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Sample records for aortic arch aneurysm

  1. Mycotic Aneurysm of the Aortic Arch

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    Ji Hye Seo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A mycotic aneurysm of the thoracic aorta is rare. We report a case of mycotic aneurysm that developed in the aortic arch. An 86-year-old man was admitted with fever and general weakness. Blood culture yielded methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Chest X-ray showed an enlarged aortic arch, and computed tomography scan revealed an aneurysm in the aortic arch. The patient was treated only with antibiotics and not surgically. The size of the aneurysm increased rapidly, resulting in bronchial obstruction and superimposed pneumonia. The patient died of respiratory failure.

  2. In situ total aortic arch replacement for infected distal aortic arch aneurysms with penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer.

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    Okada, Kenji; Yamanaka, Katsuhiro; Sakamoto, Toshihito; Inoue, Takeshi; Matsumori, Masamichi; Kawakami, Fumi; Okita, Yutaka

    2014-11-01

    We present a series of patients who underwent in situ total aortic arch replacement for infected distal aortic arch aneurysms. Between 2002 and 2013, 9 patients with infected distal aortic arch aneurysms underwent total aortic arch replacement using antegrade selective cerebral perfusion. There were 4 male and 5 female patients with a mean age of 72.7±9.0 years. All patients had penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer in the distal aortic arch, which formed saccular aneurysms. Four patients had preoperative hoarseness. Maximum preoperative white blood cell count was 10,211±4375/μL, and mean serum C-reactive protein concentration was 12.7±7.2 mg/dL. Causative microorganisms were identified by blood culture or aortic wall culture and were as follows: Candida albicans, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Edwardsiella tarda, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus (2 cases), and unknown (2 cases). Radical debridement with in situ total aortic arch replacement was performed in all patients, followed by the omental flap grafting in 7 patients. All surgery was performed on an urgent or emergency basis. Average cardiopulmonary bypass time and lower body circulatory arrest time were 199.7±50.7 minutes and 66.6±13.8 minutes, respectively. There was no in-hospital mortality, but 1 patient died of asphyxia 5 months after hospital discharge. Freedom from recurrence of infection was 100%. Surgical treatment with the combination of radical debridement with in situ total aortic arch replacement using antegrade selective cerebral perfusion and omental flap grafting was a reliable procedure for the treatment of infected distal aortic arch aneurysms. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Endovascular Stent Grafting for Aortic Arch Aneurysm in Aortoiliac Occlusive Disease following Aortic Arch Debranching and Aortobifemoral Reconstruction

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    Didem Melis Oztas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms constitutes high mortality and morbidity rates despite improvements in surgery, anesthesia, and technology. Endovascular stent grafting may be an alternative therapy with lower risks when compared with conventional techniques. However, sometimes the branches of the aortic arch may require transport to the proximal segments prior to successful thoracic aortic endovascular stent grafting. Atherosclerosis is accounted among the etiology of both aneurysms and occlusive diseases that can coexist in the same patient. In these situations stent grafting may even be more complicated. In this report, we present the treatment of a 92-year-old patient with aortic arch aneurysm and proximal descending aortic aneurysm. For successful thoracic endovascular stent grafting, the patient needed an alternative route other than the native femoral and iliac arteries for the deployment of the stent graft. In addition, debranching of left carotid and subclavian arteries from the aortic arch was also required for successful exclusion of the thoracic aneurysm.

  4. “Open” approach to aortic arch aneurysm repair☆

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    Al Kindi, Adil H.; Al Kimyani, Nasser; Alameddine, Tarek; Al Abri, Qasim; Balan, Baskaran; Al Sabti, Hilal

    2014-01-01

    Aortic arch aneurysm is a relatively rare entity in cardiac surgery. Repair of such aneurysms, either in isolation or combined with other cardiac procedures, remains a challenging task. The need to produce a relatively bloodless surgical field with circulatory arrest, while at the same time protecting the brain, is the hallmark of this challenge. However, a clear understanding of the topic allows a better and less morbid approach to such a complex surgery. Literature has shown the advantage of selective cerebral perfusion techniques in comparison with only circulatory arrest. Ability to perfuse the brain has allowed circulatory arrest temperatures at moderate hypothermia without the need for deep hypothermia. Even though cannulation site selection appears to be a minor issue, literature has shown that the subclavian/axillary route has the best outcomes and that femoral cannulation should only be reserved for no access patients. Although different techniques for arch anastomosis have been described, we routinely perform the distal first technique as we find it to be less cumbersome and easiest to reproduce. In this review our aim is to outline a systematic approach to aortic arch surgery. Starting with indications for intervention and proceeding with approaches on site of cannulation, approaches to brain protection with hypothermia and selective cerebral perfusion and finally surgical steps in performing the distal and arch vessels anastomosis. PMID:24954988

  5. Bovine aortic arch and idiopathic pulmonary artery aneurysm associated with bronchial compression

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    Süleyman Sezai Yıldız

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The left common carotid artery originating from the brachiocephalic trunk is termed the bovine aortic arch. Although it is the third most-common normal variant found in 9% humans, the origin of this term remains unclear. Until now, It has not been reported in the literature bovine aortic arch togetherness with pulmonary aneurysm and bronchial compression. Herein, we present a case with bovine aorta arch and pulmonary artery aneurysm associated with bronchial compression, which is incidentally detected by X-ray film. A 56-year-old Caucasian female admitted to the cardiology clinic with complaint of chest pain. Physical examination was unremarkable. Blood biochemistry values and cardiac markers were in normal range. Chest radiography revealed a widened mediastinum and prominent pulmonary conus with no active pulmonary disease. A subsequent transthoracic echocardiography revealed left ventricular hypertrophy, left atrial enlargement (diameter: 41 mm, mild mitral and tricuspid valve insufficiency, dilatation of main pulmonary artery (parasternal short-axis view diameter: 33 mm, normal pulmonary artery pressure and normal left ventricular systolic function. Computed tomography revealed bovine aortic arch associated with pulmonary artery aneurysm (diameter: 53 mm. And left main bronch of trachea was critically squeezed by aortic arch. Aortic and pulmonary vascular anomalies should be considered in patients with chest pain. And, identification with imaging modalities is important for prevention of chronic and irreversible complications.

  6. A review of the surgical management of right-sided aortic arch aneurysms.

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    Barr, James G; Sepehripour, Amir H; Jarral, Omar A; Tsipas, Pantelis; Kokotsakis, John; Kourliouros, Antonios; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2016-07-01

    Aneurysms and dissections of the right-sided aortic arch are rare and published data are limited to a few case reports and small series. The optimal treatment strategy of this entity and the challenges associated with their management are not yet fully investigated and conclusive. We performed a systematic review of the literature to identify all patients who underwent surgical or endovascular intervention for right aortic arch aneurysms or dissections. The search was limited to the articles published only in English. We focused on presentation and critically assessed different management strategies and outcomes. We identified 74 studies that reported 99 patients undergoing surgical or endovascular intervention for a right aortic arch aneurysm or dissection. The median age was 61 years. The commonest presenting symptoms were chest or back pain and dysphagia. Eighty-eight patients had an aberrant left subclavian artery with only 11 patients having the mirror image variant of a right aortic arch. The commonest pathology was aneurysm arising from a Kommerell's diverticulum occurring in over 50% of the patients. Twenty-eight patients had dissections, 19 of these were Type B and 9 were Type A. Eighty-one patients had elective operations while 18 had emergency procedures. Sixty-seven patients underwent surgical treatment, 20 patients had hybrid surgical and endovascular procedures and 12 had totally endovascular procedure. There were 5 deaths, 4 of which were in patients undergoing emergency surgery and none in the endovascular repair group. Aneurysms and dissections of a right-sided aortic arch are rare. Advances in endovascular treatment and hybrid surgical and endovascular management are making this rare pathology amenable to these approaches and may confer improved outcomes compared with conventional extensive repair techniques. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights

  7. Importance of stent-graft design for aortic arch aneurysm repair

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    C Singh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aneurysm of the aorta is currently treated by open surgical repair or endovascular repair. However, when the aneurysm occurs in regions between the aortic arch and proximal descending aorta, it can be a complex pathology to treat due to its intricate geometry. When complex aortic aneurysms are treated with the conventional procedures, some of the patients present with significant post-operative complications and high mortality rate. Consequently, a clinically driven hybrid innovation known as the frozen elephant trunk procedure was introduced to treat complex aortic aneurysms. Although this procedure significantly reduces mortality rate and operating time, it is still associated with complications such as endoleaks, spinal cord ischemia, renal failure and stroke. Some of these complications are consequences of a mismatch in the biomechanical behaviour of the stent-graft device and the aorta. Research on complex aneurysm repair tended to focus more on the surgical procedure than the stent-graft design. Current stent-graft devices are suitable for straight vessels. However, when used to treat aortic aneurysm with complex geometry, these devices are ineffective in restoring the normal biological and biomechanical function of the aorta. A stent-graft device with mechanical properties that are comparable with the aorta and aortic arch could possibly lead to fewer post-operative complications, thus, better outcome for patients with complex aneurysm conditions. This review highlights the influence stent-graft design has on the biomechanical properties of the aorta which in turn can contribute to complications of complex aneurysm repair. Design attributes critical for minimising postoperative biomechanical mismatch are also discussed.

  8. Type A interrupted aortic arch accompanied by intracranial aneurysms causing subarachnoid hemorrhage in an adult man.

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    Eren, Suat; Kantarci, Mecit; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Cakir, Murteza; Ogul, Hayri

    2014-01-01

    Interrupted aortic arch anomaly (IAA) characterized by complete luminal dissociation between the ascending and descending aorta and accounting for less than 1% of all cases of congenital heart disease. IAA is a rare condition in infants that occurs approximately three times per million births. It is usually diagnosed and repaired during the neonatal period and is extremely rare in adults. We present the case of an adult man who was diagnosed with IAA accompanied by intracranial aneurysms causing subarachnoid hemorrhage and demonstrate the imaging findings with 256-slice computed tomography angiography and digital subtraction angiography. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Aortic aneurysm endovascular treatment with the parallel graft technique from the aortic arch to the iliac axis.

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    Fadda, Gian F; Marino, Mario; Kasemi, Holta; DI Angelo, Costantino L; Dionisi, Carlo P; Cammalleri, Valeria; Setacci, Carlo

    2017-05-26

    The chimney technique has been developed for the treatment of complex aortic aneurysms. We analyzed the midterm to long-term outcomes of this approach from a single- centre experience. From October 2008 to July 2016, 58 patients underwent endovascular aortic aneurysm repair using the chimney technique. Indications for treatment were thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) (n = 11), thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) (n = 2), pararenal aortic aneurysm (PAAA) (n= 15), aortoiliac/isolated hypogastric artery aneurysm (n = 25), type I endoleak after previous TEVAR/EVAR (n=4), proximal pseudoaneurysm after AAA open repair (n = 1). Elective (82.8%) and emergent (17.2%) procedures were included. The immediate technical success was 100%. Single, double and triple chimneys were performed in 46, 10 and 2 patients, respectively. Overall, 61 target vessels (3 left common carotid arteries, 8 left subclavian arteries, 3 celiac trunks, 3 superior mesenteric arteries, 19 renal arteries and 25 hypogastric arteries) were involved. Post-operative mortality was 0. No neurologic complications were registered. Primary patency rate of the chimney stent/stent graft was 98.3%. Low flow type I endoleak was observed in 4 patients (6.9%). Post-operative chimney graft re-intervention rate was 1.7%. The median follow up was 32±20 months (range 3- 96 months). Overall estimated survival at 12, 50 and 80 months was 100%, 89% and 44%, respectively. Estimated freedom from endoleak at 1, 12, 24 and 36 months was 96.5%, 95%, 95% and 93%, respectively. One HA stent graft occluded at the 3rd month of follow up. No reintervention was performed. Our experience with the chimney technique for aortic aneurysms from the aortic arch to the iliac axis shows promising and durable mid- and long term results. Endograft oversizing, associated with the chimney graft diameter and length choice remain fundamental to reduce the risk of the most frequent procedure complications: type I endoleak and CG occlusion.The wider

  10. Medical image of the week: atherosclerotic aneurysm of aortic arch and descecnding thoracic aorta

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    Parasram M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. A 94-year-old Spanish-speaking woman presented to the hospital with intermittent episodes of dyspnea and abdominal pain for one week. Her past medical history was notable for 30 pack-year smoking history and hypertension, which was reportedly controlled with medical therapy. Physical exam showed trace peripheral edema bilaterally, intact peripheral pulses, and a mild abdominal bruit. Work up at the emergency department revealed a non-ST elevation myocardial infarction with troponin T of 0.34 ng/mL but no ST-wave abnormality on electrocardiography. Chest x-ray displayed an incidental thoracic aneurysm (Figure 1. Chest computed tomography with contrast demonstrated a continuous aneurysm of the aortic arch and descending thoracic aorta with diameters measuring 6.8 cm and 6 cm, respectively (Figure 2A and 2B. Eccentric thrombi are noted in the aortic arch and the descending aorta. Interestingly, the distal descending thoracic aorta curves as it transitions to the abdominal aorta, which is evidence of a tortuous descending ...

  11. [Hybrid surgical intervention in a patient with an aortic arch aneurysm and coronary artery disease].

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    Charchan, E R; Abugov, S A; Puretsky, M V; Kim, S Yu; Skvortsov, A A; Khachatryan, Z R

    2015-01-01

    Presented herein is a clinical case report regarding the use of hybrid technology in surgical treatment of a patient with an aneurysm of the distal portion of the aortic arch and coronary artery disease. The patient underwent a hybrid operation, i.e. debranching of the aortic arch branches, exoprosthetic repair of the ascending aorta, autovenous prosthetic coronary bypass grafting of the branch of the blunt edge of the anterior interventricular artery, stenting of the ascending portion, arch and descending portion of the aorta (stent graft "Medtronic Valiant"). In doing so, we used a non-standard approach to connecting the artificial circulation unit and to choosing the place for establishing proximal anastomoses of autovenous coronary bypass grafts. The early postoperative period was complicated by the development of respiratory insufficiency requiring continuation artificial pulmonary ventilation. The duration of the hospital stay of the patient amounted to 15 days. The check-up multispiral computed tomography showed normal functioning of the reconstruction zones, the stent graft is expanded, with no leak observed. The conclusion was made that hybrid interventions may be considered as an alternative to the classical surgical treatment associated in patients of older age group with a severe course of the postoperative period and high lethality.

  12. Repair of aortic arch aneurysm under cardiopulmonary bypass and deep hypothermia with low flow: A case report

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    Md. Rezwanul Hoque

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aortic arch surgery is the challenging and most difficult surgery among the cardiovascular operations. Cerebral and spinal complications are the most feared and common complications of aortic arch surgery. With best available techniques for cerebral and spinal protection, anesthetic management and good post-operative care; aortic arch surgery is considerably safer nowadays and satisfactory results can be achieved in most patients. Also, selecting the sites for arterial cannulation to maintain whole body circulation, during isolation of the aortic arch to operate on it, need proper anatomical description of the extent of the aneurysm. This is also achievable by the availability of the imaging techniques like Computed Tomog­raphy (CT with or without contrast, CT Angiography (CTA and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI. We are reporting a case of aneurysm of aortic arch in a young adult, who had undergone repair under cardiopulmonary bypass and deep hypothermia with low flow and had normal convalescence without any cerebral or spinal complications.

  13. [Hybrid treatment of patients with aneurysms and dissections of the aortic arch and descending portion of the thoracic aorta].

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    Shlomin, V V; Gordeev, M L; Zverev, D A; Shloĭdo, E A; Uspenskiĭ, V E; Zvereva, E D; Bondarenko, P B; Puzdriak, P D

    The authors share herein their experience with hybrid surgical treatment of 21 patients presenting with lesions of the aortic arch and descending thoracic aorta. Aortic pathology included dissection of the thoracoabdominal aorta (n=15), a sacciform aneurysm of the aortic arch (n=5), and a spindle-shaped aneurysm of the distal portions of the aortic arch (n=1). The first stage consisted of the following operations: transposition of the left subclavian artery into the left common carotid artery (n=9; 42.8%), partial debranching (n=11; 52.5%), and total debranching (n=1; 4.7%). The second stage consisted in implantation of a stent graft: to the thoracic aorta in 18 (85.8%) cases, and to the thoracic and abdominal portions of the aorta in 3 (14.2%) cases. The most significant complications of the immediate postoperative period included acute cerebral circulation impairment (n=1) and local dissection of the ascending aorta (n=1). Type I endoleaks were observed in 4 (19%) patients, type II endoleaks in 1 (4.7%), and type III endoleaks in 1 (4.7%). The mean duration of the follow up after discharge from hospital amounted to 11.6±7.9 months. In 4 patients after 6 months the findings of the control MSCT angiography showed no significant changes of the endoleaks. 1-year patency of the shunted branches of the aortic arch amounted to 95.2%. The cumulative survival rate amounted to 95.2%.

  14. Thoracic endograft positioning and carotid-subclavian bypass grafting in a patient with a saccular aneurysm at the aortic arch.

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    Valerio, Nicolas; Bucci, Federico; Redler, Adriano; Salvati, Bruno; Ferdani, Michel

    2007-01-01

    A 75-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of sudden thoracic pain. A saccular aneurysm of the aortic arch extending on the anterior surface of the aortic arch was found on computed tomographic arteriography. The patient was hemodynamically stable and he was programmed for a staged surgical and endovascular approach (hybrid approach). As a first stage and in order to prevent major cardiac complications due to the overstenting of the left subclavian artery (LSA) with the occlusion of the aortocoronary bypass, the patient underwent a polytetrafluoroethylene bypass graft (GORE-TEX, W.L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, AZ) between the LSA and the left carotid artery. Intraoperative arteriography revealed a good patency of the left carotid-subclavian bypass and of the left internal mammary bypass on the left anterior descending artery. As a second stage the endovascular procedure was accomplished 5 days later in the operating room. A Gore TAG stent graft (W.L. Gore & Associates) was deployed in the aortic arch 20 mm proximally to the aneurysmatic segment covering the ostium of the LSA. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on the fifth postoperative day in good general conditions. Hybrid procedures for treatment of aneurysms of the aortic arch or of the descending thoracic aorta are a promising alternative to open surgery especially in high-risk patients, with lower early morbidity and mortality rates. Long-term effectiveness remains to be fully elucidated.

  15. [Bentall operation combined with total arch replacement and stented elephant trunk implantation for serious Debakey I aortic dissecting aneurysm].

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    Gu, Tian-Xiang; Wang, Chun; Zhang, Yu-Hai

    2008-12-01

    To summarize the clinical experience of Bentall operation combined with total arch replacement and stented elephant trunk implantation for serious Debakey I aortic dissecting aneurysm. Twelve patients with serious Debakey I aortic dissecting aneurysm underwent surgical treatment from January 2005 to December 2007. There were 10 male and 2 female with the mean age of (40.1 +/- 9.5) years old. There were acute aortic dissection in 9 cases, chronic aortic dissection in 3 cases. The inner diameter of aorta was (5.3 +/- 1.8) cm. There were Marfan syndrome in 4 cases, aortic regurgitation in all cases, severely persistent chest pain in 9 cases, acute left heart failure in 8 cases, and cardiac tamponade in 4 cases. Bentall operations combined with total arch replacement and stented elephant trunk implantation were performed by using deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and antegrade selective cerebral perfusion in all cases. Urgent surgery underwent in 9 cases. The mean interval between the onset of aortic dissection and the accomplishment of surgery was (41.0 +/- 15.9) hours. Cardiopulmonary bypass time was (191 +/- 26) min, average cross clamp time was (134 +/- 31) min, and average deep hypothermic circulatory arrest time was (50.0 +/- 14.5) min. One patient died in hospital. The time stayed in ICU was 3 to 27 d. Mental disorder in 6 cases, hemi-paralysis in 1 case, amputation in 1 case, hemorrhage of anastomosis in 1 case, hemorrhage of alimentary tract in 1 case, and pleural effusion in 4 cases were recorded. Eleven cases were followed-up for 8 weeks to 36 months. There were no bending of the stents and no obstruction in the vascular prosthesis.No re-operation was needed. One case died 6 months postoperatively. Bentall operation combined with total arch replacement and stented elephant trunk implantation is safe and effective for serious Debakey I aortic dissecting aneurysm, while good organs protection and consummate cardiopulmonary bypass were taken.

  16. Hybrid repair of penetrating aortic ulcer associated with right aortic arch and aberrant left innominate artery arising from aneurysmal Kommerell's diverticulum with simultaneous repair of bilateral common iliac artery aneurysms.

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    Guo, Yuanyuan; Yang, Bin; Cai, Hongbo; Jin, Hui

    2014-02-01

    We present the first case of a hybrid endovascular approach to a penetrating aortic ulcer on the left descending aorta with a right aortic arch and aberrant left innominate artery arising from an aneurysmal Kommerell's diverticulum. The patient also had bilateral common iliac artery aneurysms. The three-step procedure consisted of a carotid-carotid bypass, followed by endovascular exclusion of the ulcer and the aneurysmal Kommerell's diverticulum, and then completion by covering the iliac aneurysms. The patient had no complications at 18 months after surgery. In such rare configurations, endovascular repair is a safe therapeutic option. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Open repair management of a patient with aortic arch saccular aneurysm, penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer, one vessel coronary artery disease and an isolated dissection of the abdominal aorta.

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    Romolo, Harvey; Wartono, Dicky A; Suyuti, Sugisman; Herlambang, Bagus; Caesario, Michael; Sunu, Ismoyo

    2017-01-01

    Isolated saccular compared to fusiform aneurysm is considered to be a rare entity with challenges of its own. A 62-year-old female was diagnosed with a case of saccular aneurysm and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer of the aortic arch. Additionally, she also had one vessel coronary artery disease and type B abdominal aortic dissection. She was then managed with open aortic arch repair and coronary artery bypass grafting. If required, elective endovascular repair will be done for the abdominal aorta on a later date.

  18. Two-stage hybrid treatment strategy for an adult patient with aortic arch coarctation, poststenotic aneurysm, and hypoplastic left subclavian artery: A case report.

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    Pu, Xiao-Bo; Chen, Shi-Jian; Chen, Mao; Feng, Yuan

    2017-12-01

    Coarctation of aorta in adulthood is usually complicated by other cardiovascular anomalies, posing great technical challenge for intervention. Here, we report an extremely rare case of aortic arch coarctation combined with a poststenotic biloculated calcified aneurysm and hypoplastic left subclavian artery. First, an extra-anatomic bypass was established, along with narrowing of aorta just proximal and distal to the aneurysm. While the bypass graft significantly relieved trans-coarctation gradient, the latter procedure decreased intra-aneurysm pressure and created landing zones for aneurysm occlusion. Six months later, 2 muscular ventricular septal defect occluders were deployed at the proximal and distal orifice of the aneurysm. Follow-up computed tomography angiography confirmed the absence of contrast leakage into aneurysm. A 2-stage hybrid approach described here appears to be feasible, safe, and associated with favorable clinical outcomes in the treatment of complicated aortic coarctation and poststenotic aneurysm.

  19. Aortic arch malformations

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    Kellenberger, Christian J.

    2010-01-01

    Although anomalies of the aortic arch and its branches are relatively uncommon malformations, they are often associated with congenital heart disease. Isolated lesions may be clinically significant when the airways are compromised by a vascular ring. In this article, the development and imaging appearance of the aortic arch system and its various malformations are reviewed. (orig.)

  20. Endovascular treatment of aortic arch aneurysms Tratamento endovascular dos aneurismas de arco aórtico

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    Roberto Chiesa

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endovascular approach to the aortic arch is an appealing solution for selected patients. OBJECTIVE: To compare the technical and clinical success recorded in the different anatomical settings of endografting for aortic arch disease. METHODS: Between June 1999 and October 2006, among 178 patients treated at our institution for thoracic aorta disease with a stent-graft, the aortic arch was involved in 64 cases. According to the classification proposed by Ishimaru, aortic zone 0 was involved in 14 cases, zone 1 in 12 cases and zone 2 in 38 cases. A hybrid surgical procedure of supra-aortic debranching and revascularization was performed in 37 cases. RESULTS: Zone 0. Proximal neck length: 44±6 mm. Initial clinical success was 78.6%: two deaths (stroke, one type Ia endoleak. At a mean follow-up of 16.4±11 months the midterm clinical success was 85.7%. Zone 1. Proximal neck length: 28±5 mm. Initial clinical success was 66.7%: 0 deaths, four type Ia endoleaks. At a mean follow-up of 16.9±17.2 months the midterm clinical success was 75.0%. Zone 2. Proximal neck length: 30±5 mm. Initial clinical success was 84.2%: two deaths (one cardiac arrest, one multiorgan embolization, three type Ia endoleaks, one case of open conversion. Two cases of delayed transitory paraparesis/paraplegia were observed. At a mean follow-up of 28.0±17.2 months the midterm clinical success was 89.5%. CONCLUSIONS: This study and a literature review demonstrated that hybrid procedure for aortic arch pathology is feasible in selected patients at high risk for conventional surgery. Our experience is still limited by the relatively small sample size. We propose to reserve zone 1 for patients unfit for sternotomy or in cases with aortic neck length > 30 mm following left common carotid artery debranching. We recommend to perform complete aortic rerouting of the aortic arch in cases with lesser comorbidities and shorter aortic neck.CONTEXTO: O tratamento endovascular

  1. Frozen elephant trunk reconstruction for right-sided aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery and aneurysm of the descending aorta: a case report.

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    Kokotsakis, John; Jarral, Omar A; Harling, Leanne; Tsipas, Panteleimon; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2016-05-05

    A 59-year old man being investigated for back pain was found to have aneurysmal dilatation of a right-sided aortic arch and descending thoracic aorta together with an aberrant left subclavian artery. He underwent repair of this utilising the frozen elephant trunk technique, which dealt with all three pathologies in one-stage. He made an unremarkable recovery and was discharged home on the 8th post-operative day. This case report further demonstrates the flexibility and safety of the frozen elephant trunk in dealing with complex aortic pathology as a single-stage procedure.

  2. Double aortic arch

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    Surgery can be done to fix double aortic arch. The surgeon ties off the smaller branch and separates it from the larger branch. Then the surgeon closes the ends of the aorta with stitches. This relieves pressure on the esophagus and windpipe.

  3. Hypoplasia of the aortic arch

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    Ю. С. Синельников

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available An aggressive surgical approach to early repair of aortic coarctation and concomitant arch hypoplasia results in considerable improvement of the long-term outcomes of surgical treatment by reducing the number of aortic re-coarctation and arterial hypertension persistence events. At present, there exist some methods of determining the degree of aortic arch hypoplasia, which allow for arch reconstruction planning. Our review focuses on the analysis of modern methods of determination of the aortic arch hypoplasia and the outcomes of surgical treatment of this disease.

  4. Aortic Aneurysm Statistics

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    ... people with inherited connective tissue disorders, such as Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, get thoracic aortic aneurysms. ... Smoking . Some inherited connective tissue disorders, such as Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, can also increase your ...

  5. Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysms

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    Ali Azizzadeh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 50 years, significant progress has been made in the surgical repair of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA.  Improvements in perioperative care and surgical techniques have resulted in reductions in complication and mortality rates. Adjunctive use of distal aortic perfusion and cerebrospinal fluid drainage has been especially helpful, reducing the incidence of neurological deficits to 2.4%. Current research is aimed at improving organ preservation. This review focuses on the current diagnosis and management of TAAA.

  6. Unoperated aortic aneurysm

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    Perko, M J; Nørgaard, M; Herzog, T M

    1995-01-01

    From 1984 to 1993, 1,053 patients were admitted with aortic aneurysm (AA) and 170 (15%) were not operated on. The most frequent reason for nonoperative management was presumed technical inoperability. Survivals for patients with thoracic, thoracoabdominal, and abdominal AA were comparable. No sig...

  7. [Aortic arch advancement surgery as treatment for aortic coarctation with hypoplastic aortic arch in children].

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    Palacios-Macedo-Quenot, Alexis; Urencio, Miguel; Ponce-De-León-Rosales, Sergio; López-Terrazas, Javier; Castañuela-Sánchez, Violeta; March-Mifsut, Almudena; López-Magallón, Alejandro; Pérez-Juárez, Fabiola; Cedillo-Rendón, Irma; Tamariz-Cruz, Orlando

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of aortic coarctation with hypoplastic aortic arch is still a surgical challenge. The aortic arch advancement surgery has shown less re-coarctation frequency. To determine the re-coarctation frequency in patients who underwent aortic arch advancement technique for aortic coarctation with hypoplastic aortic arch and analyze the results. Retrospective and observational study of 38 patients who underwent aortic arch advancement in a third level Institution from 2002 to 2010. Twenty four males and 14 females all with aortic arch Z index diameter of coarctation was O%. With the previously mentioned technique the recoarctation frequency on medium and long term basis was 0%. From the anatomical and functional point of view, we believe this technique offers the best possible results.

  8. Case of successful prosthetics of aortic arch in a patient with congenital deformation of aortic arch in severe hypothermia and circulatory arrest

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    Bokeria L.A.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Atresia of the aortic arch is a rare congenital disease, often accompanied by congenital heart defects. Isolated atresia of the aorta is rare and usually has a complex deformation with multiple aneurysms, bending of the aorta and its branches. This anatomy complicates the exposure and makes surgery technically complicated with conventional approaches. The aim of the work is the presentation of a case of successful prosthetics of aortic arch and a 5-year observation of a patient with congenital deformation of the aortic arch in severe hypothermia and circulatory arrest. The article presents the variant of surgical tactics in treatment of patients with this form of atresia of aortic arch.

  9. Tobacco smoking and aortic aneurysm

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    Sode, Birgitte F; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Grønbæk, Morten

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We determined the predictive power of tobacco smoking on aortic aneurysm as opposed to other risk factors in the general population. METHODS: We recorded tobacco smoking and other risk factors at baseline, and assessed hospitalization and death from aortic aneurysm in 15,072 individuals...... aneurysm in males and females consuming above 20g tobacco daily was 3.5% and 1.3%, among those >60years with plasma cholesterol >5mmol/L and a systolic blood pressure >140mmHg. CONCLUSIONS: Tobacco smoking is the most important predictor of future aortic aneurysm outcomes in the general population...

  10. Unoperated aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perko, M J; Nørgaard, M; Herzog, T M

    1995-01-01

    From 1984 to 1993, 1,053 patients were admitted with aortic aneurysm (AA) and 170 (15%) were not operated on. The most frequent reason for nonoperative management was presumed technical inoperability. Survivals for patients with thoracic, thoracoabdominal, and abdominal AA were comparable....... No significant differences in survival for patients with dissecting and nondissecting AA were detected. In all, 132 patients (78%) died and 78 (59%) of them died of rupture. Mean time to rupture was 1,300 +/- 8 days. Cumulative 5-year hazard of rupture for the dissecting AA was twice that of the nondissecting (p...... A dissections. The results suggest that type B dissections may have a more favorable course if operated on, but a prospective, randomized study is necessary to confirm this observation. We believe that older patients and those with a small aneurysm may benefit from early, elective operation....

  11. Equine pericardial roll graft replacement of infected pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubota Hiroshi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Resection of the infected aorta, debridement of the surrounding tissue, in situ graft replacement, and omentopexy is the standard procedure for treating infected aortic aneurysms, but the question of which graft material is optimal is still a matter of controversy. We recently treated a patient with an infected thoracic aortic aneurysm. The aneurysm was located in the proximal aortic arch. Because the patients had previously undergone abdominal surgery, the aortic arch were replaced in situ with a branched equine pericardial roll grafts. The patient is alive and well 23 months after the operation.

  12. Abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gefke, K; Schroeder, T V; Thisted, B

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify patients who need longer care in the ICU (more than 48 hours) following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery and to evaluate the influence of perioperative complications on short- and long-term survival and quality of life. AAA surgery was performed in 553......, 78% stated that their quality of life had improved or was unchanged after surgery and had resumed working. These data justify a therapeutically aggressive approach, including ICU therapy following AAA surgery, despite failure of one or more organ systems....

  13. Psychological consequences of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm and conservative treatment of small abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Vammen, Sten; Fasting, H

    2000-01-01

    To describe the potential psychological consequences of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs).......To describe the potential psychological consequences of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs)....

  14. Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Andrusaitis

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 69-year-old male with poorly controlled hypertension presented with 1 hour of severe low back pain that radiated to his abdomen. The patient was tachycardic and had an initial blood pressure of 70/40. He had a rigid and severely tender abdomen. The patient’s history of hypertension, abnormal vital signs, severity and location of his pain were suspicious for a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. Therefore, a computed tomography angiogram (CTA was ordered. Significant findings: CTA demonstrated a ruptured 7.4 cm infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm with a large left retroperitoneal hematoma. Discussion: True abdominal aortic aneurysm is defined as at least a 3cm dilatation of all three layers of the arterial wall of the abdominal aorta.1 An estimated 15,000 people die per year in the US of this condition.2 Risk factors for AAA include males older than 65, tobacco use, and hypertension.1,3,4 There are also congenital, mechanical, traumatic, inflammatory, and infectious causes of AAA.3 Rupture is often the first manifestation of the disease. The classic triad of abdominal pain, pulsatile mass, and hypotension is seen in only 50% of ruptured AAAs.5 Pain (abdominal, groin, or back is the most common symptom. The most common misdiagnoses of ruptured AAAs are renal colic, diverticulitis, and gastrointestinal hemorrhage.6 Bedside ultrasonography is the fastest way to detect this condition and is nearly 100% sensitive.1 One study showed that bedside ultrasounds performed by emergency physicians had a sensitivity of .94 [95% CI = .86-1.0] and specificity of 1 [95% CI = .98-1.0] for detecting AAAs.7 CTA has excellent sensitivity (approximately 100% and yields the added benefit of facilitating surgical planning and management.1 Without surgical treatment, a ruptured AAA is almost uniformly fatal, and 50% of those who undergo surgery do not survive.1 Early resuscitation and coordination with vascular surgery should be

  15. Cervical aortic arch and a new type of double aortic arch. Report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornali, M; Reginato, E; Azzolina, G

    1976-09-01

    A case of cervical aortic arch is reported. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first to be associated with a serious intracardiac anomaly. In addition, it is part of a new type of double aortic arch, caused by failure of reabsorption of both dorsal aortic roots and persistence of the fourth right and second (or third) left branchial arches.

  16. Expanding arch aneurysm causing a "kink" in a Bentall graft and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mohaissen, Maha A; Skarsgard, Peter; Khoo, Clarence; Virani, Sean A; Munt, Brad; Leipsic, Jonathon; Ignaszewski, Andrew

    2012-07-01

    Marfan syndrome is associated with a high incidence of aortic root aneurysm and life-threatening aortic dissection. With the successful use of surgical aortic root replacement, dissection-related mortality has been significantly reduced. We present the case of a patient with Marfan syndrome who presented with heart failure secondary to an unusual graft-related complication 14 years after a Bentall procedure. Investigations revealed a supra-aortic stenosis resulting from a kink in the Bentall graft caused by pressure from an expanding aortic arch aneurysm. The patient underwent surgery with improvement in his ejection fraction and heart failure symptoms.

  17. Self-Expandable Stent for Repairing Coarctation of the Left-Circumferential Aortic Arch with Right-sided Descending Aorta and Aberrant Right Subclavian Artery with Kommerell's Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajali, Zahra; Sanati, Hamid Reza; Pouraliakbar, Hamidreza; Mohebbi, Bahram; Aeinfar, Kamran; Zolfaghari, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Endovascular treatment offers a great advantage in the management of main arteries stenoses. However, simultaneous presence of a group of anomalies may complicate the situation. Here we present a case of 21-year-old man with aortic coarctation. Radiographic imaging and angiography demonstrated aortic coarctation of the left-circumferential aortic arch, right-sided descending aorta, and Kommerell's diverticulum at the origin of right subclavian artery. These anomalies have rarely been reported to concurrently exist in the same case and the treatment is challenging. Percutaneous treatment for repair of aortic coarctation was successfully performed with deployment of self-expanding nitinol stents. Follow-up demonstrated the correction of blood pressure and improvement of the symptoms. It appears that deployment of self-expandable nitinol stents present a viable option for the management of coarcted aorta in patients having all or some of these anomalies together. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Total arch and descending thoracic aortic replacement by left thoracotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvera, Joel S; Fehrenbacher, John W

    2012-05-01

    The hybrid treatment of transverse aortic arch pathologies with supraaortic debranching and endovascular repair is associated with significant morbidity and death and lacks long-term follow-up. The traditional two-stage open surgical approach to extensive arch and descending thoracic aneurysms carries a significant interval mortality rate. We report the results of a single-stage technique of total arch and descending thoracic aortic replacement by a left thoracotomy. From January 1995 to February 2011, 426 patients underwent thoracic or thoracoabdominal aneurysm repair, of which a highly selected group of 27 patients underwent total arch replacement with descending thoracic or thoracoabdominal aortic replacement. All procedures were performed with hypothermic circulatory arrest and selective antegrade cerebral perfusion. Two patients required transverse division of the sternum. Two patients had emergency or urgent operations. Five patients had concomitant coronary artery bypass, and 1 had concomitant mitral valve replacement. There were no hospital deaths, no cerebrovascular accidents, and one instance of transient spinal cord ischemia. Three patients had acute renal failure not requiring hemodialysis. Intubation in 5 patients exceeded 48 hours, and 1 patient needed tracheostomy. Two patients required reexploration for postoperative bleeding. Survival at 1, 3, and 5 years was 95%, 78%, and 73%, respectively. Replacement of the total arch and descending thoracic aorta by a left thoracotomy provides excellent short-term and long-term results for the treatment of extensive arch and thoracic aortic pathology, without the need for a second-stage operation. Other cardiac pathologies, such as left-sided coronary disease and mitral valve disease, can be addressed concurrently. Copyright © 2012 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Tratamento cirúrgico dos aneurismas e dissecções do arco aórtico Surgical treatment of aneurysms and dissections of the aortic arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayard GONTIJO FILHO

    1999-10-01

    ; 31 patients were male (66.0% and ages ranged from 26-74 years (mean = 54.9 ± 10.9. Aortic dissection was present in 33 patients (70.2% and fusiform or sacular aneurysms in 14 (29.8%. Previous cardíac procedures had been performed in 11 patients (23.4%, rupture with cardíac tamponade was present in 4 patients. Median sternotomy was used in 42 cases and bilateral thoracotomy in 5. Deep hypothermia with circulatory arrest was used in 97.8% of cases with the arrest period ranging from 15 to 60 minutes (m = 30.6 ± 12.6. Anterior hemiarch reconstruction was used in 19 patients (40.4%, posterior hemiarch in 5 (10.6%, total arch replacement in 18 (38.3% aortoplasty in 4 (8.5% and extra-anatomic bypass with exclusion in 1 (2.1%. The main associated procedures were: myocardial revascularization (9, ascending aorta replacement by a valved conduit (15, elephant trunk (5 and aortic valve replacement (3. Hospital mortality was 12,3% (6 patients and respiratory insufficiency was the most common non-fatal complication (7 cases. Determinant factors for hospital mortality showed a statistical tendency for age over 60 years (p = 0.17 and for acute aortic dissection (p = 0.07. Late follow-up was achieved in 95.12% of the hospital survivors. There were 3 late deaths (1 cerebro-vascular accident, 2 reoperations. The 9 year survival rate is 80.85%.

  20. Geometric Deformations of the Thoracic Aorta and Supra-Aortic Arch Branch Vessels Following Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullery, Brant W; Suh, Ga-Young; Hirotsu, Kelsey; Zhu, David; Lee, Jason T; Dake, Michael D; Fleischmann, Dominik; Cheng, Christopher P

    2018-04-01

    To utilize 3-D modeling techniques to better characterize geometric deformations of the supra-aortic arch branch vessels and descending thoracic aorta after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Eighteen patients underwent endovascular repair of either type B aortic dissection (n = 10) or thoracic aortic aneurysm (n = 8). Computed tomography angiography was obtained pre- and postprocedure, and 3-D geometric models of the aorta and supra-aortic branch vessels were constructed. Branch angle of the supra-aortic branch vessels and curvature metrics of the ascending aorta, aortic arch, and stented thoracic aortic lumen were calculated both at pre- and postintervention. The left common carotid artery branch angle was lower than the left subclavian artery angles preintervention ( P Supra-aortic branch vessel angulation remains relatively static when proximal landing zones are distal to the left common carotid artery.

  1. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... into the artery. Then use a dye to define the extent of the aneurysm. Use x-rays ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  2. Thoracic aortic aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the aorta Injury from falls or motor vehicle accidents Syphilis Symptoms Aneurysms develop slowly over many ... rupture) if you do not have surgery to repair it. The treatment depends on the location of ...

  3. Aortic aneurysm secondary to umbilical artery catheterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brill, P.W.; Winchester, P.; Griffith, A.Y.; Kazam, E.; Zirinsky, K.; Levin, A.R.

    1985-02-01

    A 14-month-girl presented with an asymptomatic posterior mediastinal mass. She had a history of prematurity, umbilical artery catheterization, and sepsis. The diagnosis of aortic aneurysm was made by dynamic computed tomography. The aneurysm was successfully resected.

  4. Multiple infected aortic aneurysms repaired by staged in situ graft replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Yusuke; Kurisu, Kazuhiro; Hisahara, Manabu; Mashiba, Kouichi; Maeda, Takako

    2010-08-01

    The development of multiple infected aortic aneurysms is extremely rare, and treatment remains challenging. We report here a 72-year-old man with multiple infected aortic aneurysms in whom a staged in situ graft replacement for the aortic arch and pararenal abdominal aorta was successfully performed. A rifampicin-bonded graft seemed to be effective in preventing postoperative infection. Perioperative control of infection played a key role in the patient's surviving this critical condition.

  5. Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair in patients with marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mommertz, G; Sigala, F; Langer, S; Koeppel, T A; Mess, W H; Schurink, G W H; Jacobs, M J

    2008-02-01

    We assessed the surgical outcome of descending thoracic aortic aneurysm repair (DTAA) and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurym (TAAA) repair in patients with Marfan syndrome. During a six year period, 206 patients underwent DTAA and TAAA repair. In 22 patients, Marfan syndrome was confirmed. The median age was 40 years with a range between 18 and 57 years. The extend of the aneurysms included 6 DTAA (1 with total arch, 2 with distal hemi-arch), 11 type II TAAA (2 with total arch, 3 with distal hemi-arch), 4 type III and one type IV TAAA. All patients suffered from previous type A (n=6) or type B (n=16) aortic dissection and 15 already underwent aortic procedures like Bentall (n=7) and ascending aortic replacement (n=8). All patients were operated on according to the standard protocol with cerebrospinal fluid drainage, distal aortic and selective organ perfusion and monitoring motor evoked potentials. In patients undergoing simultaneous arch replacement (via left thoracotomy), transcranial Doppler and EEG assessed cerebral physiology during antegrade brain perfusion. In four patients circulatory arrest under moderate hypothermia was required. In-hospital mortality did not occur. Major postoperative complications like paraplegia, renal failure, stroke and myocardial infarction were not encountered. Mean pre-operative creatinine level was 125mmol/L, which peaked to a mean maximal level of 130 and returned to 92mmol/L at discharge. Median intubation time was 1.5 days (range 0.33-30 days). Other complications included bleeding requiring surgical intervention (n=1), arrhythmia (n=2), pneumonia (n=2) and respiratory distress syndrome (n=1). At a median follow-up of 38 months all patients were alive. Using CT surveillance, new or false aneurysms were not detected, except in one patient who developed a visceral patch aneurysm six years after open type II repair. Surgical repair of descending and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms provides excellent short- and mid-term results in

  6. Leaking mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sing, T.M.Y.; Young, N.; O'Rourke, I.C.; Tomlinson, P.

    1994-01-01

    A case of leaking mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm is reported, with a brief review of the literature. A 58 year old female presented with shoulder and abdominal pain associated with diarrhea, vomiting and fever with leucocytosis. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed pooling of contrast in the retroperitoneum anterior to a non-dilated abdominal aorta. There was considerable retroperitoneal blood accumulating in a mass-like lesion in the right lower abdomen and pelvis obstructing the right renal collecting system. Laparotomy revealed a 4 cm diameter saccular aneurysm of the abdominal aorta, with a 1 cm diameter neck. Culture of the thrombus grew Streptococcus pyogens. 11 refs., 2 figs

  7. Surveillance intervals for small abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bown, Matthew J; Sweeting, Michael J; Brown, Louise C

    2013-01-01

    Small abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs [3.0 cm-5.4 cm in diameter]) are monitored by ultrasound surveillance. The intervals between surveillance scans should be chosen to detect an expanding aneurysm prior to rupture.......Small abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs [3.0 cm-5.4 cm in diameter]) are monitored by ultrasound surveillance. The intervals between surveillance scans should be chosen to detect an expanding aneurysm prior to rupture....

  8. Abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal

    2010-12-01

    Although the number of elective operations for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is increasing, the sex- and age-standardised mortality rate of AAAs continues to rise, especially among men aged 65 years or more. The lethality of ruptured AAA continues to be 80-95%, compared with 5-7% by elective surgery of symptomfree AAA. In order to fulfil all WHO, European, and Danish criteria for screening, a randomised hospitalbased screening trial of 12,639 65-73 year old men in Viborg County (Denmark) was initiated in 1994. It seemed that US screening is a valid, suitable and acceptable method of screening. The acceptance rate was 77%, and 95% accept control scans. Furthermore, persons at the highest risk of having an AAA attend screening more frequently. We found that 97% of the interval cases developed from aortas that initially measured 2.5-2.9 cm - i.e. approx. only 5% attenders need re-screening at 5-year intervals. Two large RCTs have given clear indications of operation. Survivors of surgery enjoy the same quality of life as the background population, and only 2-5% of patients refuse an offer of surgery. Early detection seems relevant since the cardiovascular mortality is more than 4 times higher in AAA patients without previous hospital discharge diagnoses due to cardiovascular disease than among similar men without AAA. The absolute risk difference after 5 years was 16%. So, they will benefit from general cardiovascular preventive action as smoking cessation, statins and low-dose aspirin, which could inhibit further AAA progression. All 4 existing RCTs point in the same direction, viz. in favour of screening of men aged 65 and above. We found that screening significantly reduced AAA-related mortality by 67% within the first five years (NNT = 352). Restriction of screening to men with previous cardiovascular or pulmonary hospital discharge diagnoses would request only 27% of the relevant male population study to be invited, but would only have prevented 46.7% of the

  9. Surgical repair of distal arch psendoaneurysm from ruptured penetrating aortic ulcer with the frozen elephant trunk technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokotsakis, John; Tassopoulos, Dimitrios; Ttofi, Jacob; Harling, Leanne; Ashrafian, Hutan; Velissarios, Konstantinos; Kratimenos, Theodore; Anagnostou, Stratos; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2014-04-05

    Ruptured Penetrating Ulcer and aortic arch pseudo-aneurysm is a rare condition but one which carries a high risk of rupture. We report the case of a 74-year-old man with aortic arch pseudo-aneurysm, in which a Frozen Elephant Trunk procedure was successfully performed. There were no postoperative complications at 6 months follow-up. The Computed Tomography Angiogram demonstrated thrombus formation in the pseudo-aneurysm lumen, with no endoleak on the stented part of the descending thoracic aorta and complete patency of all branches of aortic arch. This case demonstrates that the Frozen Elephant Trunk technique may be the treatment of choice when treating such complex aortic arch lesions provided there is no absolute contraindication to radical surgical intervention. However, long-term clinical efficacy and safety have yet to be confirmed.

  10. Acute Aortic Arch Perforation During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Bicuspid Aortic Stenosis and a Gothic Aortic Arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan-Iturbe, Oscar; Sawaya, Fadi J; Bieliauskas, Gintautas; Chow, Danny H F; De Backer, Ole; Søndergaard, Lars

    2017-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has evolved from a novel technology to an established therapy for high/intermediate-risk patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS). Although TAVR is used to treat bicuspid severe AS, the large randomized trials typically excluded bicuspid AS because of its unique anatomic features. This case report describes an acute aortic perforation during delivery of a transcatheter heart valve to treat a severe bicuspid AS with a "gothic aortic arch"; more careful evaluation of the preprocedural multislice computed tomographic scan would have unveiled a sharply angulated aortic arch. This life-threatening complication was successfully treated by thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Albert Einstein and his abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes Castro, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The interesting case of Albert Einstein's abdominal aortic aneurysm is presented. He was operated on at age 69 and, finding that the large aneurysm could not be removed, the surgeon elected to wrap it with cellophane to prevent its growth. However, seven years later the aneurysm ruptured and caused the death of the famous scientist.

  12. Arch reconstruction with autologous pulmonary artery patch in interrupted aortic arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won-Young; Park, Jeong-Jun

    2014-04-01

    Various surgical techniques have been developed for the repair of an interrupted aortic arch. However, tension and Gothic arch formation at the anastomotic site have remained major problems for these techniques: Excessive tension causes arch stenosis and left main bronchus compression, and Gothic arch configuration is related to cardiovascular complications. To resolve these problems, we adopted a modified surgical technique of distal aortic arch augmentation using an autologous main pulmonary artery patch. The descending aorta was then anastomosed to the augmented aortic arch in an end-to-side manner. Here, we report two cases of interrupted aortic arch that were repaired using this technique.

  13. General Considerations of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chung Won; Bae, Miju; Chung, Sung Woon

    2015-01-01

    Although development of surgical technique and critical care, ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm still carries a high mortality. In order to obtain good results, various efforts have been attempted. This paper reviews initial management of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and discuss the key point open surgical repair and endovascular aneurysm repair.

  14. Aortic aneurysm and diverticulum of Kommerell: a dreadful concomitance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Peixoto Ferraz de Campos

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available First described in 1936, the diverticulum of Kommerell (DOK is a dilatation of the proximal segment of an aberrant subclavian artery. Appearing more frequently in the left-sided aortic arch, the aberrant right subclavian artery passes behind the esophagus toward the right arm, causing symptoms in the minority of cases. Diagnosis is generally incidental with this pattern. When symptomatic, dysphagia, respiratory symptoms, hoarseness, chest pain, and upper limb ischemia are the most common complaints. Although debatable, the origin of DOK is accepted as being degenerative or congenital. The degenerative condition is normally associated with atherosclerosis and occurs more frequently after the age of 50 years with no gender predominance. Complications may be life threatening and are more commonly related to the diverticulum aneurysm or when associated with aortic diseases such as aneurysms or dissection. The authors present a case of a 67-year-old male with a history of acute chest pain, neurological disturbances, and hypertensive crisis. The diagnostic workup revealed an aortic arch aneurysm with intramural hematoma and a diverticulum aneurysm of Kommerell. Treatment was conservative at first. The patient presented a satisfactory outcome and was referred to an outpatient clinic for follow up and further therapeutic consolidation.

  15. Supra-aortic interventions for endovascular exclusion of the entire aortic arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrási, Terézia B; Grossmann, Marius; Zenker, Dieter; Danner, Bernhard C; Schöndube, Friedrich A

    2017-07-01

    Our aim was to analyze the outcomes of endovascular exclusion of the entire aortic arch (proximal landing in zone 0, distal landing in zone III or beyond, after Ishimaru) in which complete surgical debranching of the supra-aortic vessels (I), endovascular supra-aortic revascularization (chimney, fenestrated, or branched grafts) with partial surgical debranching (II), or total endovascular supra-aortic revascularization (III) was additionally performed. Publications describing endovascular repair of the aortic arch (2000-2016) were systematically searched and reviewed. From a total of 53 relevant studies including 1853 patients, only 1021 patients undergoing 35 different total aortic arch procedures were found eligible for further evaluation and included in group I, II, or III (429, 190, and 402 patients, respectively). Overall early mortality was higher in group I vs groups II and III (P = .001; 1 - β = 95.6%) but exceeded in group III (18.6%) and group II (14.0%) vs group I (8.0%; P = .044; 1 - β = 57.4%) for diseases involving zone 0. Mortality was higher in all subgroups treated for zone 0 disease compared with corresponding subgroups treated for zone I to zone III disease. The incidence of cerebral ischemic events was increased in groups I and II vs group III (7.5% and 11% vs 1.7%; P = .0001) and correlated with early mortality (R 2  = .20; P = .033). The incidence of type II endoleaks and endovascular reintervention was similar between groups and correlated with each other (R 2  = .37; P = .004). Type Ia endoleak occurred more often in groups II and III than in group I (7.1% and 12.1% vs 5.8%; P = .023) and correlated with midterm mortality (R 2  = .53; P = .005). Retrograde type A dissection was low in all groups, whereas aneurysm growth was higher in group III (2.6%, 4.2%, 10.7%; P = .002), correlating with midterm mortality (R 2  = .311; P = .009). Surgical revision slightly correlated with surgical complications (R 2  = .18; P = .044

  16. Preoperative Evaluation and Endovascular Procedure of Intraoperative Aneurysm Rupture During Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zha, Bin-Shan, E-mail: binszha2013@163.com; Zhu, Hua-Gang, E-mail: huagzhu@yeah.net; Ye, Yu-Sheng, E-mail: yeyusheng@aliyun.com; Li, Yong-Sheng, E-mail: 872868848@qq.com; Zhang, Zhi-Gong, E-mail: zzgedward@sina.com; Xie, Wen-Tao, E-mail: 345344347@qq.com [The First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Department of Vascular Surgery (China)

    2017-03-15

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms are now routinely repaired with endovascular repair if anatomically feasible because of advantages in safety and recovery. However, intraoperative aneurysm rupture is a severe complication which may have an adverse effect on the outcome of treatment. Comprehensive preoperative assessment and considerate treatment are keys to success of endovascular aneurysm repair, especially during unexpected circumstances. Few cases have reported on intraoperative aortic rupture, which were successfully managed by endovascular treatment. Here, we present a rare case of an intraoperative aneurysm rupture during endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm with narrow neck and angulated aorta arch (coarctation-associated aneurysm), which was successfully treated using double access route approach and iliac limbs of infrarenal devices.Level of EvidenceLevel 5.

  17. Telomere Biology and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Aschacher

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ascending aortic aneurysms are mostly asymptomatic and present a great risk of aortic dissection or perforation. Consequently, ascending aortic aneurysms are a source of lethality with increased age. Biological aging results in progressive attrition of telomeres, which are the repetitive DNA sequences at the end of chromosomes. These telomeres play an important role in protection of genomic DNA from end-to-end fusions. Telomere maintenance and telomere attrition-associated senescence of endothelial and smooth muscle cells have been indicated to be part of the pathogenesis of degenerative vascular diseases. This systematic review provides an overview of telomeres, telomere-associated proteins and telomerase to the formation and progression of aneurysms of the thoracic ascending aorta. A better understanding of telomere regulation in the vascular pathology might provide new therapeutic approaches. Measurements of telomere length and telomerase activity could be potential prognostic biomarkers for increased risk of death in elderly patients suffering from an aortic aneurysm.

  18. Dissecting aortic aneurysm in maintenance hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ounissi M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The dissecting aortic aneurysm (DAA is a rare pathology that may result in fatal outcome. We report follow up of three cases of DAA patients undergoing maintenance hemo-dialysis who were managed conservatively.

  19. Multislice CT angiography of interrupted aortic arch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Dong Hyun; Goo, Hyun Woo [Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Seo, Dong-Man; Yun, Tae-Jin; Park, Jeong-Jun [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Paediatric Cardiac Surgery, Seoul (Korea); Park, In-Sook; Ko, Jae Kon; Kim, Young Hwee [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Paediatric Cardiology, Seoul (Korea)

    2008-01-15

    Interrupted aortic arch (IAA) is defined as complete luminal and anatomic discontinuity between the ascending and descending aorta. Because almost all patients with IAA become critically ill during the neonatal period, they should undergo urgent corrective surgery. This clinical urgency necessitates a fast and accurate noninvasive diagnostic method. Although echocardiography remains the primary imaging tool for this purpose, it is not always sufficient for planning surgical correction of IAA, principally due to a limited acoustic window and the inexperience of imagers. In this context, multislice CT angiography is regarded as an appropriate imaging technique complementary to echocardiography because it is fast, accurate, and objective for the diagnosis of IAA. In this article we describe what cardiac radiologists should know about IAA in their clinical practice, including clinicopathological features, CT features with contemporary surgical methods and postoperative complications, and differentiation from coarctation of the aorta and aortic arch atresia. (orig.)

  20. [Outcomes of endovascular repairing aortic arch disease hybrid with supra-arch debranching procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mian; Chang, Guangqi; Yin, Henghui; Yao, Chen; Wang, Jinsong; Wang, Shenming

    2015-11-01

    To summarize the experience of endovascular repairing aortic arch disease hybrid with supra-arch debranching procedures. It was a retrospective study. From January 2002 to December 2014, 42 high risk patients with aortic arch disease were treated by supra-arch debranching hybrid with subsequent endovascular repair in the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University. There were 39 male and 3 female patients with a mean age of (53±13) years (ranging from 34 to 80 years). Of the 42 patients, 7 were thoracic aortic aneurysm, 20 were Stanford type B aortic dissection and 15 were Stanford type A aortic dissection. After the supra-aortic debranching technique, simultaneous (n=16) or staged (n=26, mean interval (7±3) days) endovascular repair were performed. Fisher exact test was used to compare the in-hospital mortality of ascending aorta based debranching and non-ascending aorta based debranching. Technical success rate was 81.0% (34/42). The overall 30-day complication rate was 31.0% (13/42), including 3 cerebral stroke (7.1%), 8 endoleak (19.0%, including 6 type I endoleak and 2 type II endoleak), 1 circulatory failure, 1 aorto-tracheal fistula. The 30-day mortality was 9.5% (4/42), 2 died of cerebral stroke, 1 died of circulatory failure, 1 died of aorto-tracheal fistula. The in-hospital mortality of ascending aorta based debranching group was obviously higher than that of the non-ascending aorta based debranching group (4/16 vs. 0, P=0.02). The median time of follow-up was 64.8 (2 to 156.9) months. CT scanning was performed at 1, 3 months after surgery and annually thereafter. The overall survival rate was 76.6%. During the follow-up period, there was 4 deaths, and 2 of them were aortic artery related (5.3%). There were 4 de novo complications during the follow-up period, 1 stroke attributed to bypass occlusion was cured by medical treatment, 2 pseudoaneurysm was successfully treated with open surgery, 1 stent-graft induced new distal entry tear was

  1. Hybrid treatment of a huge complex aortic pseudo-aneurysm subsequent to a coarctation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizza, Antonio; Barletta, Valentina; Palmieri, Cataldo; Berti, Sergio

    2017-07-01

    Endovascular treatment of pseudo-aneurysms subsequent to a pre-existing aortic coarctation is becoming a well-accepted technical solution especially in patients presenting anatomical challenges involving the aortic arch. We report the case of a 65-year-old woman with a huge pseudo-aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta. Diagnostic imaging assessment documented also the presence of an aneurysmatic aberrant right subclavian artery. Due to patient's anatomical arterial condition, we decided to treat the aneurysm applying a hybrid approach. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  2. [Single coronary artery and right aortic arch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-01-01

    Coronary anomalies are mostly asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally during coronary angiography or echocardiography. However, they must be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of angina, dyspnea, syncope, acute myocardial infarction or sudden death in young patients. The case is presented of two rare anomalies, single coronary artery originating from right sinus of Valsalva and right aortic arch, in a 65 year-old patient with atherosclerotic coronary artery disease treated percutaneously. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Differences in aortic arch radius of curvature, neck size, and taper in patients with traumatic and aortic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta, Hillary B; Secor, Jessica L; Smits, Taylor C; Farber, Mark A; Jordan, William D; Matsumura, Jon S

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the differences in aortic morphology that would potentially affect the management of thoracic endovascular aneurysm/aortic repair between trauma and aneurysm patients. This was a prospective analysis of the pretreatment digital imaging of 98 traumatic injury patients and 63 aneurysm patients enrolled in multicenter regulatory studies of the Conformable GORE TAG Thoracic Device (CTAG Device) (manufactured by W.L. Gore and Associates, Flagstaff, AZ). A standardized protocol was used to perform an independent assessment of the images and measurements of the radius of curvature and proximal and distal neck diameters. The radius of curvature was measured using axial images and the proximal and distal intimal neck diameter measurements were completed using the orthogonal "centerline" view. Taper was measured over the entire treated aorta and was calculated by subtracting the distal neck diameter measurement from the proximal neck diameter. The results were analyzed with independent t-tests. The trauma patients had a significantly smaller radius of curvature than aneurysm patients. There was a significant difference in the aortic neck size, with trauma patients having smaller proximal and distal intimal neck diameters. Taper was noted in trauma patients but not in aneurysm patients. The aortic anatomy varies between treated aortic pathologies. Aneurysm patients have a wider arch and larger aortas when compared with trauma patients. Aneurysm patients have less taper than trauma patients. Despite these differences, both of these cohorts of patients are treatable under the broader oversizing ranges of the CTAG Device. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Right lung cancer with right aortic arch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Noriyuki, T; Kuroda, Y; Kuranishi, F; Nakahara, M; Fukuda, T; Ishizaki, Y; Hotta, R; Akimoto, E; Mori, H

    2008-02-01

    An abnormal shadow was detected on chest X-ray mass screening in an asymptomatic 63-year-old man. The further examinations revealed the shadow to be primary lung cancer (Rt. S6. adenocarcinoma, cT2N0M0, c-stage IB) with right aortic arch. We used 3 dimentional-computed tomography (3D-CT) to assess an anatomical feature of vessels in detail. The right lower lobectomy and the dissection of medi astinal lymph nodes was performed. We confirmed no abnormal anatomy of pulmonary artery and vein at surgery, and it was possible to perform right lower lobectomy with the common procedure. Since lymph node was found by intraopetrative pathological examination, since no metastasis from interlobar to subcarinal lymph node was found, we did not perform dissection of upper mediastinal dissection, which was equivalent to ND2a lymph nodes dissection of the left lung cancer in General Rule for Clinical and Pathological Record of Lung Cancer. The patient with right aortic arch is known to have variant anatomy of other intrathoracic vessels occasionally. 3D-CT was quite useful in assessing anatomical feature, and enabled us to perform safe operation.

  5. Comparison of Total Arch and Partial Arch Transposition During Hybrid Endovascular Repair for Aortic Arch Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, W C; Ko, Y-G; Oh, P C; Shin, E K; Park, C-H; Choi, D; Youn, Y N; Lee, D Y

    2016-08-01

    Total arch transposition (TAT) during hybrid endovascular repair for aortic arch disease is believed to allow a better landing zone, but also to be associated with higher peri-operative mortality than partial arch transposition (PAT). Information on this issue is limited. This study was a retrospective analysis. All 53 consecutive patients with aortic arch disease (41 males, mean age 65.0 years) who underwent hybrid endovascular repair with TAT (zone 0, n=20) or PAT (zone 1 or 2, n=33) from 2008 to 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. The peri-operative and late outcomes of these two groups were compared. Baseline characteristics, including EuroSCORE II results, were similar in the two groups. After procedures, peri-operative mortalities and stroke rates were similar in the two groups (5.0% vs. 9.1%, p=1.000, and 10.0% vs. 6.1%, p=.627). Interestingly, all four strokes occurred in patients with a type III aortic arch irrespective of transposition type. Primary success rates (80.0% vs. 69.7%, p=.527) and type I endoleak incidences (20.0% vs. 27.3%, p=.744) were not significantly different. During follow up (mean duration 36.9 months), overall survival (89.7% vs. 87.4% at 1 year and 89.7% vs. 79.3% at 3 years; p=.375) and re-intervention free survival rates (78.6% vs. 92.0% at 1 year; 72.0% vs. 62.2% at 3 years, p=.872) were similar in the two groups. Morbidity and mortality were high within the first year of hybrid endovascular therapy for aortic arch disease, implying that candidates for hybrid procedures need to be selected carefully. Hybrid endovascular repair with TAT was found to have peri-operative mortality, stroke, and long-term survival rates comparable with PAT, so hybrid endovascular repair may be considered, irrespective of type of arch reconstruction, when clinically indicated. Copyright © 2016 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Prosthetic aortic arch replacement. A new experimental technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodman, R F; Estner, S; Passik, C; Goldman, M

    1990-01-01

    An experimental method for rapid replacement of the transverse aortic arch is presented. Branched intraluminal prostheses were fashioned of varying sizes containing ascending and descending aortic limbs and branches for the brachiocephalic and subclavian vessels. Rigid rings were sewn into the ends to allow rapid fixation of the grafts using extraluminal ligatures. In 31 dogs, arch prostheses were inserted using inflow occlusion at normothermia. Twenty-seven animals successfully underwent aortic arch replacement during periods of circulatory arrest from 2.5 to 6.5 minutes. One animal was electively sacrificed 3 years after arch replacement. Various sized aortic arch prostheses manufactured for clinical use would have the potential advantages of technical simplicity of insertion and reduced cardiopulmonary bypass. Alternatively, varying sized tubular grafts for the brachiocephalic branches could be attached to the currently available tubular intraluminal grafts.

  7. Natural history of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perko, M J; Schroeder, T V; Olsen, P S

    1993-01-01

    During a 10-year period in which 735 patients presented with abdominal aortic aneurysms to our clinic, 63 were not offered operative treatment. The primary reason for choosing conservative treatment was concomitant diseases that increased the risk of operation. After 2 years of followup, half...

