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Sample records for antiviral agents targeting

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF ANTIVIRAL AGENTS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. DEVELOPMENT OF ANTIVIRAL AGENTS. Chandipura virus can be regarded as a model system to design and develop antiviral agents. These agents could be small molecules or RNA/PNA aptamers or Antisense RNA to speicific gene sequence in the viral genome.

  2. Selective Targeting of Antiviral and Immunomodulating Agents in the Treatment of Arenavirus Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-01

    designated by other authorized documents. aCURqY CLASIFICATION OF THIS PAGE R T M A PForm Approved REPORT DOCUMEN[ATION PAGE OMB No. 0704-0188 la...protected mice from viral infections in which the liver or lung served as the primary site of virus infection. Liposome-encapsulated ribavirin was more...report summarizes our findings using liposomes as carriers for the selective targeting of antiviral and immunomodulating agents in viral infections

  3. Recent developments in antiviral agents against enterovirus 71 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chee Wah; Lai, Jeffrey Kam Fatt; Sam, I-Ching; Chan, Yoke Fun

    2014-02-12

    Enterovirus 71 (EV-71) is the main etiological agent of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Recent EV-71 outbreaks in Asia-Pacific were not limited to mild HFMD, but were associated with severe neurological complications such as aseptic meningitis and brainstem encephalitis, which may lead to cardiopulmonary failure and death. The absence of licensed therapeutics for clinical use has intensified research into anti-EV-71 development. This review highlights the potential antiviral agents targeting EV-71 attachment, entry, uncoating, translation, polyprotein processing, virus-induced formation of membranous RNA replication complexes, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. The strategies for antiviral development include target-based synthetic compounds, anti-rhinovirus and poliovirus libraries screening, and natural compound libraries screening. Growing knowledge of the EV-71 life cycle will lead to successful development of antivirals. The continued effort to develop antiviral agents for treatment is crucial in the absence of a vaccine. The coupling of antivirals with an effective vaccine will accelerate eradication of the disease.

  4. Plants as sources of antiviral agents | Abonyi | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of plants or plant products, traditionally, as antiviral agents is relatively wider than their use in modern medicine. Some antiviral substances have so far been isolated from higher plants, algae and lichens. Suitable methods for evaluating antiviral properties of plants and their extracts include use of animal models, ...

  5. Acridones as antiviral agents: synthesis, chemical and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda, C S; Fascio, M L; García, C C; D'Accorso, N B; Damonte, E B

    2013-01-01

    Acridones are a class of compounds that have attracted attention in recent years for their wide range of biological properties, including selective inhibition of diverse human pathogenic viruses. The wide spectrum of antiviral activity includes DNA and RNA viruses, such as herpes simplex virus, cytomegalovirus, adenovirus, hepatitis C virus, dengue virus, and Junin virus, among others, indicative of the involvement of cellular factors as potential targets of acridone derivatives. At the present, their precise mode of action is not clearly determined, although the predominant action seems to be centered on the synthesis of nucleic acids. Regarding this point, inhibitory activity against cellular and viral enzymes and the ability to intercalate into nucleic acid molecules was demonstrated for some acridone compounds. Then, the possibility of a multiple effect on different targets renewed interest in these agents for virus chemotherapy allowing a potent inhibitory effectiveness associated to less feasibility of generating antiviral resistance. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding the methods of synthesis, the antiviral properties of acridone derivatives, their mechanism of action, and structural characteristics related to antiviral activity as well as the perspectives of this class of compounds for clinical application against human viral infections.

  6. Plants as sources of antiviral agents | Abonyi | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antivirals are substances other than a virus or virus containing vaccine or specific antibody which can produce either a protective or therapeutic effect to the clear detectable advantage of the virus infected host. The search for antiviral agents began in earnest in the 1950s but this was directed mainly by chance, with little or ...

  7. Development of a Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Agent with Activity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development of a Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Agent with Activity Against Herpesvirus Replication and Gene Expression. ... Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... Purpose: To evaluate the broad-spectrum antiviral activity of peptide H9 (H9) in vitro in order to gain insight into its underlying molecular mechanisms.

  8. Direct-acting antiviral agents for hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiser, Jennifer J; Flexner, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Two selective inhibitors of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease nearly double the cure rates for this infection when combined with peginterferon alfa and ribavirin. These drugs, boceprevir and telaprevir, received regulatory approval in 2011 and are the first direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) that selectively target HCV. During 2012, at least 30 additional DAAs were in various stages of clinical development. HCV protease inhibitors, polymerase inhibitors, and NS5A inhibitors (among others) can achieve high cure rates when combined with peginterferon alfa and ribavirin and demonstrate promise when used in combination with one another. Current research is attempting to improve the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of these agents, define the best regimens, and determine treatment strategies that produce the best outcomes. Several DAAs will reach the market simultaneously, and resources will be needed to guide the use of these drugs. We review the clinical pharmacology, trial results, and remaining challenges of DAAs for the treatment of HCV.

  9. Human subtilase SKI-1/S1P is a master regulator of the HCV Lifecycle and a potential host cell target for developing indirect-acting antiviral agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmstead, Andrea D; Knecht, Wolfgang; Lazarov, Ina; Dixit, Surjit B; Jean, François

    2012-01-01

    HCV infection is a major risk factor for liver cancer and liver transplantation worldwide. Overstimulation of host lipid metabolism in the liver by HCV-encoded proteins during viral infection creates a favorable environment for virus propagation and pathogenesis. In this study, we hypothesize that targeting cellular enzymes acting as master regulators of lipid homeostasis could represent a powerful approach to developing a novel class of broad-spectrum antivirals against infection associated with human Flaviviridae viruses such as hepatitis C virus (HCV), whose assembly and pathogenesis depend on interaction with lipid droplets (LDs). One such master regulator of cholesterol metabolic pathways is the host subtilisin/kexin-isozyme-1 (SKI-1)--or site-1 protease (S1P). SKI-1/S1P plays a critical role in the proteolytic activation of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs), which control expression of the key enzymes of cholesterol and fatty-acid biosynthesis. Here we report the development of a SKI-1/S1P-specific protein-based inhibitor and its application to blocking the SREBP signaling cascade. We demonstrate that SKI-1/S1P inhibition effectively blocks HCV from establishing infection in hepatoma cells. The inhibitory mechanism is associated with a dramatic reduction in the abundance of neutral lipids, LDs, and the LD marker: adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP)/perilipin 2. Reduction of LD formation inhibits virus assembly from infected cells. Importantly, we confirm that SKI-1/S1P is a key host factor for HCV infection by using a specific active, site-directed, small-molecule inhibitor of SKI-1/S1P: PF-429242. Our studies identify SKI-1/S1P as both a novel regulator of the HCV lifecycle and as a potential host-directed therapeutic target against HCV infection and liver steatosis. With identification of an increasing number of human viruses that use host LDs for infection, our results suggest that SKI-1/S1P inhibitors may allow development of

  10. Human subtilase SKI-1/S1P is a master regulator of the HCV Lifecycle and a potential host cell target for developing indirect-acting antiviral agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea D Olmstead

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available HCV infection is a major risk factor for liver cancer and liver transplantation worldwide. Overstimulation of host lipid metabolism in the liver by HCV-encoded proteins during viral infection creates a favorable environment for virus propagation and pathogenesis. In this study, we hypothesize that targeting cellular enzymes acting as master regulators of lipid homeostasis could represent a powerful approach to developing a novel class of broad-spectrum antivirals against infection associated with human Flaviviridae viruses such as hepatitis C virus (HCV, whose assembly and pathogenesis depend on interaction with lipid droplets (LDs. One such master regulator of cholesterol metabolic pathways is the host subtilisin/kexin-isozyme-1 (SKI-1--or site-1 protease (S1P. SKI-1/S1P plays a critical role in the proteolytic activation of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs, which control expression of the key enzymes of cholesterol and fatty-acid biosynthesis. Here we report the development of a SKI-1/S1P-specific protein-based inhibitor and its application to blocking the SREBP signaling cascade. We demonstrate that SKI-1/S1P inhibition effectively blocks HCV from establishing infection in hepatoma cells. The inhibitory mechanism is associated with a dramatic reduction in the abundance of neutral lipids, LDs, and the LD marker: adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP/perilipin 2. Reduction of LD formation inhibits virus assembly from infected cells. Importantly, we confirm that SKI-1/S1P is a key host factor for HCV infection by using a specific active, site-directed, small-molecule inhibitor of SKI-1/S1P: PF-429242. Our studies identify SKI-1/S1P as both a novel regulator of the HCV lifecycle and as a potential host-directed therapeutic target against HCV infection and liver steatosis. With identification of an increasing number of human viruses that use host LDs for infection, our results suggest that SKI-1/S1P inhibitors may allow

  11. Recent developments in antiviral agents against enterovirus 71 infection

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Chee Wah; Lai, Jeffrey Kam Fatt; Sam, I-Ching; Chan, Yoke Fun

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV-71) is the main etiological agent of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Recent EV-71 outbreaks in Asia-Pacific were not limited to mild HFMD, but were associated with severe neurological complications such as aseptic meningitis and brainstem encephalitis, which may lead to cardiopulmonary failure and death. The absence of licensed therapeutics for clinical use has intensified research into anti-EV-71 development. This review highlights the potential antiviral agents targe...

  12. Small Neutral Amino Acid Ester Prodrugs of Acyclovir Targeting Amino Acid Transporters on the Cornea: Possible Antiviral Agents against Ocular HSV-1 Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katragadda Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize the affinity and permeability patterns of the amino acid ester prodrugs of acyclovir (ACV, L-alanine-ACV (AACV, L-serine-ACV (SACV, L-serine-succinate-ACV (SSACV and L-cysteine-ACV (CACV on rabbit primary corneal epithelial cell culture (rPCEC and on rabbit cornea. Amino acid prodrugs of acyclovir, AACV, SACV, SSACV and CACV were synthesized in our laboratory. Chemical hydrolysis in aqueous buffer, enzymatic hydrolysis in corneal homogenates and transport across freshly excised rabbit cornea of these prodrugs were studied. SSACV inhibited the uptake of [ 3 H] L-alanine on rPCEC and across the intact rabbit cornea. Lineweaver-Burk plot transformation revealed competitive inhibition between L-alanine and SSACV. In corneal tissue homogenate, the half lives of SSACV, SACV and CACV (t 1/2 were observed to be 3.5 ± 0.4, 9.2 ± 0.6 and 1.8 ± 0.1 hr respectively, whereas AACV was readily converted to the active parent drug acyclovir exhibiting complete degradation before 5 min. Interestingly translocation of SACV across cornea was inhibited in the presence of 5 mM arginine (~51%, a specific substrate for cationic transport system and in presence of BCH (~38%, a substrate specific for large neutral amino acid transport system (LAT or cationic and neutral amino acid transport system (B 0,+ . SACV exhibited higher permeability across cornea along with excellent antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus (HSV-1 and varicella-zoster virus (VZV in comparison to ACV. Recognition by multiple transporters, stability in corneal homogenate and changes in physico-chemical properties contributed to the increased permeability of SACV across cornea.

  13. Niclosamide is a proton carrier and targets acidic endosomes with broad antiviral effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Jurgeit

    Full Text Available Viruses use a limited set of host pathways for infection. These pathways represent bona fide antiviral targets with low likelihood of viral resistance. We identified the salicylanilide niclosamide as a broad range antiviral agent targeting acidified endosomes. Niclosamide is approved for human use against helminthic infections, and has anti-neoplastic and antiviral effects. Its mode of action is unknown. Here, we show that niclosamide, which is a weak lipophilic acid inhibited infection with pH-dependent human rhinoviruses (HRV and influenza virus. Structure-activity studies showed that antiviral efficacy and endolysosomal pH neutralization co-tracked, and acidification of the extracellular medium bypassed the virus entry block. Niclosamide did not affect the vacuolar H(+-ATPase, but neutralized coated vesicles or synthetic liposomes, indicating a proton carrier mode-of-action independent of any protein target. This report demonstrates that physico-chemical interference with host pathways has broad range antiviral effects, and provides a proof of concept for the development of host-directed antivirals.

  14. Effects of Complementary Combination Therapy of Korean Red Ginseng and Antiviral Agents in Chronic Hepatitis B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung-Hwa; Yang, Keum-Jin; Lee, Dong-Soo

    2016-12-01

    Chronic hepatitis B management is commonly targeted at reducing viral replication. However, the currently available antiviral therapies are associated with some problems, including resistance and numerous adverse effects. Ginseng has been reported to be effective for treating viral infections such as influenza and human immunodeficiency virus. However, there are currently few studies on the effects of ginseng in chronic hepatitis B. Thus, this study investigated the effects of ginseng together with antiviral agents in chronic hepatitis B. This was a prospective, single-blinded, randomized controlled trial, and single-center study. Thirty-eight patients were enrolled. The control group (n = 19) was administered antiviral agents alone. The experimental group (n = 19) was administered antiviral agents along with Korean Red Ginseng powder capsules (each dose is 1 gram (two capsules), a one-day dose is 3 grams). The baseline characteristics did not differ between the two groups. Differences in several non-invasive fibrosis serologic markers (type IV collagen, hyaluronic acid, transforming growth factor-β) and in the hepatitis B virus DNA levels were compared between the groups. The non-invasive fibrosis serologic markers were further decreased in the experimental group, with significant differences after treatment observed for hyaluronic acid (p = 0.032) and transforming growth factor-β (p = 0.008), but not for type IV collagen (p = 0.174). This study suggests the possibility of Korean Red Ginseng as a complementary therapy for chronic hepatitis B.

  15. Mechanism of action of direct-acting antiviral agents in treatment of chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WEN Xiaoyu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available With the development and launch of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs in the world in recent years, therapeutic regimens for chronic hepatitis C are constantly evolving. DAAs will also be launched in China in the near future. DAAs mainly target at the non-structural proteins of HCV and can inhibit HCV RNA replication. This article introduces the targets, mechanism of action, and resistance characteristics of different DAAs, as well as their current research and development in China and the results of phase Ⅲ clinical studies, in order to provide a reference for combined therapeutic strategies with DAAs in the treatment for chronic hepatitis C.

  16. Viral Response to Specifically Targeted Antiviral Therapy for Hepatitis C and the Implications for Treatment Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis L Cooper

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, hepatitis C virus (HCV antiviral therapy is characterized by long duration, a multitude of side effects, difficult administration and suboptimal success; clearly, alternatives are needed. Collectively, specifically targeted antiviral therapy for HCV (STAT-C molecules achieve rapid viral suppression and very high rapid virological response rates, and improve sustained virological response rates. The attrition rate of agents within this class has been high due to various toxicities. Regardless, several STAT-C molecules are poised to become the standard of care for HCV treatment in the foreseeable future. Optimism must be tempered with concerns related to the rapid development of drug resistance with resulting HCV rebound. Strategies including induction dosing with interferon and ribavirin, use of combination high-potency STAT-C molecules and an intensive emphasis on adherence to HCV antiviral therapy will be critical to the success of this promising advance in HCV therapy.

  17. Novel drugs targeting Toll-like receptors for antiviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mira C; Shirey, Kari Ann; Pletneva, Lioubov M; Boukhvalova, Marina S; Garzino-Demo, Alfredo; Vogel, Stefanie N; Blanco, Jorge Cg

    2014-09-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are sentinel receptors of the host innate immune system that recognize conserved 'pathogen-associated molecular patterns' of invading microbes, including viruses. The activation of TLRs establishes antiviral innate immune responses and coordinates the development of long-lasting adaptive immunity in order to control viral pathogenesis. However, microbe-induced damage to host tissues may release 'danger-associated molecular patterns' that also activate TLRs, leading to an overexuberant inflammatory response and, ultimately, to tissue damage. Thus, TLRs have proven to be promising targets as therapeutics for the treatment of viral infections that result in inflammatory damage or as adjuvants in order to enhance the efficacy of vaccines. Here, we explore recent advances in TLR biology with a focus on novel drugs that target TLRs (agonists and antagonists) for antiviral therapy.

  18. Recent advances in the development of antiviral agents using computer-aided structure based approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vikash; Chandra, Sharat; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran

    2014-01-01

    Viral diseases have been affecting the human race since ancient times. Currently, a long list of diseases caused by the viruses is available and extensive research in this area has resulted in understanding the finest details of the molecular mechanism of pathogenesis caused by these pathogens. Side by side, efforts have been made towards the search and design of antiviral agents that could interfere with viral pathogenesis. As a result of these efforts a number of effective antiviral agents have been developed and are available in the market. However, the high cost and lengthy protocol of the drug discovery process are some of the major limiting factors in the development of new and more effective antiviral agents. Considering the above fact, presently the research community is trying to integrate short and cost effective techniques in the modern drug discovery process for the identification and design of novel antiviral agents. Computeraided drug design (CADD), which comprises of various techniques like molecular docking, virtual screening, three dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (3D-QSAR) studies and many more, has the capability to speed up the antiviral drug development process. Successful design of antiviral drugs like Relenza, Saquinavir and Tamiflu have validated application of these techniques and holds a bright future in drug discovery protocol. This review explores the role of CADD in antiviral drug development and highlights the recent advances in antiviral drug research using computer-aided structure based approaches.

  19. New era for management of chronic hepatitis C virus using direct antiviral agents: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer Elbaz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The pegylated interferon regimen has long been the lone effective management of chronic hepatitis C with modest response. The first appearance of protease inhibitors included boceprevir and telaprevir. However, their efficacy was limited to genotype 1. Recently, direct antiviral agents opened the gate for a real effective management of HCV, certainly after FDA approval of some compounds that further paved the way for the appearance of enormous potent direct antiviral agents that may achieve successful eradication of HCV.

  20. Nuclear trafficking of proteins from RNA viruses: potential target for antivirals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caly, Leon; Wagstaff, Kylie M; Jans, David A

    2012-09-01

    A key aspect of the infectious cycle of many viruses is the transport of specific viral proteins into the host cell nucleus to perturb the antiviral response. Examples include a number of RNA viruses that are significant human pathogens, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1, influenza A, dengue, respiratory syncytial virus and rabies, as well agents that predominantly infect livestock, such as Rift valley fever virus and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Inhibiting the nuclear trafficking of viral proteins as a therapeutic strategy offers an attractive possibility, with important recent progress having been made with respect to HIV-1 and dengue. The results validate nuclear protein import as an antiviral target, and suggest the identification and development of nuclear transport inhibitors as a viable therapeutic approach for a range of human and zoonotic pathogenic viruses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Light-activated nanotube-porphyrin conjugates as effective antiviral agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Indrani; Douaisi, Marc P.; Mondal, Dhananjoy; Kane, Ravi S.

    2012-03-01

    Porphyrins have been used for photodynamic therapy (PDT) against a wide range of targets like bacteria, viruses and tumor cells. In this work, we report porphyrin-conjugated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (NT-P) as potent antiviral agents. Specifically, we used Protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), which we attached to acid-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). We decided to use carbon nanotubes as scaffolds because of their ease of recovery from a solution through filtration. In the presence of visible light, NT-P was found to significantly reduce the ability of Influenza A virus to infect mammalian cells. NT-P may be used effectively against influenza viruses with little or no chance of them developing resistance to the treatment. Furthermore, NT-P can be easily recovered through filtration which offers a facile strategy to reuse the active porphyrin moiety to its fullest extent. Thus NT-P conjugates represent a new approach for preparing ex vivo reusable antiviral agents.

  2. Liposomal Systems as Nanocarriers for the Antiviral Agent Ivermectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina Croci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA virus infections can lead to the onset of severe diseases such as fever with haemorrhage, multiorgan failure, and mortality. The emergence and reemergence of RNA viruses continue to pose a significant public health threat worldwide with particular attention to the increasing incidence of flaviviruses, among others Dengue, West Nile Virus, and Yellow Fever viruses. Development of new and potent antivirals is thus urgently needed. Ivermectin, an already known antihelminthic drug, has shown potent effects in vitro on Flavivirus helicase, with EC50 values in the subnanomolar range for Yellow Fever and submicromolar EC50 for Dengue Fever, Japanese encephalitis, and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. However ivermectin is hampered in its application by pharmacokinetic problems (little solubility and high cytotoxicity. To overcome such problems we engineered different compositions of liposomes as ivermectin carriers characterizing and testing them on several cell lines for cytotoxicity. The engineered liposomes were less cytotoxic than ivermectin alone and they showed a significant increase of the antiviral activity in all the Dengue stains tested (1, 2, and S221. In the current study ivermectin is confirmed to be an effective potential antiviral and liposomes, as drug carriers, are shown to modulate the drug activity. All together the results represent a promising starting point for future improvement of ivermectin as antiviral and its delivery.

  3. The potential of antiviral agents to control classical swine fever: a modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, Jantien A; Vrancken, Robert; Neyts, Johan; Goris, Nesya

    2013-09-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) represents a continuous threat to pig populations that are free of disease without vaccination. When CSF virus is introduced, the minimal control strategy imposed by the EU is often insufficient to mitigate the epidemic. Additional measures such as preemptive culling encounter ethical objections, whereas emergency vaccination leads to prolonged export restrictions. Antiviral agents, however, provide instantaneous protection without inducing an antibody response. The use of antiviral agents to contain CSF epidemics is studied with a model describing within- and between-herd virus transmission. Epidemics are simulated in a densely populated livestock area in The Netherlands, with farms of varying sizes and pig types (finishers, piglets and sows). Our results show that vaccination and/or antiviral treatment in a 2 km radius around an infected herd is more effective than preemptive culling in a 1 km radius. However, the instantaneous but temporary protection provided by antiviral treatment is slightly less effective than the delayed but long-lasting protection offered by vaccination. Therefore, the most effective control strategy is to vaccinate animals when allowed (finishers and piglets) and to treat with antiviral agents when vaccination is prohibited (sows). As independent control measure, antiviral treatment in a 1 km radius presents an elevated risk of epidemics running out of control. A 2 km control radius largely eliminates this risk. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Historical Perspectives in the Development of Antiviral Agents Against Poxviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik De Clercq

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The poxvirus vaccinia virus (VV served as the model virus for which the first antivirals, the thiosemicarbazones, were identified. This dates back to 1950; and, although there is at present no single antiviral drug specifically licensed for the chemotherapy or -prophylaxis of poxvirus infections, numerous candidate compounds have been described over the past 50 years. These compounds include interferon and inducers thereof (i.e., polyacrylic acid, 5-substituted 2’-deoxyuridines (i.e., idoxuridine, IMP dehydrogenase inhibitors, S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitors, acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (such as cidofovir and alkoxyalkyl prodrugs thereof (such as CMX001, viral egress inhibitors (such as tecovirimat, and cellular kinase inhibitors (such as imatinib.

  5. Identification of Novel 5,6-Dimethoxyindan-1-one Derivatives as Antiviral Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Siddappa A; Patil, Vikrant; Patil, Renukadevi; Beaman, Kenneth; Patil, Shivaputra A

    2017-01-01

    Discovery of novel antiviral agents is essential because viral infection continues to threaten human life globally. Various heterocyclic small molecules have been developed as antiviral agents. The 5,6-dimethoxyindan-1-on nucleus is of considerable interest as this ring is the key constituent in a range of bioactive compounds, both naturally occurring and synthetic, and often of considerable complexity. The main purpose of this research was to discover and develop small molecule heterocycles as broad-spectrum of antiviral agents. A focused small set of 5,6-dimethoxyindan-1-one analogs (6-8) along with a thiopene derivative (9) was screened for selected viruses (Vaccinia virus - VACA, Human papillomavirus - HPV, Zika virus - ZIKV, Dengue virus - DENV, Measles virus - MV, Poliovirus 3 - PV, Rift Valley fever virus - RVFV, Tacaribe virus - TCRV, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus - VEEV, Herpes simplex virus 1 -HSV-1 and Human cytomegalovirus - HCMV) using the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)'s Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (DMID) antiviral screening program. These molecules demonstrated moderate to excellent antiviral activity towards variety of viruses. The 5,6-dimethoxyindan-1-one analog (7) demonstrated high efficacy towards vaccinia virus (EC50: 30.00 µM) in secondary plaque reduction assay. The thiophene analog (9) has shown very good viral inhibition towards several viruses such as Human papillomavirus, Measles virus, Rift Valley fever virus, Tacaribe virus and Herpes simplex virus 1. Our research identified a novel 5,6-dimethoxyindan-1-one analog (compound 7), as a potent antiviral agent for vaccinia virus, and heterocyclic chalcone analog (compound 9) as a broad spectrum antiviral agent. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. A small effect of adding antiviral agents in treating patients with severe Bell palsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, E.L. van der; Rovers, M.M.; Ru, J.A. de; Heijden, G.J. van der

    2012-01-01

    In this evidence-based case report, the authors studied the following clinical question: What is the effect of adding antiviral agents to corticosteroids in the treatment of patients with severe or complete Bell palsy? The search yielded 250 original research articles. The 6 randomized trials of

  7. Hepatitis B virus reverse transcriptase - Target of current antiviral therapy and future drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Daniel N; Hu, Jianming

    2015-11-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections rely on the proper functioning of the viral polymerase enzyme, a specialized reverse transcriptase (RT) with multiple activities. All currently approved antiviral drugs for the treatment of chronic HBV infection, except for interferon, target the RT and belong to the same chemical class - they are all nucleoside analogs. Viral DNA synthesis is carried out by the RT enzyme in several different steps, each with distinct RT conformational requirements. In principle, each stage may be targeted by distinct antiviral drugs. In particular, the HBV RT has the unique ability to initiate viral DNA synthesis using itself as a protein primer in a novel protein priming reaction. In order to help identify RT inhibitors and study their mechanisms of action, a number of experimental systems have been developed, each varying in its ability to dissect the protein priming stage and subsequent stages of viral DNA synthesis at the molecular level. Two of the most effective drugs to date, entecavir and tenofovir, can inhibit both the protein priming and the subsequent DNA elongation stages of HBV DNA synthesis. Interestingly, clevudine, a thymidine analog, can inhibit both protein priming and DNA elongation in a non-competitive manner and without being incorporated into the viral DNA. Thus, a nucleoside RT inhibitor (NRTI) can functionally mimic a non-NRTI (NNRTI) in its inhibition of the HBV RT. Therefore, novel NRTIs as well as NNRTIs may be developed to inhibit the DNA synthesis activity of the HBV RT. Furthermore, additional activities of the RT that are also essential to HBV replication, including specific recognition of the viral RNA and its packaging into viral nucleocapsids, may be exploited for antiviral development. To achieve a more potent inhibition of viral replication and ultimately cure chronic HBV infection, the next generation of anti-HBV therapies will likely need to include NRTIs, NNRTIs, and other agents that target the viral RT as

  8. Glycosylation of dengue virus glycoproteins and their interactions with carbohydrate receptors: possible targets for antiviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Fakhriedzwan; Muharram, Siti Hanna; Diah, Suwarni

    2016-07-01

    Dengue virus, an RNA virus belonging to the genus Flavivirus, affects 50 million individuals annually, and approximately 500,000-1,000,000 of these infections lead to dengue hemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome. With no licensed vaccine or specific antiviral treatments available to prevent dengue infection, dengue is considered a major public health problem in subtropical and tropical regions. The virus, like other enveloped viruses, uses the host's cellular enzymes to synthesize its structural (C, E, and prM/M) and nonstructural proteins (NS1-5) and, subsequently, to glycosylate these proteins to produce complete and functional glycoproteins. The structural glycoproteins, specifically the E protein, are known to interact with the host's carbohydrate receptors through the viral proteins' N-glycosylation sites and thus mediate the viral invasion of cells. This review focuses on the involvement of dengue glycoproteins in the course of infection and the virus' exploitation of the host's glycans, especially the interactions between host receptors and carbohydrate moieties. We also discuss the recent developments in antiviral therapies that target these processes and interactions, focusing specifically on the use of carbohydrate-binding agents derived from plants, commonly known as lectins, to inhibit the progression of infection.

  9. Removal of the antiviral agent oseltamivir and its biological activity by oxidative processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestankova, Hana; Schirmer, Kristin; Escher, Beate I.; Gunten, Urs von

    2012-01-01

    The antiviral agent oseltamivir acid (OA, the active metabolite of Tamiflu ® ) may occur at high concentrations in wastewater during pandemic influenza events. To eliminate OA and its antiviral activity from wastewater, ozonation and advanced oxidation processes were investigated. For circumneutral pH, kinetic measurements yielded second-order rate constants of 1.7 ± 0.1 × 10 5 and 4.7 ± 0.2 × 10 9 M −1 s −1 for the reaction of OA with ozone and hydroxyl radical, respectively. During the degradation of OA by both oxidants, the antiviral activity of the treated aqueous solutions was measured by inhibition of neuraminidase activity of two different viral strains. A transient, moderate (two-fold) increase in antiviral activity was observed in solutions treated up to a level of 50% OA transformation, while for higher degrees of transformation the activity corresponded to that caused exclusively by OA. OA was efficiently removed by ozonation in a wastewater treatment plant effluent, suggesting that ozonation can be applied to remove OA from wastewater. - Highlights: ► Oseltamivir acid (OA) is oxidized by ozone and hydroxyl radical. ► Kinetics: We determined rate constants for the reaction with these oxidants. ► The specific activity of OA as neuraminidase inhibitor disappeared during oxidation. ► Ozonation and advanced oxidation can effectively remove OA from wastewaters. - Ozone and hydroxyl radical treatment processes can degrade aqueous oseltamivir acid and remove its antiviral activity.

  10. Hepatitis C virus cell-cell transmission and resistance to direct-acting antiviral agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Fei; Fofana, Isabel; Heydmann, Laura

    2014-01-01

    . In contrast, the role of HCV cell-cell transmission for antiviral resistance is unknown. Aiming to address this question we investigated the phenotype of HCV strains exhibiting resistance to direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) in state-of-the-art model systems for cell-cell transmission and spread. Using HCV...... genotype 2 as a model virus, we show that cell-cell transmission is the main route of viral spread of DAA-resistant HCV. Cell-cell transmission of DAA-resistant viruses results in viral persistence and thus hampers viral eradication. We also show that blocking cell-cell transmission using host......-targeting entry inhibitors (HTEIs) was highly effective in inhibiting viral dissemination of resistant genotype 2 viruses. Combining HTEIs with DAAs prevented antiviral resistance and led to rapid elimination of the virus in cell culture model. In conclusion, our work provides evidence that cell-cell transmission...

  11. Chronic Hepatitis C Treatment with Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents in a Real-Life Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirino-Sprung, Ruby Ann; Dehesa, Margarita; Wolpert, Enrique; Corona-Lau, Clara; García-Juarez, Ignacio; Sánchez-Ávila, José Francisco; Moctezuma-Velázquez, Carlos; Kershenobich, David

    2016-01-01

    In clinical trials, new oral direct-acting antiviral agent therapies have demonstrated a high sustained virological response rate in patients with hepatitis C virus infection. We aimed to analyze the efficacy and safety data from direct-acting antiviral agent interferon-free therapy in hepatitis C virus infection in a study performed in five different clinical settings in Mexico City; four private practice sites and one academic medical center in a real-world scenario. Eighty-one patients were treated with seven different direct-acting antiviral agent regimens, in which the end of treatment, sustained virological response at 12 weeks post-treatment, and adverse effects were evaluated. At their discretion, attending physicians selected the treatment regimens and durations. In total, 70.4% of the patients were female and the mean age was 60.7 years; 74.1% had blood transfusion as a risk factor. The most common genotype was 1b (70.4%). The fibrosis stage was F3 or F4 in 55.5% of patients; liver cirrhosis was present in 44%. The overall end of treatment response was 98.8%, and the rate of sustained virological response was 96%, independent of the regimen. Three patients did not achieve sustained virological response; they had cirrhosis and were treatment-experienced, and two had hepatocarcinoma. Non-significant adverse effects during treatment were documented. In this real-life setting in Mexico, a rate of 96% of sustained virological response to direct-acting antiviral agents was achieved in an older population of patients with advanced fibrosis. This study provides data that may be useful in guiding health professionals and authorities in the development of health policies.

  12. [Antiviral action and pathogenetic targets for seaweed sulfated polysaccharides in herpesvirus infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besednova, N N; Makarenkova, I D; Zvyagintseva, T N; Imbs, T I; Somova, L M; Zaporozhets, T S

    2016-03-01

    The review summarizes results of studies of effects of sulfated polysaccharides from seaweed on herpesviruses and the course of herpesvirus infections. Importance of this problem is determined by the prevalence of herpesviruses that can persist in the human body and demonstrate a high degree of immune mimicry and resistance to antiviral agents. A wide range of physiological action of sulfated polysaccharides, receptor agonists of innate and adaptive immune cells, which possess potent antiviral, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, open the possibility of their use for creation of new generation pharmacological substances and agents with associated activity for the treatment of herpesvirus infections.

  13. Substituted 3-Benzylcoumarins as Allosteric MEK1 Inhibitors: Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation as Antiviral Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Xu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to find novel antiviral agents, a series of allosteric MEK1 inhibitors were designed and synthesized. Based on docking results, multiple optimizations were made on the coumarin scaffold. Some of the derivatives showed excellent MEK1 binding affinity in the appropriate enzymatic assays and displayed obvious inhibitory effects on the ERK pathway in a cellular assay. These compounds also significantly inhibited virus (EV71 replication in HEK293 and RD cells. Several compounds showed potential as agents for the treatment of viral infective diseases, with the most potent compound 18 showing an IC50 value of 54.57 nM in the MEK1 binding assay.

  14. Multiple classes of antiviral agents exhibit in vitro activity against human rhinovirus type C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Chris; Aguayo, Esmeralda; Rodriguez, Madeleine; Lee, Gary; Jordan, Robert; Cihlar, Tomas; Birkus, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Human rhinovirus type C (HRV-C) is a newly discovered enterovirus species frequently associated with exacerbation of asthma and other acute respiratory conditions. Until recently, HRV-C could not be propagated in vitro, hampering in-depth characterization of the virus replication cycle and preventing efficient testing of antiviral agents. Herein we describe several subgenomic RNA replicon systems and a cell culture infectious model for HRV-C that can be used for antiviral screening. The replicon constructs consist of genome sequences from HRVc15, HRVc11, HRVc24, and HRVc25 strains, with the P1 capsid region replaced by a Renilla luciferase coding sequence. Following transfection of the replicon RNA into HeLa cells, the constructs produced time-dependent increases in luciferase signal that can be inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by known inhibitors of HRV replication, including the 3C protease inhibitor rupintrivir, the nucleoside analog inhibitor MK-0608, and the phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase IIIβ (PI4K-IIIβ) kinase inhibitor PIK93. Furthermore, with the exception of pleconaril and pirodavir, the other tested classes of HRV inhibitors blocked the replication of full-length HRVc15 and HRVc11 in human airway epithelial cells (HAEs) that were differentiated in the air-liquid interface, exhibiting antiviral activities similar to those observed with HRV-16. In summary, this study is the first comprehensive profiling of multiple classes of antivirals against HRV-C, and the set of newly developed quantitative HRV-C antiviral assays represent indispensable tools for the identification and evaluation of novel panserotype HRV inhibitors.

  15. Molecular Sleds and More: Novel Antiviral Agents via Single-Molecule Biology (441st Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangel, Wally (Ph.D., Biology Department)

    2008-10-15

    Vaccines are effective against viruses such as polio and measles, but vaccines against other important viruses, such as HIV and flu viruses, may be impossible to obtain. These viruses change their genetic makeup each time they replicate so that the immune system cannot recognize all their variations. Hence it is important to develop new antiviral agents that inhibit virus replication. During this lecture, Dr. Mangel will discuss his group's work with a model system, the human adenovirus, which causes, among other ailments, pink eye, blindness and obesity. Mangel's team has developed a promising drug candidate that works by inihibiting adenovirus proteinase, an enzyme necessary for viral replication.

