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Sample records for anxiety disorders

  1. Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Therapist Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Helping Kids Cope With Stress Helping Kids Handle Worry Anxiety, Fears, and Phobias Childhood Stress Anxiety Disorders Special Needs Factsheet Social Phobia Special Needs Factsheet Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) ...

  2. Anxiety disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... women of other races and ethnicities. 7 What causes anxiety disorders? Researchers think anxiety disorders are caused by a ... Asnaani, A… .Hofmann, S.G. (2011). Gender Differences in Anxiety Disorders: Prevalence, Course of Illness, Comorbidity and Burden of Illness . Journal of Psychiatric ...

  3. Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Rachel G.

    2009-01-01

    Because of their high prevalence and their negative long-term consequences, child anxiety disorders have become an important focus of interest. Whether pathological anxiety and normal fear are similar processes continues to be controversial. Comparative studies of child anxiety disorders are scarce, but there is some support for the current…

  4. Paediatric Anxiety Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Beena Johnson

    2017-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent among children and are associated with serious morbidity. Lifetime prevalence of paediatric anxiety disorders is about fifteen percent. Social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder and separation anxiety disorder are included in the triad of paediatric anxiety disorders. Specific phobia, obsessive compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder are also commonly seen in children. Overprotection by parents, parental death or separation, female sex, ...

  5. Paediatric Anxiety Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beena Johnson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent among children and are associated with serious morbidity. Lifetime prevalence of paediatric anxiety disorders is about fifteen percent. Social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder and separation anxiety disorder are included in the triad of paediatric anxiety disorders. Specific phobia, obsessive compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder are also commonly seen in children. Overprotection by parents, parental death or separation, female sex, low educational status, family history of anxiety disorder, financial stress in family and adverse childhood experiences are risk factors for the development of anxiety disorders. If not diagnosed and managed at the earliest, paediatric anxiety disorders can cause life threatening problems in the future. Hence early and scientific management of anxiety disorders is essential. Cognitive behavioural therapy is the effective evidence based treatment for paediatric anxiety disorders.

  6. Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or dread of what's about to happen or what might happen. While fear is the emotion we feel in the presence ... feel overwhelmed, tongue-tied, or unable to do what they need to ... amounts of anxiety, fear, nervousness, worry, or dread. Anxiety that is too ...

  7. Disability in anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, S.M.; Spijker, J.; Licht, C.M.M.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Hardeveld, F.; de Graaf, R.; Batelaan, N.M.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Background This study compares disability levels between different anxiety disorders and healthy controls. We further investigate the role of anxiety arousal and avoidance behaviour in disability, and whether differences in these symptom patterns contribute to disability differences between anxiety

  8. Disability in anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, S.M.; Spijker, J.; Licht, C.M.; Beekman, A.T.; Hardeveld, F.; Graaf, R. de; Batelaan, N.M.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study compares disability levels between different anxiety disorders and healthy controls. We further investigate the role of anxiety arousal and avoidance behaviour in disability, and whether differences in these symptom patterns contribute to disability differences between anxiety

  9. Disability in anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, S.M.; Spijker, J.; Licht, C.M.M.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Hardeveld, F.; Graaf, R. de; Batelaan, N.M.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study compares disability levels between different anxiety disorders and healthy controls. We further investigate the role of anxiety arousal and avoidance behaviour in disability, and whether differences in these symptom patterns contribute to disability differences between anxiety

  10. Illness anxiety disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001236.htm Illness anxiety disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Illness anxiety disorder (IAD) is a preoccupation that physical symptoms are ...

  11. Sleep and anxiety disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Staner, Luc

    2003-01-01

    Sleep disturbances-particularly insomnia - are highly prevalent in anxiety disorders and complaints such as insomnia or nightmares have even been incorporated in some anxiety disorder definitions, such as generalized anxiety disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. In the first part of this review, the relationship between sleep and anxiety is discussed in terms of adaptive response to stress. Recent studies suggested that the corticotropin-releasing hormone system and the locus ceruleus-a...

  12. anxiety disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey A. Hofflich

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Los síntomas somáticos en niños han sido asociados con trastornos de interiorización, especialmente de ansiedad. Sin embargo, pocos estudios han examinado los síntomas somáticos precisos en trastornos de ansiedad específicos. Desde este estudio cuasi-experimental se examinan el tipo y la frecuencia de síntomas somáticos en niños (n = 178; rango de edad 7–14 años con trastorno generalizado de ansiedad (TAG, fobia social (FS, ansiedad de separación (AS y sin ningún trastorno de ansiedad. Los niños y sus padres, que acudieron en busca de tratamiento, completaron una entrevista diagnóstica estructurada, los niños completaron además la Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children (MASC (March, Parker, Sullivan, Stallings, y Conners. Los niños diagnosticados con un trastorno de ansiedad informaron de síntomas somáticos más frecuentes que aquellos sin trastorno de ansiedad, pero los síntomas somáticos no difirieron entre los principales grupos de trastornos de ansiedad. Los niños con trastornos de ansiedad y depresivos comórbidos manifestaron síntomas somáticos más frecuentemente que aquellos sin trastornos comórbidos. Se discuten los resultados en términos de los síntomas somáticos como a criterios dentro del sistema diagnóstico, y b parte del proceso de evitación.

  13. Generalised anxiety disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Gale, Christopher K; Millichamp, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Generalised anxiety disorder is characterised by persistent, excessive and difficult-to-control worry, which may be accompanied by several psychic and somatic symptoms, including suicidality. Generalized anxiety disorder is the most common psychiatric disorder in the primary care, although it is often underrecognised and undertreated. Generalized anxiety disorder is typically a chronic condition with low short- and medium-term remission rates. Clinical presentations often include depression, ...

  14. Sleep and anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staner, Luc

    2003-09-01

    Sleep disturbances-particularly insomnia - are highly prevalent in anxiety disorders and complaints such as insomnia or nightmares have even been incorporated in some anxiety disorder definitions, such as generalized anxiety disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. In the first part of this review, the relationship between sleep and anxiety is discussed in terms of adaptive response to stress. Recent studies suggested that the corticotropin-releasing hormone system and the locus ceruleus-autonomic nervous system may play major roles in the arousal response to stress. It has been suggested that these systems may be particularly vulnerable to prolonged or repeated stress, further leading to a dysfunctional arousal state and pathological anxiety states, Polysomnographic studies documented limited alteration of sleep in anxiety disorders. There is some indication for alteration in sleep maintenance in generalized anxiety disorder and for both sleep initiation and maintenance in panic disorder; no clear picture emerges for obsessive-compulsive disorder or posttraumatic stress disorder. Finally, an unequivocal sleep architecture profile that could specifically relate to a particular anxiety disorder could not be evidenced; in contrast, conflicting results are often found for the same disorder. Discrepancies between studies could have been related to illness severity, diagnostic comorbidity, and duration of illness. A brief treatment approach for each anxiety disorder is also suggested with a special focus on sleep.

  15. Separation anxiety disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, M.H.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.; Sturmey, P.; Hersen, M.

    2012-01-01

    Separation anxiety disorder (SAD) is the only anxiety disorder that is specific to childhood; however, SAD has hardly ever been addressed as a separate disorder in clinical trials investigating treatment outcome. So far, only parent training has been developed specifically for SAD. This particular

  16. Generalized anxiety disorder - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    GAD - children; Anxiety disorder - children ... The cause of GAD is unknown. Genes may play a role. Children with family members who have an anxiety disorder also may be more likely to have one. Stress may be a factor in developing GAD. Things ...

  17. Social Anxiety Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Seedat

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available According to epidemiological studies, rates of social anxiety disorder(SAD or social phobia range from 3% to 16% in the generalpopulation.[1,2]Social phobia and specific phobias have an earlier ageof onset than other anxiety disorders.

  18. SOCIAL ANXIETY DISORDER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Social phobia, also known as social anxiety disorder, is a highly prevalent disorder with significant morbidity. Patients with social phobia frequently develop co-morbid psychiatric disorders such as depression and substance abuse, and the disorder impacts significantly on social and occupational functioning.

  19. Generalized anxiety disorder (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generalized anxiety disorder is characterized by excessive worry about 2 or more life circumstances for a period of 6 months or longer. Biological and genetic factors may combine with stress to produce psychological symptoms.

  20. Treatment of anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandelow, Borwin; Michaelis, Sophie; Wedekind, Dirk

    2017-06-01

    Anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder/agoraphobia, social anxiety disorder, and others) are the most prevalent psychiatric disorders, and are associated with a high burden of illness. Anxiety disorders are often underrecognized and undertreated in primary care. Treatment is indicated when a patient shows marked distress or suffers from complications resulting from the disorder. The treatment recommendations given in this article are based on guidelines, meta-analyses, and systematic reviews of randomized controlled studies. Anxiety disorders should be treated with psychological therapy, pharmacotherapy, or a combination of both. Cognitive behavioral therapy can be regarded as the psychotherapy with the highest level of evidence. First-line drugs are the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. Benzodiazepines are not recommended for routine use. Other treatment options include pregabalin, tricyclic antidepressants, buspirone, moclobemide, and others. After remission, medications should be continued for 6 to 12 months. When developing a treatment plan, efficacy, adverse effects, interactions, costs, and the preference of the patient should be considered.

  1. Explicit memory in anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, E.S.; Roth, W.T.; Andrich, M.; Margraf, J.

    1999-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to study selective memory bias favoring anxiety-relevant materials in patients with anxiety disorders. In the 1st experiment, 32 patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), 30 with social phobia (speaking anxiety), and 31 control participants incidentally learned

  2. Social Anxiety Disorder (Social Phobia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social anxiety disorder (social phobia) Overview It's normal to feel nervous in some social situations. For example, going ... feeling of butterflies in your stomach. But in social anxiety disorder, also called social phobia, everyday interactions cause ...

  3. Social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Murray B; Stein, Dan J

    2008-03-29

    Our understanding of social anxiety disorder (also known as social phobia) has moved from rudimentary awareness that it is not merely shyness to a much more sophisticated appreciation of its prevalence, its chronic and pernicious nature, and its neurobiological underpinnings. Social anxiety disorder is the most common anxiety disorder; it has an early age of onset--by age 11 years in about 50% and by age 20 years in about 80% of individuals--and it is a risk factor for subsequent depressive illness and substance abuse. Functional neuroimaging studies point to increased activity in amygdala and insula in patients with social anxiety disorder, and genetic studies are increasingly focusing on this and other (eg, personality trait neuroticism) core phenotypes to identify risk loci. A range of effective cognitive behavioural and pharmacological treatments for children and adults now exists; the challenges lie in optimum integration and dissemination of these treatments, and learning how to help the 30-40% of patients for whom treatment does not work.

  4. Social Anxiety Disorder (Social Phobia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fear response, causing increased anxiety in social situations. Environment. Social anxiety disorder may be a learned behavior — ... harder to treat if you wait. Keep a journal. Keeping track of your personal life can help ...

  5. [Anxiety and cognition disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretti, C S

    1998-01-01

    Anxious subjects present attentional disorders that are manifest with an increased bias towards threatening contents stimuli. In tasks derived from the Stroop task (such as emotional Stroop, a variant of the classic Stroop task) congruence between anxious themes or manifestations and stimuli content induces information processing changes leading to a slowness of response speed. In this case, results are similar to those obtained in signal detection tasks either when information is visually or auditorily presented. In anxious subjects an inconscious activation provoked by anxiogenic words is observed. Because such activation is independent from the semantic content of the words, an emotional priming has been hypothesized. Berck formulated an hypervigilance theory according to which anxiety provokes a selective distractibility regarding non pertinent stimuli. Such attentional selectivity would be responsible of a cognitive vulnerability in anxious subjects. State but not trait anxiety induces working memory performances deficit. On the bases of Baddeley's working memory framework, Eysenck proposed that anxiety uses part of the limited attentional capacity, placing the subject in a dual task situation. In that, he has to cope with pertinent information and anxiety generated information. If anxiety leads to better performance in simple tasks by recruiting motivational capacities, in tasks with high information content, anxious subjects performances are impaired. Changes in the long-term memory do not seem to fit with the theoretical models based on cognitive impairment observed in patients suffering from depressive states. Anxious subjects presented a memory bias towards anxiogenic information in implicit memory tasks. But experimental data are still too searce to describe implicit performance of anxious subjects and more systematic studies are therefore needed.

  6. Anxiety Disorders and Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celano, Christopher M; Daunis, Daniel J; Lokko, Hermioni N; Campbell, Kirsti A; Huffman, Jeff C

    2016-11-01

    Anxiety and its associated disorders are common in patients with cardiovascular disease and may significantly influence cardiac health. Anxiety disorders are associated with the onset and progression of cardiac disease, and in many instances have been linked to adverse cardiovascular outcomes, including mortality. Both physiologic (autonomic dysfunction, inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, changes in platelet aggregation) and health behavior mechanisms may help to explain the relationships between anxiety disorders and cardiovascular disease. Given the associations between anxiety disorders and poor cardiac health, the timely and accurate identification and treatment of these conditions is of the utmost importance. Fortunately, pharmacologic and psychotherapeutic interventions for the management of anxiety disorders are generally safe and effective. Further study is needed to determine whether interventions to treat anxiety disorders ultimately impact both psychiatric and cardiovascular health.

  7. Therapeutic touch for anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J; Biley, F C; Dolk, H

    2007-07-18

    Anxiety disorders are a common occurrence in today's society. There is interest from the community in the use of complementary therapies for anxiety disorders. This review examined the currently available evidence supporting the use of therapeutic touch in treating anxiety disorders. To examine the efficacy and adverse effects of therapeutic touch for anxiety disorders. We searched the Cochrane Collaboration Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Controlled Trials Registers (CCDANCTR-Studies and CCDANCTR-References) (search date 13/01/06), the Controlled Trials website and Dissertation Abstracts International. Searches of reference lists of retrieved papers were also carried out and experts in the field were contacted. Inclusion criteria included all published and unpublished randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing therapeutic touch with sham (mimic) TT, pharmacological therapy, psychological treatment, other treatment or no treatment /waiting list. The participants included adults with an anxiety disorder defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-IV),the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10), validated diagnostic instruments, or other validated clinician or self-report instruments. Two review authors independently applied inclusion criteria. Further information was sought from trialists where papers contained insufficient information to make a decision about eligibility. No randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials of therapeutic touch for anxiety disorders were identified. Given the high prevalence of anxiety disorders and the current paucity of evidence on therapeutic touch in this population, there is a need for well conducted randomised controlled trials to examine the effectiveness of therapeutic touch for anxiety disorders.

  8. Refractory generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Mark H

    2009-01-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has a lifetime prevalence in the US population of about 5.7%. Typically, GAD begins in early adulthood and tends to have a chronic and persistent course. The disorder frequently presents comorbidly with other conditions, and about 90% of patients with GAD have at least 1 comorbid lifetime psychiatric disorder. Patients with GAD tend to be high users of medical services; the disorder is associated with significant physical as well as psychological symptomatology and impacts health, family relationships, and employment. Pharmacologic and psychosocial treatments are available for GAD. Different side effect profiles, speed of onset of action, and discontinuation requirements of individual drugs need to be taken into account when selecting treatment. Treatment selection should include consideration of comorbidity, psychological function, social impairment, and refractoriness, as well as the need for ongoing intervention for many individuals. Innovative treatments, including anticonvulsants, atypical antipsychotics, and others, as well as treatment targeting concomitant insomnia, may help improve outcomes for affected individuals. Copyright 2009 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  9. Virtual Reality for Anxiety Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Uzumcu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Virtual reality is a relatively new exposure tool that uses three-dimensional computer-graphics-based technologies which allow the individual to feel as if they are physically inside the virtual environment by misleading their senses. As virtual reality studies have become popular in the field of clinical psychology in recent years, it has been observed that virtual-reality-based therapies have a wide range of application areas, especially on anxiety disorders. Studies indicate that virtual reality can be more realistic than mental imagery and can create a stronger feeling of ԰resenceԻ that it is a safer starting point compared to in vivo exposure; and that it can be applied in a more practical and controlled manner. The aim of this review is to investigate exposure studies based on virtual reality in anxiety disorders (specific phobias, panic disorder and agoraphobias, generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, posttraumatic stress disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder.

  10. Anxiety and Alcohol Use Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joshua P.; Randall, Carrie L.

    2012-01-01

    The co-occurrence of anxiety disorders and alcohol use disorders (AUDs) is relatively common and is associated with a complex clinical presentation. Sound diagnosis and treatment planning requires that clinicians have an integrated understanding of the developmental pathways and course of this comorbidity. Moreover, standard interventions for anxiety disorders or AUDs may need to be modified and combined in targeted ways to accommodate the unique needs of people who have both disorders. Optimal combination of evidence-based treatments should be based on a comparative balance that considers the advantages and disadvantages of sequential, parallel, and integrated approaches. PMID:23584108

  11. Studying Anxiety Disorders | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Phobias and Anxiety Disorders Studying Anxiety Disorders Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents ... physical and psychological stress, and diet. 5 Major Anxiety Disorders Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) : chronic anxiety, exaggerated ...

  12. Comorbidity among the anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruiter, C.; Rijken, H.; Garssen, B.; van Schaik, A.; Kraaimaat, F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on the diagnoses of 120 consecutive referrals to an outpatient research program on anxiety disorders. Patients were diagnosed according to DSM-III-R criteria using a structured interview. Patterns of comorbidity among disorders were examined using two diagnostic procedures. One

  13. Suicidal Ideation in Anxiety-Disordered Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Kelly A.; Puleo, Connor M.; Benjamin, Courtney L.; Podell, Jennifer L.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence is mixed regarding an independent association between anxiety and suicidality in youth. Study 1 examined suicidal ideation in treatment-referred, anxiety-disordered youth (N = 312, aged 7-17). Forty-one percent of anxiety-disordered youth endorsed suicidal ideation. Anxiety disorder severity, global impairment, and current depressive…

  14. Anxiety disorders: a review of current literature

    OpenAIRE

    Thibaut, Florence

    2017-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent psychiatric disorders. There is a high comorbidity between anxiety (especially generalized anxiety disorders or panic disorders) and depressive disorders or between anxiety disorders, which renders treatment more complex. Current guidelines do not recommend benzodiazepines as first-line treatments due to their potential side effects. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and selective serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are recommended as fi...

  15. [Anxiety disorders in DSM-5].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The fifth edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, the DSM-5 appeared officially in May 2013 during the development of the 166th Annual Meetingof the American Psychiatric Association (APA) in San Francisco. The drafting process was long and complex; much of the debate became public so that the expectations were great. And it must be said that the new edition did not disappoint, as many changes were made in relation to their predecessors. In Chapter of Anxiety Disorders, which is reviewed in this article, the changes were significant. Obsessive-compulsive disorder and Stress-related disorders were excluded and new clinical pictures, such as separation anxiety disorder and selective mutism, were included. And took place was the long awaited split between panic disorder and agoraphobia, now two separate disorders.

  16. Panic disorder, phobias, and generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craske, Michelle G; Waters, Allison M

    2005-01-01

    This chapter provides a review of recent empirical developments, current controversies, and areas in need of further research in relation to factors that are common as well as specific to the etiology and maintenance of panic disorder, phobias, and generalized anxiety disorder. The relative contribution of broad risk factors to these disorders is discussed, including temperament, genetics, biological influences, cognition, and familial variables. In addition, the role that specific learning experiences play in relation to each disorder is reviewed. In an overarching hierarchical model, it is proposed that generalized anxiety disorder, and to some extent panic disorder, loads most heavily on broad underlying factors, whereas specific life history contributes most strongly to circumscribed phobias.

  17. Meditation therapy for anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krisanaprakornkit, T; Krisanaprakornkit, W; Piyavhatkul, N; Laopaiboon, M

    2006-01-25

    Anxiety disorders are characterised by long term worry, tension, nervousness, fidgeting and symptoms of autonomic system hyperactivity. Meditation is an age-old self regulatory strategy which is gaining more interest in mental health and psychiatry. Meditation can reduce arousal state and may ameliorate anxiety symptoms in various anxiety conditions. To investigate the effectiveness of meditation therapy in treating anxiety disorders Electronic databases searched include CCDANCTR-Studies and CCDANCTR-References, complementary and alternative medicine specific databases, Science Citation Index, Health Services/Technology Assessment Text database, and grey literature databases. Conference proceedings, book chapters and references were checked. Study authors and experts from religious/spiritual organisations were contacted. Types of studies: Randomised controlled trials. patients with a diagnosis of anxiety disorders, with or without another comorbid psychiatric condition. Types of interventions: concentrative meditation or mindfulness meditation. Comparison conditions: one or combination of 1) pharmacological therapy 2) other psychological treatment 3) other methods of meditation 4) no intervention or waiting list. Types of outcome: 1) improvement in clinical anxiety scale 2) improvement in anxiety level specified by triallists, or global improvement 3) acceptability of treatment, adverse effects 4) dropout. Data were independently extracted by two reviewers using a pre-designed data collection form. Any disagreements were discussed with a third reviewer, and the authors of the studies were contacted for further information. Two randomised controlled studies were eligible for inclusion in the review. Both studies were of moderate quality and used active control comparisons (another type of meditation, relaxation, biofeedback). Anti-anxiety drugs were used as standard treatment. The duration of trials ranged from 3 months (12 weeks) to 18 weeks. In one study

  18. Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by: familydoctor.org editorial staff Categories: Family Health, Men, Mental Health, Seniors, WomenTags: Alcohol and Drug Abuse, Anxiety, counseling, ... Basics Sports Safety Injury Rehabilitation Emotional Well-Being Mental ... Childbirth Women Men Seniors In The News Your Health Resources Healthcare ...

  19. Anxiety Disorders: Types, Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatable. If you think you have an anxiety disorder, talk to your doctor. Sometimes a physical evaluation is advisable to determine whether a person's anxiety is associated with a physical illness. If anxiety is diagnosed, the pattern of co- ...

  20. Anxiety, Mood, and Substance Use Disorders in Parents of Children with Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Alicia A.; Furr, Jami M.; Sood, Erica D.; Barmish, Andrea J.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2009-01-01

    Examined the prevalence of anxiety, mood, and substance use disorders in the parents of anxiety disordered (AD) children relative to children with no psychological disorder (NPD). The specificity of relationships between child and parent anxiety disorders was also investigated. Results revealed higher prevalence rates of anxiety disorders in…

  1. Cognitive hypnotherapy for anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, William L

    2012-04-01

    Cognitive hypnotherapy, also known as cognitive-behavioral hypnotherapy (CBH), is applied to the treatment of anxiety disorders. Specific techniques are described and illustrated. The research on CBH is discussed. CBH seems to be at least as effective as behavior therapy (BT) and cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) treatments that employ imagery and relaxation techniques for anxiety disorders. However, more research is needed because of the lack of adequate studies comparing CBH with BT and CBT. Clinical implications and suggestions for future research are offered.

  2. Cultural aspects of anxiety disorders in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khambaty, Maherra; Parikh, Rajesh M

    2017-06-01

    Cultural factors have influenced the presentation, diagnoses, and treatment of anxiety disorders in India for several centuries. This review covers the antecedents, prevalence, phenomenology, and treatment modalities of anxiety disorders in the Indian cultural context. It covers the history of the depiction of anxiety in India and the concept of culture in the classification of anxiety disorders, and examines the cultural factors influencing anxiety disorders in India. We review the prevalence and phenomenology of various disorders, such as generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social anxiety, and phobic disorder, as well as culture-specific syndromes such as dhat and koro in India. Finally, the review examines the wide range of therapeutic modalities practiced in India, such as faith healing, psychotherapy, ayurveda, psychopharmacology, Unani medicine, homeopathy, yoga, meditation, and mindfulness. We conclude by emphasizing the significance of cultural factors in making relevant diagnoses and offering effective and holistic treatments to individuals with anxiety disorders.

  3. Anxiety disorders: a review of current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibaut, Florence

    2017-06-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent psychiatric disorders. There is a high comorbidity between anxiety (especially generalized anxiety disorders or panic disorders) and depressive disorders or between anxiety disorders, which renders treatment more complex. Current guidelines do not recommend benzodiazepines as first-line treatments due to their potential side effects. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and selective serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are recommended as first-line treatments. Psychotherapy, in association with pharmacotherapy, is associated with better efficacy. Finally, a bio-psycho-social model is hypothesized in anxiety disorders.

  4. Recurrence of anxiety disorders and its predictors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, Willemijn D.; Batelaan, Neeltje M.; van Balkom, Anton J. L. M.; Penninx, Brenda; Smit, Johannes H.; van Oppen, Patricia

    Background: The chronic course of anxiety disorders and its high burden of disease are partly due to the recurrence of anxiety disorders after remission. However, knowledge about recurrence rates and predictors of recurrence is scarce. This article reports on recurrence rates of anxiety disorders

  5. Recurrence of anxiety disorders and its predictors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, W.D.; Batelaan, N.M.; van Balkom, A.J.L.M.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Smit, J.H.; van Oppen, P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The chronic course of anxiety disorders and its high burden of disease are partly due to the recurrence of anxiety disorders after remission. However, knowledge about recurrence rates and predictors of recurrence is scarce. This article reports on recurrence rates of anxiety disorders

  6. Separation anxiety disorder in OCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroczkowski, Megan M; Goes, Fernando S; Riddle, Mark A; Grados, Marco A; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Greenberg, Benjamin D; Fyer, Abby J; McCracken, James T; Rauch, Scott L; Murphy, Dennis L; Knowles, James A; Piacentini, John; Cullen, Bernadette; Rasmussen, Steven A; Geller, Daniel A; Pauls, David L; Liang, Kung-Yee; Nestadt, Gerald; Samuels, Jack F

    2011-03-01

    A history of separation anxiety disorder (SAD) is frequently reported by patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The purpose of this study was to determine if there are clinical differences between OCD-affected individuals with, versus without, a history of SAD. Using data collected during the OCD Collaborative Genetic Study, we studied 470 adult OCD participants; 80 had a history of SAD, whereas 390 did not. These two groups were compared as to onset and severity of OCD, lifetime prevalence of Axis I disorders, and number of personality disorder traits. OCD participants with a history of SAD were significantly younger than the non-SAD group (mean, 34.2 versus 42.2 years; Pphobia (OR = 1.69, CI 1.01-2.8, P<.048), after adjusting for age at interview, age at onset of OCD, and OCD severity in logistic regression models. There was a strong relationship between the number of dependent personality disorder traits and SAD (adjusted OR = 1.42, CI = 1.2-1.6, P<.001). A history of SAD is associated with anxiety disorders and dependent personality disorder traits in individuals with OCD. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Psychotherapy for Anxiety in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-30

    Autism Spectrum Disorders; Autism; Asperger's Syndrome; Pervasive Developmental Disability - Not Otherwise Specified; Obsessive-compulsive Disorder; Social Phobia; Generalized Anxiety Disorder; Specific Phobia; Separation Anxiety Disorder

  8. Screening for anxiety disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Ellin; Bögels, Susan Maria

    2009-10-01

    Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent and have negative consequences on individual and societal level. This study examined the usefulness of screening for anxiety disorders in primary school children. More specifically, the value of the screening method to discriminate between and to predict anxiety disorders was studied. Children and their parents were selected if the children had self-reported scores on the screening questionnaire Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders-71 (SCARED-71) within the top-15% (High-anxious) or from two points below to two points above the median (Median-anxious). Of the selected children, 183 high-anxious children and their parents, and 80 median-anxious children and their parents took part in a diagnostic interview, the Anxiety Disorder Interview Schedule (ADIS). Of the high-anxious children, 60% had an anxiety disorder versus 23% of the median-anxious children, whereas groups did not differ on rates of dysthymia/depression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The diagnoses separation anxiety disorder, social phobia and specific phobia were specifically predicted by the corresponding subscales of the screening questionnaire, while the diagnosis generalised anxiety disorder was not predicted by any of the subscales. The screening method has proven its utility for discriminating between children with and without anxiety disorders when applying the top-15% cut-off. Moreover, separation anxiety disorder, social phobia, and specific phobia, all known to be prevalent and debilitating childhood anxiety disorders, can be predicted by the corresponding subscale of the screening instrument.

  9. Antisocial personality disorder and anxiety disorder: a diagnostic variant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coid, Jeremy; Ullrich, Simone

    2010-06-01

    Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) with co-morbid anxiety disorder may be a variant of ASPD with different etiology and treatment requirements. We investigated diagnostic co-morbidity, ASPD criteria, and anxiety/affective symptoms of ASPD/anxiety disorder. Weighted analyses were carried out using survey data from a representative British household sample. ASPD/anxiety disorder demonstrated differing patterns of antisocial criteria, co-morbidity with clinical syndromes, psychotic symptoms, and other personality disorders compared to ASPD alone. ASPD criteria demonstrated specific associations with CIS-R scores of anxiety and affective symptoms. Findings suggest ASPD/anxiety disorder is a variant of ASPD, determined by symptoms of anxiety. Although co-morbid anxiety and affective symptoms are the same as in anxiety disorder alone, associations with psychotic symptoms require further investigation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cognitive coping in anxiety-disordered adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legerstee, Jeroen S.; Garnefski, Nadia; Verhulst, Frank C.; Utens, Elisabeth M. W. J.

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated differences in cognitive coping strategies between anxiety-disordered and non-anxious adolescents. In addition, the interaction effect with gender as well as differences between specific anxiety diagnoses was examined. A clinical sample of 159 anxiety-disordered

  11. [Anxiety in eating disorders: a comparative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano Pinto, Natalia; Cano Vindel, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Scientific literature shows that anxiety is an important factor in eating disorders. The aim of this case-control study was to compare the anxiety manifestations obtained by means of the Anxiety Situations and Responses Inventory of in a clinical sample of 74 females (46, anorexia nervosa; 28, bulimia) to those obtained by a control group (130 girls without disorders). The between-group ANOVA results showed higher anxiety scores in the clinical group with a medium effect size for the anxiety trait, finding a flat profile (within-group ANOVA) for the three response systems (cognitive, physiological and motor) and the four specific anxiety traits (test, interpersonal, phobic, and daily life situations). Moreover, high scores in anxiety involved a greater risk of being diagnosed with an eating disorder in the 8 bivariate comparisons. The estimations were more precise for cognitive anxiety and for the specific interpersonal anxiety trait.

  12. Nutritional supplements in Anxiety Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rodríguez, Mónica; Rodríguez-Legorburu, Isabel; López-Ibor Alcocer, María I

    2017-09-01

    In recent years, a direct relation between the occurrence of anxiety disorders, sleep disturbances, and mood disorders has been observed as a consequence of poor or inadequate diet. Eating habits in Western societies have greatly changed in recent decades, with an increase in the consumption of foods low in vitamin and mineral content, high in caloric value, and rapidly prepared and easily consumed. It may be that the new lifestyles that directly affect family organization and planning interfere with following a proper diet. However, with increasing frequency, especially among young adults, there is interest in healthy and balanced nutrition, as well as learning culinary techniques. We reviewed the literature for this study, and describe the concept of anxiety and its existence in relation to dietary disorders, as well as alternatives for the treatment of these symptoms. The characteristics of these disorders and their impact on patients are analyzed. The information used in this work was obtained mainly from PubMed, PsycARTICLES, PsycCRITIQUES, and PsycINFO. It was retrieved using the keywords “mental health”, “nutrition”, “diet”, “phytotherapy”, “natural alternatives”, “anxiety”, “mood”, and “sleep disturbance”.

  13. The epidemiology of anxiety disorders: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    Epidemiological studies show that anxiety disorders are highly prevalent and an important cause of functional impairment; they constitute the most frequent menial disorders in the community. Phobias are the most common with the highest rates for simple phobia and agoraphobia. Panic disorder (PD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are less frequent (2% lifetime prevalence), and there are discordant results for social phobia (SP) (2%-16%) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) (3%-30%). These studies underline the importance of an accurate definition of disorders using unambiguous diagnostic and assessment criteria. The boundaries between anxiety disorders are often ill defined and cases may vary widely according to the definition applied. Simple phobia, agoraphobia, and GAD are more common in vmrnen, while there is no gender différence for SP, PD, and OCD, Anxiety disorders are more common in separated, divorced, and widowed subjects; their prevalence is highest in subjects aged 25 to 44 years and lowest in subjects aged >65 years. The age of onset of the different types of anxiety disorders varies widely: phobic disorders begin early in life, whereas PD occurs in young adulthood. Clinical - rather than epidemiological - studies have examined risk factors such as life events, childhood experiences, and familial factors. Anxiety disorders have a chronic and persistent course, and are frequently comorbid with other anxiety disorders, depressive disorders, and substance abuse. Anxiety disorders most frequently precede depressive disorders or substance abuse, Comorbid diagnoses may influence risk factors like functional impairment and quality of life. It remains unclear whether certain anxiety disorders (eg, PD) are risk factors for suicide. The comorbidity of anxiety disorders has important implications for assessment and treatment and the risk factors should be explored. The etiology, natural history, and outcome of these disorders need to be further addressed

  14. Anxiety Disorders and Depression in Older Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Hek (Karin)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAnxiety disorders and depression are common and complex disorders. Despite decades of research, their etiology is largely unknown. Study of the occurrence and determinants, i.e. the epidemiology of anxiety disorders and depression, helps unravel their etiology. This thesis examines the

  15. The epidemiology of anxiety disorders: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    Epidemiological studies show that anxiety disorders are highly prevalent and an important cause of functional impairment; they constitute the most frequent menial disorders in the community. Phobias are the most common with the highest rates for simple phobia and agoraphobia. Panic disorder (PD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are less frequent (2% lifetime prevalence), and there are discordant results for social phobia (SP) (2%-16%) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) (3%-30%). Th...

  16. Treating nonspecific anxiety and anxiety disorders in patients with bipolar disorder: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakofsky, Jeffrey J; Dunlop, Boadie W

    2011-01-01

    To review the evidence for treating anxiety in patients with bipolar disorder. A literature search from 1950 to week 1 of August 2009 was conducted via OVID and the National Institutes of Health's clinical trials online databases. Search terms included anxiety, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, social anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder, specific phobia, posttraumatic stress disorder, and treatment. Reference lists of identified articles were also searched. Fourteen treatment studies that included patients with bipolar disorder with either a syndrome-defined anxiety disorder or nonspecific anxiety were selected. Sample size, bipolar disorder subtype, comorbid anxiety disorders, baseline anxiety, treatment interventions, and outcome measurements were extracted. The majority of studies focus on treating anxiety disorders and nonspecific anxiety occurring during bipolar mood episodes. Studies of syndrome-defined anxiety disorders reveal that risperidone monotherapy did not separate from placebo and that olanzapine was superior to lamotrigine when used to augment lithium treatment. A study using open-label divalproex sodium and an uncontrolled study of group cognitive-behavioral therapy both suggest some benefit from these treatments in patients with bipolar disorder with panic disorder. Studies of nonspecific anxiety reveal some benefit for divalproex, quetiapine, olanzapine, and olanzapine-fluoxetine combination. Weaker evidence supports the use of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy, and observational studies suggest potential efficacy for gabapentin and valproate. Nonspecific anxiety symptoms occurring during a mood episode improve with treatment of the mood disturbance, though divalproex may be the mood stabilizer of choice for anxious patients with bipolar disorder. Given their reduced risk for manic induction and episode cycling, psychotherapy, benzodiazepines, and certain atypical antipsychotics

  17. The nature of social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westenberg, H G

    1998-01-01

    The essential feature of social anxiety disorder (social phobia) is a fear of scrutiny by other people in social or performance situations. The level of anxiety experienced by the person with social anxiety disorder is excessive, and results in substantial impairment in the sufferer's social, family, and professional life. Three distinct subtypes of the disorder have been identified: generalized social anxiety disorder, in which the individual fears a multitude of social situations; nongeneralized social anxiety disorder, in which only 2 or 3 situations are feared; and public-speaking phobia. Results from a number of studies suggest that these subtypes of social anxiety disorder may represent distinct clinical syndromes, with the generalized subtype producing the most severe disability. Despite the prevalence of social anxiety disorder and the disability it causes, this condition remains underdiagnosed, and thus undertreated, by clinicians. This review discusses the barriers that prevent people who have this disorder from seeking help, and the steps that clinicians can take to aid their recognition and treatment of the disorder. It is only by effective diagnosis and treatment that the burden of social anxiety disorder will be lifted, allowing patients to resume a normal life.

  18. Processing bias in children with separation anxiety disorder, social phobia and generalised anxiety disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kindt, M.; Bögels, S.M.; Morren, M.

    2003-01-01

    The present study examined processing bias in children suffering from anxiety disorders. Processing bias was assessed using of the emotional Stroop task in clinically referred children with separation anxiety disorder (SAD), social phobia (SP), and/or generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) and normal

  19. Increased mortality among people with anxiety disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Sandra M; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mors, Ole

    2016-01-01

    : To assess mortality risk in people with anxiety disorders. METHOD: We used nationwide Danish register data to conduct a prospective cohort study with over 30 million person-years of follow-up. RESULTS: In total, 1066 (2.1%) people with anxiety disorders died during an average follow-up of 9.7 years....... The risk of death by natural and unnatural causes was significantly higher among individuals with anxiety disorders (natural mortality rate ratio (MRR) = 1.39, 95% CI 1.28-1.51; unnatural MRR = 2.46, 95% CI 2.20-2.73) compared with the general population. Of those who died from unnatural causes, 16.5% had......BACKGROUND: Anxiety disorders and depression are the most common mental disorders worldwide and have a striking impact on global disease burden. Although depression has consistently been found to increase mortality; the role of anxiety disorders in predicting mortality risk is unclear. AIMS...

  20. Autonomic arousal in childhood anxiety disorders: Associations with state anxiety and social anxiety disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkozei, Anna; Creswell, Cathy; Cooper, Peter J.; Allen, John J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Psychophysiological theories suggest that individuals with anxiety disorders may evidence inflexibility in their autonomic activity at rest and when responding to stressors. In addition, theories of social anxiety disorder, in particular, highlight the importance of physical symptoms. Research on autonomic activity in childhood (social) anxiety disorders, however, is scarce and has produced inconsistent findings, possibly because of methodological limitations. Method The present study aimed to account for limitations of previous studies and measured respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and heart rate (HR) using Actiheart heart rate monitors and software (Version 4) during rest and in response to a social and a non-social stressor in 60 anxious (30 socially anxious and 30 ‘other’ anxious), and 30 nonanxious sex-and age-matched 7–12 year olds. In addition, the effect of state anxiety during the tasks was explored. Results No group differences at rest or in response to stress were found. Importantly, however, with increases in state anxiety, all children, regardless of their anxiety diagnoses showed less autonomic responding (i.e., less change in HR and RSA from baseline in response to task) and took longer to recover once the stressor had passed. Limitations This study focused primarily on parasympathetic arousal and lacked measures of sympathetic arousal. Conclusion The findings suggest that childhood anxiety disorders may not be characterized by inflexible autonomic responding, and that previous findings to the contrary may have been the result of differences in subjective anxiety between anxious and nonanxious groups during the tasks, rather than a function of chronic autonomic dysregulation. PMID:25590763

  1. Current Diagnosis and Treatment of Anxiety Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Bystritsky, Alexander; Khalsa, Sahib S.; Cameron, Michael E.; Schiffman, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental health conditions. Although they are less visible than schizophrenia, depression, and bipolar disorder, they can be just as disabling. The diagnoses of anxiety disorders are being continuously revised. Both dimensional and structural diagnoses have been used in clinical treatment and research, and both methods have been proposed for the new classification in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV (DSM-5). However, each of t...

  2. [Psychophysiological characteristics of panic disorder and generalized anxiety disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeev, S A; Posokhov, S I; Kovrov, G V; Katenko, S V

    2013-01-01

    We studied 34 patients with panic disorder, 32 patients with generalized anxiety disorder and 29 healthy controls using clinical-neurological, psychometric, neuropsychological and neurophysiological (auditory event-related potentials) methods. Patients were characterized by pronounced autonomic dysfunctions, a higher level of anxiety and depression as well as cognitive function disturbances in the form of impairment of short-term memory and directed attention in comparison with healthy controls. Patients with generalized anxiety disorder differed from patients with panic disorder by the higher level of anxiety, greater degree of depression and more expressed disturbances of short-term memory and directed attention. Compared to controls, patients with generalized anxiety disorder had lower P300 amplitudes while the latter was higher in patients with panic disorders. It is concluded that recording of event-related potentials may be used as an additional method of differential diagnosis of these types of anxiety disorders.

  3. The Age of Onset of Anxiety Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lijster, Jasmijn M. de; Dierckx, Bram; Utens, Elisabeth M. W. J.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Zieldorff, Carola; Dieleman, Gwen C.; Legerstee, Jeroen S.

    2017-01-01

    The objective was to estimate the age of onset (AOO) for all anxiety disorders and for specific subtypes. Gender differences in the AOO of anxiety disorders were examined, as were the influence of study characteristics on reported AOOs. Seven electronic databases were searched up to October 2014,

  4. Negative autobiographical memories in social anxiety disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    OToole, Mia Skytte; Watson, Lynn Ann; Rosenberg, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Empirical interest in mental imagery in social anxiety disorder (SAD) has grown over the past years but still little is known about the specificity to SAD. The present study therefore examines negative autobiographical memories in participants with social anxiety disorder...

  5. Late-life anxiety disorders: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurmans, J.; van Balkom, A.J.L.M.

    2011-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are a major clinical problem in late life; estimated prevalence rates vary from 6% to 10%, and the disease impact is considerable and equal to that of depression. However, anxiety disorders often remain undetected and untreated in older adults. This discrepancy may be accounted for

  6. Pharmacologic Treatment of Pediatric Anxiety Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Farah S; Dobson, Eric T; Strawn, Jeffrey R

    2016-06-01

    The last decade has seen considerable advances in the treatment of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents and a considerable expansion of the evidence base for psychopharmacologic in this population. The extant data suggest that, for fear-based anxiety disorders ( e.g. , generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia/social anxiety disorder, and separation anxiety disorder), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and selective serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SSNRIs) are well tolerated and offer considerable benefit. However, the salutary effects of SSRIs and SSNRIs in pediatric anxiety disorders are consistently amplified by the addition of psychotherapy, particularly in individuals with social anxiety disorder. Additionally, several key demographic and clinical factors, including male sex, non-minority status, and better family functioning and younger age predict greater symptomatic improvement in youth with fear-based anxiety disorders. Thus, current data suggest that in addition to several forms of psychotherapy, including cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), SSRIs and SSNRIs are efficacious in the treatment of these conditions in youth and that CBT + an SSRI may be associated with greater improvement than would be expected with either treatment as monotherapy. Finally, given that some children and adolescents may exhibit partial response to current pharmacotherapies, benzodiazepines, anti-histamines and other agents may have adjunctive roles, despite a lack of data in terms of large, randomized controlled trials.

  7. Social Anxiety Disorder: More Than Just Shyness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with a counselor to talk about ways to cope with my fears. I refuse to use alcohol to escape my fears and I’m on my way to feeling better.” What is social anxiety disorder? Social anxiety disorder is a common type ...

  8. Treating Anxiety Disorders | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Phobias and Anxiety Disorders Treating Anxiety Disorders Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents Anxiety disorders are generally treated with medication, specific types ...

  9. Improving Treatment Response for Paediatric Anxiety Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ege, Sarah; Reinholdt-Dunne, Marie Louise

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is considered the treatment of choice for paediatric anxiety disorders, yet there remains substantial room for improvement in treatment outcomes. This paper examines whether theory and research into the role of information-processing in the underlying psychopat......Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is considered the treatment of choice for paediatric anxiety disorders, yet there remains substantial room for improvement in treatment outcomes. This paper examines whether theory and research into the role of information-processing in the underlying...... psychopathology of paediatric anxiety disorders indicate possibilities for improving treatment response. Using a critical review of recent theoretical, empirical and academic literature, the paper examines the role of information-processing biases in paediatric anxiety disorders, the extent to which CBT targets...... in improving response to CBT for paediatric anxiety disorders. Many important questions remain to be answered....

  10. Psychobiology of anxiety disorders and obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Dan J

    2008-09-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder is currently classified as an anxiety disorder. However, there is growing interest in the concept of an obsessive-compulsive spectrum of disorders (OCSDs). The relationship between anxiety disorders and OCSDs has been questioned. The psychobiology of anxiety disorders and OCSDs is briefly reviewed in this article. While there appear to be several distinct contrasts in the underlying psychobiology of these conditions, there is also evidence of overlapping mechanisms. In addition, there are crucial gaps in our current database, confounding nosological decision-making. Conceptualizing various anxiety disorders and putative OCSDs as lying within a broader spectrum of emotional disorders may be useful. However, clinicians must also recognize that individual anxiety and obsessive-compulsive spectrum conditions, including disorders characterized by body-focused repetitive behaviors, have distinct psychobiological underpinnings and require different treatment approaches.

  11. Fluvoxamine in the treatment of anxiety disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Irons, Jane

    2005-01-01

    Fluvoxamine is a selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) that has proved effective in large double-blind, randomized, controlled trials involving patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and panic disorder. Improvements have also been demonstrated in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder, as well as those with a range of obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders including binge eating disorder, bulimia nervosa, pathological gambling, and bod...

  12. Clinical relevance of comorbidity in anxiety disorders : A report from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmeijer-Sevink, Mieke Klein; Batelaan, Neeltje M.; van Megen, Harold J. G. M.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Cath, Danielle C.; van den Hout, Marcel A.; van Balkom, Anton J. L. M.

    Background: To study the clinical relevance of type of comorbidity and number of comorbid disorders in anxiety disorders. Four groups were compared according to sociodemographic-, vulnerability- and clinical factors: single anxiety disorder, anxiety-anxiety comorbidity, anxiety-depressive

  13. Clinical relevance of comorbidity in anxiety disorders: A report from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Hofmeijer-Sevink, M.; Batelaan, N.M.; van Megen, H.J.G.M.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Cath, D.C.; van Hout, M.A.; van Balkom, A.J.L.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: To study the clinical relevance of type of comorbidity and number of comorbid disorders in anxiety disorders. Four groups were compared according to sociodemographic-, vulnerability- and clinical factors: single anxiety disorder, anxiety-anxiety comorbidity, anxiety-depressive

  14. Obsessive beliefs in generalized anxiety disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guliz Senormanci

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown that obsessive beliefs are not specific for OCD, may also play a role in occurence of other anxiety disorders and depression. In these studies, anxiety disorders were evaluated together, with mixed samples of anxiety disorders. Obsessive beliefs are assessed in a sample of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD and compared with healthy control group. The current study compared 119 patients with GAD and 137 healthy controls. Written informed consent was provided and Obsessive Beliefs Questionnaire-44 (OBQ-44, Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7 scale, Beck Depression Inventory (BDE, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI were administered to each participant. Total scores and subscale scores for OBQ-44 in the GAD group were found to be significantly higher the control group (p0,05 except ‘perfectionism/intolerance of uncertainty’ subscale (p=0,000. According to of our study, ‘perfectionism/intolerance of uncertainty’ continues to be statistically significant when state anxiety, trait anxiety and depression levels were controlled respectively. The ‘perfectionism/intolerance of uncertainty’ may contribute to development and persistence of GAD symptoms and evaluation and development of approaches to change these beliefs may improve results of cognitive behavioral therapy in GAD patients. [JCBPR 2017; 6(3.000: 115-122

  15. Anxiety and Related Disorders in Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grant, Joe E.; Odlaug, Brian Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    is excessive and, in general, lasts for 6 months or longer (APA 2013 ).The National Comorbidity Survey found that lifetime prevalence rates for each anxiety disorder were lower in males compared to females: panic disorder (PD)(2.0 % in males vs. 5.0 % females), specifi c phobia (6.7 % vs. 15.7 %), social...... anxietydisorder (SAD) (11.1 % vs. 15.5 %), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD)(3.6 % vs. 6.6 %) (McLean et al. 2011 ). Because each of the anxiety disorders occur approximately half as commonly in men (APA 2013 ; Blanco et al. 2014 ; Mondinet al. 2013 ; Kessler et al. 2005a ), and because the anxiety disorders...

  16. Incidence and risk patterns of anxiety and depressive disorders and categorization of generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beesdo, Katja; Pine, Daniel S; Lieb, Roselind; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Controversy surrounds the diagnostic categorization of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). To examine the incidence, comorbidity, and risk patterns for anxiety and depressive disorders and to test whether developmental features of GAD more strongly support a view of this condition as a depressive as opposed to an anxiety disorder. Face-to-face, 10-year prospective longitudinal and family study with as many as 4 assessment waves. The DSM-IV Munich Composite International Diagnostic Interview was administered by clinically trained interviewers. Munich, Germany. A community sample of 3021 individuals aged 14 to 24 years at baseline and 21 to 34 years at last follow-up. Cumulative incidence of GAD, other anxiety disorders (specific phobias, social phobia, agoraphobia, and panic disorder), and depressive disorders (major depressive disorder, and dysthymia). Longitudinal associations between GAD and depressive disorders are not stronger than those between GAD and anxiety disorders or between other anxiety and depressive disorders. Survival analyses reveal that the factors associated with GAD overlap more strongly with those specific to anxiety disorders than those specific to depressive disorders. In addition, GAD differs from anxiety and depressive disorders with regard to family climate and personality profiles. Anxiety and depressive disorders appear to differ with regard to risk constellations and temporal longitudinal patterns, and GAD is a heterogeneous disorder that is, overall, more closely related to other anxiety disorders than to depressive disorders. More work is needed to elucidate the potentially unique aspects of pathways and mechanisms involved in the etiopathogenesis of GAD. Grouping GAD with depressive disorders, as suggested by cross-sectional features and diagnostic comorbidity patterns, minimizes the importance of longitudinal data on risk factors and symptom trajectories.

  17. Behavioral genetics of affective and anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domschke, Katharina; Reif, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    As shown by clinical genetic studies, affective and anxiety disorders are complex genetic disorders with genetic and environmental factors interactively determining their respective pathomechanism. Advances in molecular genetic techniques including linkage studies, association studies, and genome-wide association studies allow for the detailed dissection of the genetic influence on the development of these disorders. Besides the molecular genetic investigation of categorical entities according to standardized diagnostic criteria, intermediate phenotypes comprising neurobiological or neuropsychological traits (e.g., neuronal correlates of emotional processing) that are linked to the disease of interest and that are heritable, have been proposed to be closer to the underlying genotype than the overall disease phenotype. These intermediate phenotypes are dimensional and more precisely defined than the categorical disease phenotype, and therefore have attracted much interest in the genetic investigation of affective and anxiety disorders. Given the complex genetic nature of affective and anxiety disorders with an interaction of multiple risk genes and environmental influences, the interplay of genetic factors with environmental factors is investigated by means of gene-environment interaction (GxE) studies. Pharmacogenetic studies aid in the dissection of the genetically influenced heterogeneity of psychotropic drug response and may contribute to the development of a more individualized treatment of affective and anxiety disorders. Finally, there is some evidence for genetic factors potentially shared between affective and anxiety disorders pointing to a possible overlapping phenotype between anxiety disorders and depression.

  18. Heterogeneity in development of adolescent anxiety disorder symptoms in an 8-year longitudinal community study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelemans, S.A.; Hale, W.W.; Branje, S.J.T.; Raaijmakers, Q.A.W.; Frijns, T.; van Lier, P.A.C.; Meeus, W.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we prospectively examined developmental trajectories of five anxiety disorder symptom dimensions (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, school anxiety, separation anxiety disorder, and social anxiety disorder) from early to late adolescence in a community sample of 239

  19. Comorbid Social Anxiety Disorder in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Brenna B.; White, Susan W.

    2015-01-01

    Social anxiety symptoms are common among cognitively unimpaired youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Few studies have investigated the co-occurrence of social anxiety disorder (SAD) in adults with ASD, although identification may aid access to effective treatments and inform our scientific efforts to parse heterogeneity. In this preliminary…

  20. Lifetime anxiety disorder and current anxiety symptoms associated with hastened depressive recurrence in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Saloni; Kim, Jane P; Park, Dong Yeon; Kim, Hyun; Yuen, Laura D; Do, Dennis; Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Hooshmand, Farnaz; Miller, Shefali; Wang, Po W; Ketter, Terence A

    2017-09-01

    To assess differential relationships between lifetime anxiety disorder/current anxiety symptoms and longitudinal depressive severity in bipolar disorder (BD). Stanford BD Clinic outpatients enrolled during 2000-2011 were assessed with the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for BD (STEP-BD) Affective Disorders Evaluation and followed with the STEP-BD Clinical Monitoring Form while receiving naturalistic treatment for up to two years. Baseline unfavorable illness characteristics/current mood symptoms and times to depressive recurrence/recovery were compared in patients with versus without lifetime anxiety disorder/current anxiety symptoms. Among 105 currently recovered patients, lifetime anxiety disorder was significantly associated with 10/27 (37.0%) demographic/other unfavorable illness characteristics/current mood symptoms/current psychotropics, hastened depressive recurrence (driven by earlier onset age), and a significantly (> two-fold) higher Kaplan-Meier estimated depressive recurrence rate, whereas current anxiety symptoms were significantly associated with 10/27 (37.0%) demographic/other unfavorable illness characteristics/current mood symptoms/current psychotropics and hastened depressive recurrence (driven by lifetime anxiety disorder), but only a numerically higher Kaplan-Meier estimated depressive recurrence rate. In contrast, among 153 currently depressed patients, lifetime anxiety disorder/current anxiety symptoms were not significantly associated with time to depressive recovery or depressive recovery rate. American tertiary BD clinic referral sample, open naturalistic treatment. Research is needed regarding differential relationships between lifetime anxiety disorder and current anxiety symptoms and hastened/delayed depressive recurrence/recovery - specifically whether lifetime anxiety disorder versus current anxiety symptoms has marginally more robust association with hastened depressive recurrence, and whether both have marginally more robust

  1. What do childhood anxiety disorders predict?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Antje; Egger, Helen L; Erkanli, Alaattin; Jane Costello, E; Foley, Debra L; Angold, Adrian

    2007-12-01

    Few longitudinal studies of child and adolescent psychopathology have examined the links between specific childhood anxiety disorders and adolescent psychiatric disorder. In this paper we test the predictive specificity of separation anxiety disorder (SAD), overanxious disorder (OAD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and social phobia. Data come from the Great Smoky Mountains Study (GSMS). A representative population sample of children--ages 9, 11, and 13 years at intake--was followed to age 19. Diagnoses of both childhood (before age 13 years) and adolescent psychiatric disorders (age 13 to 19 years) were available from 906 participants. Childhood SAD predicted adolescent SAD, whereas OAD was associated with later OAD, panic attacks, depression and conduct disorder (CD). GAD was related only to CD. Social phobia in childhood was associated with adolescent OAD, social phobia, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Anxiety disorders in childhood are predictors of a range of psychiatric disorders in adolescence. It appears that children meriting a well-defined diagnosis are missed by the current rules for the diagnosis of GAD. Future studies should examine whether OAD deserves reconsideration as a nosological entity.

  2. Anxiety and Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents: Developmental Issues and Implications for DSM-V

    OpenAIRE

    Beesdo, Katja; Knappe, Susanne; Pine, Daniel S.

    2009-01-01

    This review summarizes findings on the epidemiology and etiology of anxiety disorders among children and adolescents including separation anxiety disorder, specific phobia, social phobia, agoraphobia, panic disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder, also highlighting critical aspects of diagnosis, assessment, and treatment. Childhood and adolescence is the core risk phase for the development of anxiety symptoms and syndromes, ranging from transient mild symptoms to full-blown anxiety disorde...

  3. Are Anxiety and Depression the Same Disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carey, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The issue of co-morbidity in Anxiety and Depression as disorders leads to questions about the integrity of their present taxonomies in mental health diagnostics. At face value the two appear to have discrete differences, yet nonetheless demonstrate a high co-morbidity rate and shared symptoms implying pathological similarities rather than that of chance. Reviewing evidence from behavioural, neural, and biological sources that elaborate on the aspects of these two constructs, helps to illustrate the nature of these apparent differences and similarities. Integrating evidence from the anxiety and depression literature with the pathological process best illustrated by the burnout theory, alongside with support from the neurobiology of anxiety and stress, presents a proposition of a basic and natural anxiety pathology that when excessive, may result in the symptoms psychology has come to know as representative of anxiety and depressive disorders.

  4. Social communication deficits: Specific associations with Social Anxiety Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Halls, Georgia; Cooper, Peter J.; Creswell, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    Background\\ud Social communication deficits are prevalent amongst children with anxiety disorders; however whether they are over-represented specifically among children with Social Anxiety Disorder has not been examined. This study set out to examine social communication deficits among children with Social Anxiety Disorder in comparison to children with other forms of anxiety disorder.\\ud \\ud Methods\\ud Parents of 404 children with a diagnosed anxiety disorder completed the Social Communicati...