  8. Endovascular Treatment of Late Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms after Surgical Repair of Congenital Aortic Coarctation in Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juszkat, Robert; Perek, Bartlomiej; Zabicki, Bartosz; Trojnarska, Olga; Jemielity, Marek; Staniszewski, Ryszard; Smoczyk, Wiesław; Pukacki, Fryderyk

    2013-01-01

    Background In some patients, local surgery-related complications are diagnosed many years after surgery for aortic coarctation. The purposes of this study were: (1) to systematically evaluate asymptomatic adults after Dacron patch repair in childhood, (2) to estimate the formation rate of secondary thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) and (3) to assess outcomes after intravascular treatment for TAAs. Methods This study involved 37 asymptomatic patients (26 female and 11 male) who underwent surgical repair of aortic coarctation in the childhood. After they had reached adolescence, patients with secondary TAAs were referred to endovascular repair. Results Follow-up studies revealed TAA in seven cases (19%) (including six with the gothic type of the aortic arch) and mild recoarctation in other six (16%). Six of the TAA patients were treated with stentgrafts, but one refused to undergo an endovascular procedure. In three cases, stengrafts covered the left subclavian artery (LSA), in another the graft was implanted distally to the LSA. In two individuals, elective hybrid procedures were performed with surgical bypass to the supraaortic arteries followed by stengraft implantation. All subjects survived the secondary procedures. One patient developed type Ia endoleak after stentgraft implantation that was eventually treated with a debranching procedure. Conclusions The long-term course of clinically asymptomatic patients after coarctation patch repair is not uncommonly complicated by formation of TAAs (particularly in individuals with the gothic pattern of the aortic arch) that can be treated effectively with stentgrafts. However, in some patients hybrid procedures may be necessary. PMID:24386233

  9. Endovascular treatment of late thoracic aortic aneurysms after surgical repair of congenital aortic coarctation in childhood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Juszkat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In some patients, local surgery-related complications are diagnosed many years after surgery for aortic coarctation. The purposes of this study were: (1 to systematically evaluate asymptomatic adults after Dacron patch repair in childhood, (2 to estimate the formation rate of secondary thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs and (3 to assess outcomes after intravascular treatment for TAAs. METHODS: This study involved 37 asymptomatic patients (26 female and 11 male who underwent surgical repair of aortic coarctation in the childhood. After they had reached adolescence, patients with secondary TAAs were referred to endovascular repair. RESULTS: Follow-up studies revealed TAA in seven cases (19% (including six with the gothic type of the aortic arch and mild recoarctation in other six (16%. Six of the TAA patients were treated with stentgrafts, but one refused to undergo an endovascular procedure. In three cases, stengrafts covered the left subclavian artery (LSA, in another the graft was implanted distally to the LSA. In two individuals, elective hybrid procedures were performed with surgical bypass to the supraaortic arteries followed by stengraft implantation. All subjects survived the secondary procedures. One patient developed type Ia endoleak after stentgraft implantation that was eventually treated with a debranching procedure. CONCLUSIONS: The long-term course of clinically asymptomatic patients after coarctation patch repair is not uncommonly complicated by formation of TAAs (particularly in individuals with the gothic pattern of the aortic arch that can be treated effectively with stentgrafts. However, in some patients hybrid procedures may be necessary.

  10. Diagnosis and management of aortic mycotic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Luis R; Mills, Joseph L

    2010-01-01

    We reviewed all papers most recently reported in the literature (January-December 2008) with regard to infected arterial aneurysms (IAAs) affecting the aorta. Most of the recently reported knowledge is limited to case reports and small series of aortic mycotic aneurysms. Most patients are elderly men and have comorbidities at presentation. Aneurysms were most commonly associated to Salmonella and Staphylococcus. However, several cases of aortic IAAs caused by atypical pathogens were also reported, likely due to an increase in immunosuppressive illnesses, increased life expectancy, improved diagnostic methods, and increasing medical awareness. Open surgical therapy of IAAs remains the gold standard. Some have reported successful outcomes with endovascular methodologies for patients medically compromised or for particular challenging clinical or anatomical scenarios. However, at this time, conclusive evidence is lacking and it should be in general considered a bridge to open repair. The latter should be planned at the earliest possible, when medically permissible.

  11. Thoracic aortic aneurysm: A rare cause of elevated hemidiaphragm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Arshad Ejazi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Phrenic nerve palsy causing hemidiaphragm paralysis is a very uncommon feature of thoracic aortic aneurysm. In one case, a 30 year male complained of chronic dull aching chest pain, and hoarseness of voice; posteroanterior view chest radiograph revealed large spherical radiopacity on the left upper lung zone with smooth lobulated margin with elevated left hemidiaphragm. On Colour Doppler sonography, lesion was anechoic on gray scale sonography but on Doppler analysis revealed intense internal vascularity within it with characteristic "Ying Yang" sign. The finding favor the vascular origin of the lesion and a diagnosis of an arterial aneurysm was made Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT of the thorax revealed a large well defined spherical lesion of 8 × 10 cm size with smooth well defined margin arising from the aortic arch and attenuation of impending rupture or dissection were lesion on immediate post contrast and delayed scan was similar to that of aorta. Left hemidiaphragm elevation was explained by the gross mass effect of the aneurysm causing right phrenic nerve palsy.

  12. 14-3-3 in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarti, Ritu; Gupta, Karishma; Swain, Mamuni; Willard, Belinda; Scholtz, Jaclyn; Svensson, Lars G.; Roselli, Eric E.; Pettersson, Gosta; Johnston, Douglas R.; Soltesz, Edward G.; Yamashita, Michifumi; Stuehr, Dennis; Daly, Thomas M.; Hoffman, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Large vessel vasculitides (LVV) are a group of autoimmune diseases characterized by injury to and anatomic modifications of large vessels, including the aorta and its branch vessels. Disease etiology is unknown. This study was undertaken to identify antigen targets within affected vessel walls in aortic root, ascending aorta, and aortic arch surgical specimens from patients with LVV, including giant cell arteritis, Takayasu arteritis, and isolated focal aortitis. Methods Thoracic aortic aneurysm specimens and autologous blood were acquired from consenting patients who underwent aorta reconstruction procedures. Aorta proteins were extracted from both patients with LVV and age-, race-, and sex-matched disease controls with noninflammatory aneurysms. A total of 108 serum samples from patients with LVV, matched controls, and controls with antinuclear antibodies, different forms of vasculitis, or sepsis were tested. Results Evaluation of 108 serum samples and 22 aortic tissue specimens showed that 78% of patients with LVV produced antibodies to 14-3-3 proteins in the aortic wall (93.7% specificity), whereas controls were less likely to do so (6.7% produced antibodies). LVV patient sera contained autoantibody sufficient to immunoprecipitate 14-3-3 protein(s) from aortic lysates. Three of 7 isoforms of 14-3-3 were found to be up-regulated in aorta specimens from patients with LVV, and 2 isoforms (ε and ζ) were found to be antigenic in LVV. Conclusion This is the first study to use sterile, snap-frozen thoracic aorta biopsy specimens to identify autoantigens in LVV. Our findings indicate that 78% of patients with LVV have antibody reactivity to 14-3-3 protein(s). The precise role of these antibodies and 14-3-3 proteins in LVV pathogenesis deserves further study. PMID:25917817

  13. Vitamins and abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hisato; Umemoto, Takuya

    2017-02-01

    To summarize the association of vitamins (B6, B12, C, D, and E) and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), we reviewed clinical studies with a comprehensive literature research and meta-analytic estimates. To identify all clinical studies evaluating the association of vitamins B6/B12/C/D/E and AAA, databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched through April 2015, using Web-based search engines (PubMed and OVID). For each case-control study, data regarding vitamin levels in both the AAA and control groups were used to generate standardized mean differences (SMDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Pooled analyses of the 4 case-control studies demonstrated significantly lower circulating vitamin B6 levels (SMD, -0.33; 95% CI, -0.55 to -0.11; P=0.003) but non-significantly lower vitamin B12 levels (SMD, -0.42; 95% CI, -1.09 to 0.25; P=0.22) in patients with AAA than subjects without AAA. Pooled analyses of the 2 case-control studies demonstrated significantly lower levels of circulating vitamins C (SMD, -0.71; 95% CI, -1.23 to -0.19; P=0.007) and E (SMD, -1.76; 95% CI, -2.93 to 0.60; P=0.003) in patients with AAA than subjects without AAA. Another pooled analysis of the 3 case-control studies demonstrated significantly lower circulating vitamin D (25-hydroxyvitamin D) levels (SMD, -0.25; 95% CI, -0.50 to -0.01; P=0.04) in patients with AAA than subjects without AAA. In a double-blind controlled trial, 4.0-year treatment with a high-dose folic acid and vitamin B6/B12 multivitamin in kidney transplant recipients did not reduce a rate of AAA repair despite significant reduction in homocysteine level. In another randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 5.8-year supplementation with α-tocopherol (vitamin E) had no preventive effect on large AAA among male smokers. In clinical setting, although low circulating vitamins B6/C/D/E (not B12) levels are associated with AAA presence, vitamins B6/B12/E

  14. Aneurisma do ducto arterioso associado a interrupção do arco aórtico Aneurysm of the arterial duct associated to aortic arch interruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Zielinsky

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available É relatado um caso de aneurisma de ducto arterioso, com diagnóstico pré-natal, o que é muito raro, numa gestante com 33 semanas, onde o feto apresentou uma dilatação aneurismática do canal arterial, com calibre uniformemente aumentado, inserindo-se na aorta descendente, associado à interrupção do arco aórtico. A criança nasceu de parto cesáreo e manteve-se estável com o uso de prostaglandina até o 9º dia de vida, quando foi levada à cirurgia, tendo falecido durante o procedimento por falência biventricular. Este é o primeiro relato da associação desta anomalia com outra malformação cardiovascular intra-uterina, mostrando que este achado nem sempre é associado a uma evolução benigna.Aneurysm of the arterial duct is an infrequent finding, which is very rarely detected prenatally. A case of antenatal diagnosis in a pregnant patient (33 weeks is reported. The fetus presented an aneurysmatic dilation of the arterial duct with uniformly enlarged diameter, inserting into the descending aorta, which was interrupted. The neonate was born by cesarean section and was kept on postaglandins till the 9th day of life, when he was sent to surgery. During the surgical procedure, the baby died as a result of biventricular failure. This is the first report of prenatal association of aneurysm of the ducts anteriosus with other cardiovascular malformations and emphasizes that this finding does not always have a benign course.

  15. ADAMTS-1 in abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emina Vorkapic

    Full Text Available Extracellular matrix degradation is a hallmark of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. Among proteases that are capable of degrading extracellular matrix are a disintegrin and metalloproteases with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS. Pathogenesis of these proteases in AAA has not been investigated until date.Human aneurysmal and control aortas were collected and analyzed with RT-PCR measuring the ADAMTS-1, 4,5,6,8,9,10,13,17 and ADAMTSL-1. Expression of a majority of the investigated ADAMTS members on mRNA level was decreased in aneurysm compared to control aorta. ADAMTS-1 was one of the members that was reduced most. Protein analysis using immunohistochemistry and western blot for localization and expression of ADAMTS-1 revealed that ADAMTS-1 was present predominantly in areas of SMCs and macrophages in aneurysmal aorta and higher expressed in AAA compared to control aortas. The role of ADAMTS-1 in AAA disease was further examined using ADAMTS-1 transgenic/apoE-/- mice with the experimental angiotensin II induced aneurysmal model. Transgenic mice overexpressing ADAMTS-1 showed to be similar to ADAMTS-1 wild type mice pertaining collagen, elastin content and aortic diameter.Several of the ADAMTS members, and especially ADAMTS-1, are down regulated at mRNA level in AAA, due to unknown mechanisms, at the same time ADAMTS-1 protein is induced. The cleavage of its substrates, don't seem to be crucial for the pathogenesis of AAA but rather more important in the development of thoracic aortic aneurysm and atherosclerosis as shown in previous studies.

  16. Proteção cerebral no tratamento cirúrgico dos aneurismas do arco aórtico: estudo experimental em cães Cerebral protection to be used during aortic arch aneurysms resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Murad

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available Os autores realizaram estudo experimental comparativo entre dois métodos de proteção cerebral utilizados na abordagem cirúrgica dos aneurismas do arco aórtico, avaliando a sua eficácia. Os métodos comparados foram a hipotermia sistêmica profunda isolada (menor que 20ºC com pinçamento arterial braquiocefálico e a hipotermia sistêmica profunda associada à perfusão carotídea seletiva. Dois grupos de 15 cães cada foram submetidos, respectivamente, a hipotermia sistêmica profunda com pinçamento arterial braquiocefálico (GRUPO I e a hipotermia sistêmica profunda associada a perfusão seletiva da carótida direita (GRUPO II. Foram colhidas amostras seriadas de sangue para análise das alterações metabólicas de pH e PaCO2 que ocorreram no retorno venoso cerebral, aferidas na veia jugular interna, bem como as alterações histopatológicas encontradas com 45 min, 90 min e 135 min de cada procedimento. Os resultados demonstraram que, apesar de ambos os métodos de proteção cerebral serem eficazes por um período de 45 minutos, o método utilizado no GRUPO II mostrou ser superior em períodos de até 90 minutos. Em períodos de 135 minutos os métodos tiveram resultados semelhantes, não oferecendo proteção cerebral adequada.The authors proposition is to make an experimental study of two methods of cerebral protection to be used during aortic arch aneurysm resection. The methods to be evaluated were profound systemic hypothermia (under 20oC with great vessels occlusion and profound systemic hypothermia with selective right carotid artery perfusion. Two groups of 15 dogs each were submitted either to profound systemic hypothermia with great vessels occlusion (GROUP I or to profound systemic hypothermia with selective right carotid artery perfusion (GROUP II. Serial jugular vein samples for pH and PaC02 were analyzed to evaluate ischemic cerebral metabolic derangements. Hystopathological studies were also made at 45, 90 and 135

  17. Combined coronary artery bypass surgery and abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    OpenAIRE

    Black, J J; Desai, J B

    1995-01-01

    The proper management of patients with asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms and significant coexistent coronary artery disease is still debatable. The most common approach has been to perform the coronary artery bypass surgery some weeks before the abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in the hope of reducing the cardiac morbidity and mortality. We report our initial experience of three consecutive elective cases where the coronary artery bypass surgery and the abdominal aortic aneurysm repair ...

  18. MMP-2 Isoforms in Aortic Tissue and Serum of Patients with Ascending Aortic Aneurysms and Aortic Root Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tscheuschler, Anke; Meffert, Philipp; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Heilmann, Claudia; Kocher, Nadja; Uffelmann, Xenia; Discher, Philipp; Siepe, Matthias; Kari, Fabian A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The need for biological markers of aortic wall stress and risk of rupture or dissection of ascending aortic aneurysms is obvious. To date, wall stress cannot be related to a certain biological marker. We analyzed aortic tissue and serum for the presence of different MMP-2 isoforms to find a connection between serum and tissue MMP-2 and to evaluate the potential of different MMP-2 isoforms as markers of high wall stress. Methods Serum and aortic tissue from n = 24 patients and serum from n = 19 healthy controls was analyzed by ELISA and gelatin zymography. 24 patients had ascending aortic aneurysms, 10 of them also had aortic root aneurysms. Three patients had normally functioning valves, 12 had regurgitation alone, eight had regurgitation and stenosis and one had only stenosis. Patients had bicuspid and tricuspid aortic valves (9/15). Serum samples were taken preoperatively, and the aortic wall specimen collected during surgical aortic repair. Results Pro-MMP-2 was identified in all serum and tissue samples. Pro-MMP-2 was detected in all tissue and serum samples from patients with ascending aortic/aortic root aneurysms, irrespective of valve morphology or other clinical parameters and in serum from healthy controls. We also identified active MMP-2 in all tissue samples from patients with ascending aortic/aortic root aneurysms. None of the analyzed serum samples revealed signals relatable to active MMP-2. No correlation between aortic tissue total MMP-2 or tissue pro-MMP-2 or tissue active MMP-2 and serum MMP-2 was found and tissue MMP-2/pro-MMP-2/active MMP-2 did not correlate with aortic diameter. This evidence shows that pro-MMP-2 is the predominant MMP-2 species in serum of patients and healthy individuals and in aneurysmatic aortic tissue, irrespective of aortic valve configuration. Active MMP-2 species are either not released into systemic circulation or not detectable in serum. There is no reliable connection between aortic tissue—and serum MMP-2

  19. An 18-cm unruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan M. Droz, MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a significant source of morbidity and ranked by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as the 15th leading cause of death among adults aged 60 to 64 years. Size confers the largest risk factor for aneurysm rupture, with aneurysms >6 cm having an annual rupture risk of 14.1%. We present the case of a 60-year-old man found on ultrasound imaging at a health fair screening to have a 15-cm AAA. Follow-up computed tomography angiography revealed an 18-cm × 10-cm unruptured, infrarenal, fusiform AAA. Giant AAAs, defined as >11 cm, are rarely described in the literature. Our patient underwent successful transperitoneal AAA repair with inferior mesenteric artery reimplantation and was discharged home on operative day 6. We believe this case represents one of the largest unruptured AAAs in the literature and demonstrates the feasible approach for successful repair.

  20. Recurrent aspiration pneumonia associated with giant aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Santos Hoff

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A 83-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with fever, productive cough and dyspnea. She was previously diagnosed with dementia and systemic hypertension, and was heavy smoker for nearly 50 years. Her relatives reported that in the past four months she was admitted two times for aspiration pneumonia. Chest radiography showed right lower lobe consolidation and a large mediastinal mass (Panel A. A computed tomography angiography revealed a 10,2 cm descending aortic aneurysm compressing the esophagus (Panel B and C. Serologic VDRL test was negative. Esophageal clearance was moderately diminished above the level of the aortic arch, with antiperistaltic contractions, according to videofluoroscopic swallowing study; oropharyngeal dysphagia was also present. The patient was treated for aspiration pneumonia and assessed by cardiovascular surgeons, who decided for a conservative treatment due to the characteristics of the aneurysm and her clinical condition. She was discharged with an optimized treatment for systemic hypertension including beta-blockers, and appropriate diet for dysphagia.

  1. IDIOPATHIC NEONATAL AORTIC ARCH THROMBOSIS: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignazio Lofù

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neonatal aortic arch thrombosis is a rare but life threatening condition. A correct diagnosis and an appropriate therapeutic approach are fundamental to prevent death or severe injuries. Case presentation: we report a case of spontaneous aortic arch thrombosis in a term newborn, who presented with suggestive signs of aortic coarctation immediately after birth. Despite the initiation of anticoagulant therapy, a massive increase in size of thrombus with evidence of coronary involvement was noted. Thrombolytic treatment was performed with thrombus resolution. Death occurred after a few days due to widespread brain haemorrhage. Conclusion: To date, no definitive guidelines have been published for the treatment of neonatal aortic arch thrombosis, and only anecdotal reports are available. A multidisciplinary approach is fundamental in order to evaluate the risk:benefit ratio of proposed medical and surgical interventions. Further studies are needed to improve consensus evidence based guidelines and ensure appropriate approaches to this condition.

  2. Transcarotid Artery Endovascular Reconstruction of the Aortic Arch by Modified Bifurcated Stent Graft for Stanford Type A Dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Guo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A 40-year-old man with Stanford type B dissection underwent his first endovascular repair (EVAR in April 2004 by Talent thoracic stent graft. He had an uncomplicated recovery and maintained good blood pressure control. However, a new retrograde dissection appeared in September 2004. The new dissection involved his aortic arch and ascending thoracic aorta to the opening of the coronary arteries. To reconstruct the aortic arch, bypasses between the right common carotid artery (RCCA, left common carotid artery and left subclavian artery were performed before endovascular repair. A modified bifurcated Talent stent graft was deployed from the RCCA to the ascending thoracic aorta with a long limb in the innominate artery and a short limb in the aortic arch. A further two pieces of graft were deployed via the common femoral artery. The ascending thoracic aorta and aortic arch were reconstructed completely by the bifurcated stent graft. The final angiography confirmed that there was good stent graft configuration, normal blood flow, and stable haemodynamics. No endoleak or other major complications were encountered. This result indicated that it is possible to reconstruct the aortic arch with a bifurcated stent graft and could be a new endovascular repair model for complex thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection.

  3. Thoracic type Ia endoleak: direct percutaneous coil embolization of the aortic arch at the blood entry site after TEVAR and double-chimney stent-grafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangard, Christopher; Franke, Mareike; Maintz, David; Chang, De-Hua; Pfister, Roman; Deppe, Antje-Christin; Matoussevitch, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    To introduce a novel percutaneous technique to stop blood entry at the lesser aortic arch curvature by coil embolisation in type Ia endoleak after TEVAR. A 61-year-old Marfan patient presented with type Ia endoleak of the aortic arch and a growing aortic arch pseudoaneurysm after TEVAR. Multiple preceding operations and interventions made an endovascular approach unsuccessful. Direct percutaneous puncture of the aneurysmal sac would have cured the sign, but not the cause of blood entry at the lesser curvature of the aortic arch. Direct CT-guided percutaneous puncture of the blood entry site in the aortic arch with fluoroscopically guided coil embolisation using detachable extra-long coils was successfully performed. Three weeks after the intervention, the patient developed fever because of superinfection of the pseudoaneurysm. The blood cultures and CT-guided mediastinal aspirate were sterile. After intravenous administration of antibiotics, the fever disappeared and the patient recovered. Six-month follow-up showed permanent closure of the endoleak and a shrinking aneurysmal sac. Direct percutaneous puncture of the aortic arch at the blood entry site of a thoracic type Ia endoleak after TEVAR and double-chimney stent-grafts with coil embolisation of the wedge-shaped space between the lesser aortic curvature and the stent-graft is possible. (orig.)

  4. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm - a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cost effectiveness analysis of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms based on four year results from randomized controlled trial. BMJ 2002; 325:1135-114.1. 9. Lindholt JS, Juul 5, Fasting H, Henneberg EW. Hospital costs and benefits of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms. Results from a randomized population ...

  5. Giant Dissecting Aortic Aneurysm in an Asymptomatic Young Male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyank Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant aortic aneurysm is defined as aneurysm in the aorta greater than 10 cm in diameter. It is a rare finding since most patients will present with complications of dissection or rupture before the size of aneurysm reaches that magnitude. Etiological factors include atherosclerosis, Marfan’s syndrome, giant cell arteritis, tuberculosis, syphilis, HIV-associated vasculitis, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and medial agenesis. Once diagnosed, prompt surgical intervention is the treatment of choice. Although asymptomatic unruptured giant aortic aneurysm has been reported in the literature, there has not been any case of asymptomatic giant dissecting aortic aneurysm reported in the literature thus far. We report a case of giant dissecting ascending aortic aneurysm in an asymptomatic young male who was referred to our institution for abnormal findings on physical exam.

  6. Outcomes of fenestrated and branched endovascular repair of complex abdominal and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanzer, Andres; Simons, Jessica P; Flahive, Julie; Durgin, Jonathan; Aiello, Francesco A; Doucet, Danielle; Steppacher, Robert; Messina, Louis M

    2017-09-01

    More than 80% of infrarenal aortic aneurysms are treated by endovascular repair. However, adoption of fenestrated and branched endovascular repair for complex aortic aneurysms has been limited, despite high morbidity and mortality associated with open repair. There are few published reports of consecutive outcomes, inclusive of all fenestrated and branched endovascular repairs, starting from the inception of a complex aortic aneurysm program. Therefore, we examined a single center's consecutive experience of fenestrated and branched endovascular repair of complex aortic aneurysms. This is a single-center, prospective, observational cohort study evaluating 30-day and 1-year outcomes in all consecutive patients who underwent fenestrated and branched endovascular repair of complex aortic aneurysms (definition: requiring one or more fenestrations or branches). Data were collected prospectively through an Institutional Review Board-approved registry and a physician-sponsored investigational device exemption clinical trial (G130210). We performed 100 consecutive complex endovascular aortic aneurysm repairs (November 2010 to March 2016) using 58 (58%) commercially manufactured custom-made devices and 42 (42%) physician-modified devices to treat 4 (4%) common iliac, 42 (42%) juxtarenal, 18 (18%) pararenal, and 36 (36%) thoracoabdominal aneurysms (type I, n = 1; type II, n = 4; type III, n = 12; type IV, n = 18; arch, n = 1). The repairs included 309 fenestrations, branches, and scallops (average of 3.1 branch arteries/case). All patients had 30-day follow-up for 30-day event rates: three (3%) deaths; six (6%) target artery occlusions; five (5%) progressions to dialysis; eight (8%) access complications; one (1%) paraparesis; one (1%) bowel ischemia; and no instances of myocardial infarction, paralysis, or stroke. Of 10 type I or type III endoleaks, 8 resolved (7 with secondary intervention, 1 without intervention). Mean follow-up time was 563 days (interquartile range

  7. Aortic Disease in the Young: Genetic Aneurysm Syndromes, Connective Tissue Disorders, and Familial Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cury

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many genetic syndromes associated with the aortic aneurysmal disease which include Marfan syndrome (MFS, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS, Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS, familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD, bicuspid aortic valve disease (BAV, and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD. In the absence of familial history and other clinical findings, the proportion of thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms and dissections resulting from a genetic predisposition is still unknown. In this study, we propose the review of the current genetic knowledge in the aortic disease, observing, in the results that the causative genes and molecular pathways involved in the pathophysiology of aortic aneurysm disease remain undiscovered and continue to be an area of intensive research.

  8. Infectious or Noninfectious? Ruptured, Thrombosed Inflammatory Aortic Aneurysm with Spondylolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanczyk, Ludomir; Elgalal, Marcin, E-mail: telgalal@yahoo.co.uk [Medical University of Lodz, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (Poland); Papiewski, Andrzej [Medical University of Lodz, Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Poland); Szubert, Wojciech [Medical University of Lodz, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (Poland); Szopinski, Piotr [Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Clinic of Vascular Surgery (Poland)

    2013-06-15

    Osteolysis of vertebrae due to inflammatory aortic aneurysm is rarely observed. However, it is estimated that up to 10 % of infectious aneurysms coexist with bone tissue destruction, most commonly the vertebrae. Inflammatory aneurysms with no identified infection factor, along with infiltration of adjacent muscle and in particular extensive destruction of bone tissue have rarely been described in the literature. A case of inflammatory aneurysm with posterior wall rupture and inflammatory infiltration of the iliopsoas muscle and spine, together with extensive vertebral body destruction, is presented. The aneurysm was successfully treated with endovascular aneurysm repair EVAR.

  9. Infectious or Noninfectious? Ruptured, Thrombosed Inflammatory Aortic Aneurysm with Spondylolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefańczyk, Ludomir; Elgalal, Marcin; Papiewski, Andrzej; Szubert, Wojciech; Szopiński, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Osteolysis of vertebrae due to inflammatory aortic aneurysm is rarely observed. However, it is estimated that up to 10 % of infectious aneurysms coexist with bone tissue destruction, most commonly the vertebrae. Inflammatory aneurysms with no identified infection factor, along with infiltration of adjacent muscle and in particular extensive destruction of bone tissue have rarely been described in the literature. A case of inflammatory aneurysm with posterior wall rupture and inflammatory infiltration of the iliopsoas muscle and spine, together with extensive vertebral body destruction, is presented. The aneurysm was successfully treated with endovascular aneurysm repair EVAR.

  10. Persistent Fifth Aortic Arch Associated with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Luen Lee

    2006-01-01

    Conclusion: Congenital conotruncal malformations, including tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia or stenosis, and aortic arch anomalies including a persistent fifth aortic arch or a right aortic arch, should lead to suspicion of chromosome 22q11.2 deletion when manifested together with any one of the other four cardinal phenotypic features.

  11. Mitral Valve Aneurysm: A Rare Complication of Aortic Valve Endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Moaref

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A 20-year-old intravenous drug abuser man, refered to our hospital with dyspnea and orthopnea. Tranesophagealechocardiography revealed severe aortic regurgitation, healed vegetation of aortic valve and an aneurysm of theanterior leaflet of the mitral valve. The patient was discharged after aortic valve replacement and mitral valverepair.

  12. Repetitive complications after prosthetic graft for inflammatory aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Takeda

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of retroperitoneal fibrosis after an aortic graft replacement is a marker of poor prognosis following aortic graft replacement. Herein we report the case of a 39-year-old man with retroperitoneal fibrosis that had been causing ureteral obstruction. The man had undergone repeated aortic graft replacement due to bacteremia and aortic graft–small intestinal fistula that occurred 4 years after initial aortic grafting for an inflammatory aortic aneurysm. The patient was discharged after 4 weeks of intravenous antibiotic therapy following the latest aortic graft replacement.

  13. Imaging findings in the right aortic arch with mirror image branching of arch vessels: An unusual cause of dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guneet Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 72-year-old female with a right aortic arch with mirror-image branching of arch vessels presenting with dysphagia, and characteristic images on barium esophagogram, contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan, and magnetic resonance aortography. Right-sided thoracic aortic arch with mirror-image branching of the brachiocephalic vessels causing dysphagia without associated congenital cardiac anomalies is extremely uncommon. Right-sided aortic arch is a rare congenital abnormality with incidence of 0.05-0.1% in the normal population. Anomalies of great vessels are usually incidental findings, because they are asymptomatic. Right aortic arch infrequently presents with a vascular ring that can cause complete or partial obstruction of the trachea and/or esophagus. The understanding of this arch anomaly is based on Edward′s hypothesis about the double arch system during embryonic developmental.

  14. Valve-sparing operation for aortic root aneurysm in patients with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R; Ma, W G; Tian, L X; Sun, L Z; Chang, Q

    2010-03-01

    We report our experience with aortic valve-sparing procedures in patients with Marfan syndrome and aortic root aneurysm. Between August 2003 and July 2007, we performed aortic valve-sparing procedures in 20 patients with aortic root aneurysm resulting from Marfan syndrome. Mean age was 28 +/- 10 years (range, 10 to 57 years), and there were 9 females and 11 males. A reimplantation technique was used in 9 cases, a remodeling technique in 8 and a patch technique in 3 cases. Additional procedures included total aorta replacement in 1 patient, and aortic arch replacement plus stented elephant trunk in 2 patients. The mean follow-up time was 46 +/- 16 months (range, 17 to 64 months). No in-hospital or late death occurred. Reexploration for bleeding was required in one case on postoperative day 1. No valve-related complications occurred during the follow-up period. At the end of follow-up, trivial or no aortic regurgitation was demonstrated in 14 patients, mild in 4 patients, moderate in 1 and severe in 1. Two patients with moderate and severe aortic regurgitation required reoperation. The early and mid-term results of the valve-sparing operations were favorable, and the durability of the preserved valve should encourage use of this technique in patients with Marfan syndrome.

  15. Association Between Diverticular Disease and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark-Christensen, Anders; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Diederichsen, Axel

    2017-01-01

    Background The aetiology of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is multifactorial, and many risk factors are shared with diverticular disease. It is unknown whether an independent association exists between these conditions. Methods Individuals enrolled in two Danish population based randomised AAA ...

  16. Spondylodiscitis and an aortic aneurysm due to Campylobacter coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bournet Béatrice

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Campylobacter coli is a rare cause of bacteremia. We report here the first case of C.coli spondylodiscitis complicated by an aortic aneurysm. Outcome was favourable with surgery and antibiotic therapy.

  17. Is screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm acceptable to the population?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Juul, Søren; Henneberg, E W

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse whether the selection and recruitment for hospital-based mass screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is acceptable for the population according to the criteria from the Council of Europe.......The aim of the study was to analyse whether the selection and recruitment for hospital-based mass screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is acceptable for the population according to the criteria from the Council of Europe....

  18. Variants of the left aortic arch branches

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Type C (Courtesy of Rutherford. Vascular. Surgery. 4th ed. Philadelphia: Saunders, 19954). Fig. 1. Type A. Abstract. The normal aorta has three branches from its arch, but variations in this pattern are not uncommon. Our interest was to correlate the docu- mented statistics to the variants observed in our patients. This was.

  19. 2D MR angiography of the aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amanuma, Makoto; Hasegawa, Makoto; Watabe, Tsuneya; Heshiki, Atsuko

    1992-01-01

    2D time-of-flight MR angiography was performed in 6 cases of thoracic aortic aneurysm. Oblique saturation pulses were used to suppress the signals of the pulmonary artery and SVC, providing excellent selective MR aortograms. Three dimensional extension of the aneurysm and its relation with cervical branches were easily assessed. It could be possible to replace invasive aortography by this technique. (author)

  20. MRI-based Assessment of Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, M.J. van der

    2007-01-01

    Imaging techniques play a key role in the Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair (EVAR) follow-up. The most important parameters monitored after EVAR are the aneurysm size and the presence of endoleaks. Currently, computed tomographic angiography (CTA) is the most commonly used imaging

  1. Open Versus Endovascular Stent Graft Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Firwana, Belal; Ferwana, Mazen; Hasan, Rim

    2014-01-01

    We performed an analysis to assess the need for conducting additional randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing open and endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Trial sequential analysis (TSA) is a statistical methodology that can calculate the required inform...

  2. Trans-aortic repair of a sinus of valsalva aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Ieromonachos, Constantinos; Stavridis, George; Antoniou, Theofani A; Athanassopoulos, George; Cokkinos, Dennis V; Alivizatos, Peter A

    2007-01-01

    Sinus of Valsalva aneurysms are rare and vary in their presentation and approach of surgical repair. We report on a case of isolated right sinus of Valsalva aneurysm that underwent successful excision and patch repair with individual sutures placed through the annulus of the aortic valve.

  3. Mast Cells in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Guo-Ping; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal

    2013-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are proinflammatory cells that play important roles in allergic responses, tumor growth, obesity, diabetes, atherosclerosis, and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Although the presence and function of MCs in atherosclerotic lesions have been thoroughly studied in human specimens......, in primary cultured vascular cells, and in atherosclerosis in animals, their role in AAA was recognized only recently. Via multiple activation pathways, MCs release a spectrum of mediators � including histamine, inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, proteoglycans, and proteases � to activate...... neighboring cells, degrade extracellular matrix proteins, process latent bioactive molecules, promote angiogenesis, recruit additional inflammatory cells, and stimulate vascular cell apoptosis. These activities associate closely with medial elastica breakdown, medial smooth-muscle cell loss and thinning...

  4. Mast Cells in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Guo-Ping; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal

    2013-01-01

    neighboring cells, degrade extracellular matrix proteins, process latent bioactive molecules, promote angiogenesis, recruit additional inflammatory cells, and stimulate vascular cell apoptosis. These activities associate closely with medial elastica breakdown, medial smooth-muscle cell loss and thinning......Mast cells (MCs) are proinflammatory cells that play important roles in allergic responses, tumor growth, obesity, diabetes, atherosclerosis, and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Although the presence and function of MCs in atherosclerotic lesions have been thoroughly studied in human specimens......, in primary cultured vascular cells, and in atherosclerosis in animals, their role in AAA was recognized only recently. Via multiple activation pathways, MCs release a spectrum of mediators � including histamine, inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, proteoglycans, and proteases � to activate...

  5. Candy-Plug Technique Using an Excluder Aortic Extender for Distal Occlusion of a Large False Lumen Aneurysm in Chronic Aortic Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yukihisa; Nishimaki, Hiroshi; Chiba, Kiyoshi; Murakami, Kenji; Sakurai, Yuka; Fujiwara, Keishi; Miyairi, Takeshi; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    To describe the candy-plug technique using an Excluder aortic extender for distal occlusion of a large false lumen aneurysm in chronic aortic dissection. A 60-year-old female patient with a history of chronic type B aortic dissection and high-dose steroid use for Churg-Strauss syndrome developed a large 6.2 cm maximum diameter false lumen aneurysm. She underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair from the left common carotid artery to the descending aorta to cover the proximal entry at the level of distal arch, with coil embolization of the left subclavian artery. To occlude the large false lumen from the reentry just below the level of the left renal artery ostium, a modified 32×45-mm Excluder aortic extender was deployed in the false lumen through the reentry, and a 16-mm Amplatzer Vascular Plug I was deployed in the waist of the modified Excluder aortic extender for complete occlusion. No obvious technical complication was seen. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography at 1 and 14 months revealed no endoleaks and showed complete false lumen thrombosis. The candy-plug technique using the Excluder aortic extender is feasible for occlusion of a large false lumen aneurysm in chronic aortic dissection. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelberger, Stephan; Rosso, Raffaele; Sarti, Manuela; Del Grande, Filippo; Canevascini, Reto; van den Berg, Jos C; Prouse, Giorgio; Giovannacci, Luca

    2017-03-21

    This pilot study aimed to assess the feasibility, acceptance and costs of an ultrasound scan screening programme for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) in the elderly male population resident in Canton Ticino, Switzerland. The target population were male patients aged 65-80 years who attended the outpatient clinics of the Lugano Regional Hospital in 2013. The patients showing interest were contacted by phone to verify their eligibility and fix the appointment for the ultrasound scan of the abdominal aorta. Patients with recent examinations suitable for AAA detection were excluded. Aneurysm was defined as an abdominal aorta with sagittal and/or axial diameter  30 mm. Patients' characteristics and study results were presented as descriptive statistics. The chi-squared test was used to compare categorical variables with p rate was 68.3%. A previously unknown AAA was diagnosed in 31 patients (4.2%, 95% confidence interval 2.8-5.9%). Age and area of residence had a statistically significant impact on patient's acceptance rate (p <0.05). The mean cost per screened patient was CHF 88. AAA screening of male patients aged 65-80 years is feasible with limited financial and organisational effort. Adherence might be improved by a larger community-based programme and involvement of general practitioners.

  7. The murine angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm model: rupture risk and inflammatory progression patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Y Cao

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is an enlargement of the greatest artery in the body defined as an increase in diameter of 1.5-fold. AAAs are common in the elderly population and thousands die each year from their complications. The most commonly used mouse model to study the pathogenesis of AAA is the angiotensin II (Ang II infusion method delivered via osmotic mini-pump for 28 days. Here, we studied the site-specificity and onset of aortic rupture, characterized three-dimensional (3D images and flow patterns in developing AAAs by ultrasound imaging, and examined macrophage infiltration in the Ang II model using 65 apolipoprotein E deficient mice. Aortic rupture occurred in 16 mice (25 % and was nearly as prevalent at the aortic arch (44 % as it was in the suprarenal region (56 % and was most common within the first seven days after Ang II infusion (12 of 16; 75 %. Longitudinal ultrasound screening was found to correlate nicely with histological analysis and AAA volume renderings showed a significant relationship with AAA severity index. Aortic dissection preceded altered flow patterns and macrophage infiltration was a prominent characteristic of developing AAAs. Targeting the inflammatory component of AAA disease with novel therapeutics will hopefully lead to new strategies to attenuate aneurysm growth and aortic rupture.

  8. Hybrid treatment of a true thyreocervical trunk aneurysm in a patient with Type B aortic dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos G Baikoussis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We would like to describe a case with a complex aortic disease treated in hybrid fashion. We present an interesting case of a 65-year-old man with a medical history of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and coronary artery disease percutaneously treated. An acute Type B aortic dissection occurred and treated with the implantation of a stent-graft which occluded the left subclavian artery due to its extension to the aortic arch. This event required a carotid-subclavian artery bypass due to ischemia of the left arm. An aneurysm in the innominate artery also detected, was treated with another stent-graft implantation 3 months later. At 5-year follow-up, an aneurysm of the thyreocervical trunk was found while the stent-graft of the aorta was well-tolerated without endoleak and the carotid-subclavian graft was patent. The aneurysm was asymptomatic but considering the risk of spontaneous rupture of an aneurysm of this size, elective surgery was indicated. Because the aneurysm was very close to the brachiocephalic bifurcation, open surgical repair would require a sternotomy. The right common carotid artery and right subclavian artery were exposed. The thyrocervical trunk, right internal mammary artery and right vertebral artery were occluded by ligations to isolate the aneurysm. An 8-mm Dacron graft was anastomosed end-to-end to the distal part of subclavian artery. We would like through this case, discuss the role of the hybrid cardiovascular surgery to minimize the postoperative complications in complex cardiovascular pathology. We also discuss the international bibliography about the thyreocervical trunk aneurysm and the treatment options.

  9. Epidemiology of aortic disease - aneurysm, dissection, occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steckmeier, B.

    2001-01-01

    The physiological infrarenal aortic diameter varies between 12.4 mm in women an 27.6 mm in men. As defined, an aneurysmatic dilatation begins with 29 mm. According to that, 9% of all people above the age of 65 are affected by an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Compared with the female sex, the male sex predominates at a rate of about 5:1. The disease is predominant in men of the white race. In black men, black and white women the incidence of AAA is identical. 38 to 50 percent of the AAA patients (patients) suffer from hypertension, 33 to 60% from coronary, 28% from cerebrovascular and 25% from peripheral occlusive disease. The AAA expansion rate varies between 0.2 and 0.8 cm per year and is exponential from a diameter of 5 cm on. In autopsy studies, the rupture rates with AAA diameters of 7 cm were below 5%, 39% and 65%, respecitvely. 70% of the AAA patients do not die of a rupture, but of a cardiac disease. Serum markers, such as metalloproteinases and procollagen peptides are significantly increased in AAA patients. Thoraco-abdominal aneurysms (TAA) make up only 2 to 5% of all degenerative aneurysms. 20 to 30% of the TAA patients are also affected by an AAA. 80% of the TAA are degenerative, 15 to 20% are a consequence of the chronic dissection - including 5% of Marfan patients -, 2% occur in case of infections and 1 to 2% in case of aortitis. The TAA incidence in 100,000 person-years is 5.9% during a monitoring period of 30 years. In case of TAA, an operation is indicated with a maximum diameter of 5.5 to 6 cm and more and, in case of a Marfan's syndrome (incidence of 1:10,000), with a maximum diameter of 5.5 cm and more. With regard to aorto-iliac occlusive diseases, there are defined 3 types of distribution. Type I refers to the region of the bifurcation itself. Type II defines the diffuse aortoiliac spread of the disease. Type III designates multiple-level occlusions also beyond the inguinal ligament. Type I patients in most cases are female and more

  10. Changes in abdominal aortic aneurysm epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilja, Fredrik; Wanhainen, Anders; Mani, Kevin

    2017-12-01

    The epidemiology and treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) has changed over the past 30 years. This review aims to give the reader an overview of these changes and current trends in AAA epidemiology, management and outcome. In the past decades there have been three changes in AAA management and epidemiology: 1) introduction of endovascular aortic repair (EVAR); 2) population screening; and 3) a markedly reduced prevalence of the disease. These developments have resulted in an increased incidence of intact AAA-repair and reduced incidence of ruptured AAA-repair. Overall, survival after both intact and ruptured AAA repair has improved, much thanks to the broad introduction of EVAR. Additionally, both elective and rupture repair in the elderly population has increased, with octogenarians constituting >20% of intact AAA repairs performed in several countries. International analyses of vascular registries indicate that important variations remain in AAA management and results. The changes in AAA epidemiology and management have led to a situation where most AAAs today are treated with EVAR electively. The incidence of ruptured AAA-repair continues to decrease. These changes are accompanied by improvements in both short- and long-term survival.

  11. Aneurysm growth after late conversion of thoracic endovascular aortic repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirofumi Kasahara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 69-year-old man underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair of a descending aortic aneurysm. Three years later, he developed impending rupture due to aneurysmal expansion that included the proximal landing zone. Urgent open surgery was performed via lateral thoracotomy, and a Dacron graft was sewn to the previous stent graft distally with Teflon felt reinforcement. Postoperatively, four sequential computed tomography scans demonstrated that the aneurysm was additionally increasing in size probably due to continuous hematoma production, suggesting a possibility of endoleaks. This case demonstrates the importance of careful radiologic surveillance after endovascular repair, and also after partial open conversion.

  12. Ultrasonography in the diagnosis of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paeivaensalo, M.; Laehde, S.; Myllylae, V.; Leinonen, A.

    1984-01-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm was detected in 77 patients among 16 488 abdominal ultrasonographies (US) performed in 1978-1983. In 62 cases the US finding was confirmed by operation, autopsy or other imaging method, and the US finding proved true in 60 cases. The length and diameter were accurately estimated and accompanying thrombosis reliably visualised. An error rate of 24% was observed in assessing the relation of the aneurysm to the renal arteries. US is recommended as the primary imaging mode in suspected abdominal aortic aneurysm. Screening of the abdominal aorta is recommended in elderly patients with abdominal pain and/or referred for abdominal US. (orig.) [de

  13. Effect of aging on the configurational change of the aortic arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuhiro Kojima

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We explored the relationship between aging and the configuration of the aortic arch using computed tomography angiography (CTA. We retrospectively reviewed CTA obtained in 140 cases. The configuration of the aortic arch was categorized into three types based on the criteria mentioned by Madhwal et al., and the relationships between each configuration and patient characteristics were analyzed. Anomalies of the aortic arch were also explored. Twenty patients had a type-1 aortic arch (mean age, 56.1 years, 30 patients had a type-2 aortic arch (mean age, 66.3 years, and 89 patients had a type-3 aortic arch (mean age, 71.7 years. The mean age of patients with a type-3 aortic arch was significantly higher than that of patients with a type-1 aortic arch. No significant correlations between the type of aortic arch and other factors, such as smoking habit, were seen. The configuration of the aortic arch in our study appears to be significantly affected by the age of the patients.

  14. Acute Aortic Arch Perforation During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Bicuspid Aortic Stenosis and a Gothic Aortic Arch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millan-Iturbe, Oscar; Sawaya, Fadi J.; Bieliauskas, Gintautas

    2017-01-01

    AS because of its unique anatomic features. This case report describes an acute aortic perforation during delivery of a transcatheter heart valve to treat a severe bicuspid AS with a “gothic aortic arch”; more careful evaluation of the preprocedural multislice computed tomographic scan would have unveiled...

  15. Antenatal evaluation of fetal interrupted aortic arch type B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Babacan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Interruption of the aortic arch (IAA is a rare, severe form of congenital heart defect characterized by complete anatomical discontinuity between two adjacent segments of the aortic arch. The data on the features and outcomes of fetal IAA are limited. Three anatomical types have been described according to the site of interruption. The current recommendations for screening on the obstetric fetal anomaly scan include identification of a 4-chamber view, all 4 valves, and the outflow tracts, all of which can appear to be normal to the ultrasonographer in fetuses with conotruncal anomalies. Although the identification of IAA on a prenatal echocardiogram can be challenging, a number of anatomic features can facilitate the diagnosis. We aim to present the features and outcome of a case of IAA type B referred to our centre in the light of literatures.

  16. Endovascular stent graft repair for thoracic aortic aneurysms: the history and the present in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Satoshi; Shimizu, Hideyuki; Yoshitake, Akihiro; Shimazaki, Taro; Iwahashi, Toru; Ogino, Hitoshi; Ishimaru, Shin; Shigematsu, Hiroshi; Yozu, Ryohei

    2013-01-01

    Stent-grafts for endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms have been commercially available for more than ten years in the West, whereas, in Japan, a manufactured stent-graft was not approved for the use until March 2008. Nevertheless, endovascular thoracic intervention began to be performed in Japan in the early 1990s, with homemade devices used in most cases. Many researchers have continued to develop their homemade devices. We have participated in joint design and assessment efforts with a stent-graft manufacturer, focusing primarily on fenestrated stent-grafts used in repairs at the distal arch, a site especially prone to aneurysm. In March 2008, TAG (W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., Flagstaff, Arizona, USA) was approved as a stent graft for the thoracic area first in Japan, which was major turning point in treatment for thoracic aortic aneurysms. Subsequently, TALENT (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA) was approved in May 2009, and TX2 (COOK MEDICAL Inc., Bloomington, Indiana, USA) in March 2011. Valiant as an improved version of TALENT was approved in November 2011, and TX2 Proform as an improved version of TX2 began to be supplied in October 2012. These stent grafts are excellent devices that showed good results in Western countries, and marked effectiveness can be expected by making the most of the characteristics of each device. A clinical trial in Japan on Najuta (tentative name) (Kawasumi Labo., Inc., Tokyo, Japan) as a line-up of fenestrated stent grafts that can be applied to distal arch aneurysms showing a high incidence, and allow maintenance of blood flow to the arch vessel was initiated. This trial was completed, and Najuta has just been approved in January of 2013 in Japan, and further development is expected. In the U.S., great efforts have recently been made to develop and manufacture excellent stent grafts for thoracic aneurysms, and rapid progress has been achieved. In particular, in the area of the aortic arch, in which we

  17. Retrosternal friction-induced late disruption of the anastomotic site between Bentall's valved conduit and an aortic arch graft: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukada, Johji; Morishita, Kiyofumi; Kawaharada, Nobuyoshi; Kurimoto, Yoshihiko; Muraki, Satoshi; Satsu, Takuma; Abe, Tomio

    2003-01-01

    We report a case of late mediastinal false aneurysm originating from disruption of the suture line between synthetic vascular grafts for aortic root and total aortic arch replacements. This aneurysm developed without any infection in a patient with Marfan's syndrome. To our knowledge, this event has never been reported before. The only possible cause of this disruption was that the monofilament suture was broken by continuous friction between the pointed anastomotic line and the sternum since the operation. The treatment options for this unusual event after extended synthetic graft replacement are discussed.

  18. The effect of endoleak on intra-aneurysmal pressure after EVE for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Sheng; Jing Zaiping; Mei Zhijun; Lu Qingsheng; Zhao Jun; Zhang Suzhen; Zhao Xin; Cai Lili; Tang Jingdong; Xiong Jiang; Liao Mingfang

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the intra-aneurysmal pressure curve in the presence of endoleak after endovascular exclusion (EVE) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Methods: Infrarenal aortic aneurysms were created with bovine jugular vein segments or patches. Then they were underwent incomplete endovascular exclusion of the aneurysm and formation of endoleaks. The pressures of blood flow outside the graft into the sac were measured. Results: The intrasac pressure was higher than systemic pressure in the presence of endoleak. After sealing the endoleak, pressure decreased significantly, and the pressure cure showed approximately linear. Conclusion: The change of intra-aneurysmal pressure curve reflected the load on aneurysmal wall after EVE, and can also help to determine the endoleak existence

  19. [Thymic carcinoma involving aortic arch; report of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noriyuki, Toshio; Hamamoto, M; Takazawa, Y; Katoh, K; Hashimoto, M; Kuranishi, F; Nakahara, M; Fukuda, T; Ishizaki, Y; Okuda, H; Akimoto, E; Yonehara, S

    2009-05-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the thymus is a very rare malignant tumor. The standard treatment for advanced thymic carcinoma has not yet been established, and the prognosis is poor. We report a case of thymic carcinoma that involving the aortic arch and the innominate vein. A 78-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital complaining of hoarseness in April 2007. The computed tomography (CT) scan showed an anterior mediastinal tumor contiguous to the aortic arch and the innominate vein with swelling lymphnodes. Microspcopic examinations of specimens obtained by CT-guided needle biopsy revealed poorly differenciated adenocarcinoma. The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level of serum elevated at 54.9 ng/ml. Thymic carcinoma was diagnosed. The chemoradiotherapy [concurrent, carboplatin (CBDCA) + paclitaxel(TXL)-->vinorelbine (NVB), 60 Gy] was performed, but the effect of the therapy was limited. The resection of the tumor with a part of aortic arch and other peripheral tissues was performed in Augast 2007. The postoperative course was uneventful and the CEA level of serum lowered to the normal. She was discharged 30 days after surgery.

  20. Foxc2 in pharyngeal arch mesenchyme is important for aortic arch artery remodelling and ventricular septum formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Mohammad Khaja Mafij; Kimura, Wataru; Ishikura, Tomoyuki; Koseki, Haruhiko; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Islam, Mohammad Johirul; Amin, Mohammed Badrul; Nakamura, Kasumi; Wu, Yi-Xin; Sato, Eiji; Aoto, Kazushi; Miura, Naoyuki

    2015-01-01

    The forkhead box C2 (Foxc2) protein is a member of the forkhead/winged helix transcription factor family and plays an essential role in cardiovascular development. Previous studies showed that Foxc2 null mouse embryos die during midgestation or just after birth with severe cardiovascular defects, including interruption, coarctation of the aortic arch and ventricular septal defects. These are also seen in human congenital heart disease. However, the tissue specific role of Foxc2 in aortic arch remodelling is not yet fully understood. Here we show that Foxc2 is expressed in a restricted pattern in several cell populations, including the mesenchyme and endothelium of pharyngeal arch arteries, which are important for cardiovascular development. In this study, we use a conditional knockout approach to examine the tissue specific role of Foxc2 in aortic arch remodelling. We demonstrate that mouse embryos lacking Foxc2 in Nkx2.5-expressing mesenchyme and endothelium of pharyngeal arch arteries display aortic arch interruption type B and ventricular septal defects. In contrast, conditional deletion of Foxc2 in Tie2-expressing endothelial cells does not result in aortic arch or ventricular septal defects, but does result in embryonic lethality due to peripheral oedema. Our data therefore provide for a detailed understanding of the role of mesenchymal Foxc2 in aortic arch remodelling and in the development of ventricular septum.

  1. Successful Embolization Therapy through Reentry Tear in the Right Subclavian Artery for Treating Patent False Lumen in the Aortic Arch Formed after Type A Dissection Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Hirohito; Nakamura, Kunihide; Nakamura, Eisaku; Furukawa, Koji; Ochiai, Kouichiro

    2017-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman had undergone hemiarch replacement with primary entry resection for treating acute type A dissection 6 years ago. Postoperative computed tomography (CT) showed a patent false lumen (FL) in the aortic arch and a reentry tear in the right subclavian artery. The remaining aortic arch enlarged, which resulted in formation of a 55-mm-diameter aneurysm. We performed reentry occlusion using embolization with glue and coil. The patient’s clinical course after the procedure was uneventful, and subsequent CT showed that FL was thrombosed and had decreased in size. PMID:29147154

  2. Double perforation of anterior mitral leaflet aneurysm in a patient with mitral and aortic leaflet aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Panduranga

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Double valve aneurysms in a single patient are a rare occurrence and even rare finding is occurrence of double perforation of anterior mitral leaflet aneurysm. We present an adult patient with bicuspid aortic valve, coarctation of aorta and previous endocarditis presenting late with these rare abnormalities.

  3. Distal Transverse Arch to Left Carotid Artery Ratio Helps to Identify Infants With Aortic Arch Hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Michael F; Simon, Bartholomew; Atallah-Yunes, Nader; Cholette, Jill M; Orie, Joseph; Gensini, Francisco; Alfieris, George M

    2015-09-01

    Aortic coarctation (CoA) with concomitant aortic arch hypoplasia (AAH) is associated with an increased risk of hypertension after surgical repair. The differentiation of CoA with or without AAH may be critical to delineate the ideal surgical approach that best ameliorates postoperative hypertension. Since 2000, we have defined CoA with AAH when the diameter of the distal transverse aortic arch is equal to or less than the diameter of the left carotid artery. We hypothesized that, based on our definition, aortic tissue from infants having CoA with AAH would demonstrate distinct genetic expression patterns as compared with infants having CoA alone. From 6 infants (AAH, 3; CoA, 3), an Affymetrix 1.0 genome array identified genes in the coarctation/arch region that were differentially expressed between infants having CoA with AAH versus CoA alone. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction validated genetic differences from a cohort of 21 infants (CoA with AAH, 10; CoA, 11). To evaluate the clinical outcomes based on our definition of CoA with AAH, we reviewed infants repaired using this algorithm from 2000 to 2010. Microarray data demonstrated genes differentially expressed between groups. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction confirmed that CoA with AAH was associated with an increased expression of genes involved in cardiac and vascular development and growth, including hepsin, fibroblast growth factor-18, and T-box 2. The clinical outcomes of 79 infants (AAH, 26; CoA, 53) demonstrated that 90.1% were free of hypertension at 13 years when managed with this surgical strategy. These findings provide evidence that the ratio of the diameter of the distal transverse arch to the left carotid artery may be helpful to identify CoA with AAH and, when used to delineate the surgical approach, may minimize hypertension. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Chronic inflammation, immune response, and infection in abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Shi, G-P

    2006-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are associated with atherosclerosis, transmural degenerative processes, neovascularization, decrease in content of vascular smooth muscle cells, and a chronic infiltration, mainly located in the outer aortic wall. The chronic infiltration consists mainly of macrop......Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are associated with atherosclerosis, transmural degenerative processes, neovascularization, decrease in content of vascular smooth muscle cells, and a chronic infiltration, mainly located in the outer aortic wall. The chronic infiltration consists mainly...... matrix metalloproteases and cysteine proteases for aortic matrix remodeling. The lymphocyte activation may be mediated by microorganisms as well as autoantigens generated from vascular structural proteins, perhaps through molecular mimicry. As in autoimmune diseases, the risk of AAA is increased...

  5. Risk of Aortic Dissection and Aortic Aneurysm in Patients Taking Oral Fluoroquinolone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chien-Chang; Lee, Meng-Tse Gabriel; Chen, Yueh-Sheng; Lee, Shih-Hao; Chen, Yih-Sharng; Chen, Shyr-Chyr; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2015-11-01

    Fluoroquinolones have been associated with collagen degradation, raising safety concerns related to more serious collagen disorders with use of these antibiotics, including aortic aneurysm and dissection. To examine the relationship between fluoroquinolone therapy and the risk of developing aortic aneurysm and dissection. We conducted a nested case-control analysis of 1477 case patients and 147 700 matched control cases from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) from among 1 million individuals longitudinally observed from January 2000 through December 2011. Cases patients were defined as those hospitalized for aortic aneurysm or dissection. One hundred control patients were matched for each case based on age and sex. Current, past, or any prior-year use of fluoroquinolone. Current use was defined as a filled fluoroquinolone prescription within 60 days of the aortic aneurysm or dissection; past use refers to a filled fluoroquinolone prescription between 61 and 365 days prior to the aortic aneurysm; and any prior-year use refers to having a fluoroquinolone prescription filled for 3 or more days any time during the 1-year period before the aortic aneurysm or dissection. Risk of developing aortic aneurysm or dissection. A total of 1477 individuals who experienced aortic aneurysm or dissection were matched to 147 700 controls. After propensity score adjustment, current use of fluoroquinolones was found to be associated with increased risk for aortic aneurysm or dissection (rate ratio [RR], 2.43; 95% CI, 1.83-3.22), as was past use, although this risk was attenuated (RR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.18-1.86). Sensitivity analysis focusing on aortic aneurysm and dissection requiring surgery also demonstrated an increased risk associated with current fluoroquinolone use, but the increase was not statistically significant (propensity score-adjusted RR, 2.15; 95% CI, 0.97-4.60). Use of fluoroquinolones was associated with an increased risk of aortic aneurysm and

  6. Blunt traumatic aortic injuries of the ascending aorta and aortic arch: a clinical multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera, Victor X; Marini, Milagros; Muñiz, Javier; Gulias, Daniel; Asorey-Veiga, Vanesa; Adrio-Nazar, Belen; Herrera, José M; Pradas-Montilla, Gonzalo; Cuenca, José J

    2013-09-01

    To report the clinical and radiological characteristics, management and outcomes of traumatic ascending aorta and aortic arch injuries. Historic cohort multicentre study including 17 major trauma patients with traumatic aortic injury from January 2000 to January 2011. The most common mechanism of blunt trauma was motor-vehicle crash (47%) followed by motorcycle crash (41%). Patients sustaining traumatic ascending aorta or aortic arch injuries presented a high proportion of myocardial contusion (41%); moderate or greater aortic valve regurgitation (12%); haemopericardium (35%); severe head injuries (65%) and spinal cord injury (23%). The 58.8% of the patients presented a high degree aortic injury (types III and IV). Expected in-hospital mortality was over 50% as defined by mean TRISS 59.7 (SD 38.6) and mean ISS 48.2 (SD 21.6) on admission. Observed in-hospital mortality was 53%. The cause of death was directly related to the ATAI in 45% of cases, head and abdominal injuries being the cause of death in the remaining 55% cases. Long-term survival was 46% at 1 year, 39% at 5 years, and 19% at 10 years. Traumatic aortic injuries of the ascending aorta/arch should be considered in any major thoracic trauma patient presenting cardiac tamponade, aortic valve regurgitation and/or myocardial contusion. These aortic injuries are also associated with a high incidence of neurological injuries, which can be just as lethal as the aortic injury, so treatment priorities should be modulated on an individual basis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Selective Heart, Brain and Body Perfusion in Open Aortic Arch Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Sven; Kari, Fabian; Rylski, Bartosz; Siepe, Matthias; Benk, Christoph; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm

    2016-09-01

    Open aortic arch replacement is a complex and challenging procedure, especially in post dissection aneurysms and in redo procedures after previous surgery of the ascending aorta or aortic root. We report our experience with the simultaneous selective perfusion of heart, brain, and remaining body to ensure optimal perfusion and to minimize perfusion-related risks during these procedures. We used a specially configured heart-lung machine with a centrifugal pump as arterial pump and an additional roller pump for the selective cerebral perfusion. Initial arterial cannulation is achieved via femoral artery or right axillary artery. After lower body circulatory arrest and selective antegrade cerebral perfusion for the distal arch anastomosis, we started selective lower body perfusion simultaneously to the selective antegrade cerebral perfusion and heart perfusion. Eighteen patients were successfully treated with this perfusion strategy from October 2012 to November 2015. No complications related to the heart-lung machine and the cannulation occurred during the procedures. Mean cardiopulmonary bypass time was 239 ± 33 minutes, the simultaneous selective perfusion of brain, heart, and remaining body lasted 55 ± 23 minutes. One patient suffered temporary neurological deficit that resolved completely during intensive care unit stay. No patient experienced a permanent neurological deficit or end-organ dysfunction. These high-risk procedures require a concept with a special setup of the heart-lung machine. Our perfusion strategy for aortic arch replacement ensures a selective perfusion of heart, brain, and lower body during this complex procedure and we observed excellent outcomes in this small series. This perfusion strategy is also applicable for redo procedures.

  8. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography of persistent fifth aortic arch in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Yumin; Zhu, Ming; Sun, Aimin; Li, Yuhua; Jaffe, Richard B.; Gao, Wei

    2007-01-01

    Cine angiography and echocardiography have been utilized to diagnose congenital aortic arch anomalies. However, the visualization of great vessels by echocardiography is limited, while cine angiography requires cardiac catheterization with ionizing radiation. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is a noninvasive modality suitable for visualization of congenital aortic arch anomalies. To evaluate the utility of contrast-enhanced MRA in the diagnosis of persistent fifth aortic arch, a rare congenital aortic arch anomaly, and to compare the diagnostic accuracy of MRA with that of echocardiography and cine angiography. In four pediatric patients, contrast-enhanced MRA studies were performed for diagnosing persistent fifth aortic arch. The findings of MRA were compared with echocardiographic findings and confirmed by cine angiography and operation. Transthoracic surface echocardiography noted an aberrant vessel arising from the ascending aorta in two of four patients; the etiology of this vessel was uncertain. In the other two patients a diagnosis of coarctation was made. Of the four patients, only one was diagnosed with interruption of the aortic arch. Contrast-enhanced MRA clarified uncertain echocardiographic findings, enabling the correct diagnosis of persistent fifth aortic arch with fourth aortic arch interruption in all four patients. Contrast-enhanced MRA is a safe, accurate, and fast imaging technique for the evaluation of persistent fifth aortic arch and may obviate the need for conventional cine angiography. Cardiac catheterization may be reserved for some types of complicated congenital heart disease and for obtaining hemodynamic information. (orig.)

  9. Percutaneous Zenith endografting for abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyer, Kamaldeep S; Resnick, Scott A; Matsumura, Jon S; Amaranto, Daniel; Eskandari, Mark K

    2009-03-01

    A completely percutaneous approach to infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) endografting has the theoretic benefits of being minimally invasive and more expedient. Our goal was to demonstrate the utility of this approach using a suprarenal fixation device and a suture-mediated closure system. We conducted a single-institution, retrospective review of 14 patients who underwent percutaneous AAA repair with the Zenith device between August 2003 and March 2007. Immediate and delayed access-related outcomes were examined over a mean follow-up of 12.1+/-2.0 months. Mean AAA size was 5.6 cm. Immediate arterial closure and technical success rate was 96% (27/28 vessels). One immediate hemostatic failure required open surgical repair. Over follow-up, one vessel required operative repair for new-onset claudication. No other immediate or delayed complications (thrombosis, pseudoaneurysm, infection, or deep venous thrombosis) were detected. A percutaneous approach for the treatment of AAA has several advantages over femoral artery cutdown but also has its own unique set of risks in the immediate and late postoperative period. Ultimately, the "preclose technique" can be safely applied for the Zenith device despite its large-bore delivery system.

  10. Asymptomatic Interrupted Aortic Arch, Severe Tricuspid Regurgitation, and Bicuspid Aortic Valve in a 76-Year-Old Woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajdini, Masih; Sardari, Akram; Forouzannia, Seyed Khalil; Baradaran, Abdolvahab; Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad Reza; Kassaian, Seyed Ebrahim

    2016-10-01

    Interrupted aortic arch is a rare congenital abnormality with a high infancy mortality rate. The principal finding is loss of luminal continuity between the ascending and descending portions of the aorta. Because of the high mortality rate in infancy, interrupted aortic arch is very rare among adults. In this report, we describe the case of a 76-year-old woman with asymptomatic interrupted aortic arch, severe tricuspid regurgitation, and bicuspid aortic valve. To our knowledge, she is the oldest patient ever reported with this possibly unique combination of pathologic conditions. In addition to reporting her case, we review the relevant medical literature.

  11. [Endovascular stent-grafting for mycotic thoracic aortic aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, S; Kaneko, T; Ezure, M; Satoh, Y; Hasegawa, Y; Koike, N; Okonogi, S; Takihara, H

    2009-02-01

    We report 3 cases of endovascular stent-grafting (ESG) for mycotic thoracic aortic aneurysm. The case 1 was a rupture of pseudoaneurysm of the descending aorta caused by mediastinitis due to perforation of esophageal ulcer. The patient underwent emergent ESG for temporary control of the rupture. He underwent esophagus reconstruction 5 month after ESG. The case 2 was admitted due to inflammatory reaction. She was diagnosed with mycotic descending aortic aneurysm and underwent elective ESG because of her old age. Her postoperative course was uneventful and no infection recurred. The case 3 underwent ESG for a ruptured mycotic descending aortic aneurysm. But 113 days after ESG, he underwent ESG again for a ruptured endoleak of the stentgraft. His blood culture demonstrated methillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). He died of rupture to bronchus and esophagus at 18th day after ESG. We believe that ESG is useful in high risk patients for temporary management of the rupture.

