WorldWideScience

Sample records for antiviral protein viperin

  1. The presence of the iron-sulfur motif is important for the conformational stability of the antiviral protein, Viperin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubhasis Haldar

    Full Text Available Viperin, an antiviral protein, has been shown to contain a CX(3CX(2C motif, which is conserved in the radical S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM enzyme family. A triple mutant which replaces these three cysteines with alanines has been shown to have severe deficiency in antiviral activity. Since the crystal structure of Viperin is not available, we have used a combination of computational methods including multi-template homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to develop a low-resolution predicted structure. The results show that Viperin is an α-β protein containing iron-sulfur cluster at the center pocket. The calculations suggest that the removal of iron-sulfur cluster would lead to collapse of the protein tertiary structure. To verify these predictions, we have prepared, expressed and purified four mutant proteins. In three mutants individual cysteine residues were replaced by alanine residues while in the fourth all the cysteines were replaced by alanines. Conformational analyses using circular dichroism and steady state fluorescence spectroscopy indicate that the mutant proteins are partially unfolded, conformationally unstable and aggregation prone. The lack of conformational stability of the mutant proteins may have direct relevance to the absence of their antiviral activity.

  2. Equine viperin restricts equine infectious anemia virus replication by inhibiting the production and/or release of viral Gag, Env, and receptor via distortion of the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yan-Dong; Na, Lei; Zhu, Chun-Hui; Shen, Nan; Yang, Fei; Fu, Xian-Qiu; Wang, Yu-Hong; Fu, Li-Hua; Wang, Jia-Yi; Lin, Yue-Zhi; Wang, Xue-Feng; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhou, Jian-Hua; Li, Cheng-Yao

    2014-11-01

    Viperin is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated multifunctional protein that regulates virus replication and possesses broad antiviral activity. In many cases, viperin interferes with the trafficking and budding of viral structural proteins by distorting the membrane transportation system. The lentivirus equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) has been studied extensively. In this study, we examined the restrictive effect of equine viperin (eViperin) on EIAV replication and investigated the possible molecular basis of this restriction to obtain insights into the effect of this cellular factor on retroviruses. We demonstrated that EIAV infection of primary equine monocyte-derived macrophages (eMDMs) upregulated the expression of eViperin. The overexpression of eViperin significantly inhibited the replication of EIAV in eMDMs, and knockdown of eViperin transcription enhanced the replication of EIAV in eMDMs by approximately 45.8%. Further experiments indicated that eViperin restricts EIAV at multiple steps of viral replication. The overexpression of eViperin inhibited EIAV Gag release. Both the α-helix domain and radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) domain were required for this activity. However, the essential motifs in SAM were different from those reported for the inhibition of HIV-1 Gag by human viperin. Furthermore, eViperin disrupted the synthesis of both EIAV Env and receptor, which consequently inhibited viral production and entry, respectively, and this disruption was dependent on the eViperin α-helix domain. Using immunofluorescence assays and electron microscopy, we demonstrated that the α-helix domain is responsible for the distortion of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Finally, EIAV did not exhibit counteracting eViperin at the protein level. In previous studies, viperin was indicated as restricting virus replications primarily by the inhibition of virus budding. Here, we show that viperin may have multiple antiviral mechanisms, including the reduction

  3. Positive selection drives rapid evolution of certain amino acid residues in an evolutionarily highly conserved interferon-inducible antiviral protein of fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhi, Abinash

    2013-01-01

    Viperin, an evolutionarily highly conserved interferon-inducible multifunctional protein, has previously been reported to exhibit antiviral activity against a wide range of DNA and RNA viruses. Utilizing the complete nucleotide coding sequence data of fish viperin antiviral genes, and employing the maximum likelihood-based codon substitution models, the present study reports the pervasive role of positive selection in the evolution of viperin antiviral protein in fishes. The overall rate of nonsynonymous (dN) to synonymous (dS) substitutions (dN/dS) for the three functional domains of viperin (N-terminal, central domain and C-terminal) were 1.1, 0.12, and 0.24, respectively. Codon-by-codon substitution analyses have revealed that while most of the positively selected sites were located at the N-terminal amphipathic α-helix domain, few amino acid residues at the C-terminal domain were under positive selection. However, none of the sites in the central domain were under positive selection. These results indicate that, although viperin is evolutionarily highly conserved, the three functional domains experienced differential selection pressures. Taken together with the results of previous studies, the present study suggests that the persistent antagonistic nature of surrounding infectious viral pathogens might be the likely cause for such adaptive evolutionary changes of certain amino acids in fish viperin antiviral protein.

  4. Antiviral effects of the milk protein lactoferrin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, B.; Floris, R.; Recio, I.; Visser, S.

    2003-01-01

    Milk forms a rich source of biologically interesting components and the protein fraction is known to facilitate many different biological functions. In this manuscript, we focus on the antiviral properties of the milk protein lactoferrin (LF), in particular against the human immunodeficiency virus

  5. Cloning and expression of antiviral/ribosome-inactivating protein ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu urs

    2007-12-16

    Dec 16, 2007 ... Many higher plant species belonging to various taxonomic families are known to produce endogenous, non-stress induced inhibitor proteins called antiviral proteins (AVPs). Many of these AVPs have ribosome-inhibiting rRNA N- glycosidase activity and are known as ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs).

  6. Antibacterial and antiviral effects of milk proteins and derivatives thereof

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florisa, René; Recio, Isidra; Berkhout, Ben; Visser, Servaas

    2003-01-01

    Milk forms a rich source of biologically interesting components. In particular, its protein fraction is known to encompass many kinds of biological functions. In this review we focus on antibacterial and antiviral proper-ties of milk proteins and milk protein derivatives. The latter include

  7. Cloning and expression of antiviral/ribosome-inactivating protein ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu urs

    2007-12-16

    Dec 16, 2007 ... The cleaved and purified recombinant. BBAP1 exhibited ribosome-inhibiting rRNA N-glycosidase activity, and imparted a high level of resistance against the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). [Choudhary N, Kapoor H C and Lodha M L 2008 Cloning and expression of antiviral/ribosome-inactivating protein from ...

  8. Testing of disease-resistance of pokeweed antiviral protein gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transformation of pokeweed antiviral protein gene (PAP) into plants was shown to improve plant resistance to several viruses or fungi pathogens with no much negative effect on plant growth. The non-virulent defective PAP inhibits only the virus but does not interfere with the host. A non-virulent defective PAP gene ...

  9. Cherry Valley Ducks Mitochondrial Antiviral-Signaling Protein-Mediated Signaling Pathway and Antiviral Activity Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Hong, Tianqi; Li, Rong; Wang, Yao; Guo, Mengjiao; Cao, Zongxi; Cai, Yumei; Liu, Sidang; Chai, Tongjie; Wei, Liangmeng

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS), an adaptor protein of retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs)-mediated signal pathway, is involved in innate immunity. In this study, Cherry Valley duck MAVS (duMAVS) was cloned from the spleen and analyzed. duMAVS was determined to have a caspase activation and recruitment domain at N-terminal, followed by a proline-rich domain and a transmembrane domain at C-terminal. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated that duMAVS was expressed in all tissues tested across a broad expression spectrum. The expression of duMAVS was significantly upregulated after infection with duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV). Overexpression of duMAVS could drive the activation of interferon (IFN)-β, nuclear factor-κB, interferon regulatory factor 7, and many downstream factors (such as Mx, PKR, OAS, and IL-8) in duck embryo fibroblast cells. What is more, RNA interference further confirmed that duMAVS was an important adaptor for IFN-β activation. The antiviral assay showed that duMAVS could suppress the various viral replications (DTMUV, novel reovirus, and duck plague virus) at early stages of infection. Overall, these results showed that the main signal pathway mediated by duMAVS and it had a broad-spectrum antiviral ability. This research will be helpful to better understanding the innate immune system of ducks.

  10. Mx Proteins: Antiviral Gatekeepers That Restrain the Uninvited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhelst, Judith; Hulpiau, Paco

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Fifty years after the discovery of the mouse Mx1 gene, researchers are still trying to understand the molecular details of the antiviral mechanisms mediated by Mx proteins. Mx proteins are evolutionarily conserved dynamin-like large GTPases, and GTPase activity is required for their antiviral activity. The expression of Mx genes is controlled by type I and type III interferons. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that Mx genes are present in almost all vertebrates, usually in one to three copies. Mx proteins are best known for inhibiting negative-stranded RNA viruses, but they also inhibit other virus families. Recent structural analyses provide hints about the antiviral mechanisms of Mx proteins, but it is not known how they can suppress such a wide variety of viruses lacking an obvious common molecular pattern. Perhaps they interact with a (partially) symmetrical invading oligomeric structure, such as a viral ribonucleoprotein complex. Such an interaction may be of a fairly low affinity, in line with the broad target specificity of Mx proteins, yet it would be strong enough to instigate Mx oligomerization and ring assembly. Such a model is compatible with the broad “substrate” specificity of Mx proteins: depending on the size of the invading viral ribonucleoprotein complexes that need to be wrapped, the assembly process would consume the necessary amount of Mx precursor molecules. These Mx ring structures might then act as energy-consuming wrenches to disassemble the viral target structure. PMID:24296571

  11. The antiviral activity of the milk protein lactoferrin against the human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, Ben; Floris, René; Recio, Isidra; Visser, Servaas

    2004-01-01

    Milk forms a rich source of biologically interesting components and the protein fraction is known to facilitate many different biological functions. In this manuscript, we review the antiviral properties of the milk protein lactoferrin (LF). In particular, we will describe its antiviral activity

  12. Viperin mRNA is a novel target for the human RNase MRP/RNase P endoribonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattijssen, Sandy; Hinson, Ella R; Onnekink, Carla; Hermanns, Pia; Zabel, Bernhard; Cresswell, Peter; Pruijn, Ger J M

    2011-07-01

    RNase MRP is a conserved endoribonuclease, in humans consisting of a 267-nucleotide RNA associated with 7-10 proteins. Mutations in its RNA component lead to several autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasias, including cartilage-hair hypoplasia (CHH). Because the known substrates of mammalian RNase MRP, pre-ribosomal RNA, and RNA involved in mitochondrial DNA replication are not likely involved in CHH, we analyzed the effects of RNase MRP (and the structurally related RNase P) depletion on mRNAs using DNA microarrays. We confirmed the upregulation of the interferon-inducible viperin mRNA by RNAi experiments and this appeared to be independent of the interferon response. We detected two cleavage sites for RNase MRP/RNase P in the coding sequence of viperin mRNA. This is the first study providing direct evidence for the cleavage of a mRNA by RNase MRP/RNase P in human cells. Implications for the involvement in the pathophysiology of CHH are discussed.

  13. Zinc-finger antiviral protein inhibits XMRV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinlu Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The zinc-finger antiviral protein (ZAP is a host factor that specifically inhibits the replication of certain viruses, including Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV, HIV-1, and certain alphaviruses and filoviruses. ZAP binds to specific viral mRNAs and recruits cellular mRNA degradation machinery to degrade the target RNA. The common features of ZAP-responsive RNA sequences remain elusive and thus whether a virus is susceptible to ZAP can only be determined experimentally. Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV is a recently identified γ-retrovirus that was originally thought to be involved in prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome but recently proved to be a laboratory artefact. Nonetheless, XMRV as a new retrovirus has been extensively studied. Since XMRV and MoMLV share only 67.9% sequence identity in the 3'UTRs, which is the target sequence of ZAP in MoMLV, whether XMRV is susceptible to ZAP remains to be determined. FINDINGS: We constructed an XMRV-luc vector, in which the coding sequences of Gag-Pol and part of Env were replaced with luciferase-coding sequence. Overexpression of ZAP potently inhibited the expression of XMRV-luc in a ZAP expression-level-dependent manner, while downregulation of endogenous ZAP rendered cells more sensitive to infection. Furthermore, ZAP inhibited the spreading of replication-competent XMRV. Consistent with the previously reported mechanisms by which ZAP inhibits viral infection, ZAP significantly inhibited the accumulation of XMRV-luc mRNA in the cytoplasm. The ZAP-responsive element in XMRV mRNA was mapped to the 3'UTR. CONCLUSIONS: ZAP inhibits XMRV replication by preventing the accumulation of viral mRNA in the cytoplasm. Documentation of ZAP inhibiting XMRV helps to broaden the spectrum of ZAP's antiviral activity. Comparison of the target sequences of ZAP in XMRV and MoMLV helps to better understand the features of ZAP-responsive elements.

  14. Protein: MPA1 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MPA1 TLR signaling molecules RSAD2 CIG5 Radical S-adenosyl methionine domain-containing protein 2 Cytomegalo...virus-induced gene 5 protein, Viperin, Virus inhibitory protein, endoplasmic reticu

  15. Positive selection and increased antiviral activity associated with the PARP-containing isoform of human zinc-finger antiviral protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A Kerns

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsic immunity relies on specific recognition of viral epitopes to mount a cell-autonomous defense against viral infections. Viral recognition determinants in intrinsic immunity genes are expected to evolve rapidly as host genes adapt to changing viruses, resulting in a signature of adaptive evolution. Zinc-finger antiviral protein (ZAP from rats was discovered to be an intrinsic immunity gene that can restrict murine leukemia virus, and certain alphaviruses and filoviruses. Here, we used an approach combining molecular evolution and cellular infectivity assays to address whether ZAP also acts as a restriction factor in primates, and to pinpoint which protein domains may directly interact with the virus. We find that ZAP has evolved under positive selection throughout primate evolution. Recurrent positive selection is only found in the poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP-like domain present in a longer human ZAP isoform. This PARP-like domain was not present in the previously identified and tested rat ZAP gene. Using infectivity assays, we found that the longer isoform of ZAP that contains the PARP-like domain is a stronger suppressor of murine leukemia virus expression and Semliki forest virus infection. Our study thus finds that human ZAP encodes a potent antiviral activity against alphaviruses. The striking congruence between our evolutionary predictions and cellular infectivity assays strongly validates such a combined approach to study intrinsic immunity genes.

  16. Assessment of the antiviral properties of recombinant surfactant protein D against influenza B virus in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillaire, Marine L B; van Eijk, Martin; Vogelzang-van Trierum, Stella E; Nieuwkoop, Nella J; van Riel, Debby; Fouchier, Ron A M; Kuiken, Thijs; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Haagsman, Henk P; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F

    2015-01-02

    The armamentarium of antiviral drugs against influenza viruses is limited. Furthermore, influenza viruses emerge that are resistant to existing antiviral drugs like the M2 and NA inhibitors. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of novel classes of antiviral drugs. Here we investigated the antiviral properties of recombinant porcine surfactant protein D (RpSP-D), an innate defense molecule with lectin properties, against influenza B viruses. We have previously shown that porcine SP-D has more potent neutralizing activity against influenza A viruses than human SP-D. Here we show that RpSP-D neutralizes influenza B viruses efficiently and inhibited the binding of these viruses to epithelial cells of the human trachea. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Viral Proteins That Bind Double-Stranded RNA: Countermeasures Against Host Antiviral Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Krug, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Several animal viruses encode proteins that bind double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) to counteract host dsRNA-dependent antiviral responses. This article discusses the structure and function of the dsRNA-binding proteins of influenza A virus and Ebola viruses (EBOVs).

  18. Protein-Protein Interactions of Viroporins in Coronaviruses and Paramyxoviruses: New Targets for Antivirals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaume Torres

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Viroporins are members of a rapidly growing family of channel-forming small polypeptides found in viruses. The present review will be focused on recent structural and protein-protein interaction information involving two viroporins found in enveloped viruses that target the respiratory tract; (i the envelope protein in coronaviruses and (ii the small hydrophobic protein in paramyxoviruses. Deletion of these two viroporins leads to viral attenuation in vivo, whereas data from cell culture shows involvement in the regulation of stress and inflammation. The channel activity and structure of some representative members of these viroporins have been recently characterized in some detail. In addition, searches for protein-protein interactions using yeast-two hybrid techniques have shed light on possible functional roles for their exposed cytoplasmic domains. A deeper analysis of these interactions should not only provide a more complete overview of the multiple functions of these viroporins, but also suggest novel strategies that target protein-protein interactions as much needed antivirals. These should complement current efforts to block viroporin channel activity.

  19. Charge modification of plasma and milk proteins results in antiviral active compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, P J; Harmsen, M C; Kuipers, M E; Van Dijk, A A; Van Der Strate, B W; Van Berkel, P H; Nuijens, J H; Smit, C; Witvrouw, M; De Clercq, E; de Béthune, M P; Pauwels, R; Meijer, D K

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that acylated plasma and milk proteins with increased negative charge, derived from various animal and human sources, are potent anti-HIV compounds. The antiviral effects seemed to correlate positively with the number of negative charges introduced into the various

  20. Negative regulation of RIG-I-mediated antiviral signaling by TRK-fused gene (TFG) protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Na-Rae; Shin, Han-Bo; Kim, Hye-In; Choi, Myung-Soo; Inn, Kyung-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •TRK-fused gene product (TFG) interacts with TRIM25 upon viral infection. •TFG negatively regulates RIG-I mediated antiviral signaling. •TFG depletion leads to enhanced viral replication. •TFG act downstream of MAVS. -- Abstract: RIG-I (retinoic acid inducible gene I)-mediated antiviral signaling serves as the first line of defense against viral infection. Upon detection of viral RNA, RIG-I undergoes TRIM25 (tripartite motif protein 25)-mediated K63-linked ubiquitination, leading to type I interferon (IFN) production. In this study, we demonstrate that TRK-fused gene (TFG) protein, previously identified as a TRIM25-interacting protein, binds TRIM25 upon virus infection and negatively regulates RIG-I-mediated type-I IFN signaling. RIG-I-mediated IFN production and nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathways were upregulated by the suppression of TFG expression. Furthermore, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) replication was significantly inhibited by small inhibitory hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of TFG, supporting the suppressive role of TFG in RIG-I-mediated antiviral signaling. Interestingly, suppression of TFG expression increased not only RIG-I-mediated signaling but also MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein)-induced signaling, suggesting that TFG plays a pivotal role in negative regulation of RNA-sensing, RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) family signaling pathways

  1. Negative regulation of RIG-I-mediated antiviral signaling by TRK-fused gene (TFG) protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Na-Rae; Shin, Han-Bo; Kim, Hye-In; Choi, Myung-Soo; Inn, Kyung-Soo, E-mail: innks@khu.ac.kr

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •TRK-fused gene product (TFG) interacts with TRIM25 upon viral infection. •TFG negatively regulates RIG-I mediated antiviral signaling. •TFG depletion leads to enhanced viral replication. •TFG act downstream of MAVS. -- Abstract: RIG-I (retinoic acid inducible gene I)-mediated antiviral signaling serves as the first line of defense against viral infection. Upon detection of viral RNA, RIG-I undergoes TRIM25 (tripartite motif protein 25)-mediated K63-linked ubiquitination, leading to type I interferon (IFN) production. In this study, we demonstrate that TRK-fused gene (TFG) protein, previously identified as a TRIM25-interacting protein, binds TRIM25 upon virus infection and negatively regulates RIG-I-mediated type-I IFN signaling. RIG-I-mediated IFN production and nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathways were upregulated by the suppression of TFG expression. Furthermore, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) replication was significantly inhibited by small inhibitory hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of TFG, supporting the suppressive role of TFG in RIG-I-mediated antiviral signaling. Interestingly, suppression of TFG expression increased not only RIG-I-mediated signaling but also MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein)-induced signaling, suggesting that TFG plays a pivotal role in negative regulation of RNA-sensing, RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) family signaling pathways.

  2. Filovirus proteins for antiviral drug discovery: Structure/function bases of the replication cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Baptiste; Canard, Bruno; Decroly, Etienne

    2017-05-01

    Filoviruses are important pathogens that cause severe and often fatal hemorrhagic fever in humans, for which no approved vaccines and antiviral treatments are yet available. In an earlier article (Martin et al., Antiviral Research, 2016), we reviewed the role of the filovirus surface glycoprotein in replication and as a target for drugs and vaccines. In this review, we focus on recent findings on the filovirus replication machinery and how they could be used for the identification of new therapeutic targets and the development of new antiviral compounds. First, we summarize the recent structural and functional advances on the molecules involved in filovirus replication/transcription cycle, particularly the NP, VP30, VP35 proteins, and the "large" protein L, which harbors the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and mRNA capping activities. These proteins are essential for viral mRNA synthesis and genome replication, and consequently they constitute attractive targets for drug design. We then describe how these insights into filovirus replication mechanisms and the structure/function characterization of the involved proteins have led to the development of new and innovative antiviral strategies that may help reduce the filovirus disease case fatality rate through post-exposure or prophylactic treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Antiviral and antitumor activities of the protein fractions from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, we present the extraction and purification of protein fractions from the larvae of the housefly, Musca domestica. The bioactivities of the protein fractions were indicated by pseudorabies virus (PRV) and human lung cancer cell line A 549. The crude protein fractions had no toxicity to chick embryo fibroblast-like ...

  4. Nuclear trafficking of proteins from RNA viruses: potential target for antivirals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caly, Leon; Wagstaff, Kylie M; Jans, David A

    2012-09-01

    A key aspect of the infectious cycle of many viruses is the transport of specific viral proteins into the host cell nucleus to perturb the antiviral response. Examples include a number of RNA viruses that are significant human pathogens, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1, influenza A, dengue, respiratory syncytial virus and rabies, as well agents that predominantly infect livestock, such as Rift valley fever virus and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Inhibiting the nuclear trafficking of viral proteins as a therapeutic strategy offers an attractive possibility, with important recent progress having been made with respect to HIV-1 and dengue. The results validate nuclear protein import as an antiviral target, and suggest the identification and development of nuclear transport inhibitors as a viable therapeutic approach for a range of human and zoonotic pathogenic viruses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Antiviral and antitumor activities of the protein fractions from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    2012-05-15

    May 15, 2012 ... was bought from the China Center for Type Culture Collection of. Wuhan University (Wuhan, China). ... cultures were exposed to 100 µl of the crude protein fractions. (dilution rates were 1:1, 1:10 or 1:100) on .... The values represent the average of three replications. Asterisks denote significant differences ...

  6. Antiviral Protein of Momordica charantia L. Inhibits Different Subtypes of Influenza A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viroj Pongthanapisith

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The new antiviral activity of the protein extracted from Momordica charantia was determined with different subtypes of influenza A. The protein was purified from the seed of M. charantia using an anion exchanger and a Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography (FPLC system. At the concentration of 1.401 mg/mL, the protein did not exhibit cytotoxicity in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells (MDCK but inhibited FFU influenza A/PR/8/34 H1N1 virus at 56.50%, 65.72%, and 100% inhibition by the protein treated before the virus (pretreated, the protein treated alongside with the virus (simultaneously treated, and the protein treated after the virus (posttreated during incubation, respectively. Using 5, 25, and 100 TCID50 of influenza A/New Caledonia/20/99 H1N1, A/Fujian/411/01 H3N2 and A/Thailand/1(KAN-1/2004 H5N1, the IC50 was calculated to be 100, 150, and 200; 75, 175, and 300; and 40, 75, and 200 μg/mL, respectively. Our present finding indicated that the plant protein inhibited not only H1N1 and H3N2 but also H5N1 subtype. As a result of the broad spectrum of its antiviral activity, this edible plant can be developed as an effective therapeutic agent against various and even new emerging subtypes of influenza A.

  7. Human cytomegaloviruses expressing yellow fluorescent fusion proteins--characterization and use in antiviral screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Straschewski

    Full Text Available Recombinant viruses labelled with fluorescent proteins are useful tools in molecular virology with multiple applications (e.g., studies on intracellular trafficking, protein localization, or gene activity. We generated by homologous recombination three recombinant cytomegaloviruses carrying the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP fused with the viral proteins IE-2, ppUL32 (pp150, and ppUL83 (pp65. In growth kinetics, the three viruses behaved all like wild type, even at low multiplicity of infection (MOI. The expression of all three fusion proteins was detected, and their respective localizations were the same as for the unmodified proteins in wild-type virus-infected cells. We established the in vivo measurement of fluorescence intensity and used the recombinant viruses to measure inhibition of viral replication by neutralizing antibodies or antiviral substances. The use of these viruses in a pilot screen based on fluorescence intensity and high-content analysis identified cellular kinase inhibitors that block viral replication. In summary, these viruses with individually EYFP-tagged proteins will be useful to study antiviral substances and the dynamics of viral infection in cell culture.

  8. Biophysical Properties and Antiviral Activities of Measles Fusion Protein Derived Peptide Conjugated with 25-Hydroxycholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Bárbara; Santos, Nuno C; Porotto, Matteo

    2017-10-31

    Measles virus (MV) infection is re-emerging, despite the availability of an effective vaccine. The mechanism of MV entry into a target cell relies on coordinated action between the MV hemagglutinin (H) receptor binding protein and the fusion envelope glycoprotein (F) which mediates fusion between the viral and cell membranes. Peptides derived from the C -terminal heptad repeat (HRC) of F can interfere with this process, blocking MV infection. As previously described, biophysical properties of HRC-derived peptides modulate their antiviral potency. In this work, we characterized a MV peptide fusion inhibitor conjugated to 25-hydroxycholesterol (25HC), a cholesterol derivative with intrinsic antiviral activity, and evaluated its interaction with membrane model systems and human blood cells. The peptide (MV.

  9. Autophagy Proteins in Viral Exocytosis and Anti-Viral Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Münz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Autophagy-related (Atg gene-encoded proteins were originally described for their crucial role in macroautophagy, a catabolic pathway for cytoplasmic constituent degradation in lysosomes. Recently it has become clear that modules of this machinery can also be used to influence endo- and exocytosis. This mini review discusses how these alternative Atg functions support virus replication and viral antigen presentation on major histocompatibility (MHC class I and II molecules. A better understanding of the modular use of the macroautophagy machinery might enable us to manipulate these alternative functions of Atg proteins during anti-viral therapies and to attenuate virus-induced immune pathologies.

  10. Both antiviral activity and intracellular localization of chicken Mx protein depend on a polymorphism at amino acid position 631.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Keisuke; Yoneda, Akihiro; Ninomiya, Akinori; Kawahara, Manabu; Watanabe, Tomomasa

    2013-01-04

    The Mx protein is known to inhibit the multiplication of several RNA viruses. In chickens, a polymorphism at amino acid position 631 (631 aa) of Mx protein has been suggested to be involved in the antiviral ability against vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and influenza virus, indicating that a Ser-to-Asn substitution at 631 aa is the source of this antiviral ability. However, how the substitution at 631 aa contributes to the antiviral activity remains to be clarified. In this study, we investigated differences in antiviral activity against VSV and intracellular localization between Ser and Asn types at 631 aa of the chicken Mx protein. The results showed that chicken Mx protein with an Asn at 631 aa inhibited VSV multiplication and Mx distribution in a granular-like pattern in the cytoplasm. However, Mx carrying the Ser type did not inhibit viral growth and homogenous spread throughout the cytoplasm. Furthermore, we found that replacing Ser with Asn at 631 aa provided Mx with antiviral activity against VSV, with Mx showing granular-like distribution in the cytoplasm. These results demonstrated that a single amino acid polymorphism at 631 aa of the chicken Mx protein altered both the antiviral activity and intracellular localization. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evasion of antiviral innate immunity by Theiler's virus L* protein through direct inhibition of RNase L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Sorgeloos

    Full Text Available Theiler's virus is a neurotropic picornavirus responsible for chronic infections of the central nervous system. The establishment of a persistent infection and the subsequent demyelinating disease triggered by the virus depend on the expression of L*, a viral accessory protein encoded by an alternative open reading frame of the virus. We discovered that L* potently inhibits the interferon-inducible OAS/RNase L pathway. The antagonism of RNase L by L* was particularly prominent in macrophages where baseline oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS and RNase L expression levels are elevated, but was detectable in fibroblasts after IFN pretreatment. L* mutations significantly affected Theiler's virus replication in primary macrophages derived from wild-type but not from RNase L-deficient mice. L* counteracted the OAS/RNase L pathway through direct interaction with the ankyrin domain of RNase L, resulting in the inhibition of this enzyme. Interestingly, RNase L inhibition was species-specific as Theiler's virus L* protein blocked murine RNase L but not human RNase L or RNase L of other mammals or birds. Direct RNase L inhibition by L* and species specificity were confirmed in an in vitro assay performed with purified proteins. These results demonstrate a novel viral mechanism to elude the antiviral OAS/RNase L pathway. By targeting the effector enzyme of this antiviral pathway, L* potently inhibits RNase L, underscoring the importance of this enzyme in innate immunity against Theiler's virus.

  12. Inhibition of enterovirus 71 (EV-71 infections by a novel antiviral peptide derived from EV-71 capsid protein VP1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Wah Tan

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV-71 is the main causative agent of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD. In recent years, EV-71 infections were reported to cause high fatalities and severe neurological complications in Asia. Currently, no effective antiviral or vaccine is available to treat or prevent EV-71 infection. In this study, we have discovered a synthetic peptide which could be developed as a potential antiviral for inhibition of EV-71. Ninety five synthetic peptides (15-mers overlapping the entire EV-71 capsid protein, VP1, were chemically synthesized and tested for antiviral properties against EV-71 in human Rhabdomyosarcoma (RD cells. One peptide, SP40, was found to significantly reduce cytopathic effects of all representative EV-71 strains from genotypes A, B and C tested, with IC(50 values ranging from 6-9.3 µM in RD cells. The in vitro inhibitory effect of SP40 exhibited a dose dependent concentration corresponding to a decrease in infectious viral particles, total viral RNA and the levels of VP1 protein. The antiviral activity of SP40 peptide was not restricted to a specific cell line as inhibition of EV-71 was observed in RD, HeLa, HT-29 and Vero cells. Besides inhibition of EV-71, it also had antiviral activities against CV-A16 and poliovirus type 1 in cell culture. Mechanism of action studies suggested that the SP40 peptide was not virucidal but was able to block viral attachment to the RD cells. Substitutions of arginine and lysine residues with alanine in the SP40 peptide at positions R3A, R4A, K5A and R13A were found to significantly decrease antiviral activities, implying the importance of positively charged amino acids for the antiviral activities. The data demonstrated the potential and feasibility of SP40 as a broad spectrum antiviral agent against EV-71.

  13. Assessment of the antiviral properties of recombinant surfactant protein D against influenza B virus in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillaire, Marine L.B.; van Eijk, Martin; Vogelzang-van Trierum, Stella E; Nieuwkoop, Nella J; van Riel, Debby; Fouchier, Ron A M; Kuiken, Thijs; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E.; Haagsman, Henk P.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F

    2015-01-01

    The armamentarium of antiviral drugs against influenza viruses is limited. Furthermore, influenza viruses emerge that are resistant to existing antiviral drugs like the M2 and NA inhibitors. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of novel classes of antiviral drugs. Here we

  14. High Expression of Antiviral Proteins in Mucosa from Individuals Exhibiting Resistance to Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Sandra Milena; Taborda, Natalia Andrea; Feria, Manuel Gerónimo; Arcia, David; Aguilar-Jiménez, Wbeimar; Zapata, Wildeman; Rugeles, María Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Several soluble factors have been reported to have the capacity of inhibiting HIV replication at different steps of the virus life cycle, without eliminating infected cells and through enhancement of specific cellular mechanisms. Yet, it is unclear if these antiviral factors play a role in the protection from HIV infection or in the control of viral replication. Here we evaluated two cohorts: i) one of 58 HIV-exposed seronegative individuals (HESNs) who were compared with 59 healthy controls (HCs), and ii) another of 13 HIV-controllers who were compared with 20 HIV-progressors. Peripheral blood, oral and genital mucosa and gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) samples were obtained to analyze the mRNA expression of ELAFIN, APOBEC3G, SAMHD1, TRIM5α, RNase 7 and SerpinA1 using real-time PCR. HESNs exhibited higher expression of all antiviral factors in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), oral or genital mucosa when compared with HCs. Furthermore, HIV-controllers exhibited higher levels of SerpinA1 in GALT. These findings suggest that the activity of these factors is compartmentalized and that these proteins have a predominant role depending on the tissue to avoid the infection, reduce the viral load and modulate the susceptibility to HIV infection.

  15. High Expression of Antiviral Proteins in Mucosa from Individuals Exhibiting Resistance to Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Milena Gonzalez

    Full Text Available Several soluble factors have been reported to have the capacity of inhibiting HIV replication at different steps of the virus life cycle, without eliminating infected cells and through enhancement of specific cellular mechanisms. Yet, it is unclear if these antiviral factors play a role in the protection from HIV infection or in the control of viral replication. Here we evaluated two cohorts: i one of 58 HIV-exposed seronegative individuals (HESNs who were compared with 59 healthy controls (HCs, and ii another of 13 HIV-controllers who were compared with 20 HIV-progressors. Peripheral blood, oral and genital mucosa and gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT samples were obtained to analyze the mRNA expression of ELAFIN, APOBEC3G, SAMHD1, TRIM5α, RNase 7 and SerpinA1 using real-time PCR.HESNs exhibited higher expression of all antiviral factors in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, oral or genital mucosa when compared with HCs. Furthermore, HIV-controllers exhibited higher levels of SerpinA1 in GALT.These findings suggest that the activity of these factors is compartmentalized and that these proteins have a predominant role depending on the tissue to avoid the infection, reduce the viral load and modulate the susceptibility to HIV infection.

  16. Guanylate-binding protein 1 participates in cellular antiviral response to dengue virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Wen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue virus (DENV, the causative agent of human Dengue hemorrhagic fever, is a mosquito-borne virus found in tropical and sub-tropical regions around the world. Vaccines against DENV are currently unavailable. Guanylate-binding protein 1 (GBP1 is one of the Interferon (IFN stimulated genes (ISGs and has been shown important for host immune defense against various pathogens. However, the role of GBP1 during DENV infection remains unclarified. In this study, we evaluated the relevance of GBP1 to DENV infection in in vitro model. Findings Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR and Western blot showed that the expression of mouse Gbp1 was dramatically upregulated in DENV-infected RAW264.7 cells. The intracellular DENV loads were significantly higher in Gbp1 silenced cells compared with controls. The expression levels of selective anti-viral cytokines were decreased in Gbp1 siRNA treated cells, while the transcription factor activity of NF-κB was impaired upon GBP1 silencing during infection. Conclusions Our data suggested that GBP1 plays an antiviral role during DENV infection.

  17. Antiviral Properties of Chemical Inhibitors of Cellular Anti-Apoptotic Bcl-2 Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanova, Daria; Ianevski, Aleksandr; Bugai, Andrii; Akimov, Yevhen; Kuivanen, Suvi; Paavilainen, Henrik; Kakkola, Laura; Nandania, Jatin; Turunen, Laura; Ohman, Tiina; Ala-Hongisto, Hanna; Pesonen, Hanna M; Kuisma, Marika S; Honkimaa, Anni; Walton, Emma L; Oksenych, Valentyn; Lorey, Martina B; Guschin, Dmitry; Shim, Jungmin; Kim, Jinhee; Than, Thoa T; Chang, So Young; Hukkanen, Veijo; Kulesskiy, Evgeny; Marjomaki, Varpu S; Julkunen, Ilkka; Nyman, Tuula A; Matikainen, Sampsa; Saarela, Jani S; Sane, Famara; Hober, Didier; Gabriel, Gülsah; De Brabander, Jef K; Martikainen, Miika; Windisch, Marc P; Min, Ji-Young; Bruzzone, Roberto; Aittokallio, Tero; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Vapalahti, Olli; Pulk, Arto; Velagapudi, Vidya; Kainov, Denis E

    2017-09-25

    Viral diseases remain serious threats to public health because of the shortage of effective means of control. To combat the surge of viral diseases, new treatments are urgently needed. Here we show that small-molecules, which inhibit cellular anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins (Bcl-2i), induced the premature death of cells infected with different RNA or DNA viruses, whereas, at the same concentrations, no toxicity was observed in mock-infected cells. Moreover, these compounds limited viral replication and spread. Surprisingly, Bcl-2i also induced the premature apoptosis of cells transfected with viral RNA or plasmid DNA but not of mock-transfected cells. These results suggest that Bcl-2i sensitizes cells containing foreign RNA or DNA to apoptosis. A comparison of the toxicity, antiviral activity, and side effects of six Bcl-2i allowed us to select A-1155463 as an antiviral lead candidate. Thus, our results pave the way for the further development of Bcl-2i for the prevention and treatment of viral diseases.

  18. Antiviral activity of a small molecule deubiquitinase inhibitor occurs via induction of the unfolded protein response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey W Perry

    Full Text Available Ubiquitin (Ub is a vital regulatory component in various cellular processes, including cellular responses to viral infection. As obligate intracellular pathogens, viruses have the capacity to manipulate the ubiquitin (Ub cycle to their advantage by encoding Ub-modifying proteins including deubiquitinases (DUBs. However, how cellular DUBs modulate specific viral infections, such as norovirus, is poorly understood. To examine the role of DUBs during norovirus infection, we used WP1130, a small molecule inhibitor of a subset of cellular DUBs. Replication of murine norovirus in murine macrophages and the human norovirus Norwalk virus in a replicon system were significantly inhibited by WP1130. Chemical proteomics identified the cellular DUB USP14 as a target of WP1130 in murine macrophages, and pharmacologic inhibition or siRNA-mediated knockdown of USP14 inhibited murine norovirus infection. USP14 is a proteasome-associated DUB that also binds to inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1, a critical mediator of the unfolded protein response (UPR. WP1130 treatment of murine macrophages did not alter proteasome activity but activated the X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1 through an IRE1-dependent mechanism. In addition, WP1130 treatment or induction of the UPR also reduced infection of other RNA viruses including encephalomyocarditis virus, Sindbis virus, and La Crosse virus but not vesicular stomatitis virus. Pharmacologic inhibition of the IRE1 endonuclease activity partially rescued the antiviral effect of WP1130. Taken together, our studies support a model whereby induction of the UPR through cellular DUB inhibition blocks specific viral infections, and suggest that cellular DUBs and the UPR represent novel targets for future development of broad spectrum antiviral therapies.

  19. Biological activities of the antiviral protein BE27 from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Rosario; Citores, Lucía; Di Maro, Antimo; Ferreras, José M

    2015-02-01

    The ribosome inactivating protein BE27 displays several biological activities in vitro that could result in a broad action against several types of pathogens. Beetin 27 (BE27), a ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) leaves, is an antiviral protein induced by virus and signaling compounds such as hydrogen peroxide and salicylic acid. Its role as a defense protein has been attributed to its RNA polynucleotide:adenosine glycosidase activity. Here we tested other putative activities of BE27 that could have a defensive role against pathogens finding that BE27 displays rRNA N-glycosidase activity against yeast and Agrobacterium tumefaciens ribosomes, DNA polynucleotide:adenosine glycosidase activity against herring sperm DNA, and magnesium-dependent endonuclease activity against the supercoiled plasmid PUC19 (nicking activity). The nicking activity could be a consequence of an unusual conformation of the BE27 active site, similar to that of PD-L1, a RIP from Phytolacca dioica L. leaves. Additionally, BE27 possesses superoxide dismutase activity, thus being able to produce the signal compound hydrogen peroxide. BE27 is also toxic to COLO 320 cells, inducing apoptosis in these cells by either activating the caspase pathways and/or inhibiting protein synthesis. The combined effect of these biological activities could result in a broad action against several types of pathogens such as virus, bacteria, fungi or insects.

  20. Which Plant Proteins Are Involved in Antiviral Defense? Review on In Vivo and In Vitro Activities of Selected Plant Proteins against Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Plants have evolved a variety of defense mechanisms to tackle virus attack. Endogenous plant proteins can function as virus suppressors. Different types of proteins mediate defense responses against plant viruses. Pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins are activated upon pathogen infections or in different stress situations and their production is one of many components in plant defense. Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) suppress translation by enzymatically damaging ribosomes and they have been found to have antiviral activity. RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) bind to target RNAs via specialized RNA-binding domain and can directly or indirectly function in plant defense system against RNA viruses. Proteins involved in silencing machinery, namely Dicer-like (DCL) proteins, Argonaute (AGO) proteins, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs) confer innate antiviral defense in plants as they are able to degrade foreign RNA of viral origin. This review aims to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date picture of plant proteins participating in antiviral defense. As a result we discuss proteins conferring plant antiviral resistance and their potential future applications in different fields of life including agriculture and medicine. PMID:29104238

  1. Which Plant Proteins Are Involved in Antiviral Defense? Review on In Vivo and In Vitro Activities of Selected Plant Proteins against Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musidlak, Oskar; Nawrot, Robert; Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna

    2017-11-01

    Plants have evolved a variety of defense mechanisms to tackle virus attack. Endogenous plant proteins can function as virus suppressors. Different types of proteins mediate defense responses against plant viruses. Pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins are activated upon pathogen infections or in different stress situations and their production is one of many components in plant defense. Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) suppress translation by enzymatically damaging ribosomes and they have been found to have antiviral activity. RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) bind to target RNAs via specialized RNA-binding domain and can directly or indirectly function in plant defense system against RNA viruses. Proteins involved in silencing machinery, namely Dicer-like (DCL) proteins, Argonaute (AGO) proteins, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs) confer innate antiviral defense in plants as they are able to degrade foreign RNA of viral origin. This review aims to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date picture of plant proteins participating in antiviral defense. As a result we discuss proteins conferring plant antiviral resistance and their potential future applications in different fields of life including agriculture and medicine.

  2. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus: identification of M protein-binding peptide ligands with antiviral and diagnostic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Hao; Zarlenga, Dante S; Sestak, Karol; Suo, Siqingaowa; Ren, Xiaofeng

    2013-09-01

    The membrane (M) protein is one of the major structural proteins of coronavirus particles. In this study, the M protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) was used to biopan a 12-mer phage display random peptide library. Three phages expressing TGEV-M-binding peptides were identified and characterized in more depth. A phage-based immunosorbent assay (phage-ELISA) capable of differentiating TGEV from other coronaviruses was developed using one phage, phTGEV-M7, as antigen. When the phage-ELISA was compared to conventional antibody-based ELISA for detecting infections, phage-ELISA exhibited greater sensitivity. A chemically synthesized, TGEV-M7 peptide (pepTGEV-M7; HALTPIKYIPPG) was evaluated for antiviral activity. Plaque-reduction assays revealed that pepTGEV-M7 was able to prevent TGEV infection in vitro (p<0.01) following pretreatment of the virus with the peptide. Indirect immunofluorescence and real-time RT-PCR confirmed the inhibitory effects of the peptide. These results indicate that pepTGEV-M7 might be utilized for virus-specific diagnostics and treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Identification of Secreted Proteins Involved in Nonspecific dsRNA-Mediated Lutzomyia longipalpis LL5 Cell Antiviral Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Martins-da-Silva

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematophagous insects transmit infectious diseases. Sand flies are vectors of leishmaniasis, but can also transmit viruses. We have been studying immune responses of Lutzomyia longipalpis, the main vector of visceral leishmaniasis in the Americas. We identified a non-specific antiviral response in L. longipalpis LL5 embryonic cells when treated with non-specific double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs. This response is reminiscent of interferon response in mammals. We are investigating putative effectors for this antiviral response. Secreted molecules have been implicated in immune responses, including interferon-related responses. We conducted a mass spectrometry analysis of conditioned medium from LL5 cells 24 and 48 h after dsRNA or mock treatment. We identified 304 proteins. At 24 h, 19 proteins had an abundance equal or greater than 2-fold change, while the levels of 17 proteins were reduced when compared to control cells. At the 48 h time point, these numbers were 33 and 71, respectively. The two most abundant secreted peptides at 24 h in the dsRNA-transfected group were phospholipid scramblase, an interferon-inducible protein that mediates antiviral activity, and forskolin-binding protein (FKBP, a member of the immunophilin family, which mediates the effect of immunosuppressive drugs. The transcription profile of most candidates did not follow the pattern of secreted protein abundance.

  4. CNS activity of Pokeweed Anti-viral Protein (PAP in mice infected with Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus (LCMV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibbles Heather E

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Others and we have previously described the potent in vivo and in vitro activity of the broad-spectrum antiviral agent PAP (Pokeweed antiviral protein against a wide range of viruses. The purpose of the present study was to further elucidate the anti-viral spectrum of PAP by examining its effects on the survival of mice challenged with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV. Methods We examined the therapeutic effect of PAP in CBA mice inoculated with intracerebral injections of the WE54 strain of LCMV at a 1000 PFU dose level that is lethal to 100% of mice within 7–9 days. Mice were treated either with vehicle or PAP administered intraperitoneally 24 hours prior to, 1 hour prior to and 24 hours, 48 hours 72 hours and 96 hours after virus inoculation. Results PAP exhibits significant in vivo anti- LCMV activity in mice challenged intracerebrally with an otherwise invariably fatal dose of LCMV. At non-toxic dose levels, PAP significantly prolonged survival in the absence of the majority of disease-associated symptoms. The median survival time of PAP-treated mice was >21 days as opposed to 7 days median survival for the control (p = 0.0069. Conclusion Our results presented herein provide unprecedented experimental evidence that PAP exhibits antiviral activity in the CNS of LCMV-infected mice.

  5. Characterization of a ranavirus inhibitor of the antiviral protein kinase PKR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinchar V Gregory

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ranaviruses (family Iridoviridae are important pathogens of lower vertebrates. However, little is known about how they circumvent the immune response of their hosts. Many ranaviruses contain a predicted protein, designated vIF2α, which shows homology with the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α. In analogy to distantly related proteins found in poxviruses vIF2α might act as an inhibitor of the antiviral protein kinase PKR. Results We have characterized the function of vIF2α from Rana catesbeiana virus Z (RCV-Z. Multiple sequence alignments and secondary structure prediction revealed homology of vIF2α with eIF2α throughout the S1-, helical- and C-terminal domains. Genetic and biochemical analyses showed that vIF2α blocked the toxic effects of human and zebrafish PKR in a heterologous yeast system. Rather than complementing eIF2α function, vIF2α acted in a manner comparable to the vaccinia virus (VACV K3L protein (K3, a pseudosubstrate inhibitor of PKR. Both vIF2α and K3 inhibited human PKR-mediated eIF2α phosphorylation, but not PKR autophosphorylation on Thr446. In contrast the E3L protein (E3, another poxvirus inhibitor of PKR, inhibited both Thr446 and eIF2α Ser51 phosphorylation. Interestingly, phosphorylation of eIF2α by zebrafish PKR was inhibited by vIF2α and E3, but not by K3. Effective inhibition of PKR activity coincided with increased PKR expression levels, indicative of relieved autoinhibition of PKR expression. Experiments with vIF2α deletion constructs, showed that both the N-terminal and helical domains were sufficient for inhibition of PKR, whereas the C-terminal domain was dispensable. Conclusions Our results show that RCV-Z vIF2α is a functional inhibitor of human and zebrafish PKR, and probably functions in similar fashion as VACV K3. This constitutes an important step in understanding the interaction of ranaviruses and the host innate immune system.

  6. Evolution and Antiviral Specificities of Interferon-Induced Mx Proteins of Bats against Ebola, Influenza, and Other RNA Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Jonas; Hölzer, Martin; Schilling, Mirjam; Patzina, Corinna; Schoen, Andreas; Hoenen, Thomas; Zimmer, Gert; Marz, Manja; Weber, Friedemann; Müller, Marcel A; Kochs, Georg

    2017-08-01

    Bats serve as a reservoir for various, often zoonotic viruses, including significant human pathogens such as Ebola and influenza viruses. However, for unknown reasons, viral infections rarely cause clinical symptoms in bats. A tight control of viral replication by the host innate immune defense might contribute to this phenomenon. Transcriptomic studies revealed the presence of the interferon-induced antiviral myxovirus resistance (Mx) proteins in bats, but detailed functional aspects have not been assessed. To provide evidence that bat Mx proteins might act as key factors to control viral replication we cloned Mx1 cDNAs from three bat families, Pteropodidae, Phyllostomidae, and Vespertilionidae. Phylogenetically these bat Mx1 genes cluster closely with their human ortholog MxA. Using transfected cell cultures, minireplicon systems, virus-like particles, and virus infections, we determined the antiviral potential of the bat Mx1 proteins. Bat Mx1 significantly reduced the polymerase activity of viruses circulating in bats, including Ebola and influenza A-like viruses. The related Thogoto virus, however, which is not known to infect bats, was not inhibited by bat Mx1. Further, we provide evidence for positive selection in bat Mx1 genes that might explain species-specific antiviral activities of these proteins. Together, our data suggest a role for Mx1 in controlling these viruses in their bat hosts. IMPORTANCE Bats are a natural reservoir for various viruses that rarely cause clinical symptoms in bats but are dangerous zoonotic pathogens, like Ebola or rabies virus. It has been hypothesized that the interferon system might play a key role in controlling viral replication in bats. We speculate that the interferon-induced Mx proteins might be key antiviral factors of bats and have coevolved with bat-borne viruses. This study evaluated for the first time a large set of bat Mx1 proteins spanning three major bat families for their antiviral potential, including activity

  7. Cissampelos sympodialis has anti-viral effect inhibiting dengue non-structural viral protein-1 and pro-inflammatory mediators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fagner Carvalho Leite

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Dengue is the most important viral infection transmitted among humans by arthropod-borne. There are currently no vaccines or specific therapeutical treatment. Therefore, immunomodulatory compounds from plants have been widely examined for their antiviral effects. Cissampelos sympodialis Eichler, Menispermaceae, has scientifically proven to present immunomodulatory activities. Here we assessed the antiviral activity of leaf hydroalcoholic extract, warifteine or methylwarifteine from C. sympodialis in an in vitro dengue virus infection model. The results demonstrated that leaf hydroalcoholic extract or warifteine/methylwarifteine treatment did not reduce dengue virus-Ag+ hepatocyte (Huh-7 cell rates in present experimental conditions. However, we assessed the potential antiviral effect of leaf hydroalcoholic extract or warifteine/methylwarifteine on dengue virus-infection by the production of inflammatory molecules, TNF-α, MIF, IL-8 and PGE2. Dengue virus infection enhanced TNF-α, MIF, IL-8 and PGE2 production in infected Huh-7 cells and leaf hydroalcoholic extract but not warifteine/methylwarifteine treatments, significantly reduced these molecules in infected cells. In dengue virus-infected Huh-7 cells, non-structural protein-1 is produced and leaf hydroalcoholic extract significantly inhibited it independently of alkaloids. Our findings imply that leaf hydroalcoholic extract may attenuate dengue virus infection in Huh-7 cells by inhibiting the enhanced of pro-inflammatory mediators and non-structural protein-1 production induce by dengue virus independently of warifteine/methywarifteine its major compound.

  8. Protein: MPA1 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MPA1 TLR signaling molecules Rsad2 Vig1 Radical S-adenosyl methionine domain-containing pr...otein 2 Viperin, Virus inhibitory protein, endoplasmic reticulum-associated, interferon-inducible 10090 Mus musculus 58185 Q8CBB9 21435586 ...

  9. Cucumber mosaic virus coat protein modulates the accumulation of 2b protein and antiviral silencing that causes symptom recovery in planta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Peng Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Shoot apical meristems (SAM are resistant to most plant viruses due to RNA silencing, which is restrained by viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs to facilitate transient viral invasion of the SAM. In many cases chronic symptoms and long-term virus recovery occur, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we found that wild-type Cucumber mosaic virus (CMVWT invaded the SAM transiently, but was subsequently eliminated from the meristems. Unexpectedly, a CMV mutant, designated CMVRA that harbors an alanine substitution in the N-terminal arginine-rich region of the coat protein (CP persistently invaded the SAM and resulted in visible reductions in apical dominance. Notably, the CMVWT virus elicited more potent antiviral silencing than CMVRA in newly emerging leaves of infected plants. However, both viruses caused severe symptoms with minimal antiviral silencing effects in the Arabidopsis mutants lacking host RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE 6 (RDR6 or SUPPRESSOR OF GENE SILENCING 3 (SGS3, indicating that CMVWT induced host RDR6/SGS3-dependent antiviral silencing. We also showed that reduced accumulation of the 2b protein is elicited in the CMVWT infection and consequently rescues potent antiviral RNA silencing. Indeed, co-infiltration assays showed that the suppression of posttranscriptional gene silencing mediated by 2b is more severely compromised by co-expression of CPWT than by CPRA. We further demonstrated that CPWT had high RNA binding activity leading to translation inhibition in wheat germ systems, and CPWT was associated with SGS3 into punctate granules in vivo. Thus, we propose that the RNAs bound and protected by CPWT possibly serve as templates of RDR6/SGS3 complexes for siRNA amplification. Together, these findings suggest that the CMV CP acts as a central hub that modulates antiviral silencing and VSRs activity, and mediates viral self-attenuation and long-term symptom recovery.

  10. Novel Role for Protein Inhibitor of Activated STAT 4 (PIAS4) in the Restriction of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 by the Cellular Intrinsic Antiviral Immune Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Kristen L; Wasson, Peter; McFarlane, Steven; Tong, Lily; Brown, James R; Grant, Kyle G; Domingues, Patricia; Boutell, Chris

    2016-05-01

    Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is used by the intrinsic antiviral immune response to restrict viral pathogens, such as herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). Despite characterization of the host factors that rely on SUMOylation to exert their antiviral effects, the enzymes that mediate these SUMOylation events remain to be defined. We show that unconjugated SUMO levels are largely maintained throughout infection regardless of the presence of ICP0, the HSV-1 SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase. Moreover, in the absence of ICP0, high-molecular-weight SUMO-conjugated proteins do not accumulate if HSV-1 DNA does not replicate. These data highlight the continued importance for SUMO signaling throughout infection. We show that the SUMO ligase protein inhibitor of activated STAT 4 (PIAS4) is upregulated during HSV-1 infection and localizes to nuclear domains that contain viral DNA. PIAS4 is recruited to sites associated with HSV-1 genome entry through SUMO interaction motif (SIM)-dependent mechanisms that are destabilized by ICP0. In contrast, PIAS4 accumulates in replication compartments through SIM-independent mechanisms irrespective of ICP0 expression. Depletion of PIAS4 enhances the replication of ICP0-null mutant HSV-1, which is susceptible to restriction by the intrinsic antiviral immune response. The mechanisms of PIAS4-mediated restriction are synergistic with the restriction mechanisms of a characterized intrinsic antiviral factor, promyelocytic leukemia protein, and are antagonized by ICP0. We provide the first evidence that PIAS4 is an intrinsic antiviral factor. This novel role for PIAS4 in intrinsic antiviral immunity contrasts with the known roles of PIAS proteins as suppressors of innate immunity. Posttranslational modifications with small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) proteins regulate multiple aspects of host immunity and viral replication. The protein inhibitor of activated STAT (PIAS) family of SUMO ligases is predominantly associated with the suppression of

  11. NEOGLYCOPROTEINS AS CARRIERS FOR ANTIVIRAL DRUGS - SYNTHESIS AND ANALYSIS OF PROTEIN DRUG CONJUGATES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molema, Grietje; Jansen, Robert W.; Visser, Jan; Herdewijn, Piet; Moolenaar, Frits; Meijer, Dirk K.F.

    In order to investigate whether neoglycoproteins can potentially act as carriers for targeting of antiviral drugs to certain cell types in the body, various neoglycoproteins were synthesized using thiophosgene-activated p-aminophenyl sugar derivatives. These neoglycoproteins were conjugated with the

  12. Melittin-loaded immunoliposomes against viral surface proteins, a new approach to antiviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falco Gracia, J.A.; Barrajon-Catalan, E.; Menendez-Gutierrez, M.P.; Coll, J.; Micol, V.; Estepa, A.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, melittin, a well-characterized pore-forming lytic amphiphilic peptide susceptible to be vehiculized in lipid membranes, has been utilized to study their antiviral properties. For this purpose, an assay based on melittin loaded-immunoliposomes previously described by our group was

  13. Interaction research on an antiviral molecule that targets the coat protein of southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Longlu; Ding, Yan; Luo, Liangzhi; Gan, Xiuhai; Li, Xiangyang; Chen, Yongzhong; Hu, Deyu; Song, Baoan

    2017-10-01

    Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV) coat protein (P10) is the key protein required for viral transmission and host plant infection and is thus a promising target for anti-SRBSDV agent screening. In this study, P10 was obtained from Escherichia coli through cloning, expression, and purification. The antiviral agent Ningnanmycin was selected as control, and a series of antiviral compounds based on the structural scaffold of ferulic acid were analyzed. Size-exclusion chromatography analysis results showed that compound F27 can alter the aggregation of P10 proteins. Furthermore, fluorescence titration and microscale thermophoresis assay results indicated that F27 binds to P10 with K A of 5.75×10 5 M -1 and K D of 7.81μM. The ligand- and receptor-based three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity analyses were performed to determine the requirements for the interaction between the carboxyl structures and P10s. On the basis of the obtained models and information, we provided insights regarding the design and optimization of novel molecules as anti-SRBSDV agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Antiviral immunity in marine molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Timothy J; Raftos, David; Speck, Peter; Montagnani, Caroline

    2015-09-01

    Marine molluscs, like all living organisms, are constantly exposed to viruses and have evolved efficient antiviral defences. We review here recent developments in molluscan antiviral immunity against viruses belonging to the order Herpesvirales. Emerging results suggest an interferon-like response and autophagy are involved in the antiviral defence of bivalves to viral infection. Multi-functional plasma proteins from gastropods and bivalves have been identified to have broad-spectrum antiviral activity against mammalian viruses. The antiviral defences present in molluscs can be enhanced by genetic selection, as shown by the presence of oyster strains specifically resistant to ostreid herpesvirus type 1. Whether varying amounts or different isoforms of these antiviral plasma proteins contributes to genetic resistance is worthy of further research. Other evolutionarily conserved antiviral mechanisms, such as RNA interference and apoptosis, still need further characterization.

  15. Herpes simplex virus 1 infection dampens the immediate early antiviral innate immunity signaling from peroxisomes by tegument protein VP16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chunfu; Su, Chenhe

    2017-02-21

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is an archetypal member of the alphaherpesvirus subfamily with a large genome encoding over 80 proteins, many of which play a critical role in virus-host interactions and immune modulation. Upon viral infections, the host cells activate innate immune responses to restrict their replications. Peroxisomes, which have long been defined to regulate metabolic activities, are reported to be important signaling platforms for antiviral innate immunity. It has been verified that signaling from peroxisomal MAVS (MAVS-Pex) triggers a rapid interferon (IFN) independent IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) production against invading pathogens. However, little is known about the interaction between DNA viruses such as HSV-1 and the MAVS-Pex mediated signaling. HSV-1 could activate the MAVS-Pex signaling pathway at a low multiplicity of infection (MOI), while infection at a high MOI dampens MAVS-Pex induced immediately early ISGs production. A high-throughput screen assay reveals that HSV-1 tegument protein VP16 inhibits the immediate early ISGs expression downstream of MAVS-Pex signaling. Moreover, the expression of ISGs was recovered when VP16 was knockdown with its specific short hairpin RNA. HSV-1 blocks MAVS-Pex mediated early ISGs production through VP16 to dampen the immediate early antiviral innate immunity signaling from peroxisomes.

  16. Proteolytic activation of the SARS-coronavirus spike protein: cutting enzymes at the cutting edge of antiviral research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Graham; Zmora, Pawel; Gierer, Stefanie; Heurich, Adeline; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) pandemic revealed that zoonotic transmission of animal coronaviruses (CoV) to humans poses a significant threat to public health and warrants surveillance and the development of countermeasures. The activity of host cell proteases, which cleave and activate the SARS-CoV spike (S) protein, is essential for viral infectivity and constitutes a target for intervention. However, the identities of the proteases involved have been unclear. Pioneer studies identified cathepsins and type II transmembrane serine proteases as cellular activators of SARS-CoV and demonstrated that several emerging viruses might exploit these enzymes to promote their spread. Here, we will review the proteolytic systems hijacked by SARS-CoV for S protein activation, we will discuss their contribution to viral spread in the host and we will outline antiviral strategies targeting these enzymes. This paper forms part of a series of invited articles in Antiviral Research on "From SARS to MERS: 10years of research on highly pathogenic human coronaviruses.'' Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Structure and Function of the Non-Structural Protein of Dengue Virus and its Applications in Antiviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qian; Zhang, Bao; Yu, JianHai; Wu, Qinghua; Yang, Fangji; Cao, Hong; Zhao, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Dengue fever, a type of global and tropical infectious disease, and its prevention has become a challenging issue worldwide. Antibody-dependent enhancement effects and the virus pathogenic mechanism have not yet been fully elucidated, hindering the development of dengue fever prevention and suitable drug treatment. There is currently no specific prevention and therapy in clinical trials, however, in recent years, studies have focused on the pathogenesis and treatment of dengue. Research focusing on dengue virus nonstructural protein in special drugs for the prevention and control of dengue fever is a new progress leading to improved understanding regarding the prevention and control of dengue fever and suitable drugs for the treatment. The main challenges regarding the structure of dengue virus nonstructural protein and the drugs for antiviral therapy are summarized in this paper.

  18. A recombinant, infectious human parainfluenza virus type 3 expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein for use in high-throughput antiviral assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Jason P.; Li, Joseph K.-K.; Smee, Donald F.; Morrey, John D.; Barnard, Dale L.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to rescue an infectious, recombinant, negative-stranded, RNA virus from a cDNA clone, has led to new opportunities for measuring viral replication from a viral expressed reporter gene. In this study, the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene was inserted into the human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV-3) antigenome and a recombinant, infectious virus was rescued. Maximum EGFP expression levels, measured by fluorescence, were seen at day 3. Comparison of a three-day, viral expressed EGFP fluorescence assay to a seven-day, neutral red assay, based on complete cell destruction in virus infected MA-104 cells, yielded Z′-factor values of 0.83 and 0.70, respectively. A three-day, endpoint EGFP-based antiviral assay and a seven-day, endpoint neutral red based antiviral assay were run in parallel to establish antiviral sensitivity profiles of 23 compounds based on selective index (SI) values. Using an SI threshold of 10, the EGFP-based antiviral assay had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 54%. Thus, the use of an EGFP-based antiviral assay for testing potential antiviral compounds against HPIV-3 in a high-throughput format may be justified. PMID:19189850

  19. Histone Deacetylase 2 Is a Component of Influenza A Virus-Induced Host Antiviral Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagesh, Prashanth T; Hussain, Mazhar; Galvin, Henry D; Husain, Matloob

    2017-01-01

    Host cells produce variety of antiviral factors that create an antiviral state and target various stages of influenza A virus (IAV) life cycle to inhibit infection. However, IAV has evolved various strategies to antagonize those antiviral factors. Recently, we reported that a member of class I host histone deacetylases (HDACs), HDAC1 possesses an anti-IAV function. Herein, we provide evidence that HDAC2, another class I member and closely related to HDAC1 in structure and function, also possesses anti-IAV properties. In turn, IAV, like HDAC1, dysregulates HDAC2, mainly at the polypeptide level through proteasomal degradation to potentially minimize its antiviral effect. We found that IAV downregulated the HDAC2 polypeptide level in A549 cells in an H1N1 strain-independent manner by up to 47%, which was recovered to almost 100% level in the presence of proteasome-inhibitor MG132. A further knockdown in HDAC2 expression by up to 90% via RNA interference augmented the growth kinetics of IAV in A549 cells by more than four-fold after 24 h of infection. Furthermore, the knockdown of HDAC2 expression decreased the IAV-induced phosphorylation of the transcription factor, Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription I (STAT1) and the expression of interferon-stimulated gene, viperin in infected cells by 41 and 53%, respectively. The role of HDAC2 in viperin expression was analogous to that of HDAC1, but it was not in the phosphorylation of STAT1. This indicated that, like HDAC1, HDAC2 is a component of IAV-induced host innate antiviral response and performs both redundant and non-redundant functions vis-a-vis HDAC1; however, IAV dysregulates them both in a redundant manner.

  20. Histone Deacetylase 2 Is a Component of Influenza A Virus-Induced Host Antiviral Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth T. Nagesh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Host cells produce variety of antiviral factors that create an antiviral state and target various stages of influenza A virus (IAV life cycle to inhibit infection. However, IAV has evolved various strategies to antagonize those antiviral factors. Recently, we reported that a member of class I host histone deacetylases (HDACs, HDAC1 possesses an anti-IAV function. Herein, we provide evidence that HDAC2, another class I member and closely related to HDAC1 in structure and function, also possesses anti-IAV properties. In turn, IAV, like HDAC1, dysregulates HDAC2, mainly at the polypeptide level through proteasomal degradation to potentially minimize its antiviral effect. We found that IAV downregulated the HDAC2 polypeptide level in A549 cells in an H1N1 strain-independent manner by up to 47%, which was recovered to almost 100% level in the presence of proteasome-inhibitor MG132. A further knockdown in HDAC2 expression by up to 90% via RNA interference augmented the growth kinetics of IAV in A549 cells by more than four-fold after 24 h of infection. Furthermore, the knockdown of HDAC2 expression decreased the IAV-induced phosphorylation of the transcription factor, Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription I (STAT1 and the expression of interferon-stimulated gene, viperin in infected cells by 41 and 53%, respectively. The role of HDAC2 in viperin expression was analogous to that of HDAC1, but it was not in the phosphorylation of STAT1. This indicated that, like HDAC1, HDAC2 is a component of IAV-induced host innate antiviral response and performs both redundant and non-redundant functions vis-a-vis HDAC1; however, IAV dysregulates them both in a redundant manner.

  1. The ubiquitin ligase RNF5 regulates antiviral responses by mediating degradation of the adaptor protein MITA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Bo; Zhang, Lu; Lei, Caoqi; Li, Ying; Mao, Ai-Ping; Yang, Yan; Wang, Yan-Yi; Zhang, Xiao-Lian; Shu, Hong-Bing

    2009-03-20

    Viral infection activates transcription factors NF-kappaB and IRF3, which collaborate to induce type I interferons (IFNs) and elicit innate antiviral response. MITA (also known as STING) has recently been identified as an adaptor that links virus-sensing receptors to IRF3 activation. Here, we showed that the E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF5 interacted with MITA in a viral-infection-dependent manner. Overexpression of RNF5 inhibited virus-triggered IRF3 activation, IFNB1 expression, and cellular antiviral response, whereas knockdown of RNF5 had opposite effects. RNF5 targeted MITA at Lys150 for ubiquitination and degradation after viral infection. Both MITA and RNF5 were located at the mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and viral infection caused their redistribution to the ER and mitochondria, respectively. We further found that virus-induced ubiquitination and degradation of MITA by RNF5 occurred at the mitochondria. These findings suggest that RNF5 negatively regulates virus-triggered signaling by targeting MITA for ubiquitination and degradation at the mitochondria.

  2. Inhibition of antiviral innate immunity by birnavirus VP3 protein via blockage of viral double-stranded RNA binding to the host cytoplasmic RNA detector MDA5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chengjin; Jia, Lu; Sun, Yanting; Hu, Boli; Wang, Lun; Lu, Xingmeng; Zhou, Jiyong

    2014-10-01

    Chicken MDA5 (chMDA5), the sole known pattern recognition receptor for cytoplasmic viral RNA in chickens, initiates type I interferon (IFN) production. Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) evades host innate immunity, but the mechanism is unclear. We report here that IBDV inhibited antiviral innate immunity via the chMDA5-dependent signaling pathway. IBDV infection did not induce efficient type I interferon (IFN) production but antagonized the antiviral activity of beta interferon (IFN-β) in DF-1 cells pretreated with IFN-α/β. Dual-luciferase assays and inducible expression systems demonstrated that IBDV protein VP3 significantly inhibited IFN-β expression stimulated by naked IBDV genomic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). The VP3 protein competed strongly with chMDA5 to bind IBDV genomic dsRNA in vitro and in vivo, and VP3 from other birnaviruses also bound dsRNA. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that deletion of the VP3 dsRNA binding domain restored IFN-β expression. Our data demonstrate that VP3 inhibits antiviral innate immunity by blocking binding of viral genomic dsRNA to MDA5. MDA5, a known pattern recognition receptor and cytoplasmic viral RNA sensor, plays a critical role in host antiviral innate immunity. Many pathogens escape or inhibit the host antiviral immune response, but the mechanisms involved are unclear for most pathogens. We report here that birnaviruses inhibit host antiviral innate immunity via the MDA5-dependent signaling pathway. The antiviral innate immune system involving IFN-β did not function effectively during birnavirus infection, and the viral protein VP3 significantly inhibited IFN-β expression stimulated by naked viral genomic dsRNA. We also show that VP3 blocks MDA5 binding to viral genomic dsRNA in vitro and in vivo. Our data reveal that birnavirus-encoded viral protein VP3 is an inhibitor of the antiviral innate immune response and inhibits the antiviral innate immune response via the MDA5-dependent signaling pathway

  3. Silencing herpes simplex virus type 1 capsid protein encoding genes by siRNA: a promising antiviral therapeutic approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujun Jin

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1, a member of the herpesviridae, causes a variety of human viral diseases globally. Although a series of antiviral drugs are available for the treatment of infection and suppression of dissemination, HSV-1 remains highly prevalent worldwide. Therefore, the development of novel antiviral agents with different mechanisms of action is a matter of extreme urgency. During the proliferation of HSV-1, capsid assembly is essential for viral growth, and it is highly conserved in all HSV-1 strains. In this study, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs against the HSV-1 capsid protein were screened to explore the influence of silencing capsid expression on the replication of HSV-1. We designed and chemically synthesized siRNAs for the capsid gene and assessed their inhibitory effects on the expression of target mRNA and the total intracellular viral genome loads by quantitative real-time PCR, as well as on the replication of HSV-1 via plaque reduction assays and electron microscopy. Our results showed that siRNA was an effective approach to inhibit the expression of capsid protein encoding genes including UL18, UL19, UL26, UL26.5, UL35 and UL38 in vitro. Interference of capsid proteins VP23 (UL18 and VP5 (UL19 individually or jointly greatly affected the replication of clinically isolated acyclovir-resistant HSV-1 as well as HSV-1/F and HSV-2/333. Plaque numbers and intracellular virions were significantly reduced by simultaneous knockdown of UL18 and UL19. The total intracellular viral genome loads were also significantly decreased in the UL18 and UL19 knockdown groups compared with the viral control. In conclusion, interfering with UL18 and UL19 gene expression could inhibit HSV-1 replication efficiently in vitro. Our research offers new targets for an RNA interference-based therapeutic strategy against HSV-1.

