WorldWideScience

Sample records for aortic root replacement

  1. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement and aortic valve repair in a patient with acromegaly and aortic root dilatation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Van Praet

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aortic regurgitation and dilatation of the aortic root and ascending aorta are severe complications of acromegaly. The current trend for management of an aortic root aneurysm is valve-sparing root replacement as well as restoring the diameter of the aortic sinotubular junction (STJ and annulus. Our case report supports the recommendation that in patients with acromegaly, severe aortic root involvement may indicate the need for surgery.

  2. When and how to replace the aortic root in type A aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshnower, Bradley G; Chen, Edward P

    2016-07-01

    Management of aortic root pathology during repair of acute type A aortic dissection (TAAD) requires a comprehensive evaluation of the patient's anatomy, demographics, comorbidities and physiologic status at the time of emergent operative intervention. Surgical options include conservative repair of the root (CRR) (with or without replacement of the aortic valve), replacement of the native valve and aortic root using a composite valve-conduit and valve sparing root replacement (VSRR). The primary objective of this review is to provide data for surgeons to aid in their decision-making process regarding management of the aortic root during repair of TAAD. No time or language restrictions were imposed and references of the selected studies were checked for additional relevant citations. Multiple retrospective reviews have demonstrated equivalent operative mortality between aortic root repair and replacement during TAAD. There is a higher incidence of aortic root reintervention with aortic root repair compared to aortic root replacement (ARR). Experienced, high-volume aortic centers have demonstrated the safety of VSRR in young, hemodynamically stable patients presenting with TAAD. In conclusion, aortic root repair can safely be performed in the vast majority of patients with TAAD. Despite the increased surgical complexity, ARR does not increase operative mortality and improves the freedom from root reintervention. VSRR can be performed in highly selected populations of patients with TAAD with durable mid-term valve function. PMID:27563551

  3. Pregnancy after aortic root replacement in Loeys-Dietz syndrome: High risk of aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Alan C; Moon, Marc R; Geraghty, Patrick; Willing, Marcia; Bach, Christopher; Kouchoukos, Nicholas T

    2016-08-01

    Loeys-Dietz syndrome due to mutations in TGFBR1 and 2 is associated with early and aggressive aortic aneurysm and branch vessel disease. There are reports of uncomplicated pregnancy in this condition, but there is an increased risk of aortic dissection and uterine rupture. Women with underlying aortic root aneurysm are cautioned about the risk of pregnancy-related aortic dissection. Prophylactic aortic root replacement is recommended in women with aortopathy and aortic root dilatation to lessen the risk of pregnancy. There is limited information in the literature about the outcomes of pregnancy after root replacement in Loeys-Dietz syndrome. We present a case series of three women with Loeys-Dietz syndrome who underwent elective aortic root replacement for aneurysm disease and subsequently became pregnant and underwent Cesarean section delivery. Each of these women were treated with beta blockers throughout pregnancy. Surveillance echocardiograms and noncontrast MRA studies during pregnancy remained stable demonstrating no evidence for aortic enlargement. Despite the normal aortic imaging and careful observation, two of the three women suffered acute aortic dissection in the postpartum period. These cases highlight the high risk of pregnancy following aortic root replacement in Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Women with this disorder are recommended to be counseled accordingly. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27125181

  4. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... conditions or other significant medical problems, the American College of Cardiology recommends aortic valve replacement for basically ... more likely we see aortic stenosis. Again, patient education is part of the evaluation and management of ...

  5. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... North Carolina. My name is John Streitman and I'm a cardiothoracic surgeon here at the Heart ... the corrective surgery of aortic valve replacement. If I have aortic stenosis, are there any activities that ...

  6. Aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Athanasiou, Thanos; Mestres, Carlos A;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS OF THE STUDY: Prompted by anecdotal evidence and observations by surgeons, an investigation was undertaken into the potential differences in implanted aortic valve prosthesis sizes, during aortic valve replacement (AVR) procedures, between northern and southern European...... countries. METHODS: A multi-institutional, non-randomized, retrospective analysis was conducted among 2,932 patients who underwent AVR surgery at seven tertiary cardiac surgery centers throughout Europe. Demographic and perioperative variables including valve size and type, body surface area (BSA) and early......: Prostheses with diameter valve size was also smaller in southern compared to northern European patients (21.6 +/- 2.1 mm versus 23.4 +/- 2.2 mm, p

  7. Aortic Annular Enlargement during Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selman Dumani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the surgery of aortic valve replacement is always attempted, as much as possible, to implant the larger prosthesis with the mains goals to enhance the potential benefits, to minimise transvalvular gradient, decrease left ventricular size and avoid the phenomenon of patient-prosthesis mismatch. Implantation of an ideal prosthesis often it is not possible, due to a small aortic annulus. A variety of aortic annulus enlargement techniques is reported to avoid patient-prosthesis mismatch. We present the case that has submitted four three times open heart surgery. We used Manouguian technique to enlarge aortic anulus with excellent results during the fourth time of surgery.

  8. Surgery of the aortic root: should we go for the valve-sparing root reconstruction or the composite graft-valve replacement is still the first choice of treatment for these patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando de Azevedo Lamana

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective:To compare the results of the root reconstruction with the aortic valve-sparing operation versus composite graftvalve replacement.Methods:From January 2002 to October 2013, 324 patients underwent aortic root reconstruction. They were 263 composite graft-valve replacement and 61 aortic valve-sparing operation (43 reimplantation and 18 remodeling. Twenty-six percent of the patients were NYHA functional class III and IV; 9.6% had Marfan syndrome, and 12% had bicuspid aortic valve. There was a predominance of aneurysms over dissections (81% vs. 19%, with 7% being acute dissections. The complete follow-up of 100% of the patients was performed with median follow-up time of 902 days for patients undergoing composite graft-valve replacement and 1492 for those undergoing aortic valve-sparing operation.Results:In-hospital mortality was 6.7% and 4.9%, respectively for composite graft-valve replacement and aortic valve-sparing operation (ns. During the late follow-up period, there was 0% moderate and 15.4% severe aortic regurgitation, and NYHA functional class I and II were 89.4% and 94%, respectively for composite graft-valve replacement and aortic valve-sparing operation (ns. Root reconstruction with aortic valve-sparing operation showed lower late mortality (P=0.001 and lower bleeding complications (P=0.006. There was no difference for thromboembolism, endocarditis, and need of reoperation.Conclusion:The aortic root reconstruction with preservation of the valve should be the operation being performed for presenting lower late mortality and survival free of bleeding events.

  9. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foghsgaard, Signe; Schmidt, Thomas Andersen; Kjaergard, Henrik K

    2009-01-01

    In this descriptive prospective study, we evaluate the outcomes of surgery in 98 patients who were scheduled to undergo minimally invasive aortic valve replacement. These patients were compared with a group of 50 patients who underwent scheduled aortic valve replacement through a full sternotomy...... operations were completed as mini-sternotomies, 4 died later of noncardiac causes. The aortic cross-clamp and perfusion times were significantly different across all groups (P valve replacement...... is an excellent operation in selected patients, but its true advantages over conventional aortic valve replacement (other than a smaller scar) await evaluation by means of randomized clinical trial. The "extended mini-aortic valve replacement" operation, on the other hand, is a risky procedure that should...

  10. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for patients who would not tolerate well a traditional open operation or a less invasive operation, as ... physical reserve. So Barbara Bush recently had a traditional aortic valve replacement surgery. What makes a patient ...

  11. [MINIMALLY INVASIVE AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabata, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) is defined as aortic valve replacement avoiding full sternotomy. Common approaches include a partial sternotomy right thoracotomy, and a parasternal approach. MIAVR has been shown to have advantages over conventional AVR such as shorter length of stay and smaller amount of blood transfusion and better cosmesis. However, it is also known to have disadvantages such as longer cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times and potential complications related to peripheral cannulation. Appropriate patient selection is very important. Since the procedure is more complex than conventional AVR, more intensive teamwork in the operating room is essential. Additionally, a team approach during postoperative management is critical to maximize the benefits of MIAVR. PMID:27295772

  12. [MINIMALLY INVASIVE AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabata, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) is defined as aortic valve replacement avoiding full sternotomy. Common approaches include a partial sternotomy right thoracotomy, and a parasternal approach. MIAVR has been shown to have advantages over conventional AVR such as shorter length of stay and smaller amount of blood transfusion and better cosmesis. However, it is also known to have disadvantages such as longer cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times and potential complications related to peripheral cannulation. Appropriate patient selection is very important. Since the procedure is more complex than conventional AVR, more intensive teamwork in the operating room is essential. Additionally, a team approach during postoperative management is critical to maximize the benefits of MIAVR.

  13. Aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Nikos; Sinning, Jan-Malte

    2014-01-01

    Paravalvular aortic regurgitation (AR) negatively affects prognosis following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). As transcatheter heart valves (THV) are anchored using a certain degree of oversizing at the level of the aortic annulus, incomplete stent frame expansion because of heavily annular calcifications, suboptimal placement of the prosthesis, and/or annulus-prosthesis size-mismatch can contribute to paravalvular AR with subsequent increased mortality risk. Echocardiography is essential to differentiate between transvalvular and paravalvular AR and to further elucidate the etiology of AR during the procedure. However, because echocardiographic quantification of AR in TAVR patients remains challenging, especially in the implantation situation, a multimodal approach to the evaluation of AR with use of hemodynamic measurements and imaging modalities is useful to precisely quantify the severity of AR immediately after valve deployment. "Next-generation" THVs are already on the market and first results show that paravalvular AR related to design modifications (eg, paravalvular space-fillers, full repositionability) are rarely seen in these valve types.  PMID:24632758

  14. Reoperative transapical transcatheter aortic valve replacement for central aortic regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuanjia; Kapadia, Samir; Krishnaswamy, Amar; Svensson, Lars G; Mick, Stephanie

    2016-09-01

    Paravalvular leak-related aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a common complication and is associated with increased short- and long-term mortality. However, the impact of isolated central aortic regurgitation is unknown. We report a case of transapical (TA) TAVR with postprocedural central aortic regurgitation, who returned after two years with progression of regurgitation. A reoperative valve-in-valve TA-TAVR was performed. PMID:27405799

  15. A non-contrast self-navigated 3-dimensional MR technique for aortic root and vascular access route assessment in the context of transcatheter aortic valve replacement: proof of concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renker, Matthias [Medical University of South Carolina, Heart and Vascular Center, Charleston, SC (United States); University Hospital Giessen and Marburg, Department of Medicine I, Giessen (Germany); Varga-Szemes, Akos; Rier, Jeremy D.; Steinberg, Daniel H. [Medical University of South Carolina, Heart and Vascular Center, Charleston, SC (United States); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical University of South Carolina, Heart and Vascular Center, Charleston, SC (United States); Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Baumann, Stefan [Medical University of South Carolina, Heart and Vascular Center, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Heidelberg, 1st Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Mannheim, University Medical Centre Mannheim (UMM), Mannheim (Germany); Piccini, Davide [Siemens Healthcare IM BM PI, Advanced Clinical Imaging Technology, Lausanne (Switzerland); University Hospital (CHUV) and University of Lausanne (UNIL), Department of Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Zenge, Michael O.; Mueller, Edgar [Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, Erlangen (Germany); Rehwald, Wolfgang G. [Duke University Medical Center, Cardiovascular MR Center, Durham, NC (United States); Moellmann, Helge [Kerckhoff Heart and Thorax Center, Bad Nauheim (Germany); Hamm, Christian W. [University Hospital Giessen and Marburg, Department of Medicine I, Giessen (Germany); De Cecco, Carlo N. [Medical University of South Carolina, Heart and Vascular Center, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Rome ' ' Sapienza' ' -Polo Pontino, Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, Latina (Italy)

    2016-04-15

    Due to the high prevalence of renal failure in transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) candidates, a non-contrast MR technique is desirable for pre-procedural planning. We sought to evaluate the feasibility of a novel, non-contrast, free-breathing, self-navigated three-dimensional (SN3D) MR sequence for imaging the aorta from its root to the iliofemoral run-off in comparison to non-contrast two-dimensional-balanced steady-state free-precession (2D-bSSFP) imaging. SN3D [field of view (FOV), 220-370 mm{sup 3}; slice thickness, 1.15 mm; repetition/echo time (TR/TE), 3.1/1.5 ms; and flip angle, 115 ] and 2D-bSSFP acquisitions (FOV, 340 mm; slice thickness, 6 mm; TR/TE, 2.3/1.1 ms; flip angle, 77 ) were performed in 10 healthy subjects (all male; mean age, 30.3 ± 4.3 yrs) using a 1.5-T MRI system. Aortic root measurements and qualitative image ratings (four-point Likert-scale) were compared. The mean effective aortic annulus diameter was similar for 2D-bSSFP and SN3D (26.7 ± 0.7 vs. 26.1 ± 0.9 mm, p = 0.23). The mean image quality of 2D-bSSFP (4; IQR 3-4) was rated slightly higher (p = 0.03) than SN3D (3; IQR 2-4). The mean total acquisition time for SN3D imaging was 12.8 ± 2.4 min. Our results suggest that a novel SN3D sequence allows rapid, free-breathing assessment of the aortic root and the aortoiliofemoral system without administration of contrast medium. (orig.)

  16. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... opens freely when the heart contracts. On the right, we see a picture of the aortic valve ... the aortic valve because the probe is sitting right behind the aortic valve. Lots of patients on ...

  17. Rescue Surgery 19 Years after Composite Root and Hemiarch Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin von Aspern

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 59-year-old male patient with Marfan's syndrome was referred to our clinic due to acute chest pain. His medical history contains complex surgery for type A aortic dissection 19 years ago including composite root replacement using a mechanical aortic valve. Immediate computed tomography indicated perforation at the distal ascending aortic anastomosis plus complete avulsion of both coronary ostia. The patient underwent successful rescue surgery with ascending aortic and arch replacement using a modified Cabrol technique.

  18. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mylotte, Darren; Osnabrugge, Ruben L J; Windecker, Stephan;

    2013-01-01

    The authors sought to examine the adoption of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in Western Europe and investigate factors that may influence the heterogeneous use of this therapy.......The authors sought to examine the adoption of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in Western Europe and investigate factors that may influence the heterogeneous use of this therapy....

  19. Prophylactic aortic root surgery in patients with Marfan syndrome : 10 years' experience with a protocol based on body surface area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalberts, Jan J. J.; van Tintelen, J. Peter; Hillege, Hans L.; Boonstra, Piet W.; van den Berg, Maarten P.; Waterbolk, T

    2008-01-01

    Background: Current guidelines recommending prophylactic aortic root replacement in Marfan syndrome are based on absolute diameters of the aortic root. However, aortic root diameter is a function of body surface area (BSA). Here, we report our experience with a protocol for prophylactic aortic root

  20. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of that slide, that demonstrates that patients with New York Heart Association class heart failure 1 and ... right down the aortic valve and that's the new aortic valve that Dr. Streitman's placed. And you ...

  1. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to help prevent aortic stenosis? There's no prophylactic methods that anybody can take to prevent aortic stenosis ... it will be archived on the ORlive Web site and ORlive.com and, of course, a link ...

  2. Aortic Valve Sparing in Different Aortic Valve and Aortic Root Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Tirone E

    2016-08-01

    The development of aortic valve-sparing operations (reimplantation of the aortic valve and remodeling of the aortic root) expanded the surgical armamentarium for treating patients with aortic root dilation caused by a variety of disorders. Young adults with aortic root aneurysms associated with genetic syndromes are ideal candidates for reimplantation of the aortic valve, and the long-term results have been excellent. Incompetent bicuspid aortic valves with dilated aortic annuli are also satisfactorily treated with the same type of operation. Older patients with ascending aortic aneurysm and aortic insufficiency secondary to dilated sinotubular junction and a normal aortic annulus can be treated with remodeling of the aortic root or with reimplantation of the aortic valve. The first procedure is simpler, and both procedures are likely equally effective. As with any heart valve-preserving procedure, patient selection and surgical expertise are keys to successful and durable repairs. PMID:27491910

  3. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement in elderly patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dimytri Siqueira; Alexandre Abizaid; Magaly Arrais J.; Eduardo Sousa

    2012-01-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common native valve disease, affecting up to 5% of the elderly population. Surgical aortic valve replacement reduces symptoms and improves survival, and is the definitive therapy in patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis. However, despite the good results of classic surgery, risk is markedly increased in elderly patients with co-morbidities. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) allows implantation of a prosthetic heart valve within the diseased native aortic valve without the need for open heart surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass, offering a new therapeutic option to elderly patients considered at high surgical risk or with contraindications to surgery. To date, several multicenter registries and a randomized trial have confirmed the safety and efficacy of TAVR in those patients. In this chapter, we review the background and clinical applications of TAVR in elderly patients.

  4. Midterm Results of Aortic Valve Replacement with Cryopreserved Homografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Özker

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the midterm clinical results of aortic valve replacement with cryopreserved homografts.Materials and Methods: Aortic valve replacement was performed in 40 patients with cryopreserved homograft. The indications were aortic valve endocarditis in 20 patients (50%, truncus arteriosus in 6 patients (15%, and re-stenosis or regurtitation after aortic valve reconstruction in 14 (35% patients. The valve sizes ranged from 10 to 27mm. A full root replacement technique was used for homograft replacement in all patients.Results: The 30-day postoperative mortality rate was 12.5% (5 patients. There were four late deaths. Only one of them was related to cardiac events. Overall mortality was 22.5%. Thirty-three patients were followed up for 67±26 months. Two patients needed reoperation due to aortic aneurysm caused by endocarditis. The mean transvalvular gradient significantly decreased after valve replacement (p<0.003. The last follow up showed that the 27 (82% patients had a normal left ventricular function.Conclusion: Cryopreserved homografts are safe alternatives to mechanical valves that can be used when there are proper indications. Although it has a high perioperative mortality rate, cryopreserved homograft implantation is an alternative for valve replacement, particularly in younger patients and for complex surgical problems such as endocarditis that must be minimalized.

  5. Aortic valve replacement in octogenarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dark John H

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Aims As our population ages and life expectancy increases the number of people aged over 80 and more referred for cardiac surgery is growing. This study sought to identify the outcome of aortic valve replacement (AVR in octogenarians. Methods 68 patients aged 80 years or more underwent AVR at the Freeman Hospital, between April 2001 and April 2004. A retrospective review of the notes and outcomes from the patients' GP and the NHS strategic tracking service was performed. 54% (37 underwent isolated AVR whilst 46% (31 underwent combined AVR and CABG. Results Follow up was 100% complete. The mean age was 83.1 ± s.d. 2.9 years, a mean gradient of 83 ± s.d. 31 mmHg and mean AVA of 0.56 cm2. The mean additive EuroSCORE was 8.6 ± s.d. 1.2, the logistic EuroSCORE mean 12.0 ± s.d. 5.9. In hospital 30 day mortality was 13 %. Survival was 80% at 1 year and 78% at 2 years. Median follow up was for 712 days. Stepwise logistic regression identified chronic obstructive airways disease as an independent predictor of mortality (p Conclusion Our study demonstrates that the operative mortality for AVR in the over eighties is good, whilst the mid to long term outcome is excellent There is a very low attrition rate with those undergoing the procedure living as long than their age matched population. This study confirms AVR is a safe, acceptable treatment for octogenarians with excellent mid term outcomes.

  6. Reinforced aortic root reconstruction for acute type A aortic dissection involving the aortic root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Qing-qi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: There are debates regarding the optimal approach for AAAD involving the aortic root. We described a modified reinforced aortic root reconstruction approach for treating AAAD involving the aortic root. METHODS: A total of 161 patients with AAAD involving the aortic root were treated by our modified reinforced aortic root reconstruction approach from January 1998 to December 2008. Key features of our modified approach were placement of an autologous pericardial patch in the false lumen, lining of the sinotubular junction lumen with a polyester vascular ring, and wrapping of the vessel with Teflon strips. Outcome measures included post-operative mortality, survival, complications, and level of aortic regurgitation. RESULTS: A total of 161 patients were included in the study (mean age: 43.3 1 15.5 years. The mean duration of follow-up was 5.1 1 2.96 years (2-12 years. A total of 10 (6.2% and 11 (6.8% patients died during hospitalization and during follow-up, respectively. Thirty-one (19.3% patients experienced postoperative complications. The 1-, 3-, 5-, and 10-year survival rates were 99.3%, 98%, 93.8%, and 75.5%, respectively. There were no instances of recurrent aortic dissection, aortic aneurysm, or pseudoaneurysm during the entire study period. The severity of aortic regurgitation dramatically decreased immediately after surgery (from 28.6% to 0% grade 3-4 and thereafter slightly increased (from 0% to 7.2% at 5 years and 9.1% at 10 years. CONCLUSION: This modified reinforced aortic root reconstruction was feasible, safe and durable/effective, as indicated by its low mortality, low postoperative complications and high survival rate.

  7. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... see we've used the cautery to achieve access to the sternum. On the left hand side ... wound, which allows us to get more ready access to the aorta and the aortic valve. The ...

  8. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... No medications as such have been proven to slow that disease path life. Again, it's a progressive ... no medical therapy that has been proven to slow or reverse the process of aortic stenosis. Clearly, ...

  9. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to minimize their symptoms, but that doesn't impact the course of the disease itself. When I' ... more likely we see aortic stenosis. Again, patient education is part of the evaluation and management of ...

  10. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... symptoms and ultimately surgery may be in the future. The symptoms seen primarily with aortic stenosis at ... echocardiography is? Echocardiography is the use of ultrasound technology. Ultrasound technology is a form of the same ...

  11. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... somebody for this operation. Again, there's no medical therapy that has been proven to slow or reverse ... to their physician. This may lead to earlier treatment and better outcomes as well. Aortic stenosis, as ...

  12. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... more likely we see aortic stenosis. Again, patient education is part of the evaluation and management of ... want to embrace less invasive or more progressive technology, you want to make ... with that information and certainly shouldn't be insulted by that. ...

  13. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... well. I want to underscore again that exercise testing is really not recommended in patient with classic symptoms in severe aortic stenosis, as it's probably more stress than the patient's heart should have to undergo. Once again, serial evaluations, as with any chronic disease process, are ...

  14. Aortic root pathology in Marfan syndrome increases the risk of migraine with aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koppen, H; Vis, J C; Gooiker, D J;

    2012-01-01

    To assess the lifetime prevalence of migraine in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) and to investigate a history of aortic root replacement (AR) as a possible risk factor.......To assess the lifetime prevalence of migraine in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) and to investigate a history of aortic root replacement (AR) as a possible risk factor....

  15. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Bicuspid Aortic Valve Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mylotte, Darren; Lefevre, Thierry; Søndergaard, Lars;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Limited information exists describing the results of transcatheter aortic valve (TAV) replacement in patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) disease (TAV-in-BAV). OBJECTIVES: This study sought to evaluate clinical outcomes of a large cohort of patients undergoing TAV-in-BAV. METHODS......: We retrospectively collected baseline characteristics, procedural data, and clinical follow-up findings from 12 centers in Europe and Canada that had performed TAV-in-BAV. RESULTS: A total of 139 patients underwent TAV-in-BAV with the balloon-expandable transcatheter heart valve (THV) (n = 48...

  16. Giant Thoracic Aneurysm Following Valve Replacement for Bicuspid Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Cao; Ul Haq, Ehtesham; Nguyen, Ngoc; Omar, Bassam

    2015-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve is a common congenital anomaly associated with aortopathy, which can cause aortic root dilatation, necessitating regular screening if the aortic root is > 4.0 cm. Despite the low absolute incidence of aortic complications associated with bicuspid aortic valve in the general population, the consequences of such complications for an individual patient can be devastating. Herein we propose a balanced algorithm that incorporates recommendations from the three major guidelines for follow-up imaging of the aortic root and ascending thoracic aorta in patients with a bicuspid aortic valve, maintaining the current recommendations with regard to surgical thresholds. PMID:26827748

  17. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a significant number of mitral valve repairs utilizing robotic techniques as well, which is really outside the ... no significant bleeding. Terry asks if you do robotic valve replacement surgeries. I do not. It's a ...

  18. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... his choice. Tariq asks, can we see one day that minimally invasive techniques to replace conventional heart ... rarely need those pacemaker wires after the first day after surgery. Okay, we have another question from ...

  19. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Winkley nor myself have any financial or professional relationships with the manufacturers or the devices used in ... John, just to interrupt for moment, Charles, Charles V., asks can the mitral valve also be replaced ...

  20. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... surgery. I think as physicians we owe a responsibility to our patients to try to make procedures ... patients back annually, which we feel is our responsibility any time we do valve replacement or repair ...

  1. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... back in World War II to look for things in the water. Basically, you use sound waves ... valve replacements a year. So one of the things I 10 would counsel anybody is before they ...

  2. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at the body's surface area. We, in the operating room, have a set of sizers which allow ... proves a nice replacement. However, that's sort of operating on two valves to fix one valvular problem. ...

  3. Infective endocarditis following transcatheter aortic valve replacement-

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loh, Poay Huan; Bundgaard, Henning; S�ndergaard, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) can improve the symptoms and prognosis of patients with severe aortic stenosis who, due to a high expected operative risk, would not have otherwise been treated surgically. If these patients develop prosthetic valve endocarditis, their presentations may...... be atypical causing a delay in the diagnosis and treatment. The management is also complicated by their comorbidities, and surgical treatment may not be feasible leading to a significant morbidity and mortality. We describe a case of an 85-year-old man with TAVI prosthetic valve endocarditis successfully...

  4. Aorto-right atrial fistula after ascending aortic replacement or aortic value replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the CT features of aorto-right atrial fistula after aortic valve replacement (AVR) or ascending aortic replacement. Methods: Eighty-seven patients with aortic-right atrial fistula underwent CT after operation. The CT features were retrospectively analyzed. Fistula was measured according to maximum width of the shunt. Results: Aorto-right atrial fistula was detected in 87 patients after aortic valve replacement or ascending aortic replacement by CT scan. Among them, 25 patients were diagnosed as mild aorto-right atrial fistula, 47 patients as moderate, and 15 patients as severe. Thirty-seven patients underwent follow-up CT.Among them, 10 patients with mild to moderate aorto-right atrial fistula were considered to have complete regression, 8 patients with mild aorto-right atrial fistula considered to have incomplete regression, 14 patients with mild to moderate aorto-right atrial fistula considered to have stable condition, and 5 patients with moderate aorto-right atrial fistula considered to have progression at the 3-month follow-up. Conclusion: CT is a useful tool for defining aorto-right atrial fistula after AVR or ascending aortic replacement and for evaluating it in follow-up. (authors)

  5. Dez anos de experiência com a substituição da valva aórtica com homoenxertos valvares aórticos implantados pela técnica da substituição total da raiz Ten years experience of aortic valve replacement with aortic homograft root replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Costa

    2006-06-01

    áximo variando entre 3 a 47 mmHg (média de 14,5 mmHg, sendo que apenas dois pacientes apresentavam gradiente superior a 40mmHg. Insuficiência valvar moderada foi encontrada em quatro pacientes. CONCLUSÕES: Os resultados imediatos e tardios com a substituição da valva aórtica por homoenxerto valvar criopreservado foram excelentes, com boa capacidade funcional e baixa morbi-mortalidade tardia. O único fator de risco para a degeneração tecidual primária foi a idade do paciente menor que 20 anos. Homoenxertos aórticos representam uma excelente opção para pacientes com idade acima de 40-50 anos, especialmente naqueles com contra-indicação ou que não desejem fazer o uso de anticoagulantes.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the imediate and late results of 10 years of aortic valve root replacement with aortic homografts and to identify possible risk factors related with homograft primary tissue failure. METHODS: Between May 1995 and January 2006, 282 patients with a mean age of 52.8±16.6 years were submitted to aortic valve root replacement with an aortic homografts. The most prevalent etiologies were calcified bicuspid aortic valves and senile degeneration, corresponding to 49% of the cases. Forty-seven patients were reoperations and acute bacterial endocarditis were present in 26. Associated procedures were necessary in 113 patients. The homograft was implanted as a root replacement in all. Follow-up time varied between 1 and 129 months (mean= 41±25 months. RESULTS: Early overall mortality was 7%, with only 2.6% for cases of aortic valve replacement in isolation. Of the 262 patients discharged from hospital, it was possible to obtain clinical and echocardiographic evaluations in 209. Fifty-one patients (20% were lost in the follow-up. There were 17 late deaths between the 2nd and 81st postoperative months, which resulted in an actuarial survival rate of 90% and 80.1% at 5 and 10 years respectively. There were eight thromboembolic events (four early and four late, for a

  6. Aortic root, not valve, calcification correlates with coronary artery calcification in patients with severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henein, Michael; Hällgren, Peter; Holmgren, Anders;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The underlying pathology in aortic stenosis (AS) and coronary artery stenosis (CAS) is similar including atherosclerosis and calcification. We hypothesize that coronary artery calcification (CAC) is likely to correlate with aortic root calcification (ARC) rather than with aortic valve...... calcification (AVC), due to tissue similarity between the two types of vessel rather than with the valve leaflet tissue. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We studied 212 consecutive patients (age 72.5 ± 7.9 years, 91 females) with AS requiring aortic valve replacement (AVR) in two Heart Centers, who underwent multidetector...... even after adjusting for age (p = 0.01). AVC score was associated with BAV after adjusting for age (p = 0.03) but ARC was not. Of the total cohort, 82 patients (39%) had significant coronary stenosis (>50%), but these were not different in the pattern of calcification from those without CAS. CAC...

  7. Valve-in-Valve Replacement Using a Sutureless Aortic Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohmen, Pascal M.; Lehmkuhl, Lukas; Borger, Michael A.; Misfeld, Martin; Mohr, Friedrich W.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 61 Final Diagnosis: Tissue degeneration Symptoms: Dyspnea Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Redo valve replacement Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: We present a unique case of a 61-year-old female patient with homograft deterioration after redo surgery for prosthetic valve endocarditis with root abscess. Case Report: The first operation was performed for type A dissection with root, arch, and elephant trunk replacement of the thoracic aorta. The present re-redo surgery was performed as valve-in-valve with a sutureless aortic biopros-thesis. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on day 6. Conclusions: The current case report demonstrates that sutureless bioprostheses are an attractive option for surgical valve-in-valve procedures, which can reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:27694795

  8. Left ventricular outflow tract pseudoaneurysm formation following three aortic valve replacement surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrien E Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a pseudoaneurysm arising from the left ventricular outflow tract/aortic root as a complication of aortic valve surgery. A 45-year-old Nigerian female presented to our institution′s emergency department with chest discomfort. She had three bioprosthetic aortic valve replacements in the preceding year at an outside institution for aortic regurgitation and wanted a second opinion on remaining surgical options. The learning points relevant to this case are as follows: (1 Recognizing potential complications postmultiple valve surgeries, (2 screening patients for chronic infections and rheumatologic conditions that can contribute to failed valve surgeries.

  9. Transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis surgically replaced 4 months after implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Lund, Jens Teglgaard; Engstrøm, Thomas;

    2010-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a new and rapidly evolving treatment option for high-risk surgical patients with degenerative aortic valve stenosis. Long-term results with these new valve prostheses are lacking, and potential valve dysfunction and failure would require valve replacement....... We report the first case of surgical valve replacement in a patient with a dysfunctional transcatheter-implanted aortic valve prosthesis 4 months after implantation....

  10. New-Onset Atrial Fibrillation After Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Troels Højsgaard; Thygesen, Julie Bjerre; Thyregod, Hans Gustav;

    2015-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and, more recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have been shown to be the only treatments that can improve the natural cause of severe aortic valve stenosis. However, after SAVR and TAVI, the incidence of new-onset atrial fibrillation...

  11. New-onset atrial fibrillation after surgical aortic valve replacement and transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Troels Højsgaard; Thygesen, Julie Bjerre; Thyregod, Hans Gustav;

    2015-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and, more recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have been shown to be the only treatments that can improve the natural cause of severe aortic valve stenosis. However, after SAVR and TAVI, the incidence of new-onset atrial fibrillation...

  12. Factors influencing long-term survival after aortic valve replacement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigenobu,Masaharu

    1980-06-01

    Full Text Available In the aortic stenosis group, the left ventricular (LV muscle mass index was a good parameter for predicting the prognosis. Associated mitral valve disease had no influence on long term survival after aortic valve replacement. In the aortic insufficiency group, associated mitral valve disease had a marked influence on the results of aortic valve replacement. In general, the aortic insufficiency group had less clinical improvement postoperatively than the aortic stenosis group. In the annuloaortic ectasia group, left ventricular enddiastolic pressure (LVEDP might be the predictor to the prognosis. This group had the worst prognosis, of the three groups. Early operation should be considered for patients who have no, or only mild symptoms of, aortic valve disease.

  13. Medtronic Freestyle Aortic Root Bioprosthesis Implantation for the Infective Endocarditis on Aortic Root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zekeriya Arslan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available    Infective endocarditis and periannular abscess formation are serious problems in cardiac valve surgery, requiring extensive surgical debridement and reconstruction of the aortic annulus. We aimed to report two cases which were successfully treated with bioprosthetic valve implantation for infective endocarditis. Transosephageal echocardiography were performed for the diagnosis of one prosthetic and one native destructive aortic valve endocarditis in association with congestive heart failure (NYHA class-VI and abscess formation. Medtronic Freestyle stentless aortic root bioprosthesis was implanted into the left ventricular outflow tract after surgical radical aortic root debridement for each patient followed with medical treatment, which was extended to six weeks. Neither early nor late mortality was detected. One patient required prolonged ventilatory support (two days and permanent DDD-R pacing. Echocardiography showed no signs of valve dysfunction or recurrent endocarditis for both patients in 10 months follow up.Medtronic Freestyle stentless aortic root bioprosthesis may be a good alternative way of treatment to aortic valve and root endocarditis instead of homograft.

  14. Transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis surgically replaced 4 months after implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Lund, Jens Teglgaard; Engstrøm, Thomas;

    2010-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a new and rapidly evolving treatment option for high-risk surgical patients with degenerative aortic valve stenosis. Long-term results with these new valve prostheses are lacking, and potential valve dysfunction and failure would require valve replacemen....... We report the first case of surgical valve replacement in a patient with a dysfunctional transcatheter-implanted aortic valve prosthesis 4 months after implantation....

  15. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in a Nonagenarian

    OpenAIRE

    Kneitz, Abby; Clifton, William; Kar, Biswajit; Delgado, Reynolds M.

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 30% to 40% of elderly patients with severe, symptomatic aortic valve stenosis are deemed ineligible for surgery because of high perioperative risk. We describe the use of an alternative transfemoral approach known as transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a nonagenarian patient with severe aortic stenosis. Our patient recovered successfully, and by the time of her most recent follow-up visit, 7 months after the procedure, she had regained a substantial degree of function. Th...

  16. Acute myocardial ischemia after aortic valve replacement: A comprehensive diagnostic evaluation using dynamic multislice spiral computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lembcke, Alexander [Department of Radiology, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Freie Universitaet Berlin and Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany)]. E-mail: alexander.lembcke@gmx.de; Hein, Patrick A. [Department of Radiology, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Freie Universitaet Berlin and Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Enzweiler, Christian N.H. [Department of Radiology, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Freie Universitaet Berlin and Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Hoffmann, Udo [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Klessen, Christian [Department of Radiology, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Freie Universitaet Berlin and Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Dohmen, Pascal M. [Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Freie Universitaet Berlin and Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    We describe the case of a 72-year-old man presenting with endocarditis and clinical signs of acute myocardial ischemia after biological aortic valve replacement. A comprehensive cardiac dynamic multislice spiral computed tomography demonstrated: (1) an endocarditic vegetation of the aortic valve; (2) a subvalvular leakage feeding a paravalvular pseudoaneurysm based on an aortic root abscess with subsequent compromise of the systolic blood flow in the left main coronary artery and the resulting myocardial perfusion deficit.

  17. Haemostasis monitoring during sequential aortic valve replacement and liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieders, E.; De Somer, F.; Bouchez, S.; Szegedi, L.; Van Belleghem, Y.; Colle, I.; Troisi, R.

    2010-01-01

    Despite advances in anaesthesiological and surgical techniques, cardiac surgery in cirrhotic patients remains hazardous. This report outlines our experience with haemostasis monitoring in two consecutive cases of sequential aortic valve replacement and liver transplantation. Clotting disturbances pr

  18. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation versus surgical aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis: a meta analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yi-cheng; ZHANG Jian-feng; SHEN Wei-feng; ZHAO Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has emerged as the treatment choice for non-operable patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) and may be a good alternative to surgery for those at very high or prohibitive surgical risk.We performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the comparative benefits of TAVI versus surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in patients with severe AS.Methods A comprehensive literature search of PubMed,Embase,ScienceDirect and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled trials was performed,and randomized trials as well as cohort studies with propensity score analysis were included.Results One randomized trial (n=699) and six retrospective cohort studies (n=781) were selected for meta-analysis.Mortality at 30-day and 1-year follow-up was comparable between TAVI and SAVR.Despite similar incidences of stroke,myocardial infarction,re-operation for bleeding,and renal failure requiring dialysis,TAVI was associated with a lower occurrence rate of new-onset atrial fibrillation (OR 0.51,95% CI 0.33-0.78) and shorter procedural time (mean difference -67.50 minutes,95% CI-87.20 to-47.81 minutes).Post-operative aortic regurgitation and permanent pacemaker implantation were more common in patients after TAVI than in those with SAVR (OR 5.53,95% CI 3.41-8.97; OR 1.71,95% Cl 1.02-2.84,respectively).Conclusion In patients with severe symptomatic AS,TAVI and SAVR did not differ with respect to short-and mid-term survival,but the incidence of permanent pacemaker implantation and post-procedural aortic regurgitation remain relatively high after TAVI.

  19. Transcatheter Versus Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Steinbrüchel, Daniel Andreas; Ihlemann, Nikolaj;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an option in certain high-risk surgical patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. It is unknown whether TAVR can be safely introduced to lower-risk patients. OBJECTIVES: The NOTION (Nordic Aortic Valve Intervention Trial) randomized...... clinical trial compared TAVR with surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in an all-comers patient cohort. METHODS: Patients ≥ 70 years old with severe aortic valve stenosis and no significant coronary artery disease were randomized 1:1 to TAVR using a self-expanding bioprosthesis versus SAVR. The primary...... conduction abnormalities requiring pacemaker implantation, larger improvement in effective orifice area, more total aortic valve regurgitation, and higher New York Heart Association functional class at 1 year. SAVR-treated patients had more major or life-threatening bleeding, cardiogenic shock, acute kidney...

  20. Aortic valve and ascending aortic root modeling from 3D and 3D+t CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grbic, Saša; Ionasec, Razvan I.; Zäuner, Dominik; Zheng, Yefeng; Georgescu, Bogdan; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2010-02-01

    Aortic valve disorders are the most frequent form of valvular heart disorders (VHD) affecting nearly 3% of the global population. A large fraction among them are aortic root diseases, such as aortic root aneurysm, often requiring surgical procedures (valve-sparing) as a treatment. Visual non-invasive assessment techniques could assist during pre-selection of adequate patients, planning procedures and afterward evaluation of the same. However state of the art approaches try to model a rather short part of the aortic root, insufficient to assist the physician during intervention planning. In this paper we propose a novel approach for morphological and functional quantification of both the aortic valve and the ascending aortic root. A novel physiological shape model is introduced, consisting of the aortic valve root, leaflets and the ascending aortic root. The model parameters are hierarchically estimated using robust and fast learning-based methods. Experiments performed on 63 CT sequences (630 Volumes) and 20 single phase CT volumes demonstrated an accuracy of 1.45mm and an performance of 30 seconds (3D+t) for this approach. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time a complete model of the aortic valve (including leaflets) and the ascending aortic root, estimated from CT, has been proposed.

  1. Fluid dynamics of aortic root dilation in Marfan syndrome

    CERN Document Server

    Querzoli, Giorgio; Espa, Stefania; Costantini, Martina; Sorgini, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Aortic root dilation and propensity to dissection are typical manifestations of the Marfan Syndrome (MS), a genetic defect leading to the degeneration of the elastic fibres. Dilation affects the structure of the flow and, in turn, altered flow may play a role in vessel dilation, generation of aneurysms, and dissection. The aim of the present work is the investigation in-vitro of the fluid dynamic modifications occurring as a consequence of the morphological changes typically induced in the aortic root by MS. A mock-loop reproducing the left ventricle outflow tract and the aortic root was used to measure time resolved velocity maps on a longitudinal symmetry plane of the aortic root. Two dilated model aortas, designed to resemble morphological characteristics typically observed in MS patients, have been compared to a reference, healthy geometry. The aortic model was designed to quantitatively reproduce the change of aortic distensibility caused by MS. Results demonstrate that vorticity released from the valve ...

  2. Dilatation and Dysfunction of the Neo-aortic Root and in 76 Patients After the Ross Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Corina A; Weber, Roland; Greutmann, Matthias; Dave, Hitendu; Müller, Christoph; Prêtre, René; Seifert, Burkhardt; Buechel, Emanuela Valsangiacomo; Kretschmar, Oliver; Attenhofer Jost, Christine H

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary autograft replacement (Ross procedure) is used as an alternative to prosthetic aortic valve replacement patients with aortic valve disease. There are limited data on incidence and risk factors for dilatation and dysfunction of the neo-aortic after the Ross procedure. Ross procedure was performed in 100 patients at our institution between 1993 and 2011. In 76 patients, complete follow-up data were available. Their median age at surgery was 16 (0.4-58) years (76 % males; 95 % with congenital aortic valve disease). Median follow-up duration was 5.2 years (0.3-16.0 years). We analyzed their clinical and echocardiographic follow-up to identify possible risk factors for neo-aortic root dilatation and dysfunction. Ross procedure included reduction plasty of the native ascending aorta in 25 % of patients. During follow-up, 21 patients (28 %) developed neo-aortic root dilatation, 38 patients (50 %) dilatation oft the native ascending aorta and 7 patients (9 %) at least moderate neo-aortic regurgitation. Univariate risk factors for neo-aortic root dilatation were preoperative aortic regurgitation (p = 0.04), concomitant reduction plasty of the ascending aorta (p = 0.009) and a longer duration of follow-up (p = 0.005). Younger age at surgery was associated with dilatation of the ascending aorta (p = 0.03). Reoperation on the neo-aortic root because of severe dilatation was necessary in 6 patients (8 %), where 2 patients had at least moderate neo-aortic root regurgitation. Neo-aortic root and aortic dilatation are common after the Ross procedure. This is often combined with neo-aortic valve dysfunction. Close follow-up of these patients is mandatory.

  3. Left ventricular muscle mass regression after aortic valve replacement.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, J. W.; Choi, K. J.; Lee, S G; Choo, S. J.; Kim, J.O.; Kang, D H; Song, J.K.; Song, M. G.

    1999-01-01

    Implanting a valve that will reduce left ventricular mass is critical in aortic stenosis. Regression of left ventricular hypertrophy in 46 aortic valve replacement (AVR) patients receiving a St. Jude Medical (SJM) valve was assessed by serial electrocardiographic and echocardiographic studies during the preoperative, immediate, and late postoperative periods. The patients were divided into three groups according to valve size; 19 mm group (n=9), 21 mm group (n=20), and 23+mm group (n=17). The...

  4. Aortic root size and prevalence of aortic regurgitation in elite strength trained athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaee Bigi, Mohammad Ali; Aslani, Amir

    2007-08-01

    Athletes involved in mainly static or isometric exercise (e.g., weight lifting, power lifting, and bodybuilding) develop pressure overloads due to the high systemic arterial pressure found in this type of exercise. It is hypothesized that chronically elevated aortic wall tension in strength-trained athletes is associated with aortic dilatation and regurgitation. The aim of this study was to evaluate aortic root size and the prevalence of aortic regurgitation in elite strength-trained athletes. The cohort included 100 male athletes (mean age 22.1 +/- 3.6 years; all were finalists or medalists in the country) and 128 healthy age- and height-matched subjects (the control group). Aortic root diameters at end-diastole were measured at 4 locations: (1) the aortic annulus, (2) the sinuses of Valsalva, (3) the sinotubular junction, and (4) the maximal diameter of the proximal ascending aorta. Aortic root diameters at all levels were significantly greater in the strength-trained athletes (p 18 and 36 and 54 months), progressive enlargement was found at all aortic diameters. In conclusion, aortic root diameters in all segments of the aortic root were significantly greater in elite strength-trained athletes compared with an age- and height-matched population.

  5. SERUM MAGNESIUM LEVELS IN AORTIC AND MITRAL VALVE REPLACEMENT SURGERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa Rao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : The purpose of the study was to analyze serum magnesium concentration in patients undergoing Aortic and Mitral Valve replacement surgeries. METHODS: This prospective study was conducted in 60 patients who underwent elective Aortic and Mitral va lve replacement surgeries. Blood samples from radial artery were collected just before induction of anesthesia and three days post - operatively for estimation of serum magnesium. RESULTS: Magnesium level was 2.02mg/dl at baseline, 2.28mg/dl, 2.08mg/dl and 1 .90mg/dl respectively on three consecutive days post - operatively. CONCLUSION: The lowering of serum magnesium in Aortic and Mitral valve replacement surgeries postoperatively recommends the use of routine serum magnesium determination and administration to prevent post - operative arrhythmias.

  6. Recent developments for surgical aortic valve replacement: the concept of sutureless valve technology

    OpenAIRE

    Carrel, Thierry; Englberger, Lars; Stalder, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Aortic stenosis has become the most frequent type of valvular heart disease in Europe and North America and presents in the large majority of patients as calcified aortic stenosis in adults of advanced age. Surgical aortic valve replacement has been recognized to be the definitive therapy which improves considerably survival for severe aortic stenosis since more than 40 years. In the most recent period, operative mortality of isolated aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis varies betwee...

  7. Anatomics Knowledges of Aortic Root in the Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelo Cerezo; Omar Bertani; Gisela Panciroli; Sebastián Duhalde; Karina Ferreira; Luciano Honaine

    2010-01-01

    The Aortic Valve is a valvular system that bears different high pressure forces. It takes part of a complex structure called Aortic Root. Nowadays, anatomic knowledge has taken a preponderant role, due to the use of the Transcatether Aortic Valve Implant (TAVI). To describe the patient´s characteristics which exclude them of the TAVI for anatomic reasons in cadaveric dissections and transthoracic echocardiograms. A descriptive retrospective analysis of 67 individuals was performed and divided...

  8. Thrombocytosis following splenectomy and aortic valve replacement for idiopathic thrombocytopaenic purpura with bicuspid aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarika Katiyar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic thrombocytopaenic purpura (ITP patients are at high risk for complications during and after cardiac surgeries involving cardiopulmonary bypass. The main clinical problem of primary ITP is an increased risk of bleeding although bleeding may not always be present. More recently, thrombosis has become appreciated as another potential complication of the procedure. We report a 22-year-old female patient with ITP with bicuspid aortic valve and splenomegaly, who underwent uncomplicated aortic valve replacement and splenectomy simultaneously. She was readmitted with chest pain due to coronary thrombosis following splenectomy which made the management difficult. We describe our experience in managing this patient who presented with thrombotic complication rather than bleeding in post-operative period and the challenges met in maintaining appropriate anticoagulation for aortic valve replacement as well as thrombosis, post-splenectomy

  9. Marfan syndrome in children and adolescents: predictive and prognostic value of aortic root growth for screening for aortic complications

    OpenAIRE

    Groenink, M; Rozendaal, L; Naeff, M.S.J.; Hennekam, R.C.M.; Hart, A.A.M.; Wall; Mulder, B.J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To assess and measure the diagnostic and prognostic value of individual aortic root growth in children and adolescents with Marfan syndrome.
Design—From 1983 to 1996, 250 children were screened for Marfan syndrome. Serial echocardiographic aortic root measurements of 123 children (57 Marfan, 66 control) were available for evaluation of aortic root growth. Aortic root diameters were correlated with body surface area. Based on individual growth of the aortic root a discrimination form...

  10. Has percutaneous aortic valve replacement taken center stage in the treatment of aortic valve disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Gideon Praveen; Cui, Fangsen; Mathew, Lazar; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2013-01-01

    Modern biomedical advances have propelled percutaneous valve replacement into an effective and powerful therapy for many heart valve diseases, especially aortic valve stenosis. Experiences so far suggest that outcomes for new percutaneous valve replacement surgery compare favorably with that of traditional valve surgery in selected patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. The inception of percutaneous aortic valve replacement (PAVR) began in 1992 when the potential for treating valve diseases was demonstrated through a modern technique of endoluminal deployment of a catheter-mounted crimped stented heart valve in an animal model. The first successful demonstration of such novel technique of surgical replacement of a heart valve was performed in 2002, when valve implantation in a patient with aortic stenosis was reported. Despite initial stumbles and a perception of being an uphill task, PAVR has emerged as one of the breakthroughs in surgical procedures. More than 1500 citations were found in PubMed, half of which were available after 2011. This is primarily because more than 50,000 procedures are being performed in more than 40 countries worldwide, with encouraging outcomes, and several stented valves have been launched in the market. This review provides a detailed analysis of the current state of the art of PAVR. Moreover, a competitive landscape of various devices available in the market and their design considerations, biomaterial selections, and overall hemodynamic performance are presented. PMID:24941416

  11. Minimal-access median sternotomy for aortic valve replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Luciani, Giovanni Battista; Lucchese, Gianluca

    2013-01-01

    A variety of minimally-invasive approaches for aortic valve replacement (AVR) have been developed and are increasingly being utilized. The different approaches described, such as partial upper sternotomy, right parasternal thoracotomy or transverse sternotomy have the aim to decrease invasiveness and reduce surgical trauma. Whereas port access surgery with remote cannulation has the attendant risks inherent with peripheral cardiopulmonary bypass and limitations in terms of myocardial protecti...

  12. Simulation of the fluid dynamics in artificial aortic roots: comparison of two different types of prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bara, Christoph L; Verhey, Janko F

    2008-01-01

    As a consequence of the growing number of elderly people, the incidence of degenerative aortic diseases continues to increase. Often, artificial aortic roots are needed to replace the native tissue. Some physical characteristics of the artificial aortic root, however, are quite different from native aorta and need to be optimized. The supposed benefit of a prosthesis with artificial sinuses of Valsalva could first be checked by numerical calculations. Two simplified base geometries were used for simulating the flow and pressure distributions, especially in the coronary arteries. One model approximates the ascending aorta as a tube, and the other uses a design with toroidal dilation of the aortic root to approximate the native geometry of the sinuses of Valsalva. The flow and pressure distributions in both models were compared in the ascending aorta as well as in the right and the left coronary arteries. Both the pressure and the velocity distribution in the coronary artery region were not significantly higher in the model with the sinus design compared to the tube model. The sinus design only slightly increased the mean pressures and the velocities in both the ascending aorta and in the coronary arteries. Higher pressure in the coronary arteries should improve the blood circulation and decrease the risk of a surgery-related coronary incident. The sinus design did not show the hoped-for benefits, and therefore it is only a minor factor in optimizing future aortic root prostheses.

  13. Acute Right Coronary Ostial Stenosis during Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarwar Umran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of acute right coronary artery stenosis developing in a patient undergoing aortic valve replacement. We present a case report with a brief overview of the literature relating to coronary artery occlusion associated with cardiac valve surgery - the theories and treatments are discussed. A 85 year-old female was admitted under the care of the cardiothoracic team with signs and symptoms of heart failure. Investigations, including cardiac echocardiography and coronary angiography, indicated a critical aortic valve stenosis. Intraoperative right ventricular failure ensued post aortic valve replacement. Subsequent investigations revealed an acute occlusion of the proximal right coronary artery with resultant absence of distal flow supplying the right ventricle. An immediate right coronary artery bypass procedure was performed with resolution of the right ventricular failure. Subsequent weaning off cardiopulmonary bypass was uneventful and the patient continued to make excellent recovery in the postoperative phase. To our knowledge this is one of the few documented cases of intraoperative acute coronary artery occlusion developing during valve surgery. However, surgeons should be aware of the potential for acute occlusion so that early recognition and rapid intervention can be instituted.

  14. Vascular Complications Associated with Transfemoral Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, George L; Jaspan, Vita; Kelly, Brian J; Calixte, Rose

    2016-06-01

    Background Transfemoral aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a novel technique for treating aortic stenosis, yet vascular complications are yet to be delineated. Objectives This study aims to study the vascular complications of TAVR with Edwards Sapien valves (Edwards Lifesciences Corp., Irvine, CA). Methods We performed a retrospective evaluation of TAVR patients. Standard demographics, femoral vessel and sheath size, access type (femoral cut-down [FC], percutaneous access [PFA], and iliac conduit [IC]), and treatment method were recorded. Complications were defined by the Valve Academic Research Consortium Criteria. Logistic regression was used for statistical analysis. Results A total of 99 patients underwent TAVR between February 15, 2012 and July 17, 2013 with an Edwards Sapien valve. Out of which, 48 were males with a mean age of 83 ± 7 years. Overall, 33 had FC, 58 had PFA, and 6 had an IC. A total of 17 major (2 aortic and 15 iliac) and 38 minor complications (36 access and 2 emboli) occurred. Aortic complications were managed by open repair (OR, 1) or percutaneous repair (PR, 1). Overall, 12 iliac injuries were managed by PR and 3 by OR. Out of the 33 groin complications in FC patients 8 (24%) were treated by OR, whereas 30 (52%) of the 58 groin complications in PTA patients were treated by PR. There were no differences in transfusion requirements or length of stay. Conclusion Vascular complications of TAVR are common with most being minor, related to access site and causing no immediate sequelae. Iliac injury can be managed by PR or OR. Aortic injury is associated with significant mortality. These findings increase vascular surgeons' awareness of these complications and how to manage them. PMID:27231425

  15. When and how to replace the aortic arch for type A dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bartolomeo, Roberto; Leone, Alessandro; Di Marco, Luca; Pacini, Davide

    2016-07-01

    Acute type A aortic dissection (AAAD) remains one of the most challenging diseases in cardiothoracic surgery and despite numerous innovations in medical and surgical management, early mortality remains high. The standard treatment of AAAD requires emergency surgery of the proximal aorta, preventing rupture and consequent cardiac tamponade. Resection of the primary intimal tear and repair of the aortic root and aortic valve are well-established surgical principles. However, the dissection in the aortic arch and descending untreated aorta remains. This injury is associated with the risk of subsequent false lumen dilatation potentially progressing to rupture, true lumen compression and distal malperfusion. Additionally, the dilatation of the aortic arch, the presence of a tear and retrograde dissection can all be considered indication for a total arch replacement in AAAD. In such cases a more aggressive strategy may be used, from the classic aortic arch operation to a single stage frozen elephant trunk (FET) technique or a two-stage approach such as the classical elephant trunk (ET) or the recent Lupiae technique. Although these are all feasible solutions, they are also complex and time demanding techniques requiring experience and expertise, with an in the length of cardiopulmonary bypass and both myocardial and visceral ischemia. Effective methods of cerebral, myocardial as well visceral protection are necessary to obtain acceptable results in terms of hospital mortality and morbidity. Moreover, a correct assessment of the anatomy of the dissection, through the preoperative angio CT scan, in addition to the clinical condition of the patients, remain the decision points for the best arch repair strategy to use in AAAD. PMID:27563552

  16. Aortic replacement in aorto-occlusive disease: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winter Richard K

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For many patients with aorto-occlusive disease, where stent deployment is not possible, surgery remains the only treatment option available. The aim of this study was to assess the results of aortic reconstruction surgery performed in patients with critical ischaemia. Methods All patients with critical ischaemia undergoing surgery during 1991–2004 were identified from a prospectively maintained database. Mortality data was verified against death certificate data. Demographic and clinical data were obtained from the clinical notes and the radiology database. Disease was classified as: type I – limited to aorta and common iliac arteries; type II – external iliac disease and type III combined aortic, iliac and infra-inguinal disease. Results 86 patients underwent aortic replacement surgery all of whom had critical ischaemia consisting of: type I (n = 16; type II (n = 37 and type III (n = 33. The 30-day mortality rate was 10.4%, the one-year patient survival was 80%, and the 1-year graft survival was 80%. At 2 years the actual patient survival was 73% and no additional graft losses were identified. All patients surviving 30 days reported excellent symptomatic relief. Early, complications occurred in 6 (7% patients: thrombosis within diseased superficial femoral arteries (n = 4; haemorrhage and subsequent death (n = 2. Ten (14% late complications (> 12 months occurred in the 69 surviving patients and included: anastomotic stenosis (n = 3; graft thrombosis (n = 4, graft infection (n = 3. Four patients developed claudication as a result of more distal disease in the presence of a patent graft, and 1 patient who continued smoking required an amputation for progressive distal disease. Conclusion Aortic reconstruction for patients with extensive aorto-occlussive disease provides long-standing symptomatic relief for the majority of patients. After the first year, there is continued patient attrition due to co

  17. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement: current application and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassa, Amir-Ali; Himbert, Dominique; Vahanian, Alec

    2013-04-01

    During the last decade, the rapid evolution of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has revolutionized the treatment of severe aortic stenosis. Since the PARTNER A and B trials, this technique has become the treatment of reference for inoperable patients, and an attractive alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement in those at high risk for surgery. Large multicenter registries conducted since 2007, mainly in Europe, confirmed the excellent hemodynamic performances of the 2 percutaneous valves currently available on the market, the Edwards SAPIEN, and the Medtronic CoreValve, as well as their benefits in terms of symptom relief and survival. The whole process of TAVR, from patient selection to post-procedural care and result evaluation, should be conducted by a dedicated multidisciplinary "heart team," within centers with expertise in valve disease. Though currently limited to those deemed at high risk for surgery or inoperable, indications for TAVR will likely be extended to a broader spectrum of patients, in particular those with surgical bioprosthetic failure or at intermediate risk for surgery. Beforehand, it will be essential to obtain more extensive data on the durability of percutaneous prostheses, since the available follow-up is seldom longer than 5 years, and in order to further decrease the rate of complications, mainly stroke, paravalvular regurgitation, and access site complications. Furthermore, the use of the transfemoral route will undoubtedly increase because of the miniaturization of the devices, at the expense of other approaches. Above all, multidisciplinary approach, excellent imaging, and careful evaluation will remain key to the success of this technique. PMID:23420448

  18. Effect of candesartan treatment on left ventricular remodeling after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbaek, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K;

    2010-01-01

    group had greater improvement in longitudinal LV systolic function assessed by tissue Doppler S' wave (0.6 +/- 0.1-cm/s increase in control group vs 1.4 +/- 0.1 cm/s in candesartan group, p = 0.01, p for trend = 0.02) and a decrease in LA volume (p for trend = 0.01). Treatment had no effect on diastolic......In hypertension, angiotensin receptor blockers can augment regression of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy. It is not known whether this also is the case after aortic valve replacement (AVR) for severe aortic stenosis (AS). To test the hypothesis that treatment with candesartan in addition...... to conventional treatment is able to augment LV and left atrial (LA) reverse remodeling in patients with AS undergoing AVR, we studied 114 patients scheduled for AVR. Patients were randomized to treatment with candesartan 32 mg 1 time/day or conventional therapy immediately after AVR. Patients were followed...

