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Sample records for anxiety multimodal study

  1. Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study (CAMS: rationale, design, and methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waslick Bruce D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To present the design, methods, and rationale of the Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study (CAMS, a recently completed federally-funded, multi-site, randomized placebo-controlled trial that examined the relative efficacy of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT, sertraline (SRT, and their combination (COMB against pill placebo (PBO for the treatment of separation anxiety disorder (SAD, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD and social phobia (SoP in children and adolescents. Methods Following a brief review of the acute outcomes of the CAMS trial, as well as the psychosocial and pharmacologic treatment literature for pediatric anxiety disorders, the design and methods of the CAMS trial are described. Results CAMS was a six-year, six-site, randomized controlled trial. Four hundred eighty-eight (N = 488 children and adolescents (ages 7-17 years with DSM-IV-TR diagnoses of SAD, GAD, or SoP were randomly assigned to one of four treatment conditions: CBT, SRT, COMB, or PBO. Assessments of anxiety symptoms, safety, and functional outcomes, as well as putative mediators and moderators of treatment response were completed in a multi-measure, multi-informant fashion. Manual-based therapies, trained clinicians and independent evaluators were used to ensure treatment and assessment fidelity. A multi-layered administrative structure with representation from all sites facilitated cross-site coordination of the entire trial, study protocols and quality assurance. Conclusions CAMS offers a model for clinical trials methods applicable to psychosocial and psychopharmacological comparative treatment trials by using state-of-the-art methods and rigorous cross-site quality controls. CAMS also provided a large-scale examination of the relative and combined efficacy and safety of the best evidenced-based psychosocial (CBT and pharmacologic (SSRI treatments to date for the most commonly occurring pediatric anxiety disorders. Primary and secondary results

  2. A multimodal behavioral approach to performance anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Arnold A; Abramovitz, Arnold

    2004-08-01

    Cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) stresses a trimodal assessment framework (affect, behavior, and cognition [ABC]), whereas the multimodal approach assesses seven discrete but interactive components--behavior, affect, sensation, imagery, cognition, interpersonal relationships, and drugs/biological factors (BASIC I.D.). Only complex or recalcitrant cases call for the entire seven-pronged range of multimodal interventions. Various case illustrations are offered as examples of how a clinician might proceed when confronted with problems that fall under the general heading of performance anxiety. The main example is of a violinist in a symphony orchestra whose career was in serious jeopardy because of his extreme fear of performing in public. He responded very well to a focused but elaborate desensitization procedure. The hierarchy that was eventually constructed contained many dimensions and subhierarchies featuring interlocking elements that evoked his anxiety. In addition to imaginal systematic desensitization, sessions were devoted to his actual performance in the clinical setting. As a homework assignment, he found it helpful to listen to a long-playing record of an actual rehearsal and to play along with the world-renowned orchestra and conductor. The subsequent disclosure by the client of an important sexual problem was dealt with concomitantly by using a fairly conventional counseling procedure. Therapy required 20 sessions over a 3-month period.

  3. Pattern of structural brain changes in social anxiety disorder after cognitive behavioral group therapy: a longitudinal multimodal MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger, V R; Brühl, A B; Weidt, S; Delsignore, A; Rufer, M; Jäncke, L; Herwig, U; Hänggi, J

    2016-12-06

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is characterized by fears of social and performance situations. Cognitive behavioral group therapy (CBGT) has in general positive effects on symptoms, distress and avoidance in SAD. Prior studies found increased cortical volumes and decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) in SAD compared with healthy controls (HCs). Thirty-three participants diagnosed with SAD attended in a 10-week CBGT and were scanned before and after therapy. We applied three neuroimaging methods-surface-based morphometry, diffusion tensor imaging and network-based statistics-each with specific longitudinal processing protocols, to investigate CBGT-induced structural brain alterations of the gray and white matter (WM). Surface-based morphometry revealed a significant cortical volume reduction (pre- to post-treatment) in the left inferior parietal cortex, as well as a positive partial correlation between treatment success (indexed by reductions in Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale) and reductions in cortical volume in bilateral dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. Diffusion tensor imaging analysis revealed a significant increase in FA in bilateral uncinate fasciculus and right inferior longitudinal fasciculus. Network-based statistics revealed a significant increase of structural connectivity in a frontolimbic network. No partial correlations with treatment success have been found in WM analyses. For, we believe, the first time, we present a distinctive pattern of longitudinal structural brain changes after CBGT measured with three established magnetic resonance imaging analyzing techniques. Our findings are in line with previous cross-sectional, unimodal SAD studies and extent them by highlighting anatomical brain alterations that point toward the level of HCs in parallel with a reduction in SAD symptomatology.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 6 December 2016; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.217.

  4. New advances in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder: the multimodal antidepressant vortioxetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsolini, Laura; Tomasetti, Carmine; Valchera, Alessandro; Iasevoli, Felice; Buonaguro, Elisabetta Filomena; Vellante, Federica; Fornaro, Michele; Fiengo, Annastasia; Mazza, Monica; Vecchiotti, Roberta; Perna, Giampaolo; de Bartolomeis, Andrea; Martinotti, Giovanni; Di Giannantonio, Massimo; De Berardis, Domenico

    2016-05-01

    Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) is a persistent condition characterized by chronic anxiety, exaggerated worry and tension, mainly comorbid with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Currently, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are recommended as first-line treatment of GAD. However, some patients may not respond to the treatment or discontinue due to adverse effects. Vortioxetine (VRX) is a multimodal antidepressant with a unique mechanism of action, by acting as 5-HT3A, 5-HT1D and 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, partial agonist at the 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptors and inhibitor at the 5-HT transporter. Preliminary clinical trials showed contrasting findings in terms of improvement of the anxiety symptomatology and/or cognitive impairment. Here, we aim to systematically review the evidence currently available on the efficacy, safety and tolerability of VRX in the treatment of GAD. The generalizability of results on the efficacy of VRX in patients with anxiety symptomatology and GAD is limited due to few and contrasting RCTs so far available. Only two studies, of which one prevention relapse trial, reported a significant improvement in anxiety symptomatology compared to three with negative findings.

  5. Randomized Controlled Trial: Multimodal Anxiety and Social Skill Intervention for Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan W.; Ollendick, Thomas; Albano, Anne Marie; Oswald, Donald; Johnson, Cynthia; Southam-Gerow, Michael A.; Kim, Inyoung; Scahill, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety is common among adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and may amplify the core social disability, thus necessitating combined treatment approaches. This pilot, randomized controlled trial evaluated the feasibility and preliminary outcomes of the Multimodal Anxiety and Social Skills Intervention (MASSI) program in a sample of 30…

  6. Multimodality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie

    2010-01-01

    on their teaching and learning situations. The choices they make involve e-learning resources like videos, social platforms and mobile devices, not just as digital artefacts we interact with, but the entire practice of using digital media. In a life-long learning perspective, multimodality is potentially very......In this paper, I address an ongoing discussion in Danish E-learning research about how to take advantage of the fact that digital media facilitate other communication forms than text, so-called ‘multimodal' communication, which should not be confused with the term ‘multimedia'. While multimedia...... useful for developing pedagogies where a synergy of different symbol systems facilitates new and flexible learning situations that can meet different needs of different learners. The present paper includes an example from a Danish university program...

  7. Analgesic efficacy of lidocaine and multimodal analgesia for chest tube removal: A randomized trial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdecy Ferreira de Oliveira Pinheiro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess the analgesic efficacy of subcutaneous lidocaine and multimodal analgesia for chest tube removal following heart surgery. Methods: sixty volunteers were randomly allocated in two groups; 30 participants in the experimental group were given 1% subcutaneous lidocaine, and 30 controls were given a multimodal analgesia regime comprising systemic anti-inflammatory agents and opioids. The intensity and quality of pain and trait and state anxiety were assessed. The association between independent variables and final outcome was assessed by means of the Chi-squared test with Yates' correction and Fisher's exact test. Results: the groups did not exhibit significant difference with respect to the intensity of pain upon chest tube removal (p= 0.47. The most frequent descriptors of pain reported by the participants were pressing, sharp, pricking, burning and unbearable. Conclusion: the present study suggests that the analgesic effect of the subcutaneous administration of 1% lidocaine combined with multimodal analgesia is most efficacious.

  8. Multimodality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie

    and learning situations. The choices they make involve E-learning resources like videos, social platforms and mobile devices, not just as digital artefacts we interact with, but the entire practice of using digital media. In a life-long learning perspective, multimodality is potentially very useful......In this paper, I address an ongoing discussion in Danish E-learning research about how to take advantage of the fact that digital media facilitate other communication forms than text, so-called ‘multimodal’ communication, which should not be confused with the term ‘multimedia’. While multimedia...... for developing pedagogies where a synergy of different symbol systems facilitates new and flexible learning situations that can meet different needs of different learners. The present paper includes an example from a Danish university program....

  9. Clinical relevance of comorbidity in anxiety disorders : A report from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmeijer-Sevink, Mieke Klein; Batelaan, Neeltje M.; van Megen, Harold J. G. M.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Cath, Danielle C.; van den Hout, Marcel A.; van Balkom, Anton J. L. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: To study the clinical relevance of type of comorbidity and number of comorbid disorders in anxiety disorders. Four groups were compared according to sociodemographic-, vulnerability- and clinical factors: single anxiety disorder, anxiety-anxiety comorbidity, anxiety-depressive comorbidit

  10. "Math Anxiety" Explored in Studies

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    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2011-01-01

    Math problems make more than a few students--and even teachers--sweat, but new brain research is providing insights into the earliest causes of the anxiety so often associated with mathematics. Experts argue that "math anxiety" can bring about widespread, intergenerational discomfort with the subject, which could lead to anything from fewer…

  11. Multimodal Biometric Systems - Study to Improve Accuracy and Performance

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    Sasidhar, K; Ramakrishna, Kolikipogu; KailasaRao, K

    2010-01-01

    Biometrics is the science and technology of measuring and analyzing biological data of human body, extracting a feature set from the acquired data, and comparing this set against to the template set in the database. Experimental studies show that Unimodal biometric systems had many disadvantages regarding performance and accuracy. Multimodal biometric systems perform better than unimodal biometric systems and are popular even more complex also. We examine the accuracy and performance of multimodal biometric authentication systems using state of the art Commercial Off- The-Shelf (COTS) products. Here we discuss fingerprint and face biometric systems, decision and fusion techniques used in these systems. We also discuss their advantage over unimodal biometric systems.

  12. Multimodal Communication in an Eighth Grade History Classroom : A study from a design theoretical and multimodal perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Parry, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The following essay was written in Stockholm, Sweden in the autumn of 2015 at Stockholm University. The purpose of this study is to explore the forms of multimodal communication that are used in the classroom as meaning making prompts. The study is from a multimodal and design theoretical perspective and uses the model Learning Design Sequence as a framework for collecting and analysing data. A qualitative method is being used for collecting data from video observation, from two eighth grade ...

  13. Is the beck anxiety inventory a good tool to assess the severity of anxiety? A primary care study in The Netherlands study of depression and anxiety (NESDA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muntingh, Anna D. T.; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M.; van Marwijk, Harm W. J.; Spinhoven, Philip; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; van Balkom, Anton J. L. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Appropriate management of anxiety disorders in primary care requires clinical assessment and monitoring of the severity of the anxiety. This study focuses on the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) as a severity indicator for anxiety in primary care patients with different anxiety disorders (so

  14. Religiousness and preoperative anxiety: a correlational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimollahi Mansoureh

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major life changes are among factors that cause anxiety, and one of these changes is surgery. Emotional reactions to surgery have specific effects on the intensity and velocity as well as the process of physical disease. In addition, they can cause delay in patients recovery. This study is aimed at determining the relationship between religious beliefs and preoperative anxiety. Methods This survey is a correlational study to assess the relationship between religious beliefs and preoperative anxiety of patients undergoing abdominal, orthopaedic, and gynaecologic surgery in educational hospitals. We used the convenience sampling method. The data collection instruments included a questionnaire containing the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, and another questionnaire formulated by the researcher with queries on religious beliefs and demographic characteristics as well as disease-related information. Analysis of the data was carried out with SPSS software using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results were arranged in three tables. Results The findings showed that almost all the subjects had high level of religiosity and moderate level of anxiety. In addition, there was an inverse relationship between religiosity and intensity of anxiety, though this was not statistically significant. Conclusion The results of this study can be used as evidence for presenting religious counselling and spiritual interventions for individuals undergoing stress. Finally, based on the results of this study, the researcher suggested some recommendations for applying results and conducting further research.

  15. A Multimodal Search Engine for Medical Imaging Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Eduardo; Godinho, Tiago; Valente, Frederico; Costa, Carlos

    2017-02-01

    The use of digital medical imaging systems in healthcare institutions has increased significantly, and the large amounts of data in these systems have led to the conception of powerful support tools: recent studies on content-based image retrieval (CBIR) and multimodal information retrieval in the field hold great potential in decision support, as well as for addressing multiple challenges in healthcare systems, such as computer-aided diagnosis (CAD). However, the subject is still under heavy research, and very few solutions have become part of Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) in hospitals and clinics. This paper proposes an extensible platform for multimodal medical image retrieval, integrated in an open-source PACS software with profile-based CBIR capabilities. In this article, we detail a technical approach to the problem by describing its main architecture and each sub-component, as well as the available web interfaces and the multimodal query techniques applied. Finally, we assess our implementation of the engine with computational performance benchmarks.

  16. Pilot study of a multimodal intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarden, Mary Ellen; Hovgaard, Doris; Boesen, Ellen

    2007-01-01

    Substantial physical and functional deconditioning and diminished psychological wellbeing are all potential adverse effects of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety and benefits (physical and functional capacity) of a 4......-6 week supervised and structured mixed-type exercise, progressive relaxation and psychoeducation programme in patients undergoing allo-HSCT. Nineteen patients were randomized to an intervention or a conventional care group (CC) and were tested for physical and functional capacity before admission...

  17. Contrasting Systemic Functional Linguistic and Situated Literacies Approaches to Multimodality in Literacy and Writing Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kate T.

    2013-01-01

    Against the backdrop of proliferating research on multimodality in the fields of literacy and writing studies, this article considers the contributions of two prominent theoretical perspectives--Systemic Functional Linguistics (SFL) and Situated Literacies--and the methodological tensions they raise for the study of multimodality. To delineate…

  18. Writing Anxiety: A Case Study on Students’ Reasons for Anxiety in Writing

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was twofold. First, the present study set out to investigate the learners‟ attitudes towards academic writing courses that they have to take as part of their curriculum, whether they experience second language writing anxiety and what reasons they report for their anxiety and failure in academic writing courses. Second, the study aimed to develop a selfreport measure of second language writing anxiety reasons

  19. Study Parses Comorbidity of Cannabis Use and Social Anxiety

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    ... Use and Social Anxiety Study Parses Comorbidity of Cannabis Use and Social Anxiety Email Facebook Twitter October ... difficulties and other cannabis-related problems. SAD and Cannabis Use Severity Further analysis suggested that people with ...

  20. Studying Anxiety Disorders | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Phobias and Anxiety Disorders Studying Anxiety Disorders Past Issues / ... palpitations, shortness of breath, dizziness, or abdominal distress. Phobias often result in panic attacks. Post-Traumatic Stress ...

  1. The Study of the Relationship between Mothers' Anxiety with the Mathematical Performance and Students' Anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Moradpour

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Today mathematics stress have considered under interesting of many psychologists of mathematics education and cognitive psychologists too so that recognize emotion and mental stimulations of students in mathematics and to find scientific strategies for removing and controlling them. Anxiety is one of important and effective issues of 21th century. This study is done with aim of the study of relationship between mothers' anxiety with mathematics performance and anxiety of their children at first grade of high school at zone one of Tehran. Among population, 97 students and their mothers are chosen. Data of this research are collected by Cattell standard questionnaire for studying mothers' anxiety and standard questionnaire of mathematics anxiety for studying mathematics anxiety and a math exam for studying of students' performance. Research findings indicate that there is significant relationship between mothers' anxiety with mathematics anxiety and performance of students. Also it indicated that there is significant difference between students with high and low mathematics anxiety in term of mathematics performance.

  2. The Intersection of Multimodality and Critical Perspective: Multimodality as Subversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shin-ying

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the relevance of multimodality to critical media literacy. It is based on the understanding that communication is intrinsically multimodal and multimodal communication is inherently social and ideological. By analysing two English-language learners' multimodal ensembles, the study reports on how multimodality contributes to a…

  3. Study of English Speaking Anxiety in English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张艳梅

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety has an important influence on two language learning as one of the affective factors in language learning. Peo-ple usually think that excessive anxiety can interfere with the learning of English, especially the spoken English. This paper mainly studies the reasons of causing anxiety, strategies of solving speaking anxiety and help students overcome affective barriers, enhanc-ing the level of spoken english.

  4. Mathematics Anxiety in Young Children: An Exploratory Study

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    Harari, Rachel R.; Vukovic, Rose K.; Bailey, Sean P.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the nature of mathematics anxiety in a sample of 106 ethnically and linguistically diverse first-grade students. Although much is known about mathematics anxiety in older children and adults, little is known about when mathematics anxiety first emerges or its characteristics in young children. Results from exploratory factor…

  5. An Exploratory Study of Library Anxiety in Developmental Education Students

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    Lee, Scott W.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined Library Anxiety in a cohort of developmental English students. Levels of anxiety were measured in 191 students using Bostick's Library Anxiety Scale. Thirteen of those students were then interviewed about their use, knowledge and valuation of their campus library. The results of the interviews were compared against the measured…

  6. Determining the Anxiety Sensitivity Bases of Anxiety: A Study with Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erozkan, Atilgan

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to examine the relationships between subdimensions of anxiety sensitivity and anxiety. The participants in the study were 841 undergraduate students (411 females; 430 males) randomly selected from three different faculties--Faculties of Technical Education, Education, and Sport Sciences--at Mugla Sitki Kocman University. Data…

  7. Study on Writing Anxiety among Iranian EFL Students

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    Naghmeh Jebreil

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article aimed at investigating the level of writing anxiety of the Iranian EFL students with different proficiency levels. To do so, 45 students (elementary, intermediate, and advanced learners studying in Azad University of Ilam, Iran were selected based on random sampling. Second, Language Writing Anxiety Inventory SLWAI (Cheng, 2004 was used to measure anxiety.  Both descriptive and inferential statistics including One-way ANOVA were run to analyze the data. Statistical analysis was conducted using Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS. The results of the study indicated that the selected Iranian EFL students majoring in English language teaching experienced a high level of anxiety. In addition, students with elementary level were found to suffer higher level of English writing anxiety than the students with intermediate and advanced levels. Finally, based on the findings, cognitive anxiety was the most common type of anxiety, followed by somatic anxiety, and avoidance behavior. The results also highlighted the fact that foreign and second language teachers should be cautious of the dangers of  anxiety  and try  to  make  the  atmosphere  of  class  as  stress-free  as possible  in  order  to  improve  students’ performance. Keywords: Writing Anxiety, EFL Students, Cognitive Anxiety, Somatic Anxiety, Avoidance

  8. Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home & Community Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Anxiety Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic Facts & Information Causes & Symptoms Diagnosis & Tests Care & Treatment Lifestyle & Management Other Resources Caregiving How ...

  9. Experimental Study on Bioluminescence Tomography with Multimodality Fusion

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    Yujie Lv

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available To verify the influence of a priori information on the nonuniqueness problem of bioluminescence tomography (BLT, the multimodality imaging fusion based BLT experiment is performed by multiview noncontact detection mode, which incorporates the anatomical information obtained by the microCT scanner and the background optical properties based on diffuse reflectance measurements. In the reconstruction procedure, the utilization of adaptive finite element methods (FEMs and a priori permissible source region refines the reconstructed results and improves numerical robustness and efficiency. The comparison between the absence and employment of a priori information shows that multimodality imaging fusion is essential to quantitative BLT reconstruction.

  10. Experimental Study on Bioluminescence Tomography with Multimodality Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yujie; Tian, Jie; Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2007-01-01

    To verify the influence of a priori information on the nonuniqueness problem of bioluminescence tomography (BLT), the multimodality imaging fusion based BLT experiment is performed by multiview noncontact detection mode, which incorporates the anatomical information obtained by the microCT scanner and the background optical properties based on diffuse reflectance measurements. In the reconstruction procedure, the utilization of adaptive finite element methods (FEMs) and a priori permissible source region refines the reconstructed results and improves numerical robustness and efficiency. The comparison between the absence and employment of a priori information shows that multimodality imaging fusion is essential to quantitative BLT reconstruction. PMID:18256736

  11. Study of Mothers' Anxieties Related to Their Children's Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilgar, Sengul

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to study anxieties of mothers related to their children's future. Qualitative method was used in order to study anxieties of mothers from different socio-economic levels. Sample of the study participants are 129 mothers living in Istanbul. 32 of those mothers are from upper socio-economic level, 57, from middle…

  12. Mining Multimodal Sequential Patterns: A Case Study on Affect Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez, Héctor Pérez; Yannakakis, Georgios N.

    2011-01-01

    to the analysis and, subsequently, are presented either to a multimodal fusion mechanism or a computational model of the interaction. This paper proposes a feature extraction methodology which is based on frequent sequence mining within and across multiple modalities of user input. The proposed method is applied...

  13. Dental anxiety among adults: An epidemiological study in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devapriya Appukuttan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental anxiety is a major barrier for dental care utilization. Hence, identifying anxious individuals and their appropriate management becomes crucial in clinical practice. Aim: The study aims to assess dental anxiety, factors influencing dental anxiety, and anxiety towards tooth extraction procedure among patients attending a dental hospital in India. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of 1,148 consecutive patients aged 18-70 years. The assessment tools consisted of a consent form, history form, a questionnaire form containing the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS which was used to assess the level of dental anxiety, and an additional question on anxiety towards dental extraction procedure. Results: Among the study group, 63.7% were men and 36.3% were women. Based on the MDAS score, 45.2% of the participants were identified to be less anxious, 51.8% were moderately or extremely anxious, and 3% were suffering from dental phobia. Mean MDAS total score was 10.4 (standard deviation (SD = 3.91. Female participants and younger subjects were more anxious (P < 0.001. Subjects who were anxious had postponed their dental visit (P < 0.001. Participants who had negative dental experience were more anxious (P < 0.05. Notably, 82.6% reported anxiety towards extraction procedure. Significant association was seen between anxiety towards extraction procedure and the respondents gender (P < 0.05, age (P < 0.001, education level (P < 0.05, employment status (P < 0.001, income (P < 0.001, self-perceived oral health status (P < 0.05, and their history of visit to dentist (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Significant percentage of population was suffering from dental anxiety in this study population. A plethora of factors like age, gender, education level, occupation, financial stability, and previous bad dental experience influences dental anxiety to various levels. Extraction followed by drilling of tooth and receiving local anesthetic injection

  14. Analyzing International Students' Study Anxiety in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshlessan, Rezvan; Das, Kumer Pial

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore international students' study anxiety in a mid-sized public four-year university in Southeast Texas by comparing their existing study anxiety along lines of nationality, gender, age, major, degree, and stage of education. The subjects were selected using a convenience sample during the Spring of 2013. The…

  15. A STUDY OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE ANXIETY AMONG CHINESE COLLEGE STUDENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仇迪

    2012-01-01

      The aims of this paper are to determine whether English language anxiety in Chinese college students affects their learning of English, to identify what these effects are, and to discover strategies for countering such anxiety. A brief review of literature on the previous studies of English language anxiety was conducted. A second review of literature relating to definitions, classifications, causes of these anxieties, and relations with other variables was also conducted. Through a review of the literature, the corresponding countermeasures of anxiety were summarized and a variety of recommendations were provided: 1) create a relaxing and pleasant learning atmosphere, 2) increase learners’ self-confidence, 3) reduce learners’ test anxiety, and 4) adopt cooperative learning in the English class.

  16. Foreign Language Speaking Anxiety: A Study of Chinese Language Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Luo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates Chinese Language Speaking Anxiety and its associated factors among college-level students who learn Chinese as a foreign language (CFL in the U.S. Although the Speaking Anxiety scores of the participants were not high on average, but frequency analyses showed that quite a number of learners experienced high levels of anxiety when speaking Chinese. The results of ANOVA analyses indicated that gender had a significant effect on Speaking Anxiety, but proficiency level and the elective-required status did not. Correlation and multiple regression results showed that perceived difficulty level of the Chinese language, self-perceived language learning ability, and self-perceived achievement in Chinese classes were significant predictors of Speaking Anxiety and altogether accounted for 21.4% of the variance in Speaking Anxiety.

  17. Is math anxiety in the secondary classroom limiting physics mastery? A study of math anxiety and physics performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Gary J.

    This quantitative study examined the relationship between secondary students with math anxiety and physics performance in an inquiry-based constructivist classroom. The Revised Math Anxiety Rating Scale was used to evaluate math anxiety levels. The results were then compared to the performance on a physics standardized final examination. A simple correlation was performed, followed by a multivariate regression analysis to examine effects based on gender and prior math background. The correlation showed statistical significance between math anxiety and physics performance. The regression analysis showed statistical significance for math anxiety, physics performance, and prior math background, but did not show statistical significance for math anxiety, physics performance, and gender.

  18. A study of exam related anxiety amongst medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Pahwa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study focuses on pre-examination anxiety amongst medical students & its personality co-relates. Material & Method : 91 medical students were administered Eysenck Personality Questionnaire to determine predominant personality trait if any and Beck′s Anxiety Inventory. Results : There was an increase in anxiety levels prior to exam, more so in females and in students with neuroticism and extraversion temperaments. Conclusion: Anxiety levels increase in medical students prior to exams and are associated with certain personality traits, though the difference is not statistically significant.

  19. The impact of smoking in adolescence on early adult anxiety symptoms and the relationship between infant vulnerability factors for anxiety and early adult anxiety symptoms: the TOPP Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Moylan

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking is increased in people with trait anxiety and anxiety disorders, however no longitudinal data exist illuminating whether smoking in adolescence can influence the developmental trajectory of anxiety symptoms from early vulnerability in infancy to adult anxiety expression. Using The Tracing Opportunities and Problems in Childhood and Adolescence (TOPP Study, a community-based cohort of children and adolescents from Norway who were observed from the age of 18 months to age 18-19 years, we explored the relationship between adolescent smoking, early vulnerability for anxiety in infancy (e.g. shyness, internalizing behaviors, emotional temperaments and reported early adult anxiety. Structural equation modeling demonstrated that adolescent active smoking was positively associated with increased early adulthood anxiety (β = 0.17, p<0.05, after controlling for maternal education (proxy for socioeconomic status. Adolescent anxiety did not predict early adult smoking. Adolescent active smoking was a significant effect modifier in the relationship between some infant vulnerability factors and later anxiety; smoking during adolescence moderated the relationship between infant internalizing behaviors (total sample: active smokers: β = 0.85, p<0.01, non-active smokers: ns and highly emotional temperament (total sample: active smokers: β = 0.55, p<0.01,non-active smokers: ns, but not shyness, and anxiety in early adulthood. The results support a model where smoking acts as an exogenous risk factor in the development of anxiety, and smoking may alter the developmental trajectory of anxiety from infant vulnerability to early adult anxiety symptom expression. Although alternative non-mutually exclusive models may explain these findings, the results suggest that adolescent smoking may be a risk factor for adult anxiety, potentially by influencing anxiety developmental trajectories. Given the known adverse health effects of cigarette

  20. The challenge of simple graphics for multimodal studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Christian Mosbæk

    2017-01-01

    This article suggests that a Multimodal Social Semiotics (MSS) approach to graphics is severely challenged by structurally very simple texts. Methodologically, MSS favours the level at which elements from discrete modes are integrated grammatically into texts. Because the tradition has this focus...... as typically understood by MSS. In order to demonstrate the usefulness of the approach, the article carries out a comparative reading of two logos for Scandinavian fuel retail companies: Norwegian Statoil Fuel and Retail ASA and Swedish Preem AB....

  1. Can Coloring Mandalas Reduce Anxiety? A Replication Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vennet, Renee; Serice, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This experimental study replicated Curry and Kasser's (2005) research that tested whether coloring a mandala would reduce anxiety. After inducing an anxious mood via a writing activity, participants were randomly assigned to three groups that colored either on a mandala design, on a plaid design, or on a blank paper. Anxiety level was measured…

  2. The impact of smoking in adolescence on early adult anxiety symptoms and the relationship between infant vulnerability factors for anxiety and early adult anxiety symptoms: the TOPP Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moylan, Steven; Gustavson, Kristin; Karevold, Evalill; Øverland, Simon; Jacka, Felice N; Pasco, Julie A; Berk, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is increased in people with trait anxiety and anxiety disorders, however no longitudinal data exist illuminating whether smoking in adolescence can influence the developmental trajectory of anxiety symptoms from early vulnerability in infancy to adult anxiety expression. Using The Tracing Opportunities and Problems in Childhood and Adolescence (TOPP) Study, a community-based cohort of children and adolescents from Norway who were observed from the age of 18 months to age 18-19 years, we explored the relationship between adolescent smoking, early vulnerability for anxiety in infancy (e.g. shyness, internalizing behaviors, emotional temperaments) and reported early adult anxiety. Structural equation modeling demonstrated that adolescent active smoking was positively associated with increased early adulthood anxiety (β = 0.17, pAdolescent anxiety did not predict early adult smoking. Adolescent active smoking was a significant effect modifier in the relationship between some infant vulnerability factors and later anxiety; smoking during adolescence moderated the relationship between infant internalizing behaviors (total sample: active smokers: β = 0.85, psmoking acts as an exogenous risk factor in the development of anxiety, and smoking may alter the developmental trajectory of anxiety from infant vulnerability to early adult anxiety symptom expression. Although alternative non-mutually exclusive models may explain these findings, the results suggest that adolescent smoking may be a risk factor for adult anxiety, potentially by influencing anxiety developmental trajectories. Given the known adverse health effects of cigarette smoking and significant health burden imposed by anxiety disorders, this study supports the importance of smoking prevention and cessation programs targeting children and adolescence.

  3. Critical Analysis of Multimodal Discourse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Leeuwen, Theo

    2013-01-01

    This is an encyclopaedia article which defines the fields of critical discourse analysis and multimodality studies, argues that within critical discourse analysis more attention should be paid to multimodality, and within multimodality to critical analysis, and ends reviewing a few examples...... of recent work in the critical analysis of multimodal discourse....

  4. Correlation of cerebrovascular disorder and anxiety: The Kecskemet study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipos, Kornel; Bodo, Michael; Szalay, Piroska; Szucs, Attila

    2010-04-01

    In order to test the hypothesis that anxiety is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, specifically stroke, we simultaneously measured anxiety and cerebral vascular alternation, using a computer-based system, "Cerberus." Sixty nine psychiatric patients (including an alcoholic subgroup) were selected as subjects for measurements conducted in Kecskemet, Hungary. The five-item short form of anxiety test (STAI) was administered twice during the same session. Between each test, brain pulse waves were recorded by rheoencephalogram (REG). A REG peak time above 180 milliseconds was considered a cerebrovascular alteration (modified after Jenkner). Data were sorted into two groups: low anxiety (N=10) and high anxiety (N=10). Significant differences were found between cardiovascular risk factors (panxiety group, and two in the low anxiety group. For the two anxiety groups, there were no significant differences in body mass index, cardiovascular sympathetic-parasympathetic balance, age and symptoms of transient ischemic attack. The correlation of REG and age was significantly different only for the alcoholic subgroup (Szalay et al, 2007). These data support the hypothesis that a correlation exists between cerebrovascular disorder and anxiety in the studied population.

  5. Correlational study of psychological variables self-confidence and anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria González Campos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this study is to analyze the concurrent validity of the psychological variables self-confidence and anxiety among the psychological measurement instruments: Psychological Characteristics Questionnaire related to Sports Performance (CPRD; Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2 (CSAI-2; and Sports Psychological Inventory LOEHR. For this purpose, a correlational study was conducted between the selected variables and pertinent aspects of the measurement instruments. The study has revealed that the psychological variables self-confidence and anxiety are relevant in all three instruments, although not in all of the selected items.

  6. A twin study of computer anxiety in Turkish adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deryakulu, Deniz; Calışkan, Erkan

    2012-04-01

    The present study investigated computer anxiety within a sample of Turkish twins aged 10-18. A total of 185 twin-pairs participated in the study. Of the twins, 64 pairs (34.6 percent) were monozygotic (MZ) and 121 pairs (65.4 percent) were dizygotic (DZ). Of the 121 DZ twins, 54 pairs (44.63 percent) were same-sex twins and 67 pairs (55.37 percent) were opposite-sex twins. Computer anxiety was assessed using Computer Anxiety Rating Scale-Turkish Version (CARS-TV), one of the three main scales of "Measuring Technophobia Instruments" developed by Rosen and Weil. The results of paired t test comparisons showed no significant differences in MZ and same-sex DZ twin-pairs' levels of computer anxiety. On the other hand, a significant difference was found in opposite-sex DZ twin-pairs' level of computer anxiety. Interesting enough, males appeared to be more computer anxious than their female co-twins. In the present study, using Falconer's formula, heritability estimate for computer anxiety was derived from correlations based on MZ and DZ twins' mean scores on CARS-TV. The results showed that 57 percent of the variance in computer anxiety was from genetics and 41.5 percent was from nonshared environmental factors. Shared environmental influence, on the other hand, was very small and negligible. Interpretations of results and potential directions for future research are presented.

  7. Instruments for the assessment of social anxiety disorder: Validation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osório, Flávia de Lima; Crippa, José Alexandre de Souza; Loureiro, Sonia Regina

    2012-10-22

    Great progress has been observed in the literature over the last decade regarding the validation of instruments for the assessment of Social Anxiety Disorder in the Brazilian context. Particularly outstanding in this respect is the production of a group of Brazilian investigators regarding the psychometric study of the following instruments: Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, Social Phobia Inventory, Brief Social Phobia Scale, Disability Profile, Liebowitz Self-Rated Disability Scale, Social Phobia Safety Behaviors Scale and Self-Statements During Public Speaking Scale, which have proved to be appropriate and valid for use in the adult Brazilian population, representing resources for the assessment of social anxiety in clinical and experimental situations.

  8. Review of Studies of Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Ci-feng

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety is considered to be one of the key psychological variables as well as one of the important emotional factors that affect language learning. Taken into account that classroom is the main place in which Chinese college students learn English, it is of great significance to study students’language anxiety in the classroom environment. Based on the previous researches, this paper reviews the relevant studies in this area conducted at home and abroad.

  9. Anxiety disorders in young people: a population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaíse Campos Mondin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the prevalence of anxiety disorders and associated factors in young adults. Methods: Cross-sectional population-based study of individuals between the ages of 18 and 24 years randomly selected from 89 census-based sectors to ensure an adequate sample size. Household selection within the sectors was performed according to a systematic sampling process. Anxiety disorders were assessed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI. The final sample comprised 1,560 young adults. Results: Of the participants who were diagnosed with anxiety disorders, 12.3% had agoraphobia, 9.7% had generalised anxiety disorder, 4.0% had social phobia, 3.3% had obsessive-compulsive disorder, 2.5% had panic disorder, and 2.1% had post-traumatic stress disorder; only 23.8% had received any previous treatment. Anxiety disorders were associated with sex, socioeconomic status, psychiatric problems in parents, alcohol abuse, and tobacco use. Conclusions: The identification of factors associated with anxiety disorders in young people enables us to develop intervention strategies. Anxiety disorders are not only highly prevalent but are also associated with significant functional impairment, significant reductions in quality of life, lower productivity, and higher rates of comorbidities.

  10. Studies on anxiety about teaching science in preservice elementary teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerback, Mary E.

    During a sequence of science content courses designed for elementary teachers, anxiety about teaching science as measured by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory was reduced. Each study: 1977-; 1978, 1978-; 1979, 1979-; 1980, and 1980-; 1981, was a separate descriptive study. The overall patterns were similar in all four years. Initial anxiety about teaching science was high and changed in a positive direction in all studies. Variations from year to year were attributed to staffing arrangements, grading practices and course sequences. Both the X and Y forms of the STAI were used. There appears to be a high degree of relationship between them, but the Y form was preferable because it is more reflective of anxiety than depression and has better psychometric properties.

  11. A Case Study of Diverse Multimodal Influences on Music Improvisation Using Visual Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Michelle M.

    2016-01-01

    This case study employed multimodal methods and visual analysis to explore how a young multilingual student used music improvisation to form a speech rap. This student, recently arrived in Australia from Ethiopia, created piano music that was central to his music identity and that simultaneously, through dialogue with his mother, enhanced his…

  12. Dispersion Studies on Multimode Polymer Spiral Waveguides for Board-Level Optical Interconnects

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Jian; Edwards, Tom J; Brown, Christian T A; Penty, Richard V; White, Ian H

    2016-01-01

    Dispersion studies are conducted on 1m long multimode polymer spiral waveguides with different refractive index profiles. Bandwidth-length products >40GHzxm are obtained from such waveguides under a 50/125 um MMF, indicating the potential of this technology.

  13. Virtual Chironomia: A Multimodal Study of Verbal and Non-Verbal Communication in a Virtual World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhulsdonck, Gustav

    2010-01-01

    This mixed methods study examined the various aspects of multimodal use of non-verbal communication in virtual worlds during dyadic negotiations. Quantitative analysis uncovered a treatment effect whereby people with more rhetorical certainty used more neutral non-verbal communication; whereas people that were rhetorically less certain used more…

  14. Seasonality in depressive and anxiety symptoms among primary care patients and in patients with depressive and anxiety disorders; results from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winthorst Wim H

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about seasonality of specific depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms in different patient populations. This study aims to assess seasonal variation of depressive and anxiety symptoms in a primary care population and across participants who were classified in diagnostic groups 1 healthy controls 2 patients with a major depressive disorder, 3 patients with any anxiety disorder and 4 patients with a major depression and any anxiety disorder. Methods Data were used from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA. First, in 5549 patients from the NESDA primary care recruitment population the Kessler-10 screening questionnaire was used and data were analyzed across season in a multilevel linear model. Second, in 1090 subjects classified into four groups according to psychiatric status according to the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, overall depressive symptoms and atypical versus melancholic features were assessed with the Inventory of Depressive Symptoms. Anxiety and fear were assessed with the Beck Anxiety Inventory and the Fear questionnaire. Symptom levels across season were analyzed in a linear regression model. Results In the primary care population the severity of depressive and anxiety symptoms did not show a seasonal pattern. In the diagnostic groups healthy controls and patients with any anxiety disorder, but not patients with a major depressive disorder, showed a small rise in depressive symptoms in winter. Atypical and melancholic symptoms were both elevated in winter. No seasonal pattern for anxiety symptoms was found. There was a small gender related seasonal effect for fear symptoms. Conclusions Seasonal differences in severity or type of depressive and anxiety symptoms, as measured with a general screening instrument and symptom questionnaires, were absent or small in effect size in a primary care population and in patient populations with a major depressive disorder and

  15. The role of bibliotherapy in health anxiety: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Freda A

    2002-10-01

    Despite its high prevalence and implications for health care resources, health anxiety is generally considered difficult and expensive to manage. Structured self-help materials (bibliotherapy) using a cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) treatment approach have been shown to be clinically effective. This experimental study investigated the effects of bibliotherapy on patients who had been identified as demonstrating health concerns. The 40 participants (patients drawn from GP surgeries) were randomly allocated to two groups, one receiving bibliotherapy and the other not. Half the patients had a medically diagnosed problem. Anxiety was assessed before and after the bibliotherapy intervention, which took the form of a cognitive-behavioural self-help booklet for health anxiety sufferers. Patients in the bibliotherapy group showed reduced levels of anxiety at post-test, even when they also had an identifiable physical problem. These results are consistent with the idea that self-help materials can be an effective and accessible intervention in CBT, although further research is recommended.

  16. Comparative Study of Multimodal and Pharmacological Therapy in Treating School Aged Children with ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Bogdana MILEA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, one of the most commonly diagnosed psychiatric disorders among school aged children, continues to create disputes between specialists, upon the best treatment to be used. The herby study aims to bring forward some differences that may exist between the efficacy of the multimodal treatment compared to the drug treatment of ADHD. The novelty component of this study, unfolded February 2010-July 2012, is that the children, their parents and also their teachers were included in the multimodality treatment. The children included in this research (n=63, aged 6-14 and ADHD diagnosed, were randomly assigned in two groups. In the medication (Med group (n=32 the children only received the specific pharmacological treatment (Atomoxetine or Methylphenidate, and for the multimodality (MM group (n=31 the therapy included psychosocial interventions besides the drug therapy. All children were evaluated, both pre and post intervention, with the Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment – ASEBA, for the 6-18 aged category. We have compared the influence of therapy on the core symptoms, on the adaptive functionality and academic performance and on the competences and social functioning of the children in the two groups. The multimodal intervention proved to be more effective (p<0.05 than medication alone, firstly in ameliorating the child’s social behavior in both family and school environment, than in what concerns the main ADHD symptoms. The children’s academic performance was little impacted by either of the two therapies.

  17. A Study on English Writing Anxiety of Chinese College Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭敏

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated the relationship between English writing anxiety and English proficiency of Chinese college stu-dents. A total of 149 college students participated in the study. Research data was collected through a writing anxiety test and the final course scores of writing classes. In order to address assess writing anxiety, three factors (Negative perception about writing ability, Fear of evaluation, and Avoidance of writing in English) were examined. The results found that Chinese college students were highly apprehensive in the process of English writing, and the Negative perception about the writing ability was a most im-portant and significant component of their writing anxiety. It also found that there was a significant correlation between the writ-ing anxiety and the final English writing score, and it also provided evidence that self-perception about the writing ability had the strongest relationship with the writing performance. Students who are not interested in taking more advanced English writing classes were more anxiety than the participant who were willing to enroll the courses.

  18. A Case Study of Anxiety in the Spanish Classroom in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía, Glenda

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the links between anxiety during oral activities in the Spanish language classroom and the teacher's role, as well as the strategies students use to cope with their anxiety. Most of the studies on language anxiety have focused on beginner groups; however, such anxiety is not limited to just that group. As this study has…

  19. Level of Anxiety among Two Genders Appearing for National Level Test: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Zamirullah; Ahmed, Waseem; Khan, Naseem Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most common mental, emotional and behavioral problem that occurs during exam. University students suffer to some levels of study anxiety, such as; have new experiences, environment and situation. Study anxiety is a real phenomenon. The prevalence of study anxiety has been acknowledged by students. An attempt has been made…

  20. Study of internalization and viability of multimodal nanoparticles for labeling of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells; Estudo de internalizacao e viabilidade de nanoparticulas multimodal para marcacao de celulas-tronco mesenquimais de cordao umbilical humano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyaki, Liza Aya Mabuchi [Faculdade de Enfermagem, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein - HIAE, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Sibov, Tatiana Tais; Pavon, Lorena Favaro; Mamani, Javier Bustamante; Gamarra, Lionel Fernel, E-mail: tatianats@einstein.br [Instituto do Cerebro - InCe, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein - HIAE, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-04-15

    Objective: To analyze multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B in culture media for cell labeling, and to establish a study of multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B detection at labeled cells evaluating they viability at concentrations of 10 {mu}g Fe/mL and 100{mu}g Fe/mL. Methods: We performed the analysis of stability of multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B in different culture media; the mesenchymal stem cells labeling with multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B; the intracellular detection of multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B in mesenchymal stem cells, and assessment of the viability of labeled cells by kinetic proliferation. Results: The stability analysis showed that multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B had good stability in cultured Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's-Low Glucose medium and RPMI 1640 medium. The mesenchymal stem cell with multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B described location of intracellular nanoparticles, which were shown as blue granules co-localized in fluorescent clusters, thus characterizing magnetic and fluorescent properties of multimodal magnetic nanoparticles Rhodamine B. Conclusion: The stability of multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B found in cultured Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's-Low Glucose medium and RPMI 1640 medium assured intracellular mesenchymal stem cells labeling. This cell labeling did not affect viability of labeled mesenchymal stem cells since they continued to proliferate for five days. (author)

  1. Efficacy of Child-Focused and Parent-Focused Interventions in a Child Anxiety Prevention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Ellin; Bogels, Susan Maria; Voncken, Jannie Marisol

    2011-01-01

    This study examined anxiety development in median- (n = 74) and high-anxious children (n = 183) aged 8-13, the effect of parent- and child-focused preventive interventions on child/parental anxiety, and the effect of parental anxiety on child anxiety. High-anxious children were randomized into a parent-focused (n = 69), child-focused (n = 58) or…

  2. Efficacy of child-focused and parent-focused interventions in a child anxiety prevention study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, E.; Bögels, S.M.; Voncken, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined anxiety development in median- (n = 74) and high-anxious children (n = 183) aged 8-13, the effect of parent- and child-focused preventive interventions on child/parental anxiety, and the effect of parental anxiety on child anxiety. High-anxious children were randomized into a par

  3. Language Anxiety in the Online Environment: An Exploratory Study of a Secondary Online Spanish Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahoe, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated foreign language anxiety from a qualitative perspective to understand the scope of foreign language anxiety in the online environment. Foreign language anxiety is very real and hinders learners from speaking a new language. Learning a language online can complicate matters related to language anxiety. With distance…

  4. Metacognitive Therapy for Comorbid Anxiety Disorders: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sverre U.; Hoffart, Asle

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to systematically evaluate a generic model of metacognitive therapy (MCT) with a highly comorbid anxiety disorder patient, that had been treated with diagnosis-specific cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) without significant effect. Traditionally, CBT has progressed within a disorder-specific approach, however, it has been suggested that this could be less optimal with highly comorbid patients. To address comorbidity, transdiagnostic treatment models have been emerging. This case study used an AB-design with repeated assessments during each therapy session and a 1-year follow-up assessment to evaluate the effectiveness of MCT. Following 8 sessions of MCT, significant decrease in anxiety and depression symptoms, as well as loss of diagnostic status was observed. Outcomes were preserved at 12 months follow up. The generic model of MCT seems promising as an approach to highly comorbid mixed anxiety depression patients. Further testing using more powered methodologies are needed. PMID:27746757

  5. Relationship between preschool children and the caregiver's preoperative anxiety. A cross study assessing modified Yale preoperative anxiety Scale (m-YPAS)

    OpenAIRE

    Emiliana Gomes de Mello; Vivian Brancalione Gonçalves; Neil Ferreira Novo; Eduardo Toshiyuki Moro

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety is a common event in children before surgery. Several ways have been proposed to assess the level of anxiety in pediatric patients. The modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale (m-Ypas) was developed recently and allows the assessment of anxiety level from the observation of children's attitudes. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of variables such as anxiety of caregivers (parents or relatives), preoperative fasting and previous surgical experiences on children's anxi...

  6. Preschool Predictors of Childhood Anxiety Disorders: A Prospective Community Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichstrøm, Lars; Belsky, Jay; Berg-Nielsen, Turid Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Background: Anxiety disorders are often present at preschool age. Research on older children and studies contrasting preschoolers with high versus low behavioral inhibition (BI) highlight several risk factors, but these have not been investigated in community samples of young children. Child, parent, and peer factors at age 4 were therefore…

  7. Foreign Language Anxiety in Female Arabs Learning English: Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saraj, Taghreed M.

    2014-01-01

    A case study design was used to examine the experiences of female college students learning English as a Foreign Language in Saudi Arabia, where English is becoming an increasingly necessary skill and the culture is undergoing immense changes. Ten participants who reported experiencing moderate to high anxiety, five from the beginning level (Level…

  8. The Influence of Art Making on Anxiety: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandmire, David Alan; Gorham, Sarah Roberts; Rankin, Nancy Elizabeth; Grimm, David Robert

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the psychological effects of art making in a sample of 57 undergraduate students. One week prior to final examinations, participants were randomly assigned to either an art-making group or a control group. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory was administered before and after participation. Art making activities included painting…

  9. DEVELOPING OF INDIVIDUAL INSTRUMENT PERFORMANCE ANXIETY SCALE: VALIDITY - RELIABILITY STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra DALKIRAN

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to develop a scale unique to our culture, concerning  individual instrument performance anxiety of the students  who are getting instrument training  in the Department of Music Education. In the study, the descriptive research model is used and qualitative research techniques are utilized. The study population consists of the students attending the 23 universities which has Music Education Department. The sample of the study consists of 438 girls and 312 boys, totally 750 students  who are studying in the Department of Music Education of randomly selected 10 universities. As a result of the explanatory and confirmatory factor analyses that were performed, a one-dimensional structure consisting of 14 items was obtained. Also, t-scores and  the coefficient scores of total item correlation concerning the distinguishing power of the items, the difference in the scores of the set of lower and upper 27% was calculated, and it was observed that the items are distinguishing as a result of both analyses. Of the scale, Cronbach's alpha coefficient of internal consistency was calculated as .94, and test-retest reliability coefficient was calculated as .93. As a result, a valid and reliable assessment and evaluation instrument that measures the exam performance anxiety of the students studying in the Department of Music Education, has been developed.Extended AbstractsIntroductionAnxiety is a universal phenomenon which people experience once or a few times during lives. It was accepted as concern for the future or as an unpleasant emotional experience regarding probable hitches of the events (Di Tomasso & Gosch, 2002.In general, the occasions on which negative feelings are experienced cause anxiety to arise (Baltaş and Baltaş, 2000. People also feel anxious in dangerous situations. Anxiety may lead a person to be creative, while it may have hindering characteristics. Anxiety is that an individual considers him

  10. Safety and efficacy of multimodal thromboprophylaxis following total knee arthroplasty: a comparative study of preferential aspirin vs. routine coumadin chemoprophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesell, Mark W; González Della Valle, Alejandro; Bartolomé García, Sergio; Memtsoudis, Stavros G; Ma, Yan; Haas, Steven B; Salvati, Eduardo A

    2013-04-01

    Multimodal thromboprophylaxis encompasses preoperative VTE risk stratification, regional anesthesia, mechanical prophylaxis, and early mobilization. We determined if aspirin can be safely used for adjuvant chemoprophylaxis in patients who have a low thromboembolic risk. 1016 consecutive patients undergoing TKA received multimodal thromboprophylaxis. Aspirin was used in 67% of patients and Coumadin 33% (high risk patients, or who were on Coumadin before surgery). This study group was compared to 1001 consecutive patients who received multimodal thromboprophylaxis and routine Coumadin chemoprophylaxis. There was no significant difference in rates of VTE, PE, bleeding, complications, readmission and 90-day mortality between the two groups. There was a significantly higher rate of wound related complications in the control group (p=0.03). Multimodal thromboprophylaxis with aspirin given to the majority of patients at a low VTE risk is safe and effective in patients undergoing primary TKA.

  11. Depressive and anxiety disorders and risk of subclinical atherosclerosis Findings from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seldenrijk, Adrie; Vogelzangs, Nicole; van Hout, Hein P. J.; van Marwijk, Harm W. J.; Diamant, Michaela; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Current evidence regarding the association between psychopathology and subclinical atherosclerosis show inconsistent results. The present study examined whether subclinical atherosclerosis was more prevalent in a large cohort of persons with depressive or anxiety disorders as compared to

  12. Science Anxiety, Science Attitudes, and Constructivism: A Binational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Fred B.; Kastrup, Helge; Udo, Maria; Hislop, Nelda; Shefner, Rachel; Mallow, Jeffry

    2013-08-01

    Students' attitudes and anxieties about science were measured by responses to two self-report questionnaires. The cohorts were Danish and American students at the upper secondary- and university-levels. Relationships between and among science attitudes, science anxiety, gender, and nationality were examined. Particular attention was paid to constructivist attitudes about science. These fell into at least three broad conceptual categories: Negativity of Science Toward the Individual, Subjective Construction of Knowledge, and Inherent Bias Against Women. Multigroup confirmatory factor analyses revealed that these dimensions of constructivist attitudes were equally applicable and had the same meaning in both cultures. Gender differences in mean levels of constructivist attitudes were found; these varied across the two cultures. Constructivist beliefs were associated with science anxiety, but in different ways for females and males, and for Danes and Americans. In agreement with earlier studies, females in both the US and Danish cohorts were significantly more science anxious than males, and the gender differences for the Americans were larger than those for the Danes. Findings are discussed in terms of their implications for reducing science anxiety by changing constructivist beliefs.

  13. Anxiety trajectories and identity development in adolescence: a five-wave longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocetti, Elisabetta; Klimstra, Theo; Keijsers, Loes; Hale, William W; Meeus, Wim

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this five-wave longitudinal study was to investigate the relationship between anxiety and adolescent identity development. Participants were 1,313 adolescents who annually completed measures of anxiety and identity. Growth Mixture Modeling (GMM) analyses demonstrated that the adolescent population was best typified by two latent growth trajectory classes: a low anxiety class (n = 1,199) characterized by a low initial level of anxiety that decreased over time and a high anxiety class (n = 114) characterized by a higher initial level of anxiety that increased over time. To answer our research question, we tested a model in which the anxiety classes predicted initial levels and rates of change of three identity dimensions: commitment, in-depth exploration, and reconsideration of commitment. Findings indicated that the high anxiety adolescents displayed a more troublesome identity development than their low anxiety peers, since their commitments became weaker with age, and they reconsidered them intensively.

  14. Study habits and anxiety about learning foreign languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, P; Onwuegbuzie, A J; Daley, C E

    2000-06-01

    The purpose was to investigate the relationship of self-reported study habits to anxiety about learning foreign languages. 219 college students from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds were enrolled in either Spanish, French, German, or Japanese classes. Correlational analyses, using the Bonferroni adjustment, indicated that students with the highest anxiety about foreign languages tended to report that (1) they spend too much time on some subjects and not enough time on others, (2) they frequently do not get enough sleep and feel sluggish in class or when studying, (3) they do not try to space study period to avoid becoming too tired while studying, and (4) they have trouble settling down to work and do not begin to study as soon as they sit down. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  15. The Study on the Interactive Effect of Multimodality and Meta Cognition upon College Students' Listening Ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔中原

    2015-01-01

    Multimodality and meta cognition are the hot topic in SLA research and FLT research. This paper integrates the theoretical framework of multi-modality and meta cognition, proposing multimodal integrative and meta cognitive process approach can improve the learners' listening performance. Based on this, this paper also gives some enlightenment on the college English teaching and further listening teaching research in the end.

  16. Factors accounting for the association between anxiety and depression, and eczema: the Hordaland health study (HUSK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gotestam Karl

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The association between anxiety and depression, and eczema is well known in the literature, but factors underlying this association remain unclear. Low levels of omega-3 fatty acids and female gender have been found to be associated with both depression and eczema. Somatization and health anxiety are known to be associated with anxiety and depression, further, somatization symptoms and health anxiety have also been found in several dermatological conditions. Accordingly, omega-3 fatty acid supplement, female gender, somatization and health anxiety are possible contributing factors in the association between anxiety and depression, and eczema. The aim of the study is to examine the relevance of proposed contributing factors for the association between anxiety and depression, and eczema, including, omega-3 fatty acid supplement, female gender, health anxiety and somatization. Methods Anxiety and depression was measured in the general population (n = 15715 employing the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. Information on eczema, female gender, omega-3 fatty acid supplement, health anxiety and somatization was obtained by self-report. Results Somatization and health anxiety accounted for more than half of the association between anxiety/depression, and eczema, while the other factors examined were of minor relevance for the association of interest. Conclusions We found no support for female gender and omega-3 fatty acid supplement as contributing factors in the association between anxiety/depression, and eczema. Somatization and health anxiety accounted for about half of the association between anxiety/depression, and eczema, somatization contributed most. The association between anxiety/depression, and eczema was insignificant after adjustment for somatization and health anxiety. Biological mechanisms underlying the mediating effect of somatization are yet to be revealed.

