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Sample records for aortic arch repair

  1. Comparison of Total Arch and Partial Arch Transposition During Hybrid Endovascular Repair for Aortic Arch Disease.

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    Kang, W C; Ko, Y-G; Oh, P C; Shin, E K; Park, C-H; Choi, D; Youn, Y N; Lee, D Y

    2016-08-01

    Total arch transposition (TAT) during hybrid endovascular repair for aortic arch disease is believed to allow a better landing zone, but also to be associated with higher peri-operative mortality than partial arch transposition (PAT). Information on this issue is limited. This study was a retrospective analysis. All 53 consecutive patients with aortic arch disease (41 males, mean age 65.0 years) who underwent hybrid endovascular repair with TAT (zone 0, n=20) or PAT (zone 1 or 2, n=33) from 2008 to 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. The peri-operative and late outcomes of these two groups were compared. Baseline characteristics, including EuroSCORE II results, were similar in the two groups. After procedures, peri-operative mortalities and stroke rates were similar in the two groups (5.0% vs. 9.1%, p=1.000, and 10.0% vs. 6.1%, p=.627). Interestingly, all four strokes occurred in patients with a type III aortic arch irrespective of transposition type. Primary success rates (80.0% vs. 69.7%, p=.527) and type I endoleak incidences (20.0% vs. 27.3%, p=.744) were not significantly different. During follow up (mean duration 36.9 months), overall survival (89.7% vs. 87.4% at 1 year and 89.7% vs. 79.3% at 3 years; p=.375) and re-intervention free survival rates (78.6% vs. 92.0% at 1 year; 72.0% vs. 62.2% at 3 years, p=.872) were similar in the two groups. Morbidity and mortality were high within the first year of hybrid endovascular therapy for aortic arch disease, implying that candidates for hybrid procedures need to be selected carefully. Hybrid endovascular repair with TAT was found to have peri-operative mortality, stroke, and long-term survival rates comparable with PAT, so hybrid endovascular repair may be considered, irrespective of type of arch reconstruction, when clinically indicated. Copyright © 2016 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Contemporary results of surgical repair of recurrent aortic arch obstruction.

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    Mery, Carlos M; Khan, Muhammad S; Guzmán-Pruneda, Francisco A; Verm, Raymond; Umakanthan, Ramanan; Watrin, Carmen H; Adachi, Iki; Heinle, Jeffrey S; McKenzie, E Dean; Fraser, Charles D

    2014-07-01

    There is a paucity of data on the current outcomes of surgical intervention for recurrent aortic arch obstruction (RAAO) after initial aortic arch repair in children. The goal of this study is to report the long-term results in these patients. All patients undergoing surgical intervention for RAAO at Texas Children's Hospital from 1995 to 2012 were included. The cohort was divided into four groups based on initial procedure: (1) simple coarctation repair, (2) Norwood procedure, (3) complex congenital heart disease, and (4) interrupted aortic arch. A total of 48 patients age 9 months (range, 22 days to 36 years) underwent 49 procedures for RAAO. All patients had an anatomic repair consisting of either patch aortoplasty (n=27, 55%), aortic arch advancement (n=8, 16%), sliding arch aortoplasty (n=6, 12%), placement of an interposition graft (n=2, 17%), reconstruction with donor allograft (n=4, 8%), extended end-to-end anastomosis (n=1, 2%), or redo Norwood-type reconstruction (n=1, 2%). Most procedures (n=46, 94%) were performed through a median sternotomy using cardiopulmonary bypass. At a median follow-up of 6.1 years (range, 9 days to 17 years), only 2 patients required surgical or catheter-based intervention for RAAO. Hypertension was present in 10% of patients at last follow-up. There were no neurologic or renal complications. There was 1 perioperative death after an aortic arch advancement in group 1. Four other patients have died during follow-up, none of the deaths related to RAAO. Anatomic repair of RAAO is a safe procedure associated with low morbidity and mortality, and low long-term reintervention rates. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A geometric reappraisal of proximal landing zones for thoracic endovascular aortic repair according to aortic arch types

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    Marrocco-Trischitta, Massimiliano M.; de Beaufort, Hector W.; Secchi, Francesco; van Bakel, Theodorus M.; Ranucci, Marco; van Herwaarden, Joost A.; Moll, Frans L.; Trimarchi, Santi

    Objective: This study assessed whether the additional use of the aortic arch classification in type I, II, and III may complement Ishimaru's aortic arch map and provide valuable information on the geometry and suitability of proximal landing zones for thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Methods:

  4. [Outcomes of endovascular repairing aortic arch disease hybrid with supra-arch debranching procedures].

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    Wang, Mian; Chang, Guangqi; Yin, Henghui; Yao, Chen; Wang, Jinsong; Wang, Shenming

    2015-11-01

    To summarize the experience of endovascular repairing aortic arch disease hybrid with supra-arch debranching procedures. It was a retrospective study. From January 2002 to December 2014, 42 high risk patients with aortic arch disease were treated by supra-arch debranching hybrid with subsequent endovascular repair in the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University. There were 39 male and 3 female patients with a mean age of (53±13) years (ranging from 34 to 80 years). Of the 42 patients, 7 were thoracic aortic aneurysm, 20 were Stanford type B aortic dissection and 15 were Stanford type A aortic dissection. After the supra-aortic debranching technique, simultaneous (n=16) or staged (n=26, mean interval (7±3) days) endovascular repair were performed. Fisher exact test was used to compare the in-hospital mortality of ascending aorta based debranching and non-ascending aorta based debranching. Technical success rate was 81.0% (34/42). The overall 30-day complication rate was 31.0% (13/42), including 3 cerebral stroke (7.1%), 8 endoleak (19.0%, including 6 type I endoleak and 2 type II endoleak), 1 circulatory failure, 1 aorto-tracheal fistula. The 30-day mortality was 9.5% (4/42), 2 died of cerebral stroke, 1 died of circulatory failure, 1 died of aorto-tracheal fistula. The in-hospital mortality of ascending aorta based debranching group was obviously higher than that of the non-ascending aorta based debranching group (4/16 vs. 0, P=0.02). The median time of follow-up was 64.8 (2 to 156.9) months. CT scanning was performed at 1, 3 months after surgery and annually thereafter. The overall survival rate was 76.6%. During the follow-up period, there was 4 deaths, and 2 of them were aortic artery related (5.3%). There were 4 de novo complications during the follow-up period, 1 stroke attributed to bypass occlusion was cured by medical treatment, 2 pseudoaneurysm was successfully treated with open surgery, 1 stent-graft induced new distal entry tear was

  5. Selective Aortic Arch and Root Replacement in Repair of Acute Type A Aortic Dissection.

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    Fleischman, Fernando; Elsayed, Ramsey S; Cohen, Robbin G; Tatum, James M; Kumar, S Ram; Kazerouni, Kayvan; Mack, Wendy J; Barr, Mark L; Cunningham, Mark J; Hackmann, Amy E; Baker, Craig J; Starnes, Vaughn A; Bowdish, Michael E

    2018-02-01

    Controversy exists regarding the optimal extent of repair for type A aortic dissection. Our approach is to replace the ascending aorta, and only replace the aortic root or arch when intimal tears are present in those areas. We examined intermediate outcomes with this approach to acute type A aortic dissection repair. Between March 2005 and October 2016, 195 patients underwent repair of acute type A aortic dissection. Repair was categorized by site of proximal and distal anastomosis and extent of repair. Mean follow-up was 31.0 ± 30.9 months. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to assess survival. Multiple variable Cox proportional hazards modeling was utilized to identify factors associated with overall mortality. Overall survival was 85.1%, 83.9%, 79.1%, and 74.4% at 6, 12, 36, and 60 months, respectively. Eight patients required reintervention. The cumulative incidence of aortic reintervention at 1 year with death as a competing outcome was 3.95%. Multiple variable regression analysis identified factors such as age, preoperative renal failure, concomitant thoracic endograft, postoperative myocardial infarction and sepsis, and need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as predictive of overall mortality. Neither proximal or distal extent of repair, nor need for reintervention affected overall survival (proximal: hazard ratio 1.63, 95% confidence interval: 0.75 to 3.51, p = 0.22; distal: hazard ratio 1.12, 95% confidence interval: 0.43 to 2.97, p = 0.81; reintervention: hazard ratio 0.03, 95% confidence interval: 0.002 to 0.490, p < 0.01). A selective approach to root and arch repair in acute type A aortic dissection is safe. If aortic reintervention is needed, survival does not appear to be affected. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Geometric Deformations of the Thoracic Aorta and Supra-Aortic Arch Branch Vessels Following Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair.

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    Ullery, Brant W; Suh, Ga-Young; Hirotsu, Kelsey; Zhu, David; Lee, Jason T; Dake, Michael D; Fleischmann, Dominik; Cheng, Christopher P

    2018-04-01

    To utilize 3-D modeling techniques to better characterize geometric deformations of the supra-aortic arch branch vessels and descending thoracic aorta after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Eighteen patients underwent endovascular repair of either type B aortic dissection (n = 10) or thoracic aortic aneurysm (n = 8). Computed tomography angiography was obtained pre- and postprocedure, and 3-D geometric models of the aorta and supra-aortic branch vessels were constructed. Branch angle of the supra-aortic branch vessels and curvature metrics of the ascending aorta, aortic arch, and stented thoracic aortic lumen were calculated both at pre- and postintervention. The left common carotid artery branch angle was lower than the left subclavian artery angles preintervention ( P Supra-aortic branch vessel angulation remains relatively static when proximal landing zones are distal to the left common carotid artery.

  7. Abnormalities of aortic arch shape, central aortic flow dynamics, and distensibility predispose to hypertension after successful repair of aortic coarctation.

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    Donazzan, Luca; Crepaz, Robert; Stuefer, Josef; Stellin, Giovanni

    2014-10-01

    Systemic hypertension (HT) is a major long-term complication even after successful repair of aortic coarctation (CoA), and many factors are involved in this pathophysiology. To investigate the role of abnormalities in the aortic arch shape, central aortic flow dynamics, and distensibility in developing HT after successful repair of CoA. We selected a group of 26 normotensive patients (mean age 16.9±7.3 years, range 9-32 years) with anatomically successful repair of CoA among 140 patients regularly followed after repair of CoA and analyzed their last clinical and echocardiographic data. Bicycle exercise test and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) were also obtained. Mean age at surgical repair was 3.2±3.9 years (range 10 days-15 years); 12 patients underwent surgical correction during the first year of life. Repair of CoA was performed by end-to-end anastomosis (TT) in 23 patients (extended TT in 6 patients with arch hypoplasia), patch aortoplasty in 2, and subcalvian flap aortoplasty in 1. The postsurgical follow-up was 13.8±7.2 years (range 3.5-29.4 years). The shape of the aortic arch was defined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on this global geometry (normal-gothic-crenel), ratio of the height-transverse diameter (A/T), percentage of residual stenosis, and growth index of the transverse arch segments. Flow mapping by phase-contrast imaging in the ascending and descending aorta was performed in order to measure the systolic waveforms and central aortic distensibility. Twenty normal age-matched patients submitted to the same MRI protocol were used as controls. Six patients were found to have a gothic and 20 a normal aortic arch shape. Patients with gothic aortic arch shape had an increased A/T ratio (0.80±0.07 vs 0.58±0.05, P135 mm Hg on ABPM were higher in the gothic than in the normal arch group. There was a correlation between nocturnal SBP, 24 hours pulse pressure on ABPM in the whole group, and different MRI variables (A/T, distensibility of

  8. Endovascular Retrieval of Entrapped Elephant Trunk Graft During Complex Hybrid Aortic Arch Repair

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    Damodharan, Karthikeyan, E-mail: drdkarthik@hotmail.com [Singapore General Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Singapore); Chao, Victor T. T., E-mail: victor.chao.t.t@singhealth.com.sg [National Heart Centre, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Singapore); Tay, Kiang Hiong, E-mail: tay.kiang.hiong@singhealth.com.sg [Singapore General Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Singapore)

    2016-12-15

    Entrapment of the elephant trunk graft within the false lumen is a rare complication of surgical repair of an aortic dissection. This is normally retrieved by emergent open surgery. We describe a technique of endovascular retrieval of the dislodged graft, during hybrid aortic arch repair. The elephant trunk was cannulated through and through from a femoral access and the free end of the wire was snared and retrieved from a brachial access. The wire was externalised from both accesses and was used to reposition the graft into the true lumen using a body flossing technique.

  9. Comparison of hybrid endovascular and open surgical repair for proximal aortic arch diseases.

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    Kang, Woong Chol; Ko, Young-Guk; Shin, Eak Kyun; Park, Chul-Hyun; Choi, Donghoon; Youn, Young Nam; Lee, Do Yun

    2016-01-15

    To compare the outcomes of hybrid endovascular and open surgical repair for proximal aortic arch diseases. A total of 55 consecutive patients with aortic arch aneurysm or aortic dissection involving any of zone 0 to 1 (39 male, age 63.4 ± 14.3 years) underwent a hybrid endovascular repair (n=35) or open surgical repair (n=20) from 2006 to 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. Perioperative and late outcomes were compared. Baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups, except age and EuroSCORE II, which were higher in the hybrid group. Perioperative mortality or stroke was not significantly different between the two groups, however, tended to be lower in the hybrid repair group than in the open repair group (11.4% vs. 30.0%, p=0.144). Incidences of other morbidities did not differ. During follow-up, over-all survival was similar between the hybrid and the open repair was similar (87.3% vs. 79.7% at 1 year and 83.8% vs. 72.4% at 3 years; p=0.319). However, reintervention-free survival was significantly lower for hybrid repair compared with open repair (83.8% vs. 100% at 1 year and 65.7% vs. 100% at 3 years; p=0.022). Hybrid repair of proximal aortic disease showed comparable perioperative and late outcomes compared with open surgical repair despite a higher reintervention rate during follow-up. Therefore, hybrid repair may be considered as an acceptable treatment alternative to surgery especially in patients at high surgical risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Rapid Two-stage Versus One-stage Surgical Repair of Interrupted Aortic Arch with Ventricular Septal Defect in Neonates

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    Meng-Lin Lee

    2008-11-01

    Conclusion: The outcome of rapid two-stage repair is comparable to that of one-stage repair. Rapid two-stage repair has the advantages of significantly shorter cardiopulmonary bypass duration and AXC time, and avoids deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. LVOTO remains an unresolved issue, and postoperative aortic arch restenosis can be dilated effectively by percutaneous balloon angioplasty.

  11. Is Decellularized Porcine Small Intestine Sub-mucosa Patch Suitable for Aortic Arch Repair?

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    Corno, Antonio F.; Smith, Paul; Bezuska, Laurynas; Mimic, Branko

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: We reviewed our experience with decellularized porcine small intestine sub-mucosa (DPSIS) patch, recently introduced for congenital heart defects. Materials and Methods: Between 10/2011 and 04/2016 a DPSIS patch was used in 51 patients, median age 1.1 months (5 days to 14.5 years), for aortic arch reconstruction (45/51 = 88.2%) or aortic coarctation repair (6/51 = 11.8%). All medical records were retrospectively reviewed, with primary endpoints interventional procedure (balloon dilatation) or surgery (DPSIS patch replacement) due to patch-related complications. Results: In a median follow-up time of 1.5 ± 1.1 years (0.6–2.3years) in 13/51 patients (25.5%) a re-intervention, percutaneous interventional procedure (5/51 = 9.8%) or re-operation (8/51 = 15.7%) was required because of obstruction in the correspondence of the DPSIS patch used to enlarge the aortic arch/isthmus, with median max velocity flow at Doppler interrogation of 4.0 ± 0.51 m/s. Two patients required surgery after failed interventional cardiology. The mean interval between DPSIS patch implantation and re-intervention (percutaneous procedure or re-operation) was 6 months (1–17 months). While there were 3 hospital deaths (3/51 = 5.9%) not related to the patch implantation, no early or late mortality occurred for the subsequent procedure required for DPSIS patch interventional cardiology or surgery. The median max velocity flow at Doppler interrogation through the aortic arch/isthmus for the patients who did not require interventional procedure or surgery was 1.7 ± 0.57 m/s. Conclusions: High incidence of re-interventions with DPSIS patch for aortic arch and/or coarctation forced us to use alternative materials (homografts and decellularized gluteraldehyde preserved bovine pericardial matrix). PMID:29900163

  12. Importance of stent-graft design for aortic arch aneurysm repair

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    C Singh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aneurysm of the aorta is currently treated by open surgical repair or endovascular repair. However, when the aneurysm occurs in regions between the aortic arch and proximal descending aorta, it can be a complex pathology to treat due to its intricate geometry. When complex aortic aneurysms are treated with the conventional procedures, some of the patients present with significant post-operative complications and high mortality rate. Consequently, a clinically driven hybrid innovation known as the frozen elephant trunk procedure was introduced to treat complex aortic aneurysms. Although this procedure significantly reduces mortality rate and operating time, it is still associated with complications such as endoleaks, spinal cord ischemia, renal failure and stroke. Some of these complications are consequences of a mismatch in the biomechanical behaviour of the stent-graft device and the aorta. Research on complex aneurysm repair tended to focus more on the surgical procedure than the stent-graft design. Current stent-graft devices are suitable for straight vessels. However, when used to treat aortic aneurysm with complex geometry, these devices are ineffective in restoring the normal biological and biomechanical function of the aorta. A stent-graft device with mechanical properties that are comparable with the aorta and aortic arch could possibly lead to fewer post-operative complications, thus, better outcome for patients with complex aneurysm conditions. This review highlights the influence stent-graft design has on the biomechanical properties of the aorta which in turn can contribute to complications of complex aneurysm repair. Design attributes critical for minimising postoperative biomechanical mismatch are also discussed.

  13. Reverse extra-anatomic aortic arch debranching procedure allowing thoracic endovascular aortic repair of a chronic ascending aortic aneurysm

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    Ludovic Canaud, MD, PhD

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available A 79-year-old woman was admitted with a large chronic dissecting ascending aortic aneurysm starting 5 mm distal to the ostia of the left coronary artery and ending immediately proximal to the innominate artery. A reverse extra-anatomic aortic arch debranching procedure was performed. During the same operative time, through a transapical approach, a thoracic stent graft was deployed with the proximal landing zone just distal to the coronary ostia and the distal landing zone excluding the origin of the left common carotid artery. The postoperative course was uneventful. Computed tomography at 12 months documented patent extra-anatomic aortic arch debranching and no evidence of endoleak. Keywords: Ascending aorta, Thoracic aorta, Aortic dissection, Stent graft

  14. Aortic arch malformations

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    Kellenberger, Christian J. [University Children' s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2010-06-15

    Although anomalies of the aortic arch and its branches are relatively uncommon malformations, they are often associated with congenital heart disease. Isolated lesions may be clinically significant when the airways are compromised by a vascular ring. In this article, the development and imaging appearance of the aortic arch system and its various malformations are reviewed. (orig.)

  15. Aortic arch malformations

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    Kellenberger, Christian J.

    2010-01-01

    Although anomalies of the aortic arch and its branches are relatively uncommon malformations, they are often associated with congenital heart disease. Isolated lesions may be clinically significant when the airways are compromised by a vascular ring. In this article, the development and imaging appearance of the aortic arch system and its various malformations are reviewed. (orig.)

  16. Angular (Gothic) aortic arch leads to enhanced systolic wave reflection, central aortic stiffness, and increased left ventricular mass late after aortic coarctation repair: evaluation with magnetic resonance flow mapping.

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    Ou, Phalla; Celermajer, David S; Raisky, Olivier; Jolivet, Odile; Buyens, Fanny; Herment, Alain; Sidi, Daniel; Bonnet, Damien; Mousseaux, Elie

    2008-01-01

    We sought to investigate the mechanism whereby a particular deformity of the aortic arch, an angulated Gothic shape, might lead to hypertension late after anatomically successful repair of aortic coarctation. Fifty-five normotensive patients with anatomically successful repair of aortic coarctation and either a Gothic (angulated) or a Romanesque (smooth and rounded) arch were studied with magnetic resonance angiography and flow mapping in both the ascending and descending aortas. Systolic waveforms, central aortic stiffness, and pulse velocity were measured. We hypothesized that arch angulation would result in enhanced systolic wave reflection with loss of energy across the aortic arch, as well as increased central aortic stiffness. Twenty patients were found to have a Gothic, and 35 a Romanesque, arch. Patients with a Gothic arch showed markedly augmented systolic wave reflection (12 +/- 6 vs 5 +/- 0.3 mL, P Gothic arch (5.6 +/- 1.1 vs 4.1 +/- 1 m/s, P Gothic aortic arch is associated with increased systolic wave reflection, as well as increased central aortic stiffness and left ventricular mass index. These findings explain (at least in part) the association between this pattern of arch geometry and late hypertension at rest and on exercise in subjects after coarctation repair.

  17. Surgical modification for preventing a gothic arch after aortic arch repair without the use of foreign material.

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    Seo, Dong-Man; Park, Jiyoung; Goo, Hyun Woo; Kim, Young Hwue; Ko, Jae-Kon; Jhang, Won Kyoung

    2015-04-01

    Systemic hypertension is the main late complication after arch reconstruction in patients with arch obstruction. Gothic arch geometry is suspected to be one of its possible causes. Accordingly, we evaluated here if a modified arch repair technique using an autologous pulmonary patch is effective in preventing gothic arch development. Fifty infants who underwent arch repair with either a modified (n = 17) or conventional (n = 33) technique between January 2006 and August 2012 by a single surgeon were retrospectively reviewed. Arch geometry was compared using three categories (gothic, crenel or roman), classified by the height/width (H/W) ratio and the arch angle measured in computed tomography. No gothic arch geometry was observed in the modified group, whereas it was observed in 9 cases in the conventional group (P = 0.005). Moreover, reintervention for arch restenosis was performed only in the conventional group (n = 4; P = 0.29). No associated complications were observed, although the selective cerebral perfusion time was longer in the modified group than in the conventional group (28.5 ± 6.2 vs 17.1 ± 9.9 min; P gothic arch geometry, but also as equally safe in terms of early clinical outcomes as conventional arch reconstruction techniques. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  18. Repair of aortic arch aneurysm under cardiopulmonary bypass and deep hypothermia with low flow: A case report

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    Md. Rezwanul Hoque

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aortic arch surgery is the challenging and most difficult surgery among the cardiovascular operations. Cerebral and spinal complications are the most feared and common complications of aortic arch surgery. With best available techniques for cerebral and spinal protection, anesthetic management and good post-operative care; aortic arch surgery is considerably safer nowadays and satisfactory results can be achieved in most patients. Also, selecting the sites for arterial cannulation to maintain whole body circulation, during isolation of the aortic arch to operate on it, need proper anatomical description of the extent of the aneurysm. This is also achievable by the availability of the imaging techniques like Computed Tomog­raphy (CT with or without contrast, CT Angiography (CTA and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI. We are reporting a case of aneurysm of aortic arch in a young adult, who had undergone repair under cardiopulmonary bypass and deep hypothermia with low flow and had normal convalescence without any cerebral or spinal complications.

  19. Arch reconstruction with autologous pulmonary artery patch in interrupted aortic arch.

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    Lee, Won-Young; Park, Jeong-Jun

    2014-04-01

    Various surgical techniques have been developed for the repair of an interrupted aortic arch. However, tension and Gothic arch formation at the anastomotic site have remained major problems for these techniques: Excessive tension causes arch stenosis and left main bronchus compression, and Gothic arch configuration is related to cardiovascular complications. To resolve these problems, we adopted a modified surgical technique of distal aortic arch augmentation using an autologous main pulmonary artery patch. The descending aorta was then anastomosed to the augmented aortic arch in an end-to-side manner. Here, we report two cases of interrupted aortic arch that were repaired using this technique.

  20. Traumatic partial avulsion of a single right subclavian artery from the aortic arch and definitive repair.

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    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Sears-Rogan, Pamela; Young, Richard S; Kanda, Louis T; Ellis, Jennifer L

    2006-01-01

    Blunt injury to the right subclavian artery is a rare complication of severe deceleration trauma often associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We describe an atypical presentation in a patient who sustained a traumatic avulsion of his right subclavian artery arising off the aortic arch. An interposition graft was used to restore the continuity of the artery to the ascending thoracic aorta.

  1. Double aortic arch

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    Surgery can be done to fix double aortic arch. The surgeon ties off the smaller branch and separates it from the larger branch. Then the surgeon closes the ends of the aorta with stitches. This relieves pressure on the esophagus and windpipe.

  2. The Infant with Aortic Arch Hypoplasia and Small Left Heart Structures: Echocardiographic Indices of Mitral and Aortic Hypoplasia Predicting Successful Biventricular Repair.

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    Plymale, Jennifer M; Frommelt, Peter C; Nugent, Melodee; Simpson, Pippa; Tweddell, James S; Shillingford, Amanda J

    2017-08-01

    In infants with aortic arch hypoplasia and small left-sided cardiac structures, successful biventricular repair is dependent on the adequacy of the left-sided structures. Defining accurate thresholds of echocardiographic indices predictive of successful biventricular repair is paramount to achieving optimal outcomes. We sought to identify pre-operative echocardiographic indices of left heart size that predict intervention-free survival in infants with small left heart structures undergoing primary aortic arch repair to establish biventricular circulation (BVC). Infants ≤2 months undergoing aortic arch repair from 1999 to 2010 with aortic and/or mitral valve hypoplasia, (Z-score ≤-2) were included. Pre-operative and follow-up echocardiograms were reviewed. Primary outcome was successful biventricular circulation (BVC), defined as freedom from death, transplant, or single ventricular conversion at 1 year. Need for catheter based or surgical re-intervention (RI), valve annular growth, and significant late aortic or mitral valve obstruction were additional outcomes. Fifty one of 73 subjects (79%) had successful BVC and were free of RI at 1 year. Seven subjects failed BVC; four of those died. The overall 1 year survival for the cohort was 95%. Fifteen subjects underwent a RI but maintained BVC. In univariate analysis, larger transverse aorta (p = 0.006) and aortic valve (p = 0.02) predicted successful BVC without RI. In CART analysis, the combination of mitral valve (MV) to tricuspid valve (TV) ratio ≤0.66 with an aortic valve (AV) annulus Z-score ≤-3 had the greatest power to predict BVC failure (sensitivity 71%, specificity 94%). In those with successful BVC, the combination of both AV and MV Z-score ≤-2.5 increased the odds of RI (OR 3.8; CI 1.3-11.4). Follow-up of non-RI subjects revealed improvement in AV and MV Z-score (median AV annulus changed over time from -2.34 to 0.04 (p indices. In this complex population, 1 year survival is high, but

  3. Is there a prospect for hybrid aortic arch surgery?

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    Bashir, Mohamad; Harky, Amer; Bilal, Haris

    2018-05-16

    The surge of endovascular repair of aortic aneurysm in current modern aortic surgery practice has been the key for surgical management of elective cases of thoracic aortic aneurysms. This has paved way for the combined hybrid approach to be amongst the armamentarium for the management of aortic arch disease. The pivotal understanding of the aortic arch natural history coupled with device technology advancement allowed surgeons insight into delivery of hybrid surgery with acceptable morbidity and mortality results. This review article provides current insights into hybrid technique of aortic arch aneurysm repair and the evidences behind its applicability to arch surgery. It is aimed to highlight the challenges encountered for this innovative approach and correlate its challenges to those that are met by the conventional open aortic arch repair.

  4. Early- and Mid-term Results of the Chimney Technique in the Repair of Aortic Arch Pathologies

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    Zou, Junjie; Jiao, Yuanyong, E-mail: wishlucky@163.com, E-mail: johemail@163.com; Zhang, Xiwei; Jiang, Jun; Yang, Hongyu; Ma, Hao [First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Division of Vascular Surgery, Department of General Surgery (China)

    2016-11-15

    PurposeTo examine the safety, feasibility, and mid-term efficacy of the chimney technique for aortic arch pathologies.MethodsFrom February 2011 to December 2014, a total of 35 patients (30 men; mean age 54.3 ± 14.1 years) with aortic arch pathologies underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair combined with chimney stents. The indication was a proximal landing zone <1.5 cm. Follow-up was performed at 3, 6, and 12 months and then yearly thereafter.ResultsA total of 36 chimney stents were deployed (innominate artery, n = 1; left common carotid artery, n = 9; right subclavian artery, n = 1; left subclavian artery, n = 25). The technical success rate was 94.3 % (33/35). Immediate type Ia endoleaks (ELIa) were observed in two patients (8.6 %, 2/35). Twenty-five patients were successfully followed-up for a median period of 29.3 months (range, 6–48 months). One patient died due to aortic dissection aneurysm rupture at 36 months (mortality rate of 4 %, 1/25). Three late ELIa were observed and no reinterventions were performed. The overall incidence of ELIa was 20 % (5/25). During follow-up, the patency rate for chimney stents was 92 % (23/25).ConclusionOur limited experience demonstrates that the chimney technique is a viable and relatively safe treatment for patients with challenging thoracic aortic pathologies at least in the mid-term follow-up period.

  5. Early- and Mid-term Results of the Chimney Technique in the Repair of Aortic Arch Pathologies

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    Zou, Junjie; Jiao, Yuanyong; Zhang, Xiwei; Jiang, Jun; Yang, Hongyu; Ma, Hao

    2016-01-01

    PurposeTo examine the safety, feasibility, and mid-term efficacy of the chimney technique for aortic arch pathologies.MethodsFrom February 2011 to December 2014, a total of 35 patients (30 men; mean age 54.3 ± 14.1 years) with aortic arch pathologies underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair combined with chimney stents. The indication was a proximal landing zone <1.5 cm. Follow-up was performed at 3, 6, and 12 months and then yearly thereafter.ResultsA total of 36 chimney stents were deployed (innominate artery, n = 1; left common carotid artery, n = 9; right subclavian artery, n = 1; left subclavian artery, n = 25). The technical success rate was 94.3 % (33/35). Immediate type Ia endoleaks (ELIa) were observed in two patients (8.6 %, 2/35). Twenty-five patients were successfully followed-up for a median period of 29.3 months (range, 6–48 months). One patient died due to aortic dissection aneurysm rupture at 36 months (mortality rate of 4 %, 1/25). Three late ELIa were observed and no reinterventions were performed. The overall incidence of ELIa was 20 % (5/25). During follow-up, the patency rate for chimney stents was 92 % (23/25).ConclusionOur limited experience demonstrates that the chimney technique is a viable and relatively safe treatment for patients with challenging thoracic aortic pathologies at least in the mid-term follow-up period.

  6. Hybrid Repair of Complex Thoracic Aortic Arch Pathology: Long-Term Outcomes of Extra-anatomic Bypass Grafting of the Supra-aortic Trunk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotfi, S.; Clough, R. E.; Ali, T.; Salter, R.; Young, C. P.; Bell, R.; Modarai, B.; Taylor, P.

    2013-01-01

    Hybrid repair constitutes supra-aortic debranching before thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). It offers improved short-term outcome compared with open surgery; however, longer-term studies are required to assess patient outcomes and patency of the extra-anatomic bypass grafts. A prospectively maintained database of 380 elective and urgent patients who had undergone TEVAR (1997–2011) was analyzed retrospectively. Fifty-one patients (34 males; 17 females) underwent hybrid repair. Median age was 71 (range, 18–90) years with mean follow-up of 15 (range, 0–61) months. Perioperative complications included death: 10 % (5/51), stroke: 12 % (6/51), paraplegia: 6 % (3/51), endoleak: 16 % (8/51), rupture: 4 % (2/51), upper-limb ischemia: 2 % (1/51), bypass graft occlusion: 4 % (2/51), and cardiopulmonary complications in 14 % (7/51). Three patients (6 %) required emergency intervention for retrograde dissection: (2 aortic root repairs; 2 innominate stents). Early reintervention was performed for type 1 endoleak in two patients (2 proximal cuff extensions). One patient underwent innominate stenting and revision of their bypass for symptomatic restenosis. At 48 months, survival was 73 %. Endoleak was detected in three (6 %) patients (type 1 = 2; type 2 = 1) requiring debranching with proximal stent graft (n = 2) and proximal extension cuff (n = 1). One patient had a fatal rupture of a mycotic aneurysm and two arch aneurysms expanded. No bypass graft occluded after the perioperative period. Hybrid operations to treat aortic arch disease can be performed with results comparable to open surgery. The longer-term outcomes demonstrate low rates of reintervention and high rates of graft patency.

  7. Hybrid Repair of Complex Thoracic Aortic Arch Pathology: Long-Term Outcomes of Extra-anatomic Bypass Grafting of the Supra-aortic Trunk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotfi, S., E-mail: shamim.lotfi@kcl.ac.uk; Clough, R. E.; Ali, T. [Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Trust, Vascular Surgery (United Kingdom); Salter, R. [Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Trust, Interventional Radiology (United Kingdom); Young, C. P. [Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Trust, Cardiac Surgery (United Kingdom); Bell, R.; Modarai, B.; Taylor, P., E-mail: peter.taylor@gstt.nhs.uk [Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Trust, Vascular Surgery (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15

    Hybrid repair constitutes supra-aortic debranching before thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). It offers improved short-term outcome compared with open surgery; however, longer-term studies are required to assess patient outcomes and patency of the extra-anatomic bypass grafts. A prospectively maintained database of 380 elective and urgent patients who had undergone TEVAR (1997-2011) was analyzed retrospectively. Fifty-one patients (34 males; 17 females) underwent hybrid repair. Median age was 71 (range, 18-90) years with mean follow-up of 15 (range, 0-61) months. Perioperative complications included death: 10 % (5/51), stroke: 12 % (6/51), paraplegia: 6 % (3/51), endoleak: 16 % (8/51), rupture: 4 % (2/51), upper-limb ischemia: 2 % (1/51), bypass graft occlusion: 4 % (2/51), and cardiopulmonary complications in 14 % (7/51). Three patients (6 %) required emergency intervention for retrograde dissection: (2 aortic root repairs; 2 innominate stents). Early reintervention was performed for type 1 endoleak in two patients (2 proximal cuff extensions). One patient underwent innominate stenting and revision of their bypass for symptomatic restenosis. At 48 months, survival was 73 %. Endoleak was detected in three (6 %) patients (type 1 = 2; type 2 = 1) requiring debranching with proximal stent graft (n = 2) and proximal extension cuff (n = 1). One patient had a fatal rupture of a mycotic aneurysm and two arch aneurysms expanded. No bypass graft occluded after the perioperative period. Hybrid operations to treat aortic arch disease can be performed with results comparable to open surgery. The longer-term outcomes demonstrate low rates of reintervention and high rates of graft patency.

  8. Autologous platelet-rich plasma reduces transfusions during ascending aortic arch repair: a prospective, randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shao Feng; Estrera, Anthony L; Loubser, Paul; Ignacio, Craig; Panthayi, Sreelatha; Miller, Charles; Sheinbaum, Roy; Safi, Hazim J

    2015-04-01

    Blood conservation using autologous platelet-rich plasma (aPRP), a technique of whole blood harvest that separates red blood cells from plasma and platelets before cardiopulmonary bypass with retransfusion of the preserved platelets after completion of cardiopulmonary bypass, has not been studied extensively. We sought to prospectively determine whether aPRP reduces blood transfusions during ascending and transverse aortic arch repair. We randomly assigned 80 patients undergoing elective ascending and transverse aortic arch repair using deep hypothermic circulatory arrest to receive either aPRP (n = 38) or no aPRP (n = 42). Volume of aPRP retransfused was 726 ± 124 mL. The primary end point was transfusion amount. Secondary end points were death, stroke, renal failure, pulmonary failure, and transfusion costs. Perioperative transfusion rate was defined as blood transfusions given during surgery and up to 72 hours afterward. The surgeon and intensivist were blinded to the treatment arm. Because an anesthesiologist initiated the protocol, the surgeon was not aware of aPRP collection, as this occurred only after the sterile drape was in place. In addition, because cell salvage was performed on all cases, differentiation in perfusionist activities (during spinning of aPRP) was not evident. Platelet, fresh frozen plasma, and cryoprecipitate intraoperative transfusions were performed only after heparin was reversed and the patient was judged as coagulopathic on the basis of associated criteria: cryoprecipitate transfusion for fibrinogen level less than 150 μg/dL, platelet transfusion for platelet count less than 80,000, and fresh frozen plasma when thromboelastogram test was suggestive or a partial thromboplastin time was greater than 55 seconds, and prothrombin time was greater than 1.6 seconds. Early mortality, stroke, and respiratory complications were similar between groups. Only acute renal failure was reduced in the aPRP group, 7% versus 0% (p platelets by 56

  9. Acute Aortic Arch Perforation During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Bicuspid Aortic Stenosis and a Gothic Aortic Arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan-Iturbe, Oscar; Sawaya, Fadi J; Bieliauskas, Gintautas; Chow, Danny H F; De Backer, Ole; Søndergaard, Lars

    2017-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has evolved from a novel technology to an established therapy for high/intermediate-risk patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS). Although TAVR is used to treat bicuspid severe AS, the large randomized trials typically excluded bicuspid AS because of its unique anatomic features. This case report describes an acute aortic perforation during delivery of a transcatheter heart valve to treat a severe bicuspid AS with a "gothic aortic arch"; more careful evaluation of the preprocedural multislice computed tomographic scan would have unveiled a sharply angulated aortic arch. This life-threatening complication was successfully treated by thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Variation in Perfusion Strategies for Neonatal and Infant Aortic Arch Repair: Contemporary Practice in the STS Congenital Heart Surgery Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, David B; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Hill, Kevin; Wallace, Amelia S; Bateson, Brian; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2016-09-01

    Regional cerebral perfusion (RCP) is used as an adjunct or alternative to deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) for neonates and infants undergoing aortic arch repair. Clinical studies have not demonstrated clear superiority of either strategy, and multicenter data regarding current use of these strategies are lacking. We sought to describe the variability in contemporary practice patterns for use of these techniques. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (2010-2013) was queried to identify neonates and infants whose index operation involved aortic arch repair with cardiopulmonary bypass. Perfusion strategy was classified as isolated DHCA, RCP (with less than or equal to ten minutes of DHCA), or mixed (RCP with more than ten minutes of DHCA). Data were analyzed for the entire cohort and stratified by operation subgroups. Overall, 4,523 patients (105 centers) were identified; median age seven days (interquartile range: 5.0-13.0). The most prevalent perfusion strategy was RCP (43%). Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and mixed perfusion accounted for 32% and 16% of cases, respectively. In all, 59% of operations involved some period of RCP. Regional cerebral perfusion was the most prevalent perfusion strategy for each operation subgroup. Neither age nor weight was associated with perfusion strategy, but reoperations were less likely to use RCP (31% vs 45%, P RCP and DHCA in the RCP group was longer than the DHCA time in the DHCA group (45 vs 36 minutes, P neonates and infants. In contemporary practice, RCP is the most prevalent perfusion strategy for these procedures. Use of DHCA is also common. Further investigation is warranted to ascertain possible relative merits of the various perfusion techniques. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Arch translocation and the intra-arch elephant-trunk technique with collared graft for extended chronic dissecting aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikenaga Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Management of extensive, chronic, dissecting aortic aneurysms after prior repair of the ascending aorta presents a technical challenge for surgeons. A symptomatic 64-year-old patient was admitted for elective surgical repair of an aortic annular dilatation, causing severe aortic regurgitation, and a Crawford type II extended thoracoabdominal aneurysm, 4 years after he underwent primary repair of an acute aortic dissection. The aorta was diffusely dilated, and there were no sites beyond the distal aortic arch where anastomosis could be performed. We successfully performed total aortic replacement with a 2-stage strategy, using an arch translocation technique and an intra-arch elephant-trunk technique.

  12. Bovine aortic arch with supravalvular aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idhrees, Mohammed; Cherian, Vijay Thomas; Menon, Sabarinath; Mathew, Thomas; Dharan, Baiju S; Jayakumar, K

    2016-09-01

    A 5-year-old boy was diagnosed to have supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS). On evaluation of CT angiogram, there was associated bovine aortic arch (BAA). Association of BAA with SVAS has not been previously reported in literature, and to best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of SVAS with BAA. Recent studies show BAA as a marker for aortopathy. SVAS is also an arteriopathy. In light of this, SVAS can also possibly be a manifestation of aortopathy associated with BAA. Copyright © 2015 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Bovine aortic arch with supravalvular aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Idhrees

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A 5-year-old boy was diagnosed to have supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS. On evaluation of CT angiogram, there was associated bovine aortic arch (BAA. Association of BAA with SVAS has not been previously reported in literature, and to best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of SVAS with BAA. Recent studies show BAA as a marker for aortopathy. SVAS is also an arteriopathy. In light of this, SVAS can also possibly be a manifestation of aortopathy associated with BAA.

  14. Whole body perfusion for hybrid aortic arch repair: evolution of selective regional perfusion with a modified extracorporeal circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Philip; Walsh, Graham; Walsh, Stephanie; O'Neil, Michael; Gelinas, Jill; Chu, Michael W A

    2017-04-01

    Patients undergoing hybrid aortic arch reconstruction require careful protection of vital organs. We believe that whole body perfusion with tailored dual circuitry may help to achieve optimal patient outcomes. Our circuit has evolved from a secondary circuit utilizing a cardioplegia delivery device for lower body perfusion to a dual-oxygenator circuit. This allows individually controlled regional perfusion with ease of switching from secondary to primary circuit for total body flow. The re-design allows for separate flow and temperature regulation with two oxygenators in parallel. All patients underwent a single-stage operation for simultaneous treatment of arch and descending aortic pathology via a sternotomy, using a hybrid frozen elephant trunk technique. We report six consecutive patients undergoing hybrid arch and frozen elephant trunk reconstruction using a dual-oxygenator circuit. Five patients underwent elective surgery and one was emergent. One patient had an acute dissection while three underwent concomitant procedures, including a Ross procedure and two valve-sparing root reconstructions. Three cases were redo sternotomies. The mean pump time was 358 ± 131 min, the aortic cross clamp time 243 ± 135 min, the cardioplegia volume of 33,208 ml ± 16,173, cerebral ischemia 0 min, lower body ischemia 76 ± 34 min and the average lower body perfusion time was 142 min. Two patients did not require any donor blood products. The median intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital lengths of stay (LOS) were two days and 10 days, respectively. The average peak serum lactate on CPB was 7.47 mmol/L and, at admission to the ICU, it was 3.37 mmol/L. Renal and respiratory failure developed in the salvage acute type A dissection patient. No other complications occurred in this series. Whole body perfusion as delivered through individually controlled dual-oxygenator circuitry allows maximum flexibility for hybrid aortic arch reconstruction. A modified circuit perfusion

  15. Mycotic Aneurysm of the Aortic Arch

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    Ji Hye Seo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A mycotic aneurysm of the thoracic aorta is rare. We report a case of mycotic aneurysm that developed in the aortic arch. An 86-year-old man was admitted with fever and general weakness. Blood culture yielded methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Chest X-ray showed an enlarged aortic arch, and computed tomography scan revealed an aneurysm in the aortic arch. The patient was treated only with antibiotics and not surgically. The size of the aneurysm increased rapidly, resulting in bronchial obstruction and superimposed pneumonia. The patient died of respiratory failure.

  16. Aortic Arch Aneurysms: Treatment with Extra anatomical Bypass and Endovascular Stent-Grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Noriyuki; Shimono, Takatsugu; Hirano, Tadanori; Mizumoto, Toru; Ishida, Masaki; Fujii, Hideki; Yada, Isao; Takeda, Kan

    2002-01-01

    Endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms is emerging as an attractive alternative to surgical graft replacement. However,patients with aortic arch aneurysms are often excluded from the target of endovascular repair because of lack of suitable landing zones, especially at the proximal ones. In this paper we describe our method for treating patients with aortic arch aneurysms using a combination of extra anatomical bypass surgery and endovascular stent-grafting

  17. Tracheal Compression Caused by a Mediastinal Hematoma After Interrupted Aortic Arch Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Qingwang; Lin, Zhiyong; Hu, Xingti; Zhao, Qifeng

    2017-08-03

    Congenital abnormalities of the aortic arch include interrupted aortic arch (IAA), coarctation of the aorta (CoA), and double aortic arch (DAA). Aortic arch repair is difficult and postoperative complications are common. However, postoperative tracheobronchial stenosis with respiratory insufficiency is an uncommon complication and is usually caused by increased aortic anastomotic tension. We report here a case of tracheal compression by a mediastinal hematoma following IAA surgery. The patient underwent a repeat operation to remove the hematoma and was successfully weaned off the ventilator.In cases of tracheobronchial stenosis after aortic arch surgery, airway compression by increased aortic anastomotic tension is usually the first diagnosis considered by clinicians. Other causes, such as mediastinal hematomas, are often ignored. However, the severity of symptoms with mediastinal hematomas makes this an important entity.

  18. Neonatal aortic arch reconstruction avoiding circulatory arrest and direct arch vessel cannulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchervenkov, C I; Korkola, S J; Shum-Tim, D; Calaritis, C; Laliberté, E; Reyes, T U; Lavoie, J

    2001-11-01

    Aortic arch reconstruction in neonates routinely requires deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. We reviewed our experience with techniques of continuous low-flow cerebral perfusion (LFCP) avoiding direct arch vessel cannulation. Eighteen patients, with a median age of 11 days (range 1 to 85 days) and a mean weight of 3.2 +/- 0.8 kg, underwent aortic arch reconstruction with LFCP. Seven had biventricular repairs with arch reconstruction, 9 underwent the Norwood operation and 2 had isolated arch repairs. In 1 Norwood and 7 biventricular repair patients, LFCP was maintained by advancing the cannula from the distal ascending aorta into the innominate artery. In 8 of 9 Norwood patients, LFCP was maintained by directing the arterial cannula into the pulmonary artery confluence and perfusing the innominate artery through the right modified Blalock-Taussig shunt fully constructed before cannulation for cardiopulmonary bypass. In 2 patients requiring isolated arch reconstruction, the ascending aorta was cannulated and the cross-clamp was applied just distal to the innominate artery. LFCP was maintained at 0.6 +/- 0.2 L x min(-1) x m(-2) for 41.0 +/- 13.9 minutes at 18.5 degrees C +/- 1.1 degrees C. In 10 of the 18 patients, blood pressure during LFCP was 15 +/- 8 mm Hg remote from the innominate artery (left radial, umbilical or femoral arteries). In 8 of the 18 patients, right radial pressure during LFCP was 24 +/- 10 mm Hg. The mean mixed-venous saturation was 79.8% +/- 10% during LFCP. Two patients had preoperative seizures, whereas none had seizures postoperatively. One patient died. Neonatal aortic arch reconstruction is possible without circulatory arrest or direct arch vessel cannulation. These techniques maintained adequate mixed-venous oxygen saturations with no associated adverse neurologic outcomes.

  19. Bovine aortic arch: A novel association with thoracic aortic dilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malone, C.D.; Urbania, T.H.; Crook, S.E.S.; Hope, M.D.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether there is a link between bovine arch and thoracic aortic aneurysm. Materials and methods: Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images of the thorax of 191 patients with dilated thoracic aortas and 391 consecutive, unselected patients as controls were retrospectively reviewed. Bovine arch was considered present if either a shared origin of the left common carotid and innominate arteries or an origin of the left common carotid from the innominate artery was identified. A chi-square test was used to evaluate the significance of differences between subgroups. Results: A trend towards increased prevalence of bovine arch was seen in patients with dilated aortas (26.2%) compared to controls (20.5%, p = 0.12). The association was statistically significant in patients over 70 years old (31.9%, p = 0.019) and when dilation involved the aortic arch (47.6%, p = 0.003). Conclusions: An association between bovine arch and aortic dilation is seen in older patients, and when dilation involves the aortic arch. Bovine arch should be considered a potential risk factor for thoracic aortic aneurysm.

  20. Hybrid treatment of aortic arch disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Patrick Bastos; Rossi, Fabio Henrique; Moreira, Samuel Martins; Issa, Mario; Izukawa, Nilo Mitsuru; Dinkhuysen, Jarbas J.; Spina Neto, Domingos; Kambara, Antônio Massamitsu

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The management of thoracic aortic disease involving the ascending aorta, aortic arch and descending thoracic aorta are technically challenging and is an area in constant development and innovation. Objective To analyze early and midterm results of hybrid treatment of arch aortic disease. Methods Retrospective study of procedures performed from January 2010 to December 2012. The end points were the technical success, therapeutic success, morbidity and mortality, neurologic outcomes, the rate of endoleaks and reinterventions. Results A total of 95 patients treated for thoracic aortic diseases in this period, 18 underwent hybrid treatment and entered in this study. The average ages were 62.3 years. The male was present in 66.7%. The technical and therapeutic success was 94.5% e 83.3%. The perioperative mortality rate of 11.1%. There is any death during one-year follow- up. The reoperation rates were 16.6% due 2 cases of endoleak Ia and one case of endoleak II. There is any occlusion of anatomic or extra anatomic bypass during follow up. Conclusion In our study, the hybrid treatment of aortic arch disease proved to be a feasible alternative of conventional surgery. The therapeutic success rates and re- interventions obtained demonstrate the necessity of thorough clinical follow-up of these patients in a long time. PMID:25714205

  1. INTERRUPTION OF THE AORTIC-ARCH, DISTAL AORTOPULMONARY WINDOW, ARTERIAL DUCT AND AORTIC ORIGIN OF THE RIGHT PULMONARY-ARTERY IN A NEONATE - REPORT OF A CASE SUCCESSFULLY REPAIRED IN A ONE-STAGE OPERATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOONSTRA, PW; EBELS, T

    The case of a 4-day-old male neonate with the rare combination of interruption of the aortic arch beyond the left subclavian artery, distal aortopulmonary window, persistent arterial duct and aortic origin of the right pulmonary artery is presented. Review of the literature reveals this patient to

  2. A bovine aortic arch in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Arnáiz-García

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe a curious congenital variation of human aortic arch (AA branching pattern termed the “bovine aortic arch”. Rather than arising directly from the AA as a separate branch as occurs in the most common AA branching pattern, the left common carotid artery moves to the right and merges from the brachiocephalic trunk. It is the normal AA branching pattern presented in a number of animals (canines, felines or Macaque monkeys but it has nothing to do with anatomy of AA in ruminant animals, including cattle and buffalo. That is why it is one of the most widely misnomers used in medical literature whose origin is nowadays unknown.

  3. Total Endovascular Aortic Repair in a Patient with Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amako, Mau; Spear, Rafaëlle; Clough, Rachel E; Hertault, Adrien; Azzaoui, Richard; Martin-Gonzalez, Teresa; Sobocinski, Jonathan; Haulon, Stéphan

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study is to describe a total endovascular aortic repair with branched and fenestrated endografts in a young patient with Marfan syndrome and a chronic aortic dissection. Open surgery is the gold standard to treat aortic dissections in patients with aortic disease and Marfan syndrome. In 2000, a 38-year-old man with Marfan syndrome underwent open ascending aorta repair for an acute type A aortic dissection. One year later, a redo sternotomy was performed for aortic valve replacement. In 2013, the patient presented with endocarditis and pulmonary infection, which necessitated tracheostomy and temporary dialysis. In 2014, the first stage of the endovascular repair was performed using an inner branched endograft to exclude a 77-mm distal arch and descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. In 2015, a 63-mm thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm was excluded by implantation of a 4-fenestrated endograft. Follow-up after both endovascular repairs was uneventful. Total aortic endovascular repair was successfully performed to treat a patient with arch and thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with chronic aortic dissection and Marfan syndrome. The postoperative images confirmed patency of the endograft and its branches, and complete exclusion of the aortic false lumen. Endovascular repair is a treatment option in patients with connective tissue disease who are not candidates for open surgery. Long-term follow-up is required to confirm these favorable early outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Recurrent Pneumonia due to Double Aortic Arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Sedighi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pneumonia is one of the most common infections during childhood. In children with recurrent bacterial pneumonia complete evaluation for underlying factors is necessary. The most common underlying diseases include: antibody deficiencies , cystic fibrosis , tracheoesophageal fistula and increased pulmonary blood flow. Vascular ring and its pressure effect is a less common cause of stridor and recurrent pneumonia. Congenital abnormalities in aortic arch and main branches which form vascular ring around esophagus and trachea with variable pressure effect cause respiratory symptoms such as stridor , wheezing and recurrent pneumoniaCase Report: A 2 year old boy was admitted in our hospital with respiratory distress and cough . Chest x-Ray demonstrated right lobar pneumonia. He had history of stridor and wheezing from neonatal period and hospitalization due to pneumonia for four times. The patient received appropriate antibiotics. Despite fever and respiratory distress improvement, wheezing continued. Review of his medical documents showed fixed pressure effect on posterior aspect of esophagus in barium swallow. In CT angiography we confirmed double aortic arch.Conclusion: Double aortic arch is one of the causes of persistant respiratory symptom and recurrent pneumonia in children for which fluoroscopic barium swallow is the first non-invasive diagnostic method.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;19(1:70-74

  5. [Single coronary artery and right aortic arch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-01-01

    Coronary anomalies are mostly asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally during coronary angiography or echocardiography. However, they must be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of angina, dyspnea, syncope, acute myocardial infarction or sudden death in young patients. The case is presented of two rare anomalies, single coronary artery originating from right sinus of Valsalva and right aortic arch, in a 65 year-old patient with atherosclerotic coronary artery disease treated percutaneously. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. [Right lung cancer with right aortic arch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Noriyuki, T; Kuroda, Y; Kuranishi, F; Nakahara, M; Fukuda, T; Ishizaki, Y; Hotta, R; Akimoto, E; Mori, H

    2008-02-01

    An abnormal shadow was detected on chest X-ray mass screening in an asymptomatic 63-year-old man. The further examinations revealed the shadow to be primary lung cancer (Rt. S6. adenocarcinoma, cT2N0M0, c-stage IB) with right aortic arch. We used 3 dimentional-computed tomography (3D-CT) to assess an anatomical feature of vessels in detail. The right lower lobectomy and the dissection of medi astinal lymph nodes was performed. We confirmed no abnormal anatomy of pulmonary artery and vein at surgery, and it was possible to perform right lower lobectomy with the common procedure. Since lymph node was found by intraopetrative pathological examination, since no metastasis from interlobar to subcarinal lymph node was found, we did not perform dissection of upper mediastinal dissection, which was equivalent to ND2a lymph nodes dissection of the left lung cancer in General Rule for Clinical and Pathological Record of Lung Cancer. The patient with right aortic arch is known to have variant anatomy of other intrathoracic vessels occasionally. 3D-CT was quite useful in assessing anatomical feature, and enabled us to perform safe operation.

  7. Supra-aortic interventions for endovascular exclusion of the entire aortic arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrási, Terézia B; Grossmann, Marius; Zenker, Dieter; Danner, Bernhard C; Schöndube, Friedrich A

    2017-07-01

    Our aim was to analyze the outcomes of endovascular exclusion of the entire aortic arch (proximal landing in zone 0, distal landing in zone III or beyond, after Ishimaru) in which complete surgical debranching of the supra-aortic vessels (I), endovascular supra-aortic revascularization (chimney, fenestrated, or branched grafts) with partial surgical debranching (II), or total endovascular supra-aortic revascularization (III) was additionally performed. Publications describing endovascular repair of the aortic arch (2000-2016) were systematically searched and reviewed. From a total of 53 relevant studies including 1853 patients, only 1021 patients undergoing 35 different total aortic arch procedures were found eligible for further evaluation and included in group I, II, or III (429, 190, and 402 patients, respectively). Overall early mortality was higher in group I vs groups II and III (P = .001; 1 - β = 95.6%) but exceeded in group III (18.6%) and group II (14.0%) vs group I (8.0%; P = .044; 1 - β = 57.4%) for diseases involving zone 0. Mortality was higher in all subgroups treated for zone 0 disease compared with corresponding subgroups treated for zone I to zone III disease. The incidence of cerebral ischemic events was increased in groups I and II vs group III (7.5% and 11% vs 1.7%; P = .0001) and correlated with early mortality (R 2  = .20; P = .033). The incidence of type II endoleaks and endovascular reintervention was similar between groups and correlated with each other (R 2  = .37; P = .004). Type Ia endoleak occurred more often in groups II and III than in group I (7.1% and 12.1% vs 5.8%; P = .023) and correlated with midterm mortality (R 2  = .53; P = .005). Retrograde type A dissection was low in all groups, whereas aneurysm growth was higher in group III (2.6%, 4.2%, 10.7%; P = .002), correlating with midterm mortality (R 2  = .311; P = .009). Surgical revision slightly correlated with surgical complications (R 2  = .18; P = .044

  8. Right circumflex retro-oesophageal aortic arch with coarctation of a high-positioned right arch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Kyung-Sik; Yong, Hwan Seok; Woo, Ok Hee; Kang, Eun-Young; Lee, Joo-Won

    2007-01-01

    We present a rare case of right circumflex retro-oesophageal aortic arch with coarctation of a high-positioned right arch. A 7-month-old boy presented with a cardiac murmur. Cardiac situs was normal and there was no evidence of an intracardiac shunt or patent ductus arteriosus. MR aortography revealed a right aortic arch that was high-positioned, tortuous and narrowed. This right aortic arch crossed the midline behind the oesophagus and continued as a left-sided descending aorta. The left common carotid and subclavian arteries arose from a large branching vascular structure that derived from the top of the left-sided descending aorta. The right common carotid artery arose from the ascending aorta. The proximal portion of the right common carotid artery showed very severe stenosis and poststenotic dilatation. The right subclavian artery originated distal to the narrowed and tortuous segment of the aortic arch. (orig.)

  9. Three-dimensional printing in surgical planning: A case of aortopulmonary window with interrupted aortic arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan A Moore

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Better anatomical understanding and conceptualization of complex congenital heart defects using three-dimensional (3D printing may improve surgical planning, especially in rare defects. In this report, we utilized 3D printing to delineate the exact cardiac anatomy of a neonate with an aortopulmonary window associated with interrupted aortic arch to devise a novel approach to the repair.

  10. Regional cerebral perfusion for surgical correction of neonatal aortic arch obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Cheng, Pei; Hou, Jia; Li, Lei; Liu, Hu; Liu, Ruifang; Ji, Bingyang; Luo, Yi

    2009-05-01

    One-stage repair of aortic arch obstruction and associated cardiac anomalies is a surgical challenge in infants.The purpose of the present study is to review the current outcome using regional cerebral perfusion (RCP) during a procedure correcting interrupted aortic arch (IAA) and also isolated aortic coarctation (CoA) and CoA combined with hypoplastic aortic arch (CoA-HyAA) in our center. Between January 2007 and July 2008, 24 infant patients with interrupted aortic arch (IAA) (n=3), isolated aortic coarctation (iCoA) (n=9) and aortic coarctation with hypoplastic aortic arch (CoA-HyAA) (n=12) underwent one-stage surgical correction in our hospital. End-to-end anastomosis was employed in 12 infants (IAA n=3 and iCoA n=9); for the other 12 patients with CoA-HyAA, an end-to-end extended anastomosis was used in 8 cases, end-to-side anastomosis in 2 cases, and composite heterologous pericardial patch in 2 cases. RCP with 40 mL/kg/min through the innominate artery during aortic arch reconstruction was employed for all pediatric patients. One single-dose histidine-ketoglutarate-tryptophan (HTK) solution was used for myocardial protection during CPB. Cardiopulmonary bypass time and aortic cross-clamp time were 165.6+/-32.4 min and 81.7+/-30.0 min, respectively. The mean regional cerebral perfusion time was 31.0+/-10.6 min; lowest nasopharyngeal temperature was 19.1+/-1.1 degrees C. Operative mortality rate in both groups was 8.3%. Mean follow-up was 10.5+/-4.8 months. There was no late mortality or postoperative neurologic, renal or hepatic complications. All patients are asymptomatic and are developing normally. One-stage total arch repair using the RCP technique is an excellent method that may minimize neurologic and renal complications. Our surgical strategy for arch anomaly has a low rate of residual and recurrent coarctation when performed in these infants.

  11. Persistent truncus arteriosis associated with interruption of the aortic arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, P H; Zollikofer, C; Castaneda-Zuniga, W; Formanek, A; Amplatz, K

    1980-09-01

    Five patients with a combination of truncus arteriosus and interruption of the aortic arch are reported. The combination of those defects significantly increases the surgical risk. This rare cardiac malformation can only be diagnosed radiographically. An aberrant right subclavian artery is present in 25% of patients. It is helpful in suspecting the diagnosis from plain films of the chest. The diagnosis can be made from a ventriculogram, but usually a truncogram is necessary to define the anatomy of the aortic arch.

  12. Management strategies for thoracic stent-graft repair of distal aortic arch lesions: is intentional subclavian artery occlusion a safe procedure?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanelli, Fabrizio; Salvatori, Filippo Maria; Pucci, Armando; Lucatelli, Pierleone; Rossi, Plinio; Passariello, Roberto [University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Dake, Michael D. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Mazzesi, Giuseppe [University of Rome La Sapienza, Institute of Heart and Great Vessels, Rome (Italy)

    2009-10-15

    The aim of this retrospective analysis was to assess the clinical consequences after intentional left subclavian artery (LSA) occlusion. Thirty-seven patients, 27 type B dissection and 10 thoracic aneurysm, with short proximal neck (less than 2 cm) underwent endovascular treatment with intentional exclusion of LSA origin. No immediate complications occurred. Mean arterial pressure gradient, between right and left arms, ranged from 15 to 45 mmHg. After a mean follow-up of 43.70{+-}24.01 months, mild left arm symptoms secondary to flow reduction occurred in eight cases (21.6%) but only one required LSA transposition, after 8 months, for visual impairment. Type II endoleaks from excluded LSA occurred in 10 cases (27.0%): in seven patients, leaks were treated with coils and/or glue embolization; in one case, leak sealed spontaneously; one patient died before leak embolization could occur; one patient refused any further treatment. Intentional exclusion of the LSA may be justified when a longer proximal landing zone in the aortic arch is required. (orig.)

  13. Anatomical Study of Healthy Aortic Arches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girsowicz, Elie; Georg, Yannick; Lefebvre, François; Lejay, Anne; Thaveau, Fabien; Roy, Catherine; Ohana, Mickael; Chakfe, Nabil

    2017-10-01

    With the steady increase of endovascular procedures involving the aortic arch (AA), an actual depiction of its anatomy has become mandatory. It has also become necessary to evaluate the natural evolution of the AA morphology as part of the evaluation of endovascular devices durability. The objective of this study was to perform a morphological and anatomical study of the AA and of the supra aortic trunks (SAT) in healthy patients, with an evaluation of their evolution with time, with a specific orientation applied to endovascular therapies of the AA. Sixty-one patients (31 men, mean age 50.8 [18-82]) with a normal anatomy were included in the study. Measurements included the diameters of the AA and SAT in 17 locations, their distance and angulation based on computed tomography angiography data. Statistical analysis focused on descriptive statistics, differences between genders, as well as correlations with age. Aortic diameters (mean ± SD) were 29.5 ± 3.9 mm at the ascending aorta, 28.6 ± 3.9 mm at the innominate artery (IA), 27.1 ± 3.2 mm at the left common carotid artery (LCCA), 25.3 ± 3.0 mm at the left subclavian artery (LSCA), 23.9 ± 3.3 mm at the descending aorta. Mean angulation of the AA was 82° (95% confidence interval [CI]: 78.95-85.19°), mean angulation between LSCA/LCCA was -5.7° (95% CI: -0.9 to 18.7°) and -1.8° (95% CI: 5.4-26.4°) between LCCA/IA. Mean distance between the LSCA and the LCCA was 14.3 mm (95% CI: 13-15.6 mm) and 21.8 mm (95% CI: 20.3-23.4 mm) between LCCA and IA. All diameters of the AA increased with age (P Men had diameters statistically (P women except at the LCCA ostium level. A statistically significant increase of the distances between the LSCA and the LCCA, between the LSCA and the IA and between the IA and the LCCA was found with age, P = 0.027, better understanding of the three-dimensional aspects of the AA, confirmed the variability and heterogeneity of the SAT disposition, and discussed the principles of vascular

  14. Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair in patients with marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mommertz, G; Sigala, F; Langer, S; Koeppel, T A; Mess, W H; Schurink, G W H; Jacobs, M J

    2008-02-01

    We assessed the surgical outcome of descending thoracic aortic aneurysm repair (DTAA) and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurym (TAAA) repair in patients with Marfan syndrome. During a six year period, 206 patients underwent DTAA and TAAA repair. In 22 patients, Marfan syndrome was confirmed. The median age was 40 years with a range between 18 and 57 years. The extend of the aneurysms included 6 DTAA (1 with total arch, 2 with distal hemi-arch), 11 type II TAAA (2 with total arch, 3 with distal hemi-arch), 4 type III and one type IV TAAA. All patients suffered from previous type A (n=6) or type B (n=16) aortic dissection and 15 already underwent aortic procedures like Bentall (n=7) and ascending aortic replacement (n=8). All patients were operated on according to the standard protocol with cerebrospinal fluid drainage, distal aortic and selective organ perfusion and monitoring motor evoked potentials. In patients undergoing simultaneous arch replacement (via left thoracotomy), transcranial Doppler and EEG assessed cerebral physiology during antegrade brain perfusion. In four patients circulatory arrest under moderate hypothermia was required. In-hospital mortality did not occur. Major postoperative complications like paraplegia, renal failure, stroke and myocardial infarction were not encountered. Mean pre-operative creatinine level was 125mmol/L, which peaked to a mean maximal level of 130 and returned to 92mmol/L at discharge. Median intubation time was 1.5 days (range 0.33-30 days). Other complications included bleeding requiring surgical intervention (n=1), arrhythmia (n=2), pneumonia (n=2) and respiratory distress syndrome (n=1). At a median follow-up of 38 months all patients were alive. Using CT surveillance, new or false aneurysms were not detected, except in one patient who developed a visceral patch aneurysm six years after open type II repair. Surgical repair of descending and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms provides excellent short- and mid-term results in

  15. Neurodevelopmental Outcomes Following Regional Cerebral Perfusion with Neuromonitoring for Neonatal Aortic Arch Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andropoulos, Dean B.; Easley, R. Blaine; Brady, Ken; McKenzie, E. Dean; Heinle, Jeffrey S.; Dickerson, Heather A.; Shekerdemian, Lara S.; Meador, Marcie; Eisenman, Carol; Hunter, Jill V.; Turcich, Marie; Voigt, Robert G.; Fraser, Charles D.

    2013-01-01

    Background In this study we report magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain injury, and 12 month neurodevelopmental outcomes, when regional cerebral perfusion (RCP) is utilized for neonatal aortic arch reconstruction. Methods Fifty seven neonates receiving RCP during aortic arch reconstruction were enrolled in a prospective outcome study. RCP flows were determined by near-infrared spectroscopy and transcranial Doppler monitoring. Brain MRI were performed preoperatively and 7 days postoperatively. Bayley Scales of Infant Development III was performed at 12 months. Results Mean RCP time was 71 ± 28 minutes (range 5–121), mean flow 56.6 ± 10.6 ml/kg/min. New postoperative MRI brain injury was seen in 40% of patients. For 35 RCP patients at age 12 months, mean Bayley III composite standard scores were: Cognitive = 100.1 ± 14.6,(range 75–125); Language = 87.2 ± 15.0, (range 62–132); Motor = 87.9 ± 16.8, (range 58–121).Increasing duration of RCP was not associated with adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes. Conclusions Neonatal aortic arch repair with RCP utilizing a neuromonitoring strategy results in 12-month cognitive outcomes that are at reference population norms; language and motor outcomes are lower than the reference population norms by 0.8–0.9 standard deviation. This largest RCP group with neurodevelopmental outcomes published to date demonstrates that this technique is effective and safe in supporting the brain during neonatal aortic arch reconstruction. PMID:22766302

  16. Early Results of Chimney Technique for Type B Aortic Dissections Extending to the Aortic Arch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chen [Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, Department of General Surgery (China); Tang, Hanfei; Qiao, Tong; Liu, Changjian; Zhou, Min, E-mail: 813477618@qq.com [The Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Department of Vascular Surgery, Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital (China)

    2016-01-15

    ObjectiveTo summarize our early experience gained from the chimney technique for type B aortic dissection (TBAD) extending to the aortic arch and to evaluate the aortic remodeling in the follow-up period.MethodsFrom September 2011 to July 2014, 27 consecutive TBAD patients without adequate proximal landing zones were retrograde analyzed. Chimney stent-grafts were deployed parallel to the main endografts to reserve flow to branch vessels while extending the landing zones. In the follow-up period, aortic remodeling was observed with computed tomography angiography.ResultsThe technical success rate was 100 %, and endografts were deployed in zone 0 (n = 3, 11.1 %), zone 1 (n = 18, 66.7 %), and zone 2 (n = 6, 22.2 %). Immediately, proximal endoleaks were detected in 5 patients (18.5 %). During a mean follow-up period of 17.6 months, computed tomography angiography showed all the aortic stent-grafts and chimney grafts to be patent. Favorable remodeling was observed at the level of maximum descending aorta and left subclavian artery with expansion of true lumen (from 18.4 ± 4.8 to 25 ± 0.86 mm, p < 0.001 and 27.1 ± 0.62 to 28.5 ± 0.37 mm, p < 0.001) and depressurization of false lumen (from 23.7 ± 2.7 to 8.7 ± 3.8 mm, p < 0.001, from 5.3 ± 1.2 to 2.1 ± 2.1 mm, p < 0.001). While at the level of maximum abdominal aorta, suboptimal remodeling of the total aorta (from 24.1 ± 0.4 to 23.6 ± 1.5 mm, p = 0.06) and true lumen (from 13.8 ± 0.6 to 14.5 ± 0.4 mm, p = 0.08) was observed.ConclusionBased on our limited experience, the chimney technique with thoracic endovascular repair is demonstrated to be promising for TBAD extending to the arch with favorable aortic remodeling.

  17. Left-Sided Patent Ductus Arteriosus in a Right-Sided Aortic Arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yen Ng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a 31-year-old female with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF and right-sided aortic arch (RAA with left-sided patent ductus arteriosus (PDA originating from the left brachiocephalic artery. This is a rare finding but most common site for a PDA in TOF and a RAA. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of this rare finding on MRI in the literature.

  18. Imaging findings in the right aortic arch with mirror image branching of arch vessels: An unusual cause of dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guneet Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 72-year-old female with a right aortic arch with mirror-image branching of arch vessels presenting with dysphagia, and characteristic images on barium esophagogram, contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan, and magnetic resonance aortography. Right-sided thoracic aortic arch with mirror-image branching of the brachiocephalic vessels causing dysphagia without associated congenital cardiac anomalies is extremely uncommon. Right-sided aortic arch is a rare congenital abnormality with incidence of 0.05-0.1% in the normal population. Anomalies of great vessels are usually incidental findings, because they are asymptomatic. Right aortic arch infrequently presents with a vascular ring that can cause complete or partial obstruction of the trachea and/or esophagus. The understanding of this arch anomaly is based on Edward′s hypothesis about the double arch system during embryonic developmental.

  19. Right-sided aortic arch with Kommerell′s aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Orathi Patangi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case report of a 55-year-old lady who presented with progressive dysphagia and was diagnosed with a Kommerell′s aneurysm and a right-sided aortic arch. This case report outlines our management strategy and the challenges encountered during the perioperative period in a patient with this rare anomaly.