  16. Pharmacogenetics of hepatitis C: transition from interferon-based therapies to direct-acting antiviral agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal SM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Sanaa M Kamal1,21Department of Medicine, Division of Hepatology, Gastroenterology and Tropical Medicine, Ain Shams Faculty of Medicine, Cairo, Egypt, 2Department of Medicine, Salman Bin Abdul Aziz College of Medicine, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Hepatitis C virus (HCV has emerged as a major viral pandemic over the past two decades, infecting 170 million individuals, which equates to approximately 3% of the world's population. The prevalence of HCV varies according to geographic region, being highest in developing countries such as Egypt. HCV has a high tendency to induce chronic progressive liver damage in the form of hepatic fibrosis, cirrhosis, or liver cancer. To date, there is no vaccine against HCV infection. Combination therapy comprising PEGylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin has been the standard of care for patients with chronic hepatitis C for more than a decade. However, many patients still do not respond to therapy or develop adverse events. Recently, direct antiviral agents such as protease inhibitors, polymerase inhibitors, or NS5A inhibitors have been used to augment PEGylated interferon and ribavirin, resulting in better efficacy, better tolerance, and a shorter treatment duration. However, most clinical trials have focused on assessing the efficacy and safety of direct antiviral agents in patients with genotype 1, and the response of other HCV genotypes has not been elucidated. Moreover, the prohibitive costs of such triple therapies will limit their use in patients in developing countries where most of the HCV infection exists. Understanding the host and viral factors associated with viral clearance is necessary for individualizing therapy to maximize sustained virologic response rates, prevent progression to liver disease, and increase the overall benefits of therapy with respect to its costs. Genome wide studies have shown significant associations between a set of polymorphisms in the region of the interleukin-28B (IL

  17. Histone deacetylase inhibitors are potent inducers of gene expression in latent EBV and sensitize lymphoma cells to nucleoside antiviral agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sajal K; Perrine, Susan P; Williams, Robert M; Faller, Douglas V

    2012-01-26

    Induction of EBV lytic-phase gene expression, combined with exposure to an antiherpes viral drug, represents a promising targeted therapeutic approach to EBV-associated lymphomas. Short-chain fatty acids or certain chemotherapeutics have been used to induce EBV lytic-phase gene expression in cultured cells and mouse models, but these studies generally have not translated into clinical application. The recent success of a clinical trial with the pan-histone deacetylase (pan-HDAC) inhibitor arginine butyrate and the antiherpes viral drug ganciclovir in the treatment of EBV lymphomas prompted us to investigate the potential of several HDAC inhibitors, including some new, highly potent compounds, to sensitize EBV(+) human lymphoma cells to antiviral agents in vitro. Our study included short-chain fatty acids (sodium butyrate and valproic acid); hydroxamic acids (oxamflatin, Scriptaid, suberoyl anilide hydroxamic acid, panobinostat [LBH589], and belinostat [PXD101]); the benzamide MS275; the cyclic tetrapeptide apicidin; and the recently discovered HDAC inhibitor largazole. With the exception of suberoyl anilide hydroxamic acid and PXD101, all of the other HDAC inhibitors effectively sensitized EBV(+) lymphoma cells to ganciclovir. LBH589, MS275, and largazole were effective at nanomolar concentrations and were 10(4) to 10(5) times more potent than butyrate. The effectiveness and potency of these HDAC inhibitors make them potentially applicable as sensitizers to antivirals for the treatment of EBV-associated lymphomas.

  18. Interaction research on an antiviral molecule that targets the coat protein of southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Longlu; Ding, Yan; Luo, Liangzhi; Gan, Xiuhai; Li, Xiangyang; Chen, Yongzhong; Hu, Deyu; Song, Baoan

    2017-10-01

    Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV) coat protein (P10) is the key protein required for viral transmission and host plant infection and is thus a promising target for anti-SRBSDV agent screening. In this study, P10 was obtained from Escherichia coli through cloning, expression, and purification. The antiviral agent Ningnanmycin was selected as control, and a series of antiviral compounds based on the structural scaffold of ferulic acid were analyzed. Size-exclusion chromatography analysis results showed that compound F27 can alter the aggregation of P10 proteins. Furthermore, fluorescence titration and microscale thermophoresis assay results indicated that F27 binds to P10 with K A of 5.75×10 5 M -1 and K D of 7.81μM. The ligand- and receptor-based three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity analyses were performed to determine the requirements for the interaction between the carboxyl structures and P10s. On the basis of the obtained models and information, we provided insights regarding the design and optimization of novel molecules as anti-SRBSDV agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Antiviral Polymer Therapeutics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Anton Allen Abbotsford

    2014-01-01

    The field of drug delivery is in essence an exercise in engineered pharmacokinetics. Methods of doing so have been developed through the introduction of a vehicle carrying the drug, either by encapsulation or covalent attachment. The emergence of polymer therapeutics in anticancer therapy has...... garnered a great deal of interest due to the substantial room for improvement inherent to conventional chemotherapeutic agents. Chemotherapeutic agents and antiviral agents have a lot of features in common due to both of them typically targeting endogenous targets, unlike antibacterial compounds, though...... the examples of polymer therapeutics being applied as an antiviral treatment are few and far in-between. This work aims to explore antiviral therapeutics, specifically in context of hepatitis virus C (HCV) and HIV. The current treatment of hepatitis C consists of a combination of drugs, of which ribavirin...

  20. Inhibition of dengue virus entry into target cells using synthetic antiviral peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhoot, Mohammed Abdelfatah; Rathinam, Alwin Kumar; Wang, Seok Mui; Manikam, Rishya; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2013-01-01

    Despite the importance of DENV as a human pathogen, there is no specific treatment or protective vaccine. Successful entry into the host cells is necessary for establishing the infection. Recently, the virus entry step has become an attractive therapeutic strategy because it represents a barrier to suppress the onset of the infection. Four putative antiviral peptides were designed to target domain III of DENV-2 E protein using BioMoDroid algorithm. Two peptides showed significant inhibition of DENV when simultaneously incubated as shown by plaque formation assay, RT-qPCR, and Western blot analysis. Both DET4 and DET2 showed significant inhibition of virus entry (84.6% and 40.6% respectively) using micromolar concentrations. Furthermore, the TEM images showed that the inhibitory peptides caused structural abnormalities and alteration of the arrangement of the viral E protein, which interferes with virus binding and entry. Inhibition of DENV entry during the initial stages of infection can potentially reduce the viremia in infected humans resulting in prevention of the progression of dengue fever to the severe life-threatening infection, reduce the infected vector numbers, and thus break the transmission cycle. Moreover these peptides though designed against the conserved region in DENV-2 would have the potential to be active against all the serotypes of dengue and might be considered as Hits to begin designing and developing of more potent analogous peptides that could constitute as promising therapeutic agents for attenuating dengue infection.

  1. Hepatitis C virus cell-cell transmission and resistance to direct-acting antiviral agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Xiao

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is transmitted between hepatocytes via classical cell entry but also uses direct cell-cell transfer to infect neighboring hepatocytes. Viral cell-cell transmission has been shown to play an important role in viral persistence allowing evasion from neutralizing antibodies. In contrast, the role of HCV cell-cell transmission for antiviral resistance is unknown. Aiming to address this question we investigated the phenotype of HCV strains exhibiting resistance to direct-acting antivirals (DAAs in state-of-the-art model systems for cell-cell transmission and spread. Using HCV genotype 2 as a model virus, we show that cell-cell transmission is the main route of viral spread of DAA-resistant HCV. Cell-cell transmission of DAA-resistant viruses results in viral persistence and thus hampers viral eradication. We also show that blocking cell-cell transmission using host-targeting entry inhibitors (HTEIs was highly effective in inhibiting viral dissemination of resistant genotype 2 viruses. Combining HTEIs with DAAs prevented antiviral resistance and led to rapid elimination of the virus in cell culture model. In conclusion, our work provides evidence that cell-cell transmission plays an important role in dissemination and maintenance of resistant variants in cell culture models. Blocking virus cell-cell transmission prevents emergence of drug resistance in persistent viral infection including resistance to HCV DAAs.

  2. Advanced Prodrug Strategies in Nucleoside and Non-Nucleoside Antiviral Agents: A Review of the Recent Five Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanadi Sinokrot

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Poor pharmacokinetic profiles and resistance are the main two drawbacks from which currently used antiviral agents suffer, thus make them excellent targets for research, especially in the presence of viral pandemics such as HIV and hepatitis C. Methods: The strategies employed in the studies covered in this review were sorted by the type of drug synthesized into ester prodrugs, targeted delivery prodrugs, macromolecular prodrugs, other nucleoside conjugates, and non-nucleoside drugs. Results: Utilizing the ester prodrug approach a novel isopropyl ester prodrug was found to be potent HIV integrase inhibitor. Further, employing the targeted delivery prodrug zanamivir and valine ester prodrug was made and shown a sole delivery of zanamivir. Additionally, VivaGel, a dendrimer macromolecular prodrug, was found to be very efficient and is now undergoing clinical trials. Conclusions: Of all the strategies employed (ester, targeted delivery, macromolecular, protides and nucleoside analogues, and non-nucleoside analogues prodrugs, the most promising are nucleoside analogues and macromolecular prodrugs. The macromolecular prodrug VivaGel works by two mechanisms: envelope mediated and receptor mediated disruption. Nucleotide analogues have witnessed productive era in the recent past few years. The era of non-interferon based treatment of hepatitis (through direct inhibitors of NS5A has dawned.

  3. Targeting Innate Immunity for Antiviral Therapy through Small Molecule Agonists of the RLR Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattabhi, Sowmya; Wilkins, Courtney R.; Dong, Ran; Knoll, Megan L.; Posakony, Jeffrey; Kaiser, Shari; Mire, Chad E.; Wang, Myra L.; Ireton, Renee C.; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Bedard, Kristin M.; Iadonato, Shawn P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cellular response to virus infection is initiated when pathogen recognition receptors (PRR) engage viral pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). This process results in induction of downstream signaling pathways that activate the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). IRF3 plays a critical role in antiviral immunity to drive the expression of innate immune response genes, including those encoding antiviral factors, type 1 interferon, and immune modulatory cytokines, that act in concert to restrict virus replication. Thus, small molecule agonists that can promote IRF3 activation and induce innate immune gene expression could serve as antivirals to induce tissue-wide innate immunity for effective control of virus infection. We identified small molecule compounds that activate IRF3 to differentially induce discrete subsets of antiviral genes. We tested a lead compound and derivatives for the ability to suppress infections caused by a broad range of RNA viruses. Compound administration significantly decreased the viral RNA load in cultured cells that were infected with viruses of the family Flaviviridae, including West Nile virus, dengue virus, and hepatitis C virus, as well as viruses of the families Filoviridae (Ebola virus), Orthomyxoviridae (influenza A virus), Arenaviridae (Lassa virus), and Paramyxoviridae (respiratory syncytial virus, Nipah virus) to suppress infectious virus production. Knockdown studies mapped this response to the RIG-I-like receptor pathway. This work identifies a novel class of host-directed immune modulatory molecules that activate IRF3 to promote host antiviral responses to broadly suppress infections caused by RNA viruses of distinct genera. IMPORTANCE Incidences of emerging and reemerging RNA viruses highlight a desperate need for broad-spectrum antiviral agents that can effectively control infections caused by viruses of distinct genera. We identified small molecule compounds that can

  4. Molecular Mechanisms of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Targeting the Host Antiviral Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Rodríguez Pulido

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV is the causative agent of an acute vesicular disease affecting pigs, cattle and other domestic, and wild animals worldwide. The aim of the host interferon (IFN response is to limit viral replication and spread. Detection of the viral genome and products by specialized cellular sensors initiates a signaling cascade that leads to a rapid antiviral response involving the secretion of type I- and type III-IFNs and other antiviral cytokines with antiproliferative and immunomodulatory functions. During co-evolution with their hosts, viruses have acquired strategies to actively counteract host antiviral responses and the balance between innate response and viral antagonism may determine the outcome of disease and pathogenesis. FMDV proteases Lpro and 3C have been found to antagonize the host IFN response by a repertoire of mechanisms. Moreover, the putative role of other viral proteins in IFN antagonism is being recently unveiled, uncovering sophisticated immune evasion strategies different to those reported to date for other members of the Picornaviridae family. Here, we review the interplay between antiviral responses induced by FMDV infection and viral countermeasures to block them. Research on strategies used by viruses to modulate immunity will provide insights into the function of host pathways involved in defense against pathogens and will also lead to development of new therapeutic strategies to fight virus infections.

  5. Influenza virus neuraminidase (NA): a target for antivirals and vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadesh, Anitha; Salam, Abdul Ajees Abdul; Mudgal, Piya Paul; Arunkumar, Govindakarnavar

    2016-08-01

    Influenza, the most common infectious disease, poses a great threat to human health because of its highly contagious nature and fast transmissibility, often leading to high morbidity and mortality. Effective vaccination strategies may aid in the prevention and control of recurring epidemics and pandemics associated with this infectious disease. However, antigenic shifts and drifts are major concerns with influenza virus, requiring effective global monitoring and updating of vaccines. Current vaccines are standardized primarily based on the amount of hemagglutinin, a major surface antigen, which chiefly constitutes these preparations along with the varying amounts of neuraminidase (NA). Anti-influenza drugs targeting the active site of NA have been in use for more than a decade now. However, NA has not been approved as an effective antigenic component of the influenza vaccine because of standardization issues. Although some studies have suggested that NA antibodies are able to reduce the severity of the disease and induce a long-term and cross-protective immunity, a few major scientific issues need to be addressed prior to launching NA-based vaccines. Interestingly, an increasing number of studies have shown NA to be a promising target for future influenza vaccines. This review is an attempt to consolidate studies that reflect the strength of NA as a suitable vaccine target. The studies discussed in this article highlight NA as a potential influenza vaccine candidate and support taking the process of developing NA vaccines to the next stage.

  6. Coinjection of a vaccine and anti-viral agents can provide fast-acting protection from foot-and-mouth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Su-Hwa; Kim, Taeseong; Choi, Joo-Hyung; Park, Gundo; Lee, Kwang-Nyeong; Kim, Byounghan; Lee, Myoung-Heon; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Su-Mi; Park, Jong-Hyeon

    2017-07-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is the cause of an economically devastating animal disease. With commercial inactivated FMD vaccines, the protection against FMD virus (FMDV) begins a minimum of 4 days post vaccination (dpv). Therefore, antiviral agents could be proposed for rapid protection and to reduce the spread of FMDV during outbreaks until vaccine-induced protective immunity occurs. In previous studies, we have developed two recombinant adenoviruses that simultaneously express porcine interferon-α and interferon-γ (Ad-porcine IFN-αγ) and multiple siRNAs that target the non-structural protein-regions of FMDV (Ad-3siRNA), and we have shown that the combination of the two antiviral agents (referred to here as Ad combination) induced robust protection against FMDV in pigs. In an attempt to provide complete protection against FMDV, we co-administered Ad combination and the FMD vaccine to mice and pigs. In the C57BL/6 mice model, we observed rapid and continuous protection against homologous FMDV challenge from 1 to 3 dpv-the period in which vaccine-mediated immunity is absent. In the pig experiments, we found that most of the pigs (five out of six) that received vaccine + Ad combination and were challenged with FMDV at 1 or 2 dpv were clinically protected from FMDV. In addition, most of the pigs that received vaccine + Ad combination and all pigs inoculated with the vaccine only were clinically protected from an FMDV challenge at 7 dpv. We believe that the antiviral agent ensures early protection from FMDV, and the vaccine participates in protection after 7 dpv. Therefore, we can say that the combination of the FMD vaccine and effective antiviral agents may offer both fast-acting and continuous protection against FMDV. In further studies, we plan to design coadministration of Ad combination and novel vaccines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. DNA Topoisomerases as Targets for Antibacterial Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiasa, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases are proven therapeutic targets of antibacterial agents. Quinolones, especially fluoroquinolones, are the most successful topoisomerase-targeting antibacterial drugs. These drugs target type IIA topoisomerases in bacteria. Recent structural and biochemical studies on fluoroquinolones have provided the molecular basis for both their mechanism of action, as well as the molecular basis of bacterial resistance. Due to the development of drug resistance, including fluoroquinolone resistance, among bacterial pathogens, there is an urgent need to discover novel antibacterial agents. Recent advances in topoisomerase inhibitors may lead to the development of novel antibacterial drugs that are effective against fluoroquinolone-resistant pathogens. They include type IIA topoisomerase inhibitors that either interact with the GyrB/ParE subunit or form nick-containing ternary complexes. In addition, several topoisomerase I inhibitors have recently been identified. Thus, DNA topoisomerases remain important targets of antibacterial agents.

  8. Spermicides, microbicides and antiviral agents: recent advances in the development of novel multi-functional compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Marta; Ramalho-Santos, João

    2009-11-01

    Non-ionic surfactants have been proposed as dual action anti-viral and spermicidal agents to tackle viral infections, namely HIV. Given very promising in vitro results, nonoxynol-9 has been widely used. However, toxic effects were reported, paradoxically increasing the incidence of transmission of HIV/Sexually Transmitted Diseases in vivo. Thus, there has been a growing interest in identifying and evaluating a new generation of accessible and easy-to-use molecules with simultaneous spermicidal and microbicide action. Different biochemical compounds and mechanisms of action are currently being studied. This article reviews the diverse strategies and mechanisms of action of these novel compounds, as well the necessary systematic studies needed to evaluate their possible toxicity.

  9. Meeting report: Third Summer School on Innovative Approaches for Identification of Antiviral Agents (IAAASS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Grice, Stuart F J; Sztuba-Solinska, Joanna; Maccioni, Elias; Purzycka, Katarzyna J; Parolin, Cristina; Tramontano, Enzo

    2017-03-01

    The third Summer School on Innovative Approaches for Identification of Antiviral Agents (IAAASS) was held from September 28th to October 2nd, 2016 at the Sardegna Ricerche Research Park in Santa Margherita di Pula, Sardinia, Italy. The school brought together graduate students and postdoctoral fellows early in their careers with a faculty of internationally recognized experts, to encourage the sharing of knowledge and experience in virology research and drug development in an informal and interactive environment. The first IAAASS was held in Sardinia in 2012 and the second in 2014. The meetings provide a unique combination of plenary lectures on topics in virology, biochemistry, molecular modeling, crystallography and medicinal chemistry with small group sessions, in which students have the opportunity to ask questions and put forward their own ideas, and senior researchers offer advice, based on their own experience. This report summarizes presentations and presentations at the 3rd IAAASS. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Update on hepatitis C virus resistance to direct-acting antiviral agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poveda, Eva; Wyles, David L; Mena, Alvaro; Pedreira, José D; Castro-Iglesias, Angeles; Cachay, Edward

    2014-08-01

    Resistance to direct-acting antiviral (DAA) agents against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is driven by the selection of mutations at different positions in the NS3 protease, NS5B polymerase and NS5A proteins. With the exception of NS5B nucleos(t)ide inhibitors, most DAAs possess a low genetic barrier to resistance, with significant cross-resistance between compounds belonging to the same family. However, a specific mutation profile is associated with each agent or drug class and varies depending on the genotype/subtype (e.g., genotype 1b showed higher rates of sustained virological response (SVR) and a higher genetic barrier for resistance than genotype 1a). Moreover, some resistance mutations exist as natural polymorphisms in certain genotypes/subtypes at frequencies that require baseline drug resistance testing before recommending certain antivirals. For example, the polymorphism Q80K is frequently found among genotype 1a (19-48%) and is associated with resistance to simeprevir. Similarly, L31M and Y93H, key resistance mutations to NS5A inhibitors, are frequently found (6-12%) among NS5A genotype 1 sequences. In particular, the presence of these polymorphisms may be of relevance in poorly interferon-responsive patients (i.e., null responders and non-CC IL28B) under DAA-based therapies in combination with pegylated interferon-α plus ribavirin. The relevance of pre-existing resistance mutations for responses to interferon-free DAA therapies is unclear for most regimens and requires further study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Towards the Determination of the Structure of HIV-1 p24: A Possible Target for Antiviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prongay, Andrew J.

    1991-01-01

    The importance of targeting certain stages in the life cycle of the virus for antiviral therapy is discussed with reference to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1. Research conducted on a core antigen, p24, is described. (MSE)

  12. Mouse lung slices: An ex vivo model for the evaluation of antiviral and anti-inflammatory agents against influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; An, Liwei; Liu, Ge; Li, Xiaoyu; Tang, Wei; Chen, Xulin

    2015-08-01

    The influenza A virus is notoriously known for its ability to cause recurrent epidemics and global pandemics. Antiviral therapy is effective when treatment is initiated within 48h of symptom onset, and delaying treatment beyond this time frame is associated with decreased efficacy. Research on anti-inflammatory therapy to ameliorate influenza-induced inflammation is currently underway and seems important to the impact on the clinical outcome. Both antiviral and anti-inflammatory drugs with novel mechanisms of action are urgently needed. Current methods for evaluating the efficacy of anti-influenza drugs rely mostly on transformed cells and animals. Transformed cell models are distantly related to physiological and pathological conditions. Although animals are the best choices for preclinical drug testing, they are not time- or cost-efficient. In this study, we established an ex vivo model using mouse lung slices to evaluate both antiviral and anti-inflammatory agents against influenza virus infection. Both influenza virus PR8 (H1N1) and A/Human/Hubei/3/2005 (H3N2) can replicate efficiently in mouse lung slices and trigger significant cytokine and chemokine responses. The induction of selected cytokines and chemokines were found to have a positive correlation between ex vivo and in vivo experiments, suggesting that the ex vivo cultured lung slices may closely resemble the lung functionally in an in vivo configuration when challenged by influenza virus. Furthermore, a set of agents with known antiviral and/or anti-inflammatory activities were tested to validate the ex vivo model. Our results suggested that mouse lung slices provide a robust, convenient and cost-efficient model for the assessment of both antiviral and anti-inflammatory agents against influenza virus infection in one assay. This ex vivo model may predict the efficacy of drug candidates' antiviral and anti-inflammatory activities in vivo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Early clinical development of targeted anticancer agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brummelen, E.M.J.

    2017-01-01

    Van Brummelen studied the safety and preliminary signs of efficacy of several novel targeted anticancer agents in phase I trials. In her thesis, she reports the results of trials with the immunotherapies pembrolizumab and cergutuzumab-amunaleukin, and with combinations of inhibitors of the MEK and

  14. Reactivation of Herpesvirus in Patients With Hepatitis C Treated With Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelló M, Christie; Fernández-Carrillo, Carlos; Londoño, María-Carlota; Arias-Loste, Teresa; Hernández-Conde, Marta; Llerena, Susana; Crespo, Javier; Forns, Xavier; Calleja, José Luis

    2016-11-01

    We performed a case-series analysis of reactivation of herpesvirus in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection treated with direct-acting antiviral (DAA) agents. We collected data from 576 patients with HCV infection treated with DAA combinations at 3 hospitals in Spain, from November 2014 through November 2015. We also collected data from a control population (230 HCV-infected patients, matched for sex and age; 23 untreated and 213 treated with interferon-based regimens). Herpesvirus was reactivated in 10 patients who received DAA therapy (7 patients had cirrhosis and 3 patients had received liver transplants), a median of 8 weeks after the therapy was initiated. None of the controls had herpesvirus reactivation. Patients with herpesvirus reactivation were receiving the DAA agents sofosbuvir with ledipasvir (with or without ribavirin, 7/10), ombitasvir with paritaprevir and ritonavir plus dasabuvir (with or without ribavirin, 2/10), or sofosbuvir with simeprevir plus ribavirin (1/10). Two of the 10 patients developed postherpetic neuralgia and 1 patient developed kerato-uveitis. All 10 patients with herpesvirus reactivation achieved a sustained virologic response. Immune changes that follow clearance of HCV might lead to reactivation of other viruses, such as herpesvirus. Patients with HCV infection suspected of having herpesvirus infection should be treated immediately. Some groups also might be screened for herpesvirus infection. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Targeting APOBEC3A to the viral nucleoprotein complex confers antiviral activity

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    Strebel Klaus

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background APOBEC3 (A3 proteins constitute a family of cytidine deaminases that provide intracellular resistance to retrovirus replication and to transposition of endogenous retroelements. A3A has significant homology to the C-terminus of A3G but has only a single cytidine deaminase active site (CDA, unlike A3G, which has a second N-terminal CDA previously found to be important for Vif sensitivity and virus encapsidation. A3A is packaged into HIV-1 virions but, unlike A3G, does not have antiviral properties. Here, we investigated the reason for the lack of A3A antiviral activity. Results Sequence alignment of A3G and A3A revealed significant homology of A3A to the C-terminal region of A3G. However, while A3G co-purified with detergent-resistant viral nucleoprotein complexes (NPC, virus-associated A3A was highly detergent-sensitive leading us to speculate that the ability to assemble into NPC may be a property conveyed by the A3G N-terminus. To test this model, we constructed an A3G-3A chimeric protein, in which the N-terminal half of A3G was fused to A3A. Interestingly, the A3G-3A chimera was packaged into HIV-1 particles and, unlike A3A, associated with the viral NPC. Furthermore, the A3G-3A chimera displayed strong antiviral activity against HIV-1 and was sensitive to inhibition by HIV-1 Vif. Conclusion Our results suggest that the A3G N-terminal domain carries determinants important for targeting the protein to viral NPCs. Transfer of this domain to A3A results in A3A targeting to viral NPCs and confers antiviral activity.

  16. Multi-Agent Cooperative Target Search

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    Jinwen Hu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses a vision-based cooperative search for multiple mobile ground targets by a group of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs with limited sensing and communication capabilities. The airborne camera on each UAV has a limited field of view and its target discriminability varies as a function of altitude. First, by dividing the whole surveillance region into cells, a probability map can be formed for each UAV indicating the probability of target existence within each cell. Then, we propose a distributed probability map updating model which includes the fusion of measurement information, information sharing among neighboring agents, information decay and transmission due to environmental changes such as the target movement. Furthermore, we formulate the target search problem as a multi-agent cooperative coverage control problem by optimizing the collective coverage area and the detection performance. The proposed map updating model and the cooperative control scheme are distributed, i.e., assuming that each agent only communicates with its neighbors within its communication range. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms is illustrated by simulation.

  17. Multi-agent cooperative target search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinwen; Xie, Lihua; Xu, Jun; Xu, Zhao

    2014-05-26

    This paper addresses a vision-based cooperative search for multiple mobile ground targets by a group of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) with limited sensing and communication capabilities. The airborne camera on each UAV has a limited field of view and its target discriminability varies as a function of altitude. First, by dividing the whole surveillance region into cells, a probability map can be formed for each UAV indicating the probability of target existence within each cell. Then, we propose a distributed probability map updating model which includes the fusion of measurement information, information sharing among neighboring agents, information decay and transmission due to environmental changes such as the target movement. Furthermore, we formulate the target search problem as a multi-agent cooperative coverage control problem by optimizing the collective coverage area and the detection performance. The proposed map updating model and the cooperative control scheme are distributed, i.e., assuming that each agent only communicates with its neighbors within its communication range. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms is illustrated by simulation.

  18. Enterovirus 71 protease 2Apro targets MAVS to inhibit anti-viral type I interferon responses.

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    Bei Wang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is the major causative pathogen of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD. Its pathogenicity is not fully understood, but innate immune evasion is likely a key factor. Strategies to circumvent the initiation and effector phases of anti-viral innate immunity are well known; less well known is whether EV71 evades the signal transduction phase regulated by a sophisticated interplay of cellular and viral proteins. Here, we show that EV71 inhibits anti-viral type I interferon (IFN responses by targeting the mitochondrial anti-viral signaling (MAVS protein--a unique adaptor molecule activated upon retinoic acid induced gene-I (RIG-I and melanoma differentiation associated gene (MDA-5 viral recognition receptor signaling--upstream of type I interferon production. MAVS was cleaved and released from mitochondria during EV71 infection. An in vitro cleavage assay demonstrated that the viral 2A protease (2A(pro, but not the mutant 2A(pro (2A(pro-110 containing an inactivated catalytic site, cleaved MAVS. The Protease-Glo assay revealed that MAVS was cleaved at 3 residues between the proline-rich and transmembrane domains, and the resulting fragmentation effectively inactivated downstream signaling. In addition to MAVS cleavage, we found that EV71 infection also induced morphologic and functional changes to the mitochondria. The EV71 structural protein VP1 was detected on purified mitochondria, suggesting not only a novel role for mitochondria in the EV71 replication cycle but also an explanation of how EV71-derived 2A(pro could approach MAVS. Taken together, our findings reveal a novel strategy employed by EV71 to escape host anti-viral innate immunity that complements the known EV71-mediated immune-evasion mechanisms.

  19. Facile Synthesis of Novel Vanillin Derivatives Incorporating a Bis(2-hydroxyethyl)dithhioacetal Moiety as Antiviral Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Zhao, Lei; Zhu, Chun; Wu, Zengxue; Zhang, Guoping; Gan, Xiuhai; Liu, Dengyue; Pan, Jianke; Hu, Deyu; Song, Baoan

    2017-06-14

    A series of vanillin derivatives incorporating a bis(2-hydroxyethyl)dithioacetal moiety was designed and synthesized via a facile method. A plausible reaction pathway was proposed and verified by computational studies. Bioassay results demonstrated that target compounds possessed good to excellent activities against potato virus Y (PVY) and cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), of which, compound 6f incorporating a bis(2-hydroxyethyl)dithioacetal moiety, exhibited the best curative and protection activities against PVY and CMV in vivo, with 50% effective concentration values of 217.6, 205.7 μg/mL and 206.3, 186.2 μg/mL, respectively, better than those of ribavirin (848.0, 808.1 μg/mL and 858.2, 766.5 μg/mL, respectively), dufulin (462.6, 454.8 μg/mL and 471.2, 465.4 μg/mL, respectively), and ningnanmycin (440.5, 425.3 μg/mL and 426.1, 405.3 μg/mL, respectively). Current studies provide support for the application of vanillin derivatives incorporating bis(2-hydroxyethyl)dithioacetal as new antiviral agents.

  20. Rational Combinations of Targeted Agents in AML

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    Prithviraj Bose

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite modest improvements in survival over the last several decades, the treatment of AML continues to present a formidable challenge. Most patients are elderly, and these individuals, as well as those with secondary, therapy-related, or relapsed/refractory AML, are particularly difficult to treat, owing to both aggressive disease biology and the high toxicity of current chemotherapeutic regimens. It has become increasingly apparent in recent years that coordinated interruption of cooperative survival signaling pathways in malignant cells is necessary for optimal therapeutic results. The modest efficacy of monotherapy with both cytotoxic and targeted agents in AML testifies to this. As the complex biology of AML continues to be elucidated, many “synthetic lethal” strategies involving rational combinations of targeted agents have been developed. Unfortunately, relatively few of these have been tested clinically, although there is growing interest in this area. In this article, the preclinical and, where available, clinical data on some of the most promising rational combinations of targeted agents in AML are summarized. While new molecules should continue to be combined with conventional genotoxic drugs of proven efficacy, there is perhaps a need to rethink traditional philosophies of clinical trial development and regulatory approval with a focus on mechanism-based, synergistic strategies.

  1. Selective enhancement of radiation response of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase transduced 9L gliosarcoma cells in vitro and in vivo by antiviral agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jae, Ho Kim; Sang, Hie Kim; Kolozsvary, Andrew; Brown, Stephen L.; Ok, Bae Kim; Freytag, Svend O.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate in a well-characterized tumor model that the radiosensitivity of tumor cells transduced with a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (HS-tk) would be selectively enhanced by antiviral agents. Methods and Materials: Rat 9L gliosarcoma cells transduced with a retroviral vector containing an HS-tk gene, 9L-tk cells were exposed to various doses of irradiation under either in vitro or in vivo conditions. The radiation sensitizing potential of two antiviral drugs, bromovinyl deoxyuridine (BVdU) and dihydroxymethyl ethyl methyl guanine (acyclovir), was evaluated in vitro. The radiosensitizing ability of BVdU was also evaluated with a 9L-tk tumor growing in the rat brain. Tumors growing in the right hemisphere of rat brains were irradiated stereotactically with single-dose irradiation. Results: The radiation response of 9L-tk cells was selectively enhanced by antiviral agents relative to nontransduced cells. In the cell culture, when a 24-h drug exposure (20 μg/ml) preceded radiation, the sensitizer enhancement ratio (SER) for BVdU and acyclovir was 1.4 ± 0.1 and 1.3 ± 0.1, respectively. Exposure of cells to 10 μg/ml acyclovir for two 24-h periods both pre- and postirradiation resulted in a SER of 1.6 ± 0.1. In vivo, a significant increase in median survival time of rats with 9L-tk tumors was found when BVdU was administered prior to single-dose irradiation relative to the survival time of similar rats receiving radiation alone. Conclusion: An antiviral agent can enhance cell killing by radiation with selective action in cells transduced with the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene. The results suggest that the three-pronged therapy of HS-tk gene transduction, systemically administered antiviral drug, and stereotactically targeted radiation therapy will improve the effectiveness of radiation therapy for the treatment of radioresistant tumors

  2. Bleomycin has antiviral properties against drug-resistant HIV strains and sensitises virus to currently used antiviral agents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgiou, N.A.; Bruggen, T. van der; Healy, D.M.; Tienen, C. van; Bie, P. de; Oudshoorn, M.; Marx, J.J.M.; Asbeck, B.S. van

    2006-01-01

    In this study we performed phenotypic assays to assess involvement of the cancer chemotherapeutic agent bleomycin (BLM) in replication inhibition of mutant HIV-1 viral strains. Three clinically relevant mutant HIV variants, including one containing the Q151M mutation conferring multinucleoside

  3. Searching for synergy: Identifying optimal antiviral combination therapy using Hepatitis C virus (HCV) agents in a replicon system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Justin J; Drusano, George L; Rodriquez, Jaime L; Brown, Ashley N

    2017-10-01

    Direct acting antiviral agents (DAAs) are potent inhibitors of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) that have revolutionized the treatment landscape for this important viral disease. There are currently four classes of DAAs that inhibit HCV replication via distinct mechanisms of action: nonstructural protein (NS) 3/4a protease inhibitors, NS5A inhibitors, NS5B nucleoside polymerase inhibitors, and NS5B non-nucleoside polymerase inhibitors. Combination therapy with two or more DAAs has great potential to further enhance antiviral potency. The purpose of this study was to identify optimal combinations of DAAs against genotype 1 HCV replicons that maximized the inhibition of replicon replication. All possible two-drug combinations were evaluated against genotype 1a and 1b HCV replicons using a 96-well plate luciferase-based assay in triplicate. The Greco Universal Response Surface Area mathematical model was fit to the luciferase data to identify drug-drug interactions (i.e.: synergy, additivity, and antagonism) for antiviral effect against both genotypes. This information was used to rank-order combinations of DAAs based on their ability to inhibit replicon replication against genotype 1a and 1b HCV. These preclinical findings can provide information as to which antiviral regimens should move on in the development process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Antiviral efficacy of favipiravir against two prominent etiological agents of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safronetz, David; Falzarano, Darryl; Scott, Dana P; Furuta, Yousuke; Feldmann, Heinz; Gowen, Brian B

    2013-10-01

    Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) is caused by infection with several Sigmodontinae- and Neotominae-borne hantaviruses and has a case fatality rate of 30 to 50%. Humans often become infected by inhalation of materials contaminated with virus-laden rodent urine or saliva, although human-to-human transmission has also been documented for Andes virus (ANDV). The ability to transmit via aerosolization, coupled with the high mortality rates and lack of therapeutic options, makes the development of medical countermeasures against HPS imperative. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of the broad-spectrum antiviral agent favipiravir (T-705) against Sin Nombre virus (SNV) and ANDV, the predominant causes of HPS in North and South America, respectively. In vitro, T-705 potently inhibited SNV and ANDV, as evidenced by decreased detection of viral RNA and reduced infectious titers. For both viruses, the 90% effective concentration was estimated at ≤5 μg/ml (≤31.8 μM). In the lethal ANDV hamster model, daily administration of oral T-705 at 50 or 100 mg/kg of body weight diminished the detection of viral RNA and antigen in tissue specimens and significantly improved survival rates. Oral T-705 therapy remained protective against HPS when treatment was initiated prior to the onset of viremia. No disease model for SNV exists; however, using a hamster-adapted SNV, we found that daily administration of oral T-705 significantly reduced the detection of SNV RNA and antigen in tissue specimens, suggesting that the compound would also be effective against HPS in North America. Combined, these results suggest that T-705 treatment is beneficial for postexposure prophylaxis against HPS-causing viruses and should be considered for probable exposures.

