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Sample records for aortic stenosis implications

  1. Left ventricular hypertrophy in valvular aortic stenosis: mechanisms and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Florian; Sachdev, Esha; Arsanjani, Reza; Siegel, Robert J

    2015-04-01

    Valvular aortic stenosis is the second most prevalent adult valve disease in the United States and causes progressive pressure overload, invariably leading to life-threatening complications. Surgical aortic valve replacement and, more recently, transcatheter aortic valve replacement effectively relieve the hemodynamic burden and improve the symptoms and survival of affected individuals. However, according to current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on the management of valvular heart disease, the indications for aortic valve replacement, including transcatheter aortic valve replacement, are based primarily on the development of clinical symptoms, because their presence indicates a dismal prognosis. Left ventricular hypertrophy develops in a sizeable proportion of patients before the onset of symptoms, and a growing body of literature demonstrates that regression of left ventricular hypertrophy resulting from aortic stenosis is incomplete after aortic valve replacement and associated with adverse early postoperative outcomes and worse long-term outcomes. Thus, reliance on the development of symptoms alone without consideration of structural abnormalities of the myocardium for optimal timing of aortic valve replacement potentially constitutes a missed opportunity to prevent postoperative morbidity and mortality from severe aortic stenosis, especially in the face of the quickly expanding indications of lower-risk transcatheter aortic valve replacement. The purpose of this review is to discuss the mechanisms and clinical implications of left ventricular hypertrophy in severe valvular aortic stenosis, which may eventually move to center stage as an indication for aortic valve replacement in the asymptomatic patient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Association between serum calcium, serum phosphate and aortic stenosis with implications for prevention.

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    Wald, David S; Bestwick, Jonathan P

    2018-03-01

    Background Aortic stenosis is the most common cause of valvular heart disease with no means of prevention. Lowering serum levels of calcium or phosphate are potential preventive strategies but observational studies on the associations with aortic stenosis are inconsistent. Design and methods A case-control study was conducted in 132 individuals undergoing echocardiography (63 with aortic stenosis and 69 without) and the results combined with three other comparable studies (914 individuals overall) to provide a summary odds ratio of aortic stenosis for a 0.1 mmol/L increase (approximately one standard deviation) in calcium and phosphate respectively. The relationship between calcium and phosphate and the severity of aortic stenosis, according to peak trans-aortic velocity, was also examined in the case-control study using linear regression. Results Both calcium and phosphate were positively associated with aortic stenosis. The summary odds ratio for a 0.1 mmol/L increase in calcium was 1.79 (95% confidence interval 1.07-2.99), p = 0.027 and for phosphate it was 1.47 (1.08-2.01), p = 0.015. Peak trans-aortic velocity increased with phosphate levels, 9% (4%-14%) per 0.1 mmol/L, p = 0.001, but not with calcium, p = 0.089. Conclusions If the associations are causal and reversible, these results indicate that a small reduction in calcium or phosphate levels, within the physiological rage, would translate into a clinically significant reduction in the risk of aortic stenosis. Randomised trials of calcium and phosphate lowering therapies in aortic stenosis are needed.

  3. The left ventricle in aortic stenosis--imaging assessment and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Călin, Andreea; Roşca, Monica; Beladan, Carmen Cristiana; Enache, Roxana; Mateescu, Anca Doina; Ginghină, Carmen; Popescu, Bogdan Alexandru

    2015-04-29

    Aortic stenosis has an increasing prevalence in the context of aging population. In these patients non-invasive imaging allows not only the grading of valve stenosis severity, but also the assessment of left ventricular function. These two goals play a key role in clinical decision-making. Although left ventricular ejection fraction is currently the only left ventricular function parameter that guides intervention, current imaging techniques are able to detect early changes in LV structure and function even in asymptomatic patients with significant aortic stenosis and preserved ejection fraction. Moreover, new imaging parameters emerged as predictors of disease progression in patients with aortic stenosis. Although proper standardization and confirmatory data from large prospective studies are needed, these novel parameters have the potential of becoming useful tools in guiding intervention in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis and stratify risk in symptomatic patients undergoing aortic valve replacement.This review focuses on the mechanisms of transition from compensatory left ventricular hypertrophy to left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure in aortic stenosis and the role of non-invasive imaging assessment of the left ventricular geometry and function in these patients.

  4. Clinical Implications of Electrocardiographic Left Ventricular Strain and Hypertrophy in Asymptomatic Patients with Aortic Stenosis: The Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders M; Boman, Kurt; Gohlke-Baerwolf, Christa

    2012-01-01

    in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study. Primary endpoint was the first of myocardial infarction, non-hemorrhagic stroke, heart failure, aortic valve replacement (AVR) or cardiovascular death. Predictive value of electrocardiographic LV strain (defined as T-wave inversion in leads V(4...

  5. Prognostic implications of left ventricular asymmetry in patients with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigvardsen, Per Ejlstrup; Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Carstensen, Helle Gervig

    2018-01-01

    by multi-detector computed tomography according to previous definitions. Follow-up was conducted using electronic health records. Event-free survival was assessed using Cox proportional hazards models. Patients were followed for a median of 2.2 years (interquartile range 1.6-3.6). Indication for AVR......Aims: Left ventricular (LV) regional hypertrophy in the form of LV asymmetry is a common finding in patients with aortic valve stenosis. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that LV asymmetry predicts future symptomatic status and indication for aortic valve replacement (AVR......) in patients with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis. Methods and results: In total, 114 patients with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis (peak velocity > 2.5 m/s assessed by echocardiographic screening and LV ejection fraction > 50%) were enrolled in the study. LV asymmetry and LV geometry was assessed...

  6. Measurement of peak aortic jet velocity in the perioperative period-machine variability: implications for assessment of aortic stenosis severity.

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    Cowie, B S; Kluger, R

    2015-09-01

    Variation in echocardiography machines and probes are not well described in the perioperative period. We aimed to compare the estimation of severity of aortic stenosis with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) using two semi-portable ultrasound machines. Experienced cardiac anaesthetists performed a limited transthoracic echocardiogram with two different semi-portable ultrasound machines in patients with known aortic stenosis. The peak aortic jet velocity with continuous-wave Doppler and the time taken to obtain an acceptable envelope were recorded. The Sonosite M Turbo often underestimated the peak jet velocities (median jet velocity [IQR] 2.25 m/s [1.95 to 3.4] versus 3.85 m/s (3 to 4.2); P Turbo were significantly lower than those obtained by the formal preoperative transthoracic echocardiogram (P jet velocity can significantly underestimate the severity of aortic stenosis with potentially lethal clinical consequences. Semi-portable ultrasound machines with echocardiographic capability are not necessarily equivalent and can result in underestimation of severity of aortic stenosis.

  7. Ebstein′s anomaly with severe aortic stenosis and syncope: Implications in management

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    Vijayakumar Subban

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ebstein′s anomaly is a rare congenital heart disease involving the right side of the heart with typical malformations of the tricuspid valve and the right ventricle. Associated left heart anomalies, particularly aortic valve disease, are extremely rare. We report here an unusual case of Ebstein′s anomaly of the tricuspid valve and severe aortic stenosis who presented to us with recurrent syncopal episodes. The patient needed to undergo electrophysiological evaluation before aortic valve replacement to rule out arrhythmic causes of syncope.

  8. Aortic stenosis: An update.

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    Nathaniel, Sangeetha; Saligram, Shreyas; Innasimuthu, Antony Leslie

    2010-06-26

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common valvular heart disease in the world. It is a disease of the elderly and as our population is getting older in both the developed and the developing world, there has been an increase in the prevalence of AS. It is impacting the mortality and morbidity of our elderly population. It is also causing a huge burden on the healthcare system. There has been tremendous progress in our understanding of AS in recent years. Lately, studies have shown that AS is not just a disease of the aortic valve but it affects the entire systemic vasculature. There are studies looking at more sophisticated measures of disease severity that might better predict the optimal timing of valve replacement. The improvement in our understanding in etiology and pathophysiology of the disease process has led to a number of trials with possible treatment options for AS. In this review, we talk about our understanding of the disease and latest developments in disease assessment and management. We look forward to a time when there will be medical treatment for AS.

  9. Statins for aortic valve stenosis.

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    Thiago, Luciana; Tsuji, Selma Rumiko; Nyong, Jonathan; Puga, Maria Eduarda Dos Santos; Góis, Aécio Flávio Teixeira de; Macedo, Cristiane Rufino; Valente, Orsine; Atallah, Álvaro Nagib

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is the most common type of valvular heart disease in the USA and Europe. Aortic valve stenosis is considered similar to atherosclerotic disease. Some studies have evaluated statins for aortic valve stenosis. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of statins in aortic valve stenosis. Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS - IBECS, Web of Science and CINAHL Plus. These databases were searched from their inception to 24 November 2015. We also searched trials in registers for ongoing trials. We used no language restrictions.Selection criteria: Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) comparing statins alone or in association with other systemic drugs to reduce cholesterol levels versus placebo or usual care. Data collection and analysis: Primary outcomes were severity of aortic valve stenosis (evaluated by echocardiographic criteria: mean pressure gradient, valve area and aortic jet velocity), freedom from valve replacement and death from cardiovascular cause. Secondary outcomes were hospitalization for any reason, overall mortality, adverse events and patient quality of life.Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. The GRADE methodology was employed to assess the quality of result findings and the GRADE profiler (GRADEPRO) was used to import data from Review Manager 5.3 to create a 'Summary of findings' table. We included four RCTs with 2360 participants comparing statins (1185 participants) with placebo (1175 participants). We found low-quality evidence for our primary outcome of severity of aortic valve stenosis, evaluated by mean pressure gradient (mean difference (MD) -0.54, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.88 to 0.80; participants = 1935; studies = 2), valve area (MD -0.07, 95% CI -0.28 to 0.14; participants = 127; studies = 2), and aortic jet velocity (MD -0.06, 95% CI -0.26 to 0

  10. Circumferential ascending aortic strain and aortic stenosis.

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    Teixeira, Rogério; Moreira, Nádia; Baptista, Rui; Barbosa, António; Martins, Rui; Castro, Graça; Providência, Luís

    2013-07-01

    Two-dimensional speckle tracking (2D-ST) echocardiography for the measurement of circumferential ascending thoracic aortic strain (CAAS) in the context of aortic stenosis (AS) is not elucidated. Purpose This study assesses the thoracic ascending aortic deformation using 2D-ST echocardiography in AS patients. Population and methods Forty-five consecutive patients with an aortic valvular area (AVA) ≤0.85 cm(2)/m(2) were included. Regarding aortic deformation, the global peak CAAS was the parameter used, and an average of six segments of arterial wall deformation was calculated. The corrected CAAS was calculated as the global CAAS/pulse pressure (PP). Aortic stiffness (β2) index was assessed according to ln(Ps/Pd)/CAAS. The sample was stratified according to the stroke volume index (SVI) as: Group A (low flow, SVI ≤35 mL/m(2); n = 19) and Group B (normal flow, SVI >35 mL/m(2); n = 26). The mean age was 76.8 ± 10.3 years, 53.3% were male, the mean indexed AVA was 0.43 ± 0.15 cm(2)/m(2), and the mean CAAS was 6.3 ± 3.0%. The CAAS was predicted by SVI (β = 0.31, P < 0.01) and by valvulo-arterial impedance (Zva). The corrected CAAS was correlated with the M-mode guided aortic stiffness index (β1) (r = -0.39, P < 0.01), and was predicted by SVI, Zva, and systemic arterial compliance (β = 0.15, P < 0.01). The β2 index was significantly higher for the low-flow patients (16.1 ± 4.8 vs. 9.8 ± 5.3, P < 0.01), and was predicted by SVI (β -0.58, P < 0.01) and PP (β = 0.17, P < 0.01). Global CAAS was more accurate to predict low flow than Zva, systolic function and systemic vascular resistance. In patients with moderate-to-severe aortic stenosis, SVI and LV afterload-related variables were the most important determinants of 2S-ST global CAAS.

  11. Supravalvular aortic stenosis with sudden cardiac death

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    Pradeep Vaideeswar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death (SCD most commonly results from previously undiagnosed congenital, acquired, or hereditary cardiac diseases. Congenital aortic valvular, subvalvular, and supravalvular disease with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction is an important preventable cause of sudden death. This report documents sudden death presumably due to acute myocardial ischemia in a young male with an undiagnosed supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS due to a rare association of isolation of coronary sinuses of Valsalva. Congenital supravalvular pulmonary stenosis and mitral valvular dysplasia were also present.

  12. Severe aortic valve stenosis and nosebleed

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    Schoedel, Johannes; Obergfell, Achim; Maass, Alexander H.; Schodel, Johannes

    2007-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is known to be associated with loss of high molecular von Willebrand multimers. This can lead to gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with gastrointestinal angiodysplasia, the Heyde syndrome. Here we present a case of anaemia and severe epistaxis associated with acquired von

  13. Indexing aortic valve area by body surface area increases the prevalence of severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jander, Nikolaus; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa; Bahlmann, Edda

    2014-01-01

    To account for differences in body size in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is divided by body surface area (BSA) to calculate indexed AVA (AVAindex). Cut-off values for severe stenosis are......To account for differences in body size in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is divided by body surface area (BSA) to calculate indexed AVA (AVAindex). Cut-off values for severe stenosis are...

  14. Global Strain in Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

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    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbæk, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: -Global longitudinal systolic strain (GLS) is often reduced in aortic stenosis despite normal ejection fraction. The importance of reduced preoperative GLS on long-term outcome after aortic valve replacement (AVR) is unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: -A total of 125 patients with severe...... quartile 49% (n=15), p=0.04. Patients with increased age, left ventricular hypertrophy and left atrial dilatation were at increased risk. In Cox regression analysis after correcting for standard risk factors and ejection fraction, GLS was found to be significantly associated with cardiac morbidity...

  15. Adjusting parameters of aortic valve stenosis severity by body size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minners, Jan; Gohlke-Baerwolf, Christa; Kaufmann, Beat A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adjustment of cardiac dimensions by measures of body size appears intuitively convincing and in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is commonly adjusted by body surface area (BSA). However, there is little evidence to support such an approach. OBJECTIVE: To identify...... the adequate measure of body size for the adjustment of aortic stenosis severity. METHODS: Parameters of aortic stenosis severity (jet velocity, mean pressure gradient (MPG) and AVA) and measures of body size (height, weight, BSA and body mass index (BMI)) were analysed in 2843 consecutive patients with aortic...... stenosis (jet velocity ≥2.5 m/s) and related to outcomes in a second cohort of 1525 patients from the Simvastatin/Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study. RESULTS: Whereas jet velocity and MPG were independent of body size, AVA was significantly correlated with height, weight, BSA and BMI (Pearson...

  16. Intensive lipid lowering with simvastatin and ezetimibe in aortic stenosis

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    Rossebø, Anne B; Pedersen, Terje R; Boman, Kurt

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hyperlipidemia has been suggested as a risk factor for stenosis of the aortic valve, but lipid-lowering studies have had conflicting results. METHODS: We conducted a randomized, double-blind trial involving 1873 patients with mild-to-moderate, asymptomatic aortic stenosis. The patient...

  17. Automated quantitative 3-dimensional modeling of the aortic valve and root by 3-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography in normals, aortic regurgitation, and aortic stenosis: comparison to computed tomography in normals and clinical implications.

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    Calleja, Anna; Thavendiranathan, Paaladinesh; Ionasec, Razvan Ioan; Houle, Helene; Liu, Shizhen; Voigt, Ingmar; Sai Sudhakar, Chittoor; Crestanello, Juan; Ryan, Thomas; Vannan, Mani A

    2013-01-01

    We tested the ability of a novel automated 3-dimensional (3D) algorithm to model and quantify the aortic root from 3D transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and computed tomographic (CT) data. We compared the quantitative parameters obtained by automated modeling from 3D TEE (n=20) and CT data (n=20) to those made by 2D TEE and targeted 2D from 3D TEE and CT in patients without valve disease (normals). We also compared the automated 3D TEE measurements in severe aortic stenosis (n=14), dilated root without aortic regurgitation (n=15), and dilated root with aortic regurgitation (n=20). The automated 3D TEE sagittal annular diameter was significantly greater than the 2D TEE measurements (P=0.004). This was also true for the 3D TEE and CT coronal annular diameters (P0.05) in normals, but these were significantly different (P0.05), but all 3 were significantly different compared with the abnormal group (P<0.05). The automated 3D annulus commissure coronary ostia distances in normals showed significant difference between 3D TEE and CT (P<0.05); also, these parameters by automated 3D TEE were significantly different in abnormal (P<0.05). Finally, the automated 3D measurements showed excellent reproducibility for all parameters. Automated quantitative 3D modeling of the aortic root from 3D TEE or CT data is technically feasible and provides unique data that may aid surgical and transcatheter interventions.

  18. The Effects of Fetuin-A Levels on Aortic Stenosis

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    Ahmet Tutuncu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We aimed to investigate the relation between fetuin-A and calcific aortic stenosis in non diabetic patients whose renal function were normal. Material and Method: 26 patients followed for aortic stenosis by our cardiology clinic for outpatients and 25 voluntary healthy subjects were included in the study. The fetuin%u2013A levels were measured from the venous blood samples of the study population. All patients underwent transthorasic echocardiography, the aortic valvular area and left ventricular parameters of the patients were measured. Results: The average age of the patients in degenerative aortic stenosis group was significantly higher than the control group. The parameters related to aortic valve were naturally higher in patients with dejenerative aortic valve. There was no siginificant difference between two groups about fetuin-A levels. Further more there was no significant relation between fetuin-a levels and aortic stenosis severity. Discussion: In conclusion fetuin-A is a multifunctional glycoprotein that plays important role in systemic calcification inhibition and valvular calcification. Finally aortic stenosis is an active process and larger studies that investigate the relation between fetuin-a and the progression and prognosis of aortic stenosis are needed.

  19. Subcoronary versus supracoronary aortic stenosis. an experimental evaluation

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    Hasenkam J Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Valvular aortic stenosis is the most common cause of left ventricular hypertrophy due to gradually increasing pressure work. As the stenosis develop the left ventricular hypertrophy may lead to congestive heart failure, increased risk of perioperative complications and also increased risk of sudden death. A functional porcine model imitating the pathophysiological nature of valvular aortic stenosis is very much sought after in order to study the geometrical and pathophysiological changes of the left ventricle, timing of surgery and also pharmacological therapy in this patient group. Earlier we developed a porcine model for aortic stenosis based on supracoronary aortic banding, this model may not completely imitate the pathophysiological changes that occurs when valvular aortic stenosis is present including the coronary blood flow. It would therefore be desirable to optimize this model according to the localization of the stenosis. Methods In 20 kg pigs subcoronary (n = 8, supracoronary aortic banding (n = 8 or sham operation (n = 4 was preformed via a left lateral thoracotomy. The primary endpoint was left ventricular wall thickness; secondary endpoints were heart/body weight ratio and the systolic/diastolic blood flow ratio in the left anterior descending coronary. Statistical evaluation by oneway anova and unpaired t-test. Results Sub- and supracoronary banding induce an equal degree of left ventricular hypertrophy compared with the control group. The coronary blood flow ratio was slightly but not significantly higher in the supracoronary group (ratio = 0.45 compared with the two other groups (subcoronary ratio = 0.36, control ratio = 0.34. Conclusions A human pathophysiologically compatible porcine model for valvular aortic stenosis was developed by performing subcoronary aortic banding. Sub- and supracoronary aortic banding induce an equal degree of left ventricular hypertrophy. This model may be valid for experimental

  20. Subcoronary versus supracoronary aortic stenosis. An experimental evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Mette; Hasenkam, J Michael; Jensen, Henrik; Sloth, Erik

    2011-08-22

    Valvular aortic stenosis is the most common cause of left ventricular hypertrophy due to gradually increasing pressure work. As the stenosis develop the left ventricular hypertrophy may lead to congestive heart failure, increased risk of perioperative complications and also increased risk of sudden death. A functional porcine model imitating the pathophysiological nature of valvular aortic stenosis is very much sought after in order to study the geometrical and pathophysiological changes of the left ventricle, timing of surgery and also pharmacological therapy in this patient group. Earlier we developed a porcine model for aortic stenosis based on supracoronary aortic banding, this model may not completely imitate the pathophysiological changes that occurs when valvular aortic stenosis is present including the coronary blood flow. It would therefore be desirable to optimize this model according to the localization of the stenosis. In 20 kg pigs subcoronary (n = 8), supracoronary aortic banding (n = 8) or sham operation (n = 4) was preformed via a left lateral thoracotomy. The primary endpoint was left ventricular wall thickness; secondary endpoints were heart/body weight ratio and the systolic/diastolic blood flow ratio in the left anterior descending coronary. Statistical evaluation by oneway anova and unpaired t-test. Sub- and supracoronary banding induce an equal degree of left ventricular hypertrophy compared with the control group. The coronary blood flow ratio was slightly but not significantly higher in the supracoronary group (ratio = 0.45) compared with the two other groups (subcoronary ratio = 0.36, control ratio = 0.34). A human pathophysiologically compatible porcine model for valvular aortic stenosis was developed by performing subcoronary aortic banding. Sub- and supracoronary aortic banding induce an equal degree of left ventricular hypertrophy. This model may be valid for experimental investigations of aortic valve stenosis but studies of left

  1. Noncardiac Surgery in Patients With Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Charlotte; Jørgensen, Mads Emil; Martinsson, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    (MACE) and all-cause mortality were investigated in a contemporary Danish cohort. HYPOTHESIS: AS is not an independent risk factor for adverse outcomes in noncardiac surgery. METHODS: All patients with and without diagnosed AS who underwent noncardiac surgery in 2005 to 2011 were identified through......BACKGROUND: Past research has identified aortic stenosis (AS) as a major risk factor for adverse outcomes in noncardiac surgery; however, more contemporary studies have questioned the grave prognosis. To further our understanding of this, the risks of a 30-day major adverse cardiovascular event...... nationwide administrative registers. AS patients (n = 2823; mean age, 75.5 years, 53% female) were matched with patients without AS (n = 2823) on propensity score for AS and surgery type. RESULTS: In elective surgery, MACE (ie, nonfatal myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, or cardiovascular death...

  2. Predictors of exercise capacity and symptoms in severe aortic stenosis

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    Dalsgaard, Morten; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Pecini, Redi

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the association between invasive and non-invasive estimates of left ventricular (LV) filling pressure and exercise capacity, in order to find new potential candidates for risk markers in severe aortic valve stenosis (AS).......This study investigated the association between invasive and non-invasive estimates of left ventricular (LV) filling pressure and exercise capacity, in order to find new potential candidates for risk markers in severe aortic valve stenosis (AS)....

  3. Retrospective analysis of co-occurrence of congenital aortic stenosis and pulmonary artery stenosis in dogs.

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    Kander, M; Pasławska, U; Staszczyk, M; Cepiel, A; Pasławski, R; Mazur, G; Noszczyk-Nowak, A

    2015-01-01

    The study has focused on the retrospective analysis of cases of coexisting congenital aortic stenosis (AS) and pulmonary artery stenosis (PS) in dogs. The research included 5463 dogs which were referred for cardiological examination (including clinical examination, ECG and echocardiography) between 2004 and 2014. Aortic stenosis and PS stenosis were detected in 31 dogs. This complex defect was the most commonly diagnosed in Boxers - 7 dogs, other breeds were represented by: 4 cross-breed dogs, 2 Bichon Maltais, 3 Miniature Pinschers, 2 Bernese Mountain Dogs, 2 French Bulldogs, and individuals of following breeds: Bichon Frise, Bull Terrier, Czech Wolfdog, German Shepherd, Hairless Chinese Crested Dog, Miniature Schnauzer, Pug, Rottweiler, Samoyed, West Highland White Terrier and Yorkshire Terrier. In all the dogs, the murmurs could be heard, graded from 2 to 5 (on a scale of 1-6). Besides, in 9 cases other congenital defects were diagnosed: patent ductus arteriosus, mitral valve dysplasia, pulmonary or aortic valve regurgitation, tricuspid valve dysplasia, ventricular or atrial septal defect. The majority of the dogs suffered from pulmonary valvular stenosis (1 dog had supravalvular pulmonary artery stenosis) and subvalvular aortic stenosis (2 dogs had valvular aortic stenosis). Conclusions and clinical relevance - co-occurrence of AS and PS is the most common complex congenital heart defect. Boxer breed was predisposed to this complex defect. It was found that coexisting AS and PS is more common in male dogs and the degree of PS and AS was mostly similar.

  4. Aortic valvuloplasty of calcific aortic stenosis with monofoil and trefoil balloon catheters: practical considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Plante (Sylvain); M.J.B.M. van den Brand (Marcel); L.C.P. van Veen; C. di Mario (Carlo); C.E. Essed; K.J. Beatt (Kevin); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractIn order to evaluate the relation between balloon design (monofoil, trefoil) and valvular configuration, experimental aortic valvuloplasty was performed in four post-mortem hearts with calcific aortic stenosis of various morphology. The degree of obstruction of the aortic orifice was

  5. Ascending aortic diameters in congenital aortic stenosis: cardiac magnetic resonance versus transthoracic echocardiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linde, D. van der; Rossi, A. de; Yap, S.C.; McGhie, J.S.; Bosch, A.E. van den; Kirschbaum, S.W.; Russo, B.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Moelker, A.; Krestin, G.P.; Geuns, R.J. van; Roos-Hesselink, J.W.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/BACKGROUND: Congenital aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common obstructive left heart lesion in the young adult population and often complicated by aortic dilatation. Our objective was to evaluate accuracy of aortic imaging with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) compared with cardiac

  6. Acute Aortic Arch Perforation During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Bicuspid Aortic Stenosis and a Gothic Aortic Arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan-Iturbe, Oscar; Sawaya, Fadi J; Bieliauskas, Gintautas; Chow, Danny H F; De Backer, Ole; Søndergaard, Lars

    2017-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has evolved from a novel technology to an established therapy for high/intermediate-risk patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS). Although TAVR is used to treat bicuspid severe AS, the large randomized trials typically excluded bicuspid AS because of its unique anatomic features. This case report describes an acute aortic perforation during delivery of a transcatheter heart valve to treat a severe bicuspid AS with a "gothic aortic arch"; more careful evaluation of the preprocedural multislice computed tomographic scan would have unveiled a sharply angulated aortic arch. This life-threatening complication was successfully treated by thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Asymmetric septal hypertrophy - a marker of hypertension in aortic stenosis (a SEAS substudy)

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    Tuseth, Nora; Cramariuc, Dana; Rieck, Ashild E

    2010-01-01

    Some patients with aortic stenosis develop asymmetric septal hypertrophy (ASH) that may influence the surgical approach and is associated with higher perioperative morbidity. The aim of this analysis was to characterize further this subtype of aortic stenosis patients.......Some patients with aortic stenosis develop asymmetric septal hypertrophy (ASH) that may influence the surgical approach and is associated with higher perioperative morbidity. The aim of this analysis was to characterize further this subtype of aortic stenosis patients....

  8. Prognostic importance of atrial fibrillation in asymptomatic aortic stenosis

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    Greve, Anders; Gerdts, Eva; Boman, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The frequency and prognostic importance of atrial fibrillation (AF) in asymptomatic mild-to-moderate aortic stenosis (AS) has not been well described. METHODS: Clinical examination, electrocardiography and echocardiography were obtained in asymptomatic patients with mild-to-moderate A......BACKGROUND: The frequency and prognostic importance of atrial fibrillation (AF) in asymptomatic mild-to-moderate aortic stenosis (AS) has not been well described. METHODS: Clinical examination, electrocardiography and echocardiography were obtained in asymptomatic patients with mild......-to-moderate AS and preserved left ventricular (LV) systolic function, randomized to simvastatin/ezetimibe combination vs. placebo in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study. At inclusion, AF was categorized as episodic or longstanding. Rhythm change was assessed on annual in-study electrocardiograms...

  9. [Unicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis Combined with Aortic Coarctation;Report of a Case].

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    Kubota, Takehiro; Wakasa, Satoru; Shingu, Yasushige; Matsui, Yoshiro

    2016-06-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve in an adult is extremely rare. In addition, 90% of the patients with aortic coarctation are reported to die before the age 50. A 60-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for further examination of exertional dyspnea which had begun one year before. She had been under medical treatment for hypertension since early thirties, and had been also diagnosed with moderate aortic stenosis at 50 years of age. She was at 1st diagnosed with aortic coarctation combined with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis. The aortic valve was then found unicuspid and was replaced under cardiopulmonary bypass with perfusion to both the ascending aorta and the femoral artery. Repair of aortic coarctation was performed 3 months later through left thoracotomy without extracorporeal circulation due to the rich collateral circulation. She had no postoperative complications, and hypertension as well as ankle-brachial index improved to the normal levels.

  10. Prognostic importance of atrial fibrillation in asymptomatic aortic stenosis: The Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders M; Gerdts, Eva; Boman, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The frequency and prognostic importance of atrial fibrillation (AF) in asymptomatic mild-to-moderate aortic stenosis (AS) has not been well described. METHODS: Clinical examination, electrocardiography and echocardiography were obtained in asymptomatic patients with mild-to-moderate A......BACKGROUND: The frequency and prognostic importance of atrial fibrillation (AF) in asymptomatic mild-to-moderate aortic stenosis (AS) has not been well described. METHODS: Clinical examination, electrocardiography and echocardiography were obtained in asymptomatic patients with mild......-to-moderate AS and preserved left ventricular (LV) systolic function, randomized to simvastatin/ezetimibe combination vs. placebo in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study. At inclusion, AF was categorized as episodic or longstanding. Rhythm change was assessed on annual in-study electrocardiograms...

  11. Systematic review of the outcome of aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharma, Umesh C.; Barenbrug, Paul; Pokharel, Saraswati; Dassen, Willem R. M.; Pinto, Yigal M.; Maessen, Jos G.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After the establishment of aortic valve replacement procedure for aortic stenosis, there are heterogeneous studies and varying reports on outcome. An analysis that compares individual studies to summarize the overall effect is still lacking. This study systematically analyzes the change

  12. Effect of candesartan treatment on left ventricular remodeling after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbaek, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K

    2010-01-01

    In hypertension, angiotensin receptor blockers can augment regression of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy. It is not known whether this also is the case after aortic valve replacement (AVR) for severe aortic stenosis (AS). To test the hypothesis that treatment with candesartan in addition...

  13. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With Early- and New-Generation Devices in Bicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoon, Sung Han; Lefèvre, Thierry; Ahn, Jung Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies have evaluated the clinical outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis (AS). Particularly, limited data exist comparing the results of TAVR with new-generation devices versus early-generation devices.  Objective...

  14. Outcomes in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Bicuspid Versus Tricuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoon, Sung-Han; Bleiziffer, Sabine; De Backer, Ole

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is being increasingly performed in patients with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis (AS). OBJECTIVES: This study sought to compare the procedural and clinical outcomes in patients with bicuspid versus tricuspid AS from the Bicuspid AS TAVR mul...

  15. Impact of hypertension on left ventricular structure in patients with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis (a SEAS substudy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rieck, Ashild E; Cramariuc, Dana; Staal, Eva M

    2010-01-01

    Both hypertension and aortic valve stenosis induce left ventricular hypertrophy. However, less is known about the influence of concomitant hypertension on left ventricular structure in patients with aortic valve stenosis.......Both hypertension and aortic valve stenosis induce left ventricular hypertrophy. However, less is known about the influence of concomitant hypertension on left ventricular structure in patients with aortic valve stenosis....

  16. Refractory pulmonary edema secondary to severe aortic valvular stenosis - aortic valvuloplasty as bridge therapy to surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago, Salazar; Hanna, Franklin; Capasso, Aminta

    2009-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is a progressive disease; when it is severe and symptomatic has a bleak prognosis that affects adversely the patient survival. In these cases, the treatment of choice is valve replacement surgery that under certain circumstances can bear a huge risk that forces the physician to consider less aggressive management alternatives to solve the problem. The case of a 65 years old male with severe aortic valve stenosis is reported. He developed pulmonary edema refractory to medical treatment that was solved by aortic valvuloplasty as bridge therapy to surgery.

  17. Tissue Velocities and Myocardial Deformation in Asymptomatic and Symptomatic Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Helle Gervig; Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Hassager, Christian

    2015-01-01

    was to compare velocity (color Doppler tissue imaging) and deformation (two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography) in relation to global and regional longitudinal function in asymptomatic and severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. METHODS: In a cross-sectional design, 231 patients with aortic stenosis were...... divided into four groups: asymptomatic moderate aortic stenosis (aortic valve area, 1.0-1.5 cm(2); n = 38), asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis (aortic valve area reduced (... to be symptomatic (odds ratio, 4.97; 95% CI, 2.6-9.4; P velocity...

  18. Effects of rosuvastatin on progression of stenosis in adult patients with congenital aortic stenosis (PROCAS Trial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linde, D. van der; Yap, S.C.; Dijk, A.P. van; Budts, W.; Pieper, P.G.; Burgh, P.H. van der; Mulder, B.J.; Witsenburg, M.; Cuypers, J.A.; Lindemans, J.; Takkenberg, J.J.; Roos-Hesselink, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    Recent trials have failed to show that statin therapy halts the progression of calcific aortic stenosis (AS). We hypothesized that statin therapy in younger patients with congenital AS would be more beneficial, because the valve is less calcified. In the present double-blind, placebo-controlled

  19. DEGENERATIVE AORTIC STENOSIS: PATHOGENESIS AND NEW PRINCIPLES OF TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Andropova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To reveal of markers of inflammation and progression of calcification in patients with degenerative aortic stenosis (DAS. Material and methods. A single-stage study was done in 85 patients with degenerative calcification of aortic valve (42 patients with DAS and 43 patients without DAS. The techniques for assessing the severity of aortic valve calcification included ultrasonic diagnostics and multislice spiral computed tomography. Markers of inflammation and lipid profile were investigated.    Results. Higher blood levels of total holesterol and holesterol of low density lipoprotein were revealed in patients with DAS in comparison with patients without DAS. They also had higher levels of inflammation markers: C-reactive protein and interleukin-6. There were significant correlations between DAS severity, lipid metabolism disturbances and inflammation markers. Conclusion. Atherogenesis and inflammation may have pathogenic influence on progression of aortic valve calcification and DAS development by lipid infiltration and endothelium cells damage.

  20. Aortic root geometry in aortic stenosis patients (a SEAS substudy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahlmann, Edda; Nienaber, Christoph A; Cramariuc, Dana

    2011-01-01

    with asymptomatic AS (mean age 67 years, 39% women) in the Simvastatin Ezetimibe in AS study were used. The inner aortic diameter was measured at four levels: annulus, sinus of Valsalva, sinotubular junction and supracoronary, and sinus height as the annulo-junctional distance. Analyses were based on vendor...... diameters (all P SEAS study, 27% of women and 19% of men did not have aortic root geometry fulfilling current requirements for TAVI....

  1. Two-Year Outcomes in Patients With Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis Randomized to Transcatheter Versus Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lars; Steinbrüchel, Daniel Andreas; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Nordic Aortic Valve Intervention (NOTION) trial was the first to randomize all-comers with severe native aortic valve stenosis to either transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) with the CoreValve self-expanding bioprosthesis or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR...

  2. Valve Calcification in Aortic Stenosis: Etiology and Diagnostic Imaging Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Manuela Izquierdo-Gómez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aortic stenosis is the most common valvulopathy in the Western world. Its prevalence has increased significantly in recent years due to population aging; hence, up to 8% of westerners above the age of 84 now have severe aortic stenosis (Lindroos et al., 1993. This causes increased morbidity and mortality and therein lies the importance of adequate diagnosis and stratification of the degree of severity which allows planning the best therapeutic option in each case. Long understood as a passive age-related degenerative process, it is now considered a rather more complex entity involving mechanisms and factors similar to those of atherosclerosis (Stewart et al., 1997. In this review, we summarize the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the onset and progression of the disease and analyze the current role of cardiac imaging techniques for diagnosis.

  3. Increased risk of aortic valve stenosis in patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalid, Usman; Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease including atherosclerosis. The pathogenesis of aortic valve stenosis (AS) also includes an inflammatory component. We therefore investigated the risk of AS in patients with psoriasis compared...... with mild and severe disease, respectively. CONCLUSION: In a nationwide cohort, psoriasis was associated with a disease severity-dependent increased risk of AS. The mechanisms underlying this novel finding require further study....

  4. Temporal trends in the incidence and prognosis of aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsson, Andreas; Li, Xinjun; Andersson, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aging of Western populations is expected to result in increasing occurrence of aortic stenosis (AS), but data are limited. Recent studies have reported declining incidence and mortality for other major heart diseases. We aimed to study temporal trends in the incidence and prognosis......-cause and cardiovascular-related mortality. The age-adjusted incidence of AS in Sweden declined from 15.0 to 11.4 in men and 9.8 to 7.1 in women per 100 000 between 1989 to 1991 and 2007 to 2009, and the median age at diagnosis increased by 4 years for both men and women. The age- and sex-adjusted relative risk of 1...... that improved risk factor control and cardiovascular therapy, combined with increased use of aortic valve replacement in the elderly and reduced perioperative mortality in aortic valve replacement, have translated into favorable effects for AS....

  5. Association of ischemic heart disease to global and regional longitudinal strain in asymptomatic aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Helle Gervig; Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Hassager, Christian

    2015-01-01

    independent of aortic valve area, stroke volume index, pro-BNP, valvulo-arterial impedance, body mass index and heart rate. In linear regression models with both aortic valve area and significant coronary stenosis, apical (p

  6. Combined surgical and catheter-based treatment of extensive thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Lönn, Lars; Søndergaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    valve stenosis (AS) who are considered at high risk for surgical aortic valve replacement. In this report, we describe the combined surgical and catheter-based treatment of an extensive TAA and AS. To our knowledge, this is the first report of hybrid TAA repair combined with TAVR....

  7. Comparison of ascending aortic cohesion between patients with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis and regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedik, Jaroslav; Dohle, Daniel S; Wendt, Daniel; Pilarczyk, Kevin; Price, Vivien; Mourad, Fanar; Zykina, Elizaveta; Stebner, Ferdinand; Tsagakis, Konstantinos; Jakob, Heinz

    2014-12-01

    A bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is commonly associated with aortic wall abnormalities, including dilatation of the ascending aorta and increased potential for aortic dissection. We compared the mechanical properties of the aortic wall of BAV patients with aortic valve stenosis (AS) and regurgitation (AR) using a dissectometer, a device mimicking transverse aortic wall shear stress. Between March 2010 and February 2013, 85 consecutive patients with bicuspid aortic valve undergoing open aortic valve replacement at our institution were prospectively enrolled, presenting either with stenosis (Group 1, n = 58) or regurgitation (Group 2, n = 27). Aortic wall cohesion measured by the dissectometer (Parameters P7, P8 and P9), aortic diameters measured by transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE) and thickness of the wall were compared. One patient presenting with the Marfan syndrome was excluded from the study. Patients with aortic regurgitation were significantly younger (48.2 ± 15.8 vs 64.7 ± 10.7, P group (27.3 ± 3.6 vs 25.5 ± 2.4, P = 0.008; 41.1 ± 7.7 vs 36.7 ± 8.0, P = 0.011; 37.6 ± 9.7 vs 33.8 ± 9.1, P = 0.049). The ascending aortic diameter did not differ (43.2 ± 10.6 vs 40.3 ± 9.1, P = 0.292). Patients with AR had significantly worse aortic cohesion, as measured by shear stress testing (P7: 97.2 ± 45.0 vs 145.5 ± 84.9, P = 0.015; P8: 2.00 ± 0.65 vs 3.82 ± 1.56, P cohesion, a thicker aortic wall and a larger aortic root in patients presenting with bicuspid AR compared with patients with AS. These results suggest that bicuspid AR represents a different disease process with possible involvement of the ascending aorta, as demonstrated by dissectometer examination. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  8. Acute Right Coronary Ostial Stenosis during Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarwar Umran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of acute right coronary artery stenosis developing in a patient undergoing aortic valve replacement. We present a case report with a brief overview of the literature relating to coronary artery occlusion associated with cardiac valve surgery - the theories and treatments are discussed. A 85 year-old female was admitted under the care of the cardiothoracic team with signs and symptoms of heart failure. Investigations, including cardiac echocardiography and coronary angiography, indicated a critical aortic valve stenosis. Intraoperative right ventricular failure ensued post aortic valve replacement. Subsequent investigations revealed an acute occlusion of the proximal right coronary artery with resultant absence of distal flow supplying the right ventricle. An immediate right coronary artery bypass procedure was performed with resolution of the right ventricular failure. Subsequent weaning off cardiopulmonary bypass was uneventful and the patient continued to make excellent recovery in the postoperative phase. To our knowledge this is one of the few documented cases of intraoperative acute coronary artery occlusion developing during valve surgery. However, surgeons should be aware of the potential for acute occlusion so that early recognition and rapid intervention can be instituted.

  9. Percutaneous implantation of the first repositionable aortic valve prosthesis in a patient with severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buellesfeld, Lutz; Gerckens, Ulrich; Grube, Eberhard

    2008-04-01

    Percutaneous aortic valve replacement is a new less-invasive alternative for high-risk surgical candidates with aortic stenosis. However, the clinical experience is still limited, and the currently available 'first-generation devices' revealed technical shortcomings, such as lack of repositionability and presence of paravalvular leakages. We report the first-in-man experience with the new self-expanding Lotus Valve prosthesis composed of a nitinol frame with implemented bovine pericardial leaflets which is designed to address these issues, being repositionable and covered by a flexible membrane to seal paravalvular gaps. We implanted this prosthesis in a 93-year old patient presenting with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (valve area: 0.6 cm(2)). Surgical valve replacement had been declined due to comorbidities. We used a retrograde approach for insertion of the 21-French Lotus catheter loaded with the valve prosthesis via surgical cut-down to the external iliac artery. Positioning of the valve was guided by transesophageal echo and supra-aortic angiograms. The prosthesis was successfully inserted and deployed within the calcified native valve. Echocardiography immediately after device deployment showed a significant reduction of the transaortic mean pressure gradient (32 to 9 mmHg; final valve area 1.7 cm(2)) without evidence of residual aortic regurgitation. The postprocedural clinical status improved from NYHA-IV to NYHA-II. These results remained unchanged up to the 3 month follow-up. Successful percutaneous aortic valve replacement can be performed using the new self-expanding and repositionable Lotus valve for treatment of high-risk patients with aortic valve stenosis. Further studies are mandatory to assess device safety and efficacy in larger patient populations. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Circulating matrix metalloproteinase patterns in association with aortic dilatation in bicuspid aortic valve patients with isolated severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongshi; Wu, Boting; Dong, Lili; Wang, Chunsheng; Wang, Xiaolin; Shu, Xianhong

    2016-02-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) exhibits a clinical incline toward aortopathy, in which aberrant tensile and shear stress generated by BAV can induce differential expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their endogenous tissue inhibitors (TIMPs). Whether stenotic BAV, which exhibits additional eccentric high-velocity flow jet upon ascending aorta and further worsens circumferential systolic wall shear stress than BAV with echocardiographically normal aortic valve, can lead to unique plasma MMP/TIMP patterns is still unknown. According to their valvulopathy and aortic dilatation status, 93 BAV patients were included in the present study. Group A (n = 37) and B (n = 28) comprised severely stenotic patients with or without ascending aorta dilatation; Group C (n = 12) and D (n = 16) comprised echocardiographically normal BAV patients with or without ascending aorta dilatation. Plasma MMP/TIMP levels (MMP-1, -2, -3, -8, -9, -10, -13 and TIMP-1, -2, -4) were determined via a multiplex ELISA detection system in a single procedure. Among patients with isolated severe aortic stenosis, plasma levels of MMP-2 and -9 were significantly elevated when ascending aortic dilatation was present (p = 0.001 and p = 0.002, respectively). MMP-2, however, remained as the single elevated plasma component among echocardiographically normal BAV patients with dilated ascending aorta (p = 0.027). Multivariate analysis revealed that MMP-2 and MMP-9 could both serve as independent risk factor for aortic dilatation in the case of isolated severe stenosis (p = 0.003 and p = 0.001, respectively), and MMP-2 in echocardiographically normal patients (p = 0.002). In conclusion, BAV patients with isolated severe aortic stenosis demonstrated a distinct plasma MMP/TIMP pattern, which might be utilized as circulating biomarkers for early detection of aortic dilatation.

  11. Carotid plaque, intima-media thickness, and incident aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsson, Andreas; Östling, Gerd; Persson, Margaretha

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Aortic stenosis (AS) shares risk factors with atherosclerotic vascular disease. Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and plaque may reflect the cumulative damage from exposure to different atherosclerotic risk factors. We examined the relationship of carotid IMT and plaque with incident......-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, C-reactive protein, plaque, and IMT. In contrast, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, height, and leukocyte count were not significantly associated with AS (P>0.05). After adjustments, IMT, plaque, age, smoking, C...

  12. Resting heart rate and risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in asymptomatic aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders M; Bang, Casper N; Berg, Ronan M G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An elevated resting heart rate (RHR) may be an early sign of cardiac failure, but its prognostic value during watchful waiting in asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) is largely unknown. METHODS: RHR was determined by annual ECGs in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS...

  13. Central Sleep Apnea in Patients due to Severe Aortic Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Prinz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available History. We report about the course of central sleep apnea (CSA in 3 patients (70.3±15.2 years with severe aortic stenosis (AS (AVA≤1.0 cm2, NYHA 2.7±1.4. Investigations. Every patient received echocardiography, left/right-heart catheterization, and cardiorespiratory polygraphy before and 6 months after surgical aortic valve replacement (without right-heart catheterization during follow up. Course. Preoperatively all patients demonstrated reduced systolic left ventricular function (EF <55%. They had elevated pulmoraryarterialy pressures and severe CSA. After valve replacement left ventricular function and exercise capacity improved, as well as the severity of CSA. Conclusion. Patients with severe AS can develop CSA, which seems to improve after surgery. Patients with severe AS should be screened for CSA, because CSA might be an additional risk factor and hint that myocardial adaptation is exhausting.

  14. Atypical initial presentation of Takayasu arteritis as isolated supra-valvular aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Yeon; Kim, Hwan Wook

    2016-01-19

    Among the vascular involvements of Takayasu arteritis, a supra-valvular aortic stenosis has been reported very rarely. We report a case of surgically corrected, supra-valvular aortic stenosis caused by Takayasu arteritis. A 32-year-old female was diagnosed with supra-valvular aortic stenosis by transthoracic echocardiography for the evaluation of cardiac murmur with constitutional symptoms. Under the impression of non-familial sporadic type of supra-valvular aortic stenosis, surgical correction was performed. However, after 1 year from the operation, we could know the cause of her disease through the findings of computed tomographic aortography that Takayasu arteritis was suspected. Takayasu arteritis should be considered in adult female patients presenting supra-valvular aortic stenosis with constitutional symptoms, even if no typical features of vascular involvement.

  15. PREVALENCE AND PREDICTORS OF CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE IN SEVERE AORTIC STENOSIS PATIENTS UNDERGOING SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayanapilai Jayaprasad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The present study is to find out the prevalence of CAD in severe Aortic Stenosis (AS patients undergoing aortic valve replacement and the relation between the conventional risk factors and CAD in them. Calcific aortic stenosis is associated with the same risk factors as coronary artery disease. Studies on calcific aortic stenosis and CAD are rarely reported from India. The aim of the study is to find out the predictive value of angina for presence of CAD in severe aortic stenosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS All cases of isolated severe aortic stenosis undergoing CAG before aortic valve replacement were included in the study. Data regarding various risk factors, symptoms, echocardiographic parameters and angiographic profile were collected. RESULTS Among a total of 94 patients who have undergone aortic valve replacement for severe AS 40 (42.6% had CAD. Risk factors like advanced age, hypertension, diabetes and smoking were more in patients with CAD compared to isolate AS. Mean gradient was more in the AS + CAD group compared with AS group. Presence of angina had a sensitivity of 82.5% and specificity of 51.85% for predicting coexisting CAD. CONCLUSION Among severe aortic stenosis, patients undergoing AVR 42.6% of patients had significant obstructive CAD. The conventional risk factors predict presence of coronary artery disease. Angina has got a fairly good sensitivity, but moderate specificity for CAD.

  16. Transcatheter Versus Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Steinbrüchel, Daniel Andreas; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2015-01-01

    clinical trial compared TAVR with surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in an all-comers patient cohort. METHODS: Patients ≥ 70 years old with severe aortic valve stenosis and no significant coronary artery disease were randomized 1:1 to TAVR using a self-expanding bioprosthesis versus SAVR. The primary...... difference in the primary endpoint was found (13.1% vs. 16.3%; p = 0.43 for superiority). The result did not change in the as-treated population. No difference in the rate of cardiovascular death or prosthesis reintervention was found. Compared with SAVR-treated patients, TAVR-treated patients had more...... conduction abnormalities requiring pacemaker implantation, larger improvement in effective orifice area, more total aortic valve regurgitation, and higher New York Heart Association functional class at 1 year. SAVR-treated patients had more major or life-threatening bleeding, cardiogenic shock, acute kidney...

  17. Increased hsCRP is associated with higher risk of aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blyme, Adam; Nielsen, Olav W.; Asferg, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate relations between inflammation and aortic valve stenosis (AS) by measuring high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, at baseline (hsCRP0) and after 1 year (hsCRP1) and exploring associations with aortic valve replacement (AVR). Design We examined 1423 patients from the Simvast......Objective To investigate relations between inflammation and aortic valve stenosis (AS) by measuring high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, at baseline (hsCRP0) and after 1 year (hsCRP1) and exploring associations with aortic valve replacement (AVR). Design We examined 1423 patients from...... the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study. Results During first year of treatment, hsCRP was reduced both in patients later receiving AVR (2.3 [0.9–4.9] to 1.8 [0.8–5.4] mg/l, p regression analyses, hsCRP1...

  18. Assessing Optimal Blood Pressure in Patients With Asymptomatic Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Olav W; Sajadieh, Ahmad; Sabbah, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence for treating hypertension in patients with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis is scarce. We used data from the SEAS trial (Simvastatin Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis) to assess what blood pressure (BP) would be optimal. METHODS: A total of 1767 patients with asymptomatic aortic...... stenosis and no manifest atherosclerotic disease were analyzed. Outcomes were all-cause mortality, cardiovascular death, heart failure, stroke, myocardial infarction, and aortic valve replacement. BP was analyzed in Cox models as the cumulative average of serially measured BP and a time-varying covariate.......039). CONCLUSIONS: Optimal BP seems to be systolic BP of 130 to 139 mm Hg and diastolic BP of 70 to 90 mm Hg in these patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis and no manifest atherosclerotic disease or diabetes mellitus. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT...

  19. Recognition and treatment of outflow tract stenosis during and after endovascular exclusion for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Qingsheng; Jing Zaiping; Zhao Zhiqing; Bao Junmin; Zhao Jun; Feng Xiang; Feng Rui; Huang Sheng

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the cognition and treatment of outflow tract stenosis in and after endovascular exclusion for abdominal aortic aneurysm. Methods: From Mar 1997 to Oct 2002, in 136 patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysm endovascular exclusion, 8 patients had outflow tract stenosis during the operation, and 3 patients had outflow tract stenosis after operation. The stenosis of 5 patients occurred at the crotch of the graft-stent. PTA was done in 7 patients and stents were placed in stenotic segment in 2 patients. 2 patients were treated with crossover operation. Results: Following up 1 month to 2 years, all patients have no lower limbs ischemia. Conclusions: The diagnosis of outflow tract stenosis during and after abdominal endovascular exclusion for aortic aneurysm must be in time. The treatment should be according to the different causes of stenosis

  20. Long-term Follow-up After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation for Severe Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Pablo; Moreno, Raúl; Calvo, Luis; Sánchez-Recalde, Ángel; Jiménez-Valero, Santiago; Galeote, Guillermo; López-Fernández, Teresa; Ramírez, Ulises; Riera, Luis; Plaza, Ignacio; Moreno, Isidro; Mesa, José María; López-Sendón, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is used as an alternative to surgical valve replacement in patients with severe aortic stenosis who are considered high-surgical-risk or inoperable. Two of the main areas of uncertainty in this field are valve durability and long-term survival. This prospective single-center registry study from a tertiary hospital included all consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous aortic valve implantation between 2008 and 2012. Clinical follow-up lasted a minimum of 2.5 years and a maximum of 6.5 years. Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 definitions were used. Seventy-nine patients were included, with an immediate success rate of 94.9%. The median survival was 47.6 months (95% confidence intervals, 37.4-57.9 months), ie, 4 years. One quarter of deaths occurred in the first month, and most were of cardiovascular cause. After the first month, most deaths were due to noncardiovascular causes. The mean values of valve gradients did not increase during follow-up. The cumulative rate of prosthetic valve dysfunction was 15.3%, with no cases of repeat valve replacement. Half of the patients with aortic stenosis who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation were alive 4 years after the procedure. There was a 15.3% prosthetic valve dysfunction rate in cumulative follow-up, with no cases of repeat valve replacement. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Echocardiographic aortic valve calcification and outcomes in women and men with aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomassen, Henrik K; Cioffi, Giovanni; Gerdts, Eva; Einarsen, Eigir; Midtbø, Helga Bergljot; Mancusi, Costantino; Cramariuc, Dana

    2017-10-01

    Sex differences in risk factors of aortic valve calcification (AVC) by echocardiography have not been reported from a large prospective study in aortic stenosis (AS). AVC was assessed using a prognostically validated visual score and grouped into none/mild or moderate/severe AVC in 1725 men and women with asymptomatic AS in the Simvastatin Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study. The severity of AS was assessed by the energy loss index (ELI) taking pressure recovery in the aortic root into account. More men than women had moderate/severe AVC at baseline despite less severe AS by ELI (pAVC at baseline was independently associated with lower aortic compliance and more severe AS in both sexes, and with increased high-sensitive C reactive protein (hs-CRP) only in men (all pAVC at baseline was associated with a 2.5-fold (95% CI 1.64 to 3.80) higher hazard rate of major cardiovascular events in women, and a 2.2-fold higher hazard rate in men (95% CI 1.54 to 3.17) (both pAVC at baseline also predicted a 1.8-fold higher hazard rate of all-cause mortality in men (95% CI 1.04 to 3.06, pAVC scored by echocardiography has sex-specific characteristics in AS. Moderate/severe AVC is associated with higher cardiovascular morbidity in both sexes, and with higher all-cause mortality in men. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00092677. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Longitudinal strain predicts left ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis and preserved left ventricular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelsomino, Sandro; Lucà, Fabiana; Parise, Orlando; Lorusso, Roberto; Rao, Carmelo Massimiliano; Vizzardi, Enrico; Gensini, Gian Franco; Maessen, Jos G

    2013-11-01

    We explored the influence of global longitudinal strain (GLS) measured with two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography on left ventricular mass regression (LVMR) in patients with pure aortic stenosis (AS) and normal left ventricular function undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR). The study population included 83 patients with severe AS (aortic valve area regression (all P regression in patients with pure AS undergoing AVR. Our findings must be confirmed by further larger studies.

  3. Choice of Treatment for Aortic Valve Stenosis in the Era of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Eastern Denmark (2005 to 2015)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Luk, Ngai H V; Olsen, Niels T

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the choice of treatment for severe aortic valve stenosis in the era of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in Eastern Denmark. BACKGROUND: Until the early 21st century, the only therapeutic option for aortic valve stenosis was surgical a...

  4. Severe aortic stenosis in octogenarians: is operation an acceptable alternative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleuze, P; Loisance, D Y; Besnainou, F; Hillion, M L; Aubry, P; Bloch, G; Cachera, J P

    1990-08-01

    From 1981 to 1989, 60 patients more than 80 years of age were referred for operation for severe calcific aortic stenosis. All patients were symptomatic: 13 in New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class II, 28 in class III, and 19 in class IV. The preoperative mean cardiothoracic ratio was 0.58 +/- 0.09; the mean valve area, 0.52 +/- 0.14 cm2; and the mean aortic valve gradient, 62 +/- 18 mm Hg. Left ventricular function was impaired in 30 patients (ejection fraction less than 0.40). Coronary arteriography was performed in 10 patients. Aortic replacement used bioprosthesis in all 60 patients associated with aortocoronary bypass (in 5) and mitral valve replacement (in 1). One-month mortality rate was 28% (17 patients) due to cardiac failure (in 9), pulmonary complications (in 6), and neurological complications (in 2). Early mortality was not correlated with preoperative angina, cardiothoracic ratio, associated operation, and cross-clamping time. It was not obviously correlated with preoperative functional class but correlated positively with urgent operations and with left ventricular function (40% mortality in patients with ejection fraction less than 0.40 versus 16% mortality in others). Hospital morbidity was 68%. Mean hospitalization was 15 +/- 7 days. There were four late deaths. Thirty-nine patients are long-term survivors (3 months to 7 years): 27 in class I, 10 in class II, and 2 in class III due to primary valve failure. The actuarial survival probability is 65% at 1 year and 61% at 5 years. In summary, the good long-term quality of life justifies the high postoperative risk in octogenarians. Early operation before cardiac function impairment improves the results.

  5. Epicardial Adipose Tissue Thickness Independently Predicts Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabadi, Amir A; Kahlert, Heike A; Dykun, Iryna; Balcer, Bastian; Kahlert, Philipp; Rassaf, Tienush

    2017-05-01

    Epicardial fat tissue (EAT) is associated with coronary as well as aortic valve calcification. The study aim was to determine whether EAT thickness is different in patients with and without aortic valve stenosis (AVS). A cohort of 200 consecutive patients with severe AVS and 200 matched patients without AVS were included retrospectively in the study. EAT thickness was quantified, using transthoracic echocardiography, as the space between the epicardial wall of the myocardium and the visceral layer of the pericardium. Unadjusted and risk factor-adjusted logistic regression analysis was used to determine the association of EAT thickness with the presence of AVS. Overall, 400 patients (182 males, 218 females; mean age 79.6 ± 6.5 years) were included in the study. EAT thickness was significantly higher in patients with severe AVS (7.4 ± 0.3 mm versus 5.8 ± 0.2 mm; p EAT by one standard deviation was associated with a two-fold increased occurrence of AVS (OR [95%CI]: 2.10 [1.65-2.68]; p EAT and AVS was independent of BMI (1.78 [1.15-2.75], 2.62 [1.71- 4.02], and 2.22 [1.36- 3.62], for BMI 30kg/ m2, respectively). EAT, in addition to traditional cardiovascular risk factors, significantly improved the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (from 0.70 to 0.76; p = 0.003). EAT thickness is significantly associated with severe AVS, independent of traditional risk factors. While further studies are needed to confirm these results, the present findings support the hypothesis that EAT may influence sclerosis of the aortic valve.

  6. Predictors and progression of aortic stenosis in patients with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ersbøll, Mads; Schulte, Phillip J; Al Enezi, Fawaz

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to characterize the hemodynamic progression of aortic stenosis (AS) in a contemporary unselected cohort of patients with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. Current guidelines recommend echocardiographic surveillance of hemodynamic progression. However, limited data exist on th...

  7. Aortic stenosis with abnormal eccentric left ventricular remodeling secondary to hypothyroidism in a Bourdeaux Mastiff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Augusto Minozzo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This paper describes a case of congenital aortic stenosis with eccentric left ventricular hypertrophy associated with hypothyroidism in a 1-year-old Bourdeaux Mastiff dog. The dog had ascites, apathy, alopecic and erythematous skin lesions in different parts of the body. A two-dimensional echocardiogram revealed aortic valve stenosis, with poststenotic dilation in the ascending aorta. The same exam showed eccentric hypertrophy and dilation of the left ventricle during systole and diastole. Aortic stenosis usually results in concentric left ventricular hypertrophy instead of eccentric hypertrophy; and therefore, this finding was very unusual. Hypothyroidism, which is uncommon in young dogs, may be incriminated as the cause of ventricular dilation, making this report even more interesting. Because hypothyroidism would only result in dilatation, the eccentric hypertrophy was attributed to pressure overload caused by aortic stenosis. Thus, cardiac alterations of this case represent a paradoxical association of both diseases.

  8. Velocity ratio predicts outcomes in patients with low gradient severe aortic stenosis and preserved EF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jander, Nikolaus; Hochholzer, Willibald; Kaufmann, Beat A

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the usefulness of velocity ratio (VR) in patients with low gradient severe aortic stenosis (LGSAS) and preserved EF. BACKGROUND: LGSAS despite preserved EF represents a clinically challenging entity. Reliance on mean pressure gradient (MPG) may underestimate stenosis severity...... for severe stenosis. We hypothesised that VR may have conceptual advantages over MPG and AVA, predict clinical outcomes and thereby be useful in the management of patients with LGSAS. METHODS: Patients from the prospective Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study with an AVA....25 suggesting non-severe stenosis. Aortic valve-related events (mean follow-up 42±14 months) were more frequent in patients with VRanalysis, MPG was the strongest independent predictor...

  9. Dipyridamole thallium-201 single-photon emission tomography in aortic stenosis: gender differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rask, L.P.; Karp, K.H.; Eriksson, N.P.; Mooe, T.

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken to establish the gender-specific normal limits of thallium-201 distribution in patients with aortic stenosis and to apply these normal limits in a larger group of patients with aortic stenosis to obtain the sensitivity and specificity for coexisting CAD. A low-dose dipyridamole protocol was used (0.56 mg/kg during 4 min). Thallium was injected 2 min later and tomographic imaging was performed. Following image reconstruction a basal, a mid-ventricular and an apical short-axis slice were selected. The highest activity in each 6 segment was normalised to the maximal activity of each slice. The normal uptake for patients with aortic stenosis was obtained from ten men and ten women with aortic stenosis and a normal coronary angiography. Eighty-nine patients were prospectively evaluated. An area reduction of at least 75% in a coronary artery was considered to be a significant coronary lesion and was found in 57 (64%) patients. With gender-specific curves (-2.5 SD) sensitivity for detecting CAD was 100% and specificity was 75% in men, while sensitivity was 61% and specificity 64% in women. It is concluded that the gender-specific normal distribution of 201 Tl uptake in patients with aortic stenosis, using dipyridamole SPET, yields a high sensitivity and specificity for coronary artery lesions in men but a lower sensitivity and specificity in women with aortic stenosis. (orig./MG)

  10. A novel nonsense mutation in NPHS1: is aortic stenosis associated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    stenosis, one of the most prevalent congenital heart disease. (CHD), since two out of three individuals in the family who are heterozygous for this mutation have aortic stenosis. Taken together with the recent findings in NPHS1 knock- out mice which have severe coronary arteries malformations, the results presented here ...

  11. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation with Core Valve: First Indian experience of three high surgical risk patients with severe aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Seth

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of aortic stenosis is increasing with aging population. However with multiple co-morbidities and prior procedures in this aging population, more and more patients are being declared unfit for the ‘Gold Standard’ treatment i.e. surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR. Among the patients who are unfit or high risk for aortic valve replacement (AVR by open heart surgery, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI has been proven to be a valuable alternative improving survival and quality of life. We report first Indian experience of Core Valve (Medtronic Inc. implantation in three high surgical risk patients performed on 22nd and 23rd February 2012.

  12. Postoperative Reverse Remodeling and Symptomatic Improvement in Normal-Flow Low-Gradient Aortic Stenosis After Aortic Valve Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter-Storch, Rasmus; Møller, Jacob E; Christensen, Nicolaj L

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severe aortic stenosis (AS) most often presents with reduced aortic valve area (benefit of aortic valve...... replacement (AVR) among NFLG patients is controversial. We compared the impact of NFLG condition on preoperative left ventricular (LV) remodeling and myocardial fibrosis and postoperative remodeling and symptomatic benefit. METHODS AND RESULTS: Eighty-seven consecutive patients with reduced aortic valve area...... and normal stroke volume index undergoing AVR underwent echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, a 6-minute walk test, and measurement of natriuretic peptides before and 1 year after AVR. Myocardial fibrosis was assessed from magnetic resonance imaging. Patients were stratified as NFLG or normal...

  13. Design and baseline characteristics of the simvastatin and ezetimibe in aortic stenosis (SEAS) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossebø, Anne B; Pedersen, Terje R; Allen, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis and atherosclerotic disease have several risk factors in common, in particular, hypercholesterolemia. Histologically, the diseased valves appear to have areas of inflammation much like atherosclerotic plaques. The effect of lipid-lowering therapy on the progression of aortic...

  14. Natural history of 107 cases of fetal aortic stenosis from a European multicenter retrospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gardiner, H. M.; Kovacevic, A.; Tulzer, G.; Sarkola, T.; Herberg, U.; Dangel, J.; Öhman, A.; Bartrons, J.; Carvalho, J. S.; Jicinska, H.; Fesslova, V.; Averiss, I.; Mellander, M.; Bulock, Frances; Shebani, Suhair; Clur, Sally Ann; Daehnert, Ingo; Salvo, Giovanni Di; Heying, Ruth; Gewillig, Marc; Grijseels, Els; Koopmann, Laurens; Makikallio, Kaarin; Tekay, Aydin; Leskinen, Markku; Manning, Nicky; Archer, Nick; Oberhoffer, Renate; Romeo, Cristina; Sørensen, Keld Ejvind; Richens, Trevor; Schmidt, Klaus; Seale, Anna; Jowett, Victoria; Tissot, Cecile; Tomek, Viktor; Uhlemann, Frank; Vejlstrup, Niels; Weil, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Fetal aortic valvuloplasty (FV) aims to prevent fetal aortic valve stenosis progressing into hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), which results in postnatal univentricular (UV) circulation. Despite increasing numbers of FVs performed worldwide, the natural history of the disease in fetal life

  15. Left Ventricular Diastolic Function and Characteristics in Fetal Aortic Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Kevin G.; Schidlow, David; Freud, Lindsay; Escobar-Diaz, Maria; Tworetzky, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    Fetal aortic valvuloplasty (FAV) has shown promise in averting progression of mid-gestation aortic stenosis (AS) to hypoplastic left heart syndrome in a subset of patients. Patients who achieve biventricular circulation after FAV frequently have left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction (DD). This study evaluates DD in fetuses with AS by comparing echocardiographic indices of LV diastolic function in fetuses undergoing FAV (n=20) to controls (n=40) and evaluates for LV factors associated with DD in FAV patients. We also compared pre- and post-FAV DD variables (n=16). Median gestational age (24 weeks, range 18–29 weeks) and fetal heart rate were similar between FAV and controls. Compared to controls, FAV patients had universally abnormal LV diastolic parameters including fused mitral inflow E and A waves (p=0.008), higher E velocity(p<0.001), shorter mitral inflow time (p=0.001), lower LV lateral annulus E′ (p<0.001), septal E′ (p=0.003) and higher E/E′ (p<0.001) than controls. FAV patients had abnormal right ventricular mechanics with higher tricuspid inflow E velocity (p<0.001), and shorter tricuspid inflow time (p=0.03). Worse LV diastolic function (lower LV E′) was associated with higher endocardial fibroelastosis (EFE) grade (r=0.74, p<0.001), large LV volume (r=0.55, p=0.013) and sphericity (r=0.58, P=0.009) and with lower LV pressure by mitral regurgitation jet (r=−0.68, p<0.001). Post-FAV, fewer patients had fused mitral inflow E and A than pre-FAV (p=0.05) and septal E′ was higher (=0.04). In conclusion, fetuses with mid-gestation AS have evidence of marked DD. Worse DD is associated with larger, more spherical LV, with more extensive EFE and lower LV pressure. PMID:24819899

  16. Sex differences in aortic valve calcification measured by multidetector computed tomography in aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Shivani R; Clavel, Marie-Annick; Messika-Zeitoun, David; Cueff, Caroline; Malouf, Joseph; Araoz, Philip A; Mankad, Rekha; Michelena, Hector; Vahanian, Alec; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice

    2013-01-01

    Aortic valve calcification (AVC) is the intrinsic mechanism of valvular obstruction leading to aortic stenosis (AS) and is measurable by multidetector computed tomography. The link between sex and AS is controversial and that with AVC is unknown. We prospectively performed multidetector computed tomography in 665 patients with AS (aortic valve area, 1.05±0.35 cm(2); mean gradient, 39±19 mm Hg) to measure AVC and to assess the impact of sex on the AVC-AS severity link in men and women. AS severity was comparable between women and men (peak aortic jet velocity: 4.05±0.99 versus 3.93±0.91 m/s, P=0.11; aortic valve area index: 0.55±0.20 versus 0.56±0.18 cm(2)/m(2); P=0.46). Conversely, AVC load was lower in women versus men (1703±1321 versus 2694±1628 arbitrary units; PAVC load were much greater in men than in women (odds ratio, 5.07; PAVC showed good associations with hemodynamic AS severity in men and women (all r>0.67; PAVC load, absolute or indexed, was higher in men versus women (all P≤0.01). In this large AS population, women incurred similar AS severity than men for lower AVC loads, even after indexing for their smaller body size. Hence, the relationship between valvular calcification process and AS severity differs in women and men, warranting further pathophysiological inquiry. For AS severity diagnostic purposes, interpretation of AVC load should be different in men and in women.