  20. Morphological risk factors of stroke during thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotelis, Drosos; Bischoff, Moritz S; Jobst, Bertram; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Hinz, Ulf; Geisbüsch, Philipp; Böckler, Dittmar

    2012-12-01

    This study aims to identify independent factors correlating to an increased risk of perioperative stroke during thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). A prospective maintained TEVAR database, medical records, and imaging studies of 300 patients (205 men; median age of all, 66 years, range 21-89), who underwent TEVAR between March 1997 and February 2011, were reviewed. Preoperative CT data sets were reviewed by two experienced radiologists with focus on the atheroma burden in the aortic arch (grade I, normal, to grade V, ulcerated or pedunculated atheroma). Aortic arch geometry (arch types I-III) was documented. Further parameters included in the univariate analysis were age, gender, urgency of repair, duration of procedure, adenosine-induced cardiac arrest or rapid pacing, proximal landing zone, left subclavian artery (LSA) coverage, and number of stent grafts. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the independent correlations of potential risk factors. Atherosclerotic aneurysm was the most common pathology (44%). One hundred and fifty-four of our patients (51%) were treated under urgent or emergent conditions. Seventeen percent of all patients had significant arch atheroma (grade IV or V), and 43% had a steep type III aortic arch. The perioperative stroke was 4% (12 patients; median age, 73 years, range 31-78). Two strokes were lethal (0.7%). All strokes were classified as embolic based on imaging characteristics. In eight patients, strokes were located in the left cerebral hemisphere (seven of them in the anterior and one in the posterior circulation). Four stroke patients (one in the left posterior circulation) underwent LSA coverage without revascularization. Three stroke patients had severe arch atheroma grade V. Five patients suffering stroke were recognized to have a type III aortic arch. Strokes were equally distributed between zones 0-2 vs. 3-4 (n = 6 each, 5 vs. 3.3%). The highest incidence was found in zone 1 (11

  1. A case of complete double aortic arch visualized by transthoracic echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Naka; Kato, Shingo; Saito, Noritaka; Nakachi, Tatsuya; Fukui, Kazuki; Iwasawa, Tae; Kosuge, Masami; Kimura, Kazuo

    2017-08-01

    A case of double aortic arch that was well visualized using transthoracic echocardiography is reported. A 38-year-old man underwent transthoracic echocardiography for the evaluation of dyspnea. A suprasternal view of transthoracic echocardiography showed the ascending aorta bifurcate to left and right aortic arches, with blood flow from the ascending aorta to bilateral aortic arches. The diagnosis of right side-dominant double aortic arch was made, and the patient's symptom was conceivably related to compression of the trachea due to a vascular ring. This report indicates the potential usefulness of transthoracic echocardiography for noninvasive detection of double aortic arch in adults. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Endovascular Treatment of Late Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms after Surgical Repair of Congenital Aortic Coarctation in Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juszkat, Robert; Perek, Bartlomiej; Zabicki, Bartosz; Trojnarska, Olga; Jemielity, Marek; Staniszewski, Ryszard; Smoczyk, Wiesław; Pukacki, Fryderyk

    2013-01-01

    Background In some patients, local surgery-related complications are diagnosed many years after surgery for aortic coarctation. The purposes of this study were: (1) to systematically evaluate asymptomatic adults after Dacron patch repair in childhood, (2) to estimate the formation rate of secondary thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) and (3) to assess outcomes after intravascular treatment for TAAs. Methods This study involved 37 asymptomatic patients (26 female and 11 male) who underwent surgical repair of aortic coarctation in the childhood. After they had reached adolescence, patients with secondary TAAs were referred to endovascular repair. Results Follow-up studies revealed TAA in seven cases (19%) (including six with the gothic type of the aortic arch) and mild recoarctation in other six (16%). Six of the TAA patients were treated with stentgrafts, but one refused to undergo an endovascular procedure. In three cases, stengrafts covered the left subclavian artery (LSA), in another the graft was implanted distally to the LSA. In two individuals, elective hybrid procedures were performed with surgical bypass to the supraaortic arteries followed by stengraft implantation. All subjects survived the secondary procedures. One patient developed type Ia endoleak after stentgraft implantation that was eventually treated with a debranching procedure. Conclusions The long-term course of clinically asymptomatic patients after coarctation patch repair is not uncommonly complicated by formation of TAAs (particularly in individuals with the gothic pattern of the aortic arch) that can be treated effectively with stentgrafts. However, in some patients hybrid procedures may be necessary. PMID:24386233

  3. Selective Cerebro-Myocardial Perfusion in Complex Neonatal Aortic Arch Pathology: Midterm Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoxha, Stiljan; Abbasciano, Riccardo Giuseppe; Sandrini, Camilla; Rossetti, Lucia; Menon, Tiziano; Barozzi, Luca; Linardi, Daniele; Rungatscher, Alessio; Faggian, Giuseppe; Luciani, Giovanni Battista

    2018-04-01

    Aortic arch repair in newborns and infants has traditionally been accomplished using a period of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. To reduce neurologic and cardiac dysfunction related to circulatory arrest and myocardial ischemia during complex aortic arch surgery, an alternative and novel strategy for cerebro-myocardial protection was recently developed, where regional low-flow perfusion is combined with controlled and independent coronary perfusion. The aim of the present retrospective study was to assess short-term and mid-term results of selective and independent cerebro-myocardial perfusion in neonatal aortic arch surgery. From April 2008 to August 2015, 28 consecutive neonates underwent aortic arch surgery under cerebro-myocardial perfusion. There were 17 male and 11 female, with median age of 15 days (3-30 days) and median body weight of 3 kg (1.6-4.2 kg), 9 (32%) of whom with low body weight (cerebro-myocardial perfusion was 30 ± 11 min (15-69 min). Renal dysfunction, requiring a period of peritoneal dialysis was observed in 10 (36%) patients, while liver dysfunction was noted only in 3 (11%). There were three (11%) early and two late deaths during a median follow-up of 2.9 years (range 6 months-7.7 years), with an actuarial survival of 82% at 7 years. At latest follow-up, no patient showed signs of cardiac or neurologic dysfunction. The present experience shows that a strategy of selective and independent cerebro-myocardial perfusion is safe, versatile, and feasible in high-risk neonates with complex congenital arch pathology. Encouraging outcomes were noted in terms of cardiac and neurological function, with limited end-organ morbidity. © 2018 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Predictive factors for cerebrovascular accidents after thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariscalco, Giovanni; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Tozzi, Matteo; Bacuzzi, Alessandro; Carrafiello, Giampaolo; Sala, Andrea; Castelli, Patrizio

    2009-12-01

    Cerebrovascular accidents are devastating and worrisome complications after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. The aim of this study was to determine cerebrovascular accident predictors after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Between January 2001 and June 2008, 76 patients treated with thoracic endovascular aortic repair were prospectively enrolled. The study cohort included 61 men; mean age was 65.4 +/- 16.8 years. All patients underwent a specific neurologic assessment on an hourly basis postoperatively to detect neurologic deficits. Cerebrovascular accidents were diagnosed on the basis of physical examination, tomography scan or magnetic resonance imaging, or autopsy. Cerebrovascular accidents occurred in 8 (10.5%) patients, including 4 transient ischemic attack and 4 major strokes. Four cases were observed within the first 24-hours. Multivariable analysis revealed that anatomic incompleteness of the Willis circle (odds ratio [OR] 17.19, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.10 to 140.66), as well as the presence of coronary artery disease (OR 6.86, 95 CI% 1.18 to 40.05), were independently associated with postoperative cerebrovascular accident development. Overall hospital mortality was 9.2%, with no significant difference for patients hit by cerebrovascular accidents (25.0% vs 7.3%, p = 0.102). Preexisting coronary artery disease, reflecting a severe diseased aorta and anomalies of Willis circle are independent cerebrovascular accident predictors after thoracic endovascular aortic repair procedures. A careful evaluation of the arch vessels and cerebral vascularization should be mandatory for patients suitable for thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

  5. Acute Aortic Arch Perforation During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Bicuspid Aortic Stenosis and a Gothic Aortic Arch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millan-Iturbe, Oscar; Sawaya, Fadi J.; Bieliauskas, Gintautas

    2017-01-01

    AS because of its unique anatomic features. This case report describes an acute aortic perforation during delivery of a transcatheter heart valve to treat a severe bicuspid AS with a “gothic aortic arch”; more careful evaluation of the preprocedural multislice computed tomographic scan would have unveiled...

  6. Effect of aging on the configurational change of the aortic arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuhiro Kojima

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We explored the relationship between aging and the configuration of the aortic arch using computed tomography angiography (CTA. We retrospectively reviewed CTA obtained in 140 cases. The configuration of the aortic arch was categorized into three types based on the criteria mentioned by Madhwal et al., and the relationships between each configuration and patient characteristics were analyzed. Anomalies of the aortic arch were also explored. Twenty patients had a type-1 aortic arch (mean age, 56.1 years, 30 patients had a type-2 aortic arch (mean age, 66.3 years, and 89 patients had a type-3 aortic arch (mean age, 71.7 years. The mean age of patients with a type-3 aortic arch was significantly higher than that of patients with a type-1 aortic arch. No significant correlations between the type of aortic arch and other factors, such as smoking habit, were seen. The configuration of the aortic arch in our study appears to be significantly affected by the age of the patients.

  7. Right cervical aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjang, Yanto S; Aramendi, José I; Crespo, Alejandro; Hamzeh, Gadah; Voces, Roberto; Rodríguez, Miguel A

    2008-08-01

    The combination of right cervical aortic arch, aberrant retroesophageal left subclavian artery originating from a Kommerell's diverticulum, and a ligamentum arteriosum, constitutes a rare form of vascular ring. Two patients aged 21 days and 54 years, who were diagnosed by multislice 3-dimensional computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, underwent surgical division of a vascular ring. The adult required resection of a Kommerell's aneurysm and subclavian artery reimplantation.

  8. Complex atheromatosis of the aortic arch in cerebral infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capmany, Ramón Pujadas; Ibañez, Montserrat Oliveras; Pesquer, Xavier Jané

    2010-08-01

    In many stroke patients it is not possible to establish the etiology of stroke. However, in the last two decades, the use of transesophageal echocardiography in patients with stroke of uncertain etiology reveals atherosclerotic plaques in the aortic arch, which often protrude into the lumen and have mobile components in a high percentage of cases. Several autopsy series and retrospective studies of cases and controls have shown an association between aortic arch atheroma and arterial embolism, which was later confirmed by prospectively designed studies. The association with ischemic stroke was particularly strong when atheromas were located proximal to the ostium of the left subclavian artery, when the plaque was ≥ 4 mm thick and particularly when mobile components are present. In these cases, aspirin might not prevent adequately new arterial ischemic events especially stroke. Here we review the evidence of aortic arch atheroma as an independent risk factor for stroke and arterial embolism, including clinical and pathological data on atherosclerosis of the thoracic aorta as an embolic source. In addition, the impact of complex plaques (≥ 4 mm thick, or with mobile components) on increasing the risk of stroke is also reviewed. In non-randomized retrospective studies anticoagulation was superior to antiplatelet therapy in patients with stroke and aortic arch plaques with mobile components. In a retrospective case-control study, statins significantly reduced the relative risk of new vascular events. However, given the limited data available and its retrospective nature, randomized prospective studies are needed to establish the optimal secondary prevention therapeutic regimens in these high risk patients.

  9. Dissection of Retroesophageal Aortic Diverticulum and Descending Aorta in a Patient with Right Aortic Arch: Magnetic Resonance Demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, S.-F.; Ng, S.-H.; Fu, Morgan; Lo, P.-H.; Cheng, Y.-F.; Lee, T.-Y.

    1996-01-01

    An acute aortic dissection involved the retroesophageal aortic diverticulum (RAD) and descending thoracic aorta in a patient with right aortic arch. The RAD, which was separated into false and true lumens by an intimal flap-the classic diagnostic sign of aortic dissection-was overlooked on transesophageal echocardiography and computed tomography but was clearly depicted on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It was found that MRI can delineate the anatomy of a congenital arch anomaly complicated by great vessels disease

  10. [Thymic carcinoma involving aortic arch; report of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noriyuki, Toshio; Hamamoto, M; Takazawa, Y; Katoh, K; Hashimoto, M; Kuranishi, F; Nakahara, M; Fukuda, T; Ishizaki, Y; Okuda, H; Akimoto, E; Yonehara, S

    2009-05-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the thymus is a very rare malignant tumor. The standard treatment for advanced thymic carcinoma has not yet been established, and the prognosis is poor. We report a case of thymic carcinoma that involving the aortic arch and the innominate vein. A 78-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital complaining of hoarseness in April 2007. The computed tomography (CT) scan showed an anterior mediastinal tumor contiguous to the aortic arch and the innominate vein with swelling lymphnodes. Microspcopic examinations of specimens obtained by CT-guided needle biopsy revealed poorly differenciated adenocarcinoma. The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level of serum elevated at 54.9 ng/ml. Thymic carcinoma was diagnosed. The chemoradiotherapy [concurrent, carboplatin (CBDCA) + paclitaxel(TXL)-->vinorelbine (NVB), 60 Gy] was performed, but the effect of the therapy was limited. The resection of the tumor with a part of aortic arch and other peripheral tissues was performed in Augast 2007. The postoperative course was uneventful and the CEA level of serum lowered to the normal. She was discharged 30 days after surgery.

  11. Neurodevelopmental outcomes after regional cerebral perfusion with neuromonitoring for neonatal aortic arch reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andropoulos, Dean B; Easley, R Blaine; Brady, Ken; McKenzie, E Dean; Heinle, Jeffrey S; Dickerson, Heather A; Shekerdemian, Lara S; Meador, Marcie; Eisenman, Carol; Hunter, Jill V; Turcich, Marie; Voigt, Robert G; Fraser, Charles D

    2013-02-01

    In this study we report magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain injury and 12-month neurodevelopmental outcomes when regional cerebral perfusion (RCP) is used for neonatal aortic arch reconstruction. Fifty-seven neonates receiving RCP during aortic arch reconstruction were enrolled in a prospective outcome study. RCP flows were determined by near-infrared spectroscopy and transcranial Doppler monitoring. Brain MRI was performed preoperatively and 7 days postoperatively. Bayley Scales of Infant Development III was performed at 12 months. Mean RCP time was 71 ± 28 minutes (range, 5 to 121 minutes) and mean flow was 56.6 ± 10.6 mL/kg/min. New postoperative MRI brain injury was seen in 40% of patients. For 35 RCP patients at age 12 months, mean Bayley Scales III Composite standard scores were: Cognitive, 100.1 ± 14.6 (range, 75 to 125); Language, 87.2 ± 15.0 (range, 62 to 132); and Motor, 87.9 ± 16.8 (range, 58 to 121). Increasing duration of RCP was not associated with adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes. Neonatal aortic arch repair with RCP using a neuromonitoring strategy results in 12-month cognitive outcomes that are at reference population norms. Language and motor outcomes are lower than the reference population norms by 0.8 to 0.9 standard deviations. The neurodevelopmental outcomes in this RCP cohort demonstrate that this technique is effective and safe in supporting the brain during neonatal aortic arch reconstruction. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair with Chimney and Snorkel Grafts: Indications, Techniques and Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Rakesh P., E-mail: rpatel9@nhs.net [Northwick Park Hospital, Department of Vascular Radiology (United Kingdom); Katsargyris, Athanasios, E-mail: kthanassos@yahoo.com; Verhoeven, Eric L. G., E-mail: Eric.Verhoeven@klinikum-nuernberg.de [Klinikum Nuernberg, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery (Germany); Adam, Donald J., E-mail: donald.adam@tiscali.co.uk [Heartlands Hospital, Department of Vascular Surgery (United Kingdom); Hardman, John A., E-mail: johnhardman@doctors.org.uk [Royal United Hospital Bath, Department of Vascular Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-15

    The chimney technique in endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (Ch-EVAR) involves placement of a stent or stent-graft parallel to the main aortic stent-graft to extend the proximal or distal sealing zone while maintaining side branch patency. Ch-EVAR can facilitate endovascular repair of juxtarenal and aortic arch pathology using available standard aortic stent-grafts, therefore, eliminating the manufacturing delays required for customised fenestrated and branched stent-grafts. Several case series have demonstrated the feasibility of Ch-EVAR both in acute and elective cases with good early results. This review discusses indications, technique, and the current available clinical data on Ch-EVAR.

  13. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography of persistent fifth aortic arch in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Yumin; Zhu, Ming; Sun, Aimin; Li, Yuhua; Jaffe, Richard B.; Gao, Wei

    2007-01-01

    Cine angiography and echocardiography have been utilized to diagnose congenital aortic arch anomalies. However, the visualization of great vessels by echocardiography is limited, while cine angiography requires cardiac catheterization with ionizing radiation. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is a noninvasive modality suitable for visualization of congenital aortic arch anomalies. To evaluate the utility of contrast-enhanced MRA in the diagnosis of persistent fifth aortic arch, a rare congenital aortic arch anomaly, and to compare the diagnostic accuracy of MRA with that of echocardiography and cine angiography. In four pediatric patients, contrast-enhanced MRA studies were performed for diagnosing persistent fifth aortic arch. The findings of MRA were compared with echocardiographic findings and confirmed by cine angiography and operation. Transthoracic surface echocardiography noted an aberrant vessel arising from the ascending aorta in two of four patients; the etiology of this vessel was uncertain. In the other two patients a diagnosis of coarctation was made. Of the four patients, only one was diagnosed with interruption of the aortic arch. Contrast-enhanced MRA clarified uncertain echocardiographic findings, enabling the correct diagnosis of persistent fifth aortic arch with fourth aortic arch interruption in all four patients. Contrast-enhanced MRA is a safe, accurate, and fast imaging technique for the evaluation of persistent fifth aortic arch and may obviate the need for conventional cine angiography. Cardiac catheterization may be reserved for some types of complicated congenital heart disease and for obtaining hemodynamic information. (orig.)

  14. A current systematic evaluation and meta-analysis of chimney graft technology in aortic arch diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Wael; Mylonas, Spyridon; Majd, Payman; Brunkwall, Jan Sigge

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a review of the literature on the use of chimney graft (CG) technique in treating arterial diseases of the aortic arch and to extrapolate conclusions by summarizing the reported outcomes in a meta-analysis. An extensive electronic search was made using PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Direct Databases, and the Cochrane Library. Included in this meta-analysis were all papers published up to February 2016 on endovascular chimney technique in the arch vessels with or without adjunct extra-anatomic debranching, in any language, providing data about at least one of the essential outcomes: early and late type I endoleak, 30-day mortality rate, development of perioperative stroke, patency, and retrograde aortic dissection. Of the 478 reports yielded by the electronic search, a total of 11 publications (on 373 patients and 387 CGs) fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were included in this study. The overall estimated proportion of technical success was 91.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 87.4%-94.0%). Of the 373 patients, 26 (7%) experienced a type Ia endoleak in the perioperative period. The overall estimated proportion of early type Ia endoleak was 9.4% (95% CI, 6.5%-13.4%). Among the 10 studies that provided data, a retrograde type A dissection was observed in 2 of 351 patients, resulting in an overall estimated proportion of 1.8% (95% CI, 0.8%-4.0%). The pooled 30-day mortality rate was 7.9% (95% CI, 4.6%-13.2%). The pooled estimation for reintervention was 10.6% (95% CI, 5%-21%); for major stroke, 2.6% (95% CI, 1.3%-5.0%); for early patency, 97.9% (95% CI, 95.8%-99%); and for late patency, 92.9% (95% CI, 87.3%-96%). Treatment of aortic diseases involving the aortic arch poses a great challenge. The CG technique has been applied as an alternative treatment option. This meta-analysis shows that endovascular repair of aortic arch disease using a CG technique in the aortic arch vessels is technically feasible and effective but not without

  15. Coexistence of Single Coronary Artery Anomaly and Aortic Arch Anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilmaz Omur Otlu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A 74-year-old male patient was admitted to our hospital for evaluation of recent onset atypical chest pain. His medical history included hypertension, dislipidemia and smoking. Physical examination was unremarkable. The resting electrocardiogram was demonstrated biphasic T waves on lateral derivations. Transthoracic echocardiography showed normal left and right ventricular dimensions and functions. Coronary angiography was planned for the patient. First, right transradial approach tried; but guidewire could not be advanced to ascendig aorta. Coronary angiography was performed through the right femoral artery. Multiple attempts to cannulate the left coronary ostium were unsuccessful. The right coronary artery cannulated from its normal ostium in the right sinus of Valsalva. After a very short common main stem, the artery divided into a right coronary artery, and separate left anterior descending artery and circumflex artery (Figure A. The coronary arteries were normal without any significant stenosis and any extrinsic compression. An aortic root injection confirmed the absence of left coronary ostium. Also, a retroesophageal right subclavian artery originating from the left aortic arch (arteria lusoria was detected as the last branch of aortic arch on contrast enhanced computerized tomography (Figure B-C. The patient discharged with medical teraphy.

  16. Analysis of autologous platelet-rich plasma during ascending and transverse aortic arch surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shao-Feng; Estrera, Anthony L; Miller, Charles C; Ignacio, Craig; Panthayi, Sreelatha; Loubser, Paul; Sagun, Dean L; Sheinbaum, Roy; Safi, Hazim J

    2013-05-01

    Coagulopathy is a common complication after ascending and transverse arch aortic surgery with profound hypothermic circuit arrest (PHCA). Blood conservation strategies to reduce transfusion have been ongoing and involve multiple treatment modalities in modern cardiac surgery. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of autologous platelet-rich plasma (aPRP) as a blood conservation technique to reduce blood transfusion in ascending and arch aortic surgery. Between 2003 and 2009, we retrospectively reviewed 685 cases of ascending aorta and transverse arch repair using PHCA. A total of 287 patients in which aPRP was used (aPRP group) were compared with 398 patients who did have aPRP (non-aPRP group). Perioperative transfusion requirements and clinical outcomes that included early mortality, postoperative stroke, renal dysfunction, prolonged ventilation, coagulopathy, and length of postoperative intensive care unit stay were analyzed. The data were analyzed by mean and frequency for continuous variables and qualitative variables. To account for potential selection bias, 2 types of propensity analysis were performed. In both unadjusted and adjusted analysis, perioperative transfusions were fewer in the aPRP group compared with the non-aPRP group: (3.9 units fewer packed red blood cells, 4.5 units fewer fresh frozen plasma, 7.9 units fewer platelets, and 6.8 units fewer cryoprecipitate). In all analyses, postoperative morbidity (stroke, duration of mechanical ventilation, and intensive care unit stay) were significantly improved. Hospital mortality rate was not significantly decreased. The utilization of aPRP was associated with a reduction in allogeneic blood transfusions as well as a decrease in early postoperative morbidity during repairs of the ascending and transverse arch aorta using PHCA. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Repair of an aneurysm of the ascending aorta and arch in an infant with Loeys-Dietz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Pratiksha; Shetty, Varun; Patel, Ebrahim; Shetty, Deviprasad

    2018-05-01

    Aortic aneurysms in childhood are rare disease entities and are usually seen in patients with genetic connective tissue disorders such as Marfans, Ehler-Danlos, and Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS). Patients affected with LDS present early in life and have a rapid disease progression. We report a case of repair of an ascending and aortic arch aneurysm in an infant with Loeys-Dietz syndrome. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Detecting atheromatous plaques in the aortic arch or supra-aortic arteries for more accurate stroke subtype classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaoyang; Wu, Simiao; Zeng, Quantao; Xiao, Jiahe; Liu, Ming

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the correlations of atheromatous plaques in the aortic arch or supra-aortic arteries with intracranial arterial stenosis and carotid plaques in stroke patients, and to determine whether taking these plaques into account will reduce the proportion of patients in the undetermined etiology group. We prospectively enrolled 308 ischemic stroke patients, whose clinical characteristics and A-S-C-O classifications were compared with analyses of intracranial arteries, carotid arteries, aortic arch, and supra-aortic arteries. 125(40.6%) patients had plaques in the aortic arch or supra-aortic arteries, of which 106 (84.8%) had complex plaques. No correlations were observed between these plaques and carotid plaques ( p = 0.283) or intracranial arterial stenosis ( p = 0.097). After detecting the mobile thrombi in the aortic arch and supra-aortic arteries, the proportion of patients in the atherothrombosis group was increased from 33.8% to 55.5% ( p = 0.00), whereas the proportion of patients in stroke of undetermined etiology group was decreased from 19.2% to 11.0% ( p = 0.00). Examining only the carotid and intracranial arteries may not provide adequate information about large arteries in stroke patients. Therefore, it would be better to include a search for relevant plaques in the aortic arch or supra-aortic arteries in modern stroke workup, for it may lead to more accurate stroke subtype classification and guide secondary prevention.

  19. RIGHT-SIDED AORTIC ARCH WITH ABERRANT LEFT SUBCLAVIAN ARTERY AND DUPLICATION OF SUPERIOR VENA CAVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikhita Hazarika

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Right-sided aortic arch is a rare anatomical variant present in about 0.1% of the adult population.1,2 Half of the cases are associated with an aberrant left subclavian artery (0.05%-0.1%. Right-sided aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery is less common than left-sided aortic arch with aberrant right subclavian artery (0.5-2.0%.3,4 A rightsided aortic arch is an anatomic variant resulting from persistence of the right fourth aortic arch and involution of the left. It can be associated with an aberrant left subclavian artery arises from Kommerell’s diverticulum. It is usually asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally during adult age. A 40-year-old male presented with cough and a hump in the back. The patient was evaluated for scoliosis and plain CT thorax was done.

  20. Low rate of reoperations after acute type A aortic dissection repair from The Nordic Consortium Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pan, Emily; Gudbjartsson, Tomas; Ahlsson, Anders

    2018-01-01

    Bakey classification nor the extent of proximal or distal repair predicted freedom from a later reoperation. The only independent risk factor associated with a later proximal reoperation was a history of connective tissue disease. CONCLUSIONS: Type A aortic dissection repair in low- to medium-volume centers......OBJECTIVES: To describe the relationship between the extent of primary aortic repair and the incidence of reoperations after surgery for type A aortic dissection. METHODS: A retrospective cohort of 1159 patients treated for type A aortic dissection at eight Nordic low- to medium......-sized cardiothoracic centers from 2005 to 2014. Data were gathered from patient records and national registries. Patients were separately divided into 3 groups according to the distal anastomoses technique (ascending aorta [n = 791], hemiarch [n = 247], and total arch [n = 66]), and into 2 groups for proximal repair...

  1. Combined open proximal and stent-graft distal repair for distal arch aneurysms: an alternative to total debranching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierer, Andreas; Sanchez, Luis A; Moon, Marc R

    2009-07-01

    We present herein a novel, combined, simultaneous open proximal and stent-graft distal repair for complex distal aortic arch aneurysms involving the descending aorta. In the first surgical step, the transverse arch is opened during selective antegrade cerebral perfusion, and a Dacron graft (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) is positioned down the descending aorta in an elephant trunk-like fashion with its proximal free margin sutured circumferentially to the aorta just distal to the left subclavian or left common carotid artery. With the graft serving as the new proximal landing zone, subsequent endovascular repair is performed antegrade during rewarming through the ascending aorta.

  2. Anomalous Origin of the Left Vertebral Artery from the Aortic Arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, Evan H; Song, Linda H; Villela, Natalia L A; Fasani-Feldberg, Gregory B; Jacobs, Jonathan L; Kim, Dolly O; Nathawat, Akshay; Patel, Devika; Bender, Roger B; Peters, Daniel F

    2016-04-01

    Anatomic anomalies of the aortic arch have implications for clinical practice if their significance is understood. Our case study involves a cadaveric finding of the left vertebral artery originating directly from the aortic arch. Although this anatomical variation has been documented, the prevalence of this anomaly may be generally underestimated. After noting this anomaly, we analyzed 27 cases and found that four female cadavers had the left vertebral artery originating from the aortic arch rather than the left subclavian artery. With a prevalence rate of 14.8%, it would seem that this anomaly is more significant than previously thought, which could have implications for surgical practice.

  3. External carotid compression: a novel technique to improve cerebral perfusion during selective antegrade cerebral perfusion for aortic arch surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grocott, Hilary P; Ambrose, Emma; Moon, Mike

    2016-10-01

    Selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (SACP) involving cannulation of either the axillary or innominate artery is a commonly used technique for maintaining cerebral blood flow (CBF) during the use of hypothermic cardiac arrest (HCA) for operations on the aortic arch. Nevertheless, asymmetrical CBF with hypoperfusion of the left cerebral hemisphere is a common occurrence during SACP. The purpose of this report is to describe an adjunctive maneuver to improve left hemispheric CBF during SACP by applying extrinsic compression to the left carotid artery. A 77-yr-old male patient with a history of aortic valve replacement presented for emergent surgical repair of an acute type A aortic dissection of a previously known ascending aortic aneurysm. His intraoperative course included cannulation of the right axillary artery, which was used as the aortic inflow during cardiopulmonary bypass and also allowed for subsequent SACP during HCA. After the onset of HCA, the innominate artery was clamped at its origin to allow for SACP. Shortly thereafter, however, the left-sided cerebral oxygen saturation (SrO2) began to decrease. Augmenting the PaO2, PaCO2 and both SACP pressure and flow failed to increase left hemispheric SrO2. Following the use of ultrasound guidance to confirm the absence of atherosclerotic disease in the carotid artery, external pressure was applied partially compressing the artery. With the carotid compression, the left cerebral saturation abruptly increased, suggesting pressurization of the left cerebral hemispheric circulation and augmentation of CBF. Direct ultrasound visualization and cautious partial compression of the left carotid artery may address asymmetrical CBF that occurs with SACP during HCA for aortic arch surgery. This strategy may lead to improved symmetry of CBF and corresponding cerebral oximetry measurements during aortic arch surgery.

  4. Endovascular Repair of Thoracoabdominal and Arch Aneurysms in Patients with Connective Tissue Disease Using Branched and Fenestrated Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Rachel E; Martin-Gonzalez, Teresa; Van Calster, Katrien; Hertault, Adrien; Spear, Rafaëlle; Azzaoui, Richard; Sobocinski, Jonathan; Haulon, Stéphan

    2017-10-01

    Prophylactic open surgery is the standard practice in patients with connective tissue and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) and aortic arch disease. Branched and fenestrated devices offer a less invasive alternative but there are concerns regarding the durability of the repair and the effect of the stent graft on the fragile aortic wall. The aim of this study is to evaluate mid-term outcomes of fenestrated and/or branched endografting in patients with connective tissue disease. All patients with connective tissue disease who underwent TAAA or arch aneurysm repair using a fenestrated and/or branched endograft in a single, high-volume center between 2004 and 2015 were included. Ruptured aneurysms and acute aortic dissections were excluded from this study, but not chronic aortic dissections. In total, 427 (403 pararenal and TAAAs, and 24 arch aneurysms) endovascular interventions were performed during the study period. Of these, 17 patients (4%) (16 TAAAs, 1 arch) had connective tissue disease. All patients were classified as unfit for open repair. The mean age was 51 ± 8 years. Thirteen patients with TAAA were treated with a fenestrated, 1 with a branched, and 2 with a combined fenestrated/branch device. A double inner branch device was used to treat the arch aneurysm. The technical success rate was 100% with no incidence of early mortality, spinal cord ischemia, stroke, or further dissection. Postoperative deterioration in renal function was seen in 3 patients (18.8%) and no hemodialysis was required. The mean follow-up was 3.4 years (0.3-7.4). Aneurysm sac shrinkage was seen in 35% of patients (6/17) and the sac diameter remained stable in 65% of patients (11/17). No sac or sealing zone enlargement was observed in any of the patients and there were no conversions to open repair. Reintervention was required in 1 patient at 2 years for bilateral renal artery occlusion (successful fibrinolysis). One type II endoleak (lumbar) is under surveillance and 1 type

  5. Finite element analysis of helical flows in human aortic arch: A novel index

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Cheng-Hung; Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Jhong, Guan-Heng; Liu, Shih-Jung; Hsu, Ming-Yi; Wang, Chao-Jan; Hung, Kuo-Chun

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the helical secondary flows in the aortic arch using finite element analysis. The relationship between helical flow and the configuration of the aorta in patients of whose three-dimensional images constructed from computed tomography scans was examined. A finite element model of the pressurized root, arch, and supra-aortic vessels was developed to simulate the pattern of helical secondary flows. Calculations indicate that most of the helical secondary flow was formed i...

  6. The Arteries Root from the Aortic Arch in the Sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus, Falconiformes: Accipitridae)

    OpenAIRE

    Balkaya, Hulya

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed at determining the morphology of the aortic arch in the sparrowhawk. For this purpose, arteries near the heart of six sparrowhawks were assessed. Latex injection method was applied to the three materials and barium sulphate solution was injected into the aorta for angiography in three other materials. It was observed that two major arteries arose from aortic arch in the sparrowhawk: the left brachiocephalic trunk and the right brachiocephalic trunk. These trunks were cont...

  7. The repair of a type Ia endoleak following thoracic endovascular aortic repair using a stented elephant trunk procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Rui-Dong; Zhu, Jun-Ming; Liu, Yong-Min; Chen, Lei; Li, Cheng-Nan; Xing, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Li-Zhong

    2018-04-01

    Type Ia endoleaks are not uncommon complications that occur after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). Because aortic arch vessels prevent extension of the landing zone, it is very difficult to manipulate a type Ia endoleak using an extension cuff or stent-graft, especially when the aortic arch is involved. Here, we retrospectively review our experience of surgical treatment of type Ia endoleak after TEVAR using a stented elephant trunk procedure. From July 2010 to August 2016, we treated 17 patients diagnosed with a type Ia endoleak following TEVAR using stented elephant trunk procedure. The mean age of our patients was 52 ± 8 years. The mean interval between TEVAR and the open surgical repair was 38 ± 43 months. All cases of type Ia endoleak (100%) were repaired successfully. There were no in-hospital deaths. One case required reintubation and continuous renal replacement therapy due to renal failure; this patient recovered smoothly before discharge. One other patient suffered a stroke and renal failure and did not fully recover following discharge, or follow-up. During follow-up, there were 3 deaths. Acceptable results were obtained using a stented elephant trunk procedure in patients with a type Ia endoleak after TEVAR. This technique allowed us to repair the proximal aortic arch lesions, surgically correct the type Ia endoleak, and promote false lumen thrombosis in the distal aorta. Implantation of a stented elephant trunk, with or without a concomitant aortic arch procedure, is an alternative approach for this type of lesion. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Variations of the aortic arch - a study on the most common branching patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, Marguerite; Schmitz, Bernd L; Schick, Melanie; Schloetzer, Wiebke (Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Section Neuroradiology, Univ. Ulm (Germany)), email: marguerite.mueller@uni-ulm.de; Pauls, Sandra (Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Univ. Ulm (Germany)); Roehrer, Stefan; Kapapa, Thomas (Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. Ulm (Germany))

    2011-09-15

    Background: Anatomical variants of the aortic arch and its branching patterns often appear as an incidental finding during routine computed tomography (CT) scanning. These variations can be of relevance when performing angiography or endovascular interventions and may cause symptoms such as dysphagia. Purpose: To analyze common anatomical variations found within the arteries originating from the aortic arch in patients using contrast CT imaging techniques. Material and Methods: A total of 2033 contrast CT scans were analyzed. To obtain a truly representative sample, cases were chosen from different hospital departments without previous knowledge of the patient history. Results: The total percentage of variations within the analyzed patients was 13.3%. In 8.0% a truncus bicaroticus was found. 4.2% of the patients showed a left vertebral artery originating directly from the aortic arch, mostly proximal, and in 1 case distal to the left subclavian artery. In 1.0% we found an aberrant right subclavian artery. We also found a single case of a right descending aortic arch. Conclusion: Variations of the aortic arch and its branching are frequently found, mostly as an incidental finding during routine diagnostic scanning. A contrast-enhanced CT scan is a good method with which to study the aortic arch and its associated branching pattern

  9. Ductal Stent Implantation in Tetralogy of Fallot with Aortic Arch Abnormality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergul, Yakup; Saygi, Murat; Ozyilmaz, Isa; Guzeltas, Alper; Odemis, Ender

    2015-01-01

    Stenting of patent ductus arteriosus is an alternative to palliative cardiac surgery in newborns with duct-dependent or decreased pulmonary circulation; however, the use of this technique in patients with an aortic arch abnormality presents a challenge. Tetralogy of Fallot is a congenital heart defect that is frequently associated with anomalies of the aortic arch and its branches. The association is even more common in patients with chromosome 22q11 deletion. We present the case of an 18-day-old male infant who had cyanosis and a heart murmur. After an initial echocardiographic evaluation, the patient was diagnosed with tetralogy of Fallot and right-sided aortic arch. The pulmonary annulus and the main pulmonary artery and its branches were slightly hypoplastic; the ductus arteriosus was small. Conventional and computed tomographic angiograms revealed a double aortic arch and an aberrant left subclavian artery. The right aortic arch branched into the subclavian arteries and continued into the descending aorta, whereas the left aortic arch branched into the common carotid arteries and ended with the patent ductus arteriosus. After evaluation of the ductal anatomy, we implanted a 3.5 × 15-mm coronary stent in the duct. Follow-up injections showed augmented pulmonary flow and an increase in oxygen saturation from 65% to 94%. The patient was also found to have chromosome 22q11 deletion. PMID:26175649

  10. Variations of the aortic arch - a study on the most common branching patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, Marguerite; Schmitz, Bernd L; Schick, Melanie; Schloetzer, Wiebke; Pauls, Sandra; Roehrer, Stefan; Kapapa, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Background: Anatomical variants of the aortic arch and its branching patterns often appear as an incidental finding during routine computed tomography (CT) scanning. These variations can be of relevance when performing angiography or endovascular interventions and may cause symptoms such as dysphagia. Purpose: To analyze common anatomical variations found within the arteries originating from the aortic arch in patients using contrast CT imaging techniques. Material and Methods: A total of 2033 contrast CT scans were analyzed. To obtain a truly representative sample, cases were chosen from different hospital departments without previous knowledge of the patient history. Results: The total percentage of variations within the analyzed patients was 13.3%. In 8.0% a truncus bicaroticus was found. 4.2% of the patients showed a left vertebral artery originating directly from the aortic arch, mostly proximal, and in 1 case distal to the left subclavian artery. In 1.0% we found an aberrant right subclavian artery. We also found a single case of a right descending aortic arch. Conclusion: Variations of the aortic arch and its branching are frequently found, mostly as an incidental finding during routine diagnostic scanning. A contrast-enhanced CT scan is a good method with which to study the aortic arch and its associated branching pattern

  11. Selective cerebro-myocardial perfusion in complex congenital aortic arch pathology: a novel technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rita, Fabrizio; Lucchese, Gianluca; Barozzi, Luca; Menon, Tiziano; Faggian, Giuseppe; Mazzucco, Alessandro; Luciani, Giovanni Battista

    2011-11-01

    Simultaneous cerebro-myocardial perfusion has been described in neonatal and infant arch surgery, suggesting a reduction in cardiac morbidity. Here reported is a novel technique for selective cerebral perfusion combined with controlled and independent myocardial perfusion during surgery for complex or recurrent aortic arch lesions. From April 2008 to April 2011, 10 patients with arch pathology underwent surgery (two hypoplastic left heart syndrome [HLHS], four recurrent arch obstruction, two aortic arch hypoplasia + ventricular septal defect [VSD], one single ventricle + transposition of the great arteries + arch hypoplasia, one interrupted aortic arch type B + VSD). Median age was 63 days (6 days-36 years) and median weight 4.0 kg (1.6-52). Via midline sternotomy, an arterial cannula (6 or 8 Fr for infants) was directly inserted into the innominate artery or through a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft (for neonates cerebro-myocardial perfusion was 39 ± 18 min (17-69). Weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass was achieved without inotropic support in three and with low dose in seven patients. One patient required veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Four patients, body weight cerebro-myocardial perfusion is feasible in patients with complex or recurrent aortic arch disease, starting from premature newborn less than 2.0 kg of body weight to adults. The technique is as safe as previously reported methods of cerebro-myocardial perfusion and possibly more versatile. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2011, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Pulmonary artery stenosis caused by a large aortic arch pseudoaneurysm detected 10 years after a minor trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal Zamani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudoaneurysm of aorta is a rare condition usually seen after aortic surgeries or serious accidents. Here we report a 60 years old man without any previous medical condition who presented with non-specific symptoms and underwent different investigations for more than 1 year, until the presence of a continuous murmur raised suspicion toward his cardiovascular system. In echocardiographic and computed tomography (CT angiographic studies a large pseudoaneurysm of aortic arch with compression effect on pulmonary artery was detected. At this stage he remembered having suffered a minor trauma 10 years ago. He finally underwent operation and his aortic wall was repaired successfully with a patch. This case highlights the importance of thorough history taking and physical examination in patients irrespective of symptoms and high index of suspicion to detect this life-threatening condition.

  13. Preoperative Evaluation and Endovascular Procedure of Intraoperative Aneurysm Rupture During Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zha, Bin-Shan, E-mail: binszha2013@163.com; Zhu, Hua-Gang, E-mail: huagzhu@yeah.net; Ye, Yu-Sheng, E-mail: yeyusheng@aliyun.com; Li, Yong-Sheng, E-mail: 872868848@qq.com; Zhang, Zhi-Gong, E-mail: zzgedward@sina.com; Xie, Wen-Tao, E-mail: 345344347@qq.com [The First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Department of Vascular Surgery (China)

    2017-03-15

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms are now routinely repaired with endovascular repair if anatomically feasible because of advantages in safety and recovery. However, intraoperative aneurysm rupture is a severe complication which may have an adverse effect on the outcome of treatment. Comprehensive preoperative assessment and considerate treatment are keys to success of endovascular aneurysm repair, especially during unexpected circumstances. Few cases have reported on intraoperative aortic rupture, which were successfully managed by endovascular treatment. Here, we present a rare case of an intraoperative aneurysm rupture during endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm with narrow neck and angulated aorta arch (coarctation-associated aneurysm), which was successfully treated using double access route approach and iliac limbs of infrarenal devices.Level of EvidenceLevel 5.

  14. Hypothermia and Selective Antegrade Cerebral Perfusion Is Safe for Arch Repair in Type A Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, W Brent; Leshnower, Bradley G; Hunting, John C; Binongo, Jose; Chen, Edward P

    2017-09-01

    Unilateral selective antegrade cerebral perfusion with moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest has been shown to be a safe and effective method of cerebral protection during surgery for acute type A dissection. This study evaluates the impact of this cerebral protection strategy on clinical outcomes after extended aortic arch reconstruction in patients undergoing emergent repair of acute type A dissection. A retrospective review from 2004 to 2016 at a US academic center of patients undergoing surgery for acute type A dissections using moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest and selective antegrade cerebral perfusion was performed. Patient data were abstracted from The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) institutional database and patient charts. Cohorts were established based on extent of arch replacement: a hemiarch group and a transverse arch group were created. Owing to a dearth of events, a risk score was estimated using a logistic regression model with 30-day mortality as outcome and preoperative variables as predictors, including non-STS variables such as malperfusion. Postoperative outcomes were then adjusted in subsequent regression analyses for the estimated risk score. In all, 342 patients met inclusion criteria and were included for analysis (299 hemiarch, 43 transverse arch). The mean age was 55.4 years and not different between groups (p = 0.79). Preoperative comorbidities, including prior stroke, diabetes mellitus, and renal failure, were also similar between groups (p > 0.2). Inhospital mortality was 11.7% for the entire cohort (11.7% hemiarch, 9.3% transverse arch; p = 0.60), and the permanent stroke rate was 7.3% (7.7% hemiarch, 4.3% transverse arch; p = 0.47). Median circulatory arrest time was 38.9 ± 19.2 minutes (35.0 ± 13.2 hemiarch, 65.1 ± 30.1 transverse arch; p optimal strategy for cerebral protection in this acute setting. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Goal-directed-perfusion in neonatal aortic arch surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesnjevar, Robert Anton; Purbojo, Ariawan; Muench, Frank; Juengert, Joerg; Rueffer, André

    2016-07-01

    Reduction of mortality and morbidity in congenital cardiac surgery has always been and remains a major target for the complete team involved. As operative techniques are more and more standardized and refined, surgical risk and associated complication rates have constantly been reduced to an acceptable level but are both still present. Aortic arch surgery in neonates seems to be of particular interest, because perfusion techniques differ widely among institutions and an ideal form of a so called "total body perfusion (TBP)" is somewhat difficult to achieve. Thus concepts of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA), regional cerebral perfusion (RCP/with cardioplegic cardiac arrest or on the perfused beating heart) and TBP exist in parallel and all carry an individual risk for organ damage related to perfusion management, chosen core temperature and time on bypass. Patient safety relies more and more on adequate end organ perfusion on cardiopulmonary bypass, especially sensitive organs like the brain, heart, kidney, liver and the gut, whereby on adequate tissue protection, temperature management and oxygen delivery should be visualized and monitored.

  16. Bovine aortic arch and idiopathic pulmonary artery aneurysm associated with bronchial compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Süleyman Sezai Yıldız

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The left common carotid artery originating from the brachiocephalic trunk is termed the bovine aortic arch. Although it is the third most-common normal variant found in 9% humans, the origin of this term remains unclear. Until now, It has not been reported in the literature bovine aortic arch togetherness with pulmonary aneurysm and bronchial compression. Herein, we present a case with bovine aorta arch and pulmonary artery aneurysm associated with bronchial compression, which is incidentally detected by X-ray film. A 56-year-old Caucasian female admitted to the cardiology clinic with complaint of chest pain. Physical examination was unremarkable. Blood biochemistry values and cardiac markers were in normal range. Chest radiography revealed a widened mediastinum and prominent pulmonary conus with no active pulmonary disease. A subsequent transthoracic echocardiography revealed left ventricular hypertrophy, left atrial enlargement (diameter: 41 mm, mild mitral and tricuspid valve insufficiency, dilatation of main pulmonary artery (parasternal short-axis view diameter: 33 mm, normal pulmonary artery pressure and normal left ventricular systolic function. Computed tomography revealed bovine aortic arch associated with pulmonary artery aneurysm (diameter: 53 mm. And left main bronch of trachea was critically squeezed by aortic arch. Aortic and pulmonary vascular anomalies should be considered in patients with chest pain. And, identification with imaging modalities is important for prevention of chronic and irreversible complications.

  17. Aortic arch/elephant trunk procedure with Sienna(TM) graft and endovascular stenting of thoraco-abdominal aorta for treatment of complex chronic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Randolph H L; Baghai, Max; Yu, Simon C H; Underwood, Malcolm J

    2013-05-01

    Aneurismal dilatation of the remaining thoracic aorta after ascending aortic interposition grafting for type 'A' aortic dissection is not uncommon. For such complex cases, one treatment option is total arch replacement and elephant trunk procedure with the Sienna(TM) collared graft (Vascutek, Inchinnan, UK) technique followed by a staged thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). The video illustrates our technique in a 56-year-old man with an extensive aortic arch and descending thoracic aortic dissecting aneurysm. For the 'open' procedure femoral arterial and venous cannulation was used along with systemic cooling and circulatory arrest at 22 °C. Upon circulatory arrest, the aortic arch was incised and antegrade cerebral perfusion achieved via selective cannulation to the right brachiocephalic and left common carotid artery, keeping flow rates at 10-15 mL/kg/min and perfusion pressure at 50-60 mmHg. Arch replacement with an elephant trunk component was then performed and after completion of the distal aortic anastomosis antegrade perfusion via a side-arm in the graft was started and the operation completed using a variation of the 'sequential' clamping technique to maximize cerebral perfusion. The second endovascular stage was performed two weeks after discharge. Two covered stents were landing from the elephant trunk to the distal descending thoracic aorta, to secure the distal landing a bare stent of was placed to cover the aorta just distal to the origin of the celiac axis. The left subclavian artery was embolised with fibre coils. Post TEVAR angiogram showed no endoleak Although re-operative total arch replacement and elephant trunk procedure and subsequent TEVAR remained a challenging procedure, we believe excellent surgical outcome can be achieved with carefully planned operative strategy.

  18. Total Percutaneous Aortic Repair: Midterm Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bent, Clare L.; Fotiadis, Nikolas; Renfrew, Ian; Walsh, Michael; Brohi, Karim; Kyriakides, Constantinos; Matson, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate and midterm outcomes of percutaneous endovascular repair of thoracic and abdominal aortic pathology. Between December 2003 and June 2005, 21 patients (mean age: 60.4 ± 17.1 years; 15 males, 6 females) underwent endovascular stent-graft insertion for thoracic (n = 13) or abdominal aortic (n = 8) pathology. Preprocedural computed tomographic angiography (CTA) was performed to assess the suitability of aorto-iliac and common femoral artery (CFA) anatomy, including the degree of CFA calcification, for total percutaneous aortic stent-graft repair. Percutaneous access was used for the introduction of 18- to 26-Fr delivery devices. A 'preclose' closure technique using two Perclose suture devices (Perclose A-T; Abbott Vascular) was used in all cases. Data were prospectively collected. Each CFA puncture site was assessed via clinical examination and CTA at 1, 6, and 12 months, followed by annual review thereafter. Minimum follow-up was 36 months. Outcome measures evaluated were rates of technical success, conversion to open surgical repair, complications, and late incidence of arterial stenosis at the site of Perclose suture deployment. A total of 58 Perclose devices were used to close 29 femoral arteriotomies. Outer diameters of stent-graft delivery devices used were 18 Fr (n = 5), 20 Fr (n = 3), 22 Fr (n = 4), 24 Fr (n = 15), and 26 Fr (n = 2). Percutaneous closure was successful in 96.6% (28/29) of arteriotomies. Conversion to surgical repair was required at one access site (3.4%). Mean follow-up was 50 ± 8 months. No late complications were observed. By CT criteria, no patient developed a >50% reduction in CFA caliber at the site of Perclose deployment during the study period. In conclusion, percutaneous aortic stent-graft insertion can be safely performed, with a low risk of both immediate and midterm access-related complications.

  19. Oesophageal foreign body and a double aortic arch: rare dual pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, T E; Cooney, T

    2009-12-01

    We report the rare case of an oesophageal foreign body which lodged above the site of oesophageal compression by a double aortic arch. Case report and a review of the literature surrounding the classification, embryology, diagnosis and management of vascular rings and slings. An eight-month-old male infant presented with symptoms of tracheal compression following ingestion of an oesophageal foreign body. Following removal of the oesophageal foreign body, the infant's symptoms improved initially. However, subsequent recurrence of respiratory symptoms lead to a repeat bronchoscopy and the diagnosis of a coexisting double aortic arch, causing tracheal and oesophageal compression. To our knowledge, this is only the second reported case of a double aortic arch being diagnosed in a patient following removal of an oesophageal foreign body.

  20. Acute Type A Aortic Dissection Successfully Managed with One-stage Surgery of Total Aortic Arch Replacement with Supra-aortic Transposition Plus Frozen Elephant Trunk Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Lin Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute type A aortic dissection has long been a challenging issue. The surgical techniques traditionally vary with the anatomic extent of the aortic dissection. Simple ascending aortic grafting can be lifesaving, but the lesions beyond the aorta, which include the arch vessels and descending aorta, remain potential hazards. In this paper, we present a patient in which acute type A aortic dissection with lesions extending into descending thoracic aorta was successfully managed by total arch replacement with supra-aortic transposition plus the frozen elephant trunk technique to the descending aorta. A 67-year-old gentleman presented with severe tearing pain from the anterior to posterior chest. Computed tomography confirmed the diagnosis of acute type A dissection extending to the level of the right common iliac artery. An emergent operation was performed as in the aforementioned technique. The surgery went well and the patient was discharged without comorbidities on postoperative day 25. The patient had regular outpatient clinical follow-up. The follow-up computed tomography images showed adequate results with the obliteration of the false lumen. In conclusion, total aortic arch replacement with supra-aortic transposition plus frozen elephant trunk technique is a safe and feasible operative method for patients with detrimental acute type A aortic dissection.

  1. Management of an elderly patient with respiratory failure due to double aortic arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changwan Ryu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular rings are congenital malformations of the aortic arch. A double aortic arch (DAA, the most common type of vascular ring, results from the failure of the fourth embryonic branchial arch to regress, leading to an ascending aorta that divides into a left and right arch that fuse together to completely encircle the trachea and esophagus. The subsequent DAA causes compressive effects on the trachea and esophagus that typically manifests in infancy or early childhood. Adult presentations, particularly in the elderly, are exceedingly rare. Historically such patients have a long-standing history of dyspnea on exertion and dysphagia, with many assumed to have obstructive lung or intrinsic cardiac disease. We describe a case of an elderly woman who presented with respiratory failure due to DAA. In her case, surgery was not feasible and we describe our experience with airway stenting.

  2. Anatomic variations of the branches of the aortic arch in a Peruvian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huapaya, Julio Arturo; Chávez-Trujillo, Kristhy; Trelles, Miguel; Dueñas Carbajal, Roy; Ferrandiz Espadin, Renato

    2015-07-31

    Previous publications from two countries in South America found one anatomical variation not previously reported in the rest of the world, which in turn give some clues with regard to a racial difference. The objective of the present study is to describe variations in the anatomical distribution of the branches of the aortic arch in a Peruvian population. To describe variations in the anatomical distribution of the branches of the aortic arch in a Peruvian population. A descriptive study of patients who underwent a tomography angiography of the aorta was performed. We analyzed the reports that showed the description of the variations of the branches of the aortic arch based on the eight types currently described in the literature. From 361 analyzed reports, 282 patients (78.12%) had a normal aortic arch configuration (type I; aortic arch gives rise to the brachiocephalic trunk, left common carotid and left subclavian arteries); followed by type II (left common carotid artery as a branch of the aorta) with 41 patients (11.36%); and type IX (common ostium for the brachiocephalic trunk and the left common carotid artery) with 25 patients (6.93%). The latter and two other types are new variations. Aortic Arch Type I, Type II and Type IX were the most frequent variations in this Peruvian study. Additionally, we also found two more new types that have not been previously described in the literature. Further investigation regarding these variations is needed in order to assess a racial factor in South America and possible relationships with clinical or surgical events.

  3. Tracheal compression due to an elongated aortic arch in patients with congenital heart disease: evaluation using multidetector-row CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Noriko; Hayabuchi, Yasunobu; Inoue, Miki; Sakata, Miho; Nabo, Manal Mohamed Helmy; Nakagawa, Ryuji; Saijo, Takahiko; Kagami, Shoji [University of Tokushima, Department of Pediatrics, Tokushima (Japan)

    2009-10-15

    The airway can become obstructed as a result of compression by an elongated aortic arch. In this study we evaluated tracheal compression using multidetector-row CT in patients with congenital heart disease and an elongated aortic arch. The trachea was measured at the level of the aortic arch in 205 children and young adults and then the severity of tracheal compression was determined by measuring the tracheal diameter ratio (short axis diameter/long axis diameter). Patients were divided as follows: group I (normal aortic arch; n=166), group II (transversely running aortic arch; n=22), and group III (elongated aortic arch; n=17). From the viewpoint of the relationship of the great arteries, group II had D-malposition, and group III had L-malposition. Age, height, weight and body surface area were significantly correlated with the short and long axis diameter in group I. There was a negative correlation between tracheal diameter ratio and the physical size parameters. The tracheal diameter ratio in group III was 0.50{+-}0.13, which was significantly lower than in groups I and II (P<0.01 and 0.05, respectively). Even apparently asymptomatic patients with an elongated aortic arch can have tracheal compression. An elongated aortic arch may be a useful predictor of tracheal compression. (orig.)

  4. GROWTH OF THE HYPOPLASTIC AORTIC-ARCH AFTER SIMPLE COARCTATION RESECTION AND END-TO-END ANASTOMOSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROUWER, MHJ; CROMMEDIJKHUIS, AH; EBELS, T; EIJGELAAR, A

    Surgical treatment of a hypoplastic aortic arch associated with an aortic coarctation is controversial. The controversy concerns the claimed need to surgically enlarge the diameter of the hypoplastic arch, in addition to resection and end-to-end anastomosis. The purpose of this prospective study is

  5. Cardiogenic shock due to coronary artery disease associated with interrupted aortic arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Alberto Oliveira Dallan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute pulmonary edema is a serious event. Its occurrence in association with interrupted aortic arch and coronary heart disease is rare. Recently, an old patient developed cardiogenic shock and acute pulmonary edema due to acute coronary insufficiency, associated with interrupted aortic arch. The coronary angiography revealed occlusion of the right coronary artery and 95% obstruction in the left main coronary artery, associated with interruption of the descending aorta. Coronary artery bypass graft was performed, without extracorporeal circulation, to the anterior descending coronary artery. We discuss the initial management, given the seriousness of the case.

  6. Inflammatory aortic arch syndrome: contrast-enhanced, three-dimensional MR - angiography in stenotic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both, M.; Mueller-Huelsbeck, S.; Biederer, J.; Heller, M.; Reuter, M.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the value of contrast-enhanced, three-dimensional MR angiography for the evaluation of stenotic and occlusive vascular lesions in inflammatory aortic arch syndrome. Materials and Methods: 14 patients with inflammatory aortic arch syndrome (giant cell arteritis: n = 8, Takayasu arteritis: n = 4, ankylosing spondylitis: n = 1 sarcoidosis: n = 1) underwent MR angiography of the aortic arch and the supra-aortic vessels (n = 15,2 patients were examined twice) and of the abdominal aorta (n = 2). MRA was performed using a 3D-FLASH sequence (TR/TE 4.6/1.8 ms, flip angle 30 ) on a 1.5T system. MRA imaging was compared with the findings of DSA, which served as gold standard. Results: In a total of 467 examined vascular territories, DSA revealed 50 stenoses and 35 occlusions. All lesions were detected by MRA. In 23 segments, the degree of stenosis was overestimated by MRA. Sensitivity and specificity of MRA were 100% and 94,3%, positive and negative predictive values were 73.6 and 100%, and the accuracy was 95,1%. Conclusions: Despite a tendency to overestimate stenoses, contrast-enhanced three-dimensional MR angiography is a valid, non-invasive technique in the assessment of inflammatory aortic arch syndrome. (orig.) [de

  7. A Right-sided Aortic Arch with Kommerell's Diverticulum of the Aberrant Left Subclavian Artery Presenting with Syncope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hsun Yang

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A right-sided aortic arch with an aneurysm of the aberrant subclavian artery is a rare disease. We report a case of Kommerell's diverticulum of an aberrant left subclavian artery in a patient with a right-sided aortic arch. Fewer than 50 cases have been reported in the literature. A number of operative strategies are described. Right thoracotomy provides good exposure and avoids the morbidity associated with bilateral thoracotomy or sternotomy and thoracotomy. In our patient with symptoms of dysphagia, syncope, and left subclavian steal syndrome, a left thoracotomy was used. The repair was accomplished by division of a left ligamentum arteriosum, obliteration of the Kommerell's aneurysm, and an aorto-subclavian bypass. Postoperative complications included left vocal cord palsy and Horner's syndrome. Hoarseness and left ptosis recovered spontaneously 3 months after surgery, and the patient remained symptom-free at the 1-year follow-up. We believe a left thoracotomy for direct repair of Kommerell's diverticulum is a simple and safe method without the increased morbidity found in other procedures.

  8. Invasive aspergillosis in the aortic arch with infectious Aspergillus lesions in pulmonary bullae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isao Watanabe

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A patient with pulmonary bullae died of massive hemoptysis. At autopsy a hole was observed in the aortic wall. A microscopic examination indicated small Aspergillus lesions in pulmonary bullae and extensive necrotic lesions with Aspergillus hyphae in the media of the thoracic aorta. These findings led to a diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis in the aortic arch. This is a rare case in which Aspergillus invaded the aorta in a patient without hematologic neoplasms or neutropenia.

  9. Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair (TEVAR) in Proximal (Type A) Aortic Dissection: Ready for a Broader Application?

    OpenAIRE

    Nienaber, Christoph A.; Sakalihasan, Natzi; Clough, Rachel E.; Aboukoura, Mohamed; Mancuso, Enrico; Yeh, James S.M.; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier; Cheshire, Nick; Rosendahl, Ulrich Peter; Quarto, Cesare; Pepper, John

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveThoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has demonstrated encouraging results and is gaining increasing acceptance as a treatment option for aortic aneurysms and dissections. Yet, its role in managing proximal aortic pathologies is unknown - this is important because in proximal (Stanford type A) aortic dissections, 10-30% are not accepted for surgery, and 30-50% are technically amenable for TEVAR. We describe our case series of type A aortic dissections treated using TEVAR.Method...

  10. Vascular geometry as a risk factor for non-penetrating traumatic injuries of the aortic arch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Schicho

    Full Text Available To assess biomechanical factors in aortic arch geometry contributing to the development of non-penetrating aortic arch injury (NAAI in multiply injured patients with an Injury Severity Score (ISS ≥ 16.230 consecutive multiply injured trauma patients with an ISS ≥ 16 admitted to our Level-I trauma center during a consecutive 24-month period were prospectively included of whom 13 presented with NAAI (5.7%. Standardized whole-body CT in a 2x128-detector-row scanner included a head-and-neck CTA. Aortic arch diameters, width, height, angles and thoracic width and height were measured in individuals with NAAI and ISS-, sex-, age-, and trauma mechanism-matched controls.There was no difference between groups regarding sex, age, ISS, and aortic diameters. The aortic arch angle in individuals with NAAI (71.3° ± 14.9° was larger than in healthy control (60.7° ± 8.6°; p*<0.05. In patients with NAAI, the distance between ascendent and descendent aorta was larger (5.2 cm ± 1.9 cm than in control (2.8 ± 0.5 cm; ***p<0.001. The aortic arch is higher above tracheal bifurcation in NAAI (3.6 cm ± 0.6 cm than in matched control (2.4 cm ± 0.3 cm; ***p<0.001. Accordingly, the area under the aortic arch, calculated as half of an eliptic shape, is significantly larger in patients with NAAI (15.0 cm2 ± 6.5 cm2 when compared to age- and sex-matched controls without NAAI (5.5 cm2 ± 1.3 cm2; ***p<0.001.Besides the magnitude of deceleration and direction of impact, width and height of the aortic arch are the 3rd and 4th factor directly contributing to the risk of developing traumatic NAAI in severely injured patients.

  11. Retrograde Ascending Dissection After Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair Combined With the Chimney Technique and Successful Open Repair Using the Frozen Elephant Trunk Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Koji; Tokui, Toshiya; Nakamura, Bun; Inoue, Ryosai; Inagaki, Masahiro; Maze, Yasumi; Kato, Noriyuki

    2018-01-01

    The chimney technique can be combined with thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) to both obtain an appropriate landing zone and maintain blood flow of the arch vessels. However, surgical repair becomes more complicated if retrograde type A aortic dissection occurs after TEVAR with the chimney technique. We herein report a case involving a 73-year-old woman who developed a retrograde ascending dissection 3 months after TEVAR for acute type B aortic dissection. To ensure an adequate proximal sealing distance, the proximal edge of the stent graft was located at the zone 2 level and an additional bare stent was placed at the left subclavian artery (the chimney technique) at the time of TEVAR. Enhanced computed tomography revealed an aortic dissection involving the ascending aorta and aortic arch. Surgical aortic repair using the frozen elephant trunk technique was urgently performed. The patient survived without stroke, paraplegia, renal failure, or other major complications. Retrograde ascending dissection can occur after TEVAR combined with the chimney technique. The frozen elephant trunk technique is useful for surgical repair in such complicated cases.

  12. MRI-based multiscale models for the hemodynamic and structural evaluation of surgically reconstructed aortic arches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pittaccio, S; Migliavacca, F; Balossino, R

    2007-01-01

    ) geometries of a porcine aortic arch were derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images. Inlet conditions were derived from MRI velocimetry. A multiscale approach was used for the imposition of outlet conditions, wherein a lumped parameter net provided an active afterload. Evidence was found that ring...

  13. Abnormal pulmonary vein drainage in upper right lobe associated with double aortic arch : magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busto, M.; Dolz, J.L.; Capdevilla, A.; Castanon, M.; Mulet, J.

    1997-01-01

    We present the magnetic resonance (MR) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) findings in a case of abnormal pulmonary vein drainage from upper right lobe to superior vena cava, associated with double aortic arch, in a six-month-old boy. (Author) 9 refs

  14. Right-sided aortic arch with anomalous origin of the left subclavian artery: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučurević Goran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A right-sided aortic arch is a rare congenital defect of the aorta with incidence of 0.05% to 0.1% reported in published series. Usually it is associated with congenital heart anomalies and esophageal and tracheal compression symptoms. We present a case of a right-sided aortic arch of anomalous left subclavian artery origin, accidentally revealed during multislice CT (MSCT supraaortic branches angiography. Case Outline. A 53-year-old female patient was examined at the Outpatients’ Unit of the Vascular Surgery University Clinic for vertigo, occasional dizziness and difficulty with swallowing. Physical examination revealed a murmur of the left supraclavicular space, with 15 mmHg lower rate of arterial tension on the left arm. Ultrasound of carotid arteries revealed 60% stenosis of the left subclavian artery and bilateral internal carotid artery elongation. MSCT angiography revealed a right-sided aortic arch with aberrant separation of the left subclavian artery that was narrowed 50%, while internal carotid arteries were marginally elongated. There was no need for surgical treatment or percutaneous interventions, so that conservative treatment was indicated. Conclusion. A right-sided aortic arch is a very rare anomaly of the location and branching of the aorta. Multislice CT angiography is of great importance in the diagnostics of this rare disease.

  15. Outcomes of fenestrated and branched endovascular repair of complex abdominal and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanzer, Andres; Simons, Jessica P; Flahive, Julie; Durgin, Jonathan; Aiello, Francesco A; Doucet, Danielle; Steppacher, Robert; Messina, Louis M

    2017-09-01

    More than 80% of infrarenal aortic aneurysms are treated by endovascular repair. However, adoption of fenestrated and branched endovascular repair for complex aortic aneurysms has been limited, despite high morbidity and mortality associated with open repair. There are few published reports of consecutive outcomes, inclusive of all fenestrated and branched endovascular repairs, starting from the inception of a complex aortic aneurysm program. Therefore, we examined a single center's consecutive experience of fenestrated and branched endovascular repair of complex aortic aneurysms. This is a single-center, prospective, observational cohort study evaluating 30-day and 1-year outcomes in all consecutive patients who underwent fenestrated and branched endovascular repair of complex aortic aneurysms (definition: requiring one or more fenestrations or branches). Data were collected prospectively through an Institutional Review Board-approved registry and a physician-sponsored investigational device exemption clinical trial (G130210). We performed 100 consecutive complex endovascular aortic aneurysm repairs (November 2010 to March 2016) using 58 (58%) commercially manufactured custom-made devices and 42 (42%) physician-modified devices to treat 4 (4%) common iliac, 42 (42%) juxtarenal, 18 (18%) pararenal, and 36 (36%) thoracoabdominal aneurysms (type I, n = 1; type II, n = 4; type III, n = 12; type IV, n = 18; arch, n = 1). The repairs included 309 fenestrations, branches, and scallops (average of 3.1 branch arteries/case). All patients had 30-day follow-up for 30-day event rates: three (3%) deaths; six (6%) target artery occlusions; five (5%) progressions to dialysis; eight (8%) access complications; one (1%) paraparesis; one (1%) bowel ischemia; and no instances of myocardial infarction, paralysis, or stroke. Of 10 type I or type III endoleaks, 8 resolved (7 with secondary intervention, 1 without intervention). Mean follow-up time was 563 days (interquartile range

  16. Surgical repair for acute type A aortic dissection in octogenarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed Ahmad, Ali; Papadopoulos, Nestoras; Detho, Faisal; Srndic, Edin; Risteski, Petar; Moritz, Anton; Zierer, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Despite limited data, the necessity for immediate surgical intervention in octogenarians with acute type A aortic dissection (AAD) has recently been questioned because the surgical risk may outweigh its potential benefits. At the same time, evolving stent graft technologies are pushing in the market for pathology within the ascending aorta, even for treatment of AAD. Against this background, we analyzed our institutional experience in this patient cohort during the last 8 years. Between October 2005 and October 2013, 39 patients aged older than 80 years (82 ± 2 years) underwent surgical repair for AAD, of which 29 patients (74%) were men. Owing to patient age and comorbidities, we aimed to limit the operation to supracoronary hemiarch replacement whenever possible. Clinical data were prospectively entered into our institutional database. Late follow-up was 3.6 ± 2.8 years and was 100% complete. Hemiarch replacement was performed in 32 patients (82%), and full arch replacement was necessary in the remaining 7. In 31 patients (79%), the aortic root could be glued and reconstructed or remained untouched. The remaining 8 patients (21%) underwent the bio-Bentall procedure. Mean ventilation time was 46 ± 23 hours, and the intensive care unit stay was 5 ± 9 days. We observed new postoperative permanent neurologic deficits in 2 patients (5%) and transient neurologic deficits in 3 (8%). The 30-day mortality was 26% (n = 10). Kaplan-Meier estimates for late survival were 46% ± 16% at 5 years. Given the guidelines regarding the predicted risk of death in patients with untreated AAD, current data suggest a survival benefit with immediate open surgical intervention even in octogenarians. Similarly to the early days of transcatheter-based aortic valve implantation, open surgical reference data are warranted to set the bar for upcoming endovascular treatment of AAD in octogenarians. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  17. Morphometric changes in the aortic arch with advancing age in fetal to mature thoroughbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endoh, Chihiro; Matsuda, Kazuya; Okamoto, Minoru; Tsunoda, Nobuo; Taniyama, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-28

    Aortic rupture is a well recognized cause of sudden death in thoroughbred horses. Some microscopic lesions, such as those caused by cystic medial necrosis and medionecrosis, can lead to aortic rupture. However, these microscopic lesions are also observed in normal horses. On the other hand, a previous study of aortic rupture suggested that underlying elastin and collagen deposition disorders might be associated with aortic rupture. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the structural components of the tunica media of the aortic arch, which is composed of elastin, collagen, smooth muscle cells and mucopolysaccharides (MPS), in fetal to mature thoroughbred horses. The percentage area of elastin was greatest in the young horses and subsequently decreased with aging. The percentage area of collagen increased with aging, and the elderly horses (aged ≥20) exhibited significantly higher percentage areas of collagen than the young horses. The percentage area of smooth muscle cells did not change with age. The percentage area of MPS was inversely proportional to the percentage area of elastin. The fetuses exhibited a markedly larger percentage area of MPS than the mature horses. We concluded that the medial changes seen in the aortic arch, which included a reduction in the amount of elastin and increases in the amounts of collagen and MPS, were age-related variations.

  18. Combined Repair of Ascending Aortic Pseudoaneurysm and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Patient with Marfan Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kokotsakis, John N.; Lioulias, Achilleas G.; Foroulis, Christophoros N.; Skouteli, Eleni Anna T.; Milonakis, Michael K.; Bastounis, Elias A.; Boulafendis, Dimitrios G.

    2003-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of the ascending aorta after the original inclusion/wrap technique of the Bentall procedure present a difficult surgical management problem and are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Patients with Marfan syndrome frequently develop aneurysms and dissections that involve multiple aortic segments. We present the case of a Marfan patient who successfully underwent repair of a giant ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm and concomitant repair of an abdominal aortic ane...

  19. Video-assisted thoracoscopic left lower lobectomy in a patient with lung cancer and a right aortic arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wada Hideyuki

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A right aortic arch is a rare congenital anomaly, with a reported incidence of around 0.1%. A patient with a right aortic arch underwent video-assisted thoracic surgery left lower lobectomy and mediastinal lymph node dissection for squamous cell carcinoma. There was no aortic arch or descending aorta in the left thoracic cavity, but the esophagus. There was no anomaly in the location or branching of the pulmonary vessels, the bronchi, and the lobulation of the lungs. The vagus nerve was found at the level of the left pulmonary artery. The arterial ligament was found between the left subclavian artery and the left pulmonary artery. The recurrent laryngeal nerve was recurrent around the left subclavian artery. A Kommerell diverticulum was found at the origin of the left subclavian artery. The patient experienced no complications. We conclude that video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy with mediastinal dissection is feasible for treating lung cancer with a right aortic arch.

  20. Endovascular repair of traumatic thoracic aortic tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, M Ashraf; Kirk, Jeffrey S; Cuff, Robert F; Banegas, Shonda L; Ambrosi, Gavin M; Liao, Timothy H; Chambers, Christopher M; Wong, Peter Y; Heiser, John C

    2012-03-01

    Patients with thoracic aorta injuries (TAI) present a unique challenge. The purpose of this study was to review the outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in patients with TAI. A retrospective chart review of all patients admitted for TEVAR for trauma was performed. In a 5-year period, 19 patients (6 women and 13 men; average age, 42 y) were admitted to our trauma center with TAI. Mechanism of injury was a motor vehicle crash in 12 patients, motorcycle crash in 2 patients, automobile-pedestrian accident in 2 patients, 1 fall, 1 crush injury, and 1 stab wound to the back. A thoracic endograft was used in 6 patients and proximal aortic cuffs were used in 13 patients (68%). One patient (5%) died. There were no strokes, myocardial infarctions, paraplegia, or renal failure. TEVAR for TAI appears to be a safe option for patients with multiple injuries. TEVAR in young patients is still controversial because long-term endograft behavior is unknown. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Pattern-based approach to fetal congenital cardiovascular anomalies using the transverse aortic arch view on prenatal cardiac MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Su-Zhen; Zhu, Ming [Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Shanghai Children' s Medical Center, Shanghai (China)

    2015-05-01

    Fetal echocardiography is the imaging modality of choice for prenatal diagnosis of congenital cardiovascular anomalies. However, echocardiography has limitations. Fetal cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to complement US in detecting congenital cardiovascular anomalies. This article draws on our experience; it describes the transverse aortic arch view on fetal cardiac MRI and important clues on an abnormal transverse view at the level of the aortic arch to the diagnosis of fetal congenital cardiovascular anomalies. (orig.)

  2. Pattern-based approach to fetal congenital cardiovascular anomalies using the transverse aortic arch view on prenatal cardiac MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Su-Zhen; Zhu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Fetal echocardiography is the imaging modality of choice for prenatal diagnosis of congenital cardiovascular anomalies. However, echocardiography has limitations. Fetal cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to complement US in detecting congenital cardiovascular anomalies. This article draws on our experience; it describes the transverse aortic arch view on fetal cardiac MRI and important clues on an abnormal transverse view at the level of the aortic arch to the diagnosis of fetal congenital cardiovascular anomalies. (orig.)

