experiments need a lot of live animals and take a long period of time, modeling and simulation have been widely used to simulate and analyze hydra-dynamic property of the DAV and its assisting effects. With the measurements from the mock circulatory loop, a mathematic model of the DAV is established and embedded into the previously developed canine circulatory system. Using this model, the effect of the DAV on the failing heart at each rotation speed level is investigated. The vital cardiac variables are computed and compared with in vivo experimental results, which are in good agreement with an acceptable difference mostly 15 %. The establishment of the DAV model and its simulation are useful for further improvement of the DAV device.

  15. Genetic associations with valvular calcification and aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thanassoulis, George; Campbell, Catherine Y; Owens, David S;

    2013-01-01

    Limited information is available regarding genetic contributions to valvular calcification, which is an important precursor of clinical valve disease.......Limited information is available regarding genetic contributions to valvular calcification, which is an important precursor of clinical valve disease....

  16. Anatomics Knowledges of Aortic Root in the Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

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    Marcelo Cerezo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The Aortic Valve is a valvular system that bears different high pressure forces. It takes part of a complex structure called Aortic Root. Nowadays, anatomic knowledge has taken a preponderant role, due to the use of the Transcatether Aortic Valve Implant (TAVI. To describe the patient´s characteristics which exclude them of the TAVI for anatomic reasons in cadaveric dissections and transthoracic echocardiograms. A descriptive retrospective analysis of 67 individuals was performed and divided into two groups. Group A: Formalized cadaveric dissections with hypertrofic hearts and aortic sclerosis signs from the Chair A of Anatomy of the University of La Plata (UNLP. Group B: Transthoracic Echocardiograms realized at the San Martín Hospital of La Plata between January 2005 and December 2009. Out of 67 individuals assessed, 17 (25% had one or more contraindications for TAVI. Five on Group A (36%, and 12 on Group B (23%. The most common anatomic contraindication was the Ascending Aortic diameter less than 30mm and the aortic annulus less than 20mm, following to the RAo-TSVI Angle more than 145° (2 to Group A, and 4 to Group B and the Septal thickness more than 17mm (no one to Group A, and 3 to Group B. Only just one individual was found with a low implant left coronary artery in the Group A avoiding TAVI. According to this study, the anatomic contraindications to realize TAVI are frequent due to the diagnosis devices available at the moment. The anatomic aortic root knowledge and the aortic valve interindividual variability will allow the improvement of the manufactured devices made in the market.

  17. Does lowering cholesterol have an impact on the progression of aortic stenosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, A.M.; Wachtell, K.

    2008-01-01

    reviews the pathophysiological mechanisms of calcific AS, reviews current clinical trials of statin use in aortic stenosis and reports on on-going trials, evaluating whether cholesterol lowering therapy can slow disease progression in different populations. Finally, we review if computerized tomography...

  18. First report on intraoperative vector flow imaging of the heart among patients with healthy and diseased aortic valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse; Pedersen, Mads Møller;

    2014-01-01

    on (A) 3 patients with healthy aortic valve and (B) 3 patients with aortic valve stenosis. In group B, the systolic flow of the ascending aorta had higher velocities, was more aliased and chaotic. The jet narrowed to 44% of the lumen compared to 75% in group A and with a vector concentration, a measure......The vector velocity method Transverse Oscillation (TO) implemented on a conventional ultrasound (US) scanner (ProFocus, BK Medical, Herlev, Denmark) can provide real-time, angle-independent estimates of the cardiac blood flow. During cardiac surgery, epicardial US examination using TO was performed...... of flow complexity, of 0.41 compared to 0.87 in group A. The two groups had similar secondary flow of the ascending aorta with an average rotation frequency of 4.8 Hz. Simultaneous measurements were obtained with spectral Doppler (SD) and a thermodilution technique (TD). The mean difference in peak...

  19. Study of association between the aortic valve calcification and coronary artery disease%主动脉瓣钙化与冠心病的关系研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    耿峰; 葛艺东; 秦信

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between the aortic valve calcification(AVC)and coronary artery disease(CAD). Methods Six hundred and fifty-three patients underwent transthoracic echocardiography and coronary arteriography at the same time were analyzed retro-spectively in the study. All patients were divided into two groups: normal control group and aortic valve calcification group (left valve calcification, right valve calcification, multiple aortic valve calcification), comparison of the incidence of coronary artery disease between aortic valve calcification group and normal control group. Analysis of the correlation between single aortic valve calcification and coronary artery stenosis. Results The incidence of coronary artery disease aortic in AVC group was markedly higher than in normal control group. There was no obvious correlation between single aortic valve calcification and the same side coronary artery stenosis. Conclusion Patients with aortic valve calcification have a higher incidence of coronary artery disease, aortic valve calcification can be used as a reference index of noninvasive assessment of coronary artery disease.%目的:探讨主动脉瓣钙化与冠心病发病之间的关系。方法回顾性研究同期行冠状动脉造影检查和超声心动图检查患者653例,并对所有患者分组:正常对照组和主动脉瓣钙化组(左冠瓣钙化、右冠瓣钙化,主动脉瓣多瓣膜钙化),对比研究主动脉瓣钙化组与正常对照组间冠心病发病率差异,同时比较单瓣主动脉瓣钙化与冠状动脉狭窄是否发生于同侧。结果主动脉瓣钙化组冠心病的检出率明显高于正常对照组,单瓣主动脉瓣钙化与同侧冠脉狭窄无明显相关性。结论主动脉瓣钙化患者有更高的冠心病发病率,主动脉瓣钙化可以作为冠心病无创评估的一个参考指标。

  20. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation and Morbidity and Mortality-Related Factors: a 5-Year Experience in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Silveira Souza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation has become an option for high-surgical-risk patients with aortic valve disease. Objective: To evaluate the in-hospital and one-year follow-up outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Methods: Prospective cohort study of transcatheter aortic valve implantation cases from July 2009 to February 2015. Analysis of clinical and procedural variables, correlating them with in-hospital and one-year mortality. Results: A total of 136 patients with a mean age of 83 years (80-87 underwent heart valve implantation; of these, 49% were women, 131 (96.3% had aortic stenosis, one (0.7% had aortic regurgitation and four (2.9% had prosthetic valve dysfunction. NYHA functional class was III or IV in 129 cases (94.8%. The baseline orifice area was 0.67 ± 0.17 cm2 and the mean left ventricular-aortic pressure gradient was 47.3±18.2 mmHg, with an STS score of 9.3% (4.8%-22.3%. The prostheses implanted were self-expanding in 97% of cases. Perioperative mortality was 1.5%; 30-day mortality, 5.9%; in-hospital mortality, 8.1%; and one-year mortality, 15.5%. Blood transfusion (relative risk of 54; p = 0.0003 and pulmonary arterial hypertension (relative risk of 5.3; p = 0.036 were predictive of in-hospital mortality. Peak C-reactive protein (relative risk of 1.8; p = 0.013 and blood transfusion (relative risk of 8.3; p = 0.0009 were predictive of 1-year mortality. At 30 days, 97% of patients were in NYHA functional class I/II; at one year, this figure reached 96%. Conclusion: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was performed with a high success rate and low mortality. Blood transfusion was associated with higher in-hospital and one-year mortality. Peak C-reactive protein was associated with one-year mortality.

  1. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation and Morbidity and Mortality-Related Factors: a 5-Year Experience in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, André Luiz Silveira; Salgado, Constantino González; Mourilhe-Rocha, Ricardo; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Lima, Luciana Cristina Lima Correia; de Mattos, Nelson Durval Ferreira Gomes; Rabischoffsky, Arnaldo; Fagundes, Francisco Eduardo Sampaio; Colafranceschi, Alexandre Siciliano; Carvalho, Luiz Antonio Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation has become an option for high-surgical-risk patients with aortic valve disease. Objective To evaluate the in-hospital and one-year follow-up outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Methods Prospective cohort study of transcatheter aortic valve implantation cases from July 2009 to February 2015. Analysis of clinical and procedural variables, correlating them with in-hospital and one-year mortality. Results A total of 136 patients with a mean age of 83 years (80-87) underwent heart valve implantation; of these, 49% were women, 131 (96.3%) had aortic stenosis, one (0.7%) had aortic regurgitation and four (2.9%) had prosthetic valve dysfunction. NYHA functional class was III or IV in 129 cases (94.8%). The baseline orifice area was 0.67 ± 0.17 cm2 and the mean left ventricular-aortic pressure gradient was 47.3±18.2 mmHg, with an STS score of 9.3% (4.8%-22.3%). The prostheses implanted were self-expanding in 97% of cases. Perioperative mortality was 1.5%; 30-day mortality, 5.9%; in-hospital mortality, 8.1%; and one-year mortality, 15.5%. Blood transfusion (relative risk of 54; p = 0.0003) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (relative risk of 5.3; p = 0.036) were predictive of in-hospital mortality. Peak C-reactive protein (relative risk of 1.8; p = 0.013) and blood transfusion (relative risk of 8.3; p = 0.0009) were predictive of 1-year mortality. At 30 days, 97% of patients were in NYHA functional class I/II; at one year, this figure reached 96%. Conclusion Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was performed with a high success rate and low mortality. Blood transfusion was associated with higher in-hospital and one-year mortality. Peak C-reactive protein was associated with one-year mortality. PMID:27192383

  2. Changes in cardiac substrate transporters and metabolic proteins mirror the metabolic shift in patients with aortic stenosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa C Heather

    Full Text Available In the hypertrophied human heart, fatty acid metabolism is decreased and glucose utilisation is increased. We hypothesized that the sarcolemmal and mitochondrial proteins involved in these key metabolic pathways would mirror these changes, providing a mechanism to account for the modified metabolic flux measured in the human heart. Echocardiography was performed to assess in vivo hypertrophy and aortic valve impairment in patients with aortic stenosis (n = 18. Cardiac biopsies were obtained during valve replacement surgery, and used for western blotting to measure metabolic protein levels. Protein levels of the predominant fatty acid transporter, fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36 correlated negatively with levels of the glucose transporters, GLUT1 and GLUT4. The decrease in FAT/CD36 was accompanied by decreases in the fatty acid binding proteins, FABPpm and H-FABP, the β-oxidation protein medium chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase, the Krebs cycle protein α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and the oxidative phosphorylation protein ATP synthase. FAT/CD36 and complex I of the electron transport chain were downregulated, whereas the glucose transporter GLUT4 was upregulated with increasing left ventricular mass index, a measure of cardiac hypertrophy. In conclusion, coordinated downregulation of sequential steps involved in fatty acid and oxidative metabolism occur in the human heart, accompanied by upregulation of the glucose transporters. The profile of the substrate transporters and metabolic proteins mirror the metabolic shift from fatty acid to glucose utilisation that occurs in vivo in the human heart.

  3. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance evaluation of aortic stenosis severity using single plane measurement of effective orifice area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia Julio

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE is the standard method for the evaluation of the severity of aortic stenosis (AS. Valve effective orifice area (EOA measured by the continuity equation is one of the most frequently used stenotic indices. However, TTE measurement of aortic valve EOA is not feasible or not reliable in a significant proportion of patients. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR has emerged as a non-invasive alternative to evaluate EOA using velocity measurements. The objectives of this study were: 1 to validate a new CMR method using jet shear layer detection (JSLD based on acoustical source term (AST concept to estimate the valve EOA; 2 to introduce a simplified JSLD method not requiring vorticity field derivation. Methods and results We performed an in vitro study where EOA was measured by CMR in 4 fixed stenoses (EOA = 0.48, 1.00, 1.38 and 2.11 cm2 under the same steady flow conditions (4-20 L/min. The in vivo study included eight (8 healthy subjects and 37 patients with mild to severe AS (0.72 cm2 ≤ EOA ≤ 1.71 cm2. All subjects underwent TTE and CMR examinations. EOA was determinated by TTE with the use of continuity equation method (TTECONT. For CMR estimation of EOA, we used 3 methods: 1 Continuity equation (CMRCONT; 2 Shear layer detection (CMRJSLD, which was computed from the velocity field of a single CMR velocity profile at the peak systolic phase; 3 Single plane velocity truncation (CMRSPVT, which is a simplified version of CMRJSLD method. There was a good agreement between the EOAs obtained in vitro by the different CMR methods and the EOA predicted from the potential flow theory. In the in vivo study, there was good correlation and concordance between the EOA measured by the TTECONT method versus those measured by each of the CMR methods: CMRCONT (r = 0.88, CMRJSLD (r = 0.93 and CMRSPVT (r = 0.93. The intra- and inter- observer variability of EOA measurements was 5 ± 5% and 9 ± 5% for

  4. Monitoring of Serial Presurgical and Postsurgical Changes in the Serum Proteome in a Series of Patients with Calcific Aortic Stenosis

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    Kazumi Satoh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Comprehensive analysis of proteome differentially expressed in response to surgery or drug treatment is useful to understand biological responses to dispensed interventions. Here we investigated expression changes in sera of patients who suffered from calcific aortic stenosis (CAS, before and after surgery for aortic valve replacement. Materials and Methods. Sera obtained before and after surgery with depletion of highly abundant proteins were analyzed with iTRAQ labeling followed by nanoLC-MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS. Results. Fifty-one proteins shared in five patients were identified with differential levels in postsurgical and presurgical sera. Finally, 16 proteins that show statistically significant levels in patients’ sera compared with those in control sera (P<0.05 were identified. Most of the identified proteins were positive acute-phase proteins. Among three proteins other than acute-phase proteins, we confirmed increased levels of antithrombin-III and zinc-α-2-glycoprotein in postsurgical sera by Western blot analysis using other CAS patients’ sera. Furthermore, antithrombin-III and zinc-α-2-glycoprotein were not found among proteins with differential levels in postsurgical and presurgical sera of patients with aortic aneurysms that we identified in a previous study. Conclusions. The results indicated that antithrombin-III and zinc-α-2-glycoprotein would become unique monitoring proteins for evaluating pathophysiological and biochemical processes occurring before and after surgery for CAS.

  5. Aortic Valve Replacement in Young Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M.A. Klieverik (Loes Maria Anne)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractWorldwide the incidence and burden of heart valve disease is increasing due to aging of the world population and the problem of rheumatic cardiac disease in developing countries and in parts of the population in the developed world.1 Between 2007 and 2050 the world population will increa

  6. Minimal-access median sternotomy for aortic valve replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Luciani, Giovanni Battista; Lucchese, Gianluca

    2013-01-01

    A variety of minimally-invasive approaches for aortic valve replacement (AVR) have been developed and are increasingly being utilized. The different approaches described, such as partial upper sternotomy, right parasternal thoracotomy or transverse sternotomy have the aim to decrease invasiveness and reduce surgical trauma. Whereas port access surgery with remote cannulation has the attendant risks inherent with peripheral cardiopulmonary bypass and limitations in terms of myocardial protecti...

  7. Intermittent acute aortic valve regurgitation: A case report of a prosthetic valve dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.E. Karagiannis (Stefanos); G. Karatasakis (George); K. Spargias (Konstantinos); L. Louka; D. Poldermans (Don); D.V. Cokkinos (Dennis)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractComplications of any mechanical prosthesis include thrombus or pannus formation. In our case report we demonstrate that prosthetic aortic valve regurgitation due to pannus formation may be intermittent and non-cyclic in pattern and therefore not obvious at the time of original clinical e

  8. [Minimally invasive cardiac surgery for aortic valve disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Y; Katoh, T; Hamano, K; Gohra, H; Tsuboi, H; Esato, K

    1998-12-01

    Recent surgical advances leading to good operative results have contributed to the trend to useminimally invasive approaches, even in cardiac surgery. Smaller incisions are clearly more cosmetically acceptable to patients. When using a minimally invasive approach, it is most important to maintain surgical quality without jeopardizing patients. A good operative visual field leads to good surgical results. In the parasternal approach, we use a retractor to harvest an internal thoracic artery in coronary artery bypass surgery. Retracting the sternum upward allows for a good surgical view and permits the use of an arch cannula rather than femoral cannulation. When reoperating for aortic valve repair, the j-sternotomy approach requires less adhesiolysis compared with the traditional full sternotomy. No special technique is necessary to perform aortic valve surgery using the j-sternotomy approach. However, meticulous attention must be paid to avoiding left ventricular air embolisms to prevent postoperative stroke or neurocognitive deficits, especially when utilizing a minimally invasive approach. Transesophageal echo is useful not only for monitoring cardiac function but also for monitoring the persence of air in the left ventricle and atrium. This paper compare as the degree of invasion of minimally invasive cardiac surgery and the traditional full sternotomy. No differences were found in the occurrence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome between patients undergoing minimally invasive cardiac surgery and the traditional technique. Therefore it is concluded that minimally invasive surgery for patients with aortic valve disease may become the standard approach in the near future.

  9. New St. Jude Medical Portico™ transcatheter aortic valve: features and early results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, M S; Lyons, K; McVerry, F; Smith, B; Manoharan, G B; Maguire, C; Doherty, R; Anderson, L; Morton, A; Hughes, S; Hoeritzauer, I; Manoharan, G

    2013-06-01

    Patients with symptomatic aortic valve disease who are inoperable or have high surgery-related risks may be treated with transcatheter aortic valve implantation devices. With this method increasingly applied, device innovations are aimed at achieving improved procedural results and therapeutic outcome. This paper describes the innovations implemented in the St. Jude Medical Portico™ system for transcatheter aortic valve implantation, the application of this system and initial clinical experience. PMID:23681129

  10. Left ventricular outflow tract pseudoaneurysm formation following three aortic valve replacement surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrien E Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a pseudoaneurysm arising from the left ventricular outflow tract/aortic root as a complication of aortic valve surgery. A 45-year-old Nigerian female presented to our institution′s emergency department with chest discomfort. She had three bioprosthetic aortic valve replacements in the preceding year at an outside institution for aortic regurgitation and wanted a second opinion on remaining surgical options. The learning points relevant to this case are as follows: (1 Recognizing potential complications postmultiple valve surgeries, (2 screening patients for chronic infections and rheumatologic conditions that can contribute to failed valve surgeries.

