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Sample records for aortic valve disease

  1. Bicuspid Aortic Valve Disease: A Comprehensive Review

    OpenAIRE

    Mordi, Ify; Tzemos, Nikolaos

    2012-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve is the commonest congenital cardiac abnormality in the general population. This paper article will discuss our current knowledge of the anatomy, pathophysiology, genetics, and clinical aspects of bicuspid aortic valve disease.

  2. Aortic Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... team will discuss with you the advantages and disadvantages of both valve types. Regardless of which type ... Diagnosis and Treatment Options Recovery Questions for Your Doctor Will my condition ever get better without treatment? ...

  3. Pathogenetic Basis of Aortopathy and Aortic Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-19

    Aortopathies; Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm; Aortic Valve Disease; Thoracic Aortic Disease; Thoracic Aortic Dissection; Thoracic Aortic Rupture; Ascending Aortic Disease; Descending Aortic Disease; Ascending Aortic Aneurysm; Descending Aortic Aneurysm; Marfan Syndrome; Loeys-Dietz Syndrome; Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome; Shprintzen-Goldberg Syndrome; Turner Syndrome; PHACE Syndrome; Autosomal Recessive Cutis Laxa; Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly; Arterial Tortuosity Syndrome

  4. Inhibitory role of Notch1 in calcific aortic valve disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Acharya

    Full Text Available Aortic valve calcification is the most common form of valvular heart disease, but the mechanisms of calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD are unknown. NOTCH1 mutations are associated with aortic valve malformations and adult-onset calcification in families with inherited disease. The Notch signaling pathway is critical for multiple cell differentiation processes, but its role in the development of CAVD is not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular changes that occur with inhibition of Notch signaling in the aortic valve. Notch signaling pathway members are expressed in adult aortic valve cusps, and examination of diseased human aortic valves revealed decreased expression of NOTCH1 in areas of calcium deposition. To identify downstream mediators of Notch1, we examined gene expression changes that occur with chemical inhibition of Notch signaling in rat aortic valve interstitial cells (AVICs. We found significant downregulation of Sox9 along with several cartilage-specific genes that were direct targets of the transcription factor, Sox9. Loss of Sox9 expression has been published to be associated with aortic valve calcification. Utilizing an in vitro porcine aortic valve calcification model system, inhibition of Notch activity resulted in accelerated calcification while stimulation of Notch signaling attenuated the calcific process. Finally, the addition of Sox9 was able to prevent the calcification of porcine AVICs that occurs with Notch inhibition. In conclusion, loss of Notch signaling contributes to aortic valve calcification via a Sox9-dependent mechanism.

  5. Animal Models of Calcific Aortic Valve Disease

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    Krista L. Sider

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD, once thought to be a degenerative disease, is now recognized to be an active pathobiological process, with chronic inflammation emerging as a predominant, and possibly driving, factor. However, many details of the pathobiological mechanisms of CAVD remain to be described, and new approaches to treat CAVD need to be identified. Animal models are emerging as vital tools to this end, facilitated by the advent of new models and improved understanding of the utility of existing models. In this paper, we summarize and critically appraise current small and large animal models of CAVD, discuss the utility of animal models for priority CAVD research areas, and provide recommendations for future animal model studies of CAVD.

  6. Unicuspid aortic valve disease: a magnetic resonance imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debl, K.; Buchner, S.; Heinicke, N.; Riegger, G.; Luchner, A.; Djavidani, B.; Poschenrieder, F.; Feuerbach, S.; Schmid, C.; Kobuch, R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: congenitally malformed aortic valves are a common finding in adults with aortic valve disease. Most of these patients have bicuspid aortic valve disease. Unicuspid aortic valve disease (UAV) is rare. The aim of our study was to describe valve morphology and the dimensions of the proximal aorta in a cohort of 12 patients with UAV in comparison to tricuspid aortic valve disease (TAV) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods/results: MRI studies were performed on a 1.5 T scanner in a total of 288 consecutive patients with aortic valve disease. 12 aortic valves were retrospectively classified as UAV. Annulus areas and dimensions of the thoracic aorta were retrospectively compared to a cohort of 103 patients with TAV. In UAV, valve morphology was unicuspid unicommissural with a posterior commissure in all patients. Mean annulus areas and mean diameters of the ascending aorta were significantly greater in UAV compared to TAV (12.6 ± 4.7 cm 2 vs. 8.7 ± 2.3 cm 2 , p < 0.01 and 4.6 ± 0.7 cm vs. 3.6 ± 0.5 cm, p < 0.0001, respectively), while no differences were observed in the mean diameters of the aortic arch (2.3 ± 0.6 cm vs. 2.3 ± 0.4 cm, p = 0.69). The diameters of the descending aorta were slightly smaller in UAV compared to TAV (2.2 ± 0.5 cm vs. 2.6 ± 0.3 cm, p < 0.05). (orig.)

  7. Unicuspid aortic valve disease: a magnetic resonance imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debl, K.; Buchner, S.; Heinicke, N.; Riegger, G.; Luchner, A. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Innere Medizin II, Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg (Germany); Djavidani, B.; Poschenrieder, F.; Feuerbach, S. [Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg (Germany); Schmid, C.; Kobuch, R. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Herz-, Thorax- und herznahe Gefaesschirurgie, Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg (Germany)

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: congenitally malformed aortic valves are a common finding in adults with aortic valve disease. Most of these patients have bicuspid aortic valve disease. Unicuspid aortic valve disease (UAV) is rare. The aim of our study was to describe valve morphology and the dimensions of the proximal aorta in a cohort of 12 patients with UAV in comparison to tricuspid aortic valve disease (TAV) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods/results: MRI studies were performed on a 1.5 T scanner in a total of 288 consecutive patients with aortic valve disease. 12 aortic valves were retrospectively classified as UAV. Annulus areas and dimensions of the thoracic aorta were retrospectively compared to a cohort of 103 patients with TAV. In UAV, valve morphology was unicuspid unicommissural with a posterior commissure in all patients. Mean annulus areas and mean diameters of the ascending aorta were significantly greater in UAV compared to TAV (12.6 {+-} 4.7 cm{sup 2} vs. 8.7 {+-} 2.3 cm{sup 2}, p < 0.01 and 4.6 {+-} 0.7 cm vs. 3.6 {+-} 0.5 cm, p < 0.0001, respectively), while no differences were observed in the mean diameters of the aortic arch (2.3 {+-} 0.6 cm vs. 2.3 {+-} 0.4 cm, p = 0.69). The diameters of the descending aorta were slightly smaller in UAV compared to TAV (2.2 {+-} 0.5 cm vs. 2.6 {+-} 0.3 cm, p < 0.05). (orig.)

  8. Radiotherapy-induced aortic valve disease associated with porcelain aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daitoku, Kazuyuki; Fukui, Kozo; Ichinoseki, Ikkoh; Munakata, Mamoru; Takahashi, Shoichi; Fukuda Ikuo

    2004-01-01

    Mediastinal irradiation has been reported to induce cardiac disease such as pericarditis, valvular dysfunction, conduction abnormalities, accelerated arteriosclerosis of the coronary arteries, and also calcifications of the ascending aorta. We herein describe a case of radiotherapy-induced porcelain aorta and aortic valve disease and their surgical treatment. The patient was diagnosed with myasthenia gravis (MG) in 1965 (Osserman's type II), and mediastinal irradiation was performed in 1970 for treatment of thymic tumor associated with MG. Thirty years after radiation therapy, complete atrioventricular block and aortic valve disease with severe calcification of the ascending aorta and aortic arch (porcelain aorta) were detected on echo cardiogram and cardiac catheterization. A permanent pacemaker was implanted via the left subclavian vein and aortic valve replacement was performed under extracorporeal circulation established by selective cerebral perfusion and balloon occlusion instead of aortic cross-clamping. As no risk factors of arteriosclerosis such as hypercholesterolemia, hyperglycemia and hypertension were apparent, we concluded that the aortic valve disease and porcelain aorta were primarily induced by radiotherapy. (author)

  9. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/007684.htm Transcatheter aortic valve replacement To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is surgery to replace the aortic valve. ...

  10. Aortic valve bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Jens T; Jensen, Maiken Brit; Arendrup, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In aortic valve bypass (AVB) a valve-containing conduit is connecting the apex of the left ventricle to the descending aorta. Candidates are patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis rejected for conventional aortic valve replacement (AVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). ...

  11. Clinical Implication of Aortic Wall Biopsy in Aortic Valve Disease with Bicuspid Valve Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Han Kim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although unique aortic pathology related to bicuspid aortic valve (BAV has been previously reported, clinical implications of BAV to aortopathy risk have yet to be investigated. We looked for potential differences in matrix protein expressions in the aortic wall in BAV patients. Methods: Aorta specimens were obtained from 31 patients: BAV group (n=27, tricuspid aortic valve (TAV group (n=4. The BAV group was categorized into three subgroups: left coronary sinus-right coronary sinus (R+L group; n=13, 42%, right coronary sinus-non-coronary sinus (R+N group; n=8, 26%, and anteroposterior (AP group; n=6, 19%. We analyzed the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9, and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP-2. Results: Based on the mean value of the control group, BAV group showed decreased expression of eNOS in 72.7% of patients, increased MMP-9 in 82.3%, and decreased TIMP in 79.2%. There was a higher tendency for aortopathy in the BAV group: eNOS (BAV:TAV= 53%±7%:57%±11%, MMP-9 (BAV:TAV=48%±10%:38%±1%. The AP group showed lower expression of eNOS than the fusion (R+L, R+N group did; 48%±5% vs. 55%±7% (p=0.081. Conclusion: Not all patients with BAV had expression of aortopathy; however, for patients who had a suspicious form of bicuspid valve, aortic wall biopsy could be valuable to signify the presence of aortopathy.

  12. Aortic valve prosthesis-patient mismatch and exercise capacity in adult patients with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Slooten, Ymkje J.; Melle, van Joost P.; Freling, Hendrik G.; Bouma, Berto J.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Jongbloed, Monique R. M.; Post, Martijn C.; Sieswerda, Gertjan T.; in 't Veld, Anna Huis; Ebels, Tjark; Voors, Adriaan A.; Pieper, Petronella G.

    Objectives To report the prevalence of aortic valve prosthesis patient mismatch (PPM) in an adult population with congenital heart disease (CHD) and its impact on exercise capacity. Adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) with a history of aortic valve replacement may outgrow their prosthesis

  13. Aortic valve prosthesis-patient mismatch and exercise capacity in adult patients with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Slooten, Ymkje J.; van Melle, Joost P.; Freling, Hendrik G.; Bouma, Berto J.; van Dijk, Arie Pj; Jongbloed, Monique Rm; Post, Martijn C.; Sieswerda, Gertjan T.; Huis In 't Veld, Anna; Ebels, Tjark; Voors, Adriaan A.; Pieper, Petronella G.

    2016-01-01

    To report the prevalence of aortic valve prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) in an adult population with congenital heart disease (CHD) and its impact on exercise capacity. Adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) with a history of aortic valve replacement may outgrow their prosthesis later in

  14. The changing course of aortic valve disease in Scotland: temporal trends in hospitalizations and mortality and prognostic importance of aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Colin; Lloyd, Suzanne M; Wang, Yanzhong; Macdonald, Alyson; Ford, Ian

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the contemporary clinical course of aortic valve disease types. We performed a retrospective population-level epidemiological study of hospitalized care in Scotland from 1 January 1997 to 31 December 2005 using electronic case identification of hospital admissions and deaths. Time-to-event analyses were performed using Cox Proportional-Hazards models. A total of 19 733 adults with an index hospitalization and a final diagnosis of non-congenital aortic valve disease were identified. Aortic stenosis, aortic insufficiency, mixed aortic valve disease, or unspecified aortic valve disease occurred in 13 220 (67.0%), 2807 (14.2%), 699 (3.5%), and 3007 (15.2%), individuals, respectively. The majority of hospitalizations occurred in elderly persons aged 80 and older. In total, 9981 (50.6%) patients had died by 31 December 2006. When compared with aortic stenosis, the risk of death was less with aortic insufficiency [hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) 0.79 (0.74, 0.84)] and mixed aortic valve disease [0.83 (0.74, 0.93)]. Female gender, admission year, and hypertension were associated with lower mortality in patients with aortic stenosis. Patients with aortic stenosis had increased risk of death or heart failure (adjusted P valve replacement of whom 73.2% had aortic stenosis, 11.9% aortic valve disease (unspecified),10.0% aortic insufficiency, and 4.9% aortic stenosis with insufficiency. Patients with aortic stenosis with insufficiency had increased likelihood of aortic valve replacement [1.19 (1.02, 1.38)]. Age, female gender, and co-morbidity reduced the likelihood of aortic valve replacement. The incidence of aortic valve stenosis has substantially increased in Scotland in recent years. Aortic stenosis predicts morbidity and mortality when compared with other types of aortic valve disease.

  15. Aortic valve surgery - open

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/007408.htm Aortic valve surgery - open To use the sharing features on this page, ... separates the heart and aorta. The aortic valve opens so blood can flow out. It then closes ...

  16. Outcome of pregnancy in women after pulmonary autograft valve replacement for congenital aortic valve disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yap, Sing-Chien; Drenthen, Willem; Pieper, Petronella G.; Moons, Philip; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Klieverik, Loes M.; Vliegen, Hubert W.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Meijboom, Folkert J.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.

    Background and aim of the study: The pulmonary autograft has been recommended as the valve of choice for aortic valve replacement (AVR) in young women contemplating pregnancy. However, current information on maternal and perinatal outcome of pregnancy in women with pulmonary autograft valve

  17. Outcome of pregnancy in women after pulmonary autograft valve replacement for congenital aortic valve disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yap, Sing-Chien; Drenthen, Willem; Pieper, Petronella G.; Moons, Philip; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Klieverik, Loes M.; Vliegen, Hubert W.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Meijboom, Folkert J.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.

    2007-01-01

    Background and aim of the study: The pulmonary autograft has been recommended as the valve of choice for aortic valve replacement (AVR) in young women contemplating pregnancy. However, current information on maternal and perinatal outcome of pregnancy in women with pulmonary autograft valve

  18. Outcome of pregnancy in women after pulmonary autograft valve replacement for congenital aortic valve disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yap, S.C.; Drenthen, W.; Pieper, P.G.; Moons, P.; Mulder, B.J.M.; Klieverik, L.M.; Vliegen, H.W.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Meijboom, F.J.; Roos-Hesselink, J.W.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY: The pulmonary autograft has been recommended as the valve of choice for aortic valve replacement (AVR) in young women contemplating pregnancy. However, current information on maternal and perinatal outcome of pregnancy in women with pulmonary autograft valve

  19. Toll-Like Receptors, Inflammation, and Calcific Aortic Valve Disease

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    Carmen García-Rodríguez

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation, the primary response of innate immunity, is essential to initiate the calcification process underlying calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD, the most prevalent valvulopathy in Western countries. The pathogenesis of CAVD is multifactorial and includes inflammation, hemodynamic factors, fibrosis, and active calcification. In the development of CAVD, both innate and adaptive immune responses are activated, and accumulating evidences show the central role of inflammation in the initiation and propagation phases of the disease, being the function of Toll-like receptors (TLR particularly relevant. These receptors act as sentinels of the innate immune system by recognizing pattern molecules from both pathogens and host-derived molecules released after tissue damage. TLR mediate inflammation via NF-κB routes within and beyond the immune system, and play a crucial role in the control of infection and the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. This review outlines the current notions about the association between TLR signaling and the ensuing development of inflammation and fibrocalcific remodeling in the pathogenesis of CAVD. Recent data provide new insights into the inflammatory and osteogenic responses underlying the disease and further support the hypothesis that inflammation plays a mechanistic role in the initiation and progression of CAVD. These findings make TLR signaling a potential target for therapeutic intervention in CAVD.

  20. Aortic valve replacement and the stentless Freedom SOLO valve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wollersheim, L.W.L.M.

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis has become the most prevalent valvular heart disease in Europe and North America, and is generally caused by age-related calcification of the aortic valve. For most patients, severe symptomatic aortic stenosis needs effective mechanical relief in the form of valve replacement

  1. Aortic Valve Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most cases, doctors don't know why a heart valve fails to develop properly, so it isn't something you could have prevented. Calcium buildup on the valve. With age, heart valves may accumulate deposits of calcium (aortic valve ...

  2. The thoracic aortography by Gd-DTPA enhanced ultrafast cine MR imaging. Assessment of thoracic aortic dilatation in aging and in patients with hypertension and aortic valve disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Kentaro; Nakase, Emiko; Kawai, Ichiyoshi; Saito, Takayuki; Kikkawa, Nobutada; Haiyama, Toru

    1995-01-01

    To assess the morphology of thoracic aorta, we had a trial of Gd-DTPA enhanced ultrafast cine MR imaging on the thoracic aorta. This method was provided with high quality thoracic aortogram during 15-20 seconds. In patients without hypertension and aortic valve disease, dimensions of ascending aorta and aortic arch were significantly correlated with aging. In patients with hypertension, dimensions of ascending aorta and aortic arch were significantly dilated. In patients with aortic valve disease, thoracic aorta was diffusely enlarged, especially in ascending aorta. Gd-DTPA enhanced ultrafact cine MR imaging was useful to assess the thoracic aortic anatomy and diseases. (author)

  3. Age-related changes in aortic 3D blood flow velocities and wall shear stress: Implications for the identification of altered hemodynamics in patients with aortic valve disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooij, Pim; Garcia, Julio; Potters, Wouter V.; Malaisrie, S. Chris; Collins, Jeremy D.; Carr, James C.; Markl, Michael; Barker, Alex J.

    2016-01-01

    To investigate age-related changes in peak systolic aortic 3D velocity and wall shear stress (WSS) in healthy controls and to investigate the importance of age-matching for 3D mapping of abnormal aortic hemodynamics in bicuspid aortic valve disease (BAV). 4D flow MRI (fields strengths = 1.5-3T;

  4. Interaction of renal failure and dyslipidaemia in the development of calcific aortic valve disease in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Kris; Roosens, Bram; Bala, Gezim; Remory, Isabel; Hernot, Sophie; Delvenne, Philippe; Mestrez, Fabienne; Droogmans, Steven; Cosyns, Bernard

    2017-10-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is currently the most common heart valve disease worldwide and is known to be an active process. Both renal failure and dyslipidaemia are considered to be promoting factors for the development of valvular calcifications. The aim of this study is to prospectively evaluate the respective contribution and interaction of renal failure and dyslipidaemia on CAVD in a rat model, using echocardiography and compared with histology. Sixty-eight male Wistar rats were prospectively divided in eight groups, each fed a different diet to induce renal failure alone and combined with hyperlipidaemia or hypercholesterolemia. CAVD was detected and quantified by calibrated integrated backscatter of ultrasound (cIB) and compared with the histological calcium score. The study follow-up was 20 weeks. At the end of the study, the cIB value and the calcium score of the aortic valve were significantly increased in the group with isolated renal failure but not with dyslipidaemia. The combination of renal failure with high cholesterol or high-fat diet did not significantly increase calcifications further. Renal failure alone does induce aortic valve calcifications in a rat model of CAVD, whereas dyslipidaemia alone does not. The combination of renal failure with dyslipidaemia does not increase calcification further. These findings suggest that a combination of atherosclerotic and calcifying factors is not required to induce aortic valve calcifications in this model.

  5. Calcific Aortic Valve Disease Is Associated with Layer-Specific Alterations in Collagen Architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather N Hutson

    Full Text Available Disorganization of the valve extracellular matrix (ECM is a hallmark of calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD. However, while microarchitectural features of the ECM can strongly influence the biological and mechanical behavior of tissues, little is known about the ECM microarchitecture in CAVD. In this work, we apply advanced imaging techniques to quantify spatially heterogeneous changes in collagen microarchitecture in CAVD. Human aortic valves were obtained from individuals between 50 and 75 years old with no evidence of valvular disease (healthy and individuals who underwent valve replacement surgery due to severe stenosis (diseased. Second Harmonic Generation microscopy and subsequent image quantification revealed layer-specific changes in fiber characteristics in healthy and diseased valves. Specifically, the majority of collagen fiber changes in CAVD were found to occur in the spongiosa, where collagen fiber number increased by over 2-fold, and fiber width and density also significantly increased. Relatively few fibrillar changes occurred in the fibrosa in CAVD, where fibers became significantly shorter, but did not otherwise change in terms of number, width, density, or alignment. Immunohistochemical staining for lysyl oxidase showed localized increased expression in the diseased fibrosa. These findings reveal a more complex picture of valvular collagen enrichment and arrangement in CAVD than has previously been described using traditional analysis methods. Changes in fiber architecture may play a role in regulating the pathobiological events and mechanical properties of valves during CAVD. Additionally, characterization of the ECM microarchitecture can inform the design of fibrous scaffolds for heart valve tissue engineering.

  6. Surgery for Young Adults With Aortic Valve Disease not Amenable to Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Zakkar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Aortic valve replacement is the gold standard for the management of patients with severe aortic stenosis or mixed pathology that is not amenable to repair according to currently available guidelines. Such a simplified approach may be suitable for many patients, but it is far from ideal for young adults considering emerging evidence demonstrating that conventional valve replacement in this cohort of patients is associated with inferior long-term survival when compared to the general population. Moreover; the utilisation of mechanical and bioprosthetic valves can significantly impact on quality and is linked to increased rates of morbidities. Other available options such as stentless valve, homografts, valve reconstruction and Ross operation can be an appealing alternative to conventional valve replacement. Young patients should be fully informed about all the options available - shared decision making is now part of modern informed consent. This can be achieved when referring physicians have a better understanding of the short and long term outcomes associated with every intervention, in terms of survival and quality of life. This review presents up to date evidence for available surgical options for young adults with aortic stenosis and mixed disease not amenable to repair.

  7. Surgery for Young Adults With Aortic Valve Disease not Amenable to Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakkar, Mustafa; Bruno, Vito Domanico; Visan, Alexandru Ciprian; Curtis, Stephanie; Angelini, Gianni; Lansac, Emmanuel; Stoica, Serban

    2018-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement is the gold standard for the management of patients with severe aortic stenosis or mixed pathology that is not amenable to repair according to currently available guidelines. Such a simplified approach may be suitable for many patients, but it is far from ideal for young adults considering emerging evidence demonstrating that conventional valve replacement in this cohort of patients is associated with inferior long-term survival when compared to the general population. Moreover; the utilisation of mechanical and bioprosthetic valves can significantly impact on quality and is linked to increased rates of morbidities. Other available options such as stentless valve, homografts, valve reconstruction and Ross operation can be an appealing alternative to conventional valve replacement. Young patients should be fully informed about all the options available - shared decision making is now part of modern informed consent. This can be achieved when referring physicians have a better understanding of the short and long term outcomes associated with every intervention, in terms of survival and quality of life. This review presents up to date evidence for available surgical options for young adults with aortic stenosis and mixed disease not amenable to repair.

  8. Cardiac Hemodynamics in the Pathogenesis of Congenital Heart Disease and Aortic Valve Calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Vishal

    2011-11-01

    An improved understanding of the roles of hemodynamic forces play in cardiac development and the pathogenesis of cardiac disease will have significant scientific and clinical impact. I will focus on the role of fluid dynamics in congenital heart disease and aortic valve calcification. Congenital heart defects are the most common form of birth defect. Aortic valve calcification/stenosis is the third leading cause of adult heart disease and the most common form of acquired valvular disease in developed countries. Given the high incidence of these diseases and their associated morbidity and mortality, the potential translational impact of an improved understanding of cardiac hemodynamic forces is very large. Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego

  9. Aortic valve prosthesis-patient mismatch and exercise capacity in adult patients with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Slooten, Ymkje J; van Melle, Joost P; Freling, Hendrik G; Bouma, Berto J; van Dijk, Arie Pj; Jongbloed, Monique Rm; Post, Martijn C; Sieswerda, Gertjan T; Huis In 't Veld, Anna; Ebels, Tjark; Voors, Adriaan A; Pieper, Petronella G

    2016-01-01

    To report the prevalence of aortic valve prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) in an adult population with congenital heart disease (CHD) and its impact on exercise capacity. Adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) with a history of aortic valve replacement may outgrow their prosthesis later in life. However, the prevalence and clinical consequences of aortic PPM in ACHD are presently unknown. From the national Dutch Congenital Corvitia (CONCOR) registry, we identified 207 ACHD with an aortic valve prosthesis for this cross-sectional cohort study. Severe PPM was defined as an indexed effective orifice area ≤0.65 cm2/m2 and moderate PPM as an indexed orifice area ≤0.85 cm2/m2 measured using echocardiography. Exercise capacity was reported as percentage of predicted exercise capacity (PPEC). Of the 207 patients, 68% was male, 71% had a mechanical prosthesis and mean age at inclusion was 43.9 years ±11.4. The prevalence of PPM was 42%, comprising 23% severe PPM and 19% moderate PPM. Prevalence of PPM was higher in patients with mechanical prostheses (pHeart Association (NYHA) class remained stable in most patients. PPM showed no significant effect on death or hospitalisation during follow-up (p=0.218). In this study we report a high prevalence (42%) of PPM in ACHD with an aortic valve prosthesis and an independent association of PPM with diminished exercise capacity. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Left ventricular function in patients with ventricular arrhythmias and aortic valve disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santinga, J.T.; Kirsh, M.M.; Brady, T.J.; Thrall, J.; Pitt, B.

    1983-01-01

    Forty patients having aortic valve replacement were evaluated preoperatively for ventricular arrhythmia and left ventricular ejection fraction. Arrhythmias were classified as complex or simple using the Lown criteria on the 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiogram; ejection fractions were determined by radionuclide gated blood pool analysis and contrast angiography. The ejection fractions determined by radionuclide angiography were 59.1 +/- 13.1% for 26 patients with simple or no ventricular arrhythmias, and 43.9 +/- 20.3% for 14 patients with complex ventricular arrhythmias (p less than 0.01). Ejection fractions determined by angiography, available for 31 patients, were also lower in patients with complex ventricular arrhythmias (61.1 +/- 16.3% versus 51.4 +/- 13.4%; p less than 0.05). Seven of 9 patients showing conduction abnormalities on the electrocardiogram had complex ventricular arrhythmias. Eight of 20 patients with aortic stenosis had complex ventricular arrhythmias, while 2 of 13 patients with aortic insufficiency had such arrhythmias. It is concluded that decreased left ventricular ejection fraction, intraventricular conduction abnormalities, and aortic stenosis are associated with an increased frequency of complex ventricular arrhythmias in patients with aortic valve disease

  11. Statins for aortic valve stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Thiago

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Aortic valve stenosis is the most common type of valvular heart disease in the USA and Europe. Aortic valve stenosis is considered similar to atherosclerotic disease. Some studies have evaluated statins for aortic valve stenosis. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of statins in aortic valve stenosis. METHODS: Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS - IBECS, Web of Science and CINAHL Plus. These databases were searched from their inception to 24 November 2015. We also searched trials in registers for ongoing trials. We used no language restrictions. Selection criteria: Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs comparing statins alone or in association with other systemic drugs to reduce cholesterol levels versus placebo or usual care. Data collection and analysis: Primary outcomes were severity of aortic valve stenosis (evaluated by echocardiographic criteria: mean pressure gradient, valve area and aortic jet velocity, freedom from valve replacement and death from cardiovascular cause. Secondary outcomes were hospitalization for any reason, overall mortality, adverse events and patient quality of life. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. The GRADE methodology was employed to assess the quality of result findings and the GRADE profiler (GRADEPRO was used to import data from Review Manager 5.3 to create a 'Summary of findings' table. MAIN RESULTS: We included four RCTs with 2360 participants comparing statins (1185 participants with placebo (1175 participants. We found low-quality evidence for our primary outcome of severity of aortic valve stenosis, evaluated by mean pressure gradient (mean difference (MD -0.54, 95% confidence interval (CI -1.88 to 0.80; participants = 1935; studies = 2, valve area (MD -0.07, 95% CI -0.28 to 0.14; participants = 127; studies = 2

  12. Statins for aortic valve stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiago, Luciana; Tsuji, Selma Rumiko; Nyong, Jonathan; Puga, Maria Eduarda Dos Santos; Góis, Aécio Flávio Teixeira de; Macedo, Cristiane Rufino; Valente, Orsine; Atallah, Álvaro Nagib

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is the most common type of valvular heart disease in the USA and Europe. Aortic valve stenosis is considered similar to atherosclerotic disease. Some studies have evaluated statins for aortic valve stenosis. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of statins in aortic valve stenosis. Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS - IBECS, Web of Science and CINAHL Plus. These databases were searched from their inception to 24 November 2015. We also searched trials in registers for ongoing trials. We used no language restrictions.Selection criteria: Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) comparing statins alone or in association with other systemic drugs to reduce cholesterol levels versus placebo or usual care. Data collection and analysis: Primary outcomes were severity of aortic valve stenosis (evaluated by echocardiographic criteria: mean pressure gradient, valve area and aortic jet velocity), freedom from valve replacement and death from cardiovascular cause. Secondary outcomes were hospitalization for any reason, overall mortality, adverse events and patient quality of life.Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. The GRADE methodology was employed to assess the quality of result findings and the GRADE profiler (GRADEPRO) was used to import data from Review Manager 5.3 to create a 'Summary of findings' table. We included four RCTs with 2360 participants comparing statins (1185 participants) with placebo (1175 participants). We found low-quality evidence for our primary outcome of severity of aortic valve stenosis, evaluated by mean pressure gradient (mean difference (MD) -0.54, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.88 to 0.80; participants = 1935; studies = 2), valve area (MD -0.07, 95% CI -0.28 to 0.14; participants = 127; studies = 2), and aortic jet velocity (MD -0.06, 95% CI -0.26 to 0

  13. Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood. There are 4 valves in the heart: tricuspid, pulmonary, mitral, and aortic. Two types of problems can disrupt blood flow through the valves: regurgitation or stenosis. Regurgitation is also called insufficiency or incompetence. Regurgitation happens when a valve doesn’ ...

  14. Aortic or Mitral Valve Replacement With the Biocor and Biocor Supra

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-26

    Aortic Valve Insufficiency; Aortic Valve Regurgitation; Aortic Valve Stenosis; Aortic Valve Incompetence; Mitral Valve Insufficiency; Mitral Valve Regurgitation; Mitral Valve Stenosis; Mitral Valve Incompetence

  15. Cellular Changes during Renal Failure-Induced Inflammatory Aortic Valve Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mony Shuvy

    Full Text Available Aortic valve calcification (AVC secondary to renal failure (RF is an inflammation-regulated process, but its pathogenesis remains unknown. We sought to assess the cellular processes that are involved in the early phases of aortic valve disease using a unique animal model of RF-associated AVC.Aortic valves were obtained from rats that were fed a uremia-inducing diet exclusively for 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 weeks as well as from controls. Pathological examination of the valves included histological characterization, von Kossa staining, and antigen expression analyses.After 2 weeks, we noted a significant increase in urea and creatinine levels, reflecting RF. RF parameters exacerbated until the Week 5 and plateaued. Whereas no histological changes or calcification was observed in the valves of any study group, macrophage accumulation became apparent as early as 2 weeks after the diet was started and rose after 3 weeks. By western blot, osteoblast markers were expressed after 2 weeks on the diet and decreased after 6 weeks. Collagen 3 was up-regulated after 3 weeks, plateauing at 4 weeks, whereas collagen 1 levels peaked at 2 and 4 weeks. Fibronectin levels increased gradually until Week 5 and decreased at 6 weeks. We observed early activation of the ERK pathway, whereas other pathways remained unchanged.We concluded that RF induces dramatic changes at the cellular level, including macrophage accumulation, activation of cell signaling pathway and extracellular matrix modification. These changes precede valve calcification and may increase propensity for calcification, and have to be investigated further.

  16. Aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Athanasiou, Thanos; Mestres, Carlos A

    2008-01-01

    mortality were collected. Group analysis by patient geographic distribution and by annular diameter of the prosthesis utilized was conducted. Patients with a manufacturer's labeled prosthesis size > or = 21 mm were assigned to the 'large' aortic size subset, while those with a prosthesis size ... differences in the distribution of either gender or BSA. In the multivariable model, south European patients were seven times more likely to receive a smaller-sized aortic valve (OR = 6.5, 95% CI = 4.82-8.83, p

  17. The nordic aortic valve intervention (NOTION) trial comparing transcatheter versus surgical valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Søndergaard, Lars; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2013-01-01

    Degenerative aortic valve (AV) stenosis is the most prevalent heart valve disease in the western world. Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) has until recently been the standard of treatment for patients with severe AV stenosis. Whether transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) can...

  18. Exploratory assessment of left ventricular strain–volume loops in severe aortic valve diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulshof, Hugo G.; van Dijk, Arie P.; George, Keith P.; Hopman, Maria T. E.; Thijssen, Dick H. J.

    2017-01-01

    Key points Severe aortic valve diseases are common cardiac abnormalities that are associated with poor long‐term survival.Before any reduction in left ventricular (LV) function, the left ventricle undergoes structural remodelling under the influence of changing haemodynamic conditions.In this study, we combined temporal changes in LV structure (volume) with alterations in LV functional characteristics (strain, ԑ) into a ԑ–volume loop, in order to provide novel insight into the haemodynamic cardiac consequences of aortic valve diseases in those with preserved LV ejection fraction.We showed that our novel ԑ–volume loop and the specific loop characteristics provide additional insight into the functional and mechanical haemodynamic consequences of severe aortic valve diseases (with preserved LV ejection fraction).Finally, we showed that the ԑ–volume loop characteristics provide discriminative capacity compared with conventional measures of LV function. Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine left ventricular (LV) strain (ԑ)–volume loops to provide novel insight into the haemodynamic cardiac consequences of aortic valve stenosis (AS) and aortic valve regurgitation (AR). Twenty‐seven participants were retrospectively recruited: AR (n = 7), AS (n = 10) and control subjects (n = 10). Standard transthoracic echocardiography was used to obtain apical four‐chamber images to construct ԑ–volume relationships, which were assessed using the following parameters: early systolic ԑ (ԑ_ES); slope of ԑ–volume relationship during systole (Sslope); end‐systolic peak ԑ (peak ԑ); and diastolic uncoupling (systolic ԑ–diastolic ԑ at same volume) during early diastole (UNCOUP_ED) and late diastole (UNCOUP_LD). Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to determine the ability to detect impaired LV function. Although LV ejection fraction was comparable between groups, longitudinal peak ԑ was reduced compared with control subjects

  19. Exploratory assessment of left ventricular strain-volume loops in severe aortic valve diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulshof, Hugo G; van Dijk, Arie P; George, Keith P; Hopman, Maria T E; Thijssen, Dick H J; Oxborough, David L

    2017-06-15

    Severe aortic valve diseases are common cardiac abnormalities that are associated with poor long-term survival. Before any reduction in left ventricular (LV) function, the left ventricle undergoes structural remodelling under the influence of changing haemodynamic conditions. In this study, we combined temporal changes in LV structure (volume) with alterations in LV functional characteristics (strain, ԑ) into a ԑ-volume loop, in order to provide novel insight into the haemodynamic cardiac consequences of aortic valve diseases in those with preserved LV ejection fraction. We showed that our novel ԑ-volume loop and the specific loop characteristics provide additional insight into the functional and mechanical haemodynamic consequences of severe aortic valve diseases (with preserved LV ejection fraction). Finally, we showed that the ԑ-volume loop characteristics provide discriminative capacity compared with conventional measures of LV function. The purpose of this study was to examine left ventricular (LV) strain (ԑ)-volume loops to provide novel insight into the haemodynamic cardiac consequences of aortic valve stenosis (AS) and aortic valve regurgitation (AR). Twenty-seven participants were retrospectively recruited: AR (n = 7), AS (n = 10) and control subjects (n = 10). Standard transthoracic echocardiography was used to obtain apical four-chamber images to construct ԑ-volume relationships, which were assessed using the following parameters: early systolic ԑ (ԑ_ES); slope of ԑ-volume relationship during systole (Sslope); end-systolic peak ԑ (peak ԑ); and diastolic uncoupling (systolic ԑ-diastolic ԑ at same volume) during early diastole (UNCOUP_ED) and late diastole (UNCOUP_LD). Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to determine the ability to detect impaired LV function. Although LV ejection fraction was comparable between groups, longitudinal peak ԑ was reduced compared with control subjects. In contrast, ԑ_ES and Sslope were

  20. Triple leaflet perforation due to endocarditis in aortic valve complicated by pneumonia and exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elton Soydan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Valve perforation complicating infective endocarditis has been for decades a bad sign leading to severe valve destruction, intractable heart failure and even death if surgical therapy is not administered in time. Here we present a 57 years old male patient inadvertently diagnosed with pneumonia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation in another hospital. After 20 days of broad spectrum antibiotics and bronchodilator therapy no improvement was achieved. During examination a severe aortic regurgitation was recognized. Immediately after, patient was transferred to our hospital for aortic valve surgery evaluation. Transthorasic echocardiography (TTE showed a severe aortic regurgitation and vegetation like echogenicity over the noncoronary leaflet. An aortic valve replacement surgical therapy was decided. During the aortic valve excision underneath the vegetations, multiple small perforations in all the three leaflets were noticed. The destructed valve was excised and a mechanical aortic prosthesis (St Jude No: 23, MN, USA was successfully replaced. After 14 days of treatment patient was healthily discharged.

  1. Bicuspid aortic valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aortic disease. In: Otto CM, Bonow RO, eds. Valvular Heart Disease: A Companion to Braunwald’s Heart Disease . 4th ed. ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 13. Carabello BA. Valvular heart disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman’s Cecil ...

  2. Contemporary results of aortic valve repair for congenital disease: lessons for management and staged strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergnat, Mathieu; Asfour, Boulos; Arenz, Claudia; Suchowerskyj, Philipp; Bierbach, Benjamin; Schindler, Ehrenfried; Schneider, Martin; Hraska, Victor

    2017-09-01

    Any aortic valve (AoV) operation in children (repair, Ross or mechanical replacement) is a palliation and reinterventions are frequent. AoV repair is a temporary solution primarily aimed at allowing the patient to grow to an age when more definitive solutions are available. We retrospectively analysed AoV repair effectiveness across the whole age spectrum of children, excluding neonates and AoV disease secondary to congenital heart disease. From 2003 to 2015, 193 consecutive patients were included. The mean age was 9.2 ± 6.9 years (22% disease. The procedures performed were commissurotomy shaving (n = 74; 38%), leaflet replacement (n = 78; 40%), leaflet extension (n = 21; 11%) and neocommissure creation (n = 21; 11%). Post-repair geometry was tricuspid in 137 (71%) patients. The 10-year survival rate was 97.1%. Freedom from reoperation and replacement at 7 years was, respectively, 57% (95% confidence interval, 47-66) and 68% (95% confidence interval, 59-76). In multivariate analysis, balloon dilatation before 6 months, the absence of a developed commissure, a non-tricuspid post-repair geometry and cross-clamp duration were predictors for reoperation and replacement. After a mean follow-up period of 5.1 ± 3.0 years, 145 (75%) patients had a preserved native valve, with undisturbed valve function (peak gradient <40 mmHg, regurgitation ≤mild) in 113 (58%). Aortic valve repair in children is safe and effective in delaying the timing for more definitive solution. Surgical strategy should be individualized according to the age of the patient. Avoidance of early balloon dilatation and aiming for a tricuspid post-repair arrangement may improve outcomes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  3. Surgery for Young Adults With Aortic Valve Disease not Amenable to Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Zakkar; Mustafa Zakkar; Vito Domanico Bruno; Alexandru Ciprian Visan; Stephanie Curtis; Gianni Angelini; Emmanuel Lansac; Serban Stoica

    2018-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement is the gold standard for the management of patients with severe aortic stenosis or mixed pathology that is not amenable to repair according to currently available guidelines. Such a simplified approach may be suitable for many patients, but it is far from ideal for young adults considering emerging evidence demonstrating that conventional valve replacement in this cohort of patients is associated with inferior long-term survival when compared to the general population...

  4. Association of Aortic Valve Sclerosis with Previous Coronary Artery Disease and Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Carvalho Marmelo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aortic valve sclerosis (AVS is characterized by increased thickness, calcification and stiffness of the aortic leaflets without fusion of the commissures. Several studies show an association between AVS and presence of coronary artery disease. Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate the association between presence of AVS with occurrence of previous coronary artery disease and classical risk factors. Methods: The sample was composed of 2,493 individuals who underwent transthoracic echocardiography between August 2011 and December 2012. The mean age of the cohort was 67.5 ± 15.9 years, and 50.7% were female. Results: The most frequent clinical indication for Doppler echocardiography was the presence of stroke (28.8%, and the most common risk factor was hypertension (60.8%. The most prevalent pathological findings on Doppler echocardiography were mitral valve sclerosis (37.1% and AVS (36.7%. There was a statistically significant association between AVS with hypertension (p < 0.001, myocardial infarction (p = 0.007, diabetes (p = 0.006 and compromised left ventricular systolic function (p < 0.001. Conclusion: Patients with AVS have higher prevalences of hypertension, stroke, hypercholesterolemia, myocardial infarction, diabetes and compromised left ventricular systolic function when compared with patients without AVS. We conclude that there is an association between presence of AVS with previous coronary artery disease and classical risk factors.

  5. The changing course of aortic valve disease in Scotland:temporal trends in hospitalizations and mortality and prognostic importance of aortic stenosis

    OpenAIRE

    Berry, Colin; Lloyd, Suzanne M; Wang, Yanzhong; Macdonald, Alyson; Ford, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the contemporary clinical course of aortic valve disease types.Methods and results: We performed a retrospective population-level epidemiological study of hospitalized care in Scotland from 1 January 1997 to 31 December 2005 using electronic case identification of hospital admissions and deaths. Time-to-event analyses were performed using Cox Proportional-Hazards models. A total of 19 733 adults with an index hospitalization and a final diagnosis of non-congenital aortic ...

  6. Role of diastolic function indices in the risk stratification of patients with mixed aortic valve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbe, Alexander C; Khan, Arooj R; Boler, Amber; Said, Sameh M; Geske, Jeffrey B; Miranda, William R; Akintoye, Emmanuel; Connolly, Heidi M; Warnes, Carole A; Oh, Jae K

    2018-06-01

    Determine the role of diastolic function indices in pre-operative and post-operative risk stratification in patients with moderate mixed aortic valve disease (MAVD). A retrospective study was conducted of asymptomatic patients with moderate MAVD (a combination of moderate aortic stenosis and moderate aortic regurgitation) and an ejection fraction of 50% or more who were followed up at Mayo Clinic from 1 January 2004, to 31 December 2013. A pre-requisite for inclusion in the study was assessment of diastolic function involving at least three of the following indices: tissue Doppler early diastolic velocity (e'), mitral inflow early velocity (E), tricuspid regurgitation velocity, and left atrial volume index. Primary endpoints were aortic valve replacement (AVR) or cardiac death while secondary endpoints were cardiovascular adverse events (CAEs) after AVR. We defined CAEs as stroke, heart failure hospitalization, severe left ventricular dysfunction, and cardiac death. There were 214 patients (age 61 ± 8 years, men 146 [68%]) followed for 6.1 ± 2.3 years during which 162 (76%) AVRs and 11 (5%) cardiac deaths occurred. The multivariable risk factors for cardiac death or AVR were relative wall thickness (RWT) > 0.42 [hazard ratio (HR), 1.88 [95% CI, 1.28-2.59]; P = 0.001] and average E/e' >14 (HR, 1.94 [95% CI, 1.29-3.01]; P = 0.02). Freedom from CAE after AVR was significantly lower in the patients with baseline RWT >0.42 or mean E/e' >14 than the other patients: 79% (95% CI 74-83%) vs. 94% (95% CI 89-98%) at 3 years (P = 0.03). The presence of RWT >0.42 or E/e' >14 identifies a high-risk patient subset whose risk for cardiovascular morbidities persists even after AVR.

  7. Oxidized Phospholipids and Risk of Calcific Aortic Valve Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, Pia R.; Hung, Ming Yow; Witztum, Joseph L.

    2017-01-01

    -control study was performed within the Copenhagen General Population Study (n=87 980), including 725 CAVD cases (1977-2013) and 1413 controls free of cardiovascular disease. OxPL carried by apoB (apolipoprotein B-100; OxPL-apoB) or apolipoprotein(a) (OxPL-apo(a)) containing lipoproteins, lipoprotein(a) levels......, LPA kringle IV type 2 repeat, and rs10455872 genetic variants were measured. OxPL-apoB and OxPL-apo(a) levels correlated with lipoprotein(a) levels among cases (r=0.75 and r=0.95; both Plevels associated with risk of CAVD with odds.......001). Corresponding odds ratios for OxPL-apo(a) were 1.2 (95% CI, 1.0-1.5), 1.2(95% CI, 0.9-1.6), 2.1(95% CI, 1.4-3.1), and 2.9(95% CI, 1.9-4.5; trend, Pa) levels and explained 34%, 46%, and 39...

  8. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foghsgaard, Signe; Schmidt, Thomas Andersen; Kjaergard, Henrik K

    2009-01-01

    In this descriptive prospective study, we evaluate the outcomes of surgery in 98 patients who were scheduled to undergo minimally invasive aortic valve replacement. These patients were compared with a group of 50 patients who underwent scheduled aortic valve replacement through a full sternotomy...... operations were completed as mini-sternotomies, 4 died later of noncardiac causes. The aortic cross-clamp and perfusion times were significantly different across all groups (P replacement...... is an excellent operation in selected patients, but its true advantages over conventional aortic valve replacement (other than a smaller scar) await evaluation by means of randomized clinical trial. The "extended mini-aortic valve replacement" operation, on the other hand, is a risky procedure that should...

  9. Aortic Annular Enlargement during Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selman Dumani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the surgery of aortic valve replacement is always attempted, as much as possible, to implant the larger prosthesis with the mains goals to enhance the potential benefits, to minimise transvalvular gradient, decrease left ventricular size and avoid the phenomenon of patient-prosthesis mismatch. Implantation of an ideal prosthesis often it is not possible, due to a small aortic annulus. A variety of aortic annulus enlargement techniques is reported to avoid patient-prosthesis mismatch. We present the case that has submitted four three times open heart surgery. We used Manouguian technique to enlarge aortic anulus with excellent results during the fourth time of surgery.

  10. Transcatheter, valve-in-valve transapical aortic and mitral valve implantation, in a high risk patient with aortic and mitral prosthetic valve stenoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter valve implantation continues to grow worldwide and has been used principally for the nonsurgical management of native aortic valvular disease-as a potentially less invasive method of valve replacement in high-risk and inoperable patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. Given the burden of valvular heart disease in the general population and the increasing numbers of patients who have had previous valve operations, we are now seeing a growing number of high-risk patients presenting with prosthetic valve stenosis, who are not potential surgical candidates. For this high-risk subset transcatheter valve delivery may be the only option. Here, we present an inoperable patient with severe, prosthetic valve aortic and mitral stenosis who was successfully treated with a trans catheter based approach, with a valve-in-valve implantation procedure of both aortic and mitral valves.

  11. Double Valve Replacement (Mitral and Aortic for Rheumatic Heart Disease: A 20-year experience with 300 patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Mishra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rheumatic heart disease still remains one of the leading causes of congestive heart failure and death owing to valvular pathologies, in developing countries. Valve replacement still remains the treatment of choice in such patients.The aim of this study wasto analyze the postoperative outcome of  double valve replacement (Mitral and Aortic in patients of rheumatic heart disease. Materials and Methods: Between 1988 and 2008, 300 patients of rheumatic heart disease underwent double (Mitral and Aortic valve replacement with Starr Edwards valve or St Jude mechanical valve prosthesis were implanted. These patients were studied retrospectively for preoperative data and postoperative outcome including causes of early and late deaths and the data was analyzed statistically. Results: The 30-day hospital death rate was 11.3% andlate death occurred in 11.6%. Anticoagulant regimen was followed to maintain the target pro-thrombin time at 1.5 times the control value. The actuarial survival (exclusive of hospital mortality was 92.4%, 84.6%, and 84.4%, per year at 5, 10, and 20 years, respectively Conclusions: In view of the acknowledged advantageof superior durability, increased thromboresistance in our patient population, and its cost effectiveness the Starr-Edwards ball valve or St. Jude valve is the mechanical prosthesis of choice for advanced combined valvular disease. The low-intensity anticoagulant regimen has offered suffcient protection against thromboembolism as well as hemorrhage.

  12. Correction of moderate secondary mitral regurgitation due to aortic valve disease: immediate results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. М. Назаров

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the impact of surgical strategy in concomitant mitral valve surgery or isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR in patients with moderate secondary mitral regurgitation (MR, 1 574 patients underwent AVR over a period from January 2003 to December 2011. 241 patients had secondary MR 2+ and constituted the study population. Patients were stratified into two groups, those without concomitant mitral valve surgery (Group A, n = 113 and with it (Group B, n = 128. It was found out that AVR plastic correction of MI reduces its recurrence during short-term follow-up but increases the intervention time leading to an insignificant rise in lethality. In patients with aortic stenosis the age exceeding 70 years and the presence of atrial fibrillation are found to be the most significant predictors of preservation of residual mitral regurgitation in the early postoperative period, while more indicative for patients with aortic insufficiency is the presence of tricuspid regurgitation grade 2 or higher.

  13. Bentall Procedure Using Cryopreserved Valved Aortic Homografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Jan T.; Sierra, Jorge; Trindade, Pedro T.; Didier, Dominique; Kalangos, Afksendiyos

    2004-01-01

    The Bentall procedure is the standard operation for patients who have lesions of the ascending aorta associated with aortic valve disease. In many cases, however, mechanical prosthetic conduits are not suitable. There are few reports in the English-language medical literature concerning the mid- to long-term outcome of Bentall operations with cryopreserved homografts. Therefore, we reviewed our experience with this procedure and valved homografts. From January 1997 through December 2002, 21 patients underwent a Bentall operation with cryopreserved homografts at our institution. There were 14 males and 7 females; the mean age was 36 ± 21 years (range, 15–74 years). Eleven patients had undergone previous aortic valve surgery. All patients had aortic dilatation or aneurysms involving the ascending aorta. Indications for surgery included aortic valve stenosis or insufficiency, and aortic valve endocarditis (native valve or prosthetic). One patient had Takayasu's arteritis and 3 had Marfan syndrome. There was 1 hospital death (due to sepsis), but no other major postoperative complications. The mean hospital stay was 14 ± 7 days. Follow-up echocardiographic and computed tomographic scans were performed yearly. The mean follow-up was 34 months (6–72 months). Follow-up imaging revealed no calcifications or degenerative processes related to the homograft. Four patients had minimal valve regurgitation. Two patients died during follow-up. The 3-year actuarial survival rate was 85.7%. Our data suggest that the Bentall procedure with a valved homograft conduit is a safe procedure with excellent mid- to long-term results, comparable to results reported with aortic valve replacement with a homograft. PMID:15745290

  14. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koolbergen, David R; Manshanden, Johan S J; Bouma, Berto J; Blom, Nico A; Mulder, Barbara J M; de Mol, Bas A J M; Hazekamp, Mark G

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate our results of valve-sparing aortic root replacement and associated (multiple) valve repair. From September 2003 to September 2013, 97 patients had valve-sparing aortic root replacement procedures. Patient records and preoperative, postoperative and recent echocardiograms were reviewed. Median age was 40.3 (range: 13.4-68.6) years and 67 (69.1%) were male. Seven (7.2%) patients were younger than 18 years, the youngest being 13.4 years. Fifty-four (55.7%) had Marfan syndrome, 2 (2.1%) other fibrous tissue diseases, 15 (15.5%) bicuspid aortic valve and 3 (3.1%) had earlier Fallot repair. The reimplantation technique was used in all, with a straight vascular prosthesis in 11 (26-34 mm) and the Valsalva prosthesis in 86 (26-32 mm). Concomitant aortic valve repair was performed in 43 (44.3%), mitral valve repair in 10 (10.3%), tricuspid valve repair in 5 (5.2%) and aortic arch replacement in 3 (3.1%). Mean follow-up was 4.2 ± 2.4 years. Follow-up was complete in all. One 14-year old patient died 1.3 years post-surgery presumably of ventricular arrhythmia. One patient underwent reoperation for aneurysm of the proximal right coronary artery after 4.9 years and 4 patients required aortic valve replacement, 3 of which because of endocarditis after 0.1, 0.8 and 1.3 years and 1 because of cusp prolapse after 3.8 years. No thrombo-embolic complications occurred. Mortality, root reoperation and aortic regurgitation were absent in 88.0 ± 0.5% at 5-year follow-up. Results of valve-sparing root replacement are good, even in association with a high incidence of concomitant valve repair. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement can be performed at a very young age as long as an adult size prosthesis can be implanted. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  15. Mitral valve disease in patients with Marfan syndrome undergoing aortic root replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkala, Meghana R; Schaff, Hartzell V; Li, Zhuo; Volguina, Irina; Dietz, Harry C; LeMaire, Scott A; Coselli, Joseph S; Connolly, Heidi

    2013-09-10

    Cardiac manifestations of Marfan syndrome include aortic root dilation and mitral valve prolapse (MVP). Only scant data exist describing MVP in patients with Marfan syndrome undergoing aortic root replacement. We retrospectively analyzed data from 166 MFS patients with MVP who were enrolled in a prospective multicenter registry of patients who underwent aortic root aneurysm repair. Of these 166 patients, 9% had mitral regurgitation (MR) grade >2, and 10% had MR grade 2. The severity of MVP and MR was evaluated by echocardiography preoperatively and ≤ 3 years postoperatively. Forty-one patients (25%) underwent composite graft aortic valve replacement, and 125 patients (75%) underwent aortic valve-sparing procedures; both groups had similar prevalences of MR grade >2 (P=0.7). Thirty-three patients (20%) underwent concomitant mitral valve (MV) intervention (repair, n=29; replacement, n=4), including all 15 patients with MR grade >2. Only 1 patient required MV reintervention during follow-up (mean clinical follow-up, 31 ± 10 months). Echocardiography performed 21 ± 13 months postoperatively revealed MR >2 in only 3 patients (2%). One early death and 2 late deaths occurred. Although the majority of patients with Marfan syndrome who undergo elective aortic root replacement have MVP, only 20% have concomitant MV procedures. These concomitant procedures do not seem to increase operative risk. In patients with MR grade ≤ 2 who do not undergo a concomitant MV procedure, the short-term incidence of progressive MR is low; however, more follow-up is needed to determine whether patients with MVP and MR grade ≤ 2 would benefit from prophylactic MV intervention.

  16. Aortic valve ochronosis: a rare manifestation of alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, Christina Maria

    2011-07-28

    Alkaptonuric ochronosis is a heritable disorder of tyrosine metabolism, with various systemic abnormalities related to pigment deposition and degeneration of collagen and other tissues, including the heart and aorta. A 65-year-old woman with alkaptonuric ochronosis and a history of four joint replacements required aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis. Operative findings included ochronosis of a partly calcified aortic valve and the aortic intima. The aortic valve was removed at surgery and histologically investigated. Light microscopic examination of the aortic valve revealed intracellular and extracellular deposits of ochronotic pigment and a chronic inflammatory infiltrate. Beside the case representation, the disease history, aetiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation and treatment of aortic valve ochronosis are reviewed.

  17. Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation in patients with small diseased peripheral vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruparelia, Neil; Buzzatti, Nicola; Romano, Vittorio; Longoni, Matteo; Figini, Fillipo; Montorfano, Matteo; Kawamoto, Hiroyoshi; Miyazaki, Tadashi; Spagnolo, Pietro; Alfieri, Ottavio; Colombo, Antonio; Latib, Azeem

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility, safety and short-term outcomes of transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TF-TAVI) in patients with small diseased peripheral vessels. Background: The transfemoral (TF) route for transcatheter aortic valve (TAVI) is the default option due to associated advantages. However, this is limited due to the high prevalence of significant peripheral arterial disease and increased risk of vascular complications. Methods: Of 539 consecutive patients undergoing TAVI in a single Italian center, 23 patients underwent TF-TAVI in the presence of small peripheral vessels as defined by a minimal luminal diameter (MLD) of ≤ 5.5 mm [by computed tomography (CT)] and/or the inability to advance a large-bore sheath. Calcification was defined as being concentric if calcium extended more than 270° around the circumference of the artery. All patients underwent 30-day clinical follow-up. Results: 17 (73.9%) patients underwent peripheral vessel pre-dilatation with a semi-compliant balloon and 6 (26.1%) patients with a Solopath sheath. 6 (26.1%) patients suffered a peri-procedural complication, with 1 patient requiring surgical embolectomy for thrombotic occlusion and the remaining patients successfully managed percutaneously in the catheter laboratory. No patient suffered a vessel perforation or required implantation of a covered stent. At 30-day follow-up, all patients were free of symptoms and signs or symptoms of peripheral vascular disease, with well-functioning TAVI prostheses as evaluated by echocardiography. Conclusions: Performing TF-TAVI is feasible in patients with no other viable vascular access option in the presence of small MLD and calcification of the peripheral vasculature, with any anticipated acute vascular complication managed in the catheter laboratory with established percutaneous techniques. - Highlights: • Small peripheral vessels is regarded as contraindication to transfemoral TAVI.

  18. Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation in patients with small diseased peripheral vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruparelia, Neil [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Buzzatti, Nicola; Romano, Vittorio; Longoni, Matteo; Figini, Fillipo; Montorfano, Matteo; Kawamoto, Hiroyoshi; Miyazaki, Tadashi; Spagnolo, Pietro; Alfieri, Ottavio; Colombo, Antonio [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Latib, Azeem, E-mail: info@emocolumbus.it [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility, safety and short-term outcomes of transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TF-TAVI) in patients with small diseased peripheral vessels. Background: The transfemoral (TF) route for transcatheter aortic valve (TAVI) is the default option due to associated advantages. However, this is limited due to the high prevalence of significant peripheral arterial disease and increased risk of vascular complications. Methods: Of 539 consecutive patients undergoing TAVI in a single Italian center, 23 patients underwent TF-TAVI in the presence of small peripheral vessels as defined by a minimal luminal diameter (MLD) of ≤ 5.5 mm [by computed tomography (CT)] and/or the inability to advance a large-bore sheath. Calcification was defined as being concentric if calcium extended more than 270° around the circumference of the artery. All patients underwent 30-day clinical follow-up. Results: 17 (73.9%) patients underwent peripheral vessel pre-dilatation with a semi-compliant balloon and 6 (26.1%) patients with a Solopath sheath. 6 (26.1%) patients suffered a peri-procedural complication, with 1 patient requiring surgical embolectomy for thrombotic occlusion and the remaining patients successfully managed percutaneously in the catheter laboratory. No patient suffered a vessel perforation or required implantation of a covered stent. At 30-day follow-up, all patients were free of symptoms and signs or symptoms of peripheral vascular disease, with well-functioning TAVI prostheses as evaluated by echocardiography. Conclusions: Performing TF-TAVI is feasible in patients with no other viable vascular access option in the presence of small MLD and calcification of the peripheral vasculature, with any anticipated acute vascular complication managed in the catheter laboratory with established percutaneous techniques. - Highlights: • Small peripheral vessels is regarded as contraindication to transfemoral TAVI.

  19. Outcomes of patients with chronic lung disease and severe aortic stenosis treated with transcatheter versus surgical aortic valve replacement or standard therapy: insights from the PARTNER trial (placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER Valve).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvir, Danny; Waksman, Ron; Barbash, Israel M; Kodali, Susheel K; Svensson, Lars G; Tuzcu, E Murat; Xu, Ke; Minha, Sa'ar; Alu, Maria C; Szeto, Wilson Y; Thourani, Vinod H; Makkar, Raj; Kapadia, Samir; Satler, Lowell F; Webb, John G; Leon, Martin B; Pichard, Augusto D

    2014-01-28

    The study aimed to evaluate the impact of chronic lung disease (CLD) on outcomes of severe aortic stenosis patients across all treatment modalities. Outcomes of patients with CLD undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) have not been systematically examined. All patients who underwent TAVR in the PARTNER (Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER Valve) trial, including the continued access registry (n = 2,553; 1,108 with CLD), were evaluated according to CLD clinical severity. Additionally, outcomes of CLD patients included in the randomization arms of the PARTNER trial were compared: Cohort A patients (high-risk operable) treated by either TAVR (n = 149) or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR); (n = 138); and Cohort B patients (inoperable) treated by either TAVR (n = 72) or standard therapy only (n = 95). Among all TAVR-treated patients, at 1-year follow-up, patients with CLD had higher mortality than those without it (23.4% vs. 19.6%, p = 0.02). Baseline characteristics of CLD patients who underwent TAVR were similar to respective controls. In Cohort A, 2-year all-cause death rates were similar (TAVR 35.2% and SAVR 33.6%, p = 0.92), whereas in Cohort B, the death rate was lower after TAVR (52.0% vs. 69.6% after standard therapy only, p = 0.04). Independent predictors for mortality in CLD patients undergoing TAVR included poor mobility (6-min walk test CLD patients undergoing TAVR have worse outcomes than patients without CLD, TAVR is better in these patients than standard therapy and is similar to SAVR. Although patients with CLD undergoing TAVR had worse outcomes than patients without CLD, TAVR performed better in these patients than standard therapy and was similar to SAVR. However, CLD patients who were either poorly mobile or oxygen-dependent had poor outcomes. (THE PARTNER TRIAL: Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER Valve Trial; NCT00530894). Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  20. Cellular regulation of the structure and function of aortic valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail El-Hamamsy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aortic valve was long considered a passive structure that opens and closes in response to changes in transvalvular pressure. Recent evidence suggests that the aortic valve performs highly sophisticated functions as a result of its unique microscopic structure. These functions allow it to adapt to its hemodynamic and mechanical environment. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in normal valve physiology is essential to elucidate the mechanisms behind valve disease. We here review the structure and developmental biology of aortic valves; we examine the role of its cellular parts in regulating its function and describe potential pathophysiological and clinical implications.

  1. Aortic valve function after bicuspidization of the unicuspid aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aicher, Diana; Bewarder, Moritz; Kindermann, Michael; Abdul-Khalique, Hashim; Schäfers, Hans-Joachim

    2013-05-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve (UAV) anatomy leads to dysfunction of the valve in young individuals. We introduced a reconstructive technique of bicuspidizing the UAV. Initially we copied the typical asymmetry of a normal bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) (I), later we created a symmetric BAV (II). This study compared the hemodynamic function of the two designs of a bicuspidized UAV. Aortic valve function was studied at rest and during exercise in 28 patients after repair of UAV (group I, n = 8; group II, n = 20). There were no differences among the groups I and II with respect to gender, age, body size, or weight. All patients were in New York Heart Association class I. Six healthy adults served as control individuals. All patients were studied with transthoracic echocardiography between 4 and 65 months postoperatively. Systolic gradients were assessed by continuous wave Doppler while patients were at rest and exercising on a bicycle ergometer. Aortic regurgitation was grade I or less in all patients. Resting gradients were significantly elevated in group I compared with group II and control individuals (group I, peak 33.8 ± 7.8 mm Hg; mean 19.1 ± 5.4 mm Hg; group II, peak 15.8 ± 5.4, mean 8.2 ± 2.8 mm Hg; control individuals, peak 6.0 ± 1.6, mean 3.2 ± 0.8 mm Hg; p competence. A symmetric repair design leads to improved systolic aortic valve function at rest and during exercise. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Outcomes of Patients With Severe Chronic Lung Disease Who Are Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Rakesh M; Gulack, Brian C; Brennan, J Matthew; Thourani, Vinod H; Dai, Dadi; Zajarias, Alan; Greason, Kevin L; Vassileva, Christina M; Mathew, Verghese; Nkomo, Vuyisile T; Mack, Michael J; Rihal, Charanjit S; Svensson, Lars G; Nishimura, Rick A; O'Gara, Patrick T; Holmes, David R

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we sought to determine the clinical outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) among patients with chronic lung disease (CLD) and to evaluate the safety of transaortic versus transapical alternate access approaches in patients with varying severities of CLD. Clinical records for patients undergoing TAVR from 2011 to 2014 in The Society of Thoracic Surgeons/American College of Cardiology Transcatheter Valve Therapy Registry were linked to Medicare hospital claims (n = 11,656). Clinical outcomes were evaluated across strata of CLD severity, and the risk-adjusted association between access route and post-TAVR mortality was determined among patients with severe CLD. In this cohort (median age, 84 years; 51.7% female), moderate to severe CLD was present in 27.7% (14.3%, moderate; 13.4%, severe). Compared with patients with no or mild CLD, patients with severe CLD had a higher rate of post-TAVR mortality to 1-year (32.3% versus 21.0%; adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.31 to 1.66), as did those with moderate CLD (25.5%; adjusted HR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.30). The adjusted rate of mortality was similar for transapical versus transaortic approaches to 1 year (adjusted HR, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.83 to 1.65). Moderate or severe CLD is associated with an increased risk of death to 1-year after TAVR, and among patients with severe CLD, the risk of death appears to be similar with either transapical or transaortic alternate-access approaches. Further study is necessary to understand strategies to mitigate risk associated with CLD and the long-term implications of these findings. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Mechanical versus bioprosthetic aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Stuart J; Çelik, Mevlüt; Kappetein, A Pieter

    2017-07-21

    Mechanical valves used for aortic valve replacement (AVR) continue to be associated with bleeding risks because of anticoagulation therapy, while bioprosthetic valves are at risk of structural valve deterioration requiring reoperation. This risk/benefit ratio of mechanical and bioprosthetic valves has led American and European guidelines on valvular heart disease to be consistent in recommending the use of mechanical prostheses in patients younger than 60 years of age. Despite these recommendations, the use of bioprosthetic valves has significantly increased over the last decades in all age groups. A systematic review of manuscripts applying propensity-matching or multivariable analysis to compare the usage of mechanical vs. bioprosthetic valves found either similar outcomes between the two types of valves or favourable outcomes with mechanical prostheses, particularly in younger patients. The risk/benefit ratio and choice of valves will be impacted by developments in valve designs, anticoagulation therapy, reducing the required international normalized ratio, and transcatheter and minimally invasive procedures. However, there is currently no evidence to support lowering the age threshold for implanting a bioprosthesis. Physicians in the Heart Team and patients should be cautious in pursuing more bioprosthetic valve use until its benefit is clearly proven in middle-aged patients. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. The bicuspid aortic valve and its relation to aortic dilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A bicuspid aortic valve (BAV is a common congenital heart disease, which affects 1-2% of the population. However, the relationship between BAVs and aortic dilation has not been sufficiently elucidated. METHODS: A total of 241 BAV patients who were referred to this hospital for cardiac surgey over a 4.75-year period were included in this study. In addition to the clinical characteristics of the included patients, the morphological features of the aortic valve and aorta, the length of the left main coronary artery, and the laboratory findings (the coagulation and hematological parameters as well as the total cholesterol concentration were determined and compared with those of the tricuspid aortic valve (TAV patients. RESULTS: The BAV patients were younger than the TAV patients for a valve surgery in the last 3 months of the study period. The BAV patients were predominantly male. Most of the BAVs that were surgically treated were stenotic, regurgitant, or combined, and only 19 (7.88% were normally functioning valves. According to echocardiography or operative records, 148 (78.31% were type A, 31 (16.40% were type B, and 10 (5.29% were type C. The left main coronary artery was much shorter in the BAV patients than it was in the TAV patients. There was no significant difference between BAV and TAV patients in the total cholesterol concentrations; whereas differences were noted between patients receiving lipid-lowering therapy and those not receiving lipid-lowering therapy. The dimensions of the aortic root, sinotubular junction, and ascending aorta were beyond normal limits, while they were significantly smaller in the BAV patients than in the TAV patients. They were also much smaller in patients receiving statin therapy than those not receiving statin therapy in both groups. Moreover, the aortic dilation in the BAV group was found to be significantly associated with patient age. CONCLUSIONS: The BAV patients developed aortic wall and

  5. Aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis caused by alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroyoshi, Junko; Saito, Aya; Panthee, Nirmal; Imai, Yasushi; Kawashima, Dai; Motomura, Noboru; Ono, Minoru

    2013-03-01

    We report a case of aortic stenosis associated with ochronosis in a 70-year-old man who underwent biologic aortic valve replacement. Intraoperative findings included ochronosis of a severely calcified pigmented aortic valve along with pigmentation of the intima of the aorta. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Relationship between aortic valve calcification and the severity of coronary atherosclerotic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Juying; Chen, Zhangwei; Ge, Junbo; Ma, Jianying; Chang, Shufu; Fan, Bing; Liu, Xuebo; Ge, Lei

    2010-07-01

    Aortic valve calcification (AVC), which has been confirmed to be associated with various risk factors of cardiac disease, is common in the elderly and associated with increased cardiovascular mortality. It has been hypothesized that AVC is associated with coronary atherosclerotic disease, and its severity. Between July 2007 and November 2007, a total of 235 patients with chest pain or chest distress were admitted to the authors' institution for coronary angiography. The severity of coronary atherosclerotic disease (CAD) was evaluated by the Gensini score, the number of stenosed vessels, and the prevalence of total occlusion. All patients underwent transthoracic echocardiography to detect AVC. Patients with CAD had a higher prevalence of AVC than those without CAD (44% versus 26%, p = 0.005). Likewise, the prevalence of AVC was significantly higher in patients with a higher Gensini score than in those with a lower score. Patients with AVC had a higher prevalence of CAD, and higher Gensini scores and numbers of stenosed coronary arteries, even after stratification by age (65 years). On multivariable logistic regression analysis for CAD, the odds ratio (OR) of AVC was 2.315 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.158-4.629, p = 0.018); this value was higher than that for total cholesterol (OR = 1.637, p = 0.008), lipoprotein-a (OR = 1.003, p = 0.015) and fibrinogen (OR = 1.009, p = 0.006), and marginally less than that for male gender (OR = 2.665, p = 0.005). Patients with AVC had a higher prevalence and greater severity of CAD.

