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Sample records for anxiety inventory stai

  1. Psychometric properties of a new short version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) for the assessment of anxiety in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Blázquez, M A; Ávila-Villanueva, M; López-Pina, J A; Zea-Sevilla, M A; Frades-Payo, B

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety has negative effects on the cognitive performance and psychosocial adjustment of elderly people. Given the high prevalence of anxiety symptoms in patients suffering from cognitive impairment, it has been suggested that these symptoms may be an early marker of dementia. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) is one of the most widely-used scales for evaluating anxiety in elderly people. However, inasmuch as the STAI may be difficult to apply to older people, having a short form of it would be desirable. The participants comprised 489 community-dwelling individuals aged 68 years and over. All of them were volunteers in a longitudinal study for early detection of Alzheimer' Disease (Proyecto Vallecas). The full sample was divided in two homogeneous subgroups: Group A, used to reduce the number of items and response options, and Group B, the group used to determine the psychometric properties of the new short form (STAIr). A dichotomous Rasch model was used to obtain the STAIr. No statistically significant differences for STAIr scores were found with respect to sociodemographic variables. Psychometric properties and normative data were obtained for the new short version. The STAIr is composed of 13 items and data fits the model well. Since it is short and easy to apply to elderly people, STAIr will be very useful in clinical and research settings. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Metaanálisis de comparación de grupos y metaanálisis de generalización de la fiabilidad del cuestionario State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Guillén-Riquelme

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fundamentos: Desde su creación, el STAI se ha citado en más de 14.000 documentos, contando con más de 60 adaptaciones en diversos países. En algunas de ellas este cuestionario no cuenta con puntuaciones clínicas. El objetivo de este trabajo es determinar si el cuestionario State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI tiene puntuaciones superiores en personas diagnosticadas de ansiedad respecto a la población general. Además, se pretende analizar si la consistencia interna es adecuada en personas con ansiedad. Método: Se realizó una búsqueda bibliográfica en Tripdatabase, Cochrane, Web of Knowledge, Scopus, PyscINFO y Scholar Google de documentos publicados entre 2008 y 2012. Se seleccionaron 131 artículos para la comparación entre pacientes diagnosticados de ansiedad respecto a la población general y 25 para la generalización de la fiabilidad. En los análisis se utilizó la d de Cohen para la comparación de medias (método de efectos aleatorios y para la generalización de la fiabilidad el alfa de Cronbach (método de efectos fijos. Resultados: En la comparación entre grupos, en la ansiedad estado (d = 1,39; IC95%: 1,22-1,56 y en la ansiedad rasgo (d = 1,74; IC95%: 1,56-1,91 las diferencias fueron estadísticamente significativas. Además de ello, la fiabilidad para pacientes con algún trastorno de ansiedad abarcó de 0,87 a 0,93. Conclusiones: El STAI es un cuestionario sensible para medir el nivel de ansiedad y fiable en personas diagnosticadas de crisis de angustia, fobia específica, fobia social, fobia social generalizada, trastorno de ansiedad generalizada, trastorno de estrés post-traumático, trastorno obsesivo compulsivo o trastorno por estrés agudo.

  3. Development of a short version of the Dutch version of the Spielberger STAI Trait Anxiety Scale in women suspected of breast cancer and breast cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, J.; van Heck, G.L.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to develop a short form of the Dutch version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) Trait scale and to provide initial validation data in a sample of breast cancer patients and survivors. This short trait anxiety (A-Trait) scale was designed to reduce time

  4. Evaluating the Quality of Life of Glaucoma Patients Using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otori, Yasumasa; Takahashi, Genichiro; Urashima, Mitsuyoshi; Kuwayama, Yasuaki

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate anxiety felt by glaucoma patients. In total, 472 glaucoma patients responded to a questionnaire on anxiety, subjective symptoms, and vision-related quality of life (VR-QOL) associated with glaucoma. Anxiety was evaluated using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), state anxiety (STAI-State) subscale along with our novel questionnaire, assessing visual function and subjective symptoms, specialized for glaucoma. VR-QOL was evaluated using 5 subitems from the 25-item National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire (VFQ-25). Adherence to ophthalmic antiglaucoma agents was confirmed. As indexes of visual function, corrected visual acuity (measured by eye chart), mean deviation (MD) score (measured with static perimetry), and 4 thresholds at the center of vision were determined. Stages were classified according to the Aulhorn Classification. From the STAI-State scores, the prevalence of anxiety in glaucoma patients was evaluated. We analyzed the correlation between the STAI-State and VFQ-25, anxiety, subjective symptoms, adherence, and visual function indexes. In total, 78% of glaucoma patients experienced at least an intermediate level of anxiety. The STAI-State correlated significantly with anxiety and subjective symptoms as measured by our novel questionnaire, particularly for questions "current anxiety about loss of vision" and "current anxiety in life" (r=0.468 and 0.500; both Pglaucoma patients feel anxiety. The STAI-State is correlated with the VR-QOL and anxiety in glaucoma patients, making it useful for understanding the anxiety present in glaucoma patients.

  5. Psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory applied to college students: factor analysis and relation to the Beck Depression Inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade L.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the trait form of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-T and its relation to the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI were evaluated in a large Brazilian college student sample containing 845 women and 235 men. STAI-T scores tended to be higher for women, singles, those who work, and subjects under 30 years. Factor analysis of the STAI-T for total sample and by gender yielded two factors: the first representing a mood dimension and the second being related to worrying or cognitive aspects of anxiety. In order to study the relation between anxiety and depression measures, factor analysis of the combination of the 21 BDI items and the 20 STAI-T items was also carried out. The analysis resulted in two factors that were analyzed according to the tripartite model of anxiety and depression. Most of the BDI items (measuring positive affectivity and nonspecific symptoms of depression were loaded on the first factor and four STAI-T items that measure positive affectivity. The remaining STAI-T items, all of them measuring negative affect, remained in the second factor. Thus, factor 1 represents a depression dimension and factor 2 measures a mood-worrying dimension. The findings of this study suggest that, although widely used as an anxiety scale, the STAI-T in fact measures mainly a general negative affect.

  6. A Psychometric Evaluation of the STAI-Y, BDI-II, and PAI Using Single and Multifactorial Models in Young Adults Seeking Psychoeducational Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Benjamin D.; Musso, Mandi; Jones, Glenn N.; Pella, Russell D.; Gouvier, Wm. Drew

    2013-01-01

    A psychometric evaluation on the measurement of self-report anxiety and depression using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), State Trait Anxiety Inventory, Form-Y (STAI-Y), and the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) was performed using a sample of 534 generally young adults seeking psychoeducational evaluation at a university-based clinic.…

  7. Test anxiety inventory-State: Preliminary analysis of validity and reliability in psychology college students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Dominguez-Lara

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to examine the internal structure of the Test anxiety inventory-State (TAI-State in Spanish version. A sample of 125 college students from Lima (84.8% female between 18 and 31 years old (M = 22.51 was evaluated. The internal structure of the STAI was analyzed by a confirmatory factor analysis, evaluating three models: oblique, bifactor and unidimensional. The results indicate that a single dimension constitutes the STAI and there are coefficients of reliability with high magnitudes. In conclusion, the version studied shows favorable psychometric properties that support its use in Lima.

  8. Assessing Children's Anxiety Using the Modified Short State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Talking Mats: A Pilot Study

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    Stefan Nilsson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Preoperative anxiety complicates treatment and requires assessment by nurses in children. Children, with or without disability, are helped when pictures are used to support communication. The purpose of this pilot study was to test the reliability and validity of the modified short State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI using a modified Talking Mats method in children undergoing day surgeries. Method. A modified short STAI with pictorial support along the lines of the Talking Mats method was pre- and postoperatively administered to 42 typically developing children aged three to nine years. The parents assessed the children’s anxiety, simultaneously and independently, by scoring the short STAI by proxy. Results. The modified short STAI showed moderate internal consistency and good construct validity in the age group seven to nine years. Conclusions. The results of this study support the use of the instrument for self-reports in children aged seven to nine years. Future research will explore the possibilities of also using this instrument for children with cognitive and communicative difficulties.

  9. Is there a relation between dental anxiety, fear and general psychological status?

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    Tuba Talo Yildirim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Dental anxiety is a widespread problem in many populations. This problem can be a barrier to dental care and may lead to poor oral health. Dental anxiety may be related to psychological status. Aims The aim of the present study was to assess the levels of dental anxiety, dental fear, Beck Depression, and state-trait anxiety according to age, gender and education level in patients at the periodontology clinic in the Diyarbakır Mouth and Dental Health Center. Study Design A total of 231 patients (115 males, 116 females filled out dental fear scale (DFS, dental anxiety scale (DAS, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, state-trait anxiety inventory-state (STAI-S, and state-trait anxiety inventory–trait (STAI-T questionnaires, and evaluations of DFS, DAS, BDI, STAI-S, and STAI-T were conducted according to age, gender, and education level. Results The mean DFS, DAS, BDI, STAI-T, and STAI –S were 45.64, 9.15, 13.16, 38.90, and 40.18, respectively. There was a significant association among DFS, DAS, BDI, STAI-S, and STAI-T (p < 0.05. These surveys scores were significantly higher in females than males (p < 0.05. The results of this study indicated that gender age and education level have important effects on DFS, DAS, BDI, STAI-S, and STAI-T (p < 0.05. Conclusion Dental anxiety and dental fear were found to be related to psychological status (BDI, STAI-S, and STAI-T over time. There are some patients with unaddressed psychological distress.

  10. The Assessment and Management of Sexual Anxiety among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... characteristics of sexual anxiety, the Sexual Anxiety Inventory (SAI), Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS), and the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-Y1) were administered to 180 participants, aged 16-31 years. To also determine the impact of psychotherapy on sexual anxiety, using Rational Emotive Behavior therapy The ...

  11. Short form of the Spanish adaptation of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory

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    Gualberto Buela-Casal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Antecedentes/objetivos: El State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI es uno de los instru- mentos de evaluación más empleados por psicólogos en todo el mundo y el séptimo más utilizado por psicólogos clínicos en Espa ̃ na. Desde su creación, se han llevado a cabo varias versiones breves del mismo; pese a ello, no existe ninguna para población general con mues- tra espa ̃ nola. El objetivo del presente artículo es establecer y validar una versión breve. Método: Para ello, se aplicó el STAI completo a 1.157 adultos y 30 pacientes con trastorno de ansiedad generalizada. Mediante dichos grupos, se realizó un análisis discriminante. Resultados: Para la ansiedad estado y rasgo, respectivamente, se obtuvieron reducciones de cuatro ítems y se compararon con otras versiones breves mediante análisis factorial confirmato- rio. La versión establecida mediante análisis discriminante muestra el mejor ajuste en muestra espa ̃ nola. Conclusiones: estos ocho ítems pueden ser usados para facilitar la evaluación de la ansiedad estado y rasgo.

  12. Depression and anxiety among parents of phenylketonuria children

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    Gunduz, Mehmet; Arslan, Nur; Unal, Ozlem; Cakar, Sevim; Kuyum, Pınar; Bulbul, Selda F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the existence of depression and/or anxiety with underlying risk factors among parents of children with classical phenylketonuria (PKU). Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the Division of Pediatric Metabolism, Ankara Children’s Hospital, Dokuz Eylul University, Kırıkkale University, and Erzurum Local Research Hospital, Turkey, between January and July 2014. Parents of 61 patients and 36 healthy controls completed the self-report questionnaires. We used Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) to assess the parental depression and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory S-T (STAI S-T) to assess parental anxiety. Results: Depression and anxiety scores were significantly higher in the case group (BDI 12.3±9.1; STAI-S: 38.2±9.6; STAI-T: 43.2±6.9) than controls (BDI: 5.4±4.1 p=0.000; STAI-S: 31.8±7.6 p=0.001; STAI-T: 37.0±7.2 p=0.000). Mothers of the patients had higher scores than the other parental groups (BDI: p=0.000, STAI-S: p=0.001 and STAI-T: p=0.000). Logistic regression analysis showed that low educational level of the parent was the only independent factor for depression (OR 9.96, 95% CI: 1.89-52.35, p=0.007) and state anxiety (OR: 6.99, 95% CI: 1.22-40.48, p=0.030) in the case group. Conclusion: A subset of parents with PKU patients have an anxiety or depressive disorder. Supportive services dealing with the parents of chronically ill children such as PKU are needed in order to reduce the level of anxiety. PMID:26492114

  13. A New Inventory to Assess Childhood Social Anxiety and Phobia: The Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children.

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    Beidel, Deborah C.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A new instrument, the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children (SPAI-C), was developed. Results from 6 studies with nearly 600 children indicate that the SPAI-C is a reliable and valid measure for childhood social anxiety and fear. It may be useful for improving clinical assessment and documenting treatment outcomes. (SLD)

  14. March of the Living, a Holocaust Educational Tour: An Assessment of Anxiety and Depression.

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    Nager, Alan L; Pham, Phung; Grajower, Sarah N; Gold, Jeffrey I

    2016-06-01

    March of the Living (MOTL) is a 2-week international educational tour for high school seniors to learn about the Holocaust by visiting concentration/deaths camps and other Jewish historical sites in Poland, culminating in a week-long excursion in Israel. Although the trip is primarily educational, there is recent research evidence to suggest that attendees may suffer from a variety of mental health sequelae. To determine symptoms of anxiety and depression, 196 Los Angeles delegation participants voluntarily completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, composed of a trait anxiety scale (i.e., STAI-T) and a state anxiety scale (i.e., STAI-S), and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Pre-MOTL, students completed an initial background questionnaire along with the STAI-T, STAI-S, and the CES-D. At end-Poland and end-Israel, the STAI-S and CES-D were administered again. Results demonstrated that depression scores increased during end-Poland and returned to baseline; however, anxiety scores mildly increased end-Poland and rose slightly more and persisted through end-Israel.

  15. Validation of a Chinese version of the dental anxiety inventory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ng, Sam K. S.; Stouthard, Marlies E. A.; Keung Leung, W.

    2005-01-01

    To translate the English version of Dental Anxiety Inventory (DAxI) and its short-form (SDAxI) and to validate their use in Hong Kong Chinese. The DAxI and SDAxI were translated into Chinese. A total of 500 adults (18-64 years) were interviewed, the Chinese DAxI, Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL-90),

  16. So Worried I Don't Know What to Be: Anxiety Is Associated with Increased Career Indecision and Reduced Career Certainty

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    Campagna, C. Giuseppina; Curtis, Guy J.

    2007-01-01

    There is a relationship between career indecision and anxiety, however the relative contributions of state and trait anxiety are unclear in the literature. 110 first-year university students completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and Career Decision Scale (CDS) to measure anxiety and career indecision. Regression analyses revealed that…

  17. Epilepsy and anxiety

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    Marly de Albuquerque

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available We have analyzed 155 subjects with STAI (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory: 75 epileptic patients and 80 normal subjects used as a control group. A higher trait-anxiety score (chronic anxiety than that of controls was found for the epileptic group. For the epileptic group higher levels of the A-trait occurred in patients with EEG abnormalities with left temporal localization. We have also observed that the shorter the epilepsy lasts (less than two years, the higher the trait-anxiety levels. Convulsions and awareness loss during epileptic seizures do not modify state and trait-anxiety scores.

  18. Validity and reliability of an Arabic version of the state-trait anxiety inventory in a Saudi dental setting.

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    Bahammam, Maha A

    2016-06-01

    To test the psychometric properties of an adapted Arabic version of the state trait anxiety-form Y (STAI-Y) in Saudi adult dental patients.  In this cross-sectional study, the published Arabic version of the STAI-Y was evaluated by 2 experienced bilingual professionals for its compatibility with Saudi culture and revised prior to testing. Three hundred and eighty-seven patients attending dental clinics for treatment at the Faculty of Dentistry Hospital, King Abdullah University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, participated in the study. The Arabic version of the modified dental anxiety scale (MDAS) and visual analogue scale (VAS) ratings of anxiety were used to assess the concurrent criterion validity. The Arabic version of the STAI-Y had high internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha: 0.989) for state and trait subscales. Factor analysis indicated unidimensionality of the scale. Correlations between STAI-Y scores and both MDAS and VAS scores indicated strong concurrent criterion validity. Discriminant validity was supported by the findings that higher anxiety levels were present among females as opposed to males, younger individuals as compared to older individuals, and patients who do not visit the dentist unless they have a need as opposed to more frequent visitors to the dental office. The Arabic version of the STAI-Y has an adequate internal consistency reliability, generally similar to that reported in the international literature, suggesting it is appropriate for assessing dental anxiety in Arabic speaking populations.

  19. Parental state anxiety correlates with preoperative anxiety in Chinese preschool children.

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    Cui, Xulei; Zhu, Bo; Zhao, Jing; Huang, Yuguang; Luo, Ailun; Wei, Jing

    2016-06-01

    Preoperative anxiety in children is largely dependent on age and is influenced by anxiety level in parents. The current study compared the level of preoperative anxiety in preschool children versus school-aged children and its relationship with the state and trait anxiety of the parents. This study included 54 preschool children (2-5 years of age) and 48 school-age children (6-12 years) scheduled to receive ear, nose and throat, plastic or ophthalmologic surgeries. Preoperative anxiety of children was assessed in the holding area immediately prior to the surgery using a modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale (m-YPAS). Compliance with anaesthesia induction was assessed using an Induction Compliance Checklist (ICC). The state and trait anxiety of the parent who accompanied the child was assessed using a State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) questionnaire. Both m-YPAS and ICC scores were higher in preschool children than in school-age children with significant correlation between the two measures. The STAI-S score of parents was higher in the preschool group than in the school-age group. No significant difference was found in STAI-T score between the two age groups. Children's m-YPAS score correlated with parental STAI-T score in both groups (rho = 0.297, P = 0.029 and rho = 0.338, P = 0.019, respectively) but only with STAI-S score in the preschool group (rho = 0.400, P = 0.003). Both preschool children and their parents are more anxious than school-age dyads prior to surgery. The anxiety level of the children correlates with state anxiety of the parents in preschool children but not in school-age children. © 2016 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  20. Factors affecting anxiety-fear of surgical procedures in dentistry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subjects and Methods: Patients who were admitted to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of the universities in two cities, which have a different sociocultural patient profile, were enrolled. In addition to the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS), and Dental Fear Scale (DFS), the ...

  1. Measurement Invariance of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory

    OpenAIRE

    Bunnell, Brian E.; Joseph, Dana L.; Beidel, Deborah C.

    2012-01-01

    The Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI) is a commonly used self-report measure of social phobia that has demonstrated adequate reliability, convergent validity, discriminant validity, and criterion-related validity. However, research has yet to address whether this measure functions equivalently in (a) individuals with and without a diagnosis of social phobia and (b) males and females. Evaluating measurement equivalence is necessary in order to determine that the construct of social an...

  2. The effect of giving detailed information about intravenous radiopharmaceutical administration on the anxiety level of patients who request more information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaya, E.; Ciftci, I.; Demirel, R.; Gecici, O.; Cigerci, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear medicine procedures use radiopharmaceuticals, which produce radiation and potential adverse reactions, albeit at a low rate. It is the patient's ethical, legal, and medical right to be informed of the potential side effects of procedures applied to them. Our purpose was to determine the effect of providing information about intravenous radiopharmaceutical administration on the anxiety level of patients who request more information. This study was completed in two separate Nuclear Medicine Departments. The study included 620 (247 M, 373 F) patients who had been referred for myocardial perfusion, bone, dynamic renal, and thyroid scintigraphic examinations. The patients were divided into two groups according to whether they requested more information or not. Group 1 consisted of 388 patients who wanted to receive more information about the procedure, while Group 2 consisted of 232 patients who did not request additional information. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S and STAI-T) was used to determine a patient's anxiety level. After simple information was given, state and trait anxiety levels were measured in both groups. We gave detailed information to the patients in Group 1 and then measured state anxiety again. Detailed information included an explanation of the radiopharmaceutical risk and probable side effects due to the scan procedure. There was no statistical difference between Groups 1 and 2 in STAI-T or STAI-S scores after simple information was given (p=0.741 and p=0.945, respectively). The mean value of STAI-S score was increased after the provision of detailed information and there was a statistically significant difference between after simple information STAI-S and after detailed information STAI-S (p<0.001). The STAI-S score was increased in 246 patients and decreased in 110 patients after detailed information, while there was no change in 32 patients. After detailed information, the greatest increase in STAI-S score was seen in the

  3. Measurement Invariance of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunnell, Brian E.; Joseph, Dana L.; Beidel, Deborah C.

    2012-01-01

    The Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI) is a commonly used self-report measure of social phobia that has demonstrated adequate reliability, convergent validity, discriminant validity, and criterion-related validity. However, research has yet to address whether this measure functions equivalently in (a) individuals with and without a diagnosis of social phobia and (b) males and females. Evaluating measurement equivalence is necessary in order to determine that the construct of social anxiety is conceptually understood invariantly across these populations. The results of the current investigation, using a series of nested factorial models proposed by Vandenberg and Lance (2000), provide evidence for strong equivalence across 420 individuals with and without diagnoses of social anxiety disorder and across male and female samples. Accordingly, these results provide psychometric justification for comparison of SPAI scores across the symptom continuum and sexes. PMID:23247204

  4. Anxiety, splint treatment and clinical characteristics of patients with osteoarthritis of temporomandibular joint and dental students – a pilot study.

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    Tomislav Badel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of splint treatment for therapy of osteoarthritis of temporomandibular joint, and to compare the level of anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory,STAI and clinical characteristics between 16 patients and 20 asymptomatic dental school students. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was used for all subjects. Dental students showed a statistically signiicant higher capacity of mouth opening (p<0.05, and lower level of anxiety (p<0.05 for STAI 1, and p<0.001 for STAI 2 than patients. Patients who had suffered chronic pain before splint treatment had a higher value of anxiety by STAI 1 test (p<0.05.

  5. Examination of Athletes' Anxiety, Motivation, Imagination Value in Competitions with Different Severity Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallayici, Mustafa; Eroglu Kolayis, Ipek; Kesilmis, Inci; Kesilmis, Mehmet Melih

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine athletes' anxiety, motivation, and imagination value in competitions with different severity level. The research was conducted on swimming athlete in elite level 18 female and 19 male totally 37. To measure the level of imagination, imagine inventory in sports and to measure trait anxiety levels STAI were…

  6. The Impact of Music Therapy on Anxiety in Cancer Patients Undergoing Simulation for Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Andrew; Chadha, Manjeet; Torres, B Nelson; Lee, Jae K; Hylton, Donald; Loewy, Joanne V; Harrison, Louis B

    2017-09-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is associated with high stress levels. The role of music therapy (MT) for patients receiving RT is not well described. This study evaluates the impact of MT on anxiety and distress during simulation in patients with newly diagnosed head and neck or breast cancer. This institutional review board-approved randomized trial of MT versus no MT at the time of simulation included the pre-State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S Anxiety) questionnaire and Symptom Distress Thermometer (SDT). Patients randomized to MT received a consultation with a music therapist, during which music of the patients' choice to be played during simulation was selected. The no-MT patients did not receive the MT consultation, nor did they hear prerecorded music during simulation. Subsequent to the simulation, all patients repeated the STAI-S Anxiety questionnaire and the SDT. Of the 78 patients enrolled (39 in MT group and 39 in no-MT group), 38 had breast cancer and 40 had head and neck cancer. The male-female ratio was 27:51. The overall mean pre- and post-simulation STAI-S scores were 38.7 (range, 20-60) and 35.2 (range, 20-72), respectively. The overall mean pre- and post-simulation SDT scores were 3.2 (range, 0-10) and 2.5 (range, 0-10), respectively. The MT group had mean pre- and post-simulation STAI-S scores of 39.1 and 31.0, respectively (Panxiety and distress during the simulation procedure on the basis of the STAI-S questionnaire and SDT. Incorporating culturally centered individualized MT may be an effective intervention to reduce stressors. Continued research defining the role of MT intervention in improving the patient experience by reducing anxiety is warranted. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2.

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    Lane, A M; Sewell, D F; Terry, P C; Bartram, D; Nesti, M S

    1999-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the factor structure of the Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2 (CSAI-2) using confirmatory factor analysis. Volunteer participants (n = 1213) completed the CSAI-2 approximately 1 h before competition and the data were analysed in two samples. The hypothesized model showed poor fit indices in both samples independently (Robust Comparative Fit Index: sample A = 0.82, sample B = 0.84) and simultaneously (Comparative Fit Index = 0.83), suggesting that the factor structure proposed by Martens et al. is flawed. Our findings suggest that a limitation of the Cognitive Anxiety scale derives from phrasing items around the word 'concerned' rather than 'worried'. We suggest that being concerned about an impending performance does not necessarily mean that an athlete is experiencing negative thoughts, but that the athlete is acknowledging the importance and difficulty of the challenge and is attempting to mobilize resources to cope. The present results question the use of the CSAI-2 as a valid measure of competitive state anxiety.

  8. Women's acute anxiety variations before and after epidural anesthesia for childbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Campos, Francisco J; Escrivá, Dolores; Palanca, José M; Ridocci, Francisca; Barrios, Carlos; Gallego, Juan

    2017-06-01

    This study assessed changes in anxiety during different phases of childbirth in a sample of women demanding epidural anesthesia. Prospective, longitudinal case series. A total of 133 women who demanded epidural anesthesia for childbirth answered the questionnaires. Anxiety state was measured using the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) questionnaire. The STAI-S (anxiety state) was administered in three phases during childbirth: Phase 1 was before applying epidural anesthesia, Phase 2 was 45 min after the application of epidural anesthesia and Phase 3 was at less than 24 h after delivery. Data were collected in two general hospitals: a third-level public hospital and a well-recognized private hospital. STAI scores. Anxiety state decreases significantly after applying the epidural anesthesia (Phase 2) compared to before anesthesia (Phase 1), and it remains low levels 24 h after childbirth (Phase 3). There were statistically significant differences in STAI scores between the different phases administrated (Phases 1 and 2: p anxiety state in women in any of the three phases. Women's anxiety decreases significantly after applying epidural anesthesia, and it remains low 24 h after delivery. Anxiety against childbirth was not influenced by the health system used by women, by the condition of primiparous or multiparous, or by the educational level. Women who received an epidural anesthesia with a cesarean section reported higher rates of anxiety state after birth.

  9. No relationship between baseline salivary alpha-amylase and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory Score in drug-naïve patients with short-illness-duration first episode major depressive disorder: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szarmach, Joanna; Cubała, Wiesław-Jerzy; Landowski, Jerzy; Chrzanowska, Anna

    2017-04-01

    Salivary α-amylase (sAA) activity alternations are observed in major depressive disorder (MDD) being associated with depression severity and its specific psychopathological dimensions with anxiety being attributed to distress. No data is available on sAA in MDD according to Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD-17) and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). The exploratory study examines whether and to what extent baseline sAA level is interrelated to the psychopathological features including severity of symptoms and specific psychopathological dimensions. The basal, non-stimulated sAA activity was studied in 20 non-late-life adult, treatment-naïve MDD patients with short-illness-duration and in 20 age- and sex-matched healthy controls along with psychometric assessments with Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD-17) and Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Significantly lower ( p =0.011) sAA activity was observed in MDD as compared to controls. No significant correlations were observed between sAA activity and the total HAMD-17 score as well as with regard to the specific core depression, insomnia, anxiety and somatic HAM-D psychopathological dimensions. No significant correlations were also found between sAA and STAIX-1 and STAIX-2 scores. Low baseline sAA levels in MDD with no correlations between sAA and psychopathological features including severity of symptoms and specific psychopathological dimensions was found. Key words: Salivary alpha-amylase, major depressive disorder, Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression.

  10. Clay and Anxiety Reduction: A One-Group, Pretest/Posttest Design with Patients on a Psychiatric Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimport, Elizabeth R.; Hartzell, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Little research exists on using clay as an anxiety-reducing intervention with patients in psychiatric hospitals. This article reports on a study that used a one-group, pretest/posttest design with 49 adults in a psychiatric facility who created a clay pinch pot. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) was used as a pre- and posttest measure.…

  11. The Comparison of Three Approaches to the Reduction of Test Anxiety in High School Students. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Wayne R.; Heimann, Robert A.

    The relative effectiveness of client-centered, rational-emotive, and desensitization therapies in reducing test anxiety among high school students was investigated. The sample was drawn from 2336 students in grades 10 through 12 who were administered the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Thirty-three subjects with high State…

  12. The influence of a department's psychosocial climate and treatment environment on cancer patients' anxiety during radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullaney, Tara; Olausson, Kristina; Sharp, Lena; Zackrisson, Björn; Edvardsson, David; Nyholm, Tufve

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether there is a relationship between cancer patients' perceptions of the person-centeredness of their treatment experience and their anxiety levels during treatment. A questionnaire was distributed to adult cancer patients going through external beam radiotherapy (RT) with curative intent at a university hospital in Sweden (n = 892), which included two surveys, the State Trait Anxiety Inventory-state specific questions (STAI-S), and the Patient-centered Climate Questionnaire (PCQ) and additional treatment-specific questions. Eligible patients were provided with the questionnaire on their seventh day of RT by an RT-nurse. Statistical analysis showed a significant negative relationship between STAI-S scores and PCQ scores, and a significant positive relationship between the Treatment Environment questions and the STAI-S scores. Multivariate regression modeling found the PCQ subscale of safety to have the strongest negative association with STAI-S scores, showing that a climate of safety can significantly decrease patient situational anxiety levels. On the other hand, difficulty tolerating the overall treatment experience, worry about the treatment equipment, or feelings of isolation or claustrophobia within the treatment room all significantly factor into increases in patient-reported situational anxiety levels. Both the treatment environment and the psychosocial climate of the RT clinic significantly impact cancer patient state anxiety levels. These findings suggest that actively employing a person-centered approach during RT, and designing the treatment environment to be more attentive to the patient experience can both play a significant role in decreasing patient situational anxiety during treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Anxiety Level of Caregivers of Neurological Patients with Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serel Arslan, Selen; Demir, Numan; Karaduman, A Ayşe

    2017-08-01

    We aimed to investigate anxiety level of caregivers of neurological patients with dysphagia, and the relationship of patient-related factors to anxiety level of dysphagia caregivers. A total of 103 adult neurological patients with dysphagia (study group), 30 without dysphagia (control group), and their primary caregivers were included. Types of feeding, condition of dependency in eating and drinking, dysphagia duration, and history of previous dysphagia treatment were recorded for study group. In study group, the Turkish version of the Eating Assessment Tool-10 (T-EAT-10) was used to determine dysphagia symptom severity. Penetration and aspiration severity was determined with the penetration-aspiration scale (PAS). The Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) that has two subscales including state anxiety (S-STAI) and trait anxiety (T-STAI) was used to determine anxiety level of caregivers. There was no difference between groups in terms of age, gender, weight, and height. The mean S-STAI was 42.56 ± 10.10 for the study group and 29.20 ± 6.64 for the control group (p  0.05). Caregivers of neurological patients with dysphagia have greater anxiety level than caregivers of neurological patients without dysphagia.

  14. Trait vs. state anxiety in different threatening situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollyana Caldeira Leal

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Anxiety as a uni- or multidimensional construct has been under discussion. The unidimensional approach assumes that there is a general trait anxiety, which predisposes the individuals to increases in state anxiety in various threatening situations. In this case, there should be a correlation between state and trait anxiety in any situation of threat. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between trait and state anxiety in participants exposed to two different anxiogenic situations: interpersonal threat (Video-Monitored Stroop Test – VMST and physical threat (third molar extraction – TME. Methods Participants with various levels of trait anxiety (general trait: State-Trait Anxiety InventorySTAI, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; specific trait: Social Phobia Inventory, Dental Anxiety Scale had their anxious state evaluated (STAI, self-evaluation of tension level, heart rate, electromyogram activity before, during and after the VMST or the TME. Results In VMST, trait anxiety correlated to state anxiety (psychological parameters in all test phases. However, in TME, the only trait measurement that correlated to state anxiety (psychological parameters was the Dental Anxiety Scale. Conclusion Trait anxiety correlates positively to state anxiety in situations of interpersonal threat, but not of physical threat.

  15. Randomized Trial of Group Music Therapy With Chinese Prisoners: Impact on Anxiety, Depression, and Self-Esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi-Jing; Hannibal, Niels; Gold, Christian

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the effects of group music therapy on improving anxiety, depression, and self-esteem in Chinese prisoners. Two-hundred male prisoners were randomly assigned to music therapy (n = 100) or standard care (n = 100). The music therapy had 20 sessions of group therapy compared with standard care. Anxiety (State and Trait Anxiety Inventory [STAI]), depression (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI]), and self-esteem (Texas Social Behavior Inventory [TSBI], Rosenberg Self-Esteem Inventory [RSI]) were measured by standardized scales at baseline, mid-program, and post-program. Data were analyzed based on the intention to treat principle. Compared with standard care, anxiety and depression in the music therapy condition decreased significantly at mid-test and post-test; self-esteem improved significantly at mid-test (TSBI) and at post-test (TSBI, RSI). Improvements were greater in younger participants (STAI-Trait, RSI) and/or in those with a lower level of education (STAI-State, STAI-Trait). Group music therapy seems to be effective in improving anxiety, depression, and self-esteem and was shown to be most beneficial for prisoners of younger age or with lower education level. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. The effect of different types of music on patients' preoperative anxiety: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uğraş, Gülay Altun; Yıldırım, Güven; Yüksel, Serpil; Öztürkçü, Yusuf; Kuzdere, Mustafa; Öztekin, Seher Deniz

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine effect of three different types of music on patients' preoperative anxiety. This randomized controlled trial included 180 patients who were randomly divided into four groups. While the control group didn't listen to music, the experimental groups respectively listened to natural sounds, Classical Turkish or Western Music for 30 min. The State Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR) and cortisol levels were checked. The post-music STAI-S, SBP, DBP, HR and cortisol levels of the patients in music groups were significantly lower than pre-music time. All types of music decreased STAI-S, SBP, and cortisol levels; additionally natural sounds reduced DBP; Classical Turkish Music also decreased DBP, and HR. All types of music had an effect on reducing patients' preoperative anxiety, and listening to Classical Turkish Music was particularly the most effective one. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. School Anxiety Inventory: Reliability and Validity Evidence in a Sample of Slovenian Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levpušcek, Melita Puklek; Inglés, Candido J.; Marzo, Juan C.; García-Fernández, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the reliability and validity of the School Anxiety Inventory (SAI) using a sample of 646 Slovenian adolescents (48% boys), ranging in age from 12 to 19 years. Single confirmatory factor analyses replicated the correlated four-factor structure of scores on the SAI for anxiety-provoking school situations…

  18. Validation of the trait anxiety scale for state-trait anxiety inventory in suicide victims and living controls of Chinese rural youths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Gao, Qi

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the validation of STAI Trait-Anxiety Scale in suicide cases and community living controls in rural China. The participants were 392 suicides and 416 controls. Cronbach's Alpha was computed to evaluate the internal consistency. The Spearman Correlation Coefficient between Trait-Anxiety Scale and other instrument was calculated to evaluate the external validity, and the Exploratory Factor Analysis was used to evaluate the construct validity. The results showed the Cronbach's Alpha was .891 and .787 respectively in case and control groups. Most of the correlations between instruments were significant. We found 2 factors in cases and 3 factors in controls. We could cautiously infer that the Trait Anxiety Scale was an adequate tool to measure trait anxiety through proxy data in suicide victims and living controls in rural China.

  19. Portuguese validation of the Short Health Anxiety Inventory: Factor structure, reliability, and factor invariance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Alexandra; Reis, Sibília; Espada, José P; Orgilés, Mireia

    2016-09-01

    The Short Health Anxiety Inventory is a brief instrument to assess health anxiety widely used across countries; however, no validated version is available for Portuguese-speaking population. Factorial structure, reliability, and equivalency factor with the Spanish version were analyzed with Portuguese adolescents aged 14-18 years. A Portuguese adolescent cohort ( N = 629) and a comparative Spanish adolescent cohort ( N = 1502) were evaluated. The original two-factor version was the best fitting model for the Portuguese version. The reliability was excellent. Complete measurement invariance across both countries was supported. The Portuguese version of the Short Health Anxiety Inventory is a valid screening inventory to assess health anxiety in adolescents.

  20. Education and Visual Information Improves Effectiveness of Ultrasound-Guided Local Injections on Shoulder Pain and Associated Anxiety Level: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkucak, Murat; Cilesizoglu, Nurce; Capkin, Erhan; Can, Ipek; Batmaz, Ibrahim; Kerimoglu, Servet; Onder, Mustafa Avni; Karaca, Adem; Ayar, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Local injections are widely used in patients with a painful shoulder. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible impact of patients' visual information on the effectiveness of ultrasound (US)-guided local injections on anxiety levels and shoulder pain. A total of 151 patients, scheduled for local injection owing to shoulder pain, were randomly assigned into two groups in a consecutive order. Patients in group I (n = 72) were provided information related to US findings and allowed to watch the procedures from the monitor, whereas patients in group II (n = 79) received the injection only without any collaboration. Data were collected from both groups immediately before and after injections through visual analog scale and questionnaire (the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory [STAI] forms 1 and 2). US-guided local injections provided significant improvement of anxiety and pain in both groups, irrespective of providing visual information. Group I and group II comparisons with respect to the visual analog scale, STAI 1, and STAI 2 yielded significant difference only for postinjection STAI 2 in group I (P = 0.006). Intragroup comparisons revealed significant differences between preinjection and postinjection values (group I: visual analog scale, P = 0.001; STAI form 1, P = 0.001; STAI form 2, P = 0.002; group II: visual analog scale, P = 0.001; STAI form 1, P = 0.002; STAI form 2, P = 0.042). There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of postinjection satisfaction levels from the procedures (P = 0.824). Performing US-guided shoulder injections with patient visual information provides positive contributions to coping with pain and anxiety. In particular, the patient collaboration-based US-guided injections have positive consequences on patients' long-standing "trait-anxiety" levels.

  1. Influences of age and anxiety on processing of emotional information in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinholdt-Dunne, Marie Louise; Mogg, Karin; Esbjørn, Barbara Hoff

    Anxiety disorders are among the most common psychiatric disturbances in childhood (Costello 2003). Theorists suggest that information-processing biases for emotional information play an important role in the development of anxiety disorders (Kendall & Ronan, 1990), and that development/age affects...... was assessed using an emotional Stroop paradigm with angry, happy and neutral faces. Trait anxiety was measured using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children (STAI-C; Spielberger et al., 1983). There were four groups of schoolchildren (N = 67, aged 7 - 14) divided by median splits on trait anxiety...... (below vs above 31 on STAI-C) and age (below vs above 10.75 years). Results revealed a significant Age x Trait anxiety x Type of emotional face interaction effect on interference scores, indicating an interference effect of angry faces (relative to neutral faces) in younger children with moderate levels...

  2. Influences of age and anxiety on processing of emotional information in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinholdt-Dunne, Marie Louise; Mogg, Karin; Esbjørn, Barbara Hoff

    was assessed using an emotional Stroop paradigm with angry, happy and neutral faces. Trait anxiety was measured using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children (STAI-C; Spielberger et al., 1983). There were four groups of schoolchildren (N = 67, aged 7 - 14) divided by median splits on trait anxiety......Anxiety disorders are among the most common psychiatric disturbances in childhood (Costello 2003). Theorists suggest that information-processing biases for emotional information play an important role in the development of anxiety disorders (Kendall & Ronan, 1990), and that development/age affects...... (below vs above 31 on STAI-C) and age (below vs above 10.75 years). Results revealed a significant Age x Trait anxiety x Type of emotional face interaction effect on interference scores, indicating an interference effect of angry faces (relative to neutral faces) in younger children with moderate levels...

  3. Validity and Reliability of the Florida Patient Acceptance Survey and Florida Shock Anxiety Scale in Turkish Patients with Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oz Alkan H

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite its established effectiveness, living with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD is associated with ongoing psychosocial distress. Patient device acceptance and shock-related anxiety might be essential in identifying patients at risk for adverse patient-reported outcomes following implantation of an ICD. The purpose of study was to examine the validity and reliability of the Florida Patient Acceptance Survey (FPAS and the Florida Shock Anxiety Scale (FSAS of ICD patients. Methods: The sample included 180 participants (146 male, mean age=60.56 ± 13.88. Patients completed the FPAS, the FSAS, the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, the State Anxiety Inventory (STAI-TX1 and Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-TX2. Results: Confirmatory factor analysis (for FPAS revealed that a fourfactor structure: Return to Function, Device-Related Distress, Positive Appraisal and Body Image Concerns ( 2 84 χ =157.75, p=0.00, comparative fit index (CFI=0.91, root mean-square error of approximation (RMSEA=0.07. Confirmatory factor analysis (for FSAS revealed that a two-factor structure with items loading such that Factor 1 could be conceptualized as a Consequence Factor and Factor 2 as a Trigger Factor 2 34 χ =81.48, p=0.00, comparative fit index (CFI=0.93, root mean-square error of approximation (RMSEA=0.09. The FPAS was negatively correlated with FSAS, BAI, STAI-TX1 and STAI-TX2 (p<0.01. The FSAS was positively correlated with BAI, STAI-TX1 and STAI-TX2 (p<0.01. We found satisfactory evidence of internal consistency (Cronbach’s α was 0.81 for FPAS and Cronbach’s α was 0.87 for FSAS. Conclusion: FPAS and FSAS are valid and reliable instruments to assess device acceptance and shock-related anxiety in Turkish patients with ICD.

  4. [An evaluation of anxiety and depression symptoms in fibromyalgia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Emanuella Barros; Quintans Junior, Lucindo José; Fraga, Byanka Porto; Macieira, José Caetano; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the frequency of anxiety and depression symptoms by verifying the association between anxiety traits, current depression and anxiety symptoms in fibromyalgia patients. Interviews were performed with 60 subjects diagnosed with fibromyalgia at the Rheumatology Outpatient Clinic at Universidade Federal de Sergipe between August 2007 and March 2008, in which two questionnaires were administered: the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). The frequency of anxiety and depression symptoms was, respectively, 50% and 86% for individuals with fibromyalgia, and the mean trait-anxiety score was 59.38. An association was observed between trait and state anxiety. Anxiety and depression were frequent symptoms among patients with fibromyalgia. However, anxiety appeared as a secondary symptom to depression, appearing in a more severe form, and, therefore, this comorbidity should be more valued and studied.

  5. Parental Assessment of Childhood Social Phobia: Psychometric Properties of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children-Parent Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higa, Charmaine K.; Fernandez, Shantel N.; Nakamura, Brad J.; Chorpita, Bruce F.; Daleiden, Eric L.

    2006-01-01

    Validity and parent-child agreement of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children-Parent Report (SPAI-C-P) were examined in a racially diverse sample of 158 students in Grades 5 through 8 (87 girls; ages 10 to 14; M = 11.53) and their caregivers. Children completed the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children (SPAI-C), and…

  6. Psychometric Properties of the French Canadian Version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgeon, Lyse; Chartrand, Elise

    2003-01-01

    Examined the psychometric properties of a French version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children (STAIC; C. Spielberger and others, 1973), administered to 288 French Canadian children in intermediate grades. Findings show that the STAIC is psychometrically sound. (SLD)

  7. Effect of anxiety on the rate of gastric emptying of liquids.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lydon, A

    2012-02-03

    The efficacy of preoperative fasting is reduced in the presence of any factor which delays gastric emptying. We examined the association between anxiety and gastric emptying in adult patients undergoing elective surgery. Immediately before operation, 21 patients completed both a Spielberger state trait inventory (used to quantify current anxiety state (STAIs) and anxiety predisposition (STAIt)), and the Amsterdam preoperative anxiety and information scale (used to quantify anxiety and need for information). Gastric emptying was measured using the paracetamol absorption technique. Four to 10 weeks later, gastric emptying and STAI were measured again. Patients were more anxious before than after operation (STAIs = mean 35.4 (SD 10.9) and 25 (4.1), respectively; P = 0.0004). Neither anxiety state (P = 0.40) nor measures of anxiety relative to anxiety predisposition (P = 0.86) influenced gastric emptying (as measured by area under the paracetamol absorption-time curve). This contrasts with previous findings that anxiety in patients with low anxiety predisposition scores delays gastric emptying.

  8. Music reduces patient anxiety during Mohs surgery: an open-label randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachiramon, Vasanop; Sobanko, Joseph F; Rattanaumpawan, Pinyo; Miller, Christopher J

    2013-02-01

    Many patients undergoing Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) experience anxiety and stress. Although music has been proven to reduce anxiety and promote relaxation in other fields of medicine, scant research investigates the effect of music on anxiety during MMS. To determine whether music can reduce anxiety in patients undergoing MMS. An open-labeled randomized controlled trial was conducted to assess anxiety before and after listening to music. Subjects undergoing MMS were randomly allocated to listen to self-selected music (n = 50) or to have surgery without music (n = 50). Anxiety was measured using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and on a visual analog scale (VAS). Subjects in the music group experienced statistically significantly lower STAI and VAS scores than those in the control group. STAI and VAS scores were significantly lower in subjects who underwent MMS for the first time. Anxiety measures did not correlate with sex or type of skin cancer. Listening to self-selected music reduces anxiety in patients undergoing MMS, especially those who undergo MMS for the first time. Presenting patients the opportunity to listen to music is a simple strategy to minimize anxiety during MMS. © 2013 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. A one-item question with a Likert or Visual Analog Scale adequately measured current anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Heather M; Barratt, Alexandra L; Butow, Phyllis N; Deeks, Jonathan J

    2007-04-01

    To determine whether a single question with a Likert Scale or a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) response adequately measures current anxiety. Consecutive English-speaking adult women attending a dedicated breast clinic in a major Australian city were invited to complete a demographic questionnaire, the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and a single question with a five-point Likert Scale response and a VAS in random order. Only women who completed the STAI were included in analyses. Four hundred of 497 (80%) eligible women agreed to participate. Both measures were adequate predictors of the STAI score; correlation with STAI was 0.78 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.73-0.82) for the VAS and 0.75 (95% CI 0.70-0.79) for the Likert Scale. However, 11% of women incorrectly completed the VAS limiting its usefulness. A single question with either a Likert Scale or VAS response may be an adequate replacement for the STAI. Both measures quickly and easily assess anxiety and may be useful for research purposes when researchers have very limited time or questionnaire space or need to reduce the burden on participants of completing many measures.

  10. Rasch Measurement in Language Research: Creating the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda J. Walker

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to construct a new scale for measuring foreign language classroom anxiety (FLCA. It begun with the creation of an extended item pool generated by qualitative methods. Subsequent Rasch and semantic analyses led to the final 18-item Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Inventory (FLCAI. In comparison with the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (FLCAS, the FLCAI demonstrated more convincing evidence of unidimensionality and the optimal 5-point Likert scale functioned better. The FLCAI, while 55% the length of the FLCAS, thus more practical for classroom practitioners to administer and analyse, maintains its psychometric properties and covers a wider range on the construct continuum thus improving the degree of validity of the instrument. Finally, test anxiety was shown to be a component of FLCA.

  11. GABA content within the ventromedial prefrontal cortex is related to trait anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delli Pizzi, Stefano; Padulo, Caterina; Brancucci, Alfredo; Bubbico, Giovanna; Edden, Richard A.; Ferretti, Antonio; Franciotti, Raffaella; Manippa, Valerio; Marzoli, Daniele; Onofrj, Marco; Sepede, Gianna; Tartaro, Armando; Tommasi, Luca; Puglisi-Allegra, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) plays a key role in emotion processing and regulation. vmPFC dysfunction may lead to disinhibition of amygdala causing high anxiety levels. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) inter-neurons within vmPFC shape the information flow to amygdala. Thus, we hypothesize that GABA content within vmPFC could be relevant to trait anxiety. Forty-three healthy volunteers aged between 20 and 88 years were assessed for trait anxiety with the Subscale-2 of the State-Trait-Anxiety Inventory (STAI-Y2) and were studied with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to investigate GABA and Glx (glutamate+glutamine) contents within vmPFC. Total creatine (tCr) was used as internal reference. Partial correlations assessed the association between metabolite levels and STAI-Y2 scores, removing the effect of possible nuisance factors including age, educational level, volumes of gray matter and white matter within magnetic resonance spectroscopy voxel. We observed a positive relationship between GABA/tCr and STAI-Y2 scores. No significant relationships were found between Glx/tCr and STAI-Y2 and between tCr/water and STAI-Y2. No differences were found between males and females as regards to age, STAI-Y2, GABA/tCr, Glx/tCr, tCr/water, gray matter and white matter volumes. We suggest a close relationship between GABA content within vmPFC and trait anxiety providing new insights in the physiology of emotional brain. PMID:26722018

  12. Influence of Music on Preoperative Anxiety and Physiologic Parameters in Women Undergoing Gynecologic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrague, Leodoro J; McEnroe-Petitte, Denise M

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of music on anxiety levels and physiologic parameters in women undergoing gynecologic surgery. This study employed a pre- and posttest experimental design with nonrandom assignment. Ninety-seven women undergoing gynecologic surgery were included in the study, where 49 were allocated to the control group (nonmusic group) and 48 were assigned to the experimental group (music group). Preoperative anxiety was measured using the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) while noninvasive instruments were used in measuring the patients' physiologic parameters (blood pressure [BP], pulse [P], and respiration [R]) at two time periods. Women allocated in the experimental group had lower STAI scores (t = 17.41, p control group. This study provides empirical evidence to support the use of music during the preoperative period in reducing anxiety and unpleasant symptoms in women undergoing gynecologic surgery. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Evaluation of children's dental anxiety levels at a kindergarten and at a dental clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilinç, Gulser; Akay, Aynur; Eden, Ece; Sevinç, Nilgün; Ellidokuz, Hülya

    2016-08-18

    This study evaluated the dental anxiety levels of preschool children at a kindergarten and at a dental clinic. The anxiety levels of ninety 4-6-year-old (4.99 ± 0.81) preschool children were evaluated according to pulse rates, the facial image scale (FIS), the Venham picture test (VPT), and the Frankl behavior rating scale. The children's mothers were asked to complete the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI) forms 1 and 2 (STAI 2 and STAI 2). The sample t-test, Mann-Whitney U test, and Pearson's correlation test were used. A statistically significant difference was observed between the children's pulse rates when measured at the dental clinic and those when measured at the kindergarten (p dental clinic than in those at the kindergarten when assessed using FIS and VPT (p = 0.090 and p = 0.108, respectively). There was a statistically significant correlation between the transient anxiety levels (STAI 1) of mothers and the VPT scores of their children evaluated at the dental clinic (r = 0.506, p anxiety level of the mothers of males was found to be significantly higher (p = 0.033) than that of the mothers of females (STAI 2). Although the children had been informed about dentistry and were introduced to a dentist at the kindergarten, their anxiety levels seemingly increased as they arrived at the dental clinic. The significant increase observed in the children's pulse rates was a physical indicator that their anxiety levels had increased. It can be concluded that the children felt more anxious at the dental clinic that at the kindergarten.

  14. Evaluation of children’s dental anxiety levels at a kindergarten and at a dental clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulser KILINÇ

    Full Text Available Abstract This study evaluated the dental anxiety levels of preschool children at a kindergarten and at a dental clinic. The anxiety levels of ninety 4–6-year-old (4.99 ± 0.81 preschool children were evaluated according to pulse rates, the facial image scale (FIS, the Venham picture test (VPT, and the Frankl behavior rating scale. The children’s mothers were asked to complete the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI forms 1 and 2 (STAI 2 and STAI 2. The sample t-test, Mann-Whitney U test, and Pearson’s correlation test were used. A statistically significant difference was observed between the children’s pulse rates when measured at the dental clinic and those when measured at the kindergarten (p < 0.001. Although the results were not statistically significant, more negative facial expressions were observed in the children at the dental clinic than in those at the kindergarten when assessed using FIS and VPT (p = 0.090 and p = 0.108, respectively. There was a statistically significant correlation between the transient anxiety levels (STAI 1 of mothers and the VPT scores of their children evaluated at the dental clinic (r = 0.506, p < 0.001. The continuous anxiety level of the mothers of males was found to be significantly higher (p = 0.033 than that of the mothers of females (STAI 2. Although the children had been informed about dentistry and were introduced to a dentist at the kindergarten, their anxiety levels seemingly increased as they arrived at the dental clinic. The significant increase observed in the children’s pulse rates was a physical indicator that their anxiety levels had increased. It can be concluded that the children felt more anxious at the dental clinic that at the kindergarten.

  15. Psychometric properties of the Anxiety Inventory for Respiratory Disease in patients with COPD in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Lan; Tao, Yan-Xia; Suo, Xiu-Li; Li, Yue-Chuan; Liu, Fang; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Anxiety is a common comorbidity in patients with COPD in China, and it can significantly decrease patients' quality of life. Almost all anxiety measurements contain somatic items that can overlap with symptoms of COPD and side effects of medicines, which can lead to bias in measuring anxiety in patients with COPD. Therefore, a brief and disease-specific non-somatic anxiety measurement scale, the Anxiety Inventory for Respiratory Disease (AIR), which has been developed and validated in its English version, is needed for patients with COPD in China. A two-center study was conducted in two tertiary hospitals in Tianjin, China. A total of 181 outpatients with COPD (mean age 67.21±8.10 years, 32.6% women), who met the inclusion and exclusion criteria, were enrolled in the study. Test-retest reliability was examined using intraclass correlation coefficients. The internal consistency was calculated by Cronbach's α . Content validity was examined using the Content Validity Index (CVI), scale-level CVI/universal agreement, and scale-level CVI/average agreement (S-CVI/Ave). Besides, convergent validity and construct validity were also examined. The AIR-C (AIR-Chinese version) scale had high test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient =0.904) and internal consistency (Cronbach's α =0.914); the content validity of the AIR-C scale was calculated by CVI, scale-level CVI/universal agreement, and S-CVI/Ave at values of 0.89-1, 0.90, and 0.98, respectively. Meanwhile, the AIR-C scale had good convergent validity, correlating with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety ( r =0.81, P good reliability and validity for patients with COPD and can be used as a user-friendly and valid tool for measuring anxiety symptoms among patients with COPD in China.

  16. Citrus aurantium blossom and preoperative anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlaghi, Mahmood; Shabanian, Gholamreza; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Parvin, Neda; Saadat, Mitra; Akhlaghi, Mohsen

    2011-01-01

    Reducing anxiety is very important before operation. Preoperative visit and use of premedication are popular methods to achieve this goal, but the role of anxiolytic premedication remains unclear and postoperative side-effects may result from routine premedication. Citrus aurantium is used as an alternative medicine in some countries to treat anxiety, and recently the anxiolytic role of this medicinal plant was established in an animal model study. The aim of this study was to assess the anxiolytic effect of Citrus aurantium blossomon preoperative anxiety. We studied 60 ASA I patients undergoing minor operation. In a randomized double-blind design, two groups of 30 patients received one of the following oral premedication two hours before induction of anesthesia: 1) Citrus aurantium blossom distillate 1mL.kg(-1) (C-group); 2) Saline solution 1mL.kg(-1) as placebo (P-group). Anxiety was measured before and after premedication using the Spielberger state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI-state) and the Amsterdam preoperative anxiety and information scale (APAIS) before operation. After premedication, both the STAI-state and the APAIS scales were decreased in C-group (pCitrus aurantium blossom may be effective in terms of reduction in preoperative anxiety before minor operation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. The independent association of anxiety with non-cardiac chest pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smeijers, Loes; van de Pas, Harm; Nyklicek, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    the association between anxiety and NCCP is independent of personality factors. Participants with NCCP (N = 46; mean age 44.9 ± 14.7; 67% women) were evaluated for anxiety (Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory[STAI]), clinical measures and personality factors (negative affectivity and social inhibition......Non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP) is common in clinical cardiology. Anxiety is an important factor in NCCP because of its role in the neurobehavioural processes of pain regulation. It is not well established that which specific anxiety symptoms are disproportionately elevated in NCCP and whether...... measured by the Type D inventory). Item analysis was conducted for each of the anxiety symptoms. A healthy reference group was used for comparison purposes (N = 1233; mean age 55.2 ± 14.3; 50% women). Results showed that NCCP was associated with elevated anxiety levels (STAI ≥ 45) compared to the reference...

  18. The Responsiveness of the Anxiety Inventory for Respiratory Disease Scale Following Pulmonary Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohannes, Abebaw M; Dryden, Sheila; Hanania, Nicola A

    2016-07-01

    To date, there are no studies that have examined the responsiveness of the Anxiety Inventory for Respiratory disease (AIR) scale to any intervention in patients with COPD. We examined the responsiveness of the AIR scale in an 8-week pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) program. A total of 192 patients with COPD who were clinically stable and had a percent predicted FEV1 scale. Anxiety was measured using the self-administered AIR scale. The mean (SD) age was 71 (8.4) years and 51% were women. The AIR scale was responsive to PR with (AIR ≥ 8, high anxiety load) a mean change pre- vs post scores (12.25 vs 6.70, t = 7.56, P Anxiety is a predictor of noncompletion of PR. The AIR scale is sensitive to change following PR in patients with COPD and can be used in future studies evaluating interventions that reduce anxiety in this disease. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Performance Anxiety Disorder: Developing a Proposal for an Inventory, According to the Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy Rationale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Varvatsoulias

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This editorial aims at the presentation of a proposal regarding an inventory about performance anxiety disorder in a cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT framework. It provides some initial understanding as to that condition and how CBT could assist in the consideration of it counter to social anxiety disorder. At first, there is an introduction to performance anxiety in line to social anxiety/phobia and some questionnaires that have been developed which include performance anxiety as an element of social anxiety/phobia. Then, I am presenting the proposal, both in view to the rationale for that and the construction of an inventory with items drawn from elements that performance anxiety is related with, such as uneasiness about worry, self-focus issues of perfectionism and internal/external shame ideas. The statements in the inventory refer to hypothetical examples in life so inventory to be easily responded to, when administered to participants. This proposal closes with the conclusion that the questionnaire will be pilot-studied in the future by the author so the feasibility of it and/or possible changes to be considered when empirically studied.

  20. ANÁLISE DO FUNCIONAMENTO DIFERENCIAL DOS ITENS DO COMPETITIVE STATE ANXIETY INVENTORY-2

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    Daniel Bartholomeu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the differential item functioning of the Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2 items by sex in a sample of athletes searching for bias. 172 athletes, 61.6% males, aged 14-58 years old were investigated. The sports were basketball (14.5%, soccer (28.5%, Handball (22.7%, Jiu-jitsu (13.4% and volleyball (20.9%, and the research was performed in various clubs and teams in São Paulo. We analyzed the items and persons fit to the Rasch model and a few misfits were identified. That is, in some items, high concordance of low anxiety people occurred and vice versa. The differential item functioning by sex suggested approximately 40% of biased items to one of the groups and especially men were favored. New studies must be alert to this fact, avoiding problems regarding the validity of the instrument.

  1. An independent association of prenatal depression with wheezing and anxiety with rhinitis in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tuck Seng; Chen, Helen; Lee, Theresa; Teoh, Oon Hoe; Shek, Lynette P; Lee, Bee Wah; Chee, Cornelia; Godfrey, Keith M; Gluckman, Peter D; Kwek, Kenneth; Saw, Seang Mei; Chong, Yap-Seng; Meaney, Michael; Broekman, Birit F P; Chay, Oh Moh; Van Bever, Hugo; Goh, Anne

    2015-12-01

    Different maternal psychological states during pregnancy have been associated with wheeze-rhinitis-eczema symptoms in children. However, previous studies were limited and it was unclear whether the type of prenatal psychological state was associated with a particular symptom. We examined the association of maternal depression and anxiety during pregnancy with wheeze-rhinitis-eczema symptoms in infancy. In a longitudinal birth cohort (GUSTO) of 1152 mother-child pairs, wheeze-rhinitis-eczema symptoms in the infants during the first year of life were collected by parental report. Maternal depressive and anxiety symptoms were assessed at 26 weeks of gestation using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Logistic regression analyses were performed with adjustment for potential confounders. An increased risk of wheezing was found in infants of pregnant women with probable depression (EPDS ≥ 15) [odds ratio (OR) = 1.85 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10-3.12)], and an increased risk of rhinitis was associated with maternal anxiety [STAI state ≥ 41: OR = 1.42 (95% CI 1.04-1.93); STAI trait ≥ 43: OR = 1.38 (95% CI 1.01-1.88)]. After adjusting for known risk factors for the development of allergic disease, these associations remained significant [EPDS ≥ 15: adjusted OR = 2.09 (95% CI 1.05-4.19); STAI state ≥ 41: adjusted OR = 1.82 (95% CI 1.17-2.82); STAI trait ≥ 43: adjusted OR = 1.70 (95% CI 1.10-2.61)]. However, maternal psychological states were not associated with infantile eczema. This study suggests that there may be an independent effect of prenatal depression on wheezing and anxiety on rhinitis in infancy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Depression and anxiety are not related to nummular headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Peñacoba-Puente, Cecilia; López-López, Almudena; Valle, Begoña; Cuadrado, María Luz; Barriga, Francisco J; Pareja, Juan A

    2009-12-01

    Nummular headache (NH) is a clinical picture characterized by head pain that is exclusively felt in a round, elliptical, or oval area of the head. Although there is evidence supporting an organic origin for NH, some authors question this origin, hypothesizing a potential role for psychological factors. Our aims were to investigate the differences in anxiety and depression between NH patients and healthy controls, and to analyse if these conditions were related to pain parameters in NH patients. The Beck depression inventory (BDI-II) and the trait anxiety scale from state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI) were administered to 26 patients with NH and 34 comparable matched controls. No significant interactions between group (NH patients, controls) in either depression (U = 391; p = 0.443) or anxiety levels (U = 336; p = 0.113) were found. Both groups showed similar scores in the BDI-II (patients: 3.9 +/- 2.9; controls: 3.46 +/- 3.15) and STAI (patients: 17.23 +/- 10.3; controls: 13.5 +/- 7.9). Moreover, neither depression nor anxiety showed association with mean pain intensity, pain intensity in exacerbations, size of pain area, or pain frequency. Our study demonstrated that self-reported depression and anxiety were not related to the presence of NH. Further, longitudinal studies are still needed to elucidate the role of mood state in the course of NH.

  3. Psychometric properties of the Anxiety Inventory for Respiratory Disease in patients with COPD in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong X

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Xiao-Yan Dong,1,* Lan Wang,1,* Yan-Xia Tao,1 Xiu-li Suo,2 Yue-Chuan Li,2 Fang Liu,1 Yue Zhao,1 Qing Zhang1 1School of Nursing, Tianjin Medical University, 2Department of Respiratory Care, Tianjin Chest Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Anxiety is a common comorbidity in patients with COPD in China, and it can significantly decrease patients’ quality of life. Almost all anxiety measurements contain somatic items that can overlap with symptoms of COPD and side effects of medicines, which can lead to bias in measuring anxiety in patients with COPD. Therefore, a brief and disease-specific non-somatic anxiety measurement scale, the Anxiety Inventory for Respiratory Disease (AIR, which has been developed and validated in its English version, is needed for patients with COPD in China.Methods: A two-center study was conducted in two tertiary hospitals in Tianjin, China. A total of 181 outpatients with COPD (mean age 67.21±8.10 years, 32.6% women, who met the inclusion and exclusion criteria, were enrolled in the study. Test–retest reliability was examined using intraclass correlation coefficients. The internal consistency was calculated by Cronbach’s α. Content validity was examined using the Content Validity Index (CVI, scale-level CVI/universal agreement, and scale-level CVI/average agreement (S-CVI/Ave. Besides, convergent validity and construct validity were also examined.Results: The AIR-C (AIR-Chinese version scale had high test–retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient =0.904 and internal consistency (Cronbach’s α=0.914; the content validity of the AIR-C scale was calculated by CVI, scale-level CVI/universal agreement, and S-CVI/Ave at values of 0.89–1, 0.90, and 0.98, respectively. Meanwhile, the AIR-C scale had good convergent validity, correlating with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety (r=0.81, P<0.01, and there were

  4. The effects of music, white noise, and ambient noise on sedation and anxiety in patients under spinal anesthesia during surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilkkaya, Nazan Koylu; Ustun, Faik Emre; Sener, Elif Bengi; Kaya, Cengiz; Ustun, Yasemin Burcu; Koksal, Ersin; Kocamanoglu, Ismail Serhat; Ozkan, Fatih

    2014-10-01

    To compare effects of music, white noise, and ambient (background) noise on patient anxiety and sedation. Open, parallel, and randomized controlled trial. Seventy-five patients aged 18 to 60 years who were scheduled for surgical procedures under spinal anesthesia were randomly assigned to ambient noise (Group O), white noise (Group B), or music groups (Group M). We evaluated patients' anxiety and sedation levels via the Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation (OAA/S) scale and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) questionnaire. At 5 minutes before surgery, the STAI-State Anxiety Inventory (SA) value was significantly lower in Group M than the other groups. At 30-minute recovery, Group M showed significantly lower STAI-SA values than the other groups. Patient satisfaction was highest in Group M. OAA/S values were not significantly different between groups during any period (P > .05). We suggest that patient-selected music reduces perioperative anxiety and contributes to patient satisfaction during the perioperative period. Copyright © 2014 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Psychometric properties of the French Canadian version of the Geriatric Anxiety Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Alexandra; Landreville, Philippe; Gosselin, Patrick; Carmichael, Pierre-Hugues

    2018-01-01

    The Geriatric Anxiety Inventory (GAI) and a short form of this instrument (GAI-SF) were developed to assess the severity of anxiety symptoms in older adults in order to compensate for the lack of validated screening tools adapted to the elderly population. This study examined the psychometric properties of the French Canadian version of the GAI, in its complete (GAI-FC) and short form (GAI-FC-SF). A total of 331 community-dwelling seniors between 65 and 92 years old participated in this study. Both the GAI-FC and the GAI-FC-SF have sound psychometric properties with, respectively, a high internal consistency (α = .94 and .83), an adequate convergent validity (r = .50 to .86 with instruments known to evaluate constructs similar to the GAI or related to anxiety), a good test-retest reliability (r = .89 and .85), in addition to a single-factor structure. The results support the use of both the GAI-FC and the GAI-FC-SF. The GAI-FC-SF seems to be an interesting alternative to the GAI-FC as a screening tool when time available for assessment is limited.