  5. Current Diagnosis and Treatment of Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystritsky, Alexander; Khalsa, Sahib S.; Cameron, Michael E.; Schiffman, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental health conditions. Although they are less visible than schizophrenia, depression, and bipolar disorder, they can be just as disabling. The diagnoses of anxiety disorders are being continuously revised. Both dimensional and structural diagnoses have been used in clinical treatment and research, and both methods have been proposed for the new classification in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV (DSM-5). However, each of these approaches has limitations. More recently, the emphasis in diagnosis has focused on neuroimaging and genetic research. This approach is based partly on the need for a more comprehensive understanding of how biology, stress, and genetics interact to shape the symptoms of anxiety. Anxiety disorders can be effectively treated with psychopharmacological and cognitive–behavioral interventions. These inter ventions have different symptom targets; thus, logical combinations of these strategies need to be further studied in order to improve future outcomes. New developments are forthcoming in the field of alternative strategies for managing anxiety and for treatment-resistant cases. Additional treatment enhancements should include the development of algorithms that can be easily used in primary care and with greater focus on managing functional impairment in patients with anxiety. PMID:23599668

  6. Comorbidity of Social Anxiety Disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Koyuncu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite high rates of reported comorbidity in patients with social anxiety disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder comorbidity was not evaluated in these studies. Studies, investigating the prevalence of adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD comorbidity in social anxiety disorder are limited and little is known about it. The reason for this may be the fact that, ADHD have been seen as a childhood disease over a period of time. In the prospective studies ,it is reported that ADHD is often observed in the adulthood and effects persist . On the other hand, studies on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, higher rates of social anxiety disorder comorbidity have been reported. The presence of comorbid anxiety disorder increases the risk of impulsive feature in ADHD, causes problems in functionality, impaired compliance and resistance to the treatment. The aim of this article is to investigate the the status of social anxiety disorder and ADHD comorbidity and to discuss the hypothesis of antidepressant-associated hypomanic shift due to antidepressant treatment in social anxiety disorder patients. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(1.000: 10-21

  7. Interpretation and expectations among mothers of children with anxiety disorders: associations with maternal anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchard, Faith; Cooper, Peter J; Phil, D; Creswell, Cathy

    2015-02-01

    Models of the development and maintenance of childhood anxiety suggest an important role for parent cognitions: that is, negative expectations of children's coping abilities lead to parenting behaviors that maintain child anxiety. The primary aims of the current study were to (1) compare expectations of child vulnerability and coping among mothers of children with anxiety disorders on the basis of whether or not mothers also had a current anxiety disorder, and (2) examine the degree to which the association between maternal anxiety disorder status and child coping expectations was mediated by how mothers interpreted ambiguous material that referred to their own experience. The association between interpretations of threat, negative emotion, and control was assessed using hypothetical ambiguous scenarios in a sample of 271 anxious and nonanxious mothers of 7- to 12-year-old children with an anxiety disorder. Mothers also rated their expectations when presented with real life challenge tasks. There was a significant association between maternal anxiety disorder status and negative expectations of child coping behaviors. Mothers’ self-referent interpretations were found to mediate this relationship. Responses to ambiguous hypothetical scenarios correlated significantly with responses to real life challenge tasks. Treatments for childhood anxiety disorders in the context of parental anxiety disorders may benefit from the inclusion of a component to directly address parental cognitions. Some inconsistencies were found when comparing maternal expectations in response to hypothetical scenarios with real life challenges. This should be addressed in future research.

  8. Adult separation anxiety disorder in the DSM-5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bögels, S.M.; Knappe, S.; Clark, L.A.

    2013-01-01

    Unlike other DSM-IV anxiety disorders, separation anxiety disorder (SAD) has been considered a disorder that typically begins in childhood, and could be diagnosed only in adults "if onset is before 18." Moreover, SAD is the only DSM-IV anxiety disorder placed under "Disorders Usually First Diagnosed

  9. Examining sex and gender differences in anxiety disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Dorte Mølgaard

    2015-01-01

    ), specific phobia (SP), social anxiety disorder (SAD), generalised anxiety disorder (GAD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and acute and posttraumatic stress disorder (ASD and PTSD), although the latter three are technically no longer categorised as anxiety disorders according to DSM-5. This chapter...

  10. [Anxiety disorders: which psychotherapy for whom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ströhle, A; Fydrich, T

    2018-03-01

    According to the Federal Healthcare Survey (Bundesgesundheitssurvey), approximately 15% of the German population fulfil the diagnostic criteria for at least one anxiety disorder within (any) 1 year. Women are affected approximately twice as often as men. The study by the Robert Koch Institute included the systematic assessment of panic disorder, agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder and specific phobias; therefore, the question for both those affected and the treating therapist is "anxiety disorders: which psychotherapy for whom?" is of great clinical and healthcare political importance. We therefore review the available literature for answering three more specific questions: 1) what are the most suitable forms of psychotherapy, 2) which psychotherapy is most promising for an individual patient and diagnosis (differential evaluation of indications) and 3) what is the best approach to nonresponse or avoidance of the treatment offered? National and international guidelines agree that cognitive behavioral therapy is the psychotherapy of first choice in most patients with anxiety disorders. In cases of nonresponse or lack of availability of the appropriate therapy, psychodynamic therapy or pharmacotherapy can also be recommended. For individualized treatment recommendations we do not have empirical evidence. Also, no evidence-based (individual) recommendations are available for non-responders;however, there are some preferred strategies based on a clinical consensus.

  11. Depression and anxiety in multisomatoform disorder: Prevalence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. Multisomatoform disorder (MSD) is characterised by ≥3 medically inexplicable, troublesome physical symptoms, together with a ≥2-year history of somatisation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of depressive and anxiety disorders in a South African sample MSD, and to compare demographic ...

  12. Childrearing style of anxiety-disordered parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindhout, Ingeborg; Markus, Monica; Hoogendijk, Thea; Borst, Sophie; Maingay, Ragna; Spinhoven, Philip; van Dyck, Richard; Boer, Frits

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated whether anxiety-disordered (AD) parents differ in their childrearing style from non-disordered parents. A clinical sample of 36 AD parents with children aged 6-18 was compared with a normal control sample of 36 parents. Childrearing was assessed through parent report and

  13. Separation Anxiety Disorder in Children: Disorder-Specific Responses to Experimental Separation from the Mother

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossowsky, Joe; Wilhelm, Frank H.; Roth, Walton T.; Schneider, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Background: Separation anxiety disorder (SAD) is one of the most common anxiety disorders in childhood and is predictive of adult anxiety disorders, especially panic disorder. However, the disorder has seldom been studied and the attempt to distinguish SAD from other anxiety disorders with regard to psychophysiology has not been made. We expected…

  14. Treatment of comorbid anxiety disorders and personality disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arntz, A.; Emmelkamp, P.; Ehring, T.

    2014-01-01

    For a long time the diagnosis of personality disorder was associated with therapeutic pessimism: People with these problems were viewed as untreatable, due to fundamental character complications. Failures of anxiety disorder treatment tended to be labeled as "personality disorder". There is little

  15. The hyperventilation syndrome in panic disorder, agoraphobia and generalized anxiety disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruiter, C.; Garssen, B.; Rijken, H.; Kraaimaat, F.

    1989-01-01

    The symptom complex of panic disorder and generalized anxiety disorder suggests an etiological role for hyperventilation. The present study investigates the overlap between DSM-III-R panic disorder, panic disorder with agoraphobia and generalized anxiety disorder with hyperventilation syndrome

  16. [Pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy of comorbid anxiety disorders and alcoholism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorova, S S

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders commonly co-occur with substance use disorders. It is known that alcohol-dependent patients are at greater risk of a relapse if they have a comorbid anxiety disorder. There is a lot of literature reporting on the efficacy of treatments that target anxiety or alcohol addiction separately but less research has examined treatments that address these disorders when they co-occur. Anxiety treatment for alcohol-dependent patients with a co-occuring anxiety disorder can alleviate anxiety symptoms but has no significant effect on the outcomes of alcohol treatment. Efficient combinations of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy can improve outcomes of comorbid disorders.

  17. Positive thinking in anxiety disordered children reconsidered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogendoorn, Sanne M; Prins, Pier J M; Vervoort, Leentje; Wolters, Lidewij H; Nauta, Maaike H; Hartman, Catharina A; Moorlag, Harma; de Haan, Else; Boer, Frits

    2012-01-01

    Negatively valenced thoughts are assumed to play a central role in the development and maintenance of anxiety. However, the role of positive thoughts in anxiety is rather unclear. In the current study we examined the role of negative and positive self-statements in the anxiety level of anxious and non-anxious children. Participants were 139 anxiety disordered children and 293 non-anxious children (8-18 years). Compared to non-anxious children, anxious children reported more negative thoughts, less positive thoughts and lower State of Mind (SOM) ratios (ratio of positive to negative thoughts). Negative thoughts and SOM ratios were the strongest predictors of anxiety level in anxious children; whereas both negative and positive thoughts were the strongest predictors of anxiety level in non-anxious children. To conclude, a lack of positive thoughts might be more than just an epiphenomenon of anxiety level and might deserve a place in the cognitive model of anxiety. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Generalized anxiety disorder: practical assessment and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavan, Michael G; Elsasser, Gary; Barone, Eugene J

    2009-05-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder is common among patients in primary care. Affected patients experience excessive chronic anxiety and worry about events and activities, such as their health, family, work, and finances. The anxiety and worry are difficult to control and often lead to physiologic symptoms, including fatigue, muscle tension, restlessness, and other somatic complaints. Other psychiatric problems (e.g., depression) and nonpsychiatric factors (e.g., endocrine disorders, medication adverse effects, withdrawal) must be considered in patients with possible generalized anxiety disorder. Cognitive behavior therapy and the first-line pharmacologic agents, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, are effective treatments. However, evidence suggests that the effects of cognitive behavior therapy may be more durable. Although complementary and alternative medicine therapies have been used, their effectiveness has not been proven in generalized anxiety disorder. Selection of the most appropriate treatment should be based on patient preference, treatment success history, and other factors that could affect adherence and subsequent effectiveness. Copyright (c) 2009 American Academy of Family Physicians.

  19. Depression and anxiety among patients with somatoform disorders, panic disorder, and other depressive/anxiety disorders in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Lieh; Chen, Tzu-Ting; Chen, I-Ming; Ma, Huei-Mei; Lee, Ming-Tzu; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Gau, Shur-Fen

    2016-07-30

    The aim of this study is to compare the severity of depression and anxiety in individuals with somatoform disorders, panic disorder, other depressive/anxiety disorders, and healthy controls in a Han Chinese population. According to the DSM-IV-TR-based diagnostic interviews, we recruited 152 subjects with somatoform disorders (SG), 56 with panic disorder (PG), 85 with other depressive/anxiety disorders (OG), and 179 without any psychiatric disorder (NG). The four groups reported on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) for depressive and anxiety symptoms, respectively. Correlation analysis and multivariate regression analysis were used to determine the effects of demographic factors and psychiatric diagnoses on depressive and anxiety symptoms separately. BDI-II scores were not significantly different in SG, PG, and OG but were higher than NG. SG and PG had the highest BAI scores, whereas NG had the lowest. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed that the associated factors for BDI-II were gender, residential location, somatoform disorders, panic disorder, major depressive disorder (MDD), and generalized anxiety disorder, whereas BAI was significantly associated with somatoform disorders, panic disorder, and MDD. Our results strongly suggest the inclusion of clinical assessment of depressive and anxious symptoms in patients with somatoform disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Psychological Treatment of Social Anxiety Disorder Improves Body Dysmorphic Concerns

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Angela; Sawyer, Alice T.; Aderka, Idan M.; Hofmann, Stefan G.

    2013-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder and body dysmorphic disorder are considered nosologically distinct disorders In contrast, some cognitive models suggest that social anxiety disorder and body dysmorphic disorder share similar cognitive maintenance factors. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of psychological treatments for social anxiety disorder on body dysmorphic disorder concerns. In Study 1, we found that 12 weekly group sessions of cognitive-behavioral therapy led to significant decre...

  1. University students' understanding of social anxiety disorder.

    OpenAIRE

    Miyake, Yoshie; Okamoto, Yuri; Jinnin, Ran; Yashiki, Hisako; Uchino, Teiji; Isobe, Noriko; Takata, Jun; Kojima, Nanae; Nihonmatsu, Misato; Yokosaki, Yasuyuki; Hiyama, Toru; Yoshihara, Masaharu

    2014-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder is an important cause of psychosocial morbidity in adolescents and young adults. Problems in adolescents and young adults with social anxiety disorder would be a topic in recent years in campus mental health. We examined the opinion of social anxiety disorder on university students. We found that many students felt anxiety in various social scenes, and some students were worried about their anxiety. Most of the students understood the importance of mental treatment for...

  2. Do Anxiety Disorders Play a Role in Adolescent Obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Robert E; Duong, Hao T

    2016-08-01

    There have been few prospective studies on the association between anxiety disorders and adolescent obesity; none examine potential reciprocal effects. The purpose of this paper is to examine the prospective association between anxiety disorders and obesity among adolescents. Using data from a two-wave, prospective study of 3134 adolescents, we examined reciprocal effects between body weight and DSM-IV anxiety disorders. Weight status did not increase future risk of anxiety disorders nor did anxiety disorders at baseline increase risk of future obesity in the overall sample. Stratifying by gender revealed an increased risk of overweight and obesity in males with anxiety disorders, but not for females. Major depression did not mediate these associations. Similar to prospective studies of depression, it appears anxiety disorders may increase risk of obesity. However, more research is needed on the role of psychopathology in adolescent obesity, in particular anxiety disorders and possible moderators (such as gender) and mediators.

  3. Relationship between social anxiety disorder and body dysmorphic disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, A.; Hofmann, S.G.

    2010-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) and body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) are two separate, but conceptually overlapping nosological entities. In this review, we examine similarities between SAD and BDD in comorbidity, phenomenology, cognitive biases, treatment outcome, and cross-cultural aspects. Our review

  4. Generalized anxiety disorder: Differential diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Gratsiyevna Voznesenskaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD is poorly diagnosed and inadequately treated by general practitioners. The paper considers the major diagnostic signs of GAD, its differential diagnosis, prevalence, etiology, and pathogenesis. Antidepressants from a group of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in combination with psychotherapy are the drugs of first choice.

  5. Screening for Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with your daily life Having more than one illness at the same time can make it difficult to diagnose and treat the different conditions. Depression and substance abuse are among the conditions that occasionally complicate anxiety disorders. Yes No Have you experienced changes in sleeping ...

  6. Thorax deformity, joint hypermobility and anxiety disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulsun, M.; Dumlu, K.; Erbas, M.; Yilmaz, Mehmet B.; Pinar, M.; Tonbul, M.; Celik, C.; Ozdemir, B.

    2007-01-01

    Objective was to evaluate the association between thorax deformities, panic disorder and joint hypermobility. The study includes 52 males diagnosed with thorax deformity, and 40 healthy male controls without thorax deformity, in Tatvan Bitlis and Isparta, Turkey. The study was carried out from 2004 to 2006. The teleradiographic and thoracic lateral images of the subjects were evaluated to obtain the Beighton scores; subjects psychiatric conditions were evaluated using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-1), and the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM-A) was applied in order to determine the anxiety levels. Both the subjects and controls were compared in sociodemographic, anxiety levels and joint mobility levels. In addition, males with joint hypermobility and thorax deformity were compared to the group with thorax deformity without joint hypermobility. A significant difference in HAM-A scores was found between the groups with thorax deformity and without. In addition, 21 subjects with thorax deformity met the joint hypermobility criteria in the group with thorax deformity and 7 subjects without thorax deformity met the joint hypermobility criteria in the group without thorax deformity, according to Beighton scoring. The Beighton score of subjects with thorax deformity were significantly different from those of the group without deformity. Additionally, anxiety scores of the males with thorax deformity and joint hypermobility were found higher than males with thorax deformity without joint hypermobility. Anxiety disorders, particularly panic disorder, have a significantly higher distribution in males subjects with thorax deformity compared to the healthy control group. In addition, the anxiety level of males with thorax deformity and joint hypermobility is higher than males with thorax deformity without joint hypermobility. (author)

  7. Anxiety Sensitivity and the Anxiety Disorders: A Meta-Analytic Review and Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatunji, Bunmi O.; Wolitzky-Taylor, Kate B.

    2009-01-01

    There has been significant interest in the role of anxiety sensitivity (AS) in the anxiety disorders. In this meta-analysis, we empirically evaluate differences in AS between anxiety disorders, mood disorders, and nonclinical controls. A total of 38 published studies (N = 20,146) were included in the analysis. The results yielded a large effect…

  8. Psychiatric aspects of pediatric epilepsy: Focus on anxiety disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujita Kumar Kar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric co-morbidities are commonly seen with pediatric epilepsy, which can be in the form of cognitive deficits like - inattention and intellectual disability, motor disturbances like - hyperactivity, emotional disturbances like - depression and anxiety disorders and behavioral problems like - impulsivity, aggression and even psychotic behavior. Anxiety disorders like - Obsessive compulsive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, social phobia, separation anxiety disorder, agoraphobia and panic attacks are commonly seen with pediatric epilepsy. Presence of co-morbid anxiety disorder in pediatric epilepsy is responsible for scholastic decline, peer maladjustment and poor quality of life. Management of anxiety disorders in children with epilepsy is always a challenge. Until, there is no general consensus regarding management of anxiety disorders in pediatric epilepsy. Despite its enormous impact on an individual′s life, this area has not been addressed adequately through clinical research. This review focuses on psychiatric aspects of pediatric epilepsy with specific emphasis on anxiety disorders.

  9. Anxiety disorders in pregnancy and the postnatal period ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anxiety disorders in pregnancy and the postnatal period. ... Continuing Medical Education ... There is a growing realisation that many women suffer from either new onset or worsening of existing anxiety disorders during pregnancy and postnatally (the perinatal period).1 The occurrence of an anxiety disorder during this time ...

  10. Screening for anxiety disorders in patients with coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunevicius, A.; Staniute, M.; Brozaitiene, J.; Pop, V.J.M.; Neverauskas, J.; Bunevicius, R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders are prevalent and associated with poor prognosis in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). However, studies examining screening of anxiety disorders in CAD patients are lacking. In the present study we evaluated the prevalence of anxiety disorders in patients with

  11. Fluvoxamine in the treatment of anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irons, Jane

    2005-12-01

    Fluvoxamine is a selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) that has proved effective in large double-blind, randomized, controlled trials involving patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and panic disorder. Improvements have also been demonstrated in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder, as well as those with a range of obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders including binge eating disorder, bulimia nervosa, pathological gambling, and body dysmorphic disorder. Several well controlled studies have confirmed the efficacy of fluvoxamine in children and adolescents with OCD, SAD, and other anxiety disorders, and it was the first SSRI to be registered for the treatment of OCD in children. Fluvoxamine is well tolerated. In common with other SSRIs, the most frequently reported adverse event is nausea. Fluvoxamine does not cause sedation or cognitive impairment and is associated with a low risk of sexual dysfunction, suicidality, and withdrawal reactions. It is safe in overdose and has no significant effect on body weight or cardiovascular parameters.

  12. Transdiagnostic group CBT for anxiety disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinholt, Nina; Aharoni, Ruth; Winding, Clas

    2017-01-01

    to Mental Health Services. Pre-post-treatment effects were examined for psychiatric outpatients with anxiety disorders receiving UP treatment in groups. Forty-seven patients (mean-age = 34.1 (SD = 9.92), 77% females) with a principal diagnosis of anxiety were included. We found significant and clinically....... The treatment effects found in the present study correspond to treatment effects of other TCBT studies, other UP group studies, and effectiveness studies on standard CBT for outpatients. The results indicate that the UP can be successfully applied to a MHS group setting, demonstrating positive effects...

  13. Evaluating and treating anxiety disorders in medical settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ball S

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders and medical illness present to the primary care physician as a common comorbidity. This article aims to review the literature on the prevalence of anxiety disorders in patients presenting to primary care physicians; to address the key issues in assessing the comorbid condition; and to discuss psychological and pharmacological treatment options for patients with a comorbid anxiety disorder and medical illness. Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent within the primary care population, and these disorders significantly impact the patient′s course and outcome. Fortunately, primary care physicians have a variety of effective cognitive, behavioral and pharmacological interventions available for managing these patients with comorbid anxiety and medical illnesses.

  14. Attention network functioning in children with anxiety disorders, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and non-clinical anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogg, K; Salum, G A; Bradley, B P; Gadelha, A; Pan, P; Alvarenga, P; Rohde, L A; Pine, D S; Manfro, G G

    2015-01-01

    Research with adults suggests that anxiety is associated with poor control of executive attention. However, in children, it is unclear (a) whether anxiety disorders and non-clinical anxiety are associated with deficits in executive attention, (b) whether such deficits are specific to anxiety versus other psychiatric disorders, and (c) whether there is heterogeneity among anxiety disorders (in particular, specific phobia versus other anxiety disorders). We examined executive attention in 860 children classified into three groups: anxiety disorders (n = 67), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD; n = 67) and no psychiatric disorder (n = 726). Anxiety disorders were subdivided into: anxiety disorders excluding specific phobia (n = 43) and specific phobia (n = 21). The Attention Network Task was used to assess executive attention, alerting and orienting. Findings indicated heterogeneity among anxiety disorders, as children with anxiety disorders (excluding specific phobia) showed impaired executive attention, compared with disorder-free children, whereas children with specific phobia showed no executive attention deficit. Among disorder-free children, executive attention was less efficient in those with high, relative to low, levels of anxiety. There were no anxiety-related deficits in orienting or alerting. Children with ADHD not only had poorer executive attention than disorder-free children, but also higher orienting scores, less accurate responses and more variable response times. Impaired executive attention in children (reflected by difficulty inhibiting processing of task-irrelevant information) was not fully explained by general psychopathology, but instead showed specific associations with anxiety disorders (other than specific phobia) and ADHD, as well as with high levels of anxiety symptoms in disorder-free children.

  15. Pharmacological treatment of generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, Jennifer A; Mandos, Laura A; Rickels, Karl; Lohoff, Falk W

    2011-11-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a chronic, relapsing, debilitating disorder, associated with markedly impaired social and occupational functioning. Pharmacological treatment is considered standard care and several drug classes are now FDA approved for the treatment of GAD. While there are clear data for the efficacy of short-term acute treatment, long-term treatment and treatment-resistant GAD remain challenging. This article describes current pharmacological treatment options for GAD, with focus on benzodiazepines, azapirones, antidepressants and anticonvulsant and antipsychotic drugs. Recent findings from placebo-controlled clinical trials are reviewed and evidence-based clinical implications are discussed. A PubMed search was completed using the terms: 'generalized anxiety disorder AND treatment' and 'generalized anxiety disorder AND therapy'. Additional pivotal trials were included for a historical perspective (older landmark trials that established efficacy and safety for older drug classes in the treatment of GAD). Efficacy for treatment of GAD has been established for several different drug classes. At present, based on clear efficacy and good tolerability, first-line treatment with either a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) is indicated. If an initial, at least moderate, clinical response is achieved under antidepressant therapy, treatment should be at least continued for 12 months.

  16. Stress, Anxiety and Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Kesebir

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Stress has major role in functional gastrointestinal system disorders. The most typical example of this situation is Irritable bowel syndrome. Gastrointestinal system’s response to acute or short-term of stress is delay of gastric emptying and stimulation of colonic transition. While CRF2 receptors are mediate the upper section inhibition, CRF1 is responsible for the lower part colonic and anxiogenic response. Visceral hypersensitivity is managed by the emotional motor system, the amygdala plays a significant role and mucosal mast cells arise. But in people with symptoms of functional gastrointestinal, how is differ motility response in healthy individuals, this situation is due to lack of autonomous nervous system or an increased sensitivity of stress is not adequately understood. The brain-gastrointestinal axis frequency and severity of symptoms associated with negative emotions. American Gastroenterology Association is closely associated with the quality of life and is very difficult to treat the symptoms of gastrointestinal disorders, re-interpreted under the heading of 'Gastrointestinal Distress'. This review is defined as gastrointestinal distresses, physical, emotional, and behavioral components as a disorder in which, almost like an anxiety disorder are discussed. Physical component is pain, gas, and defecation problems, cognitive component is external foci control, catastrophization and anticipatory anxiety, the emotional component is somatic anxiety, hypervigilance, and avoidance of gastrointestinal stimuli as defined. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(2.000: 122-133

  17. Pathways to anxiety-depression comorbidity: A longitudinal examination of childhood anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolk, Courtney Benjamin; Carper, Matthew M; Kendall, Philip C; Olino, Thomas M; Marcus, Steven C; Beidas, Rinad S

    2016-10-01

    Anxiety disorders are prevalent in youth and associated with later depressive disorders. A recent model posits three distinct anxiety-depression pathways. Pathway 1 represents youth with a diathesis to anxiety that increases risk for depressive disorders; Pathway 2 describes youth with a shared anxiety-depression diathesis; and Pathway 3 consists of youth with a diathesis for depression who develop anxiety as a consequence of depression impairment. This is the first partial test of this model following cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for child anxiety. The present study included individuals (N = 66; M age = 27.23 years, SD = 3.54) treated with CBT for childhood anxiety disorders 7-19 years (M = 16.24; SD = 3.56) earlier. Information regarding anxiety (i.e., social phobia (SoP), separation anxiety disorder (SAD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD)) and mood disorders (i.e., major depressive disorder (MDD) and dysthymic disorders) was obtained at pretreatment, posttreatment, and one or more follow-up intervals via interviews and self-reports. Evidence of pathways from SoP, SAD, and GAD to later depressive disorders was not observed. Treatment responders evidenced reduced GAD and SoP over time, although SoP was observed to have a more chronic and enduring pattern. Evidence for typically observed pathways from childhood anxiety disorders was not observed. Future research should prospectively examine if CBT treatment response disrupts commonly observed pathways. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Defense Mechanisms in "Pure" Anxiety and "Pure" Depressive Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colovic, Olga; Lecic Tosevski, Dusica; Perunicic Mladenovic, Ivana; Milosavljevic, Maja; Munjiza, Ana

    2016-10-01

    Our study was intended to test whether there are any differences in the way defense mechanisms are used by patients suffering from pure anxiety and those with pure depressive disorders. The sample size was as follows: depressive disorders without psychotic symptoms 30, anxiety disorders 30, and the healthy control group 30. The assessment of defense mechanisms was made using the DSQ-40 questionnaire. Our findings show that "pure" anxiety disorders differ from "pure" depressive disorders only in the use of immature defense mechanisms. The group with depressive disorders was significantly more prone to use immature defense mechanisms than the group with anxiety disorders (p = 0.005), primarily projection (p = 0.001) and devaluation (p = 0.003). These defense mechanisms may therefore be used both to differentiate between anxiety and depressive disorders and also to determine which symptoms (anxiety or depressive disorders) are dominant at any given stage of treatment.

  19. Parental social anxiety disorder prospectively predicts toddlers' fear/avoidance in a social referencing paradigm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aktar, E.; Majdandžić, M.; de Vente, W.; Bögels, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anxiety runs in families. Observational learning of anxious behavior from parents with anxiety disorders plays an important role in the intergenerational transmission of anxiety. We investigated the link between parental anxiety (parental lifetime anxiety disorders and expressed parental

  20. Comorbid depression, but not comorbid anxiety disorders, predicts poor outcome in anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Balkom, A.J.L.M.; van Boeijen, C.A.; Boeke, A.J.P.; van Oppen, P.C.; Kempe, P.T.; van Dyck, R.

    2008-01-01

    Influence of type of comorbidity was studied over the course of 1 year in a sample of 141 outpatients with panic disorder with or without agoraphobia and generalized anxiety disorder, who were receiving different forms of cognitive behavior therapy. Influence of type of comorbidity was determined on

  1. Animal models of anxiety disorders and stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alline C. Campos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety and stress-related disorders are severe psychiatric conditions that affect performance in daily tasks and represent a high cost to public health. The initial observation of Charles Darwin that animals and human beings share similar characteristics in the expression of emotion raise the possibility of studying the mechanisms of psychiatric disorders in other mammals (mainly rodents. The development of animal models of anxiety and stress has helped to identify the pharmacological mechanisms and potential clinical effects of several drugs. Animal models of anxiety are based on conflict situations that can generate opposite motivational states induced by approach-avoidance situations. The present review revisited the main rodent models of anxiety and stress responses used worldwide. Here we defined as “ethological” the tests that assess unlearned/unpunished responses (such as the elevated plus maze, light-dark box, and open field, whereas models that involve learned/punished responses are referred to as “conditioned operant conflict tests” (such as the Vogel conflict test. We also discussed models that involve mainly classical conditioning tests (fear conditioning. Finally, we addressed the main protocols used to induce stress responses in rodents, including psychosocial (social defeat and neonatal isolation stress, physical (restraint stress, and chronic unpredictable stress.

  2. Emotional reasoning and anxiety sensitivity: Associations with social anxiety disorder in childhood☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkozei, Anna; Cooper, Peter J.; Creswell, Cathy

    2014-01-01

    Background Two specific cognitive constructs that have been implicated in the development and maintenance of anxiety symptoms are anxiety sensitivity and emotional reasoning, both of which relate to the experience and meaning of physical symptoms of arousal or anxiety. The interpretation of physical symptoms has been particularly implicated in theories of social anxiety disorder, where internal physical symptoms are hypothesized to influence the individual's appraisals of the self as a social object. Method The current study compared 75 children on measures of anxiety sensitivity and emotional reasoning: 25 with social anxiety disorder, 25 with other anxiety disorders, and 25 nonanxious children (aged 7–12 years). Results Children with social anxiety disorder reported higher levels of anxiety sensitivity and were more likely than both other groups to view ambiguous situations as anxiety provoking, whether physical information was present or not. There were no group differences in the extent to which physical information altered children's interpretation of hypothetical scenarios. Limitations This study is the first to investigate emotional reasoning in clinically anxious children and therefore replication is needed. In addition, those in both anxious groups commonly had comorbid conditions and, consequently, specific conclusions about social anxiety disorder need to be treated with caution. Conclusion The findings highlight cognitive characteristics that may be particularly pertinent in the context of social anxiety disorder in childhood and which may be potential targets for treatment. Furthermore, the findings suggest that strategies to modify these particular cognitive constructs may not be necessary in treatments of some other childhood anxiety disorders. PMID:24120086

  3. Test Anxiety and College Students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jason M.; Lindstrom, Will; Foels, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Test anxiety was examined in college students with and without attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Results indicated that, relative to college students without ADHD, college students with ADHD reported higher total test anxiety as well as specific aspects of test anxiety, including worry (i.e., cognitive aspects of test anxiety) and…

  4. Changes in anxiety sensitivity with pharmacotherapy for panic disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, N.M.; Otto, M.W.; Smits, J.A.J.; Nicolaou, D.C.; Reese, H.E.; Pollack, M.H.

    2004-01-01

    Fear of anxiety symptoms (anxiety sensitivity) has been implicated in the etiology and maintenance of panic disorder, and has been shown to improve with cognitive-behavioral treatment. The impact of pharmacotherapy on anxiety sensitivity is less clear. We administered the Anxiety Sensitivity Index

  5. Meta-Analysis of the Relations of Anxiety Sensitivity to the Depressive and Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naragon-Gainey, Kristin

    2010-01-01

    There is a substantial literature relating the personality trait "anxiety sensitivity" (AS; tendency to fear anxiety-related sensations) and its lower order dimensions to the mood and anxiety (i.e., internalizing) disorders. However, particularly given the disorders' high comorbidity rates, it remains unclear whether AS is broadly related to these…

  6. Neuroenhancement of Exposure Therapy in Anxiety Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan G. Hofmann

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Although exposure-based treatments and anxiolytic medications are more effective than placebo for treating anxiety disorders, there is still considerable room for further improvement. Interestingly, combining these two modalities is usually not more effective than the monotherapies. Recent translational research has identified a number of novel approaches for treating anxiety disorders using agents that serve as neuroenhancers (also known as cognitive enhancers. Several of these agents have been studied to determine their efficacy at improving treatment outcome for patients with anxiety and other psychiatric disorders. In this review, we examine d-cycloserine, yohimbine, cortisol, catecholamines, oxytocin, modafinil, and nutrients such as caffeine and amino fatty acids as potential neuroenhancers. Of these agents, d-cycloserine shows the most promise as an effective neuroenhancer for extinction learning and exposure therapy. Yet, the optimal dosing and dose timing for drug administration remains uncertain. There is partial support for cortisol, catecholamines, yohimbine and oxytocin for improving extinction learning and exposure therapy. There is less evidence to indicate that modafinil and nutrients such as caffeine and amino fatty acids are effective neuroenhancers. More research is needed to determine their long term efficacy and clinical utility of these agents.

  7. Animal models of social anxiety disorder and their validity criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Dos Santos, Maria Augusta B; Abelaira, Helena M; Quevedo, João

    2014-09-26

    Anxiety disorders pose one of the largest threats to global mental health, and they predominantly emerge early in life. Social anxiety disorder, also known as social phobia, is the most common of all anxiety disorders. Moreover, it has severe consequences and is a disabling disorder that can cause an individual to be unable to perform the tasks of daily life. Social anxiety disorder is associated with the subsequent development of major depression and other mental diseases, as well as increased substance abuse. Although some neurobiological alterations have been found to be associated with social anxiety disorder, little is known about this disorder. Animal models are useful tools for the investigation of this disorder, as well as for finding new pharmacological targets for treatment. Thus, this review will highlight the main animal models of anxiety associated with social phobia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Psychological treatment of social anxiety disorder improves body dysmorphic concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Angela; Sawyer, Alice T; Aderka, Idan M; Hofmann, Stefan G

    2013-10-01

    Social anxiety disorder and body dysmorphic disorder are considered nosologically distinct disorders. In contrast, some cognitive models suggest that social anxiety disorder and body dysmorphic disorder share similar cognitive maintenance factors. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of psychological treatments for social anxiety disorder on body dysmorphic disorder concerns. In Study 1, we found that 12 weekly group sessions of cognitive-behavioral therapy led to significant decreases in body dysmorphic symptom severity. In Study 2, we found that an attention retraining intervention for social anxiety disorder was associated with a reduction in body dysmorphic concerns, compared to a placebo control condition. These findings support the notion that psychological treatments for individuals with primary social anxiety disorder improve co-occurring body dysmorphic disorder symptoms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Genetics of anxiety disorders - status quo and quo vadis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domschke, Katharina; Deckert, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Clinical genetic studies propose a strong genetic contribution to the pathogenesis of anxiety disorders with a heritability of about 30-67%. The present review will give an overview of linkage studies, association studies and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) yielding support for some candidate genes. Additionally, first evidence for gene-environment interactions between candidate genes of anxiety disorders and stressful life events will be reported. On a systems level, neural activation correlates of anxiety-relevant emotional processing and neurophysiological measures such as peripheral sympathetic activity or the startle reflex have been shown to be potentially driven by vulnerability genes of anxiety disorders. Promising current approaches to further dissect the genetic underpinnings of anxiety disorders such as next generation sequencing, epigenetic analyses and pharmaco-/ psychotherapy-genetics will be presented. Genetic research in anxiety disorders will be discussed with respect to its potential benefit for future efforts to develop innovative and individually tailored therapeutic approaches for patients with anxiety disorders.

  10. A functionalist perspective on social anxiety and avoidant personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafreniere, Peter

    2009-01-01

    A developmental-evolutionary perspective is used to synthesize basic research from the neurosciences, ethology, genetics, and developmental psychology into a unified framework for understanding the nature and origins of social anxiety and avoidant personality disorder. Evidence is presented that social anxiety disorder (social phobia) and avoidant personality disorder may be alternate conceptualizations of the same disorder because they have virtually the same symptoms and genetic basis, and respond to the same pharmacologic and psychotherapeutic interventions. A functionalist perspective on social anxiety is formulated to (a) explain the origins of normative states of anxiety, (b) outline developmental pathways in the transition from normative anxiety to social anxiety and avoidant personality disorders, and (c) account for the processes leading to gender-differentiated patterns of anxiety-related disorders after puberty.

  11. The differential diagnosis of anxiety. Psychiatric and medical disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, O G

    1985-03-01

    This article has reviewed clinical and demographic features of the primary anxiety disorders and other psychiatric and medical disorders that often are associated with anxiety symptoms, highlighting differential diagnosis. In summary, phobic disorders (exogenous anxiety) are characterized by anxiety reliably elicited by specific environmental stimuli; the stimuli involved determine which type of phobia is diagnosed. In contrast, panic attacks and generalized anxiety (endogenous anxiety) involve symptoms of anxiety not associated only with specific eliciting stimuli. Panic disorder is differentiated from generalized anxiety disorder by the presence of discrete attacks; both disorders usually have some level of persistent anxiety. Obsessive-compulsive disorder is characterized by recurrent unwanted but irresistible thoughts and the ritualized repetitive acts resulting from these obsessions, in the absence of preexisting psychosis or depression. Finally, posttraumatic stress disorder involves various anxiety (and other) symptoms as a direct result of an obvious stressor. Depressive symptoms are frequently associated with anxiety. It is sometimes impossible to determine which is the primary disorder. Overlap of syndromes probably also occurs with other primary psychiatric disorders, especially somatoform disorders, adjustment disorder with anxious mood, and several personality disorders. Finally, primary anxiety can be confused with several medical syndromes, especially when the medical disorder has not been recognized. Nevertheless, research with patients with pheochromocytoma suggests that medical causes of anxiety may be qualitatively different from primary anxiety disorders, especially the psychic anxiety component. Attention to the clinical and demographic features listed in Table 4, as well as the use of newly-developed structured diagnostic interviews should usually lead to a correct diagnosis, as illustrated by the following examples. The onset of a fear of

  12. Gaze perception in social anxiety and social anxiety disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars eSchulze

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinical observations suggest abnormal gaze perception to be an important indicator of social anxiety disorder (SAD. Experimental research has yet paid relatively little attention to the study of gaze perception in SAD. In this article we first discuss gaze perception in healthy human beings before reviewing self-referential and threat-related biases of gaze perception in clinical and non-clinical socially anxious samples. Relative to controls, socially anxious individuals exhibit an enhanced self-directed perception of gaze directions and demonstrate a pronounced fear of direct eye contact, though findings are less consistent regarding the avoidance of mutual gaze in SAD. Prospects for future research and clinical implications are discussed.

  13. Comparative Prevalence of Eating Disorders in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Other Anxiety Disorders

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    Himanshu Tyagi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to compare the prevalence of comorbid eating disorders in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD and other common anxiety disorders. Method. 179 patients from the same geographical area with a diagnosis of OCD or an anxiety disorder were divided into two groups based on their primary diagnosis. The prevalence of a comorbid eating disorder was calculated in both groups. Results. There was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of comorbid eating disorders between the OCD and other anxiety disorders group. Conclusions. These results suggest that the prevalence of comorbid eating disorders does not differ in anxiety disorders when compared with OCD. However, in both groups, it remains statistically higher than that of the general population.

  14. Emotional Intelligence and Personality in Anxiety Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie P. Lizeretti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders (AD are by far the most frequent psychiatric disorders, and according to epidemiologic data their chronicity, comorbidities, and negative prognostic constitute a public health problem. This is why it is necessary to continue exploring the factors which contribute to the incidence, appearance, and maintenance of this set of disorders. The goal of this study has been to analyze the possible relationship between Emotional Intelligence (EI and personality disorders (PersD in outpatients suffering from AD. The sample was made up of 146 patients with AD from the Mental Health Center at the Health Consortium of Maresme, who were evaluated with the STAI, MSCEIT, and MCMI-II questionnaires. The main findings indicate that 89,4% of the patients in the sample met the criteria for the diagnosis of some PersD. The findings also confirm that patients with AD present a low EI, especially because of difficulties in the skills of emotional comprehension and regulation, and the lack of these skills is related to a higher level of anxiety and the presence of PersD. These findings suggest the need to consider emotional skills of EI and personality as central elements for the diagnosis and treatment of AD.

  15. Treatment response in child anxiety is differentially related to the form of maternal anxiety disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, P. J.; Gallop, C.; Willetts, L.; Creswell, C.

    2008-01-01

    An examination was made of the extent to which maternal anxiety predicted response to treatment of children presenting with an anxiety disorder. In a sample of 55 children referred to a local NHS CAMH service for treatment of an anxiety disorder, systematic mental state interview assessment was made of both mothers and children, and both completed self-report questionnaires to assess aspects of anxiety, both immediately before the children received treatment and following treatment. Children ...

  16. Animal defense strategies and anxiety disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Shuhama

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders are classified according to symptoms, time course and therapeutic response. Concurrently, the experimental analysis of defensive behavior has identified three strategies of defense that are shared by different animal species, triggered by situations of potential, distal and proximal predatory threat, respectively. The first one consists of cautious exploration of the environment for risk assessment. The associated emotion is supposed to be anxiety and its pathology, Generalized Anxiety Disorder. The second is manifested by oriented escape or by behavioral inhibition, being related to normal fear and to Specific Phobias, as disorders. The third consists of disorganized flight or complete immobility, associated to dread and Panic Disorder. Among conspecific interactions lies a forth defense strategy, submission, that has been related to normal social anxiety (shyness and to Social Anxiety Disorder. In turn, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder do not seem to be directly related to innate defense reactions. Such evolutionary approach offers a reliable theoretical framework for the study of the biological determinants of anxiety disorders, and a sound basis for psychiatric classification.Os transtornos de ansiedade são classificados conforme a sintomatologia, decurso temporal e resposta terapêutica. Paralelamente, a análise experimental dos comportamentos de defesa identificou três estratégias comuns a diferentes espécies de animais, desencadeadas por situações de perigo predatório potencial, distal ou proximal, respectivamente. A primeira consiste na investigação cautelosa do ambiente, avaliando o risco. Supõe-se que a emoção que a acompanha seja a ansiedade e sua patologia, o Transtorno de Ansiedade Generalizada. A segunda é expressa pela fuga orientada ou pela inibição comportamental, sendo a emoção correlata o medo, e a patologia representada pelas Fobias Específicas. Finalmente, a

  17. Induced-anxiety differentially disrupts working memory in generalized anxiety disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Vytal, Katherine E.; Arkin, Nicole E.; Overstreet, Cassie; Lieberman, Lynne; Grillon, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background Anxiety is characterized by a bias towards threatening information, anxious apprehension, and disrupted concentration. Previous research in healthy subjects suggests that working memory (WM) is disrupted by induced anxiety, but that increased task-demand reduces anxiety and WM is preserved. However, it is unknown if patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) can similarly normalize their performance on difficult WM tasks while reducing their anxiety. Increased threat-related ...

  18. Eating-related anxiety in individuals with eating disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, CM; Thuras, P; Peterson, CB; Lampert, J; Miller, D; Crow, SJ

    2011-01-01

    Although previous research has supported the importance of anxiety as an etiological and maintenance factor for eating disorders, the specific mechanisms are not well understood. The role of anxiety in the context of eating behavior is especially unclear. The purpose of this study was to identify anxiety-eliciting eating situations and anxiety management strategies patients use to mitigate anxiety experienced in the context of eating as determined by diagnostic groups and symptom patterns. Fi...

  19. Generalized anxiety disorder: A comorbid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, David; Argyropoulos, Spilos; Hood, Sean; Potokar, John

    2006-07-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) frequently occurs comorbidly with other conditions, including depression and somatic complaints. Comorbid GAD sufferers have increased psychologic and social impairment, request additional treatment, and have an extended course and poorer outcome than those with GAD alone; therapy should alleviate both the psychic and somatic symptoms of GAD without negatively affecting the comorbid condition. The ideal treatment would provide relief from both GAD and the comorbid condition, reducing the need for polypharmacy. Physicians need suitable tools to assist them in the detection and monitoring of GAD patients-the GADI, a new, self-rating scale, may meet this requirement. Clinical data have shown that various neurobiologic irregularities (e.g., in the GABA and serotonin systems) are associated with the development of anxiety. Prescribing physicians must take into account these abnormalities when choosing a drug. Effective diagnosis and treatment should improve patients' quality of life and their prognosis for recovery.

  20. Rates of isolated sleep paralysis in outpatients with anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Michael W; Simon, Naomi M; Powers, Mark; Hinton, Devon; Zalta, Alyson K; Pollack, Mark H

    2006-01-01

    Initial research suggests that rates of isolated sleep paralysis (ISP) are elevated in individuals with panic disorder and particularly low in individuals with other anxiety disorders. To further evaluate these findings, we examined rates of ISP in a sample outpatients with primary diagnoses of panic disorder (n=24), social anxiety disorder (n=18), or generalized anxiety disorder (n=18). We obtained an overall rate of ISP of 19.7%; rates for patients with panic disorder (20.8%) fell between those with generalized anxiety disorder (15.8%) and social phobia (22.2%). Analysis of comorbidities failed to provide evidence of link between depressive disorders and ISP, but did indicate a significant association between anxiety comorbidity and higher rates of ISP. Results are discussed relative to other variables predicting variability in the occurrence of ISP.

  1. Overview of diagnosis and drug treatments of anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, David J

    2005-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are common and often disabling. They fall into five main categories: panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder, each of which have characteristic symptoms and cognitions. All anxiety disorders respond to drugs and psychological treatments. This review will focus on drug treatments. Recent research has emphasized the value of antidepressants especially the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, benzodiazepines, and related sedative-like compounds. The common co-existence of depression with all of the anxiety disorders means that the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are now generally considered to be the first-line treatments but the benzodiazepines have some utility especially in promoting sleep and working acutely to reduce extreme distress.

  2. Familial and Temperamental Risk Factors for Social Anxiety Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshfeld-Becker, Dina R.

    2010-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is a common disorder that can lead to significant impairment. In this chapter, the author provides background on the disorder and reviews hypothesized familial and temperamental risk factors. In particular, it highlights the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Longitudinal Study of Children at Risk for Anxiety, now…

  3. Symptoms of social anxiety, depression, and stress in parents of children with social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halldorsson, Brynjar; Draisey, Jenny; Cooper, Peter; Creswell, Cathy

    2018-01-16

    It has been suggested that elevated maternal social anxiety may play a disorder-specific role in maintaining childhood social anxiety disorder (SAD), but few studies have examined whether mothers of children with SAD are more socially anxious than mothers of children with other anxiety disorders (ANX). This study set out to examine whether symptoms of social anxiety were more severe amongst mothers of 7-12 year old children presenting for treatment with SAD (n = 260) compared to those presenting with ANX (n = 138). In addition, we examined whether there were differences between these two groups in terms of maternal and paternal general anxiety, depression, and stress. Parents of 7-12 year old children referred for treatment of SAD or ANX completed self-report questionnaire measures of emotional symptoms. Compared to mothers of children with ANX, mothers of children with SAD reported significantly higher levels of social anxiety, general anxiety, and depression. In addition, fathers of children with SAD reported significantly higher levels of anxiety, stress, and depression than fathers of children with ANX. This study is one of the few existing studies that have examined mothers' and fathers' psychopathology across different childhood anxiety disorders. Compared to parents of children with ANX, parents of children with SAD may have poorer mental health which may inhibit optimum child treatment outcomes for children with SAD. Thus, targeting parental psychopathology may be particularly important in the treatment of childhood SAD. Consideration of parental psychopathology may be particularly important in the treatment of childhood social anxiety disorder. Mothers of children with social anxiety disorder are more socially anxious than mothers of children with other anxiety disorders Fathers of children with social anxiety disorder are more anxious and depressed than fathers of children with other anxiety disorders Participants were predominantly of high

  4. Biological markers of generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Eduard; Nutt, David

    2017-06-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a prevalent and highly disabling mental health condition; however, there is still much to learn with regard to pertinent biomarkers, as well as diagnosis, made more difficult by the marked and common overlap of GAD with affective and anxiety disorders. Recently, intensive research efforts have focused on GAD, applying neuroimaging, genetic, and blood-based approaches toward discovery of pathogenetic and treatment-related biomarkers. In this paper, we review the large amount of available data, and we focus in particular on evidence from neuroimaging, genetic, and neurochemical measurements in GAD in order to better understand potential biomarkers involved in its etiology and treatment. Overall, the majority of these studies have produced results that are solitary findings, sometimes inconsistent and not clearly replicable. For these reasons, they have not yet been translated into clinical practice. Therefore, further research efforts are needed to distinguish GAD from other mental disorders and to provide new biological insights into its pathogenesis and treatment.

  5. Genetics of Anxiety and Trauma-Related Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Norrholm, Seth D.; Ressler, Kerry J.

    2009-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most common psychiatric illnesses in the U.S. with approximately 30% of the population experiencing anxiety-related symptoms in their lifetime (Kessler et al., 2005). Notably, a variety of studies have demonstrated that 30−40% of the variance contributing to these disorders is heritable. In the present review, we discuss the latest findings regarding the genetic and environmental influences on the development and symptomatology of anxiety disorders. Specific emphasis...

  6. Examining the Panic Attack Specifier in Social Anxiety Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Nicholas P; Oglesby, Mary E; Short, Nicole A; Schmidt, Norman B

    2016-04-01

    Panic attacks (PAs) are characterized by overwhelming surges of fear and discomfort and are one of the most frequently occurring symptoms in psychiatric populations. The most recent version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (i.e. DSM-5) allows for a panic attack (PA) specifier for all disorders, including social anxiety disorder (SAD). However, there is little research examining differences between individuals diagnosed with SAD with the PA specifier versus individuals diagnosed with SAD without the PA specifier. The current study examined social anxiety, mood, anxiety, and anxiety sensitivity social concerns, a risk factor for social anxiety in SAD-diagnosed individuals without (N = 52) and with (N = 14) the PA specifier. The groups differed only in somatic symptoms of anxiety. Result of the current study provides preliminary evidence that the presence of the PA specifier in social anxiety does not result in elevated levels of comorbidity or a more severe presentation of social anxiety.

  7. Nicotine Modulation of Fear Memories and Anxiety: Implications for Learning and Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlu, Munir Gunes; Gould, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are a group of crippling mental diseases affecting millions of Americans with a 30% lifetime prevalence and costs associated with healthcare of $42.3 billion. While anxiety disorders show high levels of co-morbidity with smoking (45.3% vs. 22.5% in healthy individuals), anxiety disorders are also more common among the smoking population (22% vs. 11.1% in the non-smoking population). Moreover, there is clear evidence that smoking modulates symptom severity in patients with anxiety disorders. In order to better understand this relationship, several animal paradigms are used to model several key symptoms of anxiety disorders; these include fear conditioning and measures of anxiety. Studies clearly demonstrate that nicotine mediates acquisition and extinction of fear as well as anxiety through the modulation of specific subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in brain regions involved in emotion processing such as the hippocampus. However, the direction of nicotine’s effects on these behaviors is determined by several factors that include the length of administration, hippocampus-dependency of the fear learning task, and source of anxiety (novelty-driven vs. social anxiety). Overall, the studies reviewed here suggest that nicotine alters behaviors related to fear and anxiety and that nicotine contributes to the development, maintenance, and reoccurrence of anxiety disorders. PMID:26231942

  8. [Virtual reality therapy in anxiety disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrousia, V; Giotakos, O

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade a number of studies have been conducted in order to examine if virtual reality exposure therapy can be an alternative form of therapy for the treatment of mental disorders and particularly for the treatment of anxiety disorders. Imaginal exposure therapy, which is one of the components of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, cannot be easily applied to all patients and in cases like those virtual reality can be used as an alternative or a supportive psychotherapeutic technique. Most studies using virtual reality have focused on anxiety disorders, mainly in specific phobias, but some extend to other disorders such as eating disorders, drug dependence, pain control and palliative care and rehabilitation. Main characteristics of virtual reality therapy are: "interaction", "immersion", and "presence". High levels of "immersion" and "presence" are associated with increased response to exposure therapy in virtual environments, as well as better therapeutic outcomes and sustained therapeutic gains. Typical devices that are used in order patient's immersion to be achieved are the Head-Mounted Displays (HMD), which are only for individual use, and the computer automatic virtual environment (CAVE), which is a multiuser. Virtual reality therapy's disadvantages lie in the difficulties that arise due to the demanded specialized technology skills, devices' cost and side effects. Therapists' training is necessary in order for them to be able to manipulate the software and the hardware and to adjust it to each case's needs. Devices' cost is high but as technology continuously improves it constantly decreases. Immersion during virtual reality therapy can induce mild and temporary side effects such as nausea, dizziness or headache. Until today, however, experience shows that virtual reality offers several advantages. Patient's avoidance to be exposed in phobic stimuli is reduced via the use of virtual reality since the patient is exposed to them as many times as he

  9. Developmental risk factors in generalized anxiety disorder and panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Michelle G; Shin, Ki Eun; Zuellig, Andrea R

    2016-12-01

    There is a lack of clarity regarding specific risk factors discriminating generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) from panic disorder (PD). This study investigated whether GAD and PD could be discriminated through differences in developmental etiological factors including childhood parental loss/separation, psychological disorders, and maternal and paternal attachment. Twenty people with adult generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), 20 with adult panic disorder (PD), 11 with adult comorbid GAD and PD, and 21 adult non-anxious controls completed diagnostic interviews to assess symptoms of mental disorders in adulthood and childhood. Participants also reported on parental attachment, loss and separation. Childhood diagnoses of GAD and PD differentiated clinical groups from controls as well as from each other, suggesting greater likelihood for homotypic over heterotypic continuity. Compared to controls, specific phobia was associated with all three clinical groups, and childhood depression, social phobia, and PTSD were uniquely associated with adult GAD. Both maternal and paternal attachment also differentiated clinical groups from controls. However, higher levels of subscales reflecting maternal insecure avoidant attachment (e.g., no memory of early childhood experiences and balancing/forgiving current state of mind) emerged as more predictive of GAD relative to PD. There were no group differences in parental loss or separation. These results support differentiation of GAD and PD based on developmental risk factors. Recommendations for future research and implications of the findings for understanding the etiology and symptomatology of GAD and PD are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Cognitive, affective, and behavioral characteristics of mothers with anxiety disorders in the context of child anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, Cathy; Apetroaia, Adela; Murray, Lynne; Cooper, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Parental emotional distress, particularly high maternal anxiety, is one of the most consistent predictors of child anxiety treatment outcome. In order to identify the cognitive, affective, and behavioral parenting characteristics of mothers of children with anxiety disorders who themselves have an anxiety disorder, we assessed the expectations, appraisals, and behaviors of 88 mothers of anxious children (44 mothers who were not anxious [NONANX] and 44 mothers with a current anxiety disorder [ANX]) when interacting with their 7-12-year-old children. There were no observed differences in anxiety and avoidance among children of ANX and NONANX mothers, but, compared with NONANX mothers, ANX mothers held more negative expectations, and they differed on observations of intrusiveness, expressed anxiety, warmth, and the quality of the relationship. Associations were moderated by the degree to which children expressed anxiety during the tasks. Maternal-reported negative emotions during the task significantly mediated the association between maternal anxiety status and the observed quality of the relationship. These findings suggest that maternal anxiety disorder is associated with reduced tolerance of children's negative emotions. This may interfere with the maintenance of a positive, supportive mother-child interaction under conditions of stress and, as such, this may impede optimum treatment outcomes. The findings identify potential cognitive, affective, and behavioral targets to improve treatment outcomes for children with anxiety disorders in the context of a current maternal anxiety disorder. 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  11. The relation between anger management style, mood and somatic symptoms in anxiety disorders and somatoform disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Kyung Bong; Kim, Dong Kee; Kim, Shin Young; Park, Joong Kyu; Han, Mooyoung

    2008-09-30

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between anger management style, depression, anxiety and somatic symptoms in anxiety disorder and somatoform disorder patients. The subjects comprised 71 patients with anxiety disorders and 47 with somatoform disorders. The level of anger expression or anger suppression was assessed by the Anger Expression Scale, the severity of anxiety and depression by the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) anxiety and depression subscales, and the severity of somatic symptoms by the Somatization Rating Scale and the SCL-90-R somatization subscale. The results of path analyses showed that anger suppression had only an indirect effect on somatic symptoms through depression and anxiety in each of the disorders. In addition, only anxiety had a direct effect on somatic symptoms in anxiety disorder patients, whereas both anxiety and depression had direct effects on somatic symptoms in somatoform disorder patients. However, the anxiety disorder group showed a significant negative correlation between anger expression and anger suppression in the path from anger-out to anger-in to depression to anxiety to somatic symptoms, unlike the somatoform disorder group. The results suggest that anger suppression, but not anger expression, is associated with mood, i.e. depression and anxiety, and somatic symptoms characterize anxiety disorder and somatoform disorder patients. Anxiety is likely to be an important source of somatic symptoms in anxiety disorders, whereas both anxiety and depression are likely to be important sources of somatic symptoms in somatoform disorders. In addition, anger suppression preceded by inhibited anger expression is associated with anxiety and somatic symptoms in anxiety disorders.