  17. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Results in Improvement of Pulmonary Function in Patients With Severe Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Richard C; Thourani, Vinod H; Jensen, Hanna A; Condado, Jose; Binongo, José Nilo G; Sarin, Eric L; Devireddy, Chandan M; Leshnower, Bradley; Mavromatis, Kreton; Syed, Amjad; Guyton, Robert A; Block, Peter C; Simone, Amy; Keegan, Patricia; Stewart, James; Rajaei, Mohammad; Kaebnick, Brian; Lerakis, Stamatios; Babaliaros, Vasilis C

    2015-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been identified as a risk factor for morbidity and mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). We hypothesized that a portion of pulmonary dysfunction in patients with severe aortic stenosis may be of cardiac origin, and has potential to improve after TAVR. A retrospective analysis was made of consecutive TAVR patients from April 2008 to October 2014. Of patients who had pulmonary function testing and serum B-type natriuretic peptide data available before and after TAVR, 58 were found to have COPD (26 mild, 14 moderate, and 18 severe). Baseline variables and operative outcomes were explored along with changes in pulmonary function. Multiple regression analyses were performed to adjust for preoperative left ventricular ejection fraction and glomerular filtration rate. Comparison of pulmonary function testing before and after the procedure among all COPD categories showed a 10% improvement in forced vital capacity (95% confidence interval: 4% to 17%) and a 12% improvement in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (95% confidence interval: 6% to 19%). There was a 29% decrease in B-type natriuretic peptide after TAVR (95% confidence interval: -40% to -16%). An improvement of at least one COPD severity category was observed in 27% of patients with mild COPD, 64% of patients with moderate COPD, and 50% of patients with severe COPD. There was no 30-day mortality in any patient group. In patients with severe aortic stenosis, TAVR is associated with a significant improvement of pulmonary function and B-type natriuretic peptide. After TAVR, the reduction in COPD severity was most evident in patients with moderate and severe pulmonary dysfunction. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [The cost of innovation in treating aortic stenosis: transcatheter aortic valve implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, Simona; Saia, Francesco; Marrozzini, Cinzia; Berti, Elena; Guastaroba, Paolo; Fortuna, Daniela; Ciuca, Cristina; Moretti, Carolina; Marzocchi, Antonio; De Palma, Rossana

    2012-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) represents a promising therapeutic option for patients affected by severe aortic stenosis, but it is currently associated with high costs. Therefore, the assessment of its economic impact becomes urgent to support decision-makers' choices about its use, patient access to treatment and reimbursement mechanisms. A retrospective, observational, single-center (the teaching hospital located in Bologna, Italy) study was conducted. All patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis undergoing TAVI during the enrolment period (February 2008-August 2010) were included. The procedures were performed with both bioprostheses approved for clinical use and through different vascular access: CoreValve transfemoral (CV-TF), CoreValve transsubclavian (CV-TS), Edwards Sapien transapical (ES-TA), Edwards Sapien transfemoral (ES-TF). Costs of the whole index hospitalization have been calculated from the hospital perspective. Healthcare resource consumption was measured at patient level and assessed using unit costs (micro-costing approach). Overall, 87 consecutive patients (48 CV-TF, 12 CV-TS, 20 ES-TA, 7 ES-TF) were included in the study. They presented a high-risk profile (age 83.3 ± 5.4 years; logistic EuroSCORE 23.3 ± 12.3%) and important comorbidity. In-hospital mortality was 3.4%. Total cost of hospitalization was, on average, €35.841 (range €27.267-69.744) of which 68% was attributable to the procedure. A huge variation in costs was observed among different treatment groups. Patients treated with transfemoral implant (CV-TF: €33.977; ES-TF: €31.442) were on average less expensive than others (CV-TS: €37.035; ES-TA: €41.139). Our findings show that treating patients with TAVI places a heavy burden on hospital budget. Hence, due to the shortage of financial resources, affordability of TAVI requires further attention.

  19. Replicating Patient-Specific Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis With Functional 3D Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maragiannis, Dimitrios; Jackson, Matthew S; Igo, Stephen R; Schutt, Robert C; Connell, Patrick; Grande-Allen, Jane; Barker, Colin M; Chang, Su Min; Reardon, Michael J; Zoghbi, William A; Little, Stephen H

    2015-10-01

    3D stereolithographic printing can be used to convert high-resolution computed tomography images into life-size physical models. We sought to apply 3D printing technologies to develop patient-specific models of the anatomic and functional characteristics of severe aortic valve stenosis. Eight patient-specific models of severe aortic stenosis (6 tricuspid and 2 bicuspid) were created using dual-material fused 3D printing. Tissue types were identified and segmented from clinical computed tomography image data. A rigid material was used for printing calcific regions, and a rubber-like material was used for soft tissue structures of the outflow tract, aortic root, and noncalcified valve cusps. Each model was evaluated for its geometric valve orifice area, echocardiographic image quality, and aortic stenosis severity by Doppler and Gorlin methods under 7 different in vitro stroke volume conditions. Fused multimaterial 3D printed models replicated the focal calcific structures of aortic stenosis. Doppler-derived measures of peak and mean transvalvular gradient correlated well with reference standard pressure catheters across a range of flow conditions (r=0.988 and r=0.978 respectively, P3D printing, we demonstrate that patient-specific models can replicate both the anatomic and functional properties of severe degenerative aortic valve stenosis. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Will Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR be the Primary Therapy for Aortic Stenosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose F. Condado, MD, MS

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR is increasingly used for the treatment of high or very high surgical risk patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS or failing surgical bioprosthesis (valve-in-valve, VIV-TAVR. In TAVR, the collapsed transcatheter heart valve (THV is introduced using the delivery system inserted from the femoral artery (preferred or other alternative accesses (transapical, transaortic, transcarotid, subclavian/transinnominate or transcaval. The delivery system is then advanced until coaxially aligned with the aortic annulus, where the THV is deployed. This procedure can be associated with complications such as access site injury (vascular complication, paravalvar leak, cerebrovascular events and conduction disturbances. However, the rapid acceptance and successes observed with TAVR have been made possible through careful patient selection, preprocedural planning (i.e. MDCT annular sizing, THV technology (i.e. new generation valves, and procedural techniques (i.e. minimalist TF-TAVR and alternative percutaneous access options, as well as a decrease in complications as TAVR experience grows. Though the results or ongoing clinical trials evaluating TAVR in intermediate surgical risk patients are pending, it is likely that TAVR will soon be approved for lower risk patients as well.

  1. Optimal timing of valve replacement in asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilen, Emine; Ipek, Gökürk; Ayhan, Huseyin; Nacar, Alper Bugra; Kasapkara, Haci Ahmet; Sani, Cenk; Basbug, Serdar; Kurt, Mustafa; Bozkurt, Engin

    2014-09-01

    Patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS) constitute a heterogeneous group which includes not only certain cases who are at high risk of sudden death and valve-related heart failure, but also those at low risk for these events. Degenerative AS, which includes a majority of patients with AS, is characterized by stricture of the valve, increased arterial stiffness, and diverse left ventricular response to the valvular plus arterial vascular load. In addition to using traditional primary parameters, the severity of AS and the total left ventricular load should be assessed using new measures such as energy loss index and valvulo-arterial impedance. Natriuretic peptide levels and global longitudinal strain imaging may also be used as secondary parameters to obtain information about left ventricular systolic function, although these parameters do not correlate with the severity of AS. Exercise stress testing and exercise echocardiography are also beneficial when assessing the patient if they are symptomatic, and for determining valvular and left ventricular contractile reserves. The aim of this review was to emphasize the importance of risk stratifications in asymptomatic severe AS cases, and to assess the severity of AS using not only conventional methods but also new methods on which much emphasis has been placed during recent years.

  2. Genome-wide analysis yields new loci associating with aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgadottir, Anna; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Gretarsdottir, Solveig

    2018-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis (AS) is the most common valvular heart disease, and valve replacement is the only definitive treatment. Here we report a large genome-wide association (GWA) study of 2,457 Icelandic AS cases and 349,342 controls with a follow-up in up to 4,850 cases and 451,731 controls......(-10)) and aortic root diameter (P = 1.30 x 10(-8)), and rs1830321 associates with BAV (OR = 1.12, P = 5.3 x 10(-3)) and coronary artery disease (OR = 1.05, P = 9.3 x 10(-5)). The results implicate both cardiac developmental abnormalities and atherosclerosis-like processes in the pathogenesis of AS. We show...... of European ancestry. We identify two new AS loci, on chromosome 1p21 near PALMD (rs7543130; odds ratio (OR) = 1.20, P = 1.2 x 10(-22)) and on chromosome 2q22 in TEX41 (rs1830321; OR = 1.15, P = 1.8 x 10(-13)). Rs7543130 also associates with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) (OR = 1.28, P = 6.6 x 10...

  3. Central regional anaesthesia in patients with aortic stenosis - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Sofia; Lind, Morten Nikolaj

    2017-09-01

    Aortic stenosis is a valvular lesion that poses several haemodynamic challenges for the anaesthesiologist. The use of central regional anaesthesia is traditionally regarded as contraindicated in patients with severe aortic stenosis due to its sympatholytic effect, potentially causing loss of vascular tone and ultimately diminished cardiac output. The aim of this paper was to review current literature to find evidence for or against the use of neuroaxial blockade in patients with aortic stenosis. We searched PubMed for relevant articles, using the following MeSH terms: "aortic valve stenosis", "epidural anesthesia", "spinal anesthesia" and "epidural analgesia". Only English language literature was included. Papers concerning aortic stenosis and obstetrical anaesthesia were excluded. There are no randomised clinical trials on the subject, and existing literature is extremely sparse. Four retrospective studies and eight case reports counting a total of ten patients were found. All report successful use of neuroaxial blockade in patients with aortic stenosis, without severe haemodynamic alterations. In addition, data indicate that postepidural analgesia improves outcome compared with conventional analgesia. To the best of our knowledge, there is no clinical evidence supporting the notion that central regional anaesthesia has any adverse effects on patients with aortic stenosis. Carefully managed neuroaxial blockade could become a useful alternative to general anaesthesia in this patient group. However, evidence is sparse and of questionable quality. Large prospective randomised clinical trials are required to establish best practise. Articles published in the DMJ are “open access”. This means that the articles are distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial License, which permits any non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and source are credited.

  4. Low Rate of Prenatal Diagnosis among Neonates with Critical Aortic Stenosis: Insight into the Natural History In Utero (Aortic Stenosis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freud, Lindsay R.; Moon-Grady, Anita; Escobar-Diaz, Maria C.; Gotteiner, Nina L.; Young, Luciana T.; McElhinney, Doff B.; Tworetzky, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To better understand the natural history and spectrum of fetal aortic stenosis (AS), we aimed to 1) determine the prenatal diagnosis rate of neonates with critical AS and a biventricular (BV) outcome; and 2) describe the findings at fetal echocardiography in prenatally diagnosed patients. Methods A multi-center, retrospective study was performed from 2000 to 2013. Neonates with critical AS who were discharged with a BV outcome were included. The prenatal diagnosis rate was compared to that reported for hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). Fetal echocardiographic findings in prenatally diagnosed patients were reviewed. Results Only 10 of 117 neonates (8.5%) with critical AS and a BV outcome were diagnosed prenatally, a rate significantly lower than that for HLHS in the contemporary era (82%; p<0.0001). Of the 10 patients diagnosed prenatally, all developed LV dysfunction by a median gestational age of 33 weeks (range, 28–35). When present, Doppler abnormalities such as retrograde flow in the aortic arch (n=2), monophasic mitral inflow (n=2), and left to right flow across the foramen ovale (n=8) developed late in gestation (median 33 weeks). Conclusion The prenatal diagnosis rate among neonates with critical AS and a BV outcome is very low, likely due to a relatively normal 4-chamber view in mid-gestation with development of significant obstruction in the 3rd trimester. This natural history contrasts with that of severe mid-gestation AS with evolving HLHS and suggests that the timing in gestation of significant AS has an important impact on subsequent left heart growth in utero. PMID:25251721

  5. Early Manifestation of Supravalvular Aortic and Pulmonary Artery Stenosis in a Patient with Williams Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Uk Lee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Williams syndrome (WS is a developmental disorder characterized by vascular abnormalities such as thickening of the vascular media layer in medium- and large-sized arteries. Supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS and peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis (PPAS are common vascular abnormalities in WS. The natural course of SVAS and PPAS is variable, and the timing of surgery or intervention is determined according to the progression of vascular stenosis. In our patient, SVAS and PPAS showed rapid concurrent progression within two weeks after birth. We report the early manifestation of SVAS and PPAS in the neonatal period and describe the surgical treatment for stenosis relief.

  6. Elevated lipoprotein(a) and risk of aortic valve stenosis in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, Pia R; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine whether elevated lipoprotein(a) levels and corresponding LPA risk genotypes (rs10455872, rs3798220, kringle IV type 2 repeat polymorphism) prospectively associate with increased risk of aortic valve stenosis (AVS). BACKGROUND: The etiologic...... basis of AVS is unclear. Recent data implicate an LPA genetic variant (rs10455872), associated with Lp(a) levels, in calcific AVS. METHODS: We combined data from 2 prospective general population studies, the Copenhagen City Heart Study (1991 to 2011; n = 10,803) and the Copenhagen General Population......: Elevated Lp(a) levels and corresponding genotypes were associated with increased risk of AVS in the general population, with levels >90 mg/dl predicting a threefold increased risk....

  7. Aortic root, not valve, calcification correlates with coronary artery calcification in patients with severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henein, Michael; Hällgren, Peter; Holmgren, Anders

    2015-01-01

    calcification (AVC), due to tissue similarity between the two types of vessel rather than with the valve leaflet tissue. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We studied 212 consecutive patients (age 72.5 ± 7.9 years, 91 females) with AS requiring aortic valve replacement (AVR) in two Heart Centers, who underwent multidetector......% of patients. CAC correlated with ARC (rho = 0.51, p patients had echocardiographic evidence of BAV and 123 TAV, who were older (p ... even after adjusting for age (p = 0.01). AVC score was associated with BAV after adjusting for age (p = 0.03) but ARC was not. Of the total cohort, 82 patients (39%) had significant coronary stenosis (>50%), but these were not different in the pattern of calcification from those without CAS. CAC...

  8. Relationship between longitudinal strain and symptomatic status in aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attias, David; Macron, Laurent; Dreyfus, Julien; Monin, Jean-Luc; Brochet, Eric; Lepage, Laurent; Hekimian, Guillaume; Iung, Bernard; Vahanian, Alec; Messika-Zeitoun, David

    2013-08-01

    Global longitudinal strain (GLS) and basal longitudinal strain (BLS) assessed using two-dimensional speckle-tracking imaging have been proposed as subtle markers of left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction with potential prognostic value in patients with aortic stenosis (AS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between longitudinal strain and symptomatic status in patients with AS. GLS and BLS were measured in 171 patients with pure, isolated, at least mild AS prospectively enrolled at two institutions. The population was divided into four groups: asymptomatic nonsevere AS (n = 55), asymptomatic severe AS with preserved LV ejection fraction (LVEF; ≥50%) (n = 37), symptomatic severe AS with preserved LVEF (n = 60), and severe AS with reduced LVEF (<50%) (n = 19). GLS was significantly different among the four groups (P < .0001), but the difference was due mainly to patients with reduced LVEFs. In addition, there was an important overlap among the groups, and in multivariate analysis, after adjustment for age, gender, AS severity, and LVEF, GLS was not an independent predictor of symptomatic status (P = .07). BLS was also significantly different among the four groups (P < .0001) but in contrast was independently associated with symptomatic status (P < .0001). However, as for GLS, there was an important overlap between groups and differences were close to intraobserver or interobserver variability (1.3 ± 1.1% and 2.0 ± 1.6%, respectively). In this prospective multicenter cohort of patients with wide ranges of AS severity, symptoms, and LVEFs, BLS but not GLS was independently associated with symptomatic status. However, there was an important overlap among groups, and differences were close to measurements' reproducibility, raising caution regarding the use of longitudinal strain, at least as a single criterion, in the decision-making process for patients with severe asymptomatic AS. Copyright © 2013. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  9. Alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking and incidence of aortic valve stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, S C; Wolk, A; Bäck, M

    2017-10-01

    Alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking are modifiable lifestyle factors with important impact on public health. It is unclear whether these factors influence the risk of aortic valve stenosis (AVS). To investigate the associations of alcohol consumption and smoking, including smoking intensity and time since cessation, with AVS incidence in two prospective cohorts. This analysis was based on data from the Swedish Mammography Cohort and the Cohort of Swedish Men, comprising 69 365 adults without cardiovascular disease at baseline. Participants were followed for AVS incidence and death by linkage to the Swedish National Patient and Causes of Death Registers. Hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by Cox proportional hazards regression. Over a mean follow-up of 15.3 years, 1249 cases of AVS (494 in women and 755 in men) were recorded. Compared with never drinkers of alcohol (lifelong abstainers), the risk of AVS was significantly lower in current light drinkers (1-6 drinks per week [1 drink = 12 g alcohol]; multivariable HR 0.82; 95% CI: 0.68-0.99). The risk of AVS increased with increasing smoking intensity. Compared with never smokers, the HR was 1.46 (95% CI: 1.16-1.85) in current smokers of ≥30 pack-years. Former smokers who had quit smoking 10 or more years previously had similar risk for AVS as never smokers. This study suggests that current light alcohol consumption is associated with a lower risk of AVS, and indicates that the association between smoking and AVS risk is reversible. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Internal Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association for Publication of The Journal of Internal Medicine.

  10. Optimal timing of aortic valve replacement in elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marumoto, Akira; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Kishimoto, Yuichiro; Saiki, Munehiro; Nishimura, Motonobu

    2014-01-01

    The elderly population with severe aortic stenosis (AS) requiring aortic valve replacement (AVR) is increasing. The optimal timing of AVR in these patients has been under discussion. We retrospectively reviewed the data from severe AS patients (n = 84) who underwent AVR with/without concomitant procedures from 2005 to 2010. The symptom status, preoperative data, operative outcome, late survival and freedom from cardiac events were compared between elderly patients (age ≥80 years [n = 31]) and younger patients (age <80 years [n = 53]). The operative mortality in elderly patients (3.2 %) and younger patients (3.8 %) was comparable. The symptoms in elderly patients were more severe and hospitalized heart failure (HF) was more frequently noted as the primary symptom (p = 0.017). Patients with and without hospitalized HF differed significantly in late survival and freedom from cardiac events (p = 0.001), but advanced age had no significant effect. The results of a Cox proportional hazards analysis revealed that hospitalized HF was a significant predictor for cardiac events after AVR, irrespective of age (hazard ratio 6.93, 95 % confidence interval 1.83-26.26, p < 0.004). In elderly patients with severe AS, surgery should be recommended even in the presence of minimal symptoms and should be performed before the onset of life-threatening HF.

  11. Computed Tomography Aortic Valve Calcium Scoring in Patients With Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawade, Tania; Clavel, Marie-Annick; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Dreyfus, Julien; Mathieu, Tiffany; Tastet, Lionel; Renard, Cedric; Gun, Mesut; Jenkins, William Steven Arthur; Macron, Laurent; Sechrist, Jacob W; Lacomis, Joan M; Nguyen, Virginia; Galian Gay, Laura; Cuéllar Calabria, Hug; Ntalas, Ioannis; Cartlidge, Timothy Robert Graham; Prendergast, Bernard; Rajani, Ronak; Evangelista, Arturo; Cavalcante, João L; Newby, David E; Pibarot, Philippe; Messika Zeitoun, David; Dweck, Marc R

    2018-03-01

    Computed tomography aortic valve calcium scoring (CT-AVC) holds promise for the assessment of patients with aortic stenosis (AS). We sought to establish the clinical utility of CT-AVC in an international multicenter cohort of patients. Patients with AS who underwent ECG-gated CT-AVC within 3 months of echocardiography were entered into an international, multicenter, observational registry. Optimal CT-AVC thresholds for diagnosing severe AS were determined in patients with concordant echocardiographic assessments, before being used to arbitrate disease severity in those with discordant measurements. In patients with long-term follow-up, we assessed whether CT-AVC thresholds predicted aortic valve replacement and death. In 918 patients from 8 centers (age, 77±10 years; 60% men; peak velocity, 3.88±0.90 m/s), 708 (77%) patients had concordant echocardiographic assessments, in whom CT-AVC provided excellent discrimination for severe AS (C statistic: women 0.92, men 0.89). Our optimal sex-specific CT-AVC thresholds (women 1377 Agatston unit and men 2062 Agatston unit) were nearly identical to those previously reported (women 1274 Agatston unit and men 2065 Agatston unit). Clinical outcomes were available in 215 patients (follow-up 1029 [126-2251] days). Sex-specific CT-AVC thresholds independently predicted aortic valve replacement and death (hazard ratio, 3.90 [95% confidence interval, 2.19-6.78]; P <0.001) after adjustment for age, sex, peak velocity, and aortic valve area. Among 210 (23%) patients with discordant echocardiographic assessments, there was considerable heterogeneity in CT-AVC scores, which again were an independent predictor of clinical outcomes (hazard ratio, 3.67 [95% confidence interval, 1.39-9.73]; P =0.010). Sex-specific CT-AVC thresholds accurately identify severe AS and provide powerful prognostic information. These findings support their integration into routine clinical practice. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifiers: NCT

  12. Significance of transesophageal echocardiography in the evaluation of aortic valve stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prcović Biljana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE is a relatively new diagnostic method offering better resolution of cardiac anatomy than the conventional transthoracal two-dimensional echocardiography (TTE. Clinical indications for TEE have been expanding, thus the technique as a diagnostic procedure is used in numerous cardiac diseases such as endocarditis, congenital heart defect, aortic dissection, prosthetic valves dysfunction, as well as in calculation of aortic valve surface in aortic stenosis. The aim of the study was to prove TEE as a more precise method in determination of the level of seriousness of aortic valve stenosis. Methods. All the patients went through TTE and TEE. Evaluating of the aortic valve surface was performed by the use of Gorlin's formula in TTE while it was planimetric in TEE examination. Results. Comparative analysis of all parameters obtained by TTE and TEE showed a difference between them. All the parameters values except that for surface area of the aortic valve orifice confluence were higher in TEE than in TTE examination, but no difference was statistically significant (p > 0.05; t-test for a dependant specimens. By the use of the TTE method, the size of aortic orifice stenosis was 1.22 ± 0.54 cm2, and by the TEE method it was 1.08 ± 0.54 cm2. Conclusion. Multiplain TEE is reliable in quantification of an aortic valve area in patients with aortic stenosis. It offers useful clinical information, particularly in patients with non-adequate evaluation with TTE, as well as in seriously ill patients or those with a confirmed valvular defect.

  13. Arterial hypertension and aortic valve stenosis: Shedding light on a common “liaison”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalampos I. Liakos, MD, PhD

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Arterial hypertension and aortic valve stenosis are common disorders and frequently present as concomitant diseases, especially in elderly patients. The impact of hypertension on heart haemodynamics is substantial, thus affecting the clinical presentation of any coexisting valvulopathy, especially of aortic stenosis. However, the interaction between these 2 entities is not thoroughly discussed in the European or/and American guidelines on the management of hypertension or/and valvular heart disease. The present review summarizes all available evidence on the potential interplay between hypertension and aortic valve stenosis, aiming to help physicians understand the pathophysiology and select the best diagnostic and therapeutic strategies (medical or/and interventional for better management of these high-risk patients, taking into account the impact on outcome as well as the risk-benefit-ratio.

  14. Impact of QRS duration and morphology on the risk of sudden cardiac death in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders M; Gerdts, Eva; Boman, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the predictive value of QRS duration and morphology during watchful waiting in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (AS).......The aim of the study was to examine the predictive value of QRS duration and morphology during watchful waiting in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (AS)....

  15. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation vs. surgical aortic valve replacement for treatment of severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siontis, George C M; Praz, Fabien; Pilgrim, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: In view of the currently available evidence from randomized trials, we aimed to compare the collective safety and efficacy of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) vs. surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) across the spectrum of risk and in important subgroups. METHODS AND RESULTS......: Trials comparing TAVI vs. SAVR were identified through Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases. The primary outcome was death from any cause at 2 years. We performed random-effects meta-analyses to combine the available evidence and to evaluate the effect in different subgroups. This systematic review...... and meta-analysis is registered with PROSPERO (CRD42016037273). We identified four eligible trials including 3806 participants, who were randomly assigned to undergo TAVI (n = 1898) or SAVR (n = 1908). For the primary outcome of death from any cause, TAVI when compared with SAVR was associated...

  16. Left ventricular diastolic function is associated with symptom status in severe aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Christensen, Nicolaj L; Videbæk, Lars

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In aortic valve stenosis (AS), the occurrence of heart failure symptoms does not always correlate with severity of valve stenosis and left ventricular (LV) function. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that symptomatic patients with AS have impaired diastolic, longitudinal systolic...... atrial volume index, and deceleration time were still associated with the presence of symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: The present study demonstrates that symptomatic status in severe AS is associated with impaired diastolic function, LV hypertrophy, concentric remodeling, and left atrial dilatation when corrected...

  17. Congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis and sudden death associated with anesthesia: what's the mystery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Thomas M; McGowan, Francis X; Kussman, Barry D; Powell, Andrew J; DiNardo, James A

    2008-12-01

    Patients with congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis and associated peripheral pulmonary artery stenoses, the majority of whom have Williams-Beuren syndrome, are inherently at risk for development of myocardial ischemia. This is particularly true in the setting of procedural sedation and anesthesia. The biventricular hypertrophy that accompanies these lesions increases myocardial oxygen consumption and compromises oxygen delivery. In addition, these patients often have direct, multifactorial compromise of coronary blood flow. In this article, we review both the pathophysiology of congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis and the literature regarding sudden death in association with sedation and anesthesia. Recommendations as to preoperative assessment and management of these patients are made based on the best available evidence.

  18. [Correlation of the transaortic gradient determined with doppler echocardiography versus catheterization in patients with aortic stenosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illescas, J; Enciso, R; Vidrio, M; de la Torre, N; Baduí, E

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the reliability of a non-invasive estimation of a transaortic gradient in patients with valvular aortic stenosis by doppler echocardiography. We compared the transvalvular gradients obtained by cardiac catheterization (invasive) versus the estimation by non-invasive technique such as continuous-wave doppler in 30 consecutive patients with valvular aortic stenosis. When compared the peak velocity (Vmax) of the aortic jet versus the gradient obtained by cardiac catheterization we found a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.83 and when compared the gradient obtained by both methods we found an r value of 0.85. These results show that the calculations of aortic gradient by echo-doppler, are reliable. Besides this method allowed us to establish the correct diagnosis and to follow up these patients.

  19. Acute Aortic Arch Perforation During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Bicuspid Aortic Stenosis and a Gothic Aortic Arch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millan-Iturbe, Oscar; Sawaya, Fadi J.; Bieliauskas, Gintautas

    2017-01-01

    AS because of its unique anatomic features. This case report describes an acute aortic perforation during delivery of a transcatheter heart valve to treat a severe bicuspid AS with a “gothic aortic arch”; more careful evaluation of the preprocedural multislice computed tomographic scan would have unveiled...

  20. Experiences of and Coping With Severe Aortic Stenosis Among Patients Waiting for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Karin; Näslund, Ulf; Nilsson, Johan; Hörnsten, Åsa

    2016-01-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common valve disease in Western countries. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has made it possible to treat patients with higher surgical risks. These patients are informed about their poor prognosis with only months or a few years to live without treatment. Because of their severe symptoms, limitations, and suffering, patients awaiting TAVI need special attention. The aim of this study is to describe patients' experiences of coping with severe AS and of waiting for TAVI. Swedish participants (n = 24; 9 women, 15 men) with a mean (SD) age of 80 (7.4) years who had been offered TAVI all agreed to participate in a presurgical interview. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The participants' experiences of coping with AS and awaiting TAVI were described by the main theme "living on the edge, but trying to stay in control," which comprised 3 categories: "trying to cope with physical symptoms and anxiety," "trying to preserve self and self-esteem despite life-threatening illness," and "trying to process the decision to undergo TAVI." Patients with AS and awaiting TAVI must cope with increasing symptoms and limitations in their social lives but still wish to be seen as the people they always have been. These patients may need extra support from healthcare personnel to process their experiences, which could help them to attach personal meaning to clinical information about the condition and its treatment that they could include in their decision about whether to undergo TAVI. Listening to patients' stories could help nurses and physicians to ensure that disease and treatment are meaningfully understood by the patient.

  1. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With Aortic Stenosis and Mitral Regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavromatis, Kreton; Thourani, Vinod H; Stebbins, Amanda; Vemulapalli, Sreekanth; Devireddy, Chandan; Guyton, Robert A; Matsouaka, Roland; Ghasemzadeh, Nima; Block, Peter C; Leshnower, Bradley G; Stewart, James P; Rumsfeld, John S; Lerakis, Stamatios; Babaliaros, Vasilis

    2017-12-01

    Many patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) for aortic stenosis also have significant mitral regurgitation (MR). We sought to understand the association of concomitant MR with TAVR clinical outcomes, as well changes in MR after TAVR. Patients who underwent TAVR in the US Transcatheter Valve Therapy Registry from January 3, 2012, to December 31, 2013, were studied, with longer-term clinical outcomes from Center for Medicare Services data. Of 11,104 patients, 3,481 (31.3%) had moderate MR, and 605 (5.5%) had severe MR. At 1 year, mortality was 21.0%, 21.5%, 26.3%, and 28.0% (p < 0.0001) and heart failure (HF) rehospitalization was 13.9%, 15.8%, 20.3%, and 23.4% (p < 0.0001) in the no, mild, moderate, and severe MR patients, respectively. After adjustment for baseline differences, significant MR was associated with increased risk of 1-year mortality or HF rehospitalization, with a HR of 1.16 (95% CI, 0.99 to 1.35) for moderate MR and 1.21 (95% CI, 0.97 to 1.50) for severe MR, compared with no MR. MR improved early after TAVR grade ≥ 1 in 79% of the severe MR patients and 66% of the moderate MR patients. Patients whose baseline moderate or severe MR improved had lower mortality (p = 0.022) and HF rehospitalization (p < 0.001) compared with patients whose MR did not improve. Moderate or severe MR accompanying severe AS treated with TAVR is associated with increased mortality or HF rehospitalization. This increased risk may be attributable to the minority of patients whose MR does not improve, suggesting a potential role for surveillance and targeted intervention for those patients. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Results of simultaneous intervention in patients with concomitant coronary artery disease and aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Д. Д. Зубарев

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The study was aimed at comparing the immediate and long-term results of aortic valve replacement in combination with various techniques of intervention for myocardial revascularization, namely: coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA.Methods. This randomized prospective controlled study involved 120 cardiac patients over 18 years old with combined aortic valve stenosis and arterial sclerotic disease of coronary arteries. The inclusion criteria were a combination of aortic valve stenosis and a hemodynamically significant lesion of the coronary bed. A comparative analysis of the results obtained in the nearest postoperative period and during 1-year follow-up is presented. Results. Hybrid intervention (aortic valve replacement + percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty produces the results which are comparable with those of the control (aortic valve replacement + CABG, with a significantly greater decrease in the peak gradient on the aortic valve. During long-term follow-up, the group of patients who underwent hybrid intervention demonstrated a much higher myocardial infarction rate (12.5 versus 2.5 %, however, the severity of infarctions was significantly lower.Conclusion. PTCA, as compared to CABG, with concomitant coronary artery disease significantly improves the indicators of aortic valve insufficiency and the survival after repeated myocardial infarction, with the matching frequency of acute cerebral circulation abnormalities and the lethality rate in the long-term period.Received 29 August 2016. Accepted 5 October 2016.Funding: The study had no sponsorship. Conflict of interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

  3. Does lowering cholesterol have an impact on the progression of aortic stenosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, A.M.; Wachtell, K.

    2008-01-01

    reviews the pathophysiological mechanisms of calcific AS, reviews current clinical trials of statin use in aortic stenosis and reports on on-going trials, evaluating whether cholesterol lowering therapy can slow disease progression in different populations. Finally, we review if computerized tomography...

  4. Coronary Physiology During Exercise and Vasodilation in the Healthy Heart and in Severe Aortic Stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lumley, Matthew; Williams, Rupert; Asrress, Kaleab N.; Arri, Satpal; Briceno, Natalia; Ellis, Howard; Rajani, Ronak; Siebes, Maria; Piek, Jan J.; Clapp, Brian; Redwood, Simon R.; Marber, Michael S.; Chambers, John B.; Perera, Divaka

    2016-01-01

    Severe aortic stenosis (AS) can manifest as exertional angina even in the presence of unobstructed coronary arteries. The authors describe coronary physiological changes during exercise and hyperemia in the healthy heart and in patients with severe AS. Simultaneous intracoronary pressure and flow

  5. Impact of Three-Dimensional Echocardiography on Classification of the Severity of Aortic Stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jainandunsing, Jayant S.; Mahmood, Feroze; Matyal, Robina; Shakil, Omair; Hess, Philip E.; Lee, Justin; Panzica, Peter J.; Khabbaz, Kamal R.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Owing to its elliptical shape, the left ventricle outflow tract (LVOT) area is underestimated by two-dimensional (2D) diameter-based calculations which assume a circular shape. This results in overestimation of aortic stenosis (AS) by the continuity equation. In cases of moderate to

  6. Initial non-opioid based anesthesia in a parturient having severe aortic stenosis undergoing cesarean section with aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata Podder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy in presence of severe aortic stenosis (AS causes worsening of symptoms needing further intervention. In the advanced stages of pregnancy, some patients may even require aortic valve replacement (AVR and cesarean delivery in the same sitting. Opioid based general anesthesia for combined lower segment cesarean section (LSCS with AVR has been described. However, the use of opioid may lead to fetal morbidity and need of respiratory support for the baby. We describe successful anesthetic management for LSCS with AVR in a >33 week gravida with severe AS and congestive heart failure. We avoided opioids till delivery of the baby AVR; the delivered neonate showed a normal APGAR score.

  7. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in Lower-Risk Patients With Aortic Stenosis: Is It Justified to Be the Preferred Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelghani, Mohammad; Serruys, Patrick W

    2016-04-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation underwent progressive improvements until it became the default therapy for inoperable patients, and a recommended therapy in high-risk operable patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis. In the lower-risk patient strata, a currently costly therapy that still has important complications with questionable durability is competing with the established effective and still-improving surgical replacement. This report tries to weigh the clinical evidence, the recent technical improvements, the durability, and the cost-effectiveness claims supporting the adoption of transcatheter aortic valve implantation in intermediate-low risk patients. The importance of appropriate patients' risk stratification and a more comprehensive approach to estimate that risk are also emphasized in the present report. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Clinical predictors of prosthesis-patient mismatch after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M Astudillo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We sought to ascertain predictors of Patient Prosthesis Mismatch, an independent predictor of mortality, in patients with aortic stenosis using bioprosthetic valves. METHOD: We analyzed 2,107 sequential surgeries. Patient Prosthesis Mismatch was calculated using the effective orifice area of the prosthesis divided by the patient's body surface area. We defined nonsignificant, moderate, and severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch as effective orifice area indexes of .0.85 cm²/m, 0.85-0.66 cm²/m², and <0.65 cm²/m², respectively. RESULTS: A total of 311 bioprosthetic patients were identified. The incidence of nonsignificant, moderate, and severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch was 41%, 42, and 16%, respectively. Severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch was significantly more prevalent in females (82%. In severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch, the perfusion and the crossclamp times were considerably lower when compared with nonsignificant Patient Prosthesis Mismatch and moderate Patient Prosthesis Mismatch. Patients with severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch had a significantly higher likelihood of spending time in the intensive care unit and a significantly longer length of stay in the hospital. Body surface area was not different in severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch when compared with nonsignificant Patient Prosthesis Mismatch. In-hospital mortality in patients with nonsignificant, moderate, and severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch was 2.3%, 6.1%, and 8%, respectively. Minimally invasive surgery was significantly associated with moderate Patient Prosthesis Mismatch in 49% of the patients, but not with severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch. CONCLUSION: Severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch is more common in females, but not in those with minimal available body surface area. Though operative times were shorter in these patients, intensive care unit and hospital lengths of stay were longer. Surgeons and cardiologists should be cognizant of these clinical

  9. Statins for progression of aortic valve stenosis and the best evidence for making decisions in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiago, Luciana; Tsuj, Selma Rumiko; Atallah, Alvaro Nagib; Puga, Maria Eduarda dos Santos; de Góis, Aécio Flávio Teixeira

    2011-01-06

    In the Western world, calcified aortic valve stenosis is the most common form of valvular heart disease, affecting up to 3% of adults over the age of 75 years. It is a gradually progressive disease, characterized by a long asymptomatic phase that may last for several decades, followed by a short symptomatic phase associated with severe restriction of the valve orifice. Investigations on treatments for aortic valve stenosis are still in progress. Thus, it is believed that calcification of aortic valve stenosis is similar to the process of atherosclerosis that occurs in coronary artery disease. Recent studies have suggested that cholesterol lowering through the use of statins may have a salutary effect on the progression of aortic valve stenosis.

  10. Left atrial size and function as predictors of new-onset of atrial fibrillation in patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Casper Niels Furbo; Dalsgaard, Morten; Greve, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Left atrial (LA) size and function change with chronically increased left ventricular (LV) filling pressures. It remains unclear whether these variations in LA parameters can predict new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (AS).......Left atrial (LA) size and function change with chronically increased left ventricular (LV) filling pressures. It remains unclear whether these variations in LA parameters can predict new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (AS)....

  11. Intensive lipid lowering with simvastatin and ezetimibe in aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossebo, A.B.; Pedersen, T.R.; Boman, K.

    2008-01-01

    received either 40 mg of simvastatin plus 10 mg of ezetimibe or placebo daily. The primary outcome was a composite of major cardiovascular events, including death from cardiovascular causes, aortic-valve replacement, nonfatal myocardial infarction, hospitalization for unstable angina pectoris, heart...

  12. Noninvasive assessment of filling pressure and left atrial pressure overload in severe aortic valve stenosis: relation to ventricular remodeling and clinical outcome after aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbæk, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K

    2011-01-01

    One of the hemodynamic consequences of aortic valve stenosis is pressure overload leading to left atrial dilatation. Left atrial size is a known risk factor providing prognostic information in several cardiac conditions. It is not known if this is also the case in patients with aortic valve...

  13. Severe Aortic Stenosis and Severe Coarctation of the Aorta: A Hybrid Approach to Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    McLennan, Daniel; Caputo, Massimo; Taliotis, Demetris

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid surgery is becoming more popular in the treatment of children with congenital heart disease, particularly small infants and neonates. We report a case of a patient with aortic stenosis (AS) and coarctation of the aorta (CoA). Case: a 1-month-old baby presented with severe AS and CoA. The decision was made to perform a hybrid surgical procedure. The patient underwent a lateral thoracotomy for repair of the CoA and carotid cutdown for aortic balloon valvuloplasty (AoVP).

  14. Treatment of Symptomatic Severe Aortic Stenosis With a Novel Resheathable Supra-Annular Self-Expanding Transcatheter Aortic Valve System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, Ganesh; Walton, Antony S; Brecker, Stephen J; Pasupati, Sanjeevan; Blackman, Daniel J; Qiao, Hongyan; Meredith, Ian T

    2015-08-24

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the safety and clinical performance of the CoreValve Evolut R transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) system (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota) in a single-arm, multicenter pivotal study in high- or extreme-risk patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis. Although outcomes following TAVR are improving, challenges still exist. The repositionable 14-F equivalent CoreValve Evolut R TAVR system was developed to mitigate some of these challenges. Suitable patients (n = 60) underwent TAVR with a 26- or 29-mm Evolut R valve. Primary safety endpoints were mortality and stroke at 30 days. Primary clinical performance endpoints were device success per the VARC-2 (Valve Academic Research Consortium-2) and the percent of patients with mild or less aortic regurgitation 24 h to 7 days post-procedure. Patients (66.7% female; mean age 82.8 ± 6.1 years; Society of Thoracic Surgeons Score 7.0 ± 3.7%) underwent TAVR via the transfemoral route in 98.3%, using a 29-mm valve in 68.3% of patients. All attempts at repositioning were successful. No death or stroke was observed up to 30 days. The VARC-2 overall device success rate was 78.6%. Paravalvular regurgitation post TAVR was mild or less in 96.6%, moderate in 3.4%, and severe in 0% at 30 days. Major vascular complications occurred in 8.3%, and permanent pacemaker implantation was required in 11.7% of patients. The repositionable 14-F equivalent Evolut R TAVR system is safe and effective at treating high-risk symptomatic aortic stenosis patients. Repositioning was successful when required in all patients, with low rates of moderate or severe paravalvular aortic regurgitation and low permanent pacemaker implantation. (The Medtronic CoreValve™ Evolut R™ CE Mark Clinical Study; NCT01876420). Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Aortic arch atherosclerosis in patients with severe aortic stenosis can be argued by greater day-by-day blood pressure variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Shinichi; Sugioka, Kenichi; Fujita, Suwako; Ito, Asahiro; Matsumura, Yoshiki; Hanatani, Akihisa; Takagi, Masahiko; Di Tullio, Marco R; Homma, Shunichi; Yoshiyama, Minoru

    2015-07-01

    Although it is well known that the prevalence of aortic arch plaques, one of the risk factors for ischemic stroke, is high in patients with severe aortic stenosis, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Increased day-by-day blood pressure (BP) variability is also known to be associated with stroke; however, little is known on the association between day-by-bay BP variability and aortic arch atherosclerosis in patients with aortic stenosis. Our objective was to clarify the association between day-by-day BP variables (average values and variability) and aortic arch atherosclerosis in patients with severe aortic stenosis. The study population consisted of 104 consecutive patients (mean age 75 ± 8 years) with severe aortic stenosis who were scheduled for aortic valve replacement. BP was measured in the morning in at least 4 consecutive days (mean 6.8 days) prior to the day of surgery. Large (≥4 mm), ulcerated, or mobile plaques were defined as complex plaques using transesophageal echocardiography. Cigarette smoking and all systolic BP variables were associated with the presence of complex plaques (p < 0.05), whereas diastolic BP variables were not. Multiple regression analysis indicated that day-by-day mean systolic BP and day-by-day systolic BP variability remained independently associated with the presence of complex plaques (p < 0.05) after adjustment for age, male sex, cigarette smoking, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes mellitus. These findings suggest that higher day-by-day mean systolic BP and day-by-day systolic BP variability are associated with complex plaques in the aortic arch and consequently stroke risk in patients with aortic stenosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A CASE OF OSTEOPOROSIS OF THE SPINE IN AN ELDERLY MALE WITH CALCIFIC AORTIC STENOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yu. Karpova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The given clinical example presents a case of concomitant diseases of the heart and axial skeleton. Calcific aortic stenosis detected by chance in an elderly male was associated with osteoporosis of the lumbar spine with moderate perturbation of the calcium–vitamin D–parathyroid hormone axis and with no classical risk factors for impaired bone mineral density. Possible approaches to pathogenetic therapy are described.

  17. Acute pulmonary edema due to stress cardiomyopathy in a patient with aortic stenosis: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Bayer, Monika F

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Stress cardiomyopathy is a condition of chest pain, breathlessness, abnormal heart rhythms and sometimes congestive heart failure or shock precipitated by intense mental or physical stress. Case presentation A 64-year-old male with a known diagnosis of moderate-to-severe aortic stenosis and advised that valve replacement was not urgent, presented with acute pulmonary edema following extraordinary mental distress. The patient was misdiagnosed as having a "massive heart attack" and...

  18. Problem: Heart Valve Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understanding Problems and Causes Heart Murmurs and Valve Disease "Innocent" Heart Murmur Problem: Valve Stenosis - Problem: Aortic Valve Stenosis - Problem: Mitral Valve Stenosis - Problem: Tricuspid Valve Stenosis - Problem: Pulmonary Valve Stenosis Problem: Mitral ...

  19. Cellular Mechanisms of Aortic Valve Calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiduleva, E V; Irtyuga, O B; Shishkova, A A; Ignat'eva, E V; Kostina, A S; Levchuk, K A; Golovkin, A S; Rylov, A Yu; Kostareva, A A; Moiseeva, O M; Malashicheva, A B; Gordeev, M L

    2018-01-01

    Comparative in vitro study examined the osteogenic potential of interstitial cells of aortic valve obtained from the patients with aortic stenosis and from control recipients of orthotopic heart transplantation with intact aortic valve. The osteogenic inductors augmented mineralization of aortic valve interstitial cells (AVIC) in patients with aortic stenosis in comparison with the control level. Native AVIC culture of aortic stenosis patients demonstrated overexpression of osteopontin gene (OPN) and underexpression of osteoprotegerin gene (OPG) in comparison with control levels. In both groups, AVIC differentiation was associated with overexpression of RUNX2 and SPRY1 genes. In AVIC of aortic stenosis patients, expression of BMP2 gene was significantly greater than the control level. The study revealed an enhanced sensitivity of AVIC to osteogenic inductors in aortic stenosis patients, which indicates probable implication of OPN, OPG, and BMP2 genes in pathogenesis of aortic valve calcification.

  20. Recovery from anemia in patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation--prevalence, predictors and clinical outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Arnous, Samer; Lønborg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Preoperative anemia is common in patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and has been linked to a poorer outcome--including a higher 1-year mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of successful TAVI...... on baseline anemia. METHODS: A total of 253 patients who survived at least 1 year following TAVI were included in this study. The prevalence, predictors and clinical outcome of hemoglobin (Hb)-recovery were assessed. RESULTS: The prevalence of baseline anemia was 49% (n = 124)--recovery from anemia occurred......-recovery, while blood transfusion (OR 0.31, P = 0.038) and chronic kidney disease (CKD, OR 0.33, P = 0.043) were identified as negative predictors at, respectively, one and two years after TAVI. When compared to patients without baseline anemia, those anemic patients with Hb-recovery had a similar functional...

  1. Sex, aging, and preexisting cerebral ischemic disease in patients with aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Acker, Michael A; Bilello, Michel; Melhem, Elias R; Stambrook, Elizabeth; Ratcliffe, Sarah J; Floyd, Thomas F

    2010-10-01

    Patients undergoing cardiac surgery have a high frequency of preexisting cerebral ischemic lesions, the presence of which appears to predict cognitive sequelae. Patients undergoing aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis (AS) incur an exceptionally high risk for perioperative cerebral ischemia. The extreme risk in this subgroup may arise from the preexisting burden of cerebral ischemic disease. We tested the hypotheses that increasing age, female sex, coronary artery disease, and the severity of AS are predictive of the severity of preexisting cerebral ischemic lesions. A total of 95 subjects were included in this study. Subjects were imaged on 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanners to obtain multimodal image sets which were used for the automatic segmentation of cerebral lesion volume. The dependence of lesion volume upon age, sex, coronary artery disease, and the severity of AS were tested. The results demonstrate a strong correlation between aging, female sex, and white matter and ischemia-like lesion volume in patients with aortic stenosis. Women and those of advanced age presenting for aortic valve replacement for AS may incur a particularly high risk for postoperative neurologic sequelae due to an exceptional preexisting burden of cerebral ischemic disease. Copyright © 2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Severe hemodynamic deterioration during epidural anesthesia for endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic stenosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsma, M; Herrera, P; Moreno, I; Matoses, S; Ortí, I; López, A; Alepuz, R

    2005-10-01

    A 72-year-old woman diagnosed with critical descending aortic stenosis was scheduled for endovascular treatment by angioplasty and implantation of an aortic stent. Her medical history included arterial hypertension, lipid metabolic disorder, obesity, Takayasu disease, dermatopolymyositis, and alleged allergy to iodine contrast and local anesthetics. After the allergies were ruled out, it was decided to use a regional anesthetic technique to avoid the postoperative complications of general anesthesia and achieve better hemodynamic control during surgery. Surgery was carried out under epidural anesthesia and intravenous sedation. After angioplasty and during self-expansion of the stent, the patient's hemodynamics deteriorated rapidly; she lost consciousness and required orotracheal intubation and immediate resuscitation measures. The literature describes in detail the management of patients with thoracic aortic lesions, including the most appropriate way to provide anesthesia. General anesthesia seems to be preferred, although care is taken to individualize the decision. We analyze this case of a patient with severe thoracic aortic stenosis undergoing endovascular treatment under epidural anesthesia.

  3. Differences in cardiovascular risk profile between electrocardiographic hypertrophy versus strain in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (from SEAS data)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders M; Gerdts, Eva; Boman, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Electrocardiograms are routinely obtained in clinical follow-up of patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS). The association with aortic valve, left ventricular (LV) response to long-term pressure load, and clinical covariates is unclear and the clinical value is thus uncertain. Data from...... clinical examination, electrocardiogram, and echocardiogram in 1,563 patients in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study were used. Electrocardiograms were Minnesota coded for arrhythmias and atrioventricular and intraventricular blocks; LV hypertrophy was assessed by Sokolow...

  4. Impact of baseline severity of aortic valve stenosis on effect of intensive lipid lowering therapy (from the SEAS study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdts, Eva; Rossebø, Anne Bjørhovde; Pedersen, Terje Rolf

    2010-01-01

    Retrospective studies have suggested a beneficial effect of lipid-lowering treatment on the progression of aortic stenosis (AS) in milder stages of the disease. In the randomized, placebo-controlled Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study, 4.3 years of combined treatment...... with simvastatin 40 mg and ezetimibe 10 mg did not reduce aortic valve events (AVEs), while ischemic cardiovascular events (ICEs) were significantly reduced in the overall study population. However, the impact of baseline AS severity on treatment effect has not been reported. Baseline and outcomes data in 1...

  5. The impact of age and severity of comorbid illness on outcomes after isolated aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russo MJ

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mark J Russo,1,2 Alexander Iribarne,3 Emily Chen,2 Ashwin Karanam,2 Chris Pettit,2 Fabio Barili,4 Atman P Shah,5 Craig R Saunders1,2 1Barnabas Health Hospital, Newark/Livingston, NJ, USA; 2Barnabas Health Cardiovascular Clinical Research Center, Newark, NJ, USA; 3Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 4Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, S Croce Hospital, Cuneo, Italy; 5University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA Objectives: This study examines outcomes in a national sample of patients undergoing isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR for aortic stenosis, with particular focus on advanced-age patients and those with extreme severity of comorbid illness (SOI. Methods: Data were obtained from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample and included all patients undergoing AVRs performed from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2008. Patients with major concomitant cardiac procedures, as well as those aged <20 years, and those with infective endocarditis or aortic insufficiency without aortic stenosis, were excluded from analysis. The analysis included 13,497 patients. Patients were stratified by age and further stratified by All Patient Refined Diagnosis Related Group SOI into mild/moderate, major, and extreme subgroups. Results: Overall in-hospital mortality was 2.96% (n=399; in-hospital mortality for the ≥80-year-old group (n=139, 4.78% was significantly higher than the 20- to 49-year-old (n=9, 0.84%, P<0.001 or 50- to 79-year-old (n=251, 2.64%, P<0.001 groups. In-hospital mortality was significantly higher in the extreme SOI group (n=296, 15.33% than in the minor/moderate (n=22, 0.35%, P<0.001 and major SOI groups (n=81, 1.51%, P<0.001. Median in-hospital costs in the mild/moderate, major, and extreme SOI strata were $29,202.08, $36,035.13, and $57,572.92, respectively. Conclusion: In the minor, moderate, and major SOI groups, in-hospital mortality and costs are low regardless of age; these groups represent >85% of patients undergoing isolated AVR for aortic

  6. The hemodynamic effects of acute aortic regurgitation into a stiffened left ventricle resulting from chronic aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okafor, Ikechukwu; Raghav, Vrishank; Midha, Prem; Kumar, Gautam; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2016-06-01

    Acute aortic regurgitation (AR) post-chronic aortic stenosis is a prevalent phenomenon occurring in patients who undergo transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) surgery. The objective of this work was to characterize the effects of left ventricular diastolic stiffness (LVDS) and AR severity on LV performance. Three LVDS models were inserted into a physiological left heart simulator. AR severity was parametrically varied through four levels (ranging from trace to moderate) and compared with a competent aortic valve. Hemodynamic metrics such as average diastolic pressures (DP) and reduction in transmitral flow were measured. AR index was calculated as a function of AR severity and LVDS, and the work required to make up for lost volume due to AR was estimated. In the presence of trace AR, higher LVDS had up to a threefold reduction in transmitral flow (13% compared with 3.5%) and a significant increase in DP (2-fold). The AR index ranged from ∼42 to 16 (no AR to moderate AR), with stiffer LVs having lower values. To compensate for lost volume due to AR, the low, medium, and high LVDS models were found to require 5.1, 5.5, and 6.6 times more work, respectively. This work shows that the LVDS has a significant effect on the LV performance in the presence of AR. Therefore, the LVDS of potential TAVR patients should be assessed to gain an initial indication of their ability to tolerate post-procedural AR.

  7. Aortic coarctation associated with aortic valve stenosis and mitral regurgitation in an adult patient: a two-stage approach using a large-diameter stent graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novosel, Luka; Perkov, Dražen; Dobrota, Savko; Ćorić, Vedran; Štern Padovan, Ranka

    2014-02-01

    We report a case of a staged surgical and endovascular management in a 62-year-old woman with aortic coarctation associated with aortic valve stenosis and mitral regurgitation. The patient was admitted for severe aortic valve stenosis and mitral valve incompetence. During hospitalization and preoperative imaging, a previously undiagnosed aortic coarctation was discovered. The patient underwent a 2-stage approach that combined a Bentall procedure and mitral valve replacement in the first stage, followed by correction of the aortic coarctation by percutaneous placement of an Advanta V12 large-diameter stent graft (Atrium, Mijdrecht, The Netherlands) which to our knowledge has not been used in an adult patient with this combination of additional cardiac comorbidities. A staged approach combining surgical treatment first and endovascular placement of an Advanta V12 stent graft in the second stage can be effective and safe in adult patients with coarctation of the aorta and additional cardiac comorbidities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Early neonatal death and congenital left coronary abnormalities: ostial atresia, stenosis and anomalous aortic origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, Daniela; Bessières, Bettina; Houyel, Lucile; Bonnière, Maryse; Magny, Jean-François; Bajolle, Fanny; Boudjemline, Younes; Bonnet, Damien

    2013-04-01

    Congenital left coronary artery abnormalities such as ostial stenosis or atresia are extremely rare. Diagnosis in the neonate has not been reported. To describe five neonates with left coronary artery orifice abnormalities and discuss pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment options, with a focus on the importance of autopsy in unexpected neonatal death. Retrospective assessment of medical files of neonates with left coronary abnormalities seen during a 12-year period (2000-2012). Three neonates with anatomical (n=2) and functional (n=1) left coronary stenosis and two neonates with ostial atresia were identified. The three infants with coronary stenosis died within minutes to days after birth because of cardiac failure refractory to intensive care treatment; at autopsy, left coronary ostial stenosis (n=2) and high take-off with acute angle origin and tangential vertical course (n=1) were diagnosed. The fourth neonate was in cardiac failure due to critical aortic stenosis; left coronary ostial atresia was diagnosed during an emergency catheter procedure and the infant died after aortic valve dilatation. The fifth infant had a cardiac arrest on the third day of life; she was diagnosed with left coronary ostial atresia by coronary angiography and died during attempted revascularization surgery at 2 weeks of life. Congenital coronary ostial abnormalities can lead to severe heart failure and unexpected neonatal death. Systematic examination of the coronary arteries should be part of any neonatal autopsy. Coronary angiography remains the diagnostic method of choice despite advances in non-invasive imaging. Revascularization surgery seems indicated in symptomatic children based on small patient series. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  9. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation for bicuspid aortic valve stenosis: Acute and intermediate-term outcomes in a high volume institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anže Djordjević

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: We report our experience with transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI in patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV stenosis.Methods: Perioperative and intermediate-term follow-up data were retrospectively analysed. All procedures were performed within the premises of an experienced high-volume TAVI centre.Results: Tirty-three consecutive BAV patients (age 55 to 87 years underwent TAVI. Mean logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE was 23,2 ± 19,3. Transapical Edwards Sapien® valve was implanted in the majority of patients (87.9 %. Nine patients (27.3 % required post-ballooning of the implanted valve for moderate to severe paravalvular leak, 3 patients (9 % required a second valve implantation for persistent severe paravalvular leak, and 2 (6 % required conversion to conventional surgery. Post-operative mild aortic regurgitation (AR was presented in 12 patients (36.4% and AR = 2 in 3 %. No AR > 2 was observed. Te device success rate according to the valve academic research consortium (VARC criteria was 82 %. Similar BAV anatomy, calcium distribution, type and size of implanted valve were noticed in patients with and without residual AR. Tere was no thirty-day mortality. Two-year estimated survival was 70 % (CI: 52.7–93.1 and was similar in patients with and without post-procedural residual paravalvular leak.Conclusions: TAVI in BAV stenosis is feasible but, even in experienced centres, is technically more challenging and is associated with a higher rate of post-dilatation, re-valving, and conversion to conventional surgery. Results should be re-tested in light of the recent introduction of second-generation TAVI prostheses.

  10. Impact of Valvuloarterial Impedance on Concentric Remodeling in Aortic Stenosis and Its Regression after Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jeong Yoon; Seo, Jeong-Sook; Sun, Byung Joo; Kim, Dae-Hee; Song, Jong-Min; Kang, Duk-Hyun; Song, Jae-Kwan

    2016-09-01

    Left ventricle (LV) in patients with aortic stenosis (AS) faces a double hemodynamic load incorporating both valvular stenosis and reduced systemic arterial compliance (SAC). This study aimed to evaluate the impact of global LV afterload on LV hypertrophy (LVH) before and after aortic valve replacement (AVR). The study cohort included 453 patients (247 males; mean age, 64 ± 11 years) who underwent AVR. Pre- and post-AVR echocardiographic examinations were retrospectively analyzed including an index of valvuloarterial impedance (Z VA ) and LV mass index/LV end-diastolic volume index (LVMI/LVEDVI) as a parameter of LVH. Pre-AVR LVMI/LVEDVI was 2.7 ± 0.9 g/mL with an aortic valve area (AVA) of 0.6 ± 0.2 cm 2 . Z VA was 5.9 ± 1.9 mm Hg/mL/m 2 and showed a stronger correlation (β = 0.601, p regression in 322 patients with follow-up duration >1 year after AVR. Z VA is a major determinant of concentric remodeling in AS before AVR and LVH regression after AVR, which should be incorporated in routine evaluation of AS.

  11. Diabetes Mellitus Impairs Left Ventricular Mass Regression after Surgical or Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Severe Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Teruya; Toda, Koichi; Kuratani, Toru; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Yoshikawa, Yasushi; Fukushima, Satsuki; Saito, Shunsuke; Yoshioka, Daisuke; Kashiyama, Noriyuki; Daimon, Takashi; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    It is well-documented that persistent myocardial hypertrophy in patients with aortic stenosis is related to suboptimal postoperative outcomes after aortic valve replacement. Although diabetes is known to potentially exacerbate myocardial hypertrophy, it has yet to be examined if it affects postoperative left ventricular mass regression (LVMR). A single-centre, retrospective analysis was performed on 183 consecutive patients who underwent either surgical or transcatheter aortic valve replacement between 2010 and May 2013. Patient demographics, postoperative outcomes and echocardiographic data were obtained preoperatively and a year after surgery. There were 42 diabetic and 141 non-diabetic patients. Preoperative characteristics of diabetic patients were statistically similar to those of non-diabetic patients, except for higher prevalence of hyperlipidaemia (p regression analysis demonstrated that diabetes (standardised partial regression coefficient (SPRC)=-0.187, p=0.018), female gender (SPRC=0.245, p=0.026) and age (SPRC=0.203, p=0.018) were associated with poor postoperative LVMR. Patients with diabetes showed suboptimal postoperative LVMR, and the disease was a prognostic factor that was associated with poor LVMR. These findings suggest that diabetes may predispose the particular group of patients to worse postoperative outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Treatment of aortic stenosis with a self-expanding transcatheter valve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linke, Axel; Wenaweser, Peter; Gerckens, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    -centre 'real-world' patient population in highly experienced centres. METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients with severe aortic stenosis at a higher surgical risk in whom implantation of the CoreValve System was decided by the Heart Team were included. Endpoints were a composite of major adverse cardiovascular...... and cerebrovascular events (MACCE; all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, stroke, or reintervention) and mortality at 30 days and 1 year. Endpoint-related events were independently adjudicated based on Valve Academic Research Consortium definitions. A total of 1015 patients [mean logistic EuroSCORE 19.4 ± 12...

  13. [Calcified aortic stenosis. Semiology and non-invasive diagnostic aspects in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubach Reber, P A; Safir, D O; Guadalajara, J F

    1986-01-01

    Aortic stenosis (AoS) is a relatively common condition in elderly patients. It has different clinical manifestations from AoS seen in young individuals. We examined the manifestations of AoS in the elderly with emphasis on the findings that noninvasive techniques provide. Our study involved a retrospective analysis of 23 patients over 60 years old with diagnosis of calcified AoS established by hemodynamic studies. Calcification of the aortic valve on chest X-ray, left ventricular ejection time (LVET), from of the carotid pulse and thickness of ventricular walls by echocardiography proved to be useful variables for qualitative evaluation. The presence of syncope, murmur in mid-and end-systole and paradoxical splitting of the second sound as well as a LVET of more than 110% indicate a transaortic gradient greater than 50 mmHg. We conclude that evaluation by cardiac catheterization is required only in selected cases.

  14. A Double Whammy: Severe Aortic Stenosis and Cocaine Overwhelm the Mitral Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maini, Rohit; Lim, Jonathan; Liu, Jing; Birnbaum, Itamar; Mirza, Farooq; Lakkis, Nasser; Hamzeh, Ihab

    2018-01-01

    A 50-year-old man presented with acute onset dyspnea following cocaine use. He had severe aortic stenosis (AS), mild mitral regurgitation (MR) due to mitral valve prolapse, and no coronary artery disease on recent coronary angiography. He was in acute heart failure with signs of impending cardiogenic shock. Urgent bedside echocardiography revealed hyperdynamic left ventricular systolic function with acute severe MR from a ruptured chordae tendineae. The acute cocaine-induced spike of his already elevated left ventricular systolic pressure from severe AS likely precipitated chordal rupture of his vulnerable mitral valve. This patient underwent emergent mitral and aortic valve replacements. Although cocaine use has been associated with a myriad of cardiovascular complications, acute MR due to chordal rupture has not, to our knowledge, been previously reported in this setting. Prompt diagnosis with echocardiography and surgical intervention are of paramount importance in the management of acute MR.

  15. Echocardiographic evaluation of cardiac function response to removal of aortic stenosis: Surgical and trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aortic stenosis (AS is the commonest valve disease in the West, with a prevalence varying between 0.02% in adults under 44 years and 3-9% in those over 80 years of age 1, 2. The disease may remain “silent” and hence unnoticed for years, particularly in the elderly with naturally limited exercise. With the development of symptoms, patients may carry a mortality of 36-52%, 52-80% and 80-90% at 3, 5 and 10 years, respectively if left untreated, with a potential high risk of sudden death 3. Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR used to be the only effective treatment for severe AS, being the second indication for open heart surgery after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG 4. Trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI is a recently developed procedure which aims at non-surgical AVR in patients with severe, symptomatic and calcified AS who are at high surgical risk because of either poor left ventricular (LV function, ejection fraction (EF 80 years, previous CABG surgery and/ or aorta or other heart valve surgery, impaired kidney function, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD or pulmonary hypertension 5. Currently, this technique is not recommended in bicuspid AS patients due to the risk of incomplete and suboptimal deployment of the aortic prosthesis [6]. TAVI avoids open heart surgery and hence is likely to protect myocardial function. The purpose of this paper is to review the echocardiographic evaluation of LV, right ventricular (RV, and left atrial (LA function response to SAVR and TAVI for AS.

  16. Predictive value of platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio in severe degenerative aortic valve stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efe Edem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aortic valve stenosis (AVS is the most common cause of left ventricular outflow obstruction, and its prevalence among elderly patients causes a major public health burden. Recently, platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR has been recognized as a novel prognostic biomarker that offers information about both aggregation and inflammation pathways. Since PLR indicates inflammation, we hypothesized that PLR may be associated with the severity of AVS due to chronic inflammation pathways that cause stiffness and calcification of the aortic valve. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively enrolled 117 patients with severe degenerative AVS, who underwent aortic valve replacement and 117 control patients in our clinic. PLR was defined as the absolute platelet count divided by the absolute lymphocyte count. Severe AVS was defined as calcification and sclerosis of the valve with a mean pressure gradient of >40 mmHg. Results: PLR was 197.03 ± 49.61 in the AVS group and 144.9 ± 40.35 in the control group, which indicated a statistically significant difference (P < 0.001. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis demonstrated that PLR values over 188 predicted the severity of aortic stenosis with a sensitivity of 87% and a specificity of 70% (95% confidence interval = 0.734–0.882; P < 0.001; area under ROC curve: 0.808. Conclusion: We suggest that the level of PLR elevation is related to the severity of degenerative AVS, and PLR should be used to monitor patients' inflammatory responses and the efficacy of treatment, which will lead us to more closely monitor this high-risk population to detect severe degenerative AVS at an early stage.

  17. NOTCH1 Mutations in Aortic Stenosis: Association with Osteoprotegerin/RANK/RANKL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Irtyuga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The NOTCH pathway is known to be important in the pathogenesis of calcific aortic valve disease, possibly through regulators of osteoprotegerin (OPG, receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK, and its ligand (RANKL system. The purpose of the present study was to search for possible associations between NOTCH1 gene mutations and circulating levels of OPG and soluble RANKL (sRANKL in patients with aortic stenosis (AS. Methods. The study was performed on 61 patients with AS including 31 with bicuspid and 30 with tricuspid aortic valves. We applied a strategy of targeted mutation screening for 10 out of 34 exons of the NOTCH1 gene by direct sequencing. Serum OPG and sRANKL levels were assessed. Results. In total, 6 genetic variants of the NOTCH1 gene including two new mutations were identified in the study group. In an age- and arterial hypertension-adjusted multivariable regression analysis, the serum OPG levels and the OPG/sRANKL ratio were correlated with NOTCH1 missense variants. All studied missense variants in NOTCH1 gene were found in Ca(2+-binding EGF motif of the NOTCH extracellular domain bound to Delta-like 4. Conclusion. Our results suggest that the OPG/RANKL/RANK system might be directly influenced by genetic variants of NOTCH1 in aortic valve calcification.

  18. Observed and predicted reduction of ischemic cardiovascular events in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, Ingar; Boman, Kurt; Brudi, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    In the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) trial, combined ezetimibe (10 mg) and simvastatin (40 mg) decreased low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels by 50% and ischemic cardiovascular event (ICE) risk by 22% compared to placebo. A larger decrease in ICE risk might have been...... expected for the degree of lipid-lowering observed. This analysis investigated relations between changes in lipoprotein components (LCs), and ICE risk decrease in the SEAS trial in all patients, by severity of aortic stenosis (AS), and compared to results of other clinical trials. A total of 1,570 patients...

  19. Is the use of renin-angiotensin system inhibitors in patients with aortic valve stenosis safe and of prognostic benefit?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Charlotte; Abdulla, Jawdat

    2017-01-01

    risk [576/3389 patients receiving RASi vs. 1118/4384 controls died; relative risk 0.93 (95% confidence interval 0.78-1.11), P = 0.44]. Use of RASi was also observed to lower the risk of aortic valve replacement (AVR) surgery [67/2913 patients with RASi vs. 154/3666 controls underwent AVR; relative risk......Aortic valve stenosis (AVS) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, especially in the presence of symptoms and echocardiographic signs of left ventricular remodelling (i.e. increase in left ventricular mass, left ventricular dilation, and systolic dysfunction). Renin...... for inclusion (PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane library search criteria: aortic stenosis, aortic valve, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor in different combinations, published in English at any time up to 1 April 2016). Our analyses suggested that use of RASi was safe, with no observed increase in mortality...

  20. Continuous spinal anaesthesia with minimally invasive haemodynamic monitoring for surgical hip repair in two patients with severe aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Mercedes López

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Aortic stenosis increases perioperative morbidity and mortality, perioperative invasive monitoring is advised for patients with an aortic valve area 30 mm Hg and it is important to avoid hypotension and arrhythmias. We report the anaesthetic management with continuous spinal anaesthesia and minimally invasive haemodynamic monitoring of two patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing surgical hip repair. CASE REPORT: Two women with severe aortic stenosis were scheduled for hip fracture repair. Continuous spinal anaesthesia with minimally invasive haemodynamic monitoring was used for anaesthetic management of both. Surgery was performed successfully after two consecutive doses of 2 mg of isobaric bupivacaine 0.5% in one of them and four consecutive doses in the other. Haemodynamic conditions remained stable throughout the intervention. Vital signs and haemodynamic parameters remained stable throughout the two interventions. CONCLUSION: Our report illustrates the use of continuous spinal anaesthesia with minimally invasive haemodynamic monitoring as a valid alternative to general or epidural anaesthesia in two patients with severe aortic stenosis who are undergoing lower limb surgery. However, controlled clinical trials would be required to establish that this technique is safe and effective in these type or patients.

  1. Self-Expanding Transcatheter Aortic Valve System for Symptomatic High-Risk Patients With Severe Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichenspurner, Hermann; Schaefer, Andreas; Schäfer, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The CENTERA transcatheter heart valve (THV) is a low-profile, self-expanding nitinol valve made from bovine pericardial tissue that is 14-F compatible with a motorized delivery system allowing for repositionability. OBJECTIVES: The pivotal study evaluated safety and efficacy of this THV....... Echocardiograms and computed tomography scans were reviewed by core laboratories. The primary endpoint was all-cause mortality at 30 days. RESULTS: Between March 25, 2015 and July 5, 2016, 203 patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis and increased surgical risk, as determined by the heart team, were...... is the low incidence of permanent pacemaker implantations. (Safety and Performance Study of the Edwards CENTERA-EU Self-Expanding Transcatheter Heart Valve [CENTERA-2]; NCT02458560)....

  2. Medial arterial calcification, calcific aortic stenosis and mitral annular calcification in a diabetic patient with severe autonomic neuropathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, C C

    2012-02-03

    Medial arterial calcification (Monckeberg\\'s arteriosclerosis) is well described in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy. There is also a high prevalence of diabetes mellitus among subjects with calcific aortic stenosis and mitral annular calcification. We describe a diabetic patient with autonomic neuropathy and extensive medial arterial calcification who also had calcification of the aortic valve and of the mitral valve annulus. We propose that autonomic neuropathy may play a role in calcification of these structures at the base of the heart.