  17. Maternal Symptoms of Anxiety During Pregnancy Affect Infant Neuromotor Development: The Generation R Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batenburg-Eddes, T. van; Groot, L. de; Huizink, A.C.; Steegers, E.A.P.; Hofman, A.; Jaddoe, V.W.V.; Verhulst, F.C.; Tiemeier, H.

    2009-01-01

    Several studies found that maternal symptoms of anxiety or depression are related to functioning and development of the offspring. Within a population-based study of 2,724 children, we investigated the effect of maternal anxiety or depression on infant neuromotor development. Symptoms of anxiety and

  18. Reducing State Communication Anxiety for Public Speakers: An Energy Psychology Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, John, III; Schmuldt, Laura; Rudick, Karen L.

    2011-01-01

    This mixed-method pilot study investigates the efficacy of implementing primordial energy activation and transcendence to address public speaking anxiety. Speech anxiety was significantly reduced from pretest to posttest, as measured by the Communication Anxiety Inventory State. Suggestions for future research, limitations of the current study,…

  19. A Diary Study on the Causes of English Language Classroom Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkonou, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on learners' diaries, the study reported in this article focused on the English language classroom anxiety (ELCA) of eight Greek EFL learners in private language school settings. The study investigated the extent to which anxiety is amenable to change and the factors contributing to the creation and increase in students' anxiety in class.…

  20. A Study on the Correlation between Self Efficacy and Foreign Language Learning Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubukcu, Feryal

    2008-01-01

    Anxiety in language learning is one of the less researched areas; that is why this study explores whether the anxiety level of foreign language learners is related to their self efficacy levels. For this purpose, 100 participants joined the study and the Foreign Language Learning Anxiety Scale and The Self Efficacy Scale were administered to them.…

  1. Maternal symptoms of anxiety during pregnancy affect infant neuromotor development: the generation R study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Batenburg-Eddes, T.; de Groot, L.; Huizink, A.C.; Steegers, E.A.P.; Hofman, A.; Jaddoe, V.W.V.; Verhulst, F.C.; Tiemeier, H.

    2009-01-01

    Several studies found that maternal symptoms of anxiety or depression are related to functioning and development of the offspring. Within a population-based study of 2,724 children, we investigated the effect of maternal anxiety or depression on infant neuromotor development. Symptoms of anxiety and

  2. Student Understanding of Intermolecular Forces: A Multimodal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Melanie M.; Williams, Leah C.; Underwood, Sonia M.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to use representations of molecular structure to predict the macroscopic properties of a substance is central to the development of a robust understanding of chemistry. Intermolecular forces (IMFs) play an important role in this process because they provide a mechanism for how and why molecules interact. In this study, we investigate…

  3. Dysfunctional attitudes and anxiety sensitivity in the manifestation and first onset of social anxiety disorder versus specific phobia and healthy: A prospective longitudinal study

    OpenAIRE

    Rudaz, M.; Becker, E.S.; Margraf, J; Ledermann, T; Meyer, A.H.; Craske, M.G.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the role of two cognitive vulnerability factors, anxiety sensitivity and dysfunctional attitudes, in the prediction of the manifestation and onset of social anxiety disorder relative to specific phobia and relative to healthy controls. Women, aged between 18 and 24 years, were studied at baseline and 18 months later using the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule-Lifetime-ADIS-IV-L and the Anxiety Sensitivity Index-ASI and the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale-DAS. First, 52 wo...

  4. Studies of multimodal gating of the sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keynes, Richard D

    2002-01-01

    Chandler and Meves found that in squid axons perfused with NaF a small flow of Na+ ions persisted in the inactivated state, and that the Na+ channel therefore has more than one open state. Studies by Correa and Bezanilla on single patches in squid axons showed that such steady currents arose from reopening of the channel at a relatively low frequency. Currents with comparable properties are generated in mammalian brain cells and elsewhere. The existence of a third mode of gating was established by Patlak and Ortiz when they showed that in frog muscle fibres there were occasionally quite large bursts of late openings. Again, similar behaviour has been observed in other types of muscle and in brain cells. It is suggested that the voltage gating of all ionic channels involves a screw-helical mechanism, operating in steps each transferring unit charge. For segment S4 in domain IV of Na+ channels, three charges have to be transferred to reach the initial open state, and a fourth for fast inactivation to take place. The single late openings in the inactivated steady state may be explained by the transfer of a fifth charge in IVS4, while the larger bursts of reopening involve a modulation of the mechanism of fast inactivation.

  5. Prospective community study of family stress and anxiety in (pre)adolescents : the TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oort, Floor V. A.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Ormel, Johan; Huizink, Anja C.

    2010-01-01

    For prevention of anxiety in children and adolescents, it is important to know whether family stress is a predictor of anxiety. We studied this in 1,875 adolescents from the Tracking Adolescents' Individual Lives Survey (TRAILS) who were followed up for 2 years, from age 10-12 to 12-14 years. Adoles

  6. Prospective community study of family stress and anxiety in (pre)adolescents: the TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oort, F.V.; Verhulst, F.C.; Ormel, J.; Huizink, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    For prevention of anxiety in children and adolescents, it is important to know whether family stress is a predictor of anxiety. We studied this in 1,875 adolescents from the Tracking Adolescents’ Individual Lives Survey (TRAILS) who were followed up for 2 years, from age 10-12 to 12-14 years. Adoles

  7. Prospective community study of family stress and anxiety in (pre)adolescents: the TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, F.V.A. van; Verhulst, F.C.; Ormel, J.; Huizink, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    For prevention of anxiety in children and adolescents, it is important to know whether family stress is a predictor of anxiety. We studied this in 1,875 adolescents from the Tracking Adolescents' Individual Lives Survey (TRAILS) who were followed up for 2 years, from age 10-12 to 12-14 years. Adoles

  8. Prospective community study of family stress and anxiety in (pre)adolescents: the TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.V.A. van Oort (Floor); F.C. Verhulst (Frank); J. Ormel (Johan Hans); A.C. Huizink (Anja)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractFor prevention of anxiety in children and adolescents, it is important to know whether family stress is a predictor of anxiety. We studied this in 1,875 adolescents from the Tracking Adolescents' Individual Lives Survey (TRAILS) who were followed up for 2 years, from age 10-12 to 12-14 y

  9. Probabilistic thinking and death anxiety: a terror management based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayslip, Bert; Schuler, Eric R; Page, Kyle S; Carver, Kellye S

    2014-01-01

    Terror Management Theory has been utilized to understand how death can change behavioral outcomes and social dynamics. One area that is not well researched is why individuals willingly engage in risky behavior that could accelerate their mortality. One method of distancing a potential life threatening outcome when engaging in risky behaviors is through stacking probability in favor of the event not occurring, termed probabilistic thinking. The present study examines the creation and psychometric properties of the Probabilistic Thinking scale in a sample of young, middle aged, and older adults (n = 472). The scale demonstrated adequate internal consistency reliability for each of the four subscales, excellent overall internal consistency, and good construct validity regarding relationships with measures of death anxiety. Reliable age and gender effects in probabilistic thinking were also observed. The relationship of probabilistic thinking as part of a cultural buffer against death anxiety is discussed, as well as its implications for Terror Management research.

  10. The developmental course of anxiety symptoms during adolescence: the TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oort, F.V.; Greaves-Lord, K.; Verhulst, F.C.; Ormel, J.; Huizink, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    Background:  Little is known about the development of anxiety symptoms from late childhood to late adolescence. The present study determined developmental trajectories of symptoms of separation anxiety disorder (SAD), social phobia (SoPh), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder (PD), and

  11. The developmental course of anxiety symptoms during adolescence: the TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Oort, F.V.A.; Greaves-Lord, K.; Verhulst, F.C.; Ormel, J.; Huizink, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the development of anxiety symptoms from late childhood to late adolescence. The present study determined developmental trajectories of symptoms of separation anxiety disorder (SAD), social phobia (SoPh), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder (PD), and

  12. Dental anxiety among university students at the University of Tromsø: a quantitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Storjord, Helene Persen; Teodorsen, Mari Mjønes

    2013-01-01

    This study demonstrated that dental students have a lower degree of dental anxiety compared to psychology- and biology students. Senior dental students also have less dental anxiety than junior dental students. This indicates that the dentistry programme structure may influence dental anxiety levels.

  13. Foreign Language Anxiety and Heritage Students of Spanish: A Quantitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallon, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if heritage students of Spanish experience foreign language anxiety and, if so, what levels of anxiety they experience. The data were collected using the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (FLCAS). A total of 413 students (209 heritage students and 204 nonheritage students) participated in this…

  14. A study on current situations of college students' foreign language anxiety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bi Ran

    2015-01-01

    An empirical study on current situations of college students' foreign language anxiety is concerned with in this paper. The author adopted Horwitz's Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (FLCAS) to measure the level of foreign language anxiety of 325 participants and then the conclusions are drawn.

  15. The developmental course of anxiety symptoms during adolescence : the TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Oort, F. V. A.; Greaves-Lord, K.; Verhulst, F. C.; Ormel, J.; Huizink, A. C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the development of anxiety symptoms from late childhood to late adolescence. The present study determined developmental trajectories of symptoms of separation anxiety disorder (SAD), social phobia (SoPh), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder (PD), and

  16. VALIDITY OF THE GHQ AND SCL ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION SCALES - A COMPARATIVE-STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOETER, MWJ

    1992-01-01

    This article presents the results of a comparison between the validity of the SCL anxiety, phobic anxiety and depression scales and the GHQ-28 anxiety-/insomnia and severe depression scales in a psychiatric outpatient population. Validity was studied at a categorical level with DSM-III diagnosis, an

  17. A Quantitative and Qualitative Study of Math Anxiety among Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Tina Rye

    2010-01-01

    This project investigated the effects of a standards-based mathematics methods course on the mathematics anxiety levels of preservice teachers. The qualitative portion of the study examined aspects of a math methods course that affected mathematics anxiety levels and the antecedents of mathematics anxiety. Findings revealed a significant…

  18. Information Anxiety from the Undergraduate Student Perspective: A Pilot Study of Second-Semester Freshmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blundell, Shelley; Lambert, Frank

    2014-01-01

    In early spring 2013, a pilot study was conducted at a major public university in Ohio to explore elements of information anxiety (defined herein as a combination of library anxiety and information technology anxiety) among second-semester freshmen enrolled in all iterations of both a traditional and a remedial first-year English course. The…

  19. An Innovative and Portable Multimodal Pain Relief Device for the Management of Neuropathic Low Back Pain - a Study from Kashmir (Southeast Asia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lone, Baseer-ul-Rasool; Beigh, Mirza-Idrees-ul-Haq; Manzoor, Mushbiq

    2016-01-01

    We developed a portable multimodal system with seven different mechanisms of pain relief incorporated into a lumbar belt called the Comfort-N-Harmony Belt (C&H belt). Here, we describe the technical details of the system and also summarize the effects of this multimodal pain relieving technology as an adjuvant to analgesics versus analgesics alone, on the level of pain, improvement of psychological status, disability, and the quality of life in the patients with neuropathic low back pain (LBP). We tracked the volunteers who were following up at a tertiary health care center for the complaints of neuropathic LBP of minimum three months duration and were on analgesics alone with no relief in the severity of the pain. Study group A (n = 45) consisted of volunteers with LBP on C&H belt therapy, along with the usually prescribed analgesic intake, and group B (n = 45) with LBP volunteers on analgesics, plus a similar looking but plain leather belt (placebo). For pain, the VAS (Visual Analogue Scale); for anxiety and depression, the (HADS) Hospital Anxiety-Depression Scale; for disability, the RMDQ (Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire); and for quality of life, (NHP) Nottingham-Health-Profile were used before and after the study period.  There were no significant differences in demographic variables between the groups (p 0.05). However, in comparison of pre- and post-treatment scores, the pre-treatment score values of RMDQ, NHP-pain, NHP-physical activity, and NHP-social isolation were much higher in group A compared to the group B, but still these scores were, in a statistically significant manner, improved in group A compared to the group B after the study period was over (p < 0.05). Multiple pain relieving mechanisms in a portable device-based system, when used along with analgesics, are effective in relieving pain, improving function and quality of life, and help in relieving the associated anxiety and depression in patients with chronic neuropathic LBP than

  20. Multimodal Afslapning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Palmer

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Artiklen beskriver Multimodal Relaxation Method (MRM, fremover Multimodal Afslapningsmetode, somkan anvendes i livs-, ledelses-, virksomheds-, sports- eller sundhedscoaching til at forbedre ydeevnen hos denenkelte og reducere eller håndtere stress. Inden for sports- og sundhedscoaching kan metoden anvendes til atreducere fysiske spændinger og styrke fysiologisk kontrol, fx lavere hjertefrekvens og nedsætte blodtrykket.

  1. Deep assessment: an exploratory study of game-based, multimodal learning in Epidemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Jenson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available n this study, we examine what and how intermediate age students learned from playing in a health-focused game-based digital learning environment, Epidemic. Epidemic is a playful interactive environment designed to deliver factual knowledge, invite critical understanding, and encourage effective self-care practices in dealing with viral contagious diseases, using a social networking interface to integrate both serious games and game-like multimodal design projects. Epidemic invites a playful approach to its deadly serious core concern – communicable disease – in order to see what happens when students are encouraged to critically approach information from multiple or contradictory perspectives. To identify what participants learned while interacting within Epidemic, we deployed two instructional and assessment models, noting the differences each instructional approach could potentially make, and what approach to assessment might help us evaluate game-based learning. We found that each approach provided importantly different perspectives on what and how students learned, and on the very meaning of student success. Recognizing that traditional assessment tools based in print-cultural literacy may prove increasingly ill-suited for assessing emergent multimodal literacies in game-based learning environments, this study seeks to contribute to a growing body of work on the development of novel assessments for learning.

  2. Multimodal ultrasonographic characterisation of parotid gland lesions-A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knopf, Andreas, E-mail: a.knopf@lrz.tum.de [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Hals-Nasen-Ohrenklinik und Poliklinik, Ismaningerstrasse 22, 81675 Muenchen (Germany); Mansour, Naglaa; Chaker, Adam; Bas, Murat [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Hals-Nasen-Ohrenklinik und Poliklinik, Ismaningerstrasse 22, 81675 Muenchen (Germany); Stock, Konrad [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Abteilung fuer Nephrologie der II. Medizinischen Klinik und Poliklinik, Ismaningerstrasse 22, 81675 Muenchen (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    Objectives: Lesions of the major salivary glands represent a heterogeneous group comprising infectious, autoimmune, and neoplastic disorders. The reliable pre-operative assessment of the lesional dignity might reduce patient's morbidity preventing re-surgery. To date, there exists no imaging technique which reliably distinguishes tumour entities. Methods: 35 parotid lesions were analysed in this study. B-mode ultrasound, colour duplex imaging and contrast enhanced ultrasound were applied for all patients. After fractionated boli of 4.8 ml SonoVue{sup Registered-Sign} perfusion kinetics, time to peak (TP) and mean transit time (MTT), were analysed for intraparotideal lesion and were normalised by circumjacent parotid tissue. Ultrasonographic data was structured in a multimodal diagnostic pathway. Results: B-mode ultrasound identifies six lymphoepithelial lesions due to Sjoegren's syndrome (p: 0.0001). CDS further differentiates hypovascularised pleomorphic adenoma from hypervascularised Warthin's tumours, monomorphic adenomas, and carcinomas (p < 0.0001). Application of CEUS detected Warthin's tumours being significantly hypervascularised compared to monomorphic adenomas (MTT, p < 0.05) and carcinomas (MTT, p < 0.02). Conclusions: A multimodal diagnostic pathway unifies different ultrasonographic techniques and identifies pleomorphic adenomas, Warthin's tumours and carcinomas with sensitivities of 100%. Further studies have to be performed to validate this diagnostic approach and to specify monomorphic adenomas.

  3. Psychiatric comorbidities among adolescents with and without anxiety disorders: a community study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estácio Amaro da Silva Júnior

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate, in a community sample of adolescents, the presence of comorbidities in different anxiety disorders. Methods This is a cross-sectional study, initially composed of 2,457 adolescents, aged between 10-17 years old, from public schools of the area covered by the Basic Health Unit of a university hospital. We applied the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED to assess for anxiety disorders. Then, 138 positive cases in the screening were assessed for mental disorders through the Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children – Present and Lifetime Version (K-SADS-PL. Results Patients with anxiety disorders had more association with other anxiety disorders, as well as depression, and enuresis. The most common comorbidity described in our study was between generalized anxiety disorder and separation anxiety disorder (OR = 4.21, 95% CI 1.88, 9.58. Significant association was observed between other disorders such as enuresis and separation anxiety disorder (OR = 3.81, 95% CI 1.16, 12.49, as well as depression and generalized anxiety disorder (OR = 3.40; 95% CI 1.52, 7.61. Conclusion Our study showed a relevant presence of comorbidities adolescents with anxiety disorders, selected from a community sample, especially regarding other anxiety disorders. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  4. A Study on Listening Anxiety and Listening Proficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Ju-hong

    2015-01-01

    Three instruments are adopted including the Foreign Language Listening Anxiety Scales (FLLAS), a listening metacog⁃nitive strategy-use questionnaire and a CET-4 listening test. The results indicate that a large proportion of students report experi⁃encing listening anxiety. There is significantly negative correlation between listening anxiety and listening proficiency and there is significant difference in the use of metacognitive strategies across three listening anxiety levels.

  5. Multimodal Study of Adult-Infant Interaction: A Review of Its Origins and Its Current Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soledad Carretero Pérez

    Full Text Available Abstract An interpretative review of research on adult-infant interactions involving the analysis of movement behaviors is presented, systematically linking previous studies to current research on the subject. Forty-two articles analyzing the dyad's interactive movement in the period 1970-2015 were found. Twelve papers were excluded, including only those that studied the phenomenon in the baby's first year of life. The results revealed that movement was a central topic in early interaction studies in the 70s. In the 1980's and 1990's, its study was marginal and it is currently resurging under the embodiment perspective. The conceptual framework and research methods used in the pioneering work are presented, and the thematic foci shared with current research are highlighted. Thus, essential keys are provided for the updated study of early interactions from a multimodal perspective.

  6. Latent Profile Analyses of Test Anxiety: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Embse, Nathaniel P.; Mata, Andrea D.; Segool, Natasha; Scott, Emma-Catherine

    2014-01-01

    In an era of test-based accountability, there has been a renewed interest in understanding the relationship between test anxiety and test performance. The development and validation of test anxiety scales have grown with the rise of test anxiety research. Research is needed to critically examine the psychometric properties of these scales prior to…

  7. Cognitive-behavioral group treatment for perinatal anxiety: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Sheryl M; Haber, Erika; Frey, Benicio N; McCabe, Randi E

    2015-08-01

    Along with physical and biological changes, a tremendous amount of upheaval and adjustment accompany the pregnancy and postpartum period of a woman's life that together can often result in what is commonly known as postpartum depression. However, anxiety disorders have been found to be more frequent than depression during pregnancy and at least as common, if not more so, during the postpartum period, e.g., Brockington et al., (Archieves Women's Ment Health 9:253-263, 2006; Wenzel et al. (J Anxiety Disord, 19:295-311, 2005). Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a well-established psychological treatment of choice for anxiety; however, few studies have specifically examined a cognitive-behavioral intervention targeting perinatal anxiety. This pilot study examined the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral group treatment (CBGT) program specifically tailored to address perinatal anxiety in 10 women who were either pregnant or within 12 months postpartum. Participants were recruited from a women's clinic at an academic hospital setting, with anxiety identified as their principal focus of distress. Following a diagnostic interview confirming a primary anxiety disorder and completion of assessment measures, participants completed a 6-week CBGT program. There was a statistically significant reduction in anxiety and depressive symptoms following the CBGT program (all p treatment for addressing their perinatal anxiety. These findings suggest that CBGT for perinatal anxiety is a promising treatment for both anxiety and depressive symptoms experienced during the perinatal period. Further studies are needed to evaluate the treatment efficacy through larger controlled trials.

  8. Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Rachel G.

    2009-01-01

    Because of their high prevalence and their negative long-term consequences, child anxiety disorders have become an important focus of interest. Whether pathological anxiety and normal fear are similar processes continues to be controversial. Comparative studies of child anxiety disorders are scarce, but there is some support for the current…

  9. Investigating the Relationship among Test Anxiety, Gender, Academic Achievement and Years of Study: A Case of Iranian EFL University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezazadeh, Mohsen; Tavakoli, Mansoor

    2009-01-01

    The construct of anxiety plays a major role in one's life. One of these anxieties is test anxiety or apprehension over academic evaluation. The present study was designed to investigate the relationship between gender, academic achievement, years of study and levels of test anxiety. This investigation is a descriptive analytic study and was done…

  10. Multitasking information behavior, information task switching and anxiety: An exploratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexopoulou, Peggy; Kotsopoulou, Anastasia

    2015-02-01

    Multitasking information behavior involves multiple forms of information searching such as library and Web search. Few researchers, however, have explored multitasking information behavior and information task switching in libraries in conjunction with psychological variables. This study explored this behavior in terms of anxiety under time pressure. This was an exploratory case study. Participant searched information for three unrelated everyday life information topics during a library visit, in a timeframe of one hour. The data collection tools used were: diary, observation, interview, and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory test. Participant took the Trait-anxiety test before the library visit to measure anxiety level as a personal characteristic. She also took State-anxiety test before, during and after the library visit to measure anxiety levels regarding the information seeking behavior. The results suggested that participant had high levels of anxiety at the beginning of the multitasking information behavior. The reason for that was the concern about the performance as well as the identification of the right resources. During the multitasking information behavior, participant still had anxiety to find the right information. The levels of anxiety, however, were less due to library's good organized structure. At the end of the information seeking process, the levels of anxiety dropped significant and therefore calm and safety returned. Finally, participant searched information for topics that were more important and for which she had prior knowledge When people, under time pressure, have access to well organized information, the levels of anxiety might decrease.

  11. Multitasking information behavior, information task switching and anxiety: An exploratory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexopoulou, Peggy, E-mail: p.alexopoulou@lboro.ac.uk, E-mail: an-kotsopoulou@yahoo.com; Kotsopoulou, Anastasia, E-mail: p.alexopoulou@lboro.ac.uk, E-mail: an-kotsopoulou@yahoo.com [City Unity College, Thiseos 15-17, Athens, 105 62 (Greece)

    2015-02-09

    Multitasking information behavior involves multiple forms of information searching such as library and Web search. Few researchers, however, have explored multitasking information behavior and information task switching in libraries in conjunction with psychological variables. This study explored this behavior in terms of anxiety under time pressure. This was an exploratory case study. Participant searched information for three unrelated everyday life information topics during a library visit, in a timeframe of one hour. The data collection tools used were: diary, observation, interview, and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory test. Participant took the Trait-anxiety test before the library visit to measure anxiety level as a personal characteristic. She also took State-anxiety test before, during and after the library visit to measure anxiety levels regarding the information seeking behavior. The results suggested that participant had high levels of anxiety at the beginning of the multitasking information behavior. The reason for that was the concern about the performance as well as the identification of the right resources. During the multitasking information behavior, participant still had anxiety to find the right information. The levels of anxiety, however, were less due to library’s good organized structure. At the end of the information seeking process, the levels of anxiety dropped significant and therefore calm and safety returned. Finally, participant searched information for topics that were more important and for which she had prior knowledge When people, under time pressure, have access to well organized information, the levels of anxiety might decrease.

  12. Validity study of the Beck Anxiety Inventory (Portuguese version by the Rasch Rating Scale model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia Quintão

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to conduct a validation study of the Portuguese version of the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI by means of the Rasch Rating Scale Model, and then compare it with the most used scales of anxiety in Portugal. The sample consisted of 1,160 adults (427 men and 733 women, aged 18-82 years old (M=33.39; SD=11.85. Instruments were Beck Anxiety Inventory, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale. It was found that Beck Anxiety Inventory's system of four categories, the data-model fit, and people reliability were adequate. The measure can be considered as unidimensional. Gender and age-related differences were not a threat to the validity. BAI correlated significantly with other anxiety measures. In conclusion, BAI shows good psychometric quality.

  13. Showing or Telling a Story: A Comparative Study of Public Education Texts in Multimodality and Monomodality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kelu

    2013-01-01

    Multimodal texts that combine words and images produce meaning in a different way from monomodal texts that rely on words. They differ not only in representing the subject matter, but also constructing relationships between text producers and text receivers. This article uses two multimodal texts and one monomodal written text as samples, which…

  14. Relationship between preschool children and the caregiver's preoperative anxiety. A cross study assessing modified Yale preoperative anxiety Scale (m-YPAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliana Gomes de Mello

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety is a common event in children before surgery. Several ways have been proposed to assess the level of anxiety in pediatric patients. The modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale (m-Ypas was developed recently and allows the assessment of anxiety level from the observation of children's attitudes. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of variables such as anxiety of caregivers (parents or relatives, preoperative fasting and previous surgical experiences on children's anxiety assessing m-YPAS. METHODS: We evaluated 39 preschool children submitted to elective surgery at a tertiary hospital in Sorocaba-Brazil. After preanesthetic evaluation, performed immediately after admission, children were referred to the pediatric ward where they were observed by the evaluator who applied the scale m-Ypas. Scores above 30 points were considered as anxiety. The level of caregivers's anxiety was evaluated assessing a linear visual scale of 0 to 10 points. Values a bove 3 were considered positive for anxiety. All children were premedicated with oral midazolam. Fasting time and the presence, or absence, of prior surgery were recorded. RESULTS: Thirty nine children were evaluated. The anxiety was observed in 36% of children and in 92% of caregivers. Children's anxiety was not related to caregiver's anxiety (p = 0.70. Fasting time (p = 0.28 or the presence, or absence, of previous surgery (p = 0:09 were not related to children's anxiety as well. CONCLUSION: The caregiver's anxiety, preoperative fasting time and previous surgery were not considered predictive factors for higher or lower level of preoperative anxiety in children.

  15. Video "Reading" and Multimodality: A Study of ESL/Literacy Pupils' Interpretation of "Cinderella" from Their Socio-Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Lasisi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how Hispanic ESL/literacy learners used their socio-historical experiences and multimodal resources to mediate interpretation and representation of "Cinderella". Eighteen third-grade pupils "read" the video and re-created their understandings in pictures and sentences. The findings suggest that (a)…

  16. Postoperative recovery profile after elective abdominal hysterectomy: a prospective, observational study of a multimodal anaesthetic regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth; Kehlet, Henrik; Lund, Claus M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the applicability, effectiveness, immediate postoperative complaints and requirements for a postanaesthesia care unit stay after elective abdominal hysterectomy under a well defined, multimodal anaesthetic regime. METHODS: Observational study of 145 consecutive...... patients scheduled for the procedure at a major university hospital in Denmark. Perioperative treatments and postoperative complaints were recorded continuously until discharge from the postanaesthesia care unit. Main outcome measures were treatment regimen adherence, pain, nausea and vomiting, respiratory...... epidural analgesia (bupivacaine, morphine) was feasible in more than 90% of all patients. In the postanaesthesia care unit, 64% did not require opioids, but 25% experienced severe pain. Mean length of stay was 2 h with a mean discharge readiness of 80 min. Half the patients required supplemental oxygen...

  17. Multimorbidity is Associated with Anxiety in Older Adults in the Health and Retirement Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Christine E.; O'Hara, Ruth; Goldstein, Mary K.; Beaudreau, Sherry A.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The present study determined whether the number of medical conditions was associated with increased occurrence of anxiety and whether triads of medical conditions were associated with anxiety in a nationally representative sample of older Americans. We determined whether multimorbidity findings were unique to anxiety as compared with depressive symptoms. Methods 4,219 participants (65 or older) completed anxiety and depression measures in the Health and Retirement Study 2006 wave. The logistic regression models’ outcome was elevated anxiety (≥12 on 5-item Beck Anxiety Inventory) or depressive symptoms (≥ on 8-item Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale). The predictor variable was a tally of 7 self-report of doctor-diagnosed conditions: arthritis, cancer, diabetes, heart conditions, high blood pressure, lung disease, and stroke. Analyses were adjusted for age, gender, and depressive or anxiety symptoms. Associations among elevated anxiety or depressive symptoms and 35 triads of medical conditions were examined using Bonferroni corrected chi-square analyses. Results Three or more medical conditions conferred a 2.30-fold increase in elevated anxiety (95% CI: 1.44-4.01). Twenty triads were associated with elevated anxiety as compared with 13 associated with depressive symptoms. Six of 7 medical conditions, with the exception being stroke, were present in the majority of triads. Conclusion Number of medical conditions and specific conditions are associated with increased occurrence of elevated anxiety. Compared with elevated depressive symptoms, anxiety is associated with greater multimorbidity. Since anxiety and depression cause significant morbidity, it may be beneficial to consider these mental health symptoms when evaluating older adults with multimorbidity. PMID:27441851

  18. Evaluation of anxiety, depression and suicidal intent in undergraduate dental students: A cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Manish Bathla; Manpreet Singh; Paramanand Kulhara; Shalu Chandna; Jitender Aneja

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is an increasing amount of stress in undergraduate dental students leading to anxiety, depression, and suicidal attempts/suicide. Aims: This study aims to evaluate anxiety, depression and suicidal intent in undergraduate dental students and to find out the various areas of stress. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using a semi-structured questionnaire (to assess academic and nonacademic areas of stress) and three scales-Hamilton scale for anxiety (...

  19. A STUDY ON PREVALENCE OF ANXIETY DISORDERS AMONG HIGHER SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders are very common in secondary school children with little epidemiological data from countries like India. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of anxiety disorders in higher secondary school students using Screen for Ch ild Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED questionnaire. Methodology: The study was conducted in July 2014 and 100 students belonging to class 11 and class 12 of a higher secondary school at Tiptur were included in the study. The SCARED questionnair es were used to assess anxiety in these children. Results: In this study, 37% were found to have anxiety disorder (p value < 0.001. Of these majority (58% were females which was significant. Of the 100 children, 64% had PN (panic disorder, 10% had GD (g eneralized anxiety disorder, 53% had SP (separation anxiety, 15% had SC (social anxiety disorder and 16% had SH (significant school avoidance. Hence in this study, panic disorder and separation anxiety were found to be highly prevalent. In this study o f the children who had anxiety, majority of these children’s mothers (79% and majority of the children’s fathers were illiterate (54%. In this study, of the children with anxiety, 76% belonged to nuclear family and majority i.e. 84% belonged to rural are a. Conclusion: This study shows the high prevalence of undiagnosed depression and anxiety disorders among adolescents and hence the need for them. Early interventions can provide long - term health and socioeconomic benefits by prevention of the onset of men tal health problems and their development into chronic disorders.

  20. Risk indicators of anxiety throughout adolescence : The trails study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oort, F. V. A.; Greaves-Lord, K.; Ormel, J.; Verhulst, F. C.; Huizink, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim was to identify risk indicators from preadolescence (age period 10-12) that significantly predict unfavorable deviations from normal anxiety development throughout adolescence (age period 10-17 years). Methods: Anxiety symptoms were assessed in a community sample of 2,220 boys an

  1. Risk indicators of anxiety throughout adolescence: the TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oort, F.V.A.; Greaves-Lord, K.; Ormel, J.; Verhulst, F.C.; Huizink, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim was to identify risk indicators from preadolescence (age period 10-12) that significantly predict unfavorable deviations from normal anxiety development throughout adolescence (age period 10-17 years). Methods: Anxiety symptoms were assessed in a community sample of 2,220 boys an

  2. Science Anxiety, Science Attitudes, and Constructivism: A Binational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Fred B.; Kastrup, Helge; Udo, Maria; Hislop, Nelda; Shefner, Rachel; Mallow, Jeffry

    2013-01-01

    Students' attitudes and anxieties about science were measured by responses to two self-report questionnaires. The cohorts were Danish and American students at the upper secondary- and university-levels. Relationships between and among science attitudes, science anxiety, gender, and nationality were examined. Particular attention was paid to…

  3. Multimodal Analysis on Teacher Talk—A Case Study of an Excellent Grammar Lesson

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽君

    2016-01-01

    With the development of multi-media and computer technology, discourses are transforming into multi-semiotic, which is a more complex pattern, containing pictures, flash, font colour, tables, layout etc. Based on the multimodal analysis of an excellent lesson on English grammar, this paper explores how to realize meaning construction and interaction in class multimodally, how to make classroom discourse enlightening, vivid and coherent, and thus realize the experiential, interpersonal and textual function of classroom discourse.

  4. Face processing biases in social anxiety: an electrophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Jason S; Huppert, Jonathan D; Duval, Elizabeth; Simons, Robert F

    2008-04-01

    Studies of information processing biases in social anxiety suggest abnormal processing of negative and positive social stimuli. To further investigate these biases, behavioral performance and event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were measured, while high- and low-socially anxious individuals performed a modified version of the Erikson flanker task comprised of negative and positive facial expressions. While no group differences emerged on behavioral measures, ERP results revealed the presence of a negative face bias in socially anxious subjects as indexed by the parietally maximal attention- and memory-related P3/late positive potential. Additionally, non-anxious subjects evidenced the presence of a positive face bias as reflected in the centrally maximal early attention- and emotion-modulated P2 and the frontally maximal response monitoring-related correct response negativity. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of different processing stages to different biases in high- versus low-socially anxious individuals that may prove important in advancing models of anxious pathology.

  5. CALM Pregnancy: results of a pilot study of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for perinatal anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Janice H; Guarino, Anthony; Chenausky, Kerry; Klein, Lauri; Prager, Joanna; Petersen, Rebecca; Forget, Avery; Freeman, Marlene

    2014-10-01

    Many women experience anxiety during pregnancy with potential negative effects on maternal, birth, and child outcomes. Because of potential risks of fetal exposure to psychotropic medications, efficacious non-pharmacologic approaches are urgently needed. However, no published studies of psychotherapeutic treatments for anxiety in pregnancy exist. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) may substantially reduce anxiety and co-morbid symptoms in people with anxiety disorders. Coping with Anxiety through Living Mindfully (CALM) Pregnancy is an adaptation of MBCT designed to address anxiety in pregnant women. This study examined the feasibility, acceptability, and clinical outcomes of the CALM Pregnancy intervention in pregnant women anxiety. Twenty-four pregnant women with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) or prominent symptoms of generalized anxiety participated in an open treatment trial of the CALM Pregnancy group intervention. Psychiatric diagnoses were determined by structured clinical interview, and self-report measures of anxiety, worry, depression, self-compassion, and mindfulness were completed at baseline and post-intervention. Qualitative feedback was elicited via questionnaire. Twenty-three participants completed the intervention with high attendance and good compliance with home practice. Completers showed statistically and clinically significant improvements in anxiety, worry, and depression, and significant increases in self-compassion and mindfulness. Of the 17 participants who met GAD criteria at baseline, only one continued to meet criteria post-intervention. Participants regarded their experience in the intervention to be overwhelmingly positive. MBCT in the form of the CALM Pregnancy intervention holds potential to provide effective, non-pharmacological treatment for pregnant women with anxiety. These promising findings warrant further testing of the intervention with a randomized controlled trial.

  6. Anxiety in Children and Adolescents with Chronic Kidney Disease - Multicenter National Study Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Kiliś-Pstrusińska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Chronic medical illness is a significant risk factor for the development of psychiatric disorders. The aims of the study were: to investigate the level of anxiety in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD and to identify factors associated with the presence of that emotional problem. Methods: CKD children on hemodialysis (HD, n=22, peritoneal dialysis (PD, n=20, and on conservative treatment (CT, n=95 were enrolled in the study. We used State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI for adolescents and STAI-C for children. Socio-demographic and physical factors were assessed. Results: There was a significantly higher level of anxiety-state among HD children (8-12 years compared with other groups of participants of the same age and Polish population norms. The level of anxiety among adolescents (13-18 years, both anxiety-state and anxiety-trait, was significantly higher in the HD group compared with other groups, which did not differ among themselves. In the HD adolescents, there was a correlation between the anxiety-state and the duration of the disease as well as with the number of hospitalizations. PD adolescents in the mainstream education had higher levels of anxiety-state and anxiety-trait compared with home schooled patients. Conclusions: Even though children and adolescents with CKD are at risk of developing a variety of emotional disorders, the level of anxiety among the researched group, with the exception of HD patients, was not significantly different than the level of anxiety among healthy subjects. Adolescents on HD who present a high level of anxiety should undergo long-term psychological treatment.

  7. The Dresden Predictor Study of anxiety and depression: objectives, design, and methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trumpf, J.; Vriends, N.; Meyer, A.H.; Becker, E.S.; Neumer, S.P.; Margraf, J.

    2010-01-01

    The present report describes the objectives, design, and methods of the Dresden Predictor Study (DPS) of anxiety and depression, a prospective epidemiological study investigating anxiety disorders and depression in 3,065 young German women (18-25 years of age). The DPS consists of a baseline and one

  8. A Comparative Study of Writing Anxiety among Iranian University Students Majoring English Translation, Teaching and Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olanezhad, Mahdie

    2015-01-01

    This study is designed to examine writing anxiety in three groups of EFL students who use English writing in their academic programs. The main purpose of this study is to determine the level and sources of anxiety that students experience while writing in English as a foreign language. To this end, 150 university students from Iranian EFL students…

  9. The Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA): rationale, objectives and methods.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Smit, J.H.; Zitman, F.G.; Nolen, W.A.; Spinhoven, P.; Cuijpers, P.; Jong, P.J. de; Marwijk, H.W.J. van; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Meer, K. van der; Verhaak, P.; Wensing, M.; Graaf, R. de; Hoogendijk, W.J.; Ormel, J.; Dyck, R. van

    2008-01-01

    The Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) is a multi-site naturalistic cohort study to: (1) describe the long-term course and consequences of depressive and anxiety disorders, and (2) to integrate biological and psychosocial research paradigms within an epidemiological approach in orde

  10. The Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) : rationale, objectives and methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Smit, J.H.; Zitman, F.G.; Nolen, W.A.; Spinhoven, P.; Cuijpers, P.; de Jong, P.J.; Van Marwijk, H.W.J.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; van der Meer, K.; Verhaak, P.; Wensing, M.; de Graaf, R.; Hoogendijk, W.J.; Ormel, J.; Van Dyck, R.

    2008-01-01

    The Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) is a multi-site naturalistic cohort study to: (1) describe the long-term course and consequences of depressive and anxiety disorders, and (2) to integrate biological and psychosocial research paradigms within an epidemiological approach in orde

  11. Treatment of Depression and Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease: A Pilot Study Using Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, Farah; Egan, Sarah; Gasson, Natalie

    2005-01-01

    Depression and anxiety affect up to 50% of people with Parkinson's Disease (PD) (Marsh, 2000; Murray, 1996), however, few studies have examined the effectiveness of psychological treatment. This study examined the effectiveness of group cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) in treating depression and anxiety in PD. Four participants, aged between 56…

  12. Test Anxiety and Academic Performance: The Effects of Study-Related Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culler, Ralph E.; Holahan, Charles J.

    1980-01-01

    Students scoring high on the Test Anxiety Scale had lower grades and poorer study habits than their low-scoring counterparts. Amount and quality of study by high anxiety students were positively related to grades; missing classes and delaying exams were inversely related. (Author/CP)

  13. Headache and anxiety-depressive disorder comorbidity: the HADAS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beghi, E; Allais, G; Cortelli, P; D'Amico, D; De Simone, R; d'Onofrio, F; Genco, S; Manzoni, G C; Moschiano, F; Tonini, M C; Torelli, P; Quartaroli, M; Roncolato, M; Salvi, S; Bussone, G

    2007-05-01

    Psychiatric comorbidity (prevalence and types) was tested in a naturalistic sample of adult patients with pure migraine without aura, and in two control groups of patients, one experiencing pure tension-type headache and the other combined migraine and tension-type headaches. The study population included 374 patients (158, 110 and 106) from nine Italian secondary and tertiary centres. Psychiatric comorbidity was recorded through structured interview and also screened with the Mini International Neuropsychiatry Interview (MINI). Only anxiety and depression were investigated. Psychiatric disorders were reported by 49 patients (14.6%; 10.9% of patients with migraine, 12.8% of those with tension-type headache and 21.4% of those with combined migraine and tension-type headaches). The MINI interview detected a depressive episode in 59.9% of patients with migraine, 68.3% of patients with tension-type headache and 69.6% of patients with combined migraine and tension-type headaches. Depression subtypes were significantly different across groups (p=0.03). Anxiety (mostly generalised) was reported by 18.4% of patients with migraine, 19.3% of patients with tension-type headache, and 18.4% of patients with combined migraine and tension-type headaches. The values for panic disturbance were 12.7, 5.5 and 14.2, and those for obsessive-compulsive disorders were 2.3, 1.1 and 9.4% (p=0.009). Based on these results, psychopathology of primary headache can be a reflection of the burden of the disease rather than a hallmark of a specific headache category.

  14. Does the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale (RCADS) measure anxiety symptoms consistently across adolescence? The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathyssek, Christina M.; Olino, Thomas M.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Ormel, Johan; Verhulst, Frank C.; Van Oort, Floor V. A.

    2013-01-01

    We assessed if the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale (RCADS) measures anxiety symptoms similarly across age groups within adolescence. This is crucial for valid comparison of anxiety levels between different age groups. Anxiety symptoms were assessed biennially in a representative populatio

  15. Does the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale (RCADS) measure anxiety symptoms consistently across adolescence? The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Mathyssek (Christina); T.M. Olino (Thomas); C.A. Hartman; J. Ormel (Johan Hans); F.C. Verhulst (Frank); F.V.A. van Oort (Floor)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWe assessed if the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale (RCADS) measures anxiety symptoms similarly across age groups within adolescence. This is crucial for valid comparison of anxiety levels between different age groups. Anxiety symptoms were assessed biennially in a representati

  16. Breastfeeding cessation and symptoms of anxiety and depression: a longitudinal cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ystrom Eivind

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neonatal anxiety and depression and breastfeeding cessation are significant public health problems. There is an association between maternal symptoms of anxiety and depression and early breastfeeding cessation. In earlier studies, the causality of this association was interpreted both ways; symptoms of anxiety and depression prepartum significantly impacts breastfeeding, and breastfeeding cessation significantly impacts symptoms of anxiety and depression. First, we aimed to investigate whether breastfeeding cessation is related to an increase in symptoms of anxiety and depression from pregnancy to six months postpartum. Second, we also investigated whether the proposed symptom increase after breastfeeding cessation was disproportionately high for those women already suffering from high levels of anxiety and depression during pregnancy. Methods To answer these objectives, we examined data from 42 225 women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa. Subjects were recruited in relation to a routine ultra-sound examination, and all pregnant women in Norway were eligible. We used data from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway and questionnaires both pre and post partum. Symptoms of anxiety and depression at six months postpartum were predicted in a linear regression analysis by WHO-categories of breastfeeding, symptoms of anxiety and depression prepartum (standardized score, and interaction terms between breastfeeding categories and prepartum symptoms of anxiety and depression. The results were adjusted for cesarean sections, primiparity, plural births, preterm births, and maternal smoking. Results First, prepartum levels of anxiety and depression were related to breastfeeding cessation (β 0.24; 95% CI 0.21-0.28, and breastfeeding cessation was predictive of an increase in postpartum anxiety and depression ( β 0.11; 95%CI 0.09-0.14. Second, prepartum anxiety and depression interacted with the relation between

  17. Comorbid anxiety disorders in late-life depression : results of a cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, D.C.; van Zelst, W. H.; Schoevers, R. A.; Comijs, H. C.; Oude Voshaar, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Background: Comorbid anxiety disorders are common in late-life depression and negatively impact treatment outcome. This study aimed to examine personality characteristics as well as early and recent life-events as possible determinants of comorbid anxiety disorders in late-life depression, taking pr

  18. Parental Cultural Orientation, Shyness, and Anxiety in Hispanic Children: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudino, Omar G.; Lau, Anna S.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined associations between parental cultural orientation, childhood shyness, and anxiety symptoms in a sample of Hispanic American children (N = 127). Parents completed measures of their level of acculturation, collectivism, and socialization goals, while children provided self-reports of anxiety symptoms and both parents and…

  19. Foreign Language Anxiety of Students Studying English Language and Literature: A Sample from Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elaldi, Senel

    2016-01-01

    A considerable number of foreign language learners experience a feeling of anxiety in language learning process. The purpose of this research was to find out foreign language anxiety levels of students studying in the Faculty of English Language and Literature at Cumhuriyet University, Sivas, Turkey when they were in preparatory class and when…

  20. Cognitive Load Theory: An Empirical Study of Anxiety and Task Performance in Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, I-Jung; Chang, Chi-Cheng

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: This study explores the relationship among three variables--cognitive load, foreign language anxiety, and task performance. Cognitive load refers to the load imposed on working memory while performing a particular task. The authors hypothesized that anxiety consumes the resources of working memory, leaving less capacity for cognitive…

  1. Study of Anxiety in Parents and Children with Attention Deficit with Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Jose Juan Castro; Bermúdez, M. Olga Escandell; Sevilla, M. del Sol Fortea; Hernán-Pérez, Alejandra Sanjuán

    2015-01-01

    The identification of factors that influence attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) will help to develop intervention strategies for the personal and social adjustment of these individuals. The goal of the study is to assess the perception of anxiety in a group of children and adolescents with ADHD and the anxiety that their parents…

  2. Gender, Anxiety, and Depressive Symptoms: A Longitudinal Study of Early Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, Tara M.; Gillham, Jane E.; Seligman, Martin E. P.

    2009-01-01

    Does anxiety lead to depression more for girls than for boys? This study prospectively examines gender differences in the relationship between anxiety and depressive symptoms in early adolescence. One hundred thirteen 11- to 14-year-old middle school students complete questionnaires assessing depressive symptoms and three dimensions of anxiety…

  3. Multimodal stilistik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Nina

    2012-01-01

    socialsemiotiske multimodalitetsteori. Formålet med en sådan multimodal stilistik er således at udvikle et konsistent systematisk analyseapparat, der kan fange og beskrive den multimodale semiosis, der realiseres i romanen såvel som i andre typer tekst. Med nedslag i et udvalg af skandinaviske og oversatte...

  4. Overlap between Headache, Depression, and Anxiety in General Neurological Clinics: A Cross-sectional Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui-Bai Wei; Jian-Ping Jia; Fen Wang; Ai-Hong Zhou; Xiu-Mei Zuo; Chang-Biao Chu

    2016-01-01

    Background:Many studies have reported that depression and anxiety have bidirectional relationship with headache.However,few researches investigated the roles of depression or anxiety in patients with headache.We surveyed the prevalence of depression and anxiety as a complication or cause of headache among outpatients with a chief complaint of headache at neurology clinics in general hospitals.Additional risk factors for depression and anxiety were also analyzed.Methods:A cross-sectional study was conducted at 11 general neurological clinics.All consecutive patients with a chief complaint of headache were enrolled.Diagnoses of depression and anxiety were made using the Chinese version of the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview,and those for headache were made according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders,2nd Edition.The headache impact test and an 11-point verbal rating scale were applied to assess headache severity and intensity.Logistic regression was used to analyze risk factors of patients with headache for depression or anxiety.Results:A total of 749 outpatients with headache were included.Among them,148 (19.7%) were diagnosed with depression and 103 (13.7%) with anxiety.Further analysis showed that 114 (15.2%) patients complaining headache due to somatic symptoms of psychiatric disorders and 82 (10.9%) had a depression or anxiety comorbidity with headache.Most patients with depression or anxiety manifested mild to moderate headaches.Poor sleep and severe headache-related disabilities were predictors for either depression or anxiety.Conclusion:Clinicians must identify the etiology of headache and recognize the effects of depression or anxiety on headache to develop specific treatments.

  5. Maternal phobic anxiety and child anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Gail A; Layne, Ann E; Egan, Elizabeth A; Nelson, Lara P

    2005-01-01

    The present study examined the relation between maternal anxiety symptoms and child anxiety symptoms and evaluated whether a reporting bias is associated with maternal anxiety. Fifty-seven mother-child pairs participated. All children had features or diagnoses of separation anxiety disorder (SAD), generalized anxiety disorder, and/or social phobia. Measures of maternal symptomatology and child anxiety were administered. Higher levels of maternal phobic anxiety on the Brief Symptom Inventory were significantly associated with higher levels of separation anxiety in children. After controlling for clinician rating of SAD severity, maternal phobic anxiety emerged as a significant predictor of maternal ratings of child separation anxiety, accounting for 19% of the variance. Phobic mothers endorsed levels of separation anxiety in their children that exceeded levels endorsed by clinicians, suggesting maternal overreporting.

  6. No evidence for mirror system dysfunction in schizophrenia from a multimodal TMS/EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Sophie C; Enticott, Peter G; Hoy, Kate E; Thomson, Richard H; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2015-08-30

    Dysfunctional mirror neuron systems have been proposed to contribute to the social cognitive deficits observed in schizophrenia. A few studies have explored mirror systems in schizophrenia using various techniques such as TMS (levels of motor resonance) or EEG (levels of mu suppression), with mixed results. This study aimed to use a novel multimodal approach (i.e. concurrent TMS and EEG) to further investigate mirror systems and social cognition in schizophrenia. Nineteen individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 19 healthy controls participated. Single-pulse TMS was applied to M1 during the observation of hand movements designed to elicit mirror system activity. Single EEG electrodes (C3, CZ, C4) recorded brain activity. Participants also completed facial affect recognition and theory of mind tasks. The schizophrenia group showed significant deficits in facial affect recognition and higher level theory of mind compared to healthy controls. A significant positive relationship was revealed between mu suppression and motor resonance for the overall sample, indicating concurrent validity of these measures. Levels of mu suppression and motor resonance were not significantly different between groups. These findings indicate that in stable outpatients with schizophrenia, mirror system functioning is intact, and therefore their social cognitive difficulties may be caused by alternative pathophysiology.

  7. Multimodal sequence learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemény, Ferenc; Meier, Beat

    2016-02-01

    While sequence learning research models complex phenomena, previous studies have mostly focused on unimodal sequences. The goal of the current experiment is to put implicit sequence learning into a multimodal context: to test whether it can operate across different modalities. We used the Task Sequence Learning paradigm to test whether sequence learning varies across modalities, and whether participants are able to learn multimodal sequences. Our results show that implicit sequence learning is very similar regardless of the source modality. However, the presence of correlated task and response sequences was required for learning to take place. The experiment provides new evidence for implicit sequence learning of abstract conceptual representations. In general, the results suggest that correlated sequences are necessary for implicit sequence learning to occur. Moreover, they show that elements from different modalities can be automatically integrated into one unitary multimodal sequence.

  8. Assessing Children's Anxiety Using the Modified Short State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Talking Mats: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Nilsson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Preoperative anxiety complicates treatment and requires assessment by nurses in children. Children, with or without disability, are helped when pictures are used to support communication. The purpose of this pilot study was to test the reliability and validity of the modified short State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI using a modified Talking Mats method in children undergoing day surgeries. Method. A modified short STAI with pictorial support along the lines of the Talking Mats method was pre- and postoperatively administered to 42 typically developing children aged three to nine years. The parents assessed the children’s anxiety, simultaneously and independently, by scoring the short STAI by proxy. Results. The modified short STAI showed moderate internal consistency and good construct validity in the age group seven to nine years. Conclusions. The results of this study support the use of the instrument for self-reports in children aged seven to nine years. Future research will explore the possibilities of also using this instrument for children with cognitive and communicative difficulties.

  9. Dysfunctional attitudes and anxiety sensitivity in the manifestation and first onset of social anxiety disorder versus specific phobia and healthy: A prospective longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudaz, M.; Becker, E.S.; Margraf, J.; Ledermann, T.; Meyer, A.H.; Craske, M.G.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the role of two cognitive vulnerability factors, anxiety sensitivity and dysfunctional attitudes, in the prediction of the manifestation and onset of social anxiety disorder relative to specific phobia and relative to healthy controls. Women, aged between 18 and 24 years, were s

  10. Recognition of anxiety disorders by family physicians after rigorous medical record case extraction: results of the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, E.H.C.; Ven, P.M. van de; Terluin, B.; Verhaak, P.F.M.; Marwijk, H.W.J. van; Smolders, M.; Meer, K. van der; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Hout, H.P.J. van

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Previous studies reported low and inconsistent rates of recognition of anxiety disorders by family physicians (FPs). Our objectives were to examine (a) which combination of indications within medical records most accurately reflects recognition of anxiety disorders and (b) whether patient

  11. Recognition of anxiety disorders by family physicians after rigorous medical record case extraction Results of the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Evelien H. C.; van de Ven, Peter M.; Terluin, Berend; Verhaak, Peter F. M.; van Marwijk, Harm W. J.; Smolders, Mirrian; van der Meer, Klaas; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; van Hout, Hein P. J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Previous studies reported low and inconsistent rates of recognition of anxiety disorders by family physicians (FPs). Our objectives were to examine (a) which combination of indications within medical records most accurately reflects recognition of anxiety disorders and (b) whether patient

  12. Irradiation Studies of Multimode Fibres for use in ATLAS Front-end Links

    CERN Document Server

    Mahout, G; Arvidsson, C B; Charlton, D G; Dinkespiler, B; Dowell, John D; Gallin-Martel, L; Homer, RJ; Jovanovic, P; Kenyon, Ian Richard; Kuyt, G; Lundqvist, J M; Mandic, I; Martin, O; Pearce, M; Shaylor, H R; Stroynowski, R; Troska, Jan K; Wastie, R L; Weidberg, AR; Wilson, J A; Ye, J

    1999-01-01

    The radiation tolerance of three multimode optical fibres has been investigatedto establish their suitability for use in the front-end data links of the ATLAS experiment. Both gamma and neutron irradiation studies are reported. A step-index fibre with a pure silica core showed an induced attenuation of $\\sim$0.05~dB/mat 330~kGy(Si) and 1$\\times$10$^{15}$~n(1~MeV~Si)/cm$^{2}$ and is suitablefor use with the inner detector links which operate at 40-80~Mb/s. A graded-indexfibre with a predominantly germanium doped core exhibits an induced attenuation of $\\sim$0.1~dB/mat 800~Gy(Si) and 2$\\times$10$^{13}$~n(1~MeV~Si)/cm$^{2}$ and is suitable for the calorimeterlinks which operate at 1.6~Gb/s. Measurements of the dose rate dependence of the induced attenuation indicate that the attenuation in ATLAS will be lower.

  13. Study on self-imaging properties for line-tapered multimode interference couplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, ZiChun; Huang, SunGang; Fu, MingLei; Dong, Wen; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Ming

    2011-10-01

    The line-tapered multimode interference (MMI) couplers have advantage of compact dimension compared with conventional straight MMI couplers and then are more suitable for integrated optical components. In this paper, the self-imaging properties including general self-image and overlapping-image properties for the line-tapered MMI couplers are discussed thoroughly. Based on the width equation we defined, compact equations for the positions, amplitudes, phases of general images and overlapping images are deduced. Three disciplines for general self-imaging and four disciplines for overlapping-imaging are summarized and discussed. In addition, the overlapping-image properties are further studied by matrix analytic method and an inductive reasoning method of constructing phase and intensity matrix is developed based on it. Finally, all the theoretical results are compared with simulations results obtained by the finite-difference beam propagation method (FD-BPM). Both theoretical and simulation results are shown in this paper and demonstrated to be coincided with each other to a great extent.