  19. Anatomics Knowledges of Aortic Root in the Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cerezo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The Aortic Valve is a valvular system that bears different high pressure forces. It takes part of a complex structure called Aortic Root. Nowadays, anatomic knowledge has taken a preponderant role, due to the use of the Transcatether Aortic Valve Implant (TAVI. To describe the patient´s characteristics which exclude them of the TAVI for anatomic reasons in cadaveric dissections and transthoracic echocardiograms. A descriptive retrospective analysis of 67 individuals was performed and divided into two groups. Group A: Formalized cadaveric dissections with hypertrofic hearts and aortic sclerosis signs from the Chair A of Anatomy of the University of La Plata (UNLP. Group B: Transthoracic Echocardiograms realized at the San Martín Hospital of La Plata between January 2005 and December 2009. Out of 67 individuals assessed, 17 (25% had one or more contraindications for TAVI. Five on Group A (36%, and 12 on Group B (23%. The most common anatomic contraindication was the Ascending Aortic diameter less than 30mm and the aortic annulus less than 20mm, following to the RAo-TSVI Angle more than 145° (2 to Group A, and 4 to Group B and the Septal thickness more than 17mm (no one to Group A, and 3 to Group B. Only just one individual was found with a low implant left coronary artery in the Group A avoiding TAVI. According to this study, the anatomic contraindications to realize TAVI are frequent due to the diagnosis devices available at the moment. The anatomic aortic root knowledge and the aortic valve interindividual variability will allow the improvement of the manufactured devices made in the market.

  20. En bloc aortic and mitral valve replacement and left ventricular outflow tract enlargement using a combined transaortic and trans-septal atrial approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mohammed; Windsor, Jimmy; Ricci, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Aortic and mitral valve replacement with division and reconstruction of the inter-valvular fibrous body has been described in clinical situations involving infective endocarditis, extensive annular calcifications and diminutive valve annuli. Herein, we describe a combined transaortic and trans-septal approach with division of the inter-valvular fibrosa for combined aortic and mitral valve replacement. The reconstruction of the inter-valvular fibrous body, atrial walls and aortic root was carried out using a 'three-patch' technique with bovine pericardium. PMID:26409564

  1. Giant Aortic Root Aneurysm Presenting as Acute Type A Aortic Dissection

    OpenAIRE

    Raz, Guy M.; Stamou, Sotiris C.

    2014-01-01

    A 49-year-old woman with four months of increasing episodic palpitations, chest pain, and shortness of breath presented to an outside clinic where a new 4/6 systolic ejection murmur was identified. A transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a large aortic root aneurysm. The patient underwent emergent repair of the dissected root aneurysm with a modified Bentall procedure utilizing a #19 St Jude Valsalva mechanical valve conduit. Postoperatively, she required a permanent pacemaker placement. Her ...

  2. Hemolytic Anemia after Aortic Valve Replacement: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feridoun Sabzi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic anemia is exceedingly rare and an underestimated complication after aortic valve replacement (AVR.The mechanism responsible for hemolysis most commonly involves a regurgitated flow or jet that related to paravalvar leak or turbulence of subvalvar stenosis. It appears to be independent of its severity as assessed by echocardiography. We present a case of a 24-year-old man with a history of AVR in 10 year ago that developed severe hemolytic anemia due to a mild subvalvar stenosis caused by pannus formation and mild hypertrophic septum. After exclusion of other causes of hemolytic anemia and the lack of clinical and laboratory improvement, the patient underwent redo valve surgery with pannus and subvalvar hypertrophic septum resection. Anemia and heart failure symptoms gradually resolved after surgery

  3. Implante de tubo valvulado bioprótese "stentless" em posição aórtica: estudo experimental em ovinos A juvenile sheep model for the stentless bioprostheses implanted as aortic root replacements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo César SANTOS

    2002-03-01

    primitive position, but using tricuspid and mitral ones or inserting it in the descending aortic area. Taking that into account, it would be relevant to observe results in those studies in which the conclusions are based on their original implantation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty young sheep, 28 males and 2 females, were operated on. Ages ranged 4.4 to 6.3 months and weights 25 to 37 Kg. Extra corporeal circulation (ECC was applied to all the animals, always guided by the conventional criteria, that is to say, the arterial cannula was inserted in the thoracic aorta just past the arterious ducts and the venous cannulae, a single one, was placed in the right atrium. The operation was performed according to the principle of moderately low body temperature- 29ºC- and cold cristalloid cardioplegia, in the aortic root, to induce; but otherwise was utilized blood to the maintenance. Following with the technique proposed, the aortic valve of the animal heart was completely excised and finally implanted the valved tube stentless, not forgetting the refixation of the coronary main. The sheep were kept in clinical and laboratorial observation during thirty days in what was included a echocardiogram in the end. RESULTS: The results demonstrated 8 intraoperatory deaths (26.6%, and 6 during the following (27.7%. The mean time of ECC was 98 minutes. The dimension of the majority prothetics valves were 21 and 23. Only two valves evoluted with mild insufficiency, none denoted evidences of the endocarditis neither of leaflets perfuration, the mean fraction of ejection was 74%, the left ventricle had its wall preserved in all cases. CONCLUSION: This experimental model can certainly reproduce nearly the reality, confirming good parameters of prothetics stentless evaluation in the aortic position. And the sheep declared itself to be pleasant, which helps us its control during the whole study.

  4. Myocardial Infarction and Aortic Root Mycotic Aneurysm Complicating Aortic Valve Endocarditis: Utility of Cardiac CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, Aimee E; Cahill, Michael S; Villines, Todd C

    2016-01-01

    Aortic mycotic aneurysms are a rare but life-threatening potential complication of infective endocarditis. Rapid deterioration of the vascular wall in highly focal areas makes these pseudoaneurysms particularly prone to rupture, resulting in uncontrolled aortic hemorrhage. While computed tomography angiography (CTA) is the imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of mycotic aneurysms, it is not routinely performed in patients with known or suspected infective endocarditis (IE). However, current valvular heart disease guidelines support the use of cardiac CTA in cases of IE and suspected perivalvular extension when there is inadequate or ambiguous visualization on echocardiography. Here, we describe a case of IE in which cardiac CTA was used for two purposes: to assess perivalvular complications and to define coronary anatomy in a patient with a suspected embolic myocardial infarction. Subsequent detection of an aortic root mycotic aneurysm not previously demonstrated on transthoracic or transesophageal echocardiography allowed for timely and uncomplicated surgical intervention, while avoiding invasive coronary angiography. PMID:27642299

  5. Functional Heart Valve Scaffolds Obtained by Complete Decellularization of Porcine Aortic Roots in a Novel Differential Pressure Gradient Perfusion System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierad, Leslie Neil; Shaw, Eliza Laine; Bina, Alexander; Brazile, Bryn; Rierson, Nicholas; Patnaik, Sourav S; Kennamer, Allison; Odum, Rebekah; Cotoi, Ovidiu; Terezia, Preda; Branzaniuc, Klara; Smallwood, Harrison; Deac, Radu; Egyed, Imre; Pavai, Zoltan; Szanto, Annamaria; Harceaga, Lucian; Suciu, Horatiu; Raicea, Victor; Olah, Peter; Simionescu, Agneta; Liao, Jun; Movileanu, Ionela; Harpa, Marius; Simionescu, Dan Teodor

    2015-12-01

    There is a great need for living valve replacements for patients of all ages. Such constructs could be built by tissue engineering, with perspective of the unique structure and biology of the aortic root. The aortic valve root is composed of several different tissues, and careful structural and functional consideration has to be given to each segment and component. Previous work has shown that immersion techniques are inadequate for whole-root decellularization, with the aortic wall segment being particularly resistant to decellularization. The aim of this study was to develop a differential pressure gradient perfusion system capable of being rigorous enough to decellularize the aortic root wall while gentle enough to preserve the integrity of the cusps. Fresh porcine aortic roots have been subjected to various regimens of perfusion decellularization using detergents and enzymes and results compared to immersion decellularized roots. Success criteria for evaluation of each root segment (cusp, muscle, sinus, wall) for decellularization completeness, tissue integrity, and valve functionality were defined using complementary methods of cell analysis (histology with nuclear and matrix stains and DNA analysis), biomechanics (biaxial and bending tests), and physiologic heart valve bioreactor testing (with advanced image analysis of open-close cycles and geometric orifice area measurement). Fully acellular porcine roots treated with the optimized method exhibited preserved macroscopic structures and microscopic matrix components, which translated into conserved anisotropic mechanical properties, including bending and excellent valve functionality when tested in aortic flow and pressure conditions. This study highlighted the importance of (1) adapting decellularization methods to specific target tissues, (2) combining several methods of cell analysis compared to relying solely on histology, (3) developing relevant valve-specific mechanical tests, and (4) in vitro testing

  6. New-onset atrial fibrillation after surgical aortic valve replacement and transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a concise review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Troels Højsgaard; Thygesen, Julie Bjerre; Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Søndergaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and, more recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have been shown to be the only treatments that can improve the natural cause of severe aortic valve stenosis. However, after SAVR and TAVI, the incidence of new-onset atrial fibrillation (NOAF) is 31%-64% and 4%-32%, respectively. NOAF is independently associated with adverse events such as stroke, death, and increased length of hospital stay. Increasing the knowledge of predisposing factors, optimal postprocedural monitoring, and prophylactic antiarrhythmic and antithrombotic therapy may reduce the risk of complications secondary to NOAF. PMID:25589700

  7. Aortic Valve Replacement for Infective Endocarditis in a Renal Transplant Recipient

    OpenAIRE

    Masmoudi Sayda; Frikha Imed; Trigui Walid; Karoui Abdelhamid; Daoud Moncef; Sahnoun Youssef

    2000-01-01

    Renal transplant recipients are more prone to developing infections. We report a 37-year old renal transplant recipient who developed infective endocarditis of the aortic valve, heart failure and renal allograft dysfunction. He underwent aortic valve replacement which was followed by improvement in cardiac as well as allograft function.

  8. Aortic Valve Replacement for Infective Endocarditis in a Renal Transplant Recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masmoudi Sayda

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal transplant recipients are more prone to developing infections. We report a 37-year old renal transplant recipient who developed infective endocarditis of the aortic valve, heart failure and renal allograft dysfunction. He underwent aortic valve replacement which was followed by improvement in cardiac as well as allograft function.

  9. Patient-prosthesis mismatch and reduction in left ventricular mass after aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandler, Kristian; Møller, Christian H; Hassager, Christian;

    2013-01-01

    The presence of patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) after aortic valve replacement may influence patient survival. We examined the relationship between PPM and changes in left ventricular mass index at 3 months follow-up and also overall survival....

  10. Effects of preemptive enoximone on left ventricular diastolic function after valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Maaten, Joost M. A. A.; de Vries, Adrianus J.; Rietman, Gerrit W.; Gallandat Huet, Rolf C. G.; De Hert, Stefan G.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy is associated with increased diastolic chamber stiffness early after aortic valve replacement for valve stenosis. Enoximone, a phosphodiesterase III inhibitor, has been shown to improve myocardial contractility and relaxation when administered as a single

  11. Mechanism of aortic root dilation and cardiovascular function in tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Mitsuru; Kuwata, Seiko; Kurishima, Clara; Nakagawa, Ryo; Inuzuka, Ryo; Sugimoto, Masaya; Saiki, Hirofumi; Iwamoto, Yoichi; Ishido, Hirotaka; Masutani, Satoshi; Senzaki, Hideaki

    2016-05-01

    The aortic root dilation in tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) is a long-term clinical problem, because a severely dilated aorta can lead to aortic regurgitation, dissection, or rupture, which can be fatal, necessitating surgical intervention. The details of the mechanism of aortic root dilation, however, are unclear. We have shown that aortic stiffness is increased in patients with repaired TOF, and may mirror the histological abnormality of elastic fiber disruption and matrix expansion. This aortic stiffness is related closely to the aortic dilation, indicating that aortic stiffness may be a predictor of outcome of aortic dilation. Furthermore, the aortic volume overload is a very important determinant of aortic diameter in TOF patients before corrective surgery. In addition, a chromosomal abnormality and the transforming growth factor-β signaling pathway, a major contributor to aortic dilation in Marfan syndrome, also affect this mechanism. In this way, aortic dilation in TOF patients is suggested to be a multifactorial disorder. The aim of this review was therefore to clarify the mechanism of aortic dilation in TOF, focusing on recent research findings. Studies linking histopathology, mechanical properties, molecular/cellular physiology, and clinical manifestations of aortic dilation facilitate appropriate treatment intervention and improvement of long-term prognosis of TOF. PMID:26809655

  12. Dilated aortic root and severe aortic regurgitation causing dilated cardiomyopathy in classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainal, Abir; Hamad, Mahmoud Nidal; Naqvi, Syed Yaseen

    2016-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of heritable disorders characterised by vast clinical heterogeneity ranging from the classic constellation of symptoms including skin hyperextensibility, joint hypermobility and skin fragility to the exceedingly critical consequences of arterial rupture and visceral perforation. We describe the case of a 65-year-old male with a history of classic EDS who reported of dyspnoea on exertion, orthopnoea, fatigue and palpitations. He was found to have dilated cardiomyopathy with an ejection fraction of 35%, aortic root dilation and severe aortic valve regurgitation. The authors intend to draw attention to the rare cardiac manifestations of this condition and the therapeutic challenges involved in managing such patients. PMID:27413024

  13. Patient values and preferences on transcatheter or surgical aortic valve replacement therapy for aortic stenosis: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytvyn, Lyubov; Guyatt, Gordon H; Manja, Veena; Siemieniuk, Reed A; Zhang, Yuan; Agoritsas, Thomas; Vandvik, Per O

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate patients' values and preferences regarding aortic valve replacement therapy for aortic stenosis. Setting Studies published after transcatheter aortic valve insertion (TAVI) became available (2002). Participants Adults with aortic stenosis who are considering or have had valve replacement, either TAVI or via surgery (surgical aortic valve replacement, SAVR). Outcome measures We sought quantitative measurements, or qualitative descriptions, of values and preferences. When reported, we examined correlations between preferences and objective (eg, ejection fraction) or subjective (eg, health-related quality of life) measures of health. Results We reviewed 1348 unique citations, of which 2 studies proved eligible. One study of patients with severe aortic stenosis used a standard gamble study to ascertain that the median hypothetical mortality risk patients were willing to tolerate to achieve full health was 25% (IQR 25–50%). However, there was considerable variability; for mortality risk levels defined by current guidelines, 130 participants (30%) were willing to accept low-to-intermediate risk (≤8%), 224 (51%) high risk (>8–50%) and 85 (19%) a risk that guidelines would consider prohibitive (>50%). Study authors did not, however, assess participants' understanding of the exercise, resulting in a potential risk of bias. A second qualitative study of 15 patients identified the following factors that influence patients to undergo assessment for TAVI: symptom burden; expectations; information support; logistical barriers; facilitators; obligations and responsibilities. The study was limited by serious risk of bias due to authors' conflict of interest (5/9 authors industry-funded). Conclusions Current evidence on patient values and preferences of adults with aortic stenosis is very limited, and no studies have enrolled patients deciding between TAVI and SAVR. On the basis of the data available, there is evidence of variability in individual

  14. Effects of aortic root motion on wall stress in the Marfan aorta before and after personalised aortic root support (PEARS) surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S D; Xu, X Y; Pepper, J R; Izgi, C; Treasure, T; Mohiaddin, R H

    2016-07-01

    Aortic root motion was previously identified as a risk factor for aortic dissection due to increased longitudinal stresses in the ascending aorta. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of aortic root motion on wall stress and strain in the ascending aorta and evaluate changes before and after implantation of personalised external aortic root support (PEARS). Finite element (FE) models of the aortic root and thoracic aorta were developed using patient-specific geometries reconstructed from pre- and post-PEARS cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) images in three Marfan patients. The wall and PEARS materials were assumed to be isotropic, incompressible and linearly elastic. A static load on the inner wall corresponding to the patients' pulse pressure was applied. Cardiovascular MR cine images were used to quantify aortic root motion, which was imposed at the aortic root boundary of the FE model, with zero-displacement constraints at the distal ends of the aortic branches and descending aorta. Measurements of the systolic downward motion of the aortic root revealed a significant reduction in the axial displacement in all three patients post-PEARS compared with its pre-PEARS counterparts. Higher longitudinal stresses were observed in the ascending aorta when compared with models without the root motion. Implantation of PEARS reduced the longitudinal stresses in the ascending aorta by up to 52%. In contrast, the circumferential stresses at the interface between the supported and unsupported aorta were increase by up to 82%. However, all peak stresses were less than half the known yield stress for the dilated thoracic aorta. PMID:27255604

  15. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Degenerative Bioprosthetic Surgical Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvir, Danny; Webb, John; Brecker, Stephen;

    2012-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation is an emerging therapeutic alternative for patients with a failed surgical bioprosthesis and may obviate the need for reoperation. We evaluated the clinical results of this technique using a large, worldwide registry.......Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation is an emerging therapeutic alternative for patients with a failed surgical bioprosthesis and may obviate the need for reoperation. We evaluated the clinical results of this technique using a large, worldwide registry....

  16. Immersed boundary-finite element model of fluid-structure interaction in the aortic root

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamini, Vittoria; DeAnda, Abe; Griffith, Boyce E.

    2016-04-01

    It has long been recognized that aortic root elasticity helps to ensure efficient aortic valve closure, but our understanding of the functional importance of the elasticity and geometry of the aortic root continues to evolve as increasingly detailed in vivo imaging data become available. Herein, we describe a fluid-structure interaction model of the aortic root, including the aortic valve leaflets, the sinuses of Valsalva, the aortic annulus, and the sinotubular junction, that employs a version of Peskin's immersed boundary (IB) method with a finite element description of the structural elasticity. As in earlier work, we use a fiber-based model of the valve leaflets, but this study extends earlier IB models of the aortic root by employing an incompressible hyperelastic model of the mechanics of the sinuses and ascending aorta using a constitutive law fit to experimental data from human aortic root tissue. In vivo pressure loading is accounted for by a backward displacement method that determines the unloaded configuration of the root model. Our model yields realistic cardiac output at physiological pressures, with low transvalvular pressure differences during forward flow, minimal regurgitation during valve closure, and realistic pressure loads when the valve is closed during diastole. Further, results from high-resolution computations indicate that although the detailed leaflet and root kinematics show some grid sensitivity, our IB model of the aortic root nonetheless produces essentially grid-converged flow rates and pressures at practical grid spacings for the high Reynolds number flows of the aortic root. These results thereby clarify minimum grid resolutions required by such models when used as stand-alone models of the aortic valve as well as when used to provide models of the outflow valves in models of left-ventricular fluid dynamics.

  17. Initial non-opioid based anesthesia in a parturient having severe aortic stenosis undergoing cesarean section with aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata Podder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy in presence of severe aortic stenosis (AS causes worsening of symptoms needing further intervention. In the advanced stages of pregnancy, some patients may even require aortic valve replacement (AVR and cesarean delivery in the same sitting. Opioid based general anesthesia for combined lower segment cesarean section (LSCS with AVR has been described. However, the use of opioid may lead to fetal morbidity and need of respiratory support for the baby. We describe successful anesthetic management for LSCS with AVR in a >33 week gravida with severe AS and congestive heart failure. We avoided opioids till delivery of the baby AVR; the delivered neonate showed a normal APGAR score.

  18. Assessment of the influence of the compliant aortic root on aortic valve mechanics by means of a geometrical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redaelli, A; Di Martino, E; Gamba, A; Procopio, A M; Fumero, R

    1997-12-01

    In recent years several researchers have suggested that the changes in the geometry and angular dimensions of the aortic root which occur during the cardiac cycle are functional to the optimisation of aortic valve function, both in terms of diminishing leaflet stresses and of fluid-dynamic behaviour. The paper presents an analytical parametric model of the aortic valve which includes the aortic root movement. The indexes used to evaluate the valve behaviour are the circumferential membrane stress and the stress at the free edge of the leaflet, the index of bending strain, the bending of the leaflet at the line attachment in the radial and circumferential directions and the shape of the conduit formed by the leaflets during systole. In order to evaluate the role of geometric changes in valve performance, two control cases were considered, with different reference geometric configuration, where the movement of the aortic root was ignored. The results obtained appear consistent with physiological data, especially with regard to the late diastolic phase and the early ejection phase, and put in evidence the role of the aortic root movement in the improvement of valve behaviour. PMID:9450254

  19. Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery: Transapical Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive cardiac surgery is less traumatic and therefore leads to quicker recovery. With the assistance of engineering technologies on devices, imaging, and robotics, in conjunction with surgical technique, minimally invasive cardiac surgery will improve clinical outcomes and expand the cohort of patients that can be treated. We used transapical aortic valve implantation as an example to demonstrate that minimally invasive cardiac surgery can be implemented with the integration of surgical techniques and engineering technologies. Feasibility studies and long-term evaluation results prove that transapical aortic valve implantation under MRI guidance is feasible and practical. We are investigating an MRI compatible robotic surgical system to further assist the surgeon to precisely deliver aortic valve prostheses via a transapical approach. Ex vivo experimentation results indicate that a robotic system can also be employed in in vivo models.

  20. Transfemoral Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Mixed Aortic Valve Disease in Child's Class C Liver Disease Prior to Orthotopic Liver Transplantation: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkey, Barbara J; Hanson, Ross; Reece, T Brett; Forman, Lisa; Burton, James R; Messenger, John C; Kim, Michael S; Cleveland, Joseph C; Fiegel, Matt J; Nydam, Trevor L; Mandell, M Susan

    2016-06-01

    The American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases practice guidelines list severe cardiac disease as a contraindication to liver transplantation. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement has been shown to decrease all-cause mortality in patients with severe aortic stenosis who are not considered candidates for surgical aortic valve replacement. We report our experience of liver transplantation in a patient with severe aortic stenosis and moderate aortic insufficiency who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement with Child-Pugh Class C disease at a Model For End-Stage Liver Disease score of 29. The patient had a difficult post procedure course that was successfully medically managed. After liver transplantation the patient was discharged to home on postoperative day 11. The combination of cardiac disease and end stage liver disease is challenging but these patients can have a successful outcome despite very severe illness.

  1. The everyday used nomenclature of the aortic root components: the tower of Babel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievers, Hans-Hinrich; Hemmer, Wolfgang; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Moritz, Anton; Moosdorf, Rainer; Lichtenberg, Artur; Misfeld, Martin; Charitos, Efstratios I

    2012-03-01

    Modern analyses of data for scientific reporting and healthcare management purposes require standardized and consistent definitions, something which also holds true for aortic root surgery, as part of the cardiovascular surgery spectrum. The aim of the present study was to investigate the currently employed nomenclature of the aortic root components. A questionnaire was constructed on the terminology of aortic root components, providing a list of common definitions including anatomical descriptions, as well as fields for custom responses. Responses were received from 534 cardiothoracic surgeons registered at www.ctsnet.org. Remarkable variations in definitions were detected. The most unanimously accepted terms were: 'aortic leaflets', the freely moving parts (52.6% of responses); 'commissures', the distal part of the leaflet attachments plus the peripheral area of the free edges of the leaflets (52.2%); 'semi-lunar leaflet attachment', the anatomic site of leaflet attachment (58%); 'annulus', the circular line defined by the nadirs of the leaflets (38%); 'interleaflet triangle', the tissue between two leaflets and annulus (23%); 'aortic valve', the three leaflets only (55%); 'aortic root' as composed of sinuses, tissue between the leaflets, sinutubular junction, leaflets and their wall attachment (63%). The remarkable variability on the everyday-used definitions of the aortic root components can potentially lead to misinterpretation of data. More stringent adoption of consistent, standardized definitions of aortic root components is necessary in the modern era of data collection and management. PMID:22345173

  2. Right Minithoracotomy Approach for Replacement of the Ascending Aorta, Hemiarch, and Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamelas, Joseph; LaPietra, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    A minimally invasive right anterior thoracotomy approach is the preferred technique used at our institution for isolated aortic valve pathology. We have recently introduced more complex concomitant minimally invasive procedures through this access site. Here, we describe how we perform a replacement of the ascending aorta and aortic valve with and without the use of circulatory arrest through a 6-cm right minimally invasive thoracotomy incision.

  3. A rare presentation of late right coronary artery spasm following aortic valve replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Alizadeh-Ghavidel, Alireza; Basiri, Hosseinali; Totonchi, Ziae; Mirmesdagh, Yalda; Jalili-Shahandashti, Farshad; Gholizadeh, Behnam

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Coronary artery spasm (CAS) is defined as a reversible, sudden epicardial coronary artery stenosis that causes vessel occlusion or near occlusion. CASE REPORT In this article, we present a clinical case of CAS in a 48-year-old woman undergoing elective aortic valve replacement surgery for aortic stenosis. On the 3rd post-operative day, the patient suffered from chest pain and dyspnea. Emergent coronary angiography demonstrated a significant spasm of the ostium portion of the right ...

  4. [Surgical aortic valve replacement for acute Streptococcus viridans endocarditis with simultaneous moderate hemophilia A].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawietz, W; Loracher, C; Struck, E; Schlimok, G; Falk, H

    1988-07-01

    This is a report of a 25-year-old patient with known aortic valve stenosis since early youth and hemophilia A, showing recurrent joint bleeding. Acute Streptococcus endocarditis induced aortic valve insufficiency resulting in cardiac failure. Aortic valve replacement was performed after substitution of factor VIII, during which intra- and postoperative bleeding was prolonged by pericardial adhesions. Heparin was administered during cardiopulmonary-bypass as usual, but usual postoperative cumarin therapy was not initiated due to prolonged PTT time. One year postoperatively, the patient was in an excellent condition and fully rehabilitated. PMID:3145652

  5. Long-Term Outcomes of Homografts in the Aortic Valve and Root Position: A 20-Year Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo Yeon; Kim, Joon Bum; Jung, Sung-Ho; Choo, Suk Jung; Chung, Cheol Hyun; Lee, Jae Won

    2016-01-01

    Background The advantages of using a homograft in valve replacement surgery are the excellent hemodynamic profile, low risk of thromboembolism, and low risk of prosthetic valve infection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term outcomes of homograft implantation in the aortic valve position. Methods This is a retrospective study of 33 patients (>20 years old) who underwent aortic valve replacement or root replacement with homografts between April 1995 and May 2015. Valves were collected within 24 hours from explanted hearts of heart transplant recipients (heart transplantation. The median follow-up duration was 35.6 months (range, 0 to 168 months). Results Aortic homografts were used in all patients. The 30-day mortality rate was 9.1%. The 1- and 5-year survival rates were 80.0%±7.3% and 60.8%±10.1%, respectively. The 1-, 5-, and 10-year freedom from reoperation rates were 92.3%±5.2%, 68.9%±10.2%, and 50.3%±13.6%, respectively. The 1-, 5-, and 10-year freedom from significant aortic dysfunction rates were 91.7%±8.0%, 41.7%±14.2%, and 25.0%±12.5%, respectively. Conclusion Homografts had the advantages of a good hemodynamic profile and low risk of thromboembolic events, and with good outcomes in cases of aortitis. PMID:27525234

  6. Enlargement of the narrow aortic root and oblique insertion of a St Jude prosthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Kinsley, R H; Antunes, M J; McKibbin, J K

    1983-01-01

    The aortic root was enlarged and a St Jude Medical valve obliquely inserted in 11 patients. Prosthetic valve sizes at least one, but often two, sizes larger than that which would normally be accommodated by the dimensions of the host aortic annulus were used. Closure of the valve was not affected by obliquity. This simple technique is recommended whenever the host aortic annulus does not allow the insertion of a substitute valve of an appropriate size.

  7. Patient prosthesis mismatch after aortic valve replacement: An Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreedhar S Joshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Perioperative period. Aims: Occurrence of PPM after AVR, factors associated with PPM, impact on mortality. Settings and Design: Teritary Care Referral Cardiac Centre. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of AVR procedures at a single centre over 4 years was conducted. Demographic, echocardiographic and outcome data were collected from institute database. Rahimtoola criteria of indexed effective orifice area (iEOA were used to stratify patients into PPM categories. Patients with and without PPM were compared for associated factors. Statistical Analysis Used: Independent t-test, chi-square test, logistic regression analysis, ROC-AUC, Youden index. Results: 606 patients with complete data were analysed for PPM. The incidence of mild, moderate and severe PPM was 6.1% (37, 2.5% (15 and 0.5% (3 respectively. There was no impact of PPM on all-cause in-hospital mortality. PPM was observed more with Aortic Stenosis (AS compared to Aortic Regurgitation (AR as etiology. Aortic annulus indexed to BSA (iAA had a very good predictive ability for PPM at <16mm/m 2 BSA. Conclusions: PPM has lower incidence after AVR in this Indian population and does not increase early mortality. Patients with AS and iAA<16mm/m2BSA should be cautiously dealt with to prevent PPM.

  8. [Completion pneumonectomy combined with graft replacement of thoracic aortic aneurysm by simple clamping].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamoto, A; Takao, M; Kanemitsu, S; Fujinaga, K; Yan, G; Cruz, B P; Onoda, K; Shimono, T; Shimpo, H; Namikawa, S; Yuasa, H; Yada, I

    1999-01-01

    A 59-years-old male patient who had left upper lobe partial resection 30 years ago. He was seen at the family physician because of cough. A chest X-ray was showing an abnormal mass shadow measuring 3 x 4 cm in left lower lobe like honey comb. And squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) was detected in his sputum. He was diagnosed as primary lung cancer and introduced to our department to have operation. Chest CT-scan was showing lung tumor suspected SCC measuring 4.3 x 2.6 cm in segment 8 faced chest wall. At the same time, we detected thoracic aortic aneurysm and subcarinal lymph node, but could not see where the boundary is, so it was hard to distinguish between parietal thrombus with thoracic aortic aneurysm and swelling subcarinal lymph node. We decided it swelling subcarinal lymph node by three-dimensional treated CT-scan. Aortic angiography was showing proximal descending aortic aneurysm measuring diameter was 4.5 cm. Abdominal CT-scan was showing infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm measuring diameter was 5.5 cm. He was diagnosed as primary lung cancer (It. S8, SCC) (cT2N2M0, Stage IIIB), thoracic aortic aneurysm, abdominal aortic aneurysm, and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, and had completion pneumonectomy (R 2 b) for primary lung cancer and graft replacement with aneurysm dissection for thoracic aortic aneurysm without extracorporeal circulation. In this operation, we could find swelling subcarinal lymph node measuring 5 x 3 cm instead of parietal thrombus with thoracic aortic aneurysm. Pathological examination diagnosed middle differential SCC and no metastasis from dissected lymph node (PT2N0M0, Stage I A). PMID:10024802

  9. Total aortic arch replacement: superior ventriculo-arterial coupling with decellularized allografts compared with conventional prostheses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Weymann

    Full Text Available To date, no experimental or clinical study provides detailed analysis of vascular impedance changes after total aortic arch replacement. This study investigated ventriculoarterial coupling and vascular impedance after replacement of the aortic arch with conventional prostheses vs. decellularized allografts.After preparing decellularized aortic arch allografts, their mechanical, histological and biochemical properties were evaluated and compared to native aortic arches and conventional prostheses in vitro. In open-chest dogs, total aortic arch replacement was performed with conventional prostheses and compared to decellularized allografts (n = 5/group. Aortic flow and pressure were recorded continuously, left ventricular pressure-volume relations were measured by using a pressure-conductance catheter. From the hemodynamic variables end-systolic elastance (Ees, arterial elastance (Ea and ventriculoarterial coupling were calculated. Characteristic impedance (Z was assessed by Fourier analysis.While Ees did not differ between the groups and over time (4.1±1.19 vs. 4.58±1.39 mmHg/mL and 3.21±0.97 vs. 3.96±1.16 mmHg/mL, Ea showed a higher increase in the prosthesis group (4.01±0.67 vs. 6.18±0.20 mmHg/mL, P<0.05 in comparison to decellularized allografts (5.03±0.35 vs. 5.99±1.09 mmHg/mL. This led to impaired ventriculoarterial coupling in the prosthesis group, while it remained unchanged in the allograft group (62.5±50.9 vs. 3.9±23.4%. Z showed a strong increasing tendency in the prosthesis group and it was markedly higher after replacement when compared to decellularized allografts (44.6±8.3 dyn·sec·cm(-5 vs. 32.4±2.0 dyn·sec·cm(-5, P<0.05.Total aortic arch replacement leads to contractility-afterload mismatch by means of increased impedance and invert ventriculoarterial coupling ratio after implantation of conventional prostheses. Implantation of decellularized allografts preserves vascular impedance thereby improving

  10. Impact of prosthesis-patient mismatch on early and late mortality after aortic valve replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koene, Bart M.; Hamad, Mohamed A. Soliman; Bouma, Wobbe; Mariani, Massimo A.; Peels, Kathinka C.; van Dantzig, Jan-Melle; van Straten, Albert H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The influence of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) on survival after aortic valve replacement (AVR) remains controversial. In this study, we sought to determine the effect of PPM on early (30 days) after AVR or AVR combined with coronary artery bypass grafting (AVR with CABG). Methods: B

  11. Basal longitudinal strain predicts future aortic valve replacement in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Helle Gervig; Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Hassager, Christian;

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the prognostic value of global longitudinal strain (GLS) and basal longitudinal strain (BLS) with the knowledge of coexisting coronary pathology evaluated by multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) coronary angiography. BACKGROUND: GLS and BLS are both sensitive markers of myo......: In contrast to GLS, reduced BLS is a significant predictor of future AVR in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis, independently of clinical characteristics, conventional echocardiographic measures, and coronary pathology....

  12. Clinical predictors of prosthesis-patient mismatch after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    OpenAIRE

    Luis M Astudillo; Orlando Santana; Urbandt, Pablo A.; Benjo, Alexandre M.; Lior U Elkayam; Nascimento, Francisco O.; Lamas, Gervasio A.; Joseph Lamelas

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We sought to ascertain predictors of Patient Prosthesis Mismatch, an independent predictor of mortality, in patients with aortic stenosis using bioprosthetic valves. METHOD: We analyzed 2,107 sequential surgeries. Patient Prosthesis Mismatch was calculated using the effective orifice area of the prosthesis divided by the patient's body surface area. We defined nonsignificant, moderate, and severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch as effective orifice area indexes of >0.85 cm2/m, 0.85-0.6...

  13. Access Options for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients with Unfavorable Aortoiliofemoral Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jayendrakumar S; Krishnaswamy, Amar; Svensson, Lars G; Tuzcu, E Murat; Mick, Stephanie; Kapadia, Samir R

    2016-11-01

    In the current era, 10-15 % of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR)-eligible high and prohibitive risk patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis are not candidates for transfemoral arterial access. Knowledge of the various alternative access options can enable TAVR teams to provide improved quality of life and potentially life-saving treatment for a group of patients who otherwise have no viable options. In this article, we review approach to patients with unfavorable femoral arterial anatomy and provide an in-depth discussion on the various alternative routes for TAVR. PMID:27650782

  14. Mechanism and Correlated Factors of SAM Phenomenon after Aortic Valve Replacement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jing; WEN Jianguo; SHU Liliang; LIU Chao; ZHANG Jingchao; ZHAO Wenzeng

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism and correlated factors of systolic anterior motion (SAM) phenomenon after aortic valve replacement, 48 patients with severe aortic valvular stenosis were studied. Tested by echo-Doppler one week after aortic valve replacement, the patients were divided into two groups: SAM group and non-SAM group. The data of the left ventricular end-diastolic diameters, the left ventricular end-systolic diameters, the left ventricular outflow diameters, the thickness of the interventricular septum, the posterior wall of left ventricle, the blood velocities of left ventricular outflow and intra-cavitary gradients were recorded and compared. The results showed that no patients died during or after the operation. The blood velocities of left ventricular outflow was increased significantly in 9 patients (>2.5 m/s), and 6 of them developed SAM phenomenon. There was significant difference in all indexes (P<0.05 or P<0.01) except the posterior wall of left ventricle (P>0.05) between two groups. These indicated that the present of SAM phenomenon after aortic valve replacement may be directly related to the increase of blood velocities of left ventricular outflow and intra-cavitary gradients. It is also suggested that smaller left ventricular diastolic diameters, left ventricular systolic diameters, left ventricular outflow diameters and hypertrophy of interventricular septum may be the anatomy basis of SAM phenomenon.

  15. Aortic valve replacement in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhuvnesh Kansara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Valvular heart disease in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Current therapy includes symptomatic measures and valve replacement. SLE can present major challenges because of accrued organ damage, coagulation defects and complex management regimes. The peri-operative goals are to maintain strict asepsis, avoid use of nephrotoxic drugs and thereby renal insult, and to promote early ambulation post-operatively.

  16. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Lower Surgical Risk Patients: Review of Major Trials and Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saji, Mike; Lim, D Scott

    2016-10-01

    Following the first successful transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in 2002, TAVR has globally evolved to become a standard procedure in high-risk patients. Surgical aortic valve replacement in non-high-risk patients remains the gold standard for treatment of severe aortic stenosis. However, a paradigm shift appears to be occurring in the direction of treating lower-risk patients, and several studies have suggested its impact on clinical outcomes. In this review, we highlight the current status of TAVR in intermediate-risk patients and review major trials including Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER (PARTNER) 2A randomized intermediate-risk trial using SAPIEN XT (Edwards Lifesciences Corp, Irvine, CA) recently presented with excellent outcomes and the lowest major complications rate at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session in Chicago. Clinical trials in low-risk patients using SAPIEN 3 and CoreValve Evolut R have just been launched, and they are going to be important milestones in the TAVR field.

  17. Left Atrial Volume as Predictor of Valve Replacement and Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Asymptomatic Mild to Moderate Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Morten; Egstrup, Kenneth; Wachtell, Kristian;

    2013-01-01

    Left atrial (LA) size is known to increase with chronically increased left ventricular (LV) filling pressure. We hypothesized that LA volume was predictive of aortic valve replacement (AVR) and cardiovascular events in a large cohort of patients with asymptomatic mild to moderate aortic valve ste...

  18. Subglottic granuloma after aortic replacement: resection via flexible bronchoscopy after an emergency tracheostomy

    OpenAIRE

    Nose, Naohiro; So, Tetsuya; Sekimura, Atsushi; Miyata, Takeaki; Yoshimatsu, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    A subglottic granuloma is one of the late-phase complications that can occur after intubation. It can cause a life-threatening airway obstruction; therefore, a rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan is necessary. A 62-year-old male had undergone an emergency total arch replacement for acute aortic dissection. Postoperative ventilation support had been performed until the 15th postoperative day (POD). He was discharged from the hospital on POD 30. On POD 50, he was brought to our hospi...

  19. Dynamic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction complicating aortic valve replacement: A hidden malefactor revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panduranga Prashanth

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that a dynamic left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT obstruction exists in patients, following aortic valve replacement (AVR and is usually considered to be benign. We present a patient with dynamic LVOT obstruction following AVR, who developed refractory cardiogenic shock and expired inspite of various treatment strategies. This phenomenon must be diagnosed early and should be considered as a serious and potentially fatal complication following AVR. The possible mechanisms and treatment options are reviewed.

  20. Percutaneous aortic valve replacement using a W-model valved stent: a preliminary feasibility study in sheep

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Yuan; ZONG Gang-jun; WANG Yan-yan; JIANG Hai-bin; LI Wei-ping; WU Hong; ZHAO Xian-xian; QIN Yong-wen

    2009-01-01

    Background Percutaneous aortic valve replacement is a promising strategy in the treatment of patients with aortic valve stenosis. And many kinds of valved stents have been implanted in selected patients worldwide. However, the clinical experience is still limited. We developed a W-model valved stent and evaluated the feasibility and safety of percutaneous implantation of the device in the native aortic valve position.Methods A self expanding nitinol stent with W-model, containing porcine pericardium valves in its proximal part, was implanted in six sheep by means of a 14 French catheter through the right common lilac artery under guidance of fluoroscopy. During stent deployment the original aortic valve was pushed against the aortic wall by the self expanding force of the stent while the new valve was expanded. These sheep were followed up shortly after procedure with supra-aortic angiogram and left ventriculography. Additionally, one sheep was sacrificed after the procedure for anatomic evaluation.Results It was possible to replace the aortic valve in the beating heart in four sheep. The procedure failed in two sheep due to coronary orifice occlusion in one case and severe aortic valve regurgitation in the other case. One sheep was killed one hour after percutaneous aortic valve replacement for anatomic evaluation. There were no signs of damage of the aortic intima, or of obstruction of the coronary orifice.Conclusions Percutaneous aortic valve replacement with a W-model valved stent in the beating heart is possible. Further studies are mandatory to assess safety and efficacy of this kind of valved stent in larger sample size and by longer follow-up period.

  1. The impact of coronary artery disease on early outcome of aortic valve replacement in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Yaser Hariri

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The operative risk of aortic valve replacement (AVR depends on several factors such as underlying coronary artery disease (CAD. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine postoperative complications and early outcome for elderly patients with CAD undergoing isolated aortic valve replacement and compare them with patients without CAD. Methods: Preoperative characteristics, postoperative in-hospital complications, 30-day mortality rate, and length of stay in hospital (LOS in 79 patients at least 65 years old that underwent isolated AVR (53 patients with CAD and 25 patients without CAD were studied and compared. Results: All studied in-hospital complications were similar between the two groups. No signi cant di erence in 30-day mortality rate between the two groups was found (CAD group 8.1%, non CAD group 10.0%, P=0.781, whereas the mean of ICU stay in patients with CAD was higher than other patients (75.9 versus 47.6 hours, P=0.006. Female gender, obesity, hypertension, prolonged ventilation, and postoperative heart block in patients with CAD and only obesity in other group were signi cant predictors of 30-day mortality. Conclusion: Early outcome of patients with and without CAD undergoing aortic valve replacement was similar.

  2. Drivers of healthcare costs associated with the episode of care for surgical aortic valve replacement versus transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijeysundera, Harindra C; Li, Lindsay; Braga, Vevien; Pazhaniappan, Nandhaa; Pardhan, Anar M; Lian, Dana; Leeksma, Aric; Peterson, Ben; Cohen, Eric A; Forsey, Anne; Kingsbury, Kori J

    2016-01-01

    Objective Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is generally more expensive than surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) due to the high cost of the device. Our objective was to understand the patient and procedural drivers of cumulative healthcare costs during the index hospitalisation for these procedures. Design All patients undergoing TAVI, isolated SAVR or combined SAVR+coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) at 7 hospitals in Ontario, Canada were identified during the fiscal year 2012–2013. Data were obtained from a prospective registry. Cumulative healthcare costs during the episode of care were determined using microcosting. To identify drivers of healthcare costs, multivariable hierarchical generalised linear models with a logarithmic link and γ distribution were developed for TAVI, SAVR and SAVR+CABG separately. Results Our cohort consisted of 1310 patients with aortic stenosis, of whom 585 underwent isolated SAVR, 518 had SAVR+CABG and 207 underwent TAVI. The median costs for the index hospitalisation for isolated SAVR were $21 811 (IQR $18 148–$30 498), while those for SAVR+CABG were $27 256 (IQR $21 741–$39 000), compared with $42 742 (IQR $37 295–$56 196) for TAVI. For SAVR, the major patient-level drivers of costs were age >75 years, renal dysfunction and active endocarditis. For TAVI, chronic lung disease was a major patient-level driver. Procedural drivers of cost for TAVI included a non-transfemoral approach. A prolonged intensive care unit stay was associated with increased costs for all procedures. Conclusions We found wide variation in healthcare costs for SAVR compared with TAVI, with different patient-level drivers as well as potentially modifiable procedural factors. These highlight areas of further study to optimise healthcare delivery.

  3. The Early Variation of Left Ventricular Strain after Aortic Valve Replacement by Three-Dimensional Echocardiography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongle Chen

    Full Text Available Aortic stenosis (AS and aortic incompetence (AI are common aortic valve diseases. Both may deteriorate into irreversible myocardial dysfunction and will increase the risk of sudden death. In this study, we aimed to investigate the early variation trend of left ventricular function by three-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (3D-STE in the patients who underwent cardiac surgeries for aortic valve disease. Twenty patients with severe aortic AS and 16 patients with severe AI were enrolled. All of them underwent the aortic valve replacement (AVR procedures. The patients' global longitudinal strain (GLS and global circumferential strain (GCS were evaluated by 3D-STE before surgery and at 1 week after surgery. In addition, GLS and GCS were followed at 1 month as well as 3 months after AVR. In AS patients, the GCS after AVR altered little both at 1 week (p = 0.562 and at 1 month (p = 0.953 compared with the data before the surgery. And it increased significantly at 3 months of follow-up observation compared to that before AVR (p<0.05. Meanwhile, GLS increased progressively after AVR and improved significantly at 3 months after surgery (p<0.05. For the AI patients, GLS as well as GCS decreased at 1 week after AVR compared to those data at baseline (p<0.05. However, these two parameters recovered at 1 month after AVR. Furthermore, GLS and GCS improved significantly at 3 months after the surgery (p<0.05. Therefore, both GLS and GCS were influenced by AVR and would be improved at 3 months after surgery both in AS patients or AI patients. GLS and GCS can be finely evaluated by 3D-STE, and they are helpful to determine the variation tendency of left ventricular function in patients with AVR.

  4. Myocardial Injury Following Aortic Valve Replacement for Severe Aortic Stenosis: Risk Factor of Postoperative Myocardial Injury and Its Impact on Long-Term Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chee-Hoon; Ju, Min Ho; Kim, Joon Bum; Chung, Cheol Hyun; Jung, Sung Ho; Choo, Suk Jung; Lee, Jae Won

    2014-01-01

    Background As hypertrophied myocardium predisposes the patient to decreased tolerance to ischemia and increased reperfusion injury, myocardial protection is of utmost importance in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR) for severe aortic valve stenosis (AS). Methods Consecutive 314 patients (mean age, 62.5±10.8 years; 143 females) with severe AS undergoing isolated AVR were included. Postoperative myocardial injury (PMI) was defined as 1) maximum postoperative creatinine kinase is...

  5. An evaluation of the left atrial/aortic root ratio in children with ventricular septal defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, L A; Vitullo, D; Sodt, P; Hutcheon, N; Arcilla, R

    1979-08-01

    Echocardiograms were performed in 80 infants and children with isolated ventricular septal defect (VSD) who underwent cardiac catheterization. The pulmonary-to-systemic flow ratio (Qp/Qs) was correlated with the echocardiographic left atrial-to-aortic root diameter ratio (LA/Ao), and a relatively poor correlation (r = 0.62) was found. The end-systolic diameters of the left atrium and aorta at the level of the aortic root, obtained from lateral cineangiograms of 55 of the 80 patients, were compared with the corresponding echocardiographic dimensions. To assess the possible effect of transducer beam angulation upon the echocardiographic determinations, the angiographic measurements were made at 0 degrees position (perpendicular to the frontal plane) and at angles of 5 degrees, 10 degrees, 15 degrees and 20 degrees from zero, using the aortic root center as the point of intersection. The echocardiographic and angiographic aortic root measurements were comparable (r = 0.95), and the angiographically derived aortic diameter did not vary with different angle projections. However, the left atrial angiographic dimensions were significantly influenced by the angle of projection. We conclude that the echocardiographic LA/Ao ratio cannot reliably estimate the severity of the shunt flow in VSD.

  6. Renal replacement therapies after abdominal aortic aneurysm repair--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudorović, Narcis; Lovricević, Ivo; Brkić, Petar; Ahel, Zaky; Vicić-Hudorović, Visnja

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this review is to assess the incidence of postoperative acute renal failure that necessitates the application of hemofiltration and to determine the factors that influence the outcome in patients undergoing surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm. In addition, the review aims to assess the outcomes of postoperative early hemofiltration as compared to late intensive hemofiltration. Different forms of renal replacement therapies for use in abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery patients are discussed. Electronic literature searches were performed using Pubmed, Medline, Embase, Sumsearch, Cinahil, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Excerpta Medica. The search identified 419 potentially eligible studies, of which 119 were excluded based on the title and abstract. Of the remaining 300 studies, full articles were collected and re-evaluated. Forty-five articles satisfied our inclusion criteria, of which only 12 were of the IA Level of evidence. The search results indicated that the underlying disease, its severity and stage, the etiology of acute renal failure, clinical and hemodynamic status of the patient, the resources available, and different costs of therapy might all influence the choice of the renal replacement therapy strategy. However, clear guidelines on renal replacement therapy duration are still lacking. Moreover, it is not known whether in acute renal failure patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery, renal replacement therapy modalities can eliminate significant amounts of clinically relevant inflammatory mediators. This review gives current information available in the literature on the possible mechanisms underlying acute renal failure and recent developments in continuous renal replacement treatment modalities. PMID:22384777

  7. Prosthetic valve endocarditis with valvular obstruction after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabilona, Christine; Gitler, Bernard; Lederman, Jeffrey A; Miller, Donald; Keltz, Theodore N

    2015-04-01

    Patients with severe aortic stenosis who are at high risk for open-heart surgery might be candidates for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). To our knowledge, this is the first report of Streptococcus viridans endocarditis that caused prosthetic valve obstruction after TAVR. A 77-year-old man who had undergone TAVR 17 months earlier was admitted because of evidence of prosthetic valve endocarditis. A transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a substantial increase in the transvalvular peak gradient and mean gradient in comparison with an echocardiogram of 7 months earlier. A transesophageal echocardiogram showed a 1.5-cm vegetation obstructing the valve. Blood cultures yielded penicillin-sensitive S. viridans. The patient was hemodynamically stable and was initially treated with vancomycin because of his previous penicillin allergy. Subsequent therapy with levofloxacin, oral penicillin (after a negative penicillin skin test), and intravenous penicillin eliminated the symptoms of the infection. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement is a relatively new procedure, and sequelae are still being discovered. We recommend that physicians consider obstructive endocarditis as one of these.

  8. Octogenarian with an untreated femoral neck fracture: upright position during the postoperative course after aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Polastri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe a patient with a femoral neck fracture undergoing an aortic valve replacement. The study design was a case report. An 82-year-old female with an untreated right femoral neck fracture, and a severe aortic valve stenosis was admitted to a cardiac surgery department for surgical treatment of the valve disease. She underwent aortic valve replacement with a sutureless biological valve prosthesis through a partial sternotomy. At an early stage, the patient was instructed to make postural changes in the standing position. As a result, she was able to perform body movements associated with either a sitting or standing position. This case shows that appropriate early mobilization of a patient with a femoral neck fracture is feasible after aortic valve replacement, even though this does not necessarily mean that the patient needs to walk.

  9. Acquired Aorto-Right Ventricular Fistula following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Muhammad Tariq Shakoor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR techniques are rapidly evolving, and results of published trials suggest that TAVR is emerging as the standard of care in certain patient subsets and a viable alternative to surgery in others. As TAVR is a relatively new procedure and continues to gain its acceptance, rare procedural complications will continue to appear. Our case is about an 89-year-old male with extensive past medical history who presented with progressive exertional dyspnea and angina secondary to severe aortic stenosis. Patient got TAVR and his postoperative course was complicated by complete heart block, aorto-RV fistula, and ventricular septal defect (VSD formation as a complication of TAVR. To the best of our knowledge, this is the third reported case of aorto-RV fistula following TAVR as a procedural complication but the first one to show three complications all together in one patient.

  10. Technical Approach Determines Inflammatory Response after Surgical and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabor Erdoes

    Full Text Available To investigate the periprocedural inflammatory response in patients with isolated aortic valve stenosis undergoing surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI with different technical approaches.Patients were prospectively allocated to one of the following treatments: SAVR using conventional extracorporeal circulation (CECC, n = 47 or minimized extracorporeal circulation (MECC, n = 15, or TAVI using either transapical (TA, n = 15 or transfemoral (TF, n = 24 access. Exclusion criteria included infection, pre-procedural immunosuppressive or antibiotic drug therapy and emergency indications. We investigated interleukin (IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DR, white blood cell count, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP and soluble L-selectin (sCD62L levels before the procedure and at 4, 24, and 48 h after aortic valve replacement. Data are presented for group interaction (p-values for inter-group comparison as determined by the Greenhouse-Geisser correction.SAVR on CECC was associated with the highest levels of IL-8 and hs-CRP (p<0.017, and 0.007, respectively. SAVR on MECC showed the highest descent in levels of HLA-DR and sCD62L (both p<0.001 in the perioperative period. TA-TAVI showed increased intraprocedural concentration and the highest peak of IL-6 (p = 0.017. Significantly smaller changes in the inflammatory markers were observed in TF-TAVI.Surgical and interventional approaches to aortic valve replacement result in inflammatory modulation which differs according to the invasiveness of the procedure. As expected, extracorporeal circulation is associated with the most marked pro-inflammatory activation, whereas TF-TAVI emerges as the approach with the most attenuated inflammatory response. Factors such as the pre-treatment patient condition and the extent of myocardial injury also significantly affect inflammatory biomarker patterns. Accordingly, TA-TAVI is to be classified not

  11. MDCT evaluation of aortic root and aortic valve prior to TAVI. What is the optimal imaging time point in the cardiac cycle?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurencak, Tomas; Turek, Jakub; Nijssen, Estelle C. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P. Debyelaan 25, P.O. Box 5800, AZ, Maastricht (Netherlands); Kietselaer, Bastiaan L.J.H. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P. Debyelaan 25, P.O. Box 5800, AZ, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, CARIM School for Cardiovascular Diseases, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Mihl, Casper; Kok, Madeleine; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Das, Marco [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P. Debyelaan 25, P.O. Box 5800, AZ, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, CARIM School for Cardiovascular Diseases, Maastricht (Netherlands); Ommen, Vincent G.V.A. van [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Garsse, Leen A.F.M. van [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2015-07-15

    To determine the optimal imaging time point for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) therapy planning by comprehensive evaluation of the aortic root. Multidetector-row CT (MDCT) examination with retrospective ECG gating was retrospectively performed in 64 consecutive patients referred for pre-TAVI assessment. Eighteen different parameters of the aortic root were evaluated at 11 different time points in the cardiac cycle. Time points at which maximal (or minimal) sizes were determined, and dimension differences to other time points were evaluated. Theoretical prosthesis sizing based on different measurements was compared. Largest dimensions were found between 10 and 20 % of the cardiac cycle for annular short diameter (10 %); mean diameter (10 %); effective diameter and circumference-derived diameter (20 %); distance from the annulus to right coronary artery ostium (10 %); aortic root at the left coronary artery level (20 %); aortic root at the widest portion of coronary sinuses (20 %); and right leaflet length (20 %). Prosthesis size selection differed depending on the chosen measurements in 25-75 % of cases. Significant changes in anatomical structures of the aortic root during the cardiac cycle are crucial for TAVI planning. Imaging in systole is mandatory to obtain maximal dimensions. (orig.)