  3. Prognostic Impact of Low-Flow Severe Aortic Stenosis in Small-Body Patients Undergoing TAVR: The OCEAN-TAVI Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Akihisa; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kozuma, Ken; Nara, Yugo; Nagura, Fukuko; Kawashima, Hideyuki; Hioki, Hirofumi; Nakashima, Makoto; Yamamoto, Masanori; Takagi, Kensuke; Araki, Motoharu; Tada, Norio; Shirai, Shinichi; Yamanaka, Futoshi; Hayashida, Kentaro

    2017-05-11

    This study aimed to analyze the prognostic impact of low-flow (LF) severe aortic stenosis in small-body patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Western literature demonstrates a poor prognosis with paradoxical LF and low-flow low-gradient (LF-LG) severe aortic stenosis (AS), as defined by stroke volume index (SVi) OCEAN-TAVI]; UMIN000020423). Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Transfemoral Aortic Valve Implantation with the New Edwards Sapien 3 Valve for Treatment of Severe Aortic Stenosis-Impact of Valve Size in a Single Center Experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Wöhrle

    Full Text Available The third generation Edwards Sapien 3 (Edwards Lifesciences Inc., Irvine, California system was optimized to reduce residual aortic regurgitation and vascular complications.235 patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis were prospectively enrolled. Transcatheter aortic valve implantations (TAVI were performed without general anesthesia by transfemoral approach. Patients were followed for 30 days. Patients received 23mm (N = 77, 26mm (N = 91 or 29mm (N = 67 valve based on pre-procedural 256 multislice computer tomography. Mean oversizing did not differ between the 3 valves. There was no residual moderate or severe aortic regurgitation. Rate of mild aortic regurgitation and regurgitation index did not differ between groups. There was no switch to general anesthesia or conversion to surgery. Rate of major vascular complication was 3.0% with no difference between valve and delivery sheath sizes. Within 30 days rates of all cause mortality (2.6% and stroke (2.1% were low.In patients with severe aortic stenosis transfemoral TAVI with the Edwards Sapien 3 valve without general anesthesia was associated with a high rate of device success, no moderate or severe residual aortic regurgitation, low rates of major vascular complication, mortality and stroke within 30 days with no difference between the 3 valve sizes.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02162069.

  5. Immunological markers of frailty predict outcomes beyond current risk scores in aortic stenosis following transcatheter aortic valve replacement: Role of neopterin and tryptophan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Csordas

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: Increased immune activation and associated tryptophan degradation serve as hallmarks of frailty underscoring the prognostic role of baseline inflammation for outcome in patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing TAVR, and thus may provide a future therapeuthic target in this elderly patient population.

  6. Exercise-induced changes in left ventricular global longitudinal strain in asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Agnieszka K; Dobrowolski, Piotr P; Klisiewicz, Anna; Hoffman, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    The management of patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis (ASAS) is still under discussion. Therefore, it is advisable to search for the parameters of early damage to left ventricular (LV) function. The aim of the study was to assess exercise-induced changes in LV global longitudinal strain (GLS) in ASAS. The ASAS group consisted of 50 patients (26 women and 24 men, aged 38.4 ± 18.1 years) meeting the echocardiographic criteria of severe aortic stenosis (AVA 4 m/s, mean aortic gradient > 40 mm Hg), with normal LV ejection fraction (LVEF ≥ 55%) and sinus rhythm on electrocardiogram, and without significant concomitant valvular heart diseases. The control group consisted of 21 people matched for age and sex. Echocardiographic examinations and echocardiographic stress tests with the assessment of GLS using the speckle tracking imaging were performed. The ASAS group was characterised by statistically significantly higher LV mass index (LVMI) and higher LVEF. GLS values at rest in both groups were within normal limits but were significantly higher in the control group (-18.9 ± 2.4% vs. -20.7 ± 1.7%, p = 0.006). An increase in GLS at peak exercise in both groups was observed, lower in the ASAS group (the difference was not statistically significant: -0.8 ± 3.0% vs. -2.2 ± 3.1%, p = 0.086). Changes in GLS during exercise (ΔGLS) did not correlate with the parameters of the severity of aortic stenosis. In the multivariate model, LVMI proved to be a factor associated with GLS at rest and during exercise. In patients with ASAS, GLS is a non-invasive marker of an early stage of LV myocardial damage associated with myocardial hypertrophy. An increase in GLS during exercise in the ASAS group, smaller than in the control group, indicates a preserved functional reserve of the LV myocardium but smaller than in healthy individuals. The assessment of the clinical usefulness of exercise-induced changes in GLS requires further research.

  7. Impact of secondary hyperparathyroidism on ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis in hemodialysis-dependent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takami, Yoshiyuki; Tajima, Kazuyoshi

    2015-07-01

    In hemodialysis (HD)-dependent patients, secondary hyperparathyroidism induces cardiac hypertrophy. This study investigated whether parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels affect the degree of left ventricular (LV) mass regression in HD patients after aortic valve replacement (AVR) for aortic stenosis (AS). We retrospectively obtained preoperative and 2-year postoperative echocardiography and intact PTH measurements in 88 HD patients who underwent AVR, with bioprostheses (n = 35, 40%) and mechanical valves (n = 53, 60%) of effective orifice area >0.80 cm2/m2, between January 1997 and December 2010. The LV mass decreased significantly from 308 ± 88 to 217 ± 68 g at follow-up of 28 ± 4 months after AVR (p regression at follow-up was inversely related to preoperative PTH values (R = 0.44, p = 0.001). The LV mass regression at follow-up was significantly smaller in the patients (n = 47) with PTH ≥100 pg/mL than in those (n = 41) with PTH regression at 2-year follow-up (β = 0.23, r2 = 0.24, p = 0.02). In conclusion, the HD patients with high levels of PTH presented with less LV mass regression after AVR for AS without patient-prosthesis mismatch. Secondary hyperparathyroidism may impair regression of cardiac hypertrophy after AVR in HD patients with AS.

  8. Primary Mitral Valve Regurgitation Outcome in Patients With Severe Aortic Stenosis 1 Year After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: Echocardiographic Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florentino, Thiago Marinho; Bihan, David Le; Abizaid, Alexandre Antonio Cunha; Cedro, Alexandre Vianna; Corrêa, Amably Pessoa; Santos, Alexandre Roginski Mendes Dos; Souza, Alexandre Costa; Bignoto, Tiago Costa; Sousa, José Eduardo Moraes Rego; Sousa, Amanda Guerra de Moraes Rego

    2017-07-10

    Mitral valve regurgitation (MR), present in up to 74% of the patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS), can be a negative prognostic factor when moderate or severe. The outcome of MR after percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and predictors associated with that outcome have not been well established in the literature. To assess the outcome of primary MR in patients submitted to TAVI and to identify associated factors. Observational study of patients with symptomatic severe AS submitted to TAVI from January 2009 to April 2015 at two specialized centers. Echocardiographic outcome was assessed with data collected before and 1 year after TAVI. Of the 91 patients with MR submitted to TAVI and followed up for at least 12 months, 67 (73.6%) had minimum/mild MR before the procedure and 24 (26.4%) had moderate/severe MR. Of those with minimum/mild MR, 62 (92.5%) had no change in the MR grade (p valores de EuroSCORE II (p = 0,023) e STS morbidade (p = 0,027), quando comparados aos que continuaram na mesma classe. Observou-se mudança significativa no grau de IM após realização de TAVI. Este estudo sugere uma tendência de melhora da IM moderada ou grave após TAVI, o que se associou a escores de risco pré-operatórios menos elevados.

  9. Impact of Aortic Valve Replacement on Left Ventricular Remodeling in Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis and Severe Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abderrahmane Bakkali

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of aortic valve replacement on left ventricular function and remodeling among patients with severe aortic stenosis and severe left ventricular dysfunction. Methods: In this retrospective bicentric study extended over a 15-year period, 61 consecutive patients underwent isolated AVR for severe AS associated to reduced LV function. The mean age was 58.21 ± 12.50 years and 83.60 % were men. 70.50% of patients were in class III or IV NYHA. The mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF was 32.9 ± 5.6.The mean LVEDD and LVESD were respectively 63.6 ± 9.2 and 50.2 ± 8.8 mm. The mean calculated logistic EuroScore was 12.2 ±4.5. Results: The hospital mortality was 11.5%. Morbidity was marked mainly by low output syndrome in 40.8% of cases. After a median follow-up of 38 months we have recorded 3 deaths. Almost all survivors were in class I and II of NYHA. The mean LV end-diastolic and end-systolic diameters decreased significantly at late postoperative stage. The mean LV ejection fraction increased significantly from 32.9 ± 5.6 to 38.2 ± 9.3 and to 50.3 ± 9.6 in early and late postoperative stages, respectively. Multivariate linear regression analysis found that increased early postoperative LVEF (β= 0.44, 95% CI [0.14; 0.75], p=0.006 and low mean transprosthesis gradient (β=-0.72, 95% CI [-1.42; -0.02], p= 0.04 were the independent predictors of left ventricular systolic function recovery. Conclusion: Patients with aortic valve stenosis and impaired LV systolic function benefited from AVR as regard improvement of LV function parameters and regression of the LV diameters .This improvement depends mainly on early postoperative LVEF and mean transprosthesis gradient.

  10. Transesophageal echocardiography for cardiac thromboembolic risk assessment in patients with severe, symptomatic aortic valve stenosis referred for potential transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenders, Guy D; Paelinck, Bernard P; Wouters, Kristien; Claeys, Marc J; Rodrigus, Inez E; Van Herck, Paul L; Vrints, Christiaan J; Bosmans, Johan M

    2013-05-15

    Stroke is a devastating complication after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and might partially be related to cardiac embolization. The aim of this single-center prospective study was to determine the incidence of intracardiac thrombi and left atrial spontaneous echo contrast (SEC), both known predictors of cardiac embolic stroke, in patients referred for potential TAVI. One hundred four consecutive patients with severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis and at high or very high risk for surgery were included and underwent transesophageal echocardiography. In 11 patients (10.6%), intracardiac thrombi were detected, and 25 patients (24%) showed dense grade 2 SEC. Atrial fibrillation (p risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis referred for potential TAVI is high and can accurately be detected using transesophageal echocardiography. Systematic thromboembolic evaluation using transesophageal echocardiography is thus recommended in patients referred for TAVI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Short-term hemodynamic effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition in patients with severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Morten; Iversen, Kasper; Kjaergaard, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS), treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors has previously been considered contraindicated. However, there is a lack of clinical evidence to confirm these potential hemodynamic risks and benefits. METHODS: Forty-four patients...... hemodynamic parameters preserved both at rest and during exercise implying hemodynamic improvement with left ventricular unloading....

  12. Antihypertensive treatment with β-blockade in patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis and association with cardiovascular events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Casper N.; Greve, Anders M.; Rossebø, Anne B.

    2017-01-01

    Background--Patients with aortic stenosis (AS) often have concomitant hypertension. Antihypertensive treatment with a β-blocker (Bbl) is frequently avoided because of fear of depression of left ventricular function. However, it remains unclear whether antihypertensive treatment with a Bbl is asso...

  13. Cost-effectiveness of transcatheter aortic valve replacement compared with surgical aortic valve replacement in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis: results of the PARTNER (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves) trial (Cohort A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Matthew R; Magnuson, Elizabeth A; Lei, Yang; Wang, Kaijun; Vilain, Katherine; Li, Haiyan; Walczak, Joshua; Pinto, Duane S; Thourani, Vinod H; Svensson, Lars G; Mack, Michael J; Miller, D Craig; Satler, Lowell E; Bavaria, Joseph; Smith, Craig R; Leon, Martin B; Cohen, David J

    2012-12-25

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) compared with surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) for patients with severe aortic stenosis and high surgical risk. TAVR is an alternative to AVR for patients with severe aortic stenosis and high surgical risk. We performed a formal economic analysis based on cost, quality of life, and survival data collected in the PARTNER A (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves) trial in which patients with severe aortic stenosis and high surgical risk were randomized to TAVR or AVR. Cumulative 12-month costs (assessed from a U.S. societal perspective) and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were compared separately for the transfemoral (TF) and transapical (TA) cohorts. Although 12-month costs and QALYs were similar for TAVR and AVR in the overall population, there were important differences when results were stratified by access site. In the TF cohort, total 12-month costs were slightly lower with TAVR and QALYs were slightly higher such that TF-TAVR was economically dominant compared with AVR in the base case and economically attractive (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio economically dominated by AVR in the base case and economically attractive in only 7.1% of replicates. In the PARTNER trial, TAVR was an economically attractive strategy compared with AVR for patients suitable for TF access. Future studies are necessary to determine whether improved experience and outcomes with TA-TAVR can improve its cost-effectiveness relative to AVR. Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Does valvuloarterial impedance impact prognosis after surgery for severe aortic stenosis in the elderly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Minako; Najib, Mohammad Q; Marella, Punnaiah C; Temkit, M'hamed H; Belohlavek, Marek; Chaliki, Hari P

    2015-01-01

    Background Valvuloarterial impedance (Zva) was introduced as a prognostic measure in patients with aortic stenosis (AS). However, it is unclear whether Zva has a prognostic impact on survival after surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) in patients with severe AS with preserved ejection fraction (EF). Methods We retrospectively reviewed 929 consecutive patients who had AVR. We investigated 170 elderly patients (age >65 years, mean 76 years) who had AVR secondary to severe AS (mean gradient ≥40 mm Hg; aortic valve area ≤1 cm2; peak velocity ≥4 m/s). Patients with EF <50%, greater than moderate aortic regurgitation, prior heart surgery and concomitant mitral or tricuspid valve surgery were excluded. Zva was calculated and the patients were divided into two groups; low Zva, Zva <4.3 (n=82) and high Zva, Zva ≥4.3 (n=88). The end point was all-cause of death. Survival curves were calculated according to Kaplan-Meier method. Results Age, prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, chronic kidney disease (CKD), atrial fibrillation, symptoms, EF, E/e′ and concomitant coronary artery bypass graft were not different between the groups. Survival was not different between the groups at 5 years (70% in low Zva and 81% in high Zva; p=0.21) and for the entire follow-up period (p=0.23). Only age was a significant factor in predicting survival by multivariate analyses in Cox proportional hazards model after adjusting for Zva, CKD, atrial fibrillation and hypertension. Conclusions Our results suggest that preoperative Zva does not have a prognostic impact on postoperative survival in elderly patients with severe AS with preserved EF. Further investigation is needed to elucidate the controversial results. PMID:26196018

  15. Basal longitudinal strain predicts future aortic valve replacement in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Helle Gervig; Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Hassager, Christian

    2016-01-01

    analysis and coronary angiography by MDCT. The combined endpoint was indication for aortic valve replacement (AVR) and sudden cardiac death. During a median follow-up of 2.3 years (interquartile range 1.7-3.6) 43 patients (41%) met the endpoint of indication for AVR. The basal (13.4 ± 3.1% vs. 15.7 ± 3.......1%) and mid-ventricular segments (14.9 ± 2.7% vs. 16.2 ± 2.9%) were significantly reduced, but with sparing of the apical segments, in patients who later underwent AVR. In various multivariable Cox regression models, including only BLS, but not GLS, remained an independent predictor of AVR. CONCLUSION...

  16. Coronary Physiology During Exercise and Vasodilation in the Healthy Heart and in Severe Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumley, Matthew; Williams, Rupert; Asrress, Kaleab N; Arri, Satpal; Briceno, Natalia; Ellis, Howard; Rajani, Ronak; Siebes, Maria; Piek, Jan J; Clapp, Brian; Redwood, Simon R; Marber, Michael S; Chambers, John B; Perera, Divaka

    2016-08-16

    Severe aortic stenosis (AS) can manifest as exertional angina even in the presence of unobstructed coronary arteries. The authors describe coronary physiological changes during exercise and hyperemia in the healthy heart and in patients with severe AS. Simultaneous intracoronary pressure and flow velocity recordings were made in unobstructed coronary arteries of 22 patients with severe AS (mean effective orifice area 0.7 cm(2)) and 38 controls, at rest, during supine bicycle exercise, and during hyperemia. Stress echocardiography was performed to estimate myocardial work. Wave intensity analysis was used to quantify waves that accelerate and decelerate coronary blood flow (CBF). Despite a greater myocardial workload in AS patients compared with controls at rest (12,721 vs. 9,707 mm Hg/min(-1); p = 0.003) and during exercise (27,467 vs. 20,841 mm Hg/min(-1); p = 0.02), CBF was similar in both groups. Hyperemic CBF was less in AS compared with controls (2,170 vs. 2,716 cm/min(-1); p = 0.05). Diastolic time fraction was greater in AS compared with controls, but minimum microvascular resistance was similar. With exercise and hyperemia, efficiency of perfusion improved in the healthy heart, demonstrated by an increase in the relative contribution of accelerating waves. By contrast, in AS, perfusion efficiency decreased due to augmentation of early systolic deceleration and an attenuated rise in systolic acceleration waves. Invasive coronary physiological evaluation can be safely performed during exercise and hyperemia in patients with severe aortic stenosis. Ischemia in AS is not related to microvascular disease; rather, it is driven by abnormal cardiac-coronary coupling. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Quantification of aortic valve area and left ventricular muscle mass in healthy subjects and patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis by MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haimerl, J; Freitag-Krikovic, A; Rauch, A; Sauer, E

    2005-03-01

    MRI allows visualization and planimetry of the aortic valve orifice and accurate determination of left ventricular muscle mass, which are important parameters in aortic stenosis. In contrast to invasive methods, MRI planimetry of the aortic valve area (AVA) is flow independent. AVA is usually indexed to body surface area. Left ventricular muscle mass is dependent on weight and height in healthy individuals. We studied AVA, left ventricular muscle mass (LMM) and ejection fraction (EF) in 100 healthy individuals and in patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis (AS). All were examined by MRI (1.5 Tesla Siemens Sonate) and the AVA was visualized in segmented 2D flash sequences and planimetry of the performed AVA was manually. The aortic valve area in healthy individuals was 3.9+/-0.7 cm(2), and the LMM was 99+/-27 g. In a correlation analysis, the strongest correlation of AVA was to height (r=0.75, pvalve stenosis, AVA was 1.0+/-0.35 cm(2), in correlation to cath lab r=0.72, and LMM was 172+/-56 g. We compared the AS patients results with the data of the healthy subjects, where the reduction of the AVA was 28+/-10% of the expected normal value, while LMM was 42% higher in patients with AS. There was no correlation to height, weight or BSA in patients with AS. With cardiac MRI, planimetry of AVA for normal subjects and patients with AS offered a simple, fast and non-invasive method to quantify AVA. In addition LMM and EF could be determined. The strong correlation between height and AVA documented in normal subjects offered the opportunity to integrate this relation between expected valve area and definitive orifice in determining the disease of the aortic valve for the individual patient. With diagnostic MRI in patients with AS, invasive measurements of the systolic transvalvular gradient does not seem to be necessary.

  18. Prospective registry of symptomatic severe aortic stenosis in octogenarians: a need for intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sellés, M; Gómez Doblas, J J; Carro Hevia, A; García de la Villa, B; Ferreira-González, I; Alonso Tello, A; Andión Ogando, R; Ripoll Vera, T; Arribas Jiménez, A; Carrillo, P; Rodríguez Pascual, C; Casares i Romeva, M; Borras, X; Cornide, L; López-Palop, R

    2014-06-01

    To study the factors associated with choice of therapy and prognosis in octogenarians with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS). Prospective, observational, multicenter registry. Centralized follow-up included survival status and, if possible, mode of death and Katz index. Transnational registry in Spain. We included 928 patients aged ≥80 years with severe symptomatic AS. Aortic-valve replacement (AVR), transcatheter aortic-valve implantation (TAVI) or conservative therapy. All-cause death. Mean age was 84.2 ± 3.5 years, and only 49.0% were independent (Katz index A). The most frequent planned management was conservative therapy in 423 (46%) patients, followed by TAVI in 261 (28%) and AVR in 244 (26%). The main reason against recommending AVR in 684 patients was high surgical risk [322 (47.1%)], other medical motives [193 (28.2%)], patient refusal [134 (19.6%)] and family refusal in the case of incompetent patients [35 (5.1%)]. The mean time from treatment decision to AVR was 4.8 ± 4.6 months and to TAVI 2.1 ± 3.2 months, P treatment: TAVI Hazard ratio (HR) 0.68 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.49-0.93; P = 0.016) and AVR HR 0.56 (95% CI 0.39-0.8; P = 0.002). Octogenarians with symptomatic severe AS are frequently managed conservatively. Planned conservative management is associated with a poor prognosis. © 2013 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  19. Association of body mass index and visceral fat with aortic valve calcification and mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement: the obesity paradox in severe aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Mancio

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies showed that metabolic syndrome is associated with aortic valve calcification (AVC and poor outcomes in aortic stenosis (AS. However, if these associations change and how body fat impacts the prognosis of patients in late stage of the disease have been not yet explored. Aims To determine the association of body mass index (BMI and visceral fat with AVC and mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR. Methods This was a prospective cohort of 170 severe AS patients referred to TAVR. We quantified AVC mass score and fat depots including epicardial adipose tissue, intrathoracic fat, and abdominal visceral (VAF and subcutaneous fats by computed tomography. Fat depots were indexed to body surface area. All-cause and cardiovascular-related deaths after TAVR were recorded over a median follow-up of 1.2 years. Results Higher AVC mass was independently associated with low BMI and low VAF. All-cause mortality risk increased with the decrease of BMI and increment of VAF. A stratified analysis by obesity showed that in non-obese, VAF was inversely associated with mortality, whereas in obese, high VAF was associated with higher mortality (p value for interaction < 0.05. At long-term, hazard ratio [HR] with non-obese/low VAF was 2.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1–4.9; p = 0.021 and HR with obese/high VAF was 2.5 (95% CI 1.1–5.8; p = 0.031 compared with obese/low VAF patients. Conclusions In AS patients submitted to TAVR, BMI and VAF were inversely associated with AVC. Pre-intervention assessment of VAF by computed tomography may provide a better discrimination of mortality than BMI alone.

  20. New estimate of valvuloarterial impedance in aortic valve stenosis: A cardiac magnetic resonance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulat, Gilles; Kachenoura, Nadjia; Bollache, Emilie; Perdrix, Ludivine; Diebold, Benoit; Zhygalina, Valentina; Latremouille, Christian; Laurent, Stephane; Fabiani, Jean-Noel; Mousseaux, Elie

    2017-03-01

    Valvuloarterial impedance (Z VA ), estimating left ventricle (LV) afterload, has been proposed in transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) as a predictor of mortality in aortic valve stenosis (AVS). However, its calculation differs from arterial characteristic impedance (Z C ). Our aim was to apply the concept of Z C calculation to estimate Z VA from MR with carotid tonometry and to evaluate these indices through their associations with symptoms, LV diastolic function and aortic stiffness. In 40 patients with AVS (76 ± 13 years), Z VA-TI derived from velocity time integral and E/Ea were estimated by TTE. Z VA-INS , based on Z C formula, calculated as the instantaneous pressure gradient to peak flow ratio and aortic compliance were estimated by using MRI at 1.5 Tesla. Both Z VA estimates were higher in symptomatic than asymptomatic patients (707 ± 22 versus 579 ± 53 dyne.s/cm 5 , P = 0.031 for Z VA-INS and 4.35 ± 0.16 versus 3.33 ± 0.38 mmHg.m 2 /mL, P = 0.018 for Z VA-TI ). Although they were both associated with aortic compliance (r = -0.45; P = 0.006 for Z VA-INS and r = -0.43; P = 0.008 for Z VA-TI ) only Z VA-INS was associated with E/Ea (r = 0.50; P valve area was performed (R 2  = 0.41; P < 0.01). When Z VA-INS was added to the model, its overall significance was higher R 2  = 0.56 (P < 0.01) and Z VA-INS and LV mass were the only significant determinants. Z VA-INS was more strongly associated with diastolic dysfunction than usual parameters quantifying AVS severity. This new Z VA estimate could improve LV afterload evaluation. 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:795-803. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  1. Aortic Valve Stenosis and Atrial Fibrillation Influence Plasma Fibulin-1 Levels in Patients Treated with Coronary Bypass Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maria Lyck; Dahl, Jordi S; Argraves, W Scott

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Aortic valve stenosis (AS) causes cardiac fibrosis and left ventricular hypertrophy, and over time heart failure can occur. To date, a reliable marker to predict progression of AS or the development of heart failure is still lacking. In this study, we addressed the hypothesis that fib......Objectives: Aortic valve stenosis (AS) causes cardiac fibrosis and left ventricular hypertrophy, and over time heart failure can occur. To date, a reliable marker to predict progression of AS or the development of heart failure is still lacking. In this study, we addressed the hypothesis...... that fibulin-1 levels reflect myocardial fibrosis. Methods: Patients undergoing heart surgery at the Odense University were investigated. By 2012 data on outcome were obtained. Results: In 293 patients, plasma fibulin-1 levels were measured. Patients with AS or atrial fibrillation (AF) had significantly higher...

  2. Enhanced left ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis is associated with improved long-term survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ayyaz; Patel, Amit; Ali, Ziad; Abu-Omar, Yasir; Saeed, Amber; Athanasiou, Thanos; Pepper, John

    2011-08-01

    Aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis is usually followed by regression of left ventricular hypertrophy. More complete resolution of left ventricular hypertrophy is suggested to be associated with superior clinical outcomes; however, its translational impact on long-term survival after aortic valve replacement has not been investigated. Demographic, operative, and clinical data were obtained retrospectively through case note review. Transthoracic echocardiography was used to measure left ventricular mass preoperatively and at annual follow-up visits. Patients were classified according to their reduction in left ventricular mass at 1 year after the operation: group 1, less than 25 g; group 2, 25 to 150 g; and group 3, more than 150 g. Kaplan-Meier and multivariable Cox regression were used. A total of 147 patients were discharged from the hospital after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis between 1991 and 2001. Preoperative left ventricular mass was 279 ± 98 g in group 1 (n = 47), 347 ± 104 g in group 2 (n = 62), and 491 ± 183 g in group 3 (n = 38) (P regression such as ischemic heart disease or hypertension, valve type, or valve size used. Ten-year actuarial survival was not statistically different in patients with enhanced left ventricular mass regression when compared with the log-rank test (group 1, 51% ± 9%; group 2, 54% ± 8%; and group 3, 72% ± 10%) (P = .26). After adjustment, left ventricular mass reduction of more than 150 g was demonstrated as an independent predictor of improved long-term survival on multivariate analysis (P = .02). Our study is the first to suggest that enhanced postoperative left ventricular mass regression, specifically in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis, may be associated with improved long-term survival. In view of these findings, strategies purported to be associated with superior left ventricular mass regression should be considered when undertaking

  3. Differences in left ventricular remodelling in patients with aortic stenosis treated with transcatheter aortic valve replacement with corevalve prostheses compared to surgery with porcine or bovine biological prostheses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo, Thuc Anh; Hassager, Christian; Thyregod, Hans Gustav Hørsted

    2018-01-01

    Aims: Patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) can be considered for treatment with either transcatheter (TAVR) or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). The purpose of this study was to compare left ventricular (LV) remodeling in patients with AS after treatment with TAVR or SAVR. Methods...... were randomized to TAVR and 112 to SAVR. From baseline to 12 months post-procedure, aortic valve area (AVA) increased in both groups, but with a larger increase in the TAVR group (0.65 ± 0.04 cm2 vs. 1.02 ± 0.05 cm2 for SAVR and TAVR group, P regression was more.......0001). Paravalvular leakage (PVL) and pacemaker implantations were more common in patients treated with TAVR, which was associated with an increase in EDV (P regression at 1 year compared with patients undergoing TAVR, which may be due to increasing...

  4. Aortic stenosis concomitant with microscopic polyangiitis: a challenge in medical reasoning and thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Paulo Sampaio; Aiello, Vera Demarchi

    2014-01-01

    Microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) is part of the anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-related vasculitis, which usually presents as renal pulmonary syndrome. It is defined as a pauci-immune necrotizing small vessel vasculitis, which usually affects the kidneys, followed by the lungs. It also presents systemic symptoms. The etiology of MPA is still unclear, but evidence reinforces the autoimmune mechanisms as the main etiopathogenic factor. Aortic valve stenosis (AS) is not an uncommon disease whose etiology varies according to geographical differences and the patient's age. The natural history of AS begins with a prolonged asymptomatic period, but when symptomatic, respiratory failure is one of its main clinical presentations. The authors present the case of a 55-year-old woman who was admitted with the diagnosis of renal failure, anemia, and a cardiac murmur. The patient had been recently diagnosed with pneumonia. During hospitalization, diagnostic workup disclosed a normal kidney size as well as parenchymal thickness. A renal biopsy was undertaken but the specimen was exiguous, showing 4 sclerotic glomeruli and 1 glomerulus with crescentic glomerulonephritis. The search for ANCA was positive. The investigation of the cardiac murmur disclosed AS. The patient, on hemodialysis, presented episodes of respiratory failure, which was interpreted as acute pulmonary edema, but a suspicion of ANCA-related pulmonary renal syndrome was raised. However, the aortic valve replacement was prioritized. While awaiting cardiac surgery, the patient died because of respiratory insufficiency. Autopsy findings concluded that MPA with pulmonary hemorrhage due to vasculitis was the immediate cause of death. Although AS was present at autopsy and classified as moderate/severe, this lesion was a bystander in the process of this patient's end of life, demonstrating the value of autopsy for medical learning and reasoning purposes.

  5. Prognostic Value of Exercise-Stress Echocardiography in Asymptomatic Patients With Aortic Valve Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goublaire, Coppelia; Melissopoulou, Maria; Lobo, David; Kubota, Naozumi; Verdonk, Constance; Cimadevilla, Claire; Codogno, Isabelle; Brochet, Eric; Vahanian, Alec; Messika-Zeitoun, David

    2017-07-19

    This study sought to evaluate the prognostic value of mean pressure gradient (MPG) increase and peak systolic pulmonary artery pressure (SPAP) measured during exercise stress echocardiography in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (AS). Exercise testing is recommended in asymptomatic AS patients, but the additional value of exercise-stress echocardiography, especially the prognostic value of MPG increase and peak SPAP, is still debated. We enrolled all consecutive patients with pure, isolated, asymptomatic AS and preserved ejection fraction ≥50% and normal SPAP (20 mm Hg and/or SPAP at peak exercise >60 mm Hg). These 112 patients were managed conservatively. During a mean follow-up of 14 ± 8 months, an AS-related event occurred in 30 patients, and 25 patients underwent surgery. Neither MPG increase >20 mm Hg nor peak SPAP >60 mm Hg was predictive of occurrence of AS-related events or aortic valve replacement (all p > 0.20). In contrast, baseline AS severity was an important prognostic factor (all p < 0.01). In this observational study including 148 patients with asymptomatic AS, we confirmed and extended the importance of exercise testing for unveiling functional limitation. More importantly, neither the increase in MPG nor in SPAP at peak exercise was predictive of outcome. Our results do not support the use of these parameters in risk-stratification and clinical management of asymptomatic AS patients. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. No clinical effect of prosthesis-patient mismatch after transcatheter versus surgical aortic valve replacement in intermediate- and low-risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis at mid-term follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav Hørsted; Steinbrüchel, Daniel Andreas; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) after surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) for severe aortic valve stenosis (AVS) is common, but less common after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients considered at high risk for death after surgery. The objectives of this st......OBJECTIVES: Prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) after surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) for severe aortic valve stenosis (AVS) is common, but less common after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients considered at high risk for death after surgery. The objectives...... for TAVR, and younger age and higher body mass index for SAVR. At 2 years, there were numerical but no statistically significant differences between both TAVR and SAVR patients with severe and no severe PPM for MACCE (0.0 vs 12.8% for TAVR; P = 0.13, and 13.5 vs 7.0% for SAVR; P = 0.27), number of cardiac...

  7. SuPAR predicts postoperative complications and mortality in patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hodges, Gethin W; Bang, Casper N; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    . Methods: Baseline plasma suPAR levels were available in 411 patients who underwent AVR surgery during follow-up in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study. Cox analyses were used to evaluate suPAR in relation to all-cause mortality and the composite endpoint of postoperative...... complications (all-cause mortality, congestive heart failure, stroke and renal impairment) occurring in the 30-day postoperative period. Results: Patients with initially higher levels of suPAR were at increased risk of postoperative mortality with a HR of 3.5 (95% CI 1.4 to 9.0, P=0.008) and postoperative.......7 (95% CI 1.0 to 7.8, P=0.061); and postoperative complications with a HR of 2.5 (95% CI 1.3 to 5.0, P=0.007) and 2.4 (95% CI 1.2 to 4.8, P=0.011), respectively. Conclusion: Higher baseline suPAR levels are associated with an increased risk for postoperative complications and mortality in patients...

  8. Molecular genetic analysis of individuals with Williams syndrome and supravalvar aortic stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smoot, L.B.; Lacro, R.V.; Kunkel, L.M. [Children`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Pober, B. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Mutations at the elastin locus (chromosome 7q11.23) have been demonstrated in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) and familial supravalvar aortic stenosis (SVAS). Relationships between elastin mutations and vascular and/or neurodevelopmental pathology have yet to be defined. In determining phenotype-genotype correlations in WS/SVAS, we examined 35 individuals with sporadic WS, families with SVAS affecting multiple members, and sporadic cases of isolated obstructive vascular disease. Full length elastin cDNA was used to probe a human genomic library from which multiple elastin genomic clones have been isolated and ordered relative to the elastin gene, covering a minimum of 35 kb. (Additional genomic clones are being obtained by {open_quote}walking{close_quote} 5{prime} and 3{prime} to elastin.) Elastin genomic clones were used as probes in fluorescent in situ hybridization of metaphase chromosomes from WS/SVAS patients. Preliminary analysis confirms elastin deletions in WS patients, but have not yet been demonstrated in patients with isolated vascular disease using this technique. Results of deletional analysis in individuals representing a wide spectrum of phenotypes will be presented.

  9. Simulation of Exercise-Induced Syncope in a Heart Model with Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Sever

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe aortic valve stenosis (AVS can cause an exercise-induced reflex syncope (RS. The precise mechanism of this syncope is not known. The changes in hemodynamics are variable, including arrhythmias and myocardial ischemia, and one of the few consistent changes is a sudden fall in systemic and pulmonary arterial pressures (suggesting a reduced vascular resistance followed by a decline in heart rate. The contribution of the cardioinhibitory and vasodepressor components of the RS to hemodynamics was evaluated by a computer model. This lumped-parameter computer simulation was based on equivalent electronic circuits (EECs that reflect the hemodynamic conditions of a heart with severe AVS and a concomitantly decreased contractility as a long-term detrimental consequence of compensatory left ventricular hypertrophy. In addition, the EECs model simulated the resetting of the sympathetic nervous tone in the heart and systemic circuit during exercise and exercise-induced syncope, the fluctuating intra-thoracic pressure during respiration, and the passive relaxation of ventricle during diastole. The results of this simulation were consistent with the published case reports of exertional syncope in patients with AVS. The value of the EEC model is its ability to quantify the effect of a selective and gradable change in heart rate, ventricular contractility, or systemic vascular resistance on the hemodynamics during an exertional syncope in patients with severe AVS.

  10. Comparison of left ventricular outflow geometry and aortic valve area in patients with aortic stenosis by 2-dimensional versus 3-dimensional echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Takeji; Shiota, Maiko; Izumo, Masaki; Gurudevan, Swaminatha V; Tolstrup, Kirsten; Siegel, Robert J; Shiota, Takahiro

    2012-06-01

    The present study sought to elucidate the geometry of the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) in patients with aortic stenosis and its effect on the accuracy of the continuity equation-based aortic valve area (AVA) estimation. Real-time 3-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (RT3D-TEE) provides high-resolution images of LVOT in patients with aortic stenosis. Thus, AVA is derived reliably with the continuity equation. Forty patients with aortic stenosis who underwent 2-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography (2D-TTE), 2-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (2D-TEE), and RT3D-TEE were studied. In 2D-TTE and 2D-TEE, the LVOT areas were calculated as π × (LVOT dimension/2)(2). In RT3D-TEE, the LVOT areas and ellipticity ([diameter of the anteroposterior axis]/[diameter of the medial-lateral axis]) were evaluated by planimetry. The AVA is then determined using planimetry and the continuity equation method. LVOT shape was found to be elliptical (ellipticity of 0.80 ± 0.08). Accordingly, the LVOT areas measured by 2D-TTE (median 3.7 cm(2), interquartile range 3.1 to 4.1) and 2D-TEE (median 3.7 cm(2), interquartile range 3.1 to 4.0) were smaller than those by 3D-TEE (median 4.6 cm(2), interquartile range 3.9 to 5.3; p interquartile range 0.79 to 1.3, p interquartile range 0.64 to 0.94) and 2D-TEE (median 0.76 cm(2), interquartile range 0.62 to 0.95). Additionally, the continuity equation-based AVA by RT3D-TEE was consistent with the planimetry method. In conclusion, RT3D-TEE might allow more accurate evaluation of the elliptical LVOT geometry and continuity equation-based AVA in patients with aortic stenosis than 2D-TTE and 2D-TEE. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of the prosthesis-patient mismatch on long-term clinical outcomes after isolated aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Soonchang; Yi, Gijong; Youn, Young-Nam; Lee, Sak; Yoo, Kyung-Jong; Chang, Byung-Chul

    2013-11-01

    The effect of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) on clinical outcomes after aortic valve replacement remains controversial. We evaluated effect of PPM on long-term clinical outcomes after isolated aortic valve replacement in patients with predominant aortic stenosis. We analyzed data from patients with predominant aortic stenosis who underwent isolated aortic valve replacement between January 1995 and July 2010. The indexed effective orifice area, obtained by dividing the in vivo effective orifice area by the patient's body surface area, was used to define PPM as clinically nonsignificant (group I, 224 patients), mild (group II, 52 patients), moderate (group III, 39 patients), and severe (group IV, 36 patients). Early survival was not significantly different among the groups, but overall survival was decreased gradually in group IV. Overall survival at 12 years was lower in group IV than in group I (92.8% ± 2.7% vs 67.0 ± 10.1, respectively; P = .001). Cardiac-related-death-free survival at 12 years was lower in patients with severe PPM. Left ventricular mass index decreased during the follow-up period in all groups. But left ventricular mass index was less decreased in group IV compared with groups I, II, and III. Age, severe PPM, and ejection fraction <40%, and New York Heart Association Functional Class IV were independent risk factors of overall survival on multivariate analysis. Severe PPM was an independent risk factor for cardiac-related death. Severe PPM showed an adverse effect on long-term survival, and was an independent risk factor for cardiac-related death. In addition, patients with severe PPM showed less decreasing left ventricular mass index during follow-up. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of prosthesis-patient mismatch on the regression of secondary mitral regurgitation after isolated aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthetic valve in patients with severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeloni, Emiliano; Melina, Giovanni; Pibarot, Philippe; Benedetto, Umberto; Refice, Simone; Ciavarella, Giuseppino M; Roscitano, Antonino; Sinatra, Riccardo; Pepper, John R

    2012-01-01

    Secondary mitral regurgitation (SMR) is generally reduced after isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR), but there is important interindividual variability in the magnitude of this reduction. Prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) may hinder normalization of left ventricular geometry and pressure overload following AVR, therefore we aimed to investigate the relationship between PPM and regression of SMR following AVR for aortic valve stenosis. A total of 419 patients with AS who underwent isolated AVR at 2 institutions and presenting moderate SMR (mitral regurgitant volume 30 to 45 mL/beat) not considered for surgical correction were included in this study. Clinical and echocardiographic follow-up were completed at a median follow-up time of 37 months. PPM was defined as an indexed effective orifice area ≤0.85 cm(2)/m(2) and was found in 170/419 patients (40.6%). There were no significant differences in baseline and operative characteristics between patients with or without PPM. Patients with PPM had less regression of SMR following AVR compared with those with no PPM (change in mitral regurgitant volume: -11±4 versus -17±5 mL, respectively; Pregression model, which showed indexed effective orifice area (Pregression of SMR following AVR. This unfavorable effect was associated with worse functional capacity. These findings emphasize the importance of operative strategies aiming to prevent PPM in patients with aortic valve stenosis and concomitant SMR.

  13. Fused aortic valve without an elliptical-shaped systolic orifice in patients with severe aortic stenosis: cardiac computed tomography is useful for differentiation between bicuspid aortic valve with raphe and tricuspid aortic valve with commissural fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bak, So Hyeon; Ko, Sung Min [Konkuk University School of Medicine, Departments of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Meong Gun; Shin, Je Kyoun; Chee, Hyun Kun; Kim, Jun Suk [Konkuk University School of Medicine, Departments of Thoracic Surgery, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-01

    The objective is to determine cardiac computed tomography (CCT) features capable of differentiating between bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) and tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) in severe aortic stenosis (AS) patients with fused cusp and without elliptical-shaped systolic orifices. We retrospectively enrolled 53 patients who had severe AS with fused cusps and without an elliptical-shaped systolic orifice on CCT and who had undergone surgery. CCT features were analyzed using: (1) aortic valve findings including cusp size, cusp area, opening shape, midline calcification, fusion length, calcium volume score, and calcium grade; (2) diameters of ascending and descending aorta, and main pulmonary artery; and (3) rheumatic mitral valve findings. The variables were evaluated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. At surgery, 19 patients had BAV and 34 had TAV. CCT features including uneven cusp size, uneven cusp area, round-shaped systolic orifice, longer cusp fusion, and dilatation of ascending aorta were significantly associated with BAV (P < 0.05). In particular, fusion length (OR, 1.76; P = 0.001), uneven cusp area (OR, 10.46; P = 0.012), and midline calcification (OR, 0.08; P = 0.013) were strongly associated with BAV. CCT provides diagnostic clues that helps differentiate between BAV with raphe and TAV with commissural fusion in patients with severe AS. (orig.)

  14. Aortic or Mitral Valve Replacement With the Biocor and Biocor Supra

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-26

    Aortic Valve Insufficiency; Aortic Valve Regurgitation; Aortic Valve Stenosis; Aortic Valve Incompetence; Mitral Valve Insufficiency; Mitral Valve Regurgitation; Mitral Valve Stenosis; Mitral Valve Incompetence

  15. A prospective, randomised trial of transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation vs. surgical aortic valve replacement in operable elderly patients with aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Henrik Møller; Klaaborg, Kaj E; Nissen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    In a prospective randomised trial we aimed to compare transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation (a-TAVI) with surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in operable elderly patients.......In a prospective randomised trial we aimed to compare transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation (a-TAVI) with surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in operable elderly patients....

  16. Quantification of congenital aortic valve stenosis in pediatric patients: comparison between cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and transthoracic echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirin, Selma; Nassenstein, Kai; Neudorf, Ulrich; Jensen, Christoph J; Mikat, Christian; Schlosser, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies showed the reliability of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) in the quantification of aortic valve stenosis in adults. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the ability of cMRI in the quantification of congenital aortic valve stenosis (CAS) in children. Nineteen patients (mean age 14.0 ± 3.2 years, 15 boys and 4 girls) with CAS were imaged by cMRI and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). cMRI was performed on a 1.5-Tesla MR scanner (Magnetom Avanto; Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) using cine steady-state free precession sequences for the assessment of the aortic valve area (AVA) by MR planimetry and left-ventricular function. Phase-contrast measurement was used in cMRI to assess peak flow velocity above the aortic valve. A positive correlation was found between maximum systolic pressure gradient (MPG) as assessed by cMRI and TTE (28.9 ± 21.2 vs. 41.3 ± 22.7 mmHg, r = 0.84, p = 0.001) with a mean underestimation of 12.4 mmHg by cMRI. Only a weak correlation could be observed between AVA by cMRI and MPG at the aortic valve by TTE (r = -0.50, p = 0.029) and cMRI (r = -0.27, p = 0.40). Furthermore, a positive correlation between myocardial mass (cMRI) and MPG (TTE, r = 0.57, p = 0.01), but not between myocardial mass (cMRI) and AVA (cMRI, r = 0.07, p = 0.77), was found. The assessment of MPG by cMRI in patients with CAS is feasible with a trend toward underestimatation compared with TTE. Moreover, MPG seems to be a more accurate parameter than AVA regarding the prediction of myocardial hypertrophy.

  17. Platelet expression of stromal cell-derived factor-1 is associated with the degree of valvular aortic stenosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wurster

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Platelet surface expression of stromal-cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1 is increased during platelet activation and constitutes an important factor in hematopoetic progenitor cell trafficking at sites of vascular injury and ischemia. Enhanced platelet SDF-1 expression has been reported previously in patients suffering from acute coronary syndrome (ACS. We hypothesized that expression of platelet associated SDF-1 may also be influenced by calcified valvular aortic stenosis (AS. METHODS: We consecutively evaluated 941 patients, who were admitted to the emergency department with dyspnea and chest pain. Platelet surface expression of SDF-1 was determined by flow cytometry, AS was assessed using echocardiography and hemodynamic assessment by heart catheterization. A 1∶1 propensity score matching was implemented to match 218 cases with 109 pairs adjusting for age, sex, cardiovascular risk factors, and medication including ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, beta blockers, statins, aspirin, clopidogrel, GPIIb/IIIa antagonists, and vitamin K antagonists. RESULTS: Patients with valvular AS showed enhanced platelet SDF-1 expression compared to patients without AS (non-valvular disease, NV independent of ACS and stable coronary artery disease (SAP [mean fluorescence intensity (MFI for ACS (AS vs. NV: 75±40.4 vs. 39.5±23.3; P = 0.002; for SAP (AS vs. NV: 54.9±44.6 vs. 24.3±11.2; P = 0.008]. Moreover, the degree of AS significantly correlated with SDF-1 platelet surface expression (r = 0.462; P = 0.002. CONCLUSIONS: Valvular AS is associated with enhanced platelet-SDF-1 expression; moreover the degree of valvular AS correlates with SDF-1 platelet surface expression. These findings may have clinical implications in the future.

  18. Platelet expression of stromal cell-derived factor-1 is associated with the degree of valvular aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurster, Thomas; Tegtmeyer, Roland; Borst, Oliver; Rath, Dominik; Geisler, Tobias; Gawaz, Meinrad; Bigalke, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Platelet surface expression of stromal-cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) is increased during platelet activation and constitutes an important factor in hematopoetic progenitor cell trafficking at sites of vascular injury and ischemia. Enhanced platelet SDF-1 expression has been reported previously in patients suffering from acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We hypothesized that expression of platelet associated SDF-1 may also be influenced by calcified valvular aortic stenosis (AS). We consecutively evaluated 941 patients, who were admitted to the emergency department with dyspnea and chest pain. Platelet surface expression of SDF-1 was determined by flow cytometry, AS was assessed using echocardiography and hemodynamic assessment by heart catheterization. A 1∶1 propensity score matching was implemented to match 218 cases with 109 pairs adjusting for age, sex, cardiovascular risk factors, and medication including ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, beta blockers, statins, aspirin, clopidogrel, GPIIb/IIIa antagonists, and vitamin K antagonists. Patients with valvular AS showed enhanced platelet SDF-1 expression compared to patients without AS (non-valvular disease, NV) independent of ACS and stable coronary artery disease (SAP) [mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) for ACS (AS vs. NV): 75±40.4 vs. 39.5±23.3; P = 0.002; for SAP (AS vs. NV): 54.9±44.6 vs. 24.3±11.2; P = 0.008]. Moreover, the degree of AS significantly correlated with SDF-1 platelet surface expression (r = 0.462; P = 0.002). Valvular AS is associated with enhanced platelet-SDF-1 expression; moreover the degree of valvular AS correlates with SDF-1 platelet surface expression. These findings may have clinical implications in the future.

  19. Association between aortic valve calcification measured on non-contrast computed tomography and aortic valve stenosis in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Niels Herluf; Bønløkke Carlsen, Bjarke; Dahl, Jordi Sanchez

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aortic valve calcification (AVC) measured on non-contrast computed tomography (CT) has shown correlation to severity of aortic valve stenosis (AS) and mortality in patients with known AS. The aim of this study was to determine the association of CT verified AVC and subclinical...... AS in a general population undergoing CT. METHODS: CT scans from 566 randomly selected male participants (age 65-74) in the Danish cardiovascular screening study (DANCAVAS) were analyzed for AVC. All participants with a moderately or severely increased AVC score (≥300 arbitrary units (AU)) and a matched control...... ICD leads 16 individuals were excluded from the AVC scoring. Moderate or severe increased AVC was observed in 10.7% (95% CI: 8.4-13.7). Echocardiography was performed in 101 individuals; 32.7% (95% CI: 21.8 to 46.0) with moderate or high AVC score had moderate or severe AS, while none with no or low...

  20. The evaluation of the predictors of left ventricular systolic function improvement in patients with severe aortic stenosis after aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Ponych

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim – to evaluate clinical and echocardiographic predictors of the systolic function improvement in patients with aortic stenosis (AS and low left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF after aortic valve replacement (AVR. Material and methods. One-center study analyzed data received at clinical and instrumental examination of 72 consecutively examined patients with severe aortic stenosis and systolic dysfunction (LVEF less than 45 % selected for AVR with or without coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG. The average age of patients was 62 (lower-upper quartiles 34–79 years. All patients underwent clinical and instrumental investigations, including transthoracic echocardiography and coronary angiography. Patients were retrospectively divided into two groups: 48 (66.76 % patients with left ventricular ejection fraction increased more than 30 % in the early post-surgery period, and 24 (33.3 % – less than 30 %. In 21 (29.2 % patients AVR was combined with CABG. Results. Group of patients with greater growth of LVEF was characterized by lower body mass index (p = 0.016, greater initial signs of heart failure (p = 0.019, less frequent arterial hypertension. In addition, patients with LVEF growth over 30 % had more pronounced decrease of initial EF, greater end-systolic volume (ESV index and changes of some indices of diastolic LV function. The smaller increase in LVEF was associated with greater rate of atrial fibrillation (p = 0.028 and aortic regurgitation I degree (p = 0.012. Conclusions. The median LVEF in patients with AS and systolic dysfunction after AVR increased from 29 to 43 %. Under proper selection of patients with AS and reduced LVEF for surgery more than 30 % improvement of LVEF may be expected at early postoperative period. Critical AS with reduced LVEF, including low-flow, low gradient AS should not be regarded as an independent restriction to AVR.

  1. High- Versus Low-Gradient Severe Aortic Stenosis: Demographics, Clinical Outcomes, and Effects of the Initial Aortic Valve Replacement Strategy on Long-Term Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Tomohiko; Morimoto, Takeshi; Shiomi, Hiroki; Ando, Kenji; Kanamori, Norio; Murata, Koichiro; Kitai, Takeshi; Kawase, Yuichi; Izumi, Chisato; Miyake, Makoto; Mitsuoka, Hirokazu; Kato, Masashi; Hirano, Yutaka; Matsuda, Shintaro; Inada, Tsukasa; Nagao, Kazuya; Murakami, Tomoyuki; Takeuchi, Yasuyo; Yamane, Keiichiro; Toyofuku, Mamoru; Ishii, Mitsuru; Minamino-Muta, Eri; Kato, Takao; Inoko, Moriaki; Ikeda, Tomoyuki; Komasa, Akihiro; Ishii, Katsuhisa; Hotta, Kozo; Higashitani, Nobuya; Kato, Yoshihiro; Inuzuka, Yasutaka; Maeda, Chiyo; Jinnai, Toshikazu; Morikami, Yuko; Saito, Naritatsu; Minatoya, Kenji; Kimura, Takeshi

    2017-05-01

    There is considerable debate on the management of patients with low-gradient severe aortic stenosis (LG-AS), defined as aortic valve area strategy: n=977, and conservative strategy: n=1120) with high-gradient severe aortic stenosis (HG-AS) and 1712 patients (initial AVR strategy: n=219, and conservative strategy: n=1493) with LG-AS. AVR was more frequently performed in HG-AS patients than in LG-AS patients (60% versus 28%) during the entire follow-up. In the comparison between the initial AVR and conservative groups, the propensity score-matched cohorts were developed in both HG-AS (n=887 for each group) and LG-AS (n=218 for each group) strata. The initial AVR strategy when compared with the conservative strategy was associated with markedly lower risk for a composite of aortic valve-related death or heart failure hospitalization in both HG-AS and LG-AS strata (hazard ratio, 0.30; 95% confidence interval, 0.25-0.37; P strategy was associated with a better outcome than the conservative strategy (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.23-0.59; P strategy was associated with better outcomes than the conservative strategy in both HG-AS and LG-AS patients, although AVR was less frequently performed in LG-AS patients than in HG-AS patients. The favorable effect of initial AVR strategy was also seen in patients with LG-AS with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. URL: http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/index.htm. Unique identifier: UMIN000012140. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. ANMCO/SIC/SICI-GISE/SICCH Executive Summary of Consensus Document on Risk Stratification in elderly patients with aortic stenosis before surgery or transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulignano, Giovanni; Gulizia, Michele Massimo; Baldasseroni, Samuele; Bedogni, Francesco; Cioffi, Giovanni; Indolfi, Ciro; Romeo, Francesco; Murrone, Adriano; Musumeci, Francesco; Parolari, Alessandro; Patanè, Leonardo; Pino, Paolo Giuseppe; Mongiardo, Annalisa; Spaccarotella, Carmen; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto; Musumeci, Giuseppe

    2017-05-01

    Aortic stenosis is one of the most frequent valvular diseases in developed countries, and its impact on public health resources and assistance is increasing. A substantial proportion of elderly people with severe aortic stenosis is not eligible to surgery because of the advanced age, frailty, and multiple co-morbidities. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) enables the treatment of very elderly patients at high or prohibitive surgical risk considered ineligible for surgery and with an acceptable life expectancy. However, a significant percentage of patients die or show no improvement in quality of life (QOL) in the follow-up. In the decision-making process, it is important to determine: (i) whether and how much frailty of the patient influences the risk of procedures; (ii) how the QOL and the individual patient's survival are influenced by aortic valve disease or from other associated conditions; and (iii) whether a geriatric specialist intervention to evaluate and correct frailty or other diseases with their potential or already manifest disabilities can improve the outcome of surgery or TAVI. Consequently, in addition to risk stratification with conventional tools, a number of factors including multi-morbidity, disability, frailty, and cognitive function should be considered, in order to assess the expected benefit of both surgery and TAVI. The pre-operative optimization through a multidisciplinary approach with a Heart Team can counteract the multiple damage (cardiac, neurological, muscular, respiratory, and kidney) that can potentially aggravate the reduced physiological reserves characteristic of frailty. The systematic application in clinical practice of multidimensional assessment instruments of frailty and cognitive function in the screening and the adoption of specific care pathways should facilitate this task.

  3. The impact of age on the postoperative response of the diastolic function and left ventricular mass regression after surgical or transcatheter aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Teruya; Toda, Koichi; Kuratani, Toru; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Yoshikawa, Yasushi; Fukushima, Satsuki; Saito, Shunsuke; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2017-06-01

    We examined the impact of advanced age on left ventricular mass regression and the change in the diastolic function after aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis. The present study included 129 patients who underwent either surgical or transcatheter aortic valve replacement and 1-year postoperative echocardiography. The patient characteristics and echocardiographic findings were compared between patients who were regression was significantly greater (p = 0.02) and diastolic dysfunction was less prevalent in group Y (p = 0.02) in comparison to group O. The change in E/e' was significantly correlated with the left ventricular mass regression in group Y (p = 0.02), but not in Group O (p = 0.21). The patients in group O were less susceptible to improvements in myocardial remodeling and the diastolic function in comparison to those in group Y. The altered physiological response to aortic valve replacement might help to determine the appropriate timing of surgery in elderly patients.

  4. Management and Outcomes of Childhood Renal Artery Stenosis and Middle Aortic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumman, Rawan K; Matsuda-Abedini, Mina; Langlois, Valerie; Radhakrishnan, Seetha; Lorenzo, Armando J; Amaral, Joao; Mertens, Luc; Parekh, Rulan S

    2018-01-24

    Renal artery stenosis (RAS) in isolation or in conjunction with middle aortic syndrome (MAS), are important vascular causes of childhood hypertension. Few longitudinal studies have assessed the risk of surgical or endovascular intervention, and outcomes by etiology or extent of vascular disease. In a retrospective study of 93 children seen over 30 years with RAS and/or MAS, data on vascular involvement (isolated RAS vs RAS with MAS), etiology (unknown, inflammatory, or genetic), and management were collected. Time to first intervention (endovascular or surgical) was assessed by Cox regression. Mixed-effects analysis examined the longitudinal change in blood pressure after intervention compared to antihypertensive medications alone. Children were 7.0±5.4 years old. Etiology was unknown in 50%, genetic in 26% and inflammatory in 24% of children. Children had isolated RAS (49%) or MAS with or without RAS (51%). Overall, 70% were managed with surgical or endovascular intervention. After adjusting for age, sex, and systolic blood pressure, children with unknown etiology had a higher risk of intervention compared to those with genetic and inflammatory diseases (HR 3.1, 95% CI 1.7,5.6). Children with RAS and MAS were less likely to receive intervention (HR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2,0.8) than isolated RAS. Over a median follow-up of 2 years, 65% remained hypertensive. The longitudinal changes in systolic blood pressure did not differ by etiology, or between interventional and medical management. Hypertension persists despite endovascular or surgical management of childhood RAS and MAS highlighting the importance of close monitoring and ongoing medical management. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2018. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  5. Cardiovascular Structure and Function in Children With Middle Aortic Syndrome and Renal Artery Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumman, Rawan K; Slorach, Cameron; Hui, Wei; Matsuda-Abedini, Mina; Langlois, Valerie; Radhakrishnan, Seetha; Lorenzo, Armando J; Amaral, Joao; Mertens, Luc; Parekh, Rulan S

    2017-12-01

    Middle aortic syndrome (MAS) is a narrowing of the abdominal aorta, often in conjunction with renal artery stenosis (RAS). Structure and function of the cardiovascular system are not well understood. In a prospective cross-sectional study, 35 children with MAS or RAS or both (MAS/RAS) were compared with 140 age-, sex-, and body surface area-matched healthy children. Vascular assessment included carotid intima-media thickness and carotid distensibility using B-mode ultrasound and central and peripheral pulse wave velocities using applanation tonometry. Left ventricular structure and function were assessed by 2-dimensional and speckle-tracking echocardiography. Children with MAS or RAS were 12.5±3.0 years old at enrollment, and 50% were men. Carotid intima-media thickness (0.54±0.10 versus 0.44±0.05 mm; P children with disease compared with healthy children; however, after adjustment for systolic blood pressure z score, only carotid intima-media thickness remained significantly higher in the MAS/RAS group compared with the controls (β=0.07 [0.03, 0.10]). Peripheral pulse wave velocities and carotid distensibility were normal. Children with disease had significantly increased left ventricular mass and changes in diastolic function (lower E/a ratio and lower e' velocities). Systolic parameters, including ejection fraction, global longitudinal and circumferential strain, were similar to controls. Our findings demonstrate that children with MAS or RAS have evidence of carotid and left ventricular remodeling, without peripheral arterial involvement, which suggests a localized disease process. Left ventricular systolic function is preserved; however, subtle changes in diastolic function are observed. Carotid vessel changes are consistent with a 5- to 10-year aging, which underscores the importance of blood pressure control. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Impact of Vascular Hemodynamics on Aortic Stenosis Evaluation: New Insights Into the Pathophysiology of Normal Flow-Small Aortic Valve Area-Low Gradient Pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Nancy; Simard, Louis; Zenses, Anne-Sophie; Tastet, Lionel; Shen, Mylène; Clisson, Marine; Clavel, Marie-Annick

    2017-07-07

    About 50% of normal-flow/low-gradient patients (ie, low mean gradient [MG] or peak aortic jet velocity and small aortic valve area) have severe aortic valve calcification as measured by computed tomography. However, they are considered to have moderate aortic stenosis (AS) in current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines. The objective was thus to evaluate the effect of hypertension and reduced arterial compliance (rAC) on MG and V peak measurements. Doppler-echocardiography was performed in 4 sheep with experimentally induced severe and critical AS at: (1) normal aortic pressure, (2) during hypertension, and (3) with rAC. Hypertension and rAC induced a substantial decrease in MG/V peak compared with normal stage (both P ≤0.03) despite a stable transvalvular flow ( P >0.16). Hypertension and rAC resulted in a greater reduction of MG in critical (-42%) compared with severe (-35%) AS ( P ˂0.0001). Comprehensive Doppler-echocardiography and computed tomography were performed in 220 AS patients (mean age: 69±13 years; MG 29±18 mm Hg) with normal flow. The population was divided in 3 groups according to the presence of hypertension and rAC. The slope of the linear association between MG/V peak and aortic valve calcification divided by the cross-sectional area of the aortic annulus was significantly reduced in patients with hypertension and/or rAC compared with normotensive/normal AC patients ( P normal-flow/low-gradient and severe aortic valve calcification density were more frequent in hypertension and rAC groups compared with the normotensive/normal-AC group (16% and 12% compared with 2%; P =0.03). Hypertension and rAC are associated with a substantial reduction in MG/V peak for similar aortic valve calcification (ie, similar AS anatomic severity), which may lead to underestimation of AS hemodynamic severity. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  7. A call for an evidence-based approach to the Heart Team for patients with severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coylewright, Megan; Mack, Michael J; Holmes, David R; O'Gara, Patrick T

    2015-04-14

    Application of a Heart Team approach is now a central concept in the care of patients with severe aortic stenosis. It has Class I recommendations from American and European professional societies and is required for reimbursement for transcatheter aortic valve replacement in the United States. The rationale for changing traditional practice models is to improve patient selection, procedural planning, and management of patients at high or prohibitive surgical risk, thus improving outcomes. Although the concept is intuitive, a clear definition of the Heart Team, and data supporting its effectiveness, are lacking. Other specialties, including oncology, provide a precedent for investigation of the use of a multidisciplinary team and its impact on patient care. We highlight the need for clear definitions and shared metrics to advance our understanding of an optimal Heart Team approach, focusing on patient, clinician, and health system outcomes. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Quality of life in octogenarians after valve replacement due to aortic stenosis. A prospective comparison with younger patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, M; Janfjäll, H; Orth-Gomér, K; Undén, A; Rosenqvist, M

    1996-04-01

    Results of aortic valve surgery in octogenarians have been evaluated as event-free survival. However, little attention has been given to quality of life aspects. Thirty-two consecutive patients, mean age 83 +/- 2 years, undergoing valve replacement due to aortic stenosis, were compared to 30 patients, mean age 71 +/- 3 years, undergoing the same procedure. Mortality, morbidity and quality of life were studied. An interview was performed before surgery and 3 and 12 months postoperatively. The questionnaire contained items related to self-rated health, symptoms, physical ability, sleep disturbances and social and emotional functioning. Pre-operatively the older patient group was in a worse condition with a higher NYHA functional class and a more pronounced cardiomegaly. They had more cardiac symptoms and were more depressed. The control group had a higher score for physical ability and rated their quality of life as better. Postoperatively there was a higher early mortality rate in the octogenarians (9% vs 0%; ns). After 3 months, improvement of functional status and relief of symptoms was observed in both groups. Physical ability improved and the depression score decreased significantly in both groups. Self-rated health and quality of life improved. One year after valve replacement the improvement in quality of life was of a similar magnitude in the two groups. Following aortic valve replacement, octogenarians, despite a more compromised pre-operative status showed an improvement in symptomatology, physical ability and general well being, of a similar magnitude to that of the younger patients group. These findings lend further support to the recommendation that valve replacement should be performed in octogenarians with symptomatic aortic stenosis.

  9. Evaluation of NT-proBNP concentrations during exercise in asymptomatic patients with severe high-gradient aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowolski, Piotr; Lech, Agnieszka; Klisiewicz, Anna; Hoffman, Piotr

    2016-08-11

    INTRODUCTION The effect of asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis (ASAS) on N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels ar rest and during exercise, as well as their relevance for clinical practice remain controversial.  OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis of whether the evaluation of NT-proBNP concentrations during exercise provides additional information about the severity of aortic stenosis and left ventricular remodeling in patients with ASAS. PATIENTS AND METHODS A total of 50 patients with ASAS (mean age, 38.4 ±18.1 years) and 21 healthy subjects (mean age, 43.4 ±10.6 years) were enrolled. Rest and exercise echocardiography was performed to evaluate maximum velocity (Vmax), mean aortic gradient (AG), and aortic valve area (AVA). The left ventricular mass index (LVMI) was calculated. NT-proBNP concentrations at rest and during exercise were assessed, and the difference between the 2 values was calculated (ΔNT-proBNP). RESULTS NT-proBNP and ΔNT-proBNP levels at rest and during exercise were significantly higher in the ASAS group compared with the control group. In the ASAS group, NT-proBNP levels at rest significantly correlated with LVMI (r = 0.432; P <0.0001), AVA (r = -0.408; P <0.0001), Vmax (r = 0.375; P = 0.002), and mean AG (r = 0.257; P = 0.03). NT-proBNP levels during exercise significantly correlated with LVMI (r = 0.432; P <0.0001), mean AG (r = 0.401; P = 0.001), and AVA (r = -0.375; P = 0.001). In the multivariate logistic regression model, the factors independently associated with NT-proBNP both at rest and during exercise were age, AVA, and LVMI. CONCLUSIONS NT-proBNP levels at rest provide valuable information for identifying patients with more advanced left ventricular hypertrophy secondary to severe aortic stenosis. NT-proBNP levels during exercise do not provide new information on the severity of AS.

  10. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients with severe aortic stenosis who are at high risk for surgical complications: summary assessment of the California Technology Assessment Forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Jeffrey A; Sellke, Frank W; Schaff, Hartzell V

    2014-08-01

    The California Technology Assessment Forum is dedicated to assessment and public reporting of syntheses of available data on medical technologies. In this assessment, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) was evaluated for patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) who are at high risk for complications. In this assessment, 5 criteria were used: Regulatory approval, sufficient scientific evidence to allow conclusions on effectiveness, evidence that the technology improves net health outcomes, evidence that the technology is as beneficial as established methods, and availability of the technology outside investigational settings. In this assessment, all 5 criteria were judged to have been met. The primary benefit of TAVR is the ability to treat AS in patients who would otherwise be ineligible for surgical aortic valve replacement. It may also be useful for patients at high surgical risk by potentially reducing periprocedural complications and avoiding the morbidity and recovery from undergoing heart surgery. Potential harms include the need for conversion to an open procedure, perioperative death, myocardial infarction, stroke, bleeding, valve embolization, aortic regurgitation, heart block that requires a permanent pacemaker, renal failure, pulmonary failure, and major vascular complications such as cardiac perforation or arterial dissection. Potential long-term harms include death, stroke, valve failure or clotting, and endocarditis. As highlighted at the February 2012 California Technology Assessment Forum meeting, the dispersion of this technology to new centers across the United States must proceed with careful thought given to training and proctoring multidisciplinary teams to become new centers of excellence. TAVR is a potentially lifesaving procedure that may improve quality of life for patients at high risk for surgical AVR. However, attention needs to be paid to appropriate patient selection, their preoperative evaluation, surgical techniques, and

  11. Predictors of Paravalvular Regurgitation After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation for Aortic Stenosis Using New-Generation Balloon-Expandable SAPIEN 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Hidehiro; Hoelschermann, Frank; Tambor, Grit; Yoon, Sung-Han; Neuss, Michael; Butter, Christian

    2017-02-15

    Paravalvular regurgitation (PVR) is a common and serious complication after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). New-generation balloon-expandable SAPIEN 3 has an outer sealing skirt to minimize PVR. However, the predictors of PVR after SAPIEN 3 transcatheter heart valve (THV) implantation have not been well investigated. We sought to clarify the determinants of PVR after TAVI using SAPIEN 3 with quantitative multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) assessment. This study analyzed 281 patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who underwent TAVI using SAPIEN 3. Quantitative assessment of aortic root dimensions and calcium volume for leaflet, annulus, and left ventricular outflow tract were retrospectively performed with MDCT. MDCT nominal area oversizing was calculated using the following formula: % oversizing = (THV nominal area/MDCT derived annular area - 1) × 100. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the predictors of PVR greater than or equal to mild. PVR greater than or equal to mild was observed in 19% (53 of 281). Quantity and asymmetry of aortic valve calcium of annulus, left ventricular outflow tract, and leaflet were associated with higher incidence of PVR greater than or equal to mild, except leaflet asymmetry. Lower percentage of THV oversizing was also associated with PVR. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that larger calcification volume of annulus and lower percentage of THV oversizing were independent predictors of PVR greater than or equal to mild. These results suggest that prosthesis/annulus incongruence and aortic annulus calcification predicted PVR greater than or equal to mild after TAVI using SAPIEN 3. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of Randomized Lipid Lowering With Simvastatin and Ezetimibe on Cataract Development (from the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis Study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Casper N; Greve, Anders M; Dornonville de la Cour, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Recent American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on statin initiation on the basis of total atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk argue that the preventive effect of statins on cardiovascular events outweigh the side effects, although this is controversial. Studies...... indicate a possible effect of statin therapy on reducing risk of lens opacities. However, the results are conflicting. The Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study (NCT00092677) enrolled 1,873 patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis and no history of diabetes, coronary heart disease, or other...

  13. Lipoprotein(a-Associated Molecules Are Prominent Components in Plasma and Valve Leaflets in Calcific Aortic Valve Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Torzewski, MD

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The LPA gene is the only monogenetic risk factor for calcific aortic valve stenosis (CAVS. Oxidized phospholipids (OxPL and lysophosphatidic acid generated by autotaxin (ATX from OxPL are pro-inflammatory. Aortic valve leaflets categorized pathologically from both ATX–apolipoprotein B and ATX–apolipoprotein(a were measureable in plasma. Lipoprotein(a (Lp[a], ATX, OxPL, and malondialdehyde epitopes progressively increased in immunostaining (p < 0.001 for all. Six species of OxPL and lysophosphatidic acid were identified after extraction from valve leaflets. The presence of a constellation of pathologically linked, Lp(a-associated molecules in plasma and in aortic valve leaflets of patients with CAVS suggest that Lp(a is a key etiologic factor in CAVS. Key Words: aortic valve stenosis, autotaxin, inflammation, Lp(a, oxidation-specific epitopes

  14. Association of the C-Reactive Protein Gene (CRP rs1205 C>T Polymorphism with Aortic Valve Calcification in Patients with Aortic Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Wypasek

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Elevation in C-reactive protein (CRP levels have been shown in patients with aortic valve stenosis (AS. Minor allele of the CRP gene (CRP rs1205 C>T polymorphism has been associated with lower plasma CRP concentrations in cohorts of healthy and atherosclerotic patients. Considering the existing similarities between atherosclerosis and AS, we examined the effect of CRP rs1205 C>T polymorphism on the AS severity. Three hundred consecutive Caucasian patients diagnosed with AS were genotyped for the rs1205 C>T polymorphism using the TaqMan assay. Severity of the AS was assessed using transthoracic echocardiography. The degree of calcification was analyzed semi-quantitatively. Carriers of the rs1205 T allele were characterized by elevated serum CRP levels (2.53 (1.51–3.96 vs. 1.68 (0.98–2.90 mg/L, p < 0.001 and a higher proportion of the severe aortic valve calcification (70.4% vs. 55.1%, p = 0.01 compared with major homozygotes. The effect of CRP rs1205 polymorphism on CRP levels is opposite in AS-affected than in unaffected subjects, suggesting existence of a disease-specific molecular regulatory mechanism. Furthermore, rs1205 variant allele predisposes to larger aortic valve calcification, potentially being a novel genetic risk marker of disease progression.