  7. Long-Term Risk for Aortic Complications After Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With Bicuspid Aortic Valve Versus Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itagaki, Shinobu; Chikwe, Joanna P; Chiang, Yuting P; Egorova, Natalia N; Adams, David H

    2015-06-09

    Bicuspid aortic valves are associated with valve dysfunction, ascending aortic aneurysm and dissection. Management of the ascending aorta at the time of aortic valve replacement (AVR) in these patients is controversial and has been extrapolated from experience with Marfan syndrome, despite the absence of comparative long-term outcome data. This study sought to assess whether the natural history of thoracic aortopathy after AVR in patients with bicuspid aortic valve disease is substantially different from that seen in patients with Marfan syndrome. In this retrospective comparison, outcomes of 13,205 adults (2,079 with bicuspid aortic valves, 73 with Marfan syndrome, and 11,053 control patients with acquired aortic valve disease) who underwent primary AVR without replacement of the ascending aorta in New York State between 1995 and 2010 were compared. The median follow-up time was 6.6 years. The long-term incidence of thoracic aortic dissection was significantly higher in patients with Marfan syndrome (5.5 ± 2.7%) compared with those with bicuspid valves (0.55 ± 0.21%) and control group patients (0.41 ± 0.08%, p Marfan syndrome (10.8 ± 4.4%) compared with those with bicuspid valves (4.8 ± 0.8%) and control group patients (1.4 ± 0.2%) (p Marfan syndrome were significantly more likely to undergo thoracic aortic surgery in late follow-up (10.4 ± 4.3%) compared with those with bicuspid valves (2.5 ± 0.6%) and control group patients (0.50 ± 0.09%) (p Marfan syndrome compared with those with bicuspid aortic valves confirm that operative management of patients with bicuspid aortic valves should not be extrapolated from Marfan syndrome and support discrete treatment algorithms for these different clinical entities. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Imaging techniques in transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quaife RA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Robert A Quaife, Jennifer Dorosz, John C Messenger, Ernesto E Salcedo Division of Cardiology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: Calcific aortic stenosis is now understood as a complex valvular degenerative process sharing many risk factors with atherosclerosis. Once patients develop symptomatic calcific aortic stenosis, the only effective treatment is aortic valve replacement. In the past decade, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR has been developed as an alternative to surgery to treat severe calcific aortic stenosis. Cardiac imaging plays a pivotal role in the contemporary management of patients with calcific aortic stenosis, and particularly in patients being considered for TAVR, who demand detailed imaging of the aortic valve apparatus. In this review, we highlight the role of cardiac imaging for patient selection, procedural guidance, and evaluation of results of TAVR. Keywords: aortic stenosis, cardiovascular imaging, transcutaneous aortic valve replacement

  9. Relation of Aortic Valve and Coronary Artery Calcium in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease to the Stage and Etiology of the Renal Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piers, Lieuwe H.; Touw, Hugo R. W.; Gansevoort, Ron; Franssen, Casper F. M.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Zijlstra, Felix; Tio, Rene A.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with chronic renal failure have increased cardiac calcium loads. Previous studies have investigated the prevalence and quantitative extent of aortic valve calcium (AVC) and coronary artery calcium (CAC) in patients with various stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the impact of

  10. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement†

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolbergen, David R.; Manshanden, Johan S. J.; Bouma, Berto J.; Blom, Nico A.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.; Hazekamp, Mark G.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate our results of valve-sparing aortic root replacement and associated (multiple) valve repair. From September 2003 to September 2013, 97 patients had valve-sparing aortic root replacement procedures. Patient records and preoperative, postoperative and recent echocardiograms were reviewed.

  11. Catheterization Laboratory: Structural Heart Disease, Devices, and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorilli, Paul N; Anwaruddin, Saif; Zhou, Elizabeth; Shah, Ronak

    2017-12-01

    The cardiac catheterization laboratory is advancing medicine by performing procedures on patients who would usually require sternotomy and cardiopulmonary bypass. These procedures are done percutaneously, allowing them to be performed on patients considered inoperable. Patients have compromised cardiovascular function or advanced age. An anesthesiologist is essential for these procedures in case of hemodynamic compromise. Interventionalists are becoming more familiar with transcatheter aortic valve replacement and the device has become smaller, both contributing to less complications. Left atrial occlusion and the endovascular edge-to-edge mitral valve repair devices were approved. Although these devices require general anesthesia, an invasive surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass machine are not necessary for deployment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Prevalence and severity of coronary artery disease in diabetic patients with aortic valve calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhang-wei; Qian, Ju-ying; Jian, Ying; Ge, Lei; Liu, Xue-bo; Shu, Xian-hong; Ge, Junbo

    2011-02-01

    Aortic valve calcification (AVC) is common in the elderly and associated with increased cardiovascular mortality, while diabetes is one of the confirmed risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the prevalence and severity of CAD in type-2 diabetic patients with AVC. From June to December in 2007, a total of 325 consecutive patients with chest pain or chest distress were admitted for coronary angiography. The severity of CAD was evaluated by the Gensini score and the number of stenosed vessels. All patients underwent transthoracic echocardiography for detecting AVC. Compared with the patients without diabetes (n = 221), the type-2 diabetic patients (n = 104) had a similar prevalence of CAD (66.5% vs. 72.1%, P = 0.312). Further classified by the presence of AVC, patients with AVC had a higher prevalence of CAD, average Gensini score and the number of stenosed vessels, both in the group with and without diabetes. It was also demonstrated that the odds ratio (OR) of AVC for CAD in the diabetic patients was higher than in the non-diabetic ones (3.405 vs 2.515) after chi-square analysis (single-variable). However, at multivariable logistic regression analysis for CAD, the OR of AVC was 3.757 (P = 0.03) in diabetic group, while it did not achieve statistical significance in the non-diabetic group (OR = 2.130, P= 0.074). Type-2 diabetic patients with AVC had a higher prevalence of and more severe CAD.

  13. Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation due to severe aortic regurgitation in a degenerated aortic homograft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lene Kjaer; Engstrøm, Thomas; Søndergaard, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in severe aortic stenosis has proven to be a feasible and effective treatment modality for inoperable patients. Until now, neither aortic regurgitation nor degenerated bioprostheses has been an indication for TAVI. However, this article reports...... a successful valve-in-valve implantation of a CoreValve aortic valve prosthesis through the right subclavian artery in a case of severe aortic regurgitation within a degenerated aortic homograft. The case exemplifies the possibilities of expanding the indications for TAVI, as well as other vascular access...

  14. Surgical treatment of infective endocarditis with aortic and tricuspid valve involvement using cryopreserved aortic and mitral valve allografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovsky, Yury; Spirydonau, Siarhei; Shchatsinka, Mikalai; Shket, Aliaksandr

    2015-05-01

    Surgical treatment of infective and prosthetic endocarditis using allografts gives good results. Aortic allograft implantation is a common technique, while tricuspid valve replacement with a mitral allograft is very rare. Multiple valve disease in case of infective endocarditis is a surgical challenge as such patients are usually in a grave condition and results of surgical treatment are often unsatisfactory. In this article we describe a clinical case of successful surgical treatment in a patient with active infective endocarditis of aortic and tricuspid valve, complicated by an aortic-right ventricular fistula. The aortic valve and ascending aorta were replaced with a cryopreserved aortic allograft; the tricuspid valve was replaced with a cryopreserved mitral allograft. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  15. Aortic Root Enlargement or Sutureless Valve Implantation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos G. Baikoussis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aortic valve replacement (AVR in patients with a small aortic annulus is a challenging issue. The importance of prosthesis–patient mismatch (PPM post aortic valve replacement (AVR is controversial but has to be avoided. Many studies support the fact that PPM has a negative impact on short and long term survival. In order to avoid PPM, aortic root enlargement may be performed. Alternatively and keeping in mind that often some comorbidities are present in old patients with small aortic root, the Perceval S suturelles valve implantation could be a perfect solution. The Perceval sutureless bioprosthesis provides reasonable hemodynamic performance avoiding the PPM and providing the maximum of aortic orifice area. We would like to see in the near future the role of the aortic root enlargement techniques in the era of surgical implantation of the sutureless valve (SAVR and the transcatheter valve implantation (TAVI.

  16. THE PROGNOSIS IN TRANSCATHETER AORTIC VALVE IMPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Imaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the effect of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI, performed by different types of prostheses and various surgical access, on the prognosis of patients with critical aortic stenosis and comorbidities.Material and methods. Patients (n=130 that had consistently performed 80 TAVI by Edwards valve transfemoral (n=50 and transapical (n=30 access, as well as 50 transcatheter aortic valve replacement by CoreValve system were included into the study. Complications including perioperative mortality, total 30-day mortality, as well as post-hospital mortality were registered during aortic valve replacement, immediately after surgery, before the expiry of 30 days. Mean follow-up was 2.2 years (range 0.2 to 5.2 years.Results. Hospital mortality was on average 6.9%. 121 patients had been discharged from the department after the surgery. The number of deaths in the post-hospital period was 14.8%. Valve type and the type of access had no effect on post-hospital mortality. Men died more than 2.5 times often than women, regardless of age. Atrioventricular block, pacemaker implantation, and history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were the most significant prognostic factors. An important role of minor stroke and renal failure should be noted. Mortality did not depend on the surgical access or valve type. All parameters characterizing the intervention were significantly associated with mortality, both during and after surgery. The proportion of survivors at the end of the first year of observation using Corvalve system was 86.9%, Edwards valve by transfemoral access - 88% and Edwards valve by transapical access – 85.4% (insignificant differences for all groups, p>0.05. Two-year survival was 77.5%, 82.5% and 82.7%, respectively (also insignificant differences for all groups, p>0.05.Conclusion. TAVI is the method of choice, reasonable alternative approach for surgical valve replacement in patients with high surgical risk, although

  17. Aortic valve-sparing surgery in Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachum, Eyal; Shinfeld, Amichay; Kogan, Alexander; Preisman, Sergey; Levin, Shany; Raanani, Ehud

    2013-08-01

    Patients with Marfan syndrome are referred for cardiac surgery due to root aneurysm with or without aortic valve regurgitation. Because these patients are young and frequently present with normal-appearing aortic cusps, valve sparing is often recommended. However, due to the genetic nature of the disease, the durability of such surgery remains uncertain. Between February 2004 and June 2012, 100 patients in our department suffering from aortic aneurysm with aortic valve regurgitation underwent elective aortic valve-sparing surgery. Of them, 30 had Marfan syndrome, were significantly younger (30 +/- 13 vs. 53 +/- 16 years), and had a higher percentage of root aneurysm, compared with ascending aorta aneurysm in their non-Marfan counterparts. We evaluated the safety, durability, clinical and echocardiographic mid-term results of these patients. While no early deaths were reported in either group, there were a few major early complications in both groups. At follow-up (reaching 8 years with a mean of 34 +/- 26 months) there were no late deaths, and few major late complications in the Marfan group. Altogether, 96% and 78% of the patients were in New York Heart Association functional class I-II in the Marfan and non-Marfan groups respectively. None of the Marfan patients needed reoperation on the aortic valve. Freedom from recurrent aortic valve regurgitation > 3+ was 94% in the Marfan patients. Aortic valve-sparing surgery in Marfan symdrome patients is safe and yields good mid-term clinical outcomes.

  18. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Degenerative Bioprosthetic Surgical Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvir, Danny; Webb, John; Brecker, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation is an emerging therapeutic alternative for patients with a failed surgical bioprosthesis and may obviate the need for reoperation. We evaluated the clinical results of this technique using a large, worldwide registry....

  19. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation and cerebrovascular accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stortecky, Stefan; Wenaweser, Peter; Windecker, Stephan

    2012-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an evidence-based treatment alternative for selected high-risk patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis as acknowledged in the most recent edition of the ESC Guidelines on Valvular Heart Disease 2012. However, periprocedural complications and in particular cerebrovascular accidents remain a matter of concern. While transcatheter heart valve technology continuously improves and the development of novel and even less invasive implantation techniques is on-going, cerebrovascular events complicating TAVI may abrogate the usual improvement in terms of prognosis and quality of life. This article describes the incidence of cerebrovascular events after cardiovascular procedures, provides an overview of the pathophysiological mechanisms as well as the impact on outcomes and provides some insights into preventive strategies as well as the acute management of these events.

  20. Serum magnesium, phosphorus, and calcium levels and subclinical calcific aortic valve disease: A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisamatsu, Takashi; Miura, Katsuyuki; Fujiyoshi, Akira; Kadota, Aya; Miyagawa, Naoko; Satoh, Atsushi; Zaid, Maryam; Yamamoto, Takashi; Horie, Minoru; Ueshima, Hirotsugu

    2018-06-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is the most common valve disease. Although micronutrients are known to contribute to cardiovascular disease, the relationship with CAVD remains poorly evaluated. We examined the association of serum levels of magnesium, phosphorus, and calcium with prevalence, incidence, and progression of aortic valve calcification (AVC). We conducted a prospective study in a population-based sample of Japanese men aged 40-79 years without known cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease at baseline, and quantified AVC from serial computed tomographic images with the Agatston method. Of 938 participants at baseline (mean age, 63.7 ± 9.9 years), AVC prevalence was observed in 173 (18.4%). Of 596 participants without baseline AVC at follow-up (median duration, 5.1 years), AVC incidence was observed in 138 (23.2%). After adjustment for demographics, behaviors and cardiovascular risk factors, relative risks (95% confidence intervals) in the highest versus lowest categories of serum magnesium, phosphorus, and calcium were 0.62 (0.44-0.86), 1.45 (1.02-2.04), and 1.43 (0.95-2.15), respectively, for AVC prevalence and 0.62 (0.42-0.92), 1.93 (1.28-2.91), and 1.09 (0.77-1.55), respectively, for AVC incidence. Their linear trends of serum magnesium and phosphorus were also all statistically significant. Of 131 participants with baseline AVC, there was no association of any serum micronutrients with AVC progression. Serum magnesium was inversely associated, while serum phosphorus was positively associated with AVC prevalence and incidence, suggesting that these serum micronutrients may be potential candidates for risk prediction or prevention of CAVD, and warranting further studies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Global Strain in Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbæk, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K

    2012-01-01

    Score, history with ischemic heart disease and ejection fraction. CONCLUSIONS: -In patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis undergoing AVR reduced GLS provides important prognostic information beyond standard risk factors. Clinical Trial Registration-URL: http://www.clinicaltrial.gov. Unique identifier......BACKGROUND: -Global longitudinal systolic strain (GLS) is often reduced in aortic stenosis despite normal ejection fraction. The importance of reduced preoperative GLS on long-term outcome after aortic valve replacement (AVR) is unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: -A total of 125 patients with severe...... and mortality. In a stepwise cox model with forward selection GLS was the sole independent predictor HR=1.13 (95% confidence interval 1.02-1.25), p=0.04. Comparing the overall log likelihood χ(2) of the predictive power of the multivariable model containing GLS was statistically superior to models based on Euro...

  2. Long-Term Health Benefit of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With Chronic Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crestanello, Juan A; Popma, Jeffrey J; Adams, David H; Deeb, G Michael; Mumtaz, Mubashir; George, Barry; Huang, Jian; Reardon, Michael J

    2017-11-27

    This study sought to characterize the long-term effect of chronic lung disease (CLD) on mortality, clinical outcomes, quality of life, and health benefits after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) with a self-expanding bioprosthesis. The long-term effect of CLD after TAVR is unknown. Prevalence and severity of CLD was determined at baseline in high- and extreme-risk patients with aortic stenosis from the CoreValve US Pivotal Trial. Clinical outcomes and health status were assessed using the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire overall summary score (KCCQ-OS). A favorable health benefit was defined as alive with a KCCQ-OS ≥60 and stability (CLD was present in 55% (20% mild, 13% moderate, 22% severe) of the 1,030 patients studied. All-cause mortality was higher in patients with moderate and severe CLD at 1 year (19.6% mild, 28.1% moderate, 26.9% severe CLD vs. 19.2% non-CLD; p = 0.030) and 3 years (44.8% mild, 53.0% moderate, 51.9% severe vs. 37.7% non-CLD; p CLD at 1 and 3 years. All patients had a nearly 20-point improvement in KCCQ-OS at 1 and 3 years. However, only 43.3% of patients with CLD had a favorable health benefit at 1 year and 22.5% at 3 years. Moderate and severe CLD increases 1- and 3-year mortality after TAVR. Although functional status and quality of life were improved in CLD at 1 and 3 years after TAVR, a favorable health benefit was only achieved in selected patients. (Safety and Efficacy Study of the Medtronic CoreValve System in the Treatment of Symptomatic Severe Aortic Stenosis in High Risk and Very High Risk Subjects Who Need Aortic Valve Replacement; NCT01240902). Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mylotte, Darren; Osnabrugge, Ruben L J; Windecker, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The authors sought to examine the adoption of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in Western Europe and investigate factors that may influence the heterogeneous use of this therapy.......The authors sought to examine the adoption of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in Western Europe and investigate factors that may influence the heterogeneous use of this therapy....

  4. Imaging of aortic valve dynamics in 4D OCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schnabel Christian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical components of the heart, especially the valves and leaflets, are enormous stressed during lifetime. Therefore, those structures undergo different pathophysiological tissue transformations which affect cardiac output and in consequence living comfort of affected patients. These changes may lead to calcific aortic valve stenosis (AVS, the major heart valve disease in humans. The knowledge about changes of the dynamic behaviour during the course of this disease and the possibility of early stage diagnosis is of particular interest and could lead to the development of new treatment strategies and drug based options of prevention or therapy. 4D optical coherence tomography (OCT in combination with high-speed video microscopy were applied to characterize dynamic behaviour of the murine aortic valve and to characterize dynamic properties during artificial stimulation. We present a promising tool to investigate the aortic valve dynamics in an ex vivo disease model with a high spatial and temporal resolution using a multimodal imaging setup.

  5. Aortic valve replacement in octogenarians

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    Dark John H

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Aims As our population ages and life expectancy increases the number of people aged over 80 and more referred for cardiac surgery is growing. This study sought to identify the outcome of aortic valve replacement (AVR in octogenarians. Methods 68 patients aged 80 years or more underwent AVR at the Freeman Hospital, between April 2001 and April 2004. A retrospective review of the notes and outcomes from the patients' GP and the NHS strategic tracking service was performed. 54% (37 underwent isolated AVR whilst 46% (31 underwent combined AVR and CABG. Results Follow up was 100% complete. The mean age was 83.1 ± s.d. 2.9 years, a mean gradient of 83 ± s.d. 31 mmHg and mean AVA of 0.56 cm2. The mean additive EuroSCORE was 8.6 ± s.d. 1.2, the logistic EuroSCORE mean 12.0 ± s.d. 5.9. In hospital 30 day mortality was 13 %. Survival was 80% at 1 year and 78% at 2 years. Median follow up was for 712 days. Stepwise logistic regression identified chronic obstructive airways disease as an independent predictor of mortality (p Conclusion Our study demonstrates that the operative mortality for AVR in the over eighties is good, whilst the mid to long term outcome is excellent There is a very low attrition rate with those undergoing the procedure living as long than their age matched population. This study confirms AVR is a safe, acceptable treatment for octogenarians with excellent mid term outcomes.

  6. Early Outcomes of Sutureless Aortic Valves

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    Muhammet Onur Hanedan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In elderly high-risk surgical patients, sutureless aortic valve replacement (AVR should be an alternative to standard AVR. The potential advantages of sutureless aortic prostheses include reducing cross-clamping and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB time and facilitating minimally invasive surgery and complex cardiac interventions, while maintaining satisfactory hemodynamic outcomes and low rates of paravalvular leakage. The current study reports our single-center experience regarding the early outcomes of sutureless aortic valve implantation. Methods: Between October 2012 and June 2015, 65 patients scheduled for surgical valve replacement with symptomatic aortic valve disease and New York Heart Association function of class II or higher were included to this study. Perceval S (Sorin Biomedica Cardio Srl, Sallugia, Italy and Edwards Intuity (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA valves were used. Results: The mean age of the patients was 71.15±8.60 years. Forty-four patients (67.7% were female. The average preoperative left ventricular ejection fraction was 56.9±9.93. The CPB time was 96.51±41.27 minutes and the cross-clamping time was 60.85±27.08 minutes. The intubation time was 8.95±4.19 hours, and the intensive care unit and hospital stays were 2.89±1.42 days and 7.86±1.42 days, respectively. The mean quantity of drainage from chest tubes was 407.69±149.28 mL. The hospital mortality rate was 3.1%. A total of five patients (7.69% died during follow-up. The mean follow-up time was 687.24±24.76 days. The one-year survival rate was over 90%. Conclusion: In the last few years, several models of valvular sutureless bioprostheses have been developed. The present study evaluating the single-center early outcomes of sutureless aortic valve implantation presents the results of an innovative surgical technique, finding that it resulted in appropriate hemodynamic conditions with acceptable ischemic time.

  7. Early Outcomes of Sutureless Aortic Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanedan, Muhammet Onur; Mataracı, İlker; Yürük, Mehmet Ali; Özer, Tanıl; Sayar, Ufuk; Arslan, Ali Kemal; Ziyrek, Uğur; Yücel, Murat

    2016-06-01

    In elderly high-risk surgical patients, sutureless aortic valve replacement (AVR) should be an alternative to standard AVR. The potential advantages of sutureless aortic prostheses include reducing cross-clamping and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) time and facilitating minimally invasive surgery and complex cardiac interventions, while maintaining satisfactory hemodynamic outcomes and low rates of paravalvular leakage. The current study reports our single-center experience regarding the early outcomes of sutureless aortic valve implantation. Between October 2012 and June 2015, 65 patients scheduled for surgical valve replacement with symptomatic aortic valve disease and New York Heart Association function of class II or higher were included to this study. Perceval S (Sorin Biomedica Cardio Srl, Sallugia, Italy) and Edwards Intuity (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) valves were used. The mean age of the patients was 71.15±8.60 years. Forty-four patients (67.7%) were female. The average preoperative left ventricular ejection fraction was 56.9±9.93. The CPB time was 96.51±41.27 minutes and the cross-clamping time was 60.85±27.08 minutes. The intubation time was 8.95±4.19 hours, and the intensive care unit and hospital stays were 2.89±1.42 days and 7.86±1.42 days, respectively. The mean quantity of drainage from chest tubes was 407.69±149.28 mL. The hospital mortality rate was 3.1%. A total of five patients (7.69%) died during follow-up. The mean follow-up time was 687.24±24.76 days. The one-year survival rate was over 90%. In the last few years, several models of valvular sutureless bioprostheses have been developed. The present study evaluating the single-center early outcomes of sutureless aortic valve implantation presents the results of an innovative surgical technique, finding that it resulted in appropriate hemodynamic conditions with acceptable ischemic time.

  8. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with aortic valve sclerosis in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Bonapace

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent epidemiological data suggest that non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is closely associated with aortic valve sclerosis (AVS, an emerging risk factor for adverse cardiovascular outcomes, in nondiabetic and type 2 diabetic individuals. To date, nobody has investigated the association between NAFLD and AVS in people with type 2 diabetes, a group of individuals in which the prevalence of these two diseases is high. METHODS AND RESULTS: We recruited 180 consecutive type 2 diabetic patients without ischemic heart disease, valvular heart disease, hepatic diseases or excessive alcohol consumption. NAFLD was diagnosed by liver ultrasonography whereas AVS was determined by conventional echocardiography in all participants. In the whole sample, 120 (66.7% patients had NAFLD and 53 (29.4% had AVS. No patients had aortic stenosis. NAFLD was strongly associated with an increased risk of prevalent AVS (odds ratio [OR] 2.79, 95% CI 1.3-6.1, p<0.01. Adjustments for age, sex, duration of diabetes, diabetes treatment, body mass index, smoking, alcohol consumption, hypertension, dyslipidemia, hemoglobin A1c and estimated glomerular filtration rate did not attenuate the strong association between NAFLD and risk of prevalent AVS (adjusted-OR 3.04, 95% CI 1.3-7.3, p = 0.01. CONCLUSIONS: Our results provide the first demonstration of a positive and independent association between NAFLD and AVS in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  9. Neurotrophin 3 upregulates proliferation and collagen production in human aortic valve interstitial cells: a potential role in aortic valve sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qingzhou; Song, Rui; Ao, Lihua; Cleveland, Joseph C; Fullerton, David A; Meng, Xianzhong

    2017-06-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a leading cardiovascular disorder in the elderly. Diseased aortic valves are characterized by sclerosis (fibrosis) and nodular calcification. Sclerosis, an early pathological change, is caused by aortic valve interstitial cell (AVIC) proliferation and overproduction of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. However, the mechanism of aortic valve sclerosis remains unclear. Recently, we observed that diseased human aortic valves overexpress growth factor neurotrophin 3 (NT3). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that NT3 is a profibrogenic factor to human AVICs. AVICs isolated from normal human aortic valves were cultured in M199 growth medium and treated with recombinant human NT3 (0.10 µg/ml). An exposure to NT3 induced AVIC proliferation, upregulated the production of collagen and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), and augmented collagen deposition. These changes were abolished by inhibition of the Trk receptors. NT3 induced Akt phosphorylation and increased cyclin D1 protein levels in a Trk receptor-dependent fashion. Inhibition of Akt abrogated the effect of NT3 on cyclin D1 production. Furthermore, inhibition of either Akt or cyclin D1 suppressed NT3-induced cellular proliferation and MMP-9 and collagen production, as well as collagen deposition. Thus, NT3 upregulates cellular proliferation, ECM protein production, and collagen deposition in human AVICs. It exerts these effects through the Trk-Akt-cyclin D1 cascade. NT3 is a profibrogenic mediator in human aortic valve, and overproduction of NT3 by aortic valve tissue may contribute to the mechanism of valvular sclerosis. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Valve thrombosis following transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba-Soriano, Juan G; Puri, Rishi; Amat-Santos, Ignacio; Ribeiro, Henrique B; Abdul-Jawad Altisent, Omar; del Trigo, María; Paradis, Jean-Michel; Dumont, Eric; Urena, Marina; Rodés-Cabau, Josep

    2015-03-01

    Despite the rapid global uptake of transcatheter aortic valve implantation, valve trombosis has yet to be systematically evaluated in this field. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics, diagnostic criteria, and treatment outcomes of patients diagnosed with valve thrombosis following transcatheter aortic valve implantation through a systematic review of published data. Literature published between 2002 and 2012 on valve thrombosis as a complication of transcatheter aortic valve implantation was identified through a systematic electronic search. A total of 11 publications were identified, describing 16 patients (mean age, 80 [5] years, 65% men). All but 1 patient (94%) received a balloon-expandable valve. All patients received dual antiplatelet therapy immediately following the procedure and continued to take either mono- or dual antiplatelet therapy at the time of valve thrombosis diagnosis. Valve thrombosis was diagnosed at a median of 6 months post-procedure, with progressive dyspnea being the most common symptom. A significant increase in transvalvular gradient (from 10 [4] to 40 [12] mmHg) was the most common echocardiographic feature, in addition to leaflet thickening. Thrombus was not directly visualized with echocardiography. Three patients underwent valve explantation, and the remaining received warfarin, which effectively restored the mean transvalvular gradient to baseline within 2 months. Systemic embolism was not a feature of valve thrombosis post-transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Although a rare, yet likely under-reported complication of post-transcatheter aortic valve implantation, progressive dyspnea coupled with an increasing transvalvular gradient on echocardiography within the months following the intervention likely signifies valve thrombosis. While direct thrombus visualization appears difficult, prompt initiation of oral anticoagulation therapy effectively restores baseline valve function. Copyright © 2014

  11. Impact of bicuspid aortic valve on complications and death in infective endocarditis of native aortic valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahveci, Gokhan; Bayrak, Fatih; Pala, Selcuk; Mutlu, Bulent

    2009-01-01

    We retrospectively investigated the impact of bicuspid aortic valve on the prognosis of patients who had definite infective endocarditis of the native aortic valve.Of 51 patients, a bicuspid aortic valve was present in 22 (43%); the other 29 had tricuspid aortic valves. On average, the patients who had bicuspid valves were younger than those who had tricuspid valves. Patients with a tricuspid valve had larger left atrial diameters and were more likely to have severe mitral regurgitation.Periannular complications, which we detected in 19 patients (37%), were much more common in the patients who had a bicuspid valve (64% vs 17%, P = 0.001). The presence of a bicuspid valve was the only significant independent predictor of periannular complications. The in-hospital mortality rate in the bicuspid group was lower than that in the tricuspid group; however, this figure did not reach statistical significance (9% vs 24%, P = 0.15). In multivariate analysis, left atrial diameter was the only independent predictor associated with an increased risk of death (hazard ratio, 2.19; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-4.5; P = 0.031).In our study, patients with infective endocarditis in a bicuspid aortic valve were younger and had a higher incidence of periannular complications. Although a worse prognosis has been reported previously, we found that infective endocarditis in a native bicuspid aortic valve is not likely to increase the risk of death in comparison with infective endocarditis in native tricuspid aortic valves.

  12. Reoperative Aortic Root Replacement in Patients with Previous Aortic Root or Aortic Valve Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Kwon Chong

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Generalization of standardized surgical techniques to treat aortic valve (AV and aortic root diseases has benefited large numbers of patients. As a consequence of the proliferation of patients receiving aortic root surgeries, surgeons are more frequently challenged by reoperative aortic root procedures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of redo-aortic root replacement (ARR. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 66 patients (36 male; mean age, 44.5±9.5 years who underwent redo-ARR following AV or aortic root procedures between April 1995 and June 2015. Results: Emergency surgeries comprised 43.9% (n=29. Indications for the redo-ARR were aneurysm (n=12, pseudoaneurysm (n=1, or dissection (n=6 of the residual native aortic sinus in 19 patients (28.8%, native AV dysfunction in 8 patients (12.1%, structural dysfunction of an implanted bioprosthetic AV in 19 patients (28.8%, and infection of previously replaced AV or proximal aortic grafts in 30 patients (45.5%. There were 3 early deaths (4.5%. During follow- up (median, 54.65 months; quartile 1–3, 17.93 to 95.71 months, there were 14 late deaths (21.2%, and 9 valve-related complications including reoperation of the aortic root in 1 patient, infective endocarditis in 3 patients, and hemorrhagic events in 5 patients. Overall survival and event-free survival rates at 5 years were 81.5%±5.1% and 76.4%±5.4%, respectively. Conclusion: Despite technical challenges and a high rate of emergency conditions in patients requiring redo-ARR, early and late outcomes were acceptable in these patients.

  13. Transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis surgically replaced 4 months after implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Lund, Jens Teglgaard; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a new and rapidly evolving treatment option for high-risk surgical patients with degenerative aortic valve stenosis. Long-term results with these new valve prostheses are lacking, and potential valve dysfunction and failure would require valve replacemen....... We report the first case of surgical valve replacement in a patient with a dysfunctional transcatheter-implanted aortic valve prosthesis 4 months after implantation....

  14. Sequential transcatheter aortic valve implantation due to valve dislodgement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campante Teles, Rui; Costa, Cátia; Almeida, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become an important treatment in high surgical risk patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS), whose complications need to be managed promptly. The authors report the case of an 86-year-old woman presenting with severe symptomatic AS, rejected...

  15. Imaging techniques in aortic valve and root surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regeer, M.V.

    2017-01-01

    Aortic valve sparing surgery for aortic regurgitation and/or aortopathy serves as an alternative to aortic valve and root replacement. One of the advantages of aortic valve sparing surgery over conventional replacement is that there is no need for life-long anticoagulation, which is particularly

  16. Early outcome of mini aortic valve replacement surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawky Fareed

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery (MIAVS has evolved into a well-tolerated, efficient surgical treatment option in experienced centers, providing greater patient satisfaction and lower complication rates. Potential advantages of MIAVR arise from the concept that patient morbidity and potential mortality could be reduced without compromising the excellent results of the conventional procedure which include improved cosmetic results, safer access in the case of reoperation, less postoperative bleeding, lower intensive care unit (ICU and in-hospital stays, as well as the absence of sternal wound infection. These results were achievable also in high-risk patients. Reduced pain and hospital length of stay, decreased time until return to full activity and decreased blood product use have also been demonstrated. Methods: Sixty patients with aortic valve disease randomized into two equal groups; group “A” underwent aortic valve surgery through a minimally invasive limited upper sternotomy. Group “B” underwent aortic valve surgery through a full median sternotomy. The Pain was evaluated on 2nd, 3rd day post-operatively and at the 3rd, 6th month after discharge. Echocardiographic data were performed preoperatively and at the 3rd, 6th month after discharge in all patients. Standard aortic and bicaval cannulation with cold antegrade crystalloid cardioplegia was adopted in group“B”, while in group “A” femoral vein with ascending aortic cannulation was adopted with antegrade blood cardioplegia. Results: There was no statistical difference between the two groups preoperatively regarding their age, sex, NYHA class, EF%, LA dimension, spirometric study. There was no operative mortality in both groups but few postoperative complications occurred in both groups. Total hospital stay, ICU stay, postoperative bleeding, inotropic requirement, ventilatory support, blood transfusion was less in group “A”, with better cosmetic

  17. Prosthetic valve endocarditis after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Thue; De Backer, Ole; Thyregod, Hans G H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an advancing mode of treatment for inoperable or high-risk patients with aortic stenosis. Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) after TAVI is a serious complication, but only limited data exist on its incidence, outcome, and procedural......%) were treated conservatively and 1 with surgery. Four patients (22%) died from endocarditis or complications to treatment, 2 of those (11%) during initial hospitalization for PVE. An increased risk of TAVI-PVE was seen in patients with low implanted valve position (hazard ratio, 2.8 [1.1-7.2]), moderate...

  18. Infective endocarditis following transcatheter aortic valve replacement-

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loh, Poay Huan; Bundgaard, Henning; S�ndergaard, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) can improve the symptoms and prognosis of patients with severe aortic stenosis who, due to a high expected operative risk, would not have otherwise been treated surgically. If these patients develop prosthetic valve endocarditis, their presentations may...... be atypical causing a delay in the diagnosis and treatment. The management is also complicated by their comorbidities, and surgical treatment may not be feasible leading to a significant morbidity and mortality. We describe a case of an 85-year-old man with TAVI prosthetic valve endocarditis successfully...

  19. A Typical Immune T/B Subset Profile Characterizes Bicuspid Aortic Valve: In an Old Status?

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    Carmela R. Balistreri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bicuspid valve disease is associated with the development of thoracic aortic aneurysm. The molecular mechanisms underlying this association still need to be clarified. Here, we evaluated the circulating levels of T and B lymphocyte subsets associated with the development of vascular diseases in patients with bicuspid aortic valve or tricuspid aortic valve with and without thoracic aortic aneurysm. We unveiled that the circulating levels of the MAIT, CD4+IL−17A+, and NKT T cell subsets were significantly reduced in bicuspid valve disease cases, when compared to tricuspid aortic valve cases in either the presence or the absence of thoracic aortic aneurysm. Among patients with tricuspid aortic valve, these cells were higher in those also affected by thoracic aortic aneurysm. Similar data were obtained by examining CD19+ B cells, naïve B cells (IgD+CD27−, memory unswitched B cells (IgD+CD27+, memory switched B cells (IgD−CD27+, and double-negative B cells (DN (IgD−CD27−. These cells resulted to be lower in subjects with bicuspid valve disease with respect to patients with tricuspid aortic valve. In whole, our data indicate that patients with bicuspid valve disease show a quantitative reduction of T and B lymphocyte cell subsets. Future studies are encouraged to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying this observation and its pathophysiological significance.

  20. Altered aortic shape in bicuspid aortic valve relatives influences blood flow patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Susanne; Smith, Danielle A; Barker, Alex J; Entezari, Pegah; Honarmand, Amir R; Carr, Maria L; Malaisrie, S Chris; McCarthy, Patrick M; Collins, Jeremy; Carr, James C; Markl, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is known to exhibit familial inheritance and is associated with aortopathy and altered aortic haemodynamics. However, it remains unclear whether BAV-related aortopathy can be inherited independently of valve morphology. Four-dimensional flow magnetic resonance imaging for the in vivo assessment of thoracic aortic 3D blood flow was performed in 24 BAV relatives with trileaflet aortic valves (age = 40 ± 14 years) and 15 healthy controls (age = 37 ± 10 years). Data analysis included aortic dimensions, shape (round/gothic/cubic), and 3D blood flow characteristics (semi-quantitative vortex/helix grading and peak velocities). Cubic and gothic aortic shapes were markedly more prevalent in BAV relatives compared with controls (38 vs. 7%). Ascending aorta (AAo) vortex flow in BAV relatives was significantly increased compared with controls (grading = 1.5 ± 1.0 vs. 0.6 ± 0.9, P = 0.015). Aortic haemodynamics were influenced by aortic shape: peak velocities were reduced for gothic aortas vs. round aortas (P = 0.003); vortex flow was increased for cubic aortas in the AAo (P gothic aortas in the AAo and descending aorta (P = 0.003, P = 0.029). Logistic regression demonstrated significant associations of shape with severity of vortex flow in AAo (P < 0.001) and aortic arch (P = 0.016) in BAV relatives. BAV relatives expressed altered aortic shape and increased vortex flow despite the absence of valvular disease or aortic dilatation. These data suggest a heritable component of BAV-related aortopathy affecting aortic shape and aberrant blood flow, independent of valve morphology. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Lipoprotein(a Induces Human Aortic Valve Interstitial Cell Calcification

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    Bin Yu, PhD

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Lipoprotein(a, or Lp(a, significantly increased alkaline phosphatase activity, release of phosphate, calcium deposition, hydroxyapatite, cell apoptosis, matrix vesicle formation, and phosphorylation of signal transduction proteins; increased expression of chondro-osteogenic mediators; and decreased SOX9 and matrix Gla protein (p < 0.001. Inhibition of MAPK38 and GSK3β significantly reduced Lp(a-induced calcification of human aortic valve interstitial cells (p < 0.001. There was abundant presence of Lp(a and E06 immunoreactivity in diseased human aortic valves. The present study demonstrates a causal effect for Lp(a in aortic valve calcification and suggests that interfering with the Lp(apathway could provide a novel therapeutic approach in the management of this debilitating disease.

  2. Transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis surgically replaced 4 months after implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Lund, Jens Teglgaard; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a new and rapidly evolving treatment option for high-risk surgical patients with degenerative aortic valve stenosis. Long-term results with these new valve prostheses are lacking, and potential valve dysfunction and failure would require valve replacemen...

  3. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement and aortic valve repair in a patient with acromegaly and aortic root dilatation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Van Praet

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aortic regurgitation and dilatation of the aortic root and ascending aorta are severe complications of acromegaly. The current trend for management of an aortic root aneurysm is valve-sparing root replacement as well as restoring the diameter of the aortic sinotubular junction (STJ and annulus. Our case report supports the recommendation that in patients with acromegaly, severe aortic root involvement may indicate the need for surgery.

  4. Analysis of aortic root surgery with composite mechanical aortic valve conduit and valve-sparing reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Ricardo Ribeiro; Mejia, Omar Asdrubal Vilca; Fiorelli, Alfredo Inácio; Pomerantzeff, Pablo Maria Alberto; Dias, Altamiro Ribeiro; Mady, Charles; Stolf, Noedir Antonio Groppo

    2010-01-01

    Comparative analysis of early and late results of aortic root reconstruction with aortic valve sparing operations and the composite mechanical valve conduit replacement. From November 2002 to September 2009, 164 consecutive patients with mean age 54 ± 15 years, 115 male, underwent the aortic root reconstruction (125 mechanical valve conduit replacements and 39 valve sparing operations). Sixteen percent of patients had Marfan syndrome and 4.3% had bicuspid aortic valve. One hundred and forty-four patients (88%) were followed for a mean period of 41.1 ± 20.8 months. The hospital mortality was 4.9%, 5.6% in operations with valved conduits and 2.6% in the valve sparing procedures (P valve sparing operations, respectively (95% CI = 70% - 95%, P = 0.001), (95% CI = 82% - 95% P = 0.03) and (95% CI = 81% - 95%, P = 0.03). Multivariate analysis showed that creatinine greater than 1.4 mg/dl, Cabrol operation and renal dialysis were predictors of mortality, respectively, with occurrence chance of 6 (95% CI = 1.8 - 19.5, P = 0.003), 12 (95% CI = 3 - 49.7, P = 0.0004) and 16 (95% CI = 3.6 - 71.3, P = 0.0002). The aortic root reconstruction has a low early and late mortality, high survival free of complications and low need for reoperation. During the late follow-up, valve sparing aortic root reconstructions presented fewer incidences of bleeding, thromboembolic events and endocarditis.

  5. The German Aortic Valve Registry (GARY): a nationwide registry for patients undergoing invasive therapy for severe aortic valve stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, A; Hamm, C; Figulla, H R; Cremer, J; Kuck, K H; Lange, R; Zahn, R; Sack, S; Schuler, G C; Walther, T; Beyersdorf, F; Böhm, M; Heusch, G; Funkat, A K; Meinertz, T; Neumann, T; Papoutsis, K; Schneider, S; Welz, A; Mohr, F W

    2012-07-01

    Background The increasing prevalence of severe aortic valve defects correlates with the increase of life expectancy. For decades, surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR), under the use of extracorporeal circulation, has been the gold standard for treatment of severe aortic valve diseases. In Germany ~12,000 patients receive isolated aortic valve surgery per year. For some time, percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty has been used as a palliative therapeutic option for very few patients. Currently, alternatives for the established surgical procedures such as transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have become available, but there are only limited data from randomized studies or low-volume registries concerning long-time outcome. In Germany, the implementation of this new technology into hospital care increased rapidly in the past few years. Therefore, the German Aortic Valve Registry (GARY) was founded in July 2010 including all available therapeutic options and providing data from a large quantity of patients.Methods The GARY is assembled as a complete survey for all invasive therapies in patients with relevant aortic valve diseases. It evaluates the new therapeutic options and compares them to surgical AVR. The model for data acquisition is based on three data sources: source I, the mandatory German database for external performance measurement; source II, a specific registry dataset; and source III, a follow-up data sheet (generated by phone interview). Various procedures will be compared concerning observed complications, mortality, and quality of life up to 5 years after the initial procedure. Furthermore, the registry will enable a compilation of evidence-based indication criteria and, in addition, also a comparison of all approved operative procedures, such as Ross or David procedures, and the use of different mechanical or biological aortic valve prostheses.Results Since the launch of data acquisition in July 2010, almost all institutions performing

  6. Lactococcus garvieae Endocarditis on a Prosthetic Biological Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsur, A; Slutzki, T; Flusser, D

    2015-09-01

    Lactococcus garvieae (LG) endocarditis is a rare disease in humans. There are only about 16 reported cases in the world. We report a 76-year-old male patient with LG endocarditis. In depth interview with the patient revealed that 2 weeks prior to admission, he had eaten sushi containing raw fish. Unlike many of the other infections reported, which were on a native mitral valve, our patient's vegetation was on a prosthetic aortic valve. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Bioprosthetic Valve Fracture Improves the Hemodynamic Results of Valve-in-Valve Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhatriwalla, Adnan K; Allen, Keith B; Saxon, John T; Cohen, David J; Aggarwal, Sanjeev; Hart, Anthony J; Baron, Suzanne J; Dvir, Danny; Borkon, A Michael

    2017-07-01

    Valve-in-valve (VIV) transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) may be less effective in small surgical valves because of patient/prosthesis mismatch. Bioprosthetic valve fracture (BVF) using a high-pressure balloon can be performed to facilitate VIV TAVR. We report data from 20 consecutive clinical cases in which BVF was successfully performed before or after VIV TAVR by inflation of a high-pressure balloon positioned across the valve ring during rapid ventricular pacing. Hemodynamic measurements and calculation of the valve effective orifice area were performed at baseline, immediately after VIV TAVR, and after BVF. BVF was successfully performed in 20 patients undergoing VIV TAVR with balloon-expandable (n=8) or self-expanding (n=12) transcatheter valves in Mitroflow, Carpentier-Edwards Perimount, Magna and Magna Ease, Biocor Epic and Biocor Epic Supra, and Mosaic surgical valves. Successful fracture was noted fluoroscopically when the waist of the balloon released and by a sudden drop in inflation pressure, often accompanied by an audible snap. BVF resulted in a reduction in the mean transvalvular gradient (from 20.5±7.4 to 6.7±3.7 mm Hg, P valve effective orifice area (from 1.0±0.4 to 1.8±0.6 cm 2 , P valves to facilitate VIV TAVR with either balloon-expandable or self-expanding transcatheter valves and results in reduced residual transvalvular gradients and increased valve effective orifice area. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. New-Onset Atrial Fibrillation After Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Troels Højsgaard; Thygesen, Julie Bjerre; Thyregod, Hans Gustav

    2015-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and, more recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have been shown to be the only treatments that can improve the natural cause of severe aortic valve stenosis. However, after SAVR and TAVI, the incidence of new-onset atrial fibrillation...... (NOAF) is 31%-64% and 4%-32%, respectively. NOAF is independently associated with adverse events such as stroke, death, and increased length of hospital stay. Increasing the knowledge of predisposing factors, optimal postprocedural monitoring, and prophylactic antiarrhythmic and antithrombotic therapy...

  9. New-onset atrial fibrillation after surgical aortic valve replacement and transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Troels Højsgaard; Thygesen, Julie Bjerre; Thyregod, Hans Gustav

    2015-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and, more recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have been shown to be the only treatments that can improve the natural cause of severe aortic valve stenosis. However, after SAVR and TAVI, the incidence of new-onset atrial fibrillation...... (NOAF) is 31%-64% and 4%-32%, respectively. NOAF is independently associated with adverse events such as stroke, death, and increased length of hospital stay. Increasing the knowledge of predisposing factors, optimal postprocedural monitoring, and prophylactic antiarrhythmic and antithrombotic therapy...

  10. Impact of Aortic Insufficiency on Ascending Aortic Dilatation and Adverse Aortic Events After Isolated Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With a Bicuspid Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongshi; Wu, Boting; Li, Jun; Dong, Lili; Wang, Chunsheng; Shu, Xianhong

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant flow pattern and congenital fragility bestows bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) with a propensity toward ascending aorta dilatation, aneurysm, and dissection. Whether isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR) can prevent further dilatation in BAV ascending aorta and what indicates concurrent aortic intervention in the case of valve operation remain controversial. From June 2006 to January 2009, patients with a BAV who underwent isolated AVR were consecutively included and categorized into aortic insufficiency (BAV-AI, n = 84) and aortic stenosis (n = 112) groups, and another population of patients with a tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency (n = 149) was also recruited during the same period for comparison of annual aortic dilatation rate and adverse aortic events after isolated AVR. With a median follow-up period of 72 months (interquartile range, 66 to 78 months), ascending aorta dilatation rates were faster in the BAV-AI group than the BAV plus aortic stenosis and tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency groups (both p regression analysis identified aortic insufficiency (hazard ratio, 3.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.2 to 11.1; p = 0.019) as an independent risk factor for adverse aortic events among patients with BAV in general, whereas preoperative ascending aortic diameter larger than 45 mm (hazard ratio, 13.8; 95% confidence interval, 3.0 to 63.3; p = 0.001) served as a prognostic indicator in the BAV-AI group. An aggressive policy of preventive aortic interventions seemed appropriate in patients with BAV-AI during AVR, and BAV phenotype presenting as either insufficiency or stenosis should be taken into consideration when contemplating optimal surgical strategies for BAV aortopathy. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Perceval S aortic valve implantation in an achondroplastic Dwarf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos G Baikoussis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite cardiovascular disease in patients with dwarfism is not rare; there is a lack of reports referring to cardiac interventions in such patients. Dwarfism may be due to achondroplasia or hormonal growth disorders. We present a 58-year-old woman with episodes of dyspnea for several months. She underwent on transthoracic echocardiography, and she diagnosed with severe aortic valve stenosis. She referred to our department for surgical treatment of this finding. In accordance of her anthropometric characteristics and her very small aortic annulus, we had the dilemma of prosthesis selection. We decided to implant a stentless valve to optimize her effective orifice area. Our aim is to present the successful Perceval S valve implantation and the descriptions of the problems coming across in operating on these special patients. To our knowledge, this is the first case patient in which a Perceval S valve is implanted according to the international bibliography.

  12. Perceval S aortic valve implantation in an achondroplastic Dwarf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikoussis, Nikolaos G; Argiriou, Michalis; Argiriou, Orestis; Dedeilias, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Despite cardiovascular disease in patients with dwarfism is not rare; there is a lack of reports referring to cardiac interventions in such patients. Dwarfism may be due to achondroplasia or hormonal growth disorders. We present a 58-year-old woman with episodes of dyspnea for several months. She underwent on transthoracic echocardiography, and she diagnosed with severe aortic valve stenosis. She referred to our department for surgical treatment of this finding. In accordance of her anthropometric characteristics and her very small aortic annulus, we had the dilemma of prosthesis selection. We decided to implant a stentless valve to optimize her effective orifice area. Our aim is to present the successful Perceval S valve implantation and the descriptions of the problems coming across in operating on these special patients. To our knowledge, this is the first case patient in which a Perceval S valve is implanted according to the international bibliography.

  13. Mechanical Aortic Valve Replacement in Octogenarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Tasoglu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study analyzes the long-term outcomes of mechanical aortic valve replacement in octogenarian patients. Material and Method: A retrospective review was performed on 23 octogenarian patients who underwent mechanical aortic valve replacement. Hospital mortality, postoperative intensive care unit stay, hospital stay and long-term results was examined. Estimates of the cumulative event mortality rate were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The mean age of all patients was 82.9±2.3 years and most were men (65.22%. The median ejection fraction was 45%. 73.91% of patients were in New York Heart Association class III-IV. Thirteen patients (56.52% in this study underwent combined procedure, the remaining 10 (43.48% patients underwent isolated aortic valve replacement. The most common valve size was 23 mm. The mean intensive care unit stay was 1.76±1.14 days. The mean hospital stay was 9.33±5.06 days. No complications were observed in 56.52% patients during their hospital stay. The overall hospital mortality was 8.7%. Follow-up was completed for all 23 patients. Median follow-up time was 33 months (1-108 months. Actuarial survival among discharged from hospital was 59% at 5 years. Discussion: Mechanical aortic valve replacement is a safe procedure in octogenarian patients and can be performed safely even in combined procedure.

  14. Early results of valve-sparing ascending aortic replacement in type A aortic dissection and aortic insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М. Л. Гордеев

    2016-08-01

    -term follow-up is needed.Funding The study has been performed within the framework of the 2015-2017 government task, “Cardiovascular diseases” platform, Theme No. 4 Research on genome/cellular mechanisms responsible for aorta/aortic valve pathology development and elaboration of new methods of its multimodality treatment including hybrid technologies.Conflict of interestThe authors declare no conflict of interest.AcknowledgementThe authors express their deep gratitude for assistance in diagnostics and management of patients with aortic pathologies, as well as in preparation of this article to A.Yu. Bakanov, PhD, Head of Research Laboratory of Perfusiology and Cardiac Protection; V.V. Volkov, Fellow of Research Laboratory of Perfusiology and Cardiac Protection; A.V. Naymushin, PhD, Head of Anesthesiology & Resuscitation/ICU-2 Department; I.V. Basek, Phd, Head of X-Ray Computer Tomography Department and the specialists of X-Ray Computer Tomography Department, as well as to the employees of Research Center for Non-Coronary Heart Diseases and to specialists of cardiovascular surgery departments.

  15. Secreted Klotho Attenuates Inflammation-Associated Aortic Valve Fibrosis in Senescence-Accelerated Mice P1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianglei; Fan, Jun; Wang, Shirley; Sun, Zhongjie

    2018-05-01

    Senescence-accelerated mice P1 (SAMP1) is an aging model characterized by shortened lifespan and early signs of senescence. Klotho is an aging-suppressor gene. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether in vivo expression of secreted klotho ( Skl ) gene attenuates aortic valve fibrosis in SAMP1 mice. SAMP1 mice and age-matched (AKR/J) control mice were used. SAMP1 mice developed obvious fibrosis in aortic valves, namely fibrotic aortic valve disease. Serum level of Skl was decreased drastically in SAMP1 mice. Expression of MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein 1), ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1), F4/80, and CD68 was increased in aortic valves of SAMP1 mice, indicating inflammation. An increase in expression of α-smooth muscle actin (myofibroblast marker), transforming growth factorβ-1, and scleraxis (a transcription factor of collagen synthesis) was also found in aortic valves of SAMP1 mice, suggesting that accelerated aging is associated with myofibroblast transition and collagen gene activation. We constructed adeno-associated virus 2 carrying mouse Skl cDNA for in vivo expression of Skl. Skl gene delivery effectively increased serum Skl of SAMP1 mice to the control level. Skl gene delivery inhibited inflammation and myofibroblastic transition in aortic valves and attenuated fibrotic aortic valve disease in SAMP1 mice. It is concluded that senescence-related fibrotic aortic valve disease in SAMP1 mice is associated with a decrease in serum klotho leading to inflammation, including macrophage infiltration and transforming growth factorβ-1/scleraxis-driven myofibroblast differentiation in aortic valves. Restoration of serum Skl levels by adeno-associated virus 2 carrying mouse Skl cDNA effectively suppresses inflammation and myofibroblastic transition and attenuates aortic valve fibrosis. Skl may be a potential therapeutic target for fibrotic aortic valve disease. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Wall stress on ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms with bicuspid compared with tricuspid aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Yue; Wang, Zhongjie; Liu, Raymond; Haraldsson, Henrik; Hope, Michael D; Saloner, David A; Guccione, Julius M; Ge, Liang; Tseng, Elaine

    2018-03-08

    Guidelines for repair of bicuspid aortic valve-associated ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms have been changing, most recently to the same criteria as tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms. Rupture/dissection occurs when wall stress exceeds wall strength. Recent studies suggest similar strength of bicuspid aortic valve versus tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms; thus, comparative wall stress may better predict dissection in bicuspid aortic valve versus tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms. Our aim was to determine whether bicuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms had higher wall stresses than their tricuspid aortic valve counterparts. Patients with bicuspid aortic valve- and tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (bicuspid aortic valve = 17, tricuspid aortic valve = 19) greater than 4.5 cm underwent electrocardiogram-gated computed tomography angiography. Patient-specific 3-dimensional geometry was reconstructed and loaded to systemic pressure after accounting for prestress geometry. Finite element analyses were performed using the LS-DYNA solver (LSTC Inc, Livermore, Calif) with user-defined fiber-embedded material model to determine ascending thoracic aortic aneurysm wall stress. Bicuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms 99th-percentile longitudinal stresses were 280 kPa versus 242 kPa (P = .028) for tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms in systole. These stresses did not correlate to diameter for bicuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (r = -0.004) but had better correlation to tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms diameter (r = 0.677). Longitudinal stresses on sinotubular junction were significantly higher in bicuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms than in tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (405 vs 329 kPa, P = .023). Bicuspid

  17. Endostatin and osteopontin are elevated in patients with both coronary artery disease and aortic valve calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Sponder

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: This is the first study showing an association of ES with AVC in CAD-patients independent from age, BMI and CAD-severity which seems to be of distinct interest when trying to understand the process of heart valve calcification. OPN also correlates with AVC-severity but is mostly dependent on the age of the patients.

  18. The use of transcatheter aortic valve replacement vs surgical aortic valve replacement for the treatment of aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen HA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hanna A Jensen, Lillian L Tsai, Vinod H Thourani Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Joseph B Whitehead Department of Surgery, Structural Heart and Valve Center, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Severe aortic stenosis (AS is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality and is increasing in prevalence as the global population increases. Since AS primarily affects the elderly, many of these patients have comorbidities that make them poor candidates for the gold standard treatment for AS, surgical aortic valve replacement. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement has emerged as a novel technology for the management of AS in higher risk patients over the past decade. Randomized trials have established the safety and efficacy of transcatheter aortic valve replacement, and the medical community has rallied to identify the patients who are most suitable for this transformative treatment. This review focuses on outlining the key procedural differences, describing the unique challenges of both operations, and finally assessing and comparing outcomes both on a general level and in challenging patient subgroups. Keywords: aortic valve replacement, transcatheter aortic valve replacement, surgical aortic valve replacement 

  19. Autopsy after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kesteren, F.; Wiegerinck, E. M. A.; Rizzo, S.; Baan, J.; Planken, R. N.; von der Thüsen, J. H.; Niessen, H. W. M.; van Oosterhout, M. F. M.; Pucci, A.; Thiene, G.; Basso, C.; Sheppard, M. N.; Wassilew, K.; van der Wal, A. C.

    2017-01-01

    Autopsy after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a new field of interest in cardiovascular pathology. To identify the cause of death, it is important to be familiar with specific findings related to the time interval between the procedure and death. We aimed to provide an overview of

  20. Severe aortic valve stenosis and nosebleed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoedel, Johannes; Obergfell, Achim; Maass, Alexander H.; Schodel, Johannes

    2007-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is known to be associated with loss of high molecular von Willebrand multimers. This can lead to gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with gastrointestinal angiodysplasia, the Heyde syndrome. Here we present a case of anaemia and severe epistaxis associated with acquired von

  1. Missed aortic valve endocarditis resulting in complete atrioventricular block and redo mechanical valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harky, Amer; Garner, Megan; Popa, Miruna; Shipolini, Alex

    2017-08-03

    Infective endocarditis is a rare disease associated with high morbidity and mortality. As a result, early diagnosis and prompt antibiotic treatment with or without surgical intervention is crucial in the management of such condition.We report a case of missed infective endocarditis of the aortic valve. The patient underwent mechanical aortic valve replacement, with the native valve being sent for histopathological examination. On re-admission 16 months later, he presented with syncope, shortness of breathing and complete heart block. On review of the histopathology of native aortic valve, endocarditis was identified which had not been acted on. The patient underwent redo aortic valve replacement for severe aortic regurgitation.We highlight the importance of following up histopathological results as well as the need for multidisciplinary treatment of endocarditis with a combination of surgical and antibiotic therapy. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. [Aortic valve-sparing root reconstruction in Marfan syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, H; Sasaki, H; Hanafusa, Y; Hirata, M; Numata, S; Ando, M; Yagihara, T; Kitamura, S

    2002-07-01

    The outcome of aortic valve-sparing root reconstruction in Marfan syndrome was reviewed. Thirteen patients with Marfan syndrome underwent aortic valve-sparing root reconstruction for annuloaortic ectasia or aortic root dissection between 1994 and 1999. The grade of preoperative aortic regurgitation was I in 4, II in 2, III in 5, IV in 2 patients. The procedures of aortic valve-sparing were reimplantation in 7 and remodeling in 5 patients. There was no hospital and late death. Recurrence of aortic regurgitation greater than moderate grade developed in 1 patient immediately after the surgery and in the other 4 patients in the late stage. One patient of them required aortic valve replacement for it. Aortic valve-sparing root reconstruction is applicable in Marfan patients, although the indication should be cautious. Close observation is needed for recurrence of aortic regurgitation.

  3. Calcific aortic valve damage as a risk factor for cardiovascular events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasilewski, Jarosław; Mirota, Kryspin; Wilczek, Krzysztof; Głowacki, Jan; Poloński, Lech

    2012-01-01

    Aortic valve calcification (AVC) is a common disease of the elderly. It is a progressive disease ranging from mild valve thickening to severe calcification with aortic valve stenosis. Risk factors for AVC are similar to those for atherosclerosis: age, gender, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, hypertension, smoking and renal failure. AVC shares many similarities to atherosclerosis, including inflammatory cells and calcium deposits, and correlates with coronary plaque burden. Presence of AVC is associated with increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events. The objective for this review is to discuss the clinical features, natural history and prognostic significance of aortic valve calcifications, including mechanical and hemodynamic factors of flow distribution

  4. Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation with Concomitant Aortic Valve and Ascending Aortic Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huenges, Katharina; Panholzer, Bernd; Cremer, Jochen; Haneya, Assad

    2018-01-01

    Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is nowadays a routine therapy for patients with advanced heart failure. We present the case of a 74-year-old male patient who was admitted to our center with terminal heart failure in dilated cardiomyopathy and ascending aortic aneurysm with aortic valve regurgitation. The LVAD implantation with simultaneous aortic valve and supracoronary ascending aortic replacement was successfully performed.

  5. Dynamics of the aortic annulus in 4D CT angiography for transcatheter aortic valve implantation patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elattar, Mustafa A.; Vink, Leon W.; van Mourik, Martijn S.; Baan, Jan; Vanbavel, Ed T.; Planken, R. Nils; Marquering, Henk A.

    2017-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a well-established treatment for patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. This procedure requires pre-operative planning by assessment of aortic dimensions on CT Angiography (CTA). It is well-known that the aortic root dimensions vary over the

  6. The importance of echocardiography in transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilen, Emine; Sari, Cenk; Durmaz, Tahir; Keleş, Telat; Bayram, Nihal A; Akçay, Murat; Ayhan, Hüseyin M; Bozkurt, Engin

    2014-01-01

    Valvular heart diseases cause serious health problems in Turkey as well as in Western countries. According to a study conducted in Turkey, aortic stenosis (AS) is second after mitral valve disease among all valvular heart diseases. AS is frequently observed in elderly patients who have several cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities. In symptomatic severe AS, surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) is a definitive treatment. However, in elderly patients with left ventricular dysfunction and comorbidities, the risk of operative morbidity and mortality increases and outweighs the gain obtained from AVR surgery. As a result, almost one-third of the patients with serious AS are considered ineligible for surgery. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an effective treatment in patients with symptomatic severe AS who have high risk for conventional surgery. Since being performed for the first time in 2002, with a procedure success rate reported as 95% and a mortality rate of 5%, TAVI has become a promising method. Assessment of vascular anatomy, aortic annular diameter, and left ventricular function may be useful for the appropriate selection of patients and may reduce the risk of complications. Cardiac imaging methods including 2D and 3D echocardiography and multidetector computed tomography are critical during the evaluation of suitable patients for TAVI as well as during and after the procedure. In this review, we describe the role of echocardiography methods in clinical practice for TAVI procedure in its entirety, i.e. from patient selection to guidance during the procedure, and subsequent monitoring. © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Anesthetic Management and Complications of Percutaneous Aortic Valve Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tailur Alberto Grando

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Aortic stenosis is a highly prevalent and life-threatening disease. In elderly patients with comorbidities, percutaneous valve implantation is an option. The aim of the study was to describe the anesthetic management and complications of general anesthesia Method: Case series with 30-day and 24-month follow-ups after implantation of the CoreValve device performed at the Institute of Cardiology/University Foundation of Cardiology between December 2008 and January 2012. The patients underwent general anesthesia monitored with mean arterial pressure (PAM, electrocardiogram (ECG, pulse oximetry, capnography, transesophageal echocardiography, thermometry, and transvenous pacemaker. Results: Twenty-eight patients, mean age 82.46 years, 20.98% mean EuroSCORE, functional class III/IV, successfully underwent valve implantation. Nine patients required permanent pacemaker implantation. During follow-up, two patients died: one during surgery due to LV perforation and the other on the third day of unknown causes. At 24 months, one patient diagnosed with multiple myeloma died. This anesthetic technique proved to be safe. Conclusion: The initial experience with percutaneous aortic valve implantation under general anesthesia has proven to be safe and effective, with no significant anesthetic complications during this procedure. Keywords: Aesthesia, General, Cardiac Surgical Procedures, Aortic Valve Stenosis, Aged.