  12. Body image in social anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderka, Idan M; Gutner, Cassidy A; Lazarov, Amit; Hermesh, Haggai; Hofmann, Stefan G; Marom, Sofi

    2014-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder falls under the category of obsessive-compulsive and related disorders, yet research has suggested it may also be highly associated with social anxiety disorder. The current study examined body image variables among 68 outpatients with primary obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD; n=22), social anxiety disorder (SAD; n=25), and panic disorder (PD; n=21). Participants filled out self-report measures of body image disturbance, attitudes toward one's appearance, and anxiety. Body image disturbance and attitudes toward appearance did not significantly differ between the groups. However, SAD symptoms predicted body image disturbance, Appearance Evaluation and Body Areas Satisfaction, and OCD symptoms predicted Appearance Orientation. These findings suggest that SAD and OCD may be associated with different facets of body image. Implications for the treatment of anxiety disorders and for future research are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Anxiety Disorders in Adolescents and Psychosocial Outcomes at Age 30

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essau, Cecilia A.; Lewinsohn, Peter M.; Olaya, Beatriz; Seeley, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders are associated with adverse psychosocial functioning, and are predictive of a wide range of psychiatric disorders in adulthood. Objective The present study examined the associations between anxiety disorders during childhood and adolescence and psychosocial outcomes at age 30, and sought to address the extent to which psychopathology after age 19 mediated these relations. Method Eight hundred and sixteen participants from a large community sample were interviewed twice during adolescence, at age 24, and at age 30. They completed self-report measures of psychosocial functioning and semi-structured diagnostic interviews during adolescence and young adulthood. Results Childhood anxiety only predicted less years of completed education at age 30, whereas adolescent anxiety predicted income, unemployment, maladjustment, poor coping skills, more chronic stress and life events. Adult major depressive disorder (MDD) was the only disorder predicted by childhood anxiety, whereas adolescent anxiety predicted MDD, substance (SUD) and alcohol abuse/dependence (AUD) in adulthood. No adult psychopathology mediated the relationship between childhood anxiety disorders and psychosocial outcomes at age 30. Adult MDD, SUD and AUD partially or completely mediated the association between adolescent anxiety and most domains of psychosocial functioning at age 30. Limitations The participants are ethically and geographically homogenous, and changes in the diagnostic criteria and the interview schedules across the assessment periods. Conclusion Adolescent anxiety, compared to childhood anxiety, is associated with more adverse psychosocial outcomes at age 30. Adolescent anxiety affects negative outcomes at age 30 directly and through MDD, SUD and AUD. PMID:24456837

  14. Assessment and management of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, Cathy; Waite, Polly; Cooper, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    Anxiety disorders in childhood and adolescence are extremely common and are often associated with lifelong psychiatric disturbance. Consistent with DSM-5 and the extant literature, this review concerns the assessment and treatment of specific phobias, separation anxiety disorder, generalised anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, panic disorder and agoraphobia. Evidence-based psychological treatments (cognitive behaviour therapy; CBT) for these disorders have been developed and investigated, and in recent years promising low-intensity versions of CBT interventions have been proposed that offer a means to increase access to evidence-based treatments. There is some evidence of effectiveness of pharmacological treatments for anxiety disorders in children and young people, however, routine prescription is not recommended due to concerns about potential harm.

  15. Episodic future thinking in generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jade Q; Szpunar, Karl K; Godovich, Sheina A; Schacter, Daniel L; Hofmann, Stefan G

    2015-12-01

    Research on future-oriented cognition in generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has primarily focused on worry, while less is known about the role of episodic future thinking (EFT), an imagery-based cognitive process. To characterize EFT in this disorder, we used the experimental recombination procedure, in which 21 GAD and 19 healthy participants simulated positive, neutral and negative novel future events either once or repeatedly, and rated their phenomenological experience of EFT. Results showed that healthy controls spontaneously generated more detailed EFT over repeated simulations. Both groups found EFT easier to generate after repeated simulations, except when GAD participants simulated positive events. They also perceived higher plausibility of negative-not positive or neutral-future events than did controls. These results demonstrate a negativity bias in GAD individuals' episodic future cognition, and suggest their relative deficit in generating vivid EFT. We discuss implications for the theory and treatment of GAD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Episodic Memories in Anxiety Disorders: Clinical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlomuzica, Armin; Dere, Dorothea; Machulska, Alla; Adolph, Dirk; Dere, Ekrem; Margraf, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize research on the emerging role of episodic memories in the context of anxiety disorders (AD). The available literature on explicit, autobiographical, and episodic memory function in AD including neuroimaging studies is critically discussed. We describe the methodological diversity of episodic memory research in AD and discuss the need for novel tests to measure episodic memory in a clinical setting. We argue that alterations in episodic memory functions might contribute to the etiology of AD. We further explain why future research on the interplay between episodic memory function and emotional disorders as well as its neuroanatomical foundations offers the promise to increase the effectiveness of modern psychological treatments. We conclude that one major task is to develop methods and training programs that might help patients suffering from AD to better understand, interpret, and possibly actively use their episodic memories in a way that would support therapeutic interventions and counteract the occurrence of symptoms. PMID:24795583

  17. Episodic memories in anxiety disorders: Clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin eZlomuzica

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to summarize research on the emerging role of episodic memories in the context of anxiety disorders (AD. The available literature on explicit-, autobiographical- and episodic memory function in AD including neuroimaging studies is critically discussed. We describe the methodological diversity of episodic memory research in AD and discuss the need for novel tests to measure episodic memory in a clinical setting. We argue that alterations in episodic memory functions might contribute to the etiology of AD. We further explain why future research on the interplay between episodic memory function and emotional disorders as well as its neuroanatomical foundations offers the promise to increase the effectiveness of modern psychological treatments. We conclude that one major task is to develop methods and training programs that might help patients suffering from AD to better understand, interpret and possibly actively use their episodic memories in a way that would support therapeutic interventions and counteract the occurrence of symptoms.

  18. Association between Internet gaming disorder and generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao-Yang; Wu, Yu-Chen; Su, Chen-Hsiang; Lin, Pai-Cheng; Ko, Chih-Hung; Yen, Ju-Yu

    2017-12-01

    Introduction This study evaluates the association between generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and Internet gaming disorder (IGD) and the role of behavior inhibition in young adults. Methods We recruited 87 people with IGD and a control group of 87 people without a history of IGD. All participants underwent a diagnostic interview based on the fifth edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, IGD and GAD criteria, and completed a questionnaire on behavior inhibition, depression, and anxiety. Results Logistic regression revealed that adults with GAD were more likely (odds ratio = 8.11, 95% CI = 1.78-37.09) to have IGD than those without it. The OR decreased when controlling for behavior inhibition. IGD subjects with GAD had higher depressive and anxiety score than those without GAD. Conclusions GAD was associated with IGD. Comorbid GAD can contribute to higher emotional difficulty. GAD should be well-assessed and interventions planned when treating young adults with IGD. Behavioral inhibition confounds the association between GAD and IGD. Further study is necessary to evaluate how to intervene in behavioral inhibitions to attenuate the risk of GAD and IGD comorbidity.

  19. Biological basis of social anxiety disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Takeshi; Yoshioka, Mitsuhiro; Koyama, Tsukasa

    2007-01-01

    Reviewed are functional imaging studies of the brain in social anxiety disorder (SAD) which are being under remarkable progress, to discuss the disease in relation to the neuronal network. Current consensuses on results, their meta-analysis and consideration of regions suggested in those studies are as follows. In MRI and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies, cerebral morphology and blood flow at rest with 99m Tc-hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO) are normal in SAD. Many studies of SAD by positron emission tomography (PET) with probes such as 15 O-H 2 O and by fMRI have shown an anxiety-induced excess reaction in the amygdaloid body and insula, and certain studies, a reaction change in frontal lobe or cingulate gyrus. Pattern change of cerebral blood flow is observable by SPECT and PET with 11 C-WAY-100635 after treatment of SAD with SSRI (serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor). Image findings of brain functions in SAD are not contradictory to clinical findings. Discussion of SAD is also made here in relation to posttraumatic stress and panic disorders, and their image findings. (R.T.)

  20. Eating-related anxiety in individuals with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, C M; Thuras, P; Peterson, C B; Lampert, J; Miller, D; Crow, S J

    2011-12-01

    Although previous research has supported the importance of anxiety as an etiological and maintenance factor for eating disorders, the specific mechanisms are not well understood. The role of anxiety in the context of eating behavior is especially unclear. The purpose of this study was to identify anxiety-eliciting eating situations and anxiety management strategies patients use to mitigate anxiety experienced in the context of eating as determined by diagnostic groups and symptom patterns. Fifty-three eating disorder outpatients were administered the Eating and Anxiety Questionnaire (EAQ) and the Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale. Ratings indicated significant anxiety in most eating situations, whereas management strategies were more limited yet regularly employed. Factor analysis of the EAQ revealed a 6-factor solution for anxiety management strategies and a 4-factor solution for anxiety-eliciting situations. These results indicate patients with eating disorders report high levels of anxiety associated with eating behaviors but utilize limited yet consistent anxiety management strategies. Effective intervention strategies for managing eating-related anxiety should be incorporated into treatment and may need to be specified for different diagnostic subgroups.

  1. Anxiety disorders in children and adolescents with autistic spectrum disorders: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Steensel, F.J.A.; Bögels, S.M.; Perrin, S.

    2011-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that children and adolescents with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) are at increased risk of anxiety and anxiety disorders. However, it is less clear which of the specific DSM-IV anxiety disorders occur most in this population. The present study used meta-analytic

  2. Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents with Autistic Spectrum Disorders: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Steensel, Francisca J. A.; Bogels, Susan M.; Perrin, Sean

    2011-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that children and adolescents with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) are at increased risk of anxiety and anxiety disorders. However, it is less clear which of the specific DSM-IV anxiety disorders occur most in this population. The present study used meta-analytic techniques to help clarify this issue. A systematic…

  3. Social communication deficits: Specific associations with Social Anxiety Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halls, Georgia; Cooper, Peter J; Creswell, Cathy

    2015-02-01

    Social communication deficits are prevalent amongst children with anxiety disorders; however whether they are over-represented specifically among children with Social Anxiety Disorder has not been examined. This study set out to examine social communication deficits among children with Social Anxiety Disorder in comparison to children with other forms of anxiety disorder. Parents of 404 children with a diagnosed anxiety disorder completed the Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ; Rutter, M., Bailey, A., Lord, C., 2003. The Social Communication Questionnaire - Manual. Western Psychological Services, Los Angeles, CA). Children with a diagnosis of Social Anxiety Disorder (n=262) and anxious children without Social Anxiety Disorder (n=142) were compared on SCQ total and subscale scores and the frequency of participants scoring above clinical cut-offs. Children with Social Anxiety Disorder scored significantly higher than anxious children without Social Anxiety Disorder on the SCQ total (t(352)=4.85, p<.001, d=.55, r=.27), Reciprocal Social Interaction (t(351)=4.73, p<.001, d=.55, r=.27), communication (t(344)=3.62, p<.001, d=.43, r=.21) and repetitive, restrictive and stereotyped behaviors subscales (t(353)=3.15, p=.002, d=.37, r=.18). Furthermore, children with Social Anxiety Disorder were three times more likely to score above clinical cut-offs. The participants were a relatively affluent group of predominantly non-minority status. The social communication difficulties measure relied on parental report which could be influenced by extraneous factors. Treatments for Social Anxiety Disorder may benefit from a specific focus on developing social communication skills. Future research using objective assessments of underlying social communication skills is required. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Anxiety Disorder in a Case of Arnold-Chiari Malformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, B. Terry; Velamoor, R.; Chandarana, P.C.; Cochrane, David K.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes a patient who suffered concurrently from panic disorder with agoraphobia and Arnold-Chiari malformation. Surgical correction of the neuroanatomical anomaly altered the patient's symptom pattern, enabling a more clear delineation of her anxiety disorder. PMID:8461284

  5. Obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders in obsessive-compulsive disorder and other anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochner, Christine; Stein, Dan J

    2010-01-01

    There has been debate about whether obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) should be classified as one of the anxiety disorders, or should rather be categorized with obsessive-compulsive spectrum conditions. The question of where OCD should be located in the diagnostic system was addressed by investigating the relationship of OCD, obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders (OCSDs), and anxiety disorders. We administered a structured diagnostic interview (the SCID-OCSD) for assessing putative OCSDs in patients who presented with a primary diagnosis of OCD, panic disorder with/out agoraphobia (PD) or social anxiety disorder (SAD) in an attempt to address the proposed differentiation of OCD from the other DSM-IV anxiety disorders. Patients with OCD were significantly more likely to have multiple comorbid putative OCSDs than patients with PD or SAD. Some OCSDs, i.e. any tic disorder/Tourette's disorder as well as body-focused repetitive behaviors (self-injury, trichotillomania), and certain impulsive/reward-focused disorders (kleptomania, hypersexual disorder) were more common in OCD. Some of the putative OCSDs (e.g. hypochondriasis and body dysmorphic disorder) were more common in PD and SAD, respectively. Depression had equally high comorbidity with OCD, PD, and SAD, while generalized anxiety disorder and alcohol dependence were particularly associated with SAD. These findings suggest that some putative OCSDs may be related to OCD, while some may have a closer relationship to other anxiety disorders. From a nosological perspective, it may be useful to include OCD and certain OCSDs under the rubric of an enlarged category of anxiety and OCSDs. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Emotional reasoning and anxiety sensitivity: associations with social anxiety disorder in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkozei, Anna; Cooper, Peter J; Creswell, Cathy

    2014-01-01

    Two specific cognitive constructs that have been implicated in the development and maintenance of anxiety symptoms are anxiety sensitivity and emotional reasoning, both of which relate to the experience and meaning of physical symptoms of arousal or anxiety. The interpretation of physical symptoms has been particularly implicated in theories of social anxiety disorder, where internal physical symptoms are hypothesized to influence the individual's appraisals of the self as a social object. The current study compared 75 children on measures of anxiety sensitivity and emotional reasoning: 25 with social anxiety disorder, 25 with other anxiety disorders, and 25 nonanxious children (aged 7-12 years). Children with social anxiety disorder reported higher levels of anxiety sensitivity and were more likely than both other groups to view ambiguous situations as anxiety provoking, whether physical information was present or not. There were no group differences in the extent to which physical information altered children's interpretation of hypothetical scenarios. This study is the first to investigate emotional reasoning in clinically anxious children and therefore replication is needed. In addition, those in both anxious groups commonly had comorbid conditions and, consequently, specific conclusions about social anxiety disorder need to be treated with caution. The findings highlight cognitive characteristics that may be particularly pertinent in the context of social anxiety disorder in childhood and which may be potential targets for treatment. Furthermore, the findings suggest that strategies to modify these particular cognitive constructs may not be necessary in treatments of some other childhood anxiety disorders. © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Perinatal Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Assessment and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misri, Shaila; Abizadeh, Jasmin; Sanders, Shawn; Swift, Elena

    2015-09-01

    Perinatal generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has a high prevalence of 8.5%-10.5% during pregnancy and 4.4%-10.8% postpartum. Despite its attendant dysfunction in the patient, this potentially debilitating mental health condition is often underdiagnosed. This overview will provide guidance for clinicians in making timely diagnosis and managing symptoms appropriately. A significant barrier to the diagnosis of GAD in the perinatal population is difficulty in distinguishing normal versus pathological worry. Because a perinatal-specific screening tool for GAD is nonexistent, early identification, diagnosis and treatment is often compromised. The resultant maternal dysfunction can potentially impact mother-infant bonding and influence neurodevelopmental outcomes in the children. Comorbid occurrence of GAD and major depressive disorder changes the illness course and its treatment outcome. Psychoeducation is a key component in overcoming denial/stigma and facilitating successful intervention. Treatment strategies are contingent upon illness severity. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), relaxation, and mindfulness therapy are indicated for mild GAD. Moderate/severe illness requires pharmacotherapy and CBT, individually or in combination. No psychotropic medications are approved by the FDA or Health Canada in pregnancy or the postpartum; off-label pharmacological treatment is instituted only if the benefit of therapy outweighs its risk. SSRIs/SNRIs are the first-line treatment for anxiety disorders due to data supporting their efficacy and overall favorable side effect profile. Benzodiazepines are an option for short-term treatment. While research on atypical antipsychotics is evolving, some can be considered for severe manifestations where the response to antidepressants or benzodiazepines has been insufficient. A case example will illustrate the onset, clinical course, and treatment strategies of GAD through pregnancy and the postpartum.

  8. The Moderated Effects of Video Feedback for Social Anxiety Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Rodebaugh, Thomas L.; Heimberg, Richard G.; Schultz, Luke T.; Blackmore, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Despite initially positive results, video feedback for social anxiety has never been shown to reduce social anxiety in a controlled experiment with diagnosed participants, and only once with undiagnosed participants. Previous studies arguably did not detect such an effect because of limited assessment of anxiety and potential moderators. We tested video feedback with cognitive preparation among treatment-seeking participants with a primary diagnosis of social anxiety disorder. In Session 1, p...

  9. ADULT ANXIETY DISORDERS IN RELATION TO TRAIT ANXIETY AND PERCEIVED STRESS IN CHILDHOOD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundy, Elizabeth A; Weber, Mareen; Rauch, Scott L; Killgore, William D S; Simon, Naomi M; Pollack, Mark H; Rosso, Isabelle M

    2015-10-01

    It is well established that objective early life stressors increase risk for anxiety disorders and that environmental stressors interact with dispositional factors such as trait anxiety. There is less information on how subjective perception of stress during childhood relates to later clinical anxiety. This study tested whether childhood perceived stress and trait anxiety were independently and interactively associated with adult anxiety disorders. Forty-seven adults diagnosed with anxiety disorders (M age = 34 yr., SD = 11) and 29 healthy participants (M = 33 yr., SD = 13) completed the adult Perceived Stress Scale, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Global Perceived Early Life Events Scale as a measure of perceived stress during childhood. In a logistic regression model, high childhood perceived stress (β = 0.64) and trait anxiety (β = 0.11) were associated with significantly greater odds of adult anxiety disorder. The association between childhood perceived stress and adult anxiety remained significant when controlling for adult perceived stress. These findings suggest that children's perception of stress in their daily lives may be an important target of intervention to prevent the progression of stress into clinically significant anxiety.

  10. Social anxiety disorder and stuttering: current status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverach, Lisa; Rapee, Ronald M

    2014-06-01

    Anxiety is one of the most widely observed and extensively studied psychological concomitants of stuttering. Research conducted prior to the turn of the century produced evidence of heightened anxiety in people who stutter, yet findings were inconsistent and ambiguous. Failure to detect a clear and systematic relationship between anxiety and stuttering was attributed to methodological flaws, including use of small sample sizes and unidimensional measures of anxiety. More recent research, however, has generated far less equivocal findings when using social anxiety questionnaires and psychiatric diagnostic assessments in larger samples of people who stutter. In particular, a growing body of research has demonstrated an alarmingly high rate of social anxiety disorder among adults who stutter. Social anxiety disorder is a prevalent and chronic anxiety disorder characterised by significant fear of humiliation, embarrassment, and negative evaluation in social or performance-based situations. In light of the debilitating nature of social anxiety disorder, and the impact of stuttering on quality of life and personal functioning, collaboration between speech pathologists and psychologists is required to develop and implement comprehensive assessment and treatment programmes for social anxiety among people who stutter. This comprehensive approach has the potential to improve quality of life and engagement in everyday activities for people who stutter. Determining the prevalence of social anxiety disorder among children and adolescents who stutter is a critical line of future research. Further studies are also required to confirm the efficacy of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy in treating social anxiety disorder in stuttering. The reader will be able to: (a) describe the nature and course of social anxiety disorder; (b) outline previous research regarding anxiety and stuttering, including features of social anxiety disorder; (c) summarise research findings regarding the

  11. Some psychosocial predictors of anxiety disorder in epilepsy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to expose the variables or predictors that mediate in anxiety disorders among epileptics in Nigeria. Such variables or predictors are age, level of social support and perceived level of stigmatization were examined with reference to their roles in causing anxiety disorder among epileptics in Nigeria.

  12. Some psychosocial predictors of anxiety disorder in epilepsy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some psychosocial predictors of anxiety disorder in epilepsy. A A Adesina, O A Afolabi, R O Ohwojero. Abstract. This study was designed to expose the variables or predictors that mediate in anxiety disorders among epileptics in Nigeria. Such variables or predictors are age, level of social support and perceived level of ...

  13. Generalized Anxiety Disorder in Referred Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Gabriele; Millepiedi, Stefania; Mucci, Maria; Poli, Paola; Bertini, Nicoletta; Milantoni, Luca

    2004-01-01

    Objective: There are insufficient data on generalized anxiety disorder in children and adolescents. Symptoms and comorbidity of generalized anxiety disorder are described as a function of age, gender, and comorbidity in a consecutive series of referred children and adolescents. Method: One hundred fifty-seven outpatients (97 males and 60 females,…

  14. Functional Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Children with Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Allison M.; Schilpzand, Elizabeth; Bell, Clare; Walker, Lynn S.; Baber, Kari

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the incidence and correlates of functional gastrointestinal symptoms in children with anxiety disorders. Participants were 6-13 year old children diagnosed with one or more anxiety disorders (n = 54) and non-clinical control children (n = 51). Telephone diagnostic interviews were performed with parents to determine the presence…

  15. Complex anxiety disorders : Risk factors, underlying mechanisms, and treatment enhancement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Hofmeijer-Sevink, M.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis aims to address lacunas in the current knowledge of complex anxiety disorders. This is an important topic since complex anxiety disorders tend to develop a chronic course and because current guidelines are incomplete. In this thesis, several studies are presented regarding the various

  16. Cognitive and social predictors of generalized anxiety disorder ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is common. It accounts for about one out of four anxiety related clinic consultations. The prevalence of this common disorder and the associated factors in Ugandan students are unknown. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of GAD symptoms, and ...

  17. [Pharmacotherapy for social phobia, generalised anxiety disorder and separation anxiety disorder in children and adolescents: an overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieleman, G C; Ferdinand, R F

    2008-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent psychiatric disorders during childhood. They are often persistent and are associated with a number of negative outcomes. Therefore, effective treatment is required. To present an overview of placebo-controlled studies of pharmacotherapy for social phobia, generalised anxiety disorder and separation anxiety disorder in children an adolescents and to determine which medication is the most effective. The literature was reviewed using Pubmed. Nine randomised double-blind studies on the efficacy of pharmacotherapy for generalised anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder and social phobia were found. Tricyclic antidepressants were not more effective than placebo. Studies on benzodiazepines showed that the effect of these drugs was not superior to that of placebo either. Studies of the efficacy of ssris, however, proved that they were superior to placebo. SSRIS are the drugs of first choice for the treatment of social phobias, separation anxiety disorder and generalised anxiety disorder in children and adolescents. There is strong evidence that ssris are effective for the treatment of these anxiety disorders; the standardised effect size varies between medium and large.

  18. Precursors to the Development of Anxiety Disorders in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    SOR can also have an impact on oral care , both in the home and dental office. Similarly, the presence of an anxiety disorder has been shown to...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0526 TITLE: Precursors to the Development of Anxiety Disorders in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Precursors to the Development of Anxiety Disorders in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  19. Relationship between anxiety, anxiety sensitivity and conduct disorder symptoms in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgiç, Ayhan; Türkoğlu, Serhat; Ozcan, Ozlem; Tufan, Ali Evren; Yılmaz, Savaş; Yüksel, Tuğba

    2013-09-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is often comorbid with anxiety disorders and previous studies observed that anxiety could have an impact on the clinical course of ADHD and comorbid disruptive behavioral disorders (conduct disorders and oppositional-defiant disorders). Anxiety sensitivity (AS) is a different concept from anxiety per se and it is believed to represent the constitutionally based sensitivity of individuals to anxiety and anxiety symptoms. We aimed to assess the associations between anxiety, AS and symptoms of disruptive behavioral disorders (DBD) in a clinical sample of children and adolescents with ADHD. The sample consisted of 274 treatment naive children with ADHD aged 8-17 years. The severity of ADHD symptoms and comorbid DBD were assessed via parent rated Turgay DSM-IV-Based Child and Adolescent Behavioral Disorders Screening and Rating Scale (T-DSM-IV-S), Conners' Parent Rating Scale (CPRS), and Conners' Teacher Rating Scale (CTRS). AS and severity of anxiety symptoms of children were evaluated by self-report inventories. The association between anxiety, AS, and DBD was evaluated using structural equation modeling. Analyses revealed that AS social subscale scores negatively predicted symptoms of conduct disorder (CD) reported in T-DSM-IV-S. On the other hand, CD symptoms positively predicted severity of anxiety. No direct relationships were detected between anxiety, AS and oppositional-defiant behavior scores in any scales. These results may suggest a protective effect of AS social area on the development of conduct disorder in the presence of a diagnosis of ADHD, while the presence of symptoms of CD may be a vulnerability factor for the development of anxiety symptoms in children and adolescents with ADHD.

  20. False memories in social anxiety disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PRISCILA DE CAMARGO PALMA

    Full Text Available Abstract Background False memories are memories of events that never occurred or that occurred, but not exactly as we recall. Events with emotional content are subject to false memories production similar to neutral events. However, individual differences, such as the level of maladjustment and emotional instability characteristics of Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD, may interfere in the production of false memories. Objectives This study aimed to assess the effect of emotion in memory performance for an event witnessed by participants with and without SAD. Methods Participants were 61 young adults with SAD and 76 without any symptoms of SAD who were randomly assigned to watch a story with or without emotional arousal. Participants answered a subjective scale of emotion about the story and a recognition memory test. Results Participants with SAD recovered more true memories and more false memories for the non-emotional version compared to the emotional version of the story. Overall, participants with SAD produced fewer false memories compared to those without SAD. Discussion This finding suggests that social anxiety may have a significant impact on emotional memory accuracy, which may assist in the development and improvement of techniques for therapeutic intervention.

  1. Behavioral symptoms and sleep problems in children with anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwadare, Yoshitaka; Kamei, Yuichi; Usami, Masahide; Ushijima, Hirokage; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Kyota; Kodaira, Masaki; Saito, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-01

    Sleep disorders are frequently associated with childhood behavioral problems and mental illnesses such as anxiety disorder. To identify promising behavioral targets for pediatric anxiety disorder therapy, we investigated the associations between specific sleep and behavioral problems. We conducted retrospective reviews of 105 patients aged 4-12 years who met the DSM-IV criteria for primary diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder (n = 33), separation anxiety disorder (n = 23), social phobia (n = 21), or obsessive compulsive disorder (n = 28). Sleep problems were evaluated using the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ) and behavioral problems by the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale, Oppositional Defiant Behavior Inventory (ODBI), and Depression Self-Rating Scale for Children. Depressive behavior was weakly correlated with CSHQ subscores for sleep onset delay and night waking but not with total sleep disturbance. Anxiety was correlated with bedtime resistance, night waking, and total sleep disturbance score. Oppositional defiance was correlated with bedtime resistance, daytime sleepiness, sleep onset delay, and most strongly with total sleep disturbance. On multiple regression analysis ODBI score had the strongest positive association with total sleep disturbance and the strongest negative association with total sleep duration. Sleep problems in children with anxiety disorders are closely related to anxiety and oppositional defiant symptoms. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  2. How do we treat generalized anxiety disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latas Milan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In addition to significant prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD and related consequences, it seems that this disorder has not been studied sufficiently in Serbia. Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the understanding of psychopathology and the adequate treatment of patients with GAD by psychiatrists in Serbia. Methods. The study comprised 84 doctors - psychiatrists and neuropsychiatrists who were engaged in treatment of patients with GAD. Anonymous survey was used as the basic instrument, which collected information about the socio-demographic and professional data, experience in treating GAD and understanding psychopathology of GAD, as well as the first and the second choice therapy for patients with GAD. Results. The majority of psychiatrists (62.2% indicated the symptoms of distress/tension and slightly lower percent (36.6% designated the symptoms of worry/anxiety as the key symptoms of GAD when it was diagnosed. The results showed that almost all patients (96.5% had been treated with benzodiazepines before coming to psychiatrists. Most psychiatrists preferred the use of SSRI/SNRI antidepressants (76.2%, usually in combination with benzodiazepines (71.4% for the treatment of patients with GAD; however, if these doctors got GAD, the preference of benzodiazepine use would be significantly lesser (45.2% than for the treatment of their patients. Preference for the use of SSRI/SNRI antidepressants was significantly more frequent in physicians with completed residency. Conclusion. The understanding of psychopathology and treatment practice for patients with GAD in this sample of psychiatrists in Serbia is mostly consistent with the current trends for GAD treatment.

  3. Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms and Medical Illness Among Adults with Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, Andrea N.; Dour, Halina J.; Stanton, Annette L.; Roy-Byrne, Peter P.; Stein, Murray B.; Sullivan, Greer; Sherbourne, Cathy D.; Rose, Raphael D.; Craske, Michelle G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Anxiety is linked to a number of medical conditions, yet few studies have examined how symptom severity relates to medical comorbidity. Purpose The current study assessed associations between severity of anxiety and depression and presence of medical conditions in adults diagnosed with anxiety disorders. Method Nine-hundred eighty-nine patients diagnosed with panic, generalized anxiety, social anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorders reported on the severity of anxiety and depressive symptoms and on diagnoses of 11 medical conditions. Results Severity of anxiety and depressive symptoms was strongly associated with having more medical conditions over and above control variables, and the association was as strong as that between BMI and disease. Odds of having asthma, heart disease, back problems, ulcer, migraine headache and eyesight difficulties also increased as anxiety and depressive symptom severity increased. Anxiety symptoms were independently associated with ulcer, whereas depressive symptoms were independently associated with heart disease, migraine, and eyesight difficulties. Conclusions These findings add to a growing body of research linking anxiety disorders with physical health problems and indicate that anxiety and depressive symptoms deserve greater attention in their association with disease. PMID:25510186

  4. Anxiety and depressive symptoms and medical illness among adults with anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, Andrea N; Dour, Halina J; Stanton, Annette L; Roy-Byrne, Peter P; Stein, Murray B; Sullivan, Greer; Sherbourne, Cathy D; Rose, Raphael D; Craske, Michelle G

    2015-02-01

    Anxiety is linked to a number of medical conditions, yet few studies have examined how symptom severity relates to medical comorbidity. The current study assessed associations between severity of anxiety and depression and the presence of medical conditions in adults diagnosed with anxiety disorders. Nine-hundred eighty-nine patients diagnosed with panic, generalized anxiety, social anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorders reported on the severity of anxiety and depressive symptoms and on diagnoses of 11 medical conditions. Severity of anxiety and depressive symptoms was strongly associated with having more medical conditions over and above control variables, and the association was as strong as that between BMI and disease. Odds of having asthma, heart disease, back problems, ulcer, migraine headache and eyesight difficulties also increased as anxiety and depressive symptom severity increased. Anxiety symptoms were independently associated with ulcer, whereas depressive symptoms were independently associated with heart disease, migraine, and eyesight difficulties. These findings add to a growing body of research linking anxiety disorders with physical health problems and indicate that anxiety and depressive symptoms deserve greater attention in their association with disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Major Depressive Disorder, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, and Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Do the Sexual Dysfunctions Differ?

    OpenAIRE

    Kendurkar, Arvind; Kaur, Brinder

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Major depressive disorder (MDD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) are known to have significant impact on sexual functioning. They have been studied individually. Therefore, this study was planned to compare the sexual dysfunction between MDD, OCD, and GAD with healthy subjects as controls.

  6. Regional Brain Volume in Depression and Anxiety Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tol, Marie-Jose; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; van den Heuvel, Odile A.; Nielen, Marjan M. A.; Demenescu, Liliana R.; Aleman, Andre; Renken, Remco; van Buchem, Mark A.; Zitman, Frans G.; Veltman, Dick J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Major depressive disorder (MDD), panic disorder, and social anxiety disorder are among the most prevalent and frequently co-occurring psychiatric disorders in adults and may have, at least in part, a common etiology. Objective: To identify the unique and shared neuro-anatomical profile of

  7. Regional brain volume in depression and anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tol, Marie-José; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; van den Heuvel, Odile A.; Nielen, Marjan M. A.; Demenescu, Liliana R.; Aleman, André; Renken, Remco; van Buchem, Mark A.; Zitman, Frans G.; Veltman, Dick J.

    2010-01-01

    CONTEXT: Major depressive disorder (MDD), panic disorder, and social anxiety disorder are among the most prevalent and frequently co-occurring psychiatric disorders in adults and may have, at least in part, a common etiology. OBJECTIVE: To identify the unique and shared neuroanatomical profile of

  8. Anxiety symptoms in a major mood and schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, B; Joffe, G; Aaltonen, K; Suvisaari, J; Baryshnikov, I; Näätänen, P; Koivisto, M; Melartin, T; Oksanen, J; Suominen, K; Heikkinen, M; Paunio, T; Isometsä, E

    2016-09-01

    Comorbid anxiety symptoms and disorders are present in many psychiatric disorders, but methodological variations render comparisons of their frequency and intensity difficult. Furthermore, whether risk factors for comorbid anxiety symptoms are similar in patients with mood disorders and schizophrenia spectrum disorders remains unclear. The Overall Anxiety Severity and Impairment Scale (OASIS) was used to measure anxiety symptoms in psychiatric care patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (SSA, n=113), bipolar disorder (BD, n=99), or depressive disorder (DD, n=188) in the Helsinki University Psychiatric Consortium Study. Bivariate correlations and multivariate linear regression models were used to examine associations of depressive symptoms, neuroticism, early psychological trauma and distress, self-efficacy, symptoms of borderline personality disorder, and attachment style with anxiety symptoms in the three diagnostic groups. Frequent or constant anxiety was reported by 40.2% of SSA, 51.5% of BD, and 55.6% of DD patients; it was described as severe or extreme by 43.8%, 41.4%, and 41.2% of these patients, respectively. SSA patients were significantly less anxious (P=0.010) and less often avoided anxiety-provoking situations (P=0.009) than the other patients. In regression analyses, OASIS was associated with high neuroticism, symptoms of depression and borderline personality disorder and low self-efficacy in all patients, and with early trauma in patients with mood disorders. Comorbid anxiety symptoms are ubiquitous among psychiatric patients with mood or schizophrenia spectrum disorders, and in almost half of them, reportedly severe. Anxiety symptoms appear to be strongly related to both concurrent depressive symptoms and personality characteristics, regardless of principal diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. The prevalence and correlates of adult separation anxiety disorder in an anxiety clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Renate

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adult separation anxiety disorder (ASAD has been identified recently, but there is a paucity of data about its prevalence and associated characteristics amongst anxiety patients. This study assessed the prevalence and risk factor profile associated with ASAD in an anxiety clinic. Methods Clinical psychologists assigned 520 consecutive patients to DSM-IV adult anxiety subcategories using the SCID. We also measured demographic factors and reports of early separation anxiety (the Separation Anxiety Symptom Inventory and a retrospective diagnosis of childhood separation anxiety disorder. Other self-report measures included the Adult Separation Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire (ASA-27, the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scales (DASS-21, personality traits measured by the NEO PI-R and the Work and Social Adjustment Scale. These measures were included in three models examining for overall differences and then by gender: Model 1 compared the conventional SCID anxiety subtypes (excluding PTSD and OCD because of insufficient numbers; Model 2 divided the sample into those with and without ASAD; Model 3 compared those with ASAD with the individual anxiety subtypes in the residual group. Results Patients with ASAD had elevated early separation anxiety scores but this association was unique in females only. Except for social phobia in relation to some comparisons, those with ASAD recorded more severe symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress, higher neuroticism scores, and greater levels of disability. Conclusions Patients with ASAD attending an anxiety clinic are highly symptomatic and disabled. The findings have implications for the classification, clinical identification and treatment of adult anxiety disorders.

  10. Attachment and parenting in adult patients with anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picardi, Angelo; Caroppo, Emanuele; Fabi, Elisa; Proietti, Serena; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Meldolesi, Giulio Nicolò; Martinotti, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    The literature suggests that dysfunctional parenting and insecure attachment may increase risk of anxiety-related psychopathology. This study aimed at testing the association between anxiety disorders, attachment insecurity and dysfunctional parenting while controlling for factors usually not controlled for in previous studies, such as gender, age, and being ill. A sample of 32 non-psychotic inpatients with SCID-I diagnosis of an anxiety disorder, either alone or in comorbidity, was compared with two age- and sex-matched control groups consisting of 32 non-clinical participants and 32 in-patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. Study measures included the Experience in Close Relationships questionnaire (ECR) and the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI). The patients with anxiety disorders scored significantly higher on attachment-related anxiety and avoidance than patients with drug-resistant epilepsy and non-clinical participants. These findings were independent of comorbidity for mood disorders. ECR scores did not differ among diagnostic subgroups (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, other anxiety disorders). Patients with anxiety disorders scored significantly lower on PBI mother's care and borderline significantly lower on PBI father's care than patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. Although limitations such as the relatively small sample size and the cross-sectional nature suggest caution in interpreting these findings, they are consistent with the few previous adult studies performed on this topic and corroborate Bowlby's seminal hypothesis of a link between negative attachment-related experiences, attachment insecurity, and clinical anxiety. Attachment theory provides a useful theoretical framework for integrating research findings from several fields concerning the development of anxiety disorders and for planning therapeutic interventions.

  11. Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Social Anxiety Disorder, but Not Panic Anxiety Disorder, Are Associated with Higher Sensitivity to Learning from Negative Feedback: Behavioral and Computational Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khdour, Hussain Y; Abushalbaq, Oday M; Mughrabi, Ibrahim T; Imam, Aya F; Gluck, Mark A; Herzallah, Mohammad M; Moustafa, Ahmed A

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), social anxiety disorder (SAD), and panic anxiety disorder (PAD), are a group of common psychiatric conditions. They are characterized by excessive worrying, uneasiness, and fear of future events, such that they affect social and occupational functioning. Anxiety disorders can alter behavior and cognition as well, yet little is known about the particular domains they affect. In this study, we tested the cognitive correlates of medication-free patients with GAD, SAD, and PAD, along with matched healthy participants using a probabilistic category-learning task that allows the dissociation between positive and negative feedback learning. We also fitted all participants' data to a Q-learning model and various actor-critic models that examine learning rate parameters from positive and negative feedback to investigate effects of valence vs. action on performance. SAD and GAD patients were more sensitive to negative feedback than either PAD patients or healthy participants. PAD, SAD, and GAD patients did not differ in positive-feedback learning compared to healthy participants. We found that Q-learning models provide the simplest fit of the data in comparison to other models. However, computational analysis revealed that groups did not differ in terms of learning rate or exploration values. These findings argue that (a) not all anxiety spectrum disorders share similar cognitive correlates, but are rather different in ways that do not link them to the hallmark of anxiety (higher sensitivity to negative feedback); and (b) perception of negative consequences is the core feature of GAD and SAD, but not PAD. Further research is needed to examine the similarities and differences between anxiety spectrum disorders in other cognitive domains and potential implementation of behavioral therapy to remediate cognitive deficits.

  12. Increased mortality among people with anxiety disorders: total population study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Sandra M.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mors, Ole; Mortensen, Preben B.; Laursen, Thomas M.; Penninx, Brenda W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders and depression are the most common mental disorders worldwide and have a striking impact on global disease burden. Although depression has consistently been found to increase mortality; the role of anxiety disorders in predicting mortality risk is unclear. Aims To assess mortality risk in people with anxiety disorders. Method We used nationwide Danish register data to conduct a prospective cohort study with over 30 million person-years of follow-up. Results In total, 1066 (2.1%) people with anxiety disorders died during an average follow-up of 9.7 years. The risk of death by natural and unnatural causes was significantly higher among individuals with anxiety disorders (natural mortality rate ratio (MRR) = 1.39, 95% CI 1.28–1.51; unnatural MRR = 2.46, 95% CI 2.20–2.73) compared with the general population. Of those who died from unnatural causes, 16.5% had comorbid diagnoses of depression (MRR = 11.72, 95% CI 10.11–13.51). Conclusions Anxiety disorders significantly increased mortality risk. Comorbidity of anxiety disorders and depression played an important part in the increased mortality. PMID:27388572

  13. Generalized anxiety disorder: comorbidity, comparative biology and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, David J; Ballenger, James C; Sheehan, David; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2002-12-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a severe and chronic anxiety disorder characterized by uncontrollable worrying and somatic anxiety (tension, insomnia and hypervigilance). It is a common condition, with lifetime prevalence rates for DSM-IV GAD in the general population of approx. 5-6% being reported. In addition, like other anxiety disorders, GAD also shows comorbidity with depression and most of the other anxiety disorders. This article reviews data on the prevalence of GAD, its comorbidity with depression, and its social and economic impact. Proposed neurobiological mechanisms for GAD are discussed, since an understanding of these may help in the development of future therapies. Finally, current pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment options for GAD are reviewed, with particular attention being paid to published clinical-trial data.

  14. Comorbid Depressive Disorders in Anxiety-Disordered Youth: Demographic, Clinical, and Family Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Kelly A.; Podell, Jennifer L.; Benjamin, Courtney L.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2010-01-01

    Research indicates that depression and anxiety are highly comorbid in youth. Little is known, however, about the clinical and family characteristics of youth with principal anxiety disorders and comorbid depressive diagnoses. The present study examined the demographic, clinical, and family characteristics of 200 anxiety-disordered children and…

  15. Depression/anxiety disorder and amygdala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iidaka, Tetsuya

    2007-01-01

    Described and discussed are neuro-imaging studies on the amygdala (Am) concerning its volume, neuro-active drug effect on it and its response to repulsive and attractive stress-evoked character/temperament tests in patients mainly with major depression (MD) and anxiety disorder (AD), by functional MRI (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). A recent trend of volumetry of Am is the voxel-based morphometry by MRI, of which results are still controversial in MD. In contrast, many studies by PET and fMRI using neuro-active drugs have revealed that Am activity in MD is stimulated, and this hyperactivity can be improved by anti-depressive drugs. In addition, difference of activities is suggested in Am left and right hemispheres. The hyperactivity in Am has been reported also in AD and phobic disorders, of which symptoms are conceivably expressed by the sensitivity changes in the cerebral limbic system involving Am. The author considers the central region responsible for the depressive mood is present around cortex of anteroinferior genu of corpus callosum where neuro-network with Am is dense. (R.T.)

  16. Conditioned Subjective Responses to Socially Relevant Stimuli in Social Anxiety Disorder and Subclinical Social Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinoco-González, Daniella; Fullana, Miquel Angel; Torrents-Rodas, David; Bonillo, Albert; Vervliet, Bram; Pailhez, Guillem; Farré, Magí; Andión, Oscar; Perez, Víctor; Torrubia, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Although enhanced fear conditioning has been implicated in the origins of social anxiety disorder (SAD), laboratory evidence in support of this association is limited. Using a paradigm employing socially relevant unconditioned stimuli, we conducted two separate studies to asses fear conditioning in individuals with SAD and non-clinical individuals with high social anxiety (subclinical social anxiety [SSA]). They were compared with age-matched and gender-matched individuals with another anxiety disorder (panic disorder with agoraphobia) and healthy controls (Study 1) and with individuals with low social anxiety (Study 2). Contrary to our expectations, in both studies, self-report measures (ratings of anxiety, unpleasantness and arousal to the conditioned stimuli) of fear conditioning failed to discriminate between SAD or SSA and the other participant groups. Our results suggest that enhanced fear conditioning does not play a major role in pathological social anxiety. We used a social conditioning paradigm to study fear conditioning in clinical and subclinical social anxiety. We found no evidence of enhanced fear conditioning in social anxiety individuals. Enhanced fear conditioning may not be a hallmark of pathological social anxiety. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Parental responsibility beliefs: associations with parental anxiety and behaviours in the context of childhood anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apetroaia, Adela; Hill, Claire; Creswell, Cathy

    2015-12-01

    High levels of parental anxiety are associated with poor treatment outcomes for children with anxiety disorders. Associated parental cognitions and behaviours have been implicated as impediments to successful treatment. We examined the association between parental responsibility beliefs, maternal anxiety and parenting behaviours in the context of childhood anxiety disorders. Anxious and non-anxious mothers of 7-12 year old children with a current anxiety disorder reported their parental responsibility beliefs using a questionnaire measure. Parental behaviours towards their child during a stressor task were measured. Parents with a current anxiety disorder reported a greater sense of responsibility for their child's actions and wellbeing than parents who scored within the normal range for anxiety. Furthermore, higher parental responsibility was associated with more intrusive and less warm behaviours in parent-child interactions and there was an indirect effect between maternal anxiety and maternal intrusive behaviours via parental responsibility beliefs. The sample was limited to a treatment-seeking, relatively high socio-economic population and only mothers were included so replication with more diverse groups is needed. The use of a range of stressor tasks may have allowed for a more comprehensive assessment of parental behaviours. The findings suggest that parental anxiety disorder is associated with an elevated sense of parental responsibility and may promote parental behaviours likely to inhibit optimum child treatment outcomes. Parental responsibility beliefs may therefore be important to target in child anxiety treatments in the context of parental anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Positive thinking in anxiety disordered children reconsidered

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogendoorn, S.M.; Prins, P.J.M.; Vervoort, L.; Wolters, L.H.; Nauta, M.H.; Hartman, C.A.; Moorlag, H; de Haan, E.; Boer, F.

    2012-01-01

    Negatively valenced thoughts are assumed to play a central role in the development and maintenance of anxiety. However, the role of positive thoughts in anxiety is rather unclear. In the current study we examined the role of negative and positive self-statements in the anxiety level of anxious and

  19. Positive thinking in anxiety disordered children reconsidered

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogendoorn, S.M.; Prins, P.J.M.; Vervoort, L.; Wolters, L.H.; Nauta, M.H.; Hartman, C.A.; Moorlag, H.; de Haan, E.; Boer, F.

    Negatively valenced thoughts are assumed to play a central role in the development and maintenance of anxiety. However, the role of positive thoughts in anxiety is rather unclear. In the current study we examined the role of negative and positive self-statements in the anxiety level of anxious and

  20. Relationships among depression, anxiety, anxiety sensitivity, and perceived social support in adolescents with conversion disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Savaş; Bilgiç, Ayhan; Akça, Ömer Faruk; Türkoğlu, Serhat; Hergüner, Sabri

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the relationships of depression, anxiety, anxiety sensitivity, and perceived social support with conversion symptoms in adolescents with conversion disorder (CD). Fifty outpatients, aged 8-18 years, who had been diagnosed with CD and members of a control group were assessed using the psychological questionnaires. Compared with controls, adolescents with CD scored higher on the Child Depression Inventory (CDI), Screen for Child Anxiety-related Emotional Disorders (SCARED), Childhood Anxiety Sensitivity Index (CASI) total, CASI physical and cognitive subscales, and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support family subscale. Multiple regression analysis showed that CDI, CASI total, and CASI cognitive scores predicted the Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire (SDQ) scores and that CDI and CASI total scores predicted the Children's Somatization Inventory (CSI) scores of subjects. This study suggest that adolescents with CD had poor psychosocial well-being, and depression, global anxiety sensitivity and anxiety sensitivity cognitive concerns are related to conversion symptoms.

  1. Examining the Role of Anxiety Sensitivity in Sleep Dysfunction Across Anxiety Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Amanda W; Keshaviah, Aparna; Goetter, Elizabeth M; Bui, Eric; Swee, Michaela; Rosencrans, Peter L; Simon, Naomi M

    2017-01-01

    Anxiety Sensitivity (AS) has been associated with sleep difficulties in certain anxiety disorder populations, but no studies have examined cross-diagnostically the role of anxiety sensitivity in sleep dysfunction. Three hundred one participants with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), social anxiety disorder (SAD), and panic disorder (PD) completed an ancillary questionnaire-based study. Linear regression was used to examine AS and sleep dysfunction, and mediation analyses were used to examine whether AS was a mediator of the effect of primary diagnosis on sleep. AS was associated with increased sleep dysfunction across anxiety disorders, and primary anxiety disorder diagnosis was significantly associated with sleep dysfunction. However, after controlling for AS, primary diagnosis was no longer significant. AS significantly mediated the effects of PD versus SAD and of PD versus GAD on sleep dysfunction, but did not significantly mediate the effect of GAD versus SAD on sleep dysfunction. Taken together, AS appears to be a more important predictor of sleep dysfunction overall, emphasizing the cross-diagnostic nature of AS and bolstering the RDoC initiative approach for treating psychological dysfunction.

  2. The effect of social anxiety on urge and craving among smokers with and without anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbrel, Nathan A; Morissette, Sandra B; Gulliver, Suzy B; Langdon, Kirsten J; Zvolensky, Michael J

    2014-02-01

    Despite the often social nature of smoking, relatively little research has been conducted on the relationship between smoking and social anxiety disorder (SAD). Participants (N=99) included 34 smokers without current mental health disorders, 37 smokers with SAD, and 28 smokers who met criteria for other anxiety disorder diagnoses (e.g., panic disorder or generalized anxiety disorder, but not SAD). Nicotine and placebo patches were administered to participants in a counterbalanced manner across two assessment days. Urge and craving were assessed before and after a 5-h nicotine absorption/deprivation period. Compared to smokers without current mental health disorders, smokers with SAD did not report greater nicotine dependence, but did endorse greater motivation to use nicotine to avoid negative outcomes. In addition, after controlling for demographic variables, smoking characteristics, pre-deprivation urge and craving, and other anxiety/depression symptoms, social anxiety symptoms uniquely predicted urge and craving in the placebo patch condition; however, social anxiety had no influence on urge and craving in the nicotine patch condition. These findings suggest that one potential reason that smokers with SAD may have worse cessation outcomes is that they may experience higher levels of craving and urge to smoke during quit attempts. Thus, during a quit attempt, particularly in the absence of nicotine replacement therapy, smokers with SAD are likely to benefit from additional treatment aimed at managing or reducing their social anxiety symptoms. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  3. The High Prevalence of Anxiety Disorders After Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumming, Toby B; Blomstrand, Christian; Skoog, Ingmar; Linden, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies indicate that post-stroke anxiety is common and persistent. We aimed to determine whether point prevalence of anxiety after stroke is higher than in the population at large, and whether the profile of anxiety symptoms is different. This case-control study was conducted in Göteborg, Sweden, with stroke patients recruited from the Sahlgrenska University Hospital and a comparison group selected from local population health studies. We included 149 stroke survivors (assessed at 20 months post-stroke) and 745 participants from the general population matched for age and sex. A comprehensive psychiatric interview was conducted, with anxiety and depressive disorders diagnosed according to DSM-III-R criteria. Those in the stroke group were significantly more likely than those in the comparison group to have generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) (27% versus 8%), phobic disorder (24% versus 8%) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (9% versus 2%). Multivariate regression indicated that being in the stroke group, female sex, and having depression were all significant independent associates of having an anxiety disorder. In terms of symptom profile, stroke survivors with GAD were significantly more likely to report vegetative disturbance than those in the comparison group with GAD but less likely to have observable muscle tension or reduced sleep. Point prevalence of anxiety disorders is markedly higher after stroke than in the general population, and this cannot be attributed to higher rates of comorbid depression. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Prevalence and impact of comorbid anxiety and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Martin B

    2006-01-01

    Comorbid conditions pose a serious risk to patients with bipolar disorder, but anxiety comorbidity poses a specific hazard due to the increased negative impact of anxiety on illness course and treatment. Anxiety comorbidity appears to be highly prevalent and is associated with intensified symptoms of bipolar disorder and additional comorbid disorders, resulting in a negative impact on the patient and on the course of the illness. The presence of anxiety in bipolar patients is also associated with a lowered age at onset, hampered patient response to treatment such as lithium, increased rates of suicide and substance abuse, and decreased quality of life. Patients can experience work, family, and social impairment and be made to contend with increased health care costs and strains on family support. Studies are few and have a limited scope, and many have failed to consider the clinical significance of comorbid anxiety and bipolar disorder. Because the degree to which anxiety impacts patients with bipolar disorder is not fully known, more information is needed about the relationship between bipolar disorder and anxiety.

  5. Sleep Quality Improvement During Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsawh, Holly J; Bomyea, Jessica; Stein, Murray B; Cissell, Shadha H; Lang, Ariel J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of sleep complaints among individuals with anxiety disorders, few prior studies have examined whether sleep quality improves during anxiety treatment. The current study examined pre- to posttreatment sleep quality improvement during cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for panic disorder (PD; n = 26) or generalized anxiety disorder (GAD; n = 24). Among sleep quality indices, only global sleep quality and sleep latency improved significantly (but modestly) during CBT. Sleep quality improvement was greater for treatment responders, but did not vary by diagnosis. Additionally, poor baseline sleep quality was independently associated with worse anxiety treatment outcome, as measured by higher intolerance of uncertainty. Additional intervention targeting sleep prior to or during CBT for anxiety may be beneficial for poor sleepers.

  6. Sleep Quality Improvement During Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsawh, Holly J.; Bomyea, Jessica; Stein, Murray B.; Cissell, Shadha H.; Lang, Ariel J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of sleep complaints among individuals with anxiety disorders, few prior studies have examined whether sleep quality improves during anxiety treatment. The current study examined pre- to post-treatment sleep quality improvement during cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for panic disorder (PD; n = 26) or generalized anxiety disorder (GAD; n = 24). Among sleep quality indices, only global sleep quality and sleep latency improved significantly (but modestly) during CBT. Sleep quality improvement was greater for treatment responders, but did not vary by diagnosis. Additionally, poor baseline sleep quality was independently associated with worse anxiety treatment outcome, as measured by higher intolerance of uncertainty. Additional intervention targeting sleep prior to or during CBT for anxiety may be beneficial for poor sleepers. PMID:26244485

  7. Anxiety-Promoting Parenting Behaviors: A Comparison of Anxious Parents with and without Social Anxiety Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinger, Meghan Crosby; Drazdowski, Tess K.; Ginsburg, Golda S.

    2013-01-01

    While parenting behaviors among anxious parents have been implicated in the familial transmission of anxiety, little is known about whether these parenting behaviors are unique to specific parental anxiety disorders. The current study examined differences in the use of five specific parenting behaviors (i.e., warmth/positive affect, criticism,…

  8. Psychological treatments for depression and anxiety disorders in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Depression and anxiety disorders are highly prevalent world- wide.1 On a global scale, approximately 150 million people suffer from a major depressive disorder at any moment, and almost a million commit suicide each year.2 These common mental disorders are associated with a significantly impaired.

  9. Peer Social Status of Children with Anxiety Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Cyd C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Investigated peer social status of 6- through 13-year-olds. Found anxiety-disorder children significantly less liked than normal children, but anxious and conduct-disorder children similarly liked. Conduct disorder children received more "like least" and "fight most" nominations, with anxious and nonreferred groups alike. The anxious group…

  10. Nightmares: from anxiety symptom to sleep disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoormaker, Victor I; Schredl, Michael; van den Bout, Jan

    2006-02-01

    The DSM-IV-TR definition of nightmares-extremely frightening dreams from which the person wakes up directly-is unnecessarily narrow. Other emotions (anger, grief) have also been reported in nightmares, and direct awakening from a bad dream seems to be unrelated to increased distress. In addition, assessment of nightmares is problematic. Polysomnographic recordings have an ameliorating effect on nightmare frequency, retrospective measurements tend to underestimate nightmare frequency, and persons with frequent nightmares may feel reluctant to fill out (daily) prospective measurements. For studying nightmares, it is necessary to distinguish idiopathic nightmares from posttraumatic nightmares, which are part of a posttraumatic stress reaction or disorder that may result from experiencing a traumatic event. Both types of nightmares have been associated with an elevated level of periodic limb movements, although only posttraumatic nightmares seem to be related to more and longer nocturnal awakenings. Nightmares have also been repeatedly associated with the general level of psychopathology, or the so-called personality factor neuroticism. Nightmare distress, the impact on daily functioning caused by nightmares, may function as a mediating variable. Several studies in the last decades have shown that nightmares can be treated with several cognitive-behavioral techniques. The cognitive-restructuring technique imagery rehearsal therapy is the treatment of choice for nightmares, although a randomized controlled trial with an attention control-group has not yet been carried out. Nightmares are more than a symptom of a larger (anxiety) syndrome and need to be viewed from a sleep medicine perspective: nightmares are a highly prevalent and separate sleep disorder that can and should receive specific treatment.