  15. Aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation as predictors of atrial fibrillation during 11 years of follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widgren Veronica

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is limited information about any association between the onset of atrial fibrillation (AF and the presence of valvular disease. Methods We retrospectively examined 940 patients in sinus rhythm, examined by echocardiography in 1996. During 11 years of follow-up, we assessed the incidence of AF and outcome defined as valvular surgery or death, in relation to baseline valvular function. AS (aortic stenosis severity at baseline examination was assessed using peak transaortic valve pressure gradient. Results In univariate analysis, the risk of developing AF was related to AS (significant AS versus no significant AS; hazard ratio (HR 3.73, 95% confidence interval (CI 2.39-5.61, p Conclusions AS, but not MR, was independently predictive of development of AF and combined valvular surgery or death. In patients with combined AS and MR, the grade of AS, more than the grade of MR, determined the risk of AF and combination of valvular surgery or death. Further studies using contemporary echocardiographic quantification of aortic stenosis are warranted to confirm these retrospective data based on peak transaortic valve pressure gradient.

  16. Relevance of G8 scale in referring elderly patients with aortic stenosis requiring a TAVI for a geriatric consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Thézy, Albane; Lafargue, Aurélie; d'Arailh, Lydie; Dijos, Marina; Leroux, Lionel; Salles, Nathalie; Rainfray, Muriel

    2017-12-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) may soon become a significant public health issue. Referring elderly suffering from aortic stenosis for a transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) versus surgical valve replacement might be difficult and requires a multidisciplinary staff. G8 is a geriatric screening scale for frailty, validated in oncogeriatry. We study sensibility and specificity of G8 used by cardiologists in comparison to a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) performed by geriatrician. Prospective study, from February to July 2015, in Bordeaux university Hospital, France. Every elderly admitted for a TAVI had a G8 scale performed by cardiologist and CGA by a geriatrician in blind. Comorbidities were assessed using Cumulative Illness Rating Scale in his geriatric version (CIRS-G). CGA was abnormal if: MMSE value in comparison to gold-standard CGA. 49 patients were included (55.1% women, mean age 84.8 years old). Nearly half of the patients (48.96%) had multiple comorbidities (CIRS G score >3 for at least three items excluding the cardiology item). 38 CGA were abnormal (77.55%) and 41 G8 (83.67%). G8 had a sensibility of 100% (IC 95% [0.9-1]), a specificity of 72.7% (IC 95% [0.43-0.9]), a positive predictive value of 92.6% and a negative prospective value of 100% (IC: 95%). G8 scale seems to be an efficient geriatric screening tool for frailty in elderly undergoing TAVI in comparison to CGA. Simple and useful, G8 scale could be performed by cardiologists in older patients with AS for identifying patients with a geriatric risk profile in consultation before surgery. Further studies with bigger samples are needed to confirm these results.

  17. Percutaneous implantation of self-expandable aortic valve in high risk patients with severe aortic stenosis: The first experiences in Serbia

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    Nedeljković Milan A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Aortic stenosis (AS is the most common valvular heart disease in elderly people, with rather poor prognosis in symptomatic patients. Surgical valve replacement is the therapy of choice, but a significant number of patients cannot undergo surgical procedure. We presented initial experience of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI performed in Catheterization Laboratory of the Clinic for Cardiology, Clinical Center of Serbia. Methods. The procedures were performed in 5 patients (mean age 76 ± 6 years, 2 males, 3 female with severe and symptomatic AS with contraindication to surgery or high surgical risk. The decision to perform TAVI was made by the heart team. Pre-procedure screening included detailed clinical and echocardiographic evaluation, coronary angiography and computed tomography scan. In all the patients we implanted a self-expandable aortic valve (Core Valve, Medtronic, USA. Six months follow-up was available for all the patients. Results. All interventions were successfully performed without significant periprocedural complications. Immediate hemodynamic improvement was obtained in all the patients (peak gradient 94.2 ± 27.6 to 17.6 ± 5.2 mmHg, p < 0.001, mean pressure gradient 52.8 ± 14.5 to 8.0 ± 2.1 mmHg, p < 0.001. None of the patients developed heart block, stroke, vascular complication or significant aortic regurgitation. After 6 months, the survival was 100% with New York Heart Association (NYHA functional improvement in all the patients. Conclusion. This successful initial experience provides a solid basis to treat larger number of patients with symptomatic AS and high surgical risk who are left untreated. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON 175 020

  18. Monitoring of Serial Presurgical and Postsurgical Changes in the Serum Proteome in a Series of Patients with Calcific Aortic Stenosis

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    Kazumi Satoh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Comprehensive analysis of proteome differentially expressed in response to surgery or drug treatment is useful to understand biological responses to dispensed interventions. Here we investigated expression changes in sera of patients who suffered from calcific aortic stenosis (CAS, before and after surgery for aortic valve replacement. Materials and Methods. Sera obtained before and after surgery with depletion of highly abundant proteins were analyzed with iTRAQ labeling followed by nanoLC-MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS. Results. Fifty-one proteins shared in five patients were identified with differential levels in postsurgical and presurgical sera. Finally, 16 proteins that show statistically significant levels in patients’ sera compared with those in control sera (P<0.05 were identified. Most of the identified proteins were positive acute-phase proteins. Among three proteins other than acute-phase proteins, we confirmed increased levels of antithrombin-III and zinc-α-2-glycoprotein in postsurgical sera by Western blot analysis using other CAS patients’ sera. Furthermore, antithrombin-III and zinc-α-2-glycoprotein were not found among proteins with differential levels in postsurgical and presurgical sera of patients with aortic aneurysms that we identified in a previous study. Conclusions. The results indicated that antithrombin-III and zinc-α-2-glycoprotein would become unique monitoring proteins for evaluating pathophysiological and biochemical processes occurring before and after surgery for CAS.

  19. [OBSERVANT II: OBservational Study of Effectiveness of transcatheter aortic valve implantation with new geneRation deVices for severe Aortic steNosis Treatment. Study protocol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seccareccia, Fulvia; Tarantini, Giuseppe; Bedogni, Francesco; Berti, Sergio; Santoro, Gennaro; Tamburino, Corrado; Ussia, Gian Paolo; Barbanti, Marco; Baiocchi, Massimo; Ranucci, Marco; D'Errigo, Paola; Rosato, Stefano; Musumeci, Giuseppe

    2017-06-01

    The rapid spread of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) for the treatment of severe symptomatic aortic stenosis in the last decade in Italy has led to a gradually increasing use of TAVI procedures also in patients potentially eligible for aortic valve replacement (AVR). For this subset of patients, the OBSERVANT study (2011-2012) evaluated the short- and medium term outcome of TAVI vs AVR, at least for the first generations of TAVI devices, but failed to gather information on all the technological innovations occurred in recent years. The launch of a phase II of the study will allow to recruit a new series of TAVI, with different risk profiles compared with the historical OBSERVANT TAVI cohort, in order to assess whether and how much the use of new-generation devices mitigate the differences in outcomes recorded in the OBSERVANT study. OBSERVANT II is an observational multicenter, prospective, cohort study collecting data on patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis undergoing TAVI in Italian hospitals since December 15, 2016, for at least 12 months. For each patient, data on demographic characteristics, health status, type of intervention and presence of comorbidities will be collected. Mortality and incidence of in-hospital major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) within 36 months of intervention will be the primary adverse outcome. Secondary outcomes will include 30-day mortality and the incidence of MACCE at 12 and 24 months. The statistical hypotheses were formulated considering the results from the OBSERVANT study. Testing these hypotheses will require the recruitment of at least 823 new TAVI. The risk/propensity-adjustment techniques will be used to comparatively evaluate the effectiveness of TAVI vs AVR. Safety and efficacy profiles of the new-generation TAVI prosthesis; comparative effectiveness of the new TAVI prosthesis as compared to TAVI procedures of the OBSERVANT historical cohort; comparative effectiveness of the

  20. The JUPITER registry: 1-year results of transapical aortic valve implantation using a second-generation transcatheter heart valve in patients with aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silaschi, Miriam; Treede, Hendrik; Rastan, Ardawan J; Baumbach, Hardy; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Kappert, Utz; Eichinger, Walter; Rüter, Florian; de Kroon, Thomas L; Lange, Rüdiger; Ensminger, Stephan; Wendler, Olaf

    2016-11-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an established therapy for patients with aortic stenosis (AS) at high surgical risk. The JenaValve™ is a second-generation, self-expanding transcatheter heart valve (THV), implanted through transapical access (TA). During stent deployment, a specific 'clipping-mechanism' engages native aortic valve cusps for fixation. We present 1-year outcomes of the JUPITER registry, a post-market registry of the JenaValve for TA-TAVR. The JUPITER registry is a prospective, multicentre, uncontrolled and observational European study to evaluate the long-term safety and effectiveness of the Conformité Européenne-marked JenaValve THV. A total of 180 patients with AS were enrolled between 2012 and 2014. End-points were adjudicated in accordance with the valve academic research consortium document no. 1 definitions. The mean age was 80.4 ± 5.9 years and the mean logistic European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation I 21.2 ± 14.7%. The procedure was successful in 95.0% (171/180), implantation of a second THV (valve-in-valve) was performed in 2.2% (4/180) and conversion to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) was necessary in 2.8% (5/180). No annular rupture or coronary ostia obstruction occurred. Two patients required SAVR after the day of index procedure (1.1%). All-cause mortality at 30 days was 11.1% (20/180), being cardiovascular in 7.2% (13/180). A major stroke occurred in 1.1% (2/180) at 30 days, no additional major strokes were observed during 1 year. All-cause mortality after 30 days was 13.1% (21/160) and combined efficacy at 1 year was 80.8% (122/151). At 1-year follow-up, no patient presented with more than moderate paravalvular leakage, while 2 patients (3.2%) showed moderate, 12 (19.0%) mild and 49 (82.4%) trace/none paravalvular regurgitation. In a high-risk cohort of patients undergoing TA-TAVR for AS, the use of the JenaValve THV is safe and effective. In patients at higher risk for coronary ostia

  1. Outcome of patients with low-gradient "severe" aortic stenosis and preserved ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jander, Nikolaus; Minners, Jan; Holme, Ingar

    2011-01-01

    Retrospective studies have suggested that patients with a low transvalvular gradient in the presence of an aortic valve area <1.0 cm² and normal ejection fraction may represent a subgroup with an advanced stage of aortic valve disease, reduced stroke volume, and poor prognosis requiring early sur...

  2. A comparison of echocardiographic and electron beam computed tomographic assessment of aortic valve area in patients with valvular aortic stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piers, Lieuwe H.; Dikkers, Riksta; Tio, Rene A.; van den Berg, Maarten P.; Willems, Tineke P.; Zijlstra, Felix; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare electron beam computed tomography (EBT) with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) in determining aortic valve area (AVA). Thirty patients (9 females, 21 males) underwent a contrast-enhanced EBT scan (e-Speed, GE, San Francisco, CA, USA) and TTE within 17 +/-

  3. Impact of High-Dose Atorvastatin Therapy and Clinical Risk Factors on Incident Aortic Valve Stenosis in Patients With Cardiovascular Disease (from TNT, IDEAL, and SPARCL)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arsenault, Benoit J.; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Mora, Samia; Demicco, David A.; Bao, Weihang; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Amarenco, Pierre; Pedersen, Terje; Barter, Philip; Waters, David D.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials have not provided evidence for a role of statin therapy in reducing aortic valve stenosis (AVS) severity in patients with documented AVS. However, whether statin therapy could prevent the onset of AVS is unknown. Our objectives were (1) to compare the incidence rates of AVS among

  4. Renin–angiotensin system inhibition is not associated with increased sudden cardiac death, cardiovascular mortality or all-cause mortality in patients with aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Casper N; Greve, Anders M; Køber, Lars

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Renin-angiotensin system inhibition (RASI) is frequently avoided in aortic stenosis (AS) patients because of fear of hypotension. We evaluated if RASI with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) increased mortality in patients with mild...

  5. Lipoprotein(a) levels, genotype, and incident aortic valve stenosis: a prospective mendelian randomization study and replication in a case-control cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arsenault, Benoit J.; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Dubé, Marie-Pierre; Rhéaume, Eric; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Tardif, Jean-Claude

    2014-01-01

    Although a previous study has suggested that a genetic variant in the LPA region was associated with the presence of aortic valve stenosis (AVS), no prospective study has suggested a role for lipoprotein(a) levels in the pathophysiology of AVS. Our objective was to determine whether lipoprotein(a)

  6. Effect of aorto-iliac bifurcation and iliac stenosis on flow dynamics in an abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shivam; Usmani, Abdullah Y.; Muralidhar, K.

    2017-06-01

    Physiological flows in rigid diseased arterial flow phantoms emulating an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) under rest conditions with aorto-iliac bifurcation and iliac stenosis are examined in vitro through 2D PIV measurements. Flow characteristics are first established in the model resembling a symmetric AAA with a straight outlet tube. The influence of aorto-iliac bifurcation and iliac stenosis on AAA flow dynamics is then explored through a comparison of the nature of flow patterns, vorticity evolution, vortex core trajectory and hemodynamic factors against the reference configuration. Specifically, wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index in the bulge portion of the models are of interest. The results of this investigation indicate overall phenomenological similarity in AAA flow patterns across the models. The pattern is characterized by a central jet and wall-bounded vortices whose strength increases during the deceleration phase as it moves forward. The central jet impacts the wall of AAA at its distal end. In the presence of an aorto-iliac bifurcation as well as iliac stenosis, the flow patterns show diminished strength, expanse and speed of propagation of the primary vortices. The positions of the instantaneous vortex cores, determined using the Q-function, correlate with flow separation in the bulge, flow resistance due to a bifurcation, and the break in symmetry introduced by a stenosis in one of the legs of the model. Time-averaged WSS in a healthy aorta is around 0.70 N m-2 and is lowered to the range ±0.2 N m-2 in the presence of the downstream bifurcation with a stenosed common iliac artery. The consequence of changes in the flow pattern within the aneurysm on disease progression is discussed.

  7. Commercial versus PARTNER study experience with the transfemoral Edwards SAPIEN valve for inoperable patients with severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendyala, Lakshmana K; Minha, Sa'ar; Barbash, Israel M; Torguson, Rebecca; Magalhaes, Marco A; Okubagzi, Petros; Loh, Joshua P; Chen, Fang; Satler, Lowell F; Pichard, Augusto D; Waksman, Ron

    2014-01-15

    In patients with aortic stenosis who cannot have surgery, transcatheter aortic valve replacement using the Edwards SAPIEN valve has been shown to improve survival rate and is approved for commercial use in the United States. This study aims to assess the clinical profile, procedural characteristics, and in-hospital complications in patients treated with a commercial SAPIEN valve outside the clinical trial context. We retrospectively analyzed 69 consecutive patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement with a commercial SAPIEN valve compared with 55 Placement of AoRTic traNscathetER valves (PARTNER) trial patients from cohort B enrolled in the same institution by the same Heart Team. Compared with the commercial group, patients in the PARTNER cohort B had higher mean Society of Thoracic Surgeons score (10 ± 5 vs 9 ± 4, p = 0.04) and a lower rate of peripheral arterial disease (19% vs 44%, p = 0.004). Most patients in the commercial group had the procedure under conscious sedation (83% vs 66%, p = 0.03). Planned surgical cut down for vascular access was rare in the commercial group (1.4% vs 46%, p commercial group (7.2% vs 27%, p = 0.003; 2.9% vs 16%, p = 0.01; and 28% vs 60%, p commercial group. In conclusion, transfemoral commercial use of the Edwards SAPIEN valve for inoperable patients shows similar in-hospital mortality and stroke rates compared with PARTNER cohort B. The refinements in the procedure such as more conscious sedation, experience of the operators, and careful vascular planning in the commercial group led to lesser vascular and bleeding complications and shorter length of stay. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Implementing a Continuous Quality Improvement Program in a High-Volume Clinical Echocardiography Laboratory: Improving Care for Patients With Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samad, Zainab; Minter, Stephanie; Armour, Alicia; Tinnemore, Amanda; Sivak, Joseph A; Sedberry, Brenda; Strub, Karen; Horan, Seanna M; Harrison, J Kevin; Kisslo, Joseph; Douglas, Pamela S; Velazquez, Eric J

    2016-03-01

    The management of aortic stenosis rests on accurate echocardiographic diagnosis. Hence, it was chosen as a test case to examine the utility of continuous quality improvement (CQI) approaches to increase echocardiographic data accuracy and reliability. A novel, multistep CQI program was designed and prospectively used to investigate whether it could minimize the difference in aortic valve mean gradients reported by echocardiography when compared with cardiac catheterization. The Duke Echo Laboratory compiled a multidisciplinary CQI team including 4 senior sonographers and MD faculty to develop a mapped CQI process that incorporated Intersocietal Accreditation Commission standards. Quarterly, the CQI team reviewed all moderate- or greater-severity aortic stenosis echocardiography studies with concomitant catheterization data, and deidentified individual and group results were shared at meetings attended by cardiologists and sonographers. After review of 2011 data, the CQI team proposed specific amendments implemented over 2012: the use of nontraditional imaging and Doppler windows as well as evaluation of aortic gradients by a second sonographer. The primary outcome measure was agreement between catheterization- and echocardiography-derived mean gradients calculated by using the coverage probability index with a prespecified acceptable echocardiography-catheterization difference of <10 mm Hg in mean gradient. Between January 2011 and January 2014, 2093 echocardiograms reported moderate or greater aortic stenosis. Among cases with available catheterization data pre- and post-CQI, the coverage probability index increased from 54% to 70% (P=0.03; 98 cases, year 2011; 70 cases, year 2013). The proportion of patients referred for invasive valve hemodynamics decreased from 47% pre-CQI to 19% post-CQI (P<0.001). A laboratory practice pattern that was amenable to reform was identified, and a multistep modification was designed and implemented that produced clinically

  9. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide measurement is useful in predicting left ventricular hypertrophy regression after aortic valve replacement in patients with severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mirae; Choi, Jin-Oh; Park, Sung-Ji; Kim, Eun Young; Park, PyoWon; Oh, Jae K; Jeon, Eun-Seok

    2015-01-01

    The predictive factors for early left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) regression after aortic valve replacement (AVR) have not been fully elucidated. This study was conducted to investigate which preoperative parameters predict early LVH regression after AVR. 87 consecutive patients who underwent AVR due to isolated severe aortic stenosis (AS) were analysed. Patients with ejection fraction regression of LVH at the midterm follow-up was determined. In multivariate analysis, including preoperative echocardiographic parameters, only E/e' ratio was associated with midterm LVH regression (OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.22; p=0.035). When preoperative NT-proBNP was added to the analysis, logNT-proBNP was found to be the single significant predictor of midterm LVH regression (OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.08 to 3.71; p=0.028). By receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, a cut-off value of 440 pg/mL for NT-proBNP yielded a sensitivity of 72% and a specificity of 77% for the prediction of LVH regression after AVR. Preoperative NT-proBNP was an independent predictor for early LVH regression after AVR in patients with isolated severe AS.

  10. Speckle tracking echocardiography derived 2-dimensional myocardial strain predicts left ventricular function and mass regression in aortic stenosis patients undergoing aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staron, Adam; Bansal, Manish; Kalakoti, Piyush; Nakabo, Ayumi; Gasior, Zbigniew; Pysz, Piotr; Wita, Krystian; Jasinski, Marek; Sengupta, Partho P

    2013-04-01

    Regression of left ventricular (LV) mass in severe aortic stenosis (AS) following aortic valve replacement (AVR) reduces the potential risk of sudden death and congestive heart failure associated with LV hypertrophy. We investigated whether abnormalities of resting LV deformation in severe AS can predict the lack of regression of LV mass following AVR. Two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) was performed in a total of 100 subjects including 60 consecutive patients with severe AS having normal LV ejection fraction (EF > 50 %) and 40 controls. STE was performed preoperatively and at 4 months following AVR, including longitudinal strain assessed from the apical 4-chamber and 2-chamber views and the circumferential and rotational mechanics measured from the apical short axis view. In comparison with controls, the patients with AS showed a significantly lower LV longitudinal (p regression (>10 %) following AVR. In conclusion, STE can quantify the burden of myocardial dysfunction in patients with severe AS despite the presence of normal LV ejection fraction. Furthermore, resting abnormalities in circumferential strain at LV apex is related with a hemodynamic milieu associated with the lack of LV mass regression during short-term follow up after AVR.

  11. Functionality and Outcome in Older Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis (FOOPAS: an interdisciplinary study concept for a prospective trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogt F

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Ferdinand Vogt,1 Susanne Wicklein,2 Markus Gosch,2 Jürgen Jessl,3 Wolfgang Hitzl,4 Theodor Fischlein,1 Matthias Pauschinger,3 Steffen Pfeiffer,1 Dennis Eckner3 1Department of Cardiac Surgery, Paracelsus Medical University, Nuremberg, Germany; 2Department of Geriatric Medicine, Paracelsus Medical University, Nuremberg, Germany; 3Department of Cardiology, Paracelsus Medical University, Nuremberg, Germany; 4Research Office – Biostatistics, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg, Austria Background: Frailty is a geriatric syndrome that can influence mortality and functional recovery after treatment of severe aortic stenosis (AS. The integration of standardized geriatric assessment (GA in clinical practice is limited by a lack of consensus on how to measure it. Objectives: This study aims to compare the incremental predictive value of different frailty scales to predict the outcomes following surgical aortic valve replacement, transcatheter aortic valve implantation, and conservative treatment of severe AS. Methods: A prospective cohort of 300 older adults with severe AS will be assembled after standard clinical examinations and a comprehensive GA, including 18 different tests and values. Primary outcome parameters are overall mortality, cardiovascular mortality, quality of life, and functionality. Secondary parameters are overall complications, cardiovascular complications, and costs. Results: Expected results will contribute to the growing body of evidence on frailty based on parameters that influence clinical and functional outcome in elderly patients independent of the method of treatment. The pre-procedural assessment is expected to be valuable in discriminating new post-procedural complications from simple exacerbations of pre-existing conditions. Therefore, a new frailty test which is simple and feasible for application in a clinical routine by most medical professionals, may help in identifying patients for whom further GA should be

  12. Acute improvement in arterial-ventricular coupling after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (CoreValve) in patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bello, Vitantonio; Giannini, Cristina; De Carlo, Marco; Delle Donne, Maria Grazia; Nardi, Carmela; Palagi, Caterina; Cucco, Cuono; Dini, Frank Lloyd; Guarracino, Fabio; Marzilli, Mario; Petronio, Anna Sonia

    2012-01-01

    The recent development of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) to treat severe aortic stenosis (AS) offers a viable option for high-risk patients categories. Our aim is to evaluate the early effects of implantation of CoreValve aortic valve prosthesis on arterial-ventricular coupling by two dimensional echocardiography. Sixty five patients with severe AS performed 2D conventional echocardiography before, immediately after TAVI, at discharge (mean age: 82.6 ± 5.9 years; female: 60%). The current third generation (18-F) CoreValve Revalving system (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) was used in all cases. Vascular access was obtained by percutaneous approach through the common femoral artery; the procedure was performed with the patient under local anesthesia. We calculated, apart the conventional parameters regarding left ventricular geometry and the Doppler parameters of aortic flow (valvular load), the vascular load and the global left ventricular hemodynamic load. After TAVI we showed, by echocardiography, an improvement of valvular load. In particular we observed an immediate reduction of transaortic peak pressure gradient (P < 0.0001), of mean pressure gradient (P < 0.0001) and a concomitant increase in aortic valve area (AVA) (0.97 ± 0.3 cm(2)). Left ventricular ejection fraction improved early after TAVI (before: 47 ± 11, after: 54 ± 11; P < .0001). Vascular load, expressed by systemic arterial compliance, showed a low but significant improvement after procedure (P < 0.01), while systemic vascular resistances showed a significant reduction after procedure (P < 0.001). As a global effect of the integrated changes of these hemodynamic parameters, we observed a significant improvement of global left ventricular hemodynamic load, in particular through a significant reduction of end-systolic meridional stress (before: 80 ± 34 and after: 55 ± 29, P < 0.0001). The arterial-valvular impedance showed a significant reduction (before: 7.6 ± 2 vs after: 5.8 ± 2

  13. Effect of gender differences on 1-year mortality after transcatheter aortic valve implantation for severe aortic stenosis: results from a multicenter real-world registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherif, Mohammad A; Zahn, Ralf; Gerckens, Ulrich; Sievert, Horst; Eggebrecht, Holger; Hambrecht, Rainer; Sack, Stefan; Richardt, Gert; Schneider, Steffen; Senges, Jochen; Brachmann, Johannes

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this analysis is to examine the influence of gender differences on the outcome after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) from a multicenter real-world registry in Germany (TAVI registry). The impact of gender differences on the clinical outcome after TAVI was examined in small studies with conflicting results. Consecutive patients (n = 1,432) undergoing TAVI in the period between January 2009 and June 2010 in Germany were evaluated. Differences in all-cause mortality were examined with Kaplan-Meier estimates and proportional hazards models. Women comprised 57.8 % of the cohort. The Edwards Sapien valve (18.5 %) and CoreValve (81.5 %) were used through the transfemoral (87.7 %), subclavian (3.0 %), transapical (8.6 %), or transaortic approach (0.7 %). At baseline, women had higher aortic gradients and were older. Men had more comorbidities: prior myocardial infarction, prior revascularization, prior coronary artery bypass surgery, peripheral arterial vascular disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Women had more periprocedural vascular complications in comparison to men (25.2 vs. 17.2 %, p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in mortality at 30-day follow-up (7.6 % for women vs. 8.6 % for men, p = 0.55). The adjusted HR for 1-year all-cause mortality favored women, HR 0.75 (95 % CI 0.57-0.98, p = 0.0346) with a mortality rate of 17.3 vs. 23.6 % for men. Female gender is associated with better 1-year survival after TAVI. These results suggest that TAVI could be the best treatment modality for elderly women with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis.

  14. Association between aortic valve calcification measured on non-contrast computed tomography and aortic valve stenosis in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Niels Herluf; Carlsen, Bjarke Bønløkke; Dahl, Jordi Sanchez; Carter-Storch, Rasmus; Christensen, Nicolaj Lyhne; Khurrami, Lida; Møller, Jacob Eifer; Lindholt, Jes Sandal; Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve calcification (AVC) measured on non-contrast computed tomography (CT) has shown correlation to severity of aortic valve stenosis (AS) and mortality in patients with known AS. The aim of this study was to determine the association of CT verified AVC and subclinical AS in a general population undergoing CT. CT scans from 566 randomly selected male participants (age 65-74) in the Danish cardiovascular screening study (DANCAVAS) were analyzed for AVC. All participants with a moderately or severely increased AVC score (≥300 arbitrary units (AU)) and a matched control group were invited for a supplementary echocardiography. AS was graded by indexed aortic valve area (AVAi) on echocardiography as moderate 0.6-0.85 cm(2)/m(2) and severe AVC scoring. Moderate or severe increased AVC was observed in 10.7% (95% CI: 8.4-13.7). Echocardiography was performed in 101 individuals; 32.7% (95% CI: 21.8 to 46.0) with moderate or high AVC score had moderate or severe AS, while none with no or low AVC. A ROC analysis defined an AVC score ≥588 AU to be suggestive of moderate or severe AS (AUC 0.89 ± 0.04, sensitivity 83% and specificity 87%). In the univariate analyses, AVC was the only variable significantly associated with AS. This study indicates an association between CT verified AVC and subclinical AS. Copyright © 2016 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of Myocardial Collagen in Severe Aortic Stenosis With Preserved Ejection Fraction and Symptoms of Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echegaray, Kattalin; Andreu, Ion; Lazkano, Ane; Villanueva, Iñaki; Sáenz, Alberto; Elizalde, María Reyes; Echeverría, Tomás; López, Begoña; Garro, Asier; González, Arantxa; Zubillaga, Elena; Solla, Itziar; Sanz, Iñaki; González, Jesús; Elósegui-Artola, Alberto; Roca-Cusachs, Pere; Díez, Javier; Ravassa, Susana; Querejeta, Ramón

    2017-10-01

    We investigated the anatomical localization, biomechanical properties, and molecular phenotype of myocardial collagen tissue in 40 patients with severe aortic stenosis with preserved ejection fraction and symptoms of heart failure. Two transmural biopsies were taken from the left ventricular free wall. Mysial and nonmysial regions of the collagen network were analyzed. Myocardial collagen volume fraction (CVF) was measured by picrosirius red staining. Young's elastic modulus (YEM) was measured by atomic force microscopy in decellularized slices to assess stiffness. Collagen types I and III were measured as C I VF and C III VF, respectively, by confocal microscopy in areas with YEM evaluation. Compared with controls, patients exhibited increased mysial and nonmysial CVF and nonmysial:mysial CVF ratio (P < .05). In patients, nonmysial CVF (r = 0.330; P = .046) and the nonmysial:mysial CVF ratio (r = 0.419; P = .012) were directly correlated with the ratio of maximal early transmitral flow velocity in diastole to early mitral annulus velocity in diastole. Both the C I VF:C III VF ratio and YEM were increased (P ≤ .001) in nonmysial regions compared with mysial regions in patients, with a direct correlation (r = 0.895; P < .001) between them. These findings suggest that, in patients with severe aortic stenosis with preserved ejection fraction and symptoms of heart failure, diastolic dysfunction is associated with increased nonmysial deposition of collagen, predominantly type I, resulting in increased extracellular matrix stiffness. Therefore, the characteristics of collagen tissue may contribute to diastolic dysfunction in these patients. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Early Diastolic Strain Rate in Relation to Systolic and Diastolic Function and Prognosis in Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Barros-Gomes, Sergio; Videbæk, Lars

    2016-01-01

    .05); additionally, in a model with forward selection, E/SRe was the sole predictor (HR: 2.9; 95% CI: 1.6 to 5.5; p = 0.001. The overall log likelihood chi-square analysis of the predictive power of the multivariate model containing E/SRe was statistically superior to models based on the E/e' ratio. CONCLUSIONS: Pre......OBJECTIVES: This study examined the impact of early mitral inflow velocity-to-early diastolic strain rate (E/SRe) ratio on long-term outcome after aortic valve replacement (AVR) in aortic stenosis (AS). BACKGROUND: In AS, increased filling pressures are associated with a poor prognosis and can...... mellitus and LVEF, only E/SRe and left atrial volume index remained associated with overall mortality. Even when we included left atrial volume index in the multivariate model, E/SRe was significantly associated with overall mortality (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.2; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1 to 4.4; p

  17. Circulating levels of miR-133a predict the regression potential of left ventricular hypertrophy after valve replacement surgery in patients with aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Raquel; Villar, Ana V; Cobo, Manuel; Llano, Miguel; Martín-Durán, Rafael; Hurlé, María A; Nistal, J Francisco

    2013-08-15

    Myocardial microRNA-133a (miR-133a) is directly related to reverse remodeling after pressure overload release in aortic stenosis patients. Herein, we assessed the significance of plasma miR-133a as an accessible biomarker with prognostic value in predicting the reversibility potential of LV hypertrophy after aortic valve replacement (AVR) in these patients. The expressions of miR-133a and its targets were measured in LV biopsies from 74 aortic stenosis patients. Circulating miR-133a was measured in peripheral and coronary sinus blood. LV mass reduction was determined echocardiographically. Myocardial and plasma levels of miR-133a correlated directly (r=0.46, Pregression analysis identified plasma miR-133a as a positive predictor of the hypertrophy reversibility after surgery. The discrimination of the model yielded an area under the receiver operator characteristic curve of 0.89 (Pregression analysis revealed plasma miR-133a and its myocardial target Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome candidate 2/Negative elongation factor A as opposite predictors of the LV mass loss (g) after AVR. Preoperative plasma levels of miR-133a reflect their myocardial expression and predict the regression potential of LV hypertrophy after AVR. The value of this bedside information for the surgical timing, particularly in asymptomatic aortic stenosis patients, deserves confirmation in further clinical studies.

  18. Novel ELN mutation in a family with supravalvular aortic stenosis and intracranial aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsig, Anne Marie; Urban, Zsolt; Hucthagowder, Vishwanathan

    2017-01-01

    stenosis, various other arterial stenoses, sudden death, and intracranial aneurysms. A frameshift mutation in exon 12, not described before, was detected in the affected family members. This report emphasises the importance of family history, genetic counselling, and demonstrates the great variability...

  19. A meta-analysis and meta-regression of long-term outcomes of transcatheter versus surgical aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villablanca, Pedro A; Mathew, Verghese; Thourani, Vinod H; Rodés-Cabau, Josep; Bangalore, Sripal; Makkiya, Mohammed; Vlismas, Peter; Briceno, David F; Slovut, David P; Taub, Cynthia C; McCarthy, Patrick M; Augoustides, John G; Ramakrishna, Harish

    2016-12-15

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as an alternative to surgical aortic-valve replacement (SAVR) for patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) who are at high operative risk. We sought to determine the long-term (≥1year follow-up) safety and efficacy TAVR compared with SAVR in patients with severe AS. A comprehensive search of PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, conference proceedings, and relevant Web sites from inception through 10 April 2016. Fifty studies enrolling 44,247 patients met the inclusion criteria. The mean duration follow-up was 21.4months. No difference was found in long-term all-cause mortality (risk ratios (RR), 1.06; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.91-1.22). There was a significant difference favoring TAVR in the incidence of stroke (RR, 0.82; 95% CI 0.71-0.94), atrial fibrillation (RR, 0.43; 95% CI 0.33-0.54), acute kidney injury (RR, 0.70; 95% CI 0.53-0.92), and major bleeding (RR, 0.57; 95% CI 0.40-0.81). TAVR had significant higher incidence of vascular complications (RR, 2.90; 95% CI 1.87-4.49), aortic regurgitation (RR, 7.00; 95% CI 5.27-9.30), and pacemaker implantation (PPM) (RR, 2.02; 95% CI 1.51-2.68). TAVR demonstrated significantly lower stroke risk compared to SAVR in high-risk patients (RR, 1.49; 95% CI 1.06-2.10); no differences in PPM implantation were observed in intermediate-risk patients (RR, 1.68; 95% CI 0.94-3.00). In a meta-regression analysis, the effect of TAVR baseline clinical features did not affect the long-term all-cause mortality outcome. TAVR and SAVR showed similar long-term survival in patients with severe AS; with important differences in treatment-associated morbidity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Left ventricular global longitudinal strain is predictive of all-cause mortality independent of aortic stenosis severity and ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Arnold C T; Prihadi, Edgard A; Antoni, M Louisa; Bertini, Matteo; Ewe, See Hooi; Ajmone Marsan, Nina; Leung, Dominic Y; Delgado, Victoria; Bax, Jeroen J

    2017-07-28

    Left ventricular (LV) global longitudinal strain (GLS) may identify subclinical myocardial dysfunction in patients with aortic stenosis (AS). The aims of the present retrospective single centre study were to determine the independent prognostic value of LV GLS over LV ejection fraction (EF) and the role of LV GLS to further risk stratify severe AS patients before aortic valve replacement. A total of 688 patients (median age 72 years, 61.2% men) with mild (n = 130), moderate (n = 264) and severe AS (n = 294) were included. LV GLS was determined by 2D speckle tracking echocardiography. A total of 114 (16.6%) patients died before surgery during the study. When patients with severe AS and normal LVEF were dichotomized based on the median LV GLS value (-14.0%), patients with normal LVEF and 'preserved' LV GLS of ≤ -14% had significantly higher survival than patients with 'impaired' LV GLS of > -14%. There was no difference in survival between patients with normal LVEF but 'impaired' LV GLS ( > -14%) and patients with impaired LVEF (log-rank P = 0.34). LV GLS was independently associated with all-cause mortality on multivariable Cox regression analysis (hazard ratio 1.17, 95% confidence interval 1.09-1.26; P optimal timing of aortic valve replacement. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Integration of 3D imaging data in the assessment of aortic stenosis: impact on classification of disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Bridget; Schoenhagen, Paul; Kapadia, Samir R; Svensson, Lars G; Rodriguez, Leonardo; Griffin, Brian P; Tuzcu, E Murat; Desai, Milind Y

    2011-09-01

    In patients with aortic stenosis (AS), precise assessment of severity is critical for treatment decisions. Estimation of aortic valve area (AVA) with transthoracic echocardiographic (TTE)-continuity equation (CE) assumes a circular left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT). We evaluated incremental utility of 3D multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) over TTE assessment of AS severity. We included 51 patients (age, 81±8 years; 61% men; mean gradient, 42 ± 12 mm Hg) with calcific AS who underwent evaluation for treatment options. TTE parameters included systolic LVOT diameter (D) and continuous and pulsed wave (CW and PW) velocity-time integrals (VTI) through the LVOT and mean transaortic gradient. MDCT parameters included systolic LVOT area, ratio of maximal to minimal LVOT diameter (eccentricity index), and aortic planimetry (AVA(p)). TTE-CE AVA [(D(2)×0.786×VTIpw)/VTIcw] and dimensionless index (DI) [VTIpw/VTIcw] were calculated. Corrected AVA was calculated by substituting MDCT LVOT area into CE. The majority (96%) of patients had eccentric LVOT. LVOT area, measured on MDCT, was higher than on TTE (3.84 ± 0.8 cm(2) versus 3.03 ± 0.5 cm(2), PAVA was smaller than AVA(p) and corrected AVA (0.67 ± 0.1cm(2), 0.82 ± 0.3 cm(2), and 0.86 ± 0.3 cm(2), PAVA <0.8 cm(2)), which increased to 92% using corrected CE. In patients with suspected severe AS, incorporation of MDCT-LVOT area into CE improves congruence for AS severity.

  2. Usefulness of 3-Tesla cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of aortic stenosis severity in routine clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Franck; Iacuzio, Laura; Civaia, Filippo; Rusek, Stephane; Dommerc, Carine; Hugues, Nicolas; Alexandrescu, Clara; Dor, Vincent; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Dreyfus, Gilles

    2016-11-01

    Recently, 1.5-Tesla cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) was reported to provide a reliable alternative to transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) for the quantification of aortic stenosis (AS) severity. Few data are available using higher magnetic field strength MRI systems in this context. To evaluate the feasibility and reproducibility of the assessment of aortic valve area (AVA) using 3-Tesla CMR in routine clinical practice, and to assess concordance between TTE and CMR for the estimation of AS severity. Ninety-one consecutive patients (60 men; mean age 74±10years) with known AS documented by TTE were included prospectively in the study. All patients underwent comprehensive TTE and CMR examination, including AVA estimation using the TTE continuity equation (0.81±0.18cm 2 ), direct CMR planimetry (CMRp) (0.90±0.22cm 2 ) and CMR using Hakki's formula (CMRhk), a simplified Gorlin formula (0.70±0.19cm 2 ). Although significant agreement with TTE was found for CMRp (r=0.72) and CMRhk (r=0.66), CMRp slightly overestimated (bias=0.11±0.18cm 2 ) and CMRhk slightly underestimated (bias=-0.11±0.17cm 2 ) AVA compared with TTE. Inter- and intraobserver reproducibilities of CMR measurements were excellent (r=0.72 and r=0.74 for CMRp and r=0.88 and r=0.92 for peak aortic velocity, respectively). 3-Tesla CMR is a feasible, radiation-free, reproducible imaging modality for the estimation of severity of AS in routine practice, knowing that CMRp tends to overestimate AVA and CMRhk to underestimate AVA compared with TTE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Readmission rates after transcatheter aortic valve replacement in high- and extreme-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcillo, Jessica; Condado, Jose F; Binongo, Jose N; Lasanajak, Yi; Caughron, Hope; Babaliaros, Vasilis; Devireddy, Chandan; Leshnower, Bradley; Guyton, Robert A; Block, Peter C; Simone, Amy; Keegan, Patricia; Khairy, Paul; Thourani, Vinod H

    2017-08-01

    In high- or extreme-risk patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement, readmissions have not been adequately studied and are the subject of increased scrutiny by healthcare systems. The objectives of this study were to determine the incidence of 30-day and 1-year cardiac and noncardiac readmissions, identify predictors of readmission, and assess the association between readmission and 1-year mortality. A retrospective review was performed on 714 patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement from September 2007 to January 2015 at Emory University. Patients' median age was 83 years, and 46.6% were female. Early all-cause readmission for the cohort was 10.5%, and late readmission was 18.8%. Anemia was related to both early all-cause (hazard ratio [HR], 0.74) and cardiovascular-related readmission (HR, 0.60). A 23-mm valve implanted was associated with early all-cause readmission (HR, 1.73). Length of hospital stay was related to late all-cause (HR, 1.14) and cardiovascular-related readmission (HR, 1.21). Postoperative permanent stroke had an impact on late cardiovascular-related readmission (HR, 3.60; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-11.49). Multivariable analysis identified anemia as being associated with 30-day all-cause readmission, and anemia and postoperative stroke were associated with 30-day cardiovascular-related readmission. Readmissions seemed to be related to 1-year mortality (HR, 2.04; 95% confidence interval, 1.33-3.12). We show some baseline comorbidities and procedural complications that are directly associated with early and late readmissions, and anemia and postoperative stroke were associated with an increase in mortality. Moreover, we found that readmission was associated with double the hazard of death within 1 year. Whether treatment of identified risk factors could decrease readmission rates and mortality warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by

  4. Relation of osteoprotegerin in severe aortic valve stenosis to postoperative outcome and left ventricular function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbæk, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K

    2013-01-01

    ventricular (LV) function and remodeling and to evaluate the significance of preoperative OPG on long-term outcome in terms of survival and symptomatic improvement in 124 patients with severe AS scheduled for aortic valve replacement (AVR). Patients were divided according to tertiles of preoperative OPG...

  5. Left ventricular filling pressure estimation at rest and during exercise in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis: comparison of echocardiographic and invasive measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Morten; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Pecini, Redi

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Doppler index of left ventricular (LV) filling (E/e') is recognized as a noninvasive measure for LV filling pressure at rest but has also been suggested as a reliable measure of exercise-induced changes. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in LV filling pressure......, measured invasively as pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), at rest and during exercise to describe the relation with E/e' in patients with severe aortic stenosis. METHODS: Twenty-eight patients with an aortic valve areas

  6. Cost effectiveness of transcatheter aortic valve replacement compared to medical management in inoperable patients with severe aortic stenosis: Canadian analysis based on the PARTNER Trial Cohort B findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock-Howard, Rebecca L; Feindel, Christopher M; Rodes-Cabau, Josep; Webb, John G; Thompson, Ann K; Banz, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    The only effective treatment for severe aortic stenosis (AS) is valve replacement. However, many patients with co-existing conditions are ineligible for surgical valve replacement, historically leaving medical management (MM) as the only option which has a poor prognosis. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) is a less invasive replacement method. The objective was to estimate cost-effectiveness of TAVR via transfemoral access vs MM in surgically inoperable patients with severe AS from the Canadian public healthcare system perspective. A cost-effectiveness analysis of TAVR vs MM was conducted using a deterministic decision analytic model over a 3-year time horizon. The PARTNER randomized controlled trial results were used to estimate survival, utilities, and some resource utilization. Costs included the valve replacement procedure, complications, hospitalization, outpatient visits/tests, and home/nursing care. Resources were valued (2009 Canadian dollars) using costs from the Ontario Case Costing Initiative (OCCI), Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care and Ontario Drug Benefits Formulary, or were estimated using relative costs from a French economic evaluation or clinical experts. Costs and outcomes were discounted 5% annually. The effect of uncertainty in model parameters was explored in deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analysis. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was $32,170 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained for TAVR vs MM. When the time horizon was shortened to 24 and 12 months, the ICER increased to $52,848 and $157,429, respectively. All other sensitivity analysis returned an ICER of less than $50,000/QALY gained. A limitation was lack of availability of Canadian-specific resource and cost data for all resources, leaving one to rely on clinical experts and data from France to inform certain parameters. Based on the results of this analysis, it can be concluded that TAVR is cost-effective compared to MM for the

  7. Calcium Scoring of Aortic Valve Calcification in Aortic Valve Stenosis with a Multislice Computed Tomography Scanner: Non-enhanced versus Contrast-enhanced Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehlenbruch, G.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Previous studies have shown a positive correlation between amount of aortic valve calcification (AVC) and degree of aortic valve stenosis (AVS). We have investigated whether calcium scoring of AVC from contrast-enhanced images is reliable. Material and Methods: Nineteen patients with suspected AVS underwent retrospectively ECG-gated multislice computed tomography (MSCT). Standardized scan protocols were applied prior to (120 KV, 133 mAseff) and after (120 KV, 500 mAseff) the administration of non-ionic contrast material. Image reconstruction was performed at 60% of the RR interval (slice thickness 3 mm, reconstruction increment 2 mm). AVC was quantified using Agatston score and calcium mass. The number of lesions was calculated. All non-enhanced images were scored using thresholds of 130 HU and 350 HU. Contrast-enhanced images were assessed with a threshold of 350 HU exclusively. Results: Fifteen patients with AVCs were included in the statistical analysis. The mean Agatston score (calcium mass) in non-enhanced images was 2888.4±2844.4 (694.2 mg±869.3 mg). Altering the threshold from 130 HU to 350 HU led to a 58.2% (30.5%) decrease in the AVC score ( P values <0.001). Contrast-enhanced images showed an increased Agatston score (calcium mass) of 56.2% (33.5%) compared to non-enhanced images ( P values <0.05) with the same threshold of 350 HU. Conclusion: Quantification of AVC from contrast-enhanced images is not reliable, as contrast material simulates calcification

  8. The 'obesity paradox' does exist in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation for aortic stenosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Wenyu; Li, Shuangjiang; Liao, Yanbiao; Zhao, Zhengang; Che, Guowei; Chen, Mao; Feng, Yuan

    2017-10-01

    Most recent studies have proposed the paradoxical benefits of obesity in surgical populations. For patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) for aortic stenosis, the prognostic roles of obesity and high body mass index remain controversial. Therefore, the objective of this meta-analysis was to evaluate whether the 'obesity paradox' exists in patients undergoing TAVI. We searched in PubMed and EMBASE to identify the eligible articles. Odds ratios and hazard ratios with the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were adopted for synthesizing short-term and long-term survival outcomes, respectively. The level of heterogeneity and the publication bias between studies were also estimated. Finally, there were 16 studies with 12 330 patients who met the eligibility criteria and who were thus included in this review. When body mass index was analysed as a continuous variable, each increase of 1 kg/m2 was significantly associated with the lower 30-day mortality rate (odds ratio = 0.95; 95% CI = 0.93-0.97; P obese patients had a significantly lower risk of 30-day mortality after TAVI than did normal patients (odds ratio = 0.69; 95% CI = 0.50-0.95; P = 0.024). Further analyses indicated that the obesity could be predictive of more favourable long-term overall survival of TAVI (hazard ratio = 0.84; 95% CI = 0.72-0.97; P = 0.021). However, we found no difference in procedural complications between the obese and normal patients. In conclusion, higher body mass index and obesity seem to have protective benefits on both short-term and long-term survival of TAVI patients. Current evidence suggests that the 'obesity paradox' may really exist in TAVI. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical Implication of Aortic Wall Biopsy in Aortic Valve Disease with Bicuspid Valve Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Han Kim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although unique aortic pathology related to bicuspid aortic valve (BAV has been previously reported, clinical implications of BAV to aortopathy risk have yet to be investigated. We looked for potential differences in matrix protein expressions in the aortic wall in BAV patients. Methods: Aorta specimens were obtained from 31 patients: BAV group (n=27, tricuspid aortic valve (TAV group (n=4. The BAV group was categorized into three subgroups: left coronary sinus-right coronary sinus (R+L group; n=13, 42%, right coronary sinus-non-coronary sinus (R+N group; n=8, 26%, and anteroposterior (AP group; n=6, 19%. We analyzed the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9, and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP-2. Results: Based on the mean value of the control group, BAV group showed decreased expression of eNOS in 72.7% of patients, increased MMP-9 in 82.3%, and decreased TIMP in 79.2%. There was a higher tendency for aortopathy in the BAV group: eNOS (BAV:TAV= 53%±7%:57%±11%, MMP-9 (BAV:TAV=48%±10%:38%±1%. The AP group showed lower expression of eNOS than the fusion (R+L, R+N group did; 48%±5% vs. 55%±7% (p=0.081. Conclusion: Not all patients with BAV had expression of aortopathy; however, for patients who had a suspicious form of bicuspid valve, aortic wall biopsy could be valuable to signify the presence of aortopathy.

  10. Prognostic value of multi-detector computed tomography in asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Kofoed, Klaus Fuglsang; Carstensen, Helle Gervig

    2016-01-01

    transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). METHODS: 116 patients with asymptomatic AS (Vmax>2.5m/s assessed by clinical screening TTE, LVEF>50%) were examined with TTE (Vivid e9) and MDCT (Aquilion 320) on the same day. The treating physician was blinded for research protocol defined imaging results. Outcome...... was defined as indication for aortic valve replacement (AVR) determined by the treating physician or sudden cardiac death. RESULTS: The mean age was 72 (8) years, 27% were women, mean AVA by TTE was 1.01 (0.30) cm(2). Median follow up time was 27 (IQR 19-44) months. Forty seven patients (41%) developed...... indication for AVR. No patients suffered a sudden cardiac death. AVA and aortic valve calcification were significant univariable predictors of AVR when measured by both TTE and MDCT, whereas left ventricular mass was only significant measured by MDCT. Significant coronary artery disease by MDCT tended...

  11. First report on a human percutaneous transluminal implantation of a self-expanding valve prosthesis for interventional treatment of aortic valve stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grube, Eberhard; Laborde, Jean C; Zickmann, Bernfried; Gerckens, Ulrich; Felderhoff, Thomas; Sauren, Barthel; Bootsveld, Andreas; Buellesfeld, Lutz; Iversen, Stein

    2005-12-01

    Percutaneous aortic valve replacement is a new technology for the treatment of patients with significant aortic valve stenosis. We present the first report on a human implantation of a self-expanding aortic valve prosthesis, which is composed of three bovine pericardial leaflets inserted within a self-expanding nitinol stent. The 73-year-old woman presented with severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis (mean transvalvular gradient of 45 mmHg; valve area of 0.7 cm2). Surgical valve replacement had been declined for the patient because of comorbidities, including previous bypass surgery. A retrograde approach via the common iliac artery was used for valve deployment. The contralateral femoral vessels were used for a temporary extracorporal circulation, unloading the left ventricle during the actual stent expansion. Clinical, hemodynamic, and echocardiographic outcomes were assessed serially during the procedure. Clinical and echocardiographic follow-up at day 1, 2, and 14 post procedure was performed to evaluate the short-term outcome. The prosthesis was successfully deployed within the native aortic valve, with accurate and stable positioning and with no impairment of the coronary artery or vein graft blood flow. 2D and doppler echo immediately after device deployment showed a significant reduction in transaortic mean pressure gradient (from 45 to 8 mmHg) without evidence of aortic or mitral valve insufficiency. The clinical status has then significantly improved. These results remained unchanged up to the day 14 follow-up. This case report demonstrates a successful percutaneous implantation of a self-expanding aortic valve prosthesis with remarkable functional and clinical improvements in the acute and short-term outcome. Copyright (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Heart Team therapeutic decision-making and treatment in severe aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav Hørsted; Holmberg, Fredrik; Gerds, Thomas Alexander

    2016-01-01

    %), and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in 392 (81%) of patients. In patients referred to intervention, TAVI compared with SAVR patients were older (OR = 1.17 per year, 95% CI 1.09-1.26; p obesity (OR = 4.69, 1....... Conclusions: The HT proposed intervention in 93% of patients with severe AVS despite high age, advanced symptoms and a high burden of co-morbidity. TAVI was reserved for older patients particularly with previous CABG....

  13. Clinical Correlates and Prognostic Value of Plasma Galectin-3 Levels in Degenerative Aortic Stenosis: A Single-Center Prospective Study of Patients Referred for Invasive Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Bobrowska

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Galectin-3 (Gal-3, a β-galactoside-binding lectin, has been implicated in myocardial fibrosis, development of left ventricular (LV dysfunction and transition from compensated LV hypertrophy to overt heart failure (HF, being a novel prognostic marker in HF. Risk stratification is crucial for the choice of the optimal therapy in degenerative aortic stenosis (AS, affecting elderly subjects with coexistent diseases. Our aim was to assess correlates and prognostic value of circulating Gal-3 in real-world patients with degenerative AS referred for invasive treatment. Gal-3 levels were measured at admission in 80 consecutive patients with symptomatic degenerative AS (mean age: 79 ± 8 years; aortic valve area (AVA index: 0.4 ± 0.1 cm2/m2. The therapeutic strategy was chosen following a dedicated multidisciplinary team-oriented approach, including surgical valve replacement (n = 11, transcatheter valve implantation (n = 19, balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV (n = 25 and optimal medical therapy (n = 25. Besides routine echocardiographic indices, valvulo-arterial impedance (Zva, an index of global LV afterload, was computed. There were 22 deaths over a median follow-up of 523 days. Baseline Gal-3 correlated negatively with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR (r = −0.61, p < 0.001 and was unrelated to age, symptomatic status, AVA index, LV ejection fraction, LV mass index or Zva. For the study group as a whole, Gal-3 tended to predict mortality (Gal-3 >17.8 vs. Gal-3 <17.8 ng/mL; hazard ratio (HR: 2.03 (95% confidence interval, 0.88–4.69, p = 0.09, which was abolished upon adjustment for eGFR (HR: 1.70 (0.61–4.73, p = 0.3. However, in post-BAV patients multivariate-adjusted pre-procedural Gal-3 was associated with worse survival (HR: 7.41 (1.52–36.1, p = 0.01 regardless of eGFR. In conclusion, the inverse eGFR–Gal-3 relationship underlies a weak association between Gal-3 and adverse outcome in patients with degenerative AS referred for

  14. Validation of conventional and simplified methods to calculate projected valve area at normal flow rate in patients with low flow, low gradient aortic stenosis: the multicenter TOPAS (True or Pseudo Severe Aortic Stenosis) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavel, Marie-Annick; Burwash, Ian G; Mundigler, Gerald; Dumesnil, Jean G; Baumgartner, Helmut; Bergler-Klein, Jutta; Sénéchal, Mario; Mathieu, Patrick; Couture, Christian; Beanlands, Rob; Pibarot, Philippe

    2010-04-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that a new index of aortic stenosis (AS) severity derived from dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE), the projected aortic valve area (AVA) at a normal transvalvular flow rate (AVA(proj)), is superior to traditional Doppler echocardiographic indices to discriminate true severe from pseudosevere low-gradient AS. The objectives of this study were to prospectively validate the diagnostic and prognostic value of AVA(proj) in a large series of patients and to propose a new clinically applicable simplified method to estimate AVA(proj). AVA(proj) was calculated in 142 patients with low-flow AS using 2 methods. In the conventional method, AVA was plotted against mean transvalvular flow (Q) at each stage of DSE, and AVA at a standardized flow rate of 250 ml/s was projected from the slope of the regression line fitting the plot of AVA versus Q: AVA(proj) = AVA(rest) + slope x (250 - Q(rest)). In the simplified method, using this equation, the slope of the regression line was estimated by dividing the DSE-induced change in AVA from baseline to the peak stage of DSE by the change in Q. There was a strong correlation between AVA(proj) calculated by the two methods (r = 0.95, P < .0001). Among the 142 patients, 52 underwent aortic valve replacement and had underlying AS severity assessed by the surgeon. Conventional and simplified AVA(proj) demonstrated similar performance in discriminating true severe from pseudosevere AS (percentage of correct classification of AVA(proj) < or = 1 cm(2), 94% and 92%, respectively) and were superior to traditional dobutamine stress echocardiographic indices (percentage of correct classification, 60%-77%). Both conventional and simplified AVA(proj) correlated well with valve weight (r = 0.52 and r = 0.58, respectively), whereas traditional dobutamine stress echocardiographic indices did not. In the 84 patients who were treated medically, conventional AVA(proj) < or = 1.2 cm(2) (hazard ratio, 1.65; P = .02

  15. Comparison of early clinical outcomes following transcatheter aortic valve implantation versus surgical aortic valve replacement versus optimal medical therapy in patients older than 80 years with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Eui; Hong, Myeong-Ki; Ko, Young-Guk; Shin, Dong-Ho; Kim, Jung-Sun; Kim, Byeong-Keuk; Choi, Donghoon; Shim, Chi Young; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Shim, Jae-Kwang; Kwak, Young-Lan; Lee, Sak; Chang, Byung-Chul; Jang, Yangsoo

    2013-05-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become an attractive therapeutic strategy for severe aortic stenosis (AS) in elderly patients due to its minimally-invasive nature. Therefore, early results of its clinical outcomes in elderly Korean patients were evaluated. We compared early clinical outcomes of TAVI, surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR), and optimal medical therapy (OMT) in patients aged≥80 years with symptomatic severe AS. Treatment groups were allocated as follows: TAVI (n=10), SAVR (n=14), and OMT (n=42). Baseline clinical characteristics including predicted operative mortality were similar among the three groups. However, patients with New York Heart Association functional class III or IV symptoms and smaller aortic valve area were treated with TAVI or SAVR rather than OMT. In-hospital combined safety endpoints (all-cause mortality, major stroke, peri-procedural myocardial infarction, life-threatening bleeding, major vascular complication, and acute kidney injury) after TAVI or SAVR were significantly lower in the TAVI group than in the SAVR group (10.0% vs. 71.4%, respectively, p=0.005), along with an acceptable rate of symptom improvement and device success. During the follow-up period, the TAVI group showed the lowest rate of 3-month major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events, a composite of all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, major stroke, and re-hospitalization (TAVI 0.0% vs. SAVR 50.0% vs. OMT 42.9%, p=0.017). Treatment with TAVI was associated with lower event rates compared to SAVR or OMT. Therefore, TAVI may be considered as the first therapeutic strategy in selected patients aged≥80 years with symptomatic severe AS.

  16. Reappraising myocardial fibrosis in severe aortic stenosis: an invasive and non-invasive study in 133 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treibel, Thomas A; López, Begoña; González, Arantxa; Menacho, Katia; Schofield, Rebecca S; Ravassa, Susana; Fontana, Marianna; White, Steven K; DiSalvo, Carmelo; Roberts, Neil; Ashworth, Michael T; Díez, Javier; Moon, James C

    2018-02-21

    To investigate myocardial fibrosis (MF) in a large series of severe aortic stenosis (AS) patients using invasive biopsy and non-invasive imaging. One hundred thirty-three patients with severe, symptomatic AS accepted for surgical aortic valve replacement underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and extracellular volume fraction (ECV) quantification. Intra-operative left ventricular (LV) biopsies were performed by needle or scalpel, yielding tissue with (n = 53) and without endocardium (n = 80), and compared with 10 controls. Myocardial fibrosis occurred in three patterns: (i) thickened endocardium with a fibrotic layer; (ii) microscopic scars, with a subendomyocardial predominance; and (iii) diffuse interstitial fibrosis. Collagen volume fraction (CVF) was elevated (P < 0.001) compared with controls, and higher (P < 0.001) in endocardium-containing samples with a decreasing CVF gradient from the subendocardium (P = 0.001). Late gadolinium enhancement correlated with CVF (P < 0.001) but not ECV. Both LGE and ECV correlated independently (P < 0.001) with N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide and high-sensitivity-troponin T. High ECV was also associated with worse LV remodelling, left ventricular ejection fraction and functional capacity. Combining high ECV and LGE better identified patients with more adverse LV remodelling, blood biomarkers and histological parameters, and worse functional capacity than each parameter alone. Myocardial fibrosis in severe AS is complex, but three main patterns exist: endocardial fibrosis, microscars (mainly in the subendomyocardium), and diffuse interstitial fibrosis. Neither histological CVF nor the CMR parameters ECV and LGE capture fibrosis in its totality. A combined, multi-parametric approach with ECV and LGE allows best stratification of AS patients according to the response of the myocardial collagen matrix. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford

  17. Subendocardial enhancement in gadolinium-diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, K; Ishibashi, Y; Shimada, T; Murakami, Y; Inoue, S; Sano, K

    1999-05-15

    We investigated the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium-diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) in assessing myocardial damage from valvular aortic stenosis (AS). Cardiac catheterization and echocardiography were performed in 17 patients with AS. T1-weighted spin-echo sequence was used to obtain magnetic resonance images of short-axis planes of the left ventricle before and after intravenous Gd-DTPA injection in all patients using a 1.5 Tesla imager. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to the presence or absence of regional myocardial enhancement in the images. The Gd-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance images of 7 patients showed circumferential subendocardial enhancement. All patients with enhancement had a history of heart failure and were in New York Heart Association functional class III or IV, whereas patients without enhancement were in New York Heart Association functional class I or II. Patients with enhancement had a smaller aortic valve area (0.28 +/- 0.09 vs 0.38 +/- 0.07 cm2/m2, p <0.05), a higher transvalvular pressure gradient (109 +/- 40 vs 68 +/- 18 mm Hg, p <0.05), greater elevation of left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (22 +/- 11 vs 12 +/- 2 mm Hg, p <0.05), and greater reduction in left ventricular ejection fraction (40 +/- 9 vs 59 +/- 10%, p <0.05). Subendocardial enhancement by Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI was thus shown to be closely related to the severity of AS. In conclusion, Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI is a new noninvasive tool that can provide useful information about myocardial damage in AS.

  18. Efficacy and safety of the Lotus Valve System for treatment of patients with severe aortic valve stenosis and intermediate surgical risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Götberg, Matthias; Ihlberg, Leo

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has become an established therapeutic option for patients with symptomatic, severe aortic valve stenosis (AS) who are ineligible or at high risk for conventional valvular surgery. In Northwestern Europe, the TAVR technology is also......)-defined device success was obtained in 97.4%. A Lotus Valve was successfully implanted in all patients. There was no valve migration, embolization, ectopic valve deployment, or TAV-in-TAV deployment. The VARC-defined combined safety rate at 30days was 92.2%, with a mortality rate of 1.9% and stroke rate of 3.......2%. The clinical efficacy rate after 30days was 91.6% - only one patient had moderate aortic regurgitation. When considering only those patients in the late experience group (N=79), the combined safety and clinical efficacy rates were 93.7% and 92.4%, respectively. The pacemaker implantation rate was 27...

  19. Untreated aortic valve stenosis identified at the time of coronary artery bypass grafting: thresholds associated with adverse prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalji, Nassir M; Suri, Rakesh M; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice; Gersh, Bernard J; Huebner, Marianne; Dearani, Joseph A; Burkhart, Harold M; Li, Zhuo; Greason, Kevin L; Michelena, Hector I; Schaff, Hartzell V

    2015-04-01

    Aortic valve replacement (AVR) for severe aortic valve stenosis (AS) is a Class I indication at the time of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Management of less-than-severe AS in patients undergoing CABG is uncertain however, because the thresholds at which untreated AS impacts long-term outcome are unclear. We identified 312 patients who underwent isolated CABG between 1993 and 2006 with mild or moderate AS [aortic valve area (AVA) 1-2 cm(2)], and matched them to patients undergoing CABG alone during the same period with similar characteristics but without AS (AVA >2 cm(2)). Long-term survival after CABG and its determinants were analysed using Cox proportional hazards models with AVR as a time-dependent covariate. Late survival was lower in patients with untreated moderate AS (12 years 23 ± 5.1%) versus mild (42 ± 3.8%) or no AS (38 ± 3.3%) (P = 0.01). Adjusting for age, ejection fraction, heart failure, creatinine, diabetes, peripheral vascular disease (PVD) and interval AVR, moderate AS independently predicted higher mortality [hazard rate (HR) 2.01, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.49-2.73; P < 0.001]; whereas incremental risk was insignificant for patients with mild AS (HR 1.09, 95% CI 0.85-1.66; P = 0.33). Further stratification showed that highest late postoperative mortality occurred with an AVA of 1-1.25 cm(2) (adjusted HR 2.45, 95% CI 1.57-3.82; P < 0.001), while risk was intermediate with an AVA of 1.25-1.5 cm(2) (HR 1.83, 95% CI 1.28-2.61; P = 0.001). Untreated moderate AS is an independent determinant of excess late mortality following isolated CABG, and mortality risk increases with decreasing AVA. Those with moderate-to-severe AS (AVA 1-1.25 cm(2)) have more than 2-fold greater long-term mortality compared with those without AS. These data define AS severity thresholds for clinical trials aimed at defining whether valve intervention might mitigate this risk. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European

  20. End-stage renal disease and severe aortic stenosis: Does valve replacement improve one-year outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condado, Jose F; Maini, Aneel; Leshnower, Bradley; Thourani, Vinod; Forcillo, Jessica; Devireddy, Chandan; Mavromatis, Kreton; Sarin, Eric L; Stewart, James; Guyton, Robert; Simone, Amy; Keegan, Patricia; Lerakis, Stamatios; Block, Peter C; Babaliaros, Vasilis

    2017-05-01

    Treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and severe aortic stenosis (AS) includes balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV), surgical (SAVR), or transcatheter (TAVR) aortic valve replacement. We compared outcomes among these strategies. A retrospective review of patients with ESRD undergoing treatment for severe AS between 07/2007 and 06/2015 was performed at our center. Patients were classified based on treatment: BAV-only, TAVR, or SAVR. Baseline characteristics and 30-day outcomes were compared among groups. A 1-year survival analysis was performed. Of 85 patients, 25 (29.4%) underwent BAV, 30 (35.3%) TAVR, and 30 (35.3%) SAVR. Patients in the SAVR group, compared to the BAV or TAVR patients, were younger (63 vs. 74 vs. 71 years, P = 0.02) and had less prior stroke (3.3% vs. 12.0% vs. 30.0%, P = 0.008). While all BAV patients had NYHA class III/IV, 93.3% and 76.7% of patients had NYHA class III/IV in the TAVR and SAVR group, respectively (P = 0.001). BAV patients were less likely to have atrial fibrillation than TAVR or SAVR patients (16.0% vs. 43.3% vs. 50.0%, P = 0.03). All patients were high risk, but there was a statistical trend to lower STS scores in the SAVR group (8.6% vs. 13.5% vs. 13.5%, P = 0.08). There was no significant difference in 30-day mortality (16.7% vs. 10.0% vs. 10.0%, P = 0.74), but BAV treated patients had an increased 1-year mortality compared to those treated with TAVR or SAVR (87.0% vs. 32.0%, vs. 36.7%, P=<0.001). Independent predictors of 1-year mortality were a higher STS score (HR 1.026, 95%CI 1.002-1.051) and BAV-only strategy (BAV vs. TAVR: HR 3.961, 95%CI 1.595-9.840), but dialysis duration and type, and SAVR versus TAVR were not. Patients with ESRD and severe AS have a similar and higher survival with TAVR or SAVR when compared to BAV at 1-year. These results may influence patient care decisions favoring valve replacement in AS patients with ESRD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley

  1. Global longitudinal strain and its dynamics after replacement of aortal valve in patients with severe aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Ponych

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim – to determine factors that may influence the global longitudinal strain (GLS and its dynamics after replacement aortic valve (RAV in patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS. Materials and methods. In a one-center prospective study, 30 patients with severe AS were sequentially screened for RAV surgery. Among them there were 16 (53,3 % men and 14 (46,7 % women. The median age was 63 (range from 46 to 77, quartiles 57–69 years. All patients underwent clinical and instrumental study, including transthoracic echocardiography (TTE and coronary angiography. In the early postoperative period and 6–12 months after surgery, all patients performed a repeat TTE according to a standard protocol that included an assessment of the GLS. GLS data and their dynamics was performed in the groups of patients with preserved (n = 18 and low (n = 12 left ventricular ejection fraction (LV EF. Results. In patients with preserved LV EF, the median of the preoperative GLS was –12 % (in the quartiles from –15 to –11 %, postoperative GLS –11 % (quartiles from –11 to –9 %. In patients with reduced LV EF, the median of the preoperative GLS was –6 % (from –8.5 to –4 % for quartiles, –8.5 % for postoperative GLS (from –10 to –6 % for quartiles (p < 0.001 for comparison of baseline and p < 0.05 relative to differences in dynamics of GLS in comparable groups. In the examined patients, significant correlations were found between baseline GLS with functional class of heart failure, concomitant tricuspid insufficiency, atrial fibrillation, duration of QRS complex, LV EF, end-diastolic, endsystolic volume index (EDV, ESV and volume left atrium (LA, left ventricular myocardial mass index, aortic valve orifice area index, E/A ratio, and Thei index. In turn, the positive dynamics of GLS significantly depended on the initial functional class of heart failure, the stage of arterial hypertension, the degree of tricuspid insufficiency, LV EF, the index

  2. Estimating the Population Impact of Lp(a) Lowering on the Incidence of Myocardial Infarction and Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshar, Mehdi; Kamstrup, Pia R; Williams, Ken

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: High lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]) is the most common genetic dyslipidemia and is a causal factor for myocardial infarction (MI) and aortic stenosis (AS). We sought to estimate the population impact of Lp(a) lowering that could be achieved in primary prevention using the therapies...... in development. APPROACH AND RESULTS: We used published data from 2 prospective cohorts. High Lp(a) was defined as ≥50 mg/dL (≈20th percentile). Relative risk, attributable risk, the attributable risk percentage, population attributable risk, and the population attributable risk percentage were calculated...... as measures of the population impact. For MI, the event rate was 4.0% versus 2.8% for high versus low Lp(a) (relative risk, 1.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.45-1.46). The attributable risk was 1.26% (95% CI, 1.24-1.27), corresponding to 31.3% (95% CI, 31.0-31.7) of the excess MI risk in those with high...