  12. Pacing to treat low cardiac output syndrome following elective aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ishaq

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of low cardiac output syndrome caused by dynamic left ventricular (LV outflow obstruction after aortic valve replacement (AVR. This recognized phenomenon probably occurs more frequently than appreciated, and the author suggests that this should be considered when managing patients with severe hemodynamic instability after AVR. In addition, we also focus on the fact that invasive pacemaker systems have significant effects on cardiac output augmentation postoperatively and in long-term management of patients with LV outflow tract (LVOT obstruction following AVR. The possible mechanisms and subsequent treatments are discussed.

  13. Myocardial protection during aortic valve replacement. Cardiac metabolism and enzyme release following hypothermic cardioplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomfim, V; Kaijser, L; Bendz, R; Sylvén, C; Olin, C

    1980-01-01

    Cardiac metabolism following hypothermic potassium cardioplegia was studied in 23 patients undergoing isolated aortic valve replacement. All had normal coronary arteries. Cardioplegia was induced by infusing 700-1 000 ml of cold Ringer's acetate containing 20 mekv K+ selectively into the left coronary artery. Simultaneous blood samples were taken from the radial artery, a central vein and from the coronary sinus before and after cardioplegia. The PO2, O2-saturation and content, PCO2, pH, lactate, glucose, potassium, myoglobin, total creatine kinase (CK), its isoenzyme CK-MB, aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT) and alanine aminotransferase (ALAT) were assessed. Before bypass lactate was extracted by the heart. During the initial 10 to 20 min after cardioplegia there was a marked release of lactate in the coronary sinus. Myoglobin concentration and CK-MB serum activity peaked during the first 4 hours after the release of the aortic cross-clamping. In order to determine the best indicator of myocardial damage after cardioplegia, duration of extracorporeal circulation (ECC-time), aortic occlusion time (AOT), mean myocardial temperature (MMT) and the product of AOT and MMT, referred to as time-temperature area (TTA), were related to possible indicators of myocardial injury, such as enzyme and myoglobin release. The TTA was the best way of expressing the degree of exposure of the heart to ischaemia. The CK-MB to peak area (CK-MB max area) was the best indicator of the degree of ischaemic injury sustained by the heart during operation. PMID:7375890

  14. Composite valve graft combined with replacement of the ascending aorta and aortic arch in a patient with Marfan's syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄方炯; 叶穗辉; 陈赤红; 杨禁非; 孙东; 吴强; 于建波

    2004-01-01

    @@ Modified Bentall procedure combined with total aortic arch replacement under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) and retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP)is rarely reported. We performed this operation for a patient with worsened aortic regurgitation and cardiac shock. The operation involved the button method for coronary artery reconstruction, hypothermic circulatory arrest, and retrograde cerebral protection. The supraaortic branches were anastomosed to the prosthesis as an island flap.

  15. Left Ventricular Dynamics after Aortic Valve Replacement: A Long-term, Combined Radionuclide Angiographic and Ultrasonographic Study

    OpenAIRE

    Masotti, Claudio S.; Bonfranceschi, Paola; Rusticali, Guido; Rusticali, Franco; Pierangeli, Angelo

    1992-01-01

    Between January 1985 and July 1990, we studied 71 patients at our institution who underwent aortic valve replacement for either aortic valve regurgitation (40 patients) or stenosis (31 patients). The following prostheses were implanted: 25 St. Jude Medical valves (bileaflet), 16 Björk-Shiley (monoleaflet, tilting disc, 60° convexo-concave), 16 Medtronic-Hall (monoleaflet, tilting disc), and 14 Starr-Edwards (caged ball). The patients were evaluated pre-and postoperatively by means of gated bl...

  16. Personalised External Aortic Root Support (PEARS Compared with Alternatives for People with Life-Threatening Genetically Determined Aneurysms of the Aortic Root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Treasure

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Personalised external aortic support was first proposed in 2000 by Tal Golesworthy, an engineer with familial Marfan syndrome and an aortic root aneurysm. After putting together a research and development team, and finding a surgeon to take on the challenge to join him in this innovative approach, he was central to the manufacture of the device, custom made for his own aorta. He was the patient for the ‘first in man’ operation in 2004. Ten years later he is well and 45 other people have had their own personalised device implanted. In this account, the stepwise record of proof of principle, comparative quantification of the surgical and perioperative requirements, 10 years of results, and development and research plans for the future are presented.

  17. Marfan syndrome in children and adolescents: an adjusted nomogram for screening aortic root dilatation

    OpenAIRE

    Rozendaal, L; Groenink, M; Naeff, M.S.J.; Hennekam, R. C. M.; Hart, A.A.M.; Wall, van der, E.E.; Mulder, B.J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To construct an adjusted nomogram for the echocardiographic screening of aortic root diameter in children with possible Marfan disease.
Design—In 91 children (42 boys, 49 girls, age range 3.2 to 18.4 years) undergoing Marfan screening from 1983 until 1996, the diagnosis Marfan syndrome and any other aortic pathology was definitely ruled out. These served as a control population to set appropriate reference standards.
Results—Compared with a standard Dutch reference population, body ...

  18. Elevated transaortic valvular gradients after combined aortic valve and mitral valve replacement: an intraoperative dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essandoh, Michael; Portillo, Juan; Zuleta-Alarcon, Alix; Castellon-Larios, Karina; Otey, Andrew; Sai-Sudhakar, Chittoor B

    2015-03-01

    High transaortic valvular gradients, after combined aortic valve and mitral valve replacement, require prompt intraoperative diagnosis and appropriate management. The presence of high transaortic valvular gradients after cardiopulmonary bypass, in this setting, can be secondary to the following conditions: prosthesis dysfunction, left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, supravalvular obstruction, prosthesis-patient mismatch, hyperkinetic left ventricle from administration of inotropes, left ventricular intracavitary gradients, pressure recovery phenomenon, and increased transvalvular blood flow resulting from hyperdynamic circulation or anemia. Transesophageal echocardiography is an extremely useful tool for timely diagnosis and treatment of this complication. We describe a case of a critically ill patient with endocarditis and acute lung injury, who presented for combined aortic valve and mitral valve replacement. Transesophageal echocardiographic assessment, post-cardiopulmonary bypass, revealed high transaortic valvular gradients due to encroachment of the mitral prosthesis strut on the left ventricular outflow tract, which was compounded by a small, hypertrophied, and hyperkinetic left ventricle. Discontinuation of inotropic support, administration of fluids, phenylephrine, and esmolol led to resolution of the high gradients and prevented further surgery. PMID:25549635

  19. Surgical Management of Aorto-Esophageal Fistula as a Late Complication after Graft Replacement for Acute Aortic Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Hong; Na, Bubse; Hwang, Yoohwa; Kim, Yong Han; Park, In Kyu; Kim, Kyung-Hwan

    2016-02-01

    A 49-year-old male presented with chills and a fever. Five years previously, he underwent ascending aorta and aortic arch replacement using the elephant trunk technique for DeBakey type 1 aortic dissection. The preoperative evaluation found an esophago-paraprosthetic fistula between the prosthetic graft and the esophagus. Multiple-stage surgery was performed with appropriate antibiotic and antifungal management. First, we performed esophageal exclusion and drainage of the perigraft abscess. Second, we removed the previous graft, debrided the abscess, and performed an in situ re-replacement of the ascending aorta, aortic arch, and proximal descending thoracic aorta, with separate replacement of the innominate artery, left common carotid artery, and extra-anatomical bypass of the left subclavian artery. Finally, staged esophageal reconstruction was performed via transthoracic anastomosis. The patient's postoperative course was unremarkable and the patient has done well without dietary problems or recurrent infections over one and a half years of follow-up. PMID:26889449

  20. Clinical and economic outcomes after surgical aortic valve replacement in Medicare patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark MA

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mary Ann Clark,1 Francis G Duhay,2 Ann K Thompson,2 Michelle J Keyes,3 Lars G Svensson,4 Robert O Bonow,5 Benjamin T Stockwell,3 David J Cohen61The Neocure Group LLC, Washington, DC, 2Edwards Lifesciences Corporation, Irvine, CA, 3The Burgess Group LLC, Alexandria, VA, 4Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, 5Center for Cardiovascular Innovation, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, 6Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute, Kansas City, MO, USABackground: Aortic valve replacement (AVR is the standard of care for patients with severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis who are suitable surgical candidates, benefiting both non-high-risk and high-risk patients. The purpose of this study was to report long-term medical resource use and costs for patients following AVR and validate our assumption that high-risk patients have worse outcomes and are more costly than non-high-risk patients in this population.Methods: Patients with aortic stenosis who underwent AVR were identified in the 2003 Medicare 5% Standard Analytic Files and tracked over 5 years to measure clinical outcomes, medical resource use, and costs. An approximation to the logistic EuroSCORE (European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation based on administrative data was used to assess surgical risk, with a computed logistic EuroSCORE > 20% considered high-risk.Results: We identified 1474 patients with aortic stenosis who underwent AVR, of whom 1222 (82.9% were non-high-risk and 252 (17.1% were high-risk. Among those who were non-high-risk, the mean age was 73.3 years, 464 (38.2% were women, and the mean logistic EuroSCORE was 7%, whereas in those who were high-risk, the mean age was 77.6 years, 134 (52.8% were women, and the mean logistic EuroSCORE was 37%. All-cause mortality was 33.2% for non-high-risk and 66.7% for high-risk patients at 5 years. Over this time period, non

  1. A 'compare and contrast' exercise: wrapping versus personalised external aortic root support (PEARS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treasure, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Wrapping of the aorta and personalised external aortic root support (PEARS) both have the purpose of preventing further expansion of the ascending aorta in order to reduce the risk of aortic dissection and to spare the patient the disastrous consequences of aortic rupture. For the first time, Plonek and colleagues have reported systematically the CT appearances of a series of cases of wrapping. They illustrate the important finding that there are residual spaces between the aorta and the wrap. PEARS by contrast is intimately in contact with the aorta due to its personalised design and is fully incorporated due it construction from a porous mesh. A limitation of PEARS is that it is, of its nature, a planned and elective operation while wrapping can be undertaken during an emergency operation and can be used without prior planning as an intraoperative decision. PMID:27406033

  2. Partical replacement of the rooting procedure of Chrysanthenum merifolium cuttings by pre-rooting storage in the dark.

    OpenAIRE

    Pol, van der, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    Part of the rooting procedure of Chrysanthemum morifolium 'Pink Boston' and 'Refour' cuttings can be replaced by pre-rooting storage in the dark. Pre-rooting storage of 7 days at temperatures between 9° and 21°C was adequate. Longer periods of dark storage resulted in increase of root growth but also in severe senescence of the basal leaves.

  3. Hemodynamic Correlates of Abnormal Aortic Root Dimension in an Adult Population: The Strong Heart Study

    OpenAIRE

    de Simone, Giovanni; Roman, Mary J.; De Marco, Marina; Bella, Jonathan N; Izzo, Raffaele; Lee, Elisa T.; Devereux, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Background We evaluated the relationship of aortic root dimension (ARD) with flow output and both peripheral and central blood pressure, using multivariable equations predicting ideal sex‐specific ARD at a given age and body height. Methods and Results We measured echocardiographic diastolic ARD at the sinuses of Valsalva in 3160 adults (aged 42±16 years, 61% women) from the fourth examination of the Strong Heart Study who were free of prevalent coronary heart disease, and we compared measure...

  4. Midregional Proadrenomedullin Improves Risk Stratification beyond Surgical Risk Scores in Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Csordas

    Full Text Available Conventional surgical risk scores lack accuracy in risk stratification of patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR. Elevated levels of midregional proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM levels are associated with adverse outcome not only in patients with manifest chronic disease states, but also in the general population.We investigated the predictive value of MR-proADM for mortality in an unselected contemporary TAVR population.We prospectively included 153 patients suffering from severe aortic stenosis who underwent TAVR from September 2013 to August 2014. This population was compared to an external validation cohort of 205 patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing TAVR. The primary endpoint was all cause mortality.During a median follow-up of 258 days, 17 out of 153 patients who underwent TAVR died (11%. Patients with MR-proADM levels above the 75th percentile (≥ 1.3 nmol/l had higher mortality (31% vs. 4%, HR 8.9, 95% CI 3.0-26.0, P 6.8 only showed a trend towards higher mortality (18% vs. 9%, HR 2.1, 95% CI 0.8-5.6, P = 0.13. The Harrell's C-statistic was 0.58 (95% CI 0.45-0.82 for the EuroSCORE II, and consideration of baseline MR-proADM levels significantly improved discrimination (AUC = 0.84, 95% CI 0.71-0.92, P = 0.01. In bivariate analysis adjusted for EuroSCORE II, MR-proADM levels ≥1.3 nmol/l persisted as an independent predictor of mortality (HR 9.9, 95% CI (3.1-31.3, P <0.01 and improved the model's net reclassification index (0.89, 95% CI (0.28-1.59. These results were confirmed in the independent validation cohort.Our study identified MR-proADM as a novel predictor of mortality in patients undergoing TAVR. In the future, MR-proADM should be added to the commonly used EuroSCORE II for better risk stratification of patients suffering from severe aortic stenosis.

  5. A laboratory model of the aortic root flow including the coronary arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querzoli, Giorgio; Fortini, Stefania; Espa, Stefania; Melchionna, Simone

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular flows have been extensively investigated by means of in vitro models to assess the prosthetic valve performances and to provide insight into the fluid dynamics of the heart and proximal aorta. In particular, the models for the study of the flow past the aortic valve have been continuously improved by including, among other things, the compliance of the vessel and more realistic geometries. The flow within the sinuses of Valsalva is known to play a fundamental role in the dynamics of the aortic valve since they host a recirculation region that interacts with the leaflets. The coronary arteries originate from the ostia located within two of the three sinuses, and their presence may significantly affect the fluid dynamics of the aortic root. In spite of their importance, to the extent of the authors' knowledge, coronary arteries were not included so far when modeling in vitro the transvalvular aortic flow. We present a pulse duplicator consisting of a passively pulsing ventricle, a compliant proximal aorta, and coronary arteries connected to the sinuses of Valsalva. The coronary flow is modulated by a self-regulating device mimicking the physiological mechanism, which is based on the contraction and relaxation of the heart muscle during the cardiac cycle. Results show that the model reproduces satisfyingly the coronary flow. The analysis of the time evolution of the velocity and vorticity fields within the aortic root reveals the main characteristics of the backflow generated through the aorta in order to feed the coronaries during the diastole. Experiments without coronary flow have been run for comparison. Interestingly, the lifetime of the vortex forming in the sinus of Valsalva during the systole is reduced by the presence of the coronaries. As a matter of fact, at the end of the systole, that vortex is washed out because of the suction generated by the coronary flow. Correspondingly, the valve closure is delayed and faster compared to the case with

  6. Clinical and biochemical outcomes for additive mesenteric and lower body perfusion during hypothermic circulatory arrest for complex total aortic arch replacement surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, P; Cleland, A; Adams, C; Chu, M W A

    2012-11-01

    Surgical repair of transverse aortic arch aneurysms frequently employ hypothermia and antegrade cerebral perfusion as protective strategies during circulatory arrest. However, prolonged mesenteric and lower limb ischemia can lead to significant lactic acidosis and end organ dysfunction, which remains a significant cause of post-operative morbidity and mortality. We report our experience with additive warm mesenteric and lower body perfusion (1-3 L/min, 30°C) in addition to continuous cerebral and myocardial perfusion in 5 patients who underwent total aortic arch replacement with trifurcated head vessel re-implantation and distal elephant trunk reconstruction. Concomitant surgical procedures included re-operations (2), aortic root operations (2), coronary artery bypass (2) and descending thoracic aortic replacement (1). Serum lactate levels demonstrated a rapid decline from a peak 9.9 ± 2.6 post circulatory arrest to 3.4 ± 2.0 in the intensive care unit (ICU). The lowest serum bicarbonate levels were 19.3 ± 3.5 mmol/L, intra-operatively, which normalized to 28.4 ± 2.4 mmol/L on return to the ICU. The lowest pH levels were 7.25 ± 0.10, corrected to 7.43 ± 0.04 on return to the ICU. Mean cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times were 361 ± 104 and 253 ± 85 minutes, respectively. Mean cerebral and lower body circulatory arrest times were 0 (0) and 50 ± 35 minutes, respectively. The mean time required for systemic rewarming was 95 ± 66 minutes. There were no in-hospital mortalities and no patient experienced any neurological, mesenteric, renal or lower limb ischemic complications. Two patients required mechanical ventilation >24 hours, and one patient returned for reoperation for bleeding. Median intensive care unit and total hospital lengths of stay were 5 and 16 days, respectively. Our results suggest early serum lactate clearance, normalization of acidosis, and metabolic recovery when utilizing a simultaneous cerebral perfusion and warm body

  7. Annular sizing using real-time three-dimensional intracardiac echocardiography-guided trans-catheter aortic valve replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendon, Alejandro; Hamid, Tahir; Kanaganayagam, Gajen; Karunaratne, Devinda; Mahadevan, Vaikom S

    2016-01-01

    Objective Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been established as an alternative therapy for patients with severe aortic stenosis who are unfit for the surgical aortic valve replacements. Pre and periprocedural imaging for the TAVR procedure is the key to procedural success. Currently transesophageal echocardiography (TOE), including real-time three-dimensional (RT-3D) imaging TOE, has been used for peri-interventional monitoring and guidance for TAVR. We describe our initial experience with real-time three-dimensional intracardiac echocardiography (RT-3DICE), imaging technology for the use in the TAVR procedure. Methods We used RT-3DICE using an ACUSON SC2000 2.0v (Siemens Medical Solution), and a 10F AcuNav V catheter (Siemens-Acuson, Inc, Mountain View, California, USA) in addition to preoperative multislice CT (MSCT) in total of five patients undergoing TAVR procedure. Results Aortic annulus and sinus of valsalva diameters were measured using RT-3DICE. Aortic valve measurements obtained using RT-3DICE are comparable to those obtained using MSCT with no significant difference in our patients. Conclusions This small study of five patients shows the safe use of RT-3DICE in TAVR Procedure and may help the procedures performed under local anaesthesia without the need for TOE. PMID:27158522

  8. Twenty-Two-Year Experience with Aortic Valve Replacement: Starr-Edwards Ball Valves versus Disc Valves

    OpenAIRE

    Pilegaard, Hans K.; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Torsten T; Magnussen, Karin; Knudsen, Mary A; Albrechtsen, Ole K.

    1991-01-01

    From 1965 through 1986, 817 patients underwent aortic valve replacement at our institution. Six hundred forty-five patients received Starr-Edwards ball valves, including 286 Silastic ball valves (Models 1200/1260), 165 cloth-covered caged-ball prostheses (Models 2300/2310/2320), and 194 track-valve prostheses (Model 2400). In contrast, 172 patients received disc-valve prostheses, including 126 St. Jude Medical aortic bi-leaflet disc valves, 32 Lillehei-Kaster pivoting disc valves, and 14 Björ...

  9. Closed-bore XMR (CBXMR) systems for aortic valve replacement: X-ray tube imaging performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracken, John A.; Komljenovic, Philip; Lillaney, Prasheel V.; Fahrig, Rebecca; Rowlands, J. A. [Department of Medical Biophysics and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Medical Biophysics and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2009-04-15

    A hybrid closed-bore x-ray/MRI system (CBXMR) is proposed to improve the safety and efficacy of percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedures. In this system, an x-ray C-arm will be positioned about 1 m from the entrance of a 1.5 T MRI scanner. The CBXMR system will harness the complementary strengths of both modalities to guide and deploy a bioprosthetic valve into the aortic annulus of the heart without coronary artery obstruction. A major challenge in constructing this system is ensuring proper operation of a rotating-anode x-ray tube in the MRI magnetic fringe field environment. The electron beam in the x-ray tube responsible for producing x rays can be deflected by the fringe field. However, the clinical impact of electron beam deflection in a magnetic field has not yet been studied. Here, the authors investigated changes in focal spot resolving power, field of view shift, and field of view truncation in x-ray images as a result of electron beam deflection. The authors found that in the fringe field acting on the x-ray tube at the clinical location for the x-ray C-arm (4 mT), focal spot size increased by only 2%, so the fringe field did not limit the resolving power of the x-ray system. The magnetic field also caused the field of view to shift by 3 mm. This shift must be corrected to avoid unnecessary primary radiation exposure to the patient and the staff in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. The fringe field was too weak to cause field of view truncation.

  10. Closed-bore XMR (CBXMR) systems for aortic valve replacement: x-ray tube imaging performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracken, John A; Komljenovic, Philip; Lillaney, Prasheel V; Fahrig, Rebecca; Rowlands, J A

    2009-04-01

    A hybrid closed-bore x-ray/MRI system (CBXMR) is proposed to improve the safety and efficacy of percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedures. In this system, an x-ray C-arm will be positioned about 1 m from the entrance of a 1.5 T MRI scanner. The CBXMR system will harness the complementary strengths of both modalities to guide and deploy a bioprosthetic valve into the aortic annulus of the heart without coronary artery obstruction. A major challenge in constructing this system is ensuring proper operation of a rotating-anode x-ray tube in the MRI magnetic fringe field environment. The electron beam in the x-ray tube responsible for producing x rays can be deflected by the fringe field. However, the clinical impact of electron beam deflection in a magnetic field has not yet been studied. Here, the authors investigated changes in focal spot resolving power, field of view shift, and field of view truncation in x-ray images as a result of electron beam deflection. The authors found that in the fringe field acting on the x-ray tube at the clinical location for the x-ray C-arm (4 mT), focal spot size increased by only 2%, so the fringe field did not limit the resolving power of the x-ray system. The magnetic field also caused the field of view to shift by 3 mm. This shift must be corrected to avoid unnecessary primary radiation exposure to the patient and the staff in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. The fringe field was too weak to cause field of view truncation. PMID:19472613

  11. Vancouver Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Clinical Pathway: Minimalist Approach, Standardized Care, and Discharge Criteria to Reduce Length of Stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauck, Sandra B; Wood, David A; Baumbusch, Jennifer; Kwon, Jae-Yung; Stub, Dion; Achtem, Leslie; Blanke, Philipp; Boone, Robert H; Cheung, Anson; Dvir, Danny; Gibson, Jennifer A; Lee, Bobby; Leipsic, Jonathan; Moss, Robert; Perlman, Gidon; Polderman, Jopie; Ramanathan, Krishnan; Ye, Jian; Webb, John G

    2016-05-01

    We describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of a standardized clinical pathway to facilitate safe discharge home at the earliest time after transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve replacement. Between May 2012 and October 2014, the Heart Team developed a clinical pathway suited to the unique requirements of transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve replacement in contemporary practice. The components included risk-stratified minimalist periprocedure approach, standardized postprocedure care with early mobilization and reconditioning, and criteria-driven discharge home. Our aim was to reduce variation in care, identify a subgroup of patients suitable for early discharge (≤48 hours), and decrease length of stay for all patients. We addressed barriers related to historical practices, complex multidisciplinary stakeholder engagement, and adoption of length of stay as a quality indicator. We retrospectively reviewed the experiences of 393 consecutive patients; 150 (38.2%) were discharged early. At baseline, early discharge patients had experienced less previous balloon aortic valvuloplasty, had higher left ventricular ejection fraction, better cognitive function, and were less frail than the standard discharge group (>48 hours). Early discharge was associated with the use of local anesthesia, implantation of balloon expandable device, avoidance of urinary catheter, and early removal of temporary pacemaker. Median length of stay was 1 day for early discharge and 3 days for other patients; 97.7% were discharged home. There were no differences in 30-day mortality (1.3%), disabling stroke (0.8%), or readmission (10.7%). The implementation of a transcatheter aortic valve replacement clinical pathway shifted the program's approach to combine standardized processes and individual risk stratification. The Vancouver transcatheter aortic valve replacement clinical pathway requires a rigorous assessment to determine its efficacy, safety, and reproducibility. PMID

  12. Clinical value of regression of electrocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamabe, Sayuri; Dohi, Yoshihiro; Higashi, Akifumi; Kinoshita, Hiroki; Sada, Yoshiharu; Hidaka, Takayuki; Kurisu, Satoshi; Shiode, Nobuo; Kihara, Yasuki

    2016-09-01

    Electrocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy (ECG-LVH) gradually regressed after aortic valve replacement (AVR) in patients with severe aortic stenosis. Sokolow-Lyon voltage (SV1 + RV5/6) is possibly the most widely used criterion for ECG-LVH. The aim of this study was to determine whether decrease in Sokolow-Lyon voltage reflects left ventricular reverse remodeling detected by echocardiography after AVR. Of 129 consecutive patients who underwent AVR for severe aortic stenosis, 38 patients with preoperative ECG-LVH, defined by SV1 + RV5/6 of ≥3.5 mV, were enrolled in this study. Electrocardiography and echocardiography were performed preoperatively and 1 year postoperatively. The patients were divided into ECG-LVH regression group (n = 19) and non-regression group (n = 19) according to the median value of the absolute regression in SV1 + RV5/6. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess determinants of ECG-LVH regression among echocardiographic indices. ECG-LVH regression group showed significantly greater decrease in left ventricular mass index and left ventricular dimensions than Non-regression group. ECG-LVH regression was independently determined by decrease in the left ventricular mass index [odds ratio (OR) 1.28, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.69, p = 0.048], left ventricular end-diastolic dimension (OR 1.18, 95 % CI 1.03-1.41, p = 0.014), and left ventricular end-systolic dimension (OR 1.24, 95 % CI 1.06-1.52, p = 0.0047). ECG-LVH regression could be a marker of the effect of AVR on both reducing the left ventricular mass index and left ventricular dimensions. The effect of AVR on reverse remodeling can be estimated, at least in part, by regression of ECG-LVH.

  13. Acute regional improvement of myocardial function after interventional transfemoral aortic valve replacement in aortic stenosis: A speckle tracking echocardiography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schattke Sebastian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI is a promising therapy for patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS and high perioperative risk. New echocardiographic methods, including 2D Strain analysis, allow the more accurate measurement of left ventricular (LV systolic function. The goal of this study was to describe the course of LV reverse remodelling immediately after TAVI in a broad spectrum of patients with symptomatic severe aortic valve stenosis. Methods Thirty consecutive patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis and preserved LVEF underwent transfemoral aortic valve implantation. We performed echocardiography at baseline and one week after TAVI. Echocardiography included standard 2D and Doppler analysis of global systolic and diastolic function as well as 2D Strain measurements of longitudinal, radial and circumferential LV motion and Tissue Doppler echocardiography. Results The baseline biplane LVEF was 57 ± 8.2%, the mean pressure gradient was 46.8 ± 17.2 mmHg and the mean valve area was 0.73 ± 0.27 cm2. The average global longitudinal 2D strain of the left ventricle improved significantly from -15.1 (± 3.0 to -17.5 (± 2.4 % (p Conclusion There is an acute improvement of myocardial longitudinal systolic function of the basal and medial segments measured by 2D Strain analysis immediately after TAVI. The radial, circumferential strain and LVEF does not change significantly in all patients acutely after TAVI. These data suggest that sensitive new echo methods can reliably detect early regional changes of myocardial function after TAVI before benefits in LVEF are detectable.

  14. Sutureless replacement of aortic valves with St Jude Medical mechanical valve prostheses and Nitinol attachment rings: feasibility in long-term (90-day) pig experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Berreklouw, Eric; Koene, Bart; De Somer, Filip; Bouchez, Stefaan; Chiers, Koen; Taeymans, Yvo; Van Nooten, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Nitinol attachment rings (devices) used to attach mechanical aortic valve prostheses suturelessly were studied in long-term (90 days) pig experiments. Methods: The aortic valve was removed and replaced by a device around a St Jude Medical mechanical valve prosthesis in 10 surviving pigs. Supravalvular angiography was done at the end of the operation. No coumarin derivates were given. Results: No or minimal aortic regurgitation was confirmed in all surviving pigs at the end ...

  15. Comparison of accuracy of aortic root annulus assessment with cardiac magnetic resonance versus echocardiography and multidetector computed tomography in patients referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontone, Gianluca; Andreini, Daniele; Bartorelli, Antonio L; Bertella, Erika; Mushtaq, Saima; Gripari, Paola; Loguercio, Monica; Cortinovis, Sarah; Baggiano, Andrea; Conte, Edoardo; Beltrama, Virginia; Annoni, Andrea; Formenti, Alberto; Tamborini, Gloria; Muratori, Manuela; Guaricci, Andrea; Alamanni, Francesco; Ballerini, Giovanni; Pepi, Mauro

    2013-12-01

    The evaluation of the aortic root in patients referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation is crucial. The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) evaluation of the aortic annulus (AoA) with transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in patients referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. In 50 patients, maximum diameter, minimum diameter and AoA, length of the left coronary, right coronary, and noncoronary aortic leaflets, degree (grades 1 to 4) of aortic leaflet calcification, and distance between AoA and coronary artery ostia were assessed. AoA maximum diameter, minimum diameter, and area by CMR were 26.4 ± 2.8 mm, 20.6 ± 2.3 mm, 449.8 ± 86.2 mm(2), respectively. The length of left coronary, right coronary, and noncoronary leaflets by CMR were 13.9 ± 2.2, 13.3 ± 2.1, and 13.4 ± 1.8 mm, respectively, whereas the score of aortic leaflet calcifications was 2.9 ± 0.8. Finally, the distances between AoA and left main and right coronary artery ostia were 16.1 ± 2.8 and 16.1 ± 4.4 mm, respectively. Regarding AoA area, transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography showed an underestimation (p <0.01), with a moderate agreement (r: 0.5 and 0.6, respectively, p <0.01) compared with CMR. No differences and excellent correlation were observed between CMR and MDCT for all parameters (r: 0.9, p <0.01), except for aortic leaflet calcifications that were underestimated by CMR. In conclusion, aortic root assessment with CMR including AoA size, aortic leaflet length, and coronary artery ostia height is accurate compared with MDCT. CMR may be a valid imaging alternative in patients unsuitable for MDCT. PMID:24045059

  16. [Abdominal secondary aorto-enteric fistulae complicating aortic graft replacement: postoperative and long-term outcomes in 32 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaillant, Jean-christophe; Schoell, Thibaut; Karoui, Mehdi; Chiche, Laurent; Gaudric, Julien; Gibert, Hadrien; Tresallet, Christophe; Koskas, Fabien; Hannoun, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Management of patients with abdominal secondary aorto-entericfistulae (SAEF) complicating aortic graft replacement is controversial. We retrospectively analyzed the postope- rative and long-term outcomes of all consecutive patients operated on for SAEF betwveen 2002 and2012. All were managed by in situ replacement with a cryopreserved allograft and treatment of the affected digestive tract. Thirty-two patients (median age 65 years) underwent aortic replacement for SAEFa median of 5 years after initial aortic surgery. The fistulae were located in the duodenum (n = 20), small bowel (n = 6), colon (n = 5) or stomach (n = 1). Treatment of the digestive tract included suture (n = 16), resection with anastomosis (n = 12) covered by a defunctioning stoma (n = 1), and Hartmann's procedure (n = 3). Omentoplasty was performed in 18 patients (56 %), and 17 patients (53 %) had afeedingjejunostomy. Eight patients (25 %) died post-operatively, 3 with a recurrent aorto-enteric fistula. Fifteen (62.5 %) of the remaining patients developed 27 complications, including 6 patients (19 %) with severe morbidity (Dindo III-IV). The reoperation rate was 21 %. The median hospital stay was 33 days. During follow-up (median 15 months), no further patients had a recurrent aorto-enteric fistula. We conclude that surgery for SAEF is a major procedure associated with high mortality and morbidity. Good long-term results can be obtained by excision of the prosthetic graft with cryopreserved allograft replacement, and by management in a tertialy referral center with expertise in both vascular and digestive surgery. PMID:25518163

  17. Aortic root thrombosis with coronary embolization following neo-aortic reconstruction in a child with hypoplastic left heart syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Elizabeth A; Berman, Darren P; McConnell, Patrick I; Buber, Jonathan

    2015-08-01

    In the recent era, the diagnosis, treatment options, postoperative management and outcomes of infants born with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) have undergone dramatic changes. As is the case with many other novel treatment modalities used for congenital heart diseases, data concerning the long-term outcomes and complications of the various strategies become gradually more available as the numbers of survivors grow. In general, complications of the three-stage surgical palliation used for HLHS tend to occur most commonly following the first-stage surgery. Post-stage 2 complications are substantially less common, and centre on the procedure itself and the unique physiology of the cavopulmonary connection. In the following case report, we describe a relatively rare adverse outcome that occurred following a stage 2 surgery in the form of native aortic root thrombosis extending to the coronary arteries. The selected methods of treatment used in the catheterization laboratory and later in the operating theatre, as well as its outcomes are described. PMID:25972598

  18. Approaches for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayak Nagaraja

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Retrograde transfemoral and antegrade transapical approaches are mostly used for transcatheter aortic valve replacement. This meta-analysis is designed to assess the performance of the transfemoral and transapical approach. Methods: A systematic search was conducted using MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, Current Contents Connect, Cochrane library, Google Scholar, Science Direct, and Web of Science. Original data was abstracted from each study and used to calculate a pooled odd ratio (OR and 95% confidence interval (95% CI. Results: Only 14 studies comprising of 6965 patients met full criteria for analysis. The mean duration of hospitalisation and procedure duration were similar among the 2 cohorts. The 30 days mortality (OR: 0.70, 95% CI: 0.531-0.921, the need for haemodialysis (OR: 0.29, 95% CI: 0.157-0.525 and one year mortality (OR: 0.72, 95% CI: 0.564-0.927 were lower in the transfemoral cohort. The frequency of stroke at 30 days and new pacemaker insertion were comparable. However, the prevalence of vascular complication (OR: 2.88, 95% CI: 1.821-4.563 was higher in the transfemoral group. The incidence of aortic regurgitation (OR: 1.25, 95% CI: 0.844-1.855, valve embolization (OR: 2.00, 95% CI: 0.622-6.448, major bleeding incidence rates (OR:0.77, 95% CI: 0.488-1.225, coronary obstruction (OR:0.74, 95% CI:0.234-2.311, myocardial infarction (OR: 0.75, 95% CI: 0.28-2.00, conversion to open cardiac surgery (OR: 0.29, 95% CI: 0.062-1.343 and successful implantation (OR: 0.67, 95% CI: 0.394-1.149 were comparable in the two cohorts. Conclusions: In the absence of a randomized controlled study, the ability to discriminate true differences is challenging. Even though the complications rate was much lower in transfemoral group as compared to transapical group, the current literature does not support a clear superiority of one approach to TAVR over the other.

  19. Improving Hemostasis during Replacement of the Ascending Aorta and Aortic Valve with a Composite Graft

    OpenAIRE

    Pratali, Stefano; Milano, Aldo; Codecasa, Riccardo; Carlo, Marco De; Borzoni, Giancarlo; Bortolotti, Uberto

    2000-01-01

    The use of a composite graft is an established treatment for patients with aortic valve disease and ascending aortic aneurysms. Since bleeding from suture lines is a potential complication of this procedure, we modified the technique and evaluated the effect on hemostasis.

  20. Reoperation on aortic disease in patients with previous aortic valve surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Xiao-gang; ZHANG Liang; YU Cun-tao; QIAN Xiang-yang; CHANG Qian

    2013-01-01

    Background Aortic valve replacement (AVR) is a safe and effective method in the treatment of aortic valve diseases.This study aimed to increase the understanding on re-treatment of aortic diseases after aortic valve surgery through a retrospective analysis of 47 related cases.Methods Forty-seven patients (38 males and 9 females) with previous aortic valve surgery have received reoperation on aorta from January 2003 to June 2012,and the mean interval time of re-intervention to aortic disease was 6 years ((6.0± 3.8) years).The secondary aortic surgery included aortic root replacement (14 cases),ascending aorta replacement (10 cases),aortic root/ascending aorta plus total arch replacement with stented elephant trunk implantation (21 cases),and total thoracoabdominal aorta replacement (2 cases).All these patients have received outpatient re-exams or follow-up by phone calls.Results After the initial aortic valve replacement,patients suffered from aortic dissection (25 cases,53%),ascending aortic aneurysm (12 cases,26%) or aortic root aneurysm (10 cases,21%).Diameter in ascending aorta increased (5.2±7.1) mm per year and aortic sinus (3.3±3.1) mm per year.The annual growth value of diameter in ascending aorta was higher in patients with rheumatic heart disease than that in Marfan syndrome (P<0.05).All 47 patients have received reoperation on aorta.One patient died in operating room because aortic dissection seriously involved right coronary artery.Seven patients had renal insufficiency after operation; neurological complications occurred in 14 patients including 7 patients with stroke and the others with transient brain dysfunction.All patients were followed up,the mean survival time was (97.25±17.63) months,95% confidence interval was 55.24-73.33 months.Eight cases were died during follow-up and five-year survival rate was 83%.Conclusion To reduce the aortic adverse events after first aortic valve surgery,it is necessary to actively treat and strictly

  1. Retrograde coronary sinus versus aortic root perfusion with cold cardioplegia: randomized study of levels of cardiac enzymes in 40 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guiraudon, G.M.; Campbell, C.S.; McLellan, D.G.; Kostuk, W.J.; Purves, P.D.; MacDonald, J.L.; Cleland, A.G.; Tadros, N.B.

    1986-11-01

    Myocardial injury was assessed with the use of enzyme indexes in 40 patients randomly assigned to one of two groups undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery. Twenty patients received cold cardioplegia delivered by retrograde coronary sinus perfusion and 20 received cardioplegic solution by anterograde aortic root perfusion. Creatine kinase isoenzyme MB and lactate dehydrogenese isoenzyme 1 and isoenzyme 2 assays were carried out on blood samples obtained from the coronary sinus before aortic cross-clamping and 0, 5, and 30 min after aortic unclamping. Levels of these enzymes were also obtained from venous blood samples before aortic cross-clamping and 3, 8, 14, and 20 hr after aortic unclamping and 2, 3, 4, and 5 days after surgery. Preoperative and postoperative hemodynamic measurements (Swan-Ganz catheter) and radionuclide wall motion studies were also obtained for comparison. There was no overall significant difference between the two groups postoperatively in terms of enzyme indexes, hemodynamic measurements, or results of wall motion studies. We conclude that retrograde coronary sinus perfusion is an alternative to aortic root perfusion in delivering cold cardioplegia. More studies are required to determine which subgroup of patients with coronary artery disease may benefit from retrograde coronary perfusion.

  2. Intra-operative Vector Flow Imaging Using Ultrasound of the Ascending Aorta among 40 Patients with Normal, Stenotic and Replaced Aortic Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse; Kjaergaard, Jesper;

    2016-01-01

    Stenosis of the aortic valve gives rise to more complex blood flows with increased velocities. The angleindependent vector flow ultrasound technique transverse oscillation was employed intra-operatively on the ascending aorta of (I) 20 patients with a healthy aortic valve and 20 patients...... with aortic stenosis before (IIa) and after (IIb) valve replacement. The results indicate that aortic stenosis increased flow complexity (p , 0.0001), induced systolic backflow (p , 0.003) and reduced systolic jet width (p , 0.0001). After valve replacement, the systolic backflow and jet width were normalized...... (p , 0.52 and p , 0.22), but flow complexity was not (p , 0.0001). Flow complexity (p , 0.0001), systolic jet width (p , 0.0001) and systolic backflow (p , 0.001) were associated with peak systolic velocity. The study found that aortic stenosis changes blood flow in the ascending aorta and valve...

  3. Commissural detachment and Valsalva sinus dilatation after implantation of Prima Plus stentless valve with full root technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Suguru; Doi, Kiyoshi; Okawa, Kazunari; Yaku, Hitoshi

    2016-06-01

    The stentless aortic bioprosthesis has been used because of its excellent hemodynamics and few valve-related complications. We report a case of redo aortic root replacement for severe aortic regurgitation and dilatation of the Valsalva sinus 7 years after the implantation of a Prima Plus aortic root bioprosthesis (Edwards LifeScience, Irvine, CA, USA) using a full root technique. Intraoperative findings showed the complete detachment of the commissure between the left and non-coronary cusps, and Valsalva sinus dilatation of the porcine aortic root bioprosthesis. Redo aortic root replacement with a 23-mm porcine bioprosthesis and 28-mm straight graft was performed. There were no findings of intimal tear, suture dehiscence, degeneration, and perforation of the bioprosthesis. Such complications associated with the Edwards Prima Plus aortic root bioprosthesis were rarely reported. Commissural detachment of a porcine stentless aortic bioprosthesis can occur; thus, careful follow-up involving echocardiography and computed tomography is necessary. PMID:25341962

  4. Inhospital and Post-discharge Changes in Renal Function After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, John E A; Brummel, Kent; Friedman, Julie L; Atri, Prashant; Sweis, Ranya N; Russell, Hyde; Ricciardi, Mark J; Malaisrie, S Chris; Davidson, Charles J; Flaherty, James D

    2016-02-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of inhospital and post-discharge worsening renal function (WRF) on prognosis after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Severe chronic kidney disease and inhospital WRF are both associated with poor outcomes after TAVR. There are no data available on post-discharge WRF and outcomes. This was a single-center study evaluating all TAVR from June 1, 2008, to June 31, 2014. WRF was defined as an increase in serum creatinine of ≥0.3 mg/dl. Inhospital WRF was measured from day 0 until discharge or day 7 if the hospitalization was >7 days. Post-discharge WRF was measured at 30 days after discharge. Descriptive statistics, Kaplan-Meier time-to-event analysis, and multivariate logistic regression were used. In a series of 208 patients who underwent TAVR, 204 with complete renal function data were used in the inhospital analysis and 168 who returned for the 30-day follow-up were used in the post-discharge analysis. Inhospital WRF was seen in 28%, whereas post-discharge WRF in 12%. Inhospital and post-discharge WRF were associated with lower rates of survival; however, after multivariate analysis, only post-discharge WRF remained a predictor of 1-year mortality (hazard ratio 1.18, p = 0.030 for every 1 mg/dl increase in serum creatinine). In conclusion, the rate of inhospital WRF is higher than the rate of post-discharge WRF after TAVR, and post-discharge WRF is more predictive of mortality than inhospital WRF.

  5. Aortic arch replacement with a beating heart: a simple method using continuous 3-way perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Omar, Y; Ali, J M; Colah, S; Dunning, J J

    2014-01-01

    We describe a simplified 3-way perfusion strategy that could be used in complex aortic procedures, which ensures continuous end-organ perfusion and minimizes the potential risks of cardiac, cerebral and peripheral ischaemic complications.

  6. Matched Comparison of Two Different Biological Prostheses for Complete Supra-annular Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiegl, Kathrin; Deutsch, Marcus-Andre; Rondak, Ina-Christine; Lange, Ruediger; Guenzinger, Ralf

    2015-09-01

    Objective The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the hemodynamic performance of the St. Jude Medical Trifecta (SJM Trifecta; St. Jude Medical, St Paul, Minnesota, United States) and the Carpentier-Edwards Perimount Magna Ease (CEPM Ease; Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, California, United States) bioprostheses early postoperative and at 1 year. Methods From October 2007 to October 2008, a total of 61 consecutive patients underwent aortic valve replacement (AVR) with the CEPM Ease prosthesis. From a prospective cohort of 201 patients (March 2011 to January 2012) who received AVR with the SJM Trifecta valve, a matched group of 51 patients was selected. Matching was conducted 1:1 by ejection fraction, gender, age, and body surface area. A Hegar dilator was used to define the aortic tissue annulus diameter. Data were grouped on the basis of the patient's tissue annulus diameter (≤22 mm; 23-24 mm; ≥25 mm). Results Early postoperative and at 1 year mean pressure gradients (MPGs) in the various groups ranged from 7.2 ± 4.6 to 7.1 ± 2.4 mm Hg and from 10.0 ± 4.3 to 8.0 ± 2.8 mm Hg in the SJM Trifecta group and from 18.0 ± 5.0 to 12.1 ± 3.6 mm Hg and from 17.7 ± 4.5 to 11.8 ± 3.2 mm Hg in the CEPM Ease group, respectively. Likewise, effective orifice areas (EOAs) ranged from 1.7 ± 0.5 to 2.0 ± 0.5 cm(2) and from 1.5 ± 0.3 to 1.7 ± 0.4 cm(2) in the SJM Trifecta group and from 1.3 ± 0.5 to 1.9 ± 0.5 cm(2) and from 1.2 ± 0.3 to 1.8 ± 0.3 cm(2) in the CEPM Ease group, respectively. A marked left ventricular mass (LVM) regression across all annulus sizes was noted in both groups. Severe patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) was infrequent overall. Conclusion The SJM Trifecta valve showed lower MPGs early postoperative and at 1 year as well as higher EOA and effective orifice area index early postoperative. No significant differences were detected with regard to LVM

  7. First Report of Eurycoma longifolia Jack Root Extract Causing Relaxation of Aortic Rings in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Although Eurycoma longifolia has been studied for erectile function, the blood pressure- (BP-) lowering effect has yet to be verified. Hence, this study aims at investigating the BP-lowering properties of the plant with a view to develop an antihypertensive agent that could also preserve erectile function. Ethanolic root extract was partitioned by hexane, dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate, butanol, and water. The DCM fraction, found to be potent in relaxing phenylephrine- (PE-) precontracted rat aortic rings, was further purified by column chromatography. Subfraction DCM-II, being the most active in relaxing aortae, was studied for effects on the renin-angiotensin and kallikrein-kinin systems in aortic rings. The effect of DCM-II on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity was also evaluated in vitro. Results showed that DCM-II reduced (p < 0.05) the contractions evoked by angiotensin I and angiotensin II (Ang II). In PE-precontracted rings treated with DCM-II, the Ang II-induced contraction was attenuated (p < 0.05) while bradykinin- (BK-) induced relaxation enhanced (p < 0.001). In vitro, DCM-II inhibited (p < 0.001) the activity of ACE. These data demonstrate that the vasodilatory effect of DCM-II appears to be mediated via inhibition of Ang II type 1 receptor and ACE as well as enhancement of Ang II type 2 receptor activation and BK activity.

  8. Diffuse Supravalvular Aortic Stenosis: Surgical Repair in Adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Ferlan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 54-year-old woman in which a diffuse congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS was associated with a severe aortic valve incompetence and heavy calcification of the aortic annulus. Repair consisted in resection of the ascending aorta, patch augmentation of the hypoplastic aortic root and annulus, placement of a 20 mm Dacron tubular graft (Vascutek, Renfrewshire, UK and aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis (Sorin, Turin, Italy. Follow-up echocardiography demonstrated normal prosthetic valve function and a postoperative three-dimensional computed tomographic scan showed a normal shape of the reconstructed ascending aorta.

  9. Aortic root compliance influences hemolysis in mechanical heart valve prostheses: an in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, Torsten; Hamilton, Kathrin F; Navalon, Elena Cuenca; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2012-07-01

    Mechanical heart valve prostheses are known to activate coagulation and cause hemolysis. Both are particularly dependent on the leaflet dynamics, which in turn depends on the flow field in the aortic root influenced by the aortic root geometry and its compliance. Compliance reduction of large vessels occurs in aging patients, both in those who have atherosclerotic diseases and those who do not. In this study we investigated the correlation between hemolysis and the compliance of the proximal aorta in a novel, pulsatile in vitro blood tester using porcine blood. Two mechanical heart valves, the St Jude Medical (SJM) bileaflet valve and a trileaflet valve prototype (Triflo) were tested for hemolysis under physiological conditions (120/80 mm Hg, 4.5 l/min, 70 bpm) and using two different tester setups: with a stiff aorta and with a compliant aorta. Valve dynamics were subsequently analyzed via high-speed videos. In the tests with the Triflo valve, the free plasma hemoglobin increased by 13.4 mg/dl for the flexible and by 19.3 mg/dl for the stiff setup during the 3-hour test. The FFT spectra and closing speed showed slight differences for both setups. Free plasma hemoglobin for the SJM valve was up by 22.2 mg/dl in the flexible and 42.7 mg/dl in the stiff setup. Cavitation induced by the higher closing speed might be responsible for this, which is also indicated by the sound spectrum elevation above 16 kHz. PMID:22669587

  10. Double Valve Replacement (Mitral and Aortic for Rheumatic Heart Disease: A 20-year experience with 300 patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Mishra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rheumatic heart disease still remains one of the leading causes of congestive heart failure and death owing to valvular pathologies, in developing countries. Valve replacement still remains the treatment of choice in such patients.The aim of this study wasto analyze the postoperative outcome of  double valve replacement (Mitral and Aortic in patients of rheumatic heart disease. Materials and Methods: Between 1988 and 2008, 300 patients of rheumatic heart disease underwent double (Mitral and Aortic valve replacement with Starr Edwards valve or St Jude mechanical valve prosthesis were implanted. These patients were studied retrospectively for preoperative data and postoperative outcome including causes of early and late deaths and the data was analyzed statistically. Results: The 30-day hospital death rate was 11.3% andlate death occurred in 11.6%. Anticoagulant regimen was followed to maintain the target pro-thrombin time at 1.5 times the control value. The actuarial survival (exclusive of hospital mortality was 92.4%, 84.6%, and 84.4%, per year at 5, 10, and 20 years, respectively Conclusions: In view of the acknowledged advantageof superior durability, increased thromboresistance in our patient population, and its cost effectiveness the Starr-Edwards ball valve or St. Jude valve is the mechanical prosthesis of choice for advanced combined valvular disease. The low-intensity anticoagulant regimen has offered suffcient protection against thromboembolism as well as hemorrhage.

  11. The role of radionuclide ventriculography in the decision-making for valve replacement in chronic aortic regurgitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study 54 patients with chronic aortic incompetence were evaluated by RNV to see whether three groups ('too early', 'well-timed', 'too late' AVR (aortic valve replacement), resp.) can be separated by the relation between EDV (enddiastolic volume) and regurgitant volume (RV), the level of the EDV and the clinical status. The examination was based on pre- and postoperative RNV studies as well as on follow-up studies. A good postoperative result can be expectd in cases with a preoperative EDV/RV-ratio similar to that observed in 30 patients with AR (aortic regurgitation) in whom AVR was not indicated. In contrast, in the majority of those cases with an EDV/RV-ratio exceeding this normal range the postoperative outcome will be unsatisfactory. If the EDV/RV-ratio is normal, AVR should be performed in cases with an EDV exceeding 400 ml, while in cases with an EDV between 300 and 400 ml AVR is only indicated in the presence of additional symptoms (NYHA ≥ II). In general, AVR is not required in AR patients with an EDV below 300 ml. In cases with an EDV > 300 ml and an EDV/RV-ratio exceeding the normal range, AVR should not be deferred though the postoperative result may be unsatisfactory especially in cases with long-standing left ventricular dysfunction. (orig./MG)

  12. Aortic Valve Replacement With the Stentless Freedom SOLO Bioprosthesis: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollersheim, Laurens W; Li, Wilson W; Bouma, Berto J; Repossini, Alberto; van der Meulen, Jan; de Mol, Bas A

    2015-10-01

    This systematic review examined the clinical and hemodynamic performance of the stentless Freedom SOLO (Sorin Group, Milan, Italy) aortic bioprosthesis. The occurrence of postoperative thrombocytopenia was also analyzed. The Freedom SOLO is safe to use in everyday practice, with short cross-clamp times, and postoperative pacemaker implantation is notably lower. Valvular gradients are low and remain stable during short-term follow-up. Thrombocytopenia is more severe than in other aortic prostheses; however, this is without clinical consequences. Within a few years, the 15-year follow-up of this bioprosthesis will be known, which will be key to evaluating its long-term durability. PMID:26324106

  13. LV reverse remodeling imparted by aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis; is it durable? A cardiovascular MRI study sponsored by the American Heart Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caruppannan Ketheswaram

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS, long-term data tracking surgically induced effects of afterload reduction on reverse LV remodeling are not available. Echocardiographic data is available short term, but in limited fashion beyond one year. Cardiovascular MRI (CMR offers the ability to serially track changes in LV metrics with small numbers due to its inherent high spatial resolution and low variability. Hypothesis We hypothesize that changes in LV structure and function following aortic valve replacement (AVR are detectable by CMR and once triggered by AVR, continue for an extended period. Methods Tweny-four patients of which ten (67 ± 12 years, 6 female with severe, but compensated AS underwent CMR pre-AVR, 6 months, 1 year and up to 4 years post-AVR. 3D LV mass index, volumetrics, LV geometry, and EF were measured. Results All patients survived AVR and underwent CMR 4 serial CMR's. LVMI markedly decreased by 6 months (157 ± 42 to 134 ± 32 g/m2, p 2. Similarly, EF increased pre to post-AVR (55 ± 22 to 65 ± 11%,(p 2. LV stroke volume increased rapidly from pre to post-AVR (40 ± 11 to 44 ± 7 ml, p Conclusion After initial beneficial effects imparted by AVR in severe AS patients, there are, as expected, marked improvements in LV reverse remodeling. Via CMR, surgically induced benefits to LV structure and function are durable and, unexpectedly express continued, albeit markedly incomplete improvement through 4 years post-AVR concordant with sustained improved clinical status. This supports down-regulation of both mRNA and MMP activity acutely with robust suppression long term.

  14. Single-stage repair of extensive aortic aneurysms: extended experience with total or subtotal aortic replacement%一期全主动脉置换术治疗广泛主动脉瘤样病变早中期结果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙晓刚; 常谦; 张良; 于存涛; 钱向阳

    2012-01-01

    in the right atrium.During cooling,the ascending aorta or aortic root was replaced.At the nasopharyngeal temperature of 20 ℃,the aortic arch was replaced with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion.Staged aortic occlusions allowed for replacement of descending thoracic and abdominal aorta.T6 to T12 intercostal arteries and L1,2 lumbar arteries were formed to a neo-intercostal artery in place and were connected to an 8 mm branch for keeping spinal cord blood perfusion.Visceral arteries were joined into a patch and anastomosed to the end of the main graft.Left renal artery was anastomosed to an 8mm branch or joined to the patch.The other 10 mm branches were anastomosed to iliac arteries.Results Early mortality was4.8% ( 1/21 eases),the only one patient was dead result from renal failure and multiple organ failure.There were no postoperative spinal cord deficits occurred,two patients were stroked at day 5th and 7th respectively.Three patients were operated with tracheotomy because of respiratory insufficiency.Operation was undertaken on one patient with splenenctomy result of spleen rupture during first aortic aneurysms repair.All patients were follow-up,ranging from 18 to 84 months postoperatively,all 20 survivors were alive and had good functional status.One patient was reoperated with aortic valve replacement because of massive valve insufficiency after two years.Neo- intercostal arteries were clogged in 3 patients within follow-up,and two of those patients with Marfan syndrome underwent pseudoaneurysm after intercostal arteries reconstruction.Conclusion Single-stage repair of extensive aortic aneurysms with total or subtotal aortic replacement is safely and effectively.It is feasible with acceptable surgical risks and satisfactory results.It can eliminate the risk of remnant aortic aneurysm rupture in staged total aortic replacement and has satisfactory mid-term results.

  15. Hemodynamic function of the standard St. Jude bileaflet disc valve has no clinical impact 10 years after aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Dorup, Inge; Emmertsen, Kristian;

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Size mismatch and impaired left ventricular function have been shown to determine the hemodynamic function of the standard St. Jude bileaflet disc valve early after aortic valve replacement (AVR). We aimed to analyse St. Jude valve hemodynamic function and its clinical impact in the...... regurgitation were excluded from further analysis: they had significantly lower St. Jude valve gradient and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and larger mass index (LVMi) than 37 without. RESULTS: In the 37 patients without left sided valve regurgitation peak and mean gradients were inversely related to...... St. Jude valve geometric orifice area (GOA) indexed for either body surface area or left ventricular end-diastolic dimension (LVEDD). The gradients correlated directly with LVEDD but not with LVEF or LVMi. Eleven patients with hypertension had higher peak gradients (31+/-13 versus 22+/-8 mmHg, p<0...

  16. Closed bore XMR (CBXMR) systems for aortic valve replacement: Active magnetic shielding of x-ray tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracken, John A.; DeCrescenzo, Giovanni; Komljenovic, Philip; Lillaney, Prasheel V.; Fahrig, Rebecca; Rowlands, J. A. [Department of Medical Biophysics and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Medical Biophysics and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2009-05-15

    Hybrid closed bore x-ray/MRI systems are being developed to improve the safety and efficacy of percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedures by harnessing the complementary strengths of the x-ray and MRI modalities in a single interventional suite without requiring patient transfer between two rooms. These systems are composed of an x-ray C-arm in close proximity ({approx_equal}1 m) to an MRI scanner. The MRI magnetic fringe field can cause the electron beam in the x-ray tube to deflect. The deflection causes the x-ray field of view to shift position on the detector receptacle. This could result in unnecessary radiation exposure to the patient and the staff in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Therefore, the electron beam deflection must be corrected. The authors developed an active magnetic shielding system that can correct for electron beam deflection to within an accuracy of 5% without truncating the field of view or increasing exposure to the patient. This system was able to automatically adjust to different field strengths as the external magnetic field acting on the x-ray tube was changed. Although a small torque was observed on the shielding coils of the active shielding system when they were placed in a magnetic field, this torque will not impact their performance if they are securely mounted on the x-ray tube and the C-arm. The heating of the coils of the shielding system for use in the clinic caused by electric current was found to be slow enough not to require a dedicated cooling system for one percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedure. However, a cooling system will be required if multiple procedures are performed in one session.