  11. Autism Spectrum Traits in Children with Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Steensel, Francisca J. A.; Bogels, Susan M.; Wood, Jeffrey J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine ASD traits in children with clinical anxiety in early development, as well as current manifestations. Parents of 42 children with an anxiety disorder (but no known diagnosis of ASD) and 42 typically developing children were interviewed using the Autism Diagnostic Interview (ADI-R). They also completed…

  12. Family Factors in the Development and Management of Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapee, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    Family variables are thought to play a key role in a wide variety of psychopathology according to many theories. Yet, specific models of the development of anxiety disorders place little emphasis on general family factors despite clear evidence that anxiety runs in families. The current review examines evidence for the involvement of a number of…

  13. Self-help interventions for anxiety disorders: An overview.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, P.; Schuurmans, J.

    2007-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent and are associated with a marked impairment in quality of life and a huge economic cost to society. Unfortunately, a considerable number of people who struggle with anxiety do not seek or receive adequate treatment. Self-help interventions have been proposed to

  14. Origins of Phobias and Anxiety Disorders : Why More Women Than ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pathways that lead to excessive anxiety and fear and draws on up-to-date research from the fields of developmental psychology, neuroscience, cognitive psychology, and psychiatry. A clear and objective analysis follows of how many of the factors that place people at risk for anxiety disorders (e.g. negative affectivity and.

  15. Assessment and treatment of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehry, Anna M; Beesdo-Baum, Katja; Hennelly, Meghann M; Connolly, Sucheta D; Strawn, Jeffrey R

    2015-07-01

    Recent advances in the developmental epidemiology, neurobiology, and treatment of pediatric anxiety disorders have increased our understanding of these conditions and herald improved outcomes for affected children and adolescents. This article reviews the current epidemiology, longitudinal trajectory, and neurobiology of anxiety disorders in youth. Additionally, we summarize the current evidence for both psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic treatments of fear-based anxiety disorders (e.g., generalized, social, and separation anxiety disorders) in children and adolescents. Current data suggest that these disorders begin in childhood and adolescence, exhibit homotypic continuity, and increase the risk of secondary anxiety and mood disorders. Psychopharmacologic trials involving selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and selective serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SSNRIs) are effective in pediatric patients with anxiety disorders and have generally demonstrated moderate effect sizes. Additionally, current data support cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for the treatment of these conditions in youth and suggest that the combination of psychotherapy + an SSRI may be associated with greater improvement than would be expected with either treatment as monotherapy.

  16. Assessment and Treatment of Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehry, Anna M.; Beesdo-Baum, Katja; Hennelly, Meghann M.; Connolly, Sucheta D.; Strawn, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the developmental epidemiology, neurobiology and treatment of pediatric anxiety disorders have increased our understanding of these conditions and herald improved outcomes for affected children and adolescents. This article reviews the current epidemiology, longitudinal trajectory, and neurobiology of anxiety disorders in youth. Additionally, we summarize the current evidence for both psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic treatments of fear-based anxiety disorders (e.g., generalized, social and separation anxiety disorders) in children and adolescents. Current data suggest that these disorders begin in childhood and adolescence, exhibit homotypic continuity and increase the risk of secondary anxiety and mood disorders. Psychopharmacologic trials involving selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and selective serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SSNRIs) are effective in pediatric patients with anxiety disorders and have generally demonstrated moderate effect sizes. Additionally, current data support cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) are efficacious in the treatment of these conditions in youth and that combination of CBT + an SSRI may be associated with greater improvement than would be expected with either treatment as monotherapy. PMID:25980507

  17. Methylphenidate and Comorbid Anxiety Disorder in Children with both Chronic Multiple Tic Disorder and ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadow, Kenneth D.; Nolan, Edith E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine if comorbid anxiety disorder is associated with differential response to immediate release methylphenidate (MPH-IR) in children with both ADHD and chronic multiple tic disorder (CMTD). Method: Children with (n = 17) and without (n = 37) diagnosed anxiety disorder (ANX) were evaluated in an 8-week, placebo-controlled trial…

  18. Cbt for anxiety disorders in children with and without autism spectrum disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Steensel, F.J.A.; Bögels, S.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) was examined, and compared with children without ASD. Method: Children with ASD and comorbid anxiety disorders (n = 79, 58 boys; Mage = 11.76) and children with

  19. Social and academic functioning in adolescents with anxiety disorders: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Lijster, Jasmijn M.; Dieleman, Gwen C.; Utens, Elisabeth M. W. J.; Dierckx, Bram; Wierenga, Milou; Verhulst, Frank C.; Legerstee, Jeroen S.

    2018-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent during adolescence. Although literature points out that anxiety symptoms are related to problems in social and academic functioning, the extent of these problems among adolescents with clinical anxiety disorders has not been systematically reviewed before.

  20. Examining the Screen for Child Anxiety-Related Emotional Disorder-71 as an Assessment Tool for Anxiety in Children with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Steensel, Francisca J. A.; Deutschman, Amber A. C. G.; Bögels, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    The psychometric properties of a questionnaire developed to assess symptoms of anxiety disorders (SCARED-71) were compared between two groups of children: children with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder and comorbid anxiety disorders (ASD-group; "n" = 115), and children with anxiety disorders (AD-group; "n" = 122).…

  1. Book Review: Generalized Anxiety Disorder Across the Lifespan: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Book Review: Generalized Anxiety Disorder Across the Lifespan: An Integrative Approach. ME Portman. Abstract. Michael E. Portman: Publisher: New York: Springer, 2009. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  2. Manifesto for a European Anxiety Disorders Research Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldwin, David S.; Allgulander, Christer; Altamura, Alfredo Carlo; Angst, Jules; Bandelow, Borwin; den Boer, Johan; Boyer, Patrice; Davies, Simon; dell'Osso, Bernardo; Eriksson, Elias; Fineberg, Naomi; Fredrikson, Mats; Herran, Andres; Maron, Eduard; Metspalu, Andres; Nutt, David; van der Wee, Nic; Luis Vazquez-Barquero, Jose; Zohar, Joseph

    Despite the size, burden and costs of anxiety disorders, many patients remain unrecognised, and the effectiveness of evidence-based interventions in routine clinical practice can be disappointing. The European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP) has established the ECNP Network Initiative

  3. Social functioning in patients with depressive and anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saris, I M J; Aghajani, M; van der Werff, S J A; van der Wee, N J A; Penninx, B W J H

    2017-10-01

    Adaptive social functioning is severely impeded in depressive and anxiety disorders, even after remission. However, a comprehensive overview is still lacking. Using data from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA), behavioural (network size, social activities, social support) and affective (loneliness, affiliation, perceived social disability) indicators of social functioning were analyzed in patients with anxiety (N = 540), depressive (N = 393), comorbid anxiety and depressive disorders ('comorbid', N = 748), remitted participants (N = 621), and healthy control subjects (N = 650). Analyses revealed an increasing trend of social dysfunction among patient groups, in patients with comorbid anxiety and depressive disorders, showing the most severe impairments, followed by depressed and anxious patients (P's social functioning indicators). Affective indicators showed the largest effect sizes (Cohen's d range from 0.13 to 1.76). We also found impairments in social functioning among remitted patients. Furthermore, perceived social disability among patients was predictive of still having a depressive and/or anxiety diagnosis 2 years later (P social functioning are impaired in patients with anxiety or depressive disorders and most in patients with comorbid disorders. After remission of affective psychopathology, residual impairments tend to remain, while social dysfunction in patients seems predictive of future psychopathology. © 2017The Authors. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Major depressive and anxiety disorders in visually impaired older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Aa, Hilde P A; Comijs, Hannie C; Penninx, Brenda W J H; van Rens, Ger H M B; van Nispen, Ruth M A

    2015-01-20

    We assessed the prevalence of subthreshold depression and anxiety, and major depressive, dysthymic, and anxiety disorders (panic disorder, agoraphobia, social phobia, and general anxiety disorder) in visually impaired older adults and compared these estimates with those of normally sighted peers. Cross-sectional data were analyzed based on telephone interviews with visually impaired older adults aged ≥ 60 years (n = 615) with a visual acuity of ≥ 0.30 logMAR (20/40 Snellen) in the best eye from outpatient low vision rehabilitation centers, and face-to-face interviews with community-dwelling normally sighted peers (n = 1232). To determine prevalence rates, the normally sighted population was weighted on sex and age to fit the visually impaired population. Logistic regression analyses were used to compare the populations and to correct for confounders. The prevalence of major depressive disorder (5.4%) and anxiety disorders (7.5%), as well as the prevalence of subthreshold depression (32.2%) and subthreshold anxiety (15.6%), were significantly higher in visually impaired older adults compared to their normally sighted peers (P visually impaired older adults. This study shows that depression and anxiety are major public health problems in visually impaired older adults. Research on psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic interventions to improve depression and anxiety in this population is warranted. (http://www.trialregister.nl number, NTR3296.). Copyright 2015 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  5. Precursors to the Development of Anxiety Disorders in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    Specific Aim 1: Evaluate the relationship between Sensory Over -reactivity (SOR) and anxiety symptoms/ disorders in a sample of 3-5 year old children with...relationship between sensory over -responsivity (SOR) and anxiety symptoms/ disorders in a sample of 3-5 year old children with ASD using parent report...anxiety disorder . Further, 39 children (60%) with ASD fell 2SDs above typically developing norms for sensory over -responsivity. Overall, there was a

  6. Culture and the anxiety disorders: recommendations for DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Hinton, Devon E; Laria, Amaro J; Patterson, Elissa H; Hofmann, Stefan G; Craske, Michelle G; Stein, Dan J; Asnaani, Anu; Liao, Betty

    2010-02-01

    The anxiety disorders specified in the fourth edition, text revision, of The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-IV-TR) are identified universally in human societies, and also show substantial cultural particularities in prevalence and symptomatology. Possible explanations for the observed epidemiological variability include lack of measurement equivalence, true differences in prevalence, and limited validity or precision of diagnostic criteria. One central question is whether, through inadvertent "over-specification" of disorders, the post-DSM-III nosology has missed related but somewhat different presentations of the same disorder because they do not exactly fit specified criteria sets. This review canvases the mental health literature for evidence of cross-cultural limitations in DSM-IV-TR anxiety disorder criteria. Searches were conducted of the mental health literature, particularly since 1994, regarding cultural or race/ethnicity-related factors that might limit the universal applicability of the diagnostic criteria for six anxiety disorders. Possible mismatches between the DSM criteria and the local phenomenology of the disorder in specific cultural contexts were found for three anxiety disorders in particular. These involve the unexpectedness and 10-minute crescendo criteria in Panic Disorder; the definition of social anxiety and social reference group in Social Anxiety Disorder; and the priority given to psychological symptoms of worry in Generalized Anxiety Disorder. Limited evidence was found throughout, particularly in terms of neurobiological markers, genetic risk factors, treatment response, and other DSM-V validators that could help clarify the cross-cultural applicability of criteria. On the basis of the available data, options and preliminary recommendations for DSM-V are put forth that should be further evaluated and tested.

  7. Pharmacologic treatment of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velosa, J F; Riddle, M A

    2000-01-01

    This article reviews the pharmacologic treatment of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents. These disorders are quite common and can be considered a "silent epidemic" because they are more often reported by the children and adolescents than by their parents. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), benzodiazepines, buspirone, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been used to treat anxiety disorders in children and adolescents with varying degrees of success. Considering safety and efficacy, the SSRIs appear to be the first-line treatment for anxiety disorders in youth, but more studies are needed to confirm preliminary results. Tricyclic antidepressants and benzodiazepines may be considered when the child has not responded to SSRIs or when adverse effects have exceeded benefits. Although nonpharmacologic approaches for the treatment of anxiety in children and adolescents are beyond the scope of this article, their importance is to be underscored and they should be considered as part of the treatment plan. Over the next decade, research data will be generated regarding the treatment of anxiety disorders in youth. Ongoing research studies include the use of fluoxetine (B. Birmaher, personal communication, 1999) and fluvoxamine (J. Walkup, personal communication, 1999) for the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, or social phobia; and buspirone for generalized anxiety disorder in children. Despite these efforts, there is a need for more studies to examine the safety and efficacy of different pharmacologic treatments, as well as longitudinal studies to monitor for long-term tolerability and side effects. Pharmacokinetic studies for children and adolescents will provide information on the metabolism and absorption of these medications and delineate the developmental differences between children and adolescents when compared to adults. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, studies that compare medication

  8. Social anxiety and self-consciousness in binge eating disorder: associations with eating disorder psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaoka, Takuya; Barnes, Rachel D; Blomquist, Kerstin K; Masheb, Robin M; Grilo, Carlos M

    2012-08-01

    Research has consistently shown that anxiety disorders are common among individuals with eating disorders. Although social phobia has been found to be highly associated with eating disorders, less is known about social anxiety in individuals with binge eating disorder (BED). The present study examined associations between social anxiety and self-consciousness with body mass index (BMI) and eating disorder psychopathology in BED. Participants were 113 overweight or obese treatment-seeking men and women with BED. Participants were administered semistructural diagnostic clinical interviews and completed a battery of self-report measures. Social anxiety was positively and significantly correlated with shape and weight concerns and binge eating frequency. After accounting for depressive levels, social anxiety and self-consciousness accounted for significant variance in eating, shape, and weight concerns and overall eating disorder global severity scores (Eating Disorder Examination). Social anxiety also accounted for significant variance in binge eating frequency after covarying for depressive levels. Social anxiety and self-consciousness were not significantly associated with BMI or dietary restraint. Our findings suggest that greater social anxiety and heightened self-consciousness are associated with greater eating disorder psychopathology, most notably with greater shape and weight concerns and binge eating frequency in patients with BED. Social anxiety and self-consciousness do not appear to be merely functions of excess weight, and future research should examine whether they contribute to the maintenance of binge eating and associated eating disorder psychopathology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Anxiety driven atypical eating disorder in the course of phenylketonuria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapps, Nora; Mack, Isabelle; Herrmann-Werner, Anne; Zipfel, Stephan; Teufel, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Phenylketonuria is the most common genetic disease in amino acid metabolism. We report the case of a 22-year old patient with phenylketonuria and psychological symptoms. After early treatment, phenylalanine levels had been controlled and were within target area. Clinical interview and psychometrics showed atypical eating disorder and anxiety disorder. Possible toxic effects and psychological factors may play a role in pathogenesis. Most likely the frequency of eating disorders and anxiety disorders in phenylketonuria is underestimated. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Common and disorder-specific neural responses to emotional faces in generalised anxiety, social anxiety and panic disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonzo, Gregory A.; Ramsawh, Holly J.; Flagan, Taru M.; Sullivan, Sarah G.; Letamendi, Andrea; Simmons, Alan N.; Paulus, Martin P.; Stein, Murray B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although evidence exists for abnormal brain function across various anxiety disorders, direct comparison of neural function across diagnoses is needed to elicit abnormalities common across disorders and those distinct to a particular diagnosis. Aims To delineate common and distinct abnormalities within generalised anxiety (GAD), panic and social anxiety disorder (SAD) during affective processing. Method Fifty-nine adults (15 with GAD, 15 with panic disorder, 14 with SAD, and 15 healthy controls) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while completing a facial emotion matching task with fearful, angry and happy faces. Results Greater differential right amygdala activation to matching fearful v. happy facial expressions related to greater negative affectivity (i.e. trait anxiety) and was heightened across all anxiety disorder groups compared with controls. Collapsing across emotional face types, participants with panic disorder uniquely displayed greater posterior insula activation. Conclusions These preliminary results highlight a common neural basis for clinical anxiety in these diagnoses and also suggest the presence of disorder-specific dysfunction. PMID:25573399

  11. History of childhood abuse in panic disorder, social phobia, and generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safren, Steven A; Gershuny, Beth S; Marzol, Patricia; Otto, Michael W; Pollack, Mark H

    2002-07-01

    The authors examined the prevalence of self-reported childhood physical or sexual abuse in a sample of adult patients presenting for treatment of panic disorder, social phobia, or generalized anxiety disorder. Regardless of the presence of comorbid anxiety disorders or comorbid depression, patients with panic disorder had significantly higher rates of past childhood physical or sexual abuse than patients with social phobia. Patients with generalized anxiety disorder had intermediate rates of past physical or sexual abuse that were not significantly different from the other two diagnostic groups. Anxiety disorder patients with a history of childhood abuse were also more likely to have comorbid major depression than those without. These findings are discussed in terms of biological and behavioral factors that may influence the development of anxiety disorders after the experience of a traumatic event.

  12. Object relations theory and pharmacopsychotherapy of anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, N G; Sacks, L H; Hamilton, C A

    1994-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of object relations concepts, applying them specifically to combined psychoterapy-pharmacotherapy of anxiety disorders. Anxiety in this clinical theory is conceptualized as arising from threatened loss of the self- and object-relationship. At a rudimentary level, individuals can attempt to manage potential loss through splitting and projective identification. As benign and loving experiences accumulate and ego functions neurophysiologically develop, whole object relations provide alternate and more modulated ways of coping with anxiety. In anxiety disorders, these more mature coping styles break down. Treatment combining object relations approaches to psychotherapy with pharmacotherapy pay particular attention to the relationship aspects and meanings of medication and prescribing. These approaches use the concepts of empathy, containment, countertransference, splitting, projective identification, and transitional object formation to help patients come to terms with their anxiety and with the treatment relationship.

  13. Ventilatory physiology of children and adolescents with anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, D S; Coplan, J D; Papp, L A; Klein, R G; Martinez, J M; Kovalenko, P; Tancer, N; Moreau, D; Dummit, E S; Shaffer, D; Klein, D F; Gorman, J M

    1998-02-01

    Abnormalities in ventilatory physiology have been noted in adults with panic disorder. We tested the hypothesis that abnormalities in ventilatory physiology differentiate children and adolescents with anxiety disorders from psychiatrically healthy children. Ventilatory physiology was monitored with a canopy apparatus during room-air breathing and 15 minutes of carbon dioxide exposure in 33 children and adolescents comprising 18 probands with an anxiety disorder and 15 psychiatrically healthy children. During room-air breathing, probands had significantly larger minute ventilation, larger tidal volumes, and more variable breathing patterns than healthy comparisons, but the groups did not differ in end-tidal carbon dioxide or respiratory rate. During carbon dioxide challenge, probands exhibited larger minute ventilation and respiratory rate responses relative to comparisons. These findings on the association between ventilatory physiology and anxiety disorders in children and adolescents are consistent with results from studies of adults with panic disorder.

  14. Anxiety and mood disorders and cannabis use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Joyce T W; Mann, Robert E; Ialomiteanu, Anca; Stoduto, Gina; Chan, Vincy; Ala-Leppilampi, Kari; Rehm, Jürgen

    2010-03-01

    Cannabis use has been linked to anxiety and mood disorders (AMD) in clinical cases, but little research on this relationship has been reported at the epidemiological level. We examined the relationship between self-reported frequency of cannabis use and risk for AMD in the general Ontario adult population. Data were based on the CAMH Monitor survey of Ontario adults from 2001 to 2006 (n = 14,531). AMD was assessed with the 12-item version of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ12). Frequency of cannabis use within the past year was grouped into five categories: No use (abstainer), less than once a month but at least once a year, less than once a week but at least once a month, less than daily but at least once a week, almost every day to more than once a day. Logistic regression analysis of AMD and cannabis use was implemented while controlling for demographics and alcohol problems. AMD was most common among heavy cannabis users (used almost every day or more) (18.1%) and lowest for abstainers (8.7%). Compared to abstainers, the risk of AMD was significantly greater for infrequent cannabis users (OR = 1.43) and heavy cannabis users (OR = 2.04) but not for those in between. These data provide epidemiological evidence for a link between both light and heavy cannabis use and AMD. Recognizing the comorbidity of heavy cannabis use and AMD should facilitate improved treatment efforts. Our results also suggest the possibility that, for some individuals, AMD may occur at relatively low levels of cannabis use.

  15. Treatment of borderline personality disorder and co-occurring anxiety disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenstein, Helen R.

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent among individuals with borderline personality disorder, with comorbidity rates of up to 90%. Anxiety disorders have been found to reduce the likelihood of achieving remission from borderline personality disorder over time and to increase the risk of suicide and self-injury in this population. Evidence-based treatments for borderline personality disorder have not sufficiently focused on targeting anxiety disorders, and their effects on these disorders are either limited or unknown. Conversely, evidence-based treatments for anxiety disorders typically exclude suicidal, self-injuring, and seriously comorbid patients, thereby limiting their generalizability to individuals with borderline personality disorder. To address these limitations, recent research has begun to emerge focused on developing and evaluating treatments for individuals with co-occurring borderline personality disorder and anxiety disorders, specifically posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), with promising initial results. However, there is a need for additional research in this area, particularly studies evaluating the treatment of anxiety disorders among high-risk and complex borderline personality disorder patients. PMID:23710329

  16. Anxiety in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciberras, Emma; Lycett, Kate; Efron, Daryl; Mensah, Fiona; Gerner, Bibi; Hiscock, Harriet

    2014-05-01

    Although anxiety is common in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), it is unclear how anxiety influences the lives of these children. This study examined the association between anxiety comorbidities and functioning by comparing children with ADHD and no, 1, or ≥2 anxiety comorbidities. Differential associations were examined by current ADHD presentation (subtype). Children with diagnostically confirmed ADHD (N = 392; 5-13 years) were recruited via 21 pediatrician practices across Victoria, Australia. Anxiety was assessed by using the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for Children-IV. Functional measures included parent-reported: quality of life (QoL; Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0), behavior and peer problems (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire), daily functioning (Daily Parent Rating of Evening and Morning Behavior), and school attendance. Teacher-reported behavior and peer problems (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire) were also examined. Linear and logistic regression controlled for ADHD severity, medication use, comorbidities, and demographic factors. Children with ≥2 anxiety comorbidities (n = 143; 39%) had poorer QoL (effect size: -0.8) and more difficulties with behavior (effect size: 0.4) and daily functioning (effect size: 0.3) than children without anxiety (n = 132; 36%). Poorer functioning was not observed for children with 1 anxiety comorbidity (n = 95; 26%). Two or more anxiety comorbidities were associated with poorer functioning for children with both ADHD-Inattentive and ADHD-Combined presentation. Children with ADHD demonstrate poorer QoL, daily functioning and behavior when ≥2 anxiety comorbidities are present. Future research should examine whether treating anxiety in children with ADHD improves functional outcomes. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  17. Disorder-specific cognitive profiles in major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Sanne M; Licht, Carmilla M M; Spijker, Jan; Beekman, Aartjan T F; Hardeveld, Florian; de Graaf, Ron; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2014-04-01

    This investigation examines differences in cognitive profiles in subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Data were used from subjects with current MDD (n = 655), GAD (n = 107) and comorbid MDD/GAD (n = 266) diagnosis from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). The Composite Interview Diagnostic Instrument was used to diagnose MDD and GAD. Cognitive profiles were measured using the Leiden Index of Depression Sensitivity, the Anxiety Sensitivity Index, and the Penn State Worry Questionnaire. Results showed that differences in cognitive profiles between single MDD and single GAD subjects were present: scores on hopelessness/suicidality and rumination were significantly higher in MDD than GAD, whereas anxiety sensitivity for physical concerns and pathological worry were higher in GAD than MDD. The cognitive profile of comorbid MDD/GAD showed more extreme depression cognitions compared to single disorders, and a similar anxiety profile compared to single GAD subjects. Despite the commonalities in cognitive profiles in MDD and GAD, there are differences suggesting that MDD and GAD have disorder-specific cognitive profiles. Findings of this investigation give support for models like the cognitive content-specificity model and the tripartite model and could provide useful handles for treatment focus.

  18. The comparison of attentional control deficits in the three group of normal, with social anxiety disorder and with comorbidity (social anxiety disorder and depression) students of Lorestan University

    OpenAIRE

    Ghadampour E; Rezaei F; Hosseini Ramaghani NA; Moradi M

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims: One of the mechanisms that thought to underlie social anxiety disorder is dysfunction in attentional control. The current study was designed to compare attentional control deficits in the three group: normal, with social anxiety disorder and with comorbidity (social anxiety disorder and depression) students. Methods: The design of present study was causal-comparative. Statistical population of this study contained all normal female students, with social anxiety disorde...

  19. Beliefs regarding child anxiety and parenting competence in parents of children with separation anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herren, Chantal; In-Albon, Tina; Schneider, Silvia

    2013-03-01

    Despite the fact that numerous developmental models have highlighted the role of parental cognitive processes in connection with anxiety disorders in children and adolescents, the role of parents' beliefs about their children and parenting remains largely unexplored. This study investigated the specific association between parental beliefs and child separation anxiety. Parents of children with a diagnosis of Separation Anxiety Disorder (SAD) reported on beliefs and expectations related to their child's fears and own parenting competence. To study the potential specificity of relationships, a clinical control group of mothers of children with social phobia (SoP) and a group of mothers of children without a mental disorder (healthy controls, HC) were included. Results indicated that parents of anxious children had significantly higher levels of dysfunctional beliefs than the parents in the HC group. Mothers of children with SAD showed lower levels of parenting self-efficacy than mothers of children with SoP. They also demonstrated lower parenting self-efficacy and satisfaction compared to mothers of healthy children. Parental dysfunctional beliefs about child anxiety and paternal parenting self-efficacy were significantly positively associated with child anxiety. The effects remained significant after controlling for parental anxiety and depression. Due to the cross-sectional design of the study, causality of the found effects cannot be inferred. Data suggest that children's anxiety and parents' beliefs about their child's anxiety, coping skills and parenting are strongly associated. Further research is needed to investigate whether addressing parental cognitions in addition to parents' anxiety may improve prevention and intervention of child anxiety. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Uric acid in major depressive and anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Catherine N; Bot, Mariska; Scheffer, Peter G; Snieder, Harold; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2018-01-01

    Uric acid has neuroprotective effects, owing to its antioxidant properties. Lowered antioxidant capacity, causing increased oxidative stress, may be involved in affective disorders and might be altered by antidepressants. This study investigated the association of plasma uric acid, the greatest contributor to blood antioxidant capacity, with major depressive disorder (MDD) and anxiety disorders. Data were from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety including patients with current (N = 1648), remitted (N = 609) MDD and/or anxiety disorders (of which N = 710 antidepressant users) and 618 controls. Diagnoses were established with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Symptom severity was assessed with the Inventory of Depressive Symptoms-Self Report, Beck Anxiety Inventory and Fear Questionnaire. Uric acid was measured in plasma. Analyses were adjusted for sociodemographic, health and lifestyle variables. Plasma uric acid adjusted mean levels were lower in current MDD and/or anxiety disorder(s) (289μmol/l) compared to remitted disorders (298μmol/l, p uric acid. Limitations include the lack of data on dietary intake which could be a potential confounding factor. From these cross-sectional findings, the association between uric acid and psychopathology cannot be inferred to be causal. This large scale study finds plasma uric acid levels are lower in current, but not remitted, MDD and/or anxiety disorders, according to a dose-response gradient. This suggests the involvement of decreased antioxidant status in affective disorders, and points to their potential as an avenue for treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule – Autism Addendum: Reliability and Validity in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerns, Connor Morrow; Renno, Patricia; Kendall, Philip C.; Wood, Jeffrey J.; Storch, Eric A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Assessing anxiety in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is inherently challenging due to overlapping (e.g., social avoidance) and ambiguous symptoms (e.g., fears of change). An ASD addendum to the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule–Child/Parent, Parent Version (ADIS/ASA) was developed to provide a systematic approach for differentiating traditional anxiety disorders from symptoms of ASD and more ambiguous, ASD-related anxiety symptoms. Method Inter-rater reliability and convergent and discriminant validity were examined in a sample of 69 youth with ASD (8–13 years, 75% male, IQ:68–143) seeking treatment for anxiety. The parents of participants completed the ADIS/ASA and a battery of behavioral measures. A second rater independently observed and scored recordings of the original interviews. Results Findings suggest reliable measurement of comorbid (ICC=0.85–0.98; κ =0.67–0.91) as well as ambiguous anxiety-like symptoms (ICC=0.87–95, κ=0.77–0.90) in children with ASD. Convergent and discriminant validity were supported for the traditional anxiety symptoms on the ADIS/ASA, whereas convergent and discriminant validity were partially supported for the ambiguous anxiety-like symptoms. Conclusions Results provide evidence for the reliability and validity of the ADIS/ASA as a measure of traditional anxiety categories in youth with ASD, with partial support for the validity of the ambiguous anxiety-like categories. Unlike other measures, the ADIS/ASA differentiates comorbid anxiety disorders from overlapping and ambiguous anxiety-like symptoms in ASD, allowing for more precise measurement and clinical conceptualization. Ambiguous anxiety-like symptoms appear phenomenologically distinct from comorbid anxiety disorders and may reflect either symptoms of ASD or a novel variant of anxiety in ASD. PMID:27925775

  2. Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule-Autism Addendum: Reliability and Validity in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerns, Connor Morrow; Renno, Patricia; Kendall, Philip C; Wood, Jeffrey J; Storch, Eric A

    2017-01-01

    Assessing anxiety in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is inherently challenging due to overlapping (e.g., social avoidance) and ambiguous symptoms (e.g., fears of change). An ASD addendum to the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule-Child/Parent, Parent Version (ADIS/ASA) was developed to provide a systematic approach for differentiating traditional anxiety disorders from symptoms of ASD and more ambiguous, ASD-related anxiety symptoms. Interrater reliability and convergent and discriminant validity were examined in a sample of 69 youth with ASD (8-13 years, 75% male, IQ = 68-143) seeking treatment for anxiety. The parents of participants completed the ADIS/ASA and a battery of behavioral measures. A second rater independently observed and scored recordings of the original interviews. Findings suggest reliable measurement of comorbid (intraclass correlation = 0.85-0.98, κ = 0.67-0.91) as well as ambiguous anxiety-like symptoms (intraclass correlation = 0.87-95, κ = 0.77-0.90) in children with ASD. Convergent and discriminant validity were supported for the traditional anxiety symptoms on the ADIS/ASA, whereas convergent and discriminant validity were partially supported for the ambiguous anxiety-like symptoms. Results provide evidence for the reliability and validity of the ADIS/ASA as a measure of traditional anxiety categories in youth with ASD, with partial support for the validity of the ambiguous anxiety-like categories. Unlike other measures, the ADIS/ASA differentiates comorbid anxiety disorders from overlapping and ambiguous anxiety-like symptoms in ASD, allowing for more precise measurement and clinical conceptualization. Ambiguous anxiety-like symptoms appear phenomenologically distinct from comorbid anxiety disorders and may reflect either symptoms of ASD or a novel variant of anxiety in ASD.

  3. A translational approach to the genetics of anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, N W; Dimatelis, J J; Van Zyl, P J; Hemmings, S M J; Kinnear, C; Russell, V A; Stein, D J; Lochner, C

    2018-04-02

    There have been important advances in our understanding of the genetic architecture of anxiety disorders. At the same time, relatively few genes have reached genome wide significance in anxiety disorders, and there is relatively little work on how exposure to an adverse environment impacts on gene expression in either animal models or human clinical populations. Here we assessed differential expression of genes of the dorsal striatum involved in synaptic transmission in an animal models of early adversity (maternal separation followed by restraint stress), and investigated whether variants in these genes were associated with risk for anxiety disorders, particularly in the presence of environmental stressors. Fifty-two male Sprague Dawley rats underwent maternal separation, and gene expression was studied using array technology. The human homologues of the differentially expressed genes were screened and analysed in a DSM-IV anxiety disorders cohort, and healthy controls (patients, n = 92; controls, n = 194), using blood. Two candidate genes (Mmp9 and Bdnf) were aberrantly expressed in the experimental rodent group relative to controls. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human homologues of these genes were significantly associated with susceptibility for anxiety disorders (MMP9: rs3918242 and BDNF: rs6265, rs10835210 and rs11030107). Three of these (BDNF: rs6265, rs10835210, rs11030107) were found to interact significantly with childhood trauma severity resulting in increased likelihood of an anxiety disorder diagnosis. This study provides insights into the utility of rat models for identifying molecular candidates for anxiety disorders in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Impact of parental history of substance use disorders on the clinical course of anxiety disorders

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    Moskowitz Amanda T

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among the psychological difficulties seen in children of parents with substance use problems, the anxiety disorders are among the most chronic conditions. Although children of alcoholic parents often struggle with the effects of parental substance use problems long into adulthood, empirical investigations of the influence of parental substance use disorders on the course of anxiety disorders in adult offspring are rare. The purpose of this study was to examine prospectively the relationship between parental substance use disorders and the course of anxiety disorders in adulthood over the course of 12 years. Methods Data on 618 subjects were derived from the Harvard/Brown Anxiety Research Project (HARP, a longitudinal naturalistic investigation of the clinical course of multiple anxiety disorders. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates were used to calculate probabilities of time to anxiety disorder remission and relapse. Proportional hazards regressions were conducted to determine whether the likelihood of remission and relapse for specific anxiety disorders was lower for those who had a history of parental substance use disorders than for individuals without this parental history. Results Adults with a history of parental substance use disorders were significantly more likely to be divorced and to have a high school level of education. History of parental substance use disorder was a significant predictor of relapse of social phobia and panic disorders. Conclusion These findings provide compelling evidence that adult children of parents with substance use disorders are more likely to have relapses of social phobia and panic disorders. Clinicians who treat adults with anxiety disorders should assess parental substance use disorders and dependence histories. Such information may facilitate treatment planning with regards to their patients' level of vulnerability to perceive scrutiny by others in social situations, and ability to

  5. Effect of juggling therapy on anxiety disorders in female patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakahara Toshihiro

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of juggling therapy for anxiety disorder patients. Design and Method Subjects were 17 female outpatients who met the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for anxiety disorders. Subjects were treated with standard psychotherapy, medication and counseling for 6 months. For the last 3 months of treatment, subjects were randomized into either a non-juggling group (n = 9 or a juggling therapy group (juggling group: n = 8. The juggling group gradually acquired juggling skills by practicing juggling beanbags (otedama in Japan with both hands. The therapeutic effect was evaluated using scores of psychological testing (STAI: State and Trate Anxiety Inventry, POMS: Profile of Mood Status and of ADL (FAI: Franchay Activity Index collected before treatment, 3 months after treatment (before juggling therapy, and at the end of both treatments. Results After 6 months, an analysis of variance revealed that scores on the state anxiety, trait anxiety subscales of STAI and tension-anxiety (T-A score of POMS were significantly lower in the juggling group than in the non-juggling group (p Conclusion These findings suggest that juggling therapy may be effective for the treatment of anxiety disorders.

  6. Maternal Anxiety and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roohallah Mirzaaghas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim:  According to the previous studies, anxiety along with some other psychiatric disorders is common among mothers of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Since maternal anxiety affects mother-child interactions, early treatment plays an important role in the prognosis of ADHD in children. This study aimed to determine the relationship between maternal anxiety and hyperactivity in children. Methods: This study was conducted on 112 mothers of ADHD children (aged 6-12 years, selected via convenience sampling from October to December 2012. The subjects lived in districts 2 and 6 of Tehran and were referred to consultation centers. Depression Anxiety Stress Scale 42 (DASS-42 and Swanson, Nolan and Pelham (SNAP-IV questionnaires were completed by the subjects. Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used for the analysis of the relationship between variables. Results: A positive correlation was found between maternal anxiety and children’s hyperactivity (P=0.05. In fact, high levels of maternal anxiety are accounted for various child-rearing problems such as children’s hyperactivity. Conclusion: High levels of maternal anxiety lead to child rearing problems, which in turn cause various disorders such as hyperactivity in children.

  7. Discriminant and Convergent Validity of the Anxiety Construct in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renno, Patricia; Wood, Jeffrey J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite reports of high anxiety in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), there is controversy regarding differential diagnosis of ASD symptoms and anxiety symptoms. This study examined 88 children, aged 7-11 years, with ASD referred for concerns about anxiety. A multitrait-(social anxiety, separation anxiety, overall anxiety severity, and…

  8. Epidemiology of anxiety disorders : From surveys to nosology and back

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, Dan J; Scott, Kate M; de Jonge, Peter; Kessler, Ronald C

    On the basis of epidemiological survey findings, anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental disorders around the world and are associated with significant comorbidity and morbidity. Such surveys rely on advances in psychiatric nosology and may also contribute usefully to revisions of the

  9. Serotonergic drugs in the treatment of depressive and anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Boer, JA; Bosker, FJ; Slaap, BR

    Serotonergic dysfunction has been implicated in the aetiology of several psychiatric conditions, including depressive and anxiety disorders. Much of the evidence for the role of serotonin (5-HT) in these disorders comes from treatment studies with serotonergic drugs, including selective serotonin

  10. Ambiguity in the Manifestation of Adult Separation Anxiety Disorder Occurring in Complex Anxiety Presentations: Two Clinical Case Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudaee-Faass, Sigal; Marnane, Claire; Wagner, Renate

    2009-01-01

    Two case reports are described in which patients presented for the treatment of multiple comorbid anxiety disorders, all of which appeared to derive from prolonged separation anxiety disorder. In particular, these adults had effectively altered their lifestyles to avoid separation, thereby displaying only ambiguous separation anxiety symptoms that…

  11. Sleep disturbance in generalized anxiety disorder and its treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Jaime M.; Monti, Daniel

    2000-06-01

    Sleep laboratory and epidemiological studies indicate that insomnia is a frequent finding in patients with psychiatric disorders. In this respect, insomnia associated with a major depression or an anxiety disorder, mainly generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), is the most prevalent diagnosis. According to available evidence, the sleep disturbance associated with mild-to-moderate GAD is a sleep-maintenance insomnia, and to a lesser extent a sleep-onset insomnia. Insomnia associated with mild-to-moderate GAD generally responds to psychological treatments and anxiolytic benzodiazepines. Moreover, concomitant administration of hypnotic medication can be contemplated in patients with severe GAD.

  12. Speech and language deficits in separation anxiety disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roha M. Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Separation anxiety disorder (SAD is one of the most commonly occurring pediatric anxiety disorders. Children with SAD are characterized by excessive anxiety of separation from the primary attachment figure. These children exhibit fear of separation from their parents and display behaviors such as clinging, excessive crying, and tantrums. Children with SAD are found to have significant brain changes. SAD can co-occur with other conditions such as autism spectrum disorders, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Past studies have identified not only cognitive deficits in children diagnosed with SAD, but also speech and language deficits, which vary depending on comorbidities. A team-centered approach is essential in the assessment and treatment of children diagnosed with SAD.

  13. The overlap between anxiety, depression, and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Guy M

    2015-09-01

    The anxiety disorders include generalized anxiety disorder, specific phobia, social phobia, agoraphobia, and panic disorder. In addition to the specific symptoms of these disorders, there may be a common experience of anxiety and even dysphoria across the conditions, and of course recourse to the same drug or choice of drugs for treatment. This overlap probably occurs because of universal dimensions of distress or negative affectivity, a shared genetic predisposition, and a common neurobiology Evidence of shared genes is still based mainly on twin studies, but the shared neurobiology can be investigated directly by the investigation of emotional or cognitive bias either behaviorally or using functional brain imaging. This intermediate phenotype can then provide a substrate for understanding and developing medicines and psychological treatments.

  14. Targeting the endocannabinoid system to treat anxiety-related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korem, Nachshon; Zer-Aviv, Tomer Mizrachi; Ganon-Elazar, Eti; Abush, Hila; Akirav, Irit

    2016-05-01

    The endocannabinoid system plays an important role in the control of emotions, and its dysregulation has been implicated in several psychiatric disorders. The most common self-reported reason for using cannabis is rooted in its ability to reduce feelings of stress, tension, and anxiety. Nevertheless, there are only few studies in controlled clinical settings that confirm that administration of cannabinoids can benefit patients with a post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). There are considerable encouraging preclinical data to suggest that endocannabinoid-targeted therapeutics for anxiety disorders should continue. In this review, we will describe data supporting a role for the endocannabinoid system in preventing and treating anxiety-like behavior in animal models and PTSD patients. Cannabinoids have shown beneficial outcomes in rat and mouse models of anxiety and PTSD, but they also may have untoward effects that discourage their chronic usage, including anxiogenic effects. Hence, clinical and preclinical research on the endocannabinoid system should further study the effects of cannabinoids on anxiety and help determine whether the benefits of using exogenous cannabinoids outweigh the risks. In general, this review suggests that targeting the endocannabinoid system represents an attractive and novel approach to the treatment of anxiety-related disorders and, in particular, PTSD.

  15. The history of generalized anxiety disorder as a diagnostic category.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocq, Marc-Antoine

    2017-06-01

    From the 19th century into the 20th century, the terms used to diagnose generalized anxiety included "pantophobia" and "anxiety neurosis." Such terms designated paroxysmal manifestations (panic attacks) as well as interparoxysmal phenomenology (the apprehensive mental state). Also, generalized anxiety was considered one of numerous symptoms of neurasthenia, a vaguely defined illness. Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) appeared as a diagnostic category in the third edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders ( DSM-III ) in 1980, when anxiety neurosis was split into GAD and panic disorder. The distinct responses these two disorders had to imipramine therapy was one reason to distinguish between the two. Since the revised DSM-III ( DSM-III-R ), worry about a number of life circumstances has been gradually emphasized as the distinctive symptom of GAD. Thus, a cognitive aspect of anxiety has become the core criterion of GAD. The validity of GAD as an independent category has been questioned from DSM-III up to preparation of DSM-5 . Areas of concern have included the difficulty to establish clear boundaries between GAD and (i) personality dimensions, (ii) other anxiety-spectrum disorders, and (iii) nonbipolar depression. The National Institute of Mental Health has recently proposed the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC), a framework destined to facilitate biological research into the etiology of mental symptoms. Within the RDoC framework, generalized anxiety might be studied as a dimension denominated "anxious apprehension" that would typically fit into the research domain called "negative valence systems" and the more specific construct termed "potential threat."

  16. Family Factors in the Development, Treatment, and Prevention of Childhood Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Kelly L.; Ginsburg, Golda S.

    2012-01-01

    It is now widely accepted that anxiety disorders run in families, and current etiological models have proposed both genetic and environmental pathways to anxiety development. In this paper, the familial role in the development, treatment, and prevention of anxiety disorders in children is reviewed. We focus on three anxiety disorders in youth,…

  17. Excess costs of social anxiety disorder in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dams, Judith; König, Hans-Helmut; Bleibler, Florian; Hoyer, Jürgen; Wiltink, Jörg; Beutel, Manfred E; Salzer, Simone; Herpertz, Stephan; Willutzki, Ulrike; Strauß, Bernhard; Leibing, Eric; Leichsenring, Falk; Konnopka, Alexander

    2017-04-15

    Social anxiety disorder is one of the most frequent mental disorders. It is often associated with mental comorbidities and causes a high economic burden. The aim of our analysis was to estimate the excess costs of patients with social anxiety disorder compared to persons without anxiety disorder in Germany. Excess costs of social anxiety disorder were determined by comparing two data sets. Patient data came from the SOPHO-NET study A1 (n=495), whereas data of persons without anxiety disorder originated from a representative phone survey (n=3213) of the general German population. Missing data were handled by "Multiple Imputation by Chained Equations". Both data sets were matched using "Entropy Balancing". Excess costs were calculated from a societal perspective for the year 2014 using general linear regression with a gamma distribution and log-link function. Analyses considered direct costs (in- and outpatient treatment, rehabilitation, and professional and informal care) and indirect costs due to absenteeism from work. Total six-month excess costs amounted to 451€ (95% CI: 199€-703€). Excess costs were mainly caused by indirect excess costs due to absenteeism from work of 317€ (95% CI: 172€-461€), whereas direct excess costs amounted to 134€ (95% CI: 110€-159€). Costs for medication, unemployment and disability pension was not evaluated. Social anxiety disorder was associated with statistically significant excess costs, in particular due to indirect costs. As patients in general are often unaware of their disorder or its severity, awareness should be strengthened. Prevention and early treatment might reduce long-term indirect costs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Alcohol use, anxiety, and insomnia in older adults with generalized anxiety disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivan, M. Cristina; Amspoker, Amber B.; Nadorff, Michael R.; Kunik, Mark E.; Cully, Jeffrey A.; Wilson, Nancy; Calleo, Jessica; Kraus-Schuman, Cynthia; Stanley, Melinda A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We examined the presence and frequency of alcohol consumption among older primary care patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and their relation to demographic variables, insomnia, worry, and anxiety. We expected alcohol-use distribution to be similar to previous reports and alcohol use to be associated with higher anxiety and insomnia. A third aim was to examine the moderating role of alcohol use on the relation between anxiety and insomnia. We expected alcohol use to worsen the relation between anxiety and insomnia. Design Baseline data from a randomized controlled trial Sample 223 patients, age 60 and older, with DSM-IV GAD diagnoses Setting Patients were recruited through internal medicine, family practice, and geriatric clinics at 2 diverse healthcare settings: Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Administration Medical Center and Baylor College of Medicine. Measurements Measures addressed alcohol use (presence and frequency); insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index); self-reported worry severity (Penn State Worry Questionnaire − Abbreviated); clinician-rated worry severity (Generalized Anxiety Disorder Severity Scale); self-reported anxiety severity (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory - Trait); and clinician-rated anxiety (Structured Interview Guidelines for the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale). Results Most patients endorsed alcohol use in the past month, but overall weekly frequency was low. Presence and frequency of use among patients with GAD were greater than in prior reports of primary care samples. Alcohol use among patients with GAD was associated with higher education and female gender. Higher education also was associated with more drinks per week, and Caucasians reported more drinks per week than African Americans. Alcohol use was associated with less severe insomnia, lower self-reported anxiety, and less clinician-rated worry and anxiety. More drinks per week were associated with lower clinician-rated anxiety. Moderation analyses revealed lower

  19. Does generalized anxiety disorder predict coronary heart disease risk factors independently of major depressive disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, Steven D; Sydeman, Sumner J

    2005-09-01

    Anxiety symptoms are associated with elevated coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, but it is not known whether such associations extend to anxiety disorders or if they are independent of depression. We sought to determine if generalized anxiety disorder is associated with elevated CHD risk, and whether this association is independent of or interacts with major depressive disorder. Generalized anxiety and major depressive disorders were assessed in a cross-sectional survey of a representative sample of U.S. adults aged 25-74 (N=3032). Coronary heart disease risk was determined by self-reported smoking status, body mass index, and recent medication use for hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes. Generalized anxiety disorder independently predicted increased CHD risk (F(1,3018)=5.14; b=0.39; 95% confidence interval (0.05-0.72)) and tended to denote the greatest risk in the absence of major depressive disorder. The cross-sectional design cannot determine the causal direction of the association. Generalized anxiety disorder appears to be associated with elevated CHD risk in the general population. It may denote excess CHD risk relative to major depressive disorder, and clinicians should consider CHD risk when treating generalized anxiety disorder.

  20. Sequential Treatment of Comorbid Insomnia and Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belleville, Geneviève; Ivers, Hans; Bélanger, Lynda; Blais, France C; Morin, Charles M

    2016-09-01

    To explore the efficacy of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) for patients with comorbid generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and insomnia using 2 sequential treatments. Using a single-case methodology, 10 women (mean age = 45) with chronic insomnia and GAD were randomly assigned to CBT for GAD followed by CBT for insomnia, or to CBT for insomnia followed by CBT for GAD. Sleep and anxiety were measured via diagnostic interviews, daily diaries, and self-report questionnaires. Time series analyses, group effect sizes, and indications of clinically significant change revealed improvements on anxiety, worry, and sleep after CBT for GAD. Following CBT for insomnia, positive changes were observed on sleep and, to a lesser extent, anxiety and worry. In the presence of comorbid GAD and insomnia, initiating treatment for GAD first produced superior clinical benefits in anxiety and sleep. The addition of insomnia-specific treatment led to additional improvements in worry and sleep quality. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Social anxiety disorder and the psychobiology of self-consciousness

    OpenAIRE

    Stein, Dan J.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD) are characterized by fear or anxiety about social situations, but also by important alterations in self-referential processing. Given advances in our understanding of the neurocircuitry and neurochemistry of SAD, the question arises of the relationship between this research and an emergent literature on the psychobiology of self and self-consciousness. A number of investigations of SAD have highlighted altered activity in the medial prefrontal co...

  2. Duloxetine in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Norman, Trevor R; Olver, James S

    2008-01-01

    Trevor R Norman, James S OlverDepartment of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Austin Hospital, Heidelberg, Victoria, AustraliaAbstract: Duloxetine, a medication with effects on both serotonin and noradrenaline transporter molecules, has recently been approved for the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder. The evidence for its efficacy lies in a limited number of double blind, placebo controlled comparisons. Statistically significant improvements in the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale fro...

  3. Symptom Similarities and Differences in Anxiety and Depressive Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Sirvanli Ozen

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The question if there is a valid distinction between depression and anxiety disorders remains controversial. These two disorders have various overlaps in the symptomatology and sometimes it is difficult to make a clear diagnosis. The difficulty in making a definite diagnosis destined researchers to determine the differences and the similarities between anxiety and depression. The negative affect which has multiple dimensions such as low self-esteem, negative mood and negative cognitions is seen as the common factor in both disorders. The positive affect which has been defined as the harmony and satisfaction with others and milieu, is regarded as the discriminating factor for the diagnosis of depression. Further research has characterized somatic arousal as the third dimension, a candidate to be the discriminating factor for anxiety disorders. Although phenotypic models appear to find a solution for this problem the facts that negative affect dimension is more loaded compared to the other two dimensions and predominance of negative affect on several symptom patterns prevent researchers to reach a conclusive results regarding the differences between these two disorders. In this review article, symptom similarities and differences of anxiety and depressive disorders are discussed within the frame of phenotypic models and some alternative ideas are provided for possible changes in upcoming versions of classification systems.

  4. [Comorbid depressive and anxiety disorders in patients with cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapfhammer, H-P

    2015-03-01

    Patients with cancer face a high risk of comorbid depressive and anxiety disorders that have to be paradigmatically considered within a complex biopsychosocial context. Several conceptual challenges have to be mastered in arriving at a correct clinical diagnosis. Coexistent affective and anxiety disorders in cancer patients include a more dramatic subjective suffering, reduced psychological coping, possible negative interference with somatic treatment and rehabilitation, impaired quality of life and higher grades of psychosocial disability. They may also lead to an overall increased risk of somatic morbidity, a more rapid progression of cancer and a higher cancer-related mortality in the course of the disease. Manifold psychological, psychosocial and existential, cancer and treatment-related stressors have to be considered with respect to common neurobiological, especially neuroendocrine and neuroinflammatory mechanisms. Complex psychosomatic, somatopsychic and somato-somatic effects must always be considered. Evidence-based approaches in psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy exist for the integrative treatment of comorbid depressive and anxiety disorders in cancer.

  5. [Treatment of generalized anxiety disorder in terms of cognitive behavioral].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrowska, Anna; Gmitrowicz, Agnieszka

    2016-02-01

    Risk of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) within life is estimated at 2.6-5.1%. Amongst etiological factors that affect the development of the disorder are: biological and psychological problems, including cognitive models. There are known several cognitive models: metacognitive, Borkovec'c model and the model developed in Quebec. Key cognitive contents that occur with generalized anxiety disorder are focused on two aspects: metacognitive beliefs and intolerance of uncertainty. A primary purpose of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) is the modification of dysfunctional beliefs about worry. Cognitive behavioural therapy is effective in reducing anxiety, makes it easier to operate in the professional sphere and improves the quality of life. © 2016 MEDPRESS.

  6. Anxiety trajectories in response to a speech task in social anxiety disorder: Evidence from a randomized controlled trial of CBT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Amanda S.; Brozovich, Faith A.; Lee, Ihno A.; Jazaieri, Hooria; Goldin, Philippe R.; Heimberg, Richard G.; Gross, James J.

    2016-01-01

    The subjective experience of anxiety plays a central role in cognitive behavioral models of social anxiety disorder (SAD). However, much remains to be learned about the temporal dynamics of anxiety elicited by feared social situations. The aims of the current study were: 1) to compare anxiety trajectories during a speech task in individuals with SAD (n = 135) versus healthy controls (HCs; n = 47), and 2) to compare the effects of CBT on anxiety trajectories with a waitlist control condition. SAD was associated with higher levels of anxiety and greater increases in anticipatory anxiety compared to HCs, but not differential change in anxiety from pre- to post-speech. CBT was associated with decreases in anxiety from pre- to post-speech but not with changes in absolute levels of anticipatory anxiety or rates of change in anxiety during anticipation. The findings suggest that anticipatory experiences should be further incorporated into exposures. PMID:26760456

  7. Treatment of childhood anxiety disorder in the context of maternal anxiety disorder: a randomised controlled trial and economic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, Cathy; Cruddace, Susan; Gerry, Stephen; Gitau, Rachel; McIntosh, Emma; Mollison, Jill; Murray, Lynne; Shafran, Rosamund; Stein, Alan; Violato, Mara; Voysey, Merryn; Willetts, Lucy; Williams, Nicola; Yu, Ly-Mee; Cooper, Peter J

    2015-05-01

    Cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) for childhood anxiety disorders is associated with modest outcomes in the context of parental anxiety disorder. This study evaluated whether or not the outcome of CBT for children with anxiety disorders in the context of maternal anxiety disorders is improved by the addition of (i) treatment of maternal anxiety disorders, or (ii) treatment focused on maternal responses. The incremental cost-effectiveness of the additional treatments was also evaluated. Participants were randomised to receive (i) child cognitive-behavioural therapy (CCBT); (ii) CCBT with CBT to target maternal anxiety disorders [CCBT + maternal cognitive-behavioural therapy (MCBT)]; or (iii) CCBT with an intervention to target mother-child interactions (MCIs) (CCBT + MCI). A NHS university clinic in Berkshire, UK. Two hundred and eleven children with a primary anxiety disorder, whose mothers also had an anxiety disorder. All families received eight sessions of individual CCBT. Mothers in the CCBT + MCBT arm also received eight sessions of CBT targeting their own anxiety disorders. Mothers in the MCI arm received 10 sessions targeting maternal parenting cognitions and behaviours. Non-specific interventions were delivered to balance groups for therapist contact. Primary clinical outcomes were the child's primary anxiety disorder status and degree of improvement at the end of treatment. Follow-up assessments were conducted at 6 and 12 months. Outcomes in the economic analyses were identified and measured using estimated quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). QALYS were combined with treatment, health and social care costs and presented within an incremental cost-utility analysis framework with associated uncertainty. MCBT was associated with significant short-term improvement in maternal anxiety; however, after children had received CCBT, group differences were no longer apparent. CCBT + MCI was associated with a reduction in maternal overinvolvement

  8. The Development of Anxiety Disorders: Considering the Contributions of Attachment and Emotion Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbjorn, B. H.; Bender, P. K.; Reinholdt-Dunne, M. L.; Munck, L. A.; Ollendick, T. H.

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most common psychiatric disorders in childhood. Nonetheless, theoretical knowledge of the development and maintenance of childhood anxiety disorders is still in its infancy. Recently, research has begun to investigate the influence of emotion regulation on anxiety disorders. Although a relation between anxiety…

  9. Should OCD be classified as an anxiety disorder in DSM-V?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, Dan J.; Fineberg, Naomi A.; Bienvenu, O. Joseph; Denys, Damiaan; Lochner, Christine; Nestadt, Gerald; Leckman, James F.; Rauch, Scott L.; Phillips, Katharine A.

    2010-01-01

    In DSM-III, DSM-III-R, and DSM-IV, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) was classified as an anxiety disorder. In ICD-10, OCD is classified separately from the anxiety disorders, although within the same larger category as anxiety disorders (as one of the "neurotic, stress-related, and somatoform

  10. Collaborative care for panic disorder, generalised anxiety disorder and social phobia in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curth, Nadja Kehler; Brinck-Claussen, Ursula Ødum; Davidsen, Annette Sofie

    2017-01-01

    Background: People with anxiety disorders represent a significant part of a general practitioner’s patient population. However, there are organisational obstacles for optimal treatment, such as a lack of coordination of illness management and limited access to evidence-based treatment...... such as cognitive behavioral therapy. A limited number of studies suggest that collaborative care has a positive effect on symptoms for people with anxiety disorders. However, most studies are carried out in the USA and none have reported results for social phobia or generalised anxiety disorder separately. Thus......, there is a need for studies carried out in different settings for specific anxiety populations. A Danish model for collaborative care (the Collabri model) has been developed for people diagnosed with depression or anxiety disorders. The model is evaluated through four trials, of which three will be outlined...