  8. Left ventricular mass regression after porcine versus bovine aortic valve replacement: a randomized comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Rakesh M; Zehr, Kenton J; Sundt, Thoralf M; Dearani, Joseph A; Daly, Richard C; Oh, Jae K; Schaff, Hartzell V

    2009-10-01

    It is unclear whether small differences in transprosthetic gradient between porcine and bovine biologic aortic valves translate into improved regression of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy after aortic valve replacement. We investigated transprosthetic gradient, aortic valve orifice area, and LV mass in patients randomized to aortic valve replacement with either the Medtronic Mosaic (MM) porcine or an Edwards Perimount (EP) bovine pericardial bioprosthesis. One hundred fifty-two patients with aortic valve disease were randomly assigned to receive either the MM (n = 76) or an EP prosthesis. There were 89 men (59%), and the mean age was 76 years. Echocardiograms from preoperative, postoperative, predismissal, and 1-year time points were analyzed. Baseline characteristics and preoperative echocardiograms were similar between the two groups. The median implant size was 23 mm for both. There were no early deaths, and 10 patients (7%) died after dismissal. One hundred seven of 137 patients (78%) had a 1-year echocardiogram, and none required aortic valve reoperation. The mean aortic valve gradient at dismissal was 19.4 mm Hg (MM) versus13.5 mm Hg (EP; p regression of LV mass index (MM, -32.4 g/m(2) versus EP, -27.0 g/m(2); p = 0.40). Greater preoperative LV mass index was the sole independent predictor of greater LV mass regression after surgery (p regression of LV mass during the first year after aortic valve replacement.

  9. Infective Endocarditis of the Aortic Valve with Anterior Mitral Valve Leaflet Aneurysm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomsic, Anton; Li, Wilson W. L.; van Paridon, Marieke; Bindraban, Navin R.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Mitral valve leaflet aneurysm is a rare and potentially devastating complication of aortic valve endocarditis. We report the case of a 48-year-old man who had endocarditis of the native aortic valve and a concomitant aneurysm of the anterior mitral valve leaflet. Severe mitral regurgitation occurred

  10. Aortic valve replacement during acute rheumatic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A; Chi, S; Gonzalez-Lavin, L

    1978-07-01

    Emergency aortic valve replacement was performed during an attack of acute rheumatic fever in a 12-year-old black boy. He had an uneventful recovery and has remained asymptomatic 27 months after operation. In the light of this experience and that of others, one might conclude that the decision to operate on these patients should be based on the severity of the haemodynamic derangement rather than on the state of activity in the rheumatic process.

  11. Thrombocytosis following splenectomy and aortic valve replacement for idiopathic thrombocytopaenic purpura with bicuspid aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarika Katiyar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic thrombocytopaenic purpura (ITP patients are at high risk for complications during and after cardiac surgeries involving cardiopulmonary bypass. The main clinical problem of primary ITP is an increased risk of bleeding although bleeding may not always be present. More recently, thrombosis has become appreciated as another potential complication of the procedure. We report a 22-year-old female patient with ITP with bicuspid aortic valve and splenomegaly, who underwent uncomplicated aortic valve replacement and splenectomy simultaneously. She was readmitted with chest pain due to coronary thrombosis following splenectomy which made the management difficult. We describe our experience in managing this patient who presented with thrombotic complication rather than bleeding in post-operative period and the challenges met in maintaining appropriate anticoagulation for aortic valve replacement as well as thrombosis, post-splenectomy

  12. Vascular complications associated with transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardar, M Rizwan; Goldsweig, Andrew M; Abbott, J Dawn; Sharaf, Barry L; Gordon, Paul C; Ehsan, Afshin; Aronow, Herbert D

    2017-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is now an accepted pathway for aortic valve replacement for patients who are at prohibitive, severe and intermediate risk for traditional aortic valve surgery. However, with this rising uptrend and adaptation of this new technology, vascular complications and their management remain an Achilles heel for percutaneous aortic valve replacement. The vascular complications are an independent predictor of mortality for patients undergoing TAVR. Early recognition of these complications and appropriate management is paramount. In this article, we review the most commonly encountered vascular complications associated with currently approved TAVR devices and their optimal percutaneous management techniques.

  13. Possible Subclinical Leaflet Thrombosis in Bioprosthetic Aortic Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makkar, Raj R; Fontana, Gregory; Jilaihawi, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A finding of reduced aortic-valve leaflet motion was noted on computed tomography (CT) in a patient who had a stroke after transcatheter aortic-valve replacement (TAVR) during an ongoing clinical trial. This finding raised a concern about possible subclinical leaflet thrombosis...... patients and 1 of 115 patients, respectively; P=0.007). CONCLUSIONS: Reduced aortic-valve leaflet motion was shown in patients with bioprosthetic aortic valves. The condition resolved with therapeutic anticoagulation. The effect of this finding on clinical outcomes including stroke needs further...

  14. Bicuspid aortic valves are associated with increased wall and turbulence shear stress levels compared to trileaflet aortic valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Mirabella, Lucia; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2015-06-01

    Congenital bicuspid aortic valves (BAVs) are associated with accelerated disease progression, such as leaflet calcification and ascending aorta dilatation. Although common underlying genetic factors have been implicated in accelerated disease in BAV patients, several studies have suggested that altered hemodynamics also play a role in this disease process. The present study compares turbulence and wall shear stress (WSS) measurements between various BAV and trileaflet aortic valve (TAV) models to provide information for mechanobiological models of BAV disease. BAV and TAV models were constructed from excised porcine aortic valves to simulate parametric variations in BAV stenosis, hemodynamics and geometry. Particle image velocimetry experiments were conducted at physiological pressure conditions to characterize velocity fields in the ascending aorta. The velocity fields were post-processed to calculate turbulence, viscous and wall shear stresses in the ascending aorta. Stenosed BAV models showed the presence of eccentric systolic jets, causing increased WSS. Lower cardiac output resulted in a narrower jet, lower turbulence and lower viscous shear stress (VSS). The specific severe stenosis BAV model studied here showed reduced WSS due to reduction in non-fused leaflet mobility. Dilation of the aorta did not affect any turbulence or VSS, but reduced the WSS. In comparison with BAVs, TAVs have similar VSS values, but much smaller WSS and turbulence levels. These increased turbulence  and WSS levels in BAVs may play a key role in amplifying the biological responses of the ascending aorta wall and valvular leaflets, and support the hemodynamic underpinnings of BAV disease processes.

  15. Aortic valve insufficiency in the teenager and young adult: the role of prosthetic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Scott M

    2013-10-01

    The contents of this article were presented in the session "Aortic insufficiency in the teenager" at the congenital parallel symposium of the 2013 Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) annual meeting. The accompanying articles detail the approaches of aortic valve repair and the Ross procedure.(1,2) The current article focuses on prosthetic valve replacement. For many young patients requiring aortic valve surgery, either aortic valve repair or a Ross procedure provides a good option. The advantages include avoidance of anticoagulation and potential for growth. In other patients, a prosthetic valve is an appropriate alternative. This article discusses the current state of knowledge regarding mechanical and bioprosthetic valve prostheses and their specific advantages relative to valve repair or a Ross procedure. In current practice, young patients requiring aortic valve surgery frequently undergo valve replacement with a prosthetic valve. In STS adult cardiac database, among patients ≤30 years of age undergoing aortic valve surgery, 34% had placement of a mechanical valve, 51% had placement of a bioprosthetic valve, 9% had aortic valve repair, and 2% had a Ross procedure. In the STS congenital database, among patients 12 to 30 years of age undergoing aortic valve surgery, 21% had placement of a mechanical valve, 18% had placement of a bioprosthetic valve, 30% had aortic valve repair, and 24% had a Ross procedure. In the future, the balance among these options may be altered by design improvements in prosthetic valves, alternatives to warfarin, the development of new patch materials for valve repair, and techniques to avoid Ross autograft failure.

  16. Aortic root surgery in Marfan syndrome: Comparison of aortic valve-sparing reimplantation versus composite grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karck, Matthias; Kallenbach, Klaus; Hagl, Christian; Rhein, Christine; Leyh, Rainer; Haverich, Axel

    2004-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the results of aortic valve-sparing reimplantation and aortic root replacement with mechanical valve conduits in patients with Marfan syndrome undergoing operation for aortic root aneurysms. Patients and methods Between March 1979 and April 2002, 119 patients with clinical evidence of Marfan syndrome underwent composite graft replacement with mechanical valve conduits (n = 74) or aortic valve-sparing reimplantation according to David (n = 45). The underlying causes were aortic dissection type A (43 patients) and aneurysms (76 patients). Patients undergoing aortic valve reimplantation were younger compared with patients undergoing composite grafting (28 vs 35 years, P =.002) and had longer intraoperative aortic crossclamp times (125 vs 78 minutes, P valve reimplantation (P =.15). Mean follow-up was 30 months for patients undergoing aortic valve reimplantation and 114 months for patients undergoing composite grafting. Freedom from reoperation and death after 5 years postoperatively was 92% and 89% in patients undergoing composite grafting and 84% and 96% in patients undergoing aortic valve reimplantation (P =.31; P =.54), respectively. Thromboembolic complications or late postoperative bleeding occurred in 17 patients undergoing composite grafting, and an early postoperative event occurred in 1 patient undergoing aortic valve reimplantation. The results of aortic valve reimplantation and composite grafting of the aortic valve and ascending aorta with mechanical valve conduits are similar with regard to early and mid-term postoperative mortality and to the incidence of late reoperations in patients with Marfan syndrome. The low risk of thromboembolic or bleeding complications favors aortic valve reimplantation in these patients.

  17. Technique and Patient Selection Criteria of Right Anterior Mini-Thoracotomy for Minimal Access Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Reza; Leprince, Pascal; Gassmann, Max; Jamshidi, Peiman; Yamani, Nassrin; Amour, Julien; Lebreton, Guillaume

    2018-03-26

    Aortic valve stenosis has become the most prevalent valvular heart disease in developed countries, and is due to the aging of these populations. The incidence of the pathology increases with growing age after 65 years. Conventional surgical aortic valve replacement through median sternotomy has been the gold standard of patient care for symptomatic aortic valve stenosis. However, as the risk profile of patients worsens, other therapeutic strategies have been introduced in an attempt to maintain the excellent results obtained by the established surgical treatment. One of these approaches is represented by transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Although the outcomes of high-risk patients undergoing treatment for symptomatic aortic valve stenosis have improved with transcatheter aortic valve replacement, many patients with this condition remain candidates for surgical aortic valve replacement. In order to reduce the surgical trauma in patients who are candidates for surgical aortic valve replacement, minimally invasive approaches have garnered interest during the past decade. Since the introduction of right anterior thoracotomy for aortic valve replacement in 1993, right anterior mini-thoracotomy and upper hemi-sternotomy have become the predominant incisional approaches among cardiac surgeons performing minimal access aortic valve replacement. Beside the location of the incision, the arterial cannulation site represents the second major landmark of minimal access techniques for aortic valve replacement. The two most frequently used arterial cannulation sites include central aortic and peripheral femoral approaches. With the purpose of reducing surgical trauma in these patients, we have opted for a right anterior mini-thoracotomy approach with a central aortic cannulation site. This protocol describes in detail a technique for minimally invasive aortic valve replacement and provides recommendations for patient selection criteria, including cardiac computer

  18. Aortic root replacement after previous surgical intervention on the aortic valve, aortic root, or ascending aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, E W Matthias; Radu, N Costin; Mekontso-Dessap, Armand; Hillion, Marie-Line; Loisance, Daniel

    2006-03-01

    Aortic root replacement after a previous operation on the aortic valve, aortic root, or ascending aorta remains a major challenge. Records of 56 consecutive patients (44 men; mean age, 56.4 +/- 13.6 years) undergoing reoperative aortic root replacement between June 1994 and June 2005 were reviewed retrospectively. Reoperation was performed 9.4 +/- 6.7 years after the last cardiac operation. Indications for reoperation were true aneurysm (n = 14 [25%]), false aneurysm (n = 10 [18%]), dissection or redissection (n = 9 [16%]), structural or nonstructural valve dysfunction (n = 10 [18%]), prosthetic valve-graft infection (n = 12 [21%]), and miscellaneous (n = 1 [2%]). Procedures performed were aortic root replacement (n = 47 [84%]), aortic root replacement plus mitral valve procedure (n = 5 [9%]), and aortic root replacement plus arch replacement (n = 4 [7%]). In 14 (25%) patients coronary artery bypass grafting had to be performed unexpectedly during the same procedure or immediately after the procedure to re-establish coronary perfusion. Hospital mortality reached 17.9% (n = 10). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed the need for unplanned perioperative coronary artery bypass grafting as the sole independent risk factor for hospital death (P = .005). Actuarial survival was 83.8% +/- 4.9% at 1 month, 73.0% +/- 6.3% at 1 year, and 65.7% +/- 9.0% at 5 years after the operation. One patient had recurrence of endocarditis 6.7 months after the operation and required repeated homograft aortic root replacement. Reoperative aortic root replacement remains associated with a high postoperative mortality. The need to perform unplanned coronary artery bypass grafting during reoperative aortic root replacement is a major risk factor for hospital death. The optimal technique for coronary reconstruction in this setting remains to be debated.

  19. [Valve-sparing aortic root replacement for young female patients with Marfan syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawata, Kan; Morota, T

    2009-10-01

    Annuloaortic ectasia is frequently related with Marfan syndrome, and Bentall procedure or aortic root replacement with valved conduit has been the conventional standard operation for this disease. Recently, some institutes have adopted valve-sparing aortic root replacement (VSARR) instead of Bentall procedure. Young female patients with Marfan syndrome who wishes for childbearing seem to be a group of good candidates of this type of operation, because it let them free from morbidities after artificial valve implantation. Valve-sparing operation should be taken into consideration when the size of Valsalva sinus reaches 45 mm for patients with Marfan syndrome and when it reaches 40 mm for patients with past histories or family histories of aortic dissection or aortic rupture. Since pregnancy is one of the most serious risk factors for aortic events, Valsalva sinus of 40 mm or larger could be the new standard for surgical indication if VSARR is applicable.

  20. Transapical aortic valve implantation without angiography: proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Enrico; Sulzer, Christopher; Marcucci, Carlo; Rizzo, Elena; Tozzi, Piergiorgio; von Segesser, Ludwig K

    2010-06-01

    Cardiac computed tomographic scans, coronary angiograms, and aortographies are routinely performed in transcatheter heart valve therapies. Consequently, all patients are exposed to multiple contrast injections with a following risk of nephrotoxicity and postoperative renal failure. The transapical aortic valve implantation without angiography can prevent contrast-related complications. Between November 2008 and November 2009, 30 consecutive high-risk patients (16 female, 53.3%) underwent transapical aortic valve implantation without angiography. The landmarks identification, the stent-valve positioning, and the postoperative control were routinely performed under transesophageal echocardiogram and fluoroscopic visualization without contrast injections. Mean age was 80.1 +/- 8.7 years. Mean valve gradient, aortic orifice area, and ejection fraction were 60.3 +/- 20.9 mm Hg, 0.7 +/- 0.16 cm(2), and 0.526 +/- 0.128, respectively. Risk factors were pulmonary hypertension (60%), peripheral vascular disease (70%), chronic pulmonary disease (50%), previous cardiac surgery (13.3%), and chronic renal insufficiency (40%) (mean blood creatinine and urea levels: 96.8 +/- 54 microg/dL and 8.45 +/- 5.15 mmol/L). Average European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation was 32.2 +/- 13.3%. Valve deployment in the ideal landing zone was 96.7% successful and valve embolization occurred once. Thirty-day mortality was 10% (3 patients). Causes of death were the following: intraoperative ventricular rupture (conversion to sternotomy), right ventricular failure, and bilateral pneumonia. Stroke occurred in one patient at postoperative day 9. Renal failure (postoperative mean blood creatinine and urea levels: 91.1 +/- 66.8 microg/dL and 7.27 +/- 3.45 mmol/L), myocardial infarction, and atrioventricular block were not detected. Transapical aortic valve implantation without angiography requires a short learning curve and can be performed routinely by experienced teams. Our report

  1. Relation of thoracic aortic and aortic valve calcium to coronary artery calcium and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Nathan D; Sciammarella, Maria; Arad, Yadon; Miranda-Peats, Romalisa; Polk, Donna; Hachamovich, Rory; Friedman, John; Hayes, Sean; Daniell, Anthony; Berman, Daniel S

    2003-10-15

    Aortic calcium, aortic valve calcium (AVC), and coronary artery calcium (CAC) have been associated with cardiovascular event risk. We examined the prevalence of thoracic aortic calcium (TAC) and AVC in relation to the presence and extent of CAC, cardiovascular risk factors, and estimated risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). In 2,740 persons without known CHD aged 20 to 79 years, CAC was assessed by electron beam- or multidetector-computed tomography. We determined the prevalence of TAC and AVC in relation to CAC, CHD risk factors, and predicted 10-year risk of CHD. A close correspondence of TAC and AVC was observed with CAC. TAC and AVC increased with age; by the eighth decade of life, the prevalence of TAC was similar to that of CAC (>80%), and 36% of men and 24% of women had AVC. Age, male gender, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were directly related to the likelihood of CAC, TAC, and AVC; higher diastolic blood pressure and cigarette smoking additionally predicted CAC. Body mass index and higher systolic and lower diastolic blood pressures were also related to TAC, and higher body mass index and lower diastolic blood pressure were related to AVC. Calculated risk of CHD increased with the presence of AVC and TAC across levels of CAC. TAC and AVC provided incremental value over CAC in association with the 10-year calculated risk of CHD. If longitudinal studies show an incremental value of aortic and aortic valve calcium over that of CAC for prediction of cardiovascular events, future guidelines for risk assessment incorporating CAC assessment may additionally incorporate the measurement of aortic and/or aortic valve calcium.

  2. Delirium After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuseffi, Jennifer L; Borges, Nyal E; Boehm, Leanne M; Wang, Li; McPherson, John A; Fredi, Joseph L; Ahmad, Rashid M; Ely, E Wesley; Pandharipande, Pratik P

    2017-07-01

    Postoperative delirium is associated with increased mortality. Patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement are at risk for delirium because of comorbid conditions. To compare the incidence, odds, and mortality implications of delirium between patients undergoing transcatheter replacement and patients undergoing surgical replacement. The Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale and the Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit were used to assess arousal level and delirium prospectively in all patients with severe aortic stenosis who had transcatheter or surgical aortic valve replacement at an academic medical center. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine the relationship between procedure type and occurrence of delirium. Cox regression was used to assess the association between postoperative delirium and 6-month mortality. A total of 105 patients had transcatheter replacement and 121 had surgical replacement. Patients in the transcatheter group were older (median age, 81 vs 68 years; P replacement. Delirium is less likely to develop in the transcatheter group but is associated with higher mortality in both groups. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  3. High Risk Aortic Valve Replacement - The Challenges of Multiple Treatment Strategies with an Evolving Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, K; Beattie, R; McBride, M; Manoharan, G; Spence, M; Jones, J M

    2016-01-01

    Deciding on the optimal treatment strategy for high risk aortic valve replacement is challenging. Transcatheter Aortic Valve implantation (TAVI) has been available in our centre as an alternative treatment modality for patients since 2008. We present our early experience of TAVI and SAVR (surgical Aortic Valve Replacement) in high risk patients who required SAVR because TAVI could not be performed. The database for Surgical aortic valve and Transcatheter aortic valve replacement referrals was interrogated to identify relevant patients. Survival to hospital discharge was 95.5% in the forty five patients who had SAVR when TAVI was deemed technically unsuitable. One year survival was 86%. Defining who is appropriate for TAVI or high risk SAVR is challenging and multidisciplinary team discussion has never been more prudent in this field of evolving technology with ever decreasing risks of surgery. The introduction of TAVI at our institution has seen a rise in our surgical caseload by approximately by 25%. Overall, the option of aortic valve intervention is being offered to more patients in general which is a substantial benefit in the treatment of aortic valve disease.

  4. Acute Aortic Arch Perforation During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Bicuspid Aortic Stenosis and a Gothic Aortic Arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan-Iturbe, Oscar; Sawaya, Fadi J; Bieliauskas, Gintautas; Chow, Danny H F; De Backer, Ole; Søndergaard, Lars

    2017-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has evolved from a novel technology to an established therapy for high/intermediate-risk patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS). Although TAVR is used to treat bicuspid severe AS, the large randomized trials typically excluded bicuspid AS because of its unique anatomic features. This case report describes an acute aortic perforation during delivery of a transcatheter heart valve to treat a severe bicuspid AS with a "gothic aortic arch"; more careful evaluation of the preprocedural multislice computed tomographic scan would have unveiled a sharply angulated aortic arch. This life-threatening complication was successfully treated by thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Fate of remnant sinuses of Valsalva in patients with bicuspid and trileaflet valves undergoing aortic valve, ascending aorta, and aortic arch replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, Rita Karianna; Habertheuer, Andreas; Bavaria, Joseph E; Siki, Mary; Szeto, Wilson Y; Krause, Eric; Korutla, Varun; Desai, Nimesh D; Vallabhajosyula, Prashanth

    2017-08-01

    In patients presenting with aortic valvulopathy with concomitant ascending aortic aneurysm, surgical management of the sinus of Valsalva segment remains undefined, especially for moderately dilated aortic roots. In patients with this pathology undergoing aortic valve replacement with supracoronary ascending aorta replacement, we assessed the fate of the remnant preserved sinus of Valsalva segment stratified by aortic valve morphology and pathology. From 2002 to 2015, 428 patients underwent elective aortic valve replacement with supracoronary ascending aorta replacement. Patients were stratified on the basis of valvular morphology (bicuspid aortic valve [n = 254] and tricuspid aortic valve [n = 174]), valvular pathology (bicuspid aortic valve with aortic stenosis [n = 178], bicuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency [n = 76], tricuspid aortic valve with aortic stenosis [n = 61], tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency [n = 113]), and preoperative sinus of Valsalva dimensions (45 mm). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed no significant difference in freedom from reoperation in tricuspid aortic valve versus bicuspid aortic valve (P = .576). Multivariable Cox regression model performed with sinus of Valsalva dimensions at baseline and follow-up as time-varying covariates did not adversely affect survival. A repeated-measure, mixed-effects model constructed to assess longitudinal sinus of Valsalva trends revealed that the retained sinus of Valsalva dimensions remain stable over long-term follow-up (discharge to ≥10 years), irrespective of valvular morphology/pathology (bicuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency, tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency, tricuspid aortic valve with aortic stenosis) and preoperative sinus of Valsalva groups (45 mm). In patients with nonaneurysmal sinuses of Valsalva undergoing aortic valve replacement with supracoronary ascending aorta replacement, the sinus segment can be preserved irrespective of

  6. Preoperative computer tomography evaluation in transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groudeva, V.; Stoynova, V.; Trendafilova, D.; Dzhorgova, Y.; Nachev, G.

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement is rapidly emerging technique alternative to surgery in high risk patients. Imaging and especially computer tomography is important in preoperative assessment of the aortic ring and the prosthetic valve choice. The aim of this study is to share authors initial experience in CT assessment of the aortic ring prior to Transcatheter aortic valve replacement. 49 patients (mean age 76,55) underwent 320 rows MDCT (Acquilon One) prior TAVI. Protocol involved scanning from thoracic inlet to common femoral arteries. Aortic root size, aortic diameter at the level of coronary sinuses and the sinotubular junction and distance to coronary ostia were evaluated on a Vitrea work station. MDCT established maximal aortic ring diameter from 18 to 31 mm mean 25,04 mm while the lesser rate was from 16 to 21 mm. Accordingly positioned prostheses were in 34,75% No. 23, in 49% - No. 26 and in16,3% - No. 29. MDCT is crucial in aortic valve assessment prior to TAVI in experienced hands and multidisciplinary team. (authors) Key words: TRANSCATHETER AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT (TAVI). MDCT AORTIC VALVE ASSESSMENT

  7. Acute Aortic Arch Perforation During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Bicuspid Aortic Stenosis and a Gothic Aortic Arch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millan-Iturbe, Oscar; Sawaya, Fadi J.; Bieliauskas, Gintautas

    2017-01-01

    AS because of its unique anatomic features. This case report describes an acute aortic perforation during delivery of a transcatheter heart valve to treat a severe bicuspid AS with a “gothic aortic arch”; more careful evaluation of the preprocedural multislice computed tomographic scan would have unveiled...

  8. Indexing aortic valve area by body surface area increases the prevalence of severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jander, Nikolaus; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa; Bahlmann, Edda

    2014-01-01

    To account for differences in body size in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is divided by body surface area (BSA) to calculate indexed AVA (AVAindex). Cut-off values for severe stenosis are......To account for differences in body size in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is divided by body surface area (BSA) to calculate indexed AVA (AVAindex). Cut-off values for severe stenosis are...

  9. Bicuspid aortic valve demonstrated with multislice computed tomography - a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marzec, M.; Lasek, W.; Serafin, Z.; Laskowska, K.; Swiatkiewicz, I.; Kubica, J.

    2004-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is one of the most common congenital heart defects and often coexists with other congenital abnormalities of the heart and great vessels. A standard diagnostic technique for valve imaging is echocardiography. However, suboptimal images may cause a diagnostic problem, especially in obese patients, women and in case of significant valve calcifications. The paper reports a case of a 27-year-old male patient with recurrent chest pain, appearing regardless of exertion. Routine physical examination, laboratory tests and echocardiography were negative. Multislice computed tomography (MSCT) showed normal coronary arteries and bicuspid aortic valve. The diagnostics of bicuspid aortic valve and the diagnostic value of MSCT are discussed. MSCT seems to be an important point in cardiac diagnostic algorithms, being an alternative modality for MR in BAV imaging. The presented case emphasizes the potential of MSCT for the diagnostics of cardiac valve congenital diseases. (author)

  10. A quarter of a century of experience with aortic valve-sparing operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Tirone E; Feindel, Christopher M; David, Carolyn M; Manlhiot, Cedric

    2014-09-01

    To examine the late outcomes of aortic valve-sparing operations to treat patients with aortic root aneurysm with and without aortic insufficiency (AI) in a cohort of patients followed up prospectively since 1988. A total of 371 consecutive patients had undergone aortic valve-sparing surgery (mean age, 47 ± 15 years; 78% men) from 1988 through 2010. In addition to the aortic root aneurysm, 47% had moderate or severe AI, 35.5% had Marfan syndrome, 12.1% had type A aortic dissection, 9.2% had bicuspid aortic valve, 8.4% had mitral insufficiency, 16.1% had aortic arch aneurysm, and 10.2% had coronary artery disease. Reimplantation of the aortic valve was used in 296 patients and remodeling of the aortic root in 75. Cusp repair by plication of the free margin along the nodule of Arantius was used in 36.6% of patients, and reinforcement of the free margin with a double layer of fine Gore-Tex suture in 24.2%. The patients were followed up prospectively with images of the aortic root for a median follow-up of 8.9 ± 5.2 years. A total of 4 operative and 39 late deaths occurred. Survival at 18 years was 76.8% ± 4.31%, lower than that for the general population matched for age and gender. Age, type A aortic dissection, impaired ventricular function, and preoperative AI were associated with increased mortality on multivariable analysis. Reoperations on the aortic valve were performed in 8 patients for recurrent AI and in 2 for infective endocarditis. Freedom from reoperation on the aortic valve at 18 years was 94.8% ± 2.0%. No predictors of the need for reoperation were found on multivariable analysis. Eighteen patients developed AI greater than mild. Freedom from AI greater than mild at 18 years was 78.0% ± 4.8%. No predictors of recurrent AI were identified on multivariable analysis. Aortic valve-sparing operations continue to provide excellent clinical outcomes, although a slow but progressive deterioration of aortic valve function seems to occur during the first 2

  11. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With Early- and New-Generation Devices in Bicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoon, Sung Han; Lefèvre, Thierry; Ahn, Jung Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies have evaluated the clinical outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis (AS). Particularly, limited data exist comparing the results of TAVR with new-generation devices versus early-generation devices.  Objectives...... This study sought to evaluate the clinical outcomes of TAVR for bicuspid AS with early- and new-generation devices.  Methods The Bicuspid TAVR Registry is an international multicenter study enrolling consecutive patients with bicuspid AS undergoing TAVR between April 2005 and May 2015.  Results Of 301...... patients, 199 patients (71.1%) were treated with early-generation devices (Sapien XT [Edwards Lifesciences Corporation, Irvine, California]: n = 87; CoreValve [Medtronic, Minneapolis, Minnesota]: n = 112) and 102 with new-generation devices (Sapien 3 [Edwards Lifesciences Corporation]: n = 91; Lotus...

  12. Expanding indications for valve-sparing aortic root reconstruction: early and midterm results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valo, Johanna; Jokinen, Janne J; Kaarne, Markku; Ihlberg, Leo

    2013-02-01

    Valve-sparing aortic root reconstruction (VSRR) is an accepted method to treat patients with aortic root dilation. The role of the VSRR is less well defined for patients with bicuspid aortic valve, severe aortic valve insufficiency, congenital heart defects, and type A aortic dissection. We studied the clinical outcome of patients who underwent VSRR for expanded indications. Seventy-eight patients underwent VSRR between the 2005 and 2012. Seventy-two patients (92%) underwent reimplantation and 6 patients (8%) were operated on with the remodeling technique. The mean age was 51 ± 12 years (range 24 to 73). For 71 patients (91%), the operation was elective, and for 7 (9%; all with type A aortic dissection), on an emergency basis. Preoperatively, the degree of aortic insufficiency was graded as 2+ or greater for 27 patients (35%). Connective tissue disorder (Marfan or Loeys-Dietz), bicuspid aortic valve, or congenital heart disease was present in 15 (19%), 15 (19%), and 7 patients (9%), respectively. Concomitant aortic valve leaflet repair was performed for 39 patients (50%). The mean follow-up time was 2.4 ± 1.7 years (range, 0.1 to 7.0). Thirty-day mortality was zero. The rate of postoperative complications was low: stroke 3%, renal failure 3%, prosthesis infection 1%, and low cardiac output syndrome 1%. Survival was 100% at 1 year and 97% at 5 years. Freedom from recurrent aortic valve insufficiency (≥2+) during the follow-up was 94%. The midterm results of VSRR in terms of survival, freedom from recurrent aortic valve insufficiency, and the need for reoperation are excellent, even for high-risk patients. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Simulation for transthoracic echocardiography of aortic valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Navin C.; Kapur, K. K.; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra

    2016-01-01

    Simulation allows interactive transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) learning using a virtual three-dimensional model of the heart and may aid in the acquisition of the cognitive and technical skills needed to perform TTE. The ability to link probe manipulation, cardiac anatomy, and echocardiographic images using a simulator has been shown to be an effective model for training anesthesiology residents in transesophageal echocardiography. A proposed alternative to real-time reality patient-based learning is simulation-based training that allows anesthesiologists to learn complex concepts and procedures, especially for specific structures such as aortic valve. PMID:27397455

  14. Autopsy after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Kesteren, F; Wiegerinck, E M A; Rizzo, S

    2017-01-01

    Autopsy after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a new field of interest in cardiovascular pathology. To identify the cause of death, it is important to be familiar with specific findings related to the time interval between the procedure and death. We aimed to provide an overview...... different cause of death as was clinically determined. Autopsy on patients who underwent TAVI reveals specific patterns of cardiovascular pathology that clearly relate to the time interval between TAVI and death and significantly adds to the clinical diagnosis. Our data support the role of autopsy including...

  15. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement in Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Duke E; Vricella, Luca A

    2005-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is the most common inherited connective tissue disorder, affecting approximately 1 in 10,000 live births. The cardinal features of Marfan syndrome are the abnormalities of the skeleton (tall stature, arachnodactyly, and joint hyperelasticity), eye (lens subluxation), and aorta (root aneurysm with proclivity toward rupture and dissection). Aortic catastrophe accounts for most of the premature mortality among Marfan patients, a risk that climbs steeply during adolescence and results in death of half of Marfan patients by the age of 40 years. Most of the improvement in life expectancy that has been achieved in Marfan syndrome is attributable to early recognition of aortic root aneurysms and prophylactic replacement with composite grafts (mechanical valve prostheses within Dacron conduits) before rupture or dissection occurs. Despite the excellent early and late results with composite grafts, there has been growing interest in operative procedures that replace the sinuses but preserve the aortic valve leaflets, to avoid anticoagulation and minimize the risk of prosthesis-related endocarditis. These procedures are still in evolution and late results are not yet known, but as with mitral repair in the setting of myxomatous disease, valve-sparing procedures in Marfan syndrome have weathered a storm of initial criticism and skepticism and are steadily gaining acceptance.

  16. Reoperation for non-structural valvular dysfunction caused by pannus ingrowth in aortic valve prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se Jin; Park, Samina; Kim, Jun Sung; Kim, Kyung-Hwan; Kim, Ki Bong; Ahn, Hyuk

    2013-07-01

    The authors' clinical experience is presented of non-structural valvular dysfunction of the prosthetic aortic valve caused by pannus ingrowth during the late postoperative period after previous heart valve surgery. Between January 1999 and April 2012, at the authors' institution, a total of 33 patients underwent reoperation for increased mean pressure gradient of the prosthetic aortic valve. All patients were shown to have pannus ingrowth. The mean interval from the previous operation was 16.7 +/- 4.3 years, and the most common etiology for the previous aortic valve replacement (AVR) was rheumatic valve disease. The mean effective orifice area index (EOAI) of the previous prosthetic valve was 0.97 +/- 0.11 cm2/m2, and the mean pressure gradient on the aortic prosthesis before reoperation was 39.1 +/- 10.7 mmHg. Two patients (6.1%) died in-hospital, and late death occurred in six patients (18.2%). At the first operation, 30 patients underwent mitral or tricuspid valve surgery as a concomitant procedure. Among these operations, mitral valve replacement (MVR) was combined in 24 of all 26 patients with rheumatic valve disease. Four patients underwent pannus removal only while the prosthetic aortic valve was left in place. The mean EOAI after reoperation was significantly increased to 1.16 +/- 0.16 cm2/m2 (p pannus ingrowth was shown in patients with a small EOAI of the prosthetic aortic valve and combined MVR for rheumatic disease. As reoperation for pannus overgrowth showed good clinical outcomes, an aggressive resection of pannus and repeated AVR should be considered in symptomatic patients to avoid the complications of other cardiac diseases.

  17. Aortic valve calcification as a predictor of location and severity of paravalvular regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koh, Ezra Y.; Lam, Kayan Y.; Bindraban, Navin R.; Cocchieri, Riccardo; Planken, R. Nils; Koch, Karel T.; Baan, Jan; de Mol, Bas A.; Marquering, Henk A.

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether the location of aortic valve calcium (AVC) influences the location of paravalvular regurgitation (PR). PR is an adverse effect of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) with a negative effect on long-term patient survival. The relationship between AVC and the occurrence

  18. Turbulence downstream of subcoronary stentless and stented aortic valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funder, Jonas Amstrup; Frost, Markus Winther; Wierup, Per; Klaaborg, Kaj-Erik; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Nygaard, Hans; Hasenkam, J Michael

    2011-08-11

    Regions of turbulence downstream of bioprosthetic heart valves may cause damage to blood components, vessel wall as well as to aortic valve leaflets. Stentless aortic heart valves are known to posses several hemodynamic benefits such as larger effective orifice areas, lower aortic transvalvular pressure difference and faster left ventricular mass regression compared with their stented counterpart. Whether this is reflected by diminished turbulence formation, remains to be shown. We implanted either stented pericardial valve prostheses (Mitroflow), stentless valve prostheses (Solo or Toronto SPV) in pigs or they preserved their native valves. Following surgery, blood velocity was measured in the cross sectional area downstream of the valves using 10MHz ultrasonic probes connected to a dedicated pulsed Doppler equipment. As a measure of turbulence, Reynolds normal stress (RNS) was calculated at two different blood pressures (baseline and 50% increase). We found no difference in maximum RNS measurements between any of the investigated valve groups. The native valve had significantly lower mean RNS values than the Mitroflow (p=0.004), Toronto SPV (p=0.008) and Solo valve (p=0.02). There were no statistically significant differences between the artificial valve groups (p=0.3). The mean RNS was significantly larger when increasing blood pressure (p=0.0006). We, thus, found no advantages for the stentless aortic valves compared with stented prosthesis in terms of lower maximum or mean RNS values. Native valves have a significantly lower mean RNS value than all investigated bioprostheses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Delayed Presentation of a Giant Ascending Aortic Aneurysm following Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tugrul Göncü

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant ascending aortic aneurysm formation following aortic valve replacement is rare. A 28-year-old man who underwent aortic valve replacement with a prosthetic valve for aortic regurgitation secondary to congenital bicuspid aortic valve about 10 years ago was diagnosed with a giant ascending aortic aneurysm about 16 cm in diameter in follow-up. The aneurysm was resected leaving the functional old mechanical prosthesis in place and implanted a 34-mm Hemashield woven graft, associated with the left and right coronary artery button implantation. Histological findings of the aortic aneurysm wall showed cystic medial necrosis. The postoperative course was uneventful and postoperative examination demonstrated good surgical results.

  20. Efficiency of aortic valve commissurotomy for congenital aortic valve stenosis in pediatric population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. А. Лукьянов

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study was designed to evaluate short-term and long-term outcomes after open aortic valve commissurotomy in the pediatric patients at our center over a period of 10 years. Methods. A retrospective study of 94 patients who underwent open surgical commissurotomy because of aortic valve stenosis between 2003 and 2013 is presented. Follow-up time was in the range of 1 to 7 years. Results. The open aortic valve commissurotomy combined with debridement of leaflet free edge 36.1 %, LVOT myectomy 11.7%, leaflet suture plastic 7.4%, modified Konno procedure 6.3%, Brom's aortoplasty 4.2% was performed for all patients. Average cardiopulmonary bypass time was 59.2 30.7 min. Median aortic cross-clamping time was 31.52 15.1 min. Hospital complications were observed in 38.2% of cases. ICU time was in the range of 1 to 31 (mean 3.2 5.1 day. Artificial lung ventilation time varied from 2 to 76 (mean 15.3 18.3 hours. Inotropic support was needed in 26.5% of cases. Mean hospital stay time was 17.1 7.3 days. At follow-up between 2 and 7 years, reoperations were required for 3 patients who underwent a Ross procedure. Conclusions. The results evidence that open surgical commissurotomy is an effective way of treatment for aortic valve stenosis, considering the accuracy of plasty and additional techniques of leaflet correction. The best children age group for this type of operation is from first to five years of life.

  1. A comparison of minimally invasive and standard aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoliński, Jarosław; Plicner, Dariusz; Grudzień, Grzegorz; Wąsowicz, Marcin; Musiał, Robert; Andres, Janusz; Kapelak, Bogusław

    2016-10-01

    The study objective was to compare aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy with aortic valve replacement through a median sternotomy. With propensity score matching, we selected 211 patients after aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy and 211 patients after aortic valve replacement who underwent operation between January 2010 and December 2013. Perioperative outcomes were analyzed, and multivariable logistic regression analysis of risk factors of postoperative morbidity was performed. For propensity score-matched patients, hospital mortality was 1.0% in the aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy group and 1.4% in the aortic valve replacement group (P = 1.000). Stroke occurred in 0.5% versus 1.4% (P = .615), myocardial infarction occurred in 1.4% versus 1.9% (P = 1.000), and new onset of atrial fibrillation occurred in 12.8% versus 24.2% (P = .003) of patients in the aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy and aortic valve replacement groups, respectively. Postoperative drainage was 353.5 ± 248.6 mL versus 544.3 ± 324.5 mL (P replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy and aortic valve replacement groups, respectively. Mediastinitis occurred in 2.8% of patients after aortic valve replacement and in 0.0% of patients after aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy surgery (P = .040). Intensive care unit stay (1.3 ± 1.2 days vs 2.6 ± 2.6 days) and hospital stay (5.7 ± 1.6 days vs 8.7 ± 4.4 days) were statistically significantly shorter in the aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy group. Aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy surgery resulted in reduced postoperative morbidity (odds ratio, 0.4; P replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy surgery resulted in a reduced infection rate, diminished postoperative bleeding and blood

  2. Trans-apical aortic valve implantation in a patient with stentless valve degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; MacCarthy, Philip; Monaghan, Mark; Wendler, Olaf

    2011-06-01

    Trans-apical valve-in-valve trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has successfully been performed in selected, high-risk patients, who suffered prosthetic degeneration after aortic valve replacement using stented xenografts. We report the case of a 79-year-old male patient who underwent one of the first successful TAVIs in a failing stentless bioprosthesis. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Early clinical outcome of aortic transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ihlberg, Leo; Nissen, Henrik Hoffmann; Nielsen, Niels Erik

    2013-01-01

    Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation has emerged as an option, in addition to reoperative surgical aortic valve replacement, to treat failed biologic heart valve substitutes. However, the clinical experience with this approach is still limited. We report the comprehensive experience...

  4. Genome-wide analysis yields new loci associating with aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgadottir, Anna; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Gretarsdottir, Solveig

    2018-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis (AS) is the most common valvular heart disease, and valve replacement is the only definitive treatment. Here we report a large genome-wide association (GWA) study of 2,457 Icelandic AS cases and 349,342 controls with a follow-up in up to 4,850 cases and 451,731 controls...

  5. Contrast induced nephropathy after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Kranin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aortic stenosis ranks the third in the structure of all cardiovascular diseases, conceding only to arterial hypertension and coronary heart disease. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI is a promising area of interventional endovascular surgery that enables to provide surgical care to a significant group of the patients with severe aortal stenosis.Aim: To assess the efficacy of prevention of the contrast induced nephropathy (CIN in patients who underwent TAVI under general anesthesia.Materials and methods: We evaluated incidence of CIN in 19 patients who underwent surgery for aortic valve stenosis under general anesthesia with hemodilution and intravenous magnesium sulfate 1 g before administration of the contrast.Results: Laboratory signs of nephropathy within the first 72 hours after the intervention were found in 8/19 (42.1% of patients. In 4 (50% of patients with CIN, its risk had been very high, in 3 (38%, high, and in 1 (12%, moderate. The results obtained are compatible with the contrast-induced acute kidney injury risk estimated from the Mehran-Barrett-Parfrey scale.Conclusion: The used technique of hemodilution and magnesium-based prevention can be considered a safe method of CIN prophylaxis in TAVI patients.

  6. Bentall and De Bono surgery for correction of valve and ascending aortic disease: long-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Virgílio Figueiredo; Real, Daniel Sundfeld Spiga; Branco, João Nelson Rodrigues; Catani, Roberto; Kim, Hyong Chun; Buffolo, Enio; Fonseca, José Honório de Almeida Palma da

    2008-01-01

    A retrospective study was performed in a series of consecutive patients who underwent a Bentall and De Bono procedure. Data were removed of medical records and follow-up data were obtained from clinical records and direct contact with patients. A total of 39 patients were studied between January 1996 and December 2005. The median age was 47 years (range 14-70). There were 33 males and six females. Eleven (25.5%) patients presented Marfan syndrome and one (2.5%) Turner syndrome. Nineteen (48.5%) patients had hypertension, eight (20.5%) had history of smoking, six (15.5%) had history of alcoholism, eight (20.5%) had dyslipidemia, two (5.0%) had diabetes and one (2.56%) had myocardial infarct previously. Twenty-eight (72%) patients were in II-III NYHA class in the moment of the surgery. Annulo-aortic ecstasy was present in 14 (35.9%) patients and aortic aneurysms in 16 (41%). The median time in intensive care unit was 8.79 days with range 2-23 days. Four (10.0%) patients underwent an emergency operation and 35 (90%) elective. The overall hospital mortality was 5% (2/39). The event-free survival is 94.87% at 1 year and 84.61% at in 5 and 10. The median time of follow-up was 46.5 months (range 14-120 months). The Bentall and De Bono technique obtained excellent results in the short-term and long-term, which support the continued use of the compositive graft technique as the preferred method of treatment for patients with aortic root disease. Our findings confirm the current literature data.

  7. Association of aortic valve calcification severity with the degree of aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koos, Ralf; Mahnken, Andreas Horst; Dohmen, Guido; Brehmer, Kathrin; Günther, Rolf W; Autschbach, Rüdiger; Marx, Nikolaus; Hoffmann, Rainer

    2011-07-15

    This study sought to examine a possible relationship between the severity of aortic valve calcification (AVC), the distribution of AVC and the degree of aortic valve regurgitation (AR) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) for severe aortic stenosis (AS). 57 patients (22 men, 81 ± 5 years) with symptomatic AS and with a logistic EuroSCORE of 24 ± 12 were included. 38 patients (67%) received a third (18F)-generation CoreValve® aortic valve prosthesis, in 19 patients (33%) an Edwards SAPIEN™ prosthesis was implanted. Prior to TAVI dual-source computed tomography for assessment of AVC was performed. To determine the distribution of AVC the percentage of the calcium load of the most severely calcified cusp was calculated. After TAVI the degree of AR was determined by angiography and echocardiography. The severity of AR after TAVI was related to the severity and distribution of AVC. There was no association between the distribution of AVC and the degree of paravalvular AR after TAVI as assessed by angiography (r = -0.02, p = 0.88). Agatston AVC scores were significantly higher in patients with AR grade ≥ 3 (5055 ± 1753, n = 3) than in patients with AR grade AVC scores > 3000 were associated with a relevant paravalvular AR and showed a trend for increased need for second manoeuvres. There was a significant correlation between the severity of AVC and the degree of AR after AVR (r = 0.50, p AVC have an increased risk for a relevant AR after TAVI as well as a trend for increased need for additional procedures. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Successful Thrombolysis of Aortic Prosthetic Valve Thrombosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arun Kumar Agnihotri

    patients with valvular heart disease). Endorsed by the Society of Cardiovascular. Anesthesiologists, Society for Cardiovascular. Angiography and Interventions, and Society of. Thoracic Surgeons. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2008;52(13):e1-142. 5. Elkayam U, Bitar F. Valvular heart disease and pregnancy. Part II: prosthetic valves.

  9. Maximizing prosthetic valve size with the Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jan; Geha, Alexander S.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY: The CarboMedics Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve allows a one-size (and often two-size) increase over the standard intra-annular valve. This advantage should minimize the risk of patient-prosthesis mismatch, where the effective prosthetic valve orifice area....... This study evaluates the authors' clinical experience with Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve size selection, and the technical aspects of implantation. METHODS: Between January 1999 and October 2005, a total of 251 consecutive patients underwent 252 aortic valve replacements with Top Hat supra...... required unplanned coronary bypass, and 30-day mortality was 2.0% (5/251), indicating a good safety profile for the valves implanted in this series. CONCLUSION: The general distribution of implant sizes in the US indicates that cardiac surgeons may be under-sizing the Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve...

  10. David valve-sparing aortic root replacement: equivalent mid-term outcome for different valve types with or without connective tissue disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvitting, John-Peder Escobar; Kari, Fabian A; Fischbein, Michael P; Liang, David H; Beraud, Anne-Sophie; Stephens, Elizabeth H; Mitchell, R Scott; Miller, D Craig

    2013-01-01

    Although implicitly accepted by many that the durability of valve-sparing aortic root replacement in patients with bicuspid aortic valve disease and connective tissue disorders will be inferior, this hypothesis has not been rigorously investigated. From 1993 to 2009, 233 patients (27% bicuspid aortic valve, 40% Marfan syndrome) underwent Tirone David valve-sparing aortic root replacement. Follow-up averaged 4.7 ± 3.3 years (1102 patient-years). Freedom from adverse outcomes was determined using log-rank calculations. Survival at 5 and 10 years was 98.7% ± 0.7% and 93.5% ± 5.1%, respectively. Freedom from reoperation (all causes) on the aortic root was 92.2% ± 3.6% at 10 years; 3 reoperations were aortic valve replacement owing to structural valve deterioration. Freedom from structural valve deterioration at 10 years was 96.1% ± 2.1%. No significant differences were found in survival (P = .805, P = .793, respectively), reoperation (P = .179, P = .973, respectively), structural valve deterioration (P = .639, P = .982, respectively), or any other functional or clinical endpoints when patients were stratified by valve type (tricuspid aortic valve vs bicuspid aortic valve) or associated connective tissue disorder. At the latest echocardiographic follow-up (95% complete), 202 patients (94.8%) had none or trace aortic regurgitation, 10 (4.7%) mild, 0 had moderate to severe, and 1 (0.5%) had severe aortic regurgitation. Freedom from greater than 2+ aortic regurgitation at 10 years was 95.3% ± 2.5%. Six patients sustained acute type B aortic dissection (freedom at 10 years, 90.4% ± 5.0%). Tirone David reimplantation valve-sparing aortic root replacement in carefully selected young patients was associated with excellent clinical and echocardiographic outcome in patients with either a tricuspid aortic valve or bicuspid aortic valve. No demonstrable adverse influence was found for Marfan syndrome or connective tissue disorder on durability, clinical outcome

  11. Is aortopathy in bicuspid aortic valve disease a congenital defect or a result of abnormal hemodynamics? A critical reappraisal of a one-sided argument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girdauskas, Evaldas; Borger, Michael A; Secknus, Maria-Anna; Girdauskas, Gracijus; Kuntze, Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Although there is adequate evidence that bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is an inheritable disorder, there is a great controversy regarding the pathogenesis of dilatation of the proximal aorta. The hemodynamic theory was the first explanation for BAV aortopathy. The genetic theory, however, has become increasingly popular over the last decade and can now be viewed as the clearly dominant one. The widespread belief that BAV disease is a congenital disorder of vascular connective tissue has led to more aggressive treatment recommendations of the proximal aorta in such patients, approaching aortic management recommendations for patients with Marfan syndrome. There is emerging evidence that the 'clinically normal' BAV is associated with abnormal flow patterns and asymmetrically increased wall stress in the proximal aorta. Recent in vitro and in vivo studies on BAV function provide a unique hemodynamic insight into the different phenotypes of BAV disease and asymmetry of corresponding aortopathy even in the presence of a 'clinically normal' BAV. On the other hand, there is a subgroup of young male patients with BAV and a root dilatation phenotype, who may present the predominantly genetic form of BAV disease. In the face of these important findings, we feel that a critical review of this clinical problem is timely and appropriate, as the prevailing BAV-aortopathy theory undoubtedly affects the surgical approach to this common clinical entity. Thorough analysis of the recent literature shows a growing amount of evidence supporting the hemodynamic theory of aortopathy in patients with BAV disease. Data from recent studies requires a reevaluation of our overwhelming support of the genetic theory, and obliges us to acknowledge that hemodynamics plays an important role in the development of this disease process. Given the marked heterogeneity of BAV disease, further studies are required in order to more precisely determine which theory is the 'correct' one for explaining the

  12. Results of aortic valve repair using decellularized bovine pericardium in congenital surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordmeyer, Sarah; Murin, Peter; Schulz, Antonia; Danne, Friederike; Nordmeyer, Johannes; Kretzschmar, Johanna; Sumbadze, Daria; Schmitt, Katharina Rose Luise; Miera, Oliver; Cho, Mi-Young; Sinzobahamvya, Nicodeme; Berger, Felix; Ovroutski, Stanislav; Photiadis, Joachim

    2018-04-30

    The search for an optimal patch material for aortic valve reconstruction (AVR) is an ongoing challenge. In this study, we report our experience of AVR using decellularized bovine pericardial patch material in congenital heart surgery. Data of 40 consecutive patients who underwent AVR using the CardioCel® patch (Admedus Regen Pty Ltd, Perth, WA, Australia) between February 2014 and August 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. The median age of the patients at operation was 9 (2-34) years, and 18 patients were younger than 7 years. Twenty-six patients initially presented with aortic valve insufficiency (AI) and 14 with stenosis. Clinical and echocardiographic data were available until August 2017 for a median postoperative follow-up (FU) of 22 (6-42) months. Nine of 40 (23%) patients experienced an event during FU (death: n = 1, 2.5%; reoperation: n = 8, 20%). Overall, the probability of freedom from reoperation or death was 97 ± 3%, 76 ± 9% and 57 ± 12% at 12, 24 and 36 months of FU, respectively. Reason for reoperation was stenosis in 3 (37.5%) patients, insufficiency in 4 (50%) patients and 1 (12.5%) patient was diagnosed with aortic valve endocarditis. Of the remaining 31 patients, 2 patients are scheduled for reoperation (aortic valve stenosis: n = 1 and AI: n = 1) and 9 patients exhibit worsening of aortic valve function with moderate AI. Freedom from developing combined end point [death/reoperation/moderate degree of aortic valve dysfunction (aortic valve stenosis, AI)] after AVR was 92 ± 5%, 55 ± 9% and 28 ± 9% at 12, 24 and 36 months, respectively. AVR using decellularized bovine pericardial patch material in patients with congenital aortic valve disease show unsatisfactory results within the first 3 years of FU.

  13. Limited versus full sternotomy for aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmani, Bilal H; Jones, Sion G; Malaisrie, S C; Chung, Darryl A; Williams, Richard Jnn

    2017-04-10

    Aortic valve disease is a common condition that is easily treatable with cardiac surgery. This is conventionally performed by opening the sternum longitudinally down the centre ("median sternotomy") and replacing the valve under cardiopulmonary bypass. Median sternotomy is generally well tolerated, but as less invasive options have become available, the efficacy of limited incisions has been called into question. In particular, the effects of reducing the visibility and surgical access has raised safety concerns with regards to the placement of cannulae, venting of the heart, epicardial wire placement, and de-airing of the heart at the end of the procedure. These difficulties may increase operating times, affecting outcome. The benefits of smaller incisions are thought to include decreased pain; improved respiratory mechanics; reductions in wound infections, bleeding, and need for transfusion; shorter intensive care stay; better cosmesis; and a quicker return to normal activity. To assess the effects of minimally invasive aortic valve replacement via a limited sternotomy versus conventional aortic valve replacement via median sternotomy in people with aortic valve disease requiring surgical replacement. We performed searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, clinical trials registries, and manufacturers' websites from inception to July 2016, with no language limitations. We reviewed references of identified papers to identify any further studies of relevance. Randomised controlled trials comparing aortic valve replacement via a median sternotomy versus aortic valve replacement via a limited sternotomy. We excluded trials that performed other minimally invasive incisions such as mini-thoracotomies, port access, trans-apical, trans-femoral or robotic procedures. Although some well-conducted prospective and retrospective case-control and cohort studies exist, these were not included in this review. Two review authors independently assessed trial papers to extract data

  14. Aortic insufficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page, please enable JavaScript. Aortic insufficiency is a heart valve disease in which the aortic valve does not close ... aortic insufficiency Images Aortic insufficiency References Carabello BA. Valvular heart disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil ...

  15. TRANSCATHETER AORTIC VALVE IMPLANTATION. STATE OF THE PROBLEM AND PROSPECTS IN RUSSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Imaev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays aortic stenosis is the most common valvular pathology in Europe and North America and its incidence increases with age. Long asymptomatic period, the duration of which varies in different patients, is the main clinical feature of this disease. In 80% of asymptomatic patients with the severe aortic stenosis the onset of clinical signs that significantly worsen the prognosis, occurs within the next 4 years. So, if two-year survival rate in asymptomatic period is at least 50%, a 5-year survival rate in patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis without surgery, according to some estimates, is reduced to 15%. Therefore, these patients do not have any alternative to surgery. At that, high risk of complications after surgery and perioperative mortality related to them are the most essential problems of surgical treatment of the aortic valve diseases in the setting of cardiopulmonary bypass. This was the decisive factor for the development of alternative methods of surgical correction of the aortic valve diseases. Indications and contraindications for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI, which is currently a "disruptive technology", are discussed. Different models of aortic valve prostheses, the use of which is confirmed by the available evidence, are considered. The most important unsolved problems of TAVI use in recent times are mentioned in brief. More than 300 TAVI procedures have been performed in Russia recently which definitely does not cover the actual needs.

  16. TRANSCATHETER AORTIC VALVE IMPLANTATION. STATE OF THE PROBLEM AND PROSPECTS IN RUSSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Imaev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays aortic stenosis is the most common valvular pathology in Europe and North America and its incidence increases with age. Long asymptomatic period, the duration of which varies in different patients, is the main clinical feature of this disease. In 80% of asymptomatic patients with the severe aortic stenosis the onset of clinical signs that significantly worsen the prognosis, occurs within the next 4 years. So, if two-year survival rate in asymptomatic period is at least 50%, a 5-year survival rate in patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis without surgery, according to some estimates, is reduced to 15%. Therefore, these patients do not have any alternative to surgery. At that, high risk of complications after surgery and perioperative mortality related to them are the most essential problems of surgical treatment of the aortic valve diseases in the setting of cardiopulmonary bypass. This was the decisive factor for the development of alternative methods of surgical correction of the aortic valve diseases. Indications and contraindications for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI, which is currently a "disruptive technology", are discussed. Different models of aortic valve prostheses, the use of which is confirmed by the available evidence, are considered. The most important unsolved problems of TAVI use in recent times are mentioned in brief. More than 300 TAVI procedures have been performed in Russia recently which definitely does not cover the actual needs.

  17. The flaws in the detail of an observational study on transcatheter aortic valve implantation versus surgical aortic valve replacement in intermediate-risks patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barili, Fabio; Freemantle, Nick; Folliguet, Thierry; Muneretto, Claudio; de Bonis, Michele; Czerny, Martin; Obadia, Jean Francois; Al-Attar, Nawwar; Bonaros, Nikolaos; Kluin, Jolanda; Lorusso, Roberto; Punjabi, Prakash; Sadaba, Rafael; Suwalski, Piotr; Benedetto, Umberto; Böning, Andreas; Falk, Volkmar; Sousa-Uva, Miguel; Kappetein, Pieter A.; Menicanti, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    The PARTNER group recently published a comparison between the latest generation SAPIEN 3 transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) system (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in intermediate-risk patients, apparently demonstrating superiority of

  18. Effect of tricuspid regurgitation and the right heart on survival after transcatheter aortic valve replacement: insights from the Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves II inoperable cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindman, Brian R; Maniar, Hersh S; Jaber, Wael A; Lerakis, Stamatios; Mack, Michael J; Suri, Rakesh M; Thourani, Vinod H; Babaliaros, Vasilis; Kereiakes, Dean J; Whisenant, Brian; Miller, D Craig; Tuzcu, E Murat; Svensson, Lars G; Xu, Ke; Doshi, Darshan; Leon, Martin B; Zajarias, Alan

    2015-04-01

    Tricuspid regurgitation (TR) and right ventricular (RV) dysfunction adversely affect outcomes in patients with heart failure or mitral valve disease, but their impact on outcomes in patients with aortic stenosis treated with transcatheter aortic valve replacement has not been well characterized. Among 542 patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis treated in the Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves (PARTNER) II trial (inoperable cohort) with a Sapien or Sapien XT valve via a transfemoral approach, baseline TR severity, right atrial and RV size and RV function were evaluated by echocardiography according to established guidelines. One-year mortality was 16.9%, 17.2%, 32.6%, and 61.1% for patients with no/trace (n=167), mild (n=205), moderate (n=117), and severe (n=18) TR, respectively (Pright atrial and RV enlargement were also associated with increased mortality (Pright atrial and RV enlargement, but not RV dysfunction. There was an interaction between TR and mitral regurgitation severity (P=0.04); the increased hazard of death associated with moderate/severe TR only occurred in those with no/trace/mild mitral regurgitation. In inoperable patients treated with transcatheter aortic valve replacement, moderate or severe TR and right heart enlargement are independently associated with increased 1-year mortality; however, the association between moderate or severe TR and an increased hazard of death was only found in those with minimal mitral regurgitation at baseline. These findings may improve our assessment of anticipated benefit from transcatheter aortic valve replacement and support the need for future studies on TR and the right heart, including whether concomitant treatment of TR in operable but high-risk patients with aortic stenosis is warranted. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01314313. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. 3D Bioprinting of Heterogeneous Aortic Valve Conduits with Alginate/Gelatin Hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Bin; Hockaday, Laura A.; Kang, Kevin H.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Heart valve disease is a serious and growing public health problem for which prosthetic replacement is most commonly indicated. Current prosthetic devices are inadequate for younger adults and growing children. Tissue engineered living aortic valve conduits have potential for remodeling, regeneration, and growth, but fabricating natural anatomical complexity with cellular heterogeneity remain challenging. In the current study, we implement 3D bioprinting to fabricate living alginate/gelatin hydrogel valve conduits with anatomical architecture and direct incorporation of dual cell types in a regionally constrained manner. Encapsulated aortic root sinus smooth muscle cells (SMC) and aortic valve leaflet interstitial cells (VIC) were viable within alginate/gelatin hydrogel discs over 7 days in culture. Acellular 3D printed hydrogels exhibited reduced modulus, ultimate strength, and peak strain reducing slightly over 7-day culture, while the tensile biomechanics of cell-laden hydrogels were maintained. Aortic valve conduits were successfully bioprinted with direct encapsulation of SMC in the valve root and VIC in the leaflets. Both cell types were viable (81.4±3.4% for SMC and 83.2±4.0% for VIC) within 3D printed tissues. Encapsulated SMC expressed elevated alpha-smooth muscle actin when printed in stiff matrix, while VIC expressed elevated vimentin in soft matrix. These results demonstrate that anatomically complex, heterogeneously encapsulated aortic valve hydrogel conduits can be fabricated with 3D bioprinting. PMID:23015540

  20. Assessing Optimal Blood Pressure in Patients With Asymptomatic Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Olav W; Sajadieh, Ahmad; Sabbah, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence for treating hypertension in patients with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis is scarce. We used data from the SEAS trial (Simvastatin Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis) to assess what blood pressure (BP) would be optimal. METHODS: A total of 1767 patients with asymptomatic aortic...... stenosis and no manifest atherosclerotic disease were analyzed. Outcomes were all-cause mortality, cardiovascular death, heart failure, stroke, myocardial infarction, and aortic valve replacement. BP was analyzed in Cox models as the cumulative average of serially measured BP and a time-varying covariate.......039). CONCLUSIONS: Optimal BP seems to be systolic BP of 130 to 139 mm Hg and diastolic BP of 70 to 90 mm Hg in these patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis and no manifest atherosclerotic disease or diabetes mellitus. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT...

  1. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation for a failed bio-bentall in patients with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigel, Roy; Siegel, Robert J; Kahlon, Ravi S; Jilaihawi, Hasan; Cheng, Wen; Makkar, Raj R

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Marfan syndrome are at risk for ascending aortic dilation and dissection at the level of the aortic sinuses, making aortic root and valve replacement common. Patients undergoing an aortic root replacement with concomitant replacement of the aortic valve with a bioprosthesis (Bio-Bentall) are predisposed to bioprosthesis failure. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become an option for aortic valve replacement, avoiding cardiopulmonary bypass and/or median sternotomy. We present the first 2 reported patients with Marfan syndrome who underwent a valve-in-valve TAVI in the setting of a prior Bio-Bentall. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Expanding TAVI options: elective rotational atherectomy during trans-catheter aortic valve implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piccoli, Anna; Lunardi, Mattia; Ariotti, Sara; Ferrero, Valeria; Vassanelli, Corrado; Ribichini, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Aortic valve stenosis (AVS) in the elderly is frequently associated to coronary artery disease (CAD). In patients with significant coronary stenosis surgical valve replacement is associated to coronary bypass grafting, but whether coronary angioplasty is needed in patients receiving trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is unknown. Given the frequent complexity of CAD in the elderly with calcific AVS, rotational atherectomy (RA) may be needed in some cases. No data are available about feasibility and safety of RA during TAVI. The need for myocardial revascularization in TAVI candidates is discussed, and a series of RA cases performed during TAVI is described

  3. Expanding TAVI options: elective rotational atherectomy during trans-catheter aortic valve implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piccoli, Anna; Lunardi, Mattia; Ariotti, Sara; Ferrero, Valeria; Vassanelli, Corrado; Ribichini, Flavio, E-mail: flavio.ribichini@univr.it

    2015-01-15

    Summary: Aortic valve stenosis (AVS) in the elderly is frequently associated to coronary artery disease (CAD). In patients with significant coronary stenosis surgical valve replacement is associated to coronary bypass grafting, but whether coronary angioplasty is needed in patients receiving trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is unknown. Given the frequent complexity of CAD in the elderly with calcific AVS, rotational atherectomy (RA) may be needed in some cases. No data are available about feasibility and safety of RA during TAVI. The need for myocardial revascularization in TAVI candidates is discussed, and a series of RA cases performed during TAVI is described.

  4. Midterm Results of Aortic Valve Replacement with Cryopreserved Homografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Özker

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the midterm clinical results of aortic valve replacement with cryopreserved homografts.Materials and Methods: Aortic valve replacement was performed in 40 patients with cryopreserved homograft. The indications were aortic valve endocarditis in 20 patients (50%, truncus arteriosus in 6 patients (15%, and re-stenosis or regurtitation after aortic valve reconstruction in 14 (35% patients. The valve sizes ranged from 10 to 27mm. A full root replacement technique was used for homograft replacement in all patients.Results: The 30-day postoperative mortality rate was 12.5% (5 patients. There were four late deaths. Only one of them was related to cardiac events. Overall mortality was 22.5%. Thirty-three patients were followed up for 67±26 months. Two patients needed reoperation due to aortic aneurysm caused by endocarditis. The mean transvalvular gradient significantly decreased after valve replacement (p<0.003. The last follow up showed that the 27 (82% patients had a normal left ventricular function.Conclusion: Cryopreserved homografts are safe alternatives to mechanical valves that can be used when there are proper indications. Although it has a high perioperative mortality rate, cryopreserved homograft implantation is an alternative for valve replacement, particularly in younger patients and for complex surgical problems such as endocarditis that must be minimalized.

  5. Cardiac taurine and principal amino acids in right and left ventricles of patients with either aortic valve stenosis or coronary artery disease:the importance of diabetes and gender

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Martin J; Littlejohns, Ben R; Lin, Hua; Angelini, Gianni D; Suleiman, M-Saadeh

    2014-01-01

    Free intracellular taurine and principal α-amino acids (glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, asparagine and alanine) are abundant in human heart. They are cellular regulators and their concentration can change in response to disease and cardiac insults and have been shown to differ between hypertrophic left ventricle (LV) and the relatively "normal" right ventricle (RV) in patients with aortic valve stenosis (AVS). This difference has not been shown for coronary artery disease (CAD) and there are...