  6. A confirmatory factor analysis of the Beck Anxiety Inventory in African American and European American young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, L Kevin; Williams, Sarah R; Mast, Benjamin T; Woodruff-Borden, Janet

    2009-04-01

    The anxiety literature is particularly sparse as it relates to African Americans, and there are few studies to date that have examined the factor structure of anxiety assessment tools within this population. The current study investigated the original two-factor structure of the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) in addition to two extant factor structures of the BAI in a non-clinical sample of African American and European American young adults. One hundred twenty one European American and 100 African American young adults completed the BAI. Results of a confirmatory factor analysis indicated that the previous factor structures of the Beck Anxiety Inventory do not provide the best fit for either the African American or the European American sample. An exploratory factor analysis revealed that an alternative, two-factor model provided the best fit for the sample, particularly for the African American sample. Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.

  7. Raised Anxiety Levels Among Outpatients Preparing to Undergo a Medical Imaging Procedure: Prevalence and Correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forshaw, Kristy L; Boyes, Allison W; Carey, Mariko L; Hall, Alix E; Symonds, Michael; Brown, Sandy; Sanson-Fisher, Rob W

    2018-04-01

    To examine the percentage of patients with raised state anxiety levels before undergoing a medical imaging procedure; their attribution of procedural-related anxiety or worry; and sociodemographic, health, and procedural characteristics associated with raised state anxiety levels. This prospective cross-sectional study was undertaken in the outpatient medical imaging department at a major public hospital in Australia, with institutional board approval. Adult outpatients undergoing a medical imaging procedure (CT, x-ray, MRI, ultrasound, angiography, or fluoroscopy) completed a preprocedural survey. Anxiety was measured by the short-form state scale of the six-item State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI: Y-6). The number and percentage of participants who reported raised anxiety levels (defined as a STAI: Y-6 score ≥ 33.16) and their attribution of procedural-related anxiety or worry were calculated. Characteristics associated with raised anxiety were examined using multiple logistic regression analysis. Of the 548 (86%) patients who consented to participate, 488 (77%) completed all STAI: Y-6 items. Half of the participants (n = 240; 49%) experienced raised anxiety, and of these, 48% (n = 114) reported feeling most anxious or worried about the possible results. Female gender, imaging modality, medical condition, first time having the procedure, and lower patient-perceived health status were statistically significantly associated with raised anxiety levels. Raised anxiety is common before medical imaging procedures and is mostly attributed to the possible results. Providing increased psychological preparation, particularly to patients with circulatory conditions or neoplasms or those that do not know their medical condition, may help reduce preprocedural anxiety among these subgroups. Copyright © 2018 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of Fathers\\' Anxiety Level in the First 8 Weeks after Mothers\\' Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Maleki

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Pregnancy and transition to parenthood lead to major psychological and social changes in women and men. This study was conducted with the purpose of determining the fathers' anxiety level in the first 8 weeks after mothers' delivery. Methods: In a descriptive cross-sectional study with stratified random sampling method, the anxiety level was evaluated in 403 fathers. The data collection tools were demographic characteristics questionnaire and standard State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S with cutoff of 45, which were completed after obtaining a written informed consent from each participant. Data were analyzed using Chi-square test and logistic regression model at 95% level of confidence. Results: The mean state and trait anxiety scores of fathers' were 34.04±9.24 and 34.57±9.80, respectively. Approximately 14% of the fathers had state and 15% had trait anxiety. There was a significant relationship between state anxiety of fathers and their income, and between trait anxiety and age, occupation, and having insurance. Fathers' anxiety level decreased with increasing age. the odds of having trait anxiety was higher in men with low education and no insurance. Conclusion: Considering the increasing level of fathers’ anxiety after mothers' delivery compared to the general population and its relationship with individual and social factors, it seems necessary to improve social supports, especially for young men.

  9. Psychological impact of first-trimester prevention for preeclampsia on anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeone, Serena; Lojo, Cristina; Garcia-Esteve, Lluïsa; Triunfo, Stefania; Crovetto, Francesca; Arranz, Angela; Gratacós, Eduard; Figueras, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine whether a first-trimester strategy of secondary prevention for preeclampsia increases anxiety in pregnant women. The anxiety levels of a cohort of women screened for preeclampsia at first trimester were measured by the Spielberg State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S) and compared between women screened as low and high risk. In a subgroup of women, the anxiety levels were additionally measured at second and third trimester. A General Linear Model (GLM) for repeated measurements was performed to adjust for potential confounders (age, nulliparity and socio-economic level). A total of 255 women (135 low-risk and 120 high-risk) were evaluated. No differences were found in the mean STAI-S scores between low-risk and high-risk women: 35 (SD 9.9) and 34.6 (SD 10.1); p = 0.77. The proportion of women with high anxiety was not significantly different between groups (28/134 [20.7%] vs 24/120 [20%]; p = 0.88). No differences were found in the subgroups (51 low-risk and 50 high-risk) in which the anxiety levels were also measured at second and third trimester: 35.8 (SD 8.8) vs 35.2 (SD 9.7), p = 0.74, and 37.2 (SD 9.4) vs 35.3 (SD 8.6), p = 0.3. These differences remained non-significant after adjustment for potential confounders. A strategy of first-trimester screening for preeclampsia does not increase maternal anxiety. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Shame and Anxiety Feelings of a Roma Population in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouva, M; Mentis, M; Kotrotsiou, S; Paralikas, Th; Kotrotsiou, E

    2015-12-01

    Shame is a crucial issue for Roma. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the severity of shame and anxiety feelings in a Roma population living in Greece and assess the differentiation of these feelings between Roma men and women. A quota sample of 194 Roma adult men and women living in Southern Greece was retrieved. The Experiences of Shame Scale (ESS), the Other As Shamer Scale (OAS) and the Spielberg's State/Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) questionnaires were used. Women scored statistically significantly higher than men on ESS, whereas men scored higher on OAS scale (52.27 ± 16.91 vs 45.42 ± 9.98 and 35.93 ± 16.94 vs 30.87 ± 13.72 respectively). Women scored higher than men in both STAI subscales, however significant differences were observed only in State Anxiety scale (48.83 ± 9.26 vs 43.20 ± 9.81). OAS total score was inversely related to state anxiety, whereas ESS total score was positive related to trait anxiety, all correlations being significant at p shame and anxiety. Cultural, social and minority issues contribute to feelings of inferiority and anxiety experience.

  11. EXAMINING HOW WHEELCHAIR BASKETBALL PLAYERS’ SELF-ESTEEM AND MOTIVATION LEVELS IMPACT ON THEIR STATE AND TRAIT ANXIETY LEVELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Kolayis

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to examine how wheelchair basketball players’ self-esteem and motivation levels impact on their state and trait anxiety levels. The Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory, Sport Motivation Scale and STAI (State Trait Anxiety Inventory were applied to the athletes before a competition. Data were collected from 124 athletes with disabilities. In this study, descriptive statistical techniques, Pearson product moment correlation and multiple regression analysis (enter method were used. Multiple regression analyses indicated that self-esteem, intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation and amotivation, all of which function as predicting variables, predicted 42% variance in state anxiety and 50% variance in trait anxiety. Motivation and self-esteem are the best predictors of trait and state anxiety among the premier league wheelchair basketball players. Finally, a review of factors that impact on anxiety and quality of performance such as motivation and self-esteem is provided.

  12. Characteristics of respiratory pattern and anxiety in rhythmic gymnasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akai, Lena; Ishizaki, Sakuko; Matsuoka, Masao; Homma, Ikuo

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore characteristics of breathing pattern and anxiety levels of athletes involved in women's rhythmic gymnastics. We tested 13 college level female rhythmic gymnasts (GG) from the same team, and compared their results with those of 26 non-athlete medical students (RG). Subjects were tested by a CO(2) rebreathing method using a gas mixture of 5% CO(2) and 95% O(2). The trait and state anxiety levels of the subjects were tested using the Spielberger's trait and state anxiety inventory (STAI). GG was significantly higher in both trait and state anxiety levels and, in comparison with RG, they also exhibited significantly less variance in the % contribution of change in frequency to the overall increase in minute ventilation during CO(2) rebreathing when compared to RG. Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between both trait and state anxiety and % contribution of frequency change in the RG.

  13. Obsessive beliefs in generalized anxiety disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guliz Senormanci

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown that obsessive beliefs are not specific for OCD, may also play a role in occurence of other anxiety disorders and depression. In these studies, anxiety disorders were evaluated together, with mixed samples of anxiety disorders. Obsessive beliefs are assessed in a sample of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD and compared with healthy control group. The current study compared 119 patients with GAD and 137 healthy controls. Written informed consent was provided and Obsessive Beliefs Questionnaire-44 (OBQ-44, Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7 scale, Beck Depression Inventory (BDE, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI were administered to each participant. Total scores and subscale scores for OBQ-44 in the GAD group were found to be significantly higher the control group (p0,05 except ‘perfectionism/intolerance of uncertainty’ subscale (p=0,000. According to of our study, ‘perfectionism/intolerance of uncertainty’ continues to be statistically significant when state anxiety, trait anxiety and depression levels were controlled respectively. The ‘perfectionism/intolerance of uncertainty’ may contribute to development and persistence of GAD symptoms and evaluation and development of approaches to change these beliefs may improve results of cognitive behavioral therapy in GAD patients. [JCBPR 2017; 6(3.000: 115-122

  14. The effect of emotional freedom technique on stress and anxiety in nursing students: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Susan Librizzi

    2016-05-01

    Stress and anxiety have been identified as significant issues experienced by student nurses during their education. Some studies have suggested that the stress experienced by nursing students is greater than that experienced by medical students, other non-nursing healthcare students, degreed nurses, and the female population in general. A recently introduced energy type therapy, emotional freedom technique (EFT), has shown some success in reducing symptoms of anxiety, stress, and fear in a variety of settings. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of EFT in decreasing anxiety and stress as a potential intervention to assist students in stress management. The study used a mixed method design of both qualitative and quantitative measures. Quantitatively, in a one group pretest-posttest design, participants received group instruction in the technique and were encouraged to repeat it daily. Self-reported anxiety was measured at baseline, and then weekly for four weeks using the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). The qualitative survey was completed by participants at the end of the study in order to capture a more subjective experience. The pilot study was conducted in a two-year college in the southeastern region of the United States. All enrolled nursing students in an associate degree nursing program were invited to participate. Participation was voluntary, resulting in an original convenience sample of thirty-nine nursing students (N=39). Data collection instruments included a demographic questionnaire, pretest State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). A qualitative questionnaire was also administered at the end of the four weeks. STAI and PSS were administered weekly. Data analysis using RMANOVA was performed at the second, third and the fourth week. Decreases in anxiety as measured on both the STAI and PSS were statistically significant (p=.05). For PSS, STAI state and trait

  15. Anxiety symptoms in crack cocaine and inhalant users admitted to a psychiatric hospital in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubaran, Carlos; Foresti, Katia; Thorell, Mariana Rossi; Franceschini, Paulo Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of psychiatric comorbidity among individuals with crack or inhalant dependence is frequently observed. The objective of this study was to investigate anxiety symptoms among crack cocaine and inhalant users in southern Brazil. The study investigated two groups of volunteers of equal size (n=50): one group consisted of crack cocaine users, and the other group consisted of inhalant users. Research volunteers completed the Portuguese versions of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A), and Self-Report Questionnaire (SRQ). Both crack and inhalant users experience significant symptoms of anxiety. Inhalant users presented significantly more anxiety symptoms than crack users according to the HAM-A questionnaire only. In contrast to the results of the HAM-A, the STAI failed to demonstrate a significant difference between the two groups of substance users. SRQ scores revealed that crack and inhalants users had significant degrees of morbidity. A significant difference regarding anxiety symptomatology, especially state anxiety, was observed among inhalant and crack users. Anxiety and overall mental psychopathology were significantly correlated in this sample. The results indicate that screening initiatives to detect anxiety and additional psychiatric comorbidities among crack and inhalant users are feasible and relevant. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Aromatherapy for reducing colonoscopy related procedural anxiety and physiological parameters: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Pei-Hsin; Peng, Yen-Chun; Lin, Yu-Ting; Chang, Chi-Sen; Ou, Ming-Chiu

    2010-01-01

    Colonoscopy is generally tolerated, some patients regarding the procedure as unpleasant and painful and generally performed with the patient sedated and receiving analgesics. The effect of sedation and analgesia for colonoscopy is limited. Aromatherapy is also applied to gastrointestinal endoscopy to reduce procedural anxiety. There is lack of information about aromatherapy specific for colonoscopy. In this study, we aimed to performed a randomized controlled study to investigate the effect of aromatherapy on relieve anxiety, stress and physiological parameters of colonoscopy. A randomized controlled trail was carried out and collected in 2009 and 2010. The participants were randomized in two groups. Aromatherapy was then carried out by inhalation of Sunflower oil (control group) and Neroli oil (Experimental group). The anxiety index was evaluated by State Trait Anxiety Inventory-state (STAI-S) score before aromatherapy and after colonoscopy as well as the pain index for post-procedural by visual analogue scale (VAS). Physiological indicators, such as blood pressure (systolic and diastolic blood pressure), heart rate and respiratory rate were evaluated before and after aromatherapy. Participates in this study were 27 subjects, 13 in control group and 14 in Neroli group with average age 52.26 +/- 17.79 years. There was no significance of procedural anxiety by STAI-S score and procedural pain by VAS. The physiological parameters showed a significant lower pre- and post-procedural systolic blood pressure in Neroli group than control group. Aromatic care for colonoscopy, although with no significant effect on procedural anxiety, is an inexpensive, effective and safe pre-procedural technique that could decrease systolic blood pressure.

  17. Application of the Geriatric Anxiety Inventory-Chinese Version (GAI-CV) to older people in Beijing communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yue; Xin, Tao; Wang, Dahua; Tang, Dan

    2014-03-01

    The Geriatric Anxiety Inventory (GAI) was developed to assess anxiety in older adults. The objectives of this work were as follows: (a) to analyze the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the GAI (GAI-CV), and (b) to explore the extent of anxiety and related factors in the elderly Chinese residents of Beijing. Participants in this study included 1,047 people (59.4% female) more than 60 years old who were living in the community. They were randomly selected from 15 communities in Beijing. Basic information was collected. Anxiety was measured using the GAI-CV, the Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). The GAI-CV exhibited good internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.94) and demonstrated good concurrent validity against the SAS (r = 0.52, p = 0.018) and the BAI (r = 0.560, p = 0.000). Item response theory (IRT) analyses showed that the items of the GAI-CV exhibited high difficulty (0.97-2) and discrimination parameters (1.91-5.33). The items exhibited information parameters greater than 1.25 with the exceptions of items 2, 12, and 18. The GAI-CV scores were significantly associated with gender, age, and chronic disease. However, no significant differences due to marriage or education were found. The GAI is a new scale that was specifically designed to measure anxiety in older people. The results of this study suggest that the GAI-CV had good psychometric properties, but some items need to be modified. IRT analyses indicated that the GAI-CV provided good measures of anxiety across the moderately high to very high levels. The GAI-CV may be a useful instrument for further research studies aimed at analyzing high-level anxiety among older adults in China.

  18. Music does not alter anxiety in patients with suspected lung cancer undergoing bronchoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Elisabeth; Pedersen, Carsten M; Larsen, Klaus R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of music to relieve anxiety has been examined in various studies, but the results are inconclusive. METHODS: From April to October 2015, 160 patients undergoing examination of pulmonary nodules were randomly assigned to MusiCure or no music. MusiCure was administered through e...... earplugs to ensure blinding of the staff and was played from admission to the operating theatre to the end of the bronchoscopy. Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) was administered on admission, immediately before bronchoscopy, and on discharge. Secondary outcomes were p...

  19. A Program Aimed at Reducing Anxiety in Pregnant Women Diagnosed With a Small-for-Gestational-Age Fetus: Evaluative Findings From a Spanish Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arranz Betegón, Ángela; García, Marta; Parés, Sandra; Montenegro, Gala; Feixas, Georgina; Padilla, Nelly; Camacho, Alba; Goberna, Josefina; Botet, Francesc; Gratacós, Eduard

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of anxiety-reducing techniques including music therapy, sophrology, and creative visualization in pregnant women with a fetus diagnosed as small for gestational age and improved fetal and neonatal weight. This was a quasi-experimental study with a nonrandomized clinical trial design. We compared 2 groups of pregnant women with a fetus diagnosed as small for gestational age with no abnormalities on Doppler studies. The control group (n = 93) received standard care, and the intervention group (n = 65), in addition to standard care, underwent a program of 6 sessions led by a midwife or nurse who taught anxiety-reduction techniques. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) including trait and state subscales were completed by both groups at the start of the study, and only the STAI-State subscale was completed again at the end of the study. Comparisons between the 2 groups regarding fetal weight and centile and maternal STAI scores were performed using the t test and the χ test. There were no significant differences in the STAI-Trait scores between the 2 groups. There were statistically significant differences in the intervention group's STAI-State score percentiles between the start and the end of the study, being lower at the end of the study (P < .001). There were significant differences between the 2 groups in fetal weight trajectory on the basis of fetal weight: the intervention group had a larger weight gain (P < .005). The program designed to reduce anxiety in pregnant women was effective at reducing anxiety in the women in the intervention group, leading to a favorable fetal weight trajectory in this group.

  20. The role of ethnic identity in symptoms of anxiety and depression in African Americans

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    Williams, Monnica T.; Chapman, L. Kevin; Wong, Judy; Turkheimer, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Ethnic identity has been identified as a factor contributing to resilience and coping in African Americans. Ethnic identity includes positive feelings of ethnic affirmation and belonging, appreciation for one’s ethnic identity, and increased ethnic behaviors. This study examines the role of ethnic identity in symptoms of anxiety and depression. Participants were an adult student and community sample (N=572), administered the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Center for Epidemiologic Studies of Depression Scale (CES-D), State Trait Anxiety Inventory – state portion (STAI-S), and Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure (MEIM). Compared to European Americans, African Americans reported significantly greater depression and more negative state anxiety, as well as higher levels of ethnic identity. For African Americans, higher ethnic identity was correlated to reduced anxiety and depression, whereas this was not true for European Americans. Findings support the proposition that a strong, positive ethnic identity may serve a protective role among African Americans by moderating the relationship between discriminatory experiences and psychological well-being. An Afrocentric perspective may also contribute to reduced anxiety due to a greater emphasis on a present versus future-oriented worldview. Clinical implications and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:22513043

  1. Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS: validation in a Greek general hospital sample

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    Patapis Paulos

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS has been used in several languages to assess anxiety and depression in general hospital patients with good results. Methods The HADS was administered to 521 participants (275 controls and 246 inpatients and outpatients of the Internal Medicine and Surgical Departments in 'Attikon' General Hospital in Athens. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI were used as 'gold standards' for depression and anxiety respectively. Results The HADS presented high internal consistency; Cronbach's α cofficient was 0.884 (0.829 for anxiety and 0.840 for depression and stability (test-retest intraclass correlation coefficient 0.944. Factor analysis showed a two-factor structure. The HADS showed high concurrent validity; the correlations of the scale and its subscales with the BDI and the STAI were high (0.722 – 0.749. Conclusion The Greek version of HADS showed good psychometric properties and could serve as a useful tool for clinicians to assess anxiety and depression in general hospital patients.

  2. Physical fitness is associated with anxiety levels in women with fibromyalgia: the al-Ándalus project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba-Torrecilla, S; Aparicio, V A; Soriano-Maldonado, A; Estévez-López, F; Segura-Jiménez, V; Álvarez-Gallardo, I; Femia, P; Delgado-Fernández, M

    2016-04-01

    To assess the independent associations of individual physical fitness components with anxiety in women with fibromyalgia and to test which physical fitness component shows the greatest association. This population-based cross-sectional study included 439 women with fibromyalgia (age 52.2 ± 8.0 years). Anxiety symptoms were measured with the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and the anxiety item of the Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR). Physical fitness was assessed through the Senior Fitness Test battery and handgrip strength test. Overall, lower physical fitness was associated with higher anxiety levels (all, p anxiety symptoms and physical fitness components adjusted for age, body fat percentage and anxiolytics intake showed that the back scratch test (b = -0.18), the chair sit-and-reach test (b = -0.12; p = 0.027) and the 6-min walk test (b = -0.02; p = 0.024) were independently and inversely associated with STAI. The back scratch test and the arm- curl test were associated with FIQR-anxiety (b = -0.05; p anxiety in women with fibromyalgia, regardless of the fitness component evaluated. In particular, upper-body flexibility was an independent indicator of anxiety levels, followed by cardiorespiratory fitness and muscular strength.

  3. The Myocardial Perfusion Scintigraphy in Predicting Risk for Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with Anxiety and Depression Symptoms

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    Billur Çalışkan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: An association between psychological factors and cardiovascular disease, has long been suspected. However it is not clear whether chest pain is caused by emotional distress or whether coronary spasms are caused by the onset of coronary artery disease (CAD. We aimed to predict the risk for CAD in patients referred to myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI with chest pain using depression, stress, and anxiety symptoms. METHODS: The emotional status of all patients was evaluated using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-A and HADS-D, the State and Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-1 and STAI-2, the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS, and the Anxiety Sensitivity Index-3 (ASI. Myocardial perfusion was measured using a 17-segment model and 5-point scoring system (0: normal perfusion; 4: no perfusion. RESULTS: MPI revealed reversible perfusion defects in 24 of 141 patients and no perfusion defects in 117 patients. The STAI-2 and HADS-A and HADS-D scores were significantly higher in patients with myocardial ischemia than in those without (STAI-2: 50.8 ± 7.5 vs. 46.3 ± 7.1, respectively; p = 0.008; HADS-A: 9.5 ± 3.9 vs. 7.8 ± 3.4, respectively; p = 0.033; HADS-D: 8.7 ± 3.0 vs. 7.3 ± 3.0, respectively; p = 0.05. Unadjusted correlation analysis showed that there was statistically significant correlation between reversible perfusion defects and anxiety scores (r=0.186, p= 0.029. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: The patients with symptoms of depression and high-trait anxiety may be at higher risk of myocardial ischemia than patients without such symptoms. Thus, the emotional status of patients should be taken into consideration during clinical evaluation for CAD.

  4. The Intolerance of Uncertainty Inventory: Validity and Comparison of Scoring Methods to Assess Individuals Screening Positive for Anxiety and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauriola, Marco; Mosca, Oriana; Trentini, Cristina; Foschi, Renato; Tambelli, Renata; Carleton, R Nicholas

    2018-01-01

    Intolerance of Uncertainty is a fundamental transdiagnostic personality construct hierarchically organized with a core general factor underlying diverse clinical manifestations. The current study evaluated the construct validity of the Intolerance of Uncertainty Inventory, a two-part scale separately assessing a unitary Intolerance of Uncertainty disposition to consider uncertainties to be unacceptable and threatening (Part A) and the consequences of such disposition, regarding experiential avoidance, chronic doubt, overestimation of threat, worrying, control of uncertain situations, and seeking reassurance (Part B). Community members ( N = 1046; Mean age = 36.69 ± 12.31 years; 61% females) completed the Intolerance of Uncertainty Inventory with the Beck Depression Inventory-II and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Part A demonstrated a robust unidimensional structure and an excellent convergent validity with Part B. A bifactor model was the best fitting model for Part B. Based on these results, we compared the hierarchical factor scores with summated ratings clinical proxy groups reporting anxiety and depression symptoms. Summated rating scores were associated with both depression and anxiety and proportionally increased with the co-occurrence of depressive and anxious symptoms. By contrast, hierarchical scores were useful to detect which facets mostly separated between for depression and anxiety groups. In sum, Part A was a reliable and valid transdiagnostic measure of Intolerance of Uncertainty. The Part B was arguably more useful for assessing clinical manifestations of Intolerance of Uncertainty for specific disorders, provided that hierarchical scores are used. Overall, our study suggest that clinical assessments might need to shift toward hierarchical factor scores.

  5. Effect of olfactory stimulation with essential oils on cardiovascular reactivity during the moving beans task in stroke patients with anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iokawa, Kazuaki; Kohzuki, Masahiro; Sone, Toshimasa; Ebihara, Satoru

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the effect of olfactory stimulation with essential oils on cardiovascular reactivity during the "moving beans" rehabilitation task in stroke patients with anxiety. Twenty-eight stroke patients participated in this study. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured before and after finger movement tasks (e.g., moving beans and the Purdue pegboard test). Olfactory stimulation with lavender oil, grapefruit oil, and distilled water were conducted during finger tasks. Anxiety was assessed using the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI)-Y2 before the finger movement tasks. There were no significant changes in blood pressure or heart rate activity in both finger movement tasks when stimulation of lavender oil, grapefruit oil, and distilled water was applied. However, the change values of Δ diastolic blood pressure (DBP) associated with the moving beans task indicated a significant interaction between olfactory stimulations and the groups of STAI-Y2 scores (high vs low) (p=0.03), without main effects in the olfactory stimulations and the groups of STAI-Y2 scores. Olfactory stimulation with lavender and grapefruit oil may repress the exaggerated DBP response during the moving beans task in stroke patients with higher levels of trait anxiety symptoms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Does watching a video on third molar surgery increase patients' anxiety level?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazancioglu, Hakki Oguz; Tek, Mustafa; Ezirganli, Seref; Demirtas, Nihat

    2015-03-01

    To identify the effects of watching live taping of third molar removal on patients' anxiety levels before and after extraction. This study was based on a prospective, cross-sectional, observational investigation of the different patient education techniques about the effect of third molar removal on patients' anxiety level. A total of 333 patients were randomized into three groups: two study groups (for group 1, basic information was given verbally; for group 2, which was the study group, basic information was given verbally and through a movie on third molar extraction); and a control group (basic information was given verbally; it did not include information on operative procedures and recovery). Anxiety levels were assessed by using the Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS) and the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Pain was assessed with a visual analog scale. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS 16.0. Group 2 patients were significantly more anxious before the surgical procedure, and the most significant decreases in DAS and STAI scores were observed in that group. The age, surgery time, and education level were not correlated with anxiety or pain levels; however, female patients had high levels of anxiety (P third molar surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Childhood parental bonding affects adulthood trait anxiety through self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimura, Akiyoshi; Takaesu, Yoshikazu; Nakai, Yukiei; Murakoshi, Akiko; Ono, Yasuyuki; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Kusumi, Ichiro; Inoue, Takeshi

    2017-04-01

    The association between trait anxiety and parental bonding has been suggested. However, the mechanism remains uncertain and there is no study focused on general adult population. We investigated the association and the mechanism between childhood parental bonding and adulthood trait anxiety in the general adult population. A cross-sectional retrospective survey was conducted in 2014 with 853 adult volunteers from the general population. The Parental Bonding Instrument, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory Form Y (STAI-Y) were self-administered. Structural equation modelling was used for the analysis. Childhood parental bonding affected adulthood trait anxiety indirectly mediated by self-esteem. Trait anxiety was decreased by parental care and increased by parental overprotection through self-esteem. This model explained 51.1% of the variability in STAI-Y trait anxiety scores. This study suggests an important role of self-esteem as a mediator between childhood parental bonding and adulthood trait anxiety. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. The level of emotion control, anxiety, and self-efficacy in the elderly in Bialystok, Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulski, Mateusz; Cybulski, Lukasz; Krajewska-Kulak, Elzbieta; Cwalina, Urszula

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the level of emotion control, anxiety, and self-efficacy in the inhabitants of Bialystok (Poland) aged above 60. The study included 300 people above the age of 60, inhabitants of Bialystok and its neighborhoods: 100 residents of public nursing home, 100 participants of the University of the Third Age in Bialystok, and 100 students of the University of Healthy Senior. The three standardized psychometric scales were used in the study: Courtauld Emotional Control Scale (CECS), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES). The median of the overall score of CECS equaled 54 points, which is considered average in terms of negative emotions acceptance. The mean score of perceiving anxiety as the condition of STAI (X1) was 48 points, while anxiety as a trait of STAI (X2) was 49 points. The overall score for GSES proved that respondents had a subjective feeling of self-efficacy at the level of 29 points out of 40 points possible, which means that their self-efficacy was rather at the high level in their self-assessment. In women, a negative correlation was revealed between the sense of self-efficacy and age ( r =-0.320, P correlation was reported between the sense of self-efficacy and age among the elderly residents of public nursing home ( r =-0.408, P correlation between anger control (CECS) and the sense of anxiety as a trait of STAI (X2) was found among participants of the University of Healthy Senior ( r =0.307, P =0.002). The social and demographic features (gender, group affiliation, age) analyzed in the study were found to be correlated significantly with the control of negative emotions, the level of anxiety, and self-efficacy. The study group affiliation was a key variable conditioning the relations between the analyzed features. The elderly residents of public nursing home belonged to the group distinguishing negatively compared to other two study groups. The study respondents were characterized

  9. Effects of computer-based immediate feedback on foreign language listening comprehension and test-associated anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shu-Ping; Su, Hui-Kai; Lee, Shin-Da

    2012-06-01

    This study investigated the effects of immediate feedback on computer-based foreign language listening comprehension tests and on intrapersonal test-associated anxiety in 72 English major college students at a Taiwanese University. Foreign language listening comprehension of computer-based tests designed by MOODLE, a dynamic e-learning environment, with or without immediate feedback together with the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI) were tested and repeated after one week. The analysis indicated that immediate feedback during testing caused significantly higher anxiety and resulted in significantly higher listening scores than in the control group, which had no feedback. However, repeated feedback did not affect the test anxiety and listening scores. Computer-based immediate feedback did not lower debilitating effects of anxiety but enhanced students' intrapersonal eustress-like anxiety and probably improved their attention during listening tests. Computer-based tests with immediate feedback might help foreign language learners to increase attention in foreign language listening comprehension.

  10. Commentary on “Music Does Not Alter Anxiety in Patients with Suspected Lung Cancer Undergoing Bronchoscopy: A Randomised Controlled Trial” – European Clinical Respiratory Journal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Elisabeth; Pedersen, Carsten Michel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Not only may the prognosis of lung cancer provoke fear in patients with suspected lung cancer undergoing bronchoscopy, but also the thought of undergoing bronchoscopy may provoke fear [1]. This can be fear of pain, of shortness of breath and also fear of death in connection...... with the bronchoscopy (Figure 1). depression-anxiety-Department-Respiratory-Medicine Figure 1: Patient from Department of Respiratory Medicine, Bispebjerg Hosptial, who had supporting colleagues who printed this t-shirt for her. This patient expressed major worries about the bronchoscopy she had to undergo. The aim...... and of the effect of music on bronchoscopy-related anxiety [2-5]. The patients included in our study had state-anxiety scores ranging from no anxiety to considerable anxiety, with a median state anxiety score at 39 (Spielberger’s State-Trait Anxiety Inventory - STAI) (Figure 2). depression...

  11. EFFECT OF HYPNO-PRESSURE ON ANXIETY IN PATIENTS WITH CARDIOVASCULAR DISORDER

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    Dwi Antara Nugraha

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of the combination of hypnotherapy and acupressure (hypno-pressure on anxiety levels in patients with cardiovascular disorders. Methods: A quasy-experimental research with pretest-posttest with control group design was used. Fifty-six respondents were selected using purposive sampling in this study, which 28 respondents were randomly assigned in the experiment and control group. The Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI Form Y was used to measure anxiety. Paired t-test and Independent t-test were used for data analysis. Results: There was a significant effect of hypno-pressure on the decrease of anxiety levels in patients with cardiovascular disorder with p-value 0.000 (<0.05, t = 7.217, and effect size of 1.96. Conclusion: Hypno-pressure could reduce anxiety levels in patients with cardiovascular disorder.

  12. A short-term, comprehensive, yoga-based lifestyle intervention is efficacious in reducing anxiety, improving subjective well-being and personality

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    Raj Kumar Yadav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the efficacy of a short-term comprehensive yoga-based lifestyle intervention in reducing anxiety, improving subjective well-being and personality. Materials and Methods: The study is a part of an ongoing larger study at a tertiary care hospital. Participants (n=90 included patients with chronic diseases attending a 10-day, yoga-based lifestyle intervention program for prevention and management of chronic diseases, and healthy controls (n=45 not attending any such intervention. Primary Outcome Measures: Change in state and trait anxiety questionnaire (STAI-Y; 40 items, subjective well-being inventory (SUBI; 40 items, and neuroticism extraversion openness to experience five factor personality inventory revised (NEO-FF PI-R; 60 items at the end of intervention. Results: Following intervention, the STAI-Y scores reduced significantly (P0.01 at Day 10 versus Day 1. Similarly NEO-FF PI-R scores improved significantly (P<0.001 at Day 10 versus Day 1. Control group showed an increase in STAI-Y while SUBI and NEO-FF PI-R scores remained comparable at Day 10 versus Day 1. Conclusions: The observations suggest that a short-term, yoga-based lifestyle intervention may significantly reduce anxiety and improve subjective well-being and personality in patients with chronic diseases.

  13. The NEO Five-Factor Inventory: Latent Structure and Relationships with Dimensions of Anxiety and Depressive Disorders in a Large Clinical Sample

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    Rosellini, Anthony J.; Brown, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    The present study evaluated the latent structure of the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO FFI) and relations between the five-factor model (FFM) of personality and dimensions of "DSM-IV" anxiety and depressive disorders (panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder [GAD], obsessive-compulsive disorder, social phobia [SOC], major depressive disorder…

  14. The Effect of 1,8-Cineole Inhalation on Preoperative Anxiety: A Randomized Clinical Trial

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    Ka Young Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of inhalation of eucalyptus oil and its constituents on anxiety in patients before selective nerve root block (SNRB. This study was a randomized controlled trial carried out in 62 patients before SNRB. The patients were randomized to inhale limonene, 1,8-cineole, or eucalyptus oil, each at concentrations of 1% vol/vol in almond oil or almond oil (control. Anxiety-visual analog scale (A-VAS, state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI, profile of mood states (POMS, pain-visual analog scale (P-VAS, blood pressure, and pulse rate were measured before and after inhalation prior to SNRB. Measures of anxiety, including A-VAS (P<0.001, STAI (P=0.005, and POMS (P<0.001, were significantly lower in 1,8-cineole than in the control group and significantly greater in 1,8-cineole than in the eucalyptus group in A-VAS. P-VAS was significantly lower after than before inhalation of limonene, 1,8-cineole, and eucalyptus, despite having no significant difference in the four groups compared with control group. 1,8-Cineole, a major constituent of eucalyptus, was effective in decreasing anxiety before SNRB. The present findings suggest that inhalation of 1,8-cineole may be used to relieve anxiety before, during, and after various operations, in addition to SNRB.

  15. Reducing stress and anxiety in caregivers of lung transplant patients: benefits of mindfulness meditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, J; Spadaro, K C; Choi, J; Hoffman, L A; Blazeck, A M

    2014-01-01

    Caregivers are a vital resource in the care of transplant candidates or recipients. However, few strategies have been tested that attempt to decrease the stress and anxiety they commonly encounter. To test the feasibility of using mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) techniques to decrease stress and anxiety in caregivers of lung transplant candidates/recipients who required admission to an acute care facility. 30 caregivers of lung transplant candidates/recipients were recruited during hospitalization of their significant other. Each completed the perceived stress scale (PSS) and state trait anxiety inventory (STAI) before and 4 weeks after receiving a DVD that demonstrated MBSR techniques. Participants were asked to practice MBSR techniques for 5-15 min a day for 4 weeks. The participants had a mean±SD age of 55.6±13.6 years; 77% of participants were female and 93% Caucasian. The mean PSS and STAI (trait and anxiety) scores of caregivers were higher than population norms pre- and post-intervention. Scores for caregivers who stated they watched the entire DVD and practiced MBSR techniques as requested (n=15) decreased significantly from pre- to post-testing for perceived stress (p=0.001), state anxiety (p=0.003) and trait anxiety (p=0.006). Scores for those who watched some or none of the DVD (n=15) did not change significantly. Caregivers can benefit from stress reduction techniques using MBSR.

  16. Anxiety and assertiveness in the relatives of alcoholics and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuckit, M A

    1982-06-01

    The Rathus Assertiveness Schedule (RAS) and the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory A-Trait Scale (STAI) were administered to male university students and nonacademic staff. Subjects classified as "at-risk" on the basis of a history of alcoholism in a first-degree relative (N = 30) were compared to controls with no such family histories (N = 30). The two groups were matched on demographic variables and drinking history. No significant differences were found between the groups on the traits of anxiety or assertiveness, although the subjects hypothesized to be at higher risk for alcoholism showed a trend toward higher assertiveness scores. These findings are not consistent with the hypothesis that higher levels of anxiety and/or lower levels of assertiveness predispose an individual toward the development of alcoholism.

  17. Pre-treatment anxiety in a dental hygiene recall population: a cross-sectional pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Deborah; Thoma, Myriam V; Schmidlin, Patrick R; Attin, Thomas; Ehlert, Ulrike; Nater, Urs M

    2016-03-24

    Increased levels of anxiety may affect a patient's receptiveness to treatment, health care information and behaviour modification. This study was undertaken to assess pre-treatment anxiety in a dental hygiene recall population maintaining a schedule of regular preventive care appointments. The sample population consisted of 46 consecutive adult recall patients waiting for their regularly scheduled dental hygiene appointment. Pre-treatment state (current) anxiety was assessed using the State-Trait-Anxiety Inventory (STAI), State form; dental anxiety with the Hierarchical Anxiety Questionnaire (HAQ); subjective stress using a visual analogue scale (VAS); and mood/alertness/calmness using the Multidimensional Mood Questionnaire (MDMQ). Two distinct groups, based on state anxiety scores, were formed; one displaying increased levels of pre-treatment anxiety (n = 14), the other low anxiety (n = 32). The HA group was characterized by significantly higher dental anxiety and subjective stress levels prior to treatment; as well as worse mood, lower alertness, and less calmness in the dental office setting. There was no correlation between anxiety level and years in dental hygiene recall. A high level of pre-treatment anxiety was present in about one third of the sample population. The prevalence of this anxiety demonstrates the need for both early recognition and patient management strategies (psychological and pain management) to positively influence their treatment experience.

  18. Screening for depression and anxiety among older Chinese immigrants living in Western countries: The use of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and the Geriatric Anxiety Inventory (GAI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaoping; Haralambous, Betty; Pachana, Nancy A; Bryant, Christina; LoGiudice, Dina; Goh, Anita; Dow, Briony

    2016-03-01

    Depression and anxiety are two common mental health problems among older people. There is evidence that using well-validated screening tools can improve detection of depression and anxiety among this group. The review explored the use of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and the Geriatric Anxiety Inventory (GAI) for screening depression and anxiety among older Chinese immigrants, one of the largest and fastest growing groups of older immigrants in Western society. It focused on the GDS and GAI because both are designed specifically for older people. Online literature searches were conducted in MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO. A narrative approach was used to review included papers. A total of 21 articles were included. There were limited data on anxiety among older Chinese immigrants, with only one unpublished report identified. There were 13 studies (20 articles) using the GDS with this group. Results of these studies indicated that the GDS is a reliable tool in this population; however, there was limited validity data. Two versions of the GDS-15 have been used with older Chinese immigrants, including the standard GDS-15 and Mui's GDS-15. Prevalence of depression ranged between 20% and 30% in most reviewed studies. Results of this review have practical implications for clinicians in their use of these tools with older Chinese immigrants in Western countries, such as the different GDS versions. It also suggests a number of directions for future research, such as the inclusion of clinical samples and consideration of the diversity within this group. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. The relationship between preoperative anxiety levels and vasovagal incidents during the administration of spinal anesthesia

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    Mürsel Ekinci

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: It was aimed to investigate the relationship between preoperative anxiety and vasovagal symptoms observed during the administration of spinal anesthesia in patients undergoing surgery in the perianal and inguinal regions. Methods: The study included patients with planned surgery for inguinal hernia repair, anal fissure, hemorrhoid and pilonidal sinus excision. The study included a total of 210 patients of ASA I-II, aged 18-65 years. Patients were evaluated in respect of demographic characteristics, smoking and alcohol consumption, ASA grade and educational level. Correlations were evaluated between the number of attempts at spinal anesthesia and anesthesia history with vasovagal symptoms and educational level, gender, smoking and alcohol consumption and anesthesia history with anxiety scores. The instant (transient state anxiety inventory part of the Transient State/Trait Anxiety Inventory (State Trait Anxiety Inventory - STAI was used to determine the anxiety levels of the participants. Clinical findings of peripheral vasodilation, hypotension, bradycardia and asystole observed during the administration of spinal anesthesia were recorded. Results: Vasovagal incidences during the administration of spinal anesthesia were seen to increase in cases of high anxiety score, male gender, and an absence of anesthesia history. Educational level and the number of spinal needle punctures were not found to have any effect on vasovagal incidents. Conclusion: The determination of causes triggering vasovagal incidents seen during the application of spinal anesthesia, better patient information of regional anesthesia implementations and anxiety relief with preoperative anxiolytic treatment will help to eliminate potential vasovagal incidents.

  20. Identifying sub-categories of social fears using an alternative factor analytic structure of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayiotou, Georgia; Michaelides, Michalis P; Theodorou, Marios; Neophytou, Klavdia

    2017-05-01

    This study evaluates an alternative factor structure of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (Turner et al., 1989), a widely used measure of social anxiety. Existing models ignore variance due to the different social contexts where social fears are expressed. Taking a different approach to scoring than previous studies, this investigation proposes a new model, which, in addition to 4-5 symptom dimensions, is able to capture the situations (strangers, authority figures, members of the opposite sex and people in general) that are of concern to the examinee. To test this model, all 96 items of the Social Phobia scale, rather than the average of the sub-items of its 23 questions were subjected to confirmatory factor analysis. The model shows good fit and is superior to models ignoring the "situation" factors, which show good predictive validity in respect to real life demographics. Utilization of all single questions of the SPAI can capture a wider range of social fears related to social anxiety than using the average of the items, which has implications for the understanding and clinical assessment of social anxiety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of anxiety level changes during the first three months of orthodontic treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Yıldırım, Ersin; Karacay, Seniz

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the changes in dental anxiety, state anxiety, and trait anxiety levels of patients and their parents after 3 months of active orthodontic treatment. Methods We evaluated 120 patients and one parent of each patient. State Anxiety (STAI-S), Trait Anxiety (STAI-T), and Corah's Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS) were administered before orthodontic treatment (T1) and after 3 months of treatment (T2). Differences in scores between T1 and T2 were compared using paired-sample t-tests ...

  2. Psychological distress, anxiety and depression among nursing students in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapountzi-Krepia D.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It is usually observed that nursing students undergo tremendous stress during various stages oftheir course but the knowledge about the stress process and depressive symptoms in this population is limited. TheAim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of psychological distress, anxiety and depression amongnursing students in Greece. For that purpose 170 nursing students (34 males, 136 females of the Department of Nursingof the Technological Educational Institute of Thessaloniki completed 3 self-report questionnaires, the General HealthQuestionnaire (GHQ, the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI. The mean agewas 21.5 years. No difference in stress and depression on the basis of gender was observed. Our results showed that thescores on the GHQ, BDI and STAI tend to increase in the year 2 and 3. The majority of students reported relatively highscores on the GHQ suggesting increased psychiatric morbidity. 52.4% of students experienced depressive symptoms(34.7% mild, 12.9% moderate and 4.7% severe. The scores on the state scale were higher in the years 2 and 3, whilethe majority of students who had no or mild stress was observed in the first and the last year. Low stress personalitytraits were also observed in the first and the last year. However, no significant differences between the four years wereobserved. Our results suggest that nursing students experience different levels of stress and depression and that thesefactors are positively correlated.

  3. Efficiency of brainwave entrainment by binaural beats in reducing anxiety

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    Ahmad Alipoor

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anxiety is a fundamental phenomenon that is a common symptom in all mental disorders. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of brainwave entrainment on anxiety reduction using binaural beats. Methods: In this experimental double-blind study, 30 employees were selected from an engineering research firm through random sampling and replacement and divided into two groups: control group and experimental group. All participants completed the Spielberger’s State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI. Then, the experimental group listened to binaural beats which was recorded on a non-vocal piece of music for 4 weeks, 3 sessions each week. Each session lasted about 20 minutes. At the same time, the control group listened to the background music without any entrainment sound. At the end, both groups completed the anxiety questionnaire and the anxiety scores of both groups obtained before and after intervention were analyzed by ANCOVA. Results: The findings showed that the brainwave entrainment using binaural beats led to the significant reduction of state anxiety (P<0.001 and trait anxiety (P<0.018. Conclusion: Brainwave entrainment using binaural beats is an effective factor in decreasing state and trait anxiety; so, it can be used to reduce anxiety in mental health centers.

  4. The Level of Anxiety and Depression in Dialysis Patients Undertaking Regular Physical Exercise Training--a Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziubek, Wioletta; Kowalska, Joanna; Kusztal, Mariusz; Rogowski, Łukasz; Gołębiowski, Tomasz; Nikifur, Małgorzata; Szczepańska-Gieracha, Joanna; Zembroń-Łacny, Agnieszka; Klinger, Marian; Woźniewski, Marek

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a six-month physical training undertaken by haemodialysis (HD) patients, on the depression and anxiety. Patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) were recruited from the dialysis station at the Department of Nephrology and Transplantation Medicine in Wroclaw. Physical training took place at the beginning of the first 4-hours of dialysis, three times a week for six months. A personal questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) were used in the study. A total of 28 patients completed the study: 20 were randomised to endurance training and 8 were randomised to resistance training. Statistical analysis of depression and anxiety at the initial (t1) and final examination (t2) indicated a significant reduction in depression and anxiety, particularly anxiety as a trait (X2) in the whole study group. The change in anxiety as a state correlated with the disease duration, duration of dialysis and the initial level of anxiety as a state (t1X1). The change in anxiety as a trait significantly correlated with age and the initial level of anxiety (t1X2). Undertaking physical training during dialysis by patients with ESRD is beneficial in reducing their levels of anxiety and depression. Both resistance and endurance training improves mood, but only endurance training additionally results in anxiety reduction. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Anxiety and depression in women and men from early pregnancy to 3-months postpartum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Bárbara; Conde, Ana

    2011-06-01

    To investigate high-anxiety and depression in women and men from early pregnancy to 3-months postpartum, 260 Portuguese couples (N = 520) filled in the State-Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S) and the Edinburgh Post-Natal Depression Scale (EPDS) at the first, second, and third pregnancy trimesters, childbirth, and 3-months postpartum. Rates for high-anxiety (STAI-S ≥ 45) in women (13.1%; 12.2%; 18.2%; 18.6%; 4.7%) and men (10.1%; 8.0%, 7.8%; 8.5%; 4.4%) and for depression (EPDS ≥ 10) in women (20.0%, 19.6%, 17.4%, 17.6%; 11.1%) and men (11.3%; 6.6%; 5.5%; 7.5%; 7.2%) were high. Rates for depression were higher than rates for high-anxiety only in women during early pregnancy and the postpartum, but not at the third pregnancy trimester and childbirth. Rates for high-anxiety and depression were higher in women than in men during pregnancy/childbirth, but not at 3-months postpartum. Rates for high-anxiety but not rates for depression were higher during pregnancy/childbirth compared to 3-months postpartum and only in women. Considering that 15.9% of the parents-to-be were highly anxious and/or depressed during pregnancy-comparing to 9.3% at 3-months postpartum-particular attention should be drawn to both women's and men's mental health early in pregnancy.

  6. Reducing anxiety and enhancing physical performance by using an advanced version of EMDR: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathschlag, Marco; Memmert, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    The main aim of this pilot study was to investigate an advanced version of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) for reducing anxiety. Fifty participants were asked at two times of measurement (T1 and T2 with a rest of 4 weeks) to generate anxiety via the recall of autobiographical memories according to their anxiety. Furthermore, the participants were randomly assigned to an experimental group and a control group, and the experimental group received an intervention of 1-2 h with the advanced version of EMDR in order to their anxiety 2 weeks after T1. At T1 as well as T2, we measured the intensity of participants' anxiety with a Likert scale (LS) and collected participants' state (temporary) and trait (chronic) anxiety with the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). In addition, we measured participants' physical performance in a test for the finger musculature under the induction of their anxiety. The results showed that participant's ratings of their perceived intensity of anxiety (measured by a 9-point LS) and the state and trait anxiety decreased significantly in the experimental group but not in the control group from T1 to T2. Moreover, the physical performance under the induction of participants' anxiety increased significantly in the experimental group from T1 to T2 and there were no significant changes in the control group. The study could show that the advanced version of EMDR is an appropriate method to reduce anxiety.

  7. Comparing levels of anxiety during bed and shower baths in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Juliana de Lima; Nogueira-Martins, Luiz Antonio; Gonçalves, Maria Aparecida Batistão; de Barros, Alba Lucia Bottura Leite

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the levels of anxiety presented by patients with acute myocardial infarction in bed and shower baths and the influence of antecedent variables: age, gender, medications, previous hospitalization and/or bed bath, patients' preference regarding the professional's gender, risk factors and anxiety-traits. This crossover study was conducted between February and August 2007 in coronary units. The sample was composed of 71 patients with acute myocardial infarction. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) was applied before the baths (bed and shower baths), immediately after the baths and twenty minutes after the second evaluation. Results revealed that patients were more anxious in the bed bath than in the shower in the three assessments (p <0.0001) and the only variable that interfered with state-anxiety was high blood pressure.

  8. Religiousness and preoperative anxiety: a correlational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimollahi Mansoureh

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major life changes are among factors that cause anxiety, and one of these changes is surgery. Emotional reactions to surgery have specific effects on the intensity and velocity as well as the process of physical disease. In addition, they can cause delay in patients recovery. This study is aimed at determining the relationship between religious beliefs and preoperative anxiety. Methods This survey is a correlational study to assess the relationship between religious beliefs and preoperative anxiety of patients undergoing abdominal, orthopaedic, and gynaecologic surgery in educational hospitals. We used the convenience sampling method. The data collection instruments included a questionnaire containing the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, and another questionnaire formulated by the researcher with queries on religious beliefs and demographic characteristics as well as disease-related information. Analysis of the data was carried out with SPSS software using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results were arranged in three tables. Results The findings showed that almost all the subjects had high level of religiosity and moderate level of anxiety. In addition, there was an inverse relationship between religiosity and intensity of anxiety, though this was not statistically significant. Conclusion The results of this study can be used as evidence for presenting religious counselling and spiritual interventions for individuals undergoing stress. Finally, based on the results of this study, the researcher suggested some recommendations for applying results and conducting further research.

  9. To Construction and Standardization of the Waiting Anxiety Questionnaire (WAQ in Iran.

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    Sodeh Tavakkoli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to develop and validate a questionnaire to measure waiting anxiety.This was a cross-sectional study. Extensive review of literature and expert opinions were used to develop and validate the waiting anxiety questionnaire. A sample of 321 participants was recruited through random cluster sampling (n= 190 Iranian men and n= 131 women. The participants filled out WAQ, the Speilberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, Burtner Rating scale (BRS and Eysenk Personality questionnaire (EPQ for adults.Internal consistency of WAQ was revealed, meaning that all the 20 items were highly correlated with the total score. The Cronbach alpha equaled 0.83 for the Waiting Anxiety Questionnaire. The Pearson correlation coefficient of the questionnaire with the STAI, BRS and extraversion and neuroticism subscales of EPQ was 0.65, 0.78, - 0.47 and 0.43, respectively, which confirmed its convergent and divergent validity. Factors analysis extracting four cognitive, behavioral, sentimental and physiological factors could explain 67% of the total variance with an Eigen value of greater than 1.Our findings suggest that WAQ possesses appropriate validity and reliability to measure the individuals' anxiety during the waiting time.

  10. The influence of music therapy on perceived stressors and anxiety levels of hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantekin, Işin; Tan, Mehtap

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed as a pretest-posttest control group experiment. The aim was to identify the influence of music therapy on the perceived stressors and anxiety levels of hemodialysis (HD) patients. The data were collected in HD Units of Ataturk University Yakutiye Research Hospital and Regional Education, Application and Research Hospital between February and March. The study population consisted of 104 patients who received dialysis. Since four patients refused to participate, the study was completed with 100 patients. While one-half of the patients formed a control group, the other half consisted of an experimental group. Patient introduction form, hemodialysis stressor scale, and state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI) forms were used to collect the data. HSS was used to identify the stressors perceived by the patients, and STAI form was used to classify anxiety levels. Data were analyzed by using t-test and chi-square test. It was found that differences between average pretest and posttest scores of perceived psychosocial, physiological, and total stressors were statistically significant. It was also found that differences between average pretherapy and posttherapy test scores of state and trait anxiety were statistically significant. Music therapy was influential in reducing anxiety levels and perceived stressors of HD patients. It is concluded that music therapy-as an independent nursing initiative-can be used to help in fulfilling the physical, emotional, and psychological requirements of patients.

  11. The effect of anxiety and depression scores of couples who underwent assisted reproductive techniques on the pregnancy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzioglu, Fusun; Turk, Rukiye; Yucel, Cigdem; Dilbaz, Serdar; Cinar, Ozgur; Karahalil, Bensu

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of anxiety and depression scores of couples who underwent Assisted Reproductive Techniques (ART) on pregnancy outcomes. This study was conducted as a prospective and comparative study with 217 couples. The study data was collected by using a semi-structured questionnaire and the Turkish version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The questionnaire, STAI and BDI were applied to couples who initiated ART treatment. Couples' state anxiety scores were re-evaluated after embryo transfer (ET). A significant relationship was found between the depression score of women and pregnancy outcome (p 0.05) and lower depression scores (p positive pregnancy outcome. Study results indicated that the anxiety and depression scores of couples who had achieved a positive pregnancy result were lower than for couples with a negative result. The results of this study will contribute to the health professionals especially to the nurses who spend the most time with couples in providing consulting services and supporting psychological status of couples during ART process in Turkey.

  12. Infertility-related stress, anxiety and ovarian stimulation: can couples be reassured about the effects of psychological factors on biological responses to assisted reproductive technology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaira Donarelli

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this prospective, longitudinal study was to examine the association between couples’ pre-treatment psychological characteristics (state anxiety and infertility-related stress levels of both partners and ovarian response during assisted reproductive technology treatment in a well-controlled sample. A total of 217 heterosexual couples (434 patients, suffering from primary infertility and undergoing their first assisted reproductive technology treatment at the Reproductive Medicine Unit of ANDROS Day Surgery Clinic in Palermo (Italy, were recruited. Psychological variables were assessed using the State Scale of State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S and the Fertility Problem Inventory (FPI. The number of follicles ≥16 mm in diameter, evaluated by transvaginal ultrasound scan on the eleventh day of the workup, was chosen as the outcome measure. No association between women’s level of anxiety and infertility-related stress, and the number of follicles ≥16 mm in diameter was found. Moreover, the male partner’s infertility stress and anxiety did not influence the relationship between the woman’s infertility-related stress, anxiety level and ovarian response. Fertility staff should reassure couples that the woman’s biological response to ovarian stimulation is not influenced by either partner’s level of psychological distress.

  13. Changes of mood and anxiety during the menstrual cycle with use of oral contraceptives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Antunes

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Hormonal action is one of the main factors for behavioral change observed in women, during the menstrual cycle, and especially in the premenstrual period, most women report a variation of mood and anxiety. The aim of this work was to verify the degrees of anxiety during the menstrual cycle, charting their variation and the possible influence of oral contraceptive use. For this purpose 32 women, divided in two groups according to the use (B or not use (A of oral contraceptive, with selfapplication of the STAI (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory at three different times: before, during and after menstruation. The data was tabulated and analyzed statistically, indicating a variation of anxiety level for different menstrual periods, but with no significance as to anxiety type (trait or state or to the ingestion of contraceptive. For Trait-Anxiety, the post-test (Boferroni T-Test of variation among periods indicated significant difference for post-menstrual and other periods, in the A group; and between the premenstrual and menstrual periods, in the B group. For State Anxiety, the data indicated significant differences between the premenstrual and menstrual periods, in the A group, and between the premenstrual and menstrual periods and the menstrual and post-menstrual in the B group. The results indicate that: 1 the menstrual cycle is a generator of variations of related anxiety; 2 the use of oral contraceptives does not alter this relation; and 3 the correlated diminution of the Trait Anxiety may indicate alteration in self-perception of women during the menstrual cycle. Keywords: anxiety; mestrual cycle; STAI.

  14. Evaluation of anxiety and salivary chromogranin a secretion in women receiving breast conserving surgery followed by radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki-Nakamura, Kaori; Maebayashi, Katsuya; Nasu-Izumi, Sachiko; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Mitsuhashi, Norio

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a prospective study to assess the anxiety and salivary Chromogranin A (CgA), which is considered to be a biomarker of the stress response, in outpatients receiving breast conserving surgery followed by radiation therapy (RT) to the whole breast. Fifty consecutive patients who received whole-breast RT were enrolled in this study. The anxiety levels were measured by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) at the beginning of RT (baseline), 30 Gy, completion of RT, and 1 and 3 months after RT. Salivary CgA levels were also measured at the same time. The mean state anxiety score for all patients was 46.16 with a standard error (SE) of 1.57 at the beginning of RT (baseline) which continued to decline during and after RT. It reached its lowest score with 36.34±1.56 at 3 months after RT (p<0.0001). The mean trait anxiety score for all patients was 43.10±1.54 at baseline and remained constant during RT but began to decline after completion of RT and reached a low level at 3 months after RT (p=0.0021). The mean salivary CgA concentration for all patients demonstrated no consistent trends over time, but at 30 Gy the concentration showed a significant decreasing pattern (p=0.0473). Salivary CgA concentrations and state anxiety and trait anxiety scores at all time points showed no correlation. The mean anxiety scores measured by State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) showed no positive correlation with salivary CgA concentration for breast cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy following breast conserving surgery. (author)

  15. Psychological profile (anxiety and depression) in patients with oral lichen planus: a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, S K; Moreno, R A; Dos Santos, C H R; Seo, J; Migliari, D A

    2013-03-01

    The influence of psychological disturbances in oral lichen planus (OLP) still bears some controversy. This study aimed at assessing levels of anxiety and depression in OLP patients and control subjects, using a self-report scale questionnaire. This cross-sectional study comprised 91 consecutive OLP patients (71 female and 20 male; mean age 52.9 years) and 87 subjects as a control group (69 female and 18 male; mean age 52.7 years). Data collected of both groups included age, sex, race, medical records and systemic disease. Anxiety and depression levels were assessed using, respectively, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-T) and Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Data were analyzed by Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests as appropriate, and by Logistic regression analysis. No statistically significant difference was found when the level of anxiety and depression was compared between the OLP and control using Chi-square and Fisher's tests (P>0.05). Logistic regression analysis showed that the score in 2 out of 20 items of the STAI-T scale (but none of the CES-D) was significantly higher in OLP patients (P<0.05). The analysis by gender showed that the female and male OLP patients presented a significantly higher score for one item in the STAI-T scale (respectively question 4 and 20) but none in the CES-D scale, as compared with that of the control group (P<0.05). Our findings do not support that either anxiety or depression has any role in the development of OLP lesions.

  16. Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, H

    1990-03-01

    The analysis is a study of the nature of anxiety in human experience. The author reviews the work of theologian Paul Tillich and psychologist Rollo May and clarifies the role of anxiety in life. The article reflects the need for a basic religious affirmation as one faces the anxiety of life which comes from the many threats to human existence.

  17. The effect of music therapy during shockwave lithotripsy on patient relaxation, anxiety, and pain perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbas, Alpaslan; Gulpinar, Murat Tolga; Sancak, Eyup Burak; Karakan, Tolga; Demirbas, Arif; Utangac, Mehmet Mazhar; Dede, Onur; Sancaktutar, Ahmet A; Simsek, Tuncer; Sahin, Basak; Resorlu, Berkan

    2016-01-01

    To research the effect of listening to music during shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) on the patient's pain control, anxiety levels, and satisfaction. The study comprised 400 patients from three hospitals. Half of patients listened to music during their first SWL session but not during their second session. The other half had no music for the first session but the second session was accompanied by music. During all sessions, with and without music, pulse rates, blood pressure, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-State Anxiety scores (STAI-SA), Visual Analog Scale (VAS scores for pain), willingness to repeat procedure (0 = never to 4 happily), and patient satisfaction rates (0 = poor to 4 = excellent) were assessed. There was no statistical difference between the two groups in terms of blood pressure and pulse rates. In both groups, the STAI-SA and VAS pain scores were lower in the session when music was listened to (p music and their satisfaction was greater. Music lowered the anxiety and pain scores of patients during SWL and provided greater satisfaction with treatment. Completing this procedure while the patient listens to music increases patient compliance greatly and reduces analgesic requirements.

  18. Postpartum bonding: the role of perinatal depression, anxiety and maternal-fetal bonding during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubber, S; Reck, C; Müller, M; Gawlik, S

    2015-04-01

    Adverse effects of perinatal depression on the mother-child interaction are well documented; however, the influence of maternal-fetal bonding during pregnancy on postpartum bonding has not been clearly identified. The subject of this study was to investigate prospectively the influence of maternal-fetal bonding and perinatal symptoms of anxiety and depression on postpartum mother-infant bonding. Data from 80 women were analyzed for associations of symptoms of depression and anxiety as well as maternal bonding during pregnancy to maternal bonding in the postpartum period using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), the Pregnancy Related Anxiety Questionnaire (PRAQ-R), the Maternal-Fetal Attachment Scale (MFAS) and the Postpartum Bonding Questionnaire (PBQ-16). Maternal education, MFAS, PRAQ-R, EPDS and STAI-T significantly correlated with the PBQ-16. In the final regression model, MFAS and EPDS postpartum remained significant predictors of postpartum bonding and explained 20.8 % of the variance. The results support the hypothesized negative relationship between maternal-fetal bonding and postpartum maternal bonding impairment as well as the role of postpartum depressive symptoms. Early identification of bonding impairment during pregnancy and postpartum depression in mothers plays an important role for the prevention of potential bonding impairment in the early postpartum period.

  19. Validity of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory for use in end-stage renal disease patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loosman, W.L.; Siegert, C.E.H.; Korzec, A.; Honig, A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To validate the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) for use in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and to compare the outcome of both screening measures with each other. Design. Cross-sectional and between-subjects design. The

  20. Combined detection of depression and anxiety in epilepsy patients using the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy and the World Health Organization well-being index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Pilebæk; Amiri, Moshgan

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To validate the Danish version of the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy (NDDI-E), and compare it with the World Health Organization index for psychological well-being (WHO-5) as screening tests for depression and anxiety in epilepsy patients. METHODS: Epilepsy...