  3. [Right patent ductus arteriosus with an ipsilateral aortic arch: percutaneous closure with amplatzer devices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Justo; Acuña, Manuel; Arispe, Elizabeth; Camargo, Ronaldo; Neves, Juliana; Arnoni, Daniel; Fontes, Valmir F; Pedra, Carlos A

    2007-03-01

    The association of a right aortic arch with an ipsilateral patent ductus arteriosus is rare, especially when there are no other intracardiac anomalies. We report three female patients aged 26, 35 and 9 years with this combination in whom previous attempts at surgical closure by thoracotomy and sternotomy were unsuccessful and who subsequently underwent successful percutaneous closure of the defects using Amplatzer devices. In two patients, although angiography demonstrated the presence of type-A patent ductus arteriosus, it was not possible to determine the minimum diameter accurately and it was necessary to measure it using a sizing balloon. An Amplatzer duct occluder was used in two patients and an Amplatzer muscular ventricular septal defect occluder, in the other. In all patients, full closure was confirmed in the catheterization laboratory and the patients were discharged on the same day with no complications. Percutaneous closure of a right patent ductus arteriosus associated with a right aortic arch is feasible, safe and effective.

  4. Interrupted Aortic Arch Associated with Absence of Left Common Carotid Artery: Imaging with MDCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onbas, Omer; Olgun, Hasim; Ceviz, Naci; Ors, Rahmi; Okur, Adnan

    2006-01-01

    Interrupted aortic arch (IAA) is a rare severe congenital heart defect defined as complete luminal and anatomic discontinuity between ascending and descending aorta. Although its association with various congenital heart defects has been reported, absence of left common carotid artery (CCA) in patients with IAA has not been reported previously. We report a case of IAA associated with the absence of left CCA which was clearly shown on multidetector-row spiral CT

  5. Abnormal innominate vein and right aortic arch, an uncommon association that should be taken into account

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catala, J.; Martin, C.

    2000-01-01

    A case of abnormal innominate vein associated with right aortic arch and aberrant left subclavian artery is presented. It was an incidental finding during the radiological study of an 8-year old boy suspected of having tuberculosis. The authors review the different etiological theories, radiological features and diagnostic impact of this uncommon venous malformation, as well as its relationship to other cardiovascular anomalies. (Author) 9 refs

  6. Aortic arch reconstruction: deep and moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, YanWen; Xiao, LiQiong; Yang, Ting; Wang, Lei; Chen, Xin

    2017-07-01

    To compare the effects of moderate and deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (SACP) during aortic arch surgery in adult patients and to offer the evidence for the detection of the temperature which provides best brain protection in the subjects who accept aortic arch reconstruction surgery. A total of 109 patients undergoing surgery of the aortic arch were divided into the moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest group (Group I) and the deep hypothermic circulatory arrest group (Group II). We recorded the data of the patients and their cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) time, aortic clamping time, SACP time and postoperative anesthetized recovery time, tracheal intubation time, time in the intensive care unit (ICU) and postoperative neurologic dysfunction. Patient characteristics were similar in the two groups. There were four patients who died in Group II and 1 patient in Group I. There were no significant differences in aortic clamping time of each group (111.4±58.4 vs. 115.9±16.2) min; SACP time (27.4±5.9 vs. 23.5±6.1) min of the moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest group and the deep hypothermic circulatory arrest group; there were significant differences in cardiopulmonary bypass time (207.4±20.9 vs. 263.8±22.6) min, postoperative anesthetized recovery time (19.0±11.1 vs. 36.8±25.3) hours, extubation time (46.4±15.1 vs. 64.4±6.0) hours; length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) (4.7±1.7 vs. 8±2.3) days and postoperative neurologic dysfunction in the two groups. Compared to deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest can provide better brain protection and achieve good clinical results.

  7. Trans-aortic repair of a sinus of valsalva aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Ieromonachos, Constantinos; Stavridis, George; Antoniou, Theofani A; Athanassopoulos, George; Cokkinos, Dennis V; Alivizatos, Peter A

    2007-01-01

    Sinus of Valsalva aneurysms are rare and vary in their presentation and approach of surgical repair. We report on a case of isolated right sinus of Valsalva aneurysm that underwent successful excision and patch repair with individual sutures placed through the annulus of the aortic valve.

  8. Persistent fifth arch anomalies - broadening the spectrum to include a variation of double aortic arch vascular ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Beverley; Chan, Frandics [Stanford Children' s Hospital and Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Hanneman, Kate [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2016-12-15

    Fifth arch anomalies are rare and complex and frequently misdiagnosed or mistaken for other entities. We report a double arch vascular ring that is thought to consist of right fourth arch and left fifth arch components, a previously undescribed persistent fifth arch variant. The currently recognized spectrum and classification of fifth arch vascular anomalies are expanded along with illustrative images to justify the proposed changes. Reviewing and expanding the classification of fifth arch anomalies to include a double arch ring variant will promote recognition, correct diagnosis and appropriate management of these anomalies. (orig.)

  9. Combined Repair of Ascending Aortic Pseudoaneurysm and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Patient with Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokotsakis, John N.; Lioulias, Achilleas G.; Foroulis, Christophoros N.; Skouteli, Eleni Anna T.; Milonakis, Michael K.; Bastounis, Elias A.; Boulafendis, Dimitrios G.

    2003-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of the ascending aorta after the original inclusion/wrap technique of the Bentall procedure present a difficult surgical management problem and are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Patients with Marfan syndrome frequently develop aneurysms and dissections that involve multiple aortic segments. We present the case of a Marfan patient who successfully underwent repair of a giant ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm and concomitant repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. An aggressive surgical strategy followed by life-long cardiovascular monitoring is warranted in order to prolong the survival of these patients. (Tex Heart Inst J 2003;30:233–5) PMID:12959210

  10. Hybrid aortic repair with antegrade supra-aortic and renovisceral debranching from ascending aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Castro-Madrazo, José Antonio; Rivas-Domínguez, Margarita; Fernández-Prendes, Carlota; Zanabili Al-Sibbai, Amer; Llaneza-Coto, José Manuel; Alonso-Pérez, Manuel

    2017-05-01

    Aortic dissection is a life threatening condition. Hybrid repair has been described for the treatment of complex aortic pathology such as thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA) and type A and B dissections, although open and total endovascular repair are also possible. Open surgery is still associated with substantial perioperative morbi-mortality rates, thus less invasive techniques such as endovascular repair and hybrid procedures can achieve good results in centers with experience. We present the case of a patient with a chronic type B dissection and TAAA degeneration that was treated in a single stage hybrid procedure with antegrade supra-aortic and renovisceral debranching from the ascending aorta and TEVAR. At three-year follow up, the patient is free of intervention-related complications.

  11. Multi-detector row computed tomographic evaluation of a rare type of complete vascular ring: Double aortic arch with atretic left arch distal to the origin of left subclavian artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Ying Ying; Fu, Ching Yun; Wei, Hao Ji; Tsai, I Chen; Chen, Clayton Chi Chang [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung (China)

    2013-10-15

    Double aortic arch with an atretic left arch distal to the origin of left subclavian artery was diagnosed with multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) in two children with dysphagia. This rare type of complete vascular ring is clinically important because it may be confused with right aortic arch in mirror imaging. Anatomic details of this rare type of complete vascular ring demonstrated on MDCT facilitated appropriate surgical treatment.

  12. Selective Heart, Brain and Body Perfusion in Open Aortic Arch Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Sven; Kari, Fabian; Rylski, Bartosz; Siepe, Matthias; Benk, Christoph; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm

    2016-09-01

    Open aortic arch replacement is a complex and challenging procedure, especially in post dissection aneurysms and in redo procedures after previous surgery of the ascending aorta or aortic root. We report our experience with the simultaneous selective perfusion of heart, brain, and remaining body to ensure optimal perfusion and to minimize perfusion-related risks during these procedures. We used a specially configured heart-lung machine with a centrifugal pump as arterial pump and an additional roller pump for the selective cerebral perfusion. Initial arterial cannulation is achieved via femoral artery or right axillary artery. After lower body circulatory arrest and selective antegrade cerebral perfusion for the distal arch anastomosis, we started selective lower body perfusion simultaneously to the selective antegrade cerebral perfusion and heart perfusion. Eighteen patients were successfully treated with this perfusion strategy from October 2012 to November 2015. No complications related to the heart-lung machine and the cannulation occurred during the procedures. Mean cardiopulmonary bypass time was 239 ± 33 minutes, the simultaneous selective perfusion of brain, heart, and remaining body lasted 55 ± 23 minutes. One patient suffered temporary neurological deficit that resolved completely during intensive care unit stay. No patient experienced a permanent neurological deficit or end-organ dysfunction. These high-risk procedures require a concept with a special setup of the heart-lung machine. Our perfusion strategy for aortic arch replacement ensures a selective perfusion of heart, brain, and lower body during this complex procedure and we observed excellent outcomes in this small series. This perfusion strategy is also applicable for redo procedures.

  13. Early and midterm outcomes of open stent-graft treatment for distal aortic arch aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Kazunori; Mochizuki, Takaaki; Tsubota, Hideki; Funamoto, Masaki

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate early and late outcomes for open stent-graft treatment, which was introduced as a less-invasive technique for thoracic aortic aneurysm of the distal arch, and to clarify the validity of and indications for this treatment. We retrospectively investigated 38 patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm of the distal arch who underwent open stent-graft placement at our hospital between June 2000 and September 2006. Five patients died in hospital (hospital mortality 13.2%). Age at the time of surgery and onset of postoperative paraplegia were identified as risk factors. Four patients (10.5%) had postoperative paraplegia, but no significant risk factors were seen. The size of the aneurysm was clearly reduced in 18 of the 25 patients (75.8%), in whom computed tomography was performed after discharge, and late outcomes were good. Mural thrombus thickness on the stent landing zone of <4 mm was a predictor for aneurysm shrinkage. Seven patients died during the late period, and the 5-year survival rate among hospital survivors was 80.1%. Early outcomes for open stent-graft are not necessarily good, and late survival is also not excellent. Open stent-graft thus cannot be regarded as an ideal technique for all patients with distal aortic arch aneurysm. However, after aneurysm shrinkage was confirmed during the early period, late outcomes were good. Absence of thick mural thrombus on the stent landing zone may represent a good indication for open stent-graft surgery. (author)

  14. Total aortic arch replacement with the elephant trunk technique: single-centre 30-year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Malakh; Martens, Andreas; Krüger, Heike; Maeding, Illona; Ius, Fabio; Fleissner, Felix; Haverich, Axel

    2014-02-01

    The combined disease of the aortic arch and the descending aorta (aneurysms and dissection) remains a surgical challenge. Various approaches have been used to treat this complex pathology. In the two-stage operation, at the first-stage operation, the aortic arch is replaced through a median sternotomy. Later, at the second-stage operation, the descending thoracic aorta is replaced through a lateral thoracotomy. The elephant trunk (ET) technique was introduced by H.G. Borst at our centre in March 1982, greatly simplifying the second-phase operation. We present our 30-year experience. From March 1982 to March 2012, 179 patients (112 males, age 56.4±12.6 years) received an ET procedure for the combined disease of the aortic arch and the descending aorta (91 aneurysms, 88 dissections (47 acute)). Fifty-six of these patients had undergone previous cardiac operations. Concomitant procedures were performed if necessary. The cerebral protection was done either by deep (till 1999) or moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest and selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (SACP, after 1999). Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and X-clamp times were 208.5±76.5 min and 123.7±54.8 min, respectively. The intraoperative mortality and 30-day mortality during the first-stage operation were 1.7% (3/179) and 17.3% (31/179, 15 with AADA), respectively. Perioperative stroke was 7.9% (n=14/176). Postoperative recurrent nerve palsy was present in 18.2% (32/176) and paraplegia in 5.6% (10/176). The second-stage completion operation was performed as early as possible. Fifty-seven second-stage completion procedures were performed, either surgically (n=50) or through interventional techniques (n=7). The intraoperative and 30-day mortality after the second-stage completion procedures were 5.2% (3/57) and 7.0% (4/57), respectively. The stroke, recurrent nerve palsy and paraplegia rates were 0, 0 and 7% (4/54), respectively. The ET technique has greatly facilitated the two-stage approach to the surgical

  15. Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paravastu, Sharath Chandra Vikram; Jayarajasingam, Rubaraj; Cottam, Rachel; Palfreyman, Simon J; Michaels, Jonathan A; Thomas, Steven M

    2014-01-23

    An abnormal dilatation of the abdominal aorta is referred to as an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Due to the risk of rupture, surgical repair is offered electively to individuals with aneurysms greater than 5.5 cm in size. Traditionally, conventional open surgical repair (OSR) was considered the first choice approach. However, over the past two decades endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has gained popularity as a treatment option. This article intends to review the role of EVAR in the management of elective AAA. To assess the effectiveness of EVAR versus conventional OSR in individuals with AAA considered fit for surgery, and EVAR versus best medical care in those considered unfit for surgery. This was determined by the effect on short, intermediate and long-term mortality, endograft related complications, re-intervention rates and major complications. The Cochrane Peripheral Vascular Diseases Group Trials Search Co-ordinator (TSC) searched the Specialised Register (January 2013) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2012, Issue 12). The TSC also searched trial databases for details of ongoing or unpublished studies. Prospective randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing EVAR with OSR in individuals with AAA considered fit for surgery. and comparing EVAR with best medical care in individuals considered unfit for surgery. We excluded studies with inadequate data or using an inadequate randomisation technique. Three reviewers independently evaluated trials for appropriateness for inclusion and extracted data using pro forma designed by the Cochrane PVD Group. We assessed the quality of trials using The Cochrane Collaboration's 'Risk of bias' tool. We entered collected data in to Review Manager (version 5.2.3) for analysis. Where direct comparisons could be made, we determined odds ratios (OR). We tested studies for heterogeneity and, when present, we used a random-effects model; otherwise we used a fixed-effect model. We tabulated

  16. Isolation of the Left Innominate Artery with a Right Aortic Arch in a 76 year-old Man: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Tong; Jou, Sung Shick; Bae, Won Kyung [Soonchunhyang University Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Isolation of the left innominate artery is a rare anomaly and is usually combined with a right side aortic arch. Most patients are neonates or children with congenital heart disease. We report the MDCT findings of a right aortic arch and isolation of the left innominate artery in a 76-year-old man without congenital heart disease

  17. Aneurysm growth after late conversion of thoracic endovascular aortic repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirofumi Kasahara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 69-year-old man underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair of a descending aortic aneurysm. Three years later, he developed impending rupture due to aneurysmal expansion that included the proximal landing zone. Urgent open surgery was performed via lateral thoracotomy, and a Dacron graft was sewn to the previous stent graft distally with Teflon felt reinforcement. Postoperatively, four sequential computed tomography scans demonstrated that the aneurysm was additionally increasing in size probably due to continuous hematoma production, suggesting a possibility of endoleaks. This case demonstrates the importance of careful radiologic surveillance after endovascular repair, and also after partial open conversion.

  18. Factors Affecting Optimal Aortic Remodeling After Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair of Type B (IIIb) Aortic Dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, I-Ming; Chen, Po-Lin; Huang, Chun-Yang; Weng, Shih-Hsien; Chen, Wei-Yuan; Shih, Chun-Che

    2017-01-01

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to determine factors associated with entire aortic remodeling after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in patients with type B dissection.Materials and MethodsThe patients with type B (IIIb) dissections who underwent TEVAR from 2006 to 2013 with minimum of 2 years of follow-up computed tomography data were retrospectively reviewed. Based on the status of false lumen remodeling of entire aorta, patients were divided into three groups: complete regression, total thrombosis, and inadequate regression with patent abdominal false lumen.ResultsA total of 90 patients (72 males, 18 females; mean age 56.6 ± 16.4 years) were included and divided into the complete regression (n = 22), total thrombosis (n = 18), and inadequate regression (n = 50) groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that dissection extension to iliac arteries, increased preoperative number of dissection tear over abdominal aorta, and decreased preoperative abdominal aorta bifurcation true lumen ratio, as compared between the inadequate and complete regression groups, were associated with a persistent false lumen (odds ratio = 33.33, 2.304, and 0.021; all, p ≤ 0.012). Comparison of 6, 12, and 24 months postoperative data revealed no significant differences at any level, suggesting that the true lumen area ratio might not change after 6 months postoperatively.ConclusionsIncreased preoperative numbers of dissection tear around the abdominal visceral branches, dissection extension to the iliac arteries, and decreased preoperative true lumen area ratio of abdominal aorta are predictive of entire aortic remodeling after TEVAR in patients with type B dissection.Level of EvidenceIII.

  19. Factors Affecting Optimal Aortic Remodeling After Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair of Type B (IIIb) Aortic Dissection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, I-Ming [National Yang Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine (China); Chen, Po-Lin; Huang, Chun-Yang [National Yang Ming University, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine (China); Weng, Shih-Hsien; Chen, Wei-Yuan; Shih, Chun-Che, E-mail: ccshih@vghtpe.gov.tw [National Yang Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine (China)

    2017-05-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to determine factors associated with entire aortic remodeling after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in patients with type B dissection.Materials and MethodsThe patients with type B (IIIb) dissections who underwent TEVAR from 2006 to 2013 with minimum of 2 years of follow-up computed tomography data were retrospectively reviewed. Based on the status of false lumen remodeling of entire aorta, patients were divided into three groups: complete regression, total thrombosis, and inadequate regression with patent abdominal false lumen.ResultsA total of 90 patients (72 males, 18 females; mean age 56.6 ± 16.4 years) were included and divided into the complete regression (n = 22), total thrombosis (n = 18), and inadequate regression (n = 50) groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that dissection extension to iliac arteries, increased preoperative number of dissection tear over abdominal aorta, and decreased preoperative abdominal aorta bifurcation true lumen ratio, as compared between the inadequate and complete regression groups, were associated with a persistent false lumen (odds ratio = 33.33, 2.304, and 0.021; all, p ≤ 0.012). Comparison of 6, 12, and 24 months postoperative data revealed no significant differences at any level, suggesting that the true lumen area ratio might not change after 6 months postoperatively.ConclusionsIncreased preoperative numbers of dissection tear around the abdominal visceral branches, dissection extension to the iliac arteries, and decreased preoperative true lumen area ratio of abdominal aorta are predictive of entire aortic remodeling after TEVAR in patients with type B dissection.Level of EvidenceIII.

  20. Medical image of the week: atherosclerotic aneurysm of aortic arch and descecnding thoracic aorta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parasram M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. A 94-year-old Spanish-speaking woman presented to the hospital with intermittent episodes of dyspnea and abdominal pain for one week. Her past medical history was notable for 30 pack-year smoking history and hypertension, which was reportedly controlled with medical therapy. Physical exam showed trace peripheral edema bilaterally, intact peripheral pulses, and a mild abdominal bruit. Work up at the emergency department revealed a non-ST elevation myocardial infarction with troponin T of 0.34 ng/mL but no ST-wave abnormality on electrocardiography. Chest x-ray displayed an incidental thoracic aneurysm (Figure 1. Chest computed tomography with contrast demonstrated a continuous aneurysm of the aortic arch and descending thoracic aorta with diameters measuring 6.8 cm and 6 cm, respectively (Figure 2A and 2B. Eccentric thrombi are noted in the aortic arch and the descending aorta. Interestingly, the distal descending thoracic aorta curves as it transitions to the abdominal aorta, which is evidence of a tortuous descending ...

  1. Case report and review of the literature total endovascular repair of acute ascending aortic rupture: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, John C; Limmer, Karl K; Perricone, Anthony; Bandyk, Dennis; Kansal, Nikhil

    2013-07-01

    Thoracic aortic endografting has been successfully implemented to treat aneurysmal disease of the distal aortic arch and descending thoracic aorta. Although there are reports of ascending aortic endovascular interventions, the total endovascular repair of a ruptured ascending aorta secondary to a Type A dissection has not been described. We report the case of a 77-year-old patient who presented with a ruptured ascending aortic aneurysm secondary to degeneration of a Stanford type A aortic dissection. His surgical history was significant for orthotropic heart transplant 19 years prior. The dissection, aneurysm, and rupture occurred in the native aorta distal to the ascending aortic suture line. At presentation, he was hemodynamically unstable with a right hemothorax. We placed 3 Medtronic Talent Thoracic Stent Graft devices (Medtronic Inc, Minneapolis, MN) across the suture line in the ascending aorta, excluding the rupture. The patient survived and has been followed to 25 months.

  2. Application of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in treating dwarfism with Stanford B aortic dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jian; Cai, Wenwu; Shu, Chang; Li, Ming; Xiong, Qinggen; Li, Quanming; Li, Xin

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: To apply thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) to treat dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection. Patient concerns: In this report, we presented a 63-year-old male patient of dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection successfully treated with TEVAR. Diagnoses: He was diagnosed with dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection. Interventions: After conservative treatment, the male patient underwent TEVAR at 1 week after hospitalization. After operation, he presented with numbness and weakness of his bilateral lower extremities, and these symptoms were significantly mitigated after effective treatment. At 1- and 3-week after TEVAR, the aorta status was maintained stable and restored. Outcomes: The patient obtained favorable clinical prognosis and was smoothly discharged. During subsequent follow-up, he remained physically stable. Lessons: TEVAR is probably an option for treating dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection, which remains to be validated by subsequent studies with larger sample size. PMID:29703033

  3. Extended aortic repair using frozen elephant trunk technique for Marfan syndrome with acute aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Naomichi; Katayama, Akira; Kuraoka, Masatsugu; Katayama, Keijiro; Takahashi, Shinya; Takasaki, Taiichi; Sueda, Taijiro

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze midterm results of frozen elephant trunk technique for Marfan syndrome with acute aortic dissection. Between February 1999 and August 2011 we performed arch replacement uisng frozen elephant trunk technique for acute aortic dissection in 8 patients with Marfan syndrome containing two complicated type B dissections and six type A dissections.Five patients compromised annulo-aortic ectasia who performed Bentall operation. No patients died in the initial operation. Fate of false lumen on the stent graft border was expressed by CT scan follow-up that were patent in 0, thrombosis in 5 and absorption in 3 patients. One patient who had new aortic dissection 8 years after initial surgery required the Crawford V operation. Ten-years-survival rate was 100% and ten years-event free rate was 67%. Frozen elephant trunk technique was feasible for Marfan syndrome with acute aortic dissection and might become alternative prophylactic treatment to the downstream aorta for acute aortic dissection.

  4. Evaluation by MRA of aortic dilation late after repair of tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, W Aaron; Cook, Stephen C; Daniels, Curt J

    2013-09-10

    This study evaluated predictors for aortic dilation (AD) in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (rTOF) using magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). AD is common in patients with rTOF and may result in increased morbidity and mortality. There are no guidelines for evaluation of AD for rTOF patients. All adults with rTOF who previously underwent MRA had retrospective aortic measurements at the sinuses of Valsalva (SoV) and ascending aorta (AsAo). Rate of change in diameter was determined in patients with multiple MRAs. Chart review identified risk factors for AD. Univariate and multivariate analyses tested predictors of AD. Of the 87 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 12 (14%) had AD. At baseline, mean diameter was 3.6 ± 0.6 cm and 3.1 ± 0.6 cm at the SoV and AsAo, respectively. The AsAo was larger than the SoV in 17%. Predictors of AD included male gender, age, right aortic arch, pregnancy, older age at complete repair, smoking, and systemic hypertension. Serial studies were available in 55 patients; the rate of growth was slow: 0.4 ± 0.9 mm/year (SoV) and 0.1 ± 0.8mm/year (AsAo). AD is common in rTOF at the SoV and AsAo. Transthoracic echocardiography, which does not always image the AsAo as well as MRA, may not image AD in rTOF in cases in which the AsAo is dilated. Although several risk factors correlate with AD in rTOF, the rate of aortic growth is slow, suggesting that rTOF patients may not require frequent aortic imaging. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Hemiarch versus total aortic arch replacement in acute type A dissection: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Shi Sum; Theologou, Thomas; Harrington, Deborah; Kuduvalli, Manoj; Oo, Aung; Field, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Despite recent advances in aortic surgery, acute type A aortic dissection remains a surgical emergency associated with high mortality and morbidity. Appropriate management is crucial to achieve satisfactory outcomes but the optimal surgical approach is controversial. The present systematic review and meta-analysis sought to access cumulative data from comparative studies between hemiarch and total aortic arch replacement in patients with acute type A aortic dissection. A systematic review of the literature using six databases. Eligible studies include comparative studies on hemiarch versus total arch replacement reporting short, medium and long term outcomes. A meta-analysis was performed on eligible studies reporting outcome of interest to quantify the effects of hemiarch replacement on mortality and morbidity risk compared to total arch replacement. Fourteen retrospective studies met the inclusion criteria and 2,221 patients were included in the final analysis. Pooled analysis showed that hemiarch replacement was associated with a lower risk of post-operative renal dialysis [risk ratio (RR) =0.72; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.56-0.94; P=0.02; I(2)=0%]. There was no significant difference in terms of in-hospital mortality between the two groups (RR =0.84; 95% CI: 0.65-1.09; P=0.20; I(2)=0%). Cardiopulmonary bypass, aortic cross clamp and circulatory arrest times were significantly longer in total arch replacement. During follow up, no significant difference was reported from current studies between the two operative approaches in terms of aortic re-intervention and freedom from aortic reoperation. Within the context of publication bias by high volume aortic centres and non-randomized data sets, there was no difference in mortality outcomes between the two groups. This analysis serves to demonstrate that for those centers doing sufficient total aortic arch activity to allow for publication, excellent and equivalent outcomes are achievable. Conclusions on

  6. Endovascular repair of aortic disease: a venture capital perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Lucas W; Stavropoulos, S William; Resnick, Joshua B; Solomon, Jeffrey

    2009-03-01

    Endovascular devices for the treatment of abdominal and thoracic aortic disease are poised to become the next $1 billion medical device market. A shift from open repair to endovascular repair, advances in technology, screening initiatives, and new indications are driving this growth. Although billion-dollar medical device markets are rare, this field is fraught with risk and uncertainty for startups and their venture capital investors. Technological hurdles, daunting clinical and regulatory timelines, market adoption issues, and entrenched competitors pose significant barriers to successful new venture creation. In fact, the number of aortic endografts that have failed to reach commercialization or have been pulled from the market exceeds the number of Food and Drug Administration-approved endografts in the United States. This article will shed some light on the venture capital mind-set and decision-making paradigm in the context of aortic disease.

  7. Open Versus Endovascular Stent Graft Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Firwana, Belal; Ferwana, Mazen; Hasan, Rim

    2014-01-01

    We performed an analysis to assess the need for conducting additional randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing open and endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Trial sequential analysis (TSA) is a statistical methodology that can calculate the required inform...

  8. The impact of endovascular repair on specialties performing abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.H.J. Ultee (Klaas); R. Hurks (Rob); D.B. Buck (Dominique B.); G.S. Dasilva (George S.); P.A. Soden (Peter A.); J.A. van Herwaarden (Joost); H.J.M. Verhagen (Hence); M.L. Schermerhorn (Marc)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair has been performed by various surgical specialties for many years. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) may be a disruptive technology, having an impact on which specialties care for patients with AAA. Therefore, we examined the proportion

  9. The impact of endovascular repair on specialties performing abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ultee, Klaas H J; Hurks, Rob; Buck, Dominique B.; Dasilva, George S.; Soden, Peter A.; Van Herwaarden, Joost A.; Verhagen, Hence J M; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair has been performed by various surgical specialties for many years. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) may be a disruptive technology, having an impact on which specialties care for patients with AAA. Therefore, we examined the proportion of AAA

  10. Mechanisms of recurrent aortic regurgitation after aortic valve repair: predictive value of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Polain de Waroux, Jean-Benoît; Pouleur, Anne-Catherine; Robert, Annie; Pasquet, Agnès; Gerber, Bernhard L; Noirhomme, Philippe; El Khoury, Gébrine; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis J

    2009-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the intraoperative echocardiographic features associated with recurrent severe aortic regurgitation (AR) after an aortic valve repair surgery. Surgical valve repair for AR has significant advantages over valve replacement, but little is known about the predictors and mechanisms of its failure. We blindly reviewed all clinical, pre-operative, intraoperative, and follow-up transesophageal echocardiographic data of 186 consecutive patients who underwent valve repair for AR during a 10-year period and in whom intraoperative and follow-up echo data were available. After a median follow-up duration of 18 months, 41 patients had recurrent 3+ AR, 23 patients presented with residual 1+ to 2+ AR, and 122 had no or trivial AR. In patients with recurrent 3+ AR, the cause of recurrent AR was the rupture of a pericardial patch in 3 patients, a residual cusp prolapse in 26 patients, a restrictive cusp motion in 9 patients, an aortic dissection in 2 patients, and an infective endocarditis in 1 patient. Pre-operatively, all 3 groups were similar for aortic root dimensions and prevalence of bicuspid valve (overall 37%). Patients with recurrent AR were more likely to display Marfan syndrome or type 3 dysfunction pre-operatively. At the opposite end, patients with continent AR repair at follow-up were more likely to have type 2 dysfunction pre-operatively. After cardiopulmonary bypass, a shorter coaptation length, the degree of cusp billowing, a lower level of coaptation (relative to the annulus), a larger diameter of the aortic annulus and the sino-tubular junction, the presence of a residual AR, and the width of its vena contracta were associated with the presence of AR at follow-up. Multivariate Cox analysis identified a shorter coaptation length (odds ratio [OR]: 0.8, p = 0.05), a coaptation occurring below the level of the aortic annulus (OR: 7.9, p < 0.01), a larger aortic annulus (OR: 1.2, p = 0.01), and residual aortic regurgitation

  11. Use of Suture-Mediated Closure Device in Percutaneous Direct Carotid Puncture During Chimney-Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Gabriel; Quek, Lawrence Hwee Han; Tan, Glenn Leong Wei; Pua, Uei

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundInsertion of a carotid chimney graft during thoracic endovascular aortic repair (Ch-TEVAR) is a recognized technique to extend the proximal landing zone into the aortic arch in the treatment of thoracic aortic disease. Conventional technique requires surgical exposure of the carotid artery for insertion of the carotid chimney graft.MethodologyWe describe our experience in the use of a suture-mediated closure device in percutaneous Ch-TEVAR in four patients.ResultsSuccessful hemostasis was achieved in all four patients. No complications related to the carotid puncture were recorded.ConclusionWe conclude that using suture-mediated closure device for carotid closure appears feasible and deserves further studies as a potential alternative to conventional surgical approach.

  12. Use of Suture-Mediated Closure Device in Percutaneous Direct Carotid Puncture During Chimney-Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Gabriel, E-mail: dr.changabriel@gmail.com; Quek, Lawrence Hwee Han, E-mail: lawrence-quek@ttsh.com.sg [Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Singapore); Tan, Glenn Leong Wei, E-mail: glenn-tan@ttsh.com.sg [Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Department of General Surgery (Singapore); Pua, Uei, E-mail: druei@yahoo.com [Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Singapore)

    2016-07-15

    BackgroundInsertion of a carotid chimney graft during thoracic endovascular aortic repair (Ch-TEVAR) is a recognized technique to extend the proximal landing zone into the aortic arch in the treatment of thoracic aortic disease. Conventional technique requires surgical exposure of the carotid artery for insertion of the carotid chimney graft.MethodologyWe describe our experience in the use of a suture-mediated closure device in percutaneous Ch-TEVAR in four patients.ResultsSuccessful hemostasis was achieved in all four patients. No complications related to the carotid puncture were recorded.ConclusionWe conclude that using suture-mediated closure device for carotid closure appears feasible and deserves further studies as a potential alternative to conventional surgical approach.

  13. Secondary hypertension due to isolated interrupted aortic arch in a 45-year-old person: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian Mei; Liu, Xin Wen; Yang, Yi; Wang, Bo Zhong; Wang, Jian An

    2017-12-01

    Though it is rare, isolated interrupted aortic arch (IAA) could lead to hypertension. Surgical repair is the only effective curative method to treat IAA conditions and patients with IAA can hardly survive to adulthood with medication alone. We report an IAA case that of a 45-year-old male patient who survived for 45 years without surgical treatment. A 45-year-old man was referred to the hospital presenting with abnormal blood pressure level. Both computed tomography angiogram (CTA) and angiography revealed IAA. The patient was diagnosed as IAA based on computed tomography angiogram (CTA) and angiography. The patient's blood pressure was severely high and refractory. He refused surgical treatment and accepted antihypertensive medication for 10 days. The patient's office blood pressure level was abnormal, fluctuating between 140/90 and 160/100 mm Hg, but 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring showed normal level. Hypertension due to IAA could be controlled with medications, even surgery is not performed. The discrepancy between ambulatory and office blood pressure levels may be due to the white coat effect.

  14. Spontaneous perforation of a syphilitic aneurysm of the aortic arch into the pulmonary artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stampfel, G.

    1983-01-01

    An aortopulmonary fistula in case of a bag-shaped aneurysm of the aortic arch is demonstrated via angiography. A diagnosis to the effect that the existence of this phenomenon is suspected, can already be arrived at when examining the plain radiography of the thorax. We can say that a sign of an aortopulmonary fistula is represented, in case of an aneurysm of the aorta ascendens and of the arcus aortae, by the existence of a left-right shunt with hypercirculation in the pulmonary circulation, in most cases also signs of right ventricular insufficiency. This is often combined with a typical previous history of sudden dyspnoeas and thoracic pain. The article points out the theoretical possibility of balloon catheter occlusion of the fistula to relieve the acute right ventricular load. (orig.) [de

  15. Jaundice as a Rare Indication for Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieß, Henrik C; Tsilimparis, Nikolaos; Behrendt, Christian A; Wipper, Sabine; Debus, Eike S; Larena-Avellaneda, Axel

    2015-10-01

    Compression of adjacent anatomic structures by an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) can result in a variety of symptoms. We describe the case of an 88-year-old Caucasian woman with jaundice, elevated laboratory parameters for extrahepatic and intrahepatic cholestasis, and concomitant juxtarenal AAA compressing the liver hilum. Following exclusion of other common causes for cholestasis, the patient was considered to have a symptomatic AAA. Open abdominal aortic surgery revealed a contained rupture and was repaired. Obstructive jaundice secondary to a compromising AAA is a rare condition and to the best of our knowledge has not been reported to date. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Duplo arco aórtico: a quebra do silêncio Double aortic arch: the break of silence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Abrão

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Anéis vasculares representam 1-2% dos casos das cardiopatias congênitas. Relatamos um caso raro de duplo arco aórtico. Mulher, 60 anos, procurou atendimento na clínica médica apresentando 1 ano de história de disfagia, 6 meses de dispneia e 2 meses de dor torácica esporádica. Raio X de tórax revelou: hiperinsuflação pulmonar difusa, alargamento mediastinal, coração com volume e configurações normais, arco aórtico à direita e alterações degenerativas vertebrais. Tomografia computadorizada do tórax: arco aórtico duplo circundando e comprimindo a traqueia e o esôfago. Arco direito mais calibroso, emergindo dele o tronco braquiocefálico. Do arco esquerdo emergem a artéria carótida comum e a subclávia esquerda. Diagnóstico: anel vascular traqueoesofagiano decorrente do duplo arco aórtico, sendo o arco direito dominante. No presente caso, optou-se por seguimento clínico da paciente, levando-se em conta a intensidade dos sintomas apresentados.Vascular rings represent 1 to 2% of cases of congenital heart disease. We report a rare case of double aortic arch. A 60-year-old woman was admitted to the hospital presenting a one-year history of dysphagia, six months of dyspnea and two months of sporadic chest pain. Radiograph of the chest revealed diffuse pulmonary hyper inflation, widening of the mediastinum, heart of normal size and shape, a right-sized aortic arch, and degenerative changes of the thoracic spine. Computed tomography of the chest showed a double aortic arch encircling and compressing the trachea and the esophagus. The right aortic arch had a larger caliber, with brachiocephalic trunk arising from it. The left common carotid artery and the left subclavian artery arose from the left aortic arch. Diagnosis: tracheoesophageal vascular ring due to double aortic arch, with dominant right arch. In this case, we chose to follow the patient medically, taking into consideration the mildness of the symptoms.

  17. Aorto-enteric Fistula 15 Years After Uncomplicated Endovascular Aortic Repair with Unforeseen Onset of Endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadhim, M M K; Rasmussen, J B G; Eiberg, J P

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Aorto-enteric fistula after endovascular aortic repair is an exceedingly rare but serious condition. Report A rare case of a fistula between the excluded aortic sac and the transverse colon 15 years after endovascular aortic repair is described. Onset was endocarditis without...... such as endocarditis, which in this case probably occurred as metastatic sepsis from endograft infection....

  18. Idarucizumab (Praxbind for reversal of pradaxa prior to emergent repair of contained ruptured transverse arch aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erol Vahit Belli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Idarucizumab before cardiopulmonary bypass was used for the reversal of dabigatran during an emergent frozen elephant trunk repair of a transverse arch aneurysm. Reversal was successful and minimal not massive transfusion was required with no abnormal sequelae seen with use before cardiopulmonary bypass.

  19. Retrograde ascending aortic dissection during or after thoracic aortic stent graft placement: insight from the European registry on endovascular aortic repair complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggebrecht, Holger; Thompson, Matt; Rousseau, Hervé

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Single-center reports have identified retrograde ascending aortic dissection (rAAD) as a potentially lethal complication of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). METHODS AND RESULTS: Between 1995 and 2008, 28 centers participating in the European Registry on Endovascular Aortic...

  20. [Bentall operation combined with total arch replacement and stented elephant trunk implantation for serious Debakey I aortic dissecting aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Tian-Xiang; Wang, Chun; Zhang, Yu-Hai

    2008-12-01

    To summarize the clinical experience of Bentall operation combined with total arch replacement and stented elephant trunk implantation for serious Debakey I aortic dissecting aneurysm. Twelve patients with serious Debakey I aortic dissecting aneurysm underwent surgical treatment from January 2005 to December 2007. There were 10 male and 2 female with the mean age of (40.1 +/- 9.5) years old. There were acute aortic dissection in 9 cases, chronic aortic dissection in 3 cases. The inner diameter of aorta was (5.3 +/- 1.8) cm. There were Marfan syndrome in 4 cases, aortic regurgitation in all cases, severely persistent chest pain in 9 cases, acute left heart failure in 8 cases, and cardiac tamponade in 4 cases. Bentall operations combined with total arch replacement and stented elephant trunk implantation were performed by using deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and antegrade selective cerebral perfusion in all cases. Urgent surgery underwent in 9 cases. The mean interval between the onset of aortic dissection and the accomplishment of surgery was (41.0 +/- 15.9) hours. Cardiopulmonary bypass time was (191 +/- 26) min, average cross clamp time was (134 +/- 31) min, and average deep hypothermic circulatory arrest time was (50.0 +/- 14.5) min. One patient died in hospital. The time stayed in ICU was 3 to 27 d. Mental disorder in 6 cases, hemi-paralysis in 1 case, amputation in 1 case, hemorrhage of anastomosis in 1 case, hemorrhage of alimentary tract in 1 case, and pleural effusion in 4 cases were recorded. Eleven cases were followed-up for 8 weeks to 36 months. There were no bending of the stents and no obstruction in the vascular prosthesis.No re-operation was needed. One case died 6 months postoperatively. Bentall operation combined with total arch replacement and stented elephant trunk implantation is safe and effective for serious Debakey I aortic dissecting aneurysm, while good organs protection and consummate cardiopulmonary bypass were taken.

  1. Outcomes of endovascular aortic repair in the modern era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budtz-Lilly, Jacob; Wanhainen, Anders; Mani, Kevin

    2018-01-01

    Monitoring outcomes following endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) is critical. Although evidence from randomized controlled trials has solidified the role of EVAR, the analysis of outcomes and "real-world" data has uncovered limitations, improved the selection of appropriate patients, and underscored...... the importance of instructions for use. Subsequent studies demonstrated the learning curve of EVAR and gradual improvement of outcomes over time. Outcomes analyses will continue to play an important role, particularly as technological growth of endovascular therapy has enabled treatment of more complex aneurysm...... pathologies and patients. The important analyses are herein reviewed, following the development of EVAR in the treatment of intact abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) to ruptured AAAs, and finally to complex aneurysms, including thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms and mycotic aneurysms. This includes an overview...

  2. Blood conservation strategies reduce the need for transfusions in ascending and aortic arch surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, M W A; Losenno, K L; Moore, K; Berta, D; Hewitt, J; Ralley, F

    2013-07-01

    Ascending and aortic arch surgery is associated with higher levels of blood loss and subsequent need for allogeneic blood transfusions. We hypothesized that aggressive, comprehensive blood conservation strategies may limit the need for transfusions and, subsequently, improve postoperative outcomes. Over a five-year period, 189 patients underwent proximal aortic surgery at our institution. Fifty-one patients underwent surgery using a comprehensive blood conservation strategy (BCS), including preoperative hemoglobin optimization, antifibrinolytic therapy, intraoperative acute normovolemic hemodilution, cell salvage and meticulous surgical technique. The remaining 138 patients underwent surgery using conventional techniques (CONV). Patients in the BCS group required fewer transfusions during their hospital stay compared to the conventional group (56.9% vs. 72.5%, p=0.041). When examining elective cases, this trend widens, with 40.0% of BCS patients requiring any transfusions compared to 72.9% patients in the conventional group (p=0.001). Red cell (47.1% vs. 62.3%, p=0.06), plasma (43.1% vs. 61.6%, p=0.02) and platelets (27.5% vs. 47.8%, p=0.01) were also less frequently required in the BCS group than the conventional group, respectively. When a transfusion was required, patients in the BCS group received significantly fewer units of red blood cells (2.8 ± 7.0 units) than the conventional group (5.81 ± 9.5 units; p=0.039). Mortality was similar in both groups (BCS 7.8%, conventional 10.9%, p=0.54); however, there was significantly less morbidity in the BCS group, using a composite of any of 10 major postoperative complications (23.5% vs. 39.1%; p=0.046). Median intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital lengths of stay were 2 and 7 days in the BCS group and 2 and 8 days in the CONV group (p=0.15), respectively. The aggressive use of a comprehensive blood conservation strategy in ascending and aortic arch surgery can significantly reduce the need for blood transfusions

  3. Thoracic type Ia endoleak: direct percutaneous coil embolization of the aortic arch at the blood entry site after TEVAR and double-chimney stent-grafts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bangard, Christopher; Franke, Mareike; Maintz, David; Chang, De-Hua [University Hospital, University of Cologne, Department of Radiology, Cologne (Germany); Pfister, Roman [University Hospital, University of Cologne, Department of Internal Medicine III, Cologne (Germany); Deppe, Antje-Christin [University Hospital, University of Cologne, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Cologne (Germany); Matoussevitch, Vladimir [University Hospital, University of Cologne, Department of Vascular Surgery, Cologne (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    To introduce a novel percutaneous technique to stop blood entry at the lesser aortic arch curvature by coil embolisation in type Ia endoleak after TEVAR. A 61-year-old Marfan patient presented with type Ia endoleak of the aortic arch and a growing aortic arch pseudoaneurysm after TEVAR. Multiple preceding operations and interventions made an endovascular approach unsuccessful. Direct percutaneous puncture of the aneurysmal sac would have cured the sign, but not the cause of blood entry at the lesser curvature of the aortic arch. Direct CT-guided percutaneous puncture of the blood entry site in the aortic arch with fluoroscopically guided coil embolisation using detachable extra-long coils was successfully performed. Three weeks after the intervention, the patient developed fever because of superinfection of the pseudoaneurysm. The blood cultures and CT-guided mediastinal aspirate were sterile. After intravenous administration of antibiotics, the fever disappeared and the patient recovered. Six-month follow-up showed permanent closure of the endoleak and a shrinking aneurysmal sac. Direct percutaneous puncture of the aortic arch at the blood entry site of a thoracic type Ia endoleak after TEVAR and double-chimney stent-grafts with coil embolisation of the wedge-shaped space between the lesser aortic curvature and the stent-graft is possible. (orig.)

  4. Thoracic type Ia endoleak: direct percutaneous coil embolization of the aortic arch at the blood entry site after TEVAR and double-chimney stent-grafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangard, Christopher; Franke, Mareike; Maintz, David; Chang, De-Hua; Pfister, Roman; Deppe, Antje-Christin; Matoussevitch, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    To introduce a novel percutaneous technique to stop blood entry at the lesser aortic arch curvature by coil embolisation in type Ia endoleak after TEVAR. A 61-year-old Marfan patient presented with type Ia endoleak of the aortic arch and a growing aortic arch pseudoaneurysm after TEVAR. Multiple preceding operations and interventions made an endovascular approach unsuccessful. Direct percutaneous puncture of the aneurysmal sac would have cured the sign, but not the cause of blood entry at the lesser curvature of the aortic arch. Direct CT-guided percutaneous puncture of the blood entry site in the aortic arch with fluoroscopically guided coil embolisation using detachable extra-long coils was successfully performed. Three weeks after the intervention, the patient developed fever because of superinfection of the pseudoaneurysm. The blood cultures and CT-guided mediastinal aspirate were sterile. After intravenous administration of antibiotics, the fever disappeared and the patient recovered. Six-month follow-up showed permanent closure of the endoleak and a shrinking aneurysmal sac. Direct percutaneous puncture of the aortic arch at the blood entry site of a thoracic type Ia endoleak after TEVAR and double-chimney stent-grafts with coil embolisation of the wedge-shaped space between the lesser aortic curvature and the stent-graft is possible. (orig.)

  5. Histological aspects of arterial abnormalities produced by X-irradiation of the aortic and branchial arches in the chick embryo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, J.-L.

    1976-01-01

    Low dose X irradiations centred on one or two aortic and branchial arches of 3-day chick embryos result in teratogenic effects on the arteries (21-92%) and in low mortality (4-12%). Histological studies of abnormal arteries show different structural malformations of the arterial wall: inorganized arterial fibres, abnormal intima, newly formed arterial tissue in arterial lumen, coalescence of two arteries. It is suggested that a disturbance at the aortic differentiation level results under experimental conditions in the observed arterial abnormalities

  6. [A re-operative case of bentall operation and aortic arch replacement using a stent graft for a Marfan syndrome, post sternum turnover and post mitral valve replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, H; Aomi, S; Noji, S; Uwabe, K; Kihara, S; Kurihara, H; Koyanagi, H

    2001-09-01

    A 36-year-old male with Marfan syndrome succesfully underwent Bentall operation and aortic arch replacement using a stent graft as an elephant trunk. He had received MVR with sternum turn over 14 years previously. Median sternotomy was performed. Under circulatory arrest with rertograde cerebral perfusion we performed Bentall operation and aortic arch replacement using a stent graft. The sternum was cured well. Retractive breathing was not detected. This surgical procedure was effective for cardiovascular disease with Marfan syndrome.

  7. Outflow tract septation and the aortic arch system in reptiles: lessons for understanding the mammalian heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert E. Poelmann

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac outflow tract patterning and cell contribution are studied using an evo-devo approach to reveal insight into the development of aorto-pulmonary septation. Results We studied embryonic stages of reptile hearts (lizard, turtle and crocodile and compared these to avian and mammalian development. Immunohistochemistry allowed us to indicate where the essential cell components in the outflow tract and aortic sac were deployed, more specifically endocardial, neural crest and second heart field cells. The neural crest-derived aorto-pulmonary septum separates the pulmonary trunk from both aortae in reptiles, presenting with a left visceral and a right systemic aorta arising from the unseptated ventricle. Second heart field-derived cells function as flow dividers between both aortae and between the two pulmonary arteries. In birds, the left visceral aorta disappears early in development, while the right systemic aorta persists. This leads to a fusion of the aorto-pulmonary septum and the aortic flow divider (second heart field population forming an avian aorto-pulmonary septal complex. In mammals, there is also a second heart field-derived aortic flow divider, albeit at a more distal site, while the aorto-pulmonary septum separates the aortic trunk from the pulmonary trunk. As in birds there is fusion with second heart field-derived cells albeit from the pulmonary flow divider as the right 6th pharyngeal arch artery disappears, resulting in a mammalian aorto-pulmonary septal complex. In crocodiles, birds and mammals, the main septal and parietal endocardial cushions receive neural crest cells that are functional in fusion and myocardialization of the outflow tract septum. Longer-lasting septation in crocodiles demonstrates a heterochrony in development. In other reptiles with no indication of incursion of neural crest cells, there is either no myocardialized outflow tract septum (lizard or it is vestigial (turtle. Crocodiles

  8. Outflow tract septation and the aortic arch system in reptiles: lessons for understanding the mammalian heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelmann, Robert E; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C; Biermans, Marcel W M; Dolfing, Anne I; Jagessar, Armand; van Hattum, Sam; Hoogenboom, Amanda; Wisse, Lambertus J; Vicente-Steijn, Rebecca; de Bakker, Merijn A G; Vonk, Freek J; Hirasawa, Tatsuya; Kuratani, Shigeru; Richardson, Michael K

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac outflow tract patterning and cell contribution are studied using an evo-devo approach to reveal insight into the development of aorto-pulmonary septation. We studied embryonic stages of reptile hearts (lizard, turtle and crocodile) and compared these to avian and mammalian development. Immunohistochemistry allowed us to indicate where the essential cell components in the outflow tract and aortic sac were deployed, more specifically endocardial, neural crest and second heart field cells. The neural crest-derived aorto-pulmonary septum separates the pulmonary trunk from both aortae in reptiles, presenting with a left visceral and a right systemic aorta arising from the unseptated ventricle. Second heart field-derived cells function as flow dividers between both aortae and between the two pulmonary arteries. In birds, the left visceral aorta disappears early in development, while the right systemic aorta persists. This leads to a fusion of the aorto-pulmonary septum and the aortic flow divider (second heart field population) forming an avian aorto-pulmonary septal complex. In mammals, there is also a second heart field-derived aortic flow divider, albeit at a more distal site, while the aorto-pulmonary septum separates the aortic trunk from the pulmonary trunk. As in birds there is fusion with second heart field-derived cells albeit from the pulmonary flow divider as the right 6th pharyngeal arch artery disappears, resulting in a mammalian aorto-pulmonary septal complex. In crocodiles, birds and mammals, the main septal and parietal endocardial cushions receive neural crest cells that are functional in fusion and myocardialization of the outflow tract septum. Longer-lasting septation in crocodiles demonstrates a heterochrony in development. In other reptiles with no indication of incursion of neural crest cells, there is either no myocardialized outflow tract septum (lizard) or it is vestigial (turtle). Crocodiles are unique in bearing a central shunt, the

  9. [Right-side aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery and Kommerell's diverticulum. A cause of vascular ring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo-Espinosa, Tania; Erdmenger-Orellana, Julio; Becerra-Becerra, Rosario; Balderrabano-Saucedo, Norma; Segura-Standford, Begoña

    The right-side aortic arch may be associated with aberrant left subclavian artery, in some cases this artery originates from an aneurismal dilation of the aorta called Kommerell's diverticulum. A report is presented on 2 cases of vascular ring formed by a right-side aortic arch, anomalous left subclavian artery, Kommerell's diverticulum and left patent ductus arteriosus. A review the literature was also performed as regards the embryological development and the imaging methods used to help in the diagnosis of this rare vascular anomaly. Copyright © 2017 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  10. [Mycotic aneurism in aortic arch by Aspergillus fumigatus: contribution of a case and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burón Fernández, M R; Oruezábal Moreno, M J

    2005-09-01

    The micotic aneurisms by Aspergillus are rare and usually appear in the context of an invasive pulmonary aspergilosis, or by septicum embolism or direct extension from the lungs, for that reason the location the more frequents is in aortic arch and the ascending aorta.8 cases of micotic aneurisms by Aspergillus spp. have been described in literature between 1966 and 2000, being the most frequent location the ascending aorta or the aortic arch. The Aspergillus fumigatus is the isolated species with more frequency, affecting mainly to patients undergoing inmunosupression. The diagnosis of a micotic aneurism requires a high clinical suspicion, given to its peculiarity and the presence of inespecific symptoms, being frequently an accidental finding in an invasive pulmonary aspergilosis.The case of a patient with a micotic aneurism by A. fumigatus appears and we reviewed the similar cases previously disclosed.

  11. Causes and Implications of Readmission after Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenblatt, David Yu; Greenberg, Caprice C.; Kind, Amy J.H.; Havlena, Jeffrey A.; Mell, Matthew W.; Nelson, Matthew T.; Smith, Maureen A.; Kent, K. Craig

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the frequency, causes, predictors, and consequences of 30-day readmission after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. Summary Background Data CMS will soon reduce total Medicare reimbursements for hospitals with higher-than-predicted 30-day readmission rates after vascular surgical procedures including AAA repair. However, causes and factors leading to readmission in this population have never before been systematically analyzed. Methods We analyzed elective AAA repairs over a two-year period from the CMS Chronic Conditions Warehouse, a 5% national sample of Medicare beneficiaries. Results 2481 patients underwent AAA repair – 1502 endovascular (EVAR) and 979 open. 30-day readmission rates were equivalent for EVAR (13.3%) and open repair (12.8%). While wound complication was the most common reason for readmission after both procedures, the relative frequency of other causes differed – e.g., bowel obstruction was common following open repair and graft complication after EVAR. In multivariate analyses, preoperative comorbidities had a modest effect on readmission; however, postoperative factors including serious complications leading to prolonged length of stay and discharge destination other than home had a profound influence on the probability of readmission. The one-year mortality in readmitted patients was 23.4% versus 4.5% in those not readmitted (preadmission is common after AAA repair. Adjusting for comorbidities, postoperative events predict readmission, suggesting that proactively preventing, detecting, and managing postoperative complications may provide an approach to decreasing readmissions, with the potential to reduce cost and possibly enhance long-term survival. PMID:22964736

  12. Correlation of atherosclerotic changes in peripheral arteries with pathological involvement of aortic arch in coronary bypass patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eshraghi N

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: A correlation between coronary artery disease (CAD and atherosclerosis of peripheral arteries and the determination of noninvasive indexes for its existence and extent have been sought by many researchers. Some studies report that the intima-media thickness (IMT of peripheral arteries could play this role. This study evaluated the correlation between the IMTs of common carotid and common femoral arteries and the degree of atherosclerosis in aortic arch and to evaluate the severity of CAD in candidates of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG."n "nMethods: In a cross-sectional analytic-descriptive study, The severity of CAD, the grade of atherosclerosis of the aortic arch, and the IMTs of the common carotid and common femoral arteries were determined."n "nResults: There was a significant weak positive correlation between the IMT of common carotid artery (ρ = 0.193, p = 0.039 and common femoral artery (ρ = 0.206, p = 0.028 with the number of involved carotid vessels; the mean of these two parameters was not significantly different between the three CAD groups. There was not any significant relation between the IMTs of common carotid and common femoral arteries with the severity of atherosclerosis in the aortic arch too. There was not any significant relation between the presences of atherosclerotic plaque in the common carotid or the common femoral arteries with the severity of CAD. The severe atherosclerosis of the aortic arch was significantly higher in patients with three vessel disease."n "nConclusion: According to our results, the IMTs of common carotid and/or common femoral arteries may increase with the severity of CAD; however, these parameters are not a surrogate for predicting the CAD severity.

  13. Aberrant right vertebral artery originating from the aortic arch distal to the left subclavian artery: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Soo Heui; Baek, Hye Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    We present a rare case of an aberrant right vertebral artery originated from the distal aortic arch. This issue has been incidentally detected on a preoperative CT angiography after a stabbing injury of the cervical spinal cord. Normally, the right vertebral artery originates from the right subclavian artery. Therefore, in this case report we will review the incidence and the embryological mechanism of this aberrant course of the right vertebral artery and we will discuss as well the clinical importance of this variation.

  14. Retrograde type A dissection following hybrid supra-aortic endovascular surgery in high-risk patients unfit for conventional open repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Hon C; Chan, Yiu C; Qing, Kai X; Cheng, Stephen W

    2018-04-01

    Hybrid procedures with combined open extra-anatomical supra-aortic bypasses and endovascular surgery are less invasive for patients with complex aortic arch pathology. The aim of this paper is to report patients who developed retrograde type A aortic dissection following initially successful hybrid endovascular treatment. Retrospective review of prospectively collected computerized departmental database. All patients with supra-aortic hybrid endovascular surgery and post-procedure retrograde type A dissection were identified. Patient demographics, comorbid conditions, perioperative parameters, procedural details and post-operative complications were collected. From May 2005 to July 2014, 163 patients underwent thoracic aortic endovascular procedures at our institution. From the 46 patients who had supra-aortic hybrid endovascular repair, six patients (6/46, 13% of all supra-aortic hybrid cases, 3 males) developed retrograde type A aortic dissection. All were elective cases, with 3 chronic dissecting aneurysms and 3 atherosclerotic aneurysms. All had one-stage hybrid procedures: 2 patients had carotid-carotid bypass grafts, one had carotid-carotid-left subclavian bypass graft, and 3 had bypass grafts from ascending aorta to innominate artery and left carotid artery. Five patients had Cook Zenith thoracic stent-grafts (Cook Medical, Bloomington, IN, USA), and one had Medtronic Valiant stent-grafts (Medtronic Vascular Inc, Santa Rosa, CA, USA). The retrograde type A dissection occurred with sudden symptoms at day 5, 6, 10, 20, 105 and 128, respectively. There were 3 immediate fatalities and 2 patients treated conservatively deemed unfit for reintervention (one died of pneumonia at 9 months, and one remained alive at 7 months post-complication). One patient underwent successful emergency open surgery and survived. Supra-aortic hybrid procedures in treating aortic arch pathology may be at risk of developing retrograde type A dissection. This post-operative complication

  15. Automated measurement of uptake in cerebellum, liver, and aortic arch in full-body FDG PET/CT scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Christian; Sun, Shanhui; Sun, Wenqing; Otis, Justin; Wallace, Audrey; Smith, Brian J; Sunderland, John J; Graham, Michael M; Sonka, Milan; Buatti, John M; Beichel, Reinhard R

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop and validate fully automated methods for uptake measurement of cerebellum, liver, and aortic arch in full-body PET/CT scans. Such measurements are of interest in the context of uptake normalization for quantitative assessment of metabolic activity and/or automated image quality control. Cerebellum, liver, and aortic arch regions were segmented with different automated approaches. Cerebella were segmented in PET volumes by means of a robust active shape model (ASM) based method. For liver segmentation, a largest possible hyperellipsoid was fitted to the liver in PET scans. The aortic arch was first segmented in CT images of a PET/CT scan by a tubular structure analysis approach, and the segmented result was then mapped to the corresponding PET scan. For each of the segmented structures, the average standardized uptake value (SUV) was calculated. To generate an independent reference standard for method validation, expert image analysts were asked to segment several cross sections of each of the three structures in 134 F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT scans. For each case, the true average SUV was estimated by utilizing statistical models and served as the independent reference standard. For automated aorta and liver SUV measurements, no statistically significant scale or shift differences were observed between automated results and the independent standard. In the case of the cerebellum, the scale and shift were not significantly different, if measured in the same cross sections that were utilized for generating the reference. In contrast, automated results were scaled 5% lower on average although not shifted, if FDG uptake was calculated from the whole segmented cerebellum volume. The estimated reduction in total SUV measurement error ranged between 54.7% and 99.2%, and the reduction was found to be statistically significant for cerebellum and aortic arch. With the proposed methods, the authors have demonstrated that

  16. Multimodality Imaging Approach towards Primary Aortic Sarcomas Arising after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Case Series Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamran, Mudassar, E-mail: kamranm@mir.wustl.edu; Fowler, Kathryn J., E-mail: fowlerk@mir.wustl.edu; Mellnick, Vincent M., E-mail: mellnickv@mir.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (United States); Sicard, Gregorio A., E-mail: sicard@wudosis.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery (United States); Narra, Vamsi R., E-mail: narrav@mir.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Primary aortic neoplasms are rare. Aortic sarcoma arising after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a scarce subset of primary aortic malignancies, reports of which are infrequent in the published literature. The diagnosis of aortic sarcoma is challenging due to its non-specific clinical presentation, and the prognosis is poor due to delayed diagnosis, rapid proliferation, and propensity for metastasis. Post-EVAR, aortic sarcomas may mimic other more common aortic processes on surveillance imaging. Radiologists are rarely knowledgeable about this rare entity for which multimodality imaging and awareness are invaluable in early diagnosis. A series of three pathologically confirmed cases are presented to display the multimodality imaging features and clinical presentations of aortic sarcoma arising after EVAR.

  17. Preoperative methylprednisolone enhances recovery after endovascular aortic repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Motte, Louise; Kehlet, Henrik; Vogt, Katja

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate effects of preoperative high-dose glucocorticoid on the inflammatory response and recovery after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). BACKGROUND: The postimplantation syndrome after EVAR may delay recovery due to the release of proinflammatory mediators....... Glucocorticoids may reduce postoperative inflammatory responses and enhance recovery, but with limited information on EVAR. METHODS: A single-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 153 patients undergoing elective EVAR between November 2009 and January 2013. Patients received 30 mg.......001) and fulfillment of discharge criteria was shorter [2 days (IQR = 2-4 days) vs 3 days (IQR = 3-4 days)] (P factor receptor were also reduced (P

  18. Total aortic arch replacement with the frozen elephant trunk technique: 10-year follow-up single-centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ius, Fabio; Fleissner, Felix; Pichlmaier, Maximilian; Karck, Matthias; Martens, Andreas; Haverich, Axel; Shrestha, Malakh

    2013-11-01

    Since August 2001, the frozen elephant trunk (FET) technique has been used at our institution to treat degenerative or dissecting aneurysms involving the aortic arch and descending aorta as a potential 'single-stage' procedure. The aim of this study was to review our FET experience and to present the 10-year results. Between August 2001 and January 2012, 131 patients underwent FET implant with three different prostheses: the custom-made Chavan-Haverich (n = 66), the Jotec E-vita (n = 30) and the Vascutek Thoraflex (n = 35) prostheses. Concomitant procedures included aortic valve-sparing operations (David, n = 17) and aortic root replacement (Bentall, n = 25). Patient records and the first postoperative and last available computer tomography (CT) were retrospectively reviewed. Incidence of rethoracotomy for bleeding, stroke, spinal cord injury, prolonged ventilatory support (>96 h) and acute renal failure requiring dialysis were 18, 11, 1, 41 and 16%, respectively. In-hospital mortality was 15%. The mean follow-up was 42 ± 37 (range 1-134 months). At 1, 5 and 10 years, survivals were 82 ± 3, 72 ± 5 and 58 ± 8%, respectively. Freedoms from distal aortic operation were 81 ± 4, 67 ± 5 and 43 ± 13%, respectively. Thirty-six patients underwent 40 distal aortic operations, either open surgical (n = 22, 55%) or endovascular (n = 18, 45%). Chronic aortic dissection was identified as an independent risk factor for distal aortic operation (odds ratio = 3.8; 95% confidence interval 1.5-9.3; P = 0.004). At last CT control, false-lumen thrombosis rates up to 93% were achieved around the stent graft. An FET concept adds to the armament of the surgeon in the treatment of complex and diverse aortic arch pathologies. The preoperative patient risk profile explains the postoperative morbidity and in-hospital mortality. The FET can potentially be still a 'one-stage' procedure in selected patients. However, the extension of FET to patients with extensive aortic aneurysms has led

  19. Repair-oriented classification of aortic insufficiency: impact on surgical techniques and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boodhwani, Munir; de Kerchove, Laurent; Glineur, David; Poncelet, Alain; Rubay, Jean; Astarci, Parla; Verhelst, Robert; Noirhomme, Philippe; El Khoury, Gébrine

    2009-02-01

    Valve repair for aortic insufficiency requires a tailored surgical approach determined by the leaflet and aortic disease. Over the past decade, we have developed a functional classification of AI, which guides repair strategy and can predict outcome. In this study, we analyze our experience with a systematic approach to aortic valve repair. From 1996 to 2007, 264 patients underwent elective aortic valve repair for aortic insufficiency (mean age - 54 +/- 16 years; 79% male). AV was tricuspid in 171 patients bicuspid in 90 and quadricuspid in 3. One hundred fifty three patients had type I dysfunction (aortic dilatation), 134 had type II (cusp prolapse), and 40 had type III (restrictive). Thirty six percent (96/264) of the patients had more than one identified mechanism. In-hospital mortality was 1.1% (3/264). Six patients experienced early repair failure; 3 underwent re-repair. Functional classification predicted the necessary repair techniques in 82-100% of patients, with adjunctive techniques being employed in up to 35% of patients. Mid-term follow up (median [interquartile range]: 47 [29-73] months) revealed a late mortality rate of 4.2% (11/261, 10 cardiac). Five year overall survival was 95 +/- 3%. Ten patients underwent aortic valve reoperation (1 re-repair). Freedoms from recurrent Al (>2+) and from AV reoperation at 5 years was 88 +/- 3% and 92 +/- 4% respectively and patients with type I (82 +/- 9%; 93 +/- 5%) or II (95 +/- 5%; 94 +/- 6%) had better outcomes compared to type III (76 +/- 17%; 84 +/- 13%). Aortic valve repair is an acceptable therapeutic option for patients with aortic insufficiency. This functional classification allows a systematic approach to the repair of Al and can help to predict the surgical techniques required as well as the durability of repair. Restrictive cusp motion (type III), due to fibrosis or calcification, is an important predictor for recurrent Al following AV repair.

  20. Perioperative management of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haofu; Wang Yuwei; Li Jun; Zhao Zonggang; Qi Sen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the clinical experience of perioperative management in performing endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). Methods: EVAR was performed in 22 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. Before treatment the functions of main organs were evaluated and certain measures were adopted in order to protect them. Useful parameters, including the length, diameter, angle and configuration of the proximal and distal aneurysmal neck, the relationship of the aneurysm to aortic branches, the distance from the lowest renal artery to the bifurcation of abdominal aorta, and the quality of access vessels (such as diameter, tortuosity and calcification degree) were determined and assessed with CTA. According to the parameters thus obtained, the suitable stent-graft with ideal diameter and length was selected, and the optimal surgery pattern was employed. Local anesthesia was employed in 20 patients, among them the local anesthesia had to be changed to general anesthesia in one. Epidural anesthesia was carried out in one patient through the surgically-reconstructed iliac artery access,and general anesthesia was employed in one patient who had Stanford type A aortic dissection. The lowest renal artery must be accurately localized before deployment of stent-graft was started. At least one patent internal iliac artery should be reserved when bilateral internal iliac arteries needed to be covered, to be covered by stages or to be reconstructed. After stent-graft placement, angiography must be performed to find out if there was any endoleak and, if any, to determine the type of endoleak and to deal with it properly. Two cases had proximal type I endoleak, so balloon dilation was employed in one and cuff implantation in another one. Distal type I endoleak occurred in one case, but, unfortunately, the iliac artery ruptured when balloon dilation was employed, therefore the patient had to receive vascular repair

  1. Nursing cooperation in endovascular aneurysm repair treatment for aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Li; Yuan Chanjuan; Chen Rumei; Xiao Zhanqiang; Qi Youfei

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the main points of nursing cooperation in endovascular aneurysm repair treatment for aortic dissection. Methods: Preoperative psychological care and the other preparations were carefully conducted. During the operation, the patient's body was correctly placed. Active cooperation with the performance of angiography and close observation during heparinization were carried out. The proper delivery of catheter and stent to the operator was carefully done. Close observation for the patient's vital signs, the renal function and the changes of limb blood supply were made. Results: Under close cooperation of' the operators, nurses, anesthesiologists and technicians, the surgery was successfully accomplished in 35 patients. The monitoring of vital signs during the entire performance of operation was well executed. No surgical instruments delivery error's or surgery failure due to unsuitable cooperation occurred. Conclusion: Perfect preoperative preparation, strict nursing cooperation and team cooperation are the key points to ensure a successful endovascular aneurysm repair for aortic dissection. (authors)

  2. Neurological Complications Following Endoluminal Repair of Thoracic Aortic Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, J. P.; Taylor, P. R.; Bell, R. E.; Chan, Y. C.; Sabharwal, T.; Carrell, T. W. G.; Reidy, J. F.