  4. Silencing herpes simplex virus type 1 capsid protein encoding genes by siRNA: a promising antiviral therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Fujun; Li, Shen; Zheng, Kai; Zhuo, Cuiqin; Ma, Kaiqi; Chen, Maoyun; Wang, Qiaoli; Zhang, Peizhuo; Fan, Jianglin; Ren, Zhe; Wang, Yifei

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a member of the herpesviridae, causes a variety of human viral diseases globally. Although a series of antiviral drugs are available for the treatment of infection and suppression of dissemination, HSV-1 remains highly prevalent worldwide. Therefore, the development of novel antiviral agents with different mechanisms of action is a matter of extreme urgency. During the proliferation of HSV-1, capsid assembly is essential for viral growth, and it is highly conserved in all HSV-1 strains. In this study, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against the HSV-1 capsid protein were screened to explore the influence of silencing capsid expression on the replication of HSV-1. We designed and chemically synthesized siRNAs for the capsid gene and assessed their inhibitory effects on the expression of target mRNA and the total intracellular viral genome loads by quantitative real-time PCR, as well as on the replication of HSV-1 via plaque reduction assays and electron microscopy. Our results showed that siRNA was an effective approach to inhibit the expression of capsid protein encoding genes including UL18, UL19, UL26, UL26.5, UL35 and UL38 in vitro. Interference of capsid proteins VP23 (UL18) and VP5 (UL19) individually or jointly greatly affected the replication of clinically isolated acyclovir-resistant HSV-1 as well as HSV-1/F and HSV-2/333. Plaque numbers and intracellular virions were significantly reduced by simultaneous knockdown of UL18 and UL19. The total intracellular viral genome loads were also significantly decreased in the UL18 and UL19 knockdown groups compared with the viral control. In conclusion, interfering with UL18 and UL19 gene expression could inhibit HSV-1 replication efficiently in vitro. Our research offers new targets for an RNA interference-based therapeutic strategy against HSV-1.

  5. TRIM32 protein modulates type I interferon induction and cellular antiviral response by targeting MITA/STING protein for K63-linked ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Hu, Ming-Ming; Wang, Yan-Yi; Shu, Hong-Bing

    2012-08-17

    Viral infection activates several transcription factors including NF-κB and IRF3, which collaborate to induce type I interferons (IFNs) and innate antiviral response. MITA (also called STING) is a critical adaptor protein that links virus-sensing receptors to IRF3 activation upon infection by both RNA and DNA pathogens. Here we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase tripartite motif protein 32 (TRIM32) ubiquitinated MITA and dramatically enhanced MITA-mediated induction of IFN-β. Overexpression of TRIM32 potentiated virus-triggered IFNB1 expression and cellular antiviral response. Consistently, knockdown of TRIM32 had opposite effects. TRIM32 interacted with MITA, and was located at the mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. TRIM32 targeted MITA for K63-linked ubiquitination at K20/150/224/236 through its E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, which promoted the interaction of MITA with TBK1. These findings suggest that TRIM32 is an important regulatory protein for innate immunity against both RNA and DNA viruses by targeting MITA for K63-linked ubiquitination and downstream activation.

  6. Mitochondria and antiviral innate immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Koshiba, Takumi; Bashiruddin, Nasir; Kawabata, Shunichiro

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria, dynamic organelles that undergo continuous cycles of fusion and fission, are the powerhouses of eukaryotic cells. Recent research indicates that mitochondria also act as platforms for antiviral immunity in vertebrates. Mitochondrial-mediated antiviral immunity depends on activation of the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptors signal transduction pathway and the participation of the mitochondrial outer membrane adaptor protein “mitochondrial antiviral signaling (M...

  7. Elevation of intact and proteolytic fragments of acute phase proteins constitutes the earliest systemic antiviral response in HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger B Kramer

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The earliest immune responses activated in acute human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection (AHI exert a critical influence on subsequent virus spread or containment. During this time frame, components of the innate immune system such as macrophages and DCs, NK cells, beta-defensins, complement and other anti-microbial factors, which have all been implicated in modulating HIV infection, may play particularly important roles. A proteomics-based screen was performed on a cohort from whom samples were available at time points prior to the earliest positive HIV detection. The ability of selected factors found to be elevated in the plasma during AHI to inhibit HIV-1 replication was analyzed using in vitro PBMC and DC infection models. Analysis of unique plasma donor panels spanning the eclipse and viral expansion phases revealed very early alterations in plasma proteins in AHI. Induction of acute phase protein serum amyloid A (A-SAA occurred as early as 5-7 days prior to the first detection of plasma viral RNA, considerably prior to any elevation in systemic cytokine levels. Furthermore, a proteolytic fragment of alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT, termed virus inhibitory peptide (VIRIP, was observed in plasma coincident with viremia. Both A-SAA and VIRIP have anti-viral activity in vitro and quantitation of their plasma levels indicated that circulating concentrations are likely to be within the range of their inhibitory activity. Our results provide evidence for a first wave of host anti-viral defense occurring in the eclipse phase of AHI prior to systemic activation of other immune responses. Insights gained into the mechanism of action of acute-phase reactants and other innate molecules against HIV and how they are induced could be exploited for the future development of more efficient prophylactic vaccine strategies.

  8. Depletion of elongation initiation factor 4E binding proteins by CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing enhances antiviral response in porcine cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Type I interferons (IFN) are key mediators of the innate antiviral response in mammalian cells. Elongation initiation factor 4E binding proteins (4E-BPs) are translational controllers of interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7), the master regulator of IFN transcription. The role of 4EBPs in the negat...

  9. Detection of the antiviral activity of epicatechin isolated from Salacia crassifolia (Celastraceae) against Mayaro virus based on protein C homology modelling and virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, P G; Ferraz, A C; Figueiredo, J E; Lima, C F; Rodrigues, V G; Taranto, A G; Ferreira, J M S; Brandão, G C; Vieira-Filho, S A; Duarte, L P; de Brito Magalhães, C L; de Magalhães, J C

    2018-02-24

    Mayaro fever, caused by Mayaro virus (MAYV) is a sub-lethal disease with symptoms that are easily confused with those of dengue fever, except for polyarthralgia, which may culminate in physical incapacitation. Recently, outbreaks of MAYV have been documented in metropolitan areas, and to date, there is no therapy or vaccine available. Moreover, there is no information regarding the three-dimensional structure of the viral proteins of MAYV, which is important in the search for antivirals. In this work, we constructed a three-dimensional model of protein C of MAYV by homology modelling, and this was employed in a manner similar to that of receptors in virtual screening studies to evaluate 590 molecules as prospective antiviral agents. In vitro bioassays were utilized to confirm the potential antiviral activity of the flavonoid epicatechin isolated from Salacia crassifolia (Celastraceae). The virtual screening showed that six flavonoids were promising ligands for protein C. The bioassays showed potent antiviral action of epicatechin, which protected the cells from almost all of the effects of viral infection. An effective concentration (EC 50 ) of 0.247 μmol/mL was observed with a selectivity index (SI) of 7. The cytotoxicity assay showed that epicatechin has low toxicity, with a 50% cytotoxic concentration (CC 50 ) greater than 1.723 µmol/mL. Epicatechin was found to be twice as potent as the reference antiviral ribavirin. Furthermore, a replication kinetics assay showed a strong inhibitory effect of epicatechin on MAYV growth, with a reduction of at least four logs in virus production. Our results indicate that epicatechin is a promising candidate for further testing as an antiviral agent against Mayaro virus and other alphaviruses.

  10. Influenza A Virus Protein PA-X Contributes to Viral Growth and Suppression of the Host Antiviral and Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; MacDonald, Leslie A; Takimoto, Toru

    2015-06-01

    Influenza virus infection causes global inhibition of host protein synthesis in infected cells. This host shutoff is thought to allow viruses to escape from the host antiviral response, which restricts virus replication and spread. Although the mechanism of host shutoff is unclear, a novel viral protein expressed by ribosomal frameshifting, PA-X, was found to play a major role in influenza virus-induced host shutoff. However, little is known about the impact of PA-X expression on currently circulating influenza A virus pathogenicity and the host antiviral response. In this study, we rescued a recombinant influenza A virus, A/California/04/09 (H1N1, Cal), containing mutations at the frameshift motif in the polymerase PA gene (Cal PA-XFS). Cal PA-XFS expressed significantly less PA-X than Cal wild type (WT). Cal WT, but not Cal PA-XFS, induced degradation of host β-actin mRNA and suppressed host protein synthesis, supporting the idea that PA-X induces host shutoff via mRNA decay. Moreover, Cal WT inhibited beta interferon (IFN-β) expression and replicated more rapidly than Cal PA-XFS in human respiratory cells. Mice infected with Cal PA-XFS had significantly lower levels of viral growth and greater expression of IFN-β mRNA in their lungs than mice infected with Cal WT. Importantly, more antihemagglutinin and neutralizing antibodies were produced in Cal PA-XFS-infected mice than in Cal WT-infected mice, despite the lower level of virus replication in the lungs. Our data indicate that PA-X of the pandemic H1N1 virus has a strong impact on viral growth and the host innate and acquired immune responses to influenza virus. Virus-induced host protein shutoff is considered to be a major factor allowing viruses to evade innate and acquired immune recognition. We provide evidence that the 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus protein PA-X plays a role in virus replication and inhibition of host antiviral response by means of its host protein synthesis shutoff activity both in vitro

  11. Depletion of elongation initiation factor 4E binding proteins by CRISPR/Cas9 enhances the antiviral response in porcine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Carvajal, Lisbeth; Singh, Neetu; de los Santos, Teresa; Rodríguez, Luis L; Long, Charles R

    2016-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are key mediators of the innate antiviral response in mammalian cells. Elongation initiation factor 4E binding proteins (4E-BPs) are translational controllers of interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF-7), the "master regulator" of IFN transcription. Previous studies have suggested that mouse cells depleted of 4E-BPs are more sensitive to IFNβ treatment and had lower viral loads as compared to wild type (WT) cells. However, such approach has not been tested as an antiviral strategy in livestock species. In this study, we tested the antiviral activity of porcine cells depleted of 4E-BP1 by a Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein-9 nuclease (Cas9) genome engineering system. We found that 4E-BP1 knockout (KO) porcine cells had increased expression of IFNα and β, IFN stimulated genes, and significant reduction in vesicular stomatitis virus titer as compare to WT cells. No phenotypical changes associated with CRISPR/Cas9 manipulation were observed in 4E-BP1 KO cells. This work highlights the use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system to enhance the antiviral response in porcine cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The interferon-inducible DNA-sensor protein IFI16: a key player in the antiviral response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Oste, Valentina; Gatti, Deborah; Giorgio, Alessandro G; Gariglio, Marisa; Landolfo, Santo; De Andrea, Marco

    2015-01-01

    IFI16, a member of the IFN-inducible PYHIN-200 gene family, displays multifaceted activity due to its ability to bind to various target proteins and, in turn, modulate a variety cell functions including proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis/pyroptosis, senescence, and in? ammation. The last few year have seen major advances in our knowledge of IFI16 antiviral activity and its role in the immune response. Indeed, a wealth of evidence now supports a key role of IFI16 in the activation of innate immunity and viral restriction against Herpesviruses and Lentiviruses, such that the definition of IFI16 as a "restriction factor" is now widely accepted. However, most viruses have developed their own unique strategy to antagonize IFI16, leading to a modification or disruption of its function. This review summarizes our current understanding of how viral replication is sensed and then inhibited by IFI16 protein and the viral strategies employed to defeat this host defense mechanism. We will focus mainly on Herpesviruses, although recent discoveries on the role of IFI16 in lentiviral infection will also be considered.

  13. Rational design of highly potent HIV-1 fusion inhibitory proteins: Implication for developing antiviral therapeutics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Ling; Gao, George F.; Tien Po

    2005-01-01

    Recombinant protein containing one heptad-repeat 1 (HR1) segment and one HR2 segment of the HIV-1 gp41 (HR1-HR2) has been shown to fold into thermally stable six-helix bundle, representing the fusogenic core of gp41. In this study, we have used the fusogenic core as a scaffold to design HIV-1 fusion inhibitory proteins by linking another HR1 to the C terminus of HR1-HR2 (HR121) or additional HR2 to the N terminus of HR1-HR2 (HR212). Both recombinant proteins could be abundantly and solubly expressed and easily purified, exhibiting high stability and potent inhibitory activity on HIV-1 fusion with IC 50 values of 16.2 ± 2.8 and 2.8 ± 0.63 nM, respectively. These suggest that these rationally designed proteins can be further developed as novel anti-HIV-1 therapeutics

  14. Antiviral activity of double-stranded RNA-binding protein PACT against influenza A virus mediated via suppression of viral RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chi-Ping; Yuen, Chun-Kit; Cheung, Pak-Hin Hinson; Fung, Sin-Yee; Lui, Pak-Yin; Chen, Honglin; Kok, Kin-Hang; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2018-03-07

    PACT is a double-stranded RNA-binding protein that has been implicated in host-influenza A virus (IAV) interaction. PACT facilitates the action of RIG-I in the activation of the type I IFN response, which is suppressed by the viral nonstructural protein NS1. PACT is also known to interact with the IAV RNA polymerase subunit PA. Exactly how PACT exerts its antiviral activity during IAV infection remains to be elucidated. In the current study, we demonstrated the interplay between PACT and IAV polymerase. Induction of IFN-β by the IAV RNP complex was most robust when both RIG-I and PACT were expressed. PACT-dependent activation of IFN-β production was suppressed by the IAV polymerase subunits, polymerase acidic protein, polymerase basic protein 1 (PB1), and PB2. PACT associated with PA, PB1, and PB2. Compromising PACT in IAV-infected A549 cells resulted in the augmentation of viral RNA (vRNA) transcription and replication and IFN-β production. Furthermore, vRNA replication was boosted by knockdown of PACT in both A549 cells and IFN-deficient Vero cells. Thus, the antiviral activity of PACT is mediated primarily via its interaction with and inhibition of IAV polymerase. Taken together, our findings reveal a new facet of the host-IAV interaction in which the interplay between PACT and IAV polymerase affects the outcome of viral infection and antiviral response.-Chan, C.-P., Yuen, C.-K., Cheung, P.-H. H., Fung, S.-Y., Lui, P.-Y., Chen, H., Kok, K.-H., Jin, D.-Y. Antiviral activity of double-stranded RNA-binding protein PACT against influenza A virus mediated via suppression of viral RNA polymerase.

  15. Interaction Research on the Antiviral Molecule Dufulin Targeting on Southern Rice Black Streaked Dwarf Virus P9-1 Nonstructural Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenchao Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available ern rice black streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV causes severe harm to rice production. Unfortunately, studies on effective antiviral drugs against SRBSDV and interaction mechanism of antiviral molecule targeting on SRBSDV have not been reported. This study found dufulin (DFL, an ideal anti-SRBSDV molecule, and investigated the interactions of DFL targeting on the nonstructural protein P9-1. The biological sequence information and bonding characterization of DFL to four kinds of P9-1 protein were described with fluorescence titration (FT and microscale thermophoresis (MST assays. The sequence analysis indicated that P9-1 had highly-conserved C- and N-terminal amino acid residues and a hypervariable region that differed from 131 aa to 160 aa. Consequently, wild-type (WT-His-P9-1, 23 C-terminal residues truncated (TR-ΔC23-His-P9-1, 6 N-terminal residues truncated (TR-ΔN6-His-P9-1, and Ser138 site-directed (MU-138-His-P9-1 mutant proteins were expressed. The FT and MST assay results indicated that DFL bounded to WT-His-P9-1 with micromole affinity and the 23 C-terminal amino acids were the potential targeting site. This system, which combines a complete sequence analysis, mutant protein expression, and binding action evaluating system, could further advance the understanding of the interaction abilities between antiviral drugs and their targets.

  16. Lopinavir up-regulates expression of the antiviral protein ribonuclease L in human papillomavirus-positive cervical carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batman, Gavin; Oliver, Anthony W; Zehbe, Ingeborg; Richard, Christina; Hampson, Lynne; Hampson, Ian N

    2011-01-01

    We have previously shown that the HIV protease inhibitor lopinavir has selective toxicity against human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive cervical carcinoma cells via an unknown mechanism. SiHa cervical carcinoma cells were stably transfected with the proteasome sensor vector pZsProSensor-1 to confirm lopinavir inhibits the proteasome in these cells. The Panorama Xpress profiler 725 antibody array was then used to analyse specific changes in protein expression in lopinavir-treated versus control untreated SiHa cells followed by PCR and western blotting. Colorimetric growth assays of lopinavir-treated E6/E7 immortalised versus control human keratinocytes were performed. Targeted small interfering RNA gene silencing followed by growth assay comparison of lopinavir-treated/untreated SiHa cells was also used. Lopinavir induced an increase in the fluorescence of pZsProSensor-1 transfected SiHa cells, indicative of proteasomal inhibition. Ribonuclease L (RNASEL) protein was shown to be up-regulated in lopinavir-treated SiHa cells, which was confirmed by PCR and western blot. Targeted silencing of RNASEL reduced the sensitivity of SiHa cells to lopinavir. Selective toxicity against E6/E7 immortalised keratinocytes versus control cells was also seen with lopinavir and was associated with up-regulated RNASEL expression. These data are consistent with the toxicity of lopinavir against HPV-positive cervical carcinoma cells being related to its ability to block viral proteasome activation and induce an up-regulation of the antiviral protein RNASEL. This is supported by the drug's selective toxicity and up-regulation of RNASEL in E6/E7 immortalised keratinocytes combined with the increased resistance to lopinavir observed in SiHa cells following silencing of RNASEL gene expression.

  17. Multiple interferon stimulated genes synergize with the zinc finger antiviral protein to mediate anti-alphavirus activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophiya Karki

    Full Text Available The zinc finger antiviral protein (ZAP is a host factor that mediates inhibition of viruses in the Filoviridae, Retroviridae and Togaviridae families. We previously demonstrated that ZAP blocks replication of Sindbis virus (SINV, the prototype Alphavirus in the Togaviridae family at an early step prior to translation of the incoming genome and that synergy between ZAP and one or more interferon stimulated genes (ISGs resulted in maximal inhibitory activity. The present study aimed to identify those ISGs that synergize with ZAP to mediate Alphavirus inhibition. Using a library of lentiviruses individually expressing more than 350 ISGs, we screened for inhibitory activity in interferon defective cells with or without ZAP overexpression. Confirmatory tests of the 23 ISGs demonstrating the largest infection reduction in combination with ZAP revealed that 16 were synergistic. Confirmatory tests of all potentially synergistic ISGs revealed 15 additional ISGs with a statistically significant synergistic effect in combination with ZAP. These 31 ISGs are candidates for further mechanistic studies. The number and diversity of the identified ZAP-synergistic ISGs lead us to speculate that ZAP may play an important role in priming the cell for optimal ISG function.

  18. Acyclic nucleoside phosphonate antivirals activate gene expression of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 and 3.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Potměšil, Petr; Holý, Antonín; Kmoníčková, Eva; Křížková, Jana; Zídek, Zdeněk

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 1 (2007), s. 59-66 ISSN 1021-7770 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Acyclic nucleoside phosponate * HIV * Monocyte chemotactic protein Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.024, year: 2007

  19. Inducible protein-10 as a predictive marker of antiviral hepatitis C treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neesgaard, Bastian; Ruhwald, Morten; Weis, Nina

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To investigate interferon-γ-inducible protein-10's (IP-10) potential to anticipate rapid (RVR)- and sustained virological responses (SVR) to chronic hepatitis C (CHC) treatment. METHODS: We included case series examining RVR or SVR in relation to 24 or 48 wk treatment for CHC, in patients...... treatment free for at least six months, with genotype 1 or 4, and in relation to 24 wk treatment for genotype 2 and 3, with pegylated interferon in combination with ribavirin. Patients had to have both a baseline IP-10 level as well as a hepatitis C virus (HCV)-RNA determination 4 wk after treatment...... initiation or 24 wk after end of treatment. Studies including patients with liver diseases other than CHC, human immunodeficiency virus-infection, treatment with immunosuppresents or cytostatica, alcohol dependency or active intravenous drug-use were excluded. We found 81 articles by searching the MEDLINE...

  20. Mx1 and Mx2 key antiviral proteins are surprisingly lost in toothed whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Benjamin A; Marcovitz, Amir; Camp, J Gray; Jia, Robin; Bejerano, Gill

    2015-06-30

    Viral outbreaks in dolphins and other Delphinoidea family members warrant investigation into the integrity of the cetacean immune system. The dynamin-like GTPase genes Myxovirus 1 (Mx1) and Mx2 defend mammals against a broad range of viral infections. Loss of Mx1 function in human and mice enhances infectivity by multiple RNA and DNA viruses, including orthomyxoviruses (influenza A), paramyxoviruses (measles), and hepadnaviruses (hepatitis B), whereas loss of Mx2 function leads to decreased resistance to HIV-1 and other viruses. Here we show that both Mx1 and Mx2 have been rendered nonfunctional in Odontoceti cetaceans (toothed whales, including dolphins and orcas). We discovered multiple exon deletions, frameshift mutations, premature stop codons, and transcriptional evidence of decay in the coding sequence of both Mx1 and Mx2 in four species of Odontocetes. We trace the likely loss event for both proteins to soon after the divergence of Odontocetes and Mystocetes (baleen whales) ∼33-37 Mya. Our data raise intriguing questions as to what drove the loss of both Mx1 and Mx2 genes in the Odontoceti lineage, a double loss seen in none of 56 other mammalian genomes, and suggests a hitherto unappreciated fundamental genetic difference in the way these magnificent mammals respond to viral infections.

  1. Over-expression of mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein inhibits coxsackievirus B3 infection by enhancing type-I interferons production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Qing-Meng

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have revealed that Mitochondrial Antiviral Signaling (MAVS protein plays an essential role in the inhibition of viral infection through type I interferon (IFN pathway. It has been shown that 3C (pro cysteine protease of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3 cleaves MAVS to inhibit type I IFNs induction. Other workers also found that MAVS knock-out mice suffered CVB3 susceptibility and severe histopathological change. Accordingly,our experiments were designed to explore the protection of over-expressing MAVS against CVB3 infection and the possible mechanism. Results In this study, HeLa cells (transfected with MAVS constructs pre- or post- exposure to CVB3 were used to analyze the function of exogenous MAVS on CVB3 infection. The results revealed that though CVB3 infection induced production of type I IFNs, viral replication and cell death were not effectively inhibited. Similarly, exogenous MAVS increased type I IFNs moderately. Morever, we observed robust production of type I IFNs in CVB3 post-infected HeLa cells thereby successfully inhibiting CVB3 infection, as well formation of cytopathic effect (CPE and cell death. Finally, introduction of exogenous MAVS into CVB3 pre-infected cells also restricted viral infection efficiently by greatly up-regulating IFNs. Conclusions In summary, exogenous MAVS effectively prevents and controls CVB3 infection by modulating and promoting the production of type I IFNs. The IFNs level in MAVS over-expressing cells is still tightly regulated by CVB3 infection. Thus, the factors that up-regulate MAVS might be an alternative prescription in CVB3-related syndromes by enhancing IFNs production.

  2. A Map of the Arenavirus Nucleoprotein-Host Protein Interactome Reveals that Junín Virus Selectively Impairs the Antiviral Activity of Double-Stranded RNA-Activated Protein Kinase (PKR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Benjamin R; Hershkowitz, Dylan; Eisenhauer, Philip L; Weir, Marion E; Ziegler, Christopher M; Russo, Joanne; Bruce, Emily A; Ballif, Bryan A; Botten, Jason

    2017-08-01

    Arenaviruses are enveloped negative-strand RNA viruses that cause significant human disease. These viruses encode only four proteins to accomplish the viral life cycle, so each arenavirus protein likely plays unappreciated accessory roles during infection. Here we used immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry to identify human proteins that interact with the nucleoproteins (NPs) of the Old World arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and the New World arenavirus Junín virus (JUNV) strain Candid #1. Bioinformatic analysis of the identified protein partners of NP revealed that host translation appears to be a key biological process engaged during infection. In particular, NP associates with the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase (PKR), a well-characterized antiviral protein that inhibits cap-dependent protein translation initiation via phosphorylation of eIF2α. JUNV infection leads to increased expression of PKR as well as its redistribution to viral replication and transcription factories. Further, phosphorylation of PKR, which is a prerequisite for its ability to phosphorylate eIF2α, is readily induced by JUNV. However, JUNV prevents this pool of activated PKR from phosphorylating eIF2α, even following exposure to the synthetic dsRNA poly(I·C), a potent PKR agonist. This blockade of PKR function is highly specific, as LCMV is unable to similarly inhibit eIF2α phosphorylation. JUNV's ability to antagonize the antiviral activity of PKR appears to be complete, as silencing of PKR expression has no impact on viral propagation. In summary, we provide a detailed map of the host machinery engaged by arenavirus NPs and identify an antiviral pathway that is subverted by JUNV. IMPORTANCE Arenaviruses are important human pathogens for which FDA-approved vaccines do not exist and effective antiviral therapeutics are needed. Design of antiviral treatment options and elucidation of the mechanistic basis of disease pathogenesis will depend

  3. Influenza A virus encoding secreted Gaussia luciferase as useful tool to analyze viral replication and its inhibition by antiviral compounds and cellular proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Eckert

    Full Text Available Reporter genes inserted into viral genomes enable the easy and rapid quantification of virus replication, which is instrumental to efficient in vitro screening of antiviral compounds or in vivo analysis of viral spread and pathogenesis. Based on a published design, we have generated several replication competent influenza A viruses carrying either fluorescent proteins or Gaussia luciferase. Reporter activity could be readily quantified in infected cultures, but the virus encoding Gaussia luciferase was more stable than viruses bearing fluorescent proteins and was therefore analyzed in detail. Quantification of Gaussia luciferase activity in the supernatants of infected culture allowed the convenient and highly sensitive detection of viral spread, and enzymatic activity correlated with the number of infectious particles released from infected cells. Furthermore, the Gaussia luciferase encoding virus allowed the sensitive quantification of the antiviral activity of the neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI zanamivir and the host cell interferon-inducible transmembrane (IFITM proteins 1-3, which are known to inhibit influenza virus entry. Finally, the virus was used to demonstrate that influenza A virus infection is sensitive to a modulator of endosomal cholesterol, in keeping with the concept that IFITMs inhibit viral entry by altering cholesterol levels in the endosomal membrane. In sum, we report the characterization of a novel influenza A reporter virus, which allows fast and sensitive detection of viral spread and its inhibition, and we show that influenza A virus entry is sensitive to alterations of endosomal cholesterol levels.

  4. Isolation of Rhp-PSP, a member of YER057c/YjgF/UK114 protein family with antiviral properties, from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris strain JSC-3b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Pin; Feng, Tuizi; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Songbai; Zhang, Yu; Cheng, Ju'e; Luo, Yuanhua; Peng, Jing; Zhang, Zhuo; Lu, Xiangyang; Zhang, Deyong; Liu, Yong

    2015-11-04

    Rhodopseudomonas palustris strain JSC-3b isolated from a water canal adjacent to a vegetable field produces a protein that was purified by bioactivity-guided fractionation based on ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange absorption and size exclusion. The protein was further identified as an endoribonuclease L-PSP (Liver-Perchloric acid-soluble protein) by shotgun mass spectrometry analysis and gene identification, and it is member of YER057c/YjgF/UK114 protein family. Herein, this protein is designated Rhp-PSP. Rhp-PSP exhibited significant inhibitory activities against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in vivo and in vitro. To our knowledge, this represents the first report on the antiviral activity of a protein of the YER057c/YjgF/UK114 family and also the first antiviral protein isolated from R. palustris. Our research provides insight into the potential of photosynthetic bacterial resources in biological control of plant virus diseases and sustainable agriculture.

  5. Inhibition of CRM1-mediated nuclear export of influenza A nucleoprotein and nuclear export protein as a novel target for antiviral drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutiwitoonchai, Nopporn; Mano, Takafumi; Kakisaka, Michinori; Sato, Hirotaka; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Osada, Hiroyuki; Kotani, Osamu; Yokoyama, Masaru; Sato, Hironori; Aida, Yoko

    2017-07-01

    An anti-influenza compound, DP2392-E10 based on inhibition of the nuclear export function of the viral nucleoprotein-nuclear export signal 3 (NP-NES3) domain was successfully identified by our previous high-throughput screening system. Here, we demonstrated that DP2392-E10 exerts its antiviral effect by inhibiting replication of a broad range of influenza A subtypes. In regard to the molecular mechanism, we revealed that DP2392-E10 inhibits nuclear export of both viral NP and nuclear export protein (NEP). More specifically, in vitro pull-down assays revealed that DP2392-E10 directly binds cellular CRM1, which mediates nuclear export of NP and NEP. In silico docking suggested that DP2392-E10 binds at a region close to the HEAT9 and HEAT10 domains of CRM1. Together, these results indicate that the CRM1-mediated nuclear export function of influenza virus represents a new potential target for antiviral drug development, and also provide a core structure for a novel class of inhibitors that target this function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Matrix Protein of Nipah Virus Targets the E3-Ubiquitin Ligase TRIM6 to Inhibit the IKKε Kinase-Mediated Type-I IFN Antiviral Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Bharaj

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available For efficient replication, viruses have developed mechanisms to evade innate immune responses, including the antiviral type-I interferon (IFN-I system. Nipah virus (NiV, a highly pathogenic member of the Paramyxoviridae family (genus Henipavirus, is known to encode for four P gene-derived viral proteins (P/C/W/V with IFN-I antagonist functions. Here we report that NiV matrix protein (NiV-M, which is important for virus assembly and budding, can also inhibit IFN-I responses. IFN-I production requires activation of multiple signaling components including the IκB kinase epsilon (IKKε. We previously showed that the E3-ubiquitin ligase TRIM6 catalyzes the synthesis of unanchored K48-linked polyubiquitin chains, which are not covalently attached to any protein, and activate IKKε for induction of IFN-I mediated antiviral responses. Using co-immunoprecipitation assays and confocal microscopy we show here that the NiV-M protein interacts with TRIM6 and promotes TRIM6 degradation. Consequently, NiV-M expression results in reduced levels of unanchored K48-linked polyubiquitin chains associated with IKKε leading to impaired IKKε oligomerization, IKKε autophosphorylation and reduced IFN-mediated responses. This IFN antagonist function of NiV-M requires a conserved lysine residue (K258 in the bipartite nuclear localization signal that is found in divergent henipaviruses. Consistent with this, the matrix proteins of Ghana, Hendra and Cedar viruses were also able to inhibit IFNβ induction. Live NiV infection, but not a recombinant NiV lacking the M protein, reduced the levels of endogenous TRIM6 protein expression. To our knowledge, matrix proteins of paramyxoviruses have never been reported to be involved in innate immune antagonism. We report here a novel mechanism of viral innate immune evasion by targeting TRIM6, IKKε and unanchored polyubiquitin chains. These findings expand the universe of viral IFN antagonism strategies and provide a new

  7. Middle east respiratory syndrome coronavirus 4a protein is a double-stranded RNA-binding protein that suppresses PACT-induced activation of RIG-I and MDA5 in the innate antiviral response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Kam-Leung; Yeung, Man Lung; Kok, Kin-Hang; Yuen, Kit-San; Kew, Chun; Lui, Pak-Yin; Chan, Chi-Ping; Tse, Herman; Woo, Patrick C Y; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2014-05-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is an emerging pathogen that causes severe disease in human. MERS-CoV is closely related to bat coronaviruses HKU4 and HKU5. Evasion of the innate antiviral response might contribute significantly to MERS-CoV pathogenesis, but the mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, we characterized MERS-CoV 4a protein as a novel immunosuppressive factor that antagonizes type I interferon production. MERS-CoV 4a protein contains a double-stranded RNA-binding domain capable of interacting with poly(I · C). Expression of MERS-CoV 4a protein suppressed the interferon production induced by poly(I · C) or Sendai virus. RNA binding of MERS-CoV 4a protein was required for IFN antagonism, a property shared by 4a protein of bat coronavirus HKU5 but not by the counterpart in bat coronavirus HKU4. MERS-CoV 4a protein interacted with PACT in an RNA-dependent manner but not with RIG-I or MDA5. It inhibited PACT-induced activation of RIG-I and MDA5 but did not affect the activity of downstream effectors such as RIG-I, MDA5, MAVS, TBK1, and IRF3. Taken together, our findings suggest a new mechanism through which MERS-CoV employs a viral double-stranded RNA-binding protein to circumvent the innate antiviral response by perturbing the function of cellular double-stranded RNA-binding protein PACT. PACT targeting might be a common strategy used by different viruses, including Ebola virus and herpes simplex virus 1, to counteract innate immunity. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is an emerging and highly lethal human pathogen. Why MERS-CoV causes severe disease in human is unclear, and one possibility is that MERS-CoV is particularly efficient in counteracting host immunity, including the sensing of virus invasion. It will therefore be critical to clarify how MERS-CoV cripples the host proteins that sense viruses and to compare MERS-CoV with its ancestral viruses in bats in the counteraction of virus sensing

  8. Antiviral lectins: Selective inhibitors of viral entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Carter A; Ramessar, Koreen; O'Keefe, Barry R

    2017-06-01

    Many natural lectins have been reported to have antiviral activity. As some of these have been put forward as potential development candidates for preventing or treating viral infections, we have set out in this review to survey the literature on antiviral lectins. The review groups lectins by structural class and class of source organism we also detail their carbohydrate specificity and their reported antiviral activities. The review concludes with a brief discussion of several of the pertinent hurdles that heterologous proteins must clear to be useful clinical candidates and cites examples where such studies have been reported for antiviral lectins. Though the clearest path currently being followed is the use of antiviral lectins as anti-HIV microbicides via topical mucosal administration, some investigators have also found systemic efficacy against acute infections following subcutaneous administration. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Viral RNase3 Co-Localizes and Interacts with the Antiviral Defense Protein SGS3 in Plant Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinheimer, Isabel; Haikonen, Tuuli; Ala-Poikela, Marjo; Moser, Mirko; Streng, Janne; Rajamäki, Minna-Liisa; Valkonen, Jari P. T.

    2016-01-01

    Sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV; family Closteroviridae) encodes a Class 1 RNase III endoribonuclease (RNase3) that suppresses post-transcriptional RNA interference (RNAi) and eliminates antiviral defense in sweetpotato plants (Ipomoea batatas). For RNAi suppression, RNase3 cleaves double-stranded small interfering RNAs (ds-siRNA) and long dsRNA to fragments that are too short to be utilized in RNAi. However, RNase3 can suppress only RNAi induced by sense RNA. Sense-mediated RNAi involves host suppressor of gene silencing 3 (SGS3) and RNA–dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6). In this study, subcellular localization and host interactions of RNase3 were studied in plant cells. RNase3 was found to interact with SGS3 of sweetpotato and Arabidopsis thaliana when expressed in leaves, and it localized to SGS3/RDR6 bodies in the cytoplasm of leaf cells and protoplasts. RNase3 was also detected in the nucleus. Co-expression of RNase3 and SGS3 in leaf tissue enhanced the suppression of RNAi, as compared with expression of RNase3 alone. These results suggest additional mechanisms needed for efficient RNase3-mediated suppression of RNAi and provide new information about the subcellular context and phase of the RNAi pathway in which RNase3 realizes RNAi suppression. PMID:27391019

  10. La respuesta inmune antiviral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainel Sánchez de la Rosa

    1998-02-01

    Full Text Available Se expone que los virus son parásitos intracelulares obligados, puesto que no tienen metabolismo propio; esto obliga al sistema inmune a poner en marcha sus mecanismos más especializados para reconocer y eliminar, tanto a los virus libres, como a las células infectadas. Se señala que las células presentadoras de antígenos, los linfocitos B y los T unidos al complejo mayor de histocompatibilidad, forman parte de la organización de la respuesta inmune antiviral; la inducción de esta respuesta con proteínas, péptidos y ADN desnudo, son alternativas actuales tanto en la prevención como en el tratamiento de las infecciones viralesIt is explained that viruses are compulsory intracellular parasites, since they don't have their own metabolism, which makes the immune system to start its mest specialized mechanisms to recognize and eliminate the free viruses and the infected cells. It is stated that the cells presenting antigens, and the B and T lymphocytes together with the major histocompatibility complex, are part of the organization of the immune antiviral response. The induction of this response with proteins, peptides and naked DNA are the present alternatives for the prevention and treatment of viral infections

  11. The Tudor domain protein Spindlin1 is involved in intrinsic antiviral defense against incoming hepatitis B Virus and herpes simplex virus type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Ducroux

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus infection (HBV is a major risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. HBV replicates from a covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA that remains as an episome within the nucleus of infected cells and serves as a template for the transcription of HBV RNAs. The regulatory protein HBx has been shown to be essential for cccDNA transcription in the context of infection. Here we identified Spindlin1, a cellular Tudor-domain protein, as an HBx interacting partner. We further demonstrated that Spindlin1 is recruited to the cccDNA and inhibits its transcription in the context of infection. Spindlin1 knockdown induced an increase in HBV transcription and in histone H4K4 trimethylation at the cccDNA, suggesting that Spindlin1 impacts on epigenetic regulation. Spindlin1-induced transcriptional inhibition was greater for the HBV virus deficient for the expression of HBx than for the HBV WT virus, suggesting that HBx counteracts Spindlin1 repression. Importantly, we showed that the repressive role of Spindlin1 is not limited to HBV transcription but also extends to other DNA virus that replicate within the nucleus such as Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1. Taken together our results identify Spindlin1 as a critical component of the intrinsic antiviral defense and shed new light on the function of HBx in HBV infection.

  12. The Importance of the KR-Rich Region of the Coat Protein of Ourmia melon virus for Host Specificity, Tissue Tropism, and Interference With Antiviral Defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Marika; Vallino, Marta; Abbà, Simona; Ciuffo, Marina; Balestrini, Raffaella; Genre, Andrea; Turina, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The N-terminal region of the Ourmia melon virus (OuMV) coat protein (CP) contains a short lysine/arginine-rich (KR) region. By alanine scanning mutagenesis, we showed that the KR region influences pathogenicity and virulence of OuMV without altering viral particle assembly. A mutant, called OuMV6710, with three basic residue substitutions in the KR region, was impaired in the ability to maintain the initial systemic infection in Nicotiana benthamiana and to infect both cucumber and melon plants systemically. The integrity of this protein region was also crucial for encapsidation of viral genomic RNA; in fact, certain mutations within the KR region partially compromised the RNA encapsidation efficiency of the CP. In Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0, OuMV6710 was impaired in particle accumulation; however, this phenotype was abolished in dcl2/dcl4 and dcl2/dcl3/dcl4 Arabidopsis mutants defective for antiviral silencing. Moreover, in contrast to CPwt, in situ immunolocalization experiments indicated that CP6710 accumulates efficiently in the spongy mesophyll tissue of infected N. benthamiana and A. thaliana leaves but only occasionally infects palisade tissues. These results provided strong evidence of a crucial role for OuMV CP during viral infection and highlighted the relevance of the KR region in determining tissue tropism, host range, pathogenicity, and RNA affinity, which may be all correlated with a possible CP silencing-suppression activity.

  13. The West Nile virus assembly process evades the conserved antiviral mechanism of the interferon-induced MxA protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoenen, Antje [School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Gillespie, Leah [Department of Microbiology, La Trobe University, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Morgan, Garry; Heide, Peter van der [Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Khromykh, Alexander [School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Australian Infectious Diseases Research Centre, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Mackenzie, Jason, E-mail: jason.mackenzie@unimelb.edu.au [Department of Microbiology, La Trobe University, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)

    2014-01-05

    Flaviviruses have evolved means to evade host innate immune responses. Recent evidence suggests this is due to prevention of interferon production and signaling in flavivirus-infected cells. Here we show that the interferon-induced MxA protein can sequester the West Nile virus strain Kunjin virus (WNV{sub KUN}) capsid protein in cytoplasmic tubular structures in an expression-replication system. This sequestering resulted in reduced titers of secreted WNV{sub KUN} particles. We show by electron microscopy, tomography and 3D modeling that these cytoplasmic tubular structures form organized bundles. Additionally we show that recombinant ER-targeted MxA can restrict production of infectious WNV{sub KUN} under conditions of virus infection. Our results indicate a co-ordinated and compartmentalized WNV{sub KUN} assembly process may prevent recognition of viral components by MxA, particularly the capsid protein. This recognition can be exploited if MxA is targeted to intracellular sites of WNV{sub KUN} assembly. This results in further understanding of the mechanisms of flavivirus evasion from the immune system. - Highlights: • We show that the ISG MxA can recognize the West Nile virus capsid protein. • Interaction between WNV C protein and MxA induces cytoplasmic fibrils. • MxA can be retargeted to the ER to restrict WNV particle release. • WNV assembly process is a strategy to avoid MxA recognition.

  14. The West Nile virus assembly process evades the conserved antiviral mechanism of the interferon-induced MxA protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoenen, Antje; Gillespie, Leah; Morgan, Garry; Heide, Peter van der; Khromykh, Alexander; Mackenzie, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Flaviviruses have evolved means to evade host innate immune responses. Recent evidence suggests this is due to prevention of interferon production and signaling in flavivirus-infected cells. Here we show that the interferon-induced MxA protein can sequester the West Nile virus strain Kunjin virus (WNV KUN ) capsid protein in cytoplasmic tubular structures in an expression-replication system. This sequestering resulted in reduced titers of secreted WNV KUN particles. We show by electron microscopy, tomography and 3D modeling that these cytoplasmic tubular structures form organized bundles. Additionally we show that recombinant ER-targeted MxA can restrict production of infectious WNV KUN under conditions of virus infection. Our results indicate a co-ordinated and compartmentalized WNV KUN assembly process may prevent recognition of viral components by MxA, particularly the capsid protein. This recognition can be exploited if MxA is targeted to intracellular sites of WNV KUN assembly. This results in further understanding of the mechanisms of flavivirus evasion from the immune system. - Highlights: • We show that the ISG MxA can recognize the West Nile virus capsid protein. • Interaction between WNV C protein and MxA induces cytoplasmic fibrils. • MxA can be retargeted to the ER to restrict WNV particle release. • WNV assembly process is a strategy to avoid MxA recognition

  15. Complementary roles of Fas-associated death domain (FADD) and receptor interacting protein kinase-3 (RIPK3) in T-cell homeostasis and antiviral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jennifer V; Weist, Brian M; van Raam, Bram J; Marro, Brett S; Nguyen, Long V; Srinivas, Prathna; Bell, Bryan D; Luhrs, Keith A; Lane, Thomas E; Salvesen, Guy S; Walsh, Craig M

    2011-09-13

    Caspase-8 (casp8) is required for extrinsic apoptosis, and mice deficient in casp8 fail to develop and die in utero while ultimately failing to maintain the proliferation of T cells, B cells, and a host of other cell types. Paradoxically, these failures are not caused by a defect in apoptosis, but by a presumed proliferative function of this protease. Indeed, following mitogenic stimulation, T cells lacking casp8 or its adaptor protein FADD (Fas-associated death domain protein) develop a hyperautophagic morphology, and die a programmed necrosis-like death process termed necroptosis. Recent studies have demonstrated that receptor-interacting protein kinases (RIPKs) RIPK1 and RIPK3 together facilitate TNF-induced necroptosis, but the precise role of RIPKs in the demise of T cells lacking FADD or casp8 activity is unknown. Here we demonstrate that RIPK3 and FADD have opposing and complementary roles in promoting T-cell clonal expansion and homeostasis. We show that the defective proliferation of T cells bearing an interfering form of FADD (FADDdd) is rescued by crossing with RIPK3(-/-) mice, although such rescue ultimately leads to lymphadenopathy. Enhanced recovery of these double-mutant T cells following stimulation demonstrates that FADD, casp8, and RIPK3 are all essential for clonal expansion, contraction, and antiviral responses. Finally, we demonstrate that caspase-mediated cleavage of RIPK1-containing necrosis inducing complexes (necrosomes) is sufficient to prevent necroptosis in the face of death receptor signaling. These studies highlight the "two-faced" nature of casp8 activity, promoting clonal expansion in some situations and apoptotic demise in others.

  16. Two mechanistically distinct immune evasion proteins of cowpox virus combine to avoid antiviral CD8 T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Byun, Minji; Verweij, Marieke C.; Pickup, David J.; Wiertz, Emmanuel J. H. J.; Hansen, Ted H.; Yokoyama, Wayne M.

    2009-01-01

    Downregulation of MHC class I on the cell surface is an immune evasion mechanism shared by many DNA viruses including cowpox virus. Previously, a cowpox virus protein, CPXV203, was shown to downregulate MHC class I. Here, we report that CPXV12 is the only other MHC class I regulating protein of cowpox virus and it uses a mechanism distinct from that of CPXV203. Whereas CPXV203 retains fully assembled MHC class I by exploiting the KDEL-mediated endoplasmic reticulum retention pathway, CPXV12 b...

  17. Interaction of antivirals with a heptameric bundle model of the p7 protein of hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Sophie L; Kalita, Monoj Mon; Fischer, Wolfgang B

    2018-04-01

    A series of ligands are known experimentally to affect the infectivity cycle of the hepatitis C virus. The target protein for the ligands is proposed to be p7, a 63 amino acid polytopic channel-forming protein, with possibly two transmembrane domains. Protein p7 is found to assemble into functional oligomers of various sizes, depending on the genotype (GT). Nine ligands are docked to various sites of a computationally derived heptameric bundle of p7 of GT1a. The energy of interaction, here binding energy, is calculated using three different docking programs (Autodock, MOE, LeadIT). Three protein regions are defined to which the ligands are placed, the loop region and the site with the termini as well as the mid-region which is supposed to track poses inside the putative pore. A common feature is that the loop sites and poses either within the pore or at the intermonomer space of the bundle are preferred for all ligands with proposed binding energies smaller than -10 kJ/mol. BIT225, benzamine, amantadine, and NN-DNJ show good overall scoring. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. The antiviral protein human lactoferrin is distributed in the body to cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection-prone cells and tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beljaars, Leonie; Bakker, Hester I; van der Strate, Barry W A; Smit, Catharina; Duijvestijn, Adrian M; Meijer, Dirk K F; Molema, Grietje

    Purpose. Lactoferrin has anti-Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and -HIV properties in vitro. However, the pharmacokinetic behavior of the 80-kD protein has not been well defined. We, therefore, assessed the plasma decay and body distribution of lactoferrin after intravenous administration to freely moving

  19. The Human Cytomegalovirus Major Immediate-Early Proteins as Antagonists of Intrinsic and Innate Antiviral Host Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Nevels

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The major immediate-early (IE gene of human cytomegalovirus (CMV is believed to have a decisive role in acute infection and its activity is an important indicator of viral reactivation from latency. Although a variety of gene products are expressed from this region, the 72-kDa IE1 and the 86-kDa IE2 nuclear phosphoproteins are the most abundant and important. Both proteins have long been recognized as promiscuous transcriptional regulators. More recently, a critical role of the IE1 and IE2 proteins in counteracting nonadaptive host cell defense mechanisms has been revealed. In this review we will briefly summarize the available literature on IE1- and IE2-dependent mechanisms contributing to CMV evasion from intrinsic and innate immune responses.

  20. Lab-Attenuated Rabies Virus Causes Abortive Infection and Induces Cytokine Expression in Astrocytes by Activating Mitochondrial Antiviral-Signaling Protein Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Tian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Rabies is an ancient disease but remains endemic in most parts of the world and causes approximately 59,000 deaths annually. The mechanism through which the causative agent, rabies virus (RABV, evades the host immune response and infects the host central nervous system (CNS has not been completely elucidated thus far. Our previous studies have shown that lab-attenuated, but not wild-type (wt, RABV activates the innate immune response in the mouse and dog models. In this present study, we demonstrate that lab-attenuated RABV causes abortive infection in astrocytes, the most abundant glial cells in the CNS. Furthermore, we found that lab-attenuated RABV produces more double-stranded RNA (dsRNA than wt RABV, which is recognized by retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I or melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 (MDA5. Activation of mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS, the common adaptor molecule for RIG-I and MDA5, results in the production of type I interferon (IFN and the expression of hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes, which suppress RABV replication and spread in astrocytes. Notably, lab-attenuated RABV replicates in a manner identical to that of wt RABV in MAVS−/− astrocytes. It was also found that lab-attenuated, but not wt, RABV induces the expression of inflammatory cytokines via the MAVS- p38/NF-κB signaling pathway. These inflammatory cytokines increase the blood–brain barrier permeability and thus enable immune cells and antibodies infiltrate the CNS parenchyma, resulting in RABV control and elimination. In contrast, wt RABV restricts dsRNA production and thus evades innate recognition by RIG-I/MDA5 in astrocytes, which could be one of the mechanisms by which wt RABV evades the host immune response in resident CNS cells. Our findings suggest that astrocytes play a critical role in limiting the replication of lab-attenuated RABV in the CNS.

  1. Mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein plays a major role in induction of the fish innate immune response against RNA and DNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biacchesi, Stéphane; LeBerre, Monique; Lamoureux, Annie; Louise, Yoann; Lauret, Emilie; Boudinot, Pierre; Brémont, Michel

    2009-08-01

    Viral infection triggers host innate immune responses through cellular sensor molecules which activate multiple signaling cascades that induce the production of interferons (IFN) and other cytokines. The recent identification of mammalian cytoplasmic viral RNA sensors, such as retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs) and their mitochondrial adaptor, the mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS), also called IPS-1, VISA, and Cardif, highlights the significance of these molecules in the induction of IFN. Teleost fish also possess a strong IFN system, but nothing is known concerning the RLRs and their downstream adaptor. In this study, we cloned MAVS cDNAs from several fish species (including salmon and zebrafish) and showed that they were orthologs of mammalian MAVS. We demonstrated that overexpression of these mitochondrial proteins in fish cells led to a constitutive induction of IFN and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). MAVS-overexpressing cells were almost fully protected against RNA virus infection, with a strong inhibition of both DNA and RNA virus replication (1,000- and 10,000-fold decreases, respectively). Analyses of MAVS deletion mutants showed that both the N-terminal CARD-like and C-terminal transmembrane domains, but not the central proline-rich region, were indispensable for MAVS signaling function. In addition, we cloned the cDNAs encoding a RIG-I-like molecule from salmonid and cyprinid cell lines. Like the case with MAVS, overexpression of RIG-I CARDs in fish cells led to a strong induction of both IFN and ISGs, conferring on fish cells full protection against RNA virus infection. This report provides the first demonstration that teleost fish possess a functional RLR pathway in which MAVS may play a central role in the induction of the innate immune response.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF ANTIVIRAL AGENTS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. DEVELOPMENT OF ANTIVIRAL AGENTS. Chandipura virus can be regarded as a model system to design and develop antiviral agents. These agents could be small molecules or RNA/PNA aptamers or Antisense RNA to speicific gene sequence in the viral genome.

  3. Type I interferon production during herpes simplex virus infection is controlled by cell-type-specific viral recognition through Toll-like receptor 9, the mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein pathway, and novel recognition systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Simon Brandtoft; Sørensen, Louise Nørgaard; Malmgaard, Lene

    2007-01-01

    Recognition of viruses by germ line-encoded pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system is essential for rapid production of type I interferon (IFN) and early antiviral defense. We investigated the mechanisms of viral recognition governing production of type I IFN during herpes...... simplex virus (HSV) infection. We show that early production of IFN in vivo is mediated through Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, whereas the subsequent alpha/beta IFN (IFN-alpha/beta) response is derived from several cell types and induced independently of TLR9...... and fibroblasts, where the virus was able to replicate, HSV-induced IFN-alpha/beta production was dependent on both viral entry and replication, and ablated in cells unable to signal through the mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein pathway. Thus, during an HSV infection in vivo, multiple mechanisms...

  4. Protein Phosphatase, Mg2+/Mn2+-dependent 1A controls the innate antiviral and antibacterial response of macrophages during HIV-1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jim; Schaaf, Kaitlyn; Duverger, Alexandra; Wolschendorf, Frank; Speer, Alexander; Wagner, Frederic; Niederweis, Michael; Kutsch, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Co-infection with HIV-1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is a major public health issue. While some research has described how each pathogen accelerates the course of infection of the other pathogen by compromising the immune system, very little is known about the molecular biology of HIV-1/Mtb co-infection at the host cell level. This is somewhat surprising, as both pathogens are known to replicate and persist in macrophages. We here identify Protein Phosphatase, Mg2+/Mn2+-dependent 1A (PPM1A) as a molecular link between Mtb infection and increased HIV-1 susceptibility of macrophages. We demonstrate that both Mtb and HIV-1 infection induce the expression of PPM1A in primary human monocyte/macrophages and THP-1 cells. Genetic manipulation studies revealed that increased PPMA1 expression rendered THP-1 cells highly susceptible to HIV-1 infection, while depletion of PPM1A rendered them relatively resistant to HIV-1 infection. At the same time, increased PPM1A expression abrogated the ability of THP-1 cells to respond to relevant bacterial stimuli with a proper cytokine/chemokine secretion response, blocked their chemotactic response and impaired their ability to phagocytose bacteria. These data suggest that PPM1A, which had previously been shown to play a role in the antiviral response to Herpes Simplex virus infection, also governs the antibacterial response of macrophages to bacteria, or at least to Mtb infection. PPM1A thus seems to play a central role in the innate immune response of macrophages, implying that host directed therapies targeting PPM1A could be highly beneficial, in particular for HIV/Mtb co-infected patients. PMID:27004401

  5. Replication-competent recombinant porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) viruses expressing indicator proteins and antiviral cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Yongming; Shi, Jishu; Sang, Wenjing; Rowland, Raymond R R; Blecha, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) can subvert early innate immunity, which leads to ineffective antimicrobial responses. Overcoming immune subversion is critical for developing vaccines and other measures to control this devastating swine virus. The overall goal of this work was to enhance innate and adaptive immunity following vaccination through the expression of interferon (IFN) genes by the PRRSV genome. We have constructed a series of recombinant PRRS viruses using an infectious PRRSV cDNA clone (pCMV-P129). Coding regions of exogenous genes, which included Renilla luciferase (Rluc), green and red fluorescent proteins (GFP and DsRed, respectively) and several interferons (IFNs), were constructed and expressed through a unique subgenomic mRNA placed between ORF1b and ORF2 of the PRRSV infectious clone. The constructs, which expressed Rluc, GFP, DsRed, efficiently produced progeny viruses and mimicked the parental virus in both MARC-145 cells and porcine macrophages. In contrast, replication of IFN-expressing viruses was attenuated, similar to the level of replication observed after the addition of exogenous IFN. Furthermore, the IFN expressing viruses inhibited the replication of a second PRRS virus co-transfected or co-infected. Inhibition by the different IFN subtypes corresponded to their anti-PRRSV activity, i.e., IFNω5 ° IFNα1 > IFN-β > IFNδ3. In summary, the indicator-expressing viruses provided an efficient means for real-time monitoring of viral replication thus allowing high‑throughput elucidation of the role of host factors in PRRSV infection. This was shown when they were used to clearly demonstrate the involvement of tumor susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101) in the early stage of PRRSV infection. In addition, replication‑competent IFN-expressing viruses may be good candidates for development of modified live virus (MLV) vaccines, which are capable of reversing subverted innate immune responses and may induce more

  6. Ubiquitin-fusion as a strategy to modulate protein half-life: A3G antiviral activity revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadima-Couto, Iris; Freitas-Vieira, Acilino; Nowarski, Roni; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Kotler, Moshe; Goncalves, Joao

    2009-01-01

    The human APOBEC3G (A3G) is a potent inhibitor of HIV-1 replication and its activity is suppressed by HIV-1 virion infectivity factor (Vif). Vif neutralizes A3G mainly by inducing its degradation in the proteasome and blocking its incorporation into HIV-1 virions. Assessing the time needed for A3G incorporation into virions is, therefore, important to determine how quickly Vif must act to induce its degradation. We show that modelling the intracellular half-life of A3G can induce its Vif-independent targeting to the ubiquitin-proteasome system. By using various amino acids (X) in a cleavable ubiquitin-X-A3G fusion, we demonstrate that the half-life (t1/2) of X-A3G can be manipulated. We show that A3G molecules with a half-life of 13 min are incorporated into virions, whereas those with a half-life shorter than 5 min were not. The amount of X-A3G incorporated into virions increases from 13 min (Phe-A3G) to 85 min (Asn-A3G) and remains constant after this time period. Interestingly, despite the presence of similar levels of Arg-A3G (t1/2 = 28 min) and Asp-A3G (t1/2 = 65 min) into HIV-1 Δvif virions, inhibition of viral infectivity was only evident in the presence of A3G proteins with a longer half-life (t1/2 ≥ 65 min).

  7. Myxoma Virus dsRNA Binding Protein M029  Inhibits the Type I IFN‐Induced Antiviral State in a  Highly Species‐Specific Fashion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masmudur M. Rahman

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Myxoma virus (MYXV is Leporipoxvirus that possesses a specific rabbit‐restricted host tropism but exhibits a much broader  cellular host range in cultured cells. MYXV is able to efficiently  block all aspects of the type I interferon (IFN‐induced  antiviral  state  in rabbit cells, partially in  human  cells  and  very  poorly  in  mouse  cells.  The mechanism(s of this species‐specific inhibition of  type I IFN‐induced antiviral state is not well understood. Here we demonstrate that MYXV encoded  protein  M029, a truncated relative of the vaccinia virus (VACV E3 double‐stranded RNA (dsRNA  binding  protein  that  inhibits  protein  kinase  R (PKR,  can  also  antagonize the type I IFN‐induced  antiviral state in a highly species‐specific manner. In cells pre‐treated with type I IFN prior to  infection,  MYXV  exploits  M029  to  overcome  the  induced  antiviral  state completely in rabbit cells,  partially  in  human  cells,  but  not at all in mouse cells. However, in cells pre‐infected with MYXV,  IFN‐induced  signaling  is fully  inhibited  even  in the  absence  of M029 in cells from all three species,  suggesting  that  other  MYXV  protein(s  apart  from  M029  block  IFN  signaling  in  a  speciesindependent  manner.  We  also  show  that  the  antiviral  state  induced in rabbit, human or mouse cells  by  type  I IFN  can  inhibit M029‐knockout MYXV even when PKR is genetically knocked‐out, suggesting  that  M029  targets  other  host  proteins  for  this  antiviral state inhibition. Thus, the MYXV  dsRNA  binding  protein  M029  not  only  antagonizes  PKR  from  multiple  species  but  also blocks the  type I IFN antiviral state independently of PKR in a highly species‐specific fashion.

  8. Myxoma Virus dsRNA Binding Protein M029  Inhibits the Type I IFN-Induced Antiviral State in a  Highly Species-Specific Fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Masmudur M; McFadden, Grant

    2017-02-02

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is Leporipoxvirus that possesses a specific rabbit-restricted host tropism but exhibits a much broader  cellular host range in cultured cells. MYXV is able to efficiently  block all aspects of the type I interferon (IFN)-induced  antiviral  state  in rabbit cells, partially in  human  cells  and  very  poorly  in  mouse  cells.  The mechanism(s) of this species-specific inhibition of  type I IFN-induced antiviral state is not well understood. Here we demonstrate that MYXV encoded  protein  M029, a truncated relative of the vaccinia virus (VACV) E3 double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)  binding  protein  that  inhibits  protein  kinase  R (PKR),  can  also  antagonize the type I IFN-induced  antiviral state in a highly species-specific manner. In cells pre-treated with type I IFN prior to  infection,  MYXV  exploits  M029  to  overcome  the  induced  antiviral  state completely in rabbit cells,  partially  in  human  cells,  but  not at all in mouse cells. However, in cells pre-infected with MYXV,  IFN-induced  signaling  is fully  inhibited  even  in the  absence  of M029 in cells from all three species,  suggesting  that  other  MYXV  protein(s)  apart  from  M029  block  IFN  signaling  in  a  speciesindependent  manner.  We  also  show  that  the  antiviral  state  induced in rabbit, human or mouse cells  by  type  I IFN  can  inhibit M029-knockout MYXV even when PKR is genetically knocked-out, suggesting  that  M029  targets  other  host  proteins  for  this  antiviral state inhibition. Thus, the MYXV  dsRNA  binding  protein  M029  not  only  antagonizes  PKR  from  multiple  species  but  also blocks the  type I IFN antiviral state independently of PKR in a highly species-specific fashion.

  9. Replication-Competent Recombinant Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS Viruses Expressing Indicator Proteins and Antiviral Cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Blecha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV can subvert early innate immunity, which leads to ineffective antimicrobial responses. Overcoming immune subversion is critical for developing vaccines and other measures to control this devastating swine virus. The overall goal of this work was to enhance innate and adaptive immunity following vaccination through the expression of interferon (IFN genes by the PRRSV genome. We have constructed a series of recombinant PRRS viruses using an infectious PRRSV cDNA clone (pCMV-P129. Coding regions of exogenous genes, which included Renilla luciferase (Rluc, green and red fluorescent proteins (GFP and DsRed, respectively and several interferons (IFNs, were constructed and expressed through a unique subgenomic mRNA placed between ORF1b and ORF2 of the PRRSV infectious clone. The constructs, which expressed Rluc, GFP, DsRed, efficiently produced progeny viruses and mimicked the parental virus in both MARC-145 cells and porcine macrophages. In contrast, replication of IFN-expressing viruses was attenuated, similar to the level of replication observed after the addition of exogenous IFN. Furthermore, the IFN expressing viruses inhibited the replication of a second PRRS virus co-transfected or co-infected. Inhibition by the different IFN subtypes corresponded to their anti-PRRSV activity, i.e., IFNω5 » IFNα1 > IFN-β > IFNδ3. In summary, the indicator-expressing viruses provided an efficient means for real-time monitoring of viral replication thus allowing high‑throughput elucidation of the role of host factors in PRRSV infection. This was shown when they were used to clearly demonstrate the involvement of tumor susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101 in the early stage of PRRSV infection. In addition, replication‑competent IFN-expressing viruses may be good candidates for development of modified live virus (MLV vaccines, which are capable of reversing subverted innate immune responses and

  10. Direct-acting Antivirals in Kidney Transplant Patients: Successful Hepatitis C Treatment and Short Term Reduction in Urinary Protein/Creatinine Ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Goetsch

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The role of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV clearance in long-term kidney graft survival is unknown. In this study, we examined short-term trends of urinary protein/creatinine (P/C ratios in a cohort of HCV-infected kidney transplant recipients with stable graft function and treated with direct-acting antivirals (DAAs. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of 19 kidney transplant patients with chronic HCV infection treated with DAAs at the University of Alabama at Birmingham 1917 Viral Hepatitis Clinic between January 2013 and June 2016. Markers of glomerular damage were assessed using average protein/creatinine (P/C ratios measured pre- and post-treatment. We also described treatment efficacy using sustained virologic response at 12 weeks post-HCV treatment (SVR12. Results: The median age of the 19 patients included was 59 years (Q1=58, Q3=64 at completion of treatment. Of these patients, 68% were African American, 32% were White and 63% were male. The median time between kidney transplant and initiation of DAA therapy was 2.25 years (Q1=0.79, Q3=3.79. Post-treatment P/C ratios (median=0.127, Q1=0.090, Q3=0.220 were significantly lower (p=0.01 than pre-treatment ratios (median=0.168, Q1=0.118, Q3=0.385. P/C ratios decreased in 14 of 19 patients (74% with median change of -0.072 (median percent change= -40%. Post-treatment eGFRs (median=58.9, Q1=48.9, Q3=72.3 were not significantly different (p=0.82 than the pre-treatment values (median=57.0, Q1=48.8, Q3=67.8. Conclusions: In this preliminary study, there was a statistically significant decrease in P/C ratios associated with HCV clearance, suggesting a potential role for DAAs in improving kidney graft survival. Larger cohort studies will be needed to assess the clinical and long-term benefits of DAAs in this special population of HCV infected patients.

  11. Critical role for cross-linking of trimeric lectin domains of surfactant protein D in antiviral activity against influenza A virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tecle, Tesfaldet; White, Mitchell R; Sørensen, Grith Lykke

    2008-01-01

    and antiviral activity of NCRDs as assessed by haemagglutination and neuraminidase inhibition and by viral neutralization. mAb-mediated cross-linking also enabled NCRDs to induce viral aggregation and to increase viral uptake by neutrophils and virus-induced respiratory burst responses by these cells...

  12. Distinct determinants in HIV-1 Vif and human APOBEC3 proteins are required for the suppression of diverse host anti-viral proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyan Zhang

    Full Text Available APOBEC3G (A3G and related cytidine deaminases of the APOBEC3 family of proteins are potent inhibitors of many retroviruses, including HIV-1. Formation of infectious HIV-1 requires the suppression of multiple cytidine deaminases by Vif. HIV-1 Vif suppresses various APOBEC3 proteins through the common mechanism of recruiting the Cullin5-ElonginB-ElonginC E3 ubiquitin ligase to induce target protein polyubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation. The domains in Vif and various APOBEC3 proteins required for APOBEC3 recognition and degradation have not been fully characterized.In the present study, we have demonstrated that the regions of APOBEC3F (A3F that are required for its HIV-1-mediated binding and degradation are distinct from those reported for A3G. We found that the C-terminal cytidine deaminase domain (C-CDD of A3F alone is sufficient for its interaction with HIV-1 Vif and its Vif-mediated degradation. We also observed that the domains of HIV-1 Vif that are uniquely required for its functional interaction with full-length A3F are also required for the degradation of the C-CDD of A3F; in contrast, those Vif domains that are uniquely required for functional interaction with A3G are not required for the degradation of the C-CDD of A3F. Interestingly, the HIV-1 Vif domains required for the degradation of A3F are also required for the degradation of A3C and A3DE. On the other hand, the Vif domains uniquely required for the degradation of A3G are dispensable for the degradation of cytidine deaminases A3C and A3DE.Our data suggest that distinct regions of A3F and A3G are targeted by HIV-1 Vif molecules. However, HIV-1 Vif suppresses A3F, A3C, and A3DE through similar recognition determinants, which are conserved among Vif molecules from diverse HIV-1 strains. Mapping these determinants may be useful for the design of novel anti-HIV inhibitors.

  13. Antiviral Polymer Therapeutics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Anton Allen Abbotsford

    2014-01-01

    The field of drug delivery is in essence an exercise in engineered pharmacokinetics. Methods of doing so have been developed through the introduction of a vehicle carrying the drug, either by encapsulation or covalent attachment. The emergence of polymer therapeutics in anticancer therapy has...... garnered a great deal of interest due to the substantial room for improvement inherent to conventional chemotherapeutic agents. Chemotherapeutic agents and antiviral agents have a lot of features in common due to both of them typically targeting endogenous targets, unlike antibacterial compounds, though...... the examples of polymer therapeutics being applied as an antiviral treatment are few and far in-between. This work aims to explore antiviral therapeutics, specifically in context of hepatitis virus C (HCV) and HIV. The current treatment of hepatitis C consists of a combination of drugs, of which ribavirin...

  14. Ophthalmic antiviral chemotherapy : An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athmanathan Sreedharan

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiviral drug development has been slow due to many factors. One such factor is the difficulty to block the viral replication in the cell without adversely affecting the host cell metabolic activity. Most of the antiviral compounds are analogs of purines and pyramidines. Currently available antiviral drugs mainly inhibit viral nucleic acid synthesis, hence act only on actively replicating viruses. This article presents an overview of some of the commonly used antiviral agents in clinical ophthalmology.

  15. Antiviral Drugs: Seasonal Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-09-29

    In this podcast, Dr. Joe Bresee explains the nature of antiviral drugs and how they are used for seasonal flu.  Created: 9/29/2010 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 9/29/2010.

  16. HIV-1 proteins in infected cells determine the presentation of viral peptides by HLA class I and class II molecules and the nature of the cellular and humoral antiviral immune responses--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Y

    1994-07-01

    The goals of molecular virology and immunology during the second half of the 20th century have been to provide the conceptual approaches and the tools for the development of safe and efficient virus vaccines for the human population. The success of the vaccination approach to prevent virus epidemics was attributed to the ability of inactivated and live virus vaccines to induce a humoral immune response and to produce antiviral neutralizing antibodies in the vaccinees. The successful development of antiviral vaccines and their application to most of the human population led to a marked decrease in virus epidemics around the globe. Despite this remarkable achievement, the developing epidemics of HIV-caused AIDS (accompanied by activation of latent herpesviruses in AIDS patients), epidemics of Dengue fever, and infections with respiratory syncytial virus may indicate that conventional approaches to the development of virus vaccines that induce antiviral humoral responses may not suffice. This may indicate that virus vaccines that induce a cellular immune response, leading to the destruction of virus-infected cells by CD8+ cytotoxic T cells (CTLs), may be needed. Antiviral CD8+ CTLs are induced by viral peptides presented within the peptide binding grooves of HLA class I molecules present on the surface of infected cells. Studies in the last decade provided an insight into the presentation of viral peptides by HLA class I molecules to CD8+ T cells. These studies are here reviewed, together with a review of the molecular events of virus replication, to obtain an overview of how viral peptides associate with the HLA class I molecules. A similar review is provided on the molecular pathway by which viral proteins, used as subunit vaccines or inactivated virus particles, are taken up by endosomes in the endosome pathway and are processed by proteolytic enzymes into peptides that interact with HLA class II molecules during their transport to the plasma membrane of antigen

  17. Smallpox Antiviral Drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    phogenic proteolysis is crucial for simple RNA viruses such as poliovirus and HIV, and also appears to play a central role in the assembly of more...al particles [14]; unidirectional packaging of bacteriophage T4 DNA [15]; completion of the infectious poliovirus virion in a flexible configuration...effects of an antiviral both in vitro and in vivo. Some viruses have not been adapted to grow in tissue culture cells or due to their genetic makeup are

  18. Regulation of mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) expression and signaling by the mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membrane (MAM) protein Gp78.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jana L; Zhu, Jianzhong; Sarkar, Saumendra N; Coyne, Carolyn B

    2014-01-17

    In a previous study, we identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase Gp78 by RNAi high-throughput screening as a gene whose depletion restricted enterovirus infection. In the current study, we show that Gp78, which localizes to the ER-mitochondria interface, is a regulator of RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) antiviral signaling. We show that depletion of Gp78 results in a robust decrease of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection and a corresponding enhancement of type I interferon (IFN) signaling. Mechanistically, we show that Gp78 modulates type I IFN induction by altering both the expression and signaling of the mitochondria-localized RLR adaptor mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS). Expression of mutants of Gp78 that abolish its E3 ubiquitin ligase and its participation in ER-associated degradation (ERAD) lost their ability to degrade MAVS, but surprisingly maintained their ability to repress RLR signaling. In contrast, Gp78 lacking its entire C terminus lost both its ability to degrade MAVS and repress RLR signaling. We show that Gp78 interacts with both the N- and C-terminal domains of MAVS via its C-terminal RING domain, and that this interaction is required to abrogate Gp78-mediated attenuation of MAVS signaling. Our data thus implicate two parallel pathways by which Gp78 regulates MAVS signaling; one pathway requires its E3 ubiquitin ligase and ERAD activity to directly degrade MAVS, whereas the other pathway occurs independently of these activities, but requires the Gp78 RING domain and occurs via a direct association between this region and MAVS.