  1. Effect of NICU Department Orientation Program on Mother’s Anxiety: a Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Valizadeh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Neonatal intensive care unit induces the high level of anxiety for mothers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of NICU orientation program on the anxiety of mothers who had preterm newborns hospitalized in NICU. Methods: This study was a randomized clinical trial (three parallel groups. Participants included 99 mothers with preterm newborns hospitalized in NICU of Al- Zahra hospital, affiliated to Tabriz University of Medical Sciences in 2015. Mothers were randomly assigned to one of three groups (film, booklet, and control. Mothers completed the State- Trait Anxiety Inventory before entering to the NICU, and then mothers in the experiment groups became familiar with the NICU environment through watching a film or reading booklet. After the first NICU visit, all mothers completed the STAI and Cattell's Anxiety Questionnaires. Data were analyzed using SPSS ver. 13 software. Results: There was no significant difference between three groups regarding state- trait anxiety before the intervention. After the first NICU visit, a significant reduction in maternal state anxiety was seen in the both experiment groups. There was no statistical significant difference regarding trait anxiety. Data obtained from Cattell's anxiety questionnaire after intervention, showed significant difference in state anxiety between groups. Conclusion: Employing film and booklet orientation strategy after preterm delivery can reduce the mother’s anxiety and beneficent for the mother, baby, family and health care system.

  2. Does Listening to Music During Office-Based Flexible Cystoscopy Decrease Anxiety in Patients: A Prospective Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raheem, Omer A; Mirheydar, Hossein S; Lee, Hak J; Patel, Nishant D; Godebu, Elana; Sakamoto, Kyoko

    2015-07-01

    To validate the effect of listening to music on perceived anxiety and pain during office-based flexible cystoscopy using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), in a well-matched North American veteran patient population in a prospective, randomized fashion. A total of 137 veteran patients receiving routine urologic care in a North American Veterans Affairs (VA) healthcare system were recruited over a 2-year period (June 2011 to June 2013). All patients were prospectively randomized to undergo office-based flexible cystoscopy with or without music. The music group consisted of 73 patients who listened to the same excerpt of classical music at the time of flexible cystoscopy; the nonmusic group consisted of 64 patients. The median postprocedural STAI anxiety scores between the music and nonmusic groups were statistically significantly different: 30 (range 23-39) and 35 (range 28-49), respectively (P=0.0017). The median postprocedural pain VAS score between the music and nonmusic groups reached statistical significance: 0 (range 0-1) and 2 (range 1-2), respectively (Pmusic and nonmusic groups: 0 (range -3-0) and 2 (range 0-4), respectively (Pmusic decreases anxiety and pain associated with flexible cystoscopy in a North American VA patient population. We recommend incorporating music as an effective adjunct to other maneuvers used at the time of flexible cystoscopy to reduce anxiety and pain.

  3. Psychometric properties of the social phobia and anxiety inventory-child version in a Swedish clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederlund, Rio; Ost, Lars-Göran

    2013-06-01

    The social phobia and anxiety inventory for children (SPAI-C) is a 26 item, empirically derived self-report instrument developed for assessing social phobic fears in children. Evidence for satisfactory psychometric properties of the SPAI-C has been found in multiple community studies. Since its development, however, no study has presented an extensive psychometric evaluation of SPAI-C in a sample of carefully diagnosed children with social phobia. The present study sought to replicate and expand previous studies by administrating the SPAI-C to a sample of 59 children that fulfilled DSM-IV criteria for social phobia, and 49 children with no social phobia diagnosis. An exploratory factor analysis resulted in a three factor solution reflecting: (1) fear of social interactions, (2) fear of public performance situations, and (3) physical and cognitive symptoms connected with social phobia. These factors appear to parallel domains of social phobia also evident in adults. The SPAI-C total scale and each factor was found to possess good internal consistency, good test-retest reliability and was generally strongly correlated with both self-report and clinician measures of anxiety and fears. The discriminative properties of the total scale were satisfactory. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Anxiety and styles of coping with occupational stress resulting from work with 'dangerous' prisoners in prison service officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirigotis, Konstantinos; Gruszczyński, Wojciech; Pęczkowski, Sebastian

    2015-10-01

    Prisoners categorised as 'dangerous' are a category of prisoners that require and/or force into using special measures of caution, protection and security. The aim of the study was to examine the intensity of anxiety (as a state and as a trait) experienced by officers working with 'dangerous' prisoners and styles of coping with stress they adopt. A total of 40 officers working with 'dangerous' prisoners (the study group, SG) and 60 officers of the security department not working with 'dangerous' prisoners (the reference group, RG) were studied. The intensity of anxiety was assessed applying the Polish version of 'State-Trait Anxiety Inventory' (STAI); styles of coping with stress were explored employing the Polish version of 'Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations' (CISS) and the author's own questionnaire. Data were analysed using the mean, standard deviation, difference testing (the Mann-Whitney U test), correlation-regression procedure (Kendall's tau, τ correlation coefficient and forward stepwise multiple regression). Officers in the SG faced verbal and physical aggression; nevertheless, scores of officers in both the groups were within the interval of mean scores for all the studied STAI and CISS variables. Officers in the SG achieved significantly higher scores on the state-anxiety scale and the Emotion-Oriented Style (EOS), and lower scores on the Task-Oriented Style (TOS) and Social Diversion (SD). The correlation-regression procedure indicated that there were relationships between anxiety and styles of coping with stress but they differed slightly between the groups. Officers in the SG feel state anxiety stronger and display a stronger preference for the EOS than officers in the RG. Officers in the RG more strongly prefer the TOS and SD. State anxiety is a variable negatively explaining the TOS in the SG, whereas anxiety as a trait is a variable explaining the EOS in both the groups. The coping styles of warders dealing with dangerous prisoners are

  5. From prenatal anxiety to parenting stress: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizink, A C; Menting, B; De Moor, M H M; Verhage, M L; Kunseler, F C; Schuengel, C; Oosterman, M

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this study was to explore how maternal mood during pregnancy, i.e., general anxiety, pregnancy-specific anxiety, and depression predicted parenting stress 3 months after giving birth, thereby shaping the child's early postnatal environmental circumstances. To this end, data were used from 1073 women participating in the Dutch longitudinal cohort Generations 2 , which studies first-time pregnant mothers during pregnancy and across the transition to parenthood. Women filled out the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Pregnancy-Related Anxiety Questionnaire-revised (PRAQ-R), and Beck Depression Index (BDI) three times during pregnancy: at 12, 22, and 32 weeks gestational age. Three months postpartum, a parenting stress questionnaire was filled out yielding seven different parenting constructs. Latent scores were computed for each of the repeatedly measured maternal mood variables with Mplus and parenting stress constructs were simultaneously regressed on these latent scores. Results showed that trait anxiety and pregnancy-specific anxiety were uniquely related to almost all parenting stress constructs, taking depression into account. Early prevention and intervention to reduce maternal anxiety in pregnancy could hold the key for a more advantageous trajectory of early postnatal parenting.

  6. Stress and the level of perceived anxiety among mariners: the mediating role of marital satisfaction.

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    Peplińska, Aleksandra; Jeżewska, Maria; Leszczyńska, Irena; Połomski, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    The challenges of professional life are becoming more and more demanding on people's private life, especially if a given profession requires many sacrifices and has negative consequences for one's physical and psychological health, as is the case of professional mariners. The purpose of this study is to attempt to verify the correlation between the quality of emotional bonds, manifested in marital satisfaction, and the level of stress and anxiety perceived by mariners. The study encompasses 210 mariners working on seagoing ships. The following research tools were employed for the purpose of the study: State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Stress Experience Questionnaire (PS) and Well-matched Marriage Questionnaire (KDM). The results indicate that marital satisfaction is correlated with the level of stress and anxiety among mariners, constituting a stress inhibitor.

  7. Subjective memory complaints in elders: depression, anxiety, or cognitive decline?

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    Balash, Y; Mordechovich, M; Shabtai, H; Giladi, N; Gurevich, T; Korczyn, A D

    2013-05-01

    To study the association of subjective memory complaints (SMC) with affective state and cognitive performance in elders. We studied community dwelling elderly persons with normal physical examination. Participants completed questionnaires regarding memory difficulties and lifestyle habits, the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Depending on their answers to the question about their memory condition, participants were divided into complainers and non-complainers and to five groups according to their MMSE scores. These data have been compared to objective cognitive performance according to Mindstreams - a computerized neuropsychological battery. A logistic regression was performed to evaluate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for those factors, which were associated with SMС (dependent variable). Of 636 consecutive subjects (61% females), 507 participants (79.7%) had SMС. Presence of SMC was inversely correlated with MMSE scores, (r = -0.108; P for trend = 0.007). GDS and STAI scores were higher among subjects with SMC (OR = 1.23: CI 95%: 1.1-1.36 and OR = 1.03: CI 95%: 1.01-1.07, respectively). SMC did not correlate with objective cognitive performance measured by Mindstreams. Subjective memory complaints are associated with sub-syndromal depression and anxiety in healthy cognitively normal elders. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. [Anxiety, life style and obstetric history of women working in a high-fashion clothing industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouri, S; Di Giampaolo, L; Toto, E; Cerrone, T; Boscolo, P

    2001-01-01

    Women with a mean age of 38 years (range 20-62) were employed in an industry producing clothes of high fashion. A part of them (n = 210) performed their activities with hands and others (n = 90) utilising machines with more repetitive procedures. All the recruited women answered to a questionnaire including the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI) test, working activities, lifestyle and obstetric history. There was no relation between obstetric history and working activities. The group of women with age ranging from 35 to 42 years showed the score of the STAI higher than that of the younger women and slightly lower than that of the subjects with older age. This may depend on the "healthy worker effect" in the old subjects able to continue their job. The scores of the STAI were also slightly influenced by the repetitive tasks utilising machines. On the whole, the working activity of women had beneficial effect on their role inside the family and in the social life.

  9. Anxiety, depression and self-esteem levels in obese children: a case-control study.

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    Topçu, Seda; Orhon, Filiz Şimşek; Tayfun, Meltem; Uçaktürk, Seyit Ahmet; Demirel, Fatma

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is a global health problem affecting all age groups. Childhood obesity, which may cause chronic diseases including diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and cancer, etc., deserves more attention. However, few studies highlight the association between childhood obesity and psychological diseases. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the psychological condition in obese children. One hundred and sixty-seven obese (body mass index (BMI) >95th percentile) and 200 normal weight children (BMI between 5th and 85th percentile) aged 9-16 years were enrolled into this case-control study. In order to assess the self-concept, anxiety and depression levels: the Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale (PHCSCS), state and trait anxiety inventory for children (STAI-C) and the children depression inventory (CDI) were administered both obese and control groups. There were significant differences among obese and control groups in terms of the total score of PHCSCS [55 (22-69) versus 65 (57-74)], STAI-C [37 (20-55) versus 28 (20-42)], and CDI [12 (4-39)] versus [8 (3-19)]; respectively (p<0.001, p<0.001, p<0.001). We also found statistically significant differences among groups in all of the subscales parameters of PHCSCS (p<0.001). Our results indicate that obese children may experience psychiatric disorders more than normal-weight peers.

  10. Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... take a test or walk down a dark street. This kind of anxiety is useful - it can make you more alert or careful. It usually ends soon after you are out of the situation that caused it. But for millions of people in the United States, the anxiety does not ...

  11. The Influence of Resistance Exercise Training on the Levels of Anxiety in Ischemic Stroke

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    Felipe José Aidar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this pilot study was to analyze the effect of a strength training program on indicators of trait and state anxiety in patients with ischemic stroke. The subjects were divided into two groups: experimental group (EG consisting of 11 subjects aged years and a control group (CG with 13 subjects aged years. EG underwent 12 weeks of strength training, with a frequency of three times a week. For data collection, a State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI was used. Significant differences were found between pre- and posttest in EG for trait anxiety ( pretest posttest and state anxiety ( pretest posttest with no differences in CG for trait anxiety ( pretest posttest and state anxiety ( pretest posttest. In the evaluation between the groups, significant differences were found for all indicators of trait anxiety ( EG; CG and state anxiety ( EG; CG. This pilot study indicates that strength training may provide an improvement in trait and state anxiety more than one year after stroke.

  12. Validation of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children (SPAI-C in a sample of Brazilian children

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    G.J.C. Gauer

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to examine the factor structure and psychometric properties of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children (SPAI-C, an instrument developed in the United States and applied to a sample of Brazilian schoolchildren. The process included the translation of the original material from English into Portuguese by two bilingual psychiatrists and a back translation by a bilingual physician. Both the front and back translations were revised by a bilingual child psychiatrist. The study was performed using a cross-sectional design and the Portuguese version of the SPAI-C was applied to a sample of 1954 children enrolled in 3rd to 8th grade attending 2 private and 11 public schools. Eighty-one subjects were excluded due to an incomplete questionnaire and 2 children refused to participate. The final sample consisted of 1871 children, 938 girls (50.1% and 933 boys (49.8%, ranging in age from 9 to 14 years. The majority of the students were Caucasian (89.0% and the remainder were African-Brazilian (11.0%. The Pearson product-moment correlation showed that the two-week test-retest reliability coefficient was r = 0.780 and Cronbach's alpha was 0.946. The factor structure was almost similar to that reported in previous studies. The results regarding the internal consistency, the test-retest reliability and the factor structure were similar to the findings obtained in studies performed on English speaking children. The present study showed that the Portuguese language version of SPAI-C is a reliable and valid measure of social anxiety for Brazilian children.

  13. The Comparison of Depression and Anxiety Levels in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

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    Dilek Yesilbursa

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this study we aimed to compare depression and anxiety levels of patients admitted for acute coronary syndrome (ACS with patients followed for stable coronary artery disease in outpatient clinics and control group without coronary artery disease. Material and Method: Study population was composed of 300 patients. Firstly all patients underwent standardized mini mental test and patients whose test scores were under 23 were excluded and patients whose scores were 23 or higher were included in the study. After the demograhic characteristics of patients had been recorded all patients were administered the following scales: Geriatric Depression Scale( GDS, Beck Depression Inventory(BDI, Beck Anxiety Inventory(BAI, State and Trait Anxiety Inventory(STAI 1 and STAI 2. The scores obtained from these scales were compared between all three groups. Results: All test scores were significantly higher in ACS group (p<0.001.In ACS group GDS, BDI and BAI scores were higher in male patients compared to females (p<0.05. When ACS group was divided as ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI, Non ST elevation myocardial infarction and unstable angina pectoris the test scores were higher in STEMI subgroup but the relation was not statistically significant. The hospitalisation period length was found to be significantly related to all test scores in patients with ACS (p<0,001. Discussion: Depression and and levels of patients with ACS syndrome must be surely evaluated. This will help us both to improve life quality of these patients and decrease mortality and morbidity of these patients by diagnosing depression and anxiety disorders and treating them on time.

  14. Anxiety and depression symptoms in women and men from early pregnancy to 3-months postpartum: parity differences and effects.

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    Figueiredo, Bárbara; Conde, Ana

    2011-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate both anxiety and depression symptoms from early pregnancy to 3-months postpartum, comparing women and men and first and second-time parents. A sample of 260 Portuguese couples (N=520), first or second-time parents, recruited in an Obstetrics Out-patients Unit, filled in the State-Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S) and the Edinburgh Post-Natal Depression Scale (EPDS) at the 1st, 2nd and 3rd pregnancy trimesters, childbirth, and 3-months postpartum. A decrease in anxiety and depression symptoms from early pregnancy to 3-months postpartum was found in both women and men, as well as in first and second-time parents. Men presented less anxiety and depression symptoms than women, but the same pattern of symptoms over time. Second-time parents showed more anxiety and depression symptoms than first-time parents and a different pattern of symptoms over time: an increase in anxiety and depression symptoms from the 3rd trimester to childbirth was observed in first-time parents versus a decrease in second-time parents. The voluntary nature of the participation may have lead to a selection bias; women and men who agreed to participate could be those who presented fewer anxiety and depression symptoms. Moreover, the use of self-report symptom measures does not give us the level of possible disorder in participants. Anxiety and depression symptoms diminish from pregnancy to the postpartum period in all parents. Patterns of anxiety and depression symptoms from early pregnancy to 3-months postpartum are similar in women and men, but somewhat different in first and second-time parents. Second-time parents should also be considered while studying and intervening during pregnancy and the postpartum. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Frequency of Worry and Anxiety in Epileptic Children's Mothers

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    Bagheri-Galeh S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Adverse effect of children's epilepsy on family members, especially mothers, is an issue that has been less considered. One of these effects is anxiety increase in mothers. This study has been done with the purpose of determining frequency of worry and anxiety in epileptic children's mothers and recognizing the factors affecting it.Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study has been done with the participation of epileptic children's mothers referred to Mofid Neurology Clinic of Medical Training and Therapy Center of Children. Anxiety level was determined by the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI standard questionnaire. The data was analyzed using t-test, Mann-Whitney test and one-way ANOVA and in all cases, p<0.05 considered as significant.Results: In this study, 206 mothers were surveyed. The mean anxiety scores of mothers was 45±9.5. 84 subjects (40.7% had mild anxiety, 71 (34.5% had moderate anxiety and 51 (24.8% had severe anxiety. Anxiety of mothers was significantly higher in cases such as education of child in special school (p=0.018, the high number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs consumed for controlling epilepsy (p=0.011, worry of death (p<0.001, permanent brain damage (p=0.036, drug side effects (p<0.01 and paralysis of child (p=0.030. Mothers who had been previously trained about epilepsy in center, had lower anxiety (p<0.001.‍Conclusion: This study showed that the majority of epileptic children's mothers had moderate and severe anxiety. This phenomenon will be higher in cases like child’s education in special school, multi medication therapy and worries of side effects of epilepsy and will be lower by increasing mothers’ awareness.

  16. [Psychometric properties and clinical norms for the German version (SPAIK) of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children (SPAI-C)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melfsen, Siebke; Walitza, Susanne; Warnke, Andreas

    2011-11-01

    The Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children (SPAIK) is a frequently used German questionnaire. The study investigates its psychometric properties and norms in a clinical study. The questionnaire was presented to a clinical sample of n = 320 school-age children (7 to 18 years) prior to beginning therapy. The items indicated a high internal consistency and homogeneity. With regard to dimensions, a one-factor solution was preferred. As to validity, there was a significant difference in total score between the normal and the clinical sample. The sample was also used to provide some normative data. The SPAIK appears to be a reliable and valid measure of childhood social anxiety.

  17. Impact of Monochorionicity and Twin to Twin Transfusion Syndrome on Prenatal Attachment, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms.

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    Berengere Beauquier-Maccotta

    Full Text Available Monochronioric (MC twin pregnancies are considered as high-risk pregnancies with potential complications requiring in-utero interventions. We aimed to assess prenatal attachment, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD and depressive symptoms in MC pregnancies complicated with Twin-To-Twin-transfusion syndrome (TTTS in comparison to uncomplicated monochorionic (UMC and dichorionic pregnancies (DC. Auto-questionnaires were filled out at diagnosis of TTTS and at successive milestones. Prenatal attachment, PTSD, anxiety and perinatal depression were evaluated respectively by the Prenatal Attachment Inventory (PAI completed for each twin, the Post-traumatic Checklist Scale (PCLS, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI and the Edinburgh Perinatal Depression Scale (EPDS. There was no significant difference in the PAI scores between the two twins. In the DC and UMC groups, PAI scores increased throughout pregnancy, whilst it didn't for TTTS group. TTTS and DC had a similar prenatal attachment while MC mothers expressed a significantly higher attachment to their fetuses and expressed it earlier. At the announcement of TTTS, 72% of the patients present a score over the threshold at the EPDS Scale, with a higher score for TTTS than for DC (p = 0.005, and UMC (p = 0.007 at the same GA. 30% of mothers in TTTS group have PTSD during pregnancy. 50% of TTTS- patients present an anxiety score over the threshold (STAI-Scale, with a score significantly higher in TTTS than in UMC (p<0.001 or DC (p<0.001. The proportion of subject with a STAI-State over the threshold is also significantly higher in TTTS than in DC at 20 GW (p = 0.01 and at 26 GW (p<0.05. The STAI-state scores in UMC and DC increase progressively during pregnancy while they decrease significantly in TTTS. TTTS announcement constitutes a traumatic event during a pregnancy with an important risk of PTSD, high level of anxiety and an alteration of the prenatal attachment. These results should

  18. [Prevalence and risk factors of social anxiety disorder in high schools and universities in Chengdu].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Rong; Wu, Wel-li; Hu, Jun-mei; Qiu, Chang-jian; Wang, Qiang; Wei, Geng; Sun, Jin-hua; Yang, Chuang; Song, Ping; Ye, An-hong; Zhang, Wei

    2006-07-01

    To explore the prevalence and risk factors of social anxiety disorder (SAD) in high schools and universities in Chengdu. 2279 students in Chengdu sampled by optimum distributing delaminating grouping method were interviewed one-to-one by the trained psychiatrists according to SCID. Both the cooperated SAD patients (n=156) and the normal counterparts (NC, n=156) in the 2279 students completed Egma Minnen av Bardndosnauppforstran (EMBU), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-Form Y), Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale (FNE) and Defense Style Questionnaire (DSQ). There were 179 SAD patients, 88 female ones and 91 male ones, in the 2279 students of the high schools and universities in Chengdu. Statistical analysis reveals that the SAD patients differ from the NC in seven aspects, i.e. growing circumstances (P = 0.049), family economical status(P = 0.000), family history of psychiatric disorder, scales of EMBU,STAI, FNE and DSQ. The total prevalence of SAD in the students of high schools and universities in Chengdu was 8.15%, the female prevalence 8.35%, and the male prevalence 7.62%. The possible risk factors were: growing up in the countryside, low family economic state, parental rearing pattern being deficient in emotional warmth, understanding, trust and encouragement but excessive in refuse, denial and overprotection, having anxiety trait, feeling fear of negative evaluation, more likely to use neurotic and immature defense mechanism while less likely to use mature defense mechanism, having positive family mental disorder history.

  19. Anxiety and physiological responses to the Trier Social Stress Test for Children in adolescents with cyclic vomiting syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarbell, Sally E; Millar, Amanda; Laudenslager, Mark; Palmer, Claire; Fortunato, John E

    2017-01-01

    This study compared anxiety and physiological responses during the Trier Social Stress Test for Children (TSST-C) in adolescents. 38 subjects (26 females) were enrolled: 11 cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS), 11 anxiety, and 16 controls. Salivary cortisol, α-amylase and heart rate variability (HRV) were assessed during the TSST-C. Anxiety was measured by the Screen for Childhood Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED), Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children (STAI-C). 11 anxiety and 7 CVS subjects had ≥1 anxiety disorder. 82% in the anxiety and CVS groups met criteria for an anxiety disorder on the SCARED. Combining groups, cortisol increased from baseline to recovery during the TSST-C (p=0.0004) and the stressor to recovery (p=0.005). α-amylase did not differ during the TSST-C for the total sample, but increased for anxiety compared to controls from baseline to recovery (p=0.01). HRV decreased during the stressor (p=0.0001) and increased at recovery (p=0.004). No associations were found between biomarkers and trait anxiety. Associations were found between baseline HRV and pre-test state anxiety (r=-0.406, p=0.012) and between recovery HRV and post-test state anxiety (r=-0.501, p=0.002) for the total sample. Anxiety is prevalent in CVS warranting screening. HRV may serve as a biomarker for evaluating stress as a potential trigger for CVS episodes. State but not trait anxiety was associated with changes in HRV, suggesting acute anxiety may be more relevant in linking stress and CVS episodes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Explanatory, Multilevel Person-Fit Analysis of Response Consistency on the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conijn, Judith M; Emons, Wilco H M; van Assen, Marcel A L M; Pedersen, Susanne S; Sijtsma, Klaas

    2013-09-01

    Self-report measures are vulnerable to concentration and motivation problems, leading to responses that may be inconsistent with the respondent's latent trait value. We investigated response consistency in a sample (N = 860) of cardiac patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator and their partners who completed the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory on five measurement occasions. For each occasion and for both the state and trait subscales, we used the l (p) z person-fit statistic to assess response consistency. We used multilevel analysis to model the between-person and within-person differences in the repeated observations of response consistency using time-dependent (e.g., mood states) and time-invariant explanatory variables (e.g., demographic characteristics). Respondents with lower education, undergoing psychological treatment, and with more post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms tended to respond less consistently. The percentages of explained variance in response consistency were small. Hence, we conclude that the results give insight into the causes of response inconsistency but that the identified explanatory variables are of limited practical value for identifying respondents at risk of producing invalid test results. We discuss explanations for the small percentage of explained variance and suggest alternative methods for studying causes of response inconsistency.

  1. The impact of dental appearance and anxiety on self-esteem in adult orthodontic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Maroto, M; Santos-Puerta, N; González Olmo, M J; Peñacoba-Puente, C

    2015-08-01

    To analyse the relationship between different dimensions of dental appearance impact and self-esteem in adult patients undergoing orthodontic treatment, with special attention to the possible mediating role of anxiety. A quasi-experimental design was used with a matched control group (without orthodontic treatment). In each group (experimental and control), there were 85 patients. The impact of dental appearance was measured using the Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire (PIDAQ). State anxiety was assessed with the State Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S) and self-esteem with Rosenberg's self-esteem scale. In both groups (experimental and control), self-esteem correlates negatively, ranging between 0.26 and 0.43, with all dimensions of dental appearance impact (except for the positive dental self-confidence dimension, where all correlations were positive). Anxiety correlates positively, ranges between 0.35 and 0.44, with social impact, psychological impact and aesthetic concern, although it maintains no significant correlations with dental self-confidence. Nevertheless, in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment, anxiety plays a mediating role between dental impact dimensions and self-esteem, whilst for the control group anxiety only plays a mediator role between psychological impact and self-esteem. Anxiety plays a fundamental role in the effect of perceived dental impact on self-esteem in adult patients undergoing orthodontic treatment. These results have important practical implications for the design of bio-psycho-social intervention programs that contemplate cognitive-affective variables as an essential part of orthodontic treatment in adults. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN ANXIETY - AS STATE OR TRAIT - AND THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF CRANIOMANDIBULAR DISORDERS

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    Luminița Elena ALBERT

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The lack of sufficient scientific evidence to support the role of occlusion as an etiologic factor in craniomandibular disorders gave credit to the role of the psycho-emotional factors able to predispose to this condition and to perpetuate it. Among them, anxiety holds a prioritary position. The aim of the research was to shed light on the signs and symptoms of craniomandibular disfunction manifested in a group of patients and on their possible association with psycho-emotional characteristics (stress, anxiety. Materials and method. A cross-sectional study was performed on a group of 54 subjects (16M, 38W, by means of a screening questionnaire for craniomandibular disfunction, containing 20 questions structured on five issues: pain, disfunction, parafunction, psycho-emotional status, trauma/iatrogenic condition. For psychological examination, the STAI I and II (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory questionnaires were applied. These psychometric instruments, containing 20 items, provide the current level of anxiety scores of the subject and the degree to which he/she is prone to anxiety. The NCSS Dawson edition statistical program was used to analyze the collected data. Results. The score of psycho-emotional characteristics evaluation correlates with the severity of craniomandibular disfunction (r = 0.5743. The specific score of the signs and symptoms manifested in craniomandibular disfunctions shows a good correlation with the disfunctional condition (0.7737. In the investigated group, fewer subjects assessed anxiety, however the predisposition to anxiety is the dominant trend, more evident in male subjects. Conclusions. Within the limits of this investigation, the psycho-emotional factors included in the screening questionnaire appear to play a role in defining a prioritary craniomandibular disfunctional state. At the same time, the results provided by the used psychometric instruments are less conclusive. Further studies are required, on more

  3. Age-related reduced prefrontal-amygdala structural connectivity is associated with lower trait anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clewett, David; Bachman, Shelby; Mather, Mara

    2014-01-01

    Objective A current neuroanatomical model of anxiety posits that greater structural connectivity between the amygdala and ventral prefrontal cortex (vPFC) facilitates regulatory control over the amygdala and helps reduce anxiety. However, some neuroimaging studies have reported contradictory findings, demonstrating a positive rather than negative association between trait anxiety and amygdala-vPFC white matter integrity. To help reconcile these findings, we tested the regulatory hypothesis of anxiety circuitry using aging as a model of white matter decline in the amygdala-vPFC pathway. Methods We used probabilistic tractography to trace connections between the amygdala and vPFC in 21 younger, 18 middle-aged, and 15 healthy older adults. The resulting tract estimates were used to extract three indices of white-matter integrity: fractional anisotropy (FA), radial diffusivity (RD) and axial diffusivity (AD). The relationship between these amygdala-vPFC structural connectivity measures and age and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) scores were assessed. Results The tractography results revealed age-related decline in the FA (p = .005) and radial diffusivity (p = .002) of the amygdala-vPFC pathway. Contrary to the regulatory hypothesis, we found a positive rather than negative association between trait anxiety and right amygdala-vPFC FA (p = .01). Conclusion These findings argue against the notion that greater amygdala-vPFC structural integrity facilitates better anxiety outcomes in healthy adults. Instead, our results suggest that white matter degeneration in this network relates to lower anxiety in older adults. PMID:24635708

  4. Virtual Reality Exposure Training for Musicians: Its Effect on Performance Anxiety and Quality.

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    Bissonnette, Josiane; Dubé, Francis; Provencher, Martin D; Moreno Sala, Maria T

    2015-09-01

    Music performance anxiety affects numerous musicians, with many of them reporting impairment of performance due to this problem. This exploratory study investigated the effects of virtual reality exposure training on students with music performance anxiety. Seventeen music students were randomly assigned to a control group (n=8) or a virtual training group (n=9). Participants were asked to play a musical piece by memory in two separate recitals within a 3-week interval. Anxiety was then measured with the Personal Report of Confidence as a Performer Scale and the S-Anxiety scale from the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-Y). Between pre- and post-tests, the virtual training group took part in virtual reality exposure training consisting of six 1-hour long sessions of virtual exposure. The results indicate a significant decrease in performance anxiety for musicians in the treatment group for those with a high level of state anxiety, for those with a high level of trait anxiety, for women, and for musicians with high immersive tendencies. Finally, between the pre- and post-tests, we observed a significant increase in performance quality for the experimental group, but not for the control group.

  5. Influence of 5-HTT variation, childhood trauma and self-efficacy on anxiety traits: a gene-environment-coping interaction study.

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    Schiele, Miriam A; Ziegler, Christiane; Holitschke, Karoline; Schartner, Christoph; Schmidt, Brigitte; Weber, Heike; Reif, Andreas; Romanos, Marcel; Pauli, Paul; Zwanzger, Peter; Deckert, Jürgen; Domschke, Katharina

    2016-08-01

    Environmental vulnerability factors such as adverse childhood experiences in interaction with genetic risk variants, e.g., the serotonin transporter gene linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), are assumed to play a role in the development of anxiety and affective disorders. However, positive influences such as general self-efficacy (GSE) may exert a compensatory effect on genetic disposition, environmental adversity, and anxiety traits. We, thus, assessed childhood trauma (Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, CTQ) and GSE in 678 adults genotyped for 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 and their interaction on agoraphobic cognitions (Agoraphobic Cognitions Questionnaire, ACQ), social anxiety (Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, LSAS), and trait anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, STAI-T). The relationship between anxiety traits and childhood trauma was moderated by self-efficacy in 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 LALA genotype carriers: LALA probands maltreated as children showed high anxiety scores when self-efficacy was low, but low anxiety scores in the presence of high self-efficacy despite childhood maltreatment. Our results extend previous findings regarding anxiety-related traits showing an interactive relationship between 5-HTT genotype and adverse childhood experiences by suggesting coping-related measures to function as an additional dimension buffering the effects of a gene-environment risk constellation. Given that anxiety disorders manifest already early in childhood, this insight could contribute to the improvement of psychotherapeutic interventions by including measures strengthening self-efficacy and inform early targeted preventive interventions in at-risk populations, particularly within the crucial time window of childhood and adolescence.

  6. Circulating vascular endothelial growth factor is independently and negatively associated with trait anxiety and depressive mood in healthy Japanese university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuura, Sakurako; Kamezaki, Yoshiko; Yamagishi, Naoko; Kuwano, Yuki; Nishida, Kensei; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Tanahashi, Toshihito; Kawai, Tomoko; Arisawa, Kokichi; Rokutan, Kazuhito

    2011-07-01

    Anxiety and depressive mood are sometimes accompanied by modulation of neuroendocrine and immune functions. The aim of this study was to identify circulating immune mediators reflecting anxiety and depressive mood in healthy young adults. Anxiety and depressive mood in 209 healthy medical students (125 males and 84 females, aged 20.7±2.7years (mean±SD)) were assessed by the Spielberger state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI) and the Zung self-rating depression scale (Zung-SDS), respectively. Cortisol and chromogranin A (CgA) levels in saliva were measured using enzyme immunoassay kits, and 50 different mediators in sera were measured by a multiplex-suspension array system. The level of statistical significance was set at α=0.05. Forty-four mediators were measurable in sera, and each mediator showed substantial individual variations. After determining Pearson correlation coefficients, we selected candidate cytokines whose levels were associated with STAI-state (2 cytokines), STAI-trait (8 cytokines), or SDS scores (8 cytokines). The candidate cytokines plus interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and macrophage migration inhibitory factor were then subjected to multiple regression analysis adjusted for gender, BMI, and salivary concentrations of cortisol and CgA. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was independently and negatively associated with both trait anxiety (pdepressive mood (pdepressive mood (p<0.05). Interactions between these two cytokines and gender or BMI were not observed. Besides IL-1β, circulating VEGF may be a potential biomarker for negative mood states in healthy young adults. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Factors associated to depression and anxiety in medical students: a multicenter study

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    Fernanda Brenneisen Mayer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate personal and institutional factors related to depression and anxiety prevalence of students from 22 Brazilian medical schools. Methods The authors performed a multicenter study (August 2011 to August 2012, examining personal factors (age, sex, housing, tuition scholarship and institutional factors (year of the medical training, school legal status, location and support service in association with scores of Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI. Results Of 1,650 randomly selected students, 1,350 (81.8 % completed the study. The depressive symptoms prevalence was 41 % (BDI > 9, state-anxiety 81.7 % and trait-anxiety in 85.6 % (STAI > 33. There was a positive relationship between levels of state (r = 0,591, p < 0.001 and trait (r = 0,718, p < 0.001 anxiety and depression scores. All three symptoms were positively associated with female sex and students from medical schools located in capital cities of both sexes. Tuition scholarship students had higher state-anxiety but not trait-anxiety or depression scores. Medical students with higher levels of depression and anxiety symptoms disagree more than their peers with the statements “I have adequate access to psychological support” and “There is a good support system for students who get stressed”. Conclusions The factors associated with the increase of medical students’ depression and anxiety symptoms were female sex, school location and tuition scholarship. It is interesting that tuition scholarship students showed state-anxiety, but not depression and trait-anxiety symptoms.

  8. Meditative music listening to reduce state anxiety in patients during the uptake phase before positron emission tomography (PET) scans.

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    Lee, Wen-Li; Sung, Huei-Chuan; Liu, Shu-Hsin; Chang, Shu-Min

    2017-02-01

    This study examines the effects of listening to meditative music on state anxiety and heart rate variability (HRV) of patients during the uptake phase before positron emission tomography (PET) scans. A two-group randomized experimental design was used. Eligible patients were randomly assigned to either the experimental or control group. All patients received baseline assessments of state anxiety using Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S) and HRV before receiving an intravenous injection of radiopharmaceutical fluorine-18 fludeoxyglucose in the uptake room. The experimental group (n = 35) listened individually to 30 min of meditative music, integrating Chinese "Chi" and western frequency resonation in the uptake room. The control group (n = 37) lay on bed quietly for 40 min in the uptake room without music. All patients were assessed for their anxiety level and HRV again, before receiving PET scanning as post-test. The results indicated that patients in the experimental group showed a significant reduction in state anxiety and heart rate, and increase on high frequency norm of HRV (p music as a non-invasive and cost-effective strategy can help maximize efforts to promote comfort and relaxation for patients awaiting stressful procedures, such as PET scans. Meditative music can be effective in alleviating state anxiety of patients during the uptake phase before PET scans. Advances in knowledge: The study provides scientific evidence of the effects of listening to meditative music for reducing state anxiety in patients during the uptake phase before PET scans. It may have the potential to lower the risk of unwanted false-positive fluorine-18 fludeoxyglucose uptake in normal organs and to further improve image quality and image interpretation. Listening to meditative music is a safe and inexpensive intervention which can be incorporated into routine procedures to reduce anxiety of patients undergoing PET scans.

  9. Interactive media as a tool for reducing waiting anxiety at paediatric rehabilitation hospitals: a randomized controlled trial.

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    Biddiss, Elaine; Knibbe, Tara Joy; Fehlings, Darcy; Mckeever, Patricia; Cohen, Ashley; Mcpherson, Amy

    2017-12-15

    To investigate the efficacy of waiting room media for reducing anxiety and increasing satisfaction at a paediatric rehabilitation hospital. In this clustered, parallel, randomized controlled trial, 310 young people with disabilities (age range 5-19y) and their parents attending outpatient clinics were assigned to interactive media (n=113), a silent nature video (n=97), or media-free comparison (n=100) groups. Young person and parent anxiety was reported using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) on arrival and after 10 minutes in the waiting space. Questionnaires measured young person, parent, and staff satisfaction. Young people exposed to interactive media reported a postexposure state anxiety that was 1.1 raw points (2.7 standardized points) lower on the STAI than the comparison group (95% confidence interval [CI] -1.9 to -0.22). There was no difference in postexposure state anxiety between the passive media and comparison groups (95% CI -0.64 to 1.1). Parents' state anxiety did not differ between conditions, but interactive media were associated with greater satisfaction (p=0.009). Of 120 staff, 119 reported that interactive media improved the clinic experience for families. Interactive media designed for accessible, hands-free play mitigate waiting anxiety and increases satisfaction. This paper provides evidence to guide design and decision-making around the use of interactive media in health care spaces. Interactive media reduced preclinic waiting anxiety for young people with disabilities. Interactive media were accessible to young people with a range of mobility. Interactive media increased parental and staff satisfaction in the clinic. Guidelines for the design of hands-free, inclusive interactive media for health care facilities are presented. © 2017 Mac Keith Press.

  10. Investigation of stress, anxiety and depression in women with fibromyalgia: a comparative study.

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    Ramiro, Fernanda de Souza; Lombardi Júnior, Império; da Silva, Regina Claudia Barbosa; Montesano, Fábio Tadeu; de Oliveira, Nara Rejane Cruz; Diniz, Ricardo Edésio Amorim Santos; Alambert, Paulo Augusto; Padovani, Ricardo da Costa

    2014-01-01

    Depression has emerged as the most prevalent mental disorder in patients with fibromyalgia. Stress, whose stages are alarm, resistance, near-exhaustion and exhaustion, constitutes a physical reaction to a threatening situation. To investigate the levels of stress, anxiety and depression in women with fibromyalgia, comparing them with those of healthy women. Participants were 50 women, 25 with a diagnosis of fibromyalgia according to the criteria of the American College of Rheumatology, and 25 without this diagnosis, matched for age. Instruments used: Lipp Inventory of Stress Symptoms for Adults (LISS), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The mean age was 49.36 years for the group with fibromyalgia (FM) and 49.20 years for the group without fibromyalgia (non-FM). FM showed a higher incidence of stress (96%) compared with non-FM (5%). The resistance phase was predominant in both groups, FM (42%) and non-FM (100%). In FM there was distribution of the four stages (alarm, resistance, near-exhaustion and exhaustion). The differences between phases in the analyzed groups were significant (p anxiety and of depression in FM were significantly higher, when compared with non-FM (p anxiety (over 50) and clinically relevant depression (greater than 20) in FM were relevant. The understanding of the emotional variables involved in fibromyalgia is important to define the therapeutic strategy.

  11. Auricular acupuncture for pre-exam anxiety in medical students: a prospective observational pilot investigation.

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    Klausenitz, Catharina; Hesse, Thomas; Hacker, Henriette; Hahnenkamp, Klaus; Usichenko, Taras

    2016-04-01

    Auricular acupuncture (AA) is effective for the treatment of preoperative anxiety. We aimed to study the feasibility and effects of AA on exam anxiety in a prospective observational pilot study. Healthy medical students received bilateral AA using indwelling fixed needles at points MA-IC1, MA-TF1, MA-SC, MA-AH7, and MA-T on the day before an anatomy exam. The needles were removed after the exam. Anxiety levels were measured using the State-Trait-Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS-100) before and after the AA intervention and once again immediately before the exam. The duration of sleep on the night before the exam was recorded and compared to that over the preceding 1 week and 6 months (all through students' recollection). In addition, blood pressure, heart rate and the acceptability of AA to the students were recorded. Ten students (all female) were included in the final analysis. All tolerated the needles well and stated they would wish to receive AA again for exam anxiety in the future. Exam anxiety measured using both STAI and VAS-100 decreased by almost 20% after AA. AA was well accepted, the outcome measurement was feasible, and the results have facilitated the calculation of the sample size for a subsequent randomised controlled trial. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. Global/local processing style: Explaining the relationship between trait anxiety and binge eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Kendra R.; Plessow, Franziska; Coniglio, Kathryn A.; Tabri, Nassim; Franko, Debra L; Zayas, Lazaro V.; Germine, Laura; Thomas, Jennifer J.; Eddy, Kamryn T.

    2018-01-01

    Objective Anxiety is a risk factor for disordered eating, but the mechanisms by which anxiety promotes disordered eating are poorly understood. One possibility is local versus global cognitive processing style, defined as a relative tendency to attend to details at the expense of the “big picture.” Anxiety may narrow attention, in turn, enhancing local and/or compromising global processing. We examined relationships between global/local processing style, anxiety, and disordered eating behaviors in a transdiagnostic outpatient clinical sample. We hypothesized that local (vs. global) processing bias would mediate the relationship between anxiety and disordered eating behaviors. Method Ninety-three participants completed the eating disorder examination—questionnaire (EDE-Q), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI)—trait subscale, and the Navon task (a test of processing style in which large letters are composed of smaller letters both congruent and incongruent with the large letter). The sample was predominantly female (95%) with a mean age of 27.4 years (SD = 12.1 years). Results Binge eating, but not fasting, purging, or excessive exercise, was correlated with lower levels of global processing style. There was a significant indirect effect between anxiety and binge eating via reduced global level global/local processing. Discussion In individuals with disordered eating, being more generally anxious may encourage a detailed-oriented bias, preventing individuals from maintaining the bigger picture and making them more likely to engage in maladaptive behaviors (e.g., binge eating). PMID:28963792

  13. Aromatherapy with two essential oils from Satureja genre and mindfulness meditation to reduce anxiety in humans

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    Marilú Roxana Soto-Vásquez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to verify whether association of aromatherapy with essential oils of Satureja brevicalyx or Satureja boliviana and mindfulness meditation can reduce anxiety levels in humans. A randomized experimental trial was carried out with 108 participants who were divided into 6 groups, comprising a waiting list control group and five experimental groups. Aromatherapy was carried out by inhalation of essential oils while mindfulness intervention program was focused on “flow meditation”. The anxiety index was evaluated by State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI. Measures were taken two times: pretest and posttest. State and Trait anxiety scores showed a decrease in posttest study phase in comparison with pretest in all experimental groups (p < 0.005, especially in those where aromatherapy and mindfulness meditation were used together. All Cohen's d scores were over to 1 that means a large size effect in anxiety variable. Percentages of change showed reductions of anxiety variable ranging between 20% and 47%. All treatments used isolated or associated, may be considered alternative treatment options for anxiety.

  14. Global/local processing style: Explaining the relationship between trait anxiety and binge eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Kendra R; Plessow, Franziska; Coniglio, Kathryn A; Tabri, Nassim; Franko, Debra L; Zayas, Lazaro V; Germine, Laura; Thomas, Jennifer J; Eddy, Kamryn T

    2017-11-01

    Anxiety is a risk factor for disordered eating, but the mechanisms by which anxiety promotes disordered eating are poorly understood. One possibility is local versus global cognitive processing style, defined as a relative tendency to attend to details at the expense of the "big picture." Anxiety may narrow attention, in turn, enhancing local and/or compromising global processing. We examined relationships between global/local processing style, anxiety, and disordered eating behaviors in a transdiagnostic outpatient clinical sample. We hypothesized that local (vs. global) processing bias would mediate the relationship between anxiety and disordered eating behaviors. Ninety-three participants completed the eating disorder examination-questionnaire (EDE-Q), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI)-trait subscale, and the Navon task (a test of processing style in which large letters are composed of smaller letters both congruent and incongruent with the large letter). The sample was predominantly female (95%) with a mean age of 27.4 years (SD = 12.1 years). Binge eating, but not fasting, purging, or excessive exercise, was correlated with lower levels of global processing style. There was a significant indirect effect between anxiety and binge eating via reduced global level global/local processing. In individuals with disordered eating, being more generally anxious may encourage a detailed-oriented bias, preventing individuals from maintaining the bigger picture and making them more likely to engage in maladaptive behaviors (e.g., binge eating). © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Aromatherapy with two essential oils from Satureja genre and mindfulness meditation to reduce anxiety in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Vásquez, Marilú Roxana; Alvarado-García, Paúl Alan Arkin

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study was to verify whether association of aromatherapy with essential oils of Satureja brevicalyx or Satureja boliviana and mindfulness meditation can reduce anxiety levels in humans. A randomized experimental trial was carried out with 108 participants who were divided into 6 groups, comprising a waiting list control group and five experimental groups. Aromatherapy was carried out by inhalation of essential oils while mindfulness intervention program was focused on "flow meditation". The anxiety index was evaluated by State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Measures were taken two times: pretest and posttest. State and Trait anxiety scores showed a decrease in posttest study phase in comparison with pretest in all experimental groups (p < 0.005), especially in those where aromatherapy and mindfulness meditation were used together. All Cohen's d scores were over to 1 that means a large size effect in anxiety variable. Percentages of change showed reductions of anxiety variable ranging between 20% and 47%. All treatments used isolated or associated, may be considered alternative treatment options for anxiety.

  16. Effect of two yoga-based relaxation techniques on memory scores and state anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanya, Pailoor; Telles, Shirley

    2009-01-01

    Background A yoga practice involving cycles of yoga postures and supine rest (called cyclic meditation) was previously shown to improve performance in attention tasks more than relaxation in the corpse posture (shavasana). This was ascribed to reduced anxiety, though this was not assessed. Methods In fifty-seven male volunteers (group average age ± S.D., 26.6 ± 4.5 years) the immediate effect of two yoga relaxation techniques was studied on memory and state anxiety. All participants were assessed before and after (i) Cyclic meditation (CM) practiced for 22:30 minutes on one day and (ii) an equal duration of Supine rest (SR) or the corpse posture (shavasana), on another day. Sections of the Wechsler memory scale (WMS) were used to assess; (i) attention and concentration (digit span forward and backward), and (ii) associate learning. State anxiety was assessed using Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Results There was a significant improvement in the scores of all sections of the WMS studied after both CM and SR, but, the magnitude of change was more after CM compared to after SR. The state anxiety scores decreased after both CM and SR, with a greater magnitude of decrease after CM. There was no correlation between percentage change in memory scores and state anxiety for either session. Conclusion A cyclical combination of yoga postures and supine rest in CM improved memory scores immediately after the practice and decreased state anxiety more than rest in a classical yoga relaxation posture (shavasana). PMID:19674483

  17. Unravelling nocebo effect: the mediating effect of anxiety between anticipation and pain at wound dressing change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Kevin Y

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the mediating effect of anxiety in the relationship between anticipation and pain in people with chronic wounds. Pain is common in people with chronic wounds. Anticipation or negative expectation of discomfort has been shown to have an augmenting effect on pain; also known as nocebo hyperalgesia. This was a cross-sectional study with repeated measures. Prior to dressing change, anticipatory pain level was evaluated by a 11-point numerical rating scale and anxiety by the Six-items State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-6). During wound dressing changes, pain was measured before dressing removal, at dressing removal, at cleansing and dressing application using the numerical scale. Analysis was completed based on the data from a convenience sample of 96 patients. Participants reported more pain at cleansing and dressing removal than baseline. High levels of anticipation, anxiety and pain at dressing change for wounds were related to heavy exudate and wound that were covered with necrotic tissue. Finally, the relationship between anticipation and pain perception was mediated by anxiety. Anticipation of pain triggers anxiety that can lead to increased pain. There is a need to incorporate evaluation of anxiety and personal expectations as part of comprehensive pain assessment. Clinicians should be aware of the impact of emotions and anticipation on overall pain experience. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. [The relationship between preoperative anxiety levels and vasovagal incidents during the administration of spinal anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekinci, Mürsel; Gölboyu, Birzat Emre; Dülgeroğlu, Onur; Aksun, Murat; Baysal, Pınar Karaca; Çelik, Erkan Cem; Yeksan, Ayşe Nur

    It was aimed to investigate the relationship between preoperative anxiety and vasovagal symptoms observed during the administration of spinal anesthesia in patients undergoing surgery in the perianal and inguinal regions. The study included patients with planned surgery for inguinal hernia repair, anal fissure, hemorrhoid and pilonidal sinus excision. The study included a total of 210 patients of ASA I-II, aged 18-65 years. Patients were evaluated in respect of demographic characteristics, smoking and alcohol consumption, ASA grade and educational level. Correlations were evaluated between the number of attempts at spinal anesthesia and anesthesia history with vasovagal symptoms and educational level, gender, smoking and alcohol consumption and anesthesia history with anxiety scores. The instant (transient) state anxiety inventory part of the Transient State/Trait Anxiety Inventory (State Trait Anxiety Inventory - STAI) was used to determine the anxiety levels of the participants. Clinical findings of peripheral vasodilation, hypotension, bradycardia and asystole observed during the administration of spinal anesthesia were recorded. Vasovagal incidences during the administration of spinal anesthesia were seen to increase in cases of high anxiety score, male gender, and an absence of anesthesia history. Educational level and the number of spinal needle punctures were not found to have any effect on vasovagal incidents. The determination of causes triggering vasovagal incidents seen during the application of spinal anesthesia, better patient information of regional anesthesia implementations and anxiety relief with preoperative anxiolytic treatment will help to eliminate potential vasovagal incidents. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Desenvolvimento da versão em português do Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI Desarrollo de la versión en portugués del Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI Development of the Brazilian Portuguese-language version of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Picon

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O objetivo do estudo foi desenvolver a versão em português do Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI, adaptada à cultura brasileira. MÉTODOS: Após aprovação de seus autores, foram realizadas: a tradução, retrotradução e discussão entre os tradutores e os autores norte-americanos para elaboração de versão final do SPAI Português; b validade de face por avaliação de peritos; c equivalência lingüística através de estudo da correlação entre teste e o reteste dos escores das versões em português e inglês, aplicados alternadamente, em amostra de 18 voluntários bilíngües, ambos os gêneros e d estudo de praticidade (aceitabilidade e utilidade (aplicabilidade do SPAI Português através das taxas de adesão e de preenchimento inadequado em amostra populacional de 365 universitários, ambos os gêneros. RESULTADOS: A versão final do SPAI Português apresenta equivalência lingüística, semântica e técnica, e validade de face plenamente satisfatórias. A equivalência lingüística foi testada através dos coeficientes de correlação de Pearson e intraclasse para o escore diferencial (total de 0,87 (IC 95% 0,64-0,96 0,87 (IC 95% 0,63-0,95, respectivamente (p OBJETIVO: El objetivo del estudio ha sido desarrollar la versión en portugués, adaptada a la cultura brasileña, del Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI. MÉTODOS: Tras aprobación de sus autores, se realizaron: a la traducción, retrotraducción y discusión entre los traductores y autores estadounidenses para elaboración de la versión final del SPAI Portugués; b validez de cara por evaluación de peritos; c equivalencia lingüística a través de estudio de la correlación entre la prueba y la reprueba de los escores de las versiones en portugués e inglés, aplicados alternadamente, en muestra de 18 voluntarios bilingües de ambos géneros y d estudio de practicidad (aceptabilidad y utilidad (aplicabilidad del SPAI Portugués a través de

  20. The relationship between self-efficacy and anxiety and general distress in caregivers of people with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugalde, Anna; Krishnasamy, Meinir; Schofield, Penelope

    2014-08-01

    Informal caregivers take on an important role in supporting people with advanced cancer but experience significant psychological distress. This study aims to describe the prevalence of anxiety and distress in a sample of caregivers of people with advanced cancer and explore the relationship with self-efficacy. A cross-sectional survey was used. Subjects were 94 caregivers of people with advanced cancer recruited from a specialist oncology setting. Questionnaires included the Caregiver Self-Efficacy Scale (CaSES), the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and the Distress Thermometer. Demographic data were recorded. The sample consisted of 94 caregivers of people with advanced cancer. The majority were female (66; 70.2%) with a mean age of 55 years. The mean distress score for the sample was 4.87 (standard deviation [SD] 2.49). Fifty-five caregivers (59.1%) had a score of ≥5 on the Distress Thermometer indicating distress. The state anxiety mean was 45.21 (SD 12.32) and trait anxiety mean was 41.21 (SD 10.143). Females had more distress and state anxiety than males. Only one self-efficacy scale, self-maintenance, correlated with distress. All STAI scores correlated with self-efficacy and self-maintenance had the strongest relationship. Caregivers had high anxiety and distress. Caregivers with higher anxiety reported lower self-efficacy. The strongest correlation was with the self-maintenance subscale, indicating an association with psychological functioning and caregivers who are able to access respite and take care of themselves during care provision.

  1. Both lavender fleur oil and unscented oil aromatherapy reduce preoperative anxiety in breast surgery patients: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Lola; Blanck, Thomas J J; Dugan, Kimberly; Kline, Richard; Shanmugam, Geetha; Galotti, Angela; von Bergen Granell, Annelise; Wajda, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether lavender fleur oil (LFO) aromatherapy would reduce anxiety when administered to women before undergoing breast surgery. This was a single-site, randomized study comparing the effect of LFO to unscented oil (UO). The study was conducted in the preoperative holding area of the ambulatory surgery department of NYU Langone Medical Center. Ninety three women, 18 years and older, scheduled for breast surgery. Women meeting inclusion/exclusion criteria were randomized to either LFO or UO aromatherapy and were blind to their assigned treatment. Subjects completed a Speilberger State Anxiety Inventory for Adults (STAI) before and after aromatherapy. Vital signs were recorded before and after aromatherapy. STAI-State questions were divided into positive and negative emotions for analysis. Before aromatherapy, there was no significant difference between groups by individual questions or overall average answer of either positive or negative questions. The use of both LFO and UO increased the positive STAI score totals, with the LFO group having a slightly, but statistically significant, greater increase. Both resulted in a statistically significant decrease in the negative score totals after treatment. There were no differences in vital signs between groups for either treatment. Following the conclusion of the trial LFO was analyzed and found to contain a very low content of the 2 major Lavandula angustifolia constituents. Both LFO and UO aromatherapy treatments lowered anxiety before surgery despite no significant changes in vital signs. LFO treatment generated a slight but statistically significant increase in positive feelings compared with UO treatment. It is probable that the beneficial effect observed was due to both aromatherapy with LFO and a placebo effect related to the added attention given to the patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Anxiety and hopelessness levels in patients with migraine and tension headache

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    Yüksel Kıvrak

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Migraine and tension type headache (TTH are two most common headaches. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether the hopelessness, anxiety and social self-esteem scores are different in two headache groups.Materials and Methods: This study was conducted with 72 migraine patients, 28 TTH patients and 50 healthy controls. Participants filled the General Information Form, Hopeless-ness Scale (HS, Spielberger Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-II and Social Comparison Scale (SCS. Results: There were no differences between the groups with respect to gender, age, education years, marital status and economical status. Hopelessness scores of the TTH group was higher than the migraine and control group (p=0.001. There were no statistical differences between the migraine and TTH groups with respect to STAI-II scores but TTH group scores higher in study groups (p=0.003. Control group SCS scores were higher than both patient groups with no significant differences (p=0.072.Conclusion: These findings indicate that the patients with TTH have more hopelessness than the migraine group and more anxious than the healthy control group.

  3. [Levels of state-trait anxiety between mothers and fathers who have children in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Carrasco, Karmina Elena

    2013-01-01

    Background: when there is a child patient in the family, it is frequent that parents get upset. Anxiety in the mother and father could be different depending on the way each one lives the critical situation of the child patient. The purpose was to measure levels of anxiety in fathers and mothers who had a hospitalized child in an intensive care unit. Methods: the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) was applied to a group of 50 pairs of parents who had a hospitalized child in the intensive care unit in a pediatric hospital. A no probabilistic intentional sample was used. Differences between groups were analyzed by Student's t test. Results: no significant differences were obtained between mothers and fathers for both state-anxiety and trait-anxiety. Significant differences were obtained intra-groups between both kinds of anxiety. Conclusions: having a child who is chronically sick or hospitalized for intensive therapy causes similar levels of anxiety in both parents. Anxiety is significantly increased in both parents when their child is hospitalized in an intensive therapy unit.

  4. Psychometric Properties of the Persian Version of the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI-P)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, Mir Mohammad; Soleimani, Robabeh; Fallahi, Mahnaz; Aghajanpour, Mohammad; Elahi, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Tinnitus can have a significant effect on an individual’s quality of life, and is very difficult quantify. One of the most popular questionnaires used in this area is the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI). The aim of this study was to determine the reliability and validity of a Persian translation of the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI-P). Materials and Methods: This prospective clinical study was performed in the Otolaryngology Department of Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Iran. A total of 102 patients aged 23–80 years with tinnitus completed the (THI-P). The patients were instructed to complete the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Audiometry was performed. Eight-five patients were asked to complete the THI-P for a second time 7–10 days after the initial interview. We assessed test–retest reliability and internal reliability of the THI-P. Validity was assessed by analyzing the THI-P of patients according to their age, tinnitus duration and psychological distress (BDI and STAI). A factor analysis was computed to verify if three subscales (functional, emotional, and catastrophic) represented three distinct variables. Results: Test–retest correlation coefficient scores were highly significant. The THI-P and its subscales showed good internal consistency reliability (α = 0.80 to 0.96). High-to-moderate correlations were observed between THI-P and psychological distress and tinnitus symptom ratings. A confirmatory factor analysis failed to validate the three subscales of THI, and high inter-correlations found between the subscales question whether they represent three distinct factors. Conclusion: The results suggest that the THI-P is a reliable and valid tool which can be used in a clinical setting to quantify the impact of tinnitus on the quality of life of Iranian patients. PMID:25938079

  5. Psychometric properties of the Persian version of the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI-P

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    Mir Mohammad Jalali

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tinnitus can have a significant effect on an individual’s quality of life, and is very difficult quantify. One of the most popular questionnaires used in this area is the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI. The aim of this study was to determine the reliability and validity of a Persian translation of the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI-P.   Materials and Methods: This prospective clinical study was performed in the Otolaryngology Department of Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Iran. A total of 102 patients aged 23–80 years with tinnitus completed the (THI-P. The patients were instructed to complete the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI. Audiometry was performed. Eight-five patients were asked to complete the THI-P for a second time 7–10 days after the initial interview. We assessed test–retest reliability and internal reliability of the THI-P. Validity was assessed by analyzing the THI-P of patients according to their age, tinnitus duration and psychological distress (BDI and STAI. A factor analysis was computed to verify if three subscales (functional, emotional, and catastrophic represented three distinct variables.   Results: Test–retest correlation coefficient scores were highly significant. The THI-P and its subscales showed good internal consistency reliability (α = 0.80 to 0.96. High-to-moderate correlations were observed between THI-P and psychological distress and tinnitus symptom ratings. A confirmatory factor analysis failed to validate the three subscales of THI, and high inter-correlations found between the subscales question whether they represent three distinct factors. Conclusion:  The results suggest that the THI-P is a reliable and valid tool which can be used in a clinical setting to quantify the impact of tinnitus on the quality of life of Iranian patients.

  6. Anxiety and Death Anxiety in Egyptian and Spanish Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Khalek, Ahmed M.; Tomas-Sabado, Joaquin

    2005-01-01

    Two samples of female nursing undergraduates from Egypt (n=132) and Spain (n=126) responded to the Arabic Scale of Death Anxiety, the Spanish Death Anxiety Inventory, the Templer's Death Anxiety Scale, the Kuwait University Anxiety Scale, and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-Trait Subscale. Each sample answered the scales in their native…

  7. Does preoperative orientation and education alleviate anxiety in posterior spinal fusion patients? A prospective, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Leslie; Nash, Cassie; Moisan, Alice; Scott, Donna C; Barkoh, Kaku; Warner, William C; Sawyer, Jeffrey R; Kelly, Derek M

    2015-01-01

    A prospective, randomized study examined the effect of interventional preoperative education and orientation for scoliosis surgery (PEOSS) on anxiety levels of patients undergoing posterior spinal fusion (PSF). Secondary outcomes analyzed were caregiver anxiety, length of stay, morphine equivalent usage, and patient/caregiver satisfaction. Patients undergoing PSF were randomly distributed into a control group (N=39) or interventional group (N=26). All subjects and caregivers completed the State (current)-Trait (typical) Anxiety Inventory (STAI) at different intervals: preoperative appointment, preoperative holding area, postoperative orthopaedic unit, and discharge. At discharge, patients and caregivers completed a satisfaction survey. Significantly higher state anxiety scores were found compared with baseline at all time intervals in both the control group and PEOSS group. The PEOSS group had higher state anxiety scores than the control group at the postoperative interval (P=0.024). There were no significant differences in the caregiver state anxiety scores between the groups at any time interval. Trait anxiety scores for both groups remained stable over time, establishing that the measurement tool accurately reflected baseline anxiety. No significant differences were found in length of stay or morphine equivalent use. Patient satisfaction scores were higher in the PEOSS group than in the control group (P=0.0005). PSF was associated with increased anxiety at all time intervals in adolescents in both groups. In the PEOSS group, PSF was associated with increased anxiety in the immediate postoperative period. Despite the increase in anxiety, patient satisfaction was higher in the intervention group. It is likely that patients need age-appropriate information and educational strategies to minimize anxiety during PSF. Further work is underway to study and develop more effective interventional strategies. Level I study.

  8. Anxiety associated with diagnostic uncertainty in early pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, A; Raine-Fenning, N; Deb, S; Campbell, B; Vedhara, K

    2017-08-01

    To determine anxiety levels of women presenting to an early pregnancy assessment unit (EPAU) with abdominal pain and/or vaginal bleeding and to assess how these levels change over time and according to ultrasonographic diagnosis. We undertook a prospective cohort study in an EPAU in a large UK teaching hospital. Women with abdominal pain and/or vaginal bleeding in early pregnancy (anxiety levels were assessed using the standardized short form of Spielberger's state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI) on three occasions (before, immediately after and 48-72 hours after an ultrasound scan). Scores were correlated with ultrasonographic diagnosis. The diagnosis was either certain or uncertain. Certain diagnoses were either positive, i.e. a viable intrauterine pregnancy (IUP), or negative, i.e. a non-viable IUP or ectopic pregnancy. Uncertain diagnoses included pregnancy of unknown location and pregnancy of uncertain viability. Statistical analysis involved mixed ANOVAs and the post-hoc Tukey-Kramer test. A total of 160 women were included in the study. Anxiety levels decreased over time for women with a certain diagnosis (n = 128), even when negative (n = 64), and increased over time for women with an uncertain diagnosis (n = 32). Before the ultrasound examination, anxiety levels were high (STAI value, 21.96 ± 1.11) and there was no significant difference between the five groups. Immediately after the ultrasound examination, anxiety levels were lower in the viable IUP group (n = 64; 7.75 ± 1.13) than in any other group. The difference between the five groups was significant (P anxiety levels than had those with an uncertain diagnosis (10.77 ± 4.30 vs 22.94 ± 1.65; P anxiety levels more than does the positive or negative connotations associated with the diagnosis per se. Healthcare providers should be aware of this when communicating uncertain diagnoses. Copyright © 2016 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Copyright © 2016 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons

  9. The association between bodily anxiety symptom dimensions and the scales of the Revised NEO Personality Inventory and the Temperament and Character Inventory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ann Suhl; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Mors, Ole

    2009-01-01

    to the general severity factor. Structural equation modeling of data on 120 patients with a primary diagnosis of social phobia and 207 patients with a primary diagnosis of panic disorder was used to examine the association between anxiety symptom dimensions and the scales of the Temperament and Character...