    2007-01-01

    Open surgery for thoracic aortic disease is associated with significant morbidity and the reported rates for paraplegia and stroke are 3%-19% and 6%-11%, respectively. Spinal cord ischemia and stroke have also been reported following endoluminal repair. This study reviews the incidence of paraplegia and stroke in a series of 186 patients treated with thoracic stent grafts. From July 1997 to September 2006, 186 patients (125 men) underwent endoluminal repair of thoracic aortic pathology. Mean age was 71 years (range, 17-90 years). One hundred twenty-eight patients were treated electively and 58 patients had urgent procedures. Anesthesia was epidural in 131, general in 50, and local in 5 patients. Seven patients developed paraplegia (3.8%; two urgent and five elective). All occurred in-hospital apart from one associated with severe hypotension after a myocardial infarction at 3 weeks. Four of these recovered with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage. One patient with paraplegia died and two had permanent neurological deficit. The rate of permanent paraplegia and death was 1.6%. There were seven strokes (3.8%; four urgent and three elective). Three patients made a complete recovery, one had permanent expressive dysphasia, and three died. The rate of permanent stroke and death was 2.1%. Endoluminal treatment of thoracic aortic disease is an attractive alternative to open surgery; however, there is still a risk of paraplegia and stroke. Permanent neurological deficits and death occurred in 3.7% of the patients in this series. We conclude that prompt recognition of paraplegia and immediate insertion of a CSF drain can be an effective way of recovering spinal cord function and improving the prognosis

  3. Periodontal Disease Associated with Aortic Arch Atheroma in Patients with Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Souvik; Chung, Matthew; Duda, Viktoriya; Giamberardino, Lauren; Hinderliter, Alan; Offenbacher, Steven

    2017-10-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) is associated with recurrent vascular event in stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). In this study, we investigated whether PD is independently associated with aortic arch atheroma (AA). We also explored the relationship PD has with AA plaque thickness and other characteristics associated with atheroembolic risk among patients with stroke or TIA. Finally, we confirmed the association between AA and recurrent vascular event in patients with stroke or TIA. In this prospective longitudinal hospital-based cohort study, PD was assessed in patients with stroke and TIA. Patients with confirmed stroke and TIA (n = 106) were assessed by calibrated dental examiners to determine periodontal status and were followed over a median of 24 months for recurrent vascular events (stroke, myocardial infarction, and death). The extent of AA and other plaque characteristics was assessed by transesophageal echocardiography. Within our patient cohort, 27 of the 106 participants had recurrent vascular events (including 16 with stroke or TIA) over the median of 24-month follow-up. Severe PD was associated with increased AA plaque thickness and calcification. The results suggest that PD may be a risk factor for AA. In this cohort, we confirm the association of severe AA with recurrent vascular events. In patients with stroke or TIA, severe PD is associated with increased AA plaque thickness, a risk factor for recurrent events. Further studies are needed to confirm this finding and to determine whether treatment of PD can reduce the rate of AA plaque progression and recurrent vascular events. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterizing saccular aortic arch aneurysms from the geometry-flow dynamics relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Kayoko; Shiiya, Norihiko; Takehara, Yasuo; Sugiyama, Masataka; Satoh, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Katsushi; Washiyama, Naoki

    2017-06-01

    Low wall shear stress (WSS) has been reported to be associated with accelerated atherosclerosis, aneurysm growth, or rupture. We evaluated the geometry of aortic arch aneurysms and their relationship with WSS by using the 4-dimensional flow magnetic resonance imaging to better characterize the saccular aneurysms. We analyzed the geometry in 100 patients using multiplanar reconstruction of computed tomography. We evaluated WSS and vortex flow using 4-dimensional flow magnetic resonance imaging in 16 of them, which were compared with 8 age-matched control subjects and eight healthy young volunteers. Eighty-two patients had a saccular aneurysm, and 18 had a fusiform aneurysm. External diameter/aneurysm length ratio and sac depth/neck width ratio of the fusiform aneurysms were constant at 0.76 ± 0.18 and 0.23 ± 0.09, whereas those of saccular aneurysms, especially those involving the outer curvature, were higher and more variable. Vortex flow was always present in the aneurysms, resulting in low WSS. When the sac depth/neck width ratio was less than 0.8, peak WSS correlated inversely with luminal diameter even in the saccular aneurysms. When this ratio exceeded 0.8, which was the case only with the saccular aneurysms, such correlation no longer existed and WSS was invariably low. Fusiform aneurysms elongate as they dilate, and WSS is lower as the diameter is larger. Saccular aneurysms dilate without proportionate elongation, and they, especially those occupying the inner curvature, have higher and variable sac depth/neck width ratio. When this ratio exceeds 0.8, WSS is low regardless of diameter, which may explain their malignant clinical behavior. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A statistical shape modelling framework to extract 3D shape biomarkers from medical imaging data: assessing arch morphology of repaired coarctation of the aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruse, Jan L.; McLeod, Kristin; Biglino, Giovanni; Ntsinjana, Hopewell N.; Capelli, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Medical image analysis in clinical practice is commonly carried out on 2D image data, without fully exploiting the detailed 3D anatomical information that is provided by modern non-invasive medical imaging techniques. In this paper, a statistical shape analysis method is presented, which enables the extraction of 3D anatomical shape features from cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) image data, with no need for manual landmarking. The method was applied to repaired aortic coarctation arches that present complex shapes, with the aim of capturing shape features as biomarkers of potential functional relevance. The method is presented from the user-perspective and is evaluated by comparing results with traditional morphometric measurements. Steps required to set up the statistical shape modelling analyses, from pre-processing of the CMR images to parameter setting and strategies to account for size differences and outliers, are described in detail. The anatomical mean shape of 20 aortic arches post-aortic coarctation repair (CoA) was computed based on surface models reconstructed from CMR data. By analysing transformations that deform the mean shape towards each of the individual patient’s anatomy, shape patterns related to differences in body surface area (BSA) and ejection fraction (EF) were extracted. The resulting shape vectors, describing shape features in 3D, were compared with traditionally measured 2D and 3D morphometric parameters. The computed 3D mean shape was close to population mean values of geometric shape descriptors and visually integrated characteristic shape features associated with our population of CoA shapes. After removing size effects due to differences in body surface area (BSA) between patients, distinct 3D shape features of the aortic arch correlated significantly with EF (r = 0.521, p = .022) and were well in agreement with trends as shown by traditional shape descriptors. The suggested method has the potential to discover previously

  6. A statistical shape modelling framework to extract 3D shape biomarkers from medical imaging data: assessing arch morphology of repaired coarctation of the aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruse, Jan L; McLeod, Kristin; Biglino, Giovanni; Ntsinjana, Hopewell N; Capelli, Claudio; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Sermesant, Maxime; Pennec, Xavier; Taylor, Andrew M; Schievano, Silvia

    2016-05-31

    Medical image analysis in clinical practice is commonly carried out on 2D image data, without fully exploiting the detailed 3D anatomical information that is provided by modern non-invasive medical imaging techniques. In this paper, a statistical shape analysis method is presented, which enables the extraction of 3D anatomical shape features from cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) image data, with no need for manual landmarking. The method was applied to repaired aortic coarctation arches that present complex shapes, with the aim of capturing shape features as biomarkers of potential functional relevance. The method is presented from the user-perspective and is evaluated by comparing results with traditional morphometric measurements. Steps required to set up the statistical shape modelling analyses, from pre-processing of the CMR images to parameter setting and strategies to account for size differences and outliers, are described in detail. The anatomical mean shape of 20 aortic arches post-aortic coarctation repair (CoA) was computed based on surface models reconstructed from CMR data. By analysing transformations that deform the mean shape towards each of the individual patient's anatomy, shape patterns related to differences in body surface area (BSA) and ejection fraction (EF) were extracted. The resulting shape vectors, describing shape features in 3D, were compared with traditionally measured 2D and 3D morphometric parameters. The computed 3D mean shape was close to population mean values of geometric shape descriptors and visually integrated characteristic shape features associated with our population of CoA shapes. After removing size effects due to differences in body surface area (BSA) between patients, distinct 3D shape features of the aortic arch correlated significantly with EF (r = 0.521, p = .022) and were well in agreement with trends as shown by traditional shape descriptors. The suggested method has the potential to discover

  7. Atheroembolization and potential air embolization during aortic declamping in open repair of a pararenal aortic aneurysm: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dregelid, Einar Børre; Lilleng, Peer Kåre

    2016-01-01

    When ischemic events ascribable to microembolization occur during open repair of proximal abdominal aortic aneurysms, a likely origin of atheroembolism is not always found. A 78-year old man with enlargement of the entire aorta underwent open repair for a pararenal abdominal aortic aneurysm using supraceliac aortic clamping for 20min. Then the graft was clamped, the supraceliac clamp was removed, and the distal and right renal anastomoses were also completed. The patient was stable throughout the operation with only transient drop in blood pressure on reperfusion. Postoperatively the patient developed ischemia, attributable to microembolization, in legs, small intestine, gall bladder and kidneys. He underwent fasciotomy, small bowel and gall bladder resections. Intestinal absorptive function did not recover adequately and he died after 4 months. Microscopic examination of hundreds of intestinal, juxtaintestinal mesenteric, and gall bladder arteries showed a few ones containing cholesterol emboli. It is unsure whether a few occluded small arteries out of several hundred could have caused the ischemic injury alone. There had been only moderate backbleeding from aortic branches above the proximal anastomosis while it was sutured. Inadvertently, remaining air in the graft, aorta, and aortic branches may have been whipped into the pulsating blood, resulting in air microbubbles, when the aortic clamp was removed. Although both atheromatous particles and air microbubbles are well-known causes of iatrogenic microembolization, the importance of air microembolization in open repair of pararenal aortic aneurysms is not known and need to be studied. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Is Conventional Open Repair for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Feasible in Nonagenarians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Kyokun; Matsuda, Hitoshi; Inoue, Yosuke; Omura, Atsushi; Seike, Yoshimasa; Sasaki, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Junjiro

    2017-09-25

    Background : Although endovascular repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm has been found to be beneficial in very elderly patients, some patients have contraindications to this procedure. For nonagenarians, the results of open repair remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of open vs. endovascular repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm in nonagenarian patients. Methods and Results : Fourteen patients undergoing open surgical repair and 24 undergoing endovascular repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm were evaluated. There was no significant difference in early mortality between the open and endovascular groups (0% vs. 4.1%, p=0.16). The open repair group required much longer hospital stays (26.4 vs. 10.6 days, respectively, p=0.003). Finally, 12 patients (86%) undergoing open repair vs. 21 (88%) undergoing endovascular repair returned home (p=0.49). During a mean follow-up period of 23.4±23.5 months, cumulative estimated 1- and 3-year survival rates were 90.0% and 48.0%, respectively in the open repair group and 90.6% and 54.9%, respectively in the endovascular repair group (p=0.51). Conclusion : Although endovascular repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm was superior in terms of recovery, the results of conventional open repair were acceptable even in nonagenarian patients. Open repair remains an alternative for patients with contraindications to endovascular repair.

  9. Fabrication of a compliant phantom of the human aortic arch for use in Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV experimentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hütter Larissa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Compliant phantoms of the human aortic arch can mimic patient specific cardiovascular dysfunctions in vitro. Hence, phantoms may enable elucidation of haemodynamic disturbances caused by aortic dysfunction. This paper describes the fabrication of a thin-walled silicone phantom of the human ascending aorta and brachiocephalic artery. The model geometry was determined via a meta-analysis and modelled in SolidWorks before 3D printing. The solid model surface was smoothed and scanned with a 3D scanner. An offset outer mould was milled from Ebalta S-Model board. The final phantom indicated that ABS was a suitable material for the internal model, the Ebalta S-Model board yielded a rough external surface. Co-location of the moulds during silicone pour was insufficient to enable consistent wall thickness. The resulting phantom was free of air bubbles but did not have the desired wall thickness consistency.

  10. Dynamics of the aortic arch submitted to a shock loading: Parametric study with fluid-structure models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Baroudi, A; Razafimahery, F; Rakotomanana, L

    2012-01-01

    This work aims to present some fluid-structure models for analyzing the dynamics of the aorta during a brusque loading. Indeed, various lesions may appear at the aortic arch during car crash or other accident such as brusque falling. Aortic stresses evolution are simulated during the shock at the cross section and along the aorta. One hot question was that if a brusque deceleration can generate tissue tearing, or a shock is necessary to provoke such a damage. Different constitutive laws of blood are then tested whereas the aorta is assumed linear and elastic. The overall shock model is inspired from an experimental jig. We show that the viscosity has strong influence on the stress and parietal moments and forces. The nonlinear viscosity has no significant additional effects for healthy aorta, but modifies the stress and parietal loadings for the stenotic aorta.

  11. Fenestrated endovascular aortic aneurysm repair using physician-modified endovascular grafts versus company-manufactured devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossabhoy, Shernaz S; Simons, Jessica P; Flahive, Julie M; Aiello, Francesco A; Sheth, Parth; Arous, Edward J; Messina, Louis M; Schanzer, Andres

    2017-12-07

    Fenestrated endografts are customized, patient-specific endovascular devices with potential to reduce morbidity and mortality of complex aortic aneurysm repair. With approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, our center began performing fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair through a physician-sponsored investigational device exemption (IDE #G130210), using both physician-modified endografts (PMEGs) and company-manufactured devices (CMDs). Because these techniques are associated with specific advantages and disadvantages, we sought to investigate differences in outcomes between PMEG and CMD cases. A single-institution retrospective review of all fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repairs was performed. The cohort was analyzed by device type (PMEG or CMD) after matching of cases on the basis of (1) number of target vessels intended for treatment, (2) extent of aneurysm, (3) aneurysm diameter, (4) device configuration, and (5) date of operation. Outcomes of ruptures, common iliac artery aneurysms, and aortic arch aneurysms were excluded. Demographics, operative details, perioperative complications, length of stay, and reinterventions were compared. For patients with >1 year of follow-up time, survival, type I or type III endoleak rate, target artery patency, and reintervention rate were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Between November 30, 2010, and July 30, 2016, 82 patients were identified and matched. The cohort included 41 PMEG and 41 CMD patients who underwent repair of 38 juxtarenal (PMEG, 17; CMD, 21; P = .38), 14 pararenal (PMEG, 6; CMD, 8; P = .56), and 30 thoracoabdominal type I to type IV (PMEG, 18; CMD, 12; P = .17) aneurysms. There were significant differences in presentation requiring urgent aneurysm repair (PMEG, 9; CMD, 0; P = .002), total fluoroscopy time (PMEG, 76 minutes; CMD, 61 minutes; P = .02), volume of contrast material used (PMEG, 88 mL; CMD, 70 mL; P = .02), in-operating room to out-of-operating room time

  12. Application of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in treating dwarfism with Stanford B aortic dissection: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jian; Cai, Wenwu; Shu, Chang; Li, Ming; Xiong, Qinggen; Li, Quanming; Li, Xin

    2018-04-01

    To apply thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) to treat dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection. In this report, we presented a 63-year-old male patient of dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection successfully treated with TEVAR. He was diagnosed with dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection. After conservative treatment, the male patient underwent TEVAR at 1 week after hospitalization. After operation, he presented with numbness and weakness of his bilateral lower extremities, and these symptoms were significantly mitigated after effective treatment. At 1- and 3-week after TEVAR, the aorta status was maintained stable and restored. The patient obtained favorable clinical prognosis and was smoothly discharged. During subsequent follow-up, he remained physically stable. TEVAR is probably an option for treating dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection, which remains to be validated by subsequent studies with larger sample size.

  13. Utility of fetal cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to assess fetuses with right aortic arch and right ductus arteriosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Su-Zhen; Zhu, Ming

    2018-06-01

    To evaluate the utility of fetal cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to diagnose right aortic arch (RAA) with right ductus arteriosus. This retrospective study included six fetuses with right aortic arch and right ductus arteriosus. The six fetal cases were examined using a 1.5-T magnetic resonance unit. The steady-state free precession (SSFP) and single-shot turbo spin echo (SSTSE) sequences were used to evaluate the fetal heart and airway. The gestational age of the six fetuses ranged from 22 to 35 weeks (mean, 26.5 weeks). The age of the pregnant women ranged from 23 to 40 years (mean 31 years). Fetal cardiac MRI diagnosed the six fetal cases with RAA with right ductus arteriosus correctly. Among the six fetuses, four were associated with other congenital heart defects. In three of six cases, the diagnoses established using prenatal echocardiography (echo) was correct when compared with postnatal diagnosis. Fetal cardiac MRI is a useful complementary tool to assess fetuses with RAA and right ductus arteriosus.

  14. Development of stroke-induced quadriplegia after endovascular repair of blunt aortic injury pseudoaneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoudi, Abdullah S; Merdad, Anas A; Makhdoom, Ahmed Q; Jamjoom, Reda A

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular repair of blunt aortic injury is now a first-line approach in management. This can warrant coverage of the left subclavian artery (LSA), which could lead to posterior strokes. In this case report, we present a severe complication of endovascular repair of a traumatic aortic aneurysm. A 53-year-old man presented with blunt aortic injury, endovascular repair was carried out where the left subclavian artery was covered. The intervention had a 100% technical success. Twelve hours later, he was discovered to have quadriplegia, a CT scan showed a large left cerebellar infarction extending to the medulla oblongata and proximal spinal cord. Strokes complicate 3% of thoracic endovascular aortic repairs, 80% of those strokes occur in patients who had their LSA`s covered. Most patients however, tolerate the coverage. Although our patient had a dominant right vertebral artery, and lacked risks for these strokes, he developed an extensive stroke that left him quadriplegic.

  15. Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Single Center Experience in 122 Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yun Young; Song, Jang Hyeon; Kim, Yong Tae; Yim, Nam Yeol; Kim, Jae Kyu; Lee, Ho Kyun; Choi, Soo Jin Na; Chung, Sang Young; Kim, Soo Hyun; Chang, Nam Kyu

    2013-01-01

    To analyze a single center experience of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysms. Results of 122 patients who underwent EVAR were analyzed, retrospectively. Sex, age, aneurysmal morphology, hostile neck anatomy, preprocedural and postprocedural sac-diameter, technical and clinical success, postprocedural complication and need of additional procedure were analyzed. A total of 111 male and 11 female patients were included. Morphology of the aneurysms was as follows: fusiform (n = 108), saccular (n = 3) and ruptured type (n = 11). Sixty-four patients had hostile neck anatomy. The preprocedural mean sac-diameter was 52.4 mm. Postprocedural sac-diameter was decreased or stable in 110 patients (90.2%) and increased in 8 patients (6.6%). Technical success rate was 100% and clinical success rate was 86.1%. Fifty-one patients showed endoleak (41.8%) and 15 patients (12.3%) underwent secondary intervention due to type I endoleak (n = 4), type II endoleak (n = 4) and stent-graft thrombosis (n = 7). EVAR is a safe and effective therapy for abdominal aortic aneurysm, and it has high technical success and clinical success rate, and low complication rate.

  16. A systematic review and meta-analysis of variations in branching patterns of the adult aortic arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popieluszko, Patrick; Henry, Brandon Michael; Sanna, Beatrice; Hsieh, Wan Chin; Saganiak, Karolina; Pękala, Przemysław A; Walocha, Jerzy A; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A

    2018-07-01

    The aortic arch (AA) is the main conduit of the left side of the heart, providing a blood supply to the head, neck, and upper limbs. As it travels through the thorax, the pattern in which it gives off the branches to supply these structures can vary. Variations of these branching patterns have been studied; however, a study providing a comprehensive incidence of these variations has not yet been conducted. The objective of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of all the studies that report prevalence data on AA variants and to provide incidence data on the most common variants. A systematic search of online databases including PubMed, Embase, Scopus, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, SciELO, BIOSIS, and CNKI was performed for literature describing incidence of AA variations in adults. Studies including prevalence data on adult patients or cadavers were collected and their data analyzed. A total of 51 articles were included (N = 23,882 arches). Seven of the most common variants were analyzed. The most common variants found included the classic branching pattern, defined as a brachiocephalic trunk, a left common carotid, and a left subclavian artery (80.9%); the bovine arch variant (13.6%); and the left vertebral artery variant (2.8%). Compared by geographic data, bovine arch variants were noted to have a prevalence as high as 26.8% in African populations. Although patients who have an AA variant are often asymptomatic, they compose a significant portion of the population of patients and pose a greater risk of hemorrhage and ischemia during surgery in the thorax. Because of the possibility of encountering such variants, it is prudent for surgeons to consider potential variations in planning procedures, especially of an endovascular nature, in the thorax. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Extra-Thoracic Supra-aortic Bypass Surgery Is Safe in Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair and Arterial Occlusive Disease Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombert, Alexander; van Issum, Lea; Barbati, Mohammad E; Grommes, Jochen; Keszei, Andras; Kotelis, Drosos; Jalaie, Houman; Greiner, Andreas; Jacobs, Michael J; Kalder, Johannes

    2018-04-20

    The safety and feasibility of supra-aortic debranching as part of endovascular aortic surgery or as a treatment option for arterial occlusive disease (AOD) remains controversial. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical outcome of this surgery. This single centre, retrospective study included 107 patients (mean age 69.2 years, 38.4% women) who underwent supra-aortic bypass surgery (carotid-subclavian bypass, carotid-carotid bypass, and carotid-carotid-subclavian bypass) because of thoracic or thoraco-abdominal endovascular aortic repair (57%; 61/107) or as AOD treatment (42.9%; 46/107) between January 2006 and January 2015. Mortality, morbidity with a focus on neurological complications, and patency rate were assessed. Twenty-six of 107 (14.2%) of the debranching patients were treated under emergency conditions because of acute type B dissection or symptomatic aneurysm. Follow up, conducted by imaging interpretation and telephone interviews, continued till March 2017 (mean 42.1, 0-125, months). The in hospital mortality rate was 10.2% (11/107), all of these cases from the debranching group and related to emergency procedures (p supra-aortic bypass surgery involves low complication rates and high mid-term bypass patency rates. It is a safe and feasible treatment option in the form of debranching in combination with endovascular aortic aneurysm repair and in AOD. Copyright © 2018 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement and aortic valve repair in a patient with acromegaly and aortic root dilatation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Van Praet

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aortic regurgitation and dilatation of the aortic root and ascending aorta are severe complications of acromegaly. The current trend for management of an aortic root aneurysm is valve-sparing root replacement as well as restoring the diameter of the aortic sinotubular junction (STJ and annulus. Our case report supports the recommendation that in patients with acromegaly, severe aortic root involvement may indicate the need for surgery.

  19. Echocardiographic assessment of the aortic root dilatation in adult patients after tetralogy of Fallot repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Cristina; Pinho, Teresa; Lebreiro, Ana; Silva Cardoso, José; Maciel, Maria Júlia

    2013-06-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography is an important tool after tetralogy of Fallot repair, of which aortic root dilatation is a recognized complication. In this study we aimed to assess its prevalence and potential predictors. We consecutively assessed adult patients by transthoracic echocardiography after tetralogy of Fallot repair, and divided them into two groups based on the maximum internal aortic diameter at the sinuses of Valsalva in parasternal long-axis view: group 1 with aortic root dilatation (≥38 mm) and group 2 without dilatation (de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. A Meta-Analysis of Total Arch Replacement With Frozen Elephant Trunk in Acute Type A Aortic Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hisato; Umemoto, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    To assess the safety and efficacy, we performed a meta-analysis of total arch replacement with frozen elephant trunk in exclusive acute type A (neither chronic nor type B) aortic dissection. Databases including MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched through March 2015 using Web-based search engines (PubMed and OVID). Eligible studies were case series of frozen elephant trunk enrolling patients with acute type A (neither chronic nor type B) aortic dissection reporting at least early (in-hospital or 30-day) all-cause mortality. Study-specific estimates were combined in both fixed- and random-effect models. Fifteen studies enrolling 1279 patients were identified and included. Pooled analyses demonstrated the cardiopulmonary bypass time of 207.1 (95% confidence interval [CI], 186.1-228.1) minutes, aortic cross-clamp time of 123.3 (95% CI, 113.1-133.5) minutes, selective antegrade cerebral perfusion time of 49.3 (95% CI, 37.6-61.0) minutes, hypothermic circulatory arrest time of 39.0 (95% CI, 30.7-47.2) minutes, early mortality of 9.2% (95% CI, 7.7-11.0%), stroke of 4.8% (95% CI, 2.5-9.0%), spinal cord injury of 3.5% (95% CI, 1.9-6.6%), mid- to long-term (≥1-year) overall mortality of 13.0% (95% CI, 10.4-16.0%), reintervention of 9.6% (95% CI, 5.6-15.8%), and false lumen thrombosis of 96.8% (95% CI, 90.7-98.9%). Total arch replacement with frozen elephant trunk provides a safe alternative to that with conventional elephant trunk in patients with acute type A aortic dissection, with acceptable early mortality and morbidity. The rates of mid- to long-term reintervention and false lumen non-thrombosis may be lower in patients undergoing the frozen than conventional elephant trunk procedure. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. A Case of an Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due to a Ruptured Dissection of a Right Aortic Arch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Born, Christine; Forster, Andreas; Rock, Clemens; Pfeifer, Klaus-Juergen; Rieger, Johannes; Reiser, Maximilian

    2003-01-01

    We report a case of severe upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage with a rare underlying cause. The patient was unconscious when he was admitted to the hospital. No chest radiogram was performed. Routine diagnostic measures, including endoscopy, failed to reveal the origin of the bleeding, which was believed to originate from the esophagus secondary to a peptic ulcer or varices. Exploratory laparotomy added no further information, but contrast-enhanced multislice computed tomography (MSCT) of the chest showed dextroposition of the widened aortic arch with a ruptured type-B dissection and a consecutive aorto-esophageal fistula (AEF). The patient died on the day of admission. Noninvasive MSCT angiography gives rapid diagnostic information on patients with occult upper gastrointestinal bleeding and should be considered before more invasive conventional angiography or surgery

  2. Surgical treatment and thoracic endovascular aortic repair in type A aortic dissection in a pregnant patient with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterner, Doerthe; Probst, Chris; Mellert, Friedrich; Schiller, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    We report an acute aortic dissection type Stanford A extending down to both iliac arteries affecting a 32-year-old woman suspected to have Marfan syndrome during week 37 of pregnancy. In a multidisciplinary approach, and emergency Cesarean section was performed followed by an abdominal hysterectomy and a valve-sparing aortic root replacement using a reimplantation technique. The aorta was replaced up to the hemi arch. Because of the high suspicion of visceral ischemia as confirmed ex juvantibus, an endovascular stent graft was implanted. Molecular testing revealed a frameshift mutation and confirmed the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome. Both the patient and her healthy child underwent an uneventful recovery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Aortic root repair for thoracic aorta false aneurysm following Bentall procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Jones, Steve; Sivananthan, U M; McGoldrick, J P

    2008-08-01

    The Bentall procedure for aortic root replacement in Marfan's syndrome is safe and durable. We describe successful repair of periprosthetic valvular leak, 12 years following Bentall repair with composite graft. The aim of this report is to analyse and evaluate technical factors leading to this unusual occurrence.

  4. Early results after implantation of a new geometric annuloplasty ring for aortic valve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzitelli, Domenico; Nöbauer, Christian; Rankin, J Scott; Badiu, Catalin C; Krane, Markus; Crooke, Philip S; Cohn, William E; Opitz, Anke; Schreiber, Christian; Lange, Rüdiger

    2013-01-01

    Aortic valve repair is associated with fewer long-term valve-related complications as compared with valve replacement, and repair is being performed increasingly. A current problem is the lack of a geometric annuloplasty ring to facilitate reconstruction. This paper describes the first clinical application of such a device designed to permanently restore physiologic annular size and geometry during aortic valve repair. Based on mathematical studies of human cadaver valves, as well as computed tomography angiographic analyses of awake patients with normal valves, a three-dimensional annuloplasty ring has been developed, consisting of low-profile, one-piece titanium construction and Dacron cloth covering. The ring design incorporates 2:3 elliptical base geometry and 10-degree outwardly flaring subcommissural posts. Appropriately sized rings were implanted in 5 patients with severe aortic insufficiency due to annular dilation and anatomic leaflet defects. The rings restored annular geometry and facilitated leaflet repairs in all patients. Each recovered excellent valve function with minimal residual leak. All patients convalesced uneventfully, were discharged within 7 days after surgery, and continue with stable valve function as long as 6 months after implantation. Initial clinical application of a geometric aortic annuloplasty ring was associated with excellent device performance and perhaps better repairs. Further clinical series and patient follow-up should identify potential benefits of the device, including improved applicability and stability of aortic valve repair. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The role of annular dimension and annuloplasty in tricuspid aortic valve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kerchove, Laurent; Mastrobuoni, Stefano; Boodhwani, Munir; Astarci, Parla; Rubay, Jean; Poncelet, Alain; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis; Noirhomme, Philippe; El Khoury, Gebrine

    2016-02-01

    Valve sparing reimplantation can improve the durability of bicuspid aortic valve repair compared with subcommissural annuloplasty, especially in patients with a large basal ring. This study analyses the effect of basal ring size and annuloplasty on valve repair in the setting of a tricuspid aortic valve. From 1995 to 2013, 382 patients underwent elective tricuspid aortic valve repair. We included only those undergoing subcommissural annuloplasty, valve sparing reimplantation or no annuloplasty and in whom intraoperative transoesophageal echocardiography images were available for retrospective pre- and post-repair basal ring measurements (n = 323, subcommissural annuloplasty: 146, valve sparing reimplantation: 154, no annuloplasty: 23). In a subgroup of patients with available echocardiographic images, basal ring was retrospectively measured at the latest follow-up or prior to reoperation. subcommissural annuloplasty and valve sparing reimplantation were compared after matching for degree of aortic regurgitation and root size. All three groups differed significantly for most of preoperative characteristics. Hospital mortality was 0.9%. The median follow-up was 4.7 years. At 8 years, overall survival was 80 ± 5%. Freedom from reoperation and freedom from aortic regurgitation >1+ were 92 ± 5% and 71 ± 8%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, predictors of aortic regurgitation >1+ were left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (P = 0.003), cusp repair (P = 0.006), body surface area (P = 0.01) and subcommissural annuloplasty (P = 0.05). In subcommissural annuloplasty, freedom from aortic regurgitation >1+ was lower for patients with basal ring ≥28 mm compared with patients with basal ring 1+ was independent of basal ring size (P = 0.38). In matched comparison between subcommissural annuloplasty and valve sparing reimplantation, freedom from aortic regurgitation >1+ was not significantly different (P = 0.06), but in patients with basal ring ≥28 mm, valve sparing

  6. The Transcranial Doppler Sonography for Optimal Monitoring and Optimization of Cerebral Perfusion in Aortic Arch Surgery: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazy, Tamer; Darwisch, Ayham; Schmidt, Torsten; Nguyen, Phong; Elmihy, Sohaila; Fajfrova, Zuzana; Zickmüller, Claudia; Matschke, Klaus; Kappert, Utz

    2017-06-16

    To analyze the feasibility and advantages of transcranial doppler sonography (TCD) for monitoring and optimization of selective cerebral perfusion (SCP) in aortic arch surgery. From April 2013 to April 2014, nine patients with extensive aortic pathology underwent surgery under moderate hypothermic cardiac arrest with unilateral antegrade SCP under TCD monitoring in our institution. Adequate sonographic window and visualization of circle of Willis were to be confirmed. Intraoperatively, a cerebral cross-filling of the contralateral cerebral arteries on the unilateral SCP was to be confirmed with TCD. If no cross-filling was confirmed, an optimization of the SCP was performed via increasing cerebral flow and increasing PCO2. If not successful, the SCP was to be switched to bilateral perfusion. Air bubble hits were recorded at the termination of SCP. A sonographic window was confirmed in all patients. Procedural success was 100%. The mean operative time was 298 ± 89 minutes. Adequate cross-filling was confirmed in 8 patients. In 1 patient, inadequate cross-filling was detected by TCD and an optimization of cerebral flow was necessary, which was successfully confirmed by TCD. There was no conversion to bilateral perfusion. Extensive air bubble hits were confirmed in 1 patient, who suffered a postoperative stroke. The 30-day mortality rate was 0. Conclusion: The TCD is feasible for cerebral perfusion monitoring in aortic surgery. It enables a confirmation of adequacy of cerebral perfusion strategy or the need for its optimization. Documentation of calcific or air-bubble hits might add insight into patients suffering postoperative neurological deficits.

  7. Interdependencies of aortic arch secondary flow patterns, geometry, and age analysed by 4-dimensional phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging at 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frydrychowicz, Alex [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Clinic for Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Luebeck (Germany); Berger, Alexander; Russe, Maximilian F.; Bock, Jelena [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics, Freiburg (Germany); Munoz del Rio, Alejandro [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Departments of Radiology and Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Harloff, Andreas [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Freiburg (Germany); Markl, Michael [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics, Freiburg (Germany); Northwestern University, Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-05-15

    It was the aim to analyse the impact of age, aortic arch geometry, and size on secondary flow patterns such as helix and vortex flow derived from flow-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (4D PC-MRI). 62 subjects (age range = 20-80 years) without circumscribed pathologies of the thoracic aorta (ascending aortic (AAo) diameter: 3.2 {+-} 0.6 cm [range 2.2-5.1]) were examined by 4D PC-MRI after IRB-approval and written informed consent. Blood flow visualisation based on streamlines and time-resolved 3D particle traces was performed. Aortic diameter, shape (gothic, crook-shaped, cubic), angle, and age were correlated with existence and extent of secondary flow patterns (helicity, vortices); statistical modelling was performed. Helical flow was the typical pattern in standard crook-shaped aortic arches. With altered shapes and increasing age, helicity was less common. AAo diameter and age had the highest correlation (r = 0.69 and 0.68, respectively) with number of detected vortices. None of the other arch geometric or demographic variables (for all, P {>=} 0.177) improved statistical modelling. Substantially different secondary flow patterns can be observed in the normal thoracic aorta. Age and the AAo diameter were the parameters correlating best with presence and amount of vortices. Findings underline the importance of age- and geometry-matched control groups for haemodynamic studies. (orig.)

  8. Interdependencies of aortic arch secondary flow patterns, geometry, and age analysed by 4-dimensional phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging at 3 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frydrychowicz, Alex; Berger, Alexander; Russe, Maximilian F.; Bock, Jelena; Munoz del Rio, Alejandro; Harloff, Andreas; Markl, Michael

    2012-01-01

    It was the aim to analyse the impact of age, aortic arch geometry, and size on secondary flow patterns such as helix and vortex flow derived from flow-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (4D PC-MRI). 62 subjects (age range = 20-80 years) without circumscribed pathologies of the thoracic aorta (ascending aortic (AAo) diameter: 3.2 ± 0.6 cm [range 2.2-5.1]) were examined by 4D PC-MRI after IRB-approval and written informed consent. Blood flow visualisation based on streamlines and time-resolved 3D particle traces was performed. Aortic diameter, shape (gothic, crook-shaped, cubic), angle, and age were correlated with existence and extent of secondary flow patterns (helicity, vortices); statistical modelling was performed. Helical flow was the typical pattern in standard crook-shaped aortic arches. With altered shapes and increasing age, helicity was less common. AAo diameter and age had the highest correlation (r = 0.69 and 0.68, respectively) with number of detected vortices. None of the other arch geometric or demographic variables (for all, P ≥ 0.177) improved statistical modelling. Substantially different secondary flow patterns can be observed in the normal thoracic aorta. Age and the AAo diameter were the parameters correlating best with presence and amount of vortices. Findings underline the importance of age- and geometry-matched control groups for haemodynamic studies. (orig.)

  9. Transperitoneal versus retroperitoneal approach for open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in the targeted vascular National Surgical Quality Improvement Program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buck, Dominique B.; Ultee, Klaas H J; Zettervall, Sara L.; Soden, Pete A.; Darling, Jeremy; Wyers, Mark; van Herwaarden, Joost A.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    Objective: We sought to compare current practices in patient selection and 30-day outcomes for transperitoneal and retroperitoneal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repairs. Methods: All patients undergoing elective transperitoneal or retroperitoneal surgical repair for AAA between January 2011 and

  10. [Bacteremia associated with mycotic aneurysm of the transversal aortic arch and myocarditis caused by Salmonella enteritidis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Martínez, L; Mesa, E; Rodríguez, J E; Sánchez, M P; Ugarte, J; Algora Weber, A; Dámaso, D; Daza, R M; Mendaza, P

    1989-02-01

    A 60-year-old male with diabetes mellitus had Salmonella enteritidis bacteremia associated with mycotic aneurysm of the transverse aortic arc and myocarditis. Antibiotic therapy with ampicillin and chloramphenicol was ineffective despite the fact that the microorganism was sensitive in vitro to those antimicrobials, and the patient had a progressive clinical deterioration which culminated in death.

  11. Surgical treatment of interrupted aortic arch associated with ventricular septal defect and patent ductus arteriosus in patients over one year of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiqiang; Li, Bin; Fan, Xiangming; Su, Junwu; Zhang, Jing; He, Yan; Liu, Yinglong

    2014-01-01

    Interrupted aortic arch (IAA) is a rare congenital anomaly affecting 1.5% of infants with congenital heart disease. Neonatal repair of IAA is required to avoid irreversible pulmonary vascular lesion. However, in China, patients with IAA associated with ventricular septal defect (VSD) and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) over one year of age are common. So we investigated the outcome of surgical treatment of IAA with VSD and PDA in patients over one year of age. From January 2009 to December 2012, 19 patients with IAA have undergone complete single-stage repair. The patients' mean age was 4.4 years, ranging 1 to 15 years; and their mean weight was 12.8 kg, ranging 4.2 to 36.0 kg. Fifteen IAA were type A, four were type B. Preoperative cardiac catheterization data were available from all patients. Mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) were measured. The measurements of postoperative pulmonary artery pressure were taken in the operating room at the end of the case. All patients underwent echocardiographic examinations before discharged from the hospital. In addition, cardiac catheterization and echocardiographic examinations were performed during follow-up. Selective brain perfusion through the innominate artery during aortic arch reconstruction was used in all patients. Mean follow-up was (1.6±0.8) years. There were two hospital deaths (2/19, 11%). One patient died of pulmonary hypertension crisis, and another died of postoperative low cardiac output. Five cases had other main postoperative complications but no postoperative neurologic complications. Seventeen survivors were followed up, and there were no late deaths or reoperation. Mean cross-clamp duration was (85±22) minutes and selective brain perfusion duration was (34±11) minutes. Two patients required delayed sternal closure at two days postoperatively. Intensive care unit and hospital stays were (9±8) days and (47±24) days, respectively. Pressure gradients across

  12. Successful Aortic Banding for Type IA Endoleak Due to Neck Dilatation after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashima, Yasushi; Tamai, Koichi; Shirasugi, Takehiro; Sato, Kenichiro; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Imamura, Yusuke; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Adachi, Hideo; Kobinata, Toshiyuki

    2017-09-25

    A 69-year-old man with a type IA endoleak that developed approximately 21 months after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) of a 46 mm diameter aneurysm was referred to our department. He had impaired renal function, Parkinson's disease, and previous cerebral infarction. Computed tomography angiography showed a type IA endoleak with neck dilatation and that the aneurysm had grown to 60 mm in diameter. We decided to perform aortic banding. The type IA endoleak disappeared after banding and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 10. Aortic banding may be effective for type IA endoleak after EVAR and less invasive for high-risk patients in particular.

  13. Perfect and least invasive sealing technique on the lesser curvature of the aortic arch: application of a novel stent graft to an aneurysm developing on a postoperative ductus arteriosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeda, Takeshi; Yokoi, Yoshihiko; Yuri, Koichi; Saito, Yuuhei; Setozaki, Shuji; Harada, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    A 78-year-old woman who underwent an operation for a patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) about thirty years ago developed an aneurysm on the aortic side of the remnant ductal tissue. To avoid risky, open surgery, we performed endovascular aortic therapy using a novel stent graft (SG), which was pre-curved, fenestrated and custom-made type. This graft was designed to configure to the patient's whole aortic arch anatomy, and was capable of accurately adjusting its fenestrations to the arch branch orifices during the procedure. The operation was successful, and the patient was discharged uneventfully on 16th postoperative day. The advantage of this fenestrated SG is close sealing, especially over the lesser curvature of the arch. This device could be a simple and effective option to deal with an otherwise normal aortic arch with such a ductus-related localized lesion.

  14. Intentional left subclavian artery coverage during thoracic endovascular aortic repair for traumatic aortic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Cameron L; Dubose, Joseph J; Miller, Charles C; Perlick, Alexa P; Charlton-Ouw, Kristofer M; Estrera, Anthony L; Safi, Hazim J; Azizzadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) is widely used for treatment of traumatic aortic injury (TAI). Stent graft coverage of the left subclavian artery (LSA) may be required in up to 40% of patients. We evaluated the long-term effects of intentional LSA coverage (LSAC) on symptoms and return to normal activity in TAI patients compared with a similarly treated group whose LSA was uncovered (LSAU). Patients were identified from a prospective institutional trauma registry between September 2005 and July 2012. TAI was confirmed using computed tomography angiography. The electronic medical records, angiograms, and computed tomography angiograms were reviewed in a retrospective fashion. In-person or telephone interviews were conducted using the SF-12v2 (Quality Metrics, Lincoln, RI) to assess quality of life. An additional questionnaire was used to assess specific LSA symptoms and the ability to return to normal activities. Data were analyzed by Spearman rank correlation and multiple linear and logistic regression analysis with appropriate transformations using SAS software (SAS Institute, Cary, NC). During the study period, 82 patients (57 men; mean age 40.5 ± 20 years, mean Injury Severity Score, 34 ± 10.0) underwent TEVAR for treatment of TAI. Among them, LSAC was used in 32 (39.5%) and LSAU in 50. A group of the LSAU patients (n = 22) served as matched controls in the analysis. We found no statistically significant difference in SF-12v2 physical health scores (ρ = -0.08; P = .62) between LSAC and LSAU patients. LSAC patients had slightly better mental health scores (ρ = 0.62; P = .037) than LSAU patients. LSAC patients did not have an increased likelihood of experiencing pain (ρ = -0.0056; P = .97), numbness (ρ = -0.12; P = .45), paresthesia (ρ = -0.11; P = .48), fatigue (ρ = -0.066; P = .69), or cramping (ρ = -0.12; P = .45). We found no difference between groups in the ability to return to activities. The mean follow-up time was 3.35 years. Six LSAC

  15. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy-like Syndrome After Aortic Aneurysm Repair: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirisha Nandipati

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of progressive supranuclear palsy‐like syndrome is a rare complication of ascending aortic aneurysm repair. We report two patients with videos and present a table of prior reported cases. To our knowledge there is no previously published video of this syndrome. The suspected mechanism is brainstem injury though neuroimaging is often negative for an associated infarct. We hope our report will increase recognition of this syndrome after aortic surgery, especially in patients with visual complaints.

  16. Surgery for Young Adults With Aortic Valve Disease not Amenable to Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Zakkar; Mustafa Zakkar; Vito Domanico Bruno; Alexandru Ciprian Visan; Stephanie Curtis; Gianni Angelini; Emmanuel Lansac; Serban Stoica

    2018-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement is the gold standard for the management of patients with severe aortic stenosis or mixed pathology that is not amenable to repair according to currently available guidelines. Such a simplified approach may be suitable for many patients, but it is far from ideal for young adults considering emerging evidence demonstrating that conventional valve replacement in this cohort of patients is associated with inferior long-term survival when compared to the general population...

  17. Predictive Factors for Mortality and Morbidity of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manabu Shiraishi

    2012-04-01

    Conclusions: Emergency open repair can be safely performed in patients for infrarenal rAAA. In particular, we identified specific independent predictive factors of clinical examination and laboratory studies for mortality, major morbidity and renal insufficiency. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2012; 1(2.000: 94-101

  18. Retrosternal friction-induced late disruption of the anastomotic site between Bentall's valved conduit and an aortic arch graft: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukada, Johji; Morishita, Kiyofumi; Kawaharada, Nobuyoshi; Kurimoto, Yoshihiko; Muraki, Satoshi; Satsu, Takuma; Abe, Tomio

    2003-01-01

    We report a case of late mediastinal false aneurysm originating from disruption of the suture line between synthetic vascular grafts for aortic root and total aortic arch replacements. This aneurysm developed without any infection in a patient with Marfan's syndrome. To our knowledge, this event has never been reported before. The only possible cause of this disruption was that the monofilament suture was broken by continuous friction between the pointed anastomotic line and the sternum since the operation. The treatment options for this unusual event after extended synthetic graft replacement are discussed.

  19. Mid-term results of zone 0 thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair after ascending aorta wrapping and supra-aortic debranching in high-risk patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecoraro, Felice; Lachat, Mario; Hofmann, Michael; Cayne, Neal S; Chaykovska, Lyubov; Rancic, Zoran; Puippe, Gilbert; Pfammatter, Thomas; Mangialardi, Nicola; Veith, Frank J; Bettex, Dominique; Maisano, Francesco; Neff, Thomas A

    2017-06-01

    Surgical repair of aneurysmal disease involving the ascending aorta, aortic arch and eventually the descending aorta is generally associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A less invasive approach with the ascending wrapping technique (WT), supra-aortic vessel debranching (SADB) and thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) in zone 0 was developed to reduce the associated risk in these patients. During a 10-year period, consecutive patients treated by the ascending WT, SADB and TEVAR in zone 0 were included. All patients were considered at high risk for conventional surgery. Measured outcomes included perioperative deaths and morbidity, maximal aortic transverse diameter (TD) and its postoperative evolution, endoleak, survival, freedom from cardiovascular reinterventions, SADB freedom from occlusion and aortic valve function during follow-up. Median follow-up was 37.4 [mean = 34; range, 0-65; standard deviation (SD) = 20] months. Twenty-six cases were included with a mean age of 71.88 ( r  = 56-87; SD = 8) years. A mean of 2.9 supra-aortic vessels (75) per patient was debranched from the ascending aorta. The mean time interval from WT/SADB and TEVAR was 29 ( r  = 0-204; SD = 48) days. TEVAR was associated with chimney and/or periscope grafts in 6 (23%) patients, and extra-anatomical supra-aortic bypasses were performed in 6 (23%) patients. Perioperative mortality was 7.7% (2/26). Neurological events were registered in 3 (11.5%) cases, and a reintervention was required in 3 (11.5%) cases. After the WT, the ascending diameter remained stable during the follow-up period in all cases. At mean follow-up, significant shrinkage of the arch/descending aorta diameter was observed. A type I/III endoleak occurred in 3 cases. At 5 years, the rates of survival, freedom from cardiovascular reinterventions and SADB freedom from occlusion were 71.7, 82.3 and 96%, respectively. The use of the ascending WT, SADB and TEVAR in selected patients

  20. Hoarseness —As a presenting feature of aortic arch aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Mathai, John; Swapna, U. P.

    2006-01-01

    Hoarseness due to left recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis (LRLN) caused by identifiable cardiovascular disease is described as Ortner’s syndrome or Cardiovocal syndrome. This was first described by Ortner in 1897 to describe left recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy secondary to Mitral Stenosis. The common conditions which gave rise to Ortners’ syndrome include mitral stenosis, mitral valve prolapse, aortic aneurysm, septal defect, following cardiothoracic surgery, high altitude pulmonary hyperte...

  1. Outcomes after open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms in patients with friendly versus hostile aortoiliac anatomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, S. C.; Reimerink, J. J.; Vahl, A. C.; Wisselink, W.; Reekers, J. A.; Legemate, D. A.; Balm, R.

    2014-01-01

    In patients with a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA), anatomic suitability for endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) depends on aortic neck and iliac artery characteristics. If the aortoiliac anatomy is unsuitable for EVAR ("hostile anatomy"), open repair (OR) is the next option. We

  2. A case of hypoplasia of left lung with very rare associations with congenital absence of left pulmonary artery and right-sided aortic arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trilok Chand

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The absence of one of the pulmonary artery with associated hypoplasia of lung and great vessel abnormality is a rare finding. The incidence of this rare congenital abnormality is around 1 in 200,000 live birth. The absence of the left side pulmonary artery is again uncommon, and associated cardiac malformations are usually tetralogy of fallot or septal defects rather than an aortic arch defect. Our case is a unique case in It’s associated congenital anomalies. He was presented with recurrent pneumothorax and hemoptysis, and on thorough workup, he was diagnosed to have an absence of left pulmonary artery with hypoplasia of the left lung and associated right-sided aortic arch. The patient’s family has declined the surgical option, and he was managed conservatively and kept in close follow-up.

  3. Separate origins of the left internal and external carotid arteries from the aortic arch and cervical internal carotid artery aneurysm in a patient with Noonan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Rizwan Ahmad; Asmaro, Karam; Pabaney, Aqueel; Kole, Max; Nypaver, Timothy; Marin, Horia

    2017-04-01

    Distinct origins of the external carotid artery and the internal carotid artery (ICA) from the aortic arch have been rarely described, and represent an aberrant development of the aortic arches during fetal life. This anatomical variation is usually discovered incidentally; infrequently, an aneurysm of the cervical ICA might accompany this rare configuration. We describe one such case in a patient with Noonan syndrome who presented with pulsatile neck mass. The diagnostic features and management of the aneurysm and a review of the literature are presented. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. Fate of remnant sinuses of Valsalva in patients with bicuspid and trileaflet valves undergoing aortic valve, ascending aorta, and aortic arch replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, Rita Karianna; Habertheuer, Andreas; Bavaria, Joseph E; Siki, Mary; Szeto, Wilson Y; Krause, Eric; Korutla, Varun; Desai, Nimesh D; Vallabhajosyula, Prashanth

    2017-08-01

    In patients presenting with aortic valvulopathy with concomitant ascending aortic aneurysm, surgical management of the sinus of Valsalva segment remains undefined, especially for moderately dilated aortic roots. In patients with this pathology undergoing aortic valve replacement with supracoronary ascending aorta replacement, we assessed the fate of the remnant preserved sinus of Valsalva segment stratified by aortic valve morphology and pathology. From 2002 to 2015, 428 patients underwent elective aortic valve replacement with supracoronary ascending aorta replacement. Patients were stratified on the basis of valvular morphology (bicuspid aortic valve [n = 254] and tricuspid aortic valve [n = 174]), valvular pathology (bicuspid aortic valve with aortic stenosis [n = 178], bicuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency [n = 76], tricuspid aortic valve with aortic stenosis [n = 61], tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency [n = 113]), and preoperative sinus of Valsalva dimensions (45 mm). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed no significant difference in freedom from reoperation in tricuspid aortic valve versus bicuspid aortic valve (P = .576). Multivariable Cox regression model performed with sinus of Valsalva dimensions at baseline and follow-up as time-varying covariates did not adversely affect survival. A repeated-measure, mixed-effects model constructed to assess longitudinal sinus of Valsalva trends revealed that the retained sinus of Valsalva dimensions remain stable over long-term follow-up (discharge to ≥10 years), irrespective of valvular morphology/pathology (bicuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency, tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency, tricuspid aortic valve with aortic stenosis) and preoperative sinus of Valsalva groups (45 mm). In patients with nonaneurysmal sinuses of Valsalva undergoing aortic valve replacement with supracoronary ascending aorta replacement, the sinus segment can be preserved irrespective of

  5. Imaging and management of complications of open surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayeemuddin, M.; Pherwani, A.D.; Asquith, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    Open repair is still considered the reference standard for long-term repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). In contrast to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), patients with open surgical repair of AAA are not routinely followed up with imaging. Although complications following EVAR are widely recognized and routinely identified on follow-up imaging, complications also do occur following open surgical repair. With frequent use of multi-slice computed tomography (CT) angiography (CTA) in vascular patients, there is now improved recognition of the potential complications following open surgical repair. Many of these complications are increasingly being managed using endovascular techniques. The aim of this review is to illustrate a variety of potential complications that may occur following open surgical repair and to demonstrate their management using both surgical and endovascular techniques.

  6. Initial Surgical Experience with Aortic Valve Repair: Clinical and Echocardiographic Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Diniz Affonso da Costa

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Due to late complications associated with the use of conventional prosthetic heart valves, several centers have advocated aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root replacement for patients with aortic valve insufficiency, in order to enhance late survival and minimize adverse postoperative events. Methods: From March/2012 thru March 2015, 37 patients consecutively underwent conservative operations of the aortic valve and/or aortic root. Mean age was 48±16 years and 81% were males. The aortic valve was bicuspid in 54% and tricuspid in the remaining. All were operated with the aid of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography. Surgical techniques consisted of replacing the aortic root with a Dacron graft whenever it was dilated or aneurysmatic, using either the remodeling or the reimplantation technique, besides correcting leaflet prolapse when present. Patients were sequentially evaluated with clinical and echocardiographic studies and mean follow-up time was 16±5 months. Results: Thirty-day mortality was 2.7%. In addition there were two late deaths, with late survival being 85% (CI 95% - 68%-95% at two years. Two patients were reoperated due to primary structural valve failure. Freedom from reoperation or from primary structural valve failure was 90% (CI 95% - 66%-97% and 91% (CI 95% - 69%-97% at 2 years, respectively. During clinical follow-up up to 3 years, there were no cases of thromboembolism, hemorrhage or endocarditis. Conclusions: Although this represents an initial series, these data demonstrates that aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root surgery can be performed with satisfactory immediate and short-term results.

  7. Radiation Exposure in Endovascular Infra-Renal Aortic Aneurysm Repair and Factors that Influence It

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Machado

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The endovascular repair of aortic abdominal aneurysms exposes the patients and surgical team to ionizing radiation with risk of direct tissue damage and induction of gene mutation. This study aims to describe our standard of radiation exposure in endovascular aortic aneurysm repair and the factors that influence it. Methods: Retrospective analysis of a prospective database of patients with abdominal infra-renal aortic aneurysms submitted to endovascular repair. This study evaluated the radiation doses (dose area product (DAP, fluoroscopy durations and their relationships to the patients, aneurysms, and stent-graft characteristics. Results: This study included 127 patients with a mean age of 73 years. The mean DAP was 4.8 mGy.m2, and the fluoroscopy time was 21.8 minutes. Aortic bilateral iliac aneurysms, higher body mass index, aneurysms with diameters larger than 60 mm, necks with diameters larger than 28 mm, common iliac arteries with diameters larger than 20 mm, and neck angulations superior to 50 degrees were associated with an increased radiation dose. The number of anatomic risk factors present was associated with increased radiation exposure and fluoroscopy time, regardless of the anatomical risk factors. Conclusion: The radiation exposure during endovascular aortic aneurysm repair is significant (mean DAP 4.8 mGy.m2 with potential hazards to the surgical team and the patients. The anatomical characteristics of the aneurysm, patient characteristics, and the procedure's technical difficulty were all related to increased radiation exposure during endovascular aortic aneurysm repair procedures. Approximately 40% of radiation exposure can be explained by body mass index, neck angulation, aneurysm diameter, neck diameter, and aneurysm type.

  8. In vitro flow investigations in the aortic arch during cardiopulmonary bypass with stereo-PIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büsen, Martin; Kaufmann, Tim A S; Neidlin, Michael; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Sonntag, Simon J

    2015-07-16

    The cardiopulmonary bypass is related to complications like stroke or hypoxia. The cannula jet is suspected to be one reason for these complications, due to the sandblast effect on the vessel wall. Several in silico and in vitro studies investigated the underlying mechanisms, but the applied experimental flow measurement techniques were not able to address the highly three-dimensional flow character with a satisfying resolution. In this work in vitro flow measurements in a cannulated and a non-cannulated aortic silicone model are presented. Stereo particle image velocimetry measurements in multiple planes were carried out. By assembling the data of the different measurement planes, quasi 3D velocity fields with a resolution of~1.5×1.5×2.5 mm(3) were obtained. The resulting velocity fields have been compared regarding magnitude, streamlines and vorticity. The presented method shows to be a suitable in vitro technique to measure and address the three-dimensional aortic CPB cannula flow with a high temporal and spatial resolution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Durability of Aortic Valve Cusp Repair With and Without Annular Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeshan, Ahmad; Idrees, Jay J; Johnston, Douglas R; Rajeswaran, Jeevanantham; Roselli, Eric E; Soltesz, Edward G; Gillinov, A Marc; Griffin, Brian; Grimm, Richard; Hammer, Donald F; Pettersson, Gösta B; Blackstone, Eugene H; Sabik, Joseph F; Svensson, Lars G

    2018-03-01

    To determine the value of aortic valve repair rather than replacement for valve dysfunction, we assessed late outcomes of various repair techniques in the contemporary era. From January 2001 to January 2011, aortic valve repair was planned in 1,124 patients. Techniques involved commissural figure-of-8 suspension sutures (n = 63 [6.2%]), cusp repair with commissuroplasty (n = 481 [48%]), debridement (n = 174 [17%]), free-margin plication (n = 271 [27%]) or resection (n = 75) or both, or annulus repair with resuspension (n = 230 [23%]), root reimplantation (n = 252 [25%]), or remodeling (n = 35 [3.5%]). Planned repair was aborted for replacement in 115 patients (10%); risk factors included greater severity of aortic regurgitation (AR; p = 0.0002) and valve calcification (p < 0.0001). In-hospital outcomes for the remaining 1,009 patients included death (12 [1.2%]), stroke (13 [1.3%]), and reoperation for valve dysfunction (14 [1.4%]). Freedom from aortic valve reoperation at 1, 5, and 10 years was 97%, 93%, and 90%, respectively. Figure-of-8 suspension sutures, valve resuspension, and root repair and replacement were least likely to require reoperation; cusp repair with commissural sutures, plication, and commissuroplasty was most likely (p < 0.05). Survival at 1, 5, and 10 years was 96%, 92%, and 83%. Immediate postoperative AR grade was none-mild (94%), moderate (5%), and severe (1%). At 10 years after repair, AR grade was none (20%), mild (33%), moderate (26%), and severe (21%). Patients undergoing root procedures were less likely to have higher-grade postoperative AR (p < 0.0001). Valve repair is effective and durable for treating aortic valve dysfunction. Greater severity of AR preoperatively is associated with higher likelihood of repair failure. Commissural figure-of-8 suspension sutures and repair with annular support have the best long-term durability. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  10. Endovascular Embolization of Bronchial Artery Originating from the Upper Portion of Aortic Arch in Patients with Massive Hemoptysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Sen; Sun, Xi-Wen; Yu, Dong; Jie, Bing

    2014-01-01

    PurposeOur experience with endovascular embolization (EVE) of the bronchial artery (BA) originating from the upper portion of the aortic arch (AA) in six patients is described.MethodsAltogether, 818 patients with hemoptysis underwent multidetector row computed tomography angiography (MDCTA) before EVE or AA angiography during EVE. Aberrant BAs originating from the upper portion of the AA were the source of massive hemoptysis in six patients (0.73 %). MDCT angiograms and/or Digital subtraction angiograms were retrospectively reviewed. Selective catheterization and embolization were performed.ResultsThe ostia of the BAs were located on the superior surface of the AA between the brachiocephalic trunk and left common carotid artery in three patients, the junction of the aorta and medial surface of the left subclavian artery in two, and the posterior wall of the upper portion of the AA in one. The six BAs comprised two common trunks, three single right sides, and one single left side. The targeted vessels were successfully catheterized and embolized by a coaxial microcatheter system using polyvinyl alcohol particles. Other pathologic BAs and nonbronchial systemic arteries also were embolized. Bleeding was immediately controlled in all patients with no recurrence of hemoptysis. No procedure-related complications occurred.ConclusionsApplication of EVE of anomalous origin of BAs in patients with hemoptysis is important, as demonstrated in the six reported patients. MDCTA before EVE or AA angiography during EVE is critical to avoid missing a rare aberrant BA originating from the upper portion of the AA

  11. Late complications in patients after repair of aortic coarctation: implications for management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriend, Joris W. J.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2005-01-01

    Survival of patients with aortic coarctation has dramatically improved after surgical repair became available and the number of patients who were operated and reach adulthood is steadily increasing. However, life expectancy is still not as normal as in unaffected peers. Cardiovascular complications

  12. Emergency abdominal aortic aneurysm repair with a preferential endovascular strategy : Mortality and cost-effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapma, Marten R.; Groen, Henk; Oranen, Bjorn I.; van der Hilst, Christian S.; Tielliu, Ignace F.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Prins, Ted R.; van den Dungen, Jan J.; Verhoeven, Eric L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess mortality and treatment costs of a new management protocol with preferential use of emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (eEVAR) for acute abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Methods: From September 2003 until February 2005, 49 consecutive patients (45 men; mean age 71 years) with

  13. Near-infrared spectroscopy assessed cerebral oxygenation during open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H.; Nielsen, Henning Morris Bay; Secher, N H

    2016-01-01

    During open abdominal aortic aneurism (AAA) repair cerebral blood flow is challenged. Clamping of the aorta may lead to unintended hyperventilation as metabolism is reduced by perfusion of a smaller part of the body and reperfusion of the aorta releases vasodilatory substances including CO2. We i...

  14. Statin use is associated with reduced all-cause mortality after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leurs, L.J.; Visser, P.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Buth, J.; Harris, P.L.; Blankensteijn, J.D.

    2006-01-01

    It has been shown that preoperative statin therapy reduces all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in patients undergoing major noncardiac vascular surgery. In this report, we investigated the influence of statin use on early and late outcome following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

  15. Outcome after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: a meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walschot, L.H.B.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Verbeek, A.L.M.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the frequencies of complications and risk factors for complications following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair (EVAR). METHODS: Thirty-nine articles published between October 1995 and October 1999 in English, German, French, or Dutch were identified in

  16. Long-term outcomes after immediate aortic repair for acute type A aortic dissection complicated by coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukube, Takuro; Haraguchi, Tomonori; Okada, Yasushi; Matsukawa, Ritsu; Kozawa, Shuichi; Ogawa, Kyoichi; Okita, Yutaka

    2014-09-01

    The management of acute type A aortic dissection complicated by coma remains controversial. We previously reported an excellent rate of recovery of consciousness provided aortic repair was performed within 5 hours of the onset of symptoms. This study evaluates the early and long-term outcomes using this approach. Between August 2003 and July 2013, of the 241 patients with acute type A aortic dissection brought to the Japanese Red Cross Kobe Hospital and Hyogo Emergency Medical Center, 30 (12.4%) presented with coma; Glasgow Coma Scale was less than 11 on arrival. Surgery was performed in 186 patients, including 27 (14.5%) who were comatose. Twenty-four comatose patients underwent successful aortic repair immediately (immediate group). Their mean age was 71.0 ± 11.1 years, Glasgow Coma Scale was 6.5 ± 2.4, and prevalence of carotid dissection was 79%. For brain protection, deep hypothermia with antegrade cerebral perfusion was used, and postoperative induced hypothermia was performed. Neurologic evaluations were performed using the Glasgow Coma Scale, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, and modified Rankin Scale. In the immediate group, the time from the onset of symptoms to arrival in the operating theater was 222 ± 86 minutes. Hospital mortality was 12.5%. Full recovery of consciousness was achieved in 79% of patients in up to 30 days. Postoperative Glasgow Coma Scale and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale improved significantly when compared with the preoperative score (P coma were satisfactory. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Discrepancies in abdominal aortic aneurysm expressions and repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurks, R.

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) disease is a growing healthcare burden. Besides theassociated cardiovascular comorbidities, the AAA itself poses a risk for the patient in two fashions. First, it could rupture, which is associated with high mortality and morbidity. This thesis focused on the second,

  18. Innovative chimney-graft technique for endovascular repair of a pararenal abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiñanes, Edgar Luis; Hernandez-Vila, Eduardo A; Krajcer, Zvonimir

    2015-02-01

    After abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, progressive degeneration of the aneurysm can be challenging to treat. Multiple comorbidities and previous operations place such patients at high risk for repeat surgery. Endovascular repair is a possible alternative; however, challenging anatomy can push the limits of available technology. We describe the case of a 71-year-old man who presented with a 5.3-cm pararenal aneurysm 4 years after undergoing open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. To avoid reoperation, we excluded the aneurysm by endovascular means, using visceral-artery stenting, a chimney-graft technique. Low-profile balloons on a monorail system enabled the rapid exchange of coronary wires via a buddy-wire technique. This novel approach facilitated stenting and simultaneous angioplasty of multiple visceral vessels and the abdominal aorta.

  19. Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms: vascular anatomy, device selection, procedure, and procedure-specific complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, Yolanda; Rogoff, Philip; Romanelli, Donald; Reichle, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is abnormal dilatation of the aorta, carrying a substantial risk of rupture and thereby marked risk of death. Open repair of AAA involves lengthy surgery time, anesthesia, and substantial recovery time. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) provides a safer option for patients with advanced age and pulmonary, cardiac, and renal dysfunction. Successful endovascular repair of AAA depends on correct selection of patients (on the basis of their vascular anatomy), choice of the correct endoprosthesis, and familiarity with the technique and procedure-specific complications. The type of aneurysm is defined by its location with respect to the renal arteries, whether it is a true or false aneurysm, and whether the common iliac arteries are involved. Vascular anatomy can be divided more technically into aortic neck, aortic aneurysm, pelvic perfusion, and iliac morphology, with grades of difficulty with respect to EVAR, aortic neck morphology being the most common factor to affect EVAR appropriateness. When choosing among the devices available on the market, one must consider the patient's vascular anatomy and choose between devices that provide suprarenal fixation versus those that provide infrarenal fixation. A successful technique can be divided into preprocedural imaging, ancillary procedures before AAA stent-graft placement, the procedure itself, postprocedural medical therapy, and postprocedural imaging surveillance. Imaging surveillance is important in assessing complications such as limb thrombosis, endoleaks, graft migration, enlargement of the aneurysm sac, and rupture. Last, one must consider the issue of radiation safety with regard to EVAR. (©)RSNA, 2015.

  20. A tetrad of bicuspid aortic valve association: A single-stage repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Ramachandra; Patnaik, A. N.; Mishra, Ramesh C.; Kumari, N. Rama; Gulati, A. S.

    2012-01-01

    We report a 27 years old male who presented with a combination of both congenital and acquired cardiac defects. This syndrome complex includes congenital bicuspid aortic valve, Seller's grade II aortic regurgitation, juxta- subclavian coarctation, stenosis of ostium of left subclavian artery and ruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysm without any evidence of infective endocarditis. This type of constellation is extremely rare. Neither coarctation of aorta with left subclavian artery stenosis nor the rupture of sinus Valsalva had a favorable pathology for percutaneus intervention. Taking account into morbidity associated with repeated surgery and anesthesia patient underwent a single stage surgical repair of both the defects by two surgical incisions. The approaches include median sternotomy for rupture of sinus of Valsalva and lateral thoracotomy for coarctation with left subclavian artery stenosis. The surgery was uneventful. After three months follow up echocardiography showed mild residual gradient across the repaired coarctation segment, mild aortic regurgitation and no residual left to right shunt. This patient is under follow up. This is an extremely rare case of single stage successful repair of coarctation and rupture of sinus of Valsalva associated with congenital bicuspid aortic valve. PMID:22629035

  1. Endovascular repair of early rupture of Dacron aortic graft--two case reports.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sultan, Sherif

    2005-01-01

    Complications after open aortic surgery pose a challenge both to the vascular surgeon and the patient because of aging population, widespread use of cardiac revascularization, and improved survival after aortic surgery. The perioperative mortality rate for redo elective aortic surgery ranges from 5% to 29% and increases to 70-100% in emergency situation. Endovascular treatment of the postaortic open surgery (PAOS) patient has fewer complications and a lower mortality rate in comparison with redo open surgical repair. Two cases of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) were managed with the conventional open surgical repair. Subsequently, spiral contrast computer tomography scans showed reperfusion of the AAA sac remnant mimicking a type III endoleak. These graft-related complications presented as vascular emergencies, and in both cases endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) procedure was performed successfully by aortouniiliac (AUI) stent graft and femorofemoral crossover bypass. These 2 patients add further merit to the cases reported in the English literature. This highlights the crucial importance of endovascular grafts in the management of such complex vascular problems.

  2. Open Repair of Mycotic Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms With Biological Grafts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinola, Ivika; Sörelius, Karl; Wyss, Thomas R

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The treatment of mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm requires surgery and antimicrobial therapy. Since prosthetic reconstructions carry a considerable risk of reinfection, biological grafts are noteworthy alternatives. The current study evaluated the durability, infection resistance......, and midterm outcome of biological grafts in treatment of mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm. METHODS AND RESULTS: All patients treated with biological graft in 6 countries between 2006 and 2016 were included. Primary outcome measures were 30- and 90-day survival, treatment-related mortality, and reinfection...... rate. Secondary outcome measures were overall mortality and graft patency. Fifty-six patients (46 males) with median age of 69 years (range 35-85) were included. Sixteen patients were immunocompromised (29%), 24 (43%) had concomitant infection, and 12 (21%) presented with rupture. Bacterial culture...

  3. Abdominal aortic aneurysm calcification and thrombus volume are not associated with outcome following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Divyajeet; Velu, Ramesh; Tosenovsky, Patrik; Quigley, Francis [James Cook University, Queensland Research Centre for Peripheral Vascular Disease, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Townsville, Queensland (Australia); The Townsville Hospital, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Douglas (Australia); Wisniowski, Brendan; Walker, Philip J. [James Cook University, Queensland Research Centre for Peripheral Vascular Disease, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Townsville, Queensland (Australia); University of Queensland, School of Medicine and Centre for Clinical Research, Department of Vascular Surgery, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Herston, QLD (Australia); Bradshaw, Barbara [James Cook University, Queensland Research Centre for Peripheral Vascular Disease, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Townsville, Queensland (Australia); Golledge, Jonathan [James Cook University, Queensland Research Centre for Peripheral Vascular Disease, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Townsville, Queensland (Australia); The Townsville Hospital, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Douglas (Australia); University of Queensland, School of Medicine and Centre for Clinical Research, Department of Vascular Surgery, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Herston, QLD (Australia)

    2014-08-15

    Aortic calcification and thrombus have been postulated to worsen outcome following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). The purpose of this study was to assess the association of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) calcification and thrombus volume with outcome following EVAR using a reproducible, quantifiable computed tomography (CT) assessment protocol. Patients with elective EVAR performed between January 2002 and 2012 at the Townsville Hospital, Mater Private Hospital (Townsville) and Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital (RBWH) were included if preoperative CTAs were available for analysis. AAA calcification and thrombus volume were measured using a semiautomated workstation protocol. Outcomes were assessed in terms of clinical failure, endoleak (type I, type II) and reintervention. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Median follow-up was 1.7 years and the interquartile range 1.0-3.8 years. One hundred thirty-four patients undergoing elective EVAR were included in the study. Rates of primary clinical success and freedom from reintervention were 82.8 % and 88.9 % at the 24-month follow-up. AAA calcification and thrombus volume were not associated with clinical failure, type I endoleak, type II endoleak or reintervention. AAA calcification and thrombus volume were not associated with poorer outcome after EVAR in this study. (orig.)

  4. Abdominal aortic aneurysm calcification and thrombus volume are not associated with outcome following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, Divyajeet; Velu, Ramesh; Tosenovsky, Patrik; Quigley, Francis; Wisniowski, Brendan; Walker, Philip J.; Bradshaw, Barbara; Golledge, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Aortic calcification and thrombus have been postulated to worsen outcome following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). The purpose of this study was to assess the association of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) calcification and thrombus volume with outcome following EVAR using a reproducible, quantifiable computed tomography (CT) assessment protocol. Patients with elective EVAR performed between January 2002 and 2012 at the Townsville Hospital, Mater Private Hospital (Townsville) and Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital (RBWH) were included if preoperative CTAs were available for analysis. AAA calcification and thrombus volume were measured using a semiautomated workstation protocol. Outcomes were assessed in terms of clinical failure, endoleak (type I, type II) and reintervention. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Median follow-up was 1.7 years and the interquartile range 1.0-3.8 years. One hundred thirty-four patients undergoing elective EVAR were included in the study. Rates of primary clinical success and freedom from reintervention were 82.8 % and 88.9 % at the 24-month follow-up. AAA calcification and thrombus volume were not associated with clinical failure, type I endoleak, type II endoleak or reintervention. AAA calcification and thrombus volume were not associated with poorer outcome after EVAR in this study. (orig.)

  5. Risk factors and early outcomes of acute renal injury after thoracic aortic endograft repair for type B aortic dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo S

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Songyuan Luo,* Huanyu Ding,* Jianfang Luo, Wei Li, Bing Ning, Yuan Liu, Wenhui Huang, Ling Xue, Ruixin Fan, Jiyan Chen Cardiology Department, Guangdong Cardiovascular Institute, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Coronary Heart Disease Prevention, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR has become an emerging treatment modality for acute type B aortic dissection (TBAD patients in recent years. The risk factors and impacts of acute kidney injury (AKI after percutaneous TEVAR, however, have not been widely established.Methods: We retrospectively studied the clinical records of 305 consecutive patients who admitted to our institution and had TEVAR for TBAD between December 2009 and June 2013. The patients were routinely monitored for their renal functions preoperatively until 7 days after TEVAR. The Kidney Disease Improving Global Guidelines (KDIGO criteria were used for AKI.Results: Of the total 305 consecutive patients, 84 (27.5% developed AKI after TEVAR, comprising 66 (21.6% patients in KDIGO stage 1, 6 (2.0% patients in stage 2 and 12 (3.9% patients in stage 3. From the logistic regression analysis, systolic blood pressure (SBP on admission >140 mmHg (odds ratio [OR], 2.288; 95% CI, 1.319–3.969 and supra-aortic branches graft bypass hybrid surgery (OR, 3.228; 95% CI, 1.526–6.831 were independent risk factors for AKI after TEVAR. Local anesthesia tended to be a protective factor (OR, 0.563; 95% CI, 0.316–1.001. The preoperative renal function, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker or statin administration, volume of contrast agent, range of TBAD and false lumen involving renal artery were not associated with post-operation AKI. The in-hospital mortality and major adverse events were markedly increased with the occurrence of AKI (7.1% vs 0.9%, P=0

  6. Suprarenal fixation barbs can induce renal artery occlusion in endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

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    Subedi, Shree K; Lee, Andy M; Landis, Gregg S

    2010-01-01

    Renal artery occlusion following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair with suprarenal fixation is uncommon. We report one patient who was found to develop renal artery occlusion and parenchymal infarction 6 months after repair using an endovascular graft with suprarenal fixation. Our patient underwent emergent endovascular repair of a symptomatic 6 cm abdominal aortic aneurysm. The covered portion of the endograft was inadvertently deployed well below the renal artery orifices. At the completion of the procedure both renal arteries were confirmed to be patent. One month postoperatively, a computed tomographic (CT) scan showed exclusion of the aortic sac and normal enhancement of both kidneys. At 6 months, the patient was found to have elevated serum creatinine levels despite having no clinical symptoms. CT scanning revealed a nonenhancing left kidney, and angiography demonstrated an occlusion of the left renal artery. A barb welded to the bare metal stent appeared to be impinging on the renal artery. We believe that renal artery occlusion after endovascular repair can occur due to repetitive injury to the renal artery orifice from barbs welded to the bare metal stent. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of renal artery occlusion caused by repetitive injury from transrenal fixation systems. Copyright 2010 Annals of Vascular Surgery Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Transient postoperative atrial fibrillation after abdominal aortic aneurysm repair increases mortality risk

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    Kothari, Anai N.; Halandras, Pegge M.; Drescher, Max; Blackwell, Robert H.; Graunke, Dawn M.; Kliethermes, Stephanie; Kuo, Paul C.; Cho, Jae S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether new-onset transient postoperative atrial fibrillation (TPAF) affects mortality rates after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair and to identify predictors for the development of TPAF. Methods Patients who underwent open aortic repair or endovascular aortic repair for a principal diagnosis AAA were retrospectively identified using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project-State Inpatient Database (Florida) for 2007 to 2011 and monitored longitudinally for 1 year. Inpatient and 1-year mortality rates were compared between those with and without TPAF. TPAF was defined as new-onset atrial fibrillation that developed in the postoperative period and subsequently resolved in patients without a history of atrial fibrillation. Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for age, gender, comorbidities, rupture status, and repair method, were used to assess 1-year survival. Predictive models were built with preoperative patient factors using Chi-squared Automatic Interaction Detector decision trees and externally validated on patients from California. Results A 3.7% incidence of TPAF was identified among 15,148 patients who underwent AAA repair. The overall mortality rate was 4.3%. The inpatient mortality rate was 12.3% in patients with TPAF vs 4.0% in those without TPAF. In the ruptured setting, the difference in mortality was similar between groups (33.7% vs 39.9%, P = .3). After controlling for age, gender, comorbid disease severity, urgency (ruptured vs nonruptured), and repair method, TPAF was associated with increased 1-year postoperative mortality (hazard ratio, 1.48; P predict an individual's probability of developing TPAF at the point of care. Conclusions The development of TPAF is associated with an increased risk of mortality in patients undergoing repair of nonruptured AAA. Predictive modeling can be used to identify those patients at highest risk for developing TPAF and guide interventions to improve

  8. Surgery for acute Type I aortic dissection without resection of supra-aortic entry sites leads to unfavourable aortic remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Woon; Song, Suk-Won; Lee, Kwang-Hun; Lee, Shin-Young; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Baek, Min-Young; Yoo, Kyung-Jong

    2018-01-29

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of remnant re-entries in arch branches on postoperative change in the aortic arch and descending aortic diameters and the rate of major adverse aortic events. Between January 2010 and December 2016, 249 patients underwent surgery for acute Type I aortic dissection. Patients who underwent total arch replacement, had Marfan syndrome or had intramural haematoma were excluded. Seventy-two patients with predischarge and follow-up computed tomography scans were enrolled. Patients with and without re-entries in the arch branches after surgery were assigned to the supra-aortic entry (SAE, n = 21) and no supra-aortic entry (n = 51) groups, respectively. Diameters were measured at 7 levels: the innominate artery, left common carotid artery, left subclavian artery, 20 mm distal to the left subclavian artery, pulmonary artery bifurcation, coeliac axis and maximal diameter of the descending thoracic aorta. Growth rates at the levels of the pulmonary artery bifurcation and 20 mm distal to the left subclavian artery were significantly higher in the SAE group than in the no supra-aortic entry group. The rate of freedom from major adverse aortic events (annual growth >5 mm or maximal diameter of the descending thoracic aorta >50 mm) at 5 years was significantly higher in the no supra-aortic entry group than in the SAE group. Remnant SAE leads to unfavourable aortic remodelling after acute Type I aortic dissection repair. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  9. Logistic considerations for a successful institutional approach to the endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Dieter; Rancic, Zoran; Pfammatter, Thomas; Hechelhammer, Lukas; Veith, Frank J; Donas, Konstantin; Lachat, Mario

    2010-01-01

    The value of emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in the setting of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm remains controversial owing to differing results. However, interpretation of published results remains difficult as there is a lack of generally accepted protocols or standard operating procedures. Furthermore, such protocols and standard operating procedures often are reported incompletely or not at all, thereby making interpretation of results difficult. We herein report our integrated logistic system for the endovascular treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms. Important components of this system are prehospital logistics, in-hospital treatment logistics, and aftercare. Further studies should include details about all of these components, and a description of these logistic components must be included in all future studies of emergency EVAR for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  10. Comparison and usefulness of cardiac magnetic resonance versus computed tomography in infants six months of age or younger with aortic arch anomalies without deep sedation or anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Mark A; Pawlowski, Thomas W; Harris, Matthew A; Whitehead, Kevin K; Keller, Marc S; Wilson, Justine; Tipton, Deanna; Harris, Christine

    2011-07-01

    The present project investigated whether cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) of aortic arch anomalies can be performed successfully in infants <6 months of age without the use of cardiac anesthesia or deep sedation. We performed a retrospective review of infants ≤6 months old from 2005 to 2009 who underwent either CMR or computed tomography angiography to investigate aortic arch abnormalities. The CMR procedure used a "feed and swaddle" protocol without deep sedation or cardiac anesthesia. Of the 52 infants referred for CMR, 24 underwent the feed and swaddle protocol (aged 2.6 ± 1.4 months). One patient awoke during the study, and examination of the remaining 23 yielded a definitive diagnosis (success rate 96%). The scanning time was 6.2 ± 3.1 minutes, with the large airways evaluation accounting for 1/2 the time. Single-shot axial steady-state free precession, in which the definitive diagnosis was made, accounted for 0.59 ± 0.3 minutes. Fifteen infants were diagnosed with a vascular ring. Of the 8 infants who underwent surgery, the diagnostic accuracy was 100%. During the same period, 19 patients, who had undergone computed tomography angiography (aged 1.67 ± 1.20 months), were referred for aortic arch evaluation. Of these 19 patients, 6 (32%) underwent sedation or anesthesia. The imaging time was 0.08 ± 0.06 minutes, significantly different from the CMR times (p <0.01). However, the overall room times (31.3 ± 22.3 and 35.8 ± 3.86 minutes, respectively) were not different between the CMR and angiographic groups. The radiation dose was 1.41 ± 1.03 mSv. In conclusion, CMR evaluation of aortic arch anomalies in children <6 months old can be successfully completed quickly using a feed and swaddle approach with high diagnostic accuracy. This protocol avoids the risks of sedation, as well as the radiation associated with computed tomography angiography. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A case of acute ischemic colitis after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

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    Grigorios Voulalas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Colonic ischemia is a recognized complication of either open or endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. The clinical difficulty in establishing the diagnosis, the severity of this complication and the patient's poor physiological status may lead to a fatal outcome. We presented a case of ischemic colitis in a patient with patent hypogastric arteries that occurred after an endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair as well as a review of the available literature. The patient's preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative data were recorded. A thorough search through the Google data and Medline to review similar cases or any analyses that referred to ischemic colitis after endovascular abdominal aneurysm repair was conducted. A 76-year-old male was admitted to our department for an elective endovascular repair of an 8 cm in diameter abdominal aortic aneurysm. A Zenith bifurcation graft was implanted. The whole procedure was uneventful and the final angiogram showed an accurate deployment of the endograft without endoleaks and patency of both hypogastric arteries. During the 1st postoperative day, the patient developed symptoms of acute abdomen in combination with metabolic acidosis and oliguria. He underwent an exploratory laparotomy, which revealed necrosis of the sigmoid. A Hartmann's procedure was performed; the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit where he deceased after 24 h. Postoperative ischemic colitis has been described after open abdominal aneurysm repair. The description of this complication has been reported since the early phase of endovascular abdominal aneurysm repair development with a current incidence of 1.5%–3.0%. Possible mechanisms that may contribute to ischemic colitis in spite of the presence of patent hypogastric arteries include atheroembolization, shock, vasopressive drugs and inferior mesenteric artery occlusion.