  19. [Antiviral properties of basidiomycetes metabolites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avtonomova, A V; Krasnopolskaya, L M

    2014-01-01

    The data on the antiviral action of the Ganoderma lucidum, Lentinus edodes, Grifola frondosa, Agaricus brasiliensis and other basidiomycetes metabolites are summurized. The metabolites of these species of basidiomycetes exhibit a direct antiviral effect on herpes simplex virus types I and II, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, influenza virus, Epstein-Barr virus, and others. Moreover, metabolites of basidiomycetes increased antiviral immunity.

  20. CRM1 Inhibitors for Antiviral Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Mathew

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases are a major global concern and despite major advancements in medical research, still cause significant morbidity and mortality. Progress in antiviral therapy is particularly hindered by appearance of mutants capable of overcoming the effects of drugs targeting viral components. Alternatively, development of drugs targeting host proteins essential for completion of viral lifecycle holds potential as a viable strategy for antiviral therapy. Nucleocytoplasmic trafficking pathways in particular are involved in several pathological conditions including cancer and viral infections, where hijacking or alteration of function of key transporter proteins, such as Chromosome Region Maintenance1 (CRM1 is observed. Overexpression of CRM1-mediated nuclear export is evident in several solid and hematological malignancies. Interestingly, CRM1-mediated nuclear export of viral components is crucial in various stages of the viral lifecycle and assembly. This review summarizes the role of CRM1 in cancer and selected viruses. Leptomycin B (LMB is the prototypical inhibitor of CRM1 potent against various cancer cell lines overexpressing CRM1 and in limiting viral infections at nanomolar concentrations in vitro. However, the irreversible shutdown of nuclear export results in high cytotoxicity and limited efficacy in vivo. This has prompted search for synthetic and natural CRM1 inhibitors that can potentially be developed as broadly active antivirals, some of which are summarized in this review.

  1. A synthetic peptide derived from the animo acid sequence of canine parvovirus structural proteins which defines a B cell epitope and elicits antiviral antibody in BALB c mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); J. Carlson; F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractSynthetic peptides, recombinant fusion proteins and mouse monoclonal antibodies were used to delineate a B cell epitope of the VP'2 structural protein of canine parvovirus (CPV). Although this epitope is not preferentially recognized in the normal antibody response to CPV, virus-specific

  2. Antiviral immunity in amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guangchun; Robert, Jacques

    2011-11-01

    Although a variety of virus species can infect amphibians, diseases caused by ranaviruses ([RVs]; Iridoviridae) have become prominent, and are a major concern for biodiversity, agriculture and international trade. The relatively recent and rapid increase in prevalence of RV infections, the wide range of host species infected by RVs, the variability in host resistance among population of the same species and among different developmental stages, all suggest an important involvement of the amphibian immune system. Nevertheless, the roles of the immune system in the etiology of viral diseases in amphibians are still poorly investigated. We review here the current knowledge of antiviral immunity in amphibians, focusing on model species such as the frog Xenopus and the salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum), and on recent progress in generating tools to better understand how host immune defenses control RV infections, pathogenicity, and transmission.

  3. Aciclovir: nuevo antiviral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Repetto

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available El aciclovir es un antiviral útil en infecciones graves causadas por el virus varicela-zoster. Es bien tolerado con escasas reacciones adversas. En pacientes deshidratados, en insuficiencia renal o si la infusión endovenosa es muy rápida, puede ocacionar una "nefropatía obstructiva" transitoria. Existen preparados de uso tópico, oftálmico, endovenoso y oral; esta última vía constituye una ventaja sobre la vidarabina con la que tiene en común el espectro de actividad. En razón de su selectividad, riesgo de resistencia y número reducido de antivirales, su prescripción debe restringirse a infecciones graves causadas por los agentes inmunodeprimidos; excluyendo por lo tanto las comunes y autolimitadas, frecuentes en el individuo normal.

  4. MCPIP1 is a positive regulator of type I interferons antiviral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Liping; Zuo, Yibo; Deng, Wenjun; Miao, Ying; Liu, Jin; Yuan, Yukang; Guo, Tingting; Zhang, Liting; Jin, Jun; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Hui

    2018-04-15

    Type-I interferons (IFN-I) are widely used for antiviral immunotherapy in clinic. Therefore, identification of the regulators of IFN-I antiviral activity is important for developing novel targets for IFN-based antiviral therapy. Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1-induced protein 1 (MCPIP1) is critical for cellular inflammatory responses. However, the roles of MCPIP1 in interferons (IFNs)-mediated antiviral immunity are unexplored. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that MCPIP1 is an important positive regulator of IFNs antiviral activity. We found that MCPIP1 can promote innate antiviral immunity independently of both its RNase and deubiquitinase activity. Furthermore, we reveal that MCPIP1 is an IFN-induced positive feedback signal molecule which promotes IFN-I-mediated antiviral efficacy. Mechanistically, MCPIP1 does not affect the activation of JAK/STAT upstream of IFN-I signaling, but significantly promotes IFN-I signaling by enhancing ISRE promoter activity and expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). And MCPIP1-mediated activation of IFN-I signaling is independently of its RNase and deubiquitinase activity. These findings uncover a novel innate antiviral mechanism mediated by the IFN-MCPIP1 axis, and may provide potential targets for enhancing IFNs antiviral therapy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. ANTIVIRAL EFFECTS OF PLASMA AND MILK-PROTEINS - LACTOFERRIN SHOWS POTENT ACTIVITY AGAINST BOTH HUMAN-IMMUNODEFICIENCY-VIRUS AND HUMAN CYTOMEGALOVIRUS REPLICATION IN-VITRO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HARMSEN, MC; SWART, PJ; DEBETHUNE, MP; PAUWELS, R; DECLERCQ, E; THE, TH; MEIJER, DKF

    Native and chemically derivatized proteins purified from serum and milk were assayed in vitro to assess their inhibiting capacity on the cytopathic effect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) on MT4 cells and fibroblasts, respectively. Only native and

  6. Novel fused tetrathiocines as antivirals that target the nucleocapsid zinc finger containing protein of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) as a model of HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asquith, Christopher R M; Meli, Marina L; Konstantinova, Lidia S; Laitinen, Tuomo; Poso, Antti; Rakitin, Oleg A; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Allenspach, Karin; Hilton, Stephen T

    2015-03-15

    A novel series of fused tetrathiocines were prepared for evaluation of activity against the nucleocapsid protein of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) in an in vitro cell culture approach. The results demonstrated that the compounds display potent nanomolar activity and low toxicity against this key model of HIV infection. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Phase diagrams map the properties of antiviral agents directed against hepatitis B virus core assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lichun; Chirapu, Srinivas Reddy; Finn, M G; Zlotnick, Adam

    2013-03-01

    Assembly effectors are small molecules that induce inappropriate virus capsid assembly to antiviral effect. To identify attributes of hepatitis B virus (HBV) assembly effectors, assembly reaction products (normal capsid, noncapsid polymer, intermediates, and free dimeric core protein) were quantified in the presence of three experimental effectors: HAP12, HAP13, and AT-130. Effectors bound stoichiometrically to capsid protein polymers, but not free protein. Thermodynamic and kinetic effects, not aberrant assembly, correlate with maximal antiviral activity.

  8. ANTI-VIRAL ACTIVITY OF GLYCIRRHETINIC AND GLYCIRRHIZIC ACIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Zarubaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza is a highly contagious human disease. In the course of use of antiviral drugs drug-resistant strains of the virus are formed, resulting in reduced efficiency of the chemotherapy. The review describes the biological activity of glycirrhetinic (GLA and glycirrhizic (GA acids in terms of their use as a therapeutic agent for viral infections. So, these compounds are against a broad spectrum of viruses, including herpes, corona-, alphaand flaviviruses, human immunodeficiency virus, vaccinia virus, poliovirus type I, vesicular stomatitis virus and influenza A virus. These data indicate that anti-viral effect of these compounds is due to several types of activity — direct antiviral effects, effects on cellular proand anti-viral and immunomodulating pathways, in particular by activation of innate immunity system. GA interferes with early steps of the viral reproductive cycle such as virus binding to its receptor, the absorption of the virus by endocytosis or virus decapsidation in the cytoplasm. This is due to the effect of GA-induced reduction of membrane fluidity. Thus, one mechanism for the antiviral activity of GA is that GA molecule increases the rigidity of cellular and viral membranes after incorporation in there. This results in increasing of energy threshold required for the formation of negative curvature at the fusion zones, as well as difficult lateral migration of the virus-receptor complexes. In addition, glycyrrhizin prevents interaction of viral nucleoprotein with cellular protein HMGB1, which is necessary for the viral life cycle. Glycyrrhizin also inhibits the induction of oxidative stress during influenza infection, exhibiting antioxidant properties, which leads to a reduction of virus-induced production of cytokines/chemokines, without affecting the replication of the virus. A wide spectrum of biological activity and effect on various aspects of the viral pathogenesis substantiate the effect of GA and GLA as a component

  9. Antiviral Activity of Resveratrol against Human and Animal Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abba, Yusuf; Hassim, Hasliza; Hamzah, Hazilawati; Noordin, Mohamed Mustapha

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol is a potent polyphenolic compound that is being extensively studied in the amelioration of viral infections both in vitro and in vivo. Its antioxidant effect is mainly elicited through inhibition of important gene pathways like the NF-κβ pathway, while its antiviral effects are associated with inhibitions of viral replication, protein synthesis, gene expression, and nucleic acid synthesis. Although the beneficial roles of resveratrol in several viral diseases have been well documented, a few adverse effects have been reported as well. This review highlights the antiviral mechanisms of resveratrol in human and animal viral infections and how some of these effects are associated with the antioxidant properties of the compound.

  10. Mechanisms of virus resistance and antiviral activity of snake venoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JVR Rivero

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Viruses depend on cell metabolism for their own propagation. The need to foster an intimate relationship with the host has resulted in the development of various strategies designed to help virus escape from the defense mechanisms present in the host. Over millions of years, the unremitting battle between pathogens and their hosts has led to changes in evolution of the immune system. Snake venoms are biological resources that have antiviral activity, hence substances of significant pharmacological value. The biodiversity in Brazil with respect to snakes is one of the richest on the planet; nevertheless, studies on the antiviral activity of venom from Brazilian snakes are scarce. The antiviral properties of snake venom appear as new promising therapeutic alternative against the defense mechanisms developed by viruses. In the current study, scientific papers published in recent years on the antiviral activity of venom from various species of snakes were reviewed. The objective of this review is to discuss the mechanisms of resistance developed by viruses and the components of snake venoms that present antiviral activity, particularly, enzymes, amino acids, peptides and proteins.

  11. Antiviral signaling protein MITA acts as a tumor suppressor in breast cancer by regulating NF-κB induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatelia, Khyati; Singh, Aru; Tomar, Dhanendra; Singh, Kritarth; Sripada, Lakshmi; Chagtoo, Megha; Prajapati, Paresh; Singh, Rochika; Godbole, Madan M; Singh, Rajesh

    2014-02-01

    Emerging evidences suggest that chronic inflammation is one of the major causes of tumorigenesis. The role of inflammation in regulation of breast cancer progression is not well established. Recently Mediator of IRF3 Activation (MITA) protein has been identified that regulates NF-κB and IFN pathways. Role of MITA in the context of inflammation and cancer progression has not been investigated. In the current report, we studied the role of MITA in the regulation of cross talk between cell death and inflammation in breast cancer cells. The expression of MITA was significantly lower on in estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer cells than ER negative cells. Similarly, it was significantly down regulated in tumor tissue as compared to the normal tissue. The overexpression of MITA in MCF-7 and T47D decreases the cell proliferation and increases the cell death by activation of caspases. MITA positively regulates NF-κB transcription factor, which is essential for MITA induced cell death. The activation of NF-κB induces TNF-α production which further sensitizes MITA induced cell death by activation of death receptor pathway through capsase-8. MITA expression decreases the colony forming units and migration ability of MCF-7 cells. Thus, our finding suggests that MITA acts as a tumor suppressor which is down regulated during tumorigenesis providing survival advantage to tumor cell. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Smallpox Antiviral Drug

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hruby, Dennis E; Bolken, Tove C

    2005-01-01

    ...) as a model system, the goal of our currently funded work is to determine whether the 17L cysteine proteinase or the 17L metalloproteinase encoded by VV is the pox virus core protein proteinase (vCPP...

  13. Viral ancestors of antiviral systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Luis P

    2011-10-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the 'Big Bang' theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features.

  14. Viral Ancestors of Antiviral Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis P. Villarreal

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the ‘Big Bang’ theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features.

  15. Interferon induced IFIT family genes in host antiviral defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiang; Michal, Jennifer J; Zhang, Lifan; Ding, Bo; Lunney, Joan K; Liu, Bang; Jiang, Zhihua

    2013-01-01

    Secretion of interferons (IFNs) from virus-infected cells is a hallmark of host antiviral immunity and in fact, IFNs exert their antiviral activities through the induction of antiviral proteins. The IFN-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFITs) family is among hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes. This family contains a cluster of duplicated loci. Most mammals have IFIT1, IFIT2, IFIT3 and IFIT5; however, bird, marsupial, frog and fish have only IFIT5. Regardless of species, IFIT5 is always adjacent to SLC16A12. IFIT family genes are predominantly induced by type I and type III interferons and are regulated by the pattern recognition and the JAK-STAT signaling pathway. IFIT family proteins are involved in many processes in response to viral infection. However, some viruses can escape the antiviral functions of the IFIT family by suppressing IFIT family genes expression or methylation of 5' cap of viral molecules. In addition, the variants of IFIT family genes could significantly influence the outcome of hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy. We believe that our current review provides a comprehensive picture for the community to understand the structure and function of IFIT family genes in response to pathogens in human, as well as in animals.

  16. The interferon-induced antiviral protein PML (TRIM19) promotes the restriction and transcriptional silencing of lentiviruses in a context-specific, isoform-specific fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masroori, Nasser; Merindol, Natacha; Berthoux, Lionel

    2016-03-22

    The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein, a type I interferon (IFN-I)-induced gene product and a member of the tripartite motif (TRIM) family, modulates the transcriptional activity of viruses belonging to various families. Whether PML has an impact on the replication of HIV-1 has not been fully addressed, but recent studies point to its possible involvement in the restriction of HIV-1 in human cells and in the maintenance of transcriptional latency in human cell lines in which HIV-1 is constitutively repressed. We investigated further the restriction of HIV-1 and a related lentivirus, SIVmac, by PML in murine cells and in a lymphocytic human cell line. In particular, we studied the relevance of PML to IFN-I-mediated inhibition and the role of individual human isoforms. We demonstrate that both human PML (hPML) and murine PML (mPML) inhibit the early post-entry stages of the replication of HIV-1 and a related lentivirus, SIVmac. In addition, HIV-1 was transcriptionally silenced by mPML and by hPML isoforms I, II, IV and VI in MEFs. This PML-mediated transcriptional repression was attenuated in presence of the histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA. In contrast, depletion of PML had no effect on HIV-1 gene expression in a human T cell line. PML was found to contribute to the inhibition of HIV-1 by IFN-I. Specifically, IFN-α and IFN-β treatments of MEFs enhanced the PML-dependent inhibition of HIV-1 early replication stages. We show that PML can inhibit HIV-1 and other lentiviruses as part of the IFN-I-mediated response. The restriction takes place at two distinct steps, i.e. reverse transcription and transcription, and in an isoform-specific, cellular context-specific fashion. Our results support a model in which PML activates innate immune antilentiviral effectors. These data are relevant to the development of latency reversal-inducing pharmacological agents, since PML was previously proposed as a pharmacological target for such inhibitors. This study also has

  17. Contribution of autophagy to antiviral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Jurado, Emma; Riedel, Claudia A; González, Pablo A; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2015-11-14

    Although identified in the 1960's, interest in autophagy has significantly increased in the past decade with notable research efforts oriented at understanding as to how this multi-protein complex operates and is regulated. Autophagy is commonly defined as a "self-eating" process evolved by eukaryotic cells to recycle senescent organelles and expired proteins, which is significantly increased during cellular stress responses. In addition, autophagy can also play important roles during human diseases, such as cancer, neurodegenerative and autoimmune disorders. Furthermore, novel findings suggest that autophagy contributes to the host defense against microbial infections. In this article, we review the role of macroautophagy in antiviral immune responses and discuss molecular mechanisms evolved by viral pathogens to evade this process. A role for autophagy as an effector mechanism used both, by innate and adaptive immunity is also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Highlights in antiviral drug research: antivirals at the horizon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq, Erik

    2013-11-01

    This review highlights ten "hot topics" in current antiviral research: (i) new nucleoside derivatives (i.e., PSI-352938) showing high potential as a direct antiviral against hepatitis C virus (HCV); (ii) cyclopropavir, which should be further pursued for treatment of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections; (iii) North-methanocarbathymidine (N-MCT), with a N-locked conformation, showing promising activity against both α- and γ-herpesviruses; (iv) CMX001, an orally bioavailable prodrug of cidofovir with broad-spectrum activity against DNA viruses, including polyoma, adeno, herpes, and pox; (v) favipiravir, which is primarily pursued for the treatment of influenza virus infections, but also inhibits the replication of other RNA viruses, particularly (-)RNA viruses such as arena, bunya, and hanta; (vi) newly emerging antiarenaviral compounds which should be more effective (and less toxic) than the ubiquitously used ribavirin; (vii) antipicornavirus agents in clinical development (pleconaril, BTA-798, and V-073); (viii) natural products receiving increased attention as potential antiviral drugs; (ix) antivirals such as U0126 targeted at specific cellular kinase pathways [i.e., mitogen extracellular kinase (MEK)], showing activity against influenza and other viruses; and (x) two structurally unrelated compounds (i.e., LJ-001 and dUY11) with broad-spectrum activity against virtually all enveloped RNA and DNA viruses. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The future of antiviral immunotoxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiess, K.; Høy Jakobsen, Mette; Kledal, Thomas N

    2016-01-01

    There is a constant need for new therapeutic interventions in a wide range of infectious diseases. Over the past few years, the immunotoxins have entered the stage as promising antiviral treatments. Immunotoxins have been extensively explored in cancer treatment and have achieved FDA approval...

  20. Assessment of the Antiviral Properties of Recombinant Porcine SP-D against Various Influenza A Viruses In Vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillaire, M.L.B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341413933; van Eijk, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/255160216; Trierum, S.E.; van Riel, D.; Saelens, X.; Romijn, R.A.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/26228359X; Hemrika, W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/121631362; Fouchier, R.A.M.; Kuiken, T.; Osterhaus, A.D.M.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074960172; Haagsman, H.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069273278; Rimmelzwaan, G.F.

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of influenza viruses resistant to existing classes of antiviral drugs raises concern and there is a need for novel antiviral agents that could be used therapeutically or prophylacticaly. Surfactant protein D (SP-D) belongs to the family of Ctype lectins which are important effector

  1. Assessment of the antiviral properties of recombinant porcine SP-D against various influenza A viruses in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L.B. Hillaire (Marine); M. van Eijk (Martin); S.E. Trierum (Stella); D.A.J. van Riel (Debby); X. Saelens (Xavier); R.A. Romijn (Roland); W. Hemrika (Wieger); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); T. Kuiken (Thijs); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); H.P. Haagsman (Henk); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe emergence of influenza viruses resistant to existing classes of antiviral drugs raises concern and there is a need for novel antiviral agents that could be used therapeutically or prophylacticaly. Surfactant protein D (SP-D) belongs to the family of C-type lectins which are important

  2. Antiviral Polymer Therapeutics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Anton Allen Abbotsford

    2014-01-01

    polymerized in a controlled manner with carrier monomers of historically proven biocompatible polymers. The carrier polymers, the loading of ribavirin as well as the size of the polymer were varied systematically with the aid of an automated synthesis platform. These polymers were tested in a cellular assay...... of reversible-addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization, which not only controls the size of polymer, but also allows the introduction of a terminal amine on the polymer which can be used for further conjugation. This has allowed for not only fluorescent labeling of the polymer, but also protein......The field of drug delivery is in essence an exercise in engineered pharmacokinetics. Methods of doing so have been developed through the introduction of a vehicle carrying the drug, either by encapsulation or covalent attachment. The emergence of polymer therapeutics in anticancer therapy has...

  3. Can antiviral drugs contain pandemic influenza transmission?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels G Becker

    Full Text Available Antiviral drugs dispensed during the 2009 influenza pandemic generally failed to contain transmission. This poses the question of whether preparedness for a future pandemic should include plans to use antiviral drugs to mitigate transmission.Simulations using a standard transmission model that allows for infected arrivals and delayed vaccination show that attempts to contain transmission require relatively few antiviral doses. In contrast, persistent use of antiviral drugs when the reproduction number remains above 1 use very many doses and are unlikely to reduce the eventual attack rate appreciably unless the stockpile is very large. A second model, in which the community has a household structure, shows that the effectiveness of a strategy of dispensing antiviral drugs to infected households decreases rapidly with time delays in dispensing the antivirals. Using characteristics of past pandemics it is estimated that at least 80% of primary household cases must present upon show of symptoms to have a chance of containing transmission by dispensing antiviral drugs to households. To determine data needs, household outbreaks were simulated with 50% receiving antiviral drugs early and 50% receiving antiviral drugs late. A test to compare the size of household outbreaks indicates that at least 100-200 household outbreaks need to be monitored to find evidence that antiviral drugs can mitigate transmission of the newly emerged virus.Use of antiviral drugs in an early attempt to contain transmission should be part of preparedness plans for a future influenza pandemic. Data on the incidence of the first 350 cases and the eventual attack rates of the first 200 hundred household outbreaks should be used to estimate the initial reproduction number R and the effectiveness of antiviral drugs to mitigate transmission. Use of antiviral drugs to mitigate general transmission should cease if these estimates indicate that containment of transmission is unlikely.

  4. Innate and intrinsic antiviral immunity in skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Tatsuyoshi; Ogawa, Youichi; Aoki, Rui; Shimada, Shinji

    2014-09-01

    As the body's most exposed interface with the environment, the skin is constantly challenged by potentially pathogenic microbes, including viruses. To sense the invading viruses, various types of cells resident in the skin express many different pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) such as C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), Toll-like receptors (TLRs), nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs), retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs) and cytosolic DNA sensors, that can detect the pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) of the viruses. The detection of viral PAMPs initiates two major innate immune signaling cascades: the first involves the activation of the downstream transcription factors, such as interferon regulatory factors (IRFs), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and activator protein 1 (AP-1), which cooperate to induce the transcription of type I interferons and pro-inflammatory cytokines. The second signaling pathway involves the caspase-1-mediated processing of IL-1β and IL-18 through the formation of an inflammasome complex. Cutaneous innate immunity including the production of the innate cytokines constitutes the first line of host defence that limits the virus dissemination from the skin, and also plays an important role in the activation of adaptive immune response, which represents the second line of defence. More recently, the third immunity "intrinsic immunity" has emerged, that provides an immediate and direct antiviral defense mediated by host intrinsic restriction factors. This review focuses on the recent advances regarding the antiviral immune systems, highlighting the innate and intrinsic immunity against the viral infections in the skin, and describes how viral components are recognized by cutaneous immune systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A novel unsupervised method to identify genes important in the anti-viral response: application to interferon/ribavirin in hepatitis C patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid I Brodsky

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Treating hepatitis C with interferon/ribavirin results in a varied response in terms of decrease in viral titer and ultimate outcome. Marked responders have a sharp decline in viral titer within a few days of treatment initiation, whereas in other patients there is no effect on the virus (poor responders. Previous studies have shown that combination therapy modifies expression of hundreds of genes in vitro and in vivo. However, identifying which, if any, of these genes have a role in viral clearance remains challenging.The goal of this paper is to link viral levels with gene expression and thereby identify genes that may be responsible for early decrease in viral titer.Microarrays were performed on RNA isolated from PBMC of patients undergoing interferon/ribavirin therapy. Samples were collected at pre-treatment (day 0, and 1, 2, 7, 14 and 28 days after initiating treatment. A novel method was applied to identify genes that are linked to a decrease in viral titer during interferon/ribavirin treatment. The method uses the relationship between inter-patient gene expression based proximities and inter-patient viral titer based proximities to define the association between microarray gene expression measurements of each gene and viral-titer measurements.We detected 36 unique genes whose expressions provide a clustering of patients that resembles viral titer based clustering of patients. These genes include IRF7, MX1, OASL and OAS2, viperin and many ISG's of unknown function.The genes identified by this method appear to play a major role in the reduction of hepatitis C virus during the early phase of treatment. The method has broad utility and can be used to analyze response to any group of factors influencing biological outcome such as antiviral drugs or anti-cancer agents where microarray data are available.

  6. Antiviral effect of lithium chloride on infection of cells by canine parvovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Pei; Fu, Xinliang; Yan, Zhongshan; Fang, Bo; Huang, San; Fu, Cheng; Hong, Malin; Li, Shoujun

    2015-11-01

    Canine parvovirus type 2 causes significant viral disease in dogs, with high morbidity, high infectivity, and high mortality. Lithium chloride is a potential antiviral drug for viruses. We determined the antiviral effect of Lithium Chloride on canine parvovirus type 2 in feline kidney cells. The viral DNA and proteins of canine parvovirus were suppressed in a dose-dependent manner by lithium chloride. Further investigation verified that viral entry into cells was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by lithium chloride. These results indicated that lithium chloride could be a potential antiviral drug for curing dogs with canine parvovirus infection. The specific steps of canine parvovirus entry into cells that are affected by lithium chloride and its antiviral effect in vivo should be explored in future studies.

  7. Infection-specific phosphorylation of glutamyl-prolyl tRNA synthetase induces antiviral immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Young; Lee, Hyun-Cheol; Kim, Hyun-Kwan; Jang, Song Yee; Park, Seong-Jun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Jong Hwan; Hwang, Jungwon; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Arif, Abul; Kim, Seon-Young; Choi, Young-Ki; Lee, Cheolju; Lee, Chul-Ho; Jung, Jae U; Fox, Paul L; Kim, Sunghoon; Lee, Jong-Soo; Kim, Myung Hee

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian cytoplasmic multi-tRNA synthetase complex (MSC) is a depot system that regulates non-translational cellular functions. Here we found that the MSC component glutamyl-prolyl-tRNA synthetase (EPRS) switched its function following viral infection and exhibited potent antiviral activity. Infection-specific phosphorylation of EPRS at Ser990 induced its dissociation from the MSC, after which it was guided to the antiviral signaling pathway, where it interacted with PCBP2, a negative regulator of mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) that is critical for antiviral immunity. This interaction blocked PCBP2-mediated ubiquitination of MAVS and ultimately suppressed viral replication. EPRS-haploid (Eprs+/−) mice showed enhanced viremia and inflammation and delayed viral clearance. This stimulus-inducible activation of MAVS by EPRS suggests an unexpected role for the MSC as a regulator of immune responses to viral infection. PMID:27595231

  8. Identification of a novel porcine OASL variant exhibiting antiviral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Changjing; Zheng, Sheng; Zhu, Dan; Lian, Xue; Liu, Weiting; Hu, Feng; Chen, Puyan; Cao, Ruibing

    2018-01-15

    2', 5'-Oligoadenylate synthetase-lilke (OASL) protein is an atypical oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS) family member, which possesses antiviral activity but lacks 2', 5'-oligoadenylate synthetase activity. Here, a novel variant of porcine OASL (pOASL2) was identified through RT-PCR amplification. This gene is distinguishable from the previously described wild-type porcine OASL (pOASL1). The gene appears to be derived from a truncation of exon 4 plus 8 nucleotides of exon 5 with a premature termination, measuring only 633 bp in length, although its position corresponds to that of pOASL1. Given this novel gene appears to be a variant of pOASL, we assayed for antiviral activity of the protein. We demonstrated that pOASL2 could inhibit Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) proliferation as well as pOASL1 in a transient overexpression assay of pOASL1 and pOASL2 in PK-15 and Vero cells. In addition to JEV, pOASL1 and pOASL2 also decreased the proliferations of Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), but did not exhibit antiviral activity against pseudorabies virus (PRV). Structural analysis showed that the pOASL2 gene retained only the first three exons at the 5'-. To investigate the role of the αN4 helix in pOASL in antiviral responses like that in hOASL, we mutated key residues in the anchor domain of the αN4 helix in pOASL2, based on the domain's location in hOASL. However, the antiviral activity of pOASL2 was not affected. Thus, the αN4 helix of pOASL likely does not play a significant role in its antiviral activity. In conclusion, pOASL2 acts as a new splice isoform of pOASL that plays a role in resistance to infection of several kinds of RNA viruses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Antiviral Activity of Resveratrol against Human and Animal Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Abba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol is a potent polyphenolic compound that is being extensively studied in the amelioration of viral infections both in vitro and in vivo. Its antioxidant effect is mainly elicited through inhibition of important gene pathways like the NF-κβ pathway, while its antiviral effects are associated with inhibitions of viral replication, protein synthesis, gene expression, and nucleic acid synthesis. Although the beneficial roles of resveratrol in several viral diseases have been well documented, a few adverse effects have been reported as well. This review highlights the antiviral mechanisms of resveratrol in human and animal viral infections and how some of these effects are associated with the antioxidant properties of the compound.

  10. New pathogenic viruses and novel antiviral drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, Ben; Eggink, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    The journal Antiviral Research was conceived and born in 1980, and launched in 1981, a time when very few antiviral drugs were around. This 30-year celebration meeting was convened by the publisher Elsevier and chaired by Eric de Clercq (Leuven University), who has acted as editor-in-chief for the

  11. The interferon response circuit in antiviral host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, O; Weber, F

    2009-01-01

    Viruses have learned to multiply in the face of a powerful innate and adaptive immune response of the host. They have evolved multiple strategies to evade the interferon (IFN) system which would otherwise limit virus growth at an early stage of infection. IFNs induce the synthesis of a range of antiviral proteins which serve as cell-autonomous intrinsic restriction factors. For example, the dynamin-like MxA GTPase inhibits the multiplication of influenza and bunyaviruses (such as La Crosse virus, Hantaan virus, Rift Valley Fever virus, and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus) by binding and sequestering the nucleocapsid protein into large perinuclear complexes. To overcome such intracellular restrictions, virulent viruses either inhibit IFN synthesis, bind and inactivate secreted IFN molecules, block IFN-activated signaling, or disturb the action of IFN-induced antiviral proteins. Many viruses produce specialized proteins to disarm the danger signal or express virulence genes that target members of the IFN regulatory factor family (IRFs) or components of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway. An alternative evasion strategy is based on extreme viral replication speed which out-competes the IFN response. The identification of viral proteins with IFN antagonistic functions has great implications for disease prevention and therapy. Virus mutants lacking IFN antagonistic properties represent safe yet highly immunogenic candidate vaccines. Furthermore, novel drugs intercepting viral IFN-antagonists could be used to disarm the viral intruders.

  12. Antiviral active peptide from oyster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Mingyong; Cui, Wenxuan; Zhao, Yuanhui; Liu, Zunying; Dong, Shiyuan; Guo, Yao

    2008-08-01

    An active peptide against herpes virus was isolated from the enzymic hydrolysate of oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) and purified with the definite direction hydrolysis technique in the order of alcalase and bromelin. The hydrolysate was fractioned into four ranges of molecular weight (>10 kDa, 10 5 kDa, 5 1 kDa and <1 kDa) using ultrafiltration membranes and dialysis. The fraction of 10 5 kDa was purified using consecutive chromatographic methods including DEAE Sephadex A-25 column, Sephadex G-25 column, and high performance liquid chromatogram (HPLC) by activity-guided isolation. The antiviral effect of the obtained peptide on herpetic virus was investigated in Vero cells by observing cytopathic effect (CPE). The result shows that the peptide has high inhibitory activity on herpetic virus.

  13. Antiviral Perspectives for Chikungunya Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Parashar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a mosquito-borne pathogen that has a major health impact in humans and causes acute febrile illness in humans accompanied by joint pains and, in many cases, persistent arthralgia lasting for weeks to years. CHIKV reemerged in 2005-2006 in several parts of the Indian Ocean islands and India after a gap of 32 years, causing millions of cases. The re-emergence of CHIKV has also resulted in numerous outbreaks in several countries in the eastern hemisphere, with a threat to further expand in the near future. However, there is no vaccine against CHIKV infection licensed for human use, and therapy for CHIKV infection is still mainly limited to supportive care as antiviral agents are yet in different stages of testing or development. In this review we explore the different perspectives for chikungunya treatment and the effectiveness of these treatment regimens and discuss the scope for future directions.

  14. Arbidol as a broad-spectrum antiviral: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaising, Julie; Polyak, Stephen J; Pécheur, Eve-Isabelle

    2014-07-01

    Arbidol (ARB) is a Russian-made small indole-derivative molecule, licensed in Russia and China for prophylaxis and treatment of influenza and other respiratory viral infections. It also demonstrates inhibitory activity against other viruses, enveloped or not, responsible for emerging or globally prevalent infectious diseases such as hepatitis B and C, gastroenteritis, hemorrhagic fevers or encephalitis. In this review, we will explore the possibility and pertinence of ARB as a broad-spectrum antiviral, after a careful examination of its physico-chemical properties, pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and molecular mechanisms of action. Recent studies suggest that ARB's dual interactions with membranes and aromatic amino acids in proteins may be central to its broad-spectrum antiviral activity. This could impact on the virus itself, and/or on cellular functions or critical steps in virus-cell interactions, thereby positioning ARB as both a direct-acting antiviral (DAA) and a host-targeting agent (HTA). In the context of recent studies in animals and humans, we will discuss the prospective clinical use of ARB in various viral infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Antiviral activity of lanatoside C against dengue virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Yan Yi; Chen, Karen Caiyun; Chen, Huixin; Seng, Eng Khuan; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2014-11-01

    Dengue infection poses a serious threat globally due to its recent rapid spread and rise in incidence. Currently, there is no approved vaccine or effective antiviral drug for dengue virus infection. In response to the urgent need for the development of an effective antiviral for dengue virus, the US Drug Collection library was screened in this study to identify compounds with anti-dengue activities. Lanatoside C, an FDA approved cardiac glycoside was identified as a candidate anti-dengue compound. Our data revealed that lanatoside C has an IC50 of 0.19μM for dengue virus infection in HuH-7 cells. Dose-dependent reduction in dengue viral RNA and viral proteins synthesis were also observed upon treatment with increasing concentrations of lanatoside C. Time of addition study indicated that lanatoside C inhibits the early processes of the dengue virus replication cycle. Furthermore, lanatoside C can effectively inhibit all four serotypes of dengue virus, flavivirus Kunjin, alphavirus Chikungunya and Sindbis virus as well as the human enterovirus 71. These findings suggest that lanatoside C possesses broad spectrum antiviral activity against several groups of positive-sense RNA viruses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Niclosamide is a proton carrier and targets acidic endosomes with broad antiviral effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Jurgeit

    Full Text Available Viruses use a limited set of host pathways for infection. These pathways represent bona fide antiviral targets with low likelihood of viral resistance. We identified the salicylanilide niclosamide as a broad range antiviral agent targeting acidified endosomes. Niclosamide is approved for human use against helminthic infections, and has anti-neoplastic and antiviral effects. Its mode of action is unknown. Here, we show that niclosamide, which is a weak lipophilic acid inhibited infection with pH-dependent human rhinoviruses (HRV and influenza virus. Structure-activity studies showed that antiviral efficacy and endolysosomal pH neutralization co-tracked, and acidification of the extracellular medium bypassed the virus entry block. Niclosamide did not affect the vacuolar H(+-ATPase, but neutralized coated vesicles or synthetic liposomes, indicating a proton carrier mode-of-action independent of any protein target. This report demonstrates that physico-chemical interference with host pathways has broad range antiviral effects, and provides a proof of concept for the development of host-directed antivirals.

  17. Antiviral Natural Products and Herbal Medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-Tzung Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Viral infections play an important role in human diseases, and recent outbreaks in the advent of globalization and ease of travel have underscored their prevention as a critical issue in safeguarding public health. Despite the progress made in immunization and drug development, many viruses lack preventive vaccines and efficient antiviral therapies, which are often beset by the generation of viral escape mutants. Thus, identifying novel antiviral drugs is of critical importance and natural products are an excellent source for such discoveries. In this mini-review, we summarize the antiviral effects reported for several natural products and herbal medicines.

  18. Viruses and Antiviral Immunity in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Cherry, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Viral pathogens present many challenges to organisms, driving the evolution of a myriad of antiviral strategies to combat infections. A wide variety of viruses infect invertebrates, including both natural pathogens that are insect-restricted, and viruses that are transmitted to vertebrates. Studies using the powerful tools available in the model organism Drosophila have expanded our understanding of antiviral defenses against diverse viruses. In this review, we will cover three major areas. First, we will describe the tools used to study viruses in Drosophila. Second, we will survey the major viruses that have been studied in Drosophila. And lastly, we will discuss the well-characterized mechanisms that are active against these diverse pathogens, focusing on non-RNAi mediated antiviral mechanisms. Antiviral RNAi is discussed in another paper in this issue. PMID:23680639

  19. Developing Novel Antimicrobial and Antiviral Textile Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyigundogdu, Zeynep Ustaoglu; Demir, Okan; Asutay, Ayla Burcin; Sahin, Fikrettin

    2017-03-01

    In conjunction with an increasing public awareness of infectious diseases, the textile industry and scientists are developing hygienic fabrics by the addition of various antimicrobial and antiviral compounds. In the current study, sodium pentaborate pentahydrate and triclosan are applied to cotton fabrics in order to gain antimicrobial and antiviral properties for the first time. The antimicrobial activity of textiles treated with 3 % sodium pentaborate pentahydrate, 0.03 % triclosan, and 7 % Glucapon has been investigated against a broad range of microorganisms including bacteria, yeast, and fungi. Moreover, modified cotton fabrics were tested against adenovirus type 5 and poliovirus type 1. According to the test results, the modified textile goods attained very good antimicrobial and antiviral properties. Thus, the results of the present study clearly suggest that sodium pentaborate pentahydrate and triclosan solution-treated textiles can be considered in the development of antimicrobial and antiviral textile finishes.

  20. [Significance of hepatitis C virus baseline polymorphism during the antiviral therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornai, István

    2015-05-24

    The treatment of chronic hepatitis C has developed significantly during the last 25 years. In patients with genotype 1 infection 40-50% sustained virologic response could be achieved using pegylated interferon and ribavirin dual combination, which could be increased significantly with the introduction of direct acting antivirals. Three major groups of direct acting antivirals are known, which directly inhibit different phases of viral life cycle, by inhibiting the function of several non-structural proteins (NS3/4A protease, NS5A protein and NS5B polymerase). Due to the rapid replication rate of hepatitis C virus and the error-prone NS5B polymerase activity, mutant virions are generated, which might have reduced susceptibility to direct acting antiviral therapy. Since these resistance associated variants might exist before the antiviral therapy, they are still able to replicate during the direct acting antiviral treatment. Due to this selection pressure, the resistant virus will replace the wild type. This was especially detected during monotherapy, therefore, the first generation of direct acting antivirals have been combined with pegylated interferon and ribavirin, while recently interferon-free combinations are being developed including 2 or 3 direct acting antivirals. Using the first generation protease inhibitors boceprevir and telaprevir, it could have been seen, that the rate of resistance associated variants is higher and the therapeutic outcome is worse in patients with hepatitis C virus genotype 1a, than in 1b. Similar phenomenon was seen with the second generation of NS3/4A protease inhibitors as well as with NS5A or NS5B polymerase. This is due to the lower genetic barrier to resistance, ie. usually fewer mutations are enough for the emergence of resistance in genotype 1a. The selection of resistance associated variants is one of the most important challenges during the interferon-free therapy.

  1. Optimization of Influenza Antiviral Response in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    originated 38 from Texas- Mexico border counties, TAVRS would average the 150 treatable curves that apply to that influenza scenario to be used in... INFLUENZA ANTIVIRAL RESPONSE IN TEXAS by Travis L. Chambers March 2015 Advisor: Nedialko B. Dimitrov Co-Advisor: Michael Atkinson Second...DATES COVERED March 2015 Master ’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE OPTIMIZATION OF INFLUENZA ANTIVIRAL RESPONSE IN TEXAS 6. AUTHOR(S) Travis L. Chambers

  2. Antiviral therapy of chronic hepatitis B.

    OpenAIRE

    Zoulim, Fabien

    2006-01-01

    Treatment of chronic hepatitis B remains a clinical challenge. Long-term viral suppression is a major goal of antiviral therapy to improve the clinical outcome of the patients. Antiviral treatment of chronic hepatitis B relies currently on immune modulators such as interferon alpha and its pegylated form, and viral polymerase inhibitors. Because of the slow kinetics of viral clearance and the spontaneous viral genome variability, viral mutants resistant to nucleoside analogs may be selected. ...

  3. Antiviral activity of cationic amphiphilic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salata, Cristiano; Calistri, Arianna; Parolin, Cristina; Baritussio, Aldo; Palù, Giorgio

    2017-05-01

    Emerging and reemerging viral infections represent a major concern for human and veterinary public health and there is an urgent need for the development of broad-spectrum antivirals. Areas covered: A recent strategy in antiviral research is based on the identification of molecules targeting host functions required for infection of multiple viruses. A number of FDA-approved drugs used to treat several human diseases are cationic amphiphilic drugs (CADs) that have the ability to accumulate inside cells affecting several structures/functions hijacked by viruses during infection. In this review we summarized the CADs' chemical properties and effects on the cells and reported the main FDA-approved CADs that have been identified so far as potential antivirals in drug repurposing studies. Expert commentary: Although there have been concerns regarding the efficacy and the possible side effects of the off-label use of CADs as antivirals, they seem to represent a promising starting point for the development of broad-spectrum antiviral strategies. Further knowledge about their mechanism of action is required to improve their antiviral activity and to reduce the risk of side effects.

  4. Viral evasion mechanisms of early antiviral responses involving regulation of ubiquitin pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajsbaum, Ricardo; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2013-08-01

    Early innate and cell-intrinsic responses are essential to protect host cells against pathogens. In turn, viruses have developed sophisticated mechanisms to establish productive infections by counteracting host innate immune responses. Increasing evidence indicates that these antiviral factors may have a dual role by directly inhibiting viral replication as well as by sensing and transmitting signals to induce antiviral cytokines. Recent studies have pointed at new, unappreciated mechanisms of viral evasion of host innate protective responses including manipulating the host ubiquitin (Ub) system. Virus-mediated inhibition of antiviral factors by Ub-dependent degradation is emerging as a crucial mechanism for evading the antiviral response. In addition, recent studies have uncovered new mechanisms by which virus-encoded proteins inhibit Ub and Ub-like (Ubl) modification of host proteins involved in innate immune signaling pathways. Here we discuss recent findings and novel strategies that viruses have developed to counteract these early innate antiviral defenses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Antiviral Therapy for Hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, Michelle M.; Cotler, Scott J.

    2003-12-01

    Current treatment for hepatitis C virus infection consists of pegylated interferon and ribavirin. The most important predictors of response to antiviral therapy for HCV include genotype 2 or 3 infection, baseline viral load less than 2 million copies/mL, and the absence of cirrhosis. Hepatitis C genotype and viral load should be obtained prior to initiating therapy. Liver biopsy can be used to stage the liver disease, to provide prognostic information, and to evaluate for coexisting causes of liver injury. Patients with genotype 1 infection require 48 weeks of therapy and a ribavirin dosage of 1000 to 1200 mg/d to achieve an optimal response. Patients with genotype 2 or 3 infection require only 24 weeks of treatment and a ribavirin dose of 800 mg/d. Treatment may be discontinued in patients who do not have a 100-fold reduction in hepatitis C virus RNA level from baseline at week 12 because they are unlikely to achieve a sustained response with further therapy. Patients with cirrhosis and hepatic decompensation or a small hepatocellular carcinoma should be evaluated for liver transplantation.

  6. The Antiviral Mechanism of an Influenza A Virus Nucleoprotein-Specific Single-Domain Antibody Fragment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanke, Leo; Knockenhauer, Kevin E.; Brewer, R. Camille; van Diest, Eline; Schmidt, Florian I.; Schwartz, Thomas U.; Ploegh, Hidde L. (Whitehead); (MIT)

    2016-12-13

    Alpaca-derived single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs) that target the influenza A virus nucleoprotein (NP) can protect cells from infection when expressed in the cytosol. We found that one such VHH, αNP-VHH1, exhibits antiviral activity similar to that of Mx proteins by blocking nuclear import of incoming viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs) and viral transcription and replication in the nucleus. We determined a 3.2-Å crystal structure of αNP-VHH1 in complex with influenza A virus NP. The VHH binds to a nonconserved region on the body domain of NP, which has been associated with binding to host factors and serves as a determinant of host range. Several of the NP/VHH interface residues determine sensitivity of NP to antiviral Mx GTPases. The structure of the NP/αNP-VHH1 complex affords a plausible explanation for the inhibitory properties of the VHH and suggests a rationale for the antiviral properties of Mx proteins. Such knowledge can be leveraged for much-needed novel antiviral strategies.

    IMPORTANCEInfluenza virus strains can rapidly escape from protection afforded by seasonal vaccines or acquire resistance to available drugs. Additional ways to interfere with the virus life cycle are therefore urgently needed. The influenza virus nucleoprotein is one promising target for antiviral interventions. We have previously isolated alpaca-derived single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs) that protect cells from influenza virus infection if expressed intracellularly. We show here that one such VHH exhibits antiviral activities similar to those of proteins of the cellular antiviral defense (Mx proteins). We determined the three-dimensional structure of this VHH in complex with the influenza virus nucleoprotein and identified the interaction site, which overlaps regions that determine sensitivity of the virus to Mx proteins. Our data define a new vulnerability of influenza virus, help us to better understand the cellular antiviral mechanisms, and

  7. The Antiviral Mechanism of an Influenza A Virus Nucleoprotein-Specific Single-Domain Antibody Fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, Leo; Knockenhauer, Kevin E; Brewer, R Camille; van Diest, Eline; Schmidt, Florian I; Schwartz, Thomas U; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2016-12-13

    Alpaca-derived single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs) that target the influenza A virus nucleoprotein (NP) can protect cells from infection when expressed in the cytosol. We found that one such VHH, αNP-VHH1, exhibits antiviral activity similar to that of Mx proteins by blocking nuclear import of incoming viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs) and viral transcription and replication in the nucleus. We determined a 3.2-Å crystal structure of αNP-VHH1 in complex with influenza A virus NP. The VHH binds to a nonconserved region on the body domain of NP, which has been associated with binding to host factors and serves as a determinant of host range. Several of the NP/VHH interface residues determine sensitivity of NP to antiviral Mx GTPases. The structure of the NP/αNP-VHH1 complex affords a plausible explanation for the inhibitory properties of the VHH and suggests a rationale for the antiviral properties of Mx proteins. Such knowledge can be leveraged for much-needed novel antiviral strategies. Influenza virus strains can rapidly escape from protection afforded by seasonal vaccines or acquire resistance to available drugs. Additional ways to interfere with the virus life cycle are therefore urgently needed. The influenza virus nucleoprotein is one promising target for antiviral interventions. We have previously isolated alpaca-derived single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs) that protect cells from influenza virus infection if expressed intracellularly. We show here that one such VHH exhibits antiviral activities similar to those of proteins of the cellular antiviral defense (Mx proteins). We determined the three-dimensional structure of this VHH in complex with the influenza virus nucleoprotein and identified the interaction site, which overlaps regions that determine sensitivity of the virus to Mx proteins. Our data define a new vulnerability of influenza virus, help us to better understand the cellular antiviral mechanisms, and provide a well-characterized tool to

  8. LSm14A Plays a Critical Role in Antiviral Immune Responses by Regulating MITA Level in a Cell-Specific Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tian-Tian; Yang, Qing; Li, Mi; Zhong, Bo; Ran, Yong; Liu, Li-Li; Yang, Yan; Wang, Yan-Yi; Shu, Hong-Bing

    2016-06-15

    Viral infection triggers induction of antiviral cytokines and effectors, which are critical mediators of innate antiviral immune response. It has been shown that the processing body-associated protein LSm14A is involved in the induction of antiviral cytokines in cell lines but in vivo evidence is lacking. By generating LSm14A-deficient mice, in this study, we show that LSm14A plays a critical and specific role in the induction of antiviral cytokines in dendritic cells (DCs) but not in macrophages and fibroblasts. Induction of antiviral cytokines triggered by the DNA viruses HSV-1 and murid herpesvirus 68 and the RNA virus vesicular stomatitis virus but not Sendai virus was impaired in Lsm14a(-/-) DCs, which is correlated to the functions of the adaptor protein MITA/STING in the antiviral signaling pathways. LSm14A deficiency specifically downregulated MITA/STING level in DCs by impairing its nuclear mRNA precursor processing and subsequently impaired antiviral innate and adaptive immune responses. Our findings reveal a nuclear mRNA precursor processing and cell-specific regulatory mechanism of antiviral immune responses. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. Antiviral Defense Mechanisms in Honey Bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutscher, Laura M; Daughenbaugh, Katie F; Flenniken, Michelle L

    2015-08-01

    Honey bees are significant pollinators of agricultural crops and other important plant species. High annual losses of honey bee colonies in North America and in some parts of Europe have profound ecological and economic implications. Colony losses have been attributed to multiple factors including RNA viruses, thus understanding bee antiviral defense mechanisms may result in the development of strategies that mitigate colony losses. Honey bee antiviral defense mechanisms include RNA-interference, pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) triggered signal transduction cascades, and reactive oxygen species generation. However, the relative importance of these and other pathways is largely uncharacterized. Herein we review the current understanding of honey bee antiviral defense mechanisms and suggest important avenues for future investigation.

  10. Synthesis and antiviral activity of PB1 component of the influenza A RNA polymerase peptide fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusevich, O V; Egorov, V V; Gluzdikov, I A; Titov, M I; Zarubaev, V V; Shtro, A A; Slita, A V; Dukov, M I; Shurygina, A-P S; Smirnova, T D; Kudryavtsev, I V; Vasin, A V; Kiselev, O I

    2015-01-01

    This study is devoted to the antiviral activity of peptide fragments from the PB1 protein - a component of the influenza A RNA polymerase. The antiviral activity of the peptides synthesized was studied in MDCK cell cultures against the pandemic influenza strain A/California/07/2009 (H1N1) pdm09. We found that peptide fragments 6-13, 6-14, 26-30, 395-400, and 531-540 of the PB1 protein were capable of suppressing viral replication in cell culture. Terminal modifications i.e. N-acetylation and C-amidation increased the antiviral properties of the peptides significantly. Peptide PB1 (6-14) with both termini modified showed maximum antiviral activity, its inhibitory activity manifesting itself during the early stages of viral replication. It was also shown that the fluorescent-labeled analog of this peptide was able to penetrate into the cell. The broad range of virus-inhibiting activity of PB1 (6-14) peptide was confirmed using a panel of influenza A viruses of H1, H3 and H5 subtypes including those resistant to oseltamivir, the leading drug in anti-influenza therapy. Thus, short peptide fragments of the PB1 protein could serve as leads for future development of influenza prevention and/or treatment agents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Dose and Size-Dependent Antiviral Effects of Silver Nanoparticles on Feline Calicivirus, a Human Norovirus Surrogate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekele, Aschalew Z; Gokulan, Kuppan; Williams, Katherine M; Khare, Sangeeta

    2016-05-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as antibacterial agents are incorporated in many consumer products, while the use as antiviral agents is an ongoing area of research. We evaluated the antiviral properties of AgNPs of variable sizes (10, 75, and 110 nm) and doses (25, 50, and 100 μg/mL) at different contact time points against feline calicivirus (FCV), a surrogate for norovirus. Antiviral effects of the AgNPs were determined by comparing the infectivity of FCV, the appearance of cytopathic effects (CPEs), and the integrity of the viral capsid protein in viral suspension treated with AgNPs with the untreated controls. The 10 nm AgNPs at 50 and 100 μg/mL concentrations inactivated the FCV beyond the limit of detection, resulting in a decrease of up to 6.5 log10 viral titer, prevented development of CPEs, and reduction in the western blot band signal of the viral capsid protein. No significant antiviral effect was observed for the 75 and 110 nm AgNPs. Conclusions and Applications: These results demonstrate that the antiviral effects of AgNPs are both size and dose dependent, thus potential applications of AgNPs as antiviral agents to prevent contamination of foodborne viruses need to consider size and dose effects.

  12. Spectral characterisation, antiviral activities, in silico ADMET and molecular docking of the compounds isolated from Tectona grandis to chikungunya virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K, Sangeetha; Purushothaman, Indu; S, Rajarajan

    2017-03-01

    Chikungunya infection is treated symptomatically with antipyretics and anti-inflammatory drugs without any specific antiviral drug till date. The lack of an approved antiviral drug and the emergence of virulent strains after 2006 epidemics emphasize the need for the development of potential antiviral drugs to Chikungunya virus. Hence, we studied the antiviral activity of the extracts and compounds isolated from Tectona grandis leaves to both the Asian and East central South African strains of Chikungunya virus. Five compounds were isolated from the ethanolic extract of Tectona grandis by bioactivity guided fractionation followed by Spectral Characterisation through GC-MS and NMR spectroscopy and investigated for the antiviral activity. Also in silico ADMET and Molecular Docking of the characterised compounds against the structural and non structural proteins of Chikungunya virus were performed. The characterised compound Benzene-1-carboxylic acid hexadeconate was effective at IC 50 3.036μg/ml (7.5μM) and 76.46μg/ml (189.02μM) to Asian and ECSA strain of CHIKV respectively. The compound showed desirable pharmacokinetic properties and significant molecular interactions with the E1 protein of Chikungunya virus by in silico analysis. Thus Benzene-1-carboxylic acid-2-hexadeconate isolated from Tectona grandis was found to be a promising drug candidate to both the Asian and ECSA strains of Chikungunya virus with high selectivity indices in comparison to the reference RNA antiviral drug Ribavirin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. In vitro characterization of the antiviral activity of fucoidan from Cladosiphon okamuranus against Newcastle Disease Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizondo-Gonzalez Regina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV causes a serious infectious disease in birds that results in severe losses in the worldwide poultry industry. Despite vaccination, NDV outbreaks have increased the necessity of alternative prevention and control measures. Several recent studies focused on antiviral compounds obtained from natural resources. Many extracts from marine organisms have been isolated and tested for pharmacological purposes, and their antiviral activity has been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. Fucoidan is a sulfated polysaccharide present in the cell wall matrix of brown algae that has been demonstrated to inhibit certain enveloped viruses with low toxicity. This study evaluated the potential antiviral activity and the mechanism of action of fucoidan from Cladosiphon okamuranus against NDV in the Vero cell line. Methods The cytotoxicity of fucoidan was determined by the MTT assay. To study its antiviral activity, fusion and plaque-forming unit (PFU inhibition assays were conducted. The mechanism of action was determined by time of addition, fusion inhibition, and penetration assays. The NDV vaccine strain (La Sota was used in the fusion inhibition assays. PFU and Western blot experiments were performed using a wild-type lentogenic NDV strain. Results Fucoidan exhibited antiviral activity against NDV La Sota, with an obtained IS50 >2000. In time of addition studies, we observed viral inhibition in the early stages of infection (0–60 min post-infection. The inhibition of viral penetration experiments with a wild-type NDV strain supported this result, as these experiments demonstrated a 48% decrease in viral infection as well as reduced HN protein expression. Ribavirin, which was used as an antiviral control, exhibited lower antiviral activity than fucoidan and high toxicity at active doses. In the fusion assays, the number of syncytia was significantly reduced (70% inhibition when fucoidan was added before cleavage of

  14. Isolation of human trophoblastic extracellular vesicles and characterization of their cargo and antiviral activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Yingshi; Bayer, Avraham; Chu, Tianjiao; Tyurin, Vladimir A.; Kagan, Valerian E.; Morelli, Adrian E.; Coyne, Carolyn B; Sadovsky, Yoel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Primary human trophoblasts release a repertoire of extracellular vesicles (EVs). Among them are nano-sized exosomes, which we found to suppress the replication of a wide range of diverse viruses. These exosomes contain trophoblastic microRNAs (miRNAs) that are expressed from the chromosome 19 miRNA cluster and exhibit antiviral properties. Here, we report our investigation of the cargo of placental EVs, focusing on the composition and the antiviral properties of exosomes, microvesicles, and apoptotic blebs. Methods We isolated EVs using ultracentrifugation and defined their purity using immunoblotting, electron microscopy, and nanoparticle tracking. We used liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, protein mass spectrometry, and miRNA TaqMan card PCR to examine the phospholipids, proteins, and miRNA cargo of trophoblastic EVs and an in vitro viral infection assay to assess the antiviral properties of EVs. Results We found that all three EV types contain a comparable repertoire of miRNA. Interestingly, trophoblastic exosomes harbor a protein and phospholipid profile that is distinct from that of microvesicles or apoptotic blebs. Functionally, trophoblastic exosomes exhibit the highest antiviral activity among the EVs. Consistently, plasma exosomes derived from pregnant women recapitulate the antiviral effect of trophoblastic exosomes derived from in vitro cultures of primary human trophoblasts. Discussion When compared to other trophoblastic EVs, exosomes exhibit a unique repertoire of proteins and phospholipids, but not miRNAs, and a potent viral activity. Our work suggests that human trophoblastic EVs may play a key role in maternal-placental-fetal communication. PMID:27780544

  15. Evasion of the Interferon-Mediated Antiviral Response by Filoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Washington B. Cárdenas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The members of the filoviruses are recognized as some of the most lethal viruses affecting human and non-human primates. The only two genera of the Filoviridae family, Marburg virus (MARV and Ebola virus (EBOV, comprise the main etiologic agents of severe hemorrhagic fever outbreaks in central Africa, with case fatality rates ranging from 25 to 90%. Fatal outcomes have been associated with a late and dysregulated immune response to infection, very likely due to the virus targeting key host immune cells, such as macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs that are necessary to mediate effective innate and adaptive immune responses. Despite major progress in the development of vaccine candidates for filovirus infections, a licensed vaccine or therapy for human use is still not available. During the last ten years, important progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms of filovirus pathogenesis. Several lines of evidence implicate the impairment of the host interferon (IFN antiviral innate immune response by MARV or EBOV as an important determinant of virulence. In vitro and in vivo experimental infections with recombinant Zaire Ebola virus (ZEBOV, the best characterized filovirus, demonstrated that the viral protein VP35 plays a key role in inhibiting the production of IFN-α/β. Further, the action of VP35 is synergized by the inhibition of cellular responses to IFN-α/β by the minor matrix viral protein VP24. The dual action of these viral proteins may contribute to an efficient initial virus replication and dissemination in the host. Noticeably, the analogous function of these viral proteins in MARV has not been reported. Because the IFN response is a major component of the innate immune response to virus infection, this chapter reviews recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of IFN-mediated antiviral evasion by filovirus infection.

  16. Innate immunity in the vagina (Part II): Anti-HIV activity and antiviral content of human vaginal secretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mickey V; Ghosh, Mimi; Fahey, John V; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Rossoll, Richard M; Wira, Charles R

    2014-07-01

    Whether the concentrations of antiviral proteins, and anti-HIV activity, within human vaginal secretions change across the menstrual cycle is unknown. Using a menstrual cup, vaginal secretions from pre-menopausal women were recovered at the proliferative (d6-8), mid-cycle (d13-15), and secretory (d21-23) stages of the menstrual cycle. Antiviral protein concentration was determined by ELISA, and anti-HIV activity assessed using the TZM-bl reporter cell line. CCL20, RANTES, elafin, HBD2, SDF-1α, and IL-8 levels were detectable in the secretions. Vaginal secretions had anti-HIV activity against specific clade B strains of HIV, with significant inhibition of IIIB and increased infectivity of transmitted/founder CH077.t. No significant differences in either antiviral protein concentration or anti-HIV activity with respect to menstrual cycle stage were measured, but marked differences were observed in both parameters over the course of the cycle between different women and in consecutive cycles from the same woman. The vagina contains a complement of antiviral proteins. The variation in anti-HIV activity demonstrates that immune protection in the vagina is not constant. Intra- and interindividual variations suggest that factors in addition to sex hormones influence antiviral protection. Lastly, the menstrual cup is a new model for recovering undiluted vaginal secretions from women throughout their reproductive life. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Immunity in the Vagina (Part II): Anti-HIV Activity and Antiviral Content of Human Vaginal Secretions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mickey V.; Ghosh, Mimi; Fahey, John V.; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Rossoll, Richard M.; Wira, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    Problem Whether the concentrations of antiviral proteins, and anti-HIV activity, within human vaginal secretions changes across the menstrual cycle is unknown. Method of Study Using a menstrual cup, vaginal secretions from premenopausal women were recovered at the proliferative (d6–8), mid-cycle (d13–15) and secretory (d21–23) stages of the menstrual cycle. Antiviral protein concentration was determined by ELISA, and anti-HIV activity assessed using the TZM-bl reporter cell line. Results CCL20, RANTES, elafin, HBD2, SDF-1α and IL-8 levels were detectable in the secretions. Vaginal secretions had anti-HIV activity against specific clade B strains of HIV, with significant inhibition of IIIB and increased infectivity of transmitted/founder CH077.t. No significant differences in either antiviral protein concentration or anti-HIV activity with respect to menstrual cycle stage were measured, but marked differences were observed in both parameters over the course of the cycle between different women, and in consecutive cycles from the same woman. Conclusion The vagina contains a complement of antiviral proteins. The variation in anti-HIV activity demonstrates that immune protection in the vagina is not constant. Intra- and inter-individual variations suggest that factors in addition to sex hormones influence antiviral protection. Lastly, the menstrual cup is a new model for recovering undiluted vaginal secretions from women throughout their reproductive life. PMID:24806967

  18. Self-interest versus group-interest in antiviral control

    OpenAIRE

    Boven, M. van; Klinkenberg, D.; Pen, I.; Weissing, F.J.; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.

    2008-01-01

    Antiviral agents have been hailed to hold considerable promise for the treatment and prevention of emerging viral diseases like H5N1 avian influenza and SARS. However, antiviral drugs are not completely harmless, and the conditions under which individuals are willing to participate in a large-scale antiviral drug treatment program are as yet unknown. We provide population dynamical and game theoretical analyses of large-scale prophylactic antiviral treatment programs. Throughout we compare th...

  19. Plants as sources of antiviral agents | Abonyi | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of plants or plant products, traditionally, as antiviral agents is relatively wider than their use in modern medicine. Some antiviral substances have so far been isolated from higher plants, algae and lichens. Suitable methods for evaluating antiviral properties of plants and their extracts include use of animal models, ...

  20. ANTIVIRAL EFFECT OF SELECTED MEDICINAL PLANTS 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methanolic extracts of the different morphological parts of three medicinal plants, Diospyros bateri, Diospyros monbutensis and Sphenocentrum jollyanum were evaluated for their antiviral activities on polio virus Types 1, 2, and 3. The leaf and root extracts of S. jollyanum, the seed extracts of D. monbutensis as well as the ...

  1. Antiviral drug resistance of herpes simplex virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stranska, Ruzena

    2004-01-01

    Infections with herpes simplex virus (HSV) usually have an asymptomatic or benign course. However, severe infections do occur, particularly in HIV/AIDS patients or transplant recipients, and may be life-threatening unless adequate antiviral therapy is given. Since its introduction in the early

  2. Curcumin Shows Antiviral Properties against Norovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Minji; Lee, GilJae; Si, Jiyeon; Lee, Sung-Joon; You, Hyun Ju; Ko, GwangPyo

    2016-10-20

    Phytochemicals provide environmentally friendly and relatively inexpensive natural products, which could potentially benefit public health by controlling human norovirus (HuNoV) infection. In this study, 18 different phytochemicals were evaluated for antiviral effects against norovirus using murine norovirus (MNV) as a model for norovirus biology. Among these phytochemicals, curcumin (CCM) was the most potent anti-noroviral phytochemical, followed by resveratrol (RVT). In a cell culture infection model, exposure to CCM or RVT for 3 days reduced infectivity of norovirus by 91% and 80%, respectively. To confirm the antiviral capability of CCM, we further evaluated its antiviral efficacy at various doses (0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, and 2 mg/mL) and durations (short-term: 10, 30, 60, and 120 min; long-term: 1, 3, 7, and 14 days). The anti-noroviral effect of CCM was verified to occur in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, we evaluated the inhibitory effect of each phytochemical on the replication of HuNoV using a HuNoV replicon-bearing cell line (HG23). Neither CCM nor RVT had a strong inhibitory effect on HuNoV replication, which suggests that their antiviral mechanism may involve viral entry or other life cycle stages rather than the replication of viral RNA. Our results demonstrated that CCM may be a promising candidate for development as an anti-noroviral agent to prevent outbreaks of foodborne illness.

  3. Antiviral Prophylaxis and H1N1

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-07-14

    Dr. Richard Pebody, a consultant epidemiologist at the Health Protection Agency in London, UK, discusses the use of antiviral post-exposure prophylaxis and pandemic H1N1.  Created: 7/14/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 7/18/2011.

  4. Generation of antiviral transgenic chicken using spermatogonial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted in order to generate anti-viral transgenic chickens through transfected spermatogonial stem cell with fusion gene EGFP-MMx. After injecting fusion gene EGFP-MMx into testes, tissues frozen section, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and dot blot of testes was performed at 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80 ...

  5. Generation of antiviral transgenic chicken using spermatogonial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR TONUKARI NYEROVWO

    2011-11-09

    Nov 9, 2011 ... This study was conducted in order to generate anti-viral transgenic chickens through transfected spermatogonial stem cell with fusion gene EGFP-MMx. After injecting fusion gene EGFP-MMx into testes, tissues frozen section, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and dot blot of testes was performed at. 30, 40 ...

  6. Nose-to-Brain Delivery of Antiviral Drugs: A Way to Overcome Their Active Efflux?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Dalpiaz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Although several viruses can easily infect the central nervous system (CNS, antiviral drugs often show dramatic difficulties in penetrating the brain from the bloodstream since they are substrates of active efflux transporters (AETs. These transporters, located in the physiological barriers between blood and the CNS and in macrophage membranes, are able to recognize their substrates and actively efflux them into the bloodstream. The active transporters currently known to efflux antiviral drugs are P-glycoprotein (ABCB1 or P-gp or MDR1, multidrug resistance-associated proteins (ABCC1 or MRP1, ABCC4 or MRP4, ABCC5 or MRP5, and breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2 or BCRP. Inhibitors of AETs may be considered, but their co-administration causes serious unwanted effects. Nasal administration of antiviral drugs is therefore proposed in order to overcome the aforementioned problems, but innovative devices, formulations (thermoreversible gels, polymeric micro- and nano-particles, solid lipid microparticles, nanoemulsions, absorption enhancers (chitosan, papaverine, and mucoadhesive agents (chitosan, polyvinilpyrrolidone are required in order to selectively target the antiviral drugs and, possibly, the AET inhibitors in the CNS. Moreover, several prodrugs of antiretroviral agents can inhibit or elude the AET systems, appearing as interesting substrates for innovative nasal formulations able to target anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV agents into macrophages of the CNS, which are one of the most important HIV Sanctuaries of the body.

  7. Integrative Genomics-Based Discovery of Novel Regulators of the Innate Antiviral Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin van der Lee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The RIG-I-like receptor (RLR pathway is essential for detecting cytosolic viral RNA to trigger the production of type I interferons (IFNα/β that initiate an innate antiviral response. Through systematic assessment of a wide variety of genomics data, we discovered 10 molecular signatures of known RLR pathway components that collectively predict novel members. We demonstrate that RLR pathway genes, among others, tend to evolve rapidly, interact with viral proteins, contain a limited set of protein domains, are regulated by specific transcription factors, and form a tightly connected interaction network. Using a Bayesian approach to integrate these signatures, we propose likely novel RLR regulators. RNAi knockdown experiments revealed a high prediction accuracy, identifying 94 genes among 187 candidates tested (~50% that affected viral RNA-induced production of IFNβ. The discovered antiviral regulators may participate in a wide range of processes that highlight the complexity of antiviral defense (e.g. MAP3K11, CDK11B, PSMA3, TRIM14, HSPA9B, CDC37, NUP98, G3BP1, and include uncharacterized factors (DDX17, C6orf58, C16orf57, PKN2, SNW1. Our validated RLR pathway list (http://rlr.cmbi.umcn.nl/, obtained using a combination of integrative genomics and experiments, is a new resource for innate antiviral immunity research.