  10. Depression and anxiety in pregnancy and postpartum in women with mild and severe preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedian, Zahra; Soltani, Narges; Mokhber, Naghmeh; Esmaily, Habibollah

    2015-01-01

    Risk for anxiety and depression is increased in women with high-risk pregnancy. The aim of this study was to evaluate anxiety and depression in women with mild and severe preeclampsia at admission and 6 weeks postpartum. In this cohort study, 122 preeclamptic women who were admitted to the Public hospital and Tamin Ejtemaee hospital of Mashhad were included. Selection was done by convenience sampling method. Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) and Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) were completed at admission and 6 weeks after delivery. Data were analyzed by SPSS 16 using Chi-square, Fisher's exact test, Mann-Whitney U test, and Repeated measurement. The mean depression score was 4.81 ± 4.09 at admission and 11.17 ± 5.5 at 6 weeks postpartum. The mean of trait anxiety was 42.5 ± 10.5 at admission and 32.3 ± 6.5 at 6 weeks postpartum, and the mean of state anxiety score at admission was 43.09 ± 9.5 and at 6 weeks postpartum was 31.99 ± 5.9. There was a significant difference between the scores of depression (F = 3.8, P preeclampsia and the scores of depression, state anxiety, and trait anxiety at admission and 6 weeks postpartum. The mean score of state and trait anxiety decreased significantly in preeclamptic women from admission to 6 weeks postpartum, but the mean score of depression increased. Severity of preeclampsia was not an independent risk factor of depression and anxiety.

  11. Influence of obstetrical events on satisfaction and anxiety during childbirth: a prospective longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floris, Lucia; Irion, Olivier; Courvoisier, Delphine

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feelings of anxiety and satisfaction among 79 primiparas who had uncomplicated pregnancies, at the time of hospital admission and after birth, considering the mode of delivery, analgesia, and pain levels. Questionnaires were completed at admission to the hospital and two months after delivery, using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) state scale and the Labour Agentry Scale. The mean (SD) STAI state score was higher at admission (36.7 (10.7)) than 4 months after childbirth (32.1 (9.7)) (paired Student's t-test, t = 2.93; df = 78; p = .004). However, the postnatal anxiety was not associated with the mode of delivery, epidural or pain. Regarding the satisfaction with the expectations of control during childbirth, the mean (SD) score was higher before childbirth (166.0 (21.8)) than after (157.5 (33.5)) (paired Student's t-test, t = -2.28; df = 77; p = .03). The satisfaction with the childbirth experience was significantly associated with the expectations of childbirth and the mode of delivery, but not with analgesia or pain. The postnatal anxiety was associated with physical health, pain and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale score during the postpartum period. It is important to consider the temporality of perinatal anxiety in order to understand its causes. Our results indicate that the experience of childbirth was predicted in this sample by the antenatal expectations and delivery outcomes.

  12. Foundation programme impact on junior doctor personality and anxiety in Northern Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Mark; Noad, Rebecca; Boohan, Mairead; Carragher, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The main objectives of this study were to assess personality traits and levels of anxiety in Foundation Year 2 (F2) doctors during the foundation doctor training programme in the Northern Ireland Deanery (NIMDTA). A prospective survey-based study was conducted for all F2 doctors attending the mandatory generic skills programme at NIMDTA. Anxiety was measured using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) while personality was assessed using the IPIP-NEO questionnaire. These previously validated questionnaires were completed at the start and again at the end of the F2 year. 147 (M=65, F=82) and 106 (M=55, F=51) F2 doctors completed questionnaires at both time points. STAI scores suggested a moderate level of anxiety amongst both male and female doctors at baseline and at the end of the academic year. There was no difference between gender for either parameter (Baseline-State: 34.0 vs. 36.0, p=0.48 and Trait: 39.0 vs. 40.5, p=0.33) (End-State: 41.0 vs. 36.0, p=0.14 and Trait: 42.0 vs. 40.5, p=0.78). IPIP-NEO scores for F2 doctors were consistently higher in the Accommodation (93.9 & 92.3) and Consolidation (88.8 & 87.6) personality factors and lower in the Neuroticism factor (66.3 & 65.9) at both assessment time-points. Female F2 doctors scored significantly higher in the accommodation factor at the end of the academic year when compared to their male counterparts (88.0 vs. 94.0, p0.09). This first cohort of F2 doctors were exposed to many emerging changes in their training which did not appear to have any detrimental effect on their anxiety levels or personality profiles and suggests that junior doctors may not be affected by external influences or changing educational environments.

  13. Sexual Compulsivity Comorbidity With Depression, Anxiety, and Substance Use in Students From Serbia and Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzanan Berberovic

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to examine relationships between sexual compulsivity, depression (including level of self-esteem anxiety, and the use of tobacco, alcohol and drugs in a sample of 1,711 students from Serbia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. Sexual compulsivity, depression, and anxiety were measured with standardized scales and inventories (the Sexual Compulsivity Scale – SCS, the Beck Depression Inventory – BDI, and the Spielberger’s State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-Trait, STAI-T, respectively, whereas specific questions about tobacco, alcohol, and drug use were modified for the purpose of this study. Results indicated positive, significant but low correlations between sexual compulsivity and depression; sexual compulsivity and anxiety; and sexual compulsivity and substance use; whereas a low, negative but significant correlation was obtained between sexual compulsivity and self-esteem. The strongest predictor of sexual compulsivity was drug use; two other significant predictors were alcohol and depression. Limitations of the study are discussed in the end.

  14. Anxiety among adolescents and its affect on orthodontic compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trakyali, G; Isik-Ozdemir, F; Tunaboylu-Ikiz, T; Pirim, B; Yavuz, A Elif

    2009-01-01

    Investigations have suggested that poor compliance could be an indicator of poor relationship with family and could be related to the person's personality traits. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of parents attitude, the anxiety during treatment and self-confidence/self-care of the patient on cooperation during orthodontic treatment. The study material consisted of questionnaires completed by 82 adolescent patients and their parents. The patients were divided into two groups of 42 compliant and 40 non-compliant patients. The above-mentioned questionnaires were State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-STAI, Piers-Harris Children's Self Concept Scale and The Exercise of Self-Care Agency for the patients and Mc Master Family Assessment Device and Parental Attitude Research Instrument-PARI for the parents. The problem solving and caring attitude of the father and his determinative role in the family had a positive influence on the compliance of the child. The patients who showed better compliance also had a lower state of anxiety, which could also be explained by the positive effect of the attitude of the father in the family. It would be useful to overcome the increased state of anxiety of the child in the orthodontic clinic by using educational and relaxation techniques. Besides, it would be wise to ask the father to be present at the first appointment during part of the education of the child.

  15. Anxiety among adolescents and its affect on orthodontic compliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trakyali G

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Investigations have suggested that poor compliance could be an indicator of poor relationship with family and could be related to the person′s personality traits. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of parents attitude, the anxiety during treatment and self-confidence/self-care of the patient on cooperation during orthodontic treatment. Materials and Methods: The study material consisted of questionnaires completed by 82 adolescent patients and their parents. The patients were divided into two groups of 42 compliant and 40 non-compliant patients. The above-mentioned questionnaries were State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-STAI, Piers-Harris Children′s Self Concept Scale and The Exercise of Self-Care Agency for the patients and Mc Master Family Assessment Device and Parental Attitude Research Instrument-PARI for the parents. Results: The problem solving and caring attitude of the father and his determinative role in the family had a positive infulence on the compliance of the child. The patients who showed better compliance also had a lower state of anxiety, which could also be explained by the positive effect of the attitude of the father in the family. Conclusion: It would be useful to overcome the increased state of anxiety of the child in the orthodontic clinic by using educational and relaxation techniques. Besides, it would be wise to ask the father to be present at the first appointment during part of the education of the child.

  16. [The Polish adaptation of the public speaking anxiety questionnaire].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodkiewicz, Jan; Miniszewska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was the Polish adaptation of the shortened Public Speaking Anxiety Questionnaire GFER by Spitznagel and co-workers. GFER is a self-assessment method which consists of 16 statements and is designed to assess emotions, physiological reactions, and thoughts that appear in a situation of public speaking. GFER was used to examine 320 students from Lodz's universities. The State/Trait Anxiety Inventory - STAI by Spielberger, The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale by Zigmunt and Snaith and TCI by Cloninger were also used. The Polish version of GFER is a reliable and valid tool. The factor structure is similar to the original structure. As a result of the conducted analyses, there was obtained the 9-item version of the tool, which has a 2-factor structure - factor I: emotional and physiological reactions, factor II: worrying. The results obtained with GFER present a statistically significant correlation with other measures of anxiety and with the dimension of temperament: harm avoidance. The obtained results indicate that GFER may be used in both scientific research and therapeutic practice.

  17. Anxiety and depression among infertile women: a cross-sectional survey from Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Enikő; Szigeti, Judit F; Ujma, Péter P; Sexty, Réka; Balog, Piroska

    2017-07-24

    Infertility is often associated with a chronic state of stress which may manifest itself in anxiety-related and depressive symptoms. The aim of our study is to assess the psychological state of women with and without fertility problems, and to investigate the background factors of anxiety-related and depressive symptoms in women struggling with infertility. Our study was conducted with the participation of 225 (134 primary infertile and 91 fertile) women, recruited in a clinical setting and online. We used the following questionnaires: Spielberger Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-T), Shortened Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Fertility Problem Inventory (FPI). We also interviewed our subjects on the presence of other sources of stress (the quality of the relationship with their mother, financial and illness-related stress), and we described sociodemographic and fertility-specific characteristics. We tested our hypotheses using independent-samples t-tests (M ± SD) and multiple linear regression modelling (ß). Infertile women were younger (33.30 ± 4.85 vs. 35.74 ± 5.73, p = .001), but had significantly worse psychological well-being (BDI = 14.94 ± 12.90 vs. 8.95 ± 10.49, p anxiety in infertile women were associated with age, social concern, sexual concern and maternal relationship stress. Trait anxiety was also associated with financial stress. Our model was able to account for 58% of the variance of depressive symptoms and 62% of the variance of trait anxiety. Depressive and anxiety-related symptoms of infertile women are more prominent than those of fertile females. The measurement of these indicators and the mitigation of underlying distress by adequate psychosocial interventions should be encouraged.

  18. Effects of acute sleep deprivation on state anxiety levels: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Gabriel Natan; Bezerra, Andreia Gomes; Tufik, Sergio; Andersen, Monica Levy

    2016-08-01

    Increased anxiety levels have been widely recognized as one of the most important consequences of sleep deprivation. However, despite this general consensus, there are still aspects of this relationship, such as the extent of the anxiogenic potential and the specific effects of different types of sleep deprivation, which remain unclear. As no broad review has been undertaken to evaluate this relationship, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis regarding the effects of sleep deprivation on state anxiety. Our search strategy encompassed two databases - Pubmed/Medline and Scopus - through which we were able to identify 756 articles. After the selection process, 18 articles, encompassing 34 experiments, composed our final sample. Our analyses indicate that sleep deprivation, whether total or not, leads to a significant increase in state anxiety levels, but sleep restriction does not. Regarding the effect of the length of the period of sleep deprivation, no significant results were observed, but there was a notable tendency for an increase in anxiety in longer sleep deprivations. With regard to tools, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) seems to be the best one to measure sleep-induced anxiogenesis, while the Profile of Mood States (POMS) presented inconclusive results. In conclusion, it can be affirmed that sleep deprivation induces a state of increased anxiety, with similar results also in the case of total sleep deprivation; however, results in more specific experimental conditions are not definitive. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Relationship between time management skills and anxiety and academic motivation of nursing students in Tehran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiasvand, Arezoo Mohamadkhani; Naderi, Manijeh; Tafreshi, Mansoureh Zagheri; Ahmadi, Farzane; Hosseini, Meimanat

    2017-01-01

    Time management skills are essential for nursing students' success, and development of clinical competence. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between time management skills and anxiety and academic motivation of nursing students in Tehran medical sciences universities in 2015. This cross-sectional study was carried out on 441 nursing students in three medical universities in Tehran. Random stratified sampling was done to select the samples. Data were collected using demographic Questionnaire, Time Management Questionnaire (TMQ), Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and Academic Motivation Scale (AMS), which was completed t by self-report. Data were analyzed using SPSS 18 software with descriptive and analytical statistics such as ANOVA, independent t-test, Regression and Pearson Correlation Coefficient. Most participants had a moderate level of time Management skills (49%), State Anxiety (58%), Trait Anxiety (60%) and Academic Motivation (58%). The results also showed a statistically significant negative correlation between the students' TMQ scores and the state anxiety (r= -0.282, ptime management skills in order to enhance academic motivation and reduce anxiety rates among nursing students.

  20. Effects of a single 1200-mg preoperative dose of gabapentin on anxiety and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, F; Bordenave, L; Sessler, D I; Chauvin, M

    2012-10-01

    Gabapentin has antihyperalgesic and potential anxiolytic effects. We therefore evaluated the effects of gabapentin premedication on anxiety, amnesia, and sedation. We tested the primary hypothesis that 1200mg of oral gabapentin 2 to 3h before surgery reduces preoperative anxiety. Our secondary hypothesis was that gabapentin administration is sedative without causing preoperative amnesia. Prospective, randomized and placebo-controlled study. Surgical patients having general anaesthesia were randomly assigned to either 1200mg oral gabapentin (n=32) or an identical-looking placebo (n=32) 2 to 3h before anaesthesia. Anxiety, sedation, and amnesia were quantified before premedication, 2h thereafter, and postoperatively. Preoperative anxiety was measured using the Spielberger state trait anxiety inventory (STAI state) and the visual analogue scale anxiety (VAS). Memory was assessed with the picture recall test of Snodgrass and Vanderwart. Results were compared with t, Mann-Whitney U, or Chi(2) tests as appropriate, Psedation scores. Gabapentin premedication, 1200mg, provided preoperative anxiolysis without causing sedation or impairing preoperative memory. Copyright © 2012 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Original article Attachment styles and anxiety of rejecters in intimate relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Mandal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background In this paper, the problem of the lack of stability of intimate female-male relationships, the intensity of which is currently increasing, is presented. Attention is focused on early-childhood attachment styles and anxiety in rejecters in intimate relationships. Participants and procedure The research included 120 individuals: 60 individuals who had dropped 3-15 partners (on average, M = 3.77 partners and 60 individuals from the control group. The following research tools were applied: the Attachment Styles Inventory, and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI. Results The results showed that rejecters in intimate relationships obtained higher results than individuals from the control group in an avoidant and an anxious-ambivalent attachment style, and lower ones in a secure attachment style, as well as higher ones in anxiety as a trait. Sex itself was not a differentiating factor in any of the studied variables. An avoidant attachment style, and anxiety as a trait, were predictors of being a rejecter. Conclusions The obtained results confirm the fundamental findings of the theory of attachment indicating that the lower the level of a secure style is, the lower is the level of interpersonal skills.

  2. State anxiety and depression as factors modulating and influencing postoperative pain in dental implant surgery. A prospective clinical survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-de Diego, Rafael; Cutando-Soriano, Antonio; Montero-Martín, Javier; Prados-Frutos, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Objetives: To determine whether preoperative state anxiety and depression modulate or influence objective and subjective postoperative pain following dental implant insertion. Study Design: Prospective, clinical study with 7-day follow-up of a sample of 105 subjects who preoperatively completed the state anxiety questionnaire (STAI-E) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and postoperatively, at 2 and 7 days, recorded objective pain with the Semmes-Weinstein mechanical esthesiometer (SW test) and subjective pain with the Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Results: 85.6% and 81.5% of patients, respectively, recorded no signs of state anxiety or depression. The correlation between anxiety and depression for both maxillary bones was the lower (P=0.02). The correlation between subjective and objective pain at 2 and 7 days, and the anatomic regions intervened, was statistically significant in the mandible at day 7 (P<0.01), and highly significant (P<0.001) for the other variables. The correlation between state anxiety and objective pain at day 7 was nearly statistically significant (P=0.07). Conclusions: The correlation between state anxiety and depression, and objective and subjective pain at day 7 was not statistically significant. A strong correlation was found between objective and subjective pain in the immediate postoperative period. Key words:Anxiety, depression, postoperative pain, dental implants. PMID:24880447

  3. A randomized trial of the effects of an aquatic exercise program on depression, anxiety levels, and functional capacity in of people who suffered an ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aidar, Felipe J; Jacó de Oliveira, Ricardo; Gama de Matos, Dihogo; Chilibeck, Philip D; de Souza, Raphael F; Carneiro, André L; Machado Reis, Victor

    2017-05-09

    Aquatic exercise programs are used in rehabilitation and might help to reduce disability after stroke. This was a randomized intervention trial to assess the influence of an aquatic exercise program on people suffering from depression and anxiety after ischemic stroke. Participants were randomized to an experimental group (EG) composed of 19 individuals (51.8 ± 8.5 years; ten males and nine females), and a control group (CG) composed of 17 people (52.7 ± 6.7 years; nine males and eight females). The aquatic exercise program consisted of two sessions per week, each lasting between 45 and 60 minutes and divided into 5 to 10 minutes exercise sections during 12 weeks. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) was used to determine anxiety levels while the Beck Depression Inventory was used as a self-assessment of depression. EG improved measures of depression, anxiety trait and anxiety state between pre- and post-treatment, with no changes in CG. EG improved in all tests related to functional capacity compared to CG. The practice of aquatic exercises promotes improvements in the levels of depression and anxiety in people who suffered an ischemic stroke.

  4. Methodology in the assessment of stress among air traffic control specialists (ATCS) : normative adult data for the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory from non-ATCS populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    STAI scores of adult men and women within the age range of 25 through 59 years were generally equal to or slightly less than scores of the college undergraduate normative group. This suggests that the previous use of undergraduate norms to evaluate A...

  5. Referral for Fetal Echocardiography is Associated with Increased Maternal Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Katherine B.; Monk, Catherine; Kleinman, Charles S.; Glickstein, Julie S.; Levasseur, Stephanie M.; Simpson, Lynne L.; Williams, Ismee A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Referral for fetal echocardiography is an acute stressor that may induce significant maternal anxiety. To promote good clinical management of expectant mothers in this situation, including adequate screening for possible psychiatric interventions, data is needed regarding the psychosocial functioning of women scheduled for fECHO procedures. Objective To investigate the association between fECHO and maternal anxiety. Methods Pregnant women answered two questionnaires prior to first fECHO. The Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) assessed how subjects feel “now” (state) versus how they “usually feel” (trait). Separate state and trait anxiety scores were calculated; scores were compared between the study cohort and a gestational age-matched historical cohort of 31 pregnant women who did not undergo fECHO. A second questionnaire developed by the investigators ascertained pregnancy specific concerns and characteristics. Results 40 subjects were enrolled. The mean state score of the fECHO cohort (42.1±15.1) differed from the historical cohort (32.8±11.3; p=0.006); however there was no difference between trait scores (34.7±10.8 vs. 35.4 ±12.8; p=0.8). A multivariate linear regression model controlling for race and maternal age demonstrated that fECHO was a strong independent predictor of maternal state anxiety score (p=0.004, β=10.4). Conclusions Pregnant women presenting for fECHO report high anxiety levels compared with women not presenting for fECHO. Clinician awareness and sensitivity is recommended and further investigation of modifiers of anxiety in this high risk group should be explored. PMID:20443657

  6. Anxiety and depression mediate the role of low self-esteem and low self-directedness in the development of eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloi, Matteo; Segura-García, Cristina

    2016-10-14

    Low self-esteem and low self-directedness (SD) are considered a risk factor for the development of eating disorders (EDs). The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that low self-esteem and low SD lead to a higher risk for EDs through the mediation of anxiety and depression. Seventy-seven female teenagers answered the Eating Disorder Inventory 3 (EDI-3), the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale (IUS), the Temperament and Character Inventory-Revised (TCI-R), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), and the State and Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R). To test the hypothesis, a structural equation model (SEM) was used. According to the EDI3-EDRC scores, 23/77 (29.9%) participants demonstrated positive results in the screening. Participants who had positive results in the screening had significantly higher scores on trait and state anxiety, depression, and IU, and lower means of self-esteem and SD. The SEM demonstrated good fit indices and all paths were significant in the predicted directions, confirming the hypothesized model. The current results confirm the role of self-esteem and SD in the development of an ED among adolescent females through the mediating action of IU, anxiety, and depression.

  7. Role of Auriculotherapy in the Treatment of Temporomandibular Disorders with Anxiety in University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Hollanda Iunes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of auriculotherapy with mustard seeds in the treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs, anxiety, and electromyographic (EMG activity in university students. Methodology. The State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC for TMDs (RDC/TMDs, and electromyography were used in this study of 44 college students with high levels of anxiety and TMDs. The subjects were divided into two groups: an auriculotherapy (AA group (n=31 and an AA sham group (n=13. The mustard seeds were applied to the shenmen, rim, sympathetic, brain stem, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ points in the AA group and to sham points in the external ear and wrist in the AA sham group. The treatment protocol was 10 sessions (two treatments per week. Results. Anxiety (p<0.01 was significantly reduced in the AA group. This group also showed a decrease in tender points in the mandibular posterior region (p=0.04 and in the right side of the submandibular region (p=0.02. Complaints of bilateral pain were reduced in the temporal tendon (p≤0.01 and in the left side of the ATM (p<0.01. In addition, electromyographic (EMG activity was reduced during temporal muscle contraction (p=0.03.  Conclusion. Auriculotherapy was effective in the treatment of students with anxiety and TMDs.

  8. Further validation of the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory in a US adult population sample

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    BeLue Rhonda

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20 was developed in 1995. Since then, it has been widely used in cancer research and cancer-related illnesses but has never been validated in fatiguing illnesses or in a large US population-selected sample. In this study, we sought to examine the reliability and validity of the MFI-20 in the population of the state of Georgia, USA. Further, we assessed whether the MFI-20 could serve as a complementary diagnostic tool in chronically fatigued and unwell populations. Methods The data derive from a cross-sectional population-based study investigating the prevalence of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS in Georgia. The study sample was comprised of three diagnostic groups: CFS-like (292, chronically unwell (269, and well (222. Participants completed the MFI-20 along with several other measures of psychosocial functioning, including the Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form-36 (SF-36, the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS, and the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI. We assessed the five MFI-20 subscales using several criteria: inter-item correlations, corrected item-total correlations, internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha coefficients, construct validity, discriminant (known-group validity, floor/ceiling effects, and convergent validity through correlations with the SF-36, SDS, and STAI instruments. Results Averaged inter-item correlations ranged from 0.38 to 0.61, indicating no item redundancy. Corrected item-total correlations for all MFI-20 subscales were greater than 0.30, and Cronbach's alpha coefficients achieved an acceptable level of 0.70. No significant floor/ceiling effect was observed. Factor analysis demonstrated factorial complexity. The MFI-20 also distinguished clearly between three diagnostic groups on all subscales. Furthermore, correlations with depression (SDS, anxiety (STAI, and functional impairment (SF-36 demonstrated strong convergent

  9. [Effect of schema-focused therapy on depression, anxiety and maladaptive cognitive schemas in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindynis, S; Burlacu, S; Louville, P; Limosin, F

    2013-12-01

    Depression is one of the most frequent mental disorders in older people, known to increase rates of disability and mortality. Depression in late life, commonly accompanied by multiple medical illnesses, reduces quality of life and is a strong risk factor for suicide. Despite its clinical significance, depression remains underdiagnosed and inadequately treated in older patients. Cognitive-behavioural psychotherapies have the most empirical support in treating late-life depression, and are recommended by numerous guidelines in this indication. Group interventions are also recommended for older adults because they offer peer support, mitigate social isolation, encourage shared empathy and provide a context for peer feedback help from the group. Previous studies have shown that maladaptive schemas have an important role in the development or maintenance of depression and anxiety in older people, either as risk factors or as vulnerability markers, but there are no studies that have examined the effectiveness of schema-focused therapy to improve depression in late life. The main goals of the present study were to explore the relationship of maladaptive schemas with depression and anxiety severity in aged inpatients, and to evaluate the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioural individual and group treatment program that includes schema-focused therapy on depression, anxiety, and cognitive schemas activation. The sample consisted of aged depressed inpatients (n=51) treated in a psychiatric unit. Participants completed measures of depression (Geriatric Depression Scale [GDS]) and anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory [STAI]) severity and maladaptive schemas (Cognitive Inventory of Subjective Distress [CISD]) at pre- and post-intervention (mean hospital stay: 4weeks). The maladaptive schemas Loss of Individuality, Refusal of Assistance and Vulnerability are more activated in our sample of depressed subjects with regard to the reference population. Most of specific maladaptive

  10. Comparison of the Levels of Anxiety, Depression and Hopelessness of Patients with Epilepsy and Healthy Individuals

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    Emine Rabia Koç

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Epilepsy is characterized by sudden seizures and loss of control in patients; it leads to constantly be under stress. Psychiatric disorders, particularly depressive disorders are more frequent in patients with epilepsy than in the whole of society. In this study; we aimed to compare depression,anxiety and desperation levels between epileptic patients and healthy ones. METHODS: 34 patients and 34 healthy controls were enrolled to the study. Demographic features of all subjects were also recorded. Neurologic examination, Electroencephalography (EEG and cranial magnetic resonance imaging(MRI of patients were also evaluated. State-Trait Anxety Inventory (STAI is for anxiety, Beck Depression Inventory (BDE is for depression, Beck Hopelessness Scale (BUO is for hopelessness were evaluated. RESULTS: Epileptic patients were with mean age of 24.56 ± 8.49, healthy subjects were with the mean age 27.44 ± 5.66 years. 13 of patients were female(38.2% and 21 patients were male(%38.2 in all groups.There was no significant difference about demographic features(p>0.05. When continuous and instant anxiety levels of epileptic and healthy groups were compared, no significant difference was observed between instant anxiety levels(p> 0.05; but there was difference between continuous anxiety levels (p <0.05. Also, hopelessness and depression levels were similar between groups (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: The results of the study showed that depression, anxiety and hopelessness levels were higher in epileptic patients when compared to healthy people. In addition, patients with seizure control with less drug use will reduce the level of trait anxiety was concluded

  11. Comparison of the Levels of Anxiety, Depression and Hopelessness of Patients with Epilepsy and Healthy Individuals

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    Emine Rabia Koç

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Epilepsy is characterized by sudden seizures and loss of control in patients; it leads to constantly be under stress. Psychiatric disorders, particularly depressive disorders are more frequent in patients with epilepsy than in the whole of society. In this study; we aimed to compare depression,anxiety and desperation levels between epileptic patients and healthy ones. METHODS: 34 patients and 34 healthy controls were enrolled to the study. Demographic features of all subjects were also recorded. Neurologic examination, Electroencephalography (EEG and cranial magnetic resonance imaging(MRI of patients were also evaluated. State-Trait Anxety Inventory (STAI is for anxiety, Beck Depression Inventory (BDE is for depression, Beck Hopelessness Scale (BUO is for hopelessness were evaluated. RESULTS: Epileptic patients were with mean age of 24.56 ± 8.49, healthy subjects were with the mean age 27.44 ± 5.66 years. 13 of patients were female(38.2% and 21 patients were male(%38.2 in all groups.There was no significant difference about demographic features(p>0.05. When continuous and instant anxiety levels of epileptic and healthy groups were compared, no significant difference was observed between instant anxiety levels(p> 0.05; but there was difference between continuous anxiety levels (p <0.05. Also, hopelessness and depression levels were similar between groups (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: The results of the study showed that depression, anxiety and hopelessness levels were higher in epileptic patients when compared to healthy people. In addition, patients with seizure control with less drug use will reduce the level of trait anxiety was concluded.

  12. Intensification of anxiety and depression, and personal resources among women during the peri-operative period

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    Magdalena Lewicka

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Surgical treatment of women due to gynaecological disorders is the cause of stress and may lead to psychological changes. Studies concerning human response to stress emphasize the importance of the effect of the level of the sense of coherence, anxiety, depression, dispositional optimism and skills of expressing emotions on the quality of feelings and experiences in difficult situations. Materials and methods. The study covered 232 women who had undergone gynaecological surgery due to various causes. Permission to conduct the research was obtained from the Bioethical Commission at the Medical University in Lublin. The study was carried out with the use of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, the Beck Depression Inventory, Courtauld Emotional Control Scale (CECS, and Life Orientation Test – Revised (LOT-R. Results and conclusions. The study showed that investigations of the sense of coherence, level of anxiety and depression, and personal resources allow determination of the characteristics of patients who should be covered with special psychoprophylactic care during the peri-operative period. In addition, the results of own studies obtained may be used for the development of adequate principles of psycho-prophylactic management in the course of the diagnostic-treatment proces with respect to women who had undergone surgical treatment due to gynaecological disorders.

  13. Investigation of depression, anxiety and quality of life in patients with knee osteoarthritis: a comparative study.

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    Ferreira, Alyne Hevellen; Godoy, Priscilla Brandi Gomes; Oliveira, Nara Rejane Cruz de; Diniz, Roger Amorim Santos; Diniz, Ricardo Edésio Amorim Santos; Padovani, Ricardo da Costa; Silva, Regina Cláudia Barbosa da

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) affects the articular cartilage and subchondral bone, compromising the joint as a whole. The knee joint is characterized as one of the main sites of involvement of OA and the most significant risk factors for developing the disease are aging, overweight and female gender. OA is considered one of the most frequent causes of disability, which may affect the quality of life of the patients, favoring the onset of mental disorders. To investigate whether anxiety and depression symptoms are more significant in women with OA, when compared with women without this diagnosis, and to what extent this rheumatic disease affects the quality of life of these patients. The study included 75 women, mean age 67 years; 40 were diagnosed with knee OA and 35 without this diagnosis. The following instruments were used: State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and SF-36, a quality of life questionnaire. Women with knee OA have higher rates of depression and anxiety when compared to controls; in addition, they have a lower quality of life. We believe that the treatment of patients with OA should consider the combination of pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, counseling and family support, in order to achieve a better quality of life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Control of anxiety through music in a head and neckoutpatient clinic: a randomized clinical trial

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    Mariana Alves Firmeza

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE Evaluating the effectiveness of a musical intervention in reducing anxiety and vital parameters in people suffering from head and neck cancer. METHOD A randomized controlled clinical trial, performed in a head and neck outpatient clinic with 40 participants, subdivided into two groups (intervention and control.The classicalmusic“Spring” from The Four Seasons by Vivaldi was used as an intervention.The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI was used as the data collectioninstrument,along with an inventory of socio-demographic and clinical data. Student'st-test was used to verify intragroup and intergroup statistical significance. RESULTS Participants presented a statistically significant reduction in levels of perceived anxiety (t= 12.68; p<0.001,as well as blood pressure levels (t = 4.56; p<0.001; pulse (t = 6.15; p<0.001 and respiratory rate (t = 5.10; p<0.001. CONCLUSION Music has proven to be an effective non-pharmacological therapeutic resource in managinganxiety in an outpatient setting for people with cancer, as well as in reducing blood pressure, pulse and respiratory rate. Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials: RBR-7W4YJJ

  15. Social anxiety, depression and self-esteem in obese adolescent girls with acanthosis nigricans.

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    Pirgon, Özgür; Sandal, Gonca; Gökçen, Cem; Bilgin, Hüseyin; Dündar, Bumin

    2015-03-01

    To assess the impact of acanthosis nigricans (AN) on depression symptoms, related quality of life and self-esteem scores in obese adolescent girls. Fifty-nine obese adolescent girls (mean age: 13.19±1.3 years, age range: 12-17 years, mean body mass index: 29.89±3.30) were enrolled in this study. The obese adolescent girls were divided into two groups based on presence or absence of AN. Non-obese healthy adolescents constituted the control group (30 girls, mean age: 13.5±1.4 years). All subjects were evaluated using the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children (STAI-C), and the modified Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (SES). Higher scores indicated more severe depression and anxiety, as well as low self-esteem status. The AN and non-AN obese groups showed significantly higher CDI, STAI-C and SES scores than the control group, and the two obese groups demonstrated no significant differences for these scores. The AN obese group with higher total testosterone levels (>50 ng/dL) had higher scores for SES (2.55±1.8 vs. 1.42±1.2; p=0.03) than the AN obese group with low total testosterone levels. SES scores significantly correlated with total testosterone levels (r=0.362; p=0.03) and fasting insulin (r=0.462; p=0.03) in the AN obese group. Higher SES scores (low self-esteem status) were determined in obese adolescents with acanthosis and were related to hyperandrogenism. This study also showed that a high testosterone level may be one of the important indicators of low self-esteem status in obese girls with AN.

  16. Quality of life and anxiety in women with breast cancer before and after treatment

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    Raquel Rey Villar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: to determine the quality of life and anxiety in patients with breast cancer and the changes they experience after treatments. Method: prospective study. Breast cancer statistics (n=339, confidence=95%, accuracy= ± 5.32%. The quality of life questionnaires (QLQ used were QLQ C-30 and QLQ Br23, and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI was used for anxiety. A multivariate analysis was performed to identify variables associated with baseline quality of life and anxiety as well as pre- and post-treatment differences. Authorization was obtained from the Ethics Committee, and informed consent was provided by all patients. Results: the baseline quality of life dimensions with the lowest score were future prospects (46.0/100 and sexual enjoyment (55.7/100. The dimensions with the highest score were body image (94.2/100 and role (93.3/100. The most disturbing symptoms were insomnia, fatigue and concern about hair loss. After treatment, the dimensions of physical function, role, body image, financial concerns and symptomatology worsened, whereas emotional function and future prospects improved. Severe anxiety presented as a state (48.6% and as a trait (18.2%. The highest baseline state anxiety was associated with married-widowed status and anxiolytic medication. The greatest trait anxiety was associated with an inactive work situation, anxiolytic medication, breast swelling and advanced stage at diagnosis. After treatment, anxiety significantly decreased. Conclusions: After treatment, the quality of life score was positively modified, while state and trait anxiety decreased.

  17. Parental problem drinking and anxiety disorder symptoms in adult offspring: examining the mediating role of anxiety sensitivity components.

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    MacPherson, P S; Stewart, S H; McWilliams, L A

    2001-01-01

    Preliminary studies have implicated childhood exposure to parental problem drinking as a possible factor in the development of anxiety sensitivity (AS). The present retrospective study was designed to examine the role of exposure to distressing parental problem drinking behaviors, over and above the role of parental alcoholism, in the development of various AS components (psychological, physical, and social concerns) in the offspring. We also examined the possible mediating role of AS components in explaining relations between parental drinking problems and anxiety-related symptoms in the adult offspring. A sample of 213 university students provided retrospective reports of both distress related to parental drinking [Children of Alcoholics Screening Test (CAST)] and parental alcoholism [maternal and paternal forms of the Short Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (SMAST)]. Participants also reported on their own current AS levels [AS Index (ASI)], general anxiety symptoms [State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-Trait subscale (STAI-T)], and lifetime history of uncued panic attacks [Panic Attack Questionnaire-Revised (PAQ-R)]. Scores on the CAST predicted AS psychological and physical concerns (but not social concerns) over and above participant gender and parental alcoholism measured by the SMASTs. Moreover, AS psychological concerns proved a consistent modest mediator of the relations between parental problem drinking on the CAST and both general anxiety and uncued panic outcomes in the offspring. Thus, exposure to distressing parental problem drinking behavior may be one factor that contributes to elevated AS psychological concerns in the child, which in turn may contribute to the development of anxiety disorder symptoms in the offspring.

  18. STATE ANXIETY, SUBJECTIVE IMBALANCE AND HANDICAP IN VESTIBULAR SCHWANNOMA

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    Yougan Saman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTEvidence is emerging of a significant clinical and neuro-anatomical relationship between balance and anxiety. Research has suggested a potentially priming effect with anxiety symptoms predicting a worsening of balance function in patients with underlying balance dysfunction. We propose to show that a vestibular stimulus is responsible for an increase in state anxiety and there is a relationship between increased state anxiety and worsening balance function. Aims1.To quantify state anxiety following a vestibular stimulus in patients with a chronic vestibular deficit.2.To determine if state anxiety during a vestibular stimulus would correlate with the severity of chronic balance symptoms and handicap. MethodsTwo separate cohorts Vestibular Schwannoma (VS patients underwent vestibular tests (electronystagmography, cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and caloric responses and questionnaire assessment (Vertigo handicap Questionnaire, Vertigo Symptom Scale, State Trait Anxiety InventoryFifteen post resection Vestibular schwannoma patients, with complete unilateral vestibular deafferentation, were assessed at a minimum of 6 months after surgery in Experiment 1 (Aim 1. Forty-five patients with VS in-situ and with preserved vestibular function formed the cohort for Experiment 2 (Aim 2. Experiment 1: VS subjects (N=15 with a complete post-resection unilateral vestibular deafferentation completed a State anxiety questionnaire before caloric assessment and again afterwards with the point of maximal vertigo as the reference (Aim 1. Experiment 2: State anxiety measured at the point of maximal vertigo following a caloric assessment was compared between two groups of presenting with balance symptoms (Group 1 N=26 and without balance symptoms (Group 2 N=11 (Aim 2. The presence of balance symptoms was defined as having a positive score on the VSS-VER.ResultsIn experiment 1, a significant difference (p<0.01 was found when comparing

  19. Intimacy in Phone Conversations: Anxiety Reduction for Danish Seniors with Hugvie

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    Ryuji eYamazaki

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available There is a lack of physical contact in current telecommunications such as text messaging and Internet access. To challenge the limitation and re-embody telecommunication, researchers have attempted to introduce tactile stimulation to media and developed huggable devices. Previous experiments in Japan showed that a huggable communication technology, i.e., Hugvie decreased stress level of its female users. In the present experiment in Denmark, we aim to investigate i whether Hugvie can decrease stress cross-culturally, i.e. Japanese vs. Danish participants ii, investigate whether gender plays a role in this psychological effect (stress reduction and iii if there is a preference of this type of communication technology (Hugvie vs. a regular telephone. Twenty-nine healthy elderly participated (15 female and 14 male, M=64.52 years, SD=5.67 in Jutland, Denmark. The participants filled out questionnaires including State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, NEO Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI and Becks Depression Inventory (BDI-II, had a 15 minutes conversation via phone or Hugvie and were interviewed afterwards. They spoke with an unknown person of opposite gender during the conversation; the same two conversation partners were used during the experiment and the Phone and Hugvie groups were equally balanced. There was no baseline difference between the Hugvie and Phone groups on age or anxiety or depression scores. In the Hugvie group, there was a statistically significant reduction on state anxiety after meeting Hugvie (p=.013. The change in state anxiety for the Hugvie group was positively correlated with openness (r=.532 p=.041 as measured by the NEO-FFI. This indicates that openness to experiences may increase the chances of having an anxiety reduction from being with Hugvie. Based on the results, we see that personality may affect the participants’ engagement and benefits from Hugvie. We discuss the implications of the results and further elaborations.

  20. Validity of the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18) for identifying depression and anxiety in young adult cancer survivors: Comparison with a Structured Clinical Diagnostic Interview.

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    Recklitis, Christopher J; Blackmon, Jaime E; Chang, Grace

    2017-10-01

    The Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18) is widely used to assess psychological symptoms in cancer survivors, but the validity of conventional BSI-18 cut-off scores in this population has been questioned. This study assessed the accuracy of the BSI-18 for identifying significant anxiety and depression in young adult cancer survivors (YACS), by comparing it with a "gold standard" diagnostic interview measure. Two hundred fifty YACS, age 18-40 completed the BSI-18 and the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV; SCID) interview assessing anxiety and depressive disorders. BSI-18 results were compared with SCID criteria using receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analyses. Forty four participants (17.7%) met criteria for ≥1 SCID diagnoses, and an additional 20 (8.0%) met criteria for clinically significant SCID symptoms without a diagnosis. General concordance between the BSI-18 GSI scale and SCID diagnosis was good (AUC = 0.848), but the 2 most widely used BSI-18 case rules failed to identify a majority of survivors with SCID diagnoses, and no alternative BSI-18 cut-off scores met study criteria for clinical screening. Analyses aimed at identifying survivors with significant SCID symptoms or a SCID diagnosis had similar results, as did analyses examining depression and anxiety separately. The BSI-18 shows good overall concordance with a psychiatric interview, but recommended cut-off scores fail to identify a majority of YACS with psychiatric diagnosis. Clinicians should not rely on the BSI-18 alone as a screening measure for YACS. Alternative BSI-18 scoring algorithms optimized for detecting psychiatric symptoms in YACS may be an important step to address this limitation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Psychometric properties and measurement equivalence of the English and Chinese versions of the Beck Anxiety Inventory in patients with breast cancer.

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    Ke, Yu; Ng, Terence; Yeo, Hui Ling; Shwe, Maung; Gan, Yan Xiang; Chan, Alexandre

    2017-02-01

    There is a lack of psychometric data for both the English and Chinese versions of Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) to support its usage among breast cancer patients. This study examined the psychometric properties and measurement equivalence of the English and Chinese versions of BAI among breast cancer patients in Singapore. Patients were recruited from two major cancer centers in Singapore. The criterion and construct validity of BAI was assessed by its correlation strength with (1) the emotional functioning subdomain of EORTC QLQ-C30 and (2) constructs related to anxiety, namely fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life. The known-group validity was assessed according to the patients' breast cancer stage, religious beliefs, and emotional functioning levels. The internal consistency of the BAI domains was evaluated using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Regression analysis was performed to compare the BAI total and domain scores between the two language versions. Data from 244 patients (144 English-speaking and 100 Chinese-speaking) were analyzed. For both language versions, the BAI total scores correlated moderately with the EORTC QLQ-C30 emotional functioning subdomain (r = -0.655 and -0.601). Correlations with fatigue, quality of life, and dyspnea were moderate (|r| = 0.456-0.606). Patients with poorer emotional functioning reported higher anxiety levels, establishing known-group validity. All BAI domains demonstrated satisfactory internal consistencies (α = 0.74-0.87), except for the panic domain (α = 0.57-0.61). Possible measurement equivalence between the language versions was established. Both English and Chinese versions of BAI are valid, reliable, and possibly equivalent for future use.

  2. Parental anxiety at initial acute presentation is not associated with prolonged symptoms following pediatric concussion.

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    Zemek, Roger; Clarkin, Chantalle; Farion, Ken J; Vassilyadi, Michael; Anderson, Peter; Irish, Brendan; Goulet, Kristian; Barrowman, Nick; Osmond, Martin H

    2013-10-01

    Anxiety modulates symptom perception in adults following concussion, prolonging the time to full recovery. The authors sought to determine whether parental anxiety was associated with persistent postconcussive symptoms (PCS) in their children following concussion. A prospective observational cohort with 98 children aged 5 to 17 years following concussion participated from a tertiary pediatric emergency department (ED). The main exposure was parental anxiety at the time of acute presentation following pediatric concussion, measured using the self-administered, validated Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-State Anxiety Scale (STAI-S). The primary outcome measured was presence of PCS in the child at 1 month, per the validated Post-Concussive Symptom Inventory (PCSI). Secondary outcome measures included parental anxiety score over time, school absenteeism, and return to sports. Data were collected during the initial ED visit and at 3-day, 7-day, 2-week, 1-month, and 3-month follow-ups. Of 98 children enrolled, 27% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 19% to 36%) developed PCS at 1 month. No significant associations were detected between parental anxiety at the index visits and the number of previous pediatric concussions (p = 0.73), sex (p = 0.61), loss of consciousness (p = 0.43), history of migraines (p = 0.31), or history of anxiety diagnosed in the patients (p = 0.09). A significant association was noted between patient diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and parental anxiety at the index visits (p = 0.001). Parental anxiety at acute presentation was not associated with children's prolonged symptoms at 1 month (p = 0.63). Parental anxiety remained elevated in parents whose children had prolonged symptoms compared to those parents whose children's symptoms resolved (median = 30, interquartile range [IQR] = 22 to 44; and median = 21, IQR = 20 to 25, respectively; p anxiety presentation was not associated with

  3. Trait anxiety and probabilistic learning: Behavioral and electrophysiological findings.

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    Jiang, Donghong; Zhang, Dandan; Chen, Yuming; He, Zhenhong; Gao, Qiufeng; Gu, Ruolei; Xu, Pengfei

    2018-02-01

    Anxiety is a negative emotion that affects various aspects of people's daily life. To explain why individuals with high anxiety tend to make suboptimal decisions, we suggest that their learning ability might play an important role. Regarding that anxiety modulates both outcome expectation and attention allocation, it is reasonable to hypothesize that the function of feedback learning should be sensitive to individual level of anxiety. However, previous studies that directly examined this hypothesis were scarce. In this study, forty-two Chinese participants were assigned to a high-trait anxiety (HTA) group or a low-trait anxiety (LTA) group according to their scores in the Trait form of Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-T). Both groups finished a reward learning task in which two options were associated with different winning probabilities. The event-related potential (ERP) elicited by outcome feedback during the task was recorded and analyzed. Behavioral results revealed that, when the winning probability was 80% for one option and 20% for another, the HTA group chose the 80% winning option less often than the LTA group at the initial stage (i.e., first 20 trials) of the task, but there was no between-group difference in total number of choice. In addition, HTA participants took more time to make decisions in the 80/20 condition than in the 50/50 condition, but this effect was insignificant in the LTA group. ERP results indicated that anxiety affects learning in two ways. First, compared to their LTA counterparts, HTA participants showed a smaller feedback-related negativity (FRN) in response to negative feedback, indicating the impact of anxiety on outcome expectation. Second, HTA participants showed a larger P3 component in the 80/20 condition than in the 50/50 condition, indicating the impact of anxiety on attention allocation. Accordingly, we suggest that individuals' ability of feedback learning could be negatively modulated by anxiety

  4. Why is everyone so anxious?: an exploration of stress and anxiety in genetic counseling graduate students.

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    Jungbluth, Chelsy; Macfarlane, Ian M; Veach, Patricia McCarthy; Leroy, Bonnie S

    2011-06-01

    Stress is an inevitable part of daily life. Studies of graduate student stress exist, but none include genetic counseling students. The present mixed-methods study investigated 225 genetic counseling students' stress and anxiety levels using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI; Spielberger et al. 1983), frequency and intensity of stressors associated with their graduate experience, positive and challenging aspects of their experience, and their stress management advice for prospective students. Principal axis factor analysis yielded five conceptual factors underlying the stressors: Professional Uncertainty, Personal Life Events, Interpersonal Demands, Academic Demands, and Isolating Circumstances. Exploratory model fitting using regression yielded four significant predictors accounting for 19% of the variance in state anxiety: (1) trait anxiety, (2) the Interpersonal Demands factor, (3) the Isolating Circumstances factor, and (4) the interaction between the Professional Uncertainty factor and advanced student status. Content analysis of open-ended responses identified several themes. For instance, most students enjoyed what they were learning, interactions with colleagues, and affirmation of their career choice, while certain academic and professional challenges were particularly stressful (e.g., workload, time constraints, clinical rotations). Additional findings, program implications, and research recommendations are provided.

  5. Association of Anxiety, Depression, and Somatization with Menstrual Problems among North Korean Women Defectors in South Korea.

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    Kim, Hyun Kyoung; Kim, Hee Sook; Kim, Seog Ju

    2017-11-01

    North Korean women defectors have suffered from anxiety, depression, and somatization after defection. Also they have had many menstrual problems like amenorrhea. This study was done to identify the correlations of anxiety, depression, and somatization to menstrual problems among North Korean woman defectors in South Korea. The participants in this study were 126 women from 5 government resettlement centers throughout South Korea. Questionnaires which included State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Center for Epidemiological studies-Depression Scale (CED-S), and Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) were used to identify anxiety and somatization. Data were collected between June and September, 2012. The women reported the following problems; amenorrhea (9.5%), hypomenorrhea (13.6%), menorrhagia (19.8%), polymenorrhea (13.5%), oligomenorrhea (4.8%), changes in amount of menstrual discharge (4.0%), and changes in amount of blood clot (9.5%). Anxiety (r=0.20, p=0.002), depression (r=0.25, p=0.005), and Somatization (r=0.35, p<0.001) were correlated with number of menstrual problems. The results of this study indicate that mental health services need to be taken into account in interventions for North Korean woman defectors to improve their reproductive health including addressing menstrual problems.

  6. Assessment of anxiety and depression in adolescents with acne vulgaris related to the severity of clinical features and gender

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    Nermina Kurtalić

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine anxiety and depression levels in adolescents with acne vulgaris in relation to clinical severity and gender. Patients and methods. Using a sectional study, the anxiety and depression level was analyzed of 90 adolescents of both sexes, aged 16 to 21 years, who were suffering from acne vulgaris. The study was conducted between February 1st 2008 and January 31st 2009 at the Dermatovenerology department of the Cantonal Hospital “Dr. Irfan Ljubijankić”, Bihac. According to the type of efflorescence, its localization and severity of clinical features, respondents were classified in three groups: the first group consisted of adolescents with mild forms of acne, the second group had moderate forms of acne and the third had severe forms of acne. Evaluation of anxiety levels in patients with acne vulgaris was made using STAI questionnaire (Spielberger’s state and trait Anxiety Inventory that consists of 20 questions about the essential characteristics of anxiety as the condition, and the level of depression was determined using the BDS-scale (Back Depression Inventory which consists of 18 items that were used by the respondents to perform self-evaluation of depression level. Results. In the study group there were 54 (60% female respondents and 36 (40% male, mean age 17.5 years (range 15.6-20.6. Of the total number of patients with acne vulgaris, nine of them or 10% (4 female and 5 male had a mild form of acne (first group, 72 of them or 80% (46 female and 26 male a moderate form of acne (second group and 9 of them or 10 % (4 female and 5 male a severe form of acne (third group (p > 0.95. 1.1% of the respondents had an exceptionally low anxiety level, 13.3% had low level, moderate 76.8% and 8.8% had a high level. 37.8% had distinct signs of depression, the risk group consisted of 44.4%, and a normal value was found in 17.7%. The values of the STAI questionnaire expressed as median (range in the first, second and third groups

  7. Quantitative genetic analysis of anxiety trait in bipolar disorder.

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    Contreras, J; Hare, E; Chavarría, G; Raventós, H

    2018-01-01

    Bipolar disorder type I (BPI) affects approximately 1% of the world population. Although genetic influences on bipolar disorder are well established, identification of genes that predispose to the illness has been difficult. Most genetic studies are based on categorical diagnosis. One strategy to overcome this obstacle is the use of quantitative endophenotypes, as has been done for other medical disorders. We studied 619 individuals, 568 participants from 61 extended families and 51 unrelated healthy controls. The sample was 55% female and had a mean age of 43.25 (SD 13.90; range 18-78). Heritability and genetic correlation of the trait scale from the Anxiety State and Trait Inventory (STAI) was computed by using the general linear model (SOLAR package software). we observed that anxiety trait meets the following criteria for an endophenotype of bipolar disorder type I (BPI): 1) association with BPI (individuals with BPI showed the highest trait score (F = 15.20 [5,24], p = 0.009), 2) state-independence confirmed after conducting a test-retest in 321 subjects, 3) co-segregation within families 4) heritability of 0.70 (SE: 0.060), p = 2.33 × 10 -14 and 5) genetic correlation with BPI was 0.20, (SE = 0.17, p = 3.12 × 10 -5 ). Confounding factors such as comorbid disorders and pharmacological treatment could affect the clinical relationship between BPI and anxiety trait. Further research is needed to evaluate if anxiety traits are specially related to BPI in comparison with other traits such as anger, attention or response inhibition deficit, pathological impulsivity or low self-directedness. Anxiety trait is a heritable phenotype that follows a normal distribution when measured not only in subjects with BPI but also in unrelated healthy controls. It could be used as an endophenotype in BPI for the identification of genomic regions with susceptibility genes for this disorder. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Can Listening to Music Decrease Pain, Anxiety, and Stress During a Urodynamic Study? A Randomized Prospective Trial Focusing on Gender Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Ji Sung; Chae, Ji Yun; Kang, Sung Gu; Park, Jae Young; Bae, Jae Hyun; Kang, Seok Ho; Park, Hong Seok; Moon, Du Geon; Cheon, Jun; Lee, Jeong Gu; Kim, Je Jong; Oh, Mi Mi

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of listening to music on pain, anxiety, or stress during a urodynamic study (UDS). A total of 74 female and 74 male patients who underwent UDS between March 2013 and October 2013 were prospectively randomized. The patients were divided into 2 groups according to gender (female, n = 74 vs male, n = 74) and into 2 subgroups according to whether they listened to music or not. Music group subjects played their preferred music during UDS. Before and after UDS, all subjects completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) form and their degree of pain, anxiety, and satisfaction during examination were assessed by the visual analog scale (VAS, 0-10). Basic vital signs were also checked before and after the procedure. In the analysis of anxiety, pain, and stress scores, the mean shame, discomfort, and satisfaction scores (VAS) were significantly higher in female patients, whereas the mean score of willingness to retry the procedure was higher in male patients whether listening to music or not (P music group and the no-music group in either gender. In our study, music during UDS did not reduce anxiety, pain, and stress in either gender. In the analysis focusing on gender difference, female patients showed statistically higher levels of pain, anxiety, and stress scores than male patients whether listening to music or not. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Effects of aerobic exercise program and relaxation techniques on anxiety, quality of sleep, depression, and quality of life in patients with fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcos-Carmona, Isabel María; Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida María; Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo Adolfo; Gutiérrez-Rubio, Ana Belén; Ramos-González, Elena; Moreno-Lorenzo, Carmen

    2011-10-08

    Fibromyalgia is considered as a combination of physical, psychological and social disabilities. The purpose of the present study was to determine the benefits of aerobic exercise program and progressive relaxation techniques on anxiety, quality of sleep, depression and quality of life in patients with fibromyalgia. An experimental study was performed with a placebo control group. Fifty-six fibromyalgia patients were randomly assigned to intervention (aerobic exercises+progressive relaxation techniques) and placebo (sham treatment with disconnected magnet therapy device) groups. Outcome measures were anxiety (STAI- State Trait Anxiety Inventory), quality of sleep (Pittsburgh sleep quality index), depression (Beck depression inventory) and quality of life (questionnaire SF-36). Measures were performed at baseline and after 10-weeks treatment. After 10 weeks of treatment, the intervention group showed significant reduction (panxiety and quality of life. The combination of aerobic exercise program and progressive relaxation techniques contribute to improve night rest, trait anxiety and quality of life in patients with fibromyalgia. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. Mother-Infant Emotion Regulation at Three Months: The Role of Maternal Anxiety, Depression and Parenting Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva Crugnola, Cristina; Ierardi, Elena; Ferro, Valentino; Gallucci, Marcello; Parodi, Cinzia; Astengo, Marina

    While the association between anxiety and postpartum depression is well known, few studies have investigated the relationship between these two states and parenting stress. Furthermore, a number of studies have found that postpartum depression affects mother-infant emotion regulation, but there has been only one study on anxiety and emotion regulation and no studies at all on parenting stress and emotion regulation. Therefore, the primary aim of our study is to identify, in a community sample of 71 mothers, the relationship between maternal depression, anxiety, and parenting stress. The second aim is to examine the relationship between anxiety, postpartum depression, and parenting stress and mother-infant emotion regulation assessed at 3 months. Mother-infant interaction was coded with a modified version of the Infant Caregiver and Engagement Phases (ICEP) using a microanalytic approach. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and Parenting Stress Index-Short Form (PSI-SF) were administered to the mothers to assess depression, anxiety, and parenting stress, respectively. Analysis revealed correlations between anxiety and depression, showing that parenting stress is associated with both states. In a laboratory observation, depression was correlated with both negative maternal states and negative dyadic matches as well as infant positive/mother negative mismatches; anxiety was correlated with both negative maternal states and infant negative states as well as mismatches involving one of the partners having a negative state. Multiple regression analysis showed that anxiety is a greater predictor than depression of less adequate styles of mother-infant emotion regulation. Parenting stress was not shown to predict such regulation. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. The effect of patient anxiety and depression on motion during myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyra, Vassiliki; Kallergi, Maria; Rizos, Emmanouil; Lamprakopoulos, Georgios; Chatziioannou, Sofia N.

    2016-01-01

    Patient motion during myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging (MPI) may be triggered by a patient’s physical and/or psychological discomfort. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of state anxiety (patient’s reaction to exam-related stress), trait anxiety (patient’s personality characteristic) and depression on patient motion during MPI. All patients that underwent MPI in our department in a six-month period were prospectively enrolled. One hundred eighty-three patients (45 females; 138 males) filled in the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), along with a short questionnaire regarding their age, height and weight, level of education in years, occupation, and marital status. Cardiovascular and other co-morbidity factors were also evaluated. Through inspection of raw data on cinematic display, the presence or absence of patient motion was registered and classified into mild, moderate and severe, for both phases involved in image acquisition. The correlation of patient motion in the stress and delay phases of MPI and each of the other variables was investigated and the corresponding Pearson’s coefficients of association were calculated. The anxiety-motion (r = 0.43, P < 0.0001) and depression-motion (r = 0.32, P < 0.0001) correlation results were moderately strong and statistically significant for the female but not the male patients. All the other variables did not demonstrate any association with motion in MPI, except a weak correlation between age and motion in females (r = 0.23, P < 0.001). The relationship between anxiety-motion and depression-motion identified in female patients represents the first supporting evidence of psychological discomfort as predisposing factor for patient motion during MPI

  12. Effect of two yoga-based relaxation techniques on memory scores and state anxiety

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    Telles Shirley

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A yoga practice involving cycles of yoga postures and supine rest (called cyclic meditation was previously shown to improve performance in attention tasks more than relaxation in the corpse posture (shavasana. This was ascribed to reduced anxiety, though this was not assessed. Methods In fifty-seven male volunteers (group average age ± S.D., 26.6 ± 4.5 years the immediate effect of two yoga relaxation techniques was studied on memory and state anxiety. All participants were assessed before and after (i Cyclic meditation (CM practiced for 22:30 minutes on one day and (ii an equal duration of Supine rest (SR or the corpse posture (shavasana, on another day. Sections of the Wechsler memory scale (WMS were used to assess; (i attention and concentration (digit span forward and backward, and (ii associate learning. State anxiety was assessed using Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI. Results There was a significant improvement in the scores of all sections of the WMS studied after both CM and SR, but, the magnitude of change was more after CM compared to after SR. The state anxiety scores decreased after both CM and SR, with a greater magnitude of decrease after CM. There was no correlation between percentage change in memory scores and state anxiety for either session. Conclusion A cyclical combination of yoga postures and supine rest in CM improved memory scores immediately after the practice and decreased state anxiety more than rest in a classical yoga relaxation posture (shavasana.

  13. A meta-analysis of the cross-cultural psychometric properties of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children (SPAI-C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaini, Simona; Battaglia, Marco; Beidel, Deborah C; Ogliari, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have found that the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children (SPAI-C), an empirically derived self-report instrument to assess DSM-IV social phobia in childhood and adolescence, has good psychometric properties. While these findings were replicated across different cultures, the overall strength of the psychometric properties of the SPAI-C remains unknown. We assessed the validity of the SPAI-C by meta-analytic techniques across studies collected from PubMed, PsycInfo and Eric databases, conducted in different countries, among subjects of different age, and sex. A total of 21 articles were retained, predominantly from Europe and North America. We found that the psychometric properties based on Cronbach alpha, mean score differences between sexes, and construct validity, were robust for the SPAI-C scale. Girls scored significantly higher than boys, and geographical differences played a moderating effect on sex-related score differences. These results further support the SPAI-C as an instrument to identify Social Phobia in youth. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparing effects between music intervention and aromatherapy on anxiety of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation in the intensive care unit: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chiu-Hsiang; Lai, Chiung-Ling; Sung, Yi-Hui; Lai, Mei Yu; Lin, Chung-Ying; Lin, Long-Yau

    2017-07-01

    Using patient-reported outcomes and physiological indicators to test the effects of music intervention and aromatherapy on reducing anxiety for intensive care unit (ICU) patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. Patients with ICU admission duration >24 h were randomly assigned to a Music intervention group (n = 41), Aromatherapy group (n = 47), or Control group (rest only; n = 44). Each patient in the Music group listened to music; each patient in the Aromatherapy group received lavender essential oil massage on his/her back for 5 min; each patient in the Control group wore noise-canceling headphones. Anxiety was measured using the Chinese version of the Stage-Trait Anxiety Inventory (C-STAI) and the Visual Analogue Scale for Anxiety (VAS-A) at baseline, post-test, and 30-min follow-up. Heart rate, breathing rate, and blood pressure were measured every 10 min from baseline to the 30-min follow-up. The Music group had significantly better post-test VAS-A and C-STAI scores, and had lower heart rate and blood pressure than the Control group. The Aromatherapy group had significantly better VAS-A score and lower heart rate than the Control group. The 30-min follow-up showed that both Music and Aromatherapy groups had lower heart rate and blood pressure than the Control group. Music and aromatherapy interventions were both effective for ICU patients. The effects of music intervention were greater than that of aromatherapy; both interventions maintained the effects for at least 30 min.

  15. Alexithymia and anxiety in female chronic pain patients

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    Saatcioglu Omer

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives Alexithymia is highly prevalent among chronic pain patients. Pain is a remarkable cause for high levels of chronic anxiety. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of alexithymia and to determine anxiety levels among DSM-IV somatoform pain disorder (chronic pain female patients and to examine the relationship between alexithymia and the self-reporting of pain. Methods Thirty adult females (mean age: 34,63 ± 10,62 years, who applied to the outpatient psychiatry clinic at a public hospital with the diagnosis of chronic pain disorder (DSM-IV, were included in the study. Thirty seven healthy females (mean age: 34,46 ± 7,43 years, who matched for sociodemographic features with the patient group, consisted the control group. A sociodemographic data form, 26-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-26, Spielberger Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI were administered to each subject and information was obtained on several aspects of the patients' pain, including intensity (measured by VAS, and duration. Results Chronic pain patients were found significantly more alexithymic than controls. There was a positive correlation between TAS-26 scores and the duration of pain. The alexithymic and nonalexithymic group did not differ in their perception of pain. Neither positive correlation nor significant difference was found between alexithymia and trait anxiety in pain patients. Discussion Alexithymia may be important in addressing the diversity of subjective factors involved in pain. The conceptualization of alexithymia as a personality trait as well as a secondary state reaction is underlined by our data.

  16. Associations between dental anxiety and postoperative pain following extraction of horizontally impacted wisdom teeth: A prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tze-Fang; Wu, Ya-Ting; Tseng, Chien-Fu; Chou, Chyuan

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the study is to identify associations between dental anxiety and postoperative pain in patients undergoing extraction of horizontally impacted wisdom teeth.A total of 119 volunteers provided demographic data, and completed questionnaires, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Chinese Index of Dental Anxiety and Fear (C-IDAF)-4C, and the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) for pain.Mean SAI, TAI, and C-IDAF-4C scores were 42.5 ± 8.7, 46.4 ± 10.9, and 16.9 ± 7.2, respectively. Mean postoperative pain level score was 3.0 ± 1.8 (range: 0.3-8.4). SAI scores increased as preoperative pain levels increased (β = 1.30, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.62-1.98, P teeth extraction. Addressing these factors preoperatively may reduce stress and anxiety, and lead to more favorable treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A Measure of Suffering in relation to Anxiety and Quality of Life in IBS Patients: Preliminary Results

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    Sanda Pletikosić Tončić

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a chronic gastrointestinal (GI disorder with a severe impact on quality of life (QoL. We explored the relationship of a visual measure of suffering, the PRISM-RII, with quality of life (QoL and anxiety measures in IBS patients. Participants were 44 IBS patients who completed several questionnaires and kept a symptom diary for two weeks. The measures used were PRISM-RII (self-illness separation (SIS; illness perception measure (IPM; IBS-36 (IBS health related QoL; SF-36 (physical and mental health related QoL; State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-T; Visceral Sensitivity Index (VSI; GI-specific anxiety; and a symptom diary. SIS was negatively correlated to VSI, while IPM was negatively correlated to SIS and the physical component of SF-36 and positively to VSI and symptom severity. We found significant differences between participants who perceive their illness as small and those who perceive it as medium in SIS, symptom severity, VSI, and the mental component of SF-36. Participants, who perceived their illness as small, represented their illness as more distant, showed lower average symptom severity, and had lower GI-specific anxiety and higher QoL. The results indicate that IPM and SIS can be useful in discriminating patients with more prominent psychological difficulties and QoL impairment.