  12. Can an accessory renal artery be safely covered during endovascular aortic aneurysm repair?

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    Antoniou, George A.; Karkos, Christos D.; Antoniou, Stavros A.; Georgiadis, George S.

    2013-01-01

    A best evidence topic was constructed according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether coverage of an accessory renal artery (ARA) in patients undergoing endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is associated with increased risk of renal impairment. Altogether, 106 papers were located using the reported searches, of which 5 represented the best evidence to answer the question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, study type, patient group studied, rel...

  13. Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) procedures: counterbalancing the benefits with the costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraskevas, Kosmas I; Bessias, Nikolaos; Giannoukas, Athanasios D; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2010-05-01

    Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair (EVAR) is associated with lower 30-day mortality rates compared with open repair. Despite that, there are no significant differences in mortality rates between the two procedures at 2 years. On the other hand, EVAR is associated with considerably higher costs compared with open repair. The lack of significant long-term differences between the two procedures together with the substantially higher cost of EVAR may question the appropriateness of EVAR as an alternative to open surgical repair in patients fit for surgery. With several thousands of AAA procedures performed worldwide, the employment of EVAR for the management of all AAAs irrespective of the patient's surgical risk may hold implications for several national health economies. The lower perioperative mortality and morbidity rates associated with EVAR should thus be counterbalanced against the considerable costs of these procedures.

  14. Endovascular repair or medical treatment of acute type B aortic dissection? A comparison

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    Chemelli-Steingruber, I. [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University (Austria); Chemelli, A. [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University (Austria)], E-mail: andreas.chemelli@i-med.ac.at; Strasak, A. [Department of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Health Economics, Innsbruck Medical University (Austria); Hugl, B. [Department of Vascular Surgery, Innsbruck Medical University (Austria); Hiemetzberger, R. [Department of Cardiology, Innsbruck Medical University (Austria); Jaschke, W.; Glodny, B.; Czermak, B.V. [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University (Austria)

    2010-01-15

    Introduction: The aim of this retrospective study was to compare the outcome of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) to that of medical therapy in patients with acute type B aortic dissection (TBD). Materials and methods: From July 1996 to April 2008, 88 patients presenting with acute TBD underwent either TEVAR (group A, n = 38) or medical therapy (group B, n = 50). Indications for TEVAR were intractable pain, aortic branch compromise resulting in end-organ ischemia, rapid aortic dilatation and rupture. Follow-up was performed postinterventionally, at 3, 6 and 12 months and yearly thereafter and included clinical examinations and computed tomography (CT), as well as aortic diameter measurements and assessment of thrombosis. Results: Mean follow-up was 33 months in group A and 36 months in group B. The overall mortality rate was 23.7% in group A and 24% in group B, where 4 patients died of late aortic rupture. In group A, complications included 9 endoleaks and 4 retrograde type A dissections, 3 patients were converted to open surgery and 2 needed secondary intervention. None of the patients developed paraplegia. In group B, 4 patients were converted to open surgery and 2 to TEVAR. The maximal aortic diameter increased in both groups. Regarding the extent of thrombosis, our analyses showed slightly better overall results after TEVAR, but they also showed a tendency towards approximation between the two groups during follow-up. Conclusion: TEVAR is a feasible treatment option in acute TBD. However, several serious complications may occur during and after TEVAR and it should therefore be reserved to patients with life-threatening symptoms.

  15. A multidetector tomography protocol for follow-up of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Moraes Bastos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to improve the use of 64-channel multidetector computed tomography using lower doses of ionizing radiation during follow-up procedures in a series of patients with endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. METHODS: Thirty patients receiving 5 to 29 months of follow-up after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair were analyzed using a 64-channel multidetector computed tomography device by an exam that included pre-and postcontrast with both arterial and venous phases. Leak presence and type were classified based on the exam phase. RESULTS: Endoleaks were identified in 8/30 of cases; the endoleaks in 3/8 of these cases were not visible in the arterial phases of the exams. CONCLUSION: The authors conclude that multidetector computed tomography with pre-contrast and venous phases should be a part of the ongoing follow-up of patients undergoing endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. The arterial phase can be excluded when the aneurism is stable or regresses. These findings permit a lower radiation dose without jeopardizing the correct diagnosis of an endoleak.

  16. Intensive Care Management of Thoracic Aortic Surgical Patients, Including Thoracic and Infradiaphragmatic Endovascular Repair (EVAR/TEVAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Sheela Pai

    2015-12-01

    The patient with thoracic aortic disease can present for open or endovascular repair. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has emerged as a minimally invasive option for a multitude of aortic pathology, including dissections, aneurysms, traumatic injuries, and ulcers. Postoperative management of these patients depends on the extent of procedure, whether it was open or endovascular, and, finally, on the preoperative comorbidities present. While procedural success has catapulted TEVAR to popularity, midterm results have been mixed. Additionally, periprocedural complications such as paraplegia and renal failure remain a significant morbidity in these patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. The effect of endograft device on patient outcomes in endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansal, Vinay; Nagpal, Sudhir; Jetty, Prasad

    2017-12-01

    Objective Endovascular aneurysm repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is being increasingly applied as the intervention of choice. The purpose of this study was to determine whether survival and reintervention rates after ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm vary between endograft devices. Methods This cohort study identified all ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms performed at The Ottawa Hospital from January 1999 to May 2015. Data collected included patient demographics, stability index at presentation, adherence to device instructions for use, endoleaks, reinterventions, and mortality. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare outcomes between groups. Mortality outcomes were assessed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, and multivariate Cox regression modeling. Results One thousand sixty endovascular aneurysm repairs were performed using nine unique devices. Ninety-six ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms were performed using three devices: Cook Zenith ( n = 46), Medtronic Endurant ( n = 33), and Medtronic Talent ( n = 17). The percent of patients presented in unstable or extremis condition was 30.2, which did not differ between devices. Overall 30-day mortality was 18.8%, and was not statistically different between devices ( p = 0.16), although Medtronic Talent had markedly higher mortality (35.3%) than Cook Zenith (15.2%) and Medtronic Endurant (15.2%). AUI configuration was associated with increased 30-day mortality (33.3% vs. 12.1%, p = 0.02). Long-term mortality and graft-related reintervention rates at 30 days and 5 years were similar between devices. Instructions for use adherence was similar across devices, but differed between the ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and elective endovascular aneurysm repair cohorts (47.7% vs. 79.0%, p 30 days post-endovascular aneurysm repair ( p = 0.01). Type 1 endoleak rates differed significantly across devices (Cook Zenith 0.0%, Medtronic Endurant 18.2%, Medtronic Talent 17.6%, p = 0

  18. Survival affects decision making for fenestrated and branched endovascular aortic repair.

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    Beach, Jocelyn M; Rajeswaran, Jeevanantham; Parodi, F Ezequiel; Kuramochi, Yuki; Brier, Corey; Blackstone, Eugene; Eagleton, Matthew J

    2018-03-01

    Repair options for complex abdominal and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAAs) are evolving with increased experience and availability of less invasive endovascular techniques. Identifying risk factors for mortality after fenestrated and branched endovascular aortic repair (F/B-EVAR) could improve patient selection and facilitate decision making regarding who may benefit from prophylactic F/B-EVAR. We evaluated 1091 patients in a prospective investigational device exemption trial who underwent F/B-EVAR from August 2001 to June 2015 for complex aortic aneurysms (CAAs). Multivariable analysis of risk factors for death was performed using a nonproportional hazards model and a nonparametric analysis using random survival forest technology. Operative mortality after F/B-EVAR was low (3.7%), with high CAA-related survival at 30 day and 5 years (96.8% and 94.0%, respectively). All-cause 5-year survival, however, was 46.2% and older age, heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, renal disease, anemia, and coagulation disorders were risk factors. Risk was highest for those undergoing type I/II TAAA repairs and those with larger aneurysms. Patients with multiple comorbidities and those undergoing type I or II TAAA repair are at greatest risk of mortality; however, in this high-risk population, F/B-EVAR offers greater survival compared with that reported for the natural history of untreated aneurysms. Operative and early mortality is lower than the best-reported open repair outcomes, even in this high-risk population, suggesting a potential benefit in extending the use of F/B-EVAR to low-to-average risk CAA patients. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Elective visceral hybrid repair of type III thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm

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    Marjanović Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. According to the classification given by Crawford et al. type III thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA is dilatation of the aorta from the level of the rib 6 to the separation of the aorta below the renal arteries, capturing all the visceral branch of aorta. Visceral hybrid reconstruction of TAAA is a procedure developed in recent years in the world, which involves a combination of conventional, open and endovascular aortic reconstruction surgery at the level of separation of the left subclavian artery to the level of visceral branches of aorta. Case report. We presented a 75-years-old man, with elective visceral hybrid reconstruction of type III TAAA. Computerized scanning (CT angiography of the patient showed type III TAAA with the maximum transverse diameter of aneurysm of 92 mm. Aneurysm started at the level of the sixth rib, and the end of the aneurysm was 1 cm distal to the level of renal arteries. Aneurysm compressed the esophagus, causing the patient difficulty in swallowing act, especially solid food, and frequent back pain. From the other comorbidity, the patient had been treated for a long time, due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hypertension. In general endotracheal anesthesia with epidural analgesia, the patient underwent visceral hybrid reconstruction of TAAA, which combines classic, open vascular surgery and endovascular procedures. Classic vascular surgery is visceral reconstruction using by-pass procedure from the distal, normal aorta to all visceral branches: celiac trunk, superior mesenteric artery and both renal arteries, with ligature of all arteries very close to the aorta. After that, by synchronous endovascular technique a complete aneurysmal exclusion of thoracoabdominal aneurysm with thoracic stent-graft was performed. The postoperative course was conducted properly and the patient left the Clinic for Vascular Surgery on postoperative day 21. Control CT, performed 3 months after the surgery

  20. Aortic root replacement in 372 Marfan patients: evolution of operative repair over 30 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Duke E; Alejo, Diane E; Patel, Nishant D; Nwakanma, Lois U; Weiss, Eric S; Vricella, Luca A; Dietz, Harry C; Spevak, Philip J; Williams, Jason A; Bethea, Brian T; Fitton, Torin P; Gott, Vincent L

    2009-05-01

    We reviewed the evolution of practice and late results of aortic root replacement (ARR) in Marfan syndrome patients at our institution. A retrospective clinical review of Marfan patients undergoing ARR at our institution was performed. Follow-up data were obtained from hospital and office records and from telephone contact with patients or their physicians. Between September 1976 and September 2006, 372 Marfan syndrome patients underwent ARR: 269 had a Bentall composite graft, 85 had valve-sparing ARR, 16 had ARR with homografts, and 2 had ARR with porcine xenografts. In the first 24 years of the study, 85% received a Bentall graft; during the last 8 years, 61% had a valve-sparing procedure. There was no operative or hospital mortality among the 327 patients who underwent elective repair; there were 2 deaths among the 45 patients (4.4%) who underwent emergent or urgent operative repair. There were 74 late deaths (70 Bentalls, 2 homograft, and 2 valve-sparing ARRs). The most frequent causes of late death were dissection or rupture of the residual aorta (10 of 74) and arrhythmia (9 of 74). Of the 85 patients who had a valve-sparing procedure, 40 had a David II remodeling operation; there was 1 late death in this group, and 5 patients required late aortic valve replacement for aortic insufficiency. A David I reimplantation procedure using the De Paulis Valsalva graft has been used exclusively since May 2002. All 44 patients in this last group have 0 to 1+ aortic insufficiency. Prophylactic surgical replacement of the ascending aorta in patients with Marfan syndrome has low operative risk and can prevent aortic catastrophe in most patients. Valve-sparing procedures, particularly using the reimplantation technique with the Valsalva graft, show promise but have not yet proven as durable as the Bentall.

  1. Contemporary results of aortic valve repair for congenital disease: lessons for management and staged strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergnat, Mathieu; Asfour, Boulos; Arenz, Claudia; Suchowerskyj, Philipp; Bierbach, Benjamin; Schindler, Ehrenfried; Schneider, Martin; Hraska, Victor

    2017-09-01

    Any aortic valve (AoV) operation in children (repair, Ross or mechanical replacement) is a palliation and reinterventions are frequent. AoV repair is a temporary solution primarily aimed at allowing the patient to grow to an age when more definitive solutions are available. We retrospectively analysed AoV repair effectiveness across the whole age spectrum of children, excluding neonates and AoV disease secondary to congenital heart disease. From 2003 to 2015, 193 consecutive patients were included. The mean age was 9.2 ± 6.9 years (22% disease. The procedures performed were commissurotomy shaving (n = 74; 38%), leaflet replacement (n = 78; 40%), leaflet extension (n = 21; 11%) and neocommissure creation (n = 21; 11%). Post-repair geometry was tricuspid in 137 (71%) patients. The 10-year survival rate was 97.1%. Freedom from reoperation and replacement at 7 years was, respectively, 57% (95% confidence interval, 47-66) and 68% (95% confidence interval, 59-76). In multivariate analysis, balloon dilatation before 6 months, the absence of a developed commissure, a non-tricuspid post-repair geometry and cross-clamp duration were predictors for reoperation and replacement. After a mean follow-up period of 5.1 ± 3.0 years, 145 (75%) patients had a preserved native valve, with undisturbed valve function (peak gradient <40 mmHg, regurgitation ≤mild) in 113 (58%). Aortic valve repair in children is safe and effective in delaying the timing for more definitive solution. Surgical strategy should be individualized according to the age of the patient. Avoidance of early balloon dilatation and aiming for a tricuspid post-repair arrangement may improve outcomes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  2. Simultaneous repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm and resection of unexpected, associated abdominal malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Calio', Francesco G; D'Urso, Antonio; Lorusso, Riccardo; Ceccanei, Gianluca; Vietri, Francesco

    2004-12-15

    The management of unexpected intra-abdominal malignancy, discovered at laparotomy for elective treatment of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), is controversial. It is still unclear whether both conditions should be treated simultaneously or a staged approach is to be preferred. To contribute in improving treatment guidelines, we retrospectively reviewed the records of patients undergoing laparotomy for elective AAA repair. From January 1994 to March 2003, 253 patients underwent elective, trans-peritoneal repair of an AAA. In four patients (1.6%), an associated, unexpected neoplasm was detected at abdominal exploration, consisting of one renal, one gastric, one ileal carcinoid, and one ascending colon tumor. All of them were treated at the same operation, after aortic repair and careful isolation of the prosthetic graft. The whole series' operative mortality was 3.6%. None of the patients simultaneously treated for AAA and tumor resection died in the postoperative period. No graft-related infections were observed. Simultaneous treatment of AAA and tumor did not prolong significantly the mean length of stay in the hospital, compared to standard treatment of AAA alone. Except for malignancies of organs requiring major surgical resections, simultaneous AAA repair and resection of an associated, unexpected abdominal neoplasm can be safely performed, in most of the patients, sparing the need for a second procedure. Endovascular grafting of the AAA can be a valuable tool in simplifying simultaneous treatment, or in staging the procedures with a very short delay.

  3. Extra-anatomic endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a horseshoe kidney supplied by the aneurysmal aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Jorge; Golpanian, Samuel; Yang, Jane K; Moreno, Enrique; Velazquez, Omaida C; Goldstein, Lee J; Chahwala, Veer

    2015-07-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm complicated by a horseshoe kidney (HSK, fused kidney) represents a unique challenge for repair. Renal arteries arising from the aneurysmal aorta can further complicate intervention. Reports exist describing the repair of these complex anatomies using fenestrated endografts, hybrid open repairs (debranching), and open aneurysmorrhaphy with preservation of renal circulation. We describe an extra-anatomic, fully endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a HSK partially supplied by a renal artery arising from the aneurysm. We successfully applied aortouni-iliac endografting, femorofemoral bypass, and retrograde renal artery perfusion via the contralateral femoral artery to exclude the abdominal aortic aneurysm and preserve circulation to the HSK. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Valve-sparing aortic root repair in acute type A dissection: how many sinuses have to be repaired for curative surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanski, Paul P; Hijazi, Husam; Dinstak, Witold; Diegeler, Anno

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate operative and long-term results of valve-sparing aortic root surgery in acute type A dissection. The repair consisted of selective replacement of all dissected and pathological sinuses. Forty-six patients (mean age 62 ± 14; range 29-88 years, 3 with Marfan syndrome), operated on between August 2001 and July 2011 due to acute type A aortic dissection, underwent valve-sparing root repair, resulting in a valve preservation rate of 56% in acute aortic dissection surgery involving the aortic root. Insufficiency grades of 0/1+, 2+, 3+ and 4+ were presented in 16, 17, 12 and 1 patients, respectively. Root repair with resection of the whole of the pathological aortic wall without the use of any glue was performed in all patients. Replacement of 1, 2 or 3 sinuses of Valsalva was performed in 29, 12 and 5 patients, respectively. Concomitant cusp repair was necessary in 7 patients. All perioperative data were collected prospectively and an intention-to-treat analysis was performed. A total of 6 patients (median age 76, range 63-81 years) died, on average 10 months (range 0.9-44) after surgery resulting in an overall survival of 87% at the mean follow-up of 54 ± 37, range 0.9-132 months. The linearized death rate was 2.9%/year, and the actuarial survival rate at 8 years was 85.5 ± 5.6%. No death was related to the aortic valve or aortic root. There were no valve-related events and no patient required reoperation on the proximal aorta/aortic valve during the follow-up. At the last echocardiography (47.8 ± 35.6 months after surgery), 33 patients showed no and 13 patients slight (1+) aortic insufficiency. Curative repair with replacement of all pathological sinuses of Valsalva leads to an excellent long-term outcome. Selected sinus repair is a simple and effective method of curative, valve-sparing root repair in acute aortic dissection because replacement of all sinuses is seldom necessary.

  5. Surgery for Young Adults With Aortic Valve Disease not Amenable to Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Zakkar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Aortic valve replacement is the gold standard for the management of patients with severe aortic stenosis or mixed pathology that is not amenable to repair according to currently available guidelines. Such a simplified approach may be suitable for many patients, but it is far from ideal for young adults considering emerging evidence demonstrating that conventional valve replacement in this cohort of patients is associated with inferior long-term survival when compared to the general population. Moreover; the utilisation of mechanical and bioprosthetic valves can significantly impact on quality and is linked to increased rates of morbidities. Other available options such as stentless valve, homografts, valve reconstruction and Ross operation can be an appealing alternative to conventional valve replacement. Young patients should be fully informed about all the options available - shared decision making is now part of modern informed consent. This can be achieved when referring physicians have a better understanding of the short and long term outcomes associated with every intervention, in terms of survival and quality of life. This review presents up to date evidence for available surgical options for young adults with aortic stenosis and mixed disease not amenable to repair.

  6. Surgery for Young Adults With Aortic Valve Disease not Amenable to Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakkar, Mustafa; Bruno, Vito Domanico; Visan, Alexandru Ciprian; Curtis, Stephanie; Angelini, Gianni; Lansac, Emmanuel; Stoica, Serban

    2018-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement is the gold standard for the management of patients with severe aortic stenosis or mixed pathology that is not amenable to repair according to currently available guidelines. Such a simplified approach may be suitable for many patients, but it is far from ideal for young adults considering emerging evidence demonstrating that conventional valve replacement in this cohort of patients is associated with inferior long-term survival when compared to the general population. Moreover; the utilisation of mechanical and bioprosthetic valves can significantly impact on quality and is linked to increased rates of morbidities. Other available options such as stentless valve, homografts, valve reconstruction and Ross operation can be an appealing alternative to conventional valve replacement. Young patients should be fully informed about all the options available - shared decision making is now part of modern informed consent. This can be achieved when referring physicians have a better understanding of the short and long term outcomes associated with every intervention, in terms of survival and quality of life. This review presents up to date evidence for available surgical options for young adults with aortic stenosis and mixed disease not amenable to repair.

  7. Successful surgical repair of acute type A aortic dissection without the use of blood products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalexopoulou, N; Attia, R Q; Bapat, V N

    2013-10-01

    We report successful surgical treatment of type A aortic dissection in a Jehovah's Witness without the use of any blood products. An interposition graft replacement of the ascending aorta was carried out. This was under right axillo-atrial cardiopulmonary bypass with antegrade cerebral perfusion via right a subclavian and left carotid cannula for 24 minutes at 28°C. Body temperature was kept at 32°C throughout. Autologous transfusion was deployed using cell salvage and a preoperative haemodilution technique. The patient was given tranexamic acid, desmopressin, recombinant factor VIIa, folic acid and epoetin alfa. Patients who object to transfusion represent a significant challenge, especially those who are at a high risk of coagulopathy associated with inherent aortic dissection leading to perturbed haemodynamics, cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest. Type A aortic dissection repair is possible in patients refusing the use of blood products with blood salvage techniques and synthetic products that can limit the risk of bleeding. Minimal hypothermia is vital to preserve platelet function and avoid coagulopathy. Thus, a combination of normothermic/minimal hypothermia and antegrade cerebral protection with a blood conservation strategy can be deployed for a successful surgical outcome in aortic dissection without transfusion.

  8. Dental arch relationship in children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate following warsaw (one-stage repair) and oslo protocols.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fudalej, P.S.; Hortis-Dzierzbicka, M.; Dudkiewicz, Z.; Semb, G.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the dental arch relationship following one-stage repair of unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) in Warsaw with a matched sample of patients treated by the Oslo Cleft Team. MATERIAL: Study models of 61 children (mean age, 11.2; SD, 1.7) with a nonsyndromic complete UCLP

  9. Gothic aortic arch and cardiac mechanics in young patients after arterial switch operation for d-transposition of the great arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Salvo, Giovanni; Bulbul, Ziad; Pergola, Valeria; Issa, Ziad; Siblini, Ghassan; Muhanna, Nisreen; Galzerano, Domenico; Fadel, Bahaa; Al Joufan, Mansour; Al Fayyadh, Majid; Al Halees, Zohair

    2017-08-15

    In patients who have undergone arterial switch operation (ASO) for d-transposition of the great arteries a gothic aortic arch (GA) morphology has been found and it has been associated with abnormal aortic bio-elastic properties. GA is frequent in ASO patients and may have an impact on cardiac mechanics. Our study aims were to assess 1- the occurrence of GA in a large sample of patients after ASO; 2- the association between GA and aortic bio-elastic properties; and 3- the impact of GA on left ventricular (LV) function using speckle tracking echocardiography (STE). We studied one hundred and five asymptomatic patients, who have undergone first stage ASO for d-TGA, with normal left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF ≥53%). Forty-six (44%) patients showed a GA (mean age 11.5±7.2years, 26 males) while fifty-nine (56%) patients (mean age 9.6±6.7years, 37 males) did not present GA. The two groups were comparable for age, sex, BSA, and office blood pressure values. In group GA aortic root was significantly dilated (27.4±7.5mm vs. 21.2±6.9mm, p<0.0001), aortic stiffness index (Group GA=1.8±1.2 vs. 1.4±0.7, p=0.025) was significantly increased, left atrial volume was larger (p=0.0145), global longitudinal strain (Group GA=-18.4±2.5% vs. -20.1±3.3%, p=0.012) and basal LV longitudinal strains (Group GA=-16.9±4.8% vs. -20.4±7.0%, p=0.013) were significantly reduced. After ASO the presence of a GA is associated with a significantly dilated aortic root, stiffer aortic wall, larger left atrial volume, and worse LV longitudinal systolic deformations, well known predictors of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Surgical repair of supravalvular aortic stenosis in children with williams syndrome: a 30-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Tyson A; d'Udekem, Yves; Brizard, Christian P; Wheaton, Gavin; Weintraub, Robert G; Konstantinov, Igor E

    2015-04-01

    Williams syndrome is an uncommon genetic disorder associated with supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) in childhood. We reviewed outcomes of children with Williams syndrome who underwent repair of SVAS during a 30-year period at a single institution. Between 1982 and 2012, 28 patients with Williams syndrome were operated on for SVAS. Mean age at operation was 5.2 years (range, 3 months to 13 years), and mean weight at operation was 18.6 kg (range, 4.1 to 72.4 kg). Associated cardiac lesions in 11 patients (39.3%) were repaired at the time of the SVAS repair. The most common associated cardiac lesion was main pulmonary artery stenosis (8 of 28 [28%]). A 3-patch repair was performed in 10 patients, a Doty repair in 17, and a McGoon repair in 1 (3.6%). There were no early deaths. Follow-up was 96% complete (27 of 28). Overall mean follow-up was 11.2 years (range, 1 month to 27.3 years). Mean follow-up was 5 years (range, 1 month to 14.3 years) for the 3-patch repair patients and 14.7 years (range, 6 weeks to 27 years) for the Doty repair patients. Of the 17 Doty patients, there were 4 (24%) late deaths, occurring at 6 weeks, 3.5 years, 4 years, and 16 years after the initial operation. There were no late deaths in the 3-patch repair patients. Overall survival was 86% at 5, 10, and 15 years after repair. Survival was 82% at 5, 10 and 15 years for the Doty repair patients. Overall, 6 of 27 patients (22%) patients required late reoperation at a mean of 11.2 years (range, 3.6 to 23 years). No 3-patch repair patients required reoperation. Overall freedom from reoperation was 91% at 5 years and 73% at 10 and 15 years. Freedom from reoperation for the Doty repair patients was 93% at 5 years and 71% at 10 and 15 years. Surgical repair of SVAS in children Williams syndrome has excellent early results. However, significant late mortality and morbidity warrants close follow-up. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  11. Suprarenal fixation resulting in intestinal malperfusion after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siani, Andrea; Accrocca, Federico; De Vivo, Gennaro; Marcucci, Giustino

    2016-05-01

    Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and coeliac axis (CA) occlusion after endovascular abdominal aneurysm aortic repair (EVAR-AAA), using endograft with suprarenal fixation, are uncommon. However, we are reporting a case of visceral malperfusion, which occurred 7 days after successful EVAR with suprarenal fixation for symptomatic AAA. Endograft metal stent barbs caused severe stenosis of SMA and CA. A successful recovery of SMA was carried out by means of a balloon-expandable stent released through bare metal stent barbs. We believe that an unfavourable anatomy of a proximal aortic neck and visceral aorta may have caused a wrong stent strut deployment with the coverage of CA and SMA. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  12. The effects of preoperative cardiology consultation prior to elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair on patient morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniakowski, Anna E; Davis, Frank M; Phillips, Amanda R; Robinson, Adina B; Coleman, Dawn M; Henke, Peter K

    2017-08-01

    Objectives The relationship between preoperative medical consultations and postoperative complications has not been extensively studied. Thus, we investigated the impact of preoperative consultation on postoperative morbidity following elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Methods A retrospective review was conducted on 469 patients (mean age 72 years, 20% female) who underwent elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair from June 2007 to July 2014. Data elements included detailed medical history, preoperative cardiology consultation, and postoperative complications. Primary outcomes included 30-day morbidity, consult-specific morbidity, and mortality. A bivariate probit regression model accounting for the endogeneity of binary preoperative medical consult and patient variability was estimated with a maximum likelihood function. Results Eighty patients had preoperative medical consults (85% cardiology); thus, our analysis focuses on the effect of cardiac-related preoperative consults. Hyperlipidemia, increased aneurysm size, and increased revised cardiac risk index increased likelihood of referral to cardiology preoperatively. Surgery type (endovascular versus open repair) was not significant in development of postoperative complications when controlling for revised cardiac risk index ( p = 0.295). After controlling for patient comorbidities, there was no difference in postoperative cardiac-related complications between patients who did and did not undergo cardiology consultation preoperatively ( p = 0.386). Conclusions When controlling for patient disease severity using revised cardiac risk index risk stratification, preoperative cardiology consultation is not associated with postoperative cardiac morbidity.

  13. Prenatal Diagnosis of Fetal Interrupted Aortic Arch Type A by Two-Dimensional Echocardiography and Four-Dimensional Echocardiography with B-Flow Imaging and Spatiotemporal Image Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongyu; Zhang, Ying; Ren, Weidong; Sun, Feifei; Guo, Yajun; Sun, Wei; Wang, Yu; Huang, Liping; Cai, Ailu

    2016-01-01

    Fetal interrupted aortic arch (IAA) is a rare cardiac anomaly and its prenatal diagnosis is challenging. The purpose of our report is to evaluate the use of two-dimensional echocardiography (2DE) and 4D echocardiography with B-flow imaging and spatiotemporal image correlation (4D BF-STIC) in detecting IAA type A (IAA-A). Twenty-three cases of confirmed IAA-A identified by fetal echocardiography were involved in the study. The fetal echocardiography image data were reviewed to analyze the ratio of right ventricle to left ventricle (RV/LV) diameter, the ratio of main pulmonary artery to ascending aorta (MPA/AAO) diameter, and the correlation of RV/LV diameter ratio and size of ventricular septal defect (VSD). 4D BF-STIC was performed in 21 fetuses using the sagittal view (4D BF-STIC-sagittal) and the four-chamber view (4D BF-STIC-4CV) as initial planes of view. An additional 183 normal fetuses were also included in our study. RV/LV and MPA/AAO ratios were calculated and compared with that of IAA-A fetuses. Fetal 2DE, 4D BF-STIC-sagittal, and 4D BF-STIC-4CV were used to visualize the aortic arch and its associated neck vessels. Six subgroups were evaluated according to gestational age. Fetal 2DE, 4D BF-STIC-sagittal, and 4D BF-STIC-4CV made the correct prenatal diagnosis of IAA-A in 19/23 (82.6%), 14/21 (66.7%), and 19/21 (90.5%) of patients, respectively. A significantly enlarged MPA combined with symmetric ventricles was found in the IAA-A fetuses, while the size of the VSD was negatively correlated with RV/LV ratio. 4D BF-STIC-sagittal and 4D BF-STIC-4CV were better than traditional 2D ultrasound in detecting the aortic arch and neck vessels between 17 and 28 gestational weeks and 29 to 40 gestational weeks in normal fetuses. It is demonstrated that IAA-A could be diagnosed by traditional fetal echocardiography, while 4D technique could better display the anatomic structure and the spatial relationships of the great arteries. Use of volume reconstruction may

  14. Innovative postmarket device evaluation using a quality registry to monitor thoracic endovascular aortic repair in the treatment of aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Adam W; Lombardi, Joseph V; Abel, Dorothy B; Morales, J Pablo; Marinac-Dabic, Danica; Wang, Grace; Azizzadeh, Ali; Kern, John; Fillinger, Mark; White, Rodney; Cronenwett, Jack L; Cambria, Richard P

    2017-05-01

    United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-mandated postapproval studies have long been a mainstay of the continued evaluation of high-risk medical devices after initial marketing approval; however, these studies often present challenges related to patient/physician recruitment and retention. Retrospective single-center studies also do not fully represent the spectrum of real-world performance nor are they likely to have a sufficiently large enough sample size to detect important signals. In recent years, The FDA Center for Devices and Radiological Health has been promoting the development and use of patient registries to advance infrastructure and methodologies for medical device investigation. The FDA 2012 document, "Strengthening the National System for Medical Device Post-market Surveillance," highlighted registries as a core foundational infrastructure when linked to other complementary data sources, including embedded unique device identification. The Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI) thoracic endovascular aortic repair for type B aortic dissection project is an innovative method of using quality improvement registries to meet the needs of device evaluation after market approval. Here we report the organization and background of this project and highlight the innovation facilitated by collaboration of physicians, the FDA, and device manufacturers. This effort used an existing national network of VQI participants to capture patients undergoing thoracic endovascular aortic repair for acute type B aortic dissection within a registry that aligns with standard practice and existing quality efforts. The VQI captures detailed patient, device, and procedural data for consecutive eligible cases under the auspices of a Patient Safety Organization (PSO). Patients were divided into a 5-year follow-up group (200 acute; 200 chronic dissections) and a 1-year follow-up group (100 acute; 100 chronic). The 5-year cohort required additional imaging details, and the 1-year

  15. A prospective clinical, economic, and quality-of-life analysis comparing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), open repair, and best medical treatment in high-risk patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms suitable for EVAR: the Irish patient trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hynes, Niamh

    2007-12-01

    To report the results of a trial comparing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) to open repair (OR) and best medical therapy (BMT) involving high-risk patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) suitable for EVAR.

  16. Endovascular Repair of Aortic Dissection in Marfan Syndrome: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario Parisi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades, improvement of medical and surgical therapy has increased life expectancy in Marfan patients. Consequently, the number of such patients requiring secondary interventions on the descending thoracic aorta due to new or residual dissections, and distal aneurysm formation has substantially enlarged. Surgical and endovascular procedures represent two valuable options of treatment, both associated with advantages and drawbacks. The aim of the present manuscript was to review endovascular outcomes in Marfan syndrome and to assess the potential role of Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair (TEVAR in this subset of patients.

  17. JAG Tearing Technique with Radiofrequency Guide Wire for Aortic Fenestration in Thoracic Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricci, Carmelo; Ceccherini, Claudio; Leonini, Sara; Cini, Marco; Vigni, Francesco; Neri, Eugenio; Tucci, Enrico; Benvenuti, Antonio; Tommasino, Giulio; Sassi, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    An innovative approach, the JAG tearing technique, was performed during thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair in a patient with previous surgical replacement of the ascending aorta with a residual uncomplicated type B aortic dissection who developed an aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta with its lumen divided in two parts by an intimal flap. The proximal landing zone was suitable to place a thoracic stent graft. The distal landing zone was created by cutting the intimal flap in the distal third of the descending thoracic aorta with a radiofrequency guide wire and intravascular ultrasound catheter.

  18. Acute Testicular Ischemia following Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair Identified in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Finnerty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR is perhaps the most widely utilized surgical procedure for patients with large abdominal aortic aneurysms. This procedure is minimally invasive and reduces inpatient hospitalization requirements. The case involves a 72-year-old male who presented to the emergency department with right testicular ischemia two days following EVAR. Given the minimal inpatient hospitalization associated with this procedure, emergency physicians are likely to encounter associated complications. Ischemic and thromboembolic events following EVAR are extremely rare but require prompt vascular surgery intervention to minimize morbidity and mortality.

  19. CT appearance of complications related to thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR): a pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pua, U.; Tay, K.H.; Tan, B.S.; Htoo, M.M.; Sebastian, M.; Sin, K.; Chua, Y.L.

    2009-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) is a recognized treatment for various diseases involving the thoracic aorta. Patients treated with TEVAR require lifelong surveillance for potential complications, with CT being highly utilized in most centres. Endoleak is the most common complication and can be detected using CT. However, other complications such as stent strut perforations and end organ ischemia can also be detected on CT. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to illustrate the CT appearance of post-TEVAR complications encountered in our institution and to highlight their significance. (orig.)

  20. CT appearance of complications related to thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR): a pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pua, U. [Singapore General Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Singapore (Singapore); Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Singapore (Singapore); Tay, K.H.; Tan, B.S.; Htoo, M.M. [Singapore General Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Singapore (Singapore); Sebastian, M. [Singapore General Hospital, Department of General Surgery, Singapore (Singapore); Sin, K.; Chua, Y.L. [National Heart Centre, Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Singapore (Singapore)

    2009-05-15

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) is a recognized treatment for various diseases involving the thoracic aorta. Patients treated with TEVAR require lifelong surveillance for potential complications, with CT being highly utilized in most centres. Endoleak is the most common complication and can be detected using CT. However, other complications such as stent strut perforations and end organ ischemia can also be detected on CT. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to illustrate the CT appearance of post-TEVAR complications encountered in our institution and to highlight their significance. (orig.)

  1. Zone zero thoracic endovascular aortic repair: A proposed modification to the classification of landing zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roselli, Eric E; Idrees, Jay J; Johnston, Douglas R; Eagleton, Matthew J; Desai, Milind Y; Svensson, Lars G

    2018-04-01

    Endovascular stent-grafting provides an alternative treatment option for high-risk patients with ascending aortic disease. The feasibility of this approach has been demonstrated before. We assess the updated experience with ascending thoracic endovascular aortic repair and propose a modification of the landing zone classification based on the outcomes. From 2006 to 2016, 39 patients deemed very high risk for open replacement underwent endovascular repair of ascending aorta for acute type A dissection (12, 31%), intramural hematoma (2, 5%), pseudoaneurysm (22, 56%), and chronic dissection suture line entry tear (3, 8%). Ascending thoracic endovascular aortic repair was performed in 36 patients. In 3 patients with pseudoaneurysm, occluder devices were used. Computed tomography imaging analysis was performed, and the extent of aortic pathology was designated by segmental proximity to the left ventricle. Segmental anatomy of the proximal aorta was designed as zone 0A from the annulus to the distal margin of highest coronary, 0B extends from above the coronary to the distal margin of right pulmonary artery, and 0C extends from the right pulmonary artery border to the innominate artery. Multivariable time to event Cox regression analysis was performed to predict mortality, and long-term survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Operative mortality was 13%; all 5 deaths occurred after emergency ascending thoracic endovascular aortic repair for type A dissection. Other complications included stroke in 4 patients (10%), myocardial infarction in 2 patients (5%), tracheostomy in 2 patients (5%), and dialysis in 2 patients (5%). In patients with acute type A dissection, the ascending pathology extended into zone 0A in 10 (71%) and 0B in 4 (29%). Among those with pseudoaneurysm, the location of the defect was in 0B in 11 (50%), 0C in 10 (45%), and 0A in 1. Among the patients with chronic dissection, the defect was located in 0C in all 3 (100%). After multivariable

  2. Effect of Pregnancy on Ventricular and Aortic Dimensions in Repaired Tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauldwell, Matthew; Quail, Michael A; Smith, Gillian S; Heng, Ee Ling; Ghonim, Sarah; Uebing, Anselm; Swan, Lorna; Li, Wei; Patel, Roshni R; Pennell, Dudley J; Steer, Philip J; Johnson, Mark R; Gatzoulis, Michael A; Babu-Narayan, Sonya V

    2017-07-23

    The aim was to assess whether cardiovascular adaptation to pregnancy in women with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) adversely affects hemodynamic stability, in particular with respect to right ventricular (RV) dilatation, pulmonary regurgitation, or aortic root dilatation. This was a retrospective cohort study of women with repaired TOF with paired cardiovascular magnetic resonance scans before and after their first pregnancy (baseline RV end systolic volume index 49 mL/m 2 and RV end diastolic volume index 118 mL/m 2 ) matched with a comparison group of nulliparous women with TOF. Cases were matched for age at baseline cardiovascular magnetic resonance scan, time between follow-up of cardiovascular magnetic resonance scans, QRS duration, RV ejection fraction, and indexed RV end systolic and diastolic volume at baseline. Effect of pregnancy and time on parameters was assessed using mixed-effects modelling. Nineteen women with repaired TOF who had completed their first pregnancy were identified and matched with 38 nulliparous women. We observed no deleterious effects of pregnancy on RV volumes, aortic dimensions, or exercise data. There was an effect of pregnancy observed in both left ventricular end diastolic volume and left ventricular stroke volume, consistent with a sustained small increase in left ventricular stroke volume attributed to pregnancy (53-55 mL/m 2 ). Women with repaired TOF and with mild-to-moderate RV dilatation considering pregnancy can be reassured that pregnancy is unlikely to cause deterioration in their cardiovascular status. We recommend that women are routinely assessed and followed up before and after pregnancy and that prepregnancy counseling is tailored to their individual clinical status. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  3. Provider volume and outcomes for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, carotid endarterectomy, and lower extremity revascularization procedures.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, Shane D

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Intuitively, vascular procedures performed by high-volume vascular subspecialists working at high-volume institutions should be associated with improved patient outcome. Although a large number of studies assess the relationship between volume and outcome, a single contemporary compilation of such studies is lacking. METHODS: A review of the English language literature was performed incorporating searches of the Medline, EMBASE, and Cochrane collaboration databases for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (elective and emergent), carotid endarterectomy, and arterial lower limb procedures for any volume outcome relationship. Studies were included if they involved a patient cohort from 1980 onwards, were community or population based, and assessed health outcomes (mortality and morbidity) as a dependent variable and volume as an independent variable. RESULTS: We identified 74 relevant studies, and 54 were included. All showed either an inverse relationship of variable magnitude between provider volume and mortality, or no volume-outcome effect. The reduction in the risk-adjusted mortality rate (RAMR) for high-volume providers was 3% to 11% for elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair, 2.5 to 5% for emergent AAA repair, 0.7% to 4.7% carotid endarterectomy, and 0.3% to 0.9% for lower limb arterial bypass procedures. Subspeciality training also conferred a considerable morbidity and mortality benefit for emergent AAA repair, carotid endarterectomy, and lower limb arterial procedures. CONCLUSION: High-volume providers have significantly better outcomes for vascular procedures both in the elective and emergent setting. Subspeciality training also has a considerable impact. These data provide further evidence for the specialization of vascular services, whereby vascular procedures should generally be preformed by high-volume, speciality trained providers.

  4. Outcomes of Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in Patients with Hostile Neck Anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choke, Edward; Munneke, Graham; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria; Loftus, Ian; McFarland, Robert; Loosemore, Thomas; Thompson, Matthew M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. The principal anatomic contraindication to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVR) is an unfavorable proximal aortic neck. With increasing experience, a greater proportion of patients with unfavorable neck anatomy are being offered EVR. This study aimed to evaluate outcomes in patients with challenging proximal aortic neck anatomy. Methods. Prospectively collected data from 147 consecutive patients who underwent EVR between December 1997 and April 2005 were supplemented with a retrospective review of medical records and radiological images. Unfavorable anatomic features were defined as neck diameter >28 mm, angulation >60 deg., circumferential thrombus >50%, and length 30 days) (p = 0.57), distal type I endoleak (p = 0.40), type III endoleak (p 0.51), secondary interventions (p = 1.0), aneurysm sac expansion (p = 0.44), or 30 day mortality (p = 0.70). The good neck group had a significantly increased incidence of type II endoleak (p = 0.023). By multivariate analysis, the incidence of intraoperative adjunctive procedures was significantly increased in the presence of severe angulation (p = 0.041, OR 3.08, 95% CI 1.05-9.04). Conclusion. Patients with severely hostile proximal aortic neck anatomy may be treated with EVR, although severely angulated necks require additional intraoperative procedures. Early outcomes are encouraging and suggest that indications for EVR may be expanded to include patients with hostile neck anatomy

  5. Celiac Trunk Embolization, as a Means of Elongating Short Distal Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Necks, Prior to Endovascular Aortic Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belenky, Alexander; Haddad, Menashe; Idov, Igor; Knizhnik, Michael; Litvin, Sergey; Bachar, Gil N.; Atar, Eli

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report our experience in elongating short distal necks of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (DTAAs) by coil embolization of the celiac trunk prior to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). During 6 years seven patients (five men and two women; mean age, 74) who had DTAAs with short distal necks unsuitable for conventional EVAR, and well patent superior and inferior mesenteric arteries based on CT, were treated in one session with EVAR after the celiac trunk was coil embolized to elongate the neck. All patients were followed by CT every 3 months in the first year and every 6 months thereafter. Technical success was achieved in all patients, and no early or late ischemic complications were noted. No procedural complications occurred and good aneurysm sealing was obtained in all patients. Three endoleaks were identified after 3 months (one patient) and 6 months (two patients); all were treated successfully with insertion of an additional stent-graft. In patients with DTAAs who are candidates for EVAR but have short aneurysm distal necks, celiac trunk embolization-only if the superior and inferior mesenteric arteries are patent-is a good and safe way to elongate the neck and enable EVAR.

  6. Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair complicated by spondylodiscitis and iliaco-enteral fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Koning, Heleen D; van Sterkenburg, Steven M M; Pierie, Maurice E N; Reijnen, Michel M P J

    2008-06-01

    Infections of abdominal aortic endografts are rare. There are no reports on the association with spondylodiscitis. We report a case of a 74-year-old man who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and subsequently femorofemoral bypass placement due to occlusion of the right limb of the endograft. Six months later, he presented with rectal bleeding, weight loss, back pain, and low abdominal pain. Computed tomography revealed extensive abscess formation with air in and around the endograft and psoas muscles, in continuity with destructive spondylodiscitis L3-4. There was a small bowel loop in close proximity to the occluded right leg of the endograft, which was filled with air bubbles. An axillofemoral bypass was created followed by a laparotomy. Intra-operatively, an iliaco-enteral fistula was found. The small bowel defect was sutured, the endograft completely removed, and the infrarenal aorta and both common iliac arteries were closed. Necrotic fragments of the former L3-4 disk were removed. The postoperative course was uneventful. Seven months postoperatively, the patient had recovered well. Iliaco-enteric fistula and spondylodiscitis are rare complications of aortic aneurysm repair. This is the first report of spondylodiscitis after EVAR.

  7. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in the Presence of a Transplanted Kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverberg, Daniel; Yalon, Tal; Halak, Moshe

    2015-01-01

    PurposeTo present our experience performing endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms in kidney transplanted patients.MethodsA retrospective review of all patients who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) performed at our institution from 2007 to 2014. We identified all patients who had previously undergone a kidney transplant. Data collected included: comorbidities, preoperative imaging modalities, indication for surgery, stent graft configurations, pre- and postoperative renal function, perioperative complications, and survival rates.ResultsA total of 267 EVARs were performed. Six (2 %) had a transplanted kidney. Mean age was 74 (range, 64–82) years; five were males. Mean time from transplantation to EVAR was 7.5 (range, 2–12) years. Five underwent preoperative planning with noncontrast modalities only. Devices used included bifurcated (n = 3), aortouniiliac (n = 2), and tube (n = 1) stent grafts. Technical success was achieved in all patients. None experienced deterioration in renal function. Median follow-up was 39 (range, 6–51) months. Four patients were alive at the time of the study. Two patients expired during the period of follow-up from unrelated causes.ConclusionsEVAR is an effective modality for the management of AAAs in the coexistence of a transplanted kidney. It can be performed with minimal morbidity and mortality without harming the transplanted kidney. Special consideration should be given to device configuration to minimize damage to the renal graft

  8. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in the Presence of a Transplanted Kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverberg, Daniel, E-mail: silverberg-d@msn.com; Yalon, Tal; Halak, Moshe [The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, The Department of Vascular Surgery (Israel)

    2015-08-15

    PurposeTo present our experience performing endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms in kidney transplanted patients.MethodsA retrospective review of all patients who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) performed at our institution from 2007 to 2014. We identified all patients who had previously undergone a kidney transplant. Data collected included: comorbidities, preoperative imaging modalities, indication for surgery, stent graft configurations, pre- and postoperative renal function, perioperative complications, and survival rates.ResultsA total of 267 EVARs were performed. Six (2 %) had a transplanted kidney. Mean age was 74 (range, 64–82) years; five were males. Mean time from transplantation to EVAR was 7.5 (range, 2–12) years. Five underwent preoperative planning with noncontrast modalities only. Devices used included bifurcated (n = 3), aortouniiliac (n = 2), and tube (n = 1) stent grafts. Technical success was achieved in all patients. None experienced deterioration in renal function. Median follow-up was 39 (range, 6–51) months. Four patients were alive at the time of the study. Two patients expired during the period of follow-up from unrelated causes.ConclusionsEVAR is an effective modality for the management of AAAs in the coexistence of a transplanted kidney. It can be performed with minimal morbidity and mortality without harming the transplanted kidney. Special consideration should be given to device configuration to minimize damage to the renal graft.

  9. Anatomic changes of target vessels after fenestrated and branched aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalder, J; Keschenau, P; Tamm, M; Jalaie, H; Jacobs, M J; Greiner, A

    2014-04-01

    Objective of this study was to evaluate the anatomic changes of the stented target vessels after endovascular repair of complex aortic aneurysms. Between July 2011 and December 2013, 53 aortic aneurysms were treated in our department with fenestrated and branched stent-graft devices. Forty-two of these patients were pre- and postoperatively scanned with a high resolution computer tomography (CT) (Cook Zenith® fenestrated or branched, Australia Pty. Ltd., Brisbane, Australia: N.=19; AnacondaTM fenestrated, Vascutek, Glasgow, Scotland, UK: N.=23). The other 11 out of the 53 patients did not receive a CT scan, because of a pre-existing renal failure. In the CT scans we retrospectively evaluated the anatomic vessel deviation at the origin of the target vessel and the vessel shift distal to the stent. For the first measurement the CT scans were loaded into OsiriX MD®, and the pre- and postoperative angles of the target vessels were measured and subtracted. For matching, the CT-scans were normalized at vertebral body lumbar 2. The second measured angle was the maximal measured angle distal to the target vessel stent-graft. Altogether, 113 target vessels were stented (celiac trunk [CT] 15, superior mesenteric arteries [SMA] 26, renal arteries [RA] 72), with 97 balloon-expandable PTFE stents: 90 Atrium V12 (Maquet Getinge group, Hudson, NH, USA), 7 BeGrafts (Bentley InnoMed, Hechingen, Germany) and 16 self-expandable fluency PTFE stents (Bard, Karlsruhe, Germany). The mean anatomic deviation at the target vessel origin was 28±17.3 and the mean vessel shift distal to the stent was 36.3±18.8. There were no significant differences between the main device and the target vessel stent types. Fenestrated and branched stent-graft solutions for aortic aneurysm repair induce changes of the target vessel anatomy. We did not observe significant differences between the several devices.

  10. Multidirectional flow analysis by cardiovascular magnetic resonance in aneurysm development following repair of aortic coarctation

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    Stalder Aurelien F

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aneurysm formation is a life-threatening complication after operative therapy in coarctation. The identification of patients at risk for the development of such secondary pathologies is of high interest and requires a detailed understanding of the link between vascular malformation and altered hemodynamics. The routine morphometric follow-up by magnetic resonance angiography is a well-established technique. However, the intrinsic sensitivity of magnetic resonance (MR towards motion offers the possibility to additionally investigate hemodynamic consequences of morphological changes of the aorta. We demonstrate two cases of aneurysm formation 13 and 35 years after coarctation surgery based on a Waldhausen repair with a subclavian patch and a Vosschulte repair with a Dacron patch, respectively. Comprehensive flow visualization by cardiovascular MR (CMR was performed using a flow-sensitive, 3-dimensional, and 3-directional time-resolved gradient echo sequence at 3T. Subsequent analysis included the calculation of a phase contrast MR angiography and color-coded streamline and particle trace 3D visualization. Additional quantitative evaluation provided regional physiological information on blood flow and derived vessel wall parameters such as wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index. The results highlight the individual 3D blood-flow patterns associated with the different vascular pathologies following repair of aortic coarctation. In addition to known factors predisposing for aneurysm formation after surgical repair of coarctation these findings indicate the importance of flow sensitive CMR to follow up hemodynamic changes with respect to the development of vascular disease.

  11. Contemporary economic and clinical evaluations of endovascular repair for intact descending thoracic aortic aneurysms.

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    Silingardi, Roberto; Gennai, Stefano; Coppi, Giovanni; Chester, Johanna; Marcheselli, Luigi; Brunetti, Massimo

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess clinical and contemporary costs associated with elective endovascular repair of intact descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (DTAA) into the mid-term follow-up. A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained clinical database including 29 consecutive patients from July 2005 to December 2009 treated with elective endovascular repair (TEVAR) or TEVAR and surgical infrarenal repair (hybrid) of intact DTAA was performed. Mean age was 74.5 years old (±7.1). Primary clinical endpoints include mortality and major morbidity. Additionally a comprehensive economic appraisal of individual in-hospital and follow-up costs was executed. Economic endpoints include in-hospital and follow-up costs and patient discharge status. Elective endovascular and open repairs' clinical and economical outcomes in contemporary literature were assessed for comparison according to PRISMA standards. Immediate mortality was 6.9% (1/24 TEVAR and 1/5 hybrid). Three respiratory complications were recorded (11%; 2 TEVAR, 1 hybrid). Renal and cardiac complication rates were 7.4% (1 TEVAR, 1 hybrid) and 3.7% (1 TEVAR) respectively. Routine discharge home was achieved for 85% of patients (95.7% TEVAR, 25% hybrid). Three endoleaks were treated throughout the follow-up (2 TEVAR, 1 hybrid; mean 30.4 mo, ±19.9) rendering an 11% (3/27) reintervention rate. Average immediate cost was €21,976.87 for elective endovascular repair and €33,783.21 for elective endovascular hybrid repair. Additional reintervention and routine follow-up costs augmented immediate costs by 12.4%. This study supports satisfying immediate clinical outcomes for TEVAR and TEVAR+surgical infrarenal procedures. Although limited by a small population size and difficulties in economic comparisons, this study presents the real world social and economic cost scenario for both elective TEVAR and TEVAR hybrid treatment of DTAA of both the in-hospital and at mid term follow-up periods.

  12. Hybrid Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Preservation of Pelvic Perfusion with External to Internal Iliac Artery Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansukhani, Neel A; Havelka, George E; Helenowski, Irene B; Rodriguez, Heron E; Hoel, Andrew W; Eskandari, Mark K

    2017-07-01

    Diminished pelvic arterial flow as a result of intentional coverage/embolization of internal iliac arteries (IIA) during isolated endovascular common iliac artery aneurysm (CIAA) repair or endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) may result in symptomatic pelvic ischemia. Although generally well tolerated, in severe cases, pelvic ischemia may manifest as recalcitrant buttock claudication, vasculogenic impotence, or perineal, vesicle, rectal, and/or spinal cord ischemia. Branched graft technology has recently become available; however, many patients are not candidates for endovascular repair with these devices. Therefore, techniques to preserve pelvic arterial flow are needed. We reviewed our outcomes of isolated endovascular CIAA repair or EVAR in conjunction with unilateral external-internal iliac artery bypass. Single-center, retrospective review of 10 consecutive patients who underwent hybrid endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) or CIAA repair with concomitant external-internal iliac artery bypass between 2006 and 2015. Demographics, index procedural details, postoperative symptoms, hospital length of stay (LOS), follow-up imaging, and bypass patency were recorded. The cohort of 10 patients was all men with a mean age of 71 years (range: 56-84). Hybrid repair consisted of contralateral IIA coil embolization followed by EVAR with external iliac artery-internal iliac artery (EIA-IIA) bypass. All EIA-IIA bypasses were performed via a standard lower quadrant retroperitoneal approach with a prosthetic bypass graft. Technical success was 100%, and there were no perioperative deaths. One patient developed transient paraplegia, 1 patient had buttock claudication on the side of his hypogastric embolization contralateral to his iliac bypass, and 1 developed postoperative impotence. 20% of patients sustained long-term complications (buttock claudication and postoperative impotence). Mean LOS was 2.8 days (range: 1-9 days). Postoperative imaging

  13. Moderate versus deep hypothermic circulatory arrest for ascending aorta and aortic arch surgeries using open distal anastomosis technique

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    Ahmed Abdelgawad

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: MHCA with ACP achieved very good and comparable results to DHCA with RCP for ascending and aortic reconstruction. Furthermore, MHCA significantly shortened total operative, cardiopulmonary bypass and ischaemic times and, basically, decreased transfusion requirements compared with the former strategy and consequently may lead to better patient's outcome.

  14. Application of rapid artificial cardiac pacing in thoracic endovascular aortic repair in aged patients

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    Chen J

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Jun Chen,1,* Wenhui Huang,2,* Songyuan Luo,2,* Dahao Yang,1 Zhengrong Xu,1 Jianfang Luo21Department of Angiocardiopathy, Affiliated Baoan Hospital of Southern Medical University, Shenzhen City, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Cardiology, Guangdong Cardiovascular Institute, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workObjective: To compare the safety, efficacy, and impact on stent graft positioning between rapid artificial cardiac pacing (RACP, induced hypotension and sodium nitroprusside (SNP induced hypotension during thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR for Stanford B aortic dissection.Methods: One hundred and sixty-eight patients, who were diagnosed with Stanford B aortic dissection and who underwent selective TEVAR in Guangdong General Hospital and the People's Hospital of Baoan District, Shenzhen, People's Republic of China, were enrolled in this study. Patients were randomly divided into a RACP group (n=77 and a SNP group (n=91. During localization and deployment of the stent graft, hypotension was induced by RACP or intravenous SNP, according to randomization. Hemodynamics, landing precision (deviation from planned placement site, duration of procedure, renal function, neurocognitive function, and incidence of endoleaks and paraplegia/hemiplegia were compared. Except for methods of inducing hypotension, TEVAR was performed according to the same protocol in each group.Results: RACP was successfully performed in all patients assigned to the RACP group. Compared with the SNP group, blood pressure was significantly lower (43±5 versus 81±6 mmHg, P=0.003 and the restoration time of blood pressure and the operation duration were significantly shorter (7±2 versus 451±87 seconds, P<0.001; 87±15 versus 106±18 minutes, P<0.001, respectively in the RACP group. Stent graft localization/deployment was more precise in the RACP

  15. Comparison of three contemporary risk scores for mortality following elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

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    Grant, S W; Hickey, G L; Carlson, E D; McCollum, C N

    2014-07-01

    A number of contemporary risk prediction models for mortality following elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair have been developed. Before a model is used either in clinical practice or to risk-adjust surgical outcome data it is important that its performance is assessed in external validation studies. The British Aneurysm Repair (BAR) score, Medicare, and Vascular Governance North West (VGNW) models were validated using an independent prospectively collected sample of multicentre clinical audit data. Consecutive, data on 1,124 patients undergoing elective AAA repair at 17 hospitals in the north-west of England and Wales between April 2011 and March 2013 were analysed. The outcome measure was in-hospital mortality. Model calibration (observed to expected ratio with chi-square test, calibration plots, calibration intercept and slope) and discrimination (area under receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC]) were assessed in the overall cohort and procedural subgroups. The mean age of the population was 74.4 years (SD 7.7); 193 (17.2%) patients were women and the majority of patients (759, 67.5%) underwent endovascular aneurysm repair. All three models demonstrated good calibration in the overall cohort and procedural subgroups. Overall discrimination was excellent for the BAR score (AUC 0.83, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.76-0.89), and acceptable for the Medicare and VGNW models, with AUCs of 0.78 (95% CI 0.70-0.86) and 0.75 (95% CI 0.65-0.84) respectively. Only the BAR score demonstrated good discrimination in procedural subgroups. All three models demonstrated good calibration and discrimination for the prediction of in-hospital mortality following elective AAA repair and are potentially useful. The BAR score has a number of advantages, which include being developed on the most contemporaneous data, excellent overall discrimination, and good performance in procedural subgroups. Regular model validations and recalibration will be essential. Copyright

  16. Delayed endovascular aortic repair is associated with reduced in-hospital mortality in patients with blunt thoracic aortic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcaccio, Christina L; Dumas, Ryan P; Huang, Yanlan; Yang, Wei; Wang, Grace J; Holena, Daniel N

    2018-02-13

    The traditional approach to stable blunt thoracic aortic injury (BTAI) endorsed by the Society for Vascular Surgery is early (<24 hours) thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). Recently, some studies have shown improved mortality in stable BTAI patients repaired in a delayed manner (≥24 hours). However, the indications for use of delayed TEVAR for BTAI are not well characterized, and its overall impact on the patient's survival remains poorly understood. We sought to determine whether delayed TEVAR is associated with a decrease in mortality compared with early TEVAR in this population. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of adult patients with BTAI (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnosis code 901.0) who underwent TEVAR (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision procedure code 39.73) from 2009 to 2013 using the National Sample Program data set. Missing physiologic data were imputed using chained multiple imputation. Patients were parsed into groups based on the timing of TEVAR (early, <24 hours, vs delayed, ≥24 hours). The χ 2 , Mann-Whitney, and Fisher exact tests were used to compare baseline characteristics and outcomes of interest between groups. Multivariable logistic regression for mortality was performed that included all variables significant at P ≤ .2 in univariate analyses. A total of 2045 adult patients with BTAI were identified, of whom 534 (26%) underwent TEVAR. Patients with missing data on TEVAR timing were excluded (n = 27), leaving a total of 507 patients for analysis (75% male; 69% white; median age, 40 years [interquartile range, 27-56 years]; median Injury Severity Score [ISS], 34 [interquartile range, 26-41]). Of these, 378 patients underwent early TEVAR and 129 underwent delayed TEVAR. The two groups were similar with regard to age, sex, race, ISS, and presenting physiology. Mortality was 11.9% in the early TEVAR group vs 5.4% in the delayed group, with the early group

  17. Retrograde Embolization of the Left Vertebral Artery in a Type II Endoleak After Endovascular Treatment of Aortic Thoracic Rupture: Technical Note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabellino, Martin; Garcia Nielsen, L.; Baldi, S.; Zander, T.; Arnaiz, L.; Llorens, R.; Zerolo, I.; Maynar, M.

    2009-01-01

    Endoleak is a frequent complication after endovascular repair of aortic rupture. We describe the case of a female patient with traumatic aortic injury, treated with endograft, who developed a type II endoleak through the left subclavian and vertebral arteries. Both arteries originated independently from the aortic arch, and were managed with coil embolization of each vessel. We also report our experience with treating the left vertebral artery by placing a microcatheter through the right vertebral one.

  18. Type A aortic dissection in Marfan syndrome: extent of initial surgery determines long-term outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylski, Bartosz; Bavaria, Joseph E; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Branchetti, Emanuela; Desai, Nimesh D; Milewski, Rita K; Szeto, Wilson Y; Vallabhajosyula, Prashanth; Siepe, Matthias; Kari, Fabian A

    2014-04-01

    Data on outcomes after Stanford type A aortic dissection in patients with Marfan syndrome are limited. We investigated the primary surgery and long-term results in patients with Marfan syndrome who suffered aortic dissection. Among 1324 consecutive patients with aortic dissection type A, 74 with Marfan syndrome (58% men; median age, 37 years [first and third quartiles, 29 and 48 years]) underwent surgical repair (85% acute dissections; 68% DeBakey I; 55% composite valved graft, 30% supracoronary ascending replacement, 15% valve-sparing aortic root replacement; 12% total arch replacement; 3% in-hospital mortality) at 2 tertiary centers in the United States and Europe over the past 25 years. The rate of aortic reintervention with resternotomy was 24% (18 of 74) and of descending aorta (thoracic+abdominal) intervention was 30% (22 of 74) at a median follow-up of 8.4 years (first and third quartiles, 2.2 and 12.7 years). Freedom from need for aortic root reoperation in patients who underwent primarily a composite valved graft or valve-sparing aortic root replacement procedure was 95±3%, 88±5%, and 79±5% and in patients who underwent supracoronary ascending replacement was 83±9%, 60±13%, 20±16% at 5, 10, and 20 years. Secondary aortic arch surgery was necessary only in patients with initial hemi-arch replacement. Emergency surgery for type A dissection in patients with Marfan syndrome is associated with low in-hospital mortality. Failure to extend the primary surgery to aortic root or arch repair leads to a highly complex clinical course. Aortic root replacement or repair is highly recommended because supracoronary ascending replacement is associated with a high need (>40%) for root reintervention.

  19. Hybrid repair of a very late, post-aortic coarctation surgery thoracic aneurysm: a case report

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    Tilea Ioan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Local aneurysms after surgical repair of coarctation of the aorta occur mainly in patients surgically treated by Dacron patch plasty during adulthood. The management of these patients is always problematic, with frequent complications and increased mortality rates. Percutaneous stent-graft implantation avoids the need for surgical reintervention. Case presentation We report a case involving the hybrid treatment by stent-graft implantation and transposition of the left subclavian artery to the left common carotid artery of an aneurysmal dilatation of the thoracic aorta that occurred in a 64-year-old Caucasian man, operated on almost 40 years earlier with a Dacron patch plasty for aortic coarctation. Our patient presented to our facility for evaluation with back pain and shortness of breath after minimal physical effort. A physical examination revealed stony dullness to percussion of the left posterior thorax, with no other abnormalities. The results of chest radiography, followed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography and aortography, led to a diagnosis of giant aortic thoracic aneurysm. Successful treatment of the aneurysm was achieved by percutaneous stent-graft implantation combined with transposition of the left subclavian artery to the left common carotid artery. His post-procedural recovery was uneventful. Three months after the procedure, computed tomography showed complete thrombosis of the excluded aneurysm, without any clinical signs of left lower limb ischemia or new onset neurological abnormalities. Conclusions Our patient’s case illustrates the clinical outcomes of surgical interventions for aortic coarctation. However, the very late appearance of a local aneurysm is rather unusual. Management of such cases is always difficult. The decision-making should be multidisciplinary. A hybrid approach was considered the best solution for our patient.

  20. Is tube repair of aortic aneurysm followed by aneurysmal change in the common iliac arteries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provan, J L; Fialkov, J; Ameli, F M; St Louis, E L

    1990-10-01

    To address the concern that tube repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm might be followed by aneurysmal change in the common iliac arteries, 23 patients who had undergone the operation were re-examined 3 to 5 years later. Although 9 had had minimal ectasia of these arteries preoperatively, in none of the 23 was there symptomatic or radiologic evidence of aneurysmal change on follow-up. Measurements of the maximum intraluminal diameters were made by computed tomography; they indicated no significant differences between the preoperative and follow-up sizes of the common iliac arteries. The variation in time to follow-up also showed no significant correlation with change in artery diameter.

  1. Aortopulmonary Fistula Presenting without an Endoleak after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

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    Giacomo Sica

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we report the case of a 60-year-old man, a smoker with a history of arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus. After computed tomography (CT for an episode of hemoptysis, the patient underwent elective thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR because of a degenerative aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta. The area of perianeurysmal pulmonary atelectasis reported on the CT scan was not considered. Three months later, he developed an aortopulmonary fistula without endoleaks. Although TEVAR is a relatively safe procedure, no detail should be overlooked in the preoperative evaluation in order to avoid life-threatening complications. Further, the effectiveness and modality of prolonged antibiotic prophylaxis and/or preoperative respiratory physiotherapy should be assessed in such cases.

  2. Contemporary strategies for repair of complex thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms: real-world experiences and multilayer stents as an alternative

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    Ralf Robert Kolvenbach

    Full Text Available Abstract Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA present special challenges for repair due to their extent, their distinctive pathology, and the fact that they typically cross the ostia of one or more visceral branch vessels. Historically, the established treatment for TAAA was open surgical repair, with the first procedure reported in 1955. Endovascular repair of TAAA with fenestrated and/ or branched endografts, has been studied since the beginning of the current century as a means of mechanical aneurysm exclusion. More recently, flow modulator stents have been employed with the aim at reducing shear stress on aortic aneurysmal wall. In this review we present technical and main results of these techniques, based on literature review and personal experience.

  3. [Midterm results of thoracic aortic dissection endovascular repair in conjunctions with the location of Adamkiewicz artery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ying-bin; Li, Jian; Su, Yong-hui; Ma, Jie-fei; Guan, Xiao-dong; Zhang, Bai-meng

    2012-10-23

    To evaluate the effects of using longer xenografts in conjunctions with the location of Adamkiewicz artery (AKA) on midterm outcomes of endovascular treatment for thoracic aortic dissection. From March 2005 to September 2011, 217 patients with type B dissection were recruited. There were 143 males and 74 females with a mean age of 65 ± 11 years. Among them, 43 patients were from Fifth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University while another 174 patients from Affiliated Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University. They were divided into 2 groups according to whether AKA was identified or not pre-operatively. Endovascular repairs were performed for all patients. Distal landing levels of xenografts were recorded. The thrombosis of false lumen and the complications of spinal cord injury and endoleak were analyzed. AKA was detected in 121 (55.8%) patients (group A) but not in 96 (44.2%) patients (group B). According to the levels of AKA, the patients of group A obtained the stabilization of affected thoracic aorta over a longer distance. And the ratio of patients with distal landing levels at T8-T10 was significantly higher than in group B (59.5% vs 12.5%, χ² = 49.85, P < 0.01). Also, during the follow-up period of 7.3 months, the ratio of patients with total thrombosis of false lumen in group A was significantly higher than that in group B (32.1% vs 19.1%, χ² = 4.34, P < 0.05). During the endovascular repair of thoracic aortic dissection, selecting a longer device may provide a better structural stability of affected aorta and promote false lumen thrombosis.

  4. Continuous spinal anaesthesia with minimally invasive haemodynamic monitoring for surgical hip repair in two patients with severe aortic stenosis

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    María Mercedes López

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Aortic stenosis increases perioperative morbidity and mortality, perioperative invasive monitoring is advised for patients with an aortic valve area 30 mm Hg and it is important to avoid hypotension and arrhythmias. We report the anaesthetic management with continuous spinal anaesthesia and minimally invasive haemodynamic monitoring of two patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing surgical hip repair. CASE REPORT: Two women with severe aortic stenosis were scheduled for hip fracture repair. Continuous spinal anaesthesia with minimally invasive haemodynamic monitoring was used for anaesthetic management of both. Surgery was performed successfully after two consecutive doses of 2 mg of isobaric bupivacaine 0.5% in one of them and four consecutive doses in the other. Haemodynamic conditions remained stable throughout the intervention. Vital signs and haemodynamic parameters remained stable throughout the two interventions. CONCLUSION: Our report illustrates the use of continuous spinal anaesthesia with minimally invasive haemodynamic monitoring as a valid alternative to general or epidural anaesthesia in two patients with severe aortic stenosis who are undergoing lower limb surgery. However, controlled clinical trials would be required to establish that this technique is safe and effective in these type or patients.