  14. Irradiation studies of multimode optical fibres for use in ATLAS front-end links

    CERN Document Server

    Mahout, G; Andrieux, M L; Arvidsson, C B; Charlton, D G; Dinkespiler, B; Dowell, John D; Gallin-Martel, L; Homer, R James; Jovanovic, P; Kenyon, Ian Richard; Kuyt, G; Lundqvist, J M; Mandic, I; Martin, O; Shaylor, H R; Stroynowski, R; Troska, Jan K; Wastie, R L; Weidberg, A R; Wilson, J A; Ye, J

    2000-01-01

    The radiation tolerance of three multimode optical fibres has been investigated to establish their suitability for the use in the front- end data links of the ATLAS experiment. Both gamma and neutron irradiation studies are reported. A step-index fibre with a pure silica core showed an induced attenuation of ~0.05 dB/m at 330 kGy (Si) and 1*10/sup 15/ n(1 MeV Si)/cm/sup 2/ and is suitable for use with the inner detector links which operate at 40-80 Mb/s. A graded- index fibre with a predominantly germanium-doped core exhibits an induced attenuation of ~0.1 dB/m at 800 Gy(Si) and 2*10/sup 13/ n(1 MeV Si)/cm/sup 2/ and is suitable for the calorimeter links which operate at 1.6 Gb/s. Measurements of the dose rate dependence of the induced attenuation indicate that the attenuation in ATLAS will be lower. (30 refs).

  15. Mapping the connectivity underlying multimodal (verbal and non-verbal) semantic processing: a brain electrostimulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz-Gasser, Sylvie; Herbet, Guillaume; Duffau, Hugues

    2013-08-01

    Accessing the meaning of words, objects, people and facts is a human ability, made possible thanks to semantic processing. Although studies concerning its cortical organization are proficient, the subcortical connectivity underlying this semantic network received less attention. We used intraoperative direct electrostimulation, which mimics a transient virtual lesion during brain surgery for glioma in eight awaken patients, to map the anatomical white matter substrate subserving the semantic system. Patients performed a picture naming task and a non-verbal semantic association test during the electrical mapping. Direct electrostimulation of the inferior fronto-occipital fascicle, a poorly known ventral association pathway which runs throughout the brain, induced in all cases semantic disturbances. These transient disorders were highly reproducible, and concerned verbal as well as non-verbal output. Our results highlight for the first time the essential role of the left inferior fronto-occipital fascicle in multimodal (and not only in verbal) semantic processing. On the basis of these original findings, and in the lights of phylogenetic considerations regarding this fascicle, we suggest its possible implication in the monitoring of the human level of consciousness related to semantic memory, namely noetic consciousness.

  16. Integrating multimodal transport into cellulosic biofuel supply chain design under feedstock seasonality with a case study based on California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fei; Huang, Yongxi; Eksioglu, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    A multistage, mixed integer programing model was developed that fully integrates multimodal transport into the cellulosic biofuel supply chain design under feedstock seasonality. Three transport modes are considered: truck, single railcar, and unit train. The goal is to minimize the total cost for infrastructure, feedstock harvesting, biofuel production, and transportation. Strategic decisions including the locations and capacities of transshipment hubs, biorefineries, and terminals and tactical decisions on system operations are optimized in an integrated manner. When the model was implemented to a case study of cellulosic ethanol production in California, it was found that trucks are convenient for short-haul deliveries while rails are more effective for long-haul transportation. Taking the advantage of these benefits, the multimodal transport provides more cost effective solutions than the single-mode transport (truck).

  17. Cigarette smoking, nicotine dependence and anxiety disorders: a systematic review of population-based, epidemiological studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moylan Steven

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple studies have demonstrated that rates of smoking and nicotine dependence are increased in individuals with anxiety disorders. However, significant variability exists in the epidemiological literature exploring this relationship, including study design (cross-sectional versus prospective, the population assessed (random sample versus clinical population and diagnostic instrument utilized. Methods We undertook a systematic review of population-based observational studies that utilized recognized structured clinical diagnostic criteria (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM or International Classification of Diseases (ICD for anxiety disorder diagnosis to investigate the relationship between cigarette smoking, nicotine dependence and anxiety disorders. Results In total, 47 studies met the predefined inclusion criteria, with 12 studies providing prospective information and 5 studies providing quasiprospective information. The available evidence suggests that some baseline anxiety disorders are a risk factor for initiation of smoking and nicotine dependence, although the evidence is heterogeneous and many studies did not control for the effect of comorbid substance use disorders. The identified evidence however appeared to more consistently support cigarette smoking and nicotine dependence as being a risk factor for development of some anxiety disorders (for example, panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, although these findings were not replicated in all studies. A number of inconsistencies in the literature were identified. Conclusions Although many studies have demonstrated increased rates of smoking and nicotine dependence in individuals with anxiety disorders, there is a limited and heterogeneous literature that has prospectively examined this relationship in population studies using validated diagnostic criteria. The most consistent evidence supports smoking and nicotine dependence as

  18. THE IMPACT OF ANXIETY UPON COGNITION: PERSPECTIVES FROM HUMAN THREAT OF SHOCK STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Joe Robinson

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders constitute a sizeable worldwide health burden with profound social and economic consequences. The symptoms are wide-ranging; from hyperarousal to difficulties with concentrating. This latter effect falls under the broad category of altered cognitive performance; in this review we examine studies quantifying such impacts of anxiety on cognition. Specifically, we focus on the translational threat of unpredictable shock paradigm, a method previously used to characterize emotional responses and defensive mechanisms that is now emerging as valuable tool for examining the interaction between anxiety and cognition. In particular, we compare the impact of threat of shock on cognition in humans to that of pathological anxiety disorders. We highlight that both threat of shock and anxiety disorders promote mechanisms associated with harm avoidance across multiple levels of cognition (from perception to attention to learning and executive function – a ‘hot’ cognitive function which can be both adaptive and maladaptive depending upon the circumstances. This mechanism comes at a cost to other functions such as working memory, but leaves some functions, such as planning, unperturbed. We also highlight a number of cognitive effects that differ across anxiety disorders and threat of shock. These discrepant effects are largely seen in ‘cold’ cognitive functions involving control mechanisms and may reveal boundaries between adaptive (e.g. response to threat and maladaptive (e.g. pathological anxiety. We conclude by raising a number of unresolved questions regarding the role of anxiety in cognition that may provide fruitful avenues for future research.

  19. Behavioral Inhibition as a Risk Factor for the Development of Childhood Anxiety Disorders: A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muris, Peter; van Brakel, Anna M L; Arntz, Arnoud; Schouten, Erik

    2011-04-01

    This longitudinal study examined the additive and interactive effects of behavioral inhibition and a wide range of other vulnerability factors in the development of anxiety problems in youths. A sample of 261 children, aged 5 to 8 years, 124 behaviorally inhibited and 137 control children, were followed during a 3-year period. Assessments took place on three occasions to measure children's level of behavioral inhibition, anxiety disorder symptoms, other psychopathological symptoms, and a number of other vulnerability factors such as insecure attachment, negative parenting styles, adverse life events, and parental anxiety. Results obtained with Structural Equation Modeling indicated that behavioral inhibition primarily acted as a specific risk factor for the development of social anxiety symptoms. Furthermore, the longitudinal model showed additive as well as interactive effects for various vulnerability factors on the development of anxiety symptoms. That is, main effects of anxious rearing and parental trait anxiety were found, whereas behavioral inhibition and attachment had an interactive effect on anxiety symptomatology. Moreover, behavioral inhibition itself was also influenced by some of the vulnerability factors. These results provide support for dynamic, multifactorial models for the etiology of child anxiety problems.

  20. The contribution of embarrassment to phobic dental anxiety: a qualitative research study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, R.; Brødsgaard, I.; Rosenberg, N.

    2004-01-01

    , 16 men, 14 women, 20-65 yr, who avoided treatment mean 12.7 yr due to anxiety. Electronic patient records and transcribed initial assessment and exit interviews were analyzed using QSR"N4" software to aid in exploring contexts related to social aspects of dental anxiety and embarrassment phenomena...... characteristics and perceived intensity. Some cases exhibited manifestations similar to psychiatric criteria for social anxiety disorder as chief complaint, while most manifested embarrassment as a side effect.......Embarrassment is emphasized, yet scantily described as a factor in extreme dental anxiety or phobia. Present study aimed to describe details of social aspects of anxiety in dental situations, especially focusing on embarrassment phenomena. Subjects (Ss) were consecutive specialist clinic patients...

  1. Mode couplings and elasto-optic effects study in a proposed mechanical microperturbed multimode optical fiber sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichler, Anthony; Lecler, Sylvain; Serio, Bruno; Fischer, Sylvain; Pfeiffer, Pierre

    2012-11-01

    A step index multimode optical fiber with a perturbation on a micrometer scale, inducing a periodic deformation of the fiber section along its propagation axis, is theoretically investigated. The studied microperturbation is mechanically achieved using two microstructured jaws squeezing the straight fiber. As opposed to optical fiber microbend sensors, the optical axis of the proposed transducer is not bended; only the optical fiber section is deformed. Further, the strain applied on the fiber produces a periodical elliptical modification of the core and a modulation of the index of refraction. As a consequence of the micrometer scale perturbation period, the resulting mode coupling occurs directly between guided and radiated modes. To simulate the transmission induced by these kinds of perturbations, simplified models considering only total mode couplings are often used. In order to investigate the range of validity of this approximation, results are compared to the electromagnetic mode couplings rigorously computed for the first time, to our knowledge, with a large multimode fiber (more than 6000 linear polarized modes) using the Marcuse model. In addition, in order to have a more complete modeling of the proposed transducer, the anisotropic elasto-optic effects in the stressed multimode fiber are considered. In this way, the transmission of the microperturbed optical fiber transmission and, therefore, the behavior of the transducer are physically explained and its applications as a future stretching sensor are discussed.

  2. Dental anxiety in relation to neuroticism and pain sensitivity. A twin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassend, Olav; Røysamb, Espen; Nielsen, Christopher S

    2011-03-01

    Predisposing personality traits as well as heightened pain sensitivity and fear of pain have been hypothesized as central factors in the development of dental anxiety. The aim of the study was to estimate the heritability of dental anxiety, and to investigate the genetic and environmental sources of covariance between dental anxiety on one hand, and pain sensitivity and the neuroticism trait on the other. A sample comprising 188 twins, aged 23-35 years (53 monozygotic and 39 dizygotic twin pairs, and 4 single twins whose co-twin did not participate), was included in the study. Measures of dental anxiety and personality were obtained using Corah's Dental Anxiety Scale and the NEO Personality Inventory Revised, respectively. Heat pain and cold pressor pain sensitivity were assessed using standard pain testing procedures. Bivariate Cholesky models were employed to decompose the correlations between phenotypes into genetic and environmental factors. Using models with common additive genetic (A) and individual-specific environmental (E) factors, moderate heritability (i.e., .41) for dental anxiety was demonstrated. Virtually all of the phenotypic correlation between neuroticism and dental anxiety could be accounted for by A. Furthermore, a substantial part of the variance in dental anxiety was due to specific genetic and individual environmental influences unrelated to neuroticism. The phenotypic correlations between dental anxiety and the pain sensitivity indices were close to zero. Thus, while neuroticism and dental anxiety share a sizeable proportion of genetic (but not environmental) risk factors, the results also suggest that these two attributes are distinct entities with overlapping, but not identical, etiologies.

  3. Using virtual humans to alleviate social anxiety: preliminary report from a comparative outcome study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robillard, Genevève; Bouchard, Stéphane; Dumoulin, Stéphane; Guitard, Tanya; Klinger, Evelyne

    2010-01-01

    Empirical studies have consistently shown the effectiveness of a multicomponent CBT treatment of social anxiety disorder (SAD). Previous outcome studies on virtual reality and SAD have focused on people suffering from fear of public speaking and not full blown SAD. In this study, 45 adults receiving a DSM-IV-TR diagnostic of social anxiety were randomly assigned to traditional CBT treatment (with in vivo exposure), CBT-VR combined treatment, or a waiting list. Results show significant reduction of anxiety on all questionnaires as well as statistically significant interactions between both treatment groups and the waiting list.

  4. Treatment of child anxiety: an exploratory study of the role of maternal anxiety and behaviours in treatment outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, Cathy; Willetts, Lucy; Murray, Lynne; Singhal, Meghna; Cooper, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are common among parents of anxious children and have been found to impede child treatment outcomes, yet it is unclear whether it is parental anxiety that needs to be targeted in therapy or associated parental behaviours. Twenty-two children (6-12 years) with a current anxiety disorder and their mothers received cognitive-behavioural treatment (CBT) for child anxiety. In addition, of the 12 mothers who met criteria for a current anxiety disorder, 6 received CBT for their own disorder. Assessments were made of the mother-child interaction. The main findings were: (1) children did less well from treatment where their mothers had a current anxiety disorder; (2) treatment of maternal anxiety disorder did not improve child treatment outcome; and (3) maternal overinvolvement and expression of fear was associated with child treatment outcome. The results suggest that in the context of maternal anxiety disorder, child treatment outcome may be improved by specifically targeting parenting behaviours.

  5. "Library Anxiety" and "Computer Anxiety": Measures, Validity, and Research Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerabek, J. Ann; Meyer, Linda S.; Kordinak, S. Thomas

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of library anxiety and computer anxiety focuses on a study of undergraduates that investigated the construct validity of the Computer Anxiety Index and the Library Anxiety Scale. Explains the use of the Institute for Personality and Ability Testing (IPAT) Anxiety Scale for the criterion measure of anxiety. (Author/LRW)

  6. A review of studies concerning treatment adherence of patients with anxiety disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santana L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Lívia Santana1, Leonardo F Fontenelle1–31Anxiety and Depression Research Program, Institute of Psychiatry, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 2Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Institute of Community Health, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Brazil; 3D’Or Institute for Research and Education (IDOR, Rio de Janeiro, BrazilObjective: This paper aimed at describing the most consistent correlates and/or predictors of nonadherence to treatment of patients with different anxiety disorders.Method: The authors retrieved studies indexed in PubMed/MedLine, PsycINFO, and ISI Web of Knowledge using the following search terms: attrition OR dropout OR attrition rates OR patient dropouts OR treatment adherence AND anxiety disorders. Research was limited to articles published before January 2010.Results: Sixteen studies were selected that investigated the impact of sociodemographic, clinical, or cognitive variables on adherence to treatment for anxiety disorders. While no consistent pattern of sociodemographic or clinical features associated with nonadherence emerged, all studies that investigated cognitive variables in panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder found that expectations and opinions about treatment were related to adherence.Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest that it is essential to consider anxiety disorder patients’ beliefs about illness and treatment strategies to increase their compliance with the therapeutic plan.Keywords: attrition, dropout, OCD, obsessive-compulsive disorder, social anxiety disorder

  7. Balancing Cohesion and Tension in Multimodal Rhetoric. An Interdisciplinary Approach to the Study of Semiotic Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engebretsen, Martin

    2012-01-01

    What patterns of multimodal rhetoric characterizes the most successful texts meant for learning--inside or outside school? This article argues that the balance between cohesion and tension in the interplay between modes is an issue at the core of this challenging question. Texts meant for learning need both cohesion and tension in order to be both…

  8. Multimodal indexing of digital audio-visual documents: A case study for cultural heritage data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carmichael, J.; Larson, M.; Marlow, J.; Newman, E.; Clough, P.; Oomen, J.; Sav, S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a multimedia multimodal information access sub-system (MIAS) for digital audio-visual documents, typically presented in streaming media format. The system is designed to provide both professional and general users with entry points into video documents that are relevant to their

  9. Study on the New Model of College English Teaching under the Setting of Multimodality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the application of the network resources and various means of teaching such as multimedia into the classroom has led to the demonstration of multimodality in college English teaching. This paper analyzes the current status of college English teaching and the existing problems, elaborates the research trends of the theory of multimodal…

  10. Anxiety disorders and anxiety-related traits and serotonin transporter gene-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) in adolescents: case-control and trio studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoluzzi, Andressa; Blaya, Carolina; Salum, Giovanni A; Cappi, Carolina; Leistner-Segal, Sandra; Manfro, Gisele G

    2014-08-01

    The role of the serotonin transporter gene-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) in anxiety disorder and anxiety-related traits is controversial. Besides this study, few studies have evaluated the triallelic genotype in adolescents. The aim of this study was to investigate whether anxiety disorders and anxiety-related traits are associated with 5-HTTLPR (biallelic and triallelic) in adolescents, integrating both case-control-based and family-based designs in a community sample. This is a cross-sectional community study of 504 individuals and their families: 225 adolescents (129 adolescents with anxiety disorder and 96 controls) and their biological families. We assessed psychiatric diagnosis using the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia. The Temperament and Character Inventory and the Resnick Behavioral Inhibition Scale were used to evaluate harm avoidance and behavioral inhibition. DNA was extracted from saliva and genotyped, including biallelic and triallelic 5-HTTLPR classification, by PCR-RFLP followed by agarose gel electrophoresis. We were not able to find any associations between 5-HTTLPR and anxiety-related phenotypes in both case-control and trio analyses. Further investigation and meta-analytic studies are needed to better clarify the inconsistent results with regard to the association between 5-HTTLPR and anxiety-related phenotypes in adolescents.

  11. Effects of Antenatal Maternal Depression and Anxiety on Children's Early Cognitive Development: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Ibanez

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that depression or anxiety occur in 10-20% of pregnant women. These disorders are often undertreated and may affect mothers and children's health. This study investigates the relation between antenatal maternal depression, anxiety and children's early cognitive development among 1380 two-year-old children and 1227 three-year-old children.In the French EDEN Mother-Child Cohort Study, language ability was assessed with the Communicative Development Inventory at 2 years of age and overall development with the Ages and Stages Questionnaire at 3 years of age. Multiple regressions and structural equation modeling were used to examine links between depression, anxiety during pregnancy and child cognitive development.We found strong significant associations between maternal antenatal anxiety and poorer children's cognitive development at 2 and 3 years. Antenatal maternal depression was not associated with child development, except when antenatal maternal anxiety was also present. Both postnatal maternal depression and parental stimulation appeared to play mediating roles in the relation between antenatal maternal anxiety and children's cognitive development. At 3 years, parental stimulation mediated 13.2% of the effect of antenatal maternal anxiety while postnatal maternal depression mediated 26.5%.The partial nature of these effects suggests that other mediators may play a role. Implications for theory and research on child development are discussed.

  12. MR image features predicting hemorrhagic transformation in acute cerebral infarction: a multimodal study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chunming; Xu, Liang; Dong, Longchun; Liu, Zhenxing; Yang, Jun; Liu, Jun [Tianjin Union Medicine Centre, Department of Radiology, Tianjin (China); Dong, Zhengchao [Columbia University, Translational Imaging and MRI Unit, Department of Psychiatry, New York, NY (United States); New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY (United States); Khursheed, Aiman [Tianjin Medical University, International Medical School, Tianjin (China)

    2015-11-15

    The aims of this study were to observe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features and the frequency of hemorrhagic transformation (HT) in patients with acute cerebral infarction and to identify the risk factors of HT. We first performed multimodal MRI (anatomical, diffusion weighted, and susceptibility weighted) scans on 87 patients with acute cerebral infarction within 24 hours after symptom onset and documented the image findings. We then performed follow-up examinations 3 days to 2 weeks after the onset or whenever the conditions of the patients worsened within 3 days. We utilized univariate statistics to identify the correlations between HT and image features and used multivariate logistical regression to correct for confounding factors to determine relevant independent image features of HT. HT was observed in 17 out of total 87 patients (19.5 %). The infarct size (p = 0.021), cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) (p = 0.004), relative apparent diffusion (rADC) (p = 0.023), and venous anomalies (p = 0.000) were significantly related with HT in the univariate statistics. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that CMBs (odd ratio (OR) = 0.082; 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 0.011-0.597; p = 0.014), rADC (OR = 0.000; 95 % CI = 0.000-0.692; p = 0.041), and venous anomalies (OR = 0.066; 95 % CI = 0.011-0.403; p = 0.003) were independent risk factors for HT. The frequency of HT is 19.5 % in this study. CMBs, rADC, and venous anomalies are independent risk factors for HT of acute cerebral infarction. (orig.)

  13. Multimodal magnetic resonance imaging study of treatment-naive adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany M Chaim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Attention-Deficit/Hiperactivity Disorder (ADHD is a prevalent disorder, but its neuroanatomical circuitry is still relatively understudied, especially in the adult population. The few morphometric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI studies available to date have found heterogeneous results. This may be at least partly attributable to some well-known technical limitations of the conventional voxel-based methods usually employed to analyze such neuroimaging data. Moreover, there is a great paucity of imaging studies of adult ADHD to date that have excluded patients with history of use of stimulant medication. METHODS: A newly validated method named optimally-discriminative voxel-based analysis (ODVBA was applied to multimodal (structural and DTI MRI data acquired from 22 treatment-naïve ADHD adults and 19 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HC. RESULTS: Regarding DTI data, we found higher fractional anisotropy in ADHD relative to HC encompassing the white matter (WM of the bilateral superior frontal gyrus, right middle frontal left gyrus, left postcentral gyrus, bilateral cingulate gyrus, bilateral middle temporal gyrus and right superior temporal gyrus; reductions in trace (a measure of diffusivity in ADHD relative to HC were also found in fronto-striatal-parieto-occipital circuits, including the right superior frontal gyrus and bilateral middle frontal gyrus, right precentral gyrus, left middle occipital gyrus and bilateral cingulate gyrus, as well as the left body and right splenium of the corpus callosum, right superior corona radiata, and right superior longitudinal and fronto-occipital fasciculi. Volumetric abnormalities in ADHD subjects were found only at a trend level of significance, including reduced gray matter (GM in the right angular gyrus, and increased GM in the right supplementary motor area and superior frontal gyrus. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that adult ADHD is associated

  14. Family load estimates and risk factors of anxiety disorders in a nationwide three generation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helenius, Dorte; Munk-Jørgensen, Povl; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated how often anxiety disorders with different ages of onset occurred in affected families compared to control families. Furthermore, the study addressed the impact of sex, region of residence, year and month of birth, and parental age at birth. The sample included N=1373...... region. Psychiatric diagnoses were also obtained for parents, siblings, and offspring. A family load component was obtained by using various mixed regression models. Anxiety disorders occurred significantly more often in case than in control families. Having a mother, father, or a sibling......, provide further and solid evidence for the family aggregation of anxiety disorders....

  15. Effects of Antenatal Maternal Depression and Anxiety on Children's Early Cognitive Development: A Prospective Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Gladys Ibanez; Bernard, Jonathan Y.; Claire Rondet; Hugo Peyre; Anne Forhan; Monique Kaminski; Marie-Josèphe Saurel-Cubizolles

    2015-01-01

    International audience; IntroductionStudies have shown that depression or anxiety occur in 10–20% of pregnant women. These disorders are often undertreated and may affect mothers and children’s health. This study investigates the relation between antenatal maternal depression, anxiety and children’s early cognitive development among 1380 two-year-old children and 1227 three-year-old children.MethodsIn the French EDEN Mother-Child Cohort Study, language ability was assessed with the Communicat...

  16. Social and psychological predictors of onset of anxiety disorders: results from a large prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flensborg-Madsen, Trine; Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann; Sørensen, Holger Jelling

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The vast majority of studies investigating the association between social and psychological factors and anxiety disorders have been cross-sectional, making it difficult to draw causal conclusions. The purpose of the study was to investigate in a prospective longitudinal study whether...... social and psychological factors are associated with the later risk of being admitted to a hospital and receive a diagnosis of anxiety disorders. METHOD: The study population comprised 4,497 members of The Copenhagen Perinatal Cohort (CPC) who in 1993 answered a mailed questionnaire containing questions...... on a range of social and psychological factors. In 2007, the study population was linked to The Danish Hospital Discharge Register and the Danish Psychiatric Central Register to obtain information on registration with anxiety disorders. Multiple Cox regression analysis was used to analyze the risk of anxiety...

  17. Glycosylated Conductive Polymer: A Multimodal Biointerface for Studying Carbohydrate-Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiangqun; Qu, Ke; Rehman, Abdul

    2016-09-20

    Carbohydrate-protein interactions occur through glycoproteins, glycolipids, or polysaccharides displayed on the cell surface with lectins. However, studying these interactions is challenging because of the complexity and heterogeneity of the cell surface, the inherent structural complexity of carbohydrates, and the typically weak affinities of the binding reactions between the lectins and monovalent carbohydrates. The lack of chromophores and fluorophores in carbohydrate structures often drives such investigations toward fluorescence labeling techniques, which usually require tedious and complex synthetic work to conjugate fluorescent tags with additional risk of altering the reaction dynamics. Probing these interactions directly on the cell surface is even more difficult since cells could be too fragile for labeling or labile dynamics could be affected by the labeled molecules that may interfere with the cellular activities, resulting in unwanted cell responses. In contrast, label-free biosensors allow real-time monitoring of carbohydrate-protein interactions in their natural states. A prerequisite, though, for this strategy to work is to mimic the coding information on potential interactions of cell surfaces onto different biosensing platforms, while the complementary binding process can be transduced into a useful signal noninvasively. Through carbohydrate self-assembled monolayers and glycopolymer scaffolds, the multivalency of the naturally existing simple and complex carbohydrates can be mimicked and exploited with label-free readouts (e.g., optical, acoustic, mechanical, electrochemical, and electrical sensors), yet such inquiries reflect only limited aspects of complicated biointeraction processes due to the unimodal transduction. In this Account, we illustrate that functionalized glycosylated conductive polymer scaffolds are the ideal multimodal biointerfaces that not only simplify the immobilization process for surface fabrication via electrochemical

  18. How does gaze direction affect facial processing in social anxiety? -An ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Yu, Fengqiong; Ye, Rong; Chen, Xingui; Xie, Xinhui; Zhu, Chunyan; Wang, Kai

    2017-02-09

    Previous behavioral studies have demonstrated an effect of eye gaze direction on the processing of emotional expressions in adults with social anxiety. However, specific brain responses to the interaction between gaze direction and facial expressions in social anxiety remain unclear. The present study aimed to explore the time course of such interaction using event-related potentials (ERPs) in participants with social anxiety. High socially anxious individuals and low socially anxious individuals were asked to identify the gender of angry or neutral faces with direct or averted gaze while their behavioral performance and electrophysiological data were monitored. We found that identification of angry faces with direct but not averted gaze elicited larger N2 amplitude in high socially anxious individuals compared to low socially anxious individuals, while identification of neutral faces did not produce any gaze modulation effect. Moreover, the N2 was correlated with increased anxiety severity upon exposure to angry faces with direct gaze. Therefore, our results suggest that gaze direction modulates the processing of threatening faces in social anxiety. The N2 component elicited by angry faces with direct gaze could be a state-dependent biomarker of social anxiety and may be an important reference biomarker for social anxiety diagnosis and intervention.

  19. A Strategic Planning Methodology for the Multimodal Transportation Systems: A Case Study from Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umut R. Tuzkaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Transportation costs have an important effect on companies’ competition capability in various sectors. To realize a positive effect, transportation industry should provide some specific performance criteria related with the economical efficiency and service quality. Also an increase in this performance degree depends on the obtaining optimum results of using the logistical resources in a convenient manner by the specialized logistics service providers. In this study, considering the effects of transportation modes on constituting a methodology that is interested in a strategic subject like constructing a transportation network is emphasized. In the process of selecting the most convenient transportation modes, all the required criteria are determined considering the related literature and the opinions of the experts. Then the analytical network process methodology is used to solve this selection problem. The close relationship between the transportation modes that will be used among the points in the network and the points that will be used for short storages and transshipment activities is considered. And the analytical network process is again used to select the most convenient ones among the alternative port locations. After decision making on these two important points, optimizing the freight flow among the supply chain by choosing the right transportation modes at each stage is aimed. To realize that optimization, the aims of decision makers from different levels or from different functional areas are satisfied by using the multilevel programming technique. Finally, the proposed methodology is applied on a transportation project of a logistic service provider, which gives service in a multimodal, multicommodity, multilevel and multiechelon transportation network.

  20. How is anxiety related to math performance in young students? A longitudinal study of Grade 2 to Grade 3 children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargnelutti, Elisa; Tomasetto, Carlo; Passolunghi, Maria Chiara

    2017-06-01

    Both general and math-specific anxiety are related to proficiency in mathematics. However, it is not clear when math anxiety arises in young children, nor how it relates to early math performance. This study therefore investigated the early association between math anxiety and math performance in Grades 2 and 3, by accounting for general anxiety and by further inspecting the prevalent directionality of the anxiety-performance link. Results revealed that this link was significant in Grade 3, with a prevalent direction from math anxiety to performance, rather than the reverse. Longitudinal analyses also showed an indirect effect of math anxiety in Grade 2 on subsequent math performance in Grade 3. Overall, these findings highlight the importance of monitoring anxiety from the early stages of schooling in order to promote proficient academic performance.

  1. Multidisciplinary approach and multimodal therapy in resected pancreatic cancer: Observational study Evaluación multidisciplinaria y tratamiento multimodal del cáncer de páncreas resecado: Estudio observacional

    OpenAIRE

    Morales, R.; A. Cuadrado; J. F. Noguera; C. Dolz; A. Vilella; Riera, J.; M. González de Cabo; A. Arriví; E. Falcó; M. García Bonafe; Company, M; J. C. Vicens; A. Socías

    2011-01-01

    Objective: analysis and evaluation of a multidisciplinary approach, postoperative results and survival of a group of patients with resected pancreatic cancer after a multimodal therapy. Design: descriptive, prospective and observational study. Patients: between January 2004 and December 2004, 124 patients with pancreatic cancer were evaluated. In 30 patients pancreatic resection was performed, and they are the object of this study. Results of preoperative evaluation, postoperative morbidity a...

  2. The experience of death anxiety in Iranian war veterans: a phenomenology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif Nia, Hamid; Ebadi, Abbas; Lehto, Rebecca H; Peyrovi, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Recognition of death anxiety experienced by patients who have survived violence and threats to life during war is of strong importance in delivery of best care for veterans experiencing health stressors. The aim of the study was to explore the death anxiety experience of veterans from the Iran-Iraq war. Using a phenomenological approach, 11 war veterans were interviewed related to death anxiety experiences. Four major themes included afterlife fears; alienated farewell; ambiguous separation; and physical dissolution. Patients who have been exposed to death trauma in the battlefield may carry added burden from unique cognitions and fears related to personal death.

  3. Association between Anxiety Levels and Weight Change in the Multiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

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    Katherine Rieke

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine the association between anxiety and weight change in a multiethnic cohort followed for approximately 10 years. Methods. The study population consisted of participants of the multiethnic study of atherosclerosis who met specified inclusion criteria (n = 5,799. Weight was measured at baseline and four subsequent follow-up exams. Anxiety was analyzed as sex-specific anxiety quartiles (QANX. The relationship between anxiety level and weight change was examined using a mixed-effect model with weight as the dependent variable, anxiety and time as the independent variables, and adjusted for covariates. Results. Average annual weight change (range was −0.17 kg (−6.04 to 4.38 kg for QANX 1 (lowest anxiety, −0.16 kg (−10.71 to 4.45 kg for QANX 2, −0.15 kg (−8.69 to 6.39 kg for QANX 3, and −0.20 kg (−7.12 to 3.95 kg for QANX 4 (highest anxiety. No significant association was noted between QANX and weight change. However, the highest QANX was associated with a −2.48 kg (95% CI = −3.65, −1.31 lower baseline weight compared to the lowest QANX after adjustment for all covariates. Conclusions. Among adults, age 45–84, higher levels of anxiety, defined by the STPI trait anxiety scale, are associated with lower average baseline weight but not with weight change.

  4. A prospective naturalistic study of antidepressant-induced jitteriness/anxiety syndrome

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    Harada T

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Tsuyoto Harada, Ken Inada, Kazuo Yamada, Kaoru Sakamoto, Jun Ishigooka Department of Psychiatry, Tokyo Women’s Medical University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan Objective: Patients often develop neuropsychiatric symptoms such as anxiety and agitation after they have started taking an antidepressant, and this is thought to be associated with a potentially increased risk of suicide. However, the incidence of antidepressant-induced jitteriness/anxiety syndrome has not been fully investigated, and little has been reported on its predictors. The aim of this study was to survey the incidence of antidepressant-induced jitteriness/anxiety syndrome and clarify its predictors in a natural clinical setting.Materials and methods: Between January 2009 and July 2012, we prospectively surveyed 301 patients who had not taken any antidepressants for 1 month before presentation, and who were prescribed antidepressants for 1 month after their initial visit. Patients were classified as developing antidepressant-induced jitteriness/anxiety syndrome if they experienced any symptoms of anxiety, agitation, panic attacks, insomnia, irritability, hostility, aggressiveness, impulsivity, akathisia, hypomania, or mania during the first month.Results: Among the 301 patients, 21 (7.0% developed antidepressant-induced jitteriness/anxiety syndrome. Major depressive disorder and a diagnosis of mood disorder in first-degree relatives of patients were significantly associated with induction of antidepressant-induced jitteriness/anxiety syndrome (odds ratio 10.2, P=0.001; odds ratio 4.65, P=0.02; respectively. However, there was no such relationship for sex, age, class of antidepressant, combined use of benzodiazepines, or diagnosis of anxiety disorder.Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest that major depressive disorder and a diagnosis of mood disorder in first-degree relatives may be clinical predictors of antidepressant-induced jitteriness/anxiety syndrome

  5. Anxiety in Children and Adolescents with Chronic Kidney Disease - Multicenter National Study Results

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Kiliś-Pstrusińska; Anna Medyńska; Piotr Adamczak; Irena Bałasz- Chmielewska; Ryszard Grenda; Agnieszka Kluska-Jóźwiak; Beata Leszczyńska; Ilona Olszak-Szot; Monika Miklaszewska; Maria Szczepańska; Marcin Tkaczyk; Anna Wasilewska; Katarzyna Zachwieja; Maria Zajączkowska; Helena Ziółkowska

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims: Chronic medical illness is a significant risk factor for the development of psychiatric disorders. The aims of the study were: to investigate the level of anxiety in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and to identify factors associated with the presence of that emotional problem. Methods: CKD children on hemodialysis (HD, n=22), peritoneal dialysis (PD, n=20,) and on conservative treatment (CT, n=95) were enrolled in the study. We used State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (S...

  6. Depression, Anxiety, and Suicidal Ideation Among Chinese Americans: A Study of Immigration-Related Factors

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify anxiety, depression, and suicidal ideation disparities among Chinese Americans and how immigration-related factors affected the outcomes. We tried to explain the differences as a function of the Chinese culture. Data were derived from the National Latino and Asian American Study, the first national epidemiological survey of these populations in the United States. We used only the Chinese sample (N = 600) and focused on depressive disorder, anxiety disorde...

  7. Factors associated with medical student test anxiety in objective structured clinical examinations: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate attributes of medical students associated with their test anxiety on Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs). Methods A cross-sectional study using a self-administered questionnaire was conducted of all Year 3 and 4 students at a private medical school in South Korea in 2014. This 53-item questionnaire consisted of factors pertaining to test anxiety on the OSCE identified from a review of relevant literature, which included students’ motivational beliefs and achievement emotions, perceived values of the OSCE, and attitude and orientation towards patients. Participants’ test anxiety levels were measured using the Korean Achievement Emotions Questionnaire. Participants rated their responses using a five-point Likert-type scale. Univariate analysis was performed to examine relationships between the variables. Results A total of 94 students completed the questionnaire (a 93% response rate). No differences in the participants’ test anxiety scores were observed across genders, entry-levels, or years in medical school. Participants’ test anxiety on the OSCE showed moderate association with their class-related achievement emotions (i.e., anxiety and boredom), where r = 0.46 and 0.32, p OSCE (r = -0.21, p OSCE. These findings have implications for developing effective educational interventions for helping students cope with such a stress by enhancing our understanding of the various factors that influence their test anxiety in OSCEs. PMID:28035056

  8. Cognitive-behavioral treatment for anxiety in patients with dementia: two case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Cynthia A; Seignourel, Paul; Balasubramanyam, Valli; Snow, A Lynn; Wilson, Nancy L; Kunik, Mark E; Schulz, Paul E; Stanley, Melinda A

    2008-05-01

    Anxiety is common in dementia and is associated with decreased independence and increased risk of nursing home placement. However, little is known about the treatment of anxiety in dementia. This article reports results from two patients who were treated with a modified version of cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxiety in dementia (CBT-AD). Modifications were made in the content, structure, and learning strategies of CBT to adapt skills to the cognitive limitations of these patients and include collaterals (i.e., family members, friends, or other caregivers) in the treatment process. The patients received education and awareness training and were taught the skills of diaphragmatic breathing, coping self-statements, exposure, and behavioral activation. The Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) Scale was used to characterize dementia severity and determine eligibility for treatment (a CDR score of 0.5 to 2.0 was required for participation). Other measures included the Rating Anxiety in Dementia scale, the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Anxiety subscale, and the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Outcome data showed improvement in anxiety as measured by standardized rating scales. We conclude that CBT-AD is potentially useful in treating anxiety in dementia patients and that this technique merits further study.

  9. Women With Addictions Report Reduced Anxiety After Group Music Therapy: A Quasi-Experimental Study

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    Wiebke S. Diestelkamp

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Roughly six million females in the USA abuse or are addicted to alcohol. Women are more likely than men to report depression and anxiety as triggers for substance use and relapse, which emphasizes the importance of therapies designed to help women mitigate anxiety.Research supporting music therapy (MT with women with addictions is scarce. In this quasi-experimental investigation, we hoped to learn: (1 What percentage of women with addictive disorders in a 45-minute group MT session will report pre-session anxiety?; and (2 of these, what percentage will report a palpable reduction in their post-session anxiety? We used a single group design: Participants self-reported anxiety before and after each session.Study participants were 53 women in a gender-specific residential program. Voluntary group MT sessions were held twice weekly for 9 weeks. Four MT methods were used: Composition, Receptive (Listening, Improvisation, and Re-Creative (Performing. Of 53 first-session surveys, 39 (73.6% indicated pre-session anxiety. Of these, 33 (84.6% showed a reduction in post-session anxiety. A sign test confirmed an overall reduction in anxiety.Outcomes may have been related to interventions, group cohesion, or other factors. The absence of a comparison group prevents suppositions of causality. Nonetheless, the results present a compelling case for the use of MT with women with anxiety. Because of the link between trauma and addictive disorders, we encourage exploration of the role and benefits of MT within trauma-informed models of addiction treatment.

  10. Anxiety Mediates the Relationship between Perfectionism and Insomnia Symptoms: A Longitudinal Study.

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    Umair Akram

    Full Text Available Individuals with insomnia often report aspects of perfectionism and symptoms of anxiety and depression. Investigation of these factors together has been limited. As such, the aim of the present study was to examine the extent to which the association between perfectionism and insomnia symptoms was mediated by anxiety and depression, concurrently and longitudinally.Seventy-six members from the general-population participated at baseline. Data from 57 participants were subsequently analysed at twelve-month follow-up. Insomnia symptoms were assessed using The Insomnia Severity Index (ISI. Perfectionism was assessed using two Multidimensional Perfectionism Scales (F-MPS; HF-MPS. Symptoms of anxiety and depression were assessed using The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. Correlational analysis examined longitudinal associations between perfectionism and insomnia symptoms. Hierarchical regression analysis examined whether significant associations remained after controlling for anxiety and depression.Baseline insomnia symptoms were associated with future doubts about action. Further, this relationship was mediated by preceding symptoms of anxiety and concurrent symptoms of insomnia. Similarly, baseline insomnia symptoms were also associated with future parental criticism. However this relationship was partially mediated by preceding symptoms of anxiety, and was not mediated by concurrent insomnia symptoms.Symptoms of insomnia appear to be related to an increase in negative perfectionistic thinking in the form of doubts about action and parental criticism, however these relationships appear to be mediated by symptoms of anxiety. Therefore, treatments for insomnia should address anxiety symptoms with the prospect of preventing the accentuation of aspects of perfectionism due to poor sleep.

  11. Depression and Anxiety in a Cardiovascular Outpatient Clinic: A Descriptive Study

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    Baktash Bayani MD

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cardiac diseases are psycho-somatic disorders, and psychological aspects play an essential role in their initiation and exacerbation. The aim of this study was to gain appropriate knowledge in the epidemiology of co-morbid depression and anxiety disorder in cardiovascular outpatients.Method: This study is descriptive with a sample of patients attending a cardio-vascular clinic. 238 individuals were included in this study using a consecutive sampling method. The study instrument was Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS questionnaire, which is a clinical scale for assessing anxiety and depression.Results: Of the 238 participants in this study, 93(38.7% were male and 146 (61.3% female. 28.5% of patients suffered from anxiety disorders , and 41.9% had depression. Regarding comorbid diseases such as diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia and hypertension, the severity of depression was just related to hypertension. There was a meaningful relationship between gender and symptoms of anxiety so that symptoms were more severe in women. Conclusion: Considering the high prevalence of depression and anxiety in patients suffering from cardio-vascular diseases, it is necessary to screen psychological disorders in patients with cardio-vascular diseases and improve their cardio-vascular health and quality of life as mush as possible.

  12. Multimodality Imaging Probe for Positron Emission Tomography and Fluorescence Imaging Studies

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    Suresh K. Pandey

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Our goal is to develop multimodality imaging agents for use in cell tracking studies by positron emission tomography (PET and optical imaging (OI. For this purpose, bovine serum albumin (BSA was complexed with biotin (histologic studies, 5(6- carboxyfluorescein, succinimidyl ester (FAM SE (OI studies, and diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA for chelating gallium 68 (PET studies. For synthesis of BSA-biotin-FAM-DTPA, BSA was coupled to (+-biotin N-hydroxysuccinimide ester (biotin-NHSI. BSA- biotin was treated with DTPA-anhydride and biotin-BSA-DTPA was reacted with FAM. The biotin-BSA-DTPA-FAM was reacted with gallium chloride 3 to 5 mCi eluted from the generator using 0.1 N HCl and was passed through basic resin (AG 11 A8 and 150 mCi (100 μL, pH 7–8 was incubated with 0.1 mg of FAM conjugate (100 μL at room temperature for 15 minutes to give 66Ga-BSA-biotin-DTPA-FAM. A shaved C57 black mouse was injected with FAM conjugate (50 μL at one flank and FAM-68Ga (50 μL, 30 mCi at the other. Immediately after injection, the mouse was placed in a fluorescence imaging system (Kodak In-Vivo F, Bruker Biospin Co., Woodbridge, CT and imaged (Λex: 465 nm, Λem: 535 nm, time: 8 seconds, Xenon Light Source, Kodak. The same mouse was then placed under an Inveon microPET scanner (Siemens Medical Solutions, Knoxville, TN injected (intravenously with 25 μCi of 18F and after a half-hour (to allow sufficient bone uptake was imaged for 30 minutes. Molecular weight determined using matrix-associated laser desorption ionization (MALDI for the BSA sample was 66,485 Da and for biotin-BSA was 67,116 Da, indicating two biotin moieties per BSA molecule; for biotin-BSA-DTPA was 81,584 Da, indicating an average of 30 DTPA moieties per BSA molecule; and for FAM conjugate was 82,383 Da, indicating an average of 1.7 fluorescent moieties per BSA molecule. Fluorescence imaging clearly showed localization of FAM conjugate and FAM-68Ga at respective flanks of the mouse

  13. Studying MRI acquisition protocols of sustained sounds with a multimodal acquisition system

    OpenAIRE

    Laprie, Yves; Aron, Michael; Berger, Marie-Odile; Wrobel-Dautcourt, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    International audience; The acquisition of dynamic articulatory data is crucial to improve our understanding of speech production. Ultrasound (US) imaging presents the interest of offering a good temporal resolution without any health hazard and at a reasonable price. However, it cannot be used alone because there is no reference coordinate system and no spatial calibration. We describe a multimodal acquisition system which uses electromagnetography sensors to locate the US probe, and the met...

  14. Interaction Analysis in Performing Arts: A Case Study in Multimodal Choreography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christou, Maria; Luciani, Annie

    The growing overture towards interacting virtual words and the variety of uses, have brought great changes in the performing arts, that worth a profound analysis in order to understand the emerging issues. We examine the performance conception for its embodiment capacity with a methodology based on interaction analysis. Finally, we propose a new situation of multimodal choreography that respects the aforementioned analysis, and we evaluate the results on a simulation exercise.

  15. Comparative Study of Krill Herd, Firefly and Cuckoo Search Algorithms for Unimodal and Multimodal Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gobind Preet Singh

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Today, in computer science, a computational challenge exists in finding a globally optimized solution from an enormously large search space. Various meta-heuristic methods can be used for finding the solution in a large search space. These methods can be explained as iterative search processes that efficiently perform the exploration and exploitation in the solution space. In this context, three such nature inspired meta-heuristic algorithms namely Krill Herd Algorithm (KH, Firefly Algorithm (FA and Cuckoo search Algorithm (CS can be used to find optimal solutions of various mathematical optimization problems. In this paper, the proposed algorithms were used to find the optimal solution of fifteen unimodal and multimodal benchmark test functions commonly used in the field of optimization and then compare their performances on the basis of efficiency, convergence, time and conclude that for both unimodal and multimodal optimization Cuckoo Search Algorithm via Lévy flight has outperformed others and for multimodal optimization Krill Herd algorithm is superior than Firefly algorithm but for unimodal optimization Firefly is superior than Krill Herd algorithm.

  16. A Study on International Multimodal Transport Networks from Korea to Central Asia: Focus on Secondhand Vehicles

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    Ying Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently, high-income countries use multimodal transportation to export large quantities of secondhand vehicles to low-income countries. Secondhand vehicle export has shown its highest growth in recent years, especially in Korea. The problem of transporting secondhand vehicles from Korea to Central Asia is becoming an important issue, but few researchers are interested in it. The objective of this research is to determine the optimal transport network for exporting secondhand vehicles from Korea to Central Asian countries by combining experts’ opinions and real data from existing transport networks. The fuzzy Delphi method was applied to obtain factors to evaluate alternative multimodal transport networks for moving secondhand vehicles from Korea to Central Asian countries by judgment from experts. The analysis shows that among the five factors (total cost, total time, reliability, security, and transportation capability, total cost is the most considerable factor, followed by reliability, transportation capability, total time, and security. Additionally, in the mainly three multimodal transport networks, the sea+Trans-China Railway route is ranked first, followed by the sea+Trans-Siberian Railway and sea+truck routes.

  17. Mindfulness Experiences of Children who have Autistic Spectrum Disorder and Anxiety- An Exploratory Study

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, Jodie

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological study explored the experiences of four children with\\ud Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and anxiety (aged 10-13 years) who took part in a\\ud mindfulness-based intervention. The research was conducted within a local authority in\\ud times of reform in both education and mental health. A systematic literature review\\ud indicated that the majority of children with ASD experience difficulties with attention,\\ud anxiety, empathy, comprehension and communication wi...

  18. Effect of music therapy on pain and anxiety levels of cancer patients: A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Priyadharshini Krishnaswamy; Shoba Nair

    2016-01-01

    Background: The pain associated with cancer is highly detrimental to the quality of life of the affected individuals. It also contributes to the anxiety of the patient. There is a need for a nonpharmacological approach in addition to the pharmacological therapy for the management of the pain for a more holistic improvement in the individual. With this study, we wish to achieve this through music. Objective: To assess the effect of music therapy on pain scores and anxiety levels of cancer ...

  19. Childhood Separation Anxiety and the Risk of Subsequent Psychopathology: Results from a Community Study

    OpenAIRE

    Brückl, Tanja M.; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Höfler, Michael; Pfister, Hildegard; Schneider, Silvia; Lieb, Roselind

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine the association between separation anxiety disorder (SAD) and mental disorders in a community sample and to evaluate whether separation anxiety is specifically related to panic disorder with and without agoraphobia. Method: The data come from a 4-year, prospective longitudinal study of a representative cohort of adolescents and young adults aged 14–24 years at baseline in Munich, Germany. The present analyses are based on a subsample of the younger cohort that comple...

  20. Behavioral Inhibition as a Risk Factor for the Development of Childhood Anxiety Disorders: A Longitudinal Study

    OpenAIRE

    Muris, Peter; Brakel, Anna; Arntz, Arnoud; Schouten, Erik

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThis longitudinal study examined the additive and interactive effects of behavioral inhibition and a wide range of other vulnerability factors in the development of anxiety problems in youths. A sample of 261 children, aged 5 to 8 years, 124 behaviorally inhibited and 137 control children, were followed during a 3-year period. Assessments took place on three occasions to measure children's level of behavioral inhibition, anxiety disorder symptoms, other psychopathological symptoms...

  1. Oncological patient anxiety in imaging studies: the PET/CT example

    OpenAIRE

    Abreu, Carla; Grilo, Ana Monteiro; Lucena, Filipa; Carolino, Elisabete

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the subjective perception of anxiety pre- and post-procedure, and explore the relationship between demographic, clinical variables and cancer patients' anxiety during a positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scan. Two hundred and thirty-two oncological out patients, with clinical indication for performing an (18)F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) PET/CT scan and attending a nuclear medicine (NM) department, participated in ...

  2. Controlled study of withdrawal symptoms and rebound anxiety after six week course of diazepam for generalised anxiety.

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    A group of patients suffering from anxiety, as assessed by general practitioners and psychologists using research criteria for generalised anxiety, were treated with either diazepam or placebo double blind for six weeks. This active treatment period was preceded by a one week single blind placebo "wash in" period and followed by a two week single blind placebo "wash out" period. The results suggest that diazepam can produce rebound anxiety and withdrawal symptoms when used in moderate doses a...

  3. Computer-assisted cognitive behavioral therapy for children with epilepsy and anxiety: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blocher, Jacquelyn B; Fujikawa, Mayu; Sung, Connie; Jackson, Daren C; Jones, Jana E

    2013-04-01

    Anxiety disorders are prevalent in children with epilepsy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, adaptability, and feasibility of a manual-based, computer-assisted cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention for anxiety disorders in children with epilepsy. Fifteen anxious youth (aged 8-13 years) with epilepsy completed 12 weeks of manualized computer-assisted CBT. The children and parents completed a semi-structured interview at baseline, and questionnaires assessing symptoms of anxiety, depression, and behavior problems were completed prior to treatment, at treatment midpoint, after treatment completion, and at three months posttreatment. There were significant reductions in the symptoms of anxiety and depression reported by the children at completion of the intervention and at the three-month follow-up. Similarly, the parents reported fewer symptoms of anxiety and a reduction in behavior problems. No adverse events were reported. This CBT intervention for children with epilepsy and anxiety disorders appears to be safe, effective, and feasible and should be incorporated into future intervention studies.

  4. Social Communication Anxiety Treatment (S-CAT) for children and families with selective mutism: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Evelyn R; Armstrong, Sharon Lee; Skira, Kathryn; Gordon, Janice

    2017-01-01

    This research assessed the feasibility of Social Communication Anxiety Treatment (S-CAT) developed by Elisa Shipon-Blum, a brief multimodal approach, to increase social communication in 40 children aged 5-12 years with selective mutism (SM). SM is a disorder in which children consistently fail to speak in specific situations although they have the ability to do so. Key features of this approach are the SM-Social Communication Comfort Scale (SCCS), transfer of control (ToC), a nonchalant therapeutic style, and cognitive-behavioral strategies over a brief time frame. Following 9 weeks of treatment, children showed significant gains in speaking frequency on all 17 items from the Selective Mutism Questionnaire (SMQ), a standardized measure of SM severity. Children also showed decreased levels of anxiety and withdrawal as reported by parents on the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). SM initial symptom severity and family therapy compliance, but not duration of SM, contributed to treatment outcomes.

  5. Multimodal Treatment of Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Rebecca; Stacey, Brett

    2016-01-01

    Most patients with chronic pain receive multimodal treatment. There is scant literature to guide us, but when approaching combination pharmacotherapy, the practitioner and patient must weigh the benefits with the side effects; many medications have modest effect yet carry significant side effects that can be additive. Chronic pain often leads to depression, anxiety, and deconditioning, which are targets for treatment. Structured interdisciplinary programs are beneficial but costly. Interventions have their place in the treatment of chronic pain and should be a part of a multidisciplinary treatment plan. Further research is needed to validate many common combination treatments.

  6. A study to explore if dentists' anxiety affects their clinical decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipchase, S Y; Chapman, H R; Bretherton, R

    2017-02-24

    Aims To develop a measure of dentists' anxiety in clinical situations; to establish if dentists' anxiety in clinical situations affected their self-reported clinical decision-making; to establish if occupational stress, as demonstrated by burnout, is associated with anxiety in clinical situations and clinical decision-making; and to explore the relationship between decision-making style and the clinical decisions which are influenced by anxiety.Design Cross-sectional study.Setting Primary Dental Care.Subjects and methods A questionnaire battery [Maslach Burnout Inventory, measuring burnout; Melbourne Decision Making Questionnaire, measuring decision-making style; Dealing with Uncertainty Questionnaire (DUQ), measuring coping with diagnostic uncertainty; and a newly designed Dentists' Anxieties in Clinical Situations Scale, measuring dentists' anxiety (DACSS-R) and change of treatment (DACSS-C)] was distributed to dentists practicing in Nottinghamshire and Lincolnshire. Demographic data were collected and dentists gave examples of anxiety-provoking situations and their responses to them.Main outcome measure Respondents' self-reported anxiety in various clinical situations on a 11-point Likert Scale (DACSS-R) and self-reported changes in clinical procedures (Yes/No; DACSS-C). The DACSS was validated using multiple t-tests and a principal component analysis. Differences in DACSS-R ratings and burnout, decision-making and dealing with uncertainty were explored using Pearson correlations and multiple regression analysis. Qualitative data was subject to a thematic analysis.Results The DACSS-R revealed a four-factor structure and had high internal reliability (Cronbach's α = 0.94). Those with higher DACSS-R scores of anxiety were more likely to report changes in clinical procedures (DACSS-C scores). DACSS-R scores were associated with decision-making self-esteem and style as measured by the MDMQ and all burnout subscales, though not with scores on the DUQ scale

  7. Anxiety and Depressed Mood in Obese Pregnant Women: A Prospective Controlled Cohort Study

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    Annick.F.L. Bogaerts

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The psychological health in obese women during pregnancy has been poorly studied. Objective: To compare levels of anxiety and depressed mood during pregnancy in obese versus normal-weight women. Methods: 63 obese pregnant women and 156 normal-weight controls were included prospectively before 15 weeks of gestation. Levels of state and trait anxiety and depressed mood were measured during the first, second and third trimester of pregnancy. A linear mixed-effect model with repeated measures was used to evaluate group differences. Results: The levels of state anxiety significantly increased from trimester 1 to trimester 3 in obese pregnant women (beta = 3.70; p = 0.007, while this parameter remained constant throughout pregnancy in normal-weight women. Levels of trait anxiety and depressed mood significantly decreased from trimester 1 to trimester 2 in controls, but not in obese pregnant women. Variables such as maternal education, ethnicity, marital state, psychological history and miscarriages, parity and smoking behaviour had significant effects on anxiety and/or depressed moods during pregnancy. Obese pregnant women show higher levels of anxiety and depressive symptomatology compared to normal-weight pregnant women. Conclusion: Interventional programmes aiming at preventing the deleterious influence of maternal obesity on perinatal outcomes should include a psycho-educational program specifically tailored to this high-risk group.

  8. A prospective study of leukocyte telomere length and risk of phobic anxiety among women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramin, Cody; Wang, Wei; Prescott, Jennifer; Rosner, Bernard; Simon, Naomi M; De Vivo, Immaculata; Okereke, Olivia I

    2015-12-15

    We prospectively examined the relation of relative telomere lengths (RTLs), a marker of biological aging, to phobic anxiety in later-life. RTLs in peripheral blood leukocytes were measured among 3194 women in the Nurses' Health Study who provided blood samples in 1989/90. The Crown-Crisp Phobic Index (CCI, range=0–16) was assessed in 1988 and 2004. Only participants with CCI≤3 (consistent with no meaningful anxiety symptoms) in 1988 were included. We related baseline RTLs to odds ratios (ORs) of incident high phobic anxiety symptoms (CCI≥6). To enhance clinical relevance, we used finite mixture modeling (FMM) to relate baseline RTLs to latent classes of CCI in 2004. RTLs were not significantly associated with high phobic anxiety symptoms after 16 years of follow-up. However, FMM identified 3 groups of phobic symptoms in later-life: severe, minimal/intermediate, and non-anxious. The severe group had non-significantly shorter multivariable-adjusted mean RTLs than the minimal/intermediate and non-anxious groups. Women with shorter telomeres vs. longest telomeres had non-significantly higher likelihood of being in the severe vs. non-anxious group. Overall, there was no significant association between RTLs and incident phobic anxiety symptoms. Further work is required to explore potential connections of telomere length and emergence of severe phobic anxiety symptoms during later-life.