  12. A multicentre observational study of the outcomes of screening detected sub-aneurysmal aortic dilatation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wild, J B; Stather, P W; Biancari, F

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Currently most abdominal aortic aneurysm screening programmes discharge patients with aortic diameter of less than 30 mm. However, sub-aneurysmal aortic dilatation (25 mm-29 mm) does not represent a normal aortic diameter. This observational study aimed to determine the outcomes of pa...

  13. MRI follow-up of abdominal aortic aneurysms after endovascular repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, S.A.P.

    2012-01-01

    Aneurysm size changes form the basis of the follow-up after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, because aneurysm growth increases rupture risk. Aneurysm growth can be caused by endoleak (leakage of blood in the aneurysm sac). Therefore, accurate endoleak detection is important in growing

  14. Renal failure after operation for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, P S; Schroeder, T; Perko, M

    1990-01-01

    Among 656 patients undergoing surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm, 81 patients (12%) developed postoperative renal failure. Before operation hypotension and shock occurred in 88% of the patients with ruptured aneurysm, whereas none of the patients operated electively were hypotensive. Dialysis...... cases the death was caused by renal failure only or in combination with failure of other organs. Analysis of the cumulative survival shows that, if the patients survive the postoperative period, their life expectancy is comparable to that of patients without renal complications....

  15. Induction of autoimmune abdominal aortic aneurysm in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Sara Schødt; Ali, Mulham; Bergseth, Sara Hveding

    2017-01-01

    Background Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a common disease with a high mortality. Many animal models have been developed to further understand the pathogenesis of the disease, but no large animal model has been developed to investigate the autoimmune aspect of AAA formation. The aim...... of this study was to develop a large animal model for abdominal aortic aneurysm induction through autoimmunity by performing sheep-to-pig xenotransplantation. Methods Six pigs underwent a xenotransplantation procedure where the infrarenal porcine aorta was replaced by a decellularized sheep aorta...

  16. Atherosclerotic Plaques in the Aortic Arch and Subclinical Cerebrovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugcu, Aylin; Jin, Zhezhen; Homma, Shunichi; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Rundek, Tatjana; Yoshita, Mitsuhiro; DeCarli, Charles; Nakanishi, Koki; Shames, Sofia; Wright, Clinton B; Sacco, Ralph L; Di Tullio, Marco R

    2016-11-01

    Aortic arch plaque (AAP) is a risk factor for ischemic stroke, but its association with subclinical cerebrovascular disease is not established. We investigated the association between AAP and subclinical cerebrovascular disease in an elderly stroke-free community-based cohort. The CABL study (Cardiovascular Abnormalities and Brain Lesions) was designed to investigate cardiovascular predictors of silent cerebrovascular disease in the elderly. AAPs were assessed by suprasternal transthoracic echocardiography in 954 participants. Silent brain infarcts and white matter hyperintensity volume (WMHV) were assessed by brain magnetic resonance imaging. The association of AAP thickness with silent brain infarcts and WMHV was evaluated by logistic regression analysis. Mean age was 71.6±9.3 years; 63% were women. AAP was present in 658 (69%) subjects. Silent brain infarcts were detected in 138 participants (14.5%). In multivariate analysis adjusted for potential confounders, AAP thickness and large AAP (≥4 mm in thickness) were significantly associated with the upper quartile of WMHV (WMHV-Q4; odds ratio =1.17; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.32; P=0.009 and odds ratio =1.79; 95% confidence interval, 1.40-3.09; P=0.036, respectively), but not with silent brain infarcts (odds ratio =1.08; 95% confidence interval, 0.94-1.23; P=0.265 and odds ratio =1.46; 95% confidence interval, 0.77-2.77; P=0.251, respectively). Aortic arch atherosclerosis was associated with WMHV in a stroke-free community-based elderly cohort. This association was stronger in subjects with large plaques and independent of cardiovascular risk factors. Aortic arch assessment by transthoracic echocardiography may help identify subjects at higher risk of subclinical cerebrovascular disease, who may benefit from aggressive stroke risk factors treatment. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Results of aortic root reimplantation in patients with ascending aortic aneurysm and concomitant aortic insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Чернявский

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The research was designed to evaluate the results of valve-sparing operations: aortic root reimplantation versus aortic valve reimplantation when repairing an ascending aortic aneurysm with concomitant aortic insufficiency.Methods. Within a blind prospective randomized study conducted over a period from 2011 to 2015, 64 patients underwent aortic valve-sparing surgery. The inclusion criteria were the presence of an aortic aneurysm of the ascending aorta exceeding 4.5 cm and concomitant aortic insufficiency. All patients were divided into two groups: FS-group, aortic root reimplantation (modified Florida Sleeve technique (n = 32 and D-group, aortic valve reimplantation (David procedure (n = 32. The average age of patients was 57±13 (23–73 years in the FS-group and 55±11 (15–72 years in the D-group (p = 0.54. Both groups had 78% of males (p>0.99. A Marfan syndrome was identified in 6% and 9% in the FS-group and D-group respectively (p>0.99. Mean diameter of the sinuses of Valsalva was 51±7 mm and 56±10 mm (p = 0.09, aortic insufficiency 2.6±0.7 and 2.8±0.8 (p = 0.15 in the FS-group and D-group respectively. In the FS-group and D-group LVEDD amounted to 5.5±0.7 mm and 5.9±1.0 mm (p = 0.09 respectively. All patients took echocardiography in the preoperative, postoperative and follow-up periods.Results. In the long-term period, the degree of aortic regurgitation was 1.2±0.1 in the FS-group and 1.3±0.6 in the D-group (p = 0.72. LVEDD was 123±23 mm in the FS-group and 139.6±80 mm in the D-group at follow-up (p = 0.77. There were no statistically significant differences in the analysis of complications. Overall 30-day in-hospital mortality was 7.8%. There were 2 (6.3% deaths in the FS-group and 3 (9.4% in the D-group (p = 0.5.Late mortality was 6.3% in the FS-group and 3.1% in the D-group (p>0.99. Cumulative survival at 4 years was 84.3% and 84.8% in the FS-group and the D-group respectively (p = 0.94. Cumulative freedom from

  18. Combined Repair of Ascending Aortic Pseudoaneurysm and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Patient with Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokotsakis, John N.; Lioulias, Achilleas G.; Foroulis, Christophoros N.; Skouteli, Eleni Anna T.; Milonakis, Michael K.; Bastounis, Elias A.; Boulafendis, Dimitrios G.

    2003-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of the ascending aorta after the original inclusion/wrap technique of the Bentall procedure present a difficult surgical management problem and are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Patients with Marfan syndrome frequently develop aneurysms and dissections that involve multiple aortic segments. We present the case of a Marfan patient who successfully underwent repair of a giant ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm and concomitant repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. An aggressive surgical strategy followed by life-long cardiovascular monitoring is warranted in order to prolong the survival of these patients. (Tex Heart Inst J 2003;30:233–5) PMID:12959210

  19. Combined repair of ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm and abdominal aortic aneurysm: in a patient with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokotsakis, John N; Lioulias, Achilleas G; Foroulis, Christophoros N; Skouteli, Eleni Anna T; Milonakis, Michael K; Bastounis, Elias A; Boulafendis, Dimitrios G

    2003-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of the ascending aorta after the original inclusion/wrap technique of the Bentall procedure present a difficult surgical management problem and are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Patients with Marfan syndrome frequently develop aneurysms and dissections that involve multiple aortic segments. We present the case of a Marfan patient who successfully underwent repair of a giant ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm and concomitant repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. An aggressive surgical strategy followed by life-long cardiovascular monitoring is warranted in order to prolong the survival of these patients.

  20. Influence of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Shape on Hemodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-19

    An incompressible fluid with Newtonian properties is assumed. The governing equations for the conserva- tion of mass and momentum, in a Cartesian... equations . To ensure the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) num- ber < 1, the time step is fixed at ∆t = 0.5 × 10−4 s during a pulse. The simulation is...Supraceliac and infrarenal aortic flow in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms: mean flows, waveforms, and allometric scaling relation- ships, Card. Eng

  1. Combined Repair of Ascending Aortic Pseudoaneurysm and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Patient with Marfan Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kokotsakis, John N.; Lioulias, Achilleas G.; Foroulis, Christophoros N.; Skouteli, Eleni Anna T.; Milonakis, Michael K.; Bastounis, Elias A.; Boulafendis, Dimitrios G.

    2003-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of the ascending aorta after the original inclusion/wrap technique of the Bentall procedure present a difficult surgical management problem and are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Patients with Marfan syndrome frequently develop aneurysms and dissections that involve multiple aortic segments. We present the case of a Marfan patient who successfully underwent repair of a giant ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm and concomitant repair of an abdominal aortic ane...

  2. Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paravastu, Sharath Chandra Vikram; Jayarajasingam, Rubaraj; Cottam, Rachel; Palfreyman, Simon J; Michaels, Jonathan A; Thomas, Steven M

    2014-01-23

    An abnormal dilatation of the abdominal aorta is referred to as an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Due to the risk of rupture, surgical repair is offered electively to individuals with aneurysms greater than 5.5 cm in size. Traditionally, conventional open surgical repair (OSR) was considered the first choice approach. However, over the past two decades endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has gained popularity as a treatment option. This article intends to review the role of EVAR in the management of elective AAA. To assess the effectiveness of EVAR versus conventional OSR in individuals with AAA considered fit for surgery, and EVAR versus best medical care in those considered unfit for surgery. This was determined by the effect on short, intermediate and long-term mortality, endograft related complications, re-intervention rates and major complications. The Cochrane Peripheral Vascular Diseases Group Trials Search Co-ordinator (TSC) searched the Specialised Register (January 2013) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2012, Issue 12). The TSC also searched trial databases for details of ongoing or unpublished studies. Prospective randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing EVAR with OSR in individuals with AAA considered fit for surgery. and comparing EVAR with best medical care in individuals considered unfit for surgery. We excluded studies with inadequate data or using an inadequate randomisation technique. Three reviewers independently evaluated trials for appropriateness for inclusion and extracted data using pro forma designed by the Cochrane PVD Group. We assessed the quality of trials using The Cochrane Collaboration's 'Risk of bias' tool. We entered collected data in to Review Manager (version 5.2.3) for analysis. Where direct comparisons could be made, we determined odds ratios (OR). We tested studies for heterogeneity and, when present, we used a random-effects model; otherwise we used a fixed-effect model. We tabulated

  3. Detecting atheromatous plaques in the aortic arch or supra-aortic arteries for more accurate stroke subtype classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaoyang; Wu, Simiao; Zeng, Quantao; Xiao, Jiahe; Liu, Ming

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the correlations of atheromatous plaques in the aortic arch or supra-aortic arteries with intracranial arterial stenosis and carotid plaques in stroke patients, and to determine whether taking these plaques into account will reduce the proportion of patients in the undetermined etiology group. We prospectively enrolled 308 ischemic stroke patients, whose clinical characteristics and A-S-C-O classifications were compared with analyses of intracranial arteries, carotid arteries, aortic arch, and supra-aortic arteries. 125(40.6%) patients had plaques in the aortic arch or supra-aortic arteries, of which 106 (84.8%) had complex plaques. No correlations were observed between these plaques and carotid plaques ( p = 0.283) or intracranial arterial stenosis ( p = 0.097). After detecting the mobile thrombi in the aortic arch and supra-aortic arteries, the proportion of patients in the atherothrombosis group was increased from 33.8% to 55.5% ( p = 0.00), whereas the proportion of patients in stroke of undetermined etiology group was decreased from 19.2% to 11.0% ( p = 0.00). Examining only the carotid and intracranial arteries may not provide adequate information about large arteries in stroke patients. Therefore, it would be better to include a search for relevant plaques in the aortic arch or supra-aortic arteries in modern stroke workup, for it may lead to more accurate stroke subtype classification and guide secondary prevention.

  4. Development of the human aortic arch system captured in an interactive three-dimensional reference model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rana, M. Sameer; Sizarov, Aleksander; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Moorman, Antoon F. M.

    2014-01-01

    Variations and mutations in the human genome, such as 22q11.2 microdeletion, can increase the risk for congenital defects, including aortic arch malformations. Animal models are increasingly expanding our molecular and genetic insights into aortic arch development. However, in order to justify

  5. Spontaneous dissection of the arterial duct during continuous infusion of prostaglandin E1 in a neonate with aortic arch interruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Nao; Yasukochi, Satoshi; Takigiku, Kiyohiro; Matsui, Hikoro; Takei, Kohta; Nakano, Yusuke; Otagiri, Tessyu; Hashida, Yuichiro; Ogiso, Yoshifumi; Maekawa, Yoshiyuki; Umezu, Kentaro; Sakamoto, Takahiko; Harada, Yorikazu

    2013-12-01

    We report a 3-day-old boy with double outlet of the right ventricle and interruption of the aortic arch who developed spontaneous dissection of the arterial duct (DA) despite use of continuous infusion of lipo-prostaglandin E1 (PGE1). Transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated the spontaneous dissecting aneurysm of DA, which was confirmed by histology at the modified Norwood procedure done at age of 18 days. This is the first report of spontaneous dissection of DA in a neonate receiving PGE1, suggesting a new closing mechanism of DA.

  6. RIGHT-SIDED AORTIC ARCH WITH ABERRANT LEFT SUBCLAVIAN ARTERY AND DUPLICATION OF SUPERIOR VENA CAVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikhita Hazarika

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Right-sided aortic arch is a rare anatomical variant present in about 0.1% of the adult population.1,2 Half of the cases are associated with an aberrant left subclavian artery (0.05%-0.1%. Right-sided aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery is less common than left-sided aortic arch with aberrant right subclavian artery (0.5-2.0%.3,4 A rightsided aortic arch is an anatomic variant resulting from persistence of the right fourth aortic arch and involution of the left. It can be associated with an aberrant left subclavian artery arises from Kommerell’s diverticulum. It is usually asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally during adult age. A 40-year-old male presented with cough and a hump in the back. The patient was evaluated for scoliosis and plain CT thorax was done.

  7. Axillary artery counter-current aortography in the newborn with aortic arch obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, K.C.; Lo, R.N.S.; Leung, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    13 newborn infants with aortic coarctation were evaluated by counter-current aortographic technique. The right radial or brachial artery approach (2 cases in each group) did not give successful aortic arch imaging while the right axiallary artery approach resulted in adequate imaging in each of 9 cases investigated. In 2, the axillary artery was transiently weakened but returned to normal within 24 hours. No other complications were encountered. Axillary artery counter-current aortography is a safe and relatively non-invasive procedure which can be used to image the aortic arch in the newborn babies when other non-invasive diagnosis of aortic arch obstruction is tentative. (orig.)

  8. Acute Traumatic Aortic Disruption and Right Aortic Arch: A Fatal Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirvan Salaminia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute traumatic aortic disruption occurs after forceful deceleration and usually due to motor accidents. Only 10 % to 15 % reach a treatment facility alive and a highly suspicious state is needed for timely diagnosis. Most time they suffer multiple associated lethal injuries. Asymptomatic and isolated right aortic arch is a rare anomaly of the aorta with a prevalence of 0.5% [3]. Its diagnosis is by radiologic studies. We present this patient to remember that the incidental right aortic arch and disruption may interpreted as the left side mediastinal rotation in radiography and so inadvertently lead to late diagnosis and a futile outcome. A 24-year old man was brought to emergency room following a motor accident. He had Glascow Coma Scale Score: 14-15/15 but with stable vital signs. After primary survey chest radiography, emergency abdominal sonography (eFAST and brain CT scanning were requested. Spiral thoracoabdominal CT was also requested about seven hours after admission and when the patient entered an unstable hemodynamic phase. The primary survey was unremarkable. His chest radiography had left mediastinal rotation, which is opposite to what is seen pathologically in the condition of the traumatic aortic disruption, the right mediastinal rotation. His eFAST and brain CT were normal. The patient remained stable until seven hours after admission when the patient becomes unstable. Massive pleural effusion with aortic disruption and a right aortic arch was seen in thoracoabdominal CT. He transferred to the operation room but arrested during transfer. Massive hemothorax was seen during open cardiac massage. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was unsuccessful. This may raises that in any blunt trauma patient with highly suspicious history for the great vessel injury, it may be better to consider the spiral chest CT scanning as the primary radiologic test for evaluation of the chest trauma and not waste the time or resources with rely simply on a

  9. Ex vivo repair of renal artery aneurysm associated with surgical treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Dušan M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Renal artery aneurysms is relatively uncommon with reported incidence ranges from 0.3% to 1%. However, considering all visceral artery aneurysms the percentage of renal artery aneurysms is relatively high between 15-25%. The distal forms of renal artery aneurysms sometimes require "ex vivo" reconstruction and kidney autotransplantation. CASE REPORT A 75-year-old male presented with the right abdominal and back pain. He suffered from a long history of arterial hypertension and chronic renal failure over the last few months (urea blood = 19.8 mmol/l; creatinine = 198 mmol/l. Duplex ultrasonography showed abdominal aortic aneurysm. Subsequent translumbarangiography revealed juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with distal right renal artery aneurysm. The operation was performed under combined thoracic epidural analgesia and general anesthesia using transperitoneal approach. After the laparotomy, the ascending colon was mobilized and reflected medially followed by Kocher maneuver. The result was visualization of the anterior aspect of the right kidney, the collecting system, ureter as well as the right renal vein and artery with large saccular aneurysm located distally. After mobilization of the renal vessels and careful dissection of the ureter, the kidney was explanted. The operation was continued by two surgical teams. The first team performed abdominal aortic aneurysm resection and reconstruction with bifurcated Dacron graft. The second team performed ex vivo reparation of renal artery aneurysm. All time during the explantation, the kidney was perfused by Collins' solution. The saccular right renal artery aneurysm 4 cm in diameter was located at the kidney hilus at the first bifurcation. Three branches originated from the aneurysm. The aneurysm was resected completely. The longest and widest of three branches arising from the aneurysmal sac was end-to-end anastomized with 6 mm PTFE graft. After this intervention, one of

  10. Aortic Dissection and Aortic Aneurysms Associated with Fluoroquinolones: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sonal; Nautiyal, Amit

    2017-12-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the association between fluoroquinolone use and aortic dissection or aortic aneurysm in a systematic review and meta-analysis. We searched Medline, Embase, and Scopus from inception to February 15, 2017. We selected controlled studies for inclusion if they reported data on aortic dissection and aortic aneurysm associated with fluoroquinolones exposure versus no exposure. Data were extracted by 2 independent reviewers, with disagreements resolved through further discussion. We assessed the quality of studies using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale for observational studies and the strength of evidence using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. The odds ratios (ORs) from observational studies were pooled using the fixed-effect inverse variance method, and statistical heterogeneity was assessed using the I 2 statistic. After a review of 714 citations, we included 2 observational studies in the meta-analysis. Current use of fluoroquinolones was associated with a statistically significantly increased risk of aortic dissection (OR, 2.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.31-3.37; I 2  = 0%) and aortic aneurysm (OR, 2.25; 95% CI, 2.03-2.49; I 2  = 0%) in a fixed-effects meta-analysis. The unadjusted OR estimates and sensitivity analysis using a random-effects model showed similar results. We rated the strength of evidence to be of moderate quality. The number needed to treat to harm for aortic aneurysm for elderly patients aged more than 65 years who were current users of fluoroquinolones was estimated to be 618 (95% CI, 518-749). Evidence from a small number of studies suggests that exposure to fluoroquinolones is consistently associated with a small but significantly increased risk of aortic dissection and aortic aneurysm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A variant in LDLR is associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bradley, Declan T; Hughes, Anne E; Badger, Stephen A

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a common cardiovascular disease among older people and demonstrates significant heritability. In contrast to similar complex diseases, relatively few genetic associations with AAA have been confirmed. We reanalyzed our genome-wide study and carried through to re...

  12. Marfan's syndrome presenting with abdominal aortic aneurysm: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present the case of a 16-year old student with Marfan's syndrome and abdominal aortic aneurysm who presented with a diagnostic conundrum. He presented with a three months history of progressive painful left upper abdominal mass and back pain. It became severe in the last two weeks before presentation and was ...

  13. Mass or high-risk screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Henneberg, E W; Fasting, H

    1997-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is known to be associated with various diseases, especially hypertension, acute myocardial infarction (AMI), chronic obstructive airway disease (COAD), and intermittent claudication. These associations have led to a debate about whether screening of older men for AAA...

  14. High heritability of liability to abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejnert Jørgensen, Trine; Christensen, Kaare; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: First degree relatives of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) have an increased risk of developing AAA; however, despite intensive investigation, the specific genetic factors involved in the development of the disease are still largely unknown. In twin studies the influence...

  15. Asthma Associates With Human Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm and Rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Cong-Lin; Wemmelund, Holger; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Both asthma and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) involve inflammation. It remains unknown whether these diseases interact. APPROACH AND RESULTS: Databases analyzed included Danish National Registry of Patients, a population-based nationwide case-control study included all patients with...

  16. Estimating overdiagnosis in Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Minna; Hansson, Anders; Brodersen, J.

    2015-01-01

    programmes for AAA. There are also proposals to change the aortic diameter for diagnosis from ≥30 mm to 25 mm. Rationale for change: Early diagnosis by screening allows the opportunity of surgery to prevent ruptures Leap of faith—Detecting asymptomatic aneurysms will reduce AAA mortality and morbidity...

  17. Effectiveness of treatment for octogenarians with acute abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheer, Margot L. J.; Pol, Robert A.; Haveman, Jan Willem; Tielliu, Ignace F. J.; Verhoeven, Eric L. G.; Van den Dungen, Jan J. A. M.; Nijsten, Maarten W.; Zeebregts, Clark J.

    Objective: To investigate whether advanced age may be a reason to refrain from treatment in patients with an acute abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAAA). Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study that took place in a tertiary care university hospital with a 45-bed intensive care unit. Two hundred

  18. Epidemiology and contemporary management of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullery, Brant W; Hallett, Richard L; Fleischmann, Dominik

    2018-05-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is most commonly defined as a maximal diameter of the abdominal aorta in excess of 3 cm in either anterior-posterior or transverse planes or, alternatively, as a focal dilation ≥ 1.5 times the diameter of the normal adjacent arterial segment. Risk factors for the development of AAA include age > 60, tobacco use, male gender, Caucasian race, and family history of AAA. Aneurysm growth and rupture risk appear to be associated with persistent tobacco use, female gender, and chronic pulmonary disease. The majority of AAAs are asymptomatic and detected incidentally on various imaging studies, including abdominal ultrasound, and computed tomographic angiography. Symptoms associated with AAA may include abdominal or back pain, thromboembolization, atheroembolization, aortic rupture, or development of an arteriovenous or aortoenteric fistula. The Screening Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Efficiently (SAAAVE) Act provides coverage for a one-time screening abdominal ultrasound at age 65 for men who have smoked at least 100 cigarettes and women who have family history of AAA disease. Medical management is recommended for asymptomatic patients with AAAs  5 mm/6 months), or presence of a fusiform aneurysm with maximum diameter of 5.5 cm or greater. Intervention for AAA includes conventional open surgical repair and endovascular aortic stent graft repair.

  19. Biomechanical Indices for Rupture Risk Estimation in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemans, Eva L.; Willems, Tineke P.; van der Laan, Maarten J.; Slump, Cornelis H.; Zeebregts, Clark J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To review the use of biomechanical indices for the estimation of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture risk, emphasizing their potential use in a clinical setting. Methods: A search of the PubMed, Embase, Scopus, and Compendex databases was made up to June 2015 to identify articles

  20. Thoracic aortic aneurysm in a child due to cystic medial necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuribayashi, Sachio; Watabe, Tsuneya; Ohtaki, Makoto; Matsuyama, Shoya; Ogawa, Junichi

    1983-01-01

    The valuable role of computed tomography (CT) was stressed in the diagnosis of thoracic aortic aneurysm in an asymptomatic 12-year-old child. She initially presented mediastinal mass on plain chest film. A saccular thoracic aortic aneurysm was highly suspected from the CT findings, and it was confirmed on angiography. Pathological examination of the aneurysmal wall revealed cystic medial necrosis. (author)

  1. Neonatal aortic arch obstruction due to pedunculated left ventricular foetal myxoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaulitz, Renate; Haen, Susanne; Sieverding, Ludger

    2015-10-01

    Myxoma in neonatal life are extremely rare. We report a case of a neonate with a pedunculated cardiac tumour arising from the anterolateral left ventricular wall protruding across the left ventricular outflow tract and continuously extending into the distal aortic arch. Surgical removal at 14 days of age via combined transaortic approach and apical ventriculotomy was indicated because of the risk of further compromise of aortic valve function and aortic arch obstruction. Histopathologic examination was consistent with a myxoma.

  2. Selective Aortic Arch and Root Replacement in Repair of Acute Type A Aortic Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischman, Fernando; Elsayed, Ramsey S; Cohen, Robbin G; Tatum, James M; Kumar, S Ram; Kazerouni, Kayvan; Mack, Wendy J; Barr, Mark L; Cunningham, Mark J; Hackmann, Amy E; Baker, Craig J; Starnes, Vaughn A; Bowdish, Michael E

    2018-02-01

    Controversy exists regarding the optimal extent of repair for type A aortic dissection. Our approach is to replace the ascending aorta, and only replace the aortic root or arch when intimal tears are present in those areas. We examined intermediate outcomes with this approach to acute type A aortic dissection repair. Between March 2005 and October 2016, 195 patients underwent repair of acute type A aortic dissection. Repair was categorized by site of proximal and distal anastomosis and extent of repair. Mean follow-up was 31.0 ± 30.9 months. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to assess survival. Multiple variable Cox proportional hazards modeling was utilized to identify factors associated with overall mortality. Overall survival was 85.1%, 83.9%, 79.1%, and 74.4% at 6, 12, 36, and 60 months, respectively. Eight patients required reintervention. The cumulative incidence of aortic reintervention at 1 year with death as a competing outcome was 3.95%. Multiple variable regression analysis identified factors such as age, preoperative renal failure, concomitant thoracic endograft, postoperative myocardial infarction and sepsis, and need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as predictive of overall mortality. Neither proximal or distal extent of repair, nor need for reintervention affected overall survival (proximal: hazard ratio 1.63, 95% confidence interval: 0.75 to 3.51, p = 0.22; distal: hazard ratio 1.12, 95% confidence interval: 0.43 to 2.97, p = 0.81; reintervention: hazard ratio 0.03, 95% confidence interval: 0.002 to 0.490, p < 0.01). A selective approach to root and arch repair in acute type A aortic dissection is safe. If aortic reintervention is needed, survival does not appear to be affected. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Familial Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm with Dissection Presenting as Flash Pulmonary Edema in a 26-Year-Old Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabry Omar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We are reporting a case of familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection in a 26-year-old man with no significant past medical history and a family history of dissecting aortic aneurysm in his mother at the age of 40. The patient presented with cough, shortness of breath, and chest pain. Chest X-ray showed bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. CT scan of the chest showed a dissection of the ascending aorta. The patient underwent aortic dissection repair and three months later he returned to our hospital with new complaints of back pain. CT angiography showed a new aortic dissection extending from the left carotid artery through the bifurcation and into the iliac arteries. The patient underwent replacement of the aortic root, ascending aorta, total aortic arch, and aortic valve. The patient recovered well postoperatively. Genetic studies of the patient and his children revealed no mutations in ACTA2, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, TGFB2, MYH11, MYLK, SMAD3, or FBN1. This case report focuses on a patient with familial TAAD and discusses the associated genetic loci and available screening methods. It is important to recognize potential cases of familial TAAD and understand the available screening methods since early diagnosis allows appropriate management of risk factors and treatment when necessary.

  4. Characteristics and Outcomes of Ascending Versus Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vapnik, Joshua S; Kim, Joon Bum; Isselbacher, Eric M; Ghoshhajra, Brian B; Cheng, Yisha; Sundt, Thoralf M; MacGillivray, Thomas E; Cambria, Richard P; Lindsay, Mark E

    2016-05-15

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAs) occur in reproducible patterns, but etiologic factors determining the anatomic distribution of these aneurysms are not well understood. This study sought to gain insight into etiologic differences and clinical outcomes associated with repetitive anatomic distributions of TAs. From 3,247 patients registered in an institutional Thoracic Aortic Center database from July 1992 to August 2013, we identified 844 patients with full aortic dimensional imaging by computerized axial tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scan (mean age 62.8 ± 14 years, 37% women, median follow-up 40 months) with TA diameter >4.0 cm and without evidence of previous aortic dissection. Patient demographic and imaging data were analyzed in 3 groups: isolated ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (AAs; n = 628), isolated descending TAs (DTAs; n = 130), and combined AA and DTA (mixed thoracic aortic aneurysm, MTA; n = 86). Patients with DTA had more hypertension (82% vs 59%, p <0.001) and a higher burden of atherosclerosis (88% vs 9%, p <0.001) than AA. Conversely, patients with isolated AA were younger (59.5 ± 13.5 vs 71.0 ± 11.8 years, p <0.001) and contained almost every case of overt, genetically triggered TA. Patients with isolated DTA were demographically indistinguishable from patients with MTA. In follow-up, patients with DTA/MTA experienced more aortic events (aortic dissection/rupture) and had higher mortality than patients with isolated AA. In multivariate analysis, aneurysm size (odds ratio 1.1, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.16, p <0.001) and the presence of atherosclerosis (odds ratio 5.7, 95% CI 2.02 to 16.15, p <0.001) independently predicted adverse aortic events. We find that DTA with or without associated AA appears to be a disease more highly associated with atherosclerosis, hypertension, and advanced age. In contrast, isolated AA appears to be a clinically distinct entity with a greater burden of genetically triggered disease. Copyright © 2016

  5. Abnormalities of aortic arch shape, central aortic flow dynamics, and distensibility predispose to hypertension after successful repair of aortic coarctation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donazzan, Luca; Crepaz, Robert; Stuefer, Josef; Stellin, Giovanni

    2014-10-01

    Systemic hypertension (HT) is a major long-term complication even after successful repair of aortic coarctation (CoA), and many factors are involved in this pathophysiology. To investigate the role of abnormalities in the aortic arch shape, central aortic flow dynamics, and distensibility in developing HT after successful repair of CoA. We selected a group of 26 normotensive patients (mean age 16.9±7.3 years, range 9-32 years) with anatomically successful repair of CoA among 140 patients regularly followed after repair of CoA and analyzed their last clinical and echocardiographic data. Bicycle exercise test and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) were also obtained. Mean age at surgical repair was 3.2±3.9 years (range 10 days-15 years); 12 patients underwent surgical correction during the first year of life. Repair of CoA was performed by end-to-end anastomosis (TT) in 23 patients (extended TT in 6 patients with arch hypoplasia), patch aortoplasty in 2, and subcalvian flap aortoplasty in 1. The postsurgical follow-up was 13.8±7.2 years (range 3.5-29.4 years). The shape of the aortic arch was defined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on this global geometry (normal-gothic-crenel), ratio of the height-transverse diameter (A/T), percentage of residual stenosis, and growth index of the transverse arch segments. Flow mapping by phase-contrast imaging in the ascending and descending aorta was performed in order to measure the systolic waveforms and central aortic distensibility. Twenty normal age-matched patients submitted to the same MRI protocol were used as controls. Six patients were found to have a gothic and 20 a normal aortic arch shape. Patients with gothic aortic arch shape had an increased A/T ratio (0.80±0.07 vs 0.58±0.05, P135 mm Hg on ABPM were higher in the gothic than in the normal arch group. There was a correlation between nocturnal SBP, 24 hours pulse pressure on ABPM in the whole group, and different MRI variables (A/T, distensibility of

  6. FOXE3 mutations predispose to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shao-Qing; Medina-Martinez, Olga; Guo, Dong-chuan; Gong, Limin; Regalado, Ellen S.; Reynolds, Corey L.; Boileau, Catherine; Jondeau, Guillaume; Prakash, Siddharth K.; Kwartler, Callie S.; Zhu, Lawrence Yang; Peters, Andrew M.; Duan, Xue-Yan; Bamshad, Michael J.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Debbie A.; Santos-Cortez, Regie L.; Dong, Xiurong; Leal, Suzanne M.; Majesky, Mark W.; Swindell, Eric C.; Jamrich, Milan; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2016-01-01

    The ascending thoracic aorta is designed to withstand biomechanical forces from pulsatile blood. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections (TAADs) occur as a result of genetically triggered defects in aortic structure and a dysfunctional response to these forces. Here, we describe mutations in the forkhead transcription factor FOXE3 that predispose mutation-bearing individuals to TAAD. We performed exome sequencing of a large family with multiple members with TAADs and identified a rare variant in FOXE3 with an altered amino acid in the DNA-binding domain (p.Asp153His) that segregated with disease in this family. Additional pathogenic FOXE3 variants were identified in unrelated TAAD families. In mice, Foxe3 deficiency reduced smooth muscle cell (SMC) density and impaired SMC differentiation in the ascending aorta. Foxe3 expression was induced in aortic SMCs after transverse aortic constriction, and Foxe3 deficiency increased SMC apoptosis and ascending aortic rupture with increased aortic pressure. These phenotypes were rescued by inhibiting p53 activity, either by administration of a p53 inhibitor (pifithrin-α), or by crossing Foxe3–/– mice with p53–/– mice. Our data demonstrate that FOXE3 mutations lead to a reduced number of aortic SMCs during development and increased SMC apoptosis in the ascending aorta in response to increased biomechanical forces, thus defining an additional molecular pathway that leads to familial thoracic aortic disease. PMID:26854927

  7. Complicated thoraco-abdominal aortic dissection presenting with lower limb ischemia in a patient with bovine arch and arteria lusoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joliat, G-R; Dubuis, C; Déglise, S

    2017-01-01

    We report the case of a 58-year-old man who presented with thoraco-abdominal pain and right lower limb ischemia due to type B aortic dissection. Moreover, the patient was discovered to have several concomitant aortic arch anomalies (bovine arch, arteria lusoria, and left vertebral artery arising from the aortic arch). Taking into account this complex anatomy, emergent femoral exploration with fenestration and thrombectomy was performed. The blood flow to the right lower limb was restored. A few days later the aortic dissection spread proximally, and the aortic arch dilatation enlarged. Before total arch replacement could be performed, the aorta ruptured and the patient unfortunately died.

  8. Fenestrated Stent-Grafts for Salvage of Prior Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katsargyris, A.; Yazar, O.; Oikonomou, K.; Bekkema, F.; Tielliu, I.; Verhoeven, E. L. G.

    Objectives: To review our experience with fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair (F-EVAR) to treat complications after previous standard infrarenal endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Methods: A prospectively maintained database including all consecutive patients with juxtarenal abdominal aortic

  9. Preliminary ten year results from a randomised single centre mass screening trial for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Juul, Søren; Fasting, H

    2006-01-01

    At present, several regions and countries are considering screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). However, The Chichester Aneurysms Screening Trial has reported poor long term benefit of screening for AAA. We therefore supplement previously published data with a preliminary analysis...

  10. A Right-sided Aortic Arch with Kommerell's Diverticulum of the Aberrant Left Subclavian Artery Presenting with Syncope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hsun Yang

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A right-sided aortic arch with an aneurysm of the aberrant subclavian artery is a rare disease. We report a case of Kommerell's diverticulum of an aberrant left subclavian artery in a patient with a right-sided aortic arch. Fewer than 50 cases have been reported in the literature. A number of operative strategies are described. Right thoracotomy provides good exposure and avoids the morbidity associated with bilateral thoracotomy or sternotomy and thoracotomy. In our patient with symptoms of dysphagia, syncope, and left subclavian steal syndrome, a left thoracotomy was used. The repair was accomplished by division of a left ligamentum arteriosum, obliteration of the Kommerell's aneurysm, and an aorto-subclavian bypass. Postoperative complications included left vocal cord palsy and Horner's syndrome. Hoarseness and left ptosis recovered spontaneously 3 months after surgery, and the patient remained symptom-free at the 1-year follow-up. We believe a left thoracotomy for direct repair of Kommerell's diverticulum is a simple and safe method without the increased morbidity found in other procedures.

  11. Primary congenital abdominal aortic aneurysm: a case report with perinatal serial follow-up imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Im; Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Sang Joon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Seoul (Korea); Seo, Jeong-Wook [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea)

    2008-11-15

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms in neonates and infants are rare and are usually associated with infection, vasculitis, connective tissue disorder, or iatrogenic trauma such as umbilical catheterization. An idiopathic congenital abdominal aortic aneurysm is the least common category and there are few descriptions of the imaging features. We present the antenatal and postnatal imaging findings of an idiopathic congenital abdominal aortic aneurysm including the findings on US, MRI and CT. (orig.)

  12. Mutations in a TGF-β Ligand, TGFB3, Cause Syndromic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    OpenAIRE

    Bertoli Avella, Aida; Gillis, Elisabeth; Morisaki, Hiroko; Verhagen, Judith; Graaf, Bianca; Van De Beek, Gerarda; Gallo, Elena; Kruithof, Boudewijn; Venselaar, Hanka; Myers, Loretha; Laga, Steven; Doyle, Alexander; Oswald, Gretchen; Cappellen, Gert; Yamanaka, Itaru

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractBACKGROUND Aneurysms affecting the aorta are a common condition associated with high mortality as a result of aortic dissection or rupture. Investigations of the pathogenic mechanisms involved in syndromic types of thoracic aortic aneurysms, such as Marfan and Loeys-Dietz syndromes, have revealed an important contribution of disturbed transforming growth factor (TGF)-b signaling. OBJECTIVES This study sought to discover a novel gene causing syndromic aortic aneurysms in order ...

  13. Quantitative Aortic Distensibility Measurement Using CT in Patients with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Reproducibility and Clinical Relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfei Zha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the reproducibility of aortic distensibility (D measurement using CT and assess its clinical relevance in patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. Methods. 54 patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm were studied to determine their distensibility by using 64-MDCT. Aortic cross-sectional area changes were determined at two positions of the aorta, immediately below the lowest renal artery (level 1. and at the level of its maximal diameter (level 2. by semiautomatic segmentation. Measurement reproducibility was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC and Bland-Altman analyses. Stepwise multiple regression analysis was performed to assess linear associations between aortic D and anthropometric and biochemical parameters. Results. A mean distensibility of Dlevel  1.=(1.05±0.22×10-5  Pa-1 and Dlevel  2.=(0.49±0.18×10-5  Pa-1 was found. ICC proved excellent consistency between readers over two locations: 0.92 for intraobserver and 0.89 for interobserver difference in level 1. and 0.85 and 0.79 in level 2. Multivariate analysis of all these variables showed sac distensibility to be independently related (R2=0.68 to BMI, diastolic blood pressure, and AAA diameter. Conclusions. Aortic distensibility measurement in patients with AAA demonstrated high inter- and intraobserver agreement and may be valuable when choosing the optimal dimensions graft for AAA before endovascular aneurysm repair.

  14. Jaundice as a Rare Indication for Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieß, Henrik C; Tsilimparis, Nikolaos; Behrendt, Christian A; Wipper, Sabine; Debus, Eike S; Larena-Avellaneda, Axel

    2015-10-01

    Compression of adjacent anatomic structures by an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) can result in a variety of symptoms. We describe the case of an 88-year-old Caucasian woman with jaundice, elevated laboratory parameters for extrahepatic and intrahepatic cholestasis, and concomitant juxtarenal AAA compressing the liver hilum. Following exclusion of other common causes for cholestasis, the patient was considered to have a symptomatic AAA. Open abdominal aortic surgery revealed a contained rupture and was repaired. Obstructive jaundice secondary to a compromising AAA is a rare condition and to the best of our knowledge has not been reported to date. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Recurrent aspiration pneumonia associated with giant aortic aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Hoff, Leonardo Santos; Schestatsky, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    A 83-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with fever, productive cough and dyspnea. She was previously diagnosed with dementia and systemic hypertension, and was heavy smoker for nearly 50 years. Her relatives reported that in the past four months she was admitted two times for aspiration pneumonia. Chest radiography showed right lower lobe consolidation and a large mediastinal mass (Panel A). A computed tomography angiography revealed a 10,2 cm descending aortic aneurysm comp...

  16. Mechanical stress in abdominal aortic aneurysms using artificial neural networks

    OpenAIRE

    Soudah Prieto, Eduardo; Rodriguez, Jose; López González, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Combination of numerical modeling and artificial intelligence (AI) in bioengineering processes are a promising pathway for the further development of bioengineering sciences. The objective of this work is to use Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) to reduce the long computational times needed in the analysis of shear stress in the Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) by finite element methods (FEM). For that purpose two different neural networks are created. The first neural network (Mesh Neural Netw...

  17. Core curriculum case illustration: blunt traumatic thoracic aortic pseudo aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramzan, Muhammad Mubashir; Fadl, Shaimaa Abdelhassib; Robinson, Jeffrey D

    2017-06-19

    Core Curriculum Illustration: [blunt thoracic aortic pseudo aneurysm]. This is the [40th] installment of a series that will highlight one case per publication issue from the bank of cases available online as part of the American Society of Emergency Radiology (ASER) educational resources. Our goal is to generate more interest in and use of our online materials. To view more cases online, please visit the ASER Core Curriculum and Recommendations for Study online at: http://www.aseronline.org/curriculum/toc.html.

  18. Systemic levels of cotinine and elastase, but not pulmonary function, are associated with the progression of small abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Jørgensen, B; Klitgaard, N A

    2003-01-01

    to study whether smoking and impaired pulmonary function are associated with the expansion of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA).......to study whether smoking and impaired pulmonary function are associated with the expansion of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA)....

  19. Aortic stentgrafts and en dovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-07-19

    Jul 19, 2007 ... with or without hooks or barbs attached to the proximal covered stent), or suprarenal with uncovered metal stent struts that maintain perfusion of the renal arteries, while the infrarenal covered component provides the seal. Distally, a seal requires normal common iliac arteries. Associated iliac aneurysms.

  20. Fenestrated endovascular aortic aneurysm repair using physician-modified endovascular grafts versus company-manufactured devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossabhoy, Shernaz S; Simons, Jessica P; Flahive, Julie M; Aiello, Francesco A; Sheth, Parth; Arous, Edward J; Messina, Louis M; Schanzer, Andres

    2017-12-07

    Fenestrated endografts are customized, patient-specific endovascular devices with potential to reduce morbidity and mortality of complex aortic aneurysm repair. With approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, our center began performing fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair through a physician-sponsored investigational device exemption (IDE #G130210), using both physician-modified endografts (PMEGs) and company-manufactured devices (CMDs). Because these techniques are associated with specific advantages and disadvantages, we sought to investigate differences in outcomes between PMEG and CMD cases. A single-institution retrospective review of all fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repairs was performed. The cohort was analyzed by device type (PMEG or CMD) after matching of cases on the basis of (1) number of target vessels intended for treatment, (2) extent of aneurysm, (3) aneurysm diameter, (4) device configuration, and (5) date of operation. Outcomes of ruptures, common iliac artery aneurysms, and aortic arch aneurysms were excluded. Demographics, operative details, perioperative complications, length of stay, and reinterventions were compared. For patients with >1 year of follow-up time, survival, type I or type III endoleak rate, target artery patency, and reintervention rate were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Between November 30, 2010, and July 30, 2016, 82 patients were identified and matched. The cohort included 41 PMEG and 41 CMD patients who underwent repair of 38 juxtarenal (PMEG, 17; CMD, 21; P = .38), 14 pararenal (PMEG, 6; CMD, 8; P = .56), and 30 thoracoabdominal type I to type IV (PMEG, 18; CMD, 12; P = .17) aneurysms. There were significant differences in presentation requiring urgent aneurysm repair (PMEG, 9; CMD, 0; P = .002), total fluoroscopy time (PMEG, 76 minutes; CMD, 61 minutes; P = .02), volume of contrast material used (PMEG, 88 mL; CMD, 70 mL; P = .02), in-operating room to out-of-operating room time

  1. Aortic aneurysm disease vs. aortic occlusive disease - differences in outcome and intensive care resource utilisation after elective surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Jannie; Gilsaa, Torben; Rønholm, Ebbe

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT: Abdominal aortic surgery is a high-risk procedure, with aortic aneurysm and aortic occlusive diseases being the main indications. These groups are often regarded as having equal perioperative risk profiles. Previous reports suggest that the haemodynamic and inflammatory response to aortic...... clamping is more pronounced in patients with aortic aneurysm disease, which may affect outcome. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this observational cohort study was to evaluate outcome after open elective abdominal aortic surgery, hypothesising a higher 30-day mortality, a higher incidence of postoperative organ...... January 2007 to 1 March 2010. PATIENTS: One thousand two hundred and ninety-three patients scheduled for primary open elective, aortoiliac bypass or aortofemoral bypass procedures or abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Mechanical ventilation, acute dialysis, use of vasopressors...

  2. Plasma levels of plasmin-antiplasmin-complexes are predictive for small abdominal aortic aneurysms expanding to operation-recommendable sizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Jørgensen, B; Fasting, H

    2001-01-01

    Three proteolytic systems seem involved in the aneurysmal degradation of the aortic wall. Plasmin is a common activator of the systems and could thus be predictive for the progression of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs).......Three proteolytic systems seem involved in the aneurysmal degradation of the aortic wall. Plasmin is a common activator of the systems and could thus be predictive for the progression of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs)....

  3. Combined transdiaphragmatic off-pump and minimally invasive coronary artery bypass with right gastroepiploic artery and abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    OpenAIRE

    G?rer, Onur; Haberal, Ismail; Ozsoy, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 74 Final Diagnosis: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) Symptoms: Palpable abdominal mass Medication: ? Clinical Procedure: Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Coronary artery disease is common in elderly patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Here we report a case of the combination of surgical repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm and off-pump and minimally invasive coronary artery bypass surgery. Case Report: A 74-year-old ma...

  4. Abdominal Aortic Diameter Is Increased in Males with a Family History of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejnert Jørgensen, Trine; Houlind, K; Green, A

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate, at a population level, whether a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is independently related to increased aortic diameter and prevalence of AAA in men, and to elucidate whether the mean aortic diameter and the prevalence of AAA are different between...... participants with male and female relatives with AAA. DESIGN: Observational population-based cross-sectional study. MATERIALS: 18,614 male participants screened for AAA in the VIVA-trial 2008-2011 with information on both family history of AAA and maximal aortic diameter. METHODS: Standardized ultrasound scan...... measurement of maximum antero-posterior aortic diameter. Family history obtained by questionnaire. Multivariate regression analysis was used to test for confounders: age, sex, smoking, comorbidity and medication. RESULTS: From the screened cohort, 569 participants had at least one first degree relative...

  5. Modelling of aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection through 3D printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Daniel; Squelch, Andrew; Sun, Zhonghua

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess if the complex anatomy of aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection can be accurately reproduced from a contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan into a three-dimensional (3D) printed model. Contrast-enhanced cardiac CT scans from two patients were post-processed and produced as 3D printed thoracic aorta models of aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection. The transverse diameter was measured at five anatomical landmarks for both models, compared across three stages: the original contrast-enhanced CT images, the stereolithography (STL) format computerised model prepared for 3D printing and the contrast-enhanced CT of the 3D printed model. For the model with aortic dissection, measurements of the true and false lumen were taken and compared at two points on the descending aorta. Three-dimensional printed models were generated with strong and flexible plastic material with successful replication of anatomical details of aortic structures and pathologies. The mean difference in transverse vessel diameter between the contrast-enhanced CT images before and after 3D printing was 1.0 and 1.2 mm, for the first and second models respectively (standard deviation: 1.0 mm and 0.9 mm). Additionally, for the second model, the mean luminal diameter difference between the 3D printed model and CT images was 0.5 mm. Encouraging results were achieved with regards to reproducing 3D models depicting aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection. Variances in vessel diameter measurement outside a standard deviation of 1 mm tolerance indicate further work is required into the assessment and accuracy of 3D model reproduction. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian Society of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy and New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology.

  6. Endovascular Treatment of Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms with the EndoFit Stent-Graft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saratzis, N.; Saratzis, Athanasios; Melas, N.; Ginis, G.; Lioupis, A.; Lykopoulos, D.; Lazaridis, J.; Kiskinis, Dimitrios

    2007-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the mid-term feasibility, efficacy, and durability of descending thoracic aortic aneurysm (DTAA) exclusion using the EndoFit device (LeMaitre Vascular). Methods. Twenty-three (23) men (mean age 66 years) with a DTAA were admitted to our department for endovascular repair (21 were ASA III+ and 2 refused open repair) from January 2003 to July 2005. Results. Complete aneurysm exclusion was feasible in all subjects (100% technical success). The median follow-up was 18 months (range 8-40 months). A single stent-graft was used in 6 cases. The deployment of a second stent-graft was required in the remaining 17 patients. All endografts were attached proximally, beyond the left subclavian artery, leaving the aortic arch branches intact. No procedure-related deaths have occurred. A distal type I endoleak was detected in 2 cases on the 1 month follow-up CT scan, and was repaired with reintervention and deployment of an extension graft. A nonfatal acute myocardial infarction occurred in 1 patient in the sixth postoperative month. Graft migration, graft infection, paraplegia, cerebral or distal embolization, renal impairment or any other major complications were not observed. Conclusion. The treatment of DTAAs using the EndoFit stent-graft is technically feasible. Mid-term results in this series are promising

  7. Persistent 5th aortic arch--a great pretender: three new covert cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlis, L M; Ho, S Y; Anderson, R H; Da Costa, P

    1989-05-01

    Although persistence of the embryonic fifth aortic arch is considered a rare congenital malformation, analysis of the records of the cardiopathological collections of the Brompton and Killingbeck Hospitals reveals 6 examples in approximately 2000 specimens, an incidence amongst our material of 1 in 330. Since our review of the literature reveals only a further 13 described cases, we wonder if the condition may go unrecognized rather than being exceedingly rare. This possibility is further supported by the fact that 3 of our cases were incorrectly interpreted when initially described. In this report, we describe the details of 2 of these specimens and one other case that was not included in our earlier descriptions of this malformation. The first case had the persistent fifth arch as a conduit between the pulmonary and systemic circulations in the setting of aortic atresia with interruption of the aortic arch. The second case demonstrated a double lumen aortic arch, the fifth arch in this instance being an accessory systemic-to-systemic conduit. In the final case, the persistent arch was initially considered to represent an aorto-pulmonary window but review revealed an aortic to pulmonary conduit more in keeping with the presence of a fifth arch. We conclude that the powers of mimicry of this enigmatic structure may account for its apparent rarity.

  8. Ductal Stent Implantation in Tetralogy of Fallot with Aortic Arch Abnormality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergul, Yakup; Saygi, Murat; Ozyilmaz, Isa; Guzeltas, Alper; Odemis, Ender

    2015-01-01

    Stenting of patent ductus arteriosus is an alternative to palliative cardiac surgery in newborns with duct-dependent or decreased pulmonary circulation; however, the use of this technique in patients with an aortic arch abnormality presents a challenge. Tetralogy of Fallot is a congenital heart defect that is frequently associated with anomalies of the aortic arch and its branches. The association is even more common in patients with chromosome 22q11 deletion. We present the case of an 18-day-old male infant who had cyanosis and a heart murmur. After an initial echocardiographic evaluation, the patient was diagnosed with tetralogy of Fallot and right-sided aortic arch. The pulmonary annulus and the main pulmonary artery and its branches were slightly hypoplastic; the ductus arteriosus was small. Conventional and computed tomographic angiograms revealed a double aortic arch and an aberrant left subclavian artery. The right aortic arch branched into the subclavian arteries and continued into the descending aorta, whereas the left aortic arch branched into the common carotid arteries and ended with the patent ductus arteriosus. After evaluation of the ductal anatomy, we implanted a 3.5 × 15-mm coronary stent in the duct. Follow-up injections showed augmented pulmonary flow and an increase in oxygen saturation from 65% to 94%. The patient was also found to have chromosome 22q11 deletion. PMID:26175649

  9. Variations of the aortic arch - a study on the most common branching patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, Marguerite; Schmitz, Bernd L; Schick, Melanie; Schloetzer, Wiebke; Pauls, Sandra; Roehrer, Stefan; Kapapa, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Background: Anatomical variants of the aortic arch and its branching patterns often appear as an incidental finding during routine computed tomography (CT) scanning. These variations can be of relevance when performing angiography or endovascular interventions and may cause symptoms such as dysphagia. Purpose: To analyze common anatomical variations found within the arteries originating from the aortic arch in patients using contrast CT imaging techniques. Material and Methods: A total of 2033 contrast CT scans were analyzed. To obtain a truly representative sample, cases were chosen from different hospital departments without previous knowledge of the patient history. Results: The total percentage of variations within the analyzed patients was 13.3%. In 8.0% a truncus bicaroticus was found. 4.2% of the patients showed a left vertebral artery originating directly from the aortic arch, mostly proximal, and in 1 case distal to the left subclavian artery. In 1.0% we found an aberrant right subclavian artery. We also found a single case of a right descending aortic arch. Conclusion: Variations of the aortic arch and its branching are frequently found, mostly as an incidental finding during routine diagnostic scanning. A contrast-enhanced CT scan is a good method with which to study the aortic arch and its associated branching pattern

  10. Selective cerebro-myocardial perfusion in complex congenital aortic arch pathology: a novel technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rita, Fabrizio; Lucchese, Gianluca; Barozzi, Luca; Menon, Tiziano; Faggian, Giuseppe; Mazzucco, Alessandro; Luciani, Giovanni Battista

    2011-11-01

    Simultaneous cerebro-myocardial perfusion has been described in neonatal and infant arch surgery, suggesting a reduction in cardiac morbidity. Here reported is a novel technique for selective cerebral perfusion combined with controlled and independent myocardial perfusion during surgery for complex or recurrent aortic arch lesions. From April 2008 to April 2011, 10 patients with arch pathology underwent surgery (two hypoplastic left heart syndrome [HLHS], four recurrent arch obstruction, two aortic arch hypoplasia + ventricular septal defect [VSD], one single ventricle + transposition of the great arteries + arch hypoplasia, one interrupted aortic arch type B + VSD). Median age was 63 days (6 days-36 years) and median weight 4.0 kg (1.6-52). Via midline sternotomy, an arterial cannula (6 or 8 Fr for infants) was directly inserted into the innominate artery or through a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft (for neonates cerebro-myocardial perfusion was 39 ± 18 min (17-69). Weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass was achieved without inotropic support in three and with low dose in seven patients. One patient required veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Four patients, body weight cerebro-myocardial perfusion is feasible in patients with complex or recurrent aortic arch disease, starting from premature newborn less than 2.0 kg of body weight to adults. The technique is as safe as previously reported methods of cerebro-myocardial perfusion and possibly more versatile. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2011, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Aortic false aneurysm after double valve replacement in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Walters, Henry L; Forbes, Thomas J; Aggarwal, Sanjeev

    2013-06-01

    Aortic false aneurysm (AFA) is a rare but life threatening complication after aortic surgery. We report a 13-year-old boy who developed AFA after double valve replacement consisting of the following: (1) Bentall procedure utilizing a 25-mm St. Jude aortic valved composite Hemashield Dacron graft (Meadox Medicals, Oakland, NJ); and (2) replacement of right ventricle to pulmonary artery conduit with a 25-mm porcine valved conduit. The exterior metal ring of the pulmonary prosthetic valve conduit caused an abrasion of the Hemashield graft, resulting in the AFA. In addition to simple suture repair, the pulmonary conduit was wrapped with a Gore-Tex patch (W.L. Gore Assoc, Flagstaff, AZ) to prevent recurrence. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Early- and Mid-term Results of the Chimney Technique in the Repair of Aortic Arch Pathologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Junjie; Jiao, Yuanyong, E-mail: wishlucky@163.com, E-mail: johemail@163.com; Zhang, Xiwei; Jiang, Jun; Yang, Hongyu; Ma, Hao [First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Division of Vascular Surgery, Department of General Surgery (China)

    2016-11-15

    PurposeTo examine the safety, feasibility, and mid-term efficacy of the chimney technique for aortic arch pathologies.MethodsFrom February 2011 to December 2014, a total of 35 patients (30 men; mean age 54.3 ± 14.1 years) with aortic arch pathologies underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair combined with chimney stents. The indication was a proximal landing zone <1.5 cm. Follow-up was performed at 3, 6, and 12 months and then yearly thereafter.ResultsA total of 36 chimney stents were deployed (innominate artery, n = 1; left common carotid artery, n = 9; right subclavian artery, n = 1; left subclavian artery, n = 25). The technical success rate was 94.3 % (33/35). Immediate type Ia endoleaks (ELIa) were observed in two patients (8.6 %, 2/35). Twenty-five patients were successfully followed-up for a median period of 29.3 months (range, 6–48 months). One patient died due to aortic dissection aneurysm rupture at 36 months (mortality rate of 4 %, 1/25). Three late ELIa were observed and no reinterventions were performed. The overall incidence of ELIa was 20 % (5/25). During follow-up, the patency rate for chimney stents was 92 % (23/25).ConclusionOur limited experience demonstrates that the chimney technique is a viable and relatively safe treatment for patients with challenging thoracic aortic pathologies at least in the mid-term follow-up period.

  13. Early Results of Chimney Technique for Type B Aortic Dissections Extending to the Aortic Arch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chen [Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, Department of General Surgery (China); Tang, Hanfei; Qiao, Tong; Liu, Changjian; Zhou, Min, E-mail: 813477618@qq.com [The Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Department of Vascular Surgery, Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital (China)

    2016-01-15

    ObjectiveTo summarize our early experience gained from the chimney technique for type B aortic dissection (TBAD) extending to the aortic arch and to evaluate the aortic remodeling in the follow-up period.MethodsFrom September 2011 to July 2014, 27 consecutive TBAD patients without adequate proximal landing zones were retrograde analyzed. Chimney stent-grafts were deployed parallel to the main endografts to reserve flow to branch vessels while extending the landing zones. In the follow-up period, aortic remodeling was observed with computed tomography angiography.ResultsThe technical success rate was 100 %, and endografts were deployed in zone 0 (n = 3, 11.1 %), zone 1 (n = 18, 66.7 %), and zone 2 (n = 6, 22.2 %). Immediately, proximal endoleaks were detected in 5 patients (18.5 %). During a mean follow-up period of 17.6 months, computed tomography angiography showed all the aortic stent-grafts and chimney grafts to be patent. Favorable remodeling was observed at the level of maximum descending aorta and left subclavian artery with expansion of true lumen (from 18.4 ± 4.8 to 25 ± 0.86 mm, p < 0.001 and 27.1 ± 0.62 to 28.5 ± 0.37 mm, p < 0.001) and depressurization of false lumen (from 23.7 ± 2.7 to 8.7 ± 3.8 mm, p < 0.001, from 5.3 ± 1.2 to 2.1 ± 2.1 mm, p < 0.001). While at the level of maximum abdominal aorta, suboptimal remodeling of the total aorta (from 24.1 ± 0.4 to 23.6 ± 1.5 mm, p = 0.06) and true lumen (from 13.8 ± 0.6 to 14.5 ± 0.4 mm, p = 0.08) was observed.ConclusionBased on our limited experience, the chimney technique with thoracic endovascular repair is demonstrated to be promising for TBAD extending to the arch with favorable aortic remodeling.

  14. Rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm in a young man with Marfan Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Maria Weinkouff; Huynh, Khiem Dinh; Baandrup, Ulrik Thorngren

    2018-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms are very rare in Marfan syndrome. We present a case with a young non-smoking and normotensive male with Marfan syndrome, who developed an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm that presented with rupture to the retroperitoneal cavity causing life-threatening bleeding shock...

  15. Identification of peroxiredoxin-1 as a novel biomarker of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez-Pinna, Roxana; Ramos-Mozo, Priscila; Madrigal-Matute, Julio

    2011-01-01

    In the search of novel biomarkers of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) progression, proteins released by intraluminal thrombus (ILT) were analyzed by a differential proteomic approach.......In the search of novel biomarkers of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) progression, proteins released by intraluminal thrombus (ILT) were analyzed by a differential proteomic approach....

  16. Immunoglobulin A antibodies against Chlamydia pneumoniae are associated with expansion of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Juul, Søren; Vammen, Sten

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the possible association between the progression of small abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and chronic infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae.......The aim of this study was to examine the possible association between the progression of small abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and chronic infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae....

  17. Endovascular Exclusion of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Initial Experience with Stent-Grafts in Cardiology Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Howell, Marcus H.; Zaqqa, Munir; Villareal, Rollo P.; Strickman, Neil E.; Krajcer, Zvonimir

    2000-01-01

    The use of an endovascular stent-graft prosthesis for the treatment of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms is receiving increasing attention as an option that may avoid the significant morbidity and mortality associated with open surgical treatment. We studied the clinical effectiveness of stent-grafts in patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  18. Infective Endocarditis of the Aortic Valve with Anterior Mitral Valve Leaflet Aneurysm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomsic, Anton; Li, Wilson W. L.; van Paridon, Marieke; Bindraban, Navin R.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Mitral valve leaflet aneurysm is a rare and potentially devastating complication of aortic valve endocarditis. We report the case of a 48-year-old man who had endocarditis of the native aortic valve and a concomitant aneurysm of the anterior mitral valve leaflet. Severe mitral regurgitation occurred

  19. Natural history of abdominal aortic aneurysm with and without coexisting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Heickendorff, Lene; Antonsen, Sebastian

    1998-01-01

    To study the relation between abdominal aortic aneurysms and chronical obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), in particular the suggested common elastin degradation caused by elastase and smoking.......To study the relation between abdominal aortic aneurysms and chronical obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), in particular the suggested common elastin degradation caused by elastase and smoking....

  20. Mutations in a TGF-β Ligand, TGFB3, Cause Syndromic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Bertoli Avella (Aida); E. Gillis (Elisabeth); H. Morisaki (Hiroko); J.M.A. Verhagen (Judith ); B.M. de Graaf (Bianca); G. Van De Beek (Gerarda); E. Gallo (Elena); B.P.T. Kruithof (Boudewijn); H. Venselaar (Hanka); L.A. Myers (Loretha); S. Laga (Steven); A.J. Doyle (Alexander); G. Oswald (Gretchen); W.A. van Cappellen (Gert); I. Yamanaka (Itaru); R.M. van der Helm (Robert); H.B. Beverloo (Berna); J.E.M.M. de Klein (Annelies); L.M. Pardo (Luba); M. Lammens (Martin); C. Evers (Christina); K. Devriendt (Koenraad); M. Dumoulein (Michiel); J.M. Timmermans (Janneke); H.T. Brüggenwirth (Hennie); F.W. Verheijen (Frans); I. Rodrigus (Inez); G. Baynam (Gareth); M.J.E. Kempers (Marlies); J. Saenen (Johan); E.M. Van Craenenbroeck (Emeline); K. Minatoya (Kenji); R. Matsukawa (Ritsu); T. Tsukube (Takuro); N. Kubo (Noriaki); R.M.W. Hofstra (Robert); M.-J. Goumans (Marie-José); J.A. Bekkers (Jos); J.W. Roos-Hesselink (Jolien); I.M.B.H. van de Laar (Ingrid); H.C. Dietz (Harry ); L. van Laer (Lut); T. Morisaki (Takayuki); M.W. Wessels (Marja); B.L. Loeys (Bart)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractBACKGROUND Aneurysms affecting the aorta are a common condition associated with high mortality as a result of aortic dissection or rupture. Investigations of the pathogenic mechanisms involved in syndromic types of thoracic aortic aneurysms, such as Marfan and Loeys-Dietz syndromes,

  1. Mutations in a TGF-beta ligand, TGFB3, cause syndromic aortic aneurysms and dissections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertoli-Avella, A.M.; Gillis, E.; Morisaki, H.; Verhagen, J.M.A.; Graaf, B.M. de; Beek, G. van de; Gallo, E.; Kruithof, B.P.; Venselaar, H.; Myers, L.A.; Laga, S.; Doyle, A.J.; Oswald, G.; Cappellen, G.W. van; Yamanaka, I.; Helm, R.M. van der; Beverloo, B.; Klein, A.; Pardo, L.; Lammens, M.; Evers, C.; Devriendt, K.; Dumoulein, M.; Timmermans, J.; Bruggenwirth, H.T.; Verheijen, F.; Rodrigus, I.; Baynam, G.; Kempers, M.; Saenen, J.; Craenenbroeck, E.M. Van; Minatoya, K.; Matsukawa, R.; Tsukube, T.; Kubo, N.; Hofstra, R.; Goumans, M.J.; Bekkers, J.A.; Roos-Hesselink, J.W.; Laar, I.M. van de; Dietz, H.C.; Laer, L. Van; Morisaki, T.; Wessels, M.W.; Loeys, B.L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aneurysms affecting the aorta are a common condition associated with high mortality as a result of aortic dissection or rupture. Investigations of the pathogenic mechanisms involved in syndromic types of thoracic aortic aneurysms, such as Marfan and Loeys-Dietz syndromes, have revealed

  2. Optimal graft diameter and location reduce postoperative complications after total arch replacement with long elephant trunk for arch aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondoh, Haruhiko; Funatsu, Toshihiro; Toda, Koich; Kainuma, Satoshi; Kuki, Satoru; Taniguchi, Kazuhiro

    2011-08-01

    Total arch replacement with an elephant trunk is a standard treatment for arch aneurysm, but serious complications, such as paraplegia and peripheral embolization caused by flapping of the elephant trunk, remain. Moreover, dilation of the descending aorta and retrograde flow into the peri-graft space at the distal elephant trunk are frequent problems. We hypothesized that optimal graft diameter and location would reduce complications after total arch replacement with a long elephant trunk by achieving complete thrombosis and minimal dilation of the descending aorta around the elephant trunk. We treated 65 patients with arch aneurysm by total arch replacement with a long elephant trunk anastomosed at the base of the innominate artery. The graft diameter was undersized (10%-20% of the distal aorta's diameter). Elephant trunk length was determined by preoperative computed tomography to locate the distal end at Th6 to Th8. Thrombosis around the elephant trunk, diameter of the descending aorta, and distance between the descending aorta and the graft near the distal end of the elephant trunk were evaluated using computed tomography. The distal end of the elephant trunk was located at Th 8 ± 1. There were no operative deaths, 3 patients (5%) died in the hospital, and 3 patients (5%) experienced spinal cord injury, including 1 in whom permanent paraplegia developed. Computed tomography revealed complete thrombosis around the elephant trunk in 58 patients (89%). The descending aorta did not dilate further, and distance between the descending aorta and the graft progressively decreased. Optimal graft diameter and location minimized postoperative complications, with complete thrombosis and no dilation of the descending aorta around the long elephant trunk in most patients. Copyright © 2011 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Abnormal aortic arch morphology in Turner syndrome patients is a risk factor for hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groote, Katya; Devos, Daniël; Van Herck, Koen; Demulier, Laurent; Buysse, Wesley; De Schepper, Jean; De Wolf, Daniël

    2015-09-01

    Hypertension in Turner syndrome (TS) is a multifactorial, highly prevalent and significant problem that warrants timely diagnosis and rigorous treatment. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between abnormal aortic arch morphology and hypertension in adult TS patients. This was a single centre retrospective study in 74 adult TS patients (age 29.41 ± 8.91 years) who underwent a routine cardiac MRI. Patients were assigned to the hypertensive group (N = 31) if blood pressure exceeded 140/90 mmHg and/or if they were treated with antihypertensive medication. Aortic arch morphology was evaluated on MRI images and initially assigned as normal (N = 54) or abnormal (N = 20), based on the curve of the transverse arch and the distance between the left common carotid-left subclavian artery. We additionally used a new more objective method to describe aortic arch abnormality in TS by determination of the relative position of the highest point of the transverse arch (AoHP). Logistic regression analysis showed that hypertension is significantly and independently associated with age, BMI and abnormal arch morphology, with a larger effect size for the new AoHP method than for the classical method. TS patients with hypertension and abnormal arch morphology more often had dilatation of the ascending aorta. There is a significant association between abnormal arch morphology and hypertension in TS patients, independent of age and BMI, and not related to other structural heart disease. We suggest that aortic arch morphology should be included in the risk stratification for hypertension in TS and propose a new quantitative method to express aortic arch morphology.