  5. Outcome after open surgery repair in endovascular-suitable patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenzien, Felix; Matia, Ivan; Wiltberger, Georg; Hau, Hans-Michael; Freitas, Bruno; Moche, Michael; Schmelzle, Moritz; Jonas, Sven; Fellmer, Peter T

    2013-11-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has been suggested in several studies to be superior to open surgery repair (OSR) for the treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (rAAAs), but this finding might be affected by selection bias based on aneurysm morphology and patient characteristics. We tested rAAA anatomy according to EVAR suitability in patients undergoing OSR to assess the impact on mortality. This retrospective analysis reports on 83 patients with rAAAs treated between November 2002 and July 2013. Pre-operative computed tomography (CT) scans were evaluated based on EVAR suitability and were determined by blinded independent reviewers. CT scans were lacking due to acquisition in an external institution with no availability (n = 9) or solely ultrasound evaluations (n = 8). In addition patient characteristics and outcomes were assessed. All patients who underwent OSR and who had available preoperative CT scans were included in the study (n = 66). In summary, 42 % of the patients (28/66; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 30.5 - 54.4) were considered eligible for EVAR according to pre-operative CT scans and 58 % of the patients (38/66; 95 % CI, 45.6 - 69.5) were categorized as unsuitable for endovascular repair. Patients suitable for EVAR had a significantly lower prevalence of in-hospital deaths (25 % [7/28]; 95 % CI, 9 - 41) in contrast to patients unsuitable for EVAR (53 % [20/38]; 95 % CI, 36.8 - 68.5; p = 0.02). EVAR-suitable patients had a highly significant mortality reduction undergoing OSR. Thus, the present study proposes that EVAR suitability is a positive predictor for survival after open repair of rAAA.

  6. Prospective comparative study of brain protection in total aortic arch replacement: deep hypothermic circulatory arrest with retrograde cerebral perfusion or selective antegrade cerebral perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okita, Y; Minatoya, K; Tagusari, O; Ando, M; Nagatsuka, K; Kitamura, S

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the results of total aortic arch replacement using two different methods of brain protection, particularly with respect to neurologic outcome. From June 1997, 60 consecutive patients who underwent total arch replacement through a midsternotomy were alternately allocated to one of two methods of brain protection: deep hypothermic circulatory arrest with retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP: 30 patients) or with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (SCP: 30 patients). Preoperative and postoperative (3 weeks) brain CT scan, neurological examination, and cognitive function tests were performed. Serum 100b protein was assayed before and after the cardiopulmonary bypass, as well as 24 hours and 48 hours after the operation. Hospital mortality occurred in 2 patients in the RCP group (6.6%) and 2 in the SCP group (6.6%). New strokes occurred in 1 (3.3%) of the RCP group and in 2 (6.6%) of the SCP group (p = 0.6). The incidence of transient brain dysfunction was significantly higher in the RCP group than in the SCP group (10, 33.3% vs 4, 13.3%, p = 0.05). Except in patients with strokes, S-100b values showed no significant differences in the two groups (RCP: SCP, prebypass 0.01+/-0.04: 0.05+/-0.16, postbypass 2.17+/-0.94: 1.97+/-1.00, 24 hours 0.61+/-0.36: 0.60+/-0.37, 48 hours 0.36+/-0.45: 0.46+/-0.40 microg/L, p = 0.7). There were no intergroup differences in the scores of memory decline (RCP 0.74+/-0.99; SCP 0.55+/-1.19, p = 0.6), orientation (RCP 1.11+/-1.29; SCP 0.50+/-0.76, p = 0.08), or intellectual function (RCP 1.21+/-1.27; SCP 1.05+/-1.15, p = 0.7). Both methods of brain protection for patients undergoing total arch replacement resulted in acceptable levels of mortality and morbidity. However, the prevalence of transient brain dysfunction was significantly higher in patients with the RCP.

  7. The imaging assessment and specific endograft design for the endovascular repair of ascending aortic dissection

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    Zhang Y

    2016-07-01

    (10.4%, 22 (45.9%, 13 (27.1%, six (12.5%, and two (4.2% patients, respectively. Conclusion: In this selected number of Chinese patients, the suitability of endovascular repair has been demonstrated based on the CT imaging. Shorter, larger, and bare spring-free conical endografts were preferred in the ascending aortic pathology. Keywords: type A dissection, endovascular, endograft, design

  8. The Impact of Deep Versus Moderate Hypothermia on Postoperative Kidney Function After Elective Aortic Hemiarch Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaoutakis, George J; Vallabhajosyula, Prashanth; Bavaria, Joseph E; Sultan, Ibrahim; Siki, Mary; Naidu, Suveeksha; Milewski, Rita K; Williams, Matthew L; Hargrove, W Clark; Desai, Nimesh D; Szeto, Wilson Y

    2016-10-01

    There remains concern that moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest (MHCA) with antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) may provide suboptimal distal organ protection compared with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) with retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP). We compared postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI) in in patients who underwent elective hemiarch repair with either DHCA/RCP or MHCA/ACP. This was a retrospective review of all patients undergoing elective aortic hemiarch reconstruction for aneurysmal disease between 2009 and 2014. Patients were stratified according to the use of DHCA/RCP versus MHCA/ACP. The primary outcome was the occurrence of AKI at 48 hours, as defined by the Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, End-Stage (RIFLE ) criteria. A multivariable logistic regression identified risk factors for AKI. One hundred eighteen patients who underwent ACP and 471 patients who underwent RCP were included. The mean lowest temperature was 26.4°C in patients who underwent MHCA/ACP and 17.5°C in patients who underwent DHCA/RCP. Baseline demographics were similar except that patients who underwent DHCA/RCP were more likely to have peripheral arterial disease or bicuspid aortic valves. Cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times were shorter in the MHCA/ACP group. AKI occurred in 19 (16.2%) patients who underwent MHCA/ACP and 67 (14.3%) patients who underwent DHCA/RCP. Four (0.8%) patients who underwent DHCA/RCP required postoperative dialysis. In-hospital mortality tended to increase with increasing RIFLE classification (RIFLE class-0 (No AKI) = 0.41%; Risk = 1.35%, and Injury = 10.0%; p = 0.09). On multivariable analysis, the lowest temperature and cerebral perfusion strategy were not significant predictors of AKI. Lower baseline glomerular filtration rate (GFR), lower preoperative ejection fraction, and longer cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) time were independently associated with higher AKI. We applied the sensitive RIFLE criteria to examine AKI in

  9. Duodenal Obstruction after Elective Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: A Case Report

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    Chun-Yao Lin

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal tract complications after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA repair are well known. The reported frequency ranges from 6.6% to 21%. However, the incidence of duodenal obstruction following AAA has probably been underestimated. This report concerns a 78-year-old male who was admitted for elective repair of an infrarenal AAA. On the ninth postoperative day, the patient presented with large quantities of bile-stained vomitus despite passing flatus per rectum. Metoclopramide and ranitidine were given under the initial impression of paralytic ileus. However, the upper gastrointestinal obstruction persisted, and on day 12, computerized tomography (CT revealed marked distension of the gastric tube and duodenum, down to the level of the third portion, with abrupt change of caliber at the point of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA. SMA syndrome was diagnosed. After nasogastric tube aspiration, parenteral nutrition, and 11 days of conservative treatment, abdominal CT and upper gastrointestinal series showed no apparent duodenal obstruction. The patient was discharged on the 29th postoperative day; follow-up abdominal CT 4 months later was unremarkable.

  10. Right-ventricular global longitudinal strain may predict neo-aortic arch obstruction after Norwood/Sano procedure in children with hypoplastic left heart syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raucci, Frank J; Seckeler, Michael D; Saunders, Christine; Gangemi, James J; Peeler, Benjamin B; Jayakumar, K Anitha

    2013-01-01

    Neo-aortic arch obstruction (NAAO) is a common complication following the Norwood/Sano procedure (NP) for hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. However, there is currently no objective method for predicting which patients will develop NAAO. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that hemodynamic changes from development of NAAO after NP in patients with HLHS will lead to changes in myocardial dynamics that could be detected before clinical symptoms develop with strain analysis using velocity vector imaging. Patients with HLHS who had at least one cardiac catheterization after NP were identified retrospectively. Strain analysis was performed on all echocardiograms preceding the first catheterization and any subsequent catheterization performed for intervention on NAAO. Twelve patients developed NAAO and 30 patients never developed NAAO. Right ventricular strain was worse in the group that developed NAAO (-6.2 vs. -8.6 %, p = 0.040) at a median of 59 days prior to diagnosis of NAAO. Those patients that developed NAAO following NP were significantly younger at the time of first catheterization than those that did not develop NAAO (92 ± 50 vs. 140 ± 36 days, p = 0.001). This study demonstrates that right ventricular GLS is abnormal in HLHS patients following NP and worsening right ventricular strain may be predictive of the future development of NAAO.

  11. Volumetric analysis demonstrates that true and false lumen remodeling persists for 12 months after thoracic endovascular aortic repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ga-Young Suh, PhD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A 62-year-old man underwent an elephant trunk procedure followed by thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR. Computed tomography angiography-based models were built to quantify volume of the whole aorta and true and false lumens preoperatively, before TEVAR, after TEVAR, and at follow-up at 3, 6, and 12 months. With TEVAR, descending aortic true lumen volume increased by 54%, then increased additionally by 60% during 12 months. The descending aortic false lumen volume regressed continuously for 12 months following TEVAR, with the most rapid rate from 6 to 12 months at 16 cm3/month. TEVAR immediately increased true lumen volume and continued to remodel the true and false lumens throughout the following 12 months.

  12. Visceral hybrid reconstruction of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm after open repair of type a aortic dissection by the Bentall procedure with the elephant trunk technique: A case report

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    Marjanović Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Reconstruction of chronic type B dissection and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA remaining after the emergency reconstruction of the ascending thoracic aorta and aortic arch for acute type A dissection represents one of the major surgical challenges. Complications of chronic type B dissection are aneurysmal formation and rupture of an aortic aneurysm with a high mortality rate. We presented a case of visceral hybrid reconstruction of TAAA secondary to chronic dissection type B after the Bentall procedure with the elephant trunk technique due to acute type A aortic dissection in a high-risk patient. Case report. A 62 year-old woman was admitted to our institution for reconstruction of Crawford type I TAAA secondary to chronic dissection. The patient had had an acute type A aortic dissection 3 years before and undergone reconstruction by the Bentall procedure with the elephant trunk technique with valve replacement. On admission the patient had coronary artery disease (myocardial infarction, two times in the past 3 years, congestive heart disease with ejection fraction of 25% and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. On computed tomography (CT of the aorta TAAA was revealed with a maximum diameter of 93 mm in the descending thoracic aorta secondary to chronic dissection. All the visceral arteries originated from the true lumen with exception of the celiac artery (CA, and the end of chronic dissection was below the origin of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA. The patient was operated on using surgical visceral reconstruction of the SMA, CA and the right renal artery (RRA as the first procedure. Postoperative course was without complications. Endovascular TAAA reconstruction was performed as the second procedure one month later, when the elephant trunk was used as the proximal landing zone for the endograft, and distal landing zone was the level of origin of the RRA. Postoperatively, the patient had no neurological deficit and

  13. Dilatation of the ascending aorta is associated with presence of aortic regurgitation in patients after repair of tetralogy of Fallot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordovas, Karen Gomes; Keedy, Alexander; Naeger, David M.; Kallianos, Kimberly; Foster, Elyse; Liu, Jing; Saloner, David; Hope, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the association between aortic morphology and elasticity with aortic regurgitation in surgically corrected of tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) patients. We retrospectively identified 72 consecutive patients with surgically corrected TOF and 27 healthy controls who underwent cardiac MRI evaluation. Velocity-encoded cine MRI was used to quantify degree of aortic regurgitation (AR) in TOF patients. Ascending aorta diameters were measured at standard levels on MRA images. Aortic pulse-wave velocity (PWV) was quantified with MRI. Morphological and functional MRI variables were compared between groups of TOF patients with and without clinically relevant AR and controls. The association between aortic morphology and elasticity with the presence of AR was evaluated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. The majority of TOF patients had only trace AR. Nine TOF patients (12 %) had an AR fraction higher than 15 %. Indexed aorta diameter at the sinotubular junction (p = 0.007), at the RPA level (p = 0.006), and low left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (p = 0.015) showed the strongest associations with the presence of at least mild AR, which persisted after controlling for age and gender. Increased ascending aorta dimension is associated with AR in patients after repair of TOF. LVEF was also low in the group of patients with relevant AR compared to those without, suggesting even mild to moderate AR may contribute to LV dysfunction in these patients. Enlarged ascending aorta may be an indication for precise quantification of regurgitant fraction with MRI, since symptomatic patients may need aortic valve repair when moderate regurgitation is present. PMID:27240599

  14. Dental arch relationship in children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate following Warsaw (one-stage repair) and Oslo protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudalej, Piotr; Hortis-Dzierzbicka, Maria; Dudkiewicz, Zofia; Semb, Gunvor

    2009-11-01

    To compare the dental arch relationship following one-stage repair of unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) in Warsaw with a matched sample of patients treated by the Oslo Cleft Team. Study models of 61 children (mean age, 11.2; SD, 1.7) with a nonsyndromic complete UCLP consecutively treated with one-stage closure of the cleft at 9.2 months (range, 6.0 to 15.8 months; SD, 2.0) by the Warsaw Cleft Team at the Institute of Mother and Child, Poland, were compared with a sample drawn from a consecutive series of patients with UCLP treated by the Oslo Cleft Team and matched for age, gender, and soft tissue band. The study models were given random numbers to blind their origin. Four examiners rated the dental arch relationship using the GOSLON Yardstick. The strength of agreement of rating was assessed with weighted Kappa statistics. An independent t-test was carried out to compare the GOSLON scores between Warsaw and Oslo samples, and Fisher's exact tests were performed to evaluate the difference of distribution of the GOSLON scores. The intrarater and interrater agreements were high (K > or = .800). No difference in dental arch relationship between Warsaw and Oslo groups was found (mean GOSLON score = 2.68 and 2.65 for Warsaw and Oslo samples, respectively). The distribution of the GOSLON grades was similar in both groups. The dental arch relationship following one-stage repair (Warsaw protocol) was comparable with the outcome of the Oslo Cleft Team's protocol.

  15. Incisor and molar overjet, arch contraction, and molar relationship in the mixed dentition in repaired complete unilateral cleft lip and palate: A qualitative and quantitative appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disthaporn, Suteeta; Suri, Sunjay; Ross, Bruce; Tompson, Bryan; Baena, Diogenes; Fisher, David; Lou, Wendy

    2017-07-01

    To compare the mixed dentition incisor and molar overjet, severity of contraction of the dental arch, and the sagittal molar relationship on the cleft side vs the noncleft side in children with repaired complete unilateral cleft of the lip and palate (UCLP). Orthodontic records taken prior to orthodontic preparation for alveolar bone grafting were screened to select study casts from patients with nonsyndromic repaired complete UCLP who did not have mandibular skeletal or dental asymmetry. The study sample comprised dental casts from 74 children aged 8.9 ± 1 years. Standardized digital photographs were acquired at 1:1 magnification. A coordinate system was developed using digital image-processing software (Photoshop CS4 and Adobe Illustrator). Incisor and molar overjet, Angle's classification, and arch contraction were recorded. Descriptive statistics, paired t-tests, and kappa statistics were used to compare the cleft and noncleft sides. A negative overjet of -1 to -5 mm was often present at the incisors, with greater frequency and magnitude on the cleft side. Class II molar relation was more frequent on the cleft side (61.1%) than on the noncleft side (47.2%). Significantly greater contraction of the cleft side deciduous canine and deciduous first molar was noted, while the difference was very minor at the first permanent molar. Cleft side maxillary arch contraction was most severe in the deciduous canine and first deciduous molar region and progressively less severe in the posterior region of the arch. A greater frequency and severity of negative overjet and Class II molar relationship was seen on the cleft side.

  16. Management of aorto-esophageal fistula secondary after thoracic endovascular aortic repair: a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Kaname; Koike, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Seiichi; Komazawa, Daisuke; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2017-10-01

    Aorto-esophageal fistula (AEF) is a rare and lethal entity, and the difficulty of making diagnosis of AEF is well-known. As promising results in the short-term effectiveness of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) promote its usage, the occurrence of AEF after TEVAR (post-TEVAR AEF) increases as one of the major complications. Therefore, we provide a review concerning the management strategy of post-TEVAR AEF. Although its representative symptom was reported as the triad of mid-thoracic pain and sentinel hematemesis followed by massive hematemesis, the symptom-free interval between sentinel hemorrhage and massive exsanguination is unpredictable. However, the physiological condition represents a surgical contraindication. Accordingly, early diagnosis is important, but either CT or esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy rarely depicts a typical image. The formation of post-TEVAR AEF might be associated with the infection of micro-organisms, which is uncontrollable with anti-biotic administration. The current first-line strategy is combination therapy as follows, (1) to control bleeding by TEVAR in the urgent phase, and (2) radical debridement and aortic/esophageal re-construction in the semi-urgent phase. In view of the high mortality and morbidity rate, it is proposed that the choice in treatment strategies might be affected by patient`s condition, size of the wall defects and the etiology of AEF. Practically, we should keep in mind the importance of making an early diagnosis and, once a suspicious symptom has occurred in a patient with a history of TEVAR, the existence of post-TEVAR AEF should be suspected. A prospective registry together with more developed technologies will be needed to establish a future strategy.

  17. Endovascular treatment of type II endoleak following thoracic endovascular aortic repair for thoracic aortic aneurysm: Case report of squeeze technique to reach the aneurysmal sac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyun Jung; Kim, Chang Won; Lee, Tae Hong; Song, Seung Hwan; Lee, Chung Won; Chung, Sung Woon [Pusan National University Hospital, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Type II endoleaks are common after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). Various strategies are introduced to manage type II endoleaks, such as the use of coils, plugs, or liquid embolic agents (histoacryl, thrombin, onyx, etc.) through a transarterial approach or a direct puncture of the aneurysmal sac. We herein report a case of a type II endoleak caused by reverse blood flow through intercostal artery after TEVAR which was successfully treated with n-butyl cyanoacrylate (histoacryl)-lipiodol mixture by a squeeze technique to reach the aneurismal sac using a microcatheter.

  18. Open Abdomen Therapy with Vacuum and Mesh Mediated Fascial Traction After Aortic Repair: an International Multicentre Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Stefan; Seternes, Arne; Venermo, Maarit; Vikatmaa, Leena; Sörelius, Karl; Wanhainen, Anders; Svensson, Mats; Djavani, Khatereh; Björck, Martin

    2017-12-01

    Open abdomen therapy may be necessary to prevent or treat abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). The aim of the study was to analyse the primary delayed fascial closure (PDFC) rate and complications after open abdomen therapy with vacuum and mesh mediated fascial traction (VACM) after aortic repair and to compare outcomes between those treated with open abdomen after primary versus secondary operation. This was a retrospective cohort, multicentre study in Sweden, Finland, and Norway, including consecutive patients treated with open abdomen and VACM after aortic repair at six vascular centres in 2006-2015. The primary endpoint was PDFC rate. Among 191 patients, 155 were men. The median age was 71 years (IQR 66-76). Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA) occurred in 69.1%. Endovascular/hybrid and open repairs were performed in 49 and 142 patients, respectively. The indications for open abdomen were inability to close the abdomen (62%) at primary operation and ACS (80%) at secondary operation. Duration of open abdomen was 11 days (IQR 7-16) in 157 patients alive at open abdomen termination. The PDFC rate was 91.8%. Open abdomen initiated at primary (N=103), compared with secondary operation (N=88), was associated with less severe initial open abdomen status (p=.006), less intestinal ischaemia (p=.002), shorter duration of open abdomen (p=.007), and less renal replacement therapy (RRT, popen abdomen initiated at primary versus secondary operation. VACM was associated with a high PDFC rate after prolonged open abdomen therapy following aortic repair. Patient outcomes seemed better when open abdomen was initiated at primary, compared with secondary operation but a selection effect is possible. Copyright © 2017 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Embolization by micro navigation for treatment of persistent type 2 Endoleaks after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Lorenção de Almeida

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background:Endovascular repair has become established as a safe and effective method for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms. One major complication of this treatment is leakage, or endoleaks, of which type 2 leaks are the most common.Objective:To conduct a brief review of the literature and evaluate the safety and effectiveness of embolization by micronavigation for treatment of type 2 endoleaks.Method:A review of medical records from patients who underwent endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms identified 5 patients with persistent type 2 endoleaks. These patients were submitted to embolization by micronavigation.Results:In all cases, angiographic success was achieved and control CT scans showed absence of type 2 leaks and aneurysm sacs that had reduced in size after the procedure.Conclusion:Treatment of type 2 endoleaks using embolization by micronavigation is an effective and safe method and should be considered as a treatment option for this complication after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  20. Periprocedural and long-term outcomes of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in cardiology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basoor, Abhijeet; Patel, Kiritkumar C; Halabi, Abdul R; Todorov, Mina; Senthilvadivel, Prashanth; Choksi, Nishit; Phan, Thanh; LaLonde, Thomas; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; DeGregorio, Michele

    2014-12-01

    Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) has recently been made a class I indication in the treatment of AAA. In comparison to the conventional open surgical treatment, endovascular AAA repair (EVAR) is associated with equivalent long-term morbidity and mortality rates. Vascular surgeons perform majority of EVAR. There are no reports for the long-term results of this intervention performed by interventional cardiologists. We present one of the first reports of periprocedural and long-term outcomes of EVAR performed by interventional cardiologists. Retrospective chart review on patients with attempted EVAR between September 2005 and January 2011 was performed. Included cases were all consecutive patients who had attempted EVAR by interventional cardiologists. During the study period EVAR was attempted in 170 patients, with 27% being women. The mean age was 74 years (range 52-93). The endovascular graft placement was successful in 96% (163/170) of patients. Procedure failures were more common in women (6 of 46 vs 1 of 124, P = 0.003). The 30-day mortality was 1.8 % (3 of 170). In patients with successful EVAR the mean follow-up was 30 months and mean length of hospital stay was 3.5 ± 3.2 days. Major periprocedural complications were noted in 9% patients (15 of 167). During follow-up, six patients (3.5%) required re-intervention and additional 16 patients died with no aneurysm related deaths. EVAR primarily performed by interventional cardiologists demonstrates high periprocedural and long-term success rates. A higher EVAR failure rate has been observed in women. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Ex vivo repair of renal artery aneurysm associated with surgical treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Dušan M.

    2004-01-01

    shorter arteries was implanted into the long artery, and another one into PTFE graft. After 30 minutes of explanation, autotransplantation of the kidney into the right iliac fossa was performed. The right renal vein was implanted into the inferior vein cava, and PTFE graft into the right limb of Dacron graft. Immediately following the completion of both anastomoses, large volume of urine was evident. Finally, ureteneocystostomy was performed with previous insertion of double "J" catheter. In the immediate postoperative period, renal function was restored to normal, while postoperative angiography revealed all patent grafts. DISCUSSION The most common causes of renal artery aneurysms are arteriosclerosis, as in our case, and fibro-muscular dysplasia. Very often, renal artery aneurysms are asymptomatic and discovered only during angiography in patients with aneurysmal and occlusive aortic disease. Other cases include: arterial hypertension, groin pain and acute or chronic renal failure. Due to relatively small number of evaluated cases, the risk of aneurysmal rupture is not known. According to some authors, the overall rupture rate of renal artery aneurysm is 5%, however, the rupture risk becomes higher in young pregnant woman. Several standard surgical procedures are available for the repair of renal artery aneurysms. These include saphenous vein angioplasty, bypass grafting, as well as ex vivo reconstruction with reimplantation or autotransplantation. Furthermore, interventional embolization therapy, as well as endovascular treatment with ePTFE covered stent, or autologous vein-coverage stent graft, have been also reported to be successful. CONCLUSION The major indications for surgical treatment of renal artery aneurysms are to eliminate the source of thromboembolism which leads to fixed renal hypertension and kidney failure, as well as prevention of aneurysmal rupture.

  2. Sac Angiography and Glue Embolization in Emergency Endovascular Aneurysm Repair for Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

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    Koike, Yuya, E-mail: r06118@hotmail.co.jp; Nishimura, Jun-ichi, E-mail: jun-ichi-n@nifty.com; Hase, Soichiro, E-mail: haseman@hotmail.co.jp; Yamasaki, Motoshige, E-mail: genyamasaki@gmail.com [Kawasaki Saiwai Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to demonstrate a sac angiography technique and evaluate the feasibility of N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) embolization of the ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) sac in emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in hemodynamically unstable patients.MethodsA retrospective case series of three patients in whom sac angiography was performed during emergency EVAR for ruptured AAA was reviewed. After stent graft deployment, angiography within the sac of aneurysm (sac angiography) was performed by manually injecting 10 ml of contrast material through a catheter to identify the presence and site of active bleeding. In two patients, sac angiography revealed active extravasation of the contrast material, and NBCA embolization with a coaxial catheter system was performed to achieve prompt sealing.ResultsSac angiography was successful in all three patients. In the two patients who underwent NBCA embolization for aneurysm sac bleeding, follow-up computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated the accumulation of NBCA consistent with the bleeding site in preprocedural CT images.ConclusionsEVAR is associated with a potential risk of ongoing bleeding from type II or IV endoleaks into the disrupted aneurysm sac in patients with severe coagulopathy. Therefore, sac angiography and NBCA embolization during emergency EVAR may represent a possible technical improvement in the treatment of ruptured AAA in hemodynamically unstable patients.

  3. The Preclose Technique in Percutaneous Endovascular Aortic Repair: A Systematic Literature Review and Meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffan, Abdel Aziz A.; Prince, Ethan A.; Hampson, Christopher O.; Murphy, Timothy P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To establish the efficacy and safety of the preclose technique in total percutaneous endovascular aortic repair (PEVAR).MethodsA systematic literature search of Medline database was conducted for series on PEVAR published between January 1999 and January 2012.ResultsThirty-six articles comprising 2,257 patients and 3,606 arterial accesses were included. Anatomical criteria used to exclude patients from undergoing PEVAR were not uniform across all series. The technical success rate was 94 % per arterial access. Failure was unilateral in the majority (93 %) of the 133 failed PEVAR cases. The groin complication rate in PEVAR was 3.6 %; a minority (1.6 %) of these groin complications required open surgery. The groin complication rate in failed PEVAR cases converted to groin cutdown was 6.1 %. A significantly higher technical success rate was achieved when arterial access was performed via ultrasound guidance. Technical failure rate was significantly higher with larger sheath size (≥20F). Conclusion. The preclose technique in PEVAR has a high technical success rate and a low groin complication rate. Technical success tends to increase with ultrasound-guided arterial access and decrease with larger access. When failure occurs, it is unilateral in the majority of cases, and conversion to surgical cutdown does not appear to increase the operative risk.

  4. Fate of patients with spinal cord ischemia complicating thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSart, Kenneth; Scali, Salvatore T; Feezor, Robert J; Hong, Michael; Hess, Philip J; Beaver, Thomas M; Huber, Thomas S; Beck, Adam W

    2013-09-01

    Spinal cord ischemia (SCI) is a potentially devastating complication of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) that can result in varying degrees of short-term and permanent disability. This study was undertaken to describe the clinical outcomes, long-term functional impact, and influence on survival of SCI after TEVAR. A retrospective review of all TEVAR patients at the University of Florida from 2000 to 2011 was performed to identify individuals experiencing SCI, defined by any new lower extremity neurologic deficit not attributable to another cause. SCI was dichotomized into immediate or delayed onset, with immediate onset defined as SCI noted upon awakening from anesthesia, and delayed characterized as a period of normal function, followed by development of neurologic injury. Ambulatory status was determined using database query, record review, and phone interviews with patients and/or family. Mortality was estimated using life-table analysis. A total of 607 TEVARs were performed for various indications, with 57 patients (9.4%) noted to have postoperative SCI (4.3% permanent). SCI patients were more likely to be older (63.9 ± 15.6 vs 70.5 ± 11.2 years; P = .002) and have a number of comorbidities, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and cerebrovascular disease (P impact on postdischarge FI or long-term mortality. Copyright © 2013 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair of Acute Occlusion of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Intra-Aneurysmal Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terai, Yasuhiko; Mitsuoka, Hiroshi; Nakai, Masanao; Goto, Shinnosuke; Miyano, Yuta; Tsuchiya, Hirokazu; Yamazaki, Fumio

    2015-11-01

    To report a rare case of acute abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occlusion successfully treated by endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). An 89-year-old man complained of severe back pain and weakness in the bilateral lower extremities. Although there were neither acute ischemic signs on the brain computed tomography (CT) nor critical leg ischemia, the patient presented progressing weakness in the bilateral lower extremities and decreased sensation in the perianal and saddle area. Contrast-enhanced CT demonstrated an infrarenal AAA, the formation of an ulcer-like lesion in the aneurysmal wall, and the complete occlusion of distal AAA because of the caudal extension of intramural hematoma. Both common iliac arteries were patent because of the development of collateral vessels. The neurologic symptoms were considered to be caused by the occlusion of lumbar radicular arteries. EVAR seemed anatomically feasible, if the occlusion could be crossed by guidewires from both side of the common femoral artery. Wires easily traversed the occlusion, and the stent graft could be smoothly unwrapped and opened. The patient could recover decent iliac arterial flow. The neurovascular deficits recovered within 4 days after the procedure. Although our experience may not be reproduced in all case of AAA occlusion, EVAR warrants consideration to reduce the high mortality rate associated with the classical treatments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Burden of Hard Atherosclerotic Plaques Does Not Promote Endoleak Development After Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair: A Risk Stratification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, Johannes; Glodny, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To objectify the influence of the atherosclerotic burden in the proximal landing zone on the development of endoleaks after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) or thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) using objective aortic calcium scoring (ACS). Materials and Methods: This retrospective observation study included 267 patients who received an aortic endograft between 1997 and 2010 and for whom preoperative computed tomography (CT) was available to perform ACS using the CT-based V600 method. The mean follow-up period was 2 ± 2.3 years. Results: Type I endoleaks persisted in 45 patients (16.9%), type II in 34 (12.7%), type III in 8 (3%), and type IV or V in 3 patients, respectively (1.1% each). ACS in patients with type I endoleaks was not increased: 0.029 ± 0.061 ml compared with 0.075 ± 0.1349 ml in the rest of the patients, (p > 0.05; Whitney–Mann U-Test). There were significantly better results for the indication “traumatic aortic rupture” than for the other indications (p < 0.05). In multivariate logistic regression analyses, age was an independent risk factor for the development of type I endoleaks in the thoracic aorta (Wald 9.5; p = 0.002), whereas ACS score was an independent protective factor (Wald 6.9; p = 0.009). In the abdominal aorta, neither age nor ACS influenced the development of endoleaks. Conclusion: Contrary to previous assumptions, TEVAR and EVAR can be carried out without increasing the risk of an endoleak of any type, even if there is a high atherosclerotic “hard-plaque” burden of the aorta. The results are significantly better for traumatic aortic.

  7. Endovascular strategy or open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: one-year outcomes from the IMPROVE randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, Bruce; Cheshire, Nicholas J.; Greenhalgh, Roger M.; Grieve, Richard; Hassan, Tajek B.; Hinchliffe, Robert; Howell, Simon; Moore, Fionna; Nicholson, Anthony A.; Soong, Chee V.; Thompson, Matt M.; Thompson, Simon G.; Ulug, Pinar; Heatley, Francine; Anjum, Aisha; Kalinowska, Gosia; Sweeting, Michael J.; Thompson, Simon G.; Gomes, Manuel; Grieve, Richard; Powell, Janet T.; Ashleigh, Ray; Gomes, Manuel; Greenhalgh, Roger M.; Grieve, Richard; Hinchliffe, Robert; Sweeting, Michael; Thompson, Matt M.; Thompson, Simon G.; Ulug, Pinar; Roberts, Ian; Bell, Peter R. F.; Cheetham, Anne; Stephany, Jenny; Warlow, Charles; Lamont, Peter; Moss, Jonathan; Tijssen, Jan; Braithwaite, Bruce; Nicholson, Anthony A.; Thompson, Matthew; Ashleigh, Ray; Thompson, Luke; Cheshire, Nicholas J.; Boyle, Jonathan R.; Serracino-Inglott, Ferdinand; Thompson, Matt M.; Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Bell, Rachel; Wilson, Noel; Bown, Matt; Dennis, Martin; Davis, Meryl; Ashleigh, Ray; Howell, Simon; Wyatt, Michael G.; Valenti, Domenico; Bachoo, Paul; Walker, Paul; MacSweeney, Shane; Davies, Jonathan N.; Rittoo, Dynesh; Parvin, Simon D.; Yusuf, Waquar; Nice, Colin; Chetter, Ian; Howard, Adam; Chong, Patrick; Bhat, Raj; McLain, David; Gordon, Andrew; Lane, Ian; Hobbs, Simon; Pillay, Woolagasen; Rowlands, Timothy; El-Tahir, Amin; Asquith, John; Cavanagh, Steve; Dubois, Luc; Forbes, Thomas L.; Ashworth, Emily; Baker, Sara; Barakat, Hashem; Brady, Claire; Brown, Joanne; Bufton, Christine; Chance, Tina; Chrisopoulou, Angela; Cockell, Marie; Croucher, Andrea; Dabee, Leela; Dewhirst, Nikki; Evans, Jo; Gibson, Andy; Gorst, Siobhan; Gough, Moira; Graves, Lynne; Griffin, Michelle; Hatfield, Josie; Hogg, Florence; Howard, Susannah; Hughes, Cían; Metcalfe, David; Lapworth, Michelle; Massey, Ian; Novick, Teresa; Owen, Gareth; Parr, Noala; Pintar, David; Spencer, Sarah; Thomson, Claire; Thunder, Orla; Wallace, Tom; Ward, Sue; Wealleans, Vera; Wilson, Lesley; Woods, Janet; Zheng, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Aims To report the longer term outcomes following either a strategy of endovascular repair first or open repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, which are necessary for both patient and clinical decision-making. Methods and results This pragmatic multicentre (29 UK and 1 Canada) trial randomized 613 patients with a clinical diagnosis of ruptured aneurysm; 316 to an endovascular first strategy (if aortic morphology is suitable, open repair if not) and 297 to open repair. The principal 1-year outcome was mortality; secondary outcomes were re-interventions, hospital discharge, health-related quality-of-life (QoL) (EQ-5D), costs, Quality-Adjusted-Life-Years (QALYs), and cost-effectiveness [incremental net benefit (INB)]. At 1 year, all-cause mortality was 41.1% for the endovascular strategy group and 45.1% for the open repair group, odds ratio 0.85 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.62, 1.17], P = 0.325, with similar re-intervention rates in each group. The endovascular strategy group and open repair groups had average total hospital stays of 17 and 26 days, respectively, P < 0.001. Patients surviving rupture had higher average EQ-5D utility scores in the endovascular strategy vs. open repair groups, mean differences 0.087 (95% CI 0.017, 0.158), 0.068 (95% CI −0.004, 0.140) at 3 and 12 months, respectively. There were indications that QALYs were higher and costs lower for the endovascular first strategy, combining to give an INB of £3877 (95% CI £253, £7408) or €4356 (95% CI €284, €8323). Conclusion An endovascular first strategy for management of ruptured aneurysms does not offer a survival benefit over 1 year but offers patients faster discharge with better QoL and is cost-effective. Clinical trial registration ISRCTN 48334791. PMID:25855369

  8. Pros and Cons of 3D Image Fusion in Endovascular Aortic Repair: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudeketting, Seline R; Heinen, Stefan G H; Ünlü, Çağdaş; van den Heuvel, Daniel A F; de Vries, Jean-Paul P M; van Strijen, Marco J; Sailer, Anna M

    2017-08-01

    To systematically review and meta-analyze the added value of 3-dimensional (3D) image fusion technology in endovascular aortic repair for its potential to reduce contrast media volume, radiation dose, procedure time, and fluoroscopy time. Electronic databases were systematically searched for studies published between January 2010 and March 2016 that included a control group describing 3D fusion imaging in endovascular aortic procedures. Two independent reviewers assessed the methodological quality of the included studies and extracted data on iodinated contrast volume, radiation dose, procedure time, and fluoroscopy time. The contrast use for standard and complex endovascular aortic repairs (fenestrated, branched, and chimney) were pooled using a random-effects model; outcomes are reported as the mean difference with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Seven studies, 5 retrospective and 2 prospective, involving 921 patients were selected for analysis. The methodological quality of the studies was moderate (median 17, range 15-18). The use of fusion imaging led to an estimated mean reduction in iodinated contrast of 40.1 mL (95% CI 16.4 to 63.7, p=0.002) for standard procedures and a mean 70.7 mL (95% CI 44.8 to 96.6, p<0.001) for complex repairs. Secondary outcome measures were not pooled because of potential bias in nonrandomized data, but radiation doses, procedure times, and fluoroscopy times were lower, although not always significantly, in the fusion group in 6 of the 7 studies. Compared with the control group, 3D fusion imaging is associated with a significant reduction in the volume of contrast employed for standard and complex endovascular aortic procedures, which can be particularly important in patients with renal failure. Radiation doses, procedure times, and fluoroscopy times were reduced when 3D fusion was used.

  9. Atypical Presentation of a Type 2 Endoleak following Emergency Open Repair of a Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sharma

    Full Text Available : Background: An endoleak is a common complication following EVAR. Specifically, a Type 2 endoleak occurs because of retrograde flow from lumbar vessels outside the endograft within the aneurysm sac. Even though it is common following EVAR, it has not been identified as a complication following open ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA repair. Report: A 73-year-old male underwent open repair of a ruptured AAA. Five months later, computed tomography revealed filling from a lumbar vessel mimicking a Type 2 “endoleak.” The initial ultrasound showed a single pair of lumbar vessels with aneurysm sac expansion 8 weeks later. The “endoleak” and expanding sac were treated, and the 2-year surveillance demonstrated sac shrinkage. Discussion: Because endoleak is a complication after EVAR, this case provides a unique presentation of Type 2 “endoleak” physiology following open repair of a ruptured AAA. It is believed that it is necessary to expand the list of possible complications after open ruptured AAA repair to include “endoleaks.” Keywords: Endoleak: EVAR, Ruptured aneurysm, Open abdominal aortic aneurysm

  10. Long-term results after repair of ruptured and non-ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzmanović Ilija B.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Abdominal aortic aneurysm can be repaired by elective procedure while asymptomatic, or immediately when it is complicated - mostly due to rupture. Treating abdominal aneurysm electively, before it becomes urgent, has medical and economical reason. Today, the first month mortality after elective operations of the abdominal aorta aneurysm is less than 3%; on the other hand, significant mortality (25%-70% has been recorded in patients operated immediately because of rupture of the abdominal aneurysm. In addition, the costs of elective surgical treatment are significantly lower. OBJECTIVE The objective of this study is to compare long-term survival of patients that underwent elective or immediate repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (due to rupture, and to find out the factors influencing the long-term survival of these patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS Through retrospective review of prospectively collected data of the Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases of Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, 56 patients that had elective surgery and 35 patients that underwent urgent operation due to rupture of abdominal aneurysm were followed up. Only the patients that survived 30 postoperative days were included in this review, and were followed up (ranging from 2 to 126 months. Electively operated patients were followed during 58.82 months on the average (range 7 to 122, and urgently operated were followed over 52.26 months (range 2 to 126. There was no significant difference of the length of postoperative follow-up between these two groups. RESULTS During this period, out of electively operated and immediately operated patients, 27 and 22 cases died, respectively. There was no significant difference (p>0,05a of long-term survival between these two groups. Obesity and early postoperative complications significantly decreased long-term survival of both electively and immediately operated patients. Graft infection, ventral hernia, aneurysm of

  11. Tratamento cirúrgico dos aneurismas e dissecções do arco aórtico Surgical treatment of aneurysms and dissections of the aortic arch

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    Bayard GONTIJO FILHO

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available No período de jan/1990 a mar/1999, foram realizados 354 operações para tratamento de lesões da aorta torácica em nosso Serviço. Destas, 47 foram relacionadas a procedimentos no arco aórtico; 31 (66,0% pacientes eram do sexo masculino e a idade variou de 26 a 74 anos (m = 54,9 ± 10,9. A dissecção aórtica foi responsável pela indicação cirúrgica em 33 (70,2% pacientes e os aneurismas fusiformes ou saculares em 14 (29,8%. A operação foi indicada em caráter de urgência em 10 (21,3% pacientes, havendo 4 casos com sinais de rotura; 11 (23,4% pacientes já haviam sido submetidos a operação cardíaca prévia. O acesso cirúrgico foi a esternotomia mediana (42 casos ou a toracotomia esquerda ou bilateral (5 casos. Hipotermia profunda com parada circulatória (PC foi empregada em 97,8% dos casos com o tempo PC variando de 15 a 60 minutos (m = 30,6 ± 12,6. A técnica do tipo hemiarco anterior foi empregada em 19 (40,4% pacientes, o hemiarco posterior em 5 (10,6%, a substituição total em 18 (38,3%, plastia em 4 (8,5% e derivação extra-anatômica em 1 (2,1%. Foram realizados os seguintes procedimentos concomitantes: substituição da aorta ascendente por conduto valvulado (15, revascularização miocárdica (9, tromba de elefante (5 e troca valvar aórtica (3. A mortalidade hospitalar foi de 12,3% (6 pacientes sendo a complicação não fatal mais freqüente a insuficiência respiratória (7 casos. A análise dos fatores determinantes de mortalidade hospitalar demonstraram tendência estatística para idade acima de 60 anos (p = 0,17 e para portadores de dissecção aguda (p = 0,07. Dos 41 pacientes que receberam alta, 39 foram seguidos por um período de 1 mês a 9 anos. Houve 3 óbitos, sendo 1 por AVC e 2 em reoperações, necessárias em 5 pacientes. A sobrevida de 9 anos é de 80,85%.From Jan/1990 to Mar/1999 we performed 354 operations on the thoracic aorta in our hospital. Among these, 47 procedures involved the aortic arch

  12. Long-term results of aortic root repair using the reimplantation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Tirone E; Armstrong, Susan; Manlhiot, Cedric; McCrindle, Brian W; Feindel, Christopher M

    2013-03-01

    Aortic valve sparing is frequently performed to treat patients with aortic root aneurysm, but there is an inadequate amount of information regarding its long-term durability. This study examines the long-term results of reimplantation of the aortic valve in patients with aortic root aneurysms. From August 1989 to December 2010, 296 consecutive patients had reimplantation of the aortic valve into a tubular Dacron graft. Their mean age was 45 years (range, 11-79 years), and 78% were men. Of the patients, 36% had Marfan syndrome and 11% had bicuspid aortic valve. Patients were followed prospectively with periodic images of the aortic root and remaining aorta. The mean follow-up was 6.9 ± 4.5 years. There were 21 patients at risk at 15 years. There were 4 operative and 18 late deaths. The survival at 5, 10, and 15 years was 95.1% ± 3.5%, 93.1% ± 4.4%, and 76.5% ± 18%, respectively. Only 3 patients required reoperation on the aortic valve; all 3 patients had the Bentall procedure. Freedom from reoperation at 5, 10, and 15 years was 99.7% ± 2.0%, 97.8% ± 5.3%, and 97.8% ± 5.3%, respectively. During follow-up, moderate aortic insufficiency developed in 9 patients, and severe aortic insufficiency developed in 2 patients. Freedom from moderate or severe aortic insufficiency at 5, 10, and 15 years was 98.3% ± 3.5%, 92.9% ± 6.5%, and 89.4% ± 12%, respectively. The function of the aortic valve implanted inside a tubular Dacron graft remains normal at 15 years in most patients after this type of aortic valve-sparing operation. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Anesthetic management for combined mitral valve replacement and aortic valve repair in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta

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    Huang Jiapeng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenesis imperfecta is a rare disorder of connective tissues and presents multiple challenges, including difficult airway, hyperthermia, coagulopathy and respiratory dysfunction, for anesthesiologists, especially during cardiac surgery. We present anesthetic management of a patient with osteogenesis impertecta during double valve surgery. Dexmedetomidine infusion minimized the risks of malignant hyperthermia. Glidescope and in-line stabilization facilitated endotracheal intubation and protected his oral structures and cervical spine. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE diagnosed a flail A3 segment and redundant left coronary cusp causing mitral and aortic regurgitation. The mitral valve was replaced and the aortic valve repaired. Coagulopathy was corrected according to comprehensive coagulation analysis. Glidescope, dexmedetomidine, coagulation analysis and TEE could facilitate anesthetic management in these patients.

  14. Laparotomy during endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms increases mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkar, Shaunak S; Turley, Ryan S; Benrashid, Ehsan; Cox, Mitchell W; Mureebe, Leila; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2017-02-01

    Subset analyses from small case series suggest patients requiring laparotomy during endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (REVAR) have worse survival than those undergoing REVAR without laparotomy. Most concomitant laparotomies are performed for abdominal compartment syndrome. This study used data from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program to determine whether the need for laparotomy during REVAR is associated with increased mortality. Data were obtained from the 2005 to 2013 National Surgical Quality Improvement Program participant user files based on Current Procedural Terminology (American Medical Association, Chicago, Ill) and International Classification of Diseases-9 Edition coding. Patient and procedure-related characteristics and 30-day postoperative outcomes were compared using Pearson χ 2 tests for categoric variables and Wilcoxon rank sum tests for continuous variables. A backward-stepwise multivariable logistic regression model was used to identify patient- and procedure-related factors associated with increased death after REVAR. We identified 1241 patients who underwent REVAR, and 91 (7.3%) required concomitant laparotomy. The 30-day mortality was 60% in the laparotomy group and 21% in the standard REVAR group (P < .001). The major complication rate was also higher in the laparotomy group (88% vs 63%; P < .001). Multivariable analysis showed laparotomy was strongly associated with 30-day mortality (odds ratio, 5.91; 95% confidence interval, 3.62-9.62; P < .001). Laparotomy during REVAR is a commonly used technique for the management of elevated intra-abdominal pressure and abdominal compartment syndrome development. The results of this study strongly confirm findings from smaller studies that the need for laparotomy during REVAR is associated with significantly worse 30-day survival. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Mid-term outcomes of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair with carbon dioxide-guided angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yuriko; Morikage, Noriyasu; Matsuno, Yutaro; Nakamura, Tamami; Samura, Makoto; Ueda, Koshiro; Harada, Takasuke; Ikeda, Yoshitaka; Suehiro, Kotaro; Ito, Hiroshi; Sakata, Kensuke; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2018-05-14

    Although iodinated contrast (IC) agents are commonly used in endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), perioperative use in patients with renal dysfunction or IC allergies is avoided. Carbon dioxide (CO 2 )-guided angiography is a promising alternative. We aimed to evaluate short-term and mid-term outcomes of EVAR using CO 2 -guided angiography. Three hundred and eighty-one patients who underwent EVAR from January 2012 to September 2016 were retrospectively reviewed and divided into an IC-EVAR group (n=351) and CO 2 -EVAR group (n=30). Subjects in the CO 2 -EVAR group had severe renal dysfunction (n=27) and IC allergy (n=4). Intraoperative, postoperative, and follow-up variables were compared. Compared to the IC-EVAR group, preoperative serum creatinine level was significantly higher (2.0 vs. 0.92 mg/dL, P < .0001) and mean IC dose significantly lower (18 vs. 55 mL P < .0001) in the CO 2 -EVAR group. The fluoroscopy time, operative time, number of stent grafts placed, and technical success rates of the groups were similar; no type I and/or type III endoleaks were detected on completion angiography. There was no acute kidney injury and one case of intestinal necrosis in the CO 2 -EVAR group, potentially due to cholesterol embolism. Postoperative endoleak, enlargement of aneurysms, survival, freedom from secondary intervention, and renal function change up to 3 months postoperatively were similar between groups. CO 2 -EVAR is technically feasible and exhibits prominent renal protection. However, consideration of the aortic lumen status remains an important challenge. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Outcomes and Prognostic Factors of Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in Patients with Hostile Neck Anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hye Doo; Lee, Yun Young; Lee, Seung Jin; Yim, Nam Yeol; Kim, Jae Kyu; Choi, Soo Jin Na; Jung, Sang Young; Chang, Nam Kyu; Lim, Jae Hoon

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the outcomes and find the prognostic factors of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) in patients with hostile neck anatomy of the abdominal aorta. This study was performed on 100 patients with abdominal aneurysm who were treated with EVAR between March 2006 and December 2010. We divided the patients into two groups: good neck anatomy (GNA), and hostile neck anatomy (HNA) and then compared the primary success rate and the incidence rate of complications with EVAR between the two groups. Our aim was to determine the factors related to the complications of EVAR among HNA types. There were no significant differences of primary success rate and incidence rate of complications between the two groups. Among the types of HNA, the short neck angle [odd ratio (OR), 4.23; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.21-18.70; p = 0.023] and large neck angle (OR, 2.58; 95% CI, 0.15-11.85; p = 0.031) showed a low primary success rate. The short neck angle (OR, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.18-12.29; p = 0.002) and large neck angle (OR, 4.67; 95% CI, 0.14-19.07; p = 0.032) showed a high incidence rate of early type 1 complication. In the case of the large neck angle (OR, 3.78; 95% CI, 0.96-20.80; p = 0.047), the large neck thrombus (OR, 2.23; 95% CI, 0.24-7.12; p = 0.035) and large neck calcification (OR, 2.50; 95% CI, 0.08-18.37; p 0.043) showed a high incidence rate of complications within a year. The results suggest that patients with hostile neck anatomy can be treated with EVAR successfully, although there was a higher incidence of complications in patients with a short neck length, severe neck angulation, circumferential thrombosis, and calcified proximal neck.

  17. Sequential Hybrid Repair of Aorta and Bilateral Common Iliac Arteries Secondary to Chronic Aortic Dissection with Extensive Aneurysmal Degeneration in a Marfan Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, Carlos A; Anaya-Ayala, Javier E; Laparra-Escareno, Hugo; Lizola, Rene; Torres-Machorro, Adriana

    2017-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a connective tissue disorder associated with aortic dissection, aneurysmal degeneration and rupture. These cardiovascular complications represent the main cause of mortality, therefore repair is indicated. We present a 35-year-old woman who experienced acute onset of chest pain. Her imaging revealed a chronic DeBakey type I dissection with aortic root dilation and descending thoracic aneurysmal degeneration. She underwent a Bentall procedure and endovascular exclusion of the descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. She was closely followed and 2 years later a computed tomography angiography (CTA) revealed the aneurysmal degeneration of the thoracoabominal aorta and bilateral iliac arteries. The patient underwent a composite reconstruction using multi-visceral branched and bifurcated Dacron grafts. At 5 years from her last surgery, a CTA revealed no new dissection or further aneurysmal degenerations. Aortic disease in Marfan patients is a complex clinical problem that may lead to secondary or tertiary aortic reconstructions; close follow-up is mandatory.

  18. Value and limitations of chimney grafts to treat arch lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangialardi, N; Ronchey, S; Malaj, A; Fazzini, S; Alberti, V; Ardita, V; Orrico, M; Lachat, M

    2015-08-01

    The endovascular debranching with chimney stents provides a minimally invasive alternative to open surgery with readily available devices and has extended the option of endoluminal therapy into the realm of the aortic arch. But a critical observation at the use of this technique at the aortic arch is important and necessary because of the lack of long-term results and long term patency of the stents. Our study aims to review the results of chimney grafts to treat arch lesions. A systematic health database search was performed in December 2014 according to the Prisma Guidelines. Papers were sought through a meticulous search of the MEDLINE database (National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MA) using the Pubmed search engine. Twenty-two articles were eligible for detailed analysis and data extraction. A total of 182 patients underwent chimney techniques during TEVAR (Thoracic Endovascular Aneurysm Repair). A total of 217 chimney grafts were implanted: 36 to the IA, 1 to the RCCA, 91 to the LCCA and 89 to the LSA. The type of stent-graft used for TEVAR was described in 132 patients. The type and name of chimney graft was described in 126 patients. In 53 patients information was limited to the type. Primary technical success, defined as a complete chimney procedure was achieved in 171 patients (98%). In 8 patients it was not clearly reported. The overall stroke rate was 5.3%. The overall endoleak rate, in those papers were it was clearly reported, was 18.4% (31 patients); 23(13,6%) patients developed a type IA endoleak, 1 patient (0.6%) developed type IB endoleak and 7 patients (4.1%) developed a type II endoleak The total endovascular aortic arch debranching technique represent a good option to treat high-risk patients, because it dramatically reduces the aggressiveness of the procedure in the arch. Many concerns are still present, mainly related to durability and material interaction during time. Long-term follow-up is exceptionally important in light of the

  19. Surgical repair of a pseudoaneurysm of the ascending aorta after aortic valve replacement

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    Almeida Rui Manuel Sequeira de

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a patient with a pseudoaneurysm of the ascending aortic clinically diagnosed 5 months after surgical replacement of the aortic valve. Diagnosis was confirmed with the aid of two-dimensional echocardiography and helicoidal angiotomography. The corrective surgery, which consisted of a reinforced suture of the communication with the ascending aorta after opening and aspiration of the cavity of the pseudoaneurysm, was successfully performed through a complete sternotomy using extracorporeal circulation, femorofemoral cannulation, and moderate hypothermia, with no aortic clamping.

  20. Results of aortic valve repair using decellularized bovine pericardium in congenital surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordmeyer, Sarah; Murin, Peter; Schulz, Antonia; Danne, Friederike; Nordmeyer, Johannes; Kretzschmar, Johanna; Sumbadze, Daria; Schmitt, Katharina Rose Luise; Miera, Oliver; Cho, Mi-Young; Sinzobahamvya, Nicodeme; Berger, Felix; Ovroutski, Stanislav; Photiadis, Joachim

    2018-04-30

    The search for an optimal patch material for aortic valve reconstruction (AVR) is an ongoing challenge. In this study, we report our experience of AVR using decellularized bovine pericardial patch material in congenital heart surgery. Data of 40 consecutive patients who underwent AVR using the CardioCel® patch (Admedus Regen Pty Ltd, Perth, WA, Australia) between February 2014 and August 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. The median age of the patients at operation was 9 (2-34) years, and 18 patients were younger than 7 years. Twenty-six patients initially presented with aortic valve insufficiency (AI) and 14 with stenosis. Clinical and echocardiographic data were available until August 2017 for a median postoperative follow-up (FU) of 22 (6-42) months. Nine of 40 (23%) patients experienced an event during FU (death: n = 1, 2.5%; reoperation: n = 8, 20%). Overall, the probability of freedom from reoperation or death was 97 ± 3%, 76 ± 9% and 57 ± 12% at 12, 24 and 36 months of FU, respectively. Reason for reoperation was stenosis in 3 (37.5%) patients, insufficiency in 4 (50%) patients and 1 (12.5%) patient was diagnosed with aortic valve endocarditis. Of the remaining 31 patients, 2 patients are scheduled for reoperation (aortic valve stenosis: n = 1 and AI: n = 1) and 9 patients exhibit worsening of aortic valve function with moderate AI. Freedom from developing combined end point [death/reoperation/moderate degree of aortic valve dysfunction (aortic valve stenosis, AI)] after AVR was 92 ± 5%, 55 ± 9% and 28 ± 9% at 12, 24 and 36 months, respectively. AVR using decellularized bovine pericardial patch material in patients with congenital aortic valve disease show unsatisfactory results within the first 3 years of FU.

  1. Hemodynamic Modeling of Surgically Repaired Coarctation of the Aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, Laura J; de Zélicourt, Diane A; Haggerty, Christopher M; Ratnayaka, Kanishka; Cross, Russell R; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2011-12-01

    PURPOSE: Late morbidity of surgically repaired coarctation of the aorta includes early cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease, shortened life expectancy, abnormal vasomodulator response, hypertension and exercise-induced hypertension in the absence of recurrent coarctation. Observational studies have linked patterns of arch remodeling (Gothic, Crenel, and Romanesque) to late morbidity, with Gothic arches having the highest incidence. We evaluated flow in native and surgically repaired aortic arches to correlate respective hemodynamic indices with incidence of late morbidity. METHODS: Three dimensional reconstructions of each remodeled arch were created from an anatomic stack of magnetic resonance (MR) images. A structured mesh core with a boundary layer was generated. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis was performed assuming peak flow conditions with a uniform velocity profile and unsteady turbulent flow. Wall shear stress (WSS), pressure and velocity data were extracted. RESULTS: The region of maximum WSS was located in the mid-transverse arch for the Crenel, Romanesque and Native arches. Peak WSS was located in the isthmus of the Gothic model. Variations in descending aorta flow patterns were also observed among the models. CONCLUSION: The location of peak WSS is a primary difference among the models tested, and may have clinical relevance. Specifically, the Gothic arch had a unique location of peak WSS with flow disorganization in the descending aorta. Our results suggest that varied patterns and locations of WSS resulting from abnormal arch remodeling may exhibit a primary effect on clinical vascular dysfunction.

  2. Endovascular repair of primary retrograde Stanford type A aortic dissection%腔内修复术治疗原发性逆撕型Stanford A型主动脉夹层

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴海卫; 孙磊; 李德闽; 景华; 许飚; 王常田; 张雷

    2016-01-01

    Objective To summarize the short-and mid-term results on endovascular repair of primary retrograde Stanford type A aortic dissection with an entry tear in distal aortic arch or descending aorta.Methods Between December 2009 and December 2014,21 male patients of primary retrograde Stanford type A aortic dissection with a mean age of (52 ± 9) years received endovascular repair in Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery,Jinling Hospital.Among the 21 cases,17 patients were presented as ascending aortic intramural hematoma,4 patients as active blood flow in false lumen and partial thrombosis,8 patients as ulcer on descending aorta combined intramural hematoma in descending aorta,and 13 patients as typical dissection changes.All patients received cndovascular stent-graft repair successfully,with 15 cases in acute phase and 6 cases in chronic phase.Results Cone stent was implanted in 13 cases,while straight stent in 8 cases,including 1 case of left common carotid-left subclavian artery bypass surgery and 1 case of restrictive bare-metal stent implantation.No perioperative stroke,paraplegia,stent fracture or displacement,limbs or abdominal organ ischemia or other severe complications occured,except for tracheotomy in 2 patients.Active blood flow in ascending aorta or aortic arch disappeared,and intramural hematoma started being absorbed on CT angiography images before discharge.All patients were alive during follow-up (6 to 72 months),and intramural hematoma in ascending aorta and aortic arch was absorbed thoroughly.Type Ⅰ endoleak and ulcer expansion were found in 1 patient,and type Ⅳ endoleak in distal stent was found in another one patient.Secondary ascending aortic dissection was found in 1 case two years later,which was cured by hybrid procedure with cardiopulmonary bypass.Conclusion Endovascular repair of primary retrograde Stanford type A aortic dissection was safe and effective,which correlated with favorable short-and mid-term results.%目的 探讨腔内修复

  3. Regional Differences in Case Mix and Peri-operative Outcome After Elective Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in the Vascunet Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, K; Venermo, M; Beiles, B; Menyhei, G; Altreuther, M; Loftus, I; Björck, M

    2015-06-01

    National differences exist in the outcome of elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. The role of case mix variation was assessed based on an international vascular registry collaboration. All elective AAA repairs with aneurysm size data in the Vascunet database in the period 2005-09 were included. AAA size and peri-operative outcome (crude and age adjusted mortality) were analysed overall and in risk cohorts, as well as per country. Glasgow Aneurysm Score (GAS) was calculated as risk score, and patients were stratified in three equal sized risk cohorts based on GAS. Predictors of peri-operative mortality were analysed with multiple regression. Missing data were handled with multiple imputation. Patients from Australia, Finland, Hungary, Norway, Sweden and the UK (n = 5,895) were analysed; mean age was 72.7 years and 54% had endovascular repair (EVAR). There were significant variations in GAS (lowest = Finland [75.7], highest = UK [79.4], p for comparison of all regions 82. Of those with a GAS >82, 8.4% of men and 20.8% of women had an AAA case selection for elective AAA repair, including variations in AAA size and patient risk profile. These differences partly explain the variations in peri-operative mortality. Further audit is warranted to assess the underlying reasons for the regional variation in case-mix. Copyright © 2015 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mid-term cost-effectiveness analysis of open and endovascular repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, K E; Shak, J; Ambler, G K; Tang, T Y; Hayes, P D; Boyle, J R

    2014-02-01

    Emergency endovascular repair (EVAR) for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) may have lower operative mortality rates than open surgical repair. Concerns remain that the early survival benefit after EVAR for rAAA may be offset by late reinterventions. The aim of this study was to compare reintervention rates and cost-effectiveness of EVAR and open repair for rAAA. A retrospective analysis was undertaken of patients with rAAA undergoing EVAR or open repair over 6 years. A health economic model developed for the cost-effectiveness of elective EVAR was used in the emergency setting. Sixty-two patients (mean age 77·9 years) underwent EVAR and 85 (mean age 75·9 years) had open repair of rAAA. Median follow-up was 42 and 39 months respectively. There was no significant difference in 30-day mortality rates after EVAR and open repair (18 and 26 per cent respectively; P = 0·243). Reintervention rates were also similar (32 and 31 per cent; P = 0·701). The mean cost per patient was €26,725 for EVAR and €30,297 for open repair, and the cost per life-year gained was €7906 and €9933 respectively (P = 0·561). Open repair had greater initial costs: longer procedural times (217 versus 178·5 min; P < 0·001) and intensive care stay (5·0 versus 1·0 days; P = 0·015). Conversely, EVAR had greater reintervention (€156,939 versus €35,335; P = 0·001) and surveillance (P < 0·001) costs. There was no significant difference in reintervention rates after EVAR or open repair for rAAA. EVAR was as cost-effective at mid-term follow-up. The increased procedural costs of open repair are not outweighed by greater surveillance and reintervention costs after EVAR. © 2014 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Trends in treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: impact of endovascular repair and implications for future care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Brian D; Azefor, Nchang; Huang, Chun-Chih; Ricotta, John J

    2013-04-01

    Our aim was to determine national trends in treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA), with specific emphasis on open surgical repair (OSR) and endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and its impact on mortality and complications. Data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) from 2005 to 2009 were queried to identify patients older than 59 years with RAAA. Three groups were studied: nonoperative (NO), EVAR, and OSR. Chi-square analysis was used to determine the relationship between treatment type and patient demographics, clinical characteristics, and hospital type. The impact of EVAR compared with OSR on mortality and overall complications was examined using logistic regression analysis. We identified 21,206 patients with RAAA from 2005 to 2009, of which 16,558 (78.1%) underwent operative repair and 21.8% received no operative treatment. In the operative group, 12,761 (77.1%) underwent OSR and 3,796 (22.9%) underwent EVAR. Endovascular aneurysm repair was more common in teaching hospitals (29.1% vs 15.2%, p < .0001) and in urban versus rural settings. Nonoperative approach was twice as common in rural versus urban hospitals. Reduced mortality was seen in patients transferred from another institutions (31.2% vs 39.4%, p = 0.014). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated a benefit of EVAR on both complication rate (OR = 0.492; CI, 0.380-0.636) and mortality (OR=0.535; CI, 0.395-0.724). Endovascular aneurysm repair use is increasing for RAAA and is more common in urban teaching hospitals while NO therapy is more common in rural hospitals. Endovascular aneurysm repair is associated with reduced mortality and complications across all age groups. Efforts to reduce mortality from RAAA should concentrate on reducing NO and OSR in patients who are suitable for EVAR. Copyright © 2013 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Seventeen Years’ Experience of Late Open Surgical Conversion after Failed Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair with 13 Variant Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Ziheng; Xu, Liang; Qu, Lefeng; Raithel, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    PurposeTo investigate the causes and results of late open surgical conversion (LOSC) after failed abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) and to summarize our 17 years’ experience with 13 various endografts.MethodsRetrospective data from August 1994 to January 2011 were analyzed at our center. The various devices’ implant time, the types of devices, the rates and causes of LOSC, and the procedures and results of LOSC were analyzed and evaluated.ResultsA total of 1729 endovascular aneurysm repairs were performed in our single center (Nuremberg South Hospital) with 13 various devices within 17 years. The median follow-up period was 51 months (range 9–119 months). Among them, 77 patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms received LOSC. The LOSC rate was 4.5 % (77 of 1729). The LOSC rates were significantly different before and after January 2002 (p < 0.001). The reasons of LOSC were mainly large type I endoleaks (n = 51) that were hard to repair by endovascular techniques. For the LOSC procedure, 71 cases were elective and 6 were emergent. The perioperative mortality was 5.2 % (4 of 77): 1 was elective (due to septic shock) and 3 were urgent (due to hemorrhagic shock).ConclusionLarge type I endoleaks were the main reasons for LOSC. The improvement of devices and operators’ experience may decrease the LOSC rate. Urgent LOSC resulted in a high mortality rate, while selective LOSC was relatively safe with significantly lower mortality rate. Early intervention, full preparation, and timely LOSC are important for patients who require LOSC

  7. Seventeen Years’ Experience of Late Open Surgical Conversion after Failed Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair with 13 Variant Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Ziheng, E-mail: wuziheng303@hotmail.com [Zhejiang University, Department of Vascular Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine (China); Xu, Liang, E-mail: maxalive@163.com [Zhejiang University, Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine (China); Qu, Lefeng, E-mail: qulefeng@gmail.com [The Second Military Medical University, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Changzheng Hospital (China); Raithel, Dieter, E-mail: dieter.raithel@rzmail.uni-erlangen.de [Nuremberg Southern Hospital, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo investigate the causes and results of late open surgical conversion (LOSC) after failed abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) and to summarize our 17 years’ experience with 13 various endografts.MethodsRetrospective data from August 1994 to January 2011 were analyzed at our center. The various devices’ implant time, the types of devices, the rates and causes of LOSC, and the procedures and results of LOSC were analyzed and evaluated.ResultsA total of 1729 endovascular aneurysm repairs were performed in our single center (Nuremberg South Hospital) with 13 various devices within 17 years. The median follow-up period was 51 months (range 9–119 months). Among them, 77 patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms received LOSC. The LOSC rate was 4.5 % (77 of 1729). The LOSC rates were significantly different before and after January 2002 (p < 0.001). The reasons of LOSC were mainly large type I endoleaks (n = 51) that were hard to repair by endovascular techniques. For the LOSC procedure, 71 cases were elective and 6 were emergent. The perioperative mortality was 5.2 % (4 of 77): 1 was elective (due to septic shock) and 3 were urgent (due to hemorrhagic shock).ConclusionLarge type I endoleaks were the main reasons for LOSC. The improvement of devices and operators’ experience may decrease the LOSC rate. Urgent LOSC resulted in a high mortality rate, while selective LOSC was relatively safe with significantly lower mortality rate. Early intervention, full preparation, and timely LOSC are important for patients who require LOSC.

  8. Calculating when elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair improves survival for individual patients: development of the Aneurysm Repair Decision Aid and economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Stuart W; Sperrin, Matthew; Carlson, Eric; Chinai, Natasha; Ntais, Dionysios; Hamilton, Matthew; Dunn, Graham; Buchan, Iain; Davies, Linda; McCollum, Charles N

    2015-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair aims to prevent premature death from AAA rupture. Elective repair is currently recommended when AAA diameter reaches 5.5 cm (men) and 5.0 cm (women). Applying population-based indications may not be appropriate for individual patient decisions, as the optimal indication is likely to differ between patients based on age and comorbidities. To develop an Aneurysm Repair Decision Aid (ARDA) to indicate when elective AAA repair optimises survival for individual patients and to assess the cost-effectiveness and associated uncertainty of elective repair at the aneurysm diameter recommended by the ARDA compared with current practice. The UK Vascular Governance North West and National Vascular Database provided individual patient data to develop predictive models for perioperative mortality and survival. Data from published literature were used to model AAA growth and risk of rupture. The cost-effectiveness analysis used data from published literature and from local and national databases. A combination of systematic review methods and clinical registries were used to provide data to populate models and inform the structure of the ARDA. Discrete event simulation (DES) was used to model the patient journey from diagnosis to death and synthesised data were used to estimate patient outcomes and costs for elective repair at alternative aneurysm diameters. Eight patient clinical scenarios (vignettes) were used as exemplars. The DES structure was validated by clinical and statistical experts. The economic evaluation estimated costs, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) from the NHS, social care provider and patient perspective over a lifetime horizon. Cost-effectiveness acceptability analyses and probabilistic sensitivity analyses explored uncertainty in the data and the value for money of ARDA-based decisions. The ARDA outcome measures include perioperative mortality risk, annual risk of

  9. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koolbergen, David R; Manshanden, Johan S J; Bouma, Berto J; Blom, Nico A; Mulder, Barbara J M; de Mol, Bas A J M; Hazekamp, Mark G

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate our results of valve-sparing aortic root replacement and associated (multiple) valve repair. From September 2003 to September 2013, 97 patients had valve-sparing aortic root replacement procedures. Patient records and preoperative, postoperative and recent echocardiograms were reviewed. Median age was 40.3 (range: 13.4-68.6) years and 67 (69.1%) were male. Seven (7.2%) patients were younger than 18 years, the youngest being 13.4 years. Fifty-four (55.7%) had Marfan syndrome, 2 (2.1%) other fibrous tissue diseases, 15 (15.5%) bicuspid aortic valve and 3 (3.1%) had earlier Fallot repair. The reimplantation technique was used in all, with a straight vascular prosthesis in 11 (26-34 mm) and the Valsalva prosthesis in 86 (26-32 mm). Concomitant aortic valve repair was performed in 43 (44.3%), mitral valve repair in 10 (10.3%), tricuspid valve repair in 5 (5.2%) and aortic arch replacement in 3 (3.1%). Mean follow-up was 4.2 ± 2.4 years. Follow-up was complete in all. One 14-year old patient died 1.3 years post-surgery presumably of ventricular arrhythmia. One patient underwent reoperation for aneurysm of the proximal right coronary artery after 4.9 years and 4 patients required aortic valve replacement, 3 of which because of endocarditis after 0.1, 0.8 and 1.3 years and 1 because of cusp prolapse after 3.8 years. No thrombo-embolic complications occurred. Mortality, root reoperation and aortic regurgitation were absent in 88.0 ± 0.5% at 5-year follow-up. Results of valve-sparing root replacement are good, even in association with a high incidence of concomitant valve repair. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement can be performed at a very young age as long as an adult size prosthesis can be implanted. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  10. Technical and clinical success of infrarenal endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: A 10-year single-center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steingruber, I.E.; Neuhauser, B.; Seiler, R.; Greiner, A.; Chemelli, A.; Kopf, H.; Walch, C.; Waldenberger, P.; Jaschke, W.; Czermak, B.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The aim of our retrospective study was to review our single-center experience with aortic abdominal aneurysm (AAA) repair retrospectively. Material and methods: From 1995 to 2005, 70 consecutive patients affected by AAA were treated by endovascular stent-graft repair. Mean follow-up was 23.9 months. Follow-up investigations were performed at 6 and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Five different stent-graft designs were compared to each other. Primary technical success (PTS), assisted primary technical success (APTS), primary clinical success (PCS) and secondary clinical success (SCS) were evaluated. Results: All over PTS was achieved in 94.3%, APTS in 97.1%, PCS in 61.4%, APCS in 64.3% and SCS in 70%. There were 3 type I endoleaks, 25 type II endoleaks, 4 type III endoleaks, 8 limb problems, 5 conversions to open surgery, 10 aneurysm sac expansions and 14 device migrations. Patients with newer generation devices showed better results than patients with first generation prosthesis. In addition results were better for grafts with suprarenal fixation (versus infrarenal fixation) and grafts with barbs and hooks (versus grafts without barbs and hooks). Patients with bad anatomic preconditions showed a higher complication rate. Conclusion: Contrary to first generation products, new stent-graft designs show acceptable technical and clinical results in endovascular AAA aneurysm repair. However, this therapy still should be reserved only for patients with significant comorbities and suitable anatomic conditions

  11. Technical and clinical success of infrarenal endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: A 10-year single-center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steingruber, I.E. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)]. E-mail: iris.steingruber@uibk.ac.at; Neuhauser, B. [Department of Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Seiler, R. [Department of Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Greiner, A. [Department of Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Chemelli, A. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Kopf, H. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Walch, C. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Waldenberger, P. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Jaschke, W. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Czermak, B. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2006-09-15

    Objective: The aim of our retrospective study was to review our single-center experience with aortic abdominal aneurysm (AAA) repair retrospectively. Material and methods: From 1995 to 2005, 70 consecutive patients affected by AAA were treated by endovascular stent-graft repair. Mean follow-up was 23.9 months. Follow-up investigations were performed at 6 and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Five different stent-graft designs were compared to each other. Primary technical success (PTS), assisted primary technical success (APTS), primary clinical success (PCS) and secondary clinical success (SCS) were evaluated. Results: All over PTS was achieved in 94.3%, APTS in 97.1%, PCS in 61.4%, APCS in 64.3% and SCS in 70%. There were 3 type I endoleaks, 25 type II endoleaks, 4 type III endoleaks, 8 limb problems, 5 conversions to open surgery, 10 aneurysm sac expansions and 14 device migrations. Patients with newer generation devices showed better results than patients with first generation prosthesis. In addition results were better for grafts with suprarenal fixation (versus infrarenal fixation) and grafts with barbs and hooks (versus grafts without barbs and hooks). Patients with bad anatomic preconditions showed a higher complication rate. Conclusion: Contrary to first generation products, new stent-graft designs show acceptable technical and clinical results in endovascular AAA aneurysm repair. However, this therapy still should be reserved only for patients with significant comorbities and suitable anatomic conditions.