  9. Childbirth and symptoms of postpartum depression and anxiety: a prospective birth cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, A F; Carter, C S; Davis, J M; Golding, J; Adejumo, O; Pyra, M; Connelly, J J; Rubin, L H

    2016-04-01

    We investigated associations between aspects of childbirth and elevated postpartum symptoms of depression and anxiety. We employed secondary analysis of perinatal data (N = 4657-4946) from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) birth cohort. Multivariable logistic regression models (adjusted for covariates) examined predictors of elevated symptoms of postpartum depression and anxiety. Predictors included the following: type of delivery (normal physiological vs. interventive non-physiological), immediate postpartum complications, and maternal perception of the recent birth experience. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale assessed elevated symptoms of depression (score ≥ 13), and the Crown-Crisp Experiential Index assessed elevated symptoms of anxiety (score ≥ 9) at 2 and 8 months after delivery. A more negative perception of the recent birth experience was associated with elevated symptoms of anxiety at 2 months [odds ratio (OR) 1.52, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.25-1.85] and 8 months (OR 1.30, 95 % CI 1.06-1.60) postpartum but was not associated with elevated symptoms of depression at either time point. Type of delivery (physiological vs. non-physiological) and immediate postpartum complications were not associated with elevated symptoms of depression or anxiety. Our findings suggest that improving women's childbirth experience may decrease the likelihood of postpartum anxiety, but not postpartum depression.

  10. Multimodal therapy for painful bladder syndrome / interstitial cystitis: pilot study combining behavioral, pharmacologic, and endoscopic therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S. Hanley

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We evaluated the effectiveness of combining behavioral therapy, pharmacologic therapy and endoscopic hydrodistension for treating painful bladder syndrome / interstitial cystitis (PBS/IC. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five patients with PBS/IC were prospectively enrolled in a pilot multimodal behavioral, pharmacologic and endoscopic treatment protocol. Behavioral modification included diet recommendations, fluid restriction to 64 oz. /day, progressive timed voiding and Kegel exercises. Oral pharmacologic therapy consisted of daily doses of macrodantin 100 mg, hydroxyzine 10-20 mg and urised 4 tablets. Patients underwent endoscopic bladder hydrodistention under anesthesia at least 2 weeks after protocol enrollment. Behavioral and pharmacological treatments were continued after the hydrodistention. O'Leary-Sant questionnaire scores were recorded before starting the protocol, after pharmacologic/behavioral therapy, 2 months post-hydrodistension, and at scheduled follow-up. Results: Eighteen patients (72% completed the pilot multimodal treatment protocol and were followed for a mean of 10.2 months. All patients were female with a median age of 36.3 years and had mean bladder capacity under anesthesia of 836 milliliters. Mean O'Leary-Sant symptom index scores for baseline symptoms, after behavioral/pharmacologic treatment, post-hydrodistension and during follow up were 12.5, 8.6, 7.0, and 6.7 (p < 0.05. Mean O'Leary-Sant problem index scores for baseline, after behavioral/pharmacologic treatment, post-hydrodistention and during follow up were 12.7, 8.9, 6.7, and 7.7 (p < 0.05. Conclusion: Our pilot multimodal protocol of behavioral modification, pharmacologic therapy and endoscopic hydrodistention demonstrated a significant progressive improvement in PBS/IC quality of life scores, compared to a pre-treatment baseline. These results should be validated in a larger, placebo controlled trial.

  11. A Study on Potential of Integrating Multimodal Interaction into Musical Conducting Education

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    Siang, Gilbert Phuah Leong; Yong, Pang Yee

    2010-01-01

    With the rapid development of computer technology, computer music has begun to appear in the laboratory. Many potential utility of computer music is gradually increasing. The purpose of this paper is attempted to analyze the possibility of integrating multimodal interaction such as vision-based hand gesture and speech interaction into musical conducting education. To achieve this purpose, this paper is focus on discuss some related research and the traditional musical conducting education. To do so, six musical conductors had been interviewed to share their musical conducting learning/ teaching experience. These interviews had been analyzed in this paper to show the syllabus and the focus of musical conducting education for beginners.

  12. Relationship between Study Habits and Test Anxiety of Higher Secondary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Arul A. S.

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to probe the relationship between study habits and test anxiety of higher secondary students. In this normative study survey method was employed. The population for the present study consisted of higher secondary students studying in Tirunelveli district. The investigator used the simple random sampling technique. The sample…

  13. Anxiety in Cancer Patients during 18F-FDG PET/CT Low Dose: A Comparison of Anxiety Levels before and after Imaging Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Lina; Carolino, Elisabete; Oliveira, Cátia; Pacheco, Carolina; Castro, Maria; Alonso, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Assessing the level of anxiety in oncology patients who underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan and identifying the main reasons that generate anxiety. Material and Method. The study included 81 cancer patients submitted to the 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan. Patients filled in the Scan Experience Questionnaire and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) before and after 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan. Results. Substantial levels of anxiety were detected both before and after 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan (STAI mean > 30), with a significant increase in the state of anxiety after scan performance (p < 0.0001, Medianpre = 31.1, and Medianpos = 33.0). 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose results are the main cause of anxiety both before (79.1%) and after (86.9%) the scan. The information provided by staff both before and on the 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose day was classified mostly as completely understandable (70.5% and 75.3%, resp.) and as very useful (70.5% and 72.6%, resp.) and correlated positively with patients' overall satisfaction with NM Department (rS = 0.372, p = 0.004 and rS = 0.528, p = 0.000, resp.), but not with anxiety levels. Conclusions. Patients perceive high levels of anxiety during the 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan and the concern with scan results was pointed out as the main factor for that emotional reaction. PMID:28392942

  14. Moving Social Work Education Forward Through the Application of Neuroscientifically Informed Teaching Practice: A Case Study in Student Engagement Through Art and Multimodal Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Axlyn McLeod

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Modern advances in neuroscience suggest learning occurs through three basic cognition patterns. Higher-level multimodal learning occurs when learning activities contain multiple cognition patterns. This case study details an application of these concepts where fine art, journaling, practicum experiences, and in-class processing were fused to create an active and participatory method of engaging social work students in critical thinking as related to differential impacts of clinical decision-making. The learning activities are described and multimodal learning is explained, along with the findings of a focus group used to assess student feedback. Student experiences and the potential adaptations of this approach are also addressed. The tentative findings of this case study indicate positive learning experiences and suggest a need for further research to explore the opportunities associated with the use of multimodal and art-infused learning techniques in social work courses.

  15. Factors Associated with Anxiety in Premature Coronary Artery Disease Patients: THC-PAC Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Seyed Hesameddin; Kassaian, Seyed Ebrahim; Sadeghian, Saeed; Karimi, Abbasali; Saadat, Soheil; Peyvandi, Flora; Jalali, Arash; Davarpasand, Tahereh; Akhondzadeh, Shahin; Shahmansouri, Nazila; Boroumand, Mohammad Ali; Lotfi-Tokaldany, Masoumeh; Amiri Abchouyeh, Maryam; Ayatollahzade Isfahani, Farah; Rosendaal, Frits

    2016-04-01

    Anxiety may negatively affect the course of coronary artery disease (CAD). The aim of this study was to assess which factors are associated with anxiety in young adults with CAD. A cohort of individuals with premature coronary artery disease was formed between 2004-2011, as the Tehran Heart Center's Premature Coronary Atherosclerosis Cohort (THC-PAC) study. Patients (men≤45-year-old, and women≤55-year-old) were visited between March 2013 and February 2014. All participants were examined, and their demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were collected. Then, all participants filled in the Beck Anxiety Inventory. Logistic regression models were used to identifying factors related to anxiety in both sexes. During the study, 708 patients (mean [SD] age: 45.3 [5.8] y, men:48.2%) were visited. Anxiety was present in 53.0% of participants (66.0% of women and 39.0% of men). The logistic regressions model showed that the associated factors for anxiety in men were opium usage (OR=1.89, 95% CI: 1.09-3.27), positive family history (OR=1.49, 95% CI:0.94-2.35), and creatinine serum level (OR=1.17, 95% CI:1.05-1.303); and in women were major adverse cardiac events (MACE) during follow-up (OR=2.30, 95% CI:1.25-4.23), hypertension (OR=1.71, 95% CI:1.07-2.73) and the duration of CAD (OR=0.99, 95% CI:0.98-1.00). In premature CAD patients, the determinants of anxiety seem to be different in each sex. Opium usage, positive family history of CAD, and creatinine serum levels in men, and MACE, hypertension, and duration of CAD in women appear the relevant factors in this regard.

  16. Factors Associated with Anxiety in Premature Coronary Artery Disease Patients: THC-PAC Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hesameddin Abbasi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety may negatively affect the course of coronary artery disease (CAD. The aim of this study was to assess which factors are associated with anxiety in young adults with CAD. A cohort of individuals with premature coronary artery disease was formed between 2004-2011, as the Tehran Heart Center's Premature Coronary Atherosclerosis Cohort (THC-PAC study. Patients (men≤45-year-old, and women≤55-year-old were visited between March 2013 and February 2014. All participants were examined, and their demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were collected. Then, all participants filled in the Beck Anxiety Inventory. Logistic regression models were used to identifying factors related to anxiety in both sexes. During the study, 708 patients (mean [SD] age: 45.3 [5.8] y, men:48.2% were visited. Anxiety was present in 53.0% of participants (66.0% of women and 39.0% of men. The logistic regressions model showed that the associated factors for anxiety in men were opium usage (OR=1.89, 95% CI: 1.09-3.27, positive family history (OR=1.49, 95% CI:0.94-2.35, and creatinine serum level (OR=1.17, 95% CI:1.05-1.303; and in women were major adverse cardiac events (MACE during follow-up (OR=2.30, 95% CI:1.25-4.23, hypertension (OR=1.71, 95% CI:1.07-2.73 and the duration of CAD (OR=0.99, 95% CI:0.98-1.00. In premature CAD patients, the determinants of anxiety seem to be different in each sex. Opium usage, positive family history of CAD, and creatinine serum levels in men, and MACE, hypertension, and duration of CAD in women appear the relevant factors in this regard.

  17. Defining Treatment Response and Remission in Child Anxiety: Signal Detection Analysis Using the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporino, Nicole E.; Brodman, Douglas M.; Kendall, Philip C.; Albano, Anne Marie; Sherrill, Joel; Piacentini, John; Sakolsky, Dara; Birmaher, Boris; Compton, Scott N.; Ginsburg, Golda; Rynn, Moira; McCracken, James; Gosch, Elizabeth; Keeton, Courtney; March, John; Walkup, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine optimal Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale (PARS) percent reduction and raw score cut-offs for predicting treatment response and remission among children and adolescents with anxiety disorders. Method: Data were from a subset of youth (N = 438; 7-17 years of age) who participated in the Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study…

  18. Bonding Gossip as an Identity Negotiation Life Phase: A Study of Multimodal Texting via Smartphone Among Taiwanese College Freshmen

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    Hong-Chi Shiau

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Drawn on ethnographic interviews with 17 informants as well as seven focus group interviews, this study examines how college freshmen text on social media via smartphones to formulate collegiate bonding. Gossip is common between two individuals to avoid collapsed context, so both parties can ascertain the meaning derived from such situated interaction; it is less frequently among multiple small group users. Three linguistic genres of gossip identified include (1 sarcastic gossip—negative but not malicious—on fellows, (2 gossip against authorities, and (3 celebrity gossip. However, gossiping among freshmen is a life-phase phenomenon, usually lasting 2 or 3 months until a solid social network with stronger ties in an offline context has been secured. Over time, the freshmen have gradually reduced their amount of time investing in such communicative capital. As a result of multimodal communicative tools, social media has afforded wider and more multimodal dissemination of information which the freshmen might otherwise have not been able to access. Gossiping is popular for it provides sources of conversational comfort and sartorial security, creating a safer net so that the freshmen could playfully navigate through the precarious life phase.

  19. A transition from unimodal to multimodal activations in four sensory modalities in humans: an electrophysiological study

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    Takeshima Yasuyuki

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the long-latency activities common to all sensory modalities, electroencephalographic responses to auditory (1000 Hz pure tone, tactile (electrical stimulation to the index finger, visual (simple figure of a star, and noxious (intra-epidermal electrical stimulation to the dorsum of the hand stimuli were recorded from 27 scalp electrodes in 14 healthy volunteers. Results Results of source modeling showed multimodal activations in the anterior part of the cingulate cortex (ACC and hippocampal region (Hip. The activity in the ACC was biphasic. In all sensory modalities, the first component of ACC activity peaked 30–56 ms later than the peak of the major modality-specific activity, the second component of ACC activity peaked 117–145 ms later than the peak of the first component, and the activity in Hip peaked 43–77 ms later than the second component of ACC activity. Conclusion The temporal sequence of activations through modality-specific and multimodal pathways was similar among all sensory modalities.

  20. Insomnia and Relationship with Anxiety in University Students: A Cross-Sectional Designed Study.

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    Nour Choueiry

    Full Text Available Sleep disorders (SDs are now recognized as a public health concern with considerable psychiatric and societal consequences specifically on the academic life of students. The aims of this study were to assess SDs in a group of university students in Lebanon and to examine the relationship between SDs and anxiety.An observational cross-sectional study was conducted at Saint-Joseph University, Lebanon, during the academic year 2013-2014. Four questionnaires were face-to-face administered to 462 students after obtaining their written consent: Insomnia Severity Index (ISI, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS, and Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item scale (GAD-7.The prevalence of clinically significant insomnia was 10.6% (95% CI: 7.8-13.4%, more frequent in first year students. ISI mean score was 10.06 (SD = 3.76. 37.1% of the participants were poor sleepers. Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS and poor sleep were significantly more frequent among participants with clinical insomnia (p = 0.031 and 0.001 respectively. Clinically significant anxiety was more frequent in students suffering from clinical insomnia (p = 0.006 and in poor sleepers (p = 0.003. 50.8% of the participants with clinically significant anxiety presented EDS versus 30.9% of those with no clinically significant anxiety (p<0.0001.The magnitude of SDs in this sample of Lebanese university students demonstrate the importance of examining sleep health in this population. Moreover, the link between SD and anxiety reminds us of the importance of treating anxiety as soon as detected and not simply targeting the reduction of sleep problems.

  1. Prevalence of anxiety disorders: a population-based epidemiological study in metropolitan area of Casablanca, Morocco

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    Berrada Soumia

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Morocco, no epidemiological study has been conducted to show the current prevalence of mental disorders in the general population. The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence and comorbidity of anxiety disorders in Moroccan subjects. Methods We used cross-sectional study, with a representative sample of Casablanca city. Direct interviews used the Mini International Neurpsychiatric Interview in its validated Moroccan Arabic version Results Among 800 subjects, 25.5% met criteria of at least one current anxiety disorder: Panic Disorder (2%, Agoraphobia (7.6% Social phobia (3.4, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (6.1%, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (3.4%, Generalized Anxiety Disorder (4.3% Conclusion The results are generally similar to those of Western countries. Future studies need to replicate these results and to concentrate on their impact on the quality of life and the cost of such conditions in the community.

  2. Internet-based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adolescents with Anxiety Disorders: A Feasibility Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Amalie; Gaardsvig, Majken Maria; Stjerneklar, Silke

    anxiety disorders has been evaluated in Denmark. The aim of the current study was to examine the feasibility of a revised and translated version of the Chilled Out Program for adolescents with anxiety disorders, developed at Macquarie University, Australia.MethodParticipants were 6 adolescents aged 13......, cartoons, and videos) to deliver psychoeducation and CBT techniques, activities and exercises for adolescents to manage their anxiety. In addition the adolescents receive a weekly supportive phone call from a psychologist.The study was designed as a single case quasi-experimental feasibility study...... treatment and at 3-months follow-up with a semi-structured qualitative interview examining factors such as adherence to the program, overall satisfaction with the intervention format and program structure.Results and conclusionResults and conclusion will be presented at the conference as the study is still...

  3. Depression and Anxiety Disorders among Patients with Psoriasis: A Hospital-Based Case-Control Study

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    Masoud Golpour

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Psoriasis is a common, genetically determined inflammatory and proliferative disease of the skin. Psychological stress can exacerbate the disease. This study sought to investigate the depression and anxiety disorders among patients with psoriasis and control group. Method. In this hospital-based case-control study, One hundred patients with psoriasis (case referred to the dermatology department and 100 patients with otolaryngology problems and dermatological healthy volunteers (control who referred to the Otolaryngology Department of Bouali Sina Hospital in Sari, Iran, in 2007 were studied. Demographic characteristics were recorded. Beck Depression Inventory and Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Scale I-II were administered to the patients in both groups. Data were analyzed using SPSS statistical software and descriptive statistical tests. Results. From One-hundred patients in each group, 44 (45% were men. Depression score was 67% and 12% in psoriatic patients and control, respectively. The Beck depression scores of patients with psoriasis were significantly higher than scores of the control group (<0.05. Based on Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Scale, anxiety was found in 45% of patients in case group and 18% of controls. Conclusion. The results revealed that psoriatic patients reported significantly higher degrees of depression and anxiety than controls. In addition, psoriatic women were more depressed than psoriatic men.

  4. The role of individual temperament, family and peers in social anxiety disorder: A controlled study

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    Marina Cunha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present ex post facto study the influence of inhibition, attachment styles, parental rearing styles and social comparison in social anxiety disorder was investigated. First, we studied the isolated effect of each variable through the comparison of two clinical groups and a control group. Then we analysed the action of these variables altogether, using the structural equation model, controlling eventual mediator effects. The sample consisted of adolescents with ages between 12 and 18 years old, who were distributed by three comparison groups: social phobia, other anxiety disorders and normal controls. A structured clinical interview and self-report instruments were used for/in youth assessment. Results showed a specific effect of inhibition and social comparison in social anxiety disorder. The structural equation model outlined the combined action of inhibition, social comparison and peers attachment quality in what concerns the prediction of social anxiety as well as the mediation role of social comparison through the effect of other variables. Although this study presents some limitations, its results contribute to the understanding of some of the ways of development and maintenance of social anxiety during adolescence.

  5. Secondary depression in severe anxiety disorders: a population-based cohort study in Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Sandra M; Petersen, Liselotte; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mors, Ole; Mortensen, Preben B; Laursen, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Depression and anxiety disorders are highly comorbid conditions and a worldwide disease burden; however, large-scale studies delineating their association are scarce. In this retrospective study, we aimed to assess the effect of severe anxiety disorders on the risk and course of depression. Methods We did a population-based cohort study with prospectively gathered data in Denmark using data from three Danish population registers: The Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish Psychiatric Central Register, and the Danish National Hospital Registry. We selected the cohort from people born in Denmark between Jan 1, 1955, and Dec 31, 2002, who we followed up from Jan 1, 1994, to Dec 31, 2012. The cohort was restricted to individuals with known parents. First, we investigated the effect of specific anxiety diagnoses on risk of single depressive episodes and recurrent depressive disorder. Second, we investigated the effect of comorbid anxiety on risk of readmission for depression, adjusting for sex, age, calendar year, parental age, place at residence at time of birth, and the interaction of age with sex. Findings We included 3 380 059 individuals in our study cohort. The adjusted incidence rate ratio (IRR) for single depressive episodes was 3·0 (95% CI 2·8–3·1, pdepressive disorder was 5·0 (4·8–5·2) in patients with severe anxiety disorders compared with the general population. Compared with control individuals, the offspring of parents with anxiety disorders were more likely to be diagnosed with single depressive episodes (1·9, 1·8–2·0) or recurrent depressive disorder (2·1, 1·9–2·2). Comorbid anxiety increased the readmission rates in both patients with single depressive episodes and patients with recurrent depressive disorder. Interpretation Severe anxiety constitutes a significant risk factor for depression. Focusing on specific anxiety disorders might help to identify individuals at risk of depression, thereby providing new

  6. Anxiety and depressive symptoms related to parenthood in a large Norwegian community sample: the HUNT2 study

    OpenAIRE

    Rimehaug, Tormod; Wallander, Jan

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The study compared anxiety and depression prevalence between parents and non-parents in a society with family- and parenthood-friendly social politics, controlling for family status and family history, age, gender, education and social class. METHODS: All participants aged 30-49 (N = 24,040) in the large, non-sampled Norwegian HUNT2 community health study completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales. RESULTS: The slightly elevated anxiety and depression among non-parents...

  7. Video-based feedback of oral clinical presentations reduces the anxiety of ICU medical students: a multicentre, prospective, randomized study

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Matthieu; Freund, Yonathan; Alves, Mickael; Monsel, Antoine; Labbe, Vincent; Darnal, Elsa; Messika, Jonathan; Bokobza, Jerome; Similowski, Thomas; Duguet, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Background: Oral presentations of clinical cases by medical students during medical rounds in hospital wards are a source of anxiety and little is known about how this anxiety can be alleviated. The objective of this study was to investigate whether video-based feedback of public oral presentations can reduce anxiety in 4th year medical students. Methods: Multicentre randomized study conducted in six intensive care units (ICU) and emergency departments (ED) in France o...

  8. Reanalysis of SCOR and anxiety measures in the Israeli High-Risk Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugelmass, S; Faber, N; Ingraham, L J; Frenkel, E; Nathan, M; Mirsky, A F; Ben Shakhar, G

    1995-01-01

    In an earlier study, skin conductance orienting response (SCOR) and anxiety measures obtained when the subjects of the Israeli High-Risk Study were 11 years old were analyzed, using adult diagnostic information, when the subjects were 26 years old. The present study considers similar data obtained from most of this sample when the subjects were 16 years old. As in the earlier analysis, those subjects who would receive a schizophrenia spectrum diagnosis at 26 had higher anxiety ratings at age 16. Nondiagnosed index subjects also had significantly higher anxiety ratings than the nondiagnosed controls. The subjects who would receive affective spectrum diagnoses at age 26 had the most hyporesponsive SCORs, as predicted, while the subjects who would later be diagnosed in the schizophrenia spectrum had an unexpected hyperresponsive SCOR to the dishabituation tone in a habituation series. Further consideration of the long-term stability of SCORs seems necessary; they may be related to the developing psychopathological processes.

  9. Headache, anxiety and depressive disorders: the HADAS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beghi, Ettore; Bussone, Gennaro; D'Amico, Domenico; Cortelli, Pietro; Cevoli, Sabina; Manzoni, Gian Camillo; Torelli, Paola; Tonini, Maria Clara; Allais, Giovanni; De Simone, Roberto; D'Onofrio, Florindo; Genco, Sergio; Moschiano, Franca; Beghi, Massimiliano; Salvi, Sara

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this paper was to assess prevalence and characteristics of anxiety and depression in migraine without aura and tension-type headache, either isolated or in combination. Although the association between headache and psychiatric disorders is undisputed, patients with migraine and/or tension-type headache have been frequently investigated in different settings and using different tests, which prevents meaningful comparisons. Psychiatric comorbidity was tested through structured interview and the MINI inventory in 158 adults with migraine without aura and in 216 persons with tension-type headache or migraine plus tension-type headache. 49 patients reported psychiatric disorders: migraine 10.9%, tension-type headache 12.8%, and migraine plus tension-type headache 21.4%. The MINI detected a depressive episode in 59.9, 67.0, and 69.6% of cases. Values were 18.4, 19.3, and 18.4% for anxiety, 12.7, 5.5, and 14.2%, for panic disorder and 2.3, 1.1 and 9.4% (p = 0.009) for obsessive-compulsive disorder. Multivariate analysis showed panic disorder prevailing in migraine compared with the other groups (OR 2.9; 95% CI 1.2-7.0). The association was higher (OR 6.3; 95% CI 1.4-28.5) when migraine (with or without tension-type headache) was compared to pure tension-type headache. This also applied to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OR 4.8; 95% CI 1.1-20.9) in migraine plus tension-type headache. Psychopathology of primary headache can reflect shared risk factors, pathophysiologic mechanisms, and disease burden.

  10. The curious case of cyberchondria: A longitudinal study on the reciprocal relationship between health anxiety and online health information seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Te Poel, Fam; Baumgartner, Susanne E; Hartmann, Tilo; Tanis, Martin

    2016-10-01

    The current study is the first to longitudinally investigate the reciprocal relationship between online health information seeking and health anxiety, i.e., cyberchondria. Expectations were that health anxious individuals who go online to find health information, experience an increase in health anxiety, which in turn will reinforce online seeking. A 4-wave longitudinal survey study among 5322 respondents aged 16-93 was conducted. Our results showed that individuals who are more health anxious than others, search online for health information more. Moreover, the results provided initial evidence for the expected reciprocal relationship between health anxiety and online health information seeking in respondents with non-clinical levels of health anxiety at the start of the study. However, this reciprocal relationship could not be found in a subsample of clinically health anxious individuals. Although for these individuals online health information seeking did not seem to exacerbate health anxiety levels, it might still serve as a maintaining factor of clinical health anxiety.

  11. Anxiety symptoms among Chinese nurses and the associated factors: a cross sectional study

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    Gao Yu-Qin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nurses are an indispensable component of the work force in the health care system. However, many of them are known to work in a stressful environment which may affect their mental well-being; the situation could be worse in rapidly transforming societies such as China. The purpose of this study was to investigate anxiety symptoms and the associated factors in Chinese nurses working in public city hospitals. Methods A cross-sectional survey was performed for Chinese nurses in public city hospitals of Liaoning Province, northeast China. Seven hospitals in different areas of the province were randomly selected for the study. The Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale was used to measure anxiety symptoms. Effort-reward imbalance questionnaire and Job Content Questionnaire were used to assess the work stressors. Univariate analysis and stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis were used to identify the factors associated with anxiety symptoms. Results All registered nurses in the seven city hospitals, totaling 1807 registered nurses were surveyed. Of the returned questionnaires, 1437 were valid (79.5% for analysis. Utilizing the total raw score ≥ 40 as the cut-off point, the prevalence of anxiety symptoms in these nurses was 43.4%. Demographic factors (education, chronic disease and life event, lifestyle factors (regular meals and physical exercise, work conditions (hospital grade, job rank, monthly salary, nurse-patient relationships, job satisfaction and intention of leaving, job content (social support and decision latitude, effort-reward imbalance and overcommitment were all significantly related to the anxiety symptoms. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed main factors associated with anxiety symptoms were lower job rank (OR 2.501, overcommitment (OR 2.018, chronic diseases (OR 1.541, worse nurse-patient relationship (OR 1.434, higher social support (OR 0.573, lower hospital grade (OR 0.629, taking regular

  12. Depression, Anxiety and Symptoms of Stress among Hong Kong Nurses: A Cross-sectional Study

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    Teris Cheung

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent epidemiological data suggests 13.3% of Hong Kong residents suffered from Common Mental Disorders, most frequently mixed anxiety and depressive disorder. This study examines the weighted prevalence and associated risk factors of depression, anxiety and stress among Hong Kong nurses. A total of 850 nurses were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study. Participants completed the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale 21 and multiple logistic regression was used to determine significant relationships between variables. Chronic past-year illness and poor self-perceived mental health were significant correlates of past-week depression, anxiety and stress. It confirmed further positive correlations between depression and divorce, widowhood and separation, job dissatisfaction, disturbance with colleagues, low physical activity levels and sleep problems. Marital status; general medicine; sleep problems, and a lack of leisure significantly correlated with anxiety. Stress was significantly associated with younger age, clinical inexperience, past-year disturbance with colleagues, low physical activity, no leisure and drinking alcohol. Nurses were more depressed, anxious and stressed than the local general population, with over one-third of our respondents classified as subject to these disorders.

  13. Management of Stress and Anxiety Among PhD Students During Thesis Writing: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazrafkan, Leila; Shokrpour, Nasrin; Yousefi, Alireza; Yamani, Nikoo

    2016-01-01

    Today, postgraduate students experience a variety of stresses and anxiety in different situations of academic cycle. Stress and anxiety have been defined as a syndrome shown by emotional exhaustion and reduced personal goal achievement. This article addresses the causes and different strategies of coping with this phenomena by PhD students at Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences. The study was conducted by a qualitative method using conventional content analysis approach. Through purposive sampling, 16 postgraduate medical sciences PhD students were selected on the basis of theoretical sampling. Data were gathered through semistructured interviews and field observations. Six hundred fifty-four initial codes were summarized and classified into 4 main categories and 11 subcategories on the thematic coding stage dependent on conceptual similarities and differences. The obtained codes were categorized under 4 themes including "thesis as a major source of stress," "supervisor relationship," "socioeconomic problem," and "coping with stress and anxiety." It was concluded that PhD students experience stress and anxiety from a variety of sources and apply different methods of coping in effective and ineffective ways. Purposeful supervision and guidance can reduce the cause of stress and anxiety; in addition, coping strategy must be in a thoughtful approach, as recommended in this study.

  14. Anxiety, Motivation and Autonomy in Iranian High School Students: A Quantitative Study

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    Fatemeh Sanadgol

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Research in the series of second language learning certify that both cognitive and affective factors within a language learner affect the level of success that will be achieved in learning a second language. This study was an attempt to investigate the relationship among three factors of anxiety, motivation, and autonomy. To this purpose, 207 students were invited from Golestan high school in Ramian, in the north of Iran. Their age ranged from 18 to 22 years. In one session they filled out the anxiety questionnaire, in the next session they completed the motivation questionnaire, and in the third session they answered the items in the autonomy questionnaire. At the end of the term their final scores were recorded.  Analysis of the results showed that there was a meaningful relationship between anxiety and motivation, but there was no relationship between anxiety and autonomy, and no relationship autonomy and motivation. Both high-stakeholders and low-stakeholder may benefit from the findings of this study. Keywords: motivation; anxiety; autonomy; EFL learners

  15. Student Teachers' Modeling of Acceleration Using a Video-Based Laboratory in Physics Education: A Multimodal Case Study

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    Louis Trudel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory study intends to model kinematics learning of a pair of student teachers when exposed to prescribed teaching strategies in a video-based laboratory. Two student teachers were chosen from the Francophone B.Ed. program of the Faculty of Education of a Canadian university. The study method consisted of having the participants interact with a video-based laboratory to complete two activities for learning properties of acceleration in rectilinear motion. Time limits were placed on the learning activities during which the researcher collected detailed multimodal information from the student teachers' answers to questions, the graphs they produced from experimental data, and the videos taken during the learning sessions. As a result, we describe the learning approach each one followed, the evidence of conceptual change and the difficulties they face in tackling various aspects of the accelerated motion. We then specify advantages and limits of our research and propose recommendations for further study.

  16. A trans-diagnostic review of anxiety disorder comorbidity and the impact of multiple exclusion criteria on studying clinical outcomes in anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein-Piekarski, A N; Williams, L M; Humphreys, K

    2016-06-28

    Anxiety disorders are highly comorbid with each other and with other serious mental disorders. As our field progresses, we have the opportunity to pursue treatment study designs that consider these comorbidities. In this perspective review, we first characterized the prevalence of multiple anxiety disorder comorbidity by reanalyzing national survey data, then conducted an English-language PubMed search of studies analyzing the impact of exclusion criteria on treatment outcome data. In the prevalence data, 60% of people with an anxiety disorder had one or more additional anxiety or depression diagnosis. Because our commonly applied exclusion criteria focus on a single diagnosis and do not consider a multiple comorbidity profile, the impact of the criteria may be to exclude up to 92% of anxiety disorder treatment seekers. Moreover, the findings do not suggest a consistent relationship between the number of exclusion criteria and the effect size of treatment outcomes. Thus, future studies might consider a more trans-diagnostic rationale for determining exclusion criteria, one that is generalizable to real-world settings in which multiple diagnoses commonly co-occur. The findings also encourage a more systematic reporting of rationales for the choice of-and the implications of-each exclusion criterion.

  17. Effect of massage therapy on pain, anxiety, and tension after cardiac surgery: a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Brent A; Cutshall, Susanne M; Wentworth, Laura J; Engen, Deborah; Messner, Penny K; Wood, Christina M; Brekke, Karen M; Kelly, Ryan F; Sundt, Thoralf M

    2010-05-01

    Integrative therapies such as massage have gained support as interventions that improve the overall patient experience during hospitalization. Cardiac surgery patients undergo long procedures and commonly have postoperative back and shoulder pain, anxiety, and tension. Given the promising effects of massage therapy for alleviation of pain, tension, and anxiety, we studied the efficacy and feasibility of massage therapy delivered in the postoperative cardiovascular surgery setting. Patients were randomized to receive a massage or to have quiet relaxation time (control). In total, 113 patients completed the study (massage, n=62; control, n=51). Patients receiving massage therapy had significantly decreased pain, anxiety, and tension. Patients were highly satisfied with the intervention, and no major barriers to implementing massage therapy were identified. Massage therapy may be an important component of the healing experience for patients after cardiovascular surgery.

  18. Assessment of general pre and postoperative anxiety in patients undergoing tooth extraction: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Jornet, Pia; Camacho-Alonso, Fabio; Sanchez-Siles, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to analyse the amount of anxiety and fear felt before, immediately after, and one week after, dental extraction. We studied 70 patients (35 men and 35 women (mean (SD) age 43 (±10) years), who were listed for dental extraction under local anaesthesia in a private clinic that specialised in oral surgery. Patients were evaluated on 3 consecutive occasions: immediately preoperatively, immediately postoperatively, and 7 days later. Each patient's anxiety was measured using Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (Spanish version), the Modified Corah Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) and the Dental Fear Survey. There were significant differences in the STAI-Trait scale between before and 7 days after extraction (p=0.04), and in the MDAS between before and immediately after extraction (p=0.02), and between immediately after and 7 days after extraction (p=tooth extraction may be influenced by operative techniques (type of anaesthesia, duration of operation, or position of tooth extracted), but anxiety at 7 days after extraction is not.

  19. Family Functioning and Maternal Anxiety Among Cases Diagnosed With Adhd: A Comparison Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonca OZYURT

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD is one of the most common childhood neurodevelopmental disorders. Factors related with parents affect family functioning and make changes in ADHD symptoms. We aimed to evaluate maternal anxiety and family functioning in children with ADHD comparing with controls and their mothers. Method: The study group consisted of 62 children (6-12 years old diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. The control group (62 children comprised patients of other clinics at hospital and was matched for gender and age to the ADHD patients. The Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School Aged Children- Present and Lifetime Version (K-SADS-PL was used to diagnose ADHD and allowed comorbidities. All patients were treatment-naive. DuPaul Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder-Rating Scale -IV Inventory for ADHD symptoms, Family Assessment Device (FAD for family functioning, State Trait Anxiety Inventory for maternal anxiety were used. Results: There was no significant difference between sociodemographic data of two groups. The families of children with ADHD had more family dysfunction in roles, behavioral control, affective involvement subscales. Mothers of children with ADHD had higher scores than controls in State and Trait Anxiety Inventory forms. Conclusion: ADHD generally continues into adolescence and adulthood, and multiple functional impairments can occur due to ADHD. If the relationship between maternal anxiety; family functioning, and ADHD is understood well, treatment of ADHD will be provided more effectively.

  20. Comparative imaging study in ultrasound, MRI, CT, and DSA using a multimodality renal artery phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Deirdre M.; Fagan, Andrew J.; Moran, Carmel M.; Browne, Jacinta E. [Medical Ultrasound Physics and Technology Group, School of Physics, Dublin Institute of Technology, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Centre for Advanced Medical Imaging (CAMI), St James' s Hospital, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Department of Medical Physics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ (United Kingdom); Medical Ultrasound Physics and Technology Group, School of Physics, Dublin Institute of Technology, Dublin 8 (Ireland)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: A range of anatomically realistic multimodality renal artery phantoms consisting of vessels with varying degrees of stenosis was developed and evaluated using four imaging techniques currently used to detect renal artery stenosis (RAS). The spatial resolution required to visualize vascular geometry and the velocity detection performance required to adequately characterize blood flow in patients suffering from RAS are currently ill-defined, with the result that no one imaging modality has emerged as a gold standard technique for screening for this disease. Methods: The phantoms, which contained a range of stenosis values (0%, 30%, 50%, 70%, and 85%), were designed for use with ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray computed tomography, and x-ray digital subtraction angiography. The construction materials used were optimized with respect to their ultrasonic speed of sound and attenuation coefficient, MR relaxometry (T{sub 1},T{sub 2}) properties, and Hounsfield number/x-ray attenuation coefficient, with a design capable of tolerating high-pressure pulsatile flow. Fiducial targets, incorporated into the phantoms to allow for registration of images among modalities, were chosen to minimize geometric distortions. Results: High quality distortion-free images of the phantoms with good contrast between vessel lumen, fiducial markers, and background tissue to visualize all stenoses were obtained with each modality. Quantitative assessments of the grade of stenosis revealed significant discrepancies between modalities, with each underestimating the stenosis severity for the higher-stenosed phantoms (70% and 85%) by up to 14%, with the greatest discrepancy attributable to DSA. Conclusions: The design and construction of a range of anatomically realistic renal artery phantoms containing varying degrees of stenosis is described. Images obtained using the main four diagnostic techniques used to detect RAS were free from artifacts and exhibited adequate contrast

  1. A multi-factor model of panic disorder: results of a preliminary study integrating the role of perfectionism, stress, physiological anxiety and anxiety sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina M. Wood

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Panic disorder (PD is a highly prevalent and disabling mental health problem associated with different factors including perfectionism, stress, physiological anxiety, and anxiety sensitivity regarding physical concerns; however, no studies have analyzed the joint relationship between these factors and PD in a multi-factor model using structural equation modeling. Method: A cross-sectional study was carried out to collect data on these factors and self-reported DSM-IV past-year PD symptoms in a large sample of the general population (N=936. Results: Perceived stress had a significant effect in increasing physiological anxiety, which in turn had an important association with physical concerns. Perfectionism and perceived stress had an indirect relation with past year PD via the mediator role of physiological anxiety and physical concerns. Physical concerns, on one hand, seemed to mediate the impact between perfectionism and PD and, on the other, partially mediated the role between physiological anxiety and PD. Conclusions: Although there is considerable evidence on the association between each of these factors and PD, this model can be considered a broader and productive framework of research on the nature and treatment of PD.

  2. An Empirical Study on the Determinants of Anxiety in Gift-Giving Behavior: An Expansion of Wooten's Model

    OpenAIRE

    Ke Han; Takahiro Chiba; Shingoh Iketani; Akinori ONO

    2008-01-01

    Why so many givers become anxious in gift giving? Wooten (2000) provided an answer to the question by proposing a model of gifting anxiety. However, his model is lack of quantitative analysis to support its empirical adequacy. This study aims to expand Wooten's model with additional nine determinants of gifting anxiety and verify the expanded model by conducting quantitative analysis based on consumer surveys. The results show that givers' gifting anxiety arises when highly motivated to impre...

  3. The Validity and Reliability Studies of the Computer Anxiety Scale on Educational Administrators (CAS-EA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agaoglu, Esmahan; Ceyhan, Esra; Ceyhan, Aykut; Simsek, Yucel

    2008-01-01

    This study aims at investigating the validity and reliability studies of the "Computer Anxiety Scale" (Ceyhan & Gurcan Namlu, 2000) on educational administrators. The data gathered from 143 educational administrators of state schools located in Eskisehir show that the scale consists of 2 factors. The first of these factors, affective anxiety…

  4. Foreign Language Anxiety and Oral Exam Performance: A Replication of Phillips's "MLJ" Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Elaine; Stephenson, Jean

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a replication study of a substantial piece of research published in "The Modern Language Journal", carried out by Elaine Matties Phillips in 1992, and entitled "The Effects of Language Anxiety on Students' Oral Test Performance and Attitudes." The aim of both studies was to assess the influence of…

  5. A cross-sectional study of prevalence and implications of depression and anxiety in psoriasis

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    Sreelatha Lakshmy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physical and mental comorbidity is common and has significant implications for overall health outcomes. Psoriasis, a psychocutaneous disorder, is a classic example of mental-physical comorbidity. Aims: In view of the impact of socio-cultural influences on mind-body interactions and the paucity of Indian research pertaining to psychiatric morbidity in psoriatic patients, this study was undertaken to measure the prevalence of anxiety and depression in patients with psoriasis, and to correlate these with severity of psoriasis and quality of life. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 90 consecutive patients of psoriasis, over a period of 12 months, in a tertiary care centre. The Psoriasis Area and Severity Index was used to assess severity of psoriasis. PHQ-9, GAD-7 and the Perceived Stress Scale were used to screen for depression, anxiety and perceived stress respectively. The WHOQOL-BREF was used to determine the quality of life. Statistics Analysis: All analysis was performed using Microsoft Excel software and Statistical Package for Social Sciences. Results: A total of 71 (78.9% subjects had depression and 69 (76.7% had anxiety. Fifty one patients had significant stress. A significant positive correlation was established between psoriasis variables (severity and duration of psoriasis and psychological variables (depression, anxiety and stress. Severity of psoriasis had a significant negative correlation with social relationships and environmental domains of WHOQOL. Quality of life was significantly worse in patients with psoriasis with comorbid anxiety/depression. Conclusion: Patients with psoriasis have a clinically significant prevalence of depression, anxiety and perceived stress. This study highlights the complex relationship between psoriasis, psychiatric comorbidity and quality of life and the need to simultaneously consider dermatological and psychological factors.

  6. Evidence, Interpretation, and Qualification from Multiple Reports of Long-Term Outcomes in the Multimodal Treatment Study of Children with ADHD (MTA): Part I--Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, James; Arnold, L. Eugene; Kraemer, Helena; Hechtman, Lily; Molina, Brooke; Hinshaw, Stephen; Vitiello, Benedetto; Jensen, Peter; Steinhoff, Ken; Lerner, Marc; Greenhill, Laurence; Abikoff, Howard; Wells, Karen; Epstein, Jeffery; Elliott, Glen; Newcorn, Jeffrey; Hoza, Betsy; Wigal, Timothy

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To review the primary and secondary findings from the Multimodal Treatment study of ADHD (MTA) published over the past decade as three sets of articles. Method: In a two-part article--Part I: Executive Summary (without distracting details) and Part II: Supporting Details (with additional background and detail required by the complexity…

  7. Evidence, Interpretation, and Qualification from Multiple Reports of Long-Term Outcomes in the Multimodal Treatment Study of Children with ADHD (MTA): Part II--Supporting Details

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, James; Arnold, L. Eugene; Kraemer, Helena; Hechtman, Lily; Molina, Brooke; Hinshaw, Stephen; Vitiello, Benedetto; Jensen, Peter; Steinhoff, Ken; Lerner, Marc; Greenhill, Laurence; Abikoff, Howard; Wells, Karen; Epstein, Jeffery; Elliott, Glen; Newcorn, Jeffrey; Hoza, Betsy; Wigal, Timothy

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To review and provide details about the primary and secondary findings from the Multimodal Treatment study of ADHD (MTA) published during the past decade as three sets of articles. Method: In the second of a two part article, we provide additional background and detail required by the complexity of the MTA to address confusion and…

  8. The interaction of anticipatory anxiety and emotional picture processing: an event-related brain potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bublatzky, Florian; Flaisch, Tobias; Stockburger, Jessica; Schmälzle, Ralf; Schupp, Harald T

    2010-07-01

    The present study examined the interaction of anticipatory anxiety and selective emotion processing. Toward this end, a rapid stream of pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant pictures was presented in alternating blocks of threat-of-shock or safety, which were signaled by colored picture frames. The main finding is that pleasant pictures elicited a sustained negative difference potential over occipital regions during threat as compared to safety periods. In contrast, unpleasant and neutral picture processing did not vary as a function of threat-of-shock. Furthermore, in both the safety and threat-of-shock conditions, emotional pictures elicited an enlarged early posterior negativity and late positive potential. These data show that the activation of the fear/anxiety network exerts valence-specific effects on affective picture processing. Pleasant stimuli mismatching the current state of anticipatory anxiety apparently draw more attentional resources.

  9. Study of the moderating effect of parenting styles on the relationship between social anxiety and depressive symptomatology in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Silva

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Intruduction: The comorbidity between depression and social anxiety is high in adolescence. Parental emotion socialization behaviors have been associated with the development of social skills and depressive symptomatology. Objectives: This study aims to explore the moderating effect of parenting styles on the relationship between social anxiety and depression, to study the associations between them, and to analyze the relationship between parenting styles, social anxiety and depressive symptomatology in adolescents. Methods: The sample consisted of 122 parents and their children. Self-report instruments were used to assess social anxiety, depressive symptomatology and parenting styles. Results: It was found that social anxiety is significantly associated to depression and that the former has a predictive effect on the latter. The parenting styles revealed no significant associations with either depressive symptomatology or with social anxiety, but a moderating effect of explorer parenting style was found in the relationship between social anxiety (public performance and depressive symptomatology. Conclusions: The present investigation confirmed the existence of a significant association between social anxiety and depressive symptomatology in adolescence and suggests an effect of parental practices of emotional socialization in this relation, which, however, should be replicated in future research. It will also be important to study the effect of parenting styles on children's emotional regulation skills and their possible mediating effect on the relationship between social anxiety and depression.

  10. A prospective study of leukocyte telomere length and risk of phobic anxiety among women

    OpenAIRE

    Ramin, Cody; Wang, Wei; Prescott, Jennifer; Rosner, Bernard; Simon, Naomi M.; Vivo, Immaculata; Okereke, Olivia I.

    2015-01-01

    We prospectively examined the relation of relative telomere lengths (RTLs), a marker of biological aging, to phobic anxiety in later-life. RTLs in peripheral blood leukocytes were measured among 3,194 women in the Nurses’ Health Study who provided blood samples in 1989/90. The Crown-Crisp Phobic Index (CCI, range=0-16) was assessed in 1988 and 2004. Only participants with CCI≤3 (consistent with no meaningful anxiety symptoms) in 1988 were included. We related baseline RTLs to odds ratios (ORs...

  11. Multimodal perception and simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werkhoven, P.J.; Erp, J.B.F. van

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses mechanisms of multimodal perception in the context of multimodal simulators and virtual worlds. We review some notable findings from psychophysical experiments with a focus on what we call touch-inclusive multimodal perception—that is, the sensory integration of the tactile sy

  12. Effectiveness of a multimodal community intervention program to prevent suicide and suicide attempts: a quasi-experimental study.

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    Yutaka Ono

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multilevel and multimodal interventions have been suggested for suicide prevention. However, few studies have reported the outcomes of such interventions for suicidal behaviours. METHODS: We examined the effectiveness of a community-based multimodal intervention for suicide prevention in rural areas with high suicide rates, compared with a parallel prevention-as-usual control group, covering a total of 631,133 persons. The effectiveness was also examined in highly populated areas near metropolitan cities (1,319,972 persons. The intervention started in July 2006, and continued for 3.5 years. The primary outcome was the incidence of composite outcome, consisting of completed suicides and suicide attempts requiring admission to an emergency ward for critical care. We compared the rate ratios (RRs of the outcomes adjusted by sex, age group, region, period and interaction terms. Analyses were performed on an intention-to-treat basis and stratified by sex and age groups. FINDINGS: In the rural areas, the overall median adherence of the intervention was significantly higher. The RR of the composite outcome in the intervention group decreased 7% compared with that of the control group. Subgroup analyses demonstrated heterogeneous effects among subpopulations: the RR of the composite outcome in the intervention group was significantly lower in males (RR = 0.77, 95% CI 0.59-0.998, p = 0.0485 and the RR of suicide attempts was significantly lower in males (RR = 0.39, 95% CI 0.22-0.68, p = 0.001 and the elderly (RR = 0.35, 95% CI 0.17-0.71, p = 0.004. The intervention had no effect on the RR of the composite outcome in the highly populated areas. INTERPRETATION: Our findings suggest that this community-based multimodal intervention for suicide prevention could be implemented in rural areas, but not in highly populated areas. The effectiveness of the intervention was shown for males and for the elderly in rural areas

  13. How really effective are Multimodal Hints in enhancing Visual Target Spotting? Some evidence from a usability study

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    Kieffer, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    The main aim of the work presented here is to contribute to computer science advances in the multimodal usability area, in-as-much as it addresses one of the major issues relating to the generation of effective oral system messages: how to design messages which effectively help users to locate specific graphical objects in information visualisations? An experimental study was carried out to determine whether oral messages including coarse information on the locations of graphical objects on the current display may facilitate target detection tasks sufficiently for making it worth while to integrate such messages in GUIs. The display spatial layout varied in order to test the influence of visual presentation structure on the contribution of these messages to facilitating visual search on crowded displays. Finally, three levels of task difficulty were defined, based mainly on the target visual complexity and the number of distractors in the scene. The findings suggest that spatial information messages improve p...

  14. Comorbidity and risk indicators for alcohol use disorders among persons with anxiety and/or depressive disorders: findings from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Boschloo; N. Vogelzangs; J.H. Smit; W. van den Brink; D.J. Veltman; A.T.F. Beekman; B.W.J.H. Penninx

    2011-01-01

    This study examines comorbidity of alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence as well as its risk indicators among anxious and/or depressed persons, also considering temporal sequencing of disorders. Baseline data from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) were used, including 2329 perso

  15. Immediate effect of mind sound resonance technique on state anxiety and cognitive functions in patients suffering from generalized anxiety disorder: A self-controlled pilot study

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    Vipin Dhansoia

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: This pilot study suggests that MSRT may have a potential role in reducing state anxiety and enhancing psychomotor performance in patients suffering from GAD immediately after the practice. These findings need confirmation from studies with a larger sample size and randomized controlled design, which are implicated in the future.

  16. The child anxiety impact scale: examining parent- and child-reported impairment in child anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Audra K; Falk, Avital; Peris, Tara; Wiley, Joshua F; Kendall, Philip C; Ginsburg, Golda; Birmaher, Boris; March, John; Albano, Ann Marie; Piacentini, John

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the current investigation was to examine the factor structure, reliability, and construct validity of both the Child and Parent version of the Child Anxiety Impact Scale (CAIS) using data obtained from the Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study (Walkup et al., 2008 ). The CAIS child and parent versions measure anxiety-related functional impairment in school, social, and family domains. Participants were 488 children ages 7 to 17 (M age = 10.7, SD = 2.8 years) enrolled as part of the CAMS study across 6 sites and their primary parent or caregiver. Families participated in a structured diagnostic interview and then completed the CAIS along with other measures. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the a priori three-factor structure (school, social, and home/family) for the CAIS parent- and CAIS child-report was a reasonable fit, with a comparative fit index of .88 and root mean square error of approximation of .05. Internal consistency was very good for total score and subscales of both versions of the scale (Cronbach's α = .70-.90). The CAIS total scores demonstrated good construct validity, showing predicted significant correlations with the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) Internalizing Scale, the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children (MASC) and Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED) Total Scores, the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale, and the Children's Global Assessment Scale. In addition, CAIS Social and School subscales were significantly related to similar subscales on the CBCL, SCARED, and MASC. The results provide support that the CAIS is a reliable and valid measure for the assessment of the impact of anxiety on child and adolescent functioning.

  17. Multimodal Narrative Inquiry: Six Teacher Candidates Respond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawski, Cynthia M.; Rottmann, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present findings of a study on the implementation of a multimodal teacher narrative inquiry component, theoretically grounded by Rosenblatt's theory of transaction analysis, methodologically supported by action research and practically enacted by narrative inquiry and multimodal learning. In particular, the component offered…

  18. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety in Youth with an Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Follow-Up Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selles, Robert R.; Arnold, Elysse B.; Phares, Vicky; Lewin, Adam B.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Storch, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxiety in youth with an autism spectrum disorder appears efficacious; however, maintenance of treatment gains has not yet been studied. Using a sample of 32 youth who had benefited at least minimally from a past trial of cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxiety in autism spectrum disorder, this study assessed…

  19. Common mental disorders associated with 2-year diabetes incidence : The Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atlantis, Evan; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Cashman, Kara; Penninx, Brenda J. W. H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Few prospective cohort studies describe the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus associated with depression or anxiety. The aim of this study was to determine the 2-year diabetes incidence and pattern of explanatory factors associated with depressive and/or anxiety disorders. Methods: A pros

  20. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of anxiety disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otowa, Takeshi; Hek, Karin; Lee, Minyoung; Byrne, Enda M.; Mirza, Saira S.; Nivard, Michel G.; Bigdeli, Timothy; Aggen, Steven H.; Adkins, Daniel; Wolen, Aaron; Fanous, Ayman; Keller, Matthew C.; Castelao, Enrique; Kutalik, Zoltan; Van der Auwera, Sandra; Homuth, Georg; Nauck, Matthias; Teumer, Alexander; Milaneschi, Yuri; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Direk, Nese; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre; Mulder, Cornelis L.; Henders, Anjali K.; Medland, Sarah E.; Gordon, Scott; Heath, Andrew C.; Madden, Pamela A.F.; Pergadia, Michelle; van der Most, Peter J.; Nolte, Ilja M.; van Oort, Floor V.A.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Preisig, Martin; Grabe, Hans Jörgen; Middeldorp, Christel M.; Penninx, Brenda WJH; Boomsma, Dorret; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant; Maher, Brion S.; van den Oord, Edwin J.; Wray, Naomi R.; Tiemeier, Henning; Hettema, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety disorders, namely generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and phobias, are common, etiologically complex conditions with a partially genetic basis. Despite differing on diagnostic definitions based upon clinical presentation, anxiety disorders likely represent various expressions of an underlying common diathesis of abnormal regulation of basic threat-response systems. We conducted genome-wide association analyses in nine samples of European ancestry from seven large, independent studies. To identify genetic variants contributing to genetic susceptibility shared across interview-generated DSM-based anxiety disorders, we applied two phenotypic approaches: (1) comparisons between categorical anxiety disorder cases and super-normal controls, and (2) quantitative phenotypic factor scores derived from a multivariate analysis combining information across the clinical phenotypes. We used logistic and linear regression, respectively, to analyze the association between these phenotypes and genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms. Meta-analysis for each phenotype combined results across the nine samples for over 18 000 unrelated individuals. Each meta-analysis identified a different genome-wide significant region, with the following markers showing the strongest association: for case-control contrasts, rs1709393 located in an uncharacterized non-coding RNA locus on chromosomal band 3q12.3 (P=1.65×10−8); for factor scores, rs1067327 within CAMKMT encoding the calmodulin-lysine N-methyltransferase on chromosomal band 2p21 (P=2.86×10−9). Independent replication and further exploration of these findings are needed to more fully understand the role of these variants in risk and expression of anxiety disorders. PMID:26754954

  1. Tranexamic Acid in a Multimodal Blood Loss Prevention Protocol to Decrease Blood Loss in Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Cohort Study#

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Andreu, Miguel; Talavera, Gloria; Padilla-Eguiluz, Norma G.; Perez-Chrzanowska, Hanna; Figueredo-Galve, Reyes; Rodriguez-Merchán, Carlos E.; Gómez-Barrena, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To clarify if blood loss and transfusion requirements can be decreased in revision knee surgery through a multimodal blood loss approach with tranexamic acid (TXA) Patients and Methods: A retrospective study was designed in 87 knees (79 patients) that received a knee revision between 2007 and 2013. To avoid heterogeneity in the surgical technique, only revisions with one single implant system were included. A treatment series of 44 knees that received TXA and other techniques in a multimodal blood loss protocol was compared to a control series of 43 knees that received neither TXA nor the rest of the multimodal blood loss protocol. No differences in the complexity of surgeries or case severity were detected. Results: A significant decrease was observed from 58% transfusion rate in the control group to 5% in the treated group. The postoperative haemoglobin drop was also significantly different. Although the use of a blood loss prevention approach including TXA was the most relevant factor in the transfusion risk (OR=15), longer surgical time also associated an increased risk of transfusion (OR=1.15). Conclusion: This study supports the use of a two-dose intravenous TXA under a multimodal blood loss prevention approach in revision knee replacement with significant reduction in the transfusion rate, postoperative blood loss and haemoglobin drop. PMID:27708740

  2. Fathers' challenging parenting behavior prevents social anxiety development in their 4-year-old children: a longitudinal observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdandžić, Mirjana; Möller, Eline L; de Vente, Wieke; Bögels, Susan M; van den Boom, Dymphna C

    2014-02-01

    Recent models on parenting propose different roles for fathers and mothers in the development of child anxiety. Specifically, it is suggested that fathers' challenging parenting behavior, in which the child is playfully encouraged to push her limits, buffers against child anxiety. In this longitudinal study, we explored whether the effect of challenging parenting on children's social anxiety differed between fathers and mothers. Fathers and mothers from 94 families were separately observed with their two children (44 % girls), aged 2 and 4 years at Time 1, in three structured situations involving one puzzle task and two games. Overinvolved and challenging parenting behavior were coded. Child social anxiety was measured by observing the child's response to a stranger at Time 1, and half a year later at Time 2, and by parental ratings. In line with predictions, father's challenging parenting behavior predicted less subsequent observed social anxiety of the 4-year-old child. Mothers' challenging behavior, however, predicted more observed social anxiety of the 4-year-old. Parents' overinvolvement at Time 1 did not predict change in observed social anxiety of the 4-year-old child. For the 2-year-old child, maternal and paternal parenting behavior did not predict subsequent social anxiety, but early social anxiety marginally did. Parent-rated social anxiety was predicted by previous parental ratings of social anxiety, and not by parenting behavior. Challenging parenting behavior appears to have favorable effects on observed 4-year-old's social anxiety when displayed by the father. Challenging parenting behavior emerges as an important focus for future research and interventions.