  8. Broad spectrum antiviral activity for paramyxoviruses is modulated by biophysical properties of fusion inhibitory peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Cyrille; Augusto, Marcelo T; Niewiesk, Stefan; Horvat, Branka; Palermo, Laura M; Sanna, Giuseppina; Madeddu, Silvia; Huey, Devra; Castanho, Miguel A R B; Porotto, Matteo; Santos, Nuno C; Moscona, Anne

    2017-03-08

    Human paramyxoviruses include global causes of lower respiratory disease like the parainfluenza viruses, as well as agents of lethal encephalitis like Nipah virus. Infection is initiated by viral glycoprotein-mediated fusion between viral and host cell membranes. Paramyxovirus viral fusion proteins (F) insert into the target cell membrane, and form a transient intermediate that pulls the viral and cell membranes together as two heptad-repeat regions refold to form a six-helix bundle structure that can be specifically targeted by fusion-inhibitory peptides. Antiviral potency can be improved by sequence modification and lipid conjugation, and by adding linkers between the protein and lipid components. We exploit the uniquely broad spectrum antiviral activity of a parainfluenza F-derived peptide sequence that inhibits both parainfluenza and Nipah viruses, to investigate the influence of peptide orientation and intervening linker length on the peptides' interaction with transitional states of F, solubility, membrane insertion kinetics, and protease sensitivity. We assessed the impact of these features on biodistribution and antiviral efficacy in vitro and in vivo. The engineering approach based on biophysical parameters resulted in a peptide that is a highly effective inhibitor of both paramyxoviruses and a set of criteria to be used for engineering broad spectrum antivirals for emerging paramyxoviruses.

  9. The antiviral effect of jiadifenoic acids C against coxsackievirus B3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Ge

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Coxsackievirus B type 3 (CVB3 is one of the major causative pathogens associated with viral meningitis and myocarditis, which are widespread in the human population and especially prevalent in neonates and children. These infections can result in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM and other severe clinical complications. There are no vaccines or drugs approved for the prevention or therapy of CVB3-induced diseases. During screening for anti-CVB3 candidates in our previous studies, we found that jiadifenoic acids C exhibited strong antiviral activities against CVB3 as well as other strains of Coxsackie B viruses (CVBs. The present studies were carried out to evaluate the antiviral activities of jiadifenoic acids C. Results showed that jiadifenoic acids C could reduce CVB3 RNA and proteins synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. Jiadifenoic acids C also had a similar antiviral effect on the pleconaril-resistant variant of CVB3. We further examined the impact of jiadifenoic acids C on the synthesis of viral structural and non-structural proteins, finding that jiadifenoic acids C could reduce VP1 and 3D protein production. A time-course study with Vero cells showed that jiadifenoic acids C displayed significant antiviral activities at 0–6 h after CVB3 inoculation, indicating that jiadifenoic acids C functioned at an early step of CVB3 replication. However, jiadifenoic acids C had no prophylactic effect against CVB3. Taken together, we show that jiadifenoic acids C exhibit strong antiviral activities against all strains of CVB, including the pleconaril-resistant variant. Our study could provide a significant lead for anti-CVB3 drug development.

  10. An antiviral defense role of AGO2 in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagger J W Harvey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Argonaute (AGO proteins bind to small-interfering (siRNAs and micro (miRNAs to target RNA silencing against viruses, transgenes and in regulation of mRNAs. Plants encode multiple AGO proteins but, in Arabidopsis, only AGO1 is known to have an antiviral role.To uncover the roles of specific AGOs in limiting virus accumulation we inoculated turnip crinkle virus (TCV to Arabidopsis plants that were mutant for each of the ten AGO genes. The viral symptoms on most of the plants were the same as on wild type plants although the ago2 mutants were markedly hyper-susceptible to this virus. ago2 plants were also hyper-susceptible to cucumber mosaic virus (CMV, confirming that the antiviral role of AGO2 is not specific to a single virus. For both viruses, this phenotype was associated with transient increase in virus accumulation. In wild type plants the AGO2 protein was induced by TCV and CMV infection.Based on these results we propose that there are multiple layers to RNA-mediated defense and counter-defense in the interactions between plants and their viruses. AGO1 represents a first layer. With some viruses, including TCV and CMV, this layer is overcome by viral suppressors of silencing that can target AGO1 and a second layer involving AGO2 limits virus accumulation. The second layer is activated when the first layer is suppressed because AGO2 is repressed by AGO1 via miR403. The activation of the second layer is therefore a direct consequence of the loss of the first layer of defense.

  11. Meeting report: 4th ISIRV antiviral group conference: Novel antiviral therapies for influenza and other respiratory viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKimm-Breschkin, Jennifer L; Fry, Alicia M

    2016-05-01

    The International Society for Influenza and other Respiratory Virus Diseases (isirv) held its 4th Antiviral Group Conference at the University of Texas on 2-4 June, 2015. With emerging resistance to the drugs currently licensed for treatment and prophylaxis of influenza viruses, primarily the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu) and the M2 inhibitors amantadine and rimantadine, and the lack of effective interventions against other respiratory viruses, the 3-day programme focused on the discovery and development of inhibitors of several virus targets and key host cell factors involved in virus replication or mediating the inflammatory response. Virus targets included the influenza haemagglutinin, neuraminidase and M2 proteins, and both the respiratory syncytial virus and influenza polymerases and nucleoproteins. Therapies for rhinoviruses and MERS and SARS coronaviruses were also discussed. With the emerging development of monoclonal antibodies as therapeutics, the potential implications of antibody-dependent enhancement of disease were also addressed. Topics covered all aspects from structural and molecular biology to preclinical and clinical studies. The importance of suitable clinical trial endpoints and regulatory issues were also discussed from the perspectives of both industry and government. This meeting summary provides an overview, not only for the conference participants, but also for those interested in the current status of antivirals for respiratory viruses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of the antiviral efficacy of bis[1,2]dithiolo[1,4]thiazines and bis[1,2]dithiolopyrrole derivatives against the nucelocapsid protein of the Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) as a model for HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asquith, Christopher R M; Meli, Marina L; Konstantinova, Lidia S; Laitinen, Tuomo; Peräkylä, Mikael; Poso, Antti; Rakitin, Oleg A; Allenspach, Karin; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Hilton, Stephen T

    2014-06-15

    A diverse library of bis[1,2]dithiolo[1,4]thiazines and bis[1,2]dithiolopyrrole derivatives were prepared for evaluation of activity against the nucleocapsid protein of the Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) as a model for HIV, using an in vitro cell culture approach, yielding nanomolar active compounds with low toxicity. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Promising approaches of antiviral therapy of hemorrhagic fevers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markin, V A

    2014-01-01

    Acceptable means of therapy and prophylaxis for most of the especially dangerous viral hemorrhagic fevers to present date are lacking. Analysis of the state of this problem shows that creation of a new generation of etiotropic preparations requires selection of additional targets for their effect that may be based on the use of molecular-biological features of pathogenesis of these infections. Literature data analysis has shown that during filovirus infection non-structural and structural proteins of the causative agents serve as pathogens during direct damaging effect of the virus and secondary immune reactions that in general pervert cell and humoral components of immunity converting its destructive effect on cells and tissues of the macro organism. Selection of promising approaches of antiviral therapy is possible based on molecular-biological analysis of interaction of micro- and macro organism with isolation of the most vulnerable for the effect of causative agent aggression factors.

  14. Attacked from All Sides: RNA Decay in Antiviral Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome M. Molleston

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system has evolved a number of sensors that recognize viral RNA (vRNA to restrict infection, yet the full spectrum of host-encoded RNA binding proteins that target these foreign RNAs is still unknown. The RNA decay machinery, which uses exonucleases to degrade aberrant RNAs largely from the 5′ or 3′ end, is increasingly recognized as playing an important role in antiviral defense. The 5′ degradation pathway can directly target viral messenger RNA (mRNA for degradation, as well as indirectly attenuate replication by limiting specific pools of endogenous RNAs. The 3′ degradation machinery (RNA exosome is emerging as a downstream effector of a diverse array of vRNA sensors. This review discusses our current understanding of the roles of the RNA decay machinery in controlling viral infection.

  15. Antiviral activity of squalamine: Role of electrostatic membrane binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckerman, Bernard; Qu, Wei; Mishra, Abhijit; Zasloff, Michael; Wong, Gerard; Luijten, Erik

    2012-02-01

    Recent workootnotetextM. Zasloff et al., Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. (USA) 108, 15978 (2011). has demonstrated that squalamine, a molecule found in the liver of sharks, exhibits broad-spectrum antiviral properties. It has been proposed that this activity results from the charge-density matching of squalamine and phospholipid membranes, causing squalamine to bind to membranes and displace proteins such as Rac1 that are crucial for the viral replication cycle. Here we investigate this hypothesis by numerical simulation of a coarse-grained model for the competition between Rac1 and squalamine in binding affinity to a flat lipid bilayer. We perform free-energy calculations to test the ability of squalamine to condense stacked bilayer systems and thereby displace bulkier Rac1 molecules. We directly compare our findings to small-angle x-ray scattering results for the same setup.

  16. Attacked from All Sides: RNA Decay in Antiviral Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molleston, Jerome M.; Cherry, Sara

    2017-01-01

    The innate immune system has evolved a number of sensors that recognize viral RNA (vRNA) to restrict infection, yet the full spectrum of host-encoded RNA binding proteins that target these foreign RNAs is still unknown. The RNA decay machinery, which uses exonucleases to degrade aberrant RNAs largely from the 5′ or 3′ end, is increasingly recognized as playing an important role in antiviral defense. The 5′ degradation pathway can directly target viral messenger RNA (mRNA) for degradation, as well as indirectly attenuate replication by limiting specific pools of endogenous RNAs. The 3′ degradation machinery (RNA exosome) is emerging as a downstream effector of a diverse array of vRNA sensors. This review discusses our current understanding of the roles of the RNA decay machinery in controlling viral infection. PMID:28054965

  17. Molecular evolution of the primate antiviral restriction factor tetherin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tetherin is a recently identified antiviral restriction factor that restricts HIV-1 particle release in the absence of the HIV-1 viral protein U (Vpu. It is reminiscent of APOBEC3G and TRIM5a that also antagonize HIV. APOBEC3G and TRIM5a have been demonstrated to evolve under pervasive positive selection throughout primate evolution, supporting the red-queen hypothesis. Therefore, one naturally presumes that Tetherin also evolves under pervasive positive selection throughout primate evolution and supports the red-queen hypothesis. Here, we performed a detailed evolutionary analysis to address this presumption. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Results of non-synonymous and synonymous substitution rates reveal that Tetherin as a whole experiences neutral evolution rather than pervasive positive selection throughout primate evolution, as well as in non-primate mammal evolution. Sliding-window analyses show that the regions of the primate Tetherin that interact with viral proteins are under positive selection or relaxed purifying selection. In particular, the sites identified under positive selection generally focus on these regions, indicating that the main selective pressure acting on the primate Tetherin comes from virus infection. The branch-site model detected positive selection acting on the ancestral branch of the New World Monkey lineage, suggesting an episodic adaptive evolution. The positive selection was also found in duplicated Tetherins in ruminants. Moreover, there is no bias in the alterations of amino acids in the evolution of the primate Tetherin, implying that the primate Tetherin may retain broad spectrum of antiviral activity by maintaining structure stability. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results conclude that the molecular evolution of Tetherin may be attributed to the host-virus arms race, supporting the Red Queen hypothesis, and Tetherin may be in an intermediate stage in transition from neutral to pervasive

  18. Broad-spectrum antiviral properties of andrographolide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Swati; Mishra, K P; Ganju, Lilly

    2017-03-01

    Andrographolide, a diterpenoid, is known for its anti-inflammatory effects. It can be isolated from various plants of the genus Andrographis, commonly known as 'creat'. This purified compound has been tested for its anti-inflammatory effects in various stressful conditions, such as ischemia, pyrogenesis, arthritis, hepatic or neural toxicity, carcinoma, and oxidative stress, Apart from its anti-inflammatory effects, andrographolide also exhibits immunomodulatory effects by effectively enhancing cytotoxic T cells, natural killer (NK) cells, phagocytosis, and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). All these properties of andrographolide form the foundation for the use of this miraculous compound to restrain virus replication and virus-induced pathogenesis. The present article covers antiviral properties of andrographolide in variety of viral infections, with the hope of developing of a new highly potent antiviral drug with multiple effects.

  19. Antiviral Lead Compounds from Marine Sponges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth P. Minneman

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Marine sponges are currently one of the richest sources of pharmacologically active compounds found in the marine environment. These bioactive molecules are often secondary metabolites, whose main function is to enable and/or modulate cellular communication and defense. They are usually produced by functional enzyme clusters in sponges and/or their associated symbiotic microorganisms. Natural product lead compounds from sponges have often been found to be promising pharmaceutical agents. Several of them have successfully been approved as antiviral agents for clinical use or have been advanced to the late stages of clinical trials. Most of these drugs are used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and herpes simplex virus (HSV. The most important antiviral lead of marine origin reported thus far is nucleoside Ara-A (vidarabine isolated from sponge Tethya crypta. It inhibits viral DNA polymerase and DNA synthesis of herpes, vaccinica and varicella zoster viruses. However due to the discovery of new types of viruses and emergence of drug resistant strains, it is necessary to develop new antiviral lead compounds continuously. Several sponge derived antiviral lead compounds which are hopedto be developed as future drugs are discussed in this review. Supply problems are usually the major bottleneck to the development of these compounds as drugs during clinical trials. However advances in the field of metagenomics and high throughput microbial cultivation has raised the possibility that these techniques could lead to the cost-effective large scale production of such compounds. Perspectives on biotechnological methods with respect to marine drug development are also discussed.

  20. Antiviral lead compounds from marine sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Sunil; Kaur, Mandeep; Minneman, Kenneth P

    2010-10-11

    Marine sponges are currently one of the richest sources of pharmacologically active compounds found in the marine environment. These bioactive molecules are often secondary metabolites, whose main function is to enable and/or modulate cellular communication and defense. They are usually produced by functional enzyme clusters in sponges and/or their associated symbiotic microorganisms. Natural product lead compounds from sponges have often been found to be promising pharmaceutical agents. Several of them have successfully been approved as antiviral agents for clinical use or have been advanced to the late stages of clinical trials. Most of these drugs are used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV). The most important antiviral lead of marine origin reported thus far is nucleoside Ara-A (vidarabine) isolated from sponge Tethya crypta. It inhibits viral DNA polymerase and DNA synthesis of herpes, vaccinica and varicella zoster viruses. However due to the discovery of new types of viruses and emergence of drug resistant strains, it is necessary to develop new antiviral lead compounds continuously. Several sponge derived antiviral lead compounds which are hoped to be developed as future drugs are discussed in this review. Supply problems are usually the major bottleneck to the development of these compounds as drugs during clinical trials. However advances in the field of metagenomics and high throughput microbial cultivation has raised the possibility that these techniques could lead to the cost-effective large scale production of such compounds. Perspectives on biotechnological methods with respect to marine drug development are also discussed.

  1. Antiviral lead compounds from marine sponges

    KAUST Repository

    Sagar, Sunil

    2010-10-11

    Marine sponges are currently one of the richest sources of pharmacologically active compounds found in the marine environment. These bioactive molecules are often secondary metabolites, whose main function is to enable and/or modulate cellular communication and defense. They are usually produced by functional enzyme clusters in sponges and/or their associated symbiotic microorganisms. Natural product lead compounds from sponges have often been found to be promising pharmaceutical agents. Several of them have successfully been approved as antiviral agents for clinical use or have been advanced to the late stages of clinical trials. Most of these drugs are used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV). The most important antiviral lead of marine origin reported thus far is nucleoside Ara-A (vidarabine) isolated from sponge Tethya crypta. It inhibits viral DNA polymerase and DNA synthesis of herpes, vaccinica and varicella zoster viruses. However due to the discovery of new types of viruses and emergence of drug resistant strains, it is necessary to develop new antiviral lead compounds continuously. Several sponge derived antiviral lead compounds which are hopedto be developed as future drugs are discussed in this review. Supply problems are usually the major bottleneck to the development of these compounds as drugs during clinical trials. However advances in the field of metagenomics and high throughput microbial cultivation has raised the possibility that these techniques could lead to the cost-effective large scale production of such compounds. Perspectives on biotechnological methods with respect to marine drug development are also discussed. 2010 by the authors; licensee MDPI.

  2. Antiviral Efficacy and Host Innate Immunity Associated with SB 9200 Treatment in the Woodchuck Model of Chronic Hepatitis B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle E Korolowicz

    Full Text Available SB 9200, an oral prodrug of the dinucleotide SB 9000, is being developed for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection and represents a novel class of antivirals. SB 9200 is thought to activate the viral sensor proteins, retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2 resulting in interferon (IFN mediated antiviral immune responses in virus-infected cells. Additionally, the binding of SB 9200 to these sensor proteins could also sterically block the ability of the viral polymerase to access pre-genomic RNA for nucleic acid synthesis. The immune stimulating and direct antiviral properties of SB 9200 were evaluated in woodchucks chronically infected with woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV by daily, oral dosing at 15 and 30 mg/kg for 12 weeks. Prolonged treatment resulted in 2.2 and 3.7 log10 reductions in serum WHV DNA and in 0.5 and 1.6 log10 declines in serum WHV surface antigen from pretreatment level with the lower or higher dose of SB 9200, respectively. SB 9200 treatment also resulted in lower hepatic levels of WHV nucleic acids and antigen and reduced liver inflammation. Following treatment cessation, recrudescence of viral replication was observed but with dose-dependent delays in viral relapse. The antiviral effects were associated with dose-dependent and long-lasting induction of IFN-α, IFN-β and IFN-stimulated genes in blood and liver, which correlated with the prolonged activation of the RIG-I/NOD2 pathway and hepatic presence of elevated RIG-I protein levels. These results suggest that in addition to a direct antiviral activity, SB 9200 induces antiviral immunity during chronic hepadnaviral infection via activation of the viral sensor pathway.

  3. Cloning and characterization of the antiviral activity of feline Tetherin/BST-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiko Fukuma

    Full Text Available Human Tetherin/BST-2 has recently been identified as a cellular antiviral factor that blocks the release of various enveloped viruses. In this study, we cloned a cDNA fragment encoding a feline homolog of Tetherin/BST-2 and characterized the protein product. The degree of amino acid sequence identity between human Tetherin/BST-2 and the feline homolog was 44.4%. Similar to human Tetherin/BST-2, the expression of feline Tetherin/BST-2 mRNA was inducible by type I interferon (IFN. Exogenous expression of feline Tetherin/BST-2 efficiently inhibited the release of feline endogenous retrovirus RD-114. The extracellular domain of feline Tetherin/BST-2 has two putative N-linked glycosylation sites, N79 and N119. Complete loss of N-linked glycosylation by introduction of mutations into both sites resulted in almost complete abolition of its antiviral activity. In addition, feline Tetherin/BST-2 was insensitive to antagonism by HIV-1 Vpu, although the antiviral activity of human Tetherin/BST-2 was antagonized by HIV-1 Vpu. Our data suggest that feline Tetherin/BST-2 functions as a part of IFN-induced innate immunity against virus infection and that the induction of feline Tetherin/BST-2 in vivo may be effective as a novel antiviral strategy for viral infection.

  4. Trehalose-mediated autophagy impairs the anti-viral function of human primary airway epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qun Wu

    Full Text Available Human rhinovirus (HRV is the most common cause of acute exacerbations of chronic lung diseases including asthma. Impaired anti-viral IFN-λ1 production and increased HRV replication in human asthmatic airway epithelial cells may be one of the underlying mechanisms leading to asthma exacerbations. Increased autophagy has been shown in asthmatic airway epithelium, but the role of autophagy in anti-HRV response remains uncertain. Trehalose, a natural glucose disaccharide, has been recognized as an effective autophagy inducer in mammalian cells. In the current study, we used trehalose to induce autophagy in normal human primary airway epithelial cells in order to determine if autophagy directly regulates the anti-viral response against HRV. We found that trehalose-induced autophagy significantly impaired IFN-λ1 expression and increased HRV-16 load. Inhibition of autophagy via knockdown of autophagy-related gene 5 (ATG5 effectively rescued the impaired IFN-λ1 expression by trehalose and subsequently reduced HRV-16 load. Mechanistically, ATG5 protein interacted with retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I and IFN-β promoter stimulator 1 (IPS-1, two critical molecules involved in the expression of anti-viral interferons. Our results suggest that induction of autophagy in human primary airway epithelial cells inhibits the anti-viral IFN-λ1 expression and facilitates HRV infection. Intervention of excessive autophagy in chronic lung diseases may provide a novel approach to attenuate viral infections and associated disease exacerbations.

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Targeting the Host Antiviral Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Rodríguez Pulido

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV is the causative agent of an acute vesicular disease affecting pigs, cattle and other domestic, and wild animals worldwide. The aim of the host interferon (IFN response is to limit viral replication and spread. Detection of the viral genome and products by specialized cellular sensors initiates a signaling cascade that leads to a rapid antiviral response involving the secretion of type I- and type III-IFNs and other antiviral cytokines with antiproliferative and immunomodulatory functions. During co-evolution with their hosts, viruses have acquired strategies to actively counteract host antiviral responses and the balance between innate response and viral antagonism may determine the outcome of disease and pathogenesis. FMDV proteases Lpro and 3C have been found to antagonize the host IFN response by a repertoire of mechanisms. Moreover, the putative role of other viral proteins in IFN antagonism is being recently unveiled, uncovering sophisticated immune evasion strategies different to those reported to date for other members of the Picornaviridae family. Here, we review the interplay between antiviral responses induced by FMDV infection and viral countermeasures to block them. Research on strategies used by viruses to modulate immunity will provide insights into the function of host pathways involved in defense against pathogens and will also lead to development of new therapeutic strategies to fight virus infections.

  6. Steroid plus antiviral treatment for Bell's palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, H M; Jung, S Y; Byun, J Y; Park, M S; Yeo, S G

    2015-05-01

    The effectiveness of antiviral agents for the treatment of Bell's palsy is uncertain. We evaluated whether a steroid with an antiviral agent (S + A group) provided better recovery outcomes than a steroid alone (S group) in patients with Bell's palsy. A total of 1342 patients diagnosed with Bell's palsy who visited the Kyung Hee Medical Center in Seoul, Korea, from 2002 to 2012 were included in this study. Patients in the S + A group were treated with prednisolone and antiviral agents (n = 569) and those in the S group with prednisolone alone (n = 773). Outcomes were measured using the House-Brackmann (HB) scale according to age, initial disease severity, electroneurography (ENoG) findings and underlying comorbidities. The rate of recovery (HB grades I and II) with initially severe Bell's palsy (HB grades V and VI) was higher in the S + A than in the S group (P = 0.001). However, the rates of recovery were similar with initially moderate palsy (HB grades II-IV) (P = 0.502). In patients classified according to age and ENoG-determined severity of palsy, the overall recovery rate was higher in the S + A than in the S group, but the differences were not statistically significant (P > 0.05 for both). The recovery rate without diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension (HTN) was higher in the S + A group than in the S group (P = 0.031). But in the patients with HTN and DM, the difference in recovery rates between the S + A and S groups was not statistically significant (P = 0.805). Treatment with a steroid plus antiviral agent resulted in significantly higher recovery rates than steroid therapy alone in patients with initially severe Bell's palsy and without either HTN or DM, and a nonsignificant trend towards higher recovery rates in all patients with Bell's palsy in this study. Antiviral agents may therefore help in the treatment of Bell's palsy. © 2014 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  7. Antiviral activity of shikonin ester derivative PMM-034 against enterovirus 71 in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Human enterovirus 71 (EV71 is the major causative agent of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD, particularly in infants and children below 4 years of age. Shikonin is a bioactive compound with anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and antibacterial activities derived from the roots of the Chinese medicinal herb Lithospermum erythrorhizon. This study aimed to examine the antiviral activity of PMM-034, a shikonin ester derivative, against EV71 in rhabdomyosarcoma (RD cells. Cytotoxicity of PMM-034 on RD cells was determined using WST-1 assay. Dose- and time-dependent effects of PMM-034 on EV71 replication in RD cells were determined using plaque reduction assay. mRNA expression levels of EV71/VP1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α were determined by real-time RT-PCR, and EV71/VP1 and phospho-p65 protein expressions were determined by western blot analysis. PMM-034 exhibited only weak cytotoxicity against RD cells. However, PMM-034 exhibited significant antiviral activity against EV71 in RD cells with 50% inhibitory concentration of 2.31 μg/mL. The VP1 mRNA and protein levels were significantly reduced in cells treated with PMM-034. Furthermore, relative mRNA expression levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α significantly decreased in the cells treated with PMM-034, while the phospho-p65 protein expression was also significantly lower in the treated cells. These results indicated that PMM-034 suppressed the expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines in RD cells, exhibiting antiviral activity against EV71, as evidenced by the reduced VP1 mRNA and protein levels in PMM-034-treated cells. Thus, PMM-034 is a promising candidate for further development as an EV71 inhibitor.

  8. Deciphering molecular properties and docking studies of hepatitis C and non-hepatitis C antiviral inhibitors - A computational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Arthi; Febin Prabhu Dass, J

    2017-04-01

    Hepatitis C is an infectious liver disease with high mortality rate which is caused by Hepatitis C virus. Several treatment methods have been applied to combat this deadly virus including interferons, vaccine and direct acting antivirals (DAAs). However, the later shows promising effects in HCV treatment with lower adverse effect. Specifically, the DAAs target the non-structural proteins (NS3 and NS5B). The objective of the present study is to hypothesize an alternative antiviral inhibitor for HCV from the available other antivirals. Computation of 2D molecular descriptors for the selected antiviral inhibitors followed by clustering the descriptor features. The closely clustered compounds were subjected to the interaction studies against the HCV target protein to validate the cluster result. The clustering result showed that indinavir (HIV inhibitor) and AT130 (HBV inhibitor) molecule are close to the HCV inhibitor. The indinavir complexed with NS3 protein shows -5.33kcal/mol and AT-130 complexed with NS5B protein possess the binding energy of -8.87kcal/mol. The docking interaction study indicated a better binding affinity than other viral inhibitors. From the descriptor based feature similarity analysis and the interaction study, it can be concluded that indinavir and AT-130 could be a potential alternative agent for HCV treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. An innate antiviral pathway acting before interferons at epithelial surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Marie B; Reinert, Line S; Thomsen, Martin K

    2016-01-01

    we identify an innate antiviral pathway that works at epithelial surfaces before the IFNs. The pathway is activated independently of known innate sensors of viral infections through a mechanism dependent on viral O-linked glycans, which induce CXCR3 chemokines and stimulate antiviral activity...... in a manner dependent on neutrophils. This study therefore identifies a previously unknown layer of antiviral defense that exerts its action on epithelial surfaces before the classical IFN response is operative....

  10. Hydrogen bonds and antiviral activity of benzaldehyde derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Belkov, M. V.; Shadyro, O. I.; Brinkevich, S. D.; Samovich, S. N.

    2012-09-01

    We have obtained the Fourier transform IR spectra of solutions of benzaldehyde derivatives having different antiviral activities against a herpes virus. We observe a correlation between the presence of hydrogen bonds in the benzaldehyde molecules and the appearance of antiviral properties in the compounds. For compounds having antiviral activity, we have obtained spectral data suggesting the existence of hydrogen bonds of the type C=OṡṡṡH-O and O-HṡṡṡO in the molecules. When the hydrogen atom in the hydroxyl groups are replaced by a methyl group, no intramolecular hydrogen bonds are formed and the compounds lose their antiviral activity.

  11. Systems biology: A tool for charting the antiviral landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, James R; Ferris, Martin T; Suthar, Mehul S

    2016-06-15

    The host antiviral programs that are initiated following viral infection form a dynamic and complex web of responses that we have collectively termed as "the antiviral landscape". Conventional approaches to studying antiviral responses have primarily used reductionist systems to assess the function of a single or a limited subset of molecules. Systems biology is a holistic approach that considers the entire system as a whole, rather than individual components or molecules. Systems biology based approaches facilitate an unbiased and comprehensive analysis of the antiviral landscape, while allowing for the discovery of emergent properties that are missed by conventional approaches. The antiviral landscape can be viewed as a hierarchy of complexity, beginning at the whole organism level and progressing downward to isolated tissues, populations of cells, and single cells. In this review, we will discuss how systems biology has been applied to better understand the antiviral landscape at each of these layers. At the organismal level, the Collaborative Cross is an invaluable genetic resource for assessing how genetic diversity influences the antiviral response. Whole tissue and isolated bulk cell transcriptomics serves as a critical tool for the comprehensive analysis of antiviral responses at both the tissue and cellular levels of complexity. Finally, new techniques in single cell analysis are emerging tools that will revolutionize our understanding of how individual cells within a bulk infected cell population contribute to the overall antiviral landscape. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. EXPRESSION OF ANTIVIRAL GENE ON TIGER SHRIMP Penaeus monodon AT DIFFERENT TISSUE AND BODY SIZE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Parenrengi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of tiger shrimp defense against invading pathogen on molecular level such antiviral gene expression is limited to be reported. Gene expression is a process which codes information of genes that is converted to the protein as a phenotype. Distribution of PmAV antivirus gene, that has been reported as an important gene on non-specific response immune, is needed to be observed to several organs/tissues and size of tiger shrimp. The aim of this study is to determine the distribution of gene antiviral expression at several organ/tissue and size of shrimp. The organs/tissues observed in this study were: gill, hepatopancres, muscle tissue, eyes, heart, stomach, gonad, and intestine. While the size of shrimp consisted of three groups, those are: (A 10-20 g/ind., (B 30-40 g/ind., and (C 60-70 g/ind. Analysis of antiviral gene expression was performed by RNA extraction, followed by the cDNA syntesis, and amplification of gene expression by semi-quantitative PCR. The result of PCR optimation showed the optimal concentration of cDNA and primer was 1 μL and 50 mol, respectively for PCR final volume of 25 μL. Antiviral gene was expressed on the hepatopancreas and stomach in percentage of 50.0% and 16.7%, respectively. While the highest percentage of individual expressing the antiviral gene was observed in the shrimp size of C (66.7%, followed by B (50.0% and A (16.7%. The result of study implied that the hepatopancreas has importantly involed in tiger shrimp defense mechanism on viral infection.

  13. Innate immunity to dengue virus infection and subversion of antiviral responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Angela M.; Beatty, P. Robert; Hadjilaou, Alexandros; Harris, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is a major public health issue in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. The four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV1-4) are spread primarily by Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus mosquitoes, whose geographic range continues to expand. Humans are the only host for epidemic strains of DENV, and the virus has developed sophisticated mechanisms to evade human innate immune responses. The host cell's first line of defense begins with an intracellular signaling cascade resulting in production of interferon (IFN)-α/β, which promotes intracellular antiviral responses and helps initiates the adaptive response during the course of DENV infection. In response, DENV has developed numerous ways to subvert these intracellular antiviral responses and directly inhibit cellular signaling cascades. Specifically, DENV manipulates the unfolded protein response and autophagy to counter cellular stress and delay apoptosis. The DENV non-structural protein NS4B and subgenomic sfRNA interfere with the RNAi pathway by inhibiting the RNAse Dicer. During heterotypic secondary DENV infection, subneutralizing antibodies can enable viral uptake through Fcγ receptors and down-regulate signaling cascades initiated via the pattern recognition receptors TLR3 and MDA5/RIG-I, thus reducing the antiviral state of the cell. The DENV NS2B/3 protein cleaves human STING/MITA, interfering with induction of IFN-α/β. Finally, DENV NS2A, NS4A, and NS4B complex together to block STAT1 phosphorylation, while NS5 binds and promotes degradation of human STAT2, thus preventing formation of the STAT1/STAT2 heterodimer and its transcriptional induction of ISGs. Here we discuss the host innate immune response to DENV and the mechanisms of immune evasion DENV has developed to manipulate cellular antiviral responses. PMID:24316047

  14. Targeting APOBEC3A to the viral nucleoprotein complex confers antiviral activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strebel Klaus

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background APOBEC3 (A3 proteins constitute a family of cytidine deaminases that provide intracellular resistance to retrovirus replication and to transposition of endogenous retroelements. A3A has significant homology to the C-terminus of A3G but has only a single cytidine deaminase active site (CDA, unlike A3G, which has a second N-terminal CDA previously found to be important for Vif sensitivity and virus encapsidation. A3A is packaged into HIV-1 virions but, unlike A3G, does not have antiviral properties. Here, we investigated the reason for the lack of A3A antiviral activity. Results Sequence alignment of A3G and A3A revealed significant homology of A3A to the C-terminal region of A3G. However, while A3G co-purified with detergent-resistant viral nucleoprotein complexes (NPC, virus-associated A3A was highly detergent-sensitive leading us to speculate that the ability to assemble into NPC may be a property conveyed by the A3G N-terminus. To test this model, we constructed an A3G-3A chimeric protein, in which the N-terminal half of A3G was fused to A3A. Interestingly, the A3G-3A chimera was packaged into HIV-1 particles and, unlike A3A, associated with the viral NPC. Furthermore, the A3G-3A chimera displayed strong antiviral activity against HIV-1 and was sensitive to inhibition by HIV-1 Vif. Conclusion Our results suggest that the A3G N-terminal domain carries determinants important for targeting the protein to viral NPCs. Transfer of this domain to A3A results in A3A targeting to viral NPCs and confers antiviral activity.

  15. Innate immunity to dengue virus infection and subversion of antiviral responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Angela M; Beatty, P Robert; Hadjilaou, Alexandros; Harris, Eva

    2014-03-20

    Dengue is a major public health issue in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. The four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV1-DENV4) are spread primarily by Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes, whose geographic range continues to expand. Humans are the only host for epidemic strains of DENV, and the virus has developed sophisticated mechanisms to evade human innate immune responses. The host cell's first line of defense begins with an intracellular signaling cascade resulting in production of interferon α/β (IFN-α/β), which promotes intracellular antiviral responses and helps initiates the adaptive response during the course of DENV infection. In response, DENV has developed numerous ways to subvert these intracellular antiviral responses and directly inhibit cellular signaling cascades. Specifically, DENV manipulates the unfolded protein response and autophagy to counter cellular stress and delay apoptosis. The DENV non-structural protein NS4B and subgenomic flavivirus RNA interfere with the RNA interference pathway by inhibiting the RNase Dicer. During heterotypic secondary DENV infection, subneutralizing antibodies can enable viral uptake through Fcγ receptors and down-regulate signaling cascades initiated via the pattern recognition receptors TLR-3 and MDA5/RIG-I, thus reducing the antiviral state of the cell. The DENV NS2B/3 protein cleaves human STING/MITA, interfering with induction of IFN-α/β. Finally, DENV NS2A, NS4A, and NS4B complex together to block STAT1 phosphorylation, while NS5 binds and promotes degradation of human STAT2, thus preventing formation of the STAT1/STAT2 heterodimer and its transcriptional induction of interferon stimulating genes. Here, we discuss the host innate immune response to DENV and the mechanisms of immune evasion that DENV has developed to manipulate cellular antiviral responses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Enterovirus 71 protease 2Apro targets MAVS to inhibit anti-viral type I interferon responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei Wang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is the major causative pathogen of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD. Its pathogenicity is not fully understood, but innate immune evasion is likely a key factor. Strategies to circumvent the initiation and effector phases of anti-viral innate immunity are well known; less well known is whether EV71 evades the signal transduction phase regulated by a sophisticated interplay of cellular and viral proteins. Here, we show that EV71 inhibits anti-viral type I interferon (IFN responses by targeting the mitochondrial anti-viral signaling (MAVS protein--a unique adaptor molecule activated upon retinoic acid induced gene-I (RIG-I and melanoma differentiation associated gene (MDA-5 viral recognition receptor signaling--upstream of type I interferon production. MAVS was cleaved and released from mitochondria during EV71 infection. An in vitro cleavage assay demonstrated that the viral 2A protease (2A(pro, but not the mutant 2A(pro (2A(pro-110 containing an inactivated catalytic site, cleaved MAVS. The Protease-Glo assay revealed that MAVS was cleaved at 3 residues between the proline-rich and transmembrane domains, and the resulting fragmentation effectively inactivated downstream signaling. In addition to MAVS cleavage, we found that EV71 infection also induced morphologic and functional changes to the mitochondria. The EV71 structural protein VP1 was detected on purified mitochondria, suggesting not only a novel role for mitochondria in the EV71 replication cycle but also an explanation of how EV71-derived 2A(pro could approach MAVS. Taken together, our findings reveal a novel strategy employed by EV71 to escape host anti-viral innate immunity that complements the known EV71-mediated immune-evasion mechanisms.

  17. Atividade antiviral de Musa acuminata Colla, Musaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Otaviano Martins

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho avalia a atividade antiviral de extratos e frações de Musa acuminata Colla, Musaceae, coletada em duas regiões do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (Petrópolis e Santo Antônio de Pádua. As inflorescências de M. acuminata apresentaram excelente atividade para os dois vírus avaliados: herpesvírus simples humano tipo 1 e herpesvírus simples humano tipo 2, ambos resistentes ao Aciclovir. Os resultados indicam que os extratos de M. acuminata testados podem constituir alvo potencial para uso em terapias antivirais.

  18. Electronic absorption spectra of antiviral aminophenol derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkov, M. V.; Ksendzova, G. A.; Raichyonok, T. F.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Sorokin, V. L.; Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Shadyro, O. I.

    2011-03-01

    Electronic absorption spectra of aminophenol derivatives in solutions have been studied. A general property of the absorption spectra of these compounds, the dependence of the maximum of a long-wavelength absorption band on the solvent polarity, is revealed. As a rule, the absorption band maximum of compounds possessing pharmacological properties shows a greater shift to short wavelength with an increase in the medium polarity than that of inactive compounds. Absorption measurements of solutions of aminophenol derivatives can be used for a tentative estimation of their antiviral activity.

  19. Enhancement of antiviral activity of collectin trimers through cross-linking and mutagenesis of the carbohydrate recognition domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    White, Mitchell R; Boland, Patrick; Tecle, Tesfaldet

    2010-01-01

    . We have sought to find ways to increase the antiviral activity of collectin NCRDs. Cross-linking of the SP-D NCRD with nonblocking monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) markedly potentiates antiviral activity. In the present report, we demonstrate that F(ab')2 [but not F(ab')1] fragments of a cross-linking mAb...... collectins, we have constructed mutant versions of the human SP-D NCRD that have increased antiviral activity. These mutant NCRDs also had potentiated activity after cross-linking with F(ab')2 fragments or S protein complexes. Hence, the antiviral activity of NCRDs can be increased by 2 distinct...... have similar effects. Hence, cross-linking activity, but not the Fc domain of the mAb, is needed for increased antiviral activity. In contrast, the Fc domain of the mAb was important for increasing viral uptake or respiratory burst responses of human neutrophils. Our NCRD constructs contain an S...

  20. Activation of innate antiviral immune response via double-stranded RNA-dependent RLR receptor-mediated necroptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Wei-Hua; Azadzoi, Kazem M; Su, Ning; Dai, Peng; Sun, Jianbin; Wang, Qin; Liang, Ping; Zhang, Wentao; Lei, Xiaoying; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Jing-Hua

    2016-03-03

    Viruses induce double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in the host cells. The mammalian system has developed dsRNA-dependent recognition receptors such as RLRs that recognize the long stretches of dsRNA as PAMPs to activate interferon-mediated antiviral pathways and apoptosis in severe infection. Here we report an efficient antiviral immune response through dsRNA-dependent RLR receptor-mediated necroptosis against infections from different classes of viruses. We demonstrated that virus-infected A549 cells were efficiently killed in the presence of a chimeric RLR receptor, dsCARE. It measurably suppressed the interferon antiviral pathway but promoted IL-1β production. Canonical cell death analysis by morphologic assessment, phosphatidylserine exposure, caspase cleavage and chemical inhibition excluded the involvement of apoptosis and consistently suggested RLR receptor-mediated necroptosis as the underlying mechanism of infected cell death. The necroptotic pathway was augmented by the formation of RIP1-RIP3 necrosome, recruitment of MLKL protein and the activation of cathepsin D. Contributing roles of RIP1 and RIP3 were confirmed by gene knockdown. Furthermore, the necroptosis inhibitor necrostatin-1 but not the pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD impeded dsCARE-dependent infected cell death. Our data provides compelling evidence that the chimeric RLR receptor shifts the common interferon antiviral responses of infected cells to necroptosis and leads to rapid death of the virus-infected cells. This mechanism could be targeted as an efficient antiviral strategy.

  1. Investigation of the antiviral properties of copper iodide nanoparticles against feline calicivirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shionoiri, Nozomi; Sato, Tetsuya; Fujimori, Yoshie; Nakayama, Tsuruo; Nemoto, Michiko; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi

    2012-05-01

    This study demonstrated the antiviral properties of copper iodide (CuI) nanoparticles against the non-enveloped virus feline calicivirus (FCV) as a surrogate for human norovirus. The effect of CuI nanoparticles on FCV infectivity to Crandell-Rees feline kidney (CRFK) cells was elucidated. The infectivity of FCV to CRFK cells was greatly reduced by 7 orders of magnitude at 1000μgml(-1) CuI nanoparticles. At the conditions, electron spin resonance (ESR) analysis proved hydroxyl radical production in CuI nanoparticle suspension. Furthermore, amino acid oxidation in the viral capsid protein of FCV was determined by nanoflow liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric (nano LC-MS) analysis. The use of CuI nanoparticles showed extremely high antiviral activity against FCV. The high antiviral property of CuI nanoparticles was attributed to Cu(+), followed by ROS generation and subsequent capsid protein oxidation. CuI nanoparticles could be proposed as useful sources of a continuous supply of Cu(+) ions for efficient virus inactivation. Furthermore, this study brings new insights into toxic actions of copper iodide nanoparticles against viruses. Copyright © 2011 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. New alloferon analogues: synthesis and antiviral properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczer, Mariola; Majewska, Anna; Zahorska, Renata

    2013-02-01

    We have extended our study on structure/activity relationship studies of insect peptide alloferon (H-His-Gly-Val-Ser-Gly-His-Gly-Gln-His-Gly-Val-His-Gly-OH) by evaluating the antiviral effects of new alloferon analogues. We synthesized 18 alloferon analogues: 12 peptides with sequences shortened from N- or C-terminus and 6 N-terminally modified analogues H-X(1)-Gly-Val-Ser-Gly-His-Gly-Gln-His-Gly-Val-His-Gly-OH, where X(1) = Phe (13), Tyr (14), Trp (15), Phg (16), Phe(p-Cl) (17), and Phe(p-OMe) (18). We found that most of the evaluated peptides inhibit the replication of Human Herpesviruses or Coxsackievirus B2 in Vero, HEp-2 and LLC-MK(2) cells. Our results indicate that the compound [3-13]-alloferon (1) exhibits the strongest antiviral activity (IC(50) = 38 μM) among the analyzed compound. Moreover, no cytotoxic activity against the investigated cell lines was observed for all studied peptides at concentration 165 μM or higher. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Modelling Hepatitis B Virus Antiviral Therapy and Drug Resistant Mutant Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Julie; Dix, Trevor; Allison, Lloyd; Bartholomeusz, Angeline; Yuen, Lilly

    Despite the existence of vaccines, the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is still a serious global health concern. HBV targets liver cells. It has an unusual replication process involving an RNA pre-genome that the reverse transcriptase domain of the viral polymerase protein translates into viral DNA. The reverse transcription process is error prone and together with the high replication rates of the virus, allows the virus to exist as a heterogeneous population of mutants, known as a quasispecies, that can adapt and become resistant to antiviral therapy. This study presents an individual-based model of HBV inside an artificial liver, and associated blood serum, undergoing antiviral therapy. This model aims to provide insights into the evolution of the HBV quasispecies and the individual contribution of HBV mutations in the outcome of therapy.

  4. Molecular strategies to design an escape-proof antiviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, Ben; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2011-01-01

    Two antiviral approaches against the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) were presented at the Antivirals Congress in Amsterdam. The common theme among these two separate therapeutic research lines is the wish to develop a durable therapy that prevents viral escape. We will present a brief

  5. 76 FR 14027 - Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ...] Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Antiviral Drugs Advisory... liver disease who are previously untreated or who have failed previous therapy. Compensated liver...

  6. 76 FR 14026 - Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ...] Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Antiviral Drugs Advisory... who are previously untreated or who have failed previous therapy. Compensated liver disease is a stage...

  7. Self-interest versus group-interest in antiviral control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boven, M. van; Klinkenberg, D.; Pen, I.; Weissing, F.J.; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.

    2008-01-01

    Antiviral agents have been hailed to hold considerable promise for the treatment and prevention of emerging viral diseases like H5N1 avian influenza and SARS. However, antiviral drugs are not completely harmless, and the conditions under which individuals are willing to participate in a

  8. In vitro antiviral activity of Orthosiphon stamineus extract against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In vitro antiviral activity of Orthosiphon stamineus extract against dengue virus type 2. ... Journal of Fundamental and Applied Sciences ... The antiviral activity towards Dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2) was investigated by observing the morphological changes, which were further confirmed the cellular viability evaluated by ...

  9. Antiviral activities of streptomycetes against tobacco mosaic virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antiviral activities of streptomycetes against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in Datura plant: Evaluation of different organic compounds in their metabolites. ... of different compounds. Key words: Antiviral activity, tobacco mosaic virus, actinomycetes, Streptomyces, Datura metel, GC-MS analysis, human pathogenic bacteria.

  10. Antiviral activity and mechanism of action of arbidol against Hantaan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Hantavirus, Arbidol, Toll-like receptors, inducible nitric oxide synthase, Antiviral activity, ... hantavirus infection. Arbidol is a broad-spectrum antiviral compound that has been shown to have inhibitory effect on influenza virus [4,5], respiratory syncytial virus [6], ..... species in hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome.

  11. Anti-viral effect of herbal medicine Korean traditional Cynanchum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pestiviruses in general, and Bovine Viral Diarrhea (BVD) in particular, present several potential targets for directed antiviral therapy. Material and Methods: The antiviral effect of Cynanchum paniculatum (Bge.) Kitag (Dog strangling vine: DS) extract on the bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) virus was tested. First ...

  12. Antivirals Market Offering High-growth Opportunities for Market Players

    OpenAIRE

    Smita Deshmukh

    2016-01-01

    Transparency Market Research Reports incorporated a definite business overview and investigation inclines on "Antivirals Market". This report likewise incorporates more illumination about fundamental review of the business including definitions, requisitions and worldwide business sector industry structure. Read Full Report: http://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/antivirals-market.html

  13. Plants as sources of antiviral agents | Abonyi | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antivirals are substances other than a virus or virus containing vaccine or specific antibody which can produce either a protective or therapeutic effect to the clear detectable advantage of the virus infected host. The search for antiviral agents began in earnest in the 1950s but this was directed mainly by chance, with little or ...

  14. 76 FR 62418 - Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ...] Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Antiviral Drugs Advisory... enter through Building 1. Contact Person: Paul Tran, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and...

  15. 75 FR 16151 - Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    ...] Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Antiviral Drugs Advisory... phone number is 301-589- 5200. Contact Person: Paul Tran, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (HFD...

  16. 77 FR 15110 - Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-14

    ...] Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Antiviral Drugs Advisory... enter through Building 1. Contact Person: Yvette Waples, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food...

  17. Self-interest versus group-interest in antiviral control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Boven, Michiel; Klinkenberg, Don; Pen, Ido; Weissing, Franz J.; Heesterbeek, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Antiviral agents have been hailed to hold considerable promise for the treatment and prevention of emerging viral diseases like H5N1 avian influenza and SARS. However, antiviral drugs are not completely harmless, and the conditions under which individuals are willing to participate in a large-scale

  18. 78 FR 56900 - Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-16

    ...] Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Antiviral Drugs Advisory..., Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 31, Rm. 2417, Silver Spring, MD...

  19. Development of a Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Agent with Activity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development of a Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Agent with Activity Against Herpesvirus Replication and Gene Expression. ... Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... Purpose: To evaluate the broad-spectrum antiviral activity of peptide H9 (H9) in vitro in order to gain insight into its underlying molecular mechanisms.

  20. 77 FR 17487 - Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-26

    ...] Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Antiviral Drugs Advisory... Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 31, Rm. 2417, Silver...

  1. Inhibition of IFN-γ-dependent antiviral airway epithelial defense by cigarette smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Mahdy Sherif

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although individuals exposed to cigarette smoke are more susceptible to respiratory infection, the effects of cigarette smoke on lung defense are incompletely understood. Because airway epithelial cell responses to type II interferon (IFN are critical in regulation of defense against many respiratory viral infections, we hypothesized that cigarette smoke has inhibitory effects on IFN-γ-dependent antiviral mechanisms in epithelial cells in the airway. Methods Primary human tracheobronchial epithelial cells were first treated with cigarette smoke extract (CSE followed by exposure to both CSE and IFN-γ. Epithelial cell cytotoxicity and IFN-γ-induced signaling, gene expression, and antiviral effects against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV were tested without and with CSE exposure. Results CSE inhibited IFN-γ-dependent gene expression in airway epithelial cells, and these effects were not due to cell loss or cytotoxicity. CSE markedly inhibited IFN-γ-induced Stat1 phosphorylation, indicating that CSE altered type II interferon signal transduction and providing a mechanism for CSE effects. A period of CSE exposure combined with an interval of epithelial cell exposure to both CSE and IFN-γ was required to inhibit IFN-γ-induced cell signaling. CSE also decreased the inhibitory effect of IFN-γ on RSV mRNA and protein expression, confirming effects on viral infection. CSE effects on IFN-γ-induced Stat1 activation, antiviral protein expression, and inhibition of RSV infection were decreased by glutathione augmentation of epithelial cells using N-acetylcysteine or glutathione monoethyl ester, providing one strategy to alter cigarette smoke effects. Conclusions The results indicate that CSE inhibits the antiviral effects of IFN-γ, thereby presenting one explanation for increased susceptibility to respiratory viral infection in individuals exposed to cigarette smoke.

  2. Imaging analysis of nuclear antiviral factors through direct detection of incoming adenovirus genome complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsu, Tetsuro [Microbiologie Fondamentale et Pathogénicité, MFP CNRS UMR 5234, Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux 33076 (France); Department of Infection Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8575 (Japan); Will, Hans [Department of Tumor Biology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Nagata, Kyosuke [Department of Infection Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8575 (Japan); Wodrich, Harald, E-mail: harald.wodrich@u-bordeaux.fr [Microbiologie Fondamentale et Pathogénicité, MFP CNRS UMR 5234, Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux 33076 (France)

    2016-04-22

    Recent studies involving several viral systems have highlighted the importance of cellular intrinsic defense mechanisms through nuclear antiviral proteins that restrict viral propagation. These factors include among others components of PML nuclear bodies, the nuclear DNA sensor IFI16, and a potential restriction factor PHF13/SPOC1. For several nuclear replicating DNA viruses, it was shown that these factors sense and target viral genomes immediately upon nuclear import. In contrast to the anticipated view, we recently found that incoming adenoviral genomes are not targeted by PML nuclear bodies. Here we further explored cellular responses against adenoviral infection by focusing on specific conditions as well as additional nuclear antiviral factors. In line with our previous findings, we show that neither interferon treatment nor the use of specific isoforms of PML nuclear body components results in co-localization between incoming adenoviral genomes and the subnuclear domains. Furthermore, our imaging analyses indicated that neither IFI16 nor PHF13/SPOC1 are likely to target incoming adenoviral genomes. Thus our findings suggest that incoming adenoviral genomes may be able to escape from a large repertoire of nuclear antiviral mechanisms, providing a rationale for the efficient initiation of lytic replication cycle. - Highlights: • Host nuclear antiviral factors were analyzed upon adenovirus genome delivery. • Interferon treatments fail to permit PML nuclear bodies to target adenoviral genomes. • Neither Sp100A nor B targets adenoviral genomes despite potentially opposite roles. • The nuclear DNA sensor IFI16 does not target incoming adenoviral genomes. • PHF13/SPOC1 targets neither incoming adenoviral genomes nor genome-bound protein VII.

  3. Spinacia oleracea proteins with antiviral activity against tobacco ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    enoh

    2012-03-29

    Mar 29, 2012 ... Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Potato virus Y (PVY),. Tobacco etch virus (TEV), Tobacco ring ..... J. Gen. Microbiol. 2: 143-153. Kubo S, Ikeda T, Imaizumi S, Takanami Y, Mikami Y (1990). A potent plant virus inhibitor found in Mirabilis jalapa L. Ann. Phytopath. Soc. Jpn. 56: 481-487. Laemmli UK (1970).

  4. Spinacia oleracea proteins with antiviral activity against tobacco ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results show that the crude extract and the fraction of 0 to 40% ammonium sulfate precipitation could protect tobacco from TMV infection. An active fraction was further purified with cation-exchange chromatography (SP-sepharose HP) and activity screening. The inhibitory rate for TMV in vitro was up to 94.35% with 50 ...

  5. Antiviral and antitumor activities of the protein fractions from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    2012-05-15

    May 15, 2012 ... (2004). The chitosan, extracted from M. domestica was found to have effect on fungus and bacteria (Ai et al., 2008, 2012) while the extract from the larvae of the housefly exhibited antibacterial activity and in vitro anti-tumor activity (Hou et al., 2007a). In addition, Hf-1, a novel antibacterial peptide, was also.

  6. Protein: MPA1 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MPA1 TLR signaling molecules MAVS IPS1, KIAA1271, VISA VISA_(gene) Mitochondrial antiviral-signaling pr...otein CARD adapter inducing interferon beta, Interferon beta promoter stimulator protein... 1, Putative NF-kappa-B-activating protein 031N, Virus-induced-signaling adapter 9606 Homo sapiens Q7Z434 57506 2VGQ 57506 ...

  7. Mouse models for dengue vaccines and antivirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Emily M; Shresta, Sujan

    2014-08-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) has substantial global impact, with an estimated 390million people infected each year. In spite of this, there is currently no approved DENV-specific vaccine or antiviral. One reason for this is the difficulty involved with development of an adequate animal model. While non-human primates support viral replication, they do not exhibit signs of clinical disease. A mouse model is an ideal alternative; however, wild-type mice are resistant to DENV-induced disease. Infection of interferon receptor-deficient mice results in disease that recapitulates key features of severe dengue disease in humans. For the development of vaccines, interferon receptor-deficient mice provide a stringent model for testing vaccine-induced immune components from vaccinated wild-type mice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. RNAi: antiviral therapy against dengue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrees, Sobia; Ashfaq, Usman A

    2013-03-01

    Dengue virus infection has become a global threat affecting around 100 countries in the world. Currently, there is no licensed antiviral agent available against dengue. Thus, there is a strong need to develop therapeutic strategies that can tackle this life threatening disease. RNA interference is an important and effective gene silencing process which degrades targeted RNA by a sequence specific process. Several studies have been conducted during the last decade to evaluate the efficiency of siRNA in inhibiting dengue virus replication. This review summarizes siRNAs as a therapeutic approach against dengue virus serotypes and concludes that siRNAs against virus and host genes can be next generation treatment of dengue virus infection.

  9. Interfering antiviral immunity: application, subversion, hope?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunath, N; Kumar, Priti; Lee, Sang Kyung; Shankar, Premlata

    2006-07-01

    RNA interference (RNAi), initially recognized as a natural antiviral mechanism in plants, has rapidly emerged as an invaluable tool to suppress gene expression in a sequence-specific manner in all organisms, including mammals. Its potential to inhibit the replication of a variety of viruses has been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo in mouse and monkey models. These results have generated profound interest in the use of this technology as a potential treatment strategy for viral infections for which vaccines and drugs are unavailable or inadequate. In this review, we discuss the progress made within the past 2-3 years towards harnessing the potential of RNAi for clinical application in viral infections and the hurdles that have yet to be overcome.

  10. Assessment of the antiviral properties of recombinant porcine SP-D against various influenza A viruses in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillaire, Marine L B; van Eijk, Martin; van Trierum, Stella E; van Riel, Debby; Saelens, Xavier; Romijn, Roland A; Hemrika, Wieger; Fouchier, Ron A M; Kuiken, Thijs; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Haagsman, Henk P; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of influenza viruses resistant to existing classes of antiviral drugs raises concern and there is a need for novel antiviral agents that could be used therapeutically or prophylacticaly. Surfactant protein D (SP-D) belongs to the family of C-type lectins which are important effector molecules of the innate immune system with activity against bacteria and viruses, including influenza viruses. In the present study we evaluated the potential of recombinant porcine SP-D as an antiviral agent against influenza A viruses (IAVs) in vitro. To determine the range of antiviral activity, thirty IAVs of the subtypes H1N1, H3N2 and H5N1 that originated from birds, pigs and humans were selected and tested for their sensitivity to recombinant SP-D. Using these viruses it was shown by hemagglutination inhibition assay, that recombinant porcine SP-D was more potent than recombinant human SP-D and that especially higher order oligomeric forms of SP-D had the strongest antiviral activity. Porcine SP-D was active against a broad range of IAV strains and neutralized a variety of H1N1 and H3N2 IAVs, including 2009 pandemic H1N1 viruses. Using tissue sections of ferret and human trachea, we demonstrated that recombinant porcine SP-D prevented attachment of human seasonal H1N1 and H3N2 virus to receptors on epithelial cells of the upper respiratory tract. It was concluded that recombinant porcine SP-D holds promise as a novel antiviral agent against influenza and further development and evaluation in vivo seems warranted.

  11. Assessment of the antiviral properties of recombinant porcine SP-D against various influenza A viruses in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine L B Hillaire

    Full Text Available The emergence of influenza viruses resistant to existing classes of antiviral drugs raises concern and there is a need for novel antiviral agents that could be used therapeutically or prophylacticaly. Surfactant protein D (SP-D belongs to the family of C-type lectins which are important effector molecules of the innate immune system with activity against bacteria and viruses, including influenza viruses. In the present study we evaluated the potential of recombinant porcine SP-D as an antiviral agent against influenza A viruses (IAVs in vitro. To determine the range of antiviral activity, thirty IAVs of the subtypes H1N1, H3N2 and H5N1 that originated from birds, pigs and humans were selected and tested for their sensitivity to recombinant SP-D. Using these viruses it was shown by hemagglutination inhibition assay, that recombinant porcine SP-D was more potent than recombinant human SP-D and that especially higher order oligomeric forms of SP-D had the strongest antiviral activity. Porcine SP-D was active against a broad range of IAV strains and neutralized a variety of H1N1 and H3N2 IAVs, including 2009 pandemic H1N1 viruses. Using tissue sections of ferret and human trachea, we demonstrated that recombinant porcine SP-D prevented attachment of human seasonal H1N1 and H3N2 virus to receptors on epithelial cells of the upper respiratory tract. It was concluded that recombinant porcine SP-D holds promise as a novel antiviral agent against influenza and further development and evaluation in vivo seems warranted.

  12. WITHDRAWN. Antiviral treatment for Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagyor, Ildiko; Madhok, Vishnu B; Daly, Fergus; Somasundara, Dhruvashree; Sullivan, Michael; Gammie, Fiona; Sullivan, Frank

    2015-05-04

    Corticosteroids are widely used in the treatment of idiopathic facial paralysis (Bell's palsy), but the effectiveness of additional treatment with an antiviral agent is uncertain. Significant morbidity can be associated with severe cases of Bell's palsy. To assess the effects of antiviral treatments alone or in combination with any other therapy for Bell's palsy. On 7 October 2014 we searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, DARE, NHS EED, and HTA. We also reviewed the bibliographies of the identified trials and contacted trial authors and known experts in the field and relevant drug companies to identify additional published or unpublished data. We searched clinical trials registries for ongoing studies. We considered randomised controlled trials or quasi-randomised controlled trials of antivirals with and without corticosteroids versus control therapies for the treatment of Bell's palsy. We excluded trials that had a high risk of bias in several domains. Pairs of authors independently assessed trials for relevance, eligibility, and risk of bias, using standard Cochrane procedures. Eleven trials, including 2883 participants, met the inclusion criteria and are included in the final analysis. We added four studies to the previous review for this update. Some of the trials were small, and a number were at high or unclear risk of bias. Other trials did not meet current best standards in allocation concealment and blinding. Incomplete recoveryWe found no significant benefit from adding antivirals to corticosteroids in comparison with corticosteroids alone for people with Bell's palsy (risk ratio (RR) 0.69, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.47 to 1.02, n = 1715). For people with severe Bell's palsy (House-Brackmann scores of 5 and 6 or the equivalent in other scales), we found a reduction in the rate of incomplete recovery at month six when antivirals plus corticosteroids were used (RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.41 to 0

  13. Mechanism of action of a pestivirus antiviral compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginski, Scott G.; Pevear, Daniel C.; Seipel, Marty; Sun, Siu Chi Chang; Benetatos, Christopher A.; Chunduru, Srinivas K.; Rice, Charles M.; Collett, Marc S.

    2000-01-01

    We report here the discovery of a small molecule inhibitor of pestivirus replication. The compound, designated VP32947, inhibits the replication of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) in cell culture at a 50% inhibitory concentration of approximately 20 nM. VP32947 inhibits both cytopathic and noncytopathic pestiviruses, including isolates of BVDV-1, BVDV-2, border disease virus, and classical swine fever virus. However, the compound shows no activity against viruses from unrelated virus groups. Time of drug addition studies indicated that VP32947 acts after virus adsorption and penetration and before virus assembly and release. Analysis of viral macromolecular synthesis showed VP32947 had no effect on viral protein synthesis or polyprotein processing but did inhibit viral RNA synthesis. To identify the molecular target of VP32947, we isolated drug-resistant (DR) variants of BVDV-1 in cell culture. Sequence analysis of the complete genomic RNA of two DR variants revealed a single common amino acid change located within the coding region of the NS5B protein, the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. When this single amino acid change was introduced into an infectious clone of drug-sensitive wild-type (WT) BVDV-1, replication of the resulting virus was resistant to VP32947. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity of the NS5B proteins derived from WT and DR viruses expressed and purified from recombinant baculovirus-infected insect cells confirmed the drug sensitivity of the WT enzyme and the drug resistance of the DR enzyme. This work formally validates NS5B as a target for antiviral drug discovery and development. The utility of VP32947 and similar compounds for the control of pestivirus diseases, and for hepatitis C virus drug discovery efforts, is discussed. PMID:10869440

  14. Highlights of the 30th International Conference on Antiviral Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrei, Graciela; Carter, Kara; Janeba, Zlatko; Sampath, Aruna; Schang, Luis M; Tarbet, E Bart; Vere Hodge, R Anthony; Bray, Mike; Esté, José A

    2017-09-01

    The 30th International Conference on Antiviral Research (ICAR) was held in Atlanta, GA, USA from May 18 to 21, 2017. This report provides an account of award lectures, invited keynote addresses and oral presentations during the meeting. The 2017 Gertrude Elion Memorial Lecture Award by Michael Sofia highlighted one of the most important accomplishments in recent drug discovery in antiviral research, the identification of the hepatitis C virus direct-acting antiviral sofosbuvir and new alternatives to combat hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The Antonín Holý Lecture Award by David Chu on medicinal chemistry provided an overview of early developments of nucleoside analogs for the treatment of HIV and varicella zoster virus infection and how this knowledge serves to develop new drugs targeting HBV. Priscilla Yang gave the first ISAR Women in Science lecture. She reported on pharmacological validation of new antiviral targets for dengue, Zika and other flaviviruses. The William Prusoff Young Investigator Lecture Award by Maaike Everts described the Alabama Drug Discovery Alliance and the Antiviral Drug Discovery and Development Consortium, and how they are helping to accelerate the development of new antivirals. The 30th ICAR was a success in promoting new discoveries in antiviral drug development and research. The 31st ICAR will be held in Porto, Portugal, June 11-15, 2018. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Structural Basis for Suppression of a Host Antiviral Response by Influenza A Virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das,K.; Ma, L.; Xiao, R.; Radvansky, B.; Aramini, J.; Zhao, L.; Marklund, J.; Kuo, R.; Twu, K.; Arnold, E.

    2008-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are responsible for seasonal epidemics and high mortality pandemics. A major function of the viral NS1A protein, a virulence factor, is the inhibition of the production of IFN-{beta}{beta} mRNA and other antiviral mRNAs. The NS1A protein of the human influenza A/Udorn/72 (Ud) virus inhibits the production of these antiviral mRNAs by binding the cellular 30-kDa subunit of the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF30), which is required for the 3' end processing of all cellular pre-mRNAs. Here we report the 1.95- Angstroms resolution X-ray crystal structure of the complex formed between the second and third zinc finger domain (F2F3) of CPSF30 and the C-terminal domain of the Ud NS1A protein. The complex is a tetramer, in which each of two F2F3 molecules wraps around two NS1A effector domains that interact with each other head-to-head. This structure identifies a CPSF30 binding pocket on NS1A comprised of amino acid residues that are highly conserved among human influenza A viruses. Single amino acid changes within this binding pocket eliminate CPSF30 binding, and a recombinant Ud virus expressing an NS1A protein with such a substitution is attenuated and does not inhibit IFN-{beta} pre-mRNA processing. This binding pocket is a potential target for antiviral drug development. The crystal structure also reveals that two amino acids outside of this pocket, F103 and M106, which are highly conserved (>99%) among influenza A viruses isolated from humans, participate in key hydrophobic interactions with F2F3 that stabilize the complex.

  16. Antiviral activity against human immunodeficiency virus-1 in vitro by myristoylated-peptide from Heliothis virescens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ourth, Donald D.

    2004-01-01

    An insect antiviral compound was purified from Heliothis virescens larval hemolymph by gel-filtration high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and C-18 reverse-phase HPLC and its structure was determined by mass spectrometry. The antiviral compound is an N-myristoylated-peptide containing six amino acids with calculated molecular weight of 916 Da. The N-terminus contains the fatty acid myristoyl, and the C-terminus contains histidine with two methyl groups giving the histidine a permanent positive charge. The remainder of the compound is essentially non-polar. The structure of the compound corresponds with the 'myristate plus basic' motif expressed by certain viral proteins in their binding to the cytoplasmic side of the plasma membrane to initiate viral assembly and budding from a host cell. The insect antiviral compound may inhibit viral assembly and/or budding of viruses from host cells that could include the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) and herpes simplex virus-1 that use this motif for exit from a host cell. Using the formazan assay, the myristoylated-peptide was effective against HIV-1, with a nine times increase in the viability and protection in vitro of treated CEM-SS cells when compared with infected but untreated control cells

  17. RO 90-7501 enhances TLR3 and RLR agonist induced antiviral response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Guo

    Full Text Available Recognition of virus infection by innate pattern recognition receptors (PRRs, including membrane-associated toll-like receptors (TLR and cytoplasmic RIG-I-like receptors (RLR, activates cascades of signal transduction pathways leading to production of type I interferons (IFN and proinflammatory cytokines that orchestrate the elimination of the viruses. Although it has been demonstrated that PRR-mediated innate immunity plays an essential role in defending virus from infection, it also occasionally results in overwhelming production of proinflammatory cytokines that cause severe inflammation, blood vessel leakage and tissue damage. In our efforts to identify small molecules that selectively enhance PRR-mediated antiviral, but not the detrimental inflammatory response, we discovered a compound, RO 90-7501 ('2'-(4-Aminophenyl-[2,5'-bi-1H-benzimidazol]-5-amine, that significantly promoted both TLR3 and RLR ligand-induced IFN-β gene expression and antiviral response, most likely via selective activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway. Our results thus imply that pharmacological modulation of PRR signal transduction pathways in favor of the induction of a beneficial antiviral response can be a novel therapeutic strategy.

  18. Human Virus-Derived Small RNAs Can Confer Antiviral Immunity in Mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yang; Xu, Yanpeng; Zhang, Yao; Zhou, Hui; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Li, Xiao-Feng; Miao, Meng; Zhang, Qiang; Zhong, Bo; Hu, Yuanyang; Zhang, Fu-Chun; Wu, Ligang; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Zhou, Xi

    2017-06-20

    RNA interference (RNAi) functions as a potent antiviral immunity in plants and invertebrates; however, whether RNAi plays antiviral roles in mammals remains unclear. Here, using human enterovirus 71 (HEV71) as a model, we showed HEV71 3A protein as an authentic viral suppressor of RNAi during viral infection. When the 3A-mediated RNAi suppression was impaired, the mutant HEV71 readily triggered the production of abundant HEV71-derived small RNAs with canonical siRNA properties in cells and mice. These virus-derived siRNAs were produced from viral dsRNA replicative intermediates in a Dicer-dependent manner and loaded into AGO, and they were fully active in degrading cognate viral RNAs. Recombinant HEV71 deficient in 3A-mediated RNAi suppression was significantly restricted in human somatic cells and mice, whereas Dicer deficiency rescued HEV71 infection independently of type I interferon response. Thus, RNAi can function as an antiviral immunity, which is induced and suppressed by a human virus, in mammals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Regulation of the Host Antiviral State by Intercellular Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Assil

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Viruses usually induce a profound remodeling of host cells, including the usurpation of host machinery to support their replication and production of virions to invade new cells. Nonetheless, recognition of viruses by the host often triggers innate immune signaling, preventing viral spread and modulating the function of immune cells. It conventionally occurs through production of antiviral factors and cytokines by infected cells. Virtually all viruses have evolved mechanisms to blunt such responses. Importantly, it is becoming increasingly recognized that infected cells also transmit signals to regulate innate immunity in uninfected neighboring cells. These alternative pathways are notably mediated by vesicular secretion of various virus- and host-derived products (miRNAs, RNAs, and proteins and non-infectious viral particles. In this review, we focus on these newly-described modes of cell-to-cell communications and their impact on neighboring cell functions. The reception of these signals can have anti- and pro-viral impacts, as well as more complex effects in the host such as oncogenesis and inflammation. Therefore, these “broadcasting” functions, which might be tuned by an arms race involving selective evolution driven by either the host or the virus, constitute novel and original regulations of viral infection, either highly localized or systemic.