  5. Phase diagrams map the properties of antiviral agents directed against hepatitis B virus core assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lichun; Chirapu, Srinivas Reddy; Finn, M G; Zlotnick, Adam

    2013-03-01

    Assembly effectors are small molecules that induce inappropriate virus capsid assembly to antiviral effect. To identify attributes of hepatitis B virus (HBV) assembly effectors, assembly reaction products (normal capsid, noncapsid polymer, intermediates, and free dimeric core protein) were quantified in the presence of three experimental effectors: HAP12, HAP13, and AT-130. Effectors bound stoichiometrically to capsid protein polymers, but not free protein. Thermodynamic and kinetic effects, not aberrant assembly, correlate with maximal antiviral activity.

  6. Discovery of imidazo[2,1-b]thiazole HCV NS4B inhibitors exhibiting synergistic effect with other direct-acting antiviral agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning-Yu; Xu, Ying; Zuo, Wei-Qiong; Xiao, Kun-Jie; Liu, Li; Zeng, Xiu-Xiu; You, Xin-Yu; Zhang, Li-Dan; Gao, Chao; Liu, Zhi-Hao; Ye, Ting-Hong; Xia, Yong; Xiong, Ying; Song, Xue-Jiao; Lei, Qian; Peng, Cui-Ting; Tang, Hong; Yang, Sheng-Yong; Wei, Yu-Quan; Yu, Luo-Ting

    2015-03-26

    The design, synthesis, and SAR studies of novel inhibitors of HCV NS4B based on the imidazo[2,1-b]thiazole scaffold were described. Optimization of potency with respect to genotype 1b resulted in the discovery of two potent leads 26f (EC50 = 16 nM) and 28g (EC50 = 31 nM). The resistance profile studies revealed that 26f and 28g targeted HCV NS4B, more precisely the second amphipathic α helix of NS4B (4BAH2). Cross-resistance between our 4BAH2 inhibitors and other direct-acting antiviral agents targeting NS3/4A, NS5A, and NS5B was not observed. For the first time, the synergism of a series of combinations based on 4BAH2 inhibitors was evaluated. The results demonstrated that our 4BAH2 inhibitor 26f was synergistic with NS3/4A inhibitor simeprevir, NS5A inhibitor daclatasvir, and NS5B inhibitor sofosbuvir, and it could also reduce the dose of these drugs at almost all effect levels. Our study suggested that favorable effects could be achieved by combining 4BAH2 inhibitors such as 26f with these approved drugs and that new all-oral antiviral combinations based on 4BAH2 inhibitors were worth developing to supplement or even replace current treatment regimens for curing HCV infection.

  7. Broad antiviral activity of carbohydrate-binding agents against the four serotypes of dengue virus in monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijke M F Alen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dendritic cells (DC, present in the skin, are the first target cells of dengue virus (DENV. Dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN is present on DC and recognizes N-glycosylation sites on the E-glycoprotein of DENV. Thus, the DC-SIGN/E-glycoprotein interaction can be considered as an important target for inhibitors of viral replication. We evaluated various carbohydrate-binding agents (CBAs against all four described serotypes of DENV replication in Raji/DC-SIGN(+ cells and in monocyte-derived DC (MDDC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A dose-dependent anti-DENV activity of the CBAs Hippeastrum hybrid (HHA, Galanthus nivalis (GNA and Urtica dioica (UDA, but not actinohivin (AH was observed against all four DENV serotypes as analyzed by flow cytometry making use of anti-DENV antibodies. Remarkably, the potency of the CBAs against DENV in MDDC cultures was significantly higher (up to 100-fold than in Raji/DC-SIGN(+ cells. Pradimicin-S (PRM-S, a small-size non-peptidic CBA, exerted antiviral activity in MDDC but not in Raji/DC-SIGN(+ cells. The CBAs act at an early step of DENV infection as they bind to the viral envelope of DENV and subsequently prevent virus attachment. Only weak antiviral activity of the CBAs was detected when administered after the virus attachment step. The CBAs were also able to completely prevent the cellular activation and differentiation process of MDDC induced upon DENV infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The CBAs exerted broad spectrum antiviral activity against the four DENV serotypes, laboratory-adapted viruses and low passage clinical isolates, evaluated in Raji/DC-SIGN(+ cells and in primary MDDC.

  8. Pharmacological Agents Targeting the Cellular Prion Protein

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    Maria Letizia Barreca

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are associated with the conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrPC, a glycoprotein expressed at the surface of a wide variety of cell types, into a misfolded conformer (the scrapie form of PrP, or PrPSc that accumulates in brain tissues of affected individuals. PrPSc is a self-catalytic protein assembly capable of recruiting native conformers of PrPC, and causing their rearrangement into new PrPSc molecules. Several previous attempts to identify therapeutic agents against prion diseases have targeted PrPSc, and a number of compounds have shown potent anti-prion effects in experimental models. Unfortunately, so far, none of these molecules has successfully been translated into effective therapies for prion diseases. Moreover, mounting evidence suggests that PrPSc might be a difficult pharmacological target because of its poorly defined structure, heterogeneous composition, and ability to generate different structural conformers (known as prion strains that can elude pharmacological intervention. In the last decade, a less intuitive strategy to overcome all these problems has emerged: targeting PrPC, the common substrate of any prion strain replication. This alternative approach possesses several technical and theoretical advantages, including the possibility of providing therapeutic effects also for other neurodegenerative disorders, based on recent observations indicating a role for PrPC in delivering neurotoxic signals of different misfolded proteins. Here, we provide an overview of compounds claimed to exert anti-prion effects by directly binding to PrPC, discussing pharmacological properties and therapeutic potentials of each chemical class.

  9. Protein-Protein Interactions of Viroporins in Coronaviruses and Paramyxoviruses: New Targets for Antivirals?

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    Jaume Torres

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Viroporins are members of a rapidly growing family of channel-forming small polypeptides found in viruses. The present review will be focused on recent structural and protein-protein interaction information involving two viroporins found in enveloped viruses that target the respiratory tract; (i the envelope protein in coronaviruses and (ii the small hydrophobic protein in paramyxoviruses. Deletion of these two viroporins leads to viral attenuation in vivo, whereas data from cell culture shows involvement in the regulation of stress and inflammation. The channel activity and structure of some representative members of these viroporins have been recently characterized in some detail. In addition, searches for protein-protein interactions using yeast-two hybrid techniques have shed light on possible functional roles for their exposed cytoplasmic domains. A deeper analysis of these interactions should not only provide a more complete overview of the multiple functions of these viroporins, but also suggest novel strategies that target protein-protein interactions as much needed antivirals. These should complement current efforts to block viroporin channel activity.

  10. Exploring DNA topoisomerases as targets of novel therapeutic agents in the treatment of infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse-Dinh, Y-C

    2007-03-01

    DNA topoisomerases are ubiquitous enzymes needed to overcome topological problems encountered during DNA replication, transcription, recombination and maintenance of genomic stability. They have proved to be valuable targets for therapy, in part because some anti-topoisomerase agents act as poisons. Bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV (type IIA topoisomerases) are targets of fluoroquinolones while human topoisomerase I (a type IB topoisomerase) and topoisomerase II are targets of various anticancer drugs. Bacterial type IA topoisomerase share little sequence homology to type IB or type IIA topoisomerases, but all topoisomerases have the potential of having the covalent phosphotyrosine DNA cleavage intermediate trapped by drug action. Recent studies have demonstrated that stabilization of the covalent complex formed by bacterial topoisomerase I and cleaved DNA can lead to bacterial cell death, supporting bacterial topoisomerase I as a promising target for the development of novel antibiotics. For current antibacterial therapy, the prevalence of fluoroquinolone-resistant bacterial pathogens has become a major public health concern, and efforts are directed towards identifying novel inhibitors of bacterial type IIA topoisomerases that are not affected by fluoroquinolone resistant mutations on the gyrase or topoisomerase IV genes. For anti-viral therapy, poxviruses encode their own type IB topoisomerases; these enzymes differ in drug sensitivity from human topoisomerase I. To confront potential threat of small pox as a weapon in terrorist attacks, vaccinia virus topoisomerase I has been targeted for discovery of anti-viral agents. These new developments of DNA topoisomerases as targets of novel therapeutic agents being reviewed here represent excellent opportunities for drug discovery in the treatment of infectious diseases.

  11. Systems Biology-Based Investigation of Cellular Antiviral Drug Targets Identified by Gene-Trap Insertional Mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feixiong Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Viruses require host cellular factors for successful replication. A comprehensive systems-level investigation of the virus-host interactome is critical for understanding the roles of host factors with the end goal of discovering new druggable antiviral targets. Gene-trap insertional mutagenesis is a high-throughput forward genetics approach to randomly disrupt (trap host genes and discover host genes that are essential for viral replication, but not for host cell survival. In this study, we used libraries of randomly mutagenized cells to discover cellular genes that are essential for the replication of 10 distinct cytotoxic mammalian viruses, 1 gram-negative bacterium, and 5 toxins. We herein reported 712 candidate cellular genes, characterizing distinct topological network and evolutionary signatures, and occupying central hubs in the human interactome. Cell cycle phase-specific network analysis showed that host cell cycle programs played critical roles during viral replication (e.g. MYC and TAF4 regulating G0/1 phase. Moreover, the viral perturbation of host cellular networks reflected disease etiology in that host genes (e.g. CTCF, RHOA, and CDKN1B identified were frequently essential and significantly associated with Mendelian and orphan diseases, or somatic mutations in cancer. Computational drug repositioning framework via incorporating drug-gene signatures from the Connectivity Map into the virus-host interactome identified 110 putative druggable antiviral targets and prioritized several existing drugs (e.g. ajmaline that may be potential for antiviral indication (e.g. anti-Ebola. In summary, this work provides a powerful methodology with a tight integration of gene-trap insertional mutagenesis testing and systems biology to identify new antiviral targets and drugs for the development of broadly acting and targeted clinical antiviral therapeutics.

  12. Synthesis and characteristics of (Hydrogenated) ferulic acid derivatives as potential antiviral agents with insecticidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guang-Ying; Cui, Can; Wang, Zhi-Peng; Li, Yong-Qiang; Xiong, Li-Xia; Wang, Li-Zhong; Yu, Shu-Jing; Li, Zheng-Ming; Zhao, Wei-Guang

    2013-02-14

    Plant viruses cause many serious plant diseases and are currently suppressed with the simultaneous use of virucides and insecticides. The use of such materials, however, increases the amounts of pollutants in the environment. To reduce environmental contaminants, virucides with insecticidal activity is an attractive option. A series of substituted ferulic acid amide derivatives 7 and the corresponding hydrogenated ferulic acid amide derivatives 13 were synthesized and evaluated for their antiviral and insecticidal activities. The majority of the synthesized compounds exhibited good levels of antiviral activity against the tobacco mosaic virus (TMW), with compounds 7a, 7b and 7d in particular providing higher levels of protective and curative activities against TMV at 500 μg/mL than the control compound ribavirin. Furthermore, these compounds displayed good insecticidal activities against insects with piercing-sucking mouthparts, which can spread plant viruses between and within crops. Two series of ferulic acid derivatives have been synthesized efficiently. The bioassay showed title compounds not only inhibit the plant viral infection, but also prevented the spread of plant virus by insect vectors. These findings therefore demonstrate that the ferulic acid amides represent a new template for future antiviral studies.

  13. A computational network analysis based on targets of antipsychotic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei; Feng, Shuo; Liu, Zhao-Yuan; Wang, Jiu-Qiang; Qi, Ke-Ke; Wang, Kai

    2018-03-01

    Currently, numerous antipsychotic agents have been developed in the area of pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia. However, the molecular mechanism underlying multi targets of antipsychotics were yet to be explored. In this study we performed a computational network analysis based on targets of antipsychotic agents. We retrieved a total of 96 targets from 56 antipsychotic agents. By expression enrichment analysis, we identified that the expressions of antipsychotic target genes were significantly enriched in liver, brain, blood and corpus striatum. By protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analysis, a PPI network with 77 significantly interconnected target genes was generated. By historeceptomics analysis, significant brain region specific target-drug interactions were identified in targets of dopamine receptors (DRD1-Olanzapine in caudate nucleus and pons (P-valueantipsychotic targets and insights for molecular mechanism of antipsychotic agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The RNA Template Channel of the RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase as a Target for Development of Antiviral Therapy of Multiple Genera within a Virus Family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, Lonneke; Vives-Adrián, Laia; Selisko, Barbara; Ferrer-Orta, Cristina; Liu, Xinran; Lanke, Kjerstin; Ulferts, Rachel; De Palma, Armando M; Tanchis, Federica; Goris, Nesya; Lefebvre, David; De Clercq, Kris; Leyssen, Pieter; Lacroix, Céline; Pürstinger, Gerhard; Coutard, Bruno; Canard, Bruno; Boehr, David D; Arnold, Jamie J; Cameron, Craig E; Verdaguer, Nuria; Neyts, Johan; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2015-01-01

    The genus Enterovirus of the family Picornaviridae contains many important human pathogens (e.g., poliovirus, coxsackievirus, rhinovirus, and enterovirus 71) for which no antiviral drugs are available. The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase is an attractive target for antiviral therapy.

  15. Structure-Activity Relationships of Acyclic Selenopurine Nucleosides as Antiviral Agents

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    Pramod K. Sahu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A series of acyclic selenopurine nucleosides 3a–f and 4a–g were synthesized based on the bioisosteric rationale between oxygen and selenium, and then evaluated for antiviral activity. Among the compounds tested, seleno-acyclovir (4a exhibited the most potent anti-herpes simplex virus (HSV-1 (EC50 = 1.47 µM and HSV-2 (EC50 = 6.34 µM activities without cytotoxicity up to 100 µM, while 2,6-diaminopurine derivatives 4e–g exhibited significant anti-human cytomegalovirus (HCMV activity, which is slightly more potent than the guanine derivative 4d, indicating that they might act as prodrugs of seleno-ganciclovir (4d.

  16. TRIM11 negatively regulates IFNβ production and antiviral activity by targeting TBK1.

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    Younglang Lee

    Full Text Available The innate immune response is a host defense mechanism against infection by viruses and bacteria. Type I interferons (IFNα/β play a crucial role in innate immunity. If not tightly regulated under normal conditions and during immune responses, IFN production can become aberrant, leading to inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. In this study, we identified TRIM11 (tripartite motif containing 11 as a novel negative regulator of IFNβ production. Ectopic expression of TRIM11 decreased IFNβ promoter activity induced by poly (I:C stimulation or overexpression of RIG-I (retinoic acid-inducible gene-I signaling cascade components RIG-IN (constitutively active form of RIG-I, MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein, or TBK1 (TANK-binding kinase-1. Conversely, TRIM11 knockdown enhanced IFNβ promoter activity induced by these stimuli. Moreover, TRIM11 overexpression inhibited the phosphorylation and dimerization of IRF3 and expression of IFNβ mRNA. By contrast, TRIM11 knockdown increased the IRF3 phosphorylation and IFNβ mRNA expression. We also found that TRIM11 and TBK1, a key kinase that phosphorylates IRF3 in the RIG-I pathway, interacted with each other through CC and CC2 domain, respectively. This interaction was enhanced in the presence of the TBK1 adaptor proteins, NAP1 (NF-κB activating kinase-associated protein-1, SINTBAD (similar to NAP1 TBK1 adaptor or TANK (TRAF family member-associated NF-κB activator. Consistent with its inhibitory role in RIG-I-mediated IFNβ signaling, TRIM11 overexpression enhanced viral infectivity, whereas TRIM11 knockdown produced the opposite effect. Collectively, our results suggest that TRIM11 inhibits RIG-I-mediated IFNβ production by targeting the TBK1 signaling complex.

  17. Cooperative target convergence using multiple agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwok, K.S.; Driessen, B.J.

    1997-10-01

    This work considers the problem of causing multiple (100`s) autonomous mobile robots to converge to a target and provides a follow-the-leader approach to the problem. Each robot has only a limited-range sensor for sending the target and also larger but also limited-range robot-to-robot communication capability. Because of the small amount of information available to the robots, a practical approach to improve convergence to the target is to have a robot follow the robot with the best quality of information. Specifically, each robot emits a signal that informs in-range robots what its status is. A robot has a status value of 0 if it is itself in range of the target. A robot has a status of 1 if it is not in range of the target but is in communication range of a robot that is in range of the target. A robot has a status of 2 if it is not in range of the target but is within range of another robot that has status 1, and so on. Of all the mobile robots that any given robot is in range of, it follows the one with the best status. The emergent behavior is the ant-like trails of robots following each other toward the target. If the robot is not in range of another robot that is either in range of the target or following another robot, the robot will assign-1 to its quality-of-information, and will execute an exhaustive search. The exhaustive search will continue until it encounters either the target or another robot with a nonnegative quality-of-information. The quality of information approach was extended to the case where each robot only has two-bit signals informing it of distance to in-range robots.

  18. Cooperative target convergence using multiple agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok, K.S.; Driessen, B.J.

    1997-01-01

    This work considers the problem of causing multiple (100''s) autonomous mobile robots to converge to a target and provides a follow-the-leader approach to the problem. Each robot has only a limited-range sensor for sending the target and also larger but also limited-range robot-to-robot communication capability. Because of the small amount of information available to the robots, a practical approach to improve convergence to the target is to have a robot follow the robot with the best quality of information. Specifically, each robot emits a signal that informs in-range robots what its status is. A robot has a status value of 0 if it is itself in range of the target. A robot has a status of 1 if it is not in range of the target but is in communication range of a robot that is in range of the target. A robot has a status of 2 if it is not in range of the target but is within range of another robot that has status 1, and so on. Of all the mobile robots that any given robot is in range of, it follows the one with the best status. The emergent behavior is the ant-like trails of robots following each other toward the target. If the robot is not in range of another robot that is either in range of the target or following another robot, the robot will assign-1 to its quality-of-information, and will execute an exhaustive search. The exhaustive search will continue until it encounters either the target or another robot with a nonnegative quality-of-information. The quality of information approach was extended to the case where each robot only has two-bit signals informing it of distance to in-range robots

  19. Macromolecular Antiviral Agents against Zika, Ebola, SARS, and Other Pathogenic Viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schandock, Franziska; Riber, Camilla Frich; Röcker, Annika

    2017-01-01

    . This work performs selection of synthetic polymers as novel broadly active agents and demonstrates activity of these polymers against Zika, Ebola, Lassa, Lyssa, Rabies, Marburg, Ebola, influenza, herpes simplex, and human immunodeficiency viruses. Results presented herein offer structure...

  20. Mitochondrially targeted anti-cancer agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Biasutto, L.; Dong, L.A.; Zoratti, M.; Neužil, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 6 (2010), s. 670-681 ISSN 1567-7249 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Mitochondrial targeting * pro-oxidant effect * reactive oxygen species Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.238, year: 2010

  1. Treatment of Oseltamivir-Resistant Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infections in Mice With Antiviral Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smee, Donald F.; Julander, Justin G.; Tarbet, E. Bart; Gross, Matthew; Nguyen, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Influenza A/Mississippi/03/2001 (H1N1) and A/Hong Kong/2369/2009 (H1N1) viruses containing the neuraminidase gene mutation H275Y (conferring resistance to oseltamivir) were adapted to mice and evaluated for suitability as models for lethal infection and antiviral treatment. The viral neuraminidases were resistant to peramivir and oseltamivir carboxylate but sensitive to zanamivir. Similar pattern of antiviral activity were seen in MDCK cell assays. Lethal infections were achieved in mice with the two viruses. Oral oseltamivir at 100 and 300 mg/kg/day bid for 5 d starting at −2 h gave 30 and 60% protection from death, respectively, due to the A/Mississippi/03/2001 infection. Intraperitoneal treatments with zanamivir at 30 and 100 mg/kg/day starting at −2 h gave 60 and 90% protection, respectively. Neither compound at ≤300 mg/kg/day protected mice when treatments began at +24 h. Amantadine was effective at 10, 30, and 100 mg/kg/day, rimantadine was protective at 10 and 30 mg/kg/day (highest dose tested), and ribavirin was active at 30 and 75 mg/kg/day, with survival ranging from 60–100% for oral treatments initiated at −2 h. For treatments begun at +24 h, amantadine was protective at 30 and 100 mg/kg/day, rimantadine showed efficacy at 10 and 30 mg/kg/day, and ribavirin was active at 75 mg/kg/day, with 60–100% survival per group. In the A/Hong Kong/2369/2009 infection, oral oseltamivir at 100 and 300 mg/kg/day starting at −2 h gave 50 and 70% protection from death, respectively. These infection models will be useful to study newly discovered anti-influenza virus agents and to evaluate compounds in combination. PMID:22809862

  2. Transdermal Delivery and Cutaneous Targeting of Antivirals using a Penetration Enhancer and Lysolipid Prodrugs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Diblíková, D.; Kopečná, M.; Školová, B.; Krečmerová, Marcela; Roh, J.; Hrabálek, A.; Vávrová, K.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 4 (2014), s. 1071-1081 ISSN 0724-8741 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/11/0365 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : acyclic nucleoside phosphonate antivirals * lysolipid prodrug * penetration enhancer * skin absorption * transdermal drug delivery Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 3.420, year: 2014

  3. Post-exposure prophylaxis against Ebola virus disease with experimental antiviral agents: a case-series of health-care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Michael; Aarons, Emma; Bhagani, Sanjay; Buchanan, Ruaridh; Cropley, Ian; Hopkins, Susan; Lester, Rebecca; Martin, Daniel; Marshall, Neal; Mepham, Stephen; Warren, Simon; Rodger, Alison

    2015-11-01

    Although a few international health-care workers who have assisted in the current Ebola outbreak in west Africa have been medically evacuated for treatment of Ebola virus disease, more commonly they were evacuated after potential accidental exposure to Ebola virus. An urgent need exists for a consensus about the risk assessment of Ebola virus transmission after accidental exposure, and to investigate the use of post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP). Experimental vaccines have occasionally been used for Ebola PEP, but newly developed experimental antiviral agents have potential advantages. Here, we describe a new method for risk assessment and management of health-care workers potentially exposed to Ebola virus and report the use of experimental antiviral therapies for Ebola PEP in people. We devised a risk assessment and management algorithm for health-care workers potentially exposed to Ebola virus and applied this to eight consecutive individuals who were medically evacuated to the UK from west Africa between January, and March, 2015. PEP with antiviral agents was given to health-care workers assessed to have had substantial risk exposures to Ebola virus. Participants were followed up for 42 days after potential exposure. Four of eight health-care workers were classified as having had low risk exposures and managed by watchful waiting in the community. None of these health-care workers developed Ebola virus disease. The other four health-care workers had intermediate or maximum risk exposures and were given PEP with antiviral agents. PEP was well tolerated with no serious adverse effects. None of these four health-care workers, including two with maximum risk exposures from penetrating injuries with freshly used hollow-bore needles, developed Ebola virus disease. Standardised risk assessment should be adopted and consensus guidelines developed to systematically study the efficacy and safety of PEP with experimental agents. New experimental antiviral treatments are a

  4. Short hairpin RNA targeting 2B gene of coxsackievirus B3 exhibits potential antiviral effects both in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Hailan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coxsackievirus B3 is an important infectious agent of viral myocarditis, pancreatitis and aseptic meningitis, but there are no specific antiviral therapeutic reagents in clinical use. RNA interference-based technology has been developed to prevent the viral infection. Methods To evaluate the impact of RNA interference on viral replication, cytopathogenicity and animal survival, short hairpin RNAs targeting the viral 2B region (shRNA-2B expressed by a recombinant vector (pGCL-2B or a recombinant lentivirus (Lenti-2B were tansfected in HeLa cells or transduced in mice infected with CVB3. Results ShRNA-2B exhibited a significant effect on inhibition of viral production in HeLa cells. Furthermore, shRNA-2B improved mouse survival rate, reduced the viral tissues titers and attenuated tissue damage compared with those of the shRNA-NC treated control group. Lenti-2B displayed more effective role in inhibition of viral replication than pGCL-2B in vivo. Conclusions Coxsackievirus B3 2B is an effective target of gene silencing against coxsackievirus B3 infection, suggesting that shRNA-2B is a potential agent for further development into a treatment for enterviral diseases.

  5. Solute Carrier NTCP Regulates Innate Antiviral Immune Responses Targeting Hepatitis C Virus Infection of Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloi R. Verrier

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis B, C, and D virus (HBV, HCV, and HDV infections are the leading causes of liver disease and cancer worldwide. Recently, the solute carrier and sodium taurocholate co-transporter NTCP has been identified as a receptor for HBV and HDV. Here, we uncover NTCP as a host factor regulating HCV infection. Using gain- and loss-of-function studies, we show that NTCP mediates HCV infection of hepatocytes and is relevant for cell-to-cell transmission. NTCP regulates HCV infection by augmenting the bile-acid-mediated repression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs, including IFITM3. In conclusion, our results uncover NTCP as a mediator of innate antiviral immune responses in the liver, and they establish a role for NTCP in the infection process of multiple viruses via distinct mechanisms. Collectively, our findings suggest a role for solute carriers in the regulation of innate antiviral responses, and they have potential implications for virus-host interactions and antiviral therapies.

  6. Host-targeting agents in the treatment of hepatitis C: a beginning and an end?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugh, James M; Garcia-Rivera, Jose A; Gallay, Philippe A

    2013-11-01

    The development of two distinct classes of hepatitis C antiviral agents, direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) and host-targeting antivirals (HTAs), have distinctly impacted the hepatitis C virus (HCV) field by generating higher sustained virological response (SVR) rates within infected patients, via reductions in both adverse side effects and duration of treatment when compared to the old standard of care. Today DAAs are actively incorporated into the standard of care and continue to receive the most advanced clinical trial analysis. With a multitude of innovative and potent second-generation DAA compounds currently being tested in clinical trials, it is clear that the future of DAAs looks very bright. In comparison to the other class of compounds, HTAs have been slightly less impactful, despite the fact that primary treatment regimens for HCV began with the use of an HTA - interferon alpha (IFNα). The compound was advantageous in that it provided a broad-reaching antiviral response; however deleterious side effects and viral/patient resistance has since made the compound outdated. HTA research has since moved onward to target a number of cellular host factors that are required for HCV viral entry and replication such as scavenger receptor-BI (SR-BI), 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCoA reductase), cyclophilin A (CypA), fatty acid synthase (FASN) and miRNA-122. The rationale behind pursuing these HTAs is based upon the extremely low mutational rate that occurs within eukaryotic cells, thereby creating a high genetic barrier to drug resistance for anti-HCV compounds, as well as pan-genotypic coverage to all HCV genotypes and serotypes. As the end appears near for HCV, it becomes important to ask if the development of novel HTAs should also be analyzed in combination with other DAAs, in order to address potential hard-to-treat HCV patient populations. Since the treatment regimens for HCV began with the use of a global HTA, could one end the field as well

  7. miR-194 Inhibits Innate Antiviral Immunity by Targeting FGF2 in Influenza H1N1 Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyu Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2 or basic FGF regulates a wide range of cell biological functions including proliferation, angiogenesis, migration, differentiation, and injury repair. However, the roles of FGF2 and the underlying mechanisms of action in influenza A virus (IAV-induced lung injury remain largely unexplored. In this study, we report that microRNA-194-5p (miR-194 expression is significantly decreased in A549 alveolar epithelial cells (AECs following infection with IAV/Beijing/501/2009 (BJ501. We found that miR-194 can directly target FGF2, a novel antiviral regulator, to suppress FGF2 expression at the mRNA and protein levels. Overexpression of miR-194 facilitated IAV replication by negatively regulating type I interferon (IFN production, whereas reintroduction of FGF2 abrogated the miR-194-induced effects on IAV replication. Conversely, inhibition of miR-194 alleviated IAV-induced lung injury by promoting type I IFN antiviral activities in vivo. Importantly, FGF2 activated the retinoic acid-inducible gene I signaling pathway, whereas miR-194 suppressed the phosphorylation of tank binding kinase 1 and IFN regulatory factor 3. Our findings suggest that the miR-194-FGF2 axis plays a vital role in IAV-induced lung injury, and miR-194 antagonism might be a potential therapeutic target during IAV infection.

  8. Thiazolides as novel antiviral agents. 1. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachulski, Andrew V; Pidathala, Chandrakala; Row, Eleanor C; Sharma, Raman; Berry, Neil G; Iqbal, Mazhar; Bentley, Joanne; Allman, Sarah A; Edwards, Geoffrey; Helm, Alison; Hellier, Jennifer; Korba, Brent E; Semple, J Edward; Rossignol, Jean-Francois

    2011-06-23

    We report the syntheses and activities of a wide range of thiazolides [viz., 2-hydroxyaroyl-N-(thiazol-2-yl)amides] against hepatitis B virus replication, with QSAR analysis of our results. The prototypical thiazolide, nitazoxanide [2-hydroxybenzoyl-N-(5-nitrothiazol-2-yl)amide, NTZ] 1 is a broad spectrum antiinfective agent effective against anaerobic bacteria, viruses, and parasites. By contrast, 2-hydroxybenzoyl-N-(5-chlorothiazol-2-yl)amide 3 is a novel, potent, and selective inhibitor of hepatitis B replication (EC(50) = 0.33 μm) but is inactive against anaerobes. Several 4'- and 5'-substituted thiazolides show good activity against HBV; by contrast, some related salicyloylanilides show a narrower spectrum of activity. The ADME properties of 3 are similar to 1; viz., the O-acetate is an effective prodrug, and the O-aryl glucuronide is a major metabolite. The QSAR study shows a good correlation of observed EC(90) for intracellular virions with thiazolide structural parameters. Finally we discuss the mechanism of action of thiazolides in relation to the present results.

  9. Mitochondria-Targeted Agents: Mitochondriotropics, Mitochondriotoxics, and Mitocans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman-Villanueva, Diana; Weissig, Volkmar

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria, the powerhouse of the cell, have been known for many years for their central role in the energy metabolism; however, extensive progress has been made and to date substantial evidence demonstrates that mitochondria play a critical role not only in the cell bioenergetics but also in the entire cell metabolome. Mitochondria are also involved in the intracellular redox poise, the regulation of calcium homeostasis, and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are crucial for the control of a variety of signaling pathways. Additionally, they are essential for the mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis process. Thus, it is not surprising that disruptions of mitochondrial functions can lead or be associated with human pathologies. Because of diseases like diabetes, Alzheimer, Parkinson's, cancer, and ischemic disease are being increasingly linked to mitochondrial dysfunctions, the interest in mitochondria as a prime pharmacological target has dramatically risen over the last decades and as a consequence a large number of agents, which could potentially impact or modulate mitochondrial functions, are currently under investigation. Based on their site of action, these agents can be classified as mitochondria-targeted and non-mitochondria-targeted agents. As a result of the continuous search for new agents and the design of potential therapeutic agents to treat mitochondrial diseases, terms like mitochondriotropics, mitochondriotoxics, mitocancerotropics, and mitocans have emerged to describe those agents with high affinity to mitochondria that exert a therapeutic or deleterious effect on these organelles. In this chapter, mitochondria-targeted agents and some strategies to deliver agents to and/or into mitochondria will be reviewed.

  10. Possible targets for the aneugenic activity of alkylating agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellerano, P. [IST-National Institute for Research on Cancer, Genova (Italy); Abbondandolo, A. [Univ. of Genova (Italy); Bonatti, S.; Simili, M. [CNR Institute of Mutagenesis and Differentiation, Pisa (Italy)

    1993-12-31

    Alkylating agents have been of invaluable help in mutation research for half a century. In all tested organisms, they have proved able to induce a large variety of genetic effects, including aneuploidy. Credible molecular models exist to explain the ability of alkylating agents to induce gene mutation and to act as initiators in carcinogenesis as a consequence of DNA alkylation at specific sites. On the contrary, neither the mechanism of aneuploidy induction nor the relevant cellular targets are known.

  11. [Coincidence of a chronic Hepatitis C and an autoimmune Hepatitis Type 3 - successful therapy with the new direct-acting antiviral agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikopoulos, N; Zizer, E

    2016-08-01

    Chronic hepatitis C infection may be associated with several features of autoimmunity (i. e., detection of different kinds of autoantibodies in the serum). Hepatitis C is also associated with different autoimmune diseases, such as autoimmune thyroiditis, lichen ruber planus, and membranous glomerulonephritis being the most relevant. There are very few cases of a coincidence of chronic hepatitis C with an autoimmune hepatitis, that is usually diagnosed by detection of specific autoantibodies and typical histological features. During the time of interferon-based antiviral therapies, we often faced a therapeutic dilemma as interferon could lead to an exacerbation of the coincident autoimmune disease. So, in these cases, a prophylactic immunosuppression had to be started before initiation of interferon therapy. Meanwhile, in the new era of direct antiviral agents against hepatitis C, highly specific and effective therapeutic options are available. The case report presented here describes the very rare coincidence of a chronic hepatitis C, genotype 1 with an autoimmune hepatitis type 3 diagnosed by the presence of anti-SLA-antibodies. In the past, the patient had several unsuccessful interferon-based therapies without achieving a sustained virological response in parallel with an immunosuppressive treatment with azathioprine. During the further course of the disease, the patient generated a liver cirrhosis CHILD A after only a few years. After the approval of the direct antiviral agents sofosbuvir and daclatasvir in 2014, we conducted an antiviral therapy, including ribavirin, for 24 weeks and fortunately achieved a sustained virological response. Due to the persistent disease activity caused by the autoimmune hepatitis after the end of antiviral therapy, we treated the patient with prednisolone and azathioprine and could induce a stable and persistent remission of the autoimmune disease. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Characterization and structural analysis of the potent antiparasitic and antiviral agent tizoxanide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Flavia P.; Caira, Mino R.; Martin, Eliseo Ceballos; Monti, Gustavo A.; Sperandeo, Norma R.

    2013-03-01

    Tizoxanide [2-(hydroxy)-N-(5-nitro-2-thiazolyl)benzamide, TIZ] is a new potent anti-infective agent which may enhance current therapies for leishmaniasis, Chagas disease and viral hepatitis. The aim of this study was to identify the conformational preferences that may be related to the biological activity of TIZ by resolving its crystal structure and characterizing various physicochemical properties, including its experimental vibrational and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance properties, behavior on heating and solubility in several solvents at 25 °C. TIZ crystallizes from dimethylformamide as the carboxamide tautomer in the triclinic system, space group P(-1) (No. 2) with the following unit cell parameters at 173(2) K: a = 5.4110(3) Å, b = 7.3315(6) Å, c = 13.5293(9) Å, α = 97.528(3), β = 95.390(4), γ = 97.316(5), V = 524.41(6) Å3, Z = 2, Dc = 1.680 g/cm3, R1 = 0.0482 and wR2 = 0.0911 for 2374 reflections. This modification of TIZ has a 'graphitic' structure and is composed of tightly packed layers of extensively hydrogen-bonded molecules. The various spectroscopic data [Diffuse Fourier transform infrared (DRIFT) and FT-Raman, recorded in the range 3600-500 and 4000-200 cm-1 respectively, and solid-state 13C NMR] were consistent with the structure determined by X-ray crystallography. From DSC, TG and thermomicroscopy, it was concluded that TIZ is thermally stable as a solid and that melting is not an isolated event from the one-step thermal decomposition that it undergoes above 270 °C. This modification of TIZ is practically insoluble in water and slightly soluble in polar aprotic solvents such as dimethylsulfoxide, dimethylformamide and dioxane.