  3. Death and Dying Attitudes, Anxieties, and Fears of Certified Nursing Assistants: A Descriptive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Josephine A.

    2010-01-01

    The critical role of Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs) to help elderly nursing home residents' move through declining conditions or diseases to death is salient. It is important for CNAs and nursing home leaders to understand CNAs' attitudes, fears, and anxieties toward death and dying. The quantitative study investigated CNA's…

  4. Fearless Improvisation: A Pilot Study to Analyze String Students' Confidence, Anxiety, and Attitude toward Learning Improvisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the confidence, anxiety, and attitude of novice string student improvisers. A form of the Fennema-Sherman Mathematics Attitudes Scales, as modified for improvisation by Wehr-Flowers, was given to middle school and high school string students (N = 121) after their participation in a 4-month improvisation…

  5. Sleep in depression and anxiety disorders: A population-based study of elderly persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.F. van den Berg (Julia); H.J. Luijendijk (Hendrika); J.H.M. Tulen (Joke); A. Hofman (Albert); A.K. Neven (Arie); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Sleep disturbance is common in psychiatric disorders. However, the relationships of core parameters in sleep research, such as total sleep time (TST), with depression and anxiety disorders are unclear and have rarely been investigated in large population-based studies. Method:

  6. Foreign Language Anxiety's Forgotten Study: The Case of the Anxious Preservice Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tum, Danyal Oztas

    2015-01-01

    This article argues that nonnative preservice teachers are just as susceptible to foreign language anxiety as are inexperienced language learners, a claim carrying important implications for the EFL classroom. The results of the study described in this article indicate that anxious preservice teachers experience significant levels of language…

  7. Breaking the Code of Silence: A Study of Teachers' Nonverbal Decoding Accuracy of Foreign Language Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregersen, Tammy

    2007-01-01

    This study examined teachers' accuracy in decoding nonverbal behaviour indicative of foreign language anxiety. Teachers and teacher trainees twice observed a videotape without sound of seven beginning French foreign language students as they participated in an oral exam; four of these students were defined as anxious language learners by the…

  8. Aversive learning and generalization predict subclinical levels of anxiety : a six-month longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenaert, Bert; Boddez, Yannick; Griffith, James W; Vervliet, Bram; Schruers, Koen; Hermans, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    The identification of premorbid markers of risk for psychopathology is one of the most important challenges for present-day psychiatric research. This study focuses on behavioral vulnerability factors that contribute to the development of anxiety. Little is known about the role of aversive learning

  9. Correlates of benzodiazepine dependence in the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manthey, Leonie; Lohbeck, Marijke; Giltay, Erik J.; van Veena, Tineke; Zitman, Frans G.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Benzodiazepines (BZDs) are effective in the short term against anxiety and insomnia. However, some BZD users develop BZD dependence after a relatively short period of time. Therefore, we aimed to identify the risk factors of BZD dependence. Design An observational cohort study. Setting The Neth

  10. Behavioral Inhibition and Risk for Developing Social Anxiety Disorder: A Meta-Analytic Study

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    Clauss, Jacqueline A.; Blackford, Jennifer Urbano

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Behavioral inhibition (BI) has been associated with increased risk for developing social anxiety disorder (SAD); however, the degree of risk associated with BI has yet to be systematically examined and quantified. The goal of the present study was to quantify the association between childhood BI and risk for developing SAD. Method: A…

  11. Silent Illumination: A Study on Chan (Zen) Meditation, Anxiety, and Musical Performance Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Peter; Chang, Joanne; Zemon, Vance; Midlarsky, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of Chan (Zen) meditation on musical performance anxiety and musical performance quality. Nineteen participants were recruited from music conservatories and randomly assigned to either an eight-week meditation group or a wait-list control group. After the intervention, all participants performed in a public…

  12. Behavioral Inhibition as a Risk Factor for the Development of Childhood Anxiety Disorders: A Longitudinal Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.E.H.M. Muris (Peter); A.M.L. van Brakel (Anna); A. Arntz (Arnoud); E. Schouten (Erik)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis longitudinal study examined the additive and interactive effects of behavioral inhibition and a wide range of other vulnerability factors in the development of anxiety problems in youths. A sample of 261 children, aged 5 to 8 years, 124 behaviorally inhibited and 137 control childre

  13. Anxiety towards Mathematics and Educational Level: A Study on Means Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalera-Chávez, Milka Elena; García-Santillán, Arturo; Córdova-Rangel, Arturo; González-Gómez, Santiago; Tejada-Peña, Esmeralda

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research work is to analyze whether there is a difference in the degree of anxiety towards mathematics among students of different educational levels. The study is not experimental and cross sectional, and it is based on difference of means between groups. The sample is not probabilistic, and consisted of 226 students from…

  14. Pilot Study: Fluvoxamine Treatment for Depression and Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gothelf, Doron; Rubinstein, Maly; Shemesh, Eyal; Miller, Orit; Farbstein, Ilana; Klein, Anat; Weizman, Abraham; Apter, Alan; Yaniv, Isaac

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety, tolerability, and benefit of fluvoxamine for the treatment of major depressive disorder or anxiety disorders in children and adolescents with cancer. Method: The study was conducted from 2001 to 2004 at a pediatric hematology-oncology center. Fifteen children and adolescents with cancer were treated with…

  15. Patient anxiety in the medical encounter: a study of verbal and nonverbal communication in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bensing, J.M.; Verheul, W.; Dulmen, A.M. van

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Many patients feel anxious when entering the consultation room, but seldom verbalize their emotions explicitly in the medical encounter. The authors designed a study to analyse the visibility of patient pre-consultation (state) anxiety in their communication during the consultation. In an a

  16. Is metacognition a causal moderator of the relationship between catastrophic misinterpretation and health anxiety? A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Robin; Wells, Adrian

    2016-03-01

    Psychological theories have identified a range of variables contributing to health anxiety, including, dysfunctional illness beliefs, catastrophic misinterpretation, somatosensory amplification and neuroticism. More recently, metacognitive beliefs have been proposed as important in health anxiety. This study aimed to test the potential causal role of metacognitive beliefs in health anxiety. A prospective design was employed and participants (n = 105) completed a battery of questionnaire at two time points (6 months apart). Results demonstrated that cognitive, personality and metacognitive variables were bi-variate prospective correlates of health anxiety. Hierarchical regression analysis revealed that only metacognitive beliefs emerged as independent and significant prospective predictors of health anxiety. Moderation analysis demonstrated that metacognitive beliefs prospectively moderated the relationship between catastrophic misinterpretation and health anxiety. Follow-up regression analysis incorporating the interaction term (metacognition × misinterpretation) showed that the term explained additional variance in health anxiety. The results confirm that metacognition is a predictor of health anxiety and it is more substantive than misinterpretations of symptoms, somatosensory amplification, neuroticism, and illness beliefs. These results may have major implications for current cognitive models and for the treatment of health anxiety.

  17. The contribution of embarrassment to phobic dental anxiety: a qualitative research study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenberg Nicole

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Embarrassment is emphasized, yet scantily described as a factor in extreme dental anxiety or phobia. Present study aimed to describe details of social aspects of anxiety in dental situations, especially focusing on embarrassment phenomena. Methods Subjects (Ss were consecutive specialist clinic patients, 16 men, 14 women, 20–65 yr, who avoided treatment mean 12.7 yr due to anxiety. Electronic patient records and transcribed initial assessment and exit interviews were analyzed using QSR"N4" software to aid in exploring contexts related to social aspects of dental anxiety and embarrassment phenomena. Qualitative findings were co-validated with tests of association between embarrassment intensity ratings, years of treatment avoidance, and mouth-hiding behavioral ratings. Results Embarrassment was a complaint in all but three cases. Chief complaints in the sample: 30% had fear of pain; 47% cited powerlessness in relation to dental social situations, some specific to embarrassment and 23% named co-morbid psychosocial dysfunction due to effects of sexual abuse, general anxiety, gagging, fainting or panic attacks. Intense embarrassment was manifested in both clinical and non-clinical situations due to poor dental status or perceived neglect, often (n = 9 with fear of negative social evaluation as chief complaint. These nine cases were qualitatively different from other cases with chief complaints of social powerlessness associated with conditioned distrust of dentists and their negative behaviors. The majority of embarrassed Ss to some degree inhibited smiling/laughing by hiding with lips, hands or changed head position. Secrecy, taboo-thinking, and mouth-hiding were associated with intense embarrassment. Especially after many years of avoidance, embarrassment phenomena lead to feelings of self-punishment, poor self-image/esteem and in some cases personality changes in a vicious circle of anxiety and avoidance. Embarrassment

  18. The effect of a preoperative education programme on perioperative anxiety in children: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Mariam; Glasper, Alan; Keeton, Diana; Spargo, Paul

    2008-05-01

    The distress of children at the induction of anesthesia (DAI) is unpleasant for all involved and potentially harmful. Many strategies such as premedication or parental presence at induction have been described to minimize it. A preoperative education programme [the 'Saturday Morning Club' or (SMC)] has been in existence in our institution for a number of years and an observational study of children undergoing day case surgery was undertaken to assess the influence of attendance at the SMC on DAI. Ninety-four children aged between 2 and 16 years of age were included in the study; 21 attended the SMC and 73 did not. Patient anxiety using the modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale was measured by blinded observers on the day ward, in the preoperative waiting room and at induction of anesthesia. Parental anxiety at the same locations was self reported using a visual analogue scale. Attendance at the SMC had a favorable effect on patient anxiety levels in all three locations but only reached statistical significance in the waiting room (P = 0.007, Mann-Whitney U-test). At present there is little evidence to support the use of preoperative education programmes in the UK and further studies are required to determine their benefit.

  19. Sleep difficulties and the development of depression and anxiety: a longitudinal study of young Australian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Melinda L; Sztendur, Ewa M; Diamond, Neil T; Byles, Julie E; Bruck, Dorothy

    2014-06-01

    Previous longitudinal studies have demonstrated that poor sleep may precede depression and anxiety. The current study examined the association between self-reported sleeping difficulties and new onset depression and anxiety in young women. A nationally representative sample of 9,683 young women from the Australian Longitudinal Study of Women's Health was analyzed. Women were surveyed in 2000 (aged 22 to 25 years), 2003, 2006, and 2009. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine the association between sleeping difficulties in 2000 and new-onset depression (excluding postnatal depression) and anxiety at each subsequent survey. Significant increased risk of new onset depression (odds ratio (OR)=2.6 in 2003; OR=4.4 in 2006; OR=4.4 in 2009) and anxiety (OR=2.4 in 2006; OR=2.9 in 2009) was found at each follow-up survey in women who reported sleeping difficulties "often" in 2000. Further research is needed to uncover the mechanisms underlying the link between sleep problems and mental health.

  20. The cross-sectional study of anxiety levels and ratio of severity of thirteen symptoms of anxiety among medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Arslan Iqbal

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: Mild form of anxiety is much more common among medical students and majority of these medical students are females. Moreover, the symptoms of anxiety including tension, anxious mood, depressed mood, insomnia, fear and CVS symptoms appear with moderate severity in majority of medical students while on the other hand some symptoms including general somatic muscular and sensory symptoms, difficulties in concentration and memory, genitor-urinary symptoms, respiratory symptoms, GIT symptoms and other autonomic symptoms appear with least severity among majority of medical students. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(6.000: 2297-2304

  1. Comparative Study of Multimodal Biometric Recognition by Fusion of Iris and Fingerprint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houda Benaliouche

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This research investigates the comparative performance from three different approaches for multimodal recognition of combined iris and fingerprints: classical sum rule, weighted sum rule, and fuzzy logic method. The scores from the different biometric traits of iris and fingerprint are fused at the matching score and the decision levels. The scores combination approach is used after normalization of both scores using the min-max rule. Our experimental results suggest that the fuzzy logic method for the matching scores combinations at the decision level is the best followed by the classical weighted sum rule and the classical sum rule in order. The performance evaluation of each method is reported in terms of matching time, error rates, and accuracy after doing exhaustive tests on the public CASIA-Iris databases V1 and V2 and the FVC 2004 fingerprint database. Experimental results prior to fusion and after fusion are presented followed by their comparison with related works in the current literature. The fusion by fuzzy logic decision mimics the human reasoning in a soft and simple way and gives enhanced results.

  2. Multimodal communication in a noisy environment: a case study of the Bornean rock frog Staurois parvus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Ulmar Grafe

    Full Text Available High background noise is an impediment to signal detection and perception. We report the use of multiple solutions to improve signal perception in the acoustic and visual modality by the Bornean rock frog, Staurois parvus. We discovered that vocal communication was not impaired by continuous abiotic background noise characterised by fast-flowing water. Males modified amplitude, pitch, repetition rate and duration of notes within their advertisement call. The difference in sound pressure between advertisement calls and background noise at the call dominant frequency of 5578 Hz was 8 dB, a difference sufficient for receiver detection. In addition, males used several visual signals to communicate with conspecifics with foot flagging and foot flashing being the most common and conspicuous visual displays, followed by arm waving, upright posture, crouching, and an open-mouth display. We used acoustic playback experiments to test the efficacy-based alerting signal hypothesis of multimodal communication. In support of the alerting hypothesis, we found that acoustic signals and foot flagging are functionally linked with advertisement calling preceding foot flagging. We conclude that S. parvus has solved the problem of continuous broadband low-frequency noise by both modifying its advertisement call in multiple ways and by using numerous visual signals. This is the first example of a frog using multiple acoustic and visual solutions to communicate in an environment characterised by continuous noise.

  3. Predicting the laterality of temporal lobe epilepsy from PET, MRI, and DTI: A multimodal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorian Pustina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pre-surgical evaluation of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE relies on information obtained from multiple neuroimaging modalities. The relationship between modalities and their combined power in predicting the seizure focus is currently unknown. We investigated asymmetries from three different modalities, PET (glucose metabolism, MRI (cortical thickness, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI; white matter anisotropy in 28 left and 30 right TLE patients (LTLE and RTLE. Stepwise logistic regression models were built from each modality separately and from all three combined, while bootstrapped methods and split-sample validation verified the robustness of predictions. Among all multimodal asymmetries, three PET asymmetries formed the best predictive model (100% success in full sample, >95% success in split-sample validation. The combinations of PET with other modalities did not perform better than PET alone. Probabilistic classifications were obtained for new clinical cases, which showed correct lateralization for 7/7 new TLE patients (100% and for 4/5 operated patients with discordant or non-informative PET reports (80%. Metabolism showed closer relationship with white matter in LTLE and closer relationship with gray matter in RTLE. Our data suggest that metabolism is a powerful modality that can predict seizure laterality with high accuracy, and offers high value for automated predictive models. The side of epileptogenic focus can affect the relationship of metabolism with brain structure. The data and tools necessary to obtain classifications for new TLE patients are made publicly available.

  4. Effects of Yoga Versus Walking on Mood, Anxiety, and Brain GABA Levels: A Randomized Controlled MRS Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, Theodore H.; Owen, Liz; Rein, Tasha; Karri, Surya K.; Yakhkind, Aleksandra; Perlmutter, Ruth; Prescot, Andrew; Renshaw, Perry F.; Ciraulo, Domenic A.; Jensen, J. Eric

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Yoga and exercise have beneficial effects on mood and anxiety. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic activity is reduced in mood and anxiety disorders. The practice of yoga postures is associated with increased brain GABA levels. This study addresses the question of whether changes in mood, anxiety, and GABA levels are specific to yoga or related to physical activity. Methods Healthy subjects with no significant medical/psychiatric disorders were randomized to yoga or a metabolically matched walking intervention for 60 minutes 3 times a week for 12 weeks. Mood and anxiety scales were taken at weeks 0, 4, 8, 12, and before each magnetic resonance spectroscopy scan. Scan 1 was at baseline. Scan 2, obtained after the 12-week intervention, was followed by a 60-minute yoga or walking intervention, which was immediately followed by Scan 3. Results The yoga subjects (n = 19) reported greater improvement in mood and greater decreases in anxiety than the walking group (n = 15). There were positive correlations between improved mood and decreased anxiety and thalamic GABA levels. The yoga group had positive correlations between changes in mood scales and changes in GABA levels. Conclusions The 12-week yoga intervention was associated with greater improvements in mood and anxiety than a metabolically matched walking exercise. This is the first study to demonstrate that increased thalamic GABA levels are associated with improved mood and decreased anxiety. It is also the first time that a behavioral intervention (i.e., yoga postures) has been associated with a positive correlation between acute increases in thalamic GABA levels and improvements in mood and anxiety scales. Given that pharmacologic agents that increase the activity of the GABA system are prescribed to improve mood and decrease anxiety, the reported correlations are in the expected direction. The possible role of GABA in mediating the beneficial effects of yoga on mood and anxiety warrants

  5. Quality of life, depression, anxiety and loneliness in patients with bullous pemphigoid. A case control study*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouris, Anargyros; Platsidaki, Eftychia; Christodoulou, Christos; Armyra, Kalliopi; Korkoliakou, Panagiota; Stefanaki, Christina; Tsatovidou, Revekka; Rigopoulos, Dimitrios; Kontochristopoulos, George

    2016-01-01

    Background Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is a chronic, autoimmune blistering skin disease that affects patients' daily life and psychosocial well-being. Objective The aim of the study was to evaluate the quality of life, anxiety, depression and loneliness in BP patients. Methods Fifty-seven BP patients and fifty-seven healthy controls were recruited for the study. The quality of life of each patient was assessed using the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) scale. Moreover, they were evaluated for anxiety and depression according to the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS-scale), while loneliness was measured through the Loneliness Scale-Version 3 (UCLA) scale. Results The mean DLQI score was 9.45±3.34. Statistically significant differences on the HADS total scale and in HADS-depression subscale (p=0.015 and p=0.002, respectively) were documented. No statistically significant difference was found between the two groups on the HADS-anxiety subscale. Furthermore, significantly higher scores were recorded on the UCLA Scale compared with healthy volunteers (p=0.003). Conclusion BP had a significant impact on quality of life and the psychological status of patients, probably due to the appearance of unattractive lesions on the skin, functional problems and disease chronicity. PMID:27828632

  6. Depression, anxiety, and suicidal ideation among Chinese Americans: a study of immigration-related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Fang, Le; Wu, Yow-Wu B; Wieczorek, William F

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify anxiety, depression, and suicidal ideation disparities among Chinese Americans and how immigration-related factors affected the outcomes. We tried to explain the differences as a function of the Chinese culture. Data were derived from the National Latino and Asian American Study, the first national epidemiological survey of these populations in the United States. We used only the Chinese sample (N = 600) and focused on depressive disorder, anxiety disorder, and suicidal ideation. The United States-born Chinese and those Chinese who immigrated to the United States at 18 years or younger were at higher risk for lifetime depressive or anxiety disorders or suicidal ideation than were their China-born counterparts who arrived in the country at or after 18 years of age. For Chinese Americans, immigration-related factors were associated with depression and anxiety disorders and suicidal ideation. The higher prevalence of these disorders might be attributed to the psychological strains experienced by those who are at higher risk of cultural conflicts.

  7. The Survey of Behavioral Systems in Relation to Test Anxiety: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir ABDOLHOSSEINI

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to compare the behavioral activation systems between students with test anxiety (TA and without TA. Methods: This study included undergraduate students registered at the Medical Science University of during 2009-2010. The selected female students (N=300 completed Test Anxiety Scale (TAS and Gray-Wilson personality questionnaire (GWPQ and 100 students who have obtained the lowest and highest scores in TA questionnaire, were further compared according to Grays Brine-Behavioral questionnaire. Data were analyzed using a T-test. Results: The results showed that samples were significantly different in total scores of Gray-Wilson personality questionnaire. In terms of subscales of Gray-Wilson personality questionnaire, there was a significant difference between the two groups in the behavioral inhabitation system (BIS and fight -flight system (FFS but no significant differences found between two groups in the behavioral activation system (BAS. Conclusion: Test Anxiety was corresponded with brain systems behavior theory, and anxiety increased in the avoidance system activation.

  8. Working Memory Training and CBT Reduces Anxiety Symptoms and Attentional Biases to Threat: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadwin, Julie A; Richards, Helen J

    2016-01-01

    Research indicates that cognitive processes linked to the detection of threat stimuli are associated with poor attentional control, placing children and adolescents at increased risk for the development of anxious affect. The current study aimed to provide preliminary data to assess whether an intervention designed to improve attentional control (via working memory; WM) would lead to better performance in tests of WM and would be associated with positive changes in symptoms of trait and test anxiety, increased inhibitory control and reduced attention to threat. Forty adolescents aged 11-14 years who reported elevated anxiety and low attentional control were randomly allocated to a WM training or an active cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) control group. Post intervention, WM training was associated with greater improvements (versus. CBT) in trained WM tasks. Both groups, however, reported fewer anxiety symptoms, demonstrated increased inhibitory control and a reduction in attentional biases to threat post intervention and these results were maintained at follow up. The study provides indicative evidence which suggests that WM training has similar benefits to a more traditional CBT intervention on reduced anxiety and attentional biases for threat. Future research should aim to replicate the findings in a large sample size and explore the broader impact of training on day-to-day functioning. In addition, further research is needed to identify which participants benefit most from different interventions (using baseline characteristics) on treatment compliance and outcome.

  9. A study in male and female 5-HT transporter knockout rats : An animal model for anxiety and depression disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivier, J D A; Van Der Hart, M G C; Van Swelm, R P L; Dederen, P J; Homberg, J R; Cremers, T; Deen, P M T; Cuppen, E; Cools, A R; Ellenbroek, B A

    2008-01-01

    Human studies have shown that a reduction of 5-HT transporter (SERT) increases the vulnerability for anxiety and depression. Moreover, women are more vulnerable to develop depression and anxiety disorders than men. For that reason we hypothesized that homozygous 5-HT transporter knockout rat (SERT-/

  10. A study in male and female 5-HT transporter knockout rats: an animal model for anxiety and depression disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivier, J.; Van Der Hart, M.G.C.; Van Swelm, R.P.L.; Dederen, P.J.; Homberg, J.R.; Cremers, T.; Deen, P.M.T.; Cuppen, E.; Cools, A.R.; Ellenbroek, B.A.

    2008-01-01

    Human studies have shown that a reduction of 5-HT transporter (SERT) increases the vulnerability for anxiety and depression. Moreover, women are more vulnerable to develop depression and anxiety disorders than men. For that reason we hypothesized that homozygous 5-HT transporter knockout rat (SERT(-

  11. Sensitivity and Specificity of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED): A Community-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSousa, Diogo Araujo; Salum, Giovanni Abrahao; Isolan, Luciano Rassier; Manfro, Gisele Gus

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional community-based study was to examine the sensitivity and specificity of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED) to the diagnosis of anxiety disorders (AD). Participants were 119 students aged 9-18. Psychiatric diagnoses were assessed by a psychiatrist throughout a structural clinical…

  12. The Effects of Cooperative Learning on Foreign Language Anxiety: A Comparative Study of Taiwanese and American Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duxbury, John G.; Tsai, Ling-ling

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the level of foreign language anxiety in the classroom, plus the correlation between foreign language anxiety and cooperative learning attitudes and practice among university students at one university in the United States and three universities in Southern Taiwan. Two instruments (The Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety…

  13. Health anxiety and fear of fear in panic disorder and agoraphobia vs. social phobia: a prospective longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudaz, M.; Craske, M.; Becker, E.S.; Ledermann, T.; Margraf, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: This study is aimed to evaluate the role of two vulnerability factors, health anxiety and fear of :Par in the prediction of the onset of panic disorder/agoraphobia (PDA) relative to a comparison anxiety disorder Methods: Young women, aged between 18 and 24 years, were investigated at bas

  14. Factors That Explains Student Anxiety toward Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Santillán, Arturo; Escalera-Chávez, Milka Elena; Moreno-García, Elena; Santana-Villegas, Josefina del Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to test whether anxiety toward mathematics is made up of a five-factor structure: anxiety toward evaluation, anxiety toward temporality, anxiety toward understanding of mathematical problems, anxiety toward numbers and operations, and anxiety toward mathematical situations in real life. Our study sample was formed of…

  15. Evaluation of anxiety, depression and suicidal intent in undergraduate dental students: A cross-sectional study

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    Manish Bathla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is an increasing amount of stress in undergraduate dental students leading to anxiety, depression, and suicidal attempts/suicide. Aims: This study aims to evaluate anxiety, depression and suicidal intent in undergraduate dental students and to find out the various areas of stress. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using a semi-structured questionnaire (to assess academic and nonacademic areas of stress and three scales-Hamilton scale for anxiety (HAM-A; Hamilton depression rating scale (HDRS and Beck′s Suicide Intent Scale (BSI. Descriptive statistics; Pearson′s Chi-square test; Multiple ANOVA; Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney test were used to analyze the data at the significant level of P ≤ 0.05. Results: In a total of 258 dental undergraduate students, academic areas of stress that were found to be statistically significant were long teaching hours (P = 0.002; high workload (P ≤ 0.001; frequency of tests (P ≤ 0.001 and competition/fear of failure (P = 0.009. Lack of interest in the profession was a statistically significant nonacademic area for stress (P ≤ 0.001. The students of first and final year reported higher anxiety (HAM-A 13.93 ± 6.908 and 16.44 ± 7.637 respectively and depression (HDRS 14.29 ± 6.302 and 14.22 ± 5.422; whereas suicidal intent was reported almost the same throughout the study sample (BSI 5.65 ± 5.465. Conclusion: An increasing level of anxiety, depression and suicidal intent due to various stressors in undergraduate dental students indicate a need to modify current education system and timely help to have psychological healthy dental professionals in future.

  16. Study of Depression, Anxiety and Stress among the Medical Students in two Medical Colleges of Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunwar, D; Risal, A; Koirala, S

    2016-01-01

    Background Medical education is intended to prepare graduates for a promoting health and caring for the sick. Medical students are confronted with significant academic, psychological and existential stressors. There is insufficient information regarding psychological morbidity among Nepalese medical students. Objective To determine the prevalence of depression, anxiety and stress, among the medical students in Nepal, and its association with sociodemographic characteristics. Method A cross-sectional questionnaire based study was conducted including all students from first to fifth year of student using convenience method of sampling from Kathmandu University Medical School (KUSMS), Dhulikhel and Manipal College of Medical Sciences (MCOMS), Pokhara, Nepal. Depression, Anxiety and stress were assessed using Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS). Additional questions regarding demographic variables were also included in the survey. Data analysis was done on Statistical Package for the Social Sciences SPSS version 16. Result A total of 538 students participated in the study giving a response rate of 89.6%. Aamong them 56.5% were from age group 21-25 years, 42.2% were below 20 years and only 1.3% were above 25 years of age. Among them 52% were female and 48% were male. Our study found that the overall prevalence of depression was 29.9%, anxiety was 41.1% and stress was 27% among all participated medical students. Depression was significantly associated (OR 2.23, 95% CI 1.43-3.47, pstress 27% among undergraduate medical students warrants needs for strategic plans to alleviate depression anxiety and the stressors right from the time they join medical school and has to be continued till they finish the course.

  17. A PILOT STUDY ON CERTAIN YOGIC AND NATUROPATHIC PROCEDURES IN GENERALIZED ANXIETY DISORDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kshama Gupta

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD is one of the most common anxiety disorders characterized by persistent worrying, anxiety symptoms, and tension. Most community-based studies place the prevalence in the range of 2 to 5 percent, with a lifetime prevalence as high as 8 percent. Even though previous studies on yoga and naturopathy in anxiety disorders proved effective, there lack proper methodology and they are not specifically focused at GAD. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of certain yogic and naturopathic procedures in the management of GAD. A total of 12 patients with GAD satisfying the DSM IV TR diagnostic criteria were selected and allotted in to two groups, Yoga group and Naturopathic group by following randomization method. In Yoga group, various asana’s and pranayama were practiced one hour daily for 21 days. In Naturopathy group, full body massage and steam, diaphragmatic breathing and acupressure were done one hour daily for 21 days. Criteria of assessment were based on the scoring of Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS. Statistical analysis was done by using paired and unpaired‘t’ test. In Yoga group (n = 6, 52.59 % relief was observed (P 0.05 found in between the two groups. Both Yoga and Naturopathic procedures are effective in the management of GAD. Even though Yoga and Naturopathy interventions proved effective on HARS total score of GAD, Yoga seems to be an attractive option because of its non pharmacological approach, cost effectiveness and international acceptance when compared to the other interventions.

  18. Fear of being laughed at and social anxiety: A preliminary psychometric study

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    Hugo Carretero-Dios

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study examines the relationship between questionnaire measures of social phobia and gelotophobia. A sample of 211 Colombian adults filled in Spanish versions of the Social Anxiety and Distress scale (SAD; Watson & Friend, 1969, the Fear of Negative Evaluation scale (FNE; Watson & Friend, 1969 and the GELOPH (Ruch & Proyer, 2008. Results confirmed that both Social Anxiety and Distress and Fear of Negative Evaluation scale overlapped with the fear of being laughed at without being identical with it. The SAD and FNE correlated highly with the GELOPH but not all high scorers in these scales expressed a fear of being laughed at. Furthermore, an item factor analysis yielded three factors that were mostly loaded by items of the respective scales. This three-factor structure was verified using confirmatory factor analysis. A measure model where one general factor of social anxiety was specified, or another one where two different factors were defined (gelotophobia vs. social anxiety assessed by SAD and FNE showed a very poor fit to the data. It is concluded that the fear of being laughed cannot fully be accounted for by these measures of social phobia.

  19. AGT M235T genotype/anxiety interaction and gender in the HyperGEN study.

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    Sarah S Knox

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Both anxiety and elevated heart rate (HR have been implicated in the development of hypertension. The HyperGen cohort, consisting of siblings with severe and mild hypertension, an age-matched random sample of persons from the same base populations, and unmedicated adult offspring of the hypertensive siblings (N = 1,002 men and 987 women, was analyzed for an association of the angiotenisinogen AGTM235T genotype (TT, MT, MM with an endophenotype, heart rate (HR in high and low anxious groups. METHODOLOGY: The interaction of AGTM genotype with anxiety, which has been independently associated with hypertension, was investigated adjusting for age, hypertension status, smoking, alcohol consumption, beta blocker medication, body mass index, physical activity and hours of television viewing (sedentary life style. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Although there was no main effect of genotype on HR in men or women, high anxious men with the TT genotype had high HR, whereas high anxious men with the MM genotype had low HR. In women, HR was inversely associated with anxiety but there was no interaction with genotype. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest that high anxiety in men with the TT genotype may increase risk for hypertension whereas the MM genotype may be protective in high anxious men. This type of gene x environment interaction may be one reason why genome wide association studies sometimes fail to replicate. The locus may be important only in combination with certain environmental factors.

  20. Childhood Anxiety Trajectories and Adolescent Disordered Eating: Findings from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerwas, Stephanie; Von Holle, Ann; Watson, Hunna; Gottfredson, Nisha; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The goal of the present paper was to examine whether childhood anxiety trajectories predict eating psychopathology. We predicted that girls with trajectories of increasing anxiety across childhood would have significantly greater risk of disordered eating in adolescence in comparison to girls with stable or decreasing trajectories of anxiety over childhood. Method Data were collected as part of the prospective longitudinal NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (N=450 girls). Childhood anxiety was assessed yearly (54 months through 6th grade) via maternal report on the Child Behavior Checklist. Disordered eating behaviors were assessed at age 15 via adolescent self-report on the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26). We conducted latent growth mixture modeling to define girls’ childhood anxiety trajectories. Maternal sensitivity, maternal postpartum depression, maternal anxiety, and child temperament were included as predictors of trajectory membership. Results The best fitting model included three trajectories of childhood anxiety, the low-decreasing class (22.9% of girls), the high-increasing class (35.4%), and the high-decreasing class (41.6%). Mothers with more symptoms of depression and separation anxiety had girls who were significantly more likely to belong to the high-increasing anxiety trajectory. There were no significant differences in adolescent disordered eating for girls across the three childhood anxiety trajectories. Conclusions Childhood anxiety, as captured by maternal report, may not be the most robust predictor of adolescent disordered eating and may be of limited utility for prevention programs that aim to identify children in the community at greatest risk for disordered eating. PMID:24938214

  1. Prevalence of Depression and Anxiety amongst Cancer Patients in a Hospital Setting: A Cross-Sectional Study

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    Anish Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The biomedical care for cancer has not been complemented by psychosocial progressions in cancer care. Objectives. To find the prevalence of anxiety and depression amongst cancer patients in a hospital setting. Design and Setting. This cross-sectional study was conducted at the tertiary care hospitals Shifa International Hospital Islamabad and Nuclear Medicine, Oncology, and Radiotherapy Institute [NORI]. Patients and Methods. 300 patients were interviewed from both the outpatient and inpatient department using The Aga Khan University Anxiety and Depression Scale (AKUADS. Main Outcome Measures. Using a score of 20 and above on the AKUADS, 146 (48.7% patients were suffering from anxiety and depression. Results. When cross tabulation was done between different factors and the cancer patients with anxiety and depression, the following factors were found out to be significant with associated p value < 0.05: education of the patient, presence of cancer in the family, the severity of pain, and the patient’s awareness of his anxiety and depression. Out of 143 (47.7% uneducated patients, 85 (59.4% were depressed, hence making it the highest educational category suffering from depression and anxiety. Conclusion. The prevalence of anxiety and depression amongst cancer patients was high showing that importance should be given to screening and counseling cancer patients for anxiety and depression, to help them cope with cancer as a disease and its impact on their mental wellbeing. Limitations. The frequency of female patients in our research was higher than those of male patients.

  2. Prevalence of Depression and Anxiety amongst Cancer Patients in a Hospital Setting: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faheem, Muhammad; Fahim, Ammad; Innocent, Haran; Mansoor, Zainab; Rizvi, Shehrbano; Farrukh, Hizra

    2016-01-01

    Background. The biomedical care for cancer has not been complemented by psychosocial progressions in cancer care. Objectives. To find the prevalence of anxiety and depression amongst cancer patients in a hospital setting. Design and Setting. This cross-sectional study was conducted at the tertiary care hospitals Shifa International Hospital Islamabad and Nuclear Medicine, Oncology, and Radiotherapy Institute [NORI]. Patients and Methods. 300 patients were interviewed from both the outpatient and inpatient department using The Aga Khan University Anxiety and Depression Scale (AKUADS). Main Outcome Measures. Using a score of 20 and above on the AKUADS, 146 (48.7%) patients were suffering from anxiety and depression. Results. When cross tabulation was done between different factors and the cancer patients with anxiety and depression, the following factors were found out to be significant with associated p value < 0.05: education of the patient, presence of cancer in the family, the severity of pain, and the patient's awareness of his anxiety and depression. Out of 143 (47.7%) uneducated patients, 85 (59.4%) were depressed, hence making it the highest educational category suffering from depression and anxiety. Conclusion. The prevalence of anxiety and depression amongst cancer patients was high showing that importance should be given to screening and counseling cancer patients for anxiety and depression, to help them cope with cancer as a disease and its impact on their mental wellbeing. Limitations. The frequency of female patients in our research was higher than those of male patients. PMID:27752508

  3. Parental anxiety and stress before pediatric anesthesia: a pilot study on the effectiveness of preoperative clown intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, Francesca; Monti, Fiorella; Neri, Erica; Dellabartola, Sara; de Pascalis, Leonardo; Bozicevic, Laura

    2014-05-01

    As induction of pediatric anesthesia can elicit anxiety in children and parents alike, this study was aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of clown intervention in decreasing maternal anxiety and stress in the preoperative phase. Before anesthesia induction, 25 children were randomly assigned to clown intervention and 25 to a control group with a routine procedure. In the waiting room and after separation from the child, maternal anxiety and stress were measured. The results showed that after separation, only in the clown group, maternal state anxiety significantly decreased and the tendency to somatization did not increase. Moreover, after clown intervention, older children's mothers significantly reduced the level of perceived stress. As clown intervention can positively influence maternal anxiety and stress in the preoperative period, its promotion in clinical-hospital environments is recommended.

  4. Yoga-Enhanced Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (Y-CBT) for Anxiety Management: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalsa, Manjit K.; Greiner-Ferris, Julie M.; Hofmann, Stefan G.; Khalsa, Sat Bir S.

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy is an effective treatment for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), but there is still room for improvement. The aim of the present study was to examine the potential benefit of enriching cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) with Kundalini Yoga (Y-CBT). Participants consisted of treatment resistant clients at a community mental health clinic. A total of 32 participants enrolled in the study and 22 completed the program. After the Y-CBT intervention, pre-post comparisons showed statistically significant improvements in state and trait anxiety, depression, panic, sleep, and quality of life. Results from this preliminary study suggest that Y-CBT may have potential as a promising treatment for those suffering from GAD. PMID:24804619

  5. Towards Multimodal Content Representation

    CERN Document Server

    Bunt, Harry

    2009-01-01

    Multimodal interfaces, combining the use of speech, graphics, gestures, and facial expressions in input and output, promise to provide new possibilities to deal with information in more effective and efficient ways, supporting for instance: - the understanding of possibly imprecise, partial or ambiguous multimodal input; - the generation of coordinated, cohesive, and coherent multimodal presentations; - the management of multimodal interaction (e.g., task completion, adapting the interface, error prevention) by representing and exploiting models of the user, the domain, the task, the interactive context, and the media (e.g. text, audio, video). The present document is intended to support the discussion on multimodal content representation, its possible objectives and basic constraints, and how the definition of a generic representation framework for multimodal content representation may be approached. It takes into account the results of the Dagstuhl workshop, in particular those of the informal working group...

  6. A Cognitive Behavioural Intervention for Dental Anxiety for People with Learning Disabilities: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prangnell, Simon J.; Green, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Dental anxiety is a common form of anxiety problem, and research suggests that more people with learning disabilities experience dental anxiety than in the general population. Very little work has been done to investigate effective non-medical approaches for supporting people with a learning disability and dental anxiety to access dental care.…

  7. Teachers' Knowledge of Anxiety and Identification of Excessive Anxiety in

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headley, Clea; Campbell, Marilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined primary school teachers' knowledge of anxiety and excessive anxiety symptoms in children. Three hundred and fifteen primary school teachers completed a questionnaire exploring their definitions of anxiety and the indications they associated with excessive anxiety in primary school children. Results showed that teachers had an…

  8. Statistics Anxiety, Trait Anxiety, Learning Behavior, and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macher, Daniel; Paechter, Manuela; Papousek, Ilona; Ruggeri, Kai

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between statistics anxiety, individual characteristics (e.g., trait anxiety and learning strategies), and academic performance. Students enrolled in a statistics course in psychology (N = 147) filled in a questionnaire on statistics anxiety, trait anxiety, interest in statistics, mathematical…

  9. ANXIETY DISORDERS: A REVIEW

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    Arya Ashwani

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders are a highly prevalent and disabling class of psychiatric disorders. Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent and associated with substantial distress, morbidity and mortality. Recent epidemiological studies of anxiety disorders provided evidence of their high frequency in the general population worldwide. Anxiety disorders afflict an estimated 15.7 million people in the United States each year. Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent in adults with females showing higher preponderance of 2:1 as compared to males. Anxiety disorders are a group of mental disorders characterized by various combinations of key features - Irritability, fear, Insomnia, Nervousness, Tachycardia, Inability to concentrate, poor coping skills, Palpitation, Sweating, Agoraphobia and Social Withdrawal. The anxiety disorders, including panic disorder (PD, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD, social anxiety disorder (SAD, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, are among the disabling medical disorders. The neurobiology of anxiety disorders is not fully understood, but several different biologic abnormalities have been implicated in their etiology. The GABA, NE and 5HT systems play crucial roles in mediating the affective circuitry underlying the highly related clinical disorders of anxiety. Anxiety is a common psychiatric condition characterized by unnecessary aggression, poor quality of life, fear, worry, avoidance, and compulsive rituals that are associated with significant distress.

  10. Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Anxiety Disorders KidsHealth > For Teens > Anxiety Disorders A A ... Do en español Trastornos de ansiedad What Is Anxiety? Liam had always looked out for his younger ...

  11. Effect of massage therapy on pain, anxiety, relaxation, and tension after colorectal surgery: A randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Nikol E; Cutshall, Susanne M; Huebner, Marianne; Foss, Diane M; Lovely, Jenna K; Bauer, Brent A; Cima, Robert R

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the effect of postoperative massage in patients undergoing abdominal colorectal surgery. One hundred twenty-seven patients were randomized to receive a 20-min massage (n = 61) or social visit and relaxation session (no massage; n = 66) on postoperative days 2 and 3. Vital signs and psychological well-being (pain, tension, anxiety, satisfaction with care, relaxation) were assessed before and after each intervention. The study results indicated that postoperative massage significantly improved the patients' perception of pain, tension, and anxiety, but overall satisfaction was unchanged. In conclusion, massage may be beneficial during postoperative recovery for patients undergoing abdominal colorectal surgery. Further studies are warranted to optimize timing and duration and to determine other benefits in this clinical setting.

  12. Predicting the Onset of Anxiety Syndromes at 12 Months in Primary Care Attendees. The PredictA-Spain Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Peral, Patricia; Luna, Juan de Dios; Marston, Louise; King, Michael; Nazareth, Irwin; Motrico, Emma; GildeGómez-Barragán, María Josefa; Torres-González, Francisco; Montón-Franco, Carmen; Sánchez-Celaya, Marta; Díaz-Barreiros, Miguel Ángel; Vicens, Catalina; Muñoz-Bravo, Carlos; Bellón, Juan Ángel

    2014-01-01

    Background There are no risk algorithms for the onset of anxiety syndromes at 12 months in primary care. We aimed to develop and validate internally a risk algorithm to predict the onset of anxiety syndromes at 12 months. Methods A prospective cohort study with evaluations at baseline, 6 and 12 months. We measured 39 known risk factors and used multilevel logistic regression and inverse probability weighting to build the risk algorithm. Our main outcome was generalized anxiety, panic and other non-specific anxiety syndromes as measured by the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders, Patient Health Questionnaire (PRIME-MD-PHQ). We recruited 3,564 adult primary care attendees without anxiety syndromes from 174 family physicians and 32 health centers in 6 Spanish provinces. Results The cumulative 12-month incidence of anxiety syndromes was 12.2%. The predictA-Spain risk algorithm included the following predictors of anxiety syndromes: province; sex (female); younger age; taking medicines for anxiety, depression or stress; worse physical and mental quality of life (SF-12); dissatisfaction with paid and unpaid work; perception of financial strain; and the interactions sex*age, sex*perception of financial strain, and age*dissatisfaction with paid work. The C-index was 0.80 (95% confidence interval = 0.78–0.83) and the Hedges' g = 1.17 (95% confidence interval = 1.04–1.29). The Copas shrinkage factor was 0.98 and calibration plots showed an accurate goodness of fit. Conclusions The predictA-Spain risk algorithm is valid to predict anxiety syndromes at 12 months. Although external validation is required, the predictA-Spain is available for use as a predictive tool in the prevention of anxiety syndromes in primary care. PMID:25184313

  13. Does the diagnosis influence the outcome in multimodal outpatient pain management program for low back pain and sciatica? a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artner J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Juraj Artner, Stephan Kurz, Balkan Cakir, Heiko Reichel, Friederike LattigDepartment of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Ulm, GermanyAbstract: The literature describes multimodal pain-management programs as successful therapy options in the conservative treatment of chronic low back pain. Yet, the intensity and inclusion criteria of such programs remain debatable. In many studies, the pain originating from spinal structures is described as nonspecific low back pain – a diffuse diagnosis without serious implications. The purpose of this study is to compare the short-term outcomes between patients suffering from sciatica due to a discus intervertebralis herniation and those suffering from low back pain caused by facet joint disease after 3 weeks of treatment in an intense multimodal outpatient program in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the university hospital.Keywords: chronic low back pain, sciatica, interdisciplinary management, discus herniation, spondylarthritis

  14. Study protocol of the YOU CALL - WE CALL TRIAL: impact of a multimodal support intervention after a "mild" stroke

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    Bravo Gina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than 60% of new strokes each year are "mild" in severity and this proportion is expected to rise in the years to come. Within our current health care system those with "mild" stroke are typically discharged home within days, without further referral to health or rehabilitation services other than advice to see their family physician. Those with mild stroke often have limited access to support from health professionals with stroke-specific knowledge who would typically provide critical information on topics such as secondary stroke prevention, community reintegration, medication counselling and problem solving with regard to specific concerns that arise. Isolation and lack of knowledge may lead to a worsening of health problems including stroke recurrence and unnecessary and costly health care utilization. The purpose of this study is to assess the effectiveness, for individuals who experience a first "mild" stroke, of a sustainable, low cost, multimodal support intervention (comprising information, education and telephone support - "WE CALL" compared to a passive intervention (providing the name and phone number of a resource person available if they feel the need to - "YOU CALL", on two primary outcomes: unplanned-use of health services for negative events and quality of life. Method/Design We will recruit 384 adults who meet inclusion criteria for a first mild stroke across six Canadian sites. Baseline measures will be taken within the first month after stroke onset. Participants will be stratified according to comorbidity level and randomised to one of two groups: YOU CALL or WE CALL. Both interventions will be offered over a six months period. Primary outcomes include unplanned use of heath services for negative event (frequency calendar and quality of life (EQ-5D and Quality of Life Index. Secondary outcomes include participation level (LIFE-H, depression (Beck Depression Inventory II and use of health services for

  15. [Double-blind study of clobazam (Odipam) and diazepam in non-psychotic anxiety states].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrogonac, S; Vuckovic, S

    1989-01-01

    Clobazam (Odipam) and Diazepam were investigated by the double blind study method in patients with nonpsychotic anxiety. It was found out that both drugs had equal anxiolytic and tranquilizing effect with the same adverse effects. Greater frequency of excellent marks concerning the final therapeutic effect of Odipam in respect to other marks pointed to its better clinical tolerance, so that this drug was recommended as daily tranquilizer.

  16. Mathematics teaching experiences of elementary preservice teachers with high and low mathematics anxiety during student teaching: A multiple case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisbet, Leslie Deanna

    This study investigated the teaching experiences of six elementary preservice teachers (EPTs), three with high mathematics anxiety and three with low mathematics anxiety, during their student teaching semester. The EPTs were selected from an initial pool of 121 EPTs who took the Abbreviated Mathematics Anxiety Scale. The cases were compared in a cross case analysis to highlight mathematics teaching experiences among EPTs. Data sources included EPT and researcher journal entries, interview transcripts, pre-lesson surveys, field notes, lesson plans, and artifacts of observed lessons. Data were coded using Shulman's content knowledge, Graeber's mathematics pedagogical content knowledge, and mathematics anxiety characteristics. Findings revealed both similarities and differences across EPTs as related to four major categories: (a) planning and resources used, (b) role of the cooperating teacher, (c) content knowledge, and (d) pedagogical content knowledge. All EPTs used mostly direct instruction and relied on the course textbook and their respective cooperating teacher as their primary resources for planning. Additionally, across participants, the cooperating teacher influenced EPTs' perceptions of students and teaching. Also, EPTs with high mathematics anxiety were weaker with respect to content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge. Findings suggest a need to re-design methods courses to address improving the pedagogical content knowledge of EPTs with mathematics anxiety. Findings also suggest a need to develop content specific mathematics courses for EPTs to improve their content knowledge. Future studies could include a longitudinal study to follow highly anxious EPTs who take content specific elementary mathematics courses to observe their content knowledge and mathematics anxiety.

  17. Explicit memory in anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, E.S.; Roth, W.T.; Andrich, M.; Margraf, J.

    1999-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to study selective memory bias favoring anxiety-relevant materials in patients with anxiety disorders. In the 1st experiment, 32 patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), 30 with social phobia (speaking anxiety), and 31 control participants incidentally learned

  18. Neuroimaging in anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Kirsten; Bandelow, Borwin; Gruber, Oliver; Wedekind, Dirk

    2009-06-01

    Neuroimaging studies have gained increasing importance in validating neurobiological network hypotheses for anxiety disorders. Functional imaging procedures and radioligand binding studies in healthy subjects and in patients with anxiety disorders provide growing evidence of the existence of a complex anxiety network, including limbic, brainstem, temporal, and prefrontal cortical regions. Obviously, "normal anxiety" does not equal "pathological anxiety" although many phenomena are evident in healthy subjects, however to a lower extent. Differential effects of distinct brain regions and lateralization phenomena in different anxiety disorders are mentioned. An overview of neuroimaging investigations in anxiety disorders is given after a brief summary of results from healthy volunteers. Concluding implications for future research are made by the authors.

  19. Association between anxiety and hypertension: a systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiological studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Y

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Yu Pan,1,2,* Wenpeng Cai,1,* Qi Cheng,3,* Wei Dong,1 Ting An,4 Jin Yan1 1Department of Psychology and Mental Health, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, 2Department of Psychology, Peoples Liberation Army General Hospital, Beijing, 3Department of Child and Adolescent Behavioral Medicine, The 102 Hospital of PLA, Changzhou, 4Department of Internal Medicine, The PLA Second Artillery Force General Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Epidemiological studies have repeatedly investigated the association between anxiety and hypertension. However, the results have been inconsistent. This study aimed to summarize the current evidence from cross-sectional and prospective studies that evaluated this association. Methods: Seven common databases were searched for articles published up to November 2014. Cross-sectional and prospective studies that reported an association between the two conditions in adults were included. Data on prevalence, incidence, unadjusted or adjusted odds ratios or hazard ratios, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were extracted or calculated by the authors. The pooled odds ratio was calculated separately for cross-sectional and prospective studies using random-effects models. The Q test and I2 statistic was used to assess heterogeneity. A funnel plot and modified Egger linear regression test were used to estimate publication bias. Results: The search yielded 13 cross-sectional studies (n=151,389, and the final pooled odds ratio was 1.18 (95% CI 1.02–1.37; PQ<0.001; I2=84.9%. Eight prospective studies with a total sample size of 80,146 and 2,394 hypertension case subjects, and the pooled adjusted hazard ratio was 1.55 (95% CI 1.24–1.94; PQ<0.001; I2=84.6%. The meta-regression showed that location, diagnostic criteria for anxiety, age, sex, sample size, year of publication, quality, and years of follow-up (for prospective study were not

  20. Pain and anxiety control: an online study guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    The Editorial Board of the Journal of Endodontics has developed a literature-based study guide of topical areas related to endodontics. This study guide is intended to give the reader a focused review of the essential endodontic literature and does not cite all possible articles related to each topic. Although citing all articles would be comprehensive, it would defeat the idea of a study guide. This section will cover pain theories and dentin hypersensitivity, referred pain, oral pain not of dental origin, barodontalgia, local anesthetics, long-acting local anesthetics, intrapulpal anesthesia, intraligamentary anesthesia, intraosseous anesthesia, inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia, Gow-Gates anesthesia technique, Vazirani-Akinosi anesthesia technique, second-division block anesthesia technique, endodontic postoperative pain, effect of occlusal adjustment on endodontic pain, paresthesia associated with periradicular pathosis, analgesics, sedation, and endodontic flare-ups.

  1. Multidisciplinary approach and multimodal therapy in resected pancreatic cancer: Observational study Evaluación multidisciplinaria y tratamiento multimodal del cáncer de páncreas resecado: Estudio observacional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Morales

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: analysis and evaluation of a multidisciplinary approach, postoperative results and survival of a group of patients with resected pancreatic cancer after a multimodal therapy. Design: descriptive, prospective and observational study. Patients: between January 2004 and December 2004, 124 patients with pancreatic cancer were evaluated. In 30 patients pancreatic resection was performed, and they are the object of this study. Results of preoperative evaluation, postoperative morbidity and mortality, and long term survival were studied. Results: diagnostic evaluation was completed in ambulatory basis in 20% of the patients. In 63% of cases, admission was done in the same day of surgery. In 3 patients (9%, tumor resection was not achieved, therefore, concordance between radiological and surgical resectability rate was 91%. Resectability rate was 24.1%. Surgical Mortality was 3.3%, with a global morbidity rate of 56.6%. Survival at one, two, three and, four years was 76.2%, 56.3%, 43%, y 27.3% respectively. Conclusions: technological development and coordination of efforts in multidisciplinary teams offer an accurate evaluation of tumor involvement, and may reduce the number of laparotomies without tumor resection. The application of a systematic and generalized multimodal treatment in pancreatic cancer is progressively showing a tendency of progressive increase in resectability and survival rates in pancreatic cancer.Objetivo: analizar la evaluación del abordaje multidisciplinario de un grupo de pacientes con cáncer de páncreas resecado, los resultados postoperatorios y la supervivencia tras la aplicación de un tratamiento multimodal. Diseño: estudio descriptivo prospectivo observacional. Pacientes: entre enero de 2004 y diciembre 2009 se evaluaron 124 pacientes con cáncer de páncreas. De ellos, se realizó la resección pancreática con intención curativa en 30 casos que constituyen el objeto del estudio. Se analizaron los

  2. Exploring Anxiety Symptoms in a Large-Scale Twin Study of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders, Their Co-Twins and Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, Victoria; Ronald, Angelica; Colvert, Emma; Ames, Catherine; Woodhouse, Emma; Lietz, Stephanie; Garnett, Tracy; Gillan, Nicola; Rijsdijk, Fruhling; Scahill, Lawrence; Bolton, Patrick; Happé, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although many children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) experience difficulties with anxiety, the manifestation of these difficulties remains unresolved. The current study assessed anxiety in a large population-based twin sample, aged 10-15 years. Phenotypic analyses were used to explore anxiety symptoms in children with ASDs,…

  3. Dissociable neural mechanisms underlying the modulation of pain and anxiety? An FMRI pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiech, Katja; Edwards, Robert; Moseley, Graham Lorimer; Berna, Chantal; Ploner, Markus; Tracey, Irene

    2014-01-01

    The down-regulation of pain through beliefs is commonly discussed as a form of emotion regulation. In line with this interpretation, the analgesic effect has been shown to co-occur with reduced anxiety and increased activity in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), which is a key region of emotion regulation. This link between pain and anxiety modulation raises the question whether the two effects are rooted in the same neural mechanism. In this pilot fMRI study, we compared the neural basis of the analgesic and anxiolytic effect of two types of threat modulation: a "behavioral control" paradigm, which involves the ability to terminate a noxious stimulus, and a "safety signaling" paradigm, which involves visual cues that signal the threat (or absence of threat) that a subsequent noxious stimulus might be of unusually high intensity. Analgesia was paralleled by VLPFC activity during behavioral control. Safety signaling engaged elements of the descending pain control system, including the rostral anterior cingulate cortex that showed increased functional connectivity with the periaqueductal gray and VLPFC. Anxiety reduction, in contrast, scaled with dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activation during behavioral control but had no distinct neural signature during safety signaling. Our pilot data therefore suggest that analgesic and anxiolytic effects are instantiated in distinguishable neural mechanisms and differ between distinct stress- and pain-modulatory approaches, supporting the recent notion of multiple pathways subserving top-down modulation of the pain experience. Additional studies in larger cohorts are needed to follow up on these preliminary findings.