  20. [Antiviral activity of representatives of the family Crassulaceae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirobokov, V P; Evtushenko, A I; Lapchik, V F; Shirobokova, D N; Suptel', E A

    1981-12-01

    The antiviral properties of the juice of 11 species of the orpine family were studied. 8 of them belonged to the genera Kalanchoe, i. e. Kalanchoe diagremontiona R. Hamet, K. pinnata (Zam.) Persoon, K. Peteri Werd., K. prolifera (Bovie) R. Hamet, K. marnierriana (Mann. et Boit) Jacobs; K. blossfeldiana v. Poelln, K. beharensis Drake del Gastillo, K. waldheimii R. Hamet et Perr and 3 belonged to the Sedum genera, i. e. Sedum telephium L., S. spectabile Boreau, S. acre L. A high virus neutralizing activity of the juice from 4 species of Kalanchoe, i. e. K. blossfeldiana, K. waldheimii, K. pinnata and K. beharensis was shown. Inhibition of the virus infecting activity was observed at the juice dilutions from 1-2 to 1-8000 and higher. The viricidal factor of Kalanchoe is stable. It is not destroyed by ether, alcohol and potassium periodate. It is not absorbed by bentonite at the acid pH values. Addition of cattle serum or purified proteins to the juice resulted in their precipitation which suppressed the viricidal activity of the juice.

  1. Identification of DreI as an antiviral factor regulated by RLR signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs had been demonstrated to prime interferon (IFN response against viral infection via the conserved RLR signaling in fish, and a novel fish-specific gene, the grass carp reovirus (GCRV-induced gene 2 (Gig2, had been suggested to play important role in host antiviral response. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we cloned and characterized zebrafish Gig2 homolog (named Danio rerio Gig2-I, DreI, and revealed its antiviral role and expressional regulation signaling pathway. RT-PCR, Western blot and promoter activity assay indicate that DreI can be induced by poly I:C, spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV and recombinant IFN (rIFN, showing that DreI is a typical ISG. Using the pivotal signaling molecules of RLR pathway, including RIG-I, MDA5 and IRF3 from crucian carp, it is found that DreI expression is regulated by RLR cascade and IRF3 plays an important role in this regulation. Furthermore, promoter mutation assay confirms that the IFN-stimulated regulatory elements (ISRE in the 5' flanking region of DreI is essential for its induction. Finally, overexpression of DreI leads to establish a strong antiviral state against SVCV and Rana grylio virus (RGV infection in EPC (Epithelioma papulosum cyprinid cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate that DreI is an antiviral protein, which is regulated by RLR signaling pathway.

  2. Antiviral effects of polyphenols: development of bio-based cleaning wipes and filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catel-Ferreira, Manuella; Tnani, Hédia; Hellio, Claire; Cosette, Pascal; Lebrun, Laurent

    2015-02-01

    Polyphenol molecules play multiple essential roles in plant physiology such as defences against plant-pathogens and micro-organisms. The present study reports a chemical modification of the surface of non-woven cellulosic fibre filters (Kimwipes(®)) by fixing polyphenol in order to confer them antiviral properties. The grafting of the non-woven fibres by the antiviral entity was performed using laccase. T4D bacteriophage virus of Escherichia coli B was used as virus model. Catechin polyphenol was tested as antiviral entity. Proteomic experiments were performed to quantify the potential protein target of catechin on viruses. When the modified filter was in contact with the viral suspension a large improvement in the reduction of the viral concentration was observed (5-log after 1h). Thus, we propose that this material could be used as virucidal wipes for the virus elimination from contaminated surfaces. Virus filtration experiments were performed by spraying an aerial suspension of T4D bacteriophage virus through the designed filter. The best virus capture factor f (ratio of upstream to downstream virus contents) was obtained when using 2 functionalized filters (f=2.9×10(3)). When these 2 layers were placed inside a commercial medical mask in place of its cellulose layer (Kolmi M24001 mask) (f=3.5×10(4)), the f ratio then reached 2.6×10(5) for 2h of filtration. Based on these results, this novel bio-based antiviral mask represents a significant improvement over conventional medical masks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Meeting report: 28th International Conference on Antiviral Research in Rome, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vere Hodge, R Anthony

    2015-11-01

    The 28th International Conference on Antiviral Research (ICAR) was held in Rome, Italy from May 11 to 15, 2015. This article summarizes the principal invited lectures. Phillip Furman, the Elion award recipient, described the research leading to sofosbuvir. Dennis Liotta, who received the Holý award, described how an investigation into HIV entry inhibitors led to a new therapy for cancer patients. Erica Ollmann Saphire, winner of the Prusoff Young Investigator award, explored the world of viral proteins and how they remodel to perform different essential roles in viral replication. The keynote addresses, by Raffaele De Francesco and Michael Manns, reported on the remarkable progress made in the therapy of chronic HCV infections. A third keynote address, by Armand Sprecher, related the difficulties and successes of Médicins Sans Frontières in West Africa ravaged by the Ebola outbreak. There were three mini-symposia on RNA Viruses, Antiviral Chemistry and Emerging Viruses. There was a good collection of talks on RNA viruses (norovirus, rabies, dengue, HEV, HCV, and RSV). A highlight of the chemistry was the preparation of prodrugs for nucleotide triphosphates as this opens a door to new options. The third mini-symposium emphasized how research work in the antiviral area is continuing to expand and needs to do so with a sense of urgency. Although this meeting report covers only a few of the presentations, it aims to illustrate the great diversity of topics discussed at ICAR, bringing together knowledge and expertise from the whole spectrum of antiviral research. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Glycosylation of dengue virus glycoproteins and their interactions with carbohydrate receptors: possible targets for antiviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Fakhriedzwan; Muharram, Siti Hanna; Diah, Suwarni

    2016-07-01

    Dengue virus, an RNA virus belonging to the genus Flavivirus, affects 50 million individuals annually, and approximately 500,000-1,000,000 of these infections lead to dengue hemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome. With no licensed vaccine or specific antiviral treatments available to prevent dengue infection, dengue is considered a major public health problem in subtropical and tropical regions. The virus, like other enveloped viruses, uses the host's cellular enzymes to synthesize its structural (C, E, and prM/M) and nonstructural proteins (NS1-5) and, subsequently, to glycosylate these proteins to produce complete and functional glycoproteins. The structural glycoproteins, specifically the E protein, are known to interact with the host's carbohydrate receptors through the viral proteins' N-glycosylation sites and thus mediate the viral invasion of cells. This review focuses on the involvement of dengue glycoproteins in the course of infection and the virus' exploitation of the host's glycans, especially the interactions between host receptors and carbohydrate moieties. We also discuss the recent developments in antiviral therapies that target these processes and interactions, focusing specifically on the use of carbohydrate-binding agents derived from plants, commonly known as lectins, to inhibit the progression of infection.

  5. Hepatitis B virus reverse transcriptase - Target of current antiviral therapy and future drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Daniel N; Hu, Jianming

    2015-11-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections rely on the proper functioning of the viral polymerase enzyme, a specialized reverse transcriptase (RT) with multiple activities. All currently approved antiviral drugs for the treatment of chronic HBV infection, except for interferon, target the RT and belong to the same chemical class - they are all nucleoside analogs. Viral DNA synthesis is carried out by the RT enzyme in several different steps, each with distinct RT conformational requirements. In principle, each stage may be targeted by distinct antiviral drugs. In particular, the HBV RT has the unique ability to initiate viral DNA synthesis using itself as a protein primer in a novel protein priming reaction. In order to help identify RT inhibitors and study their mechanisms of action, a number of experimental systems have been developed, each varying in its ability to dissect the protein priming stage and subsequent stages of viral DNA synthesis at the molecular level. Two of the most effective drugs to date, entecavir and tenofovir, can inhibit both the protein priming and the subsequent DNA elongation stages of HBV DNA synthesis. Interestingly, clevudine, a thymidine analog, can inhibit both protein priming and DNA elongation in a non-competitive manner and without being incorporated into the viral DNA. Thus, a nucleoside RT inhibitor (NRTI) can functionally mimic a non-NRTI (NNRTI) in its inhibition of the HBV RT. Therefore, novel NRTIs as well as NNRTIs may be developed to inhibit the DNA synthesis activity of the HBV RT. Furthermore, additional activities of the RT that are also essential to HBV replication, including specific recognition of the viral RNA and its packaging into viral nucleocapsids, may be exploited for antiviral development. To achieve a more potent inhibition of viral replication and ultimately cure chronic HBV infection, the next generation of anti-HBV therapies will likely need to include NRTIs, NNRTIs, and other agents that target the viral RT as

  6. Development of Small-Molecule Antivirals for Ebola

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janeba, Zlatko

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 6 (2015), s. 1175-1194 ISSN 0198-6325 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : antiviral * filovirus * Ebola virus * Marburg virus * hemorrhagic fever Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 9.135, year: 2015

  7. Antiviral Resistance to Influenza Viruses: Clinical and Epidemiological Aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vries, E.

    2017-01-01

    There are three classes of antiviral drugs approved for the treatment of influenza: the M2 ion channel inhibitors (amantadine, rimantadine), neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors (laninamivir, oseltamivir, peramivir, zanamivir), and the protease inhibitor (favipiravir); some of the agents are only available

  8. Bell's Palsy: Treatment with Steroids and Antiviral Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drooping of a corner of the mouth • Difficulty smiling, frowning, or making other facial expressions • Twitching or ... no definite added improvement. If there is any benefit to adding an antiviral to steroid treatment, it ...

  9. Antiviral chemotherapy in veterinary medicine: current applications and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Pozzo, F; Thiry, E

    2014-12-01

    The current situation in the use of antiviral drugs in veterinary medicine is characterised by a novel and optimistic approach.Viruses of veterinary importance are still used as animal models in the developmentof human therapeutics, but there is growing interest in many of these viruses in the identification of antiviral molecules for use in both livestock and companion animals. The use of antiviral drugs in livestock animals is envisaged for the treatment or control of disease on a large scale (mass treatment), whereas in companion animals an individual approach is favoured. An overview of the most recent examples of research in the use of antivirals in veterinary medicine is presented, with particular emphasis on their in vivo applications.

  10. Mushrooms as a source of substances with antiviral activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyna Kandefer-Szerszeń

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Water extracts the fructifications of 56 species of fungi were examined as a source of antiviral substances with activity against VS and vaccinia viruses. Extracts from 16 fungal species exhibited the antiviral activity. Water extracts from Boletus edulis active against vaccinia virus and extract from Armillariella mellea active against VS virus are particularly worth nothing. Both of them in applied concentrations were not toxic in chick embryo fibroblasts tissue culture.

  11. Antiviral resistance and the control of pandemic influenza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Lipsitch

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The response to the next influenza pandemic will likely include extensive use of antiviral drugs (mainly oseltamivir, combined with other transmission-reducing measures. Animal and in vitro studies suggest that some strains of influenza may become resistant to oseltamivir while maintaining infectiousness (fitness. Use of antiviral agents on the scale anticipated for the control of pandemic influenza will create an unprecedented selective pressure for the emergence and spread of these strains. Nonetheless, antiviral resistance has received little attention when evaluating these plans.We designed and analyzed a deterministic compartmental model of the transmission of oseltamivir-sensitive and -resistant influenza infections during a pandemic. The model predicts that even if antiviral treatment or prophylaxis leads to the emergence of a transmissible resistant strain in as few as 1 in 50,000 treated persons and 1 in 500,000 prophylaxed persons, widespread use of antivirals may strongly promote the spread of resistant strains at the population level, leading to a prevalence of tens of percent by the end of a pandemic. On the other hand, even in circumstances in which a resistant strain spreads widely, the use of antivirals may significantly delay and/or reduce the total size of the pandemic. If resistant strains carry some fitness cost, then, despite widespread emergence of resistance, antivirals could slow pandemic spread by months or more, and buy time for vaccine development; this delay would be prolonged by nondrug control measures (e.g., social distancing that reduce transmission, or use of a stockpiled suboptimal vaccine. Surprisingly, the model suggests that such nondrug control measures would increase the proportion of the epidemic caused by resistant strains.The benefits of antiviral drug use to control an influenza pandemic may be reduced, although not completely offset, by drug resistance in the virus. Therefore, the risk of resistance

  12. Mechanism of action of direct-acting antiviral agents in treatment of chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WEN Xiaoyu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available With the development and launch of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs in the world in recent years, therapeutic regimens for chronic hepatitis C are constantly evolving. DAAs will also be launched in China in the near future. DAAs mainly target at the non-structural proteins of HCV and can inhibit HCV RNA replication. This article introduces the targets, mechanism of action, and resistance characteristics of different DAAs, as well as their current research and development in China and the results of phase Ⅲ clinical studies, in order to provide a reference for combined therapeutic strategies with DAAs in the treatment for chronic hepatitis C.

  13. Natural Products as Source of Potential Dengue Antivirals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Róbson Ricardo Teixeira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is a neglected disease responsible for 22,000 deaths each year in areas where it is endemic. To date, there is no clinically approved dengue vaccine or antiviral for human beings, even though there have been great efforts to accomplish these goals. Several approaches have been used in the search for dengue antivirals such as screening of compounds against dengue virus enzymes and structure-based computational discovery. During the last decades, researchers have turned their attention to nature, trying to identify compounds that can be used as dengue antivirals. Nature represents a vast reservoir of substances that can be explored with the aim of discovering new leads that can be either used directly as pharmaceuticals or can serve as lead structures that can be optimized towards the development of new antiviral agents against dengue. In this review we describe an assortment of natural products that have been reported as possessing dengue antiviral activity. The natural products are organized into classes of substances. When appropriate, structure-activity relationships are outlined. The biological assays used to assess antiviral activity are briefly described.

  14. Perspective of Use of Antiviral Peptides against Influenza Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Skalickova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The threat of a worldwide influenza pandemic has greatly increased over the past decade with the emergence of highly virulent avian influenza strains. The increased frequency of drug-resistant influenza strains against currently available antiviral drugs requires urgent development of new strategies for antiviral therapy, too. The research in the field of therapeutic peptides began to develop extensively in the second half of the 20th century. Since then, the mechanisms of action for several peptides and their antiviral prospect received large attention due to the global threat posed by viruses. Here, we discussed the therapeutic properties of peptides used in influenza treatment. Peptides with antiviral activity against influenza can be divided into three main groups. First, entry blocker peptides such as a Flupep that interact with influenza hemagglutinin, block its binding to host cells and prevent viral fusion. Second, several peptides display virucidal activity, disrupting viral envelopes, e.g., Melittin. Finally, a third set of peptides interacts with the viral polymerase complex and act as viral replication inhibitors such as PB1 derived peptides. Here, we present a review of the current literature describing the antiviral activity, mechanism and future therapeutic potential of these influenza antiviral peptides.

  15. Searching for synergy: Identifying optimal antiviral combination therapy using Hepatitis C virus (HCV) agents in a replicon system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Justin J; Drusano, George L; Rodriquez, Jaime L; Brown, Ashley N

    2017-10-01

    Direct acting antiviral agents (DAAs) are potent inhibitors of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) that have revolutionized the treatment landscape for this important viral disease. There are currently four classes of DAAs that inhibit HCV replication via distinct mechanisms of action: nonstructural protein (NS) 3/4a protease inhibitors, NS5A inhibitors, NS5B nucleoside polymerase inhibitors, and NS5B non-nucleoside polymerase inhibitors. Combination therapy with two or more DAAs has great potential to further enhance antiviral potency. The purpose of this study was to identify optimal combinations of DAAs against genotype 1 HCV replicons that maximized the inhibition of replicon replication. All possible two-drug combinations were evaluated against genotype 1a and 1b HCV replicons using a 96-well plate luciferase-based assay in triplicate. The Greco Universal Response Surface Area mathematical model was fit to the luciferase data to identify drug-drug interactions (i.e.: synergy, additivity, and antagonism) for antiviral effect against both genotypes. This information was used to rank-order combinations of DAAs based on their ability to inhibit replicon replication against genotype 1a and 1b HCV. These preclinical findings can provide information as to which antiviral regimens should move on in the development process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Cigarette Smoke Dampens Anti-viral Signaling in Small Airway Epithelial Cells by Disrupting TLR3 Cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffney, Parker F; McCarthy, Claire E; Nogales, Aitor; Thatcher, Thomas H; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Phipps, Richard P; Sime, Patricia J

    2017-12-14

    Cigarette smokers and people exposed to secondhand smoke are at an increased risk for pulmonary viral infections, yet the mechanism responsible for this heightened susceptibility is not understood. To understand the effect of cigarette smoke on susceptibility to viral infection we used an air-liquid interface culture system, and exposed primary human small airway epithelial cells (SAEC) to whole cigarette smoke followed by treatment with the viral mimetic polyinosinic polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) or influenza A virus (IAV). We found that prior smoke exposure strongly inhibited production of pro-inflammatory (interleukin 6 and interleukin 8) and anti-viral (interferon gamma induced protein 10, IP-10 and interferons) mediators in SAECs in response to poly I:C and IAV infection. Impaired antiviral responses corresponded to increased infection with IAV. This was associated with a decrease in phosphorylation of the key antiviral transcription factor interferon response factor (IRF3). Here we found that cigarette smoke exposure inhibited activation of toll-like receptor (TLR) 3 by impairing TLR3 cleavage, which was required for downstream phosphorylation of IRF3 and production of IP-10. These results identify a novel mechanism by which cigarette smoke exposure impairs antiviral responses in lung epithelial cells, which may contribute to increased susceptibility to respiratory infections.

  17. Viral respiratory diseases: vaccines and antivirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennette, E H

    1981-01-01

    Acute respiratory diseases, most of which are generally attributed to viruses, account for about 6% of all deaths and for about 60% of the deaths associated with all respiratory disease. The huge cost attributable to viral respiratory infections as a result of absenteeism and the disruption of business and the burden of medical care makes control of these diseases an important objective. The viruses that infect the respiratory tract fall taxonomically into five viral families. Although immunoprophylaxis would appear to be the logical approach, the development of suitable vaccines has been confronted with numerous obstacles, including antigenic drift and shift in the influenzaviruses, the large number of antigenically distinct immunotypes among rhinoviruses, the occurrence after immunization of rare cases of a severe form of the disease following subsequent natural infection with respiratory syncytial virus, and the risk of oncogenicity of adenoviruses for man. Considerable expenditure on the development of new antiviral drugs has so far resulted in only three compounds that are at present officially approved and licensed for use in the USA. Efforts to improve the tools available for control should continue and imaginative and inventive approaches are called for. However, creativity and ingenuity must operate within the constraints imposed by economic, political, ethical, and legal considerations.

  18. Antiviral treatment for Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildiko Gagyor

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTBACKGROUND: Corticosteroids are widely used in the treatment of idiopathic facial paralysis (Bell's palsy, but the effectiveness of additional treatment with an antiviral agent is uncertain. Significant morbidity can be associated with severe cases of Bell's palsy.OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of antiviral treatments alone or in combination with any other therapy for Bell's palsy.METHODS:Search methods:On 7 October 2014 we searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, DARE, NHS EED, and HTA. We also reviewed the bibliographies of the identified trials and contacted trial authors and known experts in the field and relevant drug companies to identify additional published or unpublished data. We searched clinical trials registries for ongoing studies.Selection criteria:We considered randomised controlled trials or quasi-randomised controlled trials of antivirals with and without corticosteroids versus control therapies for the treatment of Bell's palsy.We excluded trials that had a high risk of bias in several domains.Data collection and analysis:Pairs of authors independently assessed trials for relevance, eligibility, and risk of bias, using standard Cochrane procedures.MAIN RESULTS: Eleven trials, including 2883 participants, met the inclusion criteria and are included in the final analysis. We added four studies to the previous review for this update. Some of the trials were small, and a number were at high or unclear risk of bias. Other trials did not meet current best standards in allocation concealment and blinding. Incomplete recovery:We found no significant benefit from adding antivirals to corticosteroids in comparison with corticosteroids alone for people with Bell's palsy (risk ratio (RR 0.69, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.47 to 1.02, n = 1715. For people with severe Bell's palsy (House Brackmann scores of 5 and 6 or the equivalent in other scales, we found a

  19. Antiviral Protection via RdRP-Mediated Stable Activation of Innate Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Meghan M; Morrison, James H; Zoecklein, Laurie J; Rinkoski, Tommy A; Watzlawik, Jens O; Papke, Louisa M; Warrington, Arthur E; Bieber, Allan J; Matchett, William E; Turkowski, Kari L; Poeschla, Eric M; Rodriguez, Moses

    2015-12-01

    For many emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, definitive solutions via sterilizing adaptive immunity may require years or decades to develop, if they are even possible. The innate immune system offers alternative mechanisms that do not require antigen-specific recognition or a priori knowledge of the causative agent. However, it is unclear whether effective stable innate immune system activation can be achieved without triggering harmful autoimmunity or other chronic inflammatory sequelae. Here, we show that transgenic expression of a picornavirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP), in the absence of other viral proteins, can profoundly reconfigure mammalian innate antiviral immunity by exposing the normally membrane-sequestered RdRP activity to sustained innate immune detection. RdRP-transgenic mice have life-long, quantitatively dramatic upregulation of 80 interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and show profound resistance to normally lethal viral challenge. Multiple crosses with defined knockout mice (Rag1, Mda5, Mavs, Ifnar1, Ifngr1, and Tlr3) established that the mechanism operates via MDA5 and MAVS and is fully independent of the adaptive immune system. Human cell models recapitulated the key features with striking fidelity, with the RdRP inducing an analogous ISG network and a strict block to HIV-1 infection. This RdRP-mediated antiviral mechanism does not depend on secondary structure within the RdRP mRNA but operates at the protein level and requires RdRP catalysis. Importantly, despite lifelong massive ISG elevations, RdRP mice are entirely healthy, with normal longevity. Our data reveal that a powerfully augmented MDA5-mediated activation state can be a well-tolerated mammalian innate immune system configuration. These results provide a foundation for augmenting innate immunity to achieve broad-spectrum antiviral protection.

  20. Antiviral treatment for Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagyor, Ildiko; Madhok, Vishnu B; Daly, Fergus; Somasundara, Dhruvashree; Sullivan, Michael; Gammie, Fiona; Sullivan, Frank

    2015-11-09

    Corticosteroids are widely used in the treatment of idiopathic facial paralysis (Bell's palsy), but the effectiveness of additional treatment with an antiviral agent is uncertain. Significant morbidity can be associated with severe cases of Bell's palsy. This review was first published in 2001 and revised several times, most recently in 2009. This version replaces an update of the review in Issue 7 of the Cochrane Library subsequently withdrawn because of an ongoing investigation into the reliability of data from an included study. To assess the effects of antiviral treatments alone or in combination with any other therapy for Bell's palsy. On 7 October 2014 we searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, DARE, NHS EED, and HTA. We also reviewed the bibliographies of the identified trials and contacted trial authors and known experts in the field and relevant drug companies to identify additional published or unpublished data. We searched clinical trials registries for ongoing studies. We considered randomised controlled trials or quasi-randomised controlled trials of antivirals with and without corticosteroids versus control therapies for the treatment of Bell's palsy. We excluded trials that had a high risk of bias in several domains. Pairs of authors independently assessed trials for relevance, eligibility, and risk of bias, using standard Cochrane procedures. Ten trials, including 2280 participants, met the inclusion criteria and are included in the final analysis. Some of the trials were small, and a number were at high or unclear risk of bias. Other trials did not meet current best standards in allocation concealment and blinding. Incomplete recoveryWe found a significant benefit from adding antivirals to corticosteroids in comparison with corticosteroids alone for people with Bell's palsy (risk ratio (RR) 0.61, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.39 to 0.97, n = 1315). For people with severe Bell

  1. HIV Exploits Antiviral Host Innate GCN2-ATF4 Signaling for Establishing Viral Replication Early in Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guochun; Santos Rocha, Clarissa; Hirao, Lauren A; Mendes, Erica A; Tang, Yuyang; Thompson, George R; Wong, Joseph K; Dandekar, Satya

    2017-05-02

    Antiviral innate host defenses against acute viral infections include suppression of host protein synthesis to restrict viral protein production. Less is known about mechanisms by which viral pathogens subvert host antiviral innate responses for establishing their replication and dissemination. We investigated early innate defense against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and viral evasion by utilizing human CD4 + T cell cultures in vitro and a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) model of AIDS in vivo Our data showed that early host innate defense against the viral infection involves GCN2-ATF4 signaling-mediated suppression of global protein synthesis, which is exploited by the virus for supporting its own replication during early viral infection and dissemination in the gut mucosa. Suppression of protein synthesis and induction of protein kinase GCN2-ATF4 signaling were detected in the gut during acute SIV infection. These changes diminished during chronic viral infection. HIV replication induced by serum deprivation in CD4 + T cells was linked to the induction of ATF4 that was recruited to the HIV long terminal repeat (LTR) to promote viral transcription. Experimental inhibition of GCN2-ATF4 signaling either by a specific inhibitor or by amino acid supplementation suppressed the induction of HIV expression. Enhancing ATF4 expression through selenium administration resulted in reactivation of latent HIV in vitro as well as ex vivo in the primary CD4 + T cells isolated from patients receiving suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). In summary, HIV/SIV exploits the early host antiviral response through GCN2-ATF4 signaling by utilizing ATF4 for activating the viral LTR transcription to establish initial viral replication and is a potential target for HIV prevention and therapy. IMPORTANCE Understanding how HIV overcomes host antiviral innate defense response in order to establish infection and dissemination is critical for developing prevention and

  2. Antiviral responses of arthropod vectors: an update on recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rückert, Claudia; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Fazakerley, John K; Fragkoudis, Rennos

    2014-01-01

    Arthropod vectors, such as mosquitoes, ticks, biting midges and sand flies, transmit many viruses that can cause outbreaks of disease in humans and animals around the world. Arthropod vector species are invading new areas due to globalisation and environmental changes, and contact between exotic animal species, humans and arthropod vectors is increasing, bringing with it the regular emergence of new arboviruses. For future strategies to control arbovirus transmission, it is important to improve our understanding of virus-vector interactions. In the last decade knowledge of arthropod antiviral immunity has increased rapidly. RNAi has been proposed as the most important antiviral response in mosquitoes and it is likely to be the most important antiviral response in all arthropods. However, other newly-discovered antiviral strategies such as melanisation and the link between RNAi and the JAK/STAT pathway via the cytokine Vago have been characterised in the last few years. This review aims to summarise the most important and most recent advances made in arthropod antiviral immunity.

  3. Antiviral Screening of Multiple Compounds against Ebola Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart D. Dowall

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In light of the recent outbreak of Ebola virus (EBOV disease in West Africa, there have been renewed efforts to search for effective antiviral countermeasures. A range of compounds currently available with broad antimicrobial activity have been tested for activity against EBOV. Using live EBOV, eighteen candidate compounds were screened for antiviral activity in vitro. The compounds were selected on a rational basis because their mechanisms of action suggested that they had the potential to disrupt EBOV entry, replication or exit from cells or because they had displayed some antiviral activity against EBOV in previous tests. Nine compounds caused no reduction in viral replication despite cells remaining healthy, so they were excluded from further analysis (zidovudine; didanosine; stavudine; abacavir sulphate; entecavir; JB1a; Aimspro; celgosivir; and castanospermine. A second screen of the remaining compounds and the feasibility of appropriateness for in vivo testing removed six further compounds (ouabain; omeprazole; esomeprazole; Gleevec; D-LANA-14; and Tasigna. The three most promising compounds (17-DMAG; BGB324; and NCK-8 were further screened for in vivo activity in the guinea pig model of EBOV disease. Two of the compounds, BGB324 and NCK-8, showed some effect against lethal infection in vivo at the concentrations tested, which warrants further investigation. Further, these data add to the body of knowledge on the antiviral activities of multiple compounds against EBOV and indicate that the scientific community should invest more effort into the development of novel and specific antiviral compounds to treat Ebola virus disease.

  4. 3,7-Dideazaneplanocin: Synthesis and antiviral analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xue-Qiang; Schneller, Stewart W

    2017-12-01

    Objective To synthesize 3,7-dideazaneplanocin and evaluate its antiviral potential. Methods The target 3,7-dideazaneplanocin has been prepared in five steps from a readily available cyclopentenol. A thorough in vitro antiviral analysis was conducted versus both DNA and RNA viruses. Results A rational synthesis of 3,7-dideazaneplanocin was conceived and successfully pursued in such a way that it can be adapted to various analogs of 3,7-dideazaneplanocin. Using standard antiviral assays, no activity for 3,7-dideazaneplanocn was found. Conclusion Two structural features are necessary for adenine-based carbocyclic nucleosides (like neplanocin) for potential antiviral properties: (i) inhibition of S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase and/or (ii) C-5' activation via the mono-nucleotide. These two requisite adenine structural features to fit these criteria are not present in in the target 3,7-dideazaneplanocin: (i) an N-7 is necessary for inhibition of the hydrolase and the N-3 is claimed to be essential for phosphorylation at C-5'. Thus, it is not surprising that 3,7-dideazaneplaoncin lacked antiviral properties.

  5. Screening for Antiviral Activities of Isolated Compounds from Essential Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Astani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential oil of star anise as well as phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes, for example, trans-anethole, eugenol, β-eudesmol, farnesol, β-caryophyllene and β-caryophyllene oxide, which are present in many essential oils, were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 in vitro. Antiviral activity was analyzed by plaque reduction assays and mode of antiviral action was determined by addition of the drugs to uninfected cells, to the virus prior to infection or to herpesvirus-infected cells. Star anise oil reduced viral infectivity by >99%, phenylpropanoids inhibited HSV infectivity by about 60–80% and sesquiterpenes suppressed herpes virus infection by 40–98%. Both, star anise essential oil and all isolated compounds exhibited anti-HSV-1 activity by direct inactivation of free virus particles in viral suspension assays. All tested drugs interacted in a dose-dependent manner with herpesvirus particles, thereby inactivating viral infectivity. Star anise oil, rich in trans-anethole, revealed a high selectivity index of 160 against HSV, whereas among the isolated compounds only β-caryophyllene displayed a high selectivity index of 140. The presence of β-caryophyllene in many essential oils might contribute strongly to their antiviral ability. These results indicate that phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes present in essential oils contribute to their antiviral activity against HSV.

  6. Bioprospecting of Red Sea Sponges for Novel Antiviral Pharmacophores

    KAUST Repository

    O'Rourke, Aubrie

    2015-05-01

    Natural products offer many possibilities for the treatment of disease. More than 70% of the Earth’s surface is ocean, and recent exploration and access has allowed for new additions to this catalog of natural treasures. The Central Red Sea off the coast of Saudi Arabia serves as a newly accessible location, which provides the opportunity to bioprospect marine sponges with the purpose of identifying novel antiviral scaffolds. Antivirals are underrepresented in present day clinical trials, as well as in the academic screens of marine natural product libraries. Here a high-throughput pipeline was initiated by prefacing the antiviral screen with an Image-based High-Content Screening (HCS) technique in order to identify candidates with antiviral potential. Prospective candidates were tested in a biochemical or cell-based assay for the ability to inhibit the NS3 protease of the West Nile Virus (WNV NS protease) as well as replication and reverse transcription of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1). The analytical chemistry techniques of High-Performance Liquid Chromatograpy (HPLC), Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS), and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) where used in order to identify the compounds responsible for the characteristic antiviral activity of the selected sponge fractions. We have identified a 3-alkyl pyridinium from Amphimedon chloros as the causative agent of the observed WNV NS3 protease inhibition in vitro. Additionally, we identified debromohymenialdisine, hymenialdisine, and oroidin from Stylissa carteri as prospective scaffolds capable of HIV-1 inhibition.

  7. Cytomegalovirus Antivirals and Development of Improved Animal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Alistair; Choi, K. Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a ubiquitous pathogen that establishes a life long asymptomatic infection in healthy individuals. Infection of immunesuppressed individuals causes serious illness. Transplant and AIDS patients are highly susceptible to CMV leading to life threatening end organ disease. Another vulnerable population is the developing fetus in utero, where congenital infection can result in surviving newborns with long term developmental problems. There is no vaccine licensed for CMV and current antivirals suffer from complications associated with prolonged treatment. These include drug toxicity and emergence of resistant strains. There is an obvious need for new antivirals. Candidate intervention strategies are tested in controlled pre-clinical animal models but species specificity of HCMV precludes the direct study of the virus in an animal model. Areas covered This review explores the current status of CMV antivirals and development of new drugs. This includes the use of animal models and the development of new improved models such as humanized animal CMV and bioluminescent imaging of virus in animals in real time. Expert Opinion Various new CMV antivirals are in development, some with greater spectrum of activity against other viruses. Although the greatest need is in the setting of transplant patients there remains an unmet need for a safe antiviral strategy against congenital CMV. This is especially important since an effective CMV vaccine remains an elusive goal. In this capacity greater emphasis should be placed on suitable pre-clinical animal models and greater collaboration between industry and academia. PMID:21883024

  8. Screening of Brazilian medicinal plants for antiviral activity against rotavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecílio, Alzira Batista; de Faria, Déborah Behr; Oliveira, Pollyana de Carvalho; Caldas, Sérgio; de Oliveira, Dario Alves; Sobral, Marcos Eduardo Guerra; Duarte, Maria Gorette Resende; Moreira, Carolina Paula de Souza; Silva, Cláudia Gontijo; de Almeida, Vera Lúcia

    2012-06-14

    Brazilian medicinal plants traditionally used for the treatment of diarrhoea were investigated for their in vitro antiviral activity against the simian rotavirus SA11. The ethanolic crude extracts of plants collected in the cerrado of Minas Gerais, Brazil were submitted to phytochemical screening. The cytotoxicity of the extracts was inferred by cellular morphologic alterations. Antiviral activity was assessed by the ability of the extracts to inhibit the cytopathic effect (CPE) of rotavirus on the treated cells. RT-PCR was performed to confirm and/or confront antiviral assay data. The maximum non-toxic concentration ranged from 50 to 500 μg/mL. All extracts were toxic at a concentration of 5000 μg/mL but no extract showed cytotoxicity at 50 μg/mL. The species Byrsonima verbascifolia, Myracrodruon urundeuva, Eugenia dysenterica and Hymenaea courbaril exhibited the strongest in vitro activity against rotavirus. Their extracts prevented the formation of CPE, and RT-PCR analysis detected no amplification of genetic material from rotavirus. Tannins, flavonoids, saponins, coumarins and terpenes were the major classes of natural products found in the leaf extracts that showed antiviral activity. Among the species studied, Byrsonima verbascifolia, Eugenia dysenterica, Hymenaea courbaril and Myracrodruon urundeuva showed potential activity against rotavirus and are worthy of further study. The present study corroborates ethnopharmacological data as a valuable source in the selection of plants with antiviral activity and to some extent validates their traditional uses. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Recent developments in antiviral agents against enterovirus 71 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chee Wah; Lai, Jeffrey Kam Fatt; Sam, I-Ching; Chan, Yoke Fun

    2014-02-12

    Enterovirus 71 (EV-71) is the main etiological agent of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Recent EV-71 outbreaks in Asia-Pacific were not limited to mild HFMD, but were associated with severe neurological complications such as aseptic meningitis and brainstem encephalitis, which may lead to cardiopulmonary failure and death. The absence of licensed therapeutics for clinical use has intensified research into anti-EV-71 development. This review highlights the potential antiviral agents targeting EV-71 attachment, entry, uncoating, translation, polyprotein processing, virus-induced formation of membranous RNA replication complexes, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. The strategies for antiviral development include target-based synthetic compounds, anti-rhinovirus and poliovirus libraries screening, and natural compound libraries screening. Growing knowledge of the EV-71 life cycle will lead to successful development of antivirals. The continued effort to develop antiviral agents for treatment is crucial in the absence of a vaccine. The coupling of antivirals with an effective vaccine will accelerate eradication of the disease.

  10. Innate antiviral immune signaling, viral evasion and modulation by HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Arjun; Gale, Michael

    2014-03-20

    The intracellular innate antiviral response in human cells is an essential component of immunity against virus infection. As obligate intracellular parasites, all viruses must evade the actions of the host cell's innate immune response in order to replicate and persist. Innate immunity is induced when pathogen recognition receptors of the host cell sense viral products including nucleic acid as "non-self". This process induces downstream signaling through adaptor proteins to activate latent transcription factors that drive the expression of genes encoding antiviral and immune modulatory effector proteins that restrict virus replication and regulate adaptive immunity. The interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) are transcription factors that play major roles in innate immunity. In particular, IRF3 is activated in response to infection by a range of viruses including RNA viruses, DNA viruses and retroviruses. Among these viruses, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) remains a major global health problem mediating chronic infection in millions of people wherein recent studies show that viral persistence is linked with the ability of the virus to dysregulate and evade the innate immune response. In this review, we discuss viral pathogen sensing, innate immune signaling pathways and effectors that respond to viral infection, the role of IRF3 in these processes and how it is regulated by pathogenic viruses. We present a contemporary overview of the interplay between HIV-1 and innate immunity, with a focus on understanding how innate immune control impacts infection outcome and disease. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Bispidine-amino acid conjugates act as a novel scaffold for the design of antivirals that block Japanese encephalitis virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Haridas

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV is a major cause of viral encephalitis in South and South-East Asia. Lack of antivirals and non-availability of affordable vaccines in these endemic areas are a major setback in combating JEV and other closely related viruses such as West Nile virus and dengue virus. Protein secondary structure mimetics are excellent candidates for inhibiting the protein-protein interactions and therefore serve as an attractive tool in drug development. We synthesized derivatives containing the backbone of naturally occurring lupin alkaloid, sparteine, which act as protein secondary structure mimetics and show that these compounds exhibit antiviral properties.In this study we have identified 3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane, commonly called bispidine, as a privileged scaffold to synthesize effective antiviral agents. We have synthesized derivatives of bispidine conjugated with amino acids and found that hydrophobic amino acid residues showed antiviral properties against JEV. We identified a tryptophan derivative, Bisp-W, which at 5 µM concentration inhibited JEV infection in neuroblastoma cells by more than 100-fold. Viral inhibition was at a stage post-entry and prior to viral protein translation possibly at viral RNA replication. We show that similar concentration of Bisp-W was capable of inhibiting viral infection of two other encephalitic viruses namely, West Nile virus and Chandipura virus.We have demonstrated that the amino-acid conjugates of 3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane can serve as a molecular scaffold for development of potent antivirals against encephalitic viruses. Our findings will provide a novel platform to develop effective inhibitors of JEV and perhaps other RNA viruses causing encephalitis.

  12. Terapia antiviral para VIH-SIDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Tarinas Reyes

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available En los últimos años, muchos agentes antivirales nuevos han sido incorporados a la quimioterapéutica. En esta revisión se resumen tanto los fármacos establecidos de años atrás como los nuevos medicamentos desarrollados para el tratamiento de individuos infectados por VIH. El AZT fue el primero aprobado en marzo de 1987, le siguió el ddl (1991, ddC (1992, d4T (1994, 3TC (1995. Luego fue aprobado el primer inhibidor de proteasa, saquinavir en diciembre de 1995, seguido de ritonavir (1996, indinavir (1996, nelfinavir (1997; además de otros inhibidores de la reverso transcriptasa como nevirapine (1996, delavirdine (1997, efavirenz (1998, entre otros. En estos momentos se siguen buscando y desarrollando nuevas terapias alternativas para esta afección. En este trabajo se exponen algunas de las características de dichos medicamentos, como son: mecanismos de acción (sobre qué enzima actúa cada uno y cómo lo hacen, el ciclo viral, dosificación, incompatibilidades y reacciones adversas.During the last years many new antiviral agents have been incorporated to the chemotherapeutics. The pharmaceuticals established years ago as well as the new ones developed to treat HIV infected individuals are included in this review. The AZT was the first approved in March, 1987, followed by ddl (1991, ddc (1992, d4t (1994, and 3TC (1995. Later, the first protease inhibitor, saquinovir, was approved in December, 1995, followed by ritonavir (1996, indinavir (1996, and nelfinavir (1997; in addition to other inhibitors of the reverse transcriptase as neviparine (1996, delavirdine (1997, and efavirenz (1998, among others. At present new alternative therapies for this affection are being searched and developed. Some of the characteristics of these dugs, such as: action mechanisms (on which enzime each of them act and how they do it, viral cycle, dosage, incompatibilites and adverse reactions are dealt with in this paper.

  13. Aminoadamantanes versus other antiviral drugs for chronic hepatitis C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamers, Mieke H; Broekman, Mark; Drenth, Joost Ph

    2014-01-01

    months after the end of treatment) in approximately 40% to 80% of treated patients, depending on viral genotype. Recently, a new class of drugs have emerged for hepatitis C infection, the direct acting antivirals, which in combination with standard therapy or alone can lead to sustained virological...... response in 80% or more of treated patients. Aminoadamantanes, mostly amantadine, are antiviral drugs used for the treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis C. We have previously systematically reviewed amantadine versus placebo or no intervention and found no significant effects of the amantadine...... on all-cause mortality or liver-related morbidity and on adverse events in patients with hepatitis C. Overall, we did not observe a significant effect of amantadine on sustained virological response. In this review, we systematically review aminoadamantanes versus other antiviral drugs. OBJECTIVES...

  14. Antiviral properties from plants of the Mediterranean flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, G; Farci, P; Busonera, B; Murgia, G; La Colla, P; Giliberti, G

    2015-01-01

    Natural products are a successful source in drug discovery, playing a significant role in maintaining human health. We investigated the in vitro cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of extracts from 18 traditionally used Mediterranean plants. Noteworthy antiviral activity was found in the extract obtained from the branches of Daphne gnidium L. against human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (EC50 = 0.08 μg/mL) and coxsackievirus B5 (EC50 = 0.10 μg/mL). Other relevant activities were found against BVDV, YFV, Sb-1, RSV and HSV-1. Interestingly, extracts from Artemisia arborescens L. and Rubus ulmifolius Schott, as well as those from D. gnidium L., showed activities against two different viruses. This extensive antiviral screening allowed us to identify attractive activities, offering opportunities to develop lead compounds with a great pharmaceutical potential.

  15. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss: Is antiviral treatment really necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Övet, Gültekin; Alataş, Necat; Kocacan, Fatma Nur; Gürcüoğlu, Sermin Selver; Görgülü, Hakan; Güzelkara, Fatih; Övet, Habibe

    2015-01-01

    It was aimed to investigate the necessity of antiviral agents in the ISSHL treatment. In this study, the patients, diagnosed with sudden hearing loss and admitted in the first 7 days of hearing loss were divided into two groups; a combination therapy was administered to one of the groups, and famciclovir was administered to the other group as an antiviral treatment in addition to the combined therapy. Both groups were compared in terms of levels of recovery. No statistically significant difference was found in the recovery rates between the two groups (p=0.7). In this study, the additional antiviral treatment was found to have no effect on the remission rates in patients with ISSHL treated with combined therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Phytochemistry, cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of Eleusine indica (sambau)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iberahim, Rashidah; Yaacob, Wan Ahmad; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2015-09-01

    Goose grass also known as Eleusine indica (EI) is a local medicinal plant that displays antioxidant, antimicrobial and anticancer activities. The present study is to determine the phytochemical constituents, cytotoxicity and antiviral activities for both crude extract and fraction obtained from the plant. The crude extract contained more secondary metabolites compared to the hexane fraction as gauged using standard phytochemical tests. Cytotoxicity screening against Vero cells using MTT assay showed that the CC50 values for crude extract and hexane fraction were 2.07 and 5.62 mg/ml respectively. The antiviral activity towards Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) was determined using plaque reduction assay. The selective indices (SI = CC50 / EC50) for both methanol extract and hexane fraction were 12.2 and 6.2 respectively. These results demonstrate that the extract prepared from E. indica possesses phytochemical compound that was non cytotoxic to the cell with potential antiviral activity.

  17. The Antiviral Effect of Baicalin on Enterovirus 71 In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Baicalin is a flavonoid compound extracted from Scutellaria roots that has been reported to possess antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antiviral activities. However, the antiviral effect of baicalin on enterovirus 71 (EV71 is still unknown. In this study, we found that baicalin showed inhibitory activity on EV71 infection and was independent of direct virucidal or prophylactic effect and inhibitory viral absorption. The expressions of EV71/3D mRNA and polymerase were significantly blocked by baicalin treatment at early stages of EV71 infection. In addition, baicalin could decrease the expressions of FasL and caspase-3, as well as inhibit the apoptosis of EV71-infected human embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (RD cells. Altogether, these results indicate that baicalin exhibits potent antiviral effect on EV71 infection, probably through inhibiting EV71/3D polymerase expression and Fas/FasL signaling pathways.

  18. RNA interference-mediated intrinsic antiviral immunity in invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Arabinda; Tassetto, Michel; Kunitomi, Mark; Andino, Raul

    2013-01-01

    In invertebrates such as insects and nematodes, RNA interference (RNAi) provides RNA-based protection against viruses. This form of immunity restricts viral replication and dissemination from infected cells and viruses, in turn, have evolved evasion mechanisms or RNAi suppressors to counteract host defenses. Recent advances indicate that, in addition to RNAi, other related small RNA pathways contribute to antiviral functions in invertebrates. This has led to a deeper understanding of fundamental aspects of small RNA-based antiviral immunity in invertebrates and its contribution to viral spread and pathogenesis.

  19. From genome to antivirals: SARS as a test tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliger, Yossef; Levanon, Erez Y; Gerber, Doron

    2005-03-01

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic brought into the spotlight the need for rapid development of effective anti-viral drugs against newly emerging viruses. Researchers have leveraged the 20-year battle against AIDS into a variety of possible treatments for SARS. Most prominently, based solely on viral genome information, silencers of viral genes, viral-enzyme blockers and viral-entry inhibitors were suggested as potential therapeutic agents for SARS. In particular, inhibitors of viral entry, comprising therapeutic peptides, were based on the recently launched anti-HIV drug enfuvirtide. This could represent one of the most direct routes from genome sequencing to the discovery of antiviral drugs.

  20. A Designed “Nested” Dimer of Cyanovirin-N Increases Antiviral Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian W. Woodrum

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cyanovirin-N (CV-N is an antiviral lectin with potent activity against enveloped viruses, including HIV. The mechanism of action involves high affinity binding to mannose-rich glycans that decorate the surface of enveloped viruses. In the case of HIV, antiviral activity of CV-N is postulated to require multivalent interactions with envelope protein gp120, achieved through a pseudo-repeat of sequence that adopts two near-identical glycan-binding sites, and possibly involves a 3D-domain-swapped dimeric form of CV-N. Here, we present a covalent dimer of CV-N that increases the number of active glycan-binding sites, and we characterize its ability to recognize four glycans in solution. A CV-N variant was designed in which two native repeats were separated by the “nested” covalent insertion of two additional repeats of CV-N, resulting in four possible glycan-binding sites. The resulting Nested CV-N folds into a wild-type-like structure as assessed by circular dichroism and NMR spectroscopy, and displays high thermal stability with a Tm of 59 °C, identical to WT. All four glycan-binding domains encompassed by the sequence are functional as demonstrated by isothermal titration calorimetry, which revealed two sets of binding events to dimannose with dissociation constants Kd of 25 μM and 900 μM, assigned to domains B and B’ and domains A and A’ respectively. Nested CV-N displays a slight increase in activity when compared to WT CV-N in both an anti-HIV cellular assay and a fusion assay. This construct conserves the original binding specifityies of domain A and B, thus indicating correct fold of the two CV-N repeats. Thus, rational design can be used to increase multivalency in antiviral lectins in a controlled manner.

  1. ANTIVIRAL ACTIVITY OF COPPER(IICHLORIDE DIHYDRATE AGAINST DENGUE VIRUS TYPE-2 IN VERO CELL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teguh Hari Sucipto

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Infection of dengue virus (DENV was number of globally significant emerging pathogen. Antiviral dengue therapies ar importantly needed to control emerging dengue. Dengue virus (DENV is mosquito-borne arboviruses responsible for causing acute systemic diseases and grievous health conditions in humans. To date, there is no clinically approved dengue vaccine or antiviral for humans, even though there have been great efforts towards this end. Copper and copper compounds have more effective in inactivation viruses, likes an influenza virus and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Purpose in this project was investigated of Copper(IIchloride Dihydrate antiviral compound were further tested for inhibitory effect on the replication of DENV-2 in cell culture. DENV replication was measures by Enzyme linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA with selectivity index value (SI was determined as the ratio of cytotoxic concentration 50 (CC50 to inhibitory concentration 50 (IC50 for compound. The maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 of Copper(IIchloride Dihydrate against dengue virus type-2 was 0.13 μg/ml. The cytotoxic concentration (CC50 of compound against Vero cell was 5.03 μg/ml. The SI values for Copper(IIchloride Dihydrate 38.69. Result of this study suggest that Copper(IIchloride Dihydrate demonstated significant anti-DENV-2 inhibitory activities and not toxic in the Vero cells. Copper mechanisms play an important role in the prevention of copper toxicity, exposure to excessive levels of copper can result in a number of adverse health effects, as a result increased reactive oxygen species and oxidative damage to lipid, DNA, and proteins have been observed in human cell culture models or clinical syndromes of severe copper deficiency and inhibition was attributed to released cupric ions which react with cysteine residues on the surface of the protease.

  2. Meeting report: 27th International conference on antiviral research, in Raleigh, NC, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vere Hodge, R Anthony

    2014-11-01

    The 27th International Conference on Antiviral Research (ICAR) was held in Raleigh, North Carolina, USA from May 12 to 16, 2014. This article summarizes the principal invited lectures. John Drach (Elion Award) described the early days of antiviral drugs and their novel modes of action. Piet Herdewijn (Holý Award) used evolutionary pressure to select DNA polymerases that accept nucleoside analogs. Replacing thymine by 5-chlorouracil led to the generation of a new form of Escherichia coli. Adrian Ray (Prusoff Award) demonstrated how prodrugs can markedly improve both the efficacy and safety of potential drugs. The keynote addresses, by David Margolis and Myron Cohen, tackled two emerging areas of HIV research, to find an HIV "cure" and to prevent HIV transmission, respectively. These topics were discussed further in other presentations - a cure seems to be a distant prospect but there are exciting developments for reducing HIV transmission. TDF-containing vaginal rings and GSK-744, as a long-lasting injection, offer great hope. There were three mini-symposia. Although therapy with TDF/FTC gives excellent control of HBV replication, there are only a few patients who achieve a functional cure. Myrcludex, an entry inhibitor, is active against both HBV and HDV. The recent progress with HBV replication in cell cultures has transformed the search for new antiviral compounds. The HBV capsid protein has been recognized as key player in HBV DNA synthesis. Unexpectedly, compounds which enhance capsid formation, markedly reduce HBV DNA synthesis. The development of BCX4430, which is active against Marburg and Ebola viruses, is of great current interest. Copyright © 2014 The Author. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of immobilization methods of antiviral antibodies in serum for electrochemical biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huy, Tran Quang; Hanh, Nguyen Thi Hong; Van Chung, Pham; Anh, Dang Duc; Nga, Phan Thi; Tuan, Mai Anh

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we describes different methods to immobilize Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) antibodies in human serum onto the interdigitated surface of a microelectrode sensor for optimizing electrochemical detection: (1) direct covalent binding to the silanized surface, (2) binding to the silanized surface via a cross-linker of glutaraldehyde (GA), (3) binding to glutaraldehyde/silanized surface via goat anti-human IgG polyclonal antibody and (4) binding to glutaraldehyde/silanized surface via protein A (PrA). Field emission scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, and fluorescence microscopy are used to verify the characteristics of antibodies on the interdigitated surface after the serum antibodies immobilization. The analyzed results indicate that the use of protein A is an effective choice for immobilization and orientation of antibodies in serum for electrochemical biosensors. This study provides an advantageous immobilization method of serum containing antiviral antibodies to develop electrochemical biosensors for preliminary screening of viruses in clinical samples from outbreaks.

  4. Antiviral therapy for prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma in chronic hepatitis C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimer, Nina; Dahl, Emilie Kristine; Gluud, Lise Lotte

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether antiviral therapy reduces the risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in chronic hepatitis C.......To determine whether antiviral therapy reduces the risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in chronic hepatitis C....

  5. Antiviral Efficacy and Host Immune Response Induction during Sequential Treatment with SB 9200 Followed by Entecavir in Woodchucks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manasa Suresh

    Full Text Available SB 9200, an orally bioavailable dinucleotide, activates the viral sensor proteins, retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2 causing the induction of the interferon (IFN signaling cascade for antiviral defense. The present study evaluated the overall antiviral response in woodchucks upon induction of immune response, first with SB 9200 followed by Entecavir (ETV versus reduction of viral burden with ETV followed by SB 9200 immunomodulation. Woodchucks chronically infected with woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV were treated orally with SB 9200 (30 mg/kg/day and ETV (0.5 mg/kg/day. Group 1 received ETV for 4 weeks followed by SB 9200 for 12 weeks. Group 2 received SB 9200 for 12 weeks followed by ETV for 4 weeks. At the end of treatment in Group 2, average reductions of 6.4 log10 in serum WHV DNA and 3.3 log10 in WHV surface antigen were observed whereas in Group 1, average reductions of 4.2 log10 and 1.1 log10 in viremia and antigenemia were noted. Both groups demonstrated marked reductions in hepatic WHV nucleic acid levels which were more pronounced in Group 2. Following treatment cessation and the 8-week follow-up, recrudescence of viral replication was observed in Group 1 while viral relapse in Group 2 was significantly delayed. The antiviral effects observed in both groups were associated with temporally different induction of IFN-α, IFN-β, and IFN-stimulated genes in blood and liver. These results suggest that the induction of host immune responses by pretreatment with SB 9200 followed by ETV resulted in antiviral efficacy that was superior to that obtained using the strategy of viral reduction with ETV followed by immunomodulation.

  6. Identification of a New Host Factor Required for Antiviral RNAi and Amplification of Viral siRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhongxin; Wang, Xian-Bing; Wang, Ying; Li, Wan-Xiang; Gal-On, Amit; Ding, Shou-Wei

    2018-02-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are processed from virus-specific dsRNA to direct antiviral RNA interference (RNAi) in diverse eukaryotic hosts. We have recently performed a sensitized genetic screen in Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) and identified two related phospholipid flippases required for antiviral RNAi and the amplification of virus-derived siRNAs by plant RNA-dependent RNA polymerase1 (RDR1) and RDR6. Here we report the identification and cloning of ANTIVIRAL RNAI - DEFECTIVE2 ( AVI2 ) from the same genetic screen. AVI2 encodes a multispan transmembrane protein broadly conserved in plants and animals with two homologous human proteins known as magnesium transporters. We show that avi2 mutant plants display no developmental defects and develop severe disease symptoms after infection with a mutant Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) defective in RNAi suppression. AVI2 is induced by CMV infection, particularly in veins, and is required for antiviral RNAi and RDR6-dependent biogenesis of viral siRNAs. AVI2 is also necessary for Dicer-like2-mediated amplification of 22-nucleotide viral siRNAs induced in dcl4 mutant plants by infection, but dispensable for RDR6-dependent biogenesis of endogenous transacting siRNAs. Further genetic studies illustrate that AVI2 plays a partially redundant role with AVI2H, the most closely related member in the AVI2 gene family, in RDR1-dependent biogenesis of viral siRNAs and the endogenous virus-activated siRNAs (vasi-RNAs). Interestingly, we discovered a specific genetic interaction of AVI2 with AVI1 flippase that is critical for plant development. We propose that AVI1 and AVI2 participate in the virus-induced formation of the RDR1/RDR6-specific, membrane-bound RNA synthesis compartment, essential for the biogenesis of highly abundant viral siRNAs and vasi-RNAs. © 2018 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  7. HIV Exploits Antiviral Host Innate GCN2-ATF4 Signaling for Establishing Viral Replication Early in Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guochun Jiang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Antiviral innate host defenses against acute viral infections include suppression of host protein synthesis to restrict viral protein production. Less is known about mechanisms by which viral pathogens subvert host antiviral innate responses for establishing their replication and dissemination. We investigated early innate defense against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and viral evasion by utilizing human CD4+ T cell cultures in vitro and a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV model of AIDS in vivo. Our data showed that early host innate defense against the viral infection involves GCN2-ATF4 signaling-mediated suppression of global protein synthesis, which is exploited by the virus for supporting its own replication during early viral infection and dissemination in the gut mucosa. Suppression of protein synthesis and induction of protein kinase GCN2-ATF4 signaling were detected in the gut during acute SIV infection. These changes diminished during chronic viral infection. HIV replication induced by serum deprivation in CD4+ T cells was linked to the induction of ATF4 that was recruited to the HIV long terminal repeat (LTR to promote viral transcription. Experimental inhibition of GCN2-ATF4 signaling either by a specific inhibitor or by amino acid supplementation suppressed the induction of HIV expression. Enhancing ATF4 expression through selenium administration resulted in reactivation of latent HIV in vitro as well as ex vivo in the primary CD4+ T cells isolated from patients receiving suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART. In summary, HIV/SIV exploits the early host antiviral response through GCN2-ATF4 signaling by utilizing ATF4 for activating the viral LTR transcription to establish initial viral replication and is a potential target for HIV prevention and therapy.

  8. DMPD: What is disrupting IFN-alpha's antiviral activity? [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15283983 What is disrupting IFN-alpha's antiviral activity? Mbow ML, Sarisky RT. Tr...ends Biotechnol. 2004 Aug;22(8):395-9. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show What is disrupting IFN-alpha's ant...iviral activity? PubmedID 15283983 Title What is disrupting IFN-alpha's antiviral activity? Authors Mbow ML,

  9. DMPD: Negative regulation of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral signaling. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18703349 Negative regulation of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral signaling. Komur...Show Negative regulation of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral signaling. PubmedID 18703349 Title Negative r...egulation of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral signaling. Authors Komuro A, Bamm

  10. DMPD: Regulation of mitochondrial antiviral signaling pathways. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18549796 Regulation of mitochondrial antiviral signaling pathways. Moore CB, Ting J...P. Immunity. 2008 Jun;28(6):735-9. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Regulation of mitochondrial antiviral signaling pathways.... PubmedID 18549796 Title Regulation of mitochondrial antiviral signaling pathways. Author

  11. DMPD: TLR3 in antiviral immunity: key player or bystander? [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16027039 TLR3 in antiviral immunity: key player or bystander? Schroder M, Bowie AG.... Trends Immunol. 2005 Sep;26(9):462-8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show TLR3 in antiviral immunity: key pl...ayer or bystander? PubmedID 16027039 Title TLR3 in antiviral immunity: key player or bystander? Authors Schr

  12. Influence of antiviral therapy on survival of patients with hepatitis B ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of antiviral therapy on survival of patients with hepatitis B-associated hepatocellular carcinoma undergoing transarterial chemoembolization. ... Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... All the patients were categorized into two groups; antiviral (n = 132) and non-antiviral group (n = 224). All the clinical and ...

  13. Henipaviruses Employ a Multifaceted Approach to Evade the Antiviral Interferon Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan L. Shaw

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Hendra and Nipah virus, which constitute the genus Henipavirus, are zoonotic paramyxoviruses that have been associated with sporadic outbreaks of severe disease and mortality in humans since their emergence in the late 1990s. Similar to other paramyxoviruses, their ability to evade the host interferon (IFN response is conferred by the P gene. The henipavirus P gene encodes four proteins; the P, V, W and C proteins, which have all been described to inhibit the antiviral response. Further studies have revealed that these proteins have overlapping but unique properties which enable the virus to block multiple signaling pathways in the IFN response. The best characterized of these is the JAK-STAT signaling pathway which is targeted by the P, V and W proteins via an interaction with the transcription factor STAT1. In addition the V and W proteins can both limit virus-induced induction of IFN but they appear to do this via distinct mechanisms that rely on unique sequences in their C-terminal domains. The ability to generate recombinant Nipah viruses now gives us the opportunity to determine the precise role for each of these proteins and address their contribution to pathogenicity. Additionally, the question of whether these multiple anti-IFN strategies are all active in the different mammalian hosts for henipaviruses, particularly the fruit bat reservoir, warrants further exploration.

  14. Antimicrobial and antiviral activities against Newcastle disease virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial and antiviral activities against Newcastle disease virus (NDV) from marine algae isolated from Qusier and Marsa-Alam Seashore (Red Sea), Egypt. ... and two filamentous fungi (Aspergillus flavus and Fusarium oxysporum) and against the Newcastle sense Virus (NDV)-(Paramyxoviridae) which is responsible ...

  15. Antiviral acyclic nucleoside phosphonates: New structures and prodrugs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krečmerová, Marcela; Tichý, Tomáš; Pomeisl, Karel; Andrei, G.; Balzarini, J.; Snoeck, R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 2 (2016), s. 37 [PharmaMed-2016. International Conference on Medicinal and Pharmaceutical Chemistry . 05.12.2016-07.12.2016, Dubai] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-00522S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * prodrugs * antivirals * 5-azacytosine Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  16. Investigation of Anticancer and Antiviral Properties of Selected Aroma Samples

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ryabchenko, B.; Tulupová, Elena; Schmidt, E.; Wlcek, K.; Buchbauer, G.; Jirovetz, L.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 7 (2008), s. 1085-1088 ISSN 1934-578X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : Antiviral * Anticancer * Cytotoxicity Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.766, year: 2008

  17. Antiviral evaluation of an Hsp90 inhibitor, gedunin, against dengue ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the antiviral potential of a tetranortriterpenoid, gedunin, against dengue virus (DENV) replication by targeting the host chaperone, Hsp90. Methods: The compound, gedunin, was tested against the replication of DENV in vitro using BHK-15 cells transfected with DENV-2 subgenomic replicon. Molecular ...

  18. Antiviral effect of mefloquine on feline calicivirus in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonagh, Phillip; Sheehy, Paul A; Fawcett, Anne; Norris, Jacqueline M

    2015-04-17

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) is an important viral pathogen of domestic cats causing clinical signs ranging from mild to severe oral ulceration or upper respiratory tract disease through to a severe fatal systemic disease. Current therapeutic options are limited, with no direct acting antivirals available for treatment. This study screened a panel of 19 compounds for potential antiviral activity against FCV strain F9 and recent field isolates in vitro. Using a resazurin-based cytopathic effect (CPE) inhibition assay, mefloquine demonstrated a marked inhibitory effect on FCV induced CPE, albeit with a relatively low selectivity index. Orthogonal assays confirmed inhibition of CPE was associated with a significant reduction in viral replication. Mefloquine exhibited a strong inhibitory effect against a panel of seven recent FCV isolates from Australia, with calculated IC50 values for the field isolates approximately 50% lower than against the reference strain FCV F9. In vitro combination therapy with recombinant feline interferon-ω, a biological response modifier currently registered for the treatment of FCV, demonstrated additive effects with a concurrent reduction in the IC50 of mefloquine. These results are the first report of antiviral effects of mefloquine against a calicivirus and support further in vitro and in vivo evaluation of this compound as an antiviral therapeutic for FCV. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Treatment of antiviral-resistant recurrent erythema multiforme with dapsone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oak, Allen S W; Seminario-Vidal, Lucia; Sami, Naveed

    2017-03-01

    Recurrent erythema multiforme (REM) is a chronic disease characterized by frequent episodes of target cutaneous lesions in an acral distribution. Conventional treatment includes systemic corticosteroids and antiviral therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate dapsone as a potential steroid sparing-agent for the treatment of REM after a failed trial of at least one antiviral therapy (acyclovir, famciclovir, or valacyclovir). A retrospective chart review was conducted on thirteen patients with a diagnosis of REM who underwent treatment with dapsone after failing at least one antiviral therapy. Out of 13 patients, 6 showed complete response (CR) and 5 showed partial response (PR). The underlying cause was identified in 5 patients with all showing at least PR. Adverse effects, observed in 4 patients, included fatigue, macrocytic anemia, anxiety, insomnia and involuntary movements, and drug-induced lupus erythematosus. A continuous course of dapsone, titrated up from 25 mg/day to a dose at which clinical improvement is seen with acceptable patient tolerance, is a viable steroid sparing-agent for REM treatment after a failed trial of antiviral therapy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Antiviral activity of the extracts of Rhodophyceae from Morocco

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2010-11-15

    Nov 15, 2010 ... (Mayer, 2002; Mayer et al., 2009). Since the finding of antimicrobial (antibacterial, antifungal or antiviral) activities in many species of marine algae and the isolation of some active compounds from them, marine algae have become recognized as potential sources of antibiotic substances (Fenical and Paul, ...

  1. Antiviral activity of maca (Lepidium meyenii) against human influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Valle Mendoza, Juana; Pumarola, Tomàs; Gonzales, Libertad Alzamora; Del Valle, Luis J

    2014-09-01

    To investigate antiviral activity of maca to reduce viral load in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells infected with influenza type A and B viruses (Flu-A and Flu-B, respectively). Maca were extracted with methanol (1:2, v/v). The cell viability and toxicity of the extracts were evaluated on MDCK cells using method MTT assay. Antiviral activity of compounds against Flu-A and Flu-B viruses was assayed using a test for determining the inhibition of the cytopathic effect on cell culture and multiplex RT-PCR. The methanol extract of maca showed low cytotoxicity and inhibited influenza-induced cytopathic effect significantly, while viral load was reduced via inhibition of viral growth in MDCK infected cells. Maca contains potent inhibitors of Flu-A and Flu-B with a selectivity index [cytotoxic concentration 50%/IC50] of 157.4 and 110.5, respectively. In vitro assays demonstrated that maca has antiviral activity not only against Flu-A (like most antiviral agents) but also Flu-B viruses, providing remarkable therapeutic benefits. Copyright © 2014 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. 78 FR 57166 - Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-N-0001] Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug...

  3. Developing antiviral surgical gown using nonwoven fabrics for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To develop antiviral surgical gown comprising of Polypropylene nonwoven as outer layer, Polytetrafluroethylene (PTFE) film as middle layer and polyester nonwoven as inner layer and the surgical gown with a basic weight of 70 g/m2. Methods: The titanium dioxide (TiO2) nano dispersion was prepared with ...

  4. Acridones as antiviral agents: synthesis, chemical and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda, C S; Fascio, M L; García, C C; D'Accorso, N B; Damonte, E B

    2013-01-01

    Acridones are a class of compounds that have attracted attention in recent years for their wide range of biological properties, including selective inhibition of diverse human pathogenic viruses. The wide spectrum of antiviral activity includes DNA and RNA viruses, such as herpes simplex virus, cytomegalovirus, adenovirus, hepatitis C virus, dengue virus, and Junin virus, among others, indicative of the involvement of cellular factors as potential targets of acridone derivatives. At the present, their precise mode of action is not clearly determined, although the predominant action seems to be centered on the synthesis of nucleic acids. Regarding this point, inhibitory activity against cellular and viral enzymes and the ability to intercalate into nucleic acid molecules was demonstrated for some acridone compounds. Then, the possibility of a multiple effect on different targets renewed interest in these agents for virus chemotherapy allowing a potent inhibitory effectiveness associated to less feasibility of generating antiviral resistance. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding the methods of synthesis, the antiviral properties of acridone derivatives, their mechanism of action, and structural characteristics related to antiviral activity as well as the perspectives of this class of compounds for clinical application against human viral infections.

  5. Antiviral properties of lactoferrin--a natural immunity molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlutti, Francesca; Pantanella, Fabrizio; Natalizi, Tiziana; Frioni, Alessandra; Paesano, Rosalba; Polimeni, Antonella; Valenti, Piera

    2011-08-16

    Lactoferrin, a multifunctional iron binding glycoprotein, plays an important role in immune regulation and defence mechanisms against bacteria, fungi and viruses. Lactoferrin's iron withholding ability is related to inhibition of microbial growth as well as to modulation of motility, aggregation and biofilm formation of pathogenic bacteria. Independently of iron binding capability, lactoferrin interacts with microbial, viral and cell surfaces thus inhibiting microbial and viral adhesion and entry into host cells. Lactoferrin can be considered not only a primary defense factor against mucosal infections, but also a polyvalent regulator which interacts in viral infectious processes. Its antiviral activity, demonstrated against both enveloped and naked viruses, lies in the early phase of infection, thus preventing entry of virus in the host cell. This activity is exerted by binding to heparan sulphate glycosaminoglycan cell receptors, or viral particles or both. Despite the antiviral effect of lactoferrin, widely demonstrated in vitro studies, few clinical trials have been carried out and the related mechanism of action is still under debate. The nuclear localization of lactoferrin in different epithelial human cells suggests that lactoferrin exerts its antiviral effect not only in the early phase of surface interaction virus-cell, but also intracellularly. The capability of lactoferrin to exert a potent antiviral activity, through its binding to host cells and/or viral particles, and its nuclear localization strengthens the idea that lactoferrin is an important brick in the mucosal wall, effective against viral attacks and it could be usefully applied as novel strategy for treatment of viral infections.

  6. Antiviral activity of Conyza canadensis (L.) Cronquist extracts grown ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethyl acetate, chloroform, butanol and methanol extracts of the aerial parts of Conyza Canadensis L. Cronquist were investigated for their antiviral activity against human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) AD-169 and Cox-B3 viruses by modification of the widely used shell-vial assay. The results showed that butanol and methanol ...

  7. Synergistic antiviral activity of gemcitabine and ribavirin against enteroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyunju; Kim, Chonsaeng; Kim, Dong-eun; Song, Jae-Hyoung; Choi, Miri; Choi, Kwangman; Kang, Mingu; Lee, Kyungjin; Kim, Hae Soo; Shin, Jin Soo; Kim, Janghwan; Han, Sang-Bae; Lee, Mi-Young; Lee, Su Ui; Lee, Chong-Kyo; Kim, Meehyein; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Cho, Sungchan

    2015-12-01

    Enteroviruses are major causative agents of various human diseases, and some of them are currently considered to be an enormous threat to public health. However, no effective therapy is currently available for the treatment of these infections. We identified gemcitabine, a nucleoside-analog drug used for cancer treatment, from a screen of bioactive chemicals as a novel inhibitor of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) and enterovirus 71 (EV71). Gemcitabine potently inhibited the proliferation of CVB3 and EV71, as well as the replication of CVB3 and EV71 replicons, in cells with a low micromolar IC50 (1-5 μM). Its strong inhibitory effect was also observed in cells infected with human rhinoviruses, demonstrating broad-spectrum antiviral effects on enteroviruses. Mechanistically, an extensive analysis excluded the involvement of 2C, 3A, IRES-dependent translation, and also that of polyprotein processing in the antiviral effects of gemcitabine. Importantly, gemcitabine in combination with ribavirin, an antiviral drug currently being used against a few RNA viruses, exhibited a synergistic antiviral effect on the replication of CVB3 and EV71 replicons. Consequently, our results clearly demonstrate a new indication for gemcitabine as an effective broad-spectrum inhibitor of enteroviruses and strongly suggest a new therapeutic strategy using gemcitabine alone or in combination with ribavirin for the treatment of various diseases associated with enterovirus infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. INVESTMENT IN ANTIVIRAL DRUGS : A REAL OPTIONS APPROACH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attema, Arthur E.; Lugner, Anna K.; Feenstra, Talitha L.