  6. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation of the direct flow medical aortic valve with minimal or no contrast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latib, Azeem, E-mail: alatib@gmail.com [Interventional Cardiology Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute and EMO-GVM Centro Cuore Columbus, Milan (Italy); Maisano, Francesco; Colombo, Antonio [Interventional Cardiology Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute and EMO-GVM Centro Cuore Columbus, Milan (Italy); Klugmann, Silvio [Azienda Ospedaliera Niguarda Ca Granda, Piazza Ospedale Maggiore 3, Milan (Italy); Low, Reginald; Smith, Thomas [University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Davidson, Charles [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Harreld, John H. [Clinical Imaging Analytics, Guerneville, CA (United States); Bruschi, Giuseppe; DeMarco, Federico [Azienda Ospedaliera Niguarda Ca Granda, Piazza Ospedale Maggiore 3, Milan (Italy)

    2014-06-15

    The 18F Direct Flow Medical (DFM) THV has conformable sealing rings, which minimizes aortic regurgitation and permits full hemodynamic assessment of valve performance prior to permanent implantation. During the DISCOVER trial, three patients who were at risk for receiving contrast media, two due to severe CKD and one due to a recent hyperthyroid reaction to contrast, underwent DFM implantation under fluoroscopic and transesophageal guidance without aortography during either positioning or to confirm the final position. Valve positioning was based on the optimal angiographic projection as calculated by the pre-procedural multislice CT scan. Precise optimization of valve position was performed to minimize transvalve gradient and aortic regurgitation. Prior to final implantation, transvalve hemodynamics were assessed invasively and by TEE. The post-procedure mean gradients were 7, 10, 11 mm Hg. The final AVA by echo was 1.70, 1.40 and 1.68 cm{sup 2}. Total aortic regurgitation post-procedure was none or trace in all three patients. Total positioning and assessment of valve performance time was 4, 6, and 12 minutes. Contrast was only used to confirm successful percutaneous closure of the femoral access site. The total contrast dose was 5, 8, 12 cc. Baseline eGFR and creatinine was 28, 22, 74 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2} and 2.35, 2.98, and 1.03 mg/dL, respectively. Renal function was unchanged post-procedure: eGFR = 25, 35, and 96 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2} and creatinine = 2.58, 1.99, and 1.03 mg/dL, respectively. In conclusion, the DFM THV provides the ability to perform TAVI with minimal or no contrast. The precise and predictable implantation technique can be performed with fluoro and echo guidance.

  7. Characteristics of aortic valve dysfunction and ascending aorta dimensions according to bicuspid aortic valve morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hong Ju [Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Je Kyoun; Chee, Hyun Kun; Kim, Jun Suk [Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Sung Min [Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    To characterize aortic valve dysfunction and ascending aorta dimensions according to bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) morphology using computed tomography (CT) and surgical findings. We retrospectively enrolled 209 patients with BAVs who underwent transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and CT. BAVs were classified as anterior-posterior (BAV-AP) or lateral (BAV-LA) orientation of the cusps and divided according to the presence (raphe+) or absence (raphe-) of a raphe. Ascending aortic dimensions were measured by CT at four levels. BAV-AP was present in 129 patients (61.7 %) and raphe+ in 120 (57.4 %). Sixty-nine patients (33.0 %) had aortic regurgitation (AR), 70 (33.5 %) had aortic stenosis (AS), and 58 (27.8 %) had combined AS and AR. AR was more common in patients with BAV-AP and raphe+; AS was more common with BAV-LA and raphe-.Annulus/body surface area and tubular portion/body surface area diameters in patients with BAV-AP (17.1 ± 2.3 mm/m{sup 2} and 24.2 ± 5.3 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively) and raphe+ (17.3 ± 2.2 mm/m{sup 2} and 24.2 ± 5.5 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively) were significantly different from those with BAV-LA (15.8 ± 1.9 mm/m{sup 2} and 26.4 ± 5.5 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively) and raphe- (15.7 ± 1.9 mm/m{sup 2} and 26.2 ± 5.4 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively). The morphological characteristics of BAV might be associated with the type of valvular dysfunction, and degree and location of an ascending aorta dilatation. (orig.)

  8. Quantitative assessment of an aortic and pulmonary valve function according to valve fenestration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirkhani, S.H.; Golestani, M.G.; Hosini, M.; Kazemian, A.

    1999-01-01

    There are some reasons for malfunction of aortic and pulmonary valve like fibrosis, calcification, and atheroma. Although, in some papers fenestration were known as a pathologic sign, but it is not generally accepted, while this matter is important in choosing suitable Homograft Heart Valve. In this paper fenestrations and its size, numbers and situation effect was studied. We collected 98 hearts, the donors died because of accident, we excluded valves with atheroma, calcification, fibrosis and unequal cusps, 91 aortic and 93 pulmonary valves were given further consideration. We classified valves according to situation, number and size of fenestration. Each valve was tested with 104 cm of non-nal saline column pressure which is equal to 76 mm Hg. Valve efficacy was detected by fluid flow assay. With study of 184 valves, 95 had no fenestration, 64 had less than 2 fenestration and 25 had more than 2 fenestration. Valve efficacy in condition of less than 2 fenestration was more than others (p <0.01). Malfunction effects of fenestration increased in larger valve and it will be decreased if their situation would be marginal (free margin of cusp). In the comparison of aortic and pulmonary valve we saw that malfunction effect of fenestration in pulmonary valve was more than aortic valve. Our experience in Immam Khomeini Homograft Valve Bank has shown that a great deal of valves is fenestrated. It seems that fenestration must be considered as a quality criterion in homograft valve preparation, especially in pulmonary and large aortic valves; but complementary studies is necessary

  9. Outcomes of Aortic Valve-Sparing Operations in Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Tirone E; David, Carolyn M; Manlhiot, Cedric; Colman, Jack; Crean, Andrew M; Bradley, Timothy

    2015-09-29

    In many cardiac units, aortic valve-sparing operations have become the preferred surgical procedure to treat aortic root aneurysm in patients with Marfan syndrome, based on relatively short-term outcomes. This study examined the long-term outcomes of aortic valve-sparing operations in patients with Marfan syndrome. All patients with Marfan syndrome operated on for aortic root aneurysm from 1988 through 2012 were followed prospectively for a median of 10 years. Follow-up was 100% complete. Time-to-event analyses were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method with log-rank test for comparisons. A total of 146 patients with Marfan syndrome had aortic valve-sparing operations. Reimplantation of the aortic valve was performed in 121 and remodeling of the aortic root was performed in 25 patients. Mean age was 35.7 ± 11.4 years and two-thirds were men. Nine patients had acute, 2 had chronic type A, and 3 had chronic type B aortic dissections before surgery. There were 1 operative and 6 late deaths, 5 caused by complications of dissections. Mortality rate at 15 years was 6.8 ± 2.9%, higher than the general population matched for age and sex. Five patients required reoperation on the aortic valve: 2 for endocarditis and 3 for aortic insufficiency. Three patients developed severe, 4 moderate, and 3 mild-to-moderate aortic insufficiency. Rate of aortic insufficiency at 15 years was 7.9 ± 3.3%, lower after reimplantation than remodeling. Nine patients developed new distal aortic dissections during follow-up. Rate of dissection at 15 years was 16.5 ± 3.4%. Aortic valve-sparing operations in patients with Marfan syndrome were associated with low rates of valve-related complications in long-term follow-up. Residual and new aortic dissections were the leading cause of death. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Computed Tomography Aortic Valve Calcium Scoring in Patients With Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawade, Tania; Clavel, Marie-Annick; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Dreyfus, Julien; Mathieu, Tiffany; Tastet, Lionel; Renard, Cedric; Gun, Mesut; Jenkins, William Steven Arthur; Macron, Laurent; Sechrist, Jacob W; Lacomis, Joan M; Nguyen, Virginia; Galian Gay, Laura; Cuéllar Calabria, Hug; Ntalas, Ioannis; Cartlidge, Timothy Robert Graham; Prendergast, Bernard; Rajani, Ronak; Evangelista, Arturo; Cavalcante, João L; Newby, David E; Pibarot, Philippe; Messika Zeitoun, David; Dweck, Marc R

    2018-03-01

    Computed tomography aortic valve calcium scoring (CT-AVC) holds promise for the assessment of patients with aortic stenosis (AS). We sought to establish the clinical utility of CT-AVC in an international multicenter cohort of patients. Patients with AS who underwent ECG-gated CT-AVC within 3 months of echocardiography were entered into an international, multicenter, observational registry. Optimal CT-AVC thresholds for diagnosing severe AS were determined in patients with concordant echocardiographic assessments, before being used to arbitrate disease severity in those with discordant measurements. In patients with long-term follow-up, we assessed whether CT-AVC thresholds predicted aortic valve replacement and death. In 918 patients from 8 centers (age, 77±10 years; 60% men; peak velocity, 3.88±0.90 m/s), 708 (77%) patients had concordant echocardiographic assessments, in whom CT-AVC provided excellent discrimination for severe AS (C statistic: women 0.92, men 0.89). Our optimal sex-specific CT-AVC thresholds (women 1377 Agatston unit and men 2062 Agatston unit) were nearly identical to those previously reported (women 1274 Agatston unit and men 2065 Agatston unit). Clinical outcomes were available in 215 patients (follow-up 1029 [126-2251] days). Sex-specific CT-AVC thresholds independently predicted aortic valve replacement and death (hazard ratio, 3.90 [95% confidence interval, 2.19-6.78]; P AVC scores, which again were an independent predictor of clinical outcomes (hazard ratio, 3.67 [95% confidence interval, 1.39-9.73]; P =0.010). Sex-specific CT-AVC thresholds accurately identify severe AS and provide powerful prognostic information. These findings support their integration into routine clinical practice. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifiers: NCT01358513, NCT02132026, NCT00338676, NCT00647088, NCT01679431. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Statins for progression of aortic valve stenosis and the best evidence for making decisions in health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Thiago

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Western world, calcified aortic valve stenosis is the most common form of valvular heart disease, affecting up to 3% of adults over the age of 75 years. It is a gradually progressive disease, characterized by a long asymptomatic phase that may last for several decades, followed by a short symptomatic phase associated with severe restriction of the valve orifice. Investigations on treatments for aortic valve stenosis are still in progress. Thus, it is believed that calcification of aortic valve stenosis is similar to the process of atherosclerosis that occurs in coronary artery disease. Recent studies have suggested that cholesterol lowering through the use of statins may have a salutary effect on the progression of aortic valve stenosis

  12. Aortic valve sparing root surgery for Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matalanis, George; Perera, Nisal K

    2017-11-01

    Aortic valve sparing root surgery (AVSRS) is a safe and durable alternative for patients with dilated roots or pure aortic regurgitation (AR), which avoids the risks of anticoagulation or valvular degeneration with prosthetic valves. Notwithstanding the theoretical challenges of greater tissue fragility in Marfan syndrome (MFS), AVSRS has been demonstrated to have equal outcomes in this condition as it does in those without MFS. The benefits of retaining the native aortic valve in this generally younger age group extend beyond those of avoiding the inconvenience and complications of prolonged exposure to anticoagulants and include ease of management for future aortic, cardiac and non-cardiac procedures which are the norm for these patients. The essential principles of AVSRS in MFS do not differ from those for the rest of the population. Successful repair and durable valve function depend on a sound understanding of the close interaction between the structure and function of this exquisitely designed piece of engineering. We are fortunate to have numerous tools in our surgical armamentarium to preserve these valves. It is the purpose of this paper to demystify the complex structure-function interactions of the aortic valve, thereby gaining an intuition for AVSRS. We will also elaborate on specific technical details of established techniques that we have found successful in preserving the normal function of these valves in the long term.

  13. Bentall procedure using cryopreserved valved aortic homografts: mid- to long-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Jan T; Sierra, Jorge; Trindade, Pedro T; Dominique, Didier; Kalangos, Afksendiyos

    2004-01-01

    The Bentall procedure is the standard operation for patients who have lesions of the ascending aorta associated with aortic valve disease. In many cases, however, mechanical prosthetic conduits are not suitable. There are few reports in the English-language medical literature concerning the mid- to long-term outcome of Bentall operations with cryopreserved homografts. Therefore, we reviewed our experience with this procedure and valved homografts. From January 1997 through December 2002, 21 patients underwent a Bentall operation with cryopreserved homografts at our institution. There were 14 males and 7 females; the mean age was 36 +/- 21 years (range, 15-74 years). Eleven patients had undergone previous aortic valve surgery. All patients had aortic dilatation or aneurysms involving the ascending aorta. Indications for surgery included aortic valve stenosis or insufficiency, and aortic valve endocarditis (native valve or prosthetic). One patient had Takayasu's arteritis and 3 had Marfan syndrome. There was 1 hospital death (due to sepsis), but no other major postoperative complications. The mean hospital stay was 14 +/- 7 days. Follow-up echocardiographic and computed tomographic scans were performed yearly. The mean follow-up was 34 months (6-72 months). Follow-up imaging revealed no calcifications or degenerative processes related to the homograft. Four patients had minimal valve regurgitation. Two patients died during follow-up. The 3-year actuarial survival rate was 85.7%. Our data suggest that the Bentall procedure with a valved homograft conduit is a safe procedure with excellent mid- to long-term results, comparable to results reported with aortic valve replacement with a homograft.

  14. Automated segmentation and geometrical modeling of the tricuspid aortic valve in 3D echocardiographic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouch, Alison M; Wang, Hongzhi; Takabe, Manabu; Jackson, Benjamin M; Sehgal, Chandra M; Gorman, Joseph H; Gorman, Robert C; Yushkevich, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    The aortic valve has been described with variable anatomical definitions, and the consistency of 2D manual measurement of valve dimensions in medical image data has been questionable. Given the importance of image-based morphological assessment in the diagnosis and surgical treatment of aortic valve disease, there is considerable need to develop a standardized framework for 3D valve segmentation and shape representation. Towards this goal, this work integrates template-based medial modeling and multi-atlas label fusion techniques to automatically delineate and quantitatively describe aortic leaflet geometry in 3D echocardiographic (3DE) images, a challenging task that has been explored only to a limited extent. The method makes use of expert knowledge of aortic leaflet image appearance, generates segmentations with consistent topology, and establishes a shape-based coordinate system on the aortic leaflets that enables standardized automated measurements. In this study, the algorithm is evaluated on 11 3DE images of normal human aortic leaflets acquired at mid systole. The clinical relevance of the method is its ability to capture leaflet geometry in 3DE image data with minimal user interaction while producing consistent measurements of 3D aortic leaflet geometry.

  15. An in vitro experimental study of flow past aortic valve under varied pulsatile conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruihang; Zhang, Yan

    2017-11-01

    Flow past aortic valve represents a complex fluid-structure interaction phenomenon that involves pulsatile, vortical, and turbulent conditions. The flow characteristics immediately downstream of the valve, such as the variation of pulsatile flow velocity, formation of vortices, distribution of shear stresses, are of particular interest to further elucidate the role of hemodynamics in various aortic diseases. However, the fluid dynamics of a realistic aortic valve is not fully understood. Particularly, it is unclear how the flow fields downstream of the aortic valve would change under varied pulsatile inlet boundary conditions. In this study, an in vitro experiment has been conducted to investigate the flow fields downstream of a silicone aortic valve model within a cardiovascular flow simulator. Phased-locked Particle Image Velocimetry measurements were performed to map the velocity fields and Reynolds normal and shear stresses at different phases in a cardiac cycle. Temporal variations of pressure across the valve model were measured using high frequency transducers. Results have been compared for different pulsatile inlet conditions, including varied frequencies (heart rates), magnitudes (stroke volumes), and cardiac contractile functions (shapes of waveforms).

  16. Survival and freedom from aortic valve-related reoperation after valve-sparing aortic root replacement in 1015 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kari, Fabian A; Doll, Kai-Nicolas; Hemmer, Wolfgang; Liebrich, Markus; Sievers, Hans-Hinrich; Richardt, Doreen; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Detter, Christian; Siepe, Matthias; Czerny, Martin; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize mortality and aortic valve replacement after valve-sparing aortic root replacement (V-SARR) in a multicentre cohort. Between 1994 and 2014, 1015 patients had V-SARR with (n = 288, 28%) or without cusp/commissure repair (n = 727, 72%) at the centres of Lübeck (n = 343, 34%), Stuttgart (n = 346, 34%), Hamburg (n = 109, 11%) and Freiburg (n = 217, 21%), Germany. Comparative survival of an age- and gender-matched general population was calculated. Log-rank tests and multiple logistic regression were used to identify risk factors. The mean follow-up was 5.2 ± 3.9 years. Cumulative follow-up comprised 2933 patient-years. Early survival was 98%. NYHA status and aneurysm size were predictive of death during mid-term follow-up (P = 0.025). Freedom from aortic valve replacement was 90% at 8 years, with the type of V-SARR (root remodelling, David II) being a risk factor (P = 0.015). Bicuspid aortic valve (P = 0.26) and initial valve function (P = 0.4) did not impact reoperation. The need of additional valve repair (cusps/commissures) was not linked to reoperation: freedom from aortic valve replacement at 8 years was 84% if cusp repair was performed versus 90% if V-SARR alone was performed (P = 0.218). Marfan syndrome had no impact on survival or on aortic valve replacement. Mid-term survival of patients after V-SARR is comparable with that of a matched general population. The regurgitant bicuspid aortic valve is a favourable substrate for V-SARR. Prophylactic surgery should be performed before symptoms or large aneurysms are present to achieve optimal mid-term outcomes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  17. Percutaneous implantation of the first repositionable aortic valve prosthesis in a patient with severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buellesfeld, Lutz; Gerckens, Ulrich; Grube, Eberhard

    2008-04-01

    Percutaneous aortic valve replacement is a new less-invasive alternative for high-risk surgical candidates with aortic stenosis. However, the clinical experience is still limited, and the currently available 'first-generation devices' revealed technical shortcomings, such as lack of repositionability and presence of paravalvular leakages. We report the first-in-man experience with the new self-expanding Lotus Valve prosthesis composed of a nitinol frame with implemented bovine pericardial leaflets which is designed to address these issues, being repositionable and covered by a flexible membrane to seal paravalvular gaps. We implanted this prosthesis in a 93-year old patient presenting with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (valve area: 0.6 cm(2)). Surgical valve replacement had been declined due to comorbidities. We used a retrograde approach for insertion of the 21-French Lotus catheter loaded with the valve prosthesis via surgical cut-down to the external iliac artery. Positioning of the valve was guided by transesophageal echo and supra-aortic angiograms. The prosthesis was successfully inserted and deployed within the calcified native valve. Echocardiography immediately after device deployment showed a significant reduction of the transaortic mean pressure gradient (32 to 9 mmHg; final valve area 1.7 cm(2)) without evidence of residual aortic regurgitation. The postprocedural clinical status improved from NYHA-IV to NYHA-II. These results remained unchanged up to the 3 month follow-up. Successful percutaneous aortic valve replacement can be performed using the new self-expanding and repositionable Lotus valve for treatment of high-risk patients with aortic valve stenosis. Further studies are mandatory to assess device safety and efficacy in larger patient populations. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Successful thrombolysis of aortic prosthetic valve thrombosis during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Successful thrombolysis of aortic prosthetic valve thrombosis during first trimester of pregnancy. A Shukla, AP Raval, R Shah. Abstract. Prosthetic heart valve thrombosis during pregnancy is life-threatening. Standard surgical treatment using cardiopulmonary bypass carries high maternal and fetal complications. Here we ...

  19. Heart Team therapeutic decision-making and treatment in severe aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav Hørsted; Holmberg, Fredrik; Gerds, Thomas Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: After transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has been available for high-risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (AVS), the decision-making of the Heart Team (HT) has not been examined. Design: All adult patients with severe AVS referred to a large tertiary medical......%), and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in 392 (81%) of patients. In patients referred to intervention, TAVI compared with SAVR patients were older (OR = 1.17 per year, 95% CI 1.09-1.26; p obesity (OR = 4.69, 1.......51-13.77; p disease (COPD) (OR = 3.66, 1.21-10.75; p = 0.02). MT patients compared with patients referred to any intervention were older, had a higher prevalence of COPD, peripheral arterial disease, previous myocardial infarction, and cerebrovascular disease...

  20. Structure and function of the tricuspid and bicuspid regurgitant aortic valve: an echocardiographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönnerfalk, Mattias; Tamás, Éva

    2015-07-01

    The emerging new treatment options for aortic valve disease call for more sophisticated diagnostics. We aimed to describe the echocardiographic pathophysiology and characteristics of the purely regurgitant aortic valve in detail. Twenty-nine men, with chronic aortic regurgitation without concomitant heart disease referred for aortic valve intervention, underwent 2D transoesophageal echocardiographic (TEE) examination prior to surgery according to a previously published matrix. Measurements of the aortic valve apparatus in long and short axis view were made in systole and diastole and analysed off-line. The aortic valves were grouped as tricuspid (TAV) or bicuspid (BAV), and classified by regurgitation mechanism. Twenty-four examinations were eligible for analysis of which 13 presented TAV and 11 BAV. The regurgitation mechanism was classified as dilatation of the aorta in 6 cases, as prolapse in 11 cases and as poor cusp tissue quality or quantity in 7 cases. The ventriculo-aortic junction (VAJ) and valve opening were closely related (TAV r = 0.5, BAV r = 0.73) but no correlation was found between the VAJ and the maximal sinus diameter (maxSiD) or the sinotubular junction (STJ). However, the STJ and maxSiD were significantly related (TAV vs BAV: systole r = 0.9, r = 0.8; diastole r = 0.9, r = 0.7), forming an entity. The conjoined BAV cusps were shorter than the anterior cusps when closed (P = 0.002); the inter-commissural distances of the cusps in the BAV group were significantly different (P = 0.001 resp. 0.03) in both systole and diastole. The VAJ was independent of other aortic dimensions and should thereby be considered as a separate entity with influence on valve opening. The detailed 2D TEE measurements of this study add further important information to our knowledge about the function and echocardiographic anatomy of the pathological aortic valve and root either as a stand-alone examination or as a benchmark and complement to 3D echocardiography. This may

  1. Emergency aortic valve replacement and Caesarian section in a primigravida with severe aortic stenosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochhar, Puneet K; Zutshi, V; Shamsunder, S; Batra, S; Ghosh, P

    2011-01-01

    Congenital bicuspid aortic valve with severe aortic stenosis (AS) is a rare condition (3-6% of patients with congenital heart disease). Pregnancy in these patients carries a high risk of maternal and fetal mortality. With advancing gestational age, these women may develop cardiac failure due to increased cardiorespiratory requirements. When medical therapy proves insufficient, cardiac surgery becomes mandatory to save the patient's life. Balloon valvuloplasty is only palliative treatment, the duration of benefit being only 6 months. Valve replacement is thus recommended. Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery with valve replacement has been reported to carry a lower risk of maternal mortality (1.5-13%) but a very high fetal risk (16-40%). This paper reports the case of a 30-year-old primigravida with severe AS with bicuspid aortic valve and pulmonary congestion clinically uncontrolled, in whom CPB surgery and aortic valve replacement was performed as an emergency procedure, along with a lower segment Caesarian section. The outcome of unrelieved severe symptomatic AS in pregnancy is poor. Multidisciplinary management is important to avoid deterioration in cardiac performance in parturients with severe AS. CPB during pregnancy carries a high risk to the fetus. Therefore, open heart surgery during pregnancy should be advised only in extreme emergencies (ie, heart failure refractory to conventional therapy).

  2. Immediate post-operative responses to transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Nielsen, Susanne; Lisby, Karen H.

    2015-01-01

    Background:Conventional treatment for patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis is surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR), but transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become a reliable alternative in high-risk patients.Aims:The aim of our study was to describe the post......-operative patient response to TAVI on the evening of the procedure and the following day before discharge from the coronary care unit. A secondary aim was to compare responses of patients younger and older than 80 years of age.Methods:A prospective, comparative observational study triangulating nurse assessment...

  3. Strut fracture in a Bjork-Shiley aortic valve prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifschultz, B D; Donoghue, E R

    1985-10-01

    Strut fracture can be a life-threatening adverse effect of mechanical prosthetic heart valves. This complication has occurred in the DeBakey, the Beall, the Cooley-Cutter and, most recently, the Bjork-Shiley valves. We report the case of a 35-year-old man who died suddenly 16 months after a 60 degree Bjork-Shiley Convexo-Concave heart valve prosthesis was inserted in the aortic position. At autopsy, the two welded attachments of the valve's outlet strut had fractured. The valve's tilting disc was found in his abdominal aorta.

  4. Bicuspid aortic valves: Diagnostic accuracy of standard axial 64-slice chest CT compared to aortic valve image plane ECG-gated cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, David J., E-mail: david.murphy@st-vincents.ie [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); McEvoy, Sinead H., E-mail: s.mcevoy@st-vincents.ie [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Iyengar, Sri, E-mail: sri.iyengar@nhs.net [Department of Radiology, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth Devon PL6 8DH (United Kingdom); Feuchtner, Gudrun, E-mail: Gudrun.Feuchtner@i-med.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Cury, Ricardo C., E-mail: r.cury@baptisthealth.net [Department of Radiology, Baptist Cardiac and Vascular Institute, 8900 North Kendall Drive, Miami, FL 33176 (United States); Roobottom, Carl, E-mail: carl.roobottom@nhs.net [Department of Radiology, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth Devon PL6 8DH (United Kingdom); Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry (United Kingdom); Baumueller, Stephan, E-mail: Hatem.Alkadhi@usz.ch [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Alkadhi, Hatem, E-mail: stephan.baumueller@usz.ch [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Dodd, Jonathan D., E-mail: jonniedodd@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of standard axial 64-slice chest CT compared to aortic valve image plane ECG-gated cardiac CT for bicuspid aortic valves. Materials and methods: The standard axial chest CT scans of 20 patients with known bicuspid aortic valves were blindly, randomly analyzed for (i) the appearance of the valve cusps, (ii) the largest aortic sinus area, (iii) the longest aortic cusp length, (iv) the thickest aortic valve cusp and (v) valve calcification. A second blinded reader independently analyzed the appearance of the valve cusps. Forty-two age- and sex-matched patients with known tricuspid aortic valves were used as controls. Retrospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT multiphase reconstructions of the aortic valve were used as the gold-standard. Results: Fourteen (21%) scans were scored as unevaluable (7 bicuspid, 7 tricuspid). Of the remainder, there were 13 evaluable bicuspid valves, ten of which showed an aortic valve line sign, while the remaining three showed a normal Mercedes-Benz appearance owing to fused valve cusps. The 35 evaluable tricuspid aortic valves all showed a normal Mercedes-Benz appearance (P = 0.001). Kappa analysis = 0.62 indicating good interobserver agreement for the aortic valve cusp appearance. Aortic sinus areas, aortic cusp lengths and aortic cusp thicknesses of ≥3.8 cm{sup 2}, 3.2 cm and 1.6 mm respectively on standard axial chest CT best distinguished bicuspid from tricuspid aortic valves (P < 0.0001 for all). Of evaluable scans, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of standard axial chest CT in diagnosing bicuspid aortic valves was 77% (CI 0.54–1.0), 100%, 100% and 70% respectively. Conclusion: The aortic valve is evaluable in approximately 80% of standard chest 64-slice CT scans. Bicuspid aortic valves may be diagnosed on evaluable scans with good diagnostic accuracy. An aortic valve line sign, enlarged aortic sinuses and elongated, thickened valve cusps are specific CT

  5. [Aortic valve preservation in Marfan syndrome. Initial experience].

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    Forteza, Alberto; Cortina, Jose M; Sánchez, Violeta; Centeno, Jorge; López, M Jesús; Pérez de la Sota, Enrique; Rufilanchas, Juan J

    2007-05-01

    Preservation of the aortic valve using the technique described by David has been shown to be as effective as the Bentall-De Bono procedure. It avoids both the need for long-term anticoagulation and the complications associated with mechanical prostheses. We report our initial experience using this technique in patients with Marfan syndrome. Between April 2004 and April 2006, we used the David reimplantation technique in 40 patients with an aortic root aneurysm. Eighteen patients had Marfan syndrome. Their median age was 29 years (13-55 years). Echocardiography showed that the median diameter of the aortic sinus was 53 mm (46-59 mm). In 17 patients, aortic valve preservation was possible. No patient died during hospitalization and there were no significant complications. On echocardiography at discharge, no patient had greater than grade-II aortic regurgitation. During a median follow-up period of 8 months (1-24 months), one patient died due to rupture of an abdominal aneurysm. The others are all in New York Heart Association class I. Preservation of the aortic valve by means of valve reimplantation produced excellent results. It avoided both the thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications associated with prostheses and the need for long-term anticoagulation. If reimplanted valves continue to function adequately over the long term, this technique should become the treatment of choice for aneurysms of the ascending aorta in patients with Marfan syndrome.

  6. Intracardiac echocardiography to diagnose pannus formation after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yoshiya; Ohara, Takahiro; Funada, Akira; Takahama, Hiroyuki; Amaki, Makoto; Hasegawa, Takuya; Sugano, Yasuo; Kanzaki, Hideaki; Anzai, Toshihisa

    2016-03-01

    A 66-year-old female, under regular follow-up for 20 years after aortic valve replacement (19-mm Carbomedics), presented dyspnea on effort and hypotension during hemodialysis. A transthoracic echocardiogram showed elevation of transvalvular velocity up to 4 m/s, but the structure around the aortic prosthesis was difficult to observe due to artifacts. Fluoroscopy revealed normal motion of the leaflets of the mechanical valve. Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) revealed a pannus-like structure in the left ventricular outflow tract. Transesophageal echocardiogram also revealed this structure. ICE can visualize structural abnormalities around a prosthetic valve after cardiac surgery even in patients in whom conventional imaging modalities failed.

  7. Aortic valve replacement for Libman-Sacks endocarditis.

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    Keenan, Jack B; Janardhanan, Rajesh; Larsen, Brandon T; Khalpey, Zain

    2016-10-04

    A 24-year-old man with systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid syndrome complicated by lupus nephritis presented with acute limb ischaemia secondary to an embolus. Following embolectomy, the patient underwent a transthoracic echocardiogram which revealed a large vegetation on all three cusps of the aortic valve. The patient was taken for an urgent aortic valve replacement with a mechanical valve. Cultures of one cusp remained sterile. Histopathological examination of the remaining two cusps revealed sterile fibrin-rich thrombotic vegetations characteristic of non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  8. Aortic root reimplantation procedure: a new milestone in aortic valve-sparing operations

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    А. М. Чернявский

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Emphasis in this study was placed on clinical and functional assessment of a modified "Florida Sleeve" procedure during surgical correction of ascending aorta aneurysms with concomitant aortic insufficiency.Methods: 32 patients with an aneurysm of the ascending aorta and aortic insufficiency underwent a modified "Florida Sleeve" procedure. The average follow-up was 17 (0-60 months. The average age of patients was 57±13 (23-73 years 56±13 years.Results: The expected 4-year cumulative survival rate was 84.3%. Overall freedom from aortic insufficiency in the late period was 88.9%. Median aortic regurgitation was 1+ (1; 2. Long-term follow-up revealed no valve-associated complications.Conclusion: The aortic root reimplantation procedure enables optimal correction of the existing lesions of the aortic root without performing aortic valve replacement and demonstrates stable clinical and functional outcomes in the long-term period.Key words: aortic aneurysm; aortic valve; valve-sparing operations.FundingThe study had no sponsorship.Conflict of interestThe authors declare no conflict of interest.

  9. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation for failing surgical aortic bioprosthetic valve: from concept to clinical application and evaluation (part 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Nicolo; Bleiziffer, Sabine; Brockmann, Gernot; Hendrick, Ruge; Deutsch, Marcus-André; Opitz, Anke; Mazzitelli, Domenico; Tassani-Prell, Peter; Schreiber, Christian; Lange, Rüdiger

    2011-07-01

    This study sought to review the acute procedural outcomes of patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve (TAV)-in-surgical aortic valve (SAV) implantation at the German Heart Center, Munich, and to summarize the existing literature on TAV-in-SAV implantation (n = 47). There are several case reports and small case series describing transcatheter aortic valve implantation for a failing surgical aortic valve bioprosthesis (TAV-in-SAV implantation). From January 2007 to March 2011, 20 out of 556 patients underwent a TAV-in-SAV implantation at the German Heart Center Munich. Baseline characteristics and clinical outcome data were prospectively entered into a dedicated database. The mean patient age was 75 ± 13 years, and the mean logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation and Society of Thoracic Surgeons' Risk Model scores were 27 ± 13% and 7 ± 4%, respectively. Of the 20 patients, 14 had stented and 6 had stentless surgical bioprostheses. Most cases (12 of 20) were performed via the transapical route using a 23-mm Edwards Sapien prosthesis (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, California). Successful implantation of a TAV in a SAV with the patient leaving the catheterization laboratory alive was achieved in 18 of 20 patients. The mean transaortic valve gradient was 20.0 ± 7.5 mm Hg. None-to-trivial, mild, and mild-to-moderate paravalvular aortic regurgitation was observed in 10, 6, and 2 patients, respectively. We experienced 1 intraprocedural death following pre-implant balloon aortic valvuloplasty ("stone heart") and 2 further in-hospital deaths due to myocardial infarction. TAV-in-SAV implantation is a safe and feasible treatment for high-risk patients with failing aortic bioprosthetic valves and should be considered as part of the armamentarium in the treatment of aortic bioprosthetic valve failure. Copyright © 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Steroid therapy and conduction disturbances after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havakuk, Ofer; Konigstein, Maayan; Ben Assa, Eyal; Arbel, Yaron; Abramowitz, Yigal; Halkin, Amir; Bazan, Samuel; Shmilovich, Haim; Keren, Gad; Finkelstein, Ariel; Banai, Shmuel

    2016-10-01

    Direct mechanical compression of the frame struts on the adjacent bundle branch with local inflammatory reaction might cause conduction system disturbances and need for pacemaker implantation following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). We assessed the impact of preprocedural anti-inflammatory steroid therapy on the occurrence of conduction disturbances following TAVI. From a cohort of 324 patients who underwent transfemoral TAVI, 39 (12%) were pretreated with steroids because of iodine allergy (n=29) or active obstructive pulmonary disease (n=10). We compared the rate of occurrence of new conduction disturbances and pacemaker implantation between TAVI patients with (n=39) and without (n=285) steroid treatment, using Cox logistic regression estimates and proportional hazards models. The overall occurrence of new conduction defects and the need for new pacemaker implantation were similar among steroid and non-steroid-treated patients (38.4% vs 37.5% and 25.6% vs 25.3%, respectively). New conduction disturbances were more prevalent in patients treated with CoreValve prosthesis, low implantation, and smaller aortic annulus diameter (P<.001, P<.001, and P=.006, respectively). Thirty-day mortality and complication rates were similar between the groups. Although safe, steroid treatment prior to TAVI failed to reduce the incidence of new conduction defects and the need for pacemaker implantation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Pros and cons of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terré, Juan A; George, Isaac; Smith, Craig R

    2017-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) or replacement (TAVR) was recently approved by the FDA for intermediate risk patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS). This technique was already worldwide adopted for inoperable and high-risk patients. Improved device technology, imaging analysis and operator expertise has reduced the initial worrisome higher complications rate associated with TAVR, making it comparable to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). However, many answers need to be addressed before adoption in lower risk patients. This paper highlights the pros and cons of TAVI based mostly on randomized clinical trials involving the two device platforms approved in the United States. We focused our analysis on metrics that will play a key role in expanding TAVR indication in healthier individuals. We review the significance and gave a perspective on paravalvular leak (PVL), valve performance, valve durability, leaflet thrombosis, stroke and pacemaker requirement.

  12. Latest-Generation Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Devices and Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamandi, Chekrallah; Puri, Rishi; Rodriguez-Gabella, Tania; Rodés-Cabau, Josep

    2017-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a well-established treatment for patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who are at high or prohibitive surgical risk. More recently, TAVR has emerged as a valid alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement for treating intermediate-risk patients, and several studies are currently evaluating the role of TAVR in low-risk patients. Transcatheter heart valve (THV) technologies have evolved considerably over time, and important iterations have been implemented in many of the latest-generation devices to (1) reduce the size and improve delivery system properties; (2) improve valve deployment, repositioning, and retrievability; and (3) reduce paravalvular leaks. This article reviews the main characteristics of, and clinical results associated with, the newer-generation THVs while providing an overview of novel TAVR indications. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Valve-sparing Replacement in Patients with Aortic Root Dilatation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Kazuhiro; Minatoya, Kenji; Ueda, Ryoma; Takehara, Masato; Sakamoto, Kazuhisa; Ide, Yujiro; Kanemitsu, Hideo; Ueyama, Koji; Ikeda, Tadashi

    2018-01-01

    Valve-sparing root replacement is increasingly used to overcome drawbacks associated with valvular prostheses. In our institution, 7 patients underwent valve-sparing root replacement from August 2016 to July 2017. The mean age was 45 years (range, 14~69 years). Three patients had Marfan syndrome and 1 had Loeys-Dietz syndrome with acute aortic dissection. All patients underwent surgery with reimplantation technique using a Valsalva graft. Two patients required repair of aortic valve leaflet prolapse. All patients had an excellent clinical course, with mild or no aortic regurgitation and a decrease in end-diastolic volume on echocardiography. These results support the continued use of valve-sparing root replacement in selected patients.

  14. When operable patients become inoperable: conversion of a surgical aortic valve replacement into transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lene Kjaer; Arendrup, Henrik; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    . On extracorporal circulation it was reconized that the aortic annulus, the coronary ostiae and the proximal part of the ascending aorta were severely calcified making valve implantation impossible. Surgical closure without valve substitution was estimated to be associated with a high risk of mortality due...

  15. Myocardial hypertrophy and intracardial hemodynamics in children with bicuspid aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. V. Kamenshchyk

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bicuspid aortic valve is one of the most common congenital heart diseases with low manifestation in childhood and severe consequences in adults that determines the importance in early diagnostics of myocardial changes in this anomaly. According to the literature the polymorphisms in the genes of NFATC family could result both in impaired embriogenetic valves formation and development of postnatal myocardial hypertrophy. The aim of the study was to detect the early changes of intracardial hemodynamics at aortic valve in children with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV and establish their interrelations to the signs of myocardial hypertrophy in these children. Materials and methods: Dopplerograhphic study of basic intracardiac hemodynamics parameters in 38 children with BAV and in 28 children of control group was conducted. The results were processed statistically by Student’s t-test, correlation analysis and multiple regression. Results: In the result of study the moderate concentric left ventricle myocardial hypertrophy development was detected in 62 % of children with BAV which is accompanying to significant increasing of blood flow velocity and pressure gradient at aortic valve. There were not established significant correlations between the parameters of hemodynamics at valve and left ventricle’s posterior wall depth and septum depth whereas the highest inputs of these values were obtained in the left ventricle systolic dimension and volume and less in the hypertrophic signs. Conclusions: In children with BAV the moderate concentric myocardial hypertrophy with significant changes of intracardial hemodynamics at aortic valve takes place with the highest inputs in left ventricle volumetric values The obtained data serves as a substantiation for the treatment and prevention of it further development. bicuspid aortic valve; children; heart hypertrophy; dopplerechocardiography; hemodynamics; regression analysis

  16. Relation of Bicuspid Aortic Valve Morphology to the Dilatation Pattern of the Proximal Aorta: Focus on the Transvalvular Flow

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    Evaldas Girdauskas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Whether the dilatation of proximal aorta in patients with bicuspid aortic valve is secondary to hemodynamic effects related to the abnormal aortic valve or a primary manifestation of the genetic disorder remains controversial. We discuss in this paper the recent data on the BAV function and transvalvular flow patterns in relation with the dilatation type of the proximal aorta. Different morphological forms of bicuspid aortic valve in relation with the specific transvalvular blood flow patterns are focus of the first paragraph of this paper. In the second part of this paper we present the pathogenetic insight into the different clinically observed phenotypes of bicuspid aortic valve disease (i.e., association of proximal aortic shapes with the specific cusp fusion patterns, based on the data from recent rheological studies.

  17. Prognostic Implications of Raphe in Bicuspid Aortic Valve Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, William K F; Delgado, Victoria; Poh, Kian Keong; Regeer, Madelien V; Ng, Arnold C T; McCormack, Louise; Yeo, Tiong Cheng; Shanks, Miriam; Parent, Sarah; Enache, Roxana; Popescu, Bogdan A; Liang, Michael; Yip, James W; Ma, Lawrence C W; Kamperidis, Vasileios; van Rosendael, Philippe J; van der Velde, Enno T; Ajmone Marsan, Nina; Bax, Jeroen J

    2017-03-01

    Little is known about the association between bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) morphologic findings and the degree of valvular dysfunction, presence of aortopathy, and complications, including aortic valve surgery, aortic dissection, and all-cause mortality. To investigate the association between BAV morphologic findings (raphe vs nonraphe) and the degree of valve dysfunction, presence of aortopathy, and prognosis (including need for aortic valve surgery, aortic dissection, and all-cause mortality). In this large international multicenter registry of patients with BAV treated at tertiary referral centers, 2118 patients with BAV were evaluated. Patients referred for echocardiography from June 1, 1991, through November 31, 2015, were included in the study. Clinical and echocardiographic data were analyzed retrospectively. The morphologic BAV findings were categorized according to the Sievers and Schmidtke classification. Aortic valve function was divided into normal, regurgitation, or stenosis. Patterns of BAV aortopathy included the following: type 1, dilation of the ascending aorta and aortic root; type 2, isolated dilation of the ascending aorta; and type 3, isolated dilation of the sinus of Valsalva and/or sinotubular junction. Association between the presence and location of raphe and the risk of significant (moderate and severe) aortic valve dysfunction and aortic dilation and/or dissection. Of the 2118 patients (mean [SD] age, 47 [18] years; 1525 [72.0%] male), 1881 (88.8%) had BAV with fusion raphe, whereas 237 (11.2%) had BAV without raphe. Bicuspid aortic valves with raphe had a significantly higher prevalence of valve dysfunction, with a significantly higher frequency of aortic regurgitation (622 [33.1%] vs 57 [24.1%], P < .001) and aortic stenosis (728 [38.7%] vs 51 [21.5%], P < .001). Furthermore, aortic valve replacement event rates were significantly higher among patients with BAV with raphe (364 [19.9%] at 1 year, 393 [21.4%] at 2 years, and 447

  18. Fibrin glue on an aortic cusp detected by transesophageal echocardiography after valve-sparing aortic valve replacement: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahira, Junko; Ishii, Hisanari; Sawai, Toshiyuki; Minami, Toshiaki

    2015-03-07

    Fibrin glue is used commonly during cardiac surgery but can behave as an intracardiac abnormal foreign body following surgery. There have been few such cases reported, and they were typically noticed only because of the resulting catastrophic cardiac conditions, such as valvular malfunction. We report a case where, for the first time, transesophageal echocardiography was used to detected fibrin glue that was adherent to the ventricular side of a patient's aortic valve immediately after aortic declamping. A 45-year-old Japanese man with Marfan syndrome underwent an aortic valve-sparing operation to treat moderate aortic valve regurgitation resulting from enlargement of his right coronary cusp. Fibrin glue was lightly applied to the suture line between the previous and new grafts. Transesophageal echocardiography performed prior to weaning from the cardiopulmonary bypass revealed mild aortic valve regurgitation in addition to a mobile membranous structure attached to the ventricular side of his aortic valve. It was identified as fibrin glue. We resolved the regurgitation by removing the fibrin glue and repeating the aortic cusp plication. The patient had no complications during recovery. Fibrin glue can act as an intracardiac foreign body and lead to a potentially fatal embolism. We demonstrated the use of transesophageal echocardiography to detect a fibrin glue-derived intracardiac abnormal foreign body and to confirm its removal. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case where fibrin glue adherent to the aortic valve was detected by transesophageal echocardiography. These findings demonstrate the importance of using transesophageal echocardiography during cardiac surgery that involves using biological glues.

  19. Left main coronary artery obstruction by dislodged native-valve calculus after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmaz, Tahir; Ayhan, Huseyin; Keles, Telat; Aslan, Abdullah Nabi; Erdogan, Kemal Esref; Sari, Cenk; Bilen, Emine; Akcay, Murat; Bozkurt, Engin

    2014-08-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement can be an effective, reliable treatment for severe aortic stenosis in surgically high-risk or ineligible patients. However, various sequelae like coronary artery obstruction can occur, not only in the long term, but also immediately after the procedure. We present the case of a 78-year-old woman whose left main coronary artery became obstructed with calculus 2 hours after the transfemoral implantation of an Edwards Sapien XT aortic valve. Despite percutaneous coronary intervention in that artery, the patient died. This case reminds us that early recognition of acute coronary obstruction and prompt intervention are crucial in patients with aortic stenosis who have undergone transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

  20. Lagrangian coherent structures in the left ventricle in the presence of aortic valve regurgitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Labbio, Giuseppe; Vetel, Jerome; Kadem, Lyes

    2017-11-01

    Aortic valve regurgitation is a rather prevalent condition where the aortic valve improperly closes, allowing filling of the left ventricle of the heart to occur partly from backflow through the aortic valve. Although studies of intraventricular flow are rapidly gaining popularity in the fluid dynamics research community, much attention has been given to the left ventricular vortex and its potential for early detection of disease, particularly in the case of dilated cardiomyopathy. Notably, the subsequent flow in the left ventricle in the presence of aortic valve regurgitation ought to be appreciably disturbed and has yet to be described. Aortic valve regurgitation was simulated in vitro in a double-activation left heart duplicator and the ensuing flow was captured using two-dimensional time-resolved particle image velocimetry. Further insight into the regurgitant flow is obtained by computing attracting and repelling Lagrangian coherent structures. An interesting interplay between the two inflowing jets and their shear layer roll-up is observed for various grades of regurgitation. This study highlights flow features which may find use in further assessing regurgitation severity.

  1. Prosthetic valve endocarditis 7 months after transcatheter aortic valve implantation diagnosed with 3D TEE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenk Sarı

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI was introduced as an alternative treatment for patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis for whom surgery would be high-risk. Prosthetic aortic valve endocarditis is a serious complication of surgical AVR (SAVR with high morbidity and mortality. According to recent cases, post-TAVI prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE seems to occur very rarely. We present the case of a 75-year-old woman who underwent TAVI (Edwards Saphien XT with an uneventful postoperative stay. She was diagnosed with endocarditis using three dimensional (3D echocardiography on the TAVI device 7 months later and she subsequently underwent surgical aortic valve replacement. Little experience of the interpretation of transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE and the clinical course and effectiveness of treatment strategies in post-TAVI endocarditis exists. We report a case of PVE in a TAVI patient which was diagnosed with three-dimensional transoesophageal echocardiography (3DTEE.

  2. Systematic review of the outcome of aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharma, Umesh C.; Barenbrug, Paul; Pokharel, Saraswati; Dassen, Willem R. M.; Pinto, Yigal M.; Maessen, Jos G.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After the establishment of aortic valve replacement procedure for aortic stenosis, there are heterogeneous studies and varying reports on outcome. An analysis that compares individual studies to summarize the overall effect is still lacking. This study systematically analyzes the change

  3. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation: emerging role in poor left ventricular function severe aortic stenosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. John Chan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI has become an established treatment option for high risk elderly patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis. Its role in less high risk patients is being evaluated in clinical trials. Patients with severely impaired left ventricular function may be another group who may benefit from this emerging percutaneous treatment option.

  4. Effect of candesartan treatment on left ventricular remodeling after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbaek, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K

    2010-01-01

    In hypertension, angiotensin receptor blockers can augment regression of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy. It is not known whether this also is the case after aortic valve replacement (AVR) for severe aortic stenosis (AS). To test the hypothesis that treatment with candesartan in addition to con...

  5. Sequential transcatheter aortic valve implantation due to valve dislodgement - a Portico valve implanted over a CoreValve bioprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campante Teles, Rui; Costa, Cátia; Almeida, Manuel; Brito, João; Sondergaard, Lars; Neves, José P; Abecasis, João; M Gabriel, Henrique

    2017-03-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become an important treatment in high surgical risk patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS), whose complications need to be managed promptly. The authors report the case of an 86-year-old woman presenting with severe symptomatic AS, rejected for surgery due to advanced age and comorbidities. The patient underwent a first TAVI, with implantation of a Medtronic CoreValve ® , which became dislodged and migrated to the ascending aorta. Due to the previous balloon valvuloplasty, the patient's AS became moderate, and her symptoms improved. After several months, she required another intervention, performed with a St. Jude Portico ® repositionable self-expanding transcatheter aortic valve. There was a good clinical response that was maintained at one-year follow-up. The use of a self-expanding transcatheter bioprosthesis with repositioning features is a solution in cases of valve dislocation to avoid suboptimal positioning of a second implant, especially when the two valves have to be positioned overlapping or partially overlapping each other. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Regression in left ventricular mass after aortic valve replacement for chronic aortic regurgitation is unrelated to prosthetic valve size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Morgan L; Schaff, Hartzell V; Suri, Rakesh M; Li, Zhuo; Sundt, Thoralf M; Dearani, Joseph A; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice

    2011-08-01

    We examined the role of prosthesis-patient mismatch on left ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement for chronic aortic valve regurgitation. We selected patients who had complete preoperative and follow-up echocardiograms with measurement of left ventricular mass. Patients were excluded who had moderate or greater aortic valve stenosis, concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting, or mitral valve procedures. Patients' mean age was 55 ± 17 years; 21% were female. The mean preoperative indexed left ventricular mass was 150 ± 45 g/m(2). Patients with mildly (n = 44; mean indexed mass, 126 ± 15 g/m(2)), moderately (n = 31; mean indexed mass, 168 ± 11 g/m(2)), or severely (n = 15; mean indexed mass, 241 ± 34 g/m(2)) increased preoperative indexed left ventricular mass, were similar, except for lower ejection fractions, larger end-diastolic dimensions, and larger ventricular wall thicknesses in the severely enlarged group (P regression was unrelated to labeled valve size, prosthesis-patient mismatch, or measured indexed effective aortic valve area. A greater preoperative indexed left ventricular mass (P regression. Despite having greater left ventricular mass regression, patients with severe preoperative indexed left ventricular mass did not return to normal values (mean, 142 ± 25 g/m(2)). Left ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement for chronic aortic regurgitation is unrelated to indexed prosthetic valve area. Although incomplete, regression is greatest in patients with the largest preoperative indexed left ventricular mass. Copyright © 2011 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevalence, predictors, and prognostic implications of residual impairment of functional capacity after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdelghani, Mohammad; Cavalcante, Rafael; Miyazaki, Yosuke; de Winter, Robbert J.; Sarmento-Leite, Rogério; Mangione, José A.; Abizaid, Alexandre; Lemos, Pedro A.; Serruys, Patrick W.; de Brito, Fabio S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Patients with degenerative aortic stenosis (AS) referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) typically have advanced cardiac and vascular adverse remodeling and multiple comorbidities and, therefore, might not recover a normal functional capacity after valve replacement. We

  8. Aortic regurgitation after valve-sparing aortic root replacement: modes of failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Takanori; Okita, Yutaka; Matsumori, Masamichi; Okada, Kenji; Minami, Hitoshi; Munakata, Hiroshi; Inoue, Takeshi; Tanaka, Akiko; Sakamoto, Toshihito; Omura, Atsushi; Nomura, Takuo

    2011-11-01

    Despite the positive clinical results of valve-sparing aortic root replacement, little is known about the causes of reoperations and the modes of failure. From October 1999 to June 2010, 101 patients underwent valve-sparing aortic root replacement using the David reimplantation technique. The definition of aortic root repair failure included the following: (1) intraoperative conversion to the Bentall procedure; (2) reoperation performed because of aortic regurgitation; and (3) aortic regurgitation equal to or greater than a moderate degree at the follow-up. Sixteen patients were considered to have repair failure. Three patients required intraoperative conversion to valve replacement, 3 required reoperation within 3 months, and another 8 required reoperation during postoperative follow-up. At initial surgery 5 patients had moderate to severe aortic regurgitation, 6 patients had acute aortic dissections, 3 had Marfan syndrome, 2 had status post Ross operations, 3 had bicuspid aortic valves, and 1 had aortitis. Five patients had undergone cusp repair, including Arantius plication in 3 and plication at the commissure in 2. The causes of early failure in 6 patients included cusp perforation (3), cusp prolapse (3), and severe hemolysis (1). The causes of late failure in 10 patients included cusp prolapse (4), commissure dehiscence (3), torn cusp (2), and cusp retraction (1). Patients had valve replacements at a mean of 23 ± 20.9 months after reimplantation and survived. Causes of early failure after valve-sparing root replacement included technical failure, cusp lesions, and steep learning curve. Late failure was caused by aortic root wall degeneration due to gelatin-resorcin-formalin glue, cusp degeneration, or progression of cusp prolapse. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Modified conduit preparation creates a pseudosinus in an aortic valve-sparing procedure for aneurysm of the ascending aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, R P; Kunzelman, K S; Eddy, A C; Hofer, B O; Verrier, E D

    1995-06-01

    Mechanical valved conduit replacement of the aortic root is a durable and appropriate procedure for many diseases of the ascending aorta, but may sacrifice an anatomically salvageable aortic valve. For young active patients and for patients with "systemic" arterial disease (atherosclerosis, Marfan's syndrome) who may require future operations, life-long anticoagulation with its attendant thromboembolic versus hemorrhagic risks is not ideal. Several techniques have been suggested as aortic valve-sparing options. Recently, a procedure was described that combines the freehand homograft techniques with the standard Bentall techniques (David procedure). This innovative technique replaces the ascending aorta with a Dacron cylinder, spares the aortic valve, and restores competence and thus offers an excellent alternative. The durability of this procedure that places the aortic valve inside a cylindrical conduit without sinuses of Valsalva is unknown. In selected patients, we have used this technique to spare the aortic valve. On the basis of experimental data and preliminary computer modeling, with the hope of improving the durability, we have modified the conduit to create a "pseudosinus" in our most recent nine patients. We have done the David procedure in 10 patients. The pseudosinus modification was done in the most recent nine patients. Patients' ages ranged from 37 to 71 years (mean 49.9 years). There were five female and five male patients. Five patients had Marfan's syndrome and five patients had annuloaortic ectasia. There has been no mortality and all patients have had both early and late follow-up echocardiography. Five patients have zero to trace aortic insufficiency, four patients have trace to mild aortic insufficiency, and one patient has mild or "1+" aortic insufficiency. Aortic insufficiency has not progressed in any patient during the 18 months of follow-up. The patient with 1+ aortic insufficiency has no activity limits, good ventricular function, and

  10. Aorta-atria-septum combined incision for aortic valve re-replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yiwei; Ye, Xiaofeng; Li, Zhaolong

    2018-01-01

    This case report illustrates a patient who underwent supra-annular mechanical aortic valve replacement then suffered from prosthesis dysfunction, increasing pressure gradient with aortic valve. She was successfully underwent aortic valve re-replacement, sub-annular pannus removing and aortic annulus enlargement procedures through combined cardiac incision passing through aortic root, right atrium (RA), and upper atrial septum. This incision provides optimal visual operative field and simplifies dissection. PMID:29850170

  11. Autopsy after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kesteren, F; Wiegerinck, E M A; Rizzo, S; Baan, J; Planken, R N; von der Thüsen, J H; Niessen, H W M; van Oosterhout, M F M; Pucci, A; Thiene, G; Basso, C; Sheppard, M N; Wassilew, K; van der Wal, A C

    2017-03-01

    Autopsy after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a new field of interest in cardiovascular pathology. To identify the cause of death, it is important to be familiar with specific findings related to the time interval between the procedure and death. We aimed to provide an overview of the autopsy findings in patients with TAVI in their medical history divided by the timing of death with specific interest in the added value of autopsy over a solely clinically determined cause of death. In 8 European centres, 72 cases with autopsy reports were available. Autopsies were divided according to the time interval of death and reports were analysed. In 32 patients who died ≤72 h postprocedure, mortality resulted from cardiogenic or haemorrhagic shock in 62.5 and 34.4%, respectively. In 31 patients with mortality >72 h to ≤30 days, cardiogenic shock was the cause of death in 51.6% followed by sepsis (22.6%) and respiratory failure (9.7%). Of the nine patients with death >30 days, 88.9% died of sepsis, caused by infective endocarditis in half of them. At total of 12 patients revealed cerebrovascular complications. Autopsy revealed unexpected findings in 61.1% and resulted in a partly or completely different cause of death as was clinically determined. Autopsy on patients who underwent TAVI reveals specific patterns of cardiovascular pathology that clearly relate to the time interval between TAVI and death and significantly adds to the clinical diagnosis. Our data support the role of autopsy including investigation of the cerebrum in the quickly evolving era of cardiac device technology.

  12. Transfemoral Aortic Valve Implantation with the New Edwards Sapien 3 Valve for Treatment of Severe Aortic Stenosis-Impact of Valve Size in a Single Center Experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Wöhrle

    Full Text Available The third generation Edwards Sapien 3 (Edwards Lifesciences Inc., Irvine, California system was optimized to reduce residual aortic regurgitation and vascular complications.235 patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis were prospectively enrolled. Transcatheter aortic valve implantations (TAVI were performed without general anesthesia by transfemoral approach. Patients were followed for 30 days. Patients received 23mm (N = 77, 26mm (N = 91 or 29mm (N = 67 valve based on pre-procedural 256 multislice computer tomography. Mean oversizing did not differ between the 3 valves. There was no residual moderate or severe aortic regurgitation. Rate of mild aortic regurgitation and regurgitation index did not differ between groups. There was no switch to general anesthesia or conversion to surgery. Rate of major vascular complication was 3.0% with no difference between valve and delivery sheath sizes. Within 30 days rates of all cause mortality (2.6% and stroke (2.1% were low.In patients with severe aortic stenosis transfemoral TAVI with the Edwards Sapien 3 valve without general anesthesia was associated with a high rate of device success, no moderate or severe residual aortic regurgitation, low rates of major vascular complication, mortality and stroke within 30 days with no difference between the 3 valve sizes.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02162069.

  13. Diseases of the Tricuspid Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stenosis. Tricuspid Regurgitation Tricuspid regurgitation is also called tricuspid insufficiency or tricuspid incompetence. It means there is a ... require valve surgery. Tags: heart valves , tricuspid incompetence , ... tricuspid regurgitation , tricuspid stenosis , valve disease Related Links ...

  14. Preventative valve-sparing aortic root replacement and pregnancy outcome in Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, Vesna; Zlopasa, Gordan; Herman, Mislav; Planinić, Pavao; Micevska, Ana

    2012-06-01

    In Marfan syndrome, with dilatation of the aortic root secondary to an underlying connective tissue defect, pregnancy can cause hemodynamic stress leading to the development of an aortic aneurysm and even a fatal aortic dissection. In the presence of existing aortic root enlargement and a family history of aortic dissection, preventative elective surgery is suggested. Aortic root replacement with or without a valve-sparing procedure is superior to total aortic root replacement with prosthetic valve/tube graft. It provides excellent survival with low rates of aortic - valve related complications.

  15. Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery: Transapical Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive cardiac surgery is less traumatic and therefore leads to quicker recovery. With the assistance of engineering technologies on devices, imaging, and robotics, in conjunction with surgical technique, minimally invasive cardiac surgery will improve clinical outcomes and expand the cohort of patients that can be treated. We used transapical aortic valve implantation as an example to demonstrate that minimally invasive cardiac surgery can be implemented with the integration of surgical techniques and engineering technologies. Feasibility studies and long-term evaluation results prove that transapical aortic valve implantation under MRI guidance is feasible and practical. We are investigating an MRI compatible robotic surgical system to further assist the surgeon to precisely deliver aortic valve prostheses via a transapical approach. Ex vivo experimentation results indicate that a robotic system can also be employed in in vivo models.

  16. Spontaneous Thrombosis of a Bicuspid Aortic valve due to Primary Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Farrell

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 51-year-old man who was admitted as an emergency with spontaneous thrombosis of the aortic valve and ascending aorta. At operation he was found to have a congenitally bicuspid aortic valve and subsequent investigation revealed primary antiphospholipid syndrome. He underwent successful removal of the thrombus combined with mechanical replacement of the aortic valve.

  17. The effect of some hemodynamic factors on the behaviour of the aortic valve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhoven, van A.A.; Veenstra, P.C.; Reneman, R.S.

    1982-01-01

    To test the validity of a theoretical model of aortic valve closure, based upon the observations in a two-dimensional analogue, the effect of some hemodynamic factors on aortic valve behaviour was studied in open-chest dogs. Direct cinematography was used to record aortic valve movements. The ECG,

  18. Aortic valve replacement and prosthesis-patient mismatch in the era of trans-catheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Shigeki

    2016-08-01

    The treatment strategy for aortic stenosis (AS) has been changing due to newly developed valvular prostheses and trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). To determine the role of new modalities for AS with a small aortic root, papers using the concept of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) were reviewed. First, to determine the cut-off value of the indexed effective orifice area (IEOA) for defining PPM, the studies of surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) with a follow-up longer than 5 years and a patient number larger than 500 were reviewed. Second, the papers comparing TAVI and SAVR were reviewed. Furthermore, the prevalence of PPM was reviewed, with the addition of papers on aortic root enlargement, sutureless AVR, and aortic valve reconstruction with autologous pericardium. The results of the long-term survival after aortic valve replacement (AVR) have indicated that an IEOA less than 0.65 cm(2)/m(2) should be avoided in all cases, whereas the indications for patients with an IEOA between 065 and 0.85 cm(2)/m(2) should be determined by considering multiple factors. A large body size and younger age have a significantly negative influence on the long-term survival. In Asian population, the prevalence of PPM was low, despite the fact that the size of the aortic annulus was small. The IEOA after TAVI was larger than after surgical AVR in population-matched studies. To evaluate the role of TAVI and other modalities for a small aortic root, studies with a longer follow-up and larger volume are thus warranted.

  19. Ascending Aortic Wall Cohesion: Comparison of Bicuspid and Tricuspid Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Benedik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Bicuspid aortic valve (AV represents the most common form of congenital AV malformation, which is frequently associated with pathologies of the ascending aorta. We compared the mechanical properties of the aortic wall between patients with bicuspid and tricuspid AV using a new custom-made device mimicking transversal aortic wall shear stress. Methods. Between 03/2010 and 07/2011, 190 consecutive patients undergoing open aortic valve replacement at our institution were prospectively enrolled, presenting either with a bicuspid (group 1, n=44 or a tricuspid (group 2, n=146 AV. Aortic wall specimen were examined with the “dissectometer” resulting in nine specific aortic-wall parameters derived from tensile strength curves (TSC. Results. Patients with a bicuspid AV showed significantly more calcified valves (43.2% versus 15.8%, P<0.001, and a significantly thinner aortic wall (2.04±0.42 mm versus 2.24±0.41 mm, P=0.008. Transesophageal echocardiography diameters (annulus, aortic sinuses, and sinotubular junction were significantly larger in the bicuspid group (P=0.003, P=0.02, P=0.01. We found no difference in the aortic wall cohesion between both groups as revealed by shear stress testing (P=0.72, P=0.40, P=0.41. Conclusion. We observed no differences of TSC in patients presenting with tricuspid or bicuspid AVs. These results may allow us to assume that the morphology of the AV and the pathology of the ascending aorta are independent.

  20. Incidence and progression of mild aortic regurgitation after Tirone David reimplantation valve-sparing aortic root replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Elizabeth H; Liang, David H; Kvitting, John-Peder Escobar; Kari, Fabian A; Fischbein, Michael P; Mitchell, R Scott; Miller, D Craig

    2014-01-01

    The study objective was to determine whether recurrent or residual mild aortic regurgitation, which occurs after valve-sparing aortic root replacement, progresses over time. Between 2003 and 2008, 154 patients underwent Tirone David-V valve-sparing aortic root replacement; 96 patients (62%) had both 1-year (median, 12 ± 4 months) and mid-term (62 ± 22 months) transthoracic echocardiograms available for analysis. Age of patients averaged 38 ± 13 years, 71% were male, 31% had a bicuspid aortic valve, 41% had Marfan syndrome, and 51% underwent aortic valve repair, predominantly cusp free margin shortening. Forty-one patients (43%) had mild aortic regurgitation on 1-year echocardiogram. In 85% of patients (n = 35), mild aortic regurgitation remained stable on the most recent echocardiogram (median, 57 ± 20 months); progression to moderate aortic regurgitation occurred in 5 patients (12%) at a median of 28 ± 18 months and remained stable thereafter; severe aortic regurgitation developed in 1 patient, eventually requiring reoperation. Five patients (5%) had moderate aortic regurgitation at 1 year, which did not progress subsequently. Two patients (2%) had more than moderate aortic regurgitation at 1 year, and both ultimately required reoperation. Although mild aortic regurgitation occurs frequently after valve-sparing aortic root replacement, it is unlikely to progress over the next 5 years and should not be interpreted as failure of the valve-preservation concept. Further, we suggest that mild aortic regurgitation should not be considered nonstructural valve dysfunction, as the 2008 valve reporting guidelines would indicate. We need 10- to 15-year follow-up to learn the long-term clinical consequences of mild aortic regurgitation early after valve-sparing aortic root replacement. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Percutaneous aortic valve implantation of the Medtronic CoreValve self-expanding valve prosthesis via left subclavian artery access: the first case report in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavolias, George K; Georgiadou, Panagiota; Houri, Mazen; Sbarouni, Eftihia; Thomopoulou, Sofia; Tsiapras, Dimitrios; Smirli, Anna; Balanika, Marina; Voudris, Vassilis

    2010-01-01

    This case report describes a percutaneous aortic valve implantation with the Medtronic CoreValve selfexpanding valve prosthesis in a patient with severe aortic stenosis. The approach was made via the left subclavian artery because of the lack of femoral vessel access. The patient was a 78-year-old female with breathlessness on minimal effort, a recent hospitalisation due to pulmonary oedema, and frequent episodes of pre-syncope; surgical valve replacement had been ruled out. The prosthetic valve was successfully implanted with mild paravalvular aortic regurgitation. At 30 days, the patient's clinical condition had significantly improved, with excellent functioning of the aortic valve prosthesis.

  2. Three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography in the evaluation of aortic valve destruction by endocarditis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemes, Attila; Lagrand, Wim K.; McGhie, Jackie S.; ten Cate, Folkert J.