  4. Dissociable neural mechanisms underlying the modulation of pain and anxiety? An FMRI pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Wiech

    Full Text Available The down-regulation of pain through beliefs is commonly discussed as a form of emotion regulation. In line with this interpretation, the analgesic effect has been shown to co-occur with reduced anxiety and increased activity in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC, which is a key region of emotion regulation. This link between pain and anxiety modulation raises the question whether the two effects are rooted in the same neural mechanism. In this pilot fMRI study, we compared the neural basis of the analgesic and anxiolytic effect of two types of threat modulation: a "behavioral control" paradigm, which involves the ability to terminate a noxious stimulus, and a "safety signaling" paradigm, which involves visual cues that signal the threat (or absence of threat that a subsequent noxious stimulus might be of unusually high intensity. Analgesia was paralleled by VLPFC activity during behavioral control. Safety signaling engaged elements of the descending pain control system, including the rostral anterior cingulate cortex that showed increased functional connectivity with the periaqueductal gray and VLPFC. Anxiety reduction, in contrast, scaled with dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activation during behavioral control but had no distinct neural signature during safety signaling. Our pilot data therefore suggest that analgesic and anxiolytic effects are instantiated in distinguishable neural mechanisms and differ between distinct stress- and pain-modulatory approaches, supporting the recent notion of multiple pathways subserving top-down modulation of the pain experience. Additional studies in larger cohorts are needed to follow up on these preliminary findings.

  5. Effect of music therapy on pain and anxiety levels of cancer patients: A pilot study

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    Priyadharshini Krishnaswamy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The pain associated with cancer is highly detrimental to the quality of life of the affected individuals. It also contributes to the anxiety of the patient. There is a need for a nonpharmacological approach in addition to the pharmacological therapy for the management of the pain for a more holistic improvement in the individual. With this study, we wish to achieve this through music. Objective: To assess the effect of music therapy on pain scores and anxiety levels of cancer patients with pain. Study Design: In this quantitative study, a comparative study was done on fourteen cancer patients admitted for pain relief under the Department of Pain and Palliative Medicine, of a tertiary care hospital, having moderate to severe pain (numerical pain rating scale [NRS] - of 4 to 10. Subjects and Methods: Convenience sampling was used. Patients were allocated to test group or control group nonrandomly. The test group patients were subjected to music therapy for 20 min while the control group patients were kept occupied by talking to them for 20 min. The NRS scale was used to assess the pre- and post-interventional pain scores and the Hamilton anxiety rating scale was used to assess the pre- and post-interventional anxiety scores in the two groups. Statistics: Student′s t-test was used for comparing the pre- and post-interventional data. Two sample t-test was used to compare the data obtained from the control and study groups. Results: Statistically significant reduction seen in the pain scores in the test group after music therapy (P = 0.003. No statistically significant reduction seen in the pain score in the control group (P = 0.356. There was a statistically significant reduction in the postintervention pain scores in the test group compared to the control group (P = 0.034. The reduction in anxiety levels in both groups after intervention was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Music therapy was found to lower the pain score of

  6. Effect of Music Therapy on Pain and Anxiety Levels of Cancer Patients: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswamy, Priyadharshini; Nair, Shoba

    2016-01-01

    Background: The pain associated with cancer is highly detrimental to the quality of life of the affected individuals. It also contributes to the anxiety of the patient. There is a need for a nonpharmacological approach in addition to the pharmacological therapy for the management of the pain for a more holistic improvement in the individual. With this study, we wish to achieve this through music. Objective: To assess the effect of music therapy on pain scores and anxiety levels of cancer patients with pain. Study Design: In this quantitative study, a comparative study was done on fourteen cancer patients admitted for pain relief under the Department of Pain and Palliative Medicine, of a tertiary care hospital, having moderate to severe pain (numerical pain rating scale [NRS] – of 4 to 10). Subjects and Methods: Convenience sampling was used. Patients were allocated to test group or control group nonrandomly. The test group patients were subjected to music therapy for 20 min while the control group patients were kept occupied by talking to them for 20 min. The NRS scale was used to assess the pre- and post-interventional pain scores and the Hamilton anxiety rating scale was used to assess the pre- and post-interventional anxiety scores in the two groups. Statistics: Student's t-test was used for comparing the pre- and post-interventional data. Two sample t-test was used to compare the data obtained from the control and study groups. Results: Statistically significant reduction seen in the pain scores in the test group after music therapy (P = 0.003). No statistically significant reduction seen in the pain score in the control group (P = 0.356). There was a statistically significant reduction in the postintervention pain scores in the test group compared to the control group (P = 0.034). The reduction in anxiety levels in both groups after intervention was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Music therapy was found to lower the pain score of a patient who

  7. Parent and child perspectives on the nature of anxiety in children and young people with autism spectrum disorders: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozsivadjian, Ann; Knott, Fiona; Magiati, Iliana

    2012-03-01

    Anxiety disorders are common among children and young people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Despite growing knowledge about the prevalence, phenomenology and treatment of anxiety disorders, relatively little is understood about the nature and impact of anxiety in this group and little is known about autism-specific factors that may have a role in the increased prevalence of anxiety disorders. In this exploratory study, we report on a series of five focus groups with 17 parents of children and adolescents with ASD and anxiety. Across groups, parents gave strikingly similar descriptions of the triggers and behavioural signs associated with anxiety. Another consistent finding was that many parents reported that their children had great difficulty expressing their worries verbally and most showed their anxiety through changes in their behaviour. The impact of anxiety was reported to often be more substantial than the impact of ASD itself. The implications of the focus group findings are discussed in relation to existing literature.

  8. Comorbidity of infectious diseases and anxiety disorders in adults and its association with quality of life: a community study

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    Cornelia eWitthauer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Infectious diseases and anxiety disorders are common and both are associated with substantial burden to individual, families and society. A better understanding of their association may be helpful in explicating possible etiological mechanisms related to both. The goal of the current study was to investigate the relationship between specific infectious diseases and anxiety disorders among adults in the community, and to examine whether the co-occurrence of the two is associated with poorer quality of life compared to subjects with one or neither condition. Methods: We used data from the 1998 German Mental Health survey with 4,181 subjects aged 18-65. Various infectious diseases (lifetime and health-related quality of life were assessed via self-report questionnaires and anxiety disorders (past 12-months were diagnosed using M-CIDI interviews; Logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the association between infectious diseases and anxiety disorders; a linear model adjusted for sex was used to examine whether comorbidity of infectious diseases and anxiety disorders was associated with quality of life.Results: Whooping cough (OR=1.69, 95%CI=1.36-2.09, scarlet fever (OR=1.31, 95%CI=1.02–1.68 and diphtheria (OR=1.79, 95%CI=1.21–2.64 were associated with increased prevalence of any anxiety disorder. Subjects with both infectious diseases and anxiety disorders reported lower levels of both mental and physical quality of life, compared with subjects with only one or neither condition.Conclusions: Extending prior research, this study suggests a relationship between specific infectious diseases and anxiety disorders in an adult community sample. Research targeting etiological mechanisms related to the interplay between infectious diseases and anxiety disorders is warrented.

  9. Validation Study of Tripartite Model of Anxiety and Depression in Children and Adolescents: Clinical Sample in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jae-Won; Hong, Sungdo D.; Joung, Yoo Sook; Kim, Ji-Hae

    2006-01-01

    Although the currently available literature has provided some empirical support for a tripartite model of child and adolescent anxiety and depression, one of the limitations of these studies was that they have been conducted in America, primarily with Caucasians. In order to make this model more applicable to diverse ethnic and cultural groups, this study used a tripartite model for child and adolescent anxiety and depression in Korea, using confirmatory factor analysis with logically selecte...

  10. Are anxiety and fear separable emotions in driving? A laboratory study of behavioural and physiological responses to different driving environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, M P; Chapman, P

    2016-01-01

    Research into anxiety and driving has indicated that those higher in anxiety are potentially more dangerous on the roads. However, simulator findings suggest that conclusions are mixed at best. It is possible that anxiety is becoming confused with fear, which has a focus on more clearly defined sources of threat from the environment, as opposed to the internal, thought-related process associated with anxiety. This research aimed to measure feelings of fear, as well as physiological and attentional reactions to increasing levels of accident risk. Trait anxiety was also measured to see if it interacted with levels of risk or its associated reactions. Participants watched videos of driving scenarios with varying levels of accident risk and had to rate how much fear they would feel if they were the driver of the car, whilst skin conductance, heart rate, and eye movements were recorded. Analysis of the data suggested that perceptions of fear increased with increasing levels of accident risk, and skin conductance reflected this pattern. Eye movements, when considered alongside reaction times, indicated different patterns of performance according to different dangerous situations. These effects were independent of trait anxiety, which was only associated with higher rates of disliking driving and use of maladaptive coping mechanisms on questionnaires. It is concluded that these results could provide useful evidence in support for training-based programmes; it may also be beneficial to study trait anxiety within a more immersive driving environment and on a larger scale.

  11. Does population screening for Chlamydia trachomatis raise anxiety among those tested? Findings from a population based chlamydia screening study

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    Low Nicola

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The advent of urine testing for Chlamydia trachomatis has raised the possibility of large-scale screening for this sexually transmitted infection, which is now the most common in the United Kingdom. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of an invitation to be screened for chlamydia and of receiving a negative result on levels of anxiety, depression and self-esteem. Methods 19,773 men and women aged 16 to 39 years, selected at random from 27 general practices in two large city areas (Bristol and Birmingham were invited by post to send home-collected urine samples or vulvo-vaginal swabs for chlamydia testing. Questionnaires enquiring about anxiety, depression and self-esteem were sent to random samples of those offered screening: one month before the dispatch of invitations; when participants returned samples; and after receiving a negative result. Results Home screening was associated with an overall reduction in anxiety scores. An invitation to participate did not increase anxiety levels. Anxiety scores in men were lower after receiving the invitation than at baseline. Amongst women anxiety was reduced after receipt of negative test results. Neither depression nor self-esteem scores were affected by screening. Conclusion Postal screening for chlamydia does not appear to have a negative impact on overall psychological well-being and can lead to a decrease in anxiety levels among respondents. There is, however, a clear difference between men and women in when this reduction occurs.

  12. Evaluation of anxiety, salivary cortisol and melatonin secretion following reflexology treatment: a pilot study in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVicar, A J; Greenwood, C R; Fewell, F; D'Arcy, V; Chandrasekharan, S; Alldridge, L C

    2007-08-01

    This pilot study sought to identify an appropriate methodology to investigate the impact of reflexology in healthcare settings. The study involved healthy volunteers to prevent unnecessary intervention to individuals who may already be experiencing health related trauma. Thirty participants underwent either reflexology or no treatment (control), in a cross-over experimental design. Self-reported anxiety (Spielberger STAI), cardiovascular parameters (BP and pulse rate) and salivary cortisol and melatonin concentrations were assessed before and after reflexology. Control data were obtained at the same time points in identical settings. Reflexology had a powerful anxiety-reduction effect ('state'; Preflexology. Reflexology reduced 'state' anxiety and cardiovascular activity within healthy individuals, consistent with stress-reduction. Considering the connection between stress/anxiety and well being, the effects of reflexology may have beneficial outcomes for patients. These findings will be transferred to a study involving breast cancer patients where effects may be more pronounced particularly since cancer patients display disregulation of cortisol and melatonin secretion.

  13. Patient anxiety and surgical difficulty in impacted lower third molar extractions: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar-Arasa, L; Figueiredo, R; Valmaseda-Castellón, E; Gay-Escoda, C

    2014-09-01

    Encountering patients who are fearful and anxious is common in dental practice and these factors can increase the complexity of dental procedures. A prospective cohort study was performed to assess whether patient anxiety influences the difficulty of impacted lower third molar extraction and to identify other predictive factors of surgical difficulty; 102 extractions done under local anaesthesia were assessed. Several preoperative variables were recorded (demographic, anatomical, and surgical) and patient anxiety was assessed through the use of various questionnaires. Extraction difficulty was measured using the operation time (OT) and a 100-mm visual analogue scale (difficulty VAS) completed by the surgeon. Patients with deep impacted third molars that required bone removal and tooth sectioning showed higher levels of preoperative anxiety. Significant correlations were found between questionnaire scores and the surgical difficulty (OT and difficulty VAS). OT was also related to age, depth of impaction, third molar angulations, proximity of the third molar roots to the mandibular canal, hard and soft tissue coverage, and the need to perform an ostectomy and tooth sectioning. Impacted lower third molar extraction is significantly more difficult in anxious patients. Other demographic, radiological, and surgical factors were also found to be significantly related to the surgical difficulty.

  14. Anxiety toward Mathematics (An Empirical Study in College Students in Tuxtepec Oaxaca-México

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    Arturo García-Santillán

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we examine anxiety toward mathematics in undergraduate students; therefore, we take a Muñoz and Mato anxiety scale (2007. This is a study carried out at several universities in Tuxtepec, Oaxaca, Mexico. 302 questionnaires were applied face-to-face to undergraduate students of several profiles, among others: Business Management Engineering, Civil Engineering, Public Accounting, Electro-mechanic Engineering, Biochemistry, Informatics Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Management, Nursing, Systems Computational Engineering, Logistics, Communication, Humanities, Architectural Drawing, Industrial Mechanics, Clinical Lab, Programming, and Computer Science. Statistical procedure used was factorial analysis with an extracted principal component in order to measure data. Statistics test to prove: X2, Bartlett test of Sphericity, KMO (Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin, MSA (Measure sampling adequacy and Significance level: p X2 tabulated. The results obtained from the Bartlett test of Sphericity KMO (0.85, X2 calculated, 1214.505 with 10 df > X2tabulated, Sig. 0.000 p< 0.01, MSA (ANSIEVAL .817a; ANSITEM .822a; ANSICOM .870a; ANSINUM .892a; ANSISIMA .857a allow us to know that the variables of Muñoz and Mato scale help us to understand the student’s anxiety toward mathematics.

  15. Parental separation anxiety and diabetes self-management of older adolescents: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Shannon; Dashiff, Carol; Abdullatif, Hussein; Moreland, Elaine

    2012-01-01

    Parents of high school seniors with type 1 diabetes mellitus are faced with many concerns and fears as their adolescent prepares to assume primary disease management responsibility and leave the parental residence. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between parental separation anxiety and adolescent self-management and glycemic control. A second aim was to assess the relationship between adolescent self-management and glycemic control. Twenty-three families who had adolescents 16 to 18 years of age in or entering in their senior year of high school were recruited. Adolescents from higher income families reported better self-management skills than those from poorer families (r = 0.410, p = 0.05). Length of time since diabetes diagnosis was inversely related to glycemic control (r = 0.448, p = 0.02), indicating that adolescents who had the disease longer had poorer control. Parental separation anxiety was not related to adolescent self-management. Adolescent self-management was negatively related to glycemic control (r = -0.370, p = 0.08), suggesting that adolescents who demonstrated better self-management skills had improved glycemic control in comparison to adolescents who did not demonstrate effective self-management skills. Paternal, not maternal, separation anxiety demonstrated a significant relationship with glycemic control (r = 0.639, p < 0.001).

  16. Aromatherapy with ylang ylang for anxiety and self-esteem: a pilot study

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    Juliana Rizzo Gnatta

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To verify if the use of ylang ylang essential oil by cutaneous application or inhalation alters the anxiety and self-esteem perception and physiological parameters as blood pressure and temperature. Method : A pilot study with 34 professionals from a nursing group randomized in three groups: one received the ylang ylang essential oil by cutaneous application, the second received through inhalation and the third (placebo received the ylang ylang essence through cutaneous application. The assessment was done by an Anxiety Inventory (IDATE and the Dela Coleta self-esteem scale, applied on baseline, after 30, 60 and 90 days and after 15 days post-intervention (follow up. Results : In the pre and post-intervention intergroup analysis, there was a significant difference in self-esteem for the three groups (p values: G1=0.014; G2=0.016; G3=0.038. There were no differences in the analysis between groups for anxiety or for physiological parameters. Conclusion : It was found significant alterations only to the intergroup perception of self-esteem for the three groups.

  17. Factors Associated with Types of Mathematics Anxiety in College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessant, Kenneth C.

    1995-01-01

    Factor analysis of a version of the Mathematics Anxiety Rating Scale (MARS) and the Study Process Questionnaire (SPQ) given to (n=173) introductory statistics students found 6 factors: general evaluation anxiety, everyday numerical anxiety, passive observation anxiety, performance anxiety, mathematics test anxiety, and problem-solving anxiety. (39…

  18. Computerized measurement of anticipated anxiety from eating increasing portions of food in adolescents with and without anorexia nervosa: Pilot studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissileff, H R; Brunstrom, J M; Tesser, R; Bellace, D; Berthod, S; Thornton, J C; Halmi, K

    2016-02-01

    Dieting and excessive fear of eating coexist in vulnerable individuals, which may progress to anorexia nervosa [AN], but there is no objective measure of this fear. Therefore, we adapted a computer program that was previously developed to measure the satiating effects of foods in order to explore the potential of food to induce anxiety and fear of eating in adolescent girls. Twenty four adolescents (AN) and ten healthy controls without eating disorders rated pictures of different types of foods in varying sized portions as too large or too small and rated the expected anxiety of five different portions (20-320 kcal). Two low energy dense (potatoes and rice) and two high energy dense (pizza and M&Ms) foods were used. The regression coefficient of line lengths (0-100 mm) marked from "No anxiety" to "this would give me a panic attack", regressed from portions shown, was the measure of "expected anxiety" for a given food. The maximum tolerated portion size [kcal] (MTPS), computed by method of constant stimulus from portions shown, was significantly smaller for high energy dense foods, whereas the expected anxiety response was greater, for all foods, for patients compared to controls. For both groups, expected anxiety responses were steeper, and maximum tolerated portion sizes were larger, for low, than high, energy dense foods. Both maximum tolerated portion size and expected anxiety response were significantly predicted by severity of illness for the patients. Those who had larger maximum tolerated portion sizes had smaller anticipated anxiety to increasing portion sizes. Visual size had a greater influence than energy content for these responses. This method could be used to quantify the anxiety inducing potential of foods and for studies with neuro-imaging and phenotypic clarifications.

  19. Study on Multimodal Metaphorical Representation of Public Service Advertisement%公益广告多模态隐喻表征方式研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋婷婷

    2015-01-01

    以认知语言学隐喻理论为基础,以具有代表性的中外公益广告为研究对象,探讨公益广告多模态隐喻表征方式和语类特点。研究表明,公益广告隐喻表征方式主要可分为六类,图像和文字互动构建的多模态隐喻能在视觉和心灵上给广告受众带来强烈震撼,进而达到劝谏效果。%On the basis of cognitive metaphorical theory, the present paper discusses multimodal metaphorical representation and its genre features with examples of representative public service advertisements both in China and abroad. The study shows that multimodal metaphorical representation of public service advertisements can be classified into six types.Multimodal metaphors mu⁃tually constructed by both letters and pictures can make powerful visual and psychological impact on the audience, thus contribut⁃ing to a better persuasion effect.

  20. Quality of life in borderline patients comorbid with anxiety spectrum disorders – a cross-sectional study

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    Grambal A

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ales Grambal,1 Jan Prasko,1 Dana Kamaradova,1 Klara Latalova,1 Michaela Holubova,1,2 Zuzana Sedláčková,3 Radovan Hruby4 1Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc, University Hospital, Olomouc, 2Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Liberec, Liberec, 3Department of Psychology, Faculty of Arts, Palacky University Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic; 4Private Practice, Martin, Slovak Republic Introduction: Borderline personality disorder (BPD significantly reduces the quality of life (QoL in mental, social, and work domains. Patients with BPD often suffer from depressive anxiety symptoms. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to compare the QoL and demographic and clinical factors of inpatients diagnosed with BPD and comorbid anxiety spectrum disorders, and healthy controls.Methods: Ninety-two hospitalized patients treated in the psychotherapeutic department and 40 healthy controls were included. Subjects were assessed by the Quality of Life Satisfaction and Enjoyment Questionnaire (Q-LES-Q, Dissociative Experiences Scale, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II, Beck Anxiety Inventory, Clinical Global Impression, demographic questionnaire, Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS, and Sheehan Anxiety Scale.Results: BPD patients suffered from comorbid anxiety disorders, panic disorder (18.5%, social phobia (20.7%, generalized anxiety disorder/mixed anxiety depression disorder (17.4%, adjustment disorder (22.8%, and posttraumatic stress disorder (8.7%; 19.6% patients had two or more anxiety disorder comorbidities. Patients score in Q-LES-Q (general was 36.24±9.21, which was significantly lower in comparison to controls (57.83±10.21 and similar in all domains (physical health, feelings, work, household, school/study, leisure, social activities. The subjective level of depression measured by BDI and SDS (social life and family subscales negatively correlated with all Q-LES-Q domains.Conclusion: Patients suffering

  1. Relapse prevention and residual symptoms: a closer analysis of placebo-controlled continuation studies with escitalopram in major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Lönn, Sara L; Overø, Kerstin F

    2010-01-01

    -Severity of Illness scores and relapse status in 4 studies published from 2005 to 2007, 1 each in major depressive disorder (MDD), generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), were analyzed using mixed-effects model repeated measures as a function of Montgomery...

  2. An Analysis of Public Transit Connectivity Index in Tehran. The Case Study: Tehran Multi-Modal Transit Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Reza Mamdoohi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Public transit is a major priority in modern management of large cities and metropolitan areas in particular. Public transit systems in such cities consist of a large number of nodes and lines which are represented by a complex network. A station for public transit is a bridge between the people and public transit network, based on which, the concept of input and output power for each station can be defined. The objective of this study is the application of the transit connectivity indices to the multimodal transit network in the city of Tehran. The public transit network data employed in this study is taken from Tehran Traffic Control Company, and Tehran Urban and Suburban Railway Operation Company. The methodology for measuring transit connectivity consists of three measures: Node connectivity, Line connectivity and Regional connectivity, where activity density is applied to these measures. The results of node connectivity analysis shows that most of the node connectivity in concentrated in the city center with many nodes in the center along routes going north and south. The line connectivity analysis shows that there is a concentration of highly connected lines that are near Tehran municipality region 12 and 16. Finally, we find that areas with more metro and bus facilities with respect to the other areas, have a better regional connectivity. One of these areas includes Sadeghiyeh Metro Station which is the junction of Tehran Metro Line 2 and Tehran Metro Line 5 which have a high connectivity power. Results of this study can be used to suggest some ideas on how future investments in rail and bus should be prioritized. Particularly in Transit Oriented Development (TOD and sustainble development projects, urban planners can design transit stations with high performance to access the crucial services in poor areas.

  3. Digital Landscapes: Rethinking Poetry Interpretation in Multimodal Texts

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    Hessa A. Alghadeer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Regardless of the fact that a great deal of scholarly studies in the field of digital humanities have emphasized implementing various modes of digital literacy, critical perspectives considering the use of multimodal texts in literature, namely poetry, have received scant attention. Beyond the boundaries of printed texts and verbal means, the present study aims to cast some light on how meaning making in poetry into multimodal contexts becomes crucial to poetry interpretation in multimodal contexts. In particular, the study tackles the theory of multimodality in regard to the poetry genre and briefly reviews its significance in relevant studies. The paper then shifts to show how the multimodalities in question enhance the transformation of print-based poetic texts into creative multimodal poetry experiences. Ultimately, the study provides insight into how digital media have altered our perspectives on definitions, interpretations, and appreciation of poetry.

  4. Risk of anxiety and depressive disorders in patients with myocardial infarction: A nationwide population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hsin-Pei; Chien, Wu-Chien; Cheng, Wei-Tung; Chung, Chi-Hsiang; Cheng, Shu-Meng; Tzeng, Wen-Chii

    2016-08-01

    Anxiety and depressive symptoms are associated with adverse cardiovascular events after an acute myocardial infarction (MI). However, most studies focusing on anxiety or depression have used rating scales or self-report methods rather than clinical diagnosis. This study aimed to investigate the association between psychiatrist-diagnosed psychiatric disorders and cardiovascular prognosis.We sampled data from the National Health Insurance Research Database; 1396 patients with MI were recruited as the study cohort and 13,960 patients without MI were recruited as the comparison cohort. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to examine the effect of MI on the risk of anxiety and depressive disorders.During the first 2 years of follow-up, patients with MI exhibited a significantly higher risk of anxiety disorders (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 5.06, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.61-5.54) and depressive disorders (adjusted HR = 7.23, 95% CI: 4.88-10.88) than those without MI did. Greater risk for anxiety and depressive disorders was observed among women and patients aged 45 to 64 years following an acute MI. Patients with post-MI anxiety had a 9.37-fold (95% CI: 4.45-19.70) higher risk of recurrent MI than those without MI did after adjustment for age, sex, socioeconomic status, and comorbidities.This nationwide population-based cohort study provides evidence that MI increases the risk of anxiety and depressive disorders during the first 2 years post-MI, and post-MI anxiety disorders are associated with a higher risk of recurrent MI.

  5. Association of Body Mass Index with Depression, Anxiety and Suicide-An Instrumental Variable Analysis of the HUNT Study.

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    Johan Håkon Bjørngaard

    Full Text Available While high body mass index is associated with an increased risk of depression and anxiety, cumulative evidence indicates that it is a protective factor for suicide. The associations from conventional observational studies of body mass index with mental health outcomes are likely to be influenced by reverse causality or confounding by ill-health. In the present study, we investigated the associations between offspring body mass index and parental anxiety, depression and suicide in order to avoid problems with reverse causality and confounding by ill-health.We used data from 32,457 mother-offspring and 27,753 father-offspring pairs from the Norwegian HUNT-study. Anxiety and depression were assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and suicide death from national registers. Associations between offspring and own body mass index and symptoms of anxiety and depression and suicide mortality were estimated using logistic and Cox regression. Causal effect estimates were estimated with a two sample instrument variable approach using offspring body mass index as an instrument for parental body mass index.Both own and offspring body mass index were positively associated with depression, while the results did not indicate any substantial association between body mass index and anxiety. Although precision was low, suicide mortality was inversely associated with own body mass index and the results from the analysis using offspring body mass index supported these results. Adjusted odds ratios per standard deviation body mass index from the instrumental variable analysis were 1.22 (95% CI: 1.05, 1.43 for depression, 1.10 (95% CI: 0.95, 1.27 for anxiety, and the instrumental variable estimated hazard ratios for suicide was 0.69 (95% CI: 0.30, 1.63.The present study's results indicate that suicide mortality is inversely associated with body mass index. We also found support for a positive association between body mass index and depression, but not

  6. Parents’ perceptions on offspring risk and prevention of anxiety and depression: a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Festen, Helma; Schipper, Karen; Vries, Sybolt O; Reichart, Catrien G.; Abma, Tineke A.; Nauta, Maaike H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Offspring of patients with anxiety or depression are at high risk for developing anxiety or depression. Despite the positive findings regarding effectiveness of prevention programs, recruitment for prevention activities and trials is notoriously difficult. Our randomized controlled preven

  7. Diagnosed Anxiety Disorders and the Risk of Subsequent Anorexia Nervosa: A Danish Population Register Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Sandra M; Bulik, Cynthia M; Thornton, Laura M; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mortensen, Preben B; Petersen, Liselotte

    2015-11-01

    Anxiety disorders and anorexia nervosa are frequently acknowledged to be highly comorbid conditions, but still, little is known about the clinical and aetiological cohesion of specific anxiety diagnoses and anorexia nervosa. Using the comprehensive Danish population registers, we aimed to determine the risk of anorexia nervosa in patients with register-detected severe anxiety disorders. We also explored whether parental psychopathology was associated with offspring's anorexia nervosa. Anxiety disorders increased the risk of subsequent anorexia nervosa, with the highest risk observed in obsessive-compulsive disorder. Especially, male anxiety patients were at an increased risk for anorexia nervosa. Furthermore, an increased risk was observed in offspring of fathers with panic disorder. A diagnosis of an anxiety disorder, specifically obsessive-compulsive disorder, constitutes a risk factor for subsequent diagnosis of anorexia nervosa. These observations support the notion that anxiety disorders and anorexia nervosa share etiological mechanisms and/or that anxiety represents one developmental pathway to anorexia nervosa.

  8. Moving-Talker, Speaker-Independent Feature Study, and Baseline Results Using the CUAVE Multimodal Speech Corpus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patterson Eric K

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Strides in computer technology and the search for deeper, more powerful techniques in signal processing have brought multimodal research to the forefront in recent years. Audio-visual speech processing has become an important part of this research because it holds great potential for overcoming certain problems of traditional audio-only methods. Difficulties, due to background noise and multiple speakers in an application environment, are significantly reduced by the additional information provided by visual features. This paper presents information on a new audio-visual database, a feature study on moving speakers, and on baseline results for the whole speaker group. Although a few databases have been collected in this area, none has emerged as a standard for comparison. Also, efforts to date have often been limited, focusing on cropped video or stationary speakers. This paper seeks to introduce a challenging audio-visual database that is flexible and fairly comprehensive, yet easily available to researchers on one DVD. The Clemson University Audio-Visual Experiments (CUAVE database is a speaker-independent corpus of both connected and continuous digit strings totaling over 7000 utterances. It contains a wide variety of speakers and is designed to meet several goals discussed in this paper. One of these goals is to allow testing of adverse conditions such as moving talkers and speaker pairs. A feature study of connected digit strings is also discussed. It compares stationary and moving talkers in a speaker-independent grouping. An image-processing-based contour technique, an image transform method, and a deformable template scheme are used in this comparison to obtain visual features. This paper also presents methods and results in an attempt to make these techniques more robust to speaker movement. Finally, initial baseline speaker-independent results are included using all speakers, and conclusions as well as suggested areas of research are

  9. Multimodal intervention improves fatigue and quality of life in subjects with progressive multiple sclerosis: a pilot study

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    Bisht B

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Babita Bisht,1 Warren G Darling,2 E Torage Shivapour,3 Susan K Lutgendorf,4–6 Linda G Snetselaar,7 Catherine A Chenard,1 Terry L Wahls1,8 1Department of Internal Medicine, Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, 2Department of Health and Human Physiology, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, University of Iowa, 3Department of Neurology, Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, 4Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, University of Iowa, 5Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, 6Department of Urology, Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, 7Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Iowa, 8Department of Internal Medicine, VA Medical Center, Iowa City, IA, USA Background: Fatigue is a disabling symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS and reduces quality of life. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a multimodal intervention, including a modified Paleolithic diet, nutritional supplements, stretching, strengthening exercises with electrical stimulation of trunk and lower limb muscles, and stress management on perceived fatigue and quality of life of persons with progressive MS. Methods: Twenty subjects with progressive MS and average Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS score of 6.2 (range: 3.5–8.0 participated in the 12-month phase of the study. Assessments were completed at baseline and at 3 months, 6 months, 9 months, and 12 months. Safety analyses were based on monthly side effects questionnaires and blood analyses at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 9 months, and 12 months. Results: Subjects showed good adherence (assessed from subjects' daily logs with this intervention and did not report any serious side effects. Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS and Performance Scales-fatigue subscale scores decreased in 12 months (P<0.0005. Average FSS scores of eleven subjects showed clinically significant reduction (more than

  10. Depression, Anxiety and Symptoms of Stress among Baccalaureate Nursing Students in Hong Kong: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Teris; Wong, Siu Yi; Wong, Kit Yi; Law, Lap Yan; Ng, Karen; Tong, Man Tik; Wong, Ka Yu; Ng, Man Ying; Yip, Paul S F

    2016-08-03

    This study examines the prevalence of depression, anxiety and symptoms of stress among baccalaureate nursing students in Hong Kong. Recent epidemiological data suggest that the prevalence of mild to severe depression, anxiety and stress among qualified nurses in Hong Kong stands at 35.8%, 37.3% and 41.1%, respectively. A total of 661 nursing students were recruited to participate in our cross-sectional mental health survey using the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale 21. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine significant relationships between variables. Working in general medicine, being in financial difficulty, having sleep problems, not having leisure activity and perceiving oneself in poor mental health were significant correlates of past-week depression, anxiety and stress. Year of study, physical inactivity and family crisis in the past year correlated significantly with depression. Imbalanced diets significantly correlated with anxiety. Stress was significantly associated with a lack of alone time. This is the first study to confirm empirically that clinical specialty, financial difficulties and lifestyle factors can increase nursing students' levels of depression and anxiety and symptoms of stress. Prevention, including the early detection and treatment of mental disorder, promises to reduce the prevalence of these indicators among this group.

  11. The Study of the Relation between Students' Anxiety and How They Judge their Ability to Learn Mathematics

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    Arezoo Mohammad Jafari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The relation between ability and self-judgment has always drawn the attention of parents and teachers. Obviously, students lose their ability and fail to gain much from good education if they lack necessary motives. Learning mathematical concepts and the ability to solve mathematical questions is highly influenced by judgments, beliefs and anxiety of students. The present research attempts to study the relation between anxiety of students and how they judge their ability to learn mathematics. A number of 30 girl and boy students studying the third grade of high school in the field of mathematics were chosen by correlation research and quasi-cluster sampling method and their anxiety and self-judgment was studied by means of two questionnaires (anxiety and judgment. Descriptive and inferential statistics and the results of Pearson correlation test revealed that there is a meaningful relation between anxiety of students and how they judge their ability to learn mathematics. Therefore, students with high anxiety may judge their ability positively or negatively.

  12. Psychiatric disorders and cardiac anxiety in exercising and sedentary coronary artery disease patients: a case-control study

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    A. Sardinha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Regular physical exercise has been shown to favorably influence mood and anxiety; however, there are few studies regarding psychiatric aspects of physically active patients with coronary artery disease (CAD. The objective of the present study was to compare the prevalence of psychiatric disorders and cardiac anxiety in sedentary and exercising CAD patients. A total sample of 119 CAD patients (74 men were enrolled in a case-control study. The subjects were interviewed to identify psychiatric disorders and responded to the Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire. In the exercise group (N = 60, there was a lower prevalence (45 vs 81%; P < 0.001 of at least one psychiatric diagnosis, as well as multiple comorbidities, when compared to the sedentary group (N = 59. Considering the Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire, sedentary patients presented higher scores compared to exercisers (mean ± SEM = 55.8 ± 1.9 vs 37.3 ± 1.6; P < 0.001. In a regression model, to be attending a medically supervised exercise program presented a relevant potential for a 35% reduction in cardiac anxiety. CAD patients regularly attending an exercise program presented less current psychiatric diagnoses and multiple mental-related comorbidities and lower scores of cardiac anxiety. These salutary mental effects add to the already known health benefits of exercise for CAD patients.

  13. Factors associated with anxiety in critically ill patients: A prospective observational cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Castillo, M. I.; Cooke, M.; Macfarlane, B; Aitken, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anxiety is an unpleasant emotion that most intensive care patients experience. This emotion is an important issue in intensive care settings because of its prevalence, adverse effects and severity. Little is known about the factors associated with state and trait anxiety during critical illness. Objectives: To describe the patterns of state anxiety reported by intensive care patients, and identify factors associated with state and trait anxiety. Design: Prospective observ...

  14. The effects of multimodal intervention for the primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases on depression, anxiety, and Type-D pattern. Initial results of the randomized controlled PreFord trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albus, C.; Bjarnson-Wehrens, B.; Gysan, D. B.; Herold, G.; Schneider, C. A.; Eulenburg, C. Zu; Predel, H. G.

    2012-01-01

    Depression, anxiety, and Type-D pattern are associated with the earlier development and faster progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of the randomized controlled PreFord trial was to improve multiple biological and psychosocial risk factors in the primary prevention of CVD. A total of

  15. Anxiety, splint treatment and clinical characteristics of patients with osteoarthritis of temporomandibular joint and dental students – a pilot study.

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    Tomislav Badel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of splint treatment for therapy of osteoarthritis of temporomandibular joint, and to compare the level of anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory,STAI and clinical characteristics between 16 patients and 20 asymptomatic dental school students. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was used for all subjects. Dental students showed a statistically signiicant higher capacity of mouth opening (p<0.05, and lower level of anxiety (p<0.05 for STAI 1, and p<0.001 for STAI 2 than patients. Patients who had suffered chronic pain before splint treatment had a higher value of anxiety by STAI 1 test (p<0.05.

  16. THE EFFECTS OF COOPERATIVE LEARNING ON FOREIGN LANGUAGE ANXIETY: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF TAIWANESE AND AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES

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    John G. Duxbury

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the level of foreign language anxiety in the classroom, plus the correlation between foreign language anxiety and cooperative learning attitudes and practice among university students at one university in the United States and three universities in Southern Taiwan. Two instruments (The Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety scale by Horwitz et al., 1986 and the Style Analysis Survey by Oxford et al., 1999a were employed along with ten questions designed by the author: five sought to establish student perceptions of their classrooms’ cooperative atmosphere and five concerned students’ predilection towards cooperative learning. No significant correlation was found between foreign language anxiety and cooperative learning at the United States University. Of the three Southern Taiwan colleges, results from only one school showed a significant correlation. This was the only school that had a Taiwanese teacher.

  17. Are fatigue, depression and anxiety associated with labour market participation among patients diagnosed with haematological malignancies? A prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsbøl, Trine Allerslev; Bültman, Ute; Nielsen, Claus Vinther;

    2015-01-01

    . They were all followed prospectively for 1 year using register-based data on labour market participation. RESULTS: At baseline, high levels of fatigue, depression and anxiety were more prevalent among sickness absent patients than in those working. Half of the sickness absent patients returned to work......OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study are to examine levels of fatigue, depression and anxiety following diagnosis of a haematological malignancy, to determine the incidence of return to work (RTW) and long-term sickness absence (LTSA) during 1-year follow-up and to examine whether fatigue......, depression and anxiety are associated with RTW and LTSA in this group of cancer patients. METHODS: Questionnaire-based data on fatigue, depression and anxiety were obtained at baseline. In all, 196 patients returned the questionnaire. Of these, 106 patients were on sick leave and 90 patients were working...

  18. A population-based study of anxiety as a precursor for depression in childhood and adolescence

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    van den Bree Marianne BM

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Anxiety and depression co-occur in children and adolescents with anxiety commonly preceding depression. Although there is some evidence to suggest that the association between early anxiety and later depression is explained by a shared genetic aetiology, the contribution of environmental factors is less well examined and it is unknown whether anxiety itself is a phenotypic risk factor for later depression. These explanations of the association between early anxiety and later depression were evaluated. Methods Anxiety and depressive symptoms were assessed longitudinally in a U.K. population-based sample of 676 twins aged 5–17 at baseline. At baseline, anxiety and depression were assessed by parental questionnaire. Depression was assessed three years later by parental and adolescent questionnaire. Results Shared genetic effects between early anxiety and later depression were found. A model of a phenotypic risk effect from early anxiety on later depression provided a poor fit to the data. However, there were significant genetic effects specific to later depression, showing that early anxiety and later depression do not index entirely the same genetic risk. Conclusions Anxiety and depression are associated over time because they share a partly common genetic aetiology rather than because the anxiety phenotype leads to later depression.

  19. Foreign language classroom anxiety : A study of Chinese university students of Japanese and English over time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, Yinxing

    2016-01-01

    This PhD project mainly aimed at exploring the relationship between foreign language (FL) anxiety and FL proficiency development, the sources of FL anxiety, and the stability of FL anxiety over time and across target languages. To this end, 146 L1 Chinese university students, who had been learning E

  20. The Experiences of Anxiety of Japanese EFL Learners: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichsenring, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety is an educational phenomenon that has gained growing attention among researchers over the past three decades. It is a form of anxiety that can be debilitating and arises from various sources. This research examined foreign language classroom-based anxiety experiences of two adult Japanese English language…

  1. Test Anxiety Among Black College Students: A Cross-Cultural Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronzaft, Arline L.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    On the Alpert-Haber Achievement Anxiety Test, University of the West Indies black students had significantly higher facilitating test anxiety and significantly lower debilitating test anxiety in comparison to black students at Lehman College in the United States. Results are explained in terms of cross-cultural differences in attitudes toward…

  2. Levels of state and trait anxiety in patients referred to ophthalmology by primary care clinicians: a cross sectional study.

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    Christopher J Davey

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: There is a high level of over-referral from primary eye care leading to significant numbers of people without ocular pathology (false positives being referred to secondary eye care. The present study used a psychometric instrument to determine whether there is a psychological burden on patients due to referral to secondary eye care, and used Rasch analysis to convert the data from an ordinal to an interval scale. DESIGN: Cross sectional study. PARTICIPANTS AND CONTROLS: 322 participants and 80 control participants. METHODS: State (i.e. current and trait (i.e. propensity to anxiety were measured in a group of patients referred to a hospital eye department in the UK and in a control group who have had a sight test but were not referred. Response category analysis plus infit and outfit Rasch statistics and person separation indices were used to determine the usefulness of individual items and the response categories. Principal components analysis was used to determine dimensionality. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Levels of state and trait anxiety measured using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. RESULTS: State anxiety scores were significantly higher in the patients referred to secondary eye care than the controls (p0.1. Rasch analysis highlighted that the questionnaire results needed to be split into "anxiety-absent" and "anxiety-present" items for both state and trait anxiety, but both subscales showed the same profile of results between patients and controls. CONCLUSIONS: State anxiety was shown to be higher in patients referred to secondary eye care than the controls, and at similar levels to people with moderate to high perceived susceptibility to breast cancer. This suggests that referral from primary to secondary eye care can result in a significant psychological burden on some patients.

  3. The relationship between multiple sex partners and anxiety, depression, and substance dependence disorders: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramrakha, Sandhya; Paul, Charlotte; Bell, Melanie L; Dickson, Nigel; Moffitt, Terrie E; Caspi, Avshalom

    2013-07-01

    Changes in sexual behavior have resulted in longer periods of multiple serial or concurrent relationships. This study investigated the effects of multiple heterosexual partners on mental health, specifically, whether higher numbers of partners were linked to later anxiety, depression, and substance dependency. Data from the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study, a prospective, longitudinal study of a birth cohort born in 1972-1973 in Dunedin, New Zealand were used. The relationship between numbers of sex partners over three age periods (18-20, 21-25, and 26-32 years) and diagnoses of anxiety, depression, and substance dependence disorder at 21, 26, and 32 years were examined, using logistic regression. Interaction by gender was examined. Adjustment was made for prior mental health status. There was no significant association between number of sex partners and later anxiety and depression. Increasing numbers of sex partners were associated with increasing risk of substance dependence disorder at all three ages. The association was stronger for women and remained after adjusting for prior disorder. For women reporting 2.5 or more partners per year, compared to 0-1 partners, the adjusted odd ratios (and 95 % CIs) were 9.6 (4.4-20.9), 7.3 (2.5-21.3), and 17.5 (3.5-88.1) at 21, 26, and 32 years, respectively. Analyses using new cases of these disorders showed similar patterns. This study established a strong association between number of sex partners and later substance disorder, especially for women, which persisted beyond prior substance use and mental health problems more generally. The reasons for this association deserve investigation.

  4. Implementation of the CALM intervention for anxiety disorders: a qualitative study

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    Curran Geoffrey M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigators recently tested the effectiveness of a collaborative-care intervention for anxiety disorders: Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management(CALM [] in 17 primary care clinics around the United States. Investigators also conducted a qualitative process evaluation. Key research questions were as follows: (1 What were the facilitators/barriers to implementing CALM? (2 What were the facilitators/barriers to sustaining CALM after the study was completed? Methods Key informant interviews were conducted with 47 clinic staff members (18 primary care providers, 13 nurses, 8 clinic administrators, and 8 clinic staff and 14 study-trained anxiety clinical specialists (ACSs who coordinated the collaborative care and provided cognitive behavioral therapy. The interviews were semistructured and conducted by phone. Data were content analyzed with line-by-line analyses leading to the development and refinement of themes. Results Similar themes emerged across stakeholders. Important facilitators to implementation included the perception of "low burden" to implement, provider satisfaction with the intervention, and frequent provider interaction with ACSs. Barriers to implementation included variable provider interest in mental health, high rates of part-time providers in clinics, and high social stressors of lower socioeconomic-status patients interfering with adherence. Key sustainability facilitators were if a clinic had already incorporated collaborative care for another disorder and presence of onsite mental health staff. The main barrier to sustainability was funding for the ACS. Conclusions The CALM intervention was relatively easy to incorporate during the effectiveness trial, and satisfaction was generally high. Numerous implementation and sustainability barriers could limit the reach and impact of widespread adoption. Findings should be interpreted with the knowledge that the ACSs in this study were provided and trained by

  5. A study on the EFL students’ speech related anxiety in Taiwan

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    Hsu, Tsu-Chia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Global challenges in terms of producing more globally competitive graduates have given grounds to the need of students to enhance their English proficiencies. Although most Taiwanese students have studied English starting from their elementary education up to their senior high school years, however, research have shown that there is still a need to improve on the students’ English speech proficiency. This presentation details an empirical study which aims to investigate how Public Speaking Anxiety (PSA affects English as Foreign Language (EFL students who took a yearlong public speaking course in Taiwan. More specifically, the study seeks to answer these four major concerns: 1. what are the underlying factors behind the students PSA; 2. to what extent can gender differences affects PSA and time of preparation for a speech (TPS; 3. to what extent can gender differences and the different type of audiences affect the reported levels of PSA; and 4. what are the advantages/disadvantages brought about by the yearlong public speaking course. This case study adopts a mixed-method paradigm, wherein methodology from both quantitative and qualitative is systematically combined. Participants were 82 third-year technical-vocational college students. The Personal Report of Public Speaking Anxiety (PRPSA quantitative survey was used to determine the level of students’ anxiety, while the qualitative focus group interview was accomplished to further understand the effects of PSA and gender differences with respects to TPS and types of audiences. Results show that the yearlong public speaking course had indeed helped diminish some if not all of the students’ PSA. Furthermore, relationship between PSA and gender differences of the audience was significant. Lastly, female students have longer TPS and higher reported PSA than male students, however, is caused mainly due to their being grade conscious and fear of performing badly in front of their classmates.

  6. The Relationship Between Multiple Sex Partners and Anxiety, Depression, and Substance Dependence Disorders: A Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Charlotte; Bell, Melanie L.; Dickson, Nigel; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Caspi, Avshalom

    2013-01-01

    Changes in sexual behavior have resulted in longer periods of multiple serial or concurrent relationships. This study investigated the effects of multiple heterosexual partners on mental health, specifically, whether higher numbers of partners were linked to later anxiety, depression, and substance dependency. Data from the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study, a prospective, longitudinal study of a birth cohort born in 1972–1973 in Dunedin, New Zealand were used. The relationship between numbers of sex partners over three age periods (18–20, 21–25, and 26–32 years) and diagnoses of anxiety, depression, and substance dependence disorder at 21, 26, and 32 years were examined, using logistic regression. Interaction by gender was examined. Adjustment was made for prior mental health status. There was no significant association between number of sex partners and later anxiety and depression. Increasing numbers of sex partners were associated with increasing risk of substance dependence disorder at all three ages. The association was stronger for women and remained after adjusting for prior disorder. For women reporting 2.5 or more partners per year, compared to 0–1 partners, the adjusted odd ratios (and 95 % CIs) were 9.6 (4.4–20.9), 7.3 (2.5–21.3), and 17.5 (3.5–88.1) at 21, 26, and 32 years, respectively. Analyses using new cases of these disorders showed similar patterns. This study established a strong association between number of sex partners and later substance disorder, especially for women, which persisted beyond prior substance use and mental health problems more generally. The reasons for this association deserve investigation. PMID:23400516

  7. Building an EEG-fMRI multi-modal brain graph: a concurrent EEG-fMRI study

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    Qingbao Yu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The topological architecture of brain connectivity has been well characterized by graph theory based analysis. However, previous studies have primarily built brain graphs based on a single modality of brain imaging data. Here we develop a framework to construct multi-modal brain graphs using concurrent EEG-fMRI data which are simultaneously collected during eyes open (EO and eyes closed (EC resting states. FMRI data are decomposed into independent components with associated time courses by group independent component analysis (ICA. EEG time series are segmented, and then spectral power time courses are computed and averaged within 5 frequency bands (delta; theta; alpha; beta; low gamma. EEG-fMRI brain graphs, with EEG electrodes and fMRI brain components serving as nodes, are built by computing correlations within and between fMRI ICA time courses and EEG spectral power time courses. Dynamic EEG-fMRI graphs are built using a sliding window method, versus static ones treating the entire time course as stationary. In global level, static graph measures and properties of dynamic graph measures are different across frequency bands and are mainly showing higher values in eyes closed than eyes open. Nodal level graph measures of a few brain components are also showing higher values during eyes closed in specific frequency bands. Overall, these findings incorporate fMRI spatial localization and EEG frequency information which could not be obtained by examining only one modality. This work provides a new approach to examine EEG-fMRI associations within a graph theoretic framework with potential application to many topics.

  8. Building an EEG-fMRI Multi-Modal Brain Graph: A Concurrent EEG-fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qingbao; Wu, Lei; Bridwell, David A.; Erhardt, Erik B.; Du, Yuhui; He, Hao; Chen, Jiayu; Liu, Peng; Sui, Jing; Pearlson, Godfrey; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2016-01-01

    The topological architecture of brain connectivity has been well-characterized by graph theory based analysis. However, previous studies have primarily built brain graphs based on a single modality of brain imaging data. Here we develop a framework to construct multi-modal brain graphs using concurrent EEG-fMRI data which are simultaneously collected during eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) resting states. FMRI data are decomposed into independent components with associated time courses by group independent component analysis (ICA). EEG time series are segmented, and then spectral power time courses are computed and averaged within 5 frequency bands (delta; theta; alpha; beta; low gamma). EEG-fMRI brain graphs, with EEG electrodes and fMRI brain components serving as nodes, are built by computing correlations within and between fMRI ICA time courses and EEG spectral power time courses. Dynamic EEG-fMRI graphs are built using a sliding window method, versus static ones treating the entire time course as stationary. In global level, static graph measures and properties of dynamic graph measures are different across frequency bands and are mainly showing higher values in eyes closed than eyes open. Nodal level graph measures of a few brain components are also showing higher values during eyes closed in specific frequency bands. Overall, these findings incorporate fMRI spatial localization and EEG frequency information which could not be obtained by examining only one modality. This work provides a new approach to examine EEG-fMRI associations within a graph theoretic framework with potential application to many topics. PMID:27733821

  9. Decreasing Math Anxiety in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Andrew B.

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines the phenomenon of mathematics anxiety in contemporary college and university students. Forms of math anxiety range from moderate test anxiety to extreme anxiety including physiological symptoms such as nausea. For each of several types of math anxiety, one or more case studies is analyzed. Selected strategies for coping with…

  10. Association of depression and anxiety status with 10-year cardiovascular disease incidence among apparently healthy Greek adults: The ATTICA Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrou, Ioannis; Kollia, Natasa; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes; Georgousopoulou, Ekavi; Chrysohoou, Christina; Tsigos, Constantine; Randeva, Harpal S; Yannakoulia, Mary; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Papageorgiou, Charalabos; Pitsavos, Christos

    2017-01-01

    Background Chronic stress frequently manifests with anxiety and/or depressive symptomatology and may have detrimental cardiometabolic effects over time. As such, recognising the potential links between stress-related psychological disorders and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is becoming increasingly important in cardiovascular epidemiology research. The primary aim of this study was to explore prospectively potential associations between clinically relevant depressive symptomatology and anxiety levels and the 10-year CVD incidence among apparently healthy Greek adults. Design A population-based, health and nutrition prospective survey. Methods In the context of the ATTICA Study (2002-2012), 853 adult participants without previous CVD history (453 men (45 ± 13 years) and 400 women (44 ± 18 years)) underwent psychological evaluations through validated, self-reporting depression and anxiety questionnaires. Results After adjustment for multiple established CVD risk factors, both reported depression and anxiety levels were positively and independently associated with the 10-year CVD incidence, with depression markedly increasing the CVD risk by approximately fourfold (adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) 3.6 (1.3, 11) for depression status; 1.03 (1.0, 1.1) for anxiety levels). Conclusions Our findings indicate that standardised psychological assessments focusing on depression and anxiety should be considered as an additional and distinct aspect in the context of CVD preventive strategies that are designed and implemented by health authorities at the general population level.

  11. Group acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for bipolar disorder and co-existing anxiety - an open pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankowski, Sara; Adler, Mats; Andersson, Gerhard; Lindefors, Nils; Svanborg, Cecilia

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies have supported acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for reducing impairment related to various chronic conditions. ACT may possibly be beneficial for bipolar disorder (BD) with co-existing anxiety, which is associated with a poorer treatment outcome. Efforts are needed to identify suitable psychological interventions for BD and co-existing anxiety. In this open clinical trial, we included 26 patients with BD type 1 or 2 at an outpatient psychiatric unit specializing in affective disorders. The intervention consisted of a 12-session manualized group treatment that included psychoeducation, mindfulness, engaging in values-based behaviour, cognitive defusion, acceptance and relapse prevention modules. Participants completed four self-report questionnaires covering anxiety symptoms (Beck Anxiety Inventory - BAI), depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory - BDI-II), quality of life (Quality of Life Inventory - QOLI) and psychological flexibility (Acceptance and Action Questionnaire - AAQ-2) before, during and after the treatment. At post-treatment, the participants reported significant improvements in all outcome measures, with large effects (Cohen's d between 0.73 and 1.98). The mean reduction in anxiety symptoms was 45%. At post-treatment, 96% of the patients were classified as responders on at least one of the outcome measures. A limitation is that the trial is uncontrolled. The results suggest that ACT has the potential to be an effective treatment for BD patients with co-existing anxiety. Further randomized studies are warranted.

  12. A Comparative Study of Group Behavioral Activation and Cognitive Therapy in Reducing Subsyndromal Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Soleimani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study compared the effectiveness of two group treatments, behavioral activation (BA and cognitive therapy (CT, in reducing subsyndromal anxiety and depressive symptoms in a sample of Iranian university students.Method: Twenty-seven Iranian university students who scored 18 or higher on the depression subscale and 16 or higher on the anxiety subscale of the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS-42 were randomly assigned into treatment groups. One group received 8 sessions of BA (n = 14, and the other received 8 sessions of group CT (n = 13.Result: Analysis of covariance revealed that the BA group had a significantly greater reduction in depressive symptoms than the CT group. However, there were no significant differences between the two groups in the levels of anxiety, stress symptoms or functional impairment after treatment.Conclusion: This study found evidence for the effectiveness of BA in reducing anxiety, depressive and stress symptoms and functional impairment compared to CT. BA was more effective than CT in improving depressive symptoms and was as effective as CT in decreasing anxiety, stress and functional impairment. BA is also a cost-effective intervention, particularly in group formats.