  18. Depression, anxiety and quality of life among diabetic patients: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosaku, Kolawole; Kolawole, Babatope; Mume, Celestine; Ikem, Rosemary

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare psychiatric morbidity among diabetic patients, asthmatics and healthy individuals and also to assess the association of psychiatric morbidity and other variables with quality of life among diabetes patients. For each respondent, the questionnaire on sociodemographic and clinical variables was completed. They also completed the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale and the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI 1). Diabetic patients also completed the Diabetic Well-Being Questionnaire. A total of 180 subjects were used for this study-80 diabetics (males=37, females=43) were compared with 50 asthmatics (males=22, females=28) and 50 healthy individuals (males=23, females=27). Depression was more prevalent among diabetic patients (20%) compared with asthmatics (12%) and healthy individuals (4%), while anxiety was more prevalent among asthmatics (34%) compared with diabetics (20%) and healthy individuals (8%). Predictors of depression include age of the patient, poor glycemic control and duration of diabetes mellitus. Factors that correlated significantly with diabetic general well-being include depression, anxiety and fasting blood glucose level. Depression and the presence of comorbid medical conditions significantly predicted a low quality of life. Psychiatric morbidity has significant effects on diabetic patients' quality of life.

  19. Depressive and anxiety symptoms and social support are independently associated with disease-specific quality of life in Colombian patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Heather L; Brotherton, Hardin T; Olivera Plaza, Silvia Leonor; Segura Durán, María Angélica; Peña Altamar, Marvín Leonel

    2015-01-01

    To examine the relationship between disease-specific Quality of Life (QOL) and socio-demographic, medical, and psychosocial factors in Colombian patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). One hundred and three RA patients recruited from ambulatory centers in Neiva, Colombia were administered the Disease Activity Scale 28 (DAS-28), QOL-RA, Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Interpersonal Support Evaluation List-12 (ISEL-12), and Symptom Checklist-90 Revised (SCL-90R). Lower QOL-RA was associated with lower socio-economic status (SES; r=0.26, p<0.01), higher likelihood of using opioids (t=-2.51, p<0.05), higher likelihood of comorbid pulmonary disease (t=-2.22, p<0.05), and lower ISEL-12 sub-scales (r's=0.41-0.31, p's<0.001). Lower QOL-RA was associated with higher DAS-28 (r=-0.28, p<0.01), Visual Analog Scale (VAS; r=-0.35, p<0.001), Zung Depression (r=-0.72, p <0.001), STAI-State (r=-0.66, p<0.001), STAI-Trait (r=-0.70, p<0.001), SCL-90R Global Severity Index (r=-0.50, p<0.001), SCL-90R Positive Symptom Total (r=-0.57, p<0.001), and all SCL-90R sub-scales (r's=-0.54--0.21, p's<0.01). A multivariate linear regression model indicated that SES (B=2.77, p<0.05), Zung Depression (B=-0.53, p<0.001), STAI-State (B=-0.26, p<0.05), and ISEL-12 Belonging (B=1.15, p<0.01) were independently associated with QOL-RA, controlling for significant associations. More depressive and anxiety symptoms were independently associated with lower disease-specific QOL, while higher perceptions of having people to do activities with (belonging social support) and higher SES were independently associated with higher disease-specific QOL. Psychosocial factors impact QOL in RA above and beyond disease activity. Additional research into the benefits of psychosocial assessment of RA patients and provision of comprehensive care to improve QOL is warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Adequacy of the Simplified Version of the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI-S) to Measure Tinnitus Handicap and Relevant Distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Hee; Ra, Jin-Ju; Kim, Young Ho

    2014-04-01

    The Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) often requires patients to devote their time to complete the questionnaire than they expect. Given that it limits the effectiveness of THI in a busy clinical practice that desires a quick and easy assessment of tinnitus handicap, this study evaluated clinical usefulness of a Simplified version of Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI-S) in measuring the severity of tinnitus handicap as well as predicting the psychological distress associated with tinnitus. A total of 129 outpatients suffering from tinnitus (61 with normal hearing and 68 with hearing loss) participated in this study. The responses of THI-S (10 items) and THI (25 items) were evaluated to quantify the subjective handicap of tinnitus. The self-perceived level of stress, anxiety, and depression of all participants was measured with a series of self-report questionnaires such as Korean version of Brief Encounter Psychosocial Instrument (BEPSI), State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), respectively. All the questionnaire responses were analyzed using non-parametric analyses to examine the convergence, comparability, internal consistency reliability and validity of THI-S. The severity of tinnitus handicap and the relevant psychological distress greatly varied across individuals. The THI-S responses were comparable to original THI responses, regardless of hearing status of patients. The internal consistency of THI-S responses was found to be good for total score (Cronbach's α=0.83-0.91), with moderately high consistency for the emotional, functional, and catastrophic subscales. Significant (pwell as with the BEPSI, STAI, BDI questionnaires (rs =0.40-0.45) suggest that the THI-S questionnaire appeared to be useful to provide objective data of subjective tinnitus handicap as well as predict psychological distress. Three factors were extracted through factor analysis, which explained 73% of the total variance. Despite reducing the length of 25

  1. Anxiety and fear of childbirth as predictors of postnatal depression in nulliparous women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Zahra; Lamyian, Minoor; Hajizadeh, Ebrahim

    2012-09-01

    Perinatal mental health problems have been studied in more than 90% of high income countries but this information is available only for 10% of low and middle income countries. A study on the relationship between anxiety during pregnancy and postpartum depression has not been performed in Iran. This prospective study aimed to investigate whether anxiety and fear of childbirth during pregnancy is an independent predictor of postpartum depressive symptoms. In this prospective longitudinal study participants were 160 women with a gestational age of 28-30 weeks from 10 prenatal care clinics in Qom, Iran. Subjects were interviewed and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and Childbirth Attitudes Questionnaire (CAQ) were completed at 28 and 38 weeks of gestation. They were followed up 45 days and 3 months after childbirth. Postpartum depression was defined as a score≥13 on the Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale (EPDS). Antenatal state anxiety (odds ratio [OR]=3.2; P=0.002 and OR=2.91; P=0.007 at 28 and 38 weeks of gestation, respectively) and trait anxiety (OR=3.33; P=0.001 and OR=3.30; P=0.003 at 28 and 38 weeks of gestation, respectively) increased the risk of postpartum depression 45 days after birth (Pdepression during the first three months after childbirth (Pchildbirth was not a significant predictor of postpartum depression symptoms (P>0.05). The findings from this study suggest that antenatal state and trait anxiety, assessed by interview, is an important predictor of postpartum depression. Therefore, it should be routinely screened in order to develop specific preventive interventions. Copyright © 2011 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Effect of Therapeutic Touch Performed During Cataract Surgery on Anxiety and Patient Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emel Yılmaz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the ef­fect of therapeutic touch (TT on anxiety and patient satis­faction when performed during a cataract surgery. Methods: A randomized controlled trial sample consisted of 114 individuals, 57 in the intervention group and 57 controls, who were hospitalized for cataract surgery and who conformed to the study criteria. Prior to the study approval was obtained from the ethics committee and informed consent was given by the patients. Data was collected using a personal information form, a visual analogue scale (VAS to measure anxiety, the Spielberg State/Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI and the Newcastle Satisfaction with Nursing Care Scale (NSNCS. During the surgery, patients in the intervention group received a 15-minute session of TT. Results: In the intervention group, patients’ mean VAS anxiety score after TT was 3.56±1.85, while that of the control group in the 15th minute of the operation was 8,88±1,50. It was found that anxiety levels were reduced in the intervention group after TT compared with the con­trol group, and that vital signs were affected positively. NSNCS scores of patients in the intervention group were higher than those in the control group. Conclusion: It was observed that TT applied during sur­gery reduced anxiety, affected vital signs positively and increased patent satisfaction. The application of TT dur­ing surgery is recommended. J Clin Exp Invest 2016; 7 (1: 52-62

  3. Music Reduces State Anxiety Scores in Patients Undergoing Pleural Procedures: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackintosh, John; Cone, Grace; Harland, Kate; Sriram, Krishna B

    2018-01-18

    Patient anxiety is an often overlooked complication of pleural diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Listening to music is effective in reducing patient anxiety in some endoscopy procedures but has not yet been evaluated in pleural procedures. Consecutive patients undergoing therapeutic pleural procedures were randomised to music and control groups. Participants in the music group listened to self selected music using ear-bud headphones for the duration of the procedure. State anxiety was assessed before and after the procedure using the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Physiological parameters were also measured. 60 patients were included in the study. In the music group, a reduction in State Anxiety Scores were observed post-procedure (34±11 vs. 48±13, p<0.001) while no change was observed in the Control group (40±11 vs. 42±11, p=0.51). Participants in the music group had reductions in heart rate (87±17 vs. 95±15, p=0.04), systolic (121±13 vs. 130±16, p=0.02) and diastolic blood pressure (72±8 vs. 78±9, p=0.01) post procedure compared to the pre-procedures values. A similar change was not detected in the control group: heart rate (86±17 vs. 85±15, p=0.73), systolic (133±21 vs. 134±20, p=0.83) and diastolic blood pressure (77±9 vs. 79±10, p=0.30). There was no difference in patient pain scores (p=0.8), willingness to undergo the procedure again (p=0.27), satisfaction with the performance of the pleural procedure (p=0.20) and duration of the procedure (p=0.68) between the music and control groups. Listening to music appears to be beneficial in reducing anxiety in patients undergoing pleural procedures. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Medical clowns ease anxiety and pain perceived by children undergoing allergy prick skin tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, A; Stauber, T; Peleg, O; Hanuka, P; Eshayek, L; Confino-Cohen, R

    2014-10-01

    Intervention of medical clowns (MC) during various medical procedures performed in children has been used to relieve anxiety and pain. Their role in allergy skin testing has never been evaluated. To evaluate whether MC can diminish pain and anxiety perceived by children undergoing allergy skin prick tests (SPT). In a prospective, randomized, controlled, and blinded study, children undergoing SPT were or were not accompanied by MC. All parents and children ≥8 years completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) before and after SPT. Videotapes recorded during the procedure were scored for anxiety (m-YPAS) for all children and for pain (FLACC) for children 2-7 years old by a psychologist who was unaware of the MC's presence. After SPT, children ≥8 years completed a visual analog score (VAS) for pain. Ninety-one children (mean age 8.2 years, M/F = 54/37) were recruited of whom 45 were accompanied by clowns. A significant reduction in state-STAI was found in the clowns group, in both parents and children, when compared with the regular group (26.9 ± 6.6 and 32.3 ± 10.0; P = 0.004, and 27.1 ± 4.2 and 34.3 ± 7.6; P = 0.002, respectively). Both m-YPAS and FLACC were reduced in the clowns group compared with the regular one. In the clowns group, m-YPAS positively correlated with both VAS and FLACC (P = 0.000 and 0.002, respectively). m-YPAS was positively correlated with FLACC in the regular group (P = 0.000). Medical clowns significantly decrease the level of anxiety perceived by both children undergoing allergy SPT and their parents, as well as the pain perceived by young children. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Evaluation of the effect of music on anxiety level of patients hospitalized in cardiac wards before angiography

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    Zahra Pourmovahed

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients experience high levels of anxiety before angiography, which is mostly associated with irreparable effects on health status of such individuals. Use of alternative medicine to reduce stress and anxiety is of paramount importance. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of music on anxiety level of patients hospitalized in cardiac wards before angiography. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted on 70 patients admitted to cardiac wards before angiography in three selected hospitals of Shiraz, Iran in 2015. Samples were selected through randomized and available sampling and divided into two groups of control (n=35 and intervention (n=35. In this study, the intervention group received one hour of music before angiography for 20 minutes, whereas the usual care of ward was provided for the control group. Data was collected using the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI by Spielberger one hour before angiography (immediately before the intervention and 20 minutes after angiography (immediately after the intervention through interviews with all the participants. Data analysis was performed in SPSS version 22 using descriptive statistics, Chi-square, as well as paired and independent-tests. Results: In this study, mean anxiety scores of patients in the intervention and control groups before the intervention were 48.45±6.63 and 48.25±6.63, respectively. After the intervention, these scores were changed to 44.28±5.21 and 49.02±7.74 in the intervention (P=0.004 and control (P=0.90 groups, respectively. Therefore, a significant difference was observed between the groups after the intervention (P=0.008. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, music before angiography could lead to a significant decrease in anxiety level of patients. Therefore, this approach could be used as an effective method to alleviate anxiety in patients.

  6. Specificity in mediated pathways by anxiety symptoms linking adolescent stress profiles to depressive symptoms: Results of a moderated mediation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyan, Frederick; Bizumic, Boris; Hjemdal, Odin

    2018-03-01

    We investigated the specificity in mediated pathways that separately link specific stress dimensions through anxiety to depressive symptoms and the protective utility of resilience. Thus, this study goes beyond lumping together potential mediating and moderating processes that can explain the relations between stress and (symptoms of) psychopathology and the buffering effect of resilience. Ghanaian adolescents between 13 and 17 years (female = 285; male = 244) completed the Adolescent Stress Questionnaire (ASQ), Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Short Mood Feeling Questionnaire (SMFQ) and the Resilience Scale for Adolescents (READ). Independent samples t-test, multivariate analysis of covariance with follow-up tests and moderated mediation analyses were performed. Evidences were found for specificity in the associations between dimensions of adolescent stressors and depressive symptoms independent of transient anxiety. Transient anxiety partly accounted for the indirect effects of eight stress dimensions on depressive symptoms. Except stress of school attendance and school/leisure conflict, resilience moderated the indirect effects of specific stress dimensions on depressive symptoms. Results suggested differences in how Ghanaian adolescents view the various stress dimensions, and mediated pathways associated with anxiety and depressive symptoms. Use of cross-sectional data does not show causal process and temporal changes over time. Findings support and clarify the specificity in the interrelations and mediated pathways among dimensions of adolescent stress, transient anxiety, and depressive symptoms. Conditional process analyses shows that resilience does not only buffer direct, but also indirect psychological adversities. Interventions for good mental health may focus on low resilience subgroups in specific stress dimensions while minimizing transient anxiety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of the effect of music on anxiety level of patients hospitalized in cardiac wards before angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pourmovahed Zahra

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Patients experience high levels of anxiety before angiography, which is mostly associated with irreparable effects on health status of such individuals. Use of alternative medicine to reduce stress and anxiety is of paramount importance. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of music on anxiety level of patients hospitalized in cardiac wards before angiography. Materials and Method: This clinical trial was conducted on 70 patients admitted to cardiac wards before angiography in three selected hospitals of Shiraz, Iran in 2015. Samples were randomized convenience sampling and divided into two groups of control (n=35 and intervention (n=35. In this study, the intervention group received one hour of music before angiography for 20 minutes, whereas the usual care of ward was provided for the control group. Data was collected using the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI by Spielberger one hour before angiography (immediately before the intervention and 20 minutes after angiography (immediately after the intervention through interviews with all the participants. Data analysis was performed in SPSS version 22 using descriptive statistics, Chi-square, as well as paired and independent-tests. Results: In this study, mean anxiety scores of patients in the intervention and control groups before the intervention were 48.45±6.63 and 48.25±6.63, respectively. After the intervention, these scores were changed to 44.28±5.21 and 49.02±7.74 in the intervention (P=0.004 and control (P=0.90 groups, respectively. Therefore, a significant difference was observed between the groups after the intervention (P=0.008. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, music before angiography could lead to a significant decrease in anxiety level of patients. Therefore, this approach could be used as an effective method to alleviate anxiety in patients.

  8. Impact of parental presence during induction of anesthesia on anxiety level among pediatric patients and their parents: a randomized clinical trial

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    Sadeghi A

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Afsaneh Sadeghi, Ahmad Khaleghnejad Tabari, Alireza Mahdavi, Sara Salarian, Seyed Sajjad Razavi Department of Anesthesiology, Pediatric Surgery Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran Introduction: Anesthesia induction is a stressful event for children and their parents, and may have potentially harmful consequences on the patient’s physiological and mental situation. Stressful anesthesia induction has psychological adverse effects that recur with repeated anesthesia, can lead to increased pediatric discomfort during the recovery period, and may even induce reactionary postoperative behavior. A randomized controlled trial was performed to assess the impact of parental presence during induction of anesthesia (PPIA on preoperative anxiety of pediatric patients and their parents at three different times, cooperation of child with anesthesiologist at induction of anesthesia, and parental satisfaction.Patients and methods: A total of 96 pediatric patients undergoing elective minor surgery (ASA 1–2 were randomly divided into two groups. Both groups received oral midazolam (0.5 mg/kg at least 20 minutes before surgery, but in the PPIA group, the parents were also present in the operating room until loss of consciousness of child at anesthesia induction. Anxiety in the patients (as measured by the modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale [mYPAS] and parents (as measured by the State and Trait Anxiety Inventory [STAI], the Induction Compliance Checklist (ICC, and parental satisfaction (as measured by visual analog scale were assessed. Results: There was no significant difference in the mean anxiety scores (mYPAS of participants in the control and PPIA groups at ward T0 and upon arrival to operating room T1 (P>0.05. However, between the PPIA and control groups, mean mYPAS score was different at the time of induction of anesthesia T2 (35.5±16.6 vs 59.8±22.4; P<0.001. The ICC scores showed that perfect score was

  9. Self- Perceived Stress in Relation to Anxiety, Depression and Health-related Quality of Life among Health Professions Students: A Cross-sectional Study from Bosnia and Herzegovina.

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    Racic, Maja; Todorovic, Radica; Ivkovic, Nedeljka; Masic, Srdjan; Joksimovic, Bojan; Kulic, Milan

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine self-perceived stress of health professions students at the Faculty of Medicine Foča, and to explore its association with anxiety, depression and health-related quality of life. The cross-sectional study enrolled 451 students at the Faculty of Medicine (medicine, dentistry, nursing and speech therapy). Survey instruments were distributed at the conclusion of the spring semester during the last required lecture for each year and study programme class. Perceived stress was assessed using the 14-item Perceived Stress Scale. The students were evaluated for symptoms of depression and anxiety, using Zung's self-assessment inventory for depression and the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). European Quality of Life-5 dimensions were used for describing and evaluating health. Multivariate analyses were carried out using logistic regression to examine the relationship between the outcome variable and selected determinant factors. A high degree of stress was reported by 1.6% of students, while the majority of students had either moderate (70.6%) or low degree (27.5%) of stress. The significant independent factors associated with perceived stress were anxiety score (OR, 0.339; CI 95%, 0.276-0.403) and EQ-5D score (OR, 0.044; CI 95%, 0.033-0.085). A high degree of perceived stress (OR, 0.624; CI 95%, 0.507-0.704), the presence of depression (OR, 0.800; CI 95%, 0.513-1.087), and low quality of life were associated with anxiety (OR, 0.073; CI 95%, 0.018-0.128). Higher levels of perceived stress predispose health professions students for anxiety and lower quality of life. The study programme was not a significant determinant of perceived stress sore.

  10. Statistics anxiety, state anxiety during an examination, and academic achievement.

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    Macher, Daniel; Paechter, Manuela; Papousek, Ilona; Ruggeri, Kai; Freudenthaler, H Harald; Arendasy, Martin

    2013-12-01

    A large proportion of students identify statistics courses as the most anxiety-inducing courses in their curriculum. Many students feel impaired by feelings of state anxiety in the examination and therefore probably show lower achievements. The study investigates how statistics anxiety, attitudes (e.g., interest, mathematical self-concept) and trait anxiety, as a general disposition to anxiety, influence experiences of anxiety as well as achievement in an examination. Participants were 284 undergraduate psychology students, 225 females and 59 males. Two weeks prior to the examination, participants completed a demographic questionnaire and measures of the STARS, the STAI, self-concept in mathematics, and interest in statistics. At the beginning of the statistics examination, students assessed their present state anxiety by the KUSTA scale. After 25 min, all examination participants gave another assessment of their anxiety at that moment. Students' examination scores were recorded. Structural equation modelling techniques were used to test relationships between the variables in a multivariate context. Statistics anxiety was the only variable related to state anxiety in the examination. Via state anxiety experienced before and during the examination, statistics anxiety had a negative influence on achievement. However, statistics anxiety also had a direct positive influence on achievement. This result may be explained by students' motivational goals in the specific educational setting. The results provide insight into the relationship between students' attitudes, dispositions, experiences of anxiety in the examination, and academic achievement, and give recommendations to instructors on how to support students prior to and in the examination. © 2012 The British Psychological Society.

  11. Do You Believe It? Verbal Suggestions Influence the Clinical and Neural Effects of Escitalopram in Social Anxiety Disorder: A Randomized Trial.

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    Faria, Vanda; Gingnell, Malin; Hoppe, Johanna M; Hjorth, Olof; Alaie, Iman; Frick, Andreas; Hultberg, Sara; Wahlstedt, Kurt; Engman, Jonas; Månsson, Kristoffer N T; Carlbring, Per; Andersson, Gerhard; Reis, Margareta; Larsson, Elna-Marie; Fredrikson, Mats; Furmark, Tomas

    2017-10-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly prescribed for depression and anxiety, but their efficacy relative to placebo has been questioned. We aimed to test how manipulation of verbally induced expectancies, central for placebo, influences SSRI treatment outcome and brain activity in patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD). We did a randomized clinical trial, within an academic medical center (Uppsala, Sweden), of individuals fulfilling the DSM-IV criteria for SAD, recruited through media advertising. Participants were 18years or older and randomized in blocks, through a computer-generated sequence by an independent party, to nine weeks of overt or covert treatment with escitalopram (20mg daily). The overt group received correct treatment information whereas the covert group was treated deceptively with the SSRI described, by the psychiatrist, as active placebo. The treating psychiatrist was necessarily unmasked while the research staff was masked from intervention assignment. Treatment efficacy was assessed primarily with the self-rated Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS-SR), administered at week 0, 1, 3, 6 and 9, also yielding a dichotomous estimate of responder status (clinically significant improvement). Before and at the last week of treatment, brain activity during an emotional face-matching task was assessed with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and during fMRI sessions, anticipatory speech anxiety was also assessed with the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory - State version (STAI-S). Analyses included all randomized patients with outcome data at posttreatment. This study is registered at ISRCTN, number 98890605. Between March 17th 2014 and May 22nd 2015, 47 patients were recruited. One patient in the covert group dropped out after a few days of treatment and did not provide fMRI data, leaving 46 patients with complete outcome data. After nine weeks of treatment, overt (n=24) as compared to covert (n=22) SSRI

  12. Sedative-analgesic activity of remifentanil and effects of preoperative anxiety on perceived pain in outpatient mandibular third molar surgery.

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    Torun, A C; Yilmaz, M Z; Ozkan, N; Ustun, B; Koksal, E; Kaya, C

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the sedative-analgesic activity of different doses of remifentanil and effects of preoperative anxiety on intraoperative pain levels in patients attending a dental clinic. The patients (n=60) were divided into two groups according to the remifentanil infusion dose given: group R 1 : 0.05μg/kg/min; group R 2 : 0.1μg/kg/min. The following were evaluated: haemodynamic parameters, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) TX-I score, pain level due to local anaesthesia injection, time to reach a Ramsay Sedation Scale (RSS) score of 3, amount of bolus dose, total drug consumption, recovery period, patient and surgeon satisfaction, and complications. The patient satisfaction score on a visual analogue scale (VAS) was 90 in group R 1 and 100 in group R 2 (P=0.008); the surgeon satisfaction score was 80 in group R 1 and 90 in group R 2 (P=0.004). The time to reach an RSS score of 3 and the amount of bolus dose were significantly lower in group R 2 than in group R 1 . High levels of anxiety did not affect intraoperative pain levels. In conclusion, high doses of remifentanil can safely be used for various same-day dental surgery interventions. Copyright © 2016 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Knowledge, attitude and anxiety pertaining to basic life support and medical emergencies among dental interns in Mangalore City, India.

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    Somaraj, Vinej; Shenoy, Rekha P; Panchmal, Ganesh Shenoy; Jodalli, Praveen S; Sonde, Laxminarayan; Karkal, Ravichandra

    2017-01-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to assess the knowledge, attitude and anxiety pertaining to basic life support (BLS) and medical emergencies among interns in dental colleges of Mangalore city, Karnataka, India. The study subjects comprised of interns who volunteered from the four dental colleges. The knowledge and attitude of interns were assessed using a 30-item questionnaire prepared based on the Basic Life Support Manual from American Heart Association and the anxiety of interns pertaining to BLS and medical emergencies were assessed using a State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) Questionnaire. Chi-square test was performed on SPSS 21.0 (IBM Statistics, 2012) to determine statistically significant differences ( P basic life support procedures. Assessment of stress showed a total of 27.1% participants to be above high-stress level. Comparison of assessed knowledge and stress was found to be insignificant ( P =0.983). There was an evident lack of knowledge pertaining to the management of medical emergencies among the interns. As oral health care providers moving out to the society, a focus should be placed on the training of dental interns with respect to Basic Life Support procedures.

  14. Mother's anxiety and depression during the third pregnancy trimester and neonate's mother versus stranger's face/voice visual preference.

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    Figueiredo, Bárbara; Pacheco, Alexandra; Costa, Raquel; Conde, Ana; Teixeira, César

    2010-08-01

    Neonates show visual preference for their mother's face/voice and shift their attention from their mother to a stranger's face/voice after habituation. To assess neonate's mother versus stranger's face/voice visual preference, namely mother's anxiety and depression during the third pregnancy trimester and neonate's: 1) visual preference for the mother versus the stranger's face/voice (pretest visual preference), 2) habituation to the mother's face/voice and 3) visual preference for the stranger versus the mother's face/voice (posttest visual preference). Mothers (N=100) filled out the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and the State Anxiety Inventory (STAI) both at the third pregnancy trimester and childbirth, and the "preference and habituation to the mother's face/voice versus stranger" paradigm was administered to their newborn 1 to 5 days after childbirth. Neonates of anxious/depressed mothers during the third pregnancy trimester contrarily to neonates of non-anxious/non-depressed mothers did not look 1) longer at their mother's than at the stranger's face/voice at the pretest visual preference (showing no visual preference for the mother), nor 2) longer at the stranger's face/voice in the posttest than in the pretest visual preference (not improving their attention to the stranger's after habituation). Infants exposed to mother's anxiety/depression at the third gestational trimester exhibit less perceptual/social competencies at birth. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Purpose in life and work-related stress in mariners. Mediating role of quality of marriage bonds and perceived anxiety.

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    Peplińska, Aleksandra; Jeżewska, Maria; Leszczyńska, Irena; Połomski, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    The specific character of mariners' work is connected with many factors conducive to stress, overload, fatigue and emotional tension, all of which can negatively influence subjective quality of life, including particularly the sense of life's purpose and meaning. However, over the course of entire life one plays many various roles and takes part in many areas of life which influence one another, both positively and negatively. Undoubtedly one of such areas, essential from the point of fulfilling individual's important needs, is one's family and marriage that can function as a crucial factor for neutralising on-the-job problems and tensions. The research presented here attempts to verify the relation between stress perceived by mariners and their sense of purpose in life along with the mediating role of marriage quality and anxiety levels. A total of 210 mariners working on deep-sea ships were examined. The following research tools were applied in the study: the Purpose in Life Test (PIL), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), the Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ) and the Questionnaire of Suitable Marriage (KDM). The results arrived at indicate that both marriage satisfaction and anxiety levels can indeed mediate the relation between stress and sense of purpose in life among mariners.

  16. Deactivation of medial prefrontal and posterior cingulate cortex in anxiety disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xiaohu; Wang Peijun; Dong Ningxin; Li Chunbo; Wu Wenyuan; Hu Zhenghui; Tang Xiaowei

    2007-01-01

    Objective: We used blood oxygenation level dependent-functional MR imaging (BOLD- fMRI) to explore the characteristics of deactivation patterns in patients with anxiety disorders and the underlying neural mechanism of this disease. Methods: Ten patients and ten healthy controls participated the experiments. All subjects performed the trait portion of the State-Trait anxiety Inventory (STAI-T) prior to the fMRI scans. The subjects underwent noninvasive functional magnetic resonance imaging while listening actively to emotionally neutral words alternating with no words (experiment 1) and threat related-words alternating with emotionally neutral words (experiment2). During fMRI scanning, subjects were instructed to closely listen to each stimuli word and to silently make a judgment of the word's valence. Data were analyzed with statistical parametric mapping (SPM 99). Individual and group analysis were conducted. Results: Mean STAI-T score was significantly higher for patients group than that of controls (58 ± 8 for patients group and 33 ± 5 for controls, t=8.3, P<0.01). Our fMRI data revealed sets of deactivation brain regions in Experiment for patients and healthy controls, however, the deactivation can be found in experiment 2 only for patients. Interestingly, all the observed deactivation patterns were similar. The related areas compromise medial prefrontal cortex(BA 10, BA 24/32), posterior cingulate (BA 31/30) and Bilateral inferior parietal cortex (MPFC) (BA 39/40), which nearly overlapping with the organized default model network. Further more, the mean t values in the MPFC area (BA 24/32) was significantly higher for control group than that of patient (5.1 controls and 4.2 for patients, t=4.8, P=0.006), conversely, the mean t values in the posterior cingulate cortex(PCC) area was significantly higher for patients l than that of controls (4.9 controls and 5.8 for patients, t=2.4, P=0.026). Conclusion: Our observations suggest that the default model network

  17. Binge eating disorder, anxiety, depression and body image in grade III obesity patients Compulsão alimentar periódica, ansiedade, depressão e imagem corporal em pacientes com obesidade grau III

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    Maria Isabel R Matos

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to assess the frequency of Binge Eating Disorder (BED or Binge Eating episodes (BINGE, anxiety, depression and body image disturbances in severely obese patients seeking treatment for obesity. METHOD: We assessed 50 patients (10M and 40F with Body Mass Index (BMI between 40 and 81.7 Kg/m² (mean 52.2±9.2 Kg/m² and aging from 18 to 56 years (mean 38.5±9.7. Used instruments: Questionnaire on Eating and Weight Patterns ¾ Revised (QEWP-R for BED or BINGE assessment, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI for depressive symptoms, State - Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-TRAIT and STAI-STATE for anxiety and Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ for body image assessments. RESULTS: In this population BED and BINGE frequencies were 36% and 54%, respectively. Symptoms of depression were detected in 100% while severe symptomatology was found in 84% of the cases. The frequency of anxiety as a trait was 70%, as a state, 54% and 76% of all patients reported discomfort regarding body image. The frequency of BED was higher in patients with higher anxiety scores as a personality trait (>40 but not as a state (46% vs. 13%; p140 in the BSQ assessment. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate a high frequency of binge eating episodes, severe depressive symptoms, anxiety and concern with body image in grade III obesity patients.INTRODUÇÃO: O objetivo desse trabalho é avaliar a freqüência de transtorno da compulsão alimentar periódica (TCAP, episódios de compulsão alimentar periódica (CAP, ansiedade, depressão e distúrbios na imagem corporal em pacientes com obesidade grau III que procuram tratamento para obesidade. MÉTODO: Foram avaliados 50 pacientes (10M e 40F com Índice de Massa Corporal (IMC de 40 a 81,7 Kg/m² (média =52,2±9,2 Kg/m² e idade entre 18 e 56 anos (média de 38,5±9,7. Instrumentos utilizados: Questionário sobre Padrões de Alimentação e Peso ("Questionnaire on Eating and Weight Patterns - Revised" - QEWP

  18. The effect of improvisation-assisted desensitization, and music-assisted progressive muscle relaxation and imagery on reducing pianists' music performance anxiety.

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    Kim, Youngshin

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of two music therapy approaches, improvisation-assisted desensitization, and music-assisted progressive muscle relaxation and imagery on ameliorating the symptoms of music performance anxiety (MPA) among student pianists. Thirty female college pianists (N = 30) were randomly assigned to one of two conditions: (a) improvised music-assisted desensitization group (n = 15), or (b) music-assisted progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and imagery group (n = 15). All participants received 6 weekly music therapy sessions according to their assigned group. Two lab performances were provided; one before and one after the 6 music therapy sessions, as the performance stimuli for MPA. All participants completed pretest and posttest measures that included four types of visual analogue scales (MPA, stress, tension, and comfort), the state portion of Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and the Music Performance Anxiety Questionnaire (MPAQ) developed by Lehrer, Goldman, and Strommen (1990). Participants' finger temperatures were also measured. When results of the music-assisted PMR and imagery condition were compared from pretest to posttest, statistically significant differences occurred in 6 out of the 7 measures-MPA, tension, comfort, STAI, MPAQ, and finger temperature, indicating that the music-assisted PMR and imagery treatment was very successful in reducing MPA. For the improvisation-assisted desensitization condition, the statistically significant decreases in tension and STAI, with increases in finger temperature indicated that this approach was effective in managing MPA to some extent. When the difference scores for the two approaches were compared, there was no statistically significant difference between the two approaches for any of the seven measures. Therefore, no one treatment condition appeared more effective than the other. Although statistically significant differences were not found between

  19. Comorbid anxiety and depression in school-aged children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and selfreported symptoms of ADHD, anxiety, and depression among parents of school-aged children with and without ADHD

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    XIA, Weiping; SHEN, Lixiao; ZHANG, Jinsong

    2015-01-01

    Background Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common psychiatric disorder in children that can extend into adulthood and that is often associated with a variety of comorbid psychiatric disorders. Aim Assess the comorbidity of ADHD with anxiety disorders and depressive disorders in school-aged children, and the relationship of the severity of ADHD, anxiety, and depressive symptoms in children who have ADHD with the severity of the corresponding symptoms in their parents. Methods A two-stage screening process identified children 7-10 years of age with and without ADHD treated at the Xin Hua Hospital in Shanghai. ADHD and other DSM-IV diagnoses were determined by a senior clinician using the Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Aged Children (K-SADS-PL). One parent for each enrolled child completed three self-report scales: the ADHD Adult Self Report Scale (ASRS), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). In total 135 children with ADHD and 65 control group children without ADHD were enrolled; parents for 94 of the children with ADHD and 63 of the children without ADHD completed the parental assessment scales. Results Among the 135 children with ADHD, 27% had a comorbid anxiety disorder, 18% had a comorbid depressive disorder, and another 15% had both comorbid anxiety and depressive disorders. Parents of children with ADHD self-reported more severe ADHD inattention symptoms than parents of children without ADHD and were more likely to meet criteria for adult ADHD. Mothers (but not fathers) of children with ADHD had significantly more severe trait anxiety and depressive symptoms than mothers of children without ADHD. Among children with ADHD, the severity of ADHD symptoms was not significantly correlated with the severity of ADHD symptoms in parents, but depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms in the children were significantly correlated with the corresponding symptoms in the parents

  20. [The degree of asthma severity in children and the level of maternal anxiety and depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowska-Płusa, Urszula

    2015-02-01

    Care for sick children most often falls to mothers, which may affect their mental state, causing the states of depression and anxiety. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the severity of asthma in children and the level of anxiety and depression in mothers, taking into account the importance of the material status of the family, the educational level of the mothers, the presence of critical events, as well as the coexistence of allergic diseases in other family members. The study included 60 mothers of children with bronchial asthma. Age of mothers in the investigated families was on average 37.28 +/- 6.24 years, and most had a high school education (55.0%) or higher (28.3%). 16.7% of mothers and 8.3% fathers suffered from asthma. 13.3% of mothers of children with asthma were brought child alone. To assess the level of anxiety the inventory for measuring state and trait anxiety (STAI - State Trait Anxiety Inventory) developed by Spielberger, Gorsuch'a and Lushene'a was applied. To determine the changes in depressive the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI - Beck Depression Inventory questionnaire) was used. The Student's t test was included for two independent populations and a comparison of the results obtained in the questionnaire for diagnosing the level of anxiety and depression. For other parameters the correlation coefficient r-Pearson rank and Kendall's tau were performed. Mothers of children with moderate asthma compared to mothers of children with mild asthma had higher levels of anxiety (both state and properties), and also a slightly higher level of depression. Maternal age was connected positively and moderately strongly with the number held by children (r = 0.380; p = 0.003) and age of a child with asthma (r = 0.613, p = 0.0005). The duration of the child's disease was associated positively and moderately strongly with the level of state anxiety mother (X-1) (r = 0.345; p = 0.007) and a bit less and also positively with the

  1. Performance Enhancement with Low Stress and Anxiety Modulated by Cognitive Flexibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyung Woo; Kee, Baik Seok; Na, Churl; Na, Do-Hyun E.; Zaichkowsky, Leonard

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare cognitive flexibility abilities, stress, and anxiety between starters and non-starter athletes. Methods A total of 30 male professional-soccer and 40 professional-baseball athletes were recruited. Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) and Trail Making Test A & B (TMT A & B) were administered to assess cognitive flexibility during competition. The Korean version of the STAI form Y (STAI-KY) and Visual analogue scale for anxiety and stress were used to assess the anxiety and stress. Results The starter group had better cognitive function (fewer perseverative errors and rapid TMTB times) (Z=3.32, panxiety (F=4.34, p=0.01; F=6.61, pcognitive performances were negatively correlated with stress and anxiety. Current results suggested that cognitive flexibility would enhance human performance by modulation of the anxiety and stress during competition. PMID:21994509

  2. Low birth weight in offspring of women with depressive and anxiety symptoms during pregnancy: results from a population based study in Bangladesh

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    Nasreen Hashima E

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a high prevalence of antepartum depression and low birth weight (LBW in Bangladesh. In high- and low-income countries, prior evidence linking maternal depressive and anxiety symptoms with infant LBW is conflicting. There is no research on the association between maternal mental disorders and LBW in Bangladesh. This study aims to investigate the independent effect of maternal antepartum depressive and anxiety symptoms on infant LBW among women in a rural district of Bangladesh. Methods A population-based sample of 720 pregnant women from two rural subdistricts was assessed for symptoms of antepartum depression, using the Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale (EPDS, and antepartum anxiety, using the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, and followed for 6-8 months postpartum. Infant birth weight of 583 (81% singleton live babies born at term (≥37 weeks of pregnancy was measured within 48 hours of delivery. Baseline data provided socioeconomic, anthropometric, reproductive, obstetric, and social support information. Trained female interviewers carried out structured interviews. Chi-square, Fisher's exact, and independent-sample t tests were done as descriptive statistics, and a multiple logistic regression model was used to identify predictors of LBW. Results After adjusting for potential confounders, depressive (OR = 2.24; 95% CI 1.37-3.68 and anxiety (OR = 2.08; 95% CI 1.30-3.25 symptoms were significantly associated with LBW (≤2.5 kg. Poverty, maternal malnutrition, and support during pregnancy were also associated with LBW. Conclusions This study provides evidence that maternal depressive and anxiety symptoms during pregnancy predict the LBW of newborns and replicates results found in other South Asian countries. Policies aimed at the detection and effective management of depressive and anxiety symptoms during pregnancy may reduce the burden on mothers and also act as an important measure in the prevention of LBW

  3. Surgery information reduces anxiety in the pre-operative period Conhecimento sobre cirurgia reduz ansiedade pré-operatória

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    Leandro Yoshinobu Kiyohara

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Patients preparing to undergo surgery should not suffer needless anxiety. This study aimed to evaluate anxiety levels on the day before surgery as related to the information known by the patient regarding the diagnosis, surgical procedure, or anesthesia. METHOD: Patients reported their knowledge of diagnosis, surgery, and anesthesia. The Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI was used to measure patient anxiety levels. RESULTS: One hundred and forty-nine patients were selected, and 82 females and 38 males were interviewed. Twenty-nine patients were excluded due to illiteracy. The state-anxiety levels were alike for males and females (36.10 ± 11.94 vs. 37.61 ± 8.76 (mean ± SD. Trait-anxiety levels were higher for women (42.55 ± 10.39 vs. 38.08 ± 12.25, P = 0.041. Patient education level did not influence the state-anxiety level but was inversely related to the trait-anxiety level. Knowledge of the diagnosis was clear for 91.7% of patients, of the surgery for 75.0%, and of anesthesia for 37.5%. Unfamiliarity with the surgical procedure raised state-anxiety levels (P = 0.021. A lower state-anxiety level was found among patients who did not know the diagnosis but knew about the surgery (P = 0.038. CONCLUSIONS: Increased knowledge of patients regarding the surgery they are about to undergo may reduce their state-anxiety levels.PROPÓSITO: Pacientes que vão ser operados não devem sofrer ansiedade. Este estudo tem por objetivo comparar o grau de ansiedade no dia anterior à cirurgia entre pacientes que têm informação sobre seu diagnóstico, cirurgia e anestesia. MÉTODOS: Pacientes referiram seu conhecimento sobre o diagnóstico, a cirurgia e a anestesia. O inventário de Spielberger, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, mediu a ansiedade. RESULTADOS: Cento e quarenta e nove pacientes foram selecionados, 82 mulheres e 38 homens foram entrevistados. Vinte e nove pacientes foram excluídos do estudo por analfabetismo. A

  4. Studies on attitude toward teaching science and anxiety about teaching science in preservice elementary teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerback, Mary E.

    These studies examined attitude toward teaching science (ATTS) using an adaptation of the Bratt Attitude Test (M-BAT); anxiety about teaching science (ANX-TS), as measured by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI A-State); and selected demographic variables in preservice elementary teachers for the 1977-1978 and 1978-1979 academic years and a follow-up of those students who completed their student teaching in May 1979. The M-BAT and STAI were administered in September at the beginning of Science 6 (earth science and biology course), in December on the next to last day of Science 6, in May on the next to the last day of Science 5 (physical science), and in May 1979 after student teaching. In the two academic years, both ATTS and ANX-TS became more positive during the sequence Science 6-5. Both changes in ATTS and ANX-TS continued to change in a positive direction after completion of Science 6-5, after student teaching. There were differences in the times that the greatest changes in ATTS and ANX-TS occurred. In both studies, the greatest change in ATTS took place between September and December, during Science 6. The greatest change in ANX-TS, however, took place during Science 5 between December and May in the 1977-1978 study. In the 1978-1979 study, the greatest changes in ANX-TS occurred in Science 6, between September and December. The delayed reduction of ANX-TS in the 1977-1978 study may be explained by differences in teaching patterns. In 1977-1978, two teachers taught only their academic specialty, biology or earth science, to students who switched teachers midsemester. In 1978-1979, the same two instructors taught both biology and earth science to the same students. Correlation coefficients for successive and corresponding administrations of both the M-BAT and STAI suggest these variables are related. Students with more positive ATTS tended to have reduced ANX-TS. Neither the number of high school or college science and math courses completed nor the level

  5. Somatic symptoms evoked by exam stress in university students: the role of alexithymia, neuroticism, anxiety and depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Zunhammer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The etiology of somatization is incompletely understood, but could be elucidated by models of psychosocial stress. Academic exam stress has effectively been applied as a naturalistic stress model, however its effect on somatization symptoms according to ICD-10 and DSM-IV criteria has not been reported so far. Baseline associations between somatization and personality traits, such as alexithymia, have been studied exhaustively. Nevertheless, it is largely unknown if personality traits have an explanatory value for stress induced somatization. METHODS: This longitudinal, quasi-experimental study assessed the effects of university exams on somatization - and the reversal of effects after an exam-free period. Repeated-observations were obtained within 150 students, measuring symptom intensity before, during and after an exam period, according to the Screening for Somatoform Symptoms 7-day (SOMS-7d. Additionally, self-reports on health status were used to differentiate between medically explained and medically unexplained symptoms. Alexithymia, neuroticism, trait-anxiety and baseline depression were surveyed using the Toronto-Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20, the Big-Five Personality Interview (NEO-FFI, the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI and Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI-II. These traits were competitively tested for their ability to explain somatization increases under exam stress. RESULTS: Somatization significantly increased across a wide range of symptoms under exam stress, while health reports pointed towards a reduction in acute infections and injuries. Neuroticism, alexithymia, trait anxiety and depression explained variance in somatization at baseline, but only neuroticism was associated with symptom increases under exam stress. CONCLUSION: Exam stress is an effective psychosocial stress model inducing somatization. A comprehensive quantitative description of bodily symptoms under exam stress is supplied. The results do not

  6. Somatic symptoms evoked by exam stress in university students: the role of alexithymia, neuroticism, anxiety and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunhammer, Matthias; Eberle, Hanna; Eichhammer, Peter; Busch, Volker

    2013-01-01

    The etiology of somatization is incompletely understood, but could be elucidated by models of psychosocial stress. Academic exam stress has effectively been applied as a naturalistic stress model, however its effect on somatization symptoms according to ICD-10 and DSM-IV criteria has not been reported so far. Baseline associations between somatization and personality traits, such as alexithymia, have been studied exhaustively. Nevertheless, it is largely unknown if personality traits have an explanatory value for stress induced somatization. This longitudinal, quasi-experimental study assessed the effects of university exams on somatization - and the reversal of effects after an exam-free period. Repeated-observations were obtained within 150 students, measuring symptom intensity before, during and after an exam period, according to the Screening for Somatoform Symptoms 7-day (SOMS-7d). Additionally, self-reports on health status were used to differentiate between medically explained and medically unexplained symptoms. Alexithymia, neuroticism, trait-anxiety and baseline depression were surveyed using the Toronto-Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), the Big-Five Personality Interview (NEO-FFI), the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI-II). These traits were competitively tested for their ability to explain somatization increases under exam stress. Somatization significantly increased across a wide range of symptoms under exam stress, while health reports pointed towards a reduction in acute infections and injuries. Neuroticism, alexithymia, trait anxiety and depression explained variance in somatization at baseline, but only neuroticism was associated with symptom increases under exam stress. Exam stress is an effective psychosocial stress model inducing somatization. A comprehensive quantitative description of bodily symptoms under exam stress is supplied. The results do not support the stress-alexithymia hypothesis, but favor

  7. Responses to the Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2 by the Athletes Participated in the (IJF) Judo Grand Prix Competition, Samsun 2015 in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agaoglu, Yavuz Selim

    2016-01-01

    The judo is a popular sport which people engaged in more than 178 countries at any age in the world. Besides its popularity, the studies on this field continue to increase gradually. The purpose of this study, therefore, is to measure pre-competition anxieties, and to evaluate data obtained of the pre-competition concerns of the judo athletes who…

  8. Padrão do ciclo sono-vigília e sua relação com a ansiedade em estudantes universitários Sleep/wake cycle pattern and its relationship with anxiety in college students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Moraes de Almondes

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho, foram investigadas as relações entre o ciclo sono-vigília e a ansiedade. O ciclo sono-vigília e traço e estado de ansiedade foram avaliados em 37 estudantes do segundo ano do curso médico. Os estudantes responderam ao Índice de Qualidade de Sono de Pittsburgh - IQSP, ao Inventário de Estado e Traço de Ansiedade - IDATE e a um questionário de matutinidade - vespertinidade (cronotipo. Todos registraram seu sono em um diário durante duas semanas. Os resultados mostraram que os estudantes de medicina tinham altos escores de traço e estado de ansiedade. Aqueles que tinham maiores escores de traço de ansiedade acordavam mais cedo nos dias de semana e finais de semana enquanto os que apresentavam irregularidade do seu ciclo sono-vigília apresentaram maior estado de ansiedade. Sugere-se que há uma relação entre o ciclo sono-vigília e a ansiedade.This paper examines the relationship between the sleep/wake cycle and anxiety in medical students. The sleep/wake cycle and anxiety were evaluated in 37 second year medical school students. The volunteers answered a morningness-eveningness questionnaire, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index - PSQI and state and trait of anxiety inventory - STAI; all kept a sleep/wake diary for two weeks. The results showed that the students had high anxiety trait and state. Students who had high anxiety trait had an earlier sleep offset on weekdays and weekend, and students who displayed irregularity in the sleep/wake cycle had high anxiety state. These results suggest a relationship between the sleep/wake cycle and anxiety.

  9. Comparison of the effectiveness of music and progressive muscle relaxation for anxiety in COPD--A randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijay Pratap; Rao, V; V, Prem; R C, Sahoo; K, Keshav Pai

    2009-01-01

    Acute effects of music and relaxation have not been evaluated in hospitalized subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This study aims to evaluate the acute effects of music and progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) in hospitalized COPD subjects after a recent episode of exacerbation. A Randomized controlled study was performed of pre-test post-test design after recruiting 82 COPD subjects from K.M.C hospitals. All patients were admitted for acute exacerbation and were medically stabilized. After being screened for the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 72 subjects were selected for the study. Demographic and baseline data was taken on the day subjects were screened. Music group listened to a self selected music of 60-80 beats per minute for 30 minutes. PMR group practiced relaxation through a pre-recorded audio of instructions of 16 muscle groups. Outcome variables were Spielberger's state anxiety inventory (SSAI), Spielberger's trait anxiety inventory (STAI), dyspnea, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), pulse rate (PR) and respiratory rate (RR). There was statistically significant main effect across the sessions for state anxiety (F = 62.621, p = 0.000), trait anxiety (F = 19.528, p = 0.000), dyspnea (F = 122.227, p = 0.000), SBP (F = 63.885, p = 0.000), PR (F = 115.780, p = 0.000) and RR (F = 202.977, p = 0.000). There was statistically significant interaction effect between the two groups for state anxiety (F = 6.024, p = 0.003), trait anxiety (F = 8.222, p = 0.000), dyspnea (F = 10.659, p = 0.000), SBP (F = 12.889, p = 0.000), PR (F = 4.746, p = 0.008) and RR (F = 12.078, p = 0.000). There were greater changes observed after the second session in both groups however, change in DBP was not significant in either group. Music and PMR are effective in reducing anxiety and dyspnoea along with physiologic measures such as SBP, PR and RR in two sessions in COPD patients hospitalized with exacerbation. However, reductions in

  10. Effect of juggling therapy on anxiety disorders in female patients

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    Nakahara Toshihiro

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of juggling therapy for anxiety disorder patients. Design and Method Subjects were 17 female outpatients who met the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for anxiety disorders. Subjects were treated with standard psychotherapy, medication and counseling for 6 months. For the last 3 months of treatment, subjects were randomized into either a non-juggling group (n = 9 or a juggling therapy group (juggling group: n = 8. The juggling group gradually acquired juggling skills by practicing juggling beanbags (otedama in Japan with both hands. The therapeutic effect was evaluated using scores of psychological testing (STAI: State and Trate Anxiety Inventry, POMS: Profile of Mood Status and of ADL (FAI: Franchay Activity Index collected before treatment, 3 months after treatment (before juggling therapy, and at the end of both treatments. Results After 6 months, an analysis of variance revealed that scores on the state anxiety, trait anxiety subscales of STAI and tension-anxiety (T-A score of POMS were significantly lower in the juggling group than in the non-juggling group (p Conclusion These findings suggest that juggling therapy may be effective for the treatment of anxiety disorders.

  11. Is subclinical anxiety an endophenotype for bipolar I patients? A study from a Costa Rican sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Javier; Hare, Elizabeth; Pacheco, Adriana; Escamilla, Michael; Raventos, Henriette

    2010-05-01

    Although genetic influences on bipolar I disorder are well established, localization of genes that predispose to the illness has been difficult. Some genes predisposing to bipolar I disorder may be transmitted without expression of the categorical clinical phenotype. One strategy to overcome this obstacle is the use of quantitative endophenotypes, as has been done for other medical disorders. We analyzed 30 bipolar I extended families (300 subjects, average family size 10.34 members, range: 2-31) and 20 unrelated healthy controls from a Costa Rican sample. Heritability and genetic correlation of the state and trait scale from the Anxiety State and Trait Inventory was computed by using the general linear model (SOLAR package software). We also assessed variation of both scores among groups (patients, relatives and controls) and tested independence of affection status. Heritability for state is 0.45 (SE=0.11, p=0.0000001) and for trait is 0.89 (SE=0.06, p=6.22e-29). Genetic correlation for state and trait is 0.29, (SE=0.12, p=0.038-3.19e-8). Bipolar I patients showed the highest trait score (F=12.17 [5,24], p=0.002), (bipolar I patients>relatives with other pathologies, >healthy relatives>unrelated healthy controls) with normal distribution in healthy individuals and no difference regarding depression and mania current status, (F=0.230, df=1, p=0.632 and F=1.401, df=1, p=0.238, respectively), contrary to the state score. Confounding factors such as comorbid disorders could affect the interaction of subclinical anxiety with mania. Due to our limited budget we were not able to re-evaluate the subjects and conduct a test retest to assess the STAI reliability and mood state independence of anxiety traits over different times. Further research is needed to evaluate if anxiety traits are specially related to bipolar I disorder in comparison with other traits such as anger, attention or response inhibition deficit, pathological impulsivity or low self-directedness. Anxiety

  12. Relationships between locus of control, trait anxiety, and state anxiety: an interactionist perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, R P

    1979-06-01

    This study examined the relationships among generalized expectancy for internal or external control, situational expectancy of control over aversive stimuli, trait anxiety level, and state anxiety reactivity. Seventy-two male subjects, selected from the upper and lower halves of the distributions of scores from the I-E and STAI A-Trait Scales, were randomly assigned to one of three conditions of expectancy of control over electric shock. Repeated measures of state anxiety were taken at three points in the experiment, and subjects were asked to rate the degree of control they expected to have in avoiding shocks. Results, based upon analyses of variance, were interpreted as strongly supportive of the use of the interactionist model in understanding the manner in which personality trait and situational variables interact in the determination of subject expectancies of control and anxiety reactivity.

  13. Assessment of pre and postoperative anxiety in patients undergoing ambulatory oral surgery in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Gilabert, E; Luque-Romero, L-G; Bejarano-Avila, G; Garcia-Palma, A; Rollon-Mayordomo, A; Infante-Cossio, P

    2017-11-01

    To analyze the pre- and postoperative anxiety level in patients undergoing ambulatory oral surgery (AOS) in a primary healthcare center (PHC). Prospective and descriptive clinical study on 45 patients who underwent AOS procedures in the dental clinic of a public PHC of Spain between April and September 2015. Anxiety analysis was carried out with pre- and postoperative anxiety-state (STAI-S), anxiety-trait (STAI-T) and dental anxiety (MDAS) questionnaires. A descriptive, inferential and binary logistic regression analysis were performed for the variables age, sex, educational level, previous experience of oral treatment, type of oral surgery, degree of third molar impaction, surgical time, intraoperative complications, postoperative complications, and pain score with a visual analogue scale (VAS). The majority were female (57.8%) with a mean age of 33.5±9.6 years. The most frequent procedure was the lower third molar removal (82.2%). The mean pain score on the VAS was 1.6±1.8. The incidence of complications was low (7.8%). There was a statistically significant association between post- and preoperative anxiety (r=0.56, p<0.001) and a correlation between pain score and postoperative anxiety (Rho= -0.35, p=0.02). The likelihood of postoperative anxiety was related to preoperative anxiety (OR=1.3, p=0.03). AOS in a PHC is safe and should be more encouraged in the public primary care. The emotional impact on users was relatively low, highlighting that the preoperative anxiety levels were higher than the postoperative ones. Psychological factors related to pre- and postoperative anxiety should be considered in the AOS carried out in PC.

  14. An investigative study into psychological and fertility sequelae of gestational trophoblastic disease: the impact on patients' perceived fertility, anxiety and depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina E Di Mattei

    Full Text Available Gestational Trophoblastic Disease (GTD comprises a group of disorders that derive from the placenta. Even if full recovery is generally expected, women diagnosed with GTD have to confront: the loss of a pregnancy, a potentially life-threatening diagnosis and delays in future pregnancies. The aim of the study is to evaluate the psychological impact of GTD, focusing on perceived fertility, depression and anxiety.37 patients treated for GTD at San Raffaele Hospital, Milan, took part in the study. The STAI-Y (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the BDI-SF (Beck Depression Scale-Short Form and the FPI (Fertility Problem Inventory were used. Patients were grouped on the basis of presence of children (with or without, age (< or ≥35 and type of diagnosis (Hydatidiform Mole, HM, or Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasia, GTN. Differences in the values between variables were assessed by a t-type test statistic. Three-way ANOVAs were also carried out considering the same block factors.The study highlights that women suffering from GTN had higher depression scores compared to women suffering from HM. A significant correlation was found between anxiety (state and trait and depression. Younger women presented higher Global Stress scores on the FPI, especially tied to Need for Parenthood and Relationship Concern subscales. Need for Parenthood mean scores significantly varied between women with and without children too.We can conclude that fertility perception seems to be negatively affected by GTD diagnosis, particularly in younger women and in those without children. Patients should be followed by a multidisciplinary team so as to be supported in the disease's psychological aspects too.

  15. The relationship of anxiety to childhood depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norvell, N; Brophy, C; Finch, A J

    1985-04-01

    In order to investigate the relationship between anxiety and depression in emotionally disturbed children, 30 hospitalized inpatient children were individually administered the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI), the Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale-Revised (CMAS-R), and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children (STAIC). Results indicated a significant relationship between CDI scores, the CMAS-R and its factors, and the STAIC. Correlations between the various factors of anxiety and depression suggest a complex relationship between the two constructs. Stepwise regression analyses indicated further the complexity of this relationship. Results were discussed in terms of the possible differential role which the different anxiety factors play in depression.

  16. [Intensive Naikan therapy for generalized anxiety disorder and panic disorder: clinical outcomes and background].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nukina, Shu; Wang, Hongxin; Kamei, Kazuhisa; Kawahara, Ryuzo

    2005-01-01

    Intensive Naikan therapy (INT) is used to treat irrational recognition, and to develop awareness of others and self-reflection. Several reports have also shown that INT is effective for treating anxiety disorders. The purpose of the present systematic study was to investigate the factors contributing to the efficacy and clinical outcomes of INT by assessing the background, psychological evolution, and treatment required after such therapy. Twenty-eight anxiety disorder inpatients at Tottori University Hospital, 15 with general anxiety disorders (GAD) and 13 with panic disorders (PD), were treated with INT. Age, sex, duration of the present anxiety episode, and diagnosis were investigated. The Tokyo University Egogram (TEG), Yatabe-Guilford personality inventory (YG test) and Rosenzweig picture frustration (PF) study were conducted before and after INT to investigate psychological changes. The long-term efficacy of INT for PD and GAD was assessed with Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF). Whether the patients achieved awareness of others, awareness of egocentricity, feelings of love, and self reflection after INT were investigated. 1) All patients showed improved GAF; the average GAF score increased from 51 +/- 8 (before Naikan therapy) to 83.2 +/- 15 (after therapy). The clinical outcomes of INT were as follows: 17 patients showed extremely effective results (60.7%), 6 were effective (21.4%), 3 were slightly effective (10.7%), and 2 were unchanged (7.1%). Overall, 23 patients (82.1%) showed remarkable improvements as a result of INT (improved group) and 5 showed no remarkable improvements (not improved group). 2) The improved group included significantly more patients with obsessive tendencies or nervous personalities such as a premorbid personality. In addition, significantly more of the patients in this group underwent daily INT and improved more rapidly in the short-term. 3) According to the STAI (state trait anxiety inventory), both state-(S-anxiety), and

  17. Test Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Test Anxiety KidsHealth / For Teens / Test Anxiety What's in this ... with their concentration or performance. What Is Test Anxiety? Test anxiety is actually a type of performance ...

  18. Reduction of the anxiety of medical students after curricular reform Redução da ansiedade de estudantes de medicina após reforma curricular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Waldo Zuardi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Curricular structure may interfere in students' anxiety level at medical schools. The objective of this study was to assess anxiety levels in medical students before and after a curriculum reform at the Medical School of Ribeirão Preto and to compare them with students at other courses that had no curricular changes in the same university campus. METHOD: Study samples were obtained in two moments: 1 two years before the reform; 2 after the reform when the reformed curriculum completed its fourth year. The pre-sample (former curriculum consisted of 307 medical students and 217 students from psychology and biology courses. The post-sample (new curriculum was composed of 330 medical students and 194 students from psychology and biology courses. Anxiety was assessed by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI. RESULTS: Comparing the pre with the post sample, we found STAI-T scores of the students under the former curriculum were significantly higher in the first (42.9 + 1.08 and second (41.9 + 1.1 years than the STAI-T scores of the medical students under the new curriculum (38.1 + 1.0 and 37.9 + 1.06, respectively. Students from other courses and 5th year medical students, who followed the same curriculum, did not show any significant differences between different samples. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that changes to medical school curricula may reduce the medical student' levels of anxiety in the first two years of the course.OBJETIVOS: Características da estrutura curricular podem interferir no nível de ansiedade dos alunos do curso médico. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o nível de ansiedade nos alunos do curso médico, antes e depois de uma reforma no currículo da Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, comparando com outros cursos, do mesmo campus da universidade, que não tiveram mudanças curriculares. MÉTODO: As amostras do estudo foram obtidas em dois tempos distintos: 1 dois anos antes da reforma; 2 pós a

  19. When Sugar-Coated Words Taste Dry: The Relationship between Gender, Anxiety, and Response to Irony

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    Anna Milanowicz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article approaches the question of mocking compliments and ironic praise from an interactional gender perspective. A statement such as “You're a real genius!” could easily be interpreted as a literal compliment, as playful humor or as an offensive insult. We investigate this thin line in the use of irony among adult men and women. The research introduces an interactional approach to irony, through the lens of gender stereotype bias. The main question concerns the impact of individual differences and gender effect on the perception and production of ironic comments. Irony Processing Task (IPT, developed by Milanowicz (2016, was applied in order to study the production and perception of ironic criticism and ironic praise in adult males and females. It is a rare case of a study measuring the ability to create irony because, unlike most of known irony research, it is not a multiple choice test where participants are given the response options. The IPT was also used to assess the asymmetry of affect (humor vs. malice and impact of gender effect in the perception of ironic comments. Results are analyzed in relation to the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI scores. The findings reveal the interactional relationship between gender and response to irony. Male responses were consistently more ironic than female's, across all experimental conditions, and female responses varied more. Both, men and women used more irony in response to male ironic criticism but female ironic praise. Anxiety proved to be a moderate predictor of irony comprehension and willingness to use irony. Data, collected in control and two gender stereotype activation conditions, also corroborates the assumption that the detection of compliments and the detection of criticism can be moderated by the attitude activation effect. The results are interpreted within the framework of linguistic intergroup bias (LIB and natural selection strategies.

  20. Inventory parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a detailed overview of various parameters/factors involved in inventory analysis. It especially focuses on the assessment and modeling of basic inventory parameters, namely demand, procurement cost, cycle time, ordering cost, inventory carrying cost, inventory stock, stock out level, and stock out cost. In the context of economic lot size, it provides equations related to the optimum values. It also discusses why the optimum lot size and optimum total relevant cost are considered to be key decision variables, and uses numerous examples to explain each of these inventory parameters separately. Lastly, it provides detailed information on parameter estimation for different sectors/products. Written in a simple and lucid style, it offers a valuable resource for a broad readership, especially Master of Business Administration (MBA) students.

  1. The effects of psychological interventions on depression and anxiety among Chinese adults with cancer: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi-Long; Sui, Guo-Yuan; Liu, Guang-Cong; Huang, De-Sheng; Wang, Si-Meng; Wang, Lie

    2014-12-15

    Our previous studies found the high prevalence of depression and anxiety among Chinese cancer patients, and many empirical studies have been conducted to evaluate the effects of psychological interventions on depression and anxiety among Chinese cancer patients. This study aimed to conduct a meta-analysis in order to assess the effects of psychological interventions on depression and anxiety in Chinese adults with cancer. The four most comprehensive Chinese academic database- CNKI, Wanfang, Vip and CBM databases-were searched from their inception until January 2014. PubMed and Web of Science (SCIE) were also searched from their inception until January 2014 without language restrictions, and an internet search was used. Randomized controlled studies assessing the effects of psychological interventions on depression and anxiety among Chinese adults with cancer were analyzed. Study selection and appraisal were conducted independently by three authors. The pooled random-effects estimates of standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Moderator analysis (meta-regression and subgroup analysis) was used to explore reasons for heterogeneity. We retrieved 147 studies (covering 14,039 patients) that reported 253 experimental-control comparisons. The random effects model showed a significant large effect size for depression (SMD = 1.199, p analysis indicated that sufficient evidence had accumulated since 2000-2001 to confirm the statistically significant effectiveness of psychological interventions on depression and anxiety in Chinese cancer patients. Moderating effects were found for caner type, patients' selection, intervention format and questionnaires used. In studies that included lung cancer, preselected patients with clear signs of depression/anxiety, adopted individual intervention and used State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), the effect sizes were larger. We concluded that psychological interventions in Chinese cancer

  2. AN ANALYSIS ON WRITING ANXIETY OF INDONESIAN EFL COLLEGE LEARNERS

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    Sri Wahyuni

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at analyzing the writing anxiety of English students of an Islamic State College in East Java, Indonesia. This study described the levels, dominant type, and main factors of writing anxiety of the English students. Fifty English students at the fourth semester participated in this study. Two closed-ended questionnaires, Second Language Writing Anxiety Inventory (SLWAI proposed by Cheng, and Causes of Writing Anxiety Inventory (CWAI proposed by Rezaei and Jafari were employed to collect the data. The findings revealed that 54% of the students experienced high level of writing anxiety, 44% experienced moderate level of writing anxiety, and 2% experienced low level of writing anxiety. The dominant type of writing anxiety was cognitive writing anxiety, which is based on the highest mean among two other types of writing anxiety. Then there are four main factors that cause writing anxiety. They are linguistic difficulties, fear of teachers’ negative comments, insufficient writing practice, and time pressure.