  13. Targeted Anticancer Immunotoxins and Cytotoxic Agents with Direct Killing Moieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Kawakami

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the progress of the bioinformatics approach to characterize cell-surface antigens and receptors on tumor cells, it remains difficult to generate novel cancer vaccines or neutralizing monoclonal antibody therapeutics. Among targeted cancer therapeutics, biologicals with targetable antibodies or ligands conjugated or fused to toxins or chemicals for direct cell-killing ability have been developed over the last 2 decades. These conjugated or fused chimeric proteins are termed immunotoxins or cytotoxic agents. Two agents, DAB389IL-2 (ONTAKTM targeting the interleukin-2 receptor and CD33-calicheamicin (Mylotarg®, have been approved by the FDA for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL and relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML, respectively. Such targetable agents, including RFB4(dsFv-PE38 (BL22, IL13-PE38QQR, and Tf-CRM107, are being tested in clinical trials. Several agents using unique technology such as a cleavable adapter or immunoliposomes with antibodies are also in the preclinical stage. This review summarizes the generation, mechanism, and development of these agents. In addition, possible future directions of this therapeutic approach are discussed.

  14. Ophthalmic antiviral chemotherapy : An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athmanathan Sreedharan

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiviral drug development has been slow due to many factors. One such factor is the difficulty to block the viral replication in the cell without adversely affecting the host cell metabolic activity. Most of the antiviral compounds are analogs of purines and pyramidines. Currently available antiviral drugs mainly inhibit viral nucleic acid synthesis, hence act only on actively replicating viruses. This article presents an overview of some of the commonly used antiviral agents in clinical ophthalmology.

  15. Transgenic Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat/Cas9-Mediated Viral Gene Targeting for Antiviral Therapy of Bombyx mori Nucleopolyhedrovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuqing; Hou, Chengxiang; Bi, Honglun; Wang, Yueqiang; Xu, Jun; Li, Muwang; James, Anthony A; Huang, Yongping; Tan, Anjiang

    2017-04-15

    We developed a novel antiviral strategy by combining transposon-based transgenesis and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated 9 (Cas9) system for the direct cleavage of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) genome DNA to promote virus clearance in silkworms. We demonstrate that transgenic silkworms constitutively expressing Cas9 and guide RNAs targeting the BmNPV immediate early-1 ( ie-1 ) and me53 genes effectively induce target-specific cleavage and subsequent mutagenesis, especially large (∼7-kbp) segment deletions in BmNPV genomes, and thus exhibit robust suppression of BmNPV proliferation. Transgenic animals exhibited higher and inheritable resistance to BmNPV infection than wild-type animals. Our approach will not only contribute to modern sericulture but also shed light on future antiviral therapy. IMPORTANCE Pathogen genome targeting has shown its potential in antiviral research. However, transgenic CRISPR/Cas9 system-mediated viral genome targeting has not been reported as an antiviral strategy in a natural animal host of a virus. Our data provide an effective approach against BmNPV infection in a real-world biological system and demonstrate the potential of transgenic CRISPR/Cas9 systems in antiviral research in other species. Copyright © 2017 Chen et al.

  16. Trends in GPCR drug discovery: new agents, targets and indications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauser, Alexander Sebastian; Gloriam, David E.; Attwood, Misty M.

    2017-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most intensively studied drug targets, mostly due to their substantial involvement in human pathophysiology and their pharmacological tractability. Here, we report an up-to-date analysis of all GPCR drugs and agents in clinical trials, which reveals...... current trends across molecule types, drug targets and therapeutic indications, including showing that 475 drugs (~34% of all drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)) act at 108 unique GPCRs. Approximately 321 agents are currently in clinical trials, of which ~20% target 66 potentially...... novel GPCR targets without an approved drug, and the number of biological drugs, allosteric modulators and biased agonists has increased. The major disease indications for GPCR modulators show a shift towards diabetes, obesity and Alzheimer disease, although several central nervous system disorders...

  17. An Interferon Regulated MicroRNA Provides Broad Cell-Intrinsic Antiviral Immunity through Multihit Host-Directed Targeting of the Sterol Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin A Robertson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In invertebrates, small interfering RNAs are at the vanguard of cell-autonomous antiviral immunity. In contrast, antiviral mechanisms initiated by interferon (IFN signaling predominate in mammals. Whilst mammalian IFN-induced miRNA are known to inhibit specific viruses, it is not known whether host-directed microRNAs, downstream of IFN-signaling, have a role in mediating broad antiviral resistance. By performing an integrative, systematic, global analysis of RNA turnover utilizing 4-thiouridine labeling of newly transcribed RNA and pri/pre-miRNA in IFN-activated macrophages, we identify a new post-transcriptional viral defense mechanism mediated by miR-342-5p. On the basis of ChIP and site-directed promoter mutagenesis experiments, we find the synthesis of miR-342-5p is coupled to the antiviral IFN response via the IFN-induced transcription factor, IRF1. Strikingly, we find miR-342-5p targets mevalonate-sterol biosynthesis using a multihit mechanism suppressing the pathway at different functional levels: transcriptionally via SREBF2, post-transcriptionally via miR-33, and enzymatically via IDI1 and SC4MOL. Mass spectrometry-based lipidomics and enzymatic assays demonstrate the targeting mechanisms reduce intermediate sterol pathway metabolites and total cholesterol in macrophages. These results reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism by which IFN regulates the sterol pathway. The sterol pathway is known to be an integral part of the macrophage IFN antiviral response, and we show that miR-342-5p exerts broad antiviral effects against multiple, unrelated pathogenic viruses such Cytomegalovirus and Influenza A (H1N1. Metabolic rescue experiments confirm the specificity of these effects and demonstrate that unrelated viruses have differential mevalonate and sterol pathway requirements for their replication. This study, therefore, advances the general concept of broad antiviral defense through multihit targeting of a single host pathway.

  18. Virus-encoded chemokine receptors--putative novel antiviral drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2005-01-01

    as such a paramount role in the antiviral immune responses. It is therefore not surprising that viruses have found ways to exploit and subvert the chemokine system by means of molecular mimicry. By ancient acts of molecular piracy and by induction and suppression of endogenous genes, viruses have utilized chemokines...... and their receptors to serve a variety of roles in viral life-cycle. This review focuses on the pharmacology of virus-encoded chemokine receptors, yet also the family of virus-encoded chemokines and chemokine-binding proteins will be touched upon. Key properties of the virus-encoded receptors, compared...... to their closest endogenous homologs, are interactions with a wider range of chemokines, which can act as agonists, antagonists and inverse agonists, and the exploitation of many signal transduction pathways. High constitutive activity is another key property of some--but not all--of these receptors. The chemokine...

  19. Methyl-hydroxylamine as an efficacious antibacterial agent that targets the ribonucleotide reductase enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Julián

    Full Text Available The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria has encouraged vigorous efforts to develop antimicrobial agents with new mechanisms of action. Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR is a key enzyme in DNA replication that acts by converting ribonucleotides into the corresponding deoxyribonucleotides, which are the building blocks of DNA replication and repair. RNR has been extensively studied as an ideal target for DNA inhibition, and several drugs that are already available on the market are used for anticancer and antiviral activity. However, the high toxicity of these current drugs to eukaryotic cells does not permit their use as antibacterial agents. Here, we present a radical scavenger compound that inhibited bacterial RNR, and the compound's activity as an antibacterial agent together with its toxicity in eukaryotic cells were evaluated. First, the efficacy of N-methyl-hydroxylamine (M-HA in inhibiting the growth of different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria was demonstrated, and no effect on eukaryotic cells was observed. M-HA showed remarkable efficacy against Mycobacterium bovis BCG and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Thus, given the M-HA activity against these two bacteria, our results showed that M-HA has intracellular antimycobacterial activity against BCG-infected macrophages, and it is efficacious in partially disassembling and inhibiting the further formation of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Furthermore, M-HA and ciprofloxacin showed a synergistic effect that caused a massive reduction in a P. aeruginosa biofilm. Overall, our results suggest the vast potential of M-HA as an antibacterial agent, which acts by specifically targeting a bacterial RNR enzyme.

  20. Highlights in antiviral drug research: antivirals at the horizon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq, Erik

    2013-11-01

    This review highlights ten "hot topics" in current antiviral research: (i) new nucleoside derivatives (i.e., PSI-352938) showing high potential as a direct antiviral against hepatitis C virus (HCV); (ii) cyclopropavir, which should be further pursued for treatment of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections; (iii) North-methanocarbathymidine (N-MCT), with a N-locked conformation, showing promising activity against both α- and γ-herpesviruses; (iv) CMX001, an orally bioavailable prodrug of cidofovir with broad-spectrum activity against DNA viruses, including polyoma, adeno, herpes, and pox; (v) favipiravir, which is primarily pursued for the treatment of influenza virus infections, but also inhibits the replication of other RNA viruses, particularly (-)RNA viruses such as arena, bunya, and hanta; (vi) newly emerging antiarenaviral compounds which should be more effective (and less toxic) than the ubiquitously used ribavirin; (vii) antipicornavirus agents in clinical development (pleconaril, BTA-798, and V-073); (viii) natural products receiving increased attention as potential antiviral drugs; (ix) antivirals such as U0126 targeted at specific cellular kinase pathways [i.e., mitogen extracellular kinase (MEK)], showing activity against influenza and other viruses; and (x) two structurally unrelated compounds (i.e., LJ-001 and dUY11) with broad-spectrum activity against virtually all enveloped RNA and DNA viruses. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Direct-acting antiviral agents in the treatment of chronic Hepatitis C - "Real-life" experience from an academic centre and two specialized clinical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groß, Manuel Jonathan; Härter, Georg; Backhus, Johanna; Zizer, Eugen; Seufferlein, Thomas; Ludwig, Leopold; Dikopoulos, Nektarios

    2017-11-07

    The introduction of the new direct antiviral agents has revolutionized the therapy of chronic hepatitis C. Today we are able to cure the vast majority of our patients with an 8- to 12-week therapy course of an antiviral combination therapy with an excellent safety profile. Real-life data are very important to further develop our experience with the new therapeutics and help us to improve the care of our patients in our everyday clinical practice.In our study, we present the retrospective analysis of a representative German cohort of 344 patients with chronic hepatitis C treated with the new direct antiviral agents. The patients were recruited in an academic center of southern Germany (University Clinic of Ulm, Clinic of Internal Medicine I) and in 2 highly specialized clinical practices in the city center and the near region of Ulm. Within this in-detail characterized study cohort, we analyzed the efficacy and safety of antiviral therapy under real-life conditions.In 322 patients, we could document SVR12 data and found an excellent overall SVR12 rate of 97.8 % across all genotypes. In more detail, we could show comparable SVR12 results of 99 % and 99.2 % in patients with the hepatitis C virus subtypes 1a and 1b of and an excellent SVR12 rate of 93.1 % in genotype 3 patients without liver cirrhosis. Nevertheless, SVR12 rates tend to be lower in patients with the presence of liver cirrhosis, especially in genotype 3 patients with the lowest SVR12 rate in the whole study group of only 80 %. In general, there were no major safety issues except of 1 patient treated with a protease-inhibitor-based regimen who developed a generalized skin reaction and needed hospitalization and premature end of antiviral therapy.In summary, our analysis of this well characterized representative cohort of 344 patients adds more information in the field of real-life experience with the new antiviral therapeutics and could therefore contribute to improve the care of our patients

  2. Selection, optimization, and pharmacokinetic properties of a novel, potent antiviral locked nucleic acid-based antisense oligomer targeting hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxton, Carl; Brady, Kevin; Moschos, Sterghios; Turnpenny, Paul; Rawal, Jaiessh; Pryde, David C; Sidders, Ben; Corbau, Romu; Pickford, Chris; Murray, E J

    2011-07-01

    We have screened 47 locked nucleic acid (LNA) antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeting conserved (>95% homology) sequences in the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome using the subgenomic HCV replicon assay and generated both antiviral (50% effective concentration [EC(50)]) and cytotoxic (50% cytotoxic concentration [CC(50)]) dose-response curves to allow measurement of the selectivity index (SI). This comprehensive approach has identified an LNA ASO with potent antiviral activity (EC(50) = 4 nM) and low cytotoxicity (CC(50) >880 nM) targeting the 25- to 40-nucleotide region (nt) of the HCV internal ribosome entry site (IRES) containing the distal and proximal miR-122 binding sites. LNA ASOs targeting previously known accessible regions of the IRES, namely, loop III and the initiation codon in loop IV, had poor SI values. We optimized the LNA ASO sequence by performing a 1-nucleotide walk through the 25- to 40-nt region and show that the boundaries for antiviral efficacy are extremely precise. Furthermore, we have optimized the format for the LNA ASO using different gapmer and mixomer patterns and show that RNase H is required for antiviral activity. We demonstrate that RNase H-refractory ASOs targeting the 25- to 40-nt region have no antiviral effect, revealing important regulatory features of the 25- to 40-nt region and suggesting that RNase H-refractory LNA ASOs can act as potential surrogates for proviral functions of miR-122. We confirm the antisense mechanism of action using mismatched LNA ASOs. Finally, we have performed pharmacokinetic experiments to demonstrate that the LNA ASOs have a very long half-life (>5 days) and attain hepatic maximum concentrations >100 times the concentration required for in vitro antiviral activity.

  3. Geno2pheno[HCV] - A Web-based Interpretation System to Support Hepatitis C Treatment Decisions in the Era of Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaghatgi, Prabhav; Sikorski, Anna Maria; Knops, Elena; Rupp, Daniel; Sierra, Saleta; Heger, Eva; Neumann-Fraune, Maria; Beggel, Bastian; Walker, Andreas; Timm, Jörg; Walter, Hauke; Obermeier, Martin; Kaiser, Rolf; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Lengauer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The face of hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy is changing dramatically. Direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) specifically targeting HCV proteins have been developed and entered clinical practice in 2011. However, despite high sustained viral response (SVR) rates of more than 90%, a fraction of patients do not eliminate the virus and in these cases treatment failure has been associated with the selection of drug resistance mutations (RAMs). RAMs may be prevalent prior to the start of treatment, or can be selected under therapy, and furthermore they can persist after cessation of treatment. Additionally, certain DAAs have been approved only for distinct HCV genotypes and may even have subtype specificity. Thus, sequence analysis before start of therapy is instrumental for managing DAA-based treatment strategies. We have created the interpretation system geno2pheno[HCV] (g2p[HCV]) to analyse HCV sequence data with respect to viral subtype and to predict drug resistance. Extensive reviewing and weighting of literature related to HCV drug resistance was performed to create a comprehensive list of drug resistance rules for inhibitors of the HCV protease in non-structural protein 3 (NS3-protease: Boceprevir, Paritaprevir, Simeprevir, Asunaprevir, Grazoprevir and Telaprevir), the NS5A replicase factor (Daclatasvir, Ledipasvir, Elbasvir and Ombitasvir), and the NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (Dasabuvir and Sofosbuvir). Upon submission of up to eight sequences, g2p[HCV] aligns the input sequences, identifies the genomic region(s), predicts the HCV geno- and subtypes, and generates for each DAA a drug resistance prediction report. g2p[HCV] offers easy-to-use and fast subtype and resistance analysis of HCV sequences, is continuously updated and freely accessible under http://hcv.geno2pheno.org/index.php. The system was partially validated with respect to the NS3-protease inhibitors Boceprevir, Telaprevir and Simeprevir by using data generated with recombinant, phenotypic

  4. HCV treatment initiation in persons with chronic kidney disease in the directly acting antiviral agents era: Results from ERCHIVES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Adeel A; Ren, Yanjie; Puenpatom, Amy; Arduino, Jean-Marie; Kumar, Ritesh; Abou-Samra, Abdul-Badi

    2017-12-22

    Newer direct acting antiviral agents against HCV (DAAs) are safe and efficacious in persons with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Whether approval of newer DAAs has resulted in more persons with CKD initiating HCV treatment remains unknown. We identified HCV+ persons in ERCHIVES between October 1999 and July 2016. We excluded HIV+ and HBsAg+ and those with missing baseline HCV RNA and baseline eGFR data. We identified persons initiated on any approved DAA-regimen through July 2016, by CKD stage. Logistic regression analyses were used to determine factors associated with treatment initiation. Among 83 706 evaluable persons, 21.1% initiated treatment. Rates differed significantly by CKD stage: 22.1% for eGFR>90 mL/min/1.73 m 2 and CKD stage-2; 14.9% for CKD stage 3; and 8.0% for CKD stage-4/5. Those with CKD stage-3 were 33% less likely and those with CKD stage-4/5 were 60% less likely to initiate treatment with a DAA compared with those with baseline eGFR>90 mL/min/1.73 m 2 . Treatment initiation was less likely in HCV genotype 2 (OR 0.59; 95%CI 0.53,0.66) or 3 (OR 0.53; 95%CI 0.47,0.61) and those with diabetes (OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.81,0.94), cardiovascular disease (OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.70,0.84), alcohol abuse or dependence (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.70,0.79) or cirrhosis (OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.80,0.92) at baseline. Persons with more advanced CKD are less likely to receive treatment for HCV despite recent data on safety and efficacy. Strategies are needed to improve treatment rates in the HCV/CKD population. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Targeted Imaging Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Michael M.; Weber, Wolfgang A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents our adaptation of Fryback and Thornbury’s hierarchical scheme for modeling the efficacy of diagnostic imaging systems. The original scheme was designed to evaluate new medical imaging systems but is less successful when applied to evaluate new radiopharmaceuticals. The proposed adaptation, which is specifically directed toward evaluating targeted imaging agents, has 6 levels: in vitro characterization, in vivo animal studies, initial human studies, impact on clinical care (change in management), impact on patient outcome, and societal efficacy. These levels, particularly the first four, implicitly define the sequence of studies needed to move an agent from the radiochemistry synthesis laboratory to the clinic. Completion of level 4 (impact on clinical care) should be sufficient for initial approval and reimbursement. We hope that the adapted scheme will help streamline the process and assist in bringing new targeted radiopharmaceuticals to approval over the next few years. PMID:26769867

  6. Lipoprotein Nanoplatform for Targeted Delivery of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry D. Glickson

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Low-density lipoprotein (LDL provides a highly versatile natural nanoplatform for delivery of visible or near-infrared fluorescent optical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agents and photodynamic therapy and chemotherapeutic agents to normal and neoplastic cells that overexpress low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLRs. Extension to other lipoproteins ranging in diameter from about 10 nm (high-density lipoprotein [HDL] to over a micron (chylomicrons is feasible. Loading of contrast or therapeutic agents onto or into these particles has been achieved by protein loading (covalent attachment to protein side chains, surface loading (intercalation into the phospholipid monolayer, and core loading (extraction and reconstitution of the triglyceride/cholesterol ester core. Core and surface loading of LDL have been used for delivery of optical imaging agents to tumor cells in vivo and in culture. Surface loading was used for delivery of gadolinium-bis-stearylamide contrast agents for in vivo MRI detection in tumor-bearing mice. Chlorin and phthalocyanine near-infrared photodynamic therapy agents (≤ 400/LDL have been attached by core loading. Protein loading was used to reroute the LDL from its natural receptor (LDLR to folate receptors and could be used to target other receptors. A semisynthetic nanoparticle has been constructed by coating magnetite iron oxide nanoparticles with carboxylated cholesterol and overlaying a monolayer of phospholipid to which apolipoprotein A1 or E was adsorbed for targeting HDL or adsorbing synthetic amphipathic helical peptides ltargeting LDL or folate receptors. These particles can be used for in situ loading of magnetite into cells for MRI-monitored cell tracking or gene expression.

  7. Lipoprotein nanoplatform for targeted delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickson, Jerry D; Lund-Katz, Sissel; Zhou, Rong; Choi, Hoon; Chen, I-Wei; Li, Hui; Corbin, Ian; Popov, Anatoliy V; Cao, Weiguo; Song, Liping; Qi, Chenze; Marotta, Diane; Nelson, David S; Chen, Juan; Chance, Britton; Zheng, Gang

    2009-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) provides a highly versatile natural nanoplatform for delivery of optical and MRI contrast agents, photodynamic therapy agents and chemotherapeutic agents to normal and neoplastic cells that over express LDL receptors (LDLR). Extension to other lipoproteins ranging in diameter from approximately 5-10 nm (high density lipoprotein, HDL) to over a micron (chilomicrons) is feasible. Loading of contrast or therapeutic agents has been achieved by covalent attachment to protein side chains, intercalation into the phospholipid monolayer and extraction and reconstitution of the triglyceride/cholesterol ester core. Covalent attachment of folate to the lysine side chain amino groups was used to reroute the LDL from its natural receptor (LDLR) to folate receptors and could be utilized to target other receptors. A semi-synthetic nanoparticle has been constructed by coating magnetite iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONs) with carboxylated cholesterol and overlaying a monolayer ofphospholipid to which Apo A1, Apo E or synthetic amphoteric alpha-helical polypeptides were adsorbed for targeting HDL, LDL or folate receptors, respectively. These particles can be utilized for in situ loading of magnetite into cells for MRI monitored cell tracking or gene therapy.

  8. Preclinical evaluation of molecular-targeted anticancer agents for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, Mechthild; Zips, Daniel; Thames, Howard D.; Kummermehr, Johann; Baumann, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The combination of molecular-targeted agents with irradiation is a highly promising avenue for cancer research and patient care. Molecular-targeted agents are in themselves not curative in solid tumours, whereas radiotherapy is highly efficient in eradicating tumour stem cells. Recurrences after high-dose radiotherapy are caused by only one or few surviving tumour stem cells. Thus, even if a novel agent has the potential to kill only few tumour stem cells, or if it interferes in mechanisms of radioresistance of tumours, combination with radiotherapy may lead to an important improvement in local tumour control and survival. To evaluate the effects of novel agents combined with radiotherapy, it is therefore necessary to use experimental endpoints which reflect the killing of tumour stem cells, in particular tumour control assays. Such endpoints often do not correlate with volume-based parameters of tumour response such as tumour regression and growth delay. This calls for radiotherapy specific research strategies in the preclinical testing of novel anti-cancer drugs, which in many aspects are different from research approaches for medical oncology

  9. Imaging efficacy of a targeted imaging agent for fluorescence endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, A. J.; Bendiksen, R.; Attramadal, T.; Bjerke, R.; Waagene, S.; Hvoslef, A. M.; Johannesen, E.

    2008-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major cause of cancer death. A significant unmet clinical need exists in the area of screening for earlier and more accurate diagnosis and treatment. We have identified a fluorescence imaging agent targeted to an early stage molecular marker for colorectal cancer. The agent is administered intravenously and imaged in a far red imaging channel as an adjunct to white light endoscopy. There is experimental evidence of preclinical proof of mechanism for the agent. In order to assess potential clinical efficacy, imaging was performed with a prototype fluorescence endoscope system designed to produce clinically relevant images. A clinical laparoscope system was modified for fluorescence imaging. The system was optimised for sensitivity. Images were recorded at settings matching those expected with a clinical endoscope implementation (at video frame rate operation). The animal model was comprised of a HCT-15 xenograft tumour expressing the target at concentration levels expected in early stage colorectal cancer. Tumours were grown subcutaneously. The imaging agent was administered intravenously at a dose of 50nmol/kg body weight. The animals were killed 2 hours post administration and prepared for imaging. A 3-4mm diameter, 1.6mm thick slice of viable tumour was placed over the opened colon and imaged with the laparoscope system. A receiver operator characteristic analysis was applied to imaging results. An area under the curve of 0.98 and a sensitivity of 87% [73, 96] and specificity of 100% [93, 100] were obtained.

  10. Crystal structure of an antiviral ankyrin targeting the HIV-1 capsid and molecular modeling of the ankyrin-capsid complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praditwongwan, Warachai; Chuankhayan, Phimonphan; Saoin, Somphot; Wisitponchai, Tanchanok; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Nangola, Sawitree; Hong, Saw See; Minard, Philippe; Boulanger, Pierre; Chen, Chun-Jung; Tayapiwatana, Chatchai

    2014-08-01

    Ankyrins are cellular repeat proteins, which can be genetically modified to randomize amino-acid residues located at defined positions in each repeat unit, and thus create a potential binding surface adaptable to macromolecular ligands. From a phage-display library of artificial ankyrins, we have isolated AnkGAG1D4, a trimodular ankyrin which binds to the HIV-1 capsid protein N-terminal domain (NTDCA) and has an antiviral effect at the late steps of the virus life cycle. In this study, the determinants of the AnkGAG1D4-NTDCA interaction were analyzed using peptide scanning in competition ELISA, capsid mutagenesis, ankyrin crystallography and molecular modeling. We determined the AnkGAG1D4 structure at 2.2 Å resolution, and used the crystal structure in molecular docking with a homology model of HIV-1 capsid. Our results indicated that NTDCA alpha-helices H1 and H7 could mediate the formation of the capsid-AnkGAG1D4 binary complex, but the interaction involving H7 was predicted to be more stable than with H1. Arginine-18 (R18) in H1, and R132 and R143 in H7 were found to be the key players of the AnkGAG1D4-NTDCA interaction. This was confirmed by R-to-A mutagenesis of NTDCA, and by sequence analysis of trimodular ankyrins negative for capsid binding. In AnkGAG1D4, major interactors common to H1 and H7 were found to be S45, Y56, R89, K122 and K123. Collectively, our ankyrin-capsid binding analysis implied a significant degree of flexibility within the NTDCA domain of the HIV-1 capsid protein, and provided some clues for the design of new antivirals targeting the capsid protein and viral assembly.

  11. The challenge of treating hepatitis C virus-associated cryoglobulinemic vasculitis in the era of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies and direct antiviral agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roccatello, Dario; Sciascia, Savino; Rossi, Daniela; Solfietti, Laura; Fenoglio, Roberta; Menegatti, Elisa; Baldovino, Simone

    2017-06-20

    Mixed cryoglobulinemia syndrome (MC) is a systemic vasculitis involving kidneys, joints, skin, and peripheral nerves. While many autoimmune, lymphoproliferative, and neoplastic disorders have been associated with this disorder, hepatitis C virus (HCV) is known to be the etiologic agent in the majority of patients. Therefore, clinical research has focused on anti-viral drugs and, more recently, on the new, highly potent Direct-acting Antiviral Agents (DAAs). These drugs assure sustained virologic response (SVR) rates >90%. Nevertheless, data on their efficacy in patients with HCV-associated cryoglobulinemic vasculitis are disappointing, possibly due to the inability of the drugs to suppress the immune-mediated process once it has been triggered.Despite the potential risk of exacerbation of the infection, immunosuppression has traditionally been regarded as the first-line intervention in cryoglobulinemic vasculitis, especially if renal involvement is severe. Biologic agents have raised hopes for more manageable therapeutic approaches, and Rituximab (RTX), an anti CD20 monoclonal antibody, is the most widely used biologic drug. It has proved to be safer than conventional immunosuppressants, thus substantially changing the natural history of HCV-associated cryoglobulinemic vasculitis by providing long-term remission, especially with intensive regimens.The present review focuses on the new therapeutic opportunities offered by the combination of biological drugs, mainly Rituximab, with DAAs.

  12. RNA glycosidase and other agents target Tat to inhibit HIV-1 transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrich, David; Jin, Hongping

    2018-03-20

    The HIV-1 tat gene encodes a small 86-104 amino acid protein depending on the HIV-1 strain. Tat is essential for HIV-1 replication through interactions with numerous cellular transcription factors. The interaction between Tat and P-TEFb, which is a cellular protein complex composed of cyclin T1 and CDK9, delivers P-TEFb to the newly transcribed viral mRNAs where phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II by CDK9 leads to highly efficient mRNA transcription. It has long been recognized that Tat is a potential anti-HIV-1 target and possibly a viral Achilles' heel. However, specifically targeting Tat without affecting normal host cell functions has been challenging. Means to inactivate Tat have been reported that includes small compounds, transdominant negative Tat proteins, and by plant-derived antivirals. Investigations of these agents have reported encouraging outcomes that inform and may hopefully affect strategies for a functional HIV-1 cure. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  13. Systemic corticosteroids and early administration of antiviral agents for pneumonia with acute wheezing due to influenza A(H1N1pdm09 in Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichiro Kudo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pneumonia patients with wheezing due to influenza A(H1N1pdm09 were frequently treated with systemic corticosteroids in Japan although systemic corticosteroid for critically ill patients with pneumonia caused by influenza A(H1N1pdm09 has been controversial. Applicability of systemic corticosteroid treatment needs to be evaluated. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We retrospectively reviewed 89 subjects who were diagnosed with influenza A(H1N1pdm09 and admitted to a national hospital, Tokyo during the pandemic period. The median age of subjects (45 males was 8 years (range, 0-71. All subjects were treated with antiviral agents and the median time from symptom onset to initiation of antiviral agents was 2 days (range, 0-7. Subjects were classified into four groups: upper respiratory tract infection, wheezing illness, pneumonia with wheezing, and pneumonia without wheezing. The characteristics of each group was evaluated. A history of asthma was found more frequently in the wheezing illness (55.6% and pneumonia with wheezing (43.3% groups than in the other two groups (p = 0.017. Corticosteroid treatment was assessed among subjects with pneumonia. Oxygen saturation was lower in subjects receiving corticosteroids (steroid group than in subjects not receiving corticosteroids (no-steroid group (p<0.001. The steroid group required greater oxygen supply than the no-steroid group (p<0.001. No significant difference was found by the Kaplan-Meier method between the steroid and the no-steroid groups in hours to fever alleviation from the initiation of antiviral agents and hospitalization days. In logistic regression analysis, wheezing, pneumonia and oxygen saturation were independent factors associated with using systemic corticosteroids. CONCLUSION: Patients with wheezing and a history of asthma were frequently found in the study subjects. Systemic corticosteroids together with early administration of antiviral agents to pneumonia with wheezing and

  14. Trends in GPCR drug discovery: new agents, targets and indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Alexander S; Attwood, Misty M; Rask-Andersen, Mathias; Schiöth, Helgi B; Gloriam, David E

    2017-12-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most intensively studied drug targets, mostly due to their substantial involvement in human pathophysiology and their pharmacological tractability. Here, we report an up-to-date analysis of all GPCR drugs and agents in clinical trials, which reveals current trends across molecule types, drug targets and therapeutic indications, including showing that 475 drugs (~34% of all drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)) act at 108 unique GPCRs. Approximately 321 agents are currently in clinical trials, of which ~20% target 66 potentially novel GPCR targets without an approved drug, and the number of biological drugs, allosteric modulators and biased agonists has increased. The major disease indications for GPCR modulators show a shift towards diabetes, obesity and Alzheimer disease, although several central nervous system disorders are also highly represented. The 224 (56%) non-olfactory GPCRs that have not yet been explored in clinical trials have broad untapped therapeutic potential, particularly in genetic and immune system disorders. Finally, we provide an interactive online resource to analyse and infer trends in GPCR drug discovery.

  15. Combining Targeted Agents With Modern Radiotherapy in Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Philip; Houghton, Peter; Kirsch, David G.; Finkelstein, Steven E.; Monjazeb, Arta M.; Xu-Welliver, Meng; Dicker, Adam P.; Ahmed, Mansoor; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Teicher, Beverly A.; Coleman, C. Norman; Machtay, Mitchell; Curran, Walter J.

    2014-01-01

    Improved understanding of soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) biology has led to better distinction and subtyping of these diseases with the hope of exploiting the molecular characteristics of each subtype to develop appropriately targeted treatment regimens. In the care of patients with extremity STS, adjunctive radiation therapy (RT) is used to facilitate limb and function, preserving surgeries while maintaining five-year local control above 85%. In contrast, for STS originating from nonextremity anatomical sites, the rate of local recurrence is much higher (five-year local control is approximately 50%) and a major cause of death and morbidity in these patients. Incorporating novel technological advancements to administer accurate RT in combination with novel radiosensitizing agents could potentially improve local control and overall survival. RT efficacy in STS can be increased by modulating biological pathways such as angiogenesis, cell cycle regulation, cell survival signaling, and cancer-host immune interactions. Previous experiences, advancements, ongoing research, and current clinical trials combining RT with agents modulating one or more of the above pathways are reviewed. The standard clinical management of patients with STS with pretreatment biopsy, neoadjuvant treatment, and primary surgery provides an opportune disease model for interrogating translational hypotheses. The purpose of this review is to outline a strategic vision for clinical translation of preclinical findings and to identify appropriate targeted agents to combine with radiotherapy in the treatment of STS from different sites and/or different histology subtypes. PMID:25326640

  16. 2015 Philip S. Portoghese Medicinal Chemistry Lectureship. Curing Hepatitis C Virus Infection with Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents: The Arc of a Medicinal Chemistry Triumph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meanwell, Nicholas A

    2016-08-25

    The development of direct-acting antiviral agents that can cure a chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection after 8-12 weeks of daily, well-tolerated therapy has revolutionized the treatment of this insidious disease. In this article, three of Bristol-Myers Squibb's HCV programs are summarized, each of which produced a clinical candidate: the NS3 protease inhibitor asunaprevir (64), marketed as Sunvepra, the NS5A replication complex inhibitor daclatasvir (117), marketed as Daklinza, and the allosteric NS5B polymerase inhibitor beclabuvir (142), which is in late stage clinical studies. A clinical study with 64 and 117 established for the first time that a chronic HCV infection could be cured by treatment with direct-acting antiviral agents alone in the absence of interferon. The development of small molecule HCV therapeutics, designed by medicinal chemists, has been hailed as "the arc of a medical triumph" but may equally well be described as "the arc of a medicinal chemistry triumph".

  17. Direct-acting antiviral agent efficacy and safety in renal transplant recipients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Keliang; Lu, Pei; Song, Rijin; Zhang, Jiexiu; Tao, Rongzhen; Wang, Zijie; Zhang, Wei; Gu, Min

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The efficacy and safety of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) for treating hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected renal transplant recipients (RTRs) has not been determined. Methods: We searched PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and assessed the quality of eligible studies using the Joanna Briggs Institute scale. DAA efficacy and safety were assessed using standard mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs). Results: Six studi...

  18. MEK/ERK activation plays a decisive role in yellow fever virus replication: implication as an antiviral therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarnaz, Jonas D; De Oliveira, Leonardo C; Torres, Alice A; Palhares, Rafael M; Casteluber, Marisa C; Rodrigues, Claudiney M; Cardozo, Pablo L; De Souza, Aryádina M R; Pacca, Carolina C; Ferreira, Paulo C P; Kroon, Erna G; Nogueira, Maurício L; Bonjardim, Cláudio A

    2014-11-01

    Exploiting the inhibition of host signaling pathways aiming for discovery of potential antiflaviviral compounds is clearly a beneficial strategy for the control of life-threatening diseases caused by flaviviruses. Here we describe the antiviral activity of the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 against Yellow fever virus 17D vaccine strain (YFV-17D). Infection of VERO cells with YFV-17D stimulates ERK1/2 phosphorylation early during infection. Pharmacological inhibition of MEK1/2 through U0126 treatment of VERO cells blockades not only the YFV-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation, but also inhibits YFV replication by ∼99%. U0126 was also effective against dengue virus (DENV-2 and -3) and Saint-Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV). Levels of NS4AB, as detected by immunofluorescence, are diminished upon treatment with the inhibitor, as well as the characteristic endoplasmic reticulum membrane invagination stimulated during the infection. Though not protective, treatment of YFV-infected, adult BALB/c mice with U0126 resulted in significant reduction of virus titers in brains. Collectively, our data suggest the potential targeting of the MEK1/2 kinase as a therapeutic tool against diseases caused by flaviviruses such as yellow fever, adverse events associated with yellow fever vaccination and dengue. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase, an emerging antiviral drug target for the Hendra virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velkov, Tony; Carbone, Vincenzo; Akter, Jesmin; Sivanesan, Sivashangarie; Li, Jian; Beddoe, Travis; Marsh, Glenn A

    2014-01-01

    Australia is facing a major national medical challenge with the emergence of the Hendra virus (HeV) as a medically and economically important pathogen of humans and animals. Clinical symptoms of human HeV infection can include fever, hypotension, dizziness, encephalitis, respiratory haemorrhage and edema. The window of opportunity for successful patient treatment remains unknown, but is likely to be very narrow. Currently, very few effective therapeutic options are available for the case management of severe HeV infections or the rapid silencing of local outbreaks. This underscores the need for more activity in the drug discovery arena to develop much needed therapeutics that specifically targets this deadly disease. The structural analysis of HeV is very much in its infancy, which leaves many gaps in our understanding of the biology of HeV and makes structure-guided drug design difficult. Structural studies of the viral RNAdependent- RNA polymerase (RdRp), which is the heart of the viral replication machinery, will set the stage for rational drug design and fill a major gap in our understanding of the HeV replication machinery. This review examines the current knowledge based on the multi-domain architecture of the Hendra RdRp and highlights which essential domain functions represent tangible targets for drug development against this deadly disease.