  11. 小儿先天性主动脉瓣上狭窄的超声诊断%Echocardiographic diagnosis of congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱晶晶; 蒋国平; 何瑾; 叶菁菁

    2008-01-01

    目的 探讨小儿先天性主动脉瓣上狭窄(SVAS)的超声心动图特点及其诊断价值.方法 超声心动图在多个切面上检查诊断为主动脉瓣上狭窄的31例息儿,与心导管、手术及基因检测相对照.超声重点观察主动脉瓣、瓣上、主动脉弓降部、肺动脉瓣、主肺动脉及其左右分支、冠状动脉的超声改变.结果 沙漏样环形狭窄26例,全段管型狭窄4例,隔膜型狭窄1例.极轻度狭窄[狭窄处的最大瞬时压差(△P)75 mm Hg)4例.19例患儿基因检测诊断为Williams综合征.合并主动脉瓣狭窄3例,其中1例首次检查时漏诊.合并肺动脉狭窄10例,占32.26%.其中肺动脉瓣狭窄6例,左、右肺动脉狭窄3例,左右肺动脉分叉处狭窄1例.合并冠状动脉扩张6例.结论 胸骨旁及心尖五腔切面为诊断SVAS较好的切面,SVAS好发于Williams综合征的患儿,32.26%的患儿伴有肺动脉狭窄.对于SVAS患儿需常规检查冠状动脉的改变.%Objective To study the echocardiographic characteristics and its diagnosis value on congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) in children. Methods Thirty-one patients with SVAS diagnosed by multiplane echocardiography were enrolled in the study. Their echocardiographic characteristics were compared with cardiac catheterization, operation, and gene detection results. Echocardiographic changes were mainly observed in aortic valve, supravalve, descending aortic arch, pulmonary artery valve, main pulmonary artery and its branches,and coronary artery. Results Of the 31 patients,26 had hourglass type SVAS,4 hypoplastic type,and 1 membranous type; 2 patients had extremely mild stenosis (defined as a Doppler gradient 75 mm Hg) ones. Nineteen patients were diagnosed with Williams syndrome by gene detection. Three patients were associated with aortic valve stenosis including one missed at the initial diagnosis; 10(32.26%) patients with pulmonary stenosis, including pulmonary valve stenosis in 6, left and

  12. Clinical and economic outcomes after surgical aortic valve replacement in Medicare patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark MA

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mary Ann Clark,1 Francis G Duhay,2 Ann K Thompson,2 Michelle J Keyes,3 Lars G Svensson,4 Robert O Bonow,5 Benjamin T Stockwell,3 David J Cohen61The Neocure Group LLC, Washington, DC, 2Edwards Lifesciences Corporation, Irvine, CA, 3The Burgess Group LLC, Alexandria, VA, 4Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, 5Center for Cardiovascular Innovation, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, 6Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute, Kansas City, MO, USABackground: Aortic valve replacement (AVR is the standard of care for patients with severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis who are suitable surgical candidates, benefiting both non-high-risk and high-risk patients. The purpose of this study was to report long-term medical resource use and costs for patients following AVR and validate our assumption that high-risk patients have worse outcomes and are more costly than non-high-risk patients in this population.Methods: Patients with aortic stenosis who underwent AVR were identified in the 2003 Medicare 5% Standard Analytic Files and tracked over 5 years to measure clinical outcomes, medical resource use, and costs. An approximation to the logistic EuroSCORE (European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation based on administrative data was used to assess surgical risk, with a computed logistic EuroSCORE > 20% considered high-risk.Results: We identified 1474 patients with aortic stenosis who underwent AVR, of whom 1222 (82.9% were non-high-risk and 252 (17.1% were high-risk. Among those who were non-high-risk, the mean age was 73.3 years, 464 (38.2% were women, and the mean logistic EuroSCORE was 7%, whereas in those who were high-risk, the mean age was 77.6 years, 134 (52.8% were women, and the mean logistic EuroSCORE was 37%. All-cause mortality was 33.2% for non-high-risk and 66.7% for high-risk patients at 5 years. Over this time period, non

  13. Incidence, Causes, and Impact of In-Hospital Infections After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirado-Conte, Gabriela; Freitas-Ferraz, Afonso B; Nombela-Franco, Luis; Jimenez-Quevedo, Pilar; Biagioni, Corina; Cuadrado, Ana; Nuñez-Gil, Ivan; Salinas, Pablo; Gonzalo, Nieves; Ferrera, Carlos; Vivas, David; Higueras, Javier; Viana-Tejedor, Ana; Perez-Vizcayno, Maria Jose; Vilacosta, Isidre; Escaned, Javier; Fernandez-Ortiz, Antonio; Macaya, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    In-hospital infections (IHI) are one of the most common and serious problems after invasive procedures. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an increasingly used alternative to surgery in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence, origin, risk factors, and clinical outcomes of IHI after TAVI. A total of 303 consecutive patients with severe aortic stenosis who underwent transfemoral TAVI were included and followed during a median time of 21 months. We examined the occurrence, types, origin, and timing of infections during hospital stay as well as short- and long-term clinical outcomes according to the occurrence of IHI. A total of 51 patients (17%; 62 infectious episodes) experienced IHI after TAVI. Respiratory and urinary tract infections were the most frequent type of infections (44% and 34%, respectively), followed by surgical site infection (8%) and bloodstream infection (5%). Positive cultures were obtained in 74% of the samples, of which 65% were gram-negative bacilli. Modifiable factors such as bleeding (p = 0.005) and length of coronary care unit stay (p <0.001) were independently associated with an increased infection risk. Patients with IHI had a longer hospital stay (14 vs 6 days, p <0.001), an increased mortality (hazard ratio 2.48, 95% CI 1.45 to 4.23) and readmission rate (hazard ratio 2.0, 95% CI 1.27 to 3.14) during the follow-up. In conclusion, IHI is a frequent complication after TAVI with a significant impact on short- and long-term clinical outcomes. The most important risk factors associated with the development of this complication were modifiable periprocedural aspects. These results underline the importance to implement specific preventive strategies to reduce in-hospital-acquired infections after TAVI. PMID:27296559

  14. Mini-sternotomy for the treatment of aortic valve lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dias Altamiro Ribeiro

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare inverted-L mini-sternotomy performed above the sternal furcula with conventional sternotomy in patients with aortic valve diseases who undergo surgical treatment. METHODS: We operated upon 30 patients who had aortic valve lesions that had clinical and hemodynamic findings. All patients underwent inverted-L sternotomy, which extended from above the manubrium of the sternum to the 3rd right intercostal space, without opening the pleural cavity. Their ages ranged from 32 to 76 years, and 18 were males and 12 were females. We used negative pressure in a venous ¼-inch cannula, and the patients were maintained in Trendelemburg's position. Twenty-seven patients received bioprostheses with diameters ranging from 23 to 29mm. Three patients underwent only removal of the calcifications of the aortic valve leaflets and aortic commissurotomy. RESULTS: The mean duration of anoxic cardiac arrest was 63.11min. Access was considered good in all patients. One death was due to pulmonary and renal problems not related to the incision. All patients had a better recovery in the intensive care unit, got out of bed sooner, coughed more easily, and performed prophylactic physiotherapeutic maneuvers for respiratory problems more easily and with less pain in the incision. Early ambulation was more easily carried out by all patients. CONCLUSION: Mini-sternotomy proved to be better than the conventional sternotomy because it provided morecomfort for the patients in the early postoperative period, with less pain and greater desire for early ambulation and all its inherent advantages.

  15. Quadricuspid aortic valve complicated with infective endocarditis: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoguchi, Hiroki; Sakaki, Masayuki; Inoue, Kazushige; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Iwata, Takashi; Suehiro, Yasuo; Miura, Takuya

    2014-12-01

    Congenital quadricuspid aortic valve is a rare cardiac malformation with an unknown risk of infective endocarditis. We report a case of quadricuspid aortic valve complicated with infective endocarditis. A 53-year-old Japanese woman was hospitalized with leg edema and a fever of unknown origin. Corynebacterium striatum was detected in the blood culture. Echocardiography demonstrated a quadricuspid aortic valve with vegetation and severe functional regurgitation. The condition was diagnosed as a quadricuspid aortic valve with infective endocarditis, for which surgery was performed. The quadricuspid aortic valve had three equal-sized cusps and one smaller cusp (type B according to Hurwitz classification). We dissected the vegetation and infectious focus and implanted a mechanical valve. Following the case report, we review the literature.

  16. Midregional Proadrenomedullin Improves Risk Stratification beyond Surgical Risk Scores in Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Csordas

    Full Text Available Conventional surgical risk scores lack accuracy in risk stratification of patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR. Elevated levels of midregional proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM levels are associated with adverse outcome not only in patients with manifest chronic disease states, but also in the general population.We investigated the predictive value of MR-proADM for mortality in an unselected contemporary TAVR population.We prospectively included 153 patients suffering from severe aortic stenosis who underwent TAVR from September 2013 to August 2014. This population was compared to an external validation cohort of 205 patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing TAVR. The primary endpoint was all cause mortality.During a median follow-up of 258 days, 17 out of 153 patients who underwent TAVR died (11%. Patients with MR-proADM levels above the 75th percentile (≥ 1.3 nmol/l had higher mortality (31% vs. 4%, HR 8.9, 95% CI 3.0-26.0, P 6.8 only showed a trend towards higher mortality (18% vs. 9%, HR 2.1, 95% CI 0.8-5.6, P = 0.13. The Harrell's C-statistic was 0.58 (95% CI 0.45-0.82 for the EuroSCORE II, and consideration of baseline MR-proADM levels significantly improved discrimination (AUC = 0.84, 95% CI 0.71-0.92, P = 0.01. In bivariate analysis adjusted for EuroSCORE II, MR-proADM levels ≥1.3 nmol/l persisted as an independent predictor of mortality (HR 9.9, 95% CI (3.1-31.3, P <0.01 and improved the model's net reclassification index (0.89, 95% CI (0.28-1.59. These results were confirmed in the independent validation cohort.Our study identified MR-proADM as a novel predictor of mortality in patients undergoing TAVR. In the future, MR-proADM should be added to the commonly used EuroSCORE II for better risk stratification of patients suffering from severe aortic stenosis.

  17. Determinants and prognosis of atrial fibrillation in patients with aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Franck; Rusinaru, Dan; Maréchaux, Sylvestre; Charles, Vincent; Peltier, Marcel; Tribouilloy, Christophe

    2015-11-15

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is frequently encountered in patients with aortic stenosis (AS) and its incidence also increases with age. In the general population, AF is known to increase cardiovascular risk. We sought to investigate the prognostic importance of AF associated with AS in the context of routine clinical practice. This analysis was based on 809 patients (75 ± 12 years) diagnosed with AS (aortic valve area <2 cm(2)) and normal (≥50%) ejection fraction (EF). Patients were grouped according to the presence of sinus rhythm (SR) or AF at study enrollment. The AF group comprised 141 patients (17.5%) with AF, whereas 668 patients (82.5%) were in SR at inclusion. Four-year estimates of all-cause mortality with medical and surgical management were 60 ± 5% for the AF group compared with 24 ± 2% for the SR group (p = 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, the risk of all-cause mortality was higher in the AF group than in the SR group (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 2.47 [1.83 to 3.33], p = 0.0001). AF remained associated with excess mortality risk when the analysis was limited to asymptomatic patients (adjusted HR 2.31 [1.38 to 3.89], p = 0.002) and, respectively, patients with severe AS (adjusted HR 2.22 [1.41 to 3.49], p = 0.001). Among patients managed medically, AF was independently associated with increased risk of death in the overall study population (adjusted HR 2.52 [1.81 to 3.51], p = 0.0001), in asymptomatic AS (adjusted HR 2.12 [1.19 to 3.76], p = 0.01), and in severe AS (adjusted HR 2.23 [1.30 to 3.81], p = 0.004). In conclusion, AF is a major predictor of mortality, in both medically and surgically managed patients with AS, irrespective of the functional status and the severity. AF is, therefore, a strong marker of risk in AS and should be considered for clinical decision making. PMID:26410605

  18. Three-Year Outcomes of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in Patients With Varying Levels of Surgical Risk (from the CoreValve ADVANCE Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbanti, Marco; Schiltgen, Molly; Verdoliva, Sarah; Bosmans, Johan; Bleiziffer, Sabine; Gerckens, Ulrich; Wenaweser, Peter; Brecker, Stephen; Gulino, Simona; Tamburino, Corrado; Linke, Axel

    2016-03-01

    This study compared 3-year clinical outcomes of patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation with the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) score ≤7% to those of patients with a score >7%. Data were drawn from the ADVANCE study, a multinational post-market clinical trial that enrolled real-world patients with severe aortic stenosis treated with the CoreValve bioprosthesis. Events were independently adjudicated using Valve Academic Research Consortium-1 definitions. A total of 996 patients were implanted: STS ≤7% (n = 697, median STS 4.3%, interquartile range 3.1% to 5.4%) and STS >7% (n = 298, median STS 9.7%, interquartile range 8.0% to 12.4%). At 3 years, the STS ≤7% group had lower rates of all-cause mortality (28.6 vs 45.9, p 7% group. No differences were observed in cerebrovascular accidents, vascular complications, bleeding, or myocardial infarction. In patients with STS ≤7%, mortality at 3 years was higher in those with moderate or severe aortic regurgitation (AR) at discharge than in those with mild or less AR (39.9% vs 22.9%; hazard ratio 1.98; 95% confidence interval 1.37 to 2.86; p 7% (42.9% vs 44.6%, moderate/severe vs mild/less; hazard ratio 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.62 to 1.75; p = 0.861; p for interaction = 0.047). In conclusion, patients with STS ≤7% had lower rates of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality at 3 years after transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Complication rates were low and stable in both groups, demonstrating the safety of this procedure for patients at various levels of surgical risk. PMID:26762727

  19. Aorta measurements are heritable and influenced by bicuspid aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa J Martin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Word Count 266, 1609 charactersObjectives: To determine whether the contributions of genetics and bicuspid aortic valve (BAV independently influence aortic (Ao dimensions.Background: Ao dilation is a risk factor for aneurysm, dissection, and sudden cardiac death. Frequent association of BAV with Ao dilation implicates a common underlying defect possibly due to genetic factors. Methods: Families enriched for BAV underwent standardized transthoracic echocardiography. In addition to BAV status, echocardiographic measures of Ao (annulus to descending Ao, pulmonary artery and mitral valve annulus diameters were obtained. Using variance components analysis, heritability was estimated with and without BAV status. Additionally, bivariate genetic analyses between Ao dimensions and BAV were performed.Results: Our cohort was obtained from 209 families enriched for BAV. After adjusting for age, body surface area and sex, individuals with BAV had a statistically significant increase in all echocardiographic measurements (p < 0.006 except descending Ao and mitral valve annulus. Individuals with BAV were at greater odds of having Ao dilation (OR = 4.44, 95% CI 2.93 – 6.72 than family members without BAV. All echocardiographic measurements exhibited moderate to strong heritability (0.25 to 0.53, and these estimates were not influenced by inclusion of BAV as a covariate. Bivariate genetic analyses supported that the genetic correlation between BAV and echo measures were not significantly different from zero.Conclusions: We show for the first time that echocardiographic measurements of Ao, pulmonary artery and mitral valve annulus diameters are quantitative traits that exhibit significant heritability. In addition, our results suggest the presence of BAV independently influences the proximal Ao and pulmonary artery measures but not those in the descending Ao or mitral valve annulus.

  20. MALDI-Imaging Mass Spectrometry: a step forward in the anatomopathological characterization of stenotic aortic valve tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourino-Alvarez, Laura; Iloro, Ibon; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Azkargorta, Mikel; Sastre-Oliva, Tamara; Escobes, Iraide; Lopez-Almodovar, Luis F; Sanchez, Pedro L; Urreta, Harkaitz; Fernandez-Aviles, Francisco; Pinto, Angel; Padial, Luis R; Akerström, Finn; Elortza, Felix; Barderas, Maria G

    2016-01-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common form of valve disease. Once symptoms develop, there is an inexorable deterioration with a poor prognosis; currently there are no therapies capable of modifying disease progression, and aortic valve replacement is the only available treatment. Our goal is to study the progression of calcification by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) and get new insights at molecular level that could help in the understanding of this disease. In this work, we analyzed consecutive slices from aortic valve tissue by MALDI-IMS, to establish the spatial distribution of proteins and peptides directly from the surface of the histological sections. The analysis showed different structures corresponding to regions observed in conventional histology, including large calcification areas and zones rich in collagen and elastic fibers. Peptide extraction from the tissue, followed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry analysis, provided the identification of collagen VI α-3 and NDRG2 proteins which correlated with the masses obtained by MALDI-IMS and were confirmed by immunohistochemistry. These results highlighted the molecular mechanism implied in AS using MALDI-IMS, a novel technique never used before in this pathology. In addition, we can define specific regions proving a complementary resolution of the molecular histology. PMID:27256770

  1. Including aortic valve morphology in computational fluid dynamics simulations: initial findings and application to aortic coarctation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendell, David C; Samyn, Margaret M; Cava, Joseph R; Ellwein, Laura M; Krolikowski, Mary M; Gandy, Kimberly L; Pelech, Andrew N; Shadden, Shawn C; LaDisa, John F

    2013-06-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations quantifying thoracic aortic flow patterns have not included disturbances from the aortic valve (AoV). 80% of patients with aortic coarctation (CoA) have a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) which may cause adverse flow patterns contributing to morbidity. Our objectives were to develop a method to account for the AoV in CFD simulations, and quantify its impact on local hemodynamics. The method developed facilitates segmentation of the AoV, spatiotemporal interpolation of segments, and anatomic positioning of segments at the CFD model inlet. The AoV was included in CFD model examples of a normal (tricuspid AoV) and a post-surgical CoA patient (BAV). Velocity, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), time-averaged wall shear stress (TAWSS), and oscillatory shear index (OSI) results were compared to equivalent simulations using a plug inlet profile. The plug inlet greatly underestimated TKE for both examples. TAWSS differences extended throughout the thoracic aorta for the CoA BAV, but were limited to the arch for the normal example. OSI differences existed mainly in the ascending aorta for both cases. The impact of AoV can now be included with CFD simulations to identify regions of deleterious hemodynamics thereby advancing simulations of the thoracic aorta one step closer to reality. PMID:22917990

  2. Histopathology of aortic complications in bicuspid aortic valve versus Marfan syndrome: relevance for therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, Nimrat; Franken, Romy; Mulder, Barbara J M; Goumans, Marie-José; Lindeman, Johannes H N; Jongbloed, Monique R M; DeRuiter, Marco C; Klautz, Robert J M; Bogers, Ad J J C; Poelmann, Robert E; Groot, Adriana C Gittenberger-de

    2016-05-01

    Patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) and patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) are more prone to develop aortic dilation and dissection compared to persons with a tricuspid aortic valve (TAV). To elucidate potential common and distinct pathways of clinical relevance, we compared the histopathological substrates of aortopathy. Ascending aortic wall biopsies were divided in five groups: BAV (n = 36) and TAV (n = 23) without and with dilation and non-dilated MFS (n = 8). General histologic features, apoptosis, the expression of markers for vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) maturation, markers predictive for ascending aortic dilation in BAV, and expression of fibrillin-1 were investigated. Both MFS and BAV showed an altered distribution and decreased fibrillin-1 expression in the aorta and a significantly lower level of differentiated VSMC markers. Interestingly, markers predictive for aortic dilation in BAV were not expressed in the MFS aorta. The aorta in MFS was similar to the aorta in dilated TAV with regard to the presence of medial degeneration and apoptosis, while other markers for degeneration and aging like inflammation and progerin expression were low in MFS, comparable to BAV. Both MFS and BAV aortas have immature VSMCs, while MFS and TAV patients have a similar increased rate of medial degeneration. However, the mechanism leading to apoptosis is expected to be different, being fibrillin-1 mutation induced increased angiotensin-receptor-pathway signaling in MFS and cardiovascular aging and increased progerin in TAV. Our findings could explain why angiotensin inhibition is successful in MFS and less effective in TAV and BAV patients. PMID:26129868

  3. A CASE OF OSTEOPOROSIS OF THE SPINE IN AN ELDERLY MALE WITH CALCIFIC AORTIC STENOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yu. Karpova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The given clinical example presents a case of concomitant diseases of the heart and axial skeleton. Calcific aortic stenosis detected by chance in an elderly male was associated with osteoporosis of the lumbar spine with moderate perturbation of the calcium–vitamin D–parathyroid hormone axis and with no classical risk factors for impaired bone mineral density. Possible approaches to pathogenetic therapy are described.