  17. Closed bore XMR (CBXMR) systems for aortic valve replacement: active magnetic shielding of x-ray tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracken, John A; DeCrescenzo, Giovanni; Komljenovic, Philip; Lillaney, Prasheel V; Fahrig, Rebecca; Rowlands, J A

    2009-05-01

    Hybrid closed bore x-ray/MRI systems are being developed to improve the safety and efficacy of percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedures by harnessing the complementary strengths of the x-ray and MRI modalities in a single interventional suite without requiring patient transfer between two rooms. These systems are composed of an x-ray C-arm in close proximity (approximately 1 m) to an MRI scanner. The MRI magnetic fringe field can cause the electron beam in the x-ray tube to deflect. The deflection causes the x-ray field of view to shift position on the detector receptacle. This could result in unnecessary radiation exposure to the patient and the staff in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Therefore, the electron beam deflection must be corrected. The authors developed an active magnetic shielding system that can correct for electron beam deflection to within an accuracy of 5% without truncating the field of view or increasing exposure to the patient. This system was able to automatically adjust to different field strengths as the external magnetic field acting on the x-ray tube was changed. Although a small torque was observed on the shielding coils of the active shielding system when they were placed in a magnetic field, this torque will not impact their performance if they are securely mounted on the x-ray tube and the C-arm. The heating of the coils of the shielding system for use in the clinic caused by electric current was found to be slow enough not to require a dedicated cooling system for one percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedure. However, a cooling system will be required if multiple procedures are performed in one session. PMID:19544789

  18. Health status after transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients at extreme surgical risk: Results from the CoreValve U.S. Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.L.J. Osnabrugge (Ruben); S.V. Arnold (Suzanne); M.R. Reynolds (Matthew R.); E.A. Magnuson (Elizabeth); K.K. Wang (Kenneth); V.A. Gaudiani (Vincent A.); R. Stoler (Robert); T.A. Burdon (Thomas A.); N.S. Kleiman (Neal); M.J. Reardon (Michael); D.H. Adams (David H.); J.J. Popma (Jeffrey J.); D.J. Cohen (David J.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives The purpose of this study was to characterize health status outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) with a self-expanding bioprosthesis among patients at extreme surgical risk and to identify pre-procedural patient characteristics associated with a poor ou

  19. Aortic valve bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Jens T; Jensen, Maiken Brit; Arendrup, Henrik;

    2013-01-01

    In aortic valve bypass (AVB) a valve-containing conduit is connecting the apex of the left ventricle to the descending aorta. Candidates are patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis rejected for conventional aortic valve replacement (AVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI...

  20. Noninvasive assessment of filling pressure and left atrial pressure overload in severe aortic valve stenosis: relation to ventricular remodeling and clinical outcome after aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbæk, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K;

    2011-01-01

    One of the hemodynamic consequences of aortic valve stenosis is pressure overload leading to left atrial dilatation. Left atrial size is a known risk factor providing prognostic information in several cardiac conditions. It is not known if this is also the case in patients with aortic valve...

  1. Capnocytophaga canimorsus endocarditis with root abscess in a patient with a bicuspid aortic valve

    OpenAIRE

    Guillaume Coutance; Olivier Lepage; Christophe Bachelet; Michèle Hamon; Damien Legallois; Arnaud Pellissier; Fabien Labombarda

    2009-01-01

    Infective endocarditis caused by a zoonotic micro organism is a rare clinical condition. Capnocytophaga canimorsus is a commensal bacterium living in the saliva of dogs and cats which produces rarely reported endocarditis whose incidence may be underestimated, considering its failure to grow on standard media. We reported the case of a 65-year-old man with bicuspid aortic valve endocarditis and multiple abscesses of the aortic wall caused by the canine bacteria C. canimorsus.

  2. Capnocytophaga canimorsus endocarditis with root abscess in a patient with a bicuspid aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michèle Hamon

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis caused by a zoonotic micro organism is a rare clinical condition. Capnocytophaga canimorsus is a commensal bacterium living in the saliva of dogs and cats which produces rarely reported endocarditis whose incidence may be underestimated, considering its failure to grow on standard media. We reported the case of a 65-year-old man with bicuspid aortic valve endocarditis and multiple abscesses of the aortic wall caused by the canine bacteria C. canimorsus.

  3. Effect of surgeon on transprosthetic gradients after aortic valve replacement with Freestyle® stentless bioprosthesis and its consequences: A follow-up study in 587 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauer Stefan

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The implantation of stentless valves is technically demanding and the outcome may depend on the performance of surgeons. We studied systematically the role of surgeons and other possible determinants for mid-term survival, postoperative gradients and Quality of Life (QoL after aortic valve replacement (AVR with Freestyle® stentless bioprostheses. Methods Between 1996 and 2003, 587 patients (mean 75 years underwent AVR with stentless Medtronic Freestyle® bioprostheses. Follow-up was 99% complete. Determinants of morbidity, mortality, survival time and QoL were evaluated by multiple, time-related, regression analysis. Risk models were built for all sections of the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP: energy, pain, emotional reaction, sleep, social isolation and physical mobility Results Actuarial freedom from aortic valve re-operation, structural valve deterioration, non-structural valve dysfunction, prosthetic valve endocarditis and thromboembolic events at 6 years were 95.9 ± 2.1%, 100%, 98.7 ± 0.5%, 97.0 ± 1.5%, 79.6 ± 4.3%, respectively. The actuarial freedom from bleeding events at 6 years was 93.1 ± 1.9%. Estimated survival at 6 years was similar to the age-matched German population (61.4 ± 3.8 %. Predictors of survival time were: diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, peripheral vascular disease, renal dysfunction, female gender > 80 years and patients 0.7 for each of the 6 QoL sections. Early transvalvular gradients were identified as independent risk factors for impaired physical mobility (c-index 0.77, p Conclusion In addition to the valve size (in relation to body size, subcoronary technique (versus total root and various patient-related factors the risk of elevated gradients after stentless valve implantation depends, considerably on the individual surgeon. Although there was no effect on survival time and most aspects of QoL, higher postoperative transvalvular gradients affect physical mobility after AVR.

  4. 老年人主动脉瓣置换术后病死率分析%Mortality analysis after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis in elderly patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高夏; 刘占峰; 朱汝军; 张瑞成; 梁志强; 徐宏耀; 王平凡; 白希玲; 王建伟

    2011-01-01

    目的 对年龄≥70岁的主动脉瓣狭窄患者主动脉瓣置换术后的病死率进行分析.方法 回顾性分析246例年龄≥70岁、并接受主动脉瓣置换的主动脉瓣狭窄患者的临床资料.其中高血压144例(58.5%),心房颤动42例(17.1%),肥胖27例(11.0%),有心脏手术史18例(7.3%).结果 手术30 d内死亡29例,病死率为11.8%.其中单纯主动脉瓣置换死亡15例,病死率为8.8%;复合手术死亡14例,病死率为18.7%.两种手术方式比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).手术并发症发生率为24.4%.常见的并发症为低心排出量综合征48例(19.5%),肾衰竭24例(9.8%),呼吸机辅助时间延长52例(21.1%),败血症12例(4.9%).Possion回归分析结果显示,死亡的预后因素是低心排、肾衰竭、败血症及复合手术.并发症发生的主要危险因素为体外循环时间>120 min、心房颤动与慢性阻塞性肺疾病.结论 主动脉瓣狭窄的老年患者在决定主动脉瓣置换手术前需慎重评估手术获益与手术风险.%Objective To analyze the mortality in people aged 70 years and over who had undergone aortic valve replacement (AVR) for aortic stenosis.Methods The clinical data of 246consecutive cases aged 70 years and over,who had received AVR,were retrospectively analyzed.The 144 cases (58.5 % ) had hypertension,42 cases ( 17.1 %) had atrial fibrillation,27 cases ( 11.0 % )were obeses,and 18 cases (7.3%) had undergone previous heart surgery.Results The 29 cases (11.8%) were dead within 30 days after operation.Among them,15 cases (8.8%) were with isolated AVR and the other 14 cases (18.7%) were with an associate procedure,the difference was significant (P < 0.05).The rate of postoperative complication was 24 .4%.The commoncomplications were:48 cases (19.5%) with low cardiac output,24 cases (9.8%) with renal dysfunction,52 cases (21.1% ) with prolonged ventilatory support and 12 cases (4.9%) with sepsis.In the Poisson regression analysis,the main predictors of

  5. Surgical Treatment of Aortic Aneurysm and Aortic Dissection:A Retrospective Analysis of 122 Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tucheng SUN; Xionggang JIANG; Kailun ZHANG; Jie CAI; Shu CHEN; NYANGASSA B J; Zongquan SUN

    2009-01-01

    The study summarizes the clinical experience of surgical treatments of various types of thoracic aneurysm and aortic dissection.Clinical data of 122 patients with thoracic aneurysm and aortic dissection during July 2005 to July 2008 were retrospectively analyzed.The elective operations were performed in 107 patients while emergency surgery was done in 15 cases.Different surgical strategies were employed on the basis of diseased region,including simple ascending aortic replacement (n=3),aortic root replacement (n=43),hemi-arch replacement/total arch replacement + elephant trunk technique (n=32),thoracic/thoracoabdominal aortic replacement (n=8) and endovascular repair (n=36).In this series,there is 4 cases of perioperative death due to massive cerebral hemorrhage (n=1),respiratory failure (n=1) and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) (n=2).Three cases developed post-operative massive cerebral infarction and the relatives of the patients abandoned treatment.Instant success rate of endovascular repair was 100%.The intimal rupture was sealed.Blood flow was unobstructed in true lumen and no false lumen was visualized.It was concluded that aggressive surgery should be considered in the patients with thoracic aneurysm and aortic dissection.Surgical procedures should vary with the location and the nature of the lesions.

  6. ALTERNATIVE METHOD OF SURGICAL CORRECTION OF DISSECTING AORTIC ANEURYSMS WITH AORTIC INSUFFIECIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Semenovsky

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with dissecting aortic aneurysm and associated acute aortic insufficiency form a group of seriously ill patients with significant cardiac failure, generally involving other organs and systems. It justifies an attempt to reduce a surgical risk, by using more sparing procedures, including supracoronary replacement of the ascending aorta with its root reconstruction. The latter has been performed in 27 patients (mean 54,5 ± 2,1 years with dissecting aortic aneurysm and aortic valvular insufficiency in 1996 to 2009. The major etiological factor was atherosclerosis (88%/ Seventeen (63%, 6 (22,2% and 4 (16% had types I, IIA and II dissection, respectively. Overall hospital mortality was 11%. In late period, progressive aneurysm dissection needed reinterventions in 2 cases. The competence of the reconstructed aortic valve was satisfactory both just after surgery and throughout the follow-up. Indications for this option of chronic correction, surgical techniques, and immediate and long-term results are outlined. 

  7. Correlation of Preoperative Renal Insufficiency With Mortality and Morbidity After Aortic Valve Replacement: A Propensity Score Matching Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Tsai, Feng-Chun; Chen, Yung-Chang; Lee, Hsiu-An; Chen, Shao-Wei; Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Lin, Pyng-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Preoperative end-stage renal disease carries a high mortality and morbidity risk after aortic valve replacement (AVR), but the effect of renal insufficiency remains to be clarified. Through propensity score analysis, we compared the preoperative demographics, perioperative profiles, and outcomes between patients with and without renal insufficiency. From August 2005 to November 2014, 770 adult patients underwent AVR in a single institution. Patients were classified according to their estimated glomerular infiltration rate (eGFR) as renal insufficiency (eGFR: 30–89 mL/min/1.73 m2) or normal (eGFR, ≥90 mL/min/1.73 m2). Propensity scoring was performed with a 1:1 ratio, resulting in a matched cohort of 88 patients per group. Demographics, comorbidities, and surgical procedures were well balanced between the 2 groups, except for diabetes mellitus and eGFR. Patients with renal insufficiency had higher in-hospital mortality (19.3% versus 3.4%, P 72 hour; 25% versus 9.1%, P = .008), intensive care unit stays (8.9 ± 9.9 versus 4.9 ± 7.5 days, P = .046), and hospital stays (35.3 ± 31.7 versus 24.1 ± 20.3 days, P = .008), compared with those with normal renal function. Multivariate analysis confirmed that preoperative renal insufficiency was an in-hospital mortality predictor (odds ratio, 2.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.343–4.043; P = .003), as were prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass time, intraaortic balloon pump support, and postoperative hemodialysis. The 1-year survival significantly differed between the 2 groups including (normal 87.5% versus renal insufficiency 67.9%, P < .001) or excluding in-hospital mortality (normal 90.7% versus renal insufficiency 82.1%, P = .05). Patients with preoperative renal insufficiency who underwent AVR had higher in-hospital mortality rates and increased morbidities, especially those associated with hemodynamic instabilities requiring intraaortic balloon pump support or

  8. Comparison of the effects of inhalational anesthesia with desflurane and total intravenous anesthesia on cardiac biomarkers after aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Malhotra Kapoor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective (s: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of using inhalational anesthesia with desflurane with that of a total intravenous (iv anesthetic technique using midazolam-fentanyl-propofol on the release of cardiac biomarkers after aortic valve replacement (AVR for aortic stenosis (AS. The specific objectives included (a determination of the levels of ischemia-modified albumin (IMA and cardiac troponin I (cTnI as markers of myocardial injury, (b effect on mortality, morbidity, duration of mechanical ventilation, length of Intensive Care Unit (ICU and hospital stay, incidence of arrhythmias, pacing, cardioversion, urine output, and serum creatinine. Methodology and Design: Prospective randomized clinical study. Setting: Operation room of a cardiac surgery center of a tertiary teaching hospital. Participants: Seventy-six patients in New York Heart Association classification II to III presenting electively for AVR for severe symptomatic AS. Interventions: Patients included in the study were randomized into two groups and subjected to either a desflurane-fentanyl based technique or total IV anesthesia (TIVA. Blood samples were drawn at preordained intervals to determine the levels of IMA, cTnI, and serum creatinine. Measurements and Main Results: The IMA and cTnI levels were not found to be significantly different between both the study groups. Patients in the desflurane group were found to had significantly lower ICU and hospital stays and duration of postoperative mechanical ventilation as compared to those in the TIVA group. There was no difference found in mean heart rate, urine output, serum creatinine, incidence of arrhythmias, need for cardioversion, and 30-day mortality between both groups. The patients in the TIVA group had higher mean arterial pressures on weaning off cardiopulmonary bypass as well as postoperatively in the ICU and recorded lower inotrope usage. Conclusion: The result of our study remains ambiguous regarding

  9. Acute aortic dissection type A discloses Corpus alienum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolat Philipp

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report an unusual case of an aortic type A dissection with a corpus alienum which compresses the right ventricle. The patient successfully underwent an aortic root replacement in deep hypothermia with re-implantation of the coronary arteries using a modified Bentall procedure and the resection of the corpus alienum. Intraoperative finding reveals 3 greatly adhered gauze compresses, which were most likely forgotten in the operation 34 years ago.

  10. Immunological markers of frailty predict outcomes beyond current risk scores in aortic stenosis following transcatheter aortic valve replacement: Role of neopterin and tryptophan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Csordas

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: Increased immune activation and associated tryptophan degradation serve as hallmarks of frailty underscoring the prognostic role of baseline inflammation for outcome in patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing TAVR, and thus may provide a future therapeuthic target in this elderly patient population.

  11. Comparison of 1-Year Outcome in Patients With Severe Aorta Stenosis Treated Conservatively or by Aortic Valve Replacement or by Percutaneous Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (Data from a Multicenter Spanish Registry).

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Saldivar, Hugo; Rodriguez-Pascual, Carlos; de la Morena, Gonzalo; Fernández-Golfín, Covadonga; Amorós, Carmen; Alonso, Mario Baquero; Dolz, Luis Martínez; Solé, Albert Ariza; Guzmán-Martínez, Gabriela; Gómez-Doblas, Juan José; Jiménez, Antonio Arribas; Fuentes, María Eugenia; Gay, Laura Galian; Ortiz, Martin Ruiz; Avanzas, Pablo; Abu-Assi, Emad; Ripoll-Vera, Tomás; Díaz-Castro, Oscar; Osinalde, Eduardo P; Martínez-Sellés, Manuel

    2016-07-15

    The factors that influence decision making in severe aortic stenosis (AS) are unknown. Our aim was to assess, in patients with severe AS, the determinants of management and prognosis in a multicenter registry that enrolled all consecutive adults with severe AS during a 1-month period. One-year follow-up was obtained in all patients and included vital status and aortic valve intervention (aortic valve replacement [AVR] and transcatheter aortic valve implantation [TAVI]). A total of 726 patients were included, mean age was 77.3 ± 10.6 years, and 377 were women (51.8%). The most common management was conservative therapy in 468 (64.5%) followed by AVR in 199 (27.4%) and TAVI in 59 (8.1%). The strongest association with aortic valve intervention was patient management in a tertiary hospital with cardiac surgery (odds ratio 2.7, 95% confidence interval 1.8 to 4.1, p <0.001). The 2 main reasons to choose conservative management were the absence of significant symptoms (136% to 29.1%) and the presence of co-morbidity (128% to 27.4%). During 1-year follow-up, 132 patients died (18.2%). The main causes of death were heart failure (60% to 45.5%) and noncardiac diseases (46% to 34.9%). One-year survival for patients treated conservatively, with TAVI, and with AVR was 76.3%, 94.9%, and 92.5%, respectively, p <0.001. One-year survival of patients treated conservatively in the absence of significant symptoms was 97.1%. In conclusion, most patients with severe AS are treated conservatively. The outcome in asymptomatic patients managed conservatively was acceptable. Management in tertiary hospitals is associated with valve intervention. One-year survival was similar with both interventional strategies.

  12. Comparison of 1-Year Outcome in Patients With Severe Aorta Stenosis Treated Conservatively or by Aortic Valve Replacement or by Percutaneous Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (Data from a Multicenter Spanish Registry).

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Saldivar, Hugo; Rodriguez-Pascual, Carlos; de la Morena, Gonzalo; Fernández-Golfín, Covadonga; Amorós, Carmen; Alonso, Mario Baquero; Dolz, Luis Martínez; Solé, Albert Ariza; Guzmán-Martínez, Gabriela; Gómez-Doblas, Juan José; Jiménez, Antonio Arribas; Fuentes, María Eugenia; Gay, Laura Galian; Ortiz, Martin Ruiz; Avanzas, Pablo; Abu-Assi, Emad; Ripoll-Vera, Tomás; Díaz-Castro, Oscar; Osinalde, Eduardo P; Martínez-Sellés, Manuel

    2016-07-15

    The factors that influence decision making in severe aortic stenosis (AS) are unknown. Our aim was to assess, in patients with severe AS, the determinants of management and prognosis in a multicenter registry that enrolled all consecutive adults with severe AS during a 1-month period. One-year follow-up was obtained in all patients and included vital status and aortic valve intervention (aortic valve replacement [AVR] and transcatheter aortic valve implantation [TAVI]). A total of 726 patients were included, mean age was 77.3 ± 10.6 years, and 377 were women (51.8%). The most common management was conservative therapy in 468 (64.5%) followed by AVR in 199 (27.4%) and TAVI in 59 (8.1%). The strongest association with aortic valve intervention was patient management in a tertiary hospital with cardiac surgery (odds ratio 2.7, 95% confidence interval 1.8 to 4.1, p <0.001). The 2 main reasons to choose conservative management were the absence of significant symptoms (136% to 29.1%) and the presence of co-morbidity (128% to 27.4%). During 1-year follow-up, 132 patients died (18.2%). The main causes of death were heart failure (60% to 45.5%) and noncardiac diseases (46% to 34.9%). One-year survival for patients treated conservatively, with TAVI, and with AVR was 76.3%, 94.9%, and 92.5%, respectively, p <0.001. One-year survival of patients treated conservatively in the absence of significant symptoms was 97.1%. In conclusion, most patients with severe AS are treated conservatively. The outcome in asymptomatic patients managed conservatively was acceptable. Management in tertiary hospitals is associated with valve intervention. One-year survival was similar with both interventional strategies. PMID:27239021

  13. Numerical simulation of the non-Newtonian blood flow through a mechanical aortic valve. Non-Newtonian blood flow in the aortic root

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vita, F.; de Tullio, M. D.; Verzicco, R.

    2016-04-01

    This work focuses on the comparison between Newtonian and non-Newtonian blood flows through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve in the aortic root. The blood, in fact, is a concentrated suspension of cells, mainly red blood cells, in a Newtonian matrix, the plasma, and consequently its overall behavior is that of a non-Newtonian fluid owing to the action of the cells' membrane on the fluid part. The common practice, however, assumes the blood in large vessels as a Newtonian fluid since the shear rate is generally high and the effective viscosity becomes independent of the former. In this paper, we show that this is not always the case even in the aorta, the largest artery of the systemic circulation, owing to the pulsatile and transitional nature of the flow. Unexpectedly, for most of the pulsating cycle and in a large part of the fluid volume, the shear rate is smaller than the threshold level for the blood to display a constant effective viscosity and its shear thinning character might affect the system dynamics. A direct inspection of the various flow features has shown that the valve dynamics, the transvalvular pressure drop and the large-scale features of the flow are very similar for the Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid models. On the other hand, the mechanical damage of the red blood cells (hemolysis), induced by the altered stress values in the flow, is larger for the non-Newtonian fluid model than for the Newtonian one.

  14. Consecutive percutaneous valve-in-valve replacement late after Ross procedure: A novel approach in an adult with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiktor, Dominik M; Kay, Joseph D; Kim, Michael S

    2015-11-15

    The emergence of transcatheter valve technology over the last decade has made significant impact on the treatment of patients with valvular heart disease. There has been increasing experience with both native and valve-in-valve indications with promising results. We present the case of a young woman with congenital heart disease who underwent the Ross procedure for bicuspid aortic valve endocarditis with subsequent reoperation and surgical aortic valve replacement for neo-aortic root dilation who experienced worsening symptoms related to both pulmonary and aortic valve dysfunction. She was successfully treated with percutaneous pulmonary and aortic valve replacement with excellent early term technical results and marked improvement in symptoms.

  15. Oil Red O and Hematoxylin and Eosin Staining for Quantification of Atherosclerosis Burden in Mouse Aorta and Aortic Root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés-Manzano, M Jesús; Andrés, Vicente; Dorado, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Methods for staining tissues with Oil Red O and hematoxylin-eosin are classical histological techniques that are widely used to quantify atherosclerotic burden in mouse tissues because of their ease of use, reliability, and the large amount of information they provide. These stains can provide quantitative data about the impact of a genetic or environmental factor on atherosclerotic burden and on the initiation, progression, or regression of the disease, and can also be used to evaluate the efficacy of drugs designed to prevent or treat atherosclerosis. This chapter provides protocols for quantifying atherosclerotic burden in mouse aorta and aortic root, including methods for dissection, Oil Red O staining, hematoxylin-eosin staining, and image analysis.

  16. Management of severe asymmetric pectus excavatum complicating aortic repair in a patient with Marfan's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Jonathan C; Marcuzzi, Danny; Peterson, Mark D; Ko, Michael A

    2016-05-01

    We describe the case of a 28-year old man with Marfan's syndrome and severe pectus excavatum who required an aortic root replacement for an ascending aortic aneurysm. There was a near-vertical angulation of the sternum that presented challenges with opening and exposure of the heart during aortic surgery. Furthermore, removal of the sternal retractor after aortic repair resulted in sudden loss of cardiac output. A Ravitch procedure was then performed to successfully close the chest without further cardiovascular compromise. We propose that patients with a severe pectus excavatum and mediastinal displacement seen on preoperative CT scanning should be considered for simultaneous, elective repair. PMID:26874148

  17. Management of severe asymmetric pectus excavatum complicating aortic repair in a patient with Marfan's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Jonathan C; Marcuzzi, Danny; Peterson, Mark D; Ko, Michael A

    2016-05-01

    We describe the case of a 28-year old man with Marfan's syndrome and severe pectus excavatum who required an aortic root replacement for an ascending aortic aneurysm. There was a near-vertical angulation of the sternum that presented challenges with opening and exposure of the heart during aortic surgery. Furthermore, removal of the sternal retractor after aortic repair resulted in sudden loss of cardiac output. A Ravitch procedure was then performed to successfully close the chest without further cardiovascular compromise. We propose that patients with a severe pectus excavatum and mediastinal displacement seen on preoperative CT scanning should be considered for simultaneous, elective repair.

  18. Implante de bioprótese aórtica "stentless" em pacientes com alterações do anel aórtico Aortic valve replacement with a stentless bioprosthesis in patients with weakened aortic annulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayard Gontijo Filho

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available Dezessete pacientes portadores de doença da valva aórtica associada a alterações estruturais do anel aórtico foram submetidos a implante de bioprótese aórtica "stentless" (Biocór: 8 pacientes eram portadores de endocardite bacteriana, sendo 3 em valva aórtica e 5 em próteses. Os demais pacientes eram portadores de próteses aórticas disfuncionantes. A técnica de implante foi basicamente a mesma, utilizandose dois níveis de sutura, sendo o primeiro ao nível do anel aórtico e o outro na parede aórtica. Em 11 pacientes a aorta ascendente foi ampliada com remendo de pericárdio bovino e 3 pacientes foram submetidos, também, a substituição valvar mitral. Houve 1 óbito hospitalar no 23º dia de pós-operatório por falência de múltiplos órgãos em 1 paciente portador de endocardite bacteriana e quadro de AVC pré-operatório. Dois pacientes necessitaram implante de marcapasso definitivo. Na evolução tardia houve apenas 1 óbito no 6º mês, de forma súbita, em uma criança portadora de marcapasso. Um paciente desenvolveu deiscência parcial da bioprótese na sutura inferior, o que gerou um gradiente na via de saída do ventrículo esquerdo, sendo reoperado com sucesso de 18º mês de pós-operatório. Todos os pacientes encontram-se em controle ambulatorial, com estudos ecocardiográficos seriados, que demonstram excelente desempenho da bioprótese "stentless" sem gradientes transvalvares importantes e ausência de regurgitação aórtica significativa.An aortic stentless bioprosthesis (Biocor Ind. was implanted in 17 patients with difficult aortic annulus due either to endocarditis orto a previous aortic valve replacement. Native valve endocarditis was present in 3 patients and prosthetic valve endocarditis in 5; 9 patients had one or more previous aortic valve replacements showing a wheakened aortic rim. The stentless bioprosthesis was implanted with a two layers suture technique similar to a homograft implant. The

  19. Review of numerical methods for simulation of the aortic root: Present and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Hossein; Cartier, Raymond; Mongrain, Rosaire

    2016-05-01

    Heart valvular disease is still one of the main causes of mortality and morbidity in develop countries. Numerical modeling has gained considerable attention in studying hemodynamic conditions associated with valve abnormalities. Simulating the large displacement of the valve in the course of the cardiac cycle needs a well-suited numerical method to capture the natural biomechanical phenomena which happens in the valve. The paper aims to review the principal progress of the numerical approaches for studying the hemodynamic of the aortic valve. In addition, the future directions of the current approaches as well as their potential clinical applications are discussed.

  20. Análise do tratamento cirúrgico da raiz da aorta com o tubo valvulado e com a preservação da valva aórtica Analysis of aortic root surgery with composite mechanical aortic valve conduit and valve-sparing reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Ribeiro Dias

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Análise comparativa dos resultados imediatos e tardios da reconstrução da raiz da aorta com o tubo valvulado e com a preservação da valva aórtica. MÉTODOS: No período de novembro de 2002 a setembro de 2009, 164 pacientes com idade média de 54 ± 15 anos, sendo 115 do sexo masculino, foram submetidos ao tratamento cirúrgico da raiz da aorta. Foram 125 tubos valvulados e 39 reconstruções da raiz da aorta com preservação da valva aórtica. Dezesseis por cento dos pacientes eram portadores de síndrome de Marfan e 4,3% apresentavam valva aórtica bivalvulada. Cento e quarenta e quatro (88% pacientes foram acompanhados durante tempo médio de seguimento de 41,1 ± 20,8 meses. RESULTADOS: A mortalidade hospitalar total foi de 4,9%; sendo 5,6% nas operações com tubo valvulado e 2,6% nas preservações da valva aórtica (POBJECTIVE: Comparative analysis of early and late results of aortic root reconstruction with aortic valve sparing operations and the composite mechanical valve conduit replacement. METHODS: From November 2002 to September 2009, 164 consecutive patients with mean age 54 ± 15 years, 115 male, underwent the aortic root reconstruction (125 mechanical valve conduit replacements and 39 valve sparing operations. Sixteen percent of patients had Marfan syndrome and 4.3% had bicuspid aortic valve. One hundred and forty-four patients (88% were followed for a mean period of 41.1 ± 20.8 months. RESULTS: The hospital mortality was 4.9%, 5.6% in operations with valved conduits and 2.6% in the valve sparing procedures (P <0.05. There was no difference neither in survival (95% CI = 86% - 96%, P= 0.1 nor in reoperation-free survival (95% CI = 85% - 90%, P = 0.29. The survival free of complications such as bleeding, thromboembolism and endocarditis were favorable to the valve sparing operations, respectively (95% CI = 70% - 95%, P = 0.001, (95% CI = 82% - 95% P = 0.03 and (95% CI = 81% - 95%, P = 0.03. Multivariate analysis

  1. Beating Heart Mitral Valve Replacement Surgery without Aortic Cross-Clamping via Right Thoracotomy in a Patient with Compromised Left Ventricular Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Baris-Durukan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Global myocardial ischemia and ischemia-reperfusion injury are potential adverse events related with cardioplegic arrest. Beating heart surgery has avoided such complications and adapted to valve surgery following successful results published on myocardial revascularization. Difficulty in weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass may be lessened by using on-pump beating heart surgery for mitral valve interventions. Here we describe a 64-year-old male patient with severe mitral regurgitation and dilated cardiomyopathy. Beating heart mitral valve replacement surgery was performed without aortic cross-clamping through a right thoracotomy approach. We believe that, particularly in patients with poor left ventricular functions, beating heart mitral valve surgery may be advantageous

  2. Optimal implantation depth and adherence to guidelines on permanent pacing to improve the results of transcatheter aortic valve replacement with the medtronic corevalve system: The CoreValve prospective, international, post-market ADVANCE-II study

    OpenAIRE

    Petronio, Anna S; Sinning, Jan-Malte; Van Mieghem, Nicolas; Zucchelli, Giulio; Nickenig, Georg; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Bosmans, B.; Bedogni, Francesco; Branny, Marian; Stangl, Karl; Kovac, Jan; Schiltgen, Molly; Kraus, Stacia; De Jaegere, Peter

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives The aim of the CoreValve prospective, international, post-market ADVANCE-II study was to define the rates of conduction disturbances and permanent pacemaker implantation (PPI) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement with the Medtronic CoreValve System (Minneapolis, Minnesota) using optimized implantation techniques and application of international guidelines on cardiac pacing. Background Conduction disturbances are a frequent complication of transcatheter aortic va...

  3. Long-term implications of emergency versus elective proximal aortic surgery in Marfan syndrome patients in the GenTAC Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Howard K.; Kindem, Mark; Bavaria, Joseph E.; Dietz, Harry C.; Milewicz, Dianna M.; Devereux, Richard B.; Eagle, Kim A.; Maslen, Cheryl L.; Kroner, Barbara L.; Pyeritz, Reed E.; Holmes, Kathryn W.; Weinsaft, Jonathan W.; Menashe, Victor; Ravekes, William; LeMaire, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Marfan syndrome patients with aortic root aneurysms undergo elective aortic root replacement to avoid the life-threatening outcomes of aortic dissection and emergency repair. The long-term implications of failed aortic surveillance leading to acute dissection and emergency repair are poorly defined. We compared the long-term clinical courses of Marfan syndrome patients who survive emergency versus elective proximal aortic surgery. Methods The GenTAC Registry is an NIH-funded, multicenter database and biorepository that enrolls patients with genetically triggered thoracic aortic aneurysms. Of the 635 patients with Marfan syndrome enrolled as of March 2011, 194 had undergone proximal aortic replacement. Patients were grouped according to emergent (n=47) or elective (n=147) status at the time of surgery. Results Patients in the emergent group were more likely to have incomplete proximal aortic resection; 83% of emergency procedures included aortic root replacement, compared with 95% of elective procedures. At long-term follow-up (mean, >6 years), emergent patients had a higher incidence of chronic dissection of the distal aorta and had significantly larger diameters in distal aortic segments than elective patients. Additionally, emergent patients had undergone more operations (1.31 vs 1.11 procedures/patient; P=0.01) and had lower activity scores on a health-related quality-of-life survey. Conclusions For Marfan syndrome patients, failed aortic surveillance and consequent emergency dissection repair have important long-term implications with regard to status of the distal aorta, the need for multiple procedures, and quality of life. These findings emphasize the importance of aortic surveillance and timely elective aortic root aneurysm repair for Marfan syndrome patients. PMID:22104675

  4. Homoenxerto aórtico criopreservado no tratamento cirúrgico das lesões da valva aórtica: resultados imediatos Cryopreserved aortic homograft for aortic valve replacement: immediate results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Roberto Gerola

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar os resultados imediatos, clínicos e ecocardiográficos, com o uso do homoenxerto aórtico criopreservado no tratamento cirúrgico da valva aórtica. MATERIAL: Dezoito pacientes com lesão na valva aórtica receberam homoenxerto aórtico criopreservado, sendo 15 homens, 10 com insuficiência aórtica e oito, estenose aórtica. A idade variou de 18 a 65 (média de 44,5 ± 18,14 anos. Quatro pacientes apresentavam endocardite bacteriana em atividade, 12 estavam em classe funcional II, seis em classe funcional III (NYHA. A função ventricular esquerda era normal em 15 pacientes. RESULTADOS: A mortalidade hospitalar foi de 5,5% (um paciente, por insuficiência respiratória, os demais receberam alta hospitalar entre o 5° e 8° dia de pós-operatório em classe funcional I. O gradiente transvalvar aórtico máximo, ao ecocardiograma, variou de zero a 30 mmhg, com média de 10,9 ± 9,2 mmhg. Cinco pacientes não apresentavam nenhum grau de refluxo pelo homoenxerto, 11 (61,1% tinham refluxo mínimo e dois apresentavam refluxo leve. O tempo de circulação extracorpórea variou de 130 a 220 (média de 183,9 ± 36,7 minutos. O tempo de pinçamento da aorta variou de 102 a 168 (média de 139,14 ± 25,10 minutos. O sangramento no pós-operatório variou 210 a 1220 ml, com média de 511,4 ± 335,1 ml e não houve reoperações. O tempo de intubação orotraqueal variou de 2h e 50min a 17 h com média de 9,14 ± 3,6 h. CONCLUSÃO: O homoenxerto aórtico criopreservado pode ser utilizado rotineiramente com baixa morbi-mortalidade hospitalar.OBJECTIVE: To assess immediate clinical and echocardiographic results of the use of cryopreserved aortic homografts for aortic valve replacement. METHODS: Eighteen patients with aortic valve disease underwent aortic valve replacement, receiving a cryopreserved aortic homograft, 15 were male, 10 had aortic regurgitation, and 8 had aortic stenosis. Age ranged from 18 to 65 years (mean, 44.5 ± 18

  5. Comparison of cine-MRI and transthoracic echocardiography for the assessment of aortic root diameters in patients with suspected Marfan syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with Marfan syndrome require repeated imaging for monitoring of aortic root aneurysms. Therefore, we evaluated the agreement and reproducibility of cine-MRI and echocardiography measurements of the sinuses of Valsalva in patients with suspected Marfan syndrome. 51 consecutive patients with suspected Marfan syndrome were prospectively examined using cine-MRI and echocardiography. Two readers independently measured aortic root diameters at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva in both cine-MRI and echocardiography. Statistics included intraclass correlation coefficient, Pearson correlation coefficient, Bland-Altman analysis, and two-sided t-test. In 38 of the 51 individuals (74.5 %), the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome was established according to the criteria of the Ghent-2 nosology. Cine-MRI measurements of the sinuses of Valsalva revealed a strong correlation with echocardiography (r=0.929), but a statistically significant bias of -1.0 mm (p<0.001). The mean absolute diameter for sinuses of Valsalva obtained by cine-MRI was 32.3 ± 5.8 mm as compared to 33.4 ± 5.4 mm obtained by echocardiography. Interobserver agreement of measurements of the sinuses of Valsalva was higher for cine-MRI than for echocardiography (p=0.029). Despite small, but statistically significant differences in terms of agreement and reproducibility, cine-MRI and echocardiographic measurements of aortic root diameters provide comparable results without a significant clinical difference. Therefore both techniques may be used for monitoring of the aortic root in patients with Marfan syndrome.

  6. Comparison of cine-MRI and transthoracic echocardiography for the assessment of aortic root diameters in patients with suspected Marfan syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannas, P.; Derlin, T.; Yamamura, J.; Lund, G.; Adam, G. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Rybczynski, M.; Sheikhzadeh, S.; Kodolitsch, Y. von [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of General and Interventional Cardiology; Groth, M. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Section for Pediatric Radiology

    2015-11-15

    Patients with Marfan syndrome require repeated imaging for monitoring of aortic root aneurysms. Therefore, we evaluated the agreement and reproducibility of cine-MRI and echocardiography measurements of the sinuses of Valsalva in patients with suspected Marfan syndrome. 51 consecutive patients with suspected Marfan syndrome were prospectively examined using cine-MRI and echocardiography. Two readers independently measured aortic root diameters at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva in both cine-MRI and echocardiography. Statistics included intraclass correlation coefficient, Pearson correlation coefficient, Bland-Altman analysis, and two-sided t-test. In 38 of the 51 individuals (74.5 %), the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome was established according to the criteria of the Ghent-2 nosology. Cine-MRI measurements of the sinuses of Valsalva revealed a strong correlation with echocardiography (r=0.929), but a statistically significant bias of -1.0 mm (p<0.001). The mean absolute diameter for sinuses of Valsalva obtained by cine-MRI was 32.3 ± 5.8 mm as compared to 33.4 ± 5.4 mm obtained by echocardiography. Interobserver agreement of measurements of the sinuses of Valsalva was higher for cine-MRI than for echocardiography (p=0.029). Despite small, but statistically significant differences in terms of agreement and reproducibility, cine-MRI and echocardiographic measurements of aortic root diameters provide comparable results without a significant clinical difference. Therefore both techniques may be used for monitoring of the aortic root in patients with Marfan syndrome.

  7. Quantification of plaque lipids in the aortic root of ApoE-deficient mice by 3D DIXON magnetic resonance imaging in an ex vivo model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietel, Barbara; Kuehn, Constanze; Achenbach, Stephan [University Hospital of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Cardiology and Angiology, Erlangen (Germany); Budinsky, Lubos [Campus Science Support Facilities (CSF), Vienna Biocenter (VBC), Vienna (Austria); Uder, Michael [University Hospital of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Hess, Andreas [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-10-31

    To establish a dedicated protocol for the three-dimensional (3D) quantification of plaque lipids in apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE{sup -/-}) mice using ex vivo MRI. ApoE{sup -/-} mice were fed a high-fat diet (n = 10) or normal food (n = 10) for 3 months. Subsequently, a 3D FLASH MRI sequence was used to view the anatomy of the aortic root in the isolated hearts, where a 3D double-echo two-excitation pulse sequence (DIXON sequence) was used to selectively image plaque lipids. The vessel wall, lumen and plaque lipid volumes were quantified by MRI and histology for correlation analysis. DIXON MRI allowed visualisation and accurate quantification of plaque lipids. When comparing the vessel wall, lumen and plaque lipid sizes in the aortic root, Bland-Altman and linear regression analysis revealed a close correlation between MRI results and the histological data both on a slice-by-slice basis and of the volumetric measurements (vessel wall: r{sup 2} = 0.775, p < 0.001; vessel lumen: r{sup 2} = 0.875; p = 0.002; plaque lipid: r{sup 2} = 0.819, p = 0.003). The combination of 3D FLASH and DIXON-sequence MRI permits an accurate ex vivo assessment of the investigated plaque parameters in the aortic root of mice, particularly the lipid content. (orig.)

  8. Value of intravascular ultrasound imaging in following up patients with replacement of the ascending aorta for acute type A aortic dissection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Wei; Francois Schiele; Nicolas Meneveau; Made-France Seronde; Pierre Legalery; Fiona Caulfield; Jean-Francois Bonneville; Sidney Chocron; Jean-Pierre Bassand

    2008-01-01

    Background The value of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging in patients with replacement of the ascending aorta for acute type A aortic dissection (AD) is unknown.The purpose of this study was to assess the potential use of IVUS imaging in this setting.Methods From September 2002 to July 2005,IVUS imaging with a 9 MHz probe was performed in a series of 16 consecutive patients with suspected or established AD.This study focused on 5 of them with replacement of the ascending aorta for acute type A AD.Among these 5 patients,other imaging modalities including aortography,spiral computed tomography,magnetic resonance imaging and transesophageal echocardiography were performed in 5,3,3 and 1 patients,respectively.Results There were no complications related to IVUS imaging.For the replaced graft,as other imaging modalities,IVUS could identify all 5 grafts,the proximal and the distal anastomoses,and the ostia of the reimplanted coronary arteries.In 2 cases,IVUS detected 2 peri-graft pseudo-aneurysms (1 per case),which were also detected by magnetic resonance imaging but omitted by aortography.For the residual dissection,IVUS had similar findings as other imaging modalities in detecting the patency (5/5),the longitudinal and the circumferential extent,the thrombus (4/5),the recurrent dissection (1/5) and an aneurysm distal to the graft (5 in 4 patients).However,it detected more intimal tears and side branch involvements than other imaging modalities (15 vs 10 and 3 vs 1,respectively).Conclusions In following-up patients with replacement of the ascending aorta for acute type A AD,IVUS imaging can provide complete information of the replaced graft and the residual dissection.So,IVUS imaging may be considered when the four current frequently used imaging modalities can not supply sufficient information or there are some discrepancies between them.

  9. Immediate, Non Submerged Root Analog Zirconia Implant in Single Rooted Tooth Replacement: Case Report with 2 years Follow Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patankar, Amod; Kshirsagar, Rajesh; Patankar, Swapna; Pawar, Sudhir

    2016-07-01

    This report demonstrates the clinical use of a modified, truly anatomic, root analogue zirconia implant for immediate replacement of a right mandibular first premolar. A 22-year-old female patient with chronic apical periodontitis of the right mandibular first premolar was referred and the tooth was carefully extracted. A truly anatomical, root identical, roughened zirconia implant modified by macro-retentions was manufactured and placed into the extraction socket by tapping 3 days later. After 4 months a composite crown was cemented in place. No complications occurred during the healing period. A good functional and aesthetic result was achieved with minimal bone resorption and soft tissue recession at 18 months follow-up. This report describes the successful clinical use of an immediate, single stage, truly anatomical root-analogue zirconia implant for replacement of a single rooted tooth. Significant modifications such as macro-retentions yielded primary stability and excellent osseointegration. This novel approach is minimally invasive, respects the underlying anatomy and aids socket prevention. In addition the procedure saves time and cost, has good patient acceptance as there is no need for osteotomy, sinus lift or bone augmentation. PMID:27408451

  10. Optimal implantation depth and adherence to guidelines on permanent pacing to improve the results of transcatheter aortic valve replacement with the medtronic corevalve system: The CoreValve prospective, international, post-market ADVANCE-II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.S. Petronio (Anna S.); J.-M. Sinning (Jan-Malte); N.M. van Mieghem (Nicolas); G. Zucchelli (Giulio); G. Nickenig (Georg); R. Bekeredjian (Raffi); B. Bosmans; F. Bedogni (Francesco); M. Branny (Marian); K. Stangl (Karl); J. Kovac (Jan); M. Schiltgen (Molly); S. Kraus (Stacia); P.P.T. de Jaegere (Peter)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives The aim of the CoreValve prospective, international, post-market ADVANCE-II study was to define the rates of conduction disturbances and permanent pacemaker implantation (PPI) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement with the Medtronic CoreValve System (Minneapolis, Minnes

  11. Aortoplastia redutora com contenção externa associada à troca valvar aórtica em pacientes de alto risco Reduction aortoplasty with external wrapping associated with aortic valve replacement in high-risk patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Haddad

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a evolução de pacientes de alto risco submetidos a aortoplastia redutora com contenção externa associada a troca valvar aórtica. MÉTODOS: Seis pacientes portadores de aneurisma de aorta ascendente e valvopatia aórtica, sendo quatro do sexo masculino, foram incluídos no estudo. Um paciente apresentava insuficiência mitral importante. A idade variou de 61 a 70 anos (média de 65,7 anos. A insuficiência aórtica foi a indicação de troca valvar em 83,3% dos pacientes e a estenose aórtica, em 16,7%. Os critérios de inclusão foram: pacientes portadores de valvopatia aórtica com indicação cirúrgica, aorta ascendente com diâmetro > 5,5 cm, EuroSCORE > 6 e idade acima de 60 anos. O diâmetro da aorta ascendente variou de 57 a 68 mm (média de 63,7 mm. Análise estatística foi realizada utilizando o teste t pareado para as variáveis estudadas, com nível de significância menor que 5%. RESULTADOS: Todos os pacientes foram submetidos a aortoplastia redutora com contenção externa associada a troca valvar aórtica. Não houve mortalidade hospitalar na série estudada. Um (16,7% paciente apresentou fibrilação atrial no pós-operatório. O diâmetro médio da aorta ascendente foi de 37,0 +4,5 mm aos 6 meses de pós-operatório (P OBJECTIVE: To assess the midterm follow-up of reduction aortoplasty with external wrapping associated with aortic valve replacement in high risk patients. METHODS: Six patients with ascending aortic aneurysm and aortic valve disease were included in this study. Four of them were male. The age ranged from 61 to 70 years (mean 65.7 years. One patient presented severe mitral valve insufficiency. All patients underwent aortic valve replacement (83.3% with aortic insufficiency and 16.7% with aortic stenosis. The inclusion criteria were: surgical aortic valve disease, ascending aortic aneurysm > 5.5 cm, EuroSCORE > 6 and age above 60 years. The ascending aortic diameter ranged from 57 to 68 mm

  12. Initial Surgical Experience with Aortic Valve Repair: Clinical and Echocardiographic Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Francisco Diniz Affonso; Colatusso, Daniele de Fátima Fornazari; da Costa, Ana Claudia Brenner Affonso; Balbi Filho, Eduardo Mendel; Cavicchioli, Vinicius Nesi; Lopes, Sergio Augusto Veiga; Ferreira, Andrea Dumsch de Aragon; Collatusso, Claudinei

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Due to late complications associated with the use of conventional prosthetic heart valves, several centers have advocated aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root replacement for patients with aortic valve insufficiency, in order to enhance late survival and minimize adverse postoperative events. Methods From March/2012 thru March 2015, 37 patients consecutively underwent conservative operations of the aortic valve and/or aortic root. Mean age was 48±16 years and 81% were males. The aortic valve was bicuspid in 54% and tricuspid in the remaining. All were operated with the aid of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography. Surgical techniques consisted of replacing the aortic root with a Dacron graft whenever it was dilated or aneurysmatic, using either the remodeling or the reimplantation technique, besides correcting leaflet prolapse when present. Patients were sequentially evaluated with clinical and echocardiographic studies and mean follow-up time was 16±5 months. Results Thirty-day mortality was 2.7%. In addition there were two late deaths, with late survival being 85% (CI 95% - 68%-95%) at two years. Two patients were reoperated due to primary structural valve failure. Freedom from reoperation or from primary structural valve failure was 90% (CI 95% - 66%-97%) and 91% (CI 95% - 69%-97%) at 2 years, respectively. During clinical follow-up up to 3 years, there were no cases of thromboembolism, hemorrhage or endocarditis. Conclusions Although this represents an initial series, these data demonstrates that aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root surgery can be performed with satisfactory immediate and short-term results. PMID:27556321

  13. Sociology of religion as a recapitulation of Christian replacement theology: Max Weber and the prophetic roots of western rationalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renan Springer de Freitas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the dependence of current sociological efforts towards explaining the rise of western rationalism on Christian replacement theology. Replacement theology is the view that Jesus’ redeeming sacrifice reported in the Gospels superseded and replaced Judaism because it made universal the access to divine grace, which had before been restricted to an ascriptive “chosen people”. I argue that this theological thesis lies at the root of Weber’s view that the pariah condition peculiar to the Jewish people made the Jews - unlike Paul’s missionary work - unable to diffuse the “rational conduct of life” which had been established through the (Hebrew prophetic doctrine of a universal God.

  14. Bio-Root and Implant-Based Restoration as a Tooth Replacement Alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Z H; Hu, L; Liu, G L; Wei, F L; Liu, Y; Liu, Z H; Fan, Z P; Zhang, C M; Wang, J S; Wang, S L

    2016-06-01

    We previously reported that dental stem cell-mediated bioengineered tooth root (bio-root) regeneration could restore tooth loss in a miniature pig model. As a potential new method for tooth restoration, it is essential to compare this method with the widely used commercial dental implant-based method of tooth restoration. Tooth loss models were created by extracting mandibular incisors from miniature pigs. Allogeneic periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) were isolated and cultured. A PDLSC sheet was prepared by adding 20.0 µg/mL vitamin C to the culture medium; in addition, a hydroxyapatite tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP)/DPSC graft was fabricated and cultured in a 3-dimensional culture system. A total of 46 bio-root implantations and 9 dental implants were inserted, and crown restorations were performed 6 mo after implantation. Histological, radiological, biomechanical, and elemental analyses were used to evaluate and compare tissue-engineered bio-roots and dental implants to the natural tooth roots. After 6 mo, both computed tomography scans and histological examinations showed that root-like structures and dentin-like tissues had formed. Three months after crown restoration, clinical assessments revealed that tooth function was equivalent in the regenerated bio-root and the dental implant. Biomechanical testing showed that the bio-roots were similar to natural tooth roots in compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, and torsional force; however, these properties were significantly higher in the dental implants. Elemental analysis revealed a higher similarity in elemental composition between bio-roots and natural tooth roots than between bio-roots and dental implants. However, the dental implant success rate was 100% (9 of 9) and the bio-root success rate was only 22% (10 of 46). Taken together, we showed that an allogeneic HA/TCP/DPSC/PDLSC sheet could successfully build a bio-root with structure and function similar to

  15. Bio-Root and Implant-Based Restoration as a Tooth Replacement Alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Z H; Hu, L; Liu, G L; Wei, F L; Liu, Y; Liu, Z H; Fan, Z P; Zhang, C M; Wang, J S; Wang, S L

    2016-06-01

    We previously reported that dental stem cell-mediated bioengineered tooth root (bio-root) regeneration could restore tooth loss in a miniature pig model. As a potential new method for tooth restoration, it is essential to compare this method with the widely used commercial dental implant-based method of tooth restoration. Tooth loss models were created by extracting mandibular incisors from miniature pigs. Allogeneic periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) were isolated and cultured. A PDLSC sheet was prepared by adding 20.0 µg/mL vitamin C to the culture medium; in addition, a hydroxyapatite tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP)/DPSC graft was fabricated and cultured in a 3-dimensional culture system. A total of 46 bio-root implantations and 9 dental implants were inserted, and crown restorations were performed 6 mo after implantation. Histological, radiological, biomechanical, and elemental analyses were used to evaluate and compare tissue-engineered bio-roots and dental implants to the natural tooth roots. After 6 mo, both computed tomography scans and histological examinations showed that root-like structures and dentin-like tissues had formed. Three months after crown restoration, clinical assessments revealed that tooth function was equivalent in the regenerated bio-root and the dental implant. Biomechanical testing showed that the bio-roots were similar to natural tooth roots in compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, and torsional force; however, these properties were significantly higher in the dental implants. Elemental analysis revealed a higher similarity in elemental composition between bio-roots and natural tooth roots than between bio-roots and dental implants. However, the dental implant success rate was 100% (9 of 9) and the bio-root success rate was only 22% (10 of 46). Taken together, we showed that an allogeneic HA/TCP/DPSC/PDLSC sheet could successfully build a bio-root with structure and function similar to

  16. High Spinal Anesthesia Enhances Anti-Inflammatory Responses in Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery and Aortic Valve Replacement: Randomized Pilot Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor W R Lee

    Full Text Available Cardiac surgery induces many physiologic changes including major inflammatory and sympathetic nervous system responses. Here, we conducted a single-centre pilot study to generate hypotheses on the potential immune impact of adding high spinal anaesthesia to general anaesthesia during cardiac surgery in adults. We hypothesized that this strategy, previously shown to blunt the sympathetic response and improve pain management, could reduce the undesirable systemic inflammatory responses caused by cardiac surgery.This prospective randomized unblinded pilot study was conducted on 14 patients undergoing cardiac surgery for coronary artery bypass grafting and/or aortic valve replacement secondary to severe aortic stenosis. The primary outcome measures examined longitudinally were serum pro-inflammatory (IL-6, IL-1b, CCL2, anti-inflammatory (IL-10, TNF-RII, IL-1Ra, acute phase protein (CRP, PTX3 and cardiovascular risk (sST2 biomarkers.The kinetics of pro- and anti-inflammatory biomarker was determined following surgery. All pro-inflammatory and acute phase reactant biomarker responses induced by surgical stress were indistinguishable in intensity and duration between control groups and those who also received high spinal anaesthesia. Conversely, IL-10 levels were markedly elevated in both intensity and duration in the group receiving high spinal anesthesia (p = 0.005.This hypothesis generating pilot study suggests that high spinal anesthesia can alter the net inflammatory response that results from cardiac surgery. In appropriately selected populations, this may add incremental benefit by dampening the net systemic inflammatory response during the week following surgery. Larger population studies, powered to assess immune, physiologic and clinical outcomes in both acute and longer term settings, will be required to better assess potential benefits of incorporating high spinal anesthesia.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00348920.

  17. Use of short roll C-arm computed tomography and fully automated 3D analysis tools to guide transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Michael S; Bracken, John; Eshuis, Peter; Chen, S Y James; Fullerton, David; Cleveland, Joseph; Messenger, John C; Carroll, John D

    2016-07-01

    Determination of the coplanar view is a critical component of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). The safety and accuracy of a novel reduced angular range C-arm computed tomography (CACT) approach coupled with a fully automated 3D analysis tool package to predict the coplanar view in TAVR was evaluated. Fifty-seven patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis deemed prohibitive-risk for surgery and who underwent TAVR were enrolled. Patients were randomized 2:1 to CACT vs. angiography (control) in estimating the coplanar view. These approaches to determine the coplanar view were compared quantitatively. Radiation doses needed to determine the coplanar view were recorded for both the CACT and control patients. Use of CACT offered good agreement with the actual angiographic view utilized during TAVR in 34 out of 41 cases in which a CACT scan was performed (83 %). For these 34 cases, the mean angular magnitude difference, taking into account both oblique and cranial/caudal angulation, was 1.3° ± 0.4°, while the maximum difference was 7.3°. There were no significant differences in the mean total radiation dose delivered to patients between the CACT and control groups as measured by either dose area product (207.8 ± 15.2 Gy cm(2) vs. 186.1 ± 25.3 Gy cm(2), P = 0.47) or air kerma (1287.6 ± 117.7 mGy vs. 1098.9 ± 143.8 mGy, P = 0.32). Use of reduced-angular range CACT coupled with fully automated 3D analysis tools is a safe, practical, and feasible method by which to determine the optimal angiographic deployment view for guiding TAVR procedures. PMID:27091735

  18. Monozygotic twins with Marfan's syndrome and ascending aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redruello, Héctor Jorge; Cianciulli, Tomas Francisco; Rostello, Eduardo Fernandez; Recalde, Barbara; Lax, Jorge Alberto; Picone, Victorio Próspero; Belforte, Sandro Mario; Prezioso, Horacio Alberto

    2007-08-01

    Marfan's syndrome is a hereditary connective tissue disease, in which cardiovascular abnormalities (especially aortic root dilatation) are the most important cause of morbidity and mortality. In this report, we describe two 24-year-old twins, with a history of surgery for lens subluxation and severe cardiovascular manifestations secondary to Marfan's syndrome. One of the twins suffered a type A aortic dissection, which required replacement of the ascending aorta, and the other twin had an aneurysmal dilatation of the ascending aorta (46mm) and was prescribed medical treatment with atenolol and periodic controls to detect the presence of a critical diameter (50mm) that would indicate the need for prophylactic surgery.