    2010-01-01

    Real options analysis is a promising approach to model investment under uncertainty. We employ this approach to value stockpiling of antiviral drugs as a precautionary measure against a possible influenza pandemic. Modifications of the real options approach to include risk attitude and deviations

  9. Liposomal Systems as Nanocarriers for the Antiviral Agent Ivermectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina Croci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA virus infections can lead to the onset of severe diseases such as fever with haemorrhage, multiorgan failure, and mortality. The emergence and reemergence of RNA viruses continue to pose a significant public health threat worldwide with particular attention to the increasing incidence of flaviviruses, among others Dengue, West Nile Virus, and Yellow Fever viruses. Development of new and potent antivirals is thus urgently needed. Ivermectin, an already known antihelminthic drug, has shown potent effects in vitro on Flavivirus helicase, with EC50 values in the subnanomolar range for Yellow Fever and submicromolar EC50 for Dengue Fever, Japanese encephalitis, and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. However ivermectin is hampered in its application by pharmacokinetic problems (little solubility and high cytotoxicity. To overcome such problems we engineered different compositions of liposomes as ivermectin carriers characterizing and testing them on several cell lines for cytotoxicity. The engineered liposomes were less cytotoxic than ivermectin alone and they showed a significant increase of the antiviral activity in all the Dengue stains tested (1, 2, and S221. In the current study ivermectin is confirmed to be an effective potential antiviral and liposomes, as drug carriers, are shown to modulate the drug activity. All together the results represent a promising starting point for future improvement of ivermectin as antiviral and its delivery.

  10. The Roles of Direct Recognition by Animal Lectins in Antiviral Immunity and Viral Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lectins are a group of proteins with carbohydrate recognition activity. Lectins are categorized into many families based on their different cellular locations as well as their specificities for a variety of carbohydrate structures due to the features of their carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD modules. Many studies have indicated that the direct recognition of particular oligosaccharides on viral components by lectins is important for interactions between hosts and viruses. Herein, we aim to globally review the roles of this recognition by animal lectins in antiviral immune responses and viral pathogenesis. The different classes of mammalian lectins can either recognize carbohydrates to activate host immunity for viral elimination or can exploit those carbohydrates as susceptibility factors to facilitate viral entry, replication or assembly. Additionally, some arthropod C-type lectins were recently identified as key susceptibility factors that directly interact with multiple viruses and then facilitate infection. Summarization of the pleiotropic roles of direct viral recognition by animal lectins will benefit our understanding of host-virus interactions and could provide insight into the role of lectins in antiviral drug and vaccine development.

  11. The evolution of animal Argonautes: evidence for the absence of antiviral AGO Argonautes in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynant, Niels; Santos, Dulce; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2017-08-23

    In addition to mediating regulation of endogenous gene expression, RNA interference (RNAi) in plants and invertebrates plays a crucial role in defense against viruses via virus-specific siRNAs. Different studies have demonstrated that the functional diversity of RNAi in animals is linked to the diversification of the Argonaute superfamily, central components of RISCs (RNA induced silencing complexes). The animal Argonaute superfamily is traditionally grouped into AGO and PIWI Argonautes. Yet, by performing phylogenetic analyses and determining the selective evolutionary pressure in the metazoan Argonaute superfamily, we provide evidence for the existence of three conserved Argonaute lineages between basal metazoans and protostomes, namely siRNA-class AGO, miRNA-class AGO and PIWI Argonautes. In addition, it shown that the siRNA-class AGO lineage is characterized by high rates of molecular evolution, suggesting a role in the arms race with viruses, while the miRNA-class AGOs display strong sequence conservation. Interestingly, we also demonstrate that vertebrates lack siRNA-class AGO proteins and that vertebrate AGOs display low rates of molecular evolution. In this way, we provide supportive evidence for the loss of the antiviral siRNA-class AGO group in vertebrates and discuss the consequence hereof on antiviral immunity and the use of RNAi as a loss of function tool in these animals.

  12. Functional evaluation of synthetic flavonoids and chalcones for potential antiviral and anticancer properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateeva, Nelly; Eyunni, Suresh V K; Redda, Kinfe K; Ononuju, Ucheze; Hansberry, Tony D; Aikens, Cecilia; Nag, Anita

    2017-06-01

    Flavonoids, stilbenes, and chalcones are plant secondary metabolites that often possess diverse biological activities including anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and anti-viral activities. The wide range of bioactivities poses a challenge to identify their targets. Here, we studied a set of synthetically generated flavonoids and chalcones to evaluate for their biological activity, and compared similarly substituted flavonoids and chalcones. Substituted chalcones, but not flavonoids, showed inhibition of viral translation without significantly affecting viral replication in cells infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). We suggest that the chalcones used in this study inhibit mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway by ablating phosphorylation of ribosomal protein 6 (rps6), and also the kinase necessary for phosphorylating rps6 in Huh7.5 cells (pS6K1). In addition, selected chalcones showed inhibition of growth in Ishikawa, MCF7, and MDA-MB-231 cells resulting an IC 50 of 1-6µg/mL. When similarly substituted flavonoids were used against the same set of cancer cells, we did not observe any inhibitory effect. Together, we report that chalcones show potential for anti-viral and anti-cancer activities compared to similarly substituted flavonoids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. DHX36 enhances RIG-I signaling by facilitating PKR-mediated antiviral stress granule formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Ji-Seung; Takahasi, Kiyohiro; Ng, Chen Seng; Ouda, Ryota; Onomoto, Koji; Yoneyama, Mitsutoshi; Lai, Janice Ching; Lattmann, Simon; Nagamine, Yoshikuni; Matsui, Tadashi; Iwabuchi, Kuniyoshi; Kato, Hiroki; Fujita, Takashi

    2014-03-01

    RIG-I is a DExD/H-box RNA helicase and functions as a critical cytoplasmic sensor for RNA viruses to initiate antiviral interferon (IFN) responses. Here we demonstrate that another DExD/H-box RNA helicase DHX36 is a key molecule for RIG-I signaling by regulating double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-dependent protein kinase (PKR) activation, which has been shown to be essential for the formation of antiviral stress granule (avSG). We found that DHX36 and PKR form a complex in a dsRNA-dependent manner. By forming this complex, DHX36 facilitates dsRNA binding and phosphorylation of PKR through its ATPase/helicase activity. Using DHX36 KO-inducible MEF cells, we demonstrated that DHX36 deficient cells showed defect in IFN production and higher susceptibility in RNA virus infection, indicating the physiological importance of this complex in host defense. In summary, we identify a novel function of DHX36 as a critical regulator of PKR-dependent avSG to facilitate viral RNA recognition by RIG-I-like receptor (RLR).

  14. TRBP and eIF6 homologue in Marsupenaeus japonicus play crucial roles in antiviral response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Wang

    Full Text Available Plants and invertebrates can suppress viral infection through RNA silencing, mediated by RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC. Trans-activation response RNA-binding protein (TRBP, consisting of three double-stranded RNA-binding domains, is a component of the RISC. In our previous paper, a TRBP homologue in Fenneropenaeus chinensis (Fc-TRBP was reported to directly bind to eukaryotic initiation factor 6 (Fc-eIF6. In this study, we further characterized the function of TRBP and the involvement of TRBP and eIF6 in antiviral RNA interference (RNAi pathway of shrimp. The double-stranded RNA binding domains (dsRBDs B and C of the TRBP from Marsupenaeus japonicus (Mj-TRBP were found to mediate the interaction of TRBP and eIF6. Gel-shift assays revealed that the N-terminal of Mj-TRBP dsRBD strongly binds to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA and that the homodimer of the TRBP mediated by the C-terminal dsRBD increases the affinity to dsRNA. RNAi against either Mj-TRBP or Mj-eIF6 impairs the dsRNA-induced sequence-specific RNAi pathway and facilitates the proliferation of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV. These results further proved the important roles of TRBP and eIF6 in the antiviral response of shrimp.

  15. DHX36 enhances RIG-I signaling by facilitating PKR-mediated antiviral stress granule formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Seung Yoo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available RIG-I is a DExD/H-box RNA helicase and functions as a critical cytoplasmic sensor for RNA viruses to initiate antiviral interferon (IFN responses. Here we demonstrate that another DExD/H-box RNA helicase DHX36 is a key molecule for RIG-I signaling by regulating double-stranded RNA (dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR activation, which has been shown to be essential for the formation of antiviral stress granule (avSG. We found that DHX36 and PKR form a complex in a dsRNA-dependent manner. By forming this complex, DHX36 facilitates dsRNA binding and phosphorylation of PKR through its ATPase/helicase activity. Using DHX36 KO-inducible MEF cells, we demonstrated that DHX36 deficient cells showed defect in IFN production and higher susceptibility in RNA virus infection, indicating the physiological importance of this complex in host defense. In summary, we identify a novel function of DHX36 as a critical regulator of PKR-dependent avSG to facilitate viral RNA recognition by RIG-I-like receptor (RLR.

  16. Antiviral Effects of Black Raspberry (Rubus coreanus) Seed and Its Gallic Acid against Influenza Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hye; Oh, Mi; Seok, Jong Hyeon; Kim, Sella; Lee, Dan Bi; Bae, Garam; Bae, Hae-In; Bae, Seon Young; Hong, Young-Min; Kwon, Sang-Oh; Lee, Dong-Hun; Song, Chang-Seon; Mun, Ji Young; Chung, Mi Sook; Kim, Kyung Hyun

    2016-06-06

    Influenza is a serious public health concern worldwide, as it causes significant morbidity and mortality. The emergence of drug-resistant viral strains requires new approaches for the treatment of influenza. In this study, Rubus coreanus seed (RCS) that is left over from the production of wine or juice was found to show antiviral activities against influenza type A and B viruses. Using the time-of-addition plaque assay, viral replication was almost completely abolished by simultaneous treatment with the RCS fraction of less than a 1-kDa molecular weight (RCSF1). One of the polyphenols derived from RCSF1, gallic acid (GA), identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, showed inhibitory effects against both influenza type A and B viruses, albeit at relatively high concentrations. RCSF1 was bound to hemagglutinin protein, inhibited hemagglutination significantly and disrupted viral particles, whereas GA was found to only disrupt the viral particles by using transmission electron microscopy. In BALB/c mice infected with influenza virus, oral administration of RCSF1 significantly improved the survival rate and reduced the viral titers in the lungs. Our results demonstrate that RCSF1 and GA show potent and broad antiviral activity against influenza A and B type viruses and are promising sources of agents that target virus particles.

  17. Antiviral effects of black raspberry (Rubus coreanus) seed extract and its polyphenolic compounds on norovirus surrogates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hye; Bae, Sun Young; Oh, Mi; Seok, Jong Hyeon; Kim, Sella; Chung, Yeon Bin; Gowda K, Giri; Mun, Ji Young; Chung, Mi Sook; Kim, Kyung Hyun

    2016-06-01

    Black raspberry seeds, a byproduct of wine and juice production, contain large quantities of polyphenolic compounds. The antiviral effects of black raspberry seed extract (RCS) and its fraction with molecular weight less than 1 kDa (RCS-F1) were examined against food-borne viral surrogates, murine norovirus-1 (MNV-1) and feline calicivirus-F9 (FCV-F9). The maximal antiviral effect was achieved when RCS or RCS-F1 was added simultaneously to cells with MNV-1 or FCV-F9, reaching complete inhibition at 0.1-1 mg/mL. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed enlarged viral capsids or disruption (from 35 nm to up to 100 nm) by RCS-F1. Our results thus suggest that RCS-F1 can interfere with the attachment of viral surface protein to host cells. Further, two polyphenolic compounds derived from RCS-F1, cyanidin-3-glucoside (C3G) and gallic acid, identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, showed inhibitory effects against the viruses. C3G was suggested to bind to MNV-1 RNA polymerase and to enlarge viral capsids using differential scanning fluorimetry and TEM, respectively.

  18. Antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis B: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2004-03-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a well-recognized risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which is becoming a more prevalent clinical problem, especially in HBV-endemic areas. It is estimated that 1.25 million people in the United States and more than 300 million people worldwide are chronically infected with HBV. Despite the introduction of universal vaccination against hepatitis B in over 100 countries, persistent HBV infection is still a serious problem worldwide, causing an estimated annual death rate of one million. It may take several decades until the effect of vaccination will be translated into reduced transmission and morbidity. Meanwhile, patients with persistent HBV infection require better antiviral therapeutic modalities than are currently available. It is well accepted that antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis B is effective to improve prognosis of patients with HBV by preventing development of hepatitis state and HCC. The therapeutic endpoints for hepatitis B treatment are: 1) sustained suppression of HBV replication, as indicated by HBsAg and HBeAg loss, 2) decrease of serum HBV DNA of an undetectable level by a non-PCR method, 3) remission of disease, as shown by normalization of ALT, 4) improvement in liver histology, and 5) reduction of the acute exacerbation, cirrhosis, and HCC. In the present, the antiviral treatment of hepatitis B consists of either interferon alpha or oral lamivudine alone or in combination with existing therapy. Each major antiviral drug of interferon alpha and lamivudine has pros and cons, and effect of combination therapy of both drugs is also still limited. More powerful and safe new antiviral therapies are required to achieve final goal of these therapeutic endpoints. Management of chronic hepatitis B requires significant knowledge of approved pharmacotherapeutic agents and their limitations. Therapeutic options for managing hepatitis infection after liver transplantation (LT

  19. Antiviral function of grouper MDA5 against iridovirus and nodavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Youhua; Yu, Yepin; Yang, Ying; Yang, Min; Zhou, Linli; Huang, Xiaohong; Qin, Qiwei

    2016-07-01

    Melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) is a critical member of retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptor (RLR) family which can recognize viral RNA and enhances antiviral response in host cells. In this study, a MDA5 homolog from orange spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) (EcMDA5) was cloned, and its roles on grouper virus infection were characterized. The full-length EcMDA5 cDNA encoded a polypeptide of 982 amino acids with 74% identity with MDA5 homolog from rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus). Amino acid alignment analysis indicated that EcMDA5 contained three functional domains: two caspase activation and recruitment domain (CARDs), a DEAD box helicase-like (DExDc) domain, a helicase superfamily C-terminal domain (HELICc), and a C-terminal regulatory domain (RD). Upon challenge with Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) or polyinosin-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), the transcript of EcMDA5 was significantly up-regulated especially at the early stage post-injection. Under fluorescence microscopy, we observed that EcMDA5 mostly localized in the cytoplasm of grouper spleen (GS) cells. Interestingly, during virus infection, the distribution pattern of EcMDA5 was significantly altered in SGIV infected cells, but not in red spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV) infected cells, suggested that EcMDA5 might interact with viral proteins during SGIV infection. The ectopic expression of EcMDA5 in vitro obviously delayed virus infection induced cytopathic effect (CPE) progression and significantly inhibited viral gene transcription of RGNNV and SGIV. Moreover, overexpression of EcMDA5 not only significantly increased interferon (IFN) and IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) promoter activities in a dose dependent manner, but also enhanced the expression of IRF3, IRF7 and TRAF6. In addition, the transcription level of the proinflammatory factors, including TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 were differently altered by EcMDA5 overexpression during SGIV or

  20. Overview on the antiviral activities and mechanisms of marine polysaccharides from seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qimin; Wang, Anjian; Lu, Zhonghua; Qin, Chunjun; Hu, Jing; Yin, Jian

    2017-12-01

    Marine polysaccharides are attracting increasing attention in medical and pharmaceutical development because of their important biological properties. The seaweed polysaccharides have now become a rich resource of potential antiviral drugs due to their antiviral activities against various viruses. The structural diversity and complexity of marine polysaccharides and their derivatives contribute to their antiviral activities in different phases of many different viral infection processes. This review mainly introduces the different types of seaweed polysaccharides and their derivatives with potent antiviral activities. Moreover, the antiviral mechanisms and medical applications of certain marine polysaccharides from seaweeds are also demonstrated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Inhibiting avian influenza virus shedding using a novel RNAi antiviral vector technology: proof of concept in an avian cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linke, Lyndsey M; Wilusz, Jeffrey; Pabilonia, Kristy L; Fruehauf, Johannes; Magnuson, Roberta; Olea-Popelka, Francisco; Triantis, Joni; Landolt, Gabriele; Salman, Mo

    2016-03-01

    Influenza A viruses pose significant health and economic threats to humans and animals. Outbreaks of avian influenza virus (AIV) are a liability to the poultry industry and increase the risk for transmission to humans. There are limitations to using the AIV vaccine in poultry, creating barriers to controlling outbreaks and a need for alternative effective control measures. Application of RNA interference (RNAi) techniques hold potential; however, the delivery of RNAi-mediating agents is a well-known obstacle to harnessing its clinical application. We introduce a novel antiviral approach using bacterial vectors that target avian mucosal epithelial cells and deliver (small interfering RNA) siRNAs against two AIV genes, nucleoprotein (NP) and polymerase acidic protein (PA). Using a red fluorescent reporter, we first demonstrated vector delivery and intracellular expression in avian epithelial cells. Subsequently, we demonstrated significant reductions in AIV shedding when applying these anti-AIV vectors prophylactically. These antiviral vectors provided up to a 10,000-fold reduction in viral titers shed, demonstrating in vitro proof-of-concept for using these novel anti-AIV vectors to inhibit AIV shedding. Our results indicate this siRNA vector technology could represent a scalable and clinically applicable antiviral technology for avian and human influenza and a prototype for RNAi-based vectors against other viruses.

  2. Development of Tetravalent, Bispecific CCR5 Antibodies with Antiviral Activity against CCR5 Monoclonal Antibody-Resistant HIV-1 Strains▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanzer, Jürgen; Jekle, Andreas; Nezu, Junichi; Lochner, Adriane; Croasdale, Rebecca; Dioszegi, Marianna; Zhang, Jun; Hoffmann, Eike; Dormeyer, Wilma; Stracke, Jan; Schäfer, Wolfgang; Ji, Changhua; Heilek, Gabrielle; Cammack, Nick; Brandt, Michael; Umana, Pablo; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we describe novel tetravalent, bispecific antibody derivatives that bind two different epitopes on the HIV coreceptor CCR5. The basic protein formats that we applied were derived from Morrison-type bispecific antibodies: whole IgGs to which we connected single-chain antibodies (scFvs) via (Gly4Ser)n sequences at either the C or N terminus of the light chain or heavy chain. By design optimization, including disulfide stabilization of scFvs or introduction of 30-amino-acid linkers, stable molecules could be obtained in amounts that were within the same range as or no less than 4-fold lower than those observed with monoclonal antibodies in transient expression assays. In contrast to monospecific CCR5 antibodies, bispecific antibody derivatives block two alternative docking sites of CCR5-tropic HIV strains on the CCR5 coreceptor. Consequently, these molecules showed 18- to 57-fold increased antiviral activities compared to the parent antibodies. Most importantly, one prototypic tetravalent CCR5 antibody had antiviral activity against virus strains resistant to the single parental antibodies. In summary, physical linkage of two CCR5 antibodies targeting different epitopes on the HIV coreceptor CCR5 resulted in tetravalent, bispecific antibodies with enhanced antiviral potency against wild-type and CCR5 antibody-resistant HIV-1 strains. PMID:21300827

  3. Evasion and subversion of interferon-mediated antiviral immunity by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathish, Narayanan; Yuan, Yan

    2011-11-01

    Viral invasion of a host cell triggers immune responses with both innate and adaptive components. The innate immune response involving the induction of type I interferons (alpha and beta interferons [IFN-α and -β]) constitutes the first line of antiviral defenses. The type I IFNs signal the transcription of a group of antiviral effector proteins, the IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), which target distinct viral components and distinct stages of the viral life cycle, aiming to eliminate invading viruses. In the case of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), a sudden upsurge of type I IFN-mediated innate antiviral signals is seen immediately following both primary de novo infection and viral lytic reactivation from latency. Potent subversion of these responses thus becomes mandatory for the successful establishment of a primary infection following viral entry as well as for efficient viral assembly and egress. This review gives a concise overview of the induction of the type I IFN signaling pathways in response to viral infection and provides a comprehensive understanding of the antagonizing effects exerted by KSHV on type I IFN pathways wielded at various stages of the viral life cycle. Information garnered from this review should result in a better understanding of KSHV biology essential for the development of immunotherapeutic strategies targeted toward KSHV-associated malignancies.

  4. Chicken MDA5 senses short double-stranded RNA with implications for antiviral response against avian influenza viruses in chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Chiaki; Suzuki, Yasushi; Tanikawa, Taichiro; Uchida, Yuko; Saito, Takehiko

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian melanoma differentiation-associated gene-5 (MDA5) and retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I) selectively sense double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) according to length, as well as various RNA viruses to induce an antiviral response. RIG-I, which plays a predominant role in the induction of antiviral responses against influenza virus infection, has been considered to be lacking in chicken, putting the function of chicken MDA5 (chMDA5) under the spotlight. Here, we show that chMDA5, unlike mammalian MDA5, preferentially senses shorter dsRNA synthetic analogues, poly(I:C), in chicken DF-1 fibroblasts. A requirement for caspase activation and recruitment domains for chMDA5-mediated chicken interferon beta (chIFNβ) induction and its interaction with mitochondrial antiviral signaling proteins were demonstrated. We also found that chMDA5 is involved in chIFNβ induction against avian influenza virus infection. Our findings imply that chMDA5 compensates in part the function of RIG-I in chicken, and highlights the importance of chMDA5 in the innate immune response in chicken. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Evasion and Subversion of Interferon-Mediated Antiviral Immunity by Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus: an Overview ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathish, Narayanan; Yuan, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Viral invasion of a host cell triggers immune responses with both innate and adaptive components. The innate immune response involving the induction of type I interferons (alpha and beta interferons [IFN-α and -β]) constitutes the first line of antiviral defenses. The type I IFNs signal the transcription of a group of antiviral effector proteins, the IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), which target distinct viral components and distinct stages of the viral life cycle, aiming to eliminate invading viruses. In the case of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), a sudden upsurge of type I IFN-mediated innate antiviral signals is seen immediately following both primary de novo infection and viral lytic reactivation from latency. Potent subversion of these responses thus becomes mandatory for the successful establishment of a primary infection following viral entry as well as for efficient viral assembly and egress. This review gives a concise overview of the induction of the type I IFN signaling pathways in response to viral infection and provides a comprehensive understanding of the antagonizing effects exerted by KSHV on type I IFN pathways wielded at various stages of the viral life cycle. Information garnered from this review should result in a better understanding of KSHV biology essential for the development of immunotherapeutic strategies targeted toward KSHV-associated malignancies. PMID:21775463

  6. Chronic rejection associated with antiviral therapy for recurrent hepatitis C after living-donor liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Yoshihide; Kaido, Toshimi; Ito, Takashi; Ogawa, Kohei; Yoshizawa, Atsushi; Fujimoto, Yasuhiro; Mori, Akira; Miyagawa-Hayashino, Aya; Haga, Hironori; Marusawa, Hiroyuki; Chiba, Tsutomu; Uemoto, Shinji

    2014-02-15

    Chronic rejection (CR) has been reported to be associated with antiviral therapy for recurrent hepatitis C in liver transplant (LT) recipients. The aims of this study were to clarify the details of antiviral therapy-associated CR after living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT) and to identify the factors associated with CR. A retrospective chart review was performed on 125 recipients who had received antiviral therapy for recurrent hepatitis C after LDLT between January 2001 and September 2012. The characteristics of patients who developed CR during or within 6 months after antiviral therapy were compared with those of 76 patients who did not develop CR despite receiving antiviral therapy for more than 1 year. Seven of 125 (6%) patients developed CR during or within 6 months after the end of antiviral therapy. CR was diagnosed after a median (range) of 9 (1-16) months of antiviral therapy. In five patients, rejection progressed rapidly and resulted in death within 3 months after diagnosis. Analysis revealed two significant factors associated with CR: reduction of the immunosuppressant dose during antiviral therapy and a low fibrosis score as the indication for antiviral therapy. CR developed in association with antiviral therapy for recurrent hepatitis C after LDLT. This complication may be prevented by ensuring that the immunosuppressant dose is not reduced during antiviral therapy.

  7. Insights into antiviral innate immunity revealed by studying hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Stacy M

    2015-08-01

    Experimental studies on the interactions of the positive strand RNA virus hepatitis C virus (HCV) with the host have contributed to several discoveries in the field of antiviral innate immunity. These include revealing the antiviral sensing pathways that lead to the induction of type I interferon (IFN) during HCV infection and also the importance of type III IFNs in the antiviral immune response to HCV. These studies on HCV/host interactions have contributed to our overall understanding of viral sensing and viral evasion of the antiviral intracellular innate immune response. In this review, I will highlight how these studies of HCV/host interactions have led to new insights into antiviral innate immunity. Overall, I hope to emphasize that studying antiviral immunity in the context of virus infection is necessary to fully understand antiviral immunity and how it controls the outcome of viral infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Lipid flippases promote antiviral silencing and the biogenesis of viral and host siRNAs in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhongxin; Lu, Jinfeng; Wang, Xianbing; Zhan, Binhui; Li, Wanxiang; Ding, Shou-Wei

    2017-02-07

    Dicer-mediated processing of virus-specific dsRNA into short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in plants and animals initiates a specific antiviral defense by RNA interference (RNAi). In this study, we developed a forward genetic screen for the identification of host factors required for antiviral RNAi in Arabidopsis thaliana Using whole-genome sequencing and a computational pipeline, we identified aminophospholipid transporting ATPase 2 (ALA2) and the related ALA1 in the type IV subfamily of P-type ATPases as key components of antiviral RNAi. ALA1 and ALA2 are flippases, which are transmembrane lipid transporter proteins that transport phospholipids across cellular membranes. We found that the ala1/ala2 single- and double-mutant plants exhibited enhanced disease susceptibility to cucumber mosaic virus when the virus-encoded function to suppress RNAi was disrupted. Notably, the antiviral activity of both ALA1 and ALA2 was abolished by a single amino acid substitution known to inactivate the flippase activity. Genetic analysis revealed that ALA1 and ALA2 acted to enhance the amplification of the viral siRNAs by RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) 1 (RDR1) and RDR6 and of the endogenous virus-activated siRNAs by RDR1. RNA virus replication by plant viral RdRPs occurs inside vesicle-like membrane invaginations induced by the recruitment of the viral RdRP and host factors to subcellular membrane microdomains enriched with specific phospholipids. Our results suggest that the phospholipid transporter activity of ALA1/ALA2 may be necessary for the formation of similar invaginations for the synthesis of dsRNA precursors of highly abundant viral and host siRNAs by the cellular RdRPs.

  9. Antiviral properties of extract of Opuntia streptacantha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, A; Davies, J; Randall, S; Skinner, G R

    1996-05-01

    An extract of the cactus plant Opuntia streptacantha inhibited intracellular virus replication and inactivated extracellular virus. Inhibition of virus replication also occurred following pre-infection treatment--a favourable finding in terms of in-vivo limitation of virus disease. There was inhibition of both DNA and RNA virus replication, for example, herpes simplex virus, equine herpes virus, pseudorabies virus, influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus and human immunodeficiency virus, with normal protein synthesis in uninfected cells at extract concentrations which were 15-fold in excess of 50% viral inhibitory concentrations (1 mg/ml). The active inhibitory component(s) of the extract appeared to be protein in nature and resided mainly in the wall of the plant rather than in the cuticle or inner sap. The extract was non-toxic on oral administration to mice, horses and human patients; the non-toxicity of intravenous administration of 70 mg to a mouse representing at least fifty tissue culture 50% viral inhibitory dosages encourages clinical trial of this extract in virus disease of human and veterinary species.

  10. Virus-encoded chemokine receptors--putative novel antiviral drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2005-01-01

    as such a paramount role in the antiviral immune responses. It is therefore not surprising that viruses have found ways to exploit and subvert the chemokine system by means of molecular mimicry. By ancient acts of molecular piracy and by induction and suppression of endogenous genes, viruses have utilized chemokines...... and their receptors to serve a variety of roles in viral life-cycle. This review focuses on the pharmacology of virus-encoded chemokine receptors, yet also the family of virus-encoded chemokines and chemokine-binding proteins will be touched upon. Key properties of the virus-encoded receptors, compared...... to their closest endogenous homologs, are interactions with a wider range of chemokines, which can act as agonists, antagonists and inverse agonists, and the exploitation of many signal transduction pathways. High constitutive activity is another key property of some--but not all--of these receptors. The chemokine...

  11. Regulation and evasion of antiviral immune responses by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen; Zhang, Qiong; Feng, Wen-hai

    2015-04-16

    Virus infection of mammalian cells triggers host innate immune responses to restrict viral replication and induces adaptive immunity for viral elimination. In order to survive and propagate, viruses have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to subvert host defense system by encoding proteins that target key components of the immune signaling pathways. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), a RNA virus, impairs several processes of host immune responses including interfering with interferon production and signaling, modulating cytokine expression, manipulating apoptotic responses and regulating adaptive immunity. In this review, we highlight the molecular mechanisms of how PRRSV interferes with the different steps of initial antiviral host responses to establish persistent infection in pigs. Dissection of the PRRSV-host interaction is the key in understanding PRRSV pathogenesis and will provide a basis for the rational design of vaccines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. MAVS protein is attenuated by rotavirus nonstructural protein 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satabdi Nandi

    Full Text Available Rotavirus is the single, most important agent of infantile gastroenteritis in many animal species, including humans. In developing countries, rotavirus infection attributes approximately 500,000 deaths annually. Like other viruses it establishes an intimate and complex interaction with the host cell to counteract the antiviral responses elicited by the cell. Among various pattern recognition receptors (PAMPs of the host, the cytosolic RNA helicases interact with viral RNA to activate the Mitochondrial Antiviral Signaling protein (MAVS, which regulates cellular interferon response. With an aim to identify the role of different PAMPs in rotavirus infected cell, MAVS was found to degrade in a time dependent and strain independent manner. Rotavirus non-structural protein 1 (NSP1 which is a known IFN antagonist, interacted with MAVS and degraded it in a strain independent manner, resulting in a complete loss of RNA sensing machinery in the infected cell. To best of our knowledge, this is the first report on NSP1 functionality where a signaling protein is targeted unanimously in all strains. In addition NSP1 inhibited the formation of detergent resistant MAVS aggregates, thereby averting the antiviral signaling cascade. The present study highlights the multifunctional role of rotavirus NSP1 and reinforces the fact that the virus orchestrates the cellular antiviral response to its own benefit by various back up strategies.

  13. Novel drugs targeting Toll-like receptors for antiviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mira C; Shirey, Kari Ann; Pletneva, Lioubov M; Boukhvalova, Marina S; Garzino-Demo, Alfredo; Vogel, Stefanie N; Blanco, Jorge Cg

    2014-09-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are sentinel receptors of the host innate immune system that recognize conserved 'pathogen-associated molecular patterns' of invading microbes, including viruses. The activation of TLRs establishes antiviral innate immune responses and coordinates the development of long-lasting adaptive immunity in order to control viral pathogenesis. However, microbe-induced damage to host tissues may release 'danger-associated molecular patterns' that also activate TLRs, leading to an overexuberant inflammatory response and, ultimately, to tissue damage. Thus, TLRs have proven to be promising targets as therapeutics for the treatment of viral infections that result in inflammatory damage or as adjuvants in order to enhance the efficacy of vaccines. Here, we explore recent advances in TLR biology with a focus on novel drugs that target TLRs (agonists and antagonists) for antiviral therapy.

  14. The role of CC chemokine receptor 5 in antiviral immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nansen, Anneline; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Andreasen, Susanne Ørding

    2002-01-01

    response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in mice lacking CCR5 (CCR5(-/-) mice). This infection is a classical model for studying antiviral immunity, and influx of CCR5-expressing CD8(+) T cells and macrophages is essential for both virus control and associated immunopathology. Results showed......The CC chemokine receptor CCR5 is an important coreceptor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and there is a major thrust to develop anti-CCR5-based therapies for HIV-1. However, it is not known whether CCR5 is critical for a normal antiviral T-cell response. This study investigated the immune...... influence of CCR5 was found, not even when viral peptide was used as local trigger instead of live virus. Finally, long-term CD8(+) T cell-mediated immune surveillance was efficiently sustained in CCR5(-/-) mice. Taken together, these results indicate that expression of CCR5 is not critical for T cell...

  15. Direct versus sequential immunoglobulin switch in allergy and antiviral responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svirshchevskaya, E; Fattakhova, G; Khlgatian, S; Chudakov, D; Kashirina, E; Ryazantsev, D; Kotsareva, O; Zavriev, S

    2016-09-01

    Allergy is characterized by IgE production to innocuous antigens. The question whether the switch to IgE synthesis occurs via direct or sequential pathways is still unresolved. The aim of this work was to analyze the distribution of immunoglobulins (Ig) to house dust mite D. farinae and A. alternata fungus in allergic children with primarily established diagnosis and compare it to Epstein-Barr antiviral (EBV) response in the same patients. In allergy patients the only significant difference was found in allergen specific IgE, likely mediated by a direct isotype switch, while antiviral response was dominated by EBV specific IgG and low level of concordant IgA and IgG4 production consistent with a minor sequential Ig switches. Taken collectively, we concluded that sequential isotype switch is likely to be a much rarer event than a direct one. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Historical Perspectives in the Development of Antiviral Agents Against Poxviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik De Clercq

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The poxvirus vaccinia virus (VV served as the model virus for which the first antivirals, the thiosemicarbazones, were identified. This dates back to 1950; and, although there is at present no single antiviral drug specifically licensed for the chemotherapy or -prophylaxis of poxvirus infections, numerous candidate compounds have been described over the past 50 years. These compounds include interferon and inducers thereof (i.e., polyacrylic acid, 5-substituted 2’-deoxyuridines (i.e., idoxuridine, IMP dehydrogenase inhibitors, S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitors, acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (such as cidofovir and alkoxyalkyl prodrugs thereof (such as CMX001, viral egress inhibitors (such as tecovirimat, and cellular kinase inhibitors (such as imatinib.

  17. Senataxin suppresses the antiviral transcriptional response and controls viral biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew S; Rialdi, Alexander; Ho, Jessica Sook Yuin; Tilove, Micah; Martinez-Gil, Luis; Moshkina, Natasha P; Peralta, Zuleyma; Noel, Justine; Melegari, Camilla; Maestre, Ana M; Mitsopoulos, Panagiotis; Madrenas, Joaquín; Heinz, Sven; Benner, Chris; Young, John A T; Feagins, Alicia R; Basler, Christopher F; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Becherel, Olivier J; Lavin, Martin F; van Bakel, Harm; Marazzi, Ivan

    2015-05-01

    The human helicase senataxin (SETX) has been linked to the neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS4) and ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2). Here we identified a role for SETX in controlling the antiviral response. Cells that had undergone depletion of SETX and SETX-deficient cells derived from patients with AOA2 had higher expression of antiviral mediators in response to infection than did wild-type cells. Mechanistically, we propose a model whereby SETX attenuates the activity of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) at genes stimulated after a virus is sensed and thus controls the magnitude of the host response to pathogens and the biogenesis of various RNA viruses (e.g., influenza A virus and West Nile virus). Our data indicate a potentially causal link among inborn errors in SETX, susceptibility to infection and the development of neurologic disorders.

  18. Genetic Consequences of Antiviral Therapy on HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Arenas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A variety of enzyme inhibitors have been developed in combating HIV-1, however the fast evolutionary rate of this virus commonly leads to the emergence of resistance mutations that finally allows the mutant virus to survive. This review explores the main genetic consequences of HIV-1 molecular evolution during antiviral therapies, including the viral genetic diversity and molecular adaptation. The role of recombination in the generation of drug resistance is also analyzed. Besides the investigation and discussion of published works, an evolutionary analysis of protease-coding genes collected from patients before and after treatment with different protease inhibitors was included to validate previous studies. Finally, the review discusses the importance of considering genetic consequences of antiviral therapies in models of HIV-1 evolution that could improve current genotypic resistance testing and treatments design.

  19. Antiviral strategies for emerging influenza viruses in remote communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Laskowski

    Full Text Available Due to the lack of timely access to resources for critical care, strategic use of antiviral drugs is crucial for mitigating the impact of novel influenza viruses with pandemic potential in remote and isolated communities. We sought to evaluate the effect of antiviral treatment and prophylaxis of close contacts in a Canadian remote northern community.We used an agent-based, discrete-time simulation model for disease spread in a remote community, which was developed as an in-silico population using population census data. Relative and cumulative age-specific attack rates, and the total number of infections in simulated model scenarios were obtained.We found that early initiation of antiviral treatment is more critical for lowering attack rates in a remote setting with a low population-average age compared to an urban population. Our results show that a significant reduction in the relative, age-specific attack rates due to increasing treatment coverage does not necessarily translate to a significant reduction in the overall arrack rate. When treatment coverage varies from low to moderate, targeted prophylaxis has a very limited impact in reducing attack rates and should be offered at a low level (below 10% to avoid excessive waste of drugs.In contrast to previous work, for conservative treatment coverages, our results do not provide any convincing evidence for the implementation of targeted prophylaxis. The findings suggest that public health strategies in remote communities should focus on the wider availability (higher coverage and timely distribution of antiviral drugs for treatment of clinically ill individuals.

  20. Antiviral effects of bovine interferons on bovine respiratory tract viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Fulton, R W; Downing, M M; Cummins, J M

    1984-01-01

    The antiviral effects of bovine interferons on the replication of bovine respiratory tract viruses were studied. Bovine turbinate monolayer cultures were treated with bovine interferons and challenged with several bovine herpesvirus 1 strains, bovine viral diarrhea virus, parainfluenza type 3 virus, goat respiratory syncytial virus, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine adenovirus type 7, or vesicular stomatitis virus. Treatment with bovine interferons reduced viral yield for each of the...

  1. Recent developments in antiviral agents against enterovirus 71 infection

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Chee Wah; Lai, Jeffrey Kam Fatt; Sam, I-Ching; Chan, Yoke Fun

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV-71) is the main etiological agent of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Recent EV-71 outbreaks in Asia-Pacific were not limited to mild HFMD, but were associated with severe neurological complications such as aseptic meningitis and brainstem encephalitis, which may lead to cardiopulmonary failure and death. The absence of licensed therapeutics for clinical use has intensified research into anti-EV-71 development. This review highlights the potential antiviral agents targe...

  2. Antiviral and Inflammatory Cellular Signaling Associated with Enterovirus 71 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuefei Jin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 infection has become a major threat to global public health, especially in infants and young children. Epidemiological studies have indicated that EV71 infection is responsible for severe and even fatal cases of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD. Accumulated evidence indicates that EV71 infection triggers a plethora of interactive signaling pathways, resulting in host immune evasion and inflammatory response. This review mainly covers the effects of EV71 infection on major antiviral and inflammatory cellular signal pathways. EV71 can activate cellular signaling networks including multiple cell surface and intracellular receptors, intracellular kinases, calcium flux, and transcription factors that regulate antiviral innate immunity and inflammatory response. Cellular signaling plays a critical role in the regulation of host innate immune and inflammatory pathogenesis. Elucidation of antiviral and inflammatory cellular signaling pathways initiated by EV71 will not only help uncover the potential mechanisms of EV71 infection-induced pathogenesis, but will also provide clues for the design of therapeutic strategies against EV71 infection.

  3. Anti-viral RNA silencing: do we look like plants ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lecellier Charles-Henri

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The anti-viral function of RNA silencing was first discovered in plants as a natural manifestation of the artificial 'co-suppression', which refers to the extinction of endogenous gene induced by homologous transgene. Because silencing components are conserved among most, if not all, eukaryotes, the question rapidly arose as to determine whether this process fulfils anti-viral functions in animals, such as insects and mammals. It appears that, whereas the anti-viral process seems to be similarly conserved from plants to insects, even in worms, RNA silencing does influence the replication of mammalian viruses but in a particular mode: micro(miRNAs, endogenous small RNAs naturally implicated in translational control, rather than virus-derived small interfering (siRNAs like in other organisms, are involved. In fact, these recent studies even suggest that RNA silencing may be beneficial for viral replication. Accordingly, several large DNA mammalian viruses have been shown to encode their own miRNAs. Here, we summarize the seminal studies that have implicated RNA silencing in viral infection and compare the different eukaryotic responses.

  4. Potent antiviral flavone glycosides from Ficus benjamina leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmolinsky, Ludmila; Huleihel, Mahmoud; Zaccai, Michele; Ben-Shabat, Shimon

    2012-03-01

    Crude ethanol extracts from Ficus benjamina leaves strongly inhibit Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and 2 (HSV-1/2) as well as Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV) cell infection in vitro. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the crude extract demonstrated that the most efficient inhibition of HSV-1 and HSV-2 was obtained with the flavonoid fraction. The present study was aimed to further isolate, purify and identify substances with potent antiviral activity from the flavonoid fraction of F. benjamina extracts. Flavonoids were collected from the leaf ethanol extracts through repeated purification procedure and HPLC analysis. The antiviral activity of each substance was then evaluated in cell culture. Three known flavone glycosides, (1) quercetin 3-O-rutinoside, (2) kaempferol 3-O-rutinoside and (3) kaempferol 3-O-robinobioside, showing highest antiviral efficiency were selected and their structure was determined by spectroscopic analyses including NMR and mass spectrometry (MS). These three flavones were highly effective against HSV-1 reaching a selectivity index (SI) of 266, 100 and 666 for compound 1, 2 and 3, respectively, while the SI of their aglycons, quercetin and kaempferol amounted only in 7.1 and 3.2, respectively. Kaempferol 3-O-robinobioside showed similar SI to that of acyclovir (ACV), the standard anti-HSV drug. Although highly effective against HSV-1 and HSV-2, these flavone glycosides did not show any significant activity against VZV. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of Antiviral Activity ofZanthoxylumSpecies Against Picornaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hwa-Jung

    2016-12-01

    Human rhinoviruses and enteroviruses (family Picornaviridae) infect millions of people worldwide each year, but little is known about effective therapeutical treatment for the infection caused by these viruses. We sought to determine whether or not Zanthoxylum (Rutaceae) species can exhibit antiviral activity against picornaviruses. The leaf parts of four Zanthoxylum species were extracted with methanol, and the extracts were investigated for their antiviral activity against picornaviruses using cytopathic effects by cytopathic effect reduction. Leaf extracts of Zanthoxylum piperitum among four Zanthoxylum species were found to possess only broad-spectrum antipicornavirus activity against human rhninovirus 2 with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) value of 59.48 μg/mL, human rhinovirus 3 with an IC 50 value of 39.94 μg/mL, coxsackie A16 virus with an IC 50 value of 45.80 μg/mL, coxsackie B3 virus with an IC 50 value of 68.53 μg/mL, coxsackie B4 virus with an IC 50 value of 93.58 μg/mL, and enterovirus 71 virus with an IC 50 value of 4.48 μg/mL. However, ribavirin did not possess antiviral activity against human rhinovirus 3 and four enteroviruses. Therefore, leaves of Z. piperitum showed broad-spectrum antipicornavirus activity, and may be useful as a candidate for studying picornavirus agents and development of pharmaceuticals.

  6. MicroRNA-555 has potent antiviral properties against poliovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Byoung-Shik; Wu, Weilin; Kyriakis, Constantinos S; Bakre, Abhijeet; Jorquera, Patricia A; Perwitasari, Olivia; Tripp, Ralph A

    2016-03-01

    Vaccination with live-attenuated polio vaccine has been the primary reason for the drastic reduction of poliomyelitis worldwide. However, reversion of this attenuated poliovirus vaccine occasionally results in the emergence of vaccine-derived polioviruses that may cause poliomyelitis. Thus, the development of anti-poliovirus agents remains a priority for control and eradication of the disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to regulate viral infection through targeting the viral genome or reducing host factors required for virus replication. However, the roles of miRNAs in poliovirus (PV) replication have not been fully elucidated. In this study, a library of 1200 miRNA mimics was used to identify miRNAs that govern PV replication. High-throughput screening revealed 29 miRNAs with antiviral properties against Sabin-2, which is one of the oral polio vaccine strains. In particular, miR-555 was found to have the most potent antiviral activity against three different oral polio attenuated vaccine strains tested. The results show that miR-555 reduced the level of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 (hnRNP C) required for PV replication in the infected cells, which in turn resulted in reduction of PV positive-strand RNA synthesis and production of infectious progeny. These findings provide the first evidence for the role of miR-555 in PV replication and reveal that miR-555 could contribute to the development of antiviral therapeutic strategies against PV.

  7. Recent patents on antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral properties of tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiannakopoulou, Eugenia Ch

    2012-04-01

    Teas have beneficial effects on human health including cardioprotective, anticarcinogenic, antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal activity. The precise antimicrobial spectrum of tea is difficult to be defined due to variation in the methods of testing that have been used. Antibacterial effects of tea have been demonstrated against a number of microorganisms including Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio cholerae, Escherichia coli, Shigella spp., Salmonella spp., Bacillus spp., Klebsiella spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Teas and tea ingredients seem to have both bactericidal and bacteriostatic actions. In addition, tea catechins have been shown to modify the antibiotic sensitivity of bacteria and to alter the expression of factors that determine bacterial virulence. Antiviral effects of green tea have been demonstrated against the influenza virus, as well as against the Herpes simplex virus, tobacco mosaic virus, enterovirus, rotavirus, Epstein Barr virus, HIV virus. Yet, green tea catechins have been shown to have antiviral activities against HIV infection. Antifungal effects of tea have been reported against Candida albicans, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, and Trichophyton rubrum. The present paper describes recent patents on antimicrobial effect of teas and tea ingredients.

  8. Efficacy of Antiviral Drugs against Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Katrin; Wooding, Anita; Bergmann, Michèle

    2015-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is one of the most common infectious agents affecting cats worldwide .FIV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) share many properties: both are lifelong persistent lentiviruses that are similar genetically and morphologically and both viruses propagate in T-lymphocytes, macrophages, and neural cells. Experimentally infected cats have measurable immune suppression, which sometimes progresses to an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. A transient initial state of infection is followed by a long latent stage with low virus replication and absence of clinical signs. In the terminal stage, both viruses can cause severe immunosuppression. Thus, FIV infection in cats has become an important natural model for studying HIV infection in humans, especially for evaluation of antiviral compounds. Of particular importance for chemotherapeutic studies is the close similarity between the reverse transcriptase (RT) of FIV and HIV, which results in high in vitro susceptibility of FIV to many RT-targeted antiviral compounds used in the treatment of HIV-infected patients. Thus, the aim of this article is to provide an up-to-date review of studies on antiviral treatment of FIV, focusing on commercially available compounds for human or animal use. PMID:29061953

  9. Efficacy of Antiviral Drugs against Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Hartmann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV is one of the most common infectious agents affecting cats worldwide .FIV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV share many properties: both are lifelong persistent lentiviruses that are similar genetically and morphologically and both viruses propagate in T-lymphocytes, macrophages, and neural cells. Experimentally infected cats have measurable immune suppression, which sometimes progresses to an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. A transient initial state of infection is followed by a long latent stage with low virus replication and absence of clinical signs. In the terminal stage, both viruses can cause severe immunosuppression. Thus, FIV infection in cats has become an important natural model for studying HIV infection in humans, especially for evaluation of antiviral compounds. Of particular importance for chemotherapeutic studies is the close similarity between the reverse transcriptase (RT of FIV and HIV, which results in high in vitro susceptibility of FIV to many RT-targeted antiviral compounds used in the treatment of HIV-infected patients. Thus, the aim of this article is to provide an up-to-date review of studies on antiviral treatment of FIV, focusing on commercially available compounds for human or animal use.

  10. Antiviral and antimicrobial activities of Colombian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, A; Hudson, J B; Towers, G H

    2001-10-01

    Strong antiviral and antimicrobial activities were detected in methanolic extracts of 24 plants used medicinally in the treatment of skin infections in four different regions of Colombia. Thirteen extracts displayed activity against herpes simplex virus (HSV) whereas none was active against poliovirus. The antiviral activity was indicated by a total inhibition of viral cytopathic effects (CPE) at a non-cytotoxic concentration of the extract. The most potent extract was obtained from Byrsonima verbascifolia (L.) HBK. which showed anti-HSV activity at a concentration as low as 2.5 microg/ml. Antimicrobial screening was conducted using the disc diffusion assay against Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus faecalis, Mycobacterium phlei, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium and the human pathogenic yeast, Candida albicans. Anti-Candida activity was observed for Piper lanceaefolium HBK. and Juglans neotropica Diels. Twenty-two extracts displayed activity against Gram-positive bacteria whereas none was active against the Gram-negative species. We concluded that these Colombian medicinal plants represent an untapped source of potentially useful antivirals and are worthy of further study.

  11. Antiviral Defense and Innate Immune Memory in the Oyster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck, Peter

    2018-01-01

    The Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, is becoming a valuable model for investigating antiviral defense in the Lophotrochozoa superphylum. In the past five years, improvements to laboratory-based experimental infection protocols using Ostreid herpesvirus I (OsHV-1) from naturally infected C. gigas combined with next-generation sequencing techniques has revealed that oysters have a complex antiviral response involving the activation of all major innate immune pathways. Experimental evidence indicates C. gigas utilizes an interferon-like response to limit OsHV-1 replication and spread. Oysters injected with a viral mimic (polyI:C) develop resistance to OsHV-1. Improved survival following polyI:C injection was found later in life (within-generational immune priming) and in the next generation (multi-generational immune priming). These studies indicate that the oyster’s antiviral defense system exhibits a form of innate immune-memory. An important priority is to identify the molecular mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon. This knowledge will motivate the development of practical and cost-effective treatments for improving oyster health in aquaculture. PMID:29547519

  12. Role of nonstructural protein NS2A in flavivirus assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leung, J.Y.; Pijlman, G.P.; Kondratieva, N.; Hyde, J.; Mackenzie, J.M.; Khromykh, A.A.

    2008-01-01

    Flavivirus nonstructural (NS) proteins are involved in RNA replication and modulation of the host antiviral response; however, evidence is mounting that some NS proteins also have essential roles in virus assembly. Kunjin virus (KUN) NS2A is a small, hydrophobic, transmembrane protein that is part

  13. Antiviral effects of two Ganoderma lucidum triterpenoids against enterovirus 71 infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Tao, Junyan; Yang, Xiaoping [State Key Laboratory of Virology and College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yang, Zhuliang [Key Laboratory of Biodiversity and Biogeography, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Science, Kunming 650201 (China); Zhang, Li; Liu, Hongsheng [Department of Academy of Sciences, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Wu, Kailang [State Key Laboratory of Virology and College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Wu, Jianguo, E-mail: jwu@whu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Virology and College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2014-07-04

    Highlights: • Triterpenoids GLTA and GLTB display anti-EV71 activities without cytotoxicity. • The compounds prevent EV71 infection by blocking adsorption of the virus to the cells. • GLTA and GLTB bind to EV71 capsid at the hydrophobic pocket to block EV71 uncoating. • The two compounds significantly inhibit the replication of EV71 viral RNA. • GLTA and GLTB may be used as potential therapeutic agents to treat EV71 infection. - Abstract: Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major causative agent for hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), and fatal neurological and systemic complications in children. However, there is currently no clinical approved antiviral drug available for the prevention and treatment of the viral infection. Here, we evaluated the antiviral activities of two Ganoderma lucidum triterpenoids (GLTs), Lanosta-7,9(11),24-trien-3-one,15;26-dihydroxy (GLTA) and Ganoderic acid Y (GLTB), against EV71 infection. The results showed that the two natural compounds display significant anti-EV71 activities without cytotoxicity in human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells as evaluated by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell proliferation assay. The mechanisms by which the two compounds affect EV71 infection were further elucidated by three action modes using Ribavirin, a common antiviral drug, as a positive control. The results suggested that GLTA and GLTB prevent EV71 infection through interacting with the viral particle to block the adsorption of virus to the cells. In addition, the interactions between EV71 virion and the compounds were predicated by computer molecular docking, which illustrated that GLTA and GLTB may bind to the viral capsid protein at a hydrophobic pocket (F site), and thus may block uncoating of EV71. Moreover, we demonstrated that GLTA and GLTB significantly inhibit the replication of the viral RNA (vRNA) of EV71 replication through blocking EV71 uncoating. Thus, GLTA and GLTB may represent two potential

  14. Antiviral effects of two Ganoderma lucidum triterpenoids against enterovirus 71 infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Tao, Junyan; Yang, Xiaoping; Yang, Zhuliang; Zhang, Li; Liu, Hongsheng; Wu, Kailang; Wu, Jianguo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Triterpenoids GLTA and GLTB display anti-EV71 activities without cytotoxicity. • The compounds prevent EV71 infection by blocking adsorption of the virus to the cells. • GLTA and GLTB bind to EV71 capsid at the hydrophobic pocket to block EV71 uncoating. • The two compounds significantly inhibit the replication of EV71 viral RNA. • GLTA and GLTB may be used as potential therapeutic agents to treat EV71 infection. - Abstract: Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major causative agent for hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), and fatal neurological and systemic complications in children. However, there is currently no clinical approved antiviral drug available for the prevention and treatment of the viral infection. Here, we evaluated the antiviral activities of two Ganoderma lucidum triterpenoids (GLTs), Lanosta-7,9(11),24-trien-3-one,15;26-dihydroxy (GLTA) and Ganoderic acid Y (GLTB), against EV71 infection. The results showed that the two natural compounds display significant anti-EV71 activities without cytotoxicity in human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells as evaluated by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell proliferation assay. The mechanisms by which the two compounds affect EV71 infection were further elucidated by three action modes using Ribavirin, a common antiviral drug, as a positive control. The results suggested that GLTA and GLTB prevent EV71 infection through interacting with the viral particle to block the adsorption of virus to the cells. In addition, the interactions between EV71 virion and the compounds were predicated by computer molecular docking, which illustrated that GLTA and GLTB may bind to the viral capsid protein at a hydrophobic pocket (F site), and thus may block uncoating of EV71. Moreover, we demonstrated that GLTA and GLTB significantly inhibit the replication of the viral RNA (vRNA) of EV71 replication through blocking EV71 uncoating. Thus, GLTA and GLTB may represent two potential

  15. Advanced Development of Antiviral Prophylactics and Therapeutics (ADAPT) - Research Area 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-17

    designing lead series analogs to optimize antiviral activity, Prosetta has initiated design of analogs based on the structural properties believed or...1-Mar-2011 - 31-May-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Final Rep01i: Advanced Development of Antiviral Prophylactics and Therapeutics...Number of Papers published in non peer-reviewed journals: Final Report: Advanced Development of Antiviral Prophylactics and Therapeutics (ADAPT

  16. Mx Is Not Responsible for the Antiviral Activity of Interferon-α against Japanese Encephalitis Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mx proteins are interferon (IFN-induced dynamin-like GTPases that are present in all vertebrates and inhibit the replication of myriad viruses. However, the role Mx proteins play in IFN-mediated suppression of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV infection is unknown. In this study, we set out to investigate the effects of Mx1 and Mx2 expression on the interferon-α (IFNα restriction of JEV replication. To evaluate whether the inhibitory activity of IFNα on JEV is dependent on Mx1 or Mx2, we knocked down Mx1 or Mx2 with siRNA in IFNα-treated PK-15 cells and BHK-21 cells, then challenged them with JEV; the production of progeny virus was assessed by plaque assay, RT-qPCR, and Western blotting. Our results demonstrated that depletion of Mx1 or Mx2 did not affect JEV restriction imposed by IFNα, although these two proteins were knocked down 66% and 79%, respectively. Accordingly, expression of exogenous Mx1 or Mx2 did not change the inhibitory activity of IFNα to JEV. In addition, even though virus-induced membranes were damaged by Brefeldin A (BFA, overexpressing porcine Mx1 or Mx2 did not inhibit JEV proliferation. We found that BFA inhibited JEV replication, not maturation, suggesting that BFA could be developed into a novel antiviral reagent. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that IFNα inhibits JEV infection by Mx-independent pathways.

  17. Accessory factors of cytoplasmic viral RNA sensors required for antiviral innate immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki eOshiumi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Type I interferon (IFN induces many antiviral factors in host cells. RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs are cytoplasmic viral RNA sensors that trigger the signal to induce the innate immune response that includes type I IFN production. RIG-I and MDA5 are RLRs that form nucleoprotein filaments along viral double-stranded RNA, resulting in the activation of MAVS adaptor molecule. The MAVS protein forms a prion-like aggregation structure, leading to type I IFN production. RIG-I and MDA5 undergo post-translational modification. TRIM25 and Riplet ubiquitin ligases deliver a K63-linked polyubiquitin moiety to the RIG-I N-terminal caspase activation and recruitment domains (CARDs and C-terminal region; the polyubiquitin chain then stabilizes the two-CARD tetramer structure required for MAVS assembly. MDA5 activation is regulated by phosphorylation. RIOK3 is a protein kinase that phosphorylates the MDA5 protein in a steady state, and PP1α/γ dephosphorylate this protein, resulting in its activation. RIG-I and MDA5 require cytoplasmic RNA helicases for their efficient activation. LGP2, another RLR, is an RNA helicase involved in RLR signaling. This protein does not possess N-terminal CARDs and thus cannot trigger downstream signaling by itself. Recent studies have revealed that this protein modulates MDA5 filament formation, resulting in enhanced type I IFN production. Several other cytoplasmic RNA helicases are involved in RLR signaling. DDX3, DHX29, DHX36, and DDX60 RNA helicases have been reported to be involved in RLR-mediated type I IFN production after viral infection. However, the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. Future studies are required to reveal the role of RNA helicases in the RLR signaling pathway.

  18. Novel treatment with neuroprotective and antiviral properties against a neuroinvasive human respiratory virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brison, Elodie; Jacomy, Hélène; Desforges, Marc; Talbot, Pierre J

    2014-02-01

    Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) are recognized respiratory pathogens with neuroinvasive and neurotropic properties in mice and humans. HCoV strain OC43 (HCoV-OC43) can infect and persist in human neural cells and activate neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative mechanisms, suggesting that it could be involved in neurological disease of unknown etiology in humans. Moreover, we have shown that HCoV-OC43 is neurovirulent in susceptible mice, causing encephalitis, and that a viral mutant with a single point mutation in the viral surface spike (S) protein induces a paralytic disease that involves glutamate excitotoxicity in susceptible mice. Herein, we show that glutamate recycling via the glial transporter 1 protein transporter and glutamine synthetase are central to the dysregulation of glutamate homeostasis and development of motor dysfunctions and paralytic disease in HCoV-OC43-infected mice. Moreover, memantine, an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist widely used in the treatment of neurological diseases in humans, improved clinical scores related to paralytic disease and motor disabilities by partially restoring the physiological neurofilament phosphorylation state in virus-infected mice. Interestingly, memantine attenuated mortality rates and body weight loss and reduced HCoV-OC43 replication in the central nervous system in a dose-dependent manner. This novel action of memantine on viral replication strongly suggests that it could be used as an antiviral agent to directly limit viral replication while improving neurological symptoms in various neurological diseases with a viral involvement. Mutations in the surface spike (S) protein of human respiratory coronavirus OC43 appear after persistent infection of human cells of the central nervous system, a possible viral adaptation to this environment. Furthermore, a single amino acid change in the viral S protein modulated virus-induced neuropathology in mice from an encephalitis to a neuropathology characterized by

  19. Perioperative antiviral therapy improves safety in patients with hepatitis B related HCC following hepatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Binhao; Xu, Dafeng; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Peng; Mei, Bin; Wei, Gang; Xiao, Hua; Zhang, Bixiang; Chen, Xiaoping

    2015-03-01

    Hepatectomies may exacerbate chronic hepatitis B in patients with high hepatitis B viral (HBV) DNA levels, and could result in hepatic insufficiency. Antiviral treatment is effective for suppressing HBV virus loads. This study investigated whether perioperative antiviral therapy is warranted for resection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with concurrent HBV infections. Patients with HBV-related HCC (n = 112) who underwent major liver resection were retrospectively divided into two groups based on treatment with perioperative antiviral therapy (antiviral group) (n = 72) or absence of antiviral treatment (control group) (n = 40). Exacerbation of chronic hepatitis B occurred in 6 patients of the control group (15.0%). The prevalence of hepatic insufficiency in the antiviral group and control group were 1.4% (1/72) and 12.5% (5/40), respectively (p antiviral group. The control group had significantly higher levels of postoperative alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and serum bilirubin than the antiviral group. Perioperative antiviral treatment improves patient safety by decreasing morbidity and speeding recovery of postoperative liver function for HBV-related major HCC resection. Copyright © 2015 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. beta-Cyclodextrin derivatives as carriers to enhance the antiviral activity of an antisense oligonucleotide directed toward a coronavirus intergenic consensus sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdou, S; Collomb, J; Sallas, F; Marsura, A; Finance, C

    1997-01-01

    The ability of cyclodextrins to enhance the antiviral activity of a phosphodiester oligodeoxynucleotide has been investigated. A 18-mer oligodeoxynucleotide complementary to the initiation region of the mRNA coding for the spike protein and containing the intergenic consensus sequence of an enteric coronavirus has been tested for antiviral action against virus growth in human adenocarcinoma cells. The phosphodiester oligodeoxynucleotide only showed a limited effect on virus growth rate (from 12 to 34% viral inhibition in cells treated with 7.5 to 25 microM oligodeoxynucleotide, respectively, at a multiplicity of infection of 0.1 infectious particle per cell). In the same conditions, the phosphorothioate analogue exhibited stronger antiviral activity, the inhibition increased from 56 to 90%. The inhibitory effect of this analogue was antisense and sequence-specific. Northern blot analysis showed that the sequence-dependent mechanism of action appears to be the inhibition of mRNA transcription. We conclude that the coronavirus intergenic consensus sequence is a good target for an antisense oligonucleotide antiviral action. The properties of the phosphodiester oligonucleotide was improved after its complexation with cyclodextrins. The most important increase of the antiviral activity (90% inhibition) was obtained with only 7.5 microM oligonucleotide complexed to a cyclodextrin derivative, 6-deoxy-6-S-beta-D-galactopyranosyl-6-thio-cyclomalto-heptaose+ ++ in a molar ratio of 1:100. These studies suggest that the use of cyclodextrin derivatives as carrier for phosphodiester oligonucleotides delivery may be an effective method for increasing the therapeutic potential of these compounds in viral infections.

  1. Antiviral Hammerhead Ribozymes Are Effective for Developing Transgenic Suppression of Chikungunya Virus in Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Priya; Furey, Colleen; Balaraman, Velmurugan; Fraser, Malcolm J

    2016-06-10

    The chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an emerging pathogen with widespread distribution in regions of Africa, India, and Asia that threatens to spread into temperate climates with the introduction of its major vector, Aedes albopictus. CHIKV causes a disease frequently misdiagnosed as dengue fever, with potentially life-threatening symptoms that can result in a longer-term debilitating arthritis. The increasing risk of spread from endemic regions via human travel and commerce and the current absence of a vaccine put a significant proportion of the world population at risk for this disease. In this study we designed and tested hammerhead ribozymes (hRzs) targeting CHIKV structural protein genes of the RNA genome as potential antivirals both at the cellular and in vivo level. We employed the CHIKV strain 181/25, which exhibits similar infectivity rates in both Vero cell cultures and mosquitoes. Virus suppression assay performed on transformed Vero cell clones of all seven hRzs demonstrated that all are effective at inhibiting CHIKV in Vero cells, with hRz #9 and #14 being the most effective. piggyBac transformation vectors were constructed using the Ae. aegypti t-RNA(val) Pol III promoted hRz #9 and #14 effector genes to establish a total of nine unique transgenic Higgs White Eye (HWE) Ae. aegypti lines. Following confirmation of transgene expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), comparative TCID50-IFA analysis, in situ Immuno-fluorescent Assays (IFA) and analysis of salivary CHIKV titers demonstrated effective suppression of virus replication at 7 dpi in heterozygous females of each of these transgenic lines compared with control HWE mosquitoes. This report provides a proof that appropriately engineered hRzs are powerful antiviral effector genes suitable for population replacement strategies.

  2. Update on hepatitis C virus resistance to direct-acting antiviral agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poveda, Eva; Wyles, David L; Mena, Alvaro; Pedreira, José D; Castro-Iglesias, Angeles; Cachay, Edward

    2014-08-01

    Resistance to direct-acting antiviral (DAA) agents against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is driven by the selection of mutations at different positions in the NS3 protease, NS5B polymerase and NS5A proteins. With the exception of NS5B nucleos(t)ide inhibitors, most DAAs possess a low genetic barrier to resistance, with significant cross-resistance between compounds belonging to the same family. However, a specific mutation profile is associated with each agent or drug class and varies depending on the genotype/subtype (e.g., genotype 1b showed higher rates of sustained virological response (SVR) and a higher genetic barrier for resistance than genotype 1a). Moreover, some resistance mutations exist as natural polymorphisms in certain genotypes/subtypes at frequencies that require baseline drug resistance testing before recommending certain antivirals. For example, the polymorphism Q80K is frequently found among genotype 1a (19-48%) and is associated with resistance to simeprevir. Similarly, L31M and Y93H, key resistance mutations to NS5A inhibitors, are frequently found (6-12%) among NS5A genotype 1 sequences. In particular, the presence of these polymorphisms may be of relevance in poorly interferon-responsive patients (i.e., null responders and non-CC IL28B) under DAA-based therapies in combination with pegylated interferon-α plus ribavirin. The relevance of pre-existing resistance mutations for responses to interferon-free DAA therapies is unclear for most regimens and requires further study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Antiviral Hammerhead Ribozymes Are Effective for Developing Transgenic Suppression of Chikungunya Virus in Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Mishra

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The chikungunya virus (CHIKV is an emerging pathogen with widespread distribution in regions of Africa, India, and Asia that threatens to spread into temperate climates with the introduction of its major vector, Aedes albopictus. CHIKV causes a disease frequently misdiagnosed as dengue fever, with potentially life-threatening symptoms that can result in a longer-term debilitating arthritis. The increasing risk of spread from endemic regions via human travel and commerce and the current absence of a vaccine put a significant proportion of the world population at risk for this disease. In this study we designed and tested hammerhead ribozymes (hRzs targeting CHIKV structural protein genes of the RNA genome as potential antivirals both at the cellular and in vivo level. We employed the CHIKV strain 181/25, which exhibits similar infectivity rates in both Vero cell cultures and mosquitoes. Virus suppression assay performed on transformed Vero cell clones of all seven hRzs demonstrated that all are effective at inhibiting CHIKV in Vero cells, with hRz #9 and #14 being the most effective. piggyBac transformation vectors were constructed using the Ae. aegypti t-RNAval Pol III promoted hRz #9 and #14 effector genes to establish a total of nine unique transgenic Higgs White Eye (HWE Ae. aegypti lines. Following confirmation of transgene expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, comparative TCID50-IFA analysis, in situ Immuno-fluorescent Assays (IFA and analysis of salivary CHIKV titers demonstrated effective suppression of virus replication at 7 dpi in heterozygous females of each of these transgenic lines compared with control HWE mosquitoes. This report provides a proof that appropriately engineered hRzs are powerful antiviral effector genes suitable for population replacement strategies

  4. Glycyrrhizic acid as the antiviral component of Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch. against coxsackievirus A16 and enterovirus 71 of hand foot and mouth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingjing; Chen, Xiaoqing; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Yating; Yang, Ziying; Jin, Yu; Ge, Hui Ming; Li, Erguang; Yang, Guang

    2013-05-02

    The radices of Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch. and herbal preparations containing Glycyrrhiza spp. have been used for thousands of years as an herbal medicine for the treatment of viral induced cough, viral hepatitis, and viral skin diseases like ulcers in China. Glycyrrhizic acid (GA) is considered the principal component in Glycyrrhiza spp. with a wide spectrum of antiviral activity. The present study attempt to validate the medicinal use of Glycyrrhiza uralensis for hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) and further to verify whether GA is an active antiviral component in the water extract of Glycyrrhiza uralensis. Radices of Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch. were extracted with hot water. The chemical contents of the extract were profiled with HPLC analysis. The antiviral activity of the extract and the major components was evaluated against infection of enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16) on Vero cells. The cytopathic effect caused by the infection was measured with MTT assay. Infectious virion production was determined using secondary infection assays and viral protein expression by immunoblotting analysis. The extract at 1000 μg/ml suppressed EV71 replication by 1.0 log and CVA16 by 1.5 logs. The antiviral activity was associated with the content of GA in the extract since selective depletion of GA from the extract by acid precipitation resulted in loss of antiviral activity. In contrast, the acid precipitant retained antiviral activity. The precipitant at a concentration of 200 μg/ml inhibited EV71 and CVA16 replication by 1.7 and 2.2 logs, respectively. Furthermore, GA dose-dependently blocked viral replication of EV71 and CVA16. At 3 mM, GA reduced infectious CVA16 and EV71 production by 3.5 and 2.2 logs, respectively. At 5mM, CVA16 production was reduced by 6.0 logs and EV71 by 4.0 logs. Both EV71 and CVA16 are members of Enterovirus genus, time-of-drug addition studies however showed that GA directly inactivated CVA16, while GA anti-EV71 effect

  5. Antiviral therapy and prophylaxis of acute respiratory infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Osidak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thearticle presents the results of years of studies (including biochemical and immunological of the effectiveness of application and prophylaxis (in relation to nosocomial infections and the safety of antiviral chemical preparation Arbidol in 694 children with influenza and influenza-like illness, including the coronavirus infection (43 children and combined lesions of respiratory tract (150, indicating the possible inclusion of the drug in the complex therapy for children with the listed diseases, regardless of the severity and nature of their course. The studies were conducted according to the regulated standard of test conditions and randomized clinical trials.