  13. A prospective study of anxiety in ICD patients with a pilot randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavioral therapy for patients with moderate to severe anxiety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qintar, Mohammed; George, Jason J; Panko, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Stress and anxiety are potential consequences from arrhythmias and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) shocks that can contribute to substantial morbidity. We assessed anxiety associated with an ICD and whether cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) reduces anxiety. METHODS: The stu......Trials.gov identifier: NCT00851071. URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00851071?term=anxiety+in+icd+patients+cleveland+clinic&rank=1....

  14. The Study of Effectiveness of Reality Therapy on Adjustment of Female Adolescent with Anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadidi M

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available 1.1.    Background and purpose: our country is one of the young and developing countries that a significant number of their populations are students, especially high school students who pass the critical period of adolescence. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of reality therapy on adjustment in adolescent girls with anxiety. 1.2.    Method: The research method was experimental with pre-test, post-test, and control group. The population of the research includes all female students of high school in Shirvan city in the academic year1394. Using purposive sampling or easy access, 20 students were selected who gained high anxiety scores in Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale (DASS-21, and randomly assigned to two experimental and control groups (n = 10 in each group. The experimental group received eight sessions of 2 hours reality therapy. The used instrument in this study, was the Adjustment Inventory for School Students that filled in the pre-test and post-test by experimental and control groups. Data were analyzed using SPSS software and analysis of covariance. 1.3.    Results: The results indicated the effectiveness of reality therapy in increasing overall consistency, emotional, social and educational adjustment in the experimental group compared with the control group. (P <0.001 1.4.    Conclusion: Because adolescence is associated with inconsistencies, according to results from this study, the reality therapy can be used as an effective method to increase adjustment among adolescent girls.

  15. Randomised placebo controlled study on Sarasvata choorna in generalised anxiety disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kshama Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Generalised anxiety disorder (GAD is characterised by a pattern of frequent, persistent worry and anxiety, which is out of proportion to the impact of the event or circumstance that is the focus of the worry. GAD is associated with muscle tension, trembling, twitching, feeling shaky and muscle aches or soreness. Many individuals with GAD also experience somatic symptoms like sweating, nausea and diarrhoea. Epidemiological studies reveal that the prevalence rate of GAD in India is 5.8%. Objective: The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of Sarasvata choorna in the management of GAD. Materials and Methods: In this study, a total of 114 patients with GAD satisfying the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders - Text Revision (DSM IV - TR diagnostic criteria were selected and randomly divided; of these, 102 patients completed the course of treatment. In trial group, Sarasvata choorna and in control group, placebo (wheat powder was given with the dose of 1 g thrice a day (i.e. 3 g/day along with madhu (honey and ghrita (cow′s ghee orally for 60 days. Fifteen days of follow up period was kept after treatment. Two assessments were done before and after treatment. Criterion of assessment was based on the scoring of Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A. Paired and unpaired ′t′- test was used for statistical analysis. Results and Conclusion: In trial group (n = 51, 51.1% improvement and in control group (n = 51, 47.67% of improvement was observed with the significance of (P 0.05 was found in between the two groups. Sarasvata choorna did not provide better relief compared with placebo.

  16. Anxiety is associated with diminished exercise performance and quality of life in severe emphysema: a cross-sectional study

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    Wise Robert A

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anxiety in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is associated with self-reported disability. The purpose of this study is to determine whether there is an association between anxiety and functional measures, quality of life and dyspnea. Methods Data from 1828 patients with moderate to severe emphysema enrolled in the National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT, collected prior to rehabilitation and randomization, were used in linear regression models to test the association between anxiety symptoms, measured by the Spielberger State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI and: (a six-minute walk distance test (6 MWD, (b cycle ergometry peak workload, (c St. Georges Respiratory Questionnaire (SRGQ, and (d UCSD Shortness of Breath Questionnaire (SOBQ, after controlling for potential confounders including age, gender, FEV1 (% predicted, DLCO (% predicted, and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Results Anxiety was significantly associated with worse functional capacity [6 MWD (B = -0.944, p Conclusion In clinically stable patients with moderate to severe emphysema, anxiety is associated with worse exercise performance, quality of life and shortness of breath, after accounting for the influence of demographic and physiologic factors known to affect these outcomes. Trail Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00000606

  17. The effects of self-focus on attentional biases in social anxiety:An ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judah, Matt R; Grant, DeMond M; Carlisle, Nancy B

    2016-06-01

    Cognitive theories of social anxiety disorder suggest that biased attention plays a key role in maintaining symptoms. These biases include self-focus and attention to socially threatening stimuli in the environment. The goal of this study was to utilize ERPs that are elicited by a change detection task to examine biases in selective attention (i.e., N2pc) and working memory maintenance (i.e., contralateral delay activity; CDA). Additionally, the effect of self-focus was examined using false heart rate feedback. In support of the manipulation, self-focus cues resulted in greater self-reported self-consciousness and task interference, enhanced anterior P2 amplitude and reduced SPN amplitude. Moreover, P2 amplitude for self-focus cues was correlated with reduced task performance for socially anxious subjects only. The difference in P2 amplitude between self-focus and standard cues was correlated with social anxiety independent of depression. As hypothesized, socially anxious participants (n = 20) showed early selection and maintenance of disgust faces relative to neutral faces as indicated by the N2pc and CDA components. Nonanxious controls (n = 22) did not show these biases. During self-focus cues, controls showed marginal evidence of biased selection for disgust faces, whereas socially anxious subjects showed no bias in this condition. Controls showed an ipsilateral delay activity after being cued to attend to one hemifield. Overall, this study supports early and persistent attentional bias for social threat in socially anxious individuals. Furthermore, self-focus may disrupt these biases. These findings and supplementary data are discussed in light of cognitive models of social anxiety disorder, recent empirical findings, and treatment.

  18. Effectiveness of a 16-Week Multimodal Exercise Program on Individuals With Dementia: Study Protocol for a Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharpf, Andrea; Barisch-Fritz, Bettina; Niermann, Christina; Woll, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Background The increasing prevalence of dementia in the next decades is accompanied by various societal and economic problems. Previous studies have suggested that physical activity positively affects motor and cognitive skills in individuals with dementia (IWD). However, there is insufficient evidence probably related to several methodological limitations. Moreover, to date adequate physical activity interventions specifically developed for IWD are lacking. Objective This study aims to investigate the effectiveness of a multimodal exercise program (MEP) on motor and cognitive skills in IWD in a high-quality multicenter trial. Methods A multicenter randomized controlled trial with baseline and postassessments will be performed. It is planned to enroll 405 participants with dementia of mild to moderate stage, aged 65 years and older. The intervention group will participate in a 16-week ritualized MEP especially developed for IWD. The effectiveness of the MEP on the primary outcomes balance, mobility, and gait will be examined using a comprehensive test battery. Secondary outcomes are strength and function of lower limbs, activities of daily living, and cognition (overall cognition, language, processing speed, learning and memory, and visual spatial cognition). Results Enrollment for the study started in May 2015. It is planned to complete postassessments by the beginning of 2017. Results are expected to be available in the first half of 2017. Conclusions This study will contribute to enhancing evidence for the effects of physical activity on motor and cognitive skills in IWD. Compared to previous studies, this study is characterized by a dementia-specific intervention based on scientific knowledge, a combination of motor and cognitive tasks in the intervention, and high standards regarding methodology. Findings are highly relevant to influence the multiple motor and cognitive impairments of IWD who are often participating in limited physical activity. Trial

  19. A STUDY OF ADOLESCENTS’ ANXIETY AND ACHIEVEMENT IN ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE

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    Ridha Fadillah

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at investigating whether there is relationship between students’ anxiety and students’ achievement in English as a foreign language among adolescents at Sekolah Menengah Umum Negeri 1 Banjarbaru, South Kalimantan. The sample was 152 students of sixteen and seventeen years old at second grade. The results indicate that the students’ anxiety in learning English as foreign language is at moderate level. There is no significant relationship between English language anxiety and students’ achievement in English as a foreign language as a whole. But a significant negative correlation between test anxiety and students’ achievement is indicated. And the difference of English language anxiety between male and female occurred on communication apprehension, it shows that female is more apprehensive than male in English communication but for overall anxiety, there is no difference in English language anxiety by gender at second grade in this school.

  20. Quetiapine fumarate augmentation for patients with a primary anxiety disorder or a mood disorder: a pilot study

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    Chen Yi-Chih

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comorbid anxiety symptoms,in patients with a primary anxiety disorder or a mood disorder, leads to poor patient outcomes and burdens the healthcare system. This pilot study evaluated the feasibility of extended-release quetiapine fumarate (quetiapine XR for the treatment of patients with either a primary anxiety disorder or a mood disorder with comorbid anxiety symptoms compared to a placebo, as an adjunct to antidepressant therapy. Methods Thirty-nine patients with a diagnosis of a primary anxiety disorder or a mood disorder with comorbid anxiety symptoms were enrolled in this study. Patients with a stable dose of antidepressant therapy were randomized according to a 2:1 probability of receiving either quetiapine XR or a placebo adjunctive treatment for 8 weeks. The efficacy was assessed by the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A and the Clinical Global Impression of severity (CGI-S score at baseline, week 1, 4, and 8. Results A total of 35 patients were included in this intention-to treat (ITT population for the efficacy analysis (quetiapine XR: 22 patients; placebo: 13 patients. At week 4, statistically significant differences were observed on both the HAM-A score (p = 0.003 and the CGI-S score (p = 0.025, favouring the quetiapine XR (−13.00 ± 4.14 compared to placebo (−6.63 ± 5.42. However, no statistically significant difference was observed between the two groups with regard to changes from the baseline to week 8 on the HAM-A score (p = 0.332 or the CGI-S score (p = 0.833. Conclusions Augmentation of antidepressant treatment with quetiapine XR did not result in clinical improvement according to the outcome measure of anxiety using the HAM-A and CGI-S scores at week 8, among the patients with either a primary anxiety disorder or a mood disorder with comorbid anxiety symptoms. However, treatment with quetiapine XR as an adjunct to antidepressant therapy appeared to provide a short

  1. Anxiety disorders and inflammation in a large adult cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogelzangs, N.; Beekman, A. T. F.; de Jonge, P.; Penninx, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    Although anxiety disorders, like depression, are increasingly being associated with metabolic and cardiovascular burden, in contrast with depression, the role of inflammation in anxiety has sparsely been examined. This large cohort study examines the association between anxiety disorders and anxiety

  2. Multimodal Biometrics using Feature Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Krishneswari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Biometrics is a unique, measurable physiological or behavioural characteristic of a person and finds extensive applications in authentication and authorization. Fingerprint, palm print, iris, voice, are some of the most widely used biometrics for personal identification. To reduce the error rates and enhance the usability of biometric system, multimodal biometric systems are used where more than one biometric characteristics are used. Approach: In this study it is proposed to investigate the performance of multimodal biometrics using palm print and fingerprint. Features are extracted using Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT and attributes selected using Information Gain (IG. Results and Conclusion: The proposed technique shows an average improvement of 8.52% compared to using palmprint technique alone. The processing time does not increase for verification compared to palm print techniques.

  3. A reappraisal of echolalia in aphasia: A case-series study with multimodal neuroimaging

    OpenAIRE

    López-Barroso, Diana; Torres-Prioris, María José; Roé-Vellvé, Nuria; Thurnhofer-Hemsi, Karl; Paredes-Pacheco, José; López-González, Francisco; Tubío, Javier; Alfaro, Francisco; Berthier, Marcelo L.; Dávila, Guadalupe

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Verbal echoes are commonplace in patients with aphasia, yet information on their cognitive and neural mechanisms remains unexplored (Berthier et al., in press). This study aims to instantiate the concept of echolalia (Berthier et al., 2016) by reappraising its relevance in the frame of modern neuroscience in three different types: (1) automatic echolalia (AE) (parrot-like repetition of all verbal stimuli); (2) mitigated echolalia (ME) (changes in echoes for communica...

  4. A Strategic Planning Methodology for the Multimodal Transportation Systems: A Case Study from Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Umut R. Tuzkaya; Semih Onut; Gulfem Tuzkaya

    2014-01-01

    Transportation costs have an important effect on companies’ competition capability in various sectors. To realize a positive effect, transportation industry should provide some specific performance criteria related with the economical efficiency and service quality. Also an increase in this performance degree depends on the obtaining optimum results of using the logistical resources in a convenient manner by the specialized logistics service providers. In this study, considering the effects o...

  5. Resting-state neuroimaging studies: a new way of identifying differences and similarities among the anxiety disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Andrew; Thome, Janine; Frewen, Paul; Lanius, Ruth A

    2014-06-01

    This review examines recent functional neuroimaging research of resting-state regional connectivity between brain regions in anxiety disorders. Studies compiled in the PubMed- National Center for Biotechnology Information database targeting resting-state functional connectivity in anxiety disorders were reviewed. Diagnoses included posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), social anxiety disorder (SAD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), panic disorder (PD), and specific phobia (SP). Alterations to network connectivity were demonstrated in PTSD, GAD, SAD, OCD, and PD in several resting-state investigations. Differences from control subjects were primarily observed in the default mode network within PTSD, SAD, and OCD. Alterations within the salience network were observed primarily in PTSD, GAD, and SAD. Alterations in corticostriatal networks were uniquely observed in OCD. Finally, alterations within somatosensory networks were observed in SAD and PD investigations. Resting-state studies involving SPs as a primary diagnosis (with or without comorbidities) were not generated during the literature search. The emerging use of resting-state paradigms may be an effective method for understanding associations between anxiety disorders. Targeted studies of PD and SPs, meta-analyses of the studies conducted to date, and studies of the impact of specific comorbid presentations, are recommended future research directions.

  6. Post partum anxiety and depression in peri-urban communities of Karachi, Pakistan: a quasi-experimental study

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    Azam Iqbal S

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postpartum anxiety and depression is a major public health concern because of its adverse effects on the cognitive and social development of the infant. Globally postpartum depression has been widely investigated but as anxiety is a more prominent feature of postpartum depression we assessed the prevalence of anxiety and depression and their associated factors in post partum women. Methods A quasi-experimental study investigating the impact of postpartum anxiety and depression on child growth and development was conducted in two peri-urban, multiethnic, communities of Karachi, a mega city of Pakistan. A house to house questionnaire based survey was done by trained field workers; 420 consenting pregnant women were identified and data for socio-demographic, home environment and family relationship variables was collected between 36 weeks of pregnancy and within 10 days of childbirth. Mother's levels of anxiety and depression were assessed after one month, two months, six months and twelve months of childbirth; this was two step process: initially an indigenous, validated screening instrument Aga Khan University Anxiety and Depression Scale was used and diagnostic confirmation was done through a psychologist's interview based on DSM IV criteria. Women found to be anxious and depressed at least once out of four assessments were considered for the computation of overall prevalence of postpartum anxiety and depression as well as its risk factors. However, point prevalence's of postpartum anxiety and depression were also reported at each assessment time. Two sixty seven women could be followed for one year. Data was analyzed using SPSS. Chi-square test, simple and multiple logistic regression were used to see the association of different factors. Results The overall prevalence of postpartum anxiety and depression was found to be 28.8 percent. Domestic violence, difficulty in breast feeding at birth and unplanned current pregnancy

  7. Multimodal integration of high-resolution EEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging data: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiloni, F; Babiloni, C; Carducci, F; Romani, G L; Rossini, P M; Angelone, L M; Cincotti, F

    2003-05-01

    Previous simulation studies have stressed the importance of the use of fMRI priors in the estimation of cortical current density. However, no systematic variations of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and number of electrodes were explicitly taken into account in the estimation process. In this simulation study we considered the utility of including information as estimated from fMRI. This was done by using as the dependent variable both the correlation coefficient and the relative error between the imposed and the estimated waveforms at the level of cortical region of interests (ROI). A realistic head and cortical surface model was used. Factors used in the simulations were the different values of SNR of the scalp-generated data, the different inverse operators used to estimated the cortical source activity, the strengths of the fMRI priors in the fMRI-based inverse operators, and the number of scalp electrodes used in the analysis. Analysis of variance results suggested that all the considered factors significantly afflict the correlation and the relative error between the estimated and the simulated cortical activity. For the ROIs analyzed with simulated fMRI hot spots, it was observed that the best estimation of cortical source currents was performed with the inverse operators that used fMRI information. When the ROIs analyzed do not present fMRI hot spots, both standard (i.e., minimum norm) and fMRI-based inverse operators returned statistically equivalent correlation and relative error values.

  8. Placebo-induced somatic sensations: a multi-modal study of three different placebo interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beissner, Florian; Brünner, Franziska; Fink, Maria; Meissner, Karin; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Napadow, Vitaly

    2015-01-01

    Somatic sensations induced by placebos are a frequent phenomenon whose etiology and clinical relevance remains unknown. In this study, we have evaluated the quantitative, qualitative, spatial, and temporal characteristics of placebo-induced somatic sensations in response to three different placebo interventions: (1) placebo irritant solution, (2) placebo laser stimulation, and (3) imagined laser stimulation. The quality and intensity of evoked sensations were assessed using the McGill pain questionnaire and visual analogue scales (VAS), while subjects' sensation drawings processed by a geographic information system (GIS) were used to measure their spatial characteristics. We found that all three interventions are capable of producing robust sensations most frequently described as "tingling" and "warm" that can reach consider-able spatial extent (≤ 205 mm²) and intensity (≤ 80/100 VAS). Sensations from placebo stimulation were often referred to areas remote from the stimulation site and exhibit considerable similarity with referred pain. Interestingly, there was considerable similarity of qualitative features as well as spatial patterns across subjects and placebos. However, placebo laser stimulation elicited significantly stronger and more widespread sensations than placebo irritant solution. Finally, novelty seeking, a character trait assessed by the Temperament and Character Inventory and associated with basal dopaminergic activity, was less pronounced in subjects susceptible to report placebo-induced sensations. Our study has shown that placebo-induced sensations are frequent and can reach considerable intensity and extent. As multiple somatosensory subsystems are involved despite the lack of peripheral stimulus, we propose a central etiology for this phenomenon.

  9. Dynamic neural network reorganization associated with second language vocabulary acquisition: a multimodal imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoda, Chihiro; Tanaka, Kanji; Nariai, Tadashi; Honda, Manabu; Hanakawa, Takashi

    2013-08-21

    It remains unsettled whether human language relies exclusively on innately privileged brain structure in the left hemisphere or is more flexibly shaped through experiences, which induce neuroplastic changes in potentially relevant neural circuits. Here we show that learning of second language (L2) vocabulary and its cessation can induce bidirectional changes in the mirror-reverse of the traditional language areas. A cross-sectional study identified that gray matter volume in the inferior frontal gyrus pars opercularis (IFGop) and connectivity of the IFGop with the caudate nucleus and the superior temporal gyrus/supramarginal (STG/SMG), predominantly in the right hemisphere, were positively correlated with L2 vocabulary competence. We then implemented a cohort study involving 16 weeks of L2 training in university students. Brain structure before training did not predict the later gain in L2 ability. However, training intervention did increase IFGop volume and reorganization of white matter including the IFGop-caudate and IFGop-STG/SMG pathways in the right hemisphere. These "positive" plastic changes were correlated with the gain in L2 ability in the trained group but were not observed in the control group. We propose that the right hemispheric network can be reorganized into language-related areas through use-dependent plasticity in young adults, reflecting a repertoire of flexible reorganization of the neural substrates responding to linguistic experiences.

  10. Association between Gene Polymorphisms and Pain Sensitivity Assessed in a Multi-Modal Multi-Tissue Human Experimental Model - An Explorative Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lecia Møller; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Sato, Hiroe;

    2016-01-01

    The genetic influence on sensitivity to noxious stimuli (pain sensitivity) remains controversial and needs further investigation. In the present study, the possible influence of polymorphisms in three opioid receptor (OPRM, OPRD and OPRK) genes and the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene...... on pain sensitivity in healthy participants was investigated. Catechol-O-methyltransferase has an indirect effect on the mu opioid receptor by changing its activity through an altered endogenous ligand effect. Blood samples for genetic analysis were withdrawn in a multi-modal and multi-tissue experimental...

  11. A multi-centric prospective study: Anxiety and associated factors among parents of children undergoing mild surgery in ENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Akdağ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study to evaluate the anxiety and expectancy among parents of children undergoing surgery in the multi-centric surgery units. Methods: Following approval from the ethics committee, a questionnaire was given to the parents of 123 children who were undergoing surgery in the multi-centric surgery units. The parents were informed that their answers would not affect the care given to their children. The questionnaire was evaluated using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-I and STAI-II. Results: The STAI results indicated that the parents’ anxiety level increased before their children underwent surgery. In addition, there was a negative correlation between STAI-II scores and high levels of wealth (p= 0.004. Also, those with steady employment and higher levels of education had lower anxiety levels and difference was significant (p=0.001. The state anxiety levels were unaffected by family income and education, but the trait anxiety levels decreased with increasing income and education. Mothers were less anxious if their child had undergone surgery in the past, while this result was not significant statistically (p>0.05. Parents were most commonly concerned with possible complications from the surgery and/or anesthesia. Conclusion: Results of our study indicate that parents of children undergoing surgery that have steady employment, to be informed, previously has been administered anesthesia or surgery, high level of wealth and education was observed less anxiety than others. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (2: 206-210

  12. Brain parenchymal damage in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder - A multimodal MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pache, F.; Paul, F. [Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine and Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, NeuroCure Clinical Research Center and Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Zimmermann, H.; Lacheta, A.; Papazoglou, S.; Kuchling, J.; Wuerfel, J.; Brandt, A.U. [Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine and Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, NeuroCure Clinical Research Center and Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Finke, C. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Berlin (Germany); Hamm, B. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Ruprecht, K. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Scheel, M. [Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine and Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, NeuroCure Clinical Research Center and Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    To investigate different brain regions for grey (GM) and white matter (WM) damage in a well-defined cohort of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) patients and compare advanced MRI techniques (VBM, Subcortical and cortical analyses (Freesurfer), and DTI) for their ability to detect damage in NMOSD. We analyzed 21 NMOSD patients and 21 age and gender matched control subjects. VBM (GW/WM) and DTI whole brain (TBSS) analyses were performed at different statistical thresholds to reflect different statistical approaches in previous studies. In an automated atlas-based approach, Freesurfer and DTI results were compared between NMOSD and controls. DTI TBSS and DTI atlas based analysis demonstrated microstructural impairment only within the optic radiation or in regions associated with the optic radiation (posterior thalamic radiation p < 0.001, 6.9 % reduction of fractional anisotropy). VBM demonstrated widespread brain GM and WM reduction, but only at exploratory statistical thresholds, with no differences remaining after correction for multiple comparisons. Freesurfer analysis demonstrated no group differences. NMOSD specific parenchymal brain damage is predominantly located in the optic radiation, likely due to a secondary degeneration caused by ON. In comparison, DTI appears to be the most reliable and sensitive technique for brain damage detection in NMOSD. (orig.)

  13. Structural hippocampal network alterations during healthy aging: A multi-modal MRI study

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    Amandine ePelletier

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available While hippocampal atrophy has been described during healthy aging, few studies have examined its relationship with the integrity of White Matter (WM connecting tracts of the limbic system. This investigation examined WM structural damage specifically related to hippocampal atrophy in healthy aging subjects (n=129, using morphological MRI to assess hippocampal volume and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI to assess WM integrity. Subjects with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI or dementia were excluded from the analysis. In our sample, increasing age was significantly associated with reduced hippocampal volume and reduced Fractional Anisotropy (FA at the level of the fornix and the cingulum bundle. The findings also demonstrate that hippocampal atrophy was specifically associated with reduced FA of the fornix bundle, but it was not related to alteration of the cingulum bundle. Our results indicate that the relationship between hippocampal atrophy and fornix FA values is not due to an independent effect of age on both structures. A recursive regression procedure was applied to evaluate sequential relationships between the alterations of these two brain structures. When both hippocampal atrophy and fornix FA values were included in the same model to predict age, fornix FA values remained significant whereas hippocampal atrophy was no longer significantly associated with age. According to this latter finding, hippocampal atrophy in healthy aging could be mediated by a loss of fornix connections. Structural alterations of this part of the limbic system, which have been associated with neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s disease, result at least in part from the aging process.

  14. A magnetoencephalography study of multi-modal processing of pain anticipation in primary sensory cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, R; Burgess, R C; Plow, E B; Floden, D P; Machado, A G

    2015-09-24

    Pain anticipation plays a critical role in pain chronification and results in disability due to pain avoidance. It is important to understand how different sensory modalities (auditory, visual or tactile) may influence pain anticipation as different strategies could be applied to mitigate anticipatory phenomena and chronification. In this study, using a countdown paradigm, we evaluated with magnetoencephalography the neural networks associated with pain anticipation elicited by different sensory modalities in normal volunteers. When encountered with well-established cues that signaled pain, visual and somatosensory cortices engaged the pain neuromatrix areas early during the countdown process, whereas the auditory cortex displayed delayed processing. In addition, during pain anticipation, the visual cortex displayed independent processing capabilities after learning the contextual meaning of cues from associative and limbic areas. Interestingly, cross-modal activation was also evident and strong when visual and tactile cues signaled upcoming pain. Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and mid-cingulate cortex showed significant activity during pain anticipation regardless of modality. Our results show pain anticipation is processed with great time efficiency by a highly specialized and hierarchical network. The highest degree of higher-order processing is modulated by context (pain) rather than content (modality) and rests within the associative limbic regions, corroborating their intrinsic role in chronification.

  15. Study protocol: a randomised controlled trial of the effects of a multi-modal exercise program on cognition and physical functioning in older women

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    Vaughan Sue

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intervention studies testing the efficacy of cardiorespiratory exercise have shown some promise in terms of improving cognitive function in later life. Recent developments suggest that a multi-modal exercise intervention that includes motor as well as physical training and requires sustained attention and concentration, may better elicit the actual potency of exercise to enhance cognitive performance. This study will test the effect of a multi-modal exercise program, for older women, on cognitive and physical functioning. Methods/design This randomised controlled trial involves community dwelling women, without cognitive impairment, aged 65–75 years. Participants are randomised to exercise intervention or non-exercise control groups, for 16 weeks. The intervention consists of twice weekly, 60 minute, exercise classes incorporating aerobic, strength, balance, flexibility, co-ordination and agility training. Primary outcomes are measures of cognitive function and secondary outcomes include physical functioning and a neurocognitive biomarker (brain derived neurotrophic factor. Measures are taken at baseline and 16 weeks later and qualitative data related to the experience and acceptability of the program are collected from a sub-sample of the intervention group. Discussion If this randomised controlled trial demonstrates that multimodal exercise (that includes motor fitness training can improve cognitive performance in later life, the benefits will be two-fold. First, an inexpensive, effective strategy will have been developed that could ameliorate the increased prevalence of age-related cognitive impairment predicted to accompany population ageing. Second, more robust evidence will have been provided about the mechanisms that link exercise to cognitive improvement allowing future research to be better focused and potentially more productive. Trial registration Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trial Registration Number

  16. A multimodal imaging study of recognition memory in very preterm born adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chieh-En Jane; Froudist-Walsh, Seán; Brittain, Philip J; Karolis, Vyacheslav; Caldinelli, Chiara; Kroll, Jasmin; Counsell, Serena J; Williams, Steven C R; Murray, Robin M; Nosarti, Chiara

    2017-02-01

    Very preterm (memory impairments throughout childhood and adolescence. Here, we used functional MRI (fMRI) to study the neuroanatomy of recognition memory in 49 very preterm-born adults and 50 controls (mean age: 30 years) during completion of a task involving visual encoding and recognition of abstract pictures. T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted images were also collected. Bilateral hippocampal volumes were calculated and tractography of the fornix and cingulum was performed and assessed in terms of volume and hindrance modulated orientational anisotropy (HMOA). Online recognition memory task performance, assessed with A scores, was poorer in the very preterm compared with the control group. Analysis of fMRI data focused on differences in neural activity between the recognition and encoding trials. Very preterm born adults showed decreased activation in the right middle frontal gyrus and posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus and increased activation in the left inferior frontal gyrus and bilateral lateral occipital cortex (LOC) compared with controls. Hippocampi, fornix and cingulum volume was significantly smaller and fornix HMOA was lower in very preterm adults. Among all the structural and functional brain metrics that showed statistically significant group differences, LOC activation was the best predictor of online task performance (P = 0.020). In terms of association between brain function and structure, LOC activation was predicted by fornix HMOA in the preterm group only (P = 0.020). These results suggest that neuroanatomical alterations in very preterm born individuals may be underlying their poorer recognition memory performance. Hum Brain Mapp 38:644-655, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Cortical somatosensory reorganization in children with spastic cerebral palsy: a multimodal neuroimaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHRISTOS ePAPADELIS

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Although cerebral palsy (CP is among the most common causes of physical disability in early childhood, we know little about the functional and structural changes of this disorder in the developing brain. Here, we investigated with three different neuroimaging modalities (magnetoencephalography (MEG, diffusion tension imaging (DTI, and resting state fMRI whether spastic CP is associated with functional and anatomical abnormalities in the sensorimotor network. Ten children participated in the study: four with diplegic CP (DCP, three with hemiplegic CP (HCP, and three typically-developing (TD children. Somatosensory evoked fields (SEFs were recorded in response to pneumatic stimuli applied to digits D1, D3, and D5 of both hands. Several parameters of water diffusion were calculated from DTI between the thalamus and the precentral and postcentral gyri in both hemispheres. The sensorimotor resting state networks (RSNs were examined by using an independent component analysis method. Tactile stimulation of the fingers elicited the first prominent cortical response at ~50 ms, in all except one child, localized over the primary somatosensory cortex (S1. In five CP children, abnormal somatotopic organization was observed in the affected (or more affected hemisphere. Euclidean distances were markedly different between the two hemispheres in the HCP children, and between DCP and TD children for both hemispheres. DTI analysis revealed decreased fractional anisotropy and increased apparent diffusion coefficient for the thalamocortical pathways in the more affected compared to less affected hemisphere in CP children. Rs-fMRI results indicated absent and/or abnormal sensorimotor RSNs for children with HCP and DCP consistent with the severity and location of their lesions. Our findings suggest an abnormal somatosensory processing mechanism in the sensorimotor network of children with CP possibly as a result of diminished thalamocortical projections.

  18. Test Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A A What's in this article? What Is Test Anxiety? What Causes It? Who's Likely to Have Test Anxiety? What Can You Do? en español Ansiedad ante ... prevent them from doing their best on a test. continue What Causes It? All anxiety is a reaction to anticipating something stressful. Like ...

  19. Frequency and Associated Factors for Anxiety and Depression in Pregnant Women: A Hospital-Based Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloufer S. Ali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Antepartum anxiety and/or depression is a major public health problem globally. The aim of this study was to estimate the frequency of antepartum anxiety and/or depression among pregnant women. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in a tertiary care hospital among pregnant women. A total of 165 pregnant women were interviewed by a clinical psychologist using HADS for assessing anxiety and/or depression and also collected information regarding sociodemographic, obstetric, family relationships, and home environment. Out of the total of 165 pregnant women about 70 percent of them were either anxious and/or depressed. The increasing age of women (P-value=0.073, not having any live birth (P-value=0.036, adverse pregnancy outcome in past including death of a child, stillbirth or abortion (P-value=0.013, participant’s role in household decision making (P-value=0.013, and domestic violence (verbal or physical abuse towards mother or children by any family member (P-value=0.123. Our study highlights that anxiety and/or depression is quite common among pregnant women. Therefore, there is a need to incorporate screening for anxiety and depression in the existing antenatal programs and development of strategies to provide practical support to those identified.

  20. The Study Of Anxiety In Medical Students And It’s Relation With Practice of Health Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meshkani Z

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical education is inherently stressful and demanding to deal with various stressors, which may cause impaired judgment, reduced concentration, lack of self-steam, increased anxiety and depression. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted on 250 medical students from 6 month period to graduation in medical college of Tehran university of Medical sciences in order to assess their anxiety and practice of health behaviors and also the relation between the two variables and some other related factors.. Results: The results of study show that of 6.6% medical students suffer from severe state and 4.9% from trait anxiety. The finding of this study shows that 83.3% of girls and 84.6% of boys have practicing risky health behaviors. No statistical relationships found between, anxiety and practicing health behaviors. The relation between anxiety and health satisfaction was Statistically significant; mental and physical (P<0.001. Conclusion: The information found in this research, can help medical education institute to capitalize an opportunities to help their students in preventing risky behaviors, and different stress management techniques should be taught at medical schools.

  1. Social fear conditioning: a novel and specific animal model to study social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Iulia; Neumann, Inga D; Slattery, David A

    2012-05-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is a major health concern with high lifetime prevalence. The current medication is rather unspecific and, despite considerable efforts, its efficacy is still unsatisfactory. However, there are no appropriate and specific animal models available to study the underlying etiology of the disorder. Therefore, we aimed to establish a model of specific social fear in mice and use this social fear conditioning (SFC) model to assess the therapeutic efficacy of the benzodiazepine diazepam and of the antidepressant paroxetine; treatments currently used for SAD patients. We show that by administering electric foot shocks (2-5, 1 s, 0.7 mA) during the investigation of a con-specific, the investigation of unfamiliar con-specifics was reduced for both the short- and long-term, indicating lasting social fear. The induced fear was specific to social stimuli and did not lead to other behavioral alterations, such as fear of novelty, general anxiety, depression, and impaired locomotion. We show that social fear was dose-dependently reversed by acute diazepam, at doses that were not anxiolytic in a non-social context, such as the elevated plus maze. Finally, we show that chronic paroxetine treatment reversed social fear. All in all, we demonstrated robust social fear after exposure to SFC in mice, which was reversed with both acute benzodiazepine and chronic antidepressant treatment. We propose the SFC model as an appropriate animal model to identify the underlying etiology of SAD and possible novel treatment approaches.

  2. Addressing Library Anxiety (LA) in student nurses: a study in an NHS Foundation Trust Hospital library and information service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Still, Madeleine

    2015-12-01

    Library anxiety is a concept which has been recognised in academic library circles since the early 1990s. It can result in students actively avoiding the library for the duration of their studies. Madeleine Still is Trust Librarian at North Tees & Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust and while studying for an MSc, recognised that some student nurses were exhibiting signs of library anxiety. She decided to make it the focus of her MSc dissertation, and this article discusses her research project as well as highlighting the measures she has taken to address the issues she uncovered. Madeleine graduated in July 2013 with an MSc in Information & Library Studies from Robert Gordon University.

  3. Multimodality imaging of pulmonary infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bray, T.J.P., E-mail: timothyjpbray@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ermine Street, Papworth Everard, Cambridge CB23 3RE (United Kingdom); Mortensen, K.H., E-mail: mortensen@doctors.org.uk [Department of Radiology, Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ermine Street, Papworth Everard, Cambridge CB23 3RE (United Kingdom); University Department of Radiology, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Hills Road, Box 318, Cambridge CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom); Gopalan, D., E-mail: deepa.gopalan@btopenworld.com [Department of Radiology, Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ermine Street, Papworth Everard, Cambridge CB23 3RE (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • A plethora of pulmonary and systemic disorders, often associated with grave outcomes, may cause pulmonary infarction. • A stereotypical infarct is a peripheral wedge shaped pleurally based opacity but imaging findings can be highly variable. • Multimodality imaging is key to diagnosing the presence, aetiology and complications of pulmonary infarction. • Multimodality imaging of pulmonary infarction together with any ancillary features often guide to early targeted treatment. • CT remains the principal imaging modality with MRI increasingly used alongside nuclear medicine studies and ultrasound. - Abstract: The impact of absent pulmonary arterial and venous flow on the pulmonary parenchyma depends on a host of factors. These include location of the occlusive insult, the speed at which the occlusion develops and the ability of the normal dual arterial supply to compensate through increased bronchial arterial flow. Pulmonary infarction occurs when oxygenation is cut off secondary to sudden occlusion with lack of recruitment of the dual supply arterial system. Thromboembolic disease is the commonest cause of such an insult but a whole range of disease processes intrinsic and extrinsic to the pulmonary arterial and venous lumen may also result in infarcts. Recognition of the presence of infarction can be challenging as imaging manifestations often differ from the classically described wedge shaped defect and a number of weighty causes need consideration. This review highlights aetiologies and imaging appearances of pulmonary infarction, utilising cases to illustrate the essential role of a multimodality imaging approach in order to arrive at the appropriate diagnosis.

  4. Impact of postpartum anxiety and depression on child’s mental development from two peri-urban communities of Karachi, Pakistan: a quasi-experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Niloufer Sultan; Mahmud, Sadia; Khan, Asia; Ali, Badar Sabir

    2013-01-01

    Background Postpartum anxiety and depression has detrimental effects on the overall mental development of children. This study aims to assess the impact of postpartum anxiety and depression on children’s mental development on all sub-scales in a Pakistani population. Methods A quasi-experimental study was conducted in two peri-urban communities of Karachi, a mega city of Pakistan, to assess the impact of postpartum anxiety and depression on children’s growth and mental development. A total of...

  5. EXAMINATION OF THE RELATION BETWEEN SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORT STUDENTS' APPROACH TO LEARNING AND STUDYING AND TEST ANXIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ender

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the aim of this study was to examine the relation between school of physical education and sport students' approach to learning and studying and test anxiety. Students in departments of physical education and sport teacher (n=103, coaching education (n=155 and sport management (n=110 at Mugla Sıtkı Koçman University participated in the study (n=368. 145 of participant were female, 223 of them were male. Test Anxiety Inventory (TAI, developed by Speilberger (1980 and adapted to Turkish by Öner and Albayrak-Kaymak (1993 (cited in Erözkan, 2004, was used to identify students' test anxiety levels. Approaches to Learning and Studying Inventory (ALSI, developed by Hounsell, Entwistle, Anderson et al. (2002 and adapted to Turkish by Topyaka, Yaka and Öğretmen (2011, was used to identify students' approaches to learning and studying. ALSI consists of 18 items with 5 Likert. TAI consists of 20 items with 4 likert. One-Way ANOVA and Independent T-Test in SPSS 16.0 were used to analyze the collected data. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA was used to find out whether used inventories were suitable for the sample. When the differences about approaches to learning and studying between departments were examined, while no significant difference was found in surface and deep approaches, significant difference was found in strategic approaches. No significant difference was found between grades. Significant gender differences were found in emotionality, worry and total test anxiety. Positive correlation was found between surface approach and emotionality, worry and total test anxiety. Consequently, it was found that students who adopt surface approach have high-test anxiety, because it was found that while adopting surface approach, students could have high-level of emotionality and worry. It is important to create learning environment that discourage students to adopt surface approach.

  6. Multimodal integration of EEG and MEG data: a simulation study with variable signal-to-noise ratio and number of sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiloni, Fabio; Babiloni, Claudio; Carducci, Filippo; Romani, Gian Luca; Rossini, Paolo M; Angelone, Leonardo M; Cincotti, Febo

    2004-05-01

    Previous simulation studies have stressed the importance of the multimodal integration of electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) data in the estimation of cortical current density. In such studies, no systematic variations of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and of the number of sensors were explicitly taken into account in the estimation process. We investigated effects of variable SNR and number of sensors on the accuracy of current density estimate by using multimodal EEG and MEG data. This was done by using as the dependent variable both the correlation coefficient (CC) and the relative error (RE) between imposed and estimated waveforms at the level of cortical region of interests (ROI). A realistic head and cortical surface model was used. Factors used in the simulations were: (1). the SNR of the simulated scalp data (with seven levels: infinite, 30, 20, 10, 5, 3, 1); (2). the particular inverse operator used to estimate the cortical source activity from the simulated scalp data (INVERSE, with two levels, including minimum norm and weighted minimum norm); and (3). the number of EEG or MEG sensors employed in the analysis (SENSORS, with three levels: 128, 61, 29 for EEG and 153, 61, or 38 in MEG). Analysis of variance demonstrated that all the considered factors significantly affect the CC and the RE indexes. Combined EEG-MEG data produced statistically significant lower RE and higher CC in source current density reconstructions compared to that estimated by the EEG and MEG data considered separately. These observations hold for the range of SNR values presented by the analyzed data. The superiority of current density estimation by multimodal integration of EEG and MEG was not due to differences in number of sensors between unimodal (EEG, MEG) and combined (EEG-MEG) inverse estimates. In fact, the current density estimate relative to the EEG-MEG multimodal integration involved 61 EEG plus 63 MEG sensors, whereas estimations carried out

  7. Anxiety and Charles Bonnet Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geueke, Anna; Morley, Michael G.; Morley, Katharine; Lorch, Alice; Jackson, MaryLou; Lambrou, Angeliki; Wenberg, June; Oteng-Amoako, Afua

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Some persons with Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) suffer significant anxiety because of their visual hallucinations, while others do not. The aim of the study presented here was to compare levels of anxiety in persons with low vision with and without CBS. Methods: This retrospective study compared the level of anxiety in 31 persons…

  8. Analysis of test anxiety in medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Pantić Marina; Latas Milan; Obradović Danilo

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Most students experience some level of anxiety during the exam. However, when anxiety affects the exam performance, it represents a problem. Test anxiety is a special form of anxiety, which is characterized with somatic, cognitive and behavioral symptoms of anxiety in situations of preparing and performing tests and exams. Test anxiety turns into a problem when it becomes so high that it interferes with test preparation and performance. The objective of this study was to a...

  9. Science Anxiety among Form Four Students in Penang: A Gender Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Foo Lay; Tek, Ong Eng

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports a causal-comparative study of science anxiety among Form Four students in Penang. The Wynstra's (1991) Science Anxiety Inventory (SAI), which consists of six factors (i.e., danger anxiety, science test anxiety, math and problem-solving anxiety, squeamish anxiety, performance anxiety, and science classroom anxiety), was…

  10. Listening to Their Voices: An In-Depth Study of Language Anxiety and Cultural Adjustment among Taiwanese Graduate Students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Wen

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study is to understand ten Taiwanese graduate students' personal experiences with language anxiety and cultural adjustment while studying in an American university. This study focuses not only on language anxiety but also on cultural factors in participants' daily lives inside and outside of the classroom. The study utilized an…

  11. Elementary Pre-Service Teachers' Mathematics Anxiety and Mathematics Teaching Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haciomeroglu, Guney

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined the structure of elementary pre-service teachers' mathematics anxiety and mathematics teaching anxiety by asking whether the two systems of anxiety are related. The Turkish Mathematics Anxiety Rating Scale Short Version and the Mathematics Teaching Anxiety Scale were administered to 260 elementary pre-service…

  12. Elementary Pre-Service Teachers' Mathematics Anxiety and Mathematics Teaching Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haciomeroglu, Guney

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined the structure of elementary pre-service teachers' mathematics anxiety and mathematics teaching anxiety by asking whether the two systems of anxiety are related. The Turkish Mathematics Anxiety Rating Scale Short Version and the Mathematics Teaching Anxiety Scale were administered to 260 elementary pre-service teachers.…

  13. Stress, anxiety, and depression among parents of children with autism spectrum disorder in Oman: a case–control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Farsi OA

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Omar A Al-Farsi,1 Yahya M Al-Farsi,1,2 Marwan M Al-Sharbati,3 Samir H Al-Adawi31Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat, Sultanate of Oman; 2Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA; 3Department of Behavioural Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat, Sultanate of Oman Abstract: Previous studies carried out in Euro-American populations have unequivocally indicated that psychological disorders of the CASD (caregivers of children with autism spectrum disorder are marked with high levels of stress, anxiety, and depression. This finding has been attributed to the reaction of having to care for a child with neurodevelopmental disorders. While there have been reports on autism spectrum disorder in Arab/Islamic countries such as Oman, there is no study from this region, to our knowledge, reporting the performance of indices of stress, anxiety, and depression among CASD. This study aimed to examine whether there is variation in the performance of indices of stress, depression, and anxiety explored via Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale 21 among CASD, caregivers of children with intellectual disabilities, and caregivers of typically developing children. All indices of stress, depression, and anxiety were higher in CASD compared to other caregivers in the control group. This study corroborates with other studies carried out in other populations that caring for children impacts the mental health status of caregivers. Therefore, there are strong grounds to contemplate the mechanism to help such a vulnerable group of family caregivers. Keywords: stress, anxiety, depression, caregivers, autism, Oman

  14. Prevalence of mood and anxiety disorder in self reported irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. An epidemiological population based study of women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykletun Arnstein

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is commonly regarded as a functional disorder, and is hypothesized to be associated with anxiety and depression. This evidence mainly rests on population-based studies utilising self-report screening instruments for psychopathology. Other studies applying structured clinical interviews are generally based on small clinical samples, which are vulnerable to biases. The extant evidence base for an association between IBS and psychopathology is hence not conclusive. The aim of this study was therefore to re-examine the hypothesis using population-based data and psychiatric morbidity established with a structured clinical interview. Methods Data were derived from a population-based epidemiological study (n = 1077. Anxiety and mood disorders were established using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR (SCID-I/NP and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12. Current and lifetime IBS was self-reported. Hypertension and diabetes were employed as comparison groups as they are expected to be unrelated to mental health. Results Current IBS (n = 69, 6.4% was associated with an increased likelihood of current mood and/or anxiety disorders (OR = 2.62, 95%CI 1.49 - 4.60. Half the population reporting a lifetime IBS diagnosis also had a lifetime mood or anxiety disorder. Exploratory analyses demonstrated an increased prevalence of IBS across most common anxiety and mood disorders, the exception being bipolar disorder. The association with IBS and symptoms load (GHQ-12 followed a curved dose response pattern. In contrast, hypertension and diabetes were consistently unrelated to psychiatric morbidity. Conclusions IBS is significantly associated with anxiety and mood disorders. This study provides indicative evidence for IBS as a disorder with a psychosomatic aspect.

  15. Relations of positive and negative affectivity to anxiety and depression in children: evidence from a latent variable longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonigan, Christopher J; Phillips, Beth M; Hooe, Eric S

    2003-06-01

    The tripartite model of anxiety and depression has been studied with adults; however, support is still emerging with children concerning measurement and relations between positive (PA) and negative (NA) affect and psychopathology. In this longitudinal study of 270 4th- to 11th-grade children (mean age = 12.9 years, SD = 2.23). confirmatory factor analysis supported a 2-factor orthogonal model of children's self-reported affect and revealed that the concurrent relations of NA and PA to anxiety and depression symptoms were consistent with the tripartite model. Structural equation modeling demonstrated moderate cross-time stability of trait PA and NA, consistent with a temperament view of these factors, as well as partial support for the role of NA and PA in the development of anxiety and depression symptoms in children.

  16. A Multimodal Discourse Analysis of Tmall's Double Eleven Advertisement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chunyu; Luo, Mengxi

    2016-01-01

    From the 1990s, the multimodal turn in discourse studies makes multimodal discourse analysis a popular topic in linguistics and communication studies. An important approach to applying Systemic Functional Linguistics to non-verbal modes is Visual Grammar initially proposed by Kress and van Leeuwen (1996). Considering that commercial advertisement…

  17. Use of a religious hymn in remission of symptoms of social phobia (social anxiety disorder): a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khouzam, Hani Raoul; Ghafoori, Bita; Nichols, Emma E A

    2005-04-01

    This case report described a veteran with social anxiety disorder who reported fears of negative evaluation by others, social avoidance, and accompanying physiological symptoms of heart palpitations, gastrointestinal discomfort, muscle tension and mental confusion. The symptoms of social anxiety disorder subsided with the use of a Christian hymn "Be Still My Soul" and its accompanying musical poem, in Finlandia. The veteran attributed the symptom remission to the feeling of stillness and surrender to God conveyed by the words and music of the hymn. Although previous studies have shown that both music and religious beliefs can affect mental health, the findings in this case cannot be generalized without conducting further prospective empirical studies.

  18. Statistics Anxiety, State Anxiety during an Examination, and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macher, Daniel; Paechter, Manuela; Papousek, Ilona; Ruggeri, Kai; Freudenthaler, H. Harald; Arendasy, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background: A large proportion of students identify statistics courses as the most anxiety-inducing courses in their curriculum. Many students feel impaired by feelings of state anxiety in the examination and therefore probably show lower achievements. Aims: The study investigates how statistics anxiety, attitudes (e.g., interest, mathematical…

  19. Anxiety and Test Anxiety: General and Test Anxiety among College Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custodero, Jeri Lyn

    2013-01-01

    This study compares the state, trait, and test anxiety scores of 145 college students with and without learning disabilities against categories such as demographics, general anxiety, test anxiety, and disability experience. This study used a questionnaire and compared answers among groups. The analysis indicated that students with learning…

  20. Multimodal Resources in Transnational Adoption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    The paper discusses an empirical analysis which highlights the multimodal nature of identity construction. A documentary on transnational adoption provides real life incidents as research material. The incidents involve (or from them emerge) various kinds of multimodal resources and participants...

  1. Dog-appeasing pheromone collars reduce sound-induced fear and anxiety in beagle dogs: a placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsberg, G M; Beck, A; Lopez, A; Deniaud, M; Araujo, J A; Milgram, N W

    2015-09-12

    The objective of the study was to assess the effects of a dog-appeasing pheromone (DAP) collar in reducing sound-induced fear and anxiety in a laboratory model of thunderstorm simulation. Twenty-four beagle dogs naïve to the current test were divided into two treatment groups (DAP and placebo) balanced on their fear score in response to a thunderstorm recording. Each group was then exposed to two additional thunderstorm simulation tests on consecutive days. Dogs were video-assessed by a trained observer on a 6-point scale for active, passive and global fear and anxiety (combined). Both global and active fear and anxiety scores were significantly improved during and following thunder compared with placebo on both test days. DAP significantly decreased global fear and anxiety across 'during' and 'post' thunder times when compared with baseline. There was no significant improvement in the placebo group from baseline on the test days. In addition, the DAP group showed significantly greater use of the hide box at any time with increased exposure compared with the placebo group. The DAP collar reduced the scores of fear and anxiety, and increased hide use in response to a thunder recording, possibly by counteracting noise-related increased reactivity.

  2. Impact of anxiety symptoms on outcomes of depression: an observational study in Asian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novick D

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Diego Novick,1 William Montgomery,2 Jaume Aguado,3 Xiaomei Peng,4 Josep Maria Haro3 1Eli Lilly and Company, Windlesham, Surrey, UK; 2Eli Lilly Australia Pty Ltd, West Ryde, NSW, Australia; 3Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu, CIBERSAM, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 4Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA Objective: To investigate the impact of anxiety symptoms on depression outcomes in Asian patients with major depressive disorder (MDD (n=714. Methods: The 17-item Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD-17, overall severity, somatic symptoms, and quality of life (QOL (EuroQOL Questionnaire-5 Dimensions [EQ-5D] were assessed at baseline and 3 months. Anxiety was measured using items 10 and 11 from the HAMD-17. Linear, tobit, and logistic multiple regression models analyzed the impact of anxiety symptoms on outcomes. Baseline anxiety was related to age and the presence of pain symptoms at baseline. Results: Regression models showed that a higher level of anxiety was associated with a lower frequency of remission and lower QOL at 3 months. Patients with lower baseline anxiety symptoms had higher remission rates (odds ratio for each point of anxiety symptoms, 0.829 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.723–0.951]. Patients with higher levels of baseline anxiety had a lower QOL at 3 months (a decrease in EQ-5D tariff score for each point of anxiety symptoms, 0.023 [95% CI: 0.045–0.001]. Conclusion: In conclusion, the presence of anxiety symptoms negatively impacts the outcomes of depression. Keywords: depression, anxiety, Asia, observational, outcomes

  3. Anxiety and depression in patients with head and neck cancer: 6-month follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu YS

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Yi-Shan Wu,1 Pao-Yen Lin,1,2 Chih-Yen Chien,3 Fu-Min Fang,4 Nien-Mu Chiu,1 Chi-Fa Hung,1 Yu Lee,1 Mian-Yoon Chong11Department of Psychiatry, 2Institute for Translational Research in Biomedical Sciences, 3Department of Otolaryngology, 4Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, TaiwanObjective: We aimed to assess psychiatric morbidities of patients with head and neck cancer (HNC in a prospective study at pretreatment, and 3 and 6 months after treatment, and to compare their health-related quality of life (HRQL between those with and without depressive disorders (depression.Materials and methods: Patients with newly diagnosed HNC from a tertiary hospital were recruited into the study. They were assessed for psychiatric morbidities using the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition. Their HRQL was simultaneously evaluated using the quality of life questionnaire of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer with a specific module for head and neck cancer; and depressed and nondepressed HNC patients were compared by using the generalized mixed-effect model for repeated measurements.Results: A total of 106 patients were recruited into this study. High rates of anxiety were found at pretreatment, but steadily declined over time (from 27.3% to 6.4%, and later 3.3%. A skew pattern of depression was observed, with prevalence rates from 8.5% at pretreatment to 24.5% and 14% at 3 and 6 months, respectively, after treatment. We found that loss of sense (P=0.001, loss of speech (P<0.001, low libido (P=0.001, dry mouth (P<0.001, and weight loss (P=0.001 were related to depression over time. The depressed patients had a higher consumption of painkillers (P=0.001 and nutrition supplements (P<0.001. The results showed that depression was predicted by sticky saliva (P<0.001 and trouble with

  4. Attitude Differences between Male and Female Students at Clovis Community College and Their Relationships to Math Anxiety: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendershot, Richard Lane

    The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes of males and females at Clovis Community College towards math anxiety and to look for possible factors that could be used to assist in the assignment of students to various math classes. The subjects in the study were fifty male students and fifty female students. Subjects responded to a math…

  5. Genome-wide association study of response to cognitive-behavioural therapy in children with anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coleman, Jonathan R I; Lester, Kathryn J; Keers, Robert; Roberts, Susanna; Curtis, Charles; Arendt, Kristian; Bögels, Susan; Cooper, Peter; Creswell, Cathy; Dalgleish, Tim; Hartman, Catharina A; Heiervang, Einar R; Hötzel, Katrin; Hudson, Jennifer L; In-Albon, Tina; Lavallee, Kristen; Lyneham, Heidi J; Marin, Carla E; Meiser-Stedman, Richard; Morris, Talia; Nauta, Maaike H; Rapee, Ronald M; Schneider, Silvia; Schneider, Sophie C; Silverman, Wendy K; Thastum, Mikael; Thirlwall, Kerstin; Waite, Polly; Wergeland, Gro Janne; Breen, Gerome; Eley, Thalia C

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anxiety disorders are common, and cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) is a first-line treatment. Candidate gene studies have suggested a genetic basis to treatment response, but findings have been inconsistent. AIMS: To perform the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of psychologi

  6. Genome-wide association study of response to cognitive–behavioural therapy in children with anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coleman, J.R.I.; Lester, K.J.; Keers, R.; Roberts, S.; Curtis, C.; Arendt, K.; Bögels, S.; Cooper, P.; Creswell, C.; Dalgleish, T.; Hartman, C.A.; Heiervang, E.R.; Hötzel, K.; Hudson, J.L.; In-Albon, T.; Lavallee, K.; Lyneham, H.J.; Marin, C.E.; Meiser-Stedman, R.; Morris, T.; Nauta, M.H.; Rapee, R.M.; Schneider, S.; Schneider, S.C.; Silverman, W.K.; Thastum, M.; Thirlwall, K.; Waite, P.; Wergeland, G.J.; Breen, G.; Eley, T.C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders are common, and cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) is a first-line treatment. Candidate gene studies have suggested a genetic basis to treatment response, but findings have been inconsistent. Aims To perform the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of psychologica

  7. Cognitive coping, goal adjustment, and depressive and anxiety symptoms in people undergoing infertility treatment : a prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaij, V.; Garnefski, N.; Schroevers, M.J.; Weijmer, J.; Helmerhorst, F.