  4. A case of megadolichobasilar anomaly complicated with abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Sumio; Yamaguchi, Takenori; Ogata, Jun; Ito, Mamoru; Kikuchi, Haruhiko

    1985-01-01

    A 41 year-old hypertensive male was admitted because of progressing left hemiparesis and dysarthria. CT demonstrated hyperdense mass with partial contast enhancement, extending from the level of lower pons to that of suprasellar cistern. Reconstructed imaging of CT showed a huge mass lesion, in which a wide curvilinear hyperdensity was demonstrated by contrast enhancement. Cerebral angiography revealed markedly elongated and dilated basilar and carotid arteries. From these findings, the prepontine hyperdense mass lesion was diagnosed as megadolichobasilar anomaly with marked wall thickening. Findings of abdominal aortic angiography and abdominal CT suggested the presence of marked atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysm with mural thrombi. Six months after initial admission, neurological symptoms gradually deteriorated and CT showed dilatation of the 3rd and lateral ventricles, suggesting the development of hydrocephalus due to compression of the aqueduct by the megadolichobasilar anomaly. Magnetic resonance imaging at this time demonstrated more details of the lesion and the deformity of the brain stem, which was not detected by conventional CT. Complications of vascular anomalies other than intracranial vasculature, such as aortic aneurysm, have also been repoted. After the introduction of CT, demonstration of a long, wide, curvilinear structure with abnormal density in the prepontine region has been reported to be diagnostic for the megadolichobasilar anomaly. This patient has had hypertension for 10 years, which probably due to chronic nephritis. He had no definite findings for angitis, but had abdominal aortic aneurysm with mural thrombi. From these findings, atherosclerosis of large vessels may have played one of the roles in the pathogenesis of this anomaly in the present case. (J.P.N.)

  5. Renal failure caused by a partly calcified aortic aneurysm in a patient with dabigatran therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jud, Philipp; Gary, Thomas; Tiesenhausen, Kurt; Portugaller, Rupert; Hackl, Gerald; Brodmann, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are mostly asymptomatic. If aortic aneurysms become symptomatic, complications include peripheral embolization, acute aortic occlusion, and aortic rupture. However, there are also unusual complications caused by aortic aneurysms. Patient concerns: An 87-old male with dabigatran therapy presented with newly developed melena and acute renal failure. Radiological imaging revealed an AAA with thrombotic and calcified deposits which affected the renal arteries. Diagnoses: Gastrointestinal bleeding and hypercoagulation caused by renal failure which was triggered in turn due to an AAA. Interventions: Adapted antihypertensive therapy and initiation of simvastatin 40mg once daily as well as antiplatelet therapy with aspirin 50 mg once daily due to patient's refusal of any aneurysm intervention. Outcome: Neither bleeding event nor aneurysm rupture occurred with the adapted antihypertensive therapy, simvastatin and aspirin. Lessons: Nonruptured AAAs can cause rare, unusual, and even life-threatening complications depending on their size and anatomical position. PMID:28445318

  6. Endovascular repair of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm: serial changes of periaortic fibrosis demonstrated by CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueyoshi, Eijun; Sakamoto, Ichiro; Uetani, Masataka

    2009-07-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is characterized by inflammatory and/or fibrotic changes in the periaortic regions of the retroperitoneum. Surgical repair is usually selected for this disease. However, the perioperative mortality associated with open surgical repair of IAAs is three times higher than that with noninflammatory aortic aneurysms due to inflammation and periaortic fibrosis (PAF). Endovascular aneurysm repair of IAAs excludes the aneurysm and seems to reduce the size of the aneurysmal sac and the extent of PAF with acceptable peri-interventional and long-term morbidity. We describe the successful endovascular repair of an IAAA and the serial CT findings after repair.

  7. Endoleak, a specific complication of the endovascular treatment of aortic aneurysms

    OpenAIRE

    BRULS, Samuel; CREEMERS, Etienne; TROTTEUR, Geneviève; Firket, Laurent; Chauveau, R.; Magotteaux, Paul; DESIRON, Quentin; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Endoleaks represent the most common complication of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. With the increasing use of endovascular techniques for aortic aneurysm repair, the prevalence of endoleaks has risen. While maintaining pressurization of the aneurysm sac, endoleaks expose to persistent risks of an evolution towards rupture. Long-term surveillance with imaging studies is necessary to reduce the incidence of these specific complications that may require intervention. The objective of this ...

  8. Proteção cerebral no tratamento cirúrgico dos aneurismas do arco aórtico: estudo experimental em cães Cerebral protection during surgical approach to the aortic arch aneurysms resection: experimental study in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaudêncio Lopes Espinosa

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available É realizado estudo experimental comparativo entre dois métodos de proteção cerebral na abordagem cirúrgica dos aneurismas do arco aórtico, avaliando a sua eficácia: hipotermia sistêmica profunda isolada (menor que 20ºC com pinçamento arterial braquiocefálico e hipotermia sistêmica profunda associada à perfusão carotídea seletiva. Dois grupos de 15 cães cada foram submetidos, respectivamente, à hipotermia sistêmica profunda com pinçamento arterial braquiocefálico (Grupo I e à hipotermia sistêmica profunda associada à perfusão seletiva da carótida direita (Grupo II. Foram analisadas amostras seriadas das alterações metabólicas de pH e PaCO2 que ocorreram no retorno venoso cerebral aferidas na veia julgular interna, bem como as alterações histopatológicas encontradas com 45 min., 90 min. e 135 min. de cada procedimento. Os resultados demonstram que, apesar de ambos os métodos de proteção cerebral serem eficazes por um período de 45 minutos, o método utilizado no Grupo II mostrou ser superior em períodos de até 90 minutos de isquemia cerebral. Em períodos de 135 minutos os métodos tiveram resultados semelhantes, não oferecendo proteção cerebral adequada.The authors proposition is to make an experimental study of two methods of cerebral protection to be used during aortic arch aneurysm resection. The methods to be evaluated were profound systemic hypothermia (under 20ºC whith great vessels occlusion and profound systemic hypothermia with selective right carotid artery perfusion. Two groups of 15 dogs each were submitted either to profound systemic hypothermia with great vessels occlusion (Group I, or to profound systemic hypothermia with selective right carotid artery perfusion (Group II. Serial jugular vein samples for pH and PaCO2 were analyzed to evaluate ischemic cerebral metabolic derangements. Hystopathological studies were also performed 45, 90 and 135 minutes, through animal sacrifice in each

  9. Endovascular Repair of Saccular Ascending Aortic Aneurysm After Orthotopic Heart Transplantation Using an Investigational Zenith Ascend Stent-Graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oderich, Gustavo S; Pochettino, Alberto; Mendes, Bernardo C; Roeder, Blayne; Pulido, Juan; Gloviczki, Peter

    2015-08-01

    To report the use of an investigational stent-graft to treat an ascending aortic aneurysm in a patient with a heart transplant. A 48-year-old man presented with a 3.5×1.5-cm saccular aneurysm in the mid anterior ascending aorta, abutting the sternum. The patient's history was notable for placement of a left ventricular assist device followed by orthotopic heart transplantation 2 years prior to treat end-stage familial dilated cardiomyopathy. Under compassionate use, a custom-designed ascending aortic stent-graft (Zenith Ascend) was successfully delivered via an 18-F system and deployed just distal to the origin of the left main coronary artery under pulmonary artery catheter-guided rapid ventricular pacing. The patient was discharged the next day, and 6-month follow-up was unremarkable. Imaging at 5 months showed an excluded aneurysm sac with no endoleak or migration. The ideal ascending aortic stent-graft should be low profile, conformable to the arch anatomy, with short tip delivery system and a stepwise deployment mechanism that allows precise placement relative to the ostia of the coronary arteries and the innominate artery. This case illustrates the advancement of endovascular techniques to the most challenging segment of the aorta to decrease morbidity and mortality in high-risk patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Carotid artery stenting in difficult aortic arch anatomy with or without a new dedicated guiding catheter: preliminary experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbiero, Giulio; Cognolato, Diego; Casarin, Andrea; Stramanà, Rudi; Galzignan, Elisa; Guarise, Alessandro

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate carotid artery stenting (CAS) procedures with or without a new dedicated guiding catheter in anatomically challenging aortic arches in our experience. We retrospectively reviewed 172 procedures of CAS performed from December 2006 to October 2011 in 159 consecutive patients (100 men, mean age 78 years): 15 patients had type III aortic arch, 13 had a bovine aortic arch, 6 had an acute angle at the origin of the left common carotid artery from the aortic arch, 2 had type III aortic arch with bovine aortic arch, and 1 had a bicarotid trunk with an aberrant right subclavian artery. In this group of difficult anatomy (37 cases), CAS was performed with (13 cases) or without (24 cases) a new dedicated guiding catheter. Mean time of fluoroscopy (16 min vs. 18 min, P guiding catheter group. The new dedicated guiding catheter may be more effective and less risky for CAS in anatomically challenging aortic arches. • Complex anatomy of the aortic arch is not rare • Endovascular carotid artery stenting (CAS) is more difficult when the anatomy is complex • A new dedicated guiding catheter may help CAS when the arch anatomy is complex • The new dedicated guiding catheter may be less risky in complex arches.

  11. Elective visceral hybrid repair of type III thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanović Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. According to the classification given by Crawford et al. type III thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA is dilatation of the aorta from the level of the rib 6 to the separation of the aorta below the renal arteries, capturing all the visceral branch of aorta. Visceral hybrid reconstruction of TAAA is a procedure developed in recent years in the world, which involves a combination of conventional, open and endovascular aortic reconstruction surgery at the level of separation of the left subclavian artery to the level of visceral branches of aorta. Case report. We presented a 75-years-old man, with elective visceral hybrid reconstruction of type III TAAA. Computerized scanning (CT angiography of the patient showed type III TAAA with the maximum transverse diameter of aneurysm of 92 mm. Aneurysm started at the level of the sixth rib, and the end of the aneurysm was 1 cm distal to the level of renal arteries. Aneurysm compressed the esophagus, causing the patient difficulty in swallowing act, especially solid food, and frequent back pain. From the other comorbidity, the patient had been treated for a long time, due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hypertension. In general endotracheal anesthesia with epidural analgesia, the patient underwent visceral hybrid reconstruction of TAAA, which combines classic, open vascular surgery and endovascular procedures. Classic vascular surgery is visceral reconstruction using by-pass procedure from the distal, normal aorta to all visceral branches: celiac trunk, superior mesenteric artery and both renal arteries, with ligature of all arteries very close to the aorta. After that, by synchronous endovascular technique a complete aneurysmal exclusion of thoracoabdominal aneurysm with thoracic stent-graft was performed. The postoperative course was conducted properly and the patient left the Clinic for Vascular Surgery on postoperative day 21. Control CT, performed 3 months after the surgery

  12. Surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysms. A survey of 656 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, P S; Schroeder, T; Agerskov, Kim

    1991-01-01

    renal function or chronic pulmonary disease showed an increased perioperative mortality. Development of postoperative cardiac and renal complications could not be related to previous cardiac or renal diseases. The major postoperative complications were renal failure in 81 patients (12%), pulmonary......Between 1979 and 1988, 656 patients were operated upon for abdominal aortic aneurysm. Elective operation was performed in 287 patients (44%) and acute operation in 369 patients. A ruptured aneurysm was found in 218 patients (33%). Patients with arteriosclerotic heart disease, hypertension, impaired...... insufficiency in 77 patients (11%) and cardiac complications in 96 patients (13%). Failure of one or more organs occurred in 153 patients (23%) and the mortality rate for patients with multiorgan failure was 68%. Complications leading to reoperation occurred in 93 patients (14%). The perioperative mortality...

  13. Elective infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair--transperitoneal, retroperitoneal, endovascular?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehling, Bernd M; Orend, Karl Heinz; Sunder-Plassmann, Ludger

    2009-11-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the peri-operative outcome of 210 consecutive patients undergoing elective infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair according to the surgical approach: transperitoneal (TP; 63 patients), retroperitoneal (RP; 81 patients) and endovascular (EV; 66 patients) repair. Concerning gender, AAA diameter and classification of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA score) all groups were comparable; the median age in the EV group was significantly higher (78 years vs. 68 years and 67 years, respectively, P=0.001). Mortality rates were 0% for TP, 1.2% for RP and 3% for EV repair (n.s.). Morbidity rates did not significantly differ between the groups. In specialized centres mortality rates of elective infrarenal aneurysm repair are low - regardless of the surgical approach. In such centres the best treatment options for each patient as to the surgical approach as well as peri-operative management can be provided individually.

  14. Extending Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Detection to Older Age Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makrygiannis, Georgios; Labalue, Philippe; Erpicum, Marie

    2016-01-01

    . Current screening policies (e.g., men aged 65-74 years), however, do not account for aging and increased life expectancy of Western populations. This study investigated AAA detection by extending the target population to older age groups (75-85 years). METHODS: AAA screening was conducted in the County......-74 age group but rose to 7.3% in the age-extended group (75-85 years). Further in addition to age, height, current smoking, history of coronary artery disease, hypercholesterolemia, peripheral artery disease of the lower limbs, and varicose veins were significantly associated with the presence of AAA......BACKGROUND: There is evident benefit in terms of reduced aneurysm-related mortality from screening programs of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in men aged 65 years and more. Recent studies in the United Kingdom and Sweden have shown a decline of the prevalence of AAA in the general population...

  15. Sac Angiography and Glue Embolization in Emergency Endovascular Aneurysm Repair for Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koike, Yuya, E-mail: r06118@hotmail.co.jp; Nishimura, Jun-ichi, E-mail: jun-ichi-n@nifty.com; Hase, Soichiro, E-mail: haseman@hotmail.co.jp; Yamasaki, Motoshige, E-mail: genyamasaki@gmail.com [Kawasaki Saiwai Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to demonstrate a sac angiography technique and evaluate the feasibility of N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) embolization of the ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) sac in emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in hemodynamically unstable patients.MethodsA retrospective case series of three patients in whom sac angiography was performed during emergency EVAR for ruptured AAA was reviewed. After stent graft deployment, angiography within the sac of aneurysm (sac angiography) was performed by manually injecting 10 ml of contrast material through a catheter to identify the presence and site of active bleeding. In two patients, sac angiography revealed active extravasation of the contrast material, and NBCA embolization with a coaxial catheter system was performed to achieve prompt sealing.ResultsSac angiography was successful in all three patients. In the two patients who underwent NBCA embolization for aneurysm sac bleeding, follow-up computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated the accumulation of NBCA consistent with the bleeding site in preprocedural CT images.ConclusionsEVAR is associated with a potential risk of ongoing bleeding from type II or IV endoleaks into the disrupted aneurysm sac in patients with severe coagulopathy. Therefore, sac angiography and NBCA embolization during emergency EVAR may represent a possible technical improvement in the treatment of ruptured AAA in hemodynamically unstable patients.

  16. The pathogenesis shared between abdominal aortic aneurysms and intracranial aneurysms: a microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Li, Hao; Zhao, Zheng; Wang, Haoyuan; Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Yan; Lan, Qing; Wang, Jiangfei; Cao, Yong; Zhao, Jizong

    2018-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) and intracranial saccular aneurysms (IAs) are the most common types of aneurysms. This study was to investigate the common pathogenesis shared between these two kinds of aneurysms. We collected 12 IAs samples and 12 control arteries from the Beijing Tiantan Hospital and performed microarray analysis. In addition, we utilized the microarray datasets of IAs and AAAs from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), in combination with our microarray results, to generate messenger RNA expression profiles for both AAAs and IAs in our study. Functional exploration and protein-protein interaction (PPI) analysis were performed. A total of 727 common genes were differentially expressed (404 was upregulated; 323 was downregulated) for both AAAs and IAs. The GO and pathway analyses showed that the common dysregulated genes were mainly enriched in vascular smooth muscle contraction, muscle contraction, immune response, defense response, cell activation, IL-6 signaling and chemokine signaling pathways, etc. The further protein-protein analysis identified 35 hub nodes, including TNF, IL6, MAPK13, and CCL5. These hub node genes were enriched in inflammatory response, positive regulation of IL-6 production, chemokine signaling pathway, and T/B cell receptor signaling pathway. Our study will gain new insight into the molecular mechanisms for the pathogenesis of both types of aneurysms and provide new therapeutic targets for the patients harboring AAAs and IAs.

  17. Sac Angiography and Glue Embolization in Emergency Endovascular Aneurysm Repair for Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, Yuya; Nishimura, Jun-ichi; Hase, Soichiro; Yamasaki, Motoshige

    2015-01-01

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to demonstrate a sac angiography technique and evaluate the feasibility of N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) embolization of the ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) sac in emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in hemodynamically unstable patients.MethodsA retrospective case series of three patients in whom sac angiography was performed during emergency EVAR for ruptured AAA was reviewed. After stent graft deployment, angiography within the sac of aneurysm (sac angiography) was performed by manually injecting 10 ml of contrast material through a catheter to identify the presence and site of active bleeding. In two patients, sac angiography revealed active extravasation of the contrast material, and NBCA embolization with a coaxial catheter system was performed to achieve prompt sealing.ResultsSac angiography was successful in all three patients. In the two patients who underwent NBCA embolization for aneurysm sac bleeding, follow-up computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated the accumulation of NBCA consistent with the bleeding site in preprocedural CT images.ConclusionsEVAR is associated with a potential risk of ongoing bleeding from type II or IV endoleaks into the disrupted aneurysm sac in patients with severe coagulopathy. Therefore, sac angiography and NBCA embolization during emergency EVAR may represent a possible technical improvement in the treatment of ruptured AAA in hemodynamically unstable patients

  18. Intraoperative Sac Pressure Measurement During Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Hiroyuki; Ishiguchi, Tsuneo; Ohta, Takashi; Sugimoto, Ikuo; Iwata, Hirohide; Yamada, Tetsuya; Tadakoshi, Masao; Hida, Noriyuki; Orimoto, Yuki; Kamei, Seiji

    2010-01-01

    PurposeIntraoperative sac pressure was measured during endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) to evaluate the clinical significance of sac pressure measurement.MethodsA microcatheter was placed in an aneurysm sac from the contralateral femoral artery, and sac pressure was measured during EVAR procedures in 47 patients. Aortic blood pressure was measured as a control by a catheter from the left brachial artery.ResultsThe systolic sac pressure index (SPI) was 0.87 ± 0.10 after main-body deployment, 0.63 ± 0.12 after leg deployment (P < 0.01), and 0.56 ± 0.12 after completion of the procedure (P < 0.01). Pulse pressure was 55 ± 21 mmHg, 23 ± 15 mmHg (P < 0.01), and 16 ± 12 mmHg (P < 0.01), respectively. SPI showed no significant differences between the Zenith and Excluder stent grafts (0.56 ± 0.13 vs. 0.54 ± 0.10, NS). Type I endoleak was found in seven patients (15%), and the SPI decreased from 0.62 ± 0.10 to 0.55 ± 0.10 (P = 0.10) after fixing procedures. Type II endoleak was found in 12 patients (26%) by completion angiography. The SPI showed no difference between type II endoleak positive and negative (0.58 ± 0.12 vs. 0.55 ± 0.12, NS). There were no significant differences between the final SPI of abdominal aortic aneurysms in which the diameter decreased in the follow-up and that of abdominal aortic aneurysms in which the diameter did not change (0.53 ± 0.12 vs. 0.57 ± 0.12, NS).ConclusionsSac pressure measurement was useful for instant hemodynamic evaluation of the EVAR procedure, especially in type I endoleaks. However, on the basis of this small study, the SPI cannot be used to reliably predict sac growth or regression.

  19. Bentall procedure in ascending aortic aneurysm: hospital mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galicia-Tornell, Matilde Myriam; Marín-Solís, Bertha; Fuentes-Orozco, Clotilde; Martínez-Martínez, Manuel; Villalpando-Mendoza, Esteban; Ramírez-Orozco, Fermín

    2010-01-01

    Ascending aortic aneurysm disease (AAAD) shows a low frequency, heterogeneous behavior, high risk of rupture, dissection and mortality, making elective surgery necessary. Several procedures have been developed, and the Bentall technique is considered as the reference standard. The objective was to describe the hospital mortality of AAAD surgically treated using the Bentall procedure. We carried out a descriptive study. Included were 23 patients with AAAD who were operated on between March 1, 2005 and September 30, 2008 at our hospital. Data were obtained from clinical files, and descriptive statistics were selected for analysis. The study population was comprised of 23 patients with an average age of 46 years; 83% were males. Etiology was nonspecific degeneration of the middle layer with valve implication in 43%, bivalve aorta in 22%, Marfan syndrome, Turner's syndrome and poststenotic aneurysms each represented 9%, and Takayasu disease and ankylosing spondylitis 4% each. Associated heart disease was reported in six (26%) patients as follows: aortic coarctation (2), ischemic cardiopathy (1), atrial septal defect (1), severe mitral insufficiency (1) and subaortic membrane (1). Procedures carried out were Bentall surgery in 20 (87%) patients and aortoplasty with valve prosthesis in three (13%) patients. Complications reported were abnormal bleeding with mediastinal exploration (17%), nosocomial pneumonia (13%), arrhythmia (13%), and septic shock (9%). Mortality was reported in three (13%) patients due to septic shock and ventricular fibrillation. Surgical mortality with the Bentall procedure is similar to published results by other specialized centers. Events related to the basic aortic pathology, surgical technique, aortic valve prosthesis and left ventricular dysfunction encourage longterm studies with follow-up.

  20. Antiphospholipid antibodies predict progression of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Duftner

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs frequently occur in autoimmune and cardiovascular diseases and correlate with a worse clinical outcome. In the present study, we evaluated the association between antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs, markers of inflammation, disease progression and the presence of an intra-aneurysmal thrombus in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA patients. APLs ELISAs were performed in frozen serum samples of 96 consecutive AAA patients and 48 healthy controls yielding positive test results in 13 patients (13.5% and 3 controls (6.3%; n.s.. Nine of the 13 aPL-positive AAA patients underwent a second antibody testing >12 weeks apart revealing a positive result in 6 cases. APL-positive patients had increased levels of inflammatory markers compared to aPL-negative patients. Disease progression was defined as an increase of the AAA diameter >0.5 cm/year measured by sonography. Follow-up was performed in 69 patients identifying 41 (59.4% patients with progressive disease. Performing multipredictor logistic regression analysis adjusting for classical AAA risk factors as confounders, the presence of aPLs at baseline revealed an odds ratio of 9.4 (95% CI 1.0-86.8, p = 0.049 to predict AAA progression. Fifty-five patients underwent a computed tomography in addition to ultrasound assessment indicating intra-aneurysmal thrombus formation in 82.3%. Median thrombus volume was 46.7 cm3 (1.9-377.5. AAA diameter correlated with the size of the intra-aneurysmal thrombus (corrcoeff = 0.721, p<0.001, however neither the presence nor the size of the intra-aneurysmal thrombus were related to the presence of aPLs. In conclusion, the presence of aPLs is associated with elevated levels of inflammatory markers and is an independent predictor of progressive disease in AAA patients.

  1. Activation of Endocannabinoid System Is Associated with Persistent Inflammation in Human Aortic Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gestrich, Christopher; Duerr, Georg D; Heinemann, Jan C; Meertz, Anne; Probst, Chris; Roell, Wilhelm; Schiller, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Bindila, Laura; Lutz, Beat; Welz, Armin; Dewald, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Human aortic aneurysms have been associated with inflammation and vascular remodeling. Since the endocannabinoid system modulates inflammation and tissue remodeling, we investigated its components in human aortic aneurysms. We obtained anterior aortic wall samples from patients undergoing elective surgery for aortic aneurysm or coronary artery disease as controls. Histological and molecular analysis (RT-qPCR) was performed, and endocannabinoid concentration was determined using LC-MRM. Patient characteristics were comparable between the groups except for a higher incidence of arterial hypertension and diabetes in the control group. mRNA level of cannabinoid receptors was significantly higher in aneurysms than in controls. Concentration of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol was significantly higher, while the second endocannabinoid anandamide and its metabolite arachidonic acid and palmitoylethanolamide were significantly lower in aneurysms. Histology revealed persistent infiltration of newly recruited leukocytes and significantly higher mononuclear cell density in adventitia of the aneurysms. Proinflammatory environment in aneurysms was shown by significant upregulation of M-CSF and PPARγ but associated with downregulation of chemokines. We found comparable collagen-stained area between the groups, significantly decreased mRNA level of CTGF, osteopontin-1, and MMP-2, and increased TIMP-4 expression in aneurysms. Our data provides evidence for endocannabinoid system activation in human aortic aneurysms, associated with persistent low-level inflammation and vascular remodeling.

  2. Complex aortic and bilateral renal artery aneurysm repair in a young patient with multiple arterial aneurysm syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Hinojosa, MD, MSc

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aneurysmal disease affecting the aorta and visceral vessels in young patients is uncommon and typically associated with connective tissue disorders. We describe the case of a 17-year-old girl who presented with acute onset of abdominal pain; computed tomography scan revealed aortic and bilateral renal artery aneurysms and a perirenal hematoma. She was taken to the angiography suite; rupture of the right renal artery aneurysm was identified and immediately treated successfully with coil embolization. The left renal artery aneurysm was repaired with ex-vivo renal autotransplantation; 2 years later, the aorta and right renal artery underwent surgical reconstruction.

  3. Risk factors for prolonged mechanical ventilation after total aortic arch replacement for acute DeBakey type I aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng-Nan; Chen, Lei; Ge, Yi-Peng; Zhu, Jun-Ming; Liu, Yong-Min; Zheng, Jun; Liu, Wei; Ma, Wei-Guo; Sun, Li-Zhong

    2014-09-01

    EuroSCORE II is an objective risk scoring model. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of EuroSCORE II in the prediction of prolonged mechanical ventilation following total aortic arch replacement for acute DeBakey type I aortic dissection and evaluate the risk factors for prolonged mechanical ventilation. Between February 2009 to February 2012, data from 240 patients who underwent total aortic arch replacement for acute DeBakey type I aortic dissection were collected retrospectively. Mechanical ventilation after the surgery longer than 48 hours was defined as postoperative prolonged mechanical ventilation. EuroSCORE II was applied to predict prolonged mechanical ventilation. A C statistic (receiver operating characteristic curve) was used to test discrimination of the model. Calibration was assessed with a Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit statistic. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify the final risk factors of prolonged mechanical ventilation. The overall mortality was 10%. The mean length of mechanical ventilation after total aortic arch replacement was 42.72 ± 51.45 hours. Total 74 patients needed prolonged mechanical ventilation. EuroSCORE II showed poor discriminatory ability (C statistic 0.52) and calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow, pmechanical ventilation. On multivariate analysis, independent risk factors for postoperative prolonged mechanical ventilation were age ≥ 48.5 years (pmechanical ventilation following total aortic arch replacement for acute DeBakey type I aortic dissection. Preoperative high level of leukocyte, age and surgical period from symptom onset are risk factors for prolonged mechanical ventilation. Copyright © 2014 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Transluminal endovascular stent-graft for the treatment of aortic aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Do Yun; Chang, Byung Chul; Shim, Won Heum; Cho, Seung Yun; Chung, Nam Sik; Kwon, Hyuk Moon; Lee, Young Joon; Lee, Jong Tae

    1995-01-01

    The standard treatment for aortic aneurysms is surgical replacement with a prosthetic graft. Currently there is great interest in endoluminal intervention for treatment of aortic aneurysm. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of endoluminally placed Stent-graft for the treatment of aortic aneurysms. Transluminal endovascular Stent-graft placements were attempted in 9 patients with infra-renal aortic aneurysms(n 6), thoracic aortic aneurysm(n = 1), and aortic dissection(n = 2). The endovascular Stent-grafts were custom-designed for each patient and were constructed of self-expandable modified Gianturco Stents covered with polytetrafluroethylene. The Stent-grafts were introduced through a 16-18 French sheath and expanded to 17-30 mm in diameter. The endovascular therapy was performed using a common femoral artery cutdown with local anesthesia. The endovascular Stent-graft deployment was achieved in 7 of 9 patients. Two cases failed deployment of the Stent-graft due to iliac artery stenosis and tortousity. There were complete thrombosis of the thoracic and infra-renal aortic aneurysm surround the Stent-graft in 3 patients, and persistent leak with partial thrombosis in 2. Two patients with aortic dissection were successfully treated by obliteration of entry tears. There were no major complication associated with Stent-graft placement. These preliminary results show that transluminal endovascular Stent-grafts offer great promise and good results. Further investigation is needed to establish its long-term safety and efficacy

  5. Nursing cooperation in endovascular aneurysm repair treatment for aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Li; Yuan Chanjuan; Chen Rumei; Xiao Zhanqiang; Qi Youfei

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the main points of nursing cooperation in endovascular aneurysm repair treatment for aortic dissection. Methods: Preoperative psychological care and the other preparations were carefully conducted. During the operation, the patient's body was correctly placed. Active cooperation with the performance of angiography and close observation during heparinization were carried out. The proper delivery of catheter and stent to the operator was carefully done. Close observation for the patient's vital signs, the renal function and the changes of limb blood supply were made. Results: Under close cooperation of' the operators, nurses, anesthesiologists and technicians, the surgery was successfully accomplished in 35 patients. The monitoring of vital signs during the entire performance of operation was well executed. No surgical instruments delivery error's or surgery failure due to unsuitable cooperation occurred. Conclusion: Perfect preoperative preparation, strict nursing cooperation and team cooperation are the key points to ensure a successful endovascular aneurysm repair for aortic dissection. (authors)

  6. Influence of atmospheric pressure on infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Nicolas; Frank, Michael; Avenin, Laure; Hemery, Francois; Becquemin, Jean Pierre

    2014-04-01

    Meteorologic conditions have a significant impact on the occurrence of cardiovascular events. Previous studies have shown that abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture (AAAR) may be associated with atmospheric pressure, with conflicting results. Therefore, we aimed to further investigate the nature of the correlation between atmospheric pressure variations and AAAR. Hospital admissions related to AAAR between 2005-2009 were assessed in 19 districts of metropolitan France and correlated with geographically and date-matched mean atmospheric pressures. In parallel and from 2005-2009, all fatal AAARs as reported by death certificates were assessed nationwide and correlated to local atmospheric pressures at the time of aortic rupture. Four hundred ninety-four hospital admissions related to AAAR and 6,358 deaths nationwide by AAAR were identified between 2005-2009. Both in-hospital ruptures and aneurysm-related mortality had seasonal variations, with peak/trough incidences in January and June, respectively. Atmospheric pressure peaks occurred during winter. Univariate analysis revealed a significant association (P atmospheric pressure values and AAAR. After multivariate analysis, mean maximum 1-month prerupture atmospheric pressure had a persistent correlation with both in-hospital relative risk (1.05 [95% confidence interval: 1.03-1.06]; P atmospheric pressure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Statin use and rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wemmelund, H; Høgh, A; Hundborg, H H

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) is associated with high mortality. Research suggests that statins may reduce abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) growth and improve rAAA outcomes. However, the clinical impact of statins remains uncertain in relation to both the risk and prognosis...... drug use, co-morbidities, socioeconomic markers, healthcare contacts and death were obtained from Danish nationwide registries. RESULTS: The study included 3584 cases and 3584 matched controls. Current statin use was registered for 418 patients with rAAA (11.7 per cent) and 539 AAA controls (15.0 per...... cent), corresponding to an age- and sex-matched odds ratio (OR) of 0.70 (95 per cent confidence interval (c.i.) 0.60 to 0.81) for rAAA in current statin users versus never users. The decreased risk of rAAA remained after adjustment for potential confounding factors (adjusted OR 0.73, 0.61 to 0...

  8. Appearance of femoropopliteal segment aneurysms in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksić Milanko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. To promote better treatment outcome, as well as economic benefit it is very important to find out patients with simultaneous occurrence of both aortic and arterial aneurysms. The aim of this prospective study was to determine the frequency and factors affecting femoropopliteal (F-P segment aneurysms appearance in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA. Methods. This study included 70 patients who had underwent elective or urgent surgery of AAA from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2007. After ultrasonographic examination of F-P segment, all the patients were divided into two groups - those with adjunctive F-P segment aneurysm (n = 20 and the group of 50 patients with no adjunctive F-P segment aneurysm. In both groups demographic characteristics (gender, age, risk factors (diabetes mellitus, elevated serum levels of cholesterol and triglycerides, arterial hypertension, smoking, obesity and cardiovascular comorbidity (cerebrovascular desease, ischemic heart desease were investigated. Results. Twenty (28.57% patients who had been operated on because of AAA, had adjunctive aneurysmal desease of F-P segment. Diabetes was no statistically significantly more present among the patients who, beside AAA, had adjunctive aneurismal desease of F-P segment (χ2 = 0.04; DF = 1; p > 0.05. Also, in both groups there was no statistically significant difference in gender structure (χ2 = 2. 05; DF = 2; p > 0.05, age (χ2 = 5. 46; DF = 1; p > 0.05, total cholesterol level (χ2 = 0.89; DF = 1; p > 0.05 and triglyceride (χ2 = 0.89; DF = 1; p > 0.05 levels, the presence of arterial hypertension (χ2 = 1.38; DF = 2; p > 0.05, smoking (χ2 = 1.74; DF = 1; p > 0.05, obesity (χ2 = 1.76; DF = 1; p > 0.05 and presence of cerebrovascular desease (χ2 = 2.34; DF = 1; p > 0.05. Conversly, ischemic heart desease was statistically significantly more present among the patients who, beside AAA, had adjunctive aneurismal desease of F-P segment (χ2 = 5

  9. Orthotopic branched endovascular aortic arch repair in patients who cannot undergo classical surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerny, Martin; Rylski, Bartosz; Morlock, Julia; Schröfel, Holger; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Saint Lebes, Bertrand; Meyrignac, Olivier; Mokrane, Fatima; Lescan, Mario; Schlensak, Christian; Hazenberg, Constatijn; Bloemert-Tuin, Trijntje; Braithwaite, Sue; van Herwaarden, Joost; Rousseau, Herve

    2018-01-16

    Our goal was to assess the results after orthotopic branched endovascular aortic arch repair using a new double-branch endoprosthesis in patients with thoracic aortic disease affecting the aortic arch who cannot undergo classical surgery. Within a 4-year period, 15 patients with thoracic aortic disease affecting the aortic arch were treated with the Bolton Relay plus double-branch endoprosthesis (Bolton Medical, Sunrise, FL, USA). We assessed clinical outcome, occurrence of endoleaks and the need for secondary interventions. The median logistic EuroSCORE I level was 13.6 (4.2; 22.8). The in-hospital mortality rate was 6.7%. A disabling stroke was observed in 1 (6.7%) patient, whereas non-disabling strokes occurred in 2 (13.3%) patients. Type I and III endoleaks occurred in 6.7%. The median follow-up period was 263 (1st quartile 84; 2nd quartile 564) days. Four patients died during the follow-up period. Aortic-related survival was 100%. Orthotopic branched endovascular aortic arch repair using the Bolton Relay Plus double-branch endoprosthesis is a safe and feasible technique enriching the armamentarium to treat patients with thoracic aortic disease who cannot undergo classical surgery. Aortic-related survival is excellent, and the occurrence of disabling stroke and endoleaks warranting treatment is low. Further studies are needed to assess the long-term durability of this new method. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  10. Activation of coagulation and hyperfibrinolysis in patients with aortic arch atheromatosis (Aortic AA) as a risk factor for cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemens, Hans-Joachim G; Mirau, Wladimir; Brueckner, Sabine; Jahn, Juergen; Roth-Isigkeit, Angela; Gutsche, Sven; Mitusch, Rolf; Sheikhzadeh, Abdolhamid

    2005-04-01

    In patients with cerebral ischemia, a frequent finding is atheromatous plaques in the ascending aorta and the aortic arch. Since we were able to demonstrate that patients with atrial fibrillation have an increased coagulatory activity, we wanted to evaluate a potential systemic activation of the coagulatory system in patients with aortic arch atheromatosis (Aortic AA). In 134 consecutive patients, we determined several parameters of the coagulatory and fibrinolytic systems as well as several thrombophilia risk factors and compared the results with 134 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. In 90 of the 134 patients, transesophageal echocardiography showed Aortic AA, and in the remaining 44 patients, there were no aortic findings. The Aortic AA group showed higher concentrations of thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) and plasmin-antiplasmin complexes (PAP). Further division into 4 subgroups of different severity (grade I: no plaques; grade II: plaques 2-5 mm, grade III: plaques > 5 mm, grade IV: mobile plaques), revealed increasing concentrations of fibrinogen, D-dimers and tissue-type plasminogen activator. The grade IV-group displayed the highest values in comparison to all other groups. In conclusion, Aortic AA as such is a risk factor for cerebral ischemia. It causes a systemically detectable activation of coagulation which substantially exceeds the values for controls. This observation is in accordance with our findings in patients with atrial fibrillation.

  11. Contained rupture of a mycotic infrarenal aortic aneurysm infected with Campylobacter fetus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrief, Maria; Déglise, Sébastien; Pezzetta, Edgardo

    2016-01-01

    Mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysms (MAAAs) are rare entities accounting for 0.65–2% of aortic aneurysms. Campylobacter fetus has a tropism for vascular tissue and is a rare cause of mycotic aneurysm. We present a 73-year-old male patient with contained rupture of a MAAA caused by C. fetus, successfully treated with endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) and antibiotics, which is not previously described for this aetiology. Although open surgery is the gold standard, EVAR is nowadays feasible and potentially represents a durable option, especially in frail patients. PMID:27852656

  12. Distribution of Wall Stress in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasheras, Juan

    2005-11-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture is believed to occur when the mechanical stress acting on the wall exceeds the strength of the wall tissue. Therefore, knowledge of the AAA wall stress distribution could be useful in assessing its risk of rupture. In our research, a finite element analysis was used to determine the wall stresses both in idealized models and in a real clinical model in which the aorta was considered isotropic with nonlinear material properties and was loaded with a given pressure. In the idealized models, both maximum diameter and asymmetry were found to have substantial influence on the distribution of the wall stress. The thrombus inside the AAA was also found to help protecting the walls from high stresses. Using CT scans of the AAA, the actual geometry of the aneurysm was reconstructed and we found that wall tension increases on the flatter surface (typically corresponds to the posterior surface) and at the inflection points of the bulge. In addition to the static analysis, we also performed simulations of the effect of unsteady pressure wave propagation inside the aneurysm.

  13. GROWTH OF THE HYPOPLASTIC AORTIC-ARCH AFTER SIMPLE COARCTATION RESECTION AND END-TO-END ANASTOMOSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROUWER, MHJ; CROMMEDIJKHUIS, AH; EBELS, T; EIJGELAAR, A

    Surgical treatment of a hypoplastic aortic arch associated with an aortic coarctation is controversial. The controversy concerns the claimed need to surgically enlarge the diameter of the hypoplastic arch, in addition to resection and end-to-end anastomosis. The purpose of this prospective study is

  14. The surgical anatomy of the left ventricular outflow tract in hearts with ventricular septal defect and aortic arch obstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shiokawa, Y.; Becker, A. E.

    1998-01-01

    Profound understanding of the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) anatomy is crucial to improve surgical results in patients with aortic arch obstruction, ventricular septal defect, and subaortic stenosis. We studied the morphology of the LVOT in 32 postmortem hearts with aortic arch obstruction

  15. Modification of an endovascular stent graft for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloye, Olajompo Busola

    Endovascular surgery is currently used to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). A stent graft is deployed to exclude blood flow from the aneurysm sac. It is an effective procedure used in preventing aneurysm rupture, with reduced patient morbidity and mortality compared to open surgical repair. Migration and leakage around the device ("endoleak") due to poor sealing of the stent graft to the aorta have raised concerns about the long-term durability of endovascular repair. A preliminary study of cell migration and proliferation is presented as a prelude to a more extensive in vivo testing. A method to enhance the biological seal between the stent graft and the aorta is proposed to eliminate this problem. This can be achieved by impregnating the stent graft with 50/50 poly (DL-lactide co glycolic acid) (PLGA) and growth factors such as basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) or connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), at the proximal and distal ends. It is hypothesized that as PLGA degrades it will release the growth factors that will promote proliferation and migration of aortic smooth muscle cells to the coated site, leading to a natural seal between the aorta and the stent graft. In addition, growth factor release should promote smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction that will help keep the stent graft in place at the proximal and distal ends. It is shown that a statistically significant effect of increased cell proliferation and migration is observed for CTGF release. Less of an effect is noted for bFGF or just the PLGA. The effect is estimated to be large enough to be clinically significant in a future animal study. The long term goal of this study is to reduce migration encounter after graft deployment and to reduce secondary interventions of EVAR especially for older patients who are unfit for open surgical treatment.

  16. Anatomic variations of the branches of the aortic arch in a Peruvian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huapaya, Julio Arturo; Chávez-Trujillo, Kristhy; Trelles, Miguel; Dueñas Carbajal, Roy; Ferrandiz Espadin, Renato

    2015-07-31

    Previous publications from two countries in South America found one anatomical variation not previously reported in the rest of the world, which in turn give some clues with regard to a racial difference. The objective of the present study is to describe variations in the anatomical distribution of the branches of the aortic arch in a Peruvian population. To describe variations in the anatomical distribution of the branches of the aortic arch in a Peruvian population. A descriptive study of patients who underwent a tomography angiography of the aorta was performed. We analyzed the reports that showed the description of the variations of the branches of the aortic arch based on the eight types currently described in the literature. From 361 analyzed reports, 282 patients (78.12%) had a normal aortic arch configuration (type I; aortic arch gives rise to the brachiocephalic trunk, left common carotid and left subclavian arteries); followed by type II (left common carotid artery as a branch of the aorta) with 41 patients (11.36%); and type IX (common ostium for the brachiocephalic trunk and the left common carotid artery) with 25 patients (6.93%). The latter and two other types are new variations. Aortic Arch Type I, Type II and Type IX were the most frequent variations in this Peruvian study. Additionally, we also found two more new types that have not been previously described in the literature. Further investigation regarding these variations is needed in order to assess a racial factor in South America and possible relationships with clinical or surgical events.

  17. The influence of atmospheric pressure on aortic aneurysm rupture--is the diameter of the aneurysm important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanek, Tomasz; Juśko, Maciej; Niewiem, Alfred; Kuczmik, Wacław; Ziaja, Damian; Ziaja, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    The rate of aortic aneurysm rupture correlates with the aneurysm's diameter, and a higher rate of rupture is observed in patients with larger aneurysms. According to the literature, contradictory results concerning the relationship between atmospheric pressure and aneurysm size have been reported. In this paper, we assessed the influence of changes in atmospheric pressure on abdominal aneurysm ruptures in relationship to the aneurysm's size. The records of 223 patients with ruptured abdominal aneurysms were evaluated. All of the patients had been admitted to the department in the period 1997-2007 from the Silesia region. The atmospheric pressures on the day of the rupture and on the days both before the rupture and between the rupture events were compared. The size of the aneurysm was also considered in the analysis. There were no statistically significant differences in pressure between the days of rupture and the remainder of the days within an analysed period. The highest frequency of the admission of patients with a ruptured aortic aneurysm was observed during periods of winter and spring, when the highest mean values of atmospheric pressure were observed; however, this observation was not statistically confirmed. A statistically non-significant trend towards the higher rupture of large aneurysms (> 7 cm) was observed in the cases where the pressure increased between the day before the rupture and the day of the rupture. This trend was particularly pronounced in patients suffering from hypertension (p = 0.1). The results of this study do not support the hypothesis that there is a direct link between atmospheric pressure values and abdominal aortic aneurysm ruptures.

  18. Genetic analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St. Jean, P.L.; Hart, B.K.; Zhang, X.C. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The association between AAA and gender, smoking (SM), hypertension (HTN) and inguinal herniation (IH) was examined in 141 AAA probands and 139 of their 1st degree relatives with aortic exam (36 affected, 103 unaffected). There was no significant difference between age at diagnosis of affecteds and age at exam of unaffecteds. Of 181 males, 142 had AAA; of 99 females, 35 had AAA. Using log-linear modeling AAA was significantly associated at the 5% level with gender, SM and HTN but not IH. The association of AAA with SM and HTN held when males and females were analyzed separately. HTN was -1.5 times more common in both affected males and females, while SM was 1.5 and 2 times more common in affected males and females, respectively. Tests of association and linkage analyses were performed with relevant candidate genes: 3 COL3A1 polymorphisms (C/T, ALA/THR, AvaII), 2 ELN polymorphisms (SER/GLY, (CA)n), FBN1(TAAA)n, 2 APOB polymorphisms (Xbal,Ins/Del), CLB4B (CA)n, PI and markers D1S243 (CA)n, HPR (CA)n and MFD23(CA)n. The loci were genotyped in > 100 AAA probands and > 95 normal controls. No statistically significant evidence of association at the 5% level was obtained for any of the loci using chi-square test of association. 28 families with 2 or more affecteds were analyzed using the affected pedigree member method (APM) and lod-score analyses. There was no evidence for linkage with any loci using APM. Lod-score analysis under an autosomal recessive model resulted in excluding linkage (lod score < -2) of all loci to AAA at {theta}=0.0. Under an autosomal dominant model, linkage was excluded at {theta}=0.0 to ELN, APOB, CLG4B, D1S243, HPR and MFD23. The various genes previously proposed in AAA pathogenesis are neither associated nor casually related in our study population.

  19. Interrupted aortic arch type B in A patient with cat eye syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belangero, Sintia Iole Nogueira; Bellucco, Fernanda Teixeira da Silva; Cernach, Mirlene C S P; Hacker, April M; Emanuel, Beverly S; Melaragno, Maria Isabel

    2009-05-01

    We report a patient with cat eye syndrome and interrupted aortic arch type B, a typical finding in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Chromosomal analysis and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) showed a supernumerary bisatellited isodicentric marker chromosome derived from chromosome 22. The segment from 22pter to 22q11.2 in the supernumerary chromosome found in our patient does not overlap with the region deleted in patients with the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. However, the finding of an interrupted aortic arch type B is unusual in CES, although it is a frequent heart defect in the 22q11 deletion syndrome.

  20. Cardiogenic shock due to coronary artery disease associated with interrupted aortic arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Alberto Oliveira Dallan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute pulmonary edema is a serious event. Its occurrence in association with interrupted aortic arch and coronary heart disease is rare. Recently, an old patient developed cardiogenic shock and acute pulmonary edema due to acute coronary insufficiency, associated with interrupted aortic arch. The coronary angiography revealed occlusion of the right coronary artery and 95% obstruction in the left main coronary artery, associated with interruption of the descending aorta. Coronary artery bypass graft was performed, without extracorporeal circulation, to the anterior descending coronary artery. We discuss the initial management, given the seriousness of the case.

  1. Adjusted Hospital Outcomes of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Surgery Reported in the Dutch Surgical Aneurysm Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lijftogt, N; Vahl, A C; Wilschut, E D; Elsman, B H P; Amodio, S; van Zwet, E W; Leijdekkers, V J; Wouters, M W J M; Hamming, J F

    2017-04-01

    The Dutch Surgical Aneurysm Audit (DSAA) is mandatory for all patients with primary abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) in the Netherlands. The aims are to present the observed outcomes of AAA surgery against the predicted outcomes by means of V-POSSUM (Vascular-Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the enUmeration of Mortality and Morbidity). Adjusted mortality was calculated by the original and re-estimated V(physiology)-POSSUM for hospital comparisons. All patients operated on from January 2013 to December 2014 were included for analysis. Calibration and discrimination of V-POSSUM and V(p)-POSSUM was analysed. Mortality was benchmarked by means of the original V(p)-POSSUM formula and risk-adjusted by the re-estimated V(p)-POSSUM on the DSAA. In total, 5898 patients were included for analysis: 4579 with elective AAA (EAAA) and 1319 with acute abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAAA), acute symptomatic (SAAA; n = 371) or ruptured (RAAA; n = 948). The percentage of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) varied between hospitals but showed no relation to hospital volume (EAAA: p = .12; AAAA: p = .07). EAAA, SAAA, and RAAA mortality was, respectively, 1.9%, 7.5%, and 28.7%. Elective mortality was 0.9% after EVAR and 5.0% after open surgical repair versus 15.6% and 27.4%, respectively, after AAAA. V-POSSUM overestimated mortality in most EAAA risk groups (p high risk groups, and underestimated in low risk groups (p Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Prenatal ultrasonic diagnosis and differential diagnosis of isolated right aortic arch with mirror-image branching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Junxue; Zhu, Jiaan; Pei, Qiuyan; Li, Jianguo

    2017-05-01

    This study sought to evaluate the fetal echocardiography features of isolated right aortic arch (RAA) with mirror-image branching and to improve the rate and accuracy of prenatal diagnosis of this condition. We reviewed fetal echocardiograms from all cases of isolated RAA with mirror-image branching diagnosed at our institution between August 2012 and December 2015 and classified these cases into normal and abnormal types of ductus arteriosus based on the course of the arterial duct arch. We confirmed the diagnoses by postnatal echocardiography. A total of 11 cases of isolated RAA with mirror-image branching, with the left ductus and the descending aorta located on the left side of the spine, were diagnosed using fetal echocardiography. Ten cases involved normal ductus arteriosus, with the left ductus connecting the left pulmonary artery to the descending aorta, five of which were referred to our institution for suspicions of double aortic aorta. 1 case involved abnormal ductus arteriosus, with the left ductus connecting the left pulmonary artery to the left innominate artery. RAA with mirror-image branching can be detected via fetal echocardiography, which can reveal the relationship between of the aortic arch and the trachea and can enable the identification of the course of brachiocephalic branching. The identification of isolated RAA with mirror-image branching is crucial for distinguishing this condition from other types of aortic arch anomalies, particularly double aortic aorta, which can have a rather different prognosis.

  3. Common presentation of rare diseases: Aortic aneurysms & valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbustini, Eloisa; Favalli, Valentina; Di Toro, Alessandro; Giuliani, Lorenzo; Limongelli, Giuseppe

    2018-04-15

    The concept "common presentation of rare diseases" implies that rare diseases are masked by common phenotypic manifestations. This concept applies to both aneurysmal and valvular diseases that can be syndromic and non-syndromic. Syndromic disorders include genetic connective tissue diseases and chromosomal disorders that are diagnosed independently from the aneurysm or valve disease. Non-syndromic diseases, on the other hand, are defined by the presence of aneurysm or valve disease or both. The reasons for suspecting these rare diseases include young age, the absence of risk factors, a positive family history for aortic or valvular disease/event, and extra-cardiovascular traits for syndromes. The probands should receive genetic counseling, genetic testing [single gene in case of precise phenotyping addressing the gene to be tested, or multigene panels, in case of diseases with genetic heterogeneity], post-test counseling, clinical family screening and cascade genetic testing in relatives after the identification of a causative mutation. Segregation studies are essential in case of novel mutations, in particular non-truncation predicting variants. Clinical family screening of syndromic diseases is facilitated by the evaluation of non-cardiovascular traits; this supports early diagnosis and geno-phenotype correlation. Vice versa, family screening studies in non-syndromic aneurysmal and valvular diseases exclusively relies on CV imaging screening of relatives. In this context, conditions such as BAV and related aortopathy are easy to diagnose because BAV is present at birth while aortopathy usually develops during the life course. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Invasive aspergillosis in the aortic arch with infectious Aspergillus lesions in pulmonary bullae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isao Watanabe

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A patient with pulmonary bullae died of massive hemoptysis. At autopsy a hole was observed in the aortic wall. A microscopic examination indicated small Aspergillus lesions in pulmonary bullae and extensive necrotic lesions with Aspergillus hyphae in the media of the thoracic aorta. These findings led to a diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis in the aortic arch. This is a rare case in which Aspergillus invaded the aorta in a patient without hematologic neoplasms or neutropenia.

  5. A new technique for interrupted aortic arch repair: the Neville tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergoënd, Eric; Bouissou, Antoine; Paoli, Florent; Roullet-Renoleau, Nicolas; Duchalais, Alain; Neville, Paul

    2010-10-01

    We have developed a new technique for interrupted aortic arch repair in which the pulmonary artery anterior wall is cut off and tailored so as to re-establish aortic continuity with an autologous tube. We are describing this method herein, with an 8-year follow-up of the first patient. Copyright © 2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Aorfix™ device for abdominal aortic aneurysm with challenging anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbarzaglia, P; Grattoni, C; Oshoala, K; Castriota, F; D'Alessandro, G; Cremonesi, A

    2014-02-01

    Anatomical characteristics of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are the most critical factors for successful endovascular aortic repair (EVAR). Of these, severe proximal aortic neck angulation and iliac axis tortuosity increase the complexity of EVAR. Neck angulation seems to have a pivotal potential for fixation failure, a situation that may lead to complications, including endoleak and late rupture. Bench-test studies identified that the relative stiffness of a stent-graft was responsible for its inability to conform to neck angulation, therefore creating leaks through gaps between the stent graft and the neck. Aorfix™ stent graft (Lombard Medical, Didcot, UK) is a flexible stent-graft designed and manufactured with the purpose of overcoming the issue of stent-graft stiffness. Many studies have shown good results in term of procedural success and mid-term type-I endoleak. PYTHAGORAS trial evaluated mainly patients with highly angulated infrarenal neck and showed that high performance of Aorfix™ stent graft did not present any significant difference between neck >60° and <60°. In the series of 27 patients treated at our Institution we had a primary technical success of 96.3% and an assisted primary technical success of 100%. In this review we will analyze the available data in literature regarding Aorfix™ stent graft and will discuss the outcome of the patients treated with Aorfix™ stent graft at our centre.

  7. Analysis of blood flow patterns in aortic aneurysm by cine magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Hiroshi

    1993-01-01

    Cine MRI (0.5 T) using rephased gradient echo technique was performed to study the patterns of blood flow in the aortic aneurysm of 16 patients with aortic aneurysm, and the data were compared with those of 5 healthy volunteers. In the transaxial section, the blood flow in normal aorta appeared as homogeneous high intensity during systole. On the other hand, the blood flow in the aneurysm appeared as inhomogeneous flow enhancement with flow void. In the sagittal scan, the homogeneous flow enhancement in a normal aorta was also observed during systole and its apex of flow enhancement was 'taper'. The blood flow patterns in the aneurysm were classified as 'irregular', 'zonal', 'eddy', and 'obscure' depending on the contrast of flow enhancement and flow void. Their apexes were 'taper' or 'round'. The blood flow patterns in the aneurysm were related to the size of aneurysm. In patients with a large size 'aneurysm, their flow patterns were 'eddy' or 'obscure' and the flow enhancement was 'round'. On the other hand, in patients with a small size aneurysm, their flow patterns were 'irregular' or 'zonal', and their flow enhancement was 'taper'. Though the exact mechanism of abnormal flow patterns in an aortic aneurysm remains to be determined, cine MRI gives helpful informations in assessing blood flow dynamics in the aneurysm. (author)

  8. Clinical and genetic aspects of Marfan syndrome and familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst-Hofstee, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    This thesis concerns the clinical and genetic aspects of familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections, in particular in Marfan syndrome. It includes the Dutch multidisciplinary guidelines for diagnosis and management of Marfan syndrome. These guidelines contain practical directions for

  9. Fatal late multiple emboli after endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Sandermann, Jes; Bruun-Petersen, J

    1998-01-01

    The short term experience of endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) seems promising but long term randomised data are lacking. Consequently, cases treated by endovascular procedures need to be closely followed for potential risks and benefits....

  10. Reproducibility of ECG-gated Ultrasound Diameter Assessment of Small Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredahl, K; Eldrup, N; Meyer, C

    2013-01-01

    No standardised ultrasound procedure to obtain reliable growth estimates for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is currently available. We investigated the feasibility and reproducibility of a novel approach controlling for a combination of vessel wall delineation and cardiac cycle variation....

  11. Abdominal aortic aneurysm screening during transthoracic echocardiography in an unselected population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, Sebastiaan C. A. M.; Habets, Jos H. M.; Cheriex, E. C.; Palmans, Andrea; Pinto, Yigal; Hofstra, Leo; Crijns, Harry J. G. M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We sought to investigate the echocardiographic prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in an unselected group of patients referred for regular transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). METHODS: Prospectively, during a 3-month period, a limited ultrasound examination of the infrarenal

  12. Daily diurnal variation in admissions for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, Shane

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Many vascular events, such as myocardial infarction and cerebrovascular accident, demonstrate a circadian pattern of presentation. Blood pressure is intimately related to these pathologies and is the one physiological variable consistently associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture. It also demonstrates a diurnal variation. The purpose of this study was to determine if rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA) exhibits a diurnal variation. METHODS: A retrospective cohort-based study was performed to determine the timing of presentation of RAAA to the vascular unit of Cork University Hospital over a 15-year period. Time of admission, symptom onset, and co-morbidities such as hypertension were noted. Fournier\\'s analysis and chi-squared analysis were performed. To ameliorate possible confounding factors, patients admitted with perforated peptic ulcers were examined in the same manner. RESULTS: A total of 148 cases of RAAA were identified, with a male preponderance (71.7% [124] male versus 29.3% [44] female patients) and a mean age of 74.4 +\\/- 7.2 years at presentation. 70.9% (105) were known to have hypertension, 52.2% (77) were current smokers, and 46.8% (69) were being treated for chronic obstructive airway disease (COAD). Time of symptom onset was recorded in 88.5% (131) of patients. There was a marked early morning peak in RAAA admissions, with the highest number of RAAA being admitted between 08.00 and 09.59. A second, smaller peak was observed at 14.00-15.59. These findings were suggestive of diurnal variation. [chi(2) =16.75, p < 0.003]. Some 40% (59) of patients were admitted between 00.00 and 06.00, an incidence significantly higher than for other time periods (06.00-12.00, 12.00-18.00, and 18.00-24.00) [chi(2) = 18.72; df = 3; p < 0.0003]. A significantly higher number of patients admitted between 00.00 and 06.00 were known hypertensives (chi(2) = 7.94; p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study suggest a distinct

  13. Fatal late multiple emboli after endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Sandermann, Jes; Bruun-Petersen, J

    1998-01-01

    The short term experience of endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) seems promising but long term randomised data are lacking. Consequently, cases treated by endovascular procedures need to be closely followed for potential risks and benefits.......The short term experience of endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) seems promising but long term randomised data are lacking. Consequently, cases treated by endovascular procedures need to be closely followed for potential risks and benefits....

  14. Diagnostic value of ultrasound, computed tomography, and angiography in ruptured aortic aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landtman, M.; Kivisaari, L.; Bondestam, S.; Taavitsainen, M.; Standertskjoeld-Nordenstam, C.G.; Somer, K.

    1984-11-01

    Some ruptural aneurysms cause nonspecific symptoms and the patients are referred for radiological examination because of the problems of differential diagnosis from conditions such as renal colic, diverticulitis, herniated disc, aortic dissection etc. Seven such patients have been examined either with ultrasonography, computed tomography or angiography. The diagnostic methods are compared. The more recent US and CT imaging methods are sufficiently rapid and reliable for diagnostic purposes, which should improve the prognosis for patients requiring immediate surgery for ruptured aortic aneurysms.

  15. Upper gastrointestinal obstruction secondary to aortoduodenal syndrome owing to a noninflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahill, Kevin

    2012-01-31

    Aortoduodenal syndrome is a rare complication of an abdominal aortic aneurysm wherein the aneurysm sac obstructs the patient\\'s duodenum. It presents with the symptoms of an upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction and requires surgical intervention to relieve it. Previously, gastric bypass surgery was advocated, but now aortic replacement is the mainstay of treatment. We report a case of a 67-year-old woman whose aortoduodenal syndrome was successfully managed and review the literature on this topic.

  16. Plasma cathepsin S and cystatin C levels and risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lv, Bing-Jie; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Cheng, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) lesions contain high levels of cathepsin S (CatS), but are deficient in its inhibitor, cystatin C. Whether plasma CatS and cystatin C levels are also altered in AAA patients remains unknown.......Human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) lesions contain high levels of cathepsin S (CatS), but are deficient in its inhibitor, cystatin C. Whether plasma CatS and cystatin C levels are also altered in AAA patients remains unknown....

  17. Acute Contained Ruptured Aortic Aneurysm Presenting as Left Vocal Fold Immobility

    OpenAIRE

    Gnagi, Sharon H.; Howard, Brittany E.; Hoxworth, Joseph M.; Lott, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To recognize intrathoracic abnormalities, including expansion or rupture of aortic aneurysms, as a source of acute onset vocal fold immobility. Methods. A case report and review of the literature. Results. An 85-year-old female with prior history of an aortic aneurysm presented to a tertiary care facility with sudden onset hoarseness. On laryngoscopy, the left vocal fold was immobile in the paramedian position. A CT scan obtained that day revealed a new, large hematoma surrounding ...

  18. Diagnostic value of ultrasound, computed tomography, and angiography in ruptured aortic aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landtman, M.; Kivisaari, L.; Bondestam, S.; Taavitsainen, M.; Standertskjoeld-Nordenstam, C.G.; Somer, K.

    1984-01-01

    Some ruptural aneurysms cause nonspecific symptoms and the patients are referred for radiological examination because of the problems of differential diagnosis from conditions such as renal colic, diverticulitis, herniated disc, aortic dissection etc. Seven such patients have been examined either with ultrasonography, computed tomography or angiography. The diagnostic methods are compared. The more recent US and CT imaging methods are sufficiently rapid and reliable for diagnostic purposes, which should improve the prognosis for patients requiring immediate surgery for ruptured aortic aneurysms. (orig.)

  19. Aortic Endoprosthesis for the Treatment of Native Aortic Coarctation and Concomitant Aneurysm in an Octogenarian Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabellino, Martín; Kotowicz, Vadim; Kenny, Alberto; Kohan, Andres Alejandro; García-Mónaco, Ricardo

    2015-11-01

    We report a case of an 82-year-old female patient with native coarctation of the aorta and poststenotic aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta. On consultation, she was receiving 4 antihypertensive drugs, and physical examination revealed nonpalpable lower-limb pulses with intermittent claudication at 50 min. Because of her age, high surgical risk and combination of lesions, endovascular treatment was suggested. Placement of a Valiant thoracic aorta endoprosthesis followed by coarctation angioplasty was performed. At 48 hr, the patient was discharged on 1 antihypertensive drug, palpable pulses on both limbs and a normal ankle-brachial index. At 1 month follow-up, the patient remained as discharged and multislice computed tomography angiography depicted complete coarctation expansion without residual stenosis, exclusion of the aortic aneurysm, and no signs of endoleaks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Visceral hybrid reconstruction of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm after open repair of type a aortic dissection by the Bentall procedure with the elephant trunk technique: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanović Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Reconstruction of chronic type B dissection and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA remaining after the emergency reconstruction of the ascending thoracic aorta and aortic arch for acute type A dissection represents one of the major surgical challenges. Complications of chronic type B dissection are aneurysmal formation and rupture of an aortic aneurysm with a high mortality rate. We presented a case of visceral hybrid reconstruction of TAAA secondary to chronic dissection type B after the Bentall procedure with the elephant trunk technique due to acute type A aortic dissection in a high-risk patient. Case report. A 62 year-old woman was admitted to our institution for reconstruction of Crawford type I TAAA secondary to chronic dissection. The patient had had an acute type A aortic dissection 3 years before and undergone reconstruction by the Bentall procedure with the elephant trunk technique with valve replacement. On admission the patient had coronary artery disease (myocardial infarction, two times in the past 3 years, congestive heart disease with ejection fraction of 25% and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. On computed tomography (CT of the aorta TAAA was revealed with a maximum diameter of 93 mm in the descending thoracic aorta secondary to chronic dissection. All the visceral arteries originated from the true lumen with exception of the celiac artery (CA, and the end of chronic dissection was below the origin of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA. The patient was operated on using surgical visceral reconstruction of the SMA, CA and the right renal artery (RRA as the first procedure. Postoperative course was without complications. Endovascular TAAA reconstruction was performed as the second procedure one month later, when the elephant trunk was used as the proximal landing zone for the endograft, and distal landing zone was the level of origin of the RRA. Postoperatively, the patient had no neurological deficit and

  1. Segmentation and motion estimation of stent grafts in abdominal aortic aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Almar

    2011-01-01

    Patients with an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm have a high risk of dying due to the rupture of a dilated aorta. Endovascular aneurysm repair is a technique to threat AAA, by which a stent graft prosthesis is implanted in the aorta of the patient. Due to its minimal invasive character, this intervention

  2. Emergency abdominal aortic aneurysm repair with a preferential endovascular strategy : Mortality and cost-effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapma, Marten R.; Groen, Henk; Oranen, Bjorn I.; van der Hilst, Christian S.; Tielliu, Ignace F.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Prins, Ted R.; van den Dungen, Jan J.; Verhoeven, Eric L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess mortality and treatment costs of a new management protocol with preferential use of emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (eEVAR) for acute abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Methods: From September 2003 until February 2005, 49 consecutive patients (45 men; mean age 71 years) with

  3. Relationships between activators and inhibitors of plasminogen, and the progression of small abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Jørgensen, B; Shi, G-P

    2003-01-01

    plasmin is a common activator of the known proteolytic systems involved in the aneurysmal degradation, and is reported to be associated with the expansion of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). The aim of this study was to study the activating pathways of plasminogen as predictors of the progression...