  11. Recent Advances in the Study of Sleep in the Anxiety Disorders, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Elaine M; Ross, Richard J

    2015-12-01

    Sleep disturbance is frequently associated with generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. This article reviews recent advances in understanding the mechanisms of the sleep disturbances in these disorders and discusses the implications for developing improved treatments. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Assessment of Anxiety Level of Emergency Health-care Workers by Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharthy, Nesrin; Alrajeh, Osama Abdulrahman; Almutairi, Mohammed; Alhajri, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Dealing with emergency patients is considered to be a stressful situation to all health-care workers in the emergency department (ED). Prolonged stress predispose to physical and inconsequential psychiatric disturbances. Anxiety and depressive mode were found to be the most commonly experienced psychiatric manifestation among emergency health-care workers. The aim of this study is to screen and assess the severity of anxiety among health professionals working in ED. Cross-sectional study design was used. Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD)-7 screening tool was used to assess for anxiety symptoms. GAD-7 is a validated self-report tool that comprises seven questions where each question is rated on a 3-point scale. Demographic data were collected from the study sample. The study sample consists of emergency physician, nurses, and other emergency medical services workers. Data analysis was performed using SAS version 9.2 software. Descriptive statistics, nonparametric comparison, and correlation were performed as part of data analysis. A total of 135 participants completed the questionnaire, of which, 66% of the participants were males. Occupational status of the respondents indicated that majority (35.6%) were physicians followed by 27.4% of emergency medical, and 27% of nurses. The results of this study indicated that 48% of the subjects were observed without an anxiety disorder. However, moderate to mild degrees of anxiety disorder was identified among 20.7% and 23.7% of the subjects, respectively. Severe anxiety disorder was found among 7.6% of the respondents. Emergency medical services workers were reported to have the highest GAD-7 score followed by physicians and nurses P = 0.039. Gender and older age group among health professionals were statistically significant correlated with higher GAD-7 score P = 0.028 and 0.048, respectively. There is no significant difference in GAD-7 score among health professional dealing with adult versus pediatrics patient. From this

  13. Differential carbon dioxide sensitivity in childhood anxiety disorders and nonill comparison group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, D S; Klein, R G; Coplan, J D; Papp, L A; Hoven, C W; Martinez, J; Kovalenko, P; Mandell, D J; Moreau, D; Klein, D F; Gorman, J M

    2000-10-01

    To examine the relationship between respiratory regulation and childhood anxiety disorders, this study considered the relationship between anxiety disorders and symptoms during carbon dioxide (CO(2)) exposure, CO(2) sensitivity in specific childhood anxiety disorders, and the relationship between symptomatic and physiological responses to CO(2). Following procedures established in adults, 104 children (aged 9-17 years), including 25 from a previous study, underwent 5% CO(2) inhalation. The sample included 57 probands with an anxiety disorder (social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, and panic disorder) and 47 nonill comparison subjects. Symptoms of anxiety were assessed before, during, and after CO(2) inhalation. All children tolerated the procedure well, experiencing transient or no increases in anxiety symptoms. Children with an anxiety disorder, particularly separation anxiety disorder, exhibited greater changes in somatic symptoms during inhalation of CO(2)-enriched air, relative to the comparison group. During CO(2) inhalation, symptom ratings were positively correlated with respiratory rate increases, as well as with levels of tidal volume, minute ventilation, end-tidal CO(2), and irregularity in respiratory rate during room-air breathing. Childhood anxiety disorders, particularly separation anxiety disorder, are associated with CO(2) hypersensitivity, as defined by symptom reports. Carbon dioxide hypersensitivity is associated with physiological changes similar to those found in panic disorder. These and other data suggest that certain childhood anxiety disorders may share pathophysiological features with adult panic disorder.

  14. The Impact of Caregiving on the Development of Major Depressive Disorder and Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Markey, Eve Jane

    2015-01-01

    Providing care for a relative is associated with psychological distress and a higher prevalence of psychological disorders. This study investigated the prevalence of anxiety and depressive disorders among the caregiving population. The study was based on data drawn from the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys (CPES). Binary logistic regressions were conducted to examine these associations and to identify factors influencing the development of depressive and anxiety disorders. The a...

  15. Association between Anxiety Disorders and Heart Rate Variability in The Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Licht, Carmilla M. M.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; van Dyck, Richard; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    Objective: To determine whether patients with different types of anxiety disorder (panic disorder, social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder) have higher heart rate and lower heart rate variability compared with healthy controls in a sample that was sufficiently powered to examine the confounding

  16. [The role of regular physical activity in the prevention and intervention of symptoms of anxiety and anxiety disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takács, Johanna; Stauder, Adrienne

    Anxiety disorders are the most common mental illness, but are not uniform, many clinical diagnoses include the symptoms of anxiety. That is the reason why there are relatively small numbers of population surveys and randomized-controlled trials which have examined the relationship between exercise and the various anxiety symptoms/ disorders. In our review we summarize meta-analytic studies, epidemiological surveys and randomized controlled studies which examine the role of regular physical activity in the prevention and treatment of subclinical anxiety/anxiety symptoms and anxiety disorders. The meta-analytic studies and randomized-controlled trials examining the relationship between subclinical anxiety disorders and anxiety symptoms demonstrated small to moderate effect of exercise in the decrease of anxiety symptoms, especially for moderate-intensity exercise. This relationship was confirmed for both acute and chronic exercise, for state and trait anxiety in different sex, age and state of health groups. In the case of the anxiety disorders based on reviewed studies, we can conclude that there is a potential association between decreased symptoms of anxiety and exercise. The regular, moderate-intensity exercise can reduce and alleviate the symptoms of anxiety - at least in panic, agoraphobia and generalized anxiety disorders. The reviewed studies have been highlighted the fact, that exercise can be effective in psychiatric practice as an alternative or adjuvant therapy. Physically healthy people with anxiety symptoms, or patients with anxiety disorders can perform exercise, there are no contraindications. Although based on previous studies, we cannot assume that the relationship is causal, but we cannot ignore the evidences that are already available.

  17. [Bipolar disorders and comorbid anxiety: prognostic impact and therapeutic challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazard, F; Ferreri, F

    2013-02-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the main psychiatric conditions co-occuring with bipolar disorders. Many clinical and epidemiological studies have found much higher prevalence rates of generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder in bipolar patients than in the general population, regardless of age. In the National Comorbidity Survey for instance, the diagnosis of at least one anxiety disorder was made for nearly 90% of bipolar subjects. Several issues arise from this high comorbidity, such as the way anxiety disorders alter the course and prognosis of the mood disorder, and challenge typical therapeutic strategies. This article reviews data on clinical and therapeutical significance of such comorbidity. Many studies point out the poorer outcome for bipolar patients with co-occurring anxiety symptoms: apart from the alarming increase of suicidal ideas and suicide attempts, authors have found a shorter duration of euthymia, more comorbid addictions, mixed states and rapid cycling, and lower response to treatments. This is the reason why monitoring the suicidal risk in those bipolar patients with co-occurring anxiety disorders is of critical importance. From a physiopathological standpoint, the precise links between both pathologies remains unclear. The frequency of this comorbidity and its significance on long term prognosis stands in sharp contrast with the very few therapeutic studies conducted in this indication so far. Pharmacological approaches are strongly limited by the risk of mood switching under antidepressants and drug dependence on anxiolytics such as benzodiazepines. Nevertheless, there is emerging evidence of the interest of atypical antipsychotics such as olanzapine and mood stabilisers such as lamotrigine to control anxiety symptoms in bipolar patients. There is weaker evidence for other molecules. Taking into account other therapeutic approaches than the pharmacological

  18. Social anxiety and eating disorder comorbidity: The role of negative social evaluation fears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, Cheri A.; Rodebaugh, Thomas L.

    2011-01-01

    Social anxiety and eating disorders are highly comorbid. However, it is unknown how specific domains of social anxiety relate to disordered eating. We provide data on these relationships and investigate social appearance anxiety and fear of negative evaluation as potential vulnerabilities linking social anxiety with eating disorders. Specifically, we examined five domains of social anxiety: Social interaction anxiety, fear of scrutiny, fear of positive evaluation, fear of negative evaluation, and social appearance anxiety. Results indicated that social appearance anxiety predicted body dissatisfaction, bulimia symptoms, shape concern, weight concern, and eating concern over and above fear of scrutiny, social interaction anxiety, and fear of positive evaluation. Fear of negative evaluation uniquely predicted drive for thinness and restraint. Structural equation modeling supported a model in which social appearance anxiety and fear of negative evaluation are vulnerabilities for both social anxiety and eating disorder symptoms. Interventions that target these negative social evaluation fears may help prevent development of eating disorders. PMID:22177392

  19. Recent advances in the brain imaging of social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouche, Jean-Paul; van Der Wee, Nic J A; Roelofs, Karin; Stein, Dan J

    2013-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is one of the most common and disabling anxiety disorders, yet much remains to be learned about its psychobiology. Although functional imaging has emphasized the role of the amygdala and other limbic structures in the neurobiology of SAD, structural and connectivity imaging techniques have emphasized the possibility of abnormalities in other regions and in whole-brain networks. The involvement of a broad range of networks in SAD is consistent with current understandings of the neuroanatomy of emotion and of social processing. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Diminished autonomic neurocardiac function in patients with generalized anxiety disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim K

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Kyungwook Kim,1 Seul Lee,2 Jong-Hoon Kim1–3 1Gachon University School of Medicine, 2Department of Psychiatry, Gil Medical Center, Gachon University School of Medicine, Gachon University, 3Neuroscience Research Institute, Gachon University, Incheon, Republic of Korea Background: Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD is a chronic and highly prevalent disorder that is characterized by a number of autonomic nervous system symptoms. The purpose of this study was to investigate the linear and nonlinear complexity measures of heart rate variability (HRV, measuring autonomic regulation, and to evaluate the relationship between HRV parameters and the severity of anxiety, in medication-free patients with GAD. Methods: Assessments of linear and nonlinear complexity measures of HRV were performed in 42 medication-free patients with GAD and 50 healthy control subjects. In addition, the severity of anxiety symptoms was assessed using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Beck Anxiety Inventory. The values of the HRV measures of the groups were compared, and the correlations between the HRV measures and the severity of anxiety symptoms were assessed. Results: The GAD group showed significantly lower standard deviation of RR intervals and the square root of the mean squared differences of successive normal sinus intervals values compared to the control group (P<0.01. The approximate entropy value, which is a nonlinear complexity indicator, was also significantly lower in the patient group than in the control group (P<0.01. In correlation analysis, there were no significant correlations between HRV parameters and the severity of anxiety symptoms. Conclusion: The present study indicates that GAD is significantly associated with reduced HRV, suggesting that autonomic neurocardiac integrity is substantially impaired in patients with GAD. Future prospective studies are required to investigate the effects of pharmacological or non-pharmacological treatment on

  1. [Anxiety disorders in type 1 neurofibromatosis: A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekih-Romdhane, F; Othman, S; Sahnoun, C; Helayem, S; Abbes, Z; Bouden, A

    2015-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), also known as Von Recklinghausen disease, is one of the most frequent human genetic diseases, with a prevalence of one case in 3000 births, an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance, and a high rate of new mutations. NF1 has markedly variable clinical expression, with manifestations ranging from mild lesions to several complications and functional impairment. The complications are age-specific. Psychiatric disorders are more frequent in NF1 than in the general population, especially in children. They include dysthymia, depressive mood, anxiety, and personality disorders. Bipolar mood disorders or schizophrenia are rather rare. The majority of studies have focused on physical health and neurocognitive function in NF1, whereas psychiatric disorders associated with this disease remain unclear and poorly documented. This report is based on a clinical case and discusses the relationship between neurofibromatosis type 1 and psychiatric disorders, particularly anxiety disorders. This case concerns a 13-year-old girl, the first child of healthy and non-consanguineous parents. The patient's history showed normal psychomotor and psychoaffective development. Her father and paternal grandmother had isolated café-au-lait spots. In June 2013, a subcutaneous mass appeared in her right thigh. She consulted a neurologist and was explored. The physical examination revealed signs of NF1. She had café-au-lait spots on the trunk and extremities, and a neurofibroma in the right thigh. Bilateral ophthalmic examination revealed multiple Lish nodules. After 1 month, a psychiatric consultation was requested for sad mood and night terrors. Obsessive compulsive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder were diagnosed according to the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition. The current psychiatric literature does not provide full explanations of anxiety symptoms associated with NF1. Some authors have tried to explain

  2. CBT for anxiety disorders in children with and without autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Steensel, F J A; Bögels, S M

    2015-06-01

    The effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) was examined, and compared with children without ASD. Children with ASD and comorbid anxiety disorders (n = 79, 58 boys; Mage = 11.76) and children with anxiety disorders (n = 95, 46 boys; Mage = 12.85), and their parents, participated. All families were referred to 1 of 7 mental health care centers and received the same CBT. Anxiety, quality of life, ASD-like behaviors, and emotional-behavioral problems were measured at waitlist (ASD-group only, n = 17), pretest, posttest, and 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years after CBT. CBT was more effective than waitlist for treating anxiety disorders (d = -1.45) and anxiety symptoms (d = -0.48) in children with ASD. At 2 years follow-up, 61% of the children with and 64% without ASD were free of their primary anxiety disorder (percentages not significantly different). The decrease in severity of anxiety disorders after CBT (d values ranging between -1.05 and -1.46) was not different for children with and without ASD. Improvements were less in children with ASD for (only) 2 out of 7 continuous outcomes measures: anxiety symptoms (d values ranging between -0.68 and -0.94 vs. d values ranging between -0.98 and -1.25) and quality of life (d values ranging between 0.39 and 0.56 vs. d values ranging between 0.77 and 0.98). CBT for anxiety disorders is effective for children with ASD, also in the long-term. Treatment gains may be somewhat less compared with children without ASD. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Specifically altered brain responses to threat in generalized anxiety disorder relative to social anxiety disorder and panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buff, Christine; Brinkmann, Leonie; Neumeister, Paula; Feldker, Katharina; Heitmann, Carina; Gathmann, Bettina; Andor, Tanja; Straube, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Despite considerable effort, the neurobiological underpinnings of hyper-responsive threat processing specific to patients suffering from generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) remain poorly understood. The current functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study aims to delineate GAD-specific brain activity during immediate threat processing by comparing GAD patients to healthy controls (HC), to social anxiety disorder (SAD) and to panic disorder (PD) patients. Brain activation and functional connectivity patterns to threat vs. neutral pictures were investigated using event-related fMRI. The sample consisted of 21 GAD, 21 PD, 21 SAD and 21 HC. GAD-specific elevated activity to threat vs. neutral pictures was found in cingulate cortex, dorsal anterior insula/frontal operculum (daI/FO) and posterior dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC). Defining these effects as seed regions, we detected GAD-specific increased functional connectivity to threat vs. neutral pictures between posterior dlPFC and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, between cingulate cortex and amygdala, between cingulate cortex and anterior insula, as well as decreased functional connectivity between daI/FO and mid-dlPFC. The findings present the first evidence for GAD-specific neural correlates of hyper-responsive threat processing, possibly reflecting exaggerated threat sensitivity, maladaptive appraisal and attention-allocation processes.

  4. Negative autobiographical memories in social anxiety disorder: A comparison with panic disorder and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Mia Skytte; Watson, Lynn A; Rosenberg, Nicole K; Berntsen, Dorthe

    2016-03-01

    Empirical interest in mental imagery in social anxiety disorder (SAD) has grown over the past years but still little is known about the specificity to SAD. The present study therefore examines negative autobiographical memories in participants with social anxiety disorder (SAD), compared to patients with panic disorder (PD), and healthy controls (HCs). A total of 107 participants retrieved four memories cued by verbal phrases associated with either social anxiety (SA) or panic anxiety (PA), with two memories for each cue category. PA-cued memories were experienced with stronger imagery and as more traumatic. They were also rated as more central to identity than SA-cued memories, but not among participants with SAD, who perceived SA-cued memories as equally central to their identity. When between-group effects were detected, participants with anxiety disorders differed from HCs, but not from each other. Central limitations include reliance on self-report measures, comorbidity in the anxiety disorder groups, and lack of a neutrally cued memory comparison. The findings align with models of SAD suggesting that past negative social events play a central role in this disorder. Future research is suggested to further explore the function of negative memories, not only in SAD, but also in other anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The CANMAT task force recommendations for the management of patients with mood disorders and comorbid anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Ayal; McIntosh, Diane; Goldstein, Benjamin I; Rector, Neil A; McIntyre, Roger S; Beaulieu, Serge; Swinson, Richard; Yatham, Lakshmi N

    2012-02-01

    Comorbid mood and anxiety disorders are commonly seen in clinical practice. The goal of this article is to review the available literature on the epidemiologic, etiologic, clinical, and management aspects of this comorbidity and formulate a set of evidence- and consensus-based recommendations. This article is part of a set of Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) Comorbidity Task Force papers. We conducted a PubMed search of all English-language articles published between January 1966 and November 2010. The search terms were bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder, cross-referenced with anxiety disorders/symptoms, panic disorder, agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Levels of evidence for specific interventions were assigned based on a priori determined criteria, and recommendations were developed by integrating the level of evidence and clinical opinion of the authors. Comorbid anxiety symptoms and disorders have a significant impact on the clinical presentation and treatment approach for patients with mood disorders. A set of recommendations are provided for the management of bipolar disorder (BD) with comorbid anxiety and major depressive disorder (MDD) with comorbid anxiety with a focus on comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder, use of cognitive-behavioral therapy across mood and anxiety disorders, and youth with mood and anxiety disorders. Careful attention should be given to correctly identifying anxiety comorbidities in patients with BD or MDD. Consideration of evidence- or consensus-based treatment recommendations for the management of both mood and anxiety symptoms is warranted.

  6. Anxiety Symptoms in Boys with Autism Spectrum Disorder, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, or Chronic Multiple Tic Disorder and Community Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttmann-Steinmetz, Sarit; Gadow, Kenneth D.; DeVincent, Carla J.; Crowell, Judy

    2010-01-01

    We compared symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and separation anxiety disorder (SAD) in 5 groups of boys with neurobehavioral syndromes: attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) plus autism spectrum disorder (ASD), ADHD plus chronic multiple tic disorder (CMTD), ASD only, ADHD only, and community Controls. Anxiety symptoms were…

  7. Pharmacotherapy for anxiety and comorbid alcohol use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipser, Jonathan C; Wilson, Don; Akindipe, Taiwo O; Sager, Carli; Stein, Dan J

    2015-01-20

    Anxiety disorders are a potentially disabling group of disorders that frequently co-occur with alcohol use disorders. Comorbid anxiety and alcohol use disorders are associated with poorer outcomes, and are difficult to treat with standard psychosocial interventions. In addition, improved understanding of the biological basis of the conditions has contributed to a growing interest in the use of medications for the treatment of people with both diagnoses. To assess the effects of pharmacotherapy for treating anxiety in people with comorbid alcohol use disorders, specifically: to provide an estimate of the overall effects of medication in improving treatment response and reducing symptom severity in the treatment of anxiety disorders in people with comorbid alcohol use disorders; to determine whether specific medications are more effective and tolerable than other medications in the treatment of particular anxiety disorders; and to identify which factors (clinical, methodological) predict response to pharmacotherapy for anxiety disorders. Review authors searched the specialized registers of The Cochrane Collaboration Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Review Group (CCDANCTR, to January 2014) and the Cochrane Drugs and Alcohol Group (CDAG, to March 2013) for eligible trials. These registers contain reports of relevant randomized controlled trials (RCT) from: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, all years), MEDLINE (1950 to date), EMBASE (1974 to date) and PsycINFO (1967 to date). Review authors ran complementary searches on EMBASE, PubMed, PsycINFO and the Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Science Database (ETOH) (to August 2013). We located unpublished trials through the National Institutes of Health (NIH) RePORTER service and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (to August 2013). We screened reference lists of retrieved articles for additional studies. All true RCTs of pharmacotherapy for treating

  8. Anxiety disorders and childhood maltreatment as predictors of outcome in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Barbara; Perroud, Nader; Cordera, Paolo; Uher, Rudolf; Alda, Martin; Dayer, Alexandre; Aubry, Jean-Michel

    2018-01-01

    Comorbid anxiety disorders and childhood maltreatment have each been linked with unfavourable outcomes in people with bipolar disorder. Because childhood maltreatment is associated with anxiety disorders in this population, their respective predictive value remains to be determined. In 174 adults with bipolar disorder, we assessed childhood maltreatment using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and lifetime anxiety disorders with the MINI International Neuropsychiatric Interview. We constructed an overall index of severity of bipolar disorder as a sum of six indicators (unemployment, psychotic symptoms, more than five manic episodes, more than five depressive episodes, suicide attempt, and hospital admission). We tested the relationship between childhood maltreatment, the number of anxiety disorders and the overall severity index using ordered logistic regression. The number of lifetime anxiety disorders was associated with the overall severity index (OR = 1.43, 95%CI = 1.01-2.04, p = 0.047). This relationship was only slightly attenuated when controlled for childhood maltreatment (OR = 1.39, 95%CI = 0.97-2.00, p = 0.069). The relationship between childhood maltreatment and the overall severity index was not statistically significant (OR = 1.26, 95%CI = 0.92-1.74, p = 0.151). Secondary analyses revealed that childhood maltreatment was associated with suicide attempts (OR = 1.70, 95%CI = 1.15-2.51, p = 0.008) and obsessive compulsive disorder was associated with the overall severity index (OR = 9.56, 95%CI = 2.20-41.47, p = 0.003). This was a cross-sectional study with a moderate-sized sample recruited from a specialist program. While comorbid anxiety disorders are associated with the overall severity of bipolar disorder, childhood maltreatment is specifically associated with suicide attempts. Clinicians should systematically assess both factors. Interventions to improve outcomes of people with bipolar disorder with comorbid anxiety disorders and history of childhood

  9. Social functioning in youth with anxiety disorders: association with anxiety severity and outcomes from cognitive-behavioral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settipani, Cara A; Kendall, Philip C

    2013-02-01

    Social functioning was assessed using the Child Behavior Checklist and Teacher Report Form for children with anxiety disorders who participated in a randomized clinical trial (N = 161, aged 7-14). Significant relationships were found between severity of children's principal anxiety disorder and most measures of social functioning, such that poorer social functioning was associated with more severe anxiety. Among youth who received cognitive-behavioral therapy (n = 111), significant associations were found between parent-reported social competence and both absence of principal anxiety disorder and lower anxiety severity at posttreatment and 1-year follow-up, controlling for the severity of the child's principal anxiety disorder at pretreatment. Findings support a relationship between anxiety severity and social difficulties, and suggest the importance of social competence for a favorable treatment response.

  10. Alternative psychotherapy approaches for social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsitz, J D; Marshall, R D

    2001-12-01

    Alternative therapies and therapy modalities for SAD are needed because: Established treatments (CBT and pharmacologic) do not help everyone who seeks help. Established treatments provide only partial decrease in symptoms for many patients. Patients may experience recurrence of symptoms in long-term follow-up. CBT does not reach enough patients in need. Alternative treatment approaches and modalities may also be needed to address the successful outcomes of CBT. Success in overcoming social anxiety symptoms can generate a whole new set of challenges. For example, a 31-year-old man who overcomes his fear of dating and begins his first romantic relationship may need a less symptomatically focused therapy to deal with issues that arise in this relationship. Likewise, a woman whose decreased social anxiety enables her to get a long-awaited promotion may need to deal with the stress of adjusting to her new responsibilities. An individual who overcomes phobia of public speaking and still has mild anxiety may need to graduate to a forum such as Toastmasters to provide continued exposure to further develop confidence and skills in public speaking.

  11. Using Advances From Cognitive Behavioral Models of Anxiety to Guide Treatment for Social Anxiety Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narr, Rachel K; Teachman, Bethany A

    2017-05-01

    This case features an adult male with moderate social anxiety disorder and mild depressive symptoms who showed an initial positive response to an earlier experience of cognitive behavior therapy, but then relapsed when he started avoiding social situations again because of continuing beliefs that experiencing anxiety was unacceptable. His treatment at our clinic focused on shifting unhelpful thinking about the likelihood and consequences of becoming anxious and reengaging in avoided social situations so he could learn to tolerate negative affect and uncertainty. The treatment approach draws from cognitive behavioral models of social anxiety and highlights advances in clinical science, especially recent work on the causal role of interpretation biases (the tendency to assign negative or threatening meaning to ambiguous situations) in the maintenance and reduction of anxiety. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Impression formation and revision in social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haker, Ayala; Aderka, Idan M; Marom, Sofi; Hermesh, Haggai; Gilboa-Schechtman, Eva

    2014-03-01

    Interpersonal relations are markedly impaired in social anxiety. Yet, little is known about the ways social anxiety affects social cognition. We examined impression formation and impression revision among individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD, n = 26) and non-anxious individuals (n = 29). Participants read initial descriptions of protagonists depicted as dominant, neutral or submissive and rated them on social rank and affiliation dimensions. Next, participants were presented with behavioral acts that were either congruent, incongruent or irrelevant to the initial descriptions, and re-rated the protagonists. Individuals with SAD (a) rated others as more extreme on social rank dimension, (b) rated others as lower on the affiliation dimension, and (c) revised their impressions of others to a greater extent than did the non-anxious individuals. Understanding the ways social anxiety affects the formation and revision of perceptions of others can improve our understanding of maintaining processes in SAD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical features of bipolar disorder comorbid with anxiety disorders differ between men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Erika F H; Fitzgerald, Kate D; Zhang, Peng; McInnis, Melvin G

    2012-08-01

    Anxiety disorders are commonly comorbid with bipolar disorder (BP) and may worsen course of illness, but differential impact of specific anxiety disorders in men and women remains unknown. We measured the impact of comorbid panic disorder (PD), social phobia, specific phobia, and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in 460 women and 276 men with Bipolar I Disorder (BPI) or schizoaffective disorder, bipolar type from the National Institute of Mental Health Bipolar Genetics Initiative. We compared clinical characteristics in BP with and without each anxiety disorder in men and women separately correcting for family relatedness. Comorbid PD, OCD, and specific phobia were more common in women with BP than men. Comorbid social phobia correlated with increased risk of alcohol abuse in BP women, but not men. Women with comorbid PD attended fewer years of school. Comorbidity with OCD was associated with earlier age at the onset of BP for both genders. Comorbid PD, OCD, and specific phobia were associated with more antidepressant trials in BP, across both genders, compared to BP patients without these anxiety disorders. In BP, comorbid anxiety disorders are associated with increased risk for functional impairment, and women had differently associated risks than men. Clinicians should be aware of an increased risk for comorbid PD, OCD, and specific phobia in women with BP, and an increased risk of alcohol abuse in women with BD and comorbid social phobia. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Still lonely: Social adjustment of youth with and without social anxiety disorder following cognitive behavioral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suveg, Cynthia; Kingery, Julie Newman; Davis, Molly; Jones, Anna; Whitehead, Monica; Jacob, Marni L

    2017-12-01

    Social experiences are an integral part of normative development for youth and social functioning difficulties are related to poor outcomes. Youth with anxiety disorders, and particularly social anxiety disorder, experience difficulties across many aspects of social functioning that may place them at risk for maladjustment. The goal of this paper was to compare social experiences of youth across anxiety diagnoses and examine whether treatment is helpful in improving social functioning. Ninety-two children (age 7-12 years; 58% male; 87.0% White) with a primary diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, and/or social anxiety disorder participated in cognitive behavioral therapy. At both pre- and post-treatment, children with social anxiety disorder self-reported greater loneliness than youth without social anxiety disorder, though levels of peer victimization and receipt of prosocial behavior were similar across groups. Parents reported greater social problems for youth with social anxiety disorder compared to those without social anxiety disorder. All youth experienced improved social functioning following treatment per child- and parent-reports. The results call for an increased focus on the social experiences of youth with anxiety disorders, and particularly loneliness, for children with social anxiety disorder. The results document ways that evidenced-based practice can improve social functioning for youth with anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Quantitative genetic analysis of anxiety trait in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, J; Hare, E; Chavarría, G; Raventós, H

    2018-01-01

    Bipolar disorder type I (BPI) affects approximately 1% of the world population. Although genetic influences on bipolar disorder are well established, identification of genes that predispose to the illness has been difficult. Most genetic studies are based on categorical diagnosis. One strategy to overcome this obstacle is the use of quantitative endophenotypes, as has been done for other medical disorders. We studied 619 individuals, 568 participants from 61 extended families and 51 unrelated healthy controls. The sample was 55% female and had a mean age of 43.25 (SD 13.90; range 18-78). Heritability and genetic correlation of the trait scale from the Anxiety State and Trait Inventory (STAI) was computed by using the general linear model (SOLAR package software). we observed that anxiety trait meets the following criteria for an endophenotype of bipolar disorder type I (BPI): 1) association with BPI (individuals with BPI showed the highest trait score (F = 15.20 [5,24], p = 0.009), 2) state-independence confirmed after conducting a test-retest in 321 subjects, 3) co-segregation within families 4) heritability of 0.70 (SE: 0.060), p = 2.33 × 10 -14 and 5) genetic correlation with BPI was 0.20, (SE = 0.17, p = 3.12 × 10 -5 ). Confounding factors such as comorbid disorders and pharmacological treatment could affect the clinical relationship between BPI and anxiety trait. Further research is needed to evaluate if anxiety traits are specially related to BPI in comparison with other traits such as anger, attention or response inhibition deficit, pathological impulsivity or low self-directedness. Anxiety trait is a heritable phenotype that follows a normal distribution when measured not only in subjects with BPI but also in unrelated healthy controls. It could be used as an endophenotype in BPI for the identification of genomic regions with susceptibility genes for this disorder. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Consensus statement on social anxiety disorder from the International Consensus Group on Depression and Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballenger, J C; Davidson, J R; Lecrubier, Y; Nutt, D J; Bobes, J; Beidel, D C; Ono, Y; Westenberg, H G

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this consensus statement is to provide primary care clinicians with a better understanding of management issues in social anxiety disorder (social phobia) and guide clinical practice with recommendations for appropriate pharmacotherapy. The 4 members of the International Consensus Group on Depression and Anxiety were James C. Ballenger (chair), Jonathan R. T. Davidson, Yves Lecrubier, and David J. Nutt. Other faculty invited by the chair were Julio Bobes, Deborah C. Beidel, Yukata Ono, and Herman G. M. Westenberg. The consensus statement is based on the 7 review papers published in this supplement and on the scientific literature relevant to the issues reviewed in these papers. The group met over a 2-day period. On day 1, the group discussed each review paper, and the chair identified key issues for further debate. On day 2, the group discussed these issues to arrive at a consensus view. After the group meetings, the consensus statement was drafted by the chair and approved by all attendees. The consensus statement underlines the importance of recognizing social anxiety disorder and provides recommendations on how it may be distinguished from other anxiety disorders. It proposes definitions for response and remission and considers appropriate management strategies. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are recommended as first-line therapy, and effective treatment should be continued for at least 12 months. Long-term treatment is indicated if symptoms are unresolved, the patient has a comorbid condition or a history of relapse, or there was an early onset of the disorder.

  17. Brain Imaging Predicts Psychotherapy Success in Patients with Social Anxiety Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Brain Imaging Predicts Psychotherapy Success in Patients with Social Anxiety Disorder February 1, 2013 • Science Update Treatment for social anxiety disorder or social phobia has entered the personalized ...

  18. Group Therapy for Anxiety in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConachie, Helen; McLaughlin, Eleanor; Grahame, Victoria; Taylor, Helen; Honey, Emma; Tavernor, Laura; Rodgers, Jacqui; Freeston, Mark; Hemm, Cahley; Steen, Nick; Le Couteur, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the acceptability and feasibility of adapted group therapy for anxiety in children with autism spectrum disorder in a pilot randomised controlled trial. Method: A total of 32 children aged 9-13 years were randomised to immediate or delayed therapy using the "Exploring Feelings" manual (Attwood, 2004). Child and parent…

  19. Preschool Predictors of Childhood Anxiety Disorders: A Prospective Community Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichstrøm, Lars; Belsky, Jay; Berg-Nielsen, Turid Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Background: Anxiety disorders are often present at preschool age. Research on older children and studies contrasting preschoolers with high versus low behavioral inhibition (BI) highlight several risk factors, but these have not been investigated in community samples of young children. Child, parent, and peer factors at age 4 were therefore…

  20. EMDR and the anxiety disorders: exploring the current status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jongh, A.; ten Broeke, E.

    2009-01-01

    Based on the assumptions of Shapiro's adaptive information-processing model, it could be argued that a large proportion of people suffering from an anxiety disorder would benefit from eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR). This article provides an overview of the current empirical

  1. Psychological treatment of generalized anxiety disorder: A meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, P.; Sijbrandij, M.; Koole, S.L.; Huibers, M.J.H.; Berking, M.; Andersson, G.

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have seen a near-doubling of the number of studies examining the effects of psychotherapies for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in adults. The present article integrates this new evidence with the older literature through a quantitative meta-analysis. A total of 41 studies (with 2132

  2. examining the relationship between anxiety disorders and depression

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    esteem/feelings of worthlessness. Functional impairment occurs and the disorder is not better explained by substance use, general medical condi- tions or other mental illness. An equal mixture of anxiety and depressive symptoms occurs and the condition is particularly prevalent in primary care and mental health outpatient ...

  3. Anxiety, Somatoform, and Depressive Disorders. Menelik II Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the magnitude of anxiety, somatoform, and depressive disorders among blind people. Methods: All blind patients (according to WHO definition) who attended the Out Patient Clinics of the Ophthalmology Department of Menelik II hospital from October 2000- February 2001 were interviewed using a ...

  4. [Pharmacotherapy of generalized anxiety disorder: state of the art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zullino, D F; Hättenschwiler, J; Mattia, M; Stankovic, M; Khazaal, Y; Borgeat, F

    2003-10-15

    A large percentage of patients in primary care suffer from Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD). A task force of the Swiss GAD Society has reviewed the scientific literature and has developed treatment recommendations. Basic treatment, adjunctive treatment and therapy of specific problems like insomnia and comorbidities are differentiated. Newer antidepressants are recommended as basic treatment, especially venlafaxine and paroxetine, which are licensed for that indication.

  5. Mindfulness-based therapy for social anxiety disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bockstaele, B.; Bögels, S.M.; Hofmann, S.G.; DiBartolo, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decades, a wealth of evidence has accumulated indicating that cognitive processes, such as attention for unwanted stimuli or sensations and the negative interpretation of ambiguous signals, are critically involved in the development and maintenance of social anxiety disorder (SAD).

  6. Anxiety Sensitivity as a Prospective Predictor of Alcohol Use Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Norman B.; Buckner, Julia D.; Keough, Meghan E.

    2007-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that elevated anxiety sensitivity (AS) is associated with substance use disorders. However, prospective evidence regarding this association is currently lacking. The primary aim of the present study was to determine whether AS is involved in the pathogenesis of substance-related psychopathology. A large, nonclinical…

  7. Feasibility of Virtual Reality Environments for Adolescent Social Anxiety Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Danielle E.; Oxhandler, Holly K.; Duron, Jacuelynn F.; Swank, Paul; Bordnick, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study assessed the feasibility of virtual reality (VR) exposure as an assessment and treatment modality for youth with social anxiety disorder (SAD). Methods: Forty-one adolescents, 20 of which were identified as having SAD, were recruited from a community sample. Youth with and without SAD were exposed to two social virtual…

  8. Adapting Metacognitive Therapy to Children with Generalised Anxiety Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjørn, Barbara Hoff; Normann, Nicoline; Reinholdt-Dunne, Marie Louise

    2015-01-01

    -c) with generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) and create suggestions for an adapted manual. The adaptation was based on the structure and techniques used in MCT for adults with GAD. However, the developmental limitations of children were taken into account. For instance, therapy was aided with worksheets, practical...

  9. Efficacy of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Comorbid Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia and Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrecque, Joane; Marchand, Andre; Dugas, Michel J.; Letarte, Andree

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy for comorbid panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) by combining treatment strategies for both disorders. A single-case, multiple-baseline design across participants was used. Three participants with primary PDA and secondary…

  10. Associations between HPA axis functioning and level of anxiety in children and adolescents with an anxiety disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallen, V. L.; Tulen, J. H. M.; Utens, E. M. W. J.; Treffers, P. D. A.; de Jong, F. H.; Ferdinand, R. F.

    2008-01-01

    The hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis becomes active in response to stress. Hence, increased levels of anxiety in children and adolescents may be associated with changes in HPA-axis functioning. The aim of this study was to test if level of anxiety or specific anxiety disorders were

  11. Psychometric Properties of the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale in a Longitudinal Study of Latinos with Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Courtney; Rodriguez, Benjamin F.; Weisberg, Risa B.; Perry, Ashley; Keller, Martin B.

    2012-01-01

    The Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS) is one of the most commonly used measures of social anxiety symptoms. To date, no study has examined its psychometric properties in a Latino sample. The authors examined the reliability, temporal stability, and convergent validity of the LSAS in 73 Latinos diagnosed with an anxiety disorder. The original…

  12. Complete recovery from anxiety disorders following Cognitive Behavioural Therapy in children and adolescents: a meta analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Warwick, H.; Reardon, T.; Cooper, Peter; Murayama, Kou; Reynolds, Shirley; Wilson, C.; Creswell, Cathy

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) is a well-established treatment for childhood anxiety disorders. Meta-analyses have concluded that approximately 60% of children recover following treatment, however these include studies using a broad range of diagnostic indices to assess outcomes including whether children are free of the one anxiety disorder that causes most interference (i.e. the primary anxiety disorder) or whether children are free of all anxiety disorders. We conducted a meta-analysis t...

  13. Internet-Based Mindfulness Treatment for Anxiety Disorders: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Boettcher, Johanna; Åström, Viktor; Påhlsson, Daniel; Schenström, Ola; Andersson, Gerhard; Carlbring, Per

    2014-01-01

    Mindfulness-based interventions have proven effective for the transdiagnostic treatment of heterogeneous anxiety disorders. So far, no study has investigated the potential of mindfulness-based treatments when delivered remotely via the Internet. The current trial aims at evaluating the efficacy of a stand-alone, unguided, Internet-based mindfulness treatment program for anxiety. Ninety-one participants diagnosed with social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, or an...

  14. Comparison of the DSM-5 and ICD-10: panic and other anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandelow, Borwin

    2017-10-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental disorders and are associated with substantial healthcare costs and a high burden of disease. In this article, changes in the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (the DSM-5) with respect to panic disorder/agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, specific phobias, and selective mutism are compared with the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) system.

  15. Separation anxiety disorder in children: disorder-specific responses to experimental separation from the mother.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossowsky, Joe; Wilhelm, Frank H; Roth, Walton T; Schneider, Silvia

    2012-02-01

    Separation anxiety disorder (SAD) is one of the most common anxiety disorders in childhood and is predictive of adult anxiety disorders, especially panic disorder. However, the disorder has seldom been studied and the attempt to distinguish SAD from other anxiety disorders with regard to psychophysiology has not been made. We expected exaggerated anxiety as well as sympathetic and respiratory reactivity in SAD during separation from the mother. Participants were 49 children with a principal diagnosis of SAD, 21 clinical controls (CC) with a principal diagnosis of anxiety disorder other than SAD, and 39 healthy controls (HC) not meeting criteria for any current diagnosis. Analyses of covariance controlling for age were used to assess sympathetic and parasympathetic activation (preejection period and respiratory sinus arrhythmia) as well as cardiovascular (heart rate, mean arterial pressure, total peripheral resistance), respiratory (total breath time, minute ventilation, tidal volume, end-tidal CO(2) , respiratory variability), electrodermal, and self-report (anxiety, cognitions, symptoms) variables during baseline, 4-min separation from, and reunion with the mother. Children with a diagnosis of SAD were characterized by elevated self-reported anxiety responses to separation and increased sympathetic reactivity compared with CC and HC groups. The SAD group also displayed greater vagal withdrawal and higher reactivity in multiple cardiovascular, respiratory, and electrodermal measures compared with the HC group, while corresponding responses were less in the CC group and not significantly different from the other groups. Separation from the mother elicits greater autonomic, respiratory, and experiential responses in children with SAD. Our findings based on brief experimental separation demonstrate differential subjective and physiological manifestations of specific anxiety diagnoses, thus supporting the validity of the diagnostic category of SAD. © 2011 The Authors

  16. Psychiatric comorbidities among adolescents with and without anxiety disorders: a community study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estácio Amaro da Silva Júnior

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate, in a community sample of adolescents, the presence of comorbidities in different anxiety disorders. Methods This is a cross-sectional study, initially composed of 2,457 adolescents, aged between 10-17 years old, from public schools of the area covered by the Basic Health Unit of a university hospital. We applied the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED to assess for anxiety disorders. Then, 138 positive cases in the screening were assessed for mental disorders through the Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children – Present and Lifetime Version (K-SADS-PL. Results Patients with anxiety disorders had more association with other anxiety disorders, as well as depression, and enuresis. The most common comorbidity described in our study was between generalized anxiety disorder and separation anxiety disorder (OR = 4.21, 95% CI 1.88, 9.58. Significant association was observed between other disorders such as enuresis and separation anxiety disorder (OR = 3.81, 95% CI 1.16, 12.49, as well as depression and generalized anxiety disorder (OR = 3.40; 95% CI 1.52, 7.61. Conclusion Our study showed a relevant presence of comorbidities adolescents with anxiety disorders, selected from a community sample, especially regarding other anxiety disorders. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  17. Insomnia Symptoms Following Treatment for Comorbid Panic Disorder With Agoraphobia and Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousineau, Héloïse; Marchand, André; Bouchard, Stéphane; Bélanger, Claude; Gosselin, Patrick; Langlois, Frédéric; Labrecque, Joane; Dugas, Michel J; Belleville, Geneviève

    2016-04-01

    Patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA) or generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) frequently also suffer from insomnia. However, the impact of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders on insomnia has been understudied. Furthermore, comorbidity between anxiety disorders is common. Our main objective was to assess the impact of CBT for PDA or GAD on insomnia. In a quasi-experimental design, 86 participants with PDA and GAD received conventional CBT for their primary disorder or combined CBT for both disorders. Overall, CBTs had a significant impact on reducing insomnia symptoms (η = 0.58). However, among people with insomnia at pretest (67%), 33% still had an insomnia diagnosis, and the majority (63%) had clinically significant residual insomnia following treatment. In conclusion, the CBTs had a positive effect on the reduction of insomnia, but a significant proportion of participants still had insomnia problems following treatment. Clinicians should address insomnia during CBT for PDA and GAD.

  18. Children with Generalized Anxiety Disorder Do Not Have Peer Problems, Just Fewer Friends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfstein, Lindsay; Alfano, Candice; Beidel, Deborah; Wong, Nina

    2011-01-01

    A common assumption is that all youth with anxiety disorders (AD) experience impaired peer relationships relative to healthy control children. Social impairments have been identified among youth with certain AD (e.g., social anxiety disorder; SAD), but less is known about the peer relationships of children with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD).…

  19. Physical function as predictor for the persistence of depressive and anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Milligen, B.A.; Vogelzangs, N.; Smit, J.H.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Depressive and anxiety disorders often involve a chronic course. This study examined whether objective physical function is a predictor for the persistence of depressive and anxiety disorders. Method: The study sample consisted of 1206 persons with depressive and anxiety disorders at

  20. Co-morbid anxiety disorders predict early relapse after inpatient alcohol treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, A.F.A.; Jong, C.A.J. de; Buitelaar, J.K.; Verkes, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Alcohol dependence and anxiety disorders often co-occur. Yet, the effect of co-morbid anxiety disorders on the alcohol relapse-risk after treatment is under debate. This study investigated the effect of co-morbid anxiety disorders on relapse rates in alcohol dependence. We hypothesized

  1. Co-morbid anxiety disorders predict early relapse after inpatient alcohol treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, A.F.A.; Jong, C.A.J. de; Buitelaar, J.K.; Verkes, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Alcohol dependence and anxiety disorders often co-occur. Yet, the effect of co-morbid anxiety disorders on the alcohol relapse-risk after treatment is under debate. This study investigated the effect of co-morbid anxiety disorders on relapse rates in alcohol dependence. We hypothesized

  2. Anxiety and Quality of Life: Clinically Anxious Children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorders Compared

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Steensel, Francisca J. A.; Bogels, Susan M.; Dirksen, Carmen D.

    2012-01-01

    Comorbid anxiety disorders are common in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). However, studies comparing children with ASD to clinically anxious children are rare. This study investigated anxiety problems and health-related quality of life in children with high-functioning ASD and comorbid anxiety disorders (referred to as the ASD…

  3. Heterogeneity in development of adolescent anxiety disorder symptoms in an 8-year longitudinal community study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelemans, Stefanie A; Hale, William W; Branje, Susan J T; Raaijmakers, Quinten A W; Frijns, Tom; van Lier, Pol A C; Meeus, Wim H J

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we prospectively examined developmental trajectories of five anxiety disorder symptom dimensions (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, school anxiety, separation anxiety disorder, and social anxiety disorder) from early to late adolescence in a community sample of 239 adolescents, assessed annually over 8 years. Latent growth modeling indicated different developmental trajectories from early into late adolescence for the different anxiety disorder symptoms, with some symptoms decreasing and other symptoms increasing over time. Sex differences in developmental trajectories were found for some symptoms, but not all. Furthermore, latent class growth analysis identified a normal developmental profile (including a majority of adolescents reporting persistent low anxiety disorder symptoms over 8 years) and an at-risk developmental profile (including a minority of adolescents reporting persistent high anxiety disorder symptoms over 8 years) for all of the anxiety disorder symptom dimensions except panic disorder. Additional analyses longitudinally supported the validity of these normal and at-risk developmental profiles and suggested differential associations between different anxiety disorder symptom dimensions and developmental trajectories of substance use, parenting, and identity development. Taken together, our results emphasize the importance of examining separate dimensions of anxiety disorder symptoms in contrast to a using a global, one-dimensional approach to anxiety.

  4. Physical function as predictor for the persistence of depressive and anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Milligen, Bianca A.; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Smit, Johannes H.; Penninx, Brenda

    Introduction: Depressive and anxiety disorders often involve a chronic course. This study examined whether objective physical function is a predictor for the persistence of depressive and anxiety disorders. Method: The study sample consisted of 1206 persons with depressive and anxiety disorders at

  5. No Differences between Group versus Individual Treatment of Childhood Anxiety Disorders in a Randomised Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liber, Juliette M.; Van Widenfelt, Brigit M.; Utens, Elisabeth M. W. J.; Ferdinand, Robert F.; Van Der Leeden, Adelinde J. M.; Van Gastel, Willemijn; Treffers, Philip D. A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The present study compares an individual versus a group format in the delivery of manualised cognitive-behavioural therapy (FRIENDS) for children with anxiety disorders. Clinically referred children (aged 8 to 12) diagnosed with Separation Anxiety Disorder (n = 52), Generalised Anxiety Disorder (n = 37), Social Phobia (n = 22) or…

  6. Longitudinal associations of multiple physical symptoms with recurrence of depressive and anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra-Kersten, Sandra M. A.; Sitnikova, Kate; Terluin, Berend; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Twisk, Jos W. R.; van Marwijk, Harm W. J.; van der Horst, Henriette E.; van der Wouden, Johannes C.

    Objective: To examine longitudinal associations of multiple physical symptoms with recurrence of depressive and anxiety disorders. Methods: Follow-up data of 584 participants with remitted depressive or anxiety disorders were used from the Netherlands Study of Depressive and Anxiety disorders.

  7. Childhood history of anxiety disorders among adults with social phobia: rates, correlates, and comparisons with patients with panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, M W; Pollack, M H; Maki, K M; Gould, R A; Worthington, J J; Smoller, J W; Rosenbaum, J F

    2001-01-01

    We examined the rates and correlates of a childhood history of anxiety disorders in 100 adults with a primary diagnosis of social phobia (social anxiety disorder). Adulthood and childhood disorders were assessed by experienced clinicians with structured clinical interviews. Rates of childhood anxiety disorders were evaluated to diagnostic comorbidity and a comparison group of patients with panic disorder. Onset of social phobia occurred before age 18 in 80% of the sample. Over half of the sample (54%) met criteria for one or more childhood anxiety disorders other than social phobia: 47% for overanxious disorder, 25% for avoidant disorder, 13% for separation anxiety disorder, and 1% for childhood agoraphobia. A history of childhood anxiety was associated with an early age of onset of social phobia, greater severity of fear and avoidance of social situations, greater fears of negative evaluation, and greater anxiety and depression morbidity. Rates of childhood social phobia, overanxious disorder, and avoidant disorder were significantly higher in patients with social phobia relative to our panic-disordered comparison group. We found approximately equal rates of a childhood history of separation anxiety disorder in patients with social phobia and panic disorder, providing further evidence against a unique relationship between separation anxiety disorder and panic disorder. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Generalized anxiety disorder: is there any specific symptom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faravelli, Carlo; Castellini, Giovanni; Benni, Laura; Brugnera, Andrea; Landi, Monica; Lo Sauro, Carolina; Pietrini, Francesco; Rotella, Francesco; Ricca, Valdo

    2012-11-01

    The main aim of the present research was to evaluate the coherence of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) psychopathological pattern, the robustness of its diagnostic criteria, and the clinical utility of considering this disorder as a discrete condition rather than assigning it a dimensional value. The study was designed in a purely naturalistic setting and carried out using a community sample; data from the Sesto Fiorentino Study were reanalyzed. Of the 105 subjects who satisfied the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) criteria for the diagnosis of GAD, only 18 (17.1%) had no other comorbid DSM-IV disorder. The most frequent comorbid condition was major depressive disorder (70.4 %). Only 2 of the GAD diagnostic symptoms (excessive worry and muscle tension) showed a specific association with the diagnosis itself, whereas the others, such as feeling wound up, tense, or restless, concentration problems, and fatigue, were found to be more prevalent in major depressive disorder than in GAD. Our study demonstrates that GAD, as defined by DSM-IV criteria, shows a substantial overlap with other DSM-IV diagnoses (especially with mood disorders) in the general population. Furthermore, GAD symptoms are frequent in all other disorders included in the mood/anxiety spectrum. Finally, none of the GAD symptoms, apart from muscle tension, distinguished GAD from patients without GAD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for Childhood Anxiety Disorders: Long-Term Effects on Anxiety and Secondary Disorders in Young Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Lissette M.; Silverman, Wendy K.; Morgan-Lopez, Antonio A.; Kurtines, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The present study's aim was to examine the long-term effects (8 to 13 years post-treatment; M = 9.83 years; SD = 1.71) of the most widely used treatment approaches of exposure-based cognitive behavioral treatment for phobic and anxiety disorders in children and adolescents (i.e., group treatment and two variants of individual…

  10. Personality Disorders in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Comparative Study versus Other Anxiety Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Pena-Garijo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this paper is to provide evidence for the relationship between personality disorders (PDs, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD, and other anxiety disorders different from OCD (non-OCD symptomatology. Method. The sample consisted of a group of 122 individuals divided into three groups (41 OCD; 40 non-OCD, and 41 controls matched by sex, age, and educational level. All the individuals answered the IPDE questionnaire and were evaluated by means of the SCID-I and SCID-II interviews. Results. Patients with OCD and non-OCD present a higher presence of PD. There was an increase in cluster C diagnoses in both groups, with no statistically significant differences between them. Conclusions. Presenting anxiety disorder seems to cause a specific vulnerability for PD. Most of the PDs that were presented belonged to cluster C. Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder (OCPD is the most common among OCD. However, it does not occur more frequently among OCD patients than among other anxious patients, which does not confirm the continuum between obsessive personality and OCD. Implications for categorical and dimensional diagnoses are discussed.

  11. [Body dysmorphic disorder : Anxiety about deformity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieler, T; Brähler, E

    2016-05-01

    Between 0.8 and 1.8 % of the German population suffers from a body dysmorphic disorder. In specific settings like dermatological offices up to 11.9 % of patients suffer from this disease. The highest prevalence could be found in the field of cosmetic dermatology with a prevalence of 13.1 %. Until now, the diagnosis has been made too rarely. The body dysmorphic disorder is a chronic psychic disease, in which the patients feel disfigured and experience shame and disgust at the same time. Comorbidities like social phobia, depression, suicidality, and eating disorders are frequent. The diagnosis is made using questionnaires (e.g., dysmorphic concern questionnaire) or by use of the DSM-5 manual. An early diagnosis seems to be important to avoid chronification and suicidal ideas. Therapeutic approaches should include cognitive behavioral therapies as well as the use of SSRIs.

  12. Eclectic approach to anxiety disorders among rural children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Ahmadi

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Anxiety disorders in primary school-aged children negatively affect their mental health and psychological development. Available non-medical treatments for these conditions are time-consuming and expensive. In this context, eclectic therapy is a therapeutic approach that incorporates some therapeutic techniques and philosophies to create the ideal treatment. In this study, eclectic therapy consisted of art therapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy designed for children suffering from high level of anxiety in their middle childhood years. The therapy also included group guidance sessions for their mothers. The effectiveness of this intervention was examined in the study. Methods 61 students aged 9-12 years with high levels of anxiety participated in the study. Intervention A (n = 20 consisted of 9-hour eclectic therapy for children with 3-hour group guidance sessions for their mothers. Intervention B (n = 20 consisted of 9-hour eclectic therapy for children. There was also a control group (n = 21. Results Teacher ratings of children’s mental health difficulties and self-report ratings of anxiety disorders indicated a significant difference from pretest to posttest, revealing a large effect size between the two interventions. Higher levels of pretest scores significantly predicted higher posttest scores for all domains of anxiety and mental health difficulties. Furthermore, age, gender, mothers working a 15-hour day, mother’s educational level, parental divorce rates, parental death, and family monthly income predicted therapy outcomes. Conclusion Results provide support for the effectiveness of eclectic art and CBT to improve children’s mental health and reduce anxiety through changing thoughts, beliefs, emotions, and behaviors that may cause fear and anxiety.

  13. Sensitivity to carbon dioxide and translational studies of anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Marco

    2017-03-27

    Heightened concentrations of CO 2 in inhaled air provoke temporary acidification of the brain, followed by compensatory hyperventilation and increased arousal/anxiety. These responses are likely to map a basic, latent general alarm/avoidance system that is largely shared across mammals, and are sources of individual differences. By showing paroxysmal respiratory and emotional responses to CO 2 challenges, humans with panic and separation anxiety disorders lie at one extreme of the distribution for CO 2 sensitivity. This is also a developmental trait, sensitive to interference with parental cares. By sharing CO 2 sensitivity with humans, rodents constitute a valuable resource to model panic and separation anxiety in the laboratory. Advantages of modeling CO 2 sensitivity in rodents include non-inferential measurements (e.g. respiratory readouts) as proxies for human conditions, unbiased investigation of gene-environment interplays, and flexible availability of tissues for mechanistic studies. Data in humans and animals such as those reported in this issue of Neuroscience begin to reveal that CO 2 -driven behavioral responses stem from anatomo-physiological systems that are relatively separated from those subserving general dispositions to anxiety. This supports the notion that sensitivity to suffocative stimuli and ensuing human panic are significantly independent from trait/cognitive anxiety, and corroborates newer conceptualizations that distinguish between fear and anxiety circuitries. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Emotion beliefs and cognitive behavioural therapy for social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Castella, Krista; Goldin, Philippe; Jazaieri, Hooria; Heimberg, Richard G; Dweck, Carol S; Gross, James J

    2015-01-01

    Despite strong support for the efficacy of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD), little is known about mechanisms of change in treatment. Within the context of a randomized controlled trial of CBT, this study examined patients' beliefs about the fixed versus malleable nature of anxiety-their 'implicit theories'-as a key variable in CBT for SAD. Compared to waitlist (n = 29; 58% female), CBT (n = 24; 52% female) led to significantly lower levels of fixed beliefs about anxiety (Mbaseline = 11.70 vs. MPost = 7.08, d = 1.27). These implicit beliefs indirectly explained CBT-related changes in social anxiety symptoms (κ(2) = .28, [95% CI = 0.12, 0.46]). Implicit beliefs also uniquely predicted treatment outcomes when controlling for baseline social anxiety and other kinds of maladaptive beliefs (perceived social costs, perceived social self-efficacy, and maladaptive interpersonal beliefs). Finally, implicit beliefs continued to predict social anxiety symptoms at 12 months post-treatment. These findings suggest that changes in patients' beliefs about their emotions may play an important role in CBT for SAD.