  4. Patient prosthesis mismatch after aortic valve replacement: An Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreedhar S Joshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Perioperative period. Aims: Occurrence of PPM after AVR, factors associated with PPM, impact on mortality. Settings and Design: Teritary Care Referral Cardiac Centre. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of AVR procedures at a single centre over 4 years was conducted. Demographic, echocardiographic and outcome data were collected from institute database. Rahimtoola criteria of indexed effective orifice area (iEOA were used to stratify patients into PPM categories. Patients with and without PPM were compared for associated factors. Statistical Analysis Used: Independent t-test, chi-square test, logistic regression analysis, ROC-AUC, Youden index. Results: 606 patients with complete data were analysed for PPM. The incidence of mild, moderate and severe PPM was 6.1% (37, 2.5% (15 and 0.5% (3 respectively. There was no impact of PPM on all-cause in-hospital mortality. PPM was observed more with Aortic Stenosis (AS compared to Aortic Regurgitation (AR as etiology. Aortic annulus indexed to BSA (iAA had a very good predictive ability for PPM at <16mm/m 2 BSA. Conclusions: PPM has lower incidence after AVR in this Indian population and does not increase early mortality. Patients with AS and iAA<16mm/m2BSA should be cautiously dealt with to prevent PPM.

  5. Aortic Valve Replacement for Infective Endocarditis in a Renal Transplant Recipient

    OpenAIRE

    Masmoudi Sayda; Frikha Imed; Trigui Walid; Karoui Abdelhamid; Daoud Moncef; Sahnoun Youssef

    2000-01-01

    Renal transplant recipients are more prone to developing infections. We report a 37-year old renal transplant recipient who developed infective endocarditis of the aortic valve, heart failure and renal allograft dysfunction. He underwent aortic valve replacement which was followed by improvement in cardiac as well as allograft function.

  6. Endograft failure in an adult patient with coarctation and bicuspid aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimarakis, Ioannis; Grant, Stuart; Kadir, Isaac

    2013-06-01

    A 25-year-old man presented with associated bicuspid aortic valve and coarctation of the aorta. Following aortic valve replacement, he underwent endovascular stenting of his native coarctation. We describe early failure of the latter procedure that necessitated definitive surgical correction.

  7. Aortic Valve Replacement for Infective Endocarditis in a Renal Transplant Recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masmoudi Sayda

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal transplant recipients are more prone to developing infections. We report a 37-year old renal transplant recipient who developed infective endocarditis of the aortic valve, heart failure and renal allograft dysfunction. He underwent aortic valve replacement which was followed by improvement in cardiac as well as allograft function.

  8. Value of 4D-strain imaging echocardiography in detecting left ventricular systolic dysfunction in patients with aortic stenosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Zhi-chao; LI He-zhi; LI Chang-mao; CHEN Ou-di; FEI Hong-wen; LIN Qiong-wen

    2016-01-01

    Background The myocyte dysfunction may be present in aortic stenosis (AS) patients with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF).Early aortic valve replacement (AVR) can reverse the LV hypertrophy and improve LV systolic performance and clinical outcome.Strain imaging has demonstrated to be the most appropriate method to evaluate LV myocardial contractility.However,4D-strain imaging echocardiography for the detection of subclinical left ventricular dysfunction in AS patients with preserved LVEF is seldom studied.Methods We prospectively enrolled 30 consecutive moderate to severe AS patients with preserved LVEF,and 30 healthy controls.Conventional echocardiography and 4D-strain imaging echocardiography were undergone in two groups.The 4D strain echocardiographic analyses were undertaken by using 4D Auto LVQ software.Results Compared with the healthy controls,the moderate to severe AS patients with preserved LVEF had significantly decreased global radial strain (GRS),global longitudinal strain (GLS),global area strain (GAS) and 4D strain (P < 0.05),had significantly increased left ventricular end-diastolic volume index (LVEDVI) and left ventricular mass index (LVMI) (P < 0.05),and had lower global circumferential strain (GCS) (P > 0.05).Conclusions Impaired LV myocardial contractility exists in moderate to severe AS patients,although LVEF is preserved.4D-strain imaging echocardiography can detect early left ventricular dysfunction in AS patients with preserved LVEF.

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  1. Association between aortic stenosis severity and contractile reserve measured by two-dimensional strain under low-dose dobutamine testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banović Marko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Early detection of left ventricle (LV systolic dysfunction could be a clue for surgical treatment in patients with significant aortic stenosis (AS. Therefore, we evaluated LV peak of global longitudinal strain (PGLS using speckle tracking imaging at rest and during low-dose dobutamine infusion in asymptomatic patients with moderate and severe AS and preserved LV ejection fraction (EF. Methods. All the patients underwent coronary angiography and had no obstructive coronary disease (defined as having no stenosis greater than 50% in diameter. The patients were divided into two groups: above and below median of 0.785 cm2 aortic valve area (AVA. PGLS was measured from acquired apical 4-chamber and 2-chamber cine loops using a EchoPac PC-workstation at rest and during 5 μg/kg/min, 10 μg/kg/min, and 20 μg/kg/min dobutamine infusion, respectively. The global strain was the average of segment strains from the apical views. Results: A total of 62 patients with moderate and severe AS (AVA median reached the statistical significance (- 8.71 ± 2.68% vs -11.93 ± 3.74%, p = 0.002. In addition, PGLS increase was also significant in 4-chamber view in the patients with AVA above median, but only when comparing baseline to peak 20 μg/kg/min (-10.72 ± 3.07% vs -13.14 ± 4.79%; p = 0.034. Conversely, in both groups the increase of PGLS in 2-chamber view did not reach significance. Conclusion. Two-dimensional strain speckle tracking analysis of myocardial deformation with measurement of peak systolic strain during dobutamine infusion is a feasible and accurate method to determine myocardial longitudinal systolic function and contractile reserve and may contribute to clinical decision making in patients with significant AS.

  2. 6-month aortic valve implantation of an off-the-shelf tissue-engineered valve in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syedain, Zeeshan; Reimer, Jay; Schmidt, Jillian; Lahti, Matthew; Berry, James; Bianco, Richard; Tranquillo, Robert T

    2015-12-01

    Diseased aortic valves often require replacement, with over 30% of the current aortic valve surgeries performed in patients who will outlive a bioprosthetic valve. While many promising tissue-engineered valves have been created in the lab using the cell-seeded polymeric scaffold paradigm, none have been successfully tested long-term in the aortic position of a pre-clinical model. The high pressure gradients and dynamic flow across the aortic valve leaflets require engineering a tissue that has the strength and compliance to withstand high mechanical demand without compromising normal hemodynamics. A long-term preclinical evaluation of an off-the-shelf tissue-engineered aortic valve in the sheep model is presented here. The valves were made from a tube of decellularized cell-produced matrix mounted on a frame. The engineered matrix is primarily composed of collagen, with strength and organization comparable to native valve leaflets. In vitro testing showed excellent hemodynamic performance with low regurgitation, low systolic pressure gradient, and large orifice area. The implanted valves showed large-scale leaflet motion and maintained effective orifice area throughout the duration of the 6-month implant, with no calcification. After 24 weeks implantation (over 17 million cycles), the valves showed no change in tensile mechanical properties. In addition, histology and DNA quantitation showed repopulation of the engineered matrix with interstitial-like cells and endothelialization. New extracellular matrix deposition, including elastin, further demonstrates positive tissue remodeling in addition to recellularization and valve function. Long-term implantation in the sheep model resulted in functionality, matrix remodeling, and recellularization, unprecedented results for a tissue-engineered aortic valve. PMID:26409002

  3. Multimodality Imaging of a Giant Aortic Valve Papillary Fibroelastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowell M. Fine

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Papillary fibroelastomas (PFEs are benign cardiac tumors arising from endocardium. They are commonly found on valvular surfaces and average 1.0–1.5 cm in size. Though often asymptomatic, PFEs can lead to potentially severe complications, primarily due to their embolic potential. Surgical resection is recommended for all symptomatic or large PFEs. We report the case of a patient presenting with cardiovascular symptoms who was found to have a very large aortic valve PFE, as diagnosed by histopathologic examination following surgical resection. Multimodality cardiovascular imaging demonstrates the classic morphologic findings, including a pedunculated appearance and oscillating “frond-like” surface projections.

  4. Aortic valve endocarditis complicated by ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenny, Benjamin E; Almanaseer, Yassar

    2014-12-01

    Infective endocarditis complicated by abscess formation and coronary artery compression is a rare clinical event with a high mortality rate, and diagnosis requires a heightened degree of suspicion. We present the clinical, angiographic, and echocardiographic features of a 73-year-old woman who presented with dyspnea and was found to have right coronary artery compression that was secondary to abscess formation resulting from diffuse infectious endocarditis. We discuss the patient's case and briefly review the relevant medical literature. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of abscess formation involving a native aortic valve and the right coronary artery.

  5. High-risk pregnancy in a woman with Marfan syndrome, a bicuspid aortic valve, and a dilated aortic sinus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Kristian Ambjørn; Greisen, Jacob Raben; Nielsen, Birgitte Bruun;

    2015-01-01

    A 29-year-old woman with Marfan syndrome, a bicuspid aortic valve, and a dilated aortic sinus (5.2 cm) presented herself in clinic 14 weeks pregnant. She was advised to discontinue the pregnancy due to risk of dissection; however, she decided to continue. She was treated with labetalol (300 mg...

  6. Quadricuspid aortic valve by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shamruz Khan Akerem; Tamin, Syahidah Syed; Araoz, Philip A

    2011-01-01

    Quadricuspid aortic valve (QAV) is a rare congenital cardiac entity. The recognition of QAV has clinical significance as it causes aortic valve dysfunction, commonly aortic regurgitation, and is often associated with other congenital cardiac abnormalities. We showed the important role played by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in detecting QAV and review the available literature to explain its incidence, diagnosis, classifications, embryology, correlation between morphology of the QAV and its function, associated conditions, and management. PMID:21926862

  7. Clinical comparison of St. Jude and porcine aortic valve prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, P S; Hirshfeld, J W; Edie, R N; Harken, A H; Stephenson, L W; Edmunds, L H

    1985-09-01

    One hundred eighty-seven consecutive patients who had aortic valve replacement with either a St. Jude or porcine heterograft prosthesis were studied prospectively. The two groups were similar with respect to 67 clinical and operative factors, which allowed comparison of valve performance as an independent variable. Total follow-up was 6162 patient-months (mean 32 months, range 23 to 62, 99% complete). There were no statistical differences in symptomatic improvement or mortality by life-table analysis. Valve-related complications expressed as percent per patient-year included: reoperation, 0.6 St. Jude and 1.2 porcine; endocarditis, 1.1 and 0.9; regurgitant murmur, 3.4 and 2.7; hemolysis, 2.8 and 0.0; thromboembolism, 2.8 and 1.5 (all not significant); and hemorrhage, 7.9 and 2.4 (p less than .005). Anticoagulant-related bleeding was the only significant difference between the two valves in morbidity and mortality 32 to 34 months after operation. PMID:4028357

  8. Calcium Signaling Pathway Genes RUNX2 and CACNA1C Are Associated With Calcific Aortic Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guauque-Olarte, Sandra; Messika-Zeitoun, David; Droit, Arnaud; Lamontagne, Maxime; Tremblay-Marchand, Joël; Lavoie-Charland, Emilie; Gaudreault, Nathalie; Arsenault, Benoit J.; Dubé, Marie-Pierre; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Body, Simon C.; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Boileau, Catherine; Mathieu, Patrick; Pibarot, Philippe; Bossé, Yohan

    2016-01-01

    Background Calcific aortic valve stenosis (AS) is a life-threatening disease with no medical therapy. The genetic architecture of AS remains elusive. This study combines genome-wide association studies, gene expression, and expression quantitative trait loci mapping in human valve tissues to identify susceptibility genes of AS. Methods and Results A meta-analysis was performed combining the results of 2 genome-wide association studies in 474 and 486 cases from Quebec City (Canada) and Paris (France), respectively. Corresponding controls consisted of 2988 and 1864 individuals with European ancestry from the database of genotypes and phenotypes. mRNA expression levels were evaluated in 9 calcified and 8 normal aortic valves by RNA sequencing. The results were integrated with valve expression quantitative trait loci data obtained from 22 AS patients. Twenty-five single-nucleotide polymorphisms had Pmeta-analysis. The calcium signaling pathway was the top gene set enriched for genes mapped to moderately AS-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Genes in this pathway were found differentially expressed in valves with and without AS. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms located in RUNX2 (runt-related transcription factor 2), encoding an osteogenic transcription factor, demonstrated some association with AS (genome-wide association studies P=5.33×10−5). The mRNA expression levels of RUNX2 were upregulated in calcified valves and associated with eQTL-SNPs. CACNA1C encoding a subunit of a voltage-dependent calcium channel was upregulated in calcified valves. The eQTL-SNP with the most significant association with AS located in CACNA1C was associated with higher expression of the gene. Conclusions This integrative genomic study confirmed the role of RUNX2 as a potential driver of AS and identified a new AS susceptibility gene, CACNA1C, belonging to the calcium signaling pathway. PMID:26553695

  9. A new type of aortic valved stent with good stability and no influence on coronary artery

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Jianzhi; Huang, Haitao; Zhou, Yongxin; Mei, YunQing; Shao, Jie; Wang, Yongwu

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluated the feasibility and safety of new aortic valved stents in transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) using retrograde approach by in vitro testing and animal implantation. Materials and Methods The fluid passing test, expanding and releasing tests, static and releasing tests in tube were performed for new valved stents. Transvalvular pressure gradient, effective orifice area, pre-implantation and post-implantation regurgitant volume for the new stents were detected...

  10. Elevated transaortic valvular gradients after combined aortic valve and mitral valve replacement: an intraoperative dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essandoh, Michael; Portillo, Juan; Zuleta-Alarcon, Alix; Castellon-Larios, Karina; Otey, Andrew; Sai-Sudhakar, Chittoor B

    2015-03-01

    High transaortic valvular gradients, after combined aortic valve and mitral valve replacement, require prompt intraoperative diagnosis and appropriate management. The presence of high transaortic valvular gradients after cardiopulmonary bypass, in this setting, can be secondary to the following conditions: prosthesis dysfunction, left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, supravalvular obstruction, prosthesis-patient mismatch, hyperkinetic left ventricle from administration of inotropes, left ventricular intracavitary gradients, pressure recovery phenomenon, and increased transvalvular blood flow resulting from hyperdynamic circulation or anemia. Transesophageal echocardiography is an extremely useful tool for timely diagnosis and treatment of this complication. We describe a case of a critically ill patient with endocarditis and acute lung injury, who presented for combined aortic valve and mitral valve replacement. Transesophageal echocardiographic assessment, post-cardiopulmonary bypass, revealed high transaortic valvular gradients due to encroachment of the mitral prosthesis strut on the left ventricular outflow tract, which was compounded by a small, hypertrophied, and hyperkinetic left ventricle. Discontinuation of inotropic support, administration of fluids, phenylephrine, and esmolol led to resolution of the high gradients and prevented further surgery. PMID:25549635

  11. Severe Bioprosthetic Mitral Valve Stenosis and Heart Failure in a Young Woman with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartak, Siddharth; Sadiq, Adnan; Crooke, Gregory; Moskovits, Manfred; Frankel, Robert; Hollander, Gerald; Shani, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    A 23-year-old African American woman with a past medical history of systemic lupus erythematous (SLE), secondary hypertension, and end stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis for eight years was stable until she developed symptomatic severe mitral regurgitation with preserved ejection fraction. She underwent a bioprosthetic mitral valve replacement (MVR) at outside hospital. However, within a year of her surgery, she presented to our hospital with NYHA class IV symptoms. She was treated for heart failure but in view of her persistent symptoms and low EF was considered for heart and kidney transplant. This was a challenge in view of her history of lupus. We presumed that her stenosis of bioprosthetic valve was secondary to lupus and renal disease. We hypothesized that her low ejection fraction was secondary to mitral stenosis and potentially reversible. We performed a dobutamine stress echocardiogram, which revealed an improved ejection fraction to more than 50% and confirmed preserved inotropic contractile reserve of her myocardium. Based on this finding, she underwent a metallic mitral valve and tricuspid valve replacement. Following surgery, her symptoms completely resolved. This case highlights the pathophysiology of lupus causing stenosis of prosthetic valves and low ejection cardiomyopathy.