  3. Development of paradoxical low-flow, low-gradient severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Eleid, Mackram F; Pislaru, Sorin V

    2015-01-01

    was to determine whether LFLG-sAS represents an end-stage consequence of normal-flow, high-gradient sAS (NFHG-sAS) or a different entity. METHODS: From our transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) database, we identified patients with sAS (aortic valve area ... with LFLG-sAS (stroke volume index TTE within five years prior to the index TTE. Patients were age/sex/date matched 2:1 with patients with NFHG-sAS and normal-flow, low-gradient (NFLG)-sAS who also had ≥1 TTE. Included were 1203...... TTEs (383 index studies and 820 preceding studies). RESULTS: In 78 patients with LFLG-sAS, an HG stage preceded the index TTE in only 4 (5%). During the five years preceding the index TTE, patients with LFLG-sAS developed increasing relative wall thickness (0.42 to 0.49; p

  4. Impact of mild patient prosthesis mismatch on quality of life in patients with preserved ejection fraction after isolated aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reskovic Luksic, Vlatka; Dosen, D; Pasalic, M; Separovic Hanzevacki, Jadranka

    2017-01-15

    To analyze whether PPM affects QOL and functional status in patients after isolated AVR for aortic stenosis (AS) with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Consecutive patients who underwent AVR in University Hospital Center Zagreb for isolated severe symptomatic AS and preserved EF were enrolled. Echo data was obtained from complete transthoracic examinations prior and after surgery by offline analysis. Patients were divided into two groups according to the presence of PPM (effective orifice area (EOA)/body surface area (BSA)<0,85cm 2 /m 2 ). QOL was assessed by telephone interview using Short Form 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36) along with functional NYHA status estimation. A total of 45 pts were included (23 female), and divided in PPM (n=26), and non-PPM group (n=19). Both groups were similar in pts age, LVEF, AVA/BSA prior surgery. After surgery, 57% of pts had PPM categorized as mild PPM. During follow-up of 2,5years, 3 pts had died and 10 were lost from following. There was no difference in NYHA status after surgery between groups (p=0,758). SF36 results showed no difference between groups. However, there was a significant improvement in Physical functioning (47,50% vs 75,47%,p=0,000) and Role limitation due to physical health (41,41% vs 81,25%, p=0,007) scores in the whole study population after AVR. Males had significantly better Energy/fatigue (p=0,034), Social functioning (p=0,004) and Pain (p=0,017) scores. Mild to moderate PPM showed no clinical relevance. All patients revealed improvement in QOL after AVR, while male sex was related to better functioning scores irrespectively of PPM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Absolute assessment of aortic valve stenosis by planimetry using cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging: Comparison with transoesophageal echocardiography, transthoracic echocardiography, and cardiac catheterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reant, Patricia; Lederlin, Mathieu; Lafitte, Stephane; Serri, Karim; Montaudon, Michel; Corneloup, Olivier; Roudaut, Raymond; Laurent, Francois

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The aims of this study were to investigate absolute assessment of aortic valve area (AVA), before surgery for aortic stenosis, using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in comparison with transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and with effective AVA indirectly obtained by routine techniques i.e. transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and cardiac catheterisation. Materials and methods: Absolute AVA planimetry was performed by TEE and CMR steady state free precession sequences obtained through the aortic valvular plane. Effective AVA was calculated by the continuity equation in TTE and by cardiac catheterisation (Gorlin formula). Results: Thirty-nine patients with aortic valve stenosis, mean age 71.7 ± 7.6 years, with a mean AVA of 0.93 ± 0.31 cm 2 as measured by TEE, were enrolled in the study. Mean differences were: between CMR and TEE planimetry: d = 0.01 ± 0.14 cm 2 , between CMR and cardiac catheterisation: d = 0.05 ± 0.13 cm 2 , between CMR and TTE: d = 0.10 ± 0.17 cm 2 , between TTE and TEE: d = 0.10 ± 0.18 cm 2 , between TTE and cardiac catheterisation: d 0.06 ± 0.16 cm 2 , and between TEE and cardiac catheterisation: d = 0.07 ± 0.13 cm 2 . Mean intraobserver and interobserver differences of CMR planimetry were d = 0.02 ± 0.07 cm 2 and d = 0.03 ± 0.14 cm 2 , respectively. Conclusion: CMR planimetry of the AVA is a noninvasive and reproducible technique to evaluate stenotic aortic valves and can be used as an alternative to echocardiography or cardiac catheterisation

  6. Increased stiffness is the major early abnormality in a pig model of severe aortic stenosis and predisposes to congestive heart failure in the absence of systolic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kiyotake; Aguero, Jaume; Oh, Jae Gyun; Hammoudi, Nadjib; Fish, Lauren A; Leonardson, Lauren; Picatoste, Belén; Santos-Gallego, Carlos G; Fish, Kenneth M; Hajjar, Roger J

    2015-05-20

    It remains unclear whether abnormal systolic function and relaxation are essential for developing heart failure in pathophysiology of severe aortic stenosis. Yorkshire pigs underwent surgical banding of the ascending aorta. The animals were followed for up to 5 months after surgery, and cardiac function was assessed comprehensively by invasive pressure-volume measurements, 3-dimensional echocardiography, echocardiographic speckle-tracking strain, and postmortem molecular and histological analyses. Pigs with aortic banding (n=6) exhibited significant left ventricular hypertrophy with increased stiffness compared with the control pigs (n=7) (end-diastolic pressure-volume relationship β: 0.053±0.017 versus 0.028±0.009 mm Hg/mL, P=0.007); however, all other parameters corresponding to systolic function, including ejection fraction, end-systolic pressure-volume relationship, preload recruitable stroke work, echocardiographic circumferential strain, and longitudinal strain, were not impaired in pigs with aortic banding. Relaxation parameters were also similar between groups. Sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium (Ca(2+)) ATPase protein levels in the left ventricle were similar. There were significant increases in 3-dimensional echocardiographic left atrial volumes, suggesting the usefulness of these indexes to detect increased stiffness. Right atrial pacing with a heart rate of 120 beats per minute induced increased end-diastolic pressure in pigs with aortic banding in contrast to decreased end-diastolic pressure in the control pigs. Histological evaluation revealed that increased stiffness was accompanied by cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and increased perimysial and perivascular fibrosis. Increased stiffness is the major early pathological process that predisposes to congestive heart failure without abnormalities in systolic function and relaxation in a clinically relevant animal model of aortic stenosis. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart

  7. Role of Global Longitudinal Strain in the Prediction of Outcome in Patients With Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Bastian; Liu, Dan; Gaudron, Philipp; Hu, Kai; Nordbeck, Peter; Ertl, Georg; Weidemann, Frank; Herrmann, Sebastian

    2017-08-15

    In the present study, we assessed the role of Global Longitudinal Strain (GLS) as a predictor of all-cause mortality in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (AS), irrespective of their type of treatment. Data of 807 patients with AS receiving complete echocardiographic and clinical examination were retrospectively analyzed. Valve area <1 cm 2 and sufficient image quality were inclusion criteria; patients with severe concomitant valvulopathy were excluded. Patients were grouped into treatment (aortic valve replacement [AVR]) and conservative (non-AVR) groups. Multivariable Cox analysis was used to assess predictors of all-cause mortality. Five hundred fourteen patients were included and 53.3% were of male gender. Mean age at inclusion was 76.4 ± 9.8 years; 326 received AVR. Death from any cause occurred in 72.9% of non-AVR group and 17.8% of AVR group (p <0.001). GLS (expressed as |%|) was found to be an independent predictor of all-cause mortality in non-AVR group (hazard ratio [HR] 0.933, 95% CI 0.854 to 0.987, p = 0.038). In patients receiving AVR, GLS and history of coronary artery bypass graft were found to be independent predictors of all-cause mortality (HR for GLS 0.912, 95% CI 0.730 to 0.999, p = 0.048; HR for coronary artery bypass graft 2.977, 95% CI 1.014 to 6.273, p = 0.013). In non-AVR patients, GLS <9.7% showed a higher 1- and 5-year mortality (log rank p values of 0.002 and 0.010, respectively). In conclusion, GLS is an independent predictor of all-cause mortality in severe AS, irrespective of their type of treatment. GLS <9.7% indicates a significantly higher 1- and 5-year mortality in non-AVR patients. Therefore, GLS should be regularly assessed for enhanced risk stratification and clinical decision-making. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Prognostic value of B-type natriuretic peptide in elderly patients with aortic valve stenosis: the COFRASA-GENERAC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimadevilla, Claire; Cueff, Caroline; Hekimian, Guillaume; Dehoux, Monique; Lepage, Laurent; Iung, Bernard; Duval, Xavier; Huart, Virginie; Tubach, Florence; Vahanian, Alec; Messika-Zeitoun, David

    2013-04-01

    Previous studies suggested an independent prognostic value of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) in aortic valve stenosis (AS) but were impeded by small sample sizes and inclusion of relatively selected young patients. We aimed to evaluate the relationship among N-terminal fragment of proBNP (Nt-proBNP), AS severity, symptoms and outcome in a large cohort of elderly patients with AS. Observational cohort study, COhorte Française de Retrecissement Aortique du Sujet Agé (clinicalTrial.gov number-NCT00338676) and GENEtique du Retrecissement Aortique (clinicalTrial.gov number-NCT00647088). Single-centre study. Patients older than 70 years with at least mild AS. None. A comprehensive clinical, biological and echocardiographic evaluation was performed at study entry. Asymptomatic patients were prospectively followed on a 6-months basis and AS-related events (sudden death, congestive heart failure or new onset of AS-related symptoms) collected. We prospectively enrolled 361 patients (79±6 years, 230 severe AS). Nt-proBNP increased with the grade of AS severity and the NYHA class (all pvalue of Nt-proBNP for the diagnosis of severe symptomatic AS was only modest (area under the curve of the receiver operator characteristic analysis=0.73). At 2 years, 28 AS-related events occurred among 142 asymptomatic patients prospectively followed. Nt-proBNP was associated with outcome in univariate analysis (p=0.04) but not after adjustment for age, gender and AS severity (p=0.40). The present study clearly highlights the limitations of Nt-proBNP for the evaluation and management of AS patients. Our results suggest that Nt-proBNP should be considered cautiously, at least as a single criterion, in the decision-making process of AS patients especially in the elderly population.

  9. Ascending aorta dilatation rates in patients with tricuspid and bicuspid aortic stenosis: the COFRASA/GENERAC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerneis, Caroline; Pasi, Nicoletta; Arangalage, Dimitri; Nguyen, Virginia; Mathieu, Tiffany; Verdonk, Constance; Codogno, Isabelle; Ou, Phalla; Duval, Xavier; Tubiana, Sarah; Cimadevilla, Claire; Vahanian, Alec; Messika-Zeitoun, And David

    2017-07-25

    Ascending aorta (AA) dilatation is common in aortic valve stenosis (AS) but data regarding AA progression, its determinants and impact of valve anatomy [bicuspid (BAV), or tricuspid (TAV)] are scarce. Asymptomatic AS patients enrolled in a prospective cohort (COFRASA/GENERAC) with at least 2 years of follow-up were considered in the present analysis. A transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and a computed tomography (CT) scan were performed at inclusion and yearly thereafter. We enrolled 195 patients [mean gradient 22 ± 11 mmHg, 42 BAV patients (22%)]. Mean aorta diameters assessed using TTE were 35 ± 4 and 36 ± 5 mm at the sinuses of Valsalva and tubular level, respectively. Ascending aorta diameter was >40 mm in 29% of patients (24% in TAV vs. 52% in BAV, P  0.05). Only four patients presented an AA progression ≥2 mm/year. Correlations between TTE and CT scan were excellent (all r >0.74) and similar results were obtained using CT. During follow-up, two BAV patients underwent a combined AA surgery; no surgery was primarily performed for AA aneurysm and no dissection was observed. In this prospective cohort of AS patients determinants of AA diameters were age, sex, BSA, and valve anatomy but not AS severity. AA progression rates were low and not influenced by AS severity or valve anatomy. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Tumor necrosis factor-α accelerates the calcification of human aortic valve interstitial cells obtained from patients with calcific aortic valve stenosis via the BMP2-Dlx5 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zaiqiang; Seya, Kazuhiko; Daitoku, Kazuyuki; Motomura, Shigeru; Fukuda, Ikuo; Furukawa, Ken-Ichi

    2011-04-01

    Calcific aortic valve stenosis (CAS) is the most frequent heart valve disease in the elderly, accompanied by valve calcification. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a pleiotropic cytokine secreted mainly from macrophages, has been detected in human calcified valves. However, the role of TNF-α in valve calcification remains unclear. To clarify whether TNF-α accelerates the calcification of aortic valves, we investigated the effect of TNF-α on human aortic valve interstitial cells (HAVICs) obtained from patients with CAS (CAS group) and with aortic regurgitation or aortic dissection having a noncalcified aortic valve (control group). HAVICs (2 × 10(4)) were cultured in a 12-well dish in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium with 10% fetal bovine serum. The medium containing TNF-α (30 ng/ml) was replenished every 3 days after the cells reached confluence. TNF-α significantly accelerated the calcification and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of HAVICs from CAS but not the control group after 12 days of culture. Furthermore, gene expression of calcigenic markers, ALP, bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), and distal-less homeobox 5 (Dlx5) were significantly increased after 6 days of TNF-α treatment in the CAS group but not the control group. Dorsomorphin, an inhibitor of mothers against decapentaplegic homologs (Smads) 1/5/8 phosphorylation, significantly inhibited the enhancement of TNF-α-induced calcification, ALP activity, Smad phosphorylation, and Dlx5 gene expression of HAVICs from the CAS group. These results suggest that HAVICs from the CAS group have greater sensitivity to TNF-α, which accelerates the calcification of aortic valves via the BMP2-Dlx5 pathway.

  11. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in Patients with Asymptomatic or Equivocal Symptomatic Aortic Stenosis: Feasibility, Reproducibility, Safety and Information Obtained on Exercise Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Le, Douet; Jensen, Gunnar Vagn Hagemann; Carstensen, Steen; Kjøller-Hansen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility, reproducibility, safety and information obtained on exercise physiology from cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) in patients with aortic stenosis. Patients with an aortic valve area (AVA) exercise, lower peak heart rate and FEV1, and higher VE/VCO2, but not by AVA index. Equivocal symptomatic status and a low gradient but high valvulo-arterial impedance were associated with a lower pVO2, but not with an inability to increase stroke volume. In total, 18 patients were referred for valve replacement. At 1 year, no cardiovascular deaths had occurred. CPX was feasible and reproducible and provided comprehensive data on exercise physiology. A CPX-guided treatment strategy was safe up to 1 year. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Severe prosthesis-patient mismatch after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis: Analysis of risk factors for early and long-term mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannacio, Vito; Mannacio, Luigi; Mango, Emilo; Antignano, Anita; Mottola, Michele; Caparrotti, Sergio; Musumeci, Francesco; Vosa, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    Severe prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) is considered to further decrease survival compared to moderate PPM. This study aimed to assess the impact of severe PPM on survival after aortic valve replacement (AVR). We retrospectively studied 2404 consecutive patients with PPM who underwent first-time AVR for pure stenosis between January 2003 and December 2014. Mismatch was moderate for indexed effective valve orifice >0.65 to mismatch occurred in 2165 patients (89%), and severe in 239 (11%) patients. Logistic multiple regression with bootstrapping and propensity score analyses were performed using 29 clinical and demographic data to assess the risk-adjusted impact of severe mismatch on mortality. The Cox proportional hazards model was constructed to process the long-term outcome. Early mortality was 2.3% (51/2165) in moderate mismatch group and 3.7% (9/239) in severe mismatch group (p=0.2). Mortality at 5 and 10 years, was 218/1470 (14.8%) and 252/585 (43.1%) for moderate mismatch and 43/198 (21.7%) and 61/105 (58.1%) for severe mismatch (p=0.02 and p=0.006). Multivariable predictors of late mortality were as follows: age ≥70 years, left ventricular ejection fraction ≤40%, indexed left ventricular mass >220g/m 2 and concomitant coronary artery revascularization. After propensity score matching, conditional logistic regression analysis demonstrated no relationship between severe mismatch and increased mortality at 5 postoperative years (HR, 0.9; 95% CI, 0.7-1.6; p=0.06), whereas it was significant at 10 postoperative years (HR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.2-2.5; p=0.03). During the follow-up, severe mismatch was associated with more frequent hospital readmissions for cardiac events (0.12 vs. 0.08 events/patient/year, p=0.007). Patients with severe mismatch had lower long-term survival and higher incidence of hospital readmissions for cardiac events. However, the effect of severe mismatch on outcome appeared mainly related to the preoperative risk profile of each patient

  13. Prosthesis-patient mismatch in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis: A randomized trial of a self-expanding prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorn, George L; Little, Stephen H; Tadros, Peter; Deeb, G Michael; Gleason, Thomas G; Heiser, John; Kleiman, Neal S; Oh, Jae K; Popma, Jeffrey J; Adams, David; Huang, Jian; Reardon, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    We compared the incidence of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) between transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) using a self-expanding bioprosthesis and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in the CoreValve US High Risk Pivotal Trial. We sought to determine the influence of PPM on clinical outcomes. Patients with severe aortic stenosis and at increased risk for surgery were randomized 1:1 to TAVR or SAVR. Postoperative PPM was defined by the effective orifice area index (EOAi) as severe PPM (EOAi ≤ 0.65 cm(2)/m(2)) and no severe PPM (EOAi > 0.65 cm(2)/m(2)); clinical outcomes were analyzed in the TAVR arm (n = 389) and SAVR arm (n = 353). Left ventricular mass index and regression were analyzed at baseline and 1 year. The incidence of severe PPM in the SAVR group at 1 year was 25.7% versus 6.2% in the TAVR group (P < .0001). Left ventricular mass index regression at 1 year was 6.8% for TAVR and 15.1% for SAVR in patients with severe PPM. At 1 year the rate of all-cause mortality and acute kidney injury were significantly greater in all patients (TAVR + SAVR) with severe PPM compared with no severe PPM (20.6% vs 12.0% [P = .0145] for death and 19.2% vs 8.5% [P = .0008] for acute kidney injury). In patients with high surgical risk and severe aortic stenosis, severe PPM is more common in patients treated with SAVR than those treated with TAVR. Patients with severe PPM are a greater risk for death and acute kidney injury than patients without severe PPM. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Text mining applied to electronic cardiovascular procedure reports to identify patients with trileaflet aortic stenosis and coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Aeron M; Kiss, Daniel H; Zlatsin, Yevgeny; Birtwell, David L; Williams, Heather; Guerraty, Marie A; Han, Yuchi; Anwaruddin, Saif; Holmes, John H; Chirinos, Julio A; Wilensky, Robert L; Giri, Jay; Rader, Daniel J

    2017-08-01

    Interrogation of the electronic health record (EHR) using billing codes as a surrogate for diagnoses of interest has been widely used for clinical research. However, the accuracy of this methodology is variable, as it reflects billing codes rather than severity of disease, and depends on the disease and the accuracy of the coding practitioner. Systematic application of text mining to the EHR has had variable success for the detection of cardiovascular phenotypes. We hypothesize that the application of text mining algorithms to cardiovascular procedure reports may be a superior method to identify patients with cardiovascular conditions of interest. We adapted the Oracle product Endeca, which utilizes text mining to identify terms of interest from a NoSQL-like database, for purposes of searching cardiovascular procedure reports and termed the tool "PennSeek". We imported 282,569 echocardiography reports representing 81,164 individuals and 27,205 cardiac catheterization reports representing 14,567 individuals from non-searchable databases into PennSeek. We then applied clinical criteria to these reports in PennSeek to identify patients with trileaflet aortic stenosis (TAS) and coronary artery disease (CAD). Accuracy of patient identification by text mining through PennSeek was compared with ICD-9 billing codes. Text mining identified 7115 patients with TAS and 9247 patients with CAD. ICD-9 codes identified 8272 patients with TAS and 6913 patients with CAD. 4346 patients with AS and 6024 patients with CAD were identified by both approaches. A randomly selected sample of 200-250 patients uniquely identified by text mining was compared with 200-250 patients uniquely identified by billing codes for both diseases. We demonstrate that text mining was superior, with a positive predictive value (PPV) of 0.95 compared to 0.53 by ICD-9 for TAS, and a PPV of 0.97 compared to 0.86 for CAD. These results highlight the superiority of text mining algorithms applied to electronic

  15. Surgical anatomy of the aortic root: Implication for valve-sparing reimplantation and aortic valve annuloplasty

    OpenAIRE

    de Kerchove, Laurent; Jashari, Ramadan; Boodhwani, Munir; Duy, Khanh Tran; Lengelé, Benoit; Gianello, Pierre; Nezhad, Zahra Mozala; Astarci, Parla; Noirhomme, Philippe; El Khoury, Gebrine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To enhance the reproducibility of aortic valve-sparing reimplantation and annuloplasty, we analyzed the topographic relationship between the ventriculoaortic junction (VAJ), basal ring (BR), and sinotubular junction (STJ). The root base thickness is also quantified. METHOD: Fifty-eight fresh human aortic valves were analyzed. The root was dissected to the limit where the aortic wall terminates into the cardiac structures (VAJ). Root height was measured externally from the STJ t...

  16. PCSK9 R46L Loss-of-Function Mutation Reduces Lipoprotein(a), LDL Cholesterol, and Risk of Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langsted, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge; Benn, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: Novel, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol-lowering proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type-9 (PCSK9) inhibitors also lower lipoprotein(a) levels, but the effect on aortic valve stenosis and myocardial infarction is unknown. OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that the PCSK9 R46L...... individuals of Danish descent. PARTICIPANTS: We studied 103 083 individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study, the Copenhagen City Heart Study, and the Copenhagen Ischemic Heart Disease Study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Lipoprotein(a), LDL cholesterol, and PCSK9 R46L genotype and diagnoses of aortic...... P = .02). The corresponding values for LDL cholesterol levels were 124 (101-147) mg/dl, 104 (85-132) mg/dl, and 97 (85-128) mg/dl, respectively (trend P = 2 × 10(-52)). PCSK9 R46L carriers vs noncarriers had an age- and sex-adjusted odds ratio of 0.64 (95% confidence interval, 0.44-0.95) for aortic...

  17. [Percutaneous transfemoral valvuloplasty in patients with calcified aortic stenosis and significantly increased surgical risk: clinical course and value of Doppler sonography in assessment of therapeutic success].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kücherer, H; Katus, H; Dietz, R; Rauch, B; Kübler, W

    1988-07-01

    Percutaneous transluminal valvuloplasty (PTV) was performed in 24 patients (aged 67-86 years, mean: 76 +/- 5.7 years) with calcific aortic stenosis and high operative risk. The gradient between maximal left ventricular and aortic pressures (peak-to-peak gradient, PPPG) could be reduced by 52% from 73 +/- 21 to 34 +/- 12 mmHg (p less than 0.001). Peak pressure gradient (PPG), as assessed by continuous wave Doppler, could be reduced from 80 +/- 28 to 58 +/- 21 mmHg (p less than 0.001). Aortic valve area (AVA) as determined by Doppler and two dimensional echocardiography increased significantly from 0.39 +/- 0.14 to 0.61 +/- 0.3 cm2 (p less than 0.05). Clinical symptoms were found to be improved in 5 of 8 patients with impaired ejection fraction and in 11 of 16 patients with normal ejection fraction during the first week after PTV. Complications due to the procedure were surgical revision of femoral artery puncture site in one patient and hemodynamic relevant pericardial effusion in another patient. Transmitral early (E) and late (L) diastolic filling integrals were measured by pulsed Doppler: the ratio E/L decreased significantly after PTV from 0.9 +/- 0.5 to 0.63 +/- 0.31 (p less than 0.03) indicating further reduction of left ventricular early diastolic filling. Ejection fraction, stroke volume and cardiac output did not significantly change immediately after PTV.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Aortic valve bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Jens T; Jensen, Maiken Brit; Arendrup, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In aortic valve bypass (AVB) a valve-containing conduit is connecting the apex of the left ventricle to the descending aorta. Candidates are patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis rejected for conventional aortic valve replacement (AVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). ...

  19. Left Atrial Volume as Predictor of Valve Replacement and Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Asymptomatic Mild to Moderate Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Morten; Egstrup, Kenneth; Wachtell, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Left atrial (LA) size is known to increase with chronically increased left ventricular (LV) filling pressure. We hypothesized that LA volume was predictive of aortic valve replacement (AVR) and cardiovascular events in a large cohort of patients with asymptomatic mild to moderate aortic valve...

  20. Aortic Valve Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rheumatic fever is more common in children and young adults. Addressing risk factors for coronary artery disease. These include high blood pressure, obesity and high cholesterol levels. These factors may be ...

  1. A decision tree – based method for the differential diagnosis of Aortic Stenosis from Mitral Regurgitation using heart sounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loukis Euripides N

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New technologies like echocardiography, color Doppler, CT, and MRI provide more direct and accurate evidence of heart disease than heart auscultation. However, these modalities are costly, large in size and operationally complex and therefore are not suitable for use in rural areas, in homecare and generally in primary healthcare set-ups. Furthermore the majority of internal medicine and cardiology training programs underestimate the value of cardiac auscultation and junior clinicians are not adequately trained in this field. Therefore efficient decision support systems would be very useful for supporting clinicians to make better heart sound diagnosis. In this study a rule-based method, based on decision trees, has been developed for differential diagnosis between "clear" Aortic Stenosis (AS and "clear" Mitral Regurgitation (MR using heart sounds. Methods For the purposes of our experiment we used a collection of 84 heart sound signals including 41 heart sound signals with "clear" AS systolic murmur and 43 with "clear" MR systolic murmur. Signals were initially preprocessed to detect 1st and 2nd heart sounds. Next a total of 100 features were determined for every heart sound signal and relevance to the differentiation between AS and MR was estimated. The performance of fully expanded decision tree classifiers and Pruned decision tree classifiers were studied based on various training and test datasets. Similarly, pruned decision tree classifiers were used to examine their differentiation capabilities. In order to build a generalized decision support system for heart sound diagnosis, we have divided the problem into sub problems, dealing with either one morphological characteristic of the heart-sound waveform or with difficult to distinguish cases. Results Relevance analysis on the different heart sound features demonstrated that the most relevant features are the frequency features and the morphological features that

  2. Quadricuspid Aortic Valve Combined with Moderate Ascending Aortic Dilatation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uspenskiy, Vladimir E.; Osadchii, Alexei M.; Gordeev, Mikhail L.

    2015-01-01

    The quadricuspid aortic valve is a very uncommon malformation associated with aortic insufficiency, aortic stenosis, endocarditis, and ascending aortic dilatation. We report four cases of this aortic valve malformation. One patient with severe aortic regurgitation and moderate aortic dilatation required aortic valve replacement. Three patients had mild or moderate aortic insufficiency combined with moderate ascending aortic dilatation. These patients were referred to follow-up. The presented cases demonstrate that this aortic valve malformation may not be as rare as it appears and that attention must be paid to any quadricuspid findings during computed tomographic angiography and echocardiography. PMID:27390747

  3. Extracellular Matrix Biomarker, Fibulin-1, Is Closely Related to NT-proBNP and Soluble Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor in Patients with Aortic Valve Stenosis (The SEAS Study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruger, Ruan; Rasmussen, Lars M; Argraves, William S

    2014-01-01

    associated with subclinical atherosclerosis. Therefore, we aimed to explore the interplay between these biomarkers and mild to moderate aortic valve stenosis (AS). METHODS: In 374 patients with mild to moderate AS, we investigated the relationship of fibulin-1 with NT-proBNP, levels of suPAR and the degree.......01), and suPAR (βyear0 = 0.09, p = 0.26, βyear1 = 0.23, βyear4 = 0.21, both plevels of fibulin-1 were independently associated with higher levels of suPAR and NT-proBNP especially in patients with lower AVAI, suggesting...

  4. Pulmonary artery stenosis caused by a large aortic arch pseudoaneurysm detected 10 years after a minor trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Jalal; Aghasadeghi, Kamran; Zarrabi, Khalil; Abdi Ardekani, Alireza; Zolghadrasli, Abdolali

    2016-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysm of aorta is a rare condition usually seen after aortic surgeries or serious accidents. Here we report a 60 years old man without any previous medical condition who presented with non-specific symptoms and underwent different investigations for more than 1 year, until the presence of a continuous murmur raised suspicion toward his cardiovascular system. In echocardiographic and computed tomography (CT) angiographic studies a large pseudoaneurysm of aortic arch with compression effect on pulmonary artery was detected. At this stage he remembered having suffered a minor trauma 10 years ago. He finally underwent operation and his aortic wall was repaired successfully with a patch. This case highlights the importance of thorough history taking and physical examination in patients irrespective of symptoms and high index of suspicion to detect this life-threatening condition.

  5. Pulmonary artery stenosis caused by a large aortic arch pseudoaneurysm detected 10 years after a minor trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal Zamani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudoaneurysm of aorta is a rare condition usually seen after aortic surgeries or serious accidents. Here we report a 60 years old man without any previous medical condition who presented with non-specific symptoms and underwent different investigations for more than 1 year, until the presence of a continuous murmur raised suspicion toward his cardiovascular system. In echocardiographic and computed tomography (CT angiographic studies a large pseudoaneurysm of aortic arch with compression effect on pulmonary artery was detected. At this stage he remembered having suffered a minor trauma 10 years ago. He finally underwent operation and his aortic wall was repaired successfully with a patch. This case highlights the importance of thorough history taking and physical examination in patients irrespective of symptoms and high index of suspicion to detect this life-threatening condition.

  6. Comparing characteristics and clinical and echocardiographic outcomes in low-flow vs normal-flow severe aortic stenosis with preserved ejection fraction in an Asian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngiam, Jinghao Nicholas; Tan, Benjamin Yong-Qiang; Sia, Ching-Hui; Lee, Glenn K M; Kong, William K F; Chan, Yiong-Huak; Poh, Kian-Keong

    2017-05-01

    In severe aortic stenosis (AS), deterioration of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) to normal-flow, and no study has examined LVEF deterioration. We compared factors associated with LVEF deterioration (to normal-flow (n=72) severe AS (aortic valve area 50%) and with paired echocardiography were studied. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified factors associated with LVEF deterioration. Clinical outcomes were determined on follow-up for more than 5 years. Significant LVEF deterioration (to normal-flow AS (61±7% to 31±12%). Independent factors in low-flow AS were hypertension (OR: 30.7, 95% CI: 2.0-467.6, P=.014) and higher end-systolic wall stress (OR: 1.086, 95% CI: 1.022-1.153, P=.008), compared to normal-flow, which were hypertension (OR: 15.9, 95% CI: 3.1-81.9, P=.001), higher septal E/E' ratio (OR: 1.16, 95% CI: 1.01-1.35, P=.043), lower septal S' velocity (OR: 0.204, 95% CI: 0.061-0.682, P=.010), and higher end-systolic wall stress (OR: 1.051, 95% CI: 1.001-1.104, P=.047). Overall, a third of the cohort experienced MACE, regardless of flow (log-rank 0.048, P=.827). However, aortic valve replacement (AVR) rates were lower in low-flow AS (20% vs 43%, P=.005). Low-flow AS despite normal LVEF appears similar to normal-flow in terms of LVEF deterioration and clinical outcomes in our Asian population. AVR rate was lower even though low-flow may not reflect less severe disease. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Differences in cardiovascular risk profile between electrocardiographic hypertrophy versus strain in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (from SEAS data)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders M; Gerdts, Eva; Boman, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    -Lyon voltage and Cornell voltage-duration criteria; and strain by T-wave inversion and ST-segment depression. Degree of AS severity was evaluated by echocardiography as peak aortic jet velocity and LV mass was indexed by body surface area. After adjustment for age, gender, LV mass index, heart rate, systolic...... and diastolic blood pressures, blood glucose, digoxin, antiarrhythmic drugs, drugs acting on the renin-angiotensin system, diuretics, β blockers and calcium receptor blockers; peak aortic jet velocity was significantly greater in patients with electrocardiographic strain (mean difference 0.13 m/s, p...

  8. Differences in cardiovascular risk profile between electrocardiographic hypertrophy versus strain in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (from SEAS data)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders M; Gerdts, Eva; Boman, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    -Lyon voltage and Cornell voltage-duration criteria; and strain by T-wave inversion and ST-segment depression. Degree of AS severity was evaluated by echocardiography as peak aortic jet velocity and LV mass was indexed by body surface area. After adjustment for age, gender, LV mass index, heart rate, systolic...... and diastolic blood pressures, blood glucose, digoxin, antiarrhythmic drugs, drugs acting on the renin-angiotensin system, diuretics, ß blockers and calcium receptor blockers; peak aortic jet velocity was significantly greater in patients with electrocardiographic strain (mean difference 0.13 m/s, p...

  9. Rationale and design of the Aortic Valve replAcemenT versus conservative treatment in Asymptomatic seveRe aortic stenosis (AVATAR trial): A randomized multicenter controlled event-driven trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banovic, Marko; Iung, Bernard; Bartunek, Jozef; Asanin, Milika; Beleslin, Branko; Biocina, Bojan; Casselman, Filip; da Costa, Mark; Deja, Marek; Gasparovic, Hrvoje; Kala, Petr; Labrousse, Lois; Loncar, Zlatibor; Marinkovic, Jelena; Nedeljkovic, Ivana; Nedeljkovic, Milan; Nemec, Peter; Nikolic, Serge D; Pencina, Michael; Penicka, Martin; Ristic, Arsen; Sharif, Faisal; Van Camp, Guy; Vanderheyden, Marc; Wojakowski, Wojtek; Putnik, Svetozar

    2016-04-01

    Aortic valve replacement (AVR) therapy is an obvious choice for symptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS) patients as it improves symptoms, left ventricular function, and survival. The treatment decisions and indication for AVR in asymptomatic patients with severe AS and normal left ventricular ejection fraction are less well established and the subject of ongoing debate. Many efforts have been made to define the best treatment option in asymptomatic AS patients with normal left ventricular ejection fraction. Retrospective and observational data imply that elective AVR for asymptomatic severe AS may lead to improvement in outcomes in comparison to surgery performed after onset of symptoms. The AVATAR trial will aim to assess outcomes among asymptomatic AS patients randomized to either elective early AVR or medical management with vigilant follow-up. In the latter group, AVR would be delayed until either the onset of symptoms or changes in predefined echocardiographic parameters. To the best of the authors' knowledge, it will be the first large prospective, randomized, controlled, multicenter clinical trial that will evaluate the safety and efficacy of elective AVR in this specific group of patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ex vivo assessment of valve thickness/calcification of patients with calcific aortic stenosis in relation to in vivo clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Li; Chang, Hsiao-Huang; Huang, Pei-Jung; Wang, Wei-Chen; Lin, Shan-Yang

    2017-10-01

    Calcific aortic stenosis (AS) plays a critical role in the risk of cardiovascular disease. This preliminary study examined the relationship between the ex vivo valve thickness/calcification and in vivo clinical outcomes of Chinese patients with calcific AS. Six Chinese patients (3 patients with tricuspid aortic valves (TAV)) and 3 patients with. bicuspid aortic valves (BAV) with calcific AS undergoing heart valve replacement were initially chosen for this study. In vivo medical imaging of these calcific AS patients was evaluated using computed tomography and echocardiography. The ex vivo measurements including the actual thickness, calcified area and components of the calcified aortic values excised were performed by a digimatic caliper, X-ray equipment with a cellSens imaging analysis and portable Raman spectroscopy, respectively. Six patients were diagnosed with symptomatic moderate-to-severe AS. The thickness of noncoronary (N) leaflet in the excised TAV was significantly thicker than left-coronary (L) leaflet (p 0.05). The extent of calcification in the excised TAV was a statistically significant difference between N and L (p 0.05). The patients No. 1-3 were found to be TAV with partial commissural fusion. The patient No. 4 was classified as a type 1 NL-BAV morphotype, but both patients 5 and 6 were found to be true BAV (type 0 lateral-BAV). Each calcified valve leaflet was composed of apatites, proteins (collagen and proteoglycan), and a small amount of β-carotene and cholesterol after Raman spectral determination. The calcified nodules of each valve leaflet were predominately identified to be calcium hydroxyapatite and type-B carbonate apatite. However, octacalcium phosphate was also detected in the protein-rich part of calcified valve leaflets. A positive correlation was observed between thickness and calcification for both excised TAV and BAV after ex vivo examinations. Moreover, a negative relationship was obtained among in vivo AVA index, ex vivo

  11. Cirurgia de preservação da valva aórtica em idosos com estenose aórtica Aortic valve preservation surgery in elderly patients with aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Coelho Segalote

    2008-12-01

    (AV in aortic stenosis (AS at elderly people. METHODS: Thirty-two patients operated for pure AS, older than 65 years-old were studied at InCor FMUSP. Early and late results, clinical (ambulatory and phone interview and echocardiographic follow-up were investigated. Actuarial and event-free survival analysis was done using the Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS: Four patients (15.4% had presented de novo AV stenosis. Five patients had progressed to moderate and two to serious aortic regurgitation. Demineralization, commissurotomy and rough-hewing were realized in 28, 20 and 16 patients, respectively. Nine patients had presented serious postoperative complications (28.1%. Two hospital-acquired pneumonia sepsis and five late deaths had occurred. Postoperative NYHA functional status were 70.5%, 17.6%, 5.8% and 5.8% for functional classes I, II, III and IV, respectively. Actuarial eight-year survival rate was 66.9 ± 12.1%. Eight-year free thromboembolism and endocarditis rate were 90.9 ± 8.7% and 100%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Aortic valve preservation surgery at the aged with AS was revealed a low morbidity and mortality procedure and presented an eight-year acceptable survival rate and functional status improvement among the studied series of patients.

  12. Neurodevelopmental Outcome in Children after Fetal Cardiac Intervention for Aortic Stenosis with Evolving Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laraja, Kristin; Sadhwani, Anjali; Tworetzky, Wayne; Marshall, Audrey C; Gauvreau, Kimberlee; Freud, Lindsay; Hass, Cara; Dunbar-Masterson, Carolyn; Ware, Janice; Lafranchi, Terra; Wilkins-Haug, Louise; Newburger, Jane W

    2017-05-01

    To characterize neurodevelopmental outcomes after fetal aortic valvuloplasty for evolving hypoplastic left heart syndrome and determine the risk factors for adverse neurodevelopment. Questionnaires were mailed to families of children who underwent fetal aortic valvuloplasty from 2000 to 2012, and medical records were reviewed retrospectively. The primary outcome was the General Adaptive Composite score of the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System Questionnaire-Second Edition. Other questionnaires included the Behavior Assessment System for Children, Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function, Ages and Stages, and Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory. Among 69 eligible subjects, 52 (75%) completed questionnaires at median age of 5.5 (range 1.3-12) years; 30 (58%) had biventricular status circulation. The General Adaptive Composite mean score (92 ± 17) was lower than population norms (P Behavior Assessment System for Children, Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function, Ages and Stages, Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory), most subscale scores for patients with biventricular and single ventricular status were similar. Children who underwent fetal aortic valvuloplasty have neurodevelopmental delay, similar to patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome without fetal intervention. Achievement of biventricular circulation was not associated with better outcomes. We infer that innate patient factors and morbidity during infancy have the greatest effect on neurodevelopmental outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Puérpera com trombose de prótese mecânica e estenose supravalvar aórtica adquirida Postpartum patient with thrombosis of mechanical prostheses and acquired supravalvular aortic stenosis

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    Ricardo Adala Benfatti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A hipercoagulabilidade sanguínea proporcionada na gravidez aumenta consideravelmente a incidência de trombose de valvas mecânicas. A estenose supravalvar aórtica adquirida é extremamente rara. Relata-se o caso de uma puérpera imediata, portadora de prótese mecânica aórtica e estenose supravalvar aórtica adquirida, submetida à cirurgia cardíaca de emergência, com instabilidade hemodinâmica grave, por meio de técnica operatória adaptada para a correção da estenose supravalvar aórtica, com evolução clínica e resultados ecocardiográficos pós-operatórios satisfatórios.The blood hypercoagulability in pregnancy increases significantly the incidence of thrombosis of mechanical valves. Acquired supravalvular aortic stenosis is extremely rare. We report the case of an immediate postpartum patient with aortic mechanical prostheses and acquired supravalvular aortic stenosis who underwent emergency heart surgery, with severe hemodynamic instability, using adapted surgical technique for correction of supravalvular stenosis with satisfactory clinical and echocardiography results.

  14. Recuperação por desbridamento manual da valva aórtica estenótica calcificada Manual debridement for repair in calcified aortic stenosis

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    Renato A. K Kalil

    1995-06-01

    and 1 late death. Surviving patients are in functional classes I or II. Maximum instantaneous gradient dropped from 90.7 ± 23.3 mmHg to 33.0 ±7.9 mmHg (p < 0.01 and mean aortic gradient from 50.3 ± 11.0 mmHg to 19.9 ± 3.5 mmHg (p < 0.05. Septal width reduced from 2.0 ± 0.5 cm to 1.2 ± 0.1 (p < 0.01. Aortic regurgitation, by echocardiography, was considered minimum in 5, mild in 9 and moderated in 2 cases. Mechanical debridement of calcified aortic valves, congenital or senile, provides good medium-term relief for aortic stenosis. This technical alternative may be considered in older patients, small aortic roots and higher risks of anticoagulation.

  15. FTO Is Associated with Aortic Valve Stenosis in a Gender Specific Manner of Heterozygote Advantage: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

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    Cindy Thron

    Full Text Available Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within the Fat mass and obesity associated (FTO gene have been linked with increased body weight. However, the data on an association of FTO with cardiovascular diseases remains conflicting. Therefore, we ascertained whether FTO is associated with aortic valve stenosis (AVS, one of the most frequent cardiovascular diseases in the Western world.In this population-based case-control study the FTO SNP rs9939609 was analyzed in 300 German patients with AVS and 429 German controls of the KORA survey S4, representing a random population. Blood samples were collected prior to aortic valve replacement in AVS cases and FTO rs9939609 was genotyped via ARMS-PCR. Genotype frequencies differed significantly between AVS cases and KORA controls (p = 0.004. Separate gender-analyses uncovered an association of FTO with AVS exclusively in males; homozygote carriers for the risk-allele (A had a higher risk to develop AVS (p = 0.017, odds ratio (OR 1.727; 95% confidence interval (CI 1.087-2.747, recessive model, whereas heterozygote carriers for the risk-allele showed a lower risk (p = 0.002, OR 0.565, 95% CI 0.384-0.828, overdominant model. After adjustment for multiple co-variables, the odds ratios of heterozygotes remained significant for an association with AVS (p = 0.008, OR 0.565, 95% CI 0.369-0.861.This study revealed an association of FTO rs9939609 with AVS. Furthermore, this association was restricted to men, with heterozygotes having a significantly lower chance to develop AVS. Lastly, the association between FTO and AVS was independent of BMI and other variables such as diabetes mellitus.

  16. Ethical considerations of transparency, informed consent, and nudging in a patient with paediatric aortic stenosis and symptomatic left ventricular endocardial fibroelastosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroudis, Constantine D; Cook, Thomas; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Mavroudis, Constantine

    2016-12-01

    A 9-year-old boy who was born with bicuspid aortic stenosis underwent two unsuccessful aortic valvuloplasty interventions, and by 2 years of age he developed restrictive cardiomyopathy caused by left ventricular endocardial fibroelastosis and diastolic dysfunction. The attending cardiologist referred the patient to a high-volume, high-profile congenital cardiac surgical programme 1000 miles away that has a team with considerable experience with left ventricular endocardial fibroelastosis resection and a reputation of achieving good results. Owing to problems with insurance coverage, the parents sought other options for the care of their child in their home state. Dr George Miller is a well-respected local congenital and paediatric cardiac surgeon with considerable experience with the Ross operation as well as with right ventricular endocardial fibroelastosis resection. When talking with Dr Miller, he implied that there is little difference between right ventricular endocardial fibroelastosis and left ventricular endocardial fibroelastosis resection, and stated that he would perform the operation with low mortality based on his overall experience. Dr Miller stated that the local institution could provide an equivalent surgical procedure with comparable outcomes, without the patient and family having to travel out of state. A fundamental dilemma that often arises in clinical surgical practice concerns the conduct of assessing and performing new procedures, especially in rare cases, for which the collective global experience is scant. Although Dr Miller has performed right ventricular endocardial fibroelastosis resection, this procedure differs from left ventricular endocardial fibroelastosis resection, and he cannot be sure that he will indeed be able to perform the procedure better than the high-volume surgeon. This ethical situation is best understood in terms of the principles of respect for patient autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice. The tension

  17. Imaging techniques in transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quaife RA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Robert A Quaife, Jennifer Dorosz, John C Messenger, Ernesto E Salcedo Division of Cardiology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: Calcific aortic stenosis is now understood as a complex valvular degenerative process sharing many risk factors with atherosclerosis. Once patients develop symptomatic calcific aortic stenosis, the only effective treatment is aortic valve replacement. In the past decade, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR has been developed as an alternative to surgery to treat severe calcific aortic stenosis. Cardiac imaging plays a pivotal role in the contemporary management of patients with calcific aortic stenosis, and particularly in patients being considered for TAVR, who demand detailed imaging of the aortic valve apparatus. In this review, we highlight the role of cardiac imaging for patient selection, procedural guidance, and evaluation of results of TAVR. Keywords: aortic stenosis, cardiovascular imaging, transcutaneous aortic valve replacement

  18. Prevalence and prognostic implications of baseline anaemia in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.M. van Mieghem (Nicolas); R-J.M. Nuis (Rutger-Jan); A. Tzikas (Apostolos); N. Piazza (Nicolo); C.J. Schultz (Carl); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); P.P.T. de Jaegere (Peter)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAims: TAVI is a minimally invasive alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement or medical therapy in patients with a high or prohibitive operative risk. The clinical significance of baseline anemia and prognostic implications in this patient cohort are unknown. We sought to evaluate

  19. Beneficial Effects of Physical Exercise on Functional Capacity and Skeletal Muscle Oxidative Stress in Rats with Aortic Stenosis-Induced Heart Failure

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    Mariana Janini Gomes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We evaluated the influence of exercise on functional capacity, cardiac remodeling, and skeletal muscle oxidative stress, MAPK, and NF-κB pathway in rats with aortic stenosis- (AS- induced heart failure (HF. Methods and Results. Eighteen weeks after AS induction, rats were assigned into sedentary control (C-Sed, exercised control (C-Ex, sedentary AS (AS-Sed, and exercised AS (AS-Ex groups. Exercise was performed on treadmill for eight weeks. Statistical analyses were performed with Goodman and ANOVA or Mann-Whitney. HF features frequency and mortality did not differ between AS groups. Exercise improved functional capacity, assessed by maximal exercise test on treadmill, without changing echocardiographic parameters. Soleus cross-sectional areas did not differ between groups. Lipid hydroperoxide concentration was higher in AS-Sed than C-Sed and AS-Ex. Activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase was changed in AS-Sed and restored in AS-Ex. NADPH oxidase activity and gene expression of its subunits did not differ between AS groups. Total ROS generation was lower in AS-Ex than C-Ex. Exercise modulated MAPK in AS-Ex and did not change NF-κB pathway proteins. Conclusion. Exercise improves functional capacity in rats with AS-induced HF regardless of echocardiographic parameter changes. In soleus, exercise reduces oxidative stress, preserves antioxidant enzyme activity, and modulates MAPK expression.

  20. Review in Translational Cardiology: MicroRNAs and Myocardial Fibrosis in Aortic Valve Stenosis, a Deep Insight on Left Ventricular Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacopo, Fabiani; Lorenzo, Conte; Calogero, Enrico; Matteo, Passiatore; Riccardo, Pugliese Nicola; Veronica, Santini; Valentina, Barletta; Riccardo, Liga; Cristian, Scatena; Maria, Mazzanti Chiara; Vitantonio, Di Bello

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a huge class of noncoding RNAs that regulate protein-encoding genes (degradation/inhibition of translation). miRNAs are nowadays recognized as regulators of biological processes underneath cardiovascular disorders including hypertrophy, ischemia, arrhythmias, and valvular disease. In particular, circulating miRNAs are promising biomarkers of pathology. This review gives an overview of studies in aortic valve stenosis (AS), exclusively considering myocardial remodeling processes. We searched through literature (till September 2016), all studies and reviews involving miRNAs and AS (myocardial compartment). Although at the beginning of a new era, clear evidences exist on the potential diagnostic and prognostic implementation of miRNAs in the clinical setting. In particular, for AS, miRNAs are modulators of myocardial remodeling and hypertrophy. In our experience, here presented in summary, the principal findings of our research were a confirm of the pathophysiological role in AS of miRNA-21, in particular, the interdependence between textural miRNA-21 and fibrogenic stimulus induced by an abnormal left ventricular pressure overload. Moreover, circulating miRNA-21 (biomarker) levels are able to reflect the presence of significant myocardial fibrosis (MF). Thus, the combined evaluation of miRNA-21, a marker of MF, and hypertrophy, together with advanced echocardiographic imaging (two-dimensional speckle tracking), could fulfill many existing gaps, renewing older guidelines paradigms, also allowing a better risk prognostic and diagnostic strategies.

  1. Axillofemoral Bypass Markedly Improved Acute Decompensated Heart Failure and Kidney Injury in a Patient with Severely Calcified Stenosis of Thoracoabdominal Aorta (Atypical Aortic Coarctation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Masato; Yamada, Shintaro; Maemura, Sonoko; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Takizawa, Masataka; Uozumi, Hiroki; Minegishi, Sachito; Kobayashi, Jotaro; Ikenouchi, Hiroshi

    2017-10-21

    Atypical aortic coarctation (AAC) has been reported to occur anywhere along the aorta, except for the ascending aorta. The associated symptoms include hypotension in the lower half of the body, secondary hypertension in the upper half of the body, and heart failure. Here we present an 80-year-old Asian woman complaining of progressive exertional dyspnea. She was diagnosed with acute decompensated heart failure and kidney injury due to severely calcified stenosis of the thoracoabdominal aorta, the so called AAC. She received hemodiafiltration, and pulmonary congestion improved in part. Generally, surgical treatments are quite invasive in elderly patients. Endovascular stent graft placement is less invasive, however, fracture and rupture should be considered at severely calcified lesions like this case. Therefore, we selected extra-anatomical axillofemoral bypass. Her recovery after the surgery was remarkable. In a few days, she became free from hemodiafiltration, intravenous diuretics, and oxygen administration. We thought the contributive factors are the increase in kidney blood flow and the correction of afterload mismatch. The decrease in pulse pressure may reflect the reduction in systemic arterial compliance by axillofemoral bypass. The operative mortality of axillofemoral bypass was reported to be acceptable, although the patency of the axillofemoral bypass graft was not high enough. In conclusion, axillofemoral bypass is effective and feasible for elderly patients with acute decompensated heart failure and kidney injury due to AAC.

  2. Endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm in a patient with stenosis of bilateral common iliac artery stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daab, Leo J; Aidinian, Gilbert; Weber, Michael A; Kembro, Ronald J; Cook, Patrick R

    2011-01-01

    The explosion in endovascular interventions for peripheral vascular disease has resulted in procedures being used by a multitude of specialties. Nonvascular surgeons performing these interventions can create scenarios that may make future vascular interventions difficult. In this article, we present a case report illustrating this point. A 68-year-old man with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, coronary artery disease with prior myocardial infarction, and multiple abdominal operations presented with an abdominal aortic aneurysm. In our opinion, this patient was at a prohibitive operative risk for open repair. Review of his imaging results revealed a 6.7-cm infrarenal aneurysm with bilateral common iliac artery (CIA) stents (right: 8 mm; left: 6 mm) and 6-mm self-expanding stents extending from the right external iliac artery through the common femoral artery. A Cook Zenith Renu (30 × 108 mm) graft (Cook Medical Inc., Bloomington, IN) was advanced after serial dilation and balloon angioplasty of the stenotic right CIA stent. Left brachial access was used for arteriographic imaging. The left common femoral artery was accessed and the left CIA was coil-embolized to prevent backbleeding. A femoro-femoral artery crossover bypass was then performed after segmental resection of the right common femoral artery stent. The patient tolerated the procedure well and was discharged home on postoperative day 3. Subsequent postoperative computed tomography arteriogram after 1 month showed palpable pulses and no evidence of endoleak with flow in the femoro-femoral graft on clinical exam. This case demonstrates an endovascular intervention which limited the potential options available for aneurysm repair. Similar problems may become increasingly common as more providers offer endovascular interventions, thus emphasizing the importance of a collaborative approach to the patient with complex aorto-iliac occlusive disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm. It is the duty of the

  3. Changes in Tracheostomy- and Intubation-Related Tracheal Stenosis: Implications for Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Samuel S; Khalpey, Zain; Hsu, Charles; Little, Alex G

    2017-09-01

    This study sought to identify the changing characteristic patterns and locations of stenosis after tracheostomy or intubation and to assess the risk factors associated with perioperative complication and restenosis after primary resection and reconstruction. A retrospective review was performed (January /2012 to March 2015) on patients treated at the University of Arizona Medical Center (Tucson, Arizona) who had symptomatic tracheal stenosis secondary to prolonged intubation or tracheostomy. Data on demographics, surgical approach, and outcome were obtained. Analysis was performed using the χ 2 test, Kaplan-Meier estimate of survival, Cox proportional hazards survival analysis, and univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Forty-eight patients were referred for surgical resection, and 36 patients underwent primary resection and reconstruction; 72% of patients had previous endobronchial treatments for stenosis. Fourteen patients had postintubation tracheal stenosis, and 22 had tracheostomy-related stenosis (16 percutaneous, 6 open tracheostomy). Among all patients, 52.8% had stenosis proximal to or involving the cricoid; 72.7% of patients with tracheostomy-related stenosis had stenosis at or proximal to the cricoid, whereas only 21.4% of the patients with intubation-related stenosis had a similar location. Nineteen patients underwent laryngotracheal resection, and 17 patients had tracheal resection. The mean length of resection was 3.6 cm. A body mass index greater than 35 was associated with increased perioperative complications (p = 0.012). In multivariate analysis, patients younger than 30 years of age at operation had an increased relative risk of recurrence. Recent advances in percutaneous tracheostomy have increased the numbers of patients presenting with proximal tracheal stenosis, thus necessitating more complex subglottic resection and reconstruction. The anastomotic and overall complication rate remains low despite these more complex operations

  4. Anatomic distribution of renal artery stenosis in children: implications for imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo, Nghia J.; Racadio, Judy M.; Johnson, Neil D.; Hammelman, Ben D.; Strife, C.F.; Racadio, John M.

    2006-01-01

    Renal artery stenosis (RAS) causes significant hypertension in children. Frequently, pediatric RAS occurs with systemic disorders. In these cases, stenoses are often complex and/or include long segments. We believed that hypertensive children without comorbid conditions had a different lesion distribution and that the difference might have implications for imaging and treatment. To identify locations of RAS lesions in these hypertensive children without comorbid conditions. Patients who had renal angiography for hypertension from 1993 to 2005 were identified. Patients with systemic disorders, renovascular surgery, or normal angiograms were excluded. The angiograms of the remaining patients were reviewed for number, type, and location of stenoses. Eighty-seven patients underwent renal angiography for hypertension; 30 were excluded for comorbid conditions. Twenty-one of the remaining 57 patients had abnormal angiograms; 24 stenoses were identified in those patients. All were focal and distributed as follows: 6 (25%) main renal artery, 12 (50%) 2nd order branch, 3 (12.5%) 3rd order branch, and 3 (12.5%) accessory renal artery. Hypertensive children without comorbid conditions who have RAS usually have single, focal branch artery stenoses. This distribution supports angiography in these patients because of its superior sensitivity in detecting branch vessel disease and its therapeutic role in percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty. (orig.)

  5. Relationship between N-terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide and extensive echocardiographic parameters in mild to moderate aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemri M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The N-terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide levels (NT pro-BNP are increased in cases of volume or pressure overload. Aims: To examine NT pro-BNP levels and enclose whether any relationship is present between the levels of NT pro-BNP and extensive echocardiographic parameters in asymptomatic patients with mild to moderate aortic stenosis (AS. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study about the NT pro-BNP levels was conducted in 37 asymptomatic AS patients and compared with 40 controls. Methods: Patients < 70 years old with mild to moderate AS with a peak transaortic gradient> 20 mm Hg in transthoracic echocardiogram were included in our study. Extensive echocardiographic parameters and NT pro-BNP levels were obtained from these patients and these indices were compared with the control population selected from the patients who had similar clinical characteristics with the AS patients. Statistical Analysis: NT-proBNP values were found to be distribution free. Spearman correlation coefficient was used for correlation analysis. Mean values were compared by the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: The NT pro-BNP levels were increased in patients with AS (median; interquartiles range: 686 [449-855] pg/mL vs. 140 [116-150] pg/mL, P < 0.001. Among patients with AS, when correlation analysis was performed mean transaortic gradient, aortic valve area index, myocardial performance index, E m /A m ratio, left-ventricular mass index (LVMI and E/E m ratio had correlations (r=0.38, P = 0.026; r=-0.46, P =0.008; r=0.19, P =0,049; r=-0.22, P =0.04, r=0.49, P =0.003 and r=0.53, P < 0.001 respectively with plasma NT pro-BNP levels. The LVMI (r = 0.49, P = 0.003 and E/E m ratio (r = 0.53 P < 0.001 have the strongest correlations when compared to other parameters. Conclusion: Plasma NT pro-BNP levels are increased in even asymptomatic patients with AS and correlated with several echocardiographic parameters related to severity of AS and degree of diastolic

  6. Outcomes comparison of different surgical strategies for the management of severe aortic valve stenosis: study protocol of a prospective multicentre European registry (E-AVR registry).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorati, Francesco; Gherli, Riccardo; Mariscalco, Giovanni; Girdauskas, Evaldas; Quintana, Eduardo; Santini, Francesco; De Feo, Marisa; Sponga, Sandro; Tozzi, Piergiorgio; Bashir, Mohamad; Perrotti, Andrea; Pappalardo, Aniello; Ruggieri, Vito Giovanni; Santarpino, Giuseppe; Rinaldi, Mauro; Ronaldo, Silva; Nicolini, Francesco

    2018-02-10

    Traditional and transcatheter surgical treatments of severe aortic valve stenosis (SAVS) are increasing in parallel with the improved life expectancy. Recent randomised controlled trials (RCTs) reported comparable or non-inferior mortality with transcatheter treatments compared with traditional surgery. However, RCTs have the limitation of being a mirror of the predefined inclusion/exclusion criteria, without reflecting the 'real clinical world'. Technological improvements have recently allowed the development of minimally invasive surgical accesses and the use of sutureless valves, but their impact on the clinical scenario is difficult to assess because of the monocentric design of published studies and limited sample size. A prospective multicentre registry including all patients referred for a surgical treatment of SAVS (traditional, through full sternotomy; minimally invasive; or transcatheter; with both 'sutured' and 'sutureless' valves) will provide a 'real-world' picture of available results of current surgical options and will help to clarify the 'grey zones' of current guidelines. European Aortic Valve Registry is a prospective observational open registry designed to collect all data from patients admitted for SAVS, with or without coronary artery disease, in 16 cardiac surgery centres located in six countries (France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland and UK). Patients will be enrolled over a 2-year period and followed up for a minimum of 5 years to a maximum of 10 years after enrolment. Outcome definitions are concordant with Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 criteria and established guidelines. Primary outcome is 5-year all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes aim at establishing 'early' 30-day all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, as well as major morbidity, and 'late' cardiovascular mortality, major morbidity, structural and non-structural valve complications, quality of life and echocardiographic results. The study protocol is approved by local

  7. Quadricuspid Aortic Valve Combined with Moderate Ascending Aortic Dilatation: A Report of Four Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uspenskiy, Vladimir E; Osadchii, Alexei M; Gordeev, Mikhail L

    2015-12-01

    The quadricuspid aortic valve is a very uncommon malformation associated with aortic insufficiency, aortic stenosis, endocarditis, and ascending aortic dilatation. We report four cases of this aortic valve malformation. One patient with severe aortic regurgitation and moderate aortic dilatation required aortic valve replacement. Three patients had mild or moderate aortic insufficiency combined with moderate ascending aortic dilatation. These patients were referred to follow-up. The presented cases demonstrate that this aortic valve malformation may not be as rare as it appears and that attention must be paid to any quadricuspid findings during computed tomographic angiography and echocardiography.

  8. Edema pulmonar refractario secundario a estenosis valvular aórtica severa - valvuloplastia aórtica como terapia puente a cirugía: Presentación de un caso Refractory pulmonary edema secondary to severe aortic valvular stenosis - aortic valvuloplasty as bridge therapy to surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Salazar

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available La estenosis valvular aórtica es una entidad progresiva, que cuando es severa y produce síntomas, tiene un pronóstico sombrío que afecta de forma adversa la sobrevida. En estos casos el tratamiento de elección es la cirugía de cambio valvular, la cual, bajo determinadas circunstancias clínicas, puede ser de muy alto riesgo, y obliga así a considerar alternativas de manejo menos agresivas que permitan solucionar el problema. Se muestra el caso de un hombre de 65 años, con estenosis valvular aórtica severa, quien desarrolló edema pulmonar refractario al manejo médico, que se resolvió mediante valvuloplastia aórtica, como terapia puente a cirugía.Aortic valve stenosis is a progressive disease; when it is severe and symptomatic has a bleak prognosis that affects adversely the patient survival. In these cases, the treatment of choice is valve replacement surgery that under certain circumstances can bear a huge risk that forces the physician to consider less aggressive management alternatives to solve the problem. The case of a 65 years old male with severe aortic valve stenosis is reported. He developed pulmonary edema refractory to medical treatment that was solved by aortic valvuloplasty as bridge therapy to surgery.

  9. The prognostic impact of concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting during aortic valve surgery: implications for revascularization in the transcatheter era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalji, Nassir M; Suri, Rakesh M; Daly, Richard C; Greason, Kevin L; Dearani, Joseph A; Stulak, John M; Joyce, Lyle D; Burkhart, Harold M; Pochettino, Alberto; Li, Zhuo; Frye, Robert L; Schaff, Hartzell V

    2015-02-01

    Clinicians may give greater consideration to medical management versus coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) for coronary artery disease (CAD) at the time of aortic valve intervention. We evaluated the prognostic impact of revascularization strategy during aortic valve replacement (AVR). We studied 1308 consecutive patients with significant CAD (≥50% stenosis) undergoing AVR with or with out CABG between 2001 and 2010. Late mortality and its determinants were analyzed using multivariable Cox models. Patients undergoing CABG (n = 1043; 18%) had more frequent angina (50% vs 26%; P 70% stenosis) CAD (85% vs 48%; P 70%) CAD (HR, 0.62; P = .002). In patients undergoing AVR with coexistent CAD, concomitant CABG reduces risk of late death by more than one-third, without augmenting operative mortality. This survival advantage persists in moderate (50% to 70%) and severe (>70%) CAD. These findings underline the prognostic importance of revascularization in this population and should influence decisions regarding revascularization strategy in patients undergoing transcatheter valve therapy. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Factors influencing left ventricular structure and stress-corrected systolic function in men and women with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis (a SEAS Substudy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramariuc, D.; Rieck, A.E.; Staal, E.M.

    2008-01-01

    also was a predictor of LV hypertrophy (p body mass index, heart rate, aortic valve area, LV...... mass, relative wall thickness, aortic regurgitation, hypertension, and end-systolic stress (R(2) = 0.23 and 0.59, respectively, p ... higher stress-corrected indexes of systolic function independent of LV geometry or size, wall stress, older age, or more concomitant hypertension Udgivelsesdato: 2008/2/15...

  11. Angioplasty in stenosis of the innominate artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobinia, G.S.; Bergmann, H. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    We describe a successful percutaneous transluminal dilatation (PTD) of an innominate artery stenosis in a 40-year-old patient with aortic arch syndrome. Five years earlier both a left central carotid artery occlusion and an innominate and left subclavian artery stenosis were treated by grafting from the aorta to the distal vessels. At recurrence of the neurological symptoms, reocclusion of the graft to the innominate artery and subtotal stenosis of the left carotid anastomosis were noted. The prevent the hazards of a reoperation, the innominate artery stenosis was dilated by means of PTD via the right brachial artery. Success of the procedure was demonstrated by Doppler sonography and angiography. It appears that PTD serves as an excellent method of treating stenoses of the aortic arch branches in aortic arch syndrome. (orig.)

  12. Spinal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beale, S.; Pathria, M.N.; Ross, J.S.; Masaryk, T.J.; Modic, M.T.

    1988-01-01

    The authors studied 50 patients who had spinal stenosis by means of MR imaging. All patients had undergone myelography and CT. Thirty patients underwent surgery. MR imaging included T1-weighted spin echo sequences with repetition time = 600 msec, echo time = 20 (600/20) sagittal and axial sections 4 mm thick with 2 mm gap. T2-weighted 2,000/60 axial images were obtained on 14 patients. Examinations were retrospectively evaluated for central stenosis, lateral recess narrowing, and foraminal encroachment. Measurements of sagittal, interpedicular, interfacet, and recess dimensions were made at L3-5. On MR images, 20 patients had single-level and 30 had multiple-level stenosis. There was excellent agreement between modalities with central canal stenosis, but a discrepancy in six patients with bony foraminal stenosis. MR imaging was an accurate method for assessment of lumbar stenosis, but CT appears marginally better for detection of bony foraminal stenosis in certain cases

  13. The Prevalence of Sleep Apnea in Type B Aortic Dissection: Implications for False Lumen Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Chen, Jiyan; Li, Guangxi; Luo, Songyuan; Wang, Rui; Li, Wei; Zhang, Jiawei; Liu, Yuan; Huang, Wenhui; Cao, Yingshu; Zhou, Yingling; Chen, Pingyan; Pressman, Gregg S; Somers, Virend K; Luo, Jianfang

    2017-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been implicated in aortic dissection. Thrombosis of the false lumen is associated with a prognosis of type B aortic dissection (AoD), and partial thrombosis has been reported to be an independent predictor of mortality. This study sought to explore whether the severity of OSA is associated with false lumen thrombosis. In this observational study, 151 type B AoD patients were recruited consecutively from 2013 to 2015. The status of the false lumen was classified as patent, partially thrombosed, or completely thrombosed based on a computer tomography angiography image. Patients were divided into non-OSA group (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] 30) using the AHI. The prevalence of OSA in type B dissection was 66.2%. Among 151 cases, 51 patients (33.8%) were in the non-OSA group, 56 (37.1%) were in the mild group, 21 (13.9%) were in the moderate group, and 23 (15.2%) were in the severe group. Additionally, a partially thrombosed false lumen was observed in 88 patients (58.3%). Multivariable analysis revealed that OSA severity was positively associated with partial thrombosis (odds ratio, 1.784, 95% confidence interval: 1.182-2.691, P = .006) after adjusting for other confounding factors. OSA was present in two-thirds of patients with type B AoD. The severity of OSA was significantly associated with an increased risk of partial false lumen thrombosis. OSA may therefore be implicated in both the etiology and prognosis of AoD.

  14. Aortic root replacement with a pulmonary autograft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.B. Hokken (Raymond)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractAortic valve disease in the pediatric age group is usually a consequence of congenital aortic stenosis, which may be isolated or may be a part of an anomaly of the left ventricular outflow tract or the aortic root. Management of these patients is difficult. Neonates and infants

  15. Impact of Aortic Insufficiency on Ascending Aortic Dilatation and Adverse Aortic Events After Isolated Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With a Bicuspid Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongshi; Wu, Boting; Li, Jun; Dong, Lili; Wang, Chunsheng; Shu, Xianhong

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant flow pattern and congenital fragility bestows bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) with a propensity toward ascending aorta dilatation, aneurysm, and dissection. Whether isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR) can prevent further dilatation in BAV ascending aorta and what indicates concurrent aortic intervention in the case of valve operation remain controversial. From June 2006 to January 2009, patients with a BAV who underwent isolated AVR were consecutively included and categorized into aortic insufficiency (BAV-AI, n = 84) and aortic stenosis (n = 112) groups, and another population of patients with a tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency (n = 149) was also recruited during the same period for comparison of annual aortic dilatation rate and adverse aortic events after isolated AVR. With a median follow-up period of 72 months (interquartile range, 66 to 78 months), ascending aorta dilatation rates were faster in the BAV-AI group than the BAV plus aortic stenosis and tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency groups (both p regression analysis identified aortic insufficiency (hazard ratio, 3.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.2 to 11.1; p = 0.019) as an independent risk factor for adverse aortic events among patients with BAV in general, whereas preoperative ascending aortic diameter larger than 45 mm (hazard ratio, 13.8; 95% confidence interval, 3.0 to 63.3; p = 0.001) served as a prognostic indicator in the BAV-AI group. An aggressive policy of preventive aortic interventions seemed appropriate in patients with BAV-AI during AVR, and BAV phenotype presenting as either insufficiency or stenosis should be taken into consideration when contemplating optimal surgical strategies for BAV aortopathy. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Risk of stroke after transcatheter prosthetic aortic valve implant with aortic bioprosthesis: subclinical thrombosis and possible therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pasquale, Giuseppe; Coutsoumbas, Gloria V; Zagnoni, Silvia

    2017-10-16

    : Many factors could increase the risk of stroke after transcatheter prosthetic aortic valve implant, mainly related to the procedure itself, or to the type of valvular prosthesis, or to the presence of atrial fibrillation. There is a wide variability in the antithrombotic treatment utilized in clinical practice, as far as the choice of drugs (anticoagulant, single or dual antiplatelet treatment), and its optimal duration. The most popular therapeutic strategy, also recommended by the Scientific Societies, is dual antiplatelet (aspirin and clopidogrel) for the first 3-6 months then switching to single antiplatelet (usually aspirin), limiting oral anticoagulant therapy only to those patients with other primary indication to the treatment. Recently, it has been outlined that subclinical thrombosis could be responsible for bioprosthetic valve malfunction, whereas some studies suggest the efficacy of a single antiplatelet drug after transcatheter prosthetic aortic valve implant. Therefore, it is possible to personalize the therapeutic regimen balancing the ischemic and hemorrhagic risk. Several studies are ongoing to overcome these therapeutic uncertainties, including the use of new oral anticoagulants.