  6. Potencial antiviral da quercetina sobre o parvovírus canino Antiviral potencial of quercetin in canine parvovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Carvalho

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o efeito do flavonoide quercetina na replicação do parvovírus canino in vitro por meio do ensaio de determinação da atividade virucida (ensaio 1, ensaio de determinação da atividade sobre a célula (ensaio 2 e ensaio de tempo de adição das drogas em diferentes etapas do ciclo replicativo viral (ensaio 3. A quercetina apresentou significante atividade antiviral, com valores máximos de redução do título viral de 96,3% no ensaio 1, 90% no ensaio 2 e 90% no ensaio 3. Os efeitos mais expressivos ocorreram nas etapas de adsorção e penetração viral. Os resultados deste trabalho sugerem a importância da quercetina para a medicina veterinária.The in vitro effect of the flavonoid quercetin against canine parvovirus was evaluated. The antiviral activity of quercetin was evaluated by determining the virucidal activity (assay 1, determining the activity on the cell (assay 2 and using the time of addition assay to test the inhibition of the viral replication cycle (assay 3. Quercetin showed a significant antiviral activity, with maximum viral titer reduction of 96.3% in assay 1, 90% in assay 2 and 90% in assay 3. The most expressive effects occurred in the stages of viral adsorption and penetration. The results show the importance of quercetin for veterinary medicine.

  7. Design and evaluation of novel interferon lambda analogs with enhanced antiviral activity and improved drug attributes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu D

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Debin Yu,1 Mingzhi Zhao,2 Liwei Dong,1 Lu Zhao,1 Mingwei Zou,3 Hetong Sun,4 Mengying Zhang,4 Hongyu Liu,4 Zhihua Zou1 1National Engineering Laboratory for AIDS Vaccine, Key Laboratory for Molecular Enzymology and Engineering of the Ministry of Education, School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun, 2State Key Laboratory of Proteomics, National Engineering Research Center for Protein Drugs, Beijing Proteome Research Center, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences, University of Houston, Houston, TX, USA; 4Prosit Sole Biotechnology, Co., Ltd., Beijing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Type III interferons (IFNs (also called IFN-λ: IFN-λ1, IFN-λ2, IFN-λ3, and IFN-λ4 are critical players in the defense against viral infection of mucosal epithelial cells, where the activity of type I IFNs is weak, and unlike type I IFNs that are associated with severe and diverse side effects, type III IFNs cause minimal side effects due to the highly restricted expression of their receptors, and thus appear to be promising agents for the treatment and prevention of respiratory and gastrointestinal viral infection. However, the antiviral potency of natural type III IFNs is weak compared to type I and, although IFN-λ3 possesses the highest bioactivity among the type III IFNs, IFN-λ1, instead of IFN-λ3, is being developed as a therapeutic drug due to the difficulty to express IFN-λ3 in the prokaryotic expression system. Here, to develop optimal IFN-λ molecules with improved drug attributes, we designed a series of IFN-λ analogs by replacing critical amino acids of IFN-λ1 with the IFN-λ3 counterparts, and vice versa. Four of the designed analogs were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli with high yield and were easily purified from inclusion bodies. Interestingly, all four analogs showed potent activity in inducing the

  8. RNAi and Antiviral Defense in the Honey Bee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M. Brutscher

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Honey bees play an important agricultural and ecological role as pollinators of numerous agricultural crops and other plant species. Therefore, investigating the factors associated with high annual losses of honey bee colonies in the US is an important and active area of research. Pathogen incidence and abundance correlate with Colony Collapse Disorder- (CCD- affected colonies in the US and colony losses in the US and in some European countries. Honey bees are readily infected by single-stranded positive sense RNA viruses. Largely dependent on the host immune response, virus infections can either remain asymptomatic or result in deformities, paralysis, or death of adults or larvae. RNA interference (RNAi is an important antiviral defense mechanism in insects, including honey bees. Herein, we review the role of RNAi in honey bee antiviral defense and highlight some parallels between insect and mammalian immune systems. A more thorough understanding of the role of pathogens on honey bee health and the immune mechanisms bees utilize to combat infectious agents may lead to the development of strategies that enhance honey bee health and result in the discovery of additional mechanisms of immunity in metazoans.

  9. E. fischeriana Root Compound Dpo Activates Antiviral Innate Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxuan Chen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available E. fischeriana has long been used as a traditional Chinese medicine. Recent studies reported that some compounds of E. fischeriana exhibited antimicrobial and immune enhance activity. Innate immune system is essential for the immune surveillance of inner and outer threats, initial host defense responses and immune modulation. The role of natural drug compounds, including E. fischeriana, in innate immune regulation is largely unknown. Here we demonstrated that E. fischeriana compound Dpo is involved in antiviral signaling. The genome wide RNA-seq analysis revealed that the induction of ISGs by viral infection could be synergized by Dpo. Consistently, Dpo enhanced the antiviral immune responses and protected the mice from death during viral infection. Dpo however was not able to rescue STING deficient mice lethality caused by HSV-1 infection. The enhancement of ISG15 by Dpo was also impaired in STING, IRF3, IRF7, or ELF4 deficient cells, demonstrating that Dpo activates innate immune responses in a STING/IRFs/ELF4 dependent way. The STING/IRFs/ELF4 axis is therefore important for Dpo induced ISGs expression, and can be used by host to counteract infection.

  10. Antiviral therapy for respiratory viral infections in immunocompromised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahani, Lokesh; Ariza-Heredia, Ella J; Chemaly, Roy F

    2017-04-01

    Respiratory viruses (influenza, parainfluenza, respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus, human metapneumovirus, and rhinovirus) represent the most common causes of respiratory viral infections in immunocompromised patients. Also, these infections may be more severe in immunocompromised patients than in the general population. Early diagnosis and treatment of viral infections continue to be of paramount importance in immunocompromised patients; because once viral replication and invasive infections are evident, prognosis can be grave. Areas covered: The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the main antiviral agents used for the treatment of respiratory viral infections in immunocompromised patients and review of the new agents in the pipeline. Expert commentary: Over the past decade, important diagnostic advances, specifically, the use of rapid molecular testing has helped close the gap between clinical scenarios and pathogen identification and enhanced early diagnosis of viral infections and understanding of the role of prolonged shedding and viral loads. Advancements in novel antiviral therapeutics with high resistance thresholds and effective immunization for preventable infections in immunocompromised patients are needed.

  11. Antiviral Activity of Natural Products Extracted from Marine Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobia Tabassum

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Many epidemics have broken out over the centuries. Hundreds and thousands of humans have died over a disease. Available treatments for infectious diseases have always been limited. Some infections are more deadly than the others, especially viral pathogens. These pathogens have continuously resisted all kinds of medical treatment, due to a need for new treatments to be developed. Drugs are present in nature and are also synthesized in vitro and they help in combating diseases and restoring health. Synthesizing drugs is a hard and time consuming task, which requires a lot of man power and financial aid. However, the natural compounds are just lying around on the earth, may it be land or water. Over a thousand novel compounds isolated from marine organisms are used as antiviral agents. Others are being pharmacologically tested. Today, over forty antiviral compounds are present in the pharmacological market. Some of these compounds are undergoing clinical and pre-clinical stages. Marine compounds are paving the way for a new trend in modern medicine.

  12. New antivirals for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Vincent; Barreiro, Pablo; Benitez, Laura; Peña, Jose M; de Mendoza, Carmen

    2017-07-01

    Current treatment with oral nucleos(t)ides entecavir or tenofovir provide sustained suppression of HBV replication and clinical benefit in most chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infected persons. However, HBV rebound generally occurs upon drug discontinuation due to persistence of genomic HBV reservoirs as episomic cccDNA and chromosomic integrated HBV-DNA. There is renewed enthusiasm on HBV drug discovery following recent successes with antivirals for hepatitis C and immunotherapies for some cancers. Areas covered: New drugs that target distinct steps of the HBV life cycle are been developed, including inhibitors of viral entry, new polymerase inhibitors, capsid and assembly inhibitors, virus release blockers, and disruptors of cccDNA formation and transcription. Alongside these antivirals, agents that enhance anti-HBV specific immune responses are being tested, including TLR agonists, checkpoint inhibitors and therapeutic vaccines. Expert opinion: The achievement of a 'functional cure' for chronic HBV infection, with sustained HBsAg clearance and undetectable viremia once medications are stopped, represents the next step in the pace towards HBV elimination. Hopefully, the combination of new drugs that eliminate or functionally inactivate the genomic HBV reservoirs (cccDNA and integrated HBV-DNA) along with agents that enhance or activate immune responses against HBV will lead to a 'definitive cure' for chronic HBV infection.

  13. Engineering a Therapeutic Lectin by Uncoupling Mitogenicity from Antiviral Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Michael D.; Boudreaux, Daniel M.; Salmon, Loïc; Chugh, Jeetender; Winter, Harry C.; Meagher, Jennifer L.; André, Sabine; Murphy, Paul V.; Oscarson, Stefan; Roy, René; King, Steven; Kaplan, Mark H.; Goldstein, Irwin J.; Tarbet, E. Bart; Hurst, Brett L.; Smee, Donald F.; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Hoffmann, Hans-Heinrich; Xue, Yi; Rice, Charles M.; Schols, Dominique; Garcia, J. Victor; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.; Markovitz, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A key effector route of the Sugar Code involves lectins that exert crucial regulatory controls by targeting distinct cellular glycans. We demonstrate that a single amino acid substitution in a banana lectin, replacing histidine 84 with a threonine, significantly reduces its mitogenicity while preserving its broad-spectrum antiviral potency. X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and glycocluster assays reveal that loss of mitogenicity is strongly correlated with loss of pi-pi stacking between aromatic amino acids H84 and Y83, which removes a wall separating two carbohydrate binding sites, thus diminishing multivalent interactions. On the other hand, monovalent interactions and antiviral activity are preserved by retaining other wild-type conformational features and possibly through unique contacts involving the T84 side chain. Through such fine-tuning, target selection and downstream effects of a lectin can be modulated so as to knock down one activity while preserving another, thus providing tools for therapeutics and for understanding the Sugar Code. PMID:26496612

  14. Evasion of Early Antiviral Responses by Herpes Simplex Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula A. Suazo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Besides overcoming physical constraints, such as extreme temperatures, reduced humidity, elevated pressure, and natural predators, human pathogens further need to overcome an arsenal of antimicrobial components evolved by the host to limit infection, replication and optimally, reinfection. Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1 and herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2 infect humans at a high frequency and persist within the host for life by establishing latency in neurons. To gain access to these cells, herpes simplex viruses (HSVs must replicate and block immediate host antiviral responses elicited by epithelial cells and innate immune components early after infection. During these processes, infected and noninfected neighboring cells, as well as tissue-resident and patrolling immune cells, will sense viral components and cell-associated danger signals and secrete soluble mediators. While type-I interferons aim at limiting virus spread, cytokines and chemokines will modulate resident and incoming immune cells. In this paper, we discuss recent findings relative to the early steps taking place during HSV infection and replication. Further, we discuss how HSVs evade detection by host cells and the molecular mechanisms evolved by these viruses to circumvent early antiviral mechanisms, ultimately leading to neuron infection and the establishment of latency.

  15. Evasion of early antiviral responses by herpes simplex viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suazo, Paula A; Ibañez, Francisco J; Retamal-Díaz, Angello R; Paz-Fiblas, Marysol V; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M; González, Pablo A

    2015-01-01

    Besides overcoming physical constraints, such as extreme temperatures, reduced humidity, elevated pressure, and natural predators, human pathogens further need to overcome an arsenal of antimicrobial components evolved by the host to limit infection, replication and optimally, reinfection. Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) infect humans at a high frequency and persist within the host for life by establishing latency in neurons. To gain access to these cells, herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) must replicate and block immediate host antiviral responses elicited by epithelial cells and innate immune components early after infection. During these processes, infected and noninfected neighboring cells, as well as tissue-resident and patrolling immune cells, will sense viral components and cell-associated danger signals and secrete soluble mediators. While type-I interferons aim at limiting virus spread, cytokines and chemokines will modulate resident and incoming immune cells. In this paper, we discuss recent findings relative to the early steps taking place during HSV infection and replication. Further, we discuss how HSVs evade detection by host cells and the molecular mechanisms evolved by these viruses to circumvent early antiviral mechanisms, ultimately leading to neuron infection and the establishment of latency.

  16. Development of Human Dendritic Cells and their Role in HIV Infection: Antiviral Immunity vs HIV Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuko eTsunetsugu-Yokota

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Although dendritc cells (DC represent a small cell population in the body, they have been recognized as professional antigen presenting cells and key players of both innate and acquired immunity. The recent expansion of basic knowledge concerning differentiation and function of various DC subsets will greatly help to understand the nature of protective immunity required in designing AIDS vaccines. However, HIV not only targets CD4+ T cells but also myeloid cells, including macrophages and DC. When HIV infects DC, its replication is highly restricted in DC. Nevertheless, even a low level of HIV production is sufficient to enhance HIV replication in activated CD4+ T cells, through antigen presentation activity by HIV-infected DC. Considering how antiviral immunity is initiated and memory response is maintained, such efficient DC-T cell transmission of HIV should play an important role in the disturbed immune responses associated with HIV infection. Recently, accessory proteins encoded by HIV have been shown to interact with various proteins in DC, and thereby affect DC-T cell transmission. In this review, we summarize the current understanding about DC biology and discuss what needs to be known in order to successfully manipulate DC for the development of an effective AIDS vaccine in the future.

  17. In COS cells Vpu can both stabilize tetherin expression and counteract its antiviral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waheed, Abdul A; Kuruppu, Nishani D; Felton, Kathryn L; D'Souza, Darren; Freed, Eric O

    2014-01-01

    The interferon-inducible cellular protein tetherin (CD317/BST-2) inhibits the release of a broad range of enveloped viruses. The HIV-1 accessory protein Vpu enhances virus particle release by counteracting this host restriction factor. While the antagonism of human tetherin by Vpu has been associated with both proteasomal and lysosomal degradation, the link between Vpu-mediated tetherin degradation and the ability of Vpu to counteract the antiviral activity of tetherin remains poorly understood. Here, we show that human tetherin is expressed at low levels in African green monkey kidney (COS) cells. However, Vpu markedly increases tetherin expression in this cell line, apparently by sequestering it in an internal compartment that bears lysosomal markers. This stabilization of tetherin by Vpu requires the transmembrane sequence of human tetherin. Although Vpu stabilizes human tetherin in COS cells, it still counteracts the ability of tetherin to suppress virus release. The enhancement of virus release by Vpu in COS cells is associated with a modest reduction in cell-surface tetherin expression, even though the overall expression of tetherin is higher in the presence of Vpu. This study demonstrates that COS cells provide a model system in which Vpu-mediated enhancement of HIV-1 release is uncoupled from Vpu-mediated tetherin degradation.

  18. Human rhinovirus-induced ISG15 selectively modulates epithelial antiviral immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaheer, R S; Wiehler, S; Hudy, M H; Traves, S L; Pelikan, J B; Leigh, R; Proud, D

    2014-01-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) infections trigger exacerbations of lower airway diseases. HRV infects human airway epithelial cells and induces proinflammatory and antiviral molecules that regulate the response to HRV infection. Interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene of 15 kDa (ISG15) has been shown to regulate other viruses. We now show that HRV-16 infection induces both intracellular epithelial ISG15 expression and ISG15 secretion in vitro. Moreover, ISG15 protein levels increased in nasal secretions of subjects with symptomatic HRV infections. HRV-16-induced ISG15 expression is transcriptionally regulated via an IFN regulatory factor pathway. ISG15 does not directly alter HRV replication but does modulate immune signaling via the viral sensor protein RIG-I to impact production of CXCL10, which has been linked to innate immunity to viruses. Extracellular ISG15 also alters CXCL10 production. We conclude that ISG15 has a complex role in host defense against HRV infection, and that additional studies are needed to clarify the role of this molecule. PMID:24448099

  19. Inhibition of dengue virus entry into target cells using synthetic antiviral peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhoot, Mohammed Abdelfatah; Rathinam, Alwin Kumar; Wang, Seok Mui; Manikam, Rishya; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2013-01-01

    Despite the importance of DENV as a human pathogen, there is no specific treatment or protective vaccine. Successful entry into the host cells is necessary for establishing the infection. Recently, the virus entry step has become an attractive therapeutic strategy because it represents a barrier to suppress the onset of the infection. Four putative antiviral peptides were designed to target domain III of DENV-2 E protein using BioMoDroid algorithm. Two peptides showed significant inhibition of DENV when simultaneously incubated as shown by plaque formation assay, RT-qPCR, and Western blot analysis. Both DET4 and DET2 showed significant inhibition of virus entry (84.6% and 40.6% respectively) using micromolar concentrations. Furthermore, the TEM images showed that the inhibitory peptides caused structural abnormalities and alteration of the arrangement of the viral E protein, which interferes with virus binding and entry. Inhibition of DENV entry during the initial stages of infection can potentially reduce the viremia in infected humans resulting in prevention of the progression of dengue fever to the severe life-threatening infection, reduce the infected vector numbers, and thus break the transmission cycle. Moreover these peptides though designed against the conserved region in DENV-2 would have the potential to be active against all the serotypes of dengue and might be considered as Hits to begin designing and developing of more potent analogous peptides that could constitute as promising therapeutic agents for attenuating dengue infection.

  20. Structure-based discovery of the novel antiviral properties of naproxen against the nucleoprotein of influenza A virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejal, Nathalie; Tarus, Bogdan; Bouguyon, Edwige; Chenavas, Sylvie; Bertho, Nicolas; Delmas, Bernard; Ruigrok, Rob W H; Di Primo, Carmelo; Slama-Schwok, Anny

    2013-05-01

    The nucleoprotein (NP) binds the viral RNA genome and associates with the polymerase in a ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP) required for transcription and replication of influenza A virus. NP has no cellular counterpart, and the NP sequence is highly conserved, which led to considering NP a hot target in the search for antivirals. We report here that monomeric nucleoprotein can be inhibited by a small molecule binding in its RNA binding groove, resulting in a novel antiviral against influenza A virus. We identified naproxen, an anti-inflammatory drug that targeted the nucleoprotein to inhibit NP-RNA association required for NP function, by virtual screening. Further docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations identified in the RNA groove two NP-naproxen complexes of similar levels of interaction energy. The predicted naproxen binding sites were tested using the Y148A, R152A, R355A, and R361A proteins carrying single-point mutations. Surface plasmon resonance, fluorescence, and other in vitro experiments supported the notion that naproxen binds at a site identified by MD simulations and showed that naproxen competed with RNA binding to wild-type (WT) NP and protected active monomers of the nucleoprotein against proteolytic cleavage. Naproxen protected Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells against viral challenges with the H1N1 and H3N2 viral strains and was much more effective than other cyclooxygenase inhibitors in decreasing viral titers of MDCK cells. In a mouse model of intranasal infection, naproxen treatment decreased the viral titers in mice lungs. In conclusion, naproxen is a promising lead compound for novel antivirals against influenza A virus that targets the nucleoprotein in its RNA binding groove.

  1. DMPD: An arms race: innate antiviral responses and counteracting viral strategies. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18031256 An arms race: innate antiviral responses and counteracting viral strategie...s. Schroder M, Bowie AG. Biochem Soc Trans. 2007 Dec;35(Pt 6):1512-4. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show An arm...s race: innate antiviral responses and counteracting viral strategies. PubmedID 18031256 Title An arms ra

  2. Investigations of anti-viral properties on extract of pleurotus sajor caju.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, S M; Prasad, R; Kudada, N

    2001-07-01

    Pleurotus sajor caju spawns prepared, yield fruiting bodies, Aqueous extract of these was used to test for inhibitory against Tobacco Mosaic Virus. Infectivity assay (locallesion) method was employed for the anti-viral activity. Treatments, on host plants, were distributed using half-leaf method. The results indicated that extract of the edible mushroom showed anti-viral property.

  3. Effect of antiviral therapy on markers of fibrogenesis in patients with chronic hepatitis C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøjgaard, Camilla; Johansen, J S; Krarup, H B

    2003-01-01

    ) whether treatment response is reflected by a decrease in these markers during antiviral therapy; 2) whether these markers reflect the activity of the disease; and 3) whether these markers could be used as predictors of the treatment response. RESULTS: Baseline plasma YKL-40, MMP-2, PIIINP and TIMP-1 were...... antiviral treatment...

  4. Antiviral effect of diammonium glycyrrhizinate on cell infection by porcine parvovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcine parvovirus (PPV) can cause reproductive failure in swine resulting in economic losses to the industry. Antiviral effects of diammonium glycyrrhizinate (DG) have been reported on several animal viruses; however, to date it has yet to be tested on PPV. In this study, the antiviral activity of ...

  5. Evaluation of in vitro antiviral activity of a brown alga ( Cystoseira ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The hot water extract of a brown marine alga, Cystoseira myrica, from the Persian Gulf was evaluated as an antiviral compound against KOS strain of HSV-1 in cell culture. The extract exhibited antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) not only during absorption of virus to the cells, but also on post ...

  6. Antiviral activity of human lactoferrin : Inhibition of alphavirus interaction with heparan sulfate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waarts, Barry-Lee; Aneke, Onwuchekwa J.C.; Smit, Jolanda; Kimata, Koji; Bittman, Robert; Meijer, Dirk K.F.; Wilschut, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Human lactoferrin is a component of the non-specific immune system with distinct antiviral properties. We used alphaviruses, adapted to interaction with heparan sulfate (HS), as a tool to investigate the mechanism of lactoferrin's antiviral activity. Lactoferrin inhibited infection of BHK-21 cells

  7. Antiviral activity of Aloe vera against herpes simplex virus type 2: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study we tested the antiviral activity of a crude hot glycerine extract of Aloe vera gel which was grown in Bushehr (Southwest of Iran) against HSV-2 replication in Vero cell line. The extract showed antiviral activity against HSV-2 not only before attachment and entry of virus to the Vero cells but also on post attachment ...

  8. Recent advances in the development of antiviral agents using computer-aided structure based approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vikash; Chandra, Sharat; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran

    2014-01-01

    Viral diseases have been affecting the human race since ancient times. Currently, a long list of diseases caused by the viruses is available and extensive research in this area has resulted in understanding the finest details of the molecular mechanism of pathogenesis caused by these pathogens. Side by side, efforts have been made towards the search and design of antiviral agents that could interfere with viral pathogenesis. As a result of these efforts a number of effective antiviral agents have been developed and are available in the market. However, the high cost and lengthy protocol of the drug discovery process are some of the major limiting factors in the development of new and more effective antiviral agents. Considering the above fact, presently the research community is trying to integrate short and cost effective techniques in the modern drug discovery process for the identification and design of novel antiviral agents. Computeraided drug design (CADD), which comprises of various techniques like molecular docking, virtual screening, three dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (3D-QSAR) studies and many more, has the capability to speed up the antiviral drug development process. Successful design of antiviral drugs like Relenza, Saquinavir and Tamiflu have validated application of these techniques and holds a bright future in drug discovery protocol. This review explores the role of CADD in antiviral drug development and highlights the recent advances in antiviral drug research using computer-aided structure based approaches.

  9. Antiviral Effect Assay of Aqueous Extract of Echium Amoenum-L against HSV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malihe Farahani

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medicinal plants have been used for different diseases in past. There is an increasing need for substances with antiviral activity since the treatment of viral infections with the available antiviral drugs often leads to the problem of viral resistance. Therefore in the present study Echium amoenum L plant with ethnomedical background was screened for antiviral activity against HSV-1 in different times. Materials and Methods: Flower part of Echium amoenum L plant collected from Iran was extracted with different methods to obtain crude aqueous extract. This extract was screened for its cytotoxicity against Hep II cell line by CPE assay. Antiviral properties of the plant extract were determined by cytopathic effect inhibition assay.Results: Echium amoenum L extract exhibited significant antiviral activity at non toxic concentrations to the cell line used. Findings indicated that plant extract has the most antiviral activity when it used an hour after virus inoculation.Conclusion: Echium amoenum L plant had not toxic effect at highest concentrations to the cell lines used and showed the most antiviral activity when it used an hour after virus inoculation. Further research is needed to elucidate the active constituents of this plant which may be useful in the development of new and effective antiviral agents.

  10. Coxsackievirus cloverleaf RNA containing a 5' triphosphate triggers an antiviral response via RIG-I activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, Qian; Langereis, Martijn A; Olagnier, David; Chiang, Cindy; van de Winkel, Roel; van Essen, Peter; Zoll, Jan; Hiscott, John; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2014-01-01

    Upon viral infections, pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and stimulate an antiviral state associated with the production of type I interferons (IFNs) and inflammatory markers. Type I IFNs play crucial roles in innate antiviral responses by

  11. Vaccine and Wild-Type Strains of Yellow Fever Virus Engage Distinct Entry Mechanisms and Differentially Stimulate Antiviral Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dolores Fernandez-Garcia

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The live attenuated yellow fever virus (YFV vaccine 17D stands as a “gold standard” for a successful vaccine. 17D was developed empirically by passaging the wild-type Asibi strain in mouse and chicken embryo tissues. Despite its immense success, the molecular determinants for virulence attenuation and immunogenicity of the 17D vaccine are poorly understood. 17D evolved several mutations in its genome, most of which lie within the envelope (E protein. Given the major role played by the YFV E protein during virus entry, it has been hypothesized that the residues that diverge between the Asibi and 17D E proteins may be key determinants of attenuation. In this study, we define the process of YFV entry into target cells and investigate its implication in the activation of the antiviral cytokine response. We found that Asibi infects host cells exclusively via the classical clathrin-mediated endocytosis, while 17D exploits a clathrin-independent pathway for infectious entry. We demonstrate that the mutations in the 17D E protein acquired during the attenuation process are sufficient to explain the differential entry of Asibi versus 17D. Interestingly, we show that 17D binds to and infects host cells more efficiently than Asibi, which culminates in increased delivery of viral RNA into the cytosol and robust activation of the cytokine-mediated antiviral response. Overall, our study reveals that 17D vaccine and Asibi enter target cells through distinct mechanisms and highlights a link between 17D attenuation, virus entry, and immune activation.

  12. Crystal structure of an antiviral ankyrin targeting the HIV-1 capsid and molecular modeling of the ankyrin-capsid complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praditwongwan, Warachai; Chuankhayan, Phimonphan; Saoin, Somphot; Wisitponchai, Tanchanok; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Nangola, Sawitree; Hong, Saw See; Minard, Philippe; Boulanger, Pierre; Chen, Chun-Jung; Tayapiwatana, Chatchai

    2014-08-01

    Ankyrins are cellular repeat proteins, which can be genetically modified to randomize amino-acid residues located at defined positions in each repeat unit, and thus create a potential binding surface adaptable to macromolecular ligands. From a phage-display library of artificial ankyrins, we have isolated AnkGAG1D4, a trimodular ankyrin which binds to the HIV-1 capsid protein N-terminal domain (NTDCA) and has an antiviral effect at the late steps of the virus life cycle. In this study, the determinants of the AnkGAG1D4-NTDCA interaction were analyzed using peptide scanning in competition ELISA, capsid mutagenesis, ankyrin crystallography and molecular modeling. We determined the AnkGAG1D4 structure at 2.2 Å resolution, and used the crystal structure in molecular docking with a homology model of HIV-1 capsid. Our results indicated that NTDCA alpha-helices H1 and H7 could mediate the formation of the capsid-AnkGAG1D4 binary complex, but the interaction involving H7 was predicted to be more stable than with H1. Arginine-18 (R18) in H1, and R132 and R143 in H7 were found to be the key players of the AnkGAG1D4-NTDCA interaction. This was confirmed by R-to-A mutagenesis of NTDCA, and by sequence analysis of trimodular ankyrins negative for capsid binding. In AnkGAG1D4, major interactors common to H1 and H7 were found to be S45, Y56, R89, K122 and K123. Collectively, our ankyrin-capsid binding analysis implied a significant degree of flexibility within the NTDCA domain of the HIV-1 capsid protein, and provided some clues for the design of new antivirals targeting the capsid protein and viral assembly.

  13. Spectroscopic investigation of herpes simplex viruses infected cells and their response to antiviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erukhimovitch, Vitaly; Talyshinsky, Marina; Souprun, Yelena; Huleihel, Mahmoud

    2006-07-01

    In the present study, we used microscopic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to evaluate the antiviral activity of known antiviral agents against herpes viruses. The antiviral activity of Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) (which is an active compound of propolis) against herpes simplex type 1 and 2 was examined in cell culture. The advantage of microscopic FTIR spectroscopy over conventional FTIR spectroscopy is that it facilitates inspection of restricted regions of cell culture or tissue. Our results showed significant spectral differences at early stages of infection between infected and non-infected cells, and between infected cells treated with the used antiviral agent and those not treated. In infected cells, there was a considerable increase in phosphate levels. Our results show that treatment with used antiviral agent considerably abolish the spectral changes induced by the viral infection. In addition, it is possible to track by FTIR microscopy method the deferential effect of various doses of the drug.

  14. Antioxidative and antiviral properties of flowering cherry fruits (Prunus serrulata L. var. spontanea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yook, Hong-Sun; Kim, Kyoung-Hee; Park, Jung-Eun; Shin, Hyun-Jin

    2010-01-01

    The phenolic compounds of many fruits have been known to be efficient cellular protective antioxidants. In this study, antioxidative and antiviral properties of flowering cherry cultivars (Prunus yedoensis, Prunus sargentii, Prunus lannesiana, and Prunus cerasus) in Korea were investigated. The antioxidant property was assayed for specific activities including 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) hydroxy radical scavenging activity, reducing power capacity, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) like activity. In addition, antiviral activity was determined by inhibition studies on the infection cycle of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), measured as minimum concentration of cherry extracts that inhibited 50% of cytopathic effect (CPE) on PEDV. Our results show that the four varieties of cherries contain substantially high antioxidants and antiviral activities. In particular, P. cerasus contains higher antioxidants and antiviral activities as well as polyphenolic content than other varieties. Our data indicate that Korean native cherry cultivars could be beneficial supplements of dietary antioxidants and natural antiviral agents.

  15. Construction of self-replicating subgenomic West Nile virus replicons for screening antiviral compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz-Estrada, Sofia L; Reichert, Erin Donohue; Padmanabhan, Radhakrishnan

    2013-01-01

    Mosquito-borne flavivirus RNA genomes encode one long open reading frame flanking 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions (5'- and 3'-UTRs) which contain cis-acting RNA elements playing important roles for viral RNA translation and replication. The viral RNA encodes a single polyprotein, which is processed into three structural proteins and seven nonstructural (NS) proteins. The regions coding for the seven NS proteins are sufficient for replication of the RNA. The sequences encoding the structural genes can be deleted except for two short regions. The first one encompasses 32 amino acid (aa) residues from the N-terminal coding sequence of capsid (C) and the second, 27 aa region from the C-terminus of envelope (E) protein. The deleted region can be substituted with a gene coding for a readily quantifiable reporter to give rise to a subgenomic reporter replicon. Replicons containing a variety of reporter genes and marker genes for construction of stable mammalian cell lines are valuable reagents for studying the effects of mutations in translation and/or replication in isolation from processes like the entry and assembly of the virus particles. Here we describe the construction of two West Nile virus (WNV) replicons by overlap extension PCR and standard recombinant DNA techniques. One has a Renilla luciferase (Rluc) reporter gene followed by an internal ribosome entry site (element) for cap-independent translation of the open reading frame encompassing the carboxy-terminal sequence of E to NS5. The second replicon has in tandem the Rluc gene, foot and mouth disease virus 2A, and neomycin phosphotransferase gene that allows establishment of a stable mammalian cell line expressing the Rluc reporter in the presence of the neomycin analog, G418. The stable replicon-expressing Vero cell line has been used for cell-based screening and determination of EC50 values for antiviral compounds that inhibited WNV replication.

  16. RNase H As Gene Modifier, Driver of Evolution and Antiviral Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Moelling

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Retroviral infections are ‘mini-symbiotic’ events supplying recipient cells with sequences for viral replication, including the reverse transcriptase (RT and ribonuclease H (RNase H. These proteins and other viral or cellular sequences can provide novel cellular functions including immune defense mechanisms. Their high error rate renders RT-RNases H drivers of evolutionary innovation. Integrated retroviruses and the related transposable elements (TEs have existed for at least 150 million years, constitute up to 80% of eukaryotic genomes and are also present in prokaryotes. Endogenous retroviruses regulate host genes, have provided novel genes including the syncytins that mediate maternal-fetal immune tolerance and can be experimentally rendered infectious again. The RT and the RNase H are among the most ancient and abundant protein folds. RNases H may have evolved from ribozymes, related to viroids, early in the RNA world, forming ribosomes, RNA replicases and polymerases. Basic RNA-binding peptides enhance ribozyme catalysis. RT and ribozymes or RNases H are present today in bacterial group II introns, the precedents of TEs. Thousands of unique RTs and RNases H are present in eukaryotes, bacteria, and viruses. These enzymes mediate viral and cellular replication and antiviral defense in eukaryotes and prokaryotes, splicing, R-loop resolvation, DNA repair. RNase H-like activities are also required for the activity of small regulatory RNAs. The retroviral replication components share striking similarities with the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC, the prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas machinery, eukaryotic V(DJ recombination and interferon systems. Viruses supply antiviral defense tools to cellular organisms. TEs are the evolutionary origin of siRNA and miRNA genes that, through RISC, counteract detrimental activities of TEs and chromosomal instability. Moreover, piRNAs, implicated in transgenerational inheritance, suppress TEs in germ cells. Thus

  17. RNase H As Gene Modifier, Driver of Evolution and Antiviral Defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moelling, Karin; Broecker, Felix; Russo, Giancarlo; Sunagawa, Shinichi

    2017-01-01

    Retroviral infections are 'mini-symbiotic' events supplying recipient cells with sequences for viral replication, including the reverse transcriptase (RT) and ribonuclease H (RNase H). These proteins and other viral or cellular sequences can provide novel cellular functions including immune defense mechanisms. Their high error rate renders RT-RNases H drivers of evolutionary innovation. Integrated retroviruses and the related transposable elements (TEs) have existed for at least 150 million years, constitute up to 80% of eukaryotic genomes and are also present in prokaryotes. Endogenous retroviruses regulate host genes, have provided novel genes including the syncytins that mediate maternal-fetal immune tolerance and can be experimentally rendered infectious again. The RT and the RNase H are among the most ancient and abundant protein folds. RNases H may have evolved from ribozymes, related to viroids, early in the RNA world, forming ribosomes, RNA replicases and polymerases. Basic RNA-binding peptides enhance ribozyme catalysis. RT and ribozymes or RNases H are present today in bacterial group II introns, the precedents of TEs. Thousands of unique RTs and RNases H are present in eukaryotes, bacteria, and viruses. These enzymes mediate viral and cellular replication and antiviral defense in eukaryotes and prokaryotes, splicing, R-loop resolvation, DNA repair. RNase H-like activities are also required for the activity of small regulatory RNAs. The retroviral replication components share striking similarities with the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), the prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas machinery, eukaryotic V(D)J recombination and interferon systems. Viruses supply antiviral defense tools to cellular organisms. TEs are the evolutionary origin of siRNA and miRNA genes that, through RISC, counteract detrimental activities of TEs and chromosomal instability. Moreover, piRNAs, implicated in transgenerational inheritance, suppress TEs in germ cells. Thus, virtually all known

  18. Vpx rescues HIV-1 transduction of dendritic cells from the antiviral state established by type 1 interferon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard Christian

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vpx is a virion-associated protein encoded by SIVSM, a lentivirus endemic to the West African sooty mangabey (Cercocebus atys. HIV-2 and SIVMAC, zoonoses resulting from SIVSM transmission to humans or Asian rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta, also encode Vpx. In myeloid cells, Vpx promotes reverse transcription and transduction by these viruses. This activity correlates with Vpx binding to DCAF1 (VPRBP and association with the DDB1/RBX1/CUL4A E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. When delivered experimentally to myeloid cells using VSV G-pseudotyped virus-like particles (VLPs, Vpx promotes reverse transcription of retroviruses that do not normally encode Vpx. Results Here we show that Vpx has the extraordinary ability to completely rescue HIV-1 transduction of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs from the potent antiviral state established by prior treatment with exogenous type 1 interferon (IFN. The magnitude of rescue was up to 1,000-fold, depending on the blood donor, and was also observed after induction of endogenous IFN and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs by LPS, poly(I:C, or poly(dA:dT. The effect was relatively specific in that Vpx-associated suppression of soluble IFN-β production, of mRNA levels for ISGs, or of cell surface markers for MDDC differentiation, was not detected. Vpx did not rescue HIV-2 or SIVMAC transduction from the antiviral state, even in the presence of SIVMAC or HIV-2 VLPs bearing additional Vpx, or in the presence of HIV-1 VLPs bearing all accessory genes. In contrast to the effect of Vpx on transduction of untreated MDDCs, HIV-1 rescue from the antiviral state was not dependent upon Vpx interaction with DCAF1 or on the presence of DCAF1 within the MDDC target cells. Additionally, although Vpx increased the level of HIV-1 reverse transcripts in MDDCs to the same extent whether or not MDDCs were treated with IFN or LPS, Vpx rescued a block specific to the antiviral state that occurred after HIV-1 c

  19. Alpha-lipoic acid effects on brain glial functions accompanying double-stranded RNA antiviral and inflammatory signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scumpia, Philip O; Kelly-Scumpia, Kindra; Stevens, Bruce R

    2014-01-01

    Double-stranded RNAs (dsRNA) serve as viral ligands that trigger innate immunity in astrocytes and microglial, as mediated through Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR). Beneficial transient TLR3 and PKR anti-viral signaling can become deleterious when events devolve into inflammation and cytotoxicity. Viral products in the brain cause glial cell dysfunction, and are a putative etiologic factor in neuropsychiatric disorders, notably schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, Parkinson's, and autism spectrum. Alpha-lipoic acid (LA) has been proposed as a possible therapeutic neuroprotectant. The objective of this study was to test our hypothesis that LA can control untoward antiviral mechanisms associated with neural dysfunction. Utilizing rat brain glial cultures (91% astrocytes:9% microglia) treated with PKR- and TLR3-ligand/viral mimetic dsRNA, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (polyI:C), we report in vitro glial antiviral signaling and LA reduction of the effects of this signaling. LA blunted the dsRNA-stimulated expression of IFNα/β-inducible genes Mx1, PKR, and TLR3. And in polyI:C treated cells, LA promoted gene expression of rate-limiting steps that benefit healthy neural redox status in glutamateric systems. To this end, LA decreased dsRNA-induced inflammatory signaling by downregulating IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, iNOS, and CAT2 transcripts. In the presence of polyI:C, LA prevented cultured glial cytotoxicity which was correlated with increased expression of factors known to cooperatively control glutamate/cystine/glutathione redox cycling, namely glutamate uptake transporter GLAST/EAAT1, γ-glutamyl cysteine ligase catalytic and regulatory subunits, and IL-10. Glutamate exporting transporter subunits 4F2hc and xCT were downregulated by LA in dsRNA-stimulated glia. l-Glutamate net uptake was inhibited by dsRNA, and this was relieved by LA. Glutathione synthetase mRNA levels were unchanged by dsRNA or LA. This study demonstrates the protective

  20. Peripheral dendritic cells are essential for both the innate and adaptive antiviral immune responses in the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steel, Christina D.; Hahto, Suzanne M.; Ciavarra, Richard P.

    2009-01-01

    Intranasal application of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) causes acute infection of the central nervous system (CNS). However, VSV encephalitis is not invariably fatal, suggesting that the CNS may contain a professional antigen-presenting cell (APC) capable of inducing or propagating a protective antiviral immune response. To examine this possibility, we first characterized the cellular elements that infiltrate the brain as well as the activation status of resident microglia in the brains of normal and transgenic mice acutely ablated of peripheral dendritic cells (DCs) in vivo. VSV encephalitis was characterized by a pronounced infiltrate of myeloid cells (CD45 high CD11b + ) and CD8 + T cells containing a subset that was specific for the immunodominant VSV nuclear protein epitope. This T cell response correlated temporally with a rapid and sustained upregulation of MHC class I expression on microglia, whereas class II expression was markedly delayed. Ablation of peripheral DCs profoundly inhibited the inflammatory response as well as infiltration of virus-specific CD8 + T cells. Unexpectedly, the VSV-induced interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) response in the CNS remained intact in DC-deficient mice. Thus, both the inflammatory and certain components of the adaptive primary antiviral immune response in the CNS are dependent on peripheral DCs in vivo.

  1. miR-194 Inhibits Innate Antiviral Immunity by Targeting FGF2 in Influenza H1N1 Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyu Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2 or basic FGF regulates a wide range of cell biological functions including proliferation, angiogenesis, migration, differentiation, and injury repair. However, the roles of FGF2 and the underlying mechanisms of action in influenza A virus (IAV-induced lung injury remain largely unexplored. In this study, we report that microRNA-194-5p (miR-194 expression is significantly decreased in A549 alveolar epithelial cells (AECs following infection with IAV/Beijing/501/2009 (BJ501. We found that miR-194 can directly target FGF2, a novel antiviral regulator, to suppress FGF2 expression at the mRNA and protein levels. Overexpression of miR-194 facilitated IAV replication by negatively regulating type I interferon (IFN production, whereas reintroduction of FGF2 abrogated the miR-194-induced effects on IAV replication. Conversely, inhibition of miR-194 alleviated IAV-induced lung injury by promoting type I IFN antiviral activities in vivo. Importantly, FGF2 activated the retinoic acid-inducible gene I signaling pathway, whereas miR-194 suppressed the phosphorylation of tank binding kinase 1 and IFN regulatory factor 3. Our findings suggest that the miR-194-FGF2 axis plays a vital role in IAV-induced lung injury, and miR-194 antagonism might be a potential therapeutic target during IAV infection.

  2. CARMA3 Is a Host Factor Regulating the Balance of Inflammatory and Antiviral Responses against Viral Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changying Jiang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Host response to RNA virus infection is sensed by RNA sensors such as RIG-I, which induces MAVS-mediated NF-κB and IRF3 activation to promote inflammatory and antiviral responses, respectively. Here, we have found that CARMA3, a scaffold protein previously shown to mediate NF-κB activation induced by GPCR and EGFR, positively regulates MAVS-induced NF-κB activation. However, our data suggest that CARMA3 sequesters MAVS from forming high-molecular-weight aggregates, thereby suppressing TBK1/IRF3 activation. Interestingly, following NF-κB activation upon virus infection, CARMA3 is targeted for proteasome-dependent degradation, which releases MAVS to activate IRF3. When challenged with vesicular stomatitis virus or influenza A virus, CARMA3-deficient mice showed reduced disease symptoms compared to those of wild-type mice as a result of less inflammation and a stronger ability to clear infected virus. Altogether, our results reveal the role of CARMA3 in regulating the balance of host antiviral and pro-inflammatory responses against RNA virus infection.

  3. The Antiviral and Cancer Genomic DNA Deaminase APOBEC3H Is Regulated by an RNA-Mediated Dimerization Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaban, Nadine M; Shi, Ke; Lauer, Kate V; Carpenter, Michael A; Richards, Christopher M; Salamango, Daniel; Wang, Jiayi; Lopresti, Michael W; Banerjee, Surajit; Levin-Klein, Rena; Brown, William L; Aihara, Hideki; Harris, Reuben S

    2018-01-04

    Human APOBEC3H and homologous single-stranded DNA cytosine deaminases are unique to mammals. These DNA-editing enzymes function in innate immunity by restricting the replication of viruses and transposons. APOBEC3H also contributes to cancer mutagenesis. Here, we address the fundamental nature of RNA in regulating human APOBEC3H activities. APOBEC3H co-purifies with RNA as an inactive protein, and RNase A treatment enables strong DNA deaminase activity. RNA-binding-defective mutants demonstrate clear separation of function by becoming DNA hypermutators. Biochemical and crystallographic data demonstrate a mechanism in which double-stranded RNA mediates enzyme dimerization. Additionally, APOBEC3H separation-of-function mutants show that RNA binding is required for cytoplasmic localization, packaging into HIV-1 particles, and antiviral activity. Overall, these results support a model in which structured RNA negatively regulates the potentially harmful DNA deamination activity of APOBEC3H while, at the same time, positively regulating its antiviral activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Activating transcription factor 3 is crucial for antitumor activity and to strengthen the antiviral properties of Onconase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vert, Anna; Castro, Jessica; Ribó, Marc; Benito, Antoni; Vilanova, Maria

    2017-02-14

    Onconase is a ribonuclease that presents both antitumor and antiviral properties linked to its ribonucleolytic activity and represents a new class of RNA-damaging drugs. It has reached clinical trials for the treatment of several cancers and human papilloma virus warts. Onconase targets different RNAs in the cell cytosol but Onconase-treated cells present features that are different from a simple arrest of protein synthesis. We have used microarray-derived transcriptional profiling to identify Onconase-regulated genes in two ovarian cancer cell lines (NCI/ADR-RES and OVCAR-8). RT-qPCR analyses have confirmed the microarray findings. We have identified a network of up-regulated genes implicated in different signaling pathways that may explain the cytotoxic effects exerted by Onconase. Among these genes, activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) plays a central role in the key events triggered by Onconase in treated cancer cells that finally lead to apoptosis. This mechanism, mediated by ATF3, is cell-type independent. Up-regulation of ATF3 may also explain the antiviral properties of this ribonuclease because this factor is involved in halting viral genome replication, keeping virus latency or preventing viral oncogenesis. Finally, Onconase-regulated genes are different from those affected by nuclear-directed ribonucleases.

  5. Antiviral Activity of Some Plants Used in Nepalese Traditional Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rajbhandari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanolic extracts of 41 plant species belonging to 27 families used in the traditional medicine in Nepal have been investigated for in vitro antiviral activity against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 and influenza virus A by dye uptake assay in the systems HSV-1/Vero cells and influenza virus A/MDCK cells. The extracts of Astilbe rivularis, Bergenia ciliata, Cassiope fastigiata and Thymus linearis showed potent anti-herpes viral activity. The extracts of Allium oreoprasum, Androsace strigilosa, Asparagus filicinus, Astilbe rivularis, Bergenia ciliata and Verbascum thapsus exhibited strong anti-influenza viral activity. Only the extracts of A. rivularis and B. ciliata demonstrated remarkable activity against both viruses.

  6. Griffithsin: An Antiviral Lectin with Outstanding Therapeutic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Lusvarghi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Griffithsin (GRFT, an algae-derived lectin, is one of the most potent viral entry inhibitors discovered to date. It is currently being developed as a microbicide with broad-spectrum activity against several enveloped viruses. GRFT can inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection at picomolar concentrations, surpassing the ability of most anti-HIV agents. The potential to inhibit other viruses as well as parasites has also been demonstrated. Griffithsin’s antiviral activity stems from its ability to bind terminal mannoses present in high-mannose oligosaccharides and crosslink these glycans on the surface of the viral envelope glycoproteins. Here, we review structural and biochemical studies that established mode of action and facilitated construction of GRFT analogs, mechanisms that may lead to resistance, and in vitro and pre-clinical results that support the therapeutic potential of this lectin.

  7. Direct-acting antiviral agents for hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiser, Jennifer J; Flexner, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Two selective inhibitors of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease nearly double the cure rates for this infection when combined with peginterferon alfa and ribavirin. These drugs, boceprevir and telaprevir, received regulatory approval in 2011 and are the first direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) that selectively target HCV. During 2012, at least 30 additional DAAs were in various stages of clinical development. HCV protease inhibitors, polymerase inhibitors, and NS5A inhibitors (among others) can achieve high cure rates when combined with peginterferon alfa and ribavirin and demonstrate promise when used in combination with one another. Current research is attempting to improve the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of these agents, define the best regimens, and determine treatment strategies that produce the best outcomes. Several DAAs will reach the market simultaneously, and resources will be needed to guide the use of these drugs. We review the clinical pharmacology, trial results, and remaining challenges of DAAs for the treatment of HCV.

  8. Optimal antiviral switching to minimize resistance risk in HIV therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutao Luo

    Full Text Available The development of resistant strains of HIV is the most significant barrier to effective long-term treatment of HIV infection. The most common causes of resistance development are patient noncompliance and pre-existence of resistant strains. In this paper, methods of antiviral regimen switching are developed that minimize the risk of pre-existing resistant virus emerging during therapy switches necessitated by virological failure. Two distinct cases are considered; a single previous virological failure and multiple virological failures. These methods use optimal control approaches on experimentally verified mathematical models of HIV strain competition and statistical models of resistance risk. It is shown that, theoretically, order-of-magnitude reduction in risk can be achieved, and multiple previous virological failures enable greater success of these methods in reducing the risk of subsequent treatment failures.

  9. Design, Synthesis and Antiviral Activity Studies of Schizonepetin Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwei Ding

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A series of schizonepetin derivatives have been designed and synthesized in order to obtain potent antivirus agents. The antiviral activity against HSV-1 and influenza virus H3N2 as well as the cytotoxicity of these derivatives was evaluated by using cytopathic effect (CPE inhibition assay in vitro. Compounds M2, M4, M5 and M34 showed higher inhibitory activity against HSV-1 virus with the TC50 values being in micromole. Compounds M28, M33, and M35 showed higher inhibitory activity against influenza virus H3N2 with their TC50 values being 96.4, 71.0 and 75.4 μM, respectively. Preliminary biological activity evaluation indicated that the anti-H3N2 and anti-HSV-1 activities improved obviously through the introduction of halogen into the structure of schizonepetin.

  10. Towards antiviral therapies for treating dengue virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptein, Suzanne Jf; Neyts, Johan

    2016-10-01

    Dengue virus is an emerging human pathogen that poses a huge public health burden by infecting annually about 390 million individuals of which a quarter report with clinical manifestations. Although progress has been made in understanding dengue pathogenesis, a licensed vaccine or antiviral therapy against this virus is still lacking. Treatment of patients is confined to symptomatic alleviation and supportive care. The development of dengue therapeutics thus remains of utmost importance. This review focuses on the few molecules that were evaluated in dengue virus-infected patients: balapiravir, chloroquine, lovastatin, prednisolone and celgosivir. The lessons learned from these clinical trials can be very helpful for the design of future trials for the next generation of dengue virus inhibitors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Potential of small-molecule fungal metabolites in antiviral chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Biswajit G

    2017-08-01

    Various viral diseases, such as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, influenza, and hepatitis, have emerged as leading causes of human death worldwide. Scientific endeavor since invention of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase of pox virus in 1967 resulted in better understanding of virus replication and development of various novel therapeutic strategies. Despite considerable advancement in every facet of drug discovery process, development of commercially viable, safe, and effective drugs for these viruses still remains a big challenge. Decades of intense research yielded a handful of natural and synthetic therapeutic options. But emergence of new viruses and drug-resistant viral strains had made new drug development process a never-ending battle. Small-molecule fungal metabolites due to their vast diversity, stereochemical complexity, and preapproved biocompatibility always remain an attractive source for new drug discovery. Though, exploration of therapeutic importance of fungal metabolites has started early with discovery of penicillin, recent prediction asserted that only a small percentage (5-10%) of fungal species have been identified and much less have been scientifically investigated. Therefore, exploration of new fungal metabolites, their bioassay, and subsequent mechanistic study bears huge importance in new drug discovery endeavors. Though no fungal metabolites so far approved for antiviral treatment, many of these exhibited high potential against various viral diseases. This review comprehensively discussed about antiviral activities of fungal metabolites of diverse origin against some important viral diseases. This also highlighted the mechanistic details of inhibition of viral replication along with structure-activity relationship of some common and important classes of fungal metabolites.

  12. Effect of antiviral therapy for HCV on lipid levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauss, Stefan; Berger, Florian; Wehmeyer, Malte H; Ingiliz, Patrick; Hueppe, Dietrich; Lutz, Thomas; Simon, Karl G; Schewe, Knud; Rockstroh, Juergen K; Baumgarten, Axel; Christensen, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    HCV has complex interactions with human lipid metabolism leading to down regulation of cholesterol levels. Interferon (IFN) therapy has been shown to decrease cholesterol even further. With the availability of second-generation direct-acting antiviral agents (DAA) the effect of suppressing and eliminating HCV on lipid metabolism warrants reevaluation. Prospective German multicentre cohort on HCV- and HIV-HCV-infected patients treated with direct-antiviral agents (GECCO). Lipids were assessed at baseline, during and after therapy. Wilcoxon test corrected for multiple testing was used. For the analysis, 520 patients with chronic hepatitis C were available. Patients with chronic hepatitis C were treated as follows: sofosbuvir (SOF)/pegylated IFN (PEG-IFN)/ribavirin (RBV; HCV=34, HIV-HCV=36), SOF/RBV (HCV=47, HIV-HCV=16), SOF/simeprevir (HCV=9, HCV-HIV=2), SOF/daclatasvir +/- RBV (HCV=27, HIV-HCV=47), SOF/ledipasvir +/- RBV (HCV=147, HCV-HIV=100) and ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir +/- dasabuvir +/- RBV (2D, HCV=2, HCV-HIV=6; 3D, HCV=39, HCV-HIV=8). On treatment there was a statistically significant increase in total cholesterol for any IFN-free DAA regimen, which was maintained after end of therapy. Changes of total cholesterol were driven by changes in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, whereas high-density lipoprotein cholesterol remained unchanged. In contrast, total cholesterol decreased on SOF/PEG-IFN/RBV and increased after end of therapy above baseline levels. Triglycerides increased during treatment with SOF/PEG-IFN/RBV, but not on DAA-only regimens. Suppressing and eliminating HCV with IFN-free DAA regimens increased cholesterol levels, but had no effect on triglycerides. In contrast IFN-based therapy decreased cholesterol and increased triglycerides during treatment and led to increases in cholesterol after achieving sustained virological response.

  13. In Vitro Antiviral Effect of "Nanosilver" on Influenza Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Mehrbod

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Influenza is a viral infectious disease with frequent seasonal epidemics causing world-wide economical and social effects. Due to antigenic shifts and drifts of influenza virus, long-lasting vaccine has not been developed so far. The current annual vaccines and effective antiviral drugs are not available sufficiently. Therefore in order to prevent spread of infectious agents including viruses, antiseptics are considered by world health authorities. Small particles of silver have a long history as general antiseptic and disinfectant. Silver does not induce resistance in microorganisms and this ability in Nano-size is stronger. Materials and methods: The aim of this study was to determine antiviral effects of Nanosilver against influenza virus. TCID50 (50% Tissue Culture Infectious Dose of the virus as well as CC50 (50% Cytotoxic Concentration of Nanosilver was obtained by MTT (3- [4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide, Sigma method. This compound was non-toxic to MDCK (Madin-Darbey Canin Kidney cells at concentration up to 1 µg/ml.  Effective minimal cytotoxic concentration and 100 TCID50 of the virus were added to the confluent cells.  Inhibitory effects of Nanosilver on the virus and its cytotoxicity were assessed at different temperatures using Hemagglutination (HA assay, RT-PCR (Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction, and DIF (Direct Immunofluorescent. RT-PCR and free band densitometry software were used to compare the volume of the PCR product bands on the gel. Results and Discussion:  In this study it was found that Nanosilver has destructive effect on the virus membrane glycoprotein knobs as well as the cells.

  14. Chemistry and Antiviral Activity of Arrabidaea pulchra (Bignoniaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José D. Souza Filho

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to carry out a bioguided isolation of antiviral chemical constituents from an ethanol extract of leaves from Arrabidaea pulchra (Cham. Sandwith (EEAPL that had shown in vitro activity in a previous screening using DNA and RNA viruses. The activity of EEPAL was evaluated against the DNA viruses Human herpesvirus 1 (HSV-1 and Vaccinia virus Western Reserve (VACV-WR as well as against the RNA viruses Murine encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV, and Dengue virus 2 (DENV-2 by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT colorimetric assay. Cytotoxicity was determined in LLCMK2 and Vero cells and the Selectivity Indexes (SI were calculated. The most potent effect was observed against DENV-2 (EC50 46.8 ± 1.6 µg mL−1; SI 2.7. For HSV-1 and VACV-WR EC50 values > 200 µg mL−1 were determined, while no inhibition of the cytopathic effect was observed with EMCV. Bioguided fractionation of EEAPL by partition between immiscible solvents followed by chromatography over a Sephadex LH20 column afforded two arylpropanoid glycosides, verbascoside (AP 1 and caffeoylcalleryanin (AP 2, along with a terpenoid, ursolic acid (AP 3. AP 1 and AP 3 exhibited similar anti-DENV-2 profiles, with SI values of 3.8 and 3.1, respectively, while AP 2 was the most effective anti-DENV-2 constituent, with a SI of 20.0. Our results show that A. pulchra leaves ethanol extract (EEAPL affords compounds with antiviral activity, mainly against DENV-2.

  15. Induction of Antiviral Immune Response through Recognition of the Repeating Subunit Pattern of Viral Capsids Is Toll-Like Receptor 2 Dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepardson, Kelly M; Schwarz, Benjamin; Larson, Kyle; Morton, Rachelle V; Avera, John; McCoy, Kimberly; Caffrey, Alayna; Harmsen, Ann; Douglas, Trevor; Rynda-Apple, Agnieszka

    2017-11-14

    Although viruses and viral capsids induce rapid immune responses, little is known about viral pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) that are exhibited on their surface. Here, we demonstrate that the repeating protein subunit pattern common to most virus capsids is a molecular pattern that induces a Toll-like-receptor-2 (TLR2)-dependent antiviral immune response. This early antiviral immune response regulates the clearance of subsequent bacterial superinfections, which are a primary cause of morbidities associated with influenza virus infections. Utilizing this altered susceptibility to subsequent bacterial challenge as an outcome, we determined that multiple unrelated, empty, and replication-deficient capsids initiated early TLR2-dependent immune responses, similar to intact influenza virus or murine pneumovirus. These TLR2-mediated responses driven by the capsid were not dependent upon the capsid's shape, size, origin, or amino acid sequence. However, they were dependent upon the multisubunit arrangement of the capsid proteins, because unlike intact capsids, individual capsid subunits did not enhance bacterial clearance. Further, we demonstrated that even a linear microfilament protein built from repeating protein subunits (F-actin), but not its monomer (G-actin), induced similar kinetics of subsequent bacterial clearance as did virus capsid. However, although capsids and F-actin induced similar bacterial clearance, in macrophages they required distinct TLR2 heterodimers for this response (TLR2/6 or TLR2/1, respectively) and different phagocyte populations were involved in the execution of these responses in vivo Our results demonstrate that TLR2 responds to invading viral particles that are composed of repeating protein subunits, indicating that this common architecture of virus capsids is a previously unrecognized molecular pattern. IMPORTANCE Rapid and precise pathogen identification is critical for the initiation of pathogen-specific immune responses

  16. TRIM11 negatively regulates IFNβ production and antiviral activity by targeting TBK1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younglang Lee

    Full Text Available The innate immune response is a host defense mechanism against infection by viruses and bacteria. Type I interferons (IFNα/β play a crucial role in innate immunity. If not tightly regulated under normal conditions and during immune responses, IFN production can become aberrant, leading to inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. In this study, we identified TRIM11 (tripartite motif containing 11 as a novel negative regulator of IFNβ production. Ectopic expression of TRIM11 decreased IFNβ promoter activity induced by poly (I:C stimulation or overexpression of RIG-I (retinoic acid-inducible gene-I signaling cascade components RIG-IN (constitutively active form of RIG-I, MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein, or TBK1 (TANK-binding kinase-1. Conversely, TRIM11 knockdown enhanced IFNβ promoter activity induced by these stimuli. Moreover, TRIM11 overexpression inhibited the phosphorylation and dimerization of IRF3 and expression of IFNβ mRNA. By contrast, TRIM11 knockdown increased the IRF3 phosphorylation and IFNβ mRNA expression. We also found that TRIM11 and TBK1, a key kinase that phosphorylates IRF3 in the RIG-I pathway, interacted with each other through CC and CC2 domain, respectively. This interaction was enhanced in the presence of the TBK1 adaptor proteins, NAP1 (NF-κB activating kinase-associated protein-1, SINTBAD (similar to NAP1 TBK1 adaptor or TANK (TRAF family member-associated NF-κB activator. Consistent with its inhibitory role in RIG-I-mediated IFNβ signaling, TRIM11 overexpression enhanced viral infectivity, whereas TRIM11 knockdown produced the opposite effect. Collectively, our results suggest that TRIM11 inhibits RIG-I-mediated IFNβ production by targeting the TBK1 signaling complex.

  17. Antiviral Activity of Graphene Oxide: How Sharp Edged Structure and Charge Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shiyi; Shao, Kang; Li, Zhonghua; Guo, Nan; Zuo, Yunpeng; Li, Qin; Lu, Zhicheng; Chen, Lu; He, Qigai; Han, Heyou

    2015-09-30

    Graphene oxide and its derivatives have been widely explored for their antimicrobial properties due to their high surface-to-volume ratios and unique chemical and physical properties. However, little information is available on their effects on viruses. In this study, we report the broad-spectrum antiviral activity of GO against pseudorabies virus (PRV, a DNA virus) and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV, an RNA virus). Our results showed that GO significantly suppressed the infection of PRV and PEDV for a 2 log reduction in virus titers at noncytotoxic concentrations. The potent antiviral activity of both GO and rGO can be attributed to the unique single-layer structure and negative charge. First, GO exhibited potent antiviral activity when conjugated with PVP, a nonionic polymer, but not when conjugated with PDDA, a cationic polymer. Additionally, the precursors Gt and GtO showed much weaker antiviral activity than monolayer GO and rGO, suggesting that the nanosheet structure is important for antiviral properties. Furthermore, GO inactivated both viruses by structural destruction prior to viral entry. The overall results suggest the potential of graphene oxide as a novel promising antiviral agent with a broad and potent antiviral activity.

  18. Antiviral activity of silver nanoparticle/chitosan composites against H1N1 influenza A virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yasutaka; Ono, Takeshi; Miyahira, Yasushi; Nguyen, Vinh Quang; Matsui, Takemi; Ishihara, Masayuki

    2013-02-01

    Silver nanoparticle (Ag NP)/chitosan (Ch) composites with antiviral activity against H1N1 influenza A virus were prepared. The Ag NP/Ch composites were obtained as yellow or brown floc-like powders following reaction at room temperature in aqueous medium. Ag NPs (3.5, 6.5, and 12.9 nm average diameters) were embedded into the chitosan matrix without aggregation or size alternation. The antiviral activity of the Ag NP/Ch composites was evaluated by comparing the TCID50 ratio of viral suspensions treated with the composites to untreated suspensions. For all sizes of Ag NPs tested, antiviral activity against H1N1 influenza A virus increased as the concentration of Ag NPs increased; chitosan alone exhibited no antiviral activity. Size dependence of the Ag NPs on antiviral activity was also observed: antiviral activity was generally stronger with smaller Ag NPs in the composites. These results indicate that Ag NP/Ch composites interacting with viruses exhibit antiviral activity.

  19. Recombinant protein hydrazides: application to site-specific protein PEGylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Jennifer; Anderson, David; McGregor, Joanne; Cotton, Graham

    2011-06-15

    Here, we describe a novel method for the site-specific C-terminal PEGylation of recombinant proteins. This general approach exploits chemical cleavage of precursor intein-fusion proteins with hydrazine to directly produce recombinant protein hydrazides. This unique functionality within the protein sequence then facilitates site-specific C-terminal modification by hydrazone-forming ligation reactions. This approach was used to generate folded, site-specifically C-terminal PEGylated IFNalpha2b and IFNbeta1b, which retained excellent antiviral activity, demonstrating the utility of this technology in the PEGylation of therapeutic proteins. As this methodology is straightforward to perform, is compatible with disulfide bonds, and is exclusively selective for the protein C-terminus, it shows great potential as general technology for the site-specific engineering and labeling of recombinant proteins.

  20. [Effectiveness and safety of antiviral therapy of military personnel suffering from chronic hepatitis C].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, K V; Gusev, D A; Kozlov, K V; Shishkin, M K; Sukachev, V S; Shakhmanov, D M; Zhabrov, S S

    2015-04-01

    In order to evaluate effectiveness and safety of antiviral therapy schemes examined and treated 191 patients with chronic bepatitis C were assigned standard interferon and ribavirin, pegslated interferon and ribavirin, the total duration of the course coput 24-48 weeks. Based on clinical and laboratory parameters evaluated the safety of antiviral therapy. Formation of sustainable viral response, depending on the genotype observed, was given at 58,9-70%.of patients. In case of insufficient. antiviral therapy was prescribed a second course that will improve the effectiveness of treatment to 90-95%. Correction of adverse events was held lower dosages of interferon and/or ribavirin.

  1. A neuron-specific antiviral mechanism prevents lethal flaviviral infection of mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiaoping; Zhang, Rudian; Pang, Xiaojing; Liang, Guodong; Wang, Penghua; Cheng, Gong

    2015-04-01

    Mosquitoes are natural vectors for many etiologic agents of human viral diseases. Mosquito-borne flaviviruses can persistently infect the mosquito central nervous system without causing dramatic pathology or influencing the mosquito behavior and lifespan. The mechanism by which the mosquito nervous system resists flaviviral infection is still largely unknown. Here we report that an Aedes aegypti homologue of the neural factor Hikaru genki (AaHig) efficiently restricts flavivirus infection of the central nervous system. AaHig was predominantly expressed in the mosquito nervous system and localized to the plasma membrane of neural cells. Functional blockade of AaHig enhanced Dengue virus (DENV) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), but not Sindbis virus (SINV), replication in mosquito heads and consequently caused neural apoptosis and a dramatic reduction in the mosquito lifespan. Consistently, delivery of recombinant AaHig to mosquitoes reduced viral infection. Furthermore, the membrane-localized AaHig directly interfaced with a highly conserved motif in the surface envelope proteins of DENV and JEV, and consequently interrupted endocytic viral entry into mosquito cells. Loss of either plasma membrane targeting or virion-binding ability rendered AaHig nonfunctional. Interestingly, Culex pipien pallens Hig also demonstrated a prominent anti-flavivirus activity, suggesting a functionally conserved function for Hig. Our results demonstrate that an evolutionarily conserved antiviral mechanism prevents lethal flaviviral infection of the central nervous system in mosquitoes, and thus may facilitate flaviviral transmission in nature.

  2. Antiviral Type I and Type III Interferon Responses in the Central Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorgeloos, Frédéric; Kreit, Marguerite; Hermant, Pascale; Lardinois, Cécile; Michiels, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) harbors highly differentiated cells, such as neurons that are essential to coordinate the functions of complex organisms. This organ is partly protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) from toxic substances and pathogens carried in the bloodstream. Yet, neurotropic viruses can reach the CNS either by crossing the BBB after viremia, or by exploiting motile infected cells as Trojan horses, or by using axonal transport. Type I and type III interferons (IFNs) are cytokines that are critical to control early steps of viral infections. Deficiencies in the IFN pathway have been associated with fatal viral encephalitis both in humans and mice. Therefore, the IFN system provides an essential protection of the CNS against viral infections. Yet, basal activity of the IFN system appears to be low within the CNS, likely owing to the toxicity of IFN to this organ. Moreover, after viral infection, neurons and oligodendrocytes were reported to be relatively poor IFN producers and appear to keep some susceptibility to neurotropic viruses, even in the presence of IFN. This review addresses some trends and recent developments concerning the role of type I and type III IFNs in: i) preventing neuroinvasion and infection of CNS cells; ii) the identity of IFN-producing cells in the CNS; iii) the antiviral activity of ISGs; and iv) the activity of viral proteins of neurotropic viruses that target the IFN pathway. PMID:23503326

  3. Synthesis of retinoid vitamin A-vitamin B6 conjugate analogues for antiviral chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesel, Andreas J.