  12. The power of disruptive technological innovation: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, David B; Davidson, Michael J; Schoen, Frederick J

    2015-11-01

    We sought to evaluate the principles of disruptive innovation, defined as technology innovation that fundamentally shifts performance and utility metrics, as applied to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). In particular, we considered implantation procedure, device design, cost, and patient population. Generally cheaper and lower performing, classical disruptive innovations are first commercialized in insignificant markets, promise lower margins, and often parasitize existing usage, representing unattractive investments for established market participants. However, despite presently high unit cost, TAVI is less invasive, treats a "new," generally high risk, patient population, and is generally done by a multidisciplinary integrated heart team. Moreover, at least in the short-term TAVI has not been lower-performing than open surgical aortic valve replacement in high-risk patients. We conclude that TAVI extends the paradigm of disruptive innovation and represents an attractive commercial opportunity space. Moreover, should the long-term performance and durability of TAVI approach that of conventional prostheses, TAVI will be an increasingly attractive commercial opportunity. PMID:25545639

  13. 5. Mitral valve replacement for mitral stenosis: 15 years single center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arifi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mitral valve replacement (MVR with either a bioprosthetic or a mechanical valve is the treatment of choice for severe mitral stenosis. This study aimed to evaluate and compare the early and late outcome of mitral valve replacement (mechanical versus bioprosthetic for severe mitral stenosis. A retrospective cohort study was performed on prospectively collected data involving mitral stenosis patients who have undergone MVR with either bioprosthetic (BMV (n = 50 or mechanical (MMV (n = 145 valves in our institute from 1999 to 2012. Data were analyzed for early and late mortality, NYHA functional classes, stroke, early and late valve-related complications, and survival. Chi Square test, logistic regression, Kaplan Meier curve, and dependent proportions tests were performed. A total of 195 patients were included in the study with a follow-up of 190 patients (97.5%. One patient died early post-operatively; twelve patients died late in the post-operative period, BMV group (6 and the MMV (6. The Late mortality had significantly associated with post-op stroke (p < 0.001 and post-op NYHA classes III and IV (p = 0.002. Post-op NYHA class was significantly associated with age (p = 0.003, pulmonary disease (p = 0.02, mitral valve implant type (p = 0.01, and post-op stroke (p = 0.02; 14 patients had strokes in the MMV (9 and in the BMV (5 groups. NYHA classes were significantly better after the replacement surgeries (p < 0.001. Bioprosthetic valves were significantly associated with worse survival (p = 0.03, worse NYHA post-op (p = 0.01, and more re-operations (p = 0.006. Survival was significantly better with mechanical valves (p = 0.03. When the two groups were matched for age and mitral regurgitation, the analysis revealed that bioprosthetic valves were significantly associated with re-operations (p = 0.02 but not significantly associated with worse survival (p = 0.4 or worse NYHA (p = 0.4. Mechanical mitral valve

  14. Initial Surgical Experience with Aortic Valve Repair: Clinical and Echocardiographic Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Francisco Diniz Affonso; Colatusso, Daniele de Fátima Fornazari; da Costa, Ana Claudia Brenner Affonso; Balbi Filho, Eduardo Mendel; Cavicchioli, Vinicius Nesi; Lopes, Sergio Augusto Veiga; Ferreira, Andrea Dumsch de Aragon; Collatusso, Claudinei

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Due to late complications associated with the use of conventional prosthetic heart valves, several centers have advocated aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root replacement for patients with aortic valve insufficiency, in order to enhance late survival and minimize adverse postoperative events. Methods From March/2012 thru March 2015, 37 patients consecutively underwent conservative operations of the aortic valve and/or aortic root. Mean age was 48±16 years and 81% were males. The aortic valve was bicuspid in 54% and tricuspid in the remaining. All were operated with the aid of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography. Surgical techniques consisted of replacing the aortic root with a Dacron graft whenever it was dilated or aneurysmatic, using either the remodeling or the reimplantation technique, besides correcting leaflet prolapse when present. Patients were sequentially evaluated with clinical and echocardiographic studies and mean follow-up time was 16±5 months. Results Thirty-day mortality was 2.7%. In addition there were two late deaths, with late survival being 85% (CI 95% - 68%-95%) at two years. Two patients were reoperated due to primary structural valve failure. Freedom from reoperation or from primary structural valve failure was 90% (CI 95% - 66%-97%) and 91% (CI 95% - 69%-97%) at 2 years, respectively. During clinical follow-up up to 3 years, there were no cases of thromboembolism, hemorrhage or endocarditis. Conclusions Although this represents an initial series, these data demonstrates that aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root surgery can be performed with satisfactory immediate and short-term results. PMID:27556321

  15. Assessment of the influence of the compliant aortic root on aortic valve mechanics by means of a geometrical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redaelli, A; Di Martino, E; Gamba, A; Procopio, A M; Fumero, R

    1997-12-01

    In recent years several researchers have suggested that the changes in the geometry and angular dimensions of the aortic root which occur during the cardiac cycle are functional to the optimisation of aortic valve function, both in terms of diminishing leaflet stresses and of fluid-dynamic behaviour. The paper presents an analytical parametric model of the aortic valve which includes the aortic root movement. The indexes used to evaluate the valve behaviour are the circumferential membrane stress and the stress at the free edge of the leaflet, the index of bending strain, the bending of the leaflet at the line attachment in the radial and circumferential directions and the shape of the conduit formed by the leaflets during systole. In order to evaluate the role of geometric changes in valve performance, two control cases were considered, with different reference geometric configuration, where the movement of the aortic root was ignored. The results obtained appear consistent with physiological data, especially with regard to the late diastolic phase and the early ejection phase, and put in evidence the role of the aortic root movement in the improvement of valve behaviour. PMID:9450254

  16. The Scandinavian multicenter hemodynamic evaluation of the SJM Regent aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Offstad Jon

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 112 patients who received small and medium sized St.Jude Regent heart valves (19-25 mm at 7 Scandinavian centers were studied between January 2003 and February 2005 to obtain non-invasive data regarding the hemodynamic performance at rest and during Dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE testing one year after surgery. Material and methods 46 woman and 66 men, aged 61.8 ± 9.7 (18-75 years, were operated on for aortic regurgitation (17, stenosis (65, or mixed dysfunction (30. Valve sizes were 19 mm (6, 21 mm (33, 23 mm (41, 25 mm (30. Two patients receiving size 27 valves were excluded from the hemodynamic evaluation. Pledgets were used in 100 patients, everted mattress in 66 and simple interrupted sutures in 21. Valve orientation varied and was dependent on the surgeons' choice. 34 patients (30.4% underwent concomitant coronary artery surgery. Results There were two early deaths (1.8% and three late deaths, one because of pancreatic cancer. Late events during follow-up were: non structural dysfunction (1, bleeding (2, thromboembolism (2. At one year follow up 93% of the patients were in NYHA classes 1-2 versus 47.8% preoperatively. Dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE was performed in a total of 66 and maximal peak stress was reached in 61 patients. During DSE testing, the following statistically significant changes took place: Heart rate increased by 73.0%, cardiac output by 85.5%, left ventriclular ejection fraction by 19.6%, and maximal mean prosthetic transvalvular gradient by 133.8%, whereas the effective orifice area index did not change. Left ventricular mass fell during one year from 215 ± 63 to 197 ± 62 g (p Conclusion The Dobutamine test induces a substantial stress, well suitable for echocardiographic assessment of prosthesis valve function and can be performed in the majority of the patients. The changes in pressure gradients add to the hemodynamic characteristics of the various valve sizes. In our patients

  17. Study of Coronary Artery Disease in Single Aortic Valvular Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张斌; 杨伟民; 占亚平

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To analyze the results of coronary angiographies (GAG) in patients with single aortic valvular heart disease; To study the relationship between aortic valve diseases and coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods 105 patients with single aortic valvular heart disease before surgery underwent angiography. The data of clinical characteristics and angiographies were analyzed. Results 51 patients had symptoms of angina pectoris among 105 patients with single aortic valvular heart disease. Seven of them were confirmed coronary artery disease by angiographies. Although the incidence of angina in aortic valve stenosis group was significantly higher than that in aortic valve regurgitation, the probability of combination of CAD in aortic valve stenosis group was similar to the later. However, the probability of combination of CAD in degenerative aortic valve group was significantly higher than the groups of rheumatic, congenitally bicuspid aortic valves, and other causes (p <0.01).Conclusions Angina pectoris is not sensitive for diagnosis of CAD in single aortic valve heart disease.The probability of combination of CAD in degenerative aortic valve disease is higher than that in aortic valve disease with other causes. Coronary angiography is strongly suggested for these patients.

  18. Comparison of outcomes in patients ≤85 versus >85 years of age undergoing transcatheter aortic-valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havakuk, Ofer; Finkelstein, Ariel; Steinvil, Arie; Halkin, Amir; Arbel, Yaron; Abramowitz, Yigal; Ben Assa, Eyal; Konigstein, Maayan; Keren, Gad; Banai, Shmuel

    2014-01-01

    The impact of age on baseline characteristics and outcomes in patients with severe aortic stenosis who undergo transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has not been thoroughly investigated. To describe the baseline clinical profile of TAVI patients aged >85 and ≤85 years and to evaluate the influence of age differences on outcomes, we evaluated a consecutive cohort of 293 patients who underwent transfemoral TAVI at the Tel Aviv Medical Center. The cohort was divided into 2 groups: patients aged >85 years (n = 93) and patients aged ≤85 years (n = 200). Mean age was 83 ± 5.3 years (range 63 to 98) for the entire cohort. Women comprised 70% of the older group and 57.5% of the younger age group (p = 0.043). Baseline clinical profile, including EuroSCORE index and preprocedural aortic valve area were similar in both age groups. Thirty-day mortality, major vascular complications, need for permanent pacemaker implantation, length of hospital stay, and improvement in functional class after the procedure showed no differences between the 2 groups. Adjustment for baseline clinical differences between groups did not change the results. In conclusion, among patients who underwent transfemoral TAVI, older patients (>85 years) experience similar benefits and outcomes regarding functional status, complication rates, and 30-day mortality. PMID:24210675

  19. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Substantial Tissue Specificity in Human Aortic Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Ying; Gu, Weidong; Ni, Buqing; Sun, Haoliang; Yu, Tong; Gu, Wanjun; Chen, Liang; Shao, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has revolutionary roles in transcriptome identification and quantification of different types of tissues and cells in many organisms. Although numerous RNA-seq data derived from many types of human tissues and cell lines, little is known on the transcriptome repertoire of human aortic valve. In this study, we sequenced the total RNA prepared from two calcified human aortic valves and reported the whole transcriptome of human aortic valve. Integrating RNA-seq data of 13 human tissues from Human Body Map 2 Project, we constructed a transcriptome repertoire of human tissues, including 19,505 protein-coding genes and 4,948 long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs). Among them, 263 lincRNAs were identified as novel noncoding transcripts in our data. By comparing transcriptome data among different human tissues, we observed substantial tissue specificity of RNA transcripts, both protein-coding genes and lincRNAs, in human aortic valve. Further analysis revealed that aortic valve-specific lincRNAs were more likely to be recently derived from repetitive elements in the primate lineage, but were less likely to be conserved at the nucleotide level. Expression profiling analysis showed significant lower expression levels of aortic valve-specific protein-coding genes and lincRNA genes, when compared with genes that were universally expressed in various tissues. Isoform-level expression analysis also showed that a majority of mRNA genes had a major isoform expressed in the human aortic valve. To our knowledge, this is the first comparative transcriptome analysis between human aortic valve and other human tissues. Our results are helpful to understand the transcriptome diversity of human tissues and the underlying mechanisms that drive tissue specificity of protein-coding genes and lincRNAs in human aortic valve. PMID:27493474

  20. A fibrous band associated with the non-coronary aortic valve cusp in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajithdoss, Dharani K; Arenas-Gamboa, Angela M; Edwards, John F

    2011-06-01

    A fibrous band connecting the middle of the free edge (nodulus Arantii) of the non-coronary aortic valve cusp to the ascending aorta just above the level of the non-coronary sinus of Valsalva was observed in an asymptomatic, 11-year-old, male Border Collie. The fibrous band was unrelated to the cause of the death in this dog. Such fibrous bands are usually reported in humans with congenital bicuspid aortic valves. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a fibrous band in the aortic valve in a domestic animal. PMID:21641896

  1. Type F Congenital Quadricuspid Aortic Valve: A Very Rare Case Diagnosed by 3-dimenional Transoesophageal Echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Pankaj; Kamaruddin, Hazlyna; Orme, Rachel; Watt, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Congenital quadricuspid aortic valve (QAV) is a rare cardiac anomaly. Several different anatomical variations of a quadricuspid aortic valve have been described. Aortic regurgitation is the predominant valvular dysfunction associated with QAV and patients tend to present in their 5th or 6th decade of life. This anomaly is rarely picked up by transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE). A comprehensive transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE) study is more likely to diagnose it. We describe a very rare type of QAV – Type F in a 52-year-old lady who presented with symptoms of shortness of breath and pre-syncope. We include TOE images and intra-operative valve images. PMID:24707324

  2. A new ultrasonic process for a renewal of aortic valve decalcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhat Fadi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aortic valve decalcification by ultrasound was given up. We evaluated a new ultrasound microhandpiece (Dissectron Penstyle® to rehabilitate this alternative treatment. Methods We used under magnifying lenses the ultrasound microhandpiece to decalcify 30 explanted aortic valves. In the cases with embedded calcifications the thin top of the probe could be introduced into the thickness of the leaflet preserving covering layers. Results The leaflets were totally decalcified and flexible, and surrounding structures were preserved as assessed by histological examination. Conclusion This new approach of ultrasonic aortic valve decalcification gives good in vitro results which allow to consider a clinical evaluation of this procedure.

  3. Application of Regent mechanical valve in patients with small aortic annulus: 3-year follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao Dong; Wang Chunsheng; Hong Tao; Pan Cuizhen; Guo Changfa

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Aortic valve replacement (AVR) with a small aortic annulus is always challenging for the cardiac surgeon. In this study, we sought to evaluate the midterm performance of implantation with a 17-mm or 19-mm St. Jude Medical Regent (SJM Regent) mechanical valve in retrospective consecutive cohort of patients with small aortic annulus (diameter ≤ 19 mm). Methods From January 2008 to April 2011, 40 patients (31 female, mean age = 47.2 ± 5.8 years) with small aortic annulus (≤19...

  4. Quality of life after aortic valve repair is similar to Ross patients and superior to mechanical valve replacement: A cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Zacek (Pavel); T. Holubec; M. Vobornik; J. Dominik; J.J.M. Takkenberg (Hanneke); J. Harrer; J. Vojacek

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In patients after aortic valve surgery, the quality of life is hypothesized to be influenced by the type of the valve procedure. A cross-sectional study on the postoperative quality of life was carried out in patients after aortic valve-sparing surgery (with regards to the ag

  5. Atrial Fibrillation and Early Clinical Outcomes After Mitral Valve Surgery in Patients with Rheumatic vs. Non-Rheumatic Mitral Stenosis

    OpenAIRE

    S J Mirhosseini; Sadegh Ali-Hassan-Sayegh; Mehdi Hadadzadeh; Nafiseh Naderi; S. M. Y Mostafavi Pour Manshadi

    2012-01-01

    Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia after open heart surgery that can lead to early morbidity and mortality following operation. Mitral stenosis (MS) is a structural abnormality of the mitral valve apparatus that can be resulted from previous rheumatic fever or non-rheumatic fever such as congenital mitral stenosis, malignant carcinoid disease etc. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that type of mitral stenosis can affect the incidence, duration and ...

  6. Clinical value of regression of electrocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamabe, Sayuri; Dohi, Yoshihiro; Higashi, Akifumi; Kinoshita, Hiroki; Sada, Yoshiharu; Hidaka, Takayuki; Kurisu, Satoshi; Shiode, Nobuo; Kihara, Yasuki

    2016-09-01

    Electrocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy (ECG-LVH) gradually regressed after aortic valve replacement (AVR) in patients with severe aortic stenosis. Sokolow-Lyon voltage (SV1 + RV5/6) is possibly the most widely used criterion for ECG-LVH. The aim of this study was to determine whether decrease in Sokolow-Lyon voltage reflects left ventricular reverse remodeling detected by echocardiography after AVR. Of 129 consecutive patients who underwent AVR for severe aortic stenosis, 38 patients with preoperative ECG-LVH, defined by SV1 + RV5/6 of ≥3.5 mV, were enrolled in this study. Electrocardiography and echocardiography were performed preoperatively and 1 year postoperatively. The patients were divided into ECG-LVH regression group (n = 19) and non-regression group (n = 19) according to the median value of the absolute regression in SV1 + RV5/6. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess determinants of ECG-LVH regression among echocardiographic indices. ECG-LVH regression group showed significantly greater decrease in left ventricular mass index and left ventricular dimensions than Non-regression group. ECG-LVH regression was independently determined by decrease in the left ventricular mass index [odds ratio (OR) 1.28, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.69, p = 0.048], left ventricular end-diastolic dimension (OR 1.18, 95 % CI 1.03-1.41, p = 0.014), and left ventricular end-systolic dimension (OR 1.24, 95 % CI 1.06-1.52, p = 0.0047). ECG-LVH regression could be a marker of the effect of AVR on both reducing the left ventricular mass index and left ventricular dimensions. The effect of AVR on reverse remodeling can be estimated, at least in part, by regression of ECG-LVH.

  7. Gallium-SPECT in the detection of prosthetic valve endocarditis and aortic ring abscess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, K.; Barnes, D.; Martin, R.H.; Rae, J.R. (Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Victoria General Hospital Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada))

    1991-09-01

    A 52-yr-old man who had a bioprosthetic aortic valve developed Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Despite antibiotic therapy he had persistent pyrexia and developed new conduction system disturbances. Echocardiography did not demonstrate vegetations on the valve or an abscess, but gallium scintigraphy using SPECT clearly identified a focus of intense activity in the region of the aortic valve. The presence of valvular vegetations and a septal abscess was confirmed at autopsy. Gallium scintigraphy, using SPECT, provided a useful noninvasive method for the demonstration of endocarditis and the associated valve ring abscess.

  8. Sutureless replacement of aortic valves with St Jude Medical mechanical valve prostheses and Nitinol attachment rings: feasibility in long-term (90-day) pig experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Berreklouw, Eric; Koene, Bart; De Somer, Filip; Bouchez, Stefaan; Chiers, Koen; Taeymans, Yvo; Van Nooten, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Nitinol attachment rings (devices) used to attach mechanical aortic valve prostheses suturelessly were studied in long-term (90 days) pig experiments. Methods: The aortic valve was removed and replaced by a device around a St Jude Medical mechanical valve prosthesis in 10 surviving pigs. Supravalvular angiography was done at the end of the operation. No coumarin derivates were given. Results: No or minimal aortic regurgitation was confirmed in all surviving pigs at the end ...

  9. Patient-prosthesis mismatch and reduction in left ventricular mass after aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandler, Kristian; Møller, Christian H; Hassager, Christian;

    2013-01-01

    The presence of patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) after aortic valve replacement may influence patient survival. We examined the relationship between PPM and changes in left ventricular mass index at 3 months follow-up and also overall survival....

  10. St. Jude Medical Trifecta aortic valve: results from a prospective regional multicentre registry

    OpenAIRE

    Mariscalco, Giovanni; Mariani, Silvia; Bichi, Samuele; Biondi, Andrea; Blasio, Andrea De; Borsani, Paolo; Corti, Fabrizio; Chiara, Benedetta De; Gherli, Riccardo; Leva, Cristian; Russo, Claudio Francesco; Tasca, Giordano; Vanelli, Paolo; Alfieri, Ottavio; Antona, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Background The Trifecta aortic bioprosthesis (St. Jude Medical, Inc., St. Paul, MN, USA) is a stented pericardial heart valve with excellent preliminary results. Aim of the study was to evaluate its early clinical and hemodynamic performances in a multicenter regional registry. Methods Between January 2011 and June 2012, 178 consecutive patients undergoing aortic valve replacement with the Trifecta bioprosthesis were prospectively enrolled at 9 Italian centers. Clinical and echocardiographic ...

  11. Right Minithoracotomy Approach for Replacement of the Ascending Aorta, Hemiarch, and Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamelas, Joseph; LaPietra, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    A minimally invasive right anterior thoracotomy approach is the preferred technique used at our institution for isolated aortic valve pathology. We have recently introduced more complex concomitant minimally invasive procedures through this access site. Here, we describe how we perform a replacement of the ascending aorta and aortic valve with and without the use of circulatory arrest through a 6-cm right minimally invasive thoracotomy incision.