  12. Duplex ultrasound and computed tomography angiography in the follow-up of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantador, Alex Aparecido; Siqueira, Daniel Emilio Dalledone; Jacobsen, Octavio Barcellos; Baracat, Jamal; Pereira, Ines Minniti Rodrigues; Menezes, Fabio Hüsemann; Guillaumon, Ana Terezinha

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare duplex ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) angiography in terms of their performance in detecting endoleaks, as well as in determining the diameter of the aneurysm sac, in the postoperative follow-up of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study involving 30 patients who had undergone endovascular repair of infrarenal aortoiliac aneurysms. Duplex ultrasound and CT angiography were performed simultaneously by independent radiologists. Measurements of the aneurysm sac diameter were assessed, and the presence or absence of endoleaks was determined. Results: The average diameter of the aneurysm sac, as determined by duplex ultrasound and CT angiography was 6.09 ± 1.95 and 6.27 ± 2.16 cm, respectively. Pearson's correlation coefficient showing a statistically significant correlation (R = 0.88; p < 0.01). Comparing the duplex ultrasound and CT angiography results regarding the detection of endoleaks, we found that the former had a negative predictive value of 92.59% and a specificity of 96.15%. Conclusion: Our results show that there is little variation between the two methods evaluated, and that the choice between the two would have no significant effect on clinical management. Duplex ultrasound could replace CT angiography in the postoperative follow-up of endovascular aneurysm repair of the infrarenal aorta, because it is a low-cost procedure without the potential clinical complications related to the use of iodinated contrast and exposure to radiation. (author)

  13. Duplex ultrasound and computed tomography angiography in the follow-up of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantador, Alex Aparecido; Siqueira, Daniel Emilio Dalledone; Jacobsen, Octavio Barcellos; Baracat, Jamal; Pereira, Ines Minniti Rodrigues; Menezes, Fabio Hüsemann; Guillaumon, Ana Terezinha, E-mail: alex_cantador@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FCM/UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas

    2016-07-15

    Objective: To compare duplex ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) angiography in terms of their performance in detecting endoleaks, as well as in determining the diameter of the aneurysm sac, in the postoperative follow-up of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study involving 30 patients who had undergone endovascular repair of infrarenal aortoiliac aneurysms. Duplex ultrasound and CT angiography were performed simultaneously by independent radiologists. Measurements of the aneurysm sac diameter were assessed, and the presence or absence of endoleaks was determined. Results: The average diameter of the aneurysm sac, as determined by duplex ultrasound and CT angiography was 6.09 ± 1.95 and 6.27 ± 2.16 cm, respectively. Pearson's correlation coefficient showing a statistically significant correlation (R = 0.88; p < 0.01). Comparing the duplex ultrasound and CT angiography results regarding the detection of endoleaks, we found that the former had a negative predictive value of 92.59% and a specificity of 96.15%. Conclusion: Our results show that there is little variation between the two methods evaluated, and that the choice between the two would have no significant effect on clinical management. Duplex ultrasound could replace CT angiography in the postoperative follow-up of endovascular aneurysm repair of the infrarenal aorta, because it is a low-cost procedure without the potential clinical complications related to the use of iodinated contrast and exposure to radiation. (author)

  14. Ten-Year Experience with Surgical Repair of Mycotic Aortic Aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Ming Chen

    2005-06-01

    Conclusion: Mycotic aneurysm of the aorta is a life-threatening disease, especially when rupture occurs. The high mortality rate is due not only to the high rupture rate, but also to sepsis. When mycotic aortic aneurysm is diagnosed, early surgical intervention is mandatory.

  15. Retrograde type A dissection: a serious complication due to thoracic aortic endovascular stent-graft repair for Stanford type B aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guoquan; Zhai Shuiting; Li Tianxiao; Shi Shuaitao; Zhang Kewei; Li Kun

    2011-01-01

    Objective: to discuss the possible causes and prevention of retrograde type A dissection occurred after thoracic aortic endovascular stent-graft repair (TEVAR) for symptomatic type B dissection. Methods: During the period from January 2005 to January 2011, TEVAR was carried out in 189 patients (157 males and 32 females) with symptomatic type B dissection. The average age of the patients was (51.2±13.5) years, ranged from 26 to 78 years. A follow-up lasting for 3-63 months (mean 32 months) was conducted in 135 patients (71.43%). Fifty-four patients lost in touch with the authors (28.57%). The occurrence of retrograde type A dissection after TEVAR was calculated and the possible causes were analyzed. Results: After TEVAR retrograde type A dissection occurred in two patients (1.48%), and both were males. One patient developed retrograde type A dissection in perioperative period, and the patient refused to have surgery. Conservative treatment was employed for over three years and be was still alive so far. The other patient developed retrograde type A dissection one month after TEVAR, and emergency surgery was performed. The patient was followed up for three months and he was still alive. Conclusion: The retrograde type A dissection occurred after TEVAR may be closely related to the stent-graft device, to the interventional manipulations and to the vascular disorders. Close attention should be paid to the direct damage produced by the stent-graft device to the vascular wall. (authors)

  16. Fenestrated Stent Graft Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Hemodynamic Analysis of the Effect of Fenestrated Stents on the Renal Arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Zhonghua; Chaichana, Thanapong [Curtin University of Technology, Perth (Australia)

    2010-02-15

    We wanted to investigate the hemodynamic effect of fenestrated stents on the renal arteries with using a fluid structure interaction method. Two representative patients who each had abdominal aortic aneurysm that was treated with fenestrated stent grafts were selected for the study. 3D realistic aorta models for the main artery branches and aneurysm were generated based on the multislice CT scans from two patients with different aortic geometries. The simulated fenestrated stents were designed and modelled based on the 3D intraluminal appearance, and these were placed inside the renal artery with an intra-aortic protrusion of 5.0-7.0 mm to reflect the actual patients' treatment. The stent wire thickness was simulated with a diameter of 0.4 mm and hemodynamic analysis was performed at different cardiac cycles. Our results showed that the effect of the fenestrated stent wires on the renal blood flow was minimal because the flow velocity was not significantly affected when compared to that calculated at pre-stent graft implantation, and this was despite the presence of recirculation patterns at the proximal part of the renal arteries. The wall pressure was found to be significantly decreased after fenestration, yet no significant change of the wall shear stress was noticed at post-fenestration, although the wall shear stress was shown to decrease slightly at the proximal aneurysm necks. Our analysis demonstrates that the hemodynamic effect of fenestrated renal stents on the renal arteries is insignificant. Further studies are needed to investigate the effect of different lengths of stent protrusion with variable stent thicknesses on the renal blood flow, and this is valuable for understanding the long-term outcomes of fenestrated repair.

  17. Fenestrated Stent Graft Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Hemodynamic Analysis of the Effect of Fenestrated Stents on the Renal Arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Zhonghua; Chaichana, Thanapong

    2010-01-01

    We wanted to investigate the hemodynamic effect of fenestrated stents on the renal arteries with using a fluid structure interaction method. Two representative patients who each had abdominal aortic aneurysm that was treated with fenestrated stent grafts were selected for the study. 3D realistic aorta models for the main artery branches and aneurysm were generated based on the multislice CT scans from two patients with different aortic geometries. The simulated fenestrated stents were designed and modelled based on the 3D intraluminal appearance, and these were placed inside the renal artery with an intra-aortic protrusion of 5.0-7.0 mm to reflect the actual patients' treatment. The stent wire thickness was simulated with a diameter of 0.4 mm and hemodynamic analysis was performed at different cardiac cycles. Our results showed that the effect of the fenestrated stent wires on the renal blood flow was minimal because the flow velocity was not significantly affected when compared to that calculated at pre-stent graft implantation, and this was despite the presence of recirculation patterns at the proximal part of the renal arteries. The wall pressure was found to be significantly decreased after fenestration, yet no significant change of the wall shear stress was noticed at post-fenestration, although the wall shear stress was shown to decrease slightly at the proximal aneurysm necks. Our analysis demonstrates that the hemodynamic effect of fenestrated renal stents on the renal arteries is insignificant. Further studies are needed to investigate the effect of different lengths of stent protrusion with variable stent thicknesses on the renal blood flow, and this is valuable for understanding the long-term outcomes of fenestrated repair

  18. Maximum Diameter Measurements of Aortic Aneurysms on Axial CT Images After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: Sufficient for Follow-up?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumueller, Stephan; Nguyen, Thi Dan Linh; Goetti, Robert Paul; Lachat, Mario; Seifert, Burkhardt; Pfammatter, Thomas; Frauenfelder, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of maximum diameter measurements of aortic aneurysms after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) on axial computed tomographic (CT) images in comparison to maximum diameter measurements perpendicular to the intravascular centerline for follow-up by using three-dimensional (3D) volume measurements as the reference standard. Materials and Methods: Forty-nine consecutive patients (73 ± 7.5 years, range 51–88 years), who underwent EVAR of an infrarenal aortic aneurysm were retrospectively included. Two blinded readers twice independently measured the maximum aneurysm diameter on axial CT images performed at discharge, and at 1 and 2 years after intervention. The maximum diameter perpendicular to the centerline was automatically measured. Volumes of the aortic aneurysms were calculated by dedicated semiautomated 3D segmentation software (3surgery, 3mensio, the Netherlands). Changes in diameter of 0.5 cm and in volume of 10% were considered clinically significant. Intra- and interobserver agreements were calculated by intraclass correlations (ICC) in a random effects analysis of variance. The two unidimensional measurement methods were correlated to the reference standard. Results: Intra- and interobserver agreements for maximum aneurysm diameter measurements were excellent (ICC = 0.98 and ICC = 0.96, respectively). There was an excellent correlation between maximum aneurysm diameters measured on axial CT images and 3D volume measurements (r = 0.93, P < 0.001) as well as between maximum diameter measurements perpendicular to the centerline and 3D volume measurements (r = 0.93, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Measurements of maximum aneurysm diameters on axial CT images are an accurate, reliable, and robust method for follow-up after EVAR and can be used in daily routine.

  19. Anatomical Features and Early Outcomes of Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm from a Korean Multicenter Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyunwook; Lee, Do Yun; Choi, Soo Jin Na; Park, Ki Hyuk; Min, Seung-Kee; Chang, Jeong-Hwan; Huh, Seung; Jeon, Yong Sun; Won, Jehwan; Byun, Seung Jae; Park, Sang Jun; Jang, Lee Chan; Kwon, Tae-Won

    2015-09-01

    To introduce a nation-based endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) registry in South Korea and to analyze the anatomical features and early clinical outcomes of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) in patients who underwent EVAR. The Korean EVAR registry (KER) was a template-based online registry developed and established in 2009. The KER recruited 389 patients who underwent EVAR from 13 medical centers in South Korea from January 2010 to June 2010. We retrospectively reviewed the anatomic features and 30-day clinical outcomes. Initial deployment without open conversion was achieved in all cases and procedure-related 30-day mortality rate was 1.9%. Anatomic features showed the following variables: proximal aortic neck angle 48.8±25.7° (mean±standard deviation), vertical neck length 35.0±17.2 mm, aneurysmal sac diameter 57.2±14.2 mm, common iliac artery (CIA) involvement in 218 (56.3%) patients, and median right CIA length 34.9 mm. Two hundred and nineteen (56.3%) patients showed neck calcification, 98 patients (25.2%) had neck thrombus, and the inferior mesenteric arteries of 91 patients (23.4%) were occluded. Anatomical features of AAA in patients from the KER were characterized as having angulated proximal neck, tortuous iliac artery, and a higher rate of CIA involvement. Long-term follow-up and ongoing studies are required.

  20. Correlation between intrasac pressure measurements of a pressure sensor and an angiographic catheter during endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Galvagni Silveira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To establish a correlation between intrasac pressure measurements of a pressure sensor and an angiographic catheter placed in the same aneurysm sac before and after its exclusion by an endoprosthesis. METHODS: Patients who underwent endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and received an EndoSureTM wireless pressure sensor implant between March 19 and December 11, 2004 were enrolled in the study. Simultaneous readings of systolic, diastolic, mean, and pulse pressure within the aneurysm sac were obtained from the catheter and the sensor, both before and after sac exclusion by the endoprosthesis (Readings 1 and 2, respectively. Intrasac pressure measurements were compared using Pearson's correlation and Student's t test. Statistical significance was set at p0.05, mean (p>0.05, and pulse (p0.05 by the sensor. CONCLUSION: The excellent agreement between intrasac pressure readings recorded by the catheter and the sensor justifies use of the latter for detection of post-exclusion abdominal aortic aneurysm pressurization.

  1. Meta-analysis of individual-patient data from EVAR-1, DREAM, OVER and ACE trials comparing outcomes of endovascular or open repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm over 5 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powell, J. T.; Sweeting, M. J.; Ulug, P.; Blankensteijn, J. D.; Lederle, F. A.; Becquemin, J.-P.; Greenhalgh, R. M.; Beard, J. D.; Buxton, M. J.; Brown, L. C.; Harris, P. L.; Rose, J. D. G.; Russell, I. T.; Sculpher, M. J.; Thompson, S. G.; Lilford, R. J.; Bell, P. R. F.; Whitaker, S. C.; Poole-Wilson, The Late P. A.; Ruckley, C. V.; Campbell, W. B.; Dean, M. R. E.; Ruttley, M. S. T.; Coles, E. C.; Halliday, A.; Gibbs, S. J.; Epstein, D.; Hannon, R. J.; Johnston, L.; Bradbury, A. W.; Henderson, M. J.; Parvin, S. D.; Shepherd, D. F. C.; Mitchell, A. W.; Edwards, P. R.; Abbott, G. T.; Higman, D. J.; Vohra, A.; Ashley, S.; Robottom, C.; Wyatt, M. G.; Byrne, D.; Edwards, R.; Leiberman, D. P.; McCarter, D. H.; Taylor, P. R.; Reidy, J. F.; Wilkinson, A. R.; Ettles, D. F.; Clason, A. E.; Leen, G. L. S.; Wilson, N. V.; Downes, M.; Walker, S. R.; Lavelle, J. M.; Gough, M. J.; McPherson, S.; Scott, D. J. A.; Kessell, D. O.; Naylor, R.; Sayers, R.; Fishwick, N. G.; Gould, D. A.; Walker, M. G.; Chalmers, N. C.; Garnham, A.; Collins, M. A.; Gaines, P. A.; Ashour, M. Y.; Uberoi, R.; Braithwaite, B.; Davies, J. N.; Travis, S.; Hamilton, G.; Platts, A.; Shandall, A.; Sullivan, B. A.; Sobeh, M.; Matson, M.; Fox, A. D.; Orme, R.; Yusef, W.; Doyle, T.; Horrocks, M.; Hardman, J.; Blair, P. H. B.; Ellis, P. K.; Morris, G.; Odurny, A.; Vohra, R.; Duddy, M.; Thompson, M.; Loosemore, T. M. L.; Belli, A. M.; Morgan, R.; Adiseshiah, M.; Brookes, J. A. S.; McCollum, C. N.; Ashleigh, R.; Aukett, M.; Baker, S.; Barbe, E.; Batson, N.; Bell, J.; Blundell, J.; Boardley, D.; Boyes, S.; Brown, O.; Bryce, J.; Carmichael, M.; Chance, T.; Coleman, J.; Cosgrove, C.; Curran, G.; Dennison, T.; Devine, C.; Dewhirst, N.; Errington, B.; Farrell, H.; Fisher, C.; Fulford, P.; Gough, M.; Graham, C.; Hooper, R.; Horne, G.; Horrocks, L.; Hughes, B.; Hutchings, T.; Ireland, M.; Judge, C.; Kelly, L.; Kemp, J.; Kite, A.; Kivela, M.; Lapworth, M.; Lee, C.; Linekar, L.; Mahmood, A.; March, L.; Martin, J.; Matharu, N.; McGuigen, K.; Morris-Vincent, P.; Murray, S.; Murtagh, A.; Owen, G.; Ramoutar, V.; Rippin, C.; Rowley, J.; Sinclair, J.; Spencer, S.; Taylor, V.; Tomlinson, C.; Ward, S.; Wealleans, V.; West, J.; White, K.; Williams, J.; Wilson, L.; Grobbee, D. E.; Bak, A. A. A.; Buth, J.; Pattynama, P. M.; Verhoeven, E. L. G.; van Voorthuisen, A. E.; Balm, R.; Cuypers, P. W. M.; Prinssen, M.; van Sambeek, M. R. H. M.; Baas, A. F.; Hunink, M. G.; van Engelshoven, J. M.; Jacobs, M. J. H. M.; de Mol, B. A. J. M.; van Bockel, J. H.; Reekers, J.; Tielbeek, X.; Wisselink, W.; Boekema, N.; Heuveling, L. M.; Sikking, I.; de Bruin, J. L.; Tielbeek, A. V.; Pattynama, P.; Prins, T.; van der Ham, A. C.; van der Velden, J. J. I. M.; van Sterkenburg, S. M. M.; ten Haken, G. B.; Bruijninckx, C. M. A.; van Overhagen, H.; Tutein Nolthenius, R. P.; Hendriksz, T. R.; Teijink, J. A. W.; Odink, H. F.; de Smet, A. A. E. A.; Vroegindeweij, D.; van Loenhout, R. M. M.; Rutten, M. J.; Hamming, J. F.; Lampmann, L. E. H.; Bender, M. H. M.; Pasmans, H.; Vahl, A. C.; de Vries, C.; Mackaay, A. J. C.; van Dortmont, L. M. C.; van der Vliet, A. J.; Schultze Kool, L. J.; Boomsma, J. H. B.; van Dop, H. R.; de Mol van Otterloo, J. C. A.; de Rooij, T. P. W.; Smits, T. M.; Yilmaz, E. N.; van den Berg, F. G.; Visser, M. J. T.; van der Linden, E.; Schurink, G. W. H.; de Haan, M.; Smeets, H. J.; Stabel, P.; van Elst, F.; Poniewierski, J.; Vermassen, F. E. G.; Freischlag, J. A.; Kohler, T. R.; Latts, E.; Matsumura, J.; Padberg, F. T.; Kyriakides, T. C.; Swanson, K. M.; Guarino, P.; Peduzzi, P.; Antonelli, M.; Cushing, C.; Davis, E.; Durant, L.; Joyner, S.; Kossack, The Late A.; LeGwin, Mary; McBride, V.; O'Connor, T.; Poulton, J.; Stratton, The Late S.; Zellner, S.; Snodgrass, A. J.; Thornton, J.; Haakenson, C. M.; Stroupe, K. T.; Jonk, Y.; Hallett, J. W.; Hertzer, N.; Towne, J.; Katz, D. A.; Karrison, T.; Matts, J. P.; Marottoli, R.; Kasl, S.; Mehta, R.; Feldman, R.; Farrell, W.; Allore, H.; Perry, E.; Niederman, J.; Randall, F.; Zeman, M.; Beckwith, The Late D.; O'Leary, T. J.; Huang, G. D.; Bader, M.; Ketteler, E. R.; Kingsley, D. D.; Marek, J. M.; Massen, R. J.; Matteson, B. D.; Pitcher, J. D.; Langsfeld, M.; Corson, J. D.; Goff, J. M.; Kasirajan, K.; Paap, C.; Robertson, D. C.; Salam, A.; Veeraswamy, R.; Milner, R.; Guidot, J.; Lal, B. K.; Busuttil, S. J.; Lilly, M. P.; Braganza, M.; Ellis, K.; Patterson, M. A.; Jordan, W. D.; Whitley, D.; Taylor, S.; Passman, M.; Kerns, D.; Inman, C.; Poirier, J.; Ebaugh, J.; Raffetto, J.; Chew, D.; Lathi, S.; Owens, C.; Hickson, K.; Dosluoglu, H. H.; Eschberger, K.; Kibbe, M. R.; Baraniewski, H. M.; Endo, M.; Busman, A.; Meadows, W.; Evans, M.; Giglia, J. S.; El Sayed, H.; Reed, A. B.; Ruf, M.; Ross, S.; Jean-Claude, J. M.; Pinault, G.; Kang, P.; White, N.; Eiseman, M.; Jones, The Late R.; Timaran, C. H.; Modrall, J. G.; Welborn, M. B.; Lopez, J.; Nguyen, T.; Chacko, J. K. Y.; Granke, K.; Vouyouka, A. G.; Olgren, E.; Chand, P.; Allende, B.; Ranella, M.; Yales, C.; Whitehill, T. A.; Krupski, The Late W. C.; Nehler, M. R.; Johnson, S. P.; Jones, D. N.; Strecker, P.; Bhola, M. A.; Shortell, C. K.; Gray, J. L.; Lawson, J. H.; McCann, R.; Sebastian, M. W.; Kistler Tetterton, J.; Blackwell, C.; Prinzo, P. A.; Lee, N.; Cerveira, J. J.; Zickler, R. W.; Hauck, K. A.; Berceli, S. A.; Lee, W. A.; Ozaki, C. K.; Nelson, P. R.; Irwin, A. S.; Baum, R.; Aulivola, B.; Rodriguez, H.; Littooy, F. N.; Greisler, H.; O'Sullivan, M. T.; Kougias, P.; Lin, P. H.; Bush, R. L.; Guinn, G.; Bechara, C.; Cagiannos, C.; Pisimisis, G.; Barshes, N.; Pillack, S.; Guillory, B.; Cikrit, D.; Lalka, S. G.; Lemmon, G.; Nachreiner, R.; Rusomaroff, M.; O'Brien, E.; Cullen, J. J.; Hoballah, J.; Sharp, W. J.; McCandless, J. L.; Beach, V.; Minion, D.; Schwarcz, T. H.; Kimbrough, J.; Ashe, L.; Rockich, A.; Warner-Carpenter, J.; Moursi, M.; Eidt, J. F.; Brock, S.; Bianchi, C.; Bishop, V.; Gordon, I. L.; Fujitani, R.; Kubaska, S. M.; Behdad, M.; Azadegan, R.; Ma Agas, C.; Zalecki, K.; Hoch, J. R.; Carr, S. C.; Acher, C.; Schwarze, M.; Tefera, G.; Mell, M.; Dunlap, B.; Rieder, J.; Stuart, J. M.; Weiman, D. S.; Abul-Khoudoud, O.; Garrett, H. E.; Walsh, S. M.; Wilson, K. L.; Seabrook, G. R.; Cambria, R. A.; Brown, K. R.; Lewis, B. D.; Framberg, S.; Kallio, C.; Barke, R. A.; Santilli, S. M.; d'Audiffret, A. C.; Oberle, N.; Proebstle, C.; Johnson, L. L.; Jacobowitz, G. R.; Cayne, N.; Rockman, C.; Adelman, M.; Gagne, P.; Nalbandian, M.; Caropolo, L. J.; Pipinos, I. I.; Johanning, J.; Lynch, T.; DeSpiegelaere, H.; Purviance, G.; Zhou, W.; Dalman, R.; Lee, J. T.; Safadi, B.; Coogan, S. M.; Wren, S. M.; Bahmani, D. D.; Maples, D.; Thunen, S.; Golden, M. A.; Mitchell, M. E.; Fairman, R.; Reinhardt, S.; Wilson, M. A.; Tzeng, E.; Muluk, S.; Peterson, N. M.; Foster, M.; Edwards, J.; Moneta, G. L.; Landry, G.; Taylor, L.; Yeager, R.; Cannady, E.; Treiman, G.; Hatton-Ward, S.; Salabsky, The Late B.; Kansal, N.; Owens, E.; Estes, M.; Forbes, B. A.; Sobotta, C.; Rapp, J. H.; Reilly, L. M.; Perez, S. L.; Yan, K.; Sarkar, R.; Dwyer, S. S.; Perez, S.; Chong, K.; Hatsukami, T. S.; Glickerman, D. G.; Sobel, M.; Burdick, T. S.; Pedersen, K.; Cleary, P.; Back, M.; Bandyk, D.; Johnson, B.; Shames, M.; Reinhard, R. L.; Thomas, S. C.; Hunter, G. C.; Leon, L. R.; Westerband, A.; Guerra, R. J.; Riveros, M.; Mills, J. L.; Hughes, J. D.; Escalante, A. M.; Psalms, S. B.; Day, N. N.; Macsata, R.; Sidawy, A.; Weiswasser, J.; Arora, S.; Jasper, B. J.; Dardik, A.; Gahtan, V.; Muhs, B. E.; Sumpio, B. E.; Gusberg, R. J.; Spector, M.; Pollak, J.; Aruny, J.; Kelly, E. L.; Wong, J.; Vasilas, P.; Joncas, C.; Gelabert, H. A.; DeVirgillio, C.; Rigberg, D. A.; Cole, L.; Marzelle, J.; Sapoval, M.; Favre, J.-P.; Watelet, J.; Lermusiaux, P.; Lepage, E.; Hemery, F.; Dolbeau, G.; Hawajry, N.; Cunin, P.; Harris, P.; Stockx, L.; Chatellier, G.; Mialhe, C.; Fiessinger, J.-N.; Pagny, L.; Kobeiter, H.; Boissier, C.; Lacroix, P.; Ledru, F.; Pinot, J.-J.; Deux, J.-F.; Tzvetkov, B.; Duvaldestin, P.; Jourdain, C.; DAVID, V.; Enouf, D.; Ady, N.; Krimi, A.; Boudjema, N.; Jousset, Y.; Enon, B.; Blin, V.; Picquet, J.; L'Hoste, P.; Thouveny, F.; Borie, H.; Kowarski, S.; Pernes, J.-M.; Auguste, M.; Desgranges, P.; Allaire, E.; Meaulle, P.-Y.; Chaix, D.; Juliae, P.; Fabiani, J. N.; Chevalier, P.; Combes, M.; Seguin, A.; Belhomme, D.; Baque, J.; Pellerin, O.; Favre, J. P.; Barral, X.; Veyret, C.; Peillon, C.; Plissonier, D.; Thomas, P.; Clavier, E.; Martinez, R.; Bleuet, F.; C, Dupreix; Verhoye, J. P.; Langanay, T.; Heautot, J. F.; Koussa, M.; Haulon, S.; Halna, P.; Destrieux, L.; Lions, C.; Wiloteaux, S.; Beregi, J. P.; Bergeron, P.; Patra, P.; Costargent, A.; Chaillou, P.; D'Alicourt, A.; Goueffic, Y.; Cheysson, E.; Parrot, A.; Garance, P.; Demon, A.; Tyazi, A.; Pillet, J.-C.; Lescalie, F.; Tilly, G.; Steinmetz, E.; Favier, C.; Brenot, R.; Krause, D.; Cercueil, J. P.; Vahdat, O.; Sauer, M.; Soula, P.; Querian, A.; Garcia, O.; Levade, M.; Colombier, D.; Cardon, J.-M.; Joyeux, A.; Borrelly, P.; Dogas, G.; Magnan, P.-É; Branchereau, A.; Bartoli, J.-M.; Hassen-Khodja, R.; Batt, M.; Planchard, P.-F.; Bouillanne, P.-J.; Haudebourg, P.; Bayne, J.; Gouny, P.; Badra, A.; Braesco, J.; Nonent, M.; Lucas, A.; Cardon, A.; Kerdiles, Y.; Rolland, Y.; Kassab, M.; Brillu, C.; Goubault, F.; Tailboux, L.; Darrieux, H.; Briand, O.; Maillard, J.-C.; Varty, K.; Cousins, C.

    2017-01-01

    The erosion of the early mortality advantage of elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) compared with open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm remains without a satisfactory explanation. An individual-patient data meta-analysis of four multicentre randomized trials of EVAR versus open repair

  2. Aortic valve repair for insufficiency in older children offers unpredictable durability that may not be advantageous over a primary Ross operation†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Travis J; Caldarone, Christopher A; Van Arsdell, Glen S; Pham-Hung, Eric; Gritti, Michael; Al Jughiman, Mohammed; Hickey, Edward J

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the durability of aortic valve (AoV) repair relative to other strategies for children with significant aortic insufficiency (AI). From 2001 to 2012, 90 children with greater than or equal to moderate AI underwent surgery. Resulting procedures were classified according to final operative outcome: AoV repair (repair; n = 46, 51%), Ross procedure (Ross; n = 21, 23%) or replacement with mechanical or tissue prosthesis [aortic valve replacement (AVR); n = 23, 26%]. Repeated measures (n = 1081 echocardiograms) mixed-model analysis and parametric multiphase risk-adjusted hazard analysis were used to evaluate haemodynamic parameters and durability of operations. Mean age at operation was similar for repair and Ross groups, but slightly higher for the AVR group (10.6, 11 and 13.2, respectively; P = 0.04). Baseline annular dimensions were similar among groups. Of 46 repairs, 85% involved pericardial leaflet extensions (commonly with leaflet shaving and/or commisuroplasty). The remaining repairs were commissuroplasties. On multivariable analysis, repair was associated with increased early (∼1-2 years) AI and increased outflow tract peak pressure gradients relative to Ross and AVR procedures. On univariate analysis, repairs tended to have a larger annulus size compared with Ross or AVR; however, this was not significant on multivariable analysis. There were 25 reinterventions (surgical reoperation = 16; transcatheter intervention = 9) for 22 children. Freedom from surgical reoperation was 64, 100 and 51% at 6 years for repairs, Ross and AVR, respectively (P = 0.05); however, three of five reoperations after AVR were for failed bioprosthetic devices. The freedom from reintervention was not significantly influenced by the type of AoV operation (P = 0.43). Durability of aortic valve repair for children is limited by recurrence of AI and/or stenosis, often within the first few years. After repair, reoperation should be anticipated within ∼7 years. © The Author

  3. Melatonin reduces cardiac morbidity and markers of myocardial ischemia after elective abdominal aortic aneurism repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gögenür, Ismail; Kücükakin, Bülent; Panduro Jensen, Leif

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to examine the effect of perioperative melatonin treatment on clinical cardiac morbidity and markers of myocardial ischemia in patients undergoing elective surgery for abdominal aortic aneurism. Reperfusion injury results in increased cardiac morbidity in patients undergoing surgery...... for abdominal aortic aneurisms (AAA). A randomized, placebo-controlled, clinical trial including patients undergoing surgery for AAA was performed. The patients received by infusion over a 2-hr period either, 50 mg melatonin or placebo intra-operatively, and 10 mg melatonin or placebo orally, the first three...... by Holter monitoring. A total of 26 patients received melatonin, while 24 received placebo. A significant reduction in cardiac morbidity was seen in the melatonin-treated patients compared with those given placebo [4% versus 29% (P = 0.02)]. Five patients (19%) who received melatonin had increased Tp...

  4. Strategy of endovascular versus open repair for patients with clinical diagnosis of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: the IMPROVE RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulug, Pinar; Hinchliffe, Robert J; Sweeting, Michael J; Gomes, Manuel; Thompson, Matthew T; Thompson, Simon G; Grieve, Richard J; Ashleigh, Raymond; Greenhalgh, Roger M; Powell, Janet T

    2018-05-01

    Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a common vascular emergency. The mortality from emergency endovascular repair may be much lower than the 40-50% reported for open surgery. To assess whether or not a strategy of endovascular repair compared with open repair reduces 30-day and mid-term mortality (including costs and cost-effectiveness) among patients with a suspected ruptured AAA. Randomised controlled trial, with computer-generated telephone randomisation of participants in a 1 : 1 ratio, using variable block size, stratified by centre and without blinding. Vascular centres in the UK ( n  = 29) and Canada ( n  = 1) between 2009 and 2013. A total of 613 eligible participants (480 men) with a ruptured aneurysm, clinically diagnosed at the trial centre. A total of 316 participants were randomised to the endovascular strategy group (immediate computerised tomography followed by endovascular repair if anatomically suitable or, if not suitable, open repair) and 297 were randomised to the open repair group (computerised tomography optional). The primary outcome measure was 30-day mortality, with 30-day reinterventions, costs and disposal as early secondary outcome measures. Later outcome measures included 1- and 3-year mortality, reinterventions, quality of life (QoL) and cost-effectiveness. The 30-day mortality was 35.4% in the endovascular strategy group and 37.4% in the open repair group [odds ratio (OR) 0.92, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.66 to 1.28; p  = 0.62, and, after adjustment for age, sex and Hardman index, OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.67 to 1.33]. The endovascular strategy appeared to be more effective in women than in men (interaction test p  = 0.02). More discharges in the endovascular strategy group (94%) than in the open repair group (77%) were directly to home ( p  open repair group, respectively (OR 0.73, 95% CI 0.53 to 1.00; p  = 0.053), with a stronger benefit for the endovascular strategy in the subgroup of 502 participants

  5. Real chimney technique for total debranching of supra-aortic trunks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Masaaki; Kagaya, Hideo; Kubo, Yoji; Banno, Hiroshi; Ohkubo, Nobukazu

    2015-02-01

    Side-clamping of the ascending aorta is an indispensable technique for proximal anastomosis in total debranching of supra-aortic trunks and in endovascular aneurysm repair for arch aneurysm. However, this procedure may lead to the dislodging of multiple plaques and to clamp injury of the ascending aorta. We developed a clampless technique to achieve proximal anastomosis between the ascending aorta and an artificial graft used for total debranching of supra-aortic trunks. We applied this method in six patients with arch aneurysm and a plaque-rich ascending aorta and were able to achieve total debranching of the supra-aortic trunks in all of the patients without side-clamping the ascending aorta and no procedurally related complications. This clampless anastomosis technique ("real chimney technique") in the ascending aorta is a valuable option for total debranching of supra-aortic trunks in the hybrid repair of arch aneurysms. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Long-term decline in renal function is more significant after endovascular repair of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Adas, Ziad; Shepard, Alexander D; Nypaver, Timothy J; Weaver, Mitchell R; Maatman, Thomas; Yessayan, Lenar T; Balraj, Praveen; Kabbani, Loay S

    2018-03-20

    It is not clear whether endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) results in an increase in renal insufficiency during the long term compared with open repair (OR). We reviewed our experience with AAA repair to determine whether there was a significant difference in postoperative and long-term renal outcomes between OR and EVAR. A retrospective cohort study was conducted of all patients who underwent AAA repair between January 1993 and July 2013 at a tertiary referral hospital. Demographics, comorbidities, preoperative and postoperative laboratory values, morbidity, and mortality were collected. Patients with ruptured AAAs, preoperative hemodialysis, juxtarenal or suprarenal aneurysm origin, and no follow-up laboratory values were excluded. Preoperative, postoperative, 6-month, and yearly serum creatinine values were collected. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was calculated on the basis of the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation. Acute kidney injury (AKI) was classified using the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines. Change in GFR was defined as preoperative GFR minus the GFR at each follow-up interval. Comparison was made between EVAR and OR groups using multivariate logistics for categorical data and linear regression for continuous variables. During the study period, 763 infrarenal AAA repairs were performed at our institution; 675 repairs fit the inclusion criteria (317 ORs and 358 EVARs). Mean age was 73.9 years. Seventy-nine percent were male, 78% were hypertensive, 18% were diabetic, and 31% had preoperative renal dysfunction defined as GFR below 60 mL/min. Using a multivariate logistic model to control for all variables, OR was found to have a 1.6 times greater chance for development of immediate postoperative AKI compared with EVAR (P = .038). Hypertension and aneurysm size were independent risk factors for development of AKI (P = .012 and .022, respectively). Using a linear

  7. Initial clinical experience with a sac-anchoring endoprosthesis for aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donayre, Carlos E; Zarins, Christopher K; Krievins, Dainis K; Holden, Andrew; Hill, Andrew; Calderas, Carlos; Velez, Jaime; White, Rodney A

    2011-03-01

    All current aortic endografts depend on proximal and distal fixation to prevent migration. However, migration and rupture can occur, particularly in patients with aortic necks that are short or angulated, or both. We present our initial clinical experience with a new sac-anchoring endoprosthesis designed to anchor and seal the device within the aneurysm sac. The initial worldwide experience using a new endoprosthesis for the treatment of aortic aneurysms (Nellix Endovascular, Palo Alto, Calif) was reviewed. The endoprosthesis consists of dual balloon-expandable endoframes surrounded by polymer-filled endobags designed to obliterate the aneurysm sac and maintain endograft position. Clinical results and follow-up contrast computed tomography (CT) scans at 30 days and 6 and 12 months were reviewed. The endograft was successfully deployed in 21 patients with infrarenal aortic aneurysms measuring 5.7 ± 0.7 cm (range, 4.3-7.4 cm). Two patients with common iliac aneurysms were treated with sac-anchoring extenders that maintained patency of the internal iliac artery. Infusion of 71 ± 37 mL of polymer (range, 19-158 mL) into the aortic endobags resulted in complete aneurysm exclusion in all patients. Mean implant time was 76 ± 35 minutes, with 33 ± 17 minutes of fluoroscopy time and 180 ± 81 mL of contrast; estimated blood loss was 174 ± 116 mL. One patient died during the postoperative period (30-day mortality, 4.8%), and one died at 10 months from non-device-related causes. During a mean follow-up of 8.7 ± 3.1 months and a median of 6.3 months, there were no late aneurysm- or device-related adverse events and no secondary procedures. CT imaging studies at 6 months and 1 year revealed no increase in aneurysm size, no device migration, and no new endoleaks. One patient had a limited proximal type I endoleak at 30 days that resolved at 60 days and remained sealed. One patient has an ongoing distal type I endoleak near the iliac bifurcation, with no change in aneurysm

  8. The Role of Transesophageal Echocardiography in Endovascular Repair of Traumatic Aortic Transection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swathy B

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta is a leading cause of death, following major blunt trauma, and endovascular repair has evolved as a viable alternative to open repair. This report highlights the role of transesophageal echocardiography as a valuable imaging tool for locating the exact position of the lesion, guiding placement of the endograft, detecting leaks around it and supplementing information derived from angiography during endograft deployment.

  9. PCA-induced respiratory depression simulating stroke following endoluminal repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Javed

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim To report a case of severe respiratory depression with PCA fentanyl use simulating stroke in a patient who underwent routine elective endoluminal graft repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA Case presentation A 78-year-old obese lady underwent routine endoluminal graft repair for AAA that was progressively increasing in size. Following an uneventful operation postoperative analgesia was managed with a patient-controlled analgesia (PCA device with fentanyl. On the morning following operation the patient was found to be unusually drowsy and unresponsive to stimuli. Her GCS level was 11 with plantars upgoing bilaterally. A provisional diagnosis of stroke was made. Urgent transfer to a high-dependency unit (HDU was arranged and she was given ventilatory support with a BiPap device. CT was performed and found to be normal. Arterial blood gas (ABG analysis showed respiratory acidosis with PaCO2 81 mmHg, PaO2 140 mmHg, pH 7.17 and base excess -2 mmol/l. A total dose of 600 mcg of fentanyl was self-administered in the 16 hours following emergence from general anaesthesia. Naloxone was given with good effect. There was an increase in the creatinine level from 90 μmol/L preoperatively to 167 μmol/L on the first postoperative day. The patient remained on BiPap for two days that resulted in marked improvement in gas exchange. Recovery was complete.

  10. Lower extremity weakness is associated with elevated blood and cerebrospinal fluid glucose levels following multibranched endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramoto, Jade S; Fernandez, Charlene; Gasper, Warren; Vartanian, Shant; Reilly, Linda; Chuter, Timothy

    2017-02-01

    Hyperglycemia is associated with worsened clinical outcomes after central nervous system injury. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between lower extremity weakness (LEW) and the glucose levels of blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in patients undergoing multibranched endovascular aneurysm repair (MBEVAR) of thoracoabdominal and pararenal aortic aneurysms. Blood and CSF samples were collected preoperatively, immediately after aneurysm repair, and on postoperative day 1 in 21 patients undergoing MBEVAR. Data on demographics, operative repair, complications, and outcomes were collected prospectively. There were 21 patients who underwent successful MBEVAR. Two patients had pre-existing paraplegia from prior open aortic surgery and were excluded from the current analysis. The mean age was 73 ± 8 years, and 15 of 19 (79%) were men. In the postoperative period, 7 of 19 (37%) patients developed LEW. This was temporary in 5 of 19 (26%) patients and permanent in 2 of 19 (11%) patients. The LEW group was older than the non-LEW group (77 ± 6 vs 70 ± 9 years, respectively; P = .10), had a lower preoperative glomerular filtration rate (58.6 ± 18.5 vs 71.4 ± 23.5 mL/min per 1.73 m 2 ; P = .24), and was more likely to be taking a statin (100% vs 67%, respectively; P = .13), but these did not reach statistical significance. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, coronary artery disease, lung disease, or peripheral artery disease between the LEW and non-LEW groups. There was also no difference in operative time, blood loss, contrast material volume, or fluoroscopy times between the two groups. Preoperative blood and CSF glucose levels were similar in those with and without LEW. During the postoperative period, glucose values in the blood and CSF were significantly higher in those patients who developed LEW compared with those who did not develop LEW. In all patients with LEW, the elevation

  11. Early results of valve-sparing ascending aortic replacement in type A aortic dissection and aortic insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М. Л. Гордеев

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study was designed to investigate predictors of effective valve-sparing ascending aortic replacement in patients with Stanford type A aortic dissection combined with aortic insufficiency and to analyze efficacy and safety of this kind of surgery.Methods: From January 2010 to December 2015, 49 patients with Stanford type A aortic dissection combined with aortic insufficiency underwent ascending aortic replacement. All patients were divided into 3 groups: valve-sparing procedures (group 1, n = 11, combined aortic valve and supracoronary ascending aortic replacement (group 2, n = 12, and Bentall procedure (group 3, n = 26. We assessed the initial status of patients, incidence of complications and efficacy of valve-sparing ascending aortic replacement.Results: The hospital mortality rate was 8.2% (4/49 patients. The amount of surgical correction correlated with the initial diameter of the aorta at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva. During the hospital period, none of patients from group 1 developed aortic insufficiency exceeding Grade 2 and the vast majority of patients had trivial aortic regurgitation. The parameters of cardiopulmonary bypass, cross-clamp time and circulatory arrest time did not correlate with the initial size of the ascending aorta and aortic valve blood flow impairment, neither did they influence significantly the incidence and severity of neurological complications. The baseline size of the ascending aorta and degree of aortic regurgitation did not impact the course of the early hospital period.Conclusions: Supracoronary ascending aortic replacement combined with aortic valve repair in ascending aortic dissection and aortic regurgitation is effective and safe. The initial size of the ascending aorta and aortic arch do not influence immediate results. The diameter of the aorta at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva and the condition of aortic valve leaflets could be considered as the limiting factors. Further long

  12. Repair of anomalous aortic origin of a coronary artery in 113 patients: a Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poynter, Jeffrey A; Bondarenko, Igor; Austin, Erle H; DeCampli, William M; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Ziemer, Gerhard; Kirshbom, Paul M; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Karamlou, Tara; Blackstone, Eugene H; Walters, Henry L; Gaynor, J William; Mery, Carlos M; Pearl, Jeffrey M; Brothers, Julie A; Caldarone, Christopher A; Williams, William G; Jacobs, Marshall L; Mavroudis, Constantine

    2014-10-01

    Anomalous aortic origin of a coronary artery (AAOCA) encompasses a wide morphologic spectrum, which has impeded consensus regarding indications for the diverse repair strategies. We constructed a profile of current surgical techniques and explore their application to morphologic variants. Patients<30 years old (n=113) with isolated AAOCA who underwent operations at 29 Congenital Heart Surgeons Society (CHSS) institutions from 1998 to 2012 were identified from the CHSS AAOCA Registry. Operative findings were related to surgical techniques at index repairs by cross-tabulation. Anomalous origin of the left main or left anterior descending coronary artery was present in 33 (29%) patients and of the right coronary artery in 78 (69%) patients; 2 arteries originated directly above the commissure between the left and right sinuses. There were 101 (89%) interarterial and intramural (IA/IM) arteries, 10 (9%) were interarterial but not intramural (IA/NIM) and 2 (2%) were neither interarterial nor intramural. Intramural arteries were unroofed in 100 (88%) operations, usually with intimal tacking after incision (n=47) or excision (n=25) of the common wall. Coronary reimplantation (n=11), pulmonary artery relocation (n=7; 5 for IA/NIM), simple ostioplasty (without unroofing; n=3), coronary artery bypass grafting (n=2), and ostial window (n=1) were less common. In 37 (33%) operations, a valvar commissure was taken down; 33 were resuspended. Current surgical repair of AAOCA is individualized to morphology, particularly the presence of intramural and/or interarterial segments. This report is foundational for future planned CHSS studies that will examine interventional and noninterventional outcomes and ultimately guide management of AAOCA. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. The pharmacokinetics of cefazolin in patients undergoing elective & semi-elective abdominal aortic aneurysm open repair surgery

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    Roberts Michael S

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical site infections are common, so effective antibiotic concentrations at the sites of infection are required. Surgery can lead to physiological changes influencing the pharmacokinetics of antibiotics. The aim of the study is to evaluate contemporary peri-operative prophylactic dosing of cefazolin by determining plasma and subcutaneous interstitial fluid concentrations in patients undergoing elective of semi-elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA open repair surgery. Methods/Design This is an observational pharmacokinetic study of patients undergoing AAA open repair surgery at the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital. All patients will be administered 2-g cefazolin by intravenous injection within 30-minutes of the procedure. Participants will have samples from blood and urine, collected at different intervals. Patients will also have a microdialysis catheter inserted into subcutaneous tissue to measure interstitial fluid penetration by cefazolin. Participants will be administered indocyanine green and sodium bromide as well as have cardiac output monitoring performed and tetrapolar bioimpedance to determine physiological changes occurring during surgery. Analysis of samples will be performed using validated liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic analysis will be performed using non-linear mixed effects modeling to determine individual and population pharmacokinetic parameters and the effect of peri-operative physiological changes on cefazolin disposition. Discussion The study will describe cefazolin levels in plasma and the interstitial fluid of tissues during AAA open repair surgery. The effect of physiological changes to the patient mediated by surgery will also be determined. The results of this study will guide clinicians and pharmacists to effectively dose cefazolin in order to maximize the concentration of antibiotics in the tissues which are the most common site of surgical site infections.

  14. Aortitis requiring aortic repair associated with glaucoma, thyroiditis, glaucoma, and neuropathy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayer Günther

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aortitis may be due to infectious and non-infectious causes. We observed aortitis, associated with glaucoma, thyroiditis, pericarditis, pleural effusion and neuropathy in a 63-years old woman. Despite antibiotic therapy, inflammatory signs persisted and resolved only after initiation of glucocorticoid therapy. Increasing aortic ectasia necessitated resection of the ascending aorta and implantation of a Vascutek 30 mm prosthesis. Histologically a granulomatous aortitis was diagnosed. Since all other possible causes were excluded, an immunological mechanism of the aortitis is suspected and possible triggering factors are discussed.

  15. Epidemiology of abdominal aortic aneurysms in a Chinese population during introduction of endovascular repair, 1994 to 2013: A retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Greta; Chan, Yiu Che; Chong, Ka Chun; Lee, Kam Pui; Cheung, Grace Chung-Yan; Cheng, Stephen Wing-Keung

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine changes in abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and mortality during a period when endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) was introduced.Open repair surgery was the mainstay of treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), but EVAR is increasingly utilized. Studies in the Western population have reported improved short-term or postoperative mortality and shorter length of hospital stay with EVAR. However, scant data are available in the Chinese population.We conducted a retrospective observational study using the database of the Hospital Authority, which provides public health care to most of the Hong Kong population. AAA patients admitted to public hospitals for intact repair or rupture from 1994 to 2013 were included in this study. We calculated the incidence of ruptured AAA, annual repair rates according to type of AAA and surgery, as well as death rates (operative and overall short-term). We calculated whether there were significant changes over time and compared short-term mortality between open surgery and EVAR.One thousand eight hundred eighty-five patients were admitted for intact repair and 1306 patients were admitted for AAA rupture, of whom 795 underwent rupture repair. Intact repair rates significantly increased in all age groups (7.3-37.8%, P short-term AAA-related deaths decreased by more than half (73% in 1994 to 24% in 2013, P Short-term mortality was significantly lower for EVAR than for open repair (17.2% vs 40.3%, P Short-term AAA-related deaths have declined likely due to decreased operative mortality and rupture deaths during the period of EVAR introduction and expansion.

  16. Acute coronary syndrome in a patient with Marfan syndrome following emergent surgical repair of aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovolato, Francesca Elisa; Isabella, Giambattista; Rampazzo, Debora; Guglielmi, Cosimo; Gerosa, Gino; Iliceto, Sabino; Bilato, Claudio

    2008-06-01

    We report a case of acute coronary syndrome in a patient with suspect Marfan syndrome, 25 days after emergent modified Bentall-De Bono intervention for acute type I peripartum aortic dissection. She was admitted to our intensive care unit because of unstable angina, caused by critical blood flow reduction in a large portion of the myocardium, according to the severity of the symptoms and the electrocardiographic alterations. Coronary angiography showed a sub-occlusive stenosis of the left main coronary artery as a result of the dissection extension to the coronary ostium. Because of the high risk related to heart surgery, the patient was successfully treated by unprotected angioplasty and drug-eluting stent positioning. Short- and mid-term outcomes were favourable. Subsequent tests confirmed the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome. After 2 years of follow-up, the patient remains asymptomatic and in good health. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a successful percutaneous intervention of the left main coronary artery in a patient with Marfan syndrome who had already undergone ascending aortic root and valve replacement by the Bentall-De Bono procedure for acute dissection.

  17. Stepwise Total Aortic Repairs With Fenestrated Endografts in a Patient With Loeys-Dietz Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, Kenichi; Shimizu, Hideyuki; Honda, Masanori; Inoue, Shinya; Takaki, Hidenobu; Hayashi, Kanako; Kaneyama, Hiroaki

    2017-07-01

    Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is a rare connective tissue disorder (CTD) caused by mutations in the gene encoding transforming growth factor-β receptors Ⅰ and Ⅱ. Patients with LDS manifest spontaneous aneurysms and dissections of the aorta and peripheral artery. We report a successful treatment with a hybrid endovascular repair for a rapidly expanding thoracoabdominal aneurysm in a 41-year-old woman affected by LDS. To overcome the difficulties of anatomical and surgical repair, we applied an original strategy using surgeon-modified fenestrated endografts. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dutch experience with the fenestrated Anaconda endograft for short-neck infrarenal and juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Martijn L; Tielliu, Ignace F J; Meerwaldt, Robbert; Pierie, Maurice; van Brussel, Jerome; Schurink, Geert Willem H; Lardenoye, Jan-Willem; Zeebregts, Clark J

    2014-08-01

    In the past decennium, the management of short-neck infrarenal and juxtarenal aortic aneurysms with fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair (FEVAR) has been shown to be successful, with good early and midterm results. Recently, a new fenestrated device, the fenestrated Anaconda (Vascutek, Renfrewshire, Scotland), was introduced. The aim of this study was to present the current Dutch experience with this device. A prospectively held database of patients treated with the fenestrated Anaconda endograft was analyzed. Decision to treat was based on current international guidelines. Indications for FEVAR included an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) with unsuitable neck anatomy for EVAR. Planning was performed on computed tomography angiography images using a three-dimensional workstation. Between May 2011 and September 2013, 25 patients were treated in eight institutions for juxtarenal (n = 23) and short-neck AAA (n = 2). Median AAA size was 61 mm (59-68.5 mm). All procedures except one were performed with bifurcated devices. A total of 56 fenestrations were incorporated, and 53 (94.6%) were successfully cannulated and stented. One patient died of bowel ischemia caused by occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery. On completion angiography, three type I endoleaks and seven type II endoleaks were observed. At 1 month of follow-up, all endoleaks had spontaneously resolved. Median follow-up was 11 months (range, 1-29 months). There were no aneurysm ruptures or aneurysm-related deaths and no reinterventions to date. Primary patency at 1 month of cannulated and stented target vessels was 96%. Initial and short-term results of FEVAR using the fenestrated Anaconda endograft are promising, with acceptable technical success and short-term complication rates. Growing experience and long-term results are needed to support these findings. Copyright © 2014 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Postoperative pulmonary and aortic 3D haemodynamics in patients after repair of transposition of the great arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, Julia; Buerk, Jonas; Jung, Bernd; Langer, Mathias [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics, Freiburg (Germany); Hirtler, Daniel; Stiller, Brigitte [University Medical Center Freiburg-Bad Krozingen, Department of Congenital Heart Disease and Paediatric Cardiology, Freiburg (Germany); Arnold, Raoul [University Medical Center Heidelberg, Department of Congenital Heart Disease and Paediatric Cardiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Markl, Michael [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago (United States); Northwestern University, Department Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Chicago (United States)

    2014-01-15

    To characterise aortic and pulmonary haemodynamics and investigate the correlation with post-surgical anatomy in patients with dextro-transposition of the great arteries (d-TGA). Four-dimensional (4D) MRI was performed in 17 patients after switch repair of TGA and 12 healthy controls (age, 11.9 ± 5.4 vs 23.3 ± 1.6 years). Patients were divided according to the pulmonary trunk (TP) position in relation to the ascending aorta (AAo): anterior (n = 10) and right/left anterior position (n = 7). Analysis included visual grading (ranking 0-2) of pulmonary and aortic vortical and helical flow, flow velocity quantification, blood-flow distribution to the right and left pulmonary arteries (flow ratio rPA:lPA), and vessel lumen areas. Anterior TP position was associated with increased vortices in six out of ten patients compared with right anterior TP position (one out of seven) and controls (none). Reduced systolic lPA and TP lumina in patients resulted in significantly increased peak systolic velocities (P < 0.001). Flow ratio rPA:lPA was more heterogeneous in patients (rPA:lPA = 1.56 ± 0.78 vs volunteers 1.09 ± 0.15; P < 0.05) with predominant flow to the rPA. Eleven patients presented increased helices in the AAo (grade 1.6). Evaluation of post-surgical haemodynamics in TGA patients revealed increased vortical flow for anterior TP position, asymmetric flow and increased systolic flow velocity in the pulmonary arteries owing to reduced vascular lumina. (orig.)

  20. Type 1a endoleak following Zone 1 and Zone 2 thoracic endovascular aortic repair: effect of bird-beak configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Tomoaki; Kuratani, Toru; Shimamura, Kazuo; Sakamoto, Tomohiko; Kin, Keiwa; Masada, Kenta; Shijo, Takayuki; Torikai, Kei; Maeda, Koichi; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2017-10-01

    Type 1a endoleak is one of the most severe complications after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR), because it carries the risk of aortic rupture. The association between bird-beak configuration and Type 1a endoleak remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to analyse the predictors of Type 1a endoleak following Zone 1 and Zone 2 TEVAR, with a particular focus on the effect of bird-beak configuration. From April 2008 to July 2015, 105 patients (mean age 68.6 years) who underwent Zone 1 and 2 landing TEVAR were enrolled, with a mean follow-up period of 4.3 years. The patients were categorized into 2 groups, according to the presence (Group B, n = 32) or the absence (Group N, n = 73) of bird-beak configuration on the first postoperative multidetector computed tomography. The Kaplan-Meier event-free rate curve showed that Type 1a endoleak and bird-beak progression occurred less frequently in Group N than in Group B. Five-year freedom from Type 1a endoleak rates were 79.7% and 100% for Groups B and N, respectively (P = 0.007). Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that dissecting aortic aneurysm (odds ratio 3.72, 95% confidence interval 1.30-11.0; P = 0.014) and shorter radius of inner curvature (odds ratio 1.09, 95% confidence interval 0.85-0.99; P = 0.025) were significant risk factors for bird-beak configuration. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression showed that Z-type stent graft (hazard ratio 2.69, 95% confidence interval 1.11-6.51; P = 0.030) was a significant risk factor for bird-beak progression. Appropriate stent grafts need to be chosen carefully to prevent Type 1a endoleak and bird-beak configuration after landing Zone 1 and 2 TEVAR. Patients with bird-beak configuration on early postoperative multidetector computed tomography require closer follow-up to screen for Type 1a endoleak. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio

  1. Association of left subclavian artery coverage without revascularization and spinal cord ischemia in patients undergoing thoracic endovascular aortic repair: A Vascular Quality Initiative® analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Pedro Gr; Woo, Karen; Beck, Adam W; Scali, Salvatore T; Weaver, Fred A

    2017-12-01

    Objectives Investigate the impact of left subclavian artery coverage without revascularization on spinal cord ischemia development in patients undergoing thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Methods The Vascular Quality Initiative thoracic endovascular aortic repair module (April 2011-July 2014) was analyzed. Patients undergoing left subclavian artery coverage were divided into two groups according to revascularization status. The association between left subclavian artery revascularization with the primary outcome of spinal cord ischemia and the secondary outcome of stroke was assessed with multivariable analysis adjusting for between-group baseline differences. Results The left subclavian artery was covered in 508 (24.6%) of the 2063 thoracic endovascular aortic repairs performed. Among patients with left subclavian artery coverage, 58.9% underwent revascularization. Spinal cord ischemia incidence was 12.1% in the group without revascularization compared to 8.5% in the group undergoing left subclavian artery revascularization (odds ratio (95%CI): 1.48(0.82-2.68), P = 0.189). Multivariable analysis adjustment identified an independent association between left subclavian artery coverage without revascularization and the incidence of spinal cord ischemia (adjusted odds ratio (95%CI): 2.29(1.03-5.14), P = 0.043). Although the incidence of stroke was also higher for the group with a covered and nonrevascularized left subclavian artery (12.1% versus 8.5%), this difference was not statistically significant after multivariable analysis (adjusted odds ratio (95%CI): 1.55(0.74-3.26), P = 0.244). Conclusion For patients undergoing left subclavian artery coverage during thoracic endovascular aortic repair, the addition of a revascularization procedure was associated with a significantly lower incidence of spinal cord ischemia.

  2. Reoperative aortic root replacement: Outcome in a contemporary series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esaki, Jiro; Leshnower, Bradley G; Binongo, Jose N; Lasanajak, Yi; McPherson, LaRonica; Thourani, Vinod H; Chen, Edward P

    2017-09-01

    Reoperative aortic root replacement is a challenging procedure associated with significant mortality and morbidity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the outcomes of reoperative aortic root replacement when performed in a number of complex clinical settings and to identify risk factors for operative mortality and long-term survival. From 2006 to 2015, 280 consecutive patients at an academic center underwent reoperative aortic root replacement after a variety of previous aortic or cardiac operations. Logistic regression and extended Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to determine risk factors for operative mortality and long-term survival, respectively. The mean age of patients was 52.5 ± 14.1 years. Prior operations included proximal aortic replacement in 113 patients, valve surgery in 162 patients, and coronary artery bypass grafting in 46 patients. Concomitant procedures included arch replacement in 135 patients, coronary artery bypass grafting in 68 patients, and mitral valve repair/replacement in 18 patients. Operative mortality was 14.3%. Five-year survival was 74.0%. Univariable analysis did not find previous root replacement, prior proximal aortic surgery, and concomitant arch replacement to be risk factors for operative mortality. In the multivariable analysis, chronic lung disease, prior myocardial infarction, and concomitant mitral valve surgery were risk factors for operative mortality. Age, peripheral artery disease, emergency, and concomitant mitral valve surgery were risk factors for mortality in the late phase. Reoperative aortic root replacement represents complex procedures carrying significant morbidity and mortality. Chronic lung disease, prior myocardial infarction, and concomitant mitral valve surgery were risk factors for operative mortality. Age, peripheral artery disease, emergency, and concomitant mitral valve surgery were risk factors for long-term mortality. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for

  3. Percutaneous Transabdominal Approach for the Treatment of Endoleaks after Endovascular Repair of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Do Yun; Lee, Kwang Hun [Severance Hospital, University of Yonsei, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Jong Yun [Gangnam Severance Hospital, University of Yonsei, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Dong Hoon; Shim, Won Heum [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility and clinical efficacy of percutaneous transabdominal treatment of endoleaks after endovascular aneurysm repair. Between 2000 and 2007, six patients with type I (n = 4) or II (n = 2) endoleaks were treated by the percutaneous transabdominal approach using embolization with N-butyl cyanoacrylate with or without coils. Five patients underwent a single session and one patient had two sessions of embolization. The median time between aneurysm repair and endoleak treatment was 25.5 months (range: 0-84 months). Follow-up CT images were evaluated for changes in the size and shape of the aneurysm sac and presence or resolution of endoleaks. The median follow-up after endoleak treatment was 16.4 months (range: 0-37 months). Technical success was achieved in all six patients. Clinical success was achieved in four patients with complete resolution of the endoleak confirmed by follow-up CT. Clinical failure was observed in two patients. One eventually underwent surgical conversion, and the other was lost to follow-up. There were no procedure-related complications. The percutaneous transabdominal approach for the treatment of type I or II endoleaks, after endovascular aneurysm repair, is an alternative method when conventional endovascular methods have failed.

  4. Reduction in allogeneic blood products with routine use of autotransfusion in open elective infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtemanche, Karim; Elkouri, Stephane; Dugas, Jean-Philippe; Beaudoin, Nathalie; Bruneau, Luc; Blair, Jean-François

    2013-11-01

    Concern about allogeneic blood product cost and complications has prompted interest in blood conservation techniques. Intraoperative autotransfusion (IAT) is currently not used routinely by vascular surgeons in open elective infrareanl abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. The objective of this study is to review our experience with IAT and its impact on blood transfusion. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of consecutive patients treated electively over a 4-year period and compared 2 strategy related to IAT, routine use IAT (rIAT) versus on-demand IAT (oIAT). Outcomes measured were number of units of allogeneic red blood cells and autologous red blood cells transfused intraoperatively and postoperatively, preoperative, postoperative, and discharge hemoglobin levels; postoperative infections; length of postoperative intensive care stay; and length of hospital stay. T-independent and Fisher exact test were used. A total of 212 patients were included, 38 (18%) in the rIAT and 174 (82%) in the oIAT. Groups were similar except for an inferior creatinine and a superior mean aneurysm diameter for the rIAT group. Patients in the rIAT group had a lower rate of transfusion (26% vs 54%, P = .002) and a lower mean number of blood unit transfused (0.8 vs 1.8, P = .048). These findings were still more significant for AAA larger than 60 mm (18% rIAT vs 62% oIAT, P = .0001). Postoperative hemoglobin was superior in the rIAT group (107 vs 101 g/L, P = .01). Mean postoperative intensive care length of stay was shorter for the rIAT group (1.1 vs 1.8 days, P = .01). No difference was noted for infection, mortality, or hospital length of stay. The rIAT reduced the exposure to allogeneic blood products by more than 50%, in particular for patients with AAA larger than 60 mm. These results support the use of rIAT for open elective infrarenal AAA repair.

  5. Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair with the Talent Stent-Graft: Outcomes in Patients with Large Iliac Arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, Andrew; Butterfield, John S.; McCollum, Charles N.; Ashleigh, Raymond J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report outcomes following endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in patients with ectatic common iliac arteries (CIAs). Of 117 AAA patients treated by EVAR between 1998 and 2005, 87 (74%) had CIAs diameters 18 but <25 mm. All patients were treated with Talent stent-grafts, 114 bifurcated and 3 AUI devices. Departmental databases and patient records were reviewed to assess outcomes. Technical success, iliac-related outcome, and iliac-related reintervention (IRSI) were analyzed. Patients with EVAR extending into the external iliac artery were excluded. Median (range) follow-up for the study group was 24 (1-84) months. Initial technical success was 98% for CIAs <18 mm and 100% for CIAs ≥18 mm (p = 0.551). There were three distal type I endoleaks (two in the ectatic group) and six iliac limb occlusions (one in an ectatic patient); there were no statistically significant differences between groups (p = 0.4). There were nine IRSIs (three stent-graft extensions, six femorofemoral crossover grafts); three of these patients had one or both CIAs ≥18 mm (p = 0.232). One-year freedom from IRSI was 92% ± 3% and 84% ± 9% for the <18-mm and ≥18-mm CIA groups, respectively (p = 0.232). We conclude that the treatment of AAA by EVAR in patients with CIAs 18-24 mm appears to be safe and effective, however, it may be associated with more frequent reinterventions.

  6. Can Surgeons Assess CT Suitability for Endovascular Repair (EVAR) in Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm? Implications for a Ruptured EVAR Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rayt, Harjeet; Lambert, Kelly; Bown, Matthew; Fishwick, Guy; Morgan, Robert; McCarthy, Mark; London, Nick; Sayers, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether surgeons without formal radiological training are able to assess suitability of patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) for EVAR. The CT scans of 20 patients with AAA were reviewed under timed conditions by six vascular surgeons. Twenty minutes was allocated per scan. They were asked to determine if each aneurysm would be treatable by EVAR in the emergency setting and, if so, to measure for device selection. The results were then compared with those of a vascular radiologist. Six surgeons agreed on the suitability of endovascular repair in 45% of cases (95% CI, 23.1-68.5%; 9/20 scans; κ = 0.41 [p = 0.01]) and concurred with the radiologist in eight of these. Individually, agreement ranged from 13 to 16 of the 20 scans, 65-80% between surgeons. The kappa value for agreement between all the surgeons and the radiologist was 0.47 (p = 0.01, moderate agreement). For the individual surgeons, this ranged from 0.3 to 0.6 (p = 0.01). In conclusion, while overall agreement was moderate between the surgeons and the radiologist, it is clear that if surgeons are to assess patients for ruptured EVAR in the future, focused training of surgical trainees is required.

  7. Renal sympathetic denervation in uncontrolled arterial hypertension after successful repair for aortic coarctation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurz, Philipp; Okon, Thomas; Riede, Thomas; Wagner, Robert; Schuler, Gerhard; Daehnert, Ingo; Desch, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Uncontrolled arterial hypertension is a frequent problem after successful repair of CoA and has been attributed to increased central sympathetic drive as well as a blunted baroreceptor reflex. RSD is a promising therapy to reduce central sympathetic drive and improve baroreflex sensitivity. 8 patients (age: 27±6 years) with previous surgical and/or percutaneous repair of CoA, absence of any relevant restenosis (invasive gradient across the site of previous treatment 3±4 mmHg) and resistant arterial hypertension (daytime SBP≥140 mmHg on 24 hour ambulatory blood pressure measurements [ABPM] in spite of the concurrent use of 3 antihypertensive agents of different classes or intolerance to BP medications) were included. Bilateral RSD was performed using the Symplicity Flex™ catheter (Medtronic, MN, USA). RSD was successful in all patients with no procedural complications and no evidence for renal artery stenosis 6 months post procedure. From baseline to 6 month follow-up, RSD was followed by a significant reduction in average daytime systolic BP (150.4±7.8 to 143.1±8.0 mmHg; p=0.0117) as well as systolic BP throughout 24 h (146.8±7.3 vs. 140.5±7.8, p=0.04). The BP reductions observed in these patients justify engaging in a larger clinical trial on the efficacy of RSD in this specific type of secondary hypertension and bares the hope that RSD might extend the currently very limited armory against arterial hypertension in young adults with previous repair of CoA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Spinal arterial anatomy and risk factors for lower extremity weakness following endovascular thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair with branched stent-grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Catherine K; Chuter, Timothy A M; Reilly, Linda M; Ota, Maile K; Furtado, Andre; Bucci, Monica; Wintermark, Max; Hiramoto, Jade S

    2008-06-01

    To evaluate spinal arterial anatomy and identify risk factors for lower extremity weakness (LEW) following endovascular thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) repair. A retrospective review was conducted of 37 patients (27 men; mean age 74.8+/-7.1 years, range 58-86) undergoing endovascular TAAA repair with branched stent-grafts at a single academic institution from July 2005 to December 2007. Data were collected on preoperative comorbidities, duration of operation, blood loss, type of anesthesia, extent of aortic coverage, blood pressure, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure and drainage, and postoperative development of LEW. Pre- and postoperative contrast-enhanced computed tomographic angiograms (CTA) in a 26-patient subset were analyzed to evaluate the number of patent intercostal and lumbar arteries before and after repair. All patients were neurologically intact at the end of the operation. Seven (19%) patients developed LEW postoperatively: 6 perioperatively and 1 after discharge. LEW was associated with postoperative hypotension, internal iliac artery (IIA) occlusion, and fewer patent segmental arteries on preoperative CTA. Lowest mean systolic blood pressure was segmental arteries in patients with or without LEW. Endovascular TAAA repair inevitably occludes direct inflow to lumbar and intercostal arteries. The distal segments of these arteries to the spine, however, are seen to remain patent through collaterals. Measures to preserve collateral pathways and increase perfusion pressure may help prevent or treat LEW.

  9. Estratégia cirúrgica na transposição das grandes artérias associada à obstrução do arco aórtico Surgical strategy in transposition of the great arteries with aortic arch obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayard Gontijo Filho

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar nossa experiência no tratamento cirúrgico da transposição das grandes artérias (TGA associada à obstrução do arco aórtico. MÉTODO: Entre janeiro de 1998 e dezembro de 2005, realizamos 223 operações de Jatene para correção de TGA: 21 (9,4% pacientes apresentavam obstruções do arco aórtico. A anatomia do arco aórtico evidenciou: coarctação da aorta localizada (n=10; coarctação com hipoplasia tubular do arco aórtico (n=6; interrupção do arco aórtico (n=5. Comunicação interventricular (CIV: 19 pacientes (90,5%, sendo 11 do tipo Taussig-Bing. Desproporção importante entre aorta e artéria pulmonar e anomalias coronárias foram achados freqüentes. Houve 7 correções em dois estágios e 14 correções em um único estágio. A reconstrução do arco foi realizada por ressecção e anastomose término-terminal ampliada (13 ou por translocação da aorta ascendente (8. RESULTADO: Houve cinco (23,8% óbitos hospitalares; apenas um (11,1% nos últimos nove casos consecutivos. Reoperações no período hospitalar: revisão de hemostasia (5, CIV residual + coarctação não identificada (1, estenose residual de arco aórtico (1. Após a alta, houve dois óbitos e três pacientes foram submetidos a reintervenções para estenose da via de saída do ventrículo direito. CONCLUSÃO: O tratamento da transposição das grandes artérias associada à obstrução do arco aórtico apresenta alta complexidade e morbi-mortalidade. Empregamos as correções em um e em dois estágios, obtendo resultados comparáveis. Nossa preferência atual é pela correção precoce em um único estágio para todos os pacientes, independente de sua configuração anatômica.OBJECTIVE:To analyze our experience in the surgical correction of transposition of the great arteries associated with aortic arch obstruction. METHOD: From January 1998 to December 2005 we performed 223 arterial switch operations for transposition of the great

  10. Beneficial effect of statins on total mortality in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathisen, Sven Ross; Abdelnoor, Michael

    2017-10-01

    In this single center, retrospective cohort study we wished to compare early and total mortality for all patients treated for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) with open surgery who were taking statins compared to those who were not. A cohort of 640 patients with AAA was treated with open surgery between 1999 and 2012. Patients were consecutively recruited from a source population of 390,000; 21.3% were female, and the median age was 73 years. The median follow-up was 3.93 years, with an interquartile range of 1.79-6.58 years. The total follow-up was 2855 patient-years. An explanatory strategy was used. The propensity score (PS) was implemented to control for selection bias and confounders. The crude effect of statin use showed a 78% reduction of the 30-day mortality. A stratified analysis using the Mantel-Haenszel method on quintiles of the PS gave an adjusted effect of the odds ratio equal to 0.43 (95% CI: 0.18-0.96), indicating a 57% reduction of the 30-day mortality for statin users. The adjusted rate ratio was 0.62 (95% CI: 0.45-0.83), indicating a reduction of long-term mortality of 38% for statin users compared to non-users for a median follow-up of 3.93 years. This retrospective cohort study showed a significant beneficial effect of statin use on early and long-term survival for patients treated with open surgery. To be conclusive, our results need to be replicated by a randomized clinical trial.