  20. Interaction Research on the Antiviral Molecule Dufulin Targeting on Southern Rice Black Streaked Dwarf Virus P9-1 Nonstructural Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenchao Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available ern rice black streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV causes severe harm to rice production. Unfortunately, studies on effective antiviral drugs against SRBSDV and interaction mechanism of antiviral molecule targeting on SRBSDV have not been reported. This study found dufulin (DFL, an ideal anti-SRBSDV molecule, and investigated the interactions of DFL targeting on the nonstructural protein P9-1. The biological sequence information and bonding characterization of DFL to four kinds of P9-1 protein were described with fluorescence titration (FT and microscale thermophoresis (MST assays. The sequence analysis indicated that P9-1 had highly-conserved C- and N-terminal amino acid residues and a hypervariable region that differed from 131 aa to 160 aa. Consequently, wild-type (WT-His-P9-1, 23 C-terminal residues truncated (TR-ΔC23-His-P9-1, 6 N-terminal residues truncated (TR-ΔN6-His-P9-1, and Ser138 site-directed (MU-138-His-P9-1 mutant proteins were expressed. The FT and MST assay results indicated that DFL bounded to WT-His-P9-1 with micromole affinity and the 23 C-terminal amino acids were the potential targeting site. This system, which combines a complete sequence analysis, mutant protein expression, and binding action evaluating system, could further advance the understanding of the interaction abilities between antiviral drugs and their targets.

  1. Repositioning Clofazimine as a Macrophage-Targeting Photoacoustic Contrast Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keswani, Rahul K; Tian, Chao; Peryea, Tyler; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding; Rosania, Gus R

    2016-03-22

    Photoacoustic Tomography (PAT) is a deep-tissue imaging modality, with potential clinical applications in the diagnosis of arthritis, cancer and other disease conditions. Here, we identified Clofazimine (CFZ), a red-pigmented dye and anti-inflammatory FDA-approved drug, as a macrophage-targeting photoacoustic (PA) imaging agent. Spectroscopic experiments revealed that CFZ and its various protonated forms yielded optimal PAT signals at wavelengths -450 to 540 nm. CFZ's macrophage-targeting chemical and structural forms were detected with PA microscopy at a high contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR > 22 dB) as well as with macroscopic imaging using synthetic gelatin phantoms. In vivo, natural and synthetic CFZ formulations also demonstrated significant anti-inflammatory activity. Finally, the injection of CFZ was monitored via a real-time ultrasound-photoacoustic (US-PA) dual imaging system in a live animal and clinically relevant human hand model. These results demonstrate an anti-inflammatory drug repurposing strategy, while identifying a new PA contrast agent with potential applications in the diagnosis and treatment of arthritis.

  2. Cyclophilin and Viruses: Cyclophilin as a Cofactor for Viral Infection and Possible Anti-Viral Target

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    Koichi Watashi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclophilin (CyP is a peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase, catalyzing the cis-trans isomerization of proline residues in proteins. CyP plays key roles in several different aspects of cellular physiology including the immune response, transcription, mitochondrial function, cell death, and chemotaxis. In addition to these cellular events, a number of reports demonstrated that CyP plays a critical role in the life cycle of viruses, especially human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV. These two viruses are significant causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, but current therapies are often insufficient. CyP may provide a novel therapeutic target for the management and/or cure of these diseases, in particular HCV.

  3. Cyclophilin and Viruses: Cyclophilin as a Cofactor for Viral Infection and Possible Anti-Viral Target

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    Koichi Watashi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclophilin (CyP is a peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase, catalyzing the cis-trans isomerization of proline residues in proteins. CyP plays key roles in several different aspects of cellular physiology including the immune response, transcription, mitochondrial function, cell death, and chemotaxis. In addition to these cellular events, a number of reports demonstrated that CyP plays a critical role in the life cycle of viruses, especially human immunodefi ciency virus (HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV. These two viruses are signifi cant causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, but current therapies are often insufficient. CyP may provide a novel therapeutic target for the management and/or cure of these diseases, in particular HCV.

  4. A PSMA-targeted theranostic agent for photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Chatterjee, Samit; Lisok, Ala; Minn, Il; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Wharram, Bryan; Wang, Yuchuan; Jin, Jiefu; Bhujwalla, Zaver M; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Mease, Ronnie C; Pomper, Martin G

    2017-02-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is over-expressed in the epithelium of prostate cancer and in the neovasculature of many non-prostate solid tumors. PSMA has been increasingly used as a target for cancer imaging and therapy. Here we describe a low-molecular-weight theranostic photosensitizer, YC-9, for PSMA-targeted optical imaging and photodynamic therapy (PDT). YC-9 was synthesized by conjugating IRDye700DX N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester with a PSMA targeting Lys-Glu urea through a lysine-suberate linker in suitable yield. Optical imaging in vivo demonstrated PSMA-specific tumor uptake of YC-9 with rapid clearance from non-target tissues. PSMA-specific cell kill was demonstrated with YC-9in vitro through PDT in PSMA + PC3-PIP and PSMA - PC3-flu cells. In vivo PDT in mice bearing PSMA + PC3-PIP tumors at 4h post-injection of YC-9 (A total of four PDT sessions were performed, 48h apart) resulted in significant tumor growth delay, while tumors in control groups continued to grow. PDT with YC-9 significantly increased the median survival of the PSMA + PC3-PIP tumor mice (56.5days) compared to control groups [23.5-30.0days, including untreated, light alone, YC-9 alone (without light) and non-targeted IRDye700DX PDT treatment groups], without noticeable toxicity at the doses used. This study proves in principle that YC-9 is a promising therapeutic agent for targeted PDT of PSMA-expressing tissues, such as prostate tumors, and may also be useful against non-prostate tumors by virtue of neovascular PSMA expression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Biocompatible Nanocomplexes for Molecular Targeted MRI Contrast Agent

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    Yu Dexin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Accurate diagnosis in early stage is vital for the treatment of Hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of poly lactic acid–polyethylene glycol/gadolinium–diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes using as biocompatible molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agent. The PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes were obtained using self-assembly nanotechnology by incubation of PLA–PEG nanoparticles and the commercial contrast agent, Gd–DTPA. The physicochemical properties of nanocomplexes were measured by atomic force microscopy and photon correlation spectroscopy. The T1-weighted MR images of the nanocomplexes were obtained in a 3.0 T clinical MR imager. The stability study was carried out in human plasma and the distribution in vivo was investigated in rats. The mean size of the PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes was 187.9 ± 2.30 nm, and the polydispersity index was 0.108, and the zeta potential was −12.36 ± 3.58 mV. The results of MRI test confirmed that the PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes possessed the ability of MRI, and the direct correlation between the MRI imaging intensities and the nano-complex concentrations was observed (r = 0.987. The signal intensity was still stable within 2 h after incubation of the nanocomplexes in human plasma. The nanocomplexes gave much better image contrast effects and longer stagnation time than that of commercial contrast agent in rat liver. A dose of 0.04 mmol of gadolinium per kilogram of body weight was sufficient to increase the MRI imaging intensities in rat livers by five-fold compared with the commercial Gd–DTPA. PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes could be prepared easily with small particle sizes. The nanocomplexes had high plasma stability, better image contrast effect, and liver targeting property. These results indicated that the PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes might be potential as molecular

  6. Targeting Reactive Carbonyl Species with Natural Sequestering Agents

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    Sung Won Hwang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Reactive carbonyl species generated by the oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids and sugars are highly reactive due to their electrophilic nature, and are able to easily react with the nucleophilic sites of proteins as well as DNA causing cellular dysfunction. Levels of reactive carbonyl species and their reaction products have been reported to be elevated in various chronic diseases, including metabolic disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. In an effort to identify sequestering agents for reactive carbonyl species, various analytical techniques such as spectrophotometry, high performance liquid chromatography, western blot, and mass spectrometry have been utilized. In particular, recent advances using a novel high resolution mass spectrometry approach allows screening of complex mixtures such as natural products for their sequestering ability of reactive carbonyl species. To overcome the limited bioavailability and bioefficacy of natural products, new techniques using nanoparticles and nanocarriers may offer a new attractive strategy for increased in vivo utilization and targeted delivery of bioactives.

  7. Novel microtubule-targeting agents – the epothilones

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    Daniel R Budman

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Kit L Cheng, Thomas Bradley, Daniel R Budman1Monter Cancer Center, North Shore – LIJ Health Systems, Lake Success, New York, USAAbstract: Epothilones are a new class of antimicrotubule agents currently in clinical trials. Their chemical structures are distinct from taxanes and are more amenable to synthetic modification. Six epothilones have been studied in preclinical and clinical trials: patupilone (epothilone B, ixabepilone (BMS247550, BMS 310705, sagopilone (ZK-EPO, KOS-862 (epothilone D, and KOS-1584. In vitro data have shown increased potency in taxane-sensitive and taxane-resistant cancer cell lines. This enhanced cytotoxic effect has been attributed to epothilone being a poor substrate for p-glycoprotein drug resistance protein and having high affinity to the various β tubulin isoforms. Phase I clinical data have shown different dose-limiting toxicities for each of the epothilones. These effects are drug specific, dose specific, and schedule of administration specific. While diarrhea and myelosuppression are the dose-limiting toxicities for patupilone and BMS 310705, respectively, neurologic toxicity, as seen with taxanes, is the dose-limiting toxicity of ixabepilone, sagopilone, and KOS-862. In an effort to decrease neurologic toxicity, investigators have modified dosing schedules with limited success. Ixabepilone has the most mature clinical results with published phase II and III data, and regulatory approval for clinical use in the treatment of breast cancer. Ixabepilone has also been combined with other anticancer agents and has regulatory approval in combination with capecitabine for heavily treated breast cancer.Keywords: microtubule-targeting agents, epothilones, taxanes, ixabepilone

  8. Sonophore labeled RGD: a targeted contrast agent for optoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haedicke, Katja; Brand, Christian; Omar, Murad; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Reiner, Thomas; Grimm, Jan

    2017-06-01

    Optoacoustic imaging is a rapidly expanding field for the diagnosis, characterization, and treatment evaluation of cancer. However, the availability of tumor specific exogenous contrast agents is still limited. Here, we report on a small targeted contrast agent for optoacoustic imaging using a black hole quencher ® (BHQ) dye. The sonophore BHQ-1 exhibited strong, concentration-dependent, optoacoustic signals in phantoms, demonstrating its ideal suitability for optoacoustic imaging. After labeling BHQ-1 with cyclic RGD-peptide, BHQ-1-cRGD specifically bound to α v β 3 -integrin expressing glioblastoma cell spheroids in vitro . The excellent optoacoustic properties of BHQ-1-cRGD could furthermore be proven in vivo . Together with this emerging imaging modality, our sonophore labeled small peptide probe offers new possibilities for non-invasive detection of molecular structures with high resolution in vivo and furthers the specificity of optoacoustic imaging. Ultimately, the discovery of tailor-made sonophores might offer new avenues for various molecular optoacoustic imaging applications, similar to what we see with fluorescence imaging.

  9. Sonophore labeled RGD: a targeted contrast agent for optoacoustic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Haedicke

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Optoacoustic imaging is a rapidly expanding field for the diagnosis, characterization, and treatment evaluation of cancer. However, the availability of tumor specific exogenous contrast agents is still limited. Here, we report on a small targeted contrast agent for optoacoustic imaging using a black hole quencher® (BHQ dye. The sonophore BHQ-1 exhibited strong, concentration-dependent, optoacoustic signals in phantoms, demonstrating its ideal suitability for optoacoustic imaging. After labeling BHQ-1 with cyclic RGD-peptide, BHQ-1-cRGD specifically bound to αvβ3-integrin expressing glioblastoma cell spheroids in vitro. The excellent optoacoustic properties of BHQ-1-cRGD could furthermore be proven in vivo. Together with this emerging imaging modality, our sonophore labeled small peptide probe offers new possibilities for non-invasive detection of molecular structures with high resolution in vivo and furthers the specificity of optoacoustic imaging. Ultimately, the discovery of tailor-made sonophores might offer new avenues for various molecular optoacoustic imaging applications, similar to what we see with fluorescence imaging.

  10. Synthesis of novel 2-(2-(6-chloro-9H-purin-9-ylethoxy-6-isobutoxy-tetrahydro-2H-pyran-3-ol as a potential antiviral agent

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    A. A. Jarrahpour

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose the synthesis of 2-(2-(6-chloro-9H-purin-9-ylethoxy-6-isobutoxy-tetrahydro-2H-pyran-3-ol as a new potential antiviral agent Its structure has been confirmed by IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, UV and Mass spectroscopic data.

  11. Trends in liver transplantation for hepatitis C in a country with reduced access to direct-acting antiviral agents.

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    Dirchwolf, Melisa; Marciano, Sebastián; Giunta, Diego H; Posadas-Martínez, Maria L; Biggins, Scott W; Ruf, Andrés E

    2018-02-27

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related cirrhosis is a leading indication for liver transplantation (LT) worldwide. Access to effective HCV treatment is inequitable globally. We aimed to analyze whether the introduction of effective HCV treatment caused an impact in LT trends in a middle-income country. Cross-sectional analysis of all adult patients who were listed/received a LT in Argentina for HCV, alcohol-related liver disease (ALD), or autoimmune hepatitis/primary biliary cirrhosis (AIH/PBC) from 2007 to 2017. Joinpoint regression analysis was used to identify changes in the cumulative incidence rates in waiting list (WL) registration, WL mortality, and LT. Liver transplantation WL for HCV increased significantly between 2007 and 2014, with an annual percentage change (APC) +7.8%, P = .01, followed by a downward slope from 2014 to 2017 with an APC -9.8%, P = .1. There were no significant changes in WL mortality. LT trends remained stable. LT for HCV without MELD exception points for HCC decreased (APC -6.6%, P = .01), whereas LT for HCV with HCC exception points increased (APC +11.1, P = .01) during the study period. Waiting list and LT for HCV without HCC decreased, whereas LT for HCV and HCC increased; this may be related to selective antiviral treatment access for patients with advanced fibrosis. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. ELIMINATION OF CVB ( FROM A RANGE OF CHRYSANTHEMUM VARIETIES BY APICAL MERISTEM CULTURE FOLLOWING ANTIVIRAL AGENT AND HEAT TREATMENTS

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    KURNIAWAN BUDIARTO

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available CVB elimination for retaining healthy protocols from infected chrysanthemum plant wasinvestigated through combined treatment of meristem culture with synthetic antiviral ribavirinor thermotherapy under conditions. The biological materials used for the experimentconstituted of six commercial varieties: Dewi Sartika, Saraswati, Yellow Fiji, White Puma,Yellow Puma and White Reagent. Tissue culture initiation was conducted through plantletestablishment using MS supplemented with IAA. Ribavirin was added in media with theconcentration of 40 mg/l on cv. Dewi Sartika, Saraswati and Yellow Fiji. Parallel with this step,heat treatment with different durations (1, 2, and 3 weeks was also conducted on the plantletson White Puma, Yellow Puma and White Reagent. Meristem culture was done followingthe chemo- and thermotherapy. The experiment resumed the failure of single treatment ofmeristem culture in eliminating CVB from the infected chrysanthemum plantlets. Under heattreatment, percentage of virus-free plantlets increased along with the duration ofthermotherapy, though the survival rate of plantlets decreased in lengthened heat treatment.The best results regarding virus free plant percentage were obtained when meristem culture wasapplied following ribavirin or three weeks of heat treatment.

  13. Enabling the intestinal absorption of highly polar antiviral agents: ion-pair facilitated membrane permeation of zanamivir heptyl ester and guanidino oseltamivir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jonathan M; Dahan, Arik; Gupta, Deepak; Varghese, Sheeba; Amidon, Gordon L

    2010-08-02

    Antiviral drugs often suffer from poor intestinal permeability, preventing their delivery via the oral route. The goal of this work was to enhance the intestinal absorption of the low-permeability antiviral agents zanamivir heptyl ester (ZHE) and guanidino oseltamivir (GO) utilizing an ion-pairing approach, as a critical step toward making them oral drugs. The counterion 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid (HNAP) was utilized to enhance the lipophilicity and permeability of the highly polar drugs. HNAP substantially increased the log P of the drugs by up to 3.7 log units. Binding constants (K(11(aq))) of 388 M(-1) for ZHE-HNAP and 2.91 M(-1) for GO-HNAP were obtained by applying a quasi-equilibrium transport model to double-reciprocal plots of apparent octanol-buffer distribution coefficients versus HNAP concentration. HNAP enhanced the apparent permeability (P(app)) of both compounds across Caco-2 cell monolayers in a concentration-dependent manner, as substantial P(app) (0.8-3.0 x 10(-6) cm/s) was observed in the presence of 6-24 mM HNAP, whereas no detectable transport was observed without counterion. Consistent with a quasi-equilibrium transport model, a linear relationship with slope near 1 was obtained from a log-log plot of Caco-2 P(app) versus HNAP concentration, supporting the ion-pair mechanism behind the permeability enhancement. In the rat jejunal perfusion assay, the addition of HNAP failed to increase the effective permeability (P(eff)) of GO. However, the rat jejunal permeability of ZHE was significantly enhanced by the addition of HNAP in a concentration-dependent manner, from essentially zero without HNAP to 4.0 x 10(-5) cm/s with 10 mM HNAP, matching the P(eff) of the high-permeability standard metoprolol. The success of ZHE-HNAP was explained by its >100-fold stronger K(11(aq)) versus GO-HNAP, making ZHE-HNAP less prone to dissociation and ion-exchange with competing endogenous anions and able to remain intact during membrane permeation. Overall, this

  14. Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents for the Hepatitis C Virus-Infected Chronic Kidney Disease Population: The Dawn of a New Era.

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    Kusnir, Juan; Roth, David

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of direct-acting antiviral (DAA) agents with cure rates of >90% has changed the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in dramatic fashion. An extensive literature has documented the efficacy of these agents in the general population; however, patients with chronic kidney disease have been largely excluded from these trials. Recently published studies conducted in patients with chronic kidney disease are now demonstrating that the DAAs will also offer safe and effective therapy for the HCV-infected patient with CKD as well. As effective treatment protocols are offered to larger numbers of HCV-infected CKD patients, the decision regarding when is the most opportune time to treat, especially for the patient being considered for kidney transplantation will become of greater significance. Nephrologists will need to take a lead in these clinical decisions as obtaining a sustained viral response prior to transplant will effectively eliminate the patient as a candidate to receive a kidney from a hepatitis C virus-positive donor and the benefit of the shorter waiting times accompanying this strategy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Arylazolyl(azinyl)thioacetanilide. Part 9: Synthesis and biological investigation of thiazolylthioacetamides derivatives as a novel class of potential antiviral agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Peng; Wang, Liu; Liu, Hong; Chen, Xuwang; Li, Xiao; Jiang, Xin; Zhang, Qiangqiang; Liu, Xinyong; Pannecouque, Christophe; Naesens, Lieve; De Clercq, Erik; Liu, Ailin; Du, Guanhua

    2012-06-01

    In continuation of our endeavor to develop new, potent, selective and less toxic antiviral agents, a novel series of 2-(2-amino/chloro-4-(2,4-dibromophenyl) thiazol-5-ylthio)acetamide derivatives was synthesized via an expeditious route and evaluated for their anti-HIV activities against wild-type virus and clinically relevant mutant strains, and for their anti-influenza virus activities against influenza A (H1N1 and H3N2) and influenza B in cellular assays. The selected active compounds were also assayed for their enzymic inhibitory activities. The results showed that some 2-chloro substituted thiazolylthioacetamide derivatives possessed potent activity against wild type HIV-1 and several key mutant strains (E138K, K103N, L100I) of HIV-1 in MT-4 cells with EC(50) values in micromolar range. Two 2-amino substituted thiazole derivatives 8a7 and 8a8 displayed significant potency against influenza A/H1N1 in MDCK cells with EC(50) values much lower than that of oseltamivir carboxylate, ribavirin, amantadine and rimantadine. Though the mechanism of actions is still unclear, these novel thiazolylthioacetamides might serve as original leads for further pharmacological investigations as potential therapeutic agents against HIV-1 or influenza virus.

  16. Development and evaluation of a host-targeted antiviral that abrogates herpes simplex virus replication through modulation of arginine-associated metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Maria Dulfary; Ochoa, Augusto C; Foster, Timothy P

    2016-08-01

    Since their inception five decades ago, most antivirals have been engineered to disrupt a single viral protein or process that is essential for viral replication. This approach has limited the overall therapeutic effectiveness and applicability of current antivirals due to restricted viral specificity, a propensity for development of drug resistance, and an inability to control deleterious host-mediated inflammation. As obligate intracellular parasites, viruses are reliant on host metabolism and macromolecular synthesis pathways. Of these biosynthetic processes, many viruses, including Herpes simplex viruses (HSV), are absolutely dependent on the bioavailability of arginine, a non-essential amino acid that is critical for many physiological and pathophysiological processes associated with either facilitating viral replication or progression of disease. To assess if targeting host arginine-associated metabolic pathways would inhibit HSV replication, a pegylated recombinant human Arginase I (peg-ArgI) was generated and its in vitro anti-herpetic activity was evaluated. Cells continuously treated with peg-ArgI for over 48 h exhibited no signs of cytotoxicity or loss of cell viability. The antiviral activity of peg-ArgI displayed a classical dose-response curve with IC50's in the sub-nanomolar range. peg-ArgI potently inhibited HSV-1 and HSV-2 viral replication, infectious virus production, cell-to-cell spread/transmission and virus-mediated cytopathic effects. Not unexpectedly given its host-targeted mechanism of action, peg-ArgI showed similar effectiveness at controlling replication of single and multidrug resistant HSV-1 mutants. These findings illustrate that targeting host arginine-associated metabolic pathways is an effective means of controlling viral replicative processes. Further exploration into the breadth of viruses inhibited by peg-ArgI, as well as the ability of peg-ArgI to suppress arginine-associated virus-mediated pathophysiological disease

  17. Lung cancer mutations and use of targeted agents in Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cress, W Douglas; Chiappori, Alberto; Santiago, Pedro; Muñoz-Antonia, Teresita

    2014-01-01

    Hispanic/Latinos (H/L) are expected to grow to over 24% of the USA population by 2050 and lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer death among H/L men. Due to the information that is becoming available via genetic testing, lung cancer molecular profiling is allowing for increasing application of personalized lung cancer therapies. However, to benefit the most people, development of these therapies and genetic tests must include research on as many racial and ethnic groups as possible. The purpose of this review is to bring attention to the fact that the mutations driving lung cancer in H/Ls differ in frequency and nature relative to the non-Hispanic White (WNH) majority that dominate current databases and participate in clinical trials that test new therapies. Clinical trials using new agents targeting genetic alterations (driver mutations) in lung cancer have demonstrated significant improvements in patient outcomes (for example, gefitinib, erlotinib or crizotinib for lung adenocarcinomas harboring EGFR mutations or EML4-ALK fusions, respectively). The nature and frequencies of some lung cancer driver mutations have been shown to be considerably different among racial and ethnic groups. This is particularly true for H/Ls. For example, several reports suggest a dramatic shift in the mutation pattern from predominantly KRAS in a WNH population to predominantly EGFR in multiple H/L populations. However, these studies are limited, and the effects of racial and ethnic differences on the incidence of mutations in lung cancer remain incompletely understood. This review serves as a call to address this problem.

  18. Potential therapeutic applications of multifunctional host-defense peptides from frog skin as anti-cancer, anti-viral, immunomodulatory, and anti-diabetic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, J Michael; Mechkarska, Milena; Lukic, Miodrag L; Flatt, Peter R

    2014-07-01

    Frog skin constitutes a rich source of peptides with a wide range of biological properties. These include host-defense peptides with cytotoxic activities against bacteria, fungi, protozoa, viruses, and mammalian cells. Several hundred such peptides from diverse species have been described. Although attention has been focused mainly on antimicrobial activity, the therapeutic potential of frog skin peptides as anti-infective agents remains to be realized and no compound based upon their structures has yet been adopted in clinical practice. Consequently, alternative applications are being explored. Certain naturally occurring frog skin peptides, and analogs with improved therapeutic properties, show selective cytotoxicity against tumor cells and viruses and so have potential for development into anti-cancer and anti-viral agents. Some peptides display complex cytokine-mediated immunomodulatory properties. Effects on the production of both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines by peritoneal macrophages and peripheral blood mononuclear cells have been observed so that clinical applications as anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and immunostimulatory agents are possible. Several frog skin peptides, first identified on the basis of antimicrobial activity, have been shown to stimulate insulin release both in vitro and in vivo and so show potential as incretin-based therapies for treatment of patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review assesses the therapeutic possibilities of peptides from frogs belonging to the Ascaphidae, Alytidae, Pipidae, Dicroglossidae, Leptodactylidae, Hylidae, and Ranidae families that complement their potential role as anti-infectives for use against multidrug-resistant microorganisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents for Patients With Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1 Infection Are Cost-Saving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhatwal, Jagpreet; He, Tianhua; Hur, Chin; Lopez-Olivo, Maria A

    2017-06-01

    Direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) are effective in treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infection, but their cost and value have been debated. We performed a systematic review of published cost-effectiveness analyses of DAAs, synthesized their results with updated drug prices, and calculated the maximum price at which DAA therapy for HCV genotype 1 infection is cost-effective (increased quality-adjusted life-years [QALYs] and increased cost that the society is willing to pay) and cost-saving (increased QALYs and decreased costs). We conducted a systematic review of the PubMed, Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane library, EconLit, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database, Health Technology Assessment, and Tufts University databases for cost-effectiveness analyses published from 2011 through 2015. Our analysis included cost effectiveness of DAAs versus previous standard-of-care regimens (peginterferon and ribavirin, boceprevir and telaprevir), or no treatment, performed for patients with HCV genotype 1 infection. We excluded studies that were not written in English or those that did not report QALYs. Reported incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) and treatment costs for each comparison were extracted; the threshold price was estimated for each analysis in which regimens were found to be cost-effective (ICER ≤$100,000/QALY) or cost-saving (ICER <$0), those that decreased costs and increased QALYs. We identified 24 cost-effectiveness studies that reported 170 ICERs for combinations of 11 drugs, from 11 countries. Of those, 81 ICERs were determined for first-generation DAAs (boceprevir and telaprevir) and 89 ICERs were determined for second-generation DAAs (drugs approved after the first-generation DAAs) as a primary intervention. The median threshold prices at which first-generation and second-generation DAAs became cost-effective were estimated as $120,100 (interquartile range, $90,700-$176,800) and

  20. TRIM32 protein modulates type I interferon induction and cellular antiviral response by targeting MITA/STING protein for K63-linked ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Hu, Ming-Ming; Wang, Yan-Yi; Shu, Hong-Bing

    2012-08-17

    Viral infection activates several transcription factors including NF-κB and IRF3, which collaborate to induce type I interferons (IFNs) and innate antiviral response. MITA (also called STING) is a critical adaptor protein that links virus-sensing receptors to IRF3 activation upon infection by both RNA and DNA pathogens. Here we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase tripartite motif protein 32 (TRIM32) ubiquitinated MITA and dramatically enhanced MITA-mediated induction of IFN-β. Overexpression of TRIM32 potentiated virus-triggered IFNB1 expression and cellular antiviral response. Consistently, knockdown of TRIM32 had opposite effects. TRIM32 interacted with MITA, and was located at the mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. TRIM32 targeted MITA for K63-linked ubiquitination at K20/150/224/236 through its E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, which promoted the interaction of MITA with TBK1. These findings suggest that TRIM32 is an important regulatory protein for innate immunity against both RNA and DNA viruses by targeting MITA for K63-linked ubiquitination and downstream activation.

  1. Inhibition of CRM1-mediated nuclear export of influenza A nucleoprotein and nuclear export protein as a novel target for antiviral drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutiwitoonchai, Nopporn; Mano, Takafumi; Kakisaka, Michinori; Sato, Hirotaka; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Osada, Hiroyuki; Kotani, Osamu; Yokoyama, Masaru; Sato, Hironori; Aida, Yoko

    2017-07-01

    An anti-influenza compound, DP2392-E10 based on inhibition of the nuclear export function of the viral nucleoprotein-nuclear export signal 3 (NP-NES3) domain was successfully identified by our previous high-throughput screening system. Here, we demonstrated that DP2392-E10 exerts its antiviral effect by inhibiting replication of a broad range of influenza A subtypes. In regard to the molecular mechanism, we revealed that DP2392-E10 inhibits nuclear export of both viral NP and nuclear export protein (NEP). More specifically, in vitro pull-down assays revealed that DP2392-E10 directly binds cellular CRM1, which mediates nuclear export of NP and NEP. In silico docking suggested that DP2392-E10 binds at a region close to the HEAT9 and HEAT10 domains of CRM1. Together, these results indicate that the CRM1-mediated nuclear export function of influenza virus represents a new potential target for antiviral drug development, and also provide a core structure for a novel class of inhibitors that target this function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Potent antiviral agents fail to elicit genetically-stable resistance mutations in either enterovirus 71 or Coxsackievirus A16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, James T; De Colibus, Luigi; Elliott, Lauren; Fry, Elizabeth E; Stuart, David I; Rowlands, David J; Stonehouse, Nicola J

    2015-12-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) and Coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16) are the two major causative agents of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), for which there are currently no licenced treatments. Here, the acquisition of resistance towards two novel capsid-binding compounds, NLD and ALD, was studied and compared to the analogous compound GPP3. During serial passage, EV71 rapidly became resistant to each compound and mutations at residues I113 and V123 in VP1 were identified. A mutation at residue 113 was also identified in CVA16 after passage with GPP3. The mutations were associated with reduced thermostability and were rapidly lost in the absence of inhibitors. In silico modelling suggested that the mutations prevented the compounds from binding the VP1 pocket in the capsid. Although both viruses developed resistance to these potent pocket-binding compounds, the acquired mutations were associated with large fitness costs and reverted to WT phenotype and sequence rapidly in the absence of inhibitors. The most effective inhibitor, NLD, had a very large selectivity index, showing interesting pharmacological properties as a novel anti-EV71 agent. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Treatment as Prevention for Hepatitis C (TraP Hep C) - a nationwide elimination programme in Iceland using direct-acting antiviral agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olafsson, S; Tyrfingsson, T; Runarsdottir, V; Bergmann, O M; Hansdottir, I; Björnsson, E S; Johannsson, B; Sigurdardottir, B; Fridriksdottir, R H; Löve, A; Hellard, M; Löve, T J; Gudnason, T; Heimisdottir, M; Gottfredsson, M

    2018-03-07

    A nationwide programme for the treatment of all patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) was launched in Iceland in January 2016. By providing universal access to direct-acting antiviral agents to the entire patient population, the two key aims of the project were to (i) offer a cure to patients and thus reduce the long-term sequelae of chronic hepatitis C, and (ii) to reduce domestic incidence of HCV in the population by 80% prior to the WHO goal of HCV elimination by the year 2030. An important part of the programme is that vast majority of cases will be treated within 36 months from the launch of the project, during 2016-2018. Emphasis is placed on early case finding and treatment of patients at high risk for transmitting HCV, that is people who inject drugs (PWID), as well as patients with advanced liver disease. In addition to treatment scale-up, the project also entails intensification of harm reduction efforts, improved access to diagnostic tests, as well as educational campaigns to curtail spread, facilitate early detection and improve linkage to care. With these efforts, Iceland is anticipated to achieve the WHO hepatitis C elimination goals well before 2030. This article describes the background and organization of this project. Clinical trial number: NCT02647879. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Internal Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association for Publication of The Journal of Internal Medicine.

  4. VEGF pathway targeting agents, vessel normalization and tumor drug uptake : from bench to bedside

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arjaans, Marlous; Schroder, Carolien P.; Oosting, Sjoukje F.; Dafni, Urania; Kleibeuker, Josee E.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway targeting agents have been combined with other anticancer drugs, leading to improved efficacy in carcinoma of the cervix, stomach, lung, colon and rectum, ovary, and breast. Vessel normalization induced by VEGF pathway targeting agents influences

  5. First discovery of acetone extract from cottonseed oil sludge as a novel antiviral agent against plant viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhao

    Full Text Available A novel acetone extract from cottonseed oil sludge was firstly discovered against plant viruses including Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV, Rice stripe virus (RSV and Southern rice black streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV. Gossypol and β-sitosterol separated from the acetone extract were tested for their effects on anti-TMV and analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR assay. In vivo and field trials in different geographic distributions and different host varieties declared that this extract mixture was more efficient than the commercial agent Ningnanmycin with a broad spectrum of anti-plant-viruses activity. No phytotoxic activity was observed in the treated plants and environmental toxicology showed that this new acetone extract was environmentally friendly, indicating that this acetone extract has potential application in the control of plant virus in the future.

  6. First discovery of acetone extract from cottonseed oil sludge as a novel antiviral agent against plant viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Feng, Chaohong; Hou, Caiting; Hu, Lingyun; Wang, Qiaochun; Wu, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    A novel acetone extract from cottonseed oil sludge was firstly discovered against plant viruses including Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), Rice stripe virus (RSV) and Southern rice black streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV). Gossypol and β-sitosterol separated from the acetone extract were tested for their effects on anti-TMV and analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assay. In vivo and field trials in different geographic distributions and different host varieties declared that this extract mixture was more efficient than the commercial agent Ningnanmycin with a broad spectrum of anti-plant-viruses activity. No phytotoxic activity was observed in the treated plants and environmental toxicology showed that this new acetone extract was environmentally friendly, indicating that this acetone extract has potential application in the control of plant virus in the future.

  7. DENV up-regulates the HMG-CoA reductase activity through the impairment of AMPK phosphorylation: A potential antiviral target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Soto-Acosta

    2017-04-01

    about the mechanisms involved in host lipid metabolism during DENV replicative cycle and identifies new potential antiviral targets for DENV replication.

  8. High antiviral effect of TiO2·PL–DNA nanocomposites targeted to conservative regions of (−RNA and (+RNA of influenza A virus in cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asya S. Levina

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The development of new antiviral drugs based on nucleic acids is under scrutiny. An important problem in this aspect is to find the most vulnerable conservative regions in the viral genome as targets for the action of these agents. Another challenge is the development of an efficient system for their delivery into cells. To solve this problem, we proposed a TiO2·PL–DNA nanocomposite consisting of titanium dioxide nanoparticles and polylysine (PL-containing oligonucleotides.Results: The TiO2·PL–DNA nanocomposites bearing the DNA fragments targeted to different conservative regions of (−RNA and (+RNA of segment 5 of influenza A virus (IAV were studied for their antiviral activity in MDCK cells infected with the H1N1, H5N1, and H3N2 virus subtypes. Within the negative strand of each of the studied strains, the efficiency of DNA fragments increased in the direction of its 3’-end. Thus, the DNA fragment aimed at the 3’-noncoding region of (−RNA was the most efficient and inhibited the reproduction of different IAV subtypes by 3–4 orders of magnitude. Although to a lesser extent, the DNA fragments targeted at the AUG region of (+RNA and the corresponding region of (−RNA were also active. For all studied viral subtypes, the nanocomposites bearing the DNA fragments targeted to (−RNA appeared to be more efficient than those containing fragments aimed at the corresponding (+RNA regions.Conclusion: The proposed TiO2·PL–DNA nanocomposites can be successfully used for highly efficient and site-specific inhibition of influenza A virus of different subtypes. Some patterns of localization of the most vulnerable regions in IAV segment 5 for the action of DNA-based drugs were found. The (−RNA strand of IAV segment 5 appeared to be more sensitive as compared to (+RNA.