  4. Collected world and single center experience with endovascular treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veith, F.J.; Lachat, M.; Mayer, D.; Malina, M.; Holst, J.; Mehta, M.; Verhoeven, E.L.; Larzon, T.; Gennai, S.; Coppi, G.; Lipsitz, E.C.; Gargiulo, N.J.; Vliet, J.A. van der; Blankensteijn, J.D.; Buth, J.; Lee, W.A.; Biasiol, G.; Deleo, G.; Kasirajan, K.; Moore, R.; Soong, C.V.; Cayne, N.S.; Farber, M.A.; Raithel, D.; Greenberg, R.K.; Sambeek, M.R. van; Brunkwall, J.S.; Rockman, C.B.; Hinchliffe, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Case and single center reports have documented the feasibility and suggested the effectiveness of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (RAAAs), but the role and value of such treatment remain controversial. OBJECTIVE: To clarify these we examined a

  5. Collected World and Single Center Experience With Endovascular Treatment of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veith, Frank J.; Lachat, Mario; Mayer, Dieter; Malina, Martin; Holst, Jan; Mehta, Manish; Verhoeven, Eric L. G.; Larzon, Thomas; Gennai, Stefano; Coppi, Gioacchino; Lipsitz, Evan C.; Gargiulo, Nicholas J.; van der Vliet, J. Adam; Blankensteijn, Jan; Buth, Jacob; Lee, W. Anthony; Biasi, Giorgio; Deleo, Gaetano; Kasirajan, Karthikeshwar; Moore, Randy; Soong, Chee V.; Cayne, Neal S.; Farber, Mark A.; Raithel, Dieter; Greenberg, Roy K.; van Sambeek, Marc R. H. M.; Brunkwall, Jan S.; Rockman, Caron B.; Hinchliffe, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Case and single center reports have documented the feasibility and suggested the effectiveness of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (RAAAs), but the role and value of such treatment remain controversial. Objective: To clarify these we examined a

  6. HAS-1 genetic polymorphism in sporadic abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Balbarini

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The hyaluronan synthase 1 (HAS-1 gene encodes a plasma membrane protein that synthesizes hyaluronan (HA, an extracellular matrix molecule. Accumulating evidence emphasizes the relevance of HA metabolism in an increasing number of processes of clinical interest, including abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. The existence of aberrant splicing variants of the HAS-1 gene could partly explain the altered extracellular matrix architecture and influence various biological functions, resulting in progressive arterial wall failure in the development of AAA. In the present study, we assessed the hypothesis that HAS-1 genetic 833A/G polymorphism could be associated with the risk of AAA by performing a case-control association study, involving AAA patients and healthy matched donors.

  7. Animal Models Used to Explore Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysgaard Poulsen, J; Stubbe, J; Lindholt, J S

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Experimental animal models have been used to investigate the formation, development, and progression of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) for decades. New models are constantly being developed to imitate the mechanisms of human AAAs and to identify treatments that are less risky than...... those used today. However, to the authors' knowledge, there is no model identical to the human AAA. The objective of this systematic review was to assess the different types of animal models used to investigate the development, progression, and treatment of AAA and to highlight their advantages...... and limitations. METHODS: A search protocol was used to perform a systematic literature search of PubMed and Embase. A total of 2,830 records were identified. After selection of the relevant articles, 564 papers on animal AAA models were included. RESULTS: The most common models in rodents, including elastase...

  8. Atmospheric pressure variations and abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, S D

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA) presents with increased frequency in the winter and spring months. Seasonal changes in atmospheric pressure mirrors this pattern. AIM: To establish if there was a seasonal variation in the occurrence of RAAA and to determine if there was any association with atmospheric pressure changes. METHODS: A retrospective cohort-based study was performed. Daily atmospheric pressure readings for the region were obtained. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant monthly variation in RAAA presentation with 107 cases (52.5%) occurring from November to March. The monthly number of RAAA and the mean atmospheric pressure in the previous month were inversely related (r = -0.752, r (2) = 0.566, P = 0.03), and there was significantly greater daily atmospheric pressure variability on days when patients with RAAA were admitted. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest a relationship between atmospheric pressure and RAAA.

  9. Aortic aneurysm and craniosynostosis in a family with Cantu syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraki, Yoko; Miyatake, Satoko; Hayashidani, Michiko; Nishimura, Yutaka; Matsuura, Hiroo; Kamada, Masahiro; Kawagoe, Takuji; Yunoki, Keiji; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Yofune, Hiroko; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Satisu, Hirotomo; Murakami, Akira; Miyake, Noriko; Nishimura, Gen; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2014-01-01

    Cantu syndrome is an autosomal dominant overgrowth syndrome associated with facial dysmorphism, congenital hypertrichosis, and cardiomegaly. Some affected individuals show bone undermodeling of variable severity. Recent investigations revealed that the disorder is caused by a mutation in ABCC9, encoding a regulatory SUR2 subunit of an ATP-sensitive potassium channel mainly expressed in cardiac and skeletal muscle as well as vascular smooth muscle. We report here on a Japanese family with this syndrome. An affected boy and his father had a novel missense mutation in ABCC9. Each patient had a coarse face and hypertrichosis. However, cardiomegaly was seen only in the boy, and macrosomia only in the father. Skeletal changes were not evident in either patient. Craniosynostosis in the boy and the development of aortic aneurysm in the father are previously undescribed associations with Cantu syndrome. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Right-sided aortic arch with anomalous origin of the left subclavian artery: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučurević Goran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A right-sided aortic arch is a rare congenital defect of the aorta with incidence of 0.05% to 0.1% reported in published series. Usually it is associated with congenital heart anomalies and esophageal and tracheal compression symptoms. We present a case of a right-sided aortic arch of anomalous left subclavian artery origin, accidentally revealed during multislice CT (MSCT supraaortic branches angiography. Case Outline. A 53-year-old female patient was examined at the Outpatients’ Unit of the Vascular Surgery University Clinic for vertigo, occasional dizziness and difficulty with swallowing. Physical examination revealed a murmur of the left supraclavicular space, with 15 mmHg lower rate of arterial tension on the left arm. Ultrasound of carotid arteries revealed 60% stenosis of the left subclavian artery and bilateral internal carotid artery elongation. MSCT angiography revealed a right-sided aortic arch with aberrant separation of the left subclavian artery that was narrowed 50%, while internal carotid arteries were marginally elongated. There was no need for surgical treatment or percutaneous interventions, so that conservative treatment was indicated. Conclusion. A right-sided aortic arch is a very rare anomaly of the location and branching of the aorta. Multislice CT angiography is of great importance in the diagnostics of this rare disease.

  11. Abnormal pulmonary vein drainage in upper right lobe associated with double aortic arch : magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busto, M.; Dolz, J.L.; Capdevilla, A.; Castanon, M.; Mulet, J.

    1997-01-01

    We present the magnetic resonance (MR) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) findings in a case of abnormal pulmonary vein drainage from upper right lobe to superior vena cava, associated with double aortic arch, in a six-month-old boy. (Author) 9 refs

  12. [Antegrade unilateral perfusion of the brain through the brachiocephalic trunk in operations on the aortic arch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, B N; Panfilov, D S; Kuznetsov, M S; Ponomarenko, I V; Nasrashvili, G G; Shipulin, V M

    2016-01-01

    Presented herein is a technique of unilateral antegrade perfusion of the brain in operations on the aortic arch. The method makes it possible to perform both systemic artificial circulation and adequate physiological perfusion of the brain, promoting minimization of the number of neurological complications.

  13. Traumatic partial avulsion of a single right subclavian artery from the aortic arch and definitive repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Sears-Rogan, Pamela; Young, Richard S; Kanda, Louis T; Ellis, Jennifer L

    2006-01-01

    Blunt injury to the right subclavian artery is a rare complication of severe deceleration trauma often associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We describe an atypical presentation in a patient who sustained a traumatic avulsion of his right subclavian artery arising off the aortic arch. An interposition graft was used to restore the continuity of the artery to the ascending thoracic aorta.

  14. Inhibited aortic aneurysm formation in BLT1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Neil; Lin, Alexander Y; Tager, Andrew M; Pruitt, Ivy E; Anderson, Thomas J T; Kristo, Fjoralba; Shen, Dongxiao; Cruz, Anna R; Aikawa, Masanori; Luster, Andrew D; Gerszten, Robert E

    2007-07-01

    Leukotriene B(4) is a proinflammatory lipid mediator generated by the enzymes 5-lipoxygenase and leukotriene A(4) hydrolase. Leukotriene B(4) signals primarily through its high-affinity G protein-coupled receptor, BLT1, which is highly expressed on specific leukocyte subsets. Recent genetic studies in humans as well as knockout studies in mice have implicated the leukotriene synthesis pathway in several vascular pathologies. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that BLT1 is necessary for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) formation, a major complication of atherosclerotic vascular disease. Chow-fed Apoe(-/-) and Apoe(-/-)/Blt1(-/-) mice were treated with a 4-wk infusion of angiotensin II (1000 ng/min/kg) beginning at 20 wk of age, in a well-established murine AAA model. We found a reduced incidence of AAA formation as well as concordant reductions in the maximum suprarenal/infrarenal diameter and total suprarenal/infrarenal area in the angiotensin II-treated Apoe(-/-)/Blt1(-/-) mice as compared with the Apoe(-/-) controls. Diminished AAA formation in BLT1-deficient mice was associated with significant reductions in mononuclear cell chemoattractants and leukocyte accumulation in the vessel wall, as well as striking reductions in the production of matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9. Thus, we have shown that BLT1 contributes to the frequency and size of abdominal aortic aneurysms in mice and that BLT1 deletion in turn inhibits proinflammatory circuits and enzymes that modulate vessel wall integrity. These findings extend the role of BLT1 to a critical complication of vascular disease and underscore its potential as a target for intervention in modulating multiple pathologies related to atherosclerosis.

  15. Aortic valve-sparing operations in aortic root aneurysms: remodeling or reimplantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnavardi, Mohammad; Yan, Tristan D; Bannon, Paul G; Wilson, Michael K

    2011-08-01

    A best evidence topic was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether the reimplantation (David) technique or the remodeling (Yacoub) technique provides the optimum event free survival in patients with an aortic root aneurysm suitable for an aortic valve-sparing operation. In total, 392 papers were found using the reported search criteria, of which 14 papers provided the best evidence to answer the clinical question. A total of 1338 patients (Yacoub technique in 606 and David technique in 732) from 13 centres were included. In most series, cardiopulmonary bypass time and aortic cross-clamp time were longer for the David technique compared to the Yacoub technique. Early mortality was comparable between the two techniques (0-6.9% for the Yacoub technique and 0-6% for the David technique). There is a tendency for a higher freedom from significant long-term aortic insufficiency in the David group than the Yacoub group, which does not necessarily result in a higher reoperation rate in the Yacoub group. In the largest series reported, freedom from a moderate-to-severe aortic insufficiency at 12 years was 82.6 ± 6.2% in the Yacoub and 91.0 ± 3.8% in the David group (P=0.035). Freedom from reoperation at the same time point was 90.4 ± 4.7% in the Yacoub group and 97.4 ± 2.2% in the David group (P=0.09). In another series, freedom from reoperation at a follow-up time of about four years was 89 ± 4% in the Yacoub group and 98 ± 2% in the David group. Although some authors merely preferred the Yacoub technique for a bicuspid aortic valve, the accumulated evidence in the current review indicates comparable results for both techniques in a bicuspid aortic valve. Current evidence is in favour of the David rather than the Yacoub technique in pathologies such as Marfan syndrome, acute type A aortic dissection, and excessive annular dilatation that may impair aortic root integrity. Careful selection of patients for each technique and

  16. Various complications of abdominal aortic aneurysm : CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Byun, Jae Young; Kim, Bum Soo; Kim, Euy Neyung; Yoon, Yeo Dong; Kim, Ki Tae; Lee, Jae Mun; Shinn, Kyung Sub [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-03-01

    To evaluate on abdominal CT the type and incidence of various complications of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Twenty six suspected cases of AAA were confirmed by operation(n=21) and by CT(n=5). The etiology, size, shape and incidence of various complications of AAA were then retrospectively evaluated. In addition, post-operative complications were also evaluated in five cases. The etiology of the aneurysm was atherosclerotic in 18 cases and mycotic in three;it showed the presence of Behcet disease in three cases, of tuberculosis in one, and of Marfan syndrome in one. Among the 18 fusiform AAA, the mean maximum diameter of ruptured AAA(7.5{+-}3cm, n=3) was significantly larger than that of unruptured AAA(4.9{+-}1.6cm, n=15) (p<0.05). The saccular type was much more likely to rupture than the fusiform type(p<0.00001). Out of the eight saccular AAA, seven ruptured ; their mean maximum diameter was 3.9{+-}1.3cm This was significantly smaller than that of ruptured fusiform aneurysm(p<0.05). The most common complication was rupture, and occurred ten of 26 cases(38%). Others included hydronephrosis in three cases, bowel infarction in one, and perianeurysmal retroperitoneal fibrosis in one case. Various post-oper-ative complications developed in five patients; these comprised periprosthetic pseudoaneurysm with hematoma (two cases), bowel ischemia (one), focal renal infarction (one), and secondary aorticoduodenal fistula (one). The most common complication of AAA was rupture, the rate of which was much higher in the saccular type with smaller size than the fusiform type. Other various and uncommon complications were observed. CT was helpful in detecting complications arising from AAA and in planning its treatment.

  17. Various complications of abdominal aortic aneurysm : CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Byun, Jae Young; Kim, Bum Soo; Kim, Euy Neyung; Yoon, Yeo Dong; Kim, Ki Tae; Lee, Jae Mun; Shinn, Kyung Sub

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate on abdominal CT the type and incidence of various complications of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Twenty six suspected cases of AAA were confirmed by operation(n=21) and by CT(n=5). The etiology, size, shape and incidence of various complications of AAA were then retrospectively evaluated. In addition, post-operative complications were also evaluated in five cases. The etiology of the aneurysm was atherosclerotic in 18 cases and mycotic in three;it showed the presence of Behcet disease in three cases, of tuberculosis in one, and of Marfan syndrome in one. Among the 18 fusiform AAA, the mean maximum diameter of ruptured AAA(7.5±3cm, n=3) was significantly larger than that of unruptured AAA(4.9±1.6cm, n=15) (p<0.05). The saccular type was much more likely to rupture than the fusiform type(p<0.00001). Out of the eight saccular AAA, seven ruptured ; their mean maximum diameter was 3.9±1.3cm This was significantly smaller than that of ruptured fusiform aneurysm(p<0.05). The most common complication was rupture, and occurred ten of 26 cases(38%). Others included hydronephrosis in three cases, bowel infarction in one, and perianeurysmal retroperitoneal fibrosis in one case. Various post-oper-ative complications developed in five patients; these comprised periprosthetic pseudoaneurysm with hematoma (two cases), bowel ischemia (one), focal renal infarction (one), and secondary aorticoduodenal fistula (one). The most common complication of AAA was rupture, the rate of which was much higher in the saccular type with smaller size than the fusiform type. Other various and uncommon complications were observed. CT was helpful in detecting complications arising from AAA and in planning its treatment

  18. Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Feasibility and Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagana, Domenico; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Mangini, Monica; Fontana, Federico; Caronno, Roberto; Castelli, Patrizio; Cuffari, Salvatore; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of emergency endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Methods. During 36 months we treated, on an emergency basis, 30 AAAs with endovascular exclusion. In 21 hemodynamically stable patients preoperative CT angiography (CTA) was performed to confirm the diagnosis and to plan the treatment; 9 patients with hemorrhagic shock were evaluated with angiography performed in the operating room. Twenty-two Excluder (Gore) and 8 Zenith (Cook) stent-grafts (25 bifurcated and 5 aorto-uni-iliac) were used. The follow-up was performed by CTA at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Results. Technical success was achieved in 100% of cases with a 10% mortality rate. The total complication rate was 23% (5 increases in serum creatinine level and 2 wound infections). During the follow-up, performed in 27 patients (1-36 months, mean 15.2 months), 4 secondary endoleaks (15%) (3 type II, 2 spontaneously thrombosed and 1 under observation, and 1 type III treated by iliac extender insertion) and 1 iliac leg occlusion (treated with femoro-femoral bypass) occurred. We observed a shrinkage of the aneurysmal sac in 8 of 27 cases and stability in 19 of 27 cases; we did not observe any endotension. Conclusions. Endovascular repair is a good option for emergency treatment of AAAs. The team's experience allows correct planning of the procedure in emergency situations also, with technical results comparable with elective repair. In our experience the bifurcated stent-graft is the device of choice in patients with suitable anatomy because the procedure is less time-consuming than aorto-uni-iliac stent-grafting with surgical crossover, allowing faster aneurysm exclusion. However, further studies are required to demonstrate the long-term efficacy of endovascular repair compared with surgical treatment

  19. Multimodality Imaging Approach towards Primary Aortic Sarcomas Arising after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Case Series Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamran, Mudassar, E-mail: kamranm@mir.wustl.edu; Fowler, Kathryn J., E-mail: fowlerk@mir.wustl.edu; Mellnick, Vincent M., E-mail: mellnickv@mir.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (United States); Sicard, Gregorio A., E-mail: sicard@wudosis.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery (United States); Narra, Vamsi R., E-mail: narrav@mir.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Primary aortic neoplasms are rare. Aortic sarcoma arising after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a scarce subset of primary aortic malignancies, reports of which are infrequent in the published literature. The diagnosis of aortic sarcoma is challenging due to its non-specific clinical presentation, and the prognosis is poor due to delayed diagnosis, rapid proliferation, and propensity for metastasis. Post-EVAR, aortic sarcomas may mimic other more common aortic processes on surveillance imaging. Radiologists are rarely knowledgeable about this rare entity for which multimodality imaging and awareness are invaluable in early diagnosis. A series of three pathologically confirmed cases are presented to display the multimodality imaging features and clinical presentations of aortic sarcoma arising after EVAR.

  20. Right Aortic Arch and Kommerell's Diverticulum Repaired without Reconstruction of Aberrant Left Subclavian Artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, Hiroshi; Shinohara, Daisuke; Orii, Kouan; Hosaka, Shigeru; Fukuda, Shoji; Akashi, Okihiko; Furukawa, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Right aortic arch with Kommerell's diverticulum is a very rare situation. Surgical treatment is recommended for symptomatic patients or asymptomatic patients with a large diverticulum. However planning the strategy of operation is difficult without a 3D imaging. We report a case of a 57-year-old man with right aortic arch, Kommerell's diverticulum, and aberrant left subclavian artery. After a 3D-CT imaging, the patient underwent descending aortic replacement without reconstruction of aberrant left subclavian artery. After operation, there was no signs or symptoms of ischemia of the left arm. If the reconstruction of the aberrant subclavian artery was too difficult, closing its orifice is an acceptable decision. It has been found advantageous because of a decrease blood loss and a shorter cardiopulmonary bypass duration. If an ischemia of the arm is noticed, additional reconstruction will have to be considered. 3D-CT imaging was very useful to have a proper orientation and plan for the operative strategy.

  1. Angular (Gothic) aortic arch leads to enhanced systolic wave reflection, central aortic stiffness, and increased left ventricular mass late after aortic coarctation repair: evaluation with magnetic resonance flow mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Phalla; Celermajer, David S; Raisky, Olivier; Jolivet, Odile; Buyens, Fanny; Herment, Alain; Sidi, Daniel; Bonnet, Damien; Mousseaux, Elie

    2008-01-01

    We sought to investigate the mechanism whereby a particular deformity of the aortic arch, an angulated Gothic shape, might lead to hypertension late after anatomically successful repair of aortic coarctation. Fifty-five normotensive patients with anatomically successful repair of aortic coarctation and either a Gothic (angulated) or a Romanesque (smooth and rounded) arch were studied with magnetic resonance angiography and flow mapping in both the ascending and descending aortas. Systolic waveforms, central aortic stiffness, and pulse velocity were measured. We hypothesized that arch angulation would result in enhanced systolic wave reflection with loss of energy across the aortic arch, as well as increased central aortic stiffness. Twenty patients were found to have a Gothic, and 35 a Romanesque, arch. Patients with a Gothic arch showed markedly augmented systolic wave reflection (12 +/- 6 vs 5 +/- 0.3 mL, P Gothic arch (5.6 +/- 1.1 vs 4.1 +/- 1 m/s, P Gothic aortic arch is associated with increased systolic wave reflection, as well as increased central aortic stiffness and left ventricular mass index. These findings explain (at least in part) the association between this pattern of arch geometry and late hypertension at rest and on exercise in subjects after coarctation repair.

  2. Four-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging-derived ascending aortic flow eccentricity and flow compression are linked to aneurysm morphology†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kari, Fabian A; Kocher, Nadja; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Tscheuschler, Anke; Meffert, Philipp; Rylski, Bartosz; Siepe, Matthias; Russe, Maximilian F; Hope, Michael D

    2015-05-01

    The impact of specific blood flow patterns within ascending aortic and/or aortic root aneurysms on aortic morphology is unknown. We investigated the interrelation of ascending aortic flow compression/peripheralization and aneurysm morphology with respect to sinotubuar junction (STJ) definition. Thirty-one patients (aortic root/ascending aortic aneurysm >45 mm) underwent flow-sensitive 4D magnetic resonance thoracic aortic flow measurement at 3 Tesla (Siemens, Germany) at two different institutions (Freiburg, Germany, and San Francisco, CA, USA). Time-resolved image data post-processing and visualization of mid-systolic, mid-ascending aortic flow were performed using local vector fields. The Flow Compression Index (FCI) was calculated individually as a fraction of the area of high-velocity mid-systolic flow over the complete cross-sectional ascending aortic area. According to aortic aneurysm morphology, patients were grouped as (i) small root, eccentric ascending aortic aneurysm (STJ definition) and (ii) enlarged aortic root, non-eccentric ascending aortic aneurysm with diffuse root and tubular enlargement. The mean FCI over all patients was 0.47 ± 0.5 (0.37-0.99). High levels of flow compression/peripheralization (FCI 0.8) occurred more often in Group B (n = 20). The FCI was 0.48 ± 0.05 in Group A and 0.78 ± 0.14 in Group B (P valve (P = 0.6) and type of valve dysfunction (P = 0.22 for aortic stenosis) was not found to be different between groups. Irrespective of aortic valve morphology and function, ascending aortic blood flow patterns are linked to distinct patterns of ascending aortic aneurysm morphology. Implementation of quantitative local blood flow analyses might help to improve aneurysm risk stratification in the future. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  3. Successful Aortic Banding for Type IA Endoleak Due to Neck Dilatation after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashima, Yasushi; Tamai, Koichi; Shirasugi, Takehiro; Sato, Kenichiro; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Imamura, Yusuke; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Adachi, Hideo; Kobinata, Toshiyuki

    2017-09-25

    A 69-year-old man with a type IA endoleak that developed approximately 21 months after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) of a 46 mm diameter aneurysm was referred to our department. He had impaired renal function, Parkinson's disease, and previous cerebral infarction. Computed tomography angiography showed a type IA endoleak with neck dilatation and that the aneurysm had grown to 60 mm in diameter. We decided to perform aortic banding. The type IA endoleak disappeared after banding and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 10. Aortic banding may be effective for type IA endoleak after EVAR and less invasive for high-risk patients in particular.

  4. MicroRNAs: Novel Players in Aortic Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-ming Fu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An aortic aneurysm (AA is a common disease with potentially life-threatening complications. Despite significant improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of AA, the associated morbidity and mortality remain high. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, miR are small noncoding ribonucleic acids that negatively regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level by inhibiting mRNA translation or promoting mRNA degradation. miRNAs are recently reported to be critical modulators for vascular cell functions such as cell migration, contraction, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Increasing evidences suggest crucial roles of miRNAs in the pathogenesis and progression of cardiovascular diseases such as coronary artery disease, heart failure, arterial hypertension, and cardiac arrhythmias. Recently, some miRNAs, such as miR-24, miR-155, miR-205, miR-712, miR-21, miR-26a, miR-143/145, miR-29, and miR-195, have been demonstrated to be differentially expressed in the diseased aortic tissues and strongly associated with the development of AA. In the present paper, we reviewed the recent available literature regarding the role of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of AA. Moreover, we discuss the potential use of miRNAs as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and novel targets for development of effective therapeutic strategies for AA.

  5. Repair of a Mycotic Coronary Artery Aneurysm with an Intact Prosthetic Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Mitsugu; Bell, David; Marshman, David

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 75-year-old man with a mycotic right coronary artery aneurysm without evidence of prosthetic valve endocarditis. Eight years previously he had undergone coronary artery bypass surgery and aortic valve replacement. He presented with methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus septicaemia after a prolonged hospital admission. Further investigation revealed a large mycotic right coronary artery aneurysm prompting urgent surgical repair. This case, of a mycotic coronary artery aneurysm in an atherosclerotic native coronary artery, is an extremely rare entity, which is further complicated by the presence of a prosthetic aortic valve. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. ApoA-I/HDL-C levels are inversely associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burillo, Elena; Lindholt, Jes S.; Molina-Sánchez, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) evolution is unpredictable, and there is no therapy except surgery for patients with an aortic size> 5 cm (large AAA). We aimed to identify new potential biomarkers that could facilitate prognosis and treatment of patients with AAA. A differential quantitative prot...

  7. Pilot study of dynamic cine CT angiography for the evaluation of abdominal aortic aneurysms : Implications for endograft treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teutelink, A; Rutten, A; Muhs, BE; Olree, M; van Herwaarden, JA; de Vos, AM; Prokop, M; Moll, FL; Verhagen, HJM

    Purpose: To utilize 40-slice electrocardiographically (ECG)-gated cine computed tomographic angiography (CTA) to characterize normal aortic motion during the cardiac cycle at relevant anatomical landmarks in preoperative abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients. Methods: In 10 consecutive

  8. Stenting of Variant Left Carotid Artery Using Brachial Artery Approach in a Patient with Unusual Type of Bovine Aortic Arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Gürel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bovine aortic arch is the most frequently encountered variation in human aortic arch branching. A 63-year-old Asian male presented with symptomatic severe stenosis of left carotid artery originating from the brachiocephalic trunk. Selective engagement to the left carotid artery was unsuccessful using transfemoral approach. We reported on a successful left carotid artery stenting case using right brachial artery approach in a bovine aortic arch. This paper is worthy of reporting in terms of guiding physicians for interventional procedures in these types of challenging cases.

  9. The Paraoxonase Gene Cluster Protects Against Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yun-Fei; Pei, Jian-Fei; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Ran; Wang, Fang; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Zhu-Qin; Wang, Ting-Ting; She, Zhi-Gang; Chen, Hou-Zao; Liu, De-Pei

    2017-02-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a life-threatening vascular pathology, the pathogenesis of which is closely related to oxidative stress. However, an effective pharmaceutical treatment is lacking because the exact cause of AAA remains unknown. Here, we aimed at delineating the role of the paraoxonases (PONs) gene cluster (PC), which prevents atherosclerosis through the detoxification of oxidized substrates, in AAA formation. PC transgenic (Tg) mice were crossed to an Apoe -/- background, and an angiotensin II-induced AAA mouse model was used to analyze the effect of the PC on AAA formation. Four weeks after angiotensin II infusion, PC-Tg Apoe -/- mice had a lower AAA incidence, smaller maximal abdominal aortic external diameter, and less medial elastin degradation than Apoe -/- mice. Importantly, PC-Tg Apoe -/- mice exhibited lower aortic reactive oxidative species production and oxidative stress than did the Apoe -/- control mice. As a consequence, the PC transgene alleviated angiotensin II-induced arterial inflammation and suppressed arterial extracellular matrix degradation. Specifically, on angiotensin II stimulation, PC-Tg vascular smooth muscle cells exhibited lower levels of reactive oxidative species production and a decrease in the activities and expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9. Moreover, PC-Tg serum also enhanced vascular smooth muscle cell oxidative stress resistance and further decreased the expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9, indicating that circulatory and vascular smooth muscle cell PC members suppress oxidative stress in a synergistic manner. Our findings reveal, for the first time, a protective role of the PC in AAA formation and suggest PONs as promising targets for AAA prevention. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Morphometric changes in the aortic arch with advancing age in fetal to mature thoroughbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endoh, Chihiro; Matsuda, Kazuya; Okamoto, Minoru; Tsunoda, Nobuo; Taniyama, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-28

    Aortic rupture is a well recognized cause of sudden death in thoroughbred horses. Some microscopic lesions, such as those caused by cystic medial necrosis and medionecrosis, can lead to aortic rupture. However, these microscopic lesions are also observed in normal horses. On the other hand, a previous study of aortic rupture suggested that underlying elastin and collagen deposition disorders might be associated with aortic rupture. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the structural components of the tunica media of the aortic arch, which is composed of elastin, collagen, smooth muscle cells and mucopolysaccharides (MPS), in fetal to mature thoroughbred horses. The percentage area of elastin was greatest in the young horses and subsequently decreased with aging. The percentage area of collagen increased with aging, and the elderly horses (aged ≥20) exhibited significantly higher percentage areas of collagen than the young horses. The percentage area of smooth muscle cells did not change with age. The percentage area of MPS was inversely proportional to the percentage area of elastin. The fetuses exhibited a markedly larger percentage area of MPS than the mature horses. We concluded that the medial changes seen in the aortic arch, which included a reduction in the amount of elastin and increases in the amounts of collagen and MPS, were age-related variations.

  11. Table-moving contrast-enhanced MR angiography of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amanuma, Makoto; Hirata, Hisashi; Tanaka, Junji; Yuasa, Masayuki; Kozawa, Eito; Nishi, Naoko; Enomoto, Kyoko; Watabe, Tsuneya; Heshiki, Atsuko [Saitama Medical School, Moroyama (Japan)

    1999-11-01

    Table-moving contrast-enhanced MR angiography (MRA) was performed in 14 cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm to evaluate its clinical usefulness. In all cases, aneurysms were clearly demonstrated and image quality was clinically acceptable. Findings of reconstructed MRA were highly consistent with those of DSA, and thrombosed areas were confirmed on source images. Main aortic branches including renal arteries, common iliac arteries, and internal and external iliac arteries were readily identified on reconstructed MRA and/or source images. Additional findings such as thoracic aortic aneurysm (n=1), common iliac aneurysm (n=6), external iliac aneurysm (n=1), internal iliac aneurysm (n=1), femoral arterial obstruction (n=2), and femoral arterial stenosis (n=4) were also detected. Although table-moving MRA may have disadvantages like reduced blood signal and limited spatial resolution compared with the conventional contrast-enhanced technique, the images that were obtained provided sufficient contrast and resolution for preoperative evaluation. Because abdominal aortic aneurysm is accompanied by various arterial abnormalities in many of the large arteries, table-moving MRA was considered a suitable technique for comprehensive assessment. (author)

  12. Maximum Diameter Measurements of Aortic Aneurysms on Axial CT Images After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: Sufficient for Follow-up?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumueller, Stephan; Nguyen, Thi Dan Linh; Goetti, Robert Paul; Lachat, Mario; Seifert, Burkhardt; Pfammatter, Thomas; Frauenfelder, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of maximum diameter measurements of aortic aneurysms after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) on axial computed tomographic (CT) images in comparison to maximum diameter measurements perpendicular to the intravascular centerline for follow-up by using three-dimensional (3D) volume measurements as the reference standard. Materials and Methods: Forty-nine consecutive patients (73 ± 7.5 years, range 51–88 years), who underwent EVAR of an infrarenal aortic aneurysm were retrospectively included. Two blinded readers twice independently measured the maximum aneurysm diameter on axial CT images performed at discharge, and at 1 and 2 years after intervention. The maximum diameter perpendicular to the centerline was automatically measured. Volumes of the aortic aneurysms were calculated by dedicated semiautomated 3D segmentation software (3surgery, 3mensio, the Netherlands). Changes in diameter of 0.5 cm and in volume of 10% were considered clinically significant. Intra- and interobserver agreements were calculated by intraclass correlations (ICC) in a random effects analysis of variance. The two unidimensional measurement methods were correlated to the reference standard. Results: Intra- and interobserver agreements for maximum aneurysm diameter measurements were excellent (ICC = 0.98 and ICC = 0.96, respectively). There was an excellent correlation between maximum aneurysm diameters measured on axial CT images and 3D volume measurements (r = 0.93, P < 0.001) as well as between maximum diameter measurements perpendicular to the centerline and 3D volume measurements (r = 0.93, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Measurements of maximum aneurysm diameters on axial CT images are an accurate, reliable, and robust method for follow-up after EVAR and can be used in daily routine.

  13. Logistic considerations for a successful institutional approach to the endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Dieter; Rancic, Zoran; Pfammatter, Thomas; Hechelhammer, Lukas; Veith, Frank J; Donas, Konstantin; Lachat, Mario

    2010-01-01

    The value of emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in the setting of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm remains controversial owing to differing results. However, interpretation of published results remains difficult as there is a lack of generally accepted protocols or standard operating procedures. Furthermore, such protocols and standard operating procedures often are reported incompletely or not at all, thereby making interpretation of results difficult. We herein report our integrated logistic system for the endovascular treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms. Important components of this system are prehospital logistics, in-hospital treatment logistics, and aftercare. Further studies should include details about all of these components, and a description of these logistic components must be included in all future studies of emergency EVAR for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  14. Cardiovascular Disease in Ageing: An Overview on Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm as an Emerging Inflammatory Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calogera Pisano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Medial degeneration associated with thoracic aortic aneurysm and acute aortic dissection was originally described by Erdheim as a noninflammatory lesion related to the loss of smooth muscle cells and elastic fibre fragmentation in the media. Recent evidences propose the strong role of a chronic immune/inflammatory process in aneurysm evocation and progression. The coexistence of inflammatory cells with markers of apoptotic vascular cell death in the media of ascending aorta with aneurysms and type A dissections raises the possibility that activated T cells and macrophages may contribute to the elimination of smooth muscle cells and degradation of the matrix. On the other hand, several inflammatory pathways (including TGF-β, TLR-4 interferon-γ, chemokines, and interferon-γ seem to be involved in the medial degeneration related to aged and dilated aorta. This is an overview on thoracic aortic aneurysm as an emerging inflammatory disease.

  15. Large aortic aneurysm and dissection in a patient with Marfan's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Pivatto Júnior

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Marfan’s syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder of connective tissue affecting approximately1 in5000 people. In individuals with this syndrome, more than 90% of deaths from known causes result from cardiovascular complications, such as aortic dissection, aortic regurgitation, and congestive cardiac failure. In this report, we present a patient with a large symptomatic aortic aneurysm and chronic dissection, severe aortic regurgitation and cardiomegaly, treated successfully with resection of the proximal aorta and placement of a mechanic aortic valved graft.

  16. Cost-effectiveness analysis of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms based on five year results from a randomised hospital based mass screening trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Juul, Søren; Fasting, H

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the cost effectiveness of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA).......The aim of this study was to estimate the cost effectiveness of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA)....

  17. Aortic Curvature Is a Predictor of Late Type Ia Endoleak and Migration After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuurmann, Richte C L; van Noort, Kim; Overeem, Simon P; Ouriel, Kenneth; Jordan, William D; Muhs, Bart E; 't Mannetje, Yannick; Reijnen, Michel; Fioole, Bram; Ünlü, Çağdaş; Brummel, Peter; de Vries, Jean-Paul P M

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the association between aortic curvature and other preoperative anatomical characteristics and late (>1 year) type Ia endoleak and endograft migration in endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) patients. Eight high-volume EVAR centers contributed 116 EVAR patients (mean age 81±7 years; 103 men) to the study: 36 patients (mean age 82±7 years; 31 men) with endograft migration and/or type Ia endoleak diagnosed >1 year after the initial EVAR and 80 controls without early or late complications. Aortic curvature was calculated from the preoperative computed tomography scan as the maximum and average curvature over 5 predefined aortic segments: the entire infrarenal aortic neck, aneurysm sac, and the suprarenal, juxtarenal, and infrarenal aorta. Other morphological characteristics included neck length, neck diameter, mural neck calcification and thrombus, suprarenal and infrarenal angulation, and largest aneurysm sac diameter. Independent risk factors were identified using backward stepwise logistic regression. Relevant cutoff values for each of the variables in the final regression model were determined with the receiver operator characteristic curve. Logistic regression identified maximum curvature over the length of the aneurysm sac (>47 m -1 ; p=0.023), largest aneurysm sac diameter (>56 mm; p=0.028), and mural neck thrombus (>11° circumference; pIa endoleak. Aortic curvature is a predictor for late type Ia endoleak and endograft migration after EVAR. These findings suggest that aortic curvature is a better parameter than angulation to predict post-EVAR failure and should be included as a hostile neck parameter.

  18. In vivo study on the expression pattern of resistin in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehling, Bernd M; Paintner, Agnes; Marx, Nikolaus; Barth, Thomas F E; Babiak, Christina; Orend, Karl H

    2011-01-01

    To study the expression pattern of resistin in abdominal aortic aneurysms and to correlate its plasma levels to aneurysm size and statin therapy. From 25 patients on regular and 38 patients without statin therapy tissue specimen and plasma samples were obtained for analysis. Demographic data, past medical history, and body mass index showed no significant differences between the statin and no statin group. Immunohistochemistry showed positive stainings for resistin in all sections and in part colocalization to CD 68 positive cells. Patients with large aneurysms showed significant correlation of C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin 10 (IL-10) levels; patients on statin medication had significantly lower plasma levels of resistin and CRP. In contrast to IL-10 and CRP plasma levels of resistin are not correlated to aneurysm diameter; yet statin therapy results in decrease of resistin and CRP, suggesting an anti-inflammatory action in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs).

  19. Combined transdiaphragmatic off-pump and minimally invasive coronary artery bypass with right gastroepiploic artery and abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürer, Onur; Haberal, Ismail; Ozsoy, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    Male, 74 FINAL DIAGNOSIS: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) Symptoms: Palpable abdominal mass Medication: - Clinical Procedure: Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair Specialty: Surgery. Rare disease. Coronary artery disease is common in elderly patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Here we report a case of the combination of surgical repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm and off-pump and minimally invasive coronary artery bypass surgery. A 74-year-old man who presented at our clinic with chest pain was diagnosed with an abdominal aortic aneurysm. His medical history included right coronary artery stenting. Physical examination revealed a pulsatile abdominal mass on the left side and palpable peripheral pulses. Computed tomography scans showed an infrarenal abdominal aneurysm with a 61-mm enlargement. Coronary angiography revealed 80% stenosis in the stent within the right coronary artery and 20% stenosis in the left main coronary artery. The patient underwent elective coronary artery bypass grafting and abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and transdiaphragmatic off-pump and minimal invasive coronary artery bypass grafting with right gastroepiploic artery were performed simultaneously in a single surgery. We report this case to emphasize the safety and effectiveness of transdiaphragmatic off-pump and minimally invasive coronary artery bypass surgery with abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. This combined approach shortens hospital stay and decreases cost.

  20. Selective Cerebro-Myocardial Perfusion in Complex Neonatal Aortic Arch Pathology: Midterm Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoxha, Stiljan; Abbasciano, Riccardo Giuseppe; Sandrini, Camilla; Rossetti, Lucia; Menon, Tiziano; Barozzi, Luca; Linardi, Daniele; Rungatscher, Alessio; Faggian, Giuseppe; Luciani, Giovanni Battista

    2018-03-06

    Aortic arch repair in newborns and infants has traditionally been accomplished using a period of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. To reduce neurologic and cardiac dysfunction related to circulatory arrest and myocardial ischemia during complex aortic arch surgery, an alternative and novel strategy for cerebro-myocardial protection was recently developed, where regional low-flow perfusion is combined with controlled and independent coronary perfusion. The aim of the present retrospective study was to assess short-term and mid-term results of selective and independent cerebro-myocardial perfusion in neonatal aortic arch surgery. From April 2008 to August 2015, 28 consecutive neonates underwent aortic arch surgery under cerebro-myocardial perfusion. There were 17 male and 11 female, with median age of 15 days (3-30 days) and median body weight of 3 kg (1.6-4.2 kg), 9 (32%) of whom with low body weight (cerebro-myocardial perfusion was 30 ± 11 min (15-69 min). Renal dysfunction, requiring a period of peritoneal dialysis was observed in 10 (36%) patients, while liver dysfunction was noted only in 3 (11%). There were three (11%) early and two late deaths during a median follow-up of 2.9 years (range 6 months-7.7 years), with an actuarial survival of 82% at 7 years. At latest follow-up, no patient showed signs of cardiac or neurologic dysfunction. The present experience shows that a strategy of selective and independent cerebro-myocardial perfusion is safe, versatile, and feasible in high-risk neonates with complex congenital arch pathology. Encouraging outcomes were noted in terms of cardiac and neurological function, with limited end-organ morbidity. © 2018 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Incidental Finding of a Large Mobile Aortic Arch Mass during Conventional Angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Aghajani

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Thromboembolism occurs commonly in general practice and leads to significant health burden. Apart from cardiac sources, aortic atherosclerotic plaques contribute considerably to thromboembolism. A 63-year-old diabetic hypertensive woman referred to our center due to exertional chest pain unresponsive to optimal medical therapy and underwent coronary angiography. Owing to resistance during guide-wire advancement, an aortography was performed. Aortic arch injection demonstrated a large suspended mass distal to the left subclavian artery with free movement in the descending thoracic aorta. Echocardiography revealed widespread atherosclerotic changes in the aortic arch with a large hypermobile mass. Dual-source multi-slice (2 × 128:256 computed tomography angiography of the whole aorta revealed a large floating mass (in favor of a thrombus in the distal portion of the arch. The patient underwent coronary artery bypass grafting due to severe coronary artery disease. The intra-aortic mass, which was actually a large atherosclerotic plaque, was resected at the same session. She was discharged uneventfully and during a 1-year follow-up, she had no embolic events.

  2. Screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm reduces overall mortality in men. A meta-analysis of the mid- and long-term effects of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Norman, P

    2008-01-01

    Four randomised controlled trials of screening older men for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) have been completed. A meta-analysis was performed to examine the pooled effects of screening on both mid- and long-term AAA-related and total mortality, and operations for AAA....

  3. Dynamic aortic changes in patients with thoracic aortic aneurysms evaluated with electrocardiography-triggered computed tomographic angiography before and after thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair: preliminary results.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prehn, J. van; Bartels, L.W.; Mestres, G.; Vincken, K.L.; Prokop, M.; Verhagen, H.J.; Moll, F.L.; Herwaarden, J.A. van

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to utilize dynamic computed tomographic angiography (CTA) on pre- and postoperative thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) patients to characterize cardiac pulsatility-induced aortic motion on essential TEVAR proximal sealing zones and to study the influence of

  4. Trace elements in the wall of abdominal aortic aneurysms with and without coexisting iliac artery aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaja, Damian; Chudek, Jerzy; Sznapka, Mariola; Kita, Andrzej; Biolik, Grzegorz; Sieroń-Stołtny, Karolina; Pawlicki, Krzysztof; Domalik, Jolanta; Ziaja, Krzysztof

    2015-06-01

    Iliac artery aneurysms (IAA) and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) frequently coexist. It remains unknown whether the content of trace elements in AAA walls depends on the coexistence of IAAs. The aim of this study was to compare the content of selected trace elements in AAA walls depending on the coexistence of IAAs. The content of trace elements was assessed in samples of AAA walls harvested intraoperatively in 19 consecutive patients. In the studied group, coexisting IAAs were diagnosed in 11 out of the 19 patients with AAA. The coexistence of IAAs was associated with a slightly lower content of nickel (0.28 (0.15-0.40) vs. 0.32 (0-0.85) mg/g; p = 0.09) and a significantly higher content of cadmium (0.71 (0.26-1.17) vs. 0.25 (0.20-0.31) mg/g; p = 0.04) in AAA walls. The levels of the remaining studied elements, copper, zinc, manganese, magnesium and calcium, were comparable. The elevated levels of cadmium in the walls of AAA coexisting with IAAs may suggest an impact of the accumulation of this trace element on the greater damage of the iliac artery wall.

  5. Antegrade versus retrograde cerebral perfusion in relation to postoperative complications following aortic arch surgery for acute aortic dissection type A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolakis, Efstratios; Koletsis, Efstratios N; Dedeilias, Panagiotis; Kokotsakis, John N; Sakellaropoulos, George; Psevdi, Argini; Bolos, Konstantin; Dougenis, Dimitrios

    2008-01-01

    Aortic arch surgery is impossible without the temporary interruption of brain perfusion and therefore is associated with high incidence of neurologic injury. The deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA), in combination with antegrade or retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP), is a well-established method of brain protection in aortic arch surgery. In this retrospective study, we compare the two methods of brain perfusion. From 1998 to 2006, 48 consecutive patients were urgently operated for acute type A aortic dissection and underwent arch replacement under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA). All distal anastomoses were performed with open aorta, and the arch was replaced totally in 15 cases and partially in the remaining 33 cases. Our patient cohort is divided into those protected with antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) (group A, n = 23) and those protected with RCP (group B, n = 25). No significant difference was found between groups A and B with respect to cardiopulmonary bypass-time, brain-ischemia time, cerebral-perfusion time, permanent neurologic dysfunction, and mortality. The incidence of temporary neurologic dysfunction was 16.0% for group A and 43.50% for group B (p = 0.04). The mean extubation time was 3.39 +/- 1.40 days for group A and 4.96 +/- 1.83 days for group B (p = 0.0018). The mean ICU-stay was 4.4 +/- 2.3 days for group A and 6.9 +/- 2.84 days for group B (p = 0.0017). The hospital-stay was 14.38 +/- 4.06 days for group A and 19.65 +/- 6.91 days for group B (p = 0.0026). The antegrade perfusion seems to be related with significantly lower incidence of temporary neurological complications, earlier extubation, shorter ICU-stay, and hospitalization, and hence lower total cost.

  6. Pattern-based approach to fetal congenital cardiovascular anomalies using the transverse aortic arch view on prenatal cardiac MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Su-Zhen; Zhu, Ming [Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Shanghai Children' s Medical Center, Shanghai (China)

    2015-05-01

    Fetal echocardiography is the imaging modality of choice for prenatal diagnosis of congenital cardiovascular anomalies. However, echocardiography has limitations. Fetal cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to complement US in detecting congenital cardiovascular anomalies. This article draws on our experience; it describes the transverse aortic arch view on fetal cardiac MRI and important clues on an abnormal transverse view at the level of the aortic arch to the diagnosis of fetal congenital cardiovascular anomalies. (orig.)

  7. Endovascular Retrieval of Entrapped Elephant Trunk Graft During Complex Hybrid Aortic Arch Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damodharan, Karthikeyan, E-mail: drdkarthik@hotmail.com [Singapore General Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Singapore); Chao, Victor T. T., E-mail: victor.chao.t.t@singhealth.com.sg [National Heart Centre, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Singapore); Tay, Kiang Hiong, E-mail: tay.kiang.hiong@singhealth.com.sg [Singapore General Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Singapore)

    2016-12-15

    Entrapment of the elephant trunk graft within the false lumen is a rare complication of surgical repair of an aortic dissection. This is normally retrieved by emergent open surgery. We describe a technique of endovascular retrieval of the dislodged graft, during hybrid aortic arch repair. The elephant trunk was cannulated through and through from a femoral access and the free end of the wire was snared and retrieved from a brachial access. The wire was externalised from both accesses and was used to reposition the graft into the true lumen using a body flossing technique.

  8. MRI-based multiscale models for the hemodynamic and structural evaluation of surgically reconstructed aortic arches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pittaccio, S; Migliavacca, F; Balossino, R

    2007-01-01

    The surgical reconstruction of the aortic arch is necessary in pediatric patients suffering from different types of congenital heart malformations, in particular, coarctation of the aorta. Among the reconstruction techniques used in surgical practice end-to-end anastomosis (E/E), Gore-tex graft...... interposition (GGI) and Gore-tex patch graft aortoplasty (GPGA) are compared in this study with a control model, employing a computational fluid-structure-interaction scheme. This study analyzes the impact of introducing synthetic materials on aortic hemodynamics and wall mechanics. Three-dimensional (3D...

  9. The current status of endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms (TEVAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Hosam; Ramlawi, Basel

    2011-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has been one of the most important advances in the management of thoracic aortic disease in the past two decades. The procedure was originally developed by Dake and colleagues in 1994 for the treatment of descending thoracic aortic aneurysm (DTAA), using the same principles as EVAR for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The first device approved for this indication was the TAG device (W.L. Gore & Associated, Inc., Flagstaff, AZ) in 2005. Since then there has been a plethora of changes and new developments related to thoracic endovascular aortic repair. This article will summarize the major updates related to TEVAR, focusing on three main aspects: what is new in device technology and future prospects; the expanding indications of TEVAR for the treatment of other pathologies and the newly developed techniques involved; and a glimpse at the expected future direction in the field.

  10. Concomitant percutaneous treatment of aortic coarctation and associated intercostal aneurysms: pre-procedural recognition is key.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batlivala, Sarosh P; Rome, Jonathan J

    2016-02-01

    Intercostal aneurysms are associated with aortic coarctation. Their aetiology is not well-understood but may be related to intrinsic vascular pathology and altered flow dynamics through the intercostal artery. We present the cases of two patients with coarctation and intercostal aneurysms. The aneurysms were recognised on pre-catheterisation imaging studies and were selectively occluded during the same procedure to treat the coarctation. There were no complications; both the patients have no residual coarctation at the most recent follow-up. Intercostal aneurysms associated with coarctation can have significant consequences including late rupture, paralysis, and even death. These aneurysms are common with an incidence of up to 40% with adult-diagnosed coarctation; one treatment plan is to treat both the coarctation and aneurysm during a single catheterisation. Pre-catheterisation CT or MRI may play a role in this strategy.

  11. Fate of remnant sinuses of Valsalva in patients with bicuspid and trileaflet valves undergoing aortic valve, ascending aorta, and aortic arch replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, Rita Karianna; Habertheuer, Andreas; Bavaria, Joseph E; Siki, Mary; Szeto, Wilson Y; Krause, Eric; Korutla, Varun; Desai, Nimesh D; Vallabhajosyula, Prashanth

    2017-08-01

    In patients presenting with aortic valvulopathy with concomitant ascending aortic aneurysm, surgical management of the sinus of Valsalva segment remains undefined, especially for moderately dilated aortic roots. In patients with this pathology undergoing aortic valve replacement with supracoronary ascending aorta replacement, we assessed the fate of the remnant preserved sinus of Valsalva segment stratified by aortic valve morphology and pathology. From 2002 to 2015, 428 patients underwent elective aortic valve replacement with supracoronary ascending aorta replacement. Patients were stratified on the basis of valvular morphology (bicuspid aortic valve [n = 254] and tricuspid aortic valve [n = 174]), valvular pathology (bicuspid aortic valve with aortic stenosis [n = 178], bicuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency [n = 76], tricuspid aortic valve with aortic stenosis [n = 61], tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency [n = 113]), and preoperative sinus of Valsalva dimensions (45 mm). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed no significant difference in freedom from reoperation in tricuspid aortic valve versus bicuspid aortic valve (P = .576). Multivariable Cox regression model performed with sinus of Valsalva dimensions at baseline and follow-up as time-varying covariates did not adversely affect survival. A repeated-measure, mixed-effects model constructed to assess longitudinal sinus of Valsalva trends revealed that the retained sinus of Valsalva dimensions remain stable over long-term follow-up (discharge to ≥10 years), irrespective of valvular morphology/pathology (bicuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency, tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency, tricuspid aortic valve with aortic stenosis) and preoperative sinus of Valsalva groups (45 mm). In patients with nonaneurysmal sinuses of Valsalva undergoing aortic valve replacement with supracoronary ascending aorta replacement, the sinus segment can be preserved irrespective of

  12. Outcomes after open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms in patients with friendly versus hostile aortoiliac anatomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, S. C.; Reimerink, J. J.; Vahl, A. C.; Wisselink, W.; Reekers, J. A.; Legemate, D. A.; Balm, R.

    2014-01-01

    In patients with a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA), anatomic suitability for endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) depends on aortic neck and iliac artery characteristics. If the aortoiliac anatomy is unsuitable for EVAR ("hostile anatomy"), open repair (OR) is the next option. We

  13. Long-term benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms from a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, J S; Sørensen, J; Søgaard, Rikke

    2010-01-01

    The aim was to estimate long-term mortality benefits and cost-effectiveness of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in men aged 64-73 years.......The aim was to estimate long-term mortality benefits and cost-effectiveness of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in men aged 64-73 years....

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of coarctation of the aorta and postoperative interrupted aortic arch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakizawa, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Takashi; Takada, Osamu; Nakayama, Shingo; Ogata, Hiroshi; Zuguchi, Masayuki (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1991-03-01

    ECG-gated MRI was performed at 1.5 T on 9 patients with coarctation of the aorta and restensis of the aorta after previous aortoplasty for coarctation of the aorta or interrupted aortic arch. The age of the patients ranged from 7 days to 3.3 years. MRI was more useful in assessing the severity of stenosis than echocardiography. Four patients had balloon dilation angioplasty for restenosis of the aorta. MRI was also useful in deciding the appropriate balloon size for angioplasty, and follow up after treatment. However, MRI could not always visualize the whole lesion in one slice, especially when the course of the aortic arch was not on the same plane. (author).

  15. Mutations in a TGF-β ligand, TGFB3, cause syndromic aortic aneurysms and dissections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoli-Avella, Aida M; Gillis, Elisabeth; Morisaki, Hiroko; Verhagen, Judith M A; de Graaf, Bianca M; van de Beek, Gerarda; Gallo, Elena; Kruithof, Boudewijn P T; Venselaar, Hanka; Myers, Loretha A; Laga, Steven; Doyle, Alexander J; Oswald, Gretchen; van Cappellen, Gert W A; Yamanaka, Itaru; van der Helm, Robert M; Beverloo, Berna; de Klein, Annelies; Pardo, Luba; Lammens, Martin; Evers, Christina; Devriendt, Koenraad; Dumoulein, Michiel; Timmermans, Janneke; Bruggenwirth, Hennie T; Verheijen, Frans; Rodrigus, Inez; Baynam, Gareth; Kempers, Marlies; Saenen, Johan; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M; Minatoya, Kenji; Matsukawa, Ritsu; Tsukube, Takuro; Kubo, Noriaki; Hofstra, Robert; Goumans, Marie Jose; Bekkers, Jos A; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W; van de Laar, Ingrid M B H; Dietz, Harry C; Van Laer, Lut; Morisaki, Takayuki; Wessels, Marja W; Loeys, Bart L

    2015-04-07

    Aneurysms affecting the aorta are a common condition associated with high mortality as a result of aortic dissection or rupture. Investigations of the pathogenic mechanisms involved in syndromic types of thoracic aortic aneurysms, such as Marfan and Loeys-Dietz syndromes, have revealed an important contribution of disturbed transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling. This study sought to discover a novel gene causing syndromic aortic aneurysms in order to unravel the underlying pathogenesis. We combined genome-wide linkage analysis, exome sequencing, and candidate gene Sanger sequencing in a total of 470 index cases with thoracic aortic aneurysms. Extensive cardiological examination, including physical examination, electrocardiography, and transthoracic echocardiography was performed. In adults, imaging of the entire aorta using computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging was done. Here, we report on 43 patients from 11 families with syndromic presentations of aortic aneurysms caused by TGFB3 mutations. We demonstrate that TGFB3 mutations are associated with significant cardiovascular involvement, including thoracic/abdominal aortic aneurysm and dissection, and mitral valve disease. Other systemic features overlap clinically with Loeys-Dietz, Shprintzen-Goldberg, and Marfan syndromes, including cleft palate, bifid uvula, skeletal overgrowth, cervical spine instability and clubfoot deformity. In line with previous observations in aortic wall tissues of patients with mutations in effectors of TGF-β signaling (TGFBR1/2, SMAD3, and TGFB2), we confirm a paradoxical up-regulation of both canonical and noncanonical TGF-β signaling in association with up-regulation of the expression of TGF-β ligands. Our findings emphasize the broad clinical variability associated with TGFB3 mutations and highlight the importance of early recognition of the disease because of high cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by

  16. Computational hemodynamic optimization predicts dominant aortic arch selection is driven by embryonic outflow tract orientation in the chick embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, William J; Teslovich, Nikola C; Dur, Onur; Keller, Bradley B; Pekkan, Kerem

    2012-09-01

    In the early embryo, a series of symmetric, paired vessels, the aortic arches, surround the foregut and distribute cardiac output to the growing embryo and fetus. During embryonic development, the arch vessels undergo large-scale asymmetric morphogenesis to form species-specific adult great vessel patterns. These transformations occur within a dynamic biomechanical environment, which can play an important role in the development of normal arch configurations or the aberrant arch morphologies associated with congenital cardiac defects. Arrested migration and rotation of the embryonic outflow tract during late stages of cardiac looping has been shown to produce both outflow tract and several arch abnormalities. Here, we investigate how changes in flow distribution due to a perturbation in the angular orientation of the embryonic outflow tract impact the morphogenesis and growth of the aortic arches. Using a combination of in vivo arch morphometry with fluorescent dye injection and hemodynamics-driven bioengineering optimization-based vascular growth modeling, we demonstrate that outflow tract orientation significantly changes during development and that the associated changes in hemodynamic load can dramatically influence downstream aortic arch patterning. Optimization reveals that balancing energy expenditure with diffusive capacity leads to multiple arch vessel patterns as seen in the embryo, while minimizing energy alone led to the single arch configuration seen in the mature arch of aorta. Our model further shows the critical importance of the orientation of the outflow tract in dictating morphogenesis to the adult single arch and accurately predicts arch IV as the dominant mature arch of aorta. These results support the hypothesis that abnormal positioning of the outflow tract during early cardiac morphogenesis may lead to congenital defects of the great vessels due to altered hemodynamic loading.

  17. Combined model-based segmentation and elastic registration for accurate quantification of the aortic arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesdorf, Andreas; Rohr, Karl; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Wörz, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Accurate quantification of the morphology of vessels is important for diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. We introduce a new approach for the quantification of the aortic arch morphology that combines 3D model-based segmentation with elastic image registration. The performance of the approach has been evaluated using 3D synthetic images and clinically relevant 3D CTA images including pathologies. We also performed a comparison with a previous approach.

  18. Left-Sided Patent Ductus Arteriosus in a Right-Sided Aortic Arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yen Ng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a 31-year-old female with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF and right-sided aortic arch (RAA with left-sided patent ductus arteriosus (PDA originating from the left brachiocephalic artery. This is a rare finding but most common site for a PDA in TOF and a RAA. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of this rare finding on MRI in the literature.

  19. Abnormal innominate vein and right aortic arch, an uncommon association that should be taken into account

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catala, J.; Martin, C.

    2000-01-01

    A case of abnormal innominate vein associated with right aortic arch and aberrant left subclavian artery is presented. It was an incidental finding during the radiological study of an 8-year old boy suspected of having tuberculosis. The authors review the different etiological theories, radiological features and diagnostic impact of this uncommon venous malformation, as well as its relationship to other cardiovascular anomalies. (Author) 9 refs

  20. Screening of COPD patients for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flessenkaemper IH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ingo H Flessenkaemper,1 Robert Loddenkemper,2 Stephanie Roll,3 Kathrin Enke-Melzer,1 Henrik Wurps,2 Torsten T Bauer21Department for Vascular Medicine, 2Department of Pneumology, Helios Klinikum Emil von Behring, Berlin, Germany; 3Institute for Social Medicine, Epidemiology and Health Economics, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, GermanyPurpose: Screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA in “men aged over 65 years who have ever smoked” is a recommended policy. To reduce the number of screenings, it may be of value to define subgroups with a higher prevalence of AAA. Since chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and AAA are associated with several common risk factors, this study investigates the prevalence of AAA in COPD patients.Patients and methods: Patients with COPD were identified via the hospital information system. Inclusion criteria were: COPD stage I–IV, ability to give full consent, and age >18 years; exclusion criteria were: patient too obese for an ultrasound check, previously diagnosed AAA, prior surgery for AAA, or ethical grounds such as concomitant advanced malignant or end-stage disease. The primary endpoint of the study was an aortic diameter measured by ultrasound of ≥30 mm. Defined secondary endpoints were evaluated on the basis of medical records and interviews.Results: Of the 1,180 identified COPD patients, 589 were included in this prospective study. In 22 patients (3.70%, the aortic diameter was ≥30 mm, representing an AAA prevalence of 6.72% among males aged >65 years. The risk of AAA increased with the following comorbidities/risk factors: male sex (odds ratio [OR] 2.98, coronary heart disease (OR 2.81, peripheral arterial occlusive disease (OR 2.47, hyperlipoproteinemia (OR 2.77, AAA in the family history (OR 3.95, and COPD stage I/II versus IV (OR 1.81.Conclusion: The overall AAA prevalence of 3.7% in our group of COPD patients is similar to that of the general population aged >65

  1. Thoracic aortic aneurysm in a buck associated with caseous lymphadenitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R. Pinheiro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the clinical, bacteriological and pathological findings of a thoracic aortic aneurysm in a four-year-old Anglo-Nubian goat buck, related to a framework of visceral caseous lymphadenitis. General clinical examination showed heart rate of 75 beats per minute, respiratory rate of 20 movements per minute and ruminal movements of four movements per minute. Superficial lymph nodes were normal upon palpation. Rectal temperature was slightly high (40.5°C. Blood test showed an intense leukocytosis (54,000/µL, characterized by strong neutrophil shift to the left. At necropsy, a large blood clot was detected in the thoracic cavity. The thickening of the myocardium and dilatation of the aorta in the thoracic portion, presenting a saculiform format was also observed. A large number of abscesses were disseminated in the media and intima layers of aorta. The aorta lumen obstruction by arterial plaques consisting of inflammatory infiltrate, predominantly neutrophilic was also detected. Abscesses were found spread in turbinate, rumen, reticulum, kidneys, liver, spleen, testicles and aorta wall. The microbiological exam of exudate confirmed Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis as the causal agent.

  2. [Patient volume and quality in surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austvoll-Dahlgren, Astrid; Underland, Vigdis; Straumann, Gyri Hval; Forsetlund, Louise

    2017-04-01

    BACKGROUND Patient volume is assumed to affect quality, whereby complex procedures are best performed by those who perform them frequently. We have conducted a systematic review of the research on the association between patient volume and quality of vascular surgery. In this article we describe the outcomes for abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery.MATERIAL AND METHOD We undertook systematic searches in relevant databases. We searched for systematic reviews, and randomised and observational studies. The search was concluded in December 2015. We have summarised the results descriptively and assessed the overall quality of the evidence.RESULTS Forty-six observational studies fulfilled our inclusion criteria. We found a possible association for both hospital and surgeon volume. Higher patient volume may possibly be associated with lower 30-day mortality and lower hospital mortality for both open and endovascular surgery. Although the association appears to apply to both elective and acute hospitalisations, there is greater uncertainty with regard to the most ill patients. For hospital volume there may also be fewer complications for open and endovascular surgery, as well as for all surgery assessed as a whole. We considered the evidence base to be medium to very low quality.INTERPRETATION We found a possible correlation between patient volume and quality indicators such as mortality and complications. It may be advantageous to allocate planned procedures to institutions and surgeons with high volume, while this is less certain with regard to acute hospitalisations.

  3. Medical image of the week: massive abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larson M

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. An 88 year-old presented to the emergency department with left flank and lower back pain as well as lower abdominal fullness. The fullness had started 2 days prior, but the left flank pain acutely started in the early morning before presenting. He had a history of unmedicated hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and mild vertigo. His review of systems was positive for chills and difficulty urinating but no hematuria. He was a non-smoker, and had undergone orthopedic surgeries but had otherwise avoided emergent hospitalizations. On exam, vitals were unremarkable; there was no flank nor costovertebral angle tenderness; however, a midline pulsatile mass was present. An initial non-contrast CT abdomen/pelvis revealed a massive abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA, Figure 1. Follow-up CT angiogram of the AAA can be seen in Figure 2. Upon further questioning, he had undergone a research study some 30 years earlier involving ultrasound to screen for AAA and was told he ...