  15. Duloxetine in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor R Norman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Trevor R Norman, James S OlverDepartment of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Austin Hospital, Heidelberg, Victoria, AustraliaAbstract: Duloxetine, a medication with effects on both serotonin and noradrenaline transporter molecules, has recently been approved for the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder. The evidence for its efficacy lies in a limited number of double blind, placebo controlled comparisons. Statistically significant improvements in the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale from baseline were demonstrated in all studies at doses of 60 to 120 mg per day. The significance of such changes in terms of clinical improvements compared to placebo is less certain, particularly when the effect size of the change is calculated. In comparative trials with venlafaxine, duloxetine was as effective in providing relief of anxiety symptoms. In addition to improvements in clinical symptoms duloxetine has also been associated with restitution of role function as measured by disability scales. Duloxetine use is associated with nausea, dizziness, dry mouth, constipation, insomnia, somnolence, hyperhidrosis, decreased libido and vomiting. These treatment emergent side effects were generally of mild to moderate severity and were tolerated over time. Using a tapered withdrawal schedule over two weeks in the clinical trials, duloxetine was associated with only a mild withdrawal syndrome in up to about 30% of patients compared to about 17% in placebo treated patients. Duloxetine in doses of up to 200 mg twice daily did not prolong the QTc interval in healthy volunteers. Like other agents with dual neurotransmitter actions duloxetine reduces the symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder in short term treatments. Further evidence for its efficacy and safety in long term treatment is required.Keywords: duloxetine, generalized anxiety disorder, Hamilton anxiety rating scale, withdrawal syndrome, psycho-social function

  16. The structure of vulnerabilities for social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodebaugh, Thomas L; Levinson, Cheri A; Langer, Julia K; Weeks, Justin W; Heimberg, Richard G; Brown, Patrick J; Menatti, Andrew R; Schneier, Franklin R; Blanco, Carlos; Liebowitz, Michael R

    2017-04-01

    Social anxiety disorder symptoms are generally proposed to be related to broad temperamental vulnerabilities (e.g., a low level of approach and high level of avoidance temperament), specific psychological vulnerabilities (e.g., fears of negative and positive evaluation), and additional disorders (e.g., major depressive disorder). However, existing tests of such a model have either not considered depressive symptoms or relied on samples of undergraduates. We examined these and related questions via a latent variable model in a large dataset (N=2253) that combined participants across a variety of studies. The model had adequate fit in the whole sample, and good fit in a subsample in which more participants completed the depression measure. The model indicated that low level of approach and high level of avoidance temperament contributed to fears of evaluation and social anxiety symptoms, and that fears of evaluation additionally contributed independently to social anxiety symptoms. The relationship between social anxiety and depressive symptoms was entirely accounted for by these vulnerabilities: Depressive symptoms were only predicted by avoidance temperament. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Bipolar disorder with comorbid anxiety disorders: impact of comorbidity on treatment outcome in cognitive-behavioral therapy and psychoeducation

    OpenAIRE

    Hawke, Lisa D; Velyvis, Vytas; Parikh, Sagar V

    2013-01-01

    Background Comorbid anxiety disorders are extremely prevalent in bipolar disorder (BD) and have substantial impact on the course of illness. Limited evidence regarding treatment factors has led to a renewal of research efforts examining both the impact of treatments on comorbid anxiety and the impact of comorbid anxiety on treatments. The current study examines the impact of comorbid anxiety disorders on response to two psychosocial interventions for BD. Methods A sample of 204 patients with ...

  18. Social Functioning in Youth with Anxiety Disorders: Association with Anxiety Severity and Outcomes from Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settipani, Cara A.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2013-01-01

    Social functioning was assessed using the Child Behavior Checklist and Teacher Report Form for children with anxiety disorders who participated in a randomized clinical trial (N = 161, aged 7-14). Significant relationships were found between severity of children's principal anxiety disorder and most measures of social functioning, such that poorer…

  19. Computer-supported cognitive behavioral treatment of anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Page; Jacobs, Carli; Rothbaum, Barbara O

    2004-03-01

    This article reviews the empirical literature pertaining to the use of computer-supported cognitive-behavioral treatment of anxiety disorders, including palmtop computers, virtual reality exposure therapy, and personal computer software programs. The advantages and disadvantages unique to each type of technology are described. The review concludes with a discussion of ethical issues, barriers to the use of technology by clinicians, and suggestions for a process by which scientists and practitioners can conceptualize how technology can advance our understanding of anxiety and our dissemination of effective treatments. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Psychol.

  20. Improving homework compliance in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Robert L

    2002-05-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder is a chronic condition characterized by beliefs that worry prepares and protects, but that excessive worry is out of control. In this article, I review the cognitive-behavioral model of generalized anxiety, focusing specifically on problems related to excessive worrying. Noncompliance in self-help homework is reflected in the patient's excessive focus on negative feelings, difficulty identifying automatic thoughts, demand for immediate results, and the belief that worries are realistic. Interventions for these problems are illustrated in the case of the treatment of a patient characterized by persistent worries, low self-confidence, procrastination, and avoidance. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Posttyphoon prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder, major depressive disorder, panic disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder in a Vietnamese sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstadter, Ananda B; Acierno, Ron; Richardson, Lisa K; Kilpatrick, Dean G; Gros, Daniel F; Gaboury, Mario T; Tran, Trinh Luong; Trung, Lam Tu; Tam, Nguyen Thanh; Tuan, Tran; Buoi, La Thi; Ha, Tran Thu; Thach, Tran Duc; Galea, Sandro

    2009-06-01

    In 2006, typhoon Xangsane disrupted a multiagency health needs study of 4,982 individuals in Vietnam. Following this disaster, 798 of the original participants were reinterviewed to determine prevalence and risk factors associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive disorder (MDD), panic disorder (PD), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Posttyphoon prevalences were PTSD 2.6%, MDD 5.9%, PD 9.3%, and GAD 2.2%. Of those meeting criteria for a disorder, 70% reported only one disorder, 15% had two, 14% had three, and 1% met criteria for all four disorders. Risk factors for posttyphoon psychopathology differed among disorders, but generally were related to high typhoon exposure, prior trauma exposure, and in contrast to Western populations, higher age, but not gender.

  2. Treatment of co-occurring anxiety disorders and substance use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, R Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety disorders commonly co-occur with substance use disorders both in the general population and in treatment-seeking samples. This co-occurrence is associated with greater symptom severity, higher levels of disability, and poorer course of illness relative to either disorder alone. Little research has been conducted, however, on the treatment of these co-occurring disorders. This gap may not only leave anxiety untreated or undertreated but also increase the risk for relapse and poor substance use outcomes. The aim of this article is to review the current state of the literature on treating co-occurring anxiety and substance use disorders. In addition to presenting a brief overview of the epidemiology of this co-occurrence, the article discusses the challenges in assessing anxiety in the context of a substance use disorder, the evidence for various treatment approaches, and recent advances and future directions in this understudied area. Also highlighted is the need for future research to identify optimal behavioral and pharmacologic treatments for co-occurring anxiety and substance use disorders.

  3. Integrated Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Comorbid Cannabis Use and Anxiety Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, Julia D; Ecker, Anthony H; Beighley, Jennifer S; Zvolensky, Michael J; Schmidt, Norman B; Shah, Sonia M; Carroll, Kathleen M

    2016-02-01

    Cannabis use disorders (CUDs) co-occur with anxiety disorders at high rates, presumably because some individuals with anxiety disorders may rely on cannabis to manage anxiety. Motivation enhancement therapy (MET) combined with cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is an efficacious intervention for CUD, yet outcomes are worse for patients with elevated anxiety. The integration of MET-CBT with False Safety Behavior Elimination Treatment (FSET) may be useful with anxious CUD patients, as the use of cannabis to manage anxiety can be targeted as a false safety behavior. Here, we describe the integrated treatment and the successful use of it among two patients-one with CUD and comorbid social anxiety disorder (SAD) and one with CUD and comorbid SAD and generalized anxiety disorder. Data support the feasibility of this integrated treatment as a viable approach to the treatment of CUD and comorbid anxiety disorders. Future controlled trials are now warranted to further evaluate the intervention.

  4. Neurosteroids as neuromodulators in the treatment of anxiety disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia eLongone

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders are the most common psychiatric disorders. They are frequently treated with benzodiazepines, which are fast acting highly effective anxiolytic agents. However, their long term use is impaired by tolerance development and abuse liability. In contrast, antidepressants such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs are considered as first line treatment but have a slow onset of action. Neurosteroids are powerful allosteric modulators of GABAA and glutamate receptors. However, they also modulate sigma receptors and they are modulated themselves by SSRIs. Both preclinical and clinical studies have shown that neurosteroid homeostasis is altered in depression and anxiety disorders and antidepressants may act in part through restoring neurosteroid dysbalance. Moreover, novel drugs interfering with neurosteroidogenesis such as ligands of the translocator protein (18 kDa may represent an attractive pharmacological option for novel anxiolytics which lack the unwarranted side effects of benzodiazepines. Thus, neurosteroids are important endogenous neuromodulators for the physiology and pathophysiology of anxiety and they may constitute a novel therapeutic approach in the treatment of these disorders.

  5. Discriminant and Convergent Validity of the Anxiety Construct in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Renno, Patricia; Wood, Jeffrey J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite reports of high anxiety in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), there is controversy regarding differential diagnosis of ASD symptoms and anxiety symptoms. This study examined 88 children, aged 7–11 years, with ASD referred for concerns about anxiety. A multitrait-(social anxiety, separation anxiety, overall anxiety severity, and overall ASD severity), multimethod- (diagnostic interviews, parent-, and child-based measures) analysis was conducted. Results from structural equa...

  6. Adolescent obesity and risk for subsequent major depressive disorder and anxiety disorder: prospective evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sarah E; Cohen, Patricia; Naumova, Elena N; Jacques, Paul F; Must, Aviva

    2007-11-01

    To assess whether adolescent obesity is associated with risk for development of major depressive disorder (MDD) or anxiety disorder. Obesity has been linked to psychosocial difficulties among youth. Analysis of a prospective community-based cohort originally from upstate New York, assessed four times over 20 years. Participants (n = 776) were 9 to 18 years old in 1983; subsequent assessments took place in 1985 to 1986 (n = 775), 1991 to 1994 (n = 776), and 2001 to 2003 (n = 661). Using Cox proportional hazards analysis, we evaluated the association of adolescent (age range, 12-17.99 years) weight status with risk for subsequent MDD or anxiety disorder (assessed at each wave by structured diagnostic interviews) in males and females. A total of 701 participants were not missing data on adolescent weight status and had > or = 1 subsequent assessments. MDD and anxiety disorder analyses included 674 and 559 participants (free of current or previous MDD or anxiety disorder), respectively. Adolescent obesity was defined as body mass index above the age- and gender-specific 95th percentile of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention growth reference. Adolescent obesity in females predicted an increased risk for subsequent MDD (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 3.9; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.3, 11.8) and for anxiety disorder (HR = 3.8; CI = 1.3, 11.3). Adolescent obesity in males was not statistically significantly associated with risk for MDD (HR = 1.5; CI = 0.5, 3.5) or anxiety disorder (HR = 0.7; CI = 0.2, 2.9). Females obese as adolescents may be at increased risk for development of depression or anxiety disorders.

  7. Cost-effectiveness of psychological and pharmacological interventions for generalized anxiety disorder and panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuzenroeder, Louise; Donnelly, Marie; Haby, Michelle M; Mihalopoulos, Cathrine; Rossell, Ruth; Carter, Rob; Andrews, Gavin; Vos, Theo

    2004-08-01

    To assess from a health sector perspective the incremental cost-effectiveness of interventions for generalized anxiety disorder (cognitive behavioural therapy [CBT] and serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors [SNRIs]) and panic disorder (CBT, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors [SSRIs] and tricyclic antidepressants [TCAs]). The health benefit is measured as a reduction in disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), based on effect size calculations from meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials. An assessment on second stage filter criteria ("equity", "strength of evidence", "feasibility" and "acceptability to stakeholders") is also undertaken to incorporate additional factors that impact on resource allocation decisions. Costs and benefits are calculated for a period of one year for the eligible population (prevalent cases of generalized anxiety disorder/panic disorder identified in the National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing, extrapolated to the Australian population in the year 2000 for those aged 18 years and older). Simulation modelling techniques are used to present 95% uncertainty intervals (UI) around the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). Compared to current practice, CBT by a psychologist on a public salary is the most cost-effective intervention for both generalized anxiety disorder (A$6900/DALY saved; 95% UI A$4000 to A$12 000) and panic disorder (A$6800/DALY saved; 95% UI A$2900 to A$15 000). Cognitive behavioural therapy results in a greater total health benefit than the drug interventions for both anxiety disorders, although equity and feasibility concerns for CBT interventions are also greater. Cognitive behavioural therapy is the most effective and cost-effective intervention for generalized anxiety disorder and panic disorder. However, its implementation would require policy change to enable more widespread access to a sufficient number of trained therapists for the treatment of anxiety disorders.

  8. Metacognitive therapy versus disorder-specific CBT for comorbid anxiety disorders: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sverre Urnes; Hoffart, Asle; Nordahl, Hans M; Wampold, Bruce E

    2017-08-01

    Few studies have compared the effects of Metacognitive therapy (MCT) and Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for comorbid anxiety disorders. In the current study we compared CBT and MCT for heterogeneous anxiety disorders in a residential setting. Ninety patients with a primary diagnosis of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Phobia or Panic disorder, with and without Agoraphobia, were randomized to either CBT or MCT. Patients were assessed at pre-treatment, post-treatment and one-year follow-up. Primary outcome measures were Beck Anxiety Inventory and ADIS IV and secondary outcome measures were SCID II, Beck Depression Inventory, Penn State Worry Questionnaire, The Symptom Checklist-90 and the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems-64. Treatment fidelity was satisfactory and therapist credibility was equal in both treatments. There was a significant difference in the level of anxiety favouring MCT at post-treatment (d=0.7), but there were no differences at one-year follow-up, mainly due to a further improvement in the CBT group during the follow-up period. Both treatments were efficacious. No differences in effect on comorbid diagnoses and symptoms were found, but MCT produced larger change in personality problems. MCT seems to have a more rapid effect on anxiety symptoms, but there were no significant differences in the long term for patients with comorbid anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. The DSM-5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales in a Dutch non-clinical sample: psychometric properties including the adult separation anxiety disorder scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Eline L; Bögels, Susan M

    2016-09-01

    With DSM-5, the American Psychiatric Association encourages complementing categorical diagnoses with dimensional severity ratings. We therefore examined the psychometric properties of the DSM-5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales, a set of brief dimensional scales that are consistent in content and structure and assess DSM-5-based core features of anxiety disorders. Participants (285 males, 255 females) completed the DSM-5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales for social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, specific phobia, agoraphobia, and panic disorder that were included in previous studies on the scales, and also for separation anxiety disorder, which is included in the DSM-5 chapter on anxiety disorders. Moreover, they completed the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders Adult version (SCARED-A). The DSM-5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales demonstrated high internal consistency, and the scales correlated significantly and substantially with corresponding SCARED-A subscales, supporting convergent validity. Separation anxiety appeared present among adults, supporting the DSM-5 recognition of separation anxiety as an anxiety disorder across the life span. To conclude, the DSM-5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales are a valuable tool to screen for specific adult anxiety disorders, including separation anxiety. Research in more diverse and clinical samples with anxiety disorders is needed. © 2016 The Authors International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2016 The Authors International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Integrated Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Comorbid Cannabis Use and Anxiety Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Buckner, Julia D.; Ecker, Anthony H.; Beighley, Jennifer S.; Zvolensky, Michael J.; Schmidt, Norman B.; Shah, Sonia M.; Carroll, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis use disorders (CUDs) co-occur with anxiety disorders at high rates, presumably because some individuals with anxiety disorders may rely on cannabis to manage anxiety. Motivation enhancement therapy (MET) combined with cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is an efficacious intervention for CUD, yet outcomes are worse for patients with elevated anxiety. The integration of MET-CBT with False Safety Behavior Elimination Treatment (FSET) may be useful with anxious CUD patients, as the use o...

  11. Anxiety and Depression Symptoms in Children with Asperger Syndrome Compared with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Subin; Park, Min-Hyeon; Kim, Hyo Jin; Yoo, Hee Jeong

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine (a) anxiety and depression symptoms in children with Asperger syndrome (AS) compared to children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and children with depressive disorder; (b) parental anxiety and depressive symptoms in the three groups; and (c) the association between the anxiety and…

  12. Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Postnatal Anxiety Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, J P Y

    2015-06-01

    Interpersonal psychotherapy is one of two evidence-based formal psychotherapies for perinatal mood disorders. It is a time-limited, non-transference / cognitive-based therapy that focuses on communication and social support and can be easily conducted in a perinatal clinic setting. There is limited patient access to interpersonal psychotherapy in Hong Kong because the therapy is not widely disseminated. This case report aimed to illustrate the principles and techniques of interpersonal psychotherapy in perinatal psychiatry, and to raise interest among mental health professionals in Hong Kong in this evidence-based treatment.

  13. Nutritional and herbal supplements for anxiety and anxiety-related disorders: systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vieira Karen F

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the past several decades, complementary and alternative medications have increasingly become a part of everyday treatment. With the rising cost of prescription medications and their production of unwanted side effects, patients are exploring herbal and other natural remedies for the management and treatment of psychological conditions. Psychological disorders are one of the most frequent conditions seen by clinicians, and often require a long-term regimen of prescription medications. Approximately 6.8 million Americans suffer from generalized anxiety disorder. Many also suffer from the spectrum of behavioural and physical side effects that often accompany its treatment. It is not surprising that there is universal interest in finding effective natural anxiolytic (anti-anxiety treatments with a lower risk of adverse effects or withdrawal. Methods An electronic and manual search was performed through MEDLINE/PubMed and EBSCO. Articles were not discriminated by date of publication. Available clinical studies published in English that used human participants and examined the anxiolytic potential of dietary and herbal supplements were included. Data were extracted and compiled into tables that included the study design, sample population, intervention, control, length of treatment, outcomes, direction of evidence, and reported adverse events. Results A total of 24 studies that investigated five different CAM monotherapies and eight different combination treatments and involved 2619 participants met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. There were 21 randomized controlled trials and three open-label, uncontrolled observational studies. Most studies involved patients who had been diagnosed with either an anxiety disorder or depression (n = 1786. However, eight studies used healthy volunteers (n = 877 who had normal levels of anxiety, were undergoing surgery, tested at the upper limit of the normal range of a trait anxiety

  14. Nutritional and herbal supplements for anxiety and anxiety-related disorders: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhan, Shaheen E; Vieira, Karen F

    2010-10-07

    Over the past several decades, complementary and alternative medications have increasingly become a part of everyday treatment. With the rising cost of prescription medications and their production of unwanted side effects, patients are exploring herbal and other natural remedies for the management and treatment of psychological conditions. Psychological disorders are one of the most frequent conditions seen by clinicians, and often require a long-term regimen of prescription medications. Approximately 6.8 million Americans suffer from generalized anxiety disorder. Many also suffer from the spectrum of behavioural and physical side effects that often accompany its treatment. It is not surprising that there is universal interest in finding effective natural anxiolytic (anti-anxiety) treatments with a lower risk of adverse effects or withdrawal. An electronic and manual search was performed through MEDLINE/PubMed and EBSCO. Articles were not discriminated by date of publication. Available clinical studies published in English that used human participants and examined the anxiolytic potential of dietary and herbal supplements were included. Data were extracted and compiled into tables that included the study design, sample population, intervention, control, length of treatment, outcomes, direction of evidence, and reported adverse events. A total of 24 studies that investigated five different CAM monotherapies and eight different combination treatments and involved 2619 participants met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. There were 21 randomized controlled trials and three open-label, uncontrolled observational studies. Most studies involved patients who had been diagnosed with either an anxiety disorder or depression (n = 1786). However, eight studies used healthy volunteers (n = 877) who had normal levels of anxiety, were undergoing surgery, tested at the upper limit of the normal range of a trait anxiety scale, had adverse premenstrual symptoms or were peri

  15. Metacognitive Therapy for Comorbid Anxiety Disorders: A Case Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sverre Urnes Johnson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractWe aimed to systematically evaluate a generic model of metacognitive therapy (MCT with a highly comorbid anxiety disorder patient, that had been treated with diagnosis-specific cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT without significant effect. Traditionally, CBT has progressed within a disorder-specific approach, however it has been suggested that this could be less optimal with highly comorbid patients. To address comorbidity, transdiagnostic treatment models have been emerging. This case study used an AB-design with repeated assessments during each therapy session and a 1-year follow-up assessment to evaluate the effectiveness of MCT. Following 8 sessions of MCT, significant decrease in anxiety and depression symptoms, as well as loss of diagnostic status was observed. Outcomes were preserved at 12 months follow up. The generic model of MCT seems promising as an approach to highly comorbid mixed anxiety depression patients. Further testing using more powered methodologies are needed. Keywords: Metacognitive therapy, transdiagnostic, metacognition, anxiety, comorbidity.

  16. Duloxetine in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Trevor R; Olver, James S

    2008-12-01

    Duloxetine, a medication with effects on both serotonin and noradrenaline transporter molecules, has recently been approved for the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder. The evidence for its efficacy lies in a limited number of double blind, placebo controlled comparisons. Statistically significant improvements in the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale from baseline were demonstrated in all studies at doses of 60 to 120 mg per day. The significance of such changes in terms of clinical improvements compared to placebo is less certain, particularly when the effect size of the change is calculated. In comparative trials with venlafaxine, duloxetine was as effective in providing relief of anxiety symptoms. In addition to improvements in clinical symptoms duloxetine has also been associated with restitution of role function as measured by disability scales. Duloxetine use is associated with nausea, dizziness, dry mouth, constipation, insomnia, somnolence, hyperhidrosis, decreased libido and vomiting. These treatment emergent side effects were generally of mild to moderate severity and were tolerated over time. Using a tapered withdrawal schedule over two weeks in the clinical trials, duloxetine was associated with only a mild withdrawal syndrome in up to about 30% of patients compared to about 17% in placebo treated patients. Duloxetine in doses of up to 200 mg twice daily did not prolong the QTc interval in healthy volunteers. Like other agents with dual neurotransmitter actions duloxetine reduces the symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder in short term treatments. Further evidence for its efficacy and safety in long term treatment is required.

  17. Duloxetine in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Wright

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Alan Wright, Chad VanDenBergCenter for Clinical Research, Mercer University, Atlanta, GA, USAAbstract: Duloxetine is a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI which is FDA approved for the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD in doses of 30 mg to 120 mg daily. Duloxetine has been shown to significantly improve symptoms of GAD as measured through the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAMA, the Clinical Global Impressions Scale (CGI-I, and other various outcome measures in several placebo-controlled, randomized, double blind, multi-center studies. Symptom improvement began within the first few weeks, and continued for the duration of the studies. In addition, duloxetine has also been shown to improve outcomes in elderly patients with GAD, and in GAD patients with clinically significant pain symptoms. Duloxetine was noninferior compared with venlafaxine XR. Duloxetine was found to have a good tolerability profile which was predictable and similar to another SNRI, venlafaxine. Adverse events (AEs such as nausea, constipation, dry mouth, and insomnia were mild and transient, and occurred at relatively low rates. It was found to have a low frequency of drug interactions. In conclusion, duloxetine, a selective inhibitor for the serotonin and norepinephrine transporters, is efficacious in the treatment of GAD, and has a predictable tolerability profile, with AEs generally being mild to moderate.Keywords: duloxetine, generalized anxiety disorder, anxiety, GAD

  18. Depression and Anxiety Disorders among Hospitalized Women with Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neomi Vin-Raviv

    Full Text Available To document the prevalence of depression and anxiety disorders, and their associations with mortality among hospitalized breast cancer patients.We examined the associations between breast cancer diagnosis and the diagnoses of anxiety or depression among 4,164 hospitalized breast cancer cases matched with 4,164 non-breast cancer controls using 2006-2009 inpatient data obtained from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database. Conditional logistic regression models were used to compute odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CI for the associations between breast cancer diagnosis and diagnoses of anxiety or depression. We also used binary logistic regression models to examine the association between diagnoses of depression or anxiety, and in-hospital mortality among breast cancer patients.We observed that breast cancer cases were less likely to have a diagnosis of depression (OR=0.63, 95% CI: 0.52-0.77, and less likely to have a diagnosis of anxiety (OR=0.68, 95% CI: 0.52-0.90 compared with controls. This association remained after controlling for race/ethnicity, residential income, insurance and residential region. Breast cancer patients with a depression diagnosis also had lower mortality (OR=0.69, 95% CI: 0.52-0.89 compared with those without a depression diagnosis, but there was no significant difference in mortality among those with and without anxiety diagnoses.Diagnoses of depression and anxiety in breast cancer patients were less prevalent than expected based on our analysis of hospitalized breast cancer patients and matched non-breast cancer controls identified in the NIS dataset using ICD-9 diagnostic codes. Results suggest that under-diagnosis of mental health problems may be common among hospitalized women with a primary diagnosis of breast cancer. Future work may fruitfully explore reasons for, and consequences of, inappropriate identification of the mental health needs of breast cancer patients.

  19. To what extent does the anxiety scale of the Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ) detect specific types of anxiety disorder in primary care? A psychometric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Anxiety scales may help primary care physicians to detect specific anxiety disorders among the many emotionally distressed patients presenting in primary care. The anxiety scale of the Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ) consists of an admixture of symptoms of specific anxiety disorders. The research questions were: (1) Is the anxiety scale unidimensional or multidimensional? (2) To what extent does the anxiety scale detect specific DSM-IV anxiety disorders? (3) Which cut-off points are suitable to rule out or to rule in (which) anxiety disorders? Methods We analyzed 5 primary care datasets with standardized psychiatric diagnoses and 4DSQ scores. Unidimensionality was assessed through confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). We examined mean scores and anxiety score distributions per disorder. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to determine optimal cut-off points. Results Total n was 969. CFA supported unidimensionality. The anxiety scale performed slightly better in detecting patients with panic disorder, agoraphobia, social phobia, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and specific phobia. ROC-analysis suggested that ≥4 was the optimal cut-off point to rule out and ≥10 the cut-off point to rule in anxiety disorders. Conclusions The 4DSQ anxiety scale measures a common trait of pathological anxiety that is characteristic of anxiety disorders, in particular panic disorder, agoraphobia, social phobia, OCD and PTSD. The anxiety score detects the latter anxiety disorders to a slightly greater extent than GAD and specific phobia, without being able to distinguish between the different anxiety disorder types. The cut-off points ≥4 and ≥10 can be used to separate distressed patients in three groups with a relatively low, moderate and high probability of having one or more anxiety disorders. PMID:24761829

  20. Consensus statement on generalized anxiety disorder from the International Consensus Group on Depression and Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballenger, J C; Davidson, J R; Lecrubier, Y; Nutt, D J; Borkovec, T D; Rickels, K; Stein, D J; Wittchen, H U

    2001-01-01

    To provide primary care clinicians with a better understanding of management issues in generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and guide clinical practice with recommendations on the appropriate treatment strategy. The 4 members of the International Consensus Group on Depression and Anxiety were James C. Ballenger (chair), Jonathan R.T. Davidson, Yves Lecrubier, and David J. Nutt. Four additional faculty members invited by the chair were Karl Rickels, Hans-Ulrich Wittchen, Dan J. Stein, and Thomas D. Borkovec. The consensus statement is based on the 6 review articles that are published in this supplement and the scientific literature relevant to the issues reviewed in these articles. Group meetings were held over a 2-day period. On day 1, the group discussed the review articles and the chair identified key issues for further debate. On day 2, the group discussed these issues to arrive at a consensus view. After the group meetings, the consensus statement was drafted by the chair and approved by all attendees. GAD is the most common anxiety disorder in primary care and is highly debilitating. Furthermore, it is frequently comorbid with depression and other anxiety disorders, which exacerbates functional impairment. Antidepressants (serotonin reuptake inhibitors, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, and nonsedating tricyclic antidepressants) are generally the most appropriate first-line pharmacotherapy for GAD, since they are also effective against comorbid psychiatric disorders and are suitable for long-term use. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is the preferred form of psychotherapy for GAD, although when GAD is comorbid with depression, pharmacotherapy is increasingly indicated.

  1. Seasonality in depressive and anxiety symptoms among primary care patients and in patients with depressive and anxiety disorders; results from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Little is known about seasonality of specific depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms in different patient populations. This study aims to assess seasonal variation of depressive and anxiety symptoms in a primary care population and across participants who were classified in diagnostic groups 1) healthy controls 2) patients with a major depressive disorder, 3) patients with any anxiety disorder and 4) patients with a major depression and any anxiety disorder. Methods Data were used from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). First, in 5549 patients from the NESDA primary care recruitment population the Kessler-10 screening questionnaire was used and data were analyzed across season in a multilevel linear model. Second, in 1090 subjects classified into four groups according to psychiatric status according to the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, overall depressive symptoms and atypical versus melancholic features were assessed with the Inventory of Depressive Symptoms. Anxiety and fear were assessed with the Beck Anxiety Inventory and the Fear questionnaire. Symptom levels across season were analyzed in a linear regression model. Results In the primary care population the severity of depressive and anxiety symptoms did not show a seasonal pattern. In the diagnostic groups healthy controls and patients with any anxiety disorder, but not patients with a major depressive disorder, showed a small rise in depressive symptoms in winter. Atypical and melancholic symptoms were both elevated in winter. No seasonal pattern for anxiety symptoms was found. There was a small gender related seasonal effect for fear symptoms. Conclusions Seasonal differences in severity or type of depressive and anxiety symptoms, as measured with a general screening instrument and symptom questionnaires, were absent or small in effect size in a primary care population and in patient populations with a major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders. PMID

  2. Efficacy of transdiagnostic cognitive behaviour therapy for anxiety disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinholt, Nina; Krogh, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    , treatment-as-usual, and diagnosis-specific cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) controls. A total of 11 studies reporting 12 trials (n = 1933) were included in the systematic review. Results from the meta-analysis of 11 trials suggest that TCBT was generally associated with positive outcome; TCBT patients did...... better than wait-list and treatment-as-usual patients, and treatment gains were maintained through follow-up. The pooled estimate showed a moderate treatment effect, however with large heterogeneity suggesting differences in treatment effects between the studies. Also, all the included trials, apart from......Transdiagnostic approaches to cognitive behaviour therapy (TCBT) of anxiety disorders have drawn increasing interest and empirical testing over the past decade. In this paper, we review evidence of the overall efficacy of TCBT for anxiety disorders, as well as TCBT efficacy compared with wait-list...

  3. An examination of generalized anxiety disorder and dysthymic disorder by latent class analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhebergen, D.; van der Steenstraten, I.M.; Sunderland, M.; de Graaf, R.; ten Have, M.; Lamers, F.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Andrews, G.

    2014-01-01

    Background The nosological status of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) versus dysthymic disorder (DD) has been questioned. The aim of this study was to examine qualitative differences within (co-morbid) GAD and DD symptomatology. Method Latent class analysis was applied to anxious and depressive

  4. Anxiety and Mood Disorders in Adolescents with Childhood Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagwell, Catherine L.; Molina, Brooke S.G.; Kashdan, Todd B.; Pelham, William E.; Hoza, Betsy

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the association between childhood attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and anxiety and mood disorders in adolescence. They compared a group of 142 adolescents ages 13 to 18 years with a history of ADHD in childhood to group of 100 community-recruited adolescents without ADHD. The two groups did not…

  5. The network structure of major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder and somatic symptomatology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekhuis, E.; Schoevers, R.A.; van Borkulo, C.D.; Rosmalen, J.G.M.; Boschloo, L.

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) often co-occur with somatic symptomatology. Little is known about the contributions of individual symptoms to this association and more insight into their relationships could help to identify symptoms that are central in the

  6. The network structure of major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder and somatic symptomatology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekhuis, E.; Schoevers, R. A.; van Borkulo, C. D.; Rosmalen, J. G. M.; Boschloo, L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorder (MDD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) often co-occur with somatic symptomatology. Little is known about the contributions of individual symptoms to this association and more insight into their relationships could help to identify symptoms that are central

  7. Associations between Prolonged Grief Disorder, Depression, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, and Anxiety in Rwandan Genocide Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaal, Susanne; Dusingizemungu, Jean-Pierre; Jacob, Nadja; Neuner, Frank; Elbert, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that symptoms of prolonged grief disorder (PGD) represent a symptom cluster distinct from bereavement-related depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The aim of the present study was to confirm and extend these findings using the most recent criteria defining PGD. The authors interviewed…

  8. Preferred Psychological Internet Resources for Addressing Anxiety Disorders, Parenting Problems, Eating Disorders, and Chemical Dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Laura; Doran, Matt; Simonin, Danielle; Smith, Allyson; Maloney, Colleen; Wright, Cara; Underwood, Michelle; Hoppel, Andrea; O'Donnell, Shannon; Chambliss, Catherine

    Although the Internet offers information about psychological problems and support resources for behavioral health problems, the quality of this information varies widely. So as to offer guidance in this area, preferred sites pertaining to anxiety disorders, parenting problems, eating disorders, and chemical dependency were analyzed. A total of 365…

  9. Integrative Behavioral Couple Therapy for Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Benson, Lisa Ann

    2014-01-01

    Treatments for GAD are less efficacious than those for other anxiety disorders, and individuals in relationships characterized by distress are less likely to respond to standard GAD treatments, which suggest dyadic treatment of GAD may be beneficial to individuals in distressed relationships. This dissertation presents and conducts preliminary tests of an acceptance- and mindfulness-based dyadic treatment for GAD based on the principles of Integrative Behavioral Couple Therapy (IBCT). This di...

  10. Eclectic approach to anxiety disorders among rural children

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmadi, Atefeh; Mustaffa, Mohamed Sharif; Haghdoost, Ali Akbar; Mansor, Syed Mohamed Shafeq

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Anxiety disorders in primary school-aged children negatively affect their mental health and psychological development. Available non-medical treatments for these conditions are time-consuming and expensive. In this context, eclectic therapy is a therapeutic approach that incorporates some therapeutic techniques and philosophies to create the ideal treatment. In this study, eclectic therapy consisted of art therapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy designed for children s...

  11. Mental Health Comorbidity in MS: Depression, Anxiety, and Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Aaron P; Alschuler, Kevin N; Hughes, Abbey J; Beier, Meghan; Haselkorn, Jodie K; Sloan, Alicia P; Ehde, Dawn M

    2016-12-01

    Among individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS), mental health comorbidities play a significant role in contributing to secondary disability and detracting from quality of life. This review examines current evidence surrounding three mental health issues of particular relevance to MS: depression, anxiety, and bipolar disorder. We review what is known of the prevalence, correlates, screening mechanisms, and current treatment of each issue and provide recommendations for future areas of research.

  12. The impact of mood, anxiety, and sleep disorders on fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consoli, Giorgio; Marazziti, Donatella; Ciapparelli, Antonio; Bazzichi, Laura; Massimetti, Gabriele; Giacomelli, Camillo; Rossi, Alessandra; Bombardieri, Stefano; Dell'Osso, Liliana

    2012-10-01

    Several studies carried out mainly in North America revealed high rates of mood, anxiety and sleep disorders in patients with fibromyalgia (FM), while the information in other countries is scant. Therefore, we aimed at investigating the prevalence and the impact of such conditions on the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and the severity of pain in a sample of Italian FM patients. One-hundred and sixty-seven women suffering from primary FM were consecutively enrolled. Psychiatric diagnoses were made by means of DSM-IV criteria. The HRQoL and the severity of pain were measured through the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (MOS-SF-36) and the FM Impact Questionnaire (FIQ). Fibromyalgia patients showed a high rate (80.8%) of lifetime and/or current comorbidity with mood and anxiety disorders. Patients with psychiatric comorbidity resulted significantly more impaired on the Mental Component Summary score of the MOS-SF-36 and showed a higher FIQ total score than those suffering from FM only. The severity of pain was associated with current psychiatric comorbidity. Patients with current mood disorders showed significantly lower Mental and Physical Component Summary scores of the MOS-SF-36 and higher FIQ total scores than those with current anxiety disorders or those without psychiatric comorbidity. Finally, patients with sleep disorders reported a lower HRQoL than those with a normal sleep, and specifically those with difficulty in falling in sleep had higher severity of pain. Psychiatric comorbidity, in particular with mood disorders, provokes a significant impairment of the HRQoL and, when current, a higher severity of pain in FM patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Measuring Anxiety as a Treatment Endpoint in Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecavalier, Luc; Wood, Jeffrey J.; Halladay, Alycia K.; Jones, Nancy E.; Aman, Michael G.; Cook, Edwin H.; Handen, Benjamin L.; King, Bryan H.; Pearson, Deborah A.; Hallett, Victoria; Sullivan, Katherine Anne; Grondhuis, Sabrina; Bishop, Somer L.; Horrigan, Joseph P.; Dawson, Geraldine; Scahill, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Despite the high rate of anxiety in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), measuring anxiety in ASD is fraught with uncertainty. This is due, in part, to incomplete consensus on the manifestations of anxiety in this population. Autism Speaks assembled a panel of experts to conduct a systematic review of available measures for anxiety in…

  14. Social and academic functioning in adolescents with anxiety disorders: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lijster, Jasmijn M; Dieleman, Gwen C; Utens, Elisabeth M W J; Dierckx, Bram; Wierenga, Milou; Verhulst, Frank C; Legerstee, Jeroen S

    2018-04-01

    Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent during adolescence. Although literature points out that anxiety symptoms are related to problems in social and academic functioning, the extent of these problems among adolescents with clinical anxiety disorders has not been systematically reviewed before. Electronic databases were searched up to October 2017, with keywords representing anxiety disorders, adolescents, and social or academic functioning. The inclusion criteria were studies with a sample of adolescents (10-19 years) with anxiety disorders that provided data regarding their social or academic functioning. 3431 studies were examined, of which 19 met the inclusion criteria. Adolescents with anxiety disorders had a lower social competence relative to their healthy peers. They reported more negativity within interpersonal relationships, higher levels of loneliness, and victimization. Most adolescents with anxiety disorders felt impaired at school, however, findings of their average school results, compared to peers, were mixed. In addition, they had a higher risk for school refusal and entered higher education less often. Impairments in social and academic functioning differed across type and the number of anxiety disorders. Most studies examined social phobia or anxiety disorders in general and methodological approaches varied widely between studies. This systematic review indicates that adolescents with anxiety disorders experience a range of significant problems in both social and academic functioning. These findings suggest that the assessment and treatment of anxiety disorders in adolescence should focus on improving functioning across domains. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Children and Adolescents with Anxiety Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didem Behice ÖZTOP

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT becomes one of the leading approaches in the psychotherapy. However,use of CBT in childhood psychotherapy is considerably novel. After 1990s, it has been understood that it is an effectivemethod for children and adolescents. Anxiety disorders are one of the most common problems in the field of childhoodand adolescent psychiatry. In the studies conducted, the effectiveness of CBT was demonstrated in anxiety disorders ofthe children and adolescents. Moreover, it was suggested that this effectiveness is permanent in some studies. Prioritygoal of CBT is to change inappropriate learning and thinking patterns in the children and adolescents. By “now and here”fashion, it is attempted to reveal the origin of current problems. During the process, the factors are considered, whichcause to maintain the symptoms. It is attempted to decrease signs caused to stress by improving coping skills duringtherapy. To this end, methods including observation, relaxation training, systematic desensitization, social skills training,cognitive restructuring and exposure therapy are applied in sessions by taking child’s problems into consideration. Scalesspecific to anxiety disorders are used in the assessment and follow-up. Age and development level of the child should beparticularly taken into account while using assessment tools and therapeutic modality.

  16. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Children and Adolescents with Anxiety Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emel KARAKAYA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Currently, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT becomes one of the leading approaches in the psychotherapy. However, use of CBT in childhood psychotherapy is considerably novel. After 1990s, it has been understood that it is an effective method for children and adolescents. Anxiety disorders are one of the most common problems in the field of childhood and adolescent psychiatry. In the studies conducted, the effectiveness of CBT was demonstrated in anxiety disorders of the children and adolescents. Moreover, it was suggested that this effectiveness is permanent in some studies. Priority goal of CBT is to change inappropriate learning and thinking patterns in the children and adolescents. By “now and here” fashion, it is attempted to reveal the origin of current problems. During the process, the factors are considered, which cause to maintain the symptoms. It is attempted to decrease signs caused to stress by improving coping skills during therapy. To this end, methods including observation, relaxation training, systematic desensitization, social skills training, cognitive restructuring and exposure therapy are applied in sessions by taking child’s problems into consideration. Scales specific to anxiety disorders are used in the assessment and follow-up. Age and development level of the child should be particularly taken into account while using assessment tools and therapeutic modality [JCBPR 2013; 2(1.000: 10-24

  17. Virtual reality exposure in anxiety disorders: impact on psychophysiological reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diemer, Julia; Mühlberger, Andreas; Pauli, Paul; Zwanzger, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most frequently encountered psychiatric disorders. Recommended treatments include cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and/or medication. In recent years, beneficial effects of virtual reality (VR) exposure therapy have been shown, making this technique a promising addition to CBT. However, the ability of VR to mimic threatening stimuli in a way comparable to in vivo cues has been discussed. In particular, it has been questioned whether VR is capable of provoking psychophysiological symptoms of anxiety. Since psychophysiological arousal is considered a prerequisite for effective exposure treatment, this systematic review aims to evaluate the evidence for the potential of VR exposure to evoke and modulate psychophysiological fear reactions. PubMed and PsycINFO/Academic Search Premier databases were searched. Thirty-eight studies investigating challenge or habituation effects were included. VR exposure does provoke psychophysiological arousal, especially in terms of electrodermal activity. Results on psychophysiological habituation in VR are inconclusive. Study design and methodological rigour vary widely. Despite several limitations, this review provides evidence that VR exposure elicits psychophysiological fear reactions in patients and healthy subjects, rendering VR a promising treatment for anxiety disorders, and a potent research tool for future investigations of psychophysiological processes and their significance during exposure treatment.

  18. Generalized anxiety disorder: course and risk factors in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buist, Anne; Gotman, Nathan; Yonkers, Kimberly Ann

    2011-06-01

    There are limited studies of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) across pregnancy. Women (n = 2793) were enrolled in the Yale Pink and Blue study, a cohort enriched with subjects who suffered from major depressive disorder (MDD) within the past five years or used antidepressants in the past year. Subjects were evaluated with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview at three time points: twice in pregnancy and once after delivery. We defined a generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) episode as per DSM IV but with required duration reduced to one month or longer. Course and correlates of GAD were examined in women who had: 1) no GAD during the 6 months prior or in pregnancy (Group A), 2) GAD in the 6 months prior to but not in pregnancy (Group B), 3) GAD in pregnancy only (Group C) and 4) GAD both in the 6 months prior to and during pregnancy (Group D). 9.5% of the cohort suffered from GAD at some point in pregnancy. Anxiety symptoms were highest in the first trimester and decreased across pregnancy. Regression analysis revealed that previous GAD episodes, education, social support and a history of child abuse distinguished between membership in the four groups. The sample may not be representational, as it was enhanced with those at risk, and had relatively low representation of socio-economically disadvantaged women. Identification of anxious patients during pregnancy may provide an opportunity to engage those in need of psychiatric treatment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment of major depressive disorder with comorbid generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Daniela; Tavakoli, Sason

    2015-08-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has shown promising results in treating individuals with behavioral disorders such as major depressive disorder (MDD), posttraumatic stress disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and social anxiety disorder. A number of applications of rTMS to different regions of the left and right prefrontal cortex have been used to treat these disorders, but no study of treatment for MDD with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has been conducted with application of rTMS to both the left and right prefrontal cortex. We hypothesized that applying low-frequency rTMS to the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) before applying it to the left DLPFC for the treatment of depression would be anxiolytic in patients with MDD with GAD. Thirteen adult patients with comorbid MDD and GAD received treatment with rTMS in an outpatient setting. The number of treatments ranged from 24 to 36 over 5 to 6 weeks. Response was defined as a ≥ 50% reduction in symptoms from baseline, and remission was defined as a score of anxiety symptoms on the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) scale and depressive symptoms on the 21-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D-21). At the end of the treatment period, for the GAD-7 scale, 11 out of 13 (84.6%) patients' anxiety symptoms were in remission, achieving a score of depressive symptoms. In this small pilot study of 13 patients with comorbid MDD and GAD, significant improvement in anxiety symptoms along with depressive symptoms was achieved in a majority of patients after bilateral rTMS application.

  20. The Relationship between Eating Disorder Symptoms and Social Anxiety Disorder in Students in Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahla Mohamadirizi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Eating Disorder Symptoms and social anxiety can be occurring in the same time. Also social anxiety is one of the important factors predicting Eating Disorder symptoms which vary among different cultures and countries. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between Eating Disorder symptoms and social anxiety in school boys.  Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study on 361 high school boys in isfahan who were selected through two-step random sampling. The students completed a questionnaire concerning demographic characteristics, Eating Disorder Questionnaire and social anxiety. Data were analyzed by the statistical tests of Pearson correlation coefficient, Student’s t-test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, and regression through SPSS version 14. Results: Based on the findings, the mean (SD value for age was 14.14 (1.2 years and for BMI was 23.25 (0.3.35.2% had eating disorder and 17.5% bulimia and30% had anorexia nervosa Symptoms. Also there was a positive correlation between the rate of Eating Disorder Symptoms, bulimia and anorexia nervosa and social anxiety. (P=0.004, r= 0.287, P=0.001, r= 0.257, P=0.020, r= 0.242.  Conclusions: There was correlation between the Eating Disorder Symptoms and social anxiety  in  school boys.So educating people like caregivers by community health midwives regarding nutritional problems in during adolescence can be effective in early diagnosing and identifying such disorders.

  1. Impact of dissociation on treatment of depressive and anxiety spectrum disorders with and without personality disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasko J

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Jan Prasko,1 Ales Grambal,1 Petra Kasalova,1 Dana Kamardova,1 Marie Ociskova,1 Michaela Holubova,1,2 Kristyna Vrbova,1 Zuzana Sigmundova,1 Klara Latalova,1 Milos Slepecky,3 Marta Zatkova3 1Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University in Olomouc, University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, 2Psychiatric Department, Hospital Liberec, Liberec, Czech Republic; 3Department of Psychology Sciences, Faculty of Social Science and Health Care, Constantine the Philosopher University in Nitra, Nitra, Slovak Republic Objective: The central goal of the study was to analyze the impact of dissociation on the treatment effectiveness in patients with anxiety/neurotic spectrum and depressive disorders with or without comorbid personality disorders.Methods: The research sample consisted of inpatients who were hospitalized in the psychiatric department and met the ICD-10 criteria for diagnosis of depressive disorder, panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, mixed anxiety–depressive disorder, agoraphobia, social phobia, obsessive compulsive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, adjustment disorders, dissociative/conversion disorders, somatoform disorder, or other anxiety/neurotic spectrum disorder. The participants completed these measures at the start and end of the therapeutic program – Beck Depression Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory, a subjective version of Clinical Global Impression-Severity, Sheehan Patient-Related Anxiety Scale, and Dissociative Experience Scale.Results: A total of 840 patients with anxiety or depressive spectrum disorders, who were resistant to pharmacological treatment on an outpatient basis and were referred for hospitalization for the 6-week complex therapeutic program, were enrolled in this study. Of them, 606 were statistically analyzed. Data from the remaining 234 (27.86% patients were not used because of various reasons (103 prematurely finished the program, 131 did not fill in most of the

  2. Fluoxetine for the Treatment of Childhood Anxiety Disorders: Open-Label, Long-Term Extension to a Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Duncan B.; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David; Monk, Kelly; Kalas, Catherine; Ehmann, Mary; Bridge, Jeffrey; Wood, D. Scott; Muthen, Bengt; Brent, David

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy of fluoxetine for the long-term treatment of children and adolescents with anxiety disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, and/or social phobia. Method: Children and adolescents (7-17 years old) with anxiety disorders were studied in open treatment for 1 year after they…

  3. Anxiety and Mood Disorder in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder and ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon-Lipkin, Eliza; Marvin, Alison R; Law, J Kiely; Lipkin, Paul H

    2018-04-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) frequently co-occur. Understanding the endophenotype of children with both ASD and ADHD may impact clinical management. In this study, we compare the comorbidity of anxiety and mood disorders in children with ASD, with and without ADHD. We performed a cross-sectional study of children with ASD who were enrolled in the Interactive Autism Network, an Internet-mediated, parent-report, autism research registry. Children ages 6 to 17 years with a parent-reported, professional, and questionnaire-verified diagnosis of ASD were included. Data were extracted regarding parent-reported diagnosis and/or treatment of ADHD, anxiety disorder, and mood disorder. ASD severity was measured by using Social Responsiveness Scale total raw scores. There were 3319 children who met inclusion criteria. Of these, 1503 (45.3%) had ADHD. Comorbid ADHD increased with age ( P < .001) and was associated with increased ASD severity ( P < .001). A generalized linear model revealed that children with ASD and ADHD had an increased risk of anxiety disorder (adjusted relative risk 2.20; 95% confidence interval 1.97-2.46) and mood disorder (adjusted relative risk 2.72; 95% confidence interval 2.28-3.24) compared with children with ASD alone. Increasing age was the most significant contributor to the presence of anxiety disorder and mood disorder. Co-occurrence of ADHD is common in children with ASD. Children with both ASD and ADHD have an increased risk of anxiety and mood disorders. Physicians who care for children with ASD should be aware of the coexistence of these treatable conditions. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. An adult version of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED-A)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Steensel, F.J.A.; Bögels, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Many questionnaires exist for measuring anxiety; however, most are developed for children or adults only, or do not capture symptoms of all anxiety disorders. The Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED) is a well-validated questionnaire for children, measuring symptoms of most

  5. Sleep-Related Problems among Children and Adolescents with Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfano, Candice A.; Ginsburg, Golda S.; Kingery, Julie Newman

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The present study examined sleep-related problems (SRPs) among a large sample (n = 128) of youth with anxiety disorders (i.e., generalized, separation, and social). The frequency of eight specific SRPs was examined in relation to age, gender, type of anxiety disorder, anxiety severity, and functional impairment. The impact of…

  6. Irritability and Severity of Anxious Symptomatology Among Youth With Anxiety Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornacchio, Danielle; Crum, Kathleen I; Coxe, Stefany; Pincus, Donna B; Comer, Jonathan S

    2016-01-01

    Most research on irritability and child psychopathology has focused on depressive disorders, bipolar disorder, and/or oppositional defiant disorder (ODD). Less is known about relationships between child anxiety and irritability and moderators of such associations. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to examine associations between anxiety severity and irritability in a large sample of treatment-seeking youth with anxiety disorders (N = 663, aged 7-19 years, mean = 12.25 years), after accounting for comorbid depressive disorders and ODD. Additional analyses examined whether associations were moderated by child gender, age, and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) status. There was a direct link between child anxiety and irritability even after accounting for comorbid depressive disorders and ODD. Links between child anxiety and irritability were robust across child gender and age. Furthermore, relationships between child anxiety and irritability were comparable across youth with and without GAD, suggesting that the anxiety-irritability link is relevant across child anxiety disorders and not confined to youth with GAD. Findings add to an increasing body of evidence linking child irritability to a range of internalizing and externalizing psychopathologies, and suggest that child anxiety assessment should systematically incorporate irritability evaluations. Moreover, youth in clinical settings displaying irritability should be assessed for the presence of anxiety. Treatments for childhood anxiety may do well to incorporate new treatment modules as needed that specifically target problems of irritability. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dual Cognitive and Biological Correlates of Anxiety in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollocks, Matthew J.; Pickles, Andrew; Howlin, Patricia; Simonoff, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Young people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have a high prevalence (~40 %) of anxiety disorders compared to their non-ASD peers. It is unclear whether cognitive and biological processes associated with anxiety in ASD are analogous to anxiety in typically developing (TD) populations. In this study 55 boys with ASD (34 with a co-occurring…

  8. Priorities for Advancing Research on Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Co-Occurring Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasa, Roma A.; Keefer, Amy; Reaven, Judy; South, Mikle; White, Susan W.

    2018-01-01

    Research on anxiety disorders in youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has burgeoned in the past two decades. Yet, critical gaps exist with respect to measuring and treating anxiety in this population. This study used the nominal group technique to identify the most important research priorities on co-occurring anxiety in ASD. An international…

  9. Mechanisms of comorbidity, continuity, and discontinuity in anxiety-related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughton, Neil; Corr, Philip J

    2016-11-01

    We discuss comorbidity, continuity, and discontinuity of anxiety-related disorders from the perspective of a two-dimensional neuropsychology of fear (threat avoidance) and anxiety (threat approach). Pharmacological dissection of the "neurotic" disorders justifies both a categorical division between fear and anxiety and a subdivision of each mapped to a hierarchy of neural modules that process different immediacies of threat. It is critical that each module can generate normal responses, symptoms of another syndrome, or syndromal responses. We discuss the resultant possibilities for comorbid dysfunction of these modules both with each other and with some disorders not usually classified as anxiety related. The simplest case is symptomatic fear/anxiety comorbidity, where dysfunction in one module results in excess activity in a second, otherwise normal, module to generate symptoms and apparent comorbidity. More complex is syndromal fear/anxiety comorbidity, where more than one module is concurrently dysfunctional. Yet more complex are syndromal comorbidities of anxiety that go beyond the two dimensional fear/anxiety systems: depression, substance use disorder, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Our account of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder-anxiety comorbidity entails discussion of the neuropsychology of externalizing disorders to account for the lack of anxiety comorbidity in some of these. Finally, we link the neuropsychology of disorder to personality variation, and to the development of a biomarker of variation in the anxiety system among individuals that, if extreme, may provide a means of unambiguously identifying the first of a range of anxiety syndromes.

  10. Selective processing of threatening information: effects of attachment representation and anxiety disorder on attention and memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeijlmans van Emmichhoven, I.A.; van IJzendoorn, M.H.; de Ruiter, C.; Brosschot, J.F.

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the effect of the mental representation of attachment on information processing, 28 anxiety disorder outpatients, as diagnosed by the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule?Revised, were administered the Adult Attachment Interview and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. They also

  11. What, me worry? Adolescent generalized anxiety disorder symptoms and problemematic interactions in the family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijsbroek, S.A.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/339845503

    2011-01-01

    Research has shown that Generalized Anxiety Disorder is one of the most common anxiety disorders found in adolescents today. Its main symptoms are disproportionate fear and anxiety (worrying) about work-related or school-related events or activities and social relations. Adolescents suffering from

  12. Anxiety and Repetitive Behaviours in Autism Spectrum Disorders and Williams Syndrome: A Cross-Syndrome Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Jacqui; Riby, Deborah M.; Janes, Emily; Connolly, Brenda; McConachie, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder or Williams syndrome are vulnerable to anxiety. The factors that contribute to this risk remain unclear. This study compared anxiety in autism spectrum disorder and Williams Syndrome and examined the relationship between repetitive behaviours and anxiety. Thirty-four children with autism and twenty children…

  13. Structure of genetic and environmental risk factors for dimensional representations of DSM–IV anxiety disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambs, Kristian; Czajkowsky, Nikolai; Røysamb, Espen; Neale, Michael C.; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Aggen, Steven H.; Harris, Jennifer R.; Ørstavik, Ragnhild E.; Kendler, Kenneth S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Twin data permit decomposition of comorbidity into genetically and environmentally derived correlations. No previous twin study includes all major forms of anxiety disorder. Aims To estimate the degree to which genetic and environmental risk factors are shared rather than unique to dimensionally scored panic disorder, generalised anxiety disorder, phobias, obsessive–compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder. Method Data obtained from 2801 young-adult Norwegian twins by means of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview were analysed with the Mx program. Results A multivariate common factor model fitted best. The latent liability to all anxiety disorders was substantially more heritable (54%) than the individual disorders (23% to 40%). Most of the genetic effect was common to the disorders. Genes contributed just over 50% to the covariance between liabilities. Conclusions The five anxiety disorders all share genetic and environmental risk factors. This has implications for the revision of the anxiety disorder section in DSM–V. PMID:19794197

  14. A systematic review of sleep disturbance in anxiety and related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Rebecca C; Olatunji, Bunmi O

    2016-01-01

    Recent research suggests that sleep disturbance may be a transdiagnostic process, and there is increasing interest in examining how sleep disturbance may contribute to anxiety and related disorders. The current review summarizes and synthesizes the extant research assessing sleep in anxiety and related disorders. The findings suggest that sleep disturbance exacerbates symptom severity in the majority of anxiety and related disorders. However, the nature of sleep disturbance often varies as a function of objective versus subjective assessment. Although sleep disturbance is a correlate of most anxiety and related disorders, a causal role for sleep disturbance is less clear. A model of potential mechanisms by which sleep disturbance may confer risk for the development of anxiety and related disorders is discussed. Future research integrating findings from basic sleep research with current knowledge of anxiety and related disorders may facilitate the development of novel treatments for comorbid sleep disturbance and clinical anxiety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The moderating role of avoidance behavior on anxiety over time: Is there a difference between social anxiety disorder and specific phobia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudaz, M.; Ledermann, T.; Margraf, J.; Becker, E.S.; Craske, M.G.