  9. Biophysical and In Silico Studies of the Interaction between the Anti-Viral Agents Acyclovir and Penciclovir, and Human Serum Albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhameed, Ali S; Bakheit, Ahmed H; Almutairi, Fahad M; AlRabiah, Haitham; Kadi, Adnan A

    2017-11-05

    Acyclovir (ACV) and penciclovir (PNV) have been commonly used during the last few decades as potent antiviral agents, especially for the treatment of herpes virus infections. In the present research their binding properties with human serum albumin (HSA) were studied using different advanced spectroscopic and in-silico methods. The interactions between ACV/PNV and HSA at the three investigated temperatures revealed a static type of binding. Extraction of the thermodynamic parameters of the ACV-HSA and PNV-HSA systems from the measured spectrofluorimetric data demonstrated spontaneous interactions with an enthalpy change (∆ H ⁰) of -1.79 ± 0.29 and -4.47 ± 0.51 kJ·mol -1 for ACV and PNV, respectively. The entropy change (∆ S ⁰) of 79.40 ± 0.95 and 69.95 ± 1.69 J·mol -1 ·K -1 for ACV and PNV, respectively, hence supported a potential contribution of electrostatic binding forces to the ACV-HSA and PNV-HSA systems. Putative binding of ACV/PNV to HSA, using previously reported site markers, showed that ACV/PNV were bound to HSA within subdomains IIA and IIIA (Sudlow sites I and II). Further confirmation was obtained through molecular docking studies of ACV-HSA and PNV-HSA binding, which confirmed the binding site of ACV/PNV with the most stable configurations of ACV/PNV within the HSA. These ACV/PNV conformers were shown to have free energies of -25.61 and -22.01 kJ·mol -1 for ACV within the HSA sites I and II and -22.97 and -26.53 kJ·mol -1 for PNV in HSA sites I and II, with hydrogen bonding and electrostatic forces being the main binding forces in such conformers.

  10. A Novel Antiviral Target Structure Involved in the RNA Binding, Dimerization, and Nuclear Export Functions of the Influenza A Virus Nucleoprotein.

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    Michinori Kakisaka

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Developing antiviral therapies for influenza A virus (IAV infection is an ongoing process because of the rapid rate of antigenic mutation and the emergence of drug-resistant viruses. The ideal strategy is to develop drugs that target well-conserved, functionally restricted, and unique surface structures without affecting host cell function. We recently identified the antiviral compound, RK424, by screening a library of 50,000 compounds using cell-based infection assays. RK424 showed potent antiviral activity against many different subtypes of IAV in vitro and partially protected mice from a lethal dose of A/WSN/1933 (H1N1 virus in vivo. Here, we show that RK424 inhibits viral ribonucleoprotein complex (vRNP activity, causing the viral nucleoprotein (NP to accumulate in the cell nucleus. In silico docking analysis revealed that RK424 bound to a small pocket in the viral NP. This pocket was surrounded by three functionally important domains: the RNA binding groove, the NP dimer interface, and nuclear export signal (NES 3, indicating that it may be involved in the RNA binding, oligomerization, and nuclear export functions of NP. The accuracy of this binding model was confirmed in a NP-RK424 binding assay incorporating photo-cross-linked RK424 affinity beads and in a plaque assay evaluating the structure-activity relationship of RK424. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR and pull-down assays showed that RK424 inhibited both the NP-RNA and NP-NP interactions, whereas size exclusion chromatography showed that RK424 disrupted viral RNA-induced NP oligomerization. In addition, in vitro nuclear export assays confirmed that RK424 inhibited nuclear export of NP. The amino acid residues comprising the NP pocket play a crucial role in viral replication and are highly conserved in more than 7,000 NP sequences from avian, human, and swine influenza viruses. Furthermore, we found that the NP pocket has a surface structure different from that of the pocket in host

  11. Targeted therapies for malignant gliomas: novel agents, same barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, F.

    2013-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are common and devastating brain malignancies. Despite this extensive treatment the mean overall survival is still only 14.6 months and more effective treatments are urgently needed. Targeted therapy holds the promise for the new generation of chemotherapy due to the selectively

  12. Use of Bifunctional Immunotherapeutic Agents to Target Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    enhanced effi- cacy and reduced cyto- toxicity (47–49). Therefore, we envisioned that compound 4 could serve as an archetype of a traditional targeted...4313. [54] A. K. Sarkar, K. L. Matta, Carbohydr. Res. 1992, 233, 245. [55] K. H. Jung , M. Hoch, R. R. Schmidt, Liebigs Ann. Chem. 1989, 1099. [56] P

  13. Synergy between vascular targeting agents and antibody-directed therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedley, R. Barbara; El-Emir, Ethaar; Flynn, Aiden A.; Boxer, Geoffrey M.; Dearling, Jason; Raleigh, James A.; Hill, Sally A.; Stuart, Sam; Motha, Reeya; Begent, Richard H.J.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Tumor heterogeneity necessitates the use of combined therapies. We have shown that combining antibody-directed therapy with antivascular agents converts a subcurative to a curative treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate, by radioluminographic and microscopic techniques, the regional effects of the two complementary therapies. Methods and Materials: Nude mice bearing colorectal tumors were injected with 125 I-labeled anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody, and images were obtained for antibody distribution and modeling studies using radioluminography. For therapy studies, the mice were given radioimmunotherapy alone ( 131 I-A5B7 anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody), the antivascular agent combretastatin A-4 3-0-phosphate (200 mg/kg), or both. Extra mice were used to study the regional tumor effects of these therapies over time: relevant histochemical procedures were performed on tissue sections to obtain composite digital microscopic images of apoptosis, blood vessels, perfusion, hypoxia, and morphology. Results: Antibody distribution, modeling, and immunohistochemistry showed how radioimmunotherapy (7.4 MBq/40 μg antibody) effectively treated the outer, well-oxygenated tumor region only. Combretastatin A-4 3-0-phosphate treated the more hypoxic center, and in doing so altered the relationship between tumor parameters. Conclusion: The combined complementary therapies produced cures by destroying tumor regions with different pathophysiologies. Relating these regional therapeutic effects to the relevant tumor parameters microscopically allows optimization of therapy and improved translation to clinical trials

  14. Autonomous Collaborative Agents for Onboard Multi-Sensor Re-Targeting, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In our Phase I effort we developed a prototype software-agent based framework to provide for autonomous re-targeting of sensors hosted on satellites in polar orbits,...

  15. Autonomous Collaborative Agents for Onboard Multi-Sensor Re-Targeting Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In our Phase I effort we developed a prototype software-agent based framework to provide for autonomous re-targeting of sensors hosted on satellites in polar orbits,...

  16. The RNA template channel of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase as a target for development of antiviral therapy of multiple genera within a virus family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lonneke van der Linden

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The genus Enterovirus of the family Picornaviridae contains many important human pathogens (e.g., poliovirus, coxsackievirus, rhinovirus, and enterovirus 71 for which no antiviral drugs are available. The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase is an attractive target for antiviral therapy. Nucleoside-based inhibitors have broad-spectrum activity but often exhibit off-target effects. Most non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNIs target surface cavities, which are structurally more flexible than the nucleotide-binding pocket, and hence have a more narrow spectrum of activity and are more prone to resistance development. Here, we report a novel NNI, GPC-N114 (2,2'-[(4-chloro-1,2-phenylenebis(oxy]bis(5-nitro-benzonitrile with broad-spectrum activity against enteroviruses and cardioviruses (another genus in the picornavirus family. Surprisingly, coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3 and poliovirus displayed a high genetic barrier to resistance against GPC-N114. By contrast, EMCV, a cardiovirus, rapidly acquired resistance due to mutations in 3Dpol. In vitro polymerase activity assays showed that GPC-N114 i inhibited the elongation activity of recombinant CVB3 and EMCV 3Dpol, (ii had reduced activity against EMCV 3Dpol with the resistance mutations, and (iii was most efficient in inhibiting 3Dpol when added before the RNA template-primer duplex. Elucidation of a crystal structure of the inhibitor bound to CVB3 3Dpol confirmed the RNA-binding channel as the target for GPC-N114. Docking studies of the compound into the crystal structures of the compound-resistant EMCV 3Dpol mutants suggested that the resistant phenotype is due to subtle changes that interfere with the binding of GPC-N114 but not of the RNA template-primer. In conclusion, this study presents the first NNI that targets the RNA template channel of the picornavirus polymerase and identifies a new pocket that can be used for the design of broad-spectrum inhibitors. Moreover, this study provides important new insight

  17. Development of Antibacterials Targeting the MEP Pathway of Select Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Yersinia pestis will serve as effective antibiotics by blocking isoprene biosynthesis . In strong support of this hypothesis, we have demonstrated the dose... antibiotic resistant strains and the ease by which antibiotic resistance can be engineered into bacteria further highlights the need for continued...development of novel antibiotics against new bacterial targets. This research project directly addresses this need through the development of a broad spectrum

  18. Supramolecular approach for target transport of photodynamic anticancer agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kejík, Z.; Kaplánek, R.; Bříza, T.; Králová, Jarmila; Martásek, P.; Král, V.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 2 (2012), s. 106-116 ISSN 1061-0278 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06077; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/1291; GA ČR GA203/09/1311 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : photodynamic therapy * photosensitisers * targeted transport * combination therapy * cancer Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.546, year: 2012

  19. Treatment of antiviral-resistant recurrent erythema multiforme with dapsone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oak, Allen S W; Seminario-Vidal, Lucia; Sami, Naveed

    2017-03-01

    Recurrent erythema multiforme (REM) is a chronic disease characterized by frequent episodes of target cutaneous lesions in an acral distribution. Conventional treatment includes systemic corticosteroids and antiviral therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate dapsone as a potential steroid sparing-agent for the treatment of REM after a failed trial of at least one antiviral therapy (acyclovir, famciclovir, or valacyclovir). A retrospective chart review was conducted on thirteen patients with a diagnosis of REM who underwent treatment with dapsone after failing at least one antiviral therapy. Out of 13 patients, 6 showed complete response (CR) and 5 showed partial response (PR). The underlying cause was identified in 5 patients with all showing at least PR. Adverse effects, observed in 4 patients, included fatigue, macrocytic anemia, anxiety, insomnia and involuntary movements, and drug-induced lupus erythematosus. A continuous course of dapsone, titrated up from 25 mg/day to a dose at which clinical improvement is seen with acceptable patient tolerance, is a viable steroid sparing-agent for REM treatment after a failed trial of antiviral therapy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Targeting Malassezia species for Novel Synthetic and Natural Antidandruff Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angiolella, Letizia; Carradori, Simone; Maccallini, Cristina; Giusiano, Gustavo; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2017-01-01

    Malassezia spp. are lipophilic yeasts not only present in the normal skin microflora, but also responsible of skin-related diseases (pityriasis versicolor, seborrheic/atopic dermatitis and dandruff) as well as systemic fungal infections in humans and animals. Their treatment and eradication are mainly based on old azole drugs, which are characterized by poor compliance, unpredictable clinical efficacy, emerging resistance and several side effects. These drawbacks have prompted the research toward novel synthetic and natural derivatives/ nanomaterials targeting other pivotal enzymes/pathways such as carbonic anhydrase (MgCA) and lipases, alone or in combination, in order to improve the eradication rate of this fungus. This review accomplished an update on this important topic dealing with the latest discoveries of synthetic scaffolds and natural products for the treatment of Malassezia spp.-related diseases, thus suggesting new opportunities to design innovative and alternative anti-dandruff drugs. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Antiviral Drug Ribavirin Targets Thyroid Cancer Cells by Inhibiting the eIF4E-β-Catenin Axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiawei; Zhu, Yali; Xiao, Zuixuan; Dai, Xuemei; Liu, Dan; Li, Lin; Xiao, Baolai

    2017-08-01

    Although eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) is important in cancer development and progression, its role in thyroid cancer is not well understood. Ribavirin, an anti-viral drug, has been identified as an eIF4E inhibitor. Herein, we investigated the effects of ribavirin on thyroid cancer and its molecular mechanisms of action. The effects of ribavirin on thyroid cancer was investigated using in vitro cellular assays and in vivo xenograft mouse model. The mechanism of its action on eIF4E-β-catenin axis was examined using genetic and biochemical approaches. We show that ribavirin inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in the thyroid cancer cell lines 8505C and FTC-133. Ribavirin inhibited thyroid cancer growth in a xenograft mouse model. Ribavirin also sensitized thyroid cancer's response to paclitaxel. Mechanistically, ribavirin suppressed eIF4E phosphorylation and overexpression of its wildtype and phosphor-mimetic form (S209D) but not of the non-phosphorylatable form (S209A), which rescued the inhibitory effects of ribavirin in thyroid cancer cells. We further demonstrated that ribavirin suppressed phosphorylation and activities of β-catenin and its subsequent gene transcriptional expression. β-Catenin overexpression rescued the effects of ribavirin in thyroid cancer cells. Importantly, we show that eIF4E regulated β-catenin and that the regulation depended on phosphorylation at S209. The in vivo inhibitory effects of ribavirin on phosphorylation of eIF4E and β-catenin were also observed in thyroid tumor. Our data clearly demonstrate that ribavirin acts on thyroid cancer cells by inhibiting eIF4E/β-catenin signaling. Our findings suggest that ribavirin has the potential to be repurposed for thyroid cancer treatment and also highlight the therapeutic value of inhibiting eIF4E-β-catenin in thyroid cancer. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The E3 Ubiquitin Ligase TRIM40 Attenuates Antiviral Immune Responses by Targeting MDA5 and RIG-I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyuan Zhao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs, including melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5 and RIG-I, are crucial for host recognition of non-self RNAs, especially viral RNA. Thus, the expression and activation of RLRs play fundamental roles in eliminating the invading RNA viruses and maintaining immune homeostasis. However, how RLR expression is tightly regulated remains to be further investigated. In this study, we identified a major histocompatibility complex (MHC-encoded gene, tripartite interaction motif 40 (TRIM40, as a suppressor of RLR signaling by directly targeting MDA5 and RIG-I. TRIM40 binds to MDA5 and RIG-I and promotes their K27- and K48-linked polyubiquitination via its E3 ligase activity, leading to their proteasomal degradation. TRIM40 deficiency enhances RLR-triggered signaling. Consequently, TRIM40 deficiency greatly enhances antiviral immune responses and decreases viral replication in vivo. Thus, we demonstrate that TRIM40 limits RLR-triggered innate activation, suggesting TRIM40 as a potential therapeutic target for the control of viral infection.

  3. Self-interest versus group-interest in antiviral control

    OpenAIRE

    Boven, M. van; Klinkenberg, D.; Pen, I.; Weissing, F.J.; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.

    2008-01-01

    Antiviral agents have been hailed to hold considerable promise for the treatment and prevention of emerging viral diseases like H5N1 avian influenza and SARS. However, antiviral drugs are not completely harmless, and the conditions under which individuals are willing to participate in a large-scale antiviral drug treatment program are as yet unknown. We provide population dynamical and game theoretical analyses of large-scale prophylactic antiviral treatment programs. Throughout we compare th...

  4. [Antiviral effects of dual-target antisense rna: an experimental study with hepatitis B virus transgenic mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Chen, Hong; Peng, Zhao-yuan; Li, Wen-gang; Xi, Hong-li; Xu, Xiao-yuan

    2005-12-28

    To investigate the curative effects of dual-target antisense RNA targeting the X and P regions in the genome of hepatitis B virus (HBV). Retrovirus vector pLXSN was used to construct 4 kinds of recombinant vector plasmids expressing dual-target antisense RNA complementary to the X and P regions in the genome of HBV, namely, pLXSN-asX, pLXSN-asP, pLXSN-asXP, and pLXSN-seX. 48 HBV transgenic mice were randomly divided into 6 equal groups: pLXSN-asX group, pLXSN-asX group, pLXSN-asX group, pLXSN-asX group, and blank plasmid blank (pLXSN) group, to be injected into the caudal vein with corresponding plasmids thrice for every other day, and blank control group. Venous blood samples were collected before, 1 day and 3 days, and 2, 4, and 8 weeks after the injection to undergo detection of serum HBV DNA and HBsAg. Eight weeks later the mice were killed and immunohistochemistry was used t examine the HBsAg and HBcAg in the tissues. Pathological examination of the tissues was performed. The serum HBsAg concentrations 4 and 8 weeks after injection were significantly lower than that before injection in the.pLXSN-asX and pLXSN-asXP groups (all P asX group (P asX, pLXSN-asP, and pLXSN-asXP groups than in other groups (P < 0.05). No significant abnormality was found in the tissues in all groups. Dual-target antisense RNA targeting the X and P regions in the genome of HBV inhibits the replication and expression of HBV, significantly stronger than single-target antisense-RNA.

  5. The Matrix Protein of Nipah Virus Targets the E3-Ubiquitin Ligase TRIM6 to Inhibit the IKKε Kinase-Mediated Type-I IFN Antiviral Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Bharaj

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available For efficient replication, viruses have developed mechanisms to evade innate immune responses, including the antiviral type-I interferon (IFN-I system. Nipah virus (NiV, a highly pathogenic member of the Paramyxoviridae family (genus Henipavirus, is known to encode for four P gene-derived viral proteins (P/C/W/V with IFN-I antagonist functions. Here we report that NiV matrix protein (NiV-M, which is important for virus assembly and budding, can also inhibit IFN-I responses. IFN-I production requires activation of multiple signaling components including the IκB kinase epsilon (IKKε. We previously showed that the E3-ubiquitin ligase TRIM6 catalyzes the synthesis of unanchored K48-linked polyubiquitin chains, which are not covalently attached to any protein, and activate IKKε for induction of IFN-I mediated antiviral responses. Using co-immunoprecipitation assays and confocal microscopy we show here that the NiV-M protein interacts with TRIM6 and promotes TRIM6 degradation. Consequently, NiV-M expression results in reduced levels of unanchored K48-linked polyubiquitin chains associated with IKKε leading to impaired IKKε oligomerization, IKKε autophosphorylation and reduced IFN-mediated responses. This IFN antagonist function of NiV-M requires a conserved lysine residue (K258 in the bipartite nuclear localization signal that is found in divergent henipaviruses. Consistent with this, the matrix proteins of Ghana, Hendra and Cedar viruses were also able to inhibit IFNβ induction. Live NiV infection, but not a recombinant NiV lacking the M protein, reduced the levels of endogenous TRIM6 protein expression. To our knowledge, matrix proteins of paramyxoviruses have never been reported to be involved in innate immune antagonism. We report here a novel mechanism of viral innate immune evasion by targeting TRIM6, IKKε and unanchored polyubiquitin chains. These findings expand the universe of viral IFN antagonism strategies and provide a new

  6. Ethyl Pyruvate: An Anti-Microbial Agent that Selectively Targets Pathobionts and Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Debebe, Tewodros; Kr?ger, Monika; Huse, Klaus; Kacza, Johannes; M?hlberg, Katja; K?nig, Brigitte; Birkenmeier, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    The microbiota has a strong influence on health and disease in humans. A causative shift favoring pathobionts is strongly linked to diseases. Therefore, anti-microbial agents selectively targeting potential pathogens as well as their biofilms are urgently demanded. Here we demonstrate the impact of ethyl pyruvate, so far known as ROS scavenger and anti-inflammatory agent, on planktonic microbes and biofilms. Ethyl pyruvate combats preferably the growth of pathobionts belonging to bacteria and...

  7. Metabolic network analysis-based identification of antimicrobial drug targets in category A bioterrorism agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Yeol Ahn

    Full Text Available The 2001 anthrax mail attacks in the United States demonstrated the potential threat of bioterrorism, hence driving the need to develop sophisticated treatment and diagnostic protocols to counter biological warfare. Here, by performing flux balance analyses on the fully-annotated metabolic networks of multiple, whole genome-sequenced bacterial strains, we have identified a large number of metabolic enzymes as potential drug targets for each of the three Category A-designated bioterrorism agents including Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis. Nine metabolic enzymes- belonging to the coenzyme A, folate, phosphatidyl-ethanolamine and nucleic acid pathways common to all strains across the three distinct genera were identified as targets. Antimicrobial agents against some of these enzymes are available. Thus, a combination of cross species-specific antibiotics and common antimicrobials against shared targets may represent a useful combinatorial therapeutic approach against all Category A bioterrorism agents.

  8. Large-scale production and antiviral efficacy of multi-target double-stranded RNA for the prevention of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thammasorn, Thitiporn; Sangsuriya, Pakkakul; Meemetta, Watcharachai; Senapin, Saengchan; Jitrakorn, Sarocha; Rattanarojpong, Triwit; Saksmerprome, Vanvimon

    2015-12-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a specific and effective approach for inhibiting viral replication by introducing double-stranded (ds)RNA targeting the viral gene. In this study, we employed a combinatorial approach to interfere multiple gene functions of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), the most lethal shrimp virus, using a single-batch of dsRNA, so-called "multi-WSSV dsRNA." A co-cultivation of RNase-deficient E. coli was developed to produce dsRNA targeting a major structural protein (VP28) and a hub protein (WSSV051) with high number of interacting protein partners. For a co-cultivation of transformed E. coli, use of Terrific broth (TB) medium was shown to improve the growth of the E. coli and multi-WSSV dsRNA yields as compared to the use of Luria Bertani (LB) broth. Co-culture expression was conducted under glycerol feeding fed-batch fermentation. Estimated yield of multi-WSSV dsRNA (μg/mL culture) from the fed-batch process was 30 times higher than that obtained under a lab-scale culture with LB broth. Oral delivery of the resulting multi-WSSV dsRNA reduced % cumulative mortality and delayed average time to death compared to the non-treated group after WSSV challenge. The present study suggests a co-cultivation technique for production of antiviral dsRNA with multiple viral targets. The optimal multi-WSSV dsRNA production was achieved by the use of glycerol feeding fed-batch cultivation with controlled pH and dissolved oxygen. The cultivation technique developed herein should be feasible for industrial-scale RNAi applications in shrimp aquaculture. Interference of multiple viral protein functions by a single-batch dsRNA should also be an ideal approach for RNAi-mediated fighting against viruses, especially the large and complicated WSSV.

  9. Realizing the Potential of Vascular Targeted Therapy: The Rationale for Combining Vascular Disrupting Agents and Anti-Angiogenic Agents to Treat Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siemann, D W; Chaplin, D J; Horsman, M R

    2017-01-01

    Vascular targeted therapies (VTTs) are agents that target tumor vasculature and can be classified into two categories: those that inhibit angiogenesis and those that directly interfere with established tumor vasculature. Although both the anti-angiogenic agents (AAs) and the vascular disrupting a...

  10. Targeting iron homeostasis induces cellular differentiation and synergizes with differentiating agents in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callens, Celine; Coulon, Séverine; Naudin, Jerome; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Boissel, Nicolas; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Wang, Pamella Huey Mei; Agarwal, Saurabh; Tamouza, Houda; Paubelle, Etienne; Asnafi, Vahid; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Dessen, Philippe; Canioni, Danielle; Chandesris, Olivia; Rubio, Marie Therese; Beaumont, Carole; Benhamou, Marc; Dombret, Hervé; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Monteiro, Renato C; Moura, Ivan C; Hermine, Olivier

    2010-04-12

    Differentiating agents have been proposed to overcome the impaired cellular differentiation in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, only the combinations of all-trans retinoic acid or arsenic trioxide with chemotherapy have been successful, and only in treating acute promyelocytic leukemia (also called AML3). We show that iron homeostasis is an effective target in the treatment of AML. Iron chelating therapy induces the differentiation of leukemia blasts and normal bone marrow precursors into monocytes/macrophages in a manner involving modulation of reactive oxygen species expression and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). 30% of the genes most strongly induced by iron deprivation are also targeted by vitamin D3 (VD), a well known differentiating agent. Iron chelating agents induce expression and phosphorylation of the VD receptor (VDR), and iron deprivation and VD act synergistically. VD magnifies activation of MAPK JNK and the induction of VDR target genes. When used to treat one AML patient refractory to chemotherapy, the combination of iron-chelating agents and VD resulted in reversal of pancytopenia and in blast differentiation. We propose that iron availability modulates myeloid cell commitment and that targeting this cellular differentiation pathway together with conventional differentiating agents provides new therapeutic modalities for AML.

  11. Targeting iron homeostasis induces cellular differentiation and synergizes with differentiating agents in acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callens, Celine; Coulon, Séverine; Naudin, Jerome; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Boissel, Nicolas; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Wang, Pamella Huey Mei; Agarwal, Saurabh; Tamouza, Houda; Paubelle, Etienne; Asnafi, Vahid; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Dessen, Philippe; Canioni, Danielle; Chandesris, Olivia; Rubio, Marie Therese; Beaumont, Carole; Benhamou, Marc; Dombret, Hervé; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Monteiro, Renato C.

    2010-01-01

    Differentiating agents have been proposed to overcome the impaired cellular differentiation in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, only the combinations of all-trans retinoic acid or arsenic trioxide with chemotherapy have been successful, and only in treating acute promyelocytic leukemia (also called AML3). We show that iron homeostasis is an effective target in the treatment of AML. Iron chelating therapy induces the differentiation of leukemia blasts and normal bone marrow precursors into monocytes/macrophages in a manner involving modulation of reactive oxygen species expression and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). 30% of the genes most strongly induced by iron deprivation are also targeted by vitamin D3 (VD), a well known differentiating agent. Iron chelating agents induce expression and phosphorylation of the VD receptor (VDR), and iron deprivation and VD act synergistically. VD magnifies activation of MAPK JNK and the induction of VDR target genes. When used to treat one AML patient refractory to chemotherapy, the combination of iron-chelating agents and VD resulted in reversal of pancytopenia and in blast differentiation. We propose that iron availability modulates myeloid cell commitment and that targeting this cellular differentiation pathway together with conventional differentiating agents provides new therapeutic modalities for AML. PMID:20368581

  12. Combination of nanotechnology with vascular targeting agents for effective cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanban-Esfahlan, Rana; Seidi, Khaled; Banimohamad-Shotorbani, Behnaz; Jahanban-Esfahlan, Ali; Yousefi, Bahman

    2018-04-01

    As a young science, nanotechnology promptly integrated into the current oncology practice. Accordingly, various nanostructure particles were developed to reduce drug toxicity and allow the targeted delivery of various diagnostic and therapeutic compounds to the cancer cells. New sophisticated nanosystems constantly emerge to improve the performance of current anticancer modalities. Targeting tumor vasculature is an attractive strategy to fight cancer. Though the idea was swiftly furthered from basic science to the clinic, targeting tumor vasculature had a limited potential in patients, where tumors relapse due to the development of multiple drug resistance and metastasis. The aim of this review is to discuss the advantages of nanosystem incorporation with various vascular targeting agents, including (i) endogen anti-angiogenic agents; (ii) inhibitors of angiogenesis-related growth factors; (iii) inhibitors of tyrosine kinase receptors; (iv) inhibitors of angiogenesis-related signaling pathways; (v) inhibitors of tumor endothelial cell-associated markers; and (vi) tumor vascular disrupting agents. We also review the efficacy of nanostructures as natural vascular targeting agents. The efficacy of each approach in cancer therapy is further discussed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Imidazo[2,1-b]thiazole carbohydrate derivatives: Synthesis and antiviral activity against Junin virus, agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barradas, José Sebastián; Errea, María Inés; D'Accorso, Norma B; Sepúlveda, Claudia Soledad; Damonte, Elsa Beatriz

    2011-01-01

    Herein, we describe the syntheses of 3,5-disubstituted imidazo[2,1-b]thiazole. The cyclization step was performed in two different conditions by using either thermal or microwave heating. Comparing the results of both methodologies, we found that the microwave assistance is an improved alternative to obtain this family of heterocyclic compound. Compounds were first evaluated for cytotoxicity in Vero cells by MTT method and then, the antiviral activity was assayed by a virus yield inhibition assay in the range of concentrations lower than the corresponding CC(50), using JUNV strain IV4454 as the model system. The most active compounds (3 and 4), showed a level of antiviral activity against JUNV in monkey Vero cells better than the reference substance ribavirin. Then, they are promising lead compound for further analysis and characterization to establish their therapeutic potential against hemorrhagic fever viruses. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. The combination of novel targeted molecular agents and radiation in the treatment of pediatric gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina eDasgupta

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumors are the most common solid pediatric malignancy. For high-grade, recurrent or refractory pediatric brain tumors, radiation therapy (XRT is an integral treatment modality. In the era of personalized cancer therapy, molecularly targeted agents have been designed to inhibit pathways critical to tumorigenesis. Our evolving knowledge of genetic aberrations in low-grade gliomas is being exploited with targeted inhibitors. These agents are also being combined with XRT to increase their efficacy. In this review, we discuss novel agents targeting three different pathways in low-grade gliomas, and their potential combination with XRT. B-Raf is a kinase in the Ras/Raf/MAPK kinase pathway, which is integral to cellular division, survival and metabolism. In low-grade pediatric gliomas, point mutations in BRAF (BRAF V600E or a BRAF fusion mutation (KIAA1549:BRAF causes overactivation of the MEK/MAPK pathway. Pre-clinical data shows cooperation between XRT and tagrgeted inhibitors of BRAF V600E, and MEK and mTOR inhibitors in the gliomas with the BRAF fusion. A second important signaling cascade in pediatric glioma pathogenesis is the PI3 kinase (PI3K/mTOR pathway. Dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitors are poised to enter studies of pediatric tumors. Finally, many brain tumors express potent stimulators of angiogenesis. Several inhibitors of immunomodulators are currently being evaluated in in clinical trials for the treatment of recurrent or refractory pediatric central nervous system (CNS tumors. In summary, combinations of these targeted inhibitors with radiation are currently under investigation in both translational bench research and early clinical trials. We summarize the molecular rationale for, and the pre-clinical data supporting the combinations of these targeted agents with other anti-cancer agents and XRT in pediatric gliomas. Parallels are drawn to adult gliomas, and the molecular mechanisms underlying the efficacy of these agents is discussed

  15. Novel Bone-Targeting Agent for Enhanced Delivery of Vancomycin to Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albayati, Zaineb A. F.; Sunkara, Manjula; Schmidt-Malan, Suzannah M.; Karau, Melissa J.; Morris, Andrew J.; Steckelberg, James M.; Patel, Robin; Breen, Philip J.; Smeltzer, Mark S.; Taylor, K. Grant; Merten, Kevyn E.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the pharmacokinetic properties of vancomycin conjugated to a bone-targeting agent (BT) with high affinity for hydroxyapatite after systemic intravenous administration. The results confirm enhanced persistence of BT-vancomycin in plasma and enhanced accumulation in bone relative to vancomycin. This suggests that BT-vancomycin may be a potential carrier for the systemic targeted delivery of vancomycin in the treatment of bone infections, potentially reducing the reliance on surgical debridement to achieve the desired therapeutic outcome. PMID:26666918

  16. Multi-agent target tracking using particle filters enhanced with context data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Claessens, R

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The proposed framework for Multi-Agent Target Tracking supports i) tracking of objects and ii) search and rescue based on the fusion of very heterogeneous data. The system is based on a novel approach to fusing sensory observations, intelligence...

  17. Ethyl Pyruvate: An Anti-Microbial Agent that Selectively Targets Pathobionts and Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debebe, Tewodros; Krüger, Monika; Huse, Klaus; Kacza, Johannes; Mühlberg, Katja; König, Brigitte; Birkenmeier, Gerd

    The microbiota has a strong influence on health and disease in humans. A causative shift favoring pathobionts is strongly linked to diseases. Therefore, anti-microbial agents selectively targeting potential pathogens as well as their biofilms are urgently demanded. Here we demonstrate the impact of ethyl pyruvate, so far known as ROS scavenger and anti-inflammatory agent, on planktonic microbes and biofilms. Ethyl pyruvate combats preferably the growth of pathobionts belonging to bacteria and fungi independent of the genera and prevailing drug resistance. Surprisingly, this anti-microbial agent preserves symbionts like Lactobacillus species. Moreover, ethyl pyruvate prevents the formation of biofilms and promotes matured biofilms dissolution. This potentially new anti-microbial and anti-biofilm agent could have a tremendous positive impact on human, veterinary medicine and technical industry as well.

  18. Ethyl Pyruvate: An Anti-Microbial Agent that Selectively Targets Pathobionts and Biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tewodros Debebe

    Full Text Available The microbiota has a strong influence on health and disease in humans. A causative shift favoring pathobionts is strongly linked to diseases. Therefore, anti-microbial agents selectively targeting potential pathogens as well as their biofilms are urgently demanded. Here we demonstrate the impact of ethyl pyruvate, so far known as ROS scavenger and anti-inflammatory agent, on planktonic microbes and biofilms. Ethyl pyruvate combats preferably the growth of pathobionts belonging to bacteria and fungi independent of the genera and prevailing drug resistance. Surprisingly, this anti-microbial agent preserves symbionts like Lactobacillus species. Moreover, ethyl pyruvate prevents the formation of biofilms and promotes matured biofilms dissolution. This potentially new anti-microbial and anti-biofilm agent could have a tremendous positive impact on human, veterinary medicine and technical industry as well.

  19. Nose-to-Brain Delivery of Antiviral Drugs: A Way to Overcome Their Active Efflux?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Dalpiaz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Although several viruses can easily infect the central nervous system (CNS, antiviral drugs often show dramatic difficulties in penetrating the brain from the bloodstream since they are substrates of active efflux transporters (AETs. These transporters, located in the physiological barriers between blood and the CNS and in macrophage membranes, are able to recognize their substrates and actively efflux them into the bloodstream. The active transporters currently known to efflux antiviral drugs are P-glycoprotein (ABCB1 or P-gp or MDR1, multidrug resistance-associated proteins (ABCC1 or MRP1, ABCC4 or MRP4, ABCC5 or MRP5, and breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2 or BCRP. Inhibitors of AETs may be considered, but their co-administration causes serious unwanted effects. Nasal administration of antiviral drugs is therefore proposed in order to overcome the aforementioned problems, but innovative devices, formulations (thermoreversible gels, polymeric micro- and nano-particles, solid lipid microparticles, nanoemulsions, absorption enhancers (chitosan, papaverine, and mucoadhesive agents (chitosan, polyvinilpyrrolidone are required in order to selectively target the antiviral drugs and, possibly, the AET inhibitors in the CNS. Moreover, several prodrugs of antiretroviral agents can inhibit or elude the AET systems, appearing as interesting substrates for innovative nasal formulations able to target anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV agents into macrophages of the CNS, which are one of the most important HIV Sanctuaries of the body.

  20. Targeted therapy in renal cell carcinoma: moving from molecular agents to specific immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedke, Jens; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Singh-Jasuja, Harpreet; Stevanović, Stefan; Behnes, Carl-Ludwig; Stenzl, Arnulf

    2014-02-01

    Non-specific immunotherapy has been for a long time a standard treatment option for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma but was redeemed by specific targeted molecular therapies, namely the VEGF and mTOR inhibitors. After moving treatment for mRCC to specific molecular agents with a well-defined mode of action, immunotherapy still needs this further development to increase its accuracy. Nowadays, an evolution from a rather non-specific cytokine treatment to sophisticated targeted approaches in specific immunotherapy led to a re-launch of immunotherapy in clinical studies. Recent steps in the development of immunotherapy strategies are discussed in this review with a special focus on peptide vaccination which aims at a tumor targeting by specific T lymphocytes. In addition, different combinatory strategies with immunomodulating agents like cyclophosphamide or sunitinib are outlined, and the effects of immune checkpoint modulators as anti-CTLA-4 or PD-1 antibodies are discussed.

  1. Cell-type-specific, Aptamer-functionalized Agents for Targeted Disease Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiehua Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred years ago, Dr. Paul Ehrlich popularized the “magic bullet” concept for cancer therapy in which an ideal therapeutic agent would only kill the specific tumor cells it targeted. Since then, “targeted therapy” that specifically targets the molecular defects responsible for a patient's condition has become a long-standing goal for treating human disease. However, safe and efficient drug delivery during the treatment of cancer and infectious disease remains a major challenge for clinical translation and the development of new therapies. The advent of SELEX technology has inspired many groundbreaking studies that successfully adapted cell-specific aptamers for targeted delivery of active drug substances in both in vitro and in vivo models. By covalently linking or physically functionalizing the cell-specific aptamers with therapeutic agents, such as siRNA, microRNA, chemotherapeutics or toxins, or delivery vehicles, such as organic or inorganic nanocarriers, the targeted cells and tissues can be specifically recognized and the therapeutic compounds internalized, thereby improving the local concentration of the drug and its therapeutic efficacy. Currently, many cell-type-specific aptamers have been developed that can target distinct diseases or tissues in a cell-type-specific manner. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the use of cell-specific aptamers for targeted disease therapy, as well as conjugation strategies and challenges.