  19. Current role of endovascular therapy in Marfan patients with previous aortic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Akin

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim Akin, Stephan Kische, Tim C Rehders, Tushar Chatterjee, Henrik Schneider, Thomas Körber, Christoph A Nienaber, Hüseyin InceDepartment of Medicine, Division of Cardiology at the University Hospital Rostock, Rostock School of Medicine, Ernst-Heydemann-Str. 6, 18057 Rostock, GermanyAbstract: The Marfan syndrome is a heritable disorder of the connective tissue which affects the cardiovascular, ocular, and skeletal system. The cardiovascular manifestation with aortic root dilatation, aortic valve regurgitation, and aortic dissection has a prevalence of 60% to 90% and determines the premature death of these patients. Thirty-four percent of the patients with Marfan syndrome will have serious cardiovascular complications requiring surgery in the first 10 years after diagnosis. Before aortic surgery became available, the majority of the patients died by the age of 32 years. Introduction in the aortic surgery techniques caused an increase of the 10 year survival rate up to 97%. The purpose of this article is to give an overview about the feasibility and outcome of stent-graft placement in the descending thoracic aorta in Marfan patients with previous aortic surgery.Keywords: Marfan syndrome, aortic dissection, root replacement, stent-graft, previous aortic surgery

  20. Evaluation of 17-mm St. Jude Medical Regent prosthetic aortic heart valves by rest and dobutamine stress echocardiography

    OpenAIRE

    Minardi Giovanni; Manzara Carla; Creazzo Vittorio; Maselli Daniele; Casali Giovanni; Pulignano Giovanni; Musumeci Francesco

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The prosthesis used for aortic valve replacement in patients with small aortic root can be too small in relation to body size, thus showing high transvalvular gradients at rest and/or under stress conditions. This study was carried out to evaluate rest and Dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) hemodynamic response of 17-mm St. Jude Medical Regent (SJMR-17 mm) in relatively aged patients at mean 24 months follow-up. Methods and results The study population consisted of 1...

  1. A planning system for transapical aortic valve implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessat, Michael; Merk, Denis R.; Falk, Volkmar; Walther, Thomas; Jacobs, Stefan; Nöttling, Alois; Burgert, Oliver

    2009-02-01

    Stenosis of the aortic valve is a common cardiac disease. It is usually corrected surgically by replacing the valve with a mechanical or biological prosthesis. Transapical aortic valve implantation is an experimental minimally invasive surgical technique that is applied to patients with high operative risk to avoid pulmonary arrest. A stented biological prosthesis is mounted on a catheter. Through small incisions in the fifth intercostal space and the apex of the heart, the catheter is positioned under flouroscopy in the aortic root. The stent is expanded and unfolds the valve which is thereby implanted into the aortic root. Exact targeting is crucial, since major complications can arise from a misplaced valve. Planning software for the perioperative use is presented that allows for selection of the best fitting implant and calculation of the safe target area for that implant. The software uses contrast enhanced perioperative DynaCT images acquired under rapid pacing. In a semiautomatic process, a surface segmentation of the aortic root is created. User selected anatomical landmarks are used to calculate the geometric constraints for the size and position of the implant. The software is integrated into a PACS network based on DICOM communication to query and receive the images and implants templates from a PACS server. The planning results can be exported to the same server and from there can be rertieved by an intraoperative catheter guidance device.

  2. Acute aortic valve prolapse in Marfan's syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, N J; Cullen, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    A 22 year old man with Marfan's syndrome died suddenly following acute aortic valve prolapse. Although aortic root involvement in Marfan's syndrome is common, we have found no previous description of this particular complication in the literature.

  3. Factors influencing quality of anticoagulation control and warfarin dosage in patients after aortic valve replacement within the 3 months of follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wypasek, E; Mazur, P; Bochenek, M; Awsiuk, M; Grudzien, G; Plincer, D; Undas, A

    2016-06-01

    Warfarin dosage estimation using the pharmacogenetic algorithms has been shown to improve the quality of anticoagulation control in patients with atrial fibrillation. We sought to assess the genetic, demographic and clinical factors that determine the quality of anticoagulation in patients following aortic valve replacement (AVR). We studied 200 consecutive patients (130 men) aged 63 ± 12.3 years, undergoing AVR, in whom warfarin dose was established using a pharmacogenetic algorithm. The quality of anticoagulation within the first 3 months since surgery was expressed as the time of international normalized ratio (INR) in the therapeutic range (TTR). The median TTR in the entire cohort was 59.6% (interquartile range, 38.7 - 82.7). Ninety-nine (49.5%) patients with TTR ≥ 60% did not differ from those with poor anticoagulation control (TTR modification and therapy. Possession of CYP2C9*2 and/or CYP2C9*3 allele variants is associated with lower TTR values and warfarin dose variations in AVR patients, the latter affected also by VKORC1 c.-1693G>A polymorphism. PMID:27511999

  4. Impact of methodology and the use of allometric scaling on the echocardiographic assessment of the aortic root and arch: a study by the Research and Audit Sub-Committee of the British Society of Echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxborough, David; Ghani, Saqib; Harkness, Allan; Lloyd, Guy; Moody, William; Ring, Liam; Sandoval, Julie; Senior, Roxy; Sheikh, Nabeel; Stout, Martin; Utomi, Victor; Willis, James; Zaidi, Abbas; Steeds, Richard

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the study is to establish the impact of 2D echocardiographic methods on absolute values for aortic root dimensions and to describe any allometric relationship to body size. We adopted a nationwide cross-sectional prospective multicentre design using images obtained from studies utilising control groups or where specific normality was being assessed. A total of 248 participants were enrolled with no history of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension or abnormal findings on echocardiography. Aortic root dimensions were measured at the annulus, the sinus of Valsalva, the sinotubular junction, the proximal ascending aorta and the aortic arch using the inner edge and leading edge methods in both diastole and systole by 2D echocardiography. All dimensions were scaled allometrically to body surface area (BSA), height and pulmonary artery diameter. For all parameters with the exception of the aortic annulus, dimensions were significantly larger in systole (P<0.05). All aortic root and arch measurements were significantly larger when measured using the leading edge method compared with the inner edge method (P<0.05). Allometric scaling provided a b exponent of BSA(0.6) in order to achieve size independence. Similarly, ratio scaling to height in subjects under the age of 40 years also produced size independence. In conclusion, the largest aortic dimensions occur in systole while using the leading edge method. Reproducibility of measurement, however, is better when assessing aortic dimensions in diastole. There is an allometric relationship to BSA and, therefore, allometric scaling in the order of BSA(0.6) provides a size-independent index that is not influenced by the age or gender. PMID:26693286

  5. Quality of life after aortic valve repair is similar to Ross patients and superior to mechanical valve replacement: A cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Zacek (Pavel); T. Holubec; M. Vobornik; J. Dominik; J.J.M. Takkenberg (Hanneke); J. Harrer; J. Vojacek

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In patients after aortic valve surgery, the quality of life is hypothesized to be influenced by the type of the valve procedure. A cross-sectional study on the postoperative quality of life was carried out in patients after aortic valve-sparing surgery (with regards to the ag

  6. Aortic insufficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart valve - aortic regurgitation; Valvular disease - aortic regurgitation; AI - aortic insufficiency ... BA. Valvular heart disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  7. Overview of current surgical strategies for aortic disease in patients with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Shunsuke; Okita, Yutaka

    2016-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a heritable, systemic disorder of the connective tissue with a high penetrance, named after Dr. Antoine Marfan. The most clinically important manifestations of this syndrome are cardiovascular pathologies which cause life-threatening events, such as acute aortic dissections, aortic rupture and regurgitation of the aortic valve or other artrioventricular valves leading to heart failure. These events play important roles in the life expectancy of patients with this disorder, especially prior to the development of effective surgical approaches for proximal ascending aortic disease. To prevent such catastrophic aortic events, a lower threshold has been recommended for prophylactic interventions on the aortic root. After prophylactic root replacement, disease in the aorta beyond the root and distal to the arch remains a cause for concern. Multiple surgeries are required throughout a patient's lifetime that can be problematic due to distal lesions complicated by dissection. Many controversies in surgical strategies remain, such as endovascular repair, to manage such complex cases. This review examines the trends in surgical strategies for the treatment of cardiovascular disease in patients with Marfan syndrome, and current perspectives in this field. PMID:26586198

  8. Valva aórtica bicúspide: fundamentos teóricos e clínicos para substituição simultânea da aorta ascendente Bicuspid aortic valve: theoretical and clinical aspects of concomitant ascending aorta replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Paes Leme De Sá

    2009-06-01

    and vessels of the aortic arch. Previous studies have shown that patients with normal BAV or slight dysfunction may present with dilation of the aortic root. The hemodynamic changes caused by BAV without stenosis or insufficiency seem to be an insufficient explanation for these findings. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the molecular and hystological aspects of this disease. We found a reduced fibrillin-1 content in both ascending aorta and pulmonary trunk as a possible cause. Histologically, the ascending aorta can present cystic medial necrosis and elastic fragmentation, similar to Marfan's disease. Some authors concluded that many patients, mainly those with aortic regurgitation, should have the aortic valve and the ascending aorta replaced at the same procedure, even if a mild dilatation (45 mm is present in patients with BAV if life expectancy is anticipated to be greater than 10 years to prevent further aneurysms or ruptures.

  9. THE USE OF CASSAVA ROOT MEAL AS A PARTIAL REPLACEMENT FOR CORN IN DIETS FOR ALBINO RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Nii NARKU NORTEY

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was carried out to determine if partial replacement of maize with cassava root meal (CRM in diets for albino rats will have an effect on performance, organ characteristics and blood parameters. Twenty five Sprague Dawley albino rats (F344 strain, initial body weight (216 ± 8g were randomly assigned to five treatments (T1 to T5 in a completely randomized (CRD arrangement. T1 was the control and contained zero CRM. T2 and T3 contained 30% CRM, while T4 and T5 contained 45% CRM. These levels of inclusion represented 50 and 75% replacement of corn in the diets respectively. T2 and T4 had 0.15% methionine (Met while T3 and T5 had 0.3% Met. The rats were each fed a single diet for 28d. Average daily feed intake (ADFI of rats on T1 was lower (P 0.05 in average daily gain (ADG and feed conversion efficiency (FCE. Similarly there were no differences (P>0.05 in carcass, viscera and other internal organ weights. Results of this trial indicate that albino rats can tolerate diets with added CRM (45% of the diet with no adverse effects on growth and internal organ characteristics. Future work will need to look at the possibility of using CRM at similar or higher levels in diets for growing pigs.

  10. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... viewers if they have any questions during the Web cast you can email them to us by ... click the "Ask a question" button on your Web cast to keep sending those questions in. 7 ...

  11. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... credit is available and there will be a test and evaluation at the end of the program ... CME certificate after you've completed the post-test and evaluation form. And with that, John, why ...

  12. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... screen and open the door to informed medical care. Good afternoon and welcome to the Heart Institute ... be progressive and less invasive in how we care for our patients. 8 Here's one from one ...

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    Full Text Available ... the branches that go to the arms and brain initially. And it exists the left ventricle, which ... thought to cause less untoward effects to the brain and other tissues. So again, as we're ...

  14. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... to this ORlive Webcast presentation, live from the Heart Institute at First Health Moore Regional Hospital in ... medical care. Good afternoon and welcome to the Heart Institute of First Health of the Carolinas, Moore ...

  15. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... presentation, live from the Heart Institute at First Health Moore Regional Hospital in Pinehurst, North Carolina. During ... and welcome to the Heart Institute of First Health of the Carolinas, Moore Regional Hospital in beautiful ...

  16. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... polyester material that's used for -- it's basically a medical grade fabric. And again, I want to underscore that these tissue valves are hand-made in factories and undergo quite a bit of testing and tolerance before they ever reach our shelf. ...

  17. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... function as well as anatomy in patients who need heart surgery. It allows us, from an valvular perspective, to know the human dynamic or blood pressure effects of a valvular ...

  18. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... testing and tolerance before they ever reach our shelf. Once we've placed all these sutures, the ... kidney failure for example, may have a lesser life span because those patients do tend to have ...

  19. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... a rare problem where the patient's own immune system will attack cardiac valve structures, causing them to ... it be heart, lung et cetera, the immune system recognizes those living issues as not being from ...

  20. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... to orient you a little bit, the big black chamber above 4 all the flashing lights is ... view. Again, the aorta is -- oops -- was the black tube below that. Just shows that a very ...

  1. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... which is made out of pyrolitic carbon, basically metal and plastic. Again, blood flows through this valve. ... has a prosthetic valve should let all their treating physicians, dentists, et cetera, know that so that ...

  2. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... the tissue from these is harvested from those animals and sewn into a man-made strut device ... And patients, again, are very satisfied with the cosmetic appearance. From my perspective, again that's not a ...

  3. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... pain; syncope, described as shortness of breath; or heart failure, which can manifest as easy fatigueability, ankle swelling ... most patients, certainly patients how have symptoms of heart failure or problems related to their heart, we recommend ...

  4. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... quickly, we feel that this offers them an opportunity to do that more safely than someone who's ... why I think that this is a nice opportunity to offer that. This is not a robotic ...

  5. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... as represented by the red and the blue color. Typically, blood flowing through a valve should be ... and smooth. We shouldn't see very much color such as we're seeing here. To the ...

  6. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... And Jim and his colleagues do an excellent job of that for us so that we can ... patients, again, are very satisfied with the cosmetic appearance. From my perspective, again that's not a primary ...

  7. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... dioxide is heavier than natural room air and oxygen, and so it tends to instill or be instilled into he field. And carbon dioxide more readily bubbles out of the bloodstream ...

  8. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... heart valve which is made out of pyrolitic carbon, basically metal and plastic. Again, blood flows through ... heart surgery here, we actually insufflate, or instill carbon dioxide gas into the field, which we think ...

  9. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... echocardiography is? Echocardiography is the use of ultrasound technology. Ultrasound technology is a form of the same kind of ... want to embrace less invasive or more progressive technology, you want to make sure that it's not ...

  10. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... sclerosis is not a reason to need an operation or aggressive management at that time. But when it progresses to ... patient education is part of the evaluation and management of valvular disease prior to surgery is paramount. It's important for a patient to ...

  11. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... There's been a lot of work done by academic cardiac surgeons and cardiologists to try to define ... And Jim and his colleagues do an excellent job of that for us so that we can ...

  12. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... Jim. Those are coming. There are several valve companies in this country and in Europe that have ... that we've had customized by an instrument company for this approach that really works nicely for ...

  13. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... doing traditional open valvular surgery and a significant volume of it. And so, from a surgeon's perspective, ... doing an open operation. And so, and again volume is somewhat of an issue. You know, I ...

  14. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... also want to remind viewers that the CME credit is available and there will be a test ... the end of the program to receive this credit. At the end of this program, we will ...

  15. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... heart failure 1 and 2 have a lower operative mortality, or risk of death, than those who ... feel that this provides a patient less post-operative pain, blood loss, lung dysfunction. Certainly we can ...

  16. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... thank you, Jim. This is obviously just a model of the heart just to give some perspective ... provides more stability to the incision and less risk of infection. At this point we've divided ...

  17. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... patients in the sixth and seventh decades of life. Again, some areas of the valve appear normal ... have been proven to slow that disease path life. Again, it's a progressive disease from sclerosis, or ...

  18. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... the heart easily. This can lead to some clinical symptoms, which we'll talk about in a ... I'm not sure is there from a clinical perspective. There certainly is benefit to less invasive ...

  19. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... your screen and open the door to informed medical care. Good afternoon and welcome to the Heart ... manufacturers or the devices used in this continuing medical educational activity. Thanks, John, we want to remind ...

  20. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... an infectious complication scenario or is it just cosmetic? 5 No I think the benefits are much ... And patients, again, are very satisfied with the cosmetic appearance. From my perspective, again that's not a ...

  1. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... to prevent such a problem. Is there a higher risk in someone with a biological valve for ... there but in my experience they're no higher than in someone who's had a full sternotomy. ...

  2. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... a patient's blood significantly so there is some risk of bleeding after surgery. And, of course, we reverse and stop those ... had a full sternotomy. Is the patient at risk for needing lifelong anticoagulation with this surgery or is it depending on what kind of ...

  3. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... before we start the first part of the video. Again, when a patient has a full sternotomy, ... go to the first portion of the surgical video. At this point during the operation, we're ...

  4. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... we see in a certain segment of the population. No medications as such have been proven to ... nature. It's even been liberalized in some patient populations of patients who do not have symptoms but ...

  5. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... to minimize their symptoms, but that doesn't impact the course of the disease itself. When I' ... echocardiography is? Echocardiography is the use of ultrasound technology. Ultrasound technology is a form of the same ...

  6. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... to us by clicking the button on your computer screen, the "Ask a question" button. We'll ... waves bounce back to a transducer, and the computer puts together those sound waves in a two- ...

  7. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... Dr. Jim Winkley, who's a cardiac anesthesiologist that works here with us. Before we begin, viewers need ... the valve itself has narrowed, that puts more work on the heart when a patient's at rest. ...

  8. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... it be heart, lung et cetera, the immune system recognizes those living issues as not being from the patient who receives them and the body tries to reject or get rid of that ...

  9. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... can then stop their heart to do cardiac surgery on. Are there side-effects from being a cardiopulmonary bypass? There are some ... field, which we think may have some beneficial effect with regards to neurocognitive problems after surgery. At this portion of the operation, we're ...

  10. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... Just to orient you a little bit, the big black chamber above 4 all the flashing lights ... a series of charts that we have, historical data, to know really what the best size is ...

  11. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... or the devices used in this continuing medical educational activity. Thanks, John, we want to remind the ... a rare problem where the patient's own immune system will attack cardiac valve structures, causing them to ...

  12. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... There's been a lot of work done by academic cardiac surgeons and cardiologists to try to define ... perspective, doesn't increase -- in fact from my experience has shortened -- the duration of the operation. So ...

  13. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... valve, it's just 1 sort of a normal aging process that we see in a certain segment ... this country is primarily a disease of the aging population. And, of course, we are a country ...

  14. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... a reason to need an operation or aggressive management at that time. But when it progresses to ... patient education is part of the evaluation and management of valvular disease prior to surgery is paramount. ...

  15. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... help evaluate both cardiac function as well as anatomy in patients who need heart surgery. It allows ... also important with regards to determining coronary artery anatomy, as some patients may need coronary bypass surgery ...

  16. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... is a need to be followed regularly with examinations, et cetera. Again, there's a latent period with ... After we do a detailed history and physical examination, we generally recommend in most patients, certainly patients ...

  17. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... to know the human dynamic or blood pressure effects of a valvular problem and is also important with regards to determining coronary artery anatomy, as some patients may need coronary bypass surgery in addition to valve surgery. Exercise testing, as I mentioned previously, is a nice ...

  18. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... the patient's cardiac function, look for other occult problems with the heart. And it also establishes a point of reference for us to follow patients in the future with regards ...

  19. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... War II to look for things in the water. Basically, you use sound waves to bounce off ... we have to make sure that that's a water-tight closure. When you take the clamp off, ...

  20. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... algorithms we employ. After we do a detailed history and physical examination, we generally recommend in most ... outpatient setting, is to not only define the primary lesion, or problem, that may be causing a ...

  1. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... the tissue from these is harvested from those animals and sewn into a man-made strut device ... re seeing here. To the flow to the right in blue is very turbulent flow, which is ...

  2. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... patient's heart should have to undergo. Once again, serial evaluations, as with any chronic disease process, are ... Webcast presentation from the Heart Institute at First Health Moore Regional Hospital in Pinehurst, North Carolina. ORlive ...

  3. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... the tissue from these is harvested from those animals and sewn into a man-made strut device ... found really if you do very intricate neuropsychologic testing on patients who have had heart surgery requiring ...

  4. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... you can see the patient's heart appears to be functioning well from our perspective. Again, we use the echo ... for in a surgeon or a program? 13 Well, I think, as with any procedure, never be afraid to ask that person who's doing the ...

  5. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... that neither Dr. Winkley nor myself have any financial or professional relationships with the manufacturers or the ... a rejection process, as such, that requires immunosuppressant drugs or other medications to be taken. Those are ...

  6. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... Health of the Carolinas, Moore Regional Hospital in beautiful Pinehurst, North Carolina. My name is John Streitman ... kind of sonar that they invented back in World War II to look for things in the ...

  7. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... level. Some more subtle symptoms can include decreased exercise tolerance; palpitations, or fluttering of the heart; shortness ... rest. Increasing your workload in a normal patient, exercise and increased activity increases your heart rate and ...

  8. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... the field. Again, it's our practice pattern here. Carbon dioxide is heavier than natural room air and oxygen, and so it tends to instill or be instilled into he field. And carbon dioxide more readily bubbles out of the bloodstream ...

  9. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... or the devices used in this continuing medical educational activity. Thanks, John, we want to remind the ... echocardiography is? Echocardiography is the use of ultrasound technology. Ultrasound technology is a form of the same ...

  10. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of course, a link also from our hospital's Web site, Firsthelp.org, to the Webcast will be available for some time. And again, we want to remind anyone that applied for the CME credit to complete their post-test and submit that online so that they can ...

  11. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... a patient less post-operative pain, blood loss, lung dysfunction. Certainly we can get these patients up ... thorocotomy is an incision we generally use for lung operations and for some valve operations in which ...

  12. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... us, from an valvular perspective, to know the human dynamic or blood pressure effects of a valvular ... two to three inches, depending on the patient's body, et cetera. We start out, again, with that ...

  13. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... the tissue from these is harvested from those animals and sewn into a man-made strut device ... called a mini-thorocotomy or is this something different? This is a partial upper sternotomy is the ...

  14. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... us, from an valvular perspective, to know the human dynamic or blood pressure effects of a valvular ... the tissue from these is harvested from those animals and sewn into a man-made strut device ...

  15. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Full Text Available ... in beautiful Pinehurst, North Carolina. My name is John Streitman and I'm a cardiothoracic surgeon here ... used in this continuing medical educational activity. Thanks, John, we want to remind the viewers if they ...

  16. Transcatheter Aortic Heart Valve Thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Nicolaj C; Grove, Erik L; Andersen, Henning R;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is increasing focus on transcatheter heart valve (THV) thrombosis. However, there are limited data on incidence, clinical implications and predisposing factors of THV thrombosis following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). OBJECTIVES: We assessed the incidence...

  17. Avaliação da captura de fragmentos por meio da filtração intra-aórtica em pacientes submetidos à troca valvar aórtica Particulate emboli capture by an intra-aortic filter device during aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osanan Amorim Leite Filho

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a atividade embólica de pacientes portadores de estenose aórtica calcificada submetidos a troca valvar aórtica por meio da filtração intra-aórtica com dispositivo EMBOL-X® System (Edwards Lifesciences Inc., Mountain View, CA, USA. MÉTODOS: De janeiro de 2007 a julho de 2007, foi utilizado o filtro intra-aórtico EMBOL-X após o despinçamento aórtico em 13 portadores de estenose aórtica calcificada submetidos a troca valvar aórtica consecutivamente. A média de idade dos pacientes foi 63,7 anos (34-79 e 61,5% eram do sexo feminino. A média do tempo de CEC foi 60,2±7,5 (45-72 minutos e a média do tempo despinçamento aórtico foi 50±7,5 (35-63 minutos. Após a retirada dos filtros, eles foram fixados em formalina, analisados macroscopicamente e quantificados os fragmentos capturados. Foi realizado exame histológico do material capturado. RESULTADOS Não foi observado nenhum caso de complicação neurológica. Nenhum paciente apresentou insuficiência renal pós-operatória. Não houve óbitos hospitalares. Partículas embólicas foram encontradas em cinco (38,5% dos filtros. Das partículas embólicas capturadas, em dois (40% filtros havia fibrina, dois (40% apresentavam tecido conjuntivo, um (20% continha hemácias e em um não foi possível determinar a natureza. CONCLUSÃO: O dispositivo EMBOL-X® System foi efetivo na captação de fragmentos intra-aórticos na substituição da valva aórtica em pacientes com estenose aórtica calcificada.OBJECTIVE: This study aims to analyze the embolic activity in patients with calcified aortic stenosis who underwent aortic valve replacement using intra-aortic filtration with an EMBOL-X® System device (Edwards Lifesciences Inc., Mountain View, CA, USA. METHODS: From January 2007 to July 2007, 13 consecutive patients with calcified aortic stenosis, who underwent isolated aortic valve replacement using intra-aortic filtration by an EMBOL

  18. Evaluation of morphologic characteristics of the aortic root with 64-slice spiral computed tomography%64层螺旋CT对主动脉根部形态结构的评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈华; 黄新苗; 赵仙先; 曹江; 秦永文

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究主动脉根部及临近组织结构64层螺旋CT(MSCT)成像技术、影像解剖及其临床意义.方法 60例无明显主动脉、主动脉瓣膜疾病患者行MSCT检查,采用多平面重建(MPR)、容积再现(VR)及仿真内镜(VE)等方法重建并测量相关数据.结果 测得主动脉根部直径(22.79±3.31)mm,主动脉窦间距(33.43±3.34)mm,冠脉开口处直径(30.06±2.70) mm,升主动脉内径(30.39±3.42),窦底平面至窦顶平面距离(19.18±2.21) mm.左右冠状动脉开口距主动脉根部距离分别为(15.71±3.53) mm、(15.96±3.78) mm.结论 应用MSCT增强扫描可清楚显示主动脉开口大小、冠脉开口位置、有无发育畸形及与周边结构关系,为带瓣膜支架的设计与经皮主动脉瓣膜植入手术顺利施行提供影像学依据.%Objective To explore the imaging technique for demonstrating the aortic root and its neighbouring structures with 64-slice spiral computed tomography, and to discuss the morphologic characteristics of the aortic root as well as their clinical signif'icance. Methods Multislice spiral CT scanning was performed in sixty adult patients who had no obvious ascending aorta diseases or aortic valve abnormalities. Multi-plane reconstruction (MPR) . volume rendering (VR)and virtual endoscopy (VE)were employed to demonstrate the anatomy of the aortic root, while the relevant data concerning the aorta and coronary smus were also determined. The results were analyzed. Results The mean aortic diameter at aortic root was(22.79 ± 3.3l)mm. the mean distance between coronary sinuses was (33.43 ± 3.34) mm, and the mean coronary diameter at its orifice was (30.06 ± 2.70) mm. The measurements also included the inner diameter of middle ascending aorta(30.39 ± 3.42) mm , the distance between the bottom plane and top plane of the coronary sinus(19.18 ± 2.21) mm, the distance between left coronary orifice and aortic root( 15.71 ± 3.53) mm and the distance between right coronary

  19. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an abdominal aortic aneurysm. Normally this procedure takes us about 45 minutes to an hour of doctor work time, which is, I think, a fairly quick procedure to replace a major life-threatening problem in the patient’s abdomen. So you can see ...

  20. Measurement of aortic blood flow by magnetic resonance below and above the origin of the coronary arteries in postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten Beck; Fritz-Hansen, Thomas; Jensen, Henrik Halvor;

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: Principal blood flow measures might be assessable by velocity-encoded cine magnetic resonance (VENC MR) of aortic blood flow. The feasibility of using VENC MR for clinical research was tested in a contemporary and controversial human model: the effects of 17beta-estradiol (E) and cyclic...

  1. Residual glycosaminoglycan accumulation in mitral and aortic valves of a patient with attenuated MPS I (Scheie syndrome after 6 years of enzyme replacement therapy: Implications for early diagnosis and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Sato

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS is an inherited metabolic disease caused by deficiency of the enzymes needed for glycosaminoglycan (GAG degradation. MPS type I is caused by the deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-l-iduronidase and is classified into Hurler syndrome, Scheie syndrome, and Hurler–Scheie syndrome based on disease severity and onset. Cardiac complications such as left ventricular hypertrophy, cardiac valve disease, and coronary artery disease are often observed in MPS type I. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT has been available for MPS type I, but the efficacy of this treatment for cardiac valve disease is unknown. We report on a 56-year-old female patient with attenuated MPS I (Scheie syndrome who developed aortic and mitral stenosis and coronary artery narrowing. The cardiac valve disease progressed despite ERT and she finally underwent double valve replacement and coronary artery bypass grafting. The pathology of the cardiac valves revealed GAG accumulation and lysosomal enlargement in both the mitral and aortic valves. Zebra body formation was also confirmed using electron microscopy. Our results suggest that ERT had limited efficacy in previously established cardiac valve disease. Early diagnosis and initiation of ERT is crucial to avoid further cardiac complications in MPS type I.

  2. Aortic Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Most aneurysms are in the aorta, the main artery that runs from the heart through the chest and abdomen. There are two types of aortic aneurysm: Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) - these occur in the part ...

  3. Congenital aortic regurgitation in a child with a tricuspid non-stenotic aortic valve.

    OpenAIRE

    Hashimoto, R; Miyamura, H; Eguchi, S

    1984-01-01

    After follow up for seven years a 10 year old boy with congenital aortic regurgitation was found to have a tricuspid non-stenotic aortic valve at operation. The right coronary cusp was dysplastic, thickened, and contracted; the gap between its free margin and aortic wall was bridged with two fibrous bands; and the left coronary and non-coronary cusps were almost normal. The aortic valve was replaced with a prosthesis (St Jude Medical No 23), and the postoperative course was uneventful.

  4. Left Main Percutaneous Coronary Intervention and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in a Young Male with Rheumatic Heart Disease and Porcelain Aorta

    OpenAIRE

    Chainani, Vinod; Perez, Osman; Hanno, Ram; Hourani, Patrick; Rengifo-Moreno, Pablo; Martinez-Clark, Pedro; Alfonso, Carlos E.

    2016-01-01

    We highlight the presence of a calcified mass in the left main coronary artery without significant atherosclerosis seen in the other coronary arteries or in the peripheral large arteries. In our view, the calcified character of the obstruction and the calcification of the aortic valve are characteristic of a variant type of coronary artery disease (CAD) not associated with the same risk factors as diffuse coronary atherosclerosis, but, in this case, with rheumatic heart disease. This case rep...

  5. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty as a bridge to aortic valve surgery for severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwaejike, Nnamdi; Mills, Keith; Stables, Rod; Field, Mark

    2015-03-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was, in patients with severe aortic stenosis, can balloon valvuloplasty be used as a bridge to aortic valve replacement? Altogether 463 papers were found using the reported search, of which 11 papers represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. We conclude that balloon aortic valvuloplasty is recommended as a bridge to aortic valve replacement (AVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. Institutional practices, local and logistic factors can affect patient selection and management approaches to severe aortic stenosis, but having the facility to offer balloon aortic valvuloplasty (especially in the TAVI era) provides another management option for patients who would otherwise have been considered unacceptably high risk for aortic valve surgery. The increased incidence of balloon aortic valvuloplasty mirrors the increase in the use of TAVI with a sharp increase in activity from 2006. Success rates for bridging from balloon aortic valvuloplasty to definite surgical intervention are in the range 26.3-74%, with AVR or TAVI occurring within 8 weeks to 7 months. Complications from balloon aortic valvuloplasty such as aortic regurgitation (AR) can be managed successfully. Up to 40% of patients selected by balloon aortic valvuloplasty to have TAVI or AVR do not have these procedures within 2 years. While most of these patients are excluded for objective clinical reasons such as terminal disease/malignancy or other persistent contraindication, some patients refuse definitive treatment and others die while on the waiting list. Outcomes in patients bridged to AVR/TAVI are better than in patients treated with balloon aortic valvuloplasty

  6. Free-floating left atrial ball thrombus after mitral valve replacement with patent coronary artery bypass grafts: successful removal by a right minithoracotomy approach without aortic cross-clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisatomi, Kazuki; Hashizume, Koji; Tanigawa, Kazuyoshi; Miura, Takashi; Matsukuma, Seiji; Yokose, Shogo; Kitamura, Tessho; Shimada, Takashi; Eishi, Kiyoyuki

    2016-06-01

    A free-floating thrombus in the left atrium without attachment to either the atrial wall or the mitral valve is extremely rare. We describe a case in a 79-year-old woman with chronic atrial fibrillation and a recent stroke who had undergone mitral valve replacement 25 years previously and coronary artery bypass grafting 5 years previously. Redo cardiac surgery represents a clinical challenge due to a higher rate of peri-operative morbidity and mortality. Median re-sternotomy can be particularly difficult in patients with functioning coronary artery grafts, where the risk of graft injury is a significant concern. Prompt surgical intervention was carried out, and to avoid the challenge of re-sternotomy in this patient with two prior thoracotomies, we successfully removed the thrombus by a right minithoracotomy approach without aortic cross-clamping. There was no postoperative occurrence of a new stroke or aggravation of the pre-existing stroke.

  7. Spectrum of Aortic Valve Abnormalities Associated with Aortic Dilation Across Age Groups in Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, Laura J.; Baba, Ridhwan Y.; Arai, Andrew E.; Bandettini, W. Patricia; Rosing, Douglas R.; Bakalov, Vladimir; Sachdev, Vandana; Bondy, Carolyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Congenital aortic valve fusion is associated with aortic dilation, aneurysm and rupture in girls and women with Turner syndrome (TS). Our objective was to characterize aortic valve structure in subjects with TS, and determine the prevalence of aortic dilation and valve dysfunction associated with different types of aortic valves. Methods and Results The aortic valve and thoracic aorta were characterized by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in 208 subjects with TS in an IRB-approved natural history study. Echocardiography was used to measure peak velocities across the aortic valve, and the degree of aortic regurgitation. Four distinct valve morphologies were identified: tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) 64%(n=133), partially fused aortic valve (PF) 12%(n=25), bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) 23%(n=47), and unicuspid aortic valve (UAV) 1%(n=3). Age and body surface area (BSA) were similar in the 4 valve morphology groups. There was a significant trend, independent of age, towards larger BSA-indexed ascending aortic diameters (AADi) with increasing valve fusion. AADi were (mean +/− SD) 16.9 +/− 3.3 mm/m2, 18.3 +/− 3.3 mm/m2, and 19.8 +/− 3.9 mm/m2 (p<0.0001) for TAV, PF and BAV+UAV respectively. PF, BAV, and UAV were significantly associated with mild aortic regurgitation and elevated peak velocities across the aortic valve. Conclusions Aortic valve abnormalities in TS occur with a spectrum of severity, and are associated with aortic root dilation across age groups. Partial fusion of the aortic valve, traditionally regarded as an acquired valve problem, had an equal age distribution and was associated with an increased AADi. PMID:24084490

  8. Challenging Friesian horse diseases : aortic rupture and megaesophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeg, M.

    2015-01-01

    Aortic rupture is quite rare in Warmblood horses and is best known as an acute and fatal rupture of the aortic root in older breeding stallions. It has now become clear that aortic rupture, which is diagnosed around an age of 4 years, is more frequent in the Friesian breed than in others. The high p

  9. Old Myths, New Concerns: the Long-Term Effects of Ascending Aorta Replacement with Dacron Grafts. Not All That Glitters Is Gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadaccio, Cristiano; Nappi, Francesco; Al-Attar, Nawwar; Sutherland, Fraser W; Acar, Christophe; Nenna, Antonio; Trombetta, Marcella; Chello, Massimo; Rainer, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    Synthetic grafts are widely used in cardiac and vascular surgery since the mid-1970s. Despite their general good performance, inability of mimicking the elastomechanical characteristics of the native arterial tissue, and the consequent lack of adequate compliance, leads to a cascade of hemodynamic and biological alterations deeply affecting cardiovascular homeostasis. Those concerns have been reconsidered in more contemporaneous surgical and experimental reports which also triggered some research efforts in the tissue engineering field towards the realization of biomimetic arterial surrogates. The present review focuses on the significance of the "compliance mismatch" phenomenon occurring after aortic root or ascending aorta replacement with prosthetic grafts and discusses the clinical reflexes of this state of tissue incompatibility, as the loss of the native elastomechanical properties of the aorta can translate into detrimental effects on the normal efficiency of the aortic root complex with impact in the long-term results of patients undergoing aortic replacement. PMID:27245785

  10. Immediate post-operative responses to transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Nielsen, Susanne; Lisby, Karen H.;

    2015-01-01

    Background:Conventional treatment for patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis is surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR), but transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become a reliable alternative in high-risk patients.Aims:The aim of our study was to describe the post...

  11. Graft infections after surgical aortic reconstructions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, P.

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic vascular grafts are frequently used to reconstruct (part) of the aorta. Every surgical procedure caries a certain risk for infection and when a prosthetic aortic graft is implanted, this may lead to an aortic graft infection (AGI). Endovascular techniques have gradually replaced open surg

  12. Global Strain in Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbæk, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: -Global longitudinal systolic strain (GLS) is often reduced in aortic stenosis despite normal ejection fraction. The importance of reduced preoperative GLS on long-term outcome after aortic valve replacement (AVR) is unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: -A total of 125 patients with severe...

  13. Postoperative follow-up of Stanford type A aortic dissections with Spiral-CT and MRI: Normal imaging findings and typical complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To demonstrate normal postoperative Spiral-CT and MRI findings and typical complications in patients with aortic repair after Stanford type A aortic dissection. Results: The following postoperative complications were seen: Three pseudoaneurysms which developed at the proximal anastomoses of the Dacron prosthesis in two cases and at the insertion site of the reimplanted left coronary artery after implantation of a composite graft (Bentall procedure) in one case; one re-dissection; one perforation of the false lumen; periprostethic flow in one patient after surgical repair of type A dissection by the graft inclusion technique; progressive dilatation of the false lumen in 4 cases; dilatation of the aortic root in a Marfan patient after replacement of the ascending aorta. Conclusion: Precise knowledge of the surgical technique performed is crucial to accurate postoperative imaging evaluation. MRI is the method of choice in the postoperative follow-up of clinically stable patients with aortic dissections. (orig./AJ)

  14. Transcatheter CoreValve valve-in-valve implantation in a stentless porcine aortic valve for severe aortic regurgitation

    OpenAIRE

    Yong, Celina M; Buchbinder, Maurice; Giacomini, John C

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We describe the first valve-in-valve Corevalve transcatheter aortic valve replacement in the St. Jude Toronto stentless porcine aortic valve in the United States, which enabled this 59-year-old patient with a history of bacterial endocarditis and aortic regurgitation to avoid heart transplant with complete resolution of his severe left ventricular dysfunction.

  15. Percutaneous implantation of the CoreValve aortic valve prosthesis in patients at high risk or rejected for surgical valve replacement: Clinical evaluation and feasibility of the procedure in the first 30 patients in the AMC-UvA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Baan; Z.Y. Yong; K.T. Koch; J.P.S. Henriques; B.J. Bouma; S.G. de Hert; J. van der Meulen; J.G.P. Tijssen; J.J. Piek; B.A.J.M. de Mol

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To report the feasibility, safety and efficacy of percutaneous aortic valve implantation (PAVI) with the CoreValve self-expanding aortic valve bioprosthesis in elderly patients with aortic valve stenosis who are rejected for surgery or have a high surgical risk.Methods. PAVI using the Cor

  16. Reoperation on aortic disease in patients with previous aortic valve surgery%主动脉瓣置换术后患者再次主动脉外科干预47例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张良; 常谦; 孙晓刚; 于存涛; 钱向阳

    2013-01-01

    Objective Retrospectively analyze 47 cases received reoperation with aortic disease after aortic valve replacement to deepen the understanding of aortic valve disease.Methods From January 2003 to June 2012,47 patients with previous aortic valve replacement received aortic root or other aortic operation because of new aortic disease.38 male and 9 female,the interval (6.0 ± 3.8) years. All cases with new aortic disease were diagnosed by cardiac ultrasound and aortic computed tomography.Bentall's procedure were operated on 14 patients,total aortic arch replacement with elephant trunk procedure on 14 patients,aortic root and aortic arch with elephant trunk procedure on 7 patients,ascending aortic replacement on 10patients,total thoracic and abdominal aorta replacement on 2 cases.All patients were followed by clinic interview or telephone.Results Aortic dissection and aneurysmal dilatation were occurred on ascending aorta,each account for 50%,in patients with previous aortic valve replacement because of rheumatic valve disease and bicuspid aortic valve; 3 cases with Marfan syndrome occurred ascending aortic dilatation and 4 cases occurred aortic dissection.Diameter in ascending aorta increased (5.2 + 7.1)mm per year and aortic sinus (3.3 ± 3.1)mm per year.The value of ascending aortic dilatation per year in patients with rheumatic disease was higher than patients with Marfan syndrome(P < 0.05).47 patients were re-operated in fuwai hospital,1 patients died in operating room because aortic dissection seriously involved right coronary artery.7 patients have renal insufficiency after operation and all were cured by hemofiltration; neurological complication occurred in 14 patients including that 7 patients stroked and 7 patients had transient brain dysfunciotn.There were no postoperative spinal cord deficits occurred.All patients were followed up,the mean follow up time were(53.49 +33.79) months.8 cases were died during follow-up and threeyear survival rate was 83

  17. Predictive factors related to low cardiac output syndrome following aortic valve replacement%主动脉瓣置换术后发生低心排出量综合征的预测因素探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马红; 张其霞; 李晓静; 郑晓燕

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the predictive factors related to postoperative low cardiac output syndrome in pa-tients after aortic valve replacement due to aortic stenosis or regurgitation. Methods Three hundred patients with aortic valve defect due to aortic stenosis (AS, n=150) or aortic incompetence (AI, n=150), who underwent isolated aortic valve replacement were included in the study. Low cardiac output syndrome(LOS) was defined as the need for high dosages of inotropic medication, and/or intra- aortic bal oon pumping to sustain adequate hemodynamic status. Results Postoperative low cardiac output syn-drome developed in 86 patients (28.6%), including 39 patients with AS (26.0%) and 47 patients with AI (31.3%). The development of postoperative LOS were associated with the fol owing factors (odds ratio in parentheses): for AS group: advanced age (OR=4.7), obesity (OR=1.8), history of heart failure (OR=1.7), end- systolic (OR=5.5) and end- diastolic intraventricular septum thickness (OR=4.2), left atrial diameter (OR=1.6), mitral and tricuspid regurgitation (OR=1.9, 1.5) before surgery, LVEF≤50.0%(OR=5.4), left ventricular end systolic diameter (OR=1.7), left ventricular end diastolic diameter (OR=1.9) and mitral regurgitation (OR=4.1) in early postoperative period; for AI group:advanced age (OR=1.9), obesity (OR=4.8), history of heart failure (OR=1.7), LVEF≤50.0%(OR=1.8), left ventricular end- systolic (OR=4.5), end- diastolic diameters (OR=6.4), left ventricular end systolic di-ameter (OR=1.5), left ventricular end diastolic diameter(OR=1.6), and tricuspid regurgitation (OR=1.5) in preoperative period and left ventricular end- systolic (OR=4.7) and end- diastolic diameters (OR=6.1), and LVEF≤50.0% (OR=7.2) in early postoperative period. Conclusion The patients at high risk for the development of low cardiac output syndrome should be the focus of trials of new techniques of myocardial protection to effectively resuscitate the ischemic myocardium and

  18. Acesso minimamente invasivo para troca da valva aórtica: resultados operatórios imediatos comparativos com a técnica tradicional Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement: a comparison of results with the traditional technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Tyszka

    2004-03-01

    better cosmetic results and to reduce hospital costs with the same safety than conventional surgery. This study was designed to compare the operative results from patients who underwent minimally invasive aortic valve replacement with those who were submitted to the standard procedure. METHOD: The operative and immediate post-operative results of 12 consecutive patients who received minimally invasive isolated aortic valve replacements from June 2002 to February 2003 were compared to 12 patients who underwent to traditional approach in the same institution. The minimally invasive access used was superior median hemisternotomy and cardiopulmonary bypass was established through ascendant aorta and right atrium cannulation, similar to the traditional technique. RESULTS: The patient's demographics were similar in both groups. There were no significant differences between aortic clamping time, total bypass time and operating time. The skin incision length was statiscally shorter in minimally invasive group. In the postoperative course, the mechanical ventilation time and the total hospital stay were shorter, but not statiscally significant, in the minimally invasive group. The morbidity was the same in two groups. CONCLUSIONS: This surgical approach provides adequate exposure of the cardiac structures necessary to perform a safe valve replacement. With the same instrumental used in the traditional surgery we can offer the benefits of a less invasive access with the same efficiency as in the conventional approach without add any risks to our patients.

  19. Aortic stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droc, Ionel; Calinescu, Francisca Blanca; Droc, Gabriela; Blaj, Catalin; Dammrau, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    The approach to aortic pathology is nowadays more and more endovascular at both thoracic and abdominal levels. Thoracic stenting has gained worldwide acceptance as first intention to treat pathologies of the descending thoracic aorta. Indications have been extended to aortic arch aneurysms and also to diseases of the ascending aorta. The current devices in use for thoracic endovascular repair (TEVAR) are Medtronic Valiant, Gore TAG, Cook Tx2 and Jotec. The choice of the endograft depends on the thoracic aortic pathology and the anatomical suitability. The technological evolution of the abdominal aortic endografts was very rapid, arriving now at the fourth generation. We report the results of 55 elective cases of endovascular abdominal aortic repair (EVAR) performed in two vascular surgical centers in Romania and Germany. The prostheses used were 16 E-vita Abdominal XT, 12 Excluder, eight Talent, seven PowerLink, three Endurant and nine custom-made, fenestrated or branched from Jotec. The mean follow-up was 18 months with CT-scan, duplex ultrasound and contrast-enhanced ultrasound. The mortality was 2%. EVAR tends to become the gold standard for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Technological development of the devices with lowest profile introduction systems will permit to extend the anatomical indications to new frontiers. PMID:26200430

  20. Twins with progressive thoracic aortic aneurysm, recurrent dissection and ACTA2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Stephanie M; Shikany, Amy; Landis, Benjamin J; James, Jeanne F; Hinton, Robert B

    2014-10-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is a genetically mediated disease with variable age of onset. In the pediatric age range, nonsyndromic TAA frequently has a milder course than syndromic forms of TAA, such as Marfan syndrome or Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Herein, we describe 17-year-old identical twin brothers with severe progressive TAA due to a novel de novo ACTA2 mutation. Interestingly, both boys were diagnosed at age 11 with congenital mydriasis, a recently recognized manifestation of some ACTA2 mutations due to smooth muscle dysfunction. One of the brothers presented with acute-onset lower back pain that was identified as dissection of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. Imaging of the chest at this time showed severe fusiform TAA. Cardiac imaging in his twin showed similar TAA, but no abdominal aortic aneurysm. Both brothers underwent valve-sparing aortic root replacement, but have had progressive aortic disease with recurrent dissection requiring multiple surgeries. This case emphasizes the importance of identifying physical stigmata of smooth muscle dysfunction, such as mydriasis, as potential markers for associated aortopathy and vascular diseases.

  1. Use of dried cassava root to replace corn in supplementation of Holstein cows grazing and consuming spontaneously, apparent digestibility and energy metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ádler Carvalho da Silva

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of this experiment intended to evaluate the effect of replacing ground corn for dried and ground cassava roots with the levels of 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% in the experimental supplements for lactating cows kept on tropical irrigated and fertilized pastures. Ten Holstein cows were divided into two 5x5 Latin squares, with an initial lactation average of 150 days, 22 kg/day of average milk production of lactation and approximate initial average body eight of 603 kg. The animals were kept in pasture constituted by elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum, SCHUM cv Pioneer, associated with Tifton 85 grass (Cynodon nlemfuensis, irrigated and fertilized with 600 kg of nitrogen per hectare/year. No significant effects on the substitution of ground corn for dried and ground cassava roots in the concentrate (P>0.05 over the spontaneous consumption of the total diet, with estimated average of 20.61 kg/DM/animal/day, apparent digestibility of DM with estimated average of 59.60% and energy balance with estimated average of +6.36 Mcal day-1. The results of this study demonstrate that the cassava root can be used as an energy source of high nutritional value for supplementation of lactating cows grazing on tropical pastures, similar to corn results.

  2. CT and MR imaging of the aortic valve: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Christopher J; Maleszewski, Joseph J; Araoz, Philip A

    2012-01-01

    Valvular disease is estimated to account for as many as 20% of cardiac surgical procedures performed in the United States. It may be congenital in origin or secondary to another disease process. One congenital anomaly, bicuspid aortic valve, is associated with increased incidence of stenosis, regurgitation, endocarditis, and aneurysmal dilatation of the aorta. A bicuspid valve has two cusps instead of the normal three; resultant fusion or poor excursion of the valve leaflets may lead to aortic stenosis, the presence of which is signaled by dephasing jets on magnetic resonance (MR) images. Surgery is generally recommended for patients with severe stenosis who are symptomatic or who have significant ventricular dysfunction; transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an emerging therapeutic option for patients who are not eligible for surgical treatment. Computed tomography (CT) is an essential component of preoperative planning for TAVI; it is used to determine the aortic root dimensions, severity of peripheral vascular disease, and status of the coronary arteries. Aortic regurgitation, which is caused by incompetent closure of the aortic valve, likewise leads to the appearance of jets on MR images. The severity of regurgitation is graded on the basis of valvular morphologic parameters; qualitative assessment of dephasing jets at Doppler ultrasonography; or measurements of the regurgitant fraction, volume, and orifice area. Mild regurgitation is managed conservatively, whereas severe or symptomatic regurgitation usually leads to valve replacement surgery, especially in the presence of substantial left ventricular enlargement or dysfunction. Bacterial endocarditis, although less common than aortic stenosis and regurgitation, is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Electrocardiographically gated CT reliably demonstrates infectious vegetations and benign excrescences of 1 cm or more on the valve surface, allowing the assessment of any embolic

  3. Congenital quadricuspid aortic valve: analysis of 11 surgical cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Yang-feng; XU Ji-bin; HAN Lin; LU Fang-lin; LANG Xi-long; SONG Zhi-gang; XU Zhi-yun

    2011-01-01

    Background Congenital quadricuspid aortic valve is rarely seen during aortic valve replacement (AVR).The diagnosis and treatment of the disease were reported in 11 cases.Methods Eleven patients (nine men and two women,mean age 33.4 years) with quadricuspid aortic valve were retrospectively evaluated.Medical records,echocardiograms and surgical treatment were reviewed.Results In accordance with the Hurwitz and Roberts classification,the patients were classified as type A (n=2),type B (n=7),type F (n=1) and type G (n=1).Three patients were associated with other heart diseases,including infective endocarditis and mitral prolaps,left superior vena cava,aortic aneurysm.All had aortic regurgitation (AR) except two with aortic stenosis (AS),detected by color-flow Doppler echocardiography.The congenital quadricuspid aortic valve deformity in seven patients was diagnosed by echocardiography.All patients underwent successful aortic valve replacement.Conclusion Quadricuspid aortic valve is a rare cause of aortic insufficiency,while echocardiography plays an important role in diagnosing the disease.Aortic valve replacement is the major therapy for the disease.

  4. Surgical Treatment of Patients Enrolled in the National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Conditions (GenTAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Howard K.; Bavaria, Joseph E.; Kindem, Mark W.; Holmes, Kathryn W.; Milewicz, Dianna M.; Maslen, Cheryl L.; Pyeritz, Reed E.; Basson, Craig T.; Eagle, Kim; Tolunay, H. Eser; Kroner, Barbara L.; Dietz, Hal; Menashe, Victor; Devereux, Richard B.; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; Ravekes, William; Weinsaft, Jonathan W.; Brambilla, Donald; Stylianou, Mario P.; Hendershot, Tabitha; Mitchell, Megan S.; LeMaire, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic disorders are an important cause of thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) in young patients. Despite advances in the treatment of genetically triggered TAAs, the optimal syndrome-specific treatment approach remains undefined. We used data from the NIH-funded, multicenter National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions (GenTAC) to characterize the contemporary surgical treatment of patients with genetically triggered TAAs. Methods GenTAC’s aim is to collect longitudinal clinical data and banked biospecimens from 2800 patients with genetically triggered TAAs. We analyzed data from all patients enrolled in GenTAC to date whose clinical data were available (n=606; mean age, 37.5 years). Results The patients’ primary diagnoses included Marfan syndrome (35.8%), bicuspid aortic valve with aneurysm (29.2%), and familial TAAs and dissections (10.7%). More than half of patients (56.4%) had undergone at least 1 operation; the most common indications were aneurysm (85.7%), valve dysfunction (65.8%), and dissection (25.4%). Surgical procedures included replacement of the aortic root (50.6%), ascending aorta (64.8%), aortic arch (27.9%), and descending or thoracoabdominal aorta (12.4%). Syndrome-specific differences in age, indications for surgery, and procedure type were identified. Conclusions Patients with genetically transmitted TAAs evaluated in tertiary care centers frequently undergo surgery. Aneurysm repairs most commonly involve the aortic root and ascending aorta; distal repairs are less common. Like TAAs themselves, complications of TAAs, including dissection and aortic valve dysfunction, are important indications for surgery. Future studies will focus on syndrome- and gene-specific phenotypes, biomarkers, treatments, and outcomes to improve the treatment of patients with TAAs. PMID:19699898

  5. Combined surgical and catheter-based treatment of extensive thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Lönn, Lars; Søndergaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) has changed and extended management options in thoracic aorta disease, including in those patients deemed unfit or unsuitable for open surgery. Accordingly, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is increasingly used to treat patients with symptomatic severe aortic......An extensive thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is a potentially life-threatening condition and remains a technical challenge to surgeons. Over the past decade, repair of aortic arch aneurysms has been accomplished using both hybrid (open and endovascular) and totally endovascular techniques. Thoracic...

  6. [Aortic aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Fernando; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Vila, Ramón; Lahoz, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Aortic aneurysm is one important cause of death in our country. The prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurism (AAA) is around 5% for men older than 50 years of age. Some factors are associated with increased risk for AAA: age, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, cardiovascular disease and, in particular, smoking. The medical management of patients with an AAA includes cardiovascular risk treatment, particularly smoking cessation. Most of major societies guidelines recommend ultrasonography screening for AAA in men aged 65 to 75 years who have ever smoked because it leads to decreased AAA-specific mortality. PMID:24238836

  7. Repair of recurrent pseudoaneurysm of the mitral-aortic intervalvular fibrosa: Role of transesophageal echocardiography

    OpenAIRE

    Shreedhar S Joshi; Ashwini Thimmarayappa; P S Nagaraja; Jagadeesh, A. M.; Arul Furtado; Seetharam Bhat

    2014-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysm of mitral-aortic intervalvular fibrosa (P-MAIVF) is a rare cardiac surgical condition. P-MAIVF commonly occurs as a complication of aortic and mitral valve replacement surgeries. The surgical trauma during replacement of the valves weakens the avascular mitral and aortic intervalvular area. We present a case of P-MAIVF recurrence 5 years after a primary repair. Congestive cardiac failure was the presenting feature with mitral and aortic regurgitation. In view of the recurrence,...

  8. Substituição isolada da valva aórtica em pacientes com função ventricular deprimida Aortic valve replacement in patients with depressed left ventricular ejection fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Venossi Barbosa

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available Para avaliar o valor prognóstico da fração de ejeção do ventrículo esquerdo, entre 210 pacientes com lesões da valva aórtica operados, consecutivamente, entre maio de 1981 e outubro de 1988 e que receberam as próteses Omniscience e Meditronic-Hall, foram selecionados 112 e divididos, de acordo com a fração de ejeção do ventrículo esquerdo, em dois grupos: o G1 = FE > 40%, ficou com 52 pacientes com médias de idade 39 ± 12 anos, FE = 58 ± 10% e classe funcional (NYHA = 2,8; o GE = FE To evaluate the prognostic value of resting left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF a series of 210 consecutive patients with aortic valve disease operated upon between May 1981 and October 1988 was studied retrospectively. All patients had their aortic valve replaced by Omniscience or Meditronic prosthesis; 112 formed the study group because they have complete follow up and cineangiocardiographic data. Based on pre-operatory left ventricular ejection fraction the patients were divided in two groups: Group 1 = 52 patients with LVEF > 40%, 39 ± 12 years, NYHA functional class 2.8, and EF 58 ± 10%. Group 2 = 60 patients with LVEF < 40, 48 ± 17 years, NYHA functional class 3.6, and LVEF of 27 ± 12%. During surgery moderate hypothermia and hemodilution were utilized, with dubble oxygenator and cardioplegia With St. Thomas cardioplegic solution. Mean extracorporeal circulation and cardiac arrest time were respectively 82 ± 18 and 49 ± 7 minutes in Group 1 and 96 ± 11 and 55 ± 6 minutes in Group 2. The size of the prosthesis were 25.2 ± 1.8 mm in Group 1. The short term mortality was 3.8% in Group 1 and 5.8 in Group 2. The long-term mortality was 4.0% in Group 1 and 8.7% in Group 2. In Group 1 there was a significant association between mortality and left ventricular systolic function. In the follow-up evaluation, among patients in Group 1, 65% were in class I, 28% were in functional class II, 5% in class III, and 2% in class IV. Among patients

  9. An Adult Case of Unicommissural Unicuspid Aortic Valve Diagnosed Based on the Intraoperative Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Tetsuo; Fukatsu, Toru; Ichinohe, Yoshimaro; Komatsu, Hirotaka; Seki, Masahiro; Sasaki, Kenichi; Takai, Hideaki; Kunihara, Takashi; Hirata, Yasunobu

    2016-01-01

    We herein report an adult case of unicommissural unicuspid aortic valve (UAV). A 59-year-old man, who was noted to have a cardiac murmur at 31 years of age, was admitted to our hospital due to acute heart failure. Severe calcification in the aortic valve with severe low-flow/low-gradient aortic stenosis and moderate aortic regurgitation was observed and thought to be the cause of heart failure, however, the etiology of aortic valve dysfunction was not clear. Aortic valve replacement was subsequently performed, and unicommissural UAV was diagnosed according to the intraoperative findings. UAV is very rare congenital aortic valve disease which is rarely diagnosed preoperatively.