  12. Efficacy and Safety of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation for Bicuspid Aortic Valves: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaochuan; Shi, Xiaohan; Xun, Xiaoshuang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To elucidate the performance of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) patients through a systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods: A systematic literature review was performed by searching eligible articles in PubMed, Medline, EMBASE, Google Scholar and CNKI. Meta-analysis of included case-control/cohort studies was further conducted. Relative risks (RRs) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to compare clinical outcomes of BAV patients and non-BAV patients. Results: A total of 17 articles including eight case reports, four case series and five case-control/cohort studies with 166 BAV patients were analyzed. Device success rate achieved for TAVI in this cohort of BAV patients was 95.2%. The 30-day mortality rate was 8.4%, and the medium-term (range from 6 months to 2 years) mortality rate reported was 17.9%. Overall, the performance of TAVI in BAV patients was comparable to that in non-BAV patients, as reported by the included case-control/cohort studies (30-day mortality rate: RR = 1.05, 95%CI 0.57–1.95, p = 0.87; Device success rate: RR = 1.00, 95%CI 0.95–1.05, p = 0.94; Incidence of moderate to severe paravalvular regurgitation: RR = 1.25, 95%CI 0.85–1.84, p = 0.25). Conclusion: The present study suggested that TAVI may be a feasible and safe treatment modality for BAV patients. PMID:27098769

  13. Factors affecting computed tomography image quality for assessment of mechanical aortic valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Young Joo; Kim, Young Jin; Hong, Yoo Jin; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Hur, Jin; Hong, Sae Rom; Im, Dong Jin; Kim, Yun Jung; Choi, Byoung Wook

    2016-06-01

    Evaluating mechanical valves with computed tomography (CT) can be problematic because artifacts from the metallic components of valves can hamper image quality. The purpose of this study was to determine factors affecting the image quality of cardiac CT to improve assessment of mechanical aortic valves. A total of 144 patients who underwent aortic valve replacement with mechanical valves (ten different types) and who underwent cardiac CT were included. Using a four-point grading system, the image quality of the CT scans was assessed for visibility of the valve leaflets and the subvalvular regions. Data regarding the type of mechanical valve, tube voltage, average heart rate (HR), and HR variability during CT scanning were compared between the non-diagnostic (overall image quality score ≤2) and diagnostic (overall image quality score >2) image quality groups. Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of non-diagnostic image quality. The percentage of valve types that incorporated a cobalt-chrome component (two types in total) and HR variability were significantly higher in the non-diagnostic image group than in the diagnostic group (P  0.05). Valve type was the only independent predictor of non-diagnostic quality. The CT image quality for patients with mechanical aortic valves differed significantly depending on the type of mechanical valve used and on the degree of HR variability.

  14. Improving Hemostasis during Replacement of the Ascending Aorta and Aortic Valve with a Composite Graft

    OpenAIRE

    Pratali, Stefano; Milano, Aldo; Codecasa, Riccardo; Carlo, Marco De; Borzoni, Giancarlo; Bortolotti, Uberto

    2000-01-01

    The use of a composite graft is an established treatment for patients with aortic valve disease and ascending aortic aneurysms. Since bleeding from suture lines is a potential complication of this procedure, we modified the technique and evaluated the effect on hemostasis.

  15. Aortic valve stenotic area calculation from phase contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance: the importance of short echo time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cowan Brett R

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR can potentially quantify aortic valve area (AVA in aortic stenosis (AS using a single-slice phase contrast (PC acquisition at valve level: AVA = aortic flow/aortic velocity-time integral (VTI. However, CMR has been shown to underestimate aortic flow in turbulent high velocity jets, due to intra-voxel dephasing. This study investigated the effect of decreasing intra-voxel dephasing by reducing the echo time (TE on AVA estimates in patients with AS. Method 15 patients with moderate or severe AS, were studied with three different TEs (2.8 ms/2.0 ms/1.5 ms, in the main pulmonary artery (MPA, left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT and 0 cm/1 cm/2.5 cm above the aortic valve (AoV. PC estimates of stroke volume (SV were compared with CMR left ventricular SV measurements and PC peak velocity, VTI and AVA were compared with Doppler echocardiography. CMR estimates of AVA obtained by direct planimetry from cine acquisitions were also compared with the echoAVA. Results With a TE of 2.8 ms, the mean PC SV was similar to the ventricular SV at the MPA, LVOT and AoV0 cm (by Bland-Altman analysis bias ± 1.96 SD, 1.3 ± 20.2 mL/-6.8 ± 21.9 mL/6.5 ± 50.7 mL respectively, but was significantly lower at AoV1 and AoV2.5 (-29.3 ± 31.2 mL/-21.1 ± 35.7 mL. PC peak velocity and VTI underestimated Doppler echo estimates by approximately 10% with only moderate agreement. Shortening the TE from 2.8 to 1.5 msec improved the agreement between ventricular SV and PC SV at AoV0 cm (6.5 ± 50.7 mL vs 1.5 ± 37.9 mL respectively but did not satisfactorily improve the PC SV estimate at AoV1 cm and AoV2.5 cm. Agreement of CMR AVA with echoAVA was improved at TE 1.5 ms (0.00 ± 0.39 cm2 versus TE 2.8 (0.11 ± 0.81 cm2. The CMR method which agreed best with echoAVA was direct planimetry (-0.03 cm2 ± 0.24 cm2. Conclusion Agreement of CMR AVA at the aortic valve level with echo AVA improves with a reduced TE of 1.5 ms

  16. Rapidly progressed aortic stenosis in a patient with previous diagnosis of polycythemia vera and post-polycythemia vera myelofibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiso, Shohei; Naito, Ryo; Fukao, Kosuke; Hiki, Makoto; Miyazaki, Tetsuro; Takagi, Atsutoshi; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    Polycythemia vera (PV) is a chronic myeloproliferative disease that is often complicated with thromboembolism. However, aortic stenosis (AS) could be a manifestation of the cardiovascular complications of PV possibly through shear stress and atherosclerosis. We report a rare case of rapidly progressed AS in a patient with PV. PMID:27398203

  17. Rapidly progressed aortic stenosis in a patient with previous diagnosis of polycythemia vera and post‐polycythemia vera myelofibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kiso, Shohei; Naito, Ryo; Fukao, Kosuke; Hiki, Makoto; Miyazaki, Tetsuro; Takagi, Atsutoshi; MIYAUCHI, KATSUMI; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Polycythemia vera (PV) is a chronic myeloproliferative disease that is often complicated with thromboembolism. However, aortic stenosis (AS) could be a manifestation of the cardiovascular complications of PV possibly through shear stress and atherosclerosis. We report a rare case of rapidly progressed AS in a patient with PV.

  18. Observed and predicted reduction of ischemic cardiovascular events in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, Ingar; Boman, Kurt; Brudi, Philippe;

    2010-01-01

    In the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) trial, combined ezetimibe (10 mg) and simvastatin (40 mg) decreased low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels by 50% and ischemic cardiovascular event (ICE) risk by 22% compared to placebo. A larger decrease in ICE risk might have been...

  19. Effect of B-type natriuretic peptides on long-term outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinas, Konstantinos C; O'Sullivan, Crochan J; Heg, Dik; Praz, Fabien; Stortecky, Stefan; Pilgrim, Thomas; Buellesfeld, Lutz; Jüni, Peter; Windecker, Stephan; Wenaweser, Peter

    2015-11-15

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels are elevated in patients with aortic stenosis (AS) and decrease acutely after replacement of the stenotic valve. The long-term prognostic value of BNP after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and the relative prognostic utility of single versus serial peri-interventional measurements of BNP and N-terminal prohormone BNP (NT-pro-BNP) are unknown. This study sought to determine the impact of BNP levels on long-term outcomes after TAVI and to compare the utility of BNP versus NT-pro-BNP measured before and after intervention. We analyzed 340 patients with severe AS and baseline pre-TAVI assessment of BNP. In 219 patients, BNP and NT-pro-BNP were measured serially before and after intervention. Clinical outcomes over 2 years were recorded. Patients with high baseline BNP (higher tertile ≥591 pg/ml) had increased risk of all-cause mortality (adjusted hazard ratio 3.16, 95% confidence interval 1.84 to 5.42; p curve 0.75; p <0.01). Baseline-to-discharge reduction, but not baseline levels of BNP, was related to New York Heart Association functional improvement. In conclusion, high preintervention BNP independently predicts 2-year outcomes after TAVI, particularly when elevated levels persist after the intervention. BNP and NT-pro-BNP and their serial periprocedural changes provide complementary prognostic information for symptomatic improvement and survival. PMID:26428025

  20. Reliability and Identification of Aortic Valve Prolapse in the Horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hallowell Gayle D

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objectives were to determine and assess the reliability of criteria for identification of aortic valve prolapse (AVP using echocardiography in the horse. Results Opinion of equine cardiologists indicated that a long-axis view of the aortic valve (AoV was most commonly used for identification of AVP (46%; n=13. There was consensus that AVP could be mimicked by ultrasound probe malignment. This was confirmed in 7 healthy horses, where the appearance of AVP could be induced by malalignment. In a study of a further 8 healthy horses (5 with AVP examined daily for 5 days, by two echocardiographers standardized imaging guidelines gave good to excellent agreement for the assessment of AVP (kappa>0.80 and good agreement between days and observers (kappa >0.6. The technique allowed for assessment of the degree of prolapse and measurement of the prolapse distance that provided excellent agreement between echocardiographers, days and observers (kappa/ICC>0.8. Assessments made using real-time zoomed images provided similar measurements to the standard views (ICC=0.9, with agreement for the identification of AVP (kappa>0.8. Short axis views of the AoV were used for identification of AVP by fewer respondents (23%, however provided less agreement for the identification of AVP (kappa>0.6 and only adequate agreement with observations made in long axis (kappa>0.5, with AVP being identified more often in short axis (92% compared to long axis (76%. Orthogonal views were used by 31% of respondents to identify the presence of AVP, and 85% to identify cusp. Its identification on both views on 4 days was used to categorise horses as having AVP, providing a positive predictive value of 79% and negative predictive value of 18%. Only the non-coronary cusp (NCC of the AoV was observed to prolapse in these studies. Prolapse of the NCC was confirmed during the optimisation study using four-dimensional echocardiography, which concurred with the findings

  1. Infective endocarditis in bicuspid aortic valve: atrioventricular block as sign of perivalvular abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchion, Francesco; Cukon, Sonja; Rizzoli, Giulio; Gerosa, Gino; Daliento, Luciano; Thiene, Gaetano; Basso, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    A 46-year-old man presenting with fever, peripheral edema, and chest pain was admitted to the emergency department. Electrocardiogram showed sinus tachycardia and first-degree atrioventricular block. Transesophageal echocardiogram showed infective endocarditis in bicuspid aortic valve, complicated with severe aortic regurgitation, ring abscess, and sinus-of-Valsalva aneurysm extending to mitroaortic fibrous continuity. The patient, who was unaware of his bicuspid aortic valve condition, reported having undergone an orthodontic procedure complicated with dental abscess 1 month prior, which was treated with combined clavulanate-amoxicillin antibiotic therapy. Blood cultures were positive for Bacteroides fragilis resistant to metronidazole. Intravenous antibiotic therapy was undertaken, with rapid resolution of fever. He eventually underwent successful aortic homograft implantation and mitral valve repair with residual first-degree atrioventricular block. PMID:17637435

  2. Hemodynamic function of the standard St. Jude bileaflet disc valve has no clinical impact 10 years after aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Dorup, Inge; Emmertsen, Kristian;

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Size mismatch and impaired left ventricular function have been shown to determine the hemodynamic function of the standard St. Jude bileaflet disc valve early after aortic valve replacement (AVR). We aimed to analyse St. Jude valve hemodynamic function and its clinical impact in the...... regurgitation were excluded from further analysis: they had significantly lower St. Jude valve gradient and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and larger mass index (LVMi) than 37 without. RESULTS: In the 37 patients without left sided valve regurgitation peak and mean gradients were inversely related to...... St. Jude valve geometric orifice area (GOA) indexed for either body surface area or left ventricular end-diastolic dimension (LVEDD). The gradients correlated directly with LVEDD but not with LVEF or LVMi. Eleven patients with hypertension had higher peak gradients (31+/-13 versus 22+/-8 mmHg, p<0...

  3. Detecting Aortic Valve Opening and Closing from Distal Body Vibrations

    CERN Document Server

    Wiens, Andrew D; Inan, Omer T

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Proximal and whole-body vibrations are well studied in seismocardiography and ballistocardiography, yet distal vibrations are still poorly understood. In this paper we develop two methods to measure aortic valve opening (AVO) and closing (AVC) from distal vibrations. Methods: AVO and AVC were detected for each heartbeat with accelerometers on the upper arm (A), wrist (W), and knee (K) of 22 consenting adults following isometric exercise. Exercise-induced changes were recorded with impedance cardiography, and nine-beat ensemble averaging was applied. Our first method, FilterBCG, detects peaks in distal vibrations after filtering with individually-tuned bandpass filters while RidgeBCG uses ridge regression to estimate AVO and AVC without peaks. Pseudocode is provided. Results: In agreement with recent studies, we did not find peaks at AVO and AVC in distal vibrations, and the conventional R-J interval method from the literature also correlated poorly with AVO (r2 = 0.22 A, 0.14 W, 0.12 K). Interestin...

  4. Utilization of artificial neural networks and autoregressive modeling in diagnosing mitral valve stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Sadik; Güven, Ayşegül; Okandan, Mustafa; Dirgenali, Fatma

    2006-05-01

    This research is concentrated on the diagnosis of mitral heart valve stenosis through the analysis of Doppler Signals' AR power spectral density graphic with the help of ANN. Multilayer feedforward ANN trained with a Levenberg Marquart backpropagation algorithm was implemented in the MATLAB environment. Correct classification of 94% was achieved, whereas 4 false classifications have been observed for the test group of 68 subjects in total. The designed classification structure has about 97.3% sensitivity, 90.3% specifity and positive prediction is calculated to be 92.3%. The stated results show that the proposed method can make an effective interpretation. PMID:15890326

  5. Clinical outcome of high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction undergoing medical treatment or TAVI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Pilgrim

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Reduced left ventricular function in patients with severe symptomatic valvular aortic stenosis is associated with impaired clinical outcome in patients undergoing surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI has been shown non-inferior to SAVR in high-risk patients with respect to mortality and may result in faster left ventricular recovery. METHODS: We investigated clinical outcomes of high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing medical treatment (n = 71 or TAVI (n = 256 stratified by left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF in a prospective single center registry. RESULTS: Twenty-five patients (35% among the medical cohort were found to have an LVEF≤30% (mean 26.7±4.1% and 37 patients (14% among the TAVI patients (mean 25.2±4.4%. Estimated peri-interventional risk as assessed by logistic EuroSCORE was significantly higher in patients with severely impaired LVEF as compared to patients with LVEF>30% (medical/TAVI 38.5±13.8%/40.6±16.4% versus medical/TAVI 22.5±10.8%/22.1±12.8%, p <0.001. In patients undergoing TAVI, there was no significant difference in the combined endpoint of death, myocardial infarction, major stroke, life-threatening bleeding, major access-site complications, valvular re-intervention, or renal failure at 30 days between the two groups (21.0% versus 27.0%, p = 0.40. After TAVI, patients with LVEF≤30% experienced a rapid improvement in LVEF (from 25±4% to 34±10% at discharge, p = 0.002 associated with improved NYHA functional class at 30 days (decrease ≥1 NYHA class in 95%. During long-term follow-up no difference in survival was observed in patients undergoing TAVI irrespective of baseline LVEF (p = 0.29, whereas there was a significantly higher mortality in medically treated patients with severely reduced LVEF (log rank p = 0.001. CONCLUSION: TAVI in patients with severely reduced left ventricular function may be

  6. Puérpera com trombose de prótese mecânica e estenose supravalvar aórtica adquirida Postpartum patient with thrombosis of mechanical prostheses and acquired supravalvular aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Adala Benfatti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A hipercoagulabilidade sanguínea proporcionada na gravidez aumenta consideravelmente a incidência de trombose de valvas mecânicas. A estenose supravalvar aórtica adquirida é extremamente rara. Relata-se o caso de uma puérpera imediata, portadora de prótese mecânica aórtica e estenose supravalvar aórtica adquirida, submetida à cirurgia cardíaca de emergência, com instabilidade hemodinâmica grave, por meio de técnica operatória adaptada para a correção da estenose supravalvar aórtica, com evolução clínica e resultados ecocardiográficos pós-operatórios satisfatórios.The blood hypercoagulability in pregnancy increases significantly the incidence of thrombosis of mechanical valves. Acquired supravalvular aortic stenosis is extremely rare. We report the case of an immediate postpartum patient with aortic mechanical prostheses and acquired supravalvular aortic stenosis who underwent emergency heart surgery, with severe hemodynamic instability, using adapted surgical technique for correction of supravalvular stenosis with satisfactory clinical and echocardiography results.

  7. SU-C-18C-02: Specifcation of X-Ray Projection Angles Which Are Aligned with the Aortic Valve Plane From a Planar Image of a Valvuloplasty Balloon Inflated Across the Aortic Valve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fetterly, K; Mathew, V [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures provide a method to implant a prosthetic aortic valve via a minimallyinvasive, catheter-based procedure. TAVR procedures require use of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane to minimize prosthetic valve positioning error due to x-ray imaging parallax. The purpose of this work is to calculate the continuous range of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane from a single planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve. Methods: Computational methods to measure the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve were developed. Required inputs include a planar x-ray image of a known valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and specifications of x-ray imaging geometry from the DICOM header of the image. A-priori knowledge of the species-specific typical range of aortic orientation is required to specify the sign of the angle of the long axis of the balloon with respect to the x-ray beam. The methods were validated ex-vivo and in a live pig. Results: Ex-vivo experiments demonstrated that the angular orientation of a stationary inflated valvuloplasty balloon can be measured with precision less than 1 degree. In-vivo pig experiments demonstrated that cardiac motion contributed to measurement variability, with precision less than 3 degrees. Error in specification of x-ray geometry directly influences measurement accuracy. Conclusion: This work demonstrates that the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve can be calculated precisely from a planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and known x-ray geometry. This method could be used to determine appropriate c-arm angular projections during TAVR procedures to minimize x-ray imaging parallax and thereby minimize prosthetic valve positioning errors.