    2006-01-01

    Infective endocarditis remains a serious and complex disease with significant morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the clinical usefulness of 3-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography for the spatial assessment of aortic valve endocarditis. This case showed severe

  3. A comparison of conventional surgery, transcatheter aortic valve replacement, and sutureless valves in "real-world" patients with aortic stenosis and intermediate- to high-risk profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muneretto, Claudio; Alfieri, Ottavio; Cesana, Bruno Mario; Bisleri, Gianluigi; De Bonis, Michele; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto; Savini, Carlo; Folesani, Gianluca; Di Bacco, Lorenzo; Rambaldini, Manfredo; Maureira, Juan Pablo; Laborde, Francois; Tespili, Maurizio; Repossini, Alberto; Folliguet, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    We sought to investigate the clinical outcomes of patients with isolated severe aortic stenosis and an intermediate- to high-risk profile treated by means of conventional surgery (surgical aortic valve replacement), sutureless valve implantation, or transcatheter aortic valve replacement in a multicenter evaluation. Among 991 consecutive patients with isolated severe aortic stenosis and an intermediate- to high-risk profile (Society of Thoracic Surgeons score >4 and logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation I >10), a propensity score analysis was performed on the basis of the therapeutic strategy: surgical aortic valve replacement (n = 204), sutureless valve implantation (n = 204), and transcatheter aortic valve replacement (n = 204). Primary end points were 30-day mortality and overall survival at 24-month follow-up; the secondary end point was survival free from a composite end point of major adverse cardiac events (defined as cardiac-related mortality, myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accidents, and major hemorrhagic events) and periprosthetic regurgitation greater than 2. Thirty-day mortality was significantly higher in the transcatheter aortic valve replacement group (surgical aortic valve replacement = 3.4% vs sutureless = 5.8% vs transcatheter aortic valve replacement = 9.8%; P = .005). The incidence of postprocedural was 3.9% in asurgical aortic valve replacement vs 9.8% in sutureless vs 14.7% in transcatheter aortic valve replacement (Prisk factor for overall mortality hazard ratio (hazard ratio, 2.5; confidence interval, 1.1-4.2; P = .018). The use of transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients with an intermediate- to high-risk profile was associated with a significantly higher incidence of perioperative complications and decreased survival at short- and mid-term when compared with conventional surgery and sutureless valve implantation. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by

  4. Recurrent pannus formation causing prosthetic aortic valve dysfunction: Is excision without valve re-replacement applicable?

    OpenAIRE

    Darwazah Ahmad K

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Prosthetic valve dysfunction at aortic position is commonly caused by pannus formation. The exact etiology is not known. It arises from ventricular aspect of the prosthesis encroaching its leaflets causing stenosis or it may remain localized causing left ventricular outflow tract obstruction without affecting valve function. The difference in location entails different approaches in management. Such a pathology requires surgical excision of the pannus with or without valve re-replace...

  5. Estimation of aortic valve leaflets from 3D CT images using local shape dictionaries and linear coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liang; Martin, Caitlin; Wang, Qian; Sun, Wei; Duncan, James

    2016-03-01

    Aortic valve (AV) disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The preferred treatment modality for severe AV disease is surgical resection and replacement of the native valve with either a mechanical or tissue prosthetic. In order to develop effective and long-lasting treatment methods, computational analyses, e.g., structural finite element (FE) and computational fluid dynamic simulations, are very effective for studying valve biomechanics. These computational analyses are based on mesh models of the aortic valve, which are usually constructed from 3D CT images though many hours of manual annotation, and therefore an automatic valve shape reconstruction method is desired. In this paper, we present a method for estimating the aortic valve shape from 3D cardiac CT images, which is represented by triangle meshes. We propose a pipeline for aortic valve shape estimation which includes novel algorithms for building local shape dictionaries and for building landmark detectors and curve detectors using local shape dictionaries. The method is evaluated on real patient image dataset using a leave-one-out approach and achieves an average accuracy of 0.69 mm. The work will facilitate automatic patient-specific computational modeling of the aortic valve.

  6. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in failed bioprosthetic surgical valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvir, Danny; Webb, John G; Bleiziffer, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    for patients with structural valve deterioration; however, a comprehensive evaluation of survival after the procedure has not yet been performed. OBJECTIVE: To determine the survival of patients after transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation inside failed surgical bioprosthetic valves. DESIGN, SETTING......, stroke, and New York Heart Association functional class. RESULTS: Modes of bioprosthesis failure were stenosis (n = 181 [39.4%]), regurgitation (n = 139 [30.3%]), and combined (n = 139 [30.3%]). The stenosis group had a higher percentage of small valves (37% vs 20.9% and 26.6% in the regurgitation...... and combined groups, respectively; P = .005). Within 1 month following valve-in-valve implantation, 35 (7.6%) patients died, 8 (1.7%) had major stroke, and 313 (92.6%) of surviving patients had good functional status (New York Heart Association class I/II). The overall 1-year Kaplan-Meier survival rate was 83...

  7. Factors associated with the development of aortic valve regurgitation over time after two different techniques of valve-sparing aortic root surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, Thorsten; Charitos, Efstratios I; Stierle, Ulrich; Robinson, Derek; Gorski, Armin; Sievers, Hans-H; Misfeld, Martin

    2009-02-01

    Early results after aortic valve-sparing root reconstruction are excellent. Longer-term follow-up, especially with regard to aortic valve function, is required for further judgment of these techniques. Between July of 1993 and September of 2006, 108 consecutive patients (mean age 53.0 +/- 15.8 years) underwent the Yacoub operation (group Y) and 83 patients underwent the David operation (group D). Innovative multilevel hierarchic modeling methods were used to analyze aortic regurgitation over time. In general, aortic regurgitation increased with time in both groups. Factors associated with the development of a significant increase in aortic regurgitation were Marfan syndrome, concomitant cusp intervention, and preoperative aortic anulus dimension. In Marfan syndrome, the initial aortic regurgitation was higher in group Y versus group D (0.56 aortic regurgitation vs 0.29 aortic regurgitation, P = .049), whereas the mean annual progression rate of aortic regurgitation was marginally higher in group Y (0.132 aortic regurgitation vs 0.075 aortic regurgitation, P = .1). Concomitant cusp intervention was associated with a significant aortic regurgitation increase in both groups (P Marfan syndrome and a large preoperative aortic annulus diameter were better treated with the reimplantation technique, whereas those with a smaller diameter were better treated with the remodeling technique. Concomitant free-edge plication of prolapsing cusps was disadvantageous in both groups. Considering these factors may serve to improve the aortic valve longevity after valve-sparing aortic root surgery.

  8. Shape of the dilated aorta in children with bicuspid aortic valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mart, Christopher R; McNerny, Bryn E

    2013-01-01

    The dilated aorta in adults with bicuspid aortic valve has been shown to have different shapes, but it is not known if this occurs in children. This observational study was performed to determine if there are different shapes of the dilated aorta in children with bicuspid aortic valve and their association with age, gender, hemodynamic alterations, and degree of aortic enlargement. One hundred and eighty-seven echocardiograms done on pediatric patients (0 – 18 years) for bicuspid aortic valve, during 2008, were reviewed. Aortic valve morphology, shape/size of the aorta, and pertinent hemodynamic alterations were documented. Aortic dilation was felt to be present when at least one aortic segment had a z-score > 2.0; global aortic enlargement was determined by summing the aortic segment z-scores. The aortic shape was assessed by age, gender, valve morphology, and hemodynamic alterations. Aortic dilation was present in 104/187 patients. The aorta had six different shapes designated from S1 through S6. There was no association between the aortic shape and gender, aortic valve morphology, or hemodynamic abnormalities. S3 was the most common after the age of six years and was associated with the most significant degree of global aortic enlargement. The shape of the dilated aorta in children with bicuspid aortic valve does not occur in a uniform manner and multiple shapes are seen. S2 and S3 are most commonly seen. As aortic dilation becomes more significant, a single shape (S3) becomes the dominant pattern

  9. Comprehensive update on the new indications for transcatheter aortic valve replacement in the latest 2017 European guidelines for the management of valvular heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thonghong, Tasalak; De Backer, Ole; Søndergaard, Lars

    2018-01-01

    New European guidelines on the management of valvular heart disease—supported by the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and European Association of CardioThoracic Surgery (EACTS)—were recently published. Although these guidelines are very comprehensive, these typically are not very inviting to read. In this document, we aimed to distil all the information about transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in the new 2017 ESC/EACTS guidelines to the essential and give additional comments on the position of TAVR in 2017. PMID:29531767

  10. Quantification of normative ranges and baseline predictors of aortoventricular interface dimensions using multi-detector computed tomographic imaging in patients without aortic valve disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gooley, Robert P.; Cameron, James D.; Soon, Jennifer; Loi, Duncan; Chitale, Gauri; Syeda, Rifath; Meredith, Ian T.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • MDCT imaging of the aortoventricular interface is increasingly common. • We present normative ranges for aortoventricular interface dimensions. • Such techniques and ranges should be used to standardise reporting and research. - Abstract: Background: Multidetector computed tomographic (MDCT) assessment of the aortoventricular interface has gained increased importance with the advent of minimally invasive treatment modalities for aortic and mitral valve disease. This has included a standardised technique of identifying a plane through the nadir of each coronary cusp, the basal plane, and taking further measurements in relation to this plane. Despite this there is no published data defining normal ranges for these aortoventricular metrics in a healthy cohort. This study seeks to quantify normative ranges for MDCT derived aortoventricular dimensions and evaluate baseline demographic and anthropomorphic associates of these measurements in a normal cohort. Methods: 250 consecutive patients undergoing MDCT coronary angiography were included. Aortoventricular dimensions at multiple levels of the aortoventricular interface were assessed and normative ranges quantified. Multivariate linear regression was performed to identify baseline predictors of each metric. Results: The mean age was 59 ± 12 years. The basal plane was eccentric (EI = 0.22 ± 0.06) while the left ventricular outflow tract was more eccentric (EI = 0.32 ±0.06), with no correlation to gender, age or hypertension. Male gender, height and body mass index were consistent independent predictors of larger aortoventricular dimensions at all anatomical levels, while age was predictive of supra-annular measurements. Conclusions: Male gender, height and BMI are independent predictors of all aortoventricular dimensions while age predicts only supra-annular dimensions. Use of defined metrics such as the basal plane and formation of normative ranges for these metrics allows reference for clinical

  11. Quantification of normative ranges and baseline predictors of aortoventricular interface dimensions using multi-detector computed tomographic imaging in patients without aortic valve disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gooley, Robert P., E-mail: robert.gooley@monashhealth.org [MonashHeart, Monash Health, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Department of Medicine (MMC), Monash University, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Cameron, James D., E-mail: james.cameron@monash.edu [MonashHeart, Monash Health, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Department of Medicine (MMC), Monash University, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Soon, Jennifer, E-mail: jenn.sa@gmail.com [MonashHeart, Monash Health, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Department of Medicine (MMC), Monash University, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Loi, Duncan, E-mail: dloi2@student.monash.edu [Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Department of Medicine (MMC), Monash University, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Chitale, Gauri, E-mail: gchi21@student.monash.edu [Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Department of Medicine (MMC), Monash University, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Syeda, Rifath, E-mail: rssye1@student.monash.edu [Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Department of Medicine (MMC), Monash University, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Meredith, Ian T., E-mail: ian.meredith@myheart.id.au [MonashHeart, Monash Health, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Department of Medicine (MMC), Monash University, Melbourne 3168 (Australia)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • MDCT imaging of the aortoventricular interface is increasingly common. • We present normative ranges for aortoventricular interface dimensions. • Such techniques and ranges should be used to standardise reporting and research. - Abstract: Background: Multidetector computed tomographic (MDCT) assessment of the aortoventricular interface has gained increased importance with the advent of minimally invasive treatment modalities for aortic and mitral valve disease. This has included a standardised technique of identifying a plane through the nadir of each coronary cusp, the basal plane, and taking further measurements in relation to this plane. Despite this there is no published data defining normal ranges for these aortoventricular metrics in a healthy cohort. This study seeks to quantify normative ranges for MDCT derived aortoventricular dimensions and evaluate baseline demographic and anthropomorphic associates of these measurements in a normal cohort. Methods: 250 consecutive patients undergoing MDCT coronary angiography were included. Aortoventricular dimensions at multiple levels of the aortoventricular interface were assessed and normative ranges quantified. Multivariate linear regression was performed to identify baseline predictors of each metric. Results: The mean age was 59 ± 12 years. The basal plane was eccentric (EI = 0.22 ± 0.06) while the left ventricular outflow tract was more eccentric (EI = 0.32 ±0.06), with no correlation to gender, age or hypertension. Male gender, height and body mass index were consistent independent predictors of larger aortoventricular dimensions at all anatomical levels, while age was predictive of supra-annular measurements. Conclusions: Male gender, height and BMI are independent predictors of all aortoventricular dimensions while age predicts only supra-annular dimensions. Use of defined metrics such as the basal plane and formation of normative ranges for these metrics allows reference for clinical

  12. Aortic annulus eccentricity before and after transcatheter aortic valve implantation: Comparison of balloon-expandable and self-expanding prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuhbaeck, Annika; Weingartner, Christina; Arnold, Martin; Schmid, Jasmin; Pflederer, Tobias; Marwan, Mohamed; Rixe, Johannes; Nef, Holger; Schneider, Christian; Lell, Michael; Uder, Michael; Ensminger, Stephan; Feyrer, Richard; Weyand, Michael; Achenbach, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Post-implant geometry of catheter-based aortic valve prostheses is influenced by aortic valve calcification. • Balloon-expandable prostheses are more circular as compared to self-expanding prostheses. • The impact of post-implant geometry on valve function needs to be investigated. - Abstract: Introduction: The geometry of the aortic annulus and implanted transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis might influence valve function. We investigated the influence of valve type and aortic valve calcification on post-implant geometry of catheter-based aortic valve prostheses. Methods: Eighty consecutive patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (mean age 82 ± 6 years) underwent computed tomography before and after TAVI. Aortic annulus diameters were determined. Influence of prosthesis type and degree of aortic valve calcification on post-implant eccentricity were analysed. Results: Aortic annulus eccentricity was reduced in patients after TAVI (0.21 ± 0.06 vs. 0.08 ± 0.06, p < 0.0001). Post-TAVI eccentricity was significantly lower in 65 patients following implantation of a balloon-expandable prosthesis as compared to 15 patients who received a self-expanding prosthesis (0.06 ± 0.05 vs. 0.15 ± 0.07, p < 0.0001), even though the extent of aortic valve calcification was not different. After TAVI, patients with a higher calcium amount retained a significantly higher eccentricity compared to patients with lower amounts of calcium. Conclusions: Patients undergoing TAVI with a balloon-expandable prosthesis show a more circular shape of the implanted prosthesis as compared to patients with a self-expanding prosthesis. Eccentricity of the deployed prosthesis is affected by the extent of aortic valve calcification

  13. Impact of hypertension on left ventricular structure in patients with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis (a SEAS substudy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rieck, Ashild E; Cramariuc, Dana; Staal, Eva M

    2010-01-01

    Both hypertension and aortic valve stenosis induce left ventricular hypertrophy. However, less is known about the influence of concomitant hypertension on left ventricular structure in patients with aortic valve stenosis.......Both hypertension and aortic valve stenosis induce left ventricular hypertrophy. However, less is known about the influence of concomitant hypertension on left ventricular structure in patients with aortic valve stenosis....

  14. Mitral Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for mitral valve replacement—mechanical valves (metal) or biological valves (tissue). The principal advantage of mechanical valves ... small risk of stroke due to blood clotting. Biological valves usually are made from animal tissue. Biological ...

  15. Subclinical leaflet thrombosis in surgical and transcatheter bioprosthetic aortic valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakravarty, Tarun; Søndergaard, Lars; Friedman, John

    2017-01-01

    rates of transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs; 4·18 TIAs per 100 person-years vs 0·60 TIAs per 100 person-years; p=0·0005) and all strokes or TIAs (7·85 vs 2·36 per 100 person-years; p=0·001). INTERPRETATION: Subclinical leaflet thrombosis occurred frequently in bioprosthetic aortic valves, more commonly...... outcomes after TAVR with the new-generation valves, prevention and treatment of subclinical leaflet thrombosis might offer a potential opportunity for further improvement in valve haemodynamics and clinical outcomes. FUNDING: RESOLVE (Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute) and SAVORY (Rigshospitalet)....

  16. Cine MRI of the ascending aorta in the elderly with respect to the flow signal void and aortic valve morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Masafumi; Kyomasu, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Yasuko; Mashima, Yasuoki; Tanno, Munehiko; Endo, Kazuo; Yamada, Hideo

    1990-01-01

    Cine flow MRI was performed on a 1.5 Tesla system to observe signal intensity of blood flow within the ascending aorta in the elderly who had no aortic stenosis and to determine frequency of the flow signal void. Coronal and sagittal imaging planes of the ascending aorta were obtained in 27 aged patients with no known cardiac diseases (14 men and 13 women, mean age of 76) and 7 young volunteers (7 men, mean age of 24), utilizing ECG-gating, GRASS (gradient-recalled acquisition in steady state), and a flow compensation sequence. The young volunteers presented little or no signal void within the ascending aorta. In 26 (96%) of the 27 aged patients, on the other hand, signal void was demonstrated in the blood flow distal to the aortic valve during systole. The maximum length of the signal void that was measured at 318∼632 msec after the R wave of ECG ranged from 33 to 97 mm. Conventional and Doppler echocardiography was used to evaluate motion and morphology of the aortic valve in 19 of the 27 aged patients. Eighteen of these 19 subjects had aortic signal void on cine MRI. Echocardiography showed sclerotic changes of the aortic valve (i.e., increased echogenicity of the cusps and/or commissure fusion) in 10 (53%) of the 19 subjects. The mean maximum length of the signal void in the 10 patients with aortic valve sclerosis was significantly greater than that in the 9 patients with echocardiographically normal valve (68 vs.45 mm, p<0.01). These results suggest that signal void of blood flow in the ascending aorta, which is recognized as one of the characteristic findings in patients with aortic stenosis, is not a specific feature for this disease but rather a commom one in the elderly particularly those with sclerotic changes of the aortic valve. However, the length of the signal void may distinguish between nonstenotic and stenotic aortic valves. (author)

  17. [Pannus Formation Two Years after Bioprosthetic Aortic Valve Implantation;Report of a Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Kimiyo; Kuroda, Hiroaki

    2015-08-01

    We report a case of early deterioration of the bioprosthetic aortic valve 23 months postoperatively. A 77-year-old man who had undergone aortic valve replacement with a 23-mm Epic valve( St. Jude Medical [SJM])presented to us after a syncopal episode. Echocardiography revealed severe aortic stenosis, and redo aortic valve replacement with a 21-mm SJM mechanical valve was performed. All 3 cusps of the tissue valve were thickened by fibrous pannus overgrowth. Neither calcification nor invasion of inflammatory cells was observed. The cause of pannus formation at such an early stage after implantation remains unknown.

  18. Why aortic elasticity differs among classical and non-classical mitral valve prolapsed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unlu, Murat; Demirkol, Sait; Aparci, Mustafa; Arslan, Zekeriya; Balta, Sevket; Dogan, Umuttan; Kilicarslan, Baris; Ozeke, Ozcan; Celik, Turgay; Iyisoy, Atila

    2014-01-01

    Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is the most common valvular heart disease and characterized by the displacement of an abnormally thickened mitral valve leaflet into the left atrium during systole. There are two types of MVP, broadly classified as classic (thickness ≥5 mm) and non-classic (thickness elastic properties of the aorta in young male patients with classical and non-classical MVP. In the present study, 63 young adult males (mean age: 22.7 ± 4.2) were included. Patients were divided into classic MVP (n = 27) and non-classic MVP (n = 36) groups. Aortic strain, aortic distensibility and aortic stiffness index were calculated by using aortic diameters obtained by echocardiography and blood pressures measured by sphygmomanometer. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of age, body mass index, left ventricular mass and ejection fraction. When comparing the MVP group it was found that aortic strain and aortic distensibility were increased (p = 0.0027, p = 0.016, respectively) whereas the aortic stiffness index was decreased (p = 0.06) in the classical MVP group. We concluded that the elastic properties of the aorta is increased in patients with classic MVP. Further large scale studies should be performed to understand of morphological and physiological properties of the aorta in patients with MVP.

  19. Mechanics of the pulmonary valve in the aortic position

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soares, A.L.F.; Geemen, van D.; Bogaerdt, van den A.J.; Oomens, C.W.J.; Bouten, C.V.C.; Baaijens, F.P.T.

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical models can provide valuable information to assess and evaluate the mechanical behavior and remodeling of native tissue. A relevant example when studying collagen remodeling is the Ross procedure because it involves placing the pulmonary autograft in the more demanding aortic valve

  20. Fluid-structure interaction analysis of the flow through a stenotic aortic valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Hoda; Labrosse, Michel R.; Durand, Louis-Gilles; Kadem, Lyes

    2009-11-01

    In Europe and North America, aortic stenosis (AS) is the most frequent valvular heart disease and cardiovascular disease after systemic hypertension and coronary artery disease. Understanding blood flow through an aortic stenosis and developing new accurate non-invasive diagnostic parameters is, therefore, of primarily importance. However, simulating such flows is highly challenging. In this study, we considered the interaction between blood flow and the valve leaflets and compared the results obtained in healthy valves with stenotic ones. One effective method to model the interaction between the fluid and the structure is to use Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) approach. Our two-dimensional model includes appropriate nonlinear and anisotropic materials. It is loaded during the systolic phase by applying pressure curves to the fluid domain at the inflow. For modeling the calcified stenotic valve, calcium will be added on the aortic side of valve leaflets. Such simulations allow us to determine the effective orifice area of the valve, one of the main parameters used clinically to evaluate the severity of an AS, and to correlate it with changes in the structure of the leaflets.

  1. Idiopathic mitral valve prolapse with tricuspid, aortic and pulmonary valve involvement: An autopsy case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heena M Desai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitral valve prolapse (MVP is usually asymptomatic, but can be associated with complications such as infective endocarditis, mitral regurgitation, thromboembolism and sudden cardiac death. It has been very rarely reported to occur in association with other valvular involvement. A 55-year-old male patient was brought dead and at autopsy the mitral valve orifice was stenotic and the leaflets were enlarged, myxoid and bulging suggestive of MVP and chordae tendinae were thickened, stretched and elongated. Similar changes were seen in the tricuspid valve. The pulmonary and aortic valves also showed myxomatous degeneration of their cusps. Myxomatous degeneration is the most common cause of MVP and it can be associated with involvement of the other valves. Concomitant involvement of the aortic valve has been reported, however it is very rare and simultaneous involvement of the pulmonary valve has not been reported in the literature so far. We report a case of MVP associated with myxomatous degeneration of the tricuspid, pulmonary and aortic valves.

  2. The structure and material composition of ossified aortic valves identified using a set of scientific methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, Antonín; Šmíd, Michal; Havelcová, Martina; Coufalová, Lucie; Kučková, Štěpánka; Velčovská, Martina; Hynek, Radovan

    2013-11-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis has become a common and dangerous disease in recent decades. This disease leads to the mineralization of aortic valves, their gradual thickening and loss of functionality. We studied the detailed assessment of the proportion and composition of inorganic and organic components in the ossified aortic valve, using a set of analytical methods applied in science: polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The sample valves showed the occurrence of phosphorus and calcium in the form of phosphate and calcium carbonate, hydroxyapatite, fluorapatite and hydroxy-fluorapatite, with varying content of inorganic components from 65 to 90 wt%, and with phased development of degenerative disability. The outer layers of the plaque contained an organic component with peptide bonds, fatty acids, proteins and cholesterol. The results show a correlation between the formation of fluorapatite in aortic valves and in other parts of the human bodies, associated with the formation of bones.

  3. Preventative Valve-Sparing Aortic Root Replacement and Pregnancy Outcome in Marfan Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Sokol, Vesna; Zlopaša, Gordan; Herman, Mislav; Planinić, Pavao; Micevska, Ana

    2012-01-01

    In Marfan syndrome, with dilatation of the aortic root secondary to an underlying connective tissue defect, pregnancy can cause hemodynamic stress leading to the development of an aortic aneurysm and even a fatal aortic dissection. In the presence of existing aortic root enlargement and a family history of aortic dissection, preventative elective surgery is suggested. Aortic root replacement with or without a valve-sparing procedure is superior to total aortic root replacement with ...

  4. Evolving Concepts in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhoff, F.

    2015-01-01

    Part I of the present thesis is dedicated to implantation technique and the clinical performance of new valve prostheses. A satisfactory TAVI result not solely depends on patient characteristics, but also relies on proper valve positioning and final placement. Moreover, prosthetic design is

  5. Acute Right Coronary Ostial Stenosis during Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarwar Umran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of acute right coronary artery stenosis developing in a patient undergoing aortic valve replacement. We present a case report with a brief overview of the literature relating to coronary artery occlusion associated with cardiac valve surgery - the theories and treatments are discussed. A 85 year-old female was admitted under the care of the cardiothoracic team with signs and symptoms of heart failure. Investigations, including cardiac echocardiography and coronary angiography, indicated a critical aortic valve stenosis. Intraoperative right ventricular failure ensued post aortic valve replacement. Subsequent investigations revealed an acute occlusion of the proximal right coronary artery with resultant absence of distal flow supplying the right ventricle. An immediate right coronary artery bypass procedure was performed with resolution of the right ventricular failure. Subsequent weaning off cardiopulmonary bypass was uneventful and the patient continued to make excellent recovery in the postoperative phase. To our knowledge this is one of the few documented cases of intraoperative acute coronary artery occlusion developing during valve surgery. However, surgeons should be aware of the potential for acute occlusion so that early recognition and rapid intervention can be instituted.

  6. 3D echocardiographic analysis of aortic annulus for transcatheter aortic valve replacement using novel aortic valve quantification software: Comparison with computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediratta, Anuj; Addetia, Karima; Medvedofsky, Diego; Schneider, Robert J; Kruse, Eric; Shah, Atman P; Nathan, Sandeep; Paul, Jonathan D; Blair, John E; Ota, Takeyoshi; Balkhy, Husam H; Patel, Amit R; Mor-Avi, Victor; Lang, Roberto M

    2017-05-01

    With the increasing use of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients with aortic stenosis (AS), computed tomography (CT) remains the standard for annulus sizing. However, 3D transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has been an alternative in patients with contraindications to CT. We sought to (1) test the feasibility, accuracy, and reproducibility of prototype 3DTEE analysis software (Philips) for aortic annular measurements and (2) compare the new approach to the existing echocardiographic techniques. We prospectively studied 52 patients who underwent gated contrast CT, procedural 3DTEE, and TAVR. 3DTEE images were analyzed using novel semi-automated software designed for 3D measurements of the aortic root, which uses multiplanar reconstruction, similar to CT analysis. Aortic annulus measurements included area, perimeter, and diameter calculations from these measurements. The results were compared to CT-derived values. Additionally, 3D echocardiographic measurements (3D planimetry and mitral valve analysis software adapted for the aortic valve) were also compared to the CT reference values. 3DTEE image quality was sufficient in 90% of patients for aortic annulus measurements using the new software, which were in good agreement with CT (r-values: .89-.91) and small (software can accurately measure aortic annulus in patients with severe AS undergoing TAVR, in better agreement with CT than the existing methodology. Accordingly, intra-procedural TEE could potentially replace CT in patients where CT carries significant risk. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Optimal results of aortic valve replacement with small mechanical valves (< 19 mm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yasuyuki; Hattori, Koji; Motoki, Manabu; Takahashi, Yosuke; Kotani, Shinsuke; Nishimura, Shinsuke; Shibata, Toshihiko

    2013-07-01

    Controversy exists regarding the optimal operative method or type of prosthesis for patients with a small aortic root. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the early and mid-term outcomes of standard aortic valve replacement (AVR) using 16 mm or 18 mm ATS Advanced Performance (AP) or 17 mm St. Jude Medical (SJM) Regent valves for a small aortic root. Between April 2003 and August 2009, 78 patients (age range: 50-86 years; 86% aged > or = 65 years) underwent AVR with 16 mm or 18 mm ATS AP valves (16AP group: n = 21, 18AP group: n = 32), or a 17 mm SJM Regent valve (17Regent group: n = 25). Fifty-six patients (72%) had a body surface area (BSA) of regression was similar among the groups (-30%, -25% and -28% in the 16AP, 17Regent and 18AP groups, respectively; p = 0.844). The early and mid-term results of AVR with 16 mm or 18 mm ATS AP valves, or with a 17 mm SJM Regent valve, were satisfactory. Therefore, standard AVR using these small mechanical prostheses, which avoids the need to enlarge the annulus or to conduct stentless bioprosthesis implantation, might represent an acceptable method, especially in elderly patients with a small aortic root.

  8. Aortic valve replacement with the Biocor PSB stentless xenograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolini, P; Luciani, G B; Vecchi, B; Pugliese, P; Mazzucco, A

    1998-08-01

    The midterm clinical results after aortic valve replacement with the Biocor PSB stentless xenograft on all patients operated between October 1992 and October 1996 were reviewed. One hundred six patients, aged 70+/-6 years, had aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis (67%), regurgitation (11%), or both (22%). Associated procedures were done in 49 patients (46%), including coronary artery bypass in 30 patients, mitral valve repair/replacement in 16, and ascending aorta replacement in 5 patients. Aortic cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass times were 96+/-24 and 129+/-31 minutes, respectively. There were 3 (3%) early deaths due to low output (2 patients) and cerebrovascular accident (1 patient). Follow-up of survivors ranged from 6 to 66 months (mean, 39+/-14 months). Survival was 94%+/-2% and 90%+/-3% at 1 and 5 years. There were 5 late deaths due to cardiac cause (2), cancer (2), and pulmonary embolism (1 patient). No patient had structural valve deterioration, whereas 100% and 95%+/-3% were free from valve-related events at 1 and 5 years. There were two reoperations due to narrowing of the left coronary ostium and endocarditis, with an actuarial freedom from reoperation of 99%+/-1% and 98+/-1% at 1 and 5 years, respectively. Functional results demonstrated a mean peak transprosthetic gradient of 16+/-12 mm Hg, with only 1 patient (1%) with a 55 mm Hg gradient. No cases of valve regurgitation greater than mild were recorded at follow-up. Assessment of New York Heart Association functional class demonstrated a significant improvement (2.9+/-0.6 versus 1.4+/-0.7; p=0.01). All patients were free from anticoagulation. Aortic valve replacement using the Biocor PSB stentless xenograft offers excellent midterm survival, negligible valve deterioration, and a very low rate of valve-related events, which are comparable to estimates reported with other models of stentless xenografts and currently available stented xenografts. Hemodynamic performance is favorable and

  9. MicroRNAs Clustered within the 14q32 Locus Are Associated with Endothelial Damage and Microparticle Secretion in Bicuspid Aortic Valve Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neus Martínez-Micaelo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: We previously described that PECAM+ circulating endothelial microparticles (EMPs are elevated in bicuspid aortic valve (BAV disease as a manifestation of endothelial damage. In this study, we hypothesized that this endothelial damage, is functionally related to the secretion of a specific pattern of EMP-associated miRNAs.Methods: We used a bioinformatics approach to correlate the PECAM+ EMP levels with the miRNA expression profile in plasma in healthy individuals and BAV patients (n = 36. In addition, using the miRNAs that were significantly associated with PECAM+ EMP levels, we inferred a miRNA co-expression network using a Gaussian graphical modeling approach to identify highly co-expressed miRNAs or miRNA clusters whose expression could functionally regulate endothelial damage.Results: We identified a co-expression network composed of 131 miRNAs whose circulating expression was significantly associated with PECAM+ EMP levels. Using a topological analysis, we found that miR-494 was the most important hub within the co-expression network. Furthermore, through positional gene enrichment analysis, we identified a cluster of 19 highly co-expressed miRNAs, including miR-494, that was located in the 14q32 locus on chromosome 14 (p = 1.9 × 10−7. We evaluated the putative biological role of this miRNA cluster by determining the biological significance of the genes targeted by the cluster using functional enrichment analysis. We found that this cluster was involved in the regulation of genes with various functions, specifically the “cellular nitrogen compound metabolic process” (p = 2.34 × 10−145, “immune system process” (p = 2.57 × 10−6, and “extracellular matrix organization” (p = 8.14 × 10−5 gene ontology terms and the “TGF-β signaling pathway” KEGG term (p = 2.59 × 10−8.Conclusions: Using an integrative bioinformatics approach, we identified the circulating miRNA expression profile associated with

  10. MicroRNAs Clustered within the 14q32 Locus Are Associated with Endothelial Damage and Microparticle Secretion in Bicuspid Aortic Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Micaelo, Neus; Beltrán-Debón, Raúl; Aragonés, Gerard; Faiges, Marta; Alegret, Josep M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: We previously described that PECAM+ circulating endothelial microparticles (EMPs) are elevated in bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) disease as a manifestation of endothelial damage. In this study, we hypothesized that this endothelial damage, is functionally related to the secretion of a specific pattern of EMP-associated miRNAs. Methods: We used a bioinformatics approach to correlate the PECAM+ EMP levels with the miRNA expression profile in plasma in healthy individuals and BAV patients (n = 36). In addition, using the miRNAs that were significantly associated with PECAM+ EMP levels, we inferred a miRNA co-expression network using a Gaussian graphical modeling approach to identify highly co-expressed miRNAs or miRNA clusters whose expression could functionally regulate endothelial damage. Results: We identified a co-expression network composed of 131 miRNAs whose circulating expression was significantly associated with PECAM+ EMP levels. Using a topological analysis, we found that miR-494 was the most important hub within the co-expression network. Furthermore, through positional gene enrichment analysis, we identified a cluster of 19 highly co-expressed miRNAs, including miR-494, that was located in the 14q32 locus on chromosome 14 (p = 1.9 × 10−7). We evaluated the putative biological role of this miRNA cluster by determining the biological significance of the genes targeted by the cluster using functional enrichment analysis. We found that this cluster was involved in the regulation of genes with various functions, specifically the “cellular nitrogen compound metabolic process” (p = 2.34 × 10−145), “immune system process” (p = 2.57 × 10−6), and “extracellular matrix organization” (p = 8.14 × 10−5) gene ontology terms and the “TGF-β signaling pathway” KEGG term (p = 2.59 × 10−8). Conclusions: Using an integrative bioinformatics approach, we identified the circulating miRNA expression profile associated with secreted PECAM

  11. Stent valve implantation in conventional redo aortic valve surgery to prevent patient-prosthesis mismatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Enrico; Franciosi, Giorgio; Clivio, Sara; Faletra, Francesco; Moccetti, Marco; Moccetti, Tiziano; Pedrazzini, Giovanni; Demertzis, Stefanos

    2017-03-01

    The goal was to show the technical details, feasibility and clinical results of balloon-expandable stent valve implantation in the aortic position during conventional redo open-heart surgery in selected obese patients with a small aortic prosthesis and severe patient-prosthesis mismatch. Two symptomatic overweight patients (body mass index of 31 and 38), each with a small aortic prosthesis (a 4-year-old, 21-mm Hancock II biological valve and a 29-year-old, 23-mm Duromedic mechanical valve), increased transvalvular gradients (59/31 and 74/44 mmHg) and a reduced indexed effective orifice area (0.50 and 0.43 cm 2 /m 2 ) underwent implantation of two 26-mm balloon-expandable Sapien 3 valves during standard on-pump redo valve surgery. Using full re-sternotomy, cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegic arrest, the two balloon-expandable stent valves were implanted under direct view using a standard aortotomy, after prosthesis removal and without annulus enlargement. Aortic cross-clamp times were 162 and 126 min; cardiopulmonary bypass times were 178 and 180 min; total surgical times were 360 and 318 min. At discharge, echocardiograms showed transvalvular peak and mean gradients of 13/9 and 23/13 mmHg and indexed effective orifice areas of 0.64 and 1.08 cm 2 /m 2 . The 3-month echocardiographic follow-up showed transvalvular peak and mean gradients of 18/9 and 19/11 mmHg and indexed effective orifice areas of 0.78 cm 2 /m 2 and 0.84 cm 2 /m 2 , with improved symptoms (New York Heart Association class 1). Implantation of a balloon-expandable stent valve during redo aortic valve surgery is feasible in selected cases and prevents patient-prosthesis mismatch in obese patients without need for aortic annulus enlargement. Moreover, in the case of stent valve degeneration, this approach permits additional valve-in-valve procedures with large stent valves and prevents re-redo surgery. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  12. Surgical treatment of aortic valve endocarditis: a 26-year experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylan Adademir

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We have retrospectively analyzed the results of the operations made for aortic valve endocarditis in a single center in 26 years. Methods: From June 1985 to January 2011, 174 patients were operated for aortic valve endocarditis. One hundred and thirty-eight (79.3% patients were male and the mean age was 39.3±14.4 (9-77 years. Twenty-seven (15.5% patients had prosthetic valve endocarditis. The mean duration of follow-up was 7.3±4.2 years (0.1-18.2 adding up to a total of 1030.8 patient/years. Results: Two hundred and eighty-two procedures were performed. The most frequently performed procedure was aortic valve replacement with mechanical prosthesis (81.6%. In-hospital mortality occurred in 27 (15.5% cases. Postoperatively, 25 (14.4% patients had low cardiac output and 17 (9.8% heart block. The actuarial survival rates for 10 and 15 years were 74.6±3.7% and 61.1±10.3%, respectively. In-hospital mortality was found to be associated with female gender, emergency operation, postoperative renal failure and low cardiac output. The long term mortality was significantly associated with mitral valve involvement. Male gender was found to be a significant risk factor for recurrence in the follow-up. Conclusion: Surgery for aortic valve endocarditis has significant mortality. Emergency operation, female gender, postoperative renal failure and low cardiac output are significant risk factors. Risk for recurrence and need for reoperation is low.

  13. Prosthetic valve sparing aortic root replacement: an improved technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leacche, Marzia; Balaguer, Jorge M; Umakanthan, Ramanan; Byrne, John G

    2008-10-01

    We describe a modified surgical technique to treat patients with a previous history of isolated aortic valve replacement who now require aortic root replacement for an aneurysmal or dissected aorta. This technique consists of replacing the aortic root with a Dacron conduit, leaving intact the previously implanted prosthesis, and re-implanting the coronary arteries in the Dacron graft. Our technique differs from other techniques in that we do not leave behind any aortic tissue remnant and also in that we use a felt strip to obliterate any gap between the old sewing ring and the newly implanted graft. In our opinion, this promotes better hemostasis. We demonstrate that this technique is safe, feasible, and results in acceptable outcomes.

  14. Experiences of and Coping With Severe Aortic Stenosis Among Patients Waiting for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Karin; Näslund, Ulf; Nilsson, Johan; Hörnsten, Åsa

    2016-01-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common valve disease in Western countries. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has made it possible to treat patients with higher surgical risks. These patients are informed about their poor prognosis with only months or a few years to live without treatment. Because of their severe symptoms, limitations, and suffering, patients awaiting TAVI need special attention. The aim of this study is to describe patients' experiences of coping with severe AS and of waiting for TAVI. Swedish participants (n = 24; 9 women, 15 men) with a mean (SD) age of 80 (7.4) years who had been offered TAVI all agreed to participate in a presurgical interview. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The participants' experiences of coping with AS and awaiting TAVI were described by the main theme "living on the edge, but trying to stay in control," which comprised 3 categories: "trying to cope with physical symptoms and anxiety," "trying to preserve self and self-esteem despite life-threatening illness," and "trying to process the decision to undergo TAVI." Patients with AS and awaiting TAVI must cope with increasing symptoms and limitations in their social lives but still wish to be seen as the people they always have been. These patients may need extra support from healthcare personnel to process their experiences, which could help them to attach personal meaning to clinical information about the condition and its treatment that they could include in their decision about whether to undergo TAVI. Listening to patients' stories could help nurses and physicians to ensure that disease and treatment are meaningfully understood by the patient.

  15. Association of body mass index and visceral fat with aortic valve calcification and mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement: the obesity paradox in severe aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Mancio

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies showed that metabolic syndrome is associated with aortic valve calcification (AVC and poor outcomes in aortic stenosis (AS. However, if these associations change and how body fat impacts the prognosis of patients in late stage of the disease have been not yet explored. Aims To determine the association of body mass index (BMI and visceral fat with AVC and mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR. Methods This was a prospective cohort of 170 severe AS patients referred to TAVR. We quantified AVC mass score and fat depots including epicardial adipose tissue, intrathoracic fat, and abdominal visceral (VAF and subcutaneous fats by computed tomography. Fat depots were indexed to body surface area. All-cause and cardiovascular-related deaths after TAVR were recorded over a median follow-up of 1.2 years. Results Higher AVC mass was independently associated with low BMI and low VAF. All-cause mortality risk increased with the decrease of BMI and increment of VAF. A stratified analysis by obesity showed that in non-obese, VAF was inversely associated with mortality, whereas in obese, high VAF was associated with higher mortality (p value for interaction < 0.05. At long-term, hazard ratio [HR] with non-obese/low VAF was 2.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1–4.9; p = 0.021 and HR with obese/high VAF was 2.5 (95% CI 1.1–5.8; p = 0.031 compared with obese/low VAF patients. Conclusions In AS patients submitted to TAVR, BMI and VAF were inversely associated with AVC. Pre-intervention assessment of VAF by computed tomography may provide a better discrimination of mortality than BMI alone.

  16. Association of body mass index and visceral fat with aortic valve calcification and mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement: the obesity paradox in severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancio, Jennifer; Fonseca, Paulo; Figueiredo, Bruno; Ferreira, Wilson; Carvalho, Monica; Ferreira, Nuno; Braga, Pedro; Rodrigues, Alberto; Barros, Antonio; Falcao-Pires, Ines; Leite-Moreira, Adelino; Ribeiro, Vasco Gama; Bettencourt, Nuno

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies showed that metabolic syndrome is associated with aortic valve calcification (AVC) and poor outcomes in aortic stenosis (AS). However, if these associations change and how body fat impacts the prognosis of patients in late stage of the disease have been not yet explored. To determine the association of body mass index (BMI) and visceral fat with AVC and mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). This was a prospective cohort of 170 severe AS patients referred to TAVR. We quantified AVC mass score and fat depots including epicardial adipose tissue, intrathoracic fat, and abdominal visceral (VAF) and subcutaneous fats by computed tomography. Fat depots were indexed to body surface area. All-cause and cardiovascular-related deaths after TAVR were recorded over a median follow-up of 1.2 years. Higher AVC mass was independently associated with low BMI and low VAF. All-cause mortality risk increased with the decrease of BMI and increment of VAF. A stratified analysis by obesity showed that in non-obese, VAF was inversely associated with mortality, whereas in obese, high VAF was associated with higher mortality (p value for interaction < 0.05). At long-term, hazard ratio [HR] with non-obese/low VAF was 2.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-4.9; p = 0.021) and HR with obese/high VAF was 2.5 (95% CI 1.1-5.8; p = 0.031) compared with obese/low VAF patients. In AS patients submitted to TAVR, BMI and VAF were inversely associated with AVC. Pre-intervention assessment of VAF by computed tomography may provide a better discrimination of mortality than BMI alone.

  17. Aortopathy in Congenital Heart Disease in Adults: Aortic Dilatation with Decreased Aortic Elasticity that Impacts Negatively on Left Ventricular Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Koichiro

    2013-04-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve and/or coarctation of the aorta are consistently associated with ascending aortic and para-coarctation medial abnormalities. Medial abnormalities in the ascending aorta are prevalent in other types of patients with a variety of forms congenital heart disease (CHD), such as single ventricle, persistent truncus arteriosus, transposition of the great arteries, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, tetralogy of Fallot. These abnormalities encompass a wide age range, and may predispose to dilatation, aneurysm, and rupture that necessitates aortic valve and root surgery. This dilatation can develop in CHD patients without stenotic region. These CHDs exhibit ongoing dilatation of the aortic root and reduced aortic elasticity and increased aortic stiffness that may relate to intrinsic properties of the aortic root. The concept of aortic dilatation is shifting a paradigm of aortic dilatation, as so called post stenotic dilatation, to primary intrinsic aortopahy. These aortic dilatation and increased stiffness can induce aortic aneurysm, rupture of the aorta and aortic regurgitation, but also provoke left ventricular hypertrophy, reduced coronary artery flow and left ventricular failure. We can recognize this association of aortic pathophysiological abnormality, aortic dilation and aorto-left ventricular interaction as a new clinical entity: "aortopathy".

  18. The influence of Marfans and bicuspid valves on outcomes following aortic valve reimplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Carlos E; García Montero, Carlos; Serrano, Santiago-Fiz; González, Ana; Mingo, Susana; Moñivas, Vanessa; Centeno, Jorge; Forteza, Alberto

    2017-10-01

    We analyzed our early and midterm results with aortic valve reimplantation surgery to determine the influence of Marfan syndrome and bicuspid valves on outcomes with this technique. Between March 2004 and December 2015, 267 patients underwent aortic valve reimplantation operations. The mean diameter of the sinuses of Valsalva was 50 ± 3 mm and moderate/severe aortic regurgitation was present in 34.4% of these patients. A bicuspid aortic valve was present in 21% and 40% had Marfan syndrome. Overall 30-day mortality was 0.37% (1/267). Mean follow-up was 59.7 ± 38.7 months. Overall survival at 1, 3, and 5 years was 98 ± 8%, 98 ± 1%, and 94 ± 2%, respectively. Freedom from reoperation and aortic regurgitation >II was 99 ± 5%, 98 ± 8%, 96.7 ± 8%, and 99 ± 6%, 98 ± 1%, 98 ± 1%, respectively at 1, 3, and 5 years follow-up, with no differences between Marfan and bicuspid aortic valve groups. (p = 0.94 and p = 0.96, respectively). No endocarditis or thromboembolic complications were documented, and 93.6% of the patients did not receive any anticoagulation therapy. The reimplantation technique for aortic root aneurysms is associated with excellent clinical and functional outcomes at short and mid-term follow-up. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. [Non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis on the bicuspid aortic valve in a 25-year-old male with lupus anticoagulant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elikowski, Waldemar; Jarząbek, Radosław; Małek, Małgorzata; Witczak, Włodzimierz; Łazowski, Stanisław; Psuja, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    Non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis (NBTE) is characterized by presence of sterile vegetations that develop from fibrin and platelets on heart valves. The main conditions predisposing to NBTE are malignancy, autoimmune diseases and other hypercoagulable states. The authors describe a case of a 25-year-old male, in whom NBTE was diagnosed on the bicuspid aortic valve. The presence of significant aortic regurgitation and dental caries were initially suggestive of infective endocarditis; although, serial blood culture were negative and procalcytonin concentration was within normal ranges. Empiric antibiotic therapy did not result in diminishing of vegetations, similarly to the anticoagulation treatment initiated when strongly positive lupus anticoagulant was detected in laboratory findings. Aortic valve replacement was necessary. Bacteriologic examination of the excised valve was negative. Widespread fibrin masses at different stages of organization on the leaflets confirmed NBTE in histopathologic assessment. Lupus anticoagulant was probably secondary to thyroid autoimmune disease. © 2016 MEDPRESS.

  20. A Double Whammy: Severe Aortic Stenosis and Cocaine Overwhelm the Mitral Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maini, Rohit; Lim, Jonathan; Liu, Jing; Birnbaum, Itamar; Mirza, Farooq; Lakkis, Nasser; Hamzeh, Ihab

    2018-01-01

    A 50-year-old man presented with acute onset dyspnea following cocaine use. He had severe aortic stenosis (AS), mild mitral regurgitation (MR) due to mitral valve prolapse, and no coronary artery disease on recent coronary angiography. He was in acute heart failure with signs of impending cardiogenic shock. Urgent bedside echocardiography revealed hyperdynamic left ventricular systolic function with acute severe MR from a ruptured chordae tendineae. The acute cocaine-induced spike of his already elevated left ventricular systolic pressure from severe AS likely precipitated chordal rupture of his vulnerable mitral valve. This patient underwent emergent mitral and aortic valve replacements. Although cocaine use has been associated with a myriad of cardiovascular complications, acute MR due to chordal rupture has not, to our knowledge, been previously reported in this setting. Prompt diagnosis with echocardiography and surgical intervention are of paramount importance in the management of acute MR.

  1. Colombian experience with transcatheter aortic valve implantation of medtronic CoreValve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dager, Antonio E; Nuis, Rutger-Jan; Caicedo, Bernardo; Fonseca, Jaime A; Arana, Camilo; Cruz, Lidsa; Benitez, Luis M; Nader, Carlos A; Duenas, Eduardo; de Marchena, Eduardo J; O'Neill, William W; de Jaegere, Peter P

    2012-01-01

    At our institutions, increasing numbers of aortic stenosis patients were not candidates for surgical aortic valve replacement. Accordingly, we initiated the Cali Colombian Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) program. From March 2008 through January 2011, 53 consecutive patients (mean age, 79 ± 6 yr; men, 58%) underwent TAVI with the Medtronic CoreValve System, and data were prospectively collected. Our study's endpoints conformed with Valve Academic Research Consortium recommendations. We report our clinical results.Predicted mortality rates were 25% (interquartile range, 17%-34%) according to logistic EuroSCORE and 6% (interquartile range, 3%-8%) according to the Society of Thoracic Surgeons score. The 30-day mortality rate was 9% (3 intraprocedural deaths, 5 total). The combined 30-day safety endpoint was 30% (major vascular sequelae, 23%; life-threatening bleeding, 12%; myocardial infarction, 4%; major stroke, 4%; and acute kidney injury [stage 3], 2%). Eight patients (15%) required post-implantation balloon dilation and 2 (4%) required valve-in-valve implantation, for a technical device success rate of 77%. Mean peak transvalvular gradient decreased from 74 ± 29 to 17 ± 8 mmHg and mean transvalvular gradient from 40 ± 17 to 8 ± 4 mmHg (both P=0.001). Moderate or severe aortic regurgitation decreased from 32% to 18% (P=0.12) and mitral regurgitation from 32% to 13% (P=0.002). The 1-year survival rate was 81%.We found that TAVI with the CoreValve prosthesis was safe and feasible, with sustained long-term results, for treating aortic stenosis in patients at excessive surgical risk; nonetheless, serious adverse events occurred in 30% of the patients.

  2. North American trial results at 1 year with the Sorin Freedom SOLO pericardial aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimansohn, David; Roselli, Eric E; Thourani, Vinod H; Wang, Shaohua; Voisine, Pierre; Ye, Jian; Dabir, Reza; Moon, Michael

    2016-02-01

    A North American prospective, 15-centre Food and Drug Administration (FDA) valve trial was designed to assess the safety and effectiveness of the Freedom SOLO stentless pericardial aortic valve in the treatment of surgical aortic valve disease. Beginning in 2010, 251 patients (mean: 74.7 ± 7.5 years), were recruited in the Freedom SOLO aortic valve trial. One hundred eighty-nine patients have been followed for at least 1 year and are the basis for this review. Preoperatively, 54% of patients had NYHA functional class III or IV symptoms, and the majority of patients had a normal ejection fraction (EF) (median EF = 61%). Concomitant procedures were performed in 61.9% of patients, with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) (48.7%) being the most common followed by a MAZE procedure (13.7%). Reoperations were performed in 8.5% of patients in the study. The entire cohort of 251 patients enrolled had 7 deaths prior to 30 days, 2 of which were valve-related (aspiration pneumonia and sudden death) and 5 were not valve-related. There were 11 deaths after 30 days, 1 valve-related (unknown cardiac death) and 10 not valve-related. Five valves were explanted, 3 early (endocarditis, acute insufficiency and possible root dissection) and 2 late (endocarditis). Thirty-day adverse events include arrhythmias requiring permanent pacemaker (4.2%), thromboembolic events (3.7%) and thrombocytopenia (7.4%). One-year follow-up of all 189 patients demonstrated mean gradients for valve sizes 19, 21, 23, 25 and 27 mm of 11.7, 7.8, 6.3, 4.6 and 5.0 mmHg, respectively. Effective orifice areas for the same valve sizes were 1.2, 1.3, 1.6, 1.8 and 1.9 cm(2), respectively. Ninety-six percent of patients (181/189) were in NYHA class I or II at the 1-year follow-up. The Freedom SOLO stentless pericardial aortic valve demonstrated excellent haemodynamics and a good safety profile out to the 1 year of follow-up. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European

  3. Blood Pressure and Arterial Load After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindman, Brian R; Otto, Catherine M; Douglas, Pamela S; Hahn, Rebecca T; Elmariah, Sammy; Weissman, Neil J; Stewart, William J; Ayele, Girma M; Zhang, Feifan; Zajarias, Alan; Maniar, Hersh S; Jilaihawi, Hasan; Blackstone, Eugene; Chinnakondepalli, Khaja M; Tuzcu, E Murat; Leon, Martin B; Pibarot, Philippe

    2017-07-01

    After aortic valve replacement, left ventricular afterload is often characterized by the residual valve obstruction. Our objective was to determine whether higher systemic arterial afterload-as reflected in blood pressure, pulsatile and resistive load-is associated with adverse clinical outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Total, pulsatile, and resistive arterial load were measured in 2141 patients with severe aortic stenosis treated with TAVR in the PARTNER I trial (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valve) who had systolic blood pressure (SBP) and an echocardiogram obtained 30 days after TAVR. The primary end point was 30-day to 1-year all-cause mortality. Lower SBP at 30 days after TAVR was associated with higher mortality (20.0% for SBP 100-129 mm Hg versus 12.0% for SBP 130-170 mm Hg; P <0.001). This association remained significant after adjustment, was consistent across subgroups, and confirmed in sensitivity analyses. In adjusted models that included SBP, higher total and pulsatile arterial load were associated with increased mortality ( P <0.001 for all), but resistive load was not. Patients with low 30-day SBP and high pulsatile load had a 3-fold higher mortality than those with high 30-day SBP and low pulsatile load (26.1% versus 8.1%; hazard ratio, 3.62; 95% confidence interval, 2.36-5.55). Even after relief of valve obstruction in patients with aortic stenosis, there is an independent association between post-TAVR blood pressure, systemic arterial load, and mortality. Blood pressure goals in patients with a history of aortic stenosis may need to be redefined. Increased pulsatile arterial load, rather than blood pressure, may be a target for adjunctive medical therapy to improve outcomes after TAVR. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00530894. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Deformation Differences between Tricuspid and Bicuspid Aortic Valves in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeto, Kai; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Pastuszko, Peter; Nigam, Vishal; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2011-11-01

    It has been shown in clinical studies that patients with congenital bicuspid aortic valves (CBAVs) develop degenerative calcification of the leaflets at young ages compared to patients with the normal tricuspid aortic valves (TAVs). It has been hypothesized that the asymmetrical geometry of the leaflets in CBAVs, flow shear stresses (SS), disturbed flow, and excessive strain rate levels are possible causes for the early calcification and stenosis. Central to the validation of this hypothesis is the need to quantify the differences in strain rate levels between the BAVs and TAVs. We simulate the CBAVs by surgically stitching two of the leaflets of a porcine aortic valve together. To quantify strain differences, we performed in-vitro experiments in both trileaflet and bileaflet valves by tracking the motion of small ink dots marked on each leaflet surface. We then used phase-locked stereo photogrammetry to reconstruct at each instant of time the 3D surface of the leaflets and measure the strain rates in both radial and circumferential directions during the whole cardiac cycle. Our results indicate that the total strain rate of the simulated BAVs is about 15 to 20% higher than the normal leaflets of TAVs at systole. In the BAVs' case, the fused leaflet stretches radially up to 25% higher than the reference length. The excessive stretching in both directions in the fused leaflet results in large changes in the flow patterns and associated wall SS.

  5. Three-dimensional echocardiography in valve disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Fiorentini

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This review covers the role of three-dimensional (3D echocardiography in the diagnosis of heart valve disease. Several factors have contributed to the evolution of this technique, which is currently a simple and routine method: rapid evolution in probe and computer technologies, demonstration that 3D data sets allowed more complete and accurate evaluation of cardiac structures, emerging clinical experience indicating the strong potential particularly in valve diseases, volume and function of the two ventricle measurements and several other fields. This report will review current and future applications of 3D echocardiography in mitral, aortic and tricuspid valve diseases underlying both qualitative (morphologic and quantitative advantages of this technique. (Heart International 2007; 3: 35-41

  6. Durability of central aortic valve closure in patients with continuous flow left ventricular assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKellar, Stephen H; Deo, Salil; Daly, Richard C; Durham, Lucian A; Joyce, Lyle D; Stulak, John M; Park, Soon J

    2014-01-01

    A competent aortic valve is essential to providing effective left ventricular assist device support. We have adopted a practice of central aortic valve closure by placing a simple coaptation stitch at left ventricular assist device implantation in patients with significant aortic insufficiency. We conducted a follow-up study to evaluate the efficacy and durability of this procedure. The study included patients who had undergone continuous flow left ventricular assist device implantation. The patients were divided into 2 groups, those who did not require any aortic procedure because the valve was competent and those who underwent central aortic valve closure for mild or greater aortic regurgitation. The clinical endpoints were mortality, progression or recurrence of aortic insufficiency, and reoperation for aortic valve pathologic features. Aortic insufficiency was measured qualitatively from mild to severe on a scale of 0 to 5. A total of 123 patients received continuous flow left ventricular assist devices from February 2007 to August 2011. Of those, 18 (15%) underwent central aortic valve closure at left ventricular assist device implantation because of significant aortic insufficiency (1.8 ± 1.4) and 105 who did not (competent aortic valve, 0.15 ± 0.43; P assist device-supported patients, with follow-up extending into 2 years. Although aortic insufficiency progressed over time in those with minimal native valve regurgitation initially, no such progression was noted in those with central aortic valve closure. Additional investigation is needed to evaluate whether prophylactic central aortic valve closure should be performed at left ventricular assist device implantation to avoid problematic aortic regurgitation developing over time, in particular in patients undergoing left ventricular assist device implantation for life-long (destination therapy) support. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights

  7. Full-root aortic valve replacement with stentless xenograft achieves superior regression of left ventricular hypertrophy compared to pericardial stented aortic valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Reza; Auf der Maur, Christoph; Mueller, Xavier; Schläpfer, Reinhard; Jamshidi, Peiman; Daubeuf, François; Frossard, Nelly

    2015-02-03

    Full-root aortic valve replacement with stentless xenografts has potentially superior hemodynamic performance compared to stented valves. However, a number of cardiac surgeons are reluctant to transform a classical stented aortic valve replacement into a technically more demanding full-root stentless aortic valve replacement. Here we describe our technique of full-root stentless aortic xenograft implantation and compare the early clinical and midterm hemodynamic outcomes to those after aortic valve replacement with stented valves. We retrospectively compared the pre-operative characteristics of 180 consecutive patients who underwent full-root replacement with stentless aortic xenografts with those of 80 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement with stented valves. In subgroups presenting with aortic stenosis, we further analyzed the intra-operative data, early postoperative outcomes and mid-term regression of left ventricular mass index. Patients in the stentless group were younger (62.6 ± 13 vs. 70.3 ± 11.8 years, p regression of the left ventricular mass index in the stentless (p replacement can be performed without adversely affecting the early morbidity or mortality in patients operated on for aortic valve stenosis provided that the coronary ostia are not heavily calcified. The additional time necessary for the full-root stentless compared to the classical stented aortic valve replacement is therefore not detrimental to the early clinical outcomes and is largely rewarded in patients with aortic stenosis by lower transvalvular gradients at mid-term and a better regression of their left ventricular mass index.

  8. Recurrent pannus formation causing prosthetic aortic valve dysfunction: Is excision without valve re-replacement applicable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darwazah Ahmad K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prosthetic valve dysfunction at aortic position is commonly caused by pannus formation. The exact etiology is not known. It arises from ventricular aspect of the prosthesis encroaching its leaflets causing stenosis or it may remain localized causing left ventricular outflow tract obstruction without affecting valve function. The difference in location entails different approaches in management. Such a pathology requires surgical excision of the pannus with or without valve re-replacement. A recurrent pannus was observed in a female patient who needed repeated surgical intervention to excise a localized pannus without re-replacement of a well functioning prosthetic valve. Management of our case presents several questions, whether recurrence of pannus is caused by sparing the prosthetic valve, is it simply an exaggeration of an inflammatory healing process in certain individuals or is it ideal to re-replace the valve despite a well preserved function.

  9. Recurrent pannus formation causing prosthetic aortic valve dysfunction: is excision without valve re-replacement applicable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwazah, Ahmad K

    2012-06-29

    Prosthetic valve dysfunction at aortic position is commonly caused by pannus formation. The exact etiology is not known. It arises from ventricular aspect of the prosthesis encroaching its leaflets causing stenosis or it may remain localized causing left ventricular outflow tract obstruction without affecting valve function.The difference in location entails different approaches in management. Such a pathology requires surgical excision of the pannus with or without valve re-replacement.A recurrent pannus was observed in a female patient who needed repeated surgical intervention to excise a localized pannus without re-replacement of a well functioning prosthetic valve.Management of our case presents several questions, whether recurrence of pannus is caused by sparing the prosthetic valve, is it simply an exaggeration of an inflammatory healing process in certain individuals or is it ideal to re-replace the valve despite a well preserved function.

  10. Automatic segmentation of the aortic root in CT angiography of candidate patients for transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elattar, M.A.; Wiegerinck, E.; Planken, R.N.; VanBavel, E.T.; Assen, van H.C.; Baan Jr., J.; Marquering, H.A.

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a minimal-invasive intervention for implanting prosthetic valves in patients with aortic stenosis. Accurate automated sizing for planning and patient selection is expected to reduce adverse effects such as paravalvular leakage and stroke. Segmentation of

  11. Postoperative Reverse Remodeling and Symptomatic Improvement in Normal-Flow Low-Gradient Aortic Stenosis After Aortic Valve Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter-Storch, Rasmus; Møller, Jacob E; Christensen, Nicolaj L

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severe aortic stenosis (AS) most often presents with reduced aortic valve area (benefit of aortic valve...... replacement (AVR) among NFLG patients is controversial. We compared the impact of NFLG condition on preoperative left ventricular (LV) remodeling and myocardial fibrosis and postoperative remodeling and symptomatic benefit. METHODS AND RESULTS: Eighty-seven consecutive patients with reduced aortic valve area...... and normal stroke volume index undergoing AVR underwent echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, a 6-minute walk test, and measurement of natriuretic peptides before and 1 year after AVR. Myocardial fibrosis was assessed from magnetic resonance imaging. Patients were stratified as NFLG or normal...

  12. Simultaneous rota-stenting and transcatheter aortic valve implantation for patients with heavily calcified coronary stenosis and aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Tsai Lee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Given that coronary artery disease (CAD in octogenarians undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI often presents with more complex lesions and extensive calcification, rotational atherectomy (RA may be needed in some cases before stenting. However, data regarding the feasibility and safety of simultaneous RA during TAVI using the Medtronic CoreValve (MCV; Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN, USA system are lacking. Three out of 107 (2.8% patients (2 females, average age 85.6 years, mean aortic valve area 0.5 cm2, mean left ventricular ejection fraction 39%, mean Logistic EuroScore 70%, with complex, heavily calcified coronary stenosis, and severe valvular aortic stenosis (AS were treated with TAVI and RA due to high surgical risk. After balloon valvuloplasty, all coronary lesions were successfully treated with RA and stenting, immediately followed by transfemoral TAVI with a self-expandable MCV. Our data suggested that in the very elderly patients with severe and heavily calcified CAD and AS who were turned down for cardiac surgery, RA and stenting followed by TAVI may be performed successfully in a combined, single-stage procedure.

  13. Involvement of proinflammatory S100A9/A8 in the atherocalcinosis of aortic valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. А. Moskalenko

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available According to the results of the Euro-Heart Survey on Vascular Heart Disease the most common pathology is nonrheumatic aortic stenosis, it is also called as calcific aortic valve stenosis (CAVS, as in its pathogenesis the process of biomineralization of valve cusps and ring plays the main role. The aim of the work is the immunohistochemical study of mineralized tissue of aortic heart valves, which are affected by atherocalcinosis. Materials and methods. 30 samples of mineralized aortic valves (I group and 10 samples of aortic valve without evidence of biomineralization (II group -– control were studied. Immunohistochemical study of expression of collagen (Collagen I, CD68, myeloperoxidase (MPO, calgranulin A (S100A8, calgranulin B (S100A9, caspase 3 (Casp 3 and osteopontin (OPN was conducted in AV tissue of both groups. Results. In CAV tissues the fibrillar component (collagen I growths was found, but the quantitative and qualitative compositions of CD68+ circulating inflammatory cells are not significantly different from the control group. CAVs contain much more MPO+ -cells (p <0.001 in comparison to the group of AVs without biomineralization. Our data show a significant increase of the S100A9 and OPN expression in the mineralized tissue of AVs (p < 0.01. Also, a higher expression level of Casp3 and MPO was found in CAVs (p < 0.05. Comparing the first and the second groups of AVs connection between the expression of S100A8 was not determined. Conclusion. High Casp 3 expression confirms the increased level of cell elimination in the CAVs tissue, which is obviously connected with the impact of high local concentrations of S100A9. These facts can contribute to the development of pathological biomineralization of AV. Since osteopontin inhibits the hydroxyapatite formation by binding to the surface of the crystals, its hyperproduction is a counteracting factor against biomineralization in AV tissue.

  14. Risk Factors for Late Aortic Valve Dysfunction After the David V Valve-Sparing Root Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esaki, Jiro; Leshnower, Bradley G; Binongo, Jose N; Lasanajak, Yi; McPherson, LaRonica; Guyton, Robert A; Chen, Edward P

    2017-11-01

    Valve-sparing root replacement (VSRR) is an established therapy for aortic root pathology. However, late aortic valve dysfunction requiring reoperation remains a primary concern of this procedure. This study examines risk factors for late aortic insufficiency (AI) and aortic stenosis (AS) after David V VSRR. A retrospective review from 2005 to 2015 at a US academic center identified 282 patients who underwent VSRR. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to identify risk factors for late AI and AS after VSRR. The mean age was 46.4 years. Sixty-four patients (22.7%) had bicuspid valves, and 41 patients (14.5%) had Marfan syndrome. The incidence of reoperations was 27 (9.6%), and 42 cases (14.9%) presented with acute type A dissection. Operative mortality was 8 (2.8%). Seven-year survival was 90.9%. Seven-year cumulative incidence of reoperation, greater than 2+ AI and greater than moderate AS were 3.1%, 2.2%, and 0.8%, respectively. Multivariable analysis showed aortic root size 55 mm or larger (hazard ratio 3.44, 95% confidence interval: 1.27 to 9.29, p = 0.01) to be a risk factor for late AI whereas bicuspid valve (hazard ratio 16.07, 95% confidence interval: 3.12 to 82.68, p = 0.001) and cusp repair were found to be risk factors (hazard ratio 5.91, 95% confidence interval: 1.17 to 29.86, p = 0.03) for late AS. Valve-sparing root replacement can be performed with low operative risk and good overall long-term survival even in complex clinical settings. Durable valve function can be expected; however, aortic root size 55 cm or more, bicuspid valve anatomy, and cusp repair represent independent risk factors for late aortic valve dysfunction after these procedures. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Bioprosthetic Aortic Valve Endocarditis in Association with Enterococcus durans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallavollita, Luca; Di Gioacchino, Lorena; Balestrini, Fabrizio

    2016-04-01

    Enterococci are common organisms associated with endocarditis, but infection by Enterococcus durans is very rare. To our knowledge, only 3 cases have been reported in the medical literature, and all 3 have involved native valves. Here we publish the first reported case (to our knowledge) of E. durans endocarditis in association with a bioprosthetic aortic valve. After the organism and its antibiotic susceptibility were identified, the 74-year-old male patient was treated successfully with teicoplanin and gentamicin, over a course of 6 weeks.