  2. Aurora kinases as druggable targets in pediatric leukemia: heterogeneity in target modulation activities and cytotoxicity by diverse novel therapeutic agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarthi Jayanthan

    Full Text Available Leukemia is the most common pediatric malignancy, constituting more than 30% of all childhood cancers. Although cure rates have improved greatly, approximately one in five children relapse and poor survival rates post relapse remain a challenge. Given this, more effective and innovative therapeutic strategies are needed in order to improve prognosis. Aurora kinases, a family of serine/threonine kinases essential for the regulation of several mitotic processes, have been identified as potential targets for cancer therapeutics. Elevated expression of Aurora kinases has been demonstrated in several malignancies and is associated with aberrant mitotic activity, aneuploidy and alterations in chromosomal structure and genome instability. Based on this rationale, a number of small molecule inhibitors have been formulated and advanced to human studies in the recent past. A comparative analysis of these agents in cytotoxicity and target modulation analyses against a panel of leukemia cells provides novel insights into the unique mechanisms and codependent activity pathways involved in targeting Aurora kinases, constituting a distinctive preclinical experimental framework to identify appropriate agents and combinations in future clinical studies.

  3. RNAi: antiviral therapy against dengue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrees, Sobia; Ashfaq, Usman A

    2013-03-01

    Dengue virus infection has become a global threat affecting around 100 countries in the world. Currently, there is no licensed antiviral agent available against dengue. Thus, there is a strong need to develop therapeutic strategies that can tackle this life threatening disease. RNA interference is an important and effective gene silencing process which degrades targeted RNA by a sequence specific process. Several studies have been conducted during the last decade to evaluate the efficiency of siRNA in inhibiting dengue virus replication. This review summarizes siRNAs as a therapeutic approach against dengue virus serotypes and concludes that siRNAs against virus and host genes can be next generation treatment of dengue virus infection.

  4. Multi-target consensus circle pursuit for multi-agent systems via a distributed multi-flocking method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Huiqin; Chen, Shiming; Lai, Qiang

    2016-12-01

    This paper studies the multi-target consensus pursuit problem of multi-agent systems. For solving the problem, a distributed multi-flocking method is designed based on the partial information exchange, which is employed to realise the pursuit of multi-target and the uniform distribution of the number of pursuing agents with the dynamic target. Combining with the proposed circle formation control strategy, agents can adaptively choose the target to form the different circle formation groups accomplishing a multi-target pursuit. The speed state of pursuing agents in each group converges to the same value. A Lyapunov approach is utilised to analyse the stability of multi-agent systems. In addition, a sufficient condition is given for achieving the dynamic target consensus pursuit, and which is then analysed. Finally, simulation results verify the effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

  5. Bayesian Nonparametric Estimation of Targeted Agent Effects on Biomarker Change to Predict Clinical Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziani, Rebecca; Guindani, Michele; Thall, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The effect of a targeted agent on a cancer patient's clinical outcome putatively is mediated through the agent's effect on one or more early biological events. This is motivated by pre-clinical experiments with cells or animals that identify such events, represented by binary or quantitative biomarkers. When evaluating targeted agents in humans, central questions are whether the distribution of a targeted biomarker changes following treatment, the nature and magnitude of this change, and whether it is associated with clinical outcome. Major difficulties in estimating these effects are that a biomarker's distribution may be complex, vary substantially between patients, and have complicated relationships with clinical outcomes. We present a probabilistically coherent framework for modeling and estimation in this setting, including a hierarchical Bayesian nonparametric mixture model for biomarkers that we use to define a functional profile of pre-versus-post treatment biomarker distribution change. The functional is similar to the receiver operating characteristic used in diagnostic testing. The hierarchical model yields clusters of individual patient biomarker profile functionals, and we use the profile as a covariate in a regression model for clinical outcome. The methodology is illustrated by analysis of a dataset from a clinical trial in prostate cancer using imatinib to target platelet-derived growth factor, with the clinical aim to improve progression-free survival time. PMID:25319212

  6. Aciclovir: nuevo antiviral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Repetto

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available El aciclovir es un antiviral útil en infecciones graves causadas por el virus varicela-zoster. Es bien tolerado con escasas reacciones adversas. En pacientes deshidratados, en insuficiencia renal o si la infusión endovenosa es muy rápida, puede ocacionar una "nefropatía obstructiva" transitoria. Existen preparados de uso tópico, oftálmico, endovenoso y oral; esta última vía constituye una ventaja sobre la vidarabina con la que tiene en común el espectro de actividad. En razón de su selectividad, riesgo de resistencia y número reducido de antivirales, su prescripción debe restringirse a infecciones graves causadas por los agentes inmunodeprimidos; excluyendo por lo tanto las comunes y autolimitadas, frecuentes en el individuo normal.

  7. Design and development of antivirals and intervention strategies against human herpesviruses using high-throughput approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornig, Julia; McGregor, Alistair

    2014-08-01

    Although a number of antiviral agents are licensed for treatment of some human herpesvirus (HHV) infections, effective antiviral therapy is not available for all HHVs. Additional complications are associated with approved drugs, such as toxicity and side effects, and rise in drug-resistant strains is a driving force for new drug development. Success in HHV vaccine development is limited with only vaccines against varicella-zoster virus currently in use in the clinic. In vitro, in vivo and in silico high-throughput (HTP) approaches and innovative microfluidic systems will provide novel technologies to efficiently identify and evaluate new targets and antiherpetic compounds. Coupled with HTP strategies for manipulation of herpesvirus viral genomes, these strategies will greatly accelerate the development of future antivirals as well as candidate vaccine intervention strategies. The authors provide a brief overview of the herpesvirus family and associated diseases. Further, the authors discuss the approved and investigational antiherpetic drugs in the context of current HTP technologies. HTP technology such as microfluidic systems is crucial for the identification and validation of novel drug targets and next-generation antivirals. Current drug development is limited by the unavailability of HTP preclinical model systems. Specific advancement in the development of HTP animal-specific technology, applied in parallel, allows a more rapid evaluation of drugs at the preclinical stage. The advancement of HTP combinatorial drug therapy, especially 'Organ-on-a-Chip' approaches, will aid in the evaluation of future antiviral compounds and intervention strategies.

  8. Targeted nanodiamonds as phenotype-specific photoacoustic contrast agents for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ti; Cui, Huizhong; Fang, Chia-Yi; Cheng, Kun; Yang, Xinmai; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Forrest, M Laird

    2015-03-01

    The aim is to develop irradiated nanodiamonds (INDs) as a molecularly targeted contrast agent for high-resolution and phenotype-specific detection of breast cancer with photoacoustic (PA) imaging. The surface of acid treated radiation-damaged nanodiamonds was grafted with PEG to improve its stability and circulation time in blood, followed by conjugation to an anti-HER2 peptide with a final nanoparticle size of approximately 92 nm. Immunocompetent mice bearing orthotopic HER2-positive or negative tumors were administered INDs and PA imaged using an 820-nm near-infrared laser. PA images demonstrated that INDs accumulate in tumors and completely delineated the entire tumor within 10 h. HER2 targeting significantly enhanced imaging of HER2-positive tumors. Pathological examination demonstrated INDs are nontoxic. PA technology is adaptable to low-cost bedside medicine, and with new contrast agents described herein, PA can achieve high-resolution (sub-mm) and phenotype-specific monitoring of cancer growth.

  9. Synthesis of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to use as liver targeting MRI contrast agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Farshad; Fattahi, Bahare; Azizi, Najmodin

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this research was the preparation of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to use as a liver targeting contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For this purpose, Fe3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized via the co-precipitation method. The synthesized nanoparticles were coated with silica via the Stober method and finally the coated nanoparticles were functionalized with mebrofenin. Formation of crystalline magnetite particles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDX) of the final product showed that silica had been effectively bonded onto the surface of the magnetite nanoparticles and the coated nanoparticles functionalized with mebrofenin. The magnetic resonance imaging of the functional nanoparticles showed that the Fe3O4-SiO2-mebrofenin composite is an effective MRI contrast agent for liver targeting.

  10. Agent-based multi-platform control, collaboration, and target hand-off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Norm; Tirabassi, Ben; MacKenzie, Doug

    2007-04-01

    Deploying a world wide force that is strategically responsive and dominant at every point on the spectrum of conflict involves the cooperative system development and use of advanced technologies that yield revolutionary capabilities to support the war-fighters needs. This presentation describes an agent based control architecture and prototype implementation developed by ARDEC that enables command and control of multiple unmanned platforms and associated mission packages for collaborative target hand-off/engagement. Current prototypes provide the ability to remotely locate, track and predict the movement of enemy targets on the battlefield using a variety of sensor systems hosted on multiple, non-homogeneous SUAVs and UGVs.

  11. Comparing methods of targeting obesity interventions in populations: An agent-based simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshti, Rahmatollah; Jalalpour, Mehdi; Glass, Thomas A

    2017-12-01

    Social networks as well as neighborhood environments have been shown to effect obesity-related behaviors including energy intake and physical activity. Accordingly, harnessing social networks to improve targeting of obesity interventions may be promising to the extent this leads to social multiplier effects and wider diffusion of intervention impact on populations. However, the literature evaluating network-based interventions has been inconsistent. Computational methods like agent-based models (ABM) provide researchers with tools to experiment in a simulated environment. We develop an ABM to compare conventional targeting methods (random selection, based on individual obesity risk, and vulnerable areas) with network-based targeting methods. We adapt a previously published and validated model of network diffusion of obesity-related behavior. We then build social networks among agents using a more realistic approach. We calibrate our model first against national-level data. Our results show that network-based targeting may lead to greater population impact. We also present a new targeting method that outperforms other methods in terms of intervention effectiveness at the population level.

  12. Double-targeting Using A TrkC-Ligand Conjugated To BODIPY-based PDT Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamkaew, Anyanee; Burgess, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    A molecule 1 (IY-IY-PDT) was designed to contain a fragment (IY-IY) that targets the TrkC receptor, and a photosensitizer that acts as an agent for photodynamic therapy (PDT). Molecule 1 had sub-micromolar photocytotoxicities to cells that were either engineered to stably express TrkC (NIH3T3-TrkC) or that naturally express high levels of TrkC (SY5Y neuroblastoma lines). Control experiments showed 1 is not cytotoxic in the dark, and has significantly less photocytotoxicity towards cells that do not express TrkC (NIH3T3-WT). Other controls featuring a similar agent 2 (YI-YI-PDT) which is identical and isomeric with 1 except that the targeting region is scrambled (a YI-YI motif, see text) showed 1 is considerably more photocytotoxic than 2 on TrkC+ cells. Imaging live TrkC+ cells after treatment with a fluorescent agent 1 (IY-IY-PDT) proved that 1 permeates into TrkC+ cells and localizes in the lysosomes. This observation indirectly indicates agent 1 enters the cells via the TrkC receptor. Consistent with this, the dose-dependent PDT effects of 1 can be competitively reduced by the natural TrkC ligand, neurotrophin NT3. PMID:24063347

  13. Inherent characteristics of metachronous metastatic renal cell carcinoma in the era of targeted agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jang Hee; Lee, Seung Hwan; Ham, Won Sik; Han, Woong Kyu; Rha, Koon Ho; Choi, Young Deuk; Hong, Sung Joon; Yoon, Young Eun

    2017-10-03

    To assess the prognostic and predictive factors of time to treatment failure (TTF) and overall survival (OS), respectively, in patients with metachronous metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) who were treated with targeted agents. We retrospectively reviewed metachronous mRCC patients, defined as individuals diagnosed with metastatic disease >3 months after initial nephrectomy, treated at an institute since 2005. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was performed to discover the most determinant variables associated with TTF and OS. Sarcomatoid features, absence of metastasectomy, multiple site metastasis, time to metastasis risk group (0-1 risk factors) did not reach the median OS, whereas the OS for the intermediate (2 risk factors) and high risk groups (3-5 risk factors) were 58.6 and 23.6 months, respectively (prisk criteria models. Initial tumor size or T stage did not affect TTF or OS. Patients who could not undergo metastasectomy and rapidly developed multiple metastases with higher corrected calcium and initial tumors with sarcomatoid features were less likely to benefit from targeted therapy; thus, the new agents under development or clinical trials could be more helpful than the use of standard targeted agents.

  14. Synthesis of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to use as liver targeting MRI contrast agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, Farshad, E-mail: fyazdani@ccerci.ac.ir; Fattahi, Bahare; Azizi, Najmodin

    2016-05-15

    The aim of this research was the preparation of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to use as a liver targeting contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For this purpose, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were synthesized via the co-precipitation method. The synthesized nanoparticles were coated with silica via the Stober method and finally the coated nanoparticles were functionalized with mebrofenin. Formation of crystalline magnetite particles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDX) of the final product showed that silica had been effectively bonded onto the surface of the magnetite nanoparticles and the coated nanoparticles functionalized with mebrofenin. The magnetic resonance imaging of the functional nanoparticles showed that the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–SiO{sub 2}-mebrofenin composite is an effective MRI contrast agent for liver targeting. - Highlights: • Superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized by simple and economical method. • Preperation of functional MNPs as a MRI contrast agent for liver targeting. • Gaining a good r{sub 2} relaxivity of the coated functional nanoparticles.

  15. New treatment options and emerging drugs for axial spondyloarthritis: biological and targeted synthetic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussirot, Eric

    2017-02-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and axial spondyloarthritis (ax SpA) are chronic inflammatory diseases mainly involving the axial skeleton. Pharmacological treatments for AS and ax SpA usually include local glucocorticoid injections, NSAIDs and anti-TNFα agents. Since around 30% to 40% of patients are non responders or intolerant to anti-TNFα agents, we need new therapeutic options for AS and ax SpA. Areas covered: This review describes the new biological agents that can be used or are in development for AS or ax SpA as well as emerging synthetic targeted drugs. Expert opinion: Based on the rationale of the involvement of the IL-23/Th17 axis in AS, novel biological agents have been developed and include secukinumab, an anti-IL-17A agent and ustekinumab, an anti-IL-23 antibody. New compounds in the class of synthetic drugs are apremilast, a PDE4 inhibitor, and inhibitors of kinase pathways. Secukinumab gave positive results in the treatment of AS. Ustekinumab yielded promising results in AS in an open labeled study. Apremilast is not effective in AS while results with kinase inhibitors are preliminary. Future studies will clarify the place of secukinumab in the therapeutic management of AS, its influence on radiographic progression and its effects on the non radiographic form of the disease.

  16. Ultrasound molecular imaging of ovarian cancer with CA-125 targeted nanobubble contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yong; Hernandez, Christopher; Yuan, Hai-Xia; Lilly, Jacob; Kota, Pavan; Zhou, Haoyan; Wu, Hanping; Exner, Agata A

    2017-10-01

    Ultrasound is frequently utilized in diagnosis of gynecologic malignancies such as ovarian cancer. Because epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is often characterized by overexpression of cancer antigen 125 (CA-125), ultrasound contrast agents able to target this molecular signature could be a promising complementary strategy. In this work, we demonstrate application of CA-125-targeted echogenic lipid and surfactant-stabilized nanobubbles imaged with standard clinical contrast harmonic ultrasound for imaging of CA-125 positive OVCAR-3 tumors in mice. Surface functionalization of the nanobubbles with a CA-125 antibody achieved rapid significantly (P CA-125 negative SKOV-3 tumors. Targeted nanobubbles also exhibited increased tumor retention and prolonged echogenicity compared to untargeted nanobubbles. Data suggest that ultrasound molecular imaging using CA-125 antibody-conjugated nanobubbles may contribute to improved diagnosis of EOC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Antiviral strategies for emerging influenza viruses in remote communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Laskowski

    Full Text Available Due to the lack of timely access to resources for critical care, strategic use of antiviral drugs is crucial for mitigating the impact of novel influenza viruses with pandemic potential in remote and isolated communities. We sought to evaluate the effect of antiviral treatment and prophylaxis of close contacts in a Canadian remote northern community.We used an agent-based, discrete-time simulation model for disease spread in a remote community, which was developed as an in-silico population using population census data. Relative and cumulative age-specific attack rates, and the total number of infections in simulated model scenarios were obtained.We found that early initiation of antiviral treatment is more critical for lowering attack rates in a remote setting with a low population-average age compared to an urban population. Our results show that a significant reduction in the relative, age-specific attack rates due to increasing treatment coverage does not necessarily translate to a significant reduction in the overall arrack rate. When treatment coverage varies from low to moderate, targeted prophylaxis has a very limited impact in reducing attack rates and should be offered at a low level (below 10% to avoid excessive waste of drugs.In contrast to previous work, for conservative treatment coverages, our results do not provide any convincing evidence for the implementation of targeted prophylaxis. The findings suggest that public health strategies in remote communities should focus on the wider availability (higher coverage and timely distribution of antiviral drugs for treatment of clinically ill individuals.

  18. A new mouse-adapted strain of SARS-CoV as a lethal model for evaluating antiviral agents in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Craig W.; Baric, Ralph; Cai, Sui Xiong; Frieman, Matt; Kumaki, Yohichi; Morrey, John D.; Smee, Donald F.

    2009-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a highly lethal emerging disease caused by coronavirus SARS-CoV. New lethal animal models for SARS were needed to facilitate antiviral research. We adapted and characterized a new strain of SARS-CoV (strain v2163) that was highly lethal in 5–6 week old BALB/c mice. It had nine mutations affecting 10 amino acid residues. Strain v2163 increased IL-1α, IL-6, MIP-1α, MCP-1, and RANTES in mice, and high IL-6 expression correlated with mortality. The infection largely mimicked human disease, but lung pathology lacked hyaline membrane formation. In vitro efficacy against v2163 was shown with known inhihibitors of SARS-CoV replication. In v2163-infected mice, Ampligen™ was fully protective, stinging nettle lectin (UDA) was partially protective, ribavirin was disputable and possibly exacerbated disease, and EP128533 was inactive. Ribavirin, UDA and Ampligen™ decreased IL-6 expression. Strain v2163 provided a valuable model for anti-SARS research. PMID:19853271

  19. Direct-acting antiviral agent efficacy and safety in renal transplant recipients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection: A PRISMA-compliant study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Keliang; Lu, Pei; Song, Rijin; Zhang, Jiexiu; Tao, Rongzhen; Wang, Zijie; Zhang, Wei; Gu, Min

    2017-07-01

    The efficacy and safety of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) for treating hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected renal transplant recipients (RTRs) has not been determined. We searched PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and assessed the quality of eligible studies using the Joanna Briggs Institute scale. DAA efficacy and safety were assessed using standard mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs). Six studies (360 RTRs) were included. Two hundred thirty six RTRs (98.3%) achieved sustained virological response within 12 weeks; HCV infection was cleared in 239 RTRs after 24-week treatment. Liver function differed significantly pre- and posttreatment (alanine aminotransferase, SMD: 0.96, 95%CIs: 0.65, 1.26; aspartate aminotransferase, SMD: 0.89, 95%CIs: 0.60, 1.18); allograft function pre- and posttreatment was not statistically different (serum creatinine, SMD: -0.13, 95%CIs: -0.38, 0.12; estimated glomerular filtration rate, SMD: 0.20, 95%CIs: -0.11, 0.51). General symptoms (fatigue nausea dizziness or headache) were the most common adverse events (AEs) (39.3%). Severe AEs, that is, anemia, portal vein thrombosis, and streptococcus bacteraemia and pneumonia, were present in 1.1%, 0.6%, and 1.1% of RTRs, respectively. Our findings suggest that DAAs are highly efficacious and safe for treating HCV-infected RTRs and without significant AE.

  20. Modern dose-finding designs for cancer phase I trials drug combinations and molecularly targeted agents

    CERN Document Server

    Hirakawa, Akihiro; Daimon, Takashi; Matsui, Shigeyuki

    2018-01-01

    This book deals with advanced methods for adaptive phase I dose-finding clinical trials for combination of two agents and molecularly targeted agents (MTAs) in oncology. It provides not only methodological aspects of the dose-finding methods, but also software implementations and practical considerations in applying these complex methods to real cancer clinical trials. Thus, the book aims to furnish researchers in biostatistics and statistical science with a good summary of recent developments of adaptive dose-finding methods as well as providing practitioners in biostatistics and clinical investigators with advanced materials for designing, conducting, monitoring, and analyzing adaptive dose-finding trials. The topics in the book are mainly related to cancer clinical trials, but many of those topics are potentially applicable or can be extended to trials for other diseases. The focus is mainly on model-based dose-finding methods for two kinds of phase I trials. One is clinical trials with combinations of tw...

  1. Development of Lipid-Based Nanoparticles for In Vivo Targeted Delivery of Imaging Agents into Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    targeted therapy. Targeted delivery of a combined imaging and therapy agent to cancer cells is an avenue to develop a new generation of effective and...ligands for targeting HER-2/neu on breast cancer cells . In near future we will test these nanoparticles with SK-BR-3 (HER-2/neu+) and MDA-MD-468 (HER-2/neu-) breast cancer cell lines.

  2. Desarrollo tecnológico de un antiviral de amplio espectro para administración parenteral: ribavirina 100 mg/mL Technological development of a wide spectrum antiviral agent to parenteral administration: 100 mg/mL Ribavirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Karelia Collado Coello

    2010-09-01

    appropriate package to guarantee stability of end product. Three drugs batches were manufactured, which were packing in colourless glass bulbs with a hydrolytic I quality and stored at room temperature of 30 ± 2 ºC for 12 months; its physical and chemical was studied by accelerated method and shelf life. Its microbiological stability was verified by sterility trial in each of processed batches at study onset and at the end according to USA Pharmacopeia-30 and the regulation established by Cuban State Center for Drug Control with satisfactory results. A toxicology study was conducted of injectable agent showing a wide safety margin to human use. All results obtained fulfilled the quality limits established in official literature for this type of pharmaceutical way thus concluded that the developed drug is properly formulated from the medical point of view with a useful life time of 12 months, stored under study conditions. Finally, the drug was introduced at industrial level without technological problems.

  3. An Aspartyl Cathepsin Targeted PET Agent: Application in an Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snir, Jonatan A; Suchy, Mojmir; Bindseil, Geron A; Kovacs, Michael; Chronik, Blaine A; Hudson, Robert H E; Pasternak, Stephen H; Bartha, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Early detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology is a serious challenge for both diagnosis and clinical trials. The aspartyl protease, Cathepsin D (CatD), is overexpressed in AD and could be a biomarker of disease. We have previously designed a unique contrast agent (CA) for dual-optical and magnetic resonance imaging of the activity of the CatD class of enzymes. To compare the uptake and retention of a novel, more sensitive, and clinically-translatable 68Ga PET tracer targeting CatD activity in 5XFAD mice and non-Tg littermates. The targeted CA consisted of an HIV-1 Tat cell penetrating peptide (CPP) conjugated to a specialized cleavage sequence targeting aspartyl cathepsins and a DOTA conjugate chelating 68Ga. PET images were acquired using a Siemens Inveon preclinical microPET in female Tg AD mice and non-Tg age matched female littermates (n = 5-8) following intravenous CA administration at 2, 6, and 9 months of age. Additionally, 18F fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET imaging was performed at 10 months to measure glucose uptake. The Tg mice showed significantly higher relative uptake rate of the targeting CA in the forebrain relative to hindbrain at all ages compared to controls, consistent with histology. In contrast, no differences were seen in CA uptake in other organs. Additionally, the Tg mice did not show any differences in relative uptake of FDG at 10 months of age in the forebrain relative to the hindbrain compared to age matched non-Tg controls. Elevated aspartryl cathepsin activity was detected in vivo in the 5XFAD mouse model of AD using a novel targeted PET contrast agent.

  4. GE11 Peptide as an Active Targeting Agent in Antitumor Therapy: A Minireview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Genta

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A lot of solid tumors are characterized by uncontrolled signal transduction triggered by receptors related to cellular growth. The targeting of these cell receptors with antitumor drugs is essential to improve chemotherapy efficacy. This can be achieved by conjugation of an active targeting agent to the polymer portion of a colloidal drug delivery system loaded with an antitumor drug. The goal of this minireview is to report and discuss some recent results in epidermal growth factor receptor targeting by the GE11 peptide combined with colloidal drug delivery systems as smart carriers for antitumor drugs. The minireview chapters will focus on explaining and discussing: (i Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR structures and functions; (ii GE11 structure and biologic activity; (iii examples of GE11 conjugation and GE11-conjugated drug delivery systems. The rationale is to contribute in gathering information on the topic of active targeting to tumors. A case study is introduced, involving research on tumor cell targeting by the GE11 peptide combined with polymer nanoparticles.

  5. MicroRNA-555 has potent antiviral properties against poliovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Byoung-Shik; Wu, Weilin; Kyriakis, Constantinos S; Bakre, Abhijeet; Jorquera, Patricia A; Perwitasari, Olivia; Tripp, Ralph A

    2016-03-01

    Vaccination with live-attenuated polio vaccine has been the primary reason for the drastic reduction of poliomyelitis worldwide. However, reversion of this attenuated poliovirus vaccine occasionally results in the emergence of vaccine-derived polioviruses that may cause poliomyelitis. Thus, the development of anti-poliovirus agents remains a priority for control and eradication of the disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to regulate viral infection through targeting the viral genome or reducing host factors required for virus replication. However, the roles of miRNAs in poliovirus (PV) replication have not been fully elucidated. In this study, a library of 1200 miRNA mimics was used to identify miRNAs that govern PV replication. High-throughput screening revealed 29 miRNAs with antiviral properties against Sabin-2, which is one of the oral polio vaccine strains. In particular, miR-555 was found to have the most potent antiviral activity against three different oral polio attenuated vaccine strains tested. The results show that miR-555 reduced the level of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 (hnRNP C) required for PV replication in the infected cells, which in turn resulted in reduction of PV positive-strand RNA synthesis and production of infectious progeny. These findings provide the first evidence for the role of miR-555 in PV replication and reveal that miR-555 could contribute to the development of antiviral therapeutic strategies against PV.

  6. Arbidol as a broad-spectrum antiviral: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaising, Julie; Polyak, Stephen J; Pécheur, Eve-Isabelle

    2014-07-01

    Arbidol (ARB) is a Russian-made small indole-derivative molecule, licensed in Russia and China for prophylaxis and treatment of influenza and other respiratory viral infections. It also demonstrates inhibitory activity against other viruses, enveloped or not, responsible for emerging or globally prevalent infectious diseases such as hepatitis B and C, gastroenteritis, hemorrhagic fevers or encephalitis. In this review, we will explore the possibility and pertinence of ARB as a broad-spectrum antiviral, after a careful examination of its physico-chemical properties, pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and molecular mechanisms of action. Recent studies suggest that ARB's dual interactions with membranes and aromatic amino acids in proteins may be central to its broad-spectrum antiviral activity. This could impact on the virus itself, and/or on cellular functions or critical steps in virus-cell interactions, thereby positioning ARB as both a direct-acting antiviral (DAA) and a host-targeting agent (HTA). In the context of recent studies in animals and humans, we will discuss the prospective clinical use of ARB in various viral infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Efficacy of Antiviral Drugs against Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Katrin; Wooding, Anita; Bergmann, Michèle

    2015-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is one of the most common infectious agents affecting cats worldwide .FIV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) share many properties: both are lifelong persistent lentiviruses that are similar genetically and morphologically and both viruses propagate in T-lymphocytes, macrophages, and neural cells. Experimentally infected cats have measurable immune suppression, which sometimes progresses to an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. A transient initial state of infection is followed by a long latent stage with low virus replication and absence of clinical signs. In the terminal stage, both viruses can cause severe immunosuppression. Thus, FIV infection in cats has become an important natural model for studying HIV infection in humans, especially for evaluation of antiviral compounds. Of particular importance for chemotherapeutic studies is the close similarity between the reverse transcriptase (RT) of FIV and HIV, which results in high in vitro susceptibility of FIV to many RT-targeted antiviral compounds used in the treatment of HIV-infected patients. Thus, the aim of this article is to provide an up-to-date review of studies on antiviral treatment of FIV, focusing on commercially available compounds for human or animal use. PMID:29061953

  8. Efficacy of Antiviral Drugs against Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Hartmann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV is one of the most common infectious agents affecting cats worldwide .FIV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV share many properties: both are lifelong persistent lentiviruses that are similar genetically and morphologically and both viruses propagate in T-lymphocytes, macrophages, and neural cells. Experimentally infected cats have measurable immune suppression, which sometimes progresses to an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. A transient initial state of infection is followed by a long latent stage with low virus replication and absence of clinical signs. In the terminal stage, both viruses can cause severe immunosuppression. Thus, FIV infection in cats has become an important natural model for studying HIV infection in humans, especially for evaluation of antiviral compounds. Of particular importance for chemotherapeutic studies is the close similarity between the reverse transcriptase (RT of FIV and HIV, which results in high in vitro susceptibility of FIV to many RT-targeted antiviral compounds used in the treatment of HIV-infected patients. Thus, the aim of this article is to provide an up-to-date review of studies on antiviral treatment of FIV, focusing on commercially available compounds for human or animal use.

  9. Self-interest versus group-interest in antiviral control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boven, M. van; Klinkenberg, D.; Pen, I.; Weissing, F.J.; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.

    2008-01-01

    Antiviral agents have been hailed to hold considerable promise for the treatment and prevention of emerging viral diseases like H5N1 avian influenza and SARS. However, antiviral drugs are not completely harmless, and the conditions under which individuals are willing to participate in a

  10. Self-interest versus group-interest in antiviral control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Boven, Michiel; Klinkenberg, Don; Pen, Ido; Weissing, Franz J.; Heesterbeek, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Antiviral agents have been hailed to hold considerable promise for the treatment and prevention of emerging viral diseases like H5N1 avian influenza and SARS. However, antiviral drugs are not completely harmless, and the conditions under which individuals are willing to participate in a large-scale

  11. How Generalizable Are the Results From Trials of Direct Antiviral Agents to People Coinfected With HIV/HCV in the Real World?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Sahar; Strumpf, Erin C; Walmsley, Sharon L; Rollet-Kurhajec, Kathleen; Pick, Neora; Martel-Laferrière, Valerie; Hull, Mark; Gill, M John; Cox, Joseph; Cooper, Curtis; Klein, Marina B; Cohen, Jeff; Conway, Brian; Cooper, Curtis; Côté, Pierre; Cox, Joseph; Gill, John; Haider, Shariq; Harris, Marianne; Haase, David; Hull, Mark; Montaner, Julio; Moodie, Erica; Pick, Neora; Rachlis, Anita; Rouleau, Danielle; Sandre, Roger; Tyndall, Joseph Mark; Vachon, Marie-Louise; Walmsley, Sharon; Wong, David

    2016-04-01

    Direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) against hepatitis C virus (HCV) have been described as revolutionary. However, it remains uncertain how effective these drugs will be for individuals coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-HCV. Bridging this gap between efficacy and effectiveness requires a focus on the generalizability of clinical trials. Generalizability of DAA trials was assessed by applying the eligibility criteria from 5 efficacy trials: NCT01479868, PHOTON-1 (NCT01667731), TURQUOISE-I (NCT01939197), ION-4 (NCT02073656), and ALLY-2 (NCT02032888) that evaluated simeprevir; sofosbuvir; ombitasvir, paritaprevir/ritonavir/dasabuvir; sofosbuvir/ledipasvir; and daclatasvir/sofosbuvir, respectively, to the Canadian Coinfection Cohort, representing approximately 23% of the total coinfected population in care in Canada. Of 874 active participants, 70% had chronic HCV, of whom 410, 26, 94, and 11 had genotypes 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. After applying trial eligibility criteria, only 5.9% (24/410) would have been eligible for enrollment in the simeprevir trial, 9.8% (52/530) in PHOTON-1, 6.3% (26/410) in TURQUOISE-I, and 8.1% (34/421) in ION-4. The ALLY-2 study was more inclusive; 43% (233/541) of the cohort would have been eligible. The most exclusive eligibility criteria across all trials with the exception of ALLY-2 were restriction to specific antiretroviral therapies (63%-79%) and active illicit drug use (53%-55%). DAA trial results may have limited generalizability, since the majority of coinfected individuals were not eligible to participate. Exclusions appeared to be related to improving treatment outcomes by not including those at higher risk of poor adherence and reinfection--individuals for whom real-world data are urgently needed. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  12. Design of a modular protein-based MRI contrast agent for targeted application.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Grum

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI offers a non-radioactive alternative for the non-invasive detection of tumours. Low molecular weight MRI contrast agents currently in clinical use suffer either from a lack of specificity for tumour tissue or from low relaxivity and thus low contrast amplification. In this study, we present the newly designed two domain fusion protein Zarvin, which is able to bind to therapeutic IgG antibodies suitable for targeting, while facilitating contrast enhancement through high affinity binding sites for Gd(3+. We show that the Zarvin fold is stable under serum conditions, specifically targets a cancer cell-line when bound to the Cetuximab IgG, and allows for imaging with high relaxivity, a property that would be advantageous for the detection of small tumours and metastases at 1.5 or 3 T.

  13. Combination of chemotherapy and cancer stem cell targeting agents: Preclinical and clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Atkinson, Katharine; Zhang, Tao

    2017-06-28

    The cancer stem cell model claims that the initiation, maintenance, and growth of a tumor are driven by a small population of cancer cells termed cancer stem cells. Cancer stem cells possess a variety of phenotypes associated with therapeutic resistance and often cause recurrence of the diseases. Several strategies have been investigated to target cancer stem cells in a variety of cancers, such as blocking one or more self-renewal signaling pathways, reducing the expression of drug efflux and ATP-binding cassette efflux transporters, modulating epigenetic aberrations, and promoting cancer stem cell differentiation. A number of cell and animal studies strongly support the potential benefits of combining chemotherapeutic drugs with cancer stem cell targeting agents. Clinical trials are still underway to address the pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of combination treatment. This mini-review provides an updated discussion of these preclinical and clinical studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Repurposing Auranofin, Ebselen, and PX-12 as Antimicrobial Agents Targeting the Thioredoxin System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly C. May

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available As microbial resistance to drugs continues to rise at an alarming rate, finding new ways to combat pathogens is an issue of utmost importance. Development of novel and specific antimicrobial drugs is a time-consuming and expensive process. However, the re-purposing of previously tested and/or approved drugs could be a feasible way to circumvent this long and costly process. In this review, we evaluate the U.S. Food and Drug Administration tested drugs auranofin, ebselen, and PX-12 as antimicrobial agents targeting the thioredoxin system. These drugs have been shown to act on bacterial, fungal, protozoan, and helminth pathogens without significant toxicity to the host. We propose that the thioredoxin system could serve as a useful therapeutic target with broad spectrum antimicrobial activity.

  15. The role of cytoreductive surgery in the era of targeted agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noe, Allard; Stewart, Grant D; Bex, Axel

    2015-09-01

    Two randomized trials were initiated to define the role and sequence of cytoreductive nephrectomy in combination with VEGF-targeted therapy for metastatic renal cell cancer. While these trials will not report before the end of 2016, recent retrospective population-based studies published real-world data on incidence, treatment, prognosis and outcome that may help to better define the role of cytoreductive nephrectomy for this heterogeneous patient population in the targeted therapy era. Since the introduction of targeted agents, utilization of cytoreductive nephrectomy has declined. Potentially more patients are being treated with their primary tumours in place. Some countries also observed an additional decline in the incidence of primary metastatic disease. Although large population-based studies consistently demonstrate a survival benefit after cytoreductive nephrectomy, confounding factors preclude definite conclusions. However, patients with a life expectancy of less than 1 year or at least four IMDS risk factors may not benefit from cytoreductive nephrectomy. Recent retrospective data suggest a more refined use of cytoreductive nephrectomy in the targeted therapy era. With the exception of patients in whom cytoreductive nephrectomy and resection of solitary or oligometastasis may result in cure or delay of systemic therapy, performance, prognostic models and life expectancy estimates help to define the role of cytoreductive nephrectomy in the individual patient.