  3. Riparian Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This dataset is a digital representation of the 1:24,000 Land Use Riparian Areas Inventory for the state of Kansas. The dataset includes a 100 foot buffer around all...

  4. A Multi-Informant Approach to Measuring Depressive Symptoms in Clinical Assessments of Adolescent Social Anxiety Using the Beck Depression Inventory-II: Convergent, Incremental, and Criterion-Related Validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch, Erica; Racz, Sarah J.; Augenstein, Tara M.; Keeley, Lauren; Lipton, Melanie F.; Szollos, Sebastian; Riffle, James; Moriarity, Daniel; Kromash, Rachelle; De Los Reyes, Andres

    2017-01-01

    Background: Among adolescents, depressive symptoms commonly co-occur with social anxiety, with social anxiety often developmentally preceding depressive symptoms. Thus, evidence-based assessments of adolescent social anxiety should be augmented with assessments of depressive symptoms using measures that can be administered across developmental…

  5. Actor-partner interdependence analysis in depressed patient-caregiver dyads: Influence of emotional intelligence and coping strategies on anxiety and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marguerite, Serres; Laurent, Boyer; Marine, Alessandrini; Tanguy, Leroy; Karine, Baumstarck; Pascal, Auquier; Xavier, Zendjidjian

    2017-12-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a leading cause of suffering for both patients and their natural caregivers. A preliminary study highlights the association of emotional intelligence (EI) and coping strategies with quality of life. However, there is a lack of studies concerning dyadic (i.e., patient and natural caregiver) characteristics' impact on anxious and depressive symptoms. In a sample of MDD patients-caregivers dyads, we explored the influence of EI and coping strategies on anxious and depressive symptoms using the actor-partner interdependence model (APIM). The cross-sectional study included 79 MDD patient-caregiver dyads. Self-reported data, completed by patients and their primary caregivers, were collected including socio-demographic, EI using TEIQue-SF, coping strategies using BriefCope, depressive symptoms using Beck Depression Inventory, anxious symptoms using STAI. The APIM was used to test the dyadic effects of EI and coping strategies on anxious and depressive symptoms, using structural equation modelling. Patients and caregivers reported both anxious and depressive symptoms. Coping strategies, such as problem solving, positive thinking and avoidance, exhibited evidence of actor (degree to which the individual's coping strategies are associated with their own anxiety or depression level) and partner effect (degree to which the individual's coping strategies are associated with the anxiety or depression level of the other member of the dyad). The caregivers' EI was associated with a decrease of their own depression level contrary to patients for which the results were not significant. The patients' and caregivers' EI was associated with a decrease of their own level of anxiety. EI and coping strategies were moderately associated with anxious and depressive symptomatology among MDD patient-caregiver dyads. These results suggest that targeted interventions could be proposed to both patients and caregivers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  6. Precompetitive state anxiety in judo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Montero Carretero

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of this study was to analyze the psychometric properties of the Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2 (CSAI-2 in Spanish judokas, and calculate differences in pre-competitive state anxiety due the sport level, age and gender. We analyze these relationships using a multidimensional anxiety perspective.Method: A sample of 128 judokas from amateur to high performance level participated in our study. The intensity and directional somatic anxiety, cognitive anxiety and self confidence of the CSAI-2 were measured.Results: The results show that the questionnaire administered showed acceptable psychometric properties, and there are differences in directional somatic and cognitive anxiety for age, and in intensity self confidence for sport level. The implications of these findings for the process of training and competition are discussed in the document.

  7. An Investigation of L2 Learners' Writing Self-Efficacy, Writing Anxiety and Its Causes at Higher Education in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmizi, Özkan; Kirmizi, Gülin Dagdeviren

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating higher education L2 learners in a Turkish context in terms of writing self-efficacy, writing anxiety, and the causes of writing anxiety. The data have been collected through the Second Language Writing Anxiety Inventory (SLWAI), developed by Cheng, (2004), and Causes of Writing Anxiety Inventory (CWAI), and…

  8. [Anxiety in eating disorders: a comparative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano Pinto, Natalia; Cano Vindel, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Scientific literature shows that anxiety is an important factor in eating disorders. The aim of this case-control study was to compare the anxiety manifestations obtained by means of the Anxiety Situations and Responses Inventory of in a clinical sample of 74 females (46, anorexia nervosa; 28, bulimia) to those obtained by a control group (130 girls without disorders). The between-group ANOVA results showed higher anxiety scores in the clinical group with a medium effect size for the anxiety trait, finding a flat profile (within-group ANOVA) for the three response systems (cognitive, physiological and motor) and the four specific anxiety traits (test, interpersonal, phobic, and daily life situations). Moreover, high scores in anxiety involved a greater risk of being diagnosed with an eating disorder in the 8 bivariate comparisons. The estimations were more precise for cognitive anxiety and for the specific interpersonal anxiety trait.

  9. Nursing students’ stressors and anxiety in their first clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isabel Cobo Cuenca

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Nursery practices are crucial for the subsequent professional development of the nurse, but because of her contact with suffering, death and in general the human aspects of health care, mean a stressful moment for nursing students.Objectives: know the levels of anxiety and condition, as well to determine the stressors that have influence in such anxiety in the students of Nursing Schools of the University of Castilla la ManchaMethodology: A observational, longitudinal and prospective study. The Stai-R and Stai-E questionnaires will be used to know the anxiety trait and state and the Kezkak questionnaire, validated by Zupiria, will be used to know the most frequent stressors that appear in the population subject of this survey.The population is limited to the students registered for the Introductory Practicum subject, that mean the first practices and therefore the student’s first contact with the reality of the nursery care.The analysis of information will be realized by statistical package SPSS V15.0.

  10. [Thermoplastic mask in radiotherapy: a source of anxiety for the patient?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arino, C; Stadelmaier, N; Dupin, C; Kantor, G; Henriques de Figueiredo, B

    2014-12-01

    The thermoplastic mask often used to immobilize patients in radiotherapy can cause varying levels of stress and anxiety. This study aimed at evaluating the anxiety related to the use of radiotherapy masks and the coping strategies adopted by patients. Nineteen patients treated with radiotherapy mask for head and neck cancer, a brain tumour or a lymphoma, were met twice by a psychologist, either after the making of the mask and the first course of radiotherapy, or in the middle and at the end of treatment. Thirty-four semi-structured interviews were treated using a thematic content analysis and 13 patients answered to anxiety (STAI-YB) and coping (WCC) scales. The STAI-YB anxiety scores related to wearing the masks were low during the radiotherapy treatment period, and were confirmed by the remarks of patients recorded during the semi-structured interviews. Most patients had a positive perception of the mask, and considered it as a friend or protection. Twelve out of the 13 patients admitting to anxiety benefited from problem focused coping strategies. Thermoplastic mask-related anxiety is low and possibly lies in the positive representation patients have about the mask. The explanations provided by health professionals on the radiotherapy mask possibly have a very positive effect on this perception. Copyright © 2014 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessment of anxiety and quality of life in fibromyalgia patients

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    Tathiana Pagano

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Fibromyalgia is a syndrome characterized by chronic, diffuse musculoskeletal pain, and by a low pain threshold at specific anatomical points. The syndrome is associated with other symptoms such as fatigue, sleep disturbance, morning stiffness and anxiety. Because of its chronic nature, it often has a negative impact on patients' quality of life. OBJECTIVE: To assess the quality of life and anxiety level of patients with fibromyalgia. TYPE Of STUDY: Cross-sectional. SETTING: Rheumatology outpatient service of Hospital das Clínicas (Medical School, Universidade de São Paulo. METHODS: This study evaluated 80 individuals, divided between test and control groups. The test group included 40 women with a confirmed diagnosis of fibromyalgia. The control group was composed of 40 healthy women. Three questionnaires were used: two to assess quality of life (FIQ and SF-36 and one to assess anxiety (STAI. They were applied to the individuals in both groups in a single face-to-face interview. The statistical analysis used Student's t test and Pearson's correlation test (r, with a significance level of 95%. Also, the Pearson chi-squared statistics test for homogeneity, with Yates correction, was used for comparing schooling between test and control groups. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant difference between the groups (p = 0.000, thus indicating that fibromyalgia patients have a worse quality of life and higher levels of anxiety. The correlations between the three questionnaires were high (r = 0.9. DISCUSSION: This study has confirmed the efficacy of FIQ for evaluating the impact of fibromyalgia on the quality of life. SF-36 is less specific than FIQ, although statistically significant values were obtained when analyzed separately, STAI showed lower efficacy for discriminating the test group from the control group. The test group showed worse quality of life than did the control group, which was demonstrated by both FIQ and SF-36. Even

  12. RELACIÓN ENTRE ANSIEDAD ANTE EXÁMENES Y RENDIMIENTO EN EXÁMENES EN UNIVERSITARIOS: ANÁLISIS PRELIMINAR DE LA DIFERENCIA SEGÚN ASIGNATURA / RELATION BETWEEN STATE-TEST ANXIETY AND EXAM PERFORMANCE IN COLLEGE STUDENTS: PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS OF THE DIFFERENCE AS PER COURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Alexis Dominguez-Lara

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN: El objetivo del presente estudio fue conocer si la relación entre la Ansiedad ante Exámenes - Estado (AE-E y el rendimiento en exámenes (RE difiere entre dos grupos de estudiantes de ciclos distintos. En el estudio participaron 76 estudiantes de psicología (87.1% mujeres de cuarto ciclo (n = 44 y séptimo ciclo (n = 32 provenientes de una universidad privada de la ciudad de Lima Metropolitana, con edades entre 18 y 30 años (M = 22.07. Se aplicó el Test Anxiety Inventory – Estado (TAI-Estado, y dos medidas breves, de autoeficacia académica y agotamiento emocional académico. La relación hallada entre AE-E y RE fue negativa y significativa, pero de diferente magnitud según el ciclo académico. Se discuten las implicancias del estudio.ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to find out if the relation between State - Test Anxiety (S-TA and Exam Performance (EP varies between two groups of students from different terms. The study was conducted on 76 Psychology program students (87.1 % female in the fourth term (n = 44, and the seventh term (n = 32, from a private university located in Lima Metropolitan Area, between the ages of 18 and 30 (M = 22.07. The State Test - Anxiety Inventory (S-TAI and two brief measures—academic self-efficacy and academic emotional exhaustion—were applied. The relation found between S-TA and EP was negative and significant, but of different magnitude according to the academic term. The implications of the study are discussed.

  13. Anxiety and Mood States in Delinquent Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, Frank T.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    State-trait anxiety and mood states in delinquents were studied by administering the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children and the Profile of Mood States to 41 behavior problem adolescents, residents of a facility for youthful offenders. The correlations between the instruments, and sex difference are discussed. (Author/MV)

  14. Relationship between dental anxiety, general anxiety level and depression in patients attending a university hospital dental clinic in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekkan, G; Kilicoglu, A; Hatipoglu, H

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate the relationship between dental anxiety, general anxiety and depression levels in patients attending a university hospital dental clinic in Turkey. A cross sectional study. 250 first visit patients seeking dental treatment. Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were used to assess the dental anxiety, general anxiety and depression level in these patients. The mean MDAS, BAI, and BDI scores were 10.5, 9.4, and 10.7, respectively. The prevalence of dental anxiety was found to be 20.8% (52/250) at the cut-off point > or = 15 and 6.8% (17/250) at the cut-off point > or = 19 according to MDAS score evaluation. MDAS and BAI scores were significantly higher in women (p or = 19 (p Dental anxiety was positively correlated with patients' general anxiety level and was higher in women and at younger age.

  15. Optimization of Inventory

    OpenAIRE

    PROKOPOVÁ, Nikola

    2017-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is optimization of inventory in selected organization. Inventory optimization is a very important topic in each organization because it reduces storage costs. At the beginning the inventory theory is presented. It shows the meaning and types of inventory, inventory control and also different methods and models of inventory control. Inventory optimization in the enterprise can be reached by using models of inventory control. In the second part the company on which is...

  16. Heart-related anxieties in relation to general anxiety and severity of illness in cardiology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschalla, Beate; Glatz, Johannes; Linden, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Absence of an adequate reason for anxiety is a criterion for pathological anxiety. However, the presence of danger or fear-provoking stimuli may even be a risk factor for anxiety and does not exclude that there is additionally pathological anxiety too. The question is, to what degree can heart-related anxiety be explained by the severity of illness or trait anxiety? Two hundred and nine patients (37.8% women) from a cardiology inpatient unit completed the Heart-Anxiety-Questionnaire, Progression-Anxiety-Questionnaire, Job-Anxiety-Scale and the State-Trait-Anxiety-Inventory. The severity of cardiac illness was rated by the treating cardiologists using the Multidimensional Severity of Morbidity Rating. Time absent from work due to sickness was assessed as an indicator for illness-related impairment. Heart anxiety was significantly related to progression anxiety and, to a lesser extent, trait anxiety and indicators of subjective symptoms of somatic illness. No association was found with medical ratings for prognosis, multimorbidity, or reduction in life expectancy. Heart-related anxiety is a symptom of an anxiety disorder. Although partially dependent on subjective suffering, it cannot be explained by the severity of medical illness. Treatment of health-related anxieties should focus on how to cope with subjective symptoms of illness.

  17. Anxiety and Piano Exams: Turkish Prospective Music Teachers' Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güven, Elif

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the test anxiety levels of prospective music teachers and their opinions regarding anxiety in piano exams. Test Anxiety Inventory (TAI) and semi-structured interviews were used to meet the purpose. Interviews were conducted with students prior to and after the piano exam. As a result of the study it was…

  18. The SPAIC-11 and SPAICP-11: Two Brief Child- and Parent-Rated Measures of Social Anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Bunnell, Brian E.; Beidel, Deborah C.; Liu, Liwen; Joseph, Dana L.; Higa-McMillan, Charmaine

    2015-01-01

    The Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children-11 (SPAIC-11) and Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children’s Parents-11 (SPAICP-11) were developed as brief versions of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory - Child and Parent Versions via item response theory (IRT) using child and parent reports of social anxiety. A sample of 496 children was analyzed using IRT analyses, revealing 11 items that exhibit measurement equivalence across parent and child reports. Descriptive and psyc...

  19. Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Therapist Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Helping Kids Cope With Stress Helping Kids Handle Worry Anxiety, Fears, and Phobias Childhood Stress Anxiety Disorders Special Needs Factsheet Social Phobia Special Needs Factsheet Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) ...

  20. Anxiety disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... women of other races and ethnicities. 7 What causes anxiety disorders? Researchers think anxiety disorders are caused by a ... Asnaani, A… .Hofmann, S.G. (2011). Gender Differences in Anxiety Disorders: Prevalence, Course of Illness, Comorbidity and Burden of Illness . Journal of Psychiatric ...

  1. Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Rachel G.

    2009-01-01

    Because of their high prevalence and their negative long-term consequences, child anxiety disorders have become an important focus of interest. Whether pathological anxiety and normal fear are similar processes continues to be controversial. Comparative studies of child anxiety disorders are scarce, but there is some support for the current…

  2. Relationships among depression, anxiety, anxiety sensitivity, and perceived social support in adolescents with conversion disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Savaş; Bilgiç, Ayhan; Akça, Ömer Faruk; Türkoğlu, Serhat; Hergüner, Sabri

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the relationships of depression, anxiety, anxiety sensitivity, and perceived social support with conversion symptoms in adolescents with conversion disorder (CD). Fifty outpatients, aged 8-18 years, who had been diagnosed with CD and members of a control group were assessed using the psychological questionnaires. Compared with controls, adolescents with CD scored higher on the Child Depression Inventory (CDI), Screen for Child Anxiety-related Emotional Disorders (SCARED), Childhood Anxiety Sensitivity Index (CASI) total, CASI physical and cognitive subscales, and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support family subscale. Multiple regression analysis showed that CDI, CASI total, and CASI cognitive scores predicted the Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire (SDQ) scores and that CDI and CASI total scores predicted the Children's Somatization Inventory (CSI) scores of subjects. This study suggest that adolescents with CD had poor psychosocial well-being, and depression, global anxiety sensitivity and anxiety sensitivity cognitive concerns are related to conversion symptoms.

  3. Relationship between Temperament, Depression, Anxiety, and Hopelessness in Adolescents: A Structural Equation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Iliceto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to test the validity of affective temperaments for predicting psychiatric morbidity and suicide risk, using a two-factor model to explain the relationships between temperament, anxiety, depression, and hopelessness. We investigated 210 high school students, 103 males and 107 females, 18-19 years old, who were administered self-report questionnaires to assess temperament (TEMPS-A, depression (BDI-II, anxiety (STAI and hopelessness (BHS. The final structural model had a good fit with the data, with two factors significantly correlated, the first labeled unstable cyclothymic temperament including Dysthymic/Cyclothymic/Anxious temperament, Irritable temperament and Depression, and the second labeled Demoralization including Anxiety (State/Trait and Hopelessness. Depression, anxiety and hopelessness are in a complex relationship partly mediated by temperament.

  4. Relation Between Early Maladaptive Schemes and Anxiety and Depression Features in University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Lucía Sánchez-Ortíz***

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety and depression are important health problems, because of the high prevalence rates in normal population and in clinical population. This non-experimental study intends to identify the cognitive profile, through the early maladaptive schemes in students from the Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana Bucaramanga, related with depression and anxiety scores. Thegoal is to contribute to the identification of cognitive characteristics that could help in the prevention of these disorders. 259 psychology students of the first seven semesters were evaluated by means from the following questionnaires: BDI, ST/DEP, STAI and YSQ-L2. The results don’t show the presence of specific schemes as a function of the presence of State/ Trait depression or State/Trait anxiety, which might suggest, through the dimensional paradigm, the presence of a cognitive pattern for an anxiety and depression mix disorder. It is suggested that further research should be carried out with other samples, including clinical population.

  5. Effect of integrated yoga therapy on pain, morning stiffness and anxiety in osteoarthritis of the knee joint: A randomized control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebnezar, John; Nagarathna, Raghuram; Yogitha, Bali; Nagendra, Hongasandra Ramarao

    2012-01-01

    To study the effect of integrated yoga on pain, morning stiffness and anxiety in osteoarthritis of knees. Two hundred and fifty participants with OA knees (35-80 years) were randomly assigned to yoga or control group. Both groups had transcutaneous electrical stimulation and ultrasound treatment followed by intervention (40 min) for two weeks with follow up for three months. The integrated yoga consisted of yogic loosening and strengthening practices, asanas, relaxation, pranayama and meditation. The control group had physiotherapy exercises. Assessments were done on 15(th) (post 1) and 90(th) day (post 2). Resting pain (numerical rating scale) reduced better (Panxiety (STAI-1) reduced (Panxiety (STAI 2) reduced (Preduced (Preduced (Preduced (Preducing pain, morning stiffness, state and trait anxiety, blood pressure and pulse rate in patients with OA knees.

  6. Differences among Adult COAs and Adult Non-COAs on Levels of Self-Esteem, Depression, and Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, David T.; Roberts, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    Examined self-esteem, depression, and anxiety among 60 adult children of alcoholics (COAs) and 143 adult non-COAs. Subjects completed Children of Alcoholics Screening Test, demographic questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory. Found no significant differences between COAs and…

  7. IgA/IgM Responses to Gram-Negative Bacteria are not Associated with Perinatal Depression, but with Physio-Somatic Symptoms and Activation of the Tryptophan Catabolite Pathway at the End of Term and Postnatal Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roomruangwong, Chutima; Kanchanatawan, Buranee; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Anderson, George; Carvalho, André F; Duleu, Sebastien; Geffard, Michel; Maes, Michael

    2017-04-07

    Evidence has implicated the translocation of commensal Gram-negative bacteria (Gram-B) due to leaky gut in the pathophysiology of depression and physio-somatic symptoms (e.g. fatigue, pain, irritable bowel syndrome, malaise, etc.). In addition, the leaky gut may contribute to immune-inflammatory activation and oxidative stress. This study investigated whether bacterial translocation is associated with perinatal depression and anxiety scores and with prenatal physio-somatic symptoms and immune-inflammatory biomarkers, including the tryptophan catabolite (TRYCAT) pathway. Data were collected in pregnant women at the end of term (T1) and 4-6 weeks after delivery (T2) as well as in non-pregnant controls. We examined the associations between serum IgM/IgA responses to Gram-B at the end of term and depression (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale -EPDS) and anxiety (Spielberger's State Anxiety Inventory -STAI) symptoms. Levels of C-reactive protein, zinc, haptoglobin, hematocrit and IgA/IgM responses to 9 TRYCATs were also measured. No significant associations of the IgA/IgM responses to Gram-B with prenatal depression and anxiety were observed. Increased IgA/IgM responses to Gram-B predict higher levels of haptoglobin, hematocrit and TRYCATs, in particular quinolinic acid and the quinolinic acid / kynurenic acid ratio. IgA responses to Gram-B were significantly lowered in pregnant women compared to age-matched non-pregnant women, while IgM responses were significantly elevated in participants with alcohol consumption. Physio-somatic symptoms at the end of term were significantly associated with IgM responses to Klebsiella pneumonia. Postnatal anxiety was significantly predicted by IgA responses to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In conclusion, our findings suggest that pregnancy may protect against bacterial translocation, while alcohol use may increase bacterial translocation. The results suggest that end of term mucosa-derived immune responses to Gram-B contribute to immune

  8. [Standardization of the Greek version of Zung's Self-rating Anxiety Scale (SAS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samakouri, M; Bouhos, G; Kadoglou, M; Giantzelidou, A; Tsolaki, K; Livaditis, M

    2012-01-01

    Self-rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), introduced by Zung, has been widely used in research and in clinical practice for the detection of anxiety. The present study aims at standardizing the Greek version of SAS. SAS consists of 20 items rated on a 1-4 likert type scale. The total SAS score may vary from 20 (no anxiety at all) to 80 (severe anxiety). Two hundred and fifty four participants (114 male and 140 female), psychiatric patients, physically ill and general population individuals, aged 45.40±11.35 years, completed the following: (a) a demographic characteristics' questionnaire, (b) the SAS Greek version, (c) the Spielberg's Modified Greek State-Trait Anxiety Scale (STAI-Gr.-X) and (d) the Zung Depression Rating Scale (ZDRS). Seventy six participants answered the SAS twice within a 12th-day median period of time. The following parameters were calculated: (a) internal consistency of the SAS in terms of Cronbach's α co-efficient, (b) its test-retest reliability in terms of the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) and (c) its concurrent and convergent validities through its score's Spearman's rho correlations with both the state and trait subscales of STAI-Gr X and the ZDRS. In addition, in order to evaluate SAS' discriminant validity, the scale's scores of the three groups of participants (psychiatric patients, physically ill and general population individuals) were compared among each other, in terms of Kruskall Wallis and Mann Whitney U tests. SAS Cronbach's alpha equals 0.897 while ICC regarding its test-retest reliability equals 0.913. Spearman's rho concerning validity: (a) when SAS is compared to STAI-Gr.-X (state), equals it 0.767, (b) when SAS is compared to STAI-Gr. X (trait), it equals 0.802 and (c) when SAS is compared to ZDRS, it equals 0.835. The mentally ill scored significantly higher in SAS compared to both the healthy and the general population. In conclusion, the SAS Greek version presents very satisfactory psychometric properties regarding

  9. Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or dread of what's about to happen or what might happen. While fear is the emotion we feel in the presence ... feel overwhelmed, tongue-tied, or unable to do what they need to ... amounts of anxiety, fear, nervousness, worry, or dread. Anxiety that is too ...

  10. The effects of music intervention on anxiety in the patient waiting for cardiac catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, W J

    2001-10-01

    Hospitalization causes anxiety for many patients. It increases when patients anticipate their turn for cardiac catheterization. Music therapy reduces the psychophysiologic effects of anxiety and stress through the relaxation response. To determine the effects of music therapy an anxiety, heart rate and arterial blood pressure in patients waiting for their scheduled cardiac catheterization. In a quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest design, 101 subjects were randomly assigned to either the test group: those who listened to 20 minutes of preselected music, or the control group: those who received treatment as usual. Subject anxiety levels and physiological values were measured while waiting their turn for cardiac catheterization and just prior to departure to the cardiac lab. 63 males and 38 females participated in the study. There was a statistically significant reduction in anxiety in the test group alone (P = 0.003) and in comparing the test to the control group (P = 0.004). In comparing the initial and departure physiologic values, it was noted that both heart rate and systolic blood pressure dropped in the test group, but increased in the control group. Within gender groups, there were no statistically significant differences in hemodynamics or STAI scores, but between gender groups there were significantly higher diastolic blood pressure in males and STAI initial and departure scores for females. Patients waiting for their cardiac catheterization benefit from music therapy. Anxiety and the heightened physiological values elicited by the stress response are reduced. Results also suggest that women waiting for cardiac catheterization experience a higher level of anxiety than males.

  11. Universidade, contexto ansiogênico? Avaliação de traço e estado de ansiedade em estudantes do ciclo básico Evaluation of trait and state anxiety in first year students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camomila Lira Ferreira

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo objetiva avaliar a ansiedade-traço e a ansiedade-estado de estudantes universitários do ciclo básico da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, verificando diferenças entre três grandes áreas de conhecimento, biomédica, humanística e tecnológica, tendo em vista que a entrada na universidade pode se configurar como uma situação ameaçadora que parece sofrer influência das diferentes características de cada uma dessas áreas. Participaram do estudo 158 estudantes, sendo 71 mulheres e 87 homens, com idade média de 20,04 ± 3,37 anos, respondendo uma ficha de identificação e o Inventário de Ansiedade Traço-Estado (IDATE. Resultados demonstram que as médias de ansiedade-traço e ansiedade-estado desses estudantes encontram-se dentro do esperado para essa população, embora a área biomédica seja percebida como a mais ansiogênica, uma vez que apresenta uma densa grade curricular com intensas demandas acadêmicas, o que parece elevar os escores dos estudantes dessa área, em especial os dos homens.The purpose of this study is to evaluate trait anxiety and state anxiety in first year students from the Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, verifying differences between three great areas of knowledge - Biomedical, Humanistic and Technological. The entrance to a University can be perceived as a threatening situation that seems to suffer influence from the different characteristics of each of these areas. 158 students, 71 females and 87 males aged 20.04 ± 3,37 years, answered an Identification Form and the State and Trait of Anxiety Inventory (STAI. The means of trait anxiety and state anxiety observed in these students were as expected for this population although the Biomedical area is perceived as the most anxiogenic for having a dense curriculum with intense academic demands, what seems to increase the scores of the students of this area, especially of the men.

  12. Emotional Intelligence and Personality in Anxiety Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie P. Lizeretti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders (AD are by far the most frequent psychiatric disorders, and according to epidemiologic data their chronicity, comorbidities, and negative prognostic constitute a public health problem. This is why it is necessary to continue exploring the factors which contribute to the incidence, appearance, and maintenance of this set of disorders. The goal of this study has been to analyze the possible relationship between Emotional Intelligence (EI and personality disorders (PersD in outpatients suffering from AD. The sample was made up of 146 patients with AD from the Mental Health Center at the Health Consortium of Maresme, who were evaluated with the STAI, MSCEIT, and MCMI-II questionnaires. The main findings indicate that 89,4% of the patients in the sample met the criteria for the diagnosis of some PersD. The findings also confirm that patients with AD present a low EI, especially because of difficulties in the skills of emotional comprehension and regulation, and the lack of these skills is related to a higher level of anxiety and the presence of PersD. These findings suggest the need to consider emotional skills of EI and personality as central elements for the diagnosis and treatment of AD.

  13. Non-pharmacological nurse-led interventions to manage anxiety in patients with advanced cancer : A systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zweers, D; de Graaf, E; Teunissen, SCCM

    Background Anxiety is a common symptom in patients with advanced cancer. Although pharmacological and psychosocial interventions are recommended, it remains unclear which role nurses can play in supporting patients with anxiety. Objective The objective was to provide an inventory of

  14. Predictors of anxiety recurrence in the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management (CALM) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jerome H; Jakubovski, Ewgeni; Bloch, Michael H

    2015-06-01

    Few studies have examined anxiety recurrence after symptom remission in the primary care setting. We examined anxiety recurrence in the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management (CALM) trial. From 2006 to 2009, CALM randomized adults with anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder) in primary care clinics to usual care (UC) or a collaborative care (CC) intervention of pharmacotherapy and/or cognitive behavioral therapy. We examined 274 patients who met criteria for anxiety remission (Brief Symptom Inventory for anxiety and somatization (BSI-12) anxiety recurrence (BSI-12 ≥ 6 and 50% increase from 6-month ratings) during the year following remission. Recurrence was lower in CC (29%) compared to UC (41%) (p = 0.04). Patients with comorbid depression or lower self-perceived socioeconomic status particularly benefited (in terms of reduced recurrence) if assigned to CC instead of UC. In the multivariable logistic regression model, smoking, being single, Anxiety Sensitivity Index score, functional impairment at month 6 due to residual anxiety (measured with the Sheehan Disability Scale), and treatment with benzodiazepines were associated with subsequent anxiety recurrence. ROC identified prognostic subgroups based on the risk of recurrence. Our study was exploratory, and our findings require replication. Future studies should also examine the effectiveness of relapse prevention programs in patients at highest risk for recurrence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Working and Non-Working University Students: Anxiety, Depression, and Grade Point Average

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounsey, Rebecca; Vandehey, Michael A.; Diekhoff, George M.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the differences between 110 working and non-working students in terms of mental health, academic achievement, and perceptions about student employment. Anxiety and depression were measured by the Beck Anxiety Inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory-II. Academic achievement was measured by grade point average. Perceptions of…

  16. [Environmental factors and adolescent fears and anxiety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenczyn, Jan

    2003-01-01

    The following article aims to show the significant part that the environmental factor plays in developing fears and anxiety in adolescence. Both literature and psychological practice underestimate the role of that factor, emphasising at the same time the influence of sex, age or various types of stimulants causing negative emotional states. In order to verify the suggested hypotheses, 540 adolescents in 18 groups of 30 people divided according to sex (270 girls and 270 boys), age (90 individuals of both sex in the following age groups: 12.0-13.0, 15.0-16.0 and 18.0-19.0) originating from three different environments: big city, town and village (180 individuals from each place) were examined. The following instruments of research have been used: MPi-64 of H.J. Eysencek, STAI of C.D. Spielberger and original Questionnaire of Anxiety. The results of the examination have confirmed the authenticity of the suggested hypothesis which stated that intensity of fears and anxiety depends on the types of stimulants, sex, age and particularly--on the kind of environment the individuals under examination have originated from. The second hypothesis was partially confirmed. In the group of boys the level of courage corresponded with the level of fear; in the group of girls in general the level of fear exceeded the level of courage. Socially-educational environment has a decisive influence on developing fears and anxiety, particularly on the intensification of those disorders. The village environment is the most conducive to developing strong fears, when the environment of a big city--the least. Other variables (sex, age, type of stimulant) have indirect influence on the substance and level of fears experienced by adolescents.

  17. Factors Affecting the State Anxiety Level of Higher Education Students in Macau: The Impact of Trait Anxiety and Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Hoi-Yan

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to find out the levels of anxiety of 589 day- and night-class students in higher education in Macau two weeks before the final examination period. The Chinese version of the 40-item Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (Spielberger, Gorsuch & Lusherier, 1970) was applied in this study. The two anxiety scales are…

  18. Effects of ayahuasca on psychometric measures of anxiety, panic-like and hopelessness in Santo Daime members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, R G; Landeira-Fernandez, J; Strassman, R J; Motta, V; Cruz, A P M

    2007-07-25

    The use of the hallucinogenic brew ayahuasca, obtained from infusing the shredded stalk of the malpighiaceous plant Banisteriopsis caapi with the leaves of other plants such as Psychotria viridis, is growing in urban centers of Europe, South and North America in the last several decades. Despite this diffusion, little is known about its effects on emotional states. The present study investigated the effects of ayahuasca on psychometric measures of anxiety, panic-like and hopelessness in members of the Santo Daime, an ayahuasca-using religion. Standard questionnaires were used to evaluate state-anxiety (STAI-state), trait-anxiety (STAI-trait), panic-like (ASI-R) and hopelessness (BHS) in participants that ingested ayahuasca for at least 10 consecutive years. The study was done in the Santo Daime church, where the questionnaires were administered 1h after the ingestion of the brew, in a double-blind, placebo-controlled procedure. While under the acute effects of ayahuasca, participants scored lower on the scales for panic and hopelessness related states. Ayahuasca ingestion did not modify state- or trait-anxiety. The results are discussed in terms of the possible use of ayahuasca in alleviating signs of hopelessness and panic-like related symptoms.

  19. Evaluation of anxiety, salivary cortisol and melatonin secretion following reflexology treatment: a pilot study in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVicar, A J; Greenwood, C R; Fewell, F; D'Arcy, V; Chandrasekharan, S; Alldridge, L C

    2007-08-01

    This pilot study sought to identify an appropriate methodology to investigate the impact of reflexology in healthcare settings. The study involved healthy volunteers to prevent unnecessary intervention to individuals who may already be experiencing health related trauma. Thirty participants underwent either reflexology or no treatment (control), in a cross-over experimental design. Self-reported anxiety (Spielberger STAI), cardiovascular parameters (BP and pulse rate) and salivary cortisol and melatonin concentrations were assessed before and after reflexology. Control data were obtained at the same time points in identical settings. Reflexology had a powerful anxiety-reduction effect ('state'; Pcortisol and melatonin were not significantly correlated with STAI scores and did not change significantly following reflexology. Reflexology reduced 'state' anxiety and cardiovascular activity within healthy individuals, consistent with stress-reduction. Considering the connection between stress/anxiety and well being, the effects of reflexology may have beneficial outcomes for patients. These findings will be transferred to a study involving breast cancer patients where effects may be more pronounced particularly since cancer patients display disregulation of cortisol and melatonin secretion.

  20. The Effect of the Transcendental Meditation Technique on Anxiety Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillbeck, Michael C.

    1977-01-01

    Two weeks of twice-daily practice of the Transcendental Meditation (TM) technique was compared with 2 weeks of twice-daily practice of passive relaxation as a means of reduction of anxiety, as measured by the Trait scale of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. (Editor)

  1. HIV couples' anxiety and risk taking during ART

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Elisabeth; Visser, Marja; Prins, Jan M.; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T.; van der Veen, Fulco

    2008-01-01

    Anxiety and the willingness to undergo ART was assessed by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and by trade-off at increasing hypothetical HIV-1 transmission risks in fifty serodiscordant couples undergoing intrauterine inseminations as a risk-reduction strategy. Both men and women displayed high

  2. The influence of yoga therapy on anxiety | Clark | Inkanyiso: Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    research design included quantitative and qualitative research methods. Quantitative results from the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) indicated that, although regular yoga therapy was associated with significant decreases in anxiety perceptions over time, these changes were not significant when compared with the control ...

  3. Anxiety, Attribution, and Sport Competition: Assessment Under Two Field Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freischlag, Jerry

    The effects of winning or losing and the impact of being "cut" from an athletic team on the self-concept of a volunteer group of adolescent boys was examined. State anxiety levels both before and after competitive events and "try-outs" were studied by means of a short form of Spielberger's children's trait anxiety inventory questionnaire. Results…

  4. Greek College Students and Psychopathology: New Insights

    OpenAIRE

    Kontoangelos, Konstantinos; Tsiori, Sofia; Koundi, Kalliopi; Pappa, Xenia; Sakkas, Pavlos; Papageorgiou, Charalambos C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: College students’ mental health problems include depression, anxiety, panic disorders, phobias and obsessive compulsive thoughts. Aims: To investigate Greek college students’ psychopathology. Methods: During the initial evaluation, 638 college students were assessed through the following psychometric questionnaires: (a) Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ); (b) The Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90); (c) The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI); (d) State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI)...

  5. ADULT ANXIETY DISORDERS IN RELATION TO TRAIT ANXIETY AND PERCEIVED STRESS IN CHILDHOOD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundy, Elizabeth A; Weber, Mareen; Rauch, Scott L; Killgore, William D S; Simon, Naomi M; Pollack, Mark H; Rosso, Isabelle M

    2015-10-01

    It is well established that objective early life stressors increase risk for anxiety disorders and that environmental stressors interact with dispositional factors such as trait anxiety. There is less information on how subjective perception of stress during childhood relates to later clinical anxiety. This study tested whether childhood perceived stress and trait anxiety were independently and interactively associated with adult anxiety disorders. Forty-seven adults diagnosed with anxiety disorders (M age = 34 yr., SD = 11) and 29 healthy participants (M = 33 yr., SD = 13) completed the adult Perceived Stress Scale, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Global Perceived Early Life Events Scale as a measure of perceived stress during childhood. In a logistic regression model, high childhood perceived stress (β = 0.64) and trait anxiety (β = 0.11) were associated with significantly greater odds of adult anxiety disorder. The association between childhood perceived stress and adult anxiety remained significant when controlling for adult perceived stress. These findings suggest that children's perception of stress in their daily lives may be an important target of intervention to prevent the progression of stress into clinically significant anxiety.

  6. Treating late-life generalized anxiety disorder in primary care: an effectiveness pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calleo, Jessica S; Bush, Amber L; Cully, Jeffrey A; Wilson, Nancy L; Kraus-Schuman, Cynthia; Rhoades, Howard M; Novy, Diane M; Masozera, Nicholas; Williams, Susan; Horsfield, Matthew; Kunik, Mark E; Stanley, Melinda A

    2013-05-01

    To increase the sustainability of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) in primary care for late-life anxiety, we incorporated nonexpert counselors, options for telephone meetings, and integration with primary care clinicians. This open trial examines the feasibility, satisfaction, and clinical outcomes of CBT delivered by experienced and nonexperienced counselors for older adults with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Clinical outcomes assessed worry (Penn State Worry Questionnaire), GAD (Generalized Anxiety Disorder Severity Scale), and anxiety (Beck Anxiety Inventory and Structured Interview Guide for Hamilton Anxiety Scale). After 3 months of treatment, Cohen's d effect sizes for worry and anxiety ranged from 0.48 to 0.78. Patients treated by experienced and nonexperienced counselors had similar reductions in worry and anxiety, although treatment outcomes were more improved on the Beck Anxiety Inventory for experienced therapists. Preliminary results suggest that adapted CBT can effectively reduce worry. The piloted modifications can provide acceptable and feasible evidence-based care.

  7. World Glacier Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The World Glacier Inventory (WGI) contains information for over 130,000 glaciers. Inventory parameters include geographic location, area, length, orientation,...

  8. Housing Inventory Count

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This report displays the data communities reported to HUD about the nature of their dedicated homeless inventory, referred to as their Housing Inventory Count (HIC)....

  9. HHS Enterprise Data Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Enterprise Data Inventory (EDI) is the comprehensive inventory listing of agency data resources including public, restricted public, and non-public datasets.

  10. Integrated inventory information system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarupria, J.S.; Kunte, P.D.

    The nature of oceanographic data and the management of inventory level information are described in Integrated Inventory Information System (IIIS). It is shown how a ROSCOPO (report on observations/samples collected during oceanographic programme...

  11. National Wetlands Inventory Polygons

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Wetland area features mapped as part of the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI). The National Wetlands Inventory is a national program sponsored by the US Fish and...

  12. Science Inventory | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Science Inventory is a searchable database of research products primarily from EPA's Office of Research and Development. Science Inventory records provide descriptions of the product, contact information, and links to available printed material or websites.

  13. Maternal Prenatal Positive Affect, Depressive and Anxiety Symptoms and Birth Outcomes: The PREDO Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anu-Katriina Pesonen

    Full Text Available We investigated whether maternal prenatal emotions are associated with gestational length and birth weight in the large PREDO Study with multiple measurement points of emotions during gestation.Altogether 3376 pregnant women self-assessed their positive affect (PA, Positive and Negative Affect Schedule and depressive (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, CES-D and anxiety (Spielberger State Anxiety Scale, STAI symptoms up to 14 times during gestation. Birth characteristics were derived from the National Birth Register and from medical records.One standard deviation (SD unit higher PA during the third pregnancy trimester was associated with a 0.05 SD unit longer gestational length, whereas one SD unit higher CES-D and STAI scores during the third trimester were associated with 0.04-0.05 SD unit shorter gestational lengths (P-values ≤ 0.02, corresponding to only 0.1-0.2% of the variation in gestational length. Higher PA during the third trimester was associated with a significantly decreased risk for preterm (< 37 weeks delivery (for each SD unit higher positive affect, odds ratio was 0.8-fold (P = 0.02. Mothers with preterm delivery showed a decline in PA and an increase in CES-D and STAI during eight weeks prior to delivery. Post-term birth (≥ 42 weeks, birth weight and fetal growth were not associated with maternal prenatal emotions.This study with 14 measurements of maternal emotions during pregnancy show modest effects of prenatal emotions during the third pregnancy trimester, particularly in the weeks close to delivery, on gestational length. From the clinical perspective, the effects were negligible. No associations were detected between prenatal emotions and birth weight.

  14. Assessment of dental anxiety: A facet approach.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stouthard, M.E.; Mellenbergh, G.J.; Hoogstraten, J.

    1993-01-01

    Used a facet design to construct a new Dental Anxiety Inventory (DAI), which was tested in 5 studies among 1,401 undergraduates and 174 patients. Facets chosen were time (made up of 4 elements: at home, on your way to the dentist, in the dentist's waiting room, in the dental chair), situation (3

  15. [Effect of video-based education on anxiety and satisfaction of patients undergoing spinal anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, Meltem; Kose, Isil; Zinzircioglu, Ciler; Karaman, Yucel; Tekgul, Zeki Tuncel; Pektas, Sinan; Balik, Yelda; Gonullu, Mustafa; Bozkurt, Pervin Sutas

    2018-04-07

    Providing sufficient information during a preanesthetic interview may help improve patient understanding and decrease anxiety related to spinal anesthesia. We investigated the effect of video-based education on anxiety and satisfaction in patients about to undergo spinal anesthesia. A total of 198 patients scheduled for minor elective surgery under spinal anesthesia were prospectively enrolled. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory/State and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory/Trait) questionnaires and visual analog scale were used to measure anxiety levels before the standard anesthesia evaluation was initiated. Then, 100 patients in Group 1 received written, verbal, and video-based education, whereas 98 patients in Group 2 received only written and verbal instructions regarding spinal anesthesia. Then all participants completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory/State and visual analog scale to evaluate anxiety. Finally, a 5-point Likert scale was used to measure satisfaction during postoperative period. No differences were found in the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory/State, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory/Trait, or visual analog scale scores between the two groups before the information period. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory/State scores evaluating anxiety during the post-information period were differed in both groups and they found as 36.5±10.0 in Group 1 and 39.6±8.6 in Group 2 (p=0.033). The 5-point Likert scale scores to measure satisfaction were stated as 4.5±0.6 in Group 1 and 3.5±1.2 in Group 2 (p<0.001). Providing video-based information during the preanesthetic interview alleviated anxiety and increased satisfaction in patients undergoing spinal anesthesia. Copyright © 2018. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  16. The prevalence and correlates of adult separation anxiety disorder in an anxiety clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Renate

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adult separation anxiety disorder (ASAD has been identified recently, but there is a paucity of data about its prevalence and associated characteristics amongst anxiety patients. This study assessed the prevalence and risk factor profile associated with ASAD in an anxiety clinic. Methods Clinical psychologists assigned 520 consecutive patients to DSM-IV adult anxiety subcategories using the SCID. We also measured demographic factors and reports of early separation anxiety (the Separation Anxiety Symptom Inventory and a retrospective diagnosis of childhood separation anxiety disorder. Other self-report measures included the Adult Separation Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire (ASA-27, the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scales (DASS-21, personality traits measured by the NEO PI-R and the Work and Social Adjustment Scale. These measures were included in three models examining for overall differences and then by gender: Model 1 compared the conventional SCID anxiety subtypes (excluding PTSD and OCD because of insufficient numbers; Model 2 divided the sample into those with and without ASAD; Model 3 compared those with ASAD with the individual anxiety subtypes in the residual group. Results Patients with ASAD had elevated early separation anxiety scores but this association was unique in females only. Except for social phobia in relation to some comparisons, those with ASAD recorded more severe symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress, higher neuroticism scores, and greater levels of disability. Conclusions Patients with ASAD attending an anxiety clinic are highly symptomatic and disabled. The findings have implications for the classification, clinical identification and treatment of adult anxiety disorders.

  17. Trajectories of Social Anxiety in Children: Influence of Child Cortisol Reactivity and Parental Social Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Kristie L; Van Lieshout, Ryan J; McHolm, Angela E; Cunningham, Charles E; Schmidt, Louis A

    2017-12-19

    Few studies have examined the interactive effect of intra- and extra-individual vulnerability factors on the trajectory of social anxiety in children. In this study, we examined the joint influence of familial vulnerability (i.e., parental social anxiety) and child biological stress vulnerability (i.e., cortisol reactivity) on trajectories of social anxiety. Children (N = 112 (57 males), M age  = 8.14 years, S.D. = 2.25) were followed over three visits spanning approximately three years. Parental social anxiety was assessed using the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory, children's behavior and salivary cortisol reactivity were measured in response to a speech task, and children's social anxiety was assessed at all three visits using the Screen for Child Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED; Parent-report). A growth curve analysis was used to examine trajectories of child social anxiety as predicted by children's cortisol reactivity and parental social anxiety, adjusting for covariates. We found a significant interaction between parental social anxiety and child cortisol reactivity in predicting child social anxiety across time. Having a socially anxious parent coupled with heightened cortisol reactivity predicted the highest levels of child social anxiety, with scores that remained above clinically significant levels for social anxiety across all visits. Children with familial risk for social anxiety and who also exhibit high stress-reactivity appear to be at risk for persistent, clinically significant social anxiety. This highlights the importance of considering the interaction between both biological and contextual factors when considering the development, maintenance, and treatment of social anxiety in children across time.

  18. Investigation of Preservice Teachers' Speech Anxiety with Different Points of View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kana, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to find out the level of speech anxiety of last year students at Education Faculties and the effects of speech anxiety. For this purpose, speech anxiety inventory was delivered to 540 pre-service teachers at 2013-2014 academic year using stratified sampling method. Relational screening model was used in the study. To…

  19. Selective processing of threatening information: effects of attachment representation and anxiety disorder on attention and memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeijlmans van Emmichhoven, I.A.; van IJzendoorn, M.H.; de Ruiter, C.; Brosschot, J.F.

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the effect of the mental representation of attachment on information processing, 28 anxiety disorder outpatients, as diagnosed by the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule?Revised, were administered the Adult Attachment Interview and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. They also

  20. Genre Anxiety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alacovska, Ana

    2015-01-01

    of genre-gender discursive, historical and cultural crossover, we obtain a holistic view of the complexities of the psycho-biographical gender dynamics of media work. To this end, I trace the ways in which the andocentric genre of travel writing (a genre based on a masculine ideology) causes professional...... anxiety and constrains female travel writers’ biographical identity work. By treating genres as mediators of work experiences and practices, I elucidate how contemporary female travel writers experience and cope with genre-induced anxiety....

  1. Factors of academic procrastination: The role of perfectionism, anxiety and depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Kranjec

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated dimensions of perfectionism, anxiety, and depression as factors of academic procrastination. Our main research interest was to examine the role of specific dimensions of perfectionism as moderators in the relationship between anxiety and depression and academic procrastination. Four scales were administered on the sample of 403 students: perfectionism scale FMPS, academic procrastination scale APS-SI, depression scale CESD and anxiety scale STAI-X2. The results showed significant positive relationships between maladaptive dimensions of perfectionism, anxiety, depression, and academic procrastination. In addition, results showed significant negative associations between adaptive dimensions of perfectionism and academic procrastination. Certain dimensions of perfectionism, anxiety, and depression proved to be significant predictors of academic procrastination. The dimensions of perfectionism and academic procrastination were also significantly related to anxiety and depression, which both predicted academic procrastination. The relationship between anxiety levels and academic procrastination was moderated by personal standards (as adaptive dimension of perfectionism, while the relationship between depression levels and academic procrastination was moderated by the maladaptive dimension of parents’ expectations.

  2. Selective effects of social anxiety, anxiety sensitivity, and negative affectivity on the neural bases of emotional face processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Tali Manber; Sullivan, Sarah; Flagan, Taru; Hitchcock, Carla A; Simmons, Alan; Paulus, Martin P; Stein, Murray B

    2012-01-16

    Individuals with high anxiety show heightened neural activation in affective processing regions, including the amygdala and insula. Activations have been shown to be correlated with anxiety severity, but although anxiety is a heterogeneous state, prior studies have not systematically disentangled whether neural activity in affective processing circuitry is uniquely related to specific domains of anxiety. Forty-five young adults were tested on an emotional face processing task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Participants completed the Social Interactional Anxiety Scale, Anxiety Sensitivity Index, and Spielberger Trait Anxiety Inventory. Using a robust multiple regression approach, we examined the effects of social anxiety, anxiety sensitivity, and trait anxiety (which overlapped with depressive symptoms, and can therefore be considered a measure of negative affectivity) on activation in insula, amygdala, and medial prefrontal cortex, in response to emotional faces. Adjusting for negative affectivity and anxiety sensitivity, social anxiety was associated with activity in left amygdala, right insula, and subgenual anterior cingulate across all emotional faces. When comparing negative and positive faces directly, greater negative affectivity was uniquely associated with less activity to positive faces in left amygdala, left anterior insula, and dorsal anterior cingulate. The current findings support the hypothesis that hyperactivity in brain areas during general emotional face processing is predominantly a function of social anxiety. In comparison, hypoactivity to positively valenced faces was predominantly associated with negative affectivity. Implications for the understanding of emotion processing in anxiety are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. EFFECT OF A PSYCHOEDUCATIONAL INTERVENTION ON DEPRESSION, ANXIETY, and HEALTH RESOURCE USE IN ICD PATIENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Sandra B.; Langberg, Jonathan J.; Reilly, Carolyn M.; Viswanathan, Bindu; McCarty, Frances; Culler, Steven D.; O’Brien, Marian C.; Weintraub, William S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Psychological responses have been reported for some patients after insertion of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). This study tested the effects of a psychoeducational intervention on anxiety, depressive symptoms, functional status and health resource use during the first year after ICD implantation. Methods ICD patients (n=246) were randomized to usual care (UC), group (GRP), or telephone counseling (TC) intervention that included education, symptom management, and coping skill training. Participants were 58 ± 11 years, 73% men, and 23% minorities. Anxiety (STAI), depressive symptoms (BDI-II), and functional status (DASI) were measured at baseline and after 1, 3, 6 & 12 months. Health resource use and disability days were tracked. Analyses were repeated-measures ANCOVA to assess Group X Time effects, Chi-square for percentage with clinically significant anxiety and depression at each time point, and logistic regression. Results All groups experienced decreased anxiety and depressive symptoms over the 12 months; GRP intervention had lower STAI (p=.03) than UC at 3 months. Logistic regression revealed group differences for predicted probability of having depressive symptoms at 12 months (UC=.31, GRP=.17, TC=.13, p=.03). UC had greater calls to providers at 1 and 6 months (p<.05) and more sick/disability days at 12 months (p=.01) than intervention groups. Conclusions A psychoeducational intervention reduced anxiety and depressive symptoms early after ICD, lowered probability of depressive symptoms at one year, and decreased disability days/calls to providers. These findings support further study and clinical use of both group and telephone interventions to yield better psychological outcomes after ICD implant. PMID:19796343

  4. INFLUENCE OF MUSIC THERAPY AND BREATHING EXERCISES ON ANXIETY IN POST-OPERATIVE CARDIAC DISEASED INDIVIDUALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Janardan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Asian Indians have a higher operative and overall increased mortality following coronary bypass surgery. They also have higher rates of post operative complications and repeat surgeries. Apart from physiological complications like post-operative pain, atelectasis, deep vein thrombosis, the psychological disorders are like anxiety and stress also predominantly play a major role in the morbidity of the post-surgical conditions. The aim of study is to know the influence of music therapy and breathing exercises on post-surgical cardiac diseased individuals. To evaluate the influence of music therapy and breathing exercises on physiological parameters(BP,HR,RR in post surgical cardiac diseased individuals by using electro cardio monitor and state-trait anxiety scale. Methods: Subjects were randomly divided into two groups. Experimental group, where the subjects received music therapy and breathing exercises. Control group, where the subjects received breathing exercises. All the participants were assessed with STAI scale and physiological parameters like blood pressure, heart rate and respiration rate for both groups before and after the treatment. Paired sample t-test was used to compare the STAI scale and physiological parameters within the groups. Result: Results showed a significant improvement in both the groups but, more improvement was seen in experimental group compared to control group. Conclusion: Results suggested that music therapy and breathing exercises influences more effective than breathing exercises alone.

  5. Inventory - Dollars and sense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samson, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear utilities are becoming more aware of the importance of having an inventory investment that supports two opposing philosophies. The business philosophy wants a minimal inventory investment to support a better return on invested dollars. This increase in return comes from having the dollars available to invest versus having the money tied up in inventory sitting on the shelf. The opposing viewpoint is taken by maintenance/operations organizations, which desire the maximum inventory available on-site to repair any component at any time to keep the units on-line at all times. Financial managers also want to maintain cash flow throughout operations so that plants run without interruptions. Inventory management is therefore a mixture of financial logistics with an operation perspective in mind. A small amount of common sense and accurate perception also help. The challenge to the materials/inventory manager is to optimize effectiveness of the inventory by having high material availability at the lowest possible cost

  6. Matter over mind: a randomised-controlled trial of single-session biofeedback training on performance anxiety and heart rate variability in musicians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Wells

    Full Text Available Musical performance is a skilled activity performed under intense pressure, thus is often a profound source of anxiety. In other contexts, anxiety and its concomitant symptoms of sympathetic nervous system arousal have been successfully ameliorated with HRV biofeedback (HRV BF, a technique involving slow breathing which augments autonomic and emotional regulatory capacity.This randomised-controlled study explored the impact of a single 30-minute session of HRV BF on anxiety in response to a highly stressful music performance.A total of 46 trained musicians participated in this study and were randomly allocated to a slow breathing with or without biofeedback or no-treatment control group. A 3 Group×2 Time mixed experimental design was employed to compare the effect of group before and after intervention on performance anxiety (STAI-S and frequency domain measures of HRV.Slow breathing groups (n=30 showed significantly greater improvements in high frequency (HF and LF/HF ratio measures of HRV relative to control (n=15 during 5 minute recordings of performance anticipation following the intervention (effect size: η(2 =0.122 and η(2 =0.116, respectively. The addition of biofeedback to a slow breathing protocol did not produce differential results. While intervention groups did not exhibit an overall reduction in self-reported anxiety, participants with high baseline anxiety who received the intervention (n=15 displayed greater reductions in self-reported state anxiety relative to those in the control condition (n=7 (r=0.379.These findings indicate that a single session of slow breathing, regardless of biofeedback, is sufficient for controlling physiological arousal in anticipation of psychosocial stress associated with music performance and that slow breathing is particularly helpful for musicians with high levels of anxiety. Future research is needed to further examine the effects of HRV BF as a low-cost, non-pharmacological treatment for

  7. Parameters for screening music performance anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana E. Barbar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the discriminative capacity of the Kenny Music Performance Anxiety Inventory (K-MPAI, in its version adapted for Brazil, in a sample of 230 Brazilian adult musicians. Method: The Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN was used to assess the presence of social anxiety indicators, adopting it as the gold standard. The Mann-Whitney U test and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve were used for statistical analysis, with p ≤ 0.05 set as the significance level. Results: Subjects with social anxiety indicators exhibited higher mean total K-MPAI scores, as well as higher individual scores on 62% of its items. The area under the ROC curve was 0.734 (p = 0.001, and considered appropriate. Within the possible cutoff scores presented, the score -15 had the best balance of sensitivity and specificity values. However, the score -7 had greater specificity and accuracy. Conclusion: The K-MPAI showed appropriate discriminant validity, with a marked association between music performance anxiety and social anxiety. The cutoff scores presented in the study have both clinical and research value, allowing screening for music performance anxiety and identification of possible cases.

  8. Symptom overlap in anxiety and multiple sclerosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O Donnchadha, Seán

    2013-02-14

    BACKGROUND: The validity of self-rated anxiety inventories in people with multiple sclerosis (pwMS) is unclear. However, the appropriateness of self-reported depression scales has been widely examined. Given somatic symptom overlap between depression and MS, research emphasises caution when using such scales. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluates symptom overlap between anxiety and MS in a group of 33 individuals with MS, using the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). METHODS: Participants underwent a neurological examination and completed the BAI. RESULTS: A novel procedure using hierarchical cluster analysis revealed three distinct symptom clusters. Cluster one (\\'wobbliness\\' and \\'unsteady\\') grouped separately from all other BAI items. These symptoms are well-recognised MS-related symptoms and we question whether their endorsement in pwMS can be considered to reflect anxiety. A modified 19-item BAI (mBAI) was created which excludes cluster one items. This removal reduced the number of MS participants considered \\'anxious\\' by 21.21% (low threshold) and altered the level of anxiety severity for a further 27.27%. CONCLUSION: Based on these data, it is suggested that, as with depression measures, researchers and clinicians should exercise caution when using brief screening measures for anxiety in pwMS.

  9. Parameters for screening music performance anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbar, Ana E; Crippa, José A; Osório, Flávia L

    2014-09-01

    To assess the discriminative capacity of the Kenny Music Performance Anxiety Inventory (K-MPAI), in its version adapted for Brazil, in a sample of 230 Brazilian adult musicians. The Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN) was used to assess the presence of social anxiety indicators, adopting it as the gold standard. The Mann-Whitney U test and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were used for statistical analysis, with p ≤ 0.05 set as the significance level. Subjects with social anxiety indicators exhibited higher mean total K-MPAI scores, as well as higher individual scores on 62% of its items. The area under the ROC curve was 0.734 (p = 0.001), and considered appropriate. Within the possible cutoff scores presented, the score -15 had the best balance of sensitivity and specificity values. However, the score -7 had greater specificity and accuracy. The K-MPAI showed appropriate discriminant validity, with a marked association between music performance anxiety and social anxiety. The cutoff scores presented in the study have both clinical and research value, allowing screening for music performance anxiety and identification of possible cases.

  10. Sleep quality and anxiety level in employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teker, Ayse Gulsen; Luleci, Nimet Emel

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the sleep quality and anxiety level of a group of employees, as well as determine the relationship between sleep quality and anxiety and other factors. A total of 130 of 185 employees at a university campus were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. A descriptive questionnaire, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and the Beck Anxiety Inventory were the data collection instruments. In addition to univariate analysis, the relationship between the 2 scales was examined with Spearman correlation analysis. Of the participants, 38.9% had poor sleep quality. Gender, income level, presence of a chronic disease, regular medication use, and relationship with family and the social environment were found to affect both sleep quality and anxiety. A decrease in sleep quality was associated with an increase in the level of anxiety. Poor sleep quality and a high anxiety level are common in this country, as in the rest of the world. Socioeconomic interventions and psychosocial support to improve the status of individuals with risk factors, such as chronic disease, will reduce anxiety and improve sleep quality and overall psychosocial health. Further prospective studies should be conducted with different groups of participants and with larger samples to expand knowledge of the relationship between sleep quality and anxiety.

  11. Effects of confidence and anxiety on flow state in competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehn, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Confidence and anxiety are important variables that underlie the experience of flow in sport. Specifically, research has indicated that confidence displays a positive relationship and anxiety a negative relationship with flow. The aim of this study was to assess potential direct and indirect effects of confidence and anxiety dimensions on flow state in tennis competition. A sample of 59 junior tennis players completed measures of Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2d and Flow State Scale-2. Following predictive analysis, results showed significant positive correlations between confidence (intensity and direction) and anxiety symptoms (only directional perceptions) with flow state. Standard multiple regression analysis indicated confidence as the only significant predictor of flow. The results confirmed a protective function of confidence against debilitating anxiety interpretations, but there were no significant interaction effects between confidence and anxiety on flow state.

  12. Anxiety rating scales in Parkinson's disease: a critical review updating recent literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayaka, Nadeeka N W; Torbey, Elizabeth; Pachana, Nancy A

    2015-11-01

    Assessing anxiety in Parkinson's disease (PD) has been a recent focus, and a number of studies have extensively investigated the validity of anxiety rating scales in PD. The present review aims to provide an overview of anxiety scales widely used and/or validated in PD, and to highlight recommendations for future research required in this area. A literature search was performed using terms such as Parkinson* disease, psychiatric, depress*, anxiety, assessment, scales, and valid* in PsycInfo, PubMed, and Web of Science databases. Validation studies and reviews focussed on assessment of anxiety in PD were included. The literature search identified nine anxiety rating scales. The new Parkinson's Anxiety Scale (PAS) showed good psychometric properties. Having a simple design appropriate for older adults and items focussed on cognitive anxiety, the Geriatric Anxiety Inventory (GAI) also appeared promising for use in PD. The Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A) did not demonstrate satisfactory psychometric characteristics when used in PD, while other scales had limited or no evidence of validity or reliability to infer judgments. PAS and GAI are can be recommended for use in PD without dementia. Usefulness of these scales to assess anxiety in dementia should be examined in the future. Moreover, the complex symptomatology of anxiety relating to "off" PD medication states were not addressed in these scales. Further research is required to develop an anxiety scale tailored for PD.

  13. [Social anxiety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabel-Sarron, Christine

    2010-06-20

    Social anxiety disorders are various, frequent and invalidant. Social phobia is characterized by marked and persistent fear of social or performance situations in which embarrassment may occur including, for example, fear of public speaking. In clinical setting, the majority of social phobics report fears of more than one type of social situation. Social phobia tends to develop early in life, with a life time prevalence of 2-4%. Pharmacotherapy and behavioural and cognitive therapy are communly used.

  14. Vendor-managed inventory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Govindan, Kannan

    2013-01-01

    Vendor-managed inventory (VMI) represents the methodology through which the upstream stage of a supply chain (vendor) takes responsibility for managing the inventories at the downstream stage (customer) based on previously agreed limits. VMI is another method by which supply chains can be managed...... review, we have identified six dimensions of VMI: namely, inventory, transportation, manufacturing, general benefits, coordination/collaboration, and information sharing. In addition, there are, three methodological classifications: modelling, simulation, and case studies. Finally, we will consider...

  15. LSD-assisted psychotherapy for anxiety associated with a life-threatening disease: a qualitative study of acute and sustained subjective effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, Peter; Kirchner, Katharina; Passie, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    A recently published study showed the safety and efficacy of LSD-assisted psychotherapy in patients with anxiety associated with life-threatening diseases. Participants of this study were included in a prospective follow-up. 12 months after finishing LSD psychotherapy, 10 participants were tested for anxiety (STAI) and participated in a semi-structured interview. A Qualitative Content Analysis (QCA) was carried out on the interviews to elaborate about LSD effects and lasting psychological changes. None of the participants reported lasting adverse reactions. The significant benefits as measured with the STAI were sustained over a 12-month period. In the QCA participants consistently reported insightful, cathartic and interpersonal experiences, accompanied by a reduction in anxiety (77.8%) and a rise in quality of life (66.7%). Evaluations of subjective experiences suggest facilitated access to emotions, confrontation of previously unknown anxieties, worries, resources and intense emotional peak experiences à la Maslow as major psychological working mechanisms. The experiences created led to a restructuring of the person's emotional trust, situational understanding, habits and world view. LSD administered in a medically supervised psychotherapeutic setting can be safe and generate lasting benefits in patients with a life-threatening disease. Explanatory models for the therapeutic effects of LSD warrant further study. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. A study of exam related anxiety amongst medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Pahwa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study focuses on pre-examination anxiety amongst medical students & its personality co-relates. Material & Method : 91 medical students were administered Eysenck Personality Questionnaire to determine predominant personality trait if any and Beck′s Anxiety Inventory. Results : There was an increase in anxiety levels prior to exam, more so in females and in students with neuroticism and extraversion temperaments. Conclusion: Anxiety levels increase in medical students prior to exams and are associated with certain personality traits, though the difference is not statistically significant.