  8. SU-C-18C-02: Specifcation of X-Ray Projection Angles Which Are Aligned with the Aortic Valve Plane From a Planar Image of a Valvuloplasty Balloon Inflated Across the Aortic Valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures provide a method to implant a prosthetic aortic valve via a minimallyinvasive, catheter-based procedure. TAVR procedures require use of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane to minimize prosthetic valve positioning error due to x-ray imaging parallax. The purpose of this work is to calculate the continuous range of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane from a single planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve. Methods: Computational methods to measure the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve were developed. Required inputs include a planar x-ray image of a known valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and specifications of x-ray imaging geometry from the DICOM header of the image. A-priori knowledge of the species-specific typical range of aortic orientation is required to specify the sign of the angle of the long axis of the balloon with respect to the x-ray beam. The methods were validated ex-vivo and in a live pig. Results: Ex-vivo experiments demonstrated that the angular orientation of a stationary inflated valvuloplasty balloon can be measured with precision less than 1 degree. In-vivo pig experiments demonstrated that cardiac motion contributed to measurement variability, with precision less than 3 degrees. Error in specification of x-ray geometry directly influences measurement accuracy. Conclusion: This work demonstrates that the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve can be calculated precisely from a planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and known x-ray geometry. This method could be used to determine appropriate c-arm angular projections during TAVR procedures to minimize x-ray imaging parallax and thereby minimize prosthetic valve positioning errors

  9. Rapid 3D printing of anatomically accurate and mechanically heterogeneous aortic valve hydrogel scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aortic valve exhibits complex three-dimensional (3D) anatomy and heterogeneity essential for the long-term efficient biomechanical function. These are, however, challenging to mimic in de novo engineered living tissue valve strategies. We present a novel simultaneous 3D printing/photocrosslinking technique for rapidly engineering complex, heterogeneous aortic valve scaffolds. Native anatomic and axisymmetric aortic valve geometries (root wall and tri-leaflets) with 12–22 mm inner diameters (ID) were 3D printed with poly-ethylene glycol-diacrylate (PEG-DA) hydrogels (700 or 8000 MW) supplemented with alginate. 3D printing geometric accuracy was quantified and compared using Micro-CT. Porcine aortic valve interstitial cells (PAVIC) seeded scaffolds were cultured for up to 21 days. Results showed that blended PEG-DA scaffolds could achieve over tenfold range in elastic modulus (5.3±0.9 to 74.6±1.5 kPa). 3D printing times for valve conduits with mechanically contrasting hydrogels were optimized to 14 to 45 min, increasing linearly with conduit diameter. Larger printed valves had greater shape fidelity (93.3±2.6, 85.1±2.0 and 73.3±5.2% for 22, 17 and 12 mm ID porcine valves; 89.1±4.0, 84.1±5.6 and 66.6±5.2% for simplified valves). PAVIC seeded scaffolds maintained near 100% viability over 21 days. These results demonstrate that 3D hydrogel printing with controlled photocrosslinking can rapidly fabricate anatomical heterogeneous valve conduits that support cell engraftment. (paper)

  10. Effect of aortic regurgitation following transcatheter aortic valve implantation on outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewe, See Hooi; Muratori, Manuela; van der Kley, Frank; Pepi, Mauro; Delgado, Victoria; Tamborini, Gloria; Fusini, Laura; de Weger, Arend; Gripari, Paola; Bartorelli, Antonio; Bax, Jeroen J; Marsan, Nina Ajmone

    2015-03-01

    The prognosis of aortic regurgitation (AR) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and the changes in AR grade over time remain unclear. This study evaluated the midterm survival associated with AR after TAVI and examined the evolution of AR over time and its effect on cardiac performance. Successful TAVI was performed in 314 patients (age 81 ± 7 years, 36% men). Serial transthoracic echocardiography and clinical assessment were available in 175 patients who survived >12 months. AR was assessed in terms of overall, paravalvular, and intravalvular severity. Significant post-TAVI AR (grade ≥2) was observed in 82 patients (26%), and these patients showed a trend toward reduced survival at 1- (93% vs 91%) and 2-year (89% vs 74%, log-rank p = 0.063) follow-up. Of the 175 patients who survived >12 months, grade ≥2 overall, paravalvular, and intravalvular AR were noted in 47 (27%), 32 (18%), and 8 patients (5%), respectively. Significant overall and paravalvular AR appeared to improve over time, particularly during the first 6 months (p <0.05), whereas intravalvular AR remained unchanged. Although improvements in the echocardiographic parameters were similar among patients with and without significant AR, patients who remained with grade ≥2 AR at 6 months had significantly worse survival than their counterparts at 2 years (80% vs 94%, log-rank p = 0.032). In conclusion, significant overall and paravalvular AR after TAVI appeared to improve over time. Although improvements in the echocardiographic parameters were similar, patients with grade ≥2 AR, both immediately after TAVI and at 6 months, were associated with worse survival. PMID:25591895

  11. St. Jude Medical and CarboMedics Mechanical Heart Valves in the Aortic Position: Comparison of Long-Term Results

    OpenAIRE

    Kandemir, Ozer; Tokmakoglu, Hilmi; Yildiz, Ulku; TEZCANER, Tevfik; Yorgancioglu, A. Cem; Gunay, Ilhan; Suzer, Kaya; Zorlutuna, Yaman

    2006-01-01

    We designed this study to compare long-term results of St. Jude Medical and CarboMedics mechanical heart valves in the aortic position. We retrospectively analyzed the results of 174 consecutive patients who received either a St. Jude (n=80) or a CarboMedics (n=94) mechanical aortic valve from March 1992 through October 2004.

  12. CMR assessment after a transapical-transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biere, Loïc, E-mail: lobiere@chu-angers.fr [L’UNAM Université, Angers (France); Université d’Angers, Laboratoire Cardioprotection, Remodelage et Thrombose, CHU d’Angers, Service de Cardiologie, Angers (France); Pinaud, Frédéric [L’UNAM Université, Angers (France); Université d’Angers, CHU d’Angers, Service de Chirurgie Cardio-vasculaire et Thoracique, Angers (France); UMR-CNRS 6214, INSERM 1083, faculté de médecine, Angers (France); Delépine, Stéphane; Grall, Sylvain; Viot, Nathalie; Mateus, Victor; Rouleau, Frédéric [L’UNAM Université, Angers (France); Université d’Angers, Laboratoire Cardioprotection, Remodelage et Thrombose, CHU d’Angers, Service de Cardiologie, Angers (France); Corbeau, Jean-Jacques [Université d’Angers, CHU d’Angers, Département d’anesthésie-réanimation, Angers (France); Prunier, Fabrice [L’UNAM Université, Angers (France); Université d’Angers, Laboratoire Cardioprotection, Remodelage et Thrombose, CHU d’Angers, Service de Cardiologie, Angers (France); and others

    2014-02-15

    Aims: To describe the time course of myocardial scarring after transapical-transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TA-TAVI) with the Edwards SAPIEN XT™ and the Edwards SAPIEN™ prosthesis in a 3-month follow-up study using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). Methods: In 20 TA-TAVI patients, CMR was performed at discharge and 3 months (3M). Cine-MRI was used for left ventricular (LV) functional assessment, and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging was employed for detecting the presence of myocardial scarring. Special attention was given to any artifacts caused by the prosthesis, which were consequently defined using a three-grade artifact scale. Results: We systematically reported the presence of small LGE hyperintensity relating to the apical segment, with no variation found between discharge and 3 M (2.8 ± 1.6 g vs. 2.35 ± 1.1 g). LV ejection fraction, end-diastolic, and end-systolic volumes did not significantly vary. A small area of apical akinesia was observed, with no improvement at follow-up. Whereas the Edwards SAPIEN XT™ prosthesis and the Edwards SAPIEN™ prosthesis are both constituted by metallic stenting structure, the Edwards SAPIEN™ was responsible for a larger signal void, thus potentially limiting the diagnostic performance of CMR. Conclusions: CMR may be performed safely in the context of TA-TAVI. The presence of a very small apical infarction correlating with focal akinesia was observed. As expected, the Edwards SAPIEN XT™ prosthesis was shown to be particularly suitable for CMR assessment.

  13. Capnocytophaga canimorsus endocarditis with root abscess in a patient with a bicuspid aortic valve

    OpenAIRE

    Guillaume Coutance; Olivier Lepage; Christophe Bachelet; Michèle Hamon; Damien Legallois; Arnaud Pellissier; Fabien Labombarda

    2009-01-01

    Infective endocarditis caused by a zoonotic micro organism is a rare clinical condition. Capnocytophaga canimorsus is a commensal bacterium living in the saliva of dogs and cats which produces rarely reported endocarditis whose incidence may be underestimated, considering its failure to grow on standard media. We reported the case of a 65-year-old man with bicuspid aortic valve endocarditis and multiple abscesses of the aortic wall caused by the canine bacteria C. canimorsus.

  14. Capnocytophaga canimorsus endocarditis with root abscess in a patient with a bicuspid aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michèle Hamon

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis caused by a zoonotic micro organism is a rare clinical condition. Capnocytophaga canimorsus is a commensal bacterium living in the saliva of dogs and cats which produces rarely reported endocarditis whose incidence may be underestimated, considering its failure to grow on standard media. We reported the case of a 65-year-old man with bicuspid aortic valve endocarditis and multiple abscesses of the aortic wall caused by the canine bacteria C. canimorsus.

  15. Acute myocardial ischemia after aortic valve replacement: A comprehensive diagnostic evaluation using dynamic multislice spiral computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lembcke, Alexander [Department of Radiology, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Freie Universitaet Berlin and Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany)]. E-mail: alexander.lembcke@gmx.de; Hein, Patrick A. [Department of Radiology, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Freie Universitaet Berlin and Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Enzweiler, Christian N.H. [Department of Radiology, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Freie Universitaet Berlin and Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Hoffmann, Udo [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Klessen, Christian [Department of Radiology, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Freie Universitaet Berlin and Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Dohmen, Pascal M. [Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Freie Universitaet Berlin and Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    We describe the case of a 72-year-old man presenting with endocarditis and clinical signs of acute myocardial ischemia after biological aortic valve replacement. A comprehensive cardiac dynamic multislice spiral computed tomography demonstrated: (1) an endocarditic vegetation of the aortic valve; (2) a subvalvular leakage feeding a paravalvular pseudoaneurysm based on an aortic root abscess with subsequent compromise of the systolic blood flow in the left main coronary artery and the resulting myocardial perfusion deficit.

  16. Review of reported causes of device embolization following trans-catheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibebuogu, Uzoma N; Giri, Smith; Bolorunduro, Oluwaseyi; Tartara, Paolo; Kar, Saibal; Holmes, David; Alli, Oluseun

    2015-06-15

    Transcatheter heart valve (THV) embolization is a rare but serious complication of transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Studies, including case reports, case series, and original reports published between 2002 and 2013, with regard to THV embolization were identified with a systemic electronic search using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. A total of 19 publications describing 71 patients were identified. Most patients (64%) were men, with a mean age of 80 ± 6 years and a mean logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation score of 22.4 ± 9.3%. Balloon-expandable valves were used in 72% of the patients. The reported transcatheter aortic valve replacement access site was transfemoral in 80% of patients. Most cases (90%) occurred <1 hour after implantation, whereas 10% had late embolization (range 4 hours to 43 days). The most common site of embolization was the ascending aorta (38%), followed by the left ventricle (31%), descending aorta (23%), and aortic arch (8%). Open-heart surgery was required in 28% for valve retrieval and replacement. The 30-day stroke and mortality rates were 11% and 17%, respectively. Ventricular embolization and urgent conversion to open-heart surgery were significantly associated with death during hospitalization (p = 0.017 and p = 0.029, respectively). Likely causes of embolization were identified in 59 patients, with positioning error as the most commonly reported (47%), followed by pacing error (13%). In conclusion, THV embolization occurred early after transcatheter aortic valve implantation. The ascending aorta was the most common site of embolization. Higher 30-day stroke and mortality rates were associated with THV embolization compared with most published series of transcatheter aortic valve implantation outcomes. PMID:25882773

  17. Remodelação cirúrgica da valva aórtica Surgical remodeling of the aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo D. FONTES

    2001-09-01

    úrgico conservador da doença valvar aórtica.PURPOSE: The authors report a method of surgical treatment of the aortic valve disease, called "Surgical Remodeling of Aortic Valve". MATERIAL AND METHOD: The method consisted of the utilization of the habitual extracorporeal circulation, moderated hipothermia and the infusion of cardioplegic solution in the coronary ostia. The non-coronary valvula is resected and stitches anchored in the aortic valva anulus are given in a way to approximate the resected valvula commissures, in order to turn the trivalvular valva into a bivalvulate one. The Valsalva sinus corresponding to the resected valva stays situated below the commissure and the remaining aortic wall is sutured with a few separated stitches, followed with the conventional aortorraphy. Between March of 1996 and July of 1999, 15 patients were operated with the described technique. Nine were male and the age ranged from 12 to 78 years. Four patients had aortic valve insufficiency, 4 with aortic and mitral insufficiency, 2 with double aortic lesion and coronary artery disease, 2 with ascending aortic disease, 2 with aortic insufficiency and coronary artery disease, and 1 with double dysfunction of aortic and mitral valves. RESULTS: Three patients developed aortic insufficiency on the post-operative and 3 of them were operated on in the late post-operative. Four patients were submitted to hemodynamic study and one of them had a supravalvar gradient estimated at 20 mmHg. Eleven patients were studied by echocardiogram and did not have stenosis. There were neither immediate obits and one occurred in the late post-operative period. Fourteen patients were followed during 30 days to 24 months, and had a good evolution (Functional Class I or II of the NYHA. CONCLUSION: This method for the aortic valve preservation is an alternate option for the surgical treatment of the aortic valve disease.

  18. [Acute Leaflet Arrest in St. Jude Medical Regent Mechanical Aortic Valve;Report of a Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishima, Yuji; Arakaki, Katsuya

    2015-06-01

    A 61-year-old woman was diagnosed with combined valvular disease and atrial fibrillation, and was admitted for surgery. We performed double valve replacement, tricuspid annuloplasty and maze operation. At the operation, a 19 mm St. Jude Medical Regent valve was implanted with non-everting mattress sutures at the aortic supra-annular position after mitral valve replacement. Although pulling down of the prosthesis into the aortic annulus was easy, the leaflets were unable to open at all in a movability test. After removing several stitches on the mitral side of the hinges, the subvalvular tissue was seen bulging into the hinge, hindering the free movement. The prosthesis was removed and replaced with a 17 mm Regent valve by the same technique. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. We suggest it is necessary to pay special attention to the structural characteristics of the prosthesis. PMID:26066878

  19. Mechanical aortic valve without anticoagulation for 33 years in a Yemeni man: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Aman, Khadija

    2016-01-01

    Background Mechanical prosthetic heart valves have been used for many decades to replace damaged native valves. Guidelines mandate the use of anticoagulant therapy in patients with mechanical prosthetic valves of any type, irrespective of the position in the heart. The rationale for this is to prevent valve thrombosis and thromboembolic complications without increasing the risk of excess bleeding. We report a case involving a patient with a functioning aortic mechanical valve without any anti...

  20. Surgical Treatment of 13-year-old Patient with Coronary Artery Disease and Supravalvular Aortic Stenosis with Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yüksel Atay

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Familial hypercholesterolemia is a genetic disorder caused by a mutation in low density lipoprotein (LDL gene. The homozygous type of the disease is rare and causes tendon xanthomas and coronary artery disease during the early years of life. Because of that, some of these patients needs early coronary revascularization. We presented 13-year-old patient who underwent coronary artery bypass graft due to familial hypercholesterolemia and repair of supravalvular aortic stenosis at the same time.

  1. Surgical Treatment of 13-year-old Patient with Coronary Artery Disease and Supravalvular Aortic Stenosis with Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    OpenAIRE

    Yüksel Atay; Mirali Mecidov; Fatih Ayık; Emrah Oğuz

    2011-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia is a genetic disorder caused by a mutation in low density lipoprotein (LDL) gene. The homozygous type of the disease is rare and causes tendon xanthomas and coronary artery disease during the early years of life. Because of that, some of these patients needs early coronary revascularization. We presented 13-year-old patient who underwent coronary artery bypass graft due to familial hypercholesterolemia and repair of supravalvular aortic stenosis at the same time.

  2. Calcification at orifices of aortic arch branches is a reliable and significant marker of stenosis at carotid bifurcation and intracranial arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Simple rating scale for calcification in the cervical arteries and the aortic arch on multi-detector computed tomography angiography (MDCTA) was evaluated its reliability and validity. Additionally, we investigated where is the most representative location for evaluating the calcification risk of carotid bifurcation stenosis and atherosclerotic infarction in the overall cervical arteries covering from the aortic arch to the carotid bifurcation. Method: The aortic arch and cervical arteries among 518 patients (292 men, 226 women) were evaluated the extent of calcification using a 4-point grading scale for MDCTA. Reliability, validity and the concomitant risk with vascular stenosis and atherosclerotic infarction were assessed. Results: Calcification was most frequently observed in the aortic arch itself, the orifices from the aortic arch, and the carotid bifurcation. Compared with the bilateral carotid bifurcations, the aortic arch itself had a stronger inter-observer agreement for the calcification score (Fleiss’ kappa coefficients; 0.77), but weaker associations with stenosis and atherosclerotic infarction. Calcification at the orifices of the aortic arch branches had a stronger inter-observer agreement (0.74) and enough associations with carotid bifurcation stenosis and intracranial stenosis. In addition, the extensive calcification at the orifices from the aortic arch was significantly associated with atherosclerotic infarction, similar to the calcification at the bilateral carotid bifurcations. Conclusions: The orifices of the aortic arch branches were the novel representative location of the aortic arch and overall cervical arteries for evaluating the calcification extent. Thus, calcification at the aortic arch should be evaluated with focus on the orifices of 3 main branches

  3. Calcification at orifices of aortic arch branches is a reliable and significant marker of stenosis at carotid bifurcation and intracranial arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Shigeki, E-mail: shigekiyamada3@gmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery and Stroke Center, Rakuwakai Otowa Hospital, Kyoto (Japan); Interfaculty Initiative in Information Studies/Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Neurosurgery, Hamamatsu Rosai Hospital, Shizuoka (Japan); Hashimoto, Kenji, E-mail: hashiken8022@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Neurosurgery, Kishiwada Municipal Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Ogata, Hideki, E-mail: hidogata@gmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Hamamatsu Rosai Hospital, Shizuoka (Japan); Watanabe, Yoshihiko, E-mail: ynabe@magic.odn.ne.jp [Department of Neurosurgery, Hamamatsu Rosai Hospital, Shizuoka (Japan); Oshima, Marie, E-mail: marie@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Interfaculty Initiative in Information Studies/Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Miyake, Hidenori, E-mail: hi-miyake@hamamatsuh.rofuku.go.jp [Department of Neurosurgery, Hamamatsu Rosai Hospital, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Simple rating scale for calcification in the cervical arteries and the aortic arch on multi-detector computed tomography angiography (MDCTA) was evaluated its reliability and validity. Additionally, we investigated where is the most representative location for evaluating the calcification risk of carotid bifurcation stenosis and atherosclerotic infarction in the overall cervical arteries covering from the aortic arch to the carotid bifurcation. Method: The aortic arch and cervical arteries among 518 patients (292 men, 226 women) were evaluated the extent of calcification using a 4-point grading scale for MDCTA. Reliability, validity and the concomitant risk with vascular stenosis and atherosclerotic infarction were assessed. Results: Calcification was most frequently observed in the aortic arch itself, the orifices from the aortic arch, and the carotid bifurcation. Compared with the bilateral carotid bifurcations, the aortic arch itself had a stronger inter-observer agreement for the calcification score (Fleiss’ kappa coefficients; 0.77), but weaker associations with stenosis and atherosclerotic infarction. Calcification at the orifices of the aortic arch branches had a stronger inter-observer agreement (0.74) and enough associations with carotid bifurcation stenosis and intracranial stenosis. In addition, the extensive calcification at the orifices from the aortic arch was significantly associated with atherosclerotic infarction, similar to the calcification at the bilateral carotid bifurcations. Conclusions: The orifices of the aortic arch branches were the novel representative location of the aortic arch and overall cervical arteries for evaluating the calcification extent. Thus, calcification at the aortic arch should be evaluated with focus on the orifices of 3 main branches.