  10. Hybrid treatment of recurring thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm concomitant with retrograde type A aortic dissection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Min-hong; GUO Wei; DU Xin; XIONG Jiang

    2010-01-01

    So far, standard therapy of complex thoracoabdominal aortic disease is open surgical repair requiring aortic clamping and replacement of the involved segment.Despite significant improvements, morbidity and mortality of open surgery remain high.I As a result, open surgery is often withheld owing to severe comorbidities of the patients. Endovascular technique has emerged as an alternative for treatment of these diseases in high risk patients,2 and has enlarged the options of treatment of complex aortic diseases. However, an endovascular approach alone is often deemed unsuitable for some complex aortic disorders because of the close proximity of the supraaortic or visceral branches. A hybrid open-endovascular approach has therefore been proposed as a viable alternative. We present here a unique patient with recurring thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) concomitant with an aortic dissection (AD) treated by a hybrid open-endovascular approach.

  11. Stroke in Patients With Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders Møller; Dalsgaard, Morten; Bang, Casper N;

    2014-01-01

    , and poststroke survival a secondary outcome. Cox models treating AVR as a time-varying covariate were adjusted for atrial fibrillation and congestive heart failure, hypertension, age≥75 years, diabetes mellitus, stroke/transient ischemic attack, vascular disease, age 65-74 years and female sex (CHA2DS2-VASc......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: There are limited data on risk stratification of stroke in aortic stenosis. This study examined predictors of stroke in aortic stenosis, the prognostic implications of stroke, and how aortic valve replacement (AVR) with or without concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting...... influenced the predicted outcomes. METHODS: Patients with mild-to-moderate aortic stenosis enrolled in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study. Diabetes mellitus, known atherosclerotic disease, and oral anticoagulation were exclusion criteria. Ischemic stroke was the primary end point...

  12. [Use of sutureless prosthetic aortic valves in cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarpino, Giuseppe; Fischlein, Theodor

    2014-03-01

    In the last years, an increasing proportion of high-risk patients undergo surgical aortic valve replacement. In order to reduce the risk associated with cross-clamp time or cardioplegic ischemic time, sutureless aortic prostheses have been developed. These bioprosthetic valves are not hand sewn, and this technological advance translates into reduced implantation times, thus improving outcome of patients referred for aortic valve replacement. At present, three sutureless bioprostheses are available on the market: 3f Enable (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA), Perceval (Sorin Group, Saluggia, Italy) and Intuity (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, California, USA). This article provides an overview of the available literature on sutureless aortic valves with the aim to better define current role and future perspectives of sutureless aortic bioprostheses for the treatment of aortic valve stenosis. PMID:24770430

  13. Endovascular resection of the native aortic valve before transcatheter aortic valve implantation: state of the art and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarra, Emiliano; Mosala Nezhad, Zahra; Bollen, Xavier; Gielen, Charles-Edouard; Mastrobuoni, Stefano; De Kerchove, Laurent; Raucent, Benoit; Astarci, Parla

    2016-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was introduced into clinical practice in 2002 as a rescue approach in patients presenting with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis but not eligible for conventional aortic valve replacement. This technique allows implantation of a balloon expandable bioprosthesis without resection of the native aortic valve. Several complications are described as a consequence of the residual highly calcified valve being squeezed against the aortic wall by the stent of the implant. This can result in deformation of the metal stent and paravalvular leakage, risk of occlusion of the coronary ostia, or central and peripheral embolization of valvular debris. To avoid these complications, many authors suggest the possibility to resect and remove the native aortic valve before transcatheter aortic valve implantation. In this field, different authors have described possible techniques and different sources of energy to resect the calcified valve. In this article, we review the development of these experimental techniques and discuss future prospects in this field. PMID:27032472

  14. Aortic Valve Replacement in Young Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M.A. Klieverik (Loes Maria Anne)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractWorldwide the incidence and burden of heart valve disease is increasing due to aging of the world population and the problem of rheumatic cardiac disease in developing countries and in parts of the population in the developed world.1 Between 2007 and 2050 the world population will increa

  15. The nordic aortic valve intervention (NOTION) trial comparing transcatheter versus surgical valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Søndergaard, Lars; Ihlemann, Nikolaj;

    2013-01-01

    Degenerative aortic valve (AV) stenosis is the most prevalent heart valve disease in the western world. Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) has until recently been the standard of treatment for patients with severe AV stenosis. Whether transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) can...

  16. Aortic iatrogenic perforation during transseptal puncture and successful occlusion with Amplatzer ductal occluder in a case of mitral paravalvular leak closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijangos-Vázquez, Roberto; García-Montes, José Antonio; Zabal-Cerdeira, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Complications of transseptal puncture are significant and potentially life threatening. Aortic perforation is one of these complications and it needs to be repaired immediately. We report the case of a 48-year-old female with a history of rheumatic mitral valve disease. She underwent three previous mitral valve replacements. Her last echocardiogram reported an anterolateral leak in the mitral prosthesis. Catheterization was performed. During the procedure, when attempting to perform transseptal puncture, catheterization was complicated by a forcefully puncture of the aortic root by the Brockenbrough needle followed by an immediately advancement of an 8-Fr Mullins sheath. We decided to leave the 8-Fr sheath in the aortic root recognizing the danger of removing the sheath and finally we advanced a 6/4 mm Amplatzer ductal occluder (ADO I) through the Mullins sheath and under fluoroscopy and TEE guidance we achieved a successful deployment of the device and closure of the perforation. Subsequently, the paravalvular leak was closed with an Amplatzer Vascular Plug (AVP III 10/5 mm). There are only three cases of a similar technique for the same injury in which the authors describe successful closing of aortic perforation with percutaneous closure devices. Our case is the first described during a mitral paravalvular leak closure. It is also the first to describe a different technique of leaving the Mullins sheath in the aortic root and advancing the Amplatzer device through it to achieve successful closure of the aortic perforation. We preferred the percutaneous closure over open-heart repair. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26489701

  17. Possible Subclinical Leaflet Thrombosis in Bioprosthetic Aortic Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makkar, Raj R; Fontana, Gregory; Jilaihawi, Hasan;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A finding of reduced aortic-valve leaflet motion was noted on computed tomography (CT) in a patient who had a stroke after transcatheter aortic-valve replacement (TAVR) during an ongoing clinical trial. This finding raised a concern about possible subclinical leaflet thrombosis...

  18. Substituição valvar por válvula aórtica homóloga conservada em glutaraldeído: estudo multicêntrico Valve replacement with aortic glutaraldehyde preserved homografts: a multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ernesto Succi

    1986-12-01

    Full Text Available Dado o bom resultado com a utilização das válvulas de tecidos biológicos convervadas em glutaraldeído, os autores realizam um estudo multicêntrico, com o objetivo de analisar os resultados das válvulas aórticas homólogas montadas em suporte e também conservadas em glutaraldeído, processadas industrialmente. São estudados 63 pacientes, operados de setembro de 1984 a fevereiro de 1986, com idades variáveis de 7 a 64 anos, sendo 28 deles (44,5% com idade inferior a 15 anos. A mortalidade hospitalar foi de 1,6% e não relacionada à utilização da prótese homóloga. Nos 62 pacientes restantes, o seguimento pós-operatório variou de 1 a 17 meses, num total de 454 meses/pacientes. A única complicação observada foi um caso de endocardite infecciosa por Candida albicans, no segundo mês de evolução, e em paciente portadora de candidíase vaginal que necessitou de reintervenção para substituição da prótese. Os demais pacientes apresentam-se bem, em tipo funcional 0 ou I da NYGA, acreditando os autores que se possa esperar um melhor resultado dos tecidos homólogos em relação aos heterólogos, dada a sua menor antigenicidade.Due to good results obtained with glutaraldehyde preserved heterologous biological valves, the authors are performing a multicentric trial for the purpose of analysing the results of industrialized stentmounted glutaraldehyde preserved aortic homologous valves. We studied 63 patients, operated on from February 1984 to February 1986, with ages varying from 7 to 64 years (28 of them 44.5% less than 15 years old. Hospital mortality was 1.6% and was not related to the prosthesis. In the 62 remaining patients follow-up has ranged from 1 to 17 months in a total of 454 mo/patients. The only observed complication was one case of acute endocarditis. (Candida albicans on the second postoperative month in a patient who had vaginal candidiasis and in whom a replacement was done. The other patients are doing well, all

  19. Delayed aortic regurgitation caused by a right coronary stent protruding into the aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Eduard; Mestres, Carlos A; Congiu, Stefano; Josa, Miguel; Cartañá, Ramon

    2009-11-01

    Aortic valve perforation is an extremely rare complication after percutaneous coronary intervention. The case is presented of a 49-year-old male with aortic valve regurgitation secondary to the intra-aortic protrusion of a right coronary stent. The patient had undergone an apparently successful rescue percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty with a drug-eluting stent following failed fibrinolysis, but one month later was readmitted for acute pulmonary edema. Further investigations demonstrated new-onset aortic regurgitation. Medical stabilization was achieved and an elective aortic valve replacement and coronary revascularization performed. Intraoperatively, the stent was found to be partially deployed within the aortic lumen, causing perforation to the non-coronary cusp.

  20. Aortic Valve Repair: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Published Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Fok, Matthew; Shaw, Matthew; Sancho, Elena; Abello, David; Bashir, Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is widely accepted that aortic valve disease is surgically managed with aortic valve replacement (AVR) using different available prostheses. The long-term survival, durability of the valve, and freedom from reoperation after AVR are well established in published literature. Over the past two decades, aortic valve repair (AVr) has evolved into an accepted surgical option for patients with aortic valve disease. We review and analyze the published literature on AVr. Methods: A sys...

  1. Valve selection in aortic valve endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrytska, Yana

    2016-01-01

    Aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) is a potentially life-threatening disease. Mortality and incidence of infective endocarditis have been reduced in the past 30 years. Medical treatment of aortic PVE may be successful in patients who have a prompt response after antibiotic treatment and who do not have prosthetic dysfunction. In advanced stages, antibiotic therapy alone is insufficient to control the disease, and surgical intervention is necessary. Surgical treatment may be lifesaving, but it is still associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. The aim of surgery is to perform a radical excision of all infected and necrotic tissue, reconstruction of the left ventricle outflow tract, and replacement of the aortic valve. There is no unanimous consensus on which is the optimal prosthesis to implant in this context, and several surgical techniques have been suggested. We aim to analyze the efficacy of the surgical treatment and discuss the issue of valve selection in patients with aortic valve endocarditis.

  2. A rare cause of recurrent aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Yashwant; Gupta, Vishal

    2016-07-01

    We report the case of a 19-year-old man with a history of Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS), which was diagnosed when he had a Stanford type A aortic dissection. He also had multiple aneurysms including ones in the innominate, right common carotid, and right internal mammary arteries. He had had multiple procedures including Bentall's procedure, repeat sternotomy with complete arch and valve replacement, and coil embolization of internal mammary artery aneurysm in the past. His LDS was characterized by gene mutation for transforming growth factor-β receptor 1. He presented to our facility with sudden onset of back pain, radiating to the right shoulder and chest. He was diagnosed with Stanford type B aortic dissection and underwent thoracic aorta endovascular repair for his aortic dissection. This case represents the broad spectrum of pathology associated with LDS where even with regular surveillance and aggressive medical management the patient developed Stanford B aortic dissection. PMID:27358537

  3. Intra-aortic filtration is effective in collecting hazardous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestres, Carlos-A; Bernabeu, Eduardo; Fernández, Claudio; Colli, Andrea; Josa, Miguel

    2007-04-01

    Neurological complications after cardiac operations are mostly due to particle embolization. This case illustrates the embolic potential of any material. A 77-year-old lady underwent re-operation for homograft aortic regurgitation and mitral valve replacement. Intra-aortic filtration was used. After cardiopulmonary bypass the filter was found to have captured a pledget from a suture used to secure the mitral replacement device.

  4. Acute Aortic Dissection Extending Into the Lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makdisi, George; Said, Sameh M; Schaff, Hartzell V

    2015-07-01

    The radiologic manifestations of ruptured acute aortic dissection, Stanford type A aortic dissection, DeBakey type 1 can present in different radiographic scenarios with devastating outcomes. Here, we present a rare case of a 70-year-old man who presented to the emergency department with chest pain radiating to the back. A chest computed tomography scan showed a Stanford type A, DeBakey type 1, acute aortic dissection ruptured into the aortopulmonary window and stenosing the pulmonary trunk, both main pulmonary arteries, and dissecting the bronchovascular sheaths and flow into the pulmonary interstitium, causing pulmonary interstitial hemorrhage. The patient underwent emergent ascending aorta replacement with hemiarch replacement with circulatory arrest. The postoperative course was unremarkable. PMID:26140779

  5. Mitral-aortic annular enlargement: modification of Manouguian's technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa Mario Gesteira

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We hereby present a technical modification for mitral-aortic annular enlargement. The mitral valve is replaced through the retro-septal approach, avoiding patches for left atrial roof closure. We report a mitral-aortic valve replacement in a patient whose original annuli would preclude adequate prostheses. The simultaneous annular enlargement may be necessary for avoiding patient-prosthesis mismatch and for reconstructing destroyed mitral and aortic annuli. The technique may minimize the risk of bleeding and of paravalvular leakage, using an approach well known to cardiac surgeons.

  6. Evaluation on aortic root calcification in homozygote familial hypercholesterolemia with transthoracic echocardiography and dual-source computed tomography%经胸超声心动图联合双源CT评价纯合子型家族性高胆固醇血症患者主动脉根部钙化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张小杉; 哈斯; 杨娅; 李治安; 王绿娅

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨TTE联合双源CT观察纯合子型家族性高胆固醇血症(HoFH)患者主动脉根部钙化的价值及钙化斑块对主动脉及冠状动脉血流动力学的影响.方法 采用TTE联合双源CT观察20例HoFH患者主动脉根部是否存在钙化、管腔狭窄情况及钙化斑块是否累及冠状动脉开口,并测量冠状动脉血流速度储备(CFVR).结果 经TTE联合双源CT检查,20例患者均有主动脉根部钙化,其中10例患者因钙化斑块引起主动脉管腔狭窄.主动脉根部钙化斑块累及冠状动脉开口者CFVR为1.72±0.32,低于未累及冠状动脉开口者(2.23±0.26,P<0.05).结论 TTE联合双源CT能准确评价HoFH患者主动脉根部钙化.%Objective To investigate the value of TTE combined with dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) in observing calcification in aortic root and the influence of calcified plague on coronary artery hemodynamics in patients with ho-mozygote familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH). Methods TTE combined with DSCT were performed on 20 patients with HoFH. Whether there was calcified plague in aortic root, as well as whether the calcification involved ostia of coronary artery and the situation of vessel stenosis were analyzed. And the coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR) was calculated. Results Calcification in aortic root was found in all the patients with TTE combined with DSCT, while 10 of them had aortic stenosis caused by calcified plague. Calcified plague involved ostia of coronary artery in 9 patients. CFVR of calcified plague involved ostia of coronary artery patients (1. 72 ± 0. 32) was lower than that of uninvolved patients (2. 23 ± 0. 26, P< 0. 05). Conclusion TTE combined with DSCT can accurately evaluate aortic root calcification in patients with HoFH.

  7. Aortic Aneurysm Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... connective tissue disorders, such as Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, get thoracic aortic aneurysms. Signs and symptoms of thoracic aortic aneurysm can include Sharp, sudden pain in the chest or upper back. Shortness of ...

  8. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular

    Science.gov (United States)

    EVAR; Endovascular aneurysm repair - aorta; AAA repair - endovascular; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular ... Endovascular aortic repair is done because your aneurysm is very large, growing quickly, or is leaking or bleeding. You may have ...

  9. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to become you to our live webcast. Today we’re going to repair an abdominal aortic aneurysm ... and together as a team of multidisciplinary physicians, we’re going to repair an abdominal aortic aneurysm ...

  10. Aortic growth rates in chronic aortic dissection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, A.M. [Department of Radiology, Division of Thoracic Radiology, University of Michigan Medical Center (United States)]. E-mail: ainekell@med.umich.edu; Quint, L.E. [Department of Radiology, Division of Thoracic Radiology, University of Michigan Medical Center (United States); Nan, B. [School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Zheng, J. [School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cronin, P. [Department of Radiology, Division of Thoracic Radiology, University of Michigan Medical Center (United States); Deeb, G.M. [Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Michigan Medical Center (United States); Williams, D.M. [Division of Vascular Interventional Imaging, University of Michigan Medical Center (United States)

    2007-09-15

    Aim: To determine and compare rates of descending aortic enlargement and complications in chronic aortic dissection with and without a proximal aortic graft. Methods and materials: Fifty-two patients with dissection involving the descending aorta and who had undergone at least two computed tomography (CT) examinations at our institution between November, 1993 and February, 2004 were identified, including 24 non-operated patients (four type A, 20 type B) and 28 operated patients (type A). CT examinations per patient ranged from two to 10, and follow-up ranged from 1-123 months (mean 49 months, median 38.5 months). On each CT image, the aortic short axis (SA), false lumen (FL), and true lumen (TL) diameters were measured at the longitudinal midpoint of the dissection and at the point of maximum aortic diameter. Complications were tabulated, including aortic rupture and aortic enlargement requiring surgery. Results: For non-operated patients, the midpoint and maximum point SA, TL, and FL diameters increased significantly over time. For operated patients, the midpoint and maximum point SA and FL diameters increased significantly over time. In both groups, aortic enlargement was predominantly due to FL expansion. Diameter increases in non-operated patients were significantly larger than those in operated patients. The rate of change in aortic diameter was constant, regardless of aortic size. Four non-operated and six operated patients developed aortic complications. Conclusions: In patients with a dissection involving the descending thoracic aorta, the FL increased in diameter over time, at a constant rate, and to a greater degree in non-operated patients (mostly type B) compared with operated patients (all type A)

  11. Substituição da valva mitral por aloenxerto valvar aórtico preservado em glutaraldeído Mitral valve replacement with glutaraldehyde preserved aortic allografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio A Salles

    1994-03-01

    valva natural. Ocorreram 15 óbitos tardios, representando uma mortalidade tardia de 2,1 % ± 0,5% por paciente-ano, porém apenas 3 óbitos estavam relacionados diretamente à alobioprótese, 10 à doença cardíaca (ICC, miocardiopatia e morte súbita e 2 a outras causas (tuberculose e diabetes. A sobrevida atuarial em 10 anos foi de 82,9% ± 4,8%. A sobrevida atuarial em 10 anos livre de disfunção valvar devido a fibrocalcificação foi de 62,1 % ± 8,4% sendo de 100% para pacientes acima de 15 anos e 34,2% ± 11,2% para pacientes com idade igual ou inferior a 15 anos. Embora a fibrocalcificação tenha representado a principal complicação tardia ocorrida com as alobiopróteses levando a disfunção valvar e representando a principal indicação para reoperações no grupo pediátrico, sua incidência foi significativamente menor que a incidência relatada na literatura para pacientes pediátricos portadores de xenobiopróteses.From September 1984 to December 1992, 145 selected patients underwent mitral valve replacement using cadaver aortic valves obtained during rotine autopsy, processed in glutaraldehyde and mounted into flexible stents made of Celcon and covered with Dacron fabric. Mean age was 22.5 years, ranging from 5 to 77 years and 54.5% (79 patients were 15 years old or younger. Twenty patients (13.8% had undergone previous mitral valve replacement using porcine, bovine pericardial and dura mater valves, which were calcified. Six patients had undergone a previous mitral valvuloplasty. Hospital mortality (30 days was 2.1% (3 patients. It was collected 709 patient-years of total follow-up, corresponding to a mean follow-up of 5 years per patient. The longest follow-up was 9 years and 5 months. Late complications related to the allograft were present in 48 patients, including fibrocalcification, thromboembolism, endocarditis and peri-valvular leak, corresponding to an incidence of 6.8% ± 0.9% per patient-year. Fibrocalcification was the most important

  12. Substituição valvar aórtica percutânea para o tratamento da estenose aórtica: experiência inicial no Brasil Sustitución percutánea de la válvula aórtica para el tratamiento de la estenosis aórtica: experiencia inicial en Brasil Percutaneous aortic valve replacement for the treatment of aortic stenosis: early experience in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Perin

    2009-09-01

    la reducción del gradiente transvalvular aórtico (de 82 para 50 mmHg e de 94 para 31 mmHg inmediatamente después de la intervención. Durante la internación hospitalaria se hizo necesario implantar marcapasos definitivos en ambos pacientes, a causa de bloqueo atrioventricular. Se observó seis meses después una queda aún más grande del gradiente transvalvular aórtico (gradiente BACKGROUND: Percutaneous aortic valve replacement for the treatment of aortic stenosis is an available and efficient alternative for patients at high surgical risk, especially those with advanced age and comorbidities. OBJECTIVE: The authors report the first experience made in our midst with the use of the CoreValve endoprosthesis. METHODS: In January 2008, two patients underwent percutaneous aortic valve replacement due to symptomatic aortic stenosis. They were selected for being elderly (77 and 87 years and presenting comorbidities and a high surgical risk (EuroScore 7.7% and 12.1%. RESULTS: Percutaneous implantations of the CoreValve device were successfully performed. Enlargement of the valve area (from 0.7 to 1.5 cm² and from 0.5 to 1.3 cm² and reduction of the aortic transvalvular gradient (from 82 to 50 mmHg and from 94 to 31 mmHg were observed immediately after the intervention. During hospital stay, permanent pacemaker implantation was required in both patients due to atrioventricular block. At six months, an even greater drop in the aortic transvalvular gradient (gradient < 20 mmHg and remission of symptoms of heart failure (NYHA III to NYHA I were observed. CONCLUSION: The use of the CoreValve endoprosthesis for the treatment of aortic stenosis proved to be feasible and showed encouraging results in this early experience made in our midst.

  13. Quantification of aortic regurgitation by magnetic resonance velocity mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Lindvig, K; Hildebrandt, P;

    1993-01-01

    The use of magnetic resonance (MR) velocity mapping in the quantification of aortic valvular blood flow was examined in 10 patients with angiographically verified aortic regurgitation. MR velocity mapping succeeded in identifying and quantifying the regurgitation in all patients, and the regurgit......The use of magnetic resonance (MR) velocity mapping in the quantification of aortic valvular blood flow was examined in 10 patients with angiographically verified aortic regurgitation. MR velocity mapping succeeded in identifying and quantifying the regurgitation in all patients......, and the regurgitant volume determined with MR velocity mapping agreed well with the grade obtained by aortic root angiography (p velocity mapping...... and calculated from MR imaging of the left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes in eight patients (Y = 0.89 x X + 11, r = 0.97, p velocity mapping and simultaneous 125I...

  14. [Pannus Formation Two Years after Bioprosthetic Aortic Valve Implantation;Report of a Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Kimiyo; Kuroda, Hiroaki

    2015-08-01

    We report a case of early deterioration of the bioprosthetic aortic valve 23 months postoperatively. A 77-year-old man who had undergone aortic valve replacement with a 23-mm Epic valve( St. Jude Medical [SJM])presented to us after a syncopal episode. Echocardiography revealed severe aortic stenosis, and redo aortic valve replacement with a 21-mm SJM mechanical valve was performed. All 3 cusps of the tissue valve were thickened by fibrous pannus overgrowth. Neither calcification nor invasion of inflammatory cells was observed. The cause of pannus formation at such an early stage after implantation remains unknown. PMID:26329714

  15. Case report of Streptomyces endocarditis of a prosthetic aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossad, S B; Tomford, J W; Stewart, R; Ratliff, N B; Hall, G S

    1995-01-01

    We describe the first case of prosthetic valve endocarditis due to a Streptomyces sp. The patient presented with fever, cutaneous embolic lesions, and bacteremia 3 months after aortic valve replacement. Treatment required valve replacement and a long course of parenteral imipenem. PMID:8586732

  16. Case report of Streptomyces endocarditis of a prosthetic aortic valve.

    OpenAIRE

    Mossad, S B; Tomford, J W; Stewart, R; Ratliff, N B; Hall, G. S.

    1995-01-01

    We describe the first case of prosthetic valve endocarditis due to a Streptomyces sp. The patient presented with fever, cutaneous embolic lesions, and bacteremia 3 months after aortic valve replacement. Treatment required valve replacement and a long course of parenteral imipenem.

  17. Dupla ampliação anterior e posterior do anel aórtico para substituição valvar Anterior and posterior enlargement of the aortic annulus for valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Ricardo SANT´ANNA

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Apresentar técnica de dupla ampliação anterior e posterior do anel aórtico, que difere das previamente descritas por utilizar enxertos distintos, para implante de prótese valvar e avaliar os resultados obtidos em 26 pacientes. MÉTODO: O procedimento é realizado com circulação extracorpórea convencional. Para substituição de valva nativa ou prótese aórtica estenótica, ampliação anelar posterior decorre da incisão no ponto médio do seio não coronário, que é estendida ao folheto mitral anterior; ampliação anterior resulta de incisão no anel aórtico anterior, estendida por 2 cm no septo interventricular, não transfixado. Reconstrução aórtica (e ampliação anelar é realizada mediante enxertos de pericárdio bovino distintos, sendo um triangular para incisão anterior e outro elíptico para incisão posterior. Após a fixação da prótese (mecânica ou biológica, a aorta ascendente é suturada com auxílio destes enxertos. Defeitos cardíacos associados são corrigidos. RESULTADOS: A operação aumentou o diâmetro do anel aórtico de 18,0 + 2,6 mmHg para 24,5 + 2,1 mmHg (pOBJECTIVES: To present a technique for anterior and posterior enlargement of the aortic anulus using individual patches and results in 26 patients. METHOD: Aortic valve surgery is performed with conventional cardiopulmonary bypass. For posterior enlargement, the longitudinal aortotomy is extended inferiorly and posteriosly in the mean portion of the noncoronary sinus, until the anterior mitral leaflet. Anterior enlargement results from incision between the two coronary ostium, extended in the left side of the ventricular septum for 2 cm. Two patches of bovine pericardium are sutured in the distal portion of the anterior and posterior incisions and the aortic prosthesis is fixed. Aorta is reconstructed with the patchs. Combined cardiac defects are corrected. RESULTS: Procedure resulted in increase of the annulus diameter from 18.0 + 2.6 mm

  18. Evolution of Endovascular Treatment for Complex Thoracic Aortic Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Roselli, Eric E.

    2008-01-01

    In a relatively short period of time, transcatheter and endovascular approaches to treat thoracic aortic and structural heart disease have exploded onto the scene. New device frontiers already being forged in the experimental stages include expanded indications and variations of fenestrated and branch stentgrafting to treat thoracoabdominal and arch disease, endovascular ascending and aortic root repair, and all of the cardiac valves. A fundamental concept to optimize durability of endovascul...

  19. Reproducibility of aortic annulus measurements by computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuhbaeck, Annika; Achenbach, Stephan [University of Erlangen, Department of Cardiology, Erlangen (Germany); University of Giessen, Department of Cardiology, Giessen (Germany); Pflederer, Tobias; Marwan, Mohamed; Schmid, Jasmin; Arnold, Martin [University of Erlangen, Department of Cardiology, Erlangen (Germany); Nef, Holger; Rixe, Johannes; Hecker, Franziska [University of Giessen, Department of Cardiology, Giessen (Germany); Schneider, Christian [University of Giessen, Department of Radiology, Giessen (Germany); Lell, Michael; Uder, Michael [University of Erlangen, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    To evaluate a systematic approach for measurement of aortic annulus dimensions by cardiac computed tomography. CT data sets of 64 patients were evaluated. An oblique cross-section aligned with the aortic root was created by systematically identifying the caudal insertion points of the three aortic cusps and sequentially aligning them in a double oblique plane. Aortic annulus dimensions, distances of coronary ostia and a suitable fluoroscopic projection angle were independently determined by two observers. Interobserver intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for aortic annulus diameters were excellent (ICC 0.89-0.93). Agreement for prosthesis size selection was excellent (k = 0.86 for mean, k = 0.84 for area-derived and k = 0.91 for circumference-derived diameter). Mean distances of the left/right coronary ostium were 13.4 ± 2.4/14.4 ± 2.8 mm for observer 1 and 13.2 ± 2.7/13.5 ± 3.2 mm for observer 2 (p = 0.30 and p = 0.0001, respectively; ICC 0.76/0.77 for left/right coronary artery). A difference of less than 10 for fluoroscopic projection angle was achieved in 84.3 % of patients. A systematic approach to generate a double oblique imaging plane exactly aligned with the aortic annulus demonstrates high interobserver and intraobserver agreements for derived measurements which are not influenced by aortic root calcification. (orig.)

  20. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... access catheters Vertebroplasty Women and vascular disease Women's health Social Media Facebook Twitter ... Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Interventional Radiologists Treat Abdominal Aneurysms Nonsurgically Interventional radiologists are vascular ...

  1. A Migrated Aortic Stent Graft Causing Erosive Spondylopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gestrich, Christopher, E-mail: christopher.gestrich@ukb.uni-bonn.de; Probst, Chris, E-mail: chris.probst@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Department of Cardiac Surgery (Germany); Wilhelm, Kai, E-mail: kai.wilhelm@ek-bonn.de [Johanniterkrankenhaus Bonn, Department of Radiology (Germany); Schiller, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.schiller@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Department of Cardiac Surgery (Germany)

    2013-12-15

    We report about a patient presenting with back pain 4 months after an uneventful endovascular implantation of an aortic stent graft. Computed tomography scan revealed a migration of the stent with consecutive endoleakage, kink formation, and movement of the stent toward the spine, which caused destruction of the aortic wall as well as vertebral necrosis. Explantation of the stent and replacement of the native aorta relieved the patient of his symptoms.

  2. The echocardiography of replacement heart valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This is a practical description of how replacement valves are assessed using echocardiography. Normal transthoracic appearances including normal variants are described. The problem of differentiating normal function, patient–prosthesis mismatch and pathological obstruction in aortic replacement valves with high gradients is discussed. Obstruction and abnormal regurgitation is described for valves in the aortic, mitral and right-sided positions and when to use echocardiography in suspected infective endocarditis. The roles of transoesophageal and stress echocardiography are described and finally when other imaging techniques may be useful. PMID:27600454

  3. Mid-term results of 17-mm St. Jude Medical Regent prosthetic valves in elder patients with small aortic annuli: comparison with 19-mm bioprosthetic valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teshima, Hideki; Ikebuchi, Masahiko; Sano, Toshikazu; Tai, Ryuta; Horio, Naohiro; Irie, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    This study was designed to compare the mid-term outcomes after aortic valve replacement (AVR) between 17-mm mechanical heart valves (MV) and 19-mm bioprosthetic valves (BV) in elderly patients with small aortic annuli. Between 2000 and 2011, 127 consecutive patients (mean age 79 years; 87 % female) underwent AVR for aortic valve stenosis with a small aortic annulus. 19-mm BV (n = 67) was implanted. When the 19-mm BV did not fit the annulus, 17-mm St. Jude Medical Regent prosthetic mechanical valve (n = 60) was used instead of an aortic root-enlargement procedure. The follow-up rate was 94.0 % in the BV group, and 98.5 % in the MV group. No significant differences in survival rate and valve-related complications were found between the 2 groups. In-hospital mortality rates were 1.5 % (n = 1) in the BV group and 5.0 % (n = 3) in the MV group. Late mortality rates were 3.9 % per patient-years (p-y; n = 8) in the BV group, and 6.0 % per p-y (n = 10) in the MV group. Five-year Kaplan-Meier survival rates were 62 % in the BV group, and 72 % in the MV group (log-rank P = 0.280). Freedom from major adverse valve-related stroke and cerebral bleeding events was 92.5 and 98.5 % in the BV group, and 94.7 and 100 % in the MV group. AVR using 17-mm MV in elder patients with small aortic annuli provided equivalent mid-term clinical results to that with 19-mm BV. PMID:24878870

  4. Internal mammary artery dilatation in a patient with aortic coarctation, aortic stenosis, and coronary disease. Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez Cereijo Jose M

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The ideal surgical approach is unclear in adult patients with coarctation of the aorta that is associated with other cardiovascular pathologies that require intervention. Standard median sternotomy allows simultaneous, coronary revascularization surgery, valve replacement and repair of aortic coarctation. However the collateral circulation and the anatomy of the mammary arteries must be determined, to avoid possible complications. We report a case of a 69 year-old man with aortic coarctation, aortic stenosis, coronary artery disease and internal mammary artery dilatation who underwent concomitant surgical procedures through a median sternotomy.

  5. Chronic atrial fibrillation in presence of aortic stenosis in a patient with polysplenia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronte, E; Trovato, Rl; Di Miceli, R; Sucato, V; Candela, P; Brancatelli, G; Novo, S

    2013-01-01

    We report a rare case of "situs viscerum ambiguous" with polysplenia syndrome, in a 69 year old female patient with aortic stenosis and chronic atrial fibrillation. The presenting symptom was dyspnoea on moderate exertion and an ECG showed supra ventricular arrhythmia. Patients trans-thoracic echocardiogram revealed a dilated left atrium, reduced ejection fraction, mild tricuspid regurgitation, moderate-severe pulmonary hypertension and severe aortic stenosis. The patient was successfully treated with a replacement of her aortic valve and ascending aorta.

  6. Novel pharmacological strategies to prevent aortic complications in Marfan syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter Matt; Friedrich Eckstein

    2011-01-01

    The Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a systemic connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in the FBN1 gene.Recent molecular studies,most performed in mouse models,revealed that the MFS is more a developmental abnormality with broad and complex effects on the morphogenesis and function of multiple organ systems.FBN1 haploinsufficiency and dysregulated transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β)signaling seem to be critical for clinical manifestations in MFS including aortic root dilatation.Aortic root aneurysm and aortic dissection represent the main causes of morbidity and mortality in MFS.Most importantly,TGF-β antagonism through angiotensin Ⅱ type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs),for example losartan,has been shown to prevent and possibly reverse aortic root dilatation in a mouse model of MFS.A first human study on a small pediatric cohort confirmed those promising results in reducing the aortic root growth over a follow-up period of 12 to 47 months.So,a large multicenter trial has been set up and results should be available soon.Other therapeutic strategies which might be combined with losartan include traditional β-blockade,doxycyclin and statins.Such management could offer the first potential for primary prevention of clinical manifestations in MFS.

  7. Novel pharmacological strategies to prevent aortic complications in Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt, Peter; Eckstein, Friedrich

    2011-12-01

    The Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a systemic connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in the FBN1 gene. Recent molecular studies, most performed in mouse models, revealed that the MFS is more a developmental abnormality with broad and complex effects on the morphogenesis and function of multiple organ systems. FBN1 haploinsufficiency and dysregulated transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling seem to be critical for clinical manifestations in MFS including aortic root dilatation. Aortic root aneurysm and aortic dissection represent the main causes of morbidity and mortality in MFS. Most importantly, TGF-β antagonism through angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs), for example losartan, has been shown to prevent and possibly reverse aortic root dilatation in a mouse model of MFS. A first human study on a small pediatric cohort confirmed those promising results in reducing the aortic root growth over a follow-up period of 12 to 47 months. So, a large multicenter trial has been set up and results should be available soon. Other therapeutic strategies which might be combined with losartan include traditional β-blockade, doxycyclin and statins. Such management could offer the first potential for primary prevention of clinical manifestations in MFS. PMID:22783312

  8. Imaging in aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aortic dissection (AD) is a catastrophic aortic disease. Imaging techniques play an invaluable role in the diagnostic evaluation and management of patients with AD. Major signs of AD with different imaging modalities are described in this article with a pertinent discussion on guidelines for the optimized approach of imaging study (13 refs.)

  9. Aortic arch malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellenberger, Christian J. [University Children' s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2010-06-15

    Although anomalies of the aortic arch and its branches are relatively uncommon malformations, they are often associated with congenital heart disease. Isolated lesions may be clinically significant when the airways are compromised by a vascular ring. In this article, the development and imaging appearance of the aortic arch system and its various malformations are reviewed. (orig.)

  10. Review of Ten Years' Use of St. Jude Medical Prosthetic Valve Replacement and Postoperative Management at Niigata University Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Hayashi, Jun-Ichi; Oguma, Fumiaki; Tsuchida, Sho-ichi; Fujita, Yasuo; Nakazawa, Satoshi; Miyamura, Haruo; Eguchi, Shoji

    1993-01-01

    A ten-year period of using St. Jude Medical (SJM) prosthetic heart valves at Niigata University Hospital was reviewed. Between December 1979 and August 1990, 261 patients, 118 males and 143 females, ages ranging 6-75 years, underwent SJM prosthetic valve replacement. Aortic valve replacement was performed in 72 patients, mitral valve replacement in 140 patients, combined aortic and mitral valve replacement in 37 patients, and miscellaneous valve replacement in 12 patients. The actuarial survi...

  11. Desafios técnicos e complicações da dupla substituição valvar na presença de anéis aórtico e mitral pequenos Technical challenges and complications of double valve replacement in the presence of small aortic and mitral annuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando A. Atik

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Mulher de 57 anos portadora de cardiopatia reumática com comprometimento das valvas aórtica e mitral foi submetida a uma substituição mitro-aórtica. A presença de anéis aórtico e mitral pequenos contribuiu para uma série de complicações intra-operatórias, como oclusão do óstio coronariano esquerdo e dissociação atrioventricular do tipo III. O sulco foi reparado com generoso enxerto autólogo pericárdico fresco de camada dupla sobreposto por uma prótese mecânica de duplo folheto. No pós-operatório, a paciente desenvolveu insuficiência respiratória prolongada, pneumonia, disfunção miocárdica temporária e insuficiência renal aguda. No final, ela recebeu alta sem problemas residuais.A 57 year old female with rheumatic heart disease affecting both aortic and mitral valves underwent double valve replacement. The presence of small aortic and mitral annuli contributed to a series of intraoperative complications: left coronary ostium occlusion and type III atrioventricular groove disruption. The latter was repaired with a generous fresh autologous pericardial double layer patch and implant of a bileaflet mechanical prosthesis over the patch. Postoperatively, the patient developed prolonged respiratory insufficiency and pneumonia, transient myocardial dysfunction and acute renal failure. She was eventually discharged home without residual defects.

  12. Endograft failure in an adult patient with coarctation and bicuspid aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimarakis, Ioannis; Grant, Stuart; Kadir, Isaac

    2013-06-01

    A 25-year-old man presented with associated bicuspid aortic valve and coarctation of the aorta. Following aortic valve replacement, he underwent endovascular stenting of his native coarctation. We describe early failure of the latter procedure that necessitated definitive surgical correction.

  13. A computerized system for video analysis of the aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesely, I; Menkis, A; Campbell, G

    1990-10-01

    A novel technique was developed to study the dynamic behavior of the porcine aortic valve in an isolated heart preparation. Under the control of a personal computer, a video frame grabber board continuously acquired and digitized images of the aortic valve, and an analog-to-digital (A/D) converter read four channels of physiological data (flow rate, aortic and ventricular pressure, and aortic root diameter). The valve was illuminated with a strobe light synchronized to fire at the field acquisition rate of the CCD video camera. Using the overlay bits in the video board, the measured parameters were super-imposed over the live video as graphical tracing, and the resultant composite images were recorded on-line to video tape. The overlaying of the valve images with the graphical tracings of acquired data enabled the data tracings to be precisely synchronized with the video images of the aortic valve. This technique enabled us to observe the relationship between aortic root expansion and valve function.

  14. Debranching Solutions in Endografting for Complex Thoracic Aortic Dissections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goksel, Onur Selcuk, E-mail: onurgokseljet@gmail.com [Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Cardiovascular Surgery, Istanbul (Turkey); Guven, Koray [Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey); Karatepe, Celalettin [Mustafa Kemal Medical Faculty, Cardiovascular Surgery, Istanbul (Turkey); Gok, Emre [Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Cardiovascular Surgery, Istanbul (Turkey); Acunas, Bulent [Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey); Cinar, Bayer [Medical Park Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); Alpagut, Ufuk [Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Cardiovascular Surgery, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2014-08-15

    Conventional surgical repair of thoracic aortic dissections is a challenge due to mortality and morbidity risks. We analyzed our experience in hybrid aortic arch repair for complex dissections of the aortic arch. Between 2009 and 2013, 18 patients (the mean age of 67 ± 8 years-old) underwent hybrid aortic arch repair. The procedural strategy was determined on the individual patient. Thirteen patients had type I repair using trifurcation and another patient with bifurcation graft. Two patients had type II repair with replacement of the ascending aorta. Two patients received extra-anatomic bypass grafting to left carotid artery allowing covering of zone 1. Stent graft deployment rate was 100%. No patients experienced stroke. One patient with total debranching of the aortic arch following an acute dissection of the proximal arch expired 3 months after TEVAR due to heart failure. There were no early to midterm endoleaks. The median follow-up was 20 ± 8 months with patency rate of 100%. Various debranching solutions for different complex scenarios of the aortic arch serve as less invasive procedures than conventional open surgery enabling safe and effective treatment of this highly selected subgroup of patients with complex aortic pathologies.

  15. Application of Regent mechanical valve in patients with small aortic annulus: 3-year follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao Dong; Wang Chunsheng; Hong Tao; Pan Cuizhen; Guo Changfa

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Aortic valve replacement (AVR) with a small aortic annulus is always challenging for the cardiac surgeon. In this study, we sought to evaluate the midterm performance of implantation with a 17-mm or 19-mm St. Jude Medical Regent (SJM Regent) mechanical valve in retrospective consecutive cohort of patients with small aortic annulus (diameter ≤ 19 mm). Methods From January 2008 to April 2011, 40 patients (31 female, mean age = 47.2 ± 5.8 years) with small aortic annulus (≤19...

  16. Mycotic aneurysm of the aortic arch presenting with left vocal cord palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokmaji, George; Gosev, Igor; Kumamaru, Kanako Kunishima; Bolman, Ralph Morton

    2013-07-01

    We report a case of a 71-year-old man with a mycotic aneurysm of the aortic arch who presented with progressive hoarseness. Three weeks prior to this event the patient was admitted to an outside hospital in septic condition and was diagnosed with a mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm. Resection of the infected abdominal aortic aneurysm with right axillofemoral and femoral-femoral bypass grafts was performed and the patient was discharged home on intravenous antibiotics. At our institution, the aortic arch aneurysm was treated with extensive debridement and replaced with a Dacron prosthesis under circulatory arrest with antegrade cerebral perfusion through the axillofemoral bypass. PMID:23816081

  17. No beneficial effect of general and specific anti-inflammatory therapies on aortic dilatation in Marfan mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romy Franken

    Full Text Available AIMS: Patients with Marfan syndrome have an increased risk of life-threatening aortic complications, mostly preceded by aortic dilatation. In the FBN1(C1039G/+ Marfan mouse model, losartan decreases aortic root dilatation. We recently confirmed this beneficial effect of losartan in adult patients with Marfan syndrome. The straightforward translation of this mouse model to man is reassuring to test novel treatment strategies. A number of studies have shown signs of inflammation in aortic tissue of Marfan patients. This study examined the efficacy of anti-inflammatory therapies in attenuating aortic root dilation in Marfan syndrome and compared effects to the main preventative agent, losartan. METHODS AND RESULTS: To inhibit inflammation in FBN1(C1039G/+ Marfan mice, we treated the mice with losartan (angiotensin II receptor type 1 inhibitor, methylprednisolone (corticosteroid or abatacept (T-cell-specific inhibitor. Treatment was initiated in adult Marfan mice with already existing aortic root dilatation, and applied for eight weeks. Methylprednisolone- or abatacept-treated mice did not reveal a reduction in aortic root dilatation. In this short time frame, losartan was the only treatment that significantly reduced aorta inflammation, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β signaling and aortic root dilatation rate in these adult Marfan mice. Moreover, the methylprednisolone-treated mice had significantly more aortic alcian blue staining as a marker for aortic damage. CONCLUSION: Anti-inflammatory agents do not reduce the aortic dilatation rate in Marfan mice, but possibly increase aortic damage. Currently, the most promising therapeutic drug in Marfan syndrome is losartan, by blocking the angiotensin II receptor type 1 and thereby inhibiting pSmad2 signaling.

  18. The future of transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Christian W; Arsalan, Mani; Mack, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Since the introduction of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) into clinical practice, the treatment of aortic stenosis has changed dramatically. In the past, medical therapy with or without balloon aortic valvuloplasty was the only option for inoperable patients. More recently, TAVI has become the treatment of choice for these patients and the preferred alternative for high-risk operable patients. Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) currently remains the gold standard for patients at low or intermediate operative risk. As randomized trials have demonstrated comparable results between TAVI and SAVR in the high-risk population, there is now a clear trend towards performing TAVI even in intermediate-risk patients while awaiting the results of randomized trials in that population. Nevertheless, there are still questions regarding TAVI involving paravalvular leak (PVL), stroke, pacemaker requirements, and durability that remain to be more definitively answered before TAVI can routinely be performed in a broader, lower risk population. Improvements in patient selection, imaging, and second and third generation devices have decreased the incidence of PVLs and vascular complications that followed the earliest TAVI procedures, but the rates of perioperative stroke and permanent pacemaker implantation must still be addressed. Furthermore, the long-term durability of TAVI devices and a role for post-procedure antithrombotic management remain unanswered. Until these questions are more clearly answered, it is the Heart Team's task to determine the optimal treatment for each patient based on risk scores, frailty metrics, comorbidities, patient preference, and potential for improvement in quality of life.

  19. ED 02-1 ACUTE AORTIC SYNDROME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jae-Kwan

    2016-09-01

    ascending or aortic arch repairs. Currently available CT or TEE cannot identify this type of localized intimal tear, with the only imaging characteristic reported to be a localized eccentric bulging or aneurysm. This feature is too subtle to diagnose accurately using conventional imaging modalities, suggesting that surgical exploration be performed in patients with aortic pain and aortic root dilatation who show unexplained aortic regurgitation or pericardial effusion. Further investigations are necessary to evaluate the clinical significance and outcomes of patients with incomplete dissection.Non-invasive imaging modalities such as CT and TEE have contributed to a better understanding of acute aortic syndrome, resulting in inclusion of IMH and atypical dissection as new disease entities. Differences in imaging findings may be due to differences in the hemodynamic status of the false lumen, resulting from the wide spectrum of intimal tears, from a localized or 'micro-intimal tear' to a large tear with flow communication resulting in a 'double channel aorta'. Further investigation is required to determine whether the application of different treatment options following risk stratification based on imaging results is rational and can improve the clinical outcomes of patients with this syndrome. PMID:27643004

  20. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as atherosclerosis, high blood pressure, smokers, or a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Today’s patient is ... be screened. In fact, patients who have a family history of aneurysm, men who are smoking over ...

  1. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... wall will actually thin out. And the big risk here is that if this gets too big ... to the aging baby boomers. Next slide. The risk factors for abdominal aortic aneurysms are males over ...

  2. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... atherosclerosis, high blood pressure, smokers, or a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Today’s patient is a ... screened. In fact, patients who have a family history of aneurysm, men who are smoking over the ...

  3. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaja, K; Sedlak, L; Urbanek, T; Kostyra, J; Ludyga, T

    2000-01-01

    The reported incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is from 2% to 14% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and the etiology of this disease is still discussed--according to the literature several pathogenic theories have been proposed. From 1992 to 1997 32 patients with IAAA were operated on. The patients were mostly symptomatic--abdominal pain was present in 68.75% cases, back pain in 31.25%, fever in 12.5% and weight loss in 6.25% of the operated patients. In all the patients ultrasound examination was performed, in 4 patients CT and in 3 cases urography. All the patients were operated on and characteristic signs of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm like: thickened aortic wall, perianeurysmal infiltration or retroperitoneal fibrosis with involvement of retroperitoneal structures were found. In all cases surgery was performed using transperitoneal approach; in three cases intraoperatively contiguous abdominal organs were injured, which was connected with their involvement into periaortic inflammation. In 4 cases clamping of the aorta was done at the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus. 3 patients (9.37%) died (one patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm). Authors present diagnostic procedures and the differences in the surgical tactic, emphasizing the necessity of the surgical therapy in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  4. Pulmonary artery perfusion with cold modified Low- Potassium Dextran solution reduces lung injury in combined aortic and mitral valve replacement%双瓣置换术中肺动脉灌注低温改良LPD液的肺保护作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马明星; 刘立明; 张伟; 廖晓波; 易定武; 彭清云

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨双瓣置换术中,肺动脉灌注低温改良LPD液对肺损伤的保护作用.方法 24例需实施双瓣置换术的风心病患者,对照组14例和灌注组10例,灌注组常规完成手术+肺动脉灌注低温改良LPD液,对照组常规完成手术,未行肺动脉灌注.术前、停CPB时、停CPB后1、2、6、12 h六个时间点监测两组病例的氧合指数,术前、停CPB时、停CPB后6、12 h四个时间点检测血浆IL-6、IL-10的水平.结果 与对照组相比,灌注组术后氧合指数明显改善,IL-6表达降低,IL-10表达增加.结论 CPB中肺动脉灌注低温改良LPD液能减轻双瓣置换术后肺损伤,改善肺功能.%Objective This study was to evaluate the protective effect of pulmonary perfusion with cold modified low- potassium dextran (LPD) solution on lung function after cardiopulmonary bypass in combined aortic and mitral valve replacement. Method Twenty-four consecutive adult patients with combined aortic and mitral valve disease were divided into a control group ( n =14) and a perfused group ( n = 10). Cold modified LPD solution was infused to the main pulmonary artery in the protective group. PaO_2/FiO_2 were monitored at six different time points; preoperation, 0 hour, 1 hours, 2 hours, 6 hours and 12 hours after the termination of CPB. Concentrations of interleukin-6 and interleukin-10 in plasma were measured at four different time points; preoperation, 0 hour, 6 hours, and 12 hours after the termination of CPB. Result PaO_2/FiO_2 in the perfused group were increased more than that in the control group. The IL-6 and IL-10 increased in both groups after operations( P <0. 05). Patients of the perfused group showed significantly reduced IL-6 expression, compared with the control group ( P <0. 001), but the rising extents of IL-10 in the perfused group were higher than that in the control group ( P <0.001). Conclusion Pulmonary artery perfusion with cold modified LPD solution during cardiopulmonary bypass

  5. Cadaveric aorta implantation for aortic graft infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Asad; Bahia, Sandeep S S; Ali, Tahir

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes a 73-year-old gentleman who underwent explantation of an infected prosthetic aorto-iliac graft and replacement with a cryopreserved thoracic and aorto-iliac allograft. The patient has been followed up a for more than a year after surgery and remains well. After elective tube graft repair of his abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in 2003, he presented to our unit in 2012 in cardiac arrest as a result of a rupture of the distal graft suture line due to infection. After resuscitation he underwent aorto-bifemoral grafting using a cuff of the original aortic graft proximally. Distally the new graft was anastomosed to his common femoral arteries, with gentamicin beads left in situ. Post discharge the patient was kept under close surveillance with serial investigations including nuclear scanning, however it became apparent that his new graft was infected and that he would require aortic graft replacement, an operation with a mortality of at least 50%. The patient underwent the operation and findings confirmed a synthetic graft infection. This tube graft was explanted and a cryopreserved aorta was used to the refashion the abdominal aorta and its bifurcation. The operation required a return to theatre day one post operatively for a bleeding side branch, which was repaired. The patient went on to make a full recovery stepping down from the intensive therapy unit day 6 post operatively and went on to be discharged 32 days after his cryopreserved aorta implantation. PMID:27351624

  6. Directed Replacement

    CERN Document Server

    Karttunen, L

    1996-01-01

    This paper introduces to the finite-state calculus a family of directed replace operators. In contrast to the simple replace expression, UPPER -> LOWER, defined in Karttunen (ACL-95), the new directed version, UPPER @-> LOWER, yields an unambiguous transducer if the lower language consists of a single string. It transduces the input string from left to right, making only the longest possible replacement at each point. A new type of replacement expression, UPPER @-> PREFIX ... SUFFIX, yields a transducer that inserts text around strings that are instances of UPPER. The symbol ... denotes the matching part of the input which itself remains unchanged. PREFIX and SUFFIX are regular expressions describing the insertions. Expressions of the type UPPER @-> PREFIX ... SUFFIX may be used to compose a deterministic parser for a ``local grammar'' in the sense of Gross (1989). Other useful applications of directed replacement include tokenization and filtering of text streams.

  7. Reconstructive surgery of the aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendonça José Teles de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Lacking an ideal valve substitute and motivated by the good results of mitral valve repair since 1990, we faced with determination aortic valve reconstruction surgery. The objective of this paper is to show our experience with this procedure. METHOD: Between January of 1990 and December of 2001; 136 aortic valve repair surgeries were performed. Seventy-five (55.1% of the patients were female and the ages ranged from 4 to 70 years (mean 23.3 ± 1.2 years. Every patient had rheumatic valve disease and insufficiency was the most prevalent type (108 patients - 79.4%, followed by double aortic lesion in 16 (11.7% patients and stenosis in 12 (8.8%. The surgical techniques used were: subcommissural annuloplasty in 74 (54.4% patients, commissurotomy in 38 (27.9%, cusp extension with pericardium in 17 (12.5%, substitution of one cusp in 2 (1.4%, cusp suspension by annuloplasty in 37 (27.2% and Valsalva sinus remodeling in 27 (19.8%. The surgery exclusively involved the aortic valve in 57 (41.9% patients and was associated in 79 (mitral valve replacement in 12, mitral repair in 65, coronary artery bypass grafting in 1 and pulmonary commissurotomy in 1. RESULTS: Hospital mortality was 2.2% and 22 (16.2% patients underwent a new surgery during the follow-up period (57.7 ± 3.5 months. CONCLUSIONS: Aortic valve repair is a safe surgical procedure that can be used in an increasing number of patients with promising results.

  8. Comprehensive Surgical Treatment of Aortic Aneurysm%主动脉瘤的外科综合治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许国安; 周亚军; 徐靖; 方向明; 邓武昌; 徐军; 刘毓平

    2011-01-01

    aortic arch in 2 patients,"Hybrid operation" in 5 patients (Type I :Bentall combined with total aortic arch replacement and interventional endovascular stent grafting into descending aorta in 1 patient; Type Ⅱ : the trunk or branch artery bypass grafting combined with interventional endovascular stent grafting into descending aorta and left half aortic arch in 4 patients), graft replacement of descending aorta in 4 patients,graft replacement of descending aorta and left half aortic arch in 2 patients,abdominal aortic bifurcation grafting and anastomosis with the iliac artery in 3 patients, and interventional endovascular stent grafting into descending aorta and abdominal aortic dissection in 17 patients. Results There were 3 hospital death cases :1 died of aortic root bleeding during Bentall operation and right half aortic arch grafting, 1 died of multiple organ failure after Bentall operation,and 1 died of lower gastrointestinal bleeding after endovascular exclusion of abdominal aortic aneurysm. The interventional endovascular stent grafts were all manipulated successfully(100%). The gaps in the dissection were completely closed,the bloodstream recovered in the true lumens,and the false lumens were no longer developing. Thirty-five patients were followed up for 3 to 82 months. No death occurred during the initial 3 months. One patient died of dissecting aortic aneurysm recurrence 38 months after descending aorta endovascular intervention. Conclusion According to the region and extent of lesion, comprehensive surgical techniques, including artificial vascular grafts,endovascular intervention,and "Hybrid operation",can significantly improve the treatment of aortic aneurysm .

  9. Is it time for medical therapy for aortic valve disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Rajamannan, Nalini M

    2004-01-01

    Calcific aortic stenosis is the most common indication for surgical valve replacement. Currently there are no medical therapies approved for the treatment of this disease. This review will summarize the clinical and experimental studies published over the past 5 years that indicate that medical therapy may be an option for this patient population.