  4. Is population screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm cost-effective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Lotte

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is responsible for 1–2% of all male deaths over the age of 65 years. Early detection of AAA and elective surgery can reduce the mortality risk associated with AAA. However, many patients will not be diagnosed with AAA and have therefore an increased death risk due to the untreated AAA. It has been suggested that population screening for AAA in elderly males is effective and cost-effective. The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic review of published cost-effectiveness analyses of screening elderly men for AAA. Methods We performed a systematic search for economic evaluations in NHSEED, EconLit, Medline, Cochrane, Embase, Cinahl and two Scandinavian HTA data bases (DACEHTA and SBU. All identified studies were read in full and each study was systematically assessed according to international guidelines for critical assessment of economic evaluations in health care. Results The search identified 16 cost-effectiveness studies. Most studies considered only short term cost consequences. The studies seemed to employ a number of "optimistic" assumptions in favour of AAA screening, and included only few sensitivity analyses that assessed less optimistic assumptions. Conclusion Further analyses of cost-effectiveness of AAA screening are recommended.

  5. Contemporary Applications of Ultrasound in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eScaife

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound (US is a well-established screening tool for detection of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA and is currently recommended not only for those with a relevant family history but for all men and high-risk women older than 65 years of age. The advent of minimally invasive endovascular techniques in the treatment of AAAs (EVAR has increased the need for repeat imaging especially in the post-operative period. Nevertheless, preoperative planning, intraoperative execution and postoperative surveillance all mandate accurate imaging. While CTA and angiography have dominated the field, repeatedly exposing patients to the deleterious effects of cumulative radiation and intravenous nephrotoxic contrast, ultrasound technology has significantly evolved over the past decade. In addition to standard color duplex US, 2D, 3D or 4D contrast enhanced US modalities are revolutionizing AAA management and postoperative surveillance. This technology can accurately measure AAA diameter and volume and most importantly it can detect endoleaks post EVAR with high sensitivity and specificity. 4D contrast enhanced US can even provide hemodynamic information about the branch vessels following fenestrated EVARs. The need for experienced US operators and accredited vascular labs is mandatory to guarantee the reliability of the results. This review article presents a comprehensive overview of the literature on the state-of-art US imaging in AAA management, including post EVAR follow-up, techniques and diagnostic accuracy.

  6. Hybrid endovascular treatment of an aortic root and thoracoabdominal aneurysm in a high-risk patient with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelpi, Guido; Mazzaccaro, Daniela; Romagnoni, Claudia; Contino, Monica; Antona, Carlo

    2013-05-01

    This report describes the hybrid endovascular treatment of an aortic root dilatation and a thoracoabdominal aneurysm in a high-risk patient with Marfan syndrome. A 50-year-old male, in hemodialysis for polycystic kidney and polycystic liver, was referred to our department for aortic root dilatation of 5 cm and a 6.3-cm thoracoabdominal aneurysm . He already underwent surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm 10 years ago, complicated by pseudoaneurysm of the proximal anastomosis that had been treated in another center, with an endoprosthesis. The patient underwent aortic root replacement, aortic valve sparing operation, and rerouting of the superior mesenteric artery and celiac trunk to the ascending aorta. The thoracoabdominal aneurysm was excluded with an endoprosthesis few days after the surgical step. The 12-month computed tomography scan confirmed the complete exclusion of the thoracoabdominal aneurysm.

  7. Renal failure caused by a partly calcified aortic aneurysm in a patient with dabigatran therapy: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jud, Philipp; Gary, Thomas; Tiesenhausen, Kurt; Portugaller, Rupert; Hackl, Gerald; Brodmann, Marianne

    2017-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are mostly asymptomatic. If aortic aneurysms become symptomatic, complications include peripheral embolization, acute aortic occlusion, and aortic rupture. However, there are also unusual complications caused by aortic aneurysms. An 87-old male with dabigatran therapy presented with newly developed melena and acute renal failure. Radiological imaging revealed an AAA with thrombotic and calcified deposits which affected the renal arteries. Gastrointestinal bleeding and hypercoagulation caused by renal failure which was triggered in turn due to an AAA. Adapted antihypertensive therapy and initiation of simvastatin 40mg once daily as well as antiplatelet therapy with aspirin 50 mg once daily due to patient's refusal of any aneurysm intervention. Neither bleeding event nor aneurysm rupture occurred with the adapted antihypertensive therapy, simvastatin and aspirin. Nonruptured AAAs can cause rare, unusual, and even life-threatening complications depending on their size and anatomical position.

  8. 3-D quantification of the aortic arch morphology in 3-D CTA data for endovascular aortic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörz, Stefan; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Henninger, Verena; Rengier, Fabian; Schumacher, Hardy; Böckler, Dittmar; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Rohr, Karl

    2010-10-01

    We introduce a new model-based approach for the segmentation and quantification of the aortic arch morphology in 3-D computed tomography angiography (CTA) data for thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). The approach is based on a model-fitting scheme using a 3-D analytic intensity model for thick vessels in conjunction with a two-step refinement procedure, and allows us to accurately quantify the morphology of the aortic arch. Based on the fitting results, we additionally compute the (local) 3-D vessel curvature and torsion as well as the relevant lengths not only along the 3-D centerline, but particularly also along the inner and outer contour. These measurements are important for preoperative planning in TEVAR applications. We have validated our approach based on 3-D synthetic as well as 3-D MR phantom images. Moreover, we have successfully applied our approach using 3-D CTA datasets of the human thorax and have compared the results with ground truth obtained by a radiologist. We have also performed a quantitative comparison with a commercial vascular analysis software.

  9. Comparison of arterial stiffness and microcirculatory changes following abdominal aortic aneurysm grafting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moloney, M A

    2010-11-11

    BACKGOUND: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery provides a unique opportunity to study the impact of arterial stiffness on central haemodynamics, reflected in augmentation index (AI). The aneurysmal aorta is significantly stiffer than undilated age-matched aorta. AIM: We investigated whether replacement of an aneurysmal aorta with a compliant graft would result in a decrease in AI, which would thus decrease myocardial workload parameters. METHODS: Patients undergoing elective open or endovascular AAA repair were assessed with applanation tonometry and laser fluximetry pre-operatively, immediately and long-term post-operatively. RESULTS: Replacement of a small segment of abnormal conduit vessel resulted in improvements in AI, demonstrating that arterial stiffness can be surgically manipulated. CONCLUSIONS: These results reflect a decreased myocardial workload post-aortic grafting. This decrease in AI is important from a risk factor management perspective, and arterial stiffness should become a further recognised and screened for risk factor in patients with known aneurysmal disease.

  10. Comparison of arterial stiffness and microcirculatory changes following abdominal aortic aneurysm grafting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moloney, M A

    2012-02-01

    BACKGOUND: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery provides a unique opportunity to study the impact of arterial stiffness on central haemodynamics, reflected in augmentation index (AI). The aneurysmal aorta is significantly stiffer than undilated age-matched aorta. AIM: We investigated whether replacement of an aneurysmal aorta with a compliant graft would result in a decrease in AI, which would thus decrease myocardial workload parameters. METHODS: Patients undergoing elective open or endovascular AAA repair were assessed with applanation tonometry and laser fluximetry pre-operatively, immediately and long-term post-operatively. RESULTS: Replacement of a small segment of abnormal conduit vessel resulted in improvements in AI, demonstrating that arterial stiffness can be surgically manipulated. CONCLUSIONS: These results reflect a decreased myocardial workload post-aortic grafting. This decrease in AI is important from a risk factor management perspective, and arterial stiffness should become a further recognised and screened for risk factor in patients with known aneurysmal disease.

  11. [Successful two-stage surgical treatment of a thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlomin, V V; Zverev, D A; Zvereva, E D; Puzdriak, P D; Bondarenko, P B; Gordeev, M L

    Presented herein is a clinical case report regarding hybrid or two-stage surgical treatment of a Crawford type II thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm in an 87-year-old woman. For the first stage operation we performed open resection of the abdominal aortic aneurysm with aortofemoral bifurcation prosthetic repair and debranching of visceral and renal arteries. Several months thereafter, the second stage operation was performed, consisting in transcatheter exclusion of the thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm with the help of two stent grafts. The postoperative period turned out uneventful, with no complications. The check-up contrast-enhanced multislice computed tomography (MSCT) carried out 8 months later showed neither endoleaks nor migration of the stent grafts, with the bypass shunts' patency preserved.

  12. Infected aortic aneurysm presenting as prevertebral abscess in magnetic resonance imaging: A case report

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    Yu, Jung Re; Ko, Seong Joo; Heo, Sang Taek; Kim, Jin Seok; Kim, Seung Hyoung [Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    The differential diagnosis of mass-like lesions around the aorta includes saccular pseudoaneurysms and abscesses. A 69-year-old female was admitted with multiple abscesses and fluid collections in several muscles and joints. Methicillin susceptible Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from her blood and pus. Even though she was treated with repeated operations and appropriate antibiotics, her conditions worsened with persistent fever and newly developed abscesses at other sites. Serial enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed a newly developed saccular abdominal aortic aneurysm in the retroaortic space at the celiac axis level. However, the infected aortic aneurysm mimicked a prevertebral abscess on enhanced spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) due to its heterogeneous signal intensity caused by intraaneurysmal turbulent blood flow. We report to alert the pitfall in the diagnosis of saccular aortic aneurysm using spinal MRI and the importance of serial enhanced CT study in highly suspicious patients.

  13. Recognition and treatment of outflow tract stenosis during and after endovascular exclusion for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Qingsheng; Jing Zaiping; Zhao Zhiqing; Bao Junmin; Zhao Jun; Feng Xiang; Feng Rui; Huang Sheng

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the cognition and treatment of outflow tract stenosis in and after endovascular exclusion for abdominal aortic aneurysm. Methods: From Mar 1997 to Oct 2002, in 136 patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysm endovascular exclusion, 8 patients had outflow tract stenosis during the operation, and 3 patients had outflow tract stenosis after operation. The stenosis of 5 patients occurred at the crotch of the graft-stent. PTA was done in 7 patients and stents were placed in stenotic segment in 2 patients. 2 patients were treated with crossover operation. Results: Following up 1 month to 2 years, all patients have no lower limbs ischemia. Conclusions: The diagnosis of outflow tract stenosis during and after abdominal endovascular exclusion for aortic aneurysm must be in time. The treatment should be according to the different causes of stenosis

  14. Infected aortic aneurysm presenting as prevertebral abscess in magnetic resonance imaging: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Jung Re; Ko, Seong Joo; Heo, Sang Taek; Kim, Jin Seok; Kim, Seung Hyoung

    2013-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of mass-like lesions around the aorta includes saccular pseudoaneurysms and abscesses. A 69-year-old female was admitted with multiple abscesses and fluid collections in several muscles and joints. Methicillin susceptible Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from her blood and pus. Even though she was treated with repeated operations and appropriate antibiotics, her conditions worsened with persistent fever and newly developed abscesses at other sites. Serial enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed a newly developed saccular abdominal aortic aneurysm in the retroaortic space at the celiac axis level. However, the infected aortic aneurysm mimicked a prevertebral abscess on enhanced spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) due to its heterogeneous signal intensity caused by intraaneurysmal turbulent blood flow. We report to alert the pitfall in the diagnosis of saccular aortic aneurysm using spinal MRI and the importance of serial enhanced CT study in highly suspicious patients.

  15. Perioperative nursing for patients receiving endovascular therapy for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Yanfen; Pan Wei; Zhang Hongpeng; Guo Wei; Liu Xiaoping; Wei Ren

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the nursing strategy and practical measures for patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm during the perioperative period of endovascular intervention. Methods: Endovascular therapy was carried out in 34 patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm,who were encountered in our department during the period of July 1997 to September 2008. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed and the nursing points were summarized. Results: The average hospitalization days of the 34 patients were (14 ± 5) days, the mortality rate within 30 days was 23.5% (8/34). No nursing-related complications occurred. Conclusion: A comprehensive understanding of the mechanism, development and clinical evolution of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is very important for nursing care. For nursing staff, well mastering the relevant nursing technique, carefully guarding against any nursing errors and lessening patient's suffering as far as possible, all these are the task of primary importance. (authors)

  16. Spondylodiscitis concurrent with infectious aortic aneurysm caused by Candida tropicalis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oichi, Takeshi; Sasaki, Satoru; Tajiri, Yasuhito

    2015-08-01

    We report a case of spondylodiscitis concurrent with infectious aortic aneurysm caused by Candida tropicalis in a 79-year-old immunocompromised man. The patient underwent percutaneous drainage of the abscess and endoluminal exclusion of the aneurysm using a bifurcated stent graft. Micafungin was administered intravenously for 8 weeks, followed by a prolonged course of oral fluconazole. At the one-year follow-up, no recurrence was noted, and the patient could walk with a cane without low back pain.

  17. Investigation on the Regional Loss Factor and Its Anisotropy for Aortic Aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastaran Shahmansouri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An aortic aneurysm is a lethal arterial disease that mainly occurs in the thoracic and abdominal regions of the aorta. Thoracic aortic aneurysms are prevalent in the root/ascending parts of the aorta and can lead to aortic rupture resulting in the sudden death of patients. Understanding the biomechanical and histopathological changes associated with ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (ATAAs, this study investigates the mechanical properties of the aorta during strip-biaxial tensile cycles. The loss factor—defined as the ratio of dissipated energy to the energy absorbed during a tensile cycle—the incremental modulus, and their anisotropy indexes were compared with the media fiber compositions for aneurysmal (n = 26 and control (n = 4 human ascending aortas. The aneurysmal aortas were categorized into the aortas with bicuspid aortic valves (BAV and tricuspid aortic valves (TAV. The strip-biaxial loss factor correlates well with the diameter of the aortas with BAV and TAV (for the axial direction, respectively, R2 = 0.71, p = 0.0022 and R2 = 0.54, p = 0.0096. The loss factor increases significantly with patients’ age in the BAV group (for the axial direction: R2 = 0.45, p = 0.0164. The loss factor is isotropic for all TAV quadrants, whereas it is on average only isotropic in the anterior and outer curvature regions of the BAV group. The results suggest that loss factor may be a useful surrogate measure to describe the histopathology of aneurysmal tissue and to demonstrate the differences between ATAAs with the BAV and TAV.

  18. Preliminary Computational Hemodynamics Study of Double Aortic Aneurysms under Multistage Surgical Procedures: An Idealised Model Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Otsuki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Double aortic aneurysm (DAA falls under the category of multiple aortic aneurysms. Repair is generally done through staged surgery due to low invasiveness. In this approach, one aneurysm is cured per operation. Therefore, two operations are required for DAA. However, post-first-surgery rupture cases have been reported. Although the problems involved with managing staged surgery have been discussed for more than 30 years, investigation from a hemodynamic perspective has not been attempted. Hence, this is the first computational fluid dynamics approach to the DAA problem. Three idealized geometries were prepared: presurgery, thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA cured, and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA cured. By applying identical boundary conditions for flow rate and pressure, the Navier-Stokes equation and continuity equations were solved under the Newtonian fluid assumption. Average pressure in TAA was increased by AAA repair. On the other hand, average pressure in AAA was decreased after TAA repair. Average wall shear stress was decreased at the peak in post-first-surgery models. However, the wave profile of TAA average wall shear stress was changed in the late systole phase after AAA repair. Since the average wall shear stress in the post-first-surgery models decreased and pressure at TAA after AAA repair increased, the TAA might be treated first to prevent rupture.

  19. Mild aerobic exercise blocks elastin fiber fragmentation and aortic dilatation in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome associated aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Christine; Nielsen, Cory; Alex, Ramona; Cooper, Kimbal; Farney, Michael; Gaufin, Douglas; Cui, Jason Z; van Breemen, Cornelis; Broderick, Tom L; Vallejo-Elias, Johana; Esfandiarei, Mitra

    2017-07-01

    Regular low-impact physical activity is generally allowed in patients with Marfan syndrome, a connective tissue disorder caused by heterozygous mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene. However, being above average in height encourages young adults with this syndrome to engage in high-intensity contact sports, which unfortunately increases the risk for aortic aneurysm and rupture, the leading cause of death in Marfan syndrome. In this study, we investigated the effects of voluntary (cage-wheel) or forced (treadmill) aerobic exercise at different intensities on aortic function and structure in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome. Four-week-old Marfan and wild-type mice were subjected to voluntary and forced exercise regimens or sedentary lifestyle for 5 mo. Thoracic aortic tissue was isolated and subjected to structural and functional studies. Our data showed that exercise improved aortic wall structure and function in Marfan mice and that the beneficial effect was biphasic, with an optimum at low intensity exercise (55-65% V̇o 2max ) and tapering off at a higher intensity of exercise (85% V̇o 2max ). The mechanism underlying the reduced elastin fragmentation in Marfan mice involved reduction of the expression of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 within the aortic wall. These findings present the first evidence of potential beneficial effects of mild exercise on the structural integrity of the aortic wall in Marfan syndrome associated aneurysm. Our finding that moderate, but not strenuous, exercise protects aortic structure and function in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome could have important implications for the medical care of young Marfan patients. NEW & NOTEWORTHY The present study provides conclusive scientific evidence that daily exercise can improve aortic health in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome associated aortic aneurysm, and it establishes the threshold for the exercise intensity beyond which exercise may not be as protective. These findings establish a platform

  20. Experimental Model of Saccular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in Swines with Pericardium Sac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício de Amorim Aquino

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To consider modifications in an experimental model of saccular aortic aneurysm, aiming at better reproducibility, to be used in the development of vascular prostheses. Methods: Experimental study in two phases, developed in the Center of Experimental Surgery and Bioterium (CCEB of the University of Health Sciences of Alagoas (UNCISAL, with 11 hybrid swine, female, mean weight of 20 ± 5 kg, according to modifications in the Perini technique was performed. In the first phase, the aneurysm was confectioned with bovine pericardial patch. In the second phase, fifteen days later, the patency of the aneurysms was confirmed by Doppler ultrasonography. The described variables were aortic and aneurysm sac patency, incidence of rupture, morbidity and mortality. The statistical analysis program used was STATA v.8. Results: All animals survived to the procedures. Surgical mean time was 73 minutes. Aneurysm rupture, proximal or distal aortic thrombosis, visceral or legs ischemia weren't observed. Parietal thrombus formation was observed in all of the aneurysms, two of which (18%; IC 95% = 3.98 - 48.84 were occluded and nine (82%; IC 95% = 51.15 - 96.01 were patent. Conclusion: In this series, the modifications carried out in the technique related to the surgical approach, race, anesthesia, and imaging exams reproduced the experimental model, reducing its costs, without hindering the analysis of the variables. The satisfactory patency ratio allows the method to be used in experimental models for the development of vascular prostheses.

  1. Rupture of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Young Man with Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Maria Weinkouff; Huynh, Khiem Dinh; Baandrup, Ulrik Thorngren; Nielsen, Dorte Guldbrand; Andersen, Niels Holmark

    2018-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are very rare in Marfan syndrome. We present a case with a young nonsmoking and normotensive male with Marfan syndrome, who developed an infrarenal AAA that presented with rupture to the retroperitoneal cavity causing life-threatening bleeding shock. The patient had acute aortic surgery and survived. Five months before this incident, the patient had uneventful elective aortic root replacement (ad modum David) due to an enlarged aortic root. At that time, his abdominal aorta was assessed with a routine ultrasound scan that showed a normal-sized abdominal aorta. This documents that the aneurysm had evolved very rapidly despite young age and absence of risk factors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Unexpected death caused by rupture of a dilated aorta in an adult male with aortic coarctation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind; Knudsen, Peter Juel Thiis

    2015-01-01

    arch without dissection combined with aortic coarctation. The patient, a 46-year-old man, was found dead at home. PMCT showed haemopericardium and dilatation of the ascending aorta and the aortic arch. This appearance led to the mistaken interpretation that the images represented a dissecting aneurysm...

  3. Acute Symptomatic Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Secondary to Endovascular Stent Graft Associated Type II Endoleak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Ka Leung Chan

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular abdominal aneurysm repair (EVAR is popular because of its low invasiveness and feasibility for high-risk patients. Endoleak is common after EVAR and is characterized by blood flow within the aneurysm sac but outside the stent graft. Type II or collateral endoleak commonly results from retrograde filling of the aneurysm from collateral visceral vessels, lumbar, inferior mesenteric, accessory renal or sacral arteries. Collateral leaks are generally thought to be benign and over half of the early leaks will seal spontaneously. Sporadically, collateral endoleak could lead to aneurysm sac pressurization and place the patient at ongoing risk of rupture. Herein, we report an uncommon case of early post-stent graft placement symptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with type II endoleak.

  4. The prevalence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder following neonatal aortic arch repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sistino, Joseph J; Atz, Andrew M; Simpson, Kit N; Ellis, Charles; Ikonomidis, John S; Bradley, Scott M

    2015-04-01

    We sought to determine the prevalence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in a population of children who underwent neonatal heart surgery involving repair of the aortic arch for Norwood Stage I, interrupted aortic arch, and combined repair of aortic coarctation with ventricular septal defect. Children between the ages of 5 and 16 were surveyed using the ADHD-IV and the Child Heath Questionnaire-50. Classification as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder was defined for this study as either a parent-reported diagnosis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder or ADHD-IV inattention score of ⩾93 percentile. Of the 134 surveys, 57 (43%) were returned completed. A total of 25 (44%) children either had a diagnosis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and/or ADHD-IV inattention score ⩾93 percentile. Eleven of the 13 (85%) children with interrupted aortic arch, 3 of the 7 (42.9%) children with combined coarctation/ventricular septal defect repair, and 9 of the 33 (27.3%) children with hypoplastic left-heart syndrome were classified as having attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Only 7 of the 25 (28%) children received medical treatment for this condition. Quality of life indicators in the Child Heath Questionnaire-50 Questionnaire were highly correlated with the ADHD-IV scores. The risks for the development of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder are multifactorial but are significantly increased in this post-surgical population. This study revealed a low treatment rate for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and a significant impact on the quality of life in these children.

  5. Alternative to the bentall procedure for elderly patients with aortic root aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bical, Olivier M; Deleuze, Philippe

    2013-09-01

    We describe an alternative technique to the Bentall procedure for elderly patients with aortic root aneurysms. It is the subcoronary implantation of a Freestyle (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) aortic bioprosthesis with interposition of a graft material between the upper part of the Freestyle bioprosthesis and the distal aorta. The technique described avoids the proximal anastomosis of the graft and avoids the coronary reimplantations of the Bentall procedure which are still a potential risk of bleeding particularly in elderly patients. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy-like Syndrome After Aortic Aneurysm Repair: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirisha Nandipati

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of progressive supranuclear palsy‐like syndrome is a rare complication of ascending aortic aneurysm repair. We report two patients with videos and present a table of prior reported cases. To our knowledge there is no previously published video of this syndrome. The suspected mechanism is brainstem injury though neuroimaging is often negative for an associated infarct. We hope our report will increase recognition of this syndrome after aortic surgery, especially in patients with visual complaints.

  7. Endovascular vs open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedeau, April E.; Pomposelli, Frank B.; Hamdan, Allen D.; Wyers, Mark C.; Hsu, Richard; Sachs, Teviah; Siracuse, Jeffrey J.; Schermerhorn, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Endovascular repair (EVAR) of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) has become first-line therapy at our institution and is performed under a standardized protocol. We compare perioperative mortality, midterm survival, and morbidity after EVAR and open surgical repair (OSR). Methods Records were retrospectively reviewed from May 2000 to September 2010 for repair of infrarenal rAAAs. Primary end points included perioperative mortality and midterm survival. Secondary end points included acute limb ischemia, length of stay, ventilator-dependent respiratory failure, myocardial infarction, renal failure, abdominal compartment syndrome, and secondary intervention. Statistical analysis was performed using the t-test,X2 test, the Fisher exact test, and logistic regression calculations. Midterm survival was assessed with Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard models. Results Seventy-four infrarenal rAAAs were repaired, 19 by EVAR and 55 by OSR. Despite increased age and comorbidity in the EVAR patients, perioperative mortality was 15.7% for EVAR, which was significantly lower than the 49% for OSR (odds ratio, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.05-0.74; P = .008). Midterm survival also favored EVAR (hazard ratio, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.21-0.77; P = .028, adjusted for age and sex). Mean follow-up was 20 months, and 1-year survival was 60% for EVAR vs 45% for OSR. Mean length of stay for patients surviving >1 day was 10 days for EVAR and 21 days for OSR (P = .004). Ventilator-dependent respiratory failure was 5% in the EVAR group vs 42% for OSR (odds ratio, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.01-0.62; P = .001). Conclusions EVAR of rAAA has a superior perioperative survival advantage and decreased morbidity vs OSR. Although not statistically significant, overall survival favors EVAR. We recommend that EVAR be considered as the first-line treatment of rAAAs and practiced as the standard of care. PMID:22626871

  8. Blood flow dynamic improvement with aneurysm repair detected by a patient-specific model of multiple aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sughimoto, Koichi; Takahara, Yoshiharu; Mogi, Kenji; Yamazaki, Kenji; Tsubota, Ken'ichi; Liang, Fuyou; Liu, Hao

    2014-05-01

    Aortic aneurysms may cause the turbulence of blood flow and result in the energy loss of the blood flow, while grafting of the dilated aorta may ameliorate these hemodynamic disturbances, contributing to the alleviation of the energy efficiency of blood flow delivery. However, evaluating of the energy efficiency of blood flow in an aortic aneurysm has been technically difficult to estimate and not comprehensively understood yet. We devised a multiscale computational biomechanical model, introducing novel flow indices, to investigate a single male patient with multiple aortic aneurysms. Preoperative levels of wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index (OSI) were elevated but declined after staged grafting procedures: OSI decreased from 0.280 to 0.257 (first operation) and 0.221 (second operation). Graftings may strategically counter the loss of efficient blood delivery to improve hemodynamics of the aorta. The energy efficiency of blood flow also improved postoperatively. Novel indices of pulsatile pressure index (PPI) and pulsatile energy loss index (PELI) were evaluated to characterize and quantify energy loss of pulsatile blood flow. Mean PPI decreased from 0.445 to 0.423 (first operation) and 0.359 (second operation), respectively; while the preoperative PELI of 0.986 dropped to 0.820 and 0.831. Graftings contributed not only to ameliorate wall shear stress or oscillatory shear index but also to improve efficient blood flow. This patient-specific modeling will help in analyzing the mechanism of aortic aneurysm formation and may play an important role in quantifying the energy efficiency or loss in blood delivery.

  9. [Surgical treatment of the aortic root aneurysm related to Marfan syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Si-hong; Sun, Yan-qing; Meng, Xu; Zhang, Hong; Hou, Xiao-tong; Wang, Jian-gang; Gao, Feng

    2005-08-24

    To review the experience of surgical treatment of aortic root aneurysm of Marfan syndrome. We The clinical data of 84 Marfan syndrome patients, 61 males and 23 females, aged 35 +/- 12 (5 - 62), 41 cases presenting with aortic dissection (Debakey type I in 32 cases and type II in 9), 52 cases with moderate to severe aortic regurgitation, and 9 cases with moderate to severe mitral regurgitation, 43 cases with cardiac function of class I - II, 30 with class III and 11 with class IV according the New York Heart Association (NYHA) standard, who underwent surgical treatment for aortic root aneurysm with a mean diameter of 68 mm +/- 14 mm, were analyzed. Bentall procedure was performed in 68 cases, Wheat procedure in 6, Cabrol procedure in 5, and aortic valve replacement and aortoplasty in 5. Concomitant procedures included mitral value replacement and mitral valvuoplasty in 3 cases respectively. Urgent surgery was conducted in 28 cases, and elective operation in 56 cases. There were 3 in-hospital deaths (3.57%). 76 cases were followed up for a mean duration of 55 +/- 31 months. Three patients underwent reoperation. The cardiac function returned to class I - II except for 2 cases that remained at the class III. Bentall procedure should be the first choice of the surgery for aortic root aneurysm of Marfan syndrome with a low mortality and a good late outcome.

  10. Bifurcated-bifurcated aneurysm repair is a novel technique to repair infrarenal aortic aneurysms in the setting of iliac aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Susanna Hewon; Starnes, Benjamin Ware

    2017-11-01

    Up to 40% of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) have coexistent iliac artery aneurysms (IAAs). In the past, successful endovascular repair required internal iliac artery (IIA) embolization, which can lead to pelvic or buttock ischemia. This study describes a technique that uses a readily available solution with a minimally altered off-the-shelf bifurcated graft in the IAA to maintain IIA perfusion. From August 2009 to May 2015, 14 patients with AAAs and coexisting IAAs underwent repair with a bifurcated-bifurcated approach. A 22-mm or 24-mm bifurcated main body device was used in the IAA with extension of the "contralateral" limb into the IIA. Intraoperative details including operative time, fluoroscopy time, and contrast agent use were recorded. Outcome measures assessed were operative technical success and a composite outcome measure of IIA patency, freedom from reintervention, and clinically significant endoleak at 1 year. Fourteen patients underwent bifurcated-bifurcated repair during the study period. Technical success was achieved in 93% of patients, with successful treatment of the AAA and IAA and preservation of flow to at least one IIA. The procedure was performed with a completely percutaneous bilateral femoral approach in 92% of patients. Three patients had a type II endoleak on initial follow-up imaging, but none were clinically significant. There were no cases of bowel ischemia or erectile dysfunction. One patient had buttock claudication ipsilateral to IIA coil embolization (contralateral to bifurcated iliac repair and preserved IIA) that resolved by 6-month follow-up. Two patients required reinterventions. One patient presented to his first follow-up visit on postoperative day 25 with thrombosis of the right external iliac limb ipsilateral to the bifurcated iliac repair, which was successfully treated with thrombectomy and stenting of the limb. This same patient presented at 83 months with growth of the preserved IIA to 3.9 cm and underwent coil

  11. Outcomes of Open Repair of Mycotic Aortic Aneurysms with In Situ Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo-Hyun Kim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mycotic aortic aneurysms are rare and life-threatening. Unfortunately, no established guidelines exist for the treatment of patients with mycotic aortic aneurysms. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the midterm outcomes of the open repair of mycotic thoracic and thoracoabdominal aneurysms and suggest a therapeutic strategy. Methods: From 2006 to 2016, 19 patients underwent open repair for an aortic aneurysm. All infected tissue was extensively debrided and covered with soft tissue. We recorded the clinical findings, anatomic location of the aneurysm, bacteriology results, antibiotic therapy, morbidity, and mortality for these cases. Results: The median age was 62±7.2 years (range, 16 to 78 years, 13 patients (68% were men, and the mean aneurysm size was 44.5±4.9 mm. The mean time from onset of illness to surgery was 14.5±2.4 days. Aortic continuity was restored in situ with a Dacron prosthesis (79%, homograft (16%, or Gore-Tex graft (5%. Soft-tissue coverage of the prosthesis was performed in 8 patients. The mean follow-up time was 43.2±11.7 months. The early mortality rate was 10.5%, and the 5-year survival rate was 74.9%±11.5%. Conclusion: This study showed acceptable early and midterm outcomes of open repair of my-cotic aneurysms. We emphasize that aggressive intraoperative debridement with soft-tissue coverage results in a high rate of success in these high-risk patients.

  12. Aortic arch atherosclerosis in patients with severe aortic stenosis can be argued by greater day-by-day blood pressure variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Shinichi; Sugioka, Kenichi; Fujita, Suwako; Ito, Asahiro; Matsumura, Yoshiki; Hanatani, Akihisa; Takagi, Masahiko; Di Tullio, Marco R; Homma, Shunichi; Yoshiyama, Minoru

    2015-07-01

    Although it is well known that the prevalence of aortic arch plaques, one of the risk factors for ischemic stroke, is high in patients with severe aortic stenosis, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Increased day-by-day blood pressure (BP) variability is also known to be associated with stroke; however, little is known on the association between day-by-bay BP variability and aortic arch atherosclerosis in patients with aortic stenosis. Our objective was to clarify the association between day-by-day BP variables (average values and variability) and aortic arch atherosclerosis in patients with severe aortic stenosis. The study population consisted of 104 consecutive patients (mean age 75 ± 8 years) with severe aortic stenosis who were scheduled for aortic valve replacement. BP was measured in the morning in at least 4 consecutive days (mean 6.8 days) prior to the day of surgery. Large (≥4 mm), ulcerated, or mobile plaques were defined as complex plaques using transesophageal echocardiography. Cigarette smoking and all systolic BP variables were associated with the presence of complex plaques (p < 0.05), whereas diastolic BP variables were not. Multiple regression analysis indicated that day-by-day mean systolic BP and day-by-day systolic BP variability remained independently associated with the presence of complex plaques (p < 0.05) after adjustment for age, male sex, cigarette smoking, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes mellitus. These findings suggest that higher day-by-day mean systolic BP and day-by-day systolic BP variability are associated with complex plaques in the aortic arch and consequently stroke risk in patients with aortic stenosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Bicuspid Aortic Valve and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm: Three Patient Populations, Two Disease Phenotypes, and One Shared Genotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert B. Hinton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV and thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA are two discrete cardiovascular phenotypes characterized by latent progressive disease states. There is a clear association between BAV and TAA; however the nature and extent of this relationship is unclear. There are both distinct and overlapping developmental pathways that have been established to contribute to the formation of the aortic valve and the aortic root, and the mature anatomy of these different tissue types is intimately intertwined. Likewise, human genetics studies have established apparently separate and common contributions to these clinical phenotypes, suggesting complex inheritance and a shared genetic basis and translating 3 patient populations, namely, BAV, TAA, or both, into a common but diverse etiology. A better understanding of the BAV-TAA association will provide an opportunity to leverage molecular information to modify clinical care through more sophisticated diagnostic testing, improved counseling, and ultimately new pharmacologic therapies.

  14. Validation of numerical simulation methods in aortic arch using 4D Flow MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Shohei; Itatani, Keiichi; Furusawa, Toyoki; Nishino, Teruyasu; Sugiyama, Masataka; Takehara, Yasuo; Yasukochi, Satoshi

    2017-08-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are the gold standard in studying blood flow dynamics. However, CFD results are dependent on the boundary conditions and the computation model. The purpose of this study was to validate CFD methods using comparison with actual measurements of the blood flow vector obtained with four-dimensional (4D) flow magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). 4D Flow MRI was performed on a healthy adult and a child with double-aortic arch. The aortic lumen was segmented to visualize the blood flow. The CFD analyses were performed for the same geometries based on three turbulent models: laminar, large eddy simulation (LES), and the renormalization group k-ε model (RNG k-ε). The flow-velocity vector components, namely the wall shear stress (WSS) and flow energy loss (EL), of the MRI and CFD results were compared. The flow rate of the MRI results was underestimated in small vessels, including the neck vessels. Spiral flow in the ascending aorta caused by the left ventricular twist was observed by MRI. Secondary flow distal to the aortic arch was well realized in both CFD and MRI. The average correlation coefficients of the velocity vector components of MRI and CFD for the child were the highest for the RNG k-ε model (0.530 in ascending aorta, 0.768 in the aortic arch, 0.584 in the descending aorta). The WSS and EL values of MRI were less than half of those of CFD, but the WSS distribution patterns were quite similar. The WSS and EL estimates were higher in RNG k-ε and LES than in the laminar model because of eddy viscosity. The CFD computation realized accurate flow distal to the aortic arch, and the WSS distribution was well simulated compared to actual measurement using 4D Flow MRI. However, the helical flow was not simulated in the ascending aorta. The accuracy was enhanced by using the turbulence model, and the RNG k-ε model showed the highest correlation with 4D Flow MRI.

  15. Persistent fifth arch anomalies - broadening the spectrum to include a variation of double aortic arch vascular ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Beverley; Chan, Frandics [Stanford Children' s Hospital and Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Hanneman, Kate [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2016-12-15

    Fifth arch anomalies are rare and complex and frequently misdiagnosed or mistaken for other entities. We report a double arch vascular ring that is thought to consist of right fourth arch and left fifth arch components, a previously undescribed persistent fifth arch variant. The currently recognized spectrum and classification of fifth arch vascular anomalies are expanded along with illustrative images to justify the proposed changes. Reviewing and expanding the classification of fifth arch anomalies to include a double arch ring variant will promote recognition, correct diagnosis and appropriate management of these anomalies. (orig.)

  16. Right Aortic Arch and Kommerell’s Diverticulum Repaired without Reconstruction of Aberrant Left Subclavian Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Osawa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Right aortic arch with Kommerell’s diverticulum is a very rare situation. Surgical treatment is recommended for symptomatic patients or asymptomatic patients with a large diverticulum. However planning the strategy of operation is difficult without a 3D imaging. We report a case of a 57-year-old man with right aortic arch, Kommerell’s diverticulum, and aberrant left subclavian artery. After a 3D-CT imaging, the patient underwent descending aortic replacement without reconstruction of aberrant left subclavian artery. After operation, there was no signs or symptoms of ischemia of the left arm. If the reconstruction of the aberrant subclavian artery was too difficult, closing its orifice is an acceptable decision. It has been found advantageous because of a decrease blood loss and a shorter cardiopulmonary bypass duration. If an ischemia of the arm is noticed, additional reconstruction will have to be considered. 3D-CT imaging was very useful to have a proper orientation and plan for the operative strategy.

  17. Endovascular treatment of Brucella-infected abdominal aortic aneurysm: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Ji, Donghua; Wang, Feng

    2017-10-01

    In very rare cases, a primary infected abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is caused by a species of Brucella. In this report, we report such a case that was successfully treated with a novel approach. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first case occurring in China, in which an infection of the abdominal aortic aneurysm was caused by a Brucella species. The clinical findings included high fever, fatigue, and abdominal pain. The diagnosis was confirmed by computed tomography angiography and by bacteriologic isolation from the patient's blood culture. The patient was given endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and Brucella-sensitive antibiotics for 6 weeks. During the 10-month follow-up, the patient's clinical course remained uneventful. Our case study supports the premise that endovascular aneurysm repair is an appropriate alternative strategy to treat an infected abdominal aortic aneurysm. Compared with conventional surgical treatment, EVAR with long-term oral antibiotics is a simpler, less traumatic, and more efficient procedure. However, this needs to be further evaluated through long-term follow-up.

  18. Three-dimensional finite volume modelling of blood flow in simulated angular neck abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algabri, Y. A.; Rookkapan, S.; Chatpun, S.

    2017-09-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is considered a deadly cardiovascular disease that defined as a focal dilation of blood artery. The healthy aorta size is between 15 and 24 mm based on gender, bodyweight, and age. When the diameter increased to 30 mm or more, the rupture can occur if it is kept growing or untreated. Moreover, the proximal angular neck of aneurysm is categorized as a significant morphological feature with prime harmful effects on endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Flow pattern in pathological vessel can influence the vascular intervention. The aim of this study is to investigate the blood flow behaviours in angular neck abdominal aortic aneurysm with simulated geometry based on patient’s information using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The 3D angular neck AAA models have been designed by using SolidWorks Software. Consequently, CFD tools are used for simulating these 3D models of angular neck AAA in ANSYS FLUENT Software. Eventually, based on the results, we summarized that the CFD techniques have shown high performance in explaining and investigating the flow patterns for angular neck abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  19. Abdominal aortic aneurysm in a premature neonate with disseminated candidiasis: Ultrasound and angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoss, A.E.; Ponhold, W.; Pollak, A.; Schlemmer, M.; Weninger, M.

    1985-09-01

    When using ultrasound for detection of kidney enlargement, we found an acute abdominal aortic aneurysm secondary to aortitis arising from umbilical artery catheterisation in a premature neonate with systemic candidiasis. Aortography was performed to provide vascular details such as involvement of celiac, renal, iliac and femoral arteries.

  20. Abdominal aortic aneurysm in a premature neonate with disseminated candidiasis: Ultrasound and angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoss, A.E.; Ponhold, W.; Pollak, A.; Schlemmer, M.; Weninger, M.

    1985-01-01

    When using ultrasound for detection of kidney enlargement, we found an acute abdominal aortic aneurysm secondary to aortitis arising from umbilical artery catheterisation in a premature neonate with systemic candidiasis. Aortography was performed to provide vascular details such as involvement of celiac, renal, iliac and femoral arteries. (orig.)

  1. Low-dose aspirin and rupture ofabdominal aortic aneurysm: A nationwide, population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wemmelund, H.; Jørgensen, T.; Høgh, A.

    OBJECTIVE: The use of low-dose aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid [ASA]) has been suggested to attenuate growth of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), yet solid clinical evidence of this hypothesis is still missing. This study aimed to investigate whether preadmission ASA use influenced the risk...

  2. Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair complicated by spondylodiscitis and iliaco-enteral fistula.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, H.D. de; Sterkenburg, S.M. van; Pierie, M.; Reijnen, M.M.P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Infections of abdominal aortic endografts are rare. There are no reports on the association with spondylodiscitis. We report a case of a 74-year-old man who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and subsequently femorofemoral bypass placement due to occlusion of the right limb of the

  3. Endovascular stent grafting of thoracic aortic aneurysms: technological advancements provide an alternative to traditional surgical repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lauren E Beste

    2005-01-01

    The use of endovascular stent grafts is a leading technological advancement in the treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms, and is being trialed in the United States as an alternative to medical management and traditional surgical repair. Aortic stent grafts, initially used only for abdominal aortic aneurysms, have been used for over 10 years in Europe and are currently under United States Food and Drug Administration investigation for the treatment of chronic and acute aortic aneurysms. Diseases of the thoracic aorta are often present in high-risk individuals, and, as a result, there is a high morbidity and mortality rate associated with both medical and surgical management of these patients. The development and refinement of endovascular approaches have the potential to decrease the need for traditional surgical repair, especially in high-risk populations such as the elderly and those with multiple comorbidities. Endovascular technology for thoracic repair has only been used in Europe for the last 10 years, with no long-term outcomes available; however, preliminary research demonstrates favorable early and midterm outcomes showing that endovascular stent graft placement to exclude the dilated, dissected, or ruptured aorta is both technically feasible and safe for patients. The article highlights the historical perspective of endovascular stent grafting as well as a description of patient selection, the operative procedure, benefits, risks, and unresolved issues pertaining to the procedure. A brief review of aneurysm and dissection pathophysiology and management is provided, as well as postoperative management for acute care nurses and recommendations for clinical practice.

  4. Mutations in the TGF-beta repressor SKI cause Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome with aortic aneurysm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doyle, Alexander J.; Doyle, Jefferson J.; Bessling, Seneca L.; Maragh, Samantha; Lindsay, Mark E.; Schepers, Dorien; Gillis, Elisabeth; Mortier, Geert; Homfray, Tessa; Sauls, Kimberly; Norris, Russell A.; Huso, Nicholas D.; Leahy, Dan; Mohr, David W.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Scott, Alan F.; Destrée, Anne; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Arn, Pamela H.; Curry, Cynthia J.; van Laer, Lut; McCallion, Andrew S.; Loeys, Bart L.; Dietz, Harry C.

    2012-01-01

    Elevated transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of syndromic presentations of aortic aneurysm, including Marfan syndrome (MFS) and Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS)(1-4). However, the location and character of many of the causal mutations in LDS intuitively

  5. Vascular dysfunctions in the isolated aorta of double-transgenic hypertensive mice developing aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waeckel, L.; Badier-Commander, C.; Damery, T.

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-II and oxidative stress are involved in the genesis of aortic aneurysms, a phenomenon exacerbated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) deletion or uncoupling. The purpose of this work was to study the endothelial function in wild-type C57BL/6 (BL) and transgenic mice expressing...

  6. Long-Term Outcome of the GORE EXCLUDER AAA Endoprosthesis for Treatment of Infrarenal Aortic Aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poublon, Claire G.; Holewijn, Suzanne; van Sterkenburg, Steven M. M.; Tielliu, Ignace F. J.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Reijnen, Michel M. P. J.

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term outcome of GORE EXCLUDER AAA Endoprosthesis (W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc, Flagstaff, Arizona) for elective treatment of infrarenal aortic aneurysms and to evaluate performance of different generations of the device. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was

  7. Plasma levels of cathepsins L, K, and V and risks of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lv, Bing-Jie; Lindholt, Jes S; Wang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Cathepsin L (CatL), cathepsin K (CatK), and cathepsin V (CatV) are potent elastases implicated in human arterial wall remodeling. Whether plasma levels of these cathepsins are altered in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) remains unknown....

  8. Relation between hospital volume and outcome of elective surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henebiens, M.; van den Broek, Th A. A.; Vahl, A. C.; Koelemay, M. J. W.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Our aim was to analyse the relation between hospital volume and peri-operative mortality in abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery. DESIGN: Systematic review. METHOD: The Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched to identify all population based studies reporting on the volume

  9. An emergency visceral hybrid procedure for ruptured thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Meyenfeldt, E. M.; Schnater, J. M.; Reekers, J. A.; Balm, R.

    2009-01-01

    Rupture of a thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) is usually lethal. Patients with contained ruptures, who reach the hospital, have traditionally been subjected to open reconstructive surgery. However, especially in older patients, open surgery has a high mortality and morbidity rate. Visceral

  10. Nationwide Study on the Risk of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in Patients With Psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalid, Usman; Egeberg, Alexander; Ahlehoff, Ole

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex multifactorial disease associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Increased inflammation including T-helper 17 cell-mediated effects has been implicated in AAA pathogenesis. Psoriasis is considered to be a T-helper 17-driven chronic inf...

  11. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Karl Emil; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The renin-angiotensin system is thought to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). However, effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs) on human AAAs remain unclear. We therefore ex...

  12. Randomized double-blind controlled trial of roxithromycin for prevention of abdominal aortic aneurysm expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vammen, Sten; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Ostergaard, L

    2001-01-01

    Macrolide treatment has been reported to lower the risk of recurrent ischaemic heart disease. The influence of macrolides on the expansion rate of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) remains unknown. The aim was to investigate the effect of roxithromycin on the expansion rate of small AAAs....

  13. Klf15 deficiency is a molecular link between heart failure and aortic aneurysm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Saptarsi M; Lu, Yuan; Jeyaraj, Darwin; Kawanami, Daiji; Cui, Yingjie; Eapen, Sam J; Hao, Caili; Li, Yan; Doughman, Yong-Qiu; Watanabe, Michiko; Shimizu, Koichi; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Sadoshima, Junichi; Margulies, Kenneth B; Cappola, Thomas P; Jain, Mukesh K

    2010-04-07

    Current therapies for diseases of heart muscle (cardiomyopathy) and aorta (aortopathy) include inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system, beta-adrenergic antagonists, and the statin class of cholesterol-lowering agents. These therapies have limited efficacy, as adverse cardiovascular events continue to occur with some frequency in patients taking these drugs. Although cardiomyopathy and aortopathy can coexist in a number of conditions (for example, Marfan's syndrome, acromegaly, pregnancy, and aging), pathogenetic molecular links between the two diseases remain poorly understood. We reasoned that identification of common molecular perturbations in these two tissues could point to therapies for both conditions. Here, we show that deficiency of the transcriptional regulator Kruppel-like factor 15 (Klf15) in mice leads to both heart failure and aortic aneurysm formation through a shared molecular mechanism. Klf15 concentrations are markedly reduced in failing human hearts and in human aortic aneurysm tissues. Mice deficient in Klf15 develop heart failure and aortic aneurysms in a p53-dependent and p300 acetyltransferase-dependent fashion. KLF15 activation inhibits p300-mediated acetylation of p53. Conversely, Klf15 deficiency leads to hyperacetylation of p53 in the heart and aorta, a finding that is recapitulated in human tissues. Finally, Klf15-deficient mice are rescued by p53 deletion or p300 inhibition. These findings highlight a molecular perturbation common to the pathobiology of heart failure and aortic aneurysm formation and suggest that manipulation of KLF15 function may be a productive approach to treat these morbid diseases.

  14. Potential circulating biomarkers for abdominal aortic aneurysm expansion and rupture--a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urbonavicius, Sigitas; Urbonaviciene, Grazina; Honoré, Birgit

    2008-01-01

    The maximal diameter of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) is the dominating indication for repair. However half of the AAAs repaired would never have ruptured if left unrepaired, although small AAAs occasionally rupture. Earlier surgery may be associated with a lower mortality. More precise indic...

  15. Performant Mutation Identification Using Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing of 14 Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Proost, D.; Vandeweyer, G.; Meester, J.A.; Salemink, S.; Kempers, M.; Ingram, C.; Peeters, N.; Saenen, J.; Vrints, C.; Lacro, R.V.; Roden, D.; Wuyts, W.; Dietz, H.C.; Mortier, G.; Loeys, B.L.; Laer, L. Van

    2015-01-01

    At least 14 causative genes have been identified for both syndromic and nonsyndromic forms of thoracic aortic aneurysm/dissection (TAA), an important cause of death in the industrialized world. Molecular confirmation of the diagnosis is increasingly important for gene-tailored patient management but

  16. Statin use is associated with reduced all-cause mortality after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leurs, L.J.; Visser, P.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Buth, J.; Harris, P.L.; Blankensteijn, J.D.

    2006-01-01

    It has been shown that preoperative statin therapy reduces all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in patients undergoing major noncardiac vascular surgery. In this report, we investigated the influence of statin use on early and late outcome following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

  17. Serum elastin peptides in the preoperative evaluation of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Ashton, H A; Heickendorff, Lene

    2001-01-01

    Serum elastin peptides (SEP) have been reported to be associated with the expansion of small abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Consequently, SEP-measurements may predict future rupture, and allow further selection for surgery in cases referred for surgery due to size....

  18. Immunoglobulin A antibodies against Chlamydia pneumoniae are associated with expansion of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, J.S; Juul, Svend; Vammen, S

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to examine the possible association between the progression of small abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and chronic infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae. METHODS: Patients from a hospital-based mass screening programme for AAA with annual follow-up (mean 2.7 years...

  19. The heart of patients with aortic aneurysms: evidence from cardiac computed tomography.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolzmann, P.; Phan, C.; Desbiolles, L.; Lachat, M.; Pfammatter, T.; Marincek, B.; Prokop, M.; Alkadhi, H.

    2009-01-01

    To determine in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) the coronary calcium burden and prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in relation to cardiovascular risk factors, and to assess the left ventricular (LV) function using cardiac computed tomography (CT). Sixty consecutive patients

  20. CD1d deficiency inhibits the development of abdominal aortic aneurysms in LDL receptor deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Puijvelde, Gijs H. M.; Foks, Amanda C.; van Bochove, Rosemarie E.; Bot, Ilze; Habets, Kim L. L.; de Jager, Saskia C.; ter Borg, Mariëtte N. D.; van Osch, Puck; Boon, Louis; Vos, Mariska; de Waard, Vivian; Kuiper, Johan

    2018-01-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a dilatation of the abdominal aorta leading to serious complications and mostly to death. AAA development is associated with an accumulation of inflammatory cells in the aorta including NKT cells. An important factor in promoting the recruitment of these

  1. Low-dose aspirin and rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wemmelund, Holger; Mejnert Jørgensen, Trine; Høgh, Annette

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The use of low-dose aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid [ASA]) has been suggested to attenuate growth of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), yet solid clinical evidence of this hypothesis is still missing. This study aimed to investigate whether preadmission ASA use influenced the risk...

  2. Induction of continuous expanding infrarenal aortic aneurysms in a large porcine animal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kloster, Brian Ozeraitis; Lund, Lars; Lindholt, Jes S.

    2015-01-01

    BackgroundA large animal model with a continuous expanding infrarenal aortic aneurysm gives access to a more realistic AAA model with anatomy and physiology similar to humans, and thus allows for new experimental research in the natural history and treatment options of the disease. Methods10 pigs...

  3. Glycated Hemoglobin Is Associated With the Growth Rate of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Katrine Lawaetz; Dahl, Marie; Rasmussen, Lars Melholt

    2017-01-01

    and HbA1c in the total study population (P=0.002). Both crude and adjusted analyses identified slower growth for the group with the highest HbA1c tertile compared with the lowest HbA1c tertile. After 3 years, the mean difference was 1.8 mm (confidence interval, 0.98–2.64). Similar significant differences......OBJECTIVE—: An inverse association between abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) and diabetes mellitus exists; however, the cause remains unknown. This study aimed to evaluate whether the degree of glycemia is associated with aneurysm growth. APPROACH AND RESULTS—: The study was based on VIVA trial...... (Viborg Vascular), the randomized clinically controlled screening trial for abdominal aortic aneurysm in men aged 65 to 74 years in the Central Denmark Region. The screening included measurement of the abdominal aorta by ultrasound, analysis of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and follow-up for ≤5 years...

  4. Intravascular Treatment of Left Subclavian Artery Aneurysm Coexisting with Aortic Coarctation in an Adult Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorzelski, Ryszard; Wołoszko, Tomasz; Toutounchi, Sadegh; Fiszer, Patryk; Krajewska, Ewa; Jakuczun, Wawrzyniec; Szostek, Małgorzata M; Celejewski, Krzysztof; Gałązka, Zbigniew

    2017-01-01

    Coexistence of aortic coarctation with aneurysm of subclavian artery is a uncommon situation and may require unusual treatment in patients. A 40-year-old patient diagnosed incidentally with left subclavian artery aneurysm coexisting with aortic coarctation. Patient was initially referred for hybrid treatment. Initially ostium of the left subclavian artery was covered with a stent-graft. Over a 30-month follow-up period aneurysm became thrombosed all the way up to the ostium of internal mammary artery. The patient did not present with neurological symptoms or signs of upper limb ischemia. Taking into consideration good blood supply to the axillary artery via reversed blood flow in the thyreocervical trunk, hence we decided not to proceed with cervicoaxillary bypass grafting. Implantation stent-graft into aorta coarctation with covering axillary artery is proper way of treatment and may need no other surgical procedures.

  5. Interrupted Aortic Arch Type B in A Patient with Cat Eye Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Belangero, Sintia Iole Nogueira; Bellucco, Fernanda Teixeira da Silva; Cernach, Mirlene C. S. P.; Hacker, April M.; Emanuel, Beverly S.; Melaragno, Maria Isabel

    2009-01-01

    We report a patient with cat eye syndrome and interrupted aortic arch type B, a typical finding in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Chromosomal analysis and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) showed a supernumerary bisatellited isodicentric marker chromosome derived from chromosome 22. The segment from 22pter to 22q11.2 in the supernumerary chromosome found in our patient does not overlap with the region deleted in patients with the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. However, the finding of an in...

  6. A rare association of interrupted aortic arch type C and microdeletion 22q11.2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuturilo, Goran; Drakulic, Danijela; Stevanovic, Milena; Jovanovic, Ida; Djukic, Milan; Miletic-Grkovic, Slobodanka; Atanaskovic-Markovic, Marina

    2008-10-01

    Microdeletion 22q11.2 is associated with a variety of findings, and the most common are cardiac defects. It is very frequently associated with interrupted aortic arch (IAA) type B and very rarely with type A and type C. Here we report the first case of IAA type C associated with 22q11.2 deletion in Serbia and, to the best of our knowledge, the fourth case described worldwide so far. By this report we would like to point out that all patients with IAA type C who have additional features specific for 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome should be screened for the presence of this deletion.

  7. Aortic dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... made in the chest or abdomen. Endovascular aortic repair. This surgery is done without any major surgical ... needed. If the heart arteries are involved, a coronary bypass is also performed. Outlook ... aneurysm - dissecting; Chest pain - aortic dissection; Thoracic aortic aneurysm - ...

  8. Gore excluder device with the C3 delivery system for management of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morasch MD

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Cheong J Lee, Mark L Keldahl, Mark D MoraschDivision of Vascular Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: The GORE Excluder stent-graft is one of the currently available devices approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in endovascular aortic repair. Recently, a new delivery system modification has been applied to the Excluder device which allows repositioning of the stent-graft to adjust for accurate proximal landing and facilitate gate cannulation. In this review, we examine the Excluder device with the new C3 delivery system and its potential benefit in the management of abdominal aortic aneurysms.Keywords: gore excluder, abdominal aortic aneurysm, repair, C3 delivery system

  9. Personal resources and satisfaction with life in Marfan syndrome patients with aortic pathology and in abdominal aortic aneurysm patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanišić, Michał-Goran; Rzepa, Teresa; Gawrońska, Alicja; Kubaszewski, Przemysław; Putowski, Maciej; Stefaniak, Sebastian; Perek, Bartłomiej

    2018-03-01

    Whether or not the source of aortic pathology is Marfan syndrome (MFS) or other processes leading to development of abdominal aorta aneurysms (AAA), the awareness of pathology may lead to an emotional upset and low assessment of satisfaction with life. To assess, in regard to MFS patients with aortic pathology and to abdominal aortic aneurysm patients: 1) whether or not self-efficacy (SE) and health locus of control (HLoC) affect the patients' satisfaction with life; 2) whether the two groups of patients differ in terms of mental dispositions. The study population consisted of 16 MFS patients with aortic pathology and 16 AAA patients, 9 men and 7 women in each group. The mean age of the MFS patients was 28.5 ±8.214, and of the AAA patients 64.25 ±7.019. The following scales were applied: Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale, Satisfaction With Life Scale, Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale. Abdominal aorta aneurysms patients compared to MFS patients gave a higher rating for SE ( MD = 33.94 and MD = 29.56), internal health locus of control ( MD = 25.00 and MD = 21.13), external personal HL o C ( MD = 24.50 and MD = 19.25), external impersonal HLoC ( MD = 23.06 and MD = 18.25), and satisfaction with life ( M = 22.06 and M = 20.13). Internal and external HL o C were significantly lower in MFS patients compared to AAA patients. In patients with aortic diseases, special attention must be paid to the state of personal resources (PR). Interactions made by medical professionals should focus on enhancing PR supporting the patients' self-knowledge on their SE. This will help to improve their satisfaction with life and form a positive attitude to the illness.

  10. A prospective clinical, economic, and quality-of-life analysis comparing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), open repair, and best medical treatment in high-risk patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms suitable for EVAR: the Irish patient trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hynes, Niamh

    2007-12-01

    To report the results of a trial comparing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) to open repair (OR) and best medical therapy (BMT) involving high-risk patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) suitable for EVAR.

  11. A schematic diagram showing the various components of the embryonic aortic arch complex in the retroesophageal right subclavian artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Katsushi; Honma, Satoru; Kumagai, Yoshihiro; Koba, Yoshikazu; Koizumi, Masahiro

    2011-09-01

    A retroesophageal right subclavian artery, arising from the arch of the aorta as the terminal branch and passing dorsal to the esophagus, was found in five (1.2%) of 428 bodies donated for student dissection at Kumamoto University between 1993 and 2008. The presence of a retroesophageal right subclavian artery has been generally explained to be caused by the persistence of the normally eliminated part of the right dorsal aorta caudal to the seventh intersegmental artery and the disappearance of the normally patent right fourth aortic arch and the part of the right dorsal aorta cranial to the seventh intersegmental artery during the developmental process. However, the parts which remain or disappear are different in each case. With the aim of determining the portions eliminated or persisting and thereby gaining an understanding of the developmental process of the retroesophageal right subclavian artery in each instance, we made schematic diagrams showing the various components of the embryonic aortic arch complex as the prototype just before the anomaly occurred. Based on these diagrams, we conclude that immediately preceding the disappearance of the distal part of the right dorsal aorta and the dorsal part of the right sixth aortic arch, the third intersegmental artery was situated opposite to the fourth aortic arch and the seventh intersegmental artery was situated cranial to the point of junction of the right and left dorsal aortae.

  12. Aortic root and proximal aortic arch replacement (performed by a left-handed surgeon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrel, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    We present our standard technique of composite graft replacement performed by a left-handed surgeon. This procedure is performed with a 30-day mortality comparable to that of elective isolated aortic valve replacement. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  13. Developing a new endograft for the treatment of juxtarenal aortic aneurysms: definition and experimentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Q. Belczak

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To analyze angiotomographic parameters of juxtarenal aneurysms to assess the applicability of an endograft model to patients and to create in vitro and in vivo models to assess the new endograft. METHODS: A total of 49 patients with juxtarenal aneurysms were submitted to angiotomographic evaluation, and parameters such as the aortic diameter, the length of the neck, and the angulations of the celiac trunk, superior mesenteric artery and renal arteries; the distances between them; and anatomic variations were analyzed. Based on these parameters, an endograft model was developed and tested in a newly created in vitro model of juxtarenal aneurysm. An experimental model of juxtarenal aneurysm was then established in six pigs weighing 50-60 kg to assess the new endograft model. RESULTS: The angiotomographic parameters of juxtarenal aneurysm measured in this study were similar to those reported in the literature and allowed the development of an endograft based on the hourglass concept, which was applicable to 85.8% of the patients. The in vitro model of juxtarenal aneurysm evidenced good radiopacity and functionality and permitted adjustments in the new device and technical improvements in the procedures for treating these aneurysms. In addition, the porcine model of juxtarenal aneurysm was successfully created in all six animals using a bovine pericardial patch, and use of the new endograft in three pilot procedures evidenced its feasibility. CONCLUSIONS: The Hourglass endograft was rendered applicable to treatment of the majority of patients with juxtarenal aneurysms simply by changing its diameter. Moreover, the new in vitro and in vivo models were shown to be effective for assessing both the presented endograft and experiments assessing the endovascular treatment of juxtarenal aneurysms.

  14. Developing a new endograft for the treatment of juxtarenal aortic aneurysms: definition and experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belczak, Sergio Q; Lanzaiotti, Luiz; Botelho, Yuri; Aun, Ricardo; Silva, Erasmo S da; Puech-Leão, Pedro; Luccia, Nelson de

    2015-06-01

    To analyze angiotomographic parameters of juxtarenal aneurysms to assess the applicability of an endograft model to patients and to create in vitro and in vivo models to assess the new endograft. A total of 49 patients with juxtarenal aneurysms were submitted to angiotomographic evaluation, and parameters such as the aortic diameter, the length of the neck, and the angulations of the celiac trunk, superior mesenteric artery and renal arteries; the distances between them; and anatomic variations were analyzed. Based on these parameters, an endograft model was developed and tested in a newly created in vitro model of juxtarenal aneurysm. An experimental model of juxtarenal aneurysm was then established in six pigs weighing 50-60 kg to assess the new endograft model. The angiotomographic parameters of juxtarenal aneurysm measured in this study were similar to those reported in the literature and allowed the development of an endograft based on the hourglass concept, which was applicable to 85.8% of the patients. The in vitro model of juxtarenal aneurysm evidenced good radiopacity and functionality and permitted adjustments in the new device and technical improvements in the procedures for treating these aneurysms. In addition, the porcine model of juxtarenal aneurysm was successfully created in all six animals using a bovine pericardial patch, and use of the new endograft in three pilot procedures evidenced its feasibility. The Hourglass endograft was rendered applicable to treatment of the majority of patients with juxtarenal aneurysms simply by changing its diameter. Moreover, the new in vitro and in vivo models were shown to be effective for assessing both the presented endograft and experiments assessing the endovascular treatment of juxtarenal aneurysms.

  15. Atmospheric Pressure and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Rupture : Results from a Time Series Analysis and Case-Crossover Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penning De Vries, Bas B.L.; Kolkert, Joé L.P.; Meerwaldt, Robbert; Groenwold, Rolf H.H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Associations between atmospheric pressure and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture risk have been reported, but empirical evidence is inconclusive and largely derived from studies that did not account for possible nonlinearity, seasonality, and confounding by temperature. Methods:

  16. Transperitoneal versus retroperitoneal approach for open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in the targeted vascular National Surgical Quality Improvement Program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buck, Dominique B.; Ultee, Klaas H J; Zettervall, Sara L.; Soden, Pete A.; Darling, Jeremy; Wyers, Mark; van Herwaarden, Joost A.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    Objective: We sought to compare current practices in patient selection and 30-day outcomes for transperitoneal and retroperitoneal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repairs. Methods: All patients undergoing elective transperitoneal or retroperitoneal surgical repair for AAA between January 2011 and

  17. Repair of left coronary artery aneurysm, recurrent ascending aortic aneurysm, and mitral valve prolapse 19 years after Bentall's procedure in a patient with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badmanaban, Balaji; Mallon, Peter; Campbell, Norman; Sarsam, Mazin A I

    2004-01-01

    A 45-year-old female with Marfan syndrome had a Bentall's procedure performed 19 years ago. She presented with a 4-year history of gradually worsening dyspnea and decreasing exercise tolerance. Investigations revealed severe mitral valve prolapse, a left main stem coronary artery (LMSCA) aneurysm, and a recurrent aneurysm of the ascending aorta. The mitral valve was replaced and the aortic aneurysmal sac and the LMSCA aneurysm were then repaired by a modified Bentall procedure. The patient made an uneventful recovery and was discharged home.

  18. Advanced atherosclerosis is associated with increased medial degeneration in sporadic ascending aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albini, Paul T; Segura, Ana Maria; Liu, Guanghui; Minard, Charles G; Coselli, Joseph S; Milewicz, Dianna M; Shen, Ying H; LeMaire, Scott A

    2014-02-01

    The pathogenesis of non-familial, sporadic ascending aortic aneurysms (SAAA) is poorly understood, and the relationship between ascending aortic atherosclerosis and medial degeneration is unclear. We evaluated the prevalence and severity of aortic atherosclerosis and its association with medial degeneration in SAAA. Atherosclerosis was characterized in ascending aortic tissues collected from 68 SAAA patients (mean age, 62.9 ± 12.0 years) and 15 controls (mean age, 56.6 ± 11.4 years [P = 0.07]) by using a modified American Heart Association classification system. Upon histologic examination, 97% of SAAA patients and 73% of controls showed atherosclerotic changes. Most SAAA samples had intermediate (types 2 and 3, 35%) or advanced atherosclerosis (types ≥ 4; 40%), whereas most control samples showed minimal atherosclerosis (none or type 1, 80%; P atherosclerosis grade. Advanced atherosclerosis was associated with higher grades of smooth muscle cell depletion (P atherosclerosis than in patients with minimal (P = 0.04) or intermediate atherosclerosis (P = 0.04). Immunostaining showed marked CD3+ T-cell and CD68+ macrophage infiltration, MMP-2 and MMP-9 production, and cryopyrin expression in the medial layer adjacent to atherosclerotic plaque. SAAA tissues exhibited advanced atherosclerosis that was associated with severe medial degeneration and increased aortic diameter. Our findings suggest a role for atherosclerosis in the progression of sporadic ascending aortic aneurysms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The retroperitoneal approach combined with epidural anesthesia reduces morbidity in elective infrarenal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehling, Bernd M; Meierhenrich, Rainer; Thiere, Matthias; Bischoff, Gisela; Oberhuber, Alexander; Orend, Karl Heinz; Sunder-Plassmann, Ludger

    2009-01-01

    In elective open infrarenal aortic aneurysm repair the surgical approach and the use of epidural anesthesia (EDA) may determine patients' outcome. Hence we analyzed our results after elective open aneurysm repair in the light of the surgical approach and the use of EDA. Retrospective analysis of a prospective data base. From December 2005 to April 2008, 125 patients with infrarenal aortic aneurysm underwent elective open repair. Patients were divided into four groups: retro- and transperitoneal approach with and without epidural anesthesia (RP+/-EDA and TP+/-EDA). In terms of age, sex, aneurysm diameter, ASA score and clamping time all groups were comparable. In the retroperitoneal groups significantly more tube grafts were implanted (63 vs. 27; P=0.001). The rate of surgical complications did not differ between the groups. The RP+EDA group had the lowest rate of postoperative assisted mechanical ventilation (5.1% vs. 35.7%; P=0.002) and medical complications (17.9% vs. 42.8%; P=0.032). Concerning frequency of surgical complications, the retroperitoneal incision was comparable to the transperitoneal approach in infrarenal aortic reconstruction. Supplementation with EDA resulted in a decreased rate of postoperative assisted mechanical ventilation and in lower morbidity rates.