    2003-01-01

    The synthesis of retinoid vitamin A-vitamin B 6 conjugate analogues from a vitamin B 6 coenzyme analogue and putative HIV-1 trans-activating transcriptional regulatory protein Tat antagonist (Z)-5 ' -O-phosphono-pyridoxylidenerhodanine (B6PR) monosodium salt hemiheptadecahydrate [(Z)-B6PRNa8.5H 2 O] is discussed here. All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) is coupled to B6PR by a modified Stork enamine acylation. It results in a product library of more than eight compounds, each with at least one intact all-trans or 13-cis vitamin A double bond system. This yellow oily concentrate mixture was subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-ToF) mass spectrometry (MS), UV/VIS-spectrophotometry, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-NMR). The chemical structures of six components of the concentrate mixture could be established by combination of these analytical methods. The two main components are 65% 2 ' C,3O-(all-trans-retinylidyne)B6PT (B6RA) and 25% 2 ' C-(all-trans-retinoyl)B6PT, chemically derived from (5RS)-5-(5 ' -O-phosphono-pyridoxyl)-2,4-thiazolidinedione (B6PT). This new retinoid selection could be of further interest in antiviral applications, especially treating conditions caused by RNA viruses like HIV

  4. RIG-I antiviral signaling drives interleukin-23 production and psoriasis-like skin disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Huiyuan; Lou, Fangzhou; Yin, Qianqian; Gao, Yuanyuan; Sun, Yang; Bai, Jing; Xu, Zhenyao; Liu, Zhaoyuan; Cai, Wei; Ke, Fang; Zhang, Lingyun; Zhou, Hong; Wang, Hong; Wang, Gang; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Hongxin; Wang, Zhugang; Ginhoux, Florent; Lu, Chuanjian; Su, Bing; Wang, Honglin

    2017-05-01

    Retinoic acid inducible-gene I (RIG-I) functions as one of the major sensors of RNA viruses. DDX58 , which encodes the RIG-I protein, has been newly identified as a susceptibility gene in psoriasis. Here, we show that the activation of RIG-I by 5'ppp-dsRNA, its synthetic ligand, directly causes the production of IL-23 and triggers psoriasis-like skin disease in mice. Repeated injections of IL-23 to the ears failed to induce IL-23 production and a full psoriasis-like skin phenotype, in either germ-free or RIG-I-deficient mice. RIG-I is also critical for a full development of skin inflammation in imiquimod (IMQ)-induced psoriasis-like mouse model. Furthermore, RIG-I-mediated endogenous IL-23 production was mainly confined to the CD11c + dendritic cells (DCs) via nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling, and stimulated RIG-I expression in an auto-regulatory feedback loop. Thus, our data suggest that the dysregulation in the antiviral immune responses of hosts through the innate pattern recognition receptors may trigger the skin inflammatory conditions in the pathophysiology of psoriasis. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  5. Antiviral Type I and Type III Interferon Responses in the Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Michiels

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system (CNS harbors highly differentiated cells, such as neurons that are essential to coordinate the functions of complex organisms. This organ is partly protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB from toxic substances and pathogens carried in the bloodstream. Yet, neurotropic viruses can reach the CNS either by crossing the BBB after viremia, or by exploiting motile infected cells as Trojan horses, or by using axonal transport. Type I and type III interferons (IFNs are cytokines that are critical to control early steps of viral infections. Deficiencies in the IFN pathway have been associated with fatal viral encephalitis both in humans and mice. Therefore, the IFN system provides an essential protection of the CNS against viral infections. Yet, basal activity of the IFN system appears to be low within the CNS, likely owing to the toxicity of IFN to this organ. Moreover, after viral infection, neurons and oligodendrocytes were reported to be relatively poor IFN producers and appear to keep some susceptibility to neurotropic viruses, even in the presence of IFN. This review addresses some trends and recent developments concerning the role of type I and type III IFNs in: i preventing neuroinvasion and infection of CNS cells; ii the identity of IFN-producing cells in the CNS; iii the antiviral activity of ISGs; and iv the activity of viral proteins of neurotropic viruses that target the IFN pathway.

  6. Structural basis of influenza virus fusion inhibition by the antiviral drug Arbidol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadam, Rameshwar U.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2016-12-21

    The broad-spectrum antiviral drug Arbidol shows efficacy against influenza viruses by targeting the hemagglutinin (HA) fusion machinery. However, the structural basis of the mechanism underlying fusion inhibition by Arbidol has remained obscure, thereby hindering its further development as a specific and optimized influenza therapeutic. We determined crystal structures of Arbidol in complex with influenza virus HA from pandemic 1968 H3N2 and recent 2013 H7N9 viruses. Arbidol binds in a hydrophobic cavity in the HA trimer stem at the interface between two protomers. This cavity is distal to the conserved epitope targeted by broadly neutralizing stem antibodies and is ~16 Å from the fusion peptide. Arbidol primarily makes hydrophobic interactions with the binding site but also induces some conformational rearrangements to form a network of inter- and intraprotomer salt bridges. By functioning as molecular glue, Arbidol stabilizes the prefusion conformation of HA that inhibits the large conformational rearrangements associated with membrane fusion in the low pH of the endosome. This unique binding mode compared with the small-molecule inhibitors of other class I fusion proteins enhances our understanding of how small molecules can function as fusion inhibitors and guides the development of broad-spectrum therapeutics against influenza virus.

  7. Antiviral type I and type III interferon responses in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorgeloos, Frédéric; Kreit, Marguerite; Hermant, Pascale; Lardinois, Cécile; Michiels, Thomas

    2013-03-15

    The central nervous system (CNS) harbors highly differentiated cells, such as neurons that are essential to coordinate the functions of complex organisms. This organ is partly protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) from toxic substances and pathogens carried in the bloodstream. Yet, neurotropic viruses can reach the CNS either by crossing the BBB after viremia, or by exploiting motile infected cells as Trojan horses, or by using axonal transport. Type I and type III interferons (IFNs) are cytokines that are critical to control early steps of viral infections. Deficiencies in the IFN pathway have been associated with fatal viral encephalitis both in humans and mice. Therefore, the IFN system provides an essential protection of the CNS against viral infections. Yet, basal activity of the IFN system appears to be low within the CNS, likely owing to the toxicity of IFN to this organ. Moreover, after viral infection, neurons and oligodendrocytes were reported to be relatively poor IFN producers and appear to keep some susceptibility to neurotropic viruses, even in the presence of IFN. This review addresses some trends and recent developments concerning the role of type I and type III IFNs in: i) preventing neuroinvasion and infection of CNS cells; ii) the identity of IFN-producing cells in the CNS; iii) the antiviral activity of ISGs; and iv) the activity of viral proteins of neurotropic viruses that target the IFN pathway.

  8. Production of transgenic pigs over-expressing the antiviral gene Mx1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanmei Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The myxovirus resistance gene (Mx1 has a broad spectrum of antiviral activities. It is therefore an interesting candidate gene to improve disease resistance in farm animals. In this study, we report the use of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT to produce transgenic pigs over-expressing the Mx1 gene. These transgenic pigs express approximately 15–25 times more Mx1 mRNA than non-transgenic pigs, and the protein level of Mx1 was also markedly enhanced. We challenged fibroblast cells isolated from the ear skin of transgenic and control pigs with influenza A virus and classical swine fever virus (CFSV. Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA revealed a profound decrease of influenza A proliferation in Mx1 transgenic cells. Growth kinetics showed an approximately 10-fold reduction of viral copies in the transgenic cells compared to non-transgenic controls. Additionally, we found that the Mx1 transgenic cells were more resistant to CSFV infection in comparison to non-transgenic cells. These results demonstrate that the Mx1 transgene can protect against viral infection in cells of transgenic pigs and indicate that the Mx1 transgene can be harnessed to develop disease-resistant pigs.

  9. Synthesis, Antiviral Bioactivity of Novel 4-Thioquinazoline Derivatives Containing Chalcone Moiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihua Wan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A series of novel 4-thioquinazoline derivatives containing chalcone moiety were designed, synthesized and systematically evaluated for their antiviral activity against TMV. The bioassay results showed that most of these compounds exhibited moderate to good anti-TMV activity. In particular, compounds M2 and M6 possessed appreciable protection activities against TMV in vivo, with 50% effective concentration (EC50 values of 138.1 and 154.8 μg/mL, respectively, which were superior to that of Ribavirin (436.0 μg/mL. The results indicated that chalcone derivatives containing 4-thioquinazoline moiety could effectively control TMV. Meanwhile, the structure-activity relationship (SAR of the target compounds, studied using the three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR method of comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA based on the protection activities against TMV, demonstrated that the CoMFA model exhibited good predictive ability with the cross-validated q2 and non-cross-validated r2 values of 0.674 and 0.993, respectively. Meanwhile, the microscale thermophoresis (MST experimental showed that the compound M6 may interaction with the tobacco mosaic virus coat protein (TMV CP.

  10. Nonpathogenic Lactobacillus rhamnosus activates the inflammasome and antiviral responses in human macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettinen, Minja; Pietilä, Taija E.; Kekkonen, Riina A.; Kankainen, Matti; Latvala, Sinikka; Pirhonen, Jaana; Österlund, Pamela; Korpela, Riitta; Julkunen, Ilkka

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we have utilized global gene expression profiling to compare the responses of human primary macrophages to two closely related, well-characterized Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains GG and LC705, since our understanding of the responses elicited by nonpathogenic bacteria in human innate immune system is limited. Macrophages are phagocytic cells of the innate immune system that perform sentinel functions to initiate appropriate responses to surrounding stimuli. Macrophages that reside on gut mucosa encounter ingested and intestinal bacteria. Bacteria of Lactobacillus genus are nonpathogenic and used in food and as supplements with health-promoting probiotic potential. Our results demonstrate that live GG and LC705 induced quantitatively different gene expression profiles in macrophages. A gene ontology analysis revealed functional similarities and differences in responses to GG and LC705 that were reflected in host defense responses. Both GG and LC705 induced interleukin-1β production in macrophages that required caspase-1 activity. LC705, but not GG, induced type I interferon -dependent gene activation that correlated with its ability to prevent influenza A virus replication and production of viral proteins in macrophages. Our results indicate that nonpathogenic bacteria are able to activate the inflammasome. In addition, our results suggest that L. rhamnosus may prime the antiviral potential of human macrophages. PMID:22895087

  11. Structural characterization and antiviral activity of a novel heteropolysaccharide isolated from Grifola frondosa against enterovirus 71.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chao; Gao, Luying; Wang, Chunyang; Liu, Bin; Jin, Yu; Xing, Zheng

    2016-06-25

    A novel heteropolysaccharide from Grifola frondosa mycelia was extracted and purified using DEAE Sephadex A-50 and Sephadex G-200 chromatography. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR and (13)C NMR) spectroscopy were used to decipher the structure of the purified G. frondosa polysaccharide (GFP1). Chemical and spectral analysis revealed that GFP1, with an average molecular weight of 40.5kDa, possessed a 1,6-β-d-glucan backbone with a single 1,3-α-d-fucopyranosyl side-branching unit. Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the causative pathogen of hand-foot-and-mouth disease. GFP1 was tested for its anti-EV71 activity in cultured cells, which showed that EV71 viral replication was blocked and viral VP1 protein expression and genomic RNA synthesis were suppressed. Moreover, GFP1 exhibited apoptotic and other activities by suppressing the EV71-induced caspase-3 cleavage and IκBα down regulation. Our results demonstrate that the novel G. frondosa polysaccharide has antiviral activity, which could be valuable as a potentially new anti-EV71 therapeutic compound. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Nucleic acid polymers: Broad spectrum antiviral activity, antiviral mechanisms and optimization for the treatment of hepatitis B and hepatitis D infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaillant, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Antiviral polymers are a well-studied class of broad spectrum viral attachment/entry inhibitors whose activity increases with polymer length and with increased amphipathic (hydrophobic) character. The newest members of this class of compounds are nucleic acid polymers whose activity is derived from the sequence independent properties of phosphorothioated oligonucleotides as amphipathic polymers. Although the antiviral mechanisms and broad spectrum antiviral activity of nucleic acid polymers mirror the functionality of other members of this class, they exert in addition a unique post entry activity in hepatitis B infection which inhibits the release of HBsAg from infected hepatocytes. This review provides a general overview of the antiviral polymer class with a focus on nucleic acid polymers and their development as therapeutic agents for the treatment of hepatitis B/hepatitis D. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on ''An unfinished story: from the discovery of the Australia antigen to the development of new curative therapies for hepatitis B.''. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Coinjection of a vaccine and anti-viral agents can provide fast-acting protection from foot-and-mouth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Su-Hwa; Kim, Taeseong; Choi, Joo-Hyung; Park, Gundo; Lee, Kwang-Nyeong; Kim, Byounghan; Lee, Myoung-Heon; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Su-Mi; Park, Jong-Hyeon

    2017-07-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is the cause of an economically devastating animal disease. With commercial inactivated FMD vaccines, the protection against FMD virus (FMDV) begins a minimum of 4 days post vaccination (dpv). Therefore, antiviral agents could be proposed for rapid protection and to reduce the spread of FMDV during outbreaks until vaccine-induced protective immunity occurs. In previous studies, we have developed two recombinant adenoviruses that simultaneously express porcine interferon-α and interferon-γ (Ad-porcine IFN-αγ) and multiple siRNAs that target the non-structural protein-regions of FMDV (Ad-3siRNA), and we have shown that the combination of the two antiviral agents (referred to here as Ad combination) induced robust protection against FMDV in pigs. In an attempt to provide complete protection against FMDV, we co-administered Ad combination and the FMD vaccine to mice and pigs. In the C57BL/6 mice model, we observed rapid and continuous protection against homologous FMDV challenge from 1 to 3 dpv-the period in which vaccine-mediated immunity is absent. In the pig experiments, we found that most of the pigs (five out of six) that received vaccine + Ad combination and were challenged with FMDV at 1 or 2 dpv were clinically protected from FMDV. In addition, most of the pigs that received vaccine + Ad combination and all pigs inoculated with the vaccine only were clinically protected from an FMDV challenge at 7 dpv. We believe that the antiviral agent ensures early protection from FMDV, and the vaccine participates in protection after 7 dpv. Therefore, we can say that the combination of the FMD vaccine and effective antiviral agents may offer both fast-acting and continuous protection against FMDV. In further studies, we plan to design coadministration of Ad combination and novel vaccines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparative analysis of the lambda-interferons IL-28A and IL-29 regarding their transcriptome and their antiviral properties against hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diegelmann, Julia; Beigel, Florian; Zitzmann, Kathrin; Kaul, Artur; Göke, Burkhard; Auernhammer, Christoph J; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Diepolder, Helmut M; Brand, Stephan

    2010-12-08

    Specific differences in signaling and antiviral properties between the different Lambda-interferons, a novel group of interferons composed of IL-28A, IL-28B and IL-29, are currently unknown. This is the first study comparatively investigating the transcriptome and the antiviral properties of the Lambda-interferons IL-28A and IL-29. Expression studies were performed by microarray analysis, quantitative PCR (qPCR), reporter gene assays and immunoluminometric assays. Signaling was analyzed by Western blot. HCV replication was measured in Huh-7 cells expressing subgenomic HCV replicon. All hepatic cell lines investigated as well as primary hepatocytes expressed both IFN-λ receptor subunits IL-10R2 and IFN-λR1. Both, IL-28A and IL-29 activated STAT1 signaling. As revealed by microarray analysis, similar genes were induced by both cytokines in Huh-7 cells (IL-28A: 117 genes; IL-29: 111 genes), many of them playing a role in antiviral immunity. However, only IL-28A was able to significantly down-regulate gene expression (n = 272 down-regulated genes). Both cytokines significantly decreased HCV replication in Huh-7 cells. In comparison to liver biopsies of patients with non-viral liver disease, liver biopsies of patients with HCV showed significantly increased mRNA expression of IL-28A and IL-29. Moreover, IL-28A serum protein levels were elevated in HCV patients. In a murine model of viral hepatitis, IL-28 expression was significantly increased. IL-28A and IL-29 are up-regulated in HCV patients and are similarly effective in inducing antiviral genes and inhibiting HCV replication. In contrast to IL-29, IL-28A is a potent gene repressor. Both IFN-λs may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of chronic HCV.

  15. TRIM25 Identification in the Chinese Goose: Gene Structure, Tissue Expression Profiles, and Antiviral Immune Responses In Vivo and In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunan Wei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I and the RIG-I-like receptor (RLR protein play a critical role in the interferon (IFN response during RNA virus infection. The tripartite motif containing 25 proteins (TRIM25 was reported to modify caspase activation and RIG-I recruitment domains (CARDs via ubiquitin. These modifications allow TRIM25 to interact with mitochondrial antiviral signaling molecules (MAVs and form CARD-CARD tetramers. Goose TRIM25 was cloned from gosling lungs, which possess a 1662 bp open reading flame (ORF. This ORF encodes a predicted 554 amino acid protein consisting of a B-box domain, a coiled-coil domain, and a PRY/SPRY domain. The protein sequence has 89.25% sequence identity with Anas platyrhynchos TRIM25, 78.57% with Gallus gallus TRIM25, and 46.92% with Homo sapiens TRIM25. TRIM25 is expressed in all gosling and adult goose tissues examined. QRT-PCR revealed that goose TRIM25 transcription could be induced by goose IFN-α, goose IFN-γ, and goose IFN-λ, as well as a35 s polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C, oligodeoxynucleotides 2006 (ODN 2006, and resiquimod (R848 in vitro; however, it is inhibited in H9N2 infected goslings for unknown reasons. These data suggest that goose TRIM25 might play a positive role in the regulation of the antiviral immune response.

  16. TRIM25 Identification in the Chinese Goose: Gene Structure, Tissue Expression Profiles, and Antiviral Immune Responses In Vivo and In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yunan; Zhou, Hao; Wang, Anqi; Sun, Lipei; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Sun, Kunfeng; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun; Chen, Shun

    2016-01-01

    The retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) and the RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) protein play a critical role in the interferon (IFN) response during RNA virus infection. The tripartite motif containing 25 proteins (TRIM25) was reported to modify caspase activation and RIG-I recruitment domains (CARDs) via ubiquitin. These modifications allow TRIM25 to interact with mitochondrial antiviral signaling molecules (MAVs) and form CARD-CARD tetramers. Goose TRIM25 was cloned from gosling lungs, which possess a 1662 bp open reading flame (ORF). This ORF encodes a predicted 554 amino acid protein consisting of a B-box domain, a coiled-coil domain, and a PRY/SPRY domain. The protein sequence has 89.25% sequence identity with Anas platyrhynchos TRIM25, 78.57% with Gallus gallus TRIM25, and 46.92% with Homo sapiens TRIM25. TRIM25 is expressed in all gosling and adult goose tissues examined. QRT-PCR revealed that goose TRIM25 transcription could be induced by goose IFN- α , goose IFN- γ , and goose IFN- λ , as well as a35 s polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)), oligodeoxynucleotides 2006 (ODN 2006), and resiquimod (R848) in vitro; however, it is inhibited in H9N2 infected goslings for unknown reasons. These data suggest that goose TRIM25 might play a positive role in the regulation of the antiviral immune response.

  17. Chronic spinal cord injury attenuates influenza virus-specific antiviral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracchi-Ricard, Valerie; Zha, Ji; Smith, Annalise; Lopez-Rodriguez, Darlah M; Bethea, John R; Andreansky, Samita

    2016-05-31

    Individuals suffering from spinal cord injury (SCI) are at higher risk for respiratory-related viral infections such as influenza. In a previous study (Zha et al., J Neuroinflammation 11:65, 2014), we demonstrated that chronic spinal cord injury caused impairment in CD8(+)T cell function with increased expression of the immunosuppressive protein, programmed cell death 1 (PD-1). The present study was undertaken to establish whether chronic SCI-induced immune deficits would affect antiviral immunity directed against primary and secondary infections. Six to seven weeks following a SCI contusion at thoracic level T9, mice were infected intranasally with influenza virus. Virus-specific immunity was analyzed at various time points post-infection and compared to uninjured controls. We report that chronic thoracic SCI impairs the ability of the animals to mount an adequate antiviral immune response. While all uninjured control mice cleared the virus from their lungs by day 10 post-infection, a significant number (approximately 70 %) of chronic SCI mice did not clear the virus and succumbed to infection-induced mortality. This was attributed to severe deficits in both virus-specific antibody production and CD8(+) T cell response in injured mice after primary infection. We also determined that previously acquired humoral immunity was maintained after spinal cord injury as vaccination against influenza A prior to injury-protected mice from a homologous viral challenge. In contrast, prior immunization did not protect mice from a heterotypic challenge with a different strain of influenza virus. Taken together, our data demonstrate that chronic SCI attenuates virus-specific humoral and cellular immunity during the establishment of primary response and impairs the development of memory CD8(+) T cells. In contrast, B cell memory acquired through vaccination prior to SCI is preserved after injury which demonstrates that antigen-specific memory cells are refractory following injury

  18. Antibody complementarity-determining regions (CDRs can display differential antimicrobial, antiviral and antitumor activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Polonelli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Complementarity-determining regions (CDRs are immunoglobulin (Ig hypervariable domains that determine specific antibody (Ab binding. We have shown that synthetic CDR-related peptides and many decapeptides spanning the variable region of a recombinant yeast killer toxin-like antiidiotypic Ab are candidacidal in vitro. An alanine-substituted decapeptide from the variable region of this Ab displayed increased cytotoxicity in vitro and/or therapeutic effects in vivo against various bacteria, fungi, protozoa and viruses. The possibility that isolated CDRs, represented by short synthetic peptides, may display antimicrobial, antiviral and antitumor activities irrespective of Ab specificity for a given antigen is addressed here. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CDR-based synthetic peptides of murine and human monoclonal Abs directed to: a a protein epitope of Candida albicans cell wall stress mannoprotein; b a synthetic peptide containing well-characterized B-cell and T-cell epitopes; c a carbohydrate blood group A substance, showed differential inhibitory activities in vitro, ex vivo and/or in vivo against C. albicans, HIV-1 and B16F10-Nex2 melanoma cells, conceivably involving different mechanisms of action. Antitumor activities involved peptide-induced caspase-dependent apoptosis. Engineered peptides, obtained by alanine substitution of Ig CDR sequences, and used as surrogates of natural point mutations, showed further differential increased/unaltered/decreased antimicrobial, antiviral and/or antitumor activities. The inhibitory effects observed were largely independent of the specificity of the native Ab and involved chiefly germline encoded CDR1 and CDR2 of light and heavy chains. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The high frequency of bioactive peptides based on CDRs suggests that Ig molecules are sources of an unlimited number of sequences potentially active against infectious agents and tumor cells. The easy production and low cost of small

  19. The C-Terminal Tail of TRIM56 Dictates Antiviral Restriction of Influenza A and B Viruses by Impeding Viral RNA Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baoming; Li, Nan L; Shen, Yang; Bao, Xiaoyong; Fabrizio, Thomas; Elbahesh, Husni; Webby, Richard J; Li, Kui

    2016-05-01

    Accumulating data suggest that tripartite-motif-containing (TRIM) proteins participate in host responses to viral infections, either by acting as direct antiviral restriction factors or through regulating innate immune signaling of the host. Of >70 TRIMs, TRIM56 is a restriction factor of several positive-strand RNA viruses, including three members of the family Flaviviridae(yellow fever virus, dengue virus, and bovine viral diarrhea virus) and a human coronavirus (OC43), and this ability invariably depends upon the E3 ligase activity of TRIM56. However, the impact of TRIM56 on negative-strand RNA viruses remains unclear. Here, we show that TRIM56 puts a check on replication of influenza A and B viruses in cell culture but does not inhibit Sendai virus or human metapneumovirus, two paramyxoviruses. Interestingly, the anti-influenza virus activity was independent of the E3 ligase activity, B-box, or coiled-coil domain. Rather, deletion of a 63-residue-long C-terminal-tail portion of TRIM56 abrogated the antiviral function. Moreover, expression of this short C-terminal segment curtailed the replication of influenza viruses as effectively as that of full-length TRIM56. Mechanistically, TRIM56 was found to specifically impede intracellular influenza virus RNA synthesis. Together, these data reveal a novel antiviral activity of TRIM56 against influenza A and B viruses and provide insights into the mechanism by which TRIM56 restricts these medically important orthomyxoviruses. Options to treat influenza are limited, and drug-resistant influenza virus strains can emerge through minor genetic changes. Understanding novel virus-host interactions that alter influenza virus fitness may reveal new targets/approaches for therapeutic interventions. We show here that TRIM56, a tripartite-motif protein, is an intrinsic host restriction factor of influenza A and B viruses. Unlike its antiviral actions against positive-strand RNA viruses, the anti-influenza virus activity of TRIM56

  20. Identification of anti-viral activity of the cardenolides, Na+/K+-ATPase inhibitors, against porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Wei; Chang, Hsin-Yu; Hsu, Hsing-Yu; Lee, Yue-Zhi; Chang, Hsun-Shuo; Chen, Ih-Sheng; Lee, Shiow-Ju

    2017-10-01

    A series of naturally occurring cardenolides that exhibit potent anti-transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) activity in swine testicular (ST) cells has been identified. In an immunofluorescence assay, these cardenolides were found to diminish the expressions of TGEV nucleocapsid and spike protein, which was used as an indication for viral replication; block TGEV infection induced apoptosis and cytopathic effects; and impart the same trend of inhibitory activity against Na + /K + -ATPase as for anti-TGEV activity. The viral titer inhibition was found to take place in a dose-dependent manner. Knocking down expression of Na + /K + -ATPase, the cellular receptor of cardenolides, in ST cells was found to significantly impair the susceptibility of ST cells to TGEV infectivity. Thus, we have identified Na + /K + -ATPase as an anti-viral drug target and its antagonists, cardenolides, a novel class of anti- TGEV agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Separation methods for acyclovir and related antiviral compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loregian, A; Gatti, R; Palù, G; De Palo, E F

    2001-11-25

    Acyclovir (ACV) is an antiviral drug, which selectively inhibits replication of members of the herpes group of DNA viruses with low cell toxicity. Valaciclovir (VACV), a prodrug of ACV is usually preferred in the oral treatment of viral infections, mainly herpes simplex virus (HSV). Also other analogues such as ganciclovir and penciclovir are discussed here. The former acts against cytomegalovirus (CMV) in general and the latter against CMV retinitis. The action mechanism of these antiviral drugs is presented briefly here, mainly via phosphorylation and inhibition of the viral DNA polymerase. The therapeutic use and the pharmacokinetics are also outlined. The measurement of the concentration of acyclovir and related compounds in biological samples poses a particularly significant challenge because these drugs tend to be structurally similar to endogenous substances. The analysis requires the use of highly selective analytical techniques and chromatography methods are a first choice to determine drug content in pharmaceuticals and to measure them in body fluids. Chromatography can be considered the procedure of choice for the bio-analysis of this class of antiviral compounds, as this methodology is characterised by good specificity and accuracy and it is particularly useful when metabolites need to be monitored. Among chromatographic techniques, the reversed-phase (RP) HPLC is widely used for the analysis. C18 Silica columns from 7.5 to 30 cm in length are used, the separation is carried out mainly at room temperature and less than 10 min is sufficient for the analysis at 1.0-1.5 ml/min of flow-rate. The separation methods require an isocratic system, and various authors have proposed a variety of mobile phases. The detection requires absorbance or fluorescence measurements carried out at 250-254 nm and at lambdaex=260-285 nm, lambdaem=375-380 nm, respectively. The detection limit is about 0.3-10 ng/ml but the most important aspect is related to the sample treatment

  2. Predictors of antiviral treatment initiation in hepatitis C virus-infected patients: a Danish cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, N; Obel, N; Christensen, P B

    2009-01-01

    Predictive factors for initiation of antiviral therapy in chronically infected hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients are not fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine predictive factors for initiation of treatment with standard or pegylated interferon either alone or combined...... with ribavirin. A Danish cohort of individuals chronically infected with HCV was used and observation time was calculated from the date of inclusion in the cohort to date of death, last clinical observation, 1 January 2007, or start of HCV antiviral treatment in treatment-naïve patients. Kaplan-Meier survival.......15-0.53). To our knowledge, this study is the first to estimate factors predicting initiation of antiviral treatment in patients with chronic HCV infection on a nationwide scale. We found that several of the factors predicting initiation of antiviral treatment correlate with factors known to predict a better...

  3. Antiviral and immunoregulatory role against PCV2 in vivo of Chinese herbal medicinal ingredients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Haifeng

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of the research was to investigate the antiviral and immunoregulatory effects of saikosaponin A, saikosaponin D, Panax notoginseng saponins, notoginsenoside R1, and anemoside B4 saponins commonly found in Chinese herbal medicines.

  4. Modelling viral infections using zebrafish: Innate immune response and antiviral research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Mónica; Figueras, Antonio; Novoa, Beatriz

    2017-03-01

    Zebrafish possess a highly developed immune system that is remarkably similar to the human one. Therefore, it is expected that the majority of the signalling pathways and molecules involved in the immune response of mammals exist and behave similarly in fish. The innate antiviral response depends on the recognition of viral components by host cells. Pattern recognition receptors initiate antimicrobial defence mechanisms via several well-conserved signalling pathways. In this paper, we review current knowledge of the antiviral innate immune response in zebrafish by considering the main molecules that have been characterized and the infection models used for the in vivo study of the antiviral innate immune response. We next summarize published studies in which larval and adult zebrafish were used to study viral diseases of fish, then provide a similar review of studies of human viral diseases in zebrafish and experience with antiviral drug screening in this model organism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Herpesvirus infections in immunocompromised patients : treatment, treatment failure and antiviral resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, Martha Trijntje van der

    2012-01-01

    The research described in this thesis aims to study determinants of the course and outcome of treatment of herpesvirus infections in immunocompromised patients. Both viral factors, such as antiviral resistance, and patient factors, including immunological parameters, were investigated. Techniques to

  6. African swine fever virus: current state and future perspectives in vaccine and antiviral research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaryan, Hovakim; Revilla, Yolanda

    2016-03-15

    African swine fever (ASF) is among the most significant of swine diseases for which no effective vaccines and antivirals are available. The disease, which is endemic in Africa, was introduced to Trans-Caucasian countries and the Russian Federation in 2007, where it remains prevalent today among domestic pigs and wild boars. Although some measures were implemented, ASF continues to pose a global risk for all countries, and thereby highlighting the importance of vaccine and antiviral research. In this review, an overview of research efforts toward the development of effective vaccines during the past decades is presented. As an alternative to vaccine development, the current state in antiviral research against ASFV is also presented. Finally, future perspectives in vaccine and antiviral research giving emphasis on some strategies that may allow researchers to develop effective countermeasures against ASF are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Resistance to Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus via overexpression of an endogenous antiviral gene in transgenic silkworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liang; Wang, Genhong; Cheng, Tingcai; Yang, Qiong; Jin, Shengkai; Lu, Gai; Wu, Fuquan; Xiao, Yang; Xu, Hanfu; Xia, Qingyou

    2012-07-01

    Transgenic technology is a powerful tool for improving disease-resistant species. Bmlipase-1, purified from the midgut juice of Bombyx mori, showed strong antiviral activity against B. mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV). In an attempt to create an antiviral silkworm strain for sericulture, a transgenic vector overexpressing the Bmlipase-1 gene was constructed under the control of a baculoviral immediate early-1 (IE1) promoter. Transgenic lines were generated via embryo microinjection. The mRNA level of Bmlipase-1 in the midguts of the transgenic line was 27.3 % higher than that of the non-transgenic line. After feeding the silkworm with different amounts of BmNPV, the mortality of the transgenic line decreased to approximately 33 % compared with the non-transgenic line when the virus dose was 10(6) OB/larva. These results imply that overexpressing endogenous antiviral genes can enhance the antiviral resistance of silkworms.

  8. Antiviral therapy improves survival in patients with HBV infection and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma undergoing liver resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Zhengqing; Xia, Yong; Si, Anfeng; Wang, Kui; Li, Jun; Yan, Zhenlin; Yang, Tian; Wu, Dong; Wan, Xuying; Zhou, Weiping; Liu, Jingfeng; Wang, Hongyang; Cong, Wenming; Wu, Mengchao; Pawlik, Timothy M; Lau, Wan Yee; Shen, Feng

    2017-11-16

    The impact of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection on outcomes after resection of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) has not been reported. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of antiviral therapy on survival outcomes after liver resection for patients with ICC and underlying HBV infection. Data on 928 patients with ICC and HBV infection who underwent liver resection at two medical centers between 2006 and 2011 were analyzed. Data on viral reactivation, tumor recurrence, cancer-specific survival (CSS) and overall survival (OS) were obtained. Survival rates were analyzed using the time-dependent Cox regression model adjusted for potential covariates. Postoperative viral reactivation occurred in 3.3%, 8.3% and 15.7% of patients who received preoperative antiviral therapy, who did not receive preoperative antiviral therapy with a low, or a high HBV-DNA level (antiviral therapy (70.5%, 46.9% and 43.0%) compared with patients who did not receive antiviral therapy and had a high viral level (86.5%, 20.9% and 20.5%, all p antiviral therapy patients with a low viral level (71.7%, 35.5% and 33.5%, p = 0.057, 0.051 and 0.060, respectively). Compared to patients with a high viral level who received no antiviral therapy, patients who initiated antiviral therapy either before or after surgery had better long-term outcomes (HR 0.44 and 0.54 for recurrence; 0.38 and 0.57 for CSS; 0.46 and 0.54 for OS, respectively). Viral reactivation was associated with worse prognoses after liver resection for HBV-infected patients with ICC. Antiviral therapy decreased viral reactivation and prolonged long-term survival for patients with ICC and a high viral level. Postoperative hepatitis B virus reactivation was associated with an increased complication rate and a decreased survival rate after liver resection in patients with ICC and hepatitis B virus infection. Antiviral therapy before liver resection reduced the risk of postoperative viral reactivation. Both pre- and

  9. Arbidol (Umifenovir): A broad-spectrum antiviral drug that inhibits medically important arthropod-borne flaviviruses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haviernik, J.; Štefánik, M.; Fojtíková, M.; Kali, S.; Tordo, N.; Rudolf, Ivo; Hubálek, Zdeněk; Eyer, Luděk; Růžek, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 4 (2018), č. článku 184. ISSN 1999-4915 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-20054S Institutional support: RVO:68081766 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : Antiviral activity * Arbidol * Cell-type dependent antiviral effect * Cytotoxicity * Flavivirus * Umifenovir Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Virology Impact factor: 3.465, year: 2016

  10. Synthesis and Antiviral Activity of 3-Aminoindole Nucleosides of 2-Acetamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelrahman, Adel A. H.; Elessawy, Farag A.; Barakat, Yousif A. [Menoufia Univ., Shebin El-Koam (Egypt); Ellatif, Mona M. Abd [The British Univ. in Egypt, Cairo (Egypt)

    2012-10-15

    A new method for the construction of 3-aminoindole nucleosides of 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose based is presented. Nitration and acetylation of the indole nucleosides by acetic anhydride-nitric acid mixture followed by reduction using silver catalyst (SNSM) impregnated on silica gel, afforded the corresponding amino indole nucleosides. The nucleosides were tested for antiviral activity against hepatitis B virus (HBV) to show different degrees of antiviral activities or inhibitory actions.

  11. Antiviral treatment among older adults hospitalized with influenza, 2006-2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Louise Lindegren

    Full Text Available To describe antiviral use among older, hospitalized adults during six influenza seasons (2006-2012 in Davidson County, Tennessee, USA.Among adults ≥50 years old hospitalized with symptoms of respiratory illness or non-localizing fever, we collected information on provider-initiated influenza testing and nasal/throat swabs for influenza by RT-PCR in a research laboratory, and calculated the proportion treated with antivirals.We enrolled 1753 adults hospitalized with acute respiratory illness. Only 26% (457/1753 of enrolled patients had provider-initiated influenza testing. Thirty-eight patients had a positive clinical laboratory test, representing 2.2% of total patients and 8.3% of tested patients. Among the 38 subjects with clinical laboratory-confirmed influenza, 26.3% received antivirals compared to only 4.5% of those with negative clinical influenza tests and 0.7% of those not tested (p<0.001. There were 125 (7.1% patients who tested positive for influenza in the research laboratory. Of those with research laboratory-confirmed influenza, 0.9%, 2.7%, and 2.8% received antivirals (p=.046 during pre-pandemic, pandemic, and post-pandemic influenza seasons, respectively. Both research laboratory-confirmed influenza (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 3.04 95%CI 1.26-7.35 and clinical laboratory-confirmed influenza (AOR 3.05, 95%CI 1.07-8.71 were independently associated with antiviral treatment. Severity of disease, presence of a high-risk condition, and symptom duration were not associated with antiviral use.In urban Tennessee, antiviral use was low in patients recognized to have influenza by the provider as well as those unrecognized to have influenza. The use of antivirals remained low despite recommendations to treat all hospitalized patients with confirmed or suspected influenza.

  12. New era for management of chronic hepatitis C virus using direct antiviral agents: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer Elbaz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The pegylated interferon regimen has long been the lone effective management of chronic hepatitis C with modest response. The first appearance of protease inhibitors included boceprevir and telaprevir. However, their efficacy was limited to genotype 1. Recently, direct antiviral agents opened the gate for a real effective management of HCV, certainly after FDA approval of some compounds that further paved the way for the appearance of enormous potent direct antiviral agents that may achieve successful eradication of HCV.

  13. Optimizing tactics for use of the U.S. antiviral strategic national stockpile for pandemic influenza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedialko B Dimitrov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2009, public health agencies across the globe worked to mitigate the impact of the swine-origin influenza A (pH1N1 virus. These efforts included intensified surveillance, social distancing, hygiene measures, and the targeted use of antiviral medications to prevent infection (prophylaxis. In addition, aggressive antiviral treatment was recommended for certain patient subgroups to reduce the severity and duration of symptoms. To assist States and other localities meet these needs, the U.S. Government distributed a quarter of the antiviral medications in the Strategic National Stockpile within weeks of the pandemic's start. However, there are no quantitative models guiding the geo-temporal distribution of the remainder of the Stockpile in relation to pandemic spread or severity. We present a tactical optimization model for distributing this stockpile for treatment of infected cases during the early stages of a pandemic like 2009 pH1N1, prior to the wide availability of a strain-specific vaccine. Our optimization method efficiently searches large sets of intervention strategies applied to a stochastic network model of pandemic influenza transmission within and among U.S. cities. The resulting optimized strategies depend on the transmissability of the virus and postulated rates of antiviral uptake and wastage (through misallocation or loss. Our results suggest that an aggressive community-based antiviral treatment strategy involving early, widespread, pro-rata distribution of antivirals to States can contribute to slowing the transmission of mildly transmissible strains, like pH1N1. For more highly transmissible strains, outcomes of antiviral use are more heavily impacted by choice of distribution intervals, quantities per shipment, and timing of shipments in relation to pandemic spread. This study supports previous modeling results suggesting that appropriate antiviral treatment may be an effective mitigation strategy during the early stages of

  14. Club cells surviving influenza A virus infection induce temporary nonspecific antiviral immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, Jennifer R.; Sachs, David; Lim, Jean K.; Langlois, Ryan A.; Palese, Peter; Heaton, Nicholas S.

    2016-01-01

    After influenza A virus infection, the host is protected from subsequent unrelated respiratory virus infections for a temporary period. Although this phenomenon has been reported both in animal models and human clinical data, the mechanism for this antiviral immunity is incompletely understood. In this article, we demonstrate that club cells surviving direct infection by influenza A virus are reprogramed to promote an antiviral lung environment, and the depletion of “survivor cells” eliminate...

  15. Antiviral Treatment among Older Adults Hospitalized with Influenza, 2006-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindegren, Mary Louise; Griffin, Marie R.; Williams, John V.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Zhu, Yuwei; Mitchel, Ed; Fry, Alicia M.; Schaffner, William; Talbot, H. Keipp

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe antiviral use among older, hospitalized adults during six influenza seasons (2006—2012) in Davidson County, Tennessee, USA. Methods Among adults ≥50 years old hospitalized with symptoms of respiratory illness or non-localizing fever, we collected information on provider-initiated influenza testing and nasal/throat swabs for influenza by RT-PCR in a research laboratory, and calculated the proportion treated with antivirals. Results We enrolled 1753 adults hospitalized with acute respiratory illness. Only 26% (457/1753) of enrolled patients had provider-initiated influenza testing. Thirty-eight patients had a positive clinical laboratory test, representing 2.2% of total patients and 8.3% of tested patients. Among the 38 subjects with clinical laboratory-confirmed influenza, 26.3% received antivirals compared to only 4.5% of those with negative clinical influenza tests and 0.7% of those not tested (presearch laboratory. Of those with research laboratory-confirmed influenza, 0.9%, 2.7%, and 2.8% received antivirals (p=.046) during pre-pandemic, pandemic, and post-pandemic influenza seasons, respectively. Both research laboratory-confirmed influenza (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 3.04 95%CI 1.26-7.35) and clinical laboratory-confirmed influenza (AOR 3.05, 95%CI 1.07-8.71) were independently associated with antiviral treatment. Severity of disease, presence of a high-risk condition, and symptom duration were not associated with antiviral use. Conclusions In urban Tennessee, antiviral use was low in patients recognized to have influenza by the provider as well as those unrecognized to have influenza. The use of antivirals remained low despite recommendations to treat all hospitalized patients with confirmed or suspected influenza. PMID:25807314

  16. Interferon lambda 4 signals via the IFNλ receptor to regulate antiviral activity against HCV and coronaviruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamming, Ole Jensen; Terczynska-Dyla, Ewa; Vieyres, Gabrielle

    2013-01-01

    to treatment with type I interferon. Here, we show that the IFNL4 gene encodes an active type III interferon, named IFNλ4, which signals through the IFNλR1 and IL-10R2 receptor chains. Recombinant IFNλ4 is antiviral against both HCV and coronaviruses at levels comparable to IFNλ3. However, the secretion....... Together, these findings result in the paradox that IFNλ4 is strongly antiviral but a disadvantage during HCV infection...

  17. Effects of structural modification of calcium spirulan, a sulfated polysaccharide from Spirulina platensis, on antiviral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J B; Srisomporn, P; Hayashi, K; Tanaka, T; Sankawa, U; Hayashi, T

    2001-01-01

    Calcium ion binding with the anionic part of a molecule was replaced with various metal cations and their inhibitory effects on the replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 were evaluated. Replacement of calcium ion with sodium and potassium ions maintained the antiviral activity while divalent and trivalent metal cations reduced the activity. Depolymerization of sodium spirulan with hydrogen peroxide decreased in antiviral activity as its molecular weight decreased.

  18. Combination systemic and intravitreal antiviral therapy in the management of acute retinal necrosis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Steven; Suhler, Eric B; Smith, Justine R; Bruce, Beau; Fahle, Gary; Bailey, Steven T; Hwang, Thomas S; Stout, J Timothy; Lauer, Andreas K; Wilson, David J; Rosenbaum, James T; Flaxel, Christina J

    2014-01-01

    Acute retinal necrosis (ARN) may lead to severe visual loss because of its rapid progression and high likelihood of retinal detachment (RD). This study investigates whether combination systemic and intravitreal antiviral therapy is superior to systemic antiviral therapy alone. Single-center, interventional, comparative case series of patients with ARN treated with combination systemic antiviral and intravitreal foscarnet injection therapy or systemic antiviral therapy alone. Survival analysis and incidence rates of visual acuity (VA) gain of two lines or greater, severe visual loss of 20/200 or worse, and RD were assessed. Twelve patients received combination therapy and 12 received systemic therapy alone. Patients receiving combination therapy were more likely to gain two or more lines of VA and showed decreased incidences of severe visual loss and RD. Combination oral and intravitreal antiviral therapy may improve the likelihood for VA gain and decrease the risk of RD in patients with ARN. Clinicians should consider administering combination systemic and intravitreal antiviral therapy for patients with the ARN syndrome.

  19. Antiviral Activity of Graphene–Silver Nanocomposites against Non-Enveloped and Enveloped Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ning Chen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of novel antiviral materials is important because many infectious diseases are caused by viruses. Silver nanoparticles have demonstrated strong antiviral activity, and graphene is a potential antimicrobial material due to its large surface area, high carrier mobility, and biocompatibility. No studies on the antiviral activity of nanomaterials on non-enveloped viruses have been reported. To investigate the antiviral activity of graphene oxide (GO sheets and GO sheets with silver particles (GO-Ag against enveloped and non-enveloped viruses, feline coronavirus (FCoV with an envelope and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV without an envelope were chosen. The morphology and sizes of GO and GO-Ag were characterized by transmission, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. A virus inhibition assay was used to identify the antiviral activity of GO and GO-Ag. Go-Ag inhibited 25% of infection by FCoV and 23% by IBDV, whereas GO only inhibited 16% of infection by FCoV but showed no antiviral activity against the infection by IBDV. Further application of GO and GO-Ag can be considered for personal protection equipment to decrease the transmission of viruses.

  20. In vitro evaluation of marine-microorganism extracts for anti-viral activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhara-Bell Jarred

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Viral-induced infectious diseases represent a major health threat and their control remains an unachieved goal, due in part to the limited availability of effective anti-viral drugs and measures. The use of natural products in drug manufacturing is an ancient and well-established practice. Marine organisms are known producers of pharmacological and anti-viral agents. In this study, a total of 20 extracts from marine microorganisms were evaluated for their antiviral activity. These extracts were tested against two mammalian viruses, herpes simplex virus (HSV-1 and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, using Vero cells as the cell culture system, and two marine virus counterparts, channel catfish virus (CCV and snakehead rhabdovirus (SHRV, in their respective cell cultures (CCO and EPC. Evaluation of these extracts demonstrated that some possess antiviral potential. In sum, extracts 162M(4, 258M(1, 298M(4, 313(2, 331M(2, 367M(1 and 397(1 appear to be effective broad-spectrum antivirals with potential uses as prophylactic agents to prevent infection, as evident by their highly inhibitive effects against both virus types. Extract 313(2 shows the most potential in that it showed significantly high inhibition across all tested viruses. The samples tested in this study were crude extracts; therefore the development of antiviral application of the few potential extracts is dependent on future studies focused on the isolation of the active elements contained in these extracts.

  1. Using the ferret as an animal model for investigating influenza antiviral effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Yuan Oh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The concern of the emergence of a pandemic influenza virus has sparked an increased effort towards the development and testing of novel influenza antivirals. Central to this is the animal model of influenza infection, which has played an important role in understanding treatment effectiveness and the effect of antivirals on host immune responses. Among the different animal models of influenza, ferrets can be considered the most suitable for antiviral studies as they display most of the human-like symptoms following influenza infections, they can be infected with human influenza virus without prior viral adaptation and have the ability to transmit influenza virus efficiently between one another. However, an accurate assessment of the effectiveness of an antiviral treatment in ferrets is dependent on three major experimental considerations encompassing firstly, the volume and titre of virus, and the route of viral inoculation. Secondly, the route and dose of drug administration, and lastly, the different methods used to assess clinical symptoms, viral shedding kinetics and host immune responses in the ferrets. A good understanding of these areas is necessary to achieve data that can accurately inform the human use of influenza antivirals. In this review, we discuss the current progress and the challenges faced in these three major areas when using the ferret model to measure influenza antiviral effectiveness.

  2. The potential of antiviral agents to control classical swine fever: a modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, Jantien A; Vrancken, Robert; Neyts, Johan; Goris, Nesya

    2013-09-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) represents a continuous threat to pig populations that are free of disease without vaccination. When CSF virus is introduced, the minimal control strategy imposed by the EU is often insufficient to mitigate the epidemic. Additional measures such as preemptive culling encounter ethical objections, whereas emergency vaccination leads to prolonged export restrictions. Antiviral agents, however, provide instantaneous protection without inducing an antibody response. The use of antiviral agents to contain CSF epidemics is studied with a model describing within- and between-herd virus transmission. Epidemics are simulated in a densely populated livestock area in The Netherlands, with farms of varying sizes and pig types (finishers, piglets and sows). Our results show that vaccination and/or antiviral treatment in a 2 km radius around an infected herd is more effective than preemptive culling in a 1 km radius. However, the instantaneous but temporary protection provided by antiviral treatment is slightly less effective than the delayed but long-lasting protection offered by vaccination. Therefore, the most effective control strategy is to vaccinate animals when allowed (finishers and piglets) and to treat with antiviral agents when vaccination is prohibited (sows). As independent control measure, antiviral treatment in a 1 km radius presents an elevated risk of epidemics running out of control. A 2 km control radius largely eliminates this risk. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Strategies for antiviral stockpiling for future influenza pandemics: a global epidemic-economic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Luis R; Lee, Vernon J; Chen, Mark I; Matchar, David B; Thompson, James P; Cook, Alex R

    2011-09-07

    Influenza pandemics present a global threat owing to their potential mortality and substantial economic impacts. Stockpiling antiviral drugs to manage a pandemic is an effective strategy to offset their negative impacts; however, little is known about the long-term optimal size of the stockpile under uncertainty and the characteristics of different countries. Using an epidemic-economic model we studied the effect on total mortality and costs of antiviral stockpile sizes for Brazil, China, Guatemala, India, Indonesia, New Zealand, Singapore, the UK, the USA and Zimbabwe. In the model, antivirals stockpiling considerably reduced mortality. There was greater potential avoidance of expected costs in the higher resourced countries (e.g. from $55 billion to $27 billion over a 30 year time horizon for the USA) and large avoidance of fatalities in those less resourced (e.g. from 11.4 to 2.3 million in Indonesia). Under perfect allocation, higher resourced countries should aim to store antiviral stockpiles able to cover at least 15 per cent of their population, rising to 25 per cent with 30 per cent misallocation, to minimize fatalities and economic costs. Stockpiling is estimated not to be cost-effective for two-thirds of the world's population under current antivirals pricing. Lower prices and international cooperation are necessary to make the life-saving potential of antivirals cost-effective in resource-limited countries.

  4. Strategies for antiviral stockpiling for future influenza pandemics: a global epidemic-economic perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Luis R.; Lee, Vernon J.; Chen, Mark I.; Matchar, David B.; Thompson, James P.; Cook, Alex R.

    2011-01-01

    Influenza pandemics present a global threat owing to their potential mortality and substantial economic impacts. Stockpiling antiviral drugs to manage a pandemic is an effective strategy to offset their negative impacts; however, little is known about the long-term optimal size of the stockpile under uncertainty and the characteristics of different countries. Using an epidemic–economic model we studied the effect on total mortality and costs of antiviral stockpile sizes for Brazil, China, Guatemala, India, Indonesia, New Zealand, Singapore, the UK, the USA and Zimbabwe. In the model, antivirals stockpiling considerably reduced mortality. There was greater potential avoidance of expected costs in the higher resourced countries (e.g. from $55 billion to $27 billion over a 30 year time horizon for the USA) and large avoidance of fatalities in those less resourced (e.g. from 11.4 to 2.3 million in Indonesia). Under perfect allocation, higher resourced countries should aim to store antiviral stockpiles able to cover at least 15 per cent of their population, rising to 25 per cent with 30 per cent misallocation, to minimize fatalities and economic costs. Stockpiling is estimated not to be cost-effective for two-thirds of the world's population under current antivirals pricing. Lower prices and international cooperation are necessary to make the life-saving potential of antivirals cost-effective in resource-limited countries. PMID:21296791

  5. Antiviral activity of gemcitabine against human rhinovirus in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jae-Hyoung; Kim, Seong-Ryeol; Heo, Eun-Young; Lee, Jae-Young; Kim, Dong-Eun; Cho, Sungchan; Chang, Sun-Young; Yoon, Byung-Il; Seong, Jeongmin; Ko, Hyun-Jeong

    2017-09-01

    Rhinovirus, a major causative agent of the common cold, is associated with exacerbation of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Currently, there is no antiviral treatment or vaccine for human rhinovirus (HRV). Gemcitabine (2',2'-difluorodeoxycytidine, dFdC) is a deoxycytidine analog with antiviral activity against rhinovirus, as well as enterovirus 71, in vitro. However, the antiviral effects of gemcitabine in vivo have not been investigated. In the current study, we assessed whether gemcitabine mediated antiviral effects in the murine HRV infection model. Intranasal administration of gemcitabine significantly lowered pulmonary viral load and inflammation by decreasing proinflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α and IL-1β, and reduction in the number of lung-infiltrating lymphocytes. Interestingly, we found that the addition of UTP and CTP significantly attenuated the antiviral activity of gemcitabine. Thus the limitation of UTP and CTP by the addition of gemcitabine may inhibit the viral RNA synthesis. These results suggest that gemcitabine, an antineoplastic drug, can be repositioned as an antiviral drug to inhibit HRV infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Detection of the antiviral drug oseltamivir in aquatic environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Söderström

    Full Text Available Oseltamivir (Tamiflu is the most important antiviral drug available and a cornerstone in the defence against a future influenza pandemic. Recent publications have shown that the active metabolite, oseltamivir carboxylate (OC, is not degraded in sewage treatment plants and is also persistent in aquatic environments. This implies that OC will be present in aquatic environments in areas where oseltamivir is prescribed to patients for therapeutic use. The country where oseltamivir is used most is Japan, where it is used to treat seasonal flu. We measured the levels of OC in water samples from the Yodo River system in the Kyoto and Osaka prefectures, Japan, taken before and during the flu-season 2007/8. No OC was detected before the flu-season but 2-58 ng L(-1 was detected in the samples taken during the flu season. This study shows, for the first time, that low levels of oseltamivir can be found in the aquatic environment. Therefore the natural reservoir of influenza virus, dabbling ducks, is exposed to oseltamivir, which could promote the evolution of viral resistance.

  7. Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Exerts Antiviral Activity against Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdoulaye J Dabo

    Full Text Available Increased lung levels of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9 are frequently observed during respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infection and elevated MMP9 concentrations are associated with severe disease. However little is known of the functional role of MMP9 during lung infection with RSV. To determine whether MMP9 exerted direct antiviral potential, active MMP9 was incubated with RSV, which showed that MMP9 directly prevented RSV infectivity to airway epithelial cells. Using knockout mice the effect of the loss of Mmp9 expression was examined during RSV infection to demonstrate MMP9's role in viral clearance and disease progression. Seven days following RSV infection, Mmp9-/- mice displayed substantial weight loss, increased RSV-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR and reduced clearance of RSV from the lungs compared to wild type mice. Although total bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF cell counts were similar in both groups, neutrophil recruitment to the lungs during RSV infection was significantly reduced in Mmp9-/- mice. Reduced neutrophil recruitment coincided with diminished RANTES, IL-1β, SCF, G-CSF expression and p38 phosphorylation. Induction of p38 signaling was required for RANTES and G-CSF expression during RSV infection in airway epithelial cells. Therefore, MMP9 in RSV lung infection significantly enhances neutrophil recruitment, cytokine production and viral clearance while reducing AHR.

  8. Prophylactic Antiviral Treatment in Recurrent Herpes Zoster: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Gamze Bayram

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Herpes zoster (HZ occurs in older ages with activation of varicella-zoster virus (VZV which persists in a dormant phase within the dorsal root ganglia. The incidence of HZ in immunosuppressed patients is 20-100 times higher and the clinical progress is more severe than in immunocompetent individuals. A 48-year-old man who had been diagnosed with acute myelocytic leukemia type M3 and had been treated with immunosuppressive agents was admitted to our clinic. The patient was clinically diagnosed as having HZ. He was treated with acyclovir 800 mg five times daily for 7 days. In the consecutive three months, he attended our clinic again with similar complaints. The left cervical (C5, C6 dermatomes were involved at the fourth attack of HZ. Multinucleated giant cells were determined on the Tzanck smear. VZV DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Treatment with valacyclovir 1 g three times daily for 14 days was prescribed and then, prophylactic treatment with valacyclovir 500 mg two times a day was administered. Although immunosuppressive treatment was continued, no new attacks of herpes zoster occurred. We think that prophylactic antiviral therapy should be initiated in immunosuppressive individuals who have recurrent herpes zoster attacks.

  9. Resistance to antivirals in human cytomegalovirus: mechanisms and clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, J L

    1997-09-01

    Long term therapies needed for managing human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections in immunosupressed patients provided the background for the emergence of the resistance to antivirals active against HCMV. In addition, laboratory selected mutants have also been readily achieved. Both clinical and laboratory resistant strains share the same determinants of resistance. Ganciclovir resistance may be due to a few mutations in the HCMV UL97 gene and/or viral DNA pol gene, the former being responsible for about 70% of clinical resistant isolates. Among them, V464, V594, S595 and F595 are the most frequent mutations. Because of their less extensive clinical use, much less is known about resistance to foscarnet and cidofovir (formerly, HPMPC) but in both cases, it has been associated to mutations in the DNA pol. Ganciclovir resistant strains showing DNA pol mutations are cross-resistant to cidofovir and their corresponding IC50 are normally higher than those from strains harboring only mutations at the UL97 gene. To date, foscarnet resistance seems to be independent of both ganciclovir and cidofovir resistance.

  10. Poxviral Ankyrin Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H. Herbert

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Multiple repeats of the ankyrin motif (ANK are ubiquitous throughout the kingdoms of life but are absent from most viruses. The main exception to this is the poxvirus family, and specifically the chordopoxviruses, with ANK repeat proteins present in all but three species from separate genera. The poxviral ANK repeat proteins belong to distinct orthologue groups spread over different species, and align well with the phylogeny of their genera. This distribution throughout the chordopoxviruses indicates these proteins were present in an ancestral vertebrate poxvirus, and have since undergone numerous duplication events. Most poxviral ANK repeat proteins contain an unusual topology of multiple ANK motifs starting at the N-terminus with a C-terminal poxviral homologue of the cellular F-box enabling interaction with the cellular SCF ubiquitin ligase complex. The subtle variations between ANK repeat proteins of individual poxviruses suggest an array of different substrates may be bound by these protein-protein interaction domains and, via the F-box, potentially directed to cellular ubiquitination pathways and possible degradation. Known interaction partners of several of these proteins indicate that the NF-κB coordinated anti-viral response is a key target, whilst some poxviral ANK repeat domains also have an F-box independent affect on viral host-range.

  11. Options for the management of antiviral resistance during hepatitis B therapy: reflections on battles over a decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Hyung Joon; Hwang, Seong Gyu

    2013-09-01

    Although much advancement has been achieved in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B, antiviral resistance is still a challenging issue. Previous generation antiviral agents have already developed resistance in a number of patients, and it is still being used especially in resource limited countries. Once antiviral resistance occurs, it predisposes to subsequent resistance, resulting in multidrug resistance. Therefore, prevention of initial antiviral resistance is the most important strategy, and appropriate choice and modification of therapy would be the cornerstone in avoiding treatment failures. Until now, management of antiviral resistance has been evolving from sequential therapy to combination therapy. In the era of tenofovir, the paradigm shifts again, and we have to decide when to switch and when to combine on the basis of newly emerging clinical data. We expect future eradication of chronic hepatitis B virus infection by proper prevention and optimal management of antiviral resistance.

  12. Molecular Characterization of Lys49 and Asp49 Phospholipases A2 from Snake Venom and Their Antiviral Activities against Dengue virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecilio, Alzira B.; Caldas, Sergio; De Oliveira, Raiana A.; Santos, Arthur S. B.; Richardson, Michael; Naumann, Gustavo B.; Schneider, Francisco S.; Alvarenga, Valeria G.; Estevão-Costa, Maria I.; Fuly, Andre L.; Eble, Johannes A.; Sanchez, Eladio F.

    2013-01-01

    We report the detailed molecular characterization of two PLA2s, Lys49 and Asp49 isolated from Bothrops leucurus venom, and examined their effects against Dengue virus (DENV). The Bl-PLA2s, named BlK-PLA2 and BlD-PLA2, are composed of 121 and 122 amino acids determined by automated sequencing of the native proteins and peptides produced by digestion with trypsin. They contain fourteen cysteines with pIs of 9.05 and 8.18 for BlK- and BlD-PLA2s, and show a high degree of sequence similarity to homologous snake venom PLA2s, but may display different biological effects. Molecular masses of 13,689.220 (Lys49) and 13,978.386 (Asp49) were determined by mass spectrometry. DENV causes a prevalent arboviral disease in humans, and no clinically approved antiviral therapy is currently available to treat DENV infections. The maximum non-toxic concentration of the proteins to LLC-MK2 cells determined by MTT assay was 40 µg/mL for Bl-PLA2s (pool) and 20 µg/mL for each isoform. Antiviral effects of Bl-PLA2s were assessed by quantitative Real-Time PCR. Bl-PLA2s were able to reduce DENV-1, DENV-2, and DENV-3 serotypes in LLC-MK2 cells infection. Our data provide further insight into the structural properties and their antiviral activity against DENV, opening up possibilities for biotechnological applications of these Bl-PLA2s as tools of research. PMID:24131891

  13. Molecular Characterization of Lys49 and Asp49 Phospholipases A2 from Snake Venom and Their Antiviral Activities against Dengue virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre L. Fuly

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We report the detailed molecular characterization of two PLA2s, Lys49 and Asp49 isolated from Bothrops leucurus venom, and examined their effects against Dengue virus (DENV. The Bl-PLA2s, named BlK-PLA2 and BlD-PLA2, are composed of 121 and 122 amino acids determined by automated sequencing of the native proteins and peptides produced by digestion with trypsin. They contain fourteen cysteines with pIs of 9.05 and 8.18 for BlK- and BlD-PLA2s, and show a high degree of sequence similarity to homologous snake venom PLA2s, but may display different biological effects. Molecular masses of 13,689.220 (Lys49 and 13,978.386 (Asp49 were determined by mass spectrometry. DENV causes a prevalent arboviral disease in humans, and no clinically approved antiviral therapy is currently available to treat DENV infections. The maximum non-toxic concentration of the proteins to LLC-MK2 cells determined by MTT assay was 40 µg/mL for Bl-PLA2s (pool and 20 µg/mL for each isoform. Antiviral effects of Bl-PLA2s were assessed by quantitative Real-Time PCR. Bl-PLA2s were able to reduce DENV-1, DENV-2, and DENV-3 serotypes in LLC-MK2 cells infection. Our data provide further insight into the structural properties and their antiviral activity against DENV, opening up possibilities for biotechnological applications of these Bl-PLA2s as tools of research.

  14. In vitro antiviral activity of Chamaecrista nictitans (Fabaceae against herpes simplex virus: Biological characterization of mechanisms of action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libia Herrero Uribe

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available We have previously identified a crude extract of the plant Chamaecrista nictitans (Fabaceaewith antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus.The main objectives of this research were to identify the step of the replication cycle of herpes simplex inhibited by the extract,and to attempt to characterize the chemical characteristics of this extract.The crude extract from Chamaecrista nictitans (Fabaceaewas extracted with a mixture of diclorometane/methanol,and further fractionated following a bioassay-guided protocol using a combination of preparative thin layer and column chromatography.Toxicity and bioassay experiments were carried out in monolayers of Vero cells.The antiviral activity of the extract was assessed by total inhibition of cytopathic effect after three-day incubation.The highest concentration of the extract which was not toxic to the cells was 200 mu g/ml. Western blot and immunofluorescence techniques were used to elucidate the antiviral mechanism of the extract by infecting Vero cells with the virus at different times and monitoring the synthesis of viral proteins.A 60 kDa protein was detected at 2 hr and 8 hr post-infection but no additional proteins were synthesized at later time intervals,and cytopathic effect was not observed after 24 hr.This result indicates that the extract acts at the intracellular level in order to inhibit late transcription.However,it does not inhibit transcription/translation of early viral proteins.These results were confirmed by immunofluorescence experiments.A strong fluorescent signal was observed in control cell monolayers at 24 hr post infection,accompanied with a clear cytopathic effect.In contrast,in the presence of acyclovir or the extract,cells showed very discrete immunofluorescence,characterized by a punctuated pattern, and no cytopathic effect was observed.Neutralization assays were performed using pre-incubation of virus with either specific herpes simplex-1 antiserum,200 mu g/ml of the

  15. SOME ASPECTS OF THE MARKETING STUDIES FOR THE PHARMACEUTICAL MARKET OF ANTIVIRAL DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Salnikova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiviral drugs are widely used in medicinal practice. They suppress the originator and stimulate the protection of an organism. The drugs are used for the treatment of flu and ARVI, herpetic infections, virus hepatitis, HIV-infection. Contemporary pharmaceutical market is represented by a wide range of antiviral drugs. Marketing studies are conducted to develop strategies, used for the enhancement of pharmacy organization activity efficiency. Conduction of the marketing researches of pharmaceutical market is the purpose of this study. We have used State Registry of Drugs, State Record of Drugs, List of vital drugs, questionnaires of pharmaceutical workers during our work. Historical, sociological, mathematical methods, and a method of expert evaluation were used in the paper. As the result of the study we have made the following conclusions. We have studied and generalized the literature data about classification and application of antiviral drugs, marketing, competition. The assortment of antiviral drugs on the pharmaceutical market of the Russian Federation was also studied. We have conducted an analysis for the obtainment of the information about antiviral drugs by pharmaceutical workers. We have determined the competitiveness of antiviral drugs, and on the basis of the research conducted we have submitted an offer for pharmaceutical organizations to form the range of antiviral drugs.

  16. Antiviral Therapy in Steroid-refractory Ulcerative Colitis with Cytomegalovirus: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Tushar; Singh, Siddharth; Loftus, Edward V; Bruining, David H; McCurdy, Jeffrey D

    2015-11-01

    The role of antiviral therapy in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) with cytomegalovirus (CMV) remains unclear. We therefore performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the association between antiviral therapy and the risk of colectomy. Multiple electronic databases were searched systematically through July 2014 for studies reporting the risk of colectomy in patients with UC with CMV stratified by treatment with antiviral agents. Colectomy rates were assessed for the overall cohort and stratified by corticosteroid (CS) refractoriness. We estimated summary odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals, using random-effects model, and used Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation criteria to appraise the quality of evidence. Fifteen observational studies (333 patients with UC with CMV, 43.2% treated with antiviral agents) were identified, of which 8 stratified patients according to CS-refractory disease (55.4% treated with antiviral agents). Antiviral therapy resulted in a significantly lower risk of colectomy in patients with CS-refractory disease (odds ratio, 0.20; 95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.49; I = 0%) but not in the overall population of patients with UC (odds ratio, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.31-2.76; I = 65). The quality evidence was low. The results were stable when restricting the analysis to patients with a tissue diagnosis of CMV and studies that defined CS-refractory disease as a failure to respond to intravenous CS. Antiviral therapy may benefit a subgroup of patients with UC who are refractory to CS. Further prospective trials are required to confirm these findings.

  17. Antiviral stockpiles for influenza pandemics from the household perspective: treatment alone versus treatment with prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Kin On; Leung, Gabriel M; Mak, Peter; Riley, Steven

    2013-06-01

    Model-based studies of antiviral use to mitigate the impact of moderate and severe influenza pandemics implicitly take the viewpoint of a central public health authority. However, it seems likely that the key decision of when to use antivirals will be made at the household level. We used a stochastic compartmental model of the transmission of influenza within and between households to evaluate the expected mortality under two strategies: households saving available antivirals for treatment only and households implementing prophylaxis as well as treatment. Given that every individual in the population was allocated a single course of antivirals, we investigated the impact of these two strategies for a wide range of AVED, the efficacy of antivirals in preventing death in severe cases (AVED=1 for complete protection). We found a cross-over point for our baseline parameter values in a regime where antivirals were still highly effective in reducing the chance of death: below AVED=0.9 the optimal strategy was for households to use both treatment and prophylaxis. We also considered the possibility that a small number of households might "cheat" by choosing to follow the treatment-only strategy when other households were following treatment with prophylaxis. The cross-over point for cheating households was considerably lower, at AVED=0.6, but substantially above 0. These results suggest that unless antivirals are almost completely effective in reducing the chance of death in serious cases, households will likely be better served implementing prophylaxis as well as treatment. More generally, our study illustrates the potential value of considering viewpoints other than a central authority when conducting model-based analysis of interventions against infectious disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of Novel 5,6-Dimethoxyindan-1-one Derivatives as Antiviral Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Siddappa A; Patil, Vikrant; Patil, Renukadevi; Beaman, Kenneth; Patil, Shivaputra A

    2017-01-01

    Discovery of novel antiviral agents is essential because viral infection continues to threaten human life globally. Various heterocyclic small molecules have been developed as antiviral agents. The 5,6-dimethoxyindan-1-on nucleus is of considerable interest as this ring is the key constituent in a range of bioactive compounds, both naturally occurring and synthetic, and often of considerable complexity. The main purpose of this research was to discover and develop small molecule heterocycles as broad-spectrum of antiviral agents. A focused small set of 5,6-dimethoxyindan-1-one analogs (6-8) along with a thiopene derivative (9) was screened for selected viruses (Vaccinia virus - VACA, Human papillomavirus - HPV, Zika virus - ZIKV, Dengue virus - DENV, Measles virus - MV, Poliovirus 3 - PV, Rift Valley fever virus - RVFV, Tacaribe virus - TCRV, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus - VEEV, Herpes simplex virus 1 -HSV-1 and Human cytomegalovirus - HCMV) using the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)'s Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (DMID) antiviral screening program. These molecules demonstrated moderate to excellent antiviral activity towards variety of viruses. The 5,6-dimethoxyindan-1-one analog (7) demonstrated high efficacy towards vaccinia virus (EC50: 30.00 µM) in secondary plaque reduction assay. The thiophene analog (9) has shown very good viral inhibition towards several viruses such as Human papillomavirus, Measles virus, Rift Valley fever virus, Tacaribe virus and Herpes simplex virus 1. Our research identified a novel 5,6-dimethoxyindan-1-one analog (compound 7), as a potent antiviral agent for vaccinia virus, and heterocyclic chalcone analog (compound 9) as a broad spectrum antiviral agent. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. La protéine CG4572 de Drosophile et la propagation du signal ARNi immun antiviral

    OpenAIRE

    Karlikow, Margot

    2015-01-01

    During viral infection, cell survival will depend on adequately giving, receiving and processing information to establish an efficient antiviral immune response. Cellular communication is therefore essential to allow the propagation of immune signals that will confer protection to the entire organism.The major antiviral defense in insects is the RNA interference (RNAi) mechanism that is activated by detection of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). The antiviral RNAi mechanism can be divided in...

  20. Antiviral activity of glycyrrhizin against hepatitis C virus in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Matsumoto

    Full Text Available Glycyrrhizin (GL has been used in Japan to treat patients with chronic viral hepatitis, as an anti-inflammatory drug to reduce serum alanine aminotransferase levels. GL is also known to exhibit various biological activities, including anti-viral effects, but the anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV effect of GL remains to be clarified. In this study, we demonstrated that GL treatment of HCV-infected Huh7 cells caused a reduction of infectious HCV production using cell culture-produced HCV (HCVcc. To determine the target step in the HCV lifecycle of GL, we used HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp, replicon, and HCVcc systems. Significant suppressions of viral entry and replication steps were not observed. Interestingly, extracellular infectivity was decreased, and intracellular infectivity was increased. By immunofluorescence and electron microscopic analysis of GL treated cells, HCV core antigens and electron-dense particles had accumulated on endoplasmic reticulum attached to lipid droplet (LD, respectively, which is thought to act as platforms for HCV assembly. Furthermore, the amount of HCV core antigen in LD fraction increased. Taken together, these results suggest that GL inhibits release of infectious HCV particles. GL is known to have an inhibitory effect on phospholipase A2 (PLA2. We found that group 1B PLA2 (PLA2G1B inhibitor also decreased HCV release, suggesting that suppression of virus release by GL treatment may be due to its inhibitory effect on PLA2G1B. Finally, we demonstrated that combination treatment with GL augmented IFN-induced reduction of virus in the HCVcc system. GL is identified as a novel anti-HCV agent that targets infectious virus particle release.