  17. Calculation of Mitral Valve Area in Mitral Stenosis: Comparison of Continuity Equation and Pressure Half Time With Two-Dimensional Planimetry in Patients With and Without Associated Aortic or Mitral Regurgitation or Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Sattarzadeh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurement of Mitral Valve Area (MVA is essential to determining the Mitral Stenosis (MS severity and to achieving the best management strategies for this disease. The goal of the present study is to compare mitral valve area (MVA measurement by Continuity Equation (CE and Pressure Half-Time (PHT methods with that of 2D-Planimetry (PL in patients with moderate to severe mitral stenosis (MS. This comparison also was performed in subgroups of patients with significant Aortic Insufficiency (AI, Mitral Regurgitation (MR and Atrial Fibrillation (AF. We studied 70 patients with moderate to severe MS who were referred to echocardiography clinic. MVA was determined by PL, CE and PHT methods. The agreement and correlations between MVA’s obtained from various methods were determined by kappa index, Bland-Altman analysis, and linear regression analysis. The mean values for MVA calculated by CE was 0.81 cm (±0.27 and showed good correlation with those calculated by PL (0.95 cm, ±0.26 in whole population (r=0.771, P<0.001 and MR subgroup (r=0.763, P<0.001 and normal sinus rhythm and normal valve subgroups (r=0.858, P<0.001 and r=0.867, P<0.001, respectively. But CE methods didn’t show any correlation in AF and AI subgroups. MVA measured by PHT had a good correlation with that measured by PL in whole population (r=0.770, P<0.001 and also in NSR (r=0.814, P<0.001 and normal valve subgroup (r=0.781, P<0.001. Subgroup with significant AI and those with significant MR showed moderate correlation (r=0.625, P=0.017 and r=0.595, P=0.041, respectively. Bland Altman Analysis showed that CE would estimate MVA smaller in comparison with PL in the whole population and all subgroups and PHT would estimate MVA larger in comparison with PL in the whole population and all subgroups. The mean bias for CE and PHT are 0.14 cm and -0.06 cm respectively. In patients with moderate to severe mitral stenosis, in the absence of concomitant AF, AI or MR, the accuracy

  18. Implante por cateter de bioprótese valvar para tratamento da estenose aórtica: experiência de três anos Transcatheter bioprosthesis implantation for the treatment of aortic stenosis: three-year experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Sandoli de Brito Junior

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: O implante por cateter de bioprótese valvar aórtica é uma nova modalidade de tratamento para portadores de estenose aórtica inoperáveis ou de alto risco cirúrgico. Objetivo: Relatar a experiência de três anos do implante por cateter da bioprótese CoreValve. MÉTODOS: Entre janeiro de 2008 e janeiro de 2011, 35 pacientes com estenose aórtica (33 casos ou disfunção de bioprótese valvar aórtica (dois casos de alto risco cirúrgico foram submetidos ao implante da bioprótese CoreValve. RESULTADOS: A média de idade dos pacientes foi 81,5 ± 9 anos, e 80% apresentavam-se em classe funcional III ou IV de insuficiência cardíaca. O EuroScore foi 18,4 ± 14,3% e o STS 14,5 ± 11,6%. Obteve-se sucesso do implante em 34 (97,1% pacientes. Após a intervenção houve redução do gradiente transvalvar de 84,9 ± 22 para 22,5 ± 9,5 mmHg e 87,1% dos pacientes evoluíram em classe funcional I ou II. A mortalidade aos 30 dias e no seguimento médio de 400 ± 298 dias foi, respectivamente, de 11,4% e 31,4%. A ocorrência de complicações hemorrágicas com risco de morte foi o único preditor independente de mortalidade cardiovascular. Acidente vascular cerebral ocorreu em 5,7% dos pacientes. Marca-passo permanente foi necessário em 32,1% dos casos no primeiro mês após o procedimento. CONCLUSÃO: O implante por cateter de bioprótese valvar aórtica é um procedimento seguro e eficaz para ser empregado em portadores de estenose aórtica de alto risco cirúrgico. O dispositivo CoreValve é eficaz no médio-prazo, em seguimento de até três anos.BACKGROUND: Transcatheter aortic bioprosthesis implantation is a new treatment modality for patients with aortic stenosis who are inoperable or at high surgical risk. OBJECTIVE: To report the three-year experience with transcatheter CoreValve® bioprosthesis implantation. METHODS: From January 2008 to January 2011, 35 patients with aortic stenosis (33 or aortic valve bioprosthesis

  19. Aortic stenting in the growing sheep causes aortic endothelial dysfunction but not hypertension: Clinical implications for coarctation repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschietto, Nicola; Semplicini, Luca; Ceolotto, Giulio; Cattelan, Arianna; Poser Dvm, Helen; Iacopetti, Ilaria; Gerardi, Gabriele; De Benedictis, Giulia Maria; Pilla, Tommaso; Bernardini, Daniele; Aresu, Luca; Rizzo, Stefania; Basso, Cristina; Semplicini, Andrea; Milanesi, Ornella

    2017-01-01

    Stent implantation is the treatment of choice for adolescents and adults with aortic coarctation (CoAo). Despite excellent short-term results, 20%-40% of the patients develop arterial hypertension later in life, which was attributed to inappropriate response of the aortic baroreceptors to increased stiffness of the ascending aorta (ASAO), either congenital or induced by CoAo repair. In particular, it has been hypothesized that stent itself may cause or sustain hypertension. Therefore, we aimed to study the hemodynamic and structural impact following stent implantation in the normal aorta of a growing animal. Eight female sheep completed the study and a stent was implanted in four. Every 3 mo we measured blood pressure of the anterior and posterior limbs and left ventricular function by echocardiography. Twelve months later invasive pressure was measured under baseline and simulated stress conditions. Expression of genes indicating oxidative stress (OS), endothelial dysfunction (ED) and stiffness, as well as pathological examination were performed in ascending (ASAO) and descending aorta (DSAO). SOD1 and MMP9 gene expression were higher in ASAO of the stented animals, compared to DSAO and controls, while NOS3 was decreased. No differences were found in blood pressure and echocardiographic parameters. No histological differences were found in the aorta of the two groups of animals. Stent does not affect central and peripheral hemodynamics, cardiac structure and function even in the long term. However, the finding of markers of OS and increased stiffness of ASAO, proximal to the stent, points to molecular mechanisms for increased cardiovascular risk of patients with stented CoAo. © 2016 The Authors Congenital Heart Disease published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Temporal Trends in Disease Severity and Predicted Surgical Risk at the Time of Referral for Echocardiography in Patients Diagnosed with Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ersboll, Mads; Samad, Zainab; Al Enezi, Fawaz

    2015-01-01

    significantly over time (P = 0.009) with the most substantial increase occurring from 2010 and onward. Median age upon referral (P period among patients with a finding of severe AS. Among patients...... with a finding of severe AS, the proportion of patients aged older than 80 years increased to 51.0% in the most recent time period (2010-2012) compared with 32.6% in the preceding time period (P ... risk at referral. Health-care resource planning should account for an increasing number of patients in need of high-risk aortic valve replacements in the near future....

  1. Myocardial gene expression of microRNA-133a and myosin heavy and light chains, in conjunction with clinical parameters, predict regression of left ventricular hypertrophy after valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Ana V; Merino, David; Wenner, Mareike; Llano, Miguel; Cobo, Manuel; Montalvo, Cecilia; García, Raquel; Martín-Durán, Rafael; Hurlé, Juan M; Hurlé, María A; Nistal, J Francisco

    2011-07-01

    Left ventricular (LV) reverse remodelling after valve replacement in aortic stenosis (AS) has been classically linked to the hydraulic performance of the replacement device, but myocardial status at the time of surgery has received little attention. To establish predictors of LV mass (LVM) regression 1 year after valve replacement in a surgical cohort of patients with AS based on preoperative clinical and echocardiographic parameters and the myocardial gene expression profile at surgery. Transcript levels of remodelling-related proteins and regulators were determined in LV intraoperative biopsies from 46 patients with AS by RT-PCR. Using multiple linear regression analysis, an equation was developed (adjusted R²=0.73; pregression analysis identified microRNA-133a as a significant positive predictor of LVM normalisation, whereas β-myosin heavy chain and BMI constituted negative predictors. Hypertrophy regression 1 year after pressure overload release is related to the preoperative myocardial expression of remodelling-related genes, in conjunction with the patient's clinical background. In this scenario, miR-133 emerges as a key element of the reverse remodelling process. Postoperative improvement of valve haemodynamics does not predict the degree of hypertrophy regression or LVM normalisation. These results led us to reconsider the current reverse remodelling paradigm and (1) to include criteria of hypertrophy reversibility in the decision algorithm used to decide timing for the operation; and (2) to modify other prevailing factors (overweight, diabetes, etc) known to maintain LV hypertrophy.

  2. Insuficiencia cardíaca congestiva por estenosis aórtica calcificada tratada con éxito en el hogar Congenital heart failure due to calcified aortic stenosis successfully treated at home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roidel Pérez Pérez

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Se describe la historia de un paciente con una insuficiencia cardíaca congestiva debido a una estenosis aórtica calcificada, con un cuadro de arritmia cardíaca relativamente complejo, que fue ingresado en el hogar y tratado por el grupo básico de trabajo de su área de salud. Se le realizaron las investigaciones imprescindibles para un adecuado manejo médico, restableciéndosele la salud al paciente, e incorporándolo a su vida laboral, sin necesidad de ingreso hospitalario. Se demostró una vez más la ventaja de este estilo de trabajo en la atención médica de salud y el gran nivel de satisfacción de la población.The history of a patient suffering from congenital heart failure due to a calcified aortic stenosis, with a relatively complex picture of heart arrhytmia, that was admitted at home and treated by the basic working group in his health area, is described. All the investigations necessary for an adequate medical management were made. The patient's health was reestablished and he was able to work again without being hospitalized. It was proved once again the advantage of this working style in health care and the high level of the patient's satisfaction.

  3. The nordic aortic valve intervention (NOTION) trial comparing transcatheter versus surgical valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Søndergaard, Lars; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2013-01-01

    Degenerative aortic valve (AV) stenosis is the most prevalent heart valve disease in the western world. Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) has until recently been the standard of treatment for patients with severe AV stenosis. Whether transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) can...

  4. Long-term outcomes of the Ross procedure in adults with severe aortic stenosis: single-centre experience with 20 years of follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfa, David; Mohammadi, Siamak; Kalavrouziotis, Dimitri; Kharroubi, Mounir; Doyle, Daniel; Marzouk, Mohamed; Metras, Jacques; Perron, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The optimal prosthesis option for aortic valve replacement in adult patientsreplacement (n=190; 86%) or the subcoronary technique (n=31; 14%). There were 169 patients with bicuspid valves and 33 redo operations including previous aortic valve repair (n=6) and replacement (n=9) for severe AS. Demographic, preoperative, postoperative and longitudinal clinical and echocardiographic data were collected prospectively. The median and mean follow-up were 11.4 years (range: 1-20.1 years) and 10.1±5.9 years, respectively. The follow-up was complete in all patients. Kaplan-Meier actuarial survival analysis was performed to assess long-term survival, freedom from reoperation for autograft and/or homograft failure and freedom from autograft valve insufficiency. Cox regression risk analysis was performed to identify factors associated with autograft or homograft reoperations. The perioperative mortality rate was 0.9% (n=2). The incidence rate of early reoperation for bleeding was 5.9%. The actuarial survival rate at 10 and 15 years following surgery was 92.1 and 90.5%, respectively. Ross-related reoperations occurred in 21 patients during follow-up: autograft dysfunction (n=9), homograft dysfunction (n=6) and both (n=6). The rate of freedom from Ross-related reoperation was 94.7 and 87.7% at 10 and 15 years, respectively. The rate of freedom from reoperation for autograft failure was 97.6 and 91.5%, the rate of freedom from reoperation for homograft failure was 95.7 and 90.8%, and the rate of freedom from moderate or severe autograft regurgitation was 94.1 and 85.6% at 10 and 15 years, respectively. Compared with available aortic bioprosthetic alternatives in young adults with severe AS, the Ross procedure provides an excellent long-term option for patients with predominant severe AS who seek a durable operation without anticoagulation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights

  5. Learning Alternative Access Approaches for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Implications for New Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Matthew C; Percival, Thomas; Zajarias, Alan; Melby, Spencer J; Lindman, Brian R; Quader, Nishath; Damiano, Ralph J; Moon, Marc R; Lasala, John M; Rao, Ravinder S; Bell, Jennifer; Damiano, Marci S; Maniar, Hersh S

    2017-05-01

    Smaller transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) delivery systems have increased the number of patients eligible for transfemoral procedures while decreasing the need for transaortic (TAo) or transapical (TA) access. As a result, newer TAVR centers are likely to have less exposure to these alternative access techniques, making it harder to achieve proficiency. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the learning curve for TAVR approaches and compare perioperative outcomes. From January 2008 to December 2014, 400 patients underwent TAVR (transfemoral, n = 179; TA, n = 120; and TAo, n = 101)). Learning curves were constructed using metrics of contrast utilization, procedural, and fluoroscopy times. Outcomes during the learning curve were compared with after proficiency was achieved. Depending on the metric, learning curves for all three routes differed slightly but all demonstrated proficiency by the 50th case. There were no significant differences in procedural times whereas improvements in contrast use were most notable for TA (69 ± 40 mL versus 50 ± 23 mL, p = 0.002). For both TA and TAo, fewer patients received transfusions once proficiency was reached (62% versus 34%, p = 0.003, and 42% versus 14%, p = 0.002, respectively). No differences in 30-day or 1-year mortality were seen before or after proficiency was reached for any approach. The learning curves for TA and TAo are distinct but technical proficiency begins to develop by 25 cases and becomes complete by 50 cases for both approaches. Given the relatively low volume of alternative access, achieving technical proficiency may take significant time. However, technical proficiency had no effect on 30-day or 1-year mortality for any access approach. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation due to severe aortic regurgitation in a degenerated aortic homograft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lene Kjaer; Engstrøm, Thomas; Søndergaard, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in severe aortic stenosis has proven to be a feasible and effective treatment modality for inoperable patients. Until now, neither aortic regurgitation nor degenerated bioprostheses has been an indication for TAVI. However, this article reports...... a successful valve-in-valve implantation of a CoreValve aortic valve prosthesis through the right subclavian artery in a case of severe aortic regurgitation within a degenerated aortic homograft. The case exemplifies the possibilities of expanding the indications for TAVI, as well as other vascular access...

  7. Efectos del ejercicio isométrico sobre la función diastólica en pacientes con estenosis aortica severa Effect of isometric exercise on diastolic function in patients with severe aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Donato

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del estudio fue determinar los efectos del ejercicio isométrico sobre la función diastólica, en pacientes con estenosis aórtica sin lesión coronaria (grupo 1, G2, n= 9 y con lesión coronaria (grupo 2, G2, n=11. Pacientes sometidos a un cateterismo cardíaco realizaron ejercicio isométrico hasta que la frecuencia cardíaca se incrementó un 32±9%, con respecto a su valor basal. Se midieron la presión sistólica ventricular izquierda (PSVI y la presión de fin de diástole (PDFVI y se calculó la constante de tiempo de caída de la presión ventricular (tau, t, y la máxima velocidad de ascenso de la presión (+dP/dt máx. La +dP/dt máx aumentó en G1 y G2, durante el ejercicio, desde un valor de 1989±190 y 2428±220 mmHg/seg, hasta un valor de 2286±214 y 2661±230 mmHg/seg, respectivamente; retornando luego a su valor basal. La PDFVI aumentó, durante el ejercicio, en G1 y G2 desde un valor de 30.1±2.7 y 26.5±2.2 mmHg hasta 38.4±1.7 y 36.1±4.0 mmHg, respectivamente (pThe objective of the study was to determine the effects of isometric exercise on the diastolic function in patients with aortic stenosis without coronary lesion (group 1, G1, n = 9 and with coronary lesion (group 2, G2, n=11. Patients subjected to a cardiac catheterization performed isometric exercise until their heart rate increased in 32±9 % compared to baseline. The left ventricular systolic pressure, the +dP/dt max, and the end diastolic pressure (LVEDP were measured, and the time constant of pressure decay (tau, t was calculated. The +dP/dt max increased in G1 and G2 during exercise, from a value of 1989±190 and 2428±220 mmHg/sec up to 2286±214 y 2661±230 mmHg/sec, respectively, returning afterwards to its baseline value. The LVEDP increased during exercise in G1 and G2 from a value of 30.1±2.7 and 26.5±2.2 mmHg up to 38.4±1.7 and 36.1±4.0 mmHg, respectively (p<0.05, returning to its baseline value only in G1. The tau (t increased during

  8. Application of a new procedure for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry profiling of plasma amino acid-related metabolites and untargeted shotgun proteomics to identify mechanisms and biomarkers of calcific aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkowicz, Mariola; Debski, Janusz; Jablonska, Patrycja; Dadlez, Michal; Smolenski, Ryszard T

    2017-09-29

    Calcific aortic valve stenosis (CAS) increasingly affects our ageing population, but the mechanisms of the disease and its biomarkers are not well established. Recently, plasma amino acid-related metabolite (AA) profiling has attracted attention in studies on pathology and development of biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases, but has not been studied in CAS. To evaluate the potential relationship between CAS and AA metabolome, a new ion-pairing reversed-phase liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (IP-RPLC-MS/MS) method has been developed and validated for simultaneous determination of 43 AAs in plasma of stenotic patients and age-matched control subjects. Furthermore, untargeted mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis and confirmatory ELISA assays were performed. The method developed offered high accuracy (intra-assay imprecision averaged 4.4% for all compounds) and sensitivity (LOQ within 0.01-0.5μM). We found that 22 AAs and three AA ratios significantly changed in the CAS group as compared to control. The most pronounced differences were observed in urea cycle-related AAs and branched-chain AA (BCAA)-related AAs. The contents of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and its monomethylated derivative (NMMA) were increased by 30-64% with CAS. The arginine/ADMA and Fischer's ratios as well as arginine, homoarginine, ADMA, symmetric dimethylarginine, hydroxyproline, betaine and 3-methylhistidine correlated with cardiac function-related parameters and concomitant systemic factors in the CAS patients. The results of proteomic analysis were consistent with involvement of inflammation, lipid abnormalities, hemostasis and extracellular matrix remodeling in CAS. In conclusion, changes in plasma AA profile and protein pattern that we identified in CAS provide information relevant to pathomechanisms and may deliver new biomarkers of the disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis treated with medical therapy alone: temporal trends and implications for risk assessment and the design of future studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadar, Nira; Raman, Gowri; Moorthy, Denish; O'Donnell, Thomas F; Thaler, David E; Feldmann, Edward; Lau, Joseph; Kitsios, Georgios D; Dahabreh, Issa J

    2014-01-01

    The rate of adverse clinical outcomes among patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis receiving medical therapy alone can be used to guide clinical decision-making and to inform future research. We aimed to investigate temporal changes in the incidence rate of clinical outcomes among patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis receiving medical therapy alone and to explore the implications of these changes for the design of future comparative studies. We searched MEDLINE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, US Food and Drug Administration documents, and reference lists of included studies (last search: December 31, 2012). We selected prospective cohort studies of medical therapy for asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis and we extracted information on study characteristics, risk of bias, and outcomes. We performed meta-analyses to estimate summary incidence rates, meta-regressions to assess trends over time, and simulations to explore sample size requirements for the design of future studies comparing new treatments against medical therapy. The main outcomes of interest were ipsilateral stroke, any stroke, cardiovascular death, death, and myocardial infarction. We identified 41 studies of medical therapy for patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis (last recruitment year: 1978-2009). The summary incidence rate of ipsilateral carotid territory stroke (25 studies) was 1.7 per 100 person-years. This incidence rate was significantly lower in recent studies (last recruitment year from 2000 onwards) as compared to studies that ended recruitment earlier (1.0 vs. 2.3 events per 100 person-years; p rates of any territory stroke (17 studies), cardiovascular death (6 studies), death (13 studies), and myocardial infarction (5 studies) were 2.7, 4.1, 4.6, and 1.8 per 100 person-years, respectively. Simulations showed that future studies would need to enroll large numbers of patients with a relatively high incidence rate under medical therapy, and evaluate

  10. Coronary artery disease, revascularization, and clinical outcomes in transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millan-Iturbe, Oscar; Sawaya, Fadi J; Lønborg, Jacob

    2018-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has become an established therapeutic option for patients with symptomatic, severe aortic stenosis. The optimal treatment strategy for concomitant coronary artery disease (CAD) has not been tested prospectively in a randomized clinical trial. This study...

  11. Metabolomic profiling of ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections - Implications for pathophysiology and biomarker discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Doppler

    Full Text Available Our basic understanding of ascending thoracic aortic aneurysm (ATAA pathogenesis is still very limited, hampering early diagnosis, risk prediction, and development of treatment options. "Omics"-technologies, ideal to reveal tissue alterations from the normal physiological state due to disease have hardly been applied in the field. Using a metabolomic approach, with this study the authors seek to define tissue differences between controls and various forms of ATAAs.Using a targeted FIA-MS/MS metabolomics approach, we analysed and compared the metabolic profiles of ascending thoracic aortic wall tissue of age-matched controls (n = 8, bicuspid aortic valve-associated aneurysms (BAV-A; n = 9, tricuspid aortic valve-associated aneurysms (TAV-A; n = 14, and tricuspid aortic valve-associated aortic dissections (TAV-Diss; n = 6.With sphingomyelin (SM (OH C22:2, SM C18:1, SM C22:1, and SM C24:1 only 4 out of 92 detectable metabolites differed significantly between controls and BAV-A samples. Between controls and TAV-Diss samples only phosphatidylcholine (PC ae C32:1 differed. Importantly, our analyses revealed a general increase in the amount of total sphingomyelin levels in BAV-A and TAV-Diss samples compared to controls.Significantly increased levels of sphingomyelins in BAV-A and TAV-Diss samples compared to controls may argue for a repression of sphingomyelinase activity and the sphingomyelinase-ceramide pathway, which may result in an inhibition of tissue regeneration; a potential basis for disease initiation and progression.

  12. A case of William's syndrome associated peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Kyung Hwa; Hwang, Mi Soo; Kim, Sun Yong; Chang, Jae Chun; Park, Bok Hwan [College of Medicine, Yeungam University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-06-15

    William's syndrome, in order to more completely delineate the total spectrum of the disorder, indicates that 'infantile hypercalcemia', 'peculiar facies' and 'supravalvular aortic stenosis.' In has other many vascular anomalies, such as peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis, coronary arterial stenosis, celiac arterial stenosis, and renal aterial stenosis. Only 32% of the patients have evidence of supravalvular aortic stenosis. And it is very rare disease entity that has been reported rarely in Korea. Recently authors experienced a case that was questioned William's syndrome with peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis, clinically and preliminary radiologically and this case was confirmed by operation. Here we report a case of William's syndrome with peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis and reviewed literatures.

  13. A rare case of discrete aortic coarctation in Williams-Beuren syndrome. Diagnostic and therapeutic considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Savina Mannarino; Eitan Keizman; Michele Pasotti; Alessia Claudia Codazzi; Elisabetta De Sando; Alessandro Giamberti

    2015-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a genetic disorder caused by elastin gene deletions, and is characterized by cardiovascular malformations, primarily including supravalvular aortic stenosis and peripheral pulmonary stenosis. We report a case of a neonate who developed severe discrete aortic coarctation, underwent multiple surgical interventions, and was subsequently diagnosed with WBS. Severe discrete aortic coarctation is a rare event in WBS newborns. An abnormally thick aortic wall is pres...

  14. A study on the risk of subaortic and pulmonic stenosis and on genetic aspects of echocardiography measurements in the Italian Boxer dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Bittante

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Subaortic and pulmonic stenosis are congenital cardiac defects affecting several dog breeds (Jacobs, 1990; Buchanan, 1992; Tidholm, 1997. Subaortic stenosis (SAS is characterized by a fibrous ring of tissue placed immediately below the aortic valve.

  15. Protein-altering and regulatory genetic variants near GATA4 implicated in bicuspid aortic valve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Bo; Zhou, Wei-Wu; Jiao, Jiao

    2017-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is a heritable congenital heart defect and an important risk factor for valvulopathy and aortopathy. Here we report a genome-wide association scan of 466 BAV cases and 4,660 age, sex and ethnicity-matched controls with replication in up to 1,326 cases and 8,103 controls...

  16. Estenose carotídea acima de 70% em pacientes no pré-operatório de cirurgia da aorta abdominal: freqüência e fatores de risco Frequency and risk factors for carotid stenosis above 70% in patients undergoing abdominal aortic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Ventura Ferreira

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar a freqüência e os fatores de risco associados à estenose carotídea acima de 70% em pacientes que serão submetidos a cirurgias de aorta abdominal. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Foram analisados 94 pacientes que realizaram ultra-som Doppler de carótidas no pré-operatório de cirurgias de aorta abdominal entre janeiro de 2000 e janeiro de 2003, pela disciplina de Cirurgia Vascular da Santa Casa de São Paulo. RESULTADOS: Sessenta e sete pacientes (71% eram homens. Dentre os 94 pacientes, 42 (44,6% tinham doença oclusiva aorto-ilíaca, e 52 (53,4%, aneurismas da aorta abdominal (AAA. A análise dos dados mostrou uma prevalência de estenose de carótidas acima de 70% em 8,33% dos pacientes com AAA e em 13,51% dos pacientes com doença oclusiva aorto-ilíaca, diferença esta sem significância estatística (P = 0,5. Nos pacientes que apresentavam antecedente de isquemia cerebral - acidente vascular cerebral (AVC ou ataque isquêmico transitório (AIT -, houve uma prevalência estatisticamente maior de estenose carotídea entre 70 e 99%. Outros fatores de risco para aterosclerose, como sexo masculino, diabetes, hipertensão arterial e tabagismo, não foram preditivos da presença de estenose carotídea acima de 70%. CONCLUSÃO: A freqüência de estenose da carótida acima de 70% em pacientes no pré-operatório de cirurgia de aorta foi de 9,57%, e a presença de antecedente de AVC ou AIT na história foi preditiva de estenose acima de 70% neste grupo de pacientes.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the frequency and risk factors of carotid stenosis above 70% in patients undergoing abdominal aortic reconstruction. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Ninety-four patients who underwent Doppler ultrasound preoperative screening for abdominal aortic surgery between January 2000 and January 2003 were analyzed by the Vascular Surgery Unit of the Santa Casa of São Paulo (Faculty of Medical Sciences. RESULTS: Sixty-seven (71% patients were male. Of the 94 patients, 42

  17. Effect of gender on echocardiographic outcomes of patients presenting with mitral stenosis at a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed, M.; Haq, I.U.

    2011-01-01

    To assess the gender-based differences in the echocardiographic outcomes of patients with mitral stenosis presenting at a tertiary care hospital and the clinical implications of such differences. Methods: A total of 90 echocardiographs of both men and women (aged=15 years) having mitral valve area (MVA) less than 4 cm/sup 2/ were assessed. In addition to MVA, pressure half time and left atrial diameter (LAD) of the patients was also recorded. Other co-existing valvular lesions were also assessed in addition to mitral stenosis. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS-17. Results: A higher prevalence of mitral stenosis (MS) was found in women than men (76.66% vs 24.44%). Men were having more severe mitral stenosis as compared to women (MVA=1.19 cm/sup 2/ vs 1.32 cm/sup 2/). This also resulted in significantly higher left atrial dilatation in males as compared to women (45.09 vs 41.75, p=0.0422). Most of the patients had other coexisting valvular lesions and isolated MS was rare. However, men had a predominance of aortic stenosis along with mitral stenosis (27% vs 4%, p=0.0059) whereas women had a higher prevalence of mitral regurgitation along with mitral stenosis than the men (65% vs 36%, p=0.0258). Conclusion: There were certain significant differences in echocardiographic outcomes of patients based upon their gender. A gender-specific management approach towards the patients with mitral stenosis is essential to have better outcome. (author)

  18. Pulmonary homograft stenosis in the Ross procedure: Incidence, clinical impact and predictors in long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo González, Laura; Ruiz Ortiz, Martin; Delgado, Mónica; Mesa, Dolores; Villalba, Rafael; Rodriguez, Sara; Hidalgo, Francisco J; Alados, Pedro; Casares, Jaime; Suarez de Lezo, Jose

    2017-04-01

    The Ross procedure is used in the treatment of selected patients with aortic valve disease. Pulmonary graft stenosis can appear in the long-term follow-up after the Ross intervention, but the factors involved and its clinical implications are not fully known. To describe the incidence, clinical impact and predictors of homograft stenosis and reintervention after the Ross procedure in a prospective series in a tertiary referral hospital. From 1997 to 2009, 107 patients underwent the Ross procedure (mean age: 30±11 years; 69% men; 21 aged36mmHg) and surgical or percutaneous homograft reintervention. After 15 years of follow-up (median: 11 years), echocardiographic and clinical data were available in 91 (85%) and 104 (98%) patients, respectively: 26/91 (29%) patients developed homograft stenosis; 10/104 (10%) patients underwent 13 homograft reintervention procedures (three patients underwent surgical replacement, three received a percutaneous pulmonary valve and one needed stent implantation). The other three patients underwent two consecutive procedures in follow-up; one died because of a procedure-related myocardial infarction. Rates of survival free from homograft stenosis and reintervention at 1, 5 and 10 years were 96%, 82% and 75% and 99%, 94% and 91%, respectively. Paediatric patients had worse survival free from homograft stenosis (hazard ratio [HR] 3.50, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.56-7.90; P=0.002), although there were no significant differences regarding reintervention (HR: 2.01, 95% CI: 0.52-7.78; P=0.31). Younger age of homograft donor was also a stenosis predictor (HR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.94-0.99; P=0.046). The probabilities of homograft stenosis and reintervention 10 years after the Ross procedure were 29% and 10%, respectively; only one patient had a reintervention-related death. Younger donor and recipient age were associated with a higher rate of stenosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Delirium After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuseffi, Jennifer L; Borges, Nyal E; Boehm, Leanne M; Wang, Li; McPherson, John A; Fredi, Joseph L; Ahmad, Rashid M; Ely, E Wesley; Pandharipande, Pratik P

    2017-07-01

    Postoperative delirium is associated with increased mortality. Patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement are at risk for delirium because of comorbid conditions. To compare the incidence, odds, and mortality implications of delirium between patients undergoing transcatheter replacement and patients undergoing surgical replacement. The Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale and the Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit were used to assess arousal level and delirium prospectively in all patients with severe aortic stenosis who had transcatheter or surgical aortic valve replacement at an academic medical center. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine the relationship between procedure type and occurrence of delirium. Cox regression was used to assess the association between postoperative delirium and 6-month mortality. A total of 105 patients had transcatheter replacement and 121 had surgical replacement. Patients in the transcatheter group were older (median age, 81 vs 68 years; P replacement. Delirium is less likely to develop in the transcatheter group but is associated with higher mortality in both groups. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  20. Fate of remnant sinuses of Valsalva in patients with bicuspid and trileaflet valves undergoing aortic valve, ascending aorta, and aortic arch replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, Rita Karianna; Habertheuer, Andreas; Bavaria, Joseph E; Siki, Mary; Szeto, Wilson Y; Krause, Eric; Korutla, Varun; Desai, Nimesh D; Vallabhajosyula, Prashanth

    2017-08-01

    In patients presenting with aortic valvulopathy with concomitant ascending aortic aneurysm, surgical management of the sinus of Valsalva segment remains undefined, especially for moderately dilated aortic roots. In patients with this pathology undergoing aortic valve replacement with supracoronary ascending aorta replacement, we assessed the fate of the remnant preserved sinus of Valsalva segment stratified by aortic valve morphology and pathology. From 2002 to 2015, 428 patients underwent elective aortic valve replacement with supracoronary ascending aorta replacement. Patients were stratified on the basis of valvular morphology (bicuspid aortic valve [n = 254] and tricuspid aortic valve [n = 174]), valvular pathology (bicuspid aortic valve with aortic stenosis [n = 178], bicuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency [n = 76], tricuspid aortic valve with aortic stenosis [n = 61], tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency [n = 113]), and preoperative sinus of Valsalva dimensions (45 mm). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed no significant difference in freedom from reoperation in tricuspid aortic valve versus bicuspid aortic valve (P = .576). Multivariable Cox regression model performed with sinus of Valsalva dimensions at baseline and follow-up as time-varying covariates did not adversely affect survival. A repeated-measure, mixed-effects model constructed to assess longitudinal sinus of Valsalva trends revealed that the retained sinus of Valsalva dimensions remain stable over long-term follow-up (discharge to ≥10 years), irrespective of valvular morphology/pathology (bicuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency, tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency, tricuspid aortic valve with aortic stenosis) and preoperative sinus of Valsalva groups (45 mm). In patients with nonaneurysmal sinuses of Valsalva undergoing aortic valve replacement with supracoronary ascending aorta replacement, the sinus segment can be preserved irrespective of

  1. Pilot study of dynamic cine CT angiography for the evaluation of abdominal aortic aneurysms : Implications for endograft treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teutelink, A; Rutten, A; Muhs, BE; Olree, M; van Herwaarden, JA; de Vos, AM; Prokop, M; Moll, FL; Verhagen, HJM

    Purpose: To utilize 40-slice electrocardiographically (ECG)-gated cine computed tomographic angiography (CTA) to characterize normal aortic motion during the cardiac cycle at relevant anatomical landmarks in preoperative abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients. Methods: In 10 consecutive

  2. Infantile Aortic Coarctation in an Adult with Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumiz, Eva; Valero, Ernesto; Vilar, Juan Vicente; Santas, Enrique; Haba, Javier

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this case report is to highlight the importance of excluding aortic coarctation in a patient with a bicuspid aortic valve. A 56-year-old woman with hypertension was admitted complaining of progressive dyspnea. Transthoracic echocardiography showed a calcified, bicuspid aortic valve with severe stenosis. Aortography revealed the presence of severe narrowing of the aorta between the carotid and subclavian arteries. The patient was referred for cardiovascular surgery in which successful aortic valve replacement and aortic correction were performed. This case report shows an uncommon finding of infantile aortic coarctation in an adult patient admitted with heart failure. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Aortic dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... made in the chest or abdomen. Endovascular aortic repair. This surgery is done without any major surgical ... needed. If the heart arteries are involved, a coronary bypass is also performed. Outlook ... aneurysm - dissecting; Chest pain - aortic dissection; Thoracic aortic aneurysm - ...

  4. Stroke in Patients With Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders Møller; Dalsgaard, Morten; Bang, Casper N

    2014-01-01

    , and poststroke survival a secondary outcome. Cox models treating AVR as a time-varying covariate were adjusted for atrial fibrillation and congestive heart failure, hypertension, age≥75 years, diabetes mellitus, stroke/transient ischemic attack, vascular disease, age 65-74 years and female sex (CHA2DS2-VASc...

  5. is aortic stenosis associated with congenital nephropathy?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    this type is also encountered in many European countries. In the Middle-East, only two reports have shown mutations in. NPHS1 to be linked to CNS. Here, we describe the first Lebanese familial Finnish-type nephropathy and unravel a novel mutation in NPHS1, lead- ing to a truncated protein. In addition, we hypothesize ...

  6. The future of surgical aortic valve replacement and the role of sutureless technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbir, Selim

    2018-04-01

    Aortic valve stenosis has become the most frequent type of valve disease in worldwide. Surgical aortic valve replacement is still the gold standard therapy. More recently transcatheter aortic valve implantation has been demonstrated to be not inferior in patients with high and intermediate risk patients. Sutureless aortic valves were designed to simplify the surgical aortic valve replacement. With the aid of this new technology, the invasiveness of surgery can be reduced with potential improvements in outcome.

  7. [Comparison of aortic annular diameter defined by different measurement mordalities before transcatheter aortic valve implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, R X; You, X D; Pu, Z X; Yang, Q; Huang, Z X; Zhou, L M; Huang, P T

    2017-05-24

    Objective: To compare aortic annular diameter measured by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), and multislice computed tomography (MSCT) in patients with severe aortic stenosis, and to evaluate the impact on selection of prosthetic valve type in transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Methods: Clinical data of 138 patients with severe aortic stenosis referred for TAVI between January 2014 and June 2016 in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed.The difference of aortic annular diameter measured by TTE, TEE, and MSCT were compared.TTE was performed after TAVI to evaluate the accuracy of measurement before TAVI. Results: (1) Aortic annular diameter was (23.37±2.22) mm by TTE and (23.52±1.70) mm by TEE ( P =0.12). Pearson correlation analysis showed that aortic annular diameter measured by TTE was correlated to that measured by TEE ( r =0.87, P TTE and TTE (all P TTE and TEE measurements are smaller than that from MSCT.In the absence of a gold standard, selection of prosthetic valve type in TAVI procedure should rely on comprehensive considerations, which is of importance to get good clinical results for severe aortic stenosis patients underwent TAVI.

  8. Wall Stress and Geometry of the Thoracic Aorta in Patients With Aortic Valve Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Barry J; Norman, Paul E; Hoskins, Peter R; Newby, David E; Dweck, Marc R

    2018-04-01

    Aortic valve disease increases velocity and changes the way blood enters the aorta. Over time, the biomechanical environment can cause aortic remodelling. We hypothesized that aortic geometry and wall stress would be different in patients with aortic valve disease compared with controls. We examined 40 patients with aortic sclerosis (n = 10) or mild (n = 10), moderate (n = 10), and severe (n = 10) aortic stenosis, and also 10 control individuals. The thoracic aorta of each individual was reconstructed into a three-dimensional model from computed tomography. We measured geometric variables and used finite element analysis to compute aortic wall stress. Statistical analyses were performed to test our hypothesis. Aortic wall stress was significantly associated with tortuosity of the descending aorta (r = 0.35, p = 0.01), arch radius (r = 0.49, p < 0.01), ascending aortic diameter (r = 0.59, p < 0.01), and aortic centerline length (r = 0.39, p < 0.01). Wall stress was highest in patients with severe stenosis (p = 0.02), although elevations in wall stress were also noted in those with mild stenosis (p = 0.02), and aortic sclerosis (p = 0.02) compared with controls. Similar trends were observed when we corrected for difference in blood pressure. Total centerline tortuosity was higher in patients with severe aortic stenosis than in controls (p = 0.04), as was descending aorta tortuosity (p = 0.04). Aortic geometry is associated with aortic wall stress. Patients with aortic valve disease have higher aortic wall stress than controls, and those with severe aortic stenosis have more tortuous aortas. However, increases in geometric measures and wall stress are not stepwise with increasing disease severity. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. MMP-2 Isoforms in Aortic Tissue and Serum of Patients with Ascending Aortic Aneurysms and Aortic Root Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tscheuschler, Anke; Meffert, Philipp; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Heilmann, Claudia; Kocher, Nadja; Uffelmann, Xenia; Discher, Philipp; Siepe, Matthias; Kari, Fabian A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The need for biological markers of aortic wall stress and risk of rupture or dissection of ascending aortic aneurysms is obvious. To date, wall stress cannot be related to a certain biological marker. We analyzed aortic tissue and serum for the presence of different MMP-2 isoforms to find a connection between serum and tissue MMP-2 and to evaluate the potential of different MMP-2 isoforms as markers of high wall stress. Methods Serum and aortic tissue from n = 24 patients and serum from n = 19 healthy controls was analyzed by ELISA and gelatin zymography. 24 patients had ascending aortic aneurysms, 10 of them also had aortic root aneurysms. Three patients had normally functioning valves, 12 had regurgitation alone, eight had regurgitation and stenosis and one had only stenosis. Patients had bicuspid and tricuspid aortic valves (9/15). Serum samples were taken preoperatively, and the aortic wall specimen collected during surgical aortic repair. Results Pro-MMP-2 was identified in all serum and tissue samples. Pro-MMP-2 was detected in all tissue and serum samples from patients with ascending aortic/aortic root aneurysms, irrespective of valve morphology or other clinical parameters and in serum from healthy controls. We also identified active MMP-2 in all tissue samples from patients with ascending aortic/aortic root aneurysms. None of the analyzed serum samples revealed signals relatable to active MMP-2. No correlation between aortic tissue total MMP-2 or tissue pro-MMP-2 or tissue active MMP-2 and serum MMP-2 was found and tissue MMP-2/pro-MMP-2/active MMP-2 did not correlate with aortic diameter. This evidence shows that pro-MMP-2 is the predominant MMP-2 species in serum of patients and healthy individuals and in aneurysmatic aortic tissue, irrespective of aortic valve configuration. Active MMP-2 species are either not released into systemic circulation or not detectable in serum. There is no reliable connection between aortic tissue—and serum MMP-2

  10. Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part XXX: Transcatheter Aortic Valve Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A

    2017-12-01

    Initially, the transcatheter aortic valve replacement procedure was approved only for patients with aortic stenosis that was both severe and symptomatic who either also had too high a risk of aortic valve replacement surgery to have the surgery or who had a high risk for the surgery. Between the years 2012 and 2015, the death rate at 30 days declined from an initial rate of 7.5% to 4.6%. There has also been more use of the transfemoral approach over the years. In 2016, the transcatheter aortic valve replacement was approved for patients with aortic stenosis at intermediate risk of surgery.

  11. Elevation of B-Type Natriuretic Peptide at Discharge is Associated With 2-Year Mortality After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With Severe Aortic Stenosis: Insights From a Multicenter Prospective OCEAN-TAVI (Optimized Transcatheter Valvular Intervention-Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation) Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Kazuki; Hara, Masahiko; Iwata, Shinichi; Murakami, Takashi; Shibata, Toshihiko; Yoshiyama, Minoru; Naganuma, Toru; Yamanaka, Futoshi; Higashimori, Akihiro; Tada, Norio; Takagi, Kensuke; Araki, Motoharu; Ueno, Hiroshi; Tabata, Minoru; Shirai, Shinichi; Watanabe, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Masanori; Hayashida, Kentaro

    2017-07-14

    In this study, we sought to investigate the 2-year prognostic impact of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels at discharge, following transcatheter aortic valve replacement. We enrolled 1094 consecutive patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement between 2013 and 2016. Study patients were stratified into 2 groups according to survival classification and regression tree analysis (high versus low BNP groups). We evaluated the impact of high BNP on 2-year mortality compared with that of low BNP using a multivariable Cox model, and assessed whether this stratification would improve predictive accuracy for determining 2-year mortality by assessing time-dependent net reclassification improvement and integrated discrimination improvement. The median age of patients was 85 years (quartile 82-88), and 29.2% of the study population were men. The median Society of Thoracic Surgeons score was 6.8 (4.7-9.5), and BNP at discharge was 186 (93-378) pg/mL. All-cause mortality following discharge was 7.9% (95% CI, 5.8-9.9%) at 1 year and 15.4% (95% CI, 11.6-19.0%) at 2 years. The survival classification and regression tree analysis revealed that the discriminating BNP level to discern 2-year mortality was 202 pg/mL, and that elevated BNP had a statistically significant impact on outcomes, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 2.28 (1.36-3.82, P =0.002). The time-dependent net reclassification improvement ( P =0.047) and integrated discrimination improvement ( P =0.029) analysis revealed that the incorporation of BNP stratification with other clinical variables significantly improved predictive accuracy for 2-year mortality. Elevation of BNP at discharge is associated with 2-year mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  12. Persistent Fifth Aortic Arch Associated with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Luen Lee

    2006-01-01

    Conclusion: Congenital conotruncal malformations, including tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia or stenosis, and aortic arch anomalies including a persistent fifth aortic arch or a right aortic arch, should lead to suspicion of chromosome 22q11.2 deletion when manifested together with any one of the other four cardinal phenotypic features.

  13. Sequential transcatheter aortic valve implantation due to valve dislodgement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campante Teles, Rui; Costa, Cátia; Almeida, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become an important treatment in high surgical risk patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS), whose complications need to be managed promptly. The authors report the case of an 86-year-old woman presenting with severe symptomatic AS, rejected fo...

  14. Transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis surgically replaced 4 months after implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Lund, Jens Teglgaard; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a new and rapidly evolving treatment option for high-risk surgical patients with degenerative aortic valve stenosis. Long-term results with these new valve prostheses are lacking, and potential valve dysfunction and failure would require valve replacemen...

  15. Prognostic Implications of Acute Renal Failure after Surgery for Type A Acute Aortic Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Fabrizio; Morgante, Alessandro; Ceresa, Fabrizio; Salamone, Giovanni; Patanè, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    "Type A" acute aortic dissection (AAAD) is the most challenging among the emergency operations in cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was the evaluation of the role of acute renal failure (ARF) in postoperative survival of patients operated for AAAD. From February 2010 to April 2012, 37 consecutive patients were operated at our department for AAAD. We studied our population by subdividing the patients within groups according to the presence of ARF requiring continuous veno-venous hemofiltration (CVVH) and according to hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) times and degrees. The overall 30-day mortality was 27% (50% group A with ARF, 13% group B no ARF). Acute renal failure requiring CVVH was 37.8%. Multivariate analysis revealed a significant association with 30-day mortality (odds ratio 6.6 and p = 0.020). Preoperative oliguria [urine output less than 30 ml/h (odds ratio 4.7 p = 0.039)], CPB greater than 180 minutes (odds ratio 6.5 p = 0.023) and postoperative bleeding requiring a surgical reopening (odds ratio 12.2 and p = 0.021) were the variables significantly associated with acute kidney injury. The data obtained from our analysis bring out the high incidence of renal injuries after surgery for AAAD, and indicate a negative impact on renal injuries of a preoperative oliguria, longer Cardiopulmonary bypass (CBP)/HCA times, and postoperative bleeding requiring a surgical revision. Our data also suggest a better 30-day survival and better renal outcomes in case of shorter HCA and lesser degree of hypothermia. The option of lesser and shorter hypothermia may be very useful, especially for the elderly patients and octogenarians.

  16. Transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis surgically replaced 4 months after implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Lund, Jens Teglgaard; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a new and rapidly evolving treatment option for high-risk surgical patients with degenerative aortic valve stenosis. Long-term results with these new valve prostheses are lacking, and potential valve dysfunction and failure would require valve replacemen....... We report the first case of surgical valve replacement in a patient with a dysfunctional transcatheter-implanted aortic valve prosthesis 4 months after implantation....

  17. Substituição valvar aórtica percutânea para o tratamento da estenose aórtica: experiência inicial no Brasil Sustitución percutánea de la válvula aórtica para el tratamiento de la estenosis aórtica: experiencia inicial en Brasil Percutaneous aortic valve replacement for the treatment of aortic stenosis: early experience in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Perin

    2009-09-01

    la reducción del gradiente transvalvular aórtico (de 82 para 50 mmHg e de 94 para 31 mmHg inmediatamente después de la intervención. Durante la internación hospitalaria se hizo necesario implantar marcapasos definitivos en ambos pacientes, a causa de bloqueo atrioventricular. Se observó seis meses después una queda aún más grande del gradiente transvalvular aórtico (gradiente BACKGROUND: Percutaneous aortic valve replacement for the treatment of aortic stenosis is an available and efficient alternative for patients at high surgical risk, especially those with advanced age and comorbidities. OBJECTIVE: The authors report the first experience made in our midst with the use of the CoreValve endoprosthesis. METHODS: In January 2008, two patients underwent percutaneous aortic valve replacement due to symptomatic aortic stenosis. They were selected for being elderly (77 and 87 years and presenting comorbidities and a high surgical risk (EuroScore 7.7% and 12.1%. RESULTS: Percutaneous implantations of the CoreValve device were successfully performed. Enlargement of the valve area (from 0.7 to 1.5 cm² and from 0.5 to 1.3 cm² and reduction of the aortic transvalvular gradient (from 82 to 50 mmHg and from 94 to 31 mmHg were observed immediately after the intervention. During hospital stay, permanent pacemaker implantation was required in both patients due to atrioventricular block. At six months, an even greater drop in the aortic transvalvular gradient (gradient < 20 mmHg and remission of symptoms of heart failure (NYHA III to NYHA I were observed. CONCLUSION: The use of the CoreValve endoprosthesis for the treatment of aortic stenosis proved to be feasible and showed encouraging results in this early experience made in our midst.

  18. Allometric considerations when assessing aortic aneurysms in Turner syndrome: Implications for activity recommendations and medical decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbitt, Holly; Maslen, Cheryl; Prakash, Siddharth; Morris, Shaine A; Silberbach, Michael

    2018-02-01

    In Turner syndrome, the potential to form thoracic aortic aneurysms requires routine patient monitoring. However, the short stature that typically occurs complicates the assessment of severity and risk because the relationship of body size to aortic dimensions is different in Turner syndrome compared to the general population. Three allometric formula have been proposed to adjust aortic dimensions, all employing body surface area: aortic size index, Turner syndrome-specific Z-scores, and Z-scores based on a general pediatric and young adult population. In order to understand the differences between these formula we evaluated the relationship between age and aortic size index and compared Turner syndrome-specific Z-scores and pediatric/young adult based Z-scores in a group of girls and women with Turner syndrome. Our results suggest that the aortic size index is highly age-dependent for those under 15 years; and that Turner-specific Z-scores are significantly lower than Z-scores referenced to the general population. Higher Z-scores derived from the general reference population could result in stigmatization, inappropriate restriction from sports, and increasing the risk of unneeded medical or operative treatments. We propose that when estimating aortic dissection risk clinicians use Turner syndrome-specific Z-score for those under fifteen years of age. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. One stage surgical treatment of aortic valve disease and aortic coarctation with aortic bypass grafting through the diaphragm and aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zipu; Wu, Shengjun; Li, Chengchen; Zou, Yu; Ma, Liang

    2015-11-10

    To validate ascending aorta-lower abdominal aorta bypass grafting treatment for patients with descending aortic coarctation and an aortic valve disease. The three patients in whom a descending atypical aortic coarctation was associated with an aortic valve disease were treated with one stage surgical treatment with aortic bypass grafting through the diaphragm and aortic valve replacement in our heart center. Operative technique consisted of performing ascending aorta-lower abdominal aorta bypass grafting through diaphragm muscle and implementing aortic valve replacement. The mean time for extracorporeal circulation and occluding clamp of aorta was recorded. Blood pressure data for pre- and post-operation was measured in the limbs. Computer-enhanced transvenous angiograms of pre- and post-operation were applied for detection of aortic stenosis. The other adverse events were noticed in outpatient service during a follow-up period. The mean extracorporeal circulation time was 54 ± 11 min. The mean time for occluding clamp of aorta was 34 ± 6 min. An arterial pressure gradient was totally corrected after surgical treatment. Post-operation computer-enhanced transvenous angiograms showed the grafts to be open with a fluent flow. The patients had no gastrointestinal tract complications. No adverse event was noticed during a follow-up period in outpatient service. Treatment of ascending aorta-lower abdominal aorta bypass is advisable for patients with descending aortic coarctation and an aortic valve disease.

  20. Surgical or Transcatheter Aortic-Valve Replacement in Intermediate-Risk Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reardon, Michael J; Van Mieghem, Nicolas M; Popma, Jeffrey J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although transcatheter aortic-valve replacement (TAVR) is an accepted alternative to surgery in patients with severe aortic stenosis who are at high surgical risk, less is known about comparative outcomes among patients with aortic stenosis who are at intermediate surgical risk. METHODS......: We evaluated the clinical outcomes in intermediate-risk patients with severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis in a randomized trial comparing TAVR (performed with the use of a self-expanding prosthesis) with surgical aortic-valve replacement. The primary end point was a composite of death from any cause...... or disabling stroke at 24 months in patients undergoing attempted aortic-valve replacement. We used Bayesian analytical methods (with a margin of 0.07) to evaluate the noninferiority of TAVR as compared with surgical valve replacement. RESULTS: A total of 1746 patients underwent randomization at 87 centers...

  1. Detecting atheromatous plaques in the aortic arch or supra-aortic arteries for more accurate stroke subtype classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaoyang; Wu, Simiao; Zeng, Quantao; Xiao, Jiahe; Liu, Ming

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the correlations of atheromatous plaques in the aortic arch or supra-aortic arteries with intracranial arterial stenosis and carotid plaques in stroke patients, and to determine whether taking these plaques into account will reduce the proportion of patients in the undetermined etiology group. We prospectively enrolled 308 ischemic stroke patients, whose clinical characteristics and A-S-C-O classifications were compared with analyses of intracranial arteries, carotid arteries, aortic arch, and supra-aortic arteries. 125(40.6%) patients had plaques in the aortic arch or supra-aortic arteries, of which 106 (84.8%) had complex plaques. No correlations were observed between these plaques and carotid plaques ( p = 0.283) or intracranial arterial stenosis ( p = 0.097). After detecting the mobile thrombi in the aortic arch and supra-aortic arteries, the proportion of patients in the atherothrombosis group was increased from 33.8% to 55.5% ( p = 0.00), whereas the proportion of patients in stroke of undetermined etiology group was decreased from 19.2% to 11.0% ( p = 0.00). Examining only the carotid and intracranial arteries may not provide adequate information about large arteries in stroke patients. Therefore, it would be better to include a search for relevant plaques in the aortic arch or supra-aortic arteries in modern stroke workup, for it may lead to more accurate stroke subtype classification and guide secondary prevention.

  2. Follow-up study of morphology and cardiac function in rats undergoing induction of supravalvular aortic stenosis Estudo evolutivo da morfologia e função cardíaca em ratos submetidos a estenose aórtica supravalvar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Barbosa Ribeiro

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To characterize the follow-up of an experimental model of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH induced by supravalvular ascending aortic stenosis in young rats. METHODS: Wistar rats were submitted to thoracotomy and aortic stenosis was created by placing a clip on the ascending aorta (AoS group, n=12. Age-matched control animals underwent a sham operation (C group, n=12. Cardiac function was analysed by echocardiograms performed 6, 12, and 21 weeks after aortic banding. Myocardial morphological features and myocardial hydroxyproline concentration (HOP were evaluated 2, 6, 12, and 21 weeks after surgery in additional animals. RESULTS: Aortic banding promoted early concentric LVH and a progressive increase in HOP. Under light microscopy, we observed myocyte hypertrophy and wall thickening of the intramural branches of the coronary arteries due to medial hypertrophy. Cardiac function was supranormal after 6 weeks (percentage of fractional shortening - EAo6: 70.3±10.8; C6: 61.3±5.4; pOBJETIVO: Caracterizar, evolutivamente, o modelo experimental de hipertrofia ventricular esquerda (HVE por indução de estenose aórtica supravalvar em ratos jovens. MÉTODOS: Ratos Wistar foram submetidos a toracotomia para colocação de clipe ao redor da aorta torácica (grupo EAo, n=12. Animais controle foram submetidos à mesma cirurgia, porém sem a colocação do clipe (grupo C, n=12. A função cardíaca foi analisada por ecocardiogramas seriados após 6, 12 e 21 semanas. Outros grupos foram utilizados para avaliação histológica e quantificação da hidroxiprolina miocárdica (HOP: 2, 6, 12 e 21 semanas. RESULTADOS: A EAo promoveu precocemente HVE concêntrica e aumento progressivo da concentração de HOP. À microscopia óptica, observou-se hipertrofia dos miócitos e da camada média dos ramos intramurais das artérias coronárias. A função sistólica foi supranormal no período 6 semanas (porcentagem de encurtamento - EAo6:70,3±10,8; C6: 61

  3. Aortic valve ochronosis: a rare manifestation of alkaptonuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, Christina Maria

    2011-01-01

    Alkaptonuric ochronosis is a heritable disorder of tyrosine metabolism, with various systemic abnormalities related to pigment deposition and degeneration of collagen and other tissues, including the heart and aorta. A 65-year-old woman with alkaptonuric ochronosis and a history of four joint replacements required aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis. Operative findings included ochronosis of a partly calcified aortic valve and the aortic intima. The aortic valve was removed at surgery and histologically investigated. Light microscopic examination of the aortic valve revealed intracellular and extracellular deposits of ochronotic pigment and a chronic inflammatory infiltrate. Beside the case representation, the disease history, aetiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation and treatment of aortic valve ochronosis are reviewed. PMID:22689837

  4. Subacute Aortic Regurgitation as a Rare Presentation of Latrogenic Aortic Valve Leaflet Perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Teimouri

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a paucity of literature regarding iatrogenic aortic valve perforation after cardiac operation is performed in the vicinity of the aortic valve. This report describes the clinical, echocardiographic, and angiocardiographic recognition of iatrogenic aortic valve perforation in a patient who had previously under gone membranous ventricular septal defect and pulmonary stenosis. Five days after the operation, the patient showed subacute signs and symptoms of congestive heart failure in surgical ward. Echocardiographic examination revealed free aortic regurgitation. The patient was scheduled for operation, which was performed using cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegic arrest. During the operation, exploration of the aortic root revealed tearing non-coronary aortic cusp at the level of the aortic ring and slightly dilated the left sinus. Despite close examination, no suture could be identified. It was reasoned that the tension created by the dacron patch pulled on the adjacent tissue and caused the separation of the non-coronary cusp from its ring and the patient was treated by aortic valve replacement with prosthetic aortic valve. We did not have the facility to use transesophaseal echocardiography for the examination of aortic valve repair and the poor condition of the patient did not permit us to repair the valve. Precise preoperative diagnosis of this lesion allows optimal surgical planning and treatment.

  5. New-Onset Atrial Fibrillation After Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Troels Højsgaard; Thygesen, Julie Bjerre; Thyregod, Hans Gustav

    2015-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and, more recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have been shown to be the only treatments that can improve the natural cause of severe aortic valve stenosis. However, after SAVR and TAVI, the incidence of new-onset atrial fibrillation...... (NOAF) is 31%-64% and 4%-32%, respectively. NOAF is independently associated with adverse events such as stroke, death, and increased length of hospital stay. Increasing the knowledge of predisposing factors, optimal postprocedural monitoring, and prophylactic antiarrhythmic and antithrombotic therapy...

  6. New-onset atrial fibrillation after surgical aortic valve replacement and transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Troels Højsgaard; Thygesen, Julie Bjerre; Thyregod, Hans Gustav

    2015-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and, more recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have been shown to be the only treatments that can improve the natural cause of severe aortic valve stenosis. However, after SAVR and TAVI, the incidence of new-onset atrial fibrillation...... (NOAF) is 31%-64% and 4%-32%, respectively. NOAF is independently associated with adverse events such as stroke, death, and increased length of hospital stay. Increasing the knowledge of predisposing factors, optimal postprocedural monitoring, and prophylactic antiarrhythmic and antithrombotic therapy...

  7. A doença coronária aumenta a mortalidade hospitalar de portadores de estenose aórtica submetidos à substituição valvar? Does the coronary disease increase the hospital mortality in patients with aortic stenosis undergoing valve replacement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José de Lima Oliveira Júnior

    2009-12-01

    revascularização completa do miocárdio (Grupo IIA e 20,9% (nove óbitos nos com revascularização incompleta do miocárdio (Grupo IIB. CONCLUSÕES: Nos pacientes submetidos à substituição valvar aórtica isolada, a presença de doença aterosclerótica arterial coronária crítica associada, em pelo menos duas artérias, influenciou a mortalidade hospitalar. Nos pacientes submetidos ao tratamento cirúrgico combinado, o número de artérias coronárias com doença aterosclerótica crítica e a extensão da revascularização do miocárdio (RM completa ou incompleta, não influenciaram a mortalidade hospitalar, mas a realização de mais de três anastomoses distais interferiu.OBJECTIVES: With the increase in life expectancy occurred in recent decades, it has been noted the concomitant increase in the prevalence of aortic stenosis and degenerative disease of atherosclerotic coronary artery. This study aims to evaluate the influence of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease in patients with critical aortic stenosis undergoing isolated or combined implant valve prosthesis and coronary artery by pass grafting. METHODS: In the period of January 2001 to March 2006, there were analyzed 448 patients undergoing isolated implant aortic valve prosthesis (Group I and 167 patients undergoing aortic valve prosthesis implant combined with coronary artery bypass grafting (Group II. Pre- and intra-operative variables elected for analysis were: age, gender, body mass index, stroke, diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, rheumatic fever, hypertension, endocarditis, acute myocardial infarction, smoking, Fraction of the left ventricular ejection, critical atherosclerotic coronary artery disease, chronic atrial fibrillation, aortic valve operation prior (conservative, functional class of congestive heart failure, value serum creatinine, total cholesterol, size of the prosthesis used, length and number of distal anastomoses held in myocardial revascularization, duration of

  8. When operable patients become inoperable: conversion of a surgical aortic valve replacement into transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lene Kjaer; Arendrup, Henrik; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a relatively new treatment option for inoperable patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS). This case describes how a planned conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) on a 73-year-old woman was successfully converted to a TAVI procedure....... On extracorporal circulation it was reconized that the aortic annulus, the coronary ostiae and the proximal part of the ascending aorta were severely calcified making valve implantation impossible. Surgical closure without valve substitution was estimated to be associated with a high risk of mortality due...

  9. In vitro characterization of bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics using particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yap, Choon-Hwai; Milligan, Nicole C; Vasilyev, Nikolay V; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2012-08-01

    The congenital bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is associated with increased leaflet calcification, ascending aortic dilatation, aortic stenosis (AS) and regurgitation (AR). Although underlying genetic factors have been primarily implicated for these complications, the altered mechanical environment of BAVs could potentially accelerate these pathologies. The objective of the current study is to characterize BAV hemodynamics in an in vitro system. Two BAV models of varying stenosis and jet eccentricity and a trileaflet AV (TAV) were constructed from excised porcine AVs. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) experiments were conducted at physiological flow and pressure conditions to characterize fluid velocity fields in the aorta and sinus regions, and ensemble averaged Reynolds shear stress and 2D turbulent kinetic energy were calculated for all models. The dynamics of the BAV and TAV models matched the characteristics of these valves which are observed clinically. The eccentric and stenotic BAV showed the strongest systolic jet (V = 4.2 m/s), which impinged on the aortic wall on the non-fused leaflet side, causing a strong vortex in the non-fused leaflet sinus. The magnitudes of TKE and Reynolds stresses in both BAV models were almost twice as large as comparable values for TAV, and these maximum values were primarily concentrated around the central jet through the valve orifice. The in vitro model described here enables detailed characterization of BAV flow characteristics, which is currently challenging in clinical practice. This model can prove to be useful in studying the effects of altered BAV geometry on fluid dynamics in the valve and ascending aorta. These altered flows can be potentially linked to increased calcific responses from the valve endothelium in stenotic and eccentric BAVs, independent of concomitant genetic factors.

  10. MDCT evaluation of congenital mitral-aortic intervalvular fibrosa aneurysm: implications for the aetiology and differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, I. Chen; Fu, Yun-Ching; Lin, Ming-Chih; Jan, Sheng-Ling; Lin, Pao-Chun

    2009-01-01

    Mitral-aortic intervalvular fibrosa aneurysm is a rare disease whose aetiology remains a matter of debate. Here we present the youngest reported patient with the disease, a 6-month-old boy, without a history of infection, which supports a congenital origin as initially proposed. Multidetector-row CT (MDCT) surpassed echocardiography in delineating the intracardiac anatomical details with high spatial resolution, confirming the important problem-solving role of MDCT in the diagnosis of congenital heart disease. (orig.)

  11. Celiac axis stenosis: incidence and etiologies in asymptomatic individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chang Min; Chung, Jin Wook; Kim, Hyun Beom; Shin, Sang June; Park, Jae Hyung

    2000-01-01

    To determine the incidence and etiologies of celiac axis stenosis in asymptomatic individuals. This prospective study involved 400 consecutive patients (male: 319, female: 81) referred to us for celiac arteriography between April and July 1999. When celiac axis branches were opacified by collateral circulation during superior mesenteric arteriography, the presence of celiac axis stenosis was suspected; lateral projection celiac arteriography was performed and the pressure gradient was measured. The indicators used to determine whether or not celiac axis stenosis was significant were luminal narrowing of more than 50% and a resultant pressure gradient of at least 10 mmHg. Its etiology was determined on the basis of angiographic appearances and CT findings. Twenty-nine patients (7.3%) had celiac axis stenosis. The etiology of the condition was extrinsic compression due to the median arcuate ligament in 16 patients (55%) and atherosclerosis in three (10%), while in ten (35%) it was not determined. The incidence of celiac axis stenosis did not vary significantly according to sex, age and the presence of calcified aortic plaque representing atherosclerosis. The incidence of hemodynamically significant celiac axis stenosis in this asymptomatic Korean population was 7.3% and the most important etiology was extrinsic compression by the median arcuate ligament of the diaphragm. Atherosclerosis was only a minor cause of the condition

  12. Congenital pulmonary vein stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzar, Shabih

    2007-06-01

    A case of a newborn infant is described who presented with severe cyanosis at birth with rapid deterioration. The infant died at six hours of life. The diagnosis was determined at autopsy as congenital pulmonary vein stenosis.

  13. [Intravascular Hemolysis Caused by Stenosis of an Elephant Trunk;Report of a Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamaru, Rikako; Kawahito, Koji; Aizawa, Kei; Misawa, Yoshio

    2017-07-01

    Symptomatic intravascular hemolysis after prosthetic aortic graft replacement is rare. It is primarily attributed to mechanical injury of red blood cells caused by stenosis of the vascular graft. A 50-year-old man presented with hemolytic anemia, 5 years after total arch replacement with an elephant trunk for type A aortic dissection. The hemolysis was caused by graft stenosis of the elephant trunk. Endovascular treatment for the stenotic elephant trunk was successfully performed. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the hemolysis was resolved immediately after operation.

  14. Pulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass and renal function in elderly patients undergoing aortic valve surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milano, Aldo Domenico; Dodonov, Mikhail; Van Oeveren, Willem; Onorati, Francesco; Gu, Y. John; Tessari, Maddalena; Menon, Tiziano; Gottin, Leonardo; Faggian, Giuseppe

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate if pulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) has any protective influence on renal function in elderly patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR). METHODS: Forty-six patients (>= 75 years old) with aortic valve stenosis underwent AVR with either pulsatile perfusion (PP)

  15. Measures of right ventricular function after transcatheter versus surgical aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønlykke, Lars; Ihlemann, Nikolaj; Ngo, Anh Thuc

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Describe changes in measures of right ventricular (RV) function in patients treated for aortic stenosis using open-chest surgery (SAVR) or transcatheter treatment (TAVR). METHODS: Patients in the Nordic Aortic Valve Intervention (NOTION) trial were randomized 1:1 to TAVR (n = 114...

  16. Assessment of the "long sheath" technique for percutaneous aortic balloon valvuloplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Plante (Sylvain); K.J. Beatt (Kevin); M.J.B.M. van den Brand (Marcel); C. di Mario (Carlo); B. Meier (Bernard); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractA 100 cm-long 16.5 F valvuloplasty catheter introducer was assessed as an adjunct for percutaneous transluminal aortic valvuloplasty (PTAV) via the femoral artery in 31 patients with severe aortic stenosis. Observed improvements in peak systolic gradient (81.6 +/- 29.9 mm Hg vs. 35.5 +/-

  17. Meta-analysis of predictors of all-cause mortality after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giordana, Francesca; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Nijhoff, Freek; Moretti, Claudio; D'Amico, Maurizio; Biondi Zoccai, Giuseppe; Sinning, Jan Malte; Nickenig, George; van Mieghem, Nicolas M.; Chieffo, Adelaide; Dumonteil, Nicolas; Tchetche, Didier; Barbash, Israel M.; Waksman, Ron; D'Onofrio, Augusto; Lefevre, Thierry; Pilgrim, Thomas; Amabile, Nicolas; Codner, Pablo; Kornowski, Ran; Yong, Ze Yie; Baan, Jan; Colombo, Antonio; Latib, Azeem; Salizzoni, Stefano; Omedè, Pierluigi; Conrotto, Federico; La Torre, Michele; Marra, Sebastiano; Rinaldi, Mauro; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify predictors of 30-day and midterm mortality after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) by means of a systemic review. TAVI was demonstrated to be safe and efficacious in patients with severe aortic stenosis. An accurate estimation of procedural risk of

  18. An up-to-date overview of the most recent transcatheter implantable aortic valve prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerinck, Esther M. A.; van Kesteren, Floortje; van Mourik, Martijn S.; Vis, Marije M.; Baan, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has evolved towards the routine therapy for high-risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. Technical refinements in TAVI are rapidly evolving with a simultaneous expansion of the number of available devices. This review will

  19. Lumbar spinal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Spinal stenosis, which has attracted increasing attention in recent years, represents an important group of clinical and radiologic entities. Recognition and ultimate surgical management of the many abnormalities found in this group require precise preoperative delineation of the morbid anatomy. Conventional axial tomography provided the first accurate picture of the sagittal dimension, but it was limited by poor contrast resolution. Computerized tomography and ultrasound have finally provided the means for accurate measurement of midsagittal diameter and surface area. It is now possible to provide a preoperative assessment of bony and soft-tissue canal compression and to guide surgical decompression by objective anatomic measurements. True spinal stenosis of the lumbar vertebral canal is a form of compression produced by the walls of the vertebral canal. It involves the whole of the vertebral canal by exerting compression at two of its opposite surfaces. There are two types of stenosis: (1) transport stenosis, wherein the clinical manifestations are due to impeded flow of fluid, which is dependent on the available cross-sectional area of the canal surface of the stenotic structure, and (2) compressive stenosis, which includes abnormal compression of opposing surfaces only. According to these definitions, indentation on the spinal canal by disc protrusion or localized tumor is not considered true spinal stenoses. In this chapter the authors discuss only those conditions that produce true canal stenosis

  20. Anesthetic Implications of Emergent Cesarean Section in a Parturient with Marfan Syndrome Complicated by Ascending Aortic Aneurysm and Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Sung Kim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular comorbidities to the Marfan syndrome may induce hemodynamic instability especially in the parturients during labor or delivery. For anesthesiologists, it is challenging to maintain hemodynamic stability during Cesarean section in those patients with Marfan syndrome. Remifentanil is an ultra-short-acting opioid with rapid onset and offset of action which provides cardiovascular stability during surgery. Together with remifentanil, the use of a laryngeal mask airway can reduce the risk of hypertensive response followed by tracheal intubation. We describe the successful administration of remifentanil and application of laryngeal mask airway for emergent Cesarean section performed under general anesthesia in a patient with Marfan syndrome complicated by ascending aortic aneurysm and heart failure. The use of remifentanil (loading dose of 1 μg/kg for 1 min, 2 min before induction; thereafter continuous infusion dose of 0.1 μg/kg/min was useful to maintain hemodynamic stability of the parturient throughout the surgery without neonatal respiratory depression. Keywords: Ascending Aortic Aneurysm; Cesarean section; Laryngeal mask airway; Marfan syndrome; Remifentanil

  1. Intra-operative Vector Flow Imaging Using Ultrasound of the Ascending Aorta among 40 Patients with Normal, Stenotic and Replaced Aortic Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse; Kjaergaard, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Stenosis of the aortic valve gives rise to more complex blood flows with increased velocities. The angleindependent vector flow ultrasound technique transverse oscillation was employed intra-operatively on the ascending aorta of (I) 20 patients with a healthy aortic valve and 20 patients with aor...... replacement corrects some of these changes. Transverse oscillation may be useful for assessment of aortic stenosis and optimization of valve surgery. (E-mail: lindskov@gmail.com) 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology...... with aortic stenosis before (IIa) and after (IIb) valve replacement. The results indicate that aortic stenosis increased flow complexity (p , 0.0001), induced systolic backflow (p , 0.003) and reduced systolic jet width (p , 0.0001). After valve replacement, the systolic backflow and jet width were normalized...