  20. Effects of the topographical extent of coronary artery ectasia on coronary blood flow in patients with aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikenaga, Hiroki; Kurisu, Satoshi; Watanabe, Noriaki; Shimonaga, Takashi; Higaki, Tadanao; Iwasaki, Toshitaka; Utsunomiya, Hiroto; Mitsuba, Naoya; Ishibashi, Ken; Dohi, Yoshihiro; Imai, Katsuhiko; Sueda, Taijiro; Kihara, Yasuki

    2015-11-01

    Aortic aneurysms are associated with coronary artery ectasia (CAE). However, the relation between the extent of CAE and coronary blood flow in patients with aortic aneurysms is not fully understood. This study was undertaken to assess the angiographic characteristics and effects of the topographical extent of CAE on coronary blood flow in patients with aortic aneurysms. This study consisted of 93 consecutive patients with aortic aneurysms (AA group) and 79 patients without aortic aneurysms who had angiographically normal coronary arteries as the control group (Control group). Coronary flow velocity was determined using the thrombolysis in myocardial infarction frame count (TFC) and the topographical extent of CAE was assessed. In the AA group, 43 patients (46.2 %) had significant coronary artery stenosis and 37 patients (40.2 %) had diffuse CAE. TFC was significantly higher in the AA group than in the control group in all 3 coronary arteries. Furthermore, mean corrected TFC (CTFC) was significantly higher in the AA group than in the control group (40.1 ± 10.7 vs. 25.8 ± 6.5, p < 0.001). In the AA group, mean CTFC in patients with diffuse CAE was significantly higher than that in patients with segmental CAE (50.2 ± 8.7 vs. 33.6 ± 5.2, p < 0.001). The mean CTFC correlated positively with the topographical extent of CAE. Many patients with aortic aneurysms were accompanied with angiographic coronary artery stenosis and CAE. Furthermore, patients with aortic aneurysms had higher CTFC than those without aortic aneurysms and it was primarily driven by more frequent prevalence of diffuse CAE.

  1. Preclinical 4D-flow magnetic resonance phase contrast imaging of the murine aortic arch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Braig

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases remain the number one death cause worldwide. Preclinical 4D flow phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging can provide substantial insights in the analysis of aortic pathophysiologies in various animal models. These insights may allow a better understanding of pathophysiologies, therapy monitoring, and can possibly be translated to humans. This study provides a framework to acquire the velocity field within the aortic arch. It analyses important flow values at different locations within the aortic arch. Imaging parameters with high temporal and spatial resolution are provided, that still allow combining this time-consuming method with other necessary imaging-protocols.A new setup was established where a prospectively gated 4D phase contrast sequence is combined with a highly sensitive cryogenic coil on a preclinical magnetic resonance scanner. The sequence was redesigned to maintain a close to steady state condition of the longitudinal magnetization and hence to overcome steady state artifacts. Imaging parameters were optimized to provide high spatial and temporal resolution. Pathline visualizations were generated from the acquired velocity data in order to display complex flow patterns.Our setup allows data acquisition with at least two times the rate than that of previous publications based on Cartesian encoding, at an improved image quality. The "steady state" sequence reduces observed artifacts and provides uniform image intensity over the heart cycle. This made possible quantification of blood speed and wall shear stress (WSS within the aorta and its branches. The highest velocities were observed in the ascending aorta with 137.5 ± 8 cm/s. Peak velocity values in the Brachiocephalic trunk were 57 ± 12 cm/s. Quantification showed that the peak flow occurs around 20 ms post R-wave in the ascending aorta. The highest mean axial wall shear stress was observed in the analysis plane between the left common carotid artery

  2. Hybrid repair of a very late, post-aortic coarctation surgery thoracic aneurysm: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilea Ioan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Local aneurysms after surgical repair of coarctation of the aorta occur mainly in patients surgically treated by Dacron patch plasty during adulthood. The management of these patients is always problematic, with frequent complications and increased mortality rates. Percutaneous stent-graft implantation avoids the need for surgical reintervention. Case presentation We report a case involving the hybrid treatment by stent-graft implantation and transposition of the left subclavian artery to the left common carotid artery of an aneurysmal dilatation of the thoracic aorta that occurred in a 64-year-old Caucasian man, operated on almost 40 years earlier with a Dacron patch plasty for aortic coarctation. Our patient presented to our facility for evaluation with back pain and shortness of breath after minimal physical effort. A physical examination revealed stony dullness to percussion of the left posterior thorax, with no other abnormalities. The results of chest radiography, followed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography and aortography, led to a diagnosis of giant aortic thoracic aneurysm. Successful treatment of the aneurysm was achieved by percutaneous stent-graft implantation combined with transposition of the left subclavian artery to the left common carotid artery. His post-procedural recovery was uneventful. Three months after the procedure, computed tomography showed complete thrombosis of the excluded aneurysm, without any clinical signs of left lower limb ischemia or new onset neurological abnormalities. Conclusions Our patient’s case illustrates the clinical outcomes of surgical interventions for aortic coarctation. However, the very late appearance of a local aneurysm is rather unusual. Management of such cases is always difficult. The decision-making should be multidisciplinary. A hybrid approach was considered the best solution for our patient.

  3. Acute contained ruptured aortic aneurysm presenting as left vocal fold immobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnagi, Sharon H; Howard, Brittany E; Hoxworth, Joseph M; Lott, David G

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To recognize intrathoracic abnormalities, including expansion or rupture of aortic aneurysms, as a source of acute onset vocal fold immobility. Methods. A case report and review of the literature. Results. An 85-year-old female with prior history of an aortic aneurysm presented to a tertiary care facility with sudden onset hoarseness. On laryngoscopy, the left vocal fold was immobile in the paramedian position. A CT scan obtained that day revealed a new, large hematoma surrounding the upper descending aortic stent graft consistent with an acute contained ruptured aortic aneurysm. She was referred to the emergency department for evaluation and treatment by vascular surgery. She was counseled regarding surgical options and ultimately decided not to pursue further treatment. Her vocal fold immobility was subsequently treated via office-based injection medialization two weeks after presentation and again 5 months after the initial injection which dramatically improved her voice. Follow-up CT scan at 8 months demonstrated a reduction of the hematoma. The left vocal cord remains immobile to date. Conclusion. Ortner's syndrome, or cardiovocal syndrome, is hoarseness secondary to left recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy caused by cardiovascular pathology. It is a rare condition and, while typically presenting gradually, may also present with acute symptomatology.

  4. Acute Contained Ruptured Aortic Aneurysm Presenting as Left Vocal Fold Immobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon H. Gnagi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To recognize intrathoracic abnormalities, including expansion or rupture of aortic aneurysms, as a source of acute onset vocal fold immobility. Methods. A case report and review of the literature. Results. An 85-year-old female with prior history of an aortic aneurysm presented to a tertiary care facility with sudden onset hoarseness. On laryngoscopy, the left vocal fold was immobile in the paramedian position. A CT scan obtained that day revealed a new, large hematoma surrounding the upper descending aortic stent graft consistent with an acute contained ruptured aortic aneurysm. She was referred to the emergency department for evaluation and treatment by vascular surgery. She was counseled regarding surgical options and ultimately decided not to pursue further treatment. Her vocal fold immobility was subsequently treated via office-based injection medialization two weeks after presentation and again 5 months after the initial injection which dramatically improved her voice. Follow-up CT scan at 8 months demonstrated a reduction of the hematoma. The left vocal cord remains immobile to date. Conclusion. Ortner’s syndrome, or cardiovocal syndrome, is hoarseness secondary to left recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy caused by cardiovascular pathology. It is a rare condition and, while typically presenting gradually, may also present with acute symptomatology.

  5. In vivo characterization of a new abdominal aortic aneurysm mouse model with conventional and molecular magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klink, Ahmed; Heynens, Joeri; Herranz, Beatriz; Lobatto, Mark E.; Arias, Teresa; Sanders, Honorius M. H. F.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Merkx, Maarten; Nicolay, Klaas; Fuster, Valentin; Tedgui, Alain; Mallat, Ziad; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to use noninvasive conventional and molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect and characterize abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) in vivo. Collagen is an essential constituent of aneurysms. Noninvasive MRI of collagen may represent an opportunity to help detect

  6. Persistent Aortic Arch Hypoplasia After Coarctation Treatment Is Associated With Late Systemic Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quennelle, Sophie; Powell, Andrew J; Geva, Tal; Prakash, Ashwin

    2015-06-25

    Mild transverse aortic arch (TAA) hypoplasia is common after coarctation treatment, but is considered benign in the absence of an arm-leg systolic blood pressure (SBP) difference. Hypertension (HTN) is a common long-term morbidity after successful coarctation treatment. We examined whether mild TAA hypoplasia after coarctation treatment is associated with late systemic HTN. We retrospectively reviewed 92 patients (median age, 19.9 years; range, 4.9 to 57.8; 60% male) 14.1±10.3 years after successful coarctation treatment (surgery in 63, stent in 16, and balloon dilation in 13), excluding those with resting right arm-leg blood pressure gradient >20 mm Hg, atypical coarctation, and major associated heart defects. Minimum body-surface area (BSA)-adjusted TAA cross-sectional area (CSA) was calculated from cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) images. On follow-up, 38 of 92 (41%) patients had systemic HTN using standard criteria. Systemic HTN was independently associated with smaller TAA CSA/BSA (P=0.006; odds ratio [OR], 6.41 per 0.5 cm(2)/m(2) decrease), higher age at CMR (P=0.03; OR, 1.57 per 5-year increase), and in a subset (n=61), higher arm-leg SBP difference during exercise (P=0.05; OR, 1.03 per 1-mm-Hg increase). Lower ratio of TAA diameter/descending aorta diameter was associated with a larger increase in right arm SBP during peak exercise (P=0.006; r(2)=0.11). Persistent mild aortic arch hypoplasia, even in the absence of an arm-leg SBP difference at rest, is associated with late systemic HTN. Further studies should be undertaken to determine whether more-aggressive arch reconstruction at initial repair can reduce the incidence of systemic HTN. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  7. Recurrent Rare Genomic Copy Number Variants and Bicuspid Aortic Valve Are Enriched in Early Onset Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Prakash

    Full Text Available Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections (TAAD are a major cause of death in the United States. The spectrum of TAAD ranges from genetic disorders, such as Marfan syndrome, to sporadic isolated disease of unknown cause. We hypothesized that genomic copy number variants (CNVs contribute causally to early onset TAAD (ETAAD. We conducted a genome-wide SNP array analysis of ETAAD patients of European descent who were enrolled in the National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions (GenTAC. Genotyping was performed on the Illumina Omni-Express platform, using PennCNV, Nexus and CNVPartition for CNV detection. ETAAD patients (n = 108, 100% European American, 28% female, average age 20 years, 55% with bicuspid aortic valves were compared to 7013 dbGAP controls without a history of vascular disease using downsampled Omni 2.5 data. For comparison, 805 sporadic TAAD patients with late onset aortic disease (STAAD cohort and 192 affected probands from families with at least two affected relatives (FTAAD cohort from our institution were screened for additional CNVs at these loci with SNP arrays. We identified 47 recurrent CNV regions in the ETAAD, FTAAD and STAAD groups that were absent or extremely rare in controls. Nine rare CNVs that were either very large (>1 Mb or shared by ETAAD and STAAD or FTAAD patients were also identified. Four rare CNVs involved genes that cause arterial aneurysms when mutated. The largest and most prevalent of the recurrent CNVs were at Xq28 (two duplications and two deletions and 17q25.1 (three duplications. The percentage of individuals harboring rare CNVs was significantly greater in the ETAAD cohort (32% than in the FTAAD (23% or STAAD (17% cohorts. We identified multiple loci affected by rare CNVs in one-third of ETAAD patients, confirming the genetic heterogeneity of TAAD. Alterations of candidate genes at these loci may contribute to the pathogenesis of TAAD.

  8. Immunoblotting analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms using antibodies against Chlamydia pneumoniae recombinant MOMP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vammen, Sten; Vorum, Henrik; Ostergaard, L

    2002-01-01

    and electron microscopy. However, the correlation between demonstrating C. pneumoniae DNA or antigen in tissue from plaque material or aneurysms and the antibody titres in serum is controversial. The specificity of immunohistochemical procedures is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the possibility......antibodies against Chlamydia pneumoniae have been associated with atherosclerosis and with expansion of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). C. pneumoniae has been demonstrated in coronary arteries, AAA and the carotid arteries by use of polymerase chain reactions (PCR), immunohistochemical procedures...

  9. Protective effects of Resveratrol in an experimental model of abdominal aortic aneurysm induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Palmieri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol (Rsv is a natural antioxidant polyphenol with vasoprotective properties. We evaluated whether Rsv affects the inflammatory response in an experimental model of elastase-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm. Thirty male rats were subjected to aneurysm induction and treated or not with Rsv. Circulating levels of CD62L-monocyte subset, monocyte CD I 43 surface expression, MMP-9 plasma activity and TNFα serum levels were lower in Rsv-treated rats. In conclusion. Rsv acts as an anti-inflammatory compound and could be of great revelance to improve the immune response in AAA patients.

  10. Simultaneous xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis and gallbladder cancer in a patient with a large abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abed, Yahya; Elsherif, Mohammed; Firth, John; Borgstein, Rudi; Myint, Fiona

    2012-09-01

    There have been reports of the coexistence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) with intra-abdominal malignancy including gastric, colonic, pancreatic, and renal. We herein report a case of a previously undiagnosed AAA and a presenting complaint consistent with acute cholecystitis. Following cholecystectomy, this was noted to be a rare form of chronic cholecystitis: xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis. There is a known possible association of this uncommon condition with gallbladder cancer. The management of concomitant pathologies can present a real challenge to the multidisciplinary team, especially with large aneurysms.

  11. Acute Testicular Ischemia following Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair Identified in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Finnerty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR is perhaps the most widely utilized surgical procedure for patients with large abdominal aortic aneurysms. This procedure is minimally invasive and reduces inpatient hospitalization requirements. The case involves a 72-year-old male who presented to the emergency department with right testicular ischemia two days following EVAR. Given the minimal inpatient hospitalization associated with this procedure, emergency physicians are likely to encounter associated complications. Ischemic and thromboembolic events following EVAR are extremely rare but require prompt vascular surgery intervention to minimize morbidity and mortality.

  12. JAG Tearing Technique with Radiofrequency Guide Wire for Aortic Fenestration in Thoracic Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricci, Carmelo; Ceccherini, Claudio; Leonini, Sara; Cini, Marco; Vigni, Francesco; Neri, Eugenio; Tucci, Enrico; Benvenuti, Antonio; Tommasino, Giulio; Sassi, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    An innovative approach, the JAG tearing technique, was performed during thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair in a patient with previous surgical replacement of the ascending aorta with a residual uncomplicated type B aortic dissection who developed an aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta with its lumen divided in two parts by an intimal flap. The proximal landing zone was suitable to place a thoracic stent graft. The distal landing zone was created by cutting the intimal flap in the distal third of the descending thoracic aorta with a radiofrequency guide wire and intravascular ultrasound catheter.

  13. Risk Stratification of Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Using Aortic Augmentation Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Marianne; Jacomella, Vincenzo; Kohler, Malcom; Lachat, Mario; Salem, Amr; Amann-Vesti, Beatrice; Husmann, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Central augmentation index (cAIx) is an indicator for vascular stiffness. Obstructive and aneurysmatic vascular disease can affect pulse wave propagation and reflection, causing changes in central aortic pressures. To assess and compare cAIx in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and / or abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). cAIx was assessed by radial applanation tonometry (Sphygmocor) in a total of 184 patients at a tertiary referral centre. Patients were grouped as having PAD only, AAA only, or both AAA and PAD. Differences in cAIx measurements between the three patient groups were tested by non-parametric tests and stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis to investigate associations with obstructive or aneurysmatic patterns of vascular disease. In the study sample of 184 patients, 130 had PAD only, 20 had AAA only, and 34 patients had both AAA and PAD. Mean cAIx (%) was 30.5 ± 8.2 across all patients. It was significantly higher in females (35.2 ± 6.1, n = 55) than males (28.4 ± 8.2, n = 129), and significantly higher in patients over 80 years of age (34.4 ± 6.9, n = 22) than in those under 80 years (30.0 ± 8.2, n = 162). Intergroup comparison revealed a significant difference in cAIx between the three patient groups (AAA: 27.3 ± 9.5; PAD: 31.4 ± 7.8; AAA & PAD: 28.8 ± 8.5). cAIx was significantly lower in patients with AAA, higher in patients with both AAA and PAD, and highest in patients with PAD only (beta = 0.21, p = 0.006). Non-invasive assessment of arterial stiffness in high-risk patients indicates that cAIx differs according to the pattern of vascular disease. Measurements revealed significantly higher cAIx values for patients with obstructive peripheral arterial disease than for patients with aneurysmatic disease.

  14. Risk Stratification of Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Using Aortic Augmentation Index.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Beckmann

    Full Text Available Central augmentation index (cAIx is an indicator for vascular stiffness. Obstructive and aneurysmatic vascular disease can affect pulse wave propagation and reflection, causing changes in central aortic pressures.To assess and compare cAIx in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD and / or abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA.cAIx was assessed by radial applanation tonometry (Sphygmocor in a total of 184 patients at a tertiary referral centre. Patients were grouped as having PAD only, AAA only, or both AAA and PAD. Differences in cAIx measurements between the three patient groups were tested by non-parametric tests and stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis to investigate associations with obstructive or aneurysmatic patterns of vascular disease.In the study sample of 184 patients, 130 had PAD only, 20 had AAA only, and 34 patients had both AAA and PAD. Mean cAIx (% was 30.5 ± 8.2 across all patients. It was significantly higher in females (35.2 ± 6.1, n = 55 than males (28.4 ± 8.2, n = 129, and significantly higher in patients over 80 years of age (34.4 ± 6.9, n = 22 than in those under 80 years (30.0 ± 8.2, n = 162. Intergroup comparison revealed a significant difference in cAIx between the three patient groups (AAA: 27.3 ± 9.5; PAD: 31.4 ± 7.8; AAA & PAD: 28.8 ± 8.5. cAIx was significantly lower in patients with AAA, higher in patients with both AAA and PAD, and highest in patients with PAD only (beta = 0.21, p = 0.006.Non-invasive assessment of arterial stiffness in high-risk patients indicates that cAIx differs according to the pattern of vascular disease. Measurements revealed significantly higher cAIx values for patients with obstructive peripheral arterial disease than for patients with aneurysmatic disease.

  15. Surgical modification for preventing a gothic arch after aortic arch repair without the use of foreign material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dong-Man; Park, Jiyoung; Goo, Hyun Woo; Kim, Young Hwue; Ko, Jae-Kon; Jhang, Won Kyoung

    2015-04-01

    Systemic hypertension is the main late complication after arch reconstruction in patients with arch obstruction. Gothic arch geometry is suspected to be one of its possible causes. Accordingly, we evaluated here if a modified arch repair technique using an autologous pulmonary patch is effective in preventing gothic arch development. Fifty infants who underwent arch repair with either a modified (n = 17) or conventional (n = 33) technique between January 2006 and August 2012 by a single surgeon were retrospectively reviewed. Arch geometry was compared using three categories (gothic, crenel or roman), classified by the height/width (H/W) ratio and the arch angle measured in computed tomography. No gothic arch geometry was observed in the modified group, whereas it was observed in 9 cases in the conventional group (P = 0.005). Moreover, reintervention for arch restenosis was performed only in the conventional group (n = 4; P = 0.29). No associated complications were observed, although the selective cerebral perfusion time was longer in the modified group than in the conventional group (28.5 ± 6.2 vs 17.1 ± 9.9 min; P gothic arch geometry, but also as equally safe in terms of early clinical outcomes as conventional arch reconstruction techniques. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  16. [Simultaneous endovascular aortic aneurysm repair and coronary artery bypass grafting in a patient with abdominal aortic aneurysm and left main trunk lesion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Yoshihisa; Mitsuoka, Hiroshi; Masuda, Mikio; Shintani, Tsunehiro; Higashi, Shigeki

    2010-10-01

    To patients with severe coronary artery disease (CAD) and expanding large abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), simultaneous coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and AAA repair has been recommended. A 68-year-old woman had a CAD and an AAA 71 mm in diameter which was enlarging. Coronary angiography showed severe stenoses in the left main trunk (LMT), the left anterior descending artery and the circumflex artery. On-pump beating CABG and AAA repair with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) were performed simultaneously, because intraaortic balloon pumping (IABP) might be needed due to severe stenoses of LMT. Just after EAVR, on-pump beating CABG was performed. The patient was discharged 15 days after the operation. It was suggested that a simultaneous operation of CABG and EVAR might be safe and effective for high risk patients with CAD and AAA.

  17. Hemiarch versus total aortic arch replacement in acute type A dissection: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Shi Sum; Theologou, Thomas; Harrington, Deborah; Kuduvalli, Manoj; Oo, Aung; Field, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Despite recent advances in aortic surgery, acute type A aortic dissection remains a surgical emergency associated with high mortality and morbidity. Appropriate management is crucial to achieve satisfactory outcomes but the optimal surgical approach is controversial. The present systematic review and meta-analysis sought to access cumulative data from comparative studies between hemiarch and total aortic arch replacement in patients with acute type A aortic dissection. A systematic review of the literature using six databases. Eligible studies include comparative studies on hemiarch versus total arch replacement reporting short, medium and long term outcomes. A meta-analysis was performed on eligible studies reporting outcome of interest to quantify the effects of hemiarch replacement on mortality and morbidity risk compared to total arch replacement. Fourteen retrospective studies met the inclusion criteria and 2,221 patients were included in the final analysis. Pooled analysis showed that hemiarch replacement was associated with a lower risk of post-operative renal dialysis [risk ratio (RR) =0.72; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.56-0.94; P=0.02; I(2)=0%]. There was no significant difference in terms of in-hospital mortality between the two groups (RR =0.84; 95% CI: 0.65-1.09; P=0.20; I(2)=0%). Cardiopulmonary bypass, aortic cross clamp and circulatory arrest times were significantly longer in total arch replacement. During follow up, no significant difference was reported from current studies between the two operative approaches in terms of aortic re-intervention and freedom from aortic reoperation. Within the context of publication bias by high volume aortic centres and non-randomized data sets, there was no difference in mortality outcomes between the two groups. This analysis serves to demonstrate that for those centers doing sufficient total aortic arch activity to allow for publication, excellent and equivalent outcomes are achievable. Conclusions on

  18. Commentary on “Inhibition of interleukin-1beta decreases aneurysm formation and progression in a novel model of thoracic aortic aneurysms”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghua Bi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aortic aneurysm is a silent but life-threatening disease, whose pathogenesis remains poorly understood. Aneurysm models have been induced in small animals to study its pathogenesis, Johnston WF et al. successfully induced a novel model of thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA by periadventitial application of elastase in mice. We comment on this model according to our experiment. We hypothesize that endogenous MMPs, especially MMP2, play a vital role in complex repair process of aneurysmal wall, which should be a key target in the investigation and treatment of aortic aneurysms.

  19. Multifactorial relationship between 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography signaling and biomechanical properties in unruptured aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nchimi, Alain; Cheramy-Bien, Jean-Paul; Gasser, T Christian; Namur, Gauthier; Gomez, Pierre; Seidel, Laurence; Albert, Adelin; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier; Labropoulos, Nicos; Sakalihasan, Natzi

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between biomechanical properties and biological activities in aortic aneurysms was investigated with finite element simulations and 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography. The study included 53 patients (45 men) with aortic aneurysms, 47 infrarenal (abdominal aortic) and 6 thoracic (thoracic aortic), who had ≥1 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography. During a 30-month period, more clinical events occurred in patients with increased 18F-FDG uptake on their last examination than in those without (5 of 18 [28%] versus 2 of 35 [6%]; P=0.03). Wall stress and stress/strength index computed by finite element simulations and 18F-FDG uptake were evaluated in a total of 68 examinations. Twenty-five (38%) examinations demonstrated ≥1 aneurysm wall area of increased 18F-FDG uptake. The mean number of these areas per examination was 1.6 (18 of 11) in thoracic aortic aneurysms versus 0.25 (14 of 57) in abdominal aortic aneurysms, whereas the mean number of increased uptake areas colocalizing with highest wall stress and stress/strength index areas was 0.55 (6 of 11) and 0.02 (1 of 57), respectively. Quantitatively, 18F-FDG positron emission tomographic uptake correlated positively with both wall stress and stress/strength index (P<0.05). 18F-FDG uptake was particularly high in subjects with personal history of angina pectoris and familial aneurysm. Increased 18F-FDG positron emission tomographic uptake in aortic aneurysms is strongly related to aneurysm location, wall stress as derived by finite element simulations, and patient risk factors such as acquired and inherited susceptibilities.

  20. Metabolomic profiling of ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections - Implications for pathophysiology and biomarker discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Doppler

    Full Text Available Our basic understanding of ascending thoracic aortic aneurysm (ATAA pathogenesis is still very limited, hampering early diagnosis, risk prediction, and development of treatment options. "Omics"-technologies, ideal to reveal tissue alterations from the normal physiological state due to disease have hardly been applied in the field. Using a metabolomic approach, with this study the authors seek to define tissue differences between controls and various forms of ATAAs.Using a targeted FIA-MS/MS metabolomics approach, we analysed and compared the metabolic profiles of ascending thoracic aortic wall tissue of age-matched controls (n = 8, bicuspid aortic valve-associated aneurysms (BAV-A; n = 9, tricuspid aortic valve-associated aneurysms (TAV-A; n = 14, and tricuspid aortic valve-associated aortic dissections (TAV-Diss; n = 6.With sphingomyelin (SM (OH C22:2, SM C18:1, SM C22:1, and SM C24:1 only 4 out of 92 detectable metabolites differed significantly between controls and BAV-A samples. Between controls and TAV-Diss samples only phosphatidylcholine (PC ae C32:1 differed. Importantly, our analyses revealed a general increase in the amount of total sphingomyelin levels in BAV-A and TAV-Diss samples compared to controls.Significantly increased levels of sphingomyelins in BAV-A and TAV-Diss samples compared to controls may argue for a repression of sphingomyelinase activity and the sphingomyelinase-ceramide pathway, which may result in an inhibition of tissue regeneration; a potential basis for disease initiation and progression.

  1. Overexpression of interleukin-1β and interferon-γ in type I thoracic aortic dissections and ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms: possible correlation with matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression and apoptosis of aortic media cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Liao, Ming-fang; Tian, Lei; Zou, Si-li; Lu, Qing-sheng; Bao, Jun-min; Pei, Yi-fei; Jing, Zai-ping

    2011-07-01

    To examine the expression of interleukin-1β and interferon-γ and their possible roles in aortic dissections and aneurysms. Aortic specimens were obtained from patients with type I thoracic aortic dissection, ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms, and control organ donors. The expression of interleukin-1β, interferon-γ, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and signal transduction factors phospho-p38 and phosphorylated c-jun N-terminal kinase (phospho-JNK) were detected by real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (real time RT-PCR), Western blot, and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining was performed to detect apoptosis of media cells. The correlation of these factors and apoptosis was also studied. Apoptosis in the media of thoracic aortic dissection and in ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms was dramatically higher than in the control group. The expression of interleukin-1β gradually increased from the control group, thoracic aortic dissection to ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (p matrix metalloproteinase-9 was significantly increased in the media of thoracic aortic dissection and ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms compared with the control group (p correlations between interleukin-1β versus matrix metalloproteinase-9, interleukin-1β versus phospho-p38 in thoracic aortic dissection (p matrix metalloproteinase-9, interferon-γ versus phospho-JNK, interferon-γ versus apoptosis, and interleukin-1β versus apoptosis in ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (p = 0.02, 0.02, p matrix metalloproteinase-9 and the apoptosis of media cells in humans. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Endovascular treatment of type II endoleak following thoracic endovascular aortic repair for thoracic aortic aneurysm: Case report of squeeze technique to reach the aneurysmal sac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyun Jung; Kim, Chang Won; Lee, Tae Hong; Song, Seung Hwan; Lee, Chung Won; Chung, Sung Woon [Pusan National University Hospital, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Type II endoleaks are common after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). Various strategies are introduced to manage type II endoleaks, such as the use of coils, plugs, or liquid embolic agents (histoacryl, thrombin, onyx, etc.) through a transarterial approach or a direct puncture of the aneurysmal sac. We herein report a case of a type II endoleak caused by reverse blood flow through intercostal artery after TEVAR which was successfully treated with n-butyl cyanoacrylate (histoacryl)-lipiodol mixture by a squeeze technique to reach the aneurismal sac using a microcatheter.

  3. Operated DeBakey type III dissecting aortic aneurysm: review of 12 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Hi Eun; Lee, Ghi Jai; Oh, Sang Joon; Yoon, Sei Ra; Shim, Jae Chan; Kim, Ho Kyun; Han, Chang Yul

    1995-01-01

    We evaluated the indications of operation and radiologic findings in 12 operated DeBakey type III aortic dissections. We retrospectively reviewed radiologic findings of 12 operated DeBakey type III aortic dissections, using CT, MRI, or aortography, and correlations were made with clinical course of the patients. Three cases were uncomplicated dissections. There were aneurysm rupture in 4 cases, impending rupture in 4 cases, occlusion of common iliac artery in 2 cases, occlusion of renal artery in 1 case, and compression of bronchus and esophagus by dilated aorta in 1 case. Associated clinical sign and symptoms were chest and back pain in 12 cases, claudication in 3 cases, dyspnea and dysphagia in 1 case, hoarseness in 1 case, and hemoptysis in 1 case. Post-operative complications were death from aneurysm rupture in 1 case, paraplegia in 2 cases, acute renal failure in 3 cases, and hemopericardium in 1 case. Although medical therapy is preferred in management of DeBakey type III aortic dissection, surgical treatment should be considered in patients with radiological findings of aortic rupture, impending rupture, occlusion of aortic major branches

  4. Rapid Two-stage Versus One-stage Surgical Repair of Interrupted Aortic Arch with Ventricular Septal Defect in Neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Lin Lee

    2008-11-01

    Conclusion: The outcome of rapid two-stage repair is comparable to that of one-stage repair. Rapid two-stage repair has the advantages of significantly shorter cardiopulmonary bypass duration and AXC time, and avoids deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. LVOTO remains an unresolved issue, and postoperative aortic arch restenosis can be dilated effectively by percutaneous balloon angioplasty.

  5. Stent implantation to ductus arteriosus in a patient with interrupted aortic arch guided by CT image overlay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goreczny, Sebastian; Dryzek, Pawel; Moszura, Tomasz

    2017-08-01

    A 15-day-old premature patient with ventricular septal defect and interrupted aortic arch type B underwent "hybrid" initial treatment consisting of bilateral pulmonary artery banding followed by stenting of the ductus arteriosus. A pre-registered CT scan was re-purposed with a new three-dimensional image fusion software (VesselNavigator) to create a roadmap for stent delivery.

  6. Anti-Platelet Treatment of Middle-Sized Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jen S; Björck, Martin; Michel, Jean B

    2012-01-01

    between the luminal side of the thrombus and flowing blood is a site of constant thrombus renewal, which is linked to platelet aggregation-induced fibrin generation and accumulation. In addition, red blood cells are entrapped causing an oxidative response. Through centrifugal convection are factors......The physiological transport in the aortic wall occurs mainly by centrifugal convection from the lumen to the adventitia through the arterial wall. Enlargement of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is usually associated with the development of an intraluminal mural thrombus (ILT). The interface...

  7. Individual-patient meta-analysis of three randomized trials comparing endovascular versus open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sweeting, M. J.; Balm, R.; Desgranges, P.; Ulug, P.; Powell, J. T.; Koelemay, M. J. W.; Idu, M. M.; Kox, C.; Legemate, D. A.; Huisman, L. C.; Willems, M. C. M.; Reekers, J. A.; van Delden, O. M.; van Lienden, K. P.; Hoornweg, L. L.; Reimerink, J. J.; van Beek, S. C.; Vahl, A. C.; Leijdekkers, V. J.; Bosma, J.; Montauban van Swijndregt, A. D.; de Vries, C.; van der Hulst, V. P. M.; Peringa, J.; Blomjous, J. G. A. M.; Visser, M. J. T.; van der Heijden, F. H. W. M.; Wisselink, W.; Hoksbergen, A. W. J.; Blankensteijn, J. D.; Visser, M. T. J.; Coveliers, H. M. E.; Nederhoed, J. H.; van den Berg, F. G.; van der Meijs, B. B.; van den Oever, M. L. P.; Lely, R. J.; Meijerink, M. R.; Voorwinde, A.; Ultee, J. M.; van Nieuwenhuizen, R. C.; Dwars, B. J.; Nagy, T. O. M.; Tolenaar, P.; Wiersema, A. M.; Lawson, J. A.; van Aken, P. J.; Stigter, A. A.; van den Broek, T. A. A.; Vos, G. A.; Mulder, W.; Strating, R. P.; Nio, D.; Akkersdijk, G. J. M.; van der Elst, A.; van Exter, P.; Becquemin, J.-P.; Allaire, E.; Cochennec, F.; Marzelle, J.; Louis, N.; Schneider, J.; Majewski, M.; Castier, Y.; Leseche, G.; Francis, F.; Steinmetz, E.; Berne, J.-P.; Favier, C.; Haulon, S.; Koussa, M.; Azzaoui, R.; Piervito, D.; Alimi, Y.; Boufi, M.; Hartung, O.; Cerquetta, P.; Amabile, P.; Piquet, P.; Penard, J.; Demasi, M.; Alric, P.; Canaud, L.; Berthet, J.-P.; Julia, P.; Fabiani, J.-N.; Alsac, J. M.; Gouny, P.; Badra, A.; Braesco, J.; Favre, J.-P.; Albertini, J.-N.; Martinez, R.; Hassen-Khodja, R.; Batt, M.; Jean, E.; Sosa, M.; Declemy, S.; Destrieux-Garnier, L.; Lermusiaux, P.; Feugier, P.; Ashleigh, R.; Gomes, M.; Greenhalgh, R. M.; Grieve, R.; Hinchliffe, R.; Sweeting, M.; Thompson, M. M.; Thompson, S. G.; Cheshire, N. J.; Boyle, J. R.; Serracino-Inglott, F.; Smyth, J. V.; Hinchliffe, R. J.; Bell, R.; Wilson, N.; Bown, M.; Dennis, M.; Davis, M.; Howell, S.; Wyatt, M. G.; Valenti, D.; Bachoo, P.; Walker, P.; MacSweeney, S.; Davies, J. N.; Rittoo, D.; Parvin, S. D.; Yusuf, W.; Nice, C.; Chetter, I.; Howard, A.; Chong, P.; Bhat, R.; McLain, D.; Gordon, A.; Lane, I.; Hobbs, S.; Pillay, W.; Rowlands, T.; El-Tahir, A.; Asquith, J.; Cavanagh, S.; Dubois, L.; Forbes, T. L.

    2015-01-01

    The benefits of endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm remain controversial, without any strong evidence about advantages in specific subgroups. An individual-patient data meta-analysis of three recent randomized trials of endovascular versus open repair of abdominal aortic

  8. Celiac Trunk Embolization, as a Means of Elongating Short Distal Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Necks, Prior to Endovascular Aortic Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belenky, Alexander; Haddad, Menashe; Idov, Igor; Knizhnik, Michael; Litvin, Sergey; Bachar, Gil N.; Atar, Eli

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report our experience in elongating short distal necks of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (DTAAs) by coil embolization of the celiac trunk prior to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). During 6 years seven patients (five men and two women; mean age, 74) who had DTAAs with short distal necks unsuitable for conventional EVAR, and well patent superior and inferior mesenteric arteries based on CT, were treated in one session with EVAR after the celiac trunk was coil embolized to elongate the neck. All patients were followed by CT every 3 months in the first year and every 6 months thereafter. Technical success was achieved in all patients, and no early or late ischemic complications were noted. No procedural complications occurred and good aneurysm sealing was obtained in all patients. Three endoleaks were identified after 3 months (one patient) and 6 months (two patients); all were treated successfully with insertion of an additional stent-graft. In patients with DTAAs who are candidates for EVAR but have short aneurysm distal necks, celiac trunk embolization-only if the superior and inferior mesenteric arteries are patent-is a good and safe way to elongate the neck and enable EVAR.

  9. Influence of virtual intervention and blood rheology on mass transfer through thoracic aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yu; Chen, Ming; Xiong, Guanglei; Chen, Jie

    2015-09-18

    Computational fluid dynamics tools have been used to investigate blood flow through the human thoracic aortic models with aneurysm before and after virtual stent graft operation. The impact of blood rheology and aortic geometry on the wall shear stress (WSS), luminal surface low-density lipoproteins (LDL) concentration, and oxygen flux along the arterial wall is investigated. The stent graft at the aneurysm has significant effects on WSS and mass transport in blood flow. Due to the low flow rate, Newtonian blood assumption generally under-estimates the WSS. The non-Newtonian blood rheology play an important role in the LDL transport as well as oxygen transport. It is found that WSS alone is insufficient to correctly predict the location with high risk of atherogenesis. The results suggest that WSS, luminal surface LDL concentration, and the oxygen flux on the wall have to be considered together to evaluate the performance of virtual operation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. How to manage a case of aymptomatic thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm with occluded mesenteric arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhisekh Mohanty

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a unique case of a 57-year-old male having a suprarenal thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm which is extending till the origin of superior mesenteric artery (SMA. The origins of celiac artery and SMA were totally occluded and filled retrogradely through dense collateral vessels arising from the inferior mesenteric artery. Surprisingly, the patient was not having any symptoms related to mesenteric ischemia. We decided to use a conventional aortic aneurysm stent graft to repair it without revascularizing the occluded mesenteric arteries. After 1 month, CT aortogram was repeated which revealed a well-apposed stent graft with no endoleaks. He did not have any clinical signs and symptoms attributable to mesenteric ischemia.

  11. The abdominal aortic aneurysm and intraluminal thrombus: current concepts of development and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra ePiechota-Polańczyk

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA shows several hallmarks of atherosclerotic and atherothrombotic disease, but comprises an additional, predominant feature of proteolysis resulting in the degradation and destabilization of the aortic wall. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge on AAA development, involving the accumulation of neutrophils in the intraluminal thrombus and their central role in creating an oxidative and proteolytic environment. Particular focus is placed on the controversial role of heme oxygenase 1/carbon monoxide and nitric oxide synthase/peroxynitrite which may exert both protective and damaging effects in the development of the aneurysm. Treatment indications as well as surgical and pharmacological options for AAA therapy are discussed in light of recent reports.

  12. Successful Endobronchial stenting for bronchial compression from a massive thoracic aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Comer

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A case of bronchial occlusion caused by a thoracic aortic aneurysm and the relief of this obstruction by the implantation of expandable metallic stents is described. Stent deployment provided an immediate improvement in lung ventilation and chest radiograph appearances. Stent insertion was uncomplicated, but weaning from mechanical ventilation was unsuccessful and the patient died from a ventilator-associated pneumonia, unrelated to the procedure. Endobronchial stenting should be considered as a non-invasive therapy for the treatment of bronchial obstruction, with respiratory compromise, caused by a thoracic aortic aneurysm when vascular surgery is not an option. The medium to long term survival of this patient group is poor. This can be attributed to complications related to the stent and also to the poor performance status of these patients.

  13. Mobile thromboses of the aortic arch without aortic debris. A transesophageal echocardiographic finding associated with unexplained arterial embolism. The Filiale Echocardiographie de la Société Française de Cardiologie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laperche, T; Laurian, C; Roudaut, R; Steg, P G

    1997-07-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions of the aortic arch are potential sources of arterial embolism. Mobile thrombi in the aortic arch in young patients without diffuse atherosclerosis have been reported recently, but such cases remain exceptional. We describe a series of young patients with unexplained arterial embolism in whom transesophageal echocardiography detected mobile aortic arch thromboses. Transesophageal echocardiography files collected between 1991 and 1995 in French academic cardiology centers were reviewed to identify patients who fulfilled the following criteria: (1) an arterial embolic event in the preceding weeks; (2) a mobile pedunculated aortic arch thrombosis, defined as an echogenic mass protruding into the lumen of the aorta and inserted on the aortic arch; and (3) absence of obvious diffuse aortic atherosclerosis or of aortic debris on transesophageal echocardiography. Twenty-three cases were identified from 27 855 examinations. Thromboses were located on the horizontal aorta (n = 4), near the ostium of the left subclavian artery (n = 5), or on the concavity of the posterior segment of the aortic arch (in the isthmus) (n = 14). The insertion site was a small atherosclerotic plaque in 21 patients. The remaining aortic wall always appeared normal or mildly atherosclerotic. The mean age of the patients was 45 +/- 8.4 years (range, 26 to 61 years). All patients were treated with intravenous heparin after the diagnosis of aortic arch thrombosis, and surgical removal of the thrombosis was performed in 10 patients in whom histological examination confirmed an atherosclerotic process at the site of insertion of the thrombosis. The prognosis was mainly influenced by embolic events. Thromboses of the aortic arch appear to be a variant form of aortic atherosclerotic disease associated with arterial embolism in young patients.

  14. Tissue Responses to Stent Grafts with Endo-Exo-Skeleton for Saccular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in a Canine Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Il Young; Chung, Jin Wook; Kim, Hyo Cheol [Dept. of Radiology and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Clinical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young Ho; So Young Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Beom [Dept. of Radiology, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Min, Seung Kee [Dept. of Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Hyung [Dept. of Radiology, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    We evaluated the effect of close contact between the stent and the graft on the induction of endothelial covering on the stent graft placed over an aneurysm. Saccular abdominal aortic aneurysms were made with Dacron patch in eight dogs. The stent graft consisted of an inner stent, a expanded polytetrafluoroethylene graft, and an outer stent. After sacrificing the animals, the aortas with an embedded stent graft were excised. The aortas were inspected grossly and evaluated microscopically. The animals were sacrificed at two (n = 3), six (n = 3), and eight months (n = 2) after endovascular repair. In two dogs, the aortic lumen was occluded at two months after the placement. On gross inspection of specimens from the other six dogs with a patent aortic lumen, stent grafts placed over the normal aortic wall were covered by glossy white neointima, whereas, stent grafts placed over the aneurysmal aortic wall were covered by brownish neointima. On microscopic inspection, stent grafts placed over the normal aortic wall were covered by thin neointima (0.27 ± 0.05 mm, mean ± standard deviation) with an endothelial layer, and stent grafts placed over the aneurysmal aortic wall were covered by thick neointima (0.62 ± 0.17 mm) without any endothelial lining. Transgraft cell migration at the normal aortic wall was more active than that at the aneurysmal aortic wall. Close contact between the stent and the graft, which was achieved with stent grafts with endo-exo-skeleton, could not enhance endothelial covering on the stent graft placed over the aneurysms.

  15. Mycotic aortic aneurysm due to intravesical BCG immunotherapy: Clinical manifestations and diagnostic challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany J Holmes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A live, attenuated form of Mycobacterium bovis, bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG, is commonly used as intravesical immunotherapy for non-invasive urothelial bladder carcinoma. While complications are rare, dissemination can occur. A case of mycotic aortic aneurysm following BCG administration with recovery of Mycobacterium bovis in culture is reported. A review of the published experience with this problem is also presented.

  16. Ascending aortic aneurysm and diaphragmatic hernia in a case of Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Jignesh; Hinduja, Manish; Baria, Kinnaresh; Pandya, Himani

    2017-06-01

    Marfan syndrome commonly affects the skeletal, ocular, and cardiovascular systems. Involvement of the gastrointestinal system is known but uncommon. Intervention depends upon the system involved and the severity of symptoms. Special awareness is required for the diagnosis and management of gastrointestinal involvement in these patients. We report a rare case of simultaneous surgical repair of an ascending aortic aneurysm and a type IV hiatal hernia in a 35-year-old man with Marfan syndrome.

  17. Aortic aneurysm and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in Marfan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujoy Ghosh

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The combination of Marfan syndrome with lymphoma is extremely rare. This report describes a case of Marfan syndrome who presented with chest discomfort and was diagnosed to have an aortic aneurysm and an additional incidental mediastinal mass that on further investigation turned out to be a diffuse large B cell lymphoma. We have suggested a hypothesis which can explain the occurrence of lymphoma in Marfan syndrome.

  18. An Experimental and Numerical Comparison of the Rupture Locations of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Doyle, Barry J.; Corbett, Timothy J.; Callanan, Anthony; Walsh, Michael T.; Vorp, David A.; McGloughlin, Timothy M.

    2009-01-01

    Peer-reviewed PURPOSE: To identify the rupture locations of idealized physical models of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) using an in-vitro setup and to compare the findings to those predicted numerically. METHODS: Five idealized AAAs were manufactured using Sylgard 184 silicone rubber, which had been mechanically characterized from tensile tests, tear tests, and finite element analysis. The models were then inflated to the point of rupture and recorded using a high-speed camera. Numerical ...

  19. Can an accessory renal artery be safely covered during endovascular aortic aneurysm repair?

    OpenAIRE

    Antoniou, George A.; Karkos, Christos D.; Antoniou, Stavros A.; Georgiadis, George S.

    2013-01-01

    A best evidence topic was constructed according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether coverage of an accessory renal artery (ARA) in patients undergoing endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is associated with increased risk of renal impairment. Altogether, 106 papers were located using the reported searches, of which 5 represented the best evidence to answer the question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, study type, patient group studied, rel...

  20. Mid-term results of zone 0 thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair after ascending aorta wrapping and supra-aortic debranching in high-risk patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecoraro, Felice; Lachat, Mario; Hofmann, Michael; Cayne, Neal S; Chaykovska, Lyubov; Rancic, Zoran; Puippe, Gilbert; Pfammatter, Thomas; Mangialardi, Nicola; Veith, Frank J; Bettex, Dominique; Maisano, Francesco; Neff, Thomas A

    2017-06-01

    Surgical repair of aneurysmal disease involving the ascending aorta, aortic arch and eventually the descending aorta is generally associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A less invasive approach with the ascending wrapping technique (WT), supra-aortic vessel debranching (SADB) and thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) in zone 0 was developed to reduce the associated risk in these patients. During a 10-year period, consecutive patients treated by the ascending WT, SADB and TEVAR in zone 0 were included. All patients were considered at high risk for conventional surgery. Measured outcomes included perioperative deaths and morbidity, maximal aortic transverse diameter (TD) and its postoperative evolution, endoleak, survival, freedom from cardiovascular reinterventions, SADB freedom from occlusion and aortic valve function during follow-up. Median follow-up was 37.4 [mean = 34; range, 0-65; standard deviation (SD) = 20] months. Twenty-six cases were included with a mean age of 71.88 ( r  = 56-87; SD = 8) years. A mean of 2.9 supra-aortic vessels (75) per patient was debranched from the ascending aorta. The mean time interval from WT/SADB and TEVAR was 29 ( r  = 0-204; SD = 48) days. TEVAR was associated with chimney and/or periscope grafts in 6 (23%) patients, and extra-anatomical supra-aortic bypasses were performed in 6 (23%) patients. Perioperative mortality was 7.7% (2/26). Neurological events were registered in 3 (11.5%) cases, and a reintervention was required in 3 (11.5%) cases. After the WT, the ascending diameter remained stable during the follow-up period in all cases. At mean follow-up, significant shrinkage of the arch/descending aorta diameter was observed. A type I/III endoleak occurred in 3 cases. At 5 years, the rates of survival, freedom from cardiovascular reinterventions and SADB freedom from occlusion were 71.7, 82.3 and 96%, respectively. The use of the ascending WT, SADB and TEVAR in selected patients

  1. Internal right ventricular band for multiple ventricular septal defects in a neonate undergoing arterial switch and aortic arch repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, William W; Shirali, Girish S; Bradley, Scott M

    2011-01-01

    A neonate presented with d-transposition of the great arteries, aortic arch hypoplasia, aortic coarctation, and multiple ventricular septal defects. During the arterial switch procedure and the aortic arch repair, a fenestrated Gore-Tex disk (W.L. Gore & Assoc, Flagstaff, AZ) was sewn into the right ventricular outflow tract to restrict pulmonary blood flow. The internal right ventricular band successfully controlled the pulmonary blood flow, maintaining a systemic oxygen saturation of 88% to 92%, and allowing growth from 3.5 to 10.5 kg. At 8 months of age, the internal band in the patient was removed, and the ventricular septal defects were successfully closed. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Role of F-18 FDG PET/CT in the management of infected abdominal aortic aneurysm due to salmonella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seung Jin; Lee, Jin Soo; Cheong, Moon Hyun; Byun, Sung Su; Hyun, In Young [Inha University College of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    We present a case of infected abdominal aortic aneurysm due to salmonella enteritidis. F-18 FDG PET/CT was performed to diagnosis and during follow-up after antibiotic treatment. Computed tomography (CT) is considered to be the best diagnostic imaging modality in infected aortic lesions. In this case, a combination of CT and FDG PET/CT provided accurate information for the diagnosis of infected abdominal aortic aneurysm. Moreover, FDG PET/CT made an important contribution of monitoring disease activity during antibiotic treatment.

  3. Outer Wall Segmentation of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm by Variable Neighborhood Search Through Intensity and Gradient Spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriapisith, Thanongchai; Kusakunniran, Worapan; Haddawy, Peter

    2018-01-19

    Aortic aneurysm segmentation remains a challenge. Manual segmentation is a time-consuming process which is not practical for routine use. To address this limitation, several automated segmentation techniques for aortic aneurysm have been developed, such as edge detection-based methods, partial differential equation methods, and graph partitioning methods. However, automatic segmentation of aortic aneurysm is difficult due to high pixel similarity to adjacent tissue and a lack of color information in the medical image, preventing previous work from being applicable to difficult cases. This paper uses uses a variable neighborhood search that alternates between intensity-based and gradient-based segmentation techniques. By alternating between intensity and gradient spaces, the search can escape from local optima of each space. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms the other existing segmentation methods in the literature, based on measurements of dice similarity coefficient and jaccard similarity coefficient at the pixel level. In addition, it is shown to perform well for cases that are difficult to segment.

  4. A multidetector tomography protocol for follow-up of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Moraes Bastos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to improve the use of 64-channel multidetector computed tomography using lower doses of ionizing radiation during follow-up procedures in a series of patients with endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. METHODS: Thirty patients receiving 5 to 29 months of follow-up after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair were analyzed using a 64-channel multidetector computed tomography device by an exam that included pre-and postcontrast with both arterial and venous phases. Leak presence and type were classified based on the exam phase. RESULTS: Endoleaks were identified in 8/30 of cases; the endoleaks in 3/8 of these cases were not visible in the arterial phases of the exams. CONCLUSION: The authors conclude that multidetector computed tomography with pre-contrast and venous phases should be a part of the ongoing follow-up of patients undergoing endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. The arterial phase can be excluded when the aneurism is stable or regresses. These findings permit a lower radiation dose without jeopardizing the correct diagnosis of an endoleak.

  5. Metformin treatment does not affect the risk of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Katrine L.; Pottegård, Anton; Hallas, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Diabetes counteracts formation and rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms, possibly through arterial matrix accumulation. Use of metformin, on the other hand, reduces arterial accumulation of matrix molecules. Consequently, we hypothesized that metformin treatment may reverse the protec......Objective: Diabetes counteracts formation and rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms, possibly through arterial matrix accumulation. Use of metformin, on the other hand, reduces arterial accumulation of matrix molecules. Consequently, we hypothesized that metformin treatment may reverse...... of metformin and ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA). The source population was defined as all individuals in Denmark with diabetes. Cases were all individuals within the source population who were hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of RAAA. For each case, 10 controls matched by age and sex were....... In total, 22.4% of the case population were long-term metformin users compared with 28.8% of the controls. We found a statistically nonsignificant protective effect of long-term metformin use toward RAAA with crude odds ratio (OR) of 0.74 (confidence interval, 0.54-1.00). When adjusted for covariates...

  6. Branching patterns of the aortic arch in the Siberian roe deer (Capreolus pygargus Pallas, 1771).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sangyun; Sim, Jeong-Ha; Kim, Jong-Teak; Oh, Hong-Shik; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Park, Byung-Yong; Kim, In-Shik; Ahn, Dongchoon

    2018-02-02

    This study examined the branching pattern of the aortic arch (AA) and its major branches in the Siberian roe deer (Capreolus pygargus Pallas, 1771) from South Korea. A total of eight of the nine expected types, based on the branching site and bilateral levels of the costocervical trunk (CCT) and subclavian artery (SB), were observed in the arterial silicone casts of 35 deer (16 males, 19 females). This deer has no typical type. The three most common types were present in 28.6, 25.7 and 20.0% of cases and resulted from different branching patterns of the left CCT and left SB. These results suggest that the Siberian roe deer in the Korean peninsula has various AA branching patterns, which differs from other ruminants.

  7. Duplo arco aórtico: a quebra do silêncio Double aortic arch: the break of silence

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    Ana Rita Abrão

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Anéis vasculares representam 1-2% dos casos das cardiopatias congênitas. Relatamos um caso raro de duplo arco aórtico. Mulher, 60 anos, procurou atendimento na clínica médica apresentando 1 ano de história de disfagia, 6 meses de dispneia e 2 meses de dor torácica esporádica. Raio X de tórax revelou: hiperinsuflação pulmonar difusa, alargamento mediastinal, coração com volume e configurações normais, arco aórtico à direita e alterações degenerativas vertebrais. Tomografia computadorizada do tórax: arco aórtico duplo circundando e comprimindo a traqueia e o esôfago. Arco direito mais calibroso, emergindo dele o tronco braquiocefálico. Do arco esquerdo emergem a artéria carótida comum e a subclávia esquerda. Diagnóstico: anel vascular traqueoesofagiano decorrente do duplo arco aórtico, sendo o arco direito dominante. No presente caso, optou-se por seguimento clínico da paciente, levando-se em conta a intensidade dos sintomas apresentados.Vascular rings represent 1 to 2% of cases of congenital heart disease. We report a rare case of double aortic arch. A 60-year-old woman was admitted to the hospital presenting a one-year history of dysphagia, six months of dyspnea and two months of sporadic chest pain. Radiograph of the chest revealed diffuse pulmonary hyper inflation, widening of the mediastinum, heart of normal size and shape, a right-sized aortic arch, and degenerative changes of the thoracic spine. Computed tomography of the chest showed a double aortic arch encircling and compressing the trachea and the esophagus. The right aortic arch had a larger caliber, with brachiocephalic trunk arising from it. The left common carotid artery and the left subclavian artery arose from the left aortic arch. Diagnosis: tracheoesophageal vascular ring due to double aortic arch, with dominant right arch. In this case, we chose to follow the patient medically, taking into consideration the mildness of the symptoms.

  8. Modelling and numerical simulation of the in vivo mechanical response of the ascending aortic aneurysm in Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Herrera, Claudio M; Celentano, Diego J; Herrera, Emilio A

    2017-03-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a genetic disorder that affects connective tissue, impairing cardiovascular structures and function, such as heart valves and aorta. Thus, patients with Marfan disease have a higher risk of developing circulatory problems associated with mitral and aortic valves prolapse, manifested as dilated aorta and aortic aneurysm. However, little is known about the biomechanical characteristics of these structures affected with MFS. This study presents the modelling and simulation of the mechanical response of human ascending aortic aneurysms in MFS under in vivo conditions with intraluminal pressures within normotensive and hypertensive ranges. We obtained ascending aortic segments from five adults with MFS subjected to a vascular prosthesis implantation replacing an aortic aneurysm. We characterised the arterial samples via ex vivo tensile test measurements that enable fitting the material parameters of a hyperelastic isotropic constitutive model. Then, these material parameters were used in a numerical simulation of an ascending aortic aneurysm subjected to in vivo normotensive and hypertensive conditions. In addition, we assessed different constraints related to the movement of the aortic root. Overall, our results provide not only a realistic description of the mechanical behaviour of the vessel, but also useful data about stress/stretch-based criteria to predict vascular rupture. This knowledge may be included in the clinical assessment to determine risk and indicate surgical intervention.

  9. The Case of the Neighbour's Cat Causing a Symptomatic (Mycotic) Aortic Aneurysm and an Infected Endograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalan, Ahmed; Wilson, Nicky; Poels, Jon; Ikponmwosa, Anna; Cavanagh, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Aortic endograft infection is a rare but serious complication following endovascular aneurysm repair. An unusual presentation associated with an uncommon organism is reported. A 69 year old female was prescribed but failed to complete a full course of co-amoxiclav following a forearm cat bite. Nine days later she was admitted with pyrexia, left flank pain, and haematuria. Empiric treatment for a urinary tract infection was started. Pasteurella multocida was isolated from blood culture performed during this attendance. Imaging demonstrated hydronephrosis and a 5.5 cm aortic aneurysm with features of impending leak. Emergency endovascular repair was performed without immediate complication. Four weeks following stent graft insertion, the patient was readmitted with loss of consciousness. Imaging demonstrated an infected graft with an associated psoas abscess. The endograft was explanted and reconstruction performed with the femoral vein. Only at this point was the history of a cat bite and positive blood cultures elicited and recognised as relevant. Detailed history taking can expose unusual sources of infection. Ideally, an infected aortic endograft should be explanted and the septic focus eradicated prior to autogenous aortic reconstruction.

  10. Participation of Arachidonic Acid Metabolism in the Aortic Aneurysm Formation in Patients with Marfan Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María E. Soto

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome (MFS is a pleiotropic genetic disease involving the cardiovascular system where a fibrillin-1 mutation is present. This mutation is associated with accelerated activation of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ1 which contributes to the formation of aneurysms in the root of the aorta. There is an imbalance in the synthesis of thromboxane A2 (TXA2 and prostacyclin, that is a consequence of a differential protein expression of the isoforms of cyclooxygenases (COXs, suggesting an alteration of arachidonic acid (AA metabolism. The aim of this study was to analyze the participation of AA metabolism associated with inflammatory factors in the dilation and dissection of the aortic aneurysm in patients with MFS. A decrease in AA (p = 0.02, an increase in oleic acid (OA, TGFβ1, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 (p < 0.05, and COXs activity (p = 0.002 was found. The expressions of phospholipase A2 (PLA2, cytochrome P450 (CYP450 4A, 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX, COX2 and TXA2R (p < 0.05 showed a significant increase in the aortic aneurysm of patients with MFS compared to control subjects. COX1, 6-keto-prostaglandin 1 alpha (6-keto-PG1α and 8-isoprostane did not show significant changes. Histological examination of the aortas showed an increase of cystic necrosis, elastic fibers and collagen in MFS. The results suggest that there are inflammatory factors coupled to genetic factors that predispose to aortic endothelial dysfunction in the aortic tissue of patients with MFS. There is a decrease in the percentage of AA, associated with an increase of PLA2, COX2/TXA2R, CYP450 4A, and 5-LOX which leads to a greater synthesis of PGE2 than of 6-keto-PGF1α, thus contributing to the formation of the aortic aneurysm. The evident loss of the homeostasis in these mechanisms confirms that there is a participation of the AA pathway in the aneurysm progression in MFS.

  11. Elastic fiber regeneration in vitro and in vivo for treatment of experimental abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jiang; Guo, Wei; Wei, Ren; Zuo, Shang-wei; Liu, Xiao-ping; Zhang, Tao

    2013-02-01

    The pathological characteristics of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) involved the regression of extracellular matrix (ECM) in aortic walls, especially elastic structure in medial layer. As the major structural protein of aorta, elastin contributes to the extensibility and elastic recoil of the vessels. We hypothesized that overexpression of elastin in vessel walls might regenerate the elastic structure of ECM, restore the elastic structure of the aneurysmal wall, and eventually lead to a reduction of aortic diameters (ADs) in an experimental model of AAA. Tropoelastin (TE) of Sprague Dawley (SD) rat was synthesized by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and used to construct adneviral vectors containing elastin precursor protein (AdTE-GFP). Cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from aortas of male SD rats were transfected with AdTE-GFP, AdGFP, adenoviral vector (AdNull), and phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Immunofluorescence staining was performed to determine the expression of elastin in transfected cells. The expression of elastic fibers in ECM of VSMCs transfected with AdTE-GFP were detected by fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at 1, 3, and 5 days following gene transfer. The AAA vessel walls were infused with AdTE-GFP or an empty AdNull, or PBS directly into the aneurysmal lumen. ADs of the aneurysms were compared in infused aortas. Formation of new elastic fibers in vivo was assessed by hematoxylin and eosin, and elastic von-Giesson staining. Recombinant elastin-GFP in vivo was identified by immunohistochemical staining. Elastic fibers were increased both in ECM of VSMC and in vessel walls after gene transfer. Histological studies revealed that the AdTE-GFP-transduced aortas had elastic fiber regeneration in the aneurysmal walls. The AdTE-GFP-transduced aortas showed a decreased AD (23.04% ± 14.49%, P Elastic fibers have been successfully overexpressed both in vitro and in a rat model of AAA by a technique

  12. Deep gluteal grounding pad burn after abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapienza, Paolo; Venturini, Luigi; Cigna, Emanuele; Sterpetti, Antonio V; Biacchi, Daniele; di Marzo, Luca

    2015-06-24

    Although skin burns at the site of grounding pad are a known risk of surgery, their exact incidence is unknown. We first report the case of a patient who presented a deep gluteal burn at the site of the grounding pad after an abdominal aortic aneurism repair, the etiology and the challenging treatment required to overcome this complication.

  13. Role of myeloperoxidase in abdominal aortic aneurysm formation: mitigation by taurine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ha Won; Blomkalns, Andra L; Ogbi, Mourad; Thomas, Manesh; Gavrila, Daniel; Neltner, Bonnie S; Cassis, Lisa A; Thompson, Robert W; Weiss, Robert M; Lindower, Paul D; Blanco, Victor M; McCormick, Michael L; Daugherty, Alan; Fu, Xiaoming; Hazen, Stanley L; Stansfield, Brian K; Huo, Yuqing; Fulton, David J; Chatterjee, Tapan; Weintraub, Neal L

    2017-12-01

    Oxidative stress plays a fundamental role in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) formation. Activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (or neutrophils) are associated with AAA and express myeloperoxidase (MPO), which promotes inflammation, matrix degradation, and other pathological features of AAA, including enhanced oxidative stress through generation of reactive oxygen species. Both plasma and aortic MPO levels are elevated in patients with AAA, but the role of MPO in AAA pathogenesis has, heretofore, never been investigated. Here, we show that MPO gene deletion attenuates AAA formation in two animal models: ANG II infusion in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice and elastase perfusion in C57BL/6 mice. Oral administration of taurine [1% or 4% (wt/vol) in drinking water], an amino acid known to react rapidly with MPO-generated oxidants like hypochlorous acid, also prevented AAA formation in the ANG II and elastase models as well as the CaCl 2 application model of AAA formation while reducing aortic peroxidase activity and aortic protein-bound dityrosine levels, an oxidative cross link formed by MPO. Both MPO gene deletion and taurine supplementation blunted aortic macrophage accumulation, elastin fragmentation, and matrix metalloproteinase activation, key features of AAA pathogenesis. Moreover, MPO gene deletion and taurine administration significantly attenuated the induction of serum amyloid A, which promotes ANG II-induced AAAs. These data implicate MPO in AAA pathogenesis and suggest that studies exploring whether taurine can serve as a potential therapeutic for the prevention or treatment of AAA in patients merit consideration. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Neutrophils are abundant in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), and myeloperoxidase (MPO), prominently expressed in neutrophils, is associated with AAA in humans. This study demonstrates that MPO gene deletion or supplementation with the natural product taurine, which can scavenge MPO-generated oxidants, can prevent AAA formation

  14. [Results of operations for ascending aortic aneurysm in Iceland 2000-2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brynjarsdottir, Helga Bjork; Melvinsdottir, Inga Hlif; Gudbjartsson, Tomas; Geirsson, Arnar

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is an uncommon disease where treatment is complex and associated with significant comorbidity. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of operations for TAA in Iceland with emphasis on postoperative complications, 30 day mortality and survival. A retrospective study on 105 patients (mean age 60.7 yrs., 69.5% males) that underwent operations for TAA between 2000 and 2014 in Iceland. Patients with aortic injury or acute aortic dissection were excluded. Clinical information was collected from hospital charts and long-term survival estimated by Kaplan-Meier method. Mean follow-up was 5.7 yrs. Bicuspid aortic valve was present in 52 patients (51.0%) and family history was positive in 10 of the cases (9.5%). Every other patient (50.5%) was asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally. The most common procedure was aortic root replacement using biological prosthesis. Two out of three patients had complications, that were regarded as major in 31.4% of cases, however, stroke was only detected in 2 (1.9%) patients. Two patients died within 30 days postoperatively (1.9%). The overall survival at one year was 95.1%; more favorable for males compared to females (97.2 vs. 90.4%, p=0.0012, log rank test) and at 5 years 90.3%. Outcome following surgery for TAA in Iceland is comparable to studies in neighbouring countries. The complications rate is high, however, the stroke rate was low, as was 30 day mortality. Longterm survival is favorable, and is more favorable for males than females. Key words: Thoracic aortic aneurysm, ascending aorta, open heart surgery, complications, operative mortality, survival. Correspondance: Arnar Geirsson, arnarge@landspitali.is.