  17. Brief Report Reliability of the Beck Depression Inventory and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective — This study aimed to assess the reliability of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Self-Rating Anxiety Scale for epidemiological investigations of adolescents' symptoms. Method — Self-report questionnaires were administered on two occasions to 104 students in four private high schools in Cape Town ...

  18. National Wetlands Inventory Lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Linear wetland features (including selected streams, ditches, and narrow wetland bodies) mapped as part of the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI). The National...

  19. Anxiety Predicts Mortality in ICD Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kikkenborg Berg, Selina; Caspar Thygesen, Lau; Hastrup Svendsen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although highly effective in preventing arrhythmic death, patients receiving an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) may still experience psychological difficulties such as anxiety, depression, and reduced quality of life. The objectives of this study were to describe patient...... receiving ICD between January 1, 2011 and June 30, 2011 (n = 499). The following instruments were used: SF-36, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, HeartQoL, EQ-5D, and the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory. RESULTS: The response rate was 72%. Mean age was 65.5 years and 82% patients were males. Fifty...... of perceived health, quality of life, and fatigue; for example, physical health 39.8 versus 44.3 points, compared to secondary prevention indication. Anxiety, poor perceived health, fatigue, and low quality of life were all predictors of mortality, anxiety being the strongest with an adjusted odds ratio of 4...

  20. Death anxiety, death competency and self-actualization in hospice volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, R A

    1991-01-01

    A total of 248 hospice volunteers completed the Personal Orientation Inventory, the Templer/McMordie Death Anxiety Scale, the Bugen Coping with Death Scale, and a Death Self-Efficacy Scale constructed for this research. Death anxiety significantly negatively correlated with four Personal Orientation Inventory scales, Coping with Death Scale positively correlated with seven of the twelve Personal Orientation Inventory Scales, and the Self-Efficacy Scale significantly correlated with eleven of them. These findings suggest that death competency constructs may be more useful than the concept of death anxiety in conceptualizing people's emerging self-actualization in the process of confronting mortality.

  1. Seasonality in depressive and anxiety symptoms among primary care patients and in patients with depressive and anxiety disorders; results from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Little is known about seasonality of specific depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms in different patient populations. This study aims to assess seasonal variation of depressive and anxiety symptoms in a primary care population and across participants who were classified in diagnostic groups 1) healthy controls 2) patients with a major depressive disorder, 3) patients with any anxiety disorder and 4) patients with a major depression and any anxiety disorder. Methods Data were used from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). First, in 5549 patients from the NESDA primary care recruitment population the Kessler-10 screening questionnaire was used and data were analyzed across season in a multilevel linear model. Second, in 1090 subjects classified into four groups according to psychiatric status according to the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, overall depressive symptoms and atypical versus melancholic features were assessed with the Inventory of Depressive Symptoms. Anxiety and fear were assessed with the Beck Anxiety Inventory and the Fear questionnaire. Symptom levels across season were analyzed in a linear regression model. Results In the primary care population the severity of depressive and anxiety symptoms did not show a seasonal pattern. In the diagnostic groups healthy controls and patients with any anxiety disorder, but not patients with a major depressive disorder, showed a small rise in depressive symptoms in winter. Atypical and melancholic symptoms were both elevated in winter. No seasonal pattern for anxiety symptoms was found. There was a small gender related seasonal effect for fear symptoms. Conclusions Seasonal differences in severity or type of depressive and anxiety symptoms, as measured with a general screening instrument and symptom questionnaires, were absent or small in effect size in a primary care population and in patient populations with a major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders. PMID

  2. Denmark's National Inventory Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illerup, J. B.; Lyck, E.; Winther, M.

    This report is Denmark's National Inventory Report reported to the Conference of the Parties under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) due by 15 April 2001. The report contains information on Denmark's inventories for all years' from 1990 to 1999 for CO2, CH4, N2O, CO...

  3. Denmark's National Inventory Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illerup, J. B.; Lyck, E.; Winther, M.

    This report is Denmark's National Inventory Report reported to the Conference of the Parties under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) due by 15 April 2001. The report contains information on Denmark's inventories for all years' from 1990 to 1999 for CO2, CH4, N2O, ......, NMVOC, SO2, HFCs, PFCs and SF6....

  4. Integrated inventory and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    George Lightner; Hans T. Schreuder; Barry Bollenbacher; Kerry McMenus

    2001-01-01

    Understanding and inventorying our ecological systems is key to addressing how issues, questions, and management actions will affect the composition, structure, and function of these systems. Taking an ecological systems approach to the inventory and monitoring framework, is one which we feel will allow answers to currently identified management questions and new ones...

  5. The personality profile of police recruits who are high on anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgert van Jaarsveld

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The principal objective of the study was to determine the personality profile of police recruits who are high on anxiety. A secondary objective was to determine whether there are gender and ethnic differences in the levels of anxiety of those police recruits. To investigate the stated objectives the NEO Personality Inventory, Locus of Control Inventory and the IPAT Anxiety Scale were applied to 487 police recruits. Complete records were obtained for 259 participants. In comparing the personality profiles of participants who are high on anxiety and those who are low, it turned out that the biggest differences were in respect of Neuroticism, External Locus of Control and Agreeableness.

  6. Inventory control strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primrose, D.

    1998-01-01

    Finning International Inc. is in the business of selling, financing and servicing Caterpillar and complementary equipment. Its main markets are in western Canada, Britain and Chile. This paper discusses the parts inventory strategies system for Finning (Canada). The company's territory covers British Columbia, Alberta, the Yukon and the Northwest Territories. Finning's parts inventory consists of 80,000 component units valued at more than $150 M. Distribution centres are located in Langley, British Columbia and Edmonton, Alberta. To make inventory and orders easier to control, Finning has designed a computer-based system, with software written exclusively for Caterpillar dealers. The system makes use of a real time electronic interface with all Finning locations, plus all Caterpillar facilities and other dealers in North America. Details of the system are discussed, including territorial stocking procedures, addition to stock, exhaustion of stock, automatic/suggest order controls, surplus inventory management, and procedures for jointly managed inventory. 3 tabs., 1 fig

  7. Insecure attachment and anxiety in student athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, D H; Kim, S M; Zaichkowsky, L

    2013-06-01

    The main purpose of our research was to examine attachment type and competition anxiety in high school student athletes and general high school students. We recruited 465 student athletes and 543 general students to participate in our study. The Revised Korean version of the Experiences in Close Relationships Scale (K-ECRS) and the Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2 (CSAI-2) were given to all students. In χ2 tests, athletes showed attachment types in the following order of prevalence: fearful, dismissive, and preoccupied, compared to the fearful, preoccupied, and dismissive order observed in general students. In parametric, independent t-tests, athletes reported significantly higher cognitive anxiety scores, relative to general students. Further, athletes with insecure attachment compared to those with secure attachment reported higher cognitive anxiety scores and self-confidence scores. In both the athletes with insecure attachment and general students with insecure attachment groups, the K-ECRS anxiety subscale was significantly correlated with CSAI-2 total score. In post hoc analysis in the athletes with insecure attachment group, the K-ECRS anxiety subscale was also significantly correlated with the CSAI-2 cognitive anxiety subscale. These results suggest that anxious athletes with an insecure attachment style tend to exaggerate threats from both external and internal sources, which negatively affect their performances.

  8. SLEEP DEPRIVATION INDUCED ANXIETY AND ANAEROBIC PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Arzu Vardar

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of sleep deprivation induced anxiety on anaerobic performance. Thirteen volunteer male physical education students completed the Turkish version of State Anxiety Inventory and performed Wingate anaerobic test for three times: (1 following a full-night of habitual sleep (baseline measurements, (2 following 30 hours of sleep deprivation, and (3 following partial-night sleep deprivation. Baseline measurements were performed the day before total sleep deprivation. Measurements following partial sleep deprivation were made 2 weeks later than total sleep deprivation measurements. State anxiety was measured prior to each Wingate test. The mean state anxiety following total sleep deprivation was higher than the baseline measurement (44.9 ± 12.9 vs. 27.6 ± 4.2, respectively, p = 0.02 whereas anaerobic performance parameters remained unchanged. Neither anaerobic parameters nor state anxiety levels were affected by one night partial sleep deprivation. Our results suggest that 30 hours continuous wakefulness may increase anxiety level without impairing anaerobic performance, whereas one night of partial sleep deprivation was ineffective on both state anxiety and anaerobic performance

  9. Measuring Social Anxiety in College Students: A Comprehensive Evaluation of the Psychometric Properties of the SPAI-23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schry, Amie R.; Roberson-Nay, Roxann; White, Susan W.

    2012-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is 1 of the most prevalent psychological disorders, and among college students in particular, social anxiety has been associated with other problems such as substance use problems and increased vulnerability to other psychiatric disorders. The Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory-23 (SPAI-23; Roberson-Nay, Strong, Nay,…

  10. Disability in anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, S.M.; Spijker, J.; Licht, C.M.M.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Hardeveld, F.; de Graaf, R.; Batelaan, N.M.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Background This study compares disability levels between different anxiety disorders and healthy controls. We further investigate the role of anxiety arousal and avoidance behaviour in disability, and whether differences in these symptom patterns contribute to disability differences between anxiety

  11. Disability in anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, S.M.; Spijker, J.; Licht, C.M.; Beekman, A.T.; Hardeveld, F.; Graaf, R. de; Batelaan, N.M.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study compares disability levels between different anxiety disorders and healthy controls. We further investigate the role of anxiety arousal and avoidance behaviour in disability, and whether differences in these symptom patterns contribute to disability differences between anxiety

  12. Disability in anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, S.M.; Spijker, J.; Licht, C.M.M.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Hardeveld, F.; Graaf, R. de; Batelaan, N.M.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study compares disability levels between different anxiety disorders and healthy controls. We further investigate the role of anxiety arousal and avoidance behaviour in disability, and whether differences in these symptom patterns contribute to disability differences between anxiety

  13. Separation Anxiety (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Separation Anxiety KidsHealth / For Parents / Separation Anxiety What's in this ... both of you get through it. About Separation Anxiety Babies adapt pretty well to other caregivers. Parents ...

  14. Cognitive and somatic anxiety and self-confidence in athletic performance of beach volleyball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kais, Kristjan; Raudsepp, Lennart

    2004-04-01

    This study considered the influence of competitive anxiety and self-confidence state responses upon athletic performance. 66 male beach volleyball players completed the translated and modified Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2 which included the original intensity scale and a direction scale of Jones and Swain. Players' performance was scored from the video records using a standard rating scales. Correlations indicated scores on Direction subscale of modified Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2 and Self-confidence were moderately positively (r=.27 to .51) correlated with different skill components and sum of skill components of beach volleyball. Stepwise multiple regressions indicated that, as anticipated, directional perceptions of cognitive and somatic anxiety and self-confidence were significant predictors of beach volleyball performance but accounted for only 42% of variance. Original Intensity subscales of somatic and cognitive anxiety did not predict performance. Findings support the notion that direction of anxiety responses must be taken into consideration when examining anxiety-performance association in sport.

  15. A identificação da ansiedade por meio da análise da íris: uma possibilidade La identificación de la ansiedad a través del análisis de iris: una posibilidad The identification of anxiety through the analysis of the iris: a possibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Léia Fortes Salles

    2012-03-01

    estos signos indica una mayor predisposición a un comportamiento ansioso. Con la identificación temprana de este comportamiento se puede reducir el desarollo de las enfermedades.Anxiety is a behavior related to psychosomatic diseases. Through an evaluation of the iris it is possible to determine personality traits and to intervene early to refrain any non-adaptive behavior from causing psychosomatic diseases. Contraction furrows suggest a predisposition to anxiety. This study aimed to verify the correlation of contraction furrows in the iris with the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI. This study was approved by the Research Ethics Committee of the University Of São Paulo, School of Nursing, and performed with 62 teachers and employees at the Center of Health Science of the Zerbine Foundation (CeFACS, from May to July, 2010. The Spearman coefficient showed a positive and statistically significant correlation between the STAI score and the quantity of contraction furrows. This suggests that these signs indicate a predisposition to anxiety. With the early identification of this behavior we have chances to reduce the development of the disease.

  16. Managing Air Quality - Emissions Inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page describes the role of emission inventories in the air quality management process, a description of how emission inventories are developed, and where U.S. emission inventory information can be found.

  17. Interactive Inventory Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garud, Sumedha

    2013-01-01

    Method and system for monitoring present location and/or present status of a target inventory item, where the inventory items are located on one or more inventory shelves or other inventory receptacles that communicate with an inventory base station through use of responders such as RFIDs. A user operates a hand held interrogation and display (lAD) module that communicates with, or is part of the base station to provide an initial inquiry. lnformation on location(s) of the larget invenlory item is also indicated visibly and/or audibly on the receptacle(s) for the user. Status information includes an assessment of operation readiness and a time, if known, that the specified inventory item or class was last removed or examined or modified. Presentation of a user access level may be required for access to the target inventgory item. Another embodiment provides inventory informatin for a stack as a sight-impaired or hearing-impaired person adjacent to that stack.

  18. Bidirectional Influences of Anxiety and Depression in Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Joyce; Gouze, Karen R.; Bryant, Fred B.

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety and depression tend to co-occur in children. Studies indicate that higher levels of anxiety are associated with subsequent higher levels of depression, while depression may inhibit subsequent anxiety. It is important to increase our understanding of the temporal sequencing of these disorders and, particularly, to determine if suppression effects account for the inhibitory association. In addition, further information about these relationships in young children is needed. Participants were a diverse (20.4 % Hispanic, 16.7 % African American; 49.1 % boys) community sample of 796 children with data available at ages 4, 5, and 6–7 years. Anxiety and depression symptoms were assessed using the Child Symptom Inventory and symptom count measures from the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children-Parent Scale-Young Child version. The results indicated: (a) anxiety and depression were relatively stable over time; (b) anxiety at age 4 and 5 was a significant positive predictor of subsequent depression; (c) while an inhibitory effect of depression on subsequent anxiety was found, that inhibitory effect was due to negative suppression, and higher levels of depression were actually associated with subsequent anxiety; (e) consistent with a significant suppression effect, when depression was included as a predictor, the association between anxiety at ages 4 and 5 and anxiety one year later increases in magnitude. Both anxiety and depression are associated with higher levels of one another in the subsequent year. Implications for prevention are discussed. PMID:24934567

  19. The moderating role of avoidance behavior on anxiety over time: Is there a difference between social anxiety disorder and specific phobia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Rudaz

    Full Text Available Theories of anxiety disorders and phobias have ascribed a critical role to avoidance behavior in explaining the persistence of fear and anxiety, but knowledge about the role of avoidance behavior in the maintenance of anxiety in social anxiety disorder relative to specific phobia is lacking. This study examined the extent to which avoidance behavior moderates the relationship between general anxiety at baseline and 18 months later in women with a diagnosed social anxiety disorder (n = 91 and women with a diagnosed specific phobia (n = 130 at baseline. Circumscribed avoidance of social and specific situations were clinician-rated using the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule-Lifetime (ADIS-IV-L, and general anxiety was measured using the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI. Moderated regression analyses revealed that (a general anxiety at baseline predicted general anxiety at follow-up in both women with a specific phobia and women with a social anxiety disorder and (b avoidance behavior moderated this relationship in women with a specific phobia but not in women with a social anxiety disorder. Specifically, high avoidance behavior was found to amplify the effect between general anxiety at baseline and follow-up in specific phobia. Reasons for the absence of a similar moderating effect of avoidance behavior within social anxiety disorder are discussed.

  20. Metric characteristics of Anxiety Scale for Children and Adolescents: A preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Krevh

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper is exploring measurements of anxiety in youth and adolescence. It introduces a new scale for measuring anxiety in youth and adolescence (LAOM and selected metric characteristics are being analysed. The scale was designed to measure general level of anxiety in school surroundings. The concept of anxiety and the evolvement of measures are highlighted and the theoretical base for construction of the new scale is presented. The psychometric analyses were based on a sample of 300 elementary school children of both genders. The structure of the first version of LAOM was analysed with component analysis and the relevant items were kept. The reliability of the second version of the scale in terms of its internal consistency proved to be sufficient (Cronbach α = ,89. The scale differed between groups with different levels of anxiety. Concurrent validity was verified through a high positive correlation with translated STAI –X2 scale (Lamovec, 1988. Another evidence in favour of construct validity of the LAOM was provided with important gender and age differences.

  1. SBA Network Components & Software Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — SBA’s Network Components & Software Inventory contains a complete inventory of all devices connected to SBA’s network including workstations, servers, routers,...

  2. Anxiety and depression symptoms in recurrent painful renal lithiasis colic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.H.M.P. Diniz

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have reported that symptoms of anxiety and depression are significantly associated with diseases characterized by painful crises. However, there is little information about the psychological aspects of recurrent painful episodes of renal stone disease. Our objective was to evaluate the association of symptoms of anxiety, depression and recurrent painful renal colic in a case-control study involving 64 subjects (32 cases/32 controls matched for age and sex. Cases were outpatients with a confirmed diagnosis of nephrolithiasis as per their case history, physical examination, image examination and other laboratory exams. Patients had a history of at least two episodes within a 3-year period, and were currently in an intercrisis interval. The control group consisted of subjects seen at the Ophthalmology Outpatient Clinic of this University Hospital with only eye refraction symptoms, and no other associated disease. Symptoms of anxiety were evaluated by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and symptoms of depression by the Beck Depression Inventory. Statistically significant differences were observed between patients with nephrolithiasis and controls for anxiety state (P = 0.001, anxiety trait (P = 0.005 and symptoms of depression (odds ratio = 3.74; 95%CI = 1.31-10.62. The Beck Depression Inventory showed 34.5% of respondents with moderate and 6% with severe levels of depression. There was a significant linear correlation between symptoms of anxiety (P = 0.002 and depression (P < 0.001 and the number of recurrent colic episodes (anxiety-state: P = 0.016 and anxiety-trait: P < 0.001. These data suggest an association between recurrent renal colic and symptoms of both anxiety and depression.

  3. Physical self-presentation and competitive anxiety in male master divers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorimer, Ross; Westbury, Tony

    2006-12-01

    This study investigated the link between physical self-presentation and competitive anxiety in male, master-level, high-board divers (N=84, M age = 29.3 yr., SD = 14.3). Competitive trait anxiety, social physique anxiety, and physical self-presentation confidence were assessed using the Sport Anxiety Scale, Social Physique Anxiety Scale, and the Physical Self-presentation inventory. Stepwise regression analyses indicated that variance in competitive anxiety was accounted for by the physical self-presentation variables and that these variables were more strongly associated with the cognitive anxiety subscale Worry, and to a lesser extent, Somatic Anxiety. The results of this study provide support for the argument that physical self-presentation is associated with competitive anxiety in male athletes.

  4. VA Enterprise Data Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Department of Veterans Affairs Enterprise Data Inventory accounts for all of the datasets used in the agency's information systems. This entry was approved for...

  5. National Emission Inventory (NEI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data exchange allows states to submit data to the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Emissions Inventory (NEI). NEI is a national database of air...

  6. National Wetlands Inventory Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Wetland point features (typically wetlands that are too small to be as area features at the data scale) mapped as part of the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI). The...

  7. Business Process Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — Inventory of maps and descriptions of the business processes of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM), with an emphasis on the processes of the Office of the...

  8. Asset Inventory Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — AIDM is used to track USAID assets such as furniture, computers, and equipment. Using portable bar code readers, receiving and inventory personnel can capture...

  9. Toxics Release Inventory (TRI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) is a dataset compiled by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It contains information on the release and waste...

  10. National Emission Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The National Emission Inventory contains measured, modeled, and estimated data for emissions of all known source categories in the US (stationary sources, fires,...

  11. NCRN Hemlock Inventory Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — ​Data associated with the 2015 hemlock inventory project in NCR. Eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) is a coniferous tree native to the NE and Appalachian regions of...

  12. Public Waters Inventory Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This theme is a scanned and rectified version of the Minnesota DNR - Division of Waters "Public Waters Inventory" (PWI) maps. DNR Waters utilizes a small scale...

  13. Logistics and Inventory System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Logistics and Inventory System (LIS) is the agencys primary supply/support automation tool. The LIS encompasses everything from order entry by field specialists...

  14. Perfectionism in Social Anxiety: Cognitive and Behavioral Correlates

    OpenAIRE

    Craig, Douglas E.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between perfectionism and social anxiety in general as well as social phobia, specifically. Subjects completed the Personal Standards Scale, the Fear of Negative Evaluation scale, and the Social Phobia and Agoraphobia Inventory. Results indicated that neurotic perfectionism is positively associated with both general social anxiety and social phobia. Moreover, the neurotic elements of perfectionism -- "concern over making mistakes" and ...

  15. Traffic Signs Inventory System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ružbarský

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on practical application of Cambridge Correlator. The goal is to propose a traffic signs inventory system by using excellent characteristics of correlator in the rapid optical correlation. The proposal of this inventory system includes obtaining of traffic signs to create the database either collecting the GPS coordinates. It is necessary to know the traffic signs position and also to document the entire surface route for later evaluation in offline mode.

  16. Determination of health anxiety, anxiety, and somatosensory amplification levels in individuals with normal coronary angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Hasan; Korkmaz, Sevda; Yildiz, Sevler; Gündoğan, Burcu; Atmaca, Murad

    2017-06-01

    The objective of the present study is to determine the somatosensory amplification, anxiety, and depression levels in patients with normal coronary arteries. Thirty-five patients with normal coronary arteries and 35 healthy individuals of similar age and gender as the patient group were included in the study. Somatosensory Amplification Scale (SSAS), Health Anxiety Inventory (HAI-18), Penn State Anxiety Scale (PSWQ), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were applied to all participants. Comparison of the patient group with the control group demonstrated that SSAS (22.7±8.2; 18.5±5.98; p=0.018), BAI (15.4±9.43; 9.4±7.3; p=0.004), BDI (24.9±13.5; 13.7±7.5; panxiety and depression scores were higher than those of healthy individuals. Thus, the necessity of these interventions should be assessed in detail in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. CONFIDENCE, COGNITIVE AND SOMATIC ANXIETY AMONG ELITE AND NON-ELITE FUTSAL PLAYERS AND ITS RELATIONSHIP WITH SITUATIONAL FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibi Hassan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare confidence, cognitive and somatic anxiety among elite and non-elite futsal players and its relationship with situational factors. Material: 130 non-elite and 70 elite male futsal players participated in the study. Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2 and situational factors Inventory were applied. Data was analyzed using one way ANOVA and product moment correlation. Results: Results showed there was significant difference between competitive state anxiety subscales (cognitive anxiety somatic anxiety & self-confidence and situational factors among elite and non-elite futsal players but there was no significant correlations between situational factors subscales among elite and non-elite futsal players. Conclusion: Competitive state anxiety is part of sport competition and it seems elite athletes can manage and interpret anxiety well with respect to their experiences and psychological intervention and then consider anxiety and situational variables as facilitative factors for his or her competition.

  18. The cerebral neurobiology of anxiety, anxiety displacement, and anxiety denial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, L A; Fronczek, J; Abel, L; Buchsbaum, M S; Fallon, J H

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies examining the relationship of anxiety scores, derived from the content analysis of speech of normal individuals, have revealed that the anxiety scores occurring in the dreams associated with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep are significantly correlated with localized cerebral glucose metabolic rates assessed by positron emission tomography (PET) scanning. These significant intercorrelations occur in different cerebral areas when the anxiety scores are obtained from mental experiences reported during non-REM sleep or during wakeful silent mentation. The purpose of the present study was to examine the intercorrelations found between anxiety attributed to the self, anxiety-displacement, and anxiety denial measured from computerized content analysis of 5-min verbal reports of subjective thoughts and feelings obtained from wakeful normal subjects and localized cerebral glucose metabolic rates during PET scanning. The subjects were 10 wakeful young males. Their anxiety scores were derived from computerized content analysis of 5-min reports they gave of their subjective thoughts, feelings and fantasies during a 30-min period following an intravenous injection of F D-deoxyglucose (FDG). The subjects were moved 32--45 min after this injection to obtain a PET scan, which records all of the localized cerebral glucose metabolic rates during the 30 min following the FDG injection. Significant intercorrelations of localized cerebral glucose metabolic rates with the scores of self-anxiety, anxiety displacement, and anxiety-denial were found in dissimilar cerebral locations depending on the type of anxiety involved. The significant correlations occurred in brain regions known to be associated with the functions of emotions, cognition, memory, and vision. Specific combinations of cerebral areas, based on glucose metabolic rates, appear to distinguish and be associated with different verbal expressions of anxiety. Replication of this preliminary research will be

  19. Níveis de ansiedade de alunos de graduação em enfermagem frente à primeira instrumentação cirúrgica Niveles de ansiedad de los alumnos de pregrado en enfermería delante de la primera instrumentación quirúrgica Nursing undergraduates' anxiety about the first surgical instrumentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel de Carvalho

    2004-12-01

    ' anxiety about the first surgical instrumentation. The sample consisted of 30 sixth-period students who were enrolled in the subject Surgical Nursing. Data were collected through the STAI (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. We identified that 90% of the students demonstrated low levels of trait anxiety. As to state anxiety, the most frequent observations were: low anxiety level on the first day of theoretical class (76.7%. medium anxiety level at the lab (53% and medium anxiety level during supervised training (80%. Furthermore, we identified a small number of students with high anxiety levels. The statistical analysis shows significant differences among the mean levels of state-anxiety during the three data collection phases.

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    screening test for depression disorders in medical settings and in numerous studies with pregnant women. The total score ranges from 10 to 50, with higher scores indicating more severe symptoms of. Stress (Kessler et al., 2002). Anxiety Data. State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) is a short self- report instrument composed of ...

  1. Utility of recorded guided imagery and relaxing music in reducing patient pain and anxiety, and surgeon anxiety, during cutaneous surgical procedures: A single-blinded randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Murad; Roongpisuthipong, Wanjarus; Kim, Natalie A; Goyal, Amita; Swary, Jillian H; Brindise, Renata T; Iyengar, Sanjana; Pace, Natalie; West, Dennis P; Polavarapu, Mahesh; Yoo, Simon

    2016-09-01

    Guided imagery and music can reportedly reduce pain and anxiety during surgery, but no comparative study has been performed for cutaneous surgery to our knowledge. We sought to determine whether short-contact recorded guided imagery or relaxing music could reduce patient pain and anxiety, and surgeon anxiety, during cutaneous surgical procedures. Subjects were adults undergoing excisional surgery for basal and squamous cell carcinoma. Randomization was to guided imagery (n = 50), relaxing music (n = 54), or control group (n = 51). Primary outcomes were pain and anxiety measured using visual analog scale and 6-item short-form of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, respectively. Secondary outcomes were anxiety of surgeons measured by the 6-item short-form of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and physical stress of patients conveyed by vital signs, respectively. There were no significant differences in subjects' pain, anxiety, blood pressure, and pulse rate across groups. In the recorded guided imagery and the relaxing music group, surgeon anxiety was significantly lower than in the control group. Patients could not be blinded. Short-contact recorded guided imagery and relaxing music appear not to reduce patient pain and anxiety during excisional procedures under local anesthetic. However, surgeon anxiety may be reduced when patients are listening to such recordings. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Paediatric Anxiety Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beena Johnson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent among children and are associated with serious morbidity. Lifetime prevalence of paediatric anxiety disorders is about fifteen percent. Social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder and separation anxiety disorder are included in the triad of paediatric anxiety disorders. Specific phobia, obsessive compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder are also commonly seen in children. Overprotection by parents, parental death or separation, female sex, low educational status, family history of anxiety disorder, financial stress in family and adverse childhood experiences are risk factors for the development of anxiety disorders. If not diagnosed and managed at the earliest, paediatric anxiety disorders can cause life threatening problems in the future. Hence early and scientific management of anxiety disorders is essential. Cognitive behavioural therapy is the effective evidence based treatment for paediatric anxiety disorders.

  3. Anxiety: an evolutionary approach.

    OpenAIRE

    Bateson, M; Brilot, B; Nettle, D

    2011-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most common mental illnesses, with huge attendant suffering. Current treatments are not universally effective, suggesting that a deeper understanding of the causes of anxiety is needed. To understand anxiety disorders better, it is first necessary to understand the normal anxiety response. This entails considering its evolutionary function as well as the mechanisms underlying it. We argue that the function of the human anxiety response, and homologues in other ...

  4. Parkinson's disease and anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, K; Bennett, G

    2001-01-01

    There has been a recent surge of interest in the subject of anxiety in patients with Parkinson's disease. Up to 40% of patients with Parkinson's disease experience clinically significant anxiety. This anxiety may be a psychological reaction to the stress of the illness or may be related to the neurochemical changes of the disease itself. Antiparkinsonian drugs may have a role in the pathogenesis of the anxiety. The anxiety disorders in Parkinson's disease patients appear to be clustered in th...

  5. Anxiety in cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Stark, D P H; House, A

    2000-01-01

    Anxiety is common in cancer patient populations, and must often initially be recognized and managed by cancer care professionals. This article reviews the recent oncology and mental health literature on anxiety. The aim is to help those involved in cancer patient care who are not specialists in mental health to understand the nature of anxiety, and discriminate morbid from normal anxiety. We review recent research into the association of anxiety with events during diagnosis and management of ...

  6. Paediatric Anxiety Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Beena Johnson

    2017-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent among children and are associated with serious morbidity. Lifetime prevalence of paediatric anxiety disorders is about fifteen percent. Social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder and separation anxiety disorder are included in the triad of paediatric anxiety disorders. Specific phobia, obsessive compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder are also commonly seen in children. Overprotection by parents, parental death or separation, female sex, ...

  7. Relation of assertiveness and anxiety among Iranian University students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larijani, T T; Aghajani, M; Baheiraei, A; Neiestanak, N S

    2010-12-01

    • The findings from the present study revealed that less than 30% of nursing and midwifery students have high assertiveness and only half of them have low anxiety. • Assertiveness and anxiety have negative correlations in nursing and midwifery students and affect the mental health and educational and occupational performance of the students. • Many factors such as years of education and working while studying influence the level of assertiveness in the students. • The anxiety in students had a significant relation with the father's level of education, family income, etc. The simultaneous existence of low assertiveness and high anxiety in nursing and midwifery students leads to the disruption of study performance. There exists little information concerning their assertiveness. The purpose of this study was to determine the relation of assertiveness and anxiety in nursing and midwifery students. In this correlational, cross-sectional study, 173 nursing students (68 males and 105 females) and 77 midwifery students were recruited from the Tehran University of Medical Sciences in Iran. Data were collected using a questionnaire including personal-social factors, the Spielberger Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Assertion Inventory of Gambrill and Richey. More than half of the nursing and midwifery students (59.5% and 59.7%, respectively) had moderate assertiveness. Also, 43.3% and 36.4% of them had moderate and high levels of anxiety. Pearson correlation test revealed that assertiveness and anxiety had negative correlations in nursing (r=-0.51, P assertiveness and anxiety among the students. Considering the relation of assertiveness and anxiety and its effects on mental health and educational and occupational performance, students should be informed of the required skills for positive interaction with others and to increase assertiveness and decrease anxiety. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing.

  8. The SPAIC-11 and SPAICP-11: Two Brief Child- and Parent-Rated Measures of Social Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunnell, Brian E.; Beidel, Deborah C.; Liu, Liwen; Joseph, Dana L.; Higa-McMillan, Charmaine

    2015-01-01

    The Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children-11 (SPAIC-11) and Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children’s Parents-11 (SPAICP-11) were developed as brief versions of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory - Child and Parent Versions via item response theory (IRT) using child and parent reports of social anxiety. A sample of 496 children was analyzed using IRT analyses, revealing 11 items that exhibit measurement equivalence across parent and child reports. Descriptive and psychometric data are provided for the child, parent, and combined total scores. Discriminant validity was demonstrated using logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic curve analyses. The SPAIC-11 and SPAICP-11 are psychometrically sound measures that are able to measure social anxiety invariantly across children and their parents. These brief measures which include combined parent and child perception of the child’s social anxiety may provide notable benefits to clinical research. PMID:26500188

  9. Alcohol use, anxiety, and insomnia in older adults with generalized anxiety disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivan, M. Cristina; Amspoker, Amber B.; Nadorff, Michael R.; Kunik, Mark E.; Cully, Jeffrey A.; Wilson, Nancy; Calleo, Jessica; Kraus-Schuman, Cynthia; Stanley, Melinda A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We examined the presence and frequency of alcohol consumption among older primary care patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and their relation to demographic variables, insomnia, worry, and anxiety. We expected alcohol-use distribution to be similar to previous reports and alcohol use to be associated with higher anxiety and insomnia. A third aim was to examine the moderating role of alcohol use on the relation between anxiety and insomnia. We expected alcohol use to worsen the relation between anxiety and insomnia. Design Baseline data from a randomized controlled trial Sample 223 patients, age 60 and older, with DSM-IV GAD diagnoses Setting Patients were recruited through internal medicine, family practice, and geriatric clinics at 2 diverse healthcare settings: Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Administration Medical Center and Baylor College of Medicine. Measurements Measures addressed alcohol use (presence and frequency); insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index); self-reported worry severity (Penn State Worry Questionnaire − Abbreviated); clinician-rated worry severity (Generalized Anxiety Disorder Severity Scale); self-reported anxiety severity (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory - Trait); and clinician-rated anxiety (Structured Interview Guidelines for the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale). Results Most patients endorsed alcohol use in the past month, but overall weekly frequency was low. Presence and frequency of use among patients with GAD were greater than in prior reports of primary care samples. Alcohol use among patients with GAD was associated with higher education and female gender. Higher education also was associated with more drinks per week, and Caucasians reported more drinks per week than African Americans. Alcohol use was associated with less severe insomnia, lower self-reported anxiety, and less clinician-rated worry and anxiety. More drinks per week were associated with lower clinician-rated anxiety. Moderation analyses revealed lower

  10. Adult Separation Anxiety and TCI-R Personality Dimensions in Patients with Anxiety, Alcohol Use, and Gambling: A Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gino Pozzi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Nowadays, adult separation anxiety disorder (ASAD is an established diagnostic category but is little investigated in subjects with addictive behaviours. Objective. To assess the presence of ASAD among patients with addictive disorders in comparison with anxiety patients and measure the personality correlates in all these groups. Methods. 103 outpatients, meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for anxiety disorders (38 patients, alcohol dependence (30 patients, or pathological gambling (35 patients, were assessed by the Structured Clinical Interview for Separation Anxiety Symptoms (SCI-SAS and the Adult Separation Anxiety Checklist (ASA-27 for separation anxiety and by the Temperament and Character Inventory-Revised (TCI-R for personality characteristics. Results. ASAD is detected in 34.2% of anxiety patients, 13.3% of alcoholics, and 11.4% of gamblers. Separation anxiety scores correlate positively with harm avoidance and negatively with self-directedness in all groups; further correlations are seen among addictive patients only, that is, self-transcendence for gamblers and cooperativeness for both alcoholics and gamblers. Conclusions. The prevalence of ASAD is lower among addictive patients than in those with anxiety disorders; correlations are found between separation anxiety and specific TCI-R dimensions, with some matching across the three diagnostic groups.

  11. anxiety disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey A. Hofflich

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Los síntomas somáticos en niños han sido asociados con trastornos de interiorización, especialmente de ansiedad. Sin embargo, pocos estudios han examinado los síntomas somáticos precisos en trastornos de ansiedad específicos. Desde este estudio cuasi-experimental se examinan el tipo y la frecuencia de síntomas somáticos en niños (n = 178; rango de edad 7–14 años con trastorno generalizado de ansiedad (TAG, fobia social (FS, ansiedad de separación (AS y sin ningún trastorno de ansiedad. Los niños y sus padres, que acudieron en busca de tratamiento, completaron una entrevista diagnóstica estructurada, los niños completaron además la Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children (MASC (March, Parker, Sullivan, Stallings, y Conners. Los niños diagnosticados con un trastorno de ansiedad informaron de síntomas somáticos más frecuentes que aquellos sin trastorno de ansiedad, pero los síntomas somáticos no difirieron entre los principales grupos de trastornos de ansiedad. Los niños con trastornos de ansiedad y depresivos comórbidos manifestaron síntomas somáticos más frecuentemente que aquellos sin trastornos comórbidos. Se discuten los resultados en términos de los síntomas somáticos como a criterios dentro del sistema diagnóstico, y b parte del proceso de evitación.

  12. Sources of Writing Anxiety: A Study on French Language Teaching Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslim Yetis, Veda

    2017-01-01

    Conducted on French Language Teaching students, this research aims to determine the causes of writing anxiety. Designed in accordance with the mixed method, a writing anxiety inventory, a language proficiency exam, a retrospective composing-process questionnaire, a writing attitude scale and semi-structured interviews were used. After identifying…

  13. The Effects of CMC Applications on ESL Writing Anxiety among Postgraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussin, Supyan; Abdullah, Mohamad Yahya; Ismail, Noriah; Yoke, Soo Kum

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of the CMC applications on the ESL/EFL writing anxiety. This is a descriptive study using a mixed-method that adopted both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Three instruments were employed to answer the research questions of the current study which are Second Language Writing Anxiety Inventory (SLWAI),…

  14. Effectiveness of a Death-Education Program in Reducing Death Anxiety of Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Noreen; Lally, Terry

    1991-01-01

    Evaluated effectiveness of death education program in reducing death anxiety experienced by 22 junior and senior nursing students. Subjects were pre- and posttested with State Form of State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and viewed film of death experience. Posttest analysis indicated that death education program was effective in decreasing death anxiety…

  15. Reciprocal Relationships between Mathematics Anxiety and Attitude towards Mathematics in Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haciomeroglu, Guney

    2017-01-01

    This current study examined the reciprocal relationship between anxiety and attitude towards mathematics in elementary students. Two instruments (attitudes towards mathematics inventory short form [ATMI-Short Form] and the Revised Fennema-Sherman Mathematics Anxiety Scale [Revised-FSMAS]) were administered to 310 fourth grade elementary students.…

  16. Test Anxiety and Academic Procrastination Among Prelicensure Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, Nicole

    Test anxiety may cause nursing students to cope poorly with academic demands, affecting academic performance and attrition and leading to possible failure on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN®). Test-anxious nursing students may engage academic procrastination as a coping mechanism. The Test Anxiety Inventory and the Procrastination Assessment Scale for Students were administered to 202 prelicensure nursing students from diploma, associate, and baccalaureate nursing programs in southwestern Pennsylvania. Statistically significant correlations between test anxiety and academic procrastination were found. The majority of participants reported procrastinating most on weekly reading assignments. Students with higher grade point averages exhibited less academic procrastination.

  17. EXPLORING THE POTENTIAL BENEFITS OF NATURE BASED EXPERIENCE ON ANXIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana L. Vitalia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study extends the previous research regarding the beneficial impacts of nature experiences on mental and physical health. A provocative exercise was designed to facilitate the sensory contact with natural objects on a group of 30 persons. The level of anxiety was assessed before and after participating in this exercise. We used an experimental design, observation, psychodiagnostic instruments (State – Trait Anxiety Inventory, and statistical methods (Paired-Samples T Test. After the participation in this type of provocative exercise the participants experienced a lower level of state anxiety, decresed levels of irritability, worry and fear.

  18. Fukushima Daiichi Radionuclide Inventories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoni, Jeffrey N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jankovsky, Zachary Kyle [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Radionuclide inventories are generated to permit detailed analyses of the Fukushima Daiichi meltdowns. This is necessary information for severe accident calculations, dose calculations, and source term and consequence analyses. Inventories are calculated using SCALE6 and compared to values predicted by international researchers supporting the OECD/NEA's Benchmark Study on the Accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (BSAF). Both sets of inventory information are acceptable for best-estimate analyses of the Fukushima reactors. Consistent nuclear information for severe accident codes, including radionuclide class masses and core decay powers, are also derived from the SCALE6 analyses. Key nuclide activity ratios are calculated as functions of burnup and nuclear data in order to explore the utility for nuclear forensics and support future decommissioning efforts.

  19. Shortening the Xerostomia Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, William Murray; van der Putten, Gert-Jan; de Baat, Cees; Ikebe, Kazunori; Matsuda, Ken-ichi; Enoki, Kaori; Hopcraft, Matthew; Ling, Guo Y

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To determine the validity and properties of the Summated Xerostomia Inventory-Dutch Version in samples from Australia, The Netherlands, Japan and New Zealand. Study design Six cross-sectional samples of older people from The Netherlands (N = 50), Australia (N = 637 and N = 245), Japan (N = 401) and New Zealand (N = 167 and N = 86). Data were analysed using the Summated Xerostomia Inventory-Dutch Version. Results Almost all data-sets revealed a single extracted factor which explained about half of the variance, with Cronbach’s alpha values of at least 0.70. When mean scale scores were plotted against a “gold standard” xerostomia question, statistically significant gradients were observed, with the highest score seen in those who always had dry mouth, and the lowest in those who never had it. Conclusion The Summated Xerostomia Inventory-Dutch Version is valid for measuring xerostomia symptoms in clinical and epidemiological research. PMID:21684773

  20. The Effect of Dog-Assisted Intervention on Student Well-Being, Mood, and Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajfoner, Dasha; Harte, Emma; Potter, Lauren M; McGuigan, Nicola

    2017-05-05

    This novel, exploratory study investigated the effect of a short, 20 min, dog-assisted intervention on student well-being, mood, and anxiety. One hundred and thirty-two university students were allocated to either an experimental condition or one of two control conditions. Each participant completed the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale (WEMBS), the State Trait Anxiety Scale (STAI), and the UWIST Mood Adjective Checklist (UMACL) both before, and after, the intervention. The participants in the experimental condition interacted with both the dogs and their handlers, whereas the control groups interacted with either the dog only, or the handler only. The analyses revealed a significant difference across conditions for each measure, with those conditions in which a dog was present leading to significant improvements in mood and well-being, as well as a significant reduction in anxiety. Interestingly, the presence of a handler alongside the dog appeared to have a negative, and specific, effect on participant mood, with greater positive shifts in mood being witnessed when participants interacted with the dog alone, than when interacting with both the dog and the handler. These findings show that even a short 20 min session with a therapy dog can be an effective alternative intervention to improve student well-being, anxiety, and mood.

  1. Vacuum-assisted closure of wounds and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Mustafa; Karabekmez, Furkan E; Yilmaz, Erkan; Tosun, Zekeriya; Savaci, Nedim

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the degree of anxiety in patients in whom the vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) of wounds was used. Psychological evaluations were made on the day before VAC was applied and at the 10(th) day of treatment in 20 patients with traumatic wounds of the lower extremity. Anxiety was measured with the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety and with the State Anxiety Inventory test. The same measurements were also made in 20 further patients with similar wounds but managed with classic treatment as controls. Both groups showed a significant increase in anxiety during the 10 days. The mean (SD) differences in the anxiety scores measured during the 10-day period were significantly higher in the group treated by VAC than in the control group, State Anxiety Inventory test (14.0 (2.3) compared with 2.6 (1.2), pVAC is an effective tool for treating lower extremity wounds, we have concerns about possible accompanying psychological effects.

  2. National Inventory Report 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    The report presents an inventory of greenhouse gas emissions and sinks in Norway from 1990 to 2000. Trends in total greenhouse gas emissions by UNFCCC's sources and gases are described for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), tetrafluoromethane (CF{sub 4}), hexafluoroethane (C{sub 2}F{sub 6}), sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) and HFCs. Methodology used in the calculation of emissions from key sources in the Norwegian Emission Inventory are presented. Emissions are reported according to UNFCCC/IPCC common reporting format (CRF) (author)

  3. Difference in anxiety symptoms between children and their parents facing a first seizure or epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Save-Pédebos, Jessica; Bellavoine, Vanina; Goujon, Estelle; Danse, Marion; Merdariu, Dana; Dournaud, Pascal; Auvin, Stéphane

    2014-02-01

    Many studies have shown that anxiety disorders are common in children with epilepsy. We explored symptoms of anxiety simultaneously in children and their parents. We conducted a cross-sectional study using the Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale in children and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Adult in parents. We included 118 parents and 67 children, who were divided into three groups: (1) first seizure, (2) epilepsy, and (3) nonepileptic paroxysmal event. We found that the level of anxiety in parents and children differed. We observed a significant increase in the anxiety level of parents whose children have had a first seizure, while we found a significant increase in the anxiety level of children and adolescents followed for epilepsy. These findings suggest that there is no direct relationship in the anxiety of the parents and their child. Further studies are needed to understand this variation over time. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Competitive state anxiety and performance in young female rhythmic gymnasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsopani, Despoina; Dallas, George; Skordilis, Emmanouil K

    2011-04-01

    The study was designed to examine the competitive state anxiety and self-confidence of rhythmic gymnasts participating in the Greek national competition. 86 participants, ages 11 and 12 years, completed the Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2, 1 hr. before competition. The athletes, classified by performance (high and low performance) and participation in the finals (finalists and nonfinalists), responded to the three subscales: Cognitive Anxiety, Somatic Anxiety, and Self-confidence. Analyses indicated differences in Self-confidence between high versus low performance groups and finalists versus nonfinalists. No significant differences were found on Cognitive and Somatic Anxiety. In a regression analysis, Self-confidence was the only significant predictor of performance for this sample. Implications refer to the development of strategies to enhance self-confidence in order to improve the gymnast's performance during competition.

  5. Adult attachment and anxiety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sara Kerstine Kaya; Lønfeldt, Nicole Nadine; Wolitzky-Taylor, Kate

    2017-01-01

    Although there is substantial evidence for the role of emotion regulation in the etiology and maintenance of anxiety disorders, knowledge about what contributes to emotion dysregulation is sparse. Attachment style is related to emotion regulation and anxiety symptoms, but these variables have...... rarely been examined together. Examining emotion dysregulation within the context of anxiety disorders through an attachment theory framework will lead to a better understanding of the etiology and maintenance of anxiety disorders. In the present study we combined theoretically and empirically derived...... knowledge to examine the mediating role of emotion regulation between attachment dimensions (avoidance and anxiety) and anxiety symptoms....

  6. Depression and anxiety among patients with somatoform disorders, panic disorder, and other depressive/anxiety disorders in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Lieh; Chen, Tzu-Ting; Chen, I-Ming; Ma, Huei-Mei; Lee, Ming-Tzu; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Gau, Shur-Fen

    2016-07-30

    The aim of this study is to compare the severity of depression and anxiety in individuals with somatoform disorders, panic disorder, other depressive/anxiety disorders, and healthy controls in a Han Chinese population. According to the DSM-IV-TR-based diagnostic interviews, we recruited 152 subjects with somatoform disorders (SG), 56 with panic disorder (PG), 85 with other depressive/anxiety disorders (OG), and 179 without any psychiatric disorder (NG). The four groups reported on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) for depressive and anxiety symptoms, respectively. Correlation analysis and multivariate regression analysis were used to determine the effects of demographic factors and psychiatric diagnoses on depressive and anxiety symptoms separately. BDI-II scores were not significantly different in SG, PG, and OG but were higher than NG. SG and PG had the highest BAI scores, whereas NG had the lowest. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed that the associated factors for BDI-II were gender, residential location, somatoform disorders, panic disorder, major depressive disorder (MDD), and generalized anxiety disorder, whereas BAI was significantly associated with somatoform disorders, panic disorder, and MDD. Our results strongly suggest the inclusion of clinical assessment of depressive and anxious symptoms in patients with somatoform disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Influence of Art Making on Anxiety: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandmire, David Alan; Gorham, Sarah Roberts; Rankin, Nancy Elizabeth; Grimm, David Robert

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the psychological effects of art making in a sample of 57 undergraduate students. One week prior to final examinations, participants were randomly assigned to either an art-making group or a control group. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory was administered before and after participation. Art making activities included painting…

  8. Relationship Between the Death Anxiety Scale and Repression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handal, Paul J.

    1975-01-01

    The present study was designed to test further the hypothesis that the Death Anxiety Scale is a valid measure of repression by establishing the relationship between the DAS and Gleser and Ihilevich's Reversal Score, a measure of repression, on the Defense Mechanism Inventory (DMI). (Author)

  9. Handedness and anxiety in normal and clinical populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merckelbach, H.; de Ruiter, C.; Olff, M.

    1989-01-01

    Previous research has yielded inconclusive evidence as to the relationship between handedness and anxiety. In order to further examine this relationship, two studies were carried out. In the first study, university students (N = 167) completed the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory, the Fear

  10. Parental Rearing, Attachment, and Social Anxiety in Chinese Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothander, Pia Risholm; Wang, Mo

    2014-01-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated associations between perceived parental rearing, attachment, and social anxiety. 510 Chinese middle school students, aged 12 to 20 years, completed a set of questionnaires including "Egna Minnen Beträffande Uppfostran" for Children (EMBU-C), Inventory for Parent and Peer Attachment (IPPA) and…

  11. Predictors of anxiety in centenarians: health, economic factors, and loneliness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Oscar; Teixeira, Laetitia; Araújo, Lia; Afonso, Rosa Marina; Pachana, Nancy

    2015-07-01

    Centenarians' psychological well-being is presently of great interest in psychogeriatric research but little is known about factors that specifically account for the presence of clinically relevant anxiety symptoms in this age group. This study examined the presence of anxiety and its predictors in a sample of centenarians and aims to contribute to a better understanding of anxiety determinants in extreme old age. We examined how socio-demographic, health, functional, and social factors contribute to the presence of clinically significant anxiety symptoms in centenarians recruited from two Portuguese centenarian studies. The Geriatric Anxiety Inventory - Short Form (GAI-SF) was used to assess anxiety symptoms. A total of 97 centenarians (mean age 101.1 years; SD = 1.5 years; range = 100-108) with no/minor cognitive impairment were included. Clinically significant anxiety symptoms (GAI-SF ≥3) were present in 45.4% (n = 44) of the sample. Main predictive factors included worse health perception, higher number of medical conditions, financial concerns related to medical expenses (income inadequacy) and loneliness. Results suggest that along with health status (subjective and objective), income inadequacy related to medical expenses and feeling lonely may predispose centenarians to clinically significant anxiety and be important to their overall well-being. Further research is needed on the repercussions of clinical anxiety in centenarians' quality of life and on co-morbid conditions (e.g. depression) at such advanced ages.

  12. Study on Writing Anxiety among Iranian EFL Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghmeh Jebreil

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article aimed at investigating the level of writing anxiety of the Iranian EFL students with different proficiency levels. To do so, 45 students (elementary, intermediate, and advanced learners studying in Azad University of Ilam, Iran were selected based on random sampling. Second, Language Writing Anxiety Inventory SLWAI (Cheng, 2004 was used to measure anxiety.  Both descriptive and inferential statistics including One-way ANOVA were run to analyze the data. Statistical analysis was conducted using Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS. The results of the study indicated that the selected Iranian EFL students majoring in English language teaching experienced a high level of anxiety. In addition, students with elementary level were found to suffer higher level of English writing anxiety than the students with intermediate and advanced levels. Finally, based on the findings, cognitive anxiety was the most common type of anxiety, followed by somatic anxiety, and avoidance behavior. The results also highlighted the fact that foreign and second language teachers should be cautious of the dangers of  anxiety  and try  to  make  the  atmosphere  of  class  as  stress-free  as possible  in  order  to  improve  students’ performance.

  13. Purchasing and inventory management techniques for optimizing inventory investment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarlane, I.; Gehshan, T.

    1993-01-01

    In an effort to reduce operations and maintenance costs among nuclear plants, many utilities are taking a closer look at their inventory investment. Various approaches for inventory reduction have been used and discussed, but these approaches are often limited to an inventory management perspective. Interaction with purchasing and planning personnel to reduce inventory investment is a necessity in utility efforts to become more cost competitive. This paper addresses the activities that purchasing and inventory management personnel should conduct in an effort to optimize inventory investment while maintaining service-level goals. Other functions within a materials management organization, such as the warehousing and investment recovery functions, can contribute to optimizing inventory investment. However, these are not addressed in this paper because their contributions often come after inventory management and purchasing decisions have been made

  14. Inventory order crossovers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riezebos, J.

    2006-01-01

    The control policies that are used in inventory management systems assume that orders arrive in the same sequence as they were ordered. Due to changes in supply chains and markets, this assumption is no longer valid. This paper aims at providing an improved understanding of the phenomenon of order

  15. Single Item Inventory Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Bazsa-Oldenkamp; P. den Iseger

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThis paper extends a fundamental result about single-item inventory systems. This approach allows more general performance measures, demand processes and order policies, and leads to easier analysis and implementation, than prior research. We obtain closed form expressions for the

  16. Marine Education Knowledge Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hounshell, Paul B.; Hampton, Carolyn

    This 35-item, multiple-choice Marine Education Knowledge Inventory was developed for use in upper elementary/middle schools to measure a student's knowledge of marine science. Content of test items is drawn from oceanography, ecology, earth science, navigation, and the biological sciences (focusing on marine animals). Steps in the construction of…

  17. THE PRESCHOOL INVENTORY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CALDWELL, BETTYE M.; SOULE, DONALD

    THE PRESCHOOL INVENTORY BEGAN AS AN ANSWER TO THE NEED FOR SOME TYPE OF INSTRUMENT THAT WOULD PROVIDE AN INDICATION OF HOW MUCH A DISADVANTAGED CHILD, PRIOR TO HIS INTRODUCTION TO HEAD START, HAD ACHIEVED IN AREAS REGARDED AS NECESSARY FOUNDATIONS FOR SUBSEQUENT SUCCESS IN SCHOOL. MEASURING BASIC INTELLIGENCE WAS NOT THE GOAL. RATHER, THE…

  18. Rapid inventory taking system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, P.S.S.F.

    1980-01-01

    A data processing system designed to facilitate inventory taking is described. The process depends upon the earliest possible application of computer techniques and the elimination of manual operations. Data is recorded in optical character recognition (OCR) 'A' form and read by a hand held wand reader. Limited validation checks are applied before recording on mini-tape cassettes. 5 refs

  19. Calculating Optimal Inventory Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruby Perez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the project is to find the optimal value for the Economic Order Quantity Model and then use a lean manufacturing Kanban equation to find a numeric value that will minimize the total cost and the inventory size.

  20. Perishable Inventory Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Cecilie Maria; Nguyen, Vivi Thuy; Hvolby, Hans-Henrik

    2012-01-01

    The paper investigates how inventory control of perishable items is managed and line up some possible options of improvement. This includes a review of relevant literature dealing with the challenges of determining ordering policies for perishable products and a study of how the current procedures...

  1. Experimental inventory verification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steverson, C.A.; Angerman, M.I.

    1991-01-01

    As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) goals and Department of Energy (DOE) inventory requirements are frequently in conflict at facilities across the DOE complex. The authors wish, on one hand, to verify the presence of correct amounts of nuclear materials that are in storage or in process; yet on the other hand, we wish to achieve ALARA goals by keeping individual and collective exposures as low as social, technical, economic, practical, and public policy considerations permit. The Experimental Inventory Verification System (EIVSystem) is a computer-based, camera-driven system that utilizes image processing technology to detect change in vault areas. Currently in the test and evaluation phase at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this system guards personnel. The EIVSystem continually monitors the vault, providing proof of changed status for objects sorted within the vault. This paper reports that these data could provide the basis for reducing inventory requirements when no change has occurred, thus helping implement ALARA policy; the data will also help describe there target area of an inventory when change has been shown to occur

  2. Initial Radionuclide Inventories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Miller

    2004-09-19

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide an initial radionuclide inventory (in grams per waste package) and associated uncertainty distributions for use in the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) in support of the license application for the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This document is intended for use in postclosure analysis only. Bounding waste stream information and data were collected that capture probable limits. For commercially generated waste, this analysis considers alternative waste stream projections to bound the characteristics of wastes likely to be encountered using arrival scenarios that potentially impact the commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste stream. For TSPA-LA, this radionuclide inventory analysis considers U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) high-level radioactive waste (DHLW) glass and two types of spent nuclear fuel (SNF): CSNF and DOE-owned (DSNF). These wastes are placed in two groups of waste packages: the CSNF waste package and the codisposal waste package (CDSP), which are designated to contain DHLW glass and DSNF, or DHLW glass only. The radionuclide inventory for naval SNF is provided separately in the classified ''Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Technical Support Document'' for the License Application. As noted previously, the radionuclide inventory data presented here is intended only for TSPA-LA postclosure calculations. It is not applicable to preclosure safety calculations. Safe storage, transportation, and ultimate disposal of these wastes require safety analyses to support the design and licensing of repository equipment and facilities. These analyses will require radionuclide inventories to represent the radioactive source term that must be accommodated during handling, storage and disposition of these wastes. This analysis uses the best available information to identify the radionuclide inventory that is expected at the last year of last emplacement

  3. Nuclear anxiety: a test-construction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunstein, A.L.

    1986-01-01

    The Nuclear Anxiety Scale was administered to 263 undergraduate and graduate studies (on eight occasions in December, 1985 and January, 1986). (1) The obtained alpha coefficient was .91. This was significant at the .01 level, and demonstrated that the scale was internally homogeneous and consistent. (2) Item discrimination indices (point biserial correlation coefficients) computered for the thirty (30) items yielded a range of .25 to .64. All coefficients were significant at the .01 level, and all 30 items were retained as demonstrating significant discriminability. (3) The correlation between two administrations of the scale (with a 48-hour interval) was .83. This was significant at the .01 level, and demonstrated test-retest reliability and stability over time. (4) The point-biserial correlation coefficient between scores on the Nuclear Anxiety Scale, and the students' self-report of nuclear anxiety as being either a high or low ranked stressor, was .59. This was significant at the .01 level, and demonstrated concurrent validity. (5) The correlation coefficient between scores on the Nuclear Anxiety Scale and the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, A-Trait, (1970), was .41. This was significant at the .01 level, and demonstrated convergent validity. (6) The correlation coefficient between positively stated and negatively stated items (with scoring reversed) was .76. This was significant at the .01 level, and demonstrated freedom from response set bias

  4. Separation anxiety in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001542.htm Separation anxiety in children To use the sharing features on this page, ... to test their independence. To get over separation anxiety, children need to: Feel safe in their home. Trust ...

  5. Illness anxiety disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001236.htm Illness anxiety disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Illness anxiety disorder (IAD) is a preoccupation that physical symptoms are ...

  6. スポーツ選手の競技不安の解消に関する研究(2) : バイオフィードバック・トレーニングによる特性不安への影響について

    OpenAIRE

    橋本, 公雄; 徳永, 幹雄; 多々納, 秀雄; 金崎, 良三

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the effect on trait anxiety using biofeedback training by Galvanic Skin Resistance (GSR) and Skin Temperature. 15 males and 2 females as nonathletes, and a baseball player from Fukuoka Institute of Technology were took part in this training as subjects, and were trained for about two months in 1986. As the instruments to assess the trait anxiety levels, Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Martens' Sport Competition Anxiety Test (SCAT) an...

  7. Sleep and anxiety disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Staner, Luc

    2003-01-01

    Sleep disturbances-particularly insomnia - are highly prevalent in anxiety disorders and complaints such as insomnia or nightmares have even been incorporated in some anxiety disorder definitions, such as generalized anxiety disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. In the first part of this review, the relationship between sleep and anxiety is discussed in terms of adaptive response to stress. Recent studies suggested that the corticotropin-releasing hormone system and the locus ceruleus-a...

  8. The Portuguese language version of social phobia and Anxiety Inventory: analysis of items and internal consistency in a Brazilian sample of 1,014 undergraduate students Versão para o português do Inventário de Fobia Social e Ansiedade: análise de itens e consistência interna numa amostra de 1.014 estudantes universitários brasileiros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Picon

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Theoretical and empirical analysis of items and internal consistency of the Portuguese-language version of Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI-Portuguese. METHODS: Social phobia experts conducted a 45-item content analysis of the SPAI-Portuguese administered to a sample of 1,014 university students. Item discrimination was evaluated by Student's t test; interitem, mean and item-to-total correlations, by Pearson coefficient; reliability was estimated by Cronbach's alpha. RESULTS: There was 100% agreement among experts concerning the 45 items. On the SPAI-Portuguese 43 items were discriminative (p OBJETIVO: Análise teórica e empírica dos itens e da consistência interna da versão em português do Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI-Português e subescalas. MÉTODOS: Peritos em fobia social conduziram análise de conteúdo dos 45 itens do SPAI-Português, administrado a 1.014 estudantes universitários. A discriminação dos itens foi avaliada por teste t de Student; correlações interitens, médias e item/total por coeficientes de Pearson; fidedignidade pelo alfa de Cronbach. RESULTADOS: Concordância plena entre os peritos para os 45 itens. SPAI-Português com 43 itens discriminativos (p < 0,05. Alguns itens, entre as subescalas, apresentaram coeficientes abaixo de 0,2. As médias das correlações interitens foram: 0,41 na subescala fobia social; 0,32 na subescala agorafobia; e 0,32 no SPAI-Português. As correlações item/total foram maiores do que 0,3 (p < 0,001. Alfas de Cronbach foram: 0,95 no SPAI-Português; 0,96 na subescala de fobia social; 0,85 na subescala de agorafobia. CONCLUSÃO: O conteúdo dos itens foi relacionado aos constructos subjacentes (agorafobia e fobia social, com discriminabilidade de 43 itens do SPAI-Português. As correlações médias interitens e alfas revelaram consistência interna de SPAI-Português e subescalas, além de multidimensionalidade das mesmas. Nenhum item foi suprimido

  9. The role of maternal anxiety in the early postpartum period: screening for anxiety and depressive symptomatology in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giakoumaki, O; Vasilaki, K; Lili, L; Skouroliakou, M; Liosis, G

    2009-03-01

    From birth to the first year postpartum, there is a critical period for the development of affective disorders. Maternal anxiety has received little attention even though it is associated with a number of adverse outcomes. Symptoms of anxiety often comorbid with depression and pertain a significant role in the maintenance of postpartum distress. The purpose of this study is to assess anxiety and depressive symptomatology in a Greek population and to examine their relationship. This study investigated the demographic and socio-psychological factors that are associated with the onset of the symptoms of postpartum distress. The study was conducted at the perinatal hospital Elena Venizelou in Greece. Two hundred thirty-five mothers met the inclusion criteria and participated in the study. The state-trait inventory was administered to screen symptoms of anxiety. It incorporates the state subscale that measures symptoms of temporal anxiety, and trait subscale that measures personality predisposition to anxiety. The Edinburgh postpartum depression scale (EPDS) inventory was administered to screen for symptoms of depression. The first assessment was conducted in 2-3 days after labor and the follow-up assessment was conducted in 3 months postpartum by telephone. A standard survey questionnaire was used for the purposes of collecting the demographic data. Symptoms of postpartum depression had 14.5% of mothers on the first screening and 4.6% at the follow-up (EPDS >or= 14). State anxiety symptoms were manifested by 22.9% of the sample on the first screening and 12.6% at the follow-up. Trait anxiety symptoms exhibited 24.6% of the sample on the first screening and 14.3% at the follow-up. There was comorbidity between the symptoms of anxiety and depression. The comorbidity was evident even when the anxiety subscale of the EPDS was removed. State anxiety was correlated with primiparity, admission to the NICU and negative experience of labor. Trait anxiety was correlated with the

  10. Comprehensive analysis of patient and caregiver predictors for caregiver burden, anxiety and depression in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Qing; Liu, Shuling; Huo, Ya Ruth; Liu, Mengyuan; Liu, Shuai; Ji, Yong

    2015-09-01

    The primary aim of this study was to examine the correlations between patient and caregiver characteristics with caregiver burden, anxiety and depression in Alzheimer's Disease. Secondary aim was to determine which behavioural and psychological symptoms had the greatest impact on caregiver burden, anxiety and depression in Alzheimer's Disease. Caregivers of individuals with Alzheimer's Disease experience high levels of burden, both psychologically and physically. Previous studies have examined caregiver burden, anxiety and depression separately. However, no paper has examined these three psychological conditions simultaneously. A cross-sectional design. A total of 310 patients with probable Alzheimer's Disease and their primary caregivers were assessed. Cognitive impairment and neuropsychiatric symptoms were assessed with the Mini Mental State Examination, Montreal Cognitive Assessment, Clock Drawing Test and Neuropsychiatric Inventory, respectively. Caregiver burden, anxiety and depression were assessed with the ZBI, Generalised Anxiety Disorder Scale-7 and Patient Health Questionnaire-9, respectively. All 12 neuropsychiatric symptoms in the Neuropsychiatric Inventory were significantly correlated with caregiver burden, anxiety and depression, with the top three neuropsychiatric predictors being depression, apathy and anxiety. Furthermore, higher levels of caregiver anxiety were associated with a longer duration of being a caregiver. Within caregivers, higher levels of depression were independently associated with higher numbers of additional caregivers, lower educational background and being the spouse of the patient. Higher levels of burden were associated with a longer duration of being a caregiver and being the spouse of the patient. Caregiver burden, anxiety or depression were not significantly correlated with hours/day of caring for the patient. Caregiver burden, anxiety and depression were significantly correlated with different neuropsychiatric symptoms in

  11. Denmark's National Inventory Report 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole-Kenneth; Lyck, Erik; Mikkelsen, Mette Hjorth

    2010-01-01

    This report is Denmark's National Inventory Report 2010. The report contains information on Denmark's emission inventories for all years' from 1990 to 2008 for CO2, CH4, N2O, HFCs, PFCs and SF6, NOx, CO, NMVOC, SO2.......This report is Denmark's National Inventory Report 2010. The report contains information on Denmark's emission inventories for all years' from 1990 to 2008 for CO2, CH4, N2O, HFCs, PFCs and SF6, NOx, CO, NMVOC, SO2....