  16. Longitudinal strain predicts left ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis and preserved left ventricular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelsomino, Sandro; Lucà, Fabiana; Parise, Orlando; Lorusso, Roberto; Rao, Carmelo Massimiliano; Vizzardi, Enrico; Gensini, Gian Franco; Maessen, Jos G

    2013-11-01

    We explored the influence of global longitudinal strain (GLS) measured with two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography on left ventricular mass regression (LVMR) in patients with pure aortic stenosis (AS) and normal left ventricular function undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR). The study population included 83 patients with severe AS (aortic valve area regression (all P regression in patients with pure AS undergoing AVR. Our findings must be confirmed by further larger studies.

  17. Will Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR be the Primary Therapy for Aortic Stenosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose F. Condado, MD, MS

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR is increasingly used for the treatment of high or very high surgical risk patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS or failing surgical bioprosthesis (valve-in-valve, VIV-TAVR. In TAVR, the collapsed transcatheter heart valve (THV is introduced using the delivery system inserted from the femoral artery (preferred or other alternative accesses (transapical, transaortic, transcarotid, subclavian/transinnominate or transcaval. The delivery system is then advanced until coaxially aligned with the aortic annulus, where the THV is deployed. This procedure can be associated with complications such as access site injury (vascular complication, paravalvar leak, cerebrovascular events and conduction disturbances. However, the rapid acceptance and successes observed with TAVR have been made possible through careful patient selection, preprocedural planning (i.e. MDCT annular sizing, THV technology (i.e. new generation valves, and procedural techniques (i.e. minimalist TF-TAVR and alternative percutaneous access options, as well as a decrease in complications as TAVR experience grows. Though the results or ongoing clinical trials evaluating TAVR in intermediate surgical risk patients are pending, it is likely that TAVR will soon be approved for lower risk patients as well.

  18. Aortic valve-sparing operations in aortic root aneurysms: remodeling or reimplantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnavardi, Mohammad; Yan, Tristan D; Bannon, Paul G; Wilson, Michael K

    2011-08-01

    A best evidence topic was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether the reimplantation (David) technique or the remodeling (Yacoub) technique provides the optimum event free survival in patients with an aortic root aneurysm suitable for an aortic valve-sparing operation. In total, 392 papers were found using the reported search criteria, of which 14 papers provided the best evidence to answer the clinical question. A total of 1338 patients (Yacoub technique in 606 and David technique in 732) from 13 centres were included. In most series, cardiopulmonary bypass time and aortic cross-clamp time were longer for the David technique compared to the Yacoub technique. Early mortality was comparable between the two techniques (0-6.9% for the Yacoub technique and 0-6% for the David technique). There is a tendency for a higher freedom from significant long-term aortic insufficiency in the David group than the Yacoub group, which does not necessarily result in a higher reoperation rate in the Yacoub group. In the largest series reported, freedom from a moderate-to-severe aortic insufficiency at 12 years was 82.6 ± 6.2% in the Yacoub and 91.0 ± 3.8% in the David group (P=0.035). Freedom from reoperation at the same time point was 90.4 ± 4.7% in the Yacoub group and 97.4 ± 2.2% in the David group (P=0.09). In another series, freedom from reoperation at a follow-up time of about four years was 89 ± 4% in the Yacoub group and 98 ± 2% in the David group. Although some authors merely preferred the Yacoub technique for a bicuspid aortic valve, the accumulated evidence in the current review indicates comparable results for both techniques in a bicuspid aortic valve. Current evidence is in favour of the David rather than the Yacoub technique in pathologies such as Marfan syndrome, acute type A aortic dissection, and excessive annular dilatation that may impair aortic root integrity. Careful selection of patients for each technique and

  19. Aortic root, not valve, calcification correlates with coronary artery calcification in patients with severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henein, Michael; Hällgren, Peter; Holmgren, Anders

    2015-01-01

    calcification (AVC), due to tissue similarity between the two types of vessel rather than with the valve leaflet tissue. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We studied 212 consecutive patients (age 72.5 ± 7.9 years, 91 females) with AS requiring aortic valve replacement (AVR) in two Heart Centers, who underwent multidetector...... cardiac CT preoperatively. CAC, AVC and ARC were quantified using Agatston scoring. Correlations were tested by Spearman's test and Mann-Whitney U-test was used for comparing different subgroups; bicuspid (BAV) vs tricuspid (TAV) aortic valve. RESULTS: CAC was present in 92%, AVC in 100% and ARC in 82......% of patients. CAC correlated with ARC (rho = 0.51, p AVC. The number of calcified coronary arteries correlated with ARC (rho = 0.45, p AVC. 29/152 patients had echocardiographic evidence of BAV and 123 TAV, who were older (p

  20. Intermittent acute aortic valve regurgitation: A case report of a prosthetic valve dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.E. Karagiannis (Stefanos); G. Karatasakis (George); K. Spargias (Konstantinos); L. Louka; D. Poldermans (Don); D.V. Cokkinos (Dennis)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractComplications of any mechanical prosthesis include thrombus or pannus formation. In our case report we demonstrate that prosthetic aortic valve regurgitation due to pannus formation may be intermittent and non-cyclic in pattern and therefore not obvious at the time of original clinical

  1. Prosthetic valve endocarditis 7 months after transcatheter aortic valve implantation diagnosed with 3D TEE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarı, Cenk; Durmaz, Tahir; Karaduman, Bilge Duran; Keleş, Telat; Bayram, Hüseyin; Baştuğ, Serdal; Özen, Mehmet Burak; Bayram, Nihal Akar; Bilen, Emine; Ayhan, Hüseyin; Kasapkara, Hacı Ahmet; Bozkurt, Engin

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) was introduced as an alternative treatment for patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis for whom surgery would be high-risk. Prosthetic aortic valve endocarditis is a serious complication of surgical AVR (SAVR) with high morbidity and mortality. According to recent cases, post-TAVI prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) seems to occur very rarely. We present the case of a 75-year-old woman who underwent TAVI (Edwards Saphien XT) with an uneventful postoperative stay. She was diagnosed with endocarditis using three dimensional (3D) echocardiography on the TAVI device 7 months later and she subsequently underwent surgical aortic valve replacement. Little experience of the interpretation of transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and the clinical course and effectiveness of treatment strategies in post-TAVI endocarditis exists. We report a case of PVE in a TAVI patient which was diagnosed with three-dimensional transoesophageal echocardiography (3DTEE). Copyright © 2016 Hellenic Cardiological Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Prevalence, predictors, and prognostic implications of residual impairment of functional capacity after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Abdelghani (Mohammad); R. Cavalcante (Rafael); Y. Miyazaki (Yosuke); R.J. de Winter (Robbert); R. Sarmento-Leite (Rogerio); J.A. Mangione (José A.); A.C. Abizaid (Alexandre); P.A. Lemos Neto (Pedro); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); F.S. De Brito Jr. (Fabio)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractBackground: Patients with degenerative aortic stenosis (AS) referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) typically have advanced cardiac and vascular adverse remodeling and multiple comorbidities and, therefore, might not recover a normal functional capacity after

  3. [Selection of patients for transcatheter aortic valve implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tron, Christophe; Godin, Matthieu; Litzler, Pierre-Yves; Bauer, Fabrice; Caudron, Jérome; Dacher, Jean-Nicolas; Borz, Bogdan; Canville, Alexandre; Kurtz, Baptiste; Bessou, Jean-Paul; Cribier, Alain; Eltchaninoff, Hélène

    2012-06-01

    A good selection of patients is a crucial step before transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in order to select the good indications and choose the access route. TAVI should be considered only in patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis and either contraindication or high surgical risk. Indication for TAVI should be discussed in a multidisciplinary team meeting. Echocardiography and/or CT scan are mandatory to evaluate the aortic annulus size and select the good prosthesis size. The possibility of transfemoral implantation is evaluated by angiography and CT scan, and based on the arterial diameters, but also on the presence of tortuosities and arterial calcifications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Mechanisms of recurrent aortic regurgitation after aortic valve repair: predictive value of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Polain de Waroux, Jean-Benoît; Pouleur, Anne-Catherine; Robert, Annie; Pasquet, Agnès; Gerber, Bernhard L; Noirhomme, Philippe; El Khoury, Gébrine; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis J

    2009-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the intraoperative echocardiographic features associated with recurrent severe aortic regurgitation (AR) after an aortic valve repair surgery. Surgical valve repair for AR has significant advantages over valve replacement, but little is known about the predictors and mechanisms of its failure. We blindly reviewed all clinical, pre-operative, intraoperative, and follow-up transesophageal echocardiographic data of 186 consecutive patients who underwent valve repair for AR during a 10-year period and in whom intraoperative and follow-up echo data were available. After a median follow-up duration of 18 months, 41 patients had recurrent 3+ AR, 23 patients presented with residual 1+ to 2+ AR, and 122 had no or trivial AR. In patients with recurrent 3+ AR, the cause of recurrent AR was the rupture of a pericardial patch in 3 patients, a residual cusp prolapse in 26 patients, a restrictive cusp motion in 9 patients, an aortic dissection in 2 patients, and an infective endocarditis in 1 patient. Pre-operatively, all 3 groups were similar for aortic root dimensions and prevalence of bicuspid valve (overall 37%). Patients with recurrent AR were more likely to display Marfan syndrome or type 3 dysfunction pre-operatively. At the opposite end, patients with continent AR repair at follow-up were more likely to have type 2 dysfunction pre-operatively. After cardiopulmonary bypass, a shorter coaptation length, the degree of cusp billowing, a lower level of coaptation (relative to the annulus), a larger diameter of the aortic annulus and the sino-tubular junction, the presence of a residual AR, and the width of its vena contracta were associated with the presence of AR at follow-up. Multivariate Cox analysis identified a shorter coaptation length (odds ratio [OR]: 0.8, p = 0.05), a coaptation occurring below the level of the aortic annulus (OR: 7.9, p < 0.01), a larger aortic annulus (OR: 1.2, p = 0.01), and residual aortic regurgitation

  5. Aortic valve replacement: is there an implant size variation across Europe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Athanasiou, Thanos; Mestres, Carlos A; Nashef, Samer A M; Aagaard, Jan; Moritz, Anton; Van Ingen, Gerrit; Chronidou, Fany; Palatianos, George; Alivizatos, Peter A; Stavridis, George T

    2008-03-01

    differences in implanted aortic valve size, between the participating northern and southern European countries. Imbalances in the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease, health resource availability and variations in surgical practice throughout Europe might be possible etiological causes.

  6. A new self-expandable aortic valved stent deployed above native leaflets for aortic insufficiency: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H; Zhou, Y; Shao, J; Cai, J; Mei, Y; Wang, Y

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this paper was to develop a new self-expandable aortic valved stent following the shape of the sinus of Valsalva, which can be deployed above native leaflets for aortic regurgitation, and study it's effect on coronary artery flow when orthotopic implantation in and above native leaflets. New self-expandable aortic valved stent consist of nitinol stent and bovine pericardium, and was designed following the shape of the sinus of Valsalva, the bovine pericardium was tailed as native leaflet. Thirty-six swine hearts were divided into three equal groups of twelve. In Group A (N.=12), the new self-expandable aortic valved stents deployed in native leaflets. In Group B (N.=12), the new self-expandable aortic valved stents deployed above native leaflets. In Group C (N.=12), the cylinder-like valved stents deployed only in native leaflets. The measurements of each coronary flow rate and endoscopic inspections were repeated post-implantation. In Group A and C, valve implantation in native leaflets resulted in a significant decrease in both left and right coronary flows. In Group B, no significant change in either right or left coronary flow was found after new self-expandable aortic valved stent placement. Endoscopic inspections showed that in group A and C the native leaflets sandwiched between valved stent and aortic wall, whereas, in group B the native leaflets were under the artificial leaflets. Two kinds of stents deployed in native leaflets affect left and right coronary flows significantly. No significant effect was found when the new self-expandable aortic valved stent deployed above native leaflets. This new self-expandable aortic valved stent can be deployed above the native leaflets, which avoids the obstruction of native leaflets on coronary flow.

  7. Long-term results of aortic valve replacement with Edwards Prima Plus stentless bioprosthesis: eleven years' follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auriemma, Stefano; D'Onofrio, Augusto; Brunelli, Massimo; Magagna, Paolo; Paccanaro, Mariemma; Rulfo, Fanny; Fabbri, Alessandro

    2006-09-01

    The Edwards Lifesciences Prima Plus stentless valve (ELSV) is a bioprosthesis manufactured from a porcine aortic root. The study aim was to evaluate late clinical outcomes after aortic valve replacement (AVR) with ELSV implanted as a miniroot in patients with aortic valve disease. Between 1993 and 2004, 318 patients (232 males, 86 females; mean age 69 +/- 9 years; range: 37-83 years) underwent AVR with the ELSV. Preoperatively, 102 patients (32%), 162 (51%) and 54 (17%) were in NYHA classes I/II, III and IV, respectively. Aortic stenosis, aortic regurgitation and combined lesions were present in 124 patients (39%), 114 (36%) and 41 (13%), respectively. Twenty patients (6%) were referred for an acute aortic dissection, 20 (6%) for an aortic root aneurysm, and 139 (44%) had an associated aneurysmal dilatation of the ascending aorta. The ascending aorta was replaced in 159 patients (50%); aortic arch replacement was required in 10 (3%). Coronary artery bypass graft was performed in 86 patients (27%). The follow up was based on clinical data. Operative mortality was 5% (n = 17). There were 49 late deaths (5.2%/pt-yr). Valve-related mortality occurred in 10 patients (1%/pt-yr). Actuarial survival at five and 10 years was 78% and 33%, respectively. Actuarial freedom from valve reoperation and structural valve deterioration at 10 years were 100% and 64%. Actuarial freedom from embolic events and endocarditis at 10 years were 84% and 81%, respectively. The ELSV, when implanted as a miniroot, provided good early and long-term results in terms of survival and freedom from major complications.

  8. Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part XXX: Transcatheter Aortic Valve Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A

    2017-12-01

    Initially, the transcatheter aortic valve replacement procedure was approved only for patients with aortic stenosis that was both severe and symptomatic who either also had too high a risk of aortic valve replacement surgery to have the surgery or who had a high risk for the surgery. Between the years 2012 and 2015, the death rate at 30 days declined from an initial rate of 7.5% to 4.6%. There has also been more use of the transfemoral approach over the years. In 2016, the transcatheter aortic valve replacement was approved for patients with aortic stenosis at intermediate risk of surgery.

  9. Cost-Effectiveness of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With a Self-Expanding Prosthesis Versus Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Matthew R; Lei, Yang; Wang, Kaijun; Chinnakondepalli, Khaja; Vilain, Katherine A; Magnuson, Elizabeth A; Galper, Benjamin Z; Meduri, Christopher U; Arnold, Suzanne V; Baron, Suzanne J; Reardon, Michael J; Adams, David H; Popma, Jeffrey J; Cohen, David J

    2016-01-05

    Previous studies of the cost-effectiveness of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) have been based primarily on a single balloon-expandable system. The goal of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of TAVR with a self-expanding prosthesis compared with surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) for patients with severe aortic stenosis and high surgical risk. We performed a formal economic analysis on the basis of individual, patient-level data from the CoreValve U.S. High Risk Pivotal Trial. Empirical data regarding survival and quality of life over 2 years, and medical resource use and hospital costs through 12 months were used to project life expectancy, quality-adjusted life expectancy, and lifetime medical costs in order to estimate the incremental cost-effectiveness of TAVR versus SAVR from a U.S. Relative to SAVR, TAVR reduced initial length of stay an average of 4.4 days, decreased the need for rehabilitation services at discharge, and resulted in superior 1-month quality of life. Index admission and projected lifetime costs were higher with TAVR than with SAVR (differences $11,260 and $17,849 per patient, respectively), whereas TAVR was projected to provide a lifetime gain of 0.32 quality-adjusted life-years ([QALY]; 0.41 LY) with 3% discounting. Lifetime incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were $55,090 per QALY gained and $43,114 per LY gained. Sensitivity analyses indicated that a reduction in the initial cost of TAVR by ∼$1,650 would lead to an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio <$50,000/QALY gained. In a high-risk clinical trial population, TAVR with a self-expanding prosthesis provided meaningful clinical benefits compared with SAVR, with incremental costs considered acceptable by current U.S. With expected modest reductions in the cost of index TAVR admissions, the value of TAVR compared with SAVR in this patient population would become high. (Safety and Efficacy Study of the Medtronic CoreValve System in the Treatment of

  10. Aortic Valve Predilatation with a Small Balloon, without Rapid Pacing, prior to Transfemoral Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupama Shivaraju

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of this study is to assess the feasibility and clinical outcome of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR using aortic valve predilatation (AVPD with a small, nonocclusive balloon. Background. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV under rapid pacing is generally performed in TAVR to ensure the passage and sufficient deployment of the prosthesis in the stenotic AV. BAV may cause serious complications, such as left ventricular stunning or cerebrovascular embolism. Methods. A cohort of 50 consecutive patients with severe aortic stenosis underwent transfemoral TAVR with the Edwards Sapien 3-heart valve. All patients underwent AVPD with a small, nonocclusive balloon (12 × 60 or 14 × 60 mm without rapid pacing. Procedural data and clinical outcomes were analyzed. Results. The mean age of the cohort was 81±6 years and the mean logistic EuroSCORE (European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation was 13±9. Crossing the AV and prosthesis implantation was successful in all cases. The postprocedural mean AV gradient was 12±5 mmHg. There were no cases of aortic regurgitation ≥ grade 2. No periprocedural stroke occurred. One patient (2% with chronic atrial fibrillation displayed a transient Wernicke aphasia occurring more than 24 hours after TAVR. Mortality was 0% at 30 days after procedure. Conclusion. In TAVR, AVPD with a small, nonocclusive balloon can be safely performed. By avoiding rapid pacing, this technique may be a valid alternative to traditional BAV. Whether or not the use of APVD without rapid pacing translates into less periprocedural complications needs to be assessed in future studies.

  11. Identification of Reference Genes for Quantitative Real Time PCR Assays in Aortic Tissue of Syrian Hamsters with Bicuspid Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Martínez, Carmen; Fernández, M Carmen; Soto-Navarrete, María Teresa; Jiménez-Navarro, Manuel; Durán, Ana Carmen; Fernández, Borja

    2016-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most frequent congenital cardiac malformation in humans, and appears frequently associated with dilatation of the ascending aorta. This association is likely the result of a common aetiology. Currently, a Syrian hamster strain with a relatively high (∼40%) incidence of BAV constitutes the only spontaneous animal model of BAV disease. The characterization of molecular alterations in the aorta of hamsters with BAV may serve to identify pathophysiological mechanisms and molecular markers of disease in humans. In this report, we evaluate the expression of ten candidate reference genes in aortic tissue of hamsters in order to identify housekeeping genes for normalization using quantitative real time PCR (RT-qPCR) assays. A total of 51 adult (180-240 days old) and 56 old (300-440 days old) animals were used. They belonged to a control strain of hamsters with normal, tricuspid aortic valve (TAV; n = 30), or to the affected strain of hamsters with TAV (n = 45) or BAV (n = 32). The expression stability of the candidate reference genes was determined by RT-qPCR using three statistical algorithms, GeNorm, NormFinder and Bestkeeper. The expression analyses showed that the most stable reference genes for the three algorithms employed were Cdkn1β, G3pdh and Polr2a. We propose the use of Cdkn1β, or both Cdkn1β and G3pdh as reference genes for mRNA expression analyses in Syrian hamster aorta.

  12. Identification of Reference Genes for Quantitative Real Time PCR Assays in Aortic Tissue of Syrian Hamsters with Bicuspid Aortic Valve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Rueda-Martínez

    Full Text Available Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV is the most frequent congenital cardiac malformation in humans, and appears frequently associated with dilatation of the ascending aorta. This association is likely the result of a common aetiology. Currently, a Syrian hamster strain with a relatively high (∼40% incidence of BAV constitutes the only spontaneous animal model of BAV disease. The characterization of molecular alterations in the aorta of hamsters with BAV may serve to identify pathophysiological mechanisms and molecular markers of disease in humans. In this report, we evaluate the expression of ten candidate reference genes in aortic tissue of hamsters in order to identify housekeeping genes for normalization using quantitative real time PCR (RT-qPCR assays. A total of 51 adult (180-240 days old and 56 old (300-440 days old animals were used. They belonged to a control strain of hamsters with normal, tricuspid aortic valve (TAV; n = 30, or to the affected strain of hamsters with TAV (n = 45 or BAV (n = 32. The expression stability of the candidate reference genes was determined by RT-qPCR using three statistical algorithms, GeNorm, NormFinder and Bestkeeper. The expression analyses showed that the most stable reference genes for the three algorithms employed were Cdkn1β, G3pdh and Polr2a. We propose the use of Cdkn1β, or both Cdkn1β and G3pdh as reference genes for mRNA expression analyses in Syrian hamster aorta.

  13. Aortic allografts in treatment of aortic valve and ascending aorta prosthetic endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Spiridonov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim – to assess short- and long-term results of aortic root replacement using aortic allografts in patients with prosthetic endocarditis. Materials and methods. Since February 2009 until June 2016 aortic valve and ascending aorta replacement using aortic allografts was performed in 26 patients with prosthetic endocarditis. In 50 % of cases at initial operation aortic valve replacement was performed, in another 50 % of cases – aortic valve and ascending aorta replacement. Echocardiography was performed 10 days, 3, 6 and 12 months, 2, 3 and 5 years after surgery. Analysis of long-term results included all cases of deaths, prosthesis-related complications and recurrence of endocarditis. Results. 30-day mortality was 23.1 %. Extracorporeal membranous oxygenation (ECMO was used only in 5 patients (19.2 %. Four patients were weaned from ECMO. We did not observe any allograft-related complications. During follow-up period there were no cases of reoperation due to structural allograft failure. Relapse of infection occurred in 1 patient (3.8 % four years after the operation and led to lethal outcome. Conclusion. Reoperations using allografts are an effective surgical treatment of prosthetic endocarditis. In majority of cases prosthetic endocarditis was caused by gram-positive cocci (Staphylococcus. In 84.6 % of cases it was associated with destruction of paravalvular structures and abscesses formation. Heart failure was a causative factor of different complications in these patients, which required ECMO in 19.2 % of patients. In 80 % of cases patients were weaned from ECMO. Allografts using for the treatment of prosthetic endocarditis is associated with high resistance to infection and with a significant rate of freedom from recurrence of endocarditis within 3 years after surgery.

  14. Anterior mitral valve aneurysm: a rare sequelae of aortic valve endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Janardhanan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In intravenous drug abusers, infective endocarditis usually involves right-sided valves, with Staphylococcus aureus being the most common etiologic agent. We present a patient who is an intravenous drug abuser with left-sided (aortic valve endocarditis caused by Enterococcus faecalis who subsequently developed an anterior mitral valve aneurysm, which is an exceedingly rare complication. A systematic literature search was conducted which identified only five reported cases in the literature of mitral valve aneurysmal rupture in the setting of E. faecalis endocarditis. Real-time 3D-transesophageal echocardiography was critical in making an accurate diagnosis leading to timely intervention. Learning objectives: • Early recognition of a mitral valve aneurysm (MVA is important because it may rupture and produce catastrophic mitral regurgitation (MR in an already seriously ill patient requiring emergency surgery, or it may be overlooked at the time of aortic valve replacement (AVR. • Real-time 3D-transesophageal echocardiography (RT-3DTEE is much more advanced and accurate than transthoracic echocardiography for the diagnosis and management of MVA.

  15. Anterior mitral valve aneurysm: a rare sequelae of aortic valve endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardhanan, Rajesh; Kamal, Muhammad Umar; Riaz, Irbaz Bin; Smith, M Cristy

    2016-03-01

    SummaryIn intravenous drug abusers, infective endocarditis usually involves right-sided valves, with Staphylococcus aureus being the most common etiologic agent. We present a patient who is an intravenous drug abuser with left-sided (aortic valve) endocarditis caused by Enterococcus faecalis who subsequently developed an anterior mitral valve aneurysm, which is an exceedingly rare complication. A systematic literature search was conducted which identified only five reported cases in the literature of mitral valve aneurysmal rupture in the setting of E. faecalis endocarditis. Real-time 3D-transesophageal echocardiography was critical in making an accurate diagnosis leading to timely intervention. Early recognition of a mitral valve aneurysm (MVA) is important because it may rupture and produce catastrophic mitral regurgitation (MR) in an already seriously ill patient requiring emergency surgery, or it may be overlooked at the time of aortic valve replacement (AVR).Real-time 3D-transesophageal echocardiography (RT-3DTEE) is much more advanced and accurate than transthoracic echocardiography for the diagnosis and management of MVA. © 2016 The authors.

  16. Low Transvalvular Flow Rate Predicts Mortality in Patients With Low-Gradient Aortic Stenosis Following Aortic Valve Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamvakidou, Anastasia; Jin, Wenying; Danylenko, Oleksandr; Chahal, Navtej; Khattar, Rajdeep; Senior, Roxy

    2018-03-09

    This study aimed to assess the value of low transvalvular flow rate (FR) for the prediction of mortality compared with low stroke volume index (SVi) in patients with low-gradient (mean gradient: gradient AS who had undergone valve intervention. We retrospectively followed prospectively assessed consecutive patients with low-gradient, low aortic valve area AS who underwent aortic valve intervention between 2010 and 2014 for all-cause mortality. Of the 218 patients with mean age 75 ± 12 years, 102 (46.8%) had low stroke volume index (SVi) (gradient, low valve area aortic stenosis undergoing aortic valve intervention, low FR, not low SVi, was an independent predictor of medium-term mortality. Copyright © 2018 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Serum beta-2 microglobulin levels for predicting acute kidney injury complicating aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleska-Kociecka, Marta; Skrobisz, Anna; Wojtkowska, Izabela; Grabowski, Maciej; Dabrowski, Maciej; Kusmierski, Krzysztof; Piotrowska, Katarzyna; Imiela, Jacek; Stepinska, Janina

    2017-10-01

    Acute kidney injury complicating both transcatheter and surgical aortic valve replacement is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of serum beta 2 (β2) microglobulin, cystatin C and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin levels in detecting periprocedural acute kidney injury. Eighty consecutive patients who were 70 years of age or older and who were having surgical (n = 40) or transcatheter (n = 40) aortic valve replacement were recruited in a prospective study. The biomarkers were tested before the procedure, 6 times afterwards, at discharge and at a 6-month follow-up visit. The baseline β2-microglobulin level was the strongest predictor of acute kidney injury as a complication of transcatheter aortic valve replacement [odds ratio (OR) 5.277, P = 0.009]. Its level 24 h after the procedure reached the largest area under the curve (AUC) of 0.880 (P regression analysis, the levels of β2-microglobulin and cystatin C 24 h after the procedure were significantly associated with acute kidney injury after transcatheter valve replacement (OR 38.15, P = 0.044; OR 1782, P = 0.019, respectively). In the surgical aortic valve replacement group, the highest AUCs belonged to β2-microglobulin and cystatin C at 24 h (AUC = 0.808, P = 0.003 and AUC = 0.854, P = 0.001, respectively). Their higher values were also associated with acute kidney injury (OR 17.2, P = 0.018; OR 965.6, P = 0.02, respectively). A persistent increase in the postoperative levels of β2-microglobulin following acute kidney injury was associated with the progression of chronic kidney disease for 6 months after both transcatheter (OR 6.56, P = 0.030) and surgical (OR 7.67, P = 0.03) aortic valve replacements. Serum β2-microglobulin had the potential to predict acute kidney injury complicating transcatheter valve replacement and to diagnose it as early as 24 h after both the

  18. Over 20 years experience with aortic homograft in aortic valve replacement during acute infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solari, Silvia; Mastrobuoni, Stefano; De Kerchove, Laurent; Navarra, Emiliano; Astarci, Parla; Noirhomme, Philippe; Poncelet, Alain; Jashari, Ramadan; Rubay, Jean; El Khoury, Gebrine

    2016-12-01

    Despite the controversy, the aortic homograft is supposedly the best option in acute infective endocarditis (AIE), due to its resistance to reinfection. However, the technical complexity and the risk of structural deterioration over time have limited its utilization. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term results of aortic homograft for the treatment of infective endocarditis in our institution with particular attention to predictors of survival and homograft reoperation. The cohort includes 112 patients who underwent aortic valve replacement with an aortic homograft for AIE between January 1990 and December 2014. Fifteen patients (13.4%) died during the first 30 days after the operation. Two patients were lost to follow-up after discharge from the hospital; therefore, 95 patients were available for long-term analysis. The median duration of follow-up was 7.8 years (IQR 4.7-17.6). Five patients (5.3%) suffered a recurrence of infective endocarditis (1 relapse and 4 new episodes). Sixteen patients (16.8%) were reoperated for structural valve degeneration (SVD; n = 14, 87.5%) or for infection recurrence (n = 2, 12.5%). Freedom from homograft reoperation for infective endocarditis or structural homograft degeneration at 10 and 15 years postoperatively was 86.3 ± 5.5 and 47.3 ± 11.0%, respectively. For patients requiring homograft reoperation, the median interval to reintervention was 11.6 years (IQR 8.3-14.5). Long-term survival was 63.6% (95% CI 52.4-72.8%) and 53.8% (95% CI 40.6-65.3%) at 10 and 15 years, respectively. The use of aortic homograft in acute aortic valve endocarditis is associated with a remarkably low risk of relapsing infection and very acceptable long-term survival. The risk of reoperation due to SVD is significant after one decade especially in young patients. The aortic homograft seems to be ideally suited for reconstruction of the aortic valve and cardiac structures damaged by the infective process especially in early surgery.

  19. Artificial aortic valve dysfunction due to pannus and thrombus – different methods of cardiac surgical management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkiewicz, Anna; Kośmider, Anna; Walczak, Andrzej; Zwoliński, Radosław; Jaszewski, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Approximately 60 000 prosthetic valves are implanted annually in the USA. The risk of prosthesis dysfunction ranges from 0.1% to 4% per year. Prosthesis valve dysfunction is usually caused by a thrombus obstructing the prosthetic discs. However, 10% of prosthetic valves are dysfunctional due to pannus formation, and 12% of prostheses are damaged by both fibrinous and thrombotic components. The authors present two patients with dysfunctional aortic prostheses who were referred for cardiac surgery. Different surgical solutions were used in the treatment of each case. Case study 1 The first patient was a 71-year-old woman whose medical history included arterial hypertension, stable coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and hypercholesterolemia; she had previously undergone left-sided mastectomy and radiotherapy. The patient was admitted to the Cardiac Surgery Department due to aortic prosthesis dysfunction. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed complete obstruction of one disc and a severe reduction in the mobility of the second. The mean transvalvular gradient was very high. During the operation, pannus covering the discs’ surface was found. A biological aortic prosthesis was reimplanted without complications. Case study 2 The second patient was an 87-year-old woman with arterial hypertension, persistent atrial fibrillation, and COPD, whose past medical history included gastric ulcer disease and ischemic stroke. As in the case of the first patient, she was admitted due to valvular prosthesis dysfunction. Preoperative transthoracic echocardiography revealed an obstruction of the posterior prosthetic disc and significant aortic regurgitation. Transesophageal echocardiography and fluoroscopy confirmed the prosthetic dysfunction. During the operation, a thrombus growing around a minor pannus was found. The thrombus and pannus were removed, and normal functionality of the prosthetic valve was restored

  20. Artificial aortic valve dysfunction due to pannus and thrombus - different methods of cardiac surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Stanisław; Marcinkiewicz, Anna; Kośmider, Anna; Walczak, Andrzej; Zwoliński, Radosław; Jaszewski, Ryszard

    2015-09-01

    Approximately 60 000 prosthetic valves are implanted annually in the USA. The risk of prosthesis dysfunction ranges from 0.1% to 4% per year. Prosthesis valve dysfunction is usually caused by a thrombus obstructing the prosthetic discs. However, 10% of prosthetic valves are dysfunctional due to pannus formation, and 12% of prostheses are damaged by both fibrinous and thrombotic components. The authors present two patients with dysfunctional aortic prostheses who were referred for cardiac surgery. Different surgical solutions were used in the treatment of each case. The first patient was a 71-year-old woman whose medical history included arterial hypertension, stable coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and hypercholesterolemia; she had previously undergone left-sided mastectomy and radiotherapy. The patient was admitted to the Cardiac Surgery Department due to aortic prosthesis dysfunction. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed complete obstruction of one disc and a severe reduction in the mobility of the second. The mean transvalvular gradient was very high. During the operation, pannus covering the discs' surface was found. A biological aortic prosthesis was reimplanted without complications. The second patient was an 87-year-old woman with arterial hypertension, persistent atrial fibrillation, and COPD, whose past medical history included gastric ulcer disease and ischemic stroke. As in the case of the first patient, she was admitted due to valvular prosthesis dysfunction. Preoperative transthoracic echocardiography revealed an obstruction of the posterior prosthetic disc and significant aortic regurgitation. Transesophageal echocardiography and fluoroscopy confirmed the prosthetic dysfunction. During the operation, a thrombus growing around a minor pannus was found. The thrombus and pannus were removed, and normal functionality of the prosthetic valve was restored. Precise and modern diagnostic methods

  1. Impact of Chronic Rheumatic Valve Diseases on Large Vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunbas, Gokhan; Yuce, Murat; Ozer, Hasan O; Davutoglu, Vedat; Ercan, Suleyman; Kizilkan, Nese; Bilici, Muhammet

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM OF STUDY: Rheumatic valvular heart disease, which remains a common health problem in developing countries, has numerous consequences on the heart chambers and circulation. The study aim was to investigate the effects of chronic rheumatic valve disease on the diameters of the descending aorta (DA) and inferior vena cava (IVC). METHODS: A total of 88 patients with echocardiographically documented rheumatic valvular heart disease and 112 healthy controls were enrolled into the study. All patients underwent detailed echocardiographic examinations, while their height and body weight were recorded and adjusted to their body surface area. RESULTS: The most common involvement was mitral valve disease, followed by aortic valve disease and tricuspid valve disease. The mean diameter of the DA (indexed to BSA) was 1.79 ± 0.49 cm for patients and 1.53 ± 0.41 for controls (p Rheumatic valve disease, especially mitral stenosis, was closely related to remodeling of the great vessels.

  2. Percutaneous implantation of the CoreValve aortic valve prosthesis in patients at high risk or rejected for surgical valve replacement: Clinical evaluation and feasibility of the procedure in the first 30 patients in the AMC-UvA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baan, J.; Yong, Z. Y.; Koch, K. T.; Henriques, J. P. S.; Bouma, B. J.; de Hert, S. G.; van der Meulen, J.; Tijssen, J. G. P.; Piek, J. J.; de Mol, B. A. J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To report the feasibility, safety and efficacy of percutaneous aortic valve implantation (PAVI) with the CoreValve self-expanding aortic valve bioprosthesis in elderly patients with aortic valve stenosis who are rejected for surgery or have a high surgical risk.Methods. PAVI using the

  3. Aortic Disease in the Young: Genetic Aneurysm Syndromes, Connective Tissue Disorders, and Familial Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cury

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many genetic syndromes associated with the aortic aneurysmal disease which include Marfan syndrome (MFS, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS, Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS, familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD, bicuspid aortic valve disease (BAV, and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD. In the absence of familial history and other clinical findings, the proportion of thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms and dissections resulting from a genetic predisposition is still unknown. In this study, we propose the review of the current genetic knowledge in the aortic disease, observing, in the results that the causative genes and molecular pathways involved in the pathophysiology of aortic aneurysm disease remain undiscovered and continue to be an area of intensive research.

  4. Reasons for conversion and adverse intraoperative events in Endoscopic Port Access™ atrioventricular valve surgery and minimally invasive aortic valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Merwe, Johan; Van Praet, Frank; Stockman, Bernard; Degrieck, Ivan; Vermeulen, Yvette; Casselman, Filip

    2018-02-14

    This study reports the factors that contribute to sternotomy conversions (SCs) and adverse intraoperative events in minimally invasive aortic valve surgery (MI-AVS) and minimally invasive Endoscopic Port Access™ atrioventricular valve surgery (MI-PAS). In total, 3780 consecutive patients with either aortic valve disease or atrioventricular valve disease underwent minimally invasive valve surgery (MIVS) at our institution between 1 February 1997 and 31 March 2016. MI-AVS was performed in 908 patients (mean age 69.2 ± 11.3 years, 45.2% women, 6.2% redo cardiac surgery) and MI-PAS in 2872 patients (mean age 64.1 ± 13.3 years, 46.7% women, 12.2% redo cardiac surgery). A cumulative total of 4415 MIVS procedures (MI-AVS = 908, MI-PAS = 3507) included 1537 valve replacements (MI-AVS = 896, MI-PAS = 641) and 2878 isolated or combined valve repairs (MI-AVS = 12, MI-PAS = 2866). SC was required in 3.0% (n = 114 of 3780) of MIVS patients, which occurred in 3.1% (n = 28 of 908) of MI-AVS patients and 3.0% (n = 86 of 2872) of MI-PAS patients, respectively. Reasons for SC in MI-AVS included inadequate visualization (n = 4, 0.4%) and arterial cannulation difficulty (n = 7, 0.8%). For MI-PAS, SC was required in 54 (2.5%) isolated mitral valve procedures (n = 2183). Factors that contributed to SC in MI-PAS included lung adhesions (n = 35, 1.2%), inadequate visualization (n = 2, 0.1%), ventricular bleeding (n = 3, 0.1%) and atrioventricular dehiscence (n = 5, 0.2%). Neurological deficit occurred in 1 (0.1%) and 3 (3.5%) MI-AVS and MI-PAS conversions, respectively. No operative or 30-day mortalities were observed in MI-AVS conversions (n = 28). The 30-day mortality associated with SC in MI-PAS (n = 86) was 10.5% (n = 9). MIVS is increasingly being recognized as the 'gold-standard' for surgical valve interventions in the context of rapidly expanding catheter-based technology and increasing

  5. Aortic root reconstruction by aortic valve-sparing operation (David type I reimplantation) in Marfan syndrome accompanied by annuloaortic ectasia and acute type-A aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamura, Shunichi; Furuya, Hidekazu; Yagi, Kentarou; Ikeya, Eriko; Yamaguchi, Masaomi; Fujimura, Takabumi; Kanabuchi, Kazuo

    2006-09-20

    To reconstruct the aortic root for aneurysm of the ascending aorta accompanied by aortic regurgitation, annuloaortic ectasia (AAE) and acute type-A dissection with root destruction, the Bentall operation using a prosthetic valve still is the standard procedure today. Valve-sparing procedures have actively been used for aortic root lesions, and have also been attempted in aortic root reconstruction for Marfan syndrome which may have abnormalities in the valve leaflets. We conducted a valve-sparing procedure in a female patient with Marfan syndrome who had AAE accompanied by type-A acute aortic dissection. The patient was a 37-year-old woman complaining of severe pain from the chest to the back. The limbs were long, and funnel breast was observed. Diastolic murmurs were heard. On chest computed tomography, a dissection cavity was present from the ascending aorta to the left common iliac artery, and the root dilated to 55 mm. Grade II aortic regurgitation was observed on ultrasound cardiography. Regarding her family history, her father had died suddenly at 54 years of age. She was diagnosed with type-A acute dissection concurrent with Marfan syndrome and AAE. The structure of the aortic valve was normal, and root reconstruction by a valve-sparing operation and total replacement of the aortic arch was conducted. On postoperative ultrasound cardiography, the aortic regurgitation was within the allowable range, and the shortterm postoperative results were good.

  6. Bentall operation, total aortic replacement and mitral valve replacement for a young adult with Marfan syndrome: a case of three-staged operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, K; Shimazaki, Y; Watanabe, T; Kuraoka, S; Minowa, T; Miura, M; Oshikiri, S; Toyama, H

    1998-08-01

    In Marfan syndrome, the most common cardiovascular abnormalities are dilatation of the aorta and aortic valve regurgitation in adult patients. Mitral valve dysfunction is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in infants and children with Marfan syndrome, and is not frequently operated on in adult Marfan patients who undergo surgery for diseases of the aortic root and total aorta. This report describes a successfully three-staged operation for a 24 year-old man with Marfan syndrome who underwent an emergent Bentall operation and aortic arch replacement, total aortic replacement and mitral valve replacement over 2 years. Mitral valve regurgitation was mild but increased after the second operation. The graft was tightly adhesive and invasive to the sternum. Endoscopic view was helpful to avoid graft damage at resternotomy. The postoperative course was uneventful in each operation. Microscopic examination of the mitral valve leaflets showed abnormal increase of mucopolysaccharides, and disruption and fragmentation of elastic fibers.

  7. Utility of cardiac computed tomography for evaluation of pannus in mechanical aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Young Joo; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Sak; Hong, Yoo Jin; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Hur, Jin; Choi, Byoung Wook; Chang, Byung-Chul

    2015-08-01

    The clinical significance of pannus detected on computed tomography (CT) has not yet been investigated. The purposes of this study were to investigate the clinical significance of pannus detected on cardiac CT in patients who underwent aortic valve replacement (AVR) with mechanical valves, and to determine predictors for pannus severity. A total of 92 patients who underwent cardiac CT and TTE and who had undergone mechanical AVR were included. The geometric orifice area (GOA), the presence of limitation of motion (LOM) and pannus were evaluated on CT. The GOA, presence of LOM, and presence and severity of pannus were compared with echocardiographic parameters. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the predictors for pannus severity. The GOA on CT positively correlated with effective orifice area on TTE (r = 0.733, P Pannus was found in 77.2% and LOM in 14.0%. With increasing pannus severity, mean transvalvular pressure gradient (PG) was significantly higher (P pannus, more severe pannus and LOM than patients with normal PG (P pannus (P pannus formation in patients with mechanical aortic valves. Moderate to severe pannus formation frequently occurred in patients with small mechanical valve size, Carbomedics valves, rheumatic heart disease and young age at AVR.

  8. Diabetes Mellitus Impairs Left Ventricular Mass Regression after Surgical or Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Severe Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Teruya; Toda, Koichi; Kuratani, Toru; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Yoshikawa, Yasushi; Fukushima, Satsuki; Saito, Shunsuke; Yoshioka, Daisuke; Kashiyama, Noriyuki; Daimon, Takashi; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    It is well-documented that persistent myocardial hypertrophy in patients with aortic stenosis is related to suboptimal postoperative outcomes after aortic valve replacement. Although diabetes is known to potentially exacerbate myocardial hypertrophy, it has yet to be examined if it affects postoperative left ventricular mass regression (LVMR). A single-centre, retrospective analysis was performed on 183 consecutive patients who underwent either surgical or transcatheter aortic valve replacement between 2010 and May 2013. Patient demographics, postoperative outcomes and echocardiographic data were obtained preoperatively and a year after surgery. There were 42 diabetic and 141 non-diabetic patients. Preoperative characteristics of diabetic patients were statistically similar to those of non-diabetic patients, except for higher prevalence of hyperlipidaemia (p regression analysis demonstrated that diabetes (standardised partial regression coefficient (SPRC)=-0.187, p=0.018), female gender (SPRC=0.245, p=0.026) and age (SPRC=0.203, p=0.018) were associated with poor postoperative LVMR. Patients with diabetes showed suboptimal postoperative LVMR, and the disease was a prognostic factor that was associated with poor LVMR. These findings suggest that diabetes may predispose the particular group of patients to worse postoperative outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. How to use and integrate bioinformatics tools to compare proteomic data from distinct conditions? A tutorial using the pathological similarities between Aortic Valve Stenosis and Coronary Artery Disease as a case-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Fábio; Ferreira, Rita; Magalhães, Beatriz; Leite-Moreira, Adelino; Falcão-Pires, Inês; Vitorino, Rui

    2018-01-16

    Nowadays we are surrounded by a plethora of bioinformatics tools, powerful enough to deal with the large amounts of data arising from proteomic studies, but whose application is sometimes hard to find. Therefore, we used a specific clinical problem - to discriminate pathophysiology and potential biomarkers between two similar cardiovascular diseases, aortic valve stenosis (AVS) and coronary artery disease (CAD) - to make a step-by-step guide through four bioinformatics tools: STRING, DisGeNET, Cytoscape and ClueGO. Proteome data was collected from articles available on PubMed centered on proteomic studies enrolling subjects with AVS or CAD. Through the analysis of gene ontology provided by STRING and ClueGO we could find specific biological phenomena associated with AVS, such as down-regulation of elastic fiber assembly, and with CAD, such as up-regulation of plasminogen activation. Moreover, through Cytoscape and DisGeNET we could pinpoint surrogate markers either for AVS (e.g. popeye domain containing protein 2 and 28S ribosomal protein S36, mitochondrial) or for CAD (e.g. ankyrin repeat and SOCS box protein 7) which deserve future validation. Data recycling and integration as well as research orientation are among the main advantages of resorting to bioinformatics analysis, hence these tutorials can be of great convenience for proteomics investigators. As we saw for aortic valve stenosis and coronary artery disease, it can be of great relevance to perform preliminary bioinformatics analysis with already published proteomics data. It not only saves us time in the lab (avoiding work duplication) as it points out new hypothesis to explain the phenotypical presentation of the diseases as well as new surrogate markers with clinical relevance, deserving future scrutiny. These essential steps can be easily overcome if one follows the steps proposed in our tutorial for STRING, DisGeNET, Cytoscape and ClueGO utilization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  10. Mitral valve surgery using right anterolateral thoracotomy: is the aortic cannulation a safety procedure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, Marco Antonio Vieira; Pomerantzeff, Pablo Maria Alberto; Brandão, Carlos Manuel de Almeida; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; Grinberg, Max; Stolf, Noedir Antonio Groppo

    2010-01-01

    The right anterolateral thoracotomy is an alternative technique for surgical approach of mitral valve. In these cases, femoral-femoral bypass still has been used, rising occurrence of complications related to femoral cannulation. Describe the technique and results of mitral valve treatment by right anterolateral thoracotomy using aortic cannulation for cardiac pulmonary bypass (CPB). From 1983 e 2008, 100 consecutive female patients, with average age 35 ±13 years, 96 (96%) underwent mitral valve surgical treatment in the Heart Institute of São Paulo. A right anterolateral thoracotomy approach associated with aortic cannulation was used for CPB. Eighty (80%) patients had rheumatic disease and 84 (84%) patients presented functional class III or IV. Were performed 45 (45%) comissurotomies, 38 (38%) valve repairs, 7(7%) mitral valve replacements, seven (7%) recomissurotomies and three (3%) prosthesis replacement. Sparing surgery was performed in 90 (90%) patients. The average CPB and clamp time were 57 ± 27 min e 39 ± 19 min, respectively. There were no in-hospital death, reoperation due to bleeding and convertion to sternotomy. Introperative complications were related to heart harvest (5%), especially in reoperations (3%). The most important complications in postoperative period were related to pulmonary system (11%), followed by atrial fibrilation (10%) but without major systemic repercussions. The mean inhospital length of stay was 8 ± 3 days. Follow-up was 6.038 patients/month. Actuarial survival was 98.0 ± 1.9% and freedom from reoperation was 81.4 ± 7.8% in 180 months. The right anterolateral thoracotomy associated with aortic cannulation in mitral valve surgery is a simple technique, reproducible and safety.

  11. Phase-mapping technique for the evaluation of aortic valve stenosis by MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engels, G.; Mueller, E.; Reynen, K.; Wilke, N.; Bachmann, K.

    1992-01-01

    New MR-techniques for quantitative blood flow registration such as phase-mapping (a two-dimensional space-resolved technique with a time-averaged measurement of blood flow) or RACE (real-time acquisition and evaluation of blood flow in one-dimensional space projection) are available for the diagnosis of valvular heart disease. Initial results of grading aortic valve stenosis by these methods are shown in comparison to continuous wave Ultrasound-Doppler. Two groups of 15 patients were examined by RACE or phase-mapping, 12 respectively 8 of whom suffered from an aortic valve stenosis. The shape of blood flow profiles as well as grading of aortic valve stenosis show high concordance when comparing the results of MR and Doppler technique. Good reliability and practicability of the demonstrated MR-method are shown. With respect to the results of RACE and phase-mapping the development of an alternative and competing MR-method for the evaluation of valvular heart disease and shunt diagnostics seems possible. (orig.)

  12. Phase-mapping technique for the evaluation of aortic valve stenosis by MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engels, G. [Medizinische Klinik 2, Univ. of Erlangen (Germany); Mueller, E. [Siemens Medical Engineering Group, Erlangen (Germany); Reynen, K. [Medizinische Klinik 2, Univ. of Erlangen (Germany); Wilke, N. [Siemens Medical Engineering Group, Erlangen (Germany); Bachmann, K. [Medizinische Klinik 2, Univ. of Erlangen (Germany)

    1992-08-01

    New MR-techniques for quantitative blood flow registration such as phase-mapping (a two-dimensional space-resolved technique with a time-averaged measurement of blood flow) or RACE (real-time acquisition and evaluation of blood flow in one-dimensional space projection) are available for the diagnosis of valvular heart disease. Initial results of grading aortic valve stenosis by these methods are shown in comparison to continuous wave Ultrasound-Doppler. Two groups of 15 patients were examined by RACE or phase-mapping, 12 respectively 8 of whom suffered from an aortic valve stenosis. The shape of blood flow profiles as well as grading of aortic valve stenosis show high concordance when comparing the results of MR and Doppler technique. Good reliability and practicability of the demonstrated MR-method are shown. With respect to the results of RACE and phase-mapping the development of an alternative and competing MR-method for the evaluation of valvular heart disease and shunt diagnostics seems possible. (orig.)

  13. Crystalline Ultrastructures, Inflammatory Elements, and Neoangiogenesis Are Present in Inconspicuous Aortic Valve Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Dorfmüller

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Morbidity from calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD is increasing. Recent studies suggest early reversible changes involving inflammation and neoangiogenesis. We hypothesized that microcalcifications, chemokines, and growth factors are present in unaffected regions of calcific aortic valves. We studied aortic valves from 4 patients with CAVD and from 1 control, using immunohistochemistry, scanning electron microscopy, and infrared spectrography. We revealed clusters of capillary neovessels in calcified (ECC, to a lesser extent in noncalcified (ECN areas. Endothelial cells proved constant expression of SDF-1 in ECC, ECN, and endothelial cells from valvular surface (ECS. Its receptor CXCR4 was expressed in ECC. IL-6 expression correlated with CXCR4 staining and presence of lymphocytes. VEGF was expressed by ECS, its receptor by ECC and ECN. Crystalline ultrastructures were found on the surface of histologically noncalcified areas (HNCAs, spectrography revealed calcium hydroxylapatite. Our results demonstrate that crystalline ultrastructures are present in HNCAs, undergoing neoangiogenesis in an inflammatory context. These alterations could be an early witness of disease and an opening to therapy.

  14. Aorta measurements are heritable and influenced by bicuspid aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa J Martin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Word Count 266, 1609 charactersObjectives: To determine whether the contributions of genetics and bicuspid aortic valve (BAV independently influence aortic (Ao dimensions.Background: Ao dilation is a risk factor for aneurysm, dissection, and sudden cardiac death. Frequent association of BAV with Ao dilation implicates a common underlying defect possibly due to genetic factors. Methods: Families enriched for BAV underwent standardized transthoracic echocardiography. In addition to BAV status, echocardiographic measures of Ao (annulus to descending Ao, pulmonary artery and mitral valve annulus diameters were obtained. Using variance components analysis, heritability was estimated with and without BAV status. Additionally, bivariate genetic analyses between Ao dimensions and BAV were performed.Results: Our cohort was obtained from 209 families enriched for BAV. After adjusting for age, body surface area and sex, individuals with BAV had a statistically significant increase in all echocardiographic measurements (p < 0.006 except descending Ao and mitral valve annulus. Individuals with BAV were at greater odds of having Ao dilation (OR = 4.44, 95% CI 2.93 – 6.72 than family members without BAV. All echocardiographic measurements exhibited moderate to strong heritability (0.25 to 0.53, and these estimates were not influenced by inclusion of BAV as a covariate. Bivariate genetic analyses supported that the genetic correlation between BAV and echo measures were not significantly different from zero.Conclusions: We show for the first time that echocardiographic measurements of Ao, pulmonary artery and mitral valve annulus diameters are quantitative traits that exhibit significant heritability. In addition, our results suggest the presence of BAV independently influences the proximal Ao and pulmonary artery measures but not those in the descending Ao or mitral valve annulus.

  15. Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew K. Roy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive dyspnea and hypoxaemia in the subacute phase after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI are uncommon and warrant immediate assessment of valve and prosthesis leaflet function to exclude thrombosis, as well as investigation for other causes related to the procedure, such as left ventricular dysfunction, pulmonary embolism, and respiratory sepsis. In this case, we report the observation of a patient presenting two weeks after TAVI with arterial hypoxaemia in an upright position, relieved by lying flat, and coupled with an intracardiac shunt detected on echocardiography in the absence of pulmonary hypertension, raising the suspicion of Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome (POS. Invasive intracardiac haemodynamic assessment showed a significant right-to-left shunt (Qp/Qs = 0.74, which confirmed the diagnosis, with subsequent closure of the intracardiac defect resulting in immediate relief of symptoms and hypoxaemia. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an interatrial defect and shunt causing Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome after transcatheter aortic valve implantation, resolved by percutaneous device closure.

  16. Methodological inaccuracies in clinical aortic valve severity assessment: insights from computational fluid dynamic modeling of CT-derived aortic valve anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traeger, Brad; Srivatsa, Sanjay S.; Beussman, Kevin M.; Wang, Yechun; Suzen, Yildirim B.; Rybicki, Frank J.; Mazur, Wojciech; Miszalski-Jamka, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease. Assessing the contribution of the valve as a portion to total ventricular load is essential for the aging population. A CT scan for one patient was used to create one in vivo tricuspid aortic valve geometry and assessed with computational fluid dynamics (CFD). CFD simulated the pressure, velocity, and flow rate, which were used to assess the Gorlin formula and continuity equation, current clinical diagnostic standards. The results demonstrate an underestimation of the anatomic orifice area (AOA) by Gorlin formula and overestimation of AOA by the continuity equation, using peak velocities, as would be measured clinically by Doppler echocardiography. As a result, we suggest that the Gorlin formula is unable to achieve the intended estimation of AOA and largely underestimates AOA at the critical low-flow states present in heart failure. The disparity in the use of echocardiography with the continuity equation is due to the variation in velocity profile between the outflow tract and the valve orifice. Comparison of time-averaged orifice areas by Gorlin and continuity with instantaneous orifice areas by planimetry can mask the errors of these methods, which is a result of the assumption that the blood flow is inviscid.

  17. Recovery from anemia in patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation--prevalence, predictors and clinical outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Arnous, Samer; Lønborg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Preoperative anemia is common in patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and has been linked to a poorer outcome--including a higher 1-year mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of successful TAVI...... on baseline anemia. METHODS: A total of 253 patients who survived at least 1 year following TAVI were included in this study. The prevalence, predictors and clinical outcome of hemoglobin (Hb)-recovery were assessed. RESULTS: The prevalence of baseline anemia was 49% (n = 124)--recovery from anemia occurred......-recovery, while blood transfusion (OR 0.31, P = 0.038) and chronic kidney disease (CKD, OR 0.33, P = 0.043) were identified as negative predictors at, respectively, one and two years after TAVI. When compared to patients without baseline anemia, those anemic patients with Hb-recovery had a similar functional...

  18. Sex differences in aortic valve calcification measured by multidetector computed tomography in aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Shivani R; Clavel, Marie-Annick; Messika-Zeitoun, David; Cueff, Caroline; Malouf, Joseph; Araoz, Philip A; Mankad, Rekha; Michelena, Hector; Vahanian, Alec; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice

    2013-01-01

    Aortic valve calcification (AVC) is the intrinsic mechanism of valvular obstruction leading to aortic stenosis (AS) and is measurable by multidetector computed tomography. The link between sex and AS is controversial and that with AVC is unknown. We prospectively performed multidetector computed tomography in 665 patients with AS (aortic valve area, 1.05±0.35 cm(2); mean gradient, 39±19 mm Hg) to measure AVC and to assess the impact of sex on the AVC-AS severity link in men and women. AS severity was comparable between women and men (peak aortic jet velocity: 4.05±0.99 versus 3.93±0.91 m/s, P=0.11; aortic valve area index: 0.55±0.20 versus 0.56±0.18 cm(2)/m(2); P=0.46). Conversely, AVC load was lower in women versus men (1703±1321 versus 2694±1628 arbitrary units; PAVC load were much greater in men than in women (odds ratio, 5.07; PAVC showed good associations with hemodynamic AS severity in men and women (all r>0.67; PAVC load, absolute or indexed, was higher in men versus women (all P≤0.01). In this large AS population, women incurred similar AS severity than men for lower AVC loads, even after indexing for their smaller body size. Hence, the relationship between valvular calcification process and AS severity differs in women and men, warranting further pathophysiological inquiry. For AS severity diagnostic purposes, interpretation of AVC load should be different in men and in women.

  19. Prosthetic Aortic Valve Fixation Study: 48 Replacement Valves Analyzed Using Digital Pressure Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Candice Y; Wong, Joshua K; Ross, Ronald E; Liu, David C; Khabbaz, Kamal R; Martellaro, Angelo J; Gorea, Heather R; Sauer, Jude S; Knight, Peter A

    Prostheses attachment is critical in aortic valve replacement surgery, yet reliable prosthetic security remains a challenge. Accurate techniques to analyze prosthetic fixation pressures may enable the use of fewer sutures while reducing the risk of paravalvular leaks (PVL). Customized digital thin film pressure transducers were sutured between aortic annulus models and 21-mm bioprosthetic valves with 15 × 4-mm, 12 × 4-mm, or 9 × 6-mm-wide pledgeted mattress sutures. Simulating open and minimally invasive access, 4 surgeons, blinded to data acquisition, each secured 12 valves using manual knot-tying (hand-tied [HT] or knot-pusher [KP]) or automated titanium fasteners (TFs). Real-time pressure measurements and times were recorded. Two-dimensional (2D) and 3D pressure maps were generated for all valves. Pressures less than 80 mm Hg were considered at risk for PVL. Pressures under each knot (intrasuture) fell less than 80 mm Hg for 12 of 144 manual knots (5/144 HT, 7/144 KP) versus 0 of 288 TF (P prosthetic valve security.

  20. [Pannus Formation Six-years after Aortic and Mitral Valve Replacement with Tissue Valves;Report of a Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Makoto; Muraoka, Arata; Aizawa, Kei; Akutsu, Hirohiko; Kurumisawa, Soki; Misawa, Yoshio

    2015-07-01

    A 77-year-old man presented with exertional dyspnea. He had undergone aortic and mitral valve replacement with tissue valves 6-years earlier. The patient's hemoglobin level was 9.8 g/dl and serum aspartate aminotransferase (70 mU/ml) and lactate dehydrogenase (1,112 mU/ml) were elevated. Echocardiography revealed stenosis of the prosthetic valve in the aortic position with peak flow velocity of 3.8 m/second and massive mitral regurgitation. The patient underwent repeat valve replacement. Pannus formation around both implanted valves was observed. The aortic valve orifice was narrowed by the pannus, and one cusp of the prosthesis in the mitral position was fixed and caused the regurgitation, but they were free from cusp laceration or calcification. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful, and he continues to do well 14 months after surgery.

  1. Effect of permanent pacemaker on mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engborg, Jonathan; Riechel-Sarup, Casper; Gerke, Oke

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an established treatment for high-grade aortic valve stenosis in patients found unfit for open heart surgery. The method may cause cardiac conduction disorders requiring permanent pacemaker (PPM) implantation, and the long-term effect...

  2. Bicuspid aortic valve morphology and associated cardiovascular abnormalities in fetal Turner syndrome: a pathomorphological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Engelen, Klaartje; Bartelings, Margot M.; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C.; Baars, Marieke J. H.; Postma, Alex V.; Bijlsma, Emilia K.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Jongbloed, Monique R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is common in Turner syndrome (TS). In adult TS, 82-95% of BAVs have fusion of the right and left coronary leaflets. Data in fetal stages are scarce. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into aortic valve morphology and associated cardiovascular abnormalities in a

  3. The value of echocardiography in follow-up of human tissue valves in aortic position

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.P. Willems (Tineke)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThe application of human tissue valves for aortic valve or root replacement was introduced during the 19608. The first successful clinical orthotopic implantation of an aortic allograft was performed by Ross and Barrat-Boyes independently in 19621,2, In 1967 Ross first reported the use

  4. Aortic Valve Replacement for Infective Endocarditis in a Renal Transplant Recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masmoudi Sayda

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal transplant recipients are more prone to developing infections. We report a 37-year old renal transplant recipient who developed infective endocarditis of the aortic valve, heart failure and renal allograft dysfunction. He underwent aortic valve replacement which was followed by improvement in cardiac as well as allograft function.

  5. Heart Valve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your heart has four valves. Normally, these valves open to let blood flow through or out of your heart, and then shut to keep it from flowing ... close tightly. It's one of the most common heart valve conditions. Sometimes it causes regurgitation. Stenosis - when ...

  6. [Long-term outcome of aortic valve sparing procedures in connective tissue disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Ogino, H; Matsuda, H; Minatoya, K; Sasaki, N

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the long-term outcome of aortic valve sparing procedures for patients having connective tissue disorder. Between 1993 and 2008, the aortic valve sparing surgery was performed in 94 patients having aortic root dilatation. Eighty patients of them (37.2 +/- 13.4 years, 50 male) had cystic medial necrosis in the aortic wall, which was confirmed the pathological examination. We reviewed these patients. Sixty percent (48/80) had Marfan syndrome, 5% (4/80) had Loeyz-Dietz syndrome, 2% (2/80) had bicuspid aortic valve, and 11% (9/80) had aortic dissection. Our reimplantation procedure has been refined as followed: with a tube graft in 41, a tube graft with creation of neo-sinuses in 11, and a Valsalva graft in 14. Fourteen patients underwent the remodeling procedure. The follow-up rate was 100% with the duration of 3.7+/- 3.4 years. There were no operative death but six late deaths. Seventeen (21.3%) patients required aortic valve replacement, for recurrent aortic insufficiency in 13 and infection in 4. Freedom from reoperation was 80%, 43%, and freedom from moderate or severe aortic insufficiency was 80%, 54%, at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Pathological findings of the aortic valve obtained in the reoperations showed elongation and prolapse of the aortic valve due to myxomatous degeneration and fibrous thickening caused by aortic insufficiency. Even in connective tissue disorders, aortic valve sparing operation is associated with acceptable long-term durability, although cusp degeneration resulting in recurrent aortic insufficiency might be progressive.

  7. Aortic valve endocarditis complicated by ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenny, Benjamin E; Almanaseer, Yassar

    2014-12-01

    Infective endocarditis complicated by abscess formation and coronary artery compression is a rare clinical event with a high mortality rate, and diagnosis requires a heightened degree of suspicion. We present the clinical, angiographic, and echocardiographic features of a 73-year-old woman who presented with dyspnea and was found to have right coronary artery compression that was secondary to abscess formation resulting from diffuse infectious endocarditis. We discuss the patient's case and briefly review the relevant medical literature. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of abscess formation involving a native aortic valve and the right coronary artery.

  8. Aortic valve replacement in a patient with severe nickel allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusini, Mario; Barbato, Raffaele; Spadaccio, Cristiano; Chello, Massimo

    2011-11-01

    Nickel allergy can raise clinical problems in patients undergoing cardiac surgery who require sternal closure with stainless steel wire. We describe the case of a 51-year-old woman with severe nickel allergy who underwent aortic valve replacement with a nickel-free ON-X prosthesis and sternal closure by Fiberwire # 2 suture without complications. Considering its biocompatibility and its mechanical characteristics including optimal strength and knot resistance, this suture might be a viable alternative in patients in which the use of stainless steel wire is contraindicated. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Complementary role of cardiac CT in the assessment of aortic valve replacement dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Alastair J; Dweck, Marc R; Dreisbach, John G; Williams, Michelle C; Mak, Sze Mun; Cartlidge, Timothy; Nicol, Edward D; Morgan-Hughes, Gareth J

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement is the second most common cardiothoracic procedure in the UK. With an ageing population, there are an increasing number of patients with prosthetic valves that require follow-up. Imaging of prosthetic valves is challenging with conventional echocardiographic techniques making early detection of valve dysfunction or complications difficult. CT has recently emerged as a complementary approach offering excellent spatial resolution and the ability to identify a range of aortic valve replacement complications including structural valve dysfunction, thrombus development, pannus formation and prosthetic valve infective endocarditis. This review discusses each and how CT might be incorporated into a multimodal cardiovascular imaging pathway for the assessment of aortic valve replacements and in guiding clinical management. PMID:27843568

  10. Hemolytic Anemia after Aortic Valve Replacement: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feridoun Sabzi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic anemia is exceedingly rare and an underestimated complication after aortic valve replacement (AVR.The mechanism responsible for hemolysis most commonly involves a regurgitated flow or jet that related to paravalvar leak or turbulence of subvalvar stenosis. It appears to be independent of its severity as assessed by echocardiography. We present a case of a 24-year-old man with a history of AVR in 10 year ago that developed severe hemolytic anemia due to a mild subvalvar stenosis caused by pannus formation and mild hypertrophic septum. After exclusion of other causes of hemolytic anemia and the lack of clinical and laboratory improvement, the patient underwent redo valve surgery with pannus and subvalvar hypertrophic septum resection. Anemia and heart failure symptoms gradually resolved after surgery

  11. Alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking and incidence of aortic valve stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, S C; Wolk, A; Bäck, M

    2017-10-01

    Alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking are modifiable lifestyle factors with important impact on public health. It is unclear whether these factors influence the risk of aortic valve stenosis (AVS). To investigate the associations of alcohol consumption and smoking, including smoking intensity and time since cessation, with AVS incidence in two prospective cohorts. This analysis was based on data from the Swedish Mammography Cohort and the Cohort of Swedish Men, comprising 69 365 adults without cardiovascular disease at baseline. Participants were followed for AVS incidence and death by linkage to the Swedish National Patient and Causes of Death Registers. Hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by Cox proportional hazards regression. Over a mean follow-up of 15.3 years, 1249 cases of AVS (494 in women and 755 in men) were recorded. Compared with never drinkers of alcohol (lifelong abstainers), the risk of AVS was significantly lower in current light drinkers (1-6 drinks per week [1 drink = 12 g alcohol]; multivariable HR 0.82; 95% CI: 0.68-0.99). The risk of AVS increased with increasing smoking intensity. Compared with never smokers, the HR was 1.46 (95% CI: 1.16-1.85) in current smokers of ≥30 pack-years. Former smokers who had quit smoking 10 or more years previously had similar risk for AVS as never smokers. This study suggests that current light alcohol consumption is associated with a lower risk of AVS, and indicates that the association between smoking and AVS risk is reversible. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Internal Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association for Publication of The Journal of Internal Medicine.