  2. First transcatheter aortic valve implantation for severe pure aortic regurgitation in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiam, Paul Toon-Lim; Ewe, See Hooi; Chua, Yeow Leng; Lim, Yean Teng

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become the standard of care for inoperable patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS), and an alternative to open aortic valve replacement for patients at high surgical risk. TAVI has also been performed in several groups of patients with off-label indications such as severe bicuspid AS, and as a valve-in-valve therapy for a degenerated surgical bioprosthesis. Although TAVI with CoreValve® prosthesis is technically challenging, and global experience in the procedure is limited, the procedure could be a treatment option for well-selected patients with severe pure aortic regurgitation (AR). Herein, we report Asia's first case of TAVI for severe pure AR in a patient who was at extreme surgical risk, with good clinical outcome at six months. PMID:24570320

  3. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in the elderly: who to refer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Matthew; Green, Philip

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, experience with transcatheter aortic valve implantation has led to improved outcomes in elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) who may not have previously been considered for intervention. These patients are often frail with significant comorbid conditions. As the prevalence of AS increases, there is a need for improved assessment parameters to determine the patients most likely to benefit from this novel procedure. This review discusses the diagnostic criteria for severe AS and the trials available to aid in the decision to refer for aortic valve procedures in the elderly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Flow acceleration time and ratio of acceleration time to ejection time for prosthetic aortic valve function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Zekry, Sagit; Saad, Robert M; Ozkan, Mehmet; Al Shahid, Maie S; Pepi, Mauro; Muratori, Manuela; Xu, Jiaqiong; Little, Stephen H; Zoghbi, William A

    2011-11-01

    We sought to evaluate whether ejection dynamics, particularly acceleration time (AT) and the ratio of AT to ejection time (ET), can differentiate prosthetic aortic valve (PAV) stenosis from controls and prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM). Diagnosing PAV stenosis, especially in mechanical valves, may be challenging and has significant clinical implications. Doppler echocardiography was quantitated in 88 patients with PAV (44 mechanical and 44 bioprosthetic; age 63 ± 16 years; valve size range 18 to 25 mm) of whom 22 patients had documented PAV stenosis, 22 had PPM, and 44 served as controls. Quantitative Doppler parameters included ejection dynamics (AT, ET, and AT/ET) and conventional PAV parameters. Patients with PAV stenosis had significantly lower effective orifice area (EOA) values and higher gradients compared with controls and PPM. Flow ejection parameters (AT and AT/ET) were significantly longer in the stenotic valves compared with PPM and controls (respective values for AT: 120 ± 24 ms, 89 ± 16 ms, and 71 ± 15 ms; for AT/ET: 0.4, 0.32, and 0.3, p ≤ 0.001). Patients with PPM had gradients and ejection dynamics that were intermediate between normal and stenotic valves. Receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed that AT and AT/ET discriminated PAV stenosis from PPM and controls (area under ROC curve = 0.92 and 0.88, respectively). Combining AT with the conventional Doppler velocity index gave the highest area under the curve of 0.98 but was not statistically different from that of AT alone (p = 0.12). A cutoff of AT = 100 ms had a sensitivity and specificity of 86% for identifying PAV stenosis; for an AT/ET = 0.37, the sensitivity and specificity were 96% and 82%, respectively. Analysis by valve type (mechanical and biological) revealed similar results; however, biological valves had slightly higher areas under the curve for all systolic time intervals. Ejection dynamics through PAV, particularly AT and AT/ET, are reliable angle

  5. COMPARISON OF PREOPERATIVE NONINVASIVE AND INTRAOPERATIVE MEASUREMENTS OF AORTIC ANNULUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Hinduja

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Precise preoperative assessment of aortic annulus diameter is essential for sizing of aortic valve especially in patients planned for transcatheter aortic valve replacement. Computed Tomographic (CT and echocardiographic measurements of the aortic annulus vary because of elliptical shape of aortic annulus. This study was undertaken to compare the measurement of aortic annulus intraoperatively with preoperative noninvasive methods in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement. MATERIALS AND METHODS Aortic annulus diameter was measured with cardiac CT and Transesophageal Echocardiography (TEE prior to open aortic valve replacement in 30 patients with aortic valve stenosis. In CT, aortic annulus dimensions were measured in coronal plane, sagittal oblique plane and by planimetry. Both 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional TEE were used. These were compared with intraoperative measurements done by valve sizers and Hegar dilators. Pearson analysis was applied to test for degree of correlation. RESULTS CT in coronal and sagittal oblique plane tends to overestimate the diameter of aortic annulus when compared with intraoperative measurements (coefficient of relation, r = 0.798 and 0.749, respectively. CT measurements in single oblique plane showed a weaker correlation with intraoperative measurements than 3D TEE and 2D TEE (r = 0.917 and 0.898, respectively. However, CT measurements by planimetry method were most correlating with the intraoperative measurements (r = 0.951. CONCLUSION Noninvasive investigations with 3-dimensional views (CT-based measurement employing calculated average diameter assessment by planimetry and 3-dimensional TEE showed better correlation with intraoperative measurement of aortic annulus. CT-based aortic annulus measurement by planimetry seems to provide adequate dimensions most similar to operative measurements.

  6. Valor preditivo da angina em detectar doença coronariana em pacientes com estenose aórtica grave a partir da quinta década de vida Predictive value of angina to detect coronary artery disease in patients with severe aortic stenosis aged 50 years or older

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Alves Vargas Gonçalves

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo é verificar o valor de previsão da angina de peito no diagnóstico da DAC em pacientes portadores de EA, a partir da quinta década de vida. MÉTODOS: A população estudada foi constituída por 186 pacientes consecutivos com EA e idade e" 50 anos, referidos para cirurgia de troca valvar aórtica entre junho de 1989 e setembro de 2004. Cinecoronariografia de rotina foi realizada em todos os pacientes. Cento e um eram homens (54,3% e 85, mulheres (45,7%, com idade de 66±8 anos. Angina estava presente em 124 pacientes (66,7%. O gradiente máximo transvalvar aórtico foi de 89,4±27,6 mmHg e a área valvar aórtica de 0,59±0,17 cm2. Calculamos a sensibilidade, a especificidade, o valor de previsão positivo e negativo e a razão de verossimilhança positiva da angina na predição da presença de DAC. RESULTADOS: DAC estava presente em 93 pacientes (50%. Dos 124 pacientes com angina, 68 (54,8% apresentavam DAC; enquanto dos 62 sem angina, 25 apresentavam DAC (40,3%. Portanto, a sensibilidade da angina para DAC foi de 73,1%, a especificidade de 39,7%, valor preditivo positivo de 54,8%, valor preditivo negativo de 59,6% e razão de verossimilhança positiva de 1,6. CONCLUSÃO: A angina de peito não é bom preditor da presença de DAC em pacientes com EA a partir da quinta década de vida.OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to evaluate the value of angina pectoris as a predictor of CAD (coronary artery disease in patients with AS (aortic stenosis during and beyond the 5th decade of life. METHODS: The study population consisted of 186 consecutive patients with AS and e" 50 years of age, referred for surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR between June 1989 and September 2004. Routine coronary angiography was performed for all patients. One hundred and one patients were males (54.3% and 85 were females (45.7%, and the mean age was 66±8 years. One hundred and twenty-four patients (66.7% had angina. The maximum

  7. Screening for Carotid Artery Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stenosis Carotid artery stenosis is one of many risk factors for stroke, a leading cause of death and disability in ... blood thinners, which can prevent blood clots (a risk factor for stroke). Surgery may be done to remove the blockage ...

  8. Lumbar stenosis: clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Sá

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar stenosis is an increasingly common pathological condition that is becoming more frequent with increasing mean life expectancy, with high costs for society. It has many causes, among which degenerative, neoplastic and traumatic causes stand out. Most of the patients respond well to conservative therapy. Surgical treatment is reserved for patients who present symptoms after implementation of conservative measures. Here, a case of severe stenosis of the lumbar spine at several levels, in a female patient with pathological and surgical antecedents in the lumbar spine, is presented. The patient underwent two different decompression techniques within the same operation.

  9. Foraminal stenosis in spondylolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greselle, J.F.; Grenier, N.; Douws, C.; Bernard, S.; Vital, J.M.; Caille, J.M.; Broussin, J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports eighteen patients with spondylolysis evaluated with sagittal MR imaging to correlate the factors and degree of faoraminal stenosis at the level of the lysis with clinical findings. Fifteen presented with low back pain, eight with radiculopathy and one with paresthesia in the lower limbs, and two were asymptomatic. The degree of foraminal stenosis, quantified in three grades, was not correlated with the onset of radiculopathy. Three foraminal herniations were responsible for radiculopathy. Presence of isthmic bony tip and fibrocartilage buildup were not correlated with symptoms. Foraminal compression can be demonstrated by MR imaging, but without clinical correlations

  10. Osteoprotegerin inhibits aortic valve calcification and preserves valve function in hypercholesterolemic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Weiss

    Full Text Available There are no rigorously confirmed effective medical therapies for calcific aortic stenosis. Hypercholesterolemic Ldlr (-/- Apob (100/100 mice develop calcific aortic stenosis and valvular cardiomyopathy in old age. Osteoprotegerin (OPG modulates calcification in bone and blood vessels, but its effect on valve calcification and valve function is not known.To determine the impact of pharmacologic treatment with OPG upon aortic valve calcification and valve function in aortic stenosis-prone hypercholesterolemic Ldlr (-/- Apob (100/100 mice.Young Ldlr (-/- Apob (100/100 mice (age 2 months were fed a Western diet and received exogenous OPG or vehicle (N = 12 each 3 times per week, until age 8 months. After echocardiographic evaluation of valve function, the aortic valve was evaluated histologically. Older Ldlr (-/- Apob (100/100 mice were fed a Western diet beginning at age 2 months. OPG or vehicle (N = 12 each was administered from 6 to 12 months of age, followed by echocardiographic evaluation of valve function, followed by histologic evaluation.In Young Ldlr (-/- Apob (100/100 mice, OPG significantly attenuated osteogenic transformation in the aortic valve, but did not affect lipid accumulation. In Older Ldlr (-/- Apob (100/100 mice, OPG attenuated accumulation of the osteoblast-specific matrix protein osteocalcin by ∼80%, and attenuated aortic valve calcification by ∼ 70%. OPG also attenuated impairment of aortic valve function.OPG attenuates pro-calcific processes in the aortic valve, and protects against impairment of aortic valve function in hypercholesterolemic aortic stenosis-prone Ldlr (-/- Apob (100/100 mice.

  11. Residual glycosaminoglycan accumulation in mitral and aortic valves of a patient with attenuated MPS I (Scheie syndrome after 6 years of enzyme replacement therapy: Implications for early diagnosis and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Sato

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS is an inherited metabolic disease caused by deficiency of the enzymes needed for glycosaminoglycan (GAG degradation. MPS type I is caused by the deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-l-iduronidase and is classified into Hurler syndrome, Scheie syndrome, and Hurler–Scheie syndrome based on disease severity and onset. Cardiac complications such as left ventricular hypertrophy, cardiac valve disease, and coronary artery disease are often observed in MPS type I. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT has been available for MPS type I, but the efficacy of this treatment for cardiac valve disease is unknown. We report on a 56-year-old female patient with attenuated MPS I (Scheie syndrome who developed aortic and mitral stenosis and coronary artery narrowing. The cardiac valve disease progressed despite ERT and she finally underwent double valve replacement and coronary artery bypass grafting. The pathology of the cardiac valves revealed GAG accumulation and lysosomal enlargement in both the mitral and aortic valves. Zebra body formation was also confirmed using electron microscopy. Our results suggest that ERT had limited efficacy in previously established cardiac valve disease. Early diagnosis and initiation of ERT is crucial to avoid further cardiac complications in MPS type I.

  12. Stenting of Anomalous Left Main Coronary Artery Stenosis in an Adult with a Retroaortic Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanjewar Charan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary bypass graft has been the conventional treatment of choice in anomalous left man coronary artery stenosis. We are reporting an interesting case with anomalous left main coronary artery originating from right aortic sinus having retroaortic course complicated by significant atherosclerotic narrowing of the vessel and its percutaneous management.

  13. Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If you have lumbar spinal canal stenosis, your treatment will depend on how bad your symptoms are. If your pain is mild and you haven’t had it long, you can try an exercise program or a physical therapy program. This can strengthen your back muscles and ...

  14. Infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rikke Neess; Garne, Ester; Loane, Maria

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to present epidemiologic data on infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) from seven well-defined European regions, and to compare incidence and changes in incidence over time between these regions. METHODS: This was a population-based study using...

  15. Renal Branch Artery Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Zarah; Thisted, Ebbe; Andersen, Ulrik Bjørn

    2017-01-01

    Renovascular hypertension is a common cause of pediatric hypertension. In the fraction of cases that are unrelated to syndromes such as neurofibromatosis, patients with a solitary stenosis on a branch of the renal artery are common and can be diagnostically challenging. Imaging techniques...

  16. Duplex ultrasound for identifying renal artery stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachrisson, Karin; Herlitz, Hans; Lönn, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Background Renal artery duplex ultrasound (RADUS) is an established method for diagnosis of renal artery stenosis (RAS), but there is no consensus regarding optimal RADUS criteria. Purpose To define optimal cutoff values for RADUS parameters when screening for RAS using intra-arterial trans......-stenotic pressure gradient measurement (PGM) as reference. Material and Methods The renal arteries of 58 consecutive patients evaluated for renovascular hypertension were examined by RADUS and PGM. Conclusive measurements with both methods were obtained in 76 arteries. Hemodynamically significant RAS was defined...... as PGM ≥15 mmHg and was found in 43 of the 76 arteries. RADUS parameters included renal artery peak systolic velocity (PSV) and the renal-aortic ratio (RAR) of flow velocities. Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROCs) and Youden's index were used to calculate optimal RADUS criteria for RAS...

  17. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A Siordia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR is a novel therapeutic intervention for the replacement of severely stenotic aortic valves in high-risk patients for standard surgical procedures. Since the initial PARTNER trial results, use of TAVR has been on the rise each year. New delivery methods and different valves have been developed and modified in order to promote the minimally invasive procedure and reduce common complications, such as stroke. This review article focuses on the current data on the indications, risks, benefits, and future directions of TAVR. Recently, TAVR has been considered as a standard-of-care procedure. While this technique is used frequently in high-risk surgical candidates, studies have been focusing on the application of this method for younger patients with lower surgical risk. Moreover, several studies have proposed promising results regarding the use of valve-in-valve technique or the procedure in which the valve is placed within a previously implemented bioprosthetic valve. However, ischemic strokes and paravalvular leak remain a matter of debate in these surgeries. New methods and devices have been developed to reduce the incidence of post-procedural stroke. While the third generation of TAVR valves (i.e., Edwards Sapien 3 and Medtronic Evolut R addresses the issue of paravalvular leak structurally, results on their efficacy in reducing the risk of paravalvular leak are yet to be obtained. Furthermore, TAVR enters the field of hybrid methods in the treatment of cardiac issues via both surgical and catheter-based approaches. Finally, while TAVR is primarily performed on cases with aortic stenosis, new valves and methods have been proposed regarding the application of this technique in aortic regurgitation, as well as other aortic pathologies. TAVR is a suitable therapeutic approach for the treatment of aortic stenosis in high-risk patients. Considering the promising results in the current patient population

  18. Aortic Dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Follow a low-salt diet with plenty of fruits, vegetables and whole grains and exercise regularly. Wear a seat belt. This reduces the risk of traumatic injury to your chest area. Work with your doctor. If you have a family history of aortic dissection, a connective tissue disorder or ...

  19. Left main coronary artery obstruction by dislodged native-valve calculus after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmaz, Tahir; Ayhan, Huseyin; Keles, Telat; Aslan, Abdullah Nabi; Erdogan, Kemal Esref; Sari, Cenk; Bilen, Emine; Akcay, Murat; Bozkurt, Engin

    2014-08-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement can be an effective, reliable treatment for severe aortic stenosis in surgically high-risk or ineligible patients. However, various sequelae like coronary artery obstruction can occur, not only in the long term, but also immediately after the procedure. We present the case of a 78-year-old woman whose left main coronary artery became obstructed with calculus 2 hours after the transfemoral implantation of an Edwards Sapien XT aortic valve. Despite percutaneous coronary intervention in that artery, the patient died. This case reminds us that early recognition of acute coronary obstruction and prompt intervention are crucial in patients with aortic stenosis who have undergone transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

  20. Percutaneous implantation of the CoreValve aortic valve prosthesis in patients at high risk or rejected for surgical valve replacement: Clinical evaluation and feasibility of the procedure in the first 30 patients in the AMC-UvA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baan, J.; Yong, Z. Y.; Koch, K. T.; Henriques, J. P. S.; Bouma, B. J.; de Hert, S. G.; van der Meulen, J.; Tijssen, J. G. P.; Piek, J. J.; de Mol, B. A. J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To report the feasibility, safety and efficacy of percutaneous aortic valve implantation (PAVI) with the CoreValve self-expanding aortic valve bioprosthesis in elderly patients with aortic valve stenosis who are rejected for surgery or have a high surgical risk.Methods. PAVI using the

  1. Full-root aortic valve replacement with stentless xenograft achieves superior regression of left ventricular hypertrophy compared to pericardial stented aortic valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Reza; Auf der Maur, Christoph; Mueller, Xavier; Schläpfer, Reinhard; Jamshidi, Peiman; Daubeuf, François; Frossard, Nelly

    2015-02-03

    Full-root aortic valve replacement with stentless xenografts has potentially superior hemodynamic performance compared to stented valves. However, a number of cardiac surgeons are reluctant to transform a classical stented aortic valve replacement into a technically more demanding full-root stentless aortic valve replacement. Here we describe our technique of full-root stentless aortic xenograft implantation and compare the early clinical and midterm hemodynamic outcomes to those after aortic valve replacement with stented valves. We retrospectively compared the pre-operative characteristics of 180 consecutive patients who underwent full-root replacement with stentless aortic xenografts with those of 80 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement with stented valves. In subgroups presenting with aortic stenosis, we further analyzed the intra-operative data, early postoperative outcomes and mid-term regression of left ventricular mass index. Patients in the stentless group were younger (62.6 ± 13 vs. 70.3 ± 11.8 years, p regression of the left ventricular mass index in the stentless (p replacement can be performed without adversely affecting the early morbidity or mortality in patients operated on for aortic valve stenosis provided that the coronary ostia are not heavily calcified. The additional time necessary for the full-root stentless compared to the classical stented aortic valve replacement is therefore not detrimental to the early clinical outcomes and is largely rewarded in patients with aortic stenosis by lower transvalvular gradients at mid-term and a better regression of their left ventricular mass index.

  2. Exertional pulmonary edema revealing anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the right coronary aortic sinus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massih, Tony Abdel; Clur, Sally-Ann B.; Bonhoeffer, Philipp

    2002-01-01

    We report a 12-year-old child with anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the right coronary aortic sinus, the artery taking a proximal intramural course. The anomalous artery was reimplanted into the left coronary aortic sinus. Postoperative stenosis was successfully treated with

  3. The surgical anatomy of the left ventricular outflow tract in hearts with ventricular septal defect and aortic arch obstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shiokawa, Y.; Becker, A. E.

    1998-01-01

    Profound understanding of the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) anatomy is crucial to improve surgical results in patients with aortic arch obstruction, ventricular septal defect, and subaortic stenosis. We studied the morphology of the LVOT in 32 postmortem hearts with aortic arch obstruction

  4. Can Surgeons Assess CT Suitability for Endovascular Repair (EVAR) in Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm? Implications for a Ruptured EVAR Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rayt, Harjeet; Lambert, Kelly; Bown, Matthew; Fishwick, Guy; Morgan, Robert; McCarthy, Mark; London, Nick; Sayers, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether surgeons without formal radiological training are able to assess suitability of patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) for EVAR. The CT scans of 20 patients with AAA were reviewed under timed conditions by six vascular surgeons. Twenty minutes was allocated per scan. They were asked to determine if each aneurysm would be treatable by EVAR in the emergency setting and, if so, to measure for device selection. The results were then compared with those of a vascular radiologist. Six surgeons agreed on the suitability of endovascular repair in 45% of cases (95% CI, 23.1-68.5%; 9/20 scans; κ = 0.41 [p = 0.01]) and concurred with the radiologist in eight of these. Individually, agreement ranged from 13 to 16 of the 20 scans, 65-80% between surgeons. The kappa value for agreement between all the surgeons and the radiologist was 0.47 (p = 0.01, moderate agreement). For the individual surgeons, this ranged from 0.3 to 0.6 (p = 0.01). In conclusion, while overall agreement was moderate between the surgeons and the radiologist, it is clear that if surgeons are to assess patients for ruptured EVAR in the future, focused training of surgical trainees is required.

  5. Percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty in mitral stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae Hyung; Oh, Byung Hee; Park, Kyung Ju; Kim, Seung Hyup; Lee, Young Woo; Han, Man Chung

    1989-01-01

    Percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty(PBV) was successfully performed in 8 mitral stenosis patients for recent 3 months. Five patients have aortic insufficiencies also and two patients have mitral regurgitations below grade II/IV. All patients showed sinus rhythm on EKG, and had no mitral valvular calcification on echocardiography and fluoroscopy. PBV resulted in an increase in mitral valve area from 1.22±0.22 to 2.57±0.86 cm 2 , a decrease in mean left atrial pressure from 23.4±9.6 to 7.5±3.4 mmHg and a decrease in mean mitral pressure gradient from 21.3±9.4 to 6.8±3.1 mmHg. There were no significant complications except 2 cases of newly appeared and mildly aggravated mitral regurgitation. We believe that PBV will become a treatment modality of choice replacing surgical commissurotomy or valve replacement in a group of mitral stenosis patients, because of its effectiveness and safety

  6. 3D echocardiographic analysis of aortic annulus for transcatheter aortic valve replacement using novel aortic valve quantification software: Comparison with computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediratta, Anuj; Addetia, Karima; Medvedofsky, Diego; Schneider, Robert J; Kruse, Eric; Shah, Atman P; Nathan, Sandeep; Paul, Jonathan D; Blair, John E; Ota, Takeyoshi; Balkhy, Husam H; Patel, Amit R; Mor-Avi, Victor; Lang, Roberto M

    2017-05-01

    With the increasing use of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients with aortic stenosis (AS), computed tomography (CT) remains the standard for annulus sizing. However, 3D transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has been an alternative in patients with contraindications to CT. We sought to (1) test the feasibility, accuracy, and reproducibility of prototype 3DTEE analysis software (Philips) for aortic annular measurements and (2) compare the new approach to the existing echocardiographic techniques. We prospectively studied 52 patients who underwent gated contrast CT, procedural 3DTEE, and TAVR. 3DTEE images were analyzed using novel semi-automated software designed for 3D measurements of the aortic root, which uses multiplanar reconstruction, similar to CT analysis. Aortic annulus measurements included area, perimeter, and diameter calculations from these measurements. The results were compared to CT-derived values. Additionally, 3D echocardiographic measurements (3D planimetry and mitral valve analysis software adapted for the aortic valve) were also compared to the CT reference values. 3DTEE image quality was sufficient in 90% of patients for aortic annulus measurements using the new software, which were in good agreement with CT (r-values: .89-.91) and small (software can accurately measure aortic annulus in patients with severe AS undergoing TAVR, in better agreement with CT than the existing methodology. Accordingly, intra-procedural TEE could potentially replace CT in patients where CT carries significant risk. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Volume ventricular esquerdo crítico na estenose aórtica no primeiro ano de vida: sua importância na seleção de pacientes candidatos à correção univentricular pós-valvotomia Critical left ventricular volume in aortic stenosis in first year of life: its importance in patients selection candidates to univentricular surgical correction pos-valvotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurélio Santos

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Análise do volume diastólico final ventricular esquerdo crítico, definido como o menor volume aceitável para a manutenção do débito cardíaco, na seleção de pacientes com estenose aórtica pós-valvotomia, candidatos à correção univentricular. MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo em 21 pacientes com estenose aórtica, durante o primeiro ano de vida, e 232 compilados da literatura. Arbitraram-se como normais os valores do volume diastólico final (VDF de 20 a 60 ml/m2. Foi comparado o VDF dos grupos que foram ao óbito com aqueles que sobreviveram. Procurou-se, também, estabelecer uma correlação da idade e volume ventricular, na época da valvotomia, entre os grupos. Por fim, determinou-se o VDF esquerdo crítico, obtido através de uma relação teórica entre o VDF esquerdo e freqüência cardíaca para diferentes frações de ejeção e determinados índices cardíacos (IC: 2.000 e 2.500 ml/min/m2. RESULTADOS: Para valores do VDF 60 ml/m2, houve significância estatística entre os mortos e os sobreviventes (pOBJECTIVE: Analysis of critical end diastolic left ventricular volume (EDLVV, defined as the lowest acceptable volume to keep cardiac output, in the selection of patients with post-valvotomy aortic stenosis, candidates to univentricular correction. METHODS: A retrospective study in 21 patients with aortic stenosis, during the first year of life, and 232 patients compiled from literature. Values of end diastolic volume (EDLVV, from 20 to 60 ml/m2 were determined as normal. The EDLVV of deceased patients was compared to that from survival patients. A correlation between the age and EDLVV was carried out at the time of valvotomy, between the groups. Finally, the critical EDLVV through the theoretical relationship between the EDLVV and heart rate for different ejection fractions and designated cardiac indexes (CI: 2,000 and 2,500 20-60 ml/min/m2 was determined. RESULTS: For EDLVV values 60 ml/m2, there was statistical

  8. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/007684.htm Transcatheter aortic valve replacement To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is surgery to replace the aortic valve. ...

  9. Aortic Valve Regurgitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correct direction. These valves include the mitral valve, tricuspid valve, pulmonary valve and aortic valve. Each valve has ... Causes of aortic valve regurgitation include: Congenital heart valve disease. You may have been born with an aortic ...

  10. Central and foraminal stenosis of the lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major, N.M.; Helms, C.A.

    1995-01-01

    The discussion include clinical presentation, anatomy, imaging techniques, central canal stenosis, iatrogenic stenosis, post-traumatic stenosis, neural foraminal stenosis, facet joint disease, lateral recess disease (15 refs.)

  11. Mitral Stenosis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    By C. Richard Conti, MD, MACC

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitral stenosis due to rheumatic heart disease is not common in the United States but is common in the developing world because rheumatic fever is still occurring frequently. Symptoms usually gradually occur in the young adult (most commonly female. Atrial fibrillation is a common accompanying rhythm in patients with proven mitral stenosis. The main physiologic event is a pressure gradient between the left atrium and the left ventricle. Diagnosis is relatively straight forward using physical exam and simple laboratory studies such as Chest X-Ray (elevated Left main stem bronchus, Double Density indicating enlarged left atrium and ECG (P-Mitrale. Cardiac ultrasound confirms the clinical diagnosis (Doming of mitral valve in diastole, Hockey stick deformity of the anterior mitral valve leaflet, large left atrium, Doppler estimation of valve gradient. Mitral commisurotomy (surgical or Balloon is warranted if the valve is pliable and not heavily calcified.

  12. Congenital pyriform aperture stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osovsky, Micky; Aizer-Danon, Anat; Horev, Gadi; Sirota, Lea

    2007-01-01

    Nasal airway obstruction is a potentially life-threatening condition in the newborn. Neonates are obligatory nasal breathers. The pyriform aperture is the narrowest, most anterior bony portion of the nasal airway, and a decrease in its cross-sectional area will significantly increase nasal airway resistance. Congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis (CNPAS) is a rare, unusual form of nasal obstruction. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any neonate or infant with signs and symptoms of upper airway compromise. It is important to differentiate this level of obstruction from the more common posterior choanal stenosis or atresia. CNPAS presents with symptoms of nasal airway obstruction, which are often characterized by episodic apnea and cyclical cyanosis. (orig.)

  13. Congenital pyriform aperture stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osovsky, Micky [Schneider Pediatric Hospital, Department of Neonatology, Petach Tikvah (Israel); Rabin Medical Center, Department of Neonatology, Schneider Children' s Medical Center of Israel, Beilinson Campus, Petah Tikvah (Israel); Aizer-Danon, Anat; Horev, Gadi [Schneider Pediatric Hospital, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Petach Tikvah (Israel); Sirota, Lea [Schneider Pediatric Hospital, Department of Neonatology, Petach Tikvah (Israel)

    2007-01-15

    Nasal airway obstruction is a potentially life-threatening condition in the newborn. Neonates are obligatory nasal breathers. The pyriform aperture is the narrowest, most anterior bony portion of the nasal airway, and a decrease in its cross-sectional area will significantly increase nasal airway resistance. Congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis (CNPAS) is a rare, unusual form of nasal obstruction. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any neonate or infant with signs and symptoms of upper airway compromise. It is important to differentiate this level of obstruction from the more common posterior choanal stenosis or atresia. CNPAS presents with symptoms of nasal airway obstruction, which are often characterized by episodic apnea and cyclical cyanosis. (orig.)

  14. Arch reconstruction with autologous pulmonary artery patch in interrupted aortic arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won-Young; Park, Jeong-Jun

    2014-04-01

    Various surgical techniques have been developed for the repair of an interrupted aortic arch. However, tension and Gothic arch formation at the anastomotic site have remained major problems for these techniques: Excessive tension causes arch stenosis and left main bronchus compression, and Gothic arch configuration is related to cardiovascular complications. To resolve these problems, we adopted a modified surgical technique of distal aortic arch augmentation using an autologous main pulmonary artery patch. The descending aorta was then anastomosed to the augmented aortic arch in an end-to-side manner. Here, we report two cases of interrupted aortic arch that were repaired using this technique.

  15. Transcatheter implantation of a new prototype of self-expanding aortic valve prosthesis: first experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е. И. Кретов

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Calcific aortic stenosis is an aortic valve disease of atherosclerotic origin occurring in 2-4 % of persons older than 65 years, for whom open surgery is contraindicated. Models of self-expanding aortic valves available today have a number of significant drawbacks. The authors have developed a prototype of a new aortic valve and present its first successful implantation in the experiment.Received 17 October 2016. Accepted 22 November 2016.Funding: The study had no sponsorship.Conflict of interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

  16. Aortic embolization of an Edwards SAPIEN prosthesis due to sigmoid left ventricular hypertrophy: Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Isa Öner; Koklu, Erkan; Arslan, Sakir; Cagirci, Goksel; Kucukseymen, Selcuk

    2016-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is considered an alternative therapy in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. Although a minimally invasive procedure, it is not free from complications, one of which is valve embolization at the time of TAVI. We present a case of embolization of a balloon-expandable aortic valve due to sigmoid left ventricular hypertrophy and managed with a second valve without surgery. The embolized valve was repositioned in the aortic arch between the left common carotid artery and the brachiocephalic trunk. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  17. Mediastinal widening on chest radiography caused by combined aortic valve disease and primary large B-cell lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Tomaske, M; Kellenberger, CJ; Bodmer, N; Knirsch, W; Bauersfeld, U

    2007-01-01

    Poststenotic aortic root dilatation in patients with aortic valvular stenosis may result in mediastinal widening on chest radiograph. Main differential diagnosis of mediastinal widening is a tumour. In fact, besides atypical chest pain or dyspnoea at exertion secondary to compression of intrathoracic structures in the latter, symptoms may be absent. This article reports a case of combined aortic valve disease and additional primary large B-cell lymphoma.

  18. Technique and Patient Selection Criteria of Right Anterior Mini-Thoracotomy for Minimal Access Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Reza; Leprince, Pascal; Gassmann, Max; Jamshidi, Peiman; Yamani, Nassrin; Amour, Julien; Lebreton, Guillaume

    2018-03-26

    Aortic valve stenosis has become the most prevalent valvular heart disease in developed countries, and is due to the aging of these populations. The incidence of the pathology increases with growing age after 65 years. Conventional surgical aortic valve replacement through median sternotomy has been the gold standard of patient care for symptomatic aortic valve stenosis. However, as the risk profile of patients worsens, other therapeutic strategies have been introduced in an attempt to maintain the excellent results obtained by the established surgical treatment. One of these approaches is represented by transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Although the outcomes of high-risk patients undergoing treatment for symptomatic aortic valve stenosis have improved with transcatheter aortic valve replacement, many patients with this condition remain candidates for surgical aortic valve replacement. In order to reduce the surgical trauma in patients who are candidates for surgical aortic valve replacement, minimally invasive approaches have garnered interest during the past decade. Since the introduction of right anterior thoracotomy for aortic valve replacement in 1993, right anterior mini-thoracotomy and upper hemi-sternotomy have become the predominant incisional approaches among cardiac surgeons performing minimal access aortic valve replacement. Beside the location of the incision, the arterial cannulation site represents the second major landmark of minimal access techniques for aortic valve replacement. The two most frequently used arterial cannulation sites include central aortic and peripheral femoral approaches. With the purpose of reducing surgical trauma in these patients, we have opted for a right anterior mini-thoracotomy approach with a central aortic cannulation site. This protocol describes in detail a technique for minimally invasive aortic valve replacement and provides recommendations for patient selection criteria, including cardiac computer

  19. Cardiac high-energy phosphate metabolism in patients with aortic valve disease assessed by 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, S; Horn, M; Pabst, T; Harre, K; Strömer, H; Bertsch, G; Sandstede, J; Ertl, G; Hahn, D; Kochsiek, K

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the clinical and hemodynamic correlates of alterations in cardiac high-energy phosphate metabolism in patients with aortic stenosis and with aortic incompetence. Fourteen volunteers, 13 patients with aortic stenosis, and 9 patients with aortic incompetence were included. Patients underwent echocardiography and left and right heart catheterization. 31P-MR spectra from the anterior myocardium were obtained with a 1.5 Tesla clinical MR system. Aortic stenosis and aortic incompetence patients had similar New York Heart Association (NYHA) classes (2.77 +/- 0.12 vs 2.44 +/- 0.18), ejection fractions (normal), left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic pressures, and LV wall thickness. In volunteers, phosphocreatine/adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ratios were 2.02 +/- 0.11. For all patients, phosphocreatine/ATP was significantly reduced (1.64 +/- 0.09; *p = 0.011 vs volunteers). Phosphocreatine/ATP decreased to 1.55 +/- 0.12 (*p = 0.008) in aortic stenosis, while in aortic incompetence, phosphocreatine/ATP only showed a trend for a reduction (1.77 +/- 0.12; p = 0.148). For all patients, phosphocreatine/ATP decreased significantly only with NYHA class III (1.51 +/- 0.09; *p = 0.001), but not with NYHA classes I and II (phosphocreatine/ATP 1.86 +/- 0.18). In aortic stenosis, phosphocreatine/ATP ratios decreased (1.13 +/- 0.03; *p = 0.019) only when LV end-diastolic pressures were > 15 mm Hg or when LV diastolic wall stress was > 20 kdyne cm-2 (1.13 +/- 0.03; *p = 0.024). For a similar clinical degree of heart failure in human myocardium, volume overload hypertrophy does not, but pressure overload does, induce significant impairment of cardiac high-energy phosphate metabolism. In aortic valve disease, alterations of high-energy phosphate metabolism are related to the degree of heart failure.

  20. Aortic annulus eccentricity before and after transcatheter aortic valve implantation: Comparison of balloon-expandable and self-expanding prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuhbaeck, Annika, E-mail: annika.schuhbaeck@uk-erlangen.de [Department of Cardiology, University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Weingartner, Christina [Department of Cardiology, University of Gießen, Giessen (Germany); Arnold, Martin; Schmid, Jasmin; Pflederer, Tobias; Marwan, Mohamed [Department of Cardiology, University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Rixe, Johannes; Nef, Holger [Department of Cardiology, University of Gießen, Giessen (Germany); Schneider, Christian [Department of Radiology, University of Gießen, Giessen (Germany); Lell, Michael; Uder, Michael [Department of Radiology, University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Ensminger, Stephan [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Heart and Diabetes Center NRW, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bad Oeynhausen (Germany); Feyrer, Richard; Weyand, Michael [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Achenbach, Stephan [Department of Cardiology, University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Post-implant geometry of catheter-based aortic valve prostheses is influenced by aortic valve calcification. • Balloon-expandable prostheses are more circular as compared to self-expanding prostheses. • The impact of post-implant geometry on valve function needs to be investigated. - Abstract: Introduction: The geometry of the aortic annulus and implanted transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis might influence valve function. We investigated the influence of valve type and aortic valve calcification on post-implant geometry of catheter-based aortic valve prostheses. Methods: Eighty consecutive patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (mean age 82 ± 6 years) underwent computed tomography before and after TAVI. Aortic annulus diameters were determined. Influence of prosthesis type and degree of aortic valve calcification on post-implant eccentricity were analysed. Results: Aortic annulus eccentricity was reduced in patients after TAVI (0.21 ± 0.06 vs. 0.08 ± 0.06, p < 0.0001). Post-TAVI eccentricity was significantly lower in 65 patients following implantation of a balloon-expandable prosthesis as compared to 15 patients who received a self-expanding prosthesis (0.06 ± 0.05 vs. 0.15 ± 0.07, p < 0.0001), even though the extent of aortic valve calcification was not different. After TAVI, patients with a higher calcium amount retained a significantly higher eccentricity compared to patients with lower amounts of calcium. Conclusions: Patients undergoing TAVI with a balloon-expandable prosthesis show a more circular shape of the implanted prosthesis as compared to patients with a self-expanding prosthesis. Eccentricity of the deployed prosthesis is affected by the extent of aortic valve calcification.

  1. Aortic annulus eccentricity before and after transcatheter aortic valve implantation: Comparison of balloon-expandable and self-expanding prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuhbaeck, Annika; Weingartner, Christina; Arnold, Martin; Schmid, Jasmin; Pflederer, Tobias; Marwan, Mohamed; Rixe, Johannes; Nef, Holger; Schneider, Christian; Lell, Michael; Uder, Michael; Ensminger, Stephan; Feyrer, Richard; Weyand, Michael; Achenbach, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Post-implant geometry of catheter-based aortic valve prostheses is influenced by aortic valve calcification. • Balloon-expandable prostheses are more circular as compared to self-expanding prostheses. • The impact of post-implant geometry on valve function needs to be investigated. - Abstract: Introduction: The geometry of the aortic annulus and implanted transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis might influence valve function. We investigated the influence of valve type and aortic valve calcification on post-implant geometry of catheter-based aortic valve prostheses. Methods: Eighty consecutive patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (mean age 82 ± 6 years) underwent computed tomography before and after TAVI. Aortic annulus diameters were determined. Influence of prosthesis type and degree of aortic valve calcification on post-implant eccentricity were analysed. Results: Aortic annulus eccentricity was reduced in patients after TAVI (0.21 ± 0.06 vs. 0.08 ± 0.06, p < 0.0001). Post-TAVI eccentricity was significantly lower in 65 patients following implantation of a balloon-expandable prosthesis as compared to 15 patients who received a self-expanding prosthesis (0.06 ± 0.05 vs. 0.15 ± 0.07, p < 0.0001), even though the extent of aortic valve calcification was not different. After TAVI, patients with a higher calcium amount retained a significantly higher eccentricity compared to patients with lower amounts of calcium. Conclusions: Patients undergoing TAVI with a balloon-expandable prosthesis show a more circular shape of the implanted prosthesis as compared to patients with a self-expanding prosthesis. Eccentricity of the deployed prosthesis is affected by the extent of aortic valve calcification

  2. Absent aortic valve associated with double outlet right ventricle and aortopulmonary window: physiologic implications of a rare malformation in both the fetus and neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabati, Arash A; Wong, Pierre C; Randolph, Linda; Pruetz, Jay D

    2014-01-01

    Absence of the aortic valve is a rare congenital heart defect that is detectable in the prenatal period. In this condition, functional aortic valve leaflets are absent; in their place are rudimentary, immobile noncoapting plate-like structures at the level of the annulus resulting in severe aortic regurgitation. We report the fetal diagnosis and subsequent postnatal course of an infant with the novel association of absent aortic valve, double outlet right ventricle, and aortopulmonary window. This unique combination of defects resulted in an unusual pattern of circular shunting that produced evidence of fetal heart failure. Shortly after birth, the abnormal physiology led to compromised systemic perfusion, intestinal perforation and subsequent rapid demise of the patient. Abrupt postnatal deterioration typifies the vast majority of the absent aortic valve cases found in the literature. Our patient is unique in that it is the first female reported with absent aortic valve and the first reported with an aortopulmonary window. This report demonstrates that absent aortic valve is a condition that can be diagnosed prenatally by fetal echocardiogram; the highly abnormal physiology places these patients at risk for fetal heart failure. Given the potential for clinical instability and rapid deterioration after birth, such patients should undergo rapid postnatal assessment and immediate surgical intervention when deemed appropriate. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Renal artery stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafur-Soto, Jose David; White, Christopher J

    2015-02-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (RAS) is the single largest cause of secondary hypertension; it is associated with progressive renal insufficiency and causes cardiovascular complications such as refractory heart failure and flash pulmonary edema. Medical therapy, including risk factor modification, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system antagonists, lipid-lowering agents, and antiplatelet therapy, is advised in all patients. Patients with uncontrolled renovascular hypertension despite optimal medical therapy, ischemic nephropathy, and cardiac destabilization syndromes who have severe RAS are likely to benefit from renal artery revascularization. Screening for RAS can be done with Doppler ultrasonography, CT angiography, and magnetic resonance angiography. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Acquired pulmonary stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littler, W. A.; Meade, J. B.; Hamilton, D. I.

    1970-01-01

    Four cases of pulmonary artery stenosis resulting from extrinsic pressure are presented. All of these cases presented with the triad of chest pain, dyspnoea, and a pulmonary systolic murmur. Respiratory variation of this murmur was noted in three of the patients, the murmur increasing during expiration and diminishing or disappearing during inspiration. It is suggested that this may be a useful sign in diagnosing this syndrome. The tumour in these four cases was an intrapericardial sarcoma, a benign teratoma, Hodgkin's disease, and a malignant thymoma respectively. Images PMID:5485008

  5. Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    with tricuspid aortic valves matched for age, gender and grade of valvular disease . These studies suggest that the predisposition for aortic...enlargement in healthy patients with normally functioning BAV when compared to healthy subjects with normally functioning tricuspid aortic valves ...ascending aorta but also in the pulmonary arteries of patients with BAV, compared to that of patients with tricuspid aortic valves . These studies

  6. Genetic associations with valvular calcification and aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thanassoulis, George; Campbell, Catherine Y; Owens, David S

    2013-01-01

    Limited information is available regarding genetic contributions to valvular calcification, which is an important precursor of clinical valve disease.......Limited information is available regarding genetic contributions to valvular calcification, which is an important precursor of clinical valve disease....

  7. Spinal canal stenosis; Spinalkanalstenose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papanagiotou, P.; Boutchakova, M. [Klinikum Bremen-Mitte/Bremen-Ost, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Bremen (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the spinal canal by a combination of bone and soft tissues, which can lead to mechanical compression of spinal nerve roots or the dural sac. The lumbal spinal compression of these nerve roots can be symptomatic, resulting in weakness, reflex alterations, gait disturbances, bowel or bladder dysfunction, motor and sensory changes, radicular pain or atypical leg pain and neurogenic claudication. The anatomical presence of spinal canal stenosis is confirmed radiologically with computerized tomography, myelography or magnetic resonance imaging and play a decisive role in optimal patient-oriented therapy decision-making. (orig.) [German] Die Spinalkanalstenose ist eine umschriebene, knoechern-ligamentaer bedingte Einengung des Spinalkanals, die zur Kompression der Nervenwurzeln oder des Duralsacks fuehren kann. Die lumbale Spinalkanalstenose manifestiert sich klinisch als Komplex aus Rueckenschmerzen sowie sensiblen und motorischen neurologischen Ausfaellen, die in der Regel belastungsabhaengig sind (Claudicatio spinalis). Die bildgebende Diagnostik mittels Magnetresonanztomographie, Computertomographie und Myelographie spielt eine entscheidende Rolle bei der optimalen patientenbezogenen Therapieentscheidung. (orig.)

  8. Accuracy and reproducibility of aortic annular measurements obtained from echocardiographic 3D manual and semi-automated software analyses in patients referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation: implication for prosthesis size selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Stefano; Italia, Leonardo; Geremia, Giulia; Rosa, Isabella; Ancona, Francesco; Marini, Claudia; Capogrosso, Cristina; Giglio, Manuela; Montorfano, Matteo; Latib, Azeem; Margonato, Alberto; Colombo, Antonio; Agricola, Eustachio

    2018-02-06

    A 3D transoesophageal echocardiography (3D-TOE) reconstruction tool has recently been introduced. The system automatically configures a geometric model of the aortic root and performs quantitative analysis of these structures. We compared the measurements of the aortic annulus (AA) obtained by semi-automated 3D-TOE quantitative software and manual analysis vs. multislice computed tomography (MSCT) ones. One hundred and seventy-five patients (mean age 81.3 ± 6.3 years, 77 men) who underwent both MSCT and 3D-TOE for annulus assessment before transcatheter aortic valve implantation were analysed. Hypothetical prosthetic valve sizing was evaluated using the 3D manual, semi-automated measurements using manufacturer-recommended CT-based sizing algorithm as gold standard. Good correlation between 3D-TOE methods vs. MSCT measurements was found, but the semi-automated analysis demonstrated slightly better correlations for AA major diameter (r = 0.89), perimeter (r = 0.89), and area (r = 0.85) (all P 0.80). The 3D-TOE semi-automated analysis of AA is feasible and reliable and can be used in clinical practice as an alternative to MSCT for AA assessment. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author(s) 2018. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. The mystery of defining aortic valve area: what have we learnt from three-dimensional imaging modalities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alskaf, Ebraham; Kardos, Attila

    2018-02-23

    Aortic valve area is one of the main criteria used by echocardiography to determine the degree of valvular aortic stenosis, and it is calculated using the continuity equation which assumes that the flow volume of blood is equal at two points, the aortic valve area and the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT). The main fallacy of this equation is the assumption that the LVOT area which is used to calculate the flow volume at the LVOT level is circular, where it is often an ellipse and sometimes irregular. The aim of this review is to explain the physiology of the continuity equation, the different sources of errors, the added benefits of using three-dimensional imaging modalities to measure LVOT area, the latest recommendations related to valvular aortic stenosis, and to introduce future perspectives. A literature review of studies comparing aortic valve area and LVOT area, after using three-dimensional data, has shown underestimation of both measurements when using the continuity equation. This has more impact on patients with discordant echocardiographic measurements when aortic valve area is disproportionate to haemodynamic measurements in assessing the degree of aortic stenosis. Although fusion imaging modalities of LVOT area can help in certain group of patients to address the issue of aortic valve area underestimation, further research on introducing a correction factor to the conventional continuity equation might be more rewarding, saving patients additional tests and potential radiation, with no clear evidence of cost-effectiveness.

  10. Prognostic importance of atrial fibrillation in asymptomatic aortic stenosis: The Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders M; Gerdts, Eva; Boman, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    stroke (CI 1.7 to 13.6, p=0.003). CONCLUSION: Rate of AF is moderate in asymptomatic AS. Longstanding but not episodic AF was, independently predictive of increased risk of heart failure and non-hemorrhagic stroke. New-onset AF was associated with cardiac decompensation........5%) and no AF in 1,421 (90.9%). Incidence of new-onset AF was 1.2%/year; highest in those with impaired LV function. In multivariable analysis, longstanding AF was compared to no AF at baseline, associated with a 4.1-fold higher risk of heart failure (CI 1.2 to 13.8, p=0.02) and a 4.8-fold higher risk of non-hemorrhagic...

  11. Left atrial volume in patients with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis (the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Morten; Egstrup, K.; Wachtell, K.

    2008-01-01

    area. Mean values for age and AVA were 67 +/- 10 years and 1.27 +/- 0.5 cm2, respectively, and 574 were women (38%). Mean value for LA volume indexed (LAVI) was 36 +/- 13 ml/m2. Enlargement of LA volume (> or =32 ml/m2) was found in 57% of patients. AVA indexed was significantly correlated to LAVI (r.......0001), presence of LV hypertrophy (beta = 3.4, p Gender and LV ejection fraction were eliminated from the final model. In conclusion, LA volume is often enlarged in asymptomatic patients with AS. Furthermore, LA volume is related to AVA even...

  12. Is there a role of statins in the prevention of aortic biological prostheses degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popescu Bogdan A

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has been recently observed that statins might slow the progression of aortic stenosis or sclerosis. Preliminary reports suggested a similar positive effect in reducing the degeneration of aortic valve bioprostheses even though this hypothesis should be further proven and supported by new data. In this review the present evidences of the possible effects of statins in this field are discussed.

  13. Aortic valve replacement with simultaneous chest wall reconstruction for radiation-induced sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachithanandan, Anand; Dandekar, Uday; Grimer, Robert; Peart, Francis; Rooney, Stephen J

    2008-01-01

    Sarcomas, a rare complication of radiotherapy for breast carcinoma, have a poor prognosis. We describe a lady with previous mantle radiotherapy exposure, who developed a radiation-induced chest wall sarcoma. She underwent simultaneous aortic valve replacement (AVR) for severe aortic stenosis and excision of the sarcoma. Chest wall reconstruction was achieved with a composite marlex cement plate and a pedicled latissimus dorsi muscle flap.

  14. Deficient signaling via Alk2 (Acvr1 leads to bicuspid aortic valve development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penny S Thomas

    Full Text Available Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV is the most common congenital cardiac anomaly in humans. Despite recent advances, the molecular basis of BAV development is poorly understood. Previously it has been shown that mutations in the Notch1 gene lead to BAV and valve calcification both in human and mice, and mice deficient in Gata5 or its downstream target Nos3 have been shown to display BAVs. Here we show that tissue-specific deletion of the gene encoding Activin Receptor Type I (Alk2 or Acvr1 in the cushion mesenchyme results in formation of aortic valve defects including BAV. These defects are largely due to a failure of normal development of the embryonic aortic valve leaflet precursor cushions in the outflow tract resulting in either a fused right- and non-coronary leaflet, or the presence of only a very small, rudimentary non-coronary leaflet. The surviving adult mutant mice display aortic stenosis with high frequency and occasional aortic valve insufficiency. The thickened aortic valve leaflets in such animals do not show changes in Bmp signaling activity, while Map kinase pathways are activated. Although dysfunction correlated with some pro-osteogenic differences in gene expression, neither calcification nor inflammation were detected in aortic valves of Alk2 mutants with stenosis. We conclude that signaling via Alk2 is required for appropriate aortic valve development in utero, and that defects in this process lead to indirect secondary complications later in life.

  15. Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Kofoed, P E; Høst, A; Elle, B

    1988-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of ultrasound in hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (HPS) and to analyse the correlation between the dimensions of the pyloric muscle and the age and the weight of the child, 34 children with suspected HPS and 34 controls were examined. An overlap between the dimensions...... of the pyloric muscle in the HPS group and in the controls stresses the need to assess the muscle length, the muscle diameter, and the muscle wall thickness in establishing the sonographic diagnosis of HPS. We found the following criteria useful: muscle length greater than or equal to 19 mm, muscle diameter...... greater than or equal to 10 mm, and muscle wall thickness greater than or equal to 4 mm. The results did not confirm previous reports of increasing dimensions of the pyloric muscle with age and weight....

  16. Bentall Procedure Using Cryopreserved Valved Aortic Homografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Jan T.; Sierra, Jorge; Trindade, Pedro T.; Didier, Dominique; Kalangos, Afksendiyos

    2004-01-01

    The Bentall procedure is the standard operation for patients who have lesions of the ascending aorta associated with aortic valve disease. In many cases, however, mechanical prosthetic conduits are not suitable. There are few reports in the English-language medical literature concerning the mid- to long-term outcome of Bentall operations with cryopreserved homografts. Therefore, we reviewed our experience with this procedure and valved homografts. From January 1997 through December 2002, 21 patients underwent a Bentall operation with cryopreserved homografts at our institution. There were 14 males and 7 females; the mean age was 36 ± 21 years (range, 15–74 years). Eleven patients had undergone previous aortic valve surgery. All patients had aortic dilatation or aneurysms involving the ascending aorta. Indications for surgery included aortic valve stenosis or insufficiency, and aortic valve endocarditis (native valve or prosthetic). One patient had Takayasu's arteritis and 3 had Marfan syndrome. There was 1 hospital death (due to sepsis), but no other major postoperative complications. The mean hospital stay was 14 ± 7 days. Follow-up echocardiographic and computed tomographic scans were performed yearly. The mean follow-up was 34 months (6–72 months). Follow-up imaging revealed no calcifications or degenerative processes related to the homograft. Four patients had minimal valve regurgitation. Two patients died during follow-up. The 3-year actuarial survival rate was 85.7%. Our data suggest that the Bentall procedure with a valved homograft conduit is a safe procedure with excellent mid- to long-term results, comparable to results reported with aortic valve replacement with a homograft. PMID:15745290

  17. Temporal changes of new-onset atrial fibrillation in patients randomized to surgical or transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Troels Højsgaard; Thyregod, Hans Gustav Hørsted; Tarp, Julie Bjerre

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Temporal development of new-onset atrial fibrillation (NOAF) after aortic valve replacement is unclear, and opportunistic screening has limited diagnostic accuracy. This is the first study to investigate the incidence and temporal development of NOAF detected by implantable loop...... recorder (ILR) in patients with aortic stenosis, randomized to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) or transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). METHOD: An ILR was implanted in a subgroup of patients without pre-procedural atrial fibrillation (AF), randomized to SAVR or TAVR in the NOTION trial...

  18. The bicuspid aortic valve and related disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    Full Text Available Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV is the most common congenital cardiac malformation, affecting 1-2% of the population, with strong male predominance. Individuals may have a normally functioning BAV, and may be unaware of its presence and the potential risk of complications. However, they may easily develop aortic valve disorders: either stenotic or regurgitant, or both. Today, BAV is recognized as a syndrome incorporating aortic valve disorders and aortic wall abnormalities, including aortic dilation, dissection or rupture. Congenital or hereditary diseases such as ventricular septal defect, patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, Turner's syndrome, Marfan's syndrome etc., may frequently be associated with BAV. Infective endocarditis and occasionally thrombus formation may develop during the lives of BAV patients. Elevated cholesterol or C-reactive protein may be seen in laboratory findings of these patients. Beta-blockers and statins are the possibilities for medical treatment, and aortic valve repair/replacement and ascending aorta replacement are indicated for patients with a severely diseased aortic valve and aorta. Rigorous follow-up throughout life is mandatory after BAV has been diagnosed. The aim of the present article was to describe the implications of BAV and its associated disorders, and to discuss diagnostic and treatment strategies.

  19. Predictors of Paravalvular Regurgitation After Implantation of the Fully Repositionable and Retrievable Lotus Transcatheter Aortic Valve (from the REPRISE II Trial Extended Cohort).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Daniel J; Meredith, Ian T; Dumonteil, Nicolas; Tchétché, Didier; Hildick-Smith, David; Spence, Mark S; Walters, Darren L; Harnek, Jan; Worthley, Stephen G; Rioufol, Gilles; Lefèvre, Thierry; Houle, Vicki M; Allocco, Dominic J; Dawkins, Keith D

    2017-07-15

    Paravalvular leak (PVL) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement is associated with worse long-term outcomes. The Lotus Valve incorporates an innovative Adaptive Seal designed to minimize PVL. This analysis evaluated the incidence and predictors of PVL after implantation of the Lotus transcatheter aortic valve. The REPRISE II (REpositionable Percutaneous Replacement of Stenotic Aortic Valve through Implantation of Lotus Valve System - Evaluation of Safety and Performance) Study With Extended Cohort enrolled 250 high-surgical risk patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. Aortic regurgitation was assessed by echocardiography pre-procedure, at discharge and 30 days, by an independent core laboratory. Baseline and procedural predictors of mild or greater PVL at 30 days (or at discharge if 30-day data were not available) were determined using a multivariate regression model (n = 229). Of the 229 patients, 197 (86%) had no/trace PVL, 30 had mild, and 2 had moderate PVL; no patient had severe PVL. Significant predictors of mild/moderate PVL included device:annulus area ratio (odds ratio [OR] 0.87; 95% CI 0.83 to 0.92; p 10% annular oversizing by area were 17.5% (11 of 63), 2.9% (2 of 70), and 3.2% (2 of 63), respectively. Significant independent predictors of PVL included device:annulus area ratio and left ventricular outflow tract calcium volume. When the prosthetic valve was oversized by ≥5%, the rate of mild or greater PVL was only 3%. In conclusion, the overall rates of PVL with the Lotus Valve are low and predominantly related to device/annulus areas and calcium; these findings have implications for optimal device sizing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Aortic Annular Enlargement during Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selman Dumani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the surgery of aortic valve replacement is always attempted, as much as possible, to implant the larger prosthesis with the mains goals to enhance the potential benefits, to minimise transvalvular gradient, decrease left ventricular size and avoid the phenomenon of patient-prosthesis mismatch. Implantation of an ideal prosthesis often it is not possible, due to a small aortic annulus. A variety of aortic annulus enlargement techniques is reported to avoid patient-prosthesis mismatch. We present the case that has submitted four three times open heart surgery. We used Manouguian technique to enlarge aortic anulus with excellent results during the fourth time of surgery.

  1. Cervical Stenosis, Myelopathy and Radiculopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FIND A SPECIALIST Conditions Cervical Stenosis, Myelopathy and Radiculopathy Raj Rao MD Raj Rao MD Updated 5/ ... of the spinal cord within the neck. Cervical radiculopathy refers to a loss of function in a ...

  2. Degenerative lumbosacral stenosis in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suwankong, N.

    2007-01-01

    Degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLS) is now recognized as a significant cause of caudal lumbar pain and pelvic limb lameness in dogs. The condition includes lumbosacral intervertebral disc degeneration and protrusion, spondylosis deformans, sclerosis of the vertebral end plates, osteoarthrosis of

  3. Contemporary management of pyloric stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobson, Matthew; Hall, Nigel J

    2016-08-01

    Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis is a common surgical cause of vomiting in infants. Following appropriate fluid resuscitation, the mainstay of treatment is pyloromyotomy. This article reviews the aetiology and pathophysiology of hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, its clinical presentation, the role of imaging, the preoperative and postoperative management, current surgical approaches and non-surgical treatment options. Contemporary postoperative feeding regimens, outcomes and complications are also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Late complications and treatment options of aortic coarctation operated in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzsinich, Csaba; Vaszily, Miklós; Vallus, Gábor; Dzsinich, Máté; Berek, Péter; Barta, László; Darabos, Gábor; Nyiri, Gabriella; Nagy, Gabriella; Pataki, Tibor; Szentpétery, László

    2014-07-27

    The prevalence of congenital aortic coarctation is 4 in 10 000 live birth. Aortic coarctation is typically located in the aortic isthmus, but it may occur at atypical sites. Treatment options include both surgical and endovascular interventions. In patients undergoing surgical or endovascular intervention late complications such as recoarctation or aortic aneurysm may develop. The aim of the authors was to analyse their own experience in late complication and treatment options of aortic coarctation operated in childhood. Retrospective analysis of data of 32 patients treated between 1980 and 2014 for late complications 8-42 years after surgical treatment of aortic coarctation. In 28 patients aneurysm formation after isthmic patch plasty was found. Two patients had aortobronchial fistula, 2 patients showed anastomosis disruption and 2 patients had graft stenosis. During operation hybrid solution was performed in 23 patients, isthmic aorto-aortic inlay graft interposition in 5 patients, aorto-aortic bypass in 2 patients, subclavio-aortic bypass in 2 patients, graft patch plasty in one patient and ilio-renal bypass in one patient. Complications included severe intraoperative bleeding in one patient and pneumothorax in one patient. No early or late mortality occurred. The authors conclude that life long control is mandatory in order to detect late complications in patients who underwent operation of aortic coarctation in childhood.

  5. Four-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging-derived ascending aortic flow eccentricity and flow compression are linked to aneurysm morphology†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kari, Fabian A; Kocher, Nadja; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Tscheuschler, Anke; Meffert, Philipp; Rylski, Bartosz; Siepe, Matthias; Russe, Maximilian F; Hope, Michael D

    2015-05-01

    The impact of specific blood flow patterns within ascending aortic and/or aortic root aneurysms on aortic morphology is unknown. We investigated the interrelation of ascending aortic flow compression/peripheralization and aneurysm morphology with respect to sinotubuar junction (STJ) definition. Thirty-one patients (aortic root/ascending aortic aneurysm >45 mm) underwent flow-sensitive 4D magnetic resonance thoracic aortic flow measurement at 3 Tesla (Siemens, Germany) at two different institutions (Freiburg, Germany, and San Francisco, CA, USA). Time-resolved image data post-processing and visualization of mid-systolic, mid-ascending aortic flow were performed using local vector fields. The Flow Compression Index (FCI) was calculated individually as a fraction of the area of high-velocity mid-systolic flow over the complete cross-sectional ascending aortic area. According to aortic aneurysm morphology, patients were grouped as (i) small root, eccentric ascending aortic aneurysm (STJ definition) and (ii) enlarged aortic root, non-eccentric ascending aortic aneurysm with diffuse root and tubular enlargement. The mean FCI over all patients was 0.47 ± 0.5 (0.37-0.99). High levels of flow compression/peripheralization (FCI 0.8) occurred more often in Group B (n = 20). The FCI was 0.48 ± 0.05 in Group A and 0.78 ± 0.14 in Group B (P valve (P = 0.6) and type of valve dysfunction (P = 0.22 for aortic stenosis) was not found to be different between groups. Irrespective of aortic valve morphology and function, ascending aortic blood flow patterns are linked to distinct patterns of ascending aortic aneurysm morphology. Implementation of quantitative local blood flow analyses might help to improve aneurysm risk stratification in the future. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  6. Calcific aortic valve damage as a risk factor for cardiovascular events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasilewski, Jarosław; Mirota, Kryspin; Wilczek, Krzysztof; Głowacki, Jan; Poloński, Lech

    2012-01-01

    Aortic valve calcification (AVC) is a common disease of the elderly. It is a progressive disease ranging from mild valve thickening to severe calcification with aortic valve stenosis. Risk factors for AVC are similar to those for atherosclerosis: age, gender, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, hypertension, smoking and renal failure. AVC shares many similarities to atherosclerosis, including inflammatory cells and calcium deposits, and correlates with coronary plaque burden. Presence of AVC is associated with increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events. The objective for this review is to discuss the clinical features, natural history and prognostic significance of aortic valve calcifications, including mechanical and hemodynamic factors of flow distribution

  7. Atherosclerotic Renal Artery Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoepe, Robert; McQuillan, Stephen; Valsan, Debbie; Teehan, Geoffrey

    2017-01-01

    Atherosclerotic Renal Artery Stenosis is a form or peripheral arterial disease that tends to affect older subjects with hyperlipidemia, history of tobacco use, and who have other coexistent forms of vascular insufficiency. An abdominal bruit on physical exam can be a helpful clue. Slowly progressive, it can lead to critical narrowing of the renal arteries which creates a cascade of events such as renin-angiotensin-aldosterone activation (RAAS), hypertension, acute pulmonary edema, and renal fibrosis. The hypertension is considered a secondary form and can even be resistant to multiple antihypertensives. The diagnosis can be made with imaging (duplex ultrasound CT scans, MRA, or angiography). Because of the unique circulation to the kidney, stenting and angioplasty are rarely curative. This was confirmed in three recent large clinical trials. Therapy consists of lipid and blood pressure control, and dual anti-platelet agents. Because the disease activates the RAAS system, ace inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers can be useful agents but carry the risk of ischemic nephropathy, a form of acute kidney injury related to reduced renal blood flow after challenge with these agents. As such these agents are used with caution. Little is known about optimal blood pressure agents or the effect of lifestyle modification.

  8. Preliminary assessment and diagnosis of congenital discrete subaortic stenosis by using electron beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yuan; Dai Ruping; Cao Cheng; Jing Baolian

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of EBCT in diagnosing the congenital discrete subaortic stenosis. Methods: Data of four patients with congenital discrete subaortic stenosis diagnosed by EBCT were retrospectively analyzed and further compared with that of surgery and histopathologic examination. Results: Contrast enhanced EBCT scanning clearly demonstrated both a direct non-opacified sign in subvalvular regions in all four patients' left ventricle and associated cardiovascular anomalies. Movie mode scanning showed the movement of aortic valve and 'discrete membrane', and revealed distinct topography of subaortic outflow tracts as well. Conclusion: EBCT is highly valuable in the diagnosis of congenital discrete subaortic stenosis and associated anomalies by clearly demonstrating the subaortic outflow tract topography and complicated cardiovascular malformations. EBCT could be a complementary examination to cardioangiography, and could replace the cineangiography in the follow-up after operation

  9. Cauda equina syndrome: an uncommon symptom of aortic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fuliang; Xing, Tong; Yu, Fang; Li, Hongchuan; Fang, Xiutong; Song, Hongxing

    2015-01-01

    In order to help diagnose and deal with the fetal aortic diseases in time, we retrospectively reviewed 8 patients who presented with cauda equina syndrome (CES) but actually suffered from low spinal nerve ischemia due to aortic diseases. 8 patients were initially diagnosed as CES. 7 patients were confirmed with aortic diseases. 1 patient was confirmed with aortic saddle embolism post emergent laminectomy. Relief of CES symptoms was evaluated during preoperation and follow-up period. 1 patient was diagnosed as aortic dissection and 5 patients as AAA. These 6 patients underwent endovascular aortic repair (EVAR). The CES was relieved in 5-10 d post procedure. The 7th patient was diagnosed with acute abdominal aortic occlusion and then underwent catheter directed thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA) for 20 h and CES disappeared. The JOA scores of the 7 patients were recovered from preoperative 15.14±1.21 to 21.00±2.16 within 5-10 d (P<0.01), and evaluated to be 24.12±1.34, 25.88±1.21 and 26.29±1.11 at 3 m-, 6 m- and 12 m-follow-up point, respectively. The 8th patient was initially diagnosed as lumbar spinal stenosis and lumbar disc herniation. The patient underwent emergent vertebral canal decompression and presented with serious CES symptoms. CTA confirmed that the patient had been suffered from aortic saddle embolism (ASE). CES caused by abdominal aortic diseases is a special event with fetal consequences if it is not recognized and treated promptly. Orthopedists and neurosurgeons should pay attentions particularly to this issue to preserve the cauda equina functions to their maximums.