  4. Transapical perfusion for peri-arrest salvage during transcutaneous aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göbölös, L; Tsang, G M; Curzen, N; Calver, A L; Ohri, S K

    2015-11-01

    An 80-year-old man developed severe haemodynamic instability during a transapical aortic valve implantation. He was not suitable for a conventional surgical approach due to comorbidities and patent aortocoronary bypass grafts also limited further stabilizing actions. As a bail-out procedure, we demonstrate the feasibility of transapical arterial cannulation by crossing a newly implanted TAVI valve in order to establish an emergency bypass circuit.

  5. EFFECT OF OXYGEN INHALATION ON MICROEMBOLIC SIGNALS IN PATIENTS WITH MECHANICAL AORTIC VALVE

    OpenAIRE

    K. Ghandehari Z. Izadimoud

    2005-01-01

    Microembolic signals (MES) are frequently observed in transcranial ‎Doppler (TCD) recordings of patients with mechanical heart valve (MHV). If gaseous bubbles are the underlying cause, number of MES produced by MHV could be reduced with oxygen ‎inhalation. From September 2003 to September ‎2004, a consecutive series of 14 patients ‎with St Jude aortic valve visited in the cardiology clinic were referred to ‎neurosonology unit, Valie Asr Hospital, Khoras...

  6. Multi-detector computed tomography is equivalent to trans-oesophageal echocardiography for the assessment of the aortic annulus before transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), assessment of the aortic annulus is mandatory. We sought to investigate the correlation between trans-oesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) for annulus diameter assessment before TAVI. A total of 122 patients (67 male, mean age 84 ± 6 years) underwent MDCT and TEE for TAVI planning. In TEE annulus diameters were obtained in a long-axis view at diastole. MDCT data were evaluated using MPR images, and corresponding projections were adjusted for MDCT and TEE. Patients were classified by the predominant localisation of aortic valve calcifications, and annulus diameters between TEE and MDCT were correlated. Additionally, the eccentricity of the aortic annulus was calculated. Mean eccentricity of the aortic annulus determined by MDCT was 0.34 ± 0.17, with no difference according to valve calcification. Regarding the aortic annulus diameter, the mean values measured were 24.3 ± 2.1 mm in MDCT and 24.0 ± 2.5 mm in TEE (P < 0.0001 for agreement). Independent of the pattern of aortic valve calcification, close correlation is found between CT and TEE measurements of the aortic annulus diameter. In addition, CT demonstrates the non-circular shape of the aortic annulus. (orig.)

  7. In vitro flow dynamics of four prosthetic aortic valves: a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanle, D D; Harrison, E C; Yoganathan, A P; Allen, D T; Corcoran, W H

    1989-01-01

    The velocity fields downstream of four prosthetic heart valves were mapped in vitro over the entire cross-section of a model aortic root using laser Doppler anemometry. THe Björk-Shiley 60 degrees convexo-concave tilting disc valve, the Smeloff-Cutter caged ball valve, the St. Jude Medical bileaflet valve, and the Ionescu-Shiley standard bioprosthesis were examined under both steady and pulsatile flows. Velocity profiles under steady flow conditions were a good approximation for pulsatile profiles only during midsystole. The pulsatile flow characteristics of the four valves showed variation in large scale flow structures. Comparison of the valves according to pressure drop, shear stress and maximum velocities are also provided. PMID:2808443

  8. Contrast-induced acute kidney injury after computed tomography prior to transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To identify independent predictors of contrast medium-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) after enhanced multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) prior to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in high-risk patients. Materials and methods: The present single-centre study analysed retrospectively 361 patients who were assessed using MDCT prior to TAVI. CI-AKI was defined as an increase in serum creatinine (SCr) of ≥25% or ≥0.5 mg/dl in at least one sample over baseline (24 h before MDCT) and at 24, 48, and 72 h after MDCT. Results: A total of 38 patients (10.5%) experienced CI-AKI. As compared to patients without CI-AKI, they presented more frequently with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 ml/min/1.73m2, (81.6% versus 64.4%, p = 0.045) and tended to receive higher volumes of iodinated contrast media (ICM; 55.3% versus 39%, p = 0.057). There was a significant interaction between baseline eGFR and the amount of intravenous ICM administered (pfor interaction = <0.001) identifying the amount of ICM >90 ml as independent predictive factor of CI-AKI only in patients with baseline eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73m2 (OR 2.615; 95% CI: 1.21–5.64). Conclusion: One in ten elderly patients with aortic stenosis undergoing MDCT to plan a TAVI procedure experienced CI-AKI after intravenous ICM injection. Intravenous administration of <90 ml of ICM reduces this risk in patients with or without pre-existing impaired renal function. However, in the majority of patients renal function recovers before the TAVI procedure. - Highlights: • We analyzed retrospectively 361 patients who were assessed by MDCT prior to TAVI. • Overall incidence of CI-AKI after intravenous ICM injection was 10.5%. • Interaction between baseline eGFR*amount of ICM injected predicts the risk of CI-AKI. • ICM <90 ml reduces the risk in patients with or without impaired renal function. • In the majority of patients renal function recovers before TAVI procedure

  9. Left atrial volume in patients with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis (the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Morten; Egstrup, K.; Wachtell, K.;

    2008-01-01

    AS (transaortic Doppler velocity > or =2.5 and AVA) was estimated by the continuity equation and indexed by body surface...... area. Mean values for age and AVA were 67 +/- 10 years and 1.27 +/- 0.5 cm2, respectively, and 574 were women (38%). Mean value for LA volume indexed (LAVI) was 36 +/- 13 ml/m2. Enlargement of LA volume (> or =32 ml/m2) was found in 57% of patients. AVA indexed was significantly correlated to LAVI (r...... = -0.1, p = 0.0002). Multivariate analysis showed that LAVI was significantly related to AVA indexed (beta = -4.1, p = 0.007) in a model that also included mitral regurgitation (beta = 2.8, p

  10. Endarterectomy and Aortic Valve Replacement in a Patient with Aortic Stenosis and Calcified Ascending Aorta

    OpenAIRE

    YAMAMOTO, Masato; NIINAMI, Hiroshi; SUDA, Yuji; TAKEUCHI, Yasuo; 山本, 真人; 新浪, 博; 須田, 優司; 竹内, 靖夫

    2004-01-01

    高度に石灰化した大動脈porcelain aortaと狭小弁輪を伴う大動脈弁狭窄症の合併における手術療法において,大動脈を非遮断下に行う方法や有効弁口面積を確保するための様々な方法が報告されている.今回我々は, porcelain aortaおよび狭小弁輪大動脈弁狭窄症の合併症例に対して一部石灰化の及んでいない健常部の大動脈を遮断し, sinotubular junctionを血管内膜切除術後, 19-mm St. Jude Medical prosthetic HP弁を挿入し良好な結果を得たので報告する.症例は65歳,男性.胸部CTで大動脈弁輪から弓部にかけて全周性の石灰化を認め,心臓カテーテル検査で大動脈圧較差は67mmHgの大動脈弁狭窄症を認めたが,冠動脈および左室の壁運動に異常は認めなかった.手術は超低体温循環停止下で大動脈の非遮断による方法を考慮していたが,人工心肺の確立後一部石灰化の及んでいない健常部の大動脈を触診で見出すことができたため中等度低体温下で大動脈を遮断した. sinotubular junctionの高度石灰化のため19-mmのサイザーが通過せず,そのた...

  11. Immersed smoothed finite element method for fluid-structure interaction simulation of aortic valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianyao; Liu, G. R.; Narmoneva, Daria A.; Hinton, Robert B.; Zhang, Zhi-Qian

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a novel numerical method for simulating the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems when blood flows over aortic valves. The method uses the immersed boundary/element method and the smoothed finite element method and hence it is termed as IS-FEM. The IS-FEM is a partitioned approach and does not need a body-fitted mesh for FSI simulations. It consists of three main modules: the fluid solver, the solid solver and the FSI force solver. In this work, the blood is modeled as incompressible viscous flow and solved using the characteristic-based-split scheme with FEM for spacial discretization. The leaflets of the aortic valve are modeled as Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic materials and solved using smoothed finite element method (or S-FEM). The FSI force is calculated on the Lagrangian fictitious fluid mesh that is identical to the moving solid mesh. The octree search and neighbor-to-neighbor schemes are used to detect efficiently the FSI pairs of fluid and solid cells. As an example, a 3D idealized model of aortic valve is modeled, and the opening process of the valve is simulated using the proposed IS-FEM. Numerical results indicate that the IS-FEM can serve as an efficient tool in the study of aortic valve dynamics to reveal the details of stresses in the aortic valves, the flow velocities in the blood, and the shear forces on the interfaces. This tool can also be applied to animal models studying disease processes and may ultimately translate to a new adaptive methods working with magnetic resonance images, leading to improvements on diagnostic and prognostic paradigms, as well as surgical planning, in the care of patients.

  12. Combined venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and transcatheter aortic valve implantation for the treatment of acute aortic prosthesis dysfunction in a high-risk patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergolini, Amedeo; Zampi, Giordano; Tinti, Maria Denitza; Polizzi, Vincenzo; Pino, Paolo Giuseppe; Pontillo, Daniele; Musumeci, Francesco; Luzi, Giampaolo

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a patient with acute bioprosthesis dysfunction in cardiogenic shock, in whom hemodynamic support was provided by venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and successfully treated by transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

  13. Supravalvular aortic stenosis associated to infectious endocarditis and cerebral vascular disease in a patient with Williams-Beuren Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rubens Figueroa, Jesús; Marhx, Alfonso; López Terrazas, Javier; Palacios Macedo, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    The Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare genetic disease characterized by: (a) typical facial features; (b) psychomotor retardation with a specific neurocognitive profile; (c) cardiovascular condition and (d) likely transient hypocalcemia in infancy. The objective of this study was to describe the clinic evolution and diagnosis of patient with this syndrome that was associated with endocarditis caused by Streptococcus parasanguis in the ascending aorta and an aneurism located in the fronto-temporal area, which produced a parenchymal hematoma in the left lobe, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. He was treated with ceftriaxone and dicloxacillin. Then we proceeded to correct the aneurysm and perform vegetation resection in aortic arteries with supravalvular aortic stenosis correction. The evolution after one year has been favorable and is currently without neurologic sequelae. A 5-year-old male patient presented a diagnosis of supravalvular aortic stenosis. After cardiac catheterization was performed, he presented a fever and right side paresis. The echocardiogram showed multiple vegetations in the ascendant aortic arch and the supraortic arteries. The blood cultures reported S. parasanguis. The magnetic resonance showed a subarachnoid hemorrhage with an aneurysm and a hematoma. PMID:25882107

  14. Clinical and echocardiographic assessment of the Medtronic Advantage aortic valve prosthesis: the Scandinavian multicentre, prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaverstad, Rune; Vitale, Nicola; Karevold, Asbjørn;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this report is the prospective, multicentre evaluation of clinical results and haemodynamic performance of the Medtronic Advantage aortic valve prosthesis. METHODS: From April 2001 to June 2003, 166 patients (male:female 125:41; mean (SD) age 61.8 (11.8) years) received an a...... echocardiography. CONCLUSIONS: Haemodynamic performance and early clinical results of Medtronic advantage in the aortic position were satisfactory and comparable with those of other bileaflet valves in current clinical use.......OBJECTIVE: The aim of this report is the prospective, multicentre evaluation of clinical results and haemodynamic performance of the Medtronic Advantage aortic valve prosthesis. METHODS: From April 2001 to June 2003, 166 patients (male:female 125:41; mean (SD) age 61.8 (11.8) years) received...... an aortic advantage valve prosthesis. Complete cumulative follow-up was 242.7 patient-years (maximum 3.2; mean 1.6 years). Postoperatively, patients underwent early (within 30 days) and 1 year transthoracic echocardiography. RESULTS: 30 day mortality was 2.4% (n = 4). Kaplan-Meier estimates of freedom from...

  15. Semiautomatic, Quantitative Measurement of Aortic Valve Area Using CTA : Validation and Comparison with Transthoracic Echocardiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuncay, V.; Prakken, N.; van Ooijen, P. M. A.; Budde, R. P. J.; Leiner, T.; Oudkerk, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this work was to develop a fast and robust (semi) automatic segmentation technique of the aortic valve area (AVA) MDCT datasets. Methods. The algorithm starts with detection and cropping of Sinus of Valsalva on MPR image. The cropped image is then binarized and seed points are

  16. Intima-media thickness of the descending aorta in patients with bicuspid aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Petrini

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: Intima-media thickness of the descending aorta is not affected by aortic valve morphology (BAV/TAV; age is the main determinant of AoIMT. Genetic markers (SNPs known to influence IMT in the carotid artery seem to correlate to IMT in the descending aorta only in patients with TAV.

  17. Reevaluation of the indications for permanent pacemaker implantation after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre Thygesen, Julie; Loh, Poay Huan; Cholteesupachai, Jiranut;

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Conduction abnormalities (CA) requiring permanent pacemaker (PPM) are a well-known complication after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). This study aimed to determine the incidence of TAVI-related PPM and reevaluate the indications for PPM after the periprocedural period. METHO...

  18. Impact of prosthesis-patient mismatch on early and late mortality after aortic valve replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koene, Bart M.; Hamad, Mohamed A. Soliman; Bouma, Wobbe; Mariani, Massimo A.; Peels, Kathinka C.; van Dantzig, Jan-Melle; van Straten, Albert H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The influence of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) on survival after aortic valve replacement (AVR) remains controversial. In this study, we sought to determine the effect of PPM on early (30 days) after AVR or AVR combined with coronary artery bypass grafting (AVR with CABG). Methods: B

  19. Cross Talk between NOTCH Signaling and Biomechanics in Human Aortic Valve Disease Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Godby

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aortic valve disease is a burgeoning public health problem associated with significant mortality. Loss of function mutations in NOTCH1 cause bicuspid aortic valve (BAV and calcific aortic valve disease. Because calcific nodules manifest on the fibrosa side of the cusp in low fluidic oscillatory shear stress (OSS, elucidating pathogenesis requires approaches that consider both molecular and mechanical factors. Therefore, we examined the relationship between NOTCH loss of function (LOF and biomechanical indices in healthy and diseased human aortic valve interstitial cells (AVICs. An orbital shaker system was used to apply cyclic OSS, which mimics the cardiac cycle and hemodynamics experienced by AVICs in vivo. NOTCH LOF blocked OSS-induced cell alignment in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs, whereas AVICs did not align when subjected to OSS under any conditions. In healthy AVICs, OSS resulted in decreased elastin (ELN and α-SMA (ACTA2. NOTCH LOF was associated with similar changes, but in diseased AVICs, NOTCH LOF combined with OSS was associated with increased α-SMA expression. Interestingly, AVICs showed relatively higher expression of NOTCH2 compared to NOTCH1. Biomechanical interactions between endothelial and interstitial cells involve complex NOTCH signaling that contributes to matrix homeostasis in health and disorganization in disease.

  20. Video densitometric determinations of relative regurgitation volumes in aortic valve insufficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple video densitometric method based on the indicator distribution principle in the region of interes permits the determination of the relative amount of regurgitation between the ascending aorta and the left ventricle in cases of aortic valve insufficiency. The experimental basis and early clinical measurements are described and are compared with the more conventional methods of cine angiography and radionuclide ventriculography. (orig.)

  1. The systemic inflammatory response syndrome predicts short-term outcome after transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rettig, Thijs C D; Rigter, Sander; Nijenhuis, Vincent J.; Van Kuijk, Jan Peter; Ten Berg, Jurriën M.; Heijmen, Robin H.; Van De Garde, Ewoudt M W; Noordzij, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Despite the minimally invasive nature of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) and mortality is of major concern. Several studies showed that outcome was influenced by the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in patients underg

  2. Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Myocarditis Obstructive Sleep Apnea Pericarditis Peripheral Vascular Disease Rheumatic Fever Sick Sinus Syndrome Silent Ischemia Stroke Sudden Cardiac Arrest Vulnerable Plaque Valve Disease | Share Related terms: heart valves, valve insufficiency, valve regurgitation, valve stenosis, valvular ...