  12. Anxiety and stress in mothers of food-allergic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Gar-Yen; Patel, Nisha; Umasunthar, Thisanayagam; Gore, Claudia; Warner, John O; Hanna, Heather; Phillips, Katherine; Zaki, Amirah Mohd; Hodes, Matthew; Boyle, Robert J

    2014-05-01

    Previous reports suggest that parents especially mothers of food-allergic children may have increased anxiety. Studies with an appropriate control group have not been undertaken, and the determinants of such anxiety are not known. We compared measures of anxiety and stress in mothers of food-allergic children and atopic non-food-allergic children, with anxiety and stress in mothers of children with no chronic illness. Cross-sectional study of mothers attending a hospital appointment for their 8- to 16-year-old child. Mothers of children with food allergy, asthma but no food allergy or no chronic illness completed questionnaires including State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Perceived Stress Scale and measures of anxiety and psychologic adjustment in their child. Forty mothers of food-allergic children, 18 mothers of asthmatic children without food allergy and 38 mothers of children with no chronic illness (controls) were recruited. Mothers of food-allergic children showed increased state anxiety – median anxiety score 38.0 (IQR 30.0, 44.0) food allergy, 27.0 (22.0, 40.0) control p = 0.012; and increased stress – median stress score 18.5 (12.0, 22.0) food allergy, 14.0 (7.5, 19.5)control p = 0.035. No significant differences were seen between mothers in the asthmatic group and controls. In multivariate analysis, previous food anaphylaxis(p = 0.008) and poorly controlled asthma (p = 0.004) were associated with increased maternal anxiety. Child anxiety and adjustment did not differ between food-allergic and control groups. Mothers of food-allergic children have increased anxiety and stress compared with mothers of children with no chronic illness. Anaphylaxis and poorly controlled asthma are associated with maternal anxiety.

  13. Anxiety in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciberras, Emma; Lycett, Kate; Efron, Daryl; Mensah, Fiona; Gerner, Bibi; Hiscock, Harriet

    2014-05-01

    Although anxiety is common in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), it is unclear how anxiety influences the lives of these children. This study examined the association between anxiety comorbidities and functioning by comparing children with ADHD and no, 1, or ≥2 anxiety comorbidities. Differential associations were examined by current ADHD presentation (subtype). Children with diagnostically confirmed ADHD (N = 392; 5-13 years) were recruited via 21 pediatrician practices across Victoria, Australia. Anxiety was assessed by using the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for Children-IV. Functional measures included parent-reported: quality of life (QoL; Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0), behavior and peer problems (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire), daily functioning (Daily Parent Rating of Evening and Morning Behavior), and school attendance. Teacher-reported behavior and peer problems (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire) were also examined. Linear and logistic regression controlled for ADHD severity, medication use, comorbidities, and demographic factors. Children with ≥2 anxiety comorbidities (n = 143; 39%) had poorer QoL (effect size: -0.8) and more difficulties with behavior (effect size: 0.4) and daily functioning (effect size: 0.3) than children without anxiety (n = 132; 36%). Poorer functioning was not observed for children with 1 anxiety comorbidity (n = 95; 26%). Two or more anxiety comorbidities were associated with poorer functioning for children with both ADHD-Inattentive and ADHD-Combined presentation. Children with ADHD demonstrate poorer QoL, daily functioning and behavior when ≥2 anxiety comorbidities are present. Future research should examine whether treating anxiety in children with ADHD improves functional outcomes. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  14. Effect of music on pain, anxiety, and patient satisfaction in patients who present to the emergency department in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlar Kilic, Serap; Karadag, Gulendam; Oyucu, Serpil; Kale, Ozlem; Zengin, Suat; Ozdemir, Emine; Korhan, Esra Akin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of music therapy on pain, anxiety, and patient satisfaction in patients who present to the emergency department in Turkey. This controlled and experimental study was conducted in the emergency department of a hospital in Turkey between July and October 2012. The study sample consisted of 200 patients in total, 100 forming the intervention group and 100 being the control group, who fell under color code green in the triage system and came with complaints of pain due to nausea/vomiting and diarrhea, abdominal pain, headaches, and joint pain. A questionnaire, the State Anxiety Scale, and the Visual Analog Scale to measure the patients' level of pain were used in the study. The questionnaires of the intervention group were administered after playing the music. When the intervention and control groups were compared, it was observed that there was a significant decrease in the VASP and STAI-S scores in favor of the intervention group. It was observed that 21.0% of the patients in the intervention group were very pleased to hear music in the emergency department, 58% of them were moderately or at least a little pleased, and 21.0% were not pleased at all. The results showed that music therapy had a positive effect in terms of reducing the severity of pain and the level of anxiety in patients, that only a very small portion of the patients were not pleased to listen to music in the emergency department. © 2014 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2014 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  15. The effects of acute and elective cardiac surgery on the anxiety traits of patients with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benke, Kálmán; Ágg, Bence; Pólos, Miklós; Sayour, Alex Ali; Radovits, Tamás; Bartha, Elektra; Nagy, Péter; Rákóczi, Balázs; Koller, Ákos; Szokolai, Viola; Hedberg, Julianna; Merkely, Béla; Nagy, Zsolt B; Szabolcs, Zoltán

    2017-07-17

    Marfan syndrome is a genetic disease, presenting with dysfunction of connective tissues leading to lesions in the cardiovascular and skeletal muscle system. Within these symptoms, the most typical is weakness of the connective tissue in the aorta, manifesting as aortic dilatation (aneurysm). This could, in turn, become annuloaortic ectasia, or life-threatening dissection. As a result, life-saving and preventative cardiac surgical interventions are frequent among Marfan syndrome patients. Aortic aneurysm could turn into annuloaortic ectasia or life-threatening dissection, thus life-saving and preventive cardiac surgical interventions are frequent among patients with Marfan syndrome. We hypothesized that patients with Marfan syndrome have different level of anxiety, depression and satisfaction with life compared to that of the non-clinical patient population. Patients diagnosed with Marfan syndrome were divided into 3 groups: those scheduled for prophylactic surgery, those needing acute surgery, and those without need for surgery (n = 9, 19, 17, respectively). To examine the psychological features of the patients, Spielberger's anxiety (STAI) test, Beck's Depression questionnaire (BDI), the Berne Questionnaire of Subjective Well-being, and the Satisfaction with Life scale were applied. A significant difference was found in trait anxiety between healthy individuals and patients with Marfan syndrome after acute life-saving surgery (p Marfan syndrome patients was 48.56 (standard deviation (SD): 5.8) as compared to the STAI population mean score of 43.72 (SD: 8.53). No difference was found between groups on the BDI (p > 0.1). Finally, a significant, medium size effect was found between patient groups on the Joy in Living scale (F (2.39) = 3.51, p = 0.040, η 2  = 0.15). Involving psychiatric and mental-health care, in addition to existing surgical treatment interventions, is essential for more successful recovery of patients with Marfan syndrome.

  16. Inventory Control System by Using Vendor Managed Inventory (VMI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabila, Alzena Dona; Mustafid; Suryono

    2018-02-01

    The inventory control system has a strategic role for the business in managing inventory operations. Management of conventional inventory creates problems in the stock of goods that often runs into vacancies and excess goods at the retail level. This study aims to build inventory control system that can maintain the stability of goods availability at the retail level. The implementation of Vendor Managed Inventory (VMI) method on inventory control system provides transparency of sales data and inventory of goods at retailer level to supplier. Inventory control is performed by calculating safety stock and reorder point of goods based on sales data received by the system. Rule-based reasoning is provided on the system to facilitate the monitoring of inventory status information, thereby helping the process of inventory updates appropriately. Utilization of SMS technology is also considered as a medium of collecting sales data in real-time due to the ease of use. The results of this study indicate that inventory control using VMI ensures the availability of goods ± 70% and can reduce the accumulation of goods ± 30% at the retail level.

  17. National Biological Monitoring Inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    The National Biological Monitoring Inventory, initiated in 1975, currently consists of four computerized data bases and voluminous manual files. MAIN BIOMON contains detailed information on 1,021 projects, while MINI BIOMON provides skeletal data for over 3,000 projects in the 50 states, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, plus a few in Canada and Mexico. BIBLIO BIOMON and DIRECTORY BIOMON complete the computerized data bases. The structure of the system provides for on-line search capabilities to generate details of agency sponsorship, indications of funding levels, taxonomic and geographic coverage, length of program life, managerial focus or emphasis, and condition of the data. Examples of each of these are discussed and illustrated, and potential use of the Inventory in a variety of situations is emphasized

  18. Life Cycle Inventory Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Anders; Moltesen, Andreas; Laurent, Alexis

    2017-01-01

    The inventory analysis is the third and often most time-consuming part of an LCA. The analysis is guided by the goal and scope definition, and its core activity is the collection and compilation of data on elementary flows from all processes in the studied product system(s) drawing on a combination...... of different sources. The output is a compiled inventory of elementary flows that is used as basis of the subsequent life cycle impact assessment phase. This chapter teaches how to carry out this task through six steps: (1) identifying processes for the LCI model of the product system; (2) planning...... and collecting data; (3) constructing and quality checking unit processes; (4) constructing LCI model and calculating LCI results; (5) preparing the basis for uncertainty management and sensitivity analysis; and (6) reporting....

  19. Relationship between anxiety, anxiety sensitivity and conduct disorder symptoms in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgiç, Ayhan; Türkoğlu, Serhat; Ozcan, Ozlem; Tufan, Ali Evren; Yılmaz, Savaş; Yüksel, Tuğba

    2013-09-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is often comorbid with anxiety disorders and previous studies observed that anxiety could have an impact on the clinical course of ADHD and comorbid disruptive behavioral disorders (conduct disorders and oppositional-defiant disorders). Anxiety sensitivity (AS) is a different concept from anxiety per se and it is believed to represent the constitutionally based sensitivity of individuals to anxiety and anxiety symptoms. We aimed to assess the associations between anxiety, AS and symptoms of disruptive behavioral disorders (DBD) in a clinical sample of children and adolescents with ADHD. The sample consisted of 274 treatment naive children with ADHD aged 8-17 years. The severity of ADHD symptoms and comorbid DBD were assessed via parent rated Turgay DSM-IV-Based Child and Adolescent Behavioral Disorders Screening and Rating Scale (T-DSM-IV-S), Conners' Parent Rating Scale (CPRS), and Conners' Teacher Rating Scale (CTRS). AS and severity of anxiety symptoms of children were evaluated by self-report inventories. The association between anxiety, AS, and DBD was evaluated using structural equation modeling. Analyses revealed that AS social subscale scores negatively predicted symptoms of conduct disorder (CD) reported in T-DSM-IV-S. On the other hand, CD symptoms positively predicted severity of anxiety. No direct relationships were detected between anxiety, AS and oppositional-defiant behavior scores in any scales. These results may suggest a protective effect of AS social area on the development of conduct disorder in the presence of a diagnosis of ADHD, while the presence of symptoms of CD may be a vulnerability factor for the development of anxiety symptoms in children and adolescents with ADHD.

  20. Religiosity prevalence and its association with depression and anxiety symptoms among Hispanic/Latino adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shir Lerman

    Full Text Available Religion plays an important role in the lives of people in the United States. We examined the prevalence of religiosity among Hispanic/Latinos in four regions of the United States and looked at its correlation to depression and anxiety symptoms.The population-based Hispanic Community Health Study/ Study of Latinos enrolled a cohort of Hispanic/Latino adults (N = 16,415 ages 18-74 in four US cities from June 2008 to June 2011. Participants with complete data on religiosity (i.e., religious affiliation, frequency of attending religious activities and importance of religion, depression (assessed with the CESD-10, and trait anxiety (assessed with the STAI-10 were included in the present study. Distribution of religiosity is described by sociodemographic characteristics. Associations between religiosity with depression and anxiety were examined with logistic regression models controlling for sex, age group, education, Hispanic/Latino background, clinical center, and nativity.The majority of the population (89.5% reported having a religious affiliation. Weekly attendance at religious activities was reported by 41.6% of participants, while 20.6% did not attend any religious activities. Religion was very important to 63.9% and not at all important to 6.7% of the population. The CES-D scores and trait anxiety scores were not significantly related in the overall group to frequency of attending religious activity or perceived importance of religion. However, in age-stratified analyses, among older individuals (65+ years old reporting "never" participating in religious activities compared to more than once per week was associated with an 80% higher likelihood of having high depressive symptomatology. Similarly, in the older age group, no religious affiliation or reporting that religion is "not at all important" was associated with greater anxiety symptomatology.Religiosity varied by Hispanic/Latino background. Lack of religiosity was associated with

  1. Psychometric Evaluation of the Social Phobia Inventory and the Mini-Social Phobia Inventory in a Swedish University Student Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mörtberg, Ewa; Jansson Fröjmark, Markus

    2018-01-01

    Social anxiety is common in the general population, as well as among students in higher education. For screening of social anxiety, there is a need for brief scales. In the present study, the psychometric properties were examined in a Swedish version of the Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN) and the Mini-Social Phobia Inventory (Mini-SPIN) in a university student sample ( n = 161). In addition to the SPIN and Mini-SPIN, participants completed measures of fear of public speaking, general anxiety, depression, and quality of life. Exploratory factor analyses were used to investigate the underlying dimensions of the SPIN, and reliability, convergent, and divergent validity of SPIN and Mini-SPIN were examined by Cronbach's alpha and correlation analyses. It was found that a shorter eight-item version of the SPIN was associated with two solid factors ( fear and avoidance of social interaction and fear and avoidance of criticism), and acceptable internal consistency, convergent, and divergent validity. In addition, the Mini-SPIN was associated with satisfactory convergent validity, but the reliability was not acceptable. It is concluded that the SPIN-8 is a viable screening tool for social anxiety in a university student population.

  2. Resolving inventory differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, J.H.; Clark, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    Determining the cause of an inventory difference (ID) that exceeds warning or alarm limits should not only involve investigation into measurement methods and reexamination of the model assumptions used in the calculation of the limits, but also result in corrective actions that improve the quality of the accountability measurements. An example illustrating methods used by Savannah River Site (SRS) personnel to resolve an ID is presented that may be useful to other facilities faced with a similar problem. After first determining that no theft or diversion of material occurred and correcting any accountability calculation errors, investigation into the IDs focused on volume and analytical measurements, limit of error of inventory difference (LEID) modeling assumptions, and changes in the measurement procedures and methods prior to the alarm. There had been a gradual gain trend in IDs prior to the alarm which was reversed by the alarm inventory. The majority of the NM in the facility was stored in four large tanks which helped identify causes for the alarm. The investigation, while indicating no diversion or theft, resulted in changes in the analytical method and in improvements in the measurement and accountability that produced a 67% improvement in the LEID

  3. Reliability of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI Portuguese version in a heterogeneous sample of Brazilian university students Fidedignidade da versão em português do Inventário de Ansiedade e Fobia Social (SPAI em amostra heterogênea de estudantes universitários brasileiros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Picon

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate internal consistency and temporal stability trough test re-test reliability of the Portuguese version of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI in a heterogeneous Brazilian sample. METHODS: After informed consent, the translated and adapted version of the SPAI Portuguese was tested and re-tested at a 14-day interval in a sample of 225 university students, both genders, from 4 different undergraduate courses. After double data entry, statistical analysis included Cronbach's alphas, Pearson and intra-class correlation coefficients. RESULTS: The studied sample consisted of 213 students from 4 sub-samples: 95 law students, 31 social communication students, 54 civil engineering students and 33 dental medicine students. The mean age was 23 (±6 years and 110 (51.6% were female. The Cronbach' alpha was 0.96, no difference for both genders. The differential (total score of the SPAI Portuguese showed Pearson coefficient 0.83 (95% CI 0.78-0.87 and Intra-class coefficient 0.83 (95% CI 0.78-0.86. There was no statistical difference in Pearson coefficients between genders (p = 0.121 and the 4 sub-samples (p = 0.258. CONCLUSION: The results do not ensure validity, however, the SPAI Portuguese version presented a good content homogeneity with satisfactory level of internal consistency. The temporal stability evaluated was substantial. The results showed that the Portuguese SPAI presents perfectly acceptable reliability for both genders and suggest that it can be used in Brazilian populationsOBJETIVO: Avaliar consistência interna e estabilidade temporal, através de fidedignidade teste-reteste, da versão em português do Inventário de Ansiedade e Fobia Social (SPAI, em uma amostra brasileira heterogênea. MÉTODOS: Após consentimento informado, a versão traduzida e adaptada para o português do SPAI foi testada e re-testada, com 14 dias de intervalo, em uma amostra de 225 estudantes universitários de ambos os gêneros, de

  4. Procedure for taking physical inventories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boston, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Physical inventories are taken periodically to meet Company, State and IAEA requirements. Those physical inventories may be verified by IAEA and/or State inspectors. This presentation describes in an introductory but detailed manner the approaches and procedures used in planning, preparing, conducting, reconciling and reporting physical inventories for the Model Plant. Physical inventories are taken for plant accounting purposes to provide an accurate basis for starting and closing the plant material balance. Physical inventories are also taken for safeguards purposes to provide positive assurance that the nuclear materials of concern are indeed present and accounted for

  5. Pre-operative anxiety. Effect of early or late position on the operating list.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, N; Bajaj, A; Pershad, D; Yaddanapudi, L N; Chari, P

    1996-04-01

    The influence of the relative position on the operating list on pre-operative anxiety was studied in 60 adult female ASA 1 patients undergoing major surgery. Thirty patients were placed first on the operating list (group 1) and 30 were given a time 4-5 h later (group 2). Each patient was visited on the evening prior to surgery and again on the morning of surgery. Anxiety was measured at each visit by objective criteria and part 1 of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory questionnaire. The pulse rate, systolic blood pressure and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory questionnaire scores were higher on the second visit than on the first (p patients. This increase was greater in group 2 than in group 1 (p < 0.05). The evening anxiety scores were not correlated with those on the morning visit and could not predict them.

  6. Change of anxiety in patients undergoing coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zuo; Wu Zonggui; Wang Yongmei

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the change of anxiety in patients undergoing coronary angiography. Methods: The Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory was carried out in hundred and forty five patients, 104 men, 41 women, mean age (63 ± 9) years, before and after the coronary angiography procedure respectively. Results: The state anxiety score after the procedure was significantly decreased from 35.8 ± 10.2 to 31.7 ± 9.9 (P<0.01). The trait anxiety score after the procedure was slighytly lowered from 35.7 ± 8.8 to 34.4 ± 9.4 (P=0.019). Sub- group analysis showed that the state anxiety score in 55 patients with normal coronary artery was markedly decreased from 37.5 ± 10.5 to 28.8 ± 8.2 (P<0.01) while the state anxiety score in 90 patients with abnormal coronary artery was unchanged. The score in those patients with abnormal coronary artery was much higher than that of patients with normal coronary artery (33.5 ± 10.4 vs 28.8 ± 8.2, P<0.01). The trait anxiety scores in both group were not changed. Conclusion: Good news about normal coronary artery after angiography may reduce the anxiety in patients suspected of coronary heart disease. (authors)

  7. Behavioral symptoms and sleep problems in children with anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwadare, Yoshitaka; Kamei, Yuichi; Usami, Masahide; Ushijima, Hirokage; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Kyota; Kodaira, Masaki; Saito, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-01

    Sleep disorders are frequently associated with childhood behavioral problems and mental illnesses such as anxiety disorder. To identify promising behavioral targets for pediatric anxiety disorder therapy, we investigated the associations between specific sleep and behavioral problems. We conducted retrospective reviews of 105 patients aged 4-12 years who met the DSM-IV criteria for primary diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder (n = 33), separation anxiety disorder (n = 23), social phobia (n = 21), or obsessive compulsive disorder (n = 28). Sleep problems were evaluated using the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ) and behavioral problems by the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale, Oppositional Defiant Behavior Inventory (ODBI), and Depression Self-Rating Scale for Children. Depressive behavior was weakly correlated with CSHQ subscores for sleep onset delay and night waking but not with total sleep disturbance. Anxiety was correlated with bedtime resistance, night waking, and total sleep disturbance score. Oppositional defiance was correlated with bedtime resistance, daytime sleepiness, sleep onset delay, and most strongly with total sleep disturbance. On multiple regression analysis ODBI score had the strongest positive association with total sleep disturbance and the strongest negative association with total sleep duration. Sleep problems in children with anxiety disorders are closely related to anxiety and oppositional defiant symptoms. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  8. Factors associated with social interaction anxiety among Chinese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Z W; Lam, L T; Jin, J

    2011-12-01

    To investigate potential risk factors for social anxiety, particularly social interaction anxiety among the Chinese adolescents. A cross-sectional health survey was conducted in Guangzhou city of the Guangdong Province where high school students aged 13 to 18 years were recruited. The sample was selected from all high schools in the city using a 2-stage random cluster sampling technique. Social interaction anxiety was assessed using the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale. Information collected in the survey included: demographics, self-perception on school performance, relationship with teachers and peers, satisfaction with self-image, achievements, and parenting style of the mother. The parent-child relationship, specifically the relationship between respondents and their mothers, was assessed using the mother attachment subscale of the Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment. Self-esteem was assessed using the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. The multiple linear regression technique was applied to investigate associations between selected potential risk factors and social interaction anxiety, with adjustments for cluster sampling. Lower family income, lower self-esteem, and hostility were significantly associated with social interaction anxiety among adolescents. Variables identified as risk factors of anxiety disorder in the literature, such as gender, were not associated with social interaction anxiety in this sample. These results were consistent with those of other studies conducted mainly in the United States and Europe. Regarding non-significant results related to gender, they need viewing in the context of parenting styles of Chinese mothers.

  9. Is Behavioral Regulation in Children With ADHD Aggravated by Comorbid Anxiety Disorder?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lin; Plessen, Kerstin J; Nicholas, Jude

    2010-01-01

    Background: The present study investigated the impact of coexisting anxiety disorder in children with ADHD on their ability to regulate behavior. Method: Parent reports on the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) in a comorbid group of children with ADHD and anxiety (n = 11) were...... compared to BRIEF reports in a group of children with a "pure" ADHD (n = 23), a "pure" anxiety (n = 24) and a group without any diagnosis (n = 104) in a 2 (ADHD vs. no ADHD) x 2 (anxiety vs. no anxiety) design. Results: The children with ADHD and anxiety disorder scored significantly higher on the Inhibit...... children is aggravated by comorbid anxiety. (J. of Att. Dis. 2010; XX(X) 1-XX)....

  10. Trait anxiety reduces affective fading for both positive and negative autobiographical memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, W Richard; Yancu, Cecile N; Skowronski, John J

    2014-01-01

    The affect associated with negative events fades faster than the affect associated with positive events (the Fading Affect Bias; the FAB). The research that we report examined the relation between trait anxiety and the FAB. Study 1 assessed anxiety using the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale; Studies 2 and 3 used the Beck Anxiety Inventory. Studies 1 and 2 used retrospective procedures to probe positive event memories and negative event memories while Study 3 used a diary procedure. The results of all 3 studies showed that increased anxiety was associated with both a lowered FAB and lower overall affect fading for both positive events and negative events. These results suggest that for people free of trait anxiety, the FAB reflects the operation of a healthy coping mechanism in autobiographical memory that is disrupted by trait anxiety.

  11. Work environment stressors, social support, anxiety, and depression among secondary school teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Pamela L; Mahan, Michael P; Park, Na-Jin; Shelton, Christie; Brown, Kathleen C; Weaver, Michael T

    2010-05-01

    Work environment stress, a salient health and safety issue for secondary school teachers, school administrators, parents, and students, was examined in 168 teachers from two urban and five suburban high schools. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between ongoing and episodic stressors and anxiety and depression, as well as the extent to which anxiety and depression may be predicted by stressors and coworker and supervisor support. The Ongoing Stressor Scale (OSS) and the Episodic Stressor Scale (ESS), the Coworker and Supervisor Contents of Communication Scales (COCS), the State Anxiety inventory (S-Anxiety), and the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) were used to measure the variables. Ongoing and episodic stressors were significantly and positively associated with anxiety and depression. Ongoing stressors and coworker support were significant in explaining anxiety and depression among secondary school teachers. Coworker support had an inverse relationship to anxiety and depression.

  12. Comorbid atypical depression in borderline personality disorder is common and correlated with anxiety-related psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gremaud-Heitz, Daniela; Riemenschneider, Anke; Walter, Marc; Sollberger, Daniel; Küchenhoff, Joachim; Dammann, Gerhard

    2014-04-01

    The core features of borderline personality disorder (BPD) are affective instability, unstable relationships and identity disturbance. Axis I comorbidities are frequent, in particular affective disorders. The concept of atypical depression is complex and often underestimated. The purpose of the study was to investigate the comorbidity of atypical depression in borderline patients regarding anxiety-related psychopathology and interpersonal problems. Sixty patients with BPD were assessed with the Structured Clinical Interviews for DSM-IV Axis I and II Disorders (SCID I, SCID II) as well as the Atypical Depression Diagnostic Scale (ADDS). Additionally, patients completed a questionnaire (SCL-90-R, BDI, STAI, STAXI, IIP-C). Forty-five BPD patients (81.8%) had a comorbid affective disorder of which 15 (27.3%) were diagnosed with an atypical depression. In comparison to patients with major depressive disorder or no comorbid depression, patients with atypical depression showed significant higher scores in psychopathological symptoms regarding anxiety and global severity as well as interpersonal problems. The presence of atypical depression in borderline patients is correlated with psychopathology, anxiety, and interpersonal problems and seems to be of clinical importance for personalized treatment decisions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Medical conditions and depressive, anxiety, and somatic symptoms in older adults with and without generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Ayers, Catherine R; Nuevo, Roberto; Stein, Murray B; Ramsdell, Joe; Patterson, Thomas L

    2010-08-01

    The objective of this study was to examine medical illness and anxiety, depressive, and somatic symptoms in older medical patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). A case-control study was designed and conducted in the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Geriatrics Clinics. A total of fifty-four older medical patients with GAD and 54 matched controls participated. The measurements used for this study include: Brief Symptom Inventory-18, Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, and the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule. Older medical patients with GAD reported higher levels of somatic symptoms, anxiety, and depression than other older adults, as well as higher rates of diabetes and gastrointestinal conditions. In a multivariate model that included somatic symptoms, medical conditions, and depressive and anxiety symptoms, anxiety symptoms were the only significant predictors of GAD. These results suggest first, that older medical patients with GAD do not primarily express distress as somatic symptoms; second, that anxiety symptoms in geriatric patients should not be discounted as a byproduct of medical illness or depression; and third, that older adults with diabetes and gastrointestinal conditions may benefit from screening for anxiety.

  14. A randomized controlled trial of telephone-delivered cognitive-behavioral therapy for late-life anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenes, Gretchen A; Miller, Michael E; Williamson, Jeff D; McCall, W Vaughn; Knudson, Mark; Stanley, Melinda A

    2012-08-01

    Older adults face a number of barriers to receiving psychotherapy, such as a lack of transportation and access to providers. One way to overcome such barriers is to provide treatment by telephone. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of cognitive behavioral therapy delivered by telephone (CBT-T) to older adults diagnosed with an anxiety disorder. Randomized controlled trial. Participants' homes. Sixty participants age 60 and older with a diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, or anxiety disorder not otherwise specified. CBT-T versus information-only comparison. Coprimary outcomes included worry (Penn State Worry Questionnaire) and general anxiety (State Trait Anxiety Inventory). Secondary outcomes included clinician-rated anxiety (Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale), anxiety sensitivity (Anxiety Sensitivity Index), depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory), quality of life (SF-36), and sleep (Insomnia Severity Index). Assessments were completed prior to randomization, immediately upon completion of treatment, and 6 months after completing treatment. CBT-T was superior to information-only in reducing general anxiety (ES = 0.71), worry (ES = 0.61), anxiety sensitivity (ES = 0.85), and insomnia (ES = 0.82) at the posttreatment assessment; however, only the reductions in worry were maintained by the 6-month follow-up assessment (ES = 0.80). These results suggest that CBT-T may be efficacious in reducing anxiety and worry in older adults, but additional sessions may be needed to maintain these effects.

  15. Patient anxiety before invasive diagnostic examinations: coronarography, arteriography, and colonoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gryz, J.; Izdebski, P.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to answer such questions as: 1) Do patients show higher levels of anxiety (cognitive and/or physiological rates) before invasive examinations? 2) Does the type of invasive diagnostic examinations influence the patients' anxiety level? 3) Does the level of the patients' knowledge about coronarography, arteriography, or colonoscopy cause differences in their anxiety levels? The study was conducted at the Military Clinical Hospital in Bydgoszcz in the Departments of Gastroenteriology, Radiology, and Cardiology and in the Clinic of General Surgery, Chest and Vessels, and lasted seven months, from August 2002 to February 2003. 93 patients (29 women and 64 men) qualifying for different invasive examinations participated in the study. The participants were divided in three groups. The first consisted of patients awaiting coronarography, the second arteriography of the lower limbs, and the third colonoscopy. The participants were chosen on the basis of medical criteria. A structured interview was used to assess their levels of knowledge about the invasive examination they were to undergo. Anxiety was assessed with the Inventory of State and Trait Anxiety and by blood pressure measurement. On the basis of the obtained data we conclude that patients awaiting invasive examinations have higher physiological anxiety rates and that the type of invasive examination significantly influences patient anxiety levels. The type of examination did not differentiate patients according to their cognitive rates of anxiety: the level was average. The levels of patient knowledge about coronarography, colonoscopy, and arteriography did not cause any differences in physiological and cognitive rates of anxiety. The authors conclude that the cognitive aspects of anxiety do not influence the way patients experience physiological anxiety before invasive examinations. (author)

  16. Anxiety level and self-esteem in youth with cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Aneta Rita Borkowska

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the research was to compare youth with cerebral palsy (CP) and healthy individuals in terms of self-esteem and anxiety level, and to evaluate the relation between self-esteem and anxiety in both study groups. Participants and procedure The study included 30 individuals with CP and 30 healthy individuals, aged 16 to 22 years. The anxiety level was assessed using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, while self-esteem was assessed using Rosenberg’s Self-Es...

  17. The relationship of career decision self-efficacy, trait anxiety, and affectivity among undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Işik, Erkan

    2012-12-01

    This study examined the relationship between career decision self-efficacy and personal-emotional life, including trait anxiety and positive and negative affect in a sample of 249 undergraduate students. Turkish versions of career decision self-efficacy scale-short form, positive and negative affect schedule, and trait anxiety inventory were administrated. Higher career decision self-efficacy was associated with higher positive affectivity and lower trait anxiety and negative affectivity. Trait anxiety and positive affect were the significant predictors of career decision self-efficacy. Implications for career counseling and ideas for future research were discussed.

  18. The Relationship of Anxiety and Depression to Subjective Well-Being in a Mainland Chinese Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Christopher; Wachholtz, Amy

    2018-02-01

    This pilot study examines anxiety, depression, and well-being in a mainland Chinese sample and discusses the implications for mental health care. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-being, and the Body Mind Spirit Well-Being Inventory were administered to 60 mainland China residents. Correlational analyses revealed significant relationships among depression, anxiety, and every domain of well-being except the faith domain. Levels of depression and anxiety are inversely related to levels of well-being in a mainland Chinese sample. Chinese culture was expected to moderate this relationship; however, this was not confirmed by the results.

  19. [Anxiety in adolescents of a Madrid neighbourhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García de la Rasilla Cooper, Cristina; Hijano Baonza, Adela; Carreño Freire, Pilar; Martín Bun, Margarita; Gisbert Rodríguez, Jorge; Peña Rodríguez, Enriqueta

    2006-01-01

    To determine the degree of state-trait anxiety in adolescents and its possible association with several socio-demographic variables. Descriptive cross-sectional study. First semester of 2004. Two state secondary schools in Area 7, Madrid, Spain. Five hundred fifty nine students from the first to third years of secondary education. Two anonymous multiple-choice tests were given out to fill in during class time: STAIC (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children) and a questionnaire of socio-demographic variables (age, sex, immigration, toxic habits, socio-economic and family situation, relationships, view of life, and school results). Four hundred forty five tests were valid. Mean age, 13.8 (SD, 1.2); 53.5% were girls, 18.7% immigrants, 20.7% took drugs (alcohol, tobacco, or illegal drugs), 32.8% had repeated at least 1 year, 14.3% considered their relationship with their family "bad," 15% referred to a "bad" relation with their class mates and 29.5% had a "bad" view of life. A statistically significant association was established between all these variables and anxiety. It is important to know what risk factors are associated with anxiety in order to detect it early and prevent its development to other serious mental disorders. In this study, higher levels of anxiety were found in immigrants, in girls, in drug users, in students in a worse socio-economic situation and in students who have had to repeat a year. This study corroborates the classic risk factors associated with anxiety, but shows that we should take into account a further one: immigration. It also suggests the importance of good family and personal relationships for psychological balance.

  20. The effect of the Transcendental Meditation technique on anxiety level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillbeck, M C

    1977-10-01

    Two weeks of twice-daily practice of the transcendental Meditation (TM) technique was compared with 2 weeks of twice-daily practice of passive relaxation as a means of reduction of anxiety, as measured by the Trait scale of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Thirty-three graduate and undergraduate students were assigned randomly to a relaxation group and a TM group. After a 2-week experimental interval, the relaxation and meditation Ss, as well as between conditions of the relaxation-mediation group; TM was significantly more effective in reducing anxiety level. Thus, the anxiety-reducing effect of the practice of TM cannot be attributed merely to sitting quietly twice daily, although additional research must determine the extent to which S expectations for change contributed to this effect.

  1. Effectiveness of prayer in reducing anxiety in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Csizmar Carvalho

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effect of prayer on anxiety in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Method: Quasi-experimental study, with pre and post-intervention. Twenty patients admitted to treatment of continuous intravenous chemotherapy were recruited. The volunteers were evaluated through interviews using a questionnaire of sociodemographic, clinical and spiritual characteristics, the Index of Religiosity Duke University and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Vital signs were measured and collected salivary cortisol. The intervention was applied prayer and data collection occurred in three phases: first collection (baseline, pre and post-intervention. Results: The data found between the pre and post-intervention samples showed different statistically significant for state anxiety (p= <0.00, blood pressure (systolic, p=0.00, diastolic, p=<0.00 and respiratory rate (p=0.04. Conclusion: Prayer, therefore, proved to be an effective strategy in reducing the anxiety of the patient undergoing chemotherapy.

  2. Open-label observational study of the homeopathic medicine Passiflora Compose for anxiety and sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villet, Stéphanie; Vacher, Véronique; Colas, Aurélie; Danno, Karine; Masson, Jean-Louis; Marijnen, Philippe; Bordet, Marie-France

    2016-02-01

    Anxiety and sleep disorders (SDS) are frequently treated with psychotropic drugs. Health authorities in France have been advised to improve access to alternative treatments such as homeopathic medicines. Our aim was to describe the socio-demographic characteristics and clinical progression of patients prescribed homeopathic medicine Passiflora Compose (PC) for anxiety and/or SDS. This was an open-label, observational study. Randomly selected general practitioners (GPs) known to prescribe homeopathic medicines recruited consecutive patients (≥18-years) prescribed PC. The following data were recorded at inclusion by the GP: socio-demographic data and anxiety severity (Hamilton anxiety rating scale or HAM-A); and by the patients: level of anxiety (STAI Spielberger self-assessment questionnaire) and SDS (Jenkins sleep scale or JSS). Anxiety and SDS were reassessed after 4 weeks of treatment using the same scales. A total of 639 patients (mean age: 46.3 ± 17.5 years; 78.6% female) were recruited by 98 GPs. Anxiety was present in 85.4% (HAM-A) and 93.3% (Spielberger State) at inclusion (mean scores: 17.8 ± 8.91 and 54.59 ± 11.69, respectively) and SDS was present in 74.0% (mean score: 15.24 ± 5.28). A total of 401 (62.7%) patients received PC alone and 167 (26.1%) PC + psychotropics. After 4 weeks, mean anxiety scores decreased by more than 7, 12 and 6 points (HAM-A, Spielberger State and Trait respectively), and SDS score by more than 4 points (JSS). Anxiety and/or SDS improved significantly in patients included on this study. PC could be an alternative to the use of psychotropic drugs for first intention treatment of anxiety and SDS. Further studies are needed to confirm those results. Copyright © 2015 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Sleep bruxism and anxiety level in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Tomás de OLIVEIRA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the association of level of anxiety in children with and without sleep bruxism (SB. The study was performed with 84 six- to eigth-years-old children, divided into two groups: with bruxism (BG and without bruxism (CG. Following the criteria purposed by American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM to determine SB, the presence of tooth wear has been verified through clinical examinations, and the parents have answered a questionnaire about their children’s behavior and habits. Additionally, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children (STAIC was applied to parents of the selected patients. Data analysis revealed a statistical significant difference between the groups (Student’s t-test, p= 0.0136. Based on the results, anxiety assessment revealed that children with bruxism have reached higher levels in the STAIC scale than the non-bruxism group. Therefore, it indicates a direct relationship between the presence of anxiety disorder and the onset of bruxism in children.

  4. An Examination of State and Trait Anxiety Levels among College Students Based on the Students' Alcohol Usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalesky, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This study examines anxiety and level of alcohol consumption among college freshman and sophomore student's to determine if state and trait anxiety are significant factors in high risk alcohol consumption or binge drinking. The State Trait Personality Inventory (STPI) and the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) were administered to…

  5. Learning Strategies in Alleviating English Writing Anxiety for English Language Learners (ELLs) with Limited English Proficiency (LEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Pei; Lin, Huey-Ju

    2016-01-01

    This study utilized the Oxford Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL) and an English writing anxiety scale to examine the relationship between learning strategies and English writing anxiety in 102 university-level English language learners (ELLs) with Limited English Proficiency (LEP) in a university in Taiwan. Kruskal Wallis Test…

  6. Diminished autonomic neurocardiac function in patients with generalized anxiety disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim K

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Kyungwook Kim,1 Seul Lee,2 Jong-Hoon Kim1–3 1Gachon University School of Medicine, 2Department of Psychiatry, Gil Medical Center, Gachon University School of Medicine, Gachon University, 3Neuroscience Research Institute, Gachon University, Incheon, Republic of Korea Background: Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD is a chronic and highly prevalent disorder that is characterized by a number of autonomic nervous system symptoms. The purpose of this study was to investigate the linear and nonlinear complexity measures of heart rate variability (HRV, measuring autonomic regulation, and to evaluate the relationship between HRV parameters and the severity of anxiety, in medication-free patients with GAD. Methods: Assessments of linear and nonlinear complexity measures of HRV were performed in 42 medication-free patients with GAD and 50 healthy control subjects. In addition, the severity of anxiety symptoms was assessed using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Beck Anxiety Inventory. The values of the HRV measures of the groups were compared, and the correlations between the HRV measures and the severity of anxiety symptoms were assessed. Results: The GAD group showed significantly lower standard deviation of RR intervals and the square root of the mean squared differences of successive normal sinus intervals values compared to the control group (P<0.01. The approximate entropy value, which is a nonlinear complexity indicator, was also significantly lower in the patient group than in the control group (P<0.01. In correlation analysis, there were no significant correlations between HRV parameters and the severity of anxiety symptoms. Conclusion: The present study indicates that GAD is significantly associated with reduced HRV, suggesting that autonomic neurocardiac integrity is substantially impaired in patients with GAD. Future prospective studies are required to investigate the effects of pharmacological or non-pharmacological treatment on

  7. Generalised anxiety disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Gale, Christopher K; Millichamp, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Generalised anxiety disorder is characterised by persistent, excessive and difficult-to-control worry, which may be accompanied by several psychic and somatic symptoms, including suicidality. Generalized anxiety disorder is the most common psychiatric disorder in the primary care, although it is often underrecognised and undertreated. Generalized anxiety disorder is typically a chronic condition with low short- and medium-term remission rates. Clinical presentations often include depression, ...

  8. Ansiedade e necessidades dos cuidadores de crianças com e sem deficiência La ansiedad y las necesidades de los cuidadores de niños con y sin discapacidad Anxiety and needs of caregivers of disabled and non-disabled children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cátia Priscila Lemos Fernandes

    2012-03-01

    bienestar psicológico (King et al. 1999. Metodología: estudio cuantitativo, con una muestra de corte no probabilístico, constituida por 56 personas. Para la recolección de datos se utilizaron dos cuestionarios con las características sociodemográficas de la muestra, el grado de capacidad del niño con discapacidad, la escala de valoración del apoyo social a la familia, un cuestionario sobre las dificultades y necesidades de las familias y el STAI. Resultados: los cuidadores de niños con discapacidad presentan mayores niveles de ansiedad-estado y ansiedad-rasgo que los demás cuidadores. La edad del niño es predictiva de ansiedad. La enfermera puede ayudar a los cuidadores de niños con discapacidad demostrando más cariño y paciencia en su intervención. Conclusión: las enfermeras pueden desarrollar iniciativas en los cuidados a domicilio apoyando e informando a los cuidadores en vistas de una mejor prestación de cuidados. Así, el reto será reducir la sobrecarga del cuidador.Objectives: to compare the anxiety levels of caregivers of disabled children with those of caregivers of non-disabled children and to acquire the opinion of caregivers about the role of the nurse in assisting in children’s care. Background: caregivers of disabled children have responsibility in the management of chronic diseases of children. The provision of such care can be harmful to the physical health and psychological well-being of the caregiver (King et al., 1999. Methodology: in this quantitative study, the sample is non-probabilistic, consisting of 56 participants. The questionnaires used included assessment of the caregivers’ sociodemographic characteristics, sociodemographic characteristics of the children, level of ability of children with disabilities, families rating scale of and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI. Results: the caregivers of disabled children have higher levels of state and trait anxiety than caregivers of non-disabled children. Child’s age is a

  9. Effectiveness of a nursing intervention during transfusion of packed red cells on the patient´s anxiety state receiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Fernando Martín Díaz

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The transfusion provokes anxiety and this one compromises the improvement of the patient. Objetive: The study aims to evaluate whether a nursing intervention protocol-through oral and written submissions previous to the transfusion of packed red blood cells decreases anxiety levels in pretransfusion and postransfusion recipient patients through a randomized clinical trial. Methodology: Be conducted in patients over 18 years admitted in the Hospitable complex of Toledo, prescription transfusion of packed red blood cells. For an alpha error 0.05, beta error of 0.90, with an expected effect of 10%, need 70 subjects in each group. The allocation to the intervention group and the control group was randomly made simple. The performance in the normal control group will be done in the hospital, patients receiving transfusion. As dependent variables evaluated:- The anxiety level pretransfusion and postransfusion. Using the questionnaire was validated by Spielberger (STAI. - The level of satisfaction perceived by the user on the information received prior to transfusion. By design developed for this study. Also recorded other control variables: sex, age, socio-cultural level, marital status, reason for transfusion, or no knowledge of the prescription of transfusion, incidents during transfusion.Scientific and sociosanitary relevancy of the study: The results will allow to know if the transfusion increases the anxiety and if an educational intervention nurse can diminish it; and to do the intervention before every transfusion.

  10. Association between anxiety and pain in the latent phase of labour upon admission to the maternity hospital: a prospective, descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floris, Lucia; Irion, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the association between anxiety experienced by the mother, a request for analgesia, and the level of pain at maternity hospital admission in early labour. Anxiety levels were measured by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and pain was assessed using a Visual Analogue Scale. Anxiety and Visual Analogue Scale scores were compared using a linear regression model and indicated a statistically significant association between the anxiety state and degree of pain (p labour, an evaluation of anxiety should be associated with an assessment of the perceived degree of pain. © The Author(s) 2013.

  11. Sleep and anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staner, Luc

    2003-09-01

    Sleep disturbances-particularly insomnia - are highly prevalent in anxiety disorders and complaints such as insomnia or nightmares have even been incorporated in some anxiety disorder definitions, such as generalized anxiety disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. In the first part of this review, the relationship between sleep and anxiety is discussed in terms of adaptive response to stress. Recent studies suggested that the corticotropin-releasing hormone system and the locus ceruleus-autonomic nervous system may play major roles in the arousal response to stress. It has been suggested that these systems may be particularly vulnerable to prolonged or repeated stress, further leading to a dysfunctional arousal state and pathological anxiety states, Polysomnographic studies documented limited alteration of sleep in anxiety disorders. There is some indication for alteration in sleep maintenance in generalized anxiety disorder and for both sleep initiation and maintenance in panic disorder; no clear picture emerges for obsessive-compulsive disorder or posttraumatic stress disorder. Finally, an unequivocal sleep architecture profile that could specifically relate to a particular anxiety disorder could not be evidenced; in contrast, conflicting results are often found for the same disorder. Discrepancies between studies could have been related to illness severity, diagnostic comorbidity, and duration of illness. A brief treatment approach for each anxiety disorder is also suggested with a special focus on sleep.

  12. Energy Education Materials Inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-08-01

    The two volumes of the Energy Education Materials Inventory (EEMI) comprise an annotated bibliography of widely available energy education materials and reference sources. This systematic listing is designed to provide a source book which will facilitate access to these educational resources and hasten the inclusion of energy-focused learning experiences in kindergarten through grade twelve. EEMI Volume II expands Volume I and contains items that have become available since its completion in May, 1976. The inventory consists of three major parts. A core section entitled Media contains titles and descriptive information on educational materials, categorized according to medium. The other two major sections - Grade Level and Subject - are cross indexes of the items for which citations appear in the Media Section. These contain titles categorized according to grade level and subject and show the page numbers of the full citations. The general subject area covered includes the following: alternative energy sources (wood, fuel from organic wastes, geothermal energy, nuclear power, solar energy, tidal power, wind energy); energy conservation, consumption, and utilization; energy policy and legislation, environmental/social aspects of energy technology; and fossil fuels (coal, natural gas, petroleum). (RWR)

  13. NRC inventory of dams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lear, G.E.; Thompson, O.O.

    1983-01-01

    The NRC Inventory of Dams has been prepared as required by the charter of the NRC Dam Safety Officer. The inventory lists 51 dams associated with nuclear power plant sites and 14 uranium mill tailings dams (licensed by NRC) in the US as of February 1, 1982. Of the 85 listed nuclear power plants (148 units), 26 plants obtain cooling water from impoundments formed by dams. The 51 dams associated with the plants are: located on a plant site (29 dams at 15 plant sites); located off site but provide plant cooling water (18 dams at 11 additional plant sites); and located upstream from a plant (4 dams) - they have been identified as dams whose failure, and ensuing plant flooding, could result in a radiological risk to the public health and safety. The dams that might be considered NRC's responsibility in terms of the federal dam safety program are identified. This group of dams (20 on nuclear power plant sites and 14 uranium mill tailings dams) was obtained by eliminating dams that do not pose a flooding hazard (e.g., submerged dams) and dams that are regulated by another federal agency. The report includes the principal design features of all dams and related useful information

  14. Bullying in Children and Teenagers Who Stutter and the Relation to Self-Esteem, Social Acceptance and Anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, S.; Howell, P.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of bullying to self-esteem and anxiety in children and teenagers who stutter. Bullying in 59 children and teenagers who stutter was assessed using a newly-developed questionnaire, the Bullying Assessment. Additionally, the participants completed the Harter Self-Perception questionnaire, and an adapted version of the State-Trait-Anxiety Inventory. A significant correlation was found between bullying and the peer-related self-perception and state anxiety in ...

  15. Dynamic relationships of therapist alliance and group cohesion in transdiagnostic group CBT for anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Peter J; Kazantzis, Nikolaos

    2016-02-01

    Little is known about the temporal variability of the alliance-symptom change and cohesion-symptom change relationships over the course of group therapy. These questions were examined in a sample of 373 clients receiving a transdiagnostic cognitive behavior therapy (tCBT), which culled the principle research-supported mechanisms of change for anxiety disorders. The authors examined relationships between the client versions of the Working Alliance Inventory and Group Cohesion Scale in predicting subsequent symptom change, as assessed by the state scale of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Alliance and cohesion were significant predictors of next session anxiety scores. The alliance was consistently associated with anxiety symptoms (rs = -.152 to -.198, ps cohesion only showed significant relationships with anxiety symptoms at Sessions 8 and 10 (Session 8, r = -.233, p = .020, and 10, r = -.236, p = .027). Alliance-anxiety relations remained constant, whereas cohesion-anxiety relations substantially increased from earlier to later sessions. Differences that were obtained in the relation of alliance and cohesion with anxiety symptoms suggests that these processes have different roles within group tCBT. If replicated, the present findings would suggest that the dynamic relationships between alliance and cohesion and symptoms within group CBT for anxiety disorders have been an important omission in process-outcome studies. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Instruments to measure anxiety in children, adolescents, and young adults with cancer: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazor, Tanya; Tigelaar, Leonie; Pole, Jason D; De Souza, Claire; Tomlinson, Deborah; Sung, Lillian

    2017-09-01

    The primary objective was to describe anxiety measurement instruments used in children and adolescents with cancer or undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and summarize their content and psychometric properties. We conducted searches of MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, HAPI, and CINAHL. We included studies that used at least one instrument to measure anxiety quantitatively in children or adolescents with cancer or undergoing HSCT. Two authors independently identified studies and abstracted study demographics and instrument characteristics. Twenty-seven instruments, 14 multi-item and 13 single-item, were used between 78 studies. The most commonly used instrument was the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory in 46 studies. Three multi-item instruments (Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale-Mandarin version, PROMIS Pediatric Anxiety Short Form, and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory) and two single-item instruments (Faces Pain Scale-Revised and 10-cm Visual Analogue Scale, both adapted for anxiety) were found to be reliable and valid in children with cancer. We identified 14 different multi-item and 13 different single-item anxiety measurement instruments that have been used in pediatric cancer or HSCT. Only three multi-item and two single-item instruments were identified as being reliable and valid among pediatric cancer or HSCT patients and would therefore be appropriate to measure anxiety in this population.

  17. Competitive state anxiety and self-confidence: intensity and direction as relative predictors of performance on a golf putting task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Sean T; Hale, Bruce D

    2007-06-01

    This study considered relationships between the intensity and directional aspects of competitive state anxiety as measured by the modified Competitive Sport Anxiety Inventory-2(D) (Jones & Swain, 1992) in a sample of 12 experienced male golfers. Anxiety and performance scores from identical putting tasks performed under three different anxiety-manipulated competitive conditions were used to assess both the predictions of Multidimensional Anxiety Theory (MAT; Martens et al., 1990) and the relative value of intensity and direction in explaining performance variance. A within-subjects regression analysis of the intra-individual data showed partial support for the three MAT hypotheses. Cognitive anxiety intensity demonstrated a negative linear relationship with performance, somatic anxiety intensity showed a curvilinear relationship with performance, and self-confidence intensity revealed a positive linear relation. Cognitive directional anxiety illustrated a positive linear relationship with putting performance. Multiple regression analyses indicated that direction (42% of variance) was a better predictor of performance than intensity (22%).

  18. Strategic Inventories in Vertical Contracts

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnan Anand; Ravi Anupindi; Yehuda Bassok

    2008-01-01

    Classical reasons for carrying inventory include fixed (nonlinear) production or procurement costs, lead times, nonstationary or uncertain supply/demand, and capacity constraints. The last decade has seen active research in supply chain coordination focusing on the role of incentive contracts to achieve first-best levels of inventory. An extensive literature in industrial organization that studies incentives for vertical controls largely ignores the effect of inventories. Does the ability to ...

  19. INVENTORY CLASSIFICATION WITH ABC ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Kıyak, Erkan; Timuş, Oğuz Han; Karayel, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    For a substantial organization, managing the expansive inventory is a serious problem. One of the methods to solve this problem used widely is classifying the inventory according to some criteria and managing inventory according to this classisifation. In this study, ABC classification methods are researched and Ng's model, which is one of the most widely used, selected for further investigation. An illustrative example is presented to show the usability of the Ng's method.

  20. Hanford inventory program user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinkelman, K.C.

    1994-01-01

    Provides users with instructions and information about accessing and operating the Hanford Inventory Program (HIP) system. The Hanford Inventory Program is an integrated control system that provides a single source for the management and control of equipment, parts, and material warehoused by Westinghouse Hanford Company in various site-wide locations. The inventory is comprised of spare parts and equipment, shop stock, special tools, essential materials, and convenience storage items. The HIP replaced the following systems; ACA, ASP, PICS, FSP, WSR, STP, and RBO. In addition, HIP manages the catalog maintenance function for the General Supplies inventory stocked in the 1164 building and managed by WIMS

  1. Six ways to reduce inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, T

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to help you reduce the inventory in your operation. We will accomplish that task by discussing six specific methods that companies have used successfully to reduce their inventory. One common attribute of these successes is that they also build teamwork among the people. Every business operation today is concerned with methods to improve customer service. The real trick is to accomplish that task without increasing inventory. We are all concerned with improving our skills at keeping inventory low.

  2. Denmark's National Inventory Report 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole-Kenneth; Plejdrup, Marlene Schmidt; Winther, Morten

    This report is Denmark’s National Inventory Report 2013. The report contains information on Denmark’s emission inventories for all years’ from 1990 to 2011 for CO2, CH4, N2O, HFCs, PFCs and SF6, NOx, CO, NMVOC, SO2.......This report is Denmark’s National Inventory Report 2013. The report contains information on Denmark’s emission inventories for all years’ from 1990 to 2011 for CO2, CH4, N2O, HFCs, PFCs and SF6, NOx, CO, NMVOC, SO2....

  3. Denmark's National Inventory Report 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole-Kenneth; Plejdrup, Marlene Schmidt; Winther, Morten

    This report is Denmark’s National Inventory Report 2014. The report contains information on Denmark’s emission inventories for all years’ from 1990 to 2012 for CO2, CH4, N2O, HFCs, PFCs and SF6, NOx, CO, NMVOC, SO2......This report is Denmark’s National Inventory Report 2014. The report contains information on Denmark’s emission inventories for all years’ from 1990 to 2012 for CO2, CH4, N2O, HFCs, PFCs and SF6, NOx, CO, NMVOC, SO2...

  4. Denmark's National Inventory Report 2017

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole-Kenneth; Plejdrup, Marlene Schmidt; Winther, Morten

    This report is Denmark’s National Inventory Report 2017. The report contains information on Denmark’s emission inventories for all years’ from 1990 to 2015 for CO2, CH4, N2O, HFCs, PFCs and SF6, NOx, CO, NMVOC, SO2......This report is Denmark’s National Inventory Report 2017. The report contains information on Denmark’s emission inventories for all years’ from 1990 to 2015 for CO2, CH4, N2O, HFCs, PFCs and SF6, NOx, CO, NMVOC, SO2...

  5. The Effects of Distraction on Preoperative Anxiety Level in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytekin, Aynur; Doru, Özlem; Kucukoglu, Sibel

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of distraction on the preoperative anxiety levels of pediatric patients. A prospective, two-group experimental design was used. This study was conducted in the clinic of pediatric surgery of a university hospital in Turkey between November 20, 2013 and January 25, 2014. The population of the study was composed of a total of 83 children (40 in the study group and 43 in the control group) who met the inclusion. The data were collected using the "Personal Information Form," "Separation Scoring," and "State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children-State Form." Distraction was performed on the children in the study group during the preoperative period. No intervention was applied to the children in the control group. The results of this study demonstrated that the separation scores and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children-State scores of the children in the study group, on whom distraction was applied, were lower than those of the control group. Distraction applied to children in the preoperative period significantly reduced anxiety and separation anxiety. Copyright © 2016 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Alexithymia and personality in relation to social anxiety among university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbudak, Ercan; Evren, Cuneyt; Aldemir, Secil; Coskun, Kerem Senol; Yıldırım, Fatma Gul; Ugurlu, Hilal

    2013-09-30

    The aims of the present study were to investigate the relationship of social anxiety symptoms with alexithymia and personality dimensions in university students and to control the effects of depression and anxiety on this relationship. A total of 319 university students (85 males and 234 females) from two different universities in Ankara were investigated with the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) and the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). We found that subscales of the LSAS (fear or anxiety and avoidance) were positively correlated with depression and alexithymia and "difficulty in identifying feelings" (DIF) and "difficulty in describing feelings" (DDF) subscales of the TAS-20. Harm avoidance (HA) showed positive correlations with subscales of the LSAS, whereas self-directedness (SD) showed negative correlations with these subscales. High TAS-20 DDFand HA and low SD predicted fear or anxiety LSAS subscale scores, whereas high TAS-20 DDF, HA and depression scores were predictors for LSAS avoidance subscale scores. Although our sample is not representative of the whole Turkish university student population, we conclude that both fear or anxiety and avoidance were mainly interrelated with DDF and HA, although the causal relationship is not clear. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Test anxiety levels and related factors: students preparing for university exams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Ayse Sonay; Balci, Serap; Kose, Dilek

    2014-11-01

    To assess test anxiety levels and related factors among students preparing for university exams. The descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted at Istanbul University, Turkey, and comprised students preparing for exams in two private courses for the 2010-11 academic year. Data was collected via an original questionnaire and the Test Anxiety Inventory. SPSS 20 was used for statistical analyses. Of the 1250 students who qualified for the study, the final sample size was 376 (30%). Of them, 210 (55.9%) were females, and 154 (41%) were 18 years old. Students' mean Test Anxiety Inventory scores were 39.44±11.34. Female students' overall test anxiety scores and mean emotionality subscale score were significantly higher than those of their male counterparts. Students whose mothers had an educational attainment between primary school n=170 (45.2%) and a high school diploma n=184 (48.9%), as well as those with four or more siblings n=49 (15%), had significantly higher mean overall Test Anxiety Inventory scores. Among other things, test anxiety is influenced by maternal educational level, type of high school, number of exams, and number of siblings. Preparing a relaxed study environment for students, providing the family monetary or social support, and encouraging participation in social activities are recommendedto decreajb anxiety in students preparing for university exams.

  8. Relationship between group cohesion and anxiety in soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrego, Carla Chicau; Cid, Luis; Silva, Carlos

    2012-10-01

    Group cohesion in sport is a widely spread theme today. Research has found cohesion to be influenced by several individual and group components. Among the cognitive variables that relate to cohesion we found competitive anxiety. The purpose of this study was to examine the relation between task cohesion (ATG-T, and GI-T) and competitive state anxiety (A-state), and also if there would be a relation between cohesion and self-confidence. Participants were 366 football players of both genders male and female, aged between 15 to 23 years old, from Portugal's championships. Cohesion was measured using the Portuguese version of the Group Environment Questionnaire, and to assess competitive anxiety, we used the Portuguese version of the Competition State Anxiety Inventory 2. Our results show that female athletes report experiencing more cognitive anxiety and less self-confidence than male athletes. Only cognitive anxiety relates in a significantly negative way with the perception of cohesion (GI-T e ATG-T) in the total number of participants and in male athletes. Relatively to the somatic anxiety, it only relates negatively with the perception of the integration of the group in the total number of participants and in the male gender.

  9. Depression and anxiety among postpartum and adoptive mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Crystal Edler; Richards, Jenny Gringer; O’Hara, Michael W.; Stuart, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Similar to biological mothers during the postpartum period, women who adopt children experience increased stress and life changes that may put them at risk for developing depression and anxiety. The purpose of the current study was to compare levels of depression and anxiety symptoms between postpartum and adoptive women and, among adoptive women, to examine associations between specific stressors and depressive symptoms. Data from adoptive mothers (n=147), recruited from Holt International, were compared to existing data from postpartum women (n=147). Differences in the level of depression and anxiety symptoms as measured by the Inventory of Depression and Anxiety Symptoms among postpartum and adoptive women were examined. Associations between specific stressors and depressive symptoms were examined among adoptive mothers. Postpartum and adoptive women had comparable levels of depressive symptoms, but adoptive women reported greater well-being and less anxiety than postpartum women. Stressors (e.g., sleep deprivation, history of infertility, past psychological disorder, and less marital satisfaction) were all significantly associated with depressive symptoms among adoptive women. The level of depressive symptoms was not significantly different between the two groups. In contrast, adoptive women experienced significantly fewer symptoms of anxiety and experienced greater well-being. Additionally, adoptive mothers experienced more depressive symptoms during the year following adoption when the stressors were present. Thus, women with these characteristics should be routinely screened for depression and anxiety. PMID:21725836

  10. Depression and anxiety among postpartum and adoptive mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Sarah L; Schiller, Crystal Edler; Richards, Jenny Gringer; O'Hara, Michael W; Stuart, Scott

    2011-08-01

    Similar to biological mothers during the postpartum period, women who adopt children experience increased stress and life changes that may put them at risk for developing depression and anxiety. The purpose of the current study was to compare levels of depression and anxiety symptoms between postpartum and adoptive women and, among adoptive women, to examine associations between specific stressors and depressive symptoms. Data from adoptive mothers (n = 147), recruited from Holt International, were compared to existing data from postpartum women (n = 147). Differences in the level of depression and anxiety symptoms as measured by the Inventory of Depression and Anxiety Symptoms among postpartum and adoptive women were examined. Associations between specific stressors and depressive symptoms were examined among adoptive mothers. Postpartum and adoptive women had comparable levels of depressive symptoms, but adoptive women reported greater well-being and less anxiety than postpartum women. Stressors (e.g., sleep deprivation, history of infertility, past psychological disorder, and less marital satisfaction) were all significantly associated with depressive symptoms among adoptive women. The level of depressive symptoms was not significantly different between the two groups. In contrast, adoptive women experienced significantly fewer symptoms of anxiety and experienced greater well-being. Additionally, adoptive mothers experienced more depressive symptoms during the year following adoption when the stressors were present. Thus, women with these characteristics should be routinely screened for depression and anxiety.

  11. Applying inventory classification to a large inventory management system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Isaac May

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Inventory classification aims to ensure that business-driving inventory items are efficiently managed in spite of constrained resources. There are numerous single- and multiple-criteria approaches to it. Our objective is to improve resource allocation to focus on items that can lead to high equipment availability. This concern is typical of many service industries such as military logistics, airlines, amusement parks and public works. Our study tests several inventory prioritization techniques and finds that a modified multi-criterion weighted non-linear optimization (WNO technique is a powerful approach for classifying inventory, outperforming traditional techniques of inventory prioritization such as ABC analysis in a variety of performance objectives.

  12. Separation anxiety disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, M.H.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.; Sturmey, P.; Hersen, M.

    2012-01-01

    Separation anxiety disorder (SAD) is the only anxiety disorder that is specific to childhood; however, SAD has hardly ever been addressed as a separate disorder in clinical trials investigating treatment outcome. So far, only parent training has been developed specifically for SAD. This particular

  13. Generalized anxiety disorder - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    GAD - children; Anxiety disorder - children ... The cause of GAD is unknown. Genes may play a role. Children with family members who have an anxiety disorder also may be more likely to have one. Stress may be a factor in developing GAD. Things ...

  14. Social Exclusion Anxiety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Dorte Marie

    2017-01-01

    exclusion anxiety and longing for belonging are both central aspects of the affects and processes that enact and challenge social groups. Social exclusion anxiety should not be confused with ‘social phobia’, which is a concept within clinical psychology that focuses on the individual and refers to a phobic...

  15. Anxiety in family practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diseases – latest version) criteria may already be daunting, but to complicate matters further, anxiety disorders sel- dom present in isolation. Furthermore anxiety may be the presenting symp- tom of another psychiatric disorder or of a physical illness, for example, the presenting complaint of a patient with a major depressive ...

  16. Social Anxiety Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Seedat

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available According to epidemiological studies, rates of social anxiety disorder(SAD or social phobia range from 3% to 16% in the generalpopulation.[1,2]Social phobia and specific phobias have an earlier ageof onset than other