  16. Treatment Strategies that Enhance the Efficacy and Selectivity of Mitochondria-Targeted Anticancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine S. Modica-Napolitano

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nearly a century has passed since Otto Warburg first observed high rates of aerobic glycolysis in a variety of tumor cell types and suggested that this phenomenon might be due to an impaired mitochondrial respiratory capacity in these cells. Subsequently, much has been written about the role of mitochondria in the initiation and/or progression of various forms of cancer, and the possibility of exploiting differences in mitochondrial structure and function between normal and malignant cells as targets for cancer chemotherapy. A number of mitochondria-targeted compounds have shown efficacy in selective cancer cell killing in pre-clinical and early clinical testing, including those that induce mitochondria permeability transition and apoptosis, metabolic inhibitors, and ROS regulators. To date, however, none has exhibited the standards for high selectivity and efficacy and low toxicity necessary to progress beyond phase III clinical trials and be used as a viable, single modality treatment option for human cancers. This review explores alternative treatment strategies that have been shown to enhance the efficacy and selectivity of mitochondria-targeted anticancer agents in vitro and in vivo, and may yet fulfill the clinical promise of exploiting the mitochondrion as a target for cancer chemotherapy.

  17. Targeted Nanodiamonds as Phenotype Specific Photoacoustic Contrast Agents for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ti; Cui, Huizhong; Fang, Chia-Yi; Cheng, Kun; Yang, Xinmai; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Forrest, M. Laird

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim is to develop irradiated nanodiamonds (INDs) as a molecularly-targeted contrast agent for high resolution and phenotype-specific detection of breast cancer with photoacoustic (PA) imaging. Materials & Methods The surface of acid treated radiation-damaged nanodiamonds was grafted with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to improve its stability and circulation time in blood, followed by conjugation to an anti-Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) peptide (KCCYSL) with a final nanoparticle size of ca. 92 nm. Immunocompetent mice bearing orthotopic HER2 positive or negative tumors were administered INDs and PA imaged using an 820-nm near infrared laser. Results PA images demonstrated that INDs accumulate in tumors and completely delineated the entire tumor within 10 hours. HER2 targeting significantly enhanced imaging of HER2-positive tumors. Pathological examination demonstrated INDs are non-toxic. Conclusions PA technology is adaptable to low-cost bedside medicine, and with new contrast agents described herein, PA can achieve high resolution (sub-mm) and phenotype specific monitoring of cancer growth. PMID:25723091

  18. BF066, a novel dual target antiplatelet agent without significant bleeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ChangE Pan

    Full Text Available In this study, we report BF066, a novel adenine derivative, inhibits platelet activation and thrombosis via the adenosine receptor (A(2A activation and phosphodiesterase (PDE inhibition. BF066 inhibits platelet aggregation and ATP releasing induced by multiple platelet agonists in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition of BF066 on ADP-induced aggregation is potentiated by adenosine and can be dramatically antagonized by the A(2A antagonist SCH58261. BF066 also inhibits the PDE activity and platelet spreading on fibrinogen. In FeCl(3-injured mouse mesenteric arterial thrombosis model, BF066 prevents thrombus formation effectively, similar to clopidogrel. Intriguingly, at dose achieving similar antithrombotic effect compared to clopidogrel, BF066 does not increase bleeding significantly. Taken together, these results suggest that BF066 may be an effective and safe antiplatelet agent targeting both PDE and A(2A. Considering the successful use of combined antiplatelet therapy, BF066 may be further developed as a novel dual target antiplatelet agent.

  19. BF066, a Novel Dual Target Antiplatelet Agent without Significant Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jianqin; Liu, Guangda; Zhang, Si; Zhang, Yan; Du, Hongguang; Ding, Zhongren

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we report BF066, a novel adenine derivative, inhibits platelet activation and thrombosis via the adenosine receptor (A2A) activation and phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibition. BF066 inhibits platelet aggregation and ATP releasing induced by multiple platelet agonists in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition of BF066 on ADP-induced aggregation is potentiated by adenosine and can be dramatically antagonized by the A2A antagonist SCH58261. BF066 also inhibits the PDE activity and platelet spreading on fibrinogen. In FeCl3-injured mouse mesenteric arterial thrombosis model, BF066 prevents thrombus formation effectively, similar to clopidogrel. Intriguingly, at dose achieving similar antithrombotic effect compared to clopidogrel, BF066 does not increase bleeding significantly. Taken together, these results suggest that BF066 may be an effective and safe antiplatelet agent targeting both PDE and A2A. Considering the successful use of combined antiplatelet therapy, BF066 may be further developed as a novel dual target antiplatelet agent. PMID:22815749

  20. Targeting Bacterial Dsb Proteins for the Development of Anti-Virulence Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxanne P. Smith

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have witnessed a dramatic increase in bacterial antimicrobial resistance and a decline in the development of novel antibiotics. New therapeutic strategies are urgently needed to combat the growing threat posed by multidrug resistant bacterial infections. The Dsb disulfide bond forming pathways are potential targets for the development of antimicrobial agents because they play a central role in bacterial pathogenesis. In particular, the DsbA/DsbB system catalyses disulfide bond formation in a wide array of virulence factors, which are essential for many pathogens to establish infections and cause disease. These redox enzymes are well placed as antimicrobial targets because they are taxonomically widespread, share low sequence identity with human proteins, and many years of basic research have provided a deep molecular understanding of these systems in bacteria. In this review, we discuss disulfide bond catalytic pathways in bacteria and their significance in pathogenesis. We also review the use of different approaches to develop inhibitors against Dsb proteins as potential anti-virulence agents, including fragment-based drug discovery, high-throughput screening and other structure-based drug discovery methods.

  1. Contrast agent based on nano-emulsion for targeted biomedical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attia, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    X-ray imaging agents are essential in combination with X-ray computed tomography to improve contrast enhancement aiming at providing complete visualization of blood vessels and giving structural and functional information on lesions allowing the detection of a tumor. As well as it is fundamental tool to discriminate between healthy cells and pathogens. We successfully limit the problems presented in commercial X-ray contrast agents like poor contrasting in Fenestra VC associated with short blood circulation time and to avoid rapid renal elimination from the body as found in Xenetix (Iobitriol). We developed nontoxic and blood pool iodine-containing nano-emulsion contrast agents serving in preclinical X-ray μ-CT imaging such as, a- Tocopherol (vitamin E), Cholecalciferol (vitamin D3), Castor oil, Capmul MCMC8 oil and oleic acid. Those formulated nano emulsions were prepared by low energy spontaneous emulsification technic with slight modification for each platform. They showed new specific features rendering them promising agents in in vivo experiments as improving the balance between the efficacy and the toxicity of targeted therapeutic interventions. We investigate the effect of size and the chemical composition of the nanoparticles on their biodistribution, pharmacokinetics and toxicity. They demonstrated that the chemical structures of the droplet's cores have significant role in targeting for example vitamin E was mainly accumulated in liver and castor oil formulation was passively accumulated in spleen explaining the proof-of-concept of EPR effect. On the other hand, two different platform sizes of Cholecalciferol molecule revealing that no real impact on the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution but presented remarkable effect on the toxicity. Of particular interest is studying the effect of the surface charge of nanoparticles on their biodistribution, this is why oleic acid nano-emulsion was selected to proceed this study by presence of amphiphilic

  2. Targeting Histone Deacetylases in Malignant Melanoma: A Future Therapeutic Agent or Just Great Expectations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmpis, Nikolaos; Damaskos, Christos; Garmpi, Anna; Dimitroulis, Dimitrios; Spartalis, Eleftherios; Margonis, Georgios-Antonios; Schizas, Dimitrios; Deskou, Irini; Doula, Chrysoula; Magkouti, Eleni; Andreatos, Nikolaos; Antoniou, Efstathios A; Nonni, Afroditi; Kontzoglou, Konstantinos; Mantas, Dimitrios

    2017-10-01

    Malignant melanoma is the most aggressive type of skin cancer, with increasing frequency and mortality. Melanoma is characterized by rapid proliferation and metastases. Malignant transformation of normal melanocytes is associated with imbalance between oncogenes' action and tumor suppressor genes. Mutations or inactivation of these genes plays an important role in the pathogenesis of malignant melanoma. Many target-specific agents improved progression-free survival but unfortunately metastatic melanoma remains incurable, so new therapeutic strategies are needed. The balance of histones' acetylation affects cell cycle progression, differentiation and apoptosis. Histone deacetylases (HDAC) are associated with different types of cancer. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACI) are enzymes that inhibit the action of HDAC, resulting in block of tumor cell proliferation. A small number of these enzymes has been studied regarding their anticancer effects in melanoma. The purpose of this article was to review the therapeutic effect of HDACI against malignant melanoma, enlightening the molecular mechanisms of their action. The MEDLINE database was used. The keywords/ phrases were; HDACI, melanoma, targeted therapies for melanoma. Our final conclusions were based on studies that didn't refer solely to melanoma due to their wider experimental data. Thirty-two articles were selected from the total number of the search's results. Only English articles published until March 2017 were used. Molecules, such as valproid acid (VPA), LBH589, LAQ824 (dacinostat), vorinostat, tubacin, sirtinol and tx-527, suberoyl bis-hydroxamic acid (SBHA), depsipeptide and Trichostatin A (TSA) have shown promising antineoplastic effects against melanoma. HDACI represent a promising agent for targeted therapy. More trials are required. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  3. [Promising approaches of antiviral therapy of hemorrhagic fevers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markin, V A

    2014-01-01

    Acceptable means of therapy and prophylaxis for most of the especially dangerous viral hemorrhagic fevers to present date are lacking. Analysis of the state of this problem shows that creation of a new generation of etiotropic preparations requires selection of additional targets for their effect that may be based on the use of molecular-biological features of pathogenesis of these infections. Literature data analysis has shown that during filovirus infection non-structural and structural proteins of the causative agents serve as pathogens during direct damaging effect of the virus and secondary immune reactions that in general pervert cell and humoral components of immunity converting its destructive effect on cells and tissues of the macro organism. Selection of promising approaches of antiviral therapy is possible based on molecular-biological analysis of interaction of micro- and macro organism with isolation of the most vulnerable for the effect of causative agent aggression factors.

  4. The Crystal Structure of the RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase from Human Rhinovirus: A Dual Function Target for Common Cold Antiviral Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Love, Robert A.; Maegley, Karen A.; Yu, Xiu; Ferre, RoseAnn; Lingardo, Laura K.; Diehl, Wade; Parge, Hans E.; Dragovich, Peter S.; Fuhrman, Shella A. (Pfizer)

    2010-11-16

    Human rhinoviruses (HRV), the predominant members of the Picornaviridae family of positive-strand RNA viruses, are the major causative agents of the common cold. Given the lack of effective treatments for rhinoviral infections, virally encoded proteins have become attractive therapeutic targets. The HRV genome encodes an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) denoted 3D{sup pol}, which is responsible for replicating the viral genome and for synthesizing a protein primer used in the replication. Here the crystal structures for three viral serotypes (1B, 14, and 16) of HRV 3D{sup pol} have been determined. The three structures are very similar to one another, and to the closely related poliovirus (PV) 3D{sup pol} enzyme. Because the reported PV crystal structure shows significant disorder, HRV 3D{sup pol} provides the first complete view of a picornaviral RdRp. The folding topology of HRV 3D{sup pol} also resembles that of RdRps from hepatitis C virus (HCV) and rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) despite very low sequence homology.

  5. Broad spectrum antiviral activity for paramyxoviruses is modulated by biophysical properties of fusion inhibitory peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Cyrille; Augusto, Marcelo T; Niewiesk, Stefan; Horvat, Branka; Palermo, Laura M; Sanna, Giuseppina; Madeddu, Silvia; Huey, Devra; Castanho, Miguel A R B; Porotto, Matteo; Santos, Nuno C; Moscona, Anne

    2017-03-08

    Human paramyxoviruses include global causes of lower respiratory disease like the parainfluenza viruses, as well as agents of lethal encephalitis like Nipah virus. Infection is initiated by viral glycoprotein-mediated fusion between viral and host cell membranes. Paramyxovirus viral fusion proteins (F) insert into the target cell membrane, and form a transient intermediate that pulls the viral and cell membranes together as two heptad-repeat regions refold to form a six-helix bundle structure that can be specifically targeted by fusion-inhibitory peptides. Antiviral potency can be improved by sequence modification and lipid conjugation, and by adding linkers between the protein and lipid components. We exploit the uniquely broad spectrum antiviral activity of a parainfluenza F-derived peptide sequence that inhibits both parainfluenza and Nipah viruses, to investigate the influence of peptide orientation and intervening linker length on the peptides' interaction with transitional states of F, solubility, membrane insertion kinetics, and protease sensitivity. We assessed the impact of these features on biodistribution and antiviral efficacy in vitro and in vivo. The engineering approach based on biophysical parameters resulted in a peptide that is a highly effective inhibitor of both paramyxoviruses and a set of criteria to be used for engineering broad spectrum antivirals for emerging paramyxoviruses.

  6. Antiviral Resistance to Influenza Viruses: Clinical and Epidemiological Aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vries, E.

    2017-01-01

    There are three classes of antiviral drugs approved for the treatment of influenza: the M2 ion channel inhibitors (amantadine, rimantadine), neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors (laninamivir, oseltamivir, peramivir, zanamivir), and the protease inhibitor (favipiravir); some of the agents are only available

  7. Synthesis, Binding and Antiviral Properties of Potent Core-Extended Naphthalene Diimides Targeting the HIV-1 Long Terminal Repeat Promoter G-Quadruplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Rosalba; Doria, Filippo; Butovskaya, Elena; Frasson, Ilaria; Botti, Silvia; Scalabrin, Matteo; Lago, Sara; Grande, Vincenzo; Nadai, Matteo; Freccero, Mauro; Richter, Sara N

    2015-12-24

    We have previously reported that stabilization of the G-quadruplex structures in the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter suppresses viral transcription. Here we sought to develop new G-quadruplex ligands to be exploited as antiviral compounds by enhancing binding toward the viral G-quadruplex structures. We synthesized naphthalene diimide derivatives with a lateral expansion of the aromatic core. The new compounds were able to bind/stabilize the G-quadruplex to a high extent, and some of them displayed clear-cut selectivity toward the viral G-quadruplexes with respect to the human telomeric G-quadruplexes. This feature translated into low nanomolar anti-HIV-1 activity toward two viral strains and encouraging selectivity indexes. The selectivity depended on specific recognition of LTR loop residues; the mechanism of action was ascribed to inhibition of LTR promoter activity in cells. This is the first example of G-quadruplex ligands that show increased selectivity toward the viral G-quadruplexes and display remarkable antiviral activity.

  8. Activity Based Protein Profiling Leads to Identification of Novel Protein Targets for Nerve Agent VX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmany, Dan; Walz, Andrew J; Hsu, Fu-Lian; Benton, Bernard; Burnett, David; Gibbons, Jennifer; Noort, Daan; Glaros, Trevor; Sekowski, Jennifer W

    2017-04-17

    Organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents continue to be a threat at home and abroad during the war against terrorism. Human exposure to nerve agents such as VX results in a cascade of toxic effects relative to the exposure level including ocular miosis, excessive secretions, convulsions, seizures, and death. The primary mechanism behind these overt symptoms is the disruption of cholinergic pathways. While much is known about the primary toxicity mechanisms of nerve agents, there remains a paucity of information regarding impacts on other pathways and systemic effects. These are important for establishing a comprehensive understanding of the toxic mechanisms of OP nerve agents. To identify novel proteins that interact with VX, and that may give insight into these other mechanisms, we used activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) employing a novel VX-probe on lysates from rat heart, liver, kidney, diaphragm, and brain tissue. By making use of a biotin linked VX-probe, proteins covalently bound by the probe were isolated and enriched using streptavidin beads. The proteins were then digested, labeled with isobarically distinct tandem mass tag (TMT) labels, and analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Quantitative analysis identified 132 bound proteins, with many proteins found in multiple tissues. As with previously published ABPP OP work, monoacylglycerol lipase associated proteins and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) were shown to be targets of VX. In addition to these two and other predicted neurotransmitter-related proteins, a number of proteins involved with energy metabolism were identified. Four of these enzymes, mitochondrial isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2), isocitrate dehydrogenase 3 (IDH3), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), and succinyl CoA (SCS) ligase, were assayed for VX inhibition. Only IDH2 NADP+ activity was shown to be inhibited directly. This result is consistent with other work reporting animals exposed to OP compounds exhibit

  9. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease: different molecular targets and potential therapeutic agents including curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Balmiki; Lahiri, Debomoy K

    2009-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder of the elderly. Deposition of amyloid beta plaque and associated neuroinflammation are the major hallmarks of AD. Whereas reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activated microglial cells contribute to neuronal loss, nuclear factor kappaB and apolipoprotein E participate in inflammatory process of AD. Current FDA approved drugs provide only symptomatic relief in AD. For broad spectrum of activity, some natural products are also being tested. Turmeric is used as an anti-inflammatory medicine in various regions of Asia. Curcumin, which is a yellow colored polyphenol compound present in turmeric, showed anti-inflammatory properties. Herein, we discuss the neurobiological and neuroinflammatory pathways of AD, evaluate different molecular targets and potential therapeutic agents, including curcumin, for the treatment of AD.

  10. H2O2-responsive molecularly engineered polymer nanoparticles as ischemia/reperfusion-targeted nanotherapeutic agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongwon; Bae, Soochan; Hong, Donghyun; Lim, Hyungsuk; Yoon, Joo Heung; Hwang, On; Park, Seunggyu; Ke, Qingen; Khang, Gilson; Kang, Peter M.

    2013-07-01

    The main culprit in the pathogenesis of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), the most abundant form of ROS produced during I/R, causes inflammation, apoptosis and subsequent tissue damages. Here, we report H2O2-responsive antioxidant nanoparticles formulated from copolyoxalate containing vanillyl alcohol (VA) (PVAX) as a novel I/R-targeted nanotherapeutic agent. PVAX was designed to incorporate VA and H2O2-responsive peroxalate ester linkages covalently in its backbone. PVAX nanoparticles therefore degrade and release VA, which is able to reduce the generation of ROS, and exert anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic activity. In hind-limb I/R and liver I/R models in mice, PVAX nanoparticles specifically reacted with overproduced H2O2 and exerted highly potent anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic activities that reduced cellular damages. Therefore, PVAX nanoparticles have tremendous potential as nanotherapeutic agents for I/R injury and H2O2-associated diseases.

  11. DNA Repair and Cancer Therapy: Targeting APE1/Ref-1 Using Dietary Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian J. Raffoul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the cancer protective effects of dietary agents and other natural compounds isolated from fruits, soybeans, and vegetables on neoplasia. Studies have also revealed the potential for these natural products to be combined with chemotherapy or radiotherapy for the more effective treatment of cancer. In this paper we discuss the potential for targeting the DNA base excision repair enzyme APE1/Ref-1 using dietary agents such as soy isoflavones, resveratrol, curcumin, and the vitamins ascorbate and α-tocopherol. We also discuss the potential role of soy isoflavones in sensitizing cancer cells to the effects of radiotherapy. A comprehensive review of the dual nature of APE1/Ref-1 in DNA repair and redox activation of cellular transcription factors, NF-κB and HIF-1α, is also discussed. Further research efforts dedicated to delineating the role of APE1/Ref-1 DNA repair versus redox activity in sensitizing cancer cells to conventional treatment are warranted.

  12. β-Lactone natural products and derivatives inactivate homoserine transacetylase, a target for antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pascale, Gianfranco; Nazi, Ishac; Harrison, Paul H M; Wright, Gerard D

    2011-07-01

    Homoserine transacetylase (HTA) catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl-CoA to the hydroxyl group of homoserine. This is the first committed step in the biosynthesis of methionine (Met) from aspartic acid in many fungi, Gram-positive and some Gram-negative bacteria. The enzyme is absent in higher eukaryotes and is important for microorganism growth in Met-poor environments, such as blood serum, making HTA an attractive target for new antimicrobial agents. HTA catalyzes acetyl transfer via a double displacement mechanism facilitated by a classic Ser-His-Asp catalytic triad located at the bottom of a narrow actives site tunnel. We explored the inhibitory activity of several β-lactones to block the activity of HTA. In particular, the natural product ebelactone A, a β-lactone with a hydrophobic tail was found to be a potent inactivator of HTA from Haemophilus influenzae. Synthetic analogs of ebelactone A demonstrated improved inactivation characteristics. Covalent modification of HTA was confirmed by mass spectrometry, and peptide mapping identified Ser143 as the modified residue, consistent with the known structure and mechanism of the enzyme. These results demonstrate that β-lactone inhibitors are excellent biochemical probes of HTA and potential leads for new antimicrobial agents.

  13. Ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes as mitochondria-targeted two-photon photodynamic anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiangping; Chen, Yu; Li, Guanying; Zhang, Pingyu; Jin, Chengzhi; Zeng, Leli; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2015-07-01

    Clinical acceptance of photodynamic therapy is currently hindered by poor depth efficacy and inefficient activation of the cell death machinery in cancer cells during treatment. To address these issues, photoactivation using two-photon absorption (TPA) is currently being examined. Mitochondria-targeted therapy represents a promising approach to target tumors selectively and may overcome the resistance in current anticancer therapies. Herein, four ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes (RuL1-RuL4) have been designed and developed to act as mitochondria-targeted two-photon photodynamic anticancer agents. These complexes exhibit very high singlet oxygen quantum yields in methanol (0.74-0.81), significant TPA cross sections (124-198 GM), remarkable mitochondrial accumulation, and deep penetration depth. Thus, RuL1-RuL4 were utilized as one-photon and two-photon absorbing photosensitizers in both monolayer cells and 3D multicellular spheroids (MCSs). These Ru(II) complexes were almost nontoxic towards cells and 3D MCSs in the dark and generate sufficient singlet oxygen under one- and two-photon irradiation to trigger cell death. Remarkably, RuL4 exhibited an IC50 value as low as 9.6 μM in one-photon PDT (λirr = 450 nm, 12 J cm(-2)) and 1.9 μM in two-photon PDT (λirr = 830 nm, 800 J cm(-2)) of 3D MCSs; moreover, RuL4 is an order of magnitude more toxic than cisplatin in the latter test system. The combination of mitochondria-targeting and two-photon activation provides a valuable paradigm to develop ruthenium(II) complexes for PDT applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. New antivirals for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Vincent; Barreiro, Pablo; Benitez, Laura; Peña, Jose M; de Mendoza, Carmen

    2017-07-01

    Current treatment with oral nucleos(t)ides entecavir or tenofovir provide sustained suppression of HBV replication and clinical benefit in most chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infected persons. However, HBV rebound generally occurs upon drug discontinuation due to persistence of genomic HBV reservoirs as episomic cccDNA and chromosomic integrated HBV-DNA. There is renewed enthusiasm on HBV drug discovery following recent successes with antivirals for hepatitis C and immunotherapies for some cancers. Areas covered: New drugs that target distinct steps of the HBV life cycle are been developed, including inhibitors of viral entry, new polymerase inhibitors, capsid and assembly inhibitors, virus release blockers, and disruptors of cccDNA formation and transcription. Alongside these antivirals, agents that enhance anti-HBV specific immune responses are being tested, including TLR agonists, checkpoint inhibitors and therapeutic vaccines. Expert opinion: The achievement of a 'functional cure' for chronic HBV infection, with sustained HBsAg clearance and undetectable viremia once medications are stopped, represents the next step in the pace towards HBV elimination. Hopefully, the combination of new drugs that eliminate or functionally inactivate the genomic HBV reservoirs (cccDNA and integrated HBV-DNA) along with agents that enhance or activate immune responses against HBV will lead to a 'definitive cure' for chronic HBV infection.

  15. A Functional Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Modified with PLA-PEG-DG as Tumor-Targeted MRI Contrast Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Fei; Hu, Ke; Yu, Haoli; Zhou, Lijun; Song, Lina; Zhang, Yu; Shan, Xiuhong; Liu, Jianping; Gu, Ning

    2017-08-01

    Tumor targeting could greatly promote the performance of magnetic nanomaterials as MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) agent for tumor diagnosis. Herein, we reported a novel magnetic nanoparticle modified with PLA (poly lactic acid)-PEG (polyethylene glycol)-DG (D-glucosamine) as Tumor-targeted MRI Contrast Agent. In this work, we took use of the D-glucose passive targeting on tumor cells, combining it on PLA-PEG through amide reaction, and then wrapped the PLA-PEG-DG up to the Fe 3 O 4 @OA NPs. The stability and anti phagocytosis of Fe 3 O 4 @OA@PLA-PEG-DG was tested in vitro; the MRI efficiency and toxicity was also detected in vivo. These functional magnetic nanoparticles demonstrated good biocompatibility and stability both in vitro and in vivo. Cell experiments showed that Fe 3 O 4 @OA@PLA-PEG-DG nanoparticles exist good anti phagocytosis and high targetability. In vivo MRI images showed that the contrast effect of Fe 3 O 4 @OA@PLA-PEG-DG nanoparticles prevailed over the commercial non tumor-targeting magnetic nanomaterials MRI agent at a relatively low dose. The DG can validly enhance the tumor-targetting effect of Fe 3 O 4 @OA@PLA-PEG nanoparticle. Maybe MRI agents with DG can hold promise as tumor-targetting development in the future.

  16. Antiviral activity of cationic amphiphilic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salata, Cristiano; Calistri, Arianna; Parolin, Cristina; Baritussio, Aldo; Palù, Giorgio

    2017-05-01

    Emerging and reemerging viral infections represent a major concern for human and veterinary public health and there is an urgent need for the development of broad-spectrum antivirals. Areas covered: A recent strategy in antiviral research is based on the identification of molecules targeting host functions required for infection of multiple viruses. A number of FDA-approved drugs used to treat several human diseases are cationic amphiphilic drugs (CADs) that have the ability to accumulate inside cells affecting several structures/functions hijacked by viruses during infection. In this review we summarized the CADs' chemical properties and effects on the cells and reported the main FDA-approved CADs that have been identified so far as potential antivirals in drug repurposing studies. Expert commentary: Although there have been concerns regarding the efficacy and the possible side effects of the off-label use of CADs as antivirals, they seem to represent a promising starting point for the development of broad-spectrum antiviral strategies. Further knowledge about their mechanism of action is required to improve their antiviral activity and to reduce the risk of side effects.

  17. Synergistic antitumor effect of S-1 and HER2-targeting agents in gastric cancer with HER2 amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanizaki, Junko; Okamoto, Isamu; Takezawa, Ken; Tsukioka, Sayaka; Uchida, Junji; Kiniwa, Mamoru; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko

    2010-05-01

    Amplification of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) has been detected in 20% to 30% of gastric cancers and is associated with a poor outcome. Combination therapies with HER2-targeting agents and cytotoxic agents are considered a potential therapeutic option for gastric cancer with HER2 amplification. We have now investigated the effects of combination treatment with the oral fluoropyrimidine S-1 and the HER2-targeting agents lapatinib or trastuzumab in gastric cancer cells with or without HER2 amplification. We used 5-fluorouracil (5FU) instead of S-1 for in vitro experiments, given that tegafur, a component of S-1, is metabolized to 5FU in the liver. The combination of 5FU and HER2-targeting agents synergistically inhibited cell proliferation and exhibited an enhanced proapoptotic effect in gastric cancer cells with HER2 amplification, but not in those without it. Lapatinib or trastuzumab also induced downregulation of thymidylate synthase (TS) expression and activity only in cells with HER2 amplification. The combination of 5FU and TS depletion by RNA interference also exhibited an enhanced proapoptotic effect in cells with HER2 amplification. These observations thus suggest that lapatinib-induced or trastuzumab-induced downregulation of TS is responsible, at least in part, for the synergistic antitumor effect of combined treatment with 5FU and HER2-targeting agents. The antitumor effect of the combination of S-1 and HER2-targeting agents in vivo was also greater than that of either drug alone. Our preclinical findings thus indicate that the combination of S-1 and HER2-targeting agents is a promising treatment option for gastric cancer with HER2 amplification.

  18. Chalcone scaffolds as anti-infective agents: structural and molecular target perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Debarshi Kar; Bharti, Sanjay Kumar; Asati, Vivek

    2015-08-28

    In recent years, widespread outbreak of numerous infectious diseases across the globe has created havoc among the population. Particularly, the inhabitants of tropical and sub-tropical regions are mainly affected by these pathogens. Several natural and (semi) synthetic chalcones deserve the credit of being potential anti-infective candidates that inhibit various parasitic, malarial, bacterial, viral, and fungal targets like cruzain-1/2, trypanopain-Tb, trans-sialidase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), fumarate reductase, falcipain-1/2, β-hematin, topoisomerase-II, plasmepsin-II, lactate dehydrogenase, protein kinases (Pfmrk and PfPK5), and sorbitol-induced hemolysis, DEN-1 NS3, H1N1, HIV (Integrase/Protease), protein tyrosine phosphatase A/B (Ptp-A/B), FtsZ, FAS-II, lactate/isocitrate dehydrogenase, NorA efflux pump, DNA gyrase, fatty acid synthase, chitin synthase, and β-(1,3)-glucan synthase. In this review, a comprehensive study (from Jan. 1982 to May 2015) of the structural features of anti-infective chalcones, their mechanism of actions (MOAs) and structure activity relationships (SARs) have been highlighted. With the knowledge of molecular targets, structural insights and SARs, this review may be helpful for (medicinal) chemists to design more potent, safe, selective and cost effective anti-infective agents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Investigator-initiated trials of targeted oncology agents: why independent research is at risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, L; Berns, B; Dalgleish, A G; von Euler, M; Hecht, T T; Lappin, G L; Reed, N; Palmeri, S; Smyth, J; Embacher-Aichorn, S; Zwierzina, H

    2010-08-01

    Drug development traditionally has relied upon the complementary contributions of clinicians and scientists at academic institutions and at pharmaceutical companies. Greater regulatory burdens, increased bureaucratic requirements, restricted reimbursement, and spiralling research and development costs are exerting pressure on the drug development pipeline. The result is a de-emphasis of exploratory research, particularly independent academic research, despite its proven value in identifying new drug targets and developing innovative cancer therapies. An expert panel assembled by the Biotherapy Development Association-a nonprofit international forum for academic and industry researchers, patients, and government regulatory and postregulatory agencies-examined the growing schism between academia and industry and identified several causes of declining academic research. The authors propose solutions to sustain investigator-initiated research and provide a new model whereby expert organisations provide a forum for academia and industry to plan studies within a regulatory framework to support licensure/authorisation and reimbursement for new molecularly targeted agents and biomarkers. Investigator-initiated trials have led to the discovery and development of innovative, safe, and effective cancer treatments. To ensure that such research continues, action will be required on the parts of legislative and regulatory bodies, industry, universities, patient advocacy organisations, and preclinical and clinical academic scientists.

  20. The fatty acid synthase inhibitor triclosan: repurposing an anti-microbial agent for targeting prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Martin C; Pouwer, Rebecca H; Gunter, Jennifer H; Lubik, Amy A; Quinn, Ronald J; Nelson, Colleen C

    2014-10-15

    Inhibition of FASN has emerged as a promising therapeutic target in cancer, and numerous inhibitors have been investigated. However, severe pharmacological limitations have challenged their clinical testing. The synthetic FASN inhibitor triclosan, which was initially developed as a topical antibacterial agent, is merely affected by these pharmacological limitations. Yet, little is known about its mechanism in inhibiting the growth of cancer cells. Here we compared the cellular and molecular effects of triclosan in a panel of eight malignant and non-malignant prostate cell lines to the well-known FASN inhibitors C75 and orlistat, which target different partial catalytic activities of FASN. Triclosan displayed a superior cytotoxic profile with a several-fold lower IC50 than C75 or orlistat. Structure-function analysis revealed that alcohol functionality of the parent phenol is critical for inhibitory action. Rescue experiments confirmed that end product starvation was a major cause of cytotoxicity. Importantly, triclosan, C75 and orlistat induced distinct changes to morphology, cell cycle, lipid content and the expression of key enzymes of lipid metabolism, demonstrating that inhibition of different partial catalytic activities of FASN activates different metabolic pathways. These finding combined with its well-documented pharmacological safety profile make triclosan a promising drug candidate for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  1. Anti-viral effect of herbal medicine Korean traditional Cynanchum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pestiviruses in general, and Bovine Viral Diarrhea (BVD) in particular, present several potential targets for directed antiviral therapy. Material and Methods: The antiviral effect of Cynanchum paniculatum (Bge.) Kitag (Dog strangling vine: DS) extract on the bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) virus was tested. First ...

  2. Advances in the Development of Molecularly Targeted Agents in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolly, Saoirse O; Collins, Dearbhaile C; Sundar, Raghav; Popat, Sanjay; Yap, Timothy A

    2017-05-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains a significant global health challenge and the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. The traditional 'one-size-fits-all' treatment approach has now evolved into one that involves personalized strategies based on histological and molecular subtypes. The molecular era has revolutionized the treatment of patients harboring epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and ROS1 gene aberrations. In the appropriately selected population, anti-tumor agents against these molecular targets can significantly improve progression-free survival. However, the emergence of acquired resistance is inevitable. Novel potent compounds with much improved and rational selectivity profiles, such as third-generation EGFR T790M resistance mutation-specific inhibitors, have been developed and added to the NSCLC armamentarium. To date, attempts to overcome resistance bypass pathways through downstream signaling blockade has had limited success. Furthermore, the majority of patients still do not harbor known driver genetic or epigenetic alterations and/or have no new available treatment options, with chemotherapy remaining their standard of care. Several potentially actionable driver aberrations have recently been identified, with the early clinical development of multiple inhibitors against these promising targets currently in progress. The advent of immune checkpoint inhibitors has led to significant benefit for advanced NSCLC patients with durable responses observed. Further interrogation of the underlying biology of NSCLC, coupled with modern clinical trial designs, is now required to develop novel targeted therapeutics rationally matched with predictive biomarkers of response, so as to further advance NSCLC therapeutics through the next decade.

  3. Mutation of Glycosylation Sites in BST-2 Leads to Its Accumulation at Intracellular CD63-Positive Vesicles without Affecting Its Antiviral Activity against Multivesicular Body-Targeted HIV-1 and Hepatitis B Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhu; Lv, Mingyu; Shi, Ying; Yu, Jinghua; Niu, Junqi; Yu, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Wenyan

    2016-02-29

    BST-2/tetherin blocks the release of various enveloped viruses including HIV-1 with a "physical tethering" model. The detailed contribution of N-linked glycosylation to this model is controversial. Here, we confirmed that mutation of glycosylation sites exerted an effect of post-translational mis-trafficking, leading to an accumulation of BST-2 at intracellular CD63-positive vesicles. BST-2 with this phenotype potently inhibited the release of multivesicular body-targeted HIV-1 and hepatitis B virus, without affecting the co-localization of BST-2 with EEA1 and LAMP1. These results suggest that N-linked glycosylation of human BST-2 is dispensable for intracellular virion retention and imply that this recently discovered intracellular tethering function may be evolutionarily distinguished from the canonical antiviral function of BST-2 by tethering nascent virions at the cell surface.

  4. Collagen based magnetic nanobiocomposite as MRI contrast agent and for targeted delivery in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, A; Sekar, S; Kanagavel, M; Chandrasekaran, N; Mukherjee, A; Sastry, T P

    2013-10-01

    In this study, an attempt has been made with the advent of technology to prepare a multifunctional nanobiocomposite (NBC) for targeted drug delivery in cancer therapy. Collagen (C) was fabricated as nanofibers with multifunctional moieties viz. CFeAb*D by incorporating iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe), coupling with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled antibody (Ab*) and loading an anticancer gemcitabine drug (D). This NBC was characterized by conventional methods and evaluated for its biological activities. The UV-vis and FTIR spectroscopic studies revealed the fluorescein to protein ratio and revealed the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles and their interaction with the collagen molecules, respectively. While SDS-PAGE showed the