    2017-01-01

    Theories of anxiety disorders and phobias have ascribed a critical role to avoidance behavior in explaining the persistence of fear and anxiety, but knowledge about the role of avoidance behavior in the maintenance of anxiety in social anxiety disorder relative to specific phobia is lacking. This

  16. The utility of screen for child anxiety related emotional disorders (SCARED) as a tool for identifying children at high risk for prevalent anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muris, P.; Merckelbach, H.; Kindt, M.; Bögels, S.; Dreessen, L.; van Dorp, C.; Habets, A.; Rosmuller, S.; Snieder, N.

    2001-01-01

    The current study examined the utility of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED) as a screening tool for the identification of children at high risk for prevalent childhood anxiety disorders. The child version of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM (KSCID) was used

  17. Validity of the Revised Children's Anxiety and Depression Scale for youth with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Lindsey; Renno, Patricia; Storch, Eric A; Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Lewin, Adam B; Arnold, Elysse; Lin, Enjey; Wood, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    High rates of anxiety and depression are reported among youth with autism spectrum disorders. These conditions are generally assessed using measures validated for typically developing youth. Few studies have investigated their validity for autism spectrum disorders, which is crucial for accurate assessment and the provision of proper treatment. The Revised Children's Anxiety and Depression Scale was evaluated with 67 youth with autism spectrum disorders to examine its utility in measuring anxiety and depression in this population. Parents and children (aged 11-15 years) referred to a multisite intervention study completed the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale, Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children, Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule, Child Behavior Checklist, and Revised Children's Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results suggest acceptable internal consistency of the Revised Children's Anxiety and Depression Scale. Modest convergent validity was found among the Revised Children's Anxiety and Depression Scale and other standardized measures of anxiety and depression. There were stronger correlations between Revised Children's Anxiety and Depression Scale Total scores and subscales of measures expected to correlate significantly than those not expected to correlate. One exception was a significant association between the Revised Children's Anxiety and Depression Scale and Child Behavior Checklist Attention subscale, calling into question the divergent validity in separating anxiety from attention problems. Overall, results suggest preliminary support for the Revised Children's Anxiety and Depression Scale in youth with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Axis I anxiety and mental health disorders among stuttering adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Anthony; Menzies, Ross G; O'Brian, Sue; Onslow, Mark; Packman, Ann; Lowe, Robyn; Iverach, Lisa; Heard, Robert; Block, Susan

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate anxiety and psychological functioning among adolescents seeking speech therapy for stuttering using a structured, diagnostic interview and psychological questionnaires. This study also sought to determine whether any differences in psychological status were evident between younger and older adolescents. Participants were 37 stuttering adolescents seeking stuttering treatment. We administered the Computerized Voice Version of the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children, and five psychometric tests. Participants were classified into younger (12-14 years; n=20) and older adolescents (15-17 years; n=17). Thirty-eight percent of participants attained at least one diagnosis of a mental disorder, according to the diagnostic criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV; APA, 2000), with the majority of these diagnoses involving anxiety. This figure is double current estimates for general adolescent populations, and is consistent with our finding of moderate and moderate-severe quality of life impairment. Although many of the scores on psychological measures fell within the normal range, older adolescents (15-17 years) reported significantly higher anxiety, depression, reactions to stuttering, and emotional/behavioral problems, than younger adolescents (12-14 years). There was scant evidence that self-reported stuttering severity is correlated with mental health issues. There are good reasons to believe these results are conservative because many participants gave socially desirable responses about their mental health status. These results reveal a need for large-scale, statistically powerful assessments of anxiety and other mental disorders among stuttering adolescents with reference to control populations. The reader will be able to: (a) explain the clinical importance of assessing for mental health with stuttering adolescents, (b) state the superior method for adolescent mental

  19. Childhood Anxiety/Withdrawal, Adolescent Parent-Child Attachment and Later Risk of Depression and Anxiety Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, I. S.; Horwood, L. J.; Fergusson, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    positive parent-child attachment acted to mitigate the risk of later internalising disorders amongst children with high levels of early anxiety/withdrawal using data from a 30 years longitudinal study of a New Zealand birth cohort. The findings of this study showed that: (a) increasing rates of early......Previous research has shown that children with high levels of early anxiety/withdrawal are at increased risk of later anxiety and depression. It has also been found that positive parent-child attachment reduces the risk of these disorders. The aim of this paper was to examine the extent to which...... anxiety/withdrawal were associated with an increased risk of later anxiety and depression; (b) positive parent-child attachment in adolescence was associated with a decline in the risk of later anxiety and depression; and (c) these associations persisted even after controlling for confounding factors...

  20. Psychometrics of the screen for adult anxiety related disorders (SCAARED)- A new scale for the assessment of DSM-5 anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, Melina; Rooks, Brian T; Gill, MaryKay; Goldstein, Tina; Sakolsky, Dara; Goldstein, Benjamin; Monk, Kelly; Hickey, Mary Beth; Diler, Rasim S; Hafeman, Danella; Merranko, John; Axelson, David; Birmaher, Boris

    2017-07-01

    To examine the psychometrics of the Screen for Adult Anxiety Related Disorders (SCAARED). The SCAARED was adapted from the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders. Participants (N=336) ages 18-27 years old were evaluated using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders (SCID). The SCAARED was completed at or within two-weeks before the SCID. The psychometrics of the SCAARED were analyzed using standard statistical analyses including principal components, and Receiver Operant Curve analyses. A replication was performed in an age/sex matched independent sample (N=158). The SCAARED showed four factors: somatic/panic/agoraphobia, generalized anxiety, separation anxiety, and social anxiety. The total and each factor scores demonstrated good internal consistency (α=0.86-0.97) and good discriminant validity between anxiety and other disorders and within anxiety disorders for generalized and social anxiety. Area Under the Curve for the total and each of the factor scores ranged between 0.72 and 0.84 (ppsychometric properties supporting its use to screen adults for anxiety disorders, longitudinal studies following youth into adulthood and studies comparing child and adult populations. Further replication studies in larger community and clinical samples are indicated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The prevalence of major anxiety disorders in relatives of alcohol dependent men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuckit, M A; Hesselbrock, V M; Tipp, J; Nurnberger, J I; Anthenelli, R M; Crowe, R R

    1995-05-01

    The relationship between alcohol dependence and lifelong major anxiety disorders is complex. The literature indicates a close association between anxiety symptoms and drinking behavior. However, it is difficult to determine whether the anxiety conditions are lifelong disorders or if they represent temporary organic conditions related to alcohol intoxication and withdrawal. One approach to understanding more about the relationships between alcohol dependence and major anxiety disorders is to observe the rate of anxiety-related diagnoses in close relatives of alcoholics. This approach evaluates whether alcoholism and major anxiety disorders might share a common genetic basis. The data presented here describe the rates of four major anxiety disorders in 591 interviewed first-degree relatives of alcohol dependent men and women. The data were gathered through face-to-face structured standardized interviews. The analyses reveal that after focusing on DSM-III-R anxiety disorders, controlling for the potential presence of temporary organic conditions in the subject and considering the impact of assortative mating in their parents, the life-time risk for panic disorder in close biological family members of alcoholics is 3.4%; for agoraphobia, 1.4%; for social phobia, 2.3%; and for obsessive-compulsive disease, 1.4%. These data do not indicate an exceptionally high rate of anxiety disorders among close relatives of alcoholics. While other mechanisms might contribute to relationship between alcoholism and major anxiety disorders, the results do not support evidence of a common genotype for the two disorders.

  2. Therapeutic potential of kava in the treatment of anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Yadhu N; Singh, Nirbhay N

    2002-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most common psychiatric disorders that affect all age groups of the general population. Currently, the preferred treatment is with pharmacological drugs that have antidepressant or anti-anxiety properties. However, these agents have numerous and often serious adverse effects, including sedation, impaired cognition, ataxia, aggression, sexual dysfunction, tolerance and dependence. Withdrawal reactions on termination after long-term administration are also a major limiting factor in the use of these agents. Herbal remedies, including kava (Piper methysticum), have been shown to be effective as alternative treatments, at least in mild to moderate cases of anxiety. Kava is a social and ceremonial herb from the South Pacific. It is available in the west as an over-the-counter preparation. Its biological effects, due to a mixture of compounds called kavalactones, are reported to include sedative, anxiolytic, antistress, analgesic, local anaesthetic, anticonvulsant and neuroprotective properties. The pharmacological properties of kava are postulated to include blockade of voltage-gated sodium ion channels, enhanced ligand binding to gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors, diminished excitatory neurotransmitter release due to calcium ion channel blockade, reduced neuronal reuptake of noradrenaline (norepinephrine), reversible inhibition of monoamine oxidase B and suppression of the synthesis of the eicosanoid thromboxane A(2), which antagonises GABA(A) receptor function. Clinical studies have shown that kava and kavalactones are effective in the treatment of anxiety at subclinical and clinical levels, anxiety associated with menopause and anxiety due to various medical conditions. Until recently, the adverse effects attributed to kava use were considered mild or negligible, except for the occurrence of a skin lesion. This disorder, called kava dermopathy, occurs only with prolonged use of large amounts of kava and is reversible on

  3. Attention Mechanisms in Children with Anxiety Disorders and in Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Implications for Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, Adam S.; Chu, Brian C.; Reddy, Linda A.; Mohlman, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Inattention is among the most commonly referred problems for school-aged youth. Research suggests distinct mechanisms may contribute to attention problems in youth with anxiety disorders versus youth with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study compared children (8-17 years) with anxiety disorders (n = 24) and children (8-16…

  4. Long-term work disability and absenteeism in anxiety and depressive disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, S.M.; Spijker, J.; Licht, C.M.M.; Hardevel, F.; de Graaf, R.; Batelaan, N.M.; Penninx, B.W.; Beekman, A.T.

    2015-01-01

    Background This longitudinal study aims to compare long-term work disability and absenteeism between anxiety and depressive disorders focusing on the effects of different course trajectories (remission, recurrence and chronic course) and specific symptom dimensions (anxiety arousal, avoidance

  5. Long-term work disability and absenteeism in anxiety and depressive disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, S.M.; Spijker, J.; Licht, C.M.; Hardeveld, F.; Graaf, R. de; Batelaan, N.M.; Penninx, B.W.; Beekman, A.T.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This longitudinal study aims to compare long-term work disability and absenteeism between anxiety and depressive disorders focusing on the effects of different course trajectories (remission, recurrence and chronic course) and specific symptom dimensions (anxiety arousal, avoidance

  6. Long-term work disability and absenteeism in anxiety and depressive disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, S.M.; Spijker, J.; Licht, C.M.M.; Hardeveld, F.; Graaf, R. de; Batelaan, N.M.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Beekman, A.T.F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: This longitudinal study aims to compare long-term work disability and absenteeism between anxiety and depressive disorders focusing on the effects of different course trajectories (remission, recurrence and chronic course) and specific symptom dimensions (anxiety arousal, avoidance

  7. Aetiological overlap between obsessive-compulsive related and anxiety disorder symptoms: multivariate twin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Solà, Clara; Fontenelle, Leonardo F; Bui, Minh; Hopper, John L; Pantelis, Christos; Yücel, Murat; Menchón, José M; Alonso, Pino; Harrison, Ben J

    2016-01-01

    The aetiological boundary between obsessive-compulsive related disorders (OCRDs) including obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and anxiety disorders is unclear and continues to generate debate. To determine the genetic overlap and the pattern of causal relationships among OCRDs and anxiety disorders. Multivariate twin modelling methods and a new regression analysis to infer causation were used, involving 2495 male and female twins. The amount of common genetic liability observed for OCD symptoms was higher when considering anxiety disorders and OCRDs in the model v. modelling OCRD symptoms alone. OCD symptoms emerged as risk factors for the presence of generalised anxiety, panic and hoarding symptoms, whereas social phobia appeared as a risk factor for OCD symptoms. OCD represents a complex phenotype that includes important shared features with anxiety disorders and OCRDs. The novel patterns of risk identified between OCD and anxiety disorder may help to explain their frequent co-occurrence. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  8. Cognitive Hypnotherapy for Accessing and Healing Emotional Injuries for Anxiety Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alladin, Assen

    2016-07-01

    Although anxiety disorders on the surface may appear simple, they often represent complex problems that are compounded by underlying factors. For these reasons, treatment of anxiety disorders should be individualized. This article describes cognitive hypnotherapy, an individual comprehensive treatment protocol that integrates cognitive, behavioral, mindfulness, psychodynamic, and hypnotic strategies in the management of anxiety disorders. The treatment approach is based on the self-wounds model of anxiety disorders, which provides the rationale for integrating diverse strategies in the psychotherapy for anxiety disorders. Due to its evidence-based and integrated nature, the psychotherapy described here provides accuracy, efficacy, and sophistication in the formulation and treatment of anxiety disorders. This model can be easily adapted to the understanding and treatment of other emotional disorders.

  9. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Susan; Ferrando, Stephen; Findler, Marianne; Stowell, Charles; Smart, Colette; Haglin, Dean

    2008-05-01

    While cognitive behavior therapy has been found to be effective in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), a significant percentage of patients struggle with residual symptoms. There is some conceptual basis for suggesting that cultivation of mindfulness may be helpful for people with GAD. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) is a group treatment derived from mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) developed by Jon Kabat-Zinn and colleagues. MBSR uses training in mindfulness meditation as the core of the program. MBCT incorporates cognitive strategies and has been found effective in reducing relapse in patients with major depression (Teasdale, J. D., Segal, Z. V., Williams, J. M. G., Ridgeway, V., Soulsby, J., & Lau, M. (2000). Prevention of relapse/recurrence in major depression by mindfulness-based cognitive therapy. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 6, 615-623). Eligible subjects recruited to a major academic medical center participated in the group MBCT course and completed measures of anxiety, worry, depressive symptoms, mood states and mindful awareness in everyday life at baseline and end of treatment. Eleven subjects (six female and five male) with a mean age of 49 (range=36-72) met criteria and completed the study. There were significant reductions in anxiety and depressive symptoms from baseline to end of treatment. MBCT may be an acceptable and potentially effective treatment for reducing anxiety and mood symptoms and increasing awareness of everyday experiences in patients with GAD. Future directions include development of a randomized clinical trial of MBCT for GAD.

  10. Observing Interactions between Children and Adolescents and their Parents: The Effects of Anxiety Disorder and Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Polly; Creswell, Cathy

    2015-08-01

    Parental behaviors, most notably overcontrol, lack of warmth and expressed anxiety, have been implicated in models of the development and maintenance of anxiety disorders in children and young people. Theories of normative development have proposed that different parental responses are required to support emotional development in childhood and adolescence, yet age has not typically been taken into account in studies of parenting and anxiety disorders. In order to identify whether associations between anxiety disorder status and parenting differ in children and adolescents, we compared observed behaviors of parents of children (7-10 years) and adolescents (13-16 years) with and without anxiety disorders (n = 120), while they undertook a series of mildly anxiety-provoking tasks. Parents of adolescents showed significantly lower levels of expressed anxiety, intrusiveness and warm engagement than parents of children. Furthermore, offspring age moderated the association between anxiety disorder status and parenting behaviors. Specifically, parents of adolescents with anxiety disorders showed higher intrusiveness and lower warm engagement than parents of non-anxious adolescents. A similar relationship between these parenting behaviors and anxiety disorder status was not observed among parents of children. The findings suggest that theoretical accounts of the role of parental behaviors in anxiety disorders in children and adolescents should distinguish between these different developmental periods. Further experimental research to establish causality, however, would be required before committing additional resources to targeting parenting factors within treatment.

  11. Towards new approaches to disorders of fear and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Brian G; Banerjee, Sunayana B; Goodman, Jared V; Ressler, Kerry J

    2013-06-01

    Fear and anxiety are debilitating conditions that affect a significant number of individuals in their lifetimes. Understanding underlying mechanisms of these disorders affords us the possibility of therapeutic intervention. Such clarity in terms of mechanism and intervention can only come from an amalgamation of research from human to animal studies that attempt to mimic the human condition, both of which are discussed in this review. We begin by presenting an outline of our current understanding of the neurobiological basis of fear and anxiety. This outline spans various levels of organization that include the circuitry, molecular pathways, genetic and epigenetic components of fear and anxiety. Using these organizational levels as a scaffold, we then discuss strategies that are currently used to ameliorate these disorders, and forecast future interventions that hold therapeutic promise. Among these newer promising treatments, we include, optogenetic, pharmacological, and extinction-based approaches, as well as lifestyle modifications, with combinatorial treatment regimens of these holding the most promise. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Genetics of generalized anxiety disorder and related traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Michael G; Domschke, Katharina

    2017-06-01

    This review serves as a systematic guide to the genetics of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and further focuses on anxiety-relevant endophenotypes, such as pathological worry fear of uncertainty, and neuroticism. We inspect clinical genetic evidence for the familialityl heritability of GAD and cross-disorder phenotypes based on family and twin studies. Recent advances of linkage studies, genome-wide association studies, and candidate gene studies (eg, 5-HTT, 5-HT1A, MAOA, BDNF ) are outlined. Functional and structural neuroimaging and neurophysiological readouts relating to peripheral stress markers and psychophysiology are further integrated, building a multilevel disease framework. We explore etiologic factors in gene-environment interaction approaches investigating childhood trauma, environmental adversity, and stressful life events in relation to selected candidate genes ( 5-HTT, NPSR1, COMT, MAOA, CRHR1, RGS2 ), Additionally, the pharmacogenetics of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor/serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor treatment are summarized ( 5-HTT, 5-HT2A, COMT, CRHR1 ). Finally, GAD and trait anxiety research challenges and perspectives in the field of genetics, including epigenetics, are discussed.

  13. Metacognitive Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder: An A–B Replication Series Across Social Anxiety Subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Nordahl

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT is the treatment of choice for Social anxiety disorder (SAD. However, factors additional to those emphasised in CBT are the primary cause of psychological disorder according to the metacognitive model. Metacognitive Therapy (MCT aims to target a perseverative thinking style named the cognitive attentional syndrome and its underlying metacognitive beliefs (beliefs about cognition. The present study aimed to explore the effects of generic MCT for SAD. Treatment related effects were evaluated using direct replication single case (A–B methodology across three patients with different subtypes of SAD; performance type, generalised and generalised plus avoidant personality disorder, representing increasing SAD severity/complexity. All patients responded during treatment and achieved substantial symptom reductions which were largely maintained at 6 months’ follow-up. Metacognitive therapy appears to be a suitable treatment and was associated with positive outcomes for patients with different presentations of SAD.

  14. Do Comorbid Anxiety Disorders Moderate the Effects of Psychotherapy for Bipolar Disorder? Results From STEP-BD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckersbach, Thilo; Peters, Amy T.; Sylvia, Louisa; Urdahl, Anna; Magalhães, Pedro V.S.; Otto, Michael W.; Frank, Ellen; Miklowitz, David J.; Berk, Michael; Kinrys, Gustavo; Nierenberg, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Objective At least 50% of individuals with bipolar disorder have a lifetime anxiety disorder. Individuals with both bipolar disorder and a co-occurring anxiety disorder experience longer illness duration, greater illness severity, and poorer treatment response. The study explored whether comorbid lifetime anxiety in bipolar patients moderates psychotherapy treatment outcome. Method In the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program randomized controlled trial of psychotherapy for bipolar depression, participants received up to 30 sessions of intensive psychotherapy (family-focused therapy, interpersonal and social rhythm therapy, or cognitive-behavioral therapy) or collaborative care, a three-session comparison treatment, plus pharmacotherapy. Using the number needed to treat, we computed effect sizes to analyze the relationship between lifetime anxiety disorders and rates of recovery across treatment groups after 1 year. Results A total of 269 patients (113 women) with a comorbid lifetime anxiety disorder (N=177) or without a comorbid lifetime anxiety disorder (N=92) were included in the analysis. Participants with a lifetime anxiety disorder were more likely to recover with psychotherapy than with collaborative care (66% compared with 49% recovered over 1 year; number needed to treat=5.88, small to medium effect). For patients without a lifetime anxiety disorder, there was no difference between rates of recovery in psychotherapy compared with collaborative care (64% compared with 62% recovered; number needed to treat=50, small effect). Participants with one lifetime anxiety disorder were likely to benefit from intensive psychotherapy compared with collaborative care (84% compared with 53% recovered; number needed to treat=3.22, medium to large effect), whereas patients with multiple anxiety disorders exhibited no difference in response to the two treatments (54% compared with 46% recovered; number needed to treat=12.5, small effect). Conclusions Depressed patients

  15. Do comorbid anxiety disorders moderate the effects of psychotherapy for bipolar disorder? Results from STEP-BD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckersbach, Thilo; Peters, Amy T; Sylvia, Louisa; Urdahl, Anna; Magalhães, Pedro V S; Otto, Michael W; Frank, Ellen; Miklowitz, David J; Berk, Michael; Kinrys, Gustavo; Nierenberg, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    At least 50% of individuals with bipolar disorder have a lifetime anxiety disorder. Individuals with both bipolar disorder and a co-occurring anxiety disorder experience longer illness duration, greater illness severity, and poorer treatment response. The study explored whether comorbid lifetime anxiety in bipolar patients moderates psychotherapy treatment outcome. In the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program randomized controlled trial of psychotherapy for bipolar depression, participants received up to 30 sessions of intensive psychotherapy (family-focused therapy, interpersonal and social rhythm therapy, or cognitive-behavioral therapy) or collaborative care, a three-session comparison treatment, plus pharmacotherapy. Using the number needed to treat, we computed effect sizes to analyze the relationship between lifetime anxiety disorders and rates of recovery across treatment groups after 1 year. A total of 269 patients (113 women) with a comorbid lifetime anxiety disorder (N=177) or without a comorbid lifetime anxiety disorder (N=92) were included in the analysis. Participants with a lifetime anxiety disorder were more likely to recover with psychotherapy than with collaborative care (66% compared with 49% recovered over 1 year; number needed to treat=5.88, small to medium effect). For patients without a lifetime anxiety disorder, there was no difference between rates of recovery in psychotherapy compared with collaborative care (64% compared with 62% recovered; number needed to treat=50, small effect). Participants with one lifetime anxiety disorder were likely to benefit from intensive psychotherapy compared with collaborative care (84% compared with 53% recovered; number needed to treat=3.22, medium to large effect), whereas patients with multiple anxiety disorders exhibited no difference in response to the two treatments (54% compared with 46% recovered; number needed to treat=12.5, small effect). Depressed patients with bipolar disorder and comorbid

  16. Early Maladaptive Schemas in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Anxiety Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoosefi, Afsaneh; RajeziEsfahani, Sepideh; Pourshahbaz, Abbas; Dolatshahee, Behrooz; Assadi, Abbasali; Maleki, Fahime; Momeni, Sara

    2016-10-01

    Purpose of this study is comparing early maladaptive schemas which are active in patients suffering from obsessive-compulsive disorder and anxiety disorders together, considering recent DSM-5 changes through which OCD has been placed in a separate and new diagnostic level. This research is a causal-comparative study. 151 persons were categorized in three groups of people suffering from OCD (50), suffering from anxiety disorders (50), and control group (51). Early diagnosis of disorders in two clinical groups were verified based on structured clinical interview for DSM )SCID-I) and Yale-Brown obsessive-compulsive scale (Y-BOCS). General health questionnaire (GHQ-28), the short versions of the Young schemas questionnaire (YSQ), and Padua inventory-Washington State University Revision (PI-WSUR) were also implemented. Findings revealed that mean scores of all schemas of those suffering from anxiety disorders, except for Self-Sacrifice, Unrelenting-Standards/Hypercriticalness, Entitlement/Grandiosity schemas, and mean scores of all early maladaptive schemas of those suffering from obsessive compulsive disorder are significantly higher than those of control group. OCD group had significantly higher scores in Emotional Deprivation, Mistrust/Abuse, and Defectiveness/Shame schemas than anxiety disorders group. Defectiveness/Shame and Vulnerability to Harm or Illness schemas can explain 38 percent of variance of obsessive compulsive symptoms. The dominant and specific early maladaptive schemas of OCD are Defectiveness/Shame, Mistrust/Abuse, and Emotional Deprivation Schemas. This study besides supporting the theory of early maladaptive schemas, suggests that interventions based on specific schemas can be useful methods in treatment of OCD and anxiety disorders.

  17. The Impact of Caregiving on the Development of Major Depressive Disorder and Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eve Jane Markey

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Providing care for a relative is associated with psychological distress and a higher prevalence of psychological disorders. This study investigated the prevalence of anxiety and depressive disorders among the caregiving population. The study was based on data drawn from the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys (CPES. Binary logistic regressions were conducted to examine these associations and to identify factors influencing the development of depressive and anxiety disorders. The analysis indicated that respondents providing care for a relative were at a higher risk of developing a psychological disorder. A number of socio-demographic variables were identified as increasing the risk of developing a psychological disorder such as being younger, female and divorced. The findings highlight the importance of support and interventions for family caregivers.

  18. Validity of prototype diagnosis for mood and anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFife, Jared A; Peart, Joanne; Bradley, Bekh; Ressler, Kerry; Drill, Rebecca; Westen, Drew

    2013-02-01

    CONTEXT With growing recognition that most forms of psychopathology are best represented as dimensions or spectra, a central question becomes how to implement dimensional diagnosis in a way that is empirically sound and clinically useful. Prototype matching, which involves comparing a patient's clinical presentation with a prototypical description of the disorder, is an approach to diagnosis that has gained increasing attention with forthcoming revisions to both the DSM and the International Classification of Diseases. OBJECTIVE To examine prototype diagnosis for mood and anxiety disorders. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS In the first study, we examined clinicians' DSM-IV and prototype diagnoses with their ratings of the patients' adaptive functioning and patients' self-reported symptoms. In the second study, independent interviewers made prototype diagnoses following either a systematic clinical interview or a structured diagnostic interview. A third interviewer provided independent ratings of global adaptive functioning. Patients were recruited as outpatients (study 1; N = 84) and from primary care clinics (study 2; N = 143). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Patients' self-reported mood, anxiety, and externalizing symptoms along with independent clinical ratings of adaptive functioning. RESULTS Clinicians' prototype diagnoses showed small to moderate correlations with patient-reported psychopathology and performed as well as or better than DSM-IV diagnoses. Prototype diagnoses from independent interviewers correlated on average r = .50 and showed substantial incremental validity over DSM-IV diagnoses in predicting adaptive functioning. CONCLUSIONS Prototype matching is a viable alternative for psychiatric diagnosis. As in research on personality disorders, mood and anxiety disorder prototypes outperformed DSM-IV decision rules in predicting psychopathology and global functioning. Prototype matching has multiple advantages, including ease of use in clinical practice, reduced

  19. Comorbid anxiety disorders in late-life depression: results of a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veen, D C; van Zelst, W H; Schoevers, R A; Comijs, H C; Voshaar, R C Oude

    2015-07-01

    Comorbid anxiety disorders are common in late-life depression and negatively impact treatment outcome. This study aimed to examine personality characteristics as well as early and recent life-events as possible determinants of comorbid anxiety disorders in late-life depression, taking previously examined determinants into account. Using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI 2.0), we established comorbid anxiety disorders (social phobia (SP), panic disorder (PD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and agoraphobia (AGO)) in 350 patients (aged ≥60 years) suffering from a major depressive disorder according to DSM-IV-TR criteria within the past six months. Adjusted for age, sex, and level of education, we first examined previously identified determinants of anxious depression: depression severity, suicidality, partner status, loneliness, chronic diseases, and gait speed in multiple logistic regression models. Subsequently, associations were explored with the big five personality characteristics as well as early and recent life-events. First, multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted with the presence of any anxiety disorder (yes/no) as dependent variable, where after analyses were repeated for each anxiety disorder, separately. In our sample, the prevalence rate of comorbid anxiety disorders in late-life depression was 38.6%. Determinants of comorbid anxiety disorders were a lower age, female sex, less education, higher depression severity, early traumatization, neuroticism, extraversion, and conscientiousness. Nonetheless, determinants differed across the specific anxiety disorders and lumping all anxiety disorder together masked some determinants (education, personality). Our findings stress the need to examine determinants of comorbid anxiety disorder for specific anxiety disorders separately, enabling the development of targeted interventions within subgroups of depressed patients.

  20. Clarifying the prospective relationships between social anxiety and eating disorder symptoms and underlying vulnerabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, Cheri A.; Rodebaugh, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    Social anxiety and eating disorders are highly comorbid. Several explanations for these high levels of comorbidity have been theorized. First, social anxiety might be a vulnerability factor for eating disorders. Second, eating disorders might be a vulnerability factor for social anxiety. Third, the two kinds of disorders may have common, shared psychological vulnerabilities. The current study (N = 300 undergraduate women) investigates a model of social anxiety and eating disorder symptoms that examines each of these possibilities across two time points (Time 1 and six months later). We do not find support for either social anxiety or eating disorder symptoms per se predicting each other across time. Instead, we find that some underlying vulnerabilities prospectively predict symptoms of both disorders, whereas other vulnerabilities are specific to symptoms of one disorder. Specifically we find that maladaptive perfectionism is a shared prospective vulnerability for social anxiety and eating disorder symptoms. Alternatively, we find that social appearance anxiety is specific for eating disorder symptoms, whereas high standards is specific for social anxiety symptoms. These data help clarify our understanding of how and why social anxiety and eating disorder symptoms frequently co-occur. PMID:27444957

  1. Family histories of anxiety in overweight men and women with binge eating disorder: A preliminary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomquist, Kerstin K; Grilo, Carlos M

    2015-10-01

    A preliminary examination of the significance of family histories of anxiety in the expression of binge eating disorder (BED) and associated functioning. Participants were 166 overweight patients with BED assessed using diagnostic interviews. Participants were administered a structured psychiatric history interview about their first-degree relatives (parents, siblings, children) (N=897) to determine lifetime diagnoses of DSM-IV anxiety disorders and completed a battery of questionnaires assessing current and historical eating and weight variables and associated psychological functioning (depression). BED patients with a family history of anxiety disorder were significantly more likely than BED patients without a family history of anxiety disorder to have lifetime diagnoses of anxiety disorders and mood disorders but not substance use disorders. A family history of anxiety was not significantly associated with timing or sequencing of age at onset of anxiety disorder, binge eating, dieting, or obesity, or with variability in current levels of binge eating, eating disorder psychopathology, or psychological functioning. Although replication with direct interview method is needed, our preliminary findings suggest that a family history of anxiety confers greater risk for comorbid anxiety and mood disorders but is largely unrelated to the development of binge eating, dieting, or obesity and unrelated to variability in eating disorder psychopathology or psychological functioning in overweight patients with BED. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Family Histories of Anxiety in Overweight Men and Women with Binge Eating Disorder: A Preliminary Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomquist, Kerstin K.; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective A preliminary examination of the significance of family histories of anxiety in the expression of binge eating disorder (BED) and associated functioning. Methods Participants were 166 overweight patients with BED assessed using diagnostic interviews. Participants were administered a structured psychiatric history interview about their first-degree relatives (parents, siblings, children) (N=897) to determine lifetime diagnoses of DSM-IV anxiety disorders and completed a battery of questionnaires assessing current and historical eating and weight variables and associated psychological functioning (depression). Results BED patients with a family history of anxiety disorder were significantly more likely than BED patients without a family history of anxiety disorder to have lifetime diagnoses of anxiety disorders and mood disorders but not substance use disorders. A family history of anxiety was not significantly associated with timing or sequencing of age at onset of anxiety disorder, binge eating, dieting, or obesity, or with variability in current levels of binge eating, eating disorder psychopathology, or psychological functioning. Conclusions Although replication with direct interview method is needed, our preliminary findings suggest that a family history of anxiety confers greater risk for comorbid anxiety and mood disorders but is largely unrelated to the development of binge eating, dieting, or obesity and unrelated to variability in eating disorder psychopathology or psychological functioning in overweight patients with BED. PMID:26343481

  3. Attentional bias and physiological stress sensitivity in children and adolescents with an anxiety disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Kallen, Victor

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAlthough periods of heightened anxiety are part of normal psychological development (Gullone et al., 2 001; Stevenson-Hinde, & Shouldice, 1995; Westenberg et al., 2 004), a significant proportion of all children and adolescents report anxiety levels above developmentally appropriate levels and in some of these children and adolescents the anxiety levels may be so severe that they can be diagnosed as an anxiety disorder (Verhulst et al., 1997). In childhood and adolescence, anxiety...

  4. Balance Treatment Ameliorates Anxiety and Increases Self-Esteem in Children with Comorbid Anxiety and Balance Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bart, Orit; Bar-Haim, Yair; Weizman, Einat; Levin, Moran; Sadeh, Avi; Mintz, Matti

    2009-01-01

    Comorbidity between balance and anxiety disorders in adult population is a well-studied clinical entity. Children might be particularly prone to develop balance-anxiety comorbidity, but surprisingly they are practically neglected in this field of research. The consequence is that children are treated for what seems to be the primary disorder…

  5. Childhood Anxiety/Withdrawal, Adolescent Parent-Child Attachment and Later Risk of Depression and Anxiety Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Ida Skytte; Horwood, L. John; Fergusson, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has shown that children with high levels of early anxiety/withdrawal are at increased risk of later anxiety and depression. It has also been found that positive parent-child attachment reduces the risk of these disorders. The aim of this paper was to examine the extent to which positive parent-child attachment acted to mitigate…

  6. Two-year course of depressive and anxiety disorders: results from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penninx, Brenda W J H; Nolen, Willem A; Lamers, Femke; Zitman, Frans G; Smit, Johannes H; Spinhoven, Philip; Cuijpers, Pim; de Jong, Peter J; van Marwijk, Harm W J; van der Meer, Klaas; Verhaak, Peter; Laurant, Miranda G H; de Graaf, Ron; Hoogendijk, Witte J; van der Wee, Nic; Ormel, Johan; van Dyck, Richard; Beekman, Aartjan T F

    2011-09-01

    Whether course trajectories of depressive and anxiety disorders are different, remains an important question for clinical practice and informs future psychiatric nosology. This longitudinal study compares depressive and anxiety disorders in terms of diagnostic and symptom course trajectories, and examines clinical prognostic factors. Data are from 1209 depressive and/or anxiety patients residing in primary and specialized care settings, participating in the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. Diagnostic and Life Chart Interviews provided 2-year course information. Course was more favorable for pure depression (n=267, median episode duration = 6 months, 24.5% chronic) than for pure anxiety (n=487, median duration = 16 months, 41.9% chronic). Worst course was observed in the comorbid depression-anxiety group (n=455, median duration > 24 months, 56.8% chronic). Independent predictors of poor diagnostic and symptom trajectory outcomes were severity and duration of index episode, comorbid depression-anxiety, earlier onset age and older age. With only these factors a reasonable discriminative ability (C-statistic 0.72-0.77) was reached in predicting 2-year prognosis. Depression and anxiety cases concern prevalent - not incident - cases. This, however, reflects the actual patient population in primary and specialized care settings. Their differential course trajectory justifies separate consideration of pure depression, pure anxiety and comorbid anxiety-depression in clinical practice and psychiatric nosology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Social anxiety disorder and the psychobiology of self-consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Dan J

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD) are characterized by fear or anxiety about social situations, but also by important alterations in self-referential processing. Given advances in our understanding of the neurocircuitry and neurochemistry of SAD, the question arises of the relationship between this research and an emergent literature on the psychobiology of self and self-consciousness. A number of investigations of SAD have highlighted altered activity in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC; involved in self-representation), insula (involved in interoceptive processing), and other structures that play a role in bodily self-consciousness, as well as the potential value of interventions such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and self-focused reappraisal in normalizing such changes. Future studies to more closely investigate associations between psychobiological alterations and changes in self-related processing in SAD, may be useful in shedding additional light on both SAD and self-consciousness.

  8. Depressive and anxiety disorders and risk of subclinical atherosclerosis Findings from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seldenrijk, Adrie; Vogelzangs, Nicole; van Hout, Hein P. J.; van Marwijk, Harm W. J.; Diamant, Michaela; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    Objective: Current evidence regarding the association between psychopathology and subclinical atherosclerosis show inconsistent results. The present study examined whether subclinical atherosclerosis was more prevalent in a large cohort of persons with depressive or anxiety disorders as compared to

  9. Hoarding in Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Anxiety: Incidence, Clinical Correlates, and Behavioral Treatment Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, Eric A.; Nadeau, Joshua M.; Johnco, Carly; Timpano, Kiara; McBride, Nicole; Mutch, P. Jane; Lewin, Adam B.; Murphy, Tanya K.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the nature and correlates of hoarding among youth with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Forty children with ASD and a comorbid anxiety disorder were administered a battery of clinician-administered measures assessing presence of psychiatric disorders and anxiety severity. Parents completed questionnaires related to child…

  10. Suicide in patients suffering from late-life anxiety disorders; a comparison with younger patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Veen, D.C. van der; Kapur, N.; Hunt, I.; Williams, A.; Pachana, N.A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anxiety disorders are assumed to increase suicide risk, although confounding by comorbid psychiatric disorders may be one explanation. This study describes the characteristics of older patients with an anxiety disorder who died by suicide in comparison to younger patients. METHOD: A

  11. Transdiagnostic Treatment of Bipolar Disorder and Comorbid Anxiety with the Unified Protocol: A Clinical Replication Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellard, Kristen K.; Deckersbach, Thilo; Sylvia, Louisa G.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Barlow, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic, debilitating disorder with recurrent manic and depressive episodes. More than 75% of bipolar patients have a current or lifetime diagnosis of a comorbid anxiety disorder. Comorbid anxiety in BD is associated with greater illness severity, greater functional impairment, and poorer illness-related outcomes.…

  12. Anxiety disorders are associated with reduced heart rate variability: A meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John eChalmers

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anxiety disorders increase risk of future cardiovascular disease (CVD and mortality, even after controlling for confounds including smoking, lifestyle, and socioeconomic status, and irrespective of a history of medical disorders. While impaired vagal function, indicated by reductions in heart rate variability (HRV, may be one mechanism linking anxiety disorders to CVD, prior studies have reported inconsistent findings highlighting the need for meta-analysis.Method: Studies comparing resting state HRV recordings in patients with an anxiety disorder as a primary diagnosis and healthy controls were considered for meta-analysis. Results: Meta-analyses were based on 36 articles, including 2086 patients with an anxiety disorder and 2294 controls. Overall, anxiety disorders were characterised by lower HRV (high frequency: Hedges’ g = -.29. 95%CI: -.41 to -.17, p < 0.001; time domain: Hedges’ g = -0.45, 95%CI: -0.57 to -0.33, p < .001 than controls. Panic Disorder (n=447, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (n=192, Generalized Anxiety Disorder (n=68, and Social anxiety disorder (n=90, but not Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (n=40, displayed reductions in high frequency HRV relative to controls (all ps < .001. Conclusions: Anxiety disorders are associated with reduced HRV, findings associated with a small to moderate effect size. Findings have important implications for future physical health and wellbeing of patients, highlighting a need for comprehensive cardiovascular risk reduction.

  13. Suicide in patients suffering from late-life anxiety disorders; a comparison with younger patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Voshaar, R. C.; van der Veen, D.C.; Kapur, N.; Hunt, I.; Williams, A.; Pachana, N. A.

    Background: Anxiety disorders are assumed to increase suicide risk, although confounding by comorbid psychiatric disorders may be one explanation. This study describes the characteristics of older patients with an anxiety disorder who died by suicide in comparison to younger patients. Method: A

  14. Gender Differences in Anxiety Disorders: Prevalence, Course of Illness, Comorbidity and Burden of Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Carmen P.; Asnaani, Anu; Litz, Brett T.; Hofmann, Stefan G.

    2011-01-01

    Women have consistently higher prevalence rates of anxiety disorders, but less is known about how gender affects age of onset, chronicity, comorbidity, and burden of illness. Gender differences in DSM-IV anxiety disorders were examined in a large sample of adults (N = 20,013) in the United States using data from the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Studies (CPES). The lifetime and 12-month male:female prevalence ratios of any anxiety disorder were 1:1.7 and 1:1.79, respectively. Women had higher rates of lifetime diagnosis for each of the anxiety disorders examined, except for social anxiety disorder which showed no gender difference in prevalence. No gender differences were observed in the age of onset and chronicity of the illness. However, women with a lifetime diagnosis of an anxiety disorder were more likely than men to also be diagnosed with another anxiety disorder, bulimia nervosa, and major depressive disorder. Furthermore, anxiety disorders were associated with a greater illness burden in women than in men, particularly among European American women and to some extend also among Hispanic women. These results suggest that anxiety disorders are not only more prevalent but also more disabling in women than in men. PMID:21439576

  15. Preschool anxiety disorders: comprehensive assessment of clinical, demographic, temperamental, familial, and life stress correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Lea R; Tolep, Marissa R; Bufferd, Sara J; Olino, Thomas M; Dyson, Margaret; Traditi, Jennifer; Rose, Suzanne; Carlson, Gabrielle A; Klein, Daniel N

    2013-01-01

    This study examined correlates of preschoolers' anxiety disorders using a comprehensive, multimethod design. Participants included a community sample of 541 three-year-old children, of whom 106 (19.6%) met criteria for at least 1 anxiety disorder. Child and parental psychopathology and life stress were assessed with clinical interviews. Child temperament and parenting behavior were assessed with laboratory observations. Mothers and fathers reported on their parenting styles. Compared to preschoolers with no anxiety disorder, preschoolers with an anxiety disorder were more likely to meet criteria for comorbid depressive and oppositional defiant disorders and to exhibit greater temperamental behavioral inhibition and lower positive affectivity, and more sleep problems. Children with anxiety disorders also experienced more stressful life events in the previous 6 months, and their mothers had a higher rate of current anxiety disorders. Compared to children with other anxiety disorders, children with only specific phobia exhibited a somewhat different pattern of associations than children with other anxiety disorders. Overall, the findings suggest that many of the correlates observed in older youth with anxiety disorders are also observed in preschoolers.

  16. Exposure to maternal pre- and postnatal depression and anxiety symptoms: risk for major depression, anxiety disorders, and conduct disorder in adolescent offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasheen, Cristie; Richardson, Gale A; Kim, Kevin H; Larkby, Cynthia A; Swartz, Holly A; Day, Nancy L

    2013-11-01

    This study evaluated whether exposure to maternal pre- or postnatal depression or anxiety symptoms predicted psychopathology in adolescent offspring. Growth mixture modeling was used to identify trajectories of pre- and postnatal depression and anxiety symptoms in 577 women of low socioeconomic status selected from a prenatal clinic. Logistic regression models indicated that maternal pre- and postnatal depression trajectory exposure was not associated with offspring major depression, anxiety, or conduct disorder, but exposure to the high depression trajectory was associated with lower anxiety symptoms in males. Exposure to medium and high pre- and postnatal anxiety was associated with the risk of conduct disorder among offspring. Male offspring exposed to medium and high pre- and postnatal anxiety had higher odds of conduct disorder than did males with low exposure levels. Females exposed to medium or high pre- and postnatal anxiety were less likely to meet conduct disorder criteria than were females with lower exposure. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the effect of pre- and postnatal anxiety trajectories on the risk of conduct disorder in offspring. These results suggest new directions for investigating the etiology of conduct disorder with a novel target for intervention.

  17. Exposure to Maternal Pre- and Postnatal Depression and Anxiety Symptoms: Risk for Major Depression, Anxiety Disorders, and Conduct Disorder in Adolescent Offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasheen, Cristie; Richardson, Gale A.; Kim, Kevin H.; Larkby, Cynthia A.; Swartz, Holly A.; Day, Nancy L.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated whether exposure to maternal pre- or postnatal depression or anxiety symptoms predicted psychopathology in adolescent offspring. Growth mixture modeling was used to identify trajectories of pre- and postnatal depression and anxiety symptoms in 577 women of low socioeconomic status selected from a prenatal clinic. Logistic regression models indicated that maternal pre- and postnatal depression trajectory exposure was not associated with offspring major depression, anxiety, or conduct disorder but exposure to the high depression trajectory was associated with lower anxiety symptoms in males. Exposure to medium and high pre- and postnatal anxiety was associated with the risk of conduct disorder among offspring. Male offspring exposed to medium and high pre- and postnatal anxiety had higher odds of conduct disorder than males with low exposure levels. Females exposed to medium or high pre- and postnatal anxiety were less likely to meet conduct disorder criteria than females with lower exposure. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the effect of pre- and postnatal anxiety trajectories on the risk of conduct disorder in offspring. These results suggest new directions for investigating the etiology of conduct disorder with a novel target for intervention. PMID:24229548

  18. Cognitive content specificity in anxiety and depressive disorder symptoms: a twin study of cross-sectional associations with anxiety sensitivity dimensions across development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, H M; Waszczuk, M A; Zavos, H M S; Trzaskowski, M; Gregory, A M; Eley, T C

    2014-12-01

    The classification of anxiety and depressive disorders has long been debated and has important clinical implications. The present study combined a genetically sensitive design and multiple time points to investigate cognitive content specificity in anxiety and depressive disorder symptoms across anxiety sensitivity dimensions, a cognitive distortion implicated in both disorders. Phenotypic and genetic correlations between anxiety sensitivity dimensions, anxiety and depressive disorder symptoms were examined at five waves of data collection within childhood, adolescence and early adulthood in two representative twin studies (n pairs = 300 and 1372). The physical concerns dimension of anxiety sensitivity (fear of bodily symptoms) was significantly associated with anxiety but not depression at all waves. Genetic influences on physical concerns overlapped substantially more with anxiety than depression. Conversely, mental concerns (worry regarding cognitive control) were phenotypically more strongly associated with depression than anxiety. Social concerns (fear of publicly observable symptoms of anxiety) were associated with both anxiety and depression in adolescence. Genetic influences on mental and social concerns were shared to a similar extent with both anxiety and depression. Phenotypic patterns of cognitive specificity and broader genetic associations between anxiety sensitivity dimensions, anxiety and depressive disorder symptoms were similar at all waves. Both disorder-specific and shared cognitive concerns were identified, suggesting it is appropriate to classify anxiety and depression as distinct but related disorders and confirming the clinical perspective that cognitive therapy is most likely to benefit by targeting cognitive concerns relating specifically to the individual's presenting symptoms across development.

  19. The moderating role of avoidance behavior on anxiety over time: Is there a difference between social anxiety disorder and specific phobia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Rudaz

    Full Text Available Theories of anxiety disorders and phobias have ascribed a critical role to avoidance behavior in explaining the persistence of fear and anxiety, but knowledge about the role of avoidance behavior in the maintenance of anxiety in social anxiety disorder relative to specific phobia is lacking. This study examined the extent to which avoidance behavior moderates the relationship between general anxiety at baseline and 18 months later in women with a diagnosed social anxiety disorder (n = 91 and women with a diagnosed specific phobia (n = 130 at baseline. Circumscribed avoidance of social and specific situations were clinician-rated using the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule-Lifetime (ADIS-IV-L, and general anxiety was measured using the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI. Moderated regression analyses revealed that (a general anxiety at baseline predicted general anxiety at follow-up in both women with a specific phobia and women with a social anxiety disorder and (b avoidance behavior moderated this relationship in women with a specific phobia but not in women with a social anxiety disorder. Specifically, high avoidance behavior was found to amplify the effect between general anxiety at baseline and follow-up in specific phobia. Reasons for the absence of a similar moderating effect of avoidance behavior within social anxiety disorder are discussed.

  20. Evidence-based pharmacotherapy of Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, David S; Polkinghorn, Claire

    2005-06-01

    Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) is a common and often disabling disorder. This paper reviews the pharmacological treatment of GAD, based on the findings of published meta-analyses and randomized placebo-controlled studies. In doing so, it aims to address three fundamental questions: What is the first-line treatment for GAD? How long should treatment continue? What is the best intervention in patients who do not respond to first-line and second-line treatments? Due to their efficacy in GAD and comorbid anxiety and depressive disorders, their tolerability and safety, certain selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (escitalopram, paroxetine, sertraline) should be considered the first-line treatment for most patients, although the serotonin-noradrenaline re-uptake inhibitor venlafaxine is a reasonable alternative. Little is known about the optimal length of therapy after response to acute treatment but relapse-prevention studies with paroxetine suggest that continuation treatment should last for at least 6 months. The management of patients who do not respond to first-line treatment is uncertain, but some patients may benefit from certain tricyclic antidepressants, buspirone, or pregabalin.

  1. Theory of mind impairments in social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hezel, Dianne M; McNally, Richard J

    2014-07-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is a common psychiatric disorder characterized by a persistent, excessive fear and avoidance of social and performance situations. Research on cognitive biases indicates individuals with SAD may lack an accurate view of how they are perceived by others, especially in social situations when they allocate important attentional resources to monitoring their own actions as well as external threat. In the present study, we explored whether socially anxious individuals also have impairments in theory of mind (ToM), or the ability to comprehend others' mental states, including emotions, beliefs, and intentions. Forty socially anxious and 40 non-socially-anxious comparison participants completed two ToM tasks: the Reading the Mind in the Eyes and the Movie for the Assessment of Social Cognition. Participants with SAD performed worse on ToM tasks than did non-socially-anxious participants. Relative to comparison participants, those with SAD were more likely to attribute more intense emotions and greater meaning to what others were thinking and feeling. These group differences were not due to interpretation bias. The ToM impairments in people with SAD are in the opposite direction of those in people with autism spectrum conditions whose inferences about the mental states of other people are absent or very limited. This association between SAD and ToM may have important implications for our understanding of both the maintenance and treatment of social anxiety disorder. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Novel approaches to treatment of generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgulander, Christer

    2010-01-01

    The present paper reviews recent studies on the clinical presentation of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and the current level of evidence for treatment with medications and psychotherapy. An apprehensive state of mind, regardless of the quality of stimuli, is at the core of GAD, causing a pervasive cognitive dysfunction that is separate from that seen in depression and obsessive compulsive disorder. When treatments reduce anxiety-related symptoms and insomnia, patients report a restoration of social functioning, probably as a consequence of improved decision-making, cooperative skills, and risk assessment. Late-onset GAD symptoms in the elderly may be caused or aggravated by cerebrovascular events, loneliness, bereavement, substance use, and the prospect of death. Insomnia in GAD may be primary or caused by common medications. Practice guidelines fail to capture the needs of the entire range of patients with GAD as they build on patients without comorbidity who have been selected for phase III trials. They are also biased to reduce cost. The past 10 years have seen a range of safe and effective treatments for GAD. Late-onset GAD presents a new challenge to researchers and practitioners. The current state of knowledge about GAD does not justify radical revisions of the diagnostic criteria in the ongoing revisions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV and the International Statistical Classification of Diseases-10 nosologies.

  3. Examination of the decline in symptoms of anxiety and depression in generalized anxiety disorder: Impact of anxiety senstivity on response to pharmacotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olatunji, B.O.; Feldman, G.; Smits, J.A.J.; Christian, K.M.; Zalta, A.K.; Pollack, M.H.; Simon, N.M.

    2008-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy is an effective treatment for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), but few studies have examined the nature of decline of anxiety and depression during pharmacotherapy for GAD and even fewer studies have examined predictors of symptom decline. This study examined the decline in

  4. Correlates of comorbid anxiety and externalizing disorders in childhood obsessive compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Audra K; Lewin, Adam B; Bergman, R Lindsey; Lee, Joyce C; Piacentini, John

    2010-08-01

    The present study examines the influence of diagnostic comorbidity on the demographic, psychiatric, and functional status of youth with a primary diagnosis of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). Two hundred and fifteen children (ages 5-17) referred to a university-based OCD specialty clinic were compared based on DSM-IV diagnostic profile: OCD without comorbid anxiety or externalizing disorder, OCD plus anxiety disorder, and OCD plus externalizing disorder. No age or gender differences were found across groups. Higher OCD severity was found for the OCD + ANX group, while the OCD + EXT group reported greater functional impairment than the other two groups. Lower family cohesion was reported by the OCD + EXT group compared to the OCD group and the OCD + ANX group reported higher family conflict compared to the OCD + EXT group. The OCD + ANX group had significantly lower rates of tic disorders while rates of depressive disorders did not differ among the three groups. The presence of comorbid anxiety and externalizing psychopathology are associated with greater symptom severity and functional and family impairment and underscores the importance of a better understanding of the relationship of OCD characteristics and associated disorders. Results and clinical implications are further discussed.

  5. Correlates of comorbid anxiety and externalizing disorders in childhood obsessive compulsive disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Adam B.; Bergman, R. Lindsey; Lee, Joyce C.; Piacentini, John

    2010-01-01

    The present study examines the influence of diagnostic comorbidity on the demographic, psychiatric, and functional status of youth with a primary diagnosis of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). Two hundred and fifteen children (ages 5–17) referred to a university-based OCD specialty clinic were compared based on DSM-IV diagnostic profile: OCD without comorbid anxiety or externalizing disorder, OCD plus anxiety disorder, and OCD plus externalizing disorder. No age or gender differences were found across groups. Higher OCD severity was found for the OCD + ANX group, while the OCD + EXT group reported greater functional impairment than the other two groups. Lower family cohesion was reported by the OCD + EXT group compared to the OCD group and the OCD + ANX group reported higher family conflict compared to the OCD + EXT group. The OCD + ANX group had significantly lower rates of tic disorders while rates of depressive disorders did not differ among the three groups. The presence of comorbid anxiety and externalizing psychopathology are associated with greater symptom severity and functional and family impairment and underscores the importance of a better understanding of the relationship of OCD characteristics and associated disorders. Results and clinical implications are further discussed. PMID:20349255

  6. Drinking motives in alcohol use disorder patients with and without social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, R; Hildebrandt, S; Gerlach, A L

    2014-01-01

    The high comorbidity of alcohol use disorders (AUD) and social anxiety disorder (SAD) is often explained by excessive drinking in social situations to self-medicate social anxiety. Indeed, the motive to drink alcohol to lower social fears was found to be elevated in socially anxious persons. However, this social anxiety specific motive has not been directly investigated in primarily alcohol dependent individuals. We explored social anxiety, the motivation to drink alcohol in order to cope with social fears, and social anxiety as a consequence of drinking in AUD with and without comorbid SAD. Male AUD inpatients with (AUD+SAD group, N=23) and without comorbid SAD (N=37) completed a clinical interview and a questionnaire assessment. AUD+SAD patients reported higher levels of depression and an elevated motive to drink due to social anxiety but did not experience more social fears as a consequence of drinking. Previous results concerning alcohol drinking motives in order to relieve social fears could be replicated in a clinical AUD sample. Additionally, our findings suggest comorbid AUD+SAD patients to be more burdened regarding broader psychopathological symptoms. Thus, accessibility to SAD-specific screening and treatment procedures may be beneficial for primary AUD patients.

  7. The influence of comorbid anxiety on the effectiveness of Cognitive Therapy and Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Major Depressive Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bronswijk, Suzanne C.; Lemmens, Lotte H.J.M.; Huibers, Marcus J.H.; Arntz, Arnoud; Peeters, Frenk P.M.L.

    Background: Anxious depression is an important subtype of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) defined by both syndromal (anxiety disorders) and dimensional (anxiety symptoms) criteria. A debated question is how anxiety affects MDD treatment. This study examined the impact of comorbid anxiety disorders

  8. The Genetics of Stress-Related Disorders: PTSD, Depression, and Anxiety Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoller, Jordan W

    2016-01-01

    Research into the causes of psychopathology has largely focused on two broad etiologic factors: genetic vulnerability and environmental stressors. An important role for familial/heritable factors in the etiology of a broad range of psychiatric disorders was established well before the modern era of genomic research. This review focuses on the genetic basis of three disorder categories-posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive disorder (MDD), and the anxiety disorders-for which environmental stressors and stress responses are understood to be central to pathogenesis. Each of these disorders aggregates in families and is moderately heritable. More recently, molecular genetic approaches, including genome-wide studies of genetic variation, have been applied to identify specific risk variants. In this review, I summarize evidence for genetic contributions to PTSD, MDD, and the anxiety disorders including genetic epidemiology, the role of common genetic variation, the role of rare and structural variation, and the role of gene-environment interaction. Available data suggest that stress-related disorders are highly complex and polygenic and, despite substantial progress in other areas of psychiatric genetics, few risk loci have been identified for these disorders. Progress in this area will likely require analysis of much larger sample sizes than have been reported to date. The phenotypic complexity and genetic overlap among these disorders present further challenges. The review concludes with a discussion of prospects for clinical translation of genetic findings and future directions for research.