  11. Predictors of outcome after elective endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and external validation of a risk prediction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniowski, Brendan; Barnes, Mary; Jenkins, Jason; Boyne, Nicholas; Kruger, Allan; Walker, Philip J

    2011-09-01

    Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair (EVAR) has been associated with lower operative mortality and morbidity than open surgery but comparable long-term mortality and higher delayed complication and reintervention rates. Attention has therefore been directed to identifying preoperative and operative variables that influence outcomes after EVAR. Risk-prediction models, such as the EVAR Risk Assessment (ERA) model, have also been developed to help surgeons plan EVAR procedures. The aims of this study were (1) to describe outcomes of elective EVAR at the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital (RBWH), (2) to identify preoperative and operative variables predictive of outcomes after EVAR, and (3) to externally validate the ERA model. All elective EVAR procedures at the RBWH before July 1, 2009, were reviewed. Descriptive analyses were performed to determine the outcomes. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify preoperative and operative variables predictive of outcomes after EVAR. Binomial logistic regression analyses were used to externally validate the ERA model. Before July 1, 2009, 197 patients (172 men), who were a mean age of 72.8 years, underwent elective EVAR at the RBWH. Operative mortality was 1.0%. Survival was 81.1% at 3 years and 63.2% at 5 years. Multivariate analysis showed predictors of survival were age (P = .0126), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score (P = .0180), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (P = .0348) at 3 years and age (P = .0103), ASA score (P = .0006), renal failure (P = .0048), and serum creatinine (P = .0022) at 5 years. Aortic branch vessel score was predictive of initial (30-day) type II endoleak (P = .0015). AAA tortuosity was predictive of midterm type I endoleak (P = .0251). Female sex was associated with lower rates of initial clinical success (P = .0406). The ERA model fitted RBWH data well for early death (C statistic = .906), 3-year survival (C statistic = .735), 5-year

  12. Medium-Term Outcomes Following Endovascular Repair of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms with an Unfavourable Proximal Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Prakash; Hughes, John; Patel, Ashish S.; Donati, Tommaso; Sallam, Morad; Patel, Sanjay D.; Bell, Rachel E.; Katsanos, Konstantinos; Modarai, Bijan; Zayed, Hany A.

    2015-01-01

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to evaluate medium-term outcomes following endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) with unfavourable neck anatomy using stent grafts with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter.Materials and MethodsA retrospective review of 27 patients who underwent elective EVAR between 2006 and 2008 using a stent graft with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter was carried out. All patients had computed tomography angiography (CTA) for procedure planning, and detailed assessment of the aneurysm neck was performed using a three-dimensional CTA workstation. Patients were followed up with CTA at 3 and 12 months and annual duplex thereafter.ResultsThe median aneurysm diameter was 7 cm, and the median aneurysm neck diameter was 31 mm. Cook Zenith stent grafts were used in all patients, with a proximal diameter of 36 mm (n = 25) and 40 mm (n = 2). Primary and assisted primary technical success rates were 74 and 93 %, respectively. The follow-up period ranged from 62 to 84 months, with a median of 72 months. 15 patients died during follow-up. Two patients died from aortic rupture, and the remaining patients died from cardiac disease (n = 4), chest sepsis (n = 6), cancer (n = 2) and renal failure (n = 1). Complications included type I endoleak (n = 5), limb occlusion (n = 2), limb stenosis (n = 2), limb kinking (n = 1), dissection of an artery (n = 1), occlusion of a femorofemoral cross-over graft (n = 1) and poor attachment of a distal limb (n = 1).ConclusionsEVAR using stent grafts in the presence of an unfavourable neck has a high risk of complications. Medium-term survival in this group is low but mainly due to patient co-morbidities

  13. Medium-Term Outcomes Following Endovascular Repair of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms with an Unfavourable Proximal Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Prakash, E-mail: prakash.2.saha@kcl.ac.uk; Hughes, John, E-mail: johnhughes387@rocketmail.com; Patel, Ashish S., E-mail: ashish.s.patel@kcl.ac.uk; Donati, Tommaso, E-mail: tommaso.donati@gstt.nhs.uk; Sallam, Morad, E-mail: morad.sallam@gstt.nhs.uk; Patel, Sanjay D., E-mail: sanjay.patel@gstt.nhs.uk; Bell, Rachel E. [King’s Health Partners, Department of Vascular Surgery, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Katsanos, Konstantinos, E-mail: katsanos@med.upatras.gr [King’s Health Partners, Department of Interventional Radiology, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Modarai, Bijan, E-mail: bijan.modarai@kcl.ac.uk; Zayed, Hany A., E-mail: hany.zayed@gstt.nhs.uk [King’s Health Partners, Department of Vascular Surgery, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to evaluate medium-term outcomes following endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) with unfavourable neck anatomy using stent grafts with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter.Materials and MethodsA retrospective review of 27 patients who underwent elective EVAR between 2006 and 2008 using a stent graft with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter was carried out. All patients had computed tomography angiography (CTA) for procedure planning, and detailed assessment of the aneurysm neck was performed using a three-dimensional CTA workstation. Patients were followed up with CTA at 3 and 12 months and annual duplex thereafter.ResultsThe median aneurysm diameter was 7 cm, and the median aneurysm neck diameter was 31 mm. Cook Zenith stent grafts were used in all patients, with a proximal diameter of 36 mm (n = 25) and 40 mm (n = 2). Primary and assisted primary technical success rates were 74 and 93 %, respectively. The follow-up period ranged from 62 to 84 months, with a median of 72 months. 15 patients died during follow-up. Two patients died from aortic rupture, and the remaining patients died from cardiac disease (n = 4), chest sepsis (n = 6), cancer (n = 2) and renal failure (n = 1). Complications included type I endoleak (n = 5), limb occlusion (n = 2), limb stenosis (n = 2), limb kinking (n = 1), dissection of an artery (n = 1), occlusion of a femorofemoral cross-over graft (n = 1) and poor attachment of a distal limb (n = 1).ConclusionsEVAR using stent grafts in the presence of an unfavourable neck has a high risk of complications. Medium-term survival in this group is low but mainly due to patient co-morbidities.

  14. Impact of surgeon and hospital experience on outcomes of abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in New York State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Andrew J; Connolly, Peter H; Schneider, Darren B; Sedrakyan, Art

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to assess the impact of the surgeon's and hospital's experience on the outcomes of open surgical repair (OSR) and endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of intact and ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) in New York State. New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System data were used to identify patients undergoing AAA repair from 2000 to 2011. Characteristics of the provider and hospital were determined by linkage to the New York Office of Professions and National Provider Identification databases. Distinct hierarchical logistic regression models for EVAR and OSR for intact and ruptured AAAs were created to adjust for the patient's comorbidities and to evaluate the impact of the surgeon's and hospital's experience on outcomes. The provider's years since medical school graduation as well as annual volume of the facility and provider are examined in tertiles. Adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals are presented. A total of 18,842 patients underwent AAA repair by a vascular surgeon. For intact AAAs (n = 17,118), 26.2% of patients underwent OSR and 73.8% underwent EVAR. For ruptured AAAs (n = 1724), 63.9% underwent OSR and 36.1% underwent EVAR. After intact AAA repair, OSR adjusted outcomes were significantly influenced by the surgeon's annual volume but not by the facility's volume or the surgeon's age. The lowest volume providers (1-4 OSRs) had higher in-hospital mortality rates than high-volume (>11 OSRs) surgeons (adjusted odds ratio, 1.87 [95% confidence interval, 1.1-3.17]). Low-volume providers also had higher odds of major complications (1.23 [1-1.51]). For patients with intact AAA undergoing EVAR, mortality was higher at low-volume facilities (2.6 [1.3-5.3] and 2.7 [1.5-4.8] for 27 OSRs for ruptured AAA) centers (1.56 [1.02-2.39]), whereas low-volume physicians (<4 OSRs for ruptured AAA) had higher odds of major complications (1.58 [1.04-2.41]). In the case of EVAR for rupture, there were no characteristics of

  15. Comparison of dental arch dimensions in models of preschool children with cleft lip/palate repaired by means of surgery alone versus controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burhan, Ahmad S; Nawaya, Fehmieh R

    2016-09-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) anomaly is one of the most prevalent congenital defects causing disturbances of dental arch dimensions. This study aimed at investigating differences in these dimensions between preschool children with cleft lip/palate and a matched control group representing healthy individuals with normal occlusion (NO). The sample of this cross-sectional analytical study consisted of 108 plaster models of children aged from 4 to 5.5 years. They were divided into five groups: the cleft lip group, the cleft palate (CP) group, the unilateral cleft lip and palate group, the bilateral cleft lip and palate group, and the NO group. The NO group was used as a control group. All cleft-affected children were treated only with surgery. Dental arch length and widths were measured. The dental arch dimensions of the cleft lip group were nearly similar to those in the controls. Moreover, the mandibular transverse widths of the CP group were close to those in the controls. However, the mandibular arch length and all maxillary dimensions of the CP group were smaller than those in the controls. In the unilateral cleft lip and palate group, the arch lengths in both jaws and the maxillary transverse widths were smaller than those in the controls, whereas the mandibular transverse widths were similar to those in the controls. In the bilateral cleft lip and palate group, the arch lengths in both jaws were close to those in the controls, but both arches were narrower than those in the controls. The various types of CLP were found to be associated with differences in most maxillary and some mandibular arch dimensions. These data can be used for cleft patient counseling and treatment planning.

  16. Transaortic edge-to-edge mitral valve repair for moderate secondary/functional mitral regurgitation in patients undergoing aortic root/valve intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Shiv Kumar; Abraham, Atul; Bhoje, Amol; Gharde, Parag; Sahu, Manoj; Talwar, Sachin; Airan, Balram

    2017-11-01

    The present study evaluates the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of edge-to-edge repair for moderate secondary/functional mitral regurgitation in patients undergoing aortic valve/root interventions. Sixteen patients underwent transaortic edge-to-edge mitral valve repair. Mitral regurgitation was 2+ in 8 patients and 3+ in 6 patients. Two patients in whom cardiac arrest developed preoperatively had severe (4+) mitral regurgitation. Patients underwent operation for severe aortic regurgitation ± aortic root lesions. The mean left ventricular systolic and diastolic diameters were 51.5 ± 12.8 mm and 70.7 ± 10.7 mm, respectively. Left ventricular ejection fraction ranged from 20% to 60%. Primary surgical procedure included Bentall's ± hemiarch replacement in 10 patients, aortic valve replacement in 5 patients, and noncoronary sinus replacement with aortic valve repair in 1 patient. Severity of mitral regurgitation decreased to trivial or zero in 13 patients, 1+ in 2 patients, and 2+ in 1 patient. There were no gradients across the mitral valve in 9 patients, less than 5 mm Hg in 6 patients, and 9 mm Hg in 1 patient. There was no operative mortality. Follow-up ranged from 2 weeks to 54 months. Echocardiography showed trivial or no mitral regurgitation in 12 patients, 1+ in 2 patients, and 2+ in 2 patients. None of the patients had significant mitral stenosis. The mean left ventricular systolic and diastolic diameters decreased to 40.5 ± 10.3 mm and 58.7 ± 11.6 mm, respectively. Ejection fraction also improved slightly (22%-65%). Transaortic edge-to-edge mitral valve repair is a safe and effective technique to abolish secondary/functional mitral regurgitation. However, its impact on overall survival needs to be studied. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Aortic Root Replacement for Children With Loeys-Dietz Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nishant D; Alejo, Diane; Crawford, Todd; Hibino, Narutoshi; Dietz, Harry C; Cameron, Duke E; Vricella, Luca A

    2017-05-01

    Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is an aggressive aortopathy with a proclivity for aortic aneurysm rupture and dissection at smaller diameters than other connective tissue disorders. We reviewed our surgical experience of children with LDS to validate our guidelines for prophylactic aortic root replacement (ARR). We reviewed all children (younger than 18 years) with a diagnosis of LDS who underwent ARR at our institution. The primary endpoint was mortality, and secondary endpoints included complications and the need for further interventions. Thirty-four children with LDS underwent ARR. Mean age at operation was 10 years, and 15 (44%) were female. Mean preoperative root diameter was 4 cm. Three children (9%) had composite ARR with a mechanical prosthesis, and 31 (91%) underwent valve-sparing ARR. Concomitant procedures included arch replacement in 2 (6%), aortic valve repair in 1 (3%), and patent foramen ovale closure in 16 (47%). There was no operative mortality. Two children (6%) required late replacement of the ascending aorta, 5 (15%) required arch replacement, 1 (3%) required mitral valve replacement, and 2 (6%) had coronary button aneurysms/pseudoaneurysms requiring repair. Three children required redo valve-sparing ARR after a Florida sleeve procedure, and 2 had progressive aortic insufficiency requiring aortic valve replacement after a valve-sparing procedure. There were 2 late deaths (6%). These data confirm the aggressive aortopathy of LDS. Valve-sparing ARR should be performed when feasible to avoid the risks of prostheses. Serial imaging of the arterial tree is critical, given the rate of subsequent intervention. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A quarter of a century of experience with aortic valve-sparing operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Tirone E; Feindel, Christopher M; David, Carolyn M; Manlhiot, Cedric

    2014-09-01

    To examine the late outcomes of aortic valve-sparing operations to treat patients with aortic root aneurysm with and without aortic insufficiency (AI) in a cohort of patients followed up prospectively since 1988. A total of 371 consecutive patients had undergone aortic valve-sparing surgery (mean age, 47 ± 15 years; 78% men) from 1988 through 2010. In addition to the aortic root aneurysm, 47% had moderate or severe AI, 35.5% had Marfan syndrome, 12.1% had type A aortic dissection, 9.2% had bicuspid aortic valve, 8.4% had mitral insufficiency, 16.1% had aortic arch aneurysm, and 10.2% had coronary artery disease. Reimplantation of the aortic valve was used in 296 patients and remodeling of the aortic root in 75. Cusp repair by plication of the free margin along the nodule of Arantius was used in 36.6% of patients, and reinforcement of the free margin with a double layer of fine Gore-Tex suture in 24.2%. The patients were followed up prospectively with images of the aortic root for a median follow-up of 8.9 ± 5.2 years. A total of 4 operative and 39 late deaths occurred. Survival at 18 years was 76.8% ± 4.31%, lower than that for the general population matched for age and gender. Age, type A aortic dissection, impaired ventricular function, and preoperative AI were associated with increased mortality on multivariable analysis. Reoperations on the aortic valve were performed in 8 patients for recurrent AI and in 2 for infective endocarditis. Freedom from reoperation on the aortic valve at 18 years was 94.8% ± 2.0%. No predictors of the need for reoperation were found on multivariable analysis. Eighteen patients developed AI greater than mild. Freedom from AI greater than mild at 18 years was 78.0% ± 4.8%. No predictors of recurrent AI were identified on multivariable analysis. Aortic valve-sparing operations continue to provide excellent clinical outcomes, although a slow but progressive deterioration of aortic valve function seems to occur during the first 2

  19. Complete ten-year follow-up after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: Survival and causes of death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wibmer, Andreas; Nolz, Richard; Teufelsbauer, Harald; Kretschmer, Georg; Prusa, Alexander M.; Funovics, Martin; Lammer, Johannes; Schoder, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the hazard and causes of death after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms during a complete ten year follow-up. Methods: This is a retrospective clinical study of 130 consecutive patients undergoing EVAR between 1995 and 1998. One-hundred twenty-one patients (93.1%) were treated with first-generation stentgrafts and nine patients (6.9%) received second-generation devices. All patients completed a follow-up of at least 10 years, unless death occurred before then. Time and causes of death were provided by the Austrian central register of deaths. Results: The median follow-up was 7.6 years, and the 130 patients had 968.5 person-years of follow-up. The ten-year mortality rate was 62.3%. Cardiovascular events were the most frequent causes of death, with a 3.9 incidence rate per 100 person-years. Cancer death and death due to other causes occurred in 2.1 and 1.8 cases per 100 person-years, respectively. Lethal late aneurysm rupture happened in 4.6% (n = 6), which corresponds to an annual incidence rate of 0.6 per 100 person-years. All of those patients had been treated with first-generation devices. Conclusions: Cardiovascular events were the most frequent cause of death after EVAR, followed by malignancy and other diseases. The risk of dying from secondary rupture was clearly lower than that of death due to other reasons during ten years after EVAR, even in patients with first-generation stentgrafts.

  20. Low baseline and subsequent higher aortic abdominal aneurysm FDG uptake are associated with poor sac shrinkage post endovascular repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marie, Pierre-Yves [CHRU-Nancy, Universite de Lorraine, Nuclear Medecine and Nancyclotep Platform, Nancy (France); INSERM, University of Lorraine, UMR 1116, Nancy (France); CHRU-Nancy, Hopitaux de BRABOIS, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Vandoeuvre (France); Plissonnier, Didier; Rouer, Martin [CHU-Rouen, Department of Vascular Surgery, Rouen (France); Bravetti, Stephanie [CHRU-Nancy, Universite de Lorraine, Department of Radiology, Nancy (France); Coscas, Raphael [Hopital Ambroise Pare, APHP, Chirurgie Vasculaire, Boulogne-Billancourt (France); Haulon, Stephan [CHU-Lille, Department of Vascular Surgery, Lille (France); Mandry, Damien [CHRU-Nancy, Universite de Lorraine, Department of Radiology, Nancy (France); INSERM, University of Lorraine, UMR 947, Nancy (France); Alsac, Jean-Marc [grid.414093.b, APHP, HEGP, Department of Vascular Surgery, Paris (France); Malikov, Serguei; Settembre, Nicla [CHRU-Nancy, Universite de Lorraine, Vascular Surgery, Nancy (France); Goueffic, Yann [CHU-Nantes, Department of Vascular Surgery, Nantes (France); Morel, Olivier [CHU-Besancon, Department of Nuclear Medecine, Besancon (France); Roch, Veronique [CHRU-Nancy, Universite de Lorraine, Nuclear Medecine and Nancyclotep Platform, Nancy (France); Micard, Emilien [INSERM, University of Lorraine, UMR 947, Nancy (France); INSERM, CHRU-Nancy, Universite de Lorraine, CIC-1433, FCRIN INI-CRCT, Nancy (France); Lamiral, Zohra [INSERM, CHRU-Nancy, Universite de Lorraine, CIC-1433, FCRIN INI-CRCT, Nancy (France); Michel, Jean-Baptiste [INSERM, Bichat, UMR 698, Paris (France); Rossignol, Patrick [INSERM, University of Lorraine, UMR 1116, Nancy (France); INSERM, CHRU-Nancy, Universite de Lorraine, CIC-1433, FCRIN INI-CRCT, Nancy (France)

    2018-04-15

    The growth phases of medically treated abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are frequently associated with an {sup 18}F-fluorodesoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) pattern involving low baseline and subsequent higher FDG uptake. However, the FDG-PET patterns associated with the endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of larger AAA are presently unknown. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between serial AAA FDG uptake measurements, obtained before EVAR and 1 and 6 months post-intervention and subsequent sac shrinkage at 6 months, a well-recognized indicator of successful repair. Thirty-three AAA patients referred for EVAR (maximal diameter: 55.4 ± 6.0 mm, total volume: 205.7 ± 63.0 mL) underwent FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT) before EVAR and at 1 and 6 months thereafter, with the monitoring of AAA volume and of a maximal standardized FDG uptake [SUVmax] averaged between the axial slices encompassing the AAA. Sac shrinkage was highly variable and could be stratified into three terciles: a first tercile in which shrinkage was absent or very limited (0-29 mL) and a third tercile with pronounced shrinkage (56-165 mL). SUVmax values were relatively low at baseline in the 1st tercile (SUVmax: 1.69 ± 0.33), but markedly increased at 6 months (2.42 ± 0.69, p = 0.02 vs. baseline). These SUV max values were by contrast much higher at baseline in the 3rd tercile (SUVmax: 2.53 ± 0.83 p = 0.009 vs. 1st tercile) and stable at 6 months (2.49 ± 0.80), while intermediate results were documented in the 2nd tercile. Lastly, the amount of sac shrinkage, expressed in absolute values or in percentages of baseline AAA volumes, was positively correlated with baseline SUVmax (p = 0.001 for both). A low pre-EVAR FDG uptake and increased AAA FDG uptake at 6 months are associated with reduced sac shrinkage. This sequential FDG-PET pattern is similar to that already shown to accompany growth phases of medically treated AAA. (orig.)

  1. Low baseline and subsequent higher aortic abdominal aneurysm FDG uptake are associated with poor sac shrinkage post endovascular repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, Pierre-Yves; Plissonnier, Didier; Rouer, Martin; Bravetti, Stephanie; Coscas, Raphael; Haulon, Stephan; Mandry, Damien; Alsac, Jean-Marc; Malikov, Serguei; Settembre, Nicla; Goueffic, Yann; Morel, Olivier; Roch, Veronique; Micard, Emilien; Lamiral, Zohra; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Rossignol, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    The growth phases of medically treated abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are frequently associated with an 18 F-fluorodesoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) pattern involving low baseline and subsequent higher FDG uptake. However, the FDG-PET patterns associated with the endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of larger AAA are presently unknown. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between serial AAA FDG uptake measurements, obtained before EVAR and 1 and 6 months post-intervention and subsequent sac shrinkage at 6 months, a well-recognized indicator of successful repair. Thirty-three AAA patients referred for EVAR (maximal diameter: 55.4 ± 6.0 mm, total volume: 205.7 ± 63.0 mL) underwent FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT) before EVAR and at 1 and 6 months thereafter, with the monitoring of AAA volume and of a maximal standardized FDG uptake [SUVmax] averaged between the axial slices encompassing the AAA. Sac shrinkage was highly variable and could be stratified into three terciles: a first tercile in which shrinkage was absent or very limited (0-29 mL) and a third tercile with pronounced shrinkage (56-165 mL). SUVmax values were relatively low at baseline in the 1st tercile (SUVmax: 1.69 ± 0.33), but markedly increased at 6 months (2.42 ± 0.69, p = 0.02 vs. baseline). These SUV max values were by contrast much higher at baseline in the 3rd tercile (SUVmax: 2.53 ± 0.83 p = 0.009 vs. 1st tercile) and stable at 6 months (2.49 ± 0.80), while intermediate results were documented in the 2nd tercile. Lastly, the amount of sac shrinkage, expressed in absolute values or in percentages of baseline AAA volumes, was positively correlated with baseline SUVmax (p = 0.001 for both). A low pre-EVAR FDG uptake and increased AAA FDG uptake at 6 months are associated with reduced sac shrinkage. This sequential FDG-PET pattern is similar to that already shown to accompany growth phases of medically treated AAA. (orig.)

  2. Low mortality rates after endovascular aortic repair expand use to high-risk patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkar, Shaunak S; Turner, Megan C; Leraas, Harold J; Gilmore, Brian F; Nag, Uttara; Turley, Ryan S; Shortell, Cynthia K; Mureebe, Leila

    2018-02-01

    The 2010 endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) trial 2 (EVAR 2) reported that patients with comorbidity profiles rendering them unfit for open aneurysm repair who underwent EVAR did not experience a survival advantage compared with those who did not undergo intervention. These patients experienced a 30-day mortality of 7.3%, whereas reports from similar cohorts reported far lower mortality rates. The primary objective of our study was to compare the incidence of 30-day mortality in low- and high-risk patients undergoing EVAR in a contemporary data set, using patient risk stratification criteria from EVAR 2. Secondarily, we sought to identify risk factors associated with a disproportionate contribution to 30-day mortality risk. Data were obtained from the 2005 to 2013 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) Participant Use Data Files (N = 24,813). Patients were included in the high-risk cohort with the presence of renal, respiratory, or cardiac preoperative criteria alone or in combination. Renal impairment criteria were defined as dialysis and creatinine concentration >2.26 mg/dL. Respiratory impairment criteria included history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and preoperative ventilator support. Cardiac impairment criteria included history of myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, angina, and prior coronary intervention. Patient and procedural characteristics and 30-day postoperative outcomes were compared using Pearson χ 2 tests for categorical variables and Wilcoxon rank sum tests for continuous variables. Among 24,813 patients undergoing EVAR, 12,043 (48%) patients were characterized as high risk (at least one impairment criterion); 12,770 (52%) patients were stratified as low risk. The 30-day mortality rate was 1.9% in the high-risk cohort compared with the 7.3% reported by EVAR 2, and it was higher in the high-risk cohort compared with the low-risk cohort (1.9% vs 0.9%; P < .001). Whereas the

  3. Perioperative risk factors for hospital readmission after elective endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Samuel L; Kuo, Isabella J; Kabutey, Nii-Kabu; Gabra, Fady; Fujitani, Roy M

    2018-04-02

    Elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is generally well tolerated. However, the incidence of hospital readmission after EVAR and the risk factors and reasons for it are not well studied. This study sought to determine the incidence, to characterize the indications, and to identify perioperative patient-centered risk factors for hospital readmission within 30 days after elective EVAR. All patients who underwent EVAR electively in 2012 to 2013 were identified from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Targeted Vascular database (n = 3886). Preoperative demographics, operation-specific variables, and postoperative outcomes were compared between those who were readmitted within 30 days of the index operation and those who were not. Multivariate logistic regression was then used to determine independent predictors of hospital readmission. The unadjusted 30-day readmission rate after EVAR was 8.2%. Of all readmissions, 55% were for reasons related to the procedure. Median time to readmission was 12 days. Significant preoperative risk factors associated with readmission were female sex, preoperative steroid use, congestive heart failure, and dialysis dependence (P readmission, including myocardial infarction and deep venous thrombosis (P readmission were surgical site infection (odds ratio, 10.24; 95% confidence interval, 5.31-19.75; P readmissions remain a costly problem after vascular surgery and are associated with 30-day mortality after elective EVAR. Whereas female sex and certain irreversible medical comorbidities are nonmodifiable, focusing on medical optimization and identifying those perioperative variables that can affect the need for post-EVAR interventions will be an important step in decreasing hospital readmission. Copyright © 2018 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Directional tip control technique for optimal stent graft alignment in angulated proximal aortic landing zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Takayama, MD, PhD

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Angulated anatomy in the aorta, such as tortuous infrarenal aortic necks or steep aortic arches, is a significant challenge for endovascular aortic repair because it often causes inadequate sealing and fixation, which may lead to treatment failure. We have developed a technique using off-the-shelf equipment to precisely control the deployment of stent grafts in challenging landing zones. The key of this technique is to create a through-and-through wire between two access sites and to use a guiding device over the wire. This technique is best used with stent grafts without nose cones. We present an endovascular aneurysm repair case and a thoracic endovascular aortic repair case with challenging proximal landing zones treated by this technique. In both cases, technical success was attained, and follow-up imaging demonstrated well-aligned stent grafts. Our directional tip control technique is easy and effective. It can be a good technical solution for endovascular aortic treatment in angulated anatomy.

  5. A comparison of Selective Aortic Arch Perfusion and Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta for the management of hemorrhage-induced traumatic cardiac arrest: A translational model in large swine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ed B G Barnard

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Survival rates remain low after hemorrhage-induced traumatic cardiac arrest (TCA. Noncompressible torso hemorrhage (NCTH is a major cause of potentially survivable trauma death. Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta (REBOA at the thoracic aorta (Zone 1 can limit subdiaphragmatic blood loss and allow for IV fluid resuscitation when intrinsic cardiac activity is still present. Selective Aortic Arch Perfusion (SAAP combines thoracic aortic balloon hemorrhage control with intra-aortic oxygenated perfusion to achieve return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC when cardiac arrest has occurred.Male Yorkshire Landrace cross swine (80.0 ± 6.0 kg underwent anesthesia, instrumentation for monitoring, and splenectomy. TCA was induced by laparoscopic liver lobe resection combined with arterial catheter blood withdrawal to achieve a sustained systolic blood pressure <10 mmHg, cardiac arrest. After 3 min of arrest, swine were allocated to one of three interventions: (1 REBOA plus 4 units of IV fresh whole blood (FWB, (2 SAAP with oxygenated lactated Ringer's (LR, 1,600 mL/2 min, or (3 SAAP with oxygenated FWB 1,600 mL/2 min. Primary endpoint was survival to the end of 60 min of resuscitation, a simulated prehospital phase. Thirty animals were allocated to 3 groups (10 per group-5 protocol exclusions resulted in a total of 35 animals being used. Baseline measurements and time to cardiac arrest were not different amongst groups. ROSC was achieved in 0/10 (0%, 95% CI 0.00-30.9 REBOA, 6/10 (60%, 95% CI 26.2-87.8 SAAP-LR and 10/10 (100%, 95% CI 69.2-100.0 SAAP-FWB animals, p < 0.001. Survival to end of simulated 60-minute prehospital resuscitation was 0/10 (0%, 95% CI 0.00-30.9 for REBOA, 1/10 (10%, 95% CI 0.25-44.5 for SAAP-LR and 9/10 (90%, 95% CI 55.5-99.7 for SAAP-FWB, p < 0.001. Total FWB infusion volume was similar for REBOA (2,452 ± 0 mL and SAAP-FWB (2,250 ± 594 mL. This study was undertaken in laboratory conditions, and as such may have

  6. [Change of paradigms in the surgical treatment of complex thoracic aortic disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Ulf; Tsagakis, Konstantinos; Kamler, Markus; Massoudy, Parwis; Assenmacher, Eva; Eggebrecht, Holger; Buck, Thomas; Jakob, Heinz

    2006-08-01

    One of the main issues in complex thoracic aortic disease, requiring the replacement of the ascending aorta, the entire aortic arch and the descending aorta, is the vast amount of surgery necessary to cure the patient. Though one-stage repair is feasible by a clamshell thoracotomy, the associated surgical trauma and perioperative morbidity limit this approach to younger patients only. Classic surgical repair consist of a two-stage strategy, whereby, in the first step, the ascending aorta and the aortic arch are replaced via a midline sternotomy. In the second step, via a lateral thoracotomy, the descending aorta is replaced. The two stages may sum up to a mortality of 20%; furthermore, the waiting period between the stages is associated with a mortality rate of 10% of its own. Additionally, the two-stage strategy has an inherent limitation, due to the comorbidity and advanced age of the majority of patients. Therefore, the second stage cannot be offered to up to 30% of patients. New developments and improvements in aortic surgery were introduced to overcome these shortcomings and to simplify the surgical repair. The "elephant trunk" principle, introduced by Borst et al. in 1983, was an important step to facilitate surgical repair, but still required the second step. With the introduction of endovascular repair of thoracic aortic disease with stent grafts implanted retrograde via the femoral artery, new therapeutic concepts emerged. In the late 1990s, two Japanese groups reported first trials to stabilize the free-floating "elephant trunk" prosthesis by implantation of nitinol stent grafts into the vascular graft. The applied devices were purely custom-made and nonstandardized. The availability of industrially made and CE-marked stent-graft devices raised the possibility to apply them in open aortic arch surgery. The experience with stent-graft devices implanted antegrade into the descending aorta (Medtronic Talent) was reported first by the Essen and the Vienna

  7. Editor's Choice - Late Open Surgical Conversion after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansal, Vinay; Nagpal, Sudhir; Jetty, Prasad

    2018-02-01

    Late open surgical conversion following endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) may occur more frequently after performing EVAR in anatomy outside the instructions for use (IFU). This study reviews predictors and outcomes of late open surgical conversion for failed EVAR. This retrospective cohort study reviewed all EVARs performed at the Ottawa Hospital between January 1999 and May 2015. Open surgical conversions >1 month post EVAR were identified. Variables analysed included indication for conversion, pre-intervention AAA anatomy, endovascular device and configuration, operative technique, re-interventions, complications, and death. Of 1060 consecutive EVARs performed, 16 required late open surgical conversion. Endografts implanted were Medtronic Talent (n = 8, 50.0%), Medtronic Endurant (n = 3, 18.8%), Cook Zenith (n = 4, 25.0%), and Terumo Anaconda (n = 1, 6.2%). Eleven grafts were bifurcated (68.8%), five were aorto-uni-iliac (31.2%). The median time to open surgical conversion was 3.1 (IQR 1.0-5.2) years. There was no significant difference in pre-EVAR rupture status (1.4% elective, 2.1% ruptured, p = .54). Indications for conversion included: Type 1 endoleak with sac expansion (n = 4, 25.0%), Type 2 endoleak with expansion (n = 2, 12.5%), migration (n = 3, 18.8%), sac expansion without endoleak (n = 2, 12.5%), graft infection (n = 3, 18.8%), rupture (n = 2, 12.5%). Nine patients (56.2%) underwent stent graft explantation with in situ surgical graft reconstruction, seven had endograft preserving open surgical intervention. The 30 day mortality was 18.8% (n = 3, all of whom having had endograft preservation). Ten patients (62.5%) suffered major in hospital complications. One patient (6.5%) required post-conversion major surgical re-intervention. IFU adherence during initial EVAR was 43.8%, versus 79.0% (p Open surgical conversion following EVAR results in significant morbidity and mortality. IFU adherence of EVARs later requiring open surgical

  8. Occlusive ascending aorta and arch atheroma treated with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and thromboendarterectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O' Sullivan, Katie E

    2013-12-01

    We describe an uncommon presentation of severely advanced aortic atherosclerosis in a 48-year old man with a history of hypertension and heavy smoking. Initial presentation with upper limb ischaemia led to the diagnosis of an aortic arch atheroma occluding 90% of the aortic lumen, managed with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and aortic thromboendarterectomy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of atherosclerotic plaque resulting in aortic occlusion and requiring emergent operative intervention.

  9. Repair of left coronary artery aneurysm, recurrent ascending aortic aneurysm, and mitral valve prolapse 19 years after Bentall's procedure in a patient with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badmanaban, Balaji; Mallon, Peter; Campbell, Norman; Sarsam, Mazin A I

    2004-01-01

    A 45-year-old female with Marfan syndrome had a Bentall's procedure performed 19 years ago. She presented with a 4-year history of gradually worsening dyspnea and decreasing exercise tolerance. Investigations revealed severe mitral valve prolapse, a left main stem coronary artery (LMSCA) aneurysm, and a recurrent aneurysm of the ascending aorta. The mitral valve was replaced and the aortic aneurysmal sac and the LMSCA aneurysm were then repaired by a modified Bentall procedure. The patient made an uneventful recovery and was discharged home.

  10. Forbidden word entropy of cerebral oximetric values predicts postoperative neurocognitive decline in patients undergoing aortic arch surgery under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Dubovoy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Up to 53% of cardiac surgery patients experience postoperative neurocognitive decline. Cerebral oximetry is designed to detect changes in cerebral tissue saturation and therefore may be useful to predict which patients are at risk of developing neurocognitive decline. Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of a prospective study originally designed to determine if treatment of cerebral oximetry desaturation is associated with improvement in postoperative cognitive dysfunction in patients undergoing aortic reconstruction under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. Cognitive function was measured, preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively, with 15 neuropsychologic tests administered by a psychologist; the individual test scores were summed and normalized. Bilateral cerebral oximetry data were stored and analyzed using measures of entropy. Cognitive decline was defined as any decrease in the summed normalized score from baseline to 3 months. Results: Seven of 17 (41% patients suffered cognitive decline. There was no association between baseline cerebral oximetry and postoperative cognitive dysfunction. Nor were changes in oximetry values associated with cognitive decline. However, cognitive decline was associated with loss of forbidden word entropy (FwEn (correlation: Rho ρ = 0.51, P = 0.037 for left cerebral oximetry FwEn and ρ = 0.54, P = 0.025 for right cerebral oximetry FwEn. Conclusion: Postoperative cognitive decline was associated with loss of complexity of the time series as shown by a decrease in FwEn from beginning to end of the case. This suggests that regulation of cerebral oximetry is different between those who do and those who do not develop cognitive decline.

  11. Comparative clinical effectiveness and cost effectiveness of endovascular strategy v open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: three year results of the IMPROVE randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-14

    Objective  To assess the three year clinical outcomes and cost effectiveness of a strategy of endovascular repair (if aortic morphology is suitable, open repair if not) versus open repair for patients with suspected ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. Design  Randomised controlled trial. Setting  30 vascular centres (29 in UK, one in Canada), 2009-16. Participants  613 eligible patients (480 men) with a clinical diagnosis of ruptured aneurysm, of whom 502 underwent emergency repair for rupture. Interventions  316 patients were randomised to an endovascular strategy (275 with confirmed rupture) and 297 to open repair (261 with confirmed rupture). Main outcome measures  Mortality, with reinterventions after aneurysm repair, quality of life, and hospital costs to three years as secondary measures. Results  The maximum follow-up for mortality was 7.1 years, with two patients in each group lost to follow-up by three years. After similar mortality by 90 days, in the mid-term (three months to three years) there were fewer deaths in the endovascular than the open repair group (hazard ratio 0.57, 95% confidence interval 0.36 to 0.90), leading to lower mortality at three years (48% v 56%), but by seven years mortality was about 60% in each group (hazard ratio 0.92, 0.75 to 1.13). Results for the 502 patients with repaired ruptures were more pronounced: three year mortality was lower in the endovascular strategy group (42% v 54%; odds ratio 0.62, 0.43 to 0.88), but after seven years there was no clear difference between the groups (hazard ratio 0.86, 0.68 to 1.08). Reintervention rates up to three years were not significantly different between the randomised groups (hazard ratio 1.02, 0.79 to 1.32); the initial rapid rate of reinterventions was followed by a much slower mid-term reintervention rate in both groups. The early higher average quality of life in the endovascular strategy versus open repair group, coupled with the lower mortality at three years, led to a

  12. A Rare Entity: Traumatic Thoracic Aortic Injury in a Patient with Aberrant Right Subclavian Artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hiten Mohanbhai; Banerjee, Shubhabrata; Bulsara, Shahzad; Sahu, Tapish; Sheorain, Virender K; Grover, Tarun; Parakh, Rajiv

    2017-05-01

    of choice for thoracic aortic injury over open surgical repair. A hybrid suite can be life and time saving in situations which mandate simultaneous endovascular repair along with surgical revascularization when indicated, especially in cases with aberrant aortic arch anatomy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Outcome and survival of patients aged 75 years and older compared to younger patients after ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: do the results justify the effort?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahidi, S; Schroeder, T Veith; Carstensen, M.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated early mortality (preoperative variables that may be predictive of 30-day mortality in elderly patients compared to younger patients after emergency open repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA). The survey is a retrospective analysis based...... patients compared to the younger group. Between the survivors of the two groups, there were no significant differences in the total length of stay (LOS) and the LOS in the intensive care unit. Advanced age (>or=75) and the combination of this advanced age and serum creatinine of >or=0.150 mmol/L were...... the only significant (p preoperative risk factors in our single-center study. However, we believe that treatment for RAAA can be justified in elderly patients. In our experience, surgical open repair has been life-saving in 33% of patients aged 75 years and older, at a relatively low price for each...

  14. Endovascular Treatment of Various Aortic Pathologies: Review of the Latest Data and Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Koji; Ohki, Takao; Kanaoka, Yuji

    2018-06-01

    The technologies and innovations applicable to endovascular treatment for complex aortic pathologies have progressed rapidly over the last two decades. Although the initial outcomes of an endovascular aortic repair have been excellent, as long-term data became available, complications including endoleaks, endograft migration, and endograft infection have become apparent and are of concern. Previously, the indication for endovascular therapy was restricted to descending thoracic aortic aneurysms and abdominal aortic aneurysms. However, its indication has expanded along with the improvement of techniques and devices, and currently, it has become possible to treat pararenal aortic aneurysms and Crawford type 4 thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) using the off-the-shelf devices. Additionally, custom-made devices allow for the treatment of arch or more extensive TAAAs. Endovascular treatment is applied not only to aneurysms but also to acute/chronic dissections. However, long-term outcomes are still unclear. This article provides an overview of available devices and the results of endovascular treatment for various aortic pathologies.

  15. 3D printing of an aortic aneurysm to facilitate decision making and device selection for endovascular aneurysm repair in complex neck anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Matthew D B S; Laycock, Stephen D; Brown, James R I; Jakeways, Matthew

    2013-12-01

    To describe rapid prototyping or 3-dimensional (3D) printing of aneurysms with complex neck anatomy to facilitate endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). A 75-year-old man had a 6.6-cm infrarenal aortic aneurysm that appeared on computed tomographic angiography to have a sharp neck angulation of ~90°. However, although the computed tomography (CT) data were analyzed using centerline of flow, the true neck length and relations of the ostial origins were difficult to determine. No multidisciplinary consensus could be reached as to which stent-graft to use owing to these borderline features of the neck anatomy. Based on past experience with rapid prototyping technology, a decision was taken to print a model of the aneurysm to aid in visualization of the neck anatomy. The CT data were segmented, processed, and converted into a stereolithographic format representing the lumen as a 3D volume, from which a full-sized replica was printed within 24 hours. The model demonstrated that the neck was adequate for stent-graft repair using the Aorfix device. Rapid prototyping of aortic aneurysms is feasible and can aid decision making and device delivery. Further work is required to test the value of 3D replicas in planning procedures and their impact on procedure time, radiation dose, and procedure cost.

  16. ArchE - An Architecture Design Assistant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-02

    Architecture Design Assistant Len Bass August 2, 2007 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the...ArchE - An Architecture Design Assistant 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...X, Module X 3 Author / Presenter, Date if Needed What is ArchE? ArchE is a software architecture design assistant, which: • Takes quality and

  17. Society of cardiovascular anesthesiologists: the effect of blood pressure regulation during aortic coarctation repair on brain, kidney, and muscle oxygen saturation measured by near-infrared spectroscopy: a randomized, clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerman, Annelies; Bové, Thierry; François, Katrien; Jacobs, Stefan; Deblaere, Isabel; Wouters, Patrick; de Hert, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we compared the effects of 3 frequently used arterial blood pressure-regulating agents on brain (rScO2), renal (SrO2), and muscle (SmO2) oxygen saturation, during aortic coarctation repair in children. Based on the reported adverse effect of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) on left-sided

  18. Proteção cerebral no tratamento cirúrgico dos aneurismas do arco aórtico: estudo experimental em cães Cerebral protection to be used during aortic arch aneurysms resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Murad

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available Os autores realizaram estudo experimental comparativo entre dois métodos de proteção cerebral utilizados na abordagem cirúrgica dos aneurismas do arco aórtico, avaliando a sua eficácia. Os métodos comparados foram a hipotermia sistêmica profunda isolada (menor que 20ºC com pinçamento arterial braquiocefálico e a hipotermia sistêmica profunda associada à perfusão carotídea seletiva. Dois grupos de 15 cães cada foram submetidos, respectivamente, a hipotermia sistêmica profunda com pinçamento arterial braquiocefálico (GRUPO I e a hipotermia sistêmica profunda associada a perfusão seletiva da carótida direita (GRUPO II. Foram colhidas amostras seriadas de sangue para análise das alterações metabólicas de pH e PaCO2 que ocorreram no retorno venoso cerebral, aferidas na veia jugular interna, bem como as alterações histopatológicas encontradas com 45 min, 90 min e 135 min de cada procedimento. Os resultados demonstraram que, apesar de ambos os métodos de proteção cerebral serem eficazes por um período de 45 minutos, o método utilizado no GRUPO II mostrou ser superior em períodos de até 90 minutos. Em períodos de 135 minutos os métodos tiveram resultados semelhantes, não oferecendo proteção cerebral adequada.The authors proposition is to make an experimental study of two methods of cerebral protection to be used during aortic arch aneurysm resection. The methods to be evaluated were profound systemic hypothermia (under 20oC with great vessels occlusion and profound systemic hypothermia with selective right carotid artery perfusion. Two groups of 15 dogs each were submitted either to profound systemic hypothermia with great vessels occlusion (GROUP I or to profound systemic hypothermia with selective right carotid artery perfusion (GROUP II. Serial jugular vein samples for pH and PaC02 were analyzed to evaluate ischemic cerebral metabolic derangements. Hystopathological studies were also made at 45, 90 and 135

  19. Endovascular abdominal aortic repair for AAA. Anatomical suitability and limitation in Japanese population according to the inclusion criteria of Zenith AAA stent graft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Atsushi; Okita, Yutaka; Okada, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Since 2007, the EVAR (endovascular abdominal aortic repair) grafts, Zenith, Excluder and Powerlink had been commercially available in Japan. However, a small iliac artery, typical of Japanese population especially in women, was a limiting factor to indicate EVAR. We analyzed the suitability of EVAR in Japanese population according to the inclusion criteria of Zenith AAA stent graft in the current study. From January 2006 to December 2007, 106 AAA (abdominal aortic aneurysm) patients (88 men, 18 women) with a mean age of 73 years were investigated in our institution by multi-slice CT scan in terms of suitability of EVAR, then we measured their abdominal aorta and iliac artery parameters as follows; proximal neck diameter (PND) and length (PNL), common iliac artery diameter (CIAD) and length (CIAL), suprarenal (SNA) and infrarenal neck angulation (INA), external iliac artery diameter (EIAD) and aortic length from the lowest renal artery to the aortic bifurcation (AOL). The inclusion criteria for Zenith AAA stent graft treatment were; PND: 18-28 mm, PNL more than 15 mm, unilateral CIAD less than 20 mm, CIAL at least 10 mm, SNA less than 45 degree and INA less than 60 degree, unilateral EIAD more than 7.5 mm. The indication of EVAR was 25.5% (27/106 patients), and was especially very low in women (5.6%) strictly according to the inclusion criteria of the Zenith AAA stent graft. The main reason of exclusion of EVAR was proximal short neck (40.5%), small iliac artery (30.4%) and infrarenal aortic neck angulation (29.1%). In our analysis, female AAA patients had small PNL and EIAD with angulated neck compared with male AAA ones. Anatomical suitability of EVAR in Japanese population strictly following by the inclusion criteria of Zenith AAA stent graft was low due to their characteristic differences from the European Union (EU) and the United States (US) patients, such as short proximal neck, steep neck angulation and small iliac artery, especially in women. More flexible

  20. Approaches to improving brain protection in cardiac and aortic surgery:an experimental study in a porcine model with hypertonic saline dextran, levosimendan, leukocyte depleting filter and different acid base management strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Kaakinen, H. (Hanna)

    2008-01-01

    Abstract In the repair of complex congenital heart defects or in surgery of the aortic arch, normal circulation may be temporarily halted to ensure a clean, bloodless operation field. The brain is the organ most vulnerable to ischemic injury during this no-flow period, and the mortality and morbidity of these procedures today consists mostly of neurological complications. Hypothermia decreases the need for oxygen and other metabolites, and cooling the patient with an extracorporeal heart-l...

  1. Early Results of the PETTICOAT Technique for the Management of Acute Type A Aortic Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotha, Vamshi Krishna; Pozeg, Zlatko I; Herget, Eric J; Moon, Michael C; Appoo, Jehangir J

    2017-08-01

    Conventional surgical techniques for acute Type A aortic dissection (ATAAD) generally fail to address residual dissection in the descending aorta. The persistence of a false lumen is associated with visceral malperfusion in the acute setting and adverse aortic remodeling in the chronic setting. Hybrid aortic arch repair techniques may improve perioperative and long-term mortality by expanding the true lumen and obliterating the false lumen. However, there is a limit to the extent of aortic coverage due to the concomitant risk of spinal cord ischemia. In Type B dissection, the PETTICOAT (Provisional Extension To Induce Complete Attachment) technique, which entails stent graft coverage of the primary intimal tear followed by bare metal stent placement distally, may improve true lumen caliber and promote false lumen thrombosis without increasing the risk of spinal cord ischemia, as intercostal branches remain perfused through the bare metal stents. The technique of hybrid arch with surgical creation of a Dacron landing zone covering a stent graft in the proximal descending aorta and bare metal stents in the thoraco-abdominal aorta is a promising concept in the treatment of ATAAD.

  2. Why routine intensive care unit admission after elective open infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm repair is no longer an evidence based practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, David

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Elective open infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) repair is major surgery performed on high-risk patients. Routine ICU admission postoperatively is the current accepted standard of care. Few of these patients actually require a level of care that cannot be provided just as effectively in a surgical high dependency unit (HDU). Our aim was to determine, \\'can high risk patients that will require ICU admission postoperatively be reliably identified preoperatively?\\'. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of all elective open infrarenal AAA repairs in our institution over a 3-year period was performed. The Estimation of Physiological Ability and Surgical Stress (E-PASS) model was used as our risk stratification tool for predicting post-operative morbidity. Renal function was also considered as a predictor of outcome, independent of the E-PASS. RESULTS: 80% (n = 16) were admitted to ICU. Only 30% (n = 6) of the total study population necessitated intensive care. There were 9 complications in 7 patients in our study. The E-PASS comprehensive risk score (CRS)\\/Surgical stress score (SSS) were found to be significantly associated with the presence of a complication (p = 0.009)\\/(p = 0.032) respectively. Serum creatinine (p = 0.013) was similarly significantly associated with the presence of a complication. CONCLUSIONS: The E-PASS model possessing increasing external validity is an effective risk stratification tool in safely deciding the appropriate level of post-operative care for elective infrarenal AAA repairs.

  3. Resultados da cirurgia do aneurisma da aorta abdominal em pacientes jovens Outcomes after surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms in young patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telmo P. Bonamigo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: A presença de aneurisma da aorta abdominal (AAA é rara em pacientes jovens. OBJETIVO: Avaliar os resultados da cirurgia do AAA em pacientes com idade BACKGROUND: Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA are rare in young patients. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate outcomes after AAA repair in patients aged < 50 years. METHODS: Between June 1979 and January 2008, 946 patients underwent elective repair for an infrarenal AAA performed by the first author. Of these, 13 patients (1.4% were < 50 years old at surgery. Demographic characteristics and surgical data were analyzed, as well as early and late outcomes after surgical intervention. RESULTS: Mean age was 46±3.4 years (ranging from 43 to 50 years. Most patients were men (76.9%, hypertensive (76.9% and smokers (61.5%. Perioperative morbidity and mortality rates were low (15.4% and 0%, respectively; one patient had respiratory infection and another patient had unstable angina. Median follow-up was 85.5 months, and two patients died due to ischemic cardiopathy and cerebrovascular accident during the follow-up period. CONCLUSION: AAA repair in young patients is a safe procedure, with good long-term results. In our study, there were no perioperative deaths, and a good long-term survival was observed.

  4. Central-Approach Surgical Repair of Coarctation of the Aorta with a Back-up Left Ventricular Assist Device for an Infant Presenting with Severe Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Hoon Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A two-month-old infant presented with coarctation of the aorta, severe left ventricular dysfunction, and moderate to severe mitral regurgitation. Through median sternotomy, the aortic arch was repaired under cardiopulmonary bypass and regional cerebral perfusion. The patient was postoperatively supported with a left ventricular assist device for five days. Left ventricular function gradually improved, eventually recovering with the concomitant regression of mitral regurgitation. Prompt surgical repair of coarctation of the aorta is indicated for patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction. A central approach for surgical repair with a back-up left ventricular assist device is a safe and effective treatment strategy for these patients.

  5. Central-Approach Surgical Repair of Coarctation of the Aorta with a Back-up Left Ventricular Assist Device for an Infant Presenting with Severe Left Ventricular Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Shin, Yu Rim; Kim, Young Sam; Kim, Do Jung; Kim, Hyohyun; Shin, Hong Ju; Htut, Aung Thein; Park, Han Ki

    2015-12-01

    A two-month-old infant presented with coarctation of the aorta, severe left ventricular dysfunction, and moderate to severe mitral regurgitation. Through median sternotomy, the aortic arch was repaired under cardiopulmonary bypass and regional cerebral perfusion. The patient was postoperatively supported with a left ventricular assist device for five days. Left ventricular function gradually improved, eventually recovering with the concomitant regression of mitral regurgitation. Prompt surgical repair of coarctation of the aorta is indicated for patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction. A central approach for surgical repair with a back-up left ventricular assist device is a safe and effective treatment strategy for these patients.

  6. Overview of current surgical strategies for aortic disease in patients with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Shunsuke; Okita, Yutaka

    2016-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a heritable, systemic disorder of the connective tissue with a high penetrance, named after Dr. Antoine Marfan. The most clinically important manifestations of this syndrome are cardiovascular pathologies which cause life-threatening events, such as acute aortic dissections, aortic rupture and regurgitation of the aortic valve or other artrioventricular valves leading to heart failure. These events play important roles in the life expectancy of patients with this disorder, especially prior to the development of effective surgical approaches for proximal ascending aortic disease. To prevent such catastrophic aortic events, a lower threshold has been recommended for prophylactic interventions on the aortic root. After prophylactic root replacement, disease in the aorta beyond the root and distal to the arch remains a cause for concern. Multiple surgeries are required throughout a patient's lifetime that can be problematic due to distal lesions complicated by dissection. Many controversies in surgical strategies remain, such as endovascular repair, to manage such complex cases. This review examines the trends in surgical strategies for the treatment of cardiovascular disease in patients with Marfan syndrome, and current perspectives in this field.

  7. Familial Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm with Dissection Presenting as Flash Pulmonary Edema in a 26-Year-Old Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabry Omar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We are reporting a case of familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection in a 26-year-old man with no significant past medical history and a family history of dissecting aortic aneurysm in his mother at the age of 40. The patient presented with cough, shortness of breath, and chest pain. Chest X-ray showed bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. CT scan of the chest showed a dissection of the ascending aorta. The patient underwent aortic dissection repair and three months later he returned to our hospital with new complaints of back pain. CT angiography showed a new aortic dissection extending from the left carotid artery through the bifurcation and into the iliac arteries. The patient underwent replacement of the aortic root, ascending aorta, total aortic arch, and aortic valve. The patient recovered well postoperatively. Genetic studies of the patient and his children revealed no mutations in ACTA2, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, TGFB2, MYH11, MYLK, SMAD3, or FBN1. This case report focuses on a patient with familial TAAD and discusses the associated genetic loci and available screening methods. It is important to recognize potential cases of familial TAAD and understand the available screening methods since early diagnosis allows appropriate management of risk factors and treatment when necessary.

  8. 合并有主动脉弓及升主动脉倒撕裂的DeBakeyⅢ型主动脉夹层腔内介入治疗的时机和效果%Timing of TEVAR treatment in DeBakeyⅢtype aortic dissection associated with arch and ascending aorta anti-tearing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王志伟; 管生; 王稼祥; 李震

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the timing and the efficacy of TEVAR treatment in DeBakeyⅢtype aortic dissection associated with arch and ascending aorta anti-tearing. Methods Clinical data of 10 patients with DeBakeyⅢaortic dissection associated with arch and ascending aorta anti-tearing from January 2010 to January 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. All the patients had ifnally stepped stent therapy on the basis of conservative treatment, were erplored according to the follow up results. Results One case conducted TEVAR treatment three days after admission because of poor blood pressure control, but died of sudden pericardial tamponade postoperative two days. After 4 weeks’ conservative treatment all of 9 patients were performed TEVAR, the postoperative patients recovered well and were followed up for 6 to 30 months without adverse events. Conclusions False lumen thrombosis in ascending aorta and aortic arch are stable and partially absorbed after four weeks with conservative management in the patients who have DeBakeyⅢaortic dissection with arch and ascending aorta anti-tearing, and then the aortic arch can provide a relatively stable anchoring zone in the proximal end for TEVAR.%目的:探讨主动脉腔内修复术(TEVAR)治疗合并有主动脉弓和(或)升主动脉倒撕裂的DeBakeyⅢ型主动脉夹层的手术时机及疗效。方法对2010年1月至2013年1月郑州大学第一附属医院介入科收治的10例DeBakeyⅢ型主动脉夹层、同时合并有主动脉弓和(或)升主动脉逆向撕裂患者,在保守治疗的基础上行介入覆膜支架治疗,结合随访情况,探讨对该类患者行主动脉腔内修复术(TEVAR)的可行性、治疗时机及效果。结果1例患者血压控制差,入院后第3天行TEVAR治疗,术后第2天突发心包填塞而死亡;余9例患者在保守治疗4周,CT血管造影(CTA)显示逆向撕裂假腔内血栓稳定并部分吸收后,均安全实施了常规TEVAR,术

  9. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided Embolization of Growing Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm after Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: A Transretroperitoneal Approach with Intramuscular Lidocaine Injection Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Joon Young, E-mail: pjy1331@hanmail.net; Kim, Shin Jung, E-mail: witdd2@hanmail.net; Kim, Hyoung Ook, E-mail: chaos821209@hanmail.net [Chonnam National University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Tae, E-mail: mono-111@hanmail.net [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Nam Yeol, E-mail: apleseed@hanmail.net; Kim, Jae Kyu, E-mail: kjkrad@jnu.ac.kr [Chonnam National University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Sang Young, E-mail: sycpvts@jnu.ac.kr; Choi, Soo Jin Na, E-mail: choisjn@jnu.ac.kr; Lee, Ho Kyun, E-mail: mhaha@hanmail.net [Chonnam National University Hospital, Department of Surgery (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CT-guided embolization of internal iliac artery aneurysm (IIAA) after repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm by transretroperitoneal approach using the lidocaine injection technique to iliacus muscle, making window for safe needle path for three patients for whom CT-guided embolization of IIAA was performed by transretroperitoneal approach with intramuscular lidocaine injection technique. Transretroperitoneal access to the IIAA was successful in all three patients. In all three patients, the IIAA was first embolized using microcoils. The aneurysmal sac was then embolized with glue and coils without complication. With a mean follow-up of 7 months, the volume of the IIAAs remained stable without residual endoleaks. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided embolization of IIAA using intramuscular lidocaine injection technique is effective, safe, and results in good outcome.

  10. Severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is associated with adverse outcomes in patients undergoing elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, David H; Goodney, Philip P; Kalish, Jeffrey; Schanzer, Andres; Indes, Jeffrey; Walsh, Daniel B; Cronenwett, Jack L; Nolan, Brian W

    2013-06-01

    Although chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been implicated as a risk factor for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture, its effect on surgical repair is less defined. Consequently, variation in practice persists regarding patient selection and surgical management. The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of COPD on patients undergoing AAA repair. We reviewed a prospective regional registry of 3455 patients undergoing elective open AAA repair (OAR) and endovascular AAA repair (EVAR) from 23 centers in the Vascular Study Group of New England from 2003 to 2011. COPD was categorized as none, medical (medically treated but not oxygen [O2]-dependent), and O2-dependent. End points included in-hospital death, pulmonary complications, major postoperative adverse events (MAEs), extubation in the operating room, and 5-year survival. Survival was determined using life-table analysis based on the Social Security Death Index. Predictors of in-hospital and long-term mortality were determined by multivariate logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards analysis. During the study interval, 2043 patients underwent EVAR and 1412 patients underwent OAR with a nearly equal prevalence of COPD (35% EVAR vs 36% OAR). O2-dependent COPD (4%) was associated with significantly increased in-hospital mortality, pulmonary complications, and MAE and was also associated with significantly decreased extubation in the operating room among patients undergoing both EVAR and OAR. Five-year survival was significantly diminished among all patients undergoing AAA repair with COPD (none, 78%; medical, 72%; O2-dependent, 42%; P < .001). By multivariate analysis, O2-dependent COPD was independently associated with in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 2.02, 95% confidence interval, 1.0-4.0; P = .04) and diminished 5-year survival (hazard ratio, 3.02; 95% confidence interval, 2.2-4.1; P < .001). Patients with O2-dependent COPD undergoing AAA repair suffer increased pulmonary

  11. Sex differences in 30-day and 5-year outcomes after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms in the EUROSTAR study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grootenboer, Nathalie; Hunink, M G Myriam; Hendriks, Johanna M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of sex on 30-day and long-term outcomes after elective endovascular aneurysm repair.......The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of sex on 30-day and long-term outcomes after elective endovascular aneurysm repair....

  12. Assessment of ventriculo-vascular properties in repaired coarctation using cardiac magnetic resonance-derived aortic, left atrial and left ventricular strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang, Quanliang [University of Nebraska College of Medicine and Children' s Hospital and Medical Center, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Omaha, NE (United States); Central South University, Department of Radiology, Second Xiangya Hospital, Changsha, Hunan Province (China); Sarikouch, Samir; Beerbaum, Philipp [Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany); Patel, Shivani; Danford, David A.; Kutty, Shelby [University of Nebraska College of Medicine and Children' s Hospital and Medical Center, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Omaha, NE (United States); Schuster, Andreas [Department of Cardiology and Pneumonology, Georg-August-University and German Center for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK, Partner Site), Goettingen (Germany); Steinmetz, Michael [Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Georg-August-University and German Center for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK, Partner Site), Goettingen (Germany); Ou, Phalla [University Paris Diderot, Department of Radiology, Hospital Bichat, APHP, Paris (France)

    2017-01-15

    In patients with repaired coarctation of aorta (CoA), we assessed ventriculo-vascular characteristics using CMR-derived aortic area strain (AAS), left atrial (LA) and left ventricular (LV) longitudinal and circumferential strain (LS, CS). Seventy-five subjects including 50 with repaired CoA divided into hypertensive (n = 25), normotensive (n = 25) and 25 controls were studied. AAS was measured at 3 levels: ascending aorta, proximal descending and descending aorta. LA and LV LS were measured using CMR-feature tracking. LA and LV end-diastolic volumes, ejection fraction (EF) and mass were measured. Mean patient age was 19.7 ± 6.7 and controls 23 ± 15 (years). All strains (LA, LV, ascending and descending aortic) were lower in CoA subgroups compared to controls except the AAS at diaphragm, which was not different. Comparisons between hypertensive and normotensive CoA showed no differences in LV mass, LV volumetric indices, and LA and LV strain indices; however, ascending AAS was lower in hypertensive subgroup (p = 0.02). Ascending AAS was correlated with LV mass (r = -0.4, p = 0.005), LVEF (r = -0.4, p = 0.004), systolic blood pressure (r = -0.5, p = 0.0001) and LVLS (r = 0.5, p = 0.001). Ascending AAS correlated with LV mass, EF and LVLS. In hypertensive CoA, ascending AAS was reduced compared to normotensive CoA and controls, indicating vascular remodelling differences influenced by ongoing hypertension. (orig.)

  13. New Technique for the Preservation of the Left Common Carotid Artery in Zone 2a Endovascular Repair of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juszkat, Robert; Kulesza, Jerzy; Zarzecka, Anna; Jemielity, Marek; Staniszewski, Ryszard; Majewski, Wacław

    2011-01-01

    To describe a technique for the preservation of the left common carotid artery (CCA) in zone 2 endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm. This technique involves the placement of a guide wire into the left CCA via the right brachial artery before stent graft deployment to enable precise visualization and protection of the left CCA during the whole procedure. Of the 107 patients with thoracic endovascular aortic repair in our study, 32 (30%) had the left subclavian artery intentionally covered (landing zone 2). Eight (25%) of those 32 had landing zone 2a—the segment distally the origin of the left CCA, halfway between the origin of the left CCA and the left subclavian artery. In all patients, a guide wire was positioned into the left CCA via the right brachial artery before stent graft deployment. It is a retrospective study in design. In seven patients, stent grafts were positioned precisely. In the remaining patient, the positioning was imprecise; the origin of the left CCA was partially covered by the graft. A stent was implanted into the left CCA to restore the flow into the vessel. All procedures were performed successfully. The technique of placing a guide wire into the left CCA via the right brachial artery before stent graft deployment is a safe and effective method that enables the precise visualization of the left CCA during the whole procedure. Moreover, in case of inadvertent complete or partial coverage of the origin of the left CCA, it supplies safe and quick access to the artery for stent implantation.

  14. CT Imaging Findings and Their Relevance to the Clinical Outcomes After Stent Graft Repair of Penetrating Aortic Ulcers: Six-year, Single-center Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ji Hoon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Angle, John F.; Park, Auh Whan; Anderson, Curtis; Sabri, Saher S.; Turba, Ulku C. [University of Virginia Health System, Division of Angiography, Interventional Radiology and Special Procedures, Department of Radiology (United States); Kern, John A.; Cherry, Kenneth J. [University of Virginia Health System, Department of Surgery (United States); Matsumoto, Alan H., E-mail: ahm4d@virginia.edu [University of Virginia Health System, Division of Angiography, Interventional Radiology and Special Procedures, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To present the computed tomographic (CT) imaging findings and their relevance to clinical outcomes related to stent graft placement in patients with penetrating aortic ulcers (PAUs). Methods: Medical and imaging records and imaging studies were reviewed for consecutive patients who underwent stent graft repair of a PAU. The distribution and characteristics of the PAU, technical success of stent graft repair, procedure-related complications, associated aortic wall abnormalities, and outcomes of the PAUs at follow-up CT scans were evaluated. Results: Fifteen patients underwent endovascular treatment for PAU. A total of 87% of the PAUs were in the proximal (n = 8) or distal (n = 5) descending thoracic aorta. There was a broad spectrum of PAU depth (mean, 7.9 {+-} 5.6 mm; range 1.5-25.0 mm) and diameter (mean, 13.5 {+-} 9.7 mm; range 2.2-41.0 mm). Atherosclerosis of the thoracic aorta and intramural hematoma were associated in 53 and 93% of the patients, respectively. Technical success was achieved in 100%. Two or more stent grafts were used in five patients. Endoleaks were observed in two patients within 2 weeks of the procedure, both of which resolved spontaneously. At follow-up CT scanning, regression and thrombosis of the PAUs were observed in all patients. The average patient survival was 61.8 months, with an overall mortality of 13% (2 of 15) at follow-up. Neither death was related to the endograft device or the PAU. Conclusion: Endovascular stent graft placement was safe and effective in causing regression and thrombosis of PAUs in this small series of patients. Two or more stent grafts were used in five patients (33%) with associated long-segmental atherosclerotic changes of the thoracic aorta or intramural hematoma.

  15. CT Imaging Findings and Their Relevance to the Clinical Outcomes After Stent Graft Repair of Penetrating Aortic Ulcers: Six-year, Single-center Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Ji Hoon; Angle, John F.; Park, Auh Whan; Anderson, Curtis; Sabri, Saher S.; Turba, Ulku C.; Kern, John A.; Cherry, Kenneth J.; Matsumoto, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To present the computed tomographic (CT) imaging findings and their relevance to clinical outcomes related to stent graft placement in patients with penetrating aortic ulcers (PAUs). Methods: Medical and imaging records and imaging studies were reviewed for consecutive patients who underwent stent graft repair of a PAU. The distribution and characteristics of the PAU, technical success of stent graft repair, procedure-related complications, associated aortic wall abnormalities, and outcomes of the PAUs at follow-up CT scans were evaluated. Results: Fifteen patients underwent endovascular treatment for PAU. A total of 87% of the PAUs were in the proximal (n = 8) or distal (n = 5) descending thoracic aorta. There was a broad spectrum of PAU depth (mean, 7.9 ± 5.6 mm; range 1.5–25.0 mm) and diameter (mean, 13.5 ± 9.7 mm; range 2.2–41.0 mm). Atherosclerosis of the thoracic aorta and intramural hematoma were associated in 53 and 93% of the patients, respectively. Technical success was achieved in 100%. Two or more stent grafts were used in five patients. Endoleaks were observed in two patients within 2 weeks of the procedure, both of which resolved spontaneously. At follow-up CT scanning, regression and thrombosis of the PAUs were observed in all patients. The average patient survival was 61.8 months, with an overall mortality of 13% (2 of 15) at follow-up. Neither death was related to the endograft device or the PAU. Conclusion: Endovascular stent graft placement was safe and effective in causing regression and thrombosis of PAUs in this small series of patients. Two or more stent grafts were used in five patients (33%) with associated long-segmental atherosclerotic changes of the thoracic aorta or intramural hematoma.

  16. Contemporary Management of Type B Aortic Dissection in the Endovascular Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannazadeh, Mohsen; Tadros, Rami O; McKinsey, James; Chander, Rajiv; Marin, Michael L; Faries, Peter L

    2016-04-01

    Aortic dissection (AD) is one of the most common catastrophic pathologies affecting the aorta. Anatomic classification is based on the origin of entry tear and its extension. Type A dissections originate in the ascending aorta, whereas the entry tear in Type B dissections starts distal to the left subclavian artery. The patients with aortic dissection who manifest complications such as rupture, malperfusion, aneurysmal degeneration, and intractable pain are classified as complicated AD. Risk factors for developing aortic dissection include age, male gender, and aortic wall structural abnormalities. The most common presenting symptom of acute aortic dissection is pain. Malperfusion occurs as a result of end-organ ischemia due to involvement of aortic branches from the dissecting process. This can happen in various locations causing mesenteric ischemia (mesenteric vessels), stroke (aortic arch vessels), renal failure (renal arteries), spinal ischemia, and limb ischemia (iliac or subclavian arteries). Aneurysmal degeneration is the most common complication of patients with chronic Type B dissection who are managed with medical therapy. Management of Type B aortic dissection (TBAD) remains controversial. Many groups recommend conservative therapy for newly diagnosed TBAD and reserve surgical management for patients who develop complications such as rupture, malperfusion, aneurysmal dilatation, and refractory pain. The mainstay of medical therapy includes antihypertensive medication to reduced ΔP/ ΔT by lowering blood pressure and heart rate. With the continued success of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR), this procedure has been extended to treat TBAD in selected patients. The outcomes of TEVAR are promising, with early mortality rates from 10% to 20%. With promising results from these series, some groups recommend early TEVAR in uncomplicated TBAD to prevent future adverse events. The goals of endovascular treatment of TBAD are to cover the entry tear

  17. Variants of the left aortic arch branches

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Type C (Courtesy of Rutherford. ... angiographic studies. The patients were selected randomly irrespective of age. Sixty cases were ... aorta, proximal to the origin of the right innominate artery. Forty millil- itres of contrast (Jopamiron 300 mg).

  18. Alginate oligosaccharide indirectly affects toll-like receptor signaling via the inhibition of microRNA-29b in aneurysm patients after endovascular aortic repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Y

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Yong Yang,1–4,* Zhenhuan Ma,1–4,* Guokai Yang,1–4 Jia Wan,1–4 Guojian Li,1–4 Lingjuan Du,1–4 Ping Lu1–4 1Department of Vascular Surgery, The Second People’s Hospital of Yunnan Province, Kunming, China; 2Department of Vascular Surgery, The Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming, China; 3Department of Vascular Surgery, Vascular Surgery Centre in Yunnan Province, Kunming, China; 4Department of Vascular Surgery, Abdominal Surgery Centre in Yunnan Province, Kunming, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Endovascular aortic repair (EVAR is often followed by aneurysm recurrence. Alginate oligosaccharide (AOS has potential antitumor properties as a natural product while the related mechanisms remain unclear. Toll-like receptor (TLR signaling is associated with inflammatory activity of aneurysm and may be affected by miR-29b. Thus, inhibitory function of AOS on aneurysms was explored by measuring the important molecules in TLR4 signaling. After EVAR, a total of 248 aortic aneurysm patients were recruited and randomly assigned into two groups: AOS group (AG, oral administration 10-mg AOS daily and control group (CG, placebo daily. The size of residual aneurysms, aneurysm recurrence, and side effects were investigated. Aneurysm recurrence was determined by Kaplan–Meier analysis. After 2 years, eight and two patients died in the CG and AG, respectively. The sizes of residual aneurysms were significantly larger in the CG than in the AG (P<0.05. The incidence of aneurysm recurrence was also significantly higher in the CG than in the AG (P<0.05. AOS treatment reduced the levels of miR-29b, TLR4, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B, interleukin 1 (IL-1 beta, and interleukin 6 (IL-6. Overexpression and silence of miR-29b increased and reduced the level of TLR4, phospho-p65 NF-kappa B, phospho-p38 MAPK, IL-1 beta, and IL-6. Spearman’s rank correlation

  19. Blood flow dynamic improvement with aneurysm repair detected by a patient-specific model of multiple aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sughimoto, Koichi; Takahara, Yoshiharu; Mogi, Kenji; Yamazaki, Kenji; Tsubota, Ken'ichi; Liang, Fuyou; Liu, Hao

    2014-05-01

    Aortic aneurysms may cause the turbulence of blood flow and result in the energy loss of the blood flow, while grafting of the dilated aorta may ameliorate these hemodynamic disturbances, contributing to the alleviation of the energy efficiency of blood flow delivery. However, evaluating of the energy efficiency of blood flow in an aortic aneurysm has been technically difficult to estimate and not comprehensively understood yet. We devised a multiscale computational biomechanical model, introducing novel flow indices, to investigate a single male patient with multiple aortic aneurysms. Preoperative levels of wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index (OSI) were elevated but declined after staged grafting procedures: OSI decreased from 0.280 to 0.257 (first operation) and 0.221 (second operation). Graftings may strategically counter the loss of efficient blood delivery to improve hemodynamics of the aorta. The energy efficiency of blood flow also improved postoperatively. Novel indices of pulsatile pressure index (PPI) and pulsatile energy loss index (PELI) were evaluated to characterize and quantify energy loss of pulsatile blood flow. Mean PPI decreased from 0.445 to 0.423 (first operation) and 0.359 (second operation), respectively; while the preoperative PELI of 0.986 dropped to 0.820 and 0.831. Graftings contributed not only to ameliorate wall shear stress or oscillatory shear index but also to improve efficient blood flow. This patient-specific modeling will help in analyzing the mechanism of aortic aneurysm formation and may play an important role in quantifying the energy efficiency or loss in blood delivery.

  20. Can Early Computed Tomography Angiography after Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair Predict the Need for Reintervention in Patients with Type II Endoleak?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudeck, O., E-mail: oliver.dudeck@med.ovgu.de [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Germany); Schnapauff, D. [Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology (Germany