  10. Association of aortic valve calcification severity with the degree of aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koos, Ralf; Mahnken, Andreas Horst; Dohmen, Guido; Brehmer, Kathrin; Günther, Rolf W; Autschbach, Rüdiger; Marx, Nikolaus; Hoffmann, Rainer

    2011-07-15

    This study sought to examine a possible relationship between the severity of aortic valve calcification (AVC), the distribution of AVC and the degree of aortic valve regurgitation (AR) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) for severe aortic stenosis (AS). 57 patients (22 men, 81 ± 5 years) with symptomatic AS and with a logistic EuroSCORE of 24 ± 12 were included. 38 patients (67%) received a third (18F)-generation CoreValve® aortic valve prosthesis, in 19 patients (33%) an Edwards SAPIEN™ prosthesis was implanted. Prior to TAVI dual-source computed tomography for assessment of AVC was performed. To determine the distribution of AVC the percentage of the calcium load of the most severely calcified cusp was calculated. After TAVI the degree of AR was determined by angiography and echocardiography. The severity of AR after TAVI was related to the severity and distribution of AVC. There was no association between the distribution of AVC and the degree of paravalvular AR after TAVI as assessed by angiography (r = -0.02, p = 0.88). Agatston AVC scores were significantly higher in patients with AR grade ≥ 3 (5055 ± 1753, n = 3) than in patients with AR grade AVC scores > 3000 were associated with a relevant paravalvular AR and showed a trend for increased need for second manoeuvres. There was a significant correlation between the severity of AVC and the degree of AR after AVR (r = 0.50, p AVC have an increased risk for a relevant AR after TAVI as well as a trend for increased need for additional procedures. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Initial experience of two national centers in transcatheter aortic prosthesis implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lluberas, Sebastián; Abizaid, Alexandre; Siqueira, Dimytri; Ramos, Auristela; Costa, J Ribamar; Arrais, Magaly; Kambara, Antônio; Bihan, David Le; Sousa, Amanda; Sousa, J Eduardo

    2014-04-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is an effective alternative to surgical treatment of severe aortic stenosis in patients who are inoperable or at high surgical risk. To report the immediate and follow-up clinical and echocardiographic results of the initial experience of transcatheter aortic valve implantation. From 2009 June to 2013 February, 112 patients underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Mean age was 82.5 ± 6.5 years, and the logistic EuroSCORE was 23.6 ± 13.5. Procedural success was 84%. After the intervention, a reduction in the mean systolic gradient was observed (pre: 54.7 ± 15.3 vs. post: 11.7 ± 4.0 mmHg; p < 0.01). Cerebrovascular accidents occurred in 3.6%, vascular complications in 19% and permanent pacemaker was required by 13% of the patients. Thirty-day mortality and at follow-up of 16 ± 11 months was 14% and 8.9% respectively. The presence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was the only predictor of mortality at 30 days and at follow-up. During follow up, aortic valve area and mean systolic gradient did not change significantly. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is an effective and safe procedure for the treatment of aortic stenosis in high-surgical risk or inoperable patients. The presence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was the only independent predictor of mortality identified both in the first month post-intervention and at follow-up.

  12. Aortic valve replacement and prosthesis-patient mismatch in the era of trans-catheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Shigeki

    2016-08-01

    The treatment strategy for aortic stenosis (AS) has been changing due to newly developed valvular prostheses and trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). To determine the role of new modalities for AS with a small aortic root, papers using the concept of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) were reviewed. First, to determine the cut-off value of the indexed effective orifice area (IEOA) for defining PPM, the studies of surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) with a follow-up longer than 5 years and a patient number larger than 500 were reviewed. Second, the papers comparing TAVI and SAVR were reviewed. Furthermore, the prevalence of PPM was reviewed, with the addition of papers on aortic root enlargement, sutureless AVR, and aortic valve reconstruction with autologous pericardium. The results of the long-term survival after aortic valve replacement (AVR) have indicated that an IEOA less than 0.65 cm(2)/m(2) should be avoided in all cases, whereas the indications for patients with an IEOA between 065 and 0.85 cm(2)/m(2) should be determined by considering multiple factors. A large body size and younger age have a significantly negative influence on the long-term survival. In Asian population, the prevalence of PPM was low, despite the fact that the size of the aortic annulus was small. The IEOA after TAVI was larger than after surgical AVR in population-matched studies. To evaluate the role of TAVI and other modalities for a small aortic root, studies with a longer follow-up and larger volume are thus warranted.

  13. Pros and cons of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terré, Juan A; George, Isaac; Smith, Craig R

    2017-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) or replacement (TAVR) was recently approved by the FDA for intermediate risk patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS). This technique was already worldwide adopted for inoperable and high-risk patients. Improved device technology, imaging analysis and operator expertise has reduced the initial worrisome higher complications rate associated with TAVR, making it comparable to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). However, many answers need to be addressed before adoption in lower risk patients. This paper highlights the pros and cons of TAVI based mostly on randomized clinical trials involving the two device platforms approved in the United States. We focused our analysis on metrics that will play a key role in expanding TAVR indication in healthier individuals. We review the significance and gave a perspective on paravalvular leak (PVL), valve performance, valve durability, leaflet thrombosis, stroke and pacemaker requirement.

  14. Imaging of aortic valve dynamics in 4D OCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schnabel Christian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical components of the heart, especially the valves and leaflets, are enormous stressed during lifetime. Therefore, those structures undergo different pathophysiological tissue transformations which affect cardiac output and in consequence living comfort of affected patients. These changes may lead to calcific aortic valve stenosis (AVS, the major heart valve disease in humans. The knowledge about changes of the dynamic behaviour during the course of this disease and the possibility of early stage diagnosis is of particular interest and could lead to the development of new treatment strategies and drug based options of prevention or therapy. 4D optical coherence tomography (OCT in combination with high-speed video microscopy were applied to characterize dynamic behaviour of the murine aortic valve and to characterize dynamic properties during artificial stimulation. We present a promising tool to investigate the aortic valve dynamics in an ex vivo disease model with a high spatial and temporal resolution using a multimodal imaging setup.

  15. Calcific Aortic Valve Disease: a Developmental Biology Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Punashi; Lincoln, Joy

    2018-03-08

    This review aims to highlight the past and more current literature related to the multifaceted pathogenic programs that contribute to calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) with a focus on the contribution of developmental programs. Calcification of the aortic valve is an active process characterized by calcific nodule formation on the aortic surface leading to a less supple and more stiffened cusp, thereby limiting movement and causing clinical stenosis. The mechanisms underlying these pathogenic changes are largely unknown, but emerging studies have suggested that signaling pathways common to valvulogenesis and bone development play significant roles and include Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β), bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), Wnt, Notch, and Sox9. This comprehensive review of the literature highlights the complex nature of CAVD but concurrently identifies key regulators that can be targeted in the development of mechanistic-based therapies beyond surgical intervention to improve patient outcome.

  16. [Selection of patients for transcatheter aortic valve implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tron, Christophe; Godin, Matthieu; Litzler, Pierre-Yves; Bauer, Fabrice; Caudron, Jérome; Dacher, Jean-Nicolas; Borz, Bogdan; Canville, Alexandre; Kurtz, Baptiste; Bessou, Jean-Paul; Cribier, Alain; Eltchaninoff, Hélène

    2012-06-01

    A good selection of patients is a crucial step before transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in order to select the good indications and choose the access route. TAVI should be considered only in patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis and either contraindication or high surgical risk. Indication for TAVI should be discussed in a multidisciplinary team meeting. Echocardiography and/or CT scan are mandatory to evaluate the aortic annulus size and select the good prosthesis size. The possibility of transfemoral implantation is evaluated by angiography and CT scan, and based on the arterial diameters, but also on the presence of tortuosities and arterial calcifications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Endovascular treatment of acute type B dissection complicating aortic coarctation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassaian, Seyed Ebrahim; Abbasi, Kyomars; Mousavi, Mehdi; Sahebjam, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Surgical treatment poses a high risk to patients with concomitant aortic coarctation and dissection, and an interventional approach could be an alternative. We describe the case of a 52-year-old man with a long history of untreated hypertension and aortic coarctation who emergently presented at our institution with an acute Stanford type B dissection. The patient's elevated serum creatinine level, perfusion deficit in the right lower limb, and hypertension did not respond to medical therapy, and he did not consent to surgery. By endovascular means, we used a self-expandable stent-graft to cover the entry point of the dissection; then, we deployed a balloon-expandable bare-metal stent to correct residual stenosis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the endovascular treatment of aortic coarctation complicated by type B dissection.

  18. Expression of uPA, tPA, and PAI-1 in Calcified Aortic Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najlah Kochtebane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Our physiopathological assumption is that u-PA, t-PA, and PAI-1 are released by calcified aortic valves and play a role in the calcification of these valves. Methods. Sixty-five calcified aortic valves were collected from patients suffering from aortic stenosis. Each valve was incubated for 24 hours in culture medium. The supernatants were used to measure u-PA, t-PA, and PAI-1 concentrations; the valve calcification was evaluated using biphotonic absorptiometry. Results. Aortic stenosis valves expressed normal plasminogen activators concentrations and overexpressed PAI-1 (u-PA, t-PA, and PAI-1 mean concentrations were, resp., 1.69 ng/mL ± 0.80, 2.76 ng/mL ± 1.33, and 53.27 ng/mL ± 36.39. There was no correlation between u-PA and PAI-1 (r=0.3 but t-PA and PAI-1 were strongly correlated with each other (r=0.6. Overexpression of PAI-1 was proportional to the calcium content of the AS valves. Conclusions. Our results demonstrate a consistent increase of PAI-1 proportional to the calcification. The overexpression of PAI-1 may be useful as a predictive indicator in patients with aortic stenosis.

  19. Tolerância ao esforço em ratos com estenose aórtica e disfunção ventricular diastólica e/ou sistólica Exercise tolerance in rats with aortic stenosis and ventricular diastolic and/or systolic dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Castro Mendes

    2013-01-01

    although there is no data available on this parameter in animals with ventricular dysfunction and no signs of HF. OBJECTIVE: Evaluate ST in rats with ventricular diastolic dysfunction isolated or associated with systolic dysfunction induced by ascending aortic stenosis (AoS. METHODS: Young male Wistar rats (20-30 days old, divided in: control group (CG, n=11 and AoSG group, (n=12. Animals were assessed at 6 and 18 weeks after AoS surgery. Treadmill exercise test was until exhaustion and evaluated treadmill speed and lactate concentration [LAC] at lactate threshold, treadmill speed and [LAC] at exhaustion, and total testing time. RESULTS: Echocardiography data revealed remodeling of the left atrium and left ventricular concentric hypertrophy at 6 and 18 weeks. Endocardial fractional shortening was greater in AoSG than CG at 6 and 18 weeks. Midwall fractional shortening was greater in AoSG than in CG only 6 week. Cardiac index was similar in CG and AoSG at 6 and 18 weeks and decreased between from 6 to 18 weeks in both groups. The E wave to A wave ratio was greater in CG than in AoSG at both periods and did not change in both groups between week 6 and 18. Treadmill stress testing parameters were similar in both groups at 6 or 18 weeks. CONCLUSION: Although AoS promotes isolated diastolic dysfunction or associated with systolic dysfunction at 6 or 18 weeks, it is not sufficient to modify physical stress tolerance.

  20. In vitro measurement of stenotic human aortic valve orifice area in a pulsatile flow model. Validation of the continuity equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perakis, A C; Montarello, J K; Rosenthal, E; Boyd, E G; Yates, A K; Deverall, P B; Curry, P V; Sowton, E

    1990-06-01

    Aortic valve orifice area estimation in patients with aortic stenosis may be obtained non-invasively using several Doppler echocardiographic methods. Their validity has been established by correlation with catheterization data using the Gorlin formula, with its inherent limitations, and small discrepancies between the methods are present. To evaluate these differences further, 15 patients with severe aortic stenosis (mean transvalvular gradient 70, range 40-130 mmHg) had aortic valve area estimations by Doppler echocardiography using two variations of the continuity equation. The intact valves removed at valve replacement surgery were then mounted in a pulsatile model and the anatomical area was measured (mean 0.67 +/- 0.17 cm-2) from video recordings during flow at 5.4 l min-1. Aortic valve area calculated using the integrals of the velocity-time curves measured at the left ventricular outflow tract and aortic jet (mean 0.65 +/- 0.17 cm2) correlated best with the anatomical area (r = 0.87, P less than 0.001). The area derived by using the ratio of maximum velocities from the left ventricular outflow tract and aortic jet (mean 0.69 +/- 0.18 cm2) also correlated well with the anatomical area (r = 0.79, P less than 0.001). The index between the left ventricular outflow tract and aortic jet maximum velocities was less than or equal to 0.25 in all. In patients with severe aortic stenosis the aortic valve area can be reliably estimated using Doppler echocardiography.

  1. Combined transdiaphragmatic off-pump and minimally invasive coronary artery bypass with right gastroepiploic artery and abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürer, Onur; Haberal, Ismail; Ozsoy, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    Male, 74 FINAL DIAGNOSIS: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) Symptoms: Palpable abdominal mass Medication: - Clinical Procedure: Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair Specialty: Surgery. Rare disease. Coronary artery disease is common in elderly patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Here we report a case of the combination of surgical repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm and off-pump and minimally invasive coronary artery bypass surgery. A 74-year-old man who presented at our clinic with chest pain was diagnosed with an abdominal aortic aneurysm. His medical history included right coronary artery stenting. Physical examination revealed a pulsatile abdominal mass on the left side and palpable peripheral pulses. Computed tomography scans showed an infrarenal abdominal aneurysm with a 61-mm enlargement. Coronary angiography revealed 80% stenosis in the stent within the right coronary artery and 20% stenosis in the left main coronary artery. The patient underwent elective coronary artery bypass grafting and abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and transdiaphragmatic off-pump and minimal invasive coronary artery bypass grafting with right gastroepiploic artery were performed simultaneously in a single surgery. We report this case to emphasize the safety and effectiveness of transdiaphragmatic off-pump and minimally invasive coronary artery bypass surgery with abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. This combined approach shortens hospital stay and decreases cost.

  2. The diastal urethral stenosis in female children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauer, W.

    1985-01-01

    The distal urethral stenosis in female children is a pathological reality. It is represented by the hymenal hood, the meatal stenosis and the distal urethral ring. Diagnosis and localisation of the stenosis is maintained by calibration with bougies a boule. Therapeutical consequences are: internal urethrotomy, bilateral meatotomy and excision of hymenal hoods. (Author)

  3. Bronchology Treatment Of The Malignant Airway Stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slivka, R. et al

    2007-01-01

    Central airway stenosis is benign or malignant etiology. Multidiscplinary approach is useful in treatment central airway stenosis. In inoperable cases, interventional bronchology is good therapeutic alternative. We can use NdYAG laser, argon plasma coagulation, elektrocautery, cryotherapy, photodynamic therapy and stents for obstruction release. In malignant stenosis, we combine often methods of the interventional bronchology with brachytherapy, chemotherapy and external radiotherapy. (author)

  4. Percutaneous aortic valve implantation of the Medtronic CoreValve self-expanding valve prosthesis via left subclavian artery access: the first case report in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavolias, George K; Georgiadou, Panagiota; Houri, Mazen; Sbarouni, Eftihia; Thomopoulou, Sofia; Tsiapras, Dimitrios; Smirli, Anna; Balanika, Marina; Voudris, Vassilis

    2010-01-01

    This case report describes a percutaneous aortic valve implantation with the Medtronic CoreValve selfexpanding valve prosthesis in a patient with severe aortic stenosis. The approach was made via the left subclavian artery because of the lack of femoral vessel access. The patient was a 78-year-old female with breathlessness on minimal effort, a recent hospitalisation due to pulmonary oedema, and frequent episodes of pre-syncope; surgical valve replacement had been ruled out. The prosthetic valve was successfully implanted with mild paravalvular aortic regurgitation. At 30 days, the patient's clinical condition had significantly improved, with excellent functioning of the aortic valve prosthesis.

  5. Acute aortic syndromes: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridge, Carole A; Litmanovich, Diana E

    2015-05-01

    The term acute aortic syndrome comprises aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer. The most recent developments in acute aortic syndromes include (1) a change in the mindset that each entity is pathologically distinct, with a shift toward considering the acute aortic syndromes as points along a spectrum of aortic disease, (2) the optimization of aortic imaging quality and radiation dose, and (3) surgical or endovascular management. This review article focuses on how these developments pertain to thoracic radiologists.

  6. Primary metastasizing aortic endothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, E; Port, S J; Carroll, R M; Friedman, N B

    1984-10-01

    An instance of malignant endothelioma, primary in the aorta, metastasizing to intestine and bone, is reported. The aortic tumor was successfully resected. The unexpected finding of a large hepatic growth at autopsy raised the possibility that the aortic neoplasm was a metastasis. Histochemical, immunologic, and ultrastructural studies supported the diagnosis of an endothelial neoplasm. Although a number of malignant aortic and large vessel tumors have been reported, only four previous instances appear to be endotheliomatous.

  7. Aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Athanasiou, Thanos; Mestres, Carlos A

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS OF THE STUDY: Prompted by anecdotal evidence and observations by surgeons, an investigation was undertaken into the potential differences in implanted aortic valve prosthesis sizes, during aortic valve replacement (AVR) procedures, between northern and southern European...... assigned to the 'small' aortic size subset. Effective orifice area indices were calculated for all patients to assess the geographic distribution of patient-prosthesis mismatch. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses adjusting for possible confounding variables were performed. RESULTS...

  8. 16-Detector row computed tomographic coronary angiography in patients undergoing evaluation for aortic valve replacement: comparison with catheter angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manghat, N.E.; Morgan-Hughes, G.J.; Broadley, A.J.; Undy, M.B.; Wright, D.; Marshall, A.J.; Roobottom, C.A.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of 16-detector row computed tomography (CT) in assessing haemodynamically significant coronary artery stenoses in patients under evaluation for aortic stenosis pre-aortic valve replacement. Subjects and methods: Forty consecutive patients under evaluation for severe aortic stenosis and listed for cardiac catheterization before potential aortic valve replacement underwent coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring and retrospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated multi-detector row computed tomographic coronary angiography (MDCTA) using a GE Lightspeed 16-detector row CT within 1 month of invasive coronary angiography (ICA) for comparative purposes. All 13 major coronary artery segments of the American Heart Association model were evaluated for the presence of ≥50% stenosis and compared to the reference standard. Data were analysed on a segment-by-segment basis and also in 'whole patient' terms. Results: A total of 412/450 segments from 35 patients were suitable for analysis. The overall accuracy of MDCTA for detection of segments with ≥50% stenosis was high, with a sensitivity of 81.3%, specificity 95.0%, positive predictive value (PPV) 57.8%, and negative predictive value (NPV) 98.4%. On a 'whole-patient' basis, 100% (19/19) of patients with significant coronary disease were correctly identified and there were no false-negatives. Excluding patients with CAC >1000 from the analysis improved the accuracy of MDCTA to: sensitivity 90%, specificity 98.1%, PPV 60%, NPV 99.7%. Conclusion: Non-invasive 16-detector row MDCTA accurately excludes significant coronary disease in patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing evaluation before aortic valve replacement and in whom ICA can therefore be avoided. Its segment-by-segment accuracy is improved further if CAC > 1000 is used as a gatekeeper to MDCTA

  9. Diagnostic workup in carotid stenosis - a neurologist's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenkranz, Michael; Gerloff, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Carotid artery stenosis is associated with the risk of stroke, myocardial infarction, and vascular death. In selected patients, revascularization of carotid narrowing by endarterectomy may reduce the risk of stroke distal to the stenosis. Carotid artery stenting has evolved as a potential alternative to endarterectomy. Four randomized clinical trials comparing safety and efficacy of endarterectomy versus stenting of symptomatic carotid stenosis have been published in recent years, but there remains some uncertainty about the implications of these trials for clinical routine. Both carotid stenting and endarterectomy are based on different treatment strategies which may result in different specific risk factors associated with each procedure. Hence, the procedural risk of either modality varies not only with the skills of the surgeon or the interventionalist but may depend on patient characteristics. It appears that the most important question is not whether one revascularization modality is superior but for which patient one modality is better than the other. A comprehensive diagnostic workup of patients with carotid stenosis based on a broad panel of covariates that affect the risk of vascular events may improve selection of patients for carotid revascularization and may help to decide for whom one revascularization modality is likely to be better than the other. (orig.)

  10. Bilateral symmetry of radial pulse in high-level tennis players: implications for the validity of central aortic pulse wave analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gojanovic, Boris; Waeber, Bernard; Gremion, Gerald; Liaudet, Lucas; Feihl, François

    2009-08-01

    Reconstruction of the central aortic pressure wave from the noninvasive recording of the radial pulse with applanation tonometry has become a standard tool in the field of hypertension. It is not presently known whether recording the radial pulse on the dominant or the nondominant side has any effect on such reconstruction. We carried out radial applanation tonometry on both forearms in young, healthy, male volunteers, who were either sedentary (n = 11) or high-level tennis players (n = 10). The purpose of including tennis players was to investigate individuals with extreme asymmetry between the dominant and nondominant upper limb. In the sedentary individuals, forearm circumference and handgrip strength were slightly larger on the dominant (mean +/- SD respectively 27.9 +/- 1.5 cm and 53.8 +/- 10 kg) than on nondominant side (27.3 +/- 1.6 cm, P central aortic pressure waveforms, as well as derived indices of central pulsatility, were not dependent on the side where applanation tonometry was carried out. Evidence from individuals with maximal asymmetry of dominant vs. nondominant upper limb indicates that laterality of measurement is not a methodological issue for central pulse wave analysis carried out with radial applanation tonometry.

  11. Midterm Results of Aortic Valve Replacement with Cryopreserved Homografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Özker

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the midterm clinical results of aortic valve replacement with cryopreserved homografts.Materials and Methods: Aortic valve replacement was performed in 40 patients with cryopreserved homograft. The indications were aortic valve endocarditis in 20 patients (50%, truncus arteriosus in 6 patients (15%, and re-stenosis or regurtitation after aortic valve reconstruction in 14 (35% patients. The valve sizes ranged from 10 to 27mm. A full root replacement technique was used for homograft replacement in all patients.Results: The 30-day postoperative mortality rate was 12.5% (5 patients. There were four late deaths. Only one of them was related to cardiac events. Overall mortality was 22.5%. Thirty-three patients were followed up for 67±26 months. Two patients needed reoperation due to aortic aneurysm caused by endocarditis. The mean transvalvular gradient significantly decreased after valve replacement (p<0.003. The last follow up showed that the 27 (82% patients had a normal left ventricular function.Conclusion: Cryopreserved homografts are safe alternatives to mechanical valves that can be used when there are proper indications. Although it has a high perioperative mortality rate, cryopreserved homograft implantation is an alternative for valve replacement, particularly in younger patients and for complex surgical problems such as endocarditis that must be minimalized.

  12. A planning system for transapical aortic valve implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessat, Michael; Merk, Denis R.; Falk, Volkmar; Walther, Thomas; Jacobs, Stefan; Nöttling, Alois; Burgert, Oliver

    2009-02-01

    Stenosis of the aortic valve is a common cardiac disease. It is usually corrected surgically by replacing the valve with a mechanical or biological prosthesis. Transapical aortic valve implantation is an experimental minimally invasive surgical technique that is applied to patients with high operative risk to avoid pulmonary arrest. A stented biological prosthesis is mounted on a catheter. Through small incisions in the fifth intercostal space and the apex of the heart, the catheter is positioned under flouroscopy in the aortic root. The stent is expanded and unfolds the valve which is thereby implanted into the aortic root. Exact targeting is crucial, since major complications can arise from a misplaced valve. Planning software for the perioperative use is presented that allows for selection of the best fitting implant and calculation of the safe target area for that implant. The software uses contrast enhanced perioperative DynaCT images acquired under rapid pacing. In a semiautomatic process, a surface segmentation of the aortic root is created. User selected anatomical landmarks are used to calculate the geometric constraints for the size and position of the implant. The software is integrated into a PACS network based on DICOM communication to query and receive the images and implants templates from a PACS server. The planning results can be exported to the same server and from there can be rertieved by an intraoperative catheter guidance device.

  13. Characteristics of aortic valve dysfunction and ascending aorta dimensions according to bicuspid aortic valve morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hong Ju [Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Je Kyoun; Chee, Hyun Kun; Kim, Jun Suk [Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Sung Min [Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    To characterize aortic valve dysfunction and ascending aorta dimensions according to bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) morphology using computed tomography (CT) and surgical findings. We retrospectively enrolled 209 patients with BAVs who underwent transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and CT. BAVs were classified as anterior-posterior (BAV-AP) or lateral (BAV-LA) orientation of the cusps and divided according to the presence (raphe+) or absence (raphe-) of a raphe. Ascending aortic dimensions were measured by CT at four levels. BAV-AP was present in 129 patients (61.7 %) and raphe+ in 120 (57.4 %). Sixty-nine patients (33.0 %) had aortic regurgitation (AR), 70 (33.5 %) had aortic stenosis (AS), and 58 (27.8 %) had combined AS and AR. AR was more common in patients with BAV-AP and raphe+; AS was more common with BAV-LA and raphe-.Annulus/body surface area and tubular portion/body surface area diameters in patients with BAV-AP (17.1 ± 2.3 mm/m{sup 2} and 24.2 ± 5.3 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively) and raphe+ (17.3 ± 2.2 mm/m{sup 2} and 24.2 ± 5.5 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively) were significantly different from those with BAV-LA (15.8 ± 1.9 mm/m{sup 2} and 26.4 ± 5.5 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively) and raphe- (15.7 ± 1.9 mm/m{sup 2} and 26.2 ± 5.4 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively). The morphological characteristics of BAV might be associated with the type of valvular dysfunction, and degree and location of an ascending aorta dilatation. (orig.)

  14. Time to Explore Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Younger, Low-Risk Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergaard, Lars

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been established as a treatment for patients with severe aortic stenosis, who are at particularly high surgical risk. As compared with surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR), TAVR has been associated with lower early risk...... is currently being evaluated in prospective randomized trials against SAVR in younger low-risk patients. Although durability of the TAVR device may be of concern in younger patients given their longer life expectancy, intermediate-term controlled data does not reveal any difference between TAVR and SAVR...

  15. Stenting of Variant Left Carotid Artery Using Brachial Artery Approach in a Patient with Unusual Type of Bovine Aortic Arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Gürel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bovine aortic arch is the most frequently encountered variation in human aortic arch branching. A 63-year-old Asian male presented with symptomatic severe stenosis of left carotid artery originating from the brachiocephalic trunk. Selective engagement to the left carotid artery was unsuccessful using transfemoral approach. We reported on a successful left carotid artery stenting case using right brachial artery approach in a bovine aortic arch. This paper is worthy of reporting in terms of guiding physicians for interventional procedures in these types of challenging cases.

  16. Transluminal endovascular stent-graft for the treatment of aortic aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Do Yun; Chang, Byung Chul; Shim, Won Heum; Cho, Seung Yun; Chung, Nam Sik; Kwon, Hyuk Moon; Lee, Young Joon; Lee, Jong Tae

    1995-01-01

    The standard treatment for aortic aneurysms is surgical replacement with a prosthetic graft. Currently there is great interest in endoluminal intervention for treatment of aortic aneurysm. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of endoluminally placed Stent-graft for the treatment of aortic aneurysms. Transluminal endovascular Stent-graft placements were attempted in 9 patients with infra-renal aortic aneurysms(n 6), thoracic aortic aneurysm(n = 1), and aortic dissection(n = 2). The endovascular Stent-grafts were custom-designed for each patient and were constructed of self-expandable modified Gianturco Stents covered with polytetrafluroethylene. The Stent-grafts were introduced through a 16-18 French sheath and expanded to 17-30 mm in diameter. The endovascular therapy was performed using a common femoral artery cutdown with local anesthesia. The endovascular Stent-graft deployment was achieved in 7 of 9 patients. Two cases failed deployment of the Stent-graft due to iliac artery stenosis and tortousity. There were complete thrombosis of the thoracic and infra-renal aortic aneurysm surround the Stent-graft in 3 patients, and persistent leak with partial thrombosis in 2. Two patients with aortic dissection were successfully treated by obliteration of entry tears. There were no major complication associated with Stent-graft placement. These preliminary results show that transluminal endovascular Stent-grafts offer great promise and good results. Further investigation is needed to establish its long-term safety and efficacy

  17. Successful implantation of a second-generation aortic valve in severe aortic regurgitation secondary to a traumatic cusp lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangieri, Antonio [Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Institute, Milan (Italy); Latib, Azeem, E-mail: info@emocolumbus.it [Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Institute, Milan (Italy); EMO-GVM Centro Cuore Columbus, Milan (Italy); Aurelio, Andrea [Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Institute, Milan (Italy); Figini, Filippo [Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Institute, Milan (Italy); EMO-GVM Centro Cuore Columbus, Milan (Italy); Agricola, Eustachio; Rosa, Isabella; Stella, Stefano; Spagnolo, Pietro; Castiglioni, Alessandro [Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Institute, Milan (Italy); Colombo, Antonio [Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Institute, Milan (Italy); EMO-GVM Centro Cuore Columbus, Milan (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    A 67-year-old man with a dilated cardiomyopathy and severe aortic regurgitation (AR) secondary to a traumatic cusp lesion was referred to our institution because of progressive worsening of dyspnea. After formal discussion in the heart team, the patient was scheduled for TAVI (transcatheter aortic valve implantation). The pre procedural computed tomography scan revealed a minimum amount of calcium on the aortic valve and low position of coronary ostia. The TAVI procedure was performed with the implantation of a fully retrievable and repositionable aortic valve prosthesis (Direct Flow 29 mm, Direct Flow Medical, Santa Rosa, California) with an excellent result and no paravalvular leak. The TAVI devices designed for the treatment of calcific aortic stenosis have numerous limitations for the treatment of pure AR such as the risk of residual AR, the lack of repositionability and retrievability, and the need for valve- in-valve implantation. We believe that treatment of selected cases of pure AR with the Direct Flow valve is feasible and takes advantage of the retrievability of the prosthesis.

  18. Association between Carotid Artery Stenosis and Cognitive Impairment in Stroke Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yue

    Full Text Available To investigate potential associations between carotid artery stenosis and cognitive impairment among patients with acute ischemic stroke and to provide important clinical implications. We measured the degree of carotid artery stenosis and recorded the Mini-Mental State Examination score (MMSE at admission in 3116 acute ischemic stroke patients. The association between carotid stenosis and cognitive impairment assessed by MMSE was tested using multivariate regression analysis. Other clinical variables of interest were also studied. After adjusting for age, gender, education level, marriage, alcohol use, tobacco use, physical activity, hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, atrial fibrillation, myocardial infarction and NIHSS (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, we found that participants with high-grade stenosis of the carotid artery had a higher likelihood of cognitive impairment compared to those without carotid artery stenosis (OR = 1.49, 95%CI: 1.05-2.11, p<0.001. Left common carotid artery stenosis was associated with cognitive impairment in the univariate analysis, although this effect did not persist after adjustment for the NIHSS score. Cognitive impairment was associated with high-grade stenosis of the right carotid artery.

  19. Aortic valve surgery - open

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... while you are connected to this machine. This machine does the work of your heart while your heart is stopped. If your aortic valve is too damaged, you will need a new valve. This is called replacement surgery. Your surgeon will remove your aortic valve ...

  20. Imaging in aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu-Qing Liu, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    Aortic dissection (AD) is a catastrophic aortic disease. Imaging techniques play an invaluable role in the diagnostic evaluation and management of patients with AD. Major signs of AD with different imaging modalities are described in this article with a pertinent discussion on guidelines for the optimized approach of imaging study (13 refs.)

  1. Aortic arch malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellenberger, Christian J.

    2010-01-01

    Although anomalies of the aortic arch and its branches are relatively uncommon malformations, they are often associated with congenital heart disease. Isolated lesions may be clinically significant when the airways are compromised by a vascular ring. In this article, the development and imaging appearance of the aortic arch system and its various malformations are reviewed. (orig.)

  2. [Traumatic aortic valve insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, J; Lemos, C; Marques, A M; Antunes, M J; Gonsalves, A

    1996-02-01

    The traumatic aortic valvular insufficiency (TAVI), through less frequent after a non-penetrating thoracic traumatism, is a serious entity with a very reserved prognosis. So it must be suspected in every patients with signs or symptoms of de novo heart failure post-traumatism. The transthoracic echocardiography and eventually transesophageal echocardiography have a fundamental role in the confirmation of the diagnosis. The clinical picture of traumatic aortic regurgitation is quickly evolutionary and the non efficacy of medical therapy has placed the valvular substitution surgery as the best succeeded treatment. With the advent of the aortic valve repairing surgery some TAVI cases has been submitted to this procedure. Nevertheless, the development of residual aortic regurgitation in these situations, usually requiring later valvular replacement surgery, make the aortic valvuloplasty a controversial surgical technique. The AA describe a recent clinical case of aortic regurgitation after a non-penetrant thoracic traumatism, discussing the aspects connected with physiopathology, diagnosis and therapy. The singularity of this case was based on the fact that the initial clinical diagnosis had been prejudiced by the context of a polytraumatism and there had been a time free of symptoms between the traumatism and the beginning of the symptomatology of left ventricular failure. Even though the identification of the problem allowed an intensive treatment of this serious situation that ended with the replacement of the aortic valve by mechanical aortic prosthesis, with the patient's total recovery.

  3. Morphological and Functional Evaluation of Quadricuspid Aortic Valves Using Cardiac Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Inyoung; Park, Jung Ah; Choi, Bo Hwa; Ko, Sung Min [Department of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul 05030 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Je Kyoun; Chee, Hyun Keun; Kim, Jun Seok [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul 05030 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the morphological and functional characteristics of quadricuspid aortic valves (QAV) on cardiac computed tomography (CCT). We retrospectively enrolled 11 patients with QAV. All patients underwent CCT and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), and 7 patients underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). The presence and classification of QAV assessed by CCT was compared with that of TTE and intraoperative findings. The regurgitant orifice area (ROA) measured by CCT was compared with severity of aortic regurgitation (AR) by TTE and the regurgitant fraction (RF) by CMR. All of the patients had AR; 9 had pure AR, 1 had combined aortic stenosis and regurgitation, and 1 had combined subaortic stenosis and regurgitation. Two patients had a subaortic fibrotic membrane and 1 of them showed a subaortic stenosis. One QAV was misdiagnosed as tricuspid aortic valve on TTE. In accordance with the Hurwitz and Robert's classification, consensus was reached on the QAV classification between the CCT and TTE findings in 7 of 10 patients. The patients were classified as type A (n = 1), type B (n = 3), type C (n = 1), type D (n = 4), and type F (n = 2) on CCT. A very high correlation existed between ROA by CCT and RF by CMR (r = 0.99) but a good correlation existed between ROA by CCT and regurgitant severity by TTE (r = 0.62). Cardiac computed tomography provides comprehensive anatomical and functional information about the QAV.

  4. Morphological and functional evaluation of quadricuspid aortic valves using cardiac computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, In Young; Park, Jung Ah; Choi, Bo Hwa; Ko, Sung Min; Shin, Je Kyoun; Chee, Hyun Keun; KIm, Jun Seok [Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    The aim of this study was to identify the morphological and functional characteristics of quadricuspid aortic valves (QAV) on cardiac computed tomography (CCT). We retrospectively enrolled 11 patients with QAV. All patients underwent CCT and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), and 7 patients underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). The presence and classification of QAV assessed by CCT was compared with that of TTE and intraoperative findings. The regurgitant orifice area (ROA) measured by CCT was compared with severity of aortic regurgitation (AR) by TTE and the regurgitant fraction (RF) by CMR. All of the patients had AR; 9 had pure AR, 1 had combined aortic stenosis and regurgitation, and 1 had combined subaortic stenosis and regurgitation. Two patients had a subaortic fibrotic membrane and 1 of them showed a subaortic stenosis. One QAV was misdiagnosed as tricuspid aortic valve on TTE. In accordance with the Hurwitz and Robert's classification, consensus was reached on the QAV classification between the CCT and TTE findings in 7 of 10 patients. The patients were classified as type A (n = 1), type B (n = 3), type C (n = 1), type D (n = 4), and type F (n = 2) on CCT. A very high correlation existed between ROA by CCT and RF by CMR (r = 0.99) but a good correlation existed between ROA by CCT and regurgitant severity by TTE (r = 0.62). Cardiac computed tomography provides comprehensive anatomical and functional information about the QAV.

  5. Adult idiopathic hypertrophic pyloric stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsien-Ping Lin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS is a predominantly infantile disease. The adult type of IHPS is extremely rare but it has been well recognized since the 19th century. We report a case of a 47-year-old male patient who presented with postprandial nausea and vomiting. He underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, and gastric outlet obstruction was discovered. The upper gastrointestinal barium study showed a distended stomach with delayed gastric emptying due to pyloric stenosis. The abdominal computed tomography revealed thickening of the distal stomach. Since gastric malignancy could not be excluded, he underwent antrectomy with Billroth I anastomosis. The pathology revealed no malignancy but showed hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the inner circular muscle of the pylorus, which was compatible with IHPS. We reported the case to remind young physicians of this rare disease.

  6. Hemolytic Anemia after Aortic Valve Replacement: a Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Khosravi, Donya

    2015-01-01

    Hemolytic anemia is exceedingly rare and an underestimated complication after aortic valve replacement (AVR).The mechanism responsible for hemolysis most commonly involves a regurgitated flow or jet that related to paravalvar leak or turbulence of subvalvar stenosis. It appears to be independent of its severity as assessed by echocardiography. We present a case of a 24-year-old man with a history of AVR in 10 year ago that developed severe hemolytic anemia due to a mild subvalvar stenosis caused by pannus formation and mild hypertrophic septum. After exclusion of other causes of hemolytic anemia and the lack of clinical and laboratory improvement, the patient underwent redo valve surgery with pannus and subvalvar hypertrophic septum resection. Anemia and heart failure symptoms gradually resolved after surgery.

  7. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in failed bioprosthetic surgical valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvir, Danny; Webb, John G; Bleiziffer, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Owing to a considerable shift toward bioprosthesis implantation rather than mechanical valves, it is expected that patients will increasingly present with degenerated bioprostheses in the next few years. Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation is a less invasive approach......, stroke, and New York Heart Association functional class. RESULTS: Modes of bioprosthesis failure were stenosis (n = 181 [39.4%]), regurgitation (n = 139 [30.3%]), and combined (n = 139 [30.3%]). The stenosis group had a higher percentage of small valves (37% vs 20.9% and 26.6% in the regurgitation...... and combined groups, respectively; P = .005). Within 1 month following valve-in-valve implantation, 35 (7.6%) patients died, 8 (1.7%) had major stroke, and 313 (92.6%) of surviving patients had good functional status (New York Heart Association class I/II). The overall 1-year Kaplan-Meier survival rate was 83...

  8. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/EACTS/HVS/SCA/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2017 Appropriate Use Criteria for the Treatment of Patients With Severe Aortic Stenosis: A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, Heart Valve Society, Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonow, Robert O; Brown, Alan S; Gillam, Linda D; Kapadia, Samir R; Kavinsky, Clifford J; Lindman, Brian R; Mack, Michael J; Thourani, Vinod H; Dehmer, Gregory J; Bonow, Robert O; Lindman, Brian R; Beaver, Thomas M; Bradley, Steven M; Carabello, Blase A; Desai, Milind Y; George, Isaac; Green, Philip; Holmes, David R; Johnston, Douglas; Leipsic, Jonathon; Mick, Stephanie L; Passeri, Jonathan J; Piana, Robert N; Reichek, Nathaniel; Ruiz, Carlos E; Taub, Cynthia C; Thomas, James D; Turi, Zoltan G; Doherty, John U; Dehmer, Gregory J; Bailey, Steven R; Bhave, Nicole M; Brown, Alan S; Daugherty, Stacie L; Dean, Larry S; Desai, Milind Y; Duvernoy, Claire S; Gillam, Linda D; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Lindsay, Bruce D; Manning, Warren J; Mehrotra, Praveen; Patel, Manesh R; Sachdeva, Ritu; Wann, L Samuel; Winchester, David E; Allen, Joseph M

    2018-02-01

    The American College of Cardiology collaborated with the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, Heart Valve Society, Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons to develop and evaluate Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for the treatment of patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS). This is the first AUC to address the topic of AS and its treatment options, including surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). A number of common patient scenarios experienced in daily practice were developed along with assumptions and definitions for those scenarios, which were all created using guidelines, clinical trial data, and expert opinion in the field of AS. The 2014 AHA/ACC guideline for the management of patients with valvular heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines(1) and its 2017 focused update paper (2) were used as the primary guiding references in developing these indications. The writing group identified 95 clinical scenarios based on patient symptoms and clinical presentation, and up to 6 potential treatment options for those patients. A separate, independent rating panel was asked to score each indication from 1 to 9, with 1-3 categorized as "Rarely Appropriate," 4-6 as "May Be Appropriate," and 7-9 as "Appropriate." After considering factors such as symptom status, left ventricular (LV) function, surgical risk, and the presence of concomitant coronary or other valve disease, the rating panel determined that either SAVR or TAVR is Appropriate in most patients with symptomatic AS at intermediate or high surgical risk; however, situations

  9. Aortic coarctation diagnosed by renal Doppler flow patterns in a hypertensive young patient: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sari, S.; Kara, K.; Verim, S.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Aortic coarctation is a congenital malformation, which can cause systemic hypertension and subsequent complications, and causes of secondary hypertension, affecting in differential pressures in the upper and lower extremities. Because hypertension is caused by aortic coarctation, tends to be resistant to medical therapy, early recognition and surgical rectification are important. Objectives and tasks: In this article, we aimed to point out that renal Doppler sonography is a beneficial and frequently used to evaluate secondary hypertension, if there are bilateral tardus-parvus wave patterns are detected. Thus, bilateral renal artery stenosis, aortic stenosis, and coarctation should be considered in this condition. Materials and methods: A 23-year-old male who has six-month history of hypertension. He was referred by a cardiologist for investigation of his secondary hypertension. There was an ascending aortic dilatation, left ventricular hypertrophy in his echocardiography. Results: The patient's blood pressure was measured as 160/90 mm Hg in his both arms. Renal Doppler sonography was performed to identify the potential cause of secondary hypertension, specifically renal artery stenosis, after tardus-parvus pulse waves were noted in both renal intralobar-arteries. Aortic coarctation is suspected and then a chest computed tomography (CT) was performed to evaluate supra-diaphragmatic vessel abnormalities. The CT exposed a stenotic lesion in the isthmus of the aorta. The patient was transferred to cardiovascular surgery department for treatment. Conclusion: Careful physical examination should be performed in all hypertensive patients. If bilateral tardus-parvus wave pattern are seen in patients who has been referred for Doppler evaluation on suspicion of renovascular hypertension, aortic coarctation should be considered as differential diagnosis

  10. A rare case of discrete aortic coarctation in Williams-Beuren syndrome. Diagnostic and therapeutic considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savina Mannarino

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS is a genetic disorder caused by elastin gene deletions, and is characterized by cardiovascular malformations, primarily including supravalvular aortic stenosis and peripheral pulmonary stenosis. We report a case of a neonate who developed severe discrete aortic coarctation, underwent multiple surgical interventions, and was subsequently diagnosed with WBS. Severe discrete aortic coarctation is a rare event in WBS newborns. An abnormally thick aortic wall is present in these patients and is the basis of the failure of the classical approach towards coarctation repair, which consists of end-to-end anastomosis as first surgical choice. Our case, and a very few similar previously documented cases, have all demonstrated recoarctation, which only aortic patch implantation was able to successfully repair. In light of this, we would also like to underline the importance of early WBS diagnosis. Therefore, even in mild syndromic phenotype such as low birth weight or facial dysmorphism that raise the suspicion of a genetic syndrome, it is advisable to perform fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis rather than merely karyotypic one.

  11. Haemolytic anaemia resulting from the surgical repair of acute type A aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Yuji; Yamamoto, Shin; Fujikawa, Takuya; Oshima, Susumu; Ono, Makoto; Sasaguri, Shiro

    2014-02-01

    Haemolytic anaemia after acute aortic dissection surgery is extremely rare. We report 4 cases of haemolytic anaemia with different aetiologies. Four patients underwent emergency operation for acute type A aortic dissection and subsequently developed haemolytic anaemia. Case 1: a 41-year old man underwent hemiarch replacement. We performed total arch replacement 3 years postoperatively, which revealed that haemolytic anaemia was induced by proximal anastomotic stenosis caused by inverted internal felt strip. Case 2: a 28-year old man diagnosed with Marfan syndrome underwent total arch replacement. Five months postoperatively, we noted severe stenosis at the previous distal anastomotic site, which caused the haemolytic anaemia, and performed descending thoracic aortic replacement for a residual dissecting aneurysm. Case 3: a 49-year old man underwent hemiarch replacement. Three years postoperatively, we performed total arch replacement for a residual dissecting aortic arch aneurysm and repaired a kinked graft responsible for haemolytic anaemia. Case 4: a 42-year old man underwent total arch replacement. Eighteen months later, we performed descending thoracic aortic replacement. We repaired a portion of the ascending aorta as haemolityc anaemia was induced by kinking of a total arch replacement redundant graft. All the haemolityc anaemia patients were successfully released after surgical reintervention.

  12. Functional assessment of cerebral artery stenosis: A pilot study based on computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Yan, Zhengzheng; Pu, Yuehua; Shiu, Wen-Shin; Wu, Jianhuang; Chen, Rongliang; Leng, Xinyi; Qin, Haiqiang; Liu, Xin; Jia, Baixue; Song, Ligang; Wang, Yilong; Miao, Zhongrong; Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Liping; Cai, Xiao-Chuan

    2017-07-01

    The fractional pressure ratio is introduced to quantitatively assess the hemodynamic significance of severe intracranial stenosis. A computational fluid dynamics-based method is proposed to non-invasively compute the FPR CFD and compared against fractional pressure ratio measured by an invasive technique. Eleven patients with severe intracranial stenosis considered for endovascular intervention were recruited and an invasive procedure was performed to measure the distal and the aortic pressure ( P d and P a ). The fractional pressure ratio was calculated as [Formula: see text]. The computed tomography angiography was used to reconstruct three-dimensional (3D) arteries for each patient. Cerebral hemodynamics was then computed for the arteries using a mathematical model governed by Navier-Stokes equations and with the outflow conditions imposed by a model of distal resistance and compliance. The non-invasive [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and FPR CFD were then obtained from the computational fluid dynamics calculation using a 16-core parallel computer. The invasive and non-invasive parameters were tested by statistical analysis. For this group of patients, the computational fluid dynamics method achieved comparable results with the invasive measurements. The fractional pressure ratio and FPR CFD are very close and highly correlated, but not linearly proportional, with the percentage of stenosis. The proposed computational fluid dynamics method can potentially be useful in assessing the functional alteration of cerebral stenosis.

  13. In-stent restenosis of innominate artery with critical stenosis of right internal carotid artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, S.; Raza, A.; Ahmed, W.

    2011-01-01

    A lady with aortitis syndrome developed in-stent restenosis (ISR) of the innominate artery stent and critical stenosis of right internal carotid artery. The therapeutic challenge was gaining access to the carotid vessel, after treating the innominate artery ISR and all the while using distal protection to circumvent potential cerebral embolism. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) with or without stenting is a safe therapeutic option for re-vascularization of the supra aortic vessels. In the event of re-stenosis, re-treatment with PTA and stenting is safe. Ample evidence-base exists now for carotid artery stenting (CAS) in preference to carotid endarterectomy in patients with stenotic lesions of the carotid vessels. (author)

  14. Sutureless Aortic Prosthesis Implantation: the First Brazilian Experience with Perceval Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliari, Ana Paula; de Moura, Leandro; Dussin, Luiz Henrique; Saadi, Eduardo Keller

    2016-01-01

    This is a report of the first Brazilian experience with the Perceval sutureless aortic prosthesis in two patients with severe aortic stenosis. Transesophageal echocardiography was used during the procedure. The aortotomy was performed 1 cm above the sinotubular junction, followed by leaflets removal and decalcification. Correct valve size was selected, device released and an accommodation balloon used. The cardiopulmonary bypass times were 47 and 38 min and the cross-clamp times were 38 and 30 min. There was a significant decrease in mean gradients (41 and 75 mmHg preoperatively; 7 and 8 mmHg postoperatively). There was no major complication or paravalvular leak.

  15. Perceval S aortic valve implantation in an achondroplastic Dwarf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos G Baikoussis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite cardiovascular disease in patients with dwarfism is not rare; there is a lack of reports referring to cardiac interventions in such patients. Dwarfism may be due to achondroplasia or hormonal growth disorders. We present a 58-year-old woman with episodes of dyspnea for several months. She underwent on transthoracic echocardiography, and she diagnosed with severe aortic valve stenosis. She referred to our department for surgical treatment of this finding. In accordance of her anthropometric characteristics and her very small aortic annulus, we had the dilemma of prosthesis selection. We decided to implant a stentless valve to optimize her effective orifice area. Our aim is to present the successful Perceval S valve implantation and the descriptions of the problems coming across in operating on these special patients. To our knowledge, this is the first case patient in which a Perceval S valve is implanted according to the international bibliography.

  16. Perceval S aortic valve implantation in an achondroplastic Dwarf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikoussis, Nikolaos G; Argiriou, Michalis; Argiriou, Orestis; Dedeilias, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Despite cardiovascular disease in patients with dwarfism is not rare; there is a lack of reports referring to cardiac interventions in such patients. Dwarfism may be due to achondroplasia or hormonal growth disorders. We present a 58-year-old woman with episodes of dyspnea for several months. She underwent on transthoracic echocardiography, and she diagnosed with severe aortic valve stenosis. She referred to our department for surgical treatment of this finding. In accordance of her anthropometric characteristics and her very small aortic annulus, we had the dilemma of prosthesis selection. We decided to implant a stentless valve to optimize her effective orifice area. Our aim is to present the successful Perceval S valve implantation and the descriptions of the problems coming across in operating on these special patients. To our knowledge, this is the first case patient in which a Perceval S valve is implanted according to the international bibliography.

  17. A Quantitative Study of Simulated Bicuspid Aortic Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeto, Kai; Nguyen, Tran; Rodriguez, Javier; Pastuszko, Peter; Nigam, Vishal; Lasheras, Juan

    2010-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that congentially bicuspid aortic valves develop degenerative diseases earlier than the standard trileaflet, but the causes are not well understood. It has been hypothesized that the asymmetrical flow patterns and turbulence found in the bileaflet valves together with abnormally high levels of strain may result in an early thickening and eventually calcification and stenosis. Central to this hypothesis is the need for a precise quantification of the differences in the strain rate levels between bileaflets and trileaflet valves. We present here some in-vitro dynamic measurements of the spatial variation of the strain rate in pig aortic vales conducted in a left ventricular heart flow simulator device. We measure the strain rate of each leaflet during the whole cardiac cycle using phase-locked stereoscopic three-dimensional image surface reconstruction techniques. The bicuspid case is simulated by surgically stitching two of the leaflets in a normal valve.

  18. Futility, benefit, and transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindman, Brian R; Alexander, Karen P; O'Gara, Patrick T; Afilalo, Jonathan

    2014-07-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a transformative innovation that provides treatment for high or prohibitive surgical risk patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis who either were previously not referred for or were denied operative intervention. Trials have demonstrated improvements in survival and symptoms after TAVR versus medical therapy; however, there remains a sizable group of patients who die or lack improvement in quality of life soon after TAVR. This raises important questions about the need to identify and acknowledge the possibility of futility in some patients considered for TAVR. In this very elderly population, a number of factors in addition to traditional risk stratification need to be considered including multimorbidity, disability, frailty, and cognition in order to assess the anticipated benefit of TAVR. Consideration by a multidisciplinary heart valve team with broad areas of expertise is critical for assessing likely benefit from TAVR. Moreover, these complicated decisions should take place with clear communication around desired health outcomes on behalf of the patient and provider. The decision that treatment with TAVR is futile should include alternative plans to optimize the patient's health state or, in some cases, discussions related to end-of-life care. We review issues to be considered when making and communicating these difficult decisions. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Aortic Aneurysm Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people with inherited connective tissue disorders, such as Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, get thoracic aortic aneurysms. ... Smoking . Some inherited connective tissue disorders, such as Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, can also increase your ...

  20. Aortic Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It is then replaced with an artificial valve (prosthesis). There are two valve options for aortic valve ... place, the catheter will be withdrawn from your body through the original access point. Because not all ...

  1. Abnormalities of aortic arch shape, central aortic flow dynamics, and distensibility predispose to hypertension after successful repair of aortic coarctation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donazzan, Luca; Crepaz, Robert; Stuefer, Josef; Stellin, Giovanni

    2014-10-01

    Systemic hypertension (HT) is a major long-term complication even after successful repair of aortic coarctation (CoA), and many factors are involved in this pathophysiology. To investigate the role of abnormalities in the aortic arch shape, central aortic flow dynamics, and distensibility in developing HT after successful repair of CoA. We selected a group of 26 normotensive patients (mean age 16.9±7.3 years, range 9-32 years) with anatomically successful repair of CoA among 140 patients regularly followed after repair of CoA and analyzed their last clinical and echocardiographic data. Bicycle exercise test and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) were also obtained. Mean age at surgical repair was 3.2±3.9 years (range 10 days-15 years); 12 patients underwent surgical correction during the first year of life. Repair of CoA was performed by end-to-end anastomosis (TT) in 23 patients (extended TT in 6 patients with arch hypoplasia), patch aortoplasty in 2, and subcalvian flap aortoplasty in 1. The postsurgical follow-up was 13.8±7.2 years (range 3.5-29.4 years). The shape of the aortic arch was defined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on this global geometry (normal-gothic-crenel), ratio of the height-transverse diameter (A/T), percentage of residual stenosis, and growth index of the transverse arch segments. Flow mapping by phase-contrast imaging in the ascending and descending aorta was performed in order to measure the systolic waveforms and central aortic distensibility. Twenty normal age-matched patients submitted to the same MRI protocol were used as controls. Six patients were found to have a gothic and 20 a normal aortic arch shape. Patients with gothic aortic arch shape had an increased A/T ratio (0.80±0.07 vs 0.58±0.05, P135 mm Hg on ABPM were higher in the gothic than in the normal arch group. There was a correlation between nocturnal SBP, 24 hours pulse pressure on ABPM in the whole group, and different MRI variables (A/T, distensibility of

  2. Influence of the Quantity of Aortic Valve Calcium on the Agreement Between Automated 3-Dimensional Transesophageal Echocardiography and Multidetector Row Computed Tomography for Aortic Annulus Sizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlesnikar, Tomaz; Prihadi, Edgard A; van Rosendael, Philippe J; Vollema, E Mara; van der Kley, Frank; de Weger, Arend; Ajmone Marsan, Nina; Naji, Franjo; Fras, Zlatko; Bax, Jeroen J; Delgado, Victoria

    2018-01-01

    Accurate aortic annulus sizing is key for selection of appropriate transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) prosthesis size. The present study compared novel automated 3-dimensional (3D) transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) software and multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) for aortic annulus sizing and investigated the influence of the quantity of aortic valve calcium (AVC) on the selection of TAVI prosthesis size. A total of 83 patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing TAVI were evaluated. Maximal and minimal aortic annulus diameter, perimeter, and area were measured. AVC was assessed with computed tomography. The low and high AVC burden groups were defined according to the median AVC score. Overall, 3D TEE measurements slightly underestimated the aortic annulus dimensions as compared with MDCT (mean differences between maximum, minimum diameter, perimeter, and area: -1.7 mm, 0.5 mm, -2.7 mm, and -13 mm 2 , respectively). The agreement between 3D TEE and MDCT on aortic annulus dimensions was superior among patients with low AVC burden (AVC burden (≥3,025 arbitrary units). The interobserver variability was excellent for both methods. 3D TEE and MDCT led to the same prosthesis size selection in 88%, 95%, and 81% of patients in the total population, the low, and the high AVC burden group, respectively. In conclusion, the novel automated 3D TEE imaging software allows accurate and highly reproducible measurements of the aortic annulus dimensions and shows excellent agreement with MDCT to determine the TAVI prosthesis size, particularly in patients with low AVC burden. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Traumatic Aortic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianna Miner

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 48-year-old male with unknown past medical history presents as a trauma after being hit by a car traveling approximately 25 miles per hour. On initial presentation, the patient is confused, combative, and not answering questions appropriately. The patient is hypotensive with a blood pressure of 68/40 and a heart rate of 50 beats per minute, with oxygen saturation at 96% on room air. FAST scan is positive for fluid in Morrison’s pouch, splenorenal space, and pericardial space. Significant findings: The initial chest x-ray showed an abnormal superior mediastinal contour (blue line, suggestive of a possible aortic injury. The CT angiogram showed extensive circumferential irregularity and outpouching of the distal aortic arch (red arrows compatible with aortic transection. In addition, there was a circumferential intramural hematoma, which extended through the descending aorta to the proximal infrarenal abdominal aorta (green arrow. There was also an extensive surrounding mediastinal hematoma extending around the descending aorta and supraaortic branches (purple arrows. Discussion: Traumatic aortic injury is a life-threatening event. The incidence of blunt thoracic aortic injury is low, between 1 to 2 percent of those patients with blunt thoracic trauma.1 However, approximately 80% of patients with traumatic aortic injury die at the scene.2 Therefore it is imperative to diagnose traumatic aortic injury in a timely fashion. The diagnosis can be difficult due to the non-specific signs and symptoms and other distracting injuries. Clinical suspicion should be based on the mechanism of the injury and the hemodynamic status of the patient. In any patient with blunt or penetrating trauma to the chest that is hemodynamically unstable, traumatic aortic injury should be on the differential. Chest x-ray can be used as a screening tool. A normal chest x-ray has a negative predictive value of approximately 97%. CTA chest is the

  4. Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Azizzadeh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 50 years, significant progress has been made in the surgical repair of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA.  Improvements in perioperative care and surgical techniques have resulted in reductions in complication and mortality rates. Adjunctive use of distal aortic perfusion and cerebrospinal fluid drainage has been especially helpful, reducing the incidence of neurological deficits to 2.4%. Current research is aimed at improving organ preservation. This review focuses on the current diagnosis and management of TAAA.

  5. Automatic aortic root segmentation in CTA whole-body dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xinpei; Kitslaar, Pieter H.; Scholte, Arthur J. H. A.; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; Dijkstra, Jouke; Reiber, Johan H. C.

    2016-03-01

    Trans-catheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an evolving technique for patients with serious aortic stenosis disease. Typically, in this application a CTA data set is obtained of the patient's arterial system from the subclavian artery to the femoral arteries, to evaluate the quality of the vascular access route and analyze the aortic root to determine if and which prosthesis should be used. In this paper, we concentrate on the automated segmentation of the aortic root. The purpose of this study was to automatically segment the aortic root in computed tomography angiography (CTA) datasets to support TAVR procedures. The method in this study includes 4 major steps. First, the patient's cardiac CTA image was resampled to reduce the computation time. Next, the cardiac CTA image was segmented using an atlas-based approach. The most similar atlas was selected from a total of 8 atlases based on its image similarity to the input CTA image. Third, the aortic root segmentation from the previous step was transferred to the patient's whole-body CTA image by affine registration and refined in the fourth step using a deformable subdivision surface model fitting procedure based on image intensity. The pipeline was applied to 20 patients. The ground truth was created by an analyst who semi-automatically corrected the contours of the automatic method, where necessary. The average Dice similarity index between the segmentations of the automatic method and the ground truth was found to be 0.965±0.024. In conclusion, the current results are very promising.

  6. The importance of echocardiography in transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilen, Emine; Sari, Cenk; Durmaz, Tahir; Keleş, Telat; Bayram, Nihal A; Akçay, Murat; Ayhan, Hüseyin M; Bozkurt, Engin

    2014-01-01

    Valvular heart diseases cause serious health problems in Turkey as well as in Western countries. According to a study conducted in Turkey, aortic stenosis (AS) is second after mitral valve disease among all valvular heart diseases. AS is frequently observed in elderly patients who have several cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities. In symptomatic severe AS, surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) is a definitive treatment. However, in elderly patients with left ventricular dysfunction and comorbidities, the risk of operative morbidity and mortality increases and outweighs the gain obtained from AVR surgery. As a result, almost one-third of the patients with serious AS are considered ineligible for surgery. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an effective treatment in patients with symptomatic severe AS who have high risk for conventional surgery. Since being performed for the first time in 2002, with a procedure success rate reported as 95% and a mortality rate of 5%, TAVI has become a promising method. Assessment of vascular anatomy, aortic annular diameter, and left ventricular function may be useful for the appropriate selection of patients and may reduce the risk of complications. Cardiac imaging methods including 2D and 3D echocardiography and multidetector computed tomography are critical during the evaluation of suitable patients for TAVI as well as during and after the procedure. In this review, we describe the role of echocardiography methods in clinical practice for TAVI procedure in its entirety, i.e. from patient selection to guidance during the procedure, and subsequent monitoring. © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics: a fluid-structure interaction study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Santanu; Seaman, Clara; Sucosky, Philippe

    2011-11-01

    The bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is a congenital defect in which the aortic valve forms with two leaflets instead of three. While calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) also develops in the normal tricuspid aortic valve (TAV), its progression in the BAV is more rapid. Although studies have suggested a mechano-potential root for the disease, the native BAV hemodynamics remains largely unknown. This study aimed at characterizing BAV hemodynamics and quantifying the degree of wall-shear stress (WSS) abnormality on BAV leaflets. Fluid-structure interaction models validated with particle-image velocimetry were designed to predict the flow and leaflet dynamics in idealized TAV and BAV anatomies. Valvular function was quantified in terms of the effective orifice area. The regional leaflet WSS was characterized in terms of oscillatory shear index, temporal shear magnitude and temporal shear gradient. The predictions indicate the intrinsic degree of stenosis of the BAV anatomy, reveal drastic differences in shear stress magnitude and pulsatility on BAV and TAV leaflets and confirm the side- and site-specificity of the leaflet WSS. Given the ability of abnormal fluid shear stress to trigger valvular inflammation, these results support the existence of a mechano-etiology of CAVD in the BAV.

  8. Case report of a rarely seen long-segment middle aortic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakut, Kahraman; Erdoğan, İlkay

    2017-03-01

    Middle aortic syndrome (MAS) follows a course with distal thoracic and abdominal aorta stenosis. It is a rare disease that is usually diagnosed after the first decade of life. Clinical reflection of MAS is often in the form of hypertension and claudication in the lower extremities. Its etiology is unclear, but is known to be associated with congenital or acquired diseases. This pathology, which is accompanied by malignant hypertension, often does not respond to medical treatment. In patients with MAS, surgical treatment is first line recommendation to prevent complications such as hypertension, heart failure, intracranial bleeding, or aortic rupture. In order to draw attention to this disease, presently described is case of high blood pressure detected during routine examination of a child who had no complaint, and discovery of long-segment stenosis in the abdominal aorta identified with echocardiography and conventional angiography.

  9. Interobserver variability of CT angiography for evaluation of aortic annulus dimensions prior to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidkonz, C., E-mail: christian.schmidkonz@gmail.com [Department of Internal Medicine 2 (Cardiology), University of Erlangen, Ulmenweg 18, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Marwan, M.; Klinghammer, L.; Mitschke, M.; Schuhbaeck, A.; Arnold, M. [Department of Internal Medicine 2 (Cardiology), University of Erlangen, Ulmenweg 18, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Lell, M. [Radiological Institute, University of Erlangen, Maximiliansplatz 1, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Achenbach, S.; Pflederer, T. [Department of Internal Medicine 2 (Cardiology), University of Erlangen, Ulmenweg 18, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Cardiac CT provides highly reproducible measurements of aortic annulus and root dimensions prior to TAVI. • The perimeter-derived aortic annulus diameter shows the lowest interobserver variability. • If all three CT sizing methods are considered and stated as a “consensus result”, mismatches in prosthesis size selection can be further reduced. - Abstract: Objective: Assessment of aortic annulus dimensions prior to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is crucial for accurate prosthesis sizing in order to avoid prosthesis–annulus-mismatch possibly resulting in complications like valve dislodgement, paravalvular regurgitation or annulus rupture. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography allows 3-dimensional assessment of aortic annulus dimensions. Only limited data exist about its interobserver variability. Methods: In 100 consecutive patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis (51 male, BMI 27 ± 5 kg/m{sup 2}, age 81 ± 7 years, heart rate 72 ± 15 bpm, Logistic Euroscore 31 ± 14%, STS-Score 7 ± 4%), pre-interventional aortic annulus assessment was performed by dual source computed tomography (collimation 2 × 128 × 0.6 mm, high pitch spiral data acquisition mode, 40–60 ml contrast agents, radiation dose 3.5 ± 0.9 mSv). The following aortic annulus characteristics were determined by three independent observers: aortic annulus maximum, minimum and mean diameters (D{sub max}, D{sub min}, D{sub mean}), eccentricity index (EI), effective aortic annulus diameter according to its circumference (D{sub circ}), effective aortic annulus diameter according to its area (D{sub area}), distance from the aortic annulus plane to the left (LCA) and right coronary artery (RCA) ostia, maximum (D{sub max}AR) and minimum aortic root diameter (D{sub min}AR), maximum (D{sub max}STJ) and minimum diameter of the sinotubular junction (D{sub min}STJ). Subsequently, interobserver variabilities were assessed. Results: Correlation between

  10. Mild anastomotic stenosis in patient-specific CABG model may enhance graft patency: a new hypothesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlong Huo

    Full Text Available It is well known that flow patterns at the anastomosis of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG are complex and may affect the long-term patency. Various attempts at optimal designs of anastomosis have not improved long-term patency. Here, we hypothesize that mild anastomotic stenosis (area stenosis of about 40-60% may be adaptive to enhance the hemodynamic conditions, which may contribute to slower progression of atherosclerosis. We further hypothesize that proximal/distal sites to the stenosis have converse changes that may be a risk factor for the diffuse expansion of atherosclerosis from the site of stenosis. Twelve (12 patient-specific models with various stenotic degrees were extracted from computed tomography images using a validated segmentation software package. A 3-D finite element model was used to compute flow patterns including wall shear stress (WSS and its spatial and temporal gradients (WSS gradient, WSSG, and oscillatory shear index, OSI. The flow simulations showed that mild anastomotic stenosis significantly increased WSS (>15 dynes · cm(-2 and decreased OSI (<0.02 to result in a more uniform distribution of hemodynamic parameters inside anastomosis albeit proximal/distal sites to the stenosis have a decrease of WSS (<4 dynes · cm(-2. These findings have significant implications for graft adaptation and long-term patency.

  11. Mild anastomotic stenosis in patient-specific CABG model may enhance graft patency: a new hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Yunlong; Luo, Tong; Guccione, Julius M; Teague, Shawn D; Tan, Wenchang; Navia, José A; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that flow patterns at the anastomosis of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) are complex and may affect the long-term patency. Various attempts at optimal designs of anastomosis have not improved long-term patency. Here, we hypothesize that mild anastomotic stenosis (area stenosis of about 40-60%) may be adaptive to enhance the hemodynamic conditions, which may contribute to slower progression of atherosclerosis. We further hypothesize that proximal/distal sites to the stenosis have converse changes that may be a risk factor for the diffuse expansion of atherosclerosis from the site of stenosis. Twelve (12) patient-specific models with various stenotic degrees were extracted from computed tomography images using a validated segmentation software package. A 3-D finite element model was used to compute flow patterns including wall shear stress (WSS) and its spatial and temporal gradients (WSS gradient, WSSG, and oscillatory shear index, OSI). The flow simulations showed that mild anastomotic stenosis significantly increased WSS (>15 dynes · cm(-2)) and decreased OSI (<0.02) to result in a more uniform distribution of hemodynamic parameters inside anastomosis albeit proximal/distal sites to the stenosis have a decrease of WSS (<4 dynes · cm(-2)). These findings have significant implications for graft adaptation and long-term patency.

  12. Regression in left ventricular mass after aortic valve replacement for chronic aortic regurgitation is unrelated to prosthetic valve size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Morgan L; Schaff, Hartzell V; Suri, Rakesh M; Li, Zhuo; Sundt, Thoralf M; Dearani, Joseph A; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice

    2011-08-01

    We examined the role of prosthesis-patient mismatch on left ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement for chronic aortic valve regurgitation. We selected patients who had complete preoperative and follow-up echocardiograms with measurement of left ventricular mass. Patients were excluded who had moderate or greater aortic valve stenosis, concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting, or mitral valve procedures. Patients' mean age was 55 ± 17 years; 21% were female. The mean preoperative indexed left ventricular mass was 150 ± 45 g/m(2). Patients with mildly (n = 44; mean indexed mass, 126 ± 15 g/m(2)), moderately (n = 31; mean indexed mass, 168 ± 11 g/m(2)), or severely (n = 15; mean indexed mass, 241 ± 34 g/m(2)) increased preoperative indexed left ventricular mass, were similar, except for lower ejection fractions, larger end-diastolic dimensions, and larger ventricular wall thicknesses in the severely enlarged group (P regression was unrelated to labeled valve size, prosthesis-patient mismatch, or measured indexed effective aortic valve area. A greater preoperative indexed left ventricular mass (P regression. Despite having greater left ventricular mass regression, patients with severe preoperative indexed left ventricular mass did not return to normal values (mean, 142 ± 25 g/m(2)). Left ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement for chronic aortic regurgitation is unrelated to indexed prosthetic valve area. Although incomplete, regression is greatest in patients with the largest preoperative indexed left ventricular mass. Copyright © 2011 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Contemporary Management of Idiopathic Laryngotracheal Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahoe, Laura; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2018-05-01

    Idiopathic laryngotracheal stenosis is a rare but well-described indication for subglottic tracheal resection. Initially described by Pearson in 1975, the 1-stage subglottic tracheal resection with reconstruction of the airway ensures preservation of the recurrent laryngeal nerves while resulting in an effective and durable repair of the stenosis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mitral stenosis in 15 dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmkuhl, L.B.; Ware, W.A.; Bonagura, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Mitral stenosis was diagnosed in 15 young to middle-aged dogs. There were 5 Newfoundlands and 4 bull terriers affected, suggesting a breed predisposition for this disorder. Clinical signs included cough, dyspnea, exercise intolerance, and syncope. Soft left apical diastolic murmurs were heard only in 4 dogs, whereas 8 dogs had systolic murmurs characteristic of mitral regurgitation. Left atrial enlargement was the most prominent radiographic feature. Left-sided congestive heart failure was detected by radiographs in 11 dogs within 1 year of diagnosis. Electrocardiographic abnormalities varied among dogs and included atrial and ventricular enlargement, as well as atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. Abnormalities on M-mode and two-dimensional echocardiograms included abnormal diastolic motion of the mitral valve characterized by decreased leaflet separation, valve doming, concordant motion of the parietal mitral valve leaflet, and a decreased E-to-F slope. Increased mitral valve inflow velocities and prolonged pressure half-times were detected by Doppler echocardiography. Cardiac catheterization, performed in 8 dogs, documented a diastolic pressure gradient between the left atrial, pulmonary capillary wedge, or pulmonary artery diastolic pressures and the left ventricular diastolic pressure. Necropsy showed mitral stenosis caused by thickened, fused mitral valve leaflets in 5 dogs and a supramitral ring in another dog. The outcome in affected dogs was poor; 9 of 15 dogs were euthanatized or died by 2 1/2 years of age

  15. Discopathy in lumbar spinal stenosis.