  3. Transcatheter aortic value implantation with self-expandable nitinol valved stent: an experimental study in sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: to determine the feasibility and safety of transcatheter aortic valve implantation with domestic self-expandable nitinol valved stent in experimental sheep. Methods: A fresh pig pericardium was cross-linked with a 0.6% glutaraldehyde solution for 36 hours and then sutured on a nitinol self-expandable stent. Ten healthy sheep of (46.00±2.60) kg body weight were chosen for the study. Under general anesthesia, the device was delivered through catheter into the native aortic valve of the sheep via the femoral artery or abdominal aorta. The animals were followed up for three months. Results: Six devices were successfully delivered at the desired position in six sheep with no occurrence of complications. Angiographic and hemodynamic studies confirmed that the stents were fixed at correct position with competent valve function immediately and 90 days after the procedure. Technical failure or fatal complications occurred in the remaining four sheep. Conclusion: Implantation of a domestic nitinol self-expandable stent at the aortic valve position through a transcatheter approach is feasible in experimental sheep. (authors)

  4. Iatrogenic right coronary artery stenosis resulting from surgical tricuspid valve replacement: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissy, Stephen J; Atkins, Broadus Zane; Rogers, Jason H

    2014-12-01

    Iatrogenic injury to the right coronary artery (RCA) is a rare complication of tricuspid valve surgery. We herein describe the first-ever report of RCA injury related to tricuspid valve replacement surgery. A 38-year-old man with recurrent tricuspid endocarditis underwent redo tricuspid valve replacement by means of a minimally invasive right thoracotomy with a 32-mm St. Jude bioprosthetic valve. His post-operative course was complicated by pulseless ventricular tachycardia requiring CPR and defibrillation. Cardiac catheterization revealed a "kinked" stenotic distal RCA. The lesion was noted to be flow limiting by fractional flow reserve and was treated with two everolimus-eluting stents. The RCA runs in the atrioventricular groove and is susceptible to injury especially in the region of the posterior leaflet of the tricuspid valve, where the relationship of the tricuspid annulus to the RCA is most intimate. Repair of surgically induced coronary stenosis can be accomplished with percutaneous intervention. PMID:25131346

  5. Mixed partial anomalous pulmonary venous drainage coexistent with an aortic valve abnormality – analysis of ultrasound diagnostics in a 10-year-old girl with Turner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karolczak, Maciej A.; Komarnicka, Justyna; Mirecka, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    The authors present a case of echocardiographic diagnosis of a rare congenital cardiovascular anomaly in the form of mixed partial anomalous pulmonary veins connection in a 10-year-old girl with Turner syndrome and congenital mild stenosis of insufficient bicuspid aortic valve, made while diagnosing the causes of intestinal tract bleeding. The article presents various diagnostic difficulties leading to the delayed determination of a correct diagnosis, resulting from the absence of symptoms of circulatory failure in the early stage of the disease and the occurrence of severe and dominant auscultatory phenomena typical for congenital aortic valve defect which effectively masked the syndromes of increased pulmonary flow. The authors discuss the role of the impact of phenotypic characteristics of the Turner syndrome, in particular a short webbed neck restricting the suprasternal echocardiographic access and the presence of psychological factors associated with a long-term illness. The importance of indirect echocardiographic symptoms suggesting partial anomalous pulmonary veins connection in the presence of bicuspid aortic valve, e.g. enlargement of the right atrium and right ventricle, and paradoxical interventricular septum motion were emphasized in patients lacking ASD, pulmonary hypertension or tricupid and pulmonary valve abnormalities. The methodology of echocardiographic examination enabling direct visualization of the abnormal vascular structures was presented. Special attention was paid to the significance of highly sensitive echocardiographic projections: high right and left parasternal views in sagittal and transverse planes with patient lying on the side, with the use of two-dimensional imaging and color Doppler. Finally, the limitations of echocardiography resulting from the visualization and tracking of abnormal vascular structures hidden behind ultrasound non-conductive tissues were indicated, as was the role of other diagnostic modalities, such as angio

  6. Mixed partial anomalous pulmonary venous drainage coexistent with an aortic valve abnormality - analysis of ultrasound diagnostics in a 10-year-old girl with Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mądry, Wojciech; Karolczak, Maciej A; Komarnicka, Justyna; Mirecka, Małgorzata

    2014-03-01

    The authors present a case of echocardiographic diagnosis of a rare congenital cardiovascular anomaly in the form of mixed partial anomalous pulmonary veins connection in a 10-year-old girl with Turner syndrome and congenital mild stenosis of insufficient bicuspid aortic valve, made while diagnosing the causes of intestinal tract bleeding. The article presents various diagnostic difficulties leading to the delayed determination of a correct diagnosis, resulting from the absence of symptoms of circulatory failure in the early stage of the disease and the occurrence of severe and dominant auscultatory phenomena typical for congenital aortic valve defect which effectively masked the syndromes of increased pulmonary flow. The authors discuss the role of the impact of phenotypic characteristics of the Turner syndrome, in particular a short webbed neck restricting the suprasternal echocardiographic access and the presence of psychological factors associated with a long-term illness. The importance of indirect echocardiographic symptoms suggesting partial anomalous pulmonary veins connection in the presence of bicuspid aortic valve, e.g. enlargement of the right atrium and right ventricle, and paradoxical interventricular septum motion were emphasized in patients lacking ASD, pulmonary hypertension or tricupid and pulmonary valve abnormalities. The methodology of echocardiographic examination enabling direct visualization of the abnormal vascular structures was presented. Special attention was paid to the significance of highly sensitive echocardiographic projections: high right and left parasternal views in sagittal and transverse planes with patient lying on the side, with the use of two-dimensional imaging and color Doppler. Finally, the limitations of echocardiography resulting from the visualization and tracking of abnormal vascular structures hidden behind ultrasound non-conductive tissues were indicated, as was the role of other diagnostic modalities, such as angio

  7. Residual glycosaminoglycan accumulation in mitral and aortic valves of a patient with attenuated MPS I (Scheie syndrome after 6 years of enzyme replacement therapy: Implications for early diagnosis and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Sato

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS is an inherited metabolic disease caused by deficiency of the enzymes needed for glycosaminoglycan (GAG degradation. MPS type I is caused by the deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-l-iduronidase and is classified into Hurler syndrome, Scheie syndrome, and Hurler–Scheie syndrome based on disease severity and onset. Cardiac complications such as left ventricular hypertrophy, cardiac valve disease, and coronary artery disease are often observed in MPS type I. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT has been available for MPS type I, but the efficacy of this treatment for cardiac valve disease is unknown. We report on a 56-year-old female patient with attenuated MPS I (Scheie syndrome who developed aortic and mitral stenosis and coronary artery narrowing. The cardiac valve disease progressed despite ERT and she finally underwent double valve replacement and coronary artery bypass grafting. The pathology of the cardiac valves revealed GAG accumulation and lysosomal enlargement in both the mitral and aortic valves. Zebra body formation was also confirmed using electron microscopy. Our results suggest that ERT had limited efficacy in previously established cardiac valve disease. Early diagnosis and initiation of ERT is crucial to avoid further cardiac complications in MPS type I.

  8. Thoracic aortopathy in Turner syndrome and the influence of bicuspid aortic valves and blood pressure: a CMR study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hager Alfred

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate aortic dimensions in women with Turner syndrome (TS in relation to aortic valve morphology, blood pressure, karyotype, and clinical characteristics. Methods and results A cross sectional study of 102 women with TS (mean age 37.7; 18-62 years examined by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR- successful in 95, echocardiography, and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure. Aortic diameters were measured by CMR at 8 positions along the thoracic aorta. Twenty-four healthy females were recruited as controls. In TS, aortic dilatation was present at one or more positions in 22 (23%. Aortic diameter in women with TS and bicuspid aortic valve was significantly larger than in TS with tricuspid valves in both the ascending (32.4 ± 6.7 vs. 26.0 ± 4.4 mm; p Conclusions Aortic dilatation was present in 23% of adult TS women, where aortic valve morphology, age and blood pressure were major determinants of the aortic diameter.

  9. Use of Circular Foldable Nitinol Blades for Resecting Calcified Aortic Heart Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Florian; Wendt, Daniel; Stühle, Sebastian; Kawa, Emilia; Wendt, Hermann; Müller, Wiebke; Thielmann, Matthias; Kipfmüller, Brigitte; Vogel, Bernd; Jakob, Heinz

    2009-08-01

    The use of percutaneous aortic valve implantation is limited, as the native calcified valve is left in situ. A new device has been developed for resecting calcified aortic valves, using collapsible nickel-titanium blades: laser-cut T-structures of Nitinol sheet-material (Ni51Ti49 at.%) have been grinded on a high-speed milling cutter to produce cutting edges which have been given the shape of half-circles afterwards. These have been connected to each other and to struts by using rivets which also serve as articulating axes for the cutting ring. The blades are folded around these axes and retreated into a tube to be inserted in the heart through the calcified valve leaflets. Once released, the cutting edges regain their ring-shape. By combining rotation of the ring with a translating movement against a second ring of slightly greater diameter on the instrument, a punching process is created which cuts the calcified valve leaflets and leaves a circular annulus, where a prosthesis can be fixed. In vitro cutting of artificially calcified valves ( n = 6) resulted in a resection time of t = 22 ± 6.29 s with a maximum turning moment of M = 2.4 ± 1.27 Nm, proving the function and the feasibility of the concept.

  10. Estimation of the shear stress on the surface of an aortic valve leaflet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, M W; LaBorde, D V; Yoganathan, A P

    1999-01-01

    The limited durability of xenograft heart valves and the limited supply of allografts have sparked interest in tissue engineered replacement valves. A bioreactor for tissue engineered valves must operate at conditions that optimize the biosynthetic abilities of seeded cells while promoting their adherence to the leaflet matrix. An important parameter is shear stress, which is known to influence cellular behavior and may thus be crucial in bioreactor optimization. Therefore, an accurate estimate of the shear stress on the leaflet surface would not only improve our understanding of the mechanical environment of aortic valve leaflets, but it would also aid in bioreactor design. To estimate the shear stress on the leaflet surface, two-component laser-Doppler velocimetry measurements have been conducted inside a transparent polyurethane valve with a trileaflet structure similar to the native aortic valve. Steady flow rates of 7.5, 15.0, and 22.5 L/min were examined to cover the complete range possible during the cardiac cycle. The laminar shear stresses were calculated by linear regression of four axial velocity measurements near the surface of the leaflet. The maximum shear stress recorded was 79 dyne/cm2, in agreement with boundary layer theory and previous experimental and computational studies. This study has provided a range of shear stresses to be explored in bioreactor design and has defined a maximum shear stress at which cells must remain adherent upon a tissue engineered construct.

  11. Recuperação por desbridamento manual da valva aórtica estenótica calcificada Manual debridement for repair in calcified aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato A. K Kalil

    1995-06-01

    and 1 late death. Surviving patients are in functional classes I or II. Maximum instantaneous gradient dropped from 90.7 ± 23.3 mmHg to 33.0 ±7.9 mmHg (p < 0.01 and mean aortic gradient from 50.3 ± 11.0 mmHg to 19.9 ± 3.5 mmHg (p < 0.05. Septal width reduced from 2.0 ± 0.5 cm to 1.2 ± 0.1 (p < 0.01. Aortic regurgitation, by echocardiography, was considered minimum in 5, mild in 9 and moderated in 2 cases. Mechanical debridement of calcified aortic valves, congenital or senile, provides good medium-term relief for aortic stenosis. This technical alternative may be considered in older patients, small aortic roots and higher risks of anticoagulation.

  12. Percutaneous Transcatheter One-Step Mechanical Aortic Disc Valve Prosthesis Implantation: A Preliminary Feasibility Study in Swine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility of one-step implantation of a new type of stent-based mechanical aortic disc valve prosthesis (MADVP) above and across the native aortic valve and its short-term function in swine with both functional and dysfunctional native valves. Methods. The MADVP consisted of a folding disc valve made of silicone elastomer attached to either a nitinol Z-stent (Z model) or a nitinol cross-braided stent (SX model). Implantation of 10 MADVPs (6 Z and 4 SX models) was attempted in 10 swine: 4 (2 Z and 2 SX models) with a functional native valve and 6 (4 Z and 2 SX models) with aortic regurgitation induced either by intentional valve injury or by MADVP placement across the native valve. MADVP function was observed for up to 3 hr after implantation. Results. MADVP implantation was successful in 9 swine. One animal died of induced massive regurgitation prior to implantation. Four MADVPs implanted above functioning native valves exhibited good function. In 5 swine with regurgitation, MADVP implantation corrected the induced native valve dysfunction and the device's continuous good function was observed in 4 animals. One MADVP (SX model) placed across native valve gradually migrated into the left ventricle. Conclusion. The tested MADVP can be implanted above and across the native valve in a one-step procedure and can replace the function of the regurgitating native valve. Further technical development and testing are warranted, preferably with a manufactured MADVP

  13. Estimation of aortic valve leaflets from 3D CT images using local shape dictionaries and linear coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liang; Martin, Caitlin; Wang, Qian; Sun, Wei; Duncan, James

    2016-03-01

    Aortic valve (AV) disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The preferred treatment modality for severe AV disease is surgical resection and replacement of the native valve with either a mechanical or tissue prosthetic. In order to develop effective and long-lasting treatment methods, computational analyses, e.g., structural finite element (FE) and computational fluid dynamic simulations, are very effective for studying valve biomechanics. These computational analyses are based on mesh models of the aortic valve, which are usually constructed from 3D CT images though many hours of manual annotation, and therefore an automatic valve shape reconstruction method is desired. In this paper, we present a method for estimating the aortic valve shape from 3D cardiac CT images, which is represented by triangle meshes. We propose a pipeline for aortic valve shape estimation which includes novel algorithms for building local shape dictionaries and for building landmark detectors and curve detectors using local shape dictionaries. The method is evaluated on real patient image dataset using a leave-one-out approach and achieves an average accuracy of 0.69 mm. The work will facilitate automatic patient-specific computational modeling of the aortic valve.

  14. A three-dimensional co-culture model of the aortic valve using magnetic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hubert; Balaoing, Liezl R; Grigoryan, Bagrat; Raphael, Robert M; Killian, T C; Souza, Glauco R; Grande-Allen, K Jane

    2014-01-01

    The aortic valve consists of valvular interstitial cells (VICs) and endothelial cells (VECs). While these cells are understood to work synergistically to maintain leaflet structure and valvular function, few co-culture models of these cell types exist. In this study, aortic valve co-cultures (AVCCs) were assembled using magnetic levitation and cultured for 3 days. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction were used to assess the maintenance of cellular phenotype and function, and the formation of extracellular matrix. AVCCs stained positive for CD31 and α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA), demonstrating that the phenotype was maintained. Functional markers endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), von Willebrand factor (VWF) and prolyl-4-hydroxylase were present. Extracellular matrix components collagen type I, laminin and fibronectin also stained positive, with reduced gene expression of these proteins in three dimensions compared to two dimensions. Genes for collagen type I, lysyl oxidase and αSMA were expressed less in AVCCs than in 2-D cultures, indicating that VICs are quiescent. Co-localization of CD31 and αSMA in the AVCCs suggests that endothelial-mesenchymal transdifferentiation might be occurring. Differences in VWF and eNOS in VECs cultured in two and three dimensions also suggests that the AVCCs possibly have anti-thrombotic potential. Overall, a co-culture model of the aortic valve was designed, and serves as a basis for future experiments to understand heart valve biology. PMID:24036238

  15. A New Cone-Shaped Aortic Valve Prosthesis for Orthotopic Position: An Experimental Study in Swine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this experimental study was to evaluate a newly designed cone-shaped aortic valve prosthesis (CAVP) for one-step transcatheter placement in an orthotopic position. The study was conducted in 15 swine using either the transcarotid (11 animals) or the transfemoral (4 animals) artery approach. A 12- or 13-Fr sheath was inserted via arterial cutdown. The CAVP was deployed under fluoroscopic control and its struts, by design, induced significant native valve insufficiency. CAVP function was evaluated by aortography and aortic pressure curve tracing. In 11 of 15 swine the CAVP was properly deployed and functioned well throughout the scheduled period of 2-3 h. In three swine the CAVPs were placed lower than intended, however, they were functional even in the left ventricular outflow tract position. One swine expired due to inadvertent low CAVP placement that caused both aortic regurgitation and immobilization of the anterior mitral valve leaflet by the valve struts. We conclude that this design of CAVP is relatively easy to deploy, works well throughout a short time period (2-3 h), and, moreover, seems to be reliable even in a lower-than-orthotopic position (e.g., infra-annulary space). Longer-term studies are needed for its further evaluation.

  16. Bicuspid aortic valve and aortic coarctation are linked to deletion of the X chromosome short arm in Turner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondy, Carolyn; Bakalov, Vladimir K; Cheng, Clara; Olivieri, Laura; Rosing, Douglas R; Arai, Andrew E

    2013-01-01

    Background Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a cardinal feature of X chromosome monosomy, or Turner syndrome (TS). Haploinsufficiency for gene(s) located on Xp have been implicated in the short stature characteristic of the syndrome, but the chromosomal region related to the CHD phenotype has not been established. Design We used cardiac MRI to diagnose cardiovascular abnormalities in four non-mosaic karyotype groups based on 50-metaphase analyses: 45,X (n=152); 46,X,del(Xp) (n=15); 46,X,del(Xq) (n=4); and 46,X,i(Xq) (n=14) from peripheral blood cells. Results Bicuspid aortic valves (BAV) were found in 52/152 (34%) 45,X study subjects and aortic coarctation (COA) in 19/152 (12.5%). Isolated anomalous pulmonary veins (APV) were detected in 15/152 (10%) for the 45,X study group, and this defect was not correlated with the presence of BAV or COA. BAVs were present in 28.6% of subjects with Xp deletions and COA in 6.7%. APV were not found in subjects with Xp deletions. The most distal break associated with the BAV/COA trait was at cytologic band Xp11.4 and ChrX:41,500 000. One of 14 subjects (7%) with the 46,X,i(Xq) karyotype had a BAV and no cases of COA or APV were found in this group. No cardiovascular defects were found among four patients with Xq deletions. Conclusions The high prevalence of BAV and COA in subjects missing only the X chromosome short arm indicates that haploinsufficiency for Xp genes contributes to abnormal aortic valve and aortic arch development in TS. PMID:23825392

  17. Is valve choice a significant determinant of paravalular leak post-transcatheter aortic valve implantation? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, Katie E

    2013-11-01

    Paravalvular regurgitation (PVR) following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is associated with poor survival. The two main valve delivery systems used to date differ significantly in both structure and deployment technique. The primary objective of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies identifying PVR in patients post-TAVI using Medtronic CoreValve (MCV) and Edward Sapien (ES) valves in order to identify whether a significant difference exists between valve types. The secondary objective was to identify additional factors predisposing to PVR to provide an overview of the other associated considerations.

  18. Prevention of atrial fibrillation in patients with aortic valve stenosis with candesartan treatment after aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, J. S.; Videbaek, L.; Poulsen, M. K.;

    2013-01-01

    Background: Accumulating data has suggested that treatment with Angiotensin-II receptor antagonists can prevent the new onset of atrial fibrillation (AF). The aim of this study was to evaluate whether treatment with candesartan on top of conventional treatment could prevent new onset AF in patients...

  19. PROSPECTS FOR CYTOPROTECTORS USE IN THE ELDERLY PATIENTS THROUGH THE EXAMPLE OF CALCIFIED AORTIC STENOSIS AND ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yu. Karpova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Issues of pathogenesis of the calcified aortic stenosis and ischemic heart disease in the elderly are considered. The relevance of early detection of angina, syncope, and dyspnea in view of their non-specific and subclinical course for early detection of heart disease is specified. Current scientific views on the myocardial bioenergy and its role in the genesis of chronic heart failure are presented. Particular attention is paid to the place of cytoprotectors, especially trimetazidine, in the management of patients with cardiac N.Yu. Karpova1diseases.

  20. Short-term hemodynamic effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition in patients with severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Morten; Iversen, Kasper; Kjaergaard, Jesper;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS), treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors has previously been considered contraindicated. However, there is a lack of clinical evidence to confirm these potential hemodynamic risks and benefits. METHODS: Forty-four patients...... vs 0.8 ± 6 pmol/L, P = .04, respectively). No episodes of symptomatic hypotension were noted, and other hemodynamic parameters remained unchanged. CONCLUSION: Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition in severe AS caused a decrease in LVESV and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide with other...