  15. Concepts to optimize stent-grafting of abdominal aortic aneurysms based on results of experimental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavan, A.; Kirchhoff, T.; Baus, S.; Galanski, M.; Pichlmaier, M.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose. In the endoluminal therapy of abdominal aortic aneurysms, a short proximal aneurysm neck, endoleaks and the large size and stiffness of the introducer systems are responsible for many of the complications and sub-optimal outcomes. The purpose of the present review article is to to suggest strategies to minimize these complications based on the results of experimental studies in animals. Material and methods. After implanting various types of stents across the renal artery origins, the functional and morphological changes in the kidneys and renal vessels were studied by various authors. In order to prevent progressive widening of the proximal aneurysmal neck and graft dislocation, Sonesson et al. performed a laparoscopic banding around the proximal neck in pigs. To study the effects of endoleaks, Marty, Schurink and Pitton carried out pressure measurements in experimental aneurysms with and without endoleaks. Sakaguchi and Pavcnik developed the 'Twin-tube endografts' (TTEG) and the 'Bifurcated drum occluder endografts' (BDOEG) and tested them in dogs. Results. Up to 3 months after suprarenal stent placement, Chavan et al. detected no significant fall in the mean inulin clearance in sheep (140±46 ml/min before, 137±58 ml/min after). Nasim et al. and Malina et al. reported similar observations with respect to renal function. Suprarenal fixation may result in isolated thrombotic occlusions of the renal arteries and microinfarcts in the kidneys. Mean aortic diameters at the level of banding were significantly smaller in the animals with aortic banding as opposed to those in the control group without banding (8 mm vs 11 mm, p=0.004). The banding caused a secure proximal fixation of the stent-graft. Persistent endoleaks resulted in significantly higher intraaneurysmal pressures. Although the TTEG and the BDOEG stent-grafts required smaller sheaths, occlusions were observed in 8% (TTEG) and 60% (BDOEG) of the graft limbs. (orig.) [de

  16. 18F-FDG PET-CT uptake is a feature of both normal diameter and aneurysmal aortic wall and is not related to aneurysm size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barwick, Tara D. [Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Charing Cross Hospital, Department of Radiology/Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Hammersmith Hospital, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Lyons, O.T.A.; Waltham, M. [King' s College London, BHF Centre of Research Excellence and NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at King' s Health Partners, Academic Department of Surgery, London (United Kingdom); Mikhaeel, N.G. [Guy' s and St Thomas' Foundation NHS Trust, Department of Oncology, London (United Kingdom); O' Doherty, M.J. [King' s Health Partners, Clinical PET Centre, St Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Aortic metabolic activity is suggested to correlate with presence and progression of aneurysmal disease, but has been inadequately studied. This study investigates the 2-[{sup 18}F] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) uptake in a population of infra-renal abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), compared to a matched non-aneurysmal control group. The Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography (PET/CT) database was searched for infra-renal AAA. Exclusion criteria were prior repair, vasculitis, and saccular/mycotic thoracic or thoraco-abdominal aneurysms. Matching of 159 non-aneurysmal (<3 cm diameter) controls from the same population was assessed. Infra-renal aortic wall FDG uptake was assessed using visual analysis; maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) and target to background mediastinal blood pool ratio (TBR) were documented. Predictors of FDG uptake (age, sex, aortic diameter, hypertension, statin use, and diabetes) were assessed using univariate analysis. Follow-up questionnaires were sent to referring clinicians. Aneurysms (n = 151) and controls (n = 159) were matched (p > 0.05) for age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, smoking status, statin use, and indication for PET/CT. Median aneurysm diameter was 5.0 cm (range 3.2-10.4). On visual analysis there was no significant difference in the overall numbers with increased visual uptake 24 % (36/151) in the aneurysm group vs. 19 % (30/159) in the controls, p = ns. SUV{sub max} was slightly lower in the aneurysm group vs. controls (mean (2 SD) 1.75(0.79) vs. 1.84(0.58), p = 0.02). However there was no difference in TBR between the AAA group and controls (mean (2 SD) 1.03 (0.46) vs. 1.05(0.31), p = 0.36). During a median 18 (interquartile range 8-35) months' follow-up 20 were repaired and four were confirmed ruptured. The level of metabolic activity as assessed by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in infra-renal AAA does not correlate with aortic size and does not differ between aneurysms and matched controls

  17. Modified 'candy-plug' technique for chronic type B aortic dissection with aneurysmal dilatation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, Sohsyu; Inoue, Yoshito; Kasai, Mio; Suzuki, Satoru; Hachiya, Takashi

    2017-09-05

    The original 'candy-plug' technique has been reported to be beneficial for the treatment of residual perfused false lumen in patients with aortic dissection. However, this technique is also associated with several problems, such as narrowing of the true lumen and damage to the flap or vessel wall. Therefore, we modified the procedure to overcome these problems. Here we report a case in which the patient was successfully treated using the modified procedure. A 59-year-old man presented with chronic type B aortic dissection with aneurysmal dilatation. The patient had undergone prosthetic graft replacement of the ascending aorta for acute type A aortic dissection 3 years previously and replacement of the descending aorta for residual type B aortic dissection with aneurysmal dilatation 1 year previously. After these procedures, the residual false lumen aneurysm of the distal descending aorta expanded to 57-mm in diameter. Endovascular stent grafting was successfully performed using the modified 'candy-plug' technique with relining of the true lumen and occlusion of the false lumen. The patient was discharged 10 days after the procedure. Follow-up imaging at 1 year showed a completely thrombosed false lumen aneurysm. The modified 'candy-plug' technique is useful for treatment of residual type B aortic dissection with aneurysmal dilatation.

  18. Ischemic acute pancreatitis with pancreatic pseudocyst in a patient with abdominal aortic aneurysm and generalized atheromatosis - case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocota, Ileana; Badea, Radu; Scridon, Traian; Dumitrascu, Dan L

    2015-03-21

    Ischemic pancreatitis is a rare medical entity. The pancreatic tissue is susceptible to ischemia with the possibility of developing acute pancreatitis. The abdominal aortic aneurysm can be one possible cause of pancreatic hypoperfusion. We report the case of a 68-year-old man, Caucasian, with a history of a cluster of severe cardiovascular conditions, who presented epigastric pain of variable intensity for about 2 weeks. The pain occurred after intense physical effort, and was associated with anorexia and asthenia. The palpation revealed epigastric pain and palpable pulsatile mass above the umbilicus. Laboratory tests showed increased serum and urine amylases. The abdominal contrast-enhanced CT scan evidenced acute lesions of the pancreas and a caudal pancreatic pseudocyst of 39x24 mm. An abdominal aortic aneurysm was also described (which extended from the kidney level to the bilateral femoral level) with a maximum diameter of 60.5 mm and generalized atheromatosis. By corroborating clinical, anamnestic, laboratory and imaging data, the case was diagnosed as moderately severe acute ischemic pancreatitis, pancreatic pseudocyst, abdominal aortic aneurysm, generalized atheromatosis. The pancreatic pseudocyst was resorbed in eight months. Surgery for the abdominal aneurysm was performed after the resorption of the pseudocyst. The patient died after aortic surgery because of a septic complication. Ischemic pancreatitis is a rare condition but should be considered in a patient with upper abdominal pain and elevated amylase in the context of an abdominal aortic aneurysm and generalized atheromatosis.

  19. Long-term results after repair of ruptured and non-ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzmanović Ilija B.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Abdominal aortic aneurysm can be repaired by elective procedure while asymptomatic, or immediately when it is complicated - mostly due to rupture. Treating abdominal aneurysm electively, before it becomes urgent, has medical and economical reason. Today, the first month mortality after elective operations of the abdominal aorta aneurysm is less than 3%; on the other hand, significant mortality (25%-70% has been recorded in patients operated immediately because of rupture of the abdominal aneurysm. In addition, the costs of elective surgical treatment are significantly lower. OBJECTIVE The objective of this study is to compare long-term survival of patients that underwent elective or immediate repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (due to rupture, and to find out the factors influencing the long-term survival of these patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS Through retrospective review of prospectively collected data of the Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases of Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, 56 patients that had elective surgery and 35 patients that underwent urgent operation due to rupture of abdominal aneurysm were followed up. Only the patients that survived 30 postoperative days were included in this review, and were followed up (ranging from 2 to 126 months. Electively operated patients were followed during 58.82 months on the average (range 7 to 122, and urgently operated were followed over 52.26 months (range 2 to 126. There was no significant difference of the length of postoperative follow-up between these two groups. RESULTS During this period, out of electively operated and immediately operated patients, 27 and 22 cases died, respectively. There was no significant difference (p>0,05a of long-term survival between these two groups. Obesity and early postoperative complications significantly decreased long-term survival of both electively and immediately operated patients. Graft infection, ventral hernia, aneurysm of

  20. Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm with severely angulated neck and tortuous artery access: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qinglong; Huang, Lianjun; Huang, Xiaoyong; Peng, Mingliang

    2015-03-08

    Endovascular aneurysm repair has revolutionized the therapeutic strategy for abdominal aortic aneurysm. However, hostile proximal aneurysmal neck and tortuosity of access vessels remain challenges in selecting optimal stent-grafts in abdominal aortic aneurysms with difficult anatomy. A 65-year-old woman complained of intermittent abdominal pain for one week. Computed tomography angiogram demonstrated a tortuous infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm with a tapered neck and a 136° of infrarenal angulation. Aneurysmal dilatation and severe calcification of bilateral iliac arteries and tortuous aortoiliac access were also showed. Endovascular approach using Endurant stent-graft was attempted at an outside hospital, but failed because of the significant tortuosity of the abdominal aorta and iliac arteries. Since the patient refused to have open aneurysm repair, he was transferred to our hospital for further evaluation and possible EVAR with a different approach. EVAR was performed successfully using Gore Excluder stent-grafts (W.L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, AZ, USA). During the procedure, cannulation of the contralateral limb was unable to be achieved because of the tortuous aortoiliac course. Therefore, a snare was inserted from right radial artery, through the contralateral gate, to grasp the wire from left femoral artery. Two iliac stent-grafts were sequentially deployed with the lower end distal to the opening of the left internal iliac artery. Angiography confirmed complete sealing of the aneurysm with patency of bilateral renal arteries and external iliac arteries. The postoperative courses were uneventful and follow-up computed tomography angiogram at 6 months demonstrated patent bilateral femoral and renal arteries without endoleaks or stent migration. Although endovascular repair of aortic aneurysm with hostile neck and tortuous access is rather challenging, choosing flexible stent-grafts and suitable techniques is able to achieve an encouraging outcome.

  1. Outcomes of Elective Aortic Hemiarch Reconstruction for Aneurysmal Disease in the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Arman; Arnaoutakis, George J; Bavaria, Joseph E; Sultan, Ibrahim; Desai, Nimesh D; Vallabhajosyula, Prashanth; Williams, Matthew L; Milewski, Rita K; Szeto, Wilson Y

    2017-11-01

    This study evaluated outcomes of elective aortic hemiarch reconstruction for aneurysmal disease in the elderly. Patients undergoing elective aortic hemiarch reconstruction for aneurysmal disease at a single institution between 2009 and 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were stratified into nonelderly (aged less than 75 years) versus elderly (aged 75 years or more). Outcomes included operative mortality and morbidity. In all, 629 patients (95 elderly; 15%) were included. Elderly patients had a greater comorbidity burden. Concomitant aortic valve replacement and coronary artery bypass were performed more frequently whereas root replacement was performed less frequently in the elderly. The overall stroke rate was 1.8% and was higher among the elderly (4.2% versus 1.3%, p = 0.05), although this difference no longer persisted after risk adjustment (odds ratio 2.54, p = 0.17). Median length of intensive care unit and hospital stay were longer in the elderly (64 versus 41 hours and 9 versus 7 days, respectively; each p elderly versus 0.9% nonelderly, p = 0.32). Elderly patients were less frequently discharged to home (65% versus 95%, p elderly patients, with stroke and operative mortality rates of 0% each. Although elderly patients have a more prolonged recovery after elective aortic hemiarch reconstruction for aneurysmal disease, outcomes are acceptable with low operative mortality and with the majority being discharged home. Moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest with antegrade cerebral perfusion is a safe strategy for this cohort. Advanced age alone should not be viewed as a contraindication in these cases. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mutations in a TGF-β Ligand, TGFB3, Cause Syndromic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoli-Avella, Aida M.; Gillis, Elisabeth; Morisaki, Hiroko; Verhagen, Judith M.A.; de Graaf, Bianca M.; van de Beek, Gerarda; Gallo, Elena; Kruithof, Boudewijn P.T.; Venselaar, Hanka; Myers, Loretha A.; Laga, Steven; Doyle, Alexander J.; Oswald, Gretchen; van Cappellen, Gert W.A.; Yamanaka, Itaru; van der Helm, Robert M.; Beverloo, Berna; de Klein, Annelies; Pardo, Luba; Lammens, Martin; Evers, Christina; Devriendt, Koenraad; Dumoulein, Michiel; Timmermans, Janneke; Bruggenwirth, Hennie T.; Verheijen, Frans; Rodrigus, Inez; Baynam, Gareth; Kempers, Marlies; Saenen, Johan; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M.; Minatoya, Kenji; Matsukawa, Ritsu; Tsukube, Takuro; Kubo, Noriaki; Hofstra, Robert; Goumans, Marie Jose; Bekkers, Jos A.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.; van de Laar, Ingrid M.B.H.; Dietz, Harry C.; Van Laer, Lut; Morisaki, Takayuki; Wessels, Marja W.; Loeys, Bart L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Aneurysms affecting the aorta are a common condition associated with high mortality as a result of aortic dissection or rupture. Investigations of the pathogenic mechanisms involved in syndromic types of thoracic aortic aneurysms, such as Marfan and Loeys-Dietz syndromes, have revealed an important contribution of disturbed transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling. Objectives This study sought to discover a novel gene causing syndromic aortic aneurysms in order to unravel the underlying pathogenesis. Methods We combined genome-wide linkage analysis, exome sequencing, and candidate gene Sanger sequencing in a total of 470 index cases with thoracic aortic aneurysms. Extensive cardiological examination, including physical examination, electrocardiography, and transthoracic echocardiography was performed. In adults, imaging of the entire aorta using computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging was done. Results Here, we report on 43 patients from 11 families with syndromic presentations of aortic aneurysms caused by TGFB3 mutations. We demonstrate that TGFB3 mutations are associated with significant cardiovascular involvement, including thoracic/abdominal aortic aneurysm and dissection, and mitral valve disease. Other systemic features overlap clinically with Loeys-Dietz, Shprintzen-Goldberg, and Marfan syndromes, including cleft palate, bifid uvula, skeletal overgrowth, cervical spine instability and clubfoot deformity. In line with previous observations in aortic wall tissues of patients with mutations in effectors of TGF-β signaling (TGFBR1/2, SMAD3, and TGFB2), we confirm a paradoxical up-regulation of both canonical and noncanonical TGF-β signaling in association with up-regulation of the expression of TGF-β ligands. Conclusions Our findings emphasize the broad clinical variability associated with TGFB3 mutations and highlight the importance of early recognition of the disease because of high cardiovascular risk. PMID:25835445

  3. Rational imaging concepts in the follow-up of stent-graft placements for aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansmann, H.J.; Kampschulte, A.; Schumacher, H.; Noeldge, G.; Richter, G.M.

    2001-01-01

    Goal. To identify essential and relevant diagnostic algorithms in the follow-up of stent-grafts placed for aortic dissections and aneurysms based on our 7 years experience including the use of more than 10 different devices. Material and Methods. Evaluation of conventional biplane imaging, angiography, sonography, CT and MR in the efficacy of demonstrating endoleaks, sac shrinkage, changes of stent-graft integrity and, with special reference to MR-compatibility of various stent-graft devices. Results. Endoleaks are found in 20-30% of patients after endovascular exclusion of abdominal aortic aneurysms. However, this rate neither necessarily reflects the clinical course nor the onset and course of sac shrinkage. Physical long-term integrity of the devices is seen best on conventional bi-plane radiographs. Sonography is helpful only in selected patients (non-obese, good compliance) otherwise not providing information precisely enough for sac control. As gold standard both CT (CTA) and MR (MRA) are equally effective in the follow-up of endovascular stent-grafts, allowing 3D control of sac geometry in aneurysmal disease or hemodynamic changes in stent-grafts for aortic dissection. MRI is considered to be more effective in the detection of small endoleaks. Angiography is inferior to CT and MRI in the diagnosis of endoleaks and thus is required only for intervention planning in patients with suspected endoleaks. Two of 8 evaluated stent-graft devices proved to be prohibitive for MRI because of their severe artifacts productions (Life-path, Zenith) as a result of their thick metallic meshwork. Conclusion. CT including CTA with 2D and 3D reformatting is the method of choice for the follow up of stent-graft treatment of aortic disease. Depending on availability, MRI may be used alternatively. In young patients and for those with contraindications to iodinated contrast media MRI is a perfectly equivalent alternative. Especially in patients with known contraindications to

  4. Arterial access through the right subclavian artery in surgery of the aortic arch improves neurologic outcome and mid-term quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immer, Franz F; Moser, Barbara; Krähenbühl, Eva S; Englberger, Lars; Stalder, Mario; Eckstein, Friedrich S; Carrel, Thierry

    2008-05-01

    We have shown that selective antegrade cerebral perfusion improves mid-term quality of life in patients undergoing surgical repair for acute type A aortic dissection and aortic aneurysms. The aim of the study was to assess the impact of continuous cerebral perfusion through the right subclavian artery on immediate outcome and quality of life. Perioperative data of 567 consecutive patients who underwent surgery of the aortic arch using deep hypothermic circulatory arrest have been analyzed. Patients were divided into three groups, according to the management of cerebral protection. Three hundred eighty-seven patients (68.3%) had deep hypothermic circulatory arrest with pharmacologic protection with pentothal only, 91 (16.0%) had selective antegrade cerebral perfusion and pentothal, and 89 (15.7%) had continuous cerebral perfusion through the right subclavian artery and pentothal. All in-hospital data were assessed, and quality of life was analyzed prospectively 2.4 +/- 1.2 years after surgery with the Short Form-36 Health Survey Questionnaire. Major perioperative cerebrovascular injuries were observed in 1.1% of the patients with continuous cerebral perfusion through the right subclavian artery, compared with 9.8% with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (p life after an arrest time between 30 and 50 minutes with continuous cerebral perfusion through the right subclavian artery was significantly better than selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (90.2 +/- 12.1 versus 74.4 +/- 40.7; p = 0.015). Continuous cerebral perfusion through the right subclavian artery improves considerably perioperative brain protection during deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. Irreversible perioperative neurologic complications can be significantly reduced and duration of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest can be extended up to 50 minutes without impairment in quality of life.

  5. Moderately Elevated Homocysteine Does Not Contribute to Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roohi, Jasmin; Kang, Benjamin; Bernard, David; Bedja, Djahida; Dietz, Harry C; Brody, Lawrence C

    2017-07-01

    Background: Moderate hyperhomocysteinemia is an attractive target for intervention because it is present in 5-7% of the population and can be reversed by diet. This approach presupposes that hyperhomocysteinemia is directly involved in the disease process. Epidemiologic studies have indicated that moderately elevated homocysteine may contribute to thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) dilatation and dissection in humans. In vitro, elevated homocysteine disrupts the structure and function of extracellular matrix components, suggesting that moderate hyperhomocysteinemia may contribute to the development and/or progression of TAA. Objective: We investigated moderately elevated homocysteine in the development and progression of TAA in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome (MFS) and in isogenic wild-type mice. The MFS mouse is a well-described model of a systemic connective tissue disorder characterized by thoracic aortic dilatation, dissection, and rupture. We used this model as a sensitized indicator system to examine the impact of homocysteine on the progression of TAA. Methods: Murine fibrillin 1 gene ( Fbn1 ) C1039G/+ MFS and C57BL/6J wild-type mice were fed a cobalamin-restricted diet to induce moderate hyperhomocysteinemia from weaning until the age of 32 wk. Homocysteine and methylmalonic acid were measured and aortic root diameter assessed with the use of echocardiography in mice aged 3, 7, 15, and 32 wk. Results: Cobalamin-restricted mice exhibited significantly higher homocysteine ( P < 0.0001) and methylmalonic acid ( P < 0.0001) in the blood. For both strains, no significant difference in thoracic aortic diameter was observed in mice on the cobalamin-restricted diet compared with those on the control diet. Conclusions: Fbn1 C1039G/+ mice are a well-characterized model of progressive aortic root dilation. Hyperhomocysteinemia in the physiologic range did not induce abnormal aortic growth in wild-type mice and did not accelerate or otherwise influence aortic root growth

  6. Sequential Hybrid Repair of Aorta and Bilateral Common Iliac Arteries Secondary to Chronic Aortic Dissection with Extensive Aneurysmal Degeneration in a Marfan Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, Carlos A; Anaya-Ayala, Javier E; Laparra-Escareno, Hugo; Lizola, Rene; Torres-Machorro, Adriana

    2017-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a connective tissue disorder associated with aortic dissection, aneurysmal degeneration and rupture. These cardiovascular complications represent the main cause of mortality, therefore repair is indicated. We present a 35-year-old woman who experienced acute onset of chest pain. Her imaging revealed a chronic DeBakey type I dissection with aortic root dilation and descending thoracic aneurysmal degeneration. She underwent a Bentall procedure and endovascular exclusion of the descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. She was closely followed and 2 years later a computed tomography angiography (CTA) revealed the aneurysmal degeneration of the thoracoabominal aorta and bilateral iliac arteries. The patient underwent a composite reconstruction using multi-visceral branched and bifurcated Dacron grafts. At 5 years from her last surgery, a CTA revealed no new dissection or further aneurysmal degenerations. Aortic disease in Marfan patients is a complex clinical problem that may lead to secondary or tertiary aortic reconstructions; close follow-up is mandatory.

  7. The treatment of a patient suffering from a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and inoperative lung tumor - case report and review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wronski, K.; Westfal, T.; Kotala, M.; Bocian, R.; Pakula, D.

    2010-01-01

    A simultaneous case of abdominal aortic aneurysm and lung cancer occurs rarely in clinical practice (fewer than 1% of all cases treated). Treating patients with a simultaneous ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and inoperable lung cancer still arouses a great deal of controversy throughout the world. A ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm poses immediate danger to the patient's life. Several authors express the opinion that in case of a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and inoperative lung cancer life-saving surgery should not be imdertaken, and state that the doctor shoidd let the patient die with dignity. In the following article we present the case of an 84-year-old patient who, having been diagnosed earlier with an inoperative lung tumor, underwent surgery because of a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. We also present a review of literature concerning this issue and discusses its ethical and legal aspects. (authors)

  8. Controlled hypotension versus normotensive resuscitation strategy for people with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Daniel H; Cacione, Daniel G; Baptista-Silva, Jose C C

    2016-05-13

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is the pathological enlargement of the aorta and can develop in both men and women. Progressive aneurysm enlargement can lead to rupture. The rupture of an AAA is frequently fatal and accounts for the death from haemorrhagic shock of at least 45 people per 100,000 population. The outcome of people with ruptured AAA varies among countries and healthcare systems, with mortality ranging from 53% to 90%. Definitive treatment for ruptured AAA includes open surgery or endovascular repair. The management of haemorrhagic shock is crucial for the person's outcome and aims to restore organ perfusion and systolic blood pressure above 100 mm Hg through immediate and aggressive fluid replacement. This rapid fluid replacement is known as the normotensive resuscitation strategy. However, evidence suggests that infusing large volumes of cold fluid causes dilutional and hypothermic coagulopathy. The association of these factors may exacerbate bleeding, resulting in a 'lethal triad' of hypothermia, acidaemia, and coagulopathy. An alternative to the normotensive resuscitation strategy is the controlled (permissive) hypotension resuscitation strategy, with a target systolic blood pressure of 50 to 100 mm Hg. The principle of controlled or hypotensive resuscitation has been used in some management protocols for endovascular repair of ruptured AAA. It may be beneficial in preventing blood loss by avoiding the clot disruption caused by the rapid increase in systolic blood pressure; avoiding dilution of clotting factors, platelets and fibrinogen; and by avoiding the temperature decrease that inhibits enzyme activity involved in platelet and clotting factor function. To compare the effects of controlled (permissive) hypotension resuscitation and normotensive resuscitation strategies for people with ruptured AAA. The Cochrane Vascular Information Specialist searched the Specialised Register (April 2016) and the Cochrane Register of Studies (CENTRAL (2016

  9. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in the Presence of a Transplanted Kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverberg, Daniel, E-mail: silverberg-d@msn.com; Yalon, Tal; Halak, Moshe [The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, The Department of Vascular Surgery (Israel)

    2015-08-15

    PurposeTo present our experience performing endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms in kidney transplanted patients.MethodsA retrospective review of all patients who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) performed at our institution from 2007 to 2014. We identified all patients who had previously undergone a kidney transplant. Data collected included: comorbidities, preoperative imaging modalities, indication for surgery, stent graft configurations, pre- and postoperative renal function, perioperative complications, and survival rates.ResultsA total of 267 EVARs were performed. Six (2 %) had a transplanted kidney. Mean age was 74 (range, 64–82) years; five were males. Mean time from transplantation to EVAR was 7.5 (range, 2–12) years. Five underwent preoperative planning with noncontrast modalities only. Devices used included bifurcated (n = 3), aortouniiliac (n = 2), and tube (n = 1) stent grafts. Technical success was achieved in all patients. None experienced deterioration in renal function. Median follow-up was 39 (range, 6–51) months. Four patients were alive at the time of the study. Two patients expired during the period of follow-up from unrelated causes.ConclusionsEVAR is an effective modality for the management of AAAs in the coexistence of a transplanted kidney. It can be performed with minimal morbidity and mortality without harming the transplanted kidney. Special consideration should be given to device configuration to minimize damage to the renal graft.

  10. The effects of preoperative cardiology consultation prior to elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair on patient morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniakowski, Anna E; Davis, Frank M; Phillips, Amanda R; Robinson, Adina B; Coleman, Dawn M; Henke, Peter K

    2017-08-01

    Objectives The relationship between preoperative medical consultations and postoperative complications has not been extensively studied. Thus, we investigated the impact of preoperative consultation on postoperative morbidity following elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Methods A retrospective review was conducted on 469 patients (mean age 72 years, 20% female) who underwent elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair from June 2007 to July 2014. Data elements included detailed medical history, preoperative cardiology consultation, and postoperative complications. Primary outcomes included 30-day morbidity, consult-specific morbidity, and mortality. A bivariate probit regression model accounting for the endogeneity of binary preoperative medical consult and patient variability was estimated with a maximum likelihood function. Results Eighty patients had preoperative medical consults (85% cardiology); thus, our analysis focuses on the effect of cardiac-related preoperative consults. Hyperlipidemia, increased aneurysm size, and increased revised cardiac risk index increased likelihood of referral to cardiology preoperatively. Surgery type (endovascular versus open repair) was not significant in development of postoperative complications when controlling for revised cardiac risk index ( p = 0.295). After controlling for patient comorbidities, there was no difference in postoperative cardiac-related complications between patients who did and did not undergo cardiology consultation preoperatively ( p = 0.386). Conclusions When controlling for patient disease severity using revised cardiac risk index risk stratification, preoperative cardiology consultation is not associated with postoperative cardiac morbidity.

  11. Primary aorto-enteric fistula: A rare complication of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomson V

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old lady presented with recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding and septicemia caused by multiple enteric pathogens. She was diagnosed to have primary aorto-enteric fistula (PAEF complicating abdominal aortic aneurysm. Endovascular aneurysm repair was carried out that arrested gastrointestinal bleeding, but despite prolonged antibiotic therapy the patient died a month later of probable sepsis. PAEF refers to abnormal communication between the aorta and the intestine resulting from disease at either site; this rare condition should be suspected in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm who present with unexplained life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding. Computerized tomography is the most sensitive investigation. Presence of ectopic gas adjacent to or within the aorta and of contrast within the gastrointestinal tract is the pathognomonic finding. Definitive treatment consists of surgical intervention, but it is associated with high risk in the acute setting. Endovascular therapy using stent-grafts is safe and effective in arresting gastrointestinal bleeding. However, it is frequently associated with recurrent sepsis even with continued antibiotic therapy, and should be considered as a bridge to more definitive surgical repair at a later time, after optimization of the patient′s condition.

  12. Mechanical and geometrical determinants of wall stress in abdominal aortic aneurysms: A computational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dara Azar

    Full Text Available An aortic aneurysm (AA is a focal dilatation of the aortic wall. Occurrence of AA rupture is an all too common event that is associated with high levels of patient morbidity and mortality. The decision to surgically intervene prior to AA rupture is made with recognition of significant procedural risks, and is primarily based on the maximal diameter and/or growth rate of the AA. Despite established thresholds for intervention, rupture occurs in a notable subset of patients exhibiting sub-critical maximal diameters and/or growth rates. Therefore, a pressing need remains to identify better predictors of rupture risk and ultimately integrate their measurement into clinical decision making. In this study, we use a series of finite element-based computational models that represent a range of plausible AA scenarios, and evaluate the relative sensitivity of wall stress to geometrical and mechanical properties of the aneurysmal tissue. Taken together, our findings encourage an expansion of geometrical parameters considered for rupture risk assessment, and provide perspective on the degree to which tissue mechanical properties may modulate peak stress values within aneurysmal tissue.

  13. Impact of obesity on outcomes after open surgical and endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Owen N; Sidawy, Anton N; Scanlon, James M; Walcott, Roger; Arora, Subodh; Macsata, Robyn A; Amdur, Richard L; Henderson, William G

    2010-02-01

    This study examined impact of obesity on outcomes after abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Data were obtained from the Veterans Affairs National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. Body mass index (BMI) was categorized according to National Institutes of Health guidelines. Multivariate regression adjusted for 40 other risk factors to analyze trends in complications and death within 30 days. We identified 2,201 patients undergoing 1,185 open and 1,016 endovascular aneurysm repairs (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysms from January 2004 through December 2005. BMI distribution was identical in both groups and reflected national population statistics: approximately 30% were normal (BMI 18.5 to 24.9), 40% were overweight (25.0 to 29.9), and 30% were obese class I (30.0 to 34.9), II (35.0 to 39.9), or III (>/=40.0). After open repair, obesity of any class was independently predictive of wound complications (adjusted odds ratio = 2.4; 95% CI, 1.5 to 5.3; p = 0.002). Class III obesity was also an independent predictor or renal complications (adjusted odds rato = 6.3; 95% CI, 2.2 to 18.0; p aggresive wound infection prevention measures.

  14. Parametric study of effects of collagen turnover on the natural history of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J S; Baek, S; Humphrey, J D

    2013-02-08

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are characterized by significant changes in the architecture of the aortic wall, notably, loss of functional elastin and smooth muscle. Because collagen is the principal remaining load-bearing constituent of the aneurysmal wall, its turnover must play a fundamental role in the natural history of the lesion. Nevertheless, detailed investigations of the effects of different aspects of collagen turnover on AAA development are lacking. A finite-element membrane model of the growth and remodelling of idealized AAAs was thus used to investigate parametrically four of the primary aspects of collagen turnover: rates of production, half-life, deposition stretch (prestretch) and material stiffness. The predicted rates of aneurysmal expansion and spatio-temporal changes in wall thickness, biaxial stresses and maximum collagen fibre stretch at the apex of the lesion depended strongly on all four factors, as did the predicted clinical endpoints (i.e. arrest, progressive expansion or rupture). Collagen turnover also affected the axial expansion, largely due to mechanical changes within the shoulder region of the lesion. We submit, therefore, that assessment of rupture risk could be improved by future experiments that delineate and quantify different aspects of patient-specific collagen turnover and that such understanding could lead to new targeted therapeutics.

  15. CD1d deficiency inhibits the development of abdominal aortic aneurysms in LDL receptor deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gijs H M van Puijvelde

    Full Text Available An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a dilatation of the abdominal aorta leading to serious complications and mostly to death. AAA development is associated with an accumulation of inflammatory cells in the aorta including NKT cells. An important factor in promoting the recruitment of these inflammatory cells into tissues and thereby contributing to the development of AAA is angiotensin II (Ang II. We demonstrate that a deficiency in CD1d dependent NKT cells under hyperlipidemic conditions (LDLr-/-CD1d-/- mice results in a strong decline in the severity of angiotensin II induced aneurysm formation when compared with LDLr-/- mice. In addition, we show that Ang II amplifies the activation of NKT cells both in vivo and in vitro. We also provide evidence that type I NKT cells contribute to AAA development by inducing the expression of matrix degrading enzymes in vSMCs and macrophages, and by cytokine dependently decreasing vSMC viability. Altogether, these data prove that CD1d-dependent NKT cells contribute to AAA development in the Ang II-mediated aneurysm model by enhancing aortic degradation, establishing that therapeutic applications which target NKT cells can be a successful way to prevent AAA development.

  16. Anterior mitral valve aneurysm: a rare sequelae of aortic valve endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Janardhanan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In intravenous drug abusers, infective endocarditis usually involves right-sided valves, with Staphylococcus aureus being the most common etiologic agent. We present a patient who is an intravenous drug abuser with left-sided (aortic valve endocarditis caused by Enterococcus faecalis who subsequently developed an anterior mitral valve aneurysm, which is an exceedingly rare complication. A systematic literature search was conducted which identified only five reported cases in the literature of mitral valve aneurysmal rupture in the setting of E. faecalis endocarditis. Real-time 3D-transesophageal echocardiography was critical in making an accurate diagnosis leading to timely intervention. Learning objectives: • Early recognition of a mitral valve aneurysm (MVA is important because it may rupture and produce catastrophic mitral regurgitation (MR in an already seriously ill patient requiring emergency surgery, or it may be overlooked at the time of aortic valve replacement (AVR. • Real-time 3D-transesophageal echocardiography (RT-3DTEE is much more advanced and accurate than transthoracic echocardiography for the diagnosis and management of MVA.

  17. Anterior mitral valve aneurysm: a rare sequelae of aortic valve endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Muhammad Umar; Riaz, Irbaz Bin; Smith, M Cristy

    2016-01-01

    Summary In intravenous drug abusers, infective endocarditis usually involves right-sided valves, with Staphylococcus aureus being the most common etiologic agent. We present a patient who is an intravenous drug abuser with left-sided (aortic valve) endocarditis caused by Enterococcus faecalis who subsequently developed an anterior mitral valve aneurysm, which is an exceedingly rare complication. A systematic literature search was conducted which identified only five reported cases in the literature of mitral valve aneurysmal rupture in the setting of E. faecalis endocarditis. Real-time 3D-transesophageal echocardiography was critical in making an accurate diagnosis leading to timely intervention. Learning objectives Early recognition of a mitral valve aneurysm (MVA) is important because it may rupture and produce catastrophic mitral regurgitation (MR) in an already seriously ill patient requiring emergency surgery, or it may be overlooked at the time of aortic valve replacement (AVR). Real-time 3D-transesophageal echocardiography (RT-3DTEE) is much more advanced and accurate than transthoracic echocardiography for the diagnosis and management of MVA. PMID:27249815

  18. Semiautomatic sizing software in emergency endovascular aneurysm repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimerink, Jorik J.; Marquering, Henk A.; Vahl, Anco; Wisselink, Willem; Schreve, Michiel A.; de Boo, Diederick W.; Reekers, Jim A.; Legemate, Dink A.; Balm, Ron

    2014-01-01

    In emergency endovascular repair (EVAR) of ruptured aneurysms of the aorta (rAAA), anatomical suitability must be determined. Semiautomatic three-dimensional assessment of the aortoiliac arteries has the potential to standardise measurements. This study assesses the fitness for purpose of such a

  19. [A re-operative case of bentall operation and aortic arch replacement using a stent graft for a Marfan syndrome, post sternum turnover and post mitral valve replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, H; Aomi, S; Noji, S; Uwabe, K; Kihara, S; Kurihara, H; Koyanagi, H

    2001-09-01

    A 36-year-old male with Marfan syndrome succesfully underwent Bentall operation and aortic arch replacement using a stent graft as an elephant trunk. He had received MVR with sternum turn over 14 years previously. Median sternotomy was performed. Under circulatory arrest with rertograde cerebral perfusion we performed Bentall operation and aortic arch replacement using a stent graft. The sternum was cured well. Retractive breathing was not detected. This surgical procedure was effective for cardiovascular disease with Marfan syndrome.

  20. A 10-year institutional experience with open branched graft reconstruction of aortic aneurysms in connective tissue disorders versus degenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Lue, Jennifer; Glebova, Natalia O; Ehlert, Bryan A; Black, James H

    2017-11-01

    Aortic reconstruction for complex thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAAs) can be challenging, especially in patients with connective tissue disorders (CTDs) in whom tissue fragility is a major concern. Branched graft reconstruction is a more complex operation compared with inclusion patch repair of the aorta but is frequently necessary in patients with CTDs or other pathologies because of anatomic reasons. We describe our institutional experience with open branched graft reconstruction of aortic aneurysms and compare outcomes for patients with CTDs vs degenerative pathologies. We retrospectively analyzed all patients undergoing open aortic reconstruction using branched grafts at our institution between July 2006 and December 2015. Postoperative outcomes, including perioperative morbidity and mortality, midterm graft patency, and the development of new aneurysms, were compared for patients with CTD vs degenerative disease. During the 10-year study period, 137 patients (CTD, 29; degenerative, 108) underwent aortic repair with branched graft reconstruction. CTD patients were significantly younger (39 ± 1.9 vs 68 ± 1.0 years; P disease, coronary artery disease; P degenerative disease. Perioperative mortality (CTD: 10% [n = 3] vs degenerative: 6% [n = 6]; P = .40) and any complication (62% vs 55%; P = .47) were similar between groups. At a median follow-up time of 14.5 months (interquartile range: 6.5, 43.9 months), CTD patients were more likely to develop both new aortic (21%) and nonaortic (14%) aneurysms compared with the degenerative group (7% and 4% for aortic and nonaortic aneurysms, respectively; P = .02). Loss of branch graft patency occurred in 0 of 99 grafts (0%) in CTD patients and in 13 of 167 grafts (7.8%) in degenerative disease patients (P = .005). Loss of branch graft patency occurred most commonly in left renal artery bypass grafts (77%) and was clinically asymptomatic (creatinine: 1.77 ± 0.13 mg/dL currently vs 1.41 ± 0

  1. Fluid-structure interaction of a patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm treated with an endovascular stent-graft.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Molony, David S

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are local dilatations of the infrarenal aorta. If left untreated they may rupture and lead to death. One form of treatment is the minimally invasive insertion of a stent-graft into the aneurysm. Despite this effective treatment aneurysms may occasionally continue to expand and this may eventually result in post-operative rupture of the aneurysm. Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) is a particularly useful tool for investigating aneurysm biomechanics as both the wall stresses and fluid forces can be examined. METHODS: Pre-op, Post-op and Follow-up models were reconstructed from CT scans of a single patient and FSI simulations were performed on each model. The FSI approach involved coupling Abaqus and Fluent via a third-party software - MpCCI. Aneurysm wall stress and compliance were investigated as well as the drag force acting on the stent-graft. RESULTS: Aneurysm wall stress was reduced from 0.38 MPa before surgery to a value of 0.03 MPa after insertion of the stent-graft. Higher stresses were seen in the aneurysm neck and iliac legs post-operatively. The compliance of the aneurysm was also reduced post-operatively. The peak Post-op axial drag force was found to be 4.85 N. This increased to 6.37 N in the Follow-up model. CONCLUSION: In a patient-specific case peak aneurysm wall stress was reduced by 92%. Such a reduction in aneurysm wall stress may lead to shrinkage of the aneurysm over time. Hence, post-operative stress patterns may help in determining the likelihood of aneurysm shrinkage post EVAR. Post-operative remodelling of the aneurysm may lead to increased drag forces.

  2. Outflow tract septation and the aortic arch system in reptiles: lessons for understanding the mammalian heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert E. Poelmann

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac outflow tract patterning and cell contribution are studied using an evo-devo approach to reveal insight into the development of aorto-pulmonary septation. Results We studied embryonic stages of reptile hearts (lizard, turtle and crocodile and compared these to avian and mammalian development. Immunohistochemistry allowed us to indicate where the essential cell components in the outflow tract and aortic sac were deployed, more specifically endocardial, neural crest and second heart field cells. The neural crest-derived aorto-pulmonary septum separates the pulmonary trunk from both aortae in reptiles, presenting with a left visceral and a right systemic aorta arising from the unseptated ventricle. Second heart field-derived cells function as flow dividers between both aortae and between the two pulmonary arteries. In birds, the left visceral aorta disappears early in development, while the right systemic aorta persists. This leads to a fusion of the aorto-pulmonary septum and the aortic flow divider (second heart field population forming an avian aorto-pulmonary septal complex. In mammals, there is also a second heart field-derived aortic flow divider, albeit at a more distal site, while the aorto-pulmonary septum separates the aortic trunk from the pulmonary trunk. As in birds there is fusion with second heart field-derived cells albeit from the pulmonary flow divider as the right 6th pharyngeal arch artery disappears, resulting in a mammalian aorto-pulmonary septal complex. In crocodiles, birds and mammals, the main septal and parietal endocardial cushions receive neural crest cells that are functional in fusion and myocardialization of the outflow tract septum. Longer-lasting septation in crocodiles demonstrates a heterochrony in development. In other reptiles with no indication of incursion of neural crest cells, there is either no myocardialized outflow tract septum (lizard or it is vestigial (turtle. Crocodiles

  3. Anatomic severity grading score for primary descending thoracic aneurysms predicts procedural difficulty and aortic-related reinterventions after thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, Chad P; Larion, Sebastian; Ahanchi, Sadaf S; Lavingia, Kedar S; Dexter, David J; Panneton, Jean M

    2016-10-01

    An anatomic severity grading (ASG) score for primary descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (DTAs) was developed. The objective of this study was to determine if an ASG score cutoff value for DTAs is predictive of procedural complexity, aortic-related reinterventions, and mortality in patients who undergo thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). A retrospective review from 2008 to 2013 of patient records was conducted of all consecutive patients who underwent TEVAR for a primary DTA. A comprehensive scoring system of preoperative DTA morphology on the basis of computed tomography angiography images was established to identify and classify anatomic features that might influence outcome after TEVAR. ASG score calculations were achieved using preoperative computed tomography angiography images. Primary outcomes included primary technical success, aortic-related reinterventions, aneurysm-related mortality, and all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes included procedural complexity (unplanned adjunctive procedures, number of endografts implanted, contrast volume, and procedure time), endoleak formation, endoleak requiring reintervention, stroke and paraplegia, and conversion to open repair. Of 469 patients with a diagnosis of a thoracic aortic aneurysm, 62 patients (13%) underwent TEVAR and had adequate preoperative imaging (mean age, 71 years). Applying the ASG score, we identified 39 patients (63%) with a score ≥24 (high-score group) and 23 patients (37%) with a score DTAs predicted procedure complexity and aortic-related reinterventions after TEVAR. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Right-side aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery and Kommerell's diverticulum. A cause of vascular ring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo-Espinosa, Tania; Erdmenger-Orellana, Julio; Becerra-Becerra, Rosario; Balderrabano-Saucedo, Norma; Segura-Standford, Begoña

    The right-side aortic arch may be associated with aberrant left subclavian artery, in some cases this artery originates from an aneurismal dilation of the aorta called Kommerell's diverticulum. A report is presented on 2 cases of vascular ring formed by a right-side aortic arch, anomalous left subclavian artery, Kommerell's diverticulum and left patent ductus arteriosus. A review the literature was also performed as regards the embryological development and the imaging methods used to help in the diagnosis of this rare vascular anomaly. Copyright © 2017 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  5. Outcomes of Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in Patients with Hostile Neck Anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choke, Edward; Munneke, Graham; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria; Loftus, Ian; McFarland, Robert; Loosemore, Thomas; Thompson, Matthew M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. The principal anatomic contraindication to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVR) is an unfavorable proximal aortic neck. With increasing experience, a greater proportion of patients with unfavorable neck anatomy are being offered EVR. This study aimed to evaluate outcomes in patients with challenging proximal aortic neck anatomy. Methods. Prospectively collected data from 147 consecutive patients who underwent EVR between December 1997 and April 2005 were supplemented with a retrospective review of medical records and radiological images. Unfavorable anatomic features were defined as neck diameter >28 mm, angulation >60 deg., circumferential thrombus >50%, and length 30 days) (p = 0.57), distal type I endoleak (p = 0.40), type III endoleak (p 0.51), secondary interventions (p = 1.0), aneurysm sac expansion (p = 0.44), or 30 day mortality (p = 0.70). The good neck group had a significantly increased incidence of type II endoleak (p = 0.023). By multivariate analysis, the incidence of intraoperative adjunctive procedures was significantly increased in the presence of severe angulation (p = 0.041, OR 3.08, 95% CI 1.05-9.04). Conclusion. Patients with severely hostile proximal aortic neck anatomy may be treated with EVR, although severely angulated necks require additional intraoperative procedures. Early outcomes are encouraging and suggest that indications for EVR may be expanded to include patients with hostile neck anatomy

  6. Suprarenal fixation barbs can induce renal artery occlusion in endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Shree K; Lee, Andy M; Landis, Gregg S

    2010-01-01

    Renal artery occlusion following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair with suprarenal fixation is uncommon. We report one patient who was found to develop renal artery occlusion and parenchymal infarction 6 months after repair using an endovascular graft with suprarenal fixation. Our patient underwent emergent endovascular repair of a symptomatic 6 cm abdominal aortic aneurysm. The covered portion of the endograft was inadvertently deployed well below the renal artery orifices. At the completion of the procedure both renal arteries were confirmed to be patent. One month postoperatively, a computed tomographic (CT) scan showed exclusion of the aortic sac and normal enhancement of both kidneys. At 6 months, the patient was found to have elevated serum creatinine levels despite having no clinical symptoms. CT scanning revealed a nonenhancing left kidney, and angiography demonstrated an occlusion of the left renal artery. A barb welded to the bare metal stent appeared to be impinging on the renal artery. We believe that renal artery occlusion after endovascular repair can occur due to repetitive injury to the renal artery orifice from barbs welded to the bare metal stent. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of renal artery occlusion caused by repetitive injury from transrenal fixation systems. Copyright 2010 Annals of Vascular Surgery Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Redo Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: A Single-Center Experience Over 25 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Rana O; Sandhu, Harleen K; Trott, Amy E; Nguyen, Tom C; Miller, Charles C; Estrera, Anthony L; Safi, Hazim J

    2017-05-01

    Aortic disease is a lifelong, progressive illness that may require repeated intervention over time. We reviewed our 25-year experience with open redo thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) and descending thoracic aortic aneurysm (DTAA) repair. Our objectives were to determine patient outcomes after redo repair of DTAA/TAAA and compare them with nonredo repair. We also attempted to identify the risk factors for poor outcome. We reviewed all open redo TAAA and DTAA repairs between 1991 and 2014. Patient characteristics, preoperative, intraoperative variables, and postoperative outcomes were gathered. Data were analyzed by contingency table and by multiple logistic regression. We performed 1,900 open DTAA/TAAA repairs, with 266 (14%) being redos. Redos were associated with younger age (62 ± 16.4 years vs 64.5 ± 13.4 years, p 70 years, glomerular filtration rate <48 mL/min per 1.73m 2 , extent III TAAA, and emergency presentation) for predicting early death. In the presence of all four risk factors in a redo patient, a maximal risk of 82% for early death was predicted. The need for a redo operation in DTAA/TAAA repair is common and most often presents as an extension of the disease into an adjacent segment. A hybrid or completely endovascular treatment should be considered in high-risk patients. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in presence of coronary artery disease: Optimization of myocardial stress by controlled phlebotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neema Praveen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA in the presence of significant coronary artery disease (CAD carries a high-risk of adverse peri-operative cardiac event. The options to reduce cardiac risk include perioperative β-blockade, preoperative optimization by myocardial revascularization and simultaneous (combined coronary artery bypass grafting and aneurysm repair. We describe intra-operative controlled phlebotomy to optimize myocardial stress during repair of infrarenal AAA in a patient with significant stable CAD.

  9. Infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in presence of coronary artery disease: optimization of myocardial stress by controlled phlebotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neema, Praveen Kumar; Vijayakumar, Arun; Manikandan, S; Rathod, Ramesh Chandra

    2009-01-01

    The repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in the presence of significant coronary artery disease (CAD) carries a high-risk of adverse peri-operative cardiac event. The options to reduce cardiac risk include perioperative beta-blockade, preoperative optimization by myocardial revascularization and simultaneous (combined) coronary artery bypass grafting and aneurysm repair. We describe intra-operative controlled phlebotomy to optimize myocardial stress during repair of infrarenal AAA in a patient with significant stable CAD.

  10. Amlodipine reduces AngII-induced aortic aneurysms and atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Chen

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine effects of amlodipine, a dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker, on development of angiotensin II (AngII-induced vascular pathologies.Male LDL receptor -/- mice were infused with vehicle, amlodipine (5 mg/kg/d, AngII (1,000 ng/kg/min, or AngII + amlodipine for 4 weeks through osmotic pumps (n=10/group. Mice were fed a saturated fat-enriched diet for 1 week prior to pump implantation and during 4 weeks of infusion. Infusion of amlodipine resulted in plasma concentrations of 32 ± 2 ng/ml and 27 ± 2 ng/ml for mice in saline + amlodipine and AngII + amlodipine groups, respectively. This infusion rate of amlodipine did not affect AngII-induced increases in systolic blood pressure. Three of 10 (30% mice infused with AngII died of aortic rupture, while aortic rupture did not occur in mice co-infused with AngII + amlodipine. Suprarenal aortic width and intimal area of ascending aortas were measured to define aortic aneurysms. In the absence of AngII infusion, amlodipine did not change suprarenal aortic width and ascending aortic area. Infusion of AngII led to profound increases of suprarenal aortic width (saline + vehicle versus AngII + vehicle: 0.86 ± 0.02 versus 1.72 ± 0.26 mm; P=0.0006, whereas co-infusion of AngII and amlodipine diminished abdominal dilation (1.02 ± 0.14 mm; P=0.003. As expected, AngII infusion increased mean intimal area of ascending aortas (saline + vehicle versus AngII + vehicle: 8.5 ± 0.3 versus 12.5 ± 1.1 mm(2; P=0.001, while co-infusion of AngII and amlodipine ablated dilation of the ascending aorta (8.6 ± 0.2 mm(2; P=0.03. Co-administration of amlodipine also significantly attenuated AngII-induced atherosclerosis in the thoracic region as quantified by percent lesion area (AngII + vehicle versus AngII + amlodipine: 5.8 ± 2.1 % versus 0.3 ± 0.1%; P=0.05.Amlodipine inhibited AngII-induced aortic aneurysms in both the abdominal and ascending regions, and atherosclerosis in

  11. [Marfan syndrome: clinical and pathomorphological restructurings after surgical treatment of aortic aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuraev, R K; Zerbino, D D

    2014-01-01

    The authors examined the state of patients suffering from Marfan syndrome (MS) who endured operation for ascending aorta aneurysm with replacement of the ascending aorta and aortic valve (Bentall operation), studying alterations of the skeleton, face, heart and eyes, as well as pathomorphological restructurings in the aortic wall. The study was carried out 7.0 ± 4.2 years after the operation. We examined a total of 39 patients with MS - 27 (69.2%) men and 12 (30.8%) women aged from 22 to 70 years old (average age - 42.1 ± 13.4 years). All patients were operated on for dissecting aneurysm of the ascending aorta accompanied by a considerable degree of aortic valve insufficiency or aortic ostium stenosis. The mean diameter of the aorta at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva amounted to 7.0 ± 1.3 cm (minimal - 5.0 cm, maximal - 12.0 cm), the Z-score prior to operation was 12.7 ± 6.5. The time form making the diagnosis of MS to surgical intervention for aortic aneurysm amounted to 9.6 ± 5.9 years. The condition after operative treatment in all patients was satisfactory, with the haemodynamic indices stable: systolic AP - 133.5 ± 19.1 mm Hg, diastolic AP 85.1 ± 12.9 mm Hg, heart rate 74.8 ± 7.2 bpm. The average systemic score for the symptoms and tests of MS patients amounted to 8.2 ± 3.3 points. Pathohistological alterations of the aorta in patients with Marfan syndrome consisted in pronounced restructuring of the wall with deep irreversible alternative changes. The pathological process extended in the middle aortic layer all alone the length, but not only in the portions of rupture and dissection. The main pathomorphological signs in MS were as follows: focal accumulations of mucoid substances, dystrophic alterations of smooth-muscle cells, ribbon-like anuclear zones, formation of cystlike cavities, alterations of elastic fibres - fragmentation, hyperelastosis, multiplication, thinning and straightening, zones of elastolysis.

  12. Fluid-structure interaction in abdominal aortic aneurysms: Structural and geometrical considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesri, Yaser; Niazmand, Hamid; Deyranlou, Amin; Sadeghi, Mahmood Reza

    2015-08-01

    Rupture of the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is the result of the relatively complex interaction of blood hemodynamics and material behavior of arterial walls. In the present study, the cumulative effects of physiological parameters such as the directional growth, arterial wall properties (isotropy and anisotropy), iliac bifurcation and arterial wall thickness on prediction of wall stress in fully coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) analysis of five idealized AAA models have been investigated. In particular, the numerical model considers the heterogeneity of arterial wall and the iliac bifurcation, which allows the study of the geometric asymmetry due to the growth of the aneurysm into different directions. Results demonstrate that the blood pulsatile nature is responsible for emerging a time-dependent recirculation zone inside the aneurysm, which directly affects the stress distribution in aneurismal wall. Therefore, aneurysm deviation from the arterial axis, especially, in the lateral direction increases the wall stress in a relatively nonlinear fashion. Among the models analyzed in this investigation, the anisotropic material model that considers the wall thickness variations, greatly affects the wall stress values, while the stress distributions are less affected as compared to the uniform wall thickness models. In this regard, it is confirmed that wall stress predictions are more influenced by the appropriate structural model than the geometrical considerations such as the level of asymmetry and its curvature, growth direction and its extent.

  13. Concept of the aortic aneurysm repair-related surgical stress: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moris, Demetrios N; Kontos, Michalis I; Mantonakis, Eleftherios I; Athanasiou, Antonios K; Spartalis, Eleftherios D; Bakoyiannis, Chris N; Chrousos, George P; Georgopoulos, Sotirios E

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal aorta aneurysm (AAA) is a serious threat for human life. AAA repair is a high-risk procedure which results in a severe surgical stress response. We aim to give a conceptual description of the underlying pathophysiology of stress after surgical repair of AAA. The MEDLINE/PubMed database was searched for publications with the medical subject heading "surgical stress" and keywords "abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA)", or "cytokines" or "hormones" or "open repair (OR)" or "endovascular repair (EVAR)". We restricted our search to English till 2012 and only in cases of abdominal and thoracoabdominal aneurysms (TAAA). We identified 93 articles that were available in English as abstracts or/and full-text articles that were deemed appropriate for our review. Literature highlights no statistical significance for early acute TNF-α production in EVAR and no TNF-α production in OR. IL-6 and IL-8 levels are higher after OR especially when compared with those of EVAR. IL-10 peak was observed during ischemic phase in aneurysm surgical repair. Cortisol and epinephrine levels are higher in OR patients in comparison to EVAR patients. Finally, the incidence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome was significantly higher in OR than EVAR patients.

  14. Effect of exercise on patient specific abdominal aortic aneurysm flow topology and mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Les, Andrea S; Dalman, Ronald L; Shadden, Shawn C

    2014-02-01

    Computational fluid dynamics modeling was used to investigate changes in blood transport topology between rest and exercise conditions in five patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm models. MRI was used to provide the vascular anatomy and necessary boundary conditions for simulating blood velocity and pressure fields inside each model. Finite-time Lyapunov exponent fields and associated Lagrangian coherent structures were computed from blood velocity data and were used to compare features of the transport topology between rest and exercise both mechanistically and qualitatively. A mix-norm and mix-variance measure based on fresh blood distribution throughout the aneurysm over time were implemented to quantitatively compare mixing between rest and exercise. Exercise conditions resulted in higher and more uniform mixing and reduced the overall residence time in all aneurysms. Separated regions of recirculating flow were commonly observed in rest, and these regions were either reduced or removed by attached and unidirectional flow during exercise, or replaced with regional chaotic and transiently turbulent mixing, or persisted and even extended during exercise. The main factor that dictated the change in flow topology from rest to exercise was the behavior of the jet of blood penetrating into the aneurysm during systole. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Whole body perfusion for hybrid aortic arch repair: evolution of selective regional perfusion with a modified extracorporeal circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Philip; Walsh, Graham; Walsh, Stephanie; O'Neil, Michael; Gelinas, Jill; Chu, Michael W A

    2017-04-01

    Patients undergoing hybrid aortic arch reconstruction require careful protection of vital organs. We believe that whole body perfusion with tailored dual circuitry may help to achieve optimal patient outcomes. Our circuit has evolved from a secondary circuit utilizing a cardioplegia delivery device for lower body perfusion to a dual-oxygenator circuit. This allows individually controlled regional perfusion with ease of switching from secondary to primary circuit for total body flow. The re-design allows for separate flow and temperature regulation with two oxygenators in parallel. All patients underwent a single-stage operation for simultaneous treatment of arch and descending aortic pathology via a sternotomy, using a hybrid frozen elephant trunk technique. We report six consecutive patients undergoing hybrid arch and frozen elephant trunk reconstruction using a dual-oxygenator circuit. Five patients underwent elective surgery and one was emergent. One patient had an acute dissection while three underwent concomitant procedures, including a Ross procedure and two valve-sparing root reconstructions. Three cases were redo sternotomies. The mean pump time was 358 ± 131 min, the aortic cross clamp time 243 ± 135 min, the cardioplegia volume of 33,208 ml ± 16,173, cerebral ischemia 0 min, lower body ischemia 76 ± 34 min and the average lower body perfusion time was 142 min. Two patients did not require any donor blood products. The median intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital lengths of stay (LOS) were two days and 10 days, respectively. The average peak serum lactate on CPB was 7.47 mmol/L and, at admission to the ICU, it was 3.37 mmol/L. Renal and respiratory failure developed in the salvage acute type A dissection patient. No other complications occurred in this series. Whole body perfusion as delivered through individually controlled dual-oxygenator circuitry allows maximum flexibility for hybrid aortic arch reconstruction. A modified circuit perfusion

  16. Correlation of atherosclerotic changes in peripheral arteries with pathological involvement of aortic arch in coronary bypass patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eshraghi N

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: A correlation between coronary artery disease (CAD and atherosclerosis of peripheral arteries and the determination of noninvasive indexes for its existence and extent have been sought by many researchers. Some studies report that the intima-media thickness (IMT of peripheral arteries could play this role. This study evaluated the correlation between the IMTs of common carotid and common femoral arteries and the degree of atherosclerosis in aortic arch and to evaluate the severity of CAD in candidates of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG."n "nMethods: In a cross-sectional analytic-descriptive study, The severity of CAD, the grade of atherosclerosis of the aortic arch, and the IMTs of the common carotid and common femoral arteries were determined."n "nResults: There was a significant weak positive correlation between the IMT of common carotid artery (ρ = 0.193, p = 0.039 and common femoral artery (ρ = 0.206, p = 0.028 with the number of involved carotid vessels; the mean of these two parameters was not significantly different between the three CAD groups. There was not any significant relation between the IMTs of common carotid and common femoral arteries with the severity of atherosclerosis in the aortic arch too. There was not any significant relation between the presences of atherosclerotic plaque in the common carotid or the common femoral arteries with the severity of CAD. The severe atherosclerosis of the aortic arch was significantly higher in patients with three vessel disease."n "nConclusion: According to our results, the IMTs of common carotid and/or common femoral arteries may increase with the severity of CAD; however, these parameters are not a surrogate for predicting the CAD severity.

  17. Aberrant right vertebral artery originating from the aortic arch distal to the left subclavian artery: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Soo Heui; Baek, Hye Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    We present a rare case of an aberrant right vertebral artery originated from the distal aortic arch. This issue has been incidentally detected on a preoperative CT angiography after a stabbing injury of the cervical spinal cord. Normally, the right vertebral artery originates from the right subclavian artery. Therefore, in this case report we will review the incidence and the embryological mechanism of this aberrant course of the right vertebral artery and we will discuss as well the clinical importance of this variation.

  18. Low-flow antegrade cerebral perfusion attenuates early renal and intestinal injury during neonatal aortic arch reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algra, Selma O; Schouten, Antonius N J; van Oeveren, Wim; van der Tweel, Ingeborg; Schoof, Paul H; Jansen, Nicolaas J G; Haas, Felix

    2012-12-01

    Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) and antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) are 2 cardiopulmonary bypass strategies mainly used in aortic arch reconstructions. It has been suggested that during ACP, abdominal organs are better protected than during DHCA owing to partial perfusion via collaterals. We tested this hypothesis using intraoperative near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), lactate measurements, and biomarkers for early abdominal injury in neonates undergoing complex aortic arch repair. Neonates scheduled for aortic arch reconstruction via median sternotomy between 2009 and 2011 were randomized to either DHCA or ACP. During surgery, regional oxygen saturations of the abdomen were monitored using NIRS. Immediately aafter DHCA or ACP, lactate concentrations from the inferior vena cava were compared with those from the arterial cannula. Postoperatively, biomarkers for early abdominal organ injury were measured in urine. Twenty-five neonates were analyzed (DHCA, n = 12; ACP, n = 13). Procedures were performed at 18°C, and ACP flow was set at 35 to 50 mL · kg(-1) · min(-1). Median abdominal NIRS value during DHCA was 31% (IQR, 28%-41%) whereas during ACP it was 56% (IQR, 34%-64%; P intestinal damage (gluthatione s-transferase and intestinal fatty acid binding protein, respectively) were higher in the DHCA group than for the ACP group (P = .03, P = .04, respectively). These results substantiate earlier suggestions that ACP provides more abdominal organ protection than DHCA in neonates undergoing aortic arch reconstruction. Copyright © 2012 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Modern temperature management in aortic arch surgery: the dilemma of moderate hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luehr, Maximilian; Bachet, Jean; Mohr, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Etz, Christian D

    2014-01-01

    Arch surgery is undoubtedly among the most technically and strategically challenging endeavours in aortic surgery, requiring thorough understanding not only of cardiovascular physiology, but also in particular, of neurophysiology (cerebral and spinal cord), and is still associated with significant mortality and morbidity. In the late 1980s, when deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) had gained widespread acceptance as the standard approach for arch surgery, antegrade selective cerebral perfusion (SCP), as an adjunct to deep HCA, began its triumphal march, offering excellent neuroprotection and improved overall outcome. This encouraged the use of antegrade SCP in combination with steadily increasing body core temperatures--a trend culminating in the progressive advocation of moderate-to-mild temperatures up to 35 °C, and even normothermia. The impetus for progressive temperature elevation was the limitation of adverse effects of profound hypothermia and the most welcome side effect of significantly shorter cooling and rewarming periods on cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), and thereby, potentially, the alleviation of the systemic inflammatory response and, in particular, the risk of severe postoperative bleeding (and other organ dysfunctions). The safe limits of prolonged distal circulatory arrest, particularly with regard to the ischaemic tolerance of the viscera and the spinal cord, have not yet been clearly defined. Adverse outcomes due to inappropriate temperature management (core temperatures too high for the required duration of distal arrest) are probably highly underreported. Complications historically associated with hypothermia, namely excessive bleeding, are possibly overestimated. Trading effective neuroprotection and excellent outcomes for the risk of prolonged 'warm' distal ischaemia might constitute a significant step back, jeopardizing visceral and, in particular, spinal cord integrity, with unpredictable consequences for long-term outcome and

  20. Elective reconstruction of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm type IV by transabdominal approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanović Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA type IV represents an aortic dilatation from the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus to the iliac arteries branches, including visceral branches of the aorta. In the traditional procedure of TAAA type IV repair, the body is opened using thoractomy and laparotomy in order to provide adequate exposure of the descending thoracic and abdominal aorta for safe aortic reconstruction. Case report. We reported a 71-yearold man with elective reconstruction of the TAAA type IV performed by transabdominal approach. Computed tomography scans angiography revealed a TAAA type IV with diameter of 62 mm in the region of celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery branching, and the largest diameter of 75 mm in the infrarenal aortic level. The patient comorbidity included a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hypertension, therefore he was treated for a prolonged period. In preparation for the planned aortic reconstruction asymptomatic carotid disease (occlusion of the left internal carotid artery and subtotal stenosis of the right internal carotid artery was diagnosed. Within the same intervention percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with stent placement in right internal carotid artery was made. In general, under endotracheal anesthesia and epidural analgesia, with transabdominal approach performed aortic reconstruction with tubular dakron graft 24 mm were, and reimplantation of visceral aortic branches into the graft performed. Postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged on the postoperative day 17. Control computed tomography scan angiography performed three months after the operation showed vascular state of the patient to be in order. Conclusion. Complete transabdominal approach to TAAA type IV represents an appropriate substitute for thoracoabdominal approach, without compromising safety of the patient. This approach is less traumatic, especially in patients with impaired