    2010-01-01

    The relationships between cognitive coping strategies, goal adjustment, and symptoms of depression and anxiety were studied in people with fertility problems. Both cross-sectional and prospective relationships were studied in a sample of 313 patients attending an infertility clinic. Self-report ques

  8. Cognitive Coping, Goal Adjustment, and Depressive and Anxiety Symptoms in People Undergoing Infertility Treatment A Prospective Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaij, Vivian; Garnefski, Nadia; Schroevers, Maya J.; Weijmer, Janneke; Helmerhorst, Frans

    2010-01-01

    The relationships between cognitive coping strategies, goal adjustment, and symptoms of depression and anxiety were studied in people with fertility problems. Both cross-sectional and prospective relationships were studied in a sample of 313 patients attending an infertility clinic. Self-report ques

  9. Effects of Reiki on Pain, Anxiety, and Blood Pressure in Patients Undergoing Knee Replacement: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Ann Linda; Vitale, Anne; Brownell, Elise; Kryak, Elizabeth; Rand, William

    This blinded, controlled pilot study investigated the effects of Reiki on 46 patients undergoing knee replacement surgery. Of the 3 groups, Reiki, Sham Reiki, and Standard of Care, only the Reiki group showed significant reductions in pain, blood pressure, respiration rate, and state anxiety, which provides evidence for a full-scale clinical study.

  10. Anxiety mediates the effect of smoking on insomnia in people with asthma: evidence from the HUNT3 study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andenæs R

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Randi Andenæs,1 Carolyn E Schwartz1–31Department of Nursing and Health Promotion, Faculty of Health Science, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Oslo, Norway; 2DeltaQuest Foundation, Inc., Concord, 3Departments of Medicine and Orthopaedic Surgery, Tufts University Medical School, Boston, MA, USAObjective: The aim of this study was to investigate factors related to insomnia in a cohort of people with asthma.Design: This secondary analysis utilized cross-sectional data from the Norwegian Nord-Trøndelag Health Study, a population-based health survey (n=50,807.Participants: We used self-reported data from 1,342 men and women with a physician-confirmed asthma diagnosis ranging in age from 19.5 to 91 years.Measurements: Data on sleep, lifestyle variables (smoking and exercise, anxiety, and depression were included. An insomnia scale and asthma impact scale were constructed using factor analysis. Hierarchical series of multiple regression models were used to investigate direct and mediational relationships between the study variables and insomnia.Results: The hierarchical models revealed significant independent contributions of female sex, higher age, not exercising, asthma impact, anxiety, and depression on insomnia (R2=25.2%. Further, these models suggested that the impact of smoking on insomnia was mediated by anxiety, and that the beneficial impact of exercise was mitigated by depression symptoms.Conclusion: Smokers with asthma have more insomnia, and this relationship may be mediated by anxiety. Further, people with asthma who experience depression symptoms are less likely to benefit from physical exercise as a method to enhance sleep quality. Our findings would suggest that helping smokers to manage their anxiety and depression through behavioral methods may reduce their insomnia symptoms, and enable them to engage in other health-enhancing pursuits, such as physical exercise.Keywords: insomnia, asthma, anxiety

  11. Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction for Academic Evaluation Anxiety: A Naturalistic Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundas, Ingrid; Thorsheim, Torbjørn; Hjeltnes, Aslak; Binder, Per Einar

    2016-01-01

    Mindfulness based stress reduction (MBSR) for academic evaluation anxiety and self-confidence in 70 help-seeking bachelor's and master's students was examined. A repeated measures analysis of covariance on the 46 students who completed pretreatment and posttreatment measures (median age = 24 years, 83% women) showed that evaluation anxiety and…

  12. Foreign Language Reading Anxiety in a Jordanian EFL Context: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shboul, Murad M.; Ahmad, Ismail Sheikh; Nordin, Mohamad Sahari; Rahman, Zainurin Abdul

    2013-01-01

    In the last two decades, investigating the sources of foreign language anxiety in general has increasingly attracted the attention of many researchers in the field of foreign language teaching. However, the sources of anxiety that influence the acquisition of certain specific language skills such as reading in particular have rarely been…

  13. Virtual reality exposure therapy in anxiety disorders: a systematic review of process-and-outcome studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyerbröker, K.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) has become an interesting alternative for the treatment of anxiety disorders. Research has focused on the efficacy of VRET in treating anxiety disorders: phobias, panic disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. In this systematic review, st

  14. Developmental Profile of Infants Born to Mothers with Postpartum Depression and Anxiety: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Kamal Narayan

    2010-01-01

    Background: Postpartum period is associated with higher rates for depression, blues and psychosis. Anxiety is also significant. These disorders may have serious implications in the cognitive development of the infant. There is relative lack of data in this area. So we tried to estimate postpartum anxiety and depression in a group of women and…

  15. [Interpersonal anxiety and the self-others cognitive system: a study of the Self-identity System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, M

    1990-06-01

    This study examined the self-others cognitive systems of anthropophobia in terms of the (an) object relationship disorder. The Self-identity Systems of 259 students were measured to clarify visually the relationship between self and others in terms of self and others cognition and interpersonal anxiety. Cluster analysis and principal components analysis of the Self-identity Systems led to the appearance of five Self-identity System types for each sex. Low anxiety level subjects tended more toward the "self convergence type" while high anxiety subjects tended more toward the "self alienation type". These results suggest that disorder in the self-others cognitive system and the problem of self-identity relate to anthropophobia.

  16. Statistics Anxiety and Instructor Immediacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amanda S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between instructor immediacy and statistics anxiety. It was predicted that students receiving immediacy would report lower levels of statistics anxiety. Using a pretest-posttest-control group design, immediacy was measured using the Instructor Immediacy scale. Statistics anxiety was…

  17. Math Anxiety: What Is It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, Nancy E.

    While much progress has been made in treating math anxiety, little is yet known about its causes, correlates or effects. The present study examined factors related to the prevalence and intensity of math anxiety in college students and the extent to which math anxiety is predictive of math course grades. The 655 subjects were obtained from two…

  18. The Effects of Math Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Amanda; Brown, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Math anxiety is a reoccurring problem for many students, and the effects of this anxiety on college students are increasing. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between pre-enrollment math anxiety, standardized test scores, math placement scores, and academic success during freshman math coursework (i.e., pre-algebra, college…

  19. Can Coloring Mandalas Reduce Anxiety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Nancy A.; Kasser, Tim

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of different types of art activities in the reduction of anxiety. After undergoing a brief anxiety-induction, 84 undergraduate students were randomly assigned to color a mandala, to color a plaid form, or to color on a blank piece of paper. Results demonstrated that anxiety levels declined approximately the…

  20. Multimodal neurophysiological and psychometric evaluation among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shehata GA

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Ghaydaa A Shehata1, Yasser MB Elserogy2, Hossam Eddin K Ahmad2, Mohamed I Abdel-Kareem3, Ashraf M Al-kabeer4, Mohamed M Rayan2, Mohamed ES Abd El-Baky 1Department of Neurology; 2Department of Psychiatry, Assiut University, Egypt; 3Department of Rheumatology, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; 4Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Al-Azhar University, Assiut, EgyptObjective: To determine some of the neuropsychiatric manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE by applying multimodal neurophysiological and psychometric studies.Patients and methods: Twenty-six SLE patients were evaluated for neurological and psychiatric disorders and compared with 26 healthy controls matched for age, sex, education, and social class. The severity of SLE disease was assessed. Each subject was subjected to the following examinations: laboratory, neurophysiology, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, transcranial duplex, Modified Mini-mental State Examination, Cognitive Assessment Scale Inventory, Hamilton Depression Scale, and Hamilton Anxiety Scale.Results: The mean age of subjects was 25.9 ± 8.9 years. The most prevalent neurological manifestations were (in order of frequency anxiety in 17 cases (65.4%, depression in 15 cases (57.7%, headache in 10 cases (38.5%, peripheral neuropathy in 7 cases (26.9%, seizures in 6 cases (23.1%, psychosis in 5 cases (19.2%, dementia in 4 cases (15.4%, radiculopathy in 4 cases (15.4%, myositis in 3 cases (11.5%, and stroke in 2 cases (7.7%. There was a significant affection in amplitude of the ulnar nerve, cognitive function impairment, and electroencephalography changes. There was a significant increased mean velocity and decreased Pulsatility Index of the most studied intracranial vessels in the patients.Conclusion: The use of multimodal neurophysiological, transcranial duplex, and psychometric scales increases the sensitivity for detecting nervous system involvement.Keywords: SLE, SLEDAI

  1. The relation between personality and anxiety: findings from a 3-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershuny, B S; Sher, K J

    1998-05-01

    The authors tested the extent to which the personality dimensions of neuroticism, extraversion, and psychoticism (H. J. Eysenck & S. B. G. Eysenck, 1975) prospectively predicted global anxiety (assessed by items from the Brief Symptom Inventory: L. R. Derogatis & M. S. Spencer, 1982). The authors also examined prospective relations among these personality dimensions and depression to evaluate the specificity of findings. Participants were 466 young adults, primarily undergraduate students, assessed twice over a 3-year interval. An interaction between neuroticism and extraversion predicted both global anxiety and depression 3 years later. Findings indicated that personality, in particular the combination of high neuroticism and low extraversion, may play an important predisposing, etiological role in anxiety. Interpretations and implications of the predictive importance of the Neuroticism x Extraversion interaction in anxiety are discussed, and further speculations about the relation between anxiety and depression are put forth.

  2. Anxiety and depression levels in prepubertal obese children: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito M

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Maria Esposito,1 Beatrice Gallai,2 Michele Roccella,3 Rosa Marotta,4 Francesco Lavano,4 Serena Marianna Lavano,4 Giovanni Mazzotta,5 Domenico Bove,6 Michele Sorrentino,1 Francesco Precenzano,1 Marco Carotenuto1 1Clinic of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, Department of Mental Health, Physical and Preventive Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy; 2Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy; 3Child Neuropsychiatry, Department of Psychology, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy; 4Department of Psychiatry, “Magna Graecia” University of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Italy; 5Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, AUSL Umbria 2, Terni, Italy; 6Centro per la Diagnosi e Cura dei Disturbi dell’apprendimento e del Comportamento Associazione per la ricerca scientifica Fusis, Alvignano, Italy Introduction: Childhood obesity has become a worldwide epidemic in Western and in developing countries and has been accompanied by many serious and severe comorbidities, such as diabetes, hypertension, sleep apnea syndrome, depression, dyslipidemia, impaired glucose homeostasis, steatohepatitis, and intracranial hypertension, as well as medical concerns unique to youth, such as accelerated pubertal and skeletal development and orthopedic disorders. To date, no specific studies about the psychological assessment in pediatric obesity are present. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the putative relationship between psychological troubles and obesity in a sample of school-aged children. Materials and methods: The study population consists of 148 obese subjects (body mass index [BMI] >95th percentile (69 males, mean age 8.9±1.23 years consecutively referred from clinical pediatricians to the Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry department at the Second University of Naples. In all subjects, weight, height, and BMI z-score were evaluated. In order to assess the anxiety levels and the presence of

  3. [Castration anxiety and oral envy in sexual relations. Analytic studies with ethnological observations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, A

    1995-01-01

    Ethno-psychoanalysis is the study of the unconscious in foreign cultures. It can however also be of use in understanding unconscious elements operative in our own culture. To illustrate the point, the author describes the "Koro" epidemic which occurs periodically on the island of Hainan off the south of coast of China. This epidemic largely affects young unmarried men and the author pinpoints the unconscious conflicts underlying this collective phenomenon. It transpires that the epidemic is in effect a species of rite of passage in which a group of young males make the communal attempt to overcome castration anxieties which are themselves the product of covert gender envy. In the second section, Gerlach reports on his psychoanalytic encounter with a young man in Germany displaying similar symptoms. The profounder dimensions of this condition were only comprehensible to the author on account of his knowledge of "Koro".

  4. Gender, Anxiety, and Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, Tara M.; Gillham, Jane E.; Seligman, Martin E. P.

    2009-01-01

    Does anxiety lead to depression more for girls than for boys? This study prospectively examines gender differences in the relationship between anxiety and depressive symptoms in early adolescence. One hundred thirteen 11- to 14-year-old middle school students complete questionnaires assessing depressive symptoms and three dimensions of anxiety (worry and oversensitivity, social concerns and concentration, and physiological anxiety) as well as total anxiety symptoms at an initial assessment and 1 year later. Total anxiety and worry and oversensitivity symptoms are found to predict later depressive symptoms more strongly for girls than for boys. There is a similar pattern of results for social concerns and concentration symptoms, although this does not reach statistical significance. Physiological anxiety predicts later depressive symptoms for both boys and girls. These findings highlight the importance of anxiety for the development of depression in adolescence, particularly worry and oversensitivity among girls. PMID:19756209

  5. The Importance of Continuous Multimodal Therapy in Children with ADHD (Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder – A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena DODAN

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this century, the environmental factors influence our health excessively; that is why we become more agitated, always in a hurry, and more tired. We live without knowing it in a century of speed, and the children who come after us present abilities that are more and more evolved. We hear more and more around us parents who complain about their children’s hard to control behavior; kindergarten and primary school teachers who are exasperated by the children’s lack of focus and control. The consequences are the punishment of the child, and sometimes even his/her exclusion from the group. Very few people know that this kind of child cannot control his/her behavior, encountering difficulties regarding the focus of his/her attention on one single activity, even if related to play. On these aspects we can act with the help of multimodal therapy, so that we can help the child overcome the behavioral and psycho-motor obstacles encountered during growth. The aim of multimodal therapy is to act multilaterally on the subject so that at the end, the result to be favorable both for the child and parents, and for the specialists.

  6. Development of a micromirror-scanned multimodal CARS miniaturized microscope for the in vivo study of spinal cord disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugkar, Sangeeta; Smith, Brett; Naji, Majid; Brideau, Craig; Stys, Peter; Anis, Hanan

    2011-03-01

    We discuss the design and implementation of a novel multimodal coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) miniaturized microscope for imaging of injured and recovering spinal cords in a single living animal. We demonstrate for the first time, the use of a biaxial microelectromechanical system (MEMS) mirror for scanning and diffraction limited multiple lens miniaturized objective for exciting a CARS signal. The miniaturized microscope design includes light delivery using a large mode area photonic crystal fiber (PCF), and multimode fiber for collection of the nonlinear optical signal. The basic design concept, major engineering challenges, solutions, and preliminary results are presented. We demonstrate CARS and two photon excitation fluorescence microscopy in a benchtop setup with the miniaturized optics and MEMS scanning. The light source is based on a single femtosecond laser (pump beam) and a supercontinuum generated in a nonlinear PCF (Stokes beam). This is coupled using free space optics onto the surface of a resonantly driven two dimensional scanning MEMS mirror that scans the excitation light in a Lissajous pattern. The novel design of the miniaturized microscope is expected to provide significant new information on the pathogenesis of demyelinating diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis and Spinal Cord Injury.

  7. Association between amygdala volume and anxiety level: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study in autistic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juranek, Jenifer; Filipek, Pauline A; Berenji, Gholam R; Modahl, Charlotte; Osann, Kathryn; Spence, M Anne

    2006-12-01

    differences between study populations regarding age at MRI, level of impairment within autistic subjects, and underlying anxiety level in the selected study groups.

  8. Plant-based medicines for anxiety disorders, Part 1: a review of preclinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, Jerome; McIntyre, Erica; Camfield, David A

    2013-03-01

    Research in the area of herbal psychopharmacology has revealed a variety of promising medicines that may provide benefit in the treatment of general anxiety and specific anxiety disorders. However, a comprehensive review of plant-based anxiolytics has been absent to date. This article (part 1) reviews herbal medicines for which only preclinical investigations for anxiolytic activity have been performed. In part 2, we review herbal medicines for which there have been clinical investigations for anxiolytic activity. An open-ended, language-restricted (English) search of MEDLINE (PubMed), CINAHL, Scopus and the Cochrane Library databases was conducted (up to 28 October 2012) using specific search criteria to identify herbal medicines that have been investigated for anxiolytic activity. This search of the literature revealed 1,525 papers, from which 53 herbal medicines were included in the full review (having at least one study using the whole plant extract). Of these plants, 21 had human clinical trial evidence (reviewed in part 2), with another 32 having solely preclinical studies (reviewed here in part 1). Preclinical evidence of anxiolytic activity (without human clinical trials) was found for Albizia julibrissin, Sonchus oleraceus, Uncaria rhynchophylla, Stachys lavandulifolia, Cecropia glazioui, Magnolia spp., Eschscholzia californica, Erythrina spp., Annona spp., Rubus brasiliensis, Apocynum venetum, Nauclea latifolia, Equisetum arvense, Tilia spp., Securidaca longepedunculata, Achillea millefolium, Leea indica, Juncus effusus, Coriandrum sativum, Eurycoma longifolia, Turnera diffusa, Euphorbia hirta, Justicia spp., Crocus sativus, Aloysia polystachya, Albies pindrow, Casimiroa edulis, Davilla rugosa, Gastrodia elata, Sphaerathus indicus, Zizyphus jujuba and Panax ginseng. Common mechanisms of action for the majority of botanicals reviewed primarily involve GABA, either via direct receptor binding or ionic channel or cell membrane modulation; GABA transaminase

  9. Preparation and evaluation of a multimodal minoxidil microemulsion versus minoxidil alone in the treatment of androgenic alopecia of mixed etiology: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakr FM

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Farouk M Sakr,1 Ali MI Gado,2 Haseebur R Mohammed,2 Abdel Nasser Ismail Adam3 1Department of Pharmaceutics, 2Departments of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, 3Department of Biology, College of Pharmacy, Riyadh Colleges of Dentistry and Pharmacy, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Background: The variable success of topical minoxidil in the treatment of androgenic alopecia has led to the hypothesis that other pathways could mediate this form of hair loss, including infection and/or microinflammation of the hair follicles. In this study, we prepared a multimodal microemulsion comprising minoxidil (a dihydrotestosterone antagonist, diclofenac (a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent, and tea tree oil (an anti-infective agent. We investigated the stability and physicochemical properties of this formulation, and its therapeutic efficacy compared with a formulation containing minoxidil alone in the treatment of androgenic alopecia. Methods: We developed a multimodal oil/water (o/w microemulsion, a formulation containing minoxidil alone, and another containing vehicle. A three-phase diagram was constructed to obtain the optimal concentrations of the selected oil, surfactant, and cosurfactant. Thirty-two men aged 18–30 years were randomized to apply 1 mL of microemulsion containing the multimodal formulation (formulation A, n = 11, minoxidil alone (formulation B, n = 11 or placebo (formulation C, n = 10 twice daily to the affected area for 32 weeks. Efficacy was evaluated by mean hair count, thickness, and weight on the targeted area of the scalp. Global photographs were taken, changes in the area of scalp coverage were assessed by patients and external investigators, and the benefits and safety of the study medications were evaluated. The physical stability of formula A was examined after a shelf storage period of 24 months. Results: Formulation A achieved a significantly superior response than formulations B and C in terms of mean hair count (P

  10. Instantiation of Multimodal Semiotic Systems in Science Classroom Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kok-Sing

    2013-01-01

    Science classroom discourse is inherently multimodal in that scientific meanings are made through an integration of multiple semiotic systems (e.g., language, diagrams, equations). Although some studies have described this multimodal nature, few have examined and explained the relationship between the integration of multiple semiotic systems and…

  11. Fracturing Writing Spaces: Multimodal Storytelling Ignites Process Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenters, Kimberly; Winters, Kari-Lynn

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the affordances of literature-based, arts-infused and digital media processes for students, as multimodal practices take centre stage in an English Language Arts unit on fractured fairy tales. The study takes up the challenge of addressing multimodal literacy instruction and research in ways that utilize a range of…

  12. Multimodal network design for sustainable household plastic recycling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bing Xiaoyun, Xiaoyun; Groot, J.J.; Bloemhof, J.M.; Vorst, van der J.G.A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – This research studies a plastic recycling system from a reverse logistics angle and investigates the potential benefits of a multimodality strategy to the network design of plastic recycling. This research aims to quantify the impact of multimodality on the network, to provide decision sup

  13. Multimodal Processes Rescheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bocewicz, Grzegorz; Banaszak, Zbigniew A.; Nielsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic scheduling problems concerning multimodal processes are usually observed in FMSs producing multi-type parts where the Automated Guided Vehicles System (AGVS) plays a role of a material handling system. Schedulability analysis of concurrently flowing cyclic processes (SCCP) exe-cuted in the......Cyclic scheduling problems concerning multimodal processes are usually observed in FMSs producing multi-type parts where the Automated Guided Vehicles System (AGVS) plays a role of a material handling system. Schedulability analysis of concurrently flowing cyclic processes (SCCP) exe...

  14. Peripartum changes in social support among women with and without anxiety and depressive disorders prior to pregnancy: a prospective-longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asselmann, E; Wittchen, H-U; Erler, L; Martini, J

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to prospectively examine peripartum changes in social support in women with and without anxiety and depressive disorders prior to pregnancy. Data come from the Maternal Anxiety in Relation to Infant Development (MARI) Study, a prospective-longitudinal investigation among n = 306 expectant mothers. DSM-IV anxiety and depressive disorders were assessed in early pregnancy using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview for Women (CIDI-V). Social support was assessed with the Social Support Questionnaire during pregnancy as well as 4 and 16 months postpartum. Perceived social support in the total sample declined from prepartum to postpartum. Levels of prepartum and postpartum social support were lower in women with comorbid anxiety and depressive disorders compared to those with pure depressive disorder(s), pure anxiety disorder(s), or comorbid anxiety and depressive disorders prior to pregnancy. Moreover, social support more strongly declined from prepartum to postpartum in women with comorbid anxiety and depressive disorders compared to those without anxiety and depressive disorder prior to pregnancy. Findings suggest that women with a previous history of comorbid anxiety and depressive disorders are at particular risk for deficient social support during pregnancy and after delivery and might thus profit from targeted early interventions.

  15. Vision-Related Quality of Life and Appearance Concerns Are Associated with Anxiety and Depression after Eye Enucleation: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ye

    Full Text Available To investigate the association of demographic, clinical and psychosocial variables with levels of anxiety and depression in participants wearing an ocular prosthesis after eye enucleation.This cross-sectional study included 195 participants with an enucleated eye who were attending an ophthalmic clinic for prosthetic rehabilitation between July and November 2014. Demographic and clinical data, and self-reported feelings of shame, sadness and anger were collected. Participants also completed the National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire, the Facial Appearance subscale of the Negative Physical Self Scale, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Regression models were used to identify the factors associated with anxiety and depression.The proportion of participants with clinical anxiety was 11.8% and clinical depression 13.8%. More anxiety and depression were associated with poorer vision-related quality of life and greater levels of appearance concerns. Younger age was related to greater levels of anxiety. Less educated participants and those feeling more angry about losing an eye are more prone to experience depression. Clinical variables were unrelated to anxiety or depression.Anxiety and depression are more prevalent in eye-enucleated patients than the general population, which brings up the issues of psychiatric support in these patients. Psychosocial rather than clinical characteristics were associated with anxiety and depression. Longitudinal studies need to be conducted to further elucidate the direction of causality before interventions to improve mood states are developed.

  16. The potential of Virtual Reality as anxiety management tool: a randomized controlled study in a sample of patients affected by Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorini Alessandra

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD is a psychiatric disorder characterized by a constant and unspecific anxiety that interferes with daily-life activities. Its high prevalence in general population and the severe limitations it causes, point out the necessity to find new efficient strategies to treat it. Together with the cognitive-behavioural treatments, relaxation represents a useful approach for the treatment of GAD, but it has the limitation that it is hard to be learned. To overcome this limitation we propose the use of virtual reality (VR to facilitate the relaxation process by visually presenting key relaxing images to the subjects. The visual presentation of a virtual calm scenario can facilitate patients' practice and mastery of relaxation, making the experience more vivid and real than the one that most subjects can create using their own imagination and memory, and triggering a broad empowerment process within the experience induced by a high sense of presence. According to these premises, the aim of the present study is to investigate the advantages of using a VR-based relaxation protocol in reducing anxiety in patients affected by GAD. Methods/Design The trial is based on a randomized controlled study, including three groups of 25 patients each (for a total of 75 patients: (1 the VR group, (2 the non-VR group and (3 the waiting list (WL group. Patients in the VR group will be taught to relax using a VR relaxing environment and audio-visual mobile narratives; patients in the non-VR group will be taught to relax using the same relaxing narratives proposed to the VR group, but without the VR support, and patients in the WL group will not receive any kind of relaxation training. Psychometric and psychophysiological outcomes will serve as quantitative dependent variables, while subjective reports of participants will be used as qualitative dependent variables. Conclusion We argue that the use of VR for relaxation

  17. The Study on the Writing Anxiety Levels of Primary School 6, 7 and 8th Year Students in Terms of Several Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucgun, Duygu

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the writing anxiety levels of primary school 6, 7 and 8th year students in terms of several variables using the "writing anxiety scale" developed by Yaman (2010). The study group is composed of 1407 students enrolled at the 6, 7 and 8th years of 10 primary schools in Sarkisla district of Sivas province. The…

  18. A Study on Use of Computer among Higher Secondary Students as Related with Their Computer Anxiety, Internet Attitude and Self-Efficacy in Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinaitheerthan, V.; Johnson, Jomy

    2009-01-01

    The present attempt is to study the use of computer and its possible relationship to Internet attitude, self-efficacy in computer and computer anxiety among higher secondary students. The present study aims at finding the levels of use of computer, Internet attitude, Self-efficacy in computer and computer anxiety among higher secondary students.…

  19. Comparative study between patients with infarction and angina about the fear of pain, anxiety pain symptoms, heart focused anxiety, psychopathology and hostility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakella P.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: To examine the fear of pain, anxiety pain symptoms, heart focused anxiety, psychopathology and hostility between patients with infarction and angina. Method: Subjects were 104 patients with infarction or angina, who completed the Hostility and Direction of Hostility Questionnaire, the Symptom Checklist-90-R, Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire, the Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale-20 and the Fear of Pain Questionnaire – III. Results: For all patients higher levels of fear and anxiety of pain, heart-focused anxiety psychopathology, and a tendency to develop a hostile attitude were observed. For angina group higher levels of fearfull thinking and total PASS-20, avoidance CAQ, somatization and anxiety (SCL-90. In addition, all patients were found to be significantly correlated (P< .005 with sex, fearfull PASS-20, physiological responses PASS-20, total PASS-20, avoidance CAQ, somatization SCL-90, anxiety SCL-90 Conclusion: There is a variety of general factors that may promote the development of cardiophobia. These processes are likely nonspecific in the sense that they increase the chance of negative emotional responding and poor affect regulatory strategies. For persons exposed to cardiac-related illnesses or persons who model the potential dangers of cardiac-related sensations, there may be an enhanced specificity to that general vulnerability.

  20. Differential association of somatic and cognitive symptoms of depression and anxiety with inflammation : Findings from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duivis, Hester E.; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Kupper, Nina; de Jonge, Peter; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Depression and anxiety have been suggested to be associated with systemic inflammation upregulation. However, results are not always consistent, which may be due to symptom heterogeneity of depression and anxiety. There are some indications that associations with inflammation are mainly d

  1. Plant-based medicines for anxiety disorders, part 2: a review of clinical studies with supporting preclinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, Jerome; McIntyre, Erica; Camfield, David A

    2013-04-01

    Research in the area of herbal psychopharmacology has revealed a variety of promising medicines that may provide benefit in the treatment of general anxiety and specific anxiety disorders. However, a comprehensive review of plant-based anxiolytics has been absent to date. Thus, our aim was to provide a comprehensive narrative review of plant-based medicines that have clinical and/or preclinical evidence of anxiolytic activity. We present the article in two parts. In part one, we reviewed herbal medicines for which only preclinical investigations for anxiolytic activity have been performed. In this current article (part two), we review herbal medicines for which there have been both preclinical and clinical investigations of anxiolytic activity. A search of MEDLINE (PubMed), CINAHL, Scopus and the Cochrane Library databases was conducted (up to 28 October 2012) for English language papers using the search terms 'anxiety' OR 'anxiety disorder' OR 'generalized anxiety disorder' OR 'social phobia' OR 'post-traumatic stress disorder' OR 'panic disorder' OR 'agoraphobia' OR 'obsessive compulsive disorder' in combination with the search terms 'Herb*' OR 'Medicinal Plants' OR 'Botanical Medicine' OR 'Chinese herb*', in addition to individual herbal medicines. This search of the literature revealed 1,525 papers, of which 53 plants were included in the review (having at least one study using the whole plant extract). Of these plants, 21 had human clinical trial evidence (reviewed here in part two), with the other 32 having solely preclinical evidence (reviewed in part one). Support for efficacy was found for chronic use (i.e. greater than one day) of the following herbs in treating a range of anxiety disorders in human clinical trials: Piper methysticum, Matricaria recutita, Ginkgo biloba, Scutellaria lateriflora, Silybum marianum, Passiflora incarnata, Withania somniferum, Galphimia glauca, Centella asiatica, Rhodiola rosea, Echinacea spp., Melissa officinalis and Echium

  2. Determination of students’ general test anxiety and their test anxiety concerning English classes

    OpenAIRE

    Çiğdem Hürsen; İbrahim Tekman

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the students’ general test anxiety and their test anxiety concerning English classes. The research was performed with 871 students. The results of the study reveal that students’ general test anxiety is in the boundaries of “rarely”. However, according to the results about students’ levels of test anxiety concerning English classes, their test anxiety level is in the boundaries of “sometimes”. Female students have a higher level of test anxiety and 15-18 ...

  3. Self-Concept, Computer Anxiety, Gender and Attitude towards Interactive Computer Technologies: A Predictive Study among Nigerian Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbatogun, Alaba Olaoluwakotansibe

    2010-01-01

    Interactive Computer Technologies (ICTs) have crept into education industry, thus dramatically causing transformation in instructional process. This study examined the relative and combined contributions of computer anxiety, self-concept and gender to teachers' attitude towards the use of ICT(s). 454 Nigerian teachers constituted the sample. Three…

  4. Computer Self-Efficacy, Computer Anxiety, and Attitudes toward the Internet: A Study among Undergraduates in Unimas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam, Hong Kian; Othman, Abang Ekhsan Abang; Nordin, Zaimuarifuddin Shukri

    2005-01-01

    Eighty-one female and sixty-seven male undergraduates at a Malaysian university, from seven faculties and a Center for Language Studies completed a Computer Self-Efficacy Scale, Computer Anxiety Scale, and an Attitudes toward the Internet Scale and give information about their use of the Internet. This survey research investigated undergraduates'…

  5. A Comparative Study of Foreign Language Anxiety and Motivation of Academic- and Vocational-Track High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui-ju; Chen, Chien-wei

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate EFL learner language anxiety and learning motivation of high school students. Subjects included 155 students from the same private senior high school in central Taiwan, 60 in academic track and 95 in vocational track. The majority of the participants started taking English lessons either before entering elementary…

  6. An Empirical Study on Alleviating Career English Writing Anxiety through Cooperative Learning in a Chinese Polytechnic Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of cooperative learning on writing anxiety alleviation through a pre-test/post-test assessment. 120 EFL learners from a Chinese polytechnic institute were assigned into two groups: one experimental (cooperative writing) and the other comparison (solitary writing). Results revealed that cooperative learning…

  7. Comparison of Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy and Psychodynamic Therapy in the Treatment of Anxiety among University Students: An Effectiveness Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Fiorella; Tonetti, Lorenzo; Ricci Bitti, Pio Enrico

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioural (CBT) and psychodynamic (PDT) therapies in the treatment of anxiety among university students. To this aim, the Symptom Questionnaire (SQ) was completed by 30 students assigned to CBT and by 24 students assigned to PDT, both at the beginning and at the end of…

  8. The Social Physique Anxiety Scale: An Example of the Potential Consequence of Negatively Worded Items in Factorial Validity Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motl, Robert W.; Conroy, David E.; Horan, Patrick M.

    2000-01-01

    Used confirmatory factor analysis to examine whether the two-factor solution to the Social Physique Anxiety Scale (E. Hart, M. Leary, and W. Rejeski, 1989) was meaningful. Results for 4 samples of data for college students, high school students, and athletes (n=1,053) from previous studies support the existence of a single substantive factor…

  9. Are fatigue, depression and anxiety associated with labour market participation among patients diagnosed with haematological malignancies? A prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsboel, Trine A.; Bultmann, Ute; Nielsen, Claus V.; Nielsen, Bendt; Andersen, Niels T.; de Thurah, Annette

    2015-01-01

    ObjectivesThe objectives of this study are to examine levels of fatigue, depression and anxiety following diagnosis of a haematological malignancy, to determine the incidence of return to work (RTW) and long-term sickness absence (LTSA) during 1-year follow-up and to examine whether fatigue, depress

  10. A Quasi-Experimental Study Investigating the Effect of Scent on Students' Memory of Multiplication Facts and Math Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leap, Evelyn M.

    2013-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study was conducted with two fifth grade classrooms to investigate the effect of scent on students' acquisition and retention of multiplication facts and math anxiety. Forty participants received daily instruction for nine weeks, using a strategy-rich multiplication program called Factivation. Students in the Double Smencil…

  11. The structural connectivity pattern of the default mode network and its association with memory and anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan eTao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The default mode network (DMN is one of the most widely studied resting state functional networks. The structural basis for the DMN is of particular interest and has been studied by several researchers using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI. Most of these previous studies focused on a few regions or white matter tracts of the DMN so that the global structural connectivity pattern and network properties of the DMN remain unclear. Moreover, evidences indicate that the DMN is involved in both memory and emotion, but how the DMN regulates memory and anxiety from the perspective of the whole DMN structural network remains unknown. We used multimodal neuroimaging methods to investigate the structural connectivity pattern of the DMN and the association of its network properties with memory and anxiety in 205 young healthy subjects. Using a probabilistic fiber tractography technique based on DTI data and graph theory methods, we constructed the global structural connectivity pattern of the DMN and found that memory quotient (MQ score was significantly positively correlated with the global and local efficiency of the DMN whereas anxiety was found to be negatively correlated with the efficiency. The strong structural connectivity between multiple brain regions within DMN may reflect that the DMN has certain structural basis. Meanwhile, we found the network efficiency of the DMN were related to memory and anxiety measures, which indicated that the DMN may play a role in the memory and anxiety.

  12. Social appearance anxiety and dietary restraint as mediators between perfectionism and binge eating: A six month three wave longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosof, Leigh C; Levinson, Cheri A

    2017-01-01

    Binge eating is related to perfectionism and restrained eating. However, the mechanisms underlying these relationships are not well understood. It is possible that social anxiety, specifically social appearance anxiety (i.e., the fear of overall appearance evaluation), influences the relationship between binge eating, perfectionism, and dietary restraint. In the current study (N = 300 women), we tested the relationship between dietary restraint, social appearance anxiety, concern over mistakes (a component of perfectionism), and binge eating in prospective data (three time points: at baseline, at two month, and at six month follow up). We found that social appearance anxiety, dietary restraint, and concern over mistakes each predicted binge eating at baseline. Only social appearance anxiety prospectively predicted binge eating when accounting for all variables. Further, in the tested model, social appearance anxiety mediated the relationship between concern over mistakes and binge eating across six months. On the contrary, dietary restraint did not mediate the relationship between concern over mistakes and binge eating in the tested model. The finding that social appearance anxiety served as a mediator between concern over mistakes and binge eating, but that dietary restraint did not, implies that social appearance anxiety may be a more salient prospective predictor of binge eating than dietary restraint. Intervening on social appearance anxiety may be important in the treatment and prevention of binge eating.

  13. Effects of tai chi chuan on anxiety and sleep quality in young adults: lessons from a randomized controlled feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caldwell KL

    2016-11-01

    in young adults. Keywords: anxiety, sleep quality, tai chi chuan, randomized controlled trial, feasibility study

  14. A therapeutic and discontinuation study of clobazam and diazepam in anxiety neurosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapierre, Y D; Tremblay, A; Gagnon, A; Monpremier, P; Berliss, H; Oyewumi, L K

    1982-09-01

    The efficacy and safety of clobazam and diazepam were compared in 40 patients with generalized anxiety disorder in a 28 day non-placebo-controlled trial followed by a 3-day single-blind placebo washout. The two drugs were equally anxiolytic, and the anxiety symptoms of most patients were brought under control within 1 week. Both drugs were found to be nontoxic. Diazepam had slightly greater sedative properties than clobazam, which was the patients' preferred drug after 28 days of treatment. During placebo washout, anxiety returned to pretreatment levels. Abrupt withdrawal did not result in rebound phenomena.

  15. The psychological study of anxiety in the era of the Second World War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, Michal

    2013-01-01

    The mid-twentieth century in Britain ushered in a new age of anxiety with the development of total war and the aerial bombing of civilians. Rather than trying to chart and quantify levels of anxiety and fear on the British home front during the Blitz, this article's goal is to examine how these emotions were conceptualized by psychological experts immediately prior to and during the war. The essay follows the rising problematization of anxiety and fear as new concepts calling for professional knowledge and management. It emphasizes the contribution of psychoanalysts to this development while pointing to gradual change between the two world wars.

  16. Virtual reality exposure therapy in anxiety disorders: a systematic review of process-and-outcome studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerbröker, Katharina; Emmelkamp, Paul M G

    2010-10-01

    In recent years, virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) has become an interesting alternative for the treatment of anxiety disorders. Research has focused on the efficacy of VRET in treating anxiety disorders: phobias, panic disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. In this systematic review, strict methodological criteria are used to give an overview of the controlled trials regarding the efficacy of VRET in patients with anxiety disorders. Furthermore, research into process variables such as the therapeutic alliance and cognitions and enhancement of therapy effects through cognitive enhancers is discussed. The implications for implementation into clinical practice are considered.

  17. Multimodal emergens via musik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Anders

    2010-01-01

    I denne artikel præsenteres og argumenteres for en værkanalytisk indfaldsvinkel i forhold til det at undersøge multimodal betydningsdannelse i audiovisuelle medieprodukter såsom reklamefilm og dokumentarfilm, hvor flere forskellige modaliteter eller semiotiske ressourcer samvirker. Som teoretisk...

  18. Multimode geodesic branching components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, D.; Voges, E.

    1983-01-01

    Geodesic branching components are investigated for multimode guided wave optics. Geodesic structures with particular properties, e.g. focussing star couplers, are derived by a synthesis technique based on a theorem of Toraldo di Francia. Experimentally, the geodesic surfaces are printed on acrylic glass and are spin-coated with organic film waveguides.

  19. Modeling Multimodal Stratification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeriis, Morten

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses one of the core axioms of social semiotic theory, namely stratification, in the light of developments in multimodality in recent years. The discussion takes a point of departure in the approaches to stratification taken by Hjelmslev, Halliday, and Kress and van Leeuwen...

  20. Post-operative recovery profile after laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a prospective, observational study of a multimodal anaesthetic regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K; Kehlet, H; Lund, Claus

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is now often an ambulatory procedure, but dependent on short-term post-operative complaints of pain and post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV). The efficacy of post-anaesthesia care units (PACUs) is therefore important to facilitate return to normal...... functions. We investigated the feasibility and efficacy of a standardized, evidence-based anaesthesia/analgesic regime to identify residual problems in the early post-operative phase. METHODS: One hundred and thirty-four consecutive patients admitted for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy at Hvidovre...... to discharge (mean, 88 min). There were on average 2.7 treatment interventions (range, 0-11) before discharge. CONCLUSION: An evidence-based, multimodal approach to the anaesthetic/analgesic management in laparoscopic cholecystectomy is feasible and advantageous in the early post-operative phase. Pain and PONV...

  1. Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety and Learners’ and Teachers’ Beliefs toward FLL: A Case Study of Iranian Undergraduate EFL Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Toghraee

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was an attempt to determine the beliefs of undergraduate female and male EFL learners at Shahreza University, Isfahan, Iran, about foreign language classroom anxiety, and compare students’ and teachers’ attitudes toward FLL. For this purpose sixty linguistically homogeneous female and male students were selected after administering the QPT, and were given BALLI and FLCAS questionnaires designed by Horwitz (1987. Fifteen EFL instructors were selected to answer the BALLI questionnaire, and then the data from the two questionnaires were statistically analyzed with correlational analysist-tests. The findings revealed hat, first, there was a positive and statistically significant correlation between Iranian university students’ beliefs about FLL and their level of class anxiety; second, that teachers and students hold mostly different beliefs about FLL, despite some similar beliefs; and finally, male and female participants did not hold the same ideas regarding class anxiety and beliefs about FLL. The results of this study confirmed previous research findings in this area. Keywords: foreign language anxiety, beliefs about language learning, FLCAS, BALLI, university EFL learners.

  2. Language Anxiety: A Case Study of the Perceptions and Experiences of Students of English as a Foreign Language in a Higher Education Institution in the United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lababidi, Rola Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    This case study explores and investigates the perceptions and experiences of foreign language anxiety (FLA) among students of English as a Foreign Language in a Higher Education Institution in the United Arab Emirates. The first phase explored the scope and severity of language anxiety among all Foundation level male students at a college in the…

  3. Mathematics Test, Numerical, and Abstraction Anxieties and Their Relation to Elementary Teachers' Views on Preparing Students for the Study of Algebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Martha A.; Gray, Mary W.

    1992-01-01

    Reports a correlational study to determine whether teacher's mathematics anxiety might inhibit the introduction of more problem solving and abstraction in elementary schools to enable more ninth graders to enroll in algebra. Correlations on 19 variables for 116 teachers indicated that anxiety decreased with increased mathematics content studied…

  4. Convergent Findings of Altered Functional and Structural Brain Connectivity in Individuals with High Functioning Autism: A Multimodal MRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Sophia; Keeser, Daniel; Samson, Andrea C; Kirsch, Valerie; Blautzik, Janusch; Grothe, Michel; Erat, Okan; Hegenloh, Michael; Coates, Ute; Reiser, Maximilian F; Hennig-Fast, Kristina; Meindl, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Brain tissue changes in autism spectrum disorders seem to be rather subtle and widespread than anatomically distinct. Therefore a multimodal, whole brain imaging technique appears to be an appropriate approach to investigate whether alterations in white and gray matter integrity relate to consistent changes in functional resting state connectivity in individuals with high functioning autism (HFA). We applied diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) to assess differences in brain structure and function between 12 individuals with HFA (mean age 35.5, SD 11.4, 9 male) and 12 healthy controls (mean age 33.3, SD 9.0, 8 male). Psychological measures of empathy and emotionality were obtained and correlated with the most significant DTI, VBM and fcMRI findings. We found three regions of convergent structural and functional differences between HFA participants and controls. The right temporo-parietal junction area and the left frontal lobe showed decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) values along with decreased functional connectivity and a trend towards decreased gray matter volume. The bilateral superior temporal gyrus displayed significantly decreased functional connectivity that was accompanied by the strongest trend of gray matter volume decrease in the temporal lobe of HFA individuals. FA decrease in the right temporo-parietal region was correlated with psychological measurements of decreased emotionality. In conclusion, our results indicate common sites of structural and functional alterations in higher order association cortex areas and may therefore provide multimodal imaging support to the long-standing hypothesis of autism as a disorder of impaired higher-order multisensory integration.

  5. Convergent Findings of Altered Functional and Structural Brain Connectivity in Individuals with High Functioning Autism: A Multimodal MRI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Mueller

    Full Text Available Brain tissue changes in autism spectrum disorders seem to be rather subtle and widespread than anatomically distinct. Therefore a multimodal, whole brain imaging technique appears to be an appropriate approach to investigate whether alterations in white and gray matter integrity relate to consistent changes in functional resting state connectivity in individuals with high functioning autism (HFA. We applied diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, voxel-based morphometry (VBM and resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI to assess differences in brain structure and function between 12 individuals with HFA (mean age 35.5, SD 11.4, 9 male and 12 healthy controls (mean age 33.3, SD 9.0, 8 male. Psychological measures of empathy and emotionality were obtained and correlated with the most significant DTI, VBM and fcMRI findings. We found three regions of convergent structural and functional differences between HFA participants and controls. The right temporo-parietal junction area and the left frontal lobe showed decreased fractional anisotropy (FA values along with decreased functional connectivity and a trend towards decreased gray matter volume. The bilateral superior temporal gyrus displayed significantly decreased functional connectivity that was accompanied by the strongest trend of gray matter volume decrease in the temporal lobe of HFA individuals. FA decrease in the right temporo-parietal region was correlated with psychological measurements of decreased emotionality. In conclusion, our results indicate common sites of structural and functional alterations in higher order association cortex areas and may therefore provide multimodal imaging support to the long-standing hypothesis of autism as a disorder of impaired higher-order multisensory integration.

  6. Music Performance Anxiety Scale for High School Students: Validity and Reliability Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Palancı

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to develop a Music Performance Anxiety Scale (MPAS for high school students, and to conduct a validity and reliability study. In this respect, a scale will be developed to be used for high school students (adolescents, and differences between the genders will be examined. The study was conducted on 546 high school students. Of these students, 185 (33.9% were male, 361 (66.1% were female, and the average age was 16.81 with the ages ranging from 15 to 20. Correlational values of the scale items among themselves and with item totals were examined as a preliminary analysis. As a result of the EFA’s principal components technique, promax rotation technique and the analyses, a construct with three factors explaining a total of 42.74% of the total variance was attained. The structure attained was validated by CFA, and fit indices were found to be within the acceptance interval. In the reliability study, Cronbach’s alpha internal consistency coefficient was calculated as .86 for the entire scale, 27% for the lower-upper group comparison and test-retest analyses were conducted. The t-test was performed to attain the difference between genders. As a result of the study, a valid and reliable scale was seen to have been developed and a difference between the genders was apparent.

  7. Instrumentation challenges in multi-modality imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brasse, D., E-mail: david.brasse@iphc.cnrs.fr [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, Université de Strasbourg, 23 rue du Loess 67037 Strasbourg (France); CNRS, UMR7178, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Boisson, F. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, Université de Strasbourg, 23 rue du Loess 67037 Strasbourg (France); CNRS, UMR7178, 67037 Strasbourg (France)

    2016-02-11

    Based on different physical principles, imaging procedures currently used in both clinical and preclinical applications present different performance that allow researchers to achieve a large number of studies. However, the relevance of obtaining a maximum of information relating to the same subject is undeniable. The last two decades have thus seen the advent of a full-fledged research axis, the multimodal in vivo imaging. Whether from an instrumentation point of view, for medical research or the development of new probes, all these research works illustrate the growing interest of the scientific community for multimodal imaging, which can be approached with different backgrounds and perspectives from engineers to end-users point of views. In the present review, we discuss the multimodal imaging concept, which focuses not only on PET/CT and PET/MRI instrumentation but also on recent investigations of what could become a possible future in the field.

  8. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otowa, T.; Hek, K.; Lee, M.; Byrne, E. M.; Mirza, S. S.; Nivard, M. G.; Bigdeli, T.; Aggen, S. H.; Adkins, D.; Wolen, A.; Fanous, A.; Keller, M. C.; Castelao, E.; Kutalik, Z.; der Auwera, S. V.; Homuth, G.; Nauck, M.; Teumer, A.; Milaneschi, Y.; Hottenga, J-J; Direk, N.; Hofman, A.; Uitterlinden, A.; Mulder, C. L.; Henders, A. K.; Medland, S. E.; Gordon, S.; Heath, A. C.; Madden, P. A. F.; Pergadia, M. L.; van der Most, P. J.; Nolte, I. M.; van Oort, F. V. A.; Hartman, C. A.; Oldehinkel, A. J.; Preisig, M.; Grabe, H. J.; Middeldorp, C. M.; Penninx, B. W. J. H.; Boomsma, D.; Martin, N. G.; Montgomery, G.; Maher, B. S.; van den Oord, E. J.; Wray, N. R.; Tiemeier, H.; Hettema, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety disorders (ADs), namely generalized AD, panic disorder and phobias, are common, etiologically complex conditions with a partially genetic basis. Despite differing on diagnostic definitions based on clinical presentation, ADs likely represent various expressions of an underlying common diathe

  9. Worry, Intolerance of Uncertainty, and Statistics Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amanda S.

    2013-01-01

    Statistics anxiety is a problem for most graduate students. This study investigates the relationship between intolerance of uncertainty, worry, and statistics anxiety. Intolerance of uncertainty was significantly related to worry, and worry was significantly related to three types of statistics anxiety. Six types of statistics anxiety were…

  10. Suicidal Ideation in Anxiety-Disordered Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Kelly A.; Puleo, Connor M.; Benjamin, Courtney L.; Podell, Jennifer L.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence is mixed regarding an independent association between anxiety and suicidality in youth. Study 1 examined suicidal ideation in treatment-referred, anxiety-disordered youth (N = 312, aged 7-17). Forty-one percent of anxiety-disordered youth endorsed suicidal ideation. Anxiety disorder severity, global impairment, and current depressive…

  11. HEMISPHERE PREFERENCE, ANXIETY, AND COVARIATION BIAS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Peter; MERCKELBACH, H; NIJMAN, H

    1995-01-01

    In Study I, normal subjects (N = 70) completed the Preference Test (PT), the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Anxiety Sensitivity Index. Subjects with a preference for a right hemisphere thinking style (as indexed by PT) were found to have higher state anxiety and anxiety sensitivi

  12. Anxiety and EFL: Does Multilingualism Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Amy S.; Lee, Junkyu

    2013-01-01

    The current study is motivated by the gap in the current literature about foreign language classroom anxiety, namely the underlying construct of FL anxiety with regard to the understudied relationship between anxiety, proficiency, and multilingualism. The evidence for the effect of language anxiety on achievement is well-documented. More recently,…

  13. Addressing Math Anxiety in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlayson, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    In today's educational systems, students of all levels of education experience math anxiety. Furthermore, math anxiety is frequently linked to poor achievement in mathematics. The purpose of this study is to examine the causes of math anxiety and to explore strategies which pre-service teachers have identified to overcome math anxiety. The…

  14. Addressing Math Anxiety in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlayson, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    In today's educational systems, students of all levels of education experience math anxiety. Furthermore, math anxiety is frequently linked to poor achievement in mathematics. The purpose of this study is to examine the causes of math anxiety and to explore strategies which pre-service teachers have identified to overcome math anxiety. The…

  15. Women With Addictions Report Reduced Anxiety After Group Music Therapy: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    OpenAIRE

    Diestelkamp, Wiebke S.; Susan C. Gardstrom

    2013-01-01

    Roughly six million females in the USA abuse or are addicted to alcohol. Women are more likely than men to report depression and anxiety as triggers for substance use and relapse, which emphasizes the importance of therapies designed to help women mitigate anxiety.Research supporting music therapy (MT) with women with addictions is scarce. In this quasi-experimental investigation, we hoped to learn: (1) What percentage of women with addictive disorders in a 45-minute group MT session will rep...

  16. A Study on the Anxiety of Mongolian Undergraduates in Public English Class

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚韶华

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety is a complicated psychological phenomenon in foreign language learning process, involving both cognitive and affective factors, especially for those with cross culture background. This essay focuses on the anxiety of Mongolian undergradu⁃ates in public English class, analyses the contributory factors and puts forward effective strategies on how to overcome their anxi⁃ety to achieve the goal that college public English teaching will be elevated at large.

  17. Adolescent Substance Use in the Multimodal Treatment Study of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) (MTA) as a Function of Childhood ADHD, Random Assignment to Childhood Treatments, and Subsequent Medication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Brooke S. G.; Hinshaw, Stephen P.; Arnold, L. Eugene; Swanson, James M.; Pelham, William E.; Hechtman, Lily; Hoza, Betsy; Epstein, Jeffery N.; Wigal, Timothy; Abikoff, Howard B.; Greenhill, Laurence L.; Jensen, Peter S.; Wells, Karen C.; Vitiello, Benedetto; Gibbons, Robert D.; Howard, Andrea; Houck, Patricia R.; Hur, Kwan; Lu, Bo; Marcus, Sue

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine long-term effects on substance use and substance use disorder (SUD), up to 8 years after childhood enrollment, of the randomly assigned 14-month treatments in the multisite Multimodal Treatment Study of Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (MTA; n = 436); to test whether medication at follow-up, cumulative…

  18. Altered default mode network activity in patient with anxiety disorders: An fMRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Xiaohu [Imaging Department of Tong Ji Hospital of Tong Ji University, Shanghai 200065 (China) and Bio-X lab, Department of Physics, Zhe Jiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)], E-mail: xhzhao999@263.net; Wang Peijun [Imaging Department of Tong Ji Hospital of Tong Ji University, Shanghai 200065 (China)], E-mail: tongjipjwang@vip.sina.com; Li Chunbo [Department of Psychiatry, Tong Ji Hospital of Tong Ji University, Shanghai 200065 (China)], E-mail: licb@mail.tongji.edu.cn; Hu Zhenghui [Department of Electrical and Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong (China)], E-mail: eezhhu@ust.hk; Xi Qian [Imaging Department of Tong Ji Hospital of Tong Ji University, Shanghai 200065 (China)], E-mail: 96125007@sina.com.cn; Wu Wenyuan [Department of Psychiatry, Tong Ji Hospital of Tong Ji University, Shanghai 200065 (China)], E-mail: wuwy@mail.tongji.edu.cn; Tang Xiaowei [Bio-X lab, Department of Physics, Zhe Jiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)], E-mail: tangxw@zju.edu.cn

    2007-09-15

    Anxiety disorder, a common mental disorder in our clinical practice, is characterized by unprovoked anxiety. Medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), which closely involved in emotional processing, are critical regions in the default mode network. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate whether default mode network activity is altered in patients with anxiety disorder. Ten anxiety patients and 10 healthy controls underwent fMRI while listening to emotionally neutral words alternating with rest (Experiment 1) and threat-related words alternating with emotionally neutral words (Experiment 2). In Experiment 1, regions of deactivation were observed in patients and controls. In Experiment 2, regions of deactivation were observed only in patients. The observed deactivation patterns in the two experiments, which included MPFC, PCC, and inferior parietal cortex, were similar and consistent with the default model network. Less deactivation in MPFC and greater deactivation in PCC were observed for patients group comparing to controls in Experiment 1. Our observations suggest that the default model network is altered in anxiety patients and dysfunction in MPFC and PCC may play an important role in anxiety psychopathology.

  19. Self-efficacy, mathematics' anxiety and perceived importance: an empirical study with Portuguese engineering students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Manuela; Rodrigues, Cristina S.; Rocha, Ana Maria A. C.; Coutinho, Clara

    2016-01-01

    The accomplishment in mathematics has gained attention from educators and arises as an emerging field of study, including in engineering education. However, in Portugal, there is still incipient research in the area; so it is high time to explore factors that might enlighten the gap in the study of the relationship between Portuguese engineering students and the learning of mathematics. The main purpose of this study is to explore three factors identified in the literature as influencing the learning of mathematical concepts - self-efficacy, anxiety towards mathematics and perceived importance of mathematics - and search for differences by gender and by type of engineering course, a dimension not much reported in the literature but which was revealed as important in the team's previous research. Based on a sample of 140 undergraduate students of different engineering courses from University of Minho, results only identify differences in the type of course and not in gender. These results constitute a contribution and open new paths for future research in the engineering education.

  20. Mathematical anxiety effects on simple arithmetic processing efficiency: an event-related potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Pellicioni, M; Núñez-Peña, M I; Colomé, A

    2013-12-01

    This study uses event-related brain potentials to investigate the difficulties that high math anxious individuals face when processing dramatically incorrect solutions to simple arithmetical problems. To this end, thirteen high math-anxious (HMA) and thirteen low math-anxious (LMA) individuals were presented with simple addition problems in a verification task. The proposed solution could be correct, incorrect but very close to the correct one (small-split), or dramatically incorrect (large-split). The two groups did not differ in mathematical ability or trait anxiety. We reproduced previous results for flawed scores suggesting HMA difficulties in processing large-split solutions. Moreover, large-split solutions elicited a late positive component (P600/P3b) which was more enhanced and delayed in the HMA group. Our study proposes that the pattern of flawed scores found by previous studies (and that we replicate) has to do with HMA individuals'difficulties in inhibiting an extended processing of irrelevant information (large-split solutions).