  9. Quality of life impairment in depression and anxiety disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Pande

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most common mental disorders (CMDs such as anxiety disorders and depressive disorders run a persistent and long course. This results in significant impairment of quality of life (QOL of patients and their families. Evidence-based psychosocial interventions using findings in our own socio-cultural context would help clinicians in holistic management. Objectives: To document illness profile, treatment satisfaction, and QOL in various domains of life in study population and normal controls. Study Design: Cross-sectional analytical study of patients group and their normal family members as a comparison group. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 consecutive patients of depressive disorders and anxiety disorders (ICD-10 clinical diagnosis attending outpatient clinic of the medical college hospital and their age- and gender-matched relatives as the control group were recruited. Socio-demographic profile was documented along with illness parameters: Severity of illness, treatment satisfaction, and QOL was measured using semi- structured interview, HAM, Beck′s depression Inventory, and WHO-QOL scale. Results: The study group measured significantly low on QOL than the comparison group. The two groups differed significantly on the paired " t" test of significance and the variation had a genuine assignable cause. Notwithstanding some variables having a confounding effect and the limitations of a cross-sectional study, the study was conclusive in demonstrating statistically significant impairment of QOL of patients with CMDs, making a strong case for clinicians to pay attention to holistic management of patients. The study has generated QOL data on a small but significant normative population which may serve purpose in future QOL studies.

  10. Treating late-life generalized anxiety disorder in primary care: an effectiveness pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calleo, Jessica S; Bush, Amber L; Cully, Jeffrey A; Wilson, Nancy L; Kraus-Schuman, Cynthia; Rhoades, Howard M; Novy, Diane M; Masozera, Nicholas; Williams, Susan; Horsfield, Matthew; Kunik, Mark E; Stanley, Melinda A

    2013-05-01

    To increase the sustainability of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) in primary care for late-life anxiety, we incorporated nonexpert counselors, options for telephone meetings, and integration with primary care clinicians. This open trial examines the feasibility, satisfaction, and clinical outcomes of CBT delivered by experienced and nonexperienced counselors for older adults with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Clinical outcomes assessed worry (Penn State Worry Questionnaire), GAD (Generalized Anxiety Disorder Severity Scale), and anxiety (Beck Anxiety Inventory and Structured Interview Guide for Hamilton Anxiety Scale). After 3 months of treatment, Cohen's d effect sizes for worry and anxiety ranged from 0.48 to 0.78. Patients treated by experienced and nonexperienced counselors had similar reductions in worry and anxiety, although treatment outcomes were more improved on the Beck Anxiety Inventory for experienced therapists. Preliminary results suggest that adapted CBT can effectively reduce worry. The piloted modifications can provide acceptable and feasible evidence-based care.

  11. Treating generalized anxiety disorder using complementary and alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Fujio; McGraw, Leigh

    2013-01-01

    The high comorbidity rate of generalized anxiety disorders (GADs) with other diagnoses-such as panic disorder, depression, alcohol abuse, posttraumatic stress disorder, insomnia, and obsessive compulsive disorder- make it one of the most common diagnoses found in primary care, with women predominantly affected. It is estimated that 5.4%-7.6% of primary care visits are associated with GAD and in addition to impairments in mental health there is additional impairment in pain, function, and activities of daily life, accelerating the need to reconsider the medical management of this disorder and move from the traditional medical model to a more holistic approach, focusing on self-care. The study intended to investigate the effectiveness of a pilot program that used multiple complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies, focusing on self-care behaviors for treatment of GAD. The study used a quasi-experimental, pretestposttest design to evaluate the benefits of the multitherapy program for one group of individuals with GAD. The study occurred at a military treatment facility in the Pacific Northwest. Participants were a convenience sample of volunteers seeking treatment at the military treatment facility. The study enrolled participants (N = 37) if they had a documented history of GAD or met screening criteria for GAD using the GAD-7. Participants received acupuncture treatments once/wk for 6 wks and engaged in yogic breathing exercises, self- and/or partner-assisted massage therapy using scented oils, episodic journaling, nutrition counseling, and exercise. The primary outcome of interest was the reduction in anxiety as measured by the anxiety subscale on the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21), which assesses three negative affective states: (1) depression (DASS-D), (2) anxiety (DASS-A), and (3) stress (DASS-S). The research team also measured preand post-GAD-7 scores since it used them as a screening criterion for enrollment. In addition, the team

  12. Child sexual abuse in the etiology of anxiety disorders: a systematic review of reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniglio, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    There is considerable controversy about the role of child sexual abuse in the etiology of anxiety disorders. Although a growing number of research studies have been published, these have produced inconsistent results and conclusions regarding the nature of the associations between child sexual abuse and the various forms of anxiety problems as well as the potential effects of third variables, such as moderators, mediators, or confounders. This article provides a systematic review of the several reviews that have investigated the literature on the role of child sexual abuse in the etiology of anxiety disorders. Seven databases were searched, supplemented with hand search of reference lists from retrieved papers. Four meta-analyses, including 3,214,482 subjects from 171 studies, were analyzed. There is evidence that child sexual abuse is a significant, although general and nonspecific, risk factor for anxiety disorders, especially posttraumatic stress disorder, regardless of gender of the victim and severity of abuse. Additional biological or psychosocial risk factors (such as alterations in brain structure or function, information processing biases, parental anxiety disorders, family dysfunction, and other forms of child abuse) may interact with child sexual abuse or act independently to cause anxiety disorders in victims in abuse survivors. However, child sexual abuse may sometimes confer additional risk of developing anxiety disorders either as a distal and indirect cause or as a proximal and direct cause. Child sexual abuse should be considered one of the several risk factors for anxiety disorders and included in multifactorial etiological models for anxiety disorders.

  13. Genetic and environmental sources of covariation between generalized anxiety disorder and neuroticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettema, John M; Prescott, Carol A; Kendler, Kenneth S

    2004-09-01

    The authors examined the sources of covariation between generalized anxiety disorder and the personality trait of neuroticism. Because women have higher levels of neuroticism and twice the risk of lifetime generalized anxiety disorder of men, gender-specific effects were also explored. Lifetime generalized anxiety disorder and neuroticism were assessed in more than 8,000 twins from male-male, female-female, and opposite-sex pairs through structured diagnostic interviews. Sex-limited Cholesky structural equation models were used to decompose the correlations between generalized anxiety disorder and neuroticism into genetic and environmental components, including sex-specific factors. Genetic correlations between generalized anxiety disorder and neuroticism were high and differed (nonsignificantly) between men and women (1.00 and 0.58, respectively). When nonsignificant gender differences were removed from the models, correlations between generalized anxiety disorder and neuroticism were estimated at 0.80 (95% confidence interval=0.52-1.00). The individual-specific environmental correlation between generalized anxiety disorder and neuroticism was estimated at 0.20 for both genders. There is substantial overlap between the genetic factors that influence individual variation in neuroticism and those that increase liability for generalized anxiety disorder, irrespective of gender. The life experiences that increase vulnerability to generalized anxiety disorder, however, have only modest overlap with those that contribute to an individual's level of neuroticism.

  14. Children and adolescents referred for treatment of anxiety disorders: differences in clinical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Polly; Creswell, Cathy

    2014-01-01

    Reports of the clinical characteristics of children and adolescents with anxiety disorders are typically based on community populations or from clinical samples with exclusion criterion applied. Little is known about the clinical characteristics of children and adolescents routinely referred for treatment for anxiety disorders. Furthermore, children and adolescents are typically treated as one homogeneous group although they may differ in ways that are clinically meaningful. A consecutive series of children (n=100, aged 6-12 years) and adolescents (n=100, aged 13-18 years), referred to a routine clinical service, were assessed for anxiety and comorbid disorders, school refusal and parental symptoms of psychopathology. Children with a primary anxiety disorder were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with separation anxiety disorder than adolescents. Adolescents with a primary anxiety disorder had significantly higher self and clinician rated anxiety symptoms and had more frequent primary diagnoses of social anxiety disorder, diagnoses and symptoms of mood disorders, and irregular school attendance. Childhood and adolescence were considered categorically as distinct, developmental periods; in reality changes would be unlikely to occur in such a discrete manner. The finding that children and adolescents with anxiety disorders have distinct clinical characteristics has clear implications for treatment. Simply adapting treatments designed for children to make the materials more 'adolescent-friendly' is unlikely to sufficiently meet the needs of adolescents. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Panic disorder and health-related quality of life: the predictive roles of anxiety sensitivity and trait anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eun-Ho; Kim, Borah; Choe, Ah Young; Lee, Jun-Yeob; Choi, Tai Kiu; Lee, Sang-Hyuk

    2015-01-30

    Panic disorder (PD) is a very common anxiety disorder and is often a chronic disabling condition. However, little is known about the factors that predict health-related quality of life (HRQOL) other than sociodemographic factors and illness-related symptomatology that explain HRQOL in only small to modest degrees. This study explored whether anxiety-related individual traits including anxiety sensitivity and trait anxiety can predict independently HRQOL in panic patients. Patients with panic disorder with or without agoraphobia (N=230) who met the diagnostic criteria in the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV were recruited. Stepwise regression analysis was performed to determine the factors that predict HRQOL in panic disorder. HRQOL was assessed by the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). Anxiety sensitivity was an independent predictor of bodily pain and social functioning whereas trait anxiety independently predicted all of the eight domains of the SF-36. Our data suggests that the assessment of symptomatology as well as individual anxiety-related trait should be included in the evaluation of HRQOL in panic patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Precursors to the Development of Anxiety Disorders in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    specific symptoms that put a child with ASD at risk for developing an anxiety disorder. During the second year of funding we have focused on data...14 B. Actual or anticipated problems or delays and actions or plans to resolve them ..................................... 14 C. Changes...science and technology Firsthand accounts from people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) illustrate the impact of sensory over- responsivity (SOR

  17. Examining the Screen for Child Anxiety-Related Emotional Disorder-71 as an assessment tool for anxiety in children with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Steensel, Francisca J A; Deutschman, Amber A C G; Bögels, Susan M

    2013-11-01

    The psychometric properties of a questionnaire developed to assess symptoms of anxiety disorders (SCARED-71) were compared between two groups of children: children with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder and comorbid anxiety disorders (ASD-group; n = 115), and children with anxiety disorders (AD-group; n = 122). Anxiety disorders were established with a semi-structured interview (ADIS-C/P), using child- as well as parent-report. Internal consistency, construct validity, sensitivity, specificity, and discriminant validity of the SCARED-71 was investigated. Results revealed that the psychometric properties of the SCARED-71 for the ASD-group were quite comparable to the AD-group, however, the discriminant validity of the SCARED-71 child-report was less in the ASD-group. Raising the parental cutoffs of the SCARED-71 resulted in higher specificity rates, which suggests that research should focus more on establishing alternative cutoffs for the ASD-population.

  18. Pharmacologic treatments effective in both generalized anxiety disorder and major depressive disorder: clinical and theoretical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casacalenda, N; Boulenger, J P

    1998-09-01

    To review the efficacy of anxiolytics (alprazolam and azapirones) in major depressive disorder (MDD) and that of antidepressants in generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), thereby exploring the possible theoretical and clinical implications of this efficacy. A Medline literature search was performed for the period January 1980 to September 1997 of randomized, double-blind comparison studies between anxiolytics and antidepressants in the acute treatment of adult patients with either MDD or GAD. Alprazolam, at doses double those generally recommended for anxiety disorders, appears to be as effective as tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) in the acute treatment of mild to moderate MDD. Alprazolam was also found to have a more rapid onset of action than to TCAs, particularly for the improvement of anxiety, somatization, and insomnia. Two azapirones (buspirone and gepirone) also have demonstrated a modest acute antidepressant effect in preliminary studies, albeit only in a depressed outpatient sample with considerable anxiety at baseline. Finally, various antidepressant drugs (imipramine, trazodone, paroxetine) were shown to have, at the least, comparable efficacy to benzodiazepines (BZDs) in the acute treatment of GAD. The nonspecificity of treatment response suggests that GAD and MDD are 1) different expressions of a similar disorder with a common neurobiological substrate, 2) discrete diagnostic entities that respond to independent pharmacological effects of the same drugs, or 3) a combination of the two (heterogeneity hypothesis). The most relevant clinical finding is the efficacy of antidepressants in the acute treatment of GAD.

  19. The Genetics of Stress-Related Disorders: PTSD, Depression, and Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoller, Jordan W

    2016-01-01

    Research into the causes of psychopathology has largely focused on two broad etiologic factors: genetic vulnerability and environmental stressors. An important role for familial/heritable factors in the etiology of a broad range of psychiatric disorders was established well before the modern era of genomic research. This review focuses on the genetic basis of three disorder categories—posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive disorder (MDD), and the anxiety disorders—for which environmental stressors and stress responses are understood to be central to pathogenesis. Each of these disorders aggregates in families and is moderately heritable. More recently, molecular genetic approaches, including genome-wide studies of genetic variation, have been applied to identify specific risk variants. In this review, I summarize evidence for genetic contributions to PTSD, MDD, and the anxiety disorders including genetic epidemiology, the role of common genetic variation, the role of rare and structural variation, and the role of gene–environment interaction. Available data suggest that stress-related disorders are highly complex and polygenic and, despite substantial progress in other areas of psychiatric genetics, few risk loci have been identified for these disorders. Progress in this area will likely require analysis of much larger sample sizes than have been reported to date. The phenotypic complexity and genetic overlap among these disorders present further challenges. The review concludes with a discussion of prospects for clinical translation of genetic findings and future directions for research. PMID:26321314

  20. Obsessive-compulsive disorders and anxiety disorders: A comparison of personality and emotionality patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelissolo, Antoine; Moukheiber, Albert; Mallet, Luc

    2015-10-30

    Even though obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD) and anxiety disorders (AD) have been separated in the taxonomy adopted by the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, many issues remain concerning the physiopathological similarities and differences between those categories. Our objective was therefore to explore and compare their personality and emotional features, with the assumption that the distinction of two independent spectrums should imply the existence of two partially distinct temperamental profiles. We used the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI-R) and the Positive and Negative Emotionality (PNE) scale to compare two groups of patients with OCD (n=227) or AD (n=827). The latter group included patients with social anxiety disorder, panic disorder, agoraphobia, and generalized anxiety disorder. Most temperament, character and emotionality measures showed no significant differences between both groups. In the personality measures results, only the self-directedness score (TCI-R) was significantly lower in OCD patients but this difference was not significant when the comparison was adjusted for the depressive scale score and age. Only lower PNE positive affects scores were obtained in OCD patients in the adjusted comparisons. These findings suggest that OCD and AD are not really distinguishable from the point of view of associated personality traits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A review and meta-analysis of the genetic epidemiology of anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettema, J M; Neale, M C; Kendler, K S

    2001-10-01

    The authors conducted meta-analyses of data from family and twin studies of panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, phobias, and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) to explore the roles of genetic and environmental factors in their etiology. MEDLINE searches were performed to identify potential primary studies of these disorders. Data from studies that met inclusion criteria were incorporated into meta-analyses that estimated summary statistics of aggregate familial risk and heritability for each disorder. For family studies, odds ratios predicting association of illness in first-degree relatives with affection status of the proband (disorder present or absent) were homogeneous across studies for all disorders. The calculated summary odds ratios ranged from 4 to 6, depending on the disorder. Only for panic disorder and generalized anxiety disorder could the authors identify more than one large-scale twin study for meta-analysis. These yielded heritabilities of 0.43 for panic disorder and 0.32 for generalized anxiety disorder. For panic disorder, the remaining variance in liability could be attributed primarily to nonshared environment. For generalized anxiety disorder, this was true for men, but for women, a potentially significant role for common familial environment was also seen. Panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, phobias, and OCD all have significant familial aggregation. For panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and probably phobias, genes largely explain this familial aggregation; the role of family environment in generalized anxiety disorder is uncertain. The role of nonshared environmental experience is significant, underscoring the importance of identifying putative environmental risk factors that predispose individuals to anxiety.

  2. Level of anxiety and disordered eating behavior among young female athletes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatima, S.; Khan, I.; Bashir, M.S.; Fatima, M.

    2017-01-01

    To find level of anxiety and disordered eating behavior among young female athletes. Methodology: A questionnaire based survey was undertaken among 71 athletes (15-25 years old) athletes from University of Lahore and Lahore College for Women University. Then the level of anxiety and disordered eating behavior calculated. Data were statistically analyzed by SPSS version 16. Results: Out of 71 athletes, 56 (78.87%) had anxiety due to eating disorder and 15 (21.12%) had no eating disorder. And 67 (94.3%) athletes had raised anxiety levels while 3 (4.2%) had no anxiety. Conclusion: Dieting behavior and binge eating that prompted eating disorder are the main cause of anxiety among young female athletes. (author)

  3. Treatment of anxiety disorders by psychiatrists from the American Psychiatric Practice Research Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Sorsdahl

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent in the United States, and if untreated, result in a number of negative outcomes. This study aimed to investigate psychiatrists' current treatment practices for patients with anxiety disorders in the United States. Methods: Psychiatrist-reported data from the 1997 and 1999 American Psychiatric Institute for Research and Education Practice Research Network (PRN Study of Psychiatric Patients and Treatments (SPPT were examined, focusing on patients diagnosed with anxiety disorders. Information related to diagnostic and clinical features and treatments provided were obtained. Results: Anxiety disorders remain underdiagnosed and undertreated, since only 11.4% of the sample received a principal diagnosis of an anxiety disorder in a real world setting. Posttraumatic stress disorder was associated with particularly high comorbidity and disability, and social anxiety disorder was relatively rarely diagnosed and treated. Although combined pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy was commonly used to treat anxiety disorders, anxiolytics were more commonly prescribed than selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs. Conclusions: These data provide a picture of diagnosis and practice patterns across a range of psychiatric settings and suggest that anxiety disorders, despite being among the most prevalent of psychiatric disorders remain underdiagnosed and undertreated particularly in respect of the use of psychotherapeutic interventions.

  4. The association between cannabis use and anxiety disorders: Results from a population-based representative sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feingold, Daniel; Weiser, Mark; Rehm, Jürgen; Lev-Ran, Shaul

    2016-03-01

    The cross-sectional association between cannabis use and anxiety disorders is well documented, yet less is known about the longitudinal association between the two. This study explored the association between cannabis use, cannabis use disorders (CUDs) and anxiety disorders in a 3-year prospective study. Data was drawn from waves 1 and 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). Anxiety disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety, panic disorder and specific phobias, were controlled for at baseline. Initiation of cannabis use was defined as any cannabis use by former lifetime abstainers in the time period between baseline and follow-up, CUDs were defined as a diagnosis of cannabis abuse or dependence. Results indicate that cannabis use was not associated with increased incidence of any anxiety disorder (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR)=1.12(0.63-0.98)). Though heavy cannabis use was associated with increased incidence of social anxiety in most models, this was not fully retained in the final adjusted model (AOR=1.98(0.99-1.98)). Investigation of the association between baseline CUDs and anxiety disorders at follow-up revealed similar results. Any baseline anxiety disorder was not associated with future initiation of cannabis use (AOR=1.03(0.62-1.69)) or onset of a CUD (AOR=0.68(0.41-1.14)), yet individuals with baseline panic disorder were more prone to initiate cannabis use at follow-up (AOR=2.2(1.15-4.18)), possibly as a means of self-medication. Our findings suggest that cannabis use and CUDs are not associated with increased incidence of most anxiety disorders and inversely, most anxiety disorders are not associated with increased incidence of cannabis use or CUDs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  5. [Anxiety disorders in DSM-5: an overview on changes in structure and content].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittchen, H-U; Heinig, I; Beesdo-Baum, K

    2014-05-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5 (DSM-5) "anxiety, obsessive-compulsive spectrum, posttraumatic, and dissociative disorders" work group addressed reconceptualization issues regarding all anxiety-related disorders. Based on systematic literature reviews, reanalyses of available data and evaluation of results following the DSM-5 principles it was decided to rearrange the disorder spectrum into separate groupings for the classical anxiety disorders, trauma- and stressor-related disorders, obsessive-compulsive and related disorders, and dissociative disorders. Among the classical anxiety disorders DSM-5 now also includes selective mutism and separation anxiety disorder. A major change from DSM-IV is a drastically simplified classification of panic disorder and agoraphobia. Both conditions can be separately coded in DSM-5 and the overlap is disclosed by a comorbid double diagnosis. The anxiety disorder criteria have been generally harmonized regarding content and order. It was assured that criteria are applicable to all age, gender and cultural groups. Furthermore, diagnosis-specific and cross-cutting dimensional anxiety scales have been developed to supplement categorical diagnosis which appears to facilitate assessment of severity and course of treatment.

  6. [Effects of Group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy on Social Anxiety Disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Chen; Meng, Ya-Jing; Yuan, Min-Lan; Zhu, Hong-Ru; Ren, Zheng-Jia; Qiu, Chang-Jian; Zhang, Wei

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of group cognitive behavioral therapy (GCBT) on social anxiety disorders (SAD). A total of 50 patients with SAD were recruited in this study. A survey containing the Liebowitz social anxiety scale (LSAS),the automatic thoughts questionnaire (ATQ),the fear of negative evaluation questionnaire (FNE),the social support rating scale (SSRS),the tridimensional personality questionnaire (TPQ),and the egna minnen barndoms uppfostran (EMBU) was administered before and (one week) after the GCBT,including in the 50 healthy controls. About 21 patients completed the eight-week GCBT (once a week,2 h a session). Follow-up surveys were conducted on 40 patients (22 patients treated with GCBT and 18 untreated) over a 1-5 year period. Significant differences were found between the SAD patients and healthy controls in thinking mode,personality characteristics,social support,parental rearing styles,and social anxiety symptoms. Significant decrease in social anxiety symptom ( t =4.06, P =0.000) , negative automatic thoughts ( t =4.58, P =0.000) and fear for rejection ( t =3.85, P =0.000) were observed after the GCBT therapy. Such improvement was positively correlated with subjective social support ( r =0.361, P =0.022) ,and negatively correlated with rejection of father ( r =-0.431, P =0.005) . There was also statistical difference between the patients with and without the GCBT therapy ( P =0.033) . GCBT treatment can relieve SAD symptoms by changing the negative cognitive of SAD patients. Social support and rejection of father affects the prognosis of SAD.

  7. Negative and Positive Automatic thoughts in Social Anxiety Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iancu, Iulian; Bodner, Ehud; Joubran, Samia; Lupinsky, Yelena; Barenboim, Damian

    2015-01-01

    Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) is characterized by fear and avoidance in social situations where one is exposed to scrutiny by others. It is possible that automatic thoughts either cause the disorder or maintain it, and thus their examination is warranted. 30 SAD subjects diagnosed with the MiniInternational Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) and 30 healthy controls were administered the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS), the Automatic Thoughts Questionnaires (ATQ-Negative and ATQ-Positive), the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). It was hypothesized that the SAD subjects would display more depression and disability, more negative automatic thoughts and fewer positive automatic thoughts than the healthy controls, and that the automatic thoughts will predict the severity of SAD. SAD patients had higher scores of depression and disability, higher scores on the ATQ-Negative questionnaire and lower scores on the ATQ-Positive questionnaire. The scores of the LSAS subscales were predicted by the scores of the ATQ-Positive and the BDI questionnaires. Moderate sample size and limits of the questionnaires used in the study. Automatic thoughts may be an important area of research with larger samples. Further studies should be carried out in order to examine if strengthening positive thinking and ablation of negative thinking can reduce SAD symptoms during cognitive behavioral treatment.

  8. Pharmacological treatment for generalized anxiety disorder in adults: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, Jennifer A; Rickels, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Modest response and remission rates for the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and the serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, coupled with mounting evidence that the tolerability of the antidepressants (ADs) may have been overstated in the literature, has contributed to changes in prescribing patterns for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). New interest in the absence of evidence that supports these standard therapies as superior to benzodiazepines stimulated a review of the literature. A literature search was conducted in the MedLine database with search terms 'generalized anxiety disorder' and 'treatment' for purposes of including relevant literature related to pharmacologic treatment of GAD. Aside from a review of pivotal literature, the authors also included newer studies that evaluated novel drug treatments. Last, the database was searched for benzodiazepine comparisons to standard therapy secondary to concerns that such literature is sparse. The review of newer modalities and the decision to include related literature was also based on the strength of the evidence and the status of their approval for the treatment of GAD. Although ADs remain the most frequently prescribed medications for GAD, alternative and off-label therapies such as pregabalin, the atypical antipsychotics and vortioxetine are garnering interest. Based on the evidence available to us, it is our recommendation that along with the ADs, benzodiazepines be considered a possible first-line therapy in eligible patients based on the discretion and clinical judgment of the treating physician.

  9. Pilot multimodal twin imaging study of generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettema, John M; Kettenmann, Birgit; Ahluwalia, Vishwadeep; McCarthy, Christopher; Kates, Wendy R; Schmitt, James E; Silberg, Judy L; Neale, Michael C; Kendler, Kenneth S; Fatouros, Panos

    2012-03-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a common chronic condition that is relatively understudied compared to other psychiatric syndromes. Neuroimaging studies have begun to implicate particular neural structures and circuitry in its pathophysiology; however, no genetically informative research has examined the potential sources of reported brain differences. We acquired spectroscopic, volumetric, and diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging data from a pilot study of 34 female subjects selected from monozygotic twin pairs based upon their affection status for GAD, and examined brain regions previously implicated in fear and anxiety for their relationship with affection status and genetic risk. Lifetime GAD associated with increased creatine levels in the amygdala, smaller left hippocampal volume, and lower fractional anisotropy in the uncinate fasciculus which connects amygdala and frontal cortex. In addition, GAD genetic risk predicted increases in myo-inositol in the amygdala and, possibly, glutamate/glutamine/GABA alterations in the hippocampus. The association of lifetime GAD with smaller hippocampal volume was independent of major depression and might represent a common genetic risk marker for internalizing disorders. These preliminary data suggest that GAD and its genetic risk factors are likely correlated with volumetric and spectroscopic changes in fear-related limbic structures and their connections with the frontal cortex. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. A unified protocol for the transdiagnostic psychodynamic treatment of anxiety disorders: an evidence-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichsenring, Falk; Salzer, Simone

    2014-06-01

    Although there is evidence for the efficacy of psychodynamic therapy (PDT) in anxiety disorders, results are not yet satisfactory, for example, if rates of remission and response are considered. To address this problem, a unified psychodynamic protocol for anxiety disorders (UPP-ANXIETY) is proposed that integrates the treatment principles of those methods of PDT that have proven to be efficacious in anxiety disorders. In addition, this protocol is transdiagnostic, implying that it is applicable to various forms of anxiety disorders and related disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, panic disorders, avoidant personality disorder). Based on supportive-expressive therapy, the UPP-ANXIETY represents an integrated form of psychodynamic therapy that allows for a flexible use of empirically supported treatment principles. UPP-ANXIETY encompasses the following 9 treatment principles (modules): (1) socializing the patient for psychotherapy, (2) motivating and setting treatment goals, (3) establishing a secure helping alliance, (4) identifying the core conflict underlying anxiety, (5) focusing on the warded-off wish/affect, (6) modifying underlying internalized object relations, (7) changing underlying defenses and avoidance, (8) modifying underlying response of self, and (9) termination and relapse prevention. Some principles are regarded as core components to be used in every treatment (principles 3-8). A unified protocol for the psychodynamic treatment of anxiety disorders has several advantages, that is (1) integrating the most effective treatment principles of empirically supported psychodynamic treatments for anxiety disorders can be expected to further improve the efficacy of PDT; (2) using a unified protocol in efficacy studies has the potential to enhance the evidence-based status of PDT by aggregating the evidence; (3) a unified protocol will facilitate both training in PDT and transfer of research to clinical practice; and (4) thus, a unified

  11. The effect of comorbid major depressive disorder or bipolar disorder on cognitive behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fracalanza, Katie; McCabe, Randi E; Taylor, Valerie H; Antony, Martin M

    2014-06-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD) commonly co-occur in individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD), yet whether these comorbidities influence the outcomes of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for SAD is unclear. The present study examined the degree to which individuals with SAD and comorbid MDD (SAD+MDD; n=76), comorbid BD (SAD+BD; n=19), a comorbid anxiety disorder (SAD+ANX; n=27), or no comorbid diagnoses (SAD+NCO; n=41) benefitted from CBT for SAD. Individuals were screened using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV and then completed the Social Phobia Inventory and the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales before and after 12-weeks of group CBT for SAD. At pretreatment the SAD+MDD and SAD+BD groups reported higher social anxiety symptoms than the SAD+ANX and SAD+NCO groups. All groups reported large and significant improvement in social anxiety with CBT. However, at posttreatment the SAD+MDD and SAD+BD groups continued to have higher social anxiety symptoms than the SAD+NCO group, and the SAD+ANX group did not differ in social anxiety symptoms from any group. The sample also showed small and statistically significant improvement in depressive symptoms with CBT for SAD. Information about medication was not collected in the present study, and we did not assess the long-term effects of CBT. Our results suggest that CBT for SAD is an effective treatment even in the presence of comorbid mood disorders in the short-term, although extending the course of treatment may be helpful for this population and should be investigated in future research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Depression and Anxiety Symptoms in Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders without Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, John F.; Kenworthy, Lauren; Daniolos, Peter; Case, Laura; Wills, Meagan C.; Martin, Alex; Wallace, Gregory L.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that rates of depression and anxiety symptoms are elevated among individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) of various ages and IQs and that depression/anxiety symptoms are associated with higher IQ and fewer ASD symptoms. In this study which examined correlates of depression and anxiety symptoms in the full…

  13. Social Anxiety Mediates the Effect of Autism Spectrum Disorder Characteristics on Hostility in Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan Williams; Kreiser, Nicole L.; Pugliese, Cara; Scarpa, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Problems with social anxiety are frequently reported in people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). It is possible that social anxiety, when present, exacerbates the experience of hostility and other forms of aggression in relation to ASD symptoms. This study sought to determine if social anxiety symptoms mediate the relationship between features…

  14. Heterogeneity in comorbidity between major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder and its clinical consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unick, George J; Snowden, Lonnie; Hastings, Julia

    2009-04-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) are highly comorbid and, as diagnoses, problematic because they are heterogeneous, may impair functioning even in subclinical manifestations, and may not predict important external criteria as well as empirically-derived classifications. The present study employed a latent class analysis using data from National Comorbidity Survey (1990-1992) and focused on respondents who endorsed at least 1 screening question for MDD and 1 for GAD (N = 1009). Results revealed 4 symptom domains (somatic anxiety, somatic depression, psychological anxiety, and psychological depression) reflecting the heterogeneity of MDD and GAD, and 7 respondent classes. Analysis revealed that people in classes with a high prevalence of either somatic anxiety or somatic depression symptoms presented with the highest levels of disability, distress, and service utilization. Evidence also was found for clinically meaningful subthreshold comorbid conditions. Anxiety-related and depression-related symptoms can be meaningfully differentiated, but differentiating between somatic and psychological symptoms has the greatest practical significance.

  15. Anxiety in boys with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder with and without chronic multiple tic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jayne; Gadow, Kenneth D; Crowell, Judith A; Sprafkin, Joyce

    2009-12-01

    This study examined the psychosocial and behavioral concomitants of anxiety in clinic-referred boys with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) with and without chronic multiple tic disorder (CMTD). ADHD boys with (n = 65) and without (n = 94) CMTD were evaluated with measures of psychiatric symptoms, mental health risk factors, and academic and social performance. Boys with CMTD evidenced more severe anxiety and less social competence and were more likely to be living with only one biological parent than the ADHD Only group, but the magnitude of group differences was generally small. The severity of generalized anxiety, separation anxiety, social phobia, and obsessive-compulsive symptoms were uniquely associated with a different pattern of risk factors, and there was some evidence that these patterns differed for the two groups of boys. Boys with CMTD had a relatively more severe and complex pattern of anxiety that was associated with different clinical features, all of which suggests that ADHD plus CMTD might better be conceptualized as a distinct clinical entity from ADHD Only. However, findings from the extant literature are mixed, and therefore this remains a topic for further study.

  16. The association between parental history of diagnosed mood/anxiety disorders and psychiatric symptoms and disorders in young adult offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Low Nancy CP

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parental history of mood or anxiety disorders is one of the strongest and most consistent risk factors for the development of these disorders in offspring. Gaps remain however in our knowledge of whether maternal or paternal disorders are more strongly associated with offspring disorders, and whether the association exists in non-clinical samples. This study uses a large population-based sample to test if maternal or paternal history of mood and/or anxiety disorders increases the risk of mood and/or anxiety disorders, or symptoms of specific anxiety disorders, in offspring. Methods Data were drawn from the Nicotine Dependence in Teens Study, a prospective cohort investigation of 1293 grade 7 students. Data on mental health outcomes were collected in mailed self-report questionnaires when participants were aged 20.4 (0.7 years on average. Parental data were collected in mailed self-report questionnaires. This current analysis pertains to 564 participants with maternal and/or paternal data. The association between maternal and paternal history and each of diagnosed anxiety disorder, diagnosed mood disorder, and symptoms of specific anxiety disorders in offspring was studied in multivariate logistic regression. Results A higher proportion of mothers than fathers had a diagnosed mood/anxiety disorder (23% versus 12%. Similarly, 14% of female offspring had a diagnosed mood/anxiety disorder, compared to 6% of male offspring. The adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval for maternal history was 2.2 (1.1, 4.5 for diagnosed mood disorders, 4.0 (2.1, 7.8 for diagnosed anxiety disorders, and 2.2 (1.2, 4.0 for social phobia symptoms. Paternal history was not associated with any of the mental health outcomes in offspring. Conclusion Maternal, but not paternal mood/anxiety disorders were associated with diagnosed psychiatric disorders, as well as symptoms of specific anxiety disorders, in offspring. Efforts to detect mood and anxiety

  17. Major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder and response to treatment in hepatitis C patients in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MM, Bassiony; A, Yousef; U, Youssef; GM, Salah El-Deen; M, Abdelghani; H, Al-Gohari; E, Fouad; MM, El-Shafaey

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence and associated correlates of major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder in hepatitis C virus patients before and after treatment and to investigate the relationship between major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder and treatment response. A total of 116 consecutive hepatitis C virus patients from hepatitis C virus treatment center in Zagazig city, Egypt, were included in the study and divided into treated group (N = 58) and untreated group (N = 58). All hepatitis C virus patients were screened for major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder using hospital anxiety and depression scale, and those who screened positive were interviewed to confirm the diagnosis of major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder using DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria. These measures were done at baseline and after 12 weeks of treatment or observation. At baseline, 3.5% and 12.1% of hepatitis C virus patients (treated group) had major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder, respectively. After 12 weeks of treatment 37.9% of hepatitis C virus patients (treated group) had major depressive disorder and 46.6% had generalized anxiety disorder. There was a significant statistical difference between hospital anxiety and depression scale scores for depression (3.3 ± 2.3 vs. 6.4 ± 3.2, t = 9.6, p = 0.001) and for anxiety (4.6 ± 2.4 vs. 7.3 ± 3.0, t = 10.2, p = 0.001) before and after treatment. There was also significant statistical difference between treated group and untreated group regarding hospital anxiety and depression scale scores after treatment and observation (depression, treated group 6.4 ± 3.2 vs. untreated group 4.0 ± 2.4, t = 3.7, p = 0.001; anxiety, treated group 7.3 ± 3.0 vs. untreated group 4.5 ± 2.3, t = 4.4, p = 0.001). There was no association between major depressive disorder

  18. Current irritability robustly related to current and prior anxiety in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Laura D; Miller, Shefali; Wang, Po W; Hooshmand, Farnaz; Holtzman, Jessica N; Goffin, Kathryn C; Shah, Saloni; Ketter, Terence A

    2016-08-01

    Although current irritability and current/prior anxiety have been associated in unipolar depression, these relationships are less well understood in bipolar disorder (BD). We investigated relationships between current irritability and current/prior anxiety as well as other current emotions and BD illness characteristics. Outpatients referred to the Stanford Bipolar Disorders Clinic during 2000-2011 were assessed with the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for BD (STEP-BD) Affective Disorders Evaluation. Prevalence and clinical correlates of current irritability and current/prior anxiety and other illness characteristics were examined. Among 497 BD outpatients (239 Type I, 258 Type II; 58.1% female; mean ± SD age 35.6 ± 13.1 years), 301 (60.6%) had baseline current irritability. Patients with versus without current irritability had significantly higher rates of current anxiety (77.1% versus 42.9%, p anxiety disorder (73.1% versus 52.6%, p anxiety than to current anhedonia, sadness, or euphoria (all p anxiety associations persisted across current predominant mood states. Current irritability was more robustly related to past anxiety than to all other assessed illness characteristics, including 1° family history of mood disorder, history of alcohol/substance use disorder, bipolar subtype, and current syndromal/subsyndromal depression (all p anxiety. Further studies are warranted to assess longitudinal clinical implications of relationships between irritability and anxiety in BD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. To what extent does the anxiety scale of the Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ) detect specific types of anxiety disorder in primary care?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terluin, B.; Oosterbaan, D.B.; Brouwers, E.P.; van Straten, A.; van de Ven, P.M.; Langerak, W.; van Marwijk, H.W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anxiety scales may help primary care physicians to detect specific anxiety disorders among the many emotionally distressed patients presenting in primary care. The anxiety scale of the Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ) consists of an admixture of symptoms of specific anxiety

  20. To what extent does the anxiety scale of the Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ) detect specific types of anxiety disorder in primary care? A psychometric study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terluin, B.; Oosterbaan, D.B.; Brouwers, E.P.; Straten, A. van; Ven, P.M. van de; Langerak, W.; Marwijk, H.W.J. van

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anxiety scales may help primary care physicians to detect specific anxiety disorders among the many emotionally distressed patients presenting in primary care. The anxiety scale of the Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ) consists of an admixture of symptoms of specific anxiety

  1. The Effects of an Exercise Program on Anxiety Levels and Metabolic Functions in Patients With Anxiety Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei-Fen; Wu, Po-Lun; Su, Chia-Hsien; Yang, Tzu-Ching

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a home-based (HB) exercise program on anxiety levels and metabolic functions in patients with anxiety disorders in Taiwan. Purposive sampling was used to recruit 86 participants for this randomized, experimental study. Participants were asked to complete a pretest before the 3-month exercise program, a posttest at 1 week, and a follow-up test at 3 months after the exercise program. Study measures included four Self-Report Scales and biophysical assessments to collect and assess personal data, lifestyle behaviors, anxiety levels, and metabolic control functions. Of the 86 study participants, 83 completed the posttest and the 3-month follow-up test, including 41 in the experimental group and 42 in the control group. Participants in the experimental group showed significant improvements in body mass index, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and the level of moderate exercise after the program relative to the control group, as analyzed by generalized estimating equations mixed-model repeated measures. State and trait anxiety levels were also significantly improved from pretest to follow-up test in the experimental group. Finally, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome declined for participants in the experimental group. The HB exercise program produced positive effects on the metabolic indicators and anxiety levels of Taiwanese adults with anxiety disorders. Health providers should consider using similar HB exercise programs to help improve the mental and physical health of patients with anxiety disorders in their communities.

  2. Clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of patients with major depressive disorder and comorbid anxiety disorders - results from a European multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dold, Markus; Bartova, Lucie; Souery, Daniel; Mendlewicz, Julien; Serretti, Alessandro; Porcelli, Stefano; Zohar, Joseph; Montgomery, Stuart; Kasper, Siegfried

    2017-08-01

    This naturalistic European multicenter study aimed to elucidate the association between major depressive disorder (MDD) and comorbid anxiety disorders. Demographic and clinical information of 1346 MDD patients were compared between those with and without concurrent anxiety disorders. The association between explanatory variables and the presence of comorbid anxiety disorders was examined using binary logistic regression analyses. 286 (21.2%) of the participants exhibited comorbid anxiety disorders, 10.8% generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), 8.3% panic disorder, 8.1% agoraphobia, and 3.3% social phobia. MDD patients with comorbid anxiety disorders were characterized by younger age (social phobia), outpatient status (agoraphobia), suicide risk (any anxiety disorder, panic disorder, agoraphobia, social phobia), higher depressive symptom severity (GAD), polypsychopharmacy (panic disorder, agoraphobia), and a higher proportion receiving augmentation treatment with benzodiazepines (any anxiety disorder, GAD, panic disorder, agoraphobia, social phobia) and pregabalin (any anxiety disorder, GAD, panic disorder). The results in terms of treatment response were conflicting (better response for panic disorder and poorer for GAD). The logistic regression analyses revealed younger age (any anxiety disorder, social phobia), outpatient status (agoraphobia), suicide risk (agoraphobia), severe depressive symptoms (any anxiety disorder, GAD, social phobia), poorer treatment response (GAD), and increased administration of benzodiazepines (any anxiety disorder, agoraphobia, social phobia) and pregabalin (any anxiety disorder, GAD, panic disorder) to be associated with comorbid anxiety disorders. Our findings suggest that the various anxiety disorders subtypes display divergent clinical characteristics and are associated with different variables. Especially comorbid GAD appears to be characterized by high symptom severity and poor treatment response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All

  3. Medical conditions and depressive, anxiety, and somatic symptoms in older adults with and without generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Ayers, Catherine R; Nuevo, Roberto; Stein, Murray B; Ramsdell, Joe; Patterson, Thomas L

    2010-08-01

    The objective of this study was to examine medical illness and anxiety, depressive, and somatic symptoms in older medical patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). A case-control study was designed and conducted in the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Geriatrics Clinics. A total of fifty-four older medical patients with GAD and 54 matched controls participated. The measurements used for this study include: Brief Symptom Inventory-18, Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, and the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule. Older medical patients with GAD reported higher levels of somatic symptoms, anxiety, and depression than other older adults, as well as higher rates of diabetes and gastrointestinal conditions. In a multivariate model that included somatic symptoms, medical conditions, and depressive and anxiety symptoms, anxiety symptoms were the only significant predictors of GAD. These results suggest first, that older medical patients with GAD do not primarily express distress as somatic symptoms; second, that anxiety symptoms in geriatric patients should not be discounted as a byproduct of medical illness or depression; and third, that older adults with diabetes and gastrointestinal conditions may benefit from screening for anxiety.

  4. Feeling safe but appearing anxious: Differential effects of alcohol on anxiety and social performance in individuals with social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Stephan; Cooper, Ruth; Bantin, Trisha; Hermann, Christiane; Gerlach, Alexander L

    2017-07-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) and alcohol use disorders (AUD) co-occur frequently and there is preliminary evidence that alcohol might reduce social anxiety. It is, however, unclear which mechanisms contribute to the anxiety reducing effect, particularly regarding key aspects of social anxiety such as deficits in social performance. We compared self-rated and physiological measures of anxiety as well as self- and observer-rated social performance in a sample of 62 individuals with SAD and 60 nonanxious control participants during a speech task after receiving either alcohol, an alcohol-free placebo drink or orange juice. SAD patients reported more anxiety during the speech task than did control participants. Furthermore, SAD patients underestimated their performance in comparison to observer ratings. Alcohol reduced self-report anxiety only in SAD patients, while observers rated all participants as less competent when intoxicated. Although individuals with SAD experience a reduction in anxiety when drinking alcohol, simultaneous decreases in social performance might contribute to negative reactions from others and consequently increase the risk of further alcohol use to cope with these negative reactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Perfectionism and Contingent Self-Worth in Relation to Disordered Eating and Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardone-Cone, Anna M; Lin, Stacy L; Butler, Rachel M

    2017-05-01

    Perfectionism has been proposed as a transdiagnostic risk factor linked to eating disorders and anxiety. In the current study, we examine domains of contingent self-worth as potential moderators of the relationships between maladaptive perfectionism and disordered eating and anxiety using two waves of data collection. Undergraduate females (N = 237) completed online surveys of the study's core constructs at two points separated by about 14 months. At a bivariate level, maladaptive perfectionism was positively associated with disordered eating and anxiety. Maladaptive perfectionism and both appearance and relationship contingent self-worth interacted to predict increases in disordered eating. Neither of the interactive models predicted change in anxiety. Findings highlight maladaptive perfectionism as a transdiagnostic construct related to both disordered eating and anxiety. Interactive findings suggest that targeting maladaptive perfectionism and contingent self-worth (appearance, relationship) in prevention and treatment efforts could mitigate risk for the development or increase of disordered eating. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. The Place of Antipsychotics in the Therapy of Anxiety Disorders and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignon, Baptiste; Tezenas du Montcel, Chloé; Carton, Louise; Pelissolo, Antoine

    2017-11-07

    The purpose of this review was to assess and present the findings up to this date on the efficacy of antipsychotics in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorders (GAD), social anxiety disorders (SAD), panic disorders (PD), and obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD), mostly based on published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or on open-label studies when RCT were lacking. Quetiapine could be recommended in patients with GAD. The efficacy of aripiprazole in two open-label studies on patients with antidepressant-refractory GAD should be assessed in RCTs. Despite preliminary positive results in open studies, there are currently no strong evidence for the effectiveness of antipsychotics in refractory SAD and in refractory PD. Conversely, risperidone and aripiprazole can be used for the treatment of refractory OCD as augmentation agents to antidepressants. Contrary to SAD and PD, this review found evidence for the use of second-generation antipsychotics in GAD and OCD. Otherwise, first-generation antipsychotics cannot be recommended in anxiety disorders and OCD.

  7. The state effect of depressive and anxiety disorders on big five personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsten, Julie; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Riese, Hariëtte; Ormel, Johan; Nolen, Willem A; Hartman, Catharina A

    2012-05-01

    Neuroticism and extraversion are affected by depressive disorder state. Less is known about depressive state effects on conscientiousness, agreeableness and openness. Furthermore, state effects of anxiety disorders on personality have been far less studied than those of depressive disorder. Here, we aim to determine the extent of change in all five personality traits associated with the occurrence of or recovery from depressive and anxiety disorders. Using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) at baseline and two-year follow-up, respondents from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) were divided into four groups: unaffected at baseline and follow-up, occurrence, recovery, and affected at baseline and follow-up. Personality change (NEO-five factor inventory) was examined in the occurrence and recovery groups relative to the unaffected and affected groups, respectively. Analyses were repeated, differentiating between (specific) depressive and anxiety disorders. We found small state effects of affective disorders on neuroticism, extraversion and conscientiousness. Corrected for each other, both depressive and anxiety disorders showed small state effects on neuroticism, but effects on extraversion and conscientiousness were mainly associated with depressive disorders. State effects were small. When assessing neuroticism, the presence of both depressive and anxiety disorders should be taken into account, as both may independently increase neuroticism scores. However, when assessing extraversion and conscientiousness, depressive disorders but not anxiety disorders are likely to be of influence. Agreeableness and openness are influenced by neither. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Should OCD be classified as an anxiety disorder in DSM-V?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Dan J; Fineberg, Naomi A; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Denys, Damiaan; Lochner, Christine; Nestadt, Gerald; Leckman, James F; Rauch, Scott L; Phillips, Katharine A

    2010-06-01

    In DSM-III, DSM-III-R, and DSM-IV, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) was classified as an anxiety disorder. In ICD-10, OCD is classified separately from the anxiety disorders, although within the same larger category as anxiety disorders (as one of the "neurotic, stress-related, and somatoform disorders"). Ongoing advances in our understanding of OCD and other anxiety disorders have raised the question of whether OCD should continue to be classified with the anxiety disorders in DSM-V. This review presents a number of options and preliminary recommendations to be considered for DSM-V. Evidence is reviewed for retaining OCD in the category of anxiety disorders, and for moving OCD to a separate category of obsessive-compulsive (OC)-spectrum disorders, if such a category is included in DSM-V. Our preliminary recommendation is that OCD be retained in the category of anxiety disorders but that this category also includes OC-spectrum disorders along with OCD. If this change is made, the name of this category should be changed to reflect this proposed change. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Canadian clinical practice guidelines for the management of anxiety, posttraumatic stress and obsessive-compulsive disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Anxiety and related disorders are among the most common mental disorders, with lifetime prevalence reportedly as high as 31%. Unfortunately, anxiety disorders are under-diagnosed and under-treated. Methods These guidelines were developed by Canadian experts in anxiety and related disorders through a consensus process. Data on the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment (psychological and pharmacological) were obtained through MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and manual searches (1980–2012). Treatment strategies were rated on strength of evidence, and a clinical recommendation for each intervention was made, based on global impression of efficacy, effectiveness, and side effects, using a modified version of the periodic health examination guidelines. Results These guidelines are presented in 10 sections, including an introduction, principles of diagnosis and management, six sections (Sections 3 through 8) on the specific anxiety-related disorders (panic disorder, agoraphobia, specific phobia, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder), and two additional sections on special populations (children/adolescents, pregnant/lactating women, and the elderly) and clinical issues in patients with comorbid conditions. Conclusions Anxiety and related disorders are very common in clinical practice, and frequently comorbid with other psychiatric and medical conditions. Optimal management requires a good understanding of the efficacy and side effect profiles of pharmacological and psychological treatments. PMID:25081580

  10. Diagnosed Anxiety Disorders and the Risk of Subsequent Anorexia Nervosa: A Danish Population Register Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Sandra M; Bulik, Cynthia M; Thornton, Laura M; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mortensen, Preben B; Petersen, Liselotte

    2015-11-01

    Anxiety disorders and anorexia nervosa are frequently acknowledged to be highly comorbid conditions, but still, little is known about the clinical and aetiological cohesion of specific anxiety diagnoses and anorexia nervosa. Using the comprehensive Danish population registers, we aimed to determine the risk of anorexia nervosa in patients with register-detected severe anxiety disorders. We also explored whether parental psychopathology was associated with offspring's anorexia nervosa. Anxiety disorders increased the risk of subsequent anorexia nervosa, with the highest risk observed in obsessive-compulsive disorder. Especially, male anxiety patients were at an increased risk for anorexia nervosa. Furthermore, an increased risk was observed in offspring of fathers with panic disorder. A diagnosis of an anxiety disorder, specifically obsessive-compulsive disorder, constitutes a risk factor for subsequent diagnosis of anorexia nervosa. These observations support the notion that anxiety disorders and anorexia nervosa share etiological mechanisms and/or that anxiety represents one developmental pathway to anorexia nervosa. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  11. Family functioning, social support, and quality of life for patients with anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jikun; Chen, Yuhao; Tan, Cuicui; Zhao, Xudong

    2016-02-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between family functioning, social support and quality of life in patients with anxiety disorder. There is a paucity of research on anxiety disorders and their predictors in China. This study aimed to explore family functioning, social support and quality of life for patients with anxiety disorder and examine the relationship between these elements. A total of 107 patients who met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV) criteria for anxiety disorder and 80 healthy controls completed the McMaster Family Assessment Device, the Perceived Social Support Scale and the short form of the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire. The findings indicate that patients with anxiety disorder in China tend to have poor family functioning and quality of life, as well as a higher subjective perception of social support. There were strong correlations between family functioning, social support and quality of life. Affective involvement and not living with parents were identified as risk factors for anxiety disorders, while a high family income was a protective factor. Anxiety disorder is associated with reduced family functioning and poorer quality of life for Chinese patients. In addition, the Family Assessment Device is a suitable instrument for evaluating family functioning in Chinese patients with anxiety disorder. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Depressive and Anxiety Disorders Predicting First Incidence of Alcohol Use Disorders: Results of the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschloo, Lynn; Vogelzangs, Nicole; van den Brink, Wim; Smit, Johannes H.; Veltman, Dick J.; Beekman, Aartjan T. F.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Depressive and anxiety disorders may predict first incidence of alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence. This study aims to identify those persons who are at an increased risk of developing alcohol abuse or alcohol dependence by considering the heterogeneity of depressive and anxiety

  13. Depressive and anxiety disorders predicting first incidence of alcohol use disorders: results of the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschloo, L.; Vogelzangs, N.; van den Brink, W.; Smit, J.H.; Veltman, D.J.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Depressive and anxiety disorders may predict first incidence of alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence. This study aims to identify those persons who are at an increased risk of developing alcohol abuse or alcohol dependence by considering the heterogeneity of depressive and anxiety

  14. Serotonin pathway polymorphisms and the treatment of major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helton, Sarah G; Lohoff, Falk W

    2015-01-01

    While antidepressants are widely used to treat major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders, only half of the patients will respond to antidepressant treatment and only a third of patients will experience a remission of symptoms. Identification of genetic biomarkers that predict antidepressant treatment response could thus greatly improve current clinical practice by providing guidance on which drug to use for which patient. Most antidepressant drugs for the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders have effects on the serotonergic neurotransmitter system; thus, genetic polymorphisms in the genes involved in this pathway represent logical candidates for investigation. This article reviews recent findings on the pharmacogenetics of antidepressant drugs with a focus on serotonergic pathway polymorphisms and discusses future clinical applications.

  15. Anxiety Disorder Presentations in Asian Populations: A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinton, D.E.; Park, L.; Hsia, C.; Hofmann, S.G.; Pollack, M.H.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews typical anxiety presentations in Asia, and among Asian refugees. In Asia, there are multiple functional somatic syndromes that are common anxiety presentations. These distress syndromes often produce catastrophic cognitions about anxiety-type somatic and psychological symptoms.

  16. Cross-generational influences on childhood anxiety disorders: pathways and mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckman, James F.; Silverman, Wendy K.; Feldman, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are common across the lifespan, cause severe distress and impairment, and usually have their onset in childhood. Substantial clinical and epidemiological research has demonstrated the existence of links between anxiety and its disorders in children and parents. Research on the pathways and mechanisms underlying these links has pointed to both behavioral and biological systems. This review synthesizes and summarizes several major aspects of this research. Behavioral systems include vicarious learning, social referencing, and modeling of parental anxiety; overly protective or critical parenting styles; and aspects of parental responses to child anxiety including family accommodation of the child’s symptoms. Biological systems include aspects of the prenatal environment affected by maternal anxiety, development and functioning of the oxytocinergic system, and genetic and epigenetic transmission. Implications for the prevention and treatment of child anxiety disorders are discussed, including the potential to enhance child anxiety treatment outcomes through biologically informed parent-based interventions. PMID:27145763

  17. Cross-generational influences on childhood anxiety disorders: pathways and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebowitz, Eli R; Leckman, James F; Silverman, Wendy K; Feldman, Ruth

    2016-09-01

    Anxiety disorders are common across the lifespan, cause severe distress and impairment, and usually have their onset in childhood. Substantial clinical and epidemiological research has demonstrated the existence of links between anxiety and its disorders in children and parents. Research on the pathways and mechanisms underlying these links has pointed to both behavioral and biological systems. This review synthesizes and summarizes several major aspects of this research. Behavioral systems include vicarious learning, social referencing, and modeling of parental anxiety; overly protective or critical parenting styles; and aspects of parental responses to child anxiety including family accommodation of the child's symptoms. Biological systems include aspects of the prenatal environment affected by maternal anxiety, development and functioning of the oxytocinergic system, and genetic and epigenetic transmission. Implications for the prevention and treatment of child anxiety disorders are discussed, including the potential to enhance child anxiety treatment outcomes through biologically informed parent-based interventions.

  18. Symptoms of the anxiety disorders in a perinatal psychiatric sample: a chart review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Casey A; Battle, Cynthia L; Howard, Margaret; Ortiz-Hernandez, Samia

    2014-02-01

    Symptoms of anxiety are a central feature of perinatal mental health, yet the anxiety disorders have received considerably less attention than depression in both perinatal research and practice. The present investigation involved a retrospective review of the clinical records of 334 patients seen at a psychiatric day hospital program serving pregnant and postpartum women. We examined the frequency with which the patients in this setting reported symptoms of anxiety, clinical correlates of elevated anxiety, and patterns of diagnosis in the clinical record. The results suggest that anxiety symptoms are very common in this population and that the presence of anxiety is associated with a more severe clinical profile, including higher rates of suicidality and increased use of psychotropic medications during pregnancy and postpartum. Although anxiety symptom levels were markedly elevated in this sample, anxiety disorders were diagnosed at relatively low rates. Implications for clinical practice, including discharge and treatment planning, are discussed.

  19. The role of perceived parenting in familial aggregation of anxiety disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gastel, W; Legerstee, J S; Ferdinand, R F

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to explore the role of perceived parenting style in the familial aggregation of anxiety disorders. We examined the association between parental and child anxiety diagnoses, and tested whether this association was partly due to a perceived parenting style. The study was conducted in a clinical sample as well as in a control sample. Parental lifetime and current anxiety diagnoses were significantly associated with child anxiety diagnoses. When maternal and paternal lifetime and current anxiety diagnoses were entered as separate predictors, only maternal current anxiety diagnoses appeared to be significant. Perceived parenting style was assessed with the dimensions "overprotection," "emotional warmth," "rejection," and "anxious rearing." Results indicated that only maternal and paternal 'overprotection' was significantly but negatively associated with child anxiety. However, further analyses showed that 'overprotection' did not have a significant mediating role in the familial aggregation of anxiety disorders.

  20. The state effect of depressive and anxiety disorders on big five personality traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsten, Julie; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Riese, Hariette; Ormel, Johan; Nolen, Willem A.; Hartman, Catharina A.

    Background: Neuroticism and extraversion are affected by depressive disorder state. Less is known about depressive state effects on conscientiousness, agreeableness and openness. Furthermore, state effects of anxiety disorders on personality have been far less studied than those of depressive