  10. Aneurysms: thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Kevin C; Lee, Eugene S

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) have many possible etiologies, including congenital heart defects (eg, bicuspid aortic valves, coarctation of the aorta), inherited connective tissue disorders (eg, Marfan, Ehlers-Danlos, Loeys-Dietz syndromes), and degenerative conditions (eg, medial necrosis, atherosclerosis of the aortic wall). Symptoms of rupture include a severe tearing pain in the chest, back, or neck, sometimes associated with cardiovascular collapse. Before rupture, TAAs may exert pressure on other thoracic structures, leading to a variety of symptoms. However, most TAAs are asymptomatic and are found incidentally during imaging for other conditions. Diagnosis is confirmed with computed tomography scan or echocardiography. Asymptomatic TAAs should be monitored with imaging at specified intervals and patients referred for repair if the TAAs are enlarging rapidly (greater than 0.5 cm in diameter over 6 months for heritable etiologies; greater than 0.5 cm over 1 year for degenerative etiologies) or reach a critical aortic diameter threshold for elective surgery (5.5 cm for TAAs due to degenerative etiologies, 5.0 cm when associated with inherited syndromes). Open surgery is used most often to treat asymptomatic TAAs in the ascending aorta and aortic arch. Asymptomatic TAAs in the descending aorta often are treated medically with aggressive blood pressure control, though recent data suggest that endovascular procedures may result in better long-term survival rates. PMID:25860136

  11. Repair of recurrent pseudoaneurysm of the mitral-aortic intervalvular fibrosa: Role of transesophageal echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreedhar S Joshi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudoaneurysm of mitral-aortic intervalvular fibrosa (P-MAIVF is a rare cardiac surgical condition. P-MAIVF commonly occurs as a complication of aortic and mitral valve replacement surgeries. The surgical trauma during replacement of the valves weakens the avascular mitral and aortic intervalvular area. We present a case of P-MAIVF recurrence 5 years after a primary repair. Congestive cardiac failure was the presenting feature with mitral and aortic regurgitation. In view of the recurrence, the surgical team planned for a double valve replacement. The sewing rings of the two prosthetic-valves were interposed to close the mouth of the pseudoaneurysm and to provide mechanical reinforcement of the MAIVF. Intra-operative transesophageal echocardiography (TEE helped in delineating the anatomy, extent of the lesion, rupture of one of the pseudoaneurysm into left atrium and severity of the valvular regurgitation. Post-procedure TEE confirmed complete obliteration of the pseudoaneurysm and prosthetic valve function.

  12. Subacute Staphylococcus epidermidis Bacterial Endocarditis Complicated by Mitral-Aortic Intervalvular Fibrosa Pseudoaneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Elegino-Steffens

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The patient is a 75-year-old man with a history significant for hypertension and congestive heart failure who underwent a bioprosthetic aortic valve replacement secondary to acute onset of aortic insufficiency. Cultures of the native valve were positive for Staphylococcus epidermidis sensitive to nafcillin and intravenous cefazolin was initiated. On postoperative day 24, he developed acute decompensated heart failure. A transesophageal echocardiogram demonstrated a structurally abnormal mitral valve with severe regurgitation, anterior and posterior leaflet vegetations, and scallop prolapse. There was also evidence of a mitral-aortic intervalvular fibrosa pseudoaneurysm (P-MAIF with systolic expansion and flow within the aneurysm. Antibiotic treatment was changed from cefazolin to vancomycin for presumed development of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus. He subsequently underwent a bioprosthetic mitral valve replacement and has restoration of health without sequella. This case highlights the development of a P-MAIF as a rare complication of both aortic or mitral valve replacement and infective endocarditis.

  13. Interobserver variability of CT angiography for evaluation of aortic annulus dimensions prior to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidkonz, C., E-mail: christian.schmidkonz@gmail.com [Department of Internal Medicine 2 (Cardiology), University of Erlangen, Ulmenweg 18, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Marwan, M.; Klinghammer, L.; Mitschke, M.; Schuhbaeck, A.; Arnold, M. [Department of Internal Medicine 2 (Cardiology), University of Erlangen, Ulmenweg 18, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Lell, M. [Radiological Institute, University of Erlangen, Maximiliansplatz 1, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Achenbach, S.; Pflederer, T. [Department of Internal Medicine 2 (Cardiology), University of Erlangen, Ulmenweg 18, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Cardiac CT provides highly reproducible measurements of aortic annulus and root dimensions prior to TAVI. • The perimeter-derived aortic annulus diameter shows the lowest interobserver variability. • If all three CT sizing methods are considered and stated as a “consensus result”, mismatches in prosthesis size selection can be further reduced. - Abstract: Objective: Assessment of aortic annulus dimensions prior to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is crucial for accurate prosthesis sizing in order to avoid prosthesis–annulus-mismatch possibly resulting in complications like valve dislodgement, paravalvular regurgitation or annulus rupture. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography allows 3-dimensional assessment of aortic annulus dimensions. Only limited data exist about its interobserver variability. Methods: In 100 consecutive patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis (51 male, BMI 27 ± 5 kg/m{sup 2}, age 81 ± 7 years, heart rate 72 ± 15 bpm, Logistic Euroscore 31 ± 14%, STS-Score 7 ± 4%), pre-interventional aortic annulus assessment was performed by dual source computed tomography (collimation 2 × 128 × 0.6 mm, high pitch spiral data acquisition mode, 40–60 ml contrast agents, radiation dose 3.5 ± 0.9 mSv). The following aortic annulus characteristics were determined by three independent observers: aortic annulus maximum, minimum and mean diameters (D{sub max}, D{sub min}, D{sub mean}), eccentricity index (EI), effective aortic annulus diameter according to its circumference (D{sub circ}), effective aortic annulus diameter according to its area (D{sub area}), distance from the aortic annulus plane to the left (LCA) and right coronary artery (RCA) ostia, maximum (D{sub max}AR) and minimum aortic root diameter (D{sub min}AR), maximum (D{sub max}STJ) and minimum diameter of the sinotubular junction (D{sub min}STJ). Subsequently, interobserver variabilities were assessed. Results: Correlation between

  14. Aortic coarctation associated with aortic valve stenosis and mitral regurgitation in an adult patient: a two-stage approach using a large-diameter stent graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novosel, Luka; Perkov, Dražen; Dobrota, Savko; Ćorić, Vedran; Štern Padovan, Ranka

    2014-02-01

    We report a case of a staged surgical and endovascular management in a 62-year-old woman with aortic coarctation associated with aortic valve stenosis and mitral regurgitation. The patient was admitted for severe aortic valve stenosis and mitral valve incompetence. During hospitalization and preoperative imaging, a previously undiagnosed aortic coarctation was discovered. The patient underwent a 2-stage approach that combined a Bentall procedure and mitral valve replacement in the first stage, followed by correction of the aortic coarctation by percutaneous placement of an Advanta V12 large-diameter stent graft (Atrium, Mijdrecht, The Netherlands) which to our knowledge has not been used in an adult patient with this combination of additional cardiac comorbidities. A staged approach combining surgical treatment first and endovascular placement of an Advanta V12 stent graft in the second stage can be effective and safe in adult patients with coarctation of the aorta and additional cardiac comorbidities.

  15. Radiotherapy-induced aortic valve disease associated with porcelain aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mediastinal irradiation has been reported to induce cardiac disease such as pericarditis, valvular dysfunction, conduction abnormalities, accelerated arteriosclerosis of the coronary arteries, and also calcifications of the ascending aorta. We herein describe a case of radiotherapy-induced porcelain aorta and aortic valve disease and their surgical treatment. The patient was diagnosed with myasthenia gravis (MG) in 1965 (Osserman's type II), and mediastinal irradiation was performed in 1970 for treatment of thymic tumor associated with MG. Thirty years after radiation therapy, complete atrioventricular block and aortic valve disease with severe calcification of the ascending aorta and aortic arch (porcelain aorta) were detected on echo cardiogram and cardiac catheterization. A permanent pacemaker was implanted via the left subclavian vein and aortic valve replacement was performed under extracorporeal circulation established by selective cerebral perfusion and balloon occlusion instead of aortic cross-clamping. As no risk factors of arteriosclerosis such as hypercholesterolemia, hyperglycemia and hypertension were apparent, we concluded that the aortic valve disease and porcelain aorta were primarily induced by radiotherapy. (author)

  16. Percutaneous Implantation of the self-expanding valve Prosthesis a patient with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia severe aortic stenosis and porcelain aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahiner, Levent; Asil, Serkan; Kaya, Ergün Baris; Ozer, Necla; Aytemir, Kudret

    2016-10-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has shown favorable outcomes in patients with severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis who are at high surgical risk or inappropriate for open heart surgery. However, concerns exist over treating patients who have porcelain aorta and familial hypercholesterolemia, due to the potential complications of aortic root and aortic annulus. In this case report, we present a patient with familial hypercholesterolemia, symptomatic severe aortic stenosis, previous coronary artery bypass grafting and porcelain aorta, who was successfully treated with TAVI using a CoreValve. PMID:27393846

  17. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Experience with SAPIEN 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Y; Tamburino, C; Barbanti, M

    2015-06-01

    Based on randomized trials with first generation devices, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVI) has been included into the treatment strategy for high-risk and inoperable patients with severe aortic stenosis. Procedural complications remain a concern with TAVI, including stroke, vascular complications, paravalvular leak (PVL) and conduction disturbances. Addressing these limitations will support TAVI use in lower risk populations. This review discussed features and most recent clinical evidence of the new balloon-expandable THV (SAPIEN 3, Edwards Lifescience, Irvine, CA, USA). PMID:25900559

  18. RUPTURE OF ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURYSM IN RENAL TRANSPLANT PATIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. V. Fadin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article was to report our first experience in surgical treatment of aortic aneurism rupture in patient of 55 years old with renal transplant. Aortic aneurism rupture always associated with high mortality, and urgent operative procedure is also rather complicative and has also in bad anatomical conditions. The expectation of good collateral circulation for renal transplant, quick cross-clamp time and easy graft replacement may not always be the case. We believe that trans- planted kidney should be protected when ever feasible, especially in urgent procedure. 

  19. Bio-Bentall procedure in surgery for complex aortic valve-ascending aortic disease%Bio-Bentall手术治疗复杂主动脉瓣-升主动脉疾病

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨岷; 束余声; 石维平; 樊纪丹; 尤庆生; Otto E.Dapunt

    2012-01-01

    目的 报道应用无支架全主动脉根部生物瓣膜进行全主动脉根部置换术(Bio-Bentall手术)的早、中期临床效果.方法 回顾2001年11月到2009年3月病例,317例接受Bio-Bentall手术,男196例,女121例;年龄17 ~ 94岁,平均(70.3±10.2)岁,大于75岁的患者97例.均应用MedtronicFreestyle无支架全主动脉根部生物瓣膜进行全主动脉根部置换.203例患者仅行全主动脉根部置换或者主动脉根部置换加升主动脉置换(ARR),114例同期行其他手术(ARR+),其中冠状动脉旁路移植术82例,主动脉弓置换术36例,二尖瓣成形术11例.结果 ARR手术(190±57) min,主动脉阻断( 88±27) min.ARR+手术(282±93) min,主动脉阻断(110 -32) min.手术死亡25例,占7.9%.ARR者死亡11例,占5.4%;住ICU(4.9 ±8.1)天,住院(9.8±8.1)天.ARR组3例紧急行冠状动脉旁路移植手术.术后超声心动图显示跨瓣膜压力阶差低,尤其行间断单纯缝合(非褥式缝合)者压差更小.结论 Bio-Bentall手术保留了猪主动脉根部的完整性,不增加围术期和远期病死率,尤其适合小主动脉根部的老年主动脉瓣膜患者.%Objective The stentless full root aortic bioprosthesis has superior hemodynamics.Clinical data of Bio-Bentall procedure using stentless full root bioprosthesis of our center was retrospectively analyzed in this perspective for validation.Methods From November 2001 to March 2009,317 adult patients ( 196 male and 121 female) underwent modified Bio-Bentall procedure using the Medtronic Freestyle xenograft as a full root replacement.Two hundred and three patients received an isolated root replacement or a root and ascending aortic replacement (ARR).In 114 patients a variety of concomitant procedures including coronary artery bypass grafting ( n =32 ),mitral valve repair ( n =11 ) and aortic arch replacement ( n =36 ) were performed.(ARR + ).Results Mean patient age was (70.3 ± 10.2) years (range 17 -94 years),97 patients were 75 and

  20. ED 02-3 CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS OF CENTRAL HEMODYNAMICS ON AORTIC AND END-ORGAN DISEASES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Junichiro

    2016-09-01

    The central aorta constitutes the main trunk of the systemic arterial tree. It dilates passively with cardiac ejection during systole and then constricts with its recoil function during diastole, thereby regulating blood pressure and blood flow. The central pulsatile hemodynamics affects local hemodynamics within as well as downstream of the aorta (e.g., end organs).The aorta progressively stiffens and dilates with advancing age, and such age-dependent change is accelerated by hypertension. According to the law of Laplace, wall stress depends on the diameter and pressure of the blood vessel. This has been confirmed by substantial studies which have associated baseline aortic diameter with subsequent development of aortic dissection and progressive dilatation of aortic lumen. This law can also imply potential importance of local pressure within the aorta (i.e., the central pressure) in predicting the development and progression of aortic aneurysms.Several previous studies have shown that hypertension (together with age and obesity) is related to dilatation of the proximal ascending aorta (rather than of the aortic root). In addition, aortic blood flow abnormality may also be importantly related to aortic dilatation because of strong positive association between the diastole flow reversal and lumen diameter in the proximal thoracic aorta. As for the abdominal (infrarenal) aorta, aneurysmal development and progression have been attributed to aortic segmental stiffening (of the bifurcational versus infrarenal segment) and aortic pressure elevation, respectively.Central pulsatile pressure not only represents aortic wall stress but also determines cardiac afterload and microvascular wall stress in the brain and kidney. Central pulsatile flow (in both directions) could also affect the flow distribution into the upper and lower parts of the body and control end-organ function. Aortic structural change (including segmental stiffening and aneurysmal formation) causes central

  1. Inflammatory aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bitsch, M; Nørgaard, H H; Røder, O;

    1997-01-01

    operated on for abdominal aortic aneurysms without PF in the same period, served as reference group. RESULTS: Preoperative thickness of PF was assessed as > 1 cm in 11 and cm in 10 patients. Ureterolysis was performed in seven patients where the fibrosis caused ureteral obstruction. Postoperative CT...

  2. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to repair an abdominal aortic aneurysm using a technology called an “endograft,” which is sometimes called the “ ... separate area, and it’s because of this small technology that allows you to do this. Exactly. So ...

  3. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the arteries, which is known as atherosclerosis, high blood pressure, smokers, or a family history of abdominal aortic ... imaging. We can integrate ultrasound imaging, the patient’s blood pressure, and so it’s a little bit like being ...

  4. Techniques for aortic arch endovascular repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    kHONGKU, Kiattisak; Dias, Nuno; Sonesson, Bjorn; Resch, Timothy

    2016-06-01

    This article reviews endovascular strategies for aortic arch repair. Open repair remains the gold standard particularly for good risk patients. Endovascular treatment potentially offers a less invasive repair. Principles, technical considerations, devices and outcomes of each technique are discussed and summarized. Hybrid repair combines less invasive revascularization options, instead of arch replacement while extending stent-graft into the arch. Outcomes vary with regard to extent of repair and aortic arch pathologies treated. Results of arch chimney and other parallel graft techniques perhaps make it a less preferable choice for elective cases. However, they are very appealing options for urgent or bailout situations. Fenestrated stent-grafting is subjected to many technical challenges in aortic arch due to difficulties in stent-graft orientation and fenestration positioning. In situ fenestration techniques emerge to avoid these problems, but durability of stent-grafts after fenestration and ischemic consequences of temporary carotid arteries coverage raises some concern total arch repair using this technique. Arch branched graft is a new technology. Early outcomes did not meet the expectation; however the results have been improving after its learning curve period. Refining stent-graft technologies and implantation techniques positively impact outcomes of endovascular approaches. PMID:26940011

  5. Renal embolism as a primary manifestation of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis endocarditis in a patient with chronic aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimaru, Naoto; Kinami, Saori; Ohnishi, Hisashi; Takagi, Asuka; Kawamoto, Megumi; Doukuni, Ryota; Umezawa, Kanoko; Oozone, Sachiko; Yoshimura, Sho; Sakamoto, Susumu

    2015-06-01

    We report a case of renal embolism as an initial manifestation of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis (SDSE) endocarditis in a patient with chronic aortic dissection. A 37-year-old man who underwent total aortic arch replacement owing to aortic dissection, presented with a 3-h history of fever, chills, and acute right-sided flank pain. The endocarditis affected the native aortic valve and was complicated by a renal embolism. Blood culture results were positive for SDSE. Intravenous penicillin resulted in satisfactory clinical and echocardiographic recovery. PMID:26110298

  6. Shape-based diagnosis of the aortic valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionasec, Razvan Ioan; Tsymbal, Alexey; Vitanovski, Dime; Georgescu, Bogdan; Zhou, S. Kevin; Navab, Nassir; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2009-02-01

    Disorders of the aortic valve represent a common cardiovascular disease and an important public-health problem worldwide. Pathological valves are currently determined from 2D images through elaborate qualitative evalu- ations and complex measurements, potentially inaccurate and tedious to acquire. This paper presents a novel diagnostic method, which identies diseased valves based on 3D geometrical models constructed from volumetric data. A parametric model, which includes relevant anatomic landmarks as well as the aortic root and lea ets, represents the morphology of the aortic valve. Recently developed robust segmentation methods are applied to estimate the patient specic model parameters from end-diastolic cardiac CT volumes. A discriminative distance function, learned from equivalence constraints in the product space of shape coordinates, determines the corresponding pathology class based on the shape information encoded by the model. Experiments on a heterogeneous set of 63 patients aected by various diseases demonstrated the performance of our method with 94% correctly classied valves.

  7. Annular management during aortic valve repair: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunihara, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Annuloplasty is considered to play a key role to control aortic valve regurgitation (AR) and prevent recurrence of AR after aortic valve repair, because aortic root dilatation has emerged as a risk factor for recurrence of AR. Various modifications of annuloplasty have been advocated, however, none of them has become standardized. Thus in this review they are outlined and classified (internal/external, with/without ring, rigid/flexible ring), and their advantages and disadvantages are clarified. Their clinical outcomes seem currently acceptable in general, and external flexible annuloplasty has been performed more frequently with favorable outcomes. However, they are still performed for a minority of patients by special experienced teams with limited follow-up periods. Therefore, it seems too early to determine the superiority or inferiority of each approach. We must carefully conduct evaluation to clarify which approach will become reproducible, effective, and standardized.

  8. First direct aortic retrievable transcatheter aortic valve implantation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, Jaya; Glover, Chris; Labinaz, Marino; Ruel, Marc

    2014-11-01

    We describe 2 cases in which transcatheter aortic valve implantation was performed with a Portico prosthesis (St Jude Medical, St Paul, MN) through a direct aortic approach. In 1 of the cases, prosthesis retrieval was needed during the procedure and was essential to the successful outcome. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of direct aortic Portico prosthesis implantation, and it highlights the significance of the retrievable nature of this device. PMID:25442452

  9. Resultados de pacientes submetidos à cirurgia de substituição valvar aórtica usando próteses mecânicas ou biológicas Outcomes of patients subjected to aortic valve replacement surgery using mechanical or biological prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Silveira de Almeida

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Esse estudo avalia resultados em pacientes submetidos à cirurgia para troca valvar aórtica utilizando substituto biológico ou mecânico, com poder de relevância na seleção do tipo da prótese. MÉTODOS: Foram selecionados, randomicamente, 301 pacientes submetidos à cirurgia para troca valvar aórtica entre 1990 e 2005, com seguimento máximo de 20 anos. RESULTADOS: Sobrevivência em 5, 10 e 15 anos após cirurgia utilizando substituto mecânico foi de 83,9%, 75,4% e 60,2% e, para substituto biológico, foi de 89,3%, 70,4% e 58,4%, respectivamente (P=0,939. Fatores associados com óbito foram: idade, obesidade, doença pulmonar, arritmias, eventos hemorrágicos e insuficiência valvar aórtica. Probabilidade livre de reoperação desses pacientes em 5, 10 e 15 anos após cirurgia utilizando substituto mecânico foi de 97,9%, 95,8% e 95,8% e, para bioprótese, foi de 94,6%, 91,0% e 83,3%, respectivamente (P=0,057. Fatores associados com reoperação foram: insuficiência renal, endocardite de prótese e idade. Probabilidade livre de eventos hemorrágicos em 5, 10 e 15 anos após cirurgia utilizando substituto mecânico foi de 94,5%, 91,7% e 91,7% e, para bioprótese, foi de 98,6%, 97,8% e 97,8%, respectivamente (P=0,047. Fatores associados com eventos hemorrágicos foram: insuficiência renal e prótese mecânica. CONCLUSÕES: Os autores concluíram que: 1 mortalidade foi estatisticamente semelhante entre os grupos; 2 características basais dos pacientes foram os maiores determinantes de mortalidade tardia após a cirurgia; 3 houve tendência à reoperação para o grupo com bioprótese; 4 pacientes com prótese mecânica tiveram mais eventos hemorrágicos ao longo do tempo; 5 dados encontrados no presente estudo são concordantes com a literatura atualOBJECTIVE: This paper evaluates outcomes in patients subjected to surgery for replacement of the aortic valve using biological or mechanical substitutes, where selection of the

  10. Tobacco smoking and aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Birgitte F; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Grønbæk, Morten;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We determined the predictive power of tobacco smoking on aortic aneurysm as opposed to other risk factors in the general population. METHODS: We recorded tobacco smoking and other risk factors at baseline, and assessed hospitalization and death from aortic aneurysm in 15,072 individuals...... General Population Study, respectively. According to the magnitude of the hazard ratios, tobacco consumption was the most important risk factor for hospitalization and death from aortic aneurysm, followed by male sex and hypertension in both cohorts. The population attributable risk of aortic aneurysm...... outcomes due to tobacco consumption was 64% and 47% in the Copenhagen City Heart Study and Copenhagen General Population Study, respectively, and ranked highest among population attributable risks of aortic aneurysm in both cohorts. The absolute 10-year risk for hospitalization or death from aortic...

  11. [Heart valves after 22 years - good long-term function of aortic homograft, advanced impairment in function of atrioventricular valves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Błazej; Chrzanowski, Lukasz; Krzemińska-Pakula, Maria; Kasprzak, Jarosław D

    2010-03-01

    We report a case of a 61-year-old female patient with a history of aortic valve replacement, who was admitted to our hospital with symptoms and signs of decompensated heart failure (NYHA class III). Transthoracic echocardiogram revealed mitral valve and tricuspid valve regurgitation (III grade) with normal function of aortic valve homograft implanted 22 years ago. The patient underwent cardiosurgical mitral valve replacement and tricuspid valve annuloplasty with very good result. An aortic valve homograft may be the best alternative to a mechanical valves for a young female patients. PMID:20411462

  12. Upper gastrointestinal obstruction secondary to aortoduodenal syndrome owing to a noninflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahill, Kevin

    2012-01-31

    Aortoduodenal syndrome is a rare complication of an abdominal aortic aneurysm wherein the aneurysm sac obstructs the patient\\'s duodenum. It presents with the symptoms of an upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction and requires surgical intervention to relieve it. Previously, gastric bypass surgery was advocated, but now aortic replacement is the mainstay of treatment. We report a case of a 67-year-old woman whose aortoduodenal syndrome was successfully managed and review the literature on this topic.

  13. St. Jude Medical Trifecta aortic valve: results from a prospective regional multicentre registry

    OpenAIRE

    Mariscalco, Giovanni; Mariani, Silvia; Bichi, Samuele; Biondi, Andrea; Blasio, Andrea De; Borsani, Paolo; Corti, Fabrizio; Chiara, Benedetta De; Gherli, Riccardo; Leva, Cristian; Russo, Claudio Francesco; Tasca, Giordano; Vanelli, Paolo; Alfieri, Ottavio; Antona, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Background The Trifecta aortic bioprosthesis (St. Jude Medical, Inc., St. Paul, MN, USA) is a stented pericardial heart valve with excellent preliminary results. Aim of the study was to evaluate its early clinical and hemodynamic performances in a multicenter regional registry. Methods Between January 2011 and June 2012, 178 consecutive patients undergoing aortic valve replacement with the Trifecta bioprosthesis were prospectively enrolled at 9 Italian centers. Clinical and echocardiographic ...

  14. Cost effectiveness of aortic valve therapies: a systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Battaglia

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: we performed a systematic review on the cost effectiveness of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI to standard aortic valve replacement and medical management in high-risk elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis.Methods: in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses, a systematic review on current literature for cost-effectiveness of TAVI, standard aortic valve replacement, and medical management for elderly patients with high-risk severe aortic stenosis was performed. Incremental cost effectiveness ratio is used to measure effectiveness through life years gained or quality adjusted life years. Drummond checklist was used to further assess the quality of the included studies.Results: the systematic literature search identified 4 primary publications (derived from 52 citations that fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Tremendous discrepancy in incremental cost effectiveness ratio is demonstrated with operable patients similar to Cohort A of the PARTNER trial (€ 749 416 and € 39 577. Inoperable patients similar to Cohort B of the PARTNER trial suggest notable differences in favour for transcatheter aortic valve implantation with an increase in quality adjusted life years (0.06 versus 1.6, respectively. With lifetime horizon to transcatheter aortic valve implantation there is a more comparable incremental cost effectiveness ratio in the literature (€ 38 260 and € 37 432. Lowest incremental cost effectiveness ratio witnessed in the technical inoperable group at € 26 482. Lifetime horizon of 10 years with transcatheter aortic valve implantation differ (€ 39 388 versus € 19 947. Overall, a review of the literature suggests TAVI usage in patients for severe aortic stenosis whom are not eligible for surgery. All the studies were overall judged of medium-high quality.Conclusions: transcatheter aortic valve replacement is more cost effective with a lifetime horizon for the

  15. Infrarenal Aortic Occlusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, L. W.; Baker, J. D.; Dainko, E. A.; Machleder, H. I.

    1978-01-01

    Twenty-eight patients with total occlusion of the infrarenal aorta have been seen at the UCLA Hospitals in the past 11 years. Claudication was the presenting complaint in all but one patient, with one-third having ischemic rest pain. The average age of these patients was 54 years, and their histories revealed a surprising absence of myocardial infarction, stroke, or diabetes, although 40% had essential hypertension. Heavy tobacco use, however, was characteristic of the entire group. Arteriography proved valuable in identifying and characterizing the vascular abnormalities, but posed problems in technique and interpretation. Significant distal arterial disease was detected radiographically in only 21% of these patients. Operative correction of the aortic occlusion was performed on 26 patients, 18 by aortic bypass grafts and eight by aorto-iliac endarterectomy, with one early postoperative death. Although the thrombus extended to the renal artery origins in 77% of the cases, a well-designed technical approach did not require renal artery occlusion. Using serial creatinine determinations, one case of renal insufficiency was detected which was associated with prolonged postoperative hypotension. Although the extent of distal disease was more severe in those who underwent bypass, symptoms of claudication returned earlier and were more prominent in the endarterectomy group. This recurrence of systems was not favorably altered by sympathectomy performed concomitantly with the initial procedure. Even though this condition seems to pose difficult technical obstacles and has a poor prognosis, infrarenal aortic occlusion can be successfully treated by aortic bypass, with favorable long-term results, if particular attention is paid to elements of the preoperative evaluation and the intraoperative technical requirements peculiar to this relatively uncommon disease entity. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3. PMID:646479

  16. Micromanaging Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Maegdefessel

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA disease to human morbidity and mortality has increased in the aging, industrialized world. In response, extraordinary efforts have been launched to determine the molecular and pathophysiological characteristics of the diseased aorta. This work aims to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to limit AAA expansion and, ultimately, rupture. Contributions from multiple research groups have uncovered a complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory milieu, which is believed to be essential for maintaining aortic vascular homeostasis. Recently, novel small noncoding RNAs, called microRNAs, have been identified as important transcriptional and post-transcriptional inhibitors of gene expression. MicroRNAs are thought to “fine tune” the translational output of their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs by promoting mRNA degradation or inhibiting translation. With the discovery that microRNAs act as powerful regulators in the context of a wide variety of diseases, it is only logical that microRNAs be thoroughly explored as potential therapeutic entities. This current review summarizes interesting findings regarding the intriguing roles and benefits of microRNA expression modulation during AAA initiation and propagation. These studies utilize disease-relevant murine models, as well as human tissue from patients undergoing surgical aortic aneurysm repair. Furthermore, we critically examine future therapeutic strategies with regard to their clinical and translational feasibility.

  17. Image quality and diagnostic accuracy of unenhanced SSFP MR angiography compared with conventional contrast-enhanced MR angiography for the assessment of thoracic aortic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnam, Mayil S. [University of California, Cardiovascular and Thoracic Imaging, UCI Medical Center, Irvine, CA (United States); Tomasian, Anderanik; Malik, Sachin; Ruehm, Stefan G. [University of California at Los Angeles, Department of Radiological Sciences, Ronald Reagan Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Desphande, Vibhas; Laub, Gerhard [Siemens Medical Solutions, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2010-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the image quality and diagnostic accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) unenhanced steady state free precession (SSFP) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) for the evaluation of thoracic aortic diseases. Fifty consecutive patients with known or suspected thoracic aortic disease underwent free-breathing ECG-gated unenhanced SSFP MRA with non-selective radiofrequency excitation and contrast-enhanced (CE) MRA of the thorax at 1.5 T. Two readers independently evaluated the two datasets for image quality in the aortic root, ascending aorta, aortic arch, descending aorta, and origins of supra-aortic arteries, and for abnormal findings. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were determined for both datasets. Sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of unenhanced SSFP MRA for the diagnosis of aortic abnormalities were determined. Abnormal aortic findings, including aneurysm (n = 47), coarctation (n = 14), dissection (n = 12), aortic graft (n = 6), intramural hematoma (n = 11), mural thrombus in the aortic arch (n = 1), and penetrating aortic ulcer (n = 9), were confidently detected on both datasets. Sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of SSFP MRA for the detection of aortic disease were 100% with CE-MRA serving as a reference standard. Image quality of the aortic root was significantly higher on SSFP MRA (P < 0.001) with no significant difference for other aortic segments (P > 0.05). SNR and CNR values were higher for all segments on SSFP MRA (P < 0.01). Our results suggest that free-breathing navigator-gated 3D SSFP MRA with non-selective radiofrequency excitation is a promising technique that provides high image quality and diagnostic accuracy for the assessment of thoracic aortic disease without the need for intravenous contrast material. (orig.)

  18. Novel pharmacological strategies to prevent aortic complications in Marfan syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Matt, Peter; Eckstein, Friedrich

    2011-01-01

    The Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a systemic connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in the FBN1 gene. Recent molecular studies, most performed in mouse models, revealed that the MFS is more a developmental abnormality with broad and complex effects on the morphogenesis and function of multiple organ systems. FBN1 haploinsufficiency and dysregulated transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling seem to be critical for clinical manifestations in MFS including aortic root dilatation. Aort...

  19. Análise ultra-estrutural do miocárdio usando solução cardioplégica cristalóide com e sem procaína em pacientes submetidos à troca valvar aórtica Ultrastructural study of the myocardium using cardioplegic crystalloid solution with and without procaine in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Henrique Dussin

    2008-09-01

    replacement in the Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre over a 10-month period were studied. They were randomly allocated into two groups: group A - eight patients receiving cardioplegia without procaine; group B - ten patients receiving cardioplegia with procaine. Myocardial biopsies were performed in three different periods: 1st - before ischemic arrest, 2nd - at the end of ischemic arrest, and 3rd -15 minutes after reperfusion. RESULTS: The ultra structural analysis comparing the groups in the three moments did not show any statistically significant difference. The mean score in group A at moment I, II and III was 0.1 ± 0.2; 0.4 ± 0.3; 0.4 ± 0.4, and group B 0.2 ± 0.2; 0.4 ± 0.3; 0.7 ± 0.2. Comparative analysis of CK-MB was similar. The spontaneous return to sinus rhythm after aortic declamping in group B occurred in 70% and in group A 12.5% (p=0.024. CONCLUSION: Both cardioplegic solutions tested were equally effective in myocardial preservation, and we could not demonstrate at the ultrastructural level any benefit when procaine was added. The spontaneous return to sinus rhythm after aortic declamping was significantly greater when procaine was added.

  20. Transcatheter, valve-in-valve transapical aortic and mitral valve implantation, in a high risk patient with aortic and mitral prosthetic valve stenoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter valve implantation continues to grow worldwide and has been used principally for the nonsurgical management of native aortic valvular disease-as a potentially less invasive method of valve replacement in high-risk and inoperable patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. Given the burden of valvular heart disease in the general population and the increasing numbers of patients who have had previous valve operations, we are now seeing a growing number of high-risk patients presenting with prosthetic valve stenosis, who are not potential surgical candidates. For this high-risk subset transcatheter valve delivery may be the only option. Here, we present an inoperable patient with severe, prosthetic valve aortic and mitral stenosis who was successfully treated with a trans catheter based approach, with a valve-in-valve implantation procedure of both aortic and mitral valves.

  1. The aortic ejection fraction: A new technique for diagnosing aortic insufficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantor, J.C.; Siegel, M.E.; Colletti, P.; McKay, C.; Lee, K.; Halls, J.; Jacobs, L.; Yamauchi, D.; Rahimtoola, S.

    1984-01-01

    Pulsations of the ascending aorta during fluoroscopy in patients (pts) with aortic insufficiency (AI) have been described. The authors observed a similar phenomenon in pts undergoing scintiangiography who have documented AI. This paper describes a technique to validate and quantitate this observation. The authors studied 17 patients with AI documented by cardiac catheterization and 14 subjects of a demographically matched control group with no evidence of AI. First pass studies were acquired in the RAO 15/sup 0/ projection after a bolus of 20 mCi of Tc-99m pertechnetate. After framing, identical ROI's were placed over the proximal aorta during systole and diastole excluding activity of the pulmonary arteries and/or atria. An aortic ejection fraction (AEF) was determined. The calculated AEF data was correlated with the presence or absence of AI. The mean AEF from the group of 17 patients was 26.9 +- 7.0, while the mean for the non AI group was 12.0 +- 6.5. These are statistically different at the P < .01 level. An AEF of 18 optimally separates the 2 groups with a sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 88%, 86%, and 87% respectively. Preliminary data demonstrates a mean reduction in AEF of 14.6 units in the AI patients who, to date, have undergone aortic valve replacement. Initial data suggests that this technique, using the AEF, may be able to identify patients with AI without the task of isolating the right ventricle.

  2. Calcific Aortic Stenosis: Lessons Learned from Experimental and Clinical Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Rajamannan, Nalini M

    2008-01-01

    Calcific aortic stenosis is the most common indication for surgical valve replacement in the United States. For years this disease has been described as a passive degenerative process during which serum calcium attaches to the valve surface and binds to the leaflet to form nodules. Therefore, surgical treatment of this disease has been the approach towards relieving outflow obstruction in these patients. Recent studies demonstrate an association between atherosclerosis and its risk factors fo...

  3. Effects of partial replacing NO3--N with amino acid on yield, quality and root secretion of pakchoi (Brassica chinensis L. )%氨基酸部分替代硝态氮对小白菜产量、品质及根际分泌物的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹小闯; 吴良欢; 陈贤友; 韩科峰

    2012-01-01

    Effects of partial (20%) replacing NO3--N with Gly, Glu and mixed amino acids in the nutrient solution on biomass, quality and root secretion of pakchoi (Brassica chinensis L. ) were studied under the partial sterile hydroponics cultivation. Compared to the single nitrate treatment, the 20% partial replacing NO3--N with amino acids could significantly reduce biomass with decreasing of nitrate and soluble starch content in the edible part of pakchoi after 24 day' s treatment. The nitrate and soluble starch contents in the treatment of 20% replacing of NO3--N by Glu are lowest at 1490. 8 mg/kg and 1.77 mg/g, while the contents of soluble protein, soluble sugar, free amino acid and total N in leaves and roots are improved. The treatments of partial replacing NO3--N could change the root morphology structure and root activity, and the contents of NH4+ -N, free amino acids, total organicC, total N and soluble protein are also significantly increased in the treatments of 20% Gly and 20% of mixed amino acid replacing NO~-N. Compared to the treatment of single nitrate, the ratios of organic nitrogen to total nitrogen in the root secretions are increased by 5.6%, 11.2% and 12. 8% in the treatments of 20% Gly, 20% Glu and 20% of mixed amino acids replacing NO3 -N, respectively. Therefore, partial replacement of NO3 by amino acids could improve the quality of pakchoi, there is a negative relationship between the biomass of pakchoiand the root secretion (0. 7 〈 r 〈0. 83 ,P 〈0. 05 ), and the types of amino acid could significantly affect biomass, root morphology structure and the amount of root secretion.%采用局部无菌水培方法,研究了氨基酸部分替代硝态氮对小白菜产量、品质及根际分泌物的影响。结果表明,与单一硝态氮处理相比,20%氨基酸部分替代硝态氮处理小白菜产量下降,硝酸盐及可溶性淀粉含量也显著降低,其中以20%谷氨酸(Glu)处理最低,分别为1490.8 mg/kg、1.77 mg/g

  4. Abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gefke, K; Schroeder, T V; Thisted, B;

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify patients who need longer care in the ICU (more than 48 hours) following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery and to evaluate the influence of perioperative complications on short- and long-term survival and quality of life. AAA surgery was performed in 553......, 78% stated that their quality of life had improved or was unchanged after surgery and had resumed working. These data justify a therapeutically aggressive approach, including ICU therapy following AAA surgery, despite failure of one or more organ systems....

  5. Unoperated aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perko, M J; Nørgaard, M; Herzog, T M;

    1995-01-01

    . No significant differences in survival for patients with dissecting and nondissecting AA were detected. In all, 132 patients (78%) died and 78 (59%) of them died of rupture. Mean time to rupture was 1,300 +/- 8 days. Cumulative 5-year hazard of rupture for the dissecting AA was twice that of the nondissecting (p......From 1984 to 1993, 1,053 patients were admitted with aortic aneurysm (AA) and 170 (15%) were not operated on. The most frequent reason for nonoperative management was presumed technical inoperability. Survivals for patients with thoracic, thoracoabdominal, and abdominal AA were comparable...

  6. Combined procedure of heart transplantation and ascending aorta replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, João Gonçalves; Estefanía, Rafael Hernández; Delgado, Cristian; Del Barrio, Loreto García; Rábago, Gregorio

    2016-06-01

    Concomitant heart transplantation and ascending aorta replacement is infrequent. In the few cases where this simultaneous procedure was performed, most patients were diagnosed with Marfan syndrome. We report the combined procedure of heart transplantation and ascending aorta replacement using the donor's ascending aorta, in a 70-year-old man who was not diagnosed with Marfan syndrome. This combined procedure can be performed successfully, providing a potentially life-saving heart transplant for patients with aortic disease of different etiologies. PMID:25737588

  7. Surgical Treatment of Mitral-Aortic Incompetence and Aneurysm of the Ascending Aorta in a Child with Marfan's Syndrome: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Stellin, Giovanni; Bortolotti, Uberto; Faggian, Giuseppe; Livi, Ugolino; Mazzucco, Alessandro; Frigo, Giuseppe; Gallucci, Vincenzo

    1983-01-01

    A 7-year-old girl with Marfan's syndrome developed severe mitral and aortic valve incompetence and aneurysmatic dilatation of the ascending aorta. She underwent successful replacement of the mitral valve, aortic valve, and ascending aorta with coronary reimplantation. After 3 months of follow-up, she continues to be asymptomatic.

  8. Aortic biomechanics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badran, Hala Mahfouz; Soltan, Ghada; Faheem, Nagla; Elnoamany, Mohamed Fahmy; Tawfik, Mohamed; Yacoub, Magdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ventricular-vascular coupling is an important phenomenon in many cardiovascular diseases. The association between aortic mechanical dysfunction and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction is well characterized in many disease entities, but no data are available on how these changes are related in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Aim of the work: This study examined whether HCM alone is associated with an impaired aortic mechanical function in patients without cardiovascular risk factors and the relation of these changes, if any, to LV deformation and cardiac phenotype. Methods: 141 patients with HCM were recruited and compared to 66 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects as control group. Pulse pressure, aortic strain, stiffness and distensibility were calculated from the aortic diameters measured by M-mode echocardiography and blood pressure obtained by sphygmomanometer. Aortic wall systolic and diastolic velocities were measured using pulsed wave Doppler tissue imaging (DTI). Cardiac assessment included geometric parameters and myocardial deformation (strain and strain rate) and mechanical dyssynchrony. Results: The pulsatile change in the aortic diameter, distensibility and aortic wall systolic velocity (AWS') were significantly decreased and aortic stiffness index was increased in HCM compared to control (P < .001) In HCM AWS' was inversely correlated to age(r = − .32, P < .0001), MWT (r = − .22, P < .008), LVMI (r = − .20, P < .02), E/Ea (r = − .16, P < .03) LVOT gradient (r = − 19, P < .02) and severity of mitral regurg (r = − .18, P < .03) but not to the concealed LV deformation abnormalities or mechanical dyssynchrony. On multivariate analysis, the key determinant of aortic stiffness was LV mass index and LVOT obstruction while the role LV dysfunction in aortic stiffness is not evident in this population. Conclusion: HCM is associated with abnormal aortic mechanical properties. The severity of cardiac

  9. Abdominal aortic grafting for spontaneous infrarenal abdominal aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Hiroto; Shibuya, Takashi; Shintani, Takashi; Uenaka, Hisazumi; Suehiro, Shigefumi; Satoh, Hisashi

    2010-02-01

    This case report concerns a 62-year-old woman with spontaneous infrarenal abdominal aortic dissection, which developed into claudication and rest pain in the lower extremity. Multi-row detector computed tomography showed the entry site of the abdominal aortic dissection at the second lumbar artery, while the reentry site was found intraoperatively at the median sacral artery, indicating that the false lumen had progressed and compressed the true lumen. A direct approach involving grafting appears to be an effective procedure for resolving mesenteric and lower extremity hypoperfusion due to aortic dissection with a dilated false channel, even during the acute period. PMID:19879731

  10. Endarterectomy and Aortic Valve Replacement in a Patient with Aortic Stenosis and Calcified Ascending Aorta

    OpenAIRE

    YAMAMOTO, Masato; NIINAMI, Hiroshi; SUDA, Yuji; TAKEUCHI, Yasuo; 山本, 真人; 新浪, 博; 須田, 優司; 竹内, 靖夫

    2004-01-01

    高度に石灰化した大動脈porcelain aortaと狭小弁輪を伴う大動脈弁狭窄症の合併における手術療法において,大動脈を非遮断下に行う方法や有効弁口面積を確保するための様々な方法が報告されている.今回我々は, porcelain aortaおよび狭小弁輪大動脈弁狭窄症の合併症例に対して一部石灰化の及んでいない健常部の大動脈を遮断し, sinotubular junctionを血管内膜切除術後, 19-mm St. Jude Medical prosthetic HP弁を挿入し良好な結果を得たので報告する.症例は65歳,男性.胸部CTで大動脈弁輪から弓部にかけて全周性の石灰化を認め,心臓カテーテル検査で大動脈圧較差は67mmHgの大動脈弁狭窄症を認めたが,冠動脈および左室の壁運動に異常は認めなかった.手術は超低体温循環停止下で大動脈の非遮断による方法を考慮していたが,人工心肺の確立後一部石灰化の及んでいない健常部の大動脈を触診で見出すことができたため中等度低体温下で大動脈を遮断した. sinotubular junctionの高度石灰化のため19-mmのサイザーが通過せず,そのた...

  11. [Estrogen replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søgaard, A J; Berntsen, G K; Magnus, J H; Tollan, A

    1998-02-10

    Recent research on long-term postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) indicates a positive effect on both total mortality and morbidity. This has raised the question of widespread preventive long-term use of HRT. Possible side-effects and ideological issues related to preventive HRT have led to debate and uncertainty among health professionals, in the media, and in the population at large. In order to evaluate the level of knowledge about and attitudes towards HRT, a randomly selected group of 737 Norwegian women aged 16-79 was interviewed by the Central Bureau of Statistics. One in three women had received information about HRT in the last two years, mainly through weekly magazines and physicians. The proportion who answered the questions on knowledge correctly varied from 36% to 47%. Those who had been given information by a physician possessed accurate knowledge, had more positive attitudes towards HRT and were more willing to use HRT than women who had reviewed information through other channels. Women with a higher level of education were better informed and more knowledgeable than others, but were nevertheless more reluctant to use HRT than those who were less educated. The limited number of women who actually receive information on HRT, the low level of knowledge and the ambivalent attitudes toward HRT are a major challenge to the public health service.

  12. iTRAQ proteomic analysis of extracellular matrix remodeling in aortic valve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Rojas, Tatiana; Mourino-Alvarez, Laura; Alonso-Orgaz, Sergio; Rosello-Lleti, Esther; Calvo, Enrique; Lopez-Almodovar, Luis Fernando; Rivera, Miguel; Padial, Luis R; Lopez, Juan Antonio; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Barderas, Maria G

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common worldwide cause of valve replacement. The aortic valve is a thin, complex, layered connective tissue with compartmentalized extracellular matrix (ECM) produced by specialized cell types, which directs blood flow in one direction through the heart. There is evidence suggesting remodeling of such ECM during aortic stenosis development. Thus, a better characterization of the role of ECM proteins in this disease would increase our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms. Aortic valve samples were collected from 18 patients which underwent aortic valve replacement (50% males, mean age of 74 years) and 18 normal control valves were obtained from necropsies (40% males, mean age of 69 years). The proteome of the samples was analyzed by 2D-LC MS/MS iTRAQ methodology. The results showed an altered expression of 13 ECM proteins of which 3 (biglycan, periostin, prolargin) were validated by Western blotting and/or SRM analyses. These findings are substantiated by our previous results demonstrating differential ECM protein expression. The present study has demonstrated a differential ECM protein pattern in individuals with AS, therefore supporting previous evidence of a dynamic ECM remodeling in human aortic valves during AS development. PMID:26620461

  13. [Syphilitic aortic aneurysm. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Halima, A; Ibn Elhadj, Z; Essmat, W; Léfi, A; Kammoun, I; Zouaoui, W; Marrakchi, S; Chine, S; Gargouri, S; Keskes, H; Kachboura, S

    2006-05-01

    The incidence of tertiary syphilis has declined in recent years owing to the early recognition of the disease and use of antibiotics. As a result, syphilitic aortic aneurysms are rarely encountered nowadays. We report the case of a 65 years old man, who was admitted to our hospital in June 2004 for dyspnea, cough and chest discomfort. On physical examination, blood pressure was 130/80 mmHg with no significant laterality, pulse rate was 70 per minute and there was a decrease of breath sounds over the right lung. Laboratory findings revealed a slight elevation of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Serological studies for syphilis showed a positive venereal disease laboratory test (VDRL) at 1/32 and a positive Treponema pallidum hemagglutination test (TPHA) at 1/2560. The chest radiography showed a right para cardiac opacity measuring 16 x 12 cm. Fiber optic bronchoscopy showed an extrinsic compression of the right upper lobar bronchus. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography and 16 multidetector-row spiral computed aortography showed a huge partially thrombosed saccular aneurysm of the ascending aorta measuring 132 mm in diameter. The circulating lumen measured 53 mm in its largest diameter. This aneurysm involved the innominate artery. There was no other arterial involvement. The patient was given a three week course of intravenous penicillin followed by a successful surgical procedure in September 2004 with ascending aortic replacement and innominate artery reimplantation. This case illustrates well a formerly common, but now extremely rare disease.

  14. Roots Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Barnabas

    1998-01-01

    Offers historical information about square roots. Presents three different methods--Hero's method, visual method, and remainder method--which can be used to teach the finding of square roots and one method for determining cube roots. (ASK)

  15. 经食管超声二维斑点追踪成像技术评价主动脉瓣置换术后新发心房颤动的风险%Prediction of postoperative atrial fibrillation after isolated aortic valve replacement by transesophageal two-dimensional speckle tracking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李娅姣; 钱宏; 彭玲; 张尔永; 干昌平; 古君; 蒙炜; 肖正华; 胡佳

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the predictive value of the changes of left ventricular global longitudinal strain (GLS) during aortic valve replacement (AVR) for postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF).Methods Ninety-six patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis and ejection fraction≥ 50% undergoing isolated AVR were enrolled.All patients underwent intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography assessment for GLS,and were followed for the occurrence of POAF during the hospitalization.Results The incidence of POAF was 35/96 (36.5 %).Patients with POAF were associated with increased length of hospitalization and a higher risk of low cardiac output syndrome and pulmonary complications.On univariate analysis,significant risk factors associated with POAF were E/e'ratio,left atrial volume index,GLST2 and △GLS%.On multivariable analysis,GLST2 (OR:1.19,95% CI:1.09-1.35,P =0.022) and △GLS% (OR:2.66 ;95 % CI:1.65-6.79,P <0.001) were independent predictors of POAF.The best cut-off values for the prediction of POAF were GLST2 ≥-1 0.50 % and △GLS% ≥ 1 8.75 %,the latter of which had the highest discriminatory power for POAF.Conclusions A significant reduction of intraoperative GLS provides independent information for predicting POAF in post-AVR patients,and may help to identify high-risk patients who are most likely to benefit from targeted prophylaxis.%目的 探讨经食管超声斑点追踪技术评估瓣膜手术中左心室整体纵向应变预测单纯主动脉瓣置换术后出现新发心房颤动(房颤)的应用价值.方法 纳入96例因主动脉瓣狭窄接受单纯主动脉瓣置换术的患者(术前左室射血分数≥50%),于术中切皮前(T1时刻)和关闭胸骨后(T2时刻)接受经食管超声检查,评估左室整体纵向应变(global longitudinal strain,GLS),监测患者术后住院期间新发房颤情况.结果 术后新发房颤率为36.5% (35/96).合并房颤患者术后住院时间明显延长,出现低心排综合

  16. Characterizing pathways by which gravitropic effectors could move from the root cap to the root of primary roots of Zea mays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.; McClelen, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    Plasmodesmata linking the root cap and root in primary roots Zea mays are restricted to approx. 400 protodermal cells bordering approx. 110000 microns2 of the calyptrogen of the root cap. This area is less than 10% of the cross-sectional area of the root-tip at the cap junction. Therefore, gravitropic effectors moving from the root cap to the root can move symplastically only through a relatively small area in the centre of the root. Decapped roots are non-responsive to gravity. However, decapped roots whose caps are replaced immediately after decapping are strongly graviresponsive. Thus, gravicurvature occurs only when the root cap contacts the root, and symplastic continuity between the cap and root is not required for gravicurvature. Completely removing mucilage from the root tip renders the root non-responsive to gravity. Taken together, these data suggest that gravitropic effectors move apoplastically through mucilage from the cap to the root.

  17. Cognitive Outcomes following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ka Sing Paris Lai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease in the elderly in the Western world and contributes to a large proportion of all deaths over the age of 70. Severe aortic stenosis is conventionally treated with surgical aortic valve replacement; however, the less invasive transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI is suggested for those at high surgical risk. While TAVI has been associated with improved survival and favourable outcomes, there is a higher incidence of cerebral microembolisms in TAVI patients. This finding is of concern given mechanistic links with cognitive decline, a symptom highly prevalent in those with cardiovascular disease. This paper reviews the literature assessing the possible link between TAVI and cognitive changes. Studies to date have shown that global cognition improves or remains unchanged over 3 months following TAVI while individual cognitive domains remain preserved over time. However, the association between TAVI and cognition remains unclear due to methodological limitations. Furthermore, while these studies have largely focused on memory, cognitive impairment in this population may be predominantly of vascular origin. Therefore, cognitive assessment focusing on domains important in vascular cognitive impairment, such as executive dysfunction, may be more helpful in elucidating the association between TAVI and cognition in the long term.

  18. The Replacement of Missing Teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Zarb, George A.

    1988-01-01

    Dentists have used a great deal of ingenuity in replacing lost teeth. Until recently, however, it was not possible to duplicate the natural situation and attach tooth-root analogues to the host bone. Osseointegration allows such an attachment, in which threaded unalloyed titanium implants are placed in the bone by means of a meticulous surgical procedure. The documented successful use of this process has already altered profoundly the predicament of the edentulous patient. The application of ...

  19. [ENDOVASCULAR ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURISM REPAIR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maĭstrenko, D N; Generalov, M I; Tarazov, P G; Zherebtsov, F K; Osovskikh, V V; Ivanov, A S; Oleshchuk, A N; Granov, D A

    2015-01-01

    The authors analyzed the single-center experience of treatment of 72 patients with abdominal aortic aneurisms and severe accompanied pathology. The aneurisms were repaired by stent-grafts. All the patients had abdominal aortic aneurisms with the diameters from 41 to 84 mm against the background of severe somatic pathology. It was a contraindication to planned open surgery. An installation of stent-graft was successful in all 72 follow-ups. It wasn't necessary to use a conversion to open surgery. The follow-up period consisted of 44,6?2,1 months. Control ultrasound and computer tomography studies hadn't revealed an increase of aneurism sack sizes or "eakages". A reduction of abdominal aortic aneurism sizes was noted in 37 patients on 4-5% during first year after operation. The stent-graft implantation extends the possibilities of abdominal aortic aneurism treatment for patients from a high surgical risk group. PMID:26234059

  20. Adult thoracic and abdominal aortic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randa O. Kaddah

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Aortic COA could be found in any segment of the aorta. Proper identification of the anatomical details and pressure gradient studies are important factors affecting the plan of management.

  1. CONGENITAL QUADRICUSPID AORTIC-VALVE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROUWER, MHJ; DEGRAAF, JJ; EBELS, T

    1993-01-01

    Two patients with a quadricuspid aortic valve are described, one of them with concomitant juxtaposed coronary orifices facing the right hand facing sinus. The etiology and incidence of this congenital anomaly will be discussed.

  2. Anterior valve of the pulmonary valve transplantation in the treatment of single aortic valve disease%肺动脉瓣前瓣移植治疗主动脉瓣单瓣病变

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李斌; 赵文增

    2015-01-01

    Objective To discuss the partial pulmonary artery with front valve for aortic root transplantation in the treatment of aortic valve of a single valve lesions.Methods Complete animal experiments in vitro pig heart valve model 18 cases.10 cases of aortic valve group:using part of the pulmonary artery with front disc,a single aortic valve replacement for aortic root transplantation.8 cases pulmonary valve group:Taking part of the pulmonary artery with front disc,pericardial patch shape after pulmonary artery.Results Preoperative aortic cross valve differential pressure pulsation flow state of 2.08 kPa,continuous flow condition of 1.70 kPa.Postoperative aortic cross valve differential pressure pulsation flow state of 3.10 kPa,continuous flow condition of 2.46 kPa.Aortic cross valve pressure difference before and after surgery had no significant change (P > 0.05).Preoperative pulmonary valve across valve differential pressure pulsation flow state of 1.00 kPa,continuous flow condition of 0.77 kPa.Postoperative pulmonary valve across valve differential pressure pulsation flow state of 1.29 kPa,continuous flow condition of 1.04 kPa.Across pulmonary valve differential pressure tban before surgery had no significant change (P > 0.05).Aortic valve and pulmonary valve function well after the surgery,no more than mild reflux.Conclusion Part of the pulmonary artery with front disc showed good hemodynamic status.%目的 探讨肺动脉瓣前瓣移植治疗主动脉瓣单瓣病变的手术方法.方法 完成猪心瓣膜模型18例.主动脉瓣组10例:利用肺动脉瓣前瓣作主动脉根部移植、置换单个主动脉瓣.肺动脉瓣组8例:切取肺动脉瓣前瓣、利用心包修补成形肺动脉.结果 主动脉瓣组术前主动脉瓣跨瓣压差脉动流为2.08 kPa、连续流为1.70 kPa,术后主动脉瓣跨瓣压差脉动流为3.10 kPa、连续流为2.46 kPa,手术前后差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).肺动脉瓣组术前肺动脉瓣跨瓣压差脉动流为1

  3. Postoperative follow-up of Stanford type A aortic dissections with Spiral-CT and MRI: Normal imaging findings and typical complications; Spiral-CT und MRT der operierten Stanford Typ A-Aortendissektion: Verlauf und Komplikationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, T.; Pauleit, D.; Hofer, U.; Preusse, K.; Layer, G.; Schild, H. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Klinik; Abu-Ramadan, D.; Likungu, J. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Herz- und Gefaesschirurgie

    1998-02-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate normal postoperative Spiral-CT and MRI findings and typical complications in patients with aortic repair after Stanford type A aortic dissection. Results: The following postoperative complications were seen: Three pseudoaneurysms which developed at the proximal anastomoses of the Dacron prosthesis in two cases and at the insertion site of the reimplanted left coronary artery after implantation of a composite graft (Bentall procedure) in one case; one re-dissection; one perforation of the false lumen; periprostethic flow in one patient after surgical repair of type A dissection by the graft inclusion technique; progressive dilatation of the false lumen in 4 cases; dilatation of the aortic root in a Marfan patient after replacement of the ascending aorta. Conclusion: Precise knowledge of the surgical technique performed is crucial to accurate postoperative imaging evaluation. MRI is the method of choice in the postoperative follow-up of clinically stable patients with aortic dissections. (orig./AJ) [Deutsch] Ziel: Darstellung der verschiedenen Operationsverfahren bei der Stanford Typ A-Dissektion mit ihren typischen Aspekten in Spiral-CT und MRT sowie ihren spezifischen Komplikationen. Ergebnisse: Folgende postoperative Komplikationen traten auf: Drei Pseudoaneurysmen, die zweimal von der proximalen Anastomose des Aorta-ascendens-Ersatzes sowie einmal von der Insertionsstelle der reimplantierten linken Koronararterie (Operation nach Bentall) ausgingen; eine Re-Dissektion; eine gedeckte Perforation des falschen Lumens; periprothetischer Fluss nach Anwendung der Graft-Inclusion-Technik; progrediente Dilatation des falschen Lumens in 4 Faellen; aneurysmatische Erweiterung des originaeren Aortenbulbus bei einem Marfan-Patienten nach suprakoronarem Aorta-ascendens-Ersatz. Schlussfolgerung: Bei der postoperativen Verlaufskontrolle von Patienten mit Aortendissektionen mittels Spiral-CT und MRT sind Kenntnisse der verschiedenen Operationsverfahren mit

  4. Comparison between three types of stented pericardial aortic valves (Trivalve trial): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Azarnoush, Kasra; Pereira, Bruno; Dualé, Christian; Dorigo, Enrica; Farhat, Mehdi; Innorta, Andrea; Dauphin, Nicolas; Geoffroy, Etienne; Chabrot, Pascal; Camilleri, Lionel

    2013-01-01

    International audience BackgroundAortic valve stenosis is one of the most common heart diseases in older patients. Nowadays, surgical aortic valve replacement is the 'gold standard' treatment for this pathology and the most implanted prostheses are biological ones. The three most implanted bovine bioprostheses are the Trifecta valve (St. Jude Medical, Minneapolis, MN, USA), the Mitroflow valve (Sorin Group, Saluggia, Italy), and the Carpentier-Edwards Magna Ease valve (Edwards Lifesciences...