  12. Deformation of the dog aortic valve ring during the cardiac cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Renterghem, R.J.; Steenhoven, van A.A.; Arts, M.G.J.; Reneman, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    Changes in strain in the line of aortic valve leaflet attachment (aortic ring) were measured during the cardiac cycle by means of an inductive technique. To that purpose coils were sutured to each commissure and base point of the aortic ring, when the animals were on a cardiopulmonary bypass. After

  13. Surgical or Transcatheter Aortic-Valve Replacement in Intermediate-Risk Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reardon, Michael J; Van Mieghem, Nicolas M; Popma, Jeffrey J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although transcatheter aortic-valve replacement (TAVR) is an accepted alternative to surgery in patients with severe aortic stenosis who are at high surgical risk, less is known about comparative outcomes among patients with aortic stenosis who are at intermediate surgical risk. METHO...

  14. Patients' self-reported function, symptoms and health-related quality of life before and 6 months after transcatheter aortic valve implantation and surgical aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Karin; Nilsson, Johan; Hörnsten, Åsa; Näslund, Ulf

    2017-03-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common valve disease in western countries and has poor prognosis without treatment. Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) is the gold standard, and transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a new method that is used in high-risk patients who are denied surgery. The purpose of treatment is not only to save life, but also to reduce symptoms and increase health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The aim of this study was to describe patients' self-reported outcomes in terms of physical function, symptoms, dependence, HRQoL, and cognitive function after TAVI and SAVR. All patients treated with TAVI during 1 year ( n = 24) and age-matched patients treated with SAVR ( n = 24) were included. Data were collected on the day before and at 6 months after treatment using structural questionnaires. Self-rated function was low before treatment and increased at follow-up. A quarter of all patients reported syncope at baseline, and none reported this at follow-up. Breathlessness was reported by all patients to be the most limiting cardiac symptom, but the TAVI patients reported more severe symptoms. At 6 months' follow-up, symptoms were reduced, but breathlessness and fatigue were still common, especially in the TAVI group. HRQoL, which was very low in the TAVI group at baseline, increased in all dimensions except social function. We found no change in cognitive function or dependence at follow-up. There was no difference in the size of improvement between groups. The results could be helpful when informing future patients in order to give them realistic expectations.

  15. Enhanced left ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis is associated with improved long-term survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ayyaz; Patel, Amit; Ali, Ziad; Abu-Omar, Yasir; Saeed, Amber; Athanasiou, Thanos; Pepper, John

    2011-08-01

    Aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis is usually followed by regression of left ventricular hypertrophy. More complete resolution of left ventricular hypertrophy is suggested to be associated with superior clinical outcomes; however, its translational impact on long-term survival after aortic valve replacement has not been investigated. Demographic, operative, and clinical data were obtained retrospectively through case note review. Transthoracic echocardiography was used to measure left ventricular mass preoperatively and at annual follow-up visits. Patients were classified according to their reduction in left ventricular mass at 1 year after the operation: group 1, less than 25 g; group 2, 25 to 150 g; and group 3, more than 150 g. Kaplan-Meier and multivariable Cox regression were used. A total of 147 patients were discharged from the hospital after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis between 1991 and 2001. Preoperative left ventricular mass was 279 ± 98 g in group 1 (n = 47), 347 ± 104 g in group 2 (n = 62), and 491 ± 183 g in group 3 (n = 38) (P regression such as ischemic heart disease or hypertension, valve type, or valve size used. Ten-year actuarial survival was not statistically different in patients with enhanced left ventricular mass regression when compared with the log-rank test (group 1, 51% ± 9%; group 2, 54% ± 8%; and group 3, 72% ± 10%) (P = .26). After adjustment, left ventricular mass reduction of more than 150 g was demonstrated as an independent predictor of improved long-term survival on multivariate analysis (P = .02). Our study is the first to suggest that enhanced postoperative left ventricular mass regression, specifically in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis, may be associated with improved long-term survival. In view of these findings, strategies purported to be associated with superior left ventricular mass regression should be considered when undertaking

  16. CT imaging before transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) using variable helical pitch scanning and its diagnostic performance for coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Shunsuke; Yamada, Yoshitake; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Okamura, Teppei; Jinzaki, Masahiro [Keio University School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Yamada, Minoru [Keio University School of Medicine, Research Park, Tokyo (Japan); Yashima, Fumiaki; Hayashida, Kentaro; Fukuda, Keiichi [Keio University School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    To evaluate the effectiveness of CT before TAVI using variable helical pitch (VHP) scanning and its diagnostic performance for coronary artery disease (CAD). Sixty patients (84.4 ± 4.6 years) scheduled for TAVI underwent CT using VHP scanning with the contrast material (CM) volume calculated as scanning time x weight [kg] x 0.06 mL. Retrospective electrocardiography (ECG)-gated scanning was utilized to examine the thorax, and non-ECG-gated scanning of the abdomen immediately followed. We analyzed CT attenuation values of the coronary arteries, aorta, iliac and femoral arteries. The coronary CT angiography images were evaluated for the presence of stenosis (≥50 %); invasive coronary angiography served as a reference standard. The average attenuations of all of the arteries were greater than 400 HU. We could evaluate the peripheral access vessels and dimensions of the ascending aorta, aortic root, and aortic annulus in all patients. The average volume of CM was 38.7 ± 8.5 mL. On per-patient and vessel analysis, CT showed 91.7 % and 89.5 % sensitivity, and 91.3 % and 97.4 % negative predictive value (NPV). CT using VHP scanning with an average CM volume of 38.7 mL is useful before TAVI and had a high sensitivity and NPV in excluding obstructive CAD. (orig.)

  17. Long-term results of aortic valve-sparing operations in patients with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Tirone E; Armstrong, Sue; Maganti, Manjula; Colman, Jack; Bradley, Timothy J

    2009-10-01

    The appropriateness of aortic valve-sparing operations in patients with Marfan syndrome has been questioned. This study examines the long-term results of these operations in patients with Marfan syndrome. From 1988 to 2006, 103 consecutive patients with Marfan syndrome (mean age, 37 +/- 12 years) and aortic root aneurysm had aortic valve-sparing operations. Emergency surgery was performed in 11 patients: 8 for acute type A aortic dissection and 3 for unexplained persistent chest pain. Fourteen patients also had mitral valve surgery. The technique of aortic valve reimplantation was used in 77 patients, and aortic root remodeling was used in 26 patients. Patients were followed prospectively and underwent annual echocardiographic studies. The mean follow-up was 7.3 +/- 4.2 years and 100% complete. There was 1 operative death and 5 late deaths. Four of the 6 deaths were due to complications of aortic dissections. The patients' survival at 15 years was 87.2% compared with 95.6% for the general population of Ontario matched for age and sex. Seven patients had important aortic insufficiency: 4 mild to moderate, 2 moderate, and 1 moderate to severe. Freedom from greater than mild aortic insufficiency at 15 years was 79.2%. Three patients, all after aortic root remodeling, had aortic valve replacement, 2 for aortic insufficiency and 1 for endocarditis. At the most recent follow-up, 97 patients were alive: 86 were in functional class I, and 11 were in functional class II. Aortic valve-sparing operations provided excellent clinical outcomes in this series of patients with Marfan syndrome. Postoperatively, complications of aortic dissections were the leading cause of death.

  18. Aortic Regurgitation in Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With the Self-Expanding CoreValve Versus the Balloon-Expandable SAPIEN XT Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiramijyan, Sarkis; Magalhaes, Marco A; Koifman, Edward; Didier, Romain; Escarcega, Ricardo O; Baker, Nevin C; Negi, Smita I; Minha, Sa'ar; Torguson, Rebecca; Jiaxiang, Gai; Asch, Federico M; Wang, Zuyue; Okubagzi, Petros; Gaglia, Michael A; Ben-Dor, Itsik; Satler, Lowell F; Pichard, Augusto D; Waksman, Ron

    2016-05-01

    The incidence of aortic regurgitation (AR) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in a self-expanding and a balloon-expandable system is controversial. This study aimed to examine the incidence and severity of post-TAVR AR with the CoreValve (CV) versus the Edwards XT Valve (XT). Baseline, procedural, and postprocedural inhospital outcomes were compared. The primary end point was the incidence of post-TAVR AR of any severity, assessed with a transthoracic echocardiogram, in the CV versus XT groups. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was completed to evaluate for correlates of the primary end point. The secondary end points included the change in severity of AR at 30-day and 1-year follow-up. A total of 223 consecutive patients (53% men, mean age 82 years) who had transfemoral TAVR with either a CV (n = 119) or XT (n = 104) were evaluated. The rates of post-TAVR AR in the groups were similar, and there was no evidence of more-than-moderate AR in either group. There were significant differences in the rates of intraprocedural balloon postdilation with the CV (17.1%) versus XT valve (5.8%; p = 0.009) and in the rates of intraprocedural implantation of a second valve-in-valve prosthesis with the CV (9.9%) versus XT valve (2.2%; p = 0.036). There were no significant differences in inhospital safety outcomes between the 2 groups. In conclusion, the incidence of post-TAVR AR is similar between the CV and the XT valve when performed by experienced operators using optimal intraprocedural strategies, as deemed appropriate, to mitigate the severity of AR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve treatment of degenerative stentless supra-annular Freedom Solo valves: A single centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockburn, James; Dooley, Maureen; Parker, Jessica; Hill, Andrew; Hutchinson, Nevil; de Belder, Adam; Trivedi, Uday; Hildick-Smith, David

    2017-02-15

    Redo surgery for degenerative bioprosthetic aortic valves is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Report results of valve-in-valve therapy (ViV-TAVI) in failed supra-annular stentless Freedom Solo (FS) bioprostheses, which are the highest risk for coronary occlusion. Six patients with FS valves (mean age 78.5 years, 50% males). Five had valvular restenosis (peak gradient 87.2 mm Hg, valve area 0.63 cm 2 ), one had severe regurgitation (AR). Median time to failure was 7 years. Patients were high risk (mean STS/Logistic EuroScore 10.6 15.8, respectively). FS valves ranged from 21 to 25 mm. Successful ViV-TAVI was achieved in 4/6 patients (67%). Of the unsuccessful cases, (patient 1 and 2 of series) patient 1 underwent BAV with simultaneous aortography which revealed left main stem occlusion. The procedure was stopped and the patient went forward for repeat surgery. Patient 2 underwent successful ViV-TAVI with a 26-mm CoreValve with a guide catheter in the left main, but on removal coronary obstruction occurred, necessitating valve snaring into the aorta. Among the successful cases, (patients 3, 4, 5, 6) the TAVIs used were CoreValve Evolut R 23 mm (n = 3), and Lotus 23 mm (n = 1). In the successful cases the peak gradient fell from 83.0 to 38.3 mm Hg. No patient was left with >1+ AR. One patient had a stroke on Day 2, with full neurological recovery. Two patients underwent semi-elective pacing for LBBB and PR >280 ms. ViV-TAVI in stentless Freedom Solo valves is high risk. The risk of coronary occlusion is high. The smallest possible prosthesis (1:1 sizing) should be used, and strategies to protect the coronary vessels must be considered. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Krox20 defines a subpopulation of cardiac neural crest cells contributing to arterial valves and bicuspid aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odelin, Gaëlle; Faure, Emilie; Coulpier, Fanny; Di Bonito, Maria; Bajolle, Fanny; Studer, Michèle; Avierinos, Jean-François; Charnay, Patrick; Topilko, Piotr; Zaffran, Stéphane

    2018-01-03

    Although cardiac neural crest cells are required at early stages of arterial valve development, their contribution during valvular leaflet maturation remains poorly understood. Here, we show in mouse that neural crest cells from pre-otic and post-otic regions make distinct contributions to the arterial valve leaflets. Genetic fate-mapping analysis of Krox20-expressing neural crest cells shows a large contribution to the borders and the interleaflet triangles of the arterial valves. Loss of Krox20 function results in hyperplastic aortic valve and partially penetrant bicuspid aortic valve formation. Similar defects are observed in neural crest Krox20 -deficient embryos. Genetic lineage tracing in Krox20 -/- mutant mice shows that endothelial-derived cells are normal, whereas neural crest-derived cells are abnormally increased in number and misplaced in the valve leaflets. In contrast, genetic ablation of Krox20 -expressing cells is not sufficient to cause an aortic valve defect, suggesting that adjacent cells can compensate this depletion. Our findings demonstrate a crucial role for Krox20 in arterial valve development and reveal that an excess of neural crest cells may be associated with bicuspid aortic valve. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. High-risk Trans-Catheter Aortic Valve Replacement in a Failed Freestyle Valve with Low Coronary Height: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Karimi, Ashkan; Pourafshar, Negiin; Dibu, George; Beaver, Thomas M.; Bavry, Anthony A.

    2017-01-01

    A 55-year-old male with a history of two prior cardiac surgeries presented with decompensated heart failure due to severe bioprosthetic aortic valve insufficiency. A third operation was viewed prohibitively high risk and valve-in-valve trans-catheter aortic valve replacement was considered. There were however several high-risk features and technically challenging aspects including low coronary ostia height, poor visualization of the aortic sinuses, and difficulty in identification of the copl...

  2. Cost-effectiveness of transcatheter aortic valve replacement compared with surgical aortic valve replacement in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis: results of the PARTNER (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves) trial (Cohort A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Matthew R; Magnuson, Elizabeth A; Lei, Yang; Wang, Kaijun; Vilain, Katherine; Li, Haiyan; Walczak, Joshua; Pinto, Duane S; Thourani, Vinod H; Svensson, Lars G; Mack, Michael J; Miller, D Craig; Satler, Lowell E; Bavaria, Joseph; Smith, Craig R; Leon, Martin B; Cohen, David J

    2012-12-25

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) compared with surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) for patients with severe aortic stenosis and high surgical risk. TAVR is an alternative to AVR for patients with severe aortic stenosis and high surgical risk. We performed a formal economic analysis based on cost, quality of life, and survival data collected in the PARTNER A (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves) trial in which patients with severe aortic stenosis and high surgical risk were randomized to TAVR or AVR. Cumulative 12-month costs (assessed from a U.S. societal perspective) and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were compared separately for the transfemoral (TF) and transapical (TA) cohorts. Although 12-month costs and QALYs were similar for TAVR and AVR in the overall population, there were important differences when results were stratified by access site. In the TF cohort, total 12-month costs were slightly lower with TAVR and QALYs were slightly higher such that TF-TAVR was economically dominant compared with AVR in the base case and economically attractive (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio economically dominated by AVR in the base case and economically attractive in only 7.1% of replicates. In the PARTNER trial, TAVR was an economically attractive strategy compared with AVR for patients suitable for TF access. Future studies are necessary to determine whether improved experience and outcomes with TA-TAVR can improve its cost-effectiveness relative to AVR. Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The power of disruptive technological innovation: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, David B; Davidson, Michael J; Schoen, Frederick J

    2015-11-01

    We sought to evaluate the principles of disruptive innovation, defined as technology innovation that fundamentally shifts performance and utility metrics, as applied to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). In particular, we considered implantation procedure, device design, cost, and patient population. Generally cheaper and lower performing, classical disruptive innovations are first commercialized in insignificant markets, promise lower margins, and often parasitize existing usage, representing unattractive investments for established market participants. However, despite presently high unit cost, TAVI is less invasive, treats a "new," generally high risk, patient population, and is generally done by a multidisciplinary integrated heart team. Moreover, at least in the short-term TAVI has not been lower-performing than open surgical aortic valve replacement in high-risk patients. We conclude that TAVI extends the paradigm of disruptive innovation and represents an attractive commercial opportunity space. Moreover, should the long-term performance and durability of TAVI approach that of conventional prostheses, TAVI will be an increasingly attractive commercial opportunity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Bicuspid Aortic Valve Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mylotte, Darren; Lefevre, Thierry; Søndergaard, Lars

    2014-01-01

    (16.7% balloon-expandable THV vs. 17.6% self-expandable THV, p = 0.99). MSCT sizing was associated with reduced AR on multivariate analysis (odds ratio [OR]: 0.19, 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 0.08 to 0.45; p day device safety, success, and efficacy were noted in 79.1%, 89...

  5. Radial Force: An Underestimated Parameter in Oversizing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Prostheses: In Vitro Analysis with Five Commercialized Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egron, Sandrine; Fujita, Buntaro; Gullón, Lucía; Désirée, Pott; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Ensminger, Stephan; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2017-09-05

    The goal is to inform in depth on transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) prosthesis mechanical behavior, depending on frame type, design, and size, and how it crucially impacts the oversizing issue in clinical use, and ultimately the procedure outcome. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement is an established therapy for high-risk patients suffering from aortic stenosis, and the indication for TAVR is progressively expanding to intermediate-risk patients. Choosing the optimal oversizing degree is crucial to safely anchor the TAVR valve-which involves limiting the risks for embolism, aortic regurgitation, conductance disturbance, or annulus rupture-and to increase the valve prosthesis performance. The radial force (RF) profiles of five TAVR prostheses were measured in vitro: the CoreValve 23 and 26 (Medtronic, MN), the Acurate neo S (Symetis, Switzerland), and the SAPIEN XT 23 and 26 (Edwards Lifesciences, CA). Measurements were run with the RX Machine equipment (Machine Solutions Inc., AZ), which is used in ISO standard tests for intravascular stents. Test protocols were adapted for TAVR prostheses. With the prostheses RF profiles' results, mechanical behavior differences could be described and discussed in terms of oversizing strategy and clinical impact for all five valves. Besides, crossing the prostheses' RF profiles with their recommended size windows made the assessment of borderline size cases possible and helped analyze the risks when accurate measurement of patient aortic annulus proves difficult. The prostheses' RF profiles bring new support in clinical decision-making for valve type and size in patients.

  6. Identification of fibrillin 1 gene mutations in patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) without Marfan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most frequent congenital heart disease with frequent involvement in thoracic aortic dilatation, aneurysm and dissection. Although BAV and Marfan syndrome (MFS) share some clinical features, and some MFS patients with BAV display mutations in FBN1, the gene encoding fibrillin-1, the genetic background of isolated BAV is poorly defined. Methods Ten consecutive BAV patients [8 men, age range 24–42 years] without MFS were clinically characterized. BAV phenotype and function, together with evaluation of aortic morphology, were comprehensively assessed by Doppler echocardiography. Direct sequencing of each FBN1 exon with flanking intron sequences was performed on eight patients. Results We detected three FBN1 mutations in two patients (aged 24 and 25 years) displaying aortic root aneurysm ≥50 mm and moderate aortic regurgitation. In particular, one patient had two mutations (p.Arg2726Trp and p.Arg636Gly) one of which has been previously associated with variable Marfanoid phenotypes. The other patient showed a pArg529Gln substitution reported to be associated with an incomplete MFS phenotype. Conclusions The present findings enlarge the clinical spectrum of isolated BAV to include patients with BAV without MFS who have involvement of FBN1 gene. These results underscore the importance of accurate phenotyping of BAV aortopathy and of clinical characterization of BAV patients, including investigation of systemic connective tissue manifestations and genetic testing. PMID:24564502

  7. Three-dimensional thoracic aorta principal strain analysis from routine ECG-gated computerized tomography: feasibility in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satriano, Alessandro; Guenther, Zachary; White, James A; Merchant, Naeem; Di Martino, Elena S; Al-Qoofi, Faisal; Lydell, Carmen P; Fine, Nowell M

    2018-05-02

    Functional impairment of the aorta is a recognized complication of aortic and aortic valve disease. Aortic strain measurement provides effective quantification of mechanical aortic function, and 3-dimenional (3D) approaches may be desirable for serial evaluation. Computerized tomographic angiography (CTA) is routinely performed for various clinical indications, and offers the unique potential to study 3D aortic deformation. We sought to investigate the feasibility of performing 3D aortic strain analysis in a candidate population of patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Twenty-one patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (AS) referred for TAVR underwent ECG-gated CTA and echocardiography. CTA images were analyzed using a 3D feature-tracking based technique to construct a dynamic aortic mesh model to perform peak principal strain amplitude (PPSA) analysis. Segmental strain values were correlated against clinical, hemodynamic and echocardiographic variables. Reproducibility analysis was performed. The mean patient age was 81±6 years. Mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 52±14%, aortic valve area (AVA) 0.6±0.3 cm 2 and mean AS pressure gradient (MG) 44±11 mmHg. CTA-based 3D PPSA analysis was feasible in all subjects. Mean PPSA values for the global thoracic aorta, ascending aorta, aortic arch and descending aorta segments were 6.5±3.0, 10.2±6.0, 6.1±2.9 and 3.3±1.7%, respectively. 3D PSSA values demonstrated significantly more impairment with measures of worsening AS severity, including AVA and MG for the global thoracic aorta and ascending segment (panalysis is clinically feasible from routine ECG-gated CTA. Appropriate reductions in PSSA were identified with increasing AS hemodynamic severity. Expanded study of 3D aortic PSSA for patients with various forms of aortic disease is warranted.

  8. Initial Surgical Experience with Aortic Valve Repair: Clinical and Echocardiographic Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Diniz Affonso da Costa

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Due to late complications associated with the use of conventional prosthetic heart valves, several centers have advocated aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root replacement for patients with aortic valve insufficiency, in order to enhance late survival and minimize adverse postoperative events. Methods: From March/2012 thru March 2015, 37 patients consecutively underwent conservative operations of the aortic valve and/or aortic root. Mean age was 48±16 years and 81% were males. The aortic valve was bicuspid in 54% and tricuspid in the remaining. All were operated with the aid of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography. Surgical techniques consisted of replacing the aortic root with a Dacron graft whenever it was dilated or aneurysmatic, using either the remodeling or the reimplantation technique, besides correcting leaflet prolapse when present. Patients were sequentially evaluated with clinical and echocardiographic studies and mean follow-up time was 16±5 months. Results: Thirty-day mortality was 2.7%. In addition there were two late deaths, with late survival being 85% (CI 95% - 68%-95% at two years. Two patients were reoperated due to primary structural valve failure. Freedom from reoperation or from primary structural valve failure was 90% (CI 95% - 66%-97% and 91% (CI 95% - 69%-97% at 2 years, respectively. During clinical follow-up up to 3 years, there were no cases of thromboembolism, hemorrhage or endocarditis. Conclusions: Although this represents an initial series, these data demonstrates that aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root surgery can be performed with satisfactory immediate and short-term results.

  9. The role of annular dimension and annuloplasty in tricuspid aortic valve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kerchove, Laurent; Mastrobuoni, Stefano; Boodhwani, Munir; Astarci, Parla; Rubay, Jean; Poncelet, Alain; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis; Noirhomme, Philippe; El Khoury, Gebrine

    2016-02-01

    Valve sparing reimplantation can improve the durability of bicuspid aortic valve repair compared with subcommissural annuloplasty, especially in patients with a large basal ring. This study analyses the effect of basal ring size and annuloplasty on valve repair in the setting of a tricuspid aortic valve. From 1995 to 2013, 382 patients underwent elective tricuspid aortic valve repair. We included only those undergoing subcommissural annuloplasty, valve sparing reimplantation or no annuloplasty and in whom intraoperative transoesophageal echocardiography images were available for retrospective pre- and post-repair basal ring measurements (n = 323, subcommissural annuloplasty: 146, valve sparing reimplantation: 154, no annuloplasty: 23). In a subgroup of patients with available echocardiographic images, basal ring was retrospectively measured at the latest follow-up or prior to reoperation. subcommissural annuloplasty and valve sparing reimplantation were compared after matching for degree of aortic regurgitation and root size. All three groups differed significantly for most of preoperative characteristics. Hospital mortality was 0.9%. The median follow-up was 4.7 years. At 8 years, overall survival was 80 ± 5%. Freedom from reoperation and freedom from aortic regurgitation >1+ were 92 ± 5% and 71 ± 8%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, predictors of aortic regurgitation >1+ were left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (P = 0.003), cusp repair (P = 0.006), body surface area (P = 0.01) and subcommissural annuloplasty (P = 0.05). In subcommissural annuloplasty, freedom from aortic regurgitation >1+ was lower for patients with basal ring ≥28 mm compared with patients with basal ring 1+ was independent of basal ring size (P = 0.38). In matched comparison between subcommissural annuloplasty and valve sparing reimplantation, freedom from aortic regurgitation >1+ was not significantly different (P = 0.06), but in patients with basal ring ≥28 mm, valve sparing

  10. Comparing American, European and Asian practice guidelines for aortic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozado, Jose; Martin, Maria; Pascual, Isaac; Hernandez-Vaquero, Daniel; Moris, Cesar

    2017-05-01

    The aortic disease comprises a group of different pathologies of high prevalence, seriousness and ever changing by the medical and surgical investigations. Therefore cardiovascular scientific societies in USA, Europe and Asia have created Task Force on practice guidelines (PG) to develop, update and revise PG for aortic diseases. These documents issue recommendations on the diagnosis and management of different aortic diseases. The three societies agree on the recommendations about diagnostic tests and on the value of computed tomography and magnetic resonance as the main tools for the diagnosis and follow-up of aortic disease. Concerning to acute aortic syndromes (AAS), American and European GPs recognize intramural hematoma (IMH) as a type of AAS with surgery indication; however Asian guidelines consider IMH a pathological process different from AAS and indicate medical treatment. In thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA), all express the need for an adequate control of cardiovascular risk factors, emphasizing strict control of blood pressure, smoking cessation and recommend the use of beta-blockers and statins. The threshold for asymptomatic repair is 5.5 cm in European and American and 6 cm for Asian PG, with lower thresholds in Marfan and bicuspid aortic valve (BAV). As regards the abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), the PGs recognize the adequate control of cardiovascular risk factors, but there are differences in class of recommendation on statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or beta-blockers to prevent progression of AAA. For intervention, the threshold diameter in asymptomatic is 5.5 cm but can be reduced to 5 cm in women as recommended by Asian PG. Moreover the specific diseases such as Marfan, BAV, pregnancy or atherosclerosis aortic present specific recommendations with small differences between PGs. In conclusion, PGs are interesting and appropriate documents at present. They issue recommendations based on evidence that help the clinician and

  11. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement by a Novel Suprasternal Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codner, Pablo; Pugliese, Daniel; Kouz, Rémi; Patel, Amisha; Chen, Cheng-Han; Terre, Juan; Eudailey, Kyle W; Nazif, Tamim; Vahl, Torsten P; George, Isaac; Khalique, Omar K; Hahn, Rebecca T; Leon, Martin B; Kodali, Susheel; Borger, Michael

    2018-04-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) provides therapy for patients with severe aortic stenosis at extreme, high, or intermediate surgical risk. Transfemoral access has been the preferred access route; however, this approach is not suitable for many TAVR candidates. A suprasternal approach may allow for earlier ambulation and shorter hospital stay as compared with other, nontransfemoral approaches. A total of 11 patients with unsuitable transfemoral access underwent suprasternal TAVR. Propensity matching was used to compare suprasternal patients to patients undergoing transaortic, transapical, and trans-subclavian TAVR. Groups were well matched for baseline characteristics. A self-expanding valve device was used in 6 (54.5%) and a balloon-expandable valve in 5 (45.5%) of the 11 patients treated by the suprasternal route. Suprasternal and trans-subclavian patients were able to ambulate earlier than patients treated by the transaortic route, a median 1.6 days (interquartile range [IQR]: 0.9 to 1.8), 1.6 days (IQR: 0.9 to 2.7), and 3.9 days (IQR: 1.9 to 4.5) after the procedure for suprasternal, trans-subclavian, and transaortic patients, respectively (p = 0.001). Length of hospitalization was shorter for patients treated by suprasternal or trans-subclavian access in comparison with patients treated by the transaortic or transapical approach: median 4 days (IQR: 3 to 8) and 4 days (IQR: 4 to 8) versus 8 days (IQR: 6 to 14) and 6 days (IQR: 7 to 11) for suprasternal and trans-subclavian versus transaortic and transapical, respectively (p = 0.01). Suprasternal and trans-subclavian access are associated with earlier ambulation and shorter hospitalization than other nontransfemoral TAVR routes, without an increase in complications. Further study is required to determine if suprasternal is the alternative access of choice for TAVR patients with poor transfemoral vasculature. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  12. Sutureless implantation of the perceval s aortic valve prosthesis through right anterior minithoracotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmanov, Daniyar; Miceli, Antonio; Bevilacqua, Stefano; Farneti, Pierandrea; Solinas, Marco; Ferrarini, Matteo; Glauber, Mattia

    2013-12-01

    Many new, less invasive strategies are proposed for aortic valve operation in elderly patients. Rapid deployment sutureless aortic valve prosthesis has been recently introduced. We analyzed our experience with a sutureless valve implanted through a minimally invasive approach. A retrospective observational study with prospectively registered data was conducted on 137 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy. Between April 2011 and January 2013, 137 consecutive patients underwent aortic valve replacement with a recently introduced, rapid deployment, sutureless pericardial valve in minithoracotomy access (47 men; mean age, 76.6 ± 7.1 years). There were 35 obese patients with a body mass index of more than 30 kg/m(2). Mean logistic EuroSCORE I was 10.0; 74 (54%) patients were in New York Heart Association functional class III and IV. In all, 19 (13.9%), 45 (32.8%), and 73 (53.3%) patients received 21-, 23-, and 25-mm valve prostheses, respectively. The mean aortic cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass times were 59.3 ± 19 min and 92.3 ± 27 min, respectively. No operative mortality occurred. Median stay in the intensive care unit was 1 day, with assisted ventilation necessary for a median of 6 hours. Three cases of postoperative ischemic stroke were observed (1 patient with a previous history of an ischemic cerebral event). Median hospital length of stay was 6 days. A sutureless valve for minimally invasive aortic valve replacement is a feasible, effective, and safe tool. Ultimately amplifying indications for less invasive aortic valve replacement in a high surgical risk subset of patients, it can become a valid alternative for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. High-risk Trans-Catheter Aortic Valve Replacement in a Failed Freestyle Valve with Low Coronary Height: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Ashkan; Pourafshar, Negiin; Dibu, George; Beaver, Thomas M; Bavry, Anthony A

    2017-06-01

    A 55-year-old male with a history of two prior cardiac surgeries presented with decompensated heart failure due to severe bioprosthetic aortic valve insufficiency. A third operation was viewed prohibitively high risk and valve-in-valve trans-catheter aortic valve replacement was considered. There were however several high-risk features and technically challenging aspects including low coronary ostia height, poor visualization of the aortic sinuses, and difficulty in identification of the coplanar view due to severe aortic insufficiency, and a highly mobile aortic valve mass. After meticulous peri-procedural planning, trans-catheter aortic valve replacement was carried out with a SAPIEN 3 balloon-expandable valve without any complication. Strategies undertaken to navigate the technically challenging aspects of the case are discussed.

  14. Experimental validation of the fluid–structure interaction simulation of a bioprosthetic aortic heart valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemp, I.; Dellimore, K.; Rodriguez, R.; Scheffer, C.; Blaine, D.; Weich, H.; Doubell, A.

    2013-01-01

    Experiments performed on a 19 mm diameter bioprosthetic valve were used to successfully validate the fluid–structure interaction (FSI) simulation of an aortic valve at 72 bpm. The FSI simulation was initialized via a novel approach utilizing a Doppler sonogram of the experimentally tested valve. Using this approach very close quantitative agreement (≤12.5 %) between the numerical predictions and experimental values for several key valve performance parameters, including the peak systolic transvalvular pressure gradient, rapid valve opening time and rapid valve closing time, was obtained. The predicted valve leaflet kinematics during opening and closing were also in good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  15. [A clinical experience of continuous warm blood cardioplegia in two cases of repeat aortic valve surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, H; In-nami, R; Watanabe, M; Funakoshi, N; Hirooka, K; Fujiwara, A

    1992-11-01

    The continuous warm blood cardioplegia (CWBC) was used for myocardial protection during aortic cross clamping in two cases of repeat aortic valve operations with good results. Case 1: A 46-year-old man, who underwent an aortic valve replacement because of the rheumatic aortic regurgitation (AR) in 1978, have suffered from orthopnea due to para-prosthetic valvular regurgitation since 1983. He was revealed to have bi-ventricular hypertrophy with myocardial damage on ECG, EF 0.27 on UCG, PCWP 20 mmHg and severe AR on cardiac catheterization. Case 2: A 43-year-old man, who had an aortic valvuloplasty for the non-rheumatic incompetency in 1981, have had a recurrent regurgitation, resulting in left ventricular hypertrophy accompanied by chest pain. Both cases were reoperated upon, having aortic valve replacement with mechanical prosthetic valves through the re-median sternotomy, utilizing CWBC with good recovery. CWBC provides an ideal circumstances for myocardial oxygen utilization during aortic cross clamping and moreover a benefit that needs not the wide dissection of the heart in a redo case because it has no need of topical cooling and ventricular defibrillation following aortic declamping. In conclusion, CWBC is very useful in a repeat aortic valve surgery.

  16. Bacterial translocation and plasma cytokines during transcatheter and open-heart aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrie, Christophe; Parlato, Marianna; Salmi, Lynda; Adib-Conquy, Minou; Bical, Olivier; Deleuze, Philippe; Fitting, Catherine; Cavaillon, Jean Marc; Monchi, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether the good safety profile of transarterial aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is related to lower levels of systemic bacterial translocation and systemic inflammation compared with open-heart surgery. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation via the transfemoral approach is increasingly used in very high-risk patients with aortic stenosis. The outcomes seem similar to those after open-heart aortic valve replacement (OHAVR). Each of 26 consecutive high-risk patients (EuroSCORE >20% for risk of operative death) who underwent TAVI (cases) was matched to the first low-risk patient treated next in our department using elective OHAVR without coronary artery bypass (control subjects). We collected severity, outcome, and echocardiography indicators before and after surgery; complications; proinflammatory cytokine levels; and markers for microbial translocation. Despite greater illness severity, the TAVI patients had significantly lower vasopressor agent requirements, lower delirium rates, shorter hospital stays, and better hemodynamic findings compared with OHAVR patients. Vascular complications were more common after TAVI than after OHAVR (12, with seven requiring interventional therapy vs. 0, P = 0.006). Patients who underwent TAVI had lower blood transfusion requirements. Two TAVI patients died: one from iliac artery injury and the other from intracardiac prosthesis migration. Patients who underwent TAVI had lower plasma levels of endotoxin and bacterial peptidoglycan, as well as lower proinflammatory cytokine levels, suggesting less gastrointestinal bacterial translocation compared with OHAVR. Compared with OHAVR, TAVI was associated with decreases in bacterial translocation and inflammation. These differences may explain the lower delirium rate and better hemodynamic stability observed, despite the greater disease severity in TAVI patients.

  17. Aortic valve calcification - a commonly observed but frequently ignored finding during CT scanning of the chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Prashanth; Sallomi, David; George, Bindu; Patel, Hitesh; Patel, Nikhil; Lloyd, Guy

    2012-06-01

    To describe the frequency and severity of Aortic valve calcification (AVC) in an unselected cohort of patients undergoing chest CT scanning and to assess the frequency with which AVC was being reported in the radiology reports. Consecutive CT scan images of the chest and the radiological reports (December 2009 to May 2010) were reviewed at the district general hospital (DGH). AVC on CT scan was visually graded on a scale ranging from 0 to IV (0 = no calcification, IV = severe calcification). Total of 416 (232 male; 184 female) CT chest scans [Contrast enhanced 302 (72%), unenhanced 114 (28%)] were reviewed. Mean age was 70.55 ± 11.48 years. AVC in CT scans was identified in 95 of the 416 patients (22.83%). AVC classification was as follows: Grade I: 60 (63.15%), Grade II: 22 (23.15%), Grade III: 9 (9.47%), Grade IV: 4 (4.21%). Only one CT report mentioned AVC. Only 31 of 95 AVC had Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE). The interval time between CT scan and TTE was variable.   Aortic valve calcification in CT chest scans is a common finding and studies have shown that it is strongly related to the presence and severity of aortic valve disease. As CT scans are considered as a valuable additional screening tool for detection of aortic stenosis, AVC should always be commented upon in the radiology reports. Furthermore, patients with at least Grade III and IV AVC should be sent for TTE. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Replica sizing strategy for aortic valve replacement improves haemodynamic outcome of the epic supra valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Lopez, David; Faerber, Gloria; Diab, Mahmoud; Amorim, Paulo; Zeynalov, Natig; Doenst, Torsten

    2017-10-01

    Current sizing strategies suggest valve selection based on annulus diameter despite supra-annular placement of biological prostheses potentially allowing placement of a larger size. We assessed the frequency of selecting a larger prosthesis if prosthesis size was selected using a replica (upsizing) and evaluated its impact on haemodynamics. We analysed all discharge echocardiograms between June 2012 and June 2014, where a replica sizer was used for isolated aortic valve replacement (Epic Supra: 266 patients, Trifecta: 49 patients). Upsizing was possible in 71% of the Epic Supra valves (by 1 size: 168, by 2 sizes: 20) and in 59% of the Trifectas (by 1 size: 26, by 2 sizes: 3). Patients for whom upsizing was possible had the lowest pressure gradients within their annulus size groups. The difference was significant in annulus diameters of 21-22 or 25-26 mm (Epic Supra) and 23-24 mm (Trifecta). Trifecta gradients were the lowest. However, the ability to upsize the Epic Supra by 2 sizes eliminated the differences between Epic Supra and Trifecta. Upsizing did not cause intraoperative complications. Using replica sizers for aortic prosthesis size selection allows the implantation of bigger prostheses than recommended in most cases and reduces postoperative gradients, specifically for Epic Supra. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  19. Patient-prosthesis mismatch and risk of structural valve deterioration in patients undergoing bioprosthetic aortic valve implantation

    OpenAIRE

    Urso, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Tesis doctoral inédita leída en la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Medicina, Departamento de Medicina. Fecha de lectura: 15-06-2015 Patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) has been identified as a risk factor for mortality after aortic valve replacement. Recently PPM has been also reported to increase the risk of structural valve degeneration (SVD) in patients receiving a bioprosthetic aortic valve. The aim of the present study was to compare the incidence of reoperation because of S...

  20. Aortic valve calcification as a predictor of location and severity of paravalvular regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Ezra Y; Lam, Kayan Y; Bindraban, Navin R; Cocchieri, Riccardo; Planken, R Nils; Koch, Karel T; Baan, Jan; de Mol, Bas A; Marquering, Henk A

    2015-03-01

    To determine whether the location of aortic valve calcium (AVC) influences the location of paravalvular regurgitation (PR). PR is an adverse effect of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) with a negative effect on long-term patient survival. The relationship between AVC and the occurrence of PR has been documented. However, the relationship between the distribution of AVC and the location of PR is still sparsely studied. The purpose of this study was to correlate severity and location of AVC with PR in patients treated with TAVI. Fifty-six consecutive patients who underwent transaortic or transapical TAVI and had preoperative computed tomography scans were included in this retrospective study. The volume, mass and location of AVC was determined and compared between patients with and without PR using a non-parametric t-test. Postoperative echocardiography was performed to determine the presence and location of PR, which was associated with the cusp with highest AVC using a χ(2) test. Valve deployment was successful in all 56 patients. PR was present in 38 patients (68%) after TAVI. There was a non-significantly higher volume of AVC in the PR group [214 (70-418) vs 371 (254-606) cm(3), P = 0.15]. AVC mass was significantly higher in patients with PR than in patients without PR [282 (188-421) vs 142 (48-259) mg, respectively, P = 0.043]. The location of PR was determined in 36 of these patients. Of these 36 patients, PR occurred at the cusp with the highest AVC in 20 patients (56%, χ(2) P = 0.030). In our population, PR was associated with greater AVC mass. Moreover, the location of PR was associated with the cusp with the highest amount of AVC. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  1. Fracturing mechanics before valve-in-valve therapy of small aortic bioprosthetic heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Peter; Engholt, Henrik; Tang, Mariann; Nybo, Rasmus F; Rasmussen, Per D; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik

    2017-10-13

    Patients with degraded bioprosthetic heart valves (BHV) who are not candidates for valve replacement may benefit from transcatheter valve-in-valve (VIV) therapy. However, in smaller-sized surgical BHV the resultant orifice may become too narrow. To overcome this, the valve frame can be fractured by a high-pressure balloon prior to VIV. However, knowledge on fracture pressures and mechanics are prerequisites. The aim of this study was to identify the fracture pressures needed in BHV, and to describe the fracture mechanics. Commonly used BHV of small sizes were mounted on a high-pressure balloon situated in a biplane fluoroscopic system with a high-speed camera. The instant of fracture was captured along with the balloon pressure. The valves were inspected for material protrusion and later dissected for fracture zone investigation and description. The valves with a polymer frame fractured at a lower pressure (8-10 atm) than those with a metal stent (19-26 atm). None of the fractured valves had elements protruding. VIV procedures in small-sized BHV may be performed after prior fracture of the valve frame by high-pressure balloon dilatation. This study provides tentative guidelines for expected balloon sizes and pressures for valve fracturing.

  2. Complete Resolution of a Large Bicuspid Aortic Valve Thrombus with Anticoagulation in Primary Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayan Jo Rachwan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Native aortic valve thrombosis in primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APLS is a rare entity. We describe a 38-year-old man who presented with neurological symptoms and a cardiac murmur. Transthoracic echocardiography detected a large bicuspid aortic valve thrombus. Laboratory evaluation showed the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. Anticoagulation was started, and serial echocardiographic studies showed complete resolution of the aortic valve vegetation after 4 months. The patient improved clinically and had no residual symptoms. This report and review of the literature suggests that vegetations in APLS can be treated successfully with conservative treatment, regardless of their size.

  3. Early results after implantation of a new geometric annuloplasty ring for aortic valve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzitelli, Domenico; Nöbauer, Christian; Rankin, J Scott; Badiu, Catalin C; Krane, Markus; Crooke, Philip S; Cohn, William E; Opitz, Anke; Schreiber, Christian; Lange, Rüdiger

    2013-01-01

    Aortic valve repair is associated with fewer long-term valve-related complications as compared with valve replacement, and repair is being performed increasingly. A current problem is the lack of a geometric annuloplasty ring to facilitate reconstruction. This paper describes the first clinical application of such a device designed to permanently restore physiologic annular size and geometry during aortic valve repair. Based on mathematical studies of human cadaver valves, as well as computed tomography angiographic analyses of awake patients with normal valves, a three-dimensional annuloplasty ring has been developed, consisting of low-profile, one-piece titanium construction and Dacron cloth covering. The ring design incorporates 2:3 elliptical base geometry and 10-degree outwardly flaring subcommissural posts. Appropriately sized rings were implanted in 5 patients with severe aortic insufficiency due to annular dilation and anatomic leaflet defects. The rings restored annular geometry and facilitated leaflet repairs in all patients. Each recovered excellent valve function with minimal residual leak. All patients convalesced uneventfully, were discharged within 7 days after surgery, and continue with stable valve function as long as 6 months after implantation. Initial clinical application of a geometric aortic annuloplasty ring was associated with excellent device performance and perhaps better repairs. Further clinical series and patient follow-up should identify potential benefits of the device, including improved applicability and stability of aortic valve repair. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Minimally invasive redo mitral valve surgery without aortic crossclamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Rodrigo; Brofman, Paulo Roberto Slud; Oliveira, Sergio; Patrial Neto, Luiz; Rosa, Matheus; Lima, Victor Hugo; Binder, Luis Fernando; Sanches, Aline

    2013-01-01

    Reoperations of the mitral valve have a higher rate of complications when compared with the first surgery. With the field of video-assisted techniques for the first surgery of mitral valve became routine, reoperation cases began to arouse interest for this less invasive procedures. To assess the results and the technical difficulties in 10 patients undergoing minimally invasive redo mitral valve surgery. Cardiopulmonary bypass was installed through a cannula placed in the femoral vessels and right internal jugular vein, conducted in 28 degrees of temperature in ventricular fibrillation. A right lateral thoracotomy with 5 to 6 cm in the third or fourth intercostal space was done, pericardium was displaced only at the point of atriotomy. The aorta was not clamped. Ten patients with mean age of 56.9 ± 10.5 years, four were in atrial fibrilation rhythm and six in sinusal. Average time between first operation and reoperations was 11 ± 3.43 years. The mean EuroSCORE group was 8.3 ± 1.82. The mean ventricular fibrillation and cardiopulmonary bypass was respectively 70.9 ± 17.66 min and 109.4 ± 25.37 min. The average length of stay was 7.6 ± 1.5 days. There were no deaths in this series. Mitral valve reoperation can be performed through less invasive techniques with good immediate results, low morbidity and mortality. However, this type of surgery requires a longer duration of cardiopulmonary bypass, especially in cases where the patient already has prosthesis. The presence of a minimal aortic insufficiency also makes this procedure technically more challenging.

  5. Aortic stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Images Aortic stenosis Heart valves References Carabello BA. Valvular heart disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil ... ACC guideline for the management of patients with valvular heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology/ ...

  6. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation and Morbidity and Mortality-Related Factors: a 5-Year Experience in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Silveira Souza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation has become an option for high-surgical-risk patients with aortic valve disease. Objective: To evaluate the in-hospital and one-year follow-up outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Methods: Prospective cohort study of transcatheter aortic valve implantation cases from July 2009 to February 2015. Analysis of clinical and procedural variables, correlating them with in-hospital and one-year mortality. Results: A total of 136 patients with a mean age of 83 years (80-87 underwent heart valve implantation; of these, 49% were women, 131 (96.3% had aortic stenosis, one (0.7% had aortic regurgitation and four (2.9% had prosthetic valve dysfunction. NYHA functional class was III or IV in 129 cases (94.8%. The baseline orifice area was 0.67 ± 0.17 cm2 and the mean left ventricular-aortic pressure gradient was 47.3±18.2 mmHg, with an STS score of 9.3% (4.8%-22.3%. The prostheses implanted were self-expanding in 97% of cases. Perioperative mortality was 1.5%; 30-day mortality, 5.9%; in-hospital mortality, 8.1%; and one-year mortality, 15.5%. Blood transfusion (relative risk of 54; p = 0.0003 and pulmonary arterial hypertension (relative risk of 5.3; p = 0.036 were predictive of in-hospital mortality. Peak C-reactive protein (relative risk of 1.8; p = 0.013 and blood transfusion (relative risk of 8.3; p = 0.0009 were predictive of 1-year mortality. At 30 days, 97% of patients were in NYHA functional class I/II; at one year, this figure reached 96%. Conclusion: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was performed with a high success rate and low mortality. Blood transfusion was associated with higher in-hospital and one-year mortality. Peak C-reactive protein was associated with one-year mortality.

  7. Use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging for TAVR assessment in patients with bioprosthetic aortic valves: Comparison with computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quail, Michael A., E-mail: m.quail@ucl.ac.uk [Centre for Cardiovascular Imaging, UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science and Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom); Nordmeyer, Johannes [Department of Congenital Heart Disease and Paediatric Cardiology, Deutsches Herzzentrum Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Schievano, Silvia [Centre for Cardiovascular Imaging, UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science and Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom); Reinthaler, Markus; Mullen, Michael J. [The Heart Hospital, University College Hospital and Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, UCL, 16-18 Westmoreland Street, London (United Kingdom); Taylor, Andrew M. [Centre for Cardiovascular Imaging, UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science and Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been successfully used to treat patients with failing aortic bioprostheses. Computed tomography (CT) is the usual method of pre-procedural imaging for TAVR in the native position; however, the optimal modality for valve-in-valve procedures has not been established. CT can assess intracardiac anatomy and is superior to cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in the assessment of coronary artery disease. However, CMR can provide superior haemodynamic information, does not carry the risk of ionising radiation, and may be performed without contrast in patients with renal insufficiency. In this study, we compared CT and CMR for the evaluation of TAVR in a small cohort of patients with existing aortic bioprostheses. Materials and methods: 21 patients with aortic bioprostheses were prospectively evaluated by CT and CMR, as pre-assessment for TAVR; agreement between measurements of aortic geometries was assessed. Results: 16/21 patients had aortic bioprostheses constructed with a metal ring, and 5/21 patients had a metal strut construction. Patients with metal struts had significant metal-artefact on CMR, which compromised image quality in this region. There was good agreement between CT and CMR measurements of aortic geometry. The mean difference (d) in annulus area-derived diameter was 0.5 mm (95% limits of agreement [L.A] 4.2 mm). There was good agreement between modalities for the cross-sectional area of the sinuses of valsalva (d 0.5 cm{sup 2}, L.A 1.4 cm{sup 2}), sinotubular junction (d 0.9 cm{sup 2}, L.A 1.5 cm{sup 2}), and ascending aorta (d 0.6 cm{sup 2}, L.A 1.4 cm{sup 2}). In patients without metal struts, the left coronary artery height d was 0.7 mm and L.A 2.8 mm. Conclusions: Our analysis shows that CMR and CT measurements of aortic geometry show good agreement, including measurement of annulus size and coronary artery location, and thus provide the necessary anatomical information for valve-in-valve

  8. Use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging for TAVR assessment in patients with bioprosthetic aortic valves: Comparison with computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quail, Michael A.; Nordmeyer, Johannes; Schievano, Silvia; Reinthaler, Markus; Mullen, Michael J.; Taylor, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been successfully used to treat patients with failing aortic bioprostheses. Computed tomography (CT) is the usual method of pre-procedural imaging for TAVR in the native position; however, the optimal modality for valve-in-valve procedures has not been established. CT can assess intracardiac anatomy and is superior to cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in the assessment of coronary artery disease. However, CMR can provide superior haemodynamic information, does not carry the risk of ionising radiation, and may be performed without contrast in patients with renal insufficiency. In this study, we compared CT and CMR for the evaluation of TAVR in a small cohort of patients with existing aortic bioprostheses. Materials and methods: 21 patients with aortic bioprostheses were prospectively evaluated by CT and CMR, as pre-assessment for TAVR; agreement between measurements of aortic geometries was assessed. Results: 16/21 patients had aortic bioprostheses constructed with a metal ring, and 5/21 patients had a metal strut construction. Patients with metal struts had significant metal-artefact on CMR, which compromised image quality in this region. There was good agreement between CT and CMR measurements of aortic geometry. The mean difference (d) in annulus area-derived diameter was 0.5 mm (95% limits of agreement [L.A] 4.2 mm). There was good agreement between modalities for the cross-sectional area of the sinuses of valsalva (d 0.5 cm 2 , L.A 1.4 cm 2 ), sinotubular junction (d 0.9 cm 2 , L.A 1.5 cm 2 ), and ascending aorta (d 0.6 cm 2 , L.A 1.4 cm 2 ). In patients without metal struts, the left coronary artery height d was 0.7 mm and L.A 2.8 mm. Conclusions: Our analysis shows that CMR and CT measurements of aortic geometry show good agreement, including measurement of annulus size and coronary artery location, and thus provide the necessary anatomical information for valve-in-valve TAVR planning. However

  9. Aortic valve bypass surgery in severe aortic valve stenosis: Insights from cardiac and brain magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantini, Cesare; Caulo, Massimo; Marinelli, Daniele; Chiacchiaretta, Piero; Tartaro, Armando; Cotroneo, Antonio Raffaele; Di Giammarco, Gabriele

    2018-04-13

    To investigate and describe the distribution of aortic and cerebral blood flow (CBF) in patients with severe valvular aortic stenosis (AS) before and after aortic valve bypass (AVB) surgery. We enrolled 10 consecutive patients who underwent AVB surgery for severe AS. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) and brain magnetic resonance imaging were performed as baseline before surgery and twice after surgery. Quantitative flow measurements were obtained using 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner phase-contrast images of the ascending aorta, descending thoracic aorta (3 cm proximally and distally from the conduit-to-aorta anastomosis), and ventricular outflow portion of the conduit. The evaluation of CBF was performed using 3.0-T MRI scanner arterial spin labeling (ASL) through sequences acquired at the gray matter, dorsal default-mode network, and sensorimotor levels. Conduit flow, expressed as the percentage of total antegrade flow through the conduit, was 63.5 ± 8% and 67.8 ± 7% on early and mid-term postoperative CMR, respectively (P surgery in patients with severe AS, cardiac output is split between the native left ventricular outflow tract and the apico-aortic bypass, with two-thirds of the total antegrade flow passing through the latter and one-third passing through the former. In our experience, CBF assessment confirms that the flow redistribution does not jeopardize cerebral blood supply. Copyright © 2018 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Increased transcript level of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1) in human tricuspid compared with bicuspid aortic valves correlates with the stenosis severity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, Edit; Caidahl, Kenneth; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Bäck, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathomechanism of calcific aortic valve stenosis. ► We assessed the transcript levels for PARP-1 (poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase), acts as a DNA damage nick sensor in stenotic valves. ► Early stage of diseased tricuspid valves exhibited higher mRNA levels for PARP-1 compared to bicuspid valves. ► The mRNA levels for PARP-1 inversely correlated with the clinical stenosis severity in tricuspid valves. ► Our data demonstrated that DNA damage pathways might be associated with stenosis severity only in tricuspid valves. -- Abstract: Oxidative stress may contribute to the hemodynamic progression of aortic valve stenosis, and is associated with activation of the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1. The aim of the present study was to assess the transcriptional profile and the topological distribution of PARP-1 in human aortic valves, and its relation to the stenosis severity. Human stenotic aortic valves were obtained from 46 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement surgery and used for mRNA extraction followed by quantitative real-time PCR to correlate the PARP-1 expression levels with the non invasive hemodynamic parameters quantifying the stenosis severity. Primary isolated valvular interstitial cells (VICs) were used to explore the effects of cytokines and leukotriene C 4 (LTC 4 ) on valvular PARP-1 expression. The thickened areas of stenotic valves with tricuspid morphology expressed significantly higher levels of PARP-1 mRNA compared with the corresponding part of bicuspid valves (0.501 vs 0.243, P = 0.01). Furthermore, the quantitative gene expression levels of PARP-1 were inversely correlated with the aortic valve area (AVA) (r = −0.46, P = 0.0469) and AVA indexed for body surface area (BSA) (r = −0.498; P = 0.0298) only in tricuspid aortic valves. LTC 4 (1 nM) significantly elevated the mRNA levels of PARP-1 by 2.38-fold in VICs. Taken together, these data suggest that

  11. Characterizing nanoscale topography of the aortic heart valve basement membrane for tissue engineering heart valve scaffold design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Sarah; Anilkumar, Thapasimuthu; Liliensiek, Sara; Last, Julie A; Murphy, Christopher J; Pandit, Abhay

    2006-02-01

    A fully effective prosthetic heart valve has not yet been developed. A successful tissue-engineered valve prosthetic must contain a scaffold that fully supports valve endothelial cell function. Recently, topographic features of scaffolds have been shown to influence the behavior of a variety of cell types and should be considered in rational scaffold design and fabrication. The basement membrane of the aortic valve endothelium provides important parameters for tissue engineering scaffold design. This study presents a quantitative characterization of the topographic features of the native aortic valve endothelial basement membrane; topographical features were measured, and quantitative data were generated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and light microscopy. Optimal conditions for basement membrane isolation were established. Histological, immunohistochemical, and TEM analyses following decellularization confirmed basement membrane integrity. SEM and AFM photomicrographs of isolated basement membrane were captured and quantitatively analyzed. The basement membrane of the aortic valve has a rich, felt-like, 3-D nanoscale topography, consisting of pores, fibers, and elevations. All features measured were in the sub-100 nm range. No statistical difference was found between the fibrosal and ventricular surfaces of the cusp. These data provide a rational starting point for the design of extracellular scaffolds with nanoscale topographic features that mimic those found in the native aortic heart valve basement membrane.

  12. Practical considerations for optimizing cardiac computed tomography protocols for comprehensive acquisition prior to transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalique, Omar K; Pulerwitz, Todd C; Halliburton, Sandra S; Kodali, Susheel K; Hahn, Rebecca T; Nazif, Tamim M; Vahl, Torsten P; George, Isaac; Leon, Martin B; D'Souza, Belinda; Einstein, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is performed frequently in patients with severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis who are at high risk or inoperable for open surgical aortic valve replacement. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) has become the gold standard imaging modality for pre-TAVR cardiac anatomic and vascular access assessment. Traditionally, cardiac CTA has been most frequently used for assessment of coronary artery stenosis, and scanning protocols have generally been tailored for this purpose. Pre-TAVR CTA has different goals than coronary CTA and the high prevalence of chronic kidney disease in the TAVR patient population creates a particular need to optimize protocols for a reduction in iodinated contrast volume. This document reviews details which allow the physician to tailor CTA examinations to maximize image quality and minimize harm, while factoring in multiple patient and scanner variables which must be considered in customizing a pre-TAVR protocol. Copyright © 2016 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Echocardiographic aortic valve calcification and outcomes in women and men with aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomassen, Henrik K; Cioffi, Giovanni; Gerdts, Eva; Einarsen, Eigir; Midtbø, Helga Bergljot; Mancusi, Costantino; Cramariuc, Dana

    2017-10-01

    Sex differences in risk factors of aortic valve calcification (AVC) by echocardiography have not been reported from a large prospective study in aortic stenosis (AS). AVC was assessed using a prognostically validated visual score and grouped into none/mild or moderate/severe AVC in 1725 men and women with asymptomatic AS in the Simvastatin Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study. The severity of AS was assessed by the energy loss index (ELI) taking pressure recovery in the aortic root into account. More men than women had moderate/severe AVC at baseline despite less severe AS by ELI (pAVC at baseline was independently associated with lower aortic compliance and more severe AS in both sexes, and with increased high-sensitive C reactive protein (hs-CRP) only in men (all pAVC at baseline was associated with a 2.5-fold (95% CI 1.64 to 3.80) higher hazard rate of major cardiovascular events in women, and a 2.2-fold higher hazard rate in men (95% CI 1.54 to 3.17) (both pAVC at baseline also predicted a 1.8-fold higher hazard rate of all-cause mortality in men (95% CI 1.04 to 3.06, pAVC scored by echocardiography has sex-specific characteristics in AS. Moderate/severe AVC is associated with higher cardiovascular morbidity in both sexes, and with higher all-cause mortality in men. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00092677. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. The JUPITER registry: 1-year results of transapical aortic valve implantation using a second-generation transcatheter heart valve in patients with aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silaschi, Miriam; Treede, Hendrik; Rastan, Ardawan J; Baumbach, Hardy; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Kappert, Utz; Eichinger, Walter; Rüter, Florian; de Kroon, Thomas L; Lange, Rüdiger; Ensminger, Stephan; Wendler, Olaf

    2016-11-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an established therapy for patients with aortic stenosis (AS) at high surgical risk. The JenaValve™ is a second-generation, self-expanding transcatheter heart valve (THV), implanted through transapical access (TA). During stent deployment, a specific 'clipping-mechanism' engages native aortic valve cusps for fixation. We present 1-year outcomes of the JUPITER registry, a post-market registry of the JenaValve for TA-TAVR. The JUPITER registry is a prospective, multicentre, uncontrolled and observational European study to evaluate the long-term safety and effectiveness of the Conformité Européenne-marked JenaValve THV. A total of 180 patients with AS were enrolled between 2012 and 2014. End-points were adjudicated in accordance with the valve academic research consortium document no. 1 definitions. The mean age was 80.4 ± 5.9 years and the mean logistic European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation I 21.2 ± 14.7%. The procedure was successful in 95.0% (171/180), implantation of a second THV (valve-in-valve) was performed in 2.2% (4/180) and conversion to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) was necessary in 2.8% (5/180). No annular rupture or coronary ostia obstruction occurred. Two patients required SAVR after the day of index procedure (1.1%). All-cause mortality at 30 days was 11.1% (20/180), being cardiovascular in 7.2% (13/180). A major stroke occurred in 1.1% (2/180) at 30 days, no additional major strokes were observed during 1 year. All-cause mortality after 30 days was 13.1% (21/160) and combined efficacy at 1 year was 80.8% (122/151). At 1-year follow-up, no patient presented with more than moderate paravalvular leakage, while 2 patients (3.2%) showed moderate, 12 (19.0%) mild and 49 (82.4%) trace/none paravalvular regurgitation. In a high-risk cohort of patients undergoing TA-TAVR for AS, the use of the JenaValve THV is safe and effective. In patients at higher risk for coronary ostia

  15. Aortic root surgery in Marfan syndrome: Bentall procedure with the composite mechanical valved conduit versus aortic valve reimplantation with Valsalva graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Paolo; Pellegrino, Antonio; Versaci, Francesco; Mantione, Ludmilla; Polisca, Patrizio; Iorio, Fiore S; Chiariello, Luigi

    2010-09-01

    The aim of the study is to compare mid-term results of Bentall aortic root replacement with composite mechanical valved conduit and aortic valve reimplantation procedure using the Valsalva graft for the treatment of aortic root aneurysm in patients with Marfan syndrome. We retrospectively compared data of 23 patients (mean age 38 + or - 14 years) who had undergone the Bentall procedure (group B) to those of 24 patients (mean age 36 + or - 12 years) who had undergone aortic valve reimplantation (group R) during a 14-year period. Follow-up (mean duration 65 + or - 44 months) was 100% complete. There were no operative deaths in either group. In group B, as compared with group R, preoperative aortic insufficiency (3.2 + or - 1.1/4 vs. 1.7 + or - 1.4/4, P Marfan patients, the Bentall procedure is associated with excellent mid-term outcome. The reimplantation technique, adopted for less dilated aortas, provides similarly satisfactory results. The Valsalva graft seems, with time, to allow a stable aortic valve function.

  16. Clinical efficacy of transcatheter aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis in high-risk patients: the PREVAIL JAPAN trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawa, Yoshiki; Takayama, Morimasa; Mitsudo, Kazuaki; Nanto, Shinsuke; Takanashi, Shuichiro; Komiya, Tatsuhiko; Kuratani, Toru; Tobaru, Tetsuya; Goto, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is suggested to be less invasive and/or equally effective in comparison to conventional aortic valve replacement for high-risk symptomatic aortic stenosis patients. We herein report the initial results of a pivotal clinical trial of TAVR in Japan (the PREVAIL JAPAN). Sixty-four aortic stenosis patients (mean age 84.3 ± 6.1 years) not suitable for surgery were enrolled at three centers in Japan, with a primary composite endpoint of the 6-month post-procedure improvements in the aortic valve area and New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classification. A transfemoral approach was used in 37 patients and a transapical approach was used in 27. The device success rate was 91.9 %. After 30 days and 6 months, the rates of mortality from any cause were 8.1 and 11.3 %, respectively. At 6 months, symptomatic stroke was found in 3.1 % of the patients, and silent infarction in 7.8 %. The aortic valve area and mean pressure gradient were significantly improved over time with both approaches (p < 0.001). At 6 months, the NYHA functional classification based on a conventional physician's assessment was improved in 87.9 % of the patients. We found results that were equivalent to those in other major TAVR trials, such as an acceptable 30-day survival (91.9 %), suggesting that balloon-expandable TAVR is effective for small Japanese AS patients classified as high-risk or inoperable.

  17. Supra-annular Valve-in-Valve implantation reduces blood stasis on the transcatheter aortic valve leaflets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Azadani, Ali N

    2017-06-14

    Leaflet thrombosis following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) and Valve-in-Valve (ViV) procedures has been increasingly recognized. This study aimed to investigate the effect of positioning of the transcatheter aortic valve (TAV) in ViV setting on the flow dynamics aspect of post-ViV thrombosis by quantifying the blood stasis in the intra-annular and supra-annular settings. To that end, two idealized computational models, representing ViV intra-annular and supra-annular positioning of a TAV were developed in a patient-specific geometry. Three-dimensional flow fields were then obtained via fluid-solid interaction modeling to study the difference in blood residence time (BRT) on the TAV leaflets in the two settings. At the end of diastole, a strip of high BRT (⩾1.2s) region was observed on the TAV leaflets in the ViV intra-annular positioning at the fixed boundary where the leaflets are attached to the frame. Such a high BRT region was absent on the TAV leaflets in the supra-annular positioning. The maximum value of BRT on the surface of non-, right, and left coronary leaflets of the TAV in the supra-annular positioning were 53%, 11%, and 27% smaller compared to the intra-annular positioning, respectively. It was concluded that the geometric confinement of TAV by the leaflets of the failed bioprosthetic valve in ViV intra-annular positioning increases the BRT on the leaflets and may act as a permissive factor in valvular thrombosis. The absence of such a geometric confinement in the ViV supra-annular positioning leads to smaller BRT and subsequently less likelihood of leaflet thrombosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Incidence of Renal Failure Requiring Hemodialysis Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladia, Vatsal; Panchal, Hemang B; O׳Neil, Terrence J; Sitwala, Puja; Bhatheja, Samit; Patel, Rakeshkumar; Ramu, Vijay; Mukherjee, Debabrata; Mahmud, Ehtisham; Paul, Timir K

    2016-09-01

    Studies have shown that iodinated radiocontrast use is associated with acute renal failure especially in the presence of chronic kidney disease and multiple factors modulate this risk. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to compare the incidence of renal failure requiring hemodialysis between transfemoral (TF) and transapical (TA) transcatheter aortic valve replacement using the Edwards valve. The PubMed database was searched from January 2000 through December 2014. A total of 10 studies (n = 2,459) comparing TF (n = 1,268) and TA (n = 1,191) TAVR procedures using the Edwards valve were included. Variables of interest were baseline logistic EuroSCORE, prevalence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, peripheral arterial disease, chronic kidney disease and amount of contrast used. The primary endpoint was incidence of renal failure requiring hemodialysis. The odds ratio and 95% CI were computed and P renal failure requiring hemodialysis was higher with the Edwards valve. This suggests that the incidence of renal failure requiring hemodialysis after TAVR is associated with baseline comorbidities in the TA-TAVR group rather than the volume of contrast used. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Commercial versus PARTNER study experience with the transfemoral Edwards SAPIEN valve for inoperable patients with severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendyala, Lakshmana K; Minha, Sa'ar; Barbash, Israel M; Torguson, Rebecca; Magalhaes, Marco A; Okubagzi, Petros; Loh, Joshua P; Chen, Fang; Satler, Lowell F; Pichard, Augusto D; Waksman, Ron

    2014-01-15

    In patients with aortic stenosis who cannot have surgery, transcatheter aortic valve replacement using the Edwards SAPIEN valve has been shown to improve survival rate and is approved for commercial use in the United States. This study aims to assess the clinical profile, procedural characteristics, and in-hospital complications in patients treated with a commercial SAPIEN valve outside the clinical trial context. We retrospectively analyzed 69 consecutive patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement with a commercial SAPIEN valve compared with 55 Placement of AoRTic traNscathetER valves (PARTNER) trial patients from cohort B enrolled in the same institution by the same Heart Team. Compared with the commercial group, patients in the PARTNER cohort B had higher mean Society of Thoracic Surgeons score (10 ± 5 vs 9 ± 4, p = 0.04) and a lower rate of peripheral arterial disease (19% vs 44%, p = 0.004). Most patients in the commercial group had the procedure under conscious sedation (83% vs 66%, p = 0.03). Planned surgical cut down for vascular access was rare in the commercial group (1.4% vs 46%, p commercial group (7.2% vs 27%, p = 0.003; 2.9% vs 16%, p = 0.01; and 28% vs 60%, p commercial group. In conclusion, transfemoral commercial use of the Edwards SAPIEN valve for inoperable patients shows similar in-hospital mortality and stroke rates compared with PARTNER cohort B. The refinements in the procedure such as more conscious sedation, experience of the operators, and careful vascular planning in the commercial group led to lesser vascular and bleeding complications and shorter length of stay. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Quality of Life After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Prospective Data From GARY (German Aortic Valve Registry).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Rüdiger; Beckmann, Andreas; Neumann, Till; Krane, Markus; Deutsch, Marcus-André; Landwehr, Sandra; Kötting, Joachim; Welz, Armin; Zahn, Ralf; Cremer, Jochen; Figulla, Hans R; Schuler, Gerhard; Holzhey, David M; Funkat, Anne-Kathrin; Heusch, Gerd; Sack, Stefan; Pasic, Miralem; Meinertz, Thomas; Walther, Thomas; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Böhm, Michael; Möllmann, Helge; Hamm, Christian W; Mohr, Friedrich W

    2016-12-26

    This study sought to analyze health-related quality-of-life (HrQoL) outcomes of patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) based on data from GARY (German Aortic Valve Registry). Typically, patients currently referred for and treated by TAVR are elderly with a concomitant variable spectrum of multiple comorbidities, disabilities, and limited life expectancy. Beyond mortality and morbidity, the assessment of HrQoL is of paramount importance not only to guide patient-centered clinical decision-making but also to judge this new treatment modality in this high-risk patient population. In 2011, 3,875 patients undergoing TAVR were included in the GARY registry. HrQoL was prospectively measured using the EuroQol 5 dimensions questionnaire self-complete version on paper at baseline and 1 year. Complete follow-up EuroQol 5 dimensions questionnaire evaluation was available for 2,288 patients (transvascular transcatheter aortic valve replacement [TAVR-TV]: n = 1,626 and transapical TAVR [TAVR-TA]: n = 662). In-hospital mortality was 5.9% (n = 229) and the 1-year mortality was 23% (n = 893). The baseline visual analog scale score for general health status was 52.6% for TAVR-TV and 55.8% for TAVR-TA and, in parallel to an improvement in New York Heart Association functional class, improved to 59.6% and 58.5% at 1 year, respectively (p regression analysis several pre- and post-operative factors were predictive for less pronounced HrQoL benefits. TAVR treatment led to improvements in HrQoL, especially in terms of mobility and usual activities. The magnitude of improvements was higher in the TAVR-TV group as compared to the TAVR-TA group. However, there was a sizable group of patients who did not derive any HrQoL benefits. Several independent pre- and post-operative factors were identified being predictive for less pronounced HrQoL benefits. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Long-term results after aortic valve-sparing operation (David I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Malakh; Baraki, Hassina; Maeding, Ilona; Fitzner, Sebastian; Sarikouch, Samir; Khaladj, Nawid; Hagl, Christian; Haverich, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Aortic valve-sparing David procedure has gained broad acceptance. However, few long-term results have been published. We present our results. More than 450 David procedures have been performed in our institution so far. Of these, 126 patients were operated between July 1993 and December 2000. Median age was 57 (8-83) years and 46 (36.5%) were female. As many as 26 (20.6%) had Marfan syndrome, 21 (16.7%) had acute aortic dissection type A (AADA) and 67 (53.2%) had additional procedures. There were six (4.8%) deaths in 30 post-operative period (POD), four of whom had AADA. In the follow-up, there were 32 (25.4%) late deaths, 11 (34.4%) of these were caused by cardiac or underlying disease or op-related. As many as 15 (11.9%) patients were re-operated; six (40%) were Marfan patients and two (13.3%) had early endocarditis. Follow-up echocardiography of 76 (60.3%) event-free patients showed valve insufficiency (AI)≤AI I° in 68 (89.5%) and grade II in 7 (9.2%) patients. Leaflet degeneration due to proposed leaflet contact with the straight Dacron graft was not observed. A total of 36 (47.4%) patients were in New York Heart Association (NYHA) class I, 33 (43.4%) in NYHA II, and five (6.6%) were in class III. During the entire follow-up of 790 patient-years, there was no stroke or major bleeding. Survival at 1, 5 and 10 years was 93%, 85% and 70%, respectively. Freedom from valve replacement at 1, 5 and 10 years was 96%, 91% and 87%, respectively. Regardless of the underlying pathology, valve-sparing David I procedure has acceptable long-term results. Valve-related complications such as stroke or major bleeding is exceedingly low.

  2. Long-term results after aortic valve-sparing operation (David I)†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Malakh; Baraki, Hassina; Maeding, Ilona; Fitzner, Sebastian; Sarikouch, Samir; Khaladj, Nawid; Hagl, Christian; Haverich, Axel

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Aortic valve-sparing David procedure has gained broad acceptance. However, few long-term results have been published. We present our results. METHODS More than 450 David procedures have been performed in our institution so far. Of these, 126 patients were operated between July 1993 and December 2000. Median age was 57 (8–83) years and 46 (36.5%) were female. As many as 26 (20.6%) had Marfan syndrome, 21 (16.7%) had acute aortic dissection type A (AADA) and 67 (53.2%) had additional procedures. RESULTS There were six (4.8%) deaths in 30 post-operative period (POD), four of whom had AADA. In the follow-up, there were 32 (25.4%) late deaths, 11 (34.4%) of these were caused by cardiac or underlying disease or op-related. As many as 15 (11.9%) patients were re-operated; six (40%) were Marfan patients and two (13.3%) had early endocarditis. Follow-up echocardiography of 76 (60.3%) event-free patients showed valve insufficiency (AI) ≤ AI I° in 68 (89.5%) and grade II in 7 (9.2%) patients. Leaflet degeneration due to proposed leaflet contact with the straight Dacron graft was not observed. A total of 36 (47.4%) patients were in New York Heart Association (NYHA) class I, 33 (43.4%) in NYHA II, and five (6.6%) were in class III. During the entire follow-up of 790 patient-years, there was no stroke or major bleeding. Survival at 1, 5 and 10 years was 93%, 85% and 70%, respectively. Freedom from valve replacement at 1, 5 and 10 years was 96%, 91% and 87%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Regardless of the underlying pathology, valve-sparing David I procedure has acceptable long-term results. Valve-related complications such as stroke or major bleeding is exceedingly low. PMID:21632258

  3. Long-Term Durability of Bioprosthetic Aortic Valves: Implications From 12,569 Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Douglas R.; Soltesz, Edward G.; Vakil, Nakul; Rajeswaran, Jeevanantham; Roselli, Eric E.; Sabik, Joseph F.; Smedira, Nicholas G.; Svensson, Lars G.; Lytle, Bruce W.; Blackstone, Eugene H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Increased life expectancy and younger patients’ desire to avoid lifelong anticoagulation requires a better understanding of bioprosthetic valve failure. This study evaluates risk factors associated with explantation for structural valve deterioration (SVD) in a long-term series of Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT aortic valves (AV). Methods From June 1982 to January 2011, 12,569 patients underwent AV replacement with Edwards Lifesciences Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT stented bovine pericardial prostheses, models 2700PM (n = 310) or 2700 (n = 12,259). Mean age was 71 ± 11 years (range, 18 to 98 years). 93% had native AV disease, 48% underwent concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting, and 26% had additional valve surgery. There were 81,706 patient-years of systematic follow-up data available for analysis. Demographics, intraoperative variables, and 27,386 echocardiographic records were used to identify risks for explant for SVD and assess longitudinal changes in transprosthesis gradients using time-varying covariable analyses. Results Three hundred fifty-four explants were performed, with 41% related to endocarditis and 44% to SVD. Actuarial estimates of explant for SVD at 10 and 20 years were 1.9% and 15% overall, respectively, and in patients younger than 60 years, 5.6% and 46%, respectively. Younger age (p < 0.0001), lipid-lowering drugs (p = 0.002), prosthesis–patient mismatch (p = 0.001), and higher postoperative peak and mean AV gradients were associated with explant for SVD (p < 0.0001). The effect of gradient on SVD was greatest in patients younger than 60 years. Conclusions Durability of the Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT aortic valve is excellent even in younger patients. Explant for SVD is related to gradient at implantation, especially in younger patients. Strategies to reduce early postoperative AV gradients, such as root enlargement or more efficient prostheses, should be considered. PMID:25662439

  4. Gallium-SPECT in the detection of prosthetic valve endocarditis and aortic ring abscess

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    O' Brien, K.; Barnes, D.; Martin, R.H.; Rae, J.R. (Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Victoria General Hospital Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada))

    1991-09-01

    A 52-yr-old man who had a bioprosthetic aortic valve developed Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Despite antibiotic therapy he had persistent pyrexia and developed new conduction system disturbances. Echocardiography did not demonstrate vegetations on the valve or an abscess, but gallium scintigraphy using SPECT clearly identified a focus of intense activity in the region of the aortic valve. The presence of valvular vegetations and a septal abscess was confirmed at autopsy. Gallium scintigraphy, using SPECT, provided a useful noninvasive method for the demonstration of endocarditis and the associated valve ring abscess.

  5. Gallium-SPECT in the detection of prosthetic valve endocarditis and aortic ring abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, K.; Barnes, D.; Martin, R.H.; Rae, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    A 52-yr-old man who had a bioprosthetic aortic valve developed Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Despite antibiotic therapy he had persistent pyrexia and developed new conduction system disturbances. Echocardiography did not demonstrate vegetations on the valve or an abscess, but gallium scintigraphy using SPECT clearly identified a focus of intense activity in the region of the aortic valve. The presence of valvular vegetations and a septal abscess was confirmed at autopsy. Gallium scintigraphy, using SPECT, provided a useful noninvasive method for the demonstration of endocarditis and the associated valve ring abscess

  6. Early and medium term results of the sleeve valve-sparing procedure for aortic root ectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamba, Amando; Tasca, Giordano; Giannico, Floriana; Lobiati, Elisabetta; Skouse, Douglas; Galanti, Andrea; Martino, Antonello Stefano; Triggiani, Michele

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate our experience of using a simplified aortic valve sleeve procedure to treat aortic root ectasia and aneurysms with or without aortic regurgitation. In experienced hands, 2 aortic valve-sparing procedures, ie, Yacoub and David, have yielded excellent long-term results in the treatment of aortic root aneurysms, with or without aortic regurgitation. However, these techniques are demanding and not widely used. Recently, a new and simplified valve-sparing technique, named "sleeve procedure," has been proposed, and has yielded encouraging early results. Ninety consecutive patients with aortic root aneurysms underwent sleeve procedures from October 2006 to October 2012. Follow-up data (clinical 100% complete and echocardiographic 93% complete) were acquired from our outpatient clinic or from the referring cardiologist. The mean age of the patients was 61.5 ± 12.5 years, 79% were male, 16 (18%) had a bicuspid valve, 3 had Marfan syndrome, and 2 had aortic dissection. Over a mean clinical follow-up of 34 ± 19 months, 2 patients died from noncardiac causes and 1 was reoperated on for the recurrence of aortic regurgitation. On follow-up echocardiography after a mean of 18 ± 9 months, aortic regurgitation was absent/negligible, mild or moderate in 62%, 37%, and 1% of patients, respectively, and the diameters of the annulus, Valsalva sinuses, and sinotubular junction were 27.3 + 2.2, 37.0 + 3.4, and 30.6 + 3.1 mm, respectively. Our encouraging early and medium term results suggest that the sleeve procedure is a safe and effective aortic valve-sparing technique for the treatment of aortic root ectasia and aneurysm. However, longer follow-up is needed in order to draw definitive conclusions. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Association of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis and aortic valve sclerosis

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    Alberto O. Orden

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The principal objective of this investigation was to analyze the association between diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH and the presence of aortic valve sclerosis (AVS. For this study we used results from 1000 consecutive outpatients (473 males, older than 50 years of age (average 67.6 years, that had been examined with Doppler echocardiogram and anterior and lateral chest radiographs. Overall, 195 patients (19.5% were diagnosed with DISH and 283 (28.3% with AVS. DISH was more prevalent than AVS in males (66.7% vs. 42.6%, p< 0.0001 and in older patients (73.6 ± 9 years vs. 66.1 ± 9 years, p < 0.0001. Furthermore, 55.4% of patients with dorsal DISH presented aortic sclerosis calcification vs. 21.7% of patients free of DISH (OR = 4.47; 95% CI = 3.22-6.21. The adjusted odds ratio (OR was calculated by sex and age resulting in 3.04 (95% CI = 2.12-4.36; p < .0001. A statistically significant association was found between DISH and AVS in accordance to age and sex. The biological plausibility of this association is based on similar risk factors, pathogenic mechanisms and vascular complications.

  8. Assessment of structural valve deterioration of transcatheter aortic bioprosthetic balloon-expandable valves using the new European consensus definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltchaninoff, Hélène; Durand, Eric; Avinée, Guillaume; Tron, Christophe; Litzler, Pierre-Yves; Bauer, Fabrice; Dacher, Jean-Nicolas; Werhlin, Camille; Bouhzam, Najime; Bettinger, Nicolas; Candolfi, Pascal; Cribier, Alain

    2018-03-30

    Durability of transcatheter aortic bioprosthetic valves remains a major issue. Standardised definitions of deterioration and failure of bioprosthetic valves have recently been proposed. The aim of this study was to assess structural transcatheter valve deterioration (SVD) and bioprosthetic valve failure (BVF) using these new definitions. All TAVI patients implanted up to September 2012 with a minimal theoretical five-year follow-up were included. Systematic clinical and echocardiographic follow-up was performed annually. New standardised definitions were used to assess durability of transcatheter aortic bioprosthetic valves. From 2002 to 2012, 378 patients were included. Mean age and logistic EuroSCORE were 83.3±6.8 years and 22.8±13.1%. Thirty-day mortality was 13.2%. Nine patients had SVD including two severe forms and two patients had definite late BVF. The incidence of SVD and BVF at eight years was 3.2% (95% CI: 1.45-6.11) and 0.58% (95% CI: 0.15-2.75), respectively. Even though limited by the poor survival of the very high-risk/compassionate early population, our data do not demonstrate any alarm concerning transcatheter aortic valve durability. Careful prospective assessment in younger and lower-risk patients and comparison with surgical bioprosthetic valves are required for further assessment of the long-term durability of transcatheter valves.

  9. A correlative study of aortic valve rotation angle and thoracic aortic sizes using ECG gated CT angiography

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    Saremi, Farhood, E-mail: fsaremi@usc.edu; Cen, Steven; Tayari, Nazila; Alizadeh, Houman; Emami, Amir; Lin, Leah; Fleischman, Fernando

    2017-04-15

    Objective: Various degrees of aortic valve rotation may be seen in individuals with no history of congenital cardiovascular malformations, but its association with aortic sizes has not been studied. Methods: Gated computed tomographic (CT angiograms in 217 patients were studied (66.7 ± 15; 22–97 years old)). Aortic diameters were determined at 5 anatomic locations. The length of the aorta from sinus to left subclavian artery was measured. The angle of valve rotation was recorded by measuring the angle between a line connecting the midpoint of the non-coronary sinus to the anterior commissure and another line along the interatrial septum. Rotation angles were correlated with aortic measurements. Patients were separated into two groups based on aortic sizes and into three groups based on age. The threshold for aortic dilatation was set at maximum ascending aorta diameter ≥40 mm (≥21 mm body surface area [BSA] indexed). Results: No significant difference in rotation angles was seen between the three age groups or between genders. Rotation angles were significantly correlated with maximal, average, and BSA adjustment of the aortic root and ascending aortic measurements. The aortic root angles were significantly different between the dilated versus nondilated aortas. There was no significant association between the rotation angles and age, length of ascending aorta, or diameters of descending aorta. Multivariate adaptive regression splines showed 25° of aortic root rotation as the diagnostic cut off for ascending aorta dilation. Above the 25° rotation, every 10° of increasing rotation was associated with a 3.78 ± 0.87 mm increase in aortic diameter (p < 0.01) and a 1.73 ± 0.25 times increased risk for having a dilated aorta (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Rotation angles of the aortic valve may be an independent non-invasive imaging marker for dilatation of the ascending aorta. Patients with increased rotation angle of the aortic valve may have higher risk for

  10. Valve-Sparing Root Replacement Compared With Composite Valve Graft Procedures in Patients With Aortic Root Dilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounian, Maral; Rao, Vivek; Manlhiot, Cedric; Abraham, Nachum; David, Carolyn; Feindel, Christopher M; David, Tirone E

    2016-10-25

    Although aortic valve-sparing (AVS) operations are established alternatives to composite valve graft (CVG) procedures for patients with aortic root aneurysms, comparative long-term outcomes are lacking. This study sought to compare the results of patients undergoing AVS procedures with those undergoing CVG operations. From 1990 to 2010, a total of 616 patients age Marfan syndrome and lower rates of bicuspid aortic valve than those undergoing bio-CVG or m-CVG procedures. In-hospital mortality (0.3%) and stroke rate (1.3%) were similar among groups. After adjusting for clinical covariates, both bio-CVG and m-CVG procedures were associated with increased long-term major adverse valve-related events compared with patients undergoing AVS (hazard ratio [HR]: 3.4, p = 0.005; and HR: 5.2, p valve-related complications when compared with bio-CVG and m-CVG. AVS is the treatment of choice for young patients with aortic root aneurysm and normal or near-normal aortic cusps. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Systematic review and meta-analysis of surgical outcomes in Marfan patients undergoing aortic root surgery by composite-valve graft or valve sparing root replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Campbell D; Tian, David H; Wilson-Smith, Ashley; David, Tirone; Matalanis, George; Misfeld, Martin; Mastrobuoni, Stefano; El Khoury, Gebrine; Yan, Tristan D

    2017-11-01

    A major, life-limiting feature of Marfan syndrome (MFS) is the presence of aneurysmal disease. Cardiovascular intervention has dramatically improved the life expectancy of Marfan patients. Traditionally, the management of aortic root disease has been undertaken with composite-valve graft replacing the aortic valve and proximal aorta; more recently, valve sparing procedures have been developed to avoid the need for anticoagulation. This meta-analysis assesses the important surgical outcomes of the two surgical techniques. A systematic review and meta-analysis of 23 studies reporting the outcomes of aortic root surgery in Marfan patients with data extracted for outcomes of early and late mortality, thromboembolic events, late bleeding complications and surgical reintervention rates. The outcomes of 2,976 Marfan patients undergoing aortic root surgery were analysed, 1,624 patients were treated with composite valve graft (CVG) and 1,352 patients were treated with valve sparing root replacement (VSRR). When compared against CVG, VSRR was associated with reduced risk of thromboembolism (OR =0.32; 95% CI, 0.16-0.62, P=0.0008), late hemorrhagic complications (OR =0.18; 95% CI, 0.07-0.45; P=0.0003) and endocarditis (OR =0.27; 95% CI, 0.10-0.68; P=0.006). Importantly there was no significant difference in reintervention rates between VSRR and CVG (OR =0.89; 95% CI, 0.35-2.24; P=0.80). There is an increasing body of evidence that VSRR can be reliably performed in Marfan patients, resulting in a durable repair with no increased risk of re-operation compared to CVG, thus avoiding the need for systemic anticoagulation in selected patients.

  12. Comparison of 1-Year Outcome in Patients With Severe Aorta Stenosis Treated Conservatively or by Aortic Valve Replacement or by Percutaneous Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (Data from a Multicenter Spanish Registry).

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Saldivar, Hugo; Rodriguez-Pascual, Carlos; de la Morena, Gonzalo; Fernández-Golfín, Covadonga; Amorós, Carmen; Alonso, Mario Baquero; Dolz, Luis Martínez; Solé, Albert Ariza; Guzmán-Martínez, Gabriela; Gómez-Doblas, Juan José; Jiménez, Antonio Arribas; Fuentes, María Eugenia; Gay, Laura Galian; Ortiz, Martin Ruiz; Avanzas, Pablo; Abu-Assi, Emad; Ripoll-Vera, Tomás; Díaz-Castro, Oscar; Osinalde, Eduardo P; Martínez-Sellés, Manuel

    2016-07-15

    The factors that influence decision making in severe aortic stenosis (AS) are unknown. Our aim was to assess, in patients with severe AS, the determinants of management and prognosis in a multicenter registry that enrolled all consecutive adults with severe AS during a 1-month period. One-year follow-up was obtained in all patients and included vital status and aortic valve intervention (aortic valve replacement [AVR] and transcatheter aortic valve implantation [TAVI]). A total of 726 patients were included, mean age was 77.3 ± 10.6 years, and 377 were women (51.8%). The most common management was conservative therapy in 468 (64.5%) followed by AVR in 199 (27.4%) and TAVI in 59 (8.1%). The strongest association with aortic valve intervention was patient management in a tertiary hospital with cardiac surgery (odds ratio 2.7, 95% confidence interval 1.8 to 4.1, p <0.001). The 2 main reasons to choose conservative management were the absence of significant symptoms (136% to 29.1%) and the presence of co-morbidity (128% to 27.4%). During 1-year follow-up, 132 patients died (18.2%). The main causes of death were heart failure (60% to 45.5%) and noncardiac diseases (46% to 34.9%). One-year survival for patients treated conservatively, with TAVI, and with AVR was 76.3%, 94.9%, and 92.5%, respectively, p <0.001. One-year survival of patients treated conservatively in the absence of significant symptoms was 97.1%. In conclusion, most patients with severe AS are treated conservatively. The outcome in asymptomatic patients managed conservatively was acceptable. Management in tertiary hospitals is associated with valve intervention. One-year survival was similar with both interventional strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Biological aortic valve replacement: advantages and optimal indications of stentless compared to stented valve substitutes. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Reza; Danial, Pichoy; Oudjana, Ahmed Hamid; Jamshidi, Peiman; Gassmann, Max; Leprince, Pascal; Lebreton, Guillaume

    2018-05-01

    Controversy still surrounds the optimal biological valve substitute for aortic valve replacement. In light of the current literature, we review advantages and optimal indications of stentless compared to stented aortic bio-prostheses. Recent meta-analyses, prospective randomized controlled trials and retrospective studies comparing the most frequently used stentless and stented aortic bio-prostheses were analyzed. In the present review, the types and implantation techniques of the bio-prosthesis that are seldom taken into account by most studies and reviews were integrated in the interpretation of the relevant reports. For stentless aortic root bio-prostheses, full-root vs. sub-coronary implantation offered better early transvalvular gradients, effective orifice area and left ventricular mass regression as well as late freedom from structural valve deterioration in retrospective studies. Early mortality and morbidity did not differ between the stentless and stented aortic bio-prostheses. Early transvalvular gradients, effective orifice area and regression of left ventricular hypertrophy were significantly better for stentless, especially as full-root, compared to stented bio-prostheses. The long-term valve-related survival for stentless aortic root and Toronto SPV bio-prosthesis was as good as that for stented pericardial aortic bio-prostheses. For full-root configuration this survival advantage was statistically significant. There seems to be not one but different ideal biological valve substitutes for different subgroups of patients. In patients with small aortic root or exposed to prosthesis-patient mismatch full-root implantation of stentless bio-prostheses may better meet functional needs of individual patients. Longer follow-ups on newer generation of stented bio-prostheses are needed for comparison of their hemodynamic performance with stentless counterparts especially in full-root configuration.

  14. Optimal timing of valve replacement in asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilen, Emine; Ipek, Gökürk; Ayhan, Huseyin; Nacar, Alper Bugra; Kasapkara, Haci Ahmet; Sani, Cenk; Basbug, Serdar; Kurt, Mustafa; Bozkurt, Engin

    2014-09-01

    Patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS) constitute a heterogeneous group which includes not only certain cases who are at high risk of sudden death and valve-related heart failure, but also those at low risk for these events. Degenerative AS, which includes a majority of patients with AS, is characterized by stricture of the valve, increased arterial stiffness, and diverse left ventricular response to the valvular plus arterial vascular load. In addition to using traditional primary parameters, the severity of AS and the total left ventricular load should be assessed using new measures such as energy loss index and valvulo-arterial impedance. Natriuretic peptide levels and global longitudinal strain imaging may also be used as secondary parameters to obtain information about left ventricular systolic function, although these parameters do not correlate with the severity of AS. Exercise stress testing and exercise echocardiography are also beneficial when assessing the patient if they are symptomatic, and for determining valvular and left ventricular contractile reserves. The aim of this review was to emphasize the importance of risk stratifications in asymptomatic severe AS cases, and to assess the severity of AS using not only conventional methods but also new methods on which much emphasis has been placed during recent years.

  15. Comprehensive 4-stage categorization of bicuspid aortic valve leaflet morphology by cardiac MRI in 386 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, I G; Collins, J; Powell, A; Markl, M; McCarthy, P; Malaisrie, S C; Carr, J C; Barker, A J

    2017-08-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) disease is heterogeneous and related to valve dysfunction and aortopathy. Appropriate follow up and surveillance of patients with BAV may depend on correct phenotypic categorization. There are multiple classification schemes, however a need exists to comprehensively capture commissure fusion, leaflet asymmetry, and valve orifice orientation. Our aim was to develop a BAV classification scheme for use at MRI to ascertain the frequency of different phenotypes and the consistency of BAV classification. The BAV classification scheme builds on the Sievers surgical BAV classification, adding valve orifice orientation, partial leaflet fusion and leaflet asymmetry. A single observer successfully applied this classification to 386 of 398 Cardiac MRI studies. Repeatability of categorization was ascertained with intraobserver and interobserver kappa scores. Sensitivity and specificity of MRI findings was determined from operative reports, where available. Fusion of the right and left leaflets accounted for over half of all cases. Partial leaflet fusion was seen in 46% of patients. Good interobserver agreement was seen for orientation of the valve opening (κ = 0.90), type (κ = 0.72) and presence of partial fusion (κ = 0.83, p < 0.0001). Retrospective review of operative notes showed sensitivity and specificity for orientation (90, 93%) and for Sievers type (73, 87%). The proposed BAV classification schema was assessed by MRI for its reliability to classify valve morphology in addition to illustrating the wide heterogeneity of leaflet size, orifice orientation, and commissural fusion. The classification may be helpful in further understanding the relationship between valve morphology, flow derangement and aortopathy.

  16. 3D Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Aortic Valves Using a Unified Continuum ALE FEM Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannette H. Spühler

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to advances in medical imaging, computational fluid dynamics algorithms and high performance computing, computer simulation is developing into an important tool for understanding the relationship between cardiovascular diseases and intraventricular blood flow. The field of cardiac flow simulation is challenging and highly interdisciplinary. We apply a computational framework for automated solutions of partial differential equations using Finite Element Methods where any mathematical description directly can be translated to code. This allows us to develop a cardiac model where specific properties of the heart such as fluid-structure interaction of the aortic valve can be added in a modular way without extensive efforts. In previous work, we simulated the blood flow in the left ventricle of the heart. In this paper, we extend this model by placing prototypes of both a native and a mechanical aortic valve in the outflow region of the left ventricle. Numerical simulation of the blood flow in the vicinity of the valve offers the possibility to improve the treatment of aortic valve diseases as aortic stenosis (narrowing of the valve opening or regurgitation (leaking and to optimize the design of prosthetic heart valves in a controlled and specific way. The fluid-structure interaction and contact problem are formulated in a unified continuum model using the conservation laws for mass and momentum and a phase function. The discretization is based on an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian space-time finite element method with streamline diffusion stabilization, and it is implemented in the open source software Unicorn which shows near optimal scaling up to thousands of cores. Computational results are presented to demonstrate the capability of our framework.

  17. 3D Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Aortic Valves Using a Unified Continuum ALE FEM Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spühler, Jeannette H; Jansson, Johan; Jansson, Niclas; Hoffman, Johan

    2018-01-01

    Due to advances in medical imaging, computational fluid dynamics algorithms and high performance computing, computer simulation is developing into an important tool for understanding the relationship between cardiovascular diseases and intraventricular blood flow. The field of cardiac flow simulation is challenging and highly interdisciplinary. We apply a computational framework for automated solutions of partial differential equations using Finite Element Methods where any mathematical description directly can be translated to code. This allows us to develop a cardiac model where specific properties of the heart such as fluid-structure interaction of the aortic valve can be added in a modular way without extensive efforts. In previous work, we simulated the blood flow in the left ventricle of the heart. In this paper, we extend this model by placing prototypes of both a native and a mechanical aortic valve in the outflow region of the left ventricle. Numerical simulation of the blood flow in the vicinity of the valve offers the possibility to improve the treatment of aortic valve diseases as aortic stenosis (narrowing of the valve opening) or regurgitation (leaking) and to optimize the design of prosthetic heart valves in a controlled and specific way. The fluid-structure interaction and contact problem are formulated in a unified continuum model using the conservation laws for mass and momentum and a phase function. The discretization is based on an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian space-time finite element method with streamline diffusion stabilization, and it is implemented in the open source software Unicorn which shows near optimal scaling up to thousands of cores. Computational results are presented to demonstrate the capability of our framework.

  18. Elevation of Matrix Metalloproteinases in Different Areas of Ascending Aortic Aneurysms in Patients with Bicuspid and Tricuspid Aortic Valves

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    Salah A. Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim is to investigate the elevation of matrix proteins in tissues obtained from distal, above the sinotubular junction (proximal, concave, and convex sites of aneurysms in the ascending aorta using a simultaneous multiplex protein detection system. Tissues were collected from 41 patients with ascending aortic aneurysms. A total of 31 patients had a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV, whereas 10 had a tricuspid aortic valve (TAV. Concave and convex aortic site samples were collected from all patients, whereas proximal and distal convexity samples were obtained from 19 patients with BAV and 7 patients with TAV. Simultaneous detection of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and their inhibitors (TIMPs was performed at each of the four aortic sites. MMP-2 levels were higher in the concave aortic sites than in the convex aortic sites. In contrast, MMP-8 levels were higher in the convex sites than in the concave sites, as were MMP-9 levels. In both BAV and TAV patients, TIMP-3 levels were higher in the concave sites than in the convex sites. However, TIMP-2 and TIMP-4 levels were significantly elevated in the sinotubular proximal aorta of BAV patients. Simultaneous detection of MMPs and TIMPs revealed different levels at different aortic sites in the same patient.

  19. Transesophageal echocardiography for cardiac thromboembolic risk assessment in patients with severe, symptomatic aortic valve stenosis referred for potential transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenders, Guy D; Paelinck, Bernard P; Wouters, Kristien; Claeys, Marc J; Rodrigus, Inez E; Van Herck, Paul L; Vrints, Christiaan J; Bosmans, Johan M

    2013-05-15

    Stroke is a devastating complication after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and might partially be related to cardiac embolization. The aim of this single-center prospective study was to determine the incidence of intracardiac thrombi and left atrial spontaneous echo contrast (SEC), both known predictors of cardiac embolic stroke, in patients referred for potential TAVI. One hundred four consecutive patients with severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis and at high or very high risk for surgery were included and underwent transesophageal echocardiography. In 11 patients (10.6%), intracardiac thrombi were detected, and 25 patients (24%) showed dense grade 2 SEC. Atrial fibrillation (p risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis referred for potential TAVI is high and can accurately be detected using transesophageal echocardiography. Systematic thromboembolic evaluation using transesophageal echocardiography is thus recommended in patients referred for TAVI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Use of intraventricular ribbon gauze to reduce particulate emboli during aortic valve replacement

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    Loubani Mahmoud

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of cerebrovascular accidents following aortic valve surgery remains a devastating complication. The aim of this study was to determine the number of potential embolic material arising during aortic valve replacement and to examine the efficacy of using ribbon gauze in the left ventricle during removal of the native valve and decalcification of the aortic annulus. Methods Ribbon gauze was inserted into the left ventricular cavity prior to aortic valve excision in an unselected, prospectively studied series of 30 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement. A further 30 lengths of ribbon gauze were soaked in the pericardiotomy blood of the same patients and all were subjected to histological analysis. Results The median number of tissue fragments from the aortic valve replacement group was significantly higher than in the control group 5 (0–18 versus 0 (0–1 (p = 3.6 × 10-5. The size of tissue fragments varied between 0.1 and 9.0 mm with a mean of 0.61 ± 1.12 mm and a median of 0.2 mm. There was a significantly higher number of tissue fragments associated with patients having surgery for aortic stenosis when compared with patients who had aortic regurgitation with median of 5 (0–18 versus 0 (0–3 (p = 0.8 × 10-3. Conclusion Significant capture of particulate debris by the intraventricular ribbon gauze suggests that the technique of left ventricular ribbon gauze insertion during aortic valve excision has merit.

  1. Primary Mitral Valve Regurgitation Outcome in Patients With Severe Aortic Stenosis 1 Year After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: Echocardiographic Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Marinho Florentino

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Mitral valve regurgitation (MR, present in up to 74% of the patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS, can be a negative prognostic factor when moderate or severe. The outcome of MR after percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI and predictors associated with that outcome have not been well established in the literature. Objective: To assess the outcome of primary MR in patients submitted to TAVI and to identify associated factors. Methods: Observational study of patients with symptomatic severe AS submitted to TAVI from January 2009 to April 2015 at two specialized centers. Echocardiographic outcome was assessed with data collected before and 1 year after TAVI. Results: Of the 91 patients with MR submitted to TAVI and followed up for at least 12 months, 67 (73.6% had minimum/mild MR before the procedure and 24 (26.4% had moderate/severe MR. Of those with minimum/mild MR, 62 (92.5% had no change in the MR grade (p < 0.001, while 5 (7.5% showed worsening. Of those with moderate/severe MR, 8 (33.3% maintained the same grade and 16 (66.7% improved it (p = 0.076. Patients with moderate/severe MR who improved MR grade had lower EuroSCORE II (p = 0.023 and STS morbidity (p = 0.027 scores, as compared to those who maintained the MR grade. Conclusion: MR grades change after TAVI. This study suggests a trend towards improvement in moderate/severe MR after TAVI, which was associated with lower preoperative risk scores.

  2. Midterm outcome of valve-sparing aortic root replacement in inherited connective tissue disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Ogino, Hitoshi; Matsuda, Hitoshi; Minatoya, Kenji; Sasaki, Hiroaki; Iba, Yutaka

    2011-11-01

    This study determined the midterm outcome of valve-sparing aortic root replacement for patients with inherited connective tissue disorders. From 1993 to 2008, 94 patients underwent valve-sparing aortic root replacement. Sixty patients (64%), average age 33 years (range, 15 to 61 years), had inherited connective tissue disorders: Marfan syndrome, 54 (92%); Loeys-Dietz syndrome, 5 (8%); and smooth muscle α-actin (ACTA2) mutation in 1. Median preoperative sinus diameter was 52 mm (range, 42 to 76 mm), and moderate/severe aortic regurgitation was present in 14 (23%). Seven (12%, 1993 to 1999) underwent remodeling procedures, and 53 had reimplantation procedures. Cusp repair was performed in 4. Median follow-up was 55 months (range, 1 to 149 months). There were 15 patients in the early term (1993 to 2000) and 45 in the late term (2001 to 2008). Four late deaths occurred (cardiac, 3; aortic, 1), with 10-year survival of 86%. Rates of freedom from aortic valve replacement at 5 and 10 years were 85% and 58% in remodeling and 96% and 58% in reimplantation. Risk factors for reoperations were postprocedure intraoperative aortic insufficiency greater than mild (p = 0.046), remodeling procedure (p = 0.016), and early term (p = 0.0002). One patient (2%) with none/trivial postprocedure aortic insufficiency required aortic valve replacement. Freedom from reoperation in patients with none/trivial postprocedure aortic insufficiency at 5 and 10 years was 100% and 67%. Meticulous control of aortic insufficiency during operation would bring favorable midterm durability in valve-sparing aortic root replacement using a reimplantation technique, even in patients with inherited connective tissue disorders. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Continuous-flow cardiac assistance: effects on aortic valve function in a mock loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzun, Egemen; Rutten, Marcel; Dat, Marco; van de Vosse, Frans; Kadipasaoglu, Cihan; de Mol, Bas

    2011-12-01

    As the use of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) to treat end-stage heart failure has become more widespread, leaflet fusion--with resul-tant aortic regurgitation--has been observed more frequently. To quantitatively assess the effects of nonpulsatile flow on aortic valve function, we tested a continuous-flow LVAD in a mock circulatory system (MCS) with an interposed valve. To mimic the hemodynamic characteristics of LVAD patients, we utilized an MCS in which a Jarvik 2000 LVAD was positioned at the base of a servomotor-operated piston pump (left ventricular chamber). We operated the LVAD at 8000 to 12,000 rpm, changing the speed in 1000-rpm increments. At each speed, we first varied the outflow resistance at a constant stroke volume, then varied the stroke volume at a constant outflow resistance. We measured the left ventricular pressure, aortic pressure, pump flow, and total flow, and used these values to compute the change, if any, in the aortic duty cycle (aortic valve open time) and transvalvular aortic pressure loads. Validation of the MCS was demonstrated by the simulation of physiologic pressure and flow waveforms. At increasing LVAD speeds, the mean aortic pressure load steadily increased, while the aortic duty cycle steadily decreased. Changes were consistent for each MCS experimental setting, despite variations in stroke volume and outflow resistance. Increased LVAD flow results in an impaired aortic valve-open time due to a pressure overload above the aortic valve. Such an overload may initiate structural changes, causing aortic leaflet fusion and/or regurgitation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Aortic valve-sparing operation in Marfan syndrome: what do we know after a decade?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallenbach, Klaus; Baraki, Hassina; Khaladj, Nawid; Kamiya, Hiroyuki; Hagl, Christian; Haverich, Axel; Karck, Matthias

    2007-02-01

    We assessed the outcome in patients with Marfan syndrome operated on exclusively with the aortic valve-sparing reimplantation technique for aortic root aneurysms during more than a decade. Between July 1993 and April 2005, the aortic valve-sparing reimplantation technique (David I) was used in 325 patients. In 59 patients with clinical evidence of Marfan syndrome, procedures were done for aortic root aneurysm (n = 55) or aortic dissection type A (n = 4). Their mean age was 30 +/- 12 years (range, 9 to 62 years), and 37 (63%) were male. Additional procedures were arch replacement in 4 patients, coronary artery bypass grafting in 1, mitral valve surgery in 9, and closure of atrial septal defect in 3. Mean follow-up was 54 +/- 37 months (range, 0 to 139 months). No patient died during the first 30 days postoperatively. Mean bypass time was 163 +/- 34 minutes (range, 99 to 248 minutes), and mean aortic cross clamp time was 126 +/- 28 minutes (range, 78 to 202 minutes). Four patients (6.8%) required rethoracotomy for postoperative bleeding. Five late deaths (8.5%) occurred during follow-up. Reoperation of the reconstructed valve was required in 7 patients. Freedom from reoperation was 88% +/- 5% at 5 years and 80% +/- 9% at 10 years. Mean grade of aortic insufficiency was 1.81 preoperatively compared with 0.20 early postoperatively (p valve should encourage use of this technique in patients with Marfan syndrome.

  5. Valve-sparing operation for aortic root aneurysm in patients with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R; Ma, W G; Tian, L X; Sun, L Z; Chang, Q

    2010-03-01

    We report our experience with aortic valve-sparing procedures in patients with Marfan syndrome and aortic root aneurysm. Between August 2003 and July 2007, we performed aortic valve-sparing procedures in 20 patients with aortic root aneurysm resulting from Marfan syndrome. Mean age was 28 +/- 10 years (range, 10 to 57 years), and there were 9 females and 11 males. A reimplantation technique was used in 9 cases, a remodeling technique in 8 and a patch technique in 3 cases. Additional procedures included total aorta replacement in 1 patient, and aortic arch replacement plus stented elephant trunk in 2 patients. The mean follow-up time was 46 +/- 16 months (range, 17 to 64 months). No in-hospital or late death occurred. Reexploration for bleeding was required in one case on postoperative day 1. No valve-related complications occurred during the follow-up period. At the end of follow-up, trivial or no aortic regurgitation was demonstrated in 14 patients, mild in 4 patients, moderate in 1 and severe in 1. Two patients with moderate and severe aortic regurgitation required reoperation. The early and mid-term results of the valve-sparing operations were favorable, and the durability of the preserved valve should encourage use of this technique in patients with Marfan syndrome.

  6. Postoperative Reverse Remodeling and Symptomatic Improvement in Normal-Flow Low-Gradient Aortic Stenosis After Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter-Storch, Rasmus; Møller, Jacob E; Christensen, Nicolaj L; Irmukhadenov, Akhmadjon; Rasmussen, Lars M; Pecini, Redi; Øvrehus, Kristian A; Søndergård, Eva V; Marcussen, Niels; Dahl, Jordi S

    2017-12-01

    Severe aortic stenosis (AS) most often presents with reduced aortic valve area (gradient (≥40 mm Hg; normal-flow high-gradient AS) or low mean gradient (normal-flow low-gradient [NFLG] AS). The benefit of aortic valve replacement (AVR) among NFLG patients is controversial. We compared the impact of NFLG condition on preoperative left ventricular (LV) remodeling and myocardial fibrosis and postoperative remodeling and symptomatic benefit. Eighty-seven consecutive patients with reduced aortic valve area and normal stroke volume index undergoing AVR underwent echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, a 6-minute walk test, and measurement of natriuretic peptides before and 1 year after AVR. Myocardial fibrosis was assessed from magnetic resonance imaging. Patients were stratified as NFLG or normal-flow high-gradient. In total, 33 patients (38%) had NFLG. Before AVR, they were characterized by similar symptom burden but less severe AS measured by aortic valve area index (0.50±0.09 versus 0.40±0.08 cm 2 /m 2 ; P gradient condition independently predicted change in LV mass index. Patients with NFLG had less severe AS and LV remodeling than patients with normal-flow high-gradient. Furthermore, NFLG patients experienced less reverse remodeling but the same symptomatic benefit. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02316587. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. The JUPITER registry: One-year outcomes of transapical aortic valve implantation using a second generation transcatheter heart valve for aortic regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silaschi, Miriam; Conradi, Lenard; Wendler, Olaf; Schlingloff, Friederike; Kappert, Utz; Rastan, Ardawan J; Baumbach, Hardy; Holzhey, David; Eichinger, Walter; Bader, Ralf; Treede, Hendrik

    2018-06-01

    We present 1-year outcomes of the post-market registry of a next-generation transcatheter heart valve used for aortic regurgitation (AR). Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is routine in high-risk patients with aortic stenosis but is not recommended for AR. The JenaValve™ (JenaValve Technology GmbH, Munich, Germany) overcomes technical challenges in AR patients through a leaflet clipping mechanism. The JenaValve EvalUation of Long Term Performance and Safety In PaTients with SEvere Aortic Stenosis oR Aortic Insufficiency (JUPITER) Registry is a European study to evaluate safety and effectiveness of this THV. From 2012-2015, 30 patients with AR were enrolled. Mean age was 74.4 ± 9.3 years. Procedural success was 96.7% (29/30). One patient was converted to open surgery. No annular rupture or coronary ostia obstruction occurred. Mortality at 30 days was 10.0% (3/30). Combined safety endpoint was met in 13.3% (4/30). Paravalvular regurgitation was not present/trivial in 84.6% (22/26) and mild in 15.4% (4/26). Rate of permanent pacemaker implantation was 3.8% (1/26). One-year Kaplan-Meier survival was 79.9%, one-year combined efficacy was 73.1% (19/30). No further strokes were observed during 1 year of follow-up. The JenaValve overcomes technical challenges of TAVR in AR through a clipping mechanism. We report satisfactory outcomes of a multicenter registry using the JenaValve for predominant AR, as rate of THV embolization, residual AR and permanent pacemaker implantation was low. One-year results using the JenaValve for AR encourage its use for this indication. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Embrella embolic deflection device for cerebral protection during transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samim, Mariam; Agostoni, Pierfrancesco; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Budde, Ricardo P J; Nijhoff, Freek; Kluin, Jolanda; Ramjankhan, Faiz; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Stella, Pieter R.

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: To compare the extent of cerebral ischemic injury after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) with the use of an Embrella Embolic Deflector System versus unprotected TAVR. METHODS: Fifteen patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis underwent TAVR with use of the Embrella Embolic

  9. Embrella embolic deflection device for cerebral protection during transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samim, Mariam; Agostoni, Pierfrancesco; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Budde, Ricardo P. J.; Nijhoff, Freek; Kluin, Jolanda; Ramjankhan, Faiz; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Stella, Pieter R.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To compare the extent of cerebral ischemic injury after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) with the use of an Embrella Embolic Deflector System versus unprotected TAVR. Methods: Fifteen patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis underwent TAVR with use of the Embrella Embolic

  10. Continuous-flow cardiac assistance : effects on aortic valve function in a mock loop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuzun, E.; Rutten, M.C.M.; Dat, M.; Kadipasaoglu, C.; Vosse, van de F.N.; Mol, de B.A.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background As the use of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) to treat end-stage heart failure has become more widespread, leaflet fusion—with resul-tant aortic regurgitation—has been observed more frequently. To quantitatively assess the effects of nonpulsatile flow on aortic valve function, we

  11. Exophiala (Wangiella dermatitidis Prosthetic Aortic Valve Endocarditis and Prosthetic Graft Infection in an Immune Competent Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay S. Berger

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exophiala (Wangiella dermatitidis is an emerging dematiaceous fungus associated with high mortality rates and is a rare cause of endocarditis. We describe the first case of E. dermatitidis endocarditis of a prosthetic aortic valve and aortic graft in an immune competent patient with no clear risk factors of hematological acquisition.

  12. Aortic Volumetry at Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Feasibility as a Sensitive Method for Monitoring Bicuspid Aortic Valve Aortopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Brian; Dubin, Iram; Rahman, Ozair; Ferreira Botelho, Marcos P; Naro, Nicholas; Carr, James C; Collins, Jeremy D; Barker, Alex J

    2017-04-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve patients can develop thoracic aortic aneurysms and therefore require serial imaging to monitor aortic growth. This study investigates the reliability of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) volumetry compared with 2-dimensional diameter measurements to identify thoracic aortic aneurysm growth. A retrospective, institutional review board-approved, and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant study was conducted on 20 bicuspid aortic valve patients (45 ± 8.9 years, 20% women) who underwent serial CEMRA with a minimum imaging follow-up of 11 months. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at 1.5 T with electrocardiogram-gated, time-resolved CEMRA. Independent observers measured the diameter at the sinuses of Valsalva (SOVs) and mid ascending aorta (MAA) as well as ascending aorta volume between the aortic valve annulus and innominate branch. Intraobserver/interobserver coefficient of variation (COV) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were computed to assess reliability. Growth rates were calculated and assessed by Student t test (P volumetry. Three-dimensional CEMRA volumetry exhibited a larger effect when examining percentage growth, a better ICC, and a marginally lower COV. Volumetry may be more sensitive to growth and possibly less affected by error than diameter measurements.

  13. Coronary artery disease in patients undergoing valve replacement at a tertiary care cardiac centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, A.H.; Hanif, B.; Hasan, K.; Hashmani, S.

    2011-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of coronary artery disease in patients undergoing valve surgery at a tertiary care cardiac centre. The medical records of 144 consecutive patients who underwent mitral, aortic or dual (mitral and aortic) valve replacement surgery at the Tabba Heart Institute between January 2006 to December 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent coronary angiogram. Significant coronary artery disease (CAD) is defined as coronary stenosis of > 50%. There were 74 (51.4%) males and 70 (48.6%) females in the study. The mean age was 51.64 +- 11 years. Of all, 73 (50.7%) underwent mitral valve replacement, 47 (32.6%) had aortic and 24 (16.7%) had dual valve replacement. Out of 144 patients, 99 (68.8%) had 50% stenosis. In patients who had undergone mitral valve replacement (MVR), significant coronary disease was found in 32.9%, whereas in patients who had undergone aortic valve replacement (AVR) and dual valve replacement (DVR) the prevalence of coronary disease was 31.9% and 25% respectively. Our results suggest that the overall prevalence of coronary artery disease in patients undergoing valve surgery in our population is comparable with prevalence reported in international data. (author)

  14. Expression of uPA, tPA, and PAI-1 in Calcified Aortic Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najlah Kochtebane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Our physiopathological assumption is that u-PA, t-PA, and PAI-1 are released by calcified aortic valves and play a role in the calcification of these valves. Methods. Sixty-five calcified aortic valves were collected from patients suffering from aortic stenosis. Each valve was incubated for 24 hours in culture medium. The supernatants were used to measure u-PA, t-PA, and PAI-1 concentrations; the valve calcification was evaluated using biphotonic absorptiometry. Results. Aortic stenosis valves expressed normal plasminogen activators concentrations and overexpressed PAI-1 (u-PA, t-PA, and PAI-1 mean concentrations were, resp., 1.69 ng/mL ± 0.80, 2.76 ng/mL ± 1.33, and 53.27 ng/mL ± 36.39. There was no correlation between u-PA and PAI-1 (r=0.3 but t-PA and PAI-1 were strongly correlated with each other (r=0.6. Overexpression of PAI-1 was proportional to the calcium content of the AS valves. Conclusions. Our results demonstrate a consistent increase of PAI-1 proportional to the calcification. The overexpression of PAI-1 may be useful as a predictive indicator in patients with aortic stenosis.

  15. Valve Calcification in Aortic Stenosis: Etiology and Diagnostic Imaging Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Manuela Izquierdo-Gómez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aortic stenosis is the most common valvulopathy in the Western world. Its prevalence has increased significantly in recent years due to population aging; hence, up to 8% of westerners above the age of 84 now have severe aortic stenosis (Lindroos et al., 1993. This causes increased morbidity and mortality and therein lies the importance of adequate diagnosis and stratification of the degree of severity which allows planning the best therapeutic option in each case. Long understood as a passive age-related degenerative process, it is now considered a rather more complex entity involving mechanisms and factors similar to those of atherosclerosis (Stewart et al., 1997. In this review, we summarize the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the onset and progression of the disease and analyze the current role of cardiac imaging techniques for diagnosis.

  16. Preliminary Evidence for Aortopathy and an X-Linked Parent-of-Origin Effect on Aortic Valve Malformation in a Mouse Model of Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert B. Hinton

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome (TS, most frequently caused by X-monosomy (45,X, is characterized in part by cardiovascular abnormalities, including aortopathy and bicuspid aortic valve (BAV. There is a need for animal models that recapitulate the cardiovascular manifestations of TS. Extracellular matrix (ECM organization and morphometrics of the aortic valve and proximal aorta were examined in adult 39,XO mice (where the parental origin of the single X was paternal (39,XPO or maternal (39,XMO and 40,XX controls. Aortic valve morphology was normal (tricuspid in all of the 39,XPO and 40,XX mice studied, but abnormal (bicuspid or quadricuspid in 15% of 39,XMO mice. Smooth muscle cell orientation in the ascending aorta was abnormal in all 39,XPO and 39,XMO mice examined, but smooth muscle actin was decreased in 39,XMO mice only. Aortic dilation was present with reduced penetrance in 39,XO mice. The 39,XO mouse demonstrates aortopathy and an X-linked parent-of-origin effect on aortic valve malformation, and the candidate gene FAM9B is polymorphically expressed in control and diseased human aortic valves. The 39,XO mouse model may be valuable for examining the mechanisms underlying the cardiovascular findings in TS, and suggest there are important genetic modifiers on the X chromosome that modulate risk for nonsyndromic BAV and aortopathy.

  17. PREVALENCE AND PREDICTORS OF CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE IN SEVERE AORTIC STENOSIS PATIENTS UNDERGOING SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayanapilai Jayaprasad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The present study is to find out the prevalence of CAD in severe Aortic Stenosis (AS patients undergoing aortic valve replacement and the relation between the conventional risk factors and CAD in them. Calcific aortic stenosis is associated with the same risk factors as coronary artery disease. Studies on calcific aortic stenosis and CAD are rarely reported from India. The aim of the study is to find out the predictive value of angina for presence of CAD in severe aortic stenosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS All cases of isolated severe aortic stenosis undergoing CAG before aortic valve replacement were included in the study. Data regarding various risk factors, symptoms, echocardiographic parameters and angiographic profile were collected. RESULTS Among a total of 94 patients who have undergone aortic valve replacement for severe AS 40 (42.6% had CAD. Risk factors like advanced age, hypertension, diabetes and smoking were more in patients with CAD compared to isolate AS. Mean gradient was more in the AS + CAD group compared with AS group. Presence of angina had a sensitivity of 82.5% and specificity of 51.85% for predicting coexisting CAD. CONCLUSION Among severe aortic stenosis, patients undergoing AVR 42.6% of patients had significant obstructive CAD. The conventional risk factors predict presence of coronary artery disease. Angina has got a fairly good sensitivity, but moderate specificity for CAD.

  18. What Is Heart Valve Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and replacing it with a man-made or biological valve. Biological valves are made from pig, cow, or human ... the valve. Man-made valves last longer than biological valves and usually don’t have to be ...

  19. Association of the C-Reactive Protein Gene (CRP rs1205 C>T Polymorphism with Aortic Valve Calcification in Patients with Aortic Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Wypasek

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Elevation in C-reactive protein (CRP levels have been shown in patients with aortic valve stenosis (AS. Minor allele of the CRP gene (CRP rs1205 C>T polymorphism has been associated with lower plasma CRP concentrations in cohorts of healthy and atherosclerotic patients. Considering the existing similarities between atherosclerosis and AS, we examined the effect of CRP rs1205 C>T polymorphism on the AS severity. Three hundred consecutive Caucasian patients diagnosed with AS were genotyped for the rs1205 C>T polymorphism using the TaqMan assay. Severity of the AS was assessed using transthoracic echocardiography. The degree of calcification was analyzed semi-quantitatively. Carriers of the rs1205 T allele were characterized by elevated serum CRP levels (2.53 (1.51–3.96 vs. 1.68 (0.98–2.90 mg/L, p < 0.001 and a higher proportion of the severe aortic valve calcification (70.4% vs. 55.1%, p = 0.01 compared with major homozygotes. The effect of CRP rs1205 polymorphism on CRP levels is opposite in AS-affected than in unaffected subjects, suggesting existence of a disease-specific molecular regulatory mechanism. Furthermore, rs1205 variant allele predisposes to larger aortic valve calcification, potentially being a novel genetic risk marker of disease progression.

  20. Predominance of Abdominal Visceral Adipose Tissue Reflects the Presence of Aortic Valve Calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, Masayoshi; Owada, Takashi; Yamauchi, Hiroyuki; Misaka, Tomofumi; Machii, Hirofumi; Yamaki, Takayoshi; Sugimoto, Koichi; Kunii, Hiroyuki; Nakazato, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Saitoh, Shu-Ichi; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2016-01-01

    Background. Aortic valve calcification (AVC) is a common feature of aging and is related to coronary artery disease. Although abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT) plays fundamental roles in coronary artery disease, the relationship between abdominal VAT and AVC is not fully understood. Methods. We investigated 259 patients who underwent cardiac and abdominal computed tomography (CT). AVC was defined as calcified lesion on the aortic valve by CT. %abdominal VAT was calculated as abdominal VAT area/total adipose tissue area. Results. AVC was detected in 75 patients, and these patients showed higher %abdominal VAT (44% versus 38%, p AVC. When the cutoff value of %abdominal VAT was set at 40.9%, the area under the curve to diagnose AVC was 0.626. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that age (OR 1.120, 95% CI 1.078-1.168, p AVC. The net reclassification improvement value for detecting AVC was increased when %abdominal VAT was added to the model: 0.5093 (95% CI 0.2489-0.7697, p AVC.

  1. Hemodynamic function of the standard St. Jude bileaflet disc valve has no clinical impact 10 years after aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Dorup, Inge; Emmertsen, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    in the survivors of a prospective series 10 years after AVR for aortic stenosis. DESIGN: Forty-three survivors aged 32-90 years from a prospective series attended a follow-up study with Doppler echo and radionuclide cardiography 10 years after AVR for aortic stenosis. Six patients with significant left sided valve...... to St. Jude valve geometric orifice area (GOA) indexed for either body surface area or left ventricular end-diastolic dimension (LVEDD). The gradients correlated directly with LVEDD but not with LVEF or LVMi. Eleven patients with hypertension had higher peak gradients (31+/-13 versus 22+/-8 mmHg, p

  2. The impact of the metabolic syndrome on the outcome after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadic, Marijana; Vukadinovic, Davor; Cvijanovic, Dane; Celic, Vera; Kocica, Mladen; Putnik, Svetozar; Ivanovic, Branislava

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the influence of the metabolic syndrome on the left ventricular geometry as well as on the early and mid-time outcome in patients with aortic stenosis who underwent aortic valve replacement. The study included 182 patients who underwent aortic valve replacement due to aortic stenosis. The metabolic syndrome was defined by the presence of at least three AHA-NHLB (American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute) criteria. All the patients were followed for at least 2 years after the surgery. The metabolic syndrome did not influence the severity of aortic stenosis (mean gradient and aortic valve area). However, the metabolic syndrome was associated with the reduced prevalence of the normal left ventricular geometry and the increased risk of concentric left ventricular hypertrophy in patients with aortic stenosis. Among the metabolic syndrome criteria, only increased blood pressure was simultaneously associated with the short-term and mid-term outcome, independently of other risk factors. Increased fasting glucose level was an independent predictor of the only 30-day outcome after the valve replacement. The metabolic syndrome and left ventricular hypertrophy were, independently of hypertension and diabetes, associated with the 30-day outcome, as well as incidence of major cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events in the 2-year postoperative period. The metabolic syndrome does not change severity of the aortic stenosis, but significantly impacts the left ventricular remodeling in these patients. The metabolic syndrome and left ventricular hypertrophy, irrespective of hypertension and diabetes, are predictors of the short-term and mid-term outcome of patients with aortic stenosis who underwent aortic valve replacement.

  3. New graft sizing rings for aortic valve reimplantation procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelenc, Matija; Jelenc, Blaž; Kneževic, Ivan; Klokocovnik, Tomislav

    2018-01-01

    The objective was to design sizing rings that would enable proper sizing of the graft in reimplantation procedures and to perform leaflet repair before graft implantation. The rings were designed in Autodesk Fusion 360 (San Rafael, CA, USA) and 3D printed using a commercial online 3D printing service. We designed incomplete rings with a low profile and complete rings with a high profile. The complete rings are best suited for reimplantation procedures, whereas low profile C rings are intended for isolated aortic valve repair, where the ascending aorta is not transected. The rings come in sizes corresponding to Vascutek Gelweave graft sizes (Vascutek Terumo, Renfrewshire, Scotland). The ring internal diameters are 5% larger than the designated ring sizes and account for the 5% stretch of the grafts when pressurized. Blades of the rings are placed at 20° intervals. The slits between the blades are designed in such a way that the commissural U-sutures, when put in place and under tension, will lock the ring in position. The rings were successfully used in 10 of our latest reimplantation procedures. After dissection of the aortic root, the commissures were suspended with U-stitches and then the ring was seated onto them. Complete leaflet repair with plication to achieve adequate effective height was then performed, followed by graft implantation. No additional leaflet repair was needed. The newly designed sizing rings enable proper sizing of the graft in reimplantation procedures and enable complete leaflet repair before graft implantation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  4. 16-Detector row computed tomographic coronary angiography in patients undergoing evaluation for aortic valve replacement: comparison with catheter angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manghat, N.E.; Morgan-Hughes, G.J.; Broadley, A.J.; Undy, M.B.; Wright, D.; Marshall, A.J.; Roobottom, C.A.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of 16-detector row computed tomography (CT) in assessing haemodynamically significant coronary artery stenoses in patients under evaluation for aortic stenosis pre-aortic valve replacement. Subjects and methods: Forty consecutive patients under evaluation for severe aortic stenosis and listed for cardiac catheterization before potential aortic valve replacement underwent coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring and retrospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated multi-detector row computed tomographic coronary angiography (MDCTA) using a GE Lightspeed 16-detector row CT within 1 month of invasive coronary angiography (ICA) for comparative purposes. All 13 major coronary artery segments of the American Heart Association model were evaluated for the presence of ≥50% stenosis and compared to the reference standard. Data were analysed on a segment-by-segment basis and also in 'whole patient' terms. Results: A total of 412/450 segments from 35 patients were suitable for analysis. The overall accuracy of MDCTA for detection of segments with ≥50% stenosis was high, with a sensitivity of 81.3%, specificity 95.0%, positive predictive value (PPV) 57.8%, and negative predictive value (NPV) 98.4%. On a 'whole-patient' basis, 100% (19/19) of patients with significant coronary disease were correctly identified and there were no false-negatives. Excluding patients with CAC >1000 from the analysis improved the accuracy of MDCTA to: sensitivity 90%, specificity 98.1%, PPV 60%, NPV 99.7%. Conclusion: Non-invasive 16-detector row MDCTA accurately excludes significant coronary disease in patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing evaluation before aortic valve replacement and in whom ICA can therefore be avoided. Its segment-by-segment accuracy is improved further if CAC > 1000 is used as a gatekeeper to MDCTA

  5. Fixation and mounting of porcine aortic valves for use in mock circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlöglhofer, Thomas; Aigner, Philipp; Stoiber, Martin; Schima, Heinrich

    2013-10-01

    Investigations of the circulatory system in vitro use mock circuits that require valves to mimic the cardiac situation. Whereas mechanical valves increase water hammer effects due to inherent stiffness and do not allow the use of pressure lines or catheters, bioprosthetic valves are expensive and of limited durability in test fluids. Therefore, we developed a cheap, fast, alternative method to mount valves obtained from the slaughterhouse in mock circuits. Porcine aortic roots were obtained from the abattoir and used either in native condition or after fixation. Fixation was performed at a constant retrograde pressure to ensure closed valve position. Fixation time was 4 h in a 0.5%-glutaraldehyde phosphate buffer. The fixed valves were molded into a modular mock circulation connector using a fast curing silicone. Valve functionality was evaluated in a pulsatile setting (cardiac output = 4.7 l/min, heart rate = 80 beats/min) and compared before and after fixation. Leaflet motion was recorded with a high-speed camera and valve insufficiency was quantified by leakage flow under steady pressure application (80 mmHg). Under physiological conditions the aortic valves showed almost equal leaflet motion in native and fixed conditions. However, the leaflets of the native valves showed lower stiffness and more fluttering during systole than the fixed specimens. Under retrograde pressure, fresh and fixed valves showed small leakage flows of <30 ml/min. The new mounting and fixation procedure is a fast method to fabricate low cost biologic valves for the use in mock circuits.

  6. Reliability and Identification of Aortic Valve Prolapse in the Horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hallowell Gayle D

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objectives were to determine and assess the reliability of criteria for identification of aortic valve prolapse (AVP using echocardiography in the horse. Results Opinion of equine cardiologists indicated that a long-axis view of the aortic valve (AoV was most commonly used for identification of AVP (46%; n=13. There was consensus that AVP could be mimicked by ultrasound probe malignment. This was confirmed in 7 healthy horses, where the appearance of AVP could be induced by malalignment. In a study of a further 8 healthy horses (5 with AVP examined daily for 5 days, by two echocardiographers standardized imaging guidelines gave good to excellent agreement for the assessment of AVP (kappa>0.80 and good agreement between days and observers (kappa >0.6. The technique allowed for assessment of the degree of prolapse and measurement of the prolapse distance that provided excellent agreement between echocardiographers, days and observers (kappa/ICC>0.8. Assessments made using real-time zoomed images provided similar measurements to the standard views (ICC=0.9, with agreement for the identification of AVP (kappa>0.8. Short axis views of the AoV were used for identification of AVP by fewer respondents (23%, however provided less agreement for the identification of AVP (kappa>0.6 and only adequate agreement with observations made in long axis (kappa>0.5, with AVP being identified more often in short axis (92% compared to long axis (76%. Orthogonal views were used by 31% of respondents to identify the presence of AVP, and 85% to identify cusp. Its identification on both views on 4 days was used to categorise horses as having AVP, providing a positive predictive value of 79% and negative predictive value of 18%. Only the non-coronary cusp (NCC of the AoV was observed to prolapse in these studies. Prolapse of the NCC was confirmed during the optimisation study using four-dimensional echocardiography, which concurred with the findings

  7. Basal longitudinal strain predicts future aortic valve replacement in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Helle Gervig; Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Hassager, Christian

    2016-01-01

    analysis and coronary angiography by MDCT. The combined endpoint was indication for aortic valve replacement (AVR) and sudden cardiac death. During a median follow-up of 2.3 years (interquartile range 1.7-3.6) 43 patients (41%) met the endpoint of indication for AVR. The basal (13.4 ± 3.1% vs. 15.7 ± 3.......1%) and mid-ventricular segments (14.9 ± 2.7% vs. 16.2 ± 2.9%) were significantly reduced, but with sparing of the apical segments, in patients who later underwent AVR. In various multivariable Cox regression models, including only BLS, but not GLS, remained an independent predictor of AVR. CONCLUSION...

  8. The long non-coding HOTAIR is modulated by cyclic stretch and WNT/β-CATENIN in human aortic valve cells and is a novel repressor of calcification genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion, Katrina; Dyo, Jeffrey; Patel, Vishal; Sasik, Roman; Mohamed, Salah A; Hardiman, Gary; Nigam, Vishal

    2014-01-01

    Aortic valve calcification is a significant and serious clinical problem for which there are no effective medical treatments. Individuals born with bicuspid aortic valves, 1-2% of the population, are at the highest risk of developing aortic valve calcification. Aortic valve calcification involves increased expression of calcification and inflammatory genes. Bicuspid aortic valve leaflets experience increased biomechanical strain as compared to normal tricuspid aortic valves. The molecular pathogenesis involved in the calcification of BAVs are not well understood, especially the molecular response to mechanical stretch. HOTAIR is a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) that has been implicated with cancer but has not been studied in cardiac disease. We have found that HOTAIR levels are decreased in BAVs and in human aortic interstitial cells (AVICs) exposed to cyclic stretch. Reducing HOTAIR levels via siRNA in AVICs results in increased expression of calcification genes. Our data suggest that β-catenin is a stretch responsive signaling pathway that represses HOTAIR. This