  5. Chronic contained rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm presenting as a Grynfeltt lumbar hernia. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbeleir, J; Fourneau, I; Maleux, G; Daenens, K; Vandekerkhof, J; Nevelsteen, A

    2007-06-01

    We report a unique case of chronic contained thoraco-abdominal aneurysm rupture presenting as a Grynfeltt lumbar hernia. A 79-year-old man presented with backpain and a bluish swelling in the left lumbar region in the presence of a non tender aortic aneurysm. CT scan confirmed contained rupture of a type IV thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm. The peri-aortic haematoma protruded through the lumbar wall causing a Grynfeltt lumbar hernia. The aneurysm was replaced through a thoraco-phreno-lumbotomy. The patient survived and is doing well six months postoperatively.

  6. Distortion of the CoreValve during transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation due to valve dislocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souteyrand, Geraud, E-mail: gsouteyrand@chu-clermontferrand.fr [Department of Cardiology, Gabriel Montpied Hospital, CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Clermont-Ferrand (France); ERIM-EA3295, University of Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Wilczek, Krzysztof [Department of Cardiology, Medical University of Silesia, Silesian Centre for Herat Diseases, Zabrze (Poland); Innorta, Andrea; Camilleri, Lionel [Department of Cardiology, Gabriel Montpied Hospital, CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Clermont-Ferrand (France); ERIM-EA3295, University of Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Chodor, Piotr [Department of Cardiology, Medical University of Silesia, Silesian Centre for Herat Diseases, Zabrze (Poland); Lusson, Jean-René; Motreff, Pascal [Department of Cardiology, Gabriel Montpied Hospital, CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Clermont-Ferrand (France); ERIM-EA3295, University of Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Laborde, Jean-Claude [St. George' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Chabrot, Pascal; Durel, Nicolas [Department of Cardiology, Gabriel Montpied Hospital, CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Clermont-Ferrand (France); ERIM-EA3295, University of Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand (France)

    2013-09-15

    Nowadays transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an accepted alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement for high-risk patients (pts). Successful TAVI procedures for failed aortic surgical bioprosthesis (TAV-in-SAV) have already been reported. In the presented two cases of TAV-in-SAV implantation a strut distortion of the stent was revealed on angiographic imaging and confirmed on control CT scan. In both procedures, a dislocation of the medtronic core valve (MCV) prosthesis during implantation led to valve retrieval, with a necessity of reloading it in the 18F introducer before subsequent implantation of the same valve in correct position.

  7. Estudo comparativo entre válvulas biológicas e válvulas mecânicas nas posições mitral ou aórtica até 14 anos Comparative study of biological and mechanical prosthesis in mitral and aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingo M Braile

    1988-12-01

    , a menos que existam contra-indicações, e biopróteses para a posição Mi.We studied 1222 patients, who underwent isolated valve replacement; 652 had single mitral (MVR and 570 single aortic (AVR replacement. The patients were classified by sex, age and etiology. In the MVR group, the patients received 126 mechanical prostheses, as follow: 49 Björk-Shiley (B-S; 71 Lillehei-Kaster (L-K; 6 Hall-Kaster (H-K and 526 IMC cardiac prosteses from bovine pericardium (PBIMC. The postoperative follow-up was 95% to 100%. The hospital mortality was 21 % for L-K and 9,5% for PBIMC. The incidence of thrombosis and thromboembolism in events per 100 patients-year was 7.7; 5.6; 6.7 and 1.0 for B-S; L-K; H-K and PBIMC, respectively. The incidence of calcification and tears was 1.8 per 100 patients-years for PBIMC, and did not occur with mechanical prostheses. Only the patients with mechanical prosteses were anticoagulated. In the AVR group, the patients received 336 mechanical prostheses: 92 B-S; 112 L-K; 113 H-K and 234 PBIMC. The postoperative follow-up was 97% to 100%. The hospital mortality was 5.5% for mechanical group, and 2.6% for biological. The incidence of thrombosis and thromboembolism in events per 100 patients-year was 3.0 for B-S; 2.3 for L-K; 2.5 for H-K and 0.3 for PBIMC. Calcification, tear and mechanical failure was 0.54 per 100 patients-year for PBIMC and 0.38 per 100 patients-year for H-K. In the mechanical group, the patients received aspirin and dipiridamole, and 30% of them oral anticoagulants. The authors concluded that the survival, in general manner, isn't related with the type of prosthesis. The incidence of thrombosis and thromboembolism in higher with mechanical valves, and the rate of complications is lower with biological valves. Oral anticoagulation is forceable with mechanical prosthesis in MVR, but unessential in AVR. The bioprosthetic valves don't need anticoagulation. For these reasons, the authors employ by routine, mechanical prostheses for AVR

  8. [Endovascular repair of aortic aneurysm a paradigmatic shift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lönn, Lars Birger

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) is rapid and global. The aim is to replace open surgery as a life-saving treatment. According to randomised controlled studies, abdominal EVAR is a better option than open repair in terms of safety and efficacy in the short run. However......, the overall survival in EVAR patients with severe morbidity is not influenced since mortality in this group is mainly unrelated to the aneurysm. Endovascular repair is also a solid alternative in thoracic pathologies and aortic ruptures. Patient selection and follow-up in EVAR is mainly governed by vascular...... imaging, especially 3-D CT reconstructions. There is a need for an increased number of endovascular specialists in Denmark since an increasing number of patients are suitable for EVAR treatment Udgivelsesdato: 2008/3/10...

  9. [Aortic dissections: recent endovascular therapeutic advances and current indications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskas, F; Cluzel, Ph; Kieffer, E

    2002-12-01

    Dissection is one of the most serious diseases of the aorta if only because of its potential for rupture, but also for other complications which may be fatal. Replacement with a prosthesis remains the treatment of reference as an emergency for proximal dissection and as an elective procedure for selected cases of distal dissection with complications. Despite steady progress in ancillary management (distal perfusion, circulatory arrest, cardiac, neurological and visceral protection) the operation remains a very invasive procedure. Aortic endoprostheses represent the therapeutic innovation of the decade for the treatment of aortic aneurysms and their use could be extended to dissections, at least for the most distal forms and to patients at very high surgical risk. PMID:12611040

  10. The diagnosis and management of abdominal aortic aneurysms: a comparison of computed tomography, ultrasound and aortography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is suggested that all clinically significant abdominal aneurysms can be shown by infusion C.T. or ultrasound and routine aortography is no longer indicated. These methods give more information about wall thickness and wall thrombus but do not give detailed information about the extent of an aneurysm and its exact relationship to important aortic branches. They should complement rather than replace aortography

  11. Analysis of risk factors for valve replacements in 5128 cases from a single heart center in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Li-xin; MENG Xu; ZHANG Zhao-guang; BAI Tao

    2010-01-01

    Background Numerous studies have developed a "severity score" or "risk index" for short-term mortality associated with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Due to the different distribution of disease types, the number of valve surgeries in the US and Europe is relatively small. Thus, a risk-scoring system for valve surgeries was developed later and used less than that for the CABG surgery. We retrospectively reviewed 5128 cases of heart valve replacement, to quantitatively assess the risk factors for hospital mortality, and establish risk models for the hospital mortality of cardiac valve replacement patients.Methods A total of 1549 cases of aortic valve replacement, 2460 cases of mitral valve replacement, and 1119 cases of combined aortic valve and mitral valve replacement that were recorded from January 2005 to December 2009 in the cardiac surgery database at Beijing Anzhen Hospital were selected for this study. The cases were randomly assigned to a indicators were selected as possible influencing factors for hospital mortality. Single-factor analysis was performed to screen these factors, and then multi-factor analysis was used to determine the risk factors for hospital mortality in the three surgeries and to establish risk models.Results In the multi-factor analysis, age, body surface area, etiology, cardiopulmonary bypass time, preoperative cardiothoracic ratio, cardiac functional classification, and preoperative creatinine were risk factors for aortic valve replacement. Etiology, preoperative history of heart failure, cardiopulmonary bypass time, preoperative cardiothoracic ratio, and preoperative left ventricular end systolic diameter were risk factors for mitral valve replacement. Age, body mass index, cardiopulmonary bypass time, and cardiac function classification were risk factors for combined aortic valve and mitral valve replacement. The risk models showed good predictive ability (Hosmer-Lemeshow test: P=0.981 in the model for aortic valve

  12. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... And one of the things that I’m learning from this movie as we looking at these ... quick procedure to replace a major life-threatening problem in the patient’s abdomen. So you can see ...

  13. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the less invasive treatment of this type of problem with something called “stent grafts.” The next slide ... quick procedure to replace a major life-threatening problem in the patient’s abdomen. So you can see ...

  14. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... racquet-like device whether or not there is flow in this sack after we replace in aneurysm. ... space age. That’s fine. Don’t go too high. Pull it down a little bit. Pull that ...

  15. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair for complicated chronic type B aortic dissection in a patient on hemodialysis with recurrent ischemic colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Yuko; Furuyama, Tadashi; Matsubara, Yutaka; Yoshiya, Keiji; Yoshiga, Ryosuke; Inoue, Kentaro; Matsuda, Daisuke; Aoyagi, Yukihiko; Kato, Masaaki; Matsumoto, Takuya; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-12-01

    We present a successful case of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) for chronic Stanford type B aortic dissection (B-AD) with recurrent ischemic colitis. The patient was a 56-year-old woman with abdominal pain as the main complaint who had two operations previously: the total arch replacement 8 years ago and the Bentall 7 years ago for acute Stanford type A aortic dissection. Her abdominal pain worsened as her blood pressure became low during her hemodialysis treatment. An enhanced computed tomography scan was performed on the patient and showed chronic B-AD that occurred from the distal anastomotic part of the total arch graft to the bilateral common iliac arteries. The celiac artery and superior mesenteric artery (SMA) arose from the true lumen, and these were compressed by the expanded false lumen. Her complicated chronic B-AD was treated with the Zenith Dissection Endovascular System, and its procedure was performed as her proximal entry tear was covered by a proximal tapered Zenith TX2 stent graft, supplemented by a noncovered aortic stent extending across both renal arteries, the SMA, and the celiac artery. Seven days after this operation, enhanced computed tomography showed that the patient's true lumen was expanded and her blood flow to the true lumen and SMA was improved. On the other hand, her false lumen tended to be thrombosed. Consequently, she was discharged 10 days after the operation without any postoperative complications as she had no abdominal complaints even though she underwent hemodialysis three times per week after the operation. We believe that TEVAR supplemented by a noncovered aortic stent is an effective treatment, even for highly chronic B-AD in dialysis patients. PMID:27090121

  16. Catheterization-Doppler discrepancies in nonsimultaneous evaluations of aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghassi, Payam; Aurigemma, Gerard P; Folland, Edward D; Tighe, Dennis A

    2005-05-01

    Prior validation studies have established that simultaneously measured catheter (cath) and Doppler mean pressure gradients (MPG) correlate closely in evaluation of aortic stenosis (AS). In clinical practice, however, cath and Doppler are rarely performed simultaneously; which may lead to discrepant results. Accordingly, our aim was to ascertain agreement between these methods and investigate factors associated with discrepant results. We reviewed findings in 100 consecutive evaluations for AS performed in 97 patients (mean age 72 +/- 10 yr) in which cath and Doppler were performed within 6 weeks. We recorded MPG, aortic valve area (AVA), cardiac output, and ejection fraction (EF) by both methods. Aortic root diameter, left ventricular end-diastolic dimension (LVIDd) and posterior wall thickness (PWT) were measured by echocardiography and gender, heart rate, and heart rhythm were also recorded. An MPG discrepancy was defined as an intrapatient difference > 10 mmHg. Mean pressure gradients by cath and Doppler were 36 +/- 22 mmHg and 37 +/- 20 mmHg, respectively (P = 0.73). Linear regression showed good correlation (r = 0.82) between the techniques. An MPG discrepancy was found in 36 (36%) of 100 evaluations; in 19 (53%) of 36 evaluations MPG by Doppler was higher than cath, and in 17 (47%) of 36, it was lower. In 33 evaluations, EF differed by >10% between techniques. Linear regression analyses revealed that EF difference between studies was a significant predictor of MPG discrepancy (P = 0.004). Women had significantly higher MPG than men by both cath and Doppler (43 +/- 25 mmHg versus 29 +/- 15 mmHg [P = 0.001]; 42 +/- 23 mmHg versus 32 +/- 15 mmHg [P = 0.014], respectively). Women exhibited discrepant results in 23 (47%) of 49 evaluations versus 13 (25%) of 51 evaluations in men (P = 0.037). After adjustment for women's higher MPG, there was no statistically significant difference in MPG discrepancy between genders (P = 0.22). No significant interactions between

  17. ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURYSM (AAA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh G

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available AAA is defined as a distension of the infrarenal aorta by more than 50% (or 1.5 times compared with a corresponding healthy, aged and gender matched population. AAA afflicts 1 to 6 % of the general population aged more than 60 years and the incidence rises by approximately 0.15% annually. When the definition of a maximum external diameter ≥3 cm is used, the prevalence of AAA is upto 6 times greater in men than in women. AAAs are much more common than thoracic aortic aneurysms. Most common cause of AAA is atherosclerosis (95%. Less common causes include infectious or inflammatory origin or those associated with connective tissue disorders. Process of AAA formation is multifactorial. Other than the general risk factors for atherosclerosis, genetic predispo s iti on, aut o immunity and hemodynamic factors all play roles in its formation. AAA is 1.5 times more frequent in hypert ensive patients. Smokers have 8 times risk for developing AAA. The existence of familial aggre gation of AAA implicates genetic factors in the etiology of AAA. Women with AAA are more likely to have a positive family history of this disorder. Those with a family history of AAA have an increased risk of 30%, and their aneurysms tend to occur at a younger age and carry a greater risk of rupture than do sporadic aneurysms.

  18. Abdominal aortic feminism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-01-01

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer.

  19. Aortic dissection with the entrance tear in transverse aorta: analysis of 12 autopsy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, C S; Roberts, W C

    1990-11-01

    Clinical and autopsy findings are described in 12 patients who had fatal aortic dissection with the entrance tear in the transverse aorta. The 12 patients represent 7% of 182 autopsies of spontaneous aortic dissection studied by us. The ages of the 12 patients at death ranged from 37 to 87 years (mean, 67 years). Eight were men; 8 had a history of systemic hypertension, and 10 had hearts of increased weight. Diagnosis of aortic dissection was made during life in only 4 of the 12 patients. All 12 patients died of rupture of the false channel within 2 weeks of onset of signs or symptoms compatible with dissection. The direction of aortic dissection from the entrance tear was entirely retrograde in 4 patients, entirely anterograde in 4 patients, and in both directions in 4 patients. Hemopericardium occurred in the first group, left hemothorax in the second group, and either in the last group. Of the 8 patients in whom the ascending aorta was involved, the retrograde dissection in each extended to the aortic root, 6 had pulmonary adventitial hemorrhage, and 4 had involvement of the arch arteries by dissection. In the 4 patients with strictly anterograde dissection, none had dissection in the arch arteries. Thus, tear in the transverse aorta causes a dissection that is usually fata, that often dissects retrogradely, and that may mimic dissection from a tear in ascending aorta. Aortic dissection from a tear in transverse aorta requires early operative intervention. PMID:2241339

  20. Open aortic surgery after thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coselli, Joseph S; Spiliotopoulos, Konstantinos; Preventza, Ourania; de la Cruz, Kim I; Amarasekara, Hiruni; Green, Susan Y

    2016-08-01

    In the last decade, thoracic endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (TEVAR) has emerged as an appealing alternative to the traditional open aortic aneurysm repair. This is largely due to generally improved early outcomes associated with TEVAR, including lower perioperative mortality and morbidity. However, it is relatively common for patients who undergo TEVAR to need a secondary intervention. In select circumstances, these secondary interventions are performed as an open procedure. Although it is difficult to assess the rate of open repairs after TEVAR, the rates in large series of TEVAR cases (>300) have ranged from 0.4 to 7.9 %. Major complications of TEVAR that typically necessitates open distal aortic repair (i.e., repair of the descending thoracic or thoracoabdominal aorta) include endoleak (especially type I), aortic fistula, endograft infection, device collapse or migration, and continued expansion of the aneurysm sac. Conversion to open repair of the distal aorta may be either elective (as for many endoleaks) or emergent (as for rupture, retrograde complicated dissection, malperfusion, and endograft infection). In addition, in select patients (e.g., those with a chronic aortic dissection), unrepaired sections of the aorta may progressively dilate, resulting in the need for multiple distal aortic repairs. Open repairs after TEVAR can be broadly classified as full extraction, partial extraction, or full salvage of the stent-graft. Although full and partial stent-graft extraction imply failure of TEVAR, such failure is generally absent in cases where the stent-graft can be fully salvaged. We review the literature regarding open repair after TEVAR and highlight operative strategies.

  1. Aortic valve surgery: what is the future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudorović, Narcis

    2008-04-01

    Modern surgical treatment for aortic valve disease has undergone significant improvements in all areas of this procedure. Successful treatment strategies for cardiovascular diseases have often been initiated and driven by surgeons. Radical excision of diseased tissue, repair and replacement strategies lead to long-term successful treatment of the underlying diseases and clearly improved patient outcome. In highly developed nations, valve surgery will be increasing applied in older people, with more co-morbidities and a higher incidence of concomitant coronary artery disease. Cardiovascular surgeons will be facing increased competition from the catheter-based procedures; these are already applied clinically, and their numbers will rise in near future. Right now interventional cardiologists supported by some cardiac surgeons are on their way to transform some conventional open surgical procedures into catheter-based less invasive interventions, such as valve repair and replacement. Cardiovascular surgery is undergoing a rapid transformation; socio-economic factors and recent advances in medical technology contribute to these changes. Further developments will come, and surgeons with all their expertise in the treatment of valvular heart disease need to be part of it. Cardiovascular surgeons have to adapt the exciting new approaches of transapical and transfemoral transcatheter valve implantation techniques. PMID:17573248

  2. Proteomic profile of human aortic stenosis: insights into the degenerative process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Rojas, Tatiana; Gil-Dones, Felix; Lopez-Almodovar, Luis F; Padial, Luis R; Vivanco, Fernando; Barderas, Maria G

    2012-03-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis is the most common worldwide cause of valve replacement. While it shares certain risk factors with coronary artery disease, it is not delayed or reversed by reducing exposure to risk factors (e.g., therapies that lower lipids). Therefore, it is necessary to better understand its pathophysiology for preventive measures to be taken. In this work, aortic valve samples were collected from 20 patients that underwent aortic valve replacement (55% males, mean age of 74 years) and 20 normal control valves were obtained from necropsies (40% males, mean age of 69 years). The proteome of the samples was analyzed by quantitative differential electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry, and 35 protein species were clearly increased in aortic valves, including apolipoprotein AI, alpha-1-antitrypsin, serum albumin, lumican, alfa-1-glycoprotein, vimentin, superoxide dismutase Cu-Zn, serum amyloid P-component, glutathione S-transferase-P, fatty acid-binding protein, transthyretin, and fibrinogen gamma. By contrast, 8 protein species were decreased (transgelin, haptoglobin, glutathione peroxidase 3, HSP27, and calreticulin). All of the proteins identified play a significant role in cardiovascular processes, such as fibrosis, homeostasis, and coagulation. The significant changes observed in the abundance of key cardiovascular proteins strongly suggest that they can be involved in the pathogenesis of degenerative aortic stenosis. Further studies are warranted to better understand this process before we can attempt to modulate it. PMID:22276806

  3. Clinical Implications of Electrocardiographic Left Ventricular Strain and Hypertrophy in Asymptomatic Patients with Aortic Stenosis: The Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders M; Boman, Kurt; Gohlke-Baerwolf, Christa;

    2012-01-01

    in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study. Primary endpoint was the first of myocardial infarction, non-hemorrhagic stroke, heart failure, aortic valve replacement (AVR) or cardiovascular death. Predictive value of electrocardiographic LV strain (defined as T-wave inversion in leads V(4.......1, both p=0.001) and 2.5-fold higher risk of a combined endpoint of myocardial infarction, heart failure or cardiovascular death (95% CI, 1.3 to 4.9, p=0.008). CONCLUSIONS: Electrocardiographic LV strain and LVH were independently predictive of poor prognosis in asymptomatic AS. CLINICAL TRIAL......BACKGROUND: The prognostic impact of electrocardiographic left ventricular (LV) strain and hypertrophy (LVH) in asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) is not well described. METHODS AND RESULTS: Data were obtained in asymptomatic patients randomized to simvastatin/ezetimibe combination vs. placebo...

  4. Root fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg; Tsilingaridis, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth loss after root fractures and to assess the influence of the type of healing and the location of the root fracture. Furthermore, the actual cause of tooth loss was analyzed.......The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth loss after root fractures and to assess the influence of the type of healing and the location of the root fracture. Furthermore, the actual cause of tooth loss was analyzed....

  5. SU-C-18C-02: Specifcation of X-Ray Projection Angles Which Are Aligned with the Aortic Valve Plane From a Planar Image of a Valvuloplasty Balloon Inflated Across the Aortic Valve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fetterly, K; Mathew, V [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures provide a method to implant a prosthetic aortic valve via a minimallyinvasive, catheter-based procedure. TAVR procedures require use of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane to minimize prosthetic valve positioning error due to x-ray imaging parallax. The purpose of this work is to calculate the continuous range of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane from a single planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve. Methods: Computational methods to measure the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve were developed. Required inputs include a planar x-ray image of a known valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and specifications of x-ray imaging geometry from the DICOM header of the image. A-priori knowledge of the species-specific typical range of aortic orientation is required to specify the sign of the angle of the long axis of the balloon with respect to the x-ray beam. The methods were validated ex-vivo and in a live pig. Results: Ex-vivo experiments demonstrated that the angular orientation of a stationary inflated valvuloplasty balloon can be measured with precision less than 1 degree. In-vivo pig experiments demonstrated that cardiac motion contributed to measurement variability, with precision less than 3 degrees. Error in specification of x-ray geometry directly influences measurement accuracy. Conclusion: This work demonstrates that the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve can be calculated precisely from a planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and known x-ray geometry. This method could be used to determine appropriate c-arm angular projections during TAVR procedures to minimize x-ray imaging parallax and thereby minimize prosthetic valve positioning errors.

  6. SU-C-18C-02: Specifcation of X-Ray Projection Angles Which Are Aligned with the Aortic Valve Plane From a Planar Image of a Valvuloplasty Balloon Inflated Across the Aortic Valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures provide a method to implant a prosthetic aortic valve via a minimallyinvasive, catheter-based procedure. TAVR procedures require use of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane to minimize prosthetic valve positioning error due to x-ray imaging parallax. The purpose of this work is to calculate the continuous range of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane from a single planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve. Methods: Computational methods to measure the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve were developed. Required inputs include a planar x-ray image of a known valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and specifications of x-ray imaging geometry from the DICOM header of the image. A-priori knowledge of the species-specific typical range of aortic orientation is required to specify the sign of the angle of the long axis of the balloon with respect to the x-ray beam. The methods were validated ex-vivo and in a live pig. Results: Ex-vivo experiments demonstrated that the angular orientation of a stationary inflated valvuloplasty balloon can be measured with precision less than 1 degree. In-vivo pig experiments demonstrated that cardiac motion contributed to measurement variability, with precision less than 3 degrees. Error in specification of x-ray geometry directly influences measurement accuracy. Conclusion: This work demonstrates that the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve can be calculated precisely from a planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and known x-ray geometry. This method could be used to determine appropriate c-arm angular projections during TAVR procedures to minimize x-ray imaging parallax and thereby minimize prosthetic valve positioning errors

  7. Presentation of an uncommon form of aortic dissection and rupture in Marifoan syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Marfan syndrome, aneurysmatic enlargement of ascending aorta and dissection starting at the root are the most common cardiovascular complications. We present an infrequent case of a 15-year-old patient with a typical case of Marfan syndrome. CT disclosed an aorta and aortic arch of normal size with dissection originating distally with respect to the point where left subclavian artery arises. The disecction extended to descending aorta and to iliac and femoral arteries. Aortic rupture occurred in the arch, with massive hemothorax. The CT findings were confirmed at necropsy. 9 refs

  8. A Rare Cause of Foot Pain in the Emergency Room: an Aortic Dissection Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korkut S et al.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Aortic dissection is a fatal condition that can originate from any point of the aorta between the root of the aorta and iliac bifurcation so it necessitates early diagnosis and treatment. The most common sign is pain and it may appear in the chest, neck, back or interscapular area. Additionally, it may present with anxiety, syncope or high blood pressure. In this article, we aimed to present a 46 year old female patient admitted to our emergency department due to paresthesia and pain in the right foot and took the diagnosis of DeBakey Type 1 aortic dissection.

  9. Infective Endocarditis and Aortic Valve Abscess in an Infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Kristy A; Gmuca, Sabrina; Rosman, Eliyahu C; Thomas, Philomena

    2015-09-01

    Infective endocarditis is relatively uncommon in the pediatric population, but when it does occur, results in substantial morbidity and mortality. Children at risk for endocarditis are typically those with an underlying congenital heart condition. Furthermore, an endocardial abscess is a very rare yet serious complication of infective endocarditis. We describe a case of a 23-month-old previously healthy male infant with no known congenital heart disease who returned to the emergency department after a recent hospitalization for pneumococcal bacteremia, presenting acutely ill but without fever. He was found to be in congestive heart failure due to endocarditis and an aortic root abscess.

  10. Square Root +

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, John G.

    1969-01-01

    A rational presentation of the so-called long division method for extracting the square root of a number. Diagrams are used to show relationship of this technique to the binomial theorem. Presentation exposes student to many facets of mathematics in addition to the mechanics of funding square root and cube root. Geometry, algebraic statements,…

  11. Using The Descending Aortic Wall Thickness Measured In Transesophageal Echocardiography As A Risk Marker For Aortic Dissection

    OpenAIRE

    Zaher Fanari; Sumaya Hammami; Muhammad Baraa Hammami; Safa Hammami; Chete Eze-Nliam; Weintraub, William S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to estimate whether aortic wall thickness is increased in patients with Aortic dissection (AD) compared to low risk control group and can be used in addition to aortic diameter as a risk marker of AD. Background: AD occurs due to pathologies that may increase thickness of the aortic wall. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has the ability to visualise both the thoracic aortic wall and lumen. Aortic diameter has been used to predict aortic dissection...

  12. Abdominal aortic aneurysm and histological, clinical, radiological correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodella, Luigi Fabrizio; Rezzani, Rita; Bonomini, Francesca; Peroni, Michele; Cocchi, Marco Angelo; Hirtler, Lena; Bonardelli, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    To date, the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurism (AAA) still remains unclear. As such, the aim of this study was to evaluate changes of the aortic structure during AAA. We analysed the microscopic frame of vessels sections, starting from the primum movens leading to abnormal dilatation. AAA samples were collected and processed through various staining methods (Verhoeff-Van Gieson, Masson Goldner, Sirius Red). Subsequently, the vessel morphology and collagenic web of the tunica media and adventitia were determined and the amount of type I and type III collagen was measured. We also applied immune-histochemistry markers for CD34 and PGP 9.5 in order to identify vascular and nerve structures in the aorta. Immune-positivity quantification was used to calculate the percentage of the stained area. We found increasing deposition of type I collagen and reduced type III collagen in both tunica media and adventitia of AAA. The total amount of vasa vasorum, marked with CD34, and nerva vasorum, marked with PGP 9.5, was also higher in AAA samples. Cardiovascular risk factors (blood pressure, dyslipidemia, cigarette smoking) and radiological data (maximum aneurism diameter, intra-luminal thrombus, aortic wall calcification) increased these changes. These results suggest that the tunica adventitia may have a central role in the pathogenesis of AAA as clearly there are major changes characterized by rooted inflammatory infiltration. The presence of immune components could explain these modifications within the framework of the aorta. PMID:26858185

  13. Expanding TAVI options: elective rotational atherectomy during trans-catheter aortic valve implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piccoli, Anna; Lunardi, Mattia; Ariotti, Sara; Ferrero, Valeria; Vassanelli, Corrado; Ribichini, Flavio, E-mail: flavio.ribichini@univr.it

    2015-01-15

    Summary: Aortic valve stenosis (AVS) in the elderly is frequently associated to coronary artery disease (CAD). In patients with significant coronary stenosis surgical valve replacement is associated to coronary bypass grafting, but whether coronary angioplasty is needed in patients receiving trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is unknown. Given the frequent complexity of CAD in the elderly with calcific AVS, rotational atherectomy (RA) may be needed in some cases. No data are available about feasibility and safety of RA during TAVI. The need for myocardial revascularization in TAVI candidates is discussed, and a series of RA cases performed during TAVI is described.

  14. Symptomatic obstruction of the brachiocephalic and left subclavian arteries obscured by aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Peter W; Assi, Roland; Grecu, Loreta; Dardik, Alan

    2014-04-01

    Stenosis or occlusion of the brachiocephalic artery represents an uncommon cause of cerebrovascular insufficiency. We report a patient with combined brachiocephalic and left subclavian obstruction with clinical manifestations of lightheadedness, syncope, and left-sided weakness who remained misdiagnosed essentially because of symmetrical pressures in the upper extremities. Aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis failed to provide symptomatic relief. Eventual stenting of the brachiocephalic trunk resolved the patient's symptoms. Our report highlights the diagnostic challenges in this case of bilateral supraaortic vessel disease and shows that equal upper extremity pressures do not rule out brachiocephalic artery obstruction.

  15. A modified total arch replacement combined with a stented elephant trunk implantation for acute type A dissection under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and selective antegrade cerebral perfusion

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Su-Min; Xu, Ping; Cheng-xiang LI; Huang, Qiang; Gao, Hong-Bo; Li, Zhen-Fu; Chang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Since the optimal management of patients with acute aortic dissection is unclear, this study analyzed total arch replacement combined with stented elephant trunk implantation in the treatment of acute type A aortic dissection. Methods Between February 2008 and February 2013, 86 consecutive patients admitted to our hospital for acute type A dissection underwent total arch replacement combined with stented elephant trunk implantation under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. The Ben...

  16. [Acute Leaflet Arrest in St. Jude Medical Regent Mechanical Aortic Valve;Report of a Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishima, Yuji; Arakaki, Katsuya

    2015-06-01

    A 61-year-old woman was diagnosed with combined valvular disease and atrial fibrillation, and was admitted for surgery. We performed double valve replacement, tricuspid annuloplasty and maze operation. At the operation, a 19 mm St. Jude Medical Regent valve was implanted with non-everting mattress sutures at the aortic supra-annular position after mitral valve replacement. Although pulling down of the prosthesis into the aortic annulus was easy, the leaflets were unable to open at all in a movability test. After removing several stitches on the mitral side of the hinges, the subvalvular tissue was seen bulging into the hinge, hindering the free movement. The prosthesis was removed and replaced with a 17 mm Regent valve by the same technique. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. We suggest it is necessary to pay special attention to the structural characteristics of the prosthesis. PMID:26066878

  17. Inside human aortic stenosis: a proteomic analysis of plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Dones, Félix; Darde, Verónica M; Alonso-Orgaz, Sergio; Lopez-Almodovar, Luis F; Mourino-Alvarez, Laura; Padial, Luis R; Vivanco, Fernando; Barderas, Maria G

    2012-02-16

    Valvular aortic stenosis (AS) produces a slowly progressive obstruction in left ventricular outflow track. For this reason, aortic valve replacement is warranted when the valvular stenosis is hemodinamically significant, becoming the most common worldwide cause of aortic valve surgery. Recent epidemiologic studies have revealed an association between degenerative AS and cardiovascular risk factors for atherosclerosis, althought reducing the exposure to such factors and statin therapies both fail to delay or reverse the pathology. Hence, a deeper understanding of the pathophysiology of this disease is required to identify appropriate preventive measures. A proteomic analysis of plasma will permit to know and identify the changes in protein expression induced by AS in this tissue. Using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) followed by mass spectrometry (MS), we compared the crude (not pre-fractioned) and pre-fractioned plasma from AS patients and control subjects. We sought to identify plasma proteins whose expression is modified in AS. In addition we investigated if crude plasma presented some alterations in the more abundant proteins since to date, has never been studied before. We also further investigated the link between this disease and atherosclerosis with a view to identifying new potential markers and therapeutic targets. PMID:22178735

  18. Comparative study of calcified changes in aortic valvular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togashi, Mayuko; Tamura, Koichi; Masuda, Yukinari; Fukuda, Yuh

    2008-06-01

    Calcification of the aortic valve leads to stenosis or regurgitation or both. To clarify the mechanism of heart valve calcification, comparative studies using histological and ultrastructural examinations were performed of calcified aortic valves. These valves were obtained at valve replacement surgery from 11 patients with rheumatic aortic valvular disease (RAVD), 10 patients with degenerative aortic valve disease (DAVD), and 10 patients with congenitally bicuspid aortic valves (CBAV). For electron microscopic study, 5 cases were selected from each group. In RAVD, histological examination revealed calcification in a degenerated amorphous area at the center of fibrous thickened regions and in laminar fibrous thickened areas near the valve surface. In DAVD, calcification was observed mainly in the fibrosa near the valve ring. In CBAV, basic pathological changes were similar to those in DAVD; however, additional severe calcification of the raphe was observed, if the raphe was present. Ultrastructural examinations showed deposition of electron-dense materials in two patterns in all three groups; one pattern was observed in the interfibrillar spaces of collagen fibrils, and the other pattern was widespread macular deposition unrelated to the preexisting structure. In RAVD, microfibril-like fibrillar structures were found in the areas of deposition of electron-dense materials. These findings suggest that newly formed connective tissue degraded and became necrotic because of nutritional deprivation, especially in the thickened central area, causing calcium deposition. In DAVD and CBAV, numerous lipid vacuoles were found in the electron-dense deposition areas similar to lipid deposition in aortic atherosclerosis. Localized calcium deposition in the fibrosa suggests that the stress of valvular motion and pressure load induces sclerotic changes with the degeneration of collagen fibers, providing a core for calcification. In CBAV, the raphe was the main location of

  19. Decreased expression of fibulin-4 in aortic wall of aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huawei, P; Qian, C; Chuan, T; Lei, L; Laing, W; Wenlong, X; Wenzhi, L

    2014-02-01

    In this research, we will examine the expression of Fibulin-4 in aortic wall to find out its role in aortic dissection development. The samples of aortic wall were obtained from 10 patients operated for acute ascending aortic dissection and five patients for chronic ascending aortic dissection. Another 15 pieces of samples from patients who had coronary artery bypass were as controls. The aortic samples were stained with aldehyde magenta dyeing to evaluate the arrangement of elastic fibers. The Fibulin-4 protein and mRNA expression were both determined by Western blot and realtime quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Compared with the control group, both in acute and chronic ascending aortic dissection, elastic fiber fragments increased and the expression of fibulin-4 protein significantly decreased (P= 0.045 < 0.05). The level of fibulin-4 mRNA decreased in acute ascending aortic dissection (P= 0.034 < 0.05), while it increased in chronic ascending aortic dissection (P=0.004 < 0.05). The increased amounts of elastic fiber fragments were negatively correlated with the expression of fibulin-4 mRNA in acute ascending aortic dissection. In conclusion, in aortic wall of ascending aortic dissection, the expression of fibulin-4 protein decreased and the expression of fibulin-4 mRNA was abnormal. Fibulin-4 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of aortic dissection.

  20. In situ repair of a primary Brucella-infected abdominal aortic aneurysm: long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudard, Yvain; Pierret, Charles; de La Villéon, Bruno; Mlynski, Amélie; de Kerangal, Xavier

    2013-02-01

    Infected aortic aneurysms represent 0.85 to 1.3% of aortic aneurysms. Most often, the implicated bacteria species are Salmonella sp., Staphylococcus sp. and Streptococcus sp. Brucella-related infected aortic aneurysms are very rare. Most often, they result from endocarditis or from a local septic focus. Combined treatment by antibiotics and surgery is the standard for infectious aneurysms. In the absence of formal factual data, the surgical treatment is still discussed in the literature, especially since endovascular treatments have been in full expansion. We are reporting the case of a female patient presenting with a Brucella-related infra-renal abdominal aortic aneurysm, without primitive infectious source (area) or identified endocarditis. Surgical treatment with in situ prosthetic replacement and omentoplasty in association with adapted antibiotics allowed a favorable outcome with an excellent result after an 8-year follow up.

  1. Surgical treatment of aortic valve endocarditis: a 26-year experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylan Adademir

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We have retrospectively analyzed the results of the operations made for aortic valve endocarditis in a single center in 26 years. Methods: From June 1985 to January 2011, 174 patients were operated for aortic valve endocarditis. One hundred and thirty-eight (79.3% patients were male and the mean age was 39.3±14.4 (9-77 years. Twenty-seven (15.5% patients had prosthetic valve endocarditis. The mean duration of follow-up was 7.3±4.2 years (0.1-18.2 adding up to a total of 1030.8 patient/years. Results: Two hundred and eighty-two procedures were performed. The most frequently performed procedure was aortic valve replacement with mechanical prosthesis (81.6%. In-hospital mortality occurred in 27 (15.5% cases. Postoperatively, 25 (14.4% patients had low cardiac output and 17 (9.8% heart block. The actuarial survival rates for 10 and 15 years were 74.6±3.7% and 61.1±10.3%, respectively. In-hospital mortality was found to be associated with female gender, emergency operation, postoperative renal failure and low cardiac output. The long term mortality was significantly associated with mitral valve involvement. Male gender was found to be a significant risk factor for recurrence in the follow-up. Conclusion: Surgery for aortic valve endocarditis has significant mortality. Emergency operation, female gender, postoperative renal failure and low cardiac output are significant risk factors. Risk for recurrence and need for reoperation is low.

  2. Late pseudocoarctation syndrome after stent-graft implantation for traumatic aortic rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letocart, Vincent; Fau, Georges; Tirouvanziam, Ashok; Toquet, Claire; Al Habash, Oussama; Guerin, Patrice; Rousseau, Hervé; Crochet, Dominique

    2013-06-01

    The present observation illustrates an unusual complication occurring after stent-grafting (S-graft) for aortic isthmus rupture. A 22-year-old patient, treated by S-graft in the emergency department for traumatic aortic rupture, was readmitted 10 months later with pseudocoarctation syndrome. A membrane was found inside the stent-graft that had induced a pseudo-dissection, which caused the pseudocoarctation syndrome. Surgical treatment consisted of removing the stent-graft and membrane and replacing it with a vascular implant. The patient's clinical course was fair. The suggested mechanism was circumferential neoendothelialization of the stent-graft. Dehiscence caused the superior part of the membrane to drop into the lumen of the stent-graft creating a "false channel" that compressed the "true lumen" and induced "pseudocoarctation" syndrome. The cause of the extensive neointimalization remains unexplained. Thoracic aortic stent-grafts require regular follow-up monitoring by angioscan or angio-magnetic resonance imaging.

  3. Maximizing prosthetic valve size with the Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jan; Geha, Alexander S.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY: The CarboMedics Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve allows a one-size (and often two-size) increase over the standard intra-annular valve. This advantage should minimize the risk of patient-prosthesis mismatch, where the effective prosthetic valve orifice area...... is less than that of a normal valve. It is suggested that the ability to implant Top Hat valves having greater size, relative to standard intra-annular valves, may currently be under-utilized. Further, there has been some concern that Top Hat implantation can cause obstruction of the coronary ostia....... This study evaluates the authors' clinical experience with Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve size selection, and the technical aspects of implantation. METHODS: Between January 1999 and October 2005, a total of 251 consecutive patients underwent 252 aortic valve replacements with Top Hat supra...

  4. Flow modulation algorithms for intra-aortic rotary blood pumps to minimize coronary steal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ising, Mickey S; Koenig, Steven C; Sobieski, Michael A; Slaughter, Mark S; Giridharan, Guruprasad A

    2013-01-01

    Intra-aortic rotary blood pumps (IARBPs) have been used for partial cardiac support during cardiogenic shock, myocardial infarction, percutaneous coronary intervention, and potentially viable for long-term circulatory support. Intra-aortic rotary blood pump support continuously removes volume from the aortic root, which lowers left ventricular preload, external work (LVEW), and improves end-organ perfusion. However, IARBP support diminishes aortic root pressure and coronary artery. It may also create "coronary steal," which may produce a myocardial hypoxic state adversely affecting patient outcomes. Our objective was to develop IARBP flow modulation algorithms to eliminate coronary steal and improve the myocardial supply-demand ratio without compromising the clinical benefits of restored end-organ perfusion and reduced LVEW. The hemodynamic responses of the native ventricle, coronary, and systemic vasculature to timing and synchronization of IARBP flow modulation (cyclic variation of pump flow) were investigated using a clinical heart failure (HF) computer simulation model. A total of more than 150 combinations of varying pulse widths and time-shifts to modulate IARBP flow were tested at mean IARBP flow rates of 2, 3, and 4 L/min, and compared with HF baseline values (no IARBP support). Increasing IARBP support augmented cardiac output and diminished LVEW. Nonmodulated IARBP support significantly diminished mean diastolic coronary flow (-49%) and myocardial supply-demand ratio (-12%) compared with HF baseline. Intra-aortic rotary blood pump flow modulation increased mean diastolic coronary flow (+17%) and myocardial supply-demand ratio (+24%) compared with nonmodulated IARBP (constant flow). Modulation and synchronization of IARBP support augmented coronary artery perfusion and myocardial supply-demand ratio in simulated clinical HF while also restoring end-organ perfusion and reducing LVEW. Implementation of IARBP support with flow modulation may prevent

  5. A doença coronária aumenta a mortalidade hospitalar de portadores de estenose aórtica submetidos à substituição valvar? Does the coronary disease increase the hospital mortality in patients with aortic stenosis undergoing valve replacement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José de Lima Oliveira Júnior

    2009-12-01

    revascularização completa do miocárdio (Grupo IIA e 20,9% (nove óbitos nos com revascularização incompleta do miocárdio (Grupo IIB. CONCLUSÕES: Nos pacientes submetidos à substituição valvar aórtica isolada, a presença de doença aterosclerótica arterial coronária crítica associada, em pelo menos duas artérias, influenciou a mortalidade hospitalar. Nos pacientes submetidos ao tratamento cirúrgico combinado, o número de artérias coronárias com doença aterosclerótica crítica e a extensão da revascularização do miocárdio (RM completa ou incompleta, não influenciaram a mortalidade hospitalar, mas a realização de mais de três anastomoses distais interferiu.OBJECTIVES: With the increase in life expectancy occurred in recent decades, it has been noted the concomitant increase in the prevalence of aortic stenosis and degenerative disease of atherosclerotic coronary artery. This study aims to evaluate the influence of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease in patients with critical aortic stenosis undergoing isolated or combined implant valve prosthesis and coronary artery by pass grafting. METHODS: In the period of January 2001 to March 2006, there were analyzed 448 patients undergoing isolated implant aortic valve prosthesis (Group I and 167 patients undergoing aortic valve prosthesis implant combined with coronary artery bypass grafting (Group II. Pre- and intra-operative variables elected for analysis were: age, gender, body mass index, stroke, diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, rheumatic fever, hypertension, endocarditis, acute myocardial infarction, smoking, Fraction of the left ventricular ejection, critical atherosclerotic coronary artery disease, chronic atrial fibrillation, aortic valve operation prior (conservative, functional class of congestive heart failure, value serum creatinine, total cholesterol, size of the prosthesis used, length and number of distal anastomoses held in myocardial revascularization, duration of

  6. Indexing aortic valve area by body surface area increases the prevalence of severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jander, Nikolaus; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa; Bahlmann, Edda;

    2014-01-01

    To account for differences in body size in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is divided by body surface area (BSA) to calculate indexed AVA (AVAindex). Cut-off values for severe stenosis are......To account for differences in body size in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is divided by body surface area (BSA) to calculate indexed AVA (AVAindex). Cut-off values for severe stenosis are...

  7. Aortic Dissection in a Healthy Male Athlete: A Unique Case with Comprehensive Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Balraj; Treece, Jennifer M.; Bhatheja, Samit; Lavine, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    A young otherwise healthy 27-year-old male who has been using anabolic steroids for a long time developed Type I aortic dissection associated with heavy weightlifting. The patient did not have a recent history of trauma to the chest, no history of hypertension, and no illicit drug use. He presented with severe chest pain radiating to back and syncopal event with exertion. Initial vitals were significant for blood pressure of 80/50 mmHg, pulse of 80 beats per minute, respirations of 24 per minute, and oxygen saturation of 92% on room air. Physical exam was significant for elevated jugular venous pressure, muffled heart sounds, and cold extremities with diminished pulses in upper and absent pulses in lower extremities. Bedside echocardiogram showed aortic root dilatation and cardiac tamponade. STAT computed tomography (CT) scan of chest revealed dissection of ascending aorta. Cardiothoracic surgery was consulted and patient underwent successful repair of ascending aorta. Hemodynamic stress of weightlifting can predispose to aortic dissection. Aortic dissection is a rare but often catastrophic condition if not diagnosed and managed acutely. Although rare, aortic dissection needs to be in the differential when a young weightlifter presents with chest pain as a delay in diagnosis may be fatal. PMID:27738530

  8. Aortopathy in patients with a bicuspid aortic valve : determining susceptibility for aortic complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grewal, Nimrat

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of aortic dilation and related complications as rupture and dissection is higher in patients with a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) as compared to patients with a tricuspid aortic valve (TAV), although not every individual carries this increased risk. It is therefore essential to identify

  9. The Efficacy of Autologous Femoropopliteal Vein Reconstruction for Primary Aortic and Aortic Graft Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirven, M.; Jagt, M.F.P. van der; Barendregt, W.B.; Vliet, D. van der

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The objective of our study was to analyze the efficacy of autologous superficial femoropopliteal vein reconstruction for primary aortic or aortic graft infection. METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of 14 patients treated for an infected aortic prosthesis or primary infected a

  10. Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation due to severe aortic regurgitation in a degenerated aortic homograft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lene Kjaer; Engstrøm, Thomas; Søndergaard, Lars

    2009-01-01

    a successful valve-in-valve implantation of a CoreValve aortic valve prosthesis through the right subclavian artery in a case of severe aortic regurgitation within a degenerated aortic homograft. The case exemplifies the possibilities of expanding the indications for TAVI, as well as other vascular access...

  11. Surgical treatment of complex aneurysms and thoracic aortic dissections with the Frozen Elephant Trunk technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Ribeiro Dias

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective:Report initial experience with the Frozen Elephant Trunk technique.Methods:From July 2009 to October 2013, Frozen Elephant Trunk technique was performed in 21 patients (66% male, mean age 56 ±11 years. They had type A aortic dissection (acute 9.6%, chronic 57.3%, type B (14.3%, all chronic and complex aneurysms (19%. It was 9.5% of reoperations and 38% of associated procedures (25.3% miocardial revascularization, 25.3% replacement of aortic valve and 49.4% aortic valved graft. Aortic remodeling was evaluated comparing preoperative and most recent computed tomography scans. One hundred per cent of complete follow-up, mean time of 28 months.Results:In-hospital mortality of 14.2%, being 50% in acute type A aortic dissection, 8.3% in chronic type A aortic dissection, 33.3% in chronic type B aortic dissection and 0% in complex aneurysms. Mean times of cardiopulmonary bypass (152±24min, myocardial ischemia (115±31min and selective cerebral perfusion (60±15min. Main complications were bleeding (14.2%, spinal cord injury (9.5%, stroke (4.7%, prolonged mechanical ventilation (4.7% and acute renal failure (4.7%. The need for second-stage operation was 19%. False-lumen thrombosis was obtained in 80%.Conclusion:Frozen Elephant Trunk is a feasible technique and should be considered. The severity of the underlying disease justifies high mortality rates. The learning curve is a reality. This approach allows treatment of more than two segments at once. Nonetheless, if a second stage is made necessary, it is facilitated.

  12. MARFAN SYNDROME AND QUADRICUSPID AORTIC VALVE

    OpenAIRE

    Sürücü, Hüseyin; ÇİMEN, Sadi

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACTWhile the major cardiovascular manifestation in Marfan syndrome is a progressive dilatation of the ascending aorta, leading to aortic aneurysm formation and eventually to fatal aortic rupture or dissection, mitral valve prolapse and calcification of the mitral valve annulus, dilatation of the main pulmonary artery may be seen. There was no knowledge about the association of Marfan syndrome and quadricuspid aortic valve. In this case report, we aimed to declare this association between...

  13. Partial knee replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100225.htm Partial knee replacement - series To use the sharing features on ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Knee Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited ...

  14. Shoulder Joint Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... en because of implant loosening, wear, infection, and dislocation. When this occurs, a second joint replacement surgery — called a revision surgery — may be necessary. Is Shoulder Joint Replacement for You? The decision to have ...

  15. Root patterning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheres, Ben; Laskowski, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms that pattern lateral root primordial are essential for the elaboration of root system architecture, a trait of key importance for future crop breeding. But which are most important: periodic or local cues? In this issue of Journal of Experimental Botany (pages 1411-1420), Kircher a

  16. Endovascular Aortic Repair of Primary Adult Coarctation: Implications and Challenges for Postoperative Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Christina E; Then, Karen L; Rankin, James A; Appoo, Jehangir J

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular aortic repair is a relatively new surgical technique used to treat a variety of aortic pathologies. Aortic coarctation traditionally has been managed with open surgical repair, involving a large posterolateral thoracotomy, cardiopulmonary bypass, and replacement of the narrowed section of the aorta with a dacron graft. Recent advances in minimally invasive aortic surgery have allowed for repair of the diseased section with an endovascular stent placed percutaneously through the groin under intraoperative fluoroscopic guidance. In this paper, the authors willfocus on the implicationsfor postoperative nursing care after endovascular repair of aortic coarctation using a case study of a 17-year-old male. This novel technique required education of the health care team with respect to implications for practice, understanding potential complications, discharge planning and follow-up. With any new surgical technique there are many questions and challenges that health care professionals raise. The main concerns expressed from the health care team stemmed from a lack of understanding of the disease pathology, and the different risk profile associated with an endovascular repair in contrast to an open repair. The authors will address these concerns in detail.

  17. Hybrid treatment of penetrating aortic ulcer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara, Juan Antonio Herrero; Martins-Romeo, Daniela de Araujo; Escudero, Carlos Caparros; Falcon, Maria del Carmen Prieto; Batista, Vinicius Bianchi, E-mail: jaherrero5@hotmail.com [Unidade de Gestao Clinica (UGC) de Diagnostico por Imagem - Hosppital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilha (Spain); Vazquez, Rosa Maria Lepe [Unit of Radiodiagnosis - Hospital Nuestra Senora de la Merced, Osuna, Sevilha (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    Penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer is a rare entity with poor prognosis in the setting of acute aortic syndrome. In the literature, cases like the present one, located in the aortic arch, starting with chest pain and evolving with dysphonia, are even rarer. The present report emphasizes the role played by computed tomography in the diagnosis of penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer as well as in the differentiation of this condition from other acute aortic syndromes. Additionally, the authors describe a new therapeutic approach represented by a hybrid endovascular surgical procedure for treatment of the disease. (author)

  18. Abdominal Aortic Surgery: Anesthetic Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of the review are to highlight the clinical characteristics of the patient population; to assess multivariate risk factor analysis and the invasive/non-invasive techniques available for risk factor identification and management in this high-risk surgical population; to assess the major hemodynamic, metabolic, and regional blood flow changes associated with aortic cross-clamping/unclamping procedures and techniques for their modification or attenuation; and to assess the influen...

  19. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty as a bridge-to-decision in high risk patients with aortic stenosis: a new paradigm for the heart team decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saia, Francesco; Moretti, Carolina; Dall'Ara, Gianni; Ciuca, Cristina; Taglieri, Nevio; Berardini, Alessandra; Gallo, Pamela; Cannizzo, Marina; Chiarabelli, Matteo; Ramponi, Niccolò; Taffani, Linda; Bacchi-Reggiani, Maria Letizia; Marrozzini, Cinzia; Rapezzi, Claudio; Marzocchi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background Whilst the majority of the patients with severe aortic stenosis can be directly addressed to surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), in some instances additional information may be needed to complete the diagnostic workout. We evaluated the role of balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) as a bridge-to-decision (BTD) in selected high-risk patients. Methods Between 2007 and 2012, the heart team in our Institution required BTD BAV in 202 patients. Very low left ventricular ejection fraction, mitral regurgitation grade ≥ 3, frailty, hemodynamic instability, serious comorbidity, or a combination of these factors were the main drivers for this strategy. We evaluated how BAV influenced the final treatment strategy in the whole patient group and in each specific subgroup. Results Mean logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) was 23.5% ± 15.3%, age 81 ± 7 years. In-hospital mortality was 4.5%, cerebrovascular accident 1% and overall vascular complications 4% (0.5% major; 3.5% minor). Of the 193 patients with BTD BAV who survived and received a second heart team evaluation, 72.6% were finally deemed eligible for definitive treatment (25.4% for AVR; 47.2% for TAVI): 96.7% of patients with left ventricular ejection fraction recovery; 70.5% of patients with mitral regurgitation reduction; 75.7% of patients who underwent BAV in clinical hemodynamic instability; 69.2% of frail patients and 68% of patients who presented serious comorbidities. Conclusions Balloon aortic valvuloplasty can be considered as bridge-to-decision in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis who cannot be immediate candidates for definitive transcatheter or surgical treatment. PMID:27582761

  20. Assessment of the effect on blood loss and transfusion requirements when adding a polyethylene glycol sealant to the anastomotic closure of aortic procedures: a case–control analysis of 102 patients undergoing Bentall procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natour Ehsan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of CoSeal®, a polyethylene glycol sealant, in cardiac and vascular surgery for prevention of anastomotic bleeding has been subject to prior investigations. We analysed our perioperative data to determine the clinical benefit of using polyethylene glycol sealant to inhibit suture line bleeding in aortic surgery. Methods From January 2004 to June 2006, 124 patients underwent aortic surgical procedures such as full root replacements, reconstruction and/or replacement of ascending aorta and aortic arch procedures. A Bentall procedure was employed in 102 of these patients. In 48 of these, a polyethylene glycol sealant was added to the anastomotic closure of the aortic procedure (sealant group and the other 54 patients did not have this additive treatment to the suture line (control group. Results There were no significant between-group differences in the demographic characteristics of the patients undergoing Bentall procedures. Mean EuroSCORES (European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation were 13.7 ± 7.7 (sealant group and 14.4 ± 6.2 (control group, p = NS. The polyethylene glycol sealant group had reduced intraoperative and postoperative transfusion requirements (red blood cells: 761 ± 863 versus 1248 ± 1206 ml, p = 0.02; fresh frozen plasma: 413 ± 532 versus 779 ± 834 ml, p = 0.009; and less postoperative drainage loss (985 ± 972 versus 1709 ± 1302 ml, p = 0.002. A trend towards a lower rate of rethoracotomy was observed in the sealant group (1/48 versus 6/54, p = 0.07 and there was significantly less time spent in the intensive care unit or hospital (both p = 0.03. Based on hypothesis-generating calculations, the resulting economic benefit conferred by shorter intensive care unit and hospital stays, reduced transfusion requirements and a potentially lower rethoracotomy rate is estimated at €1,943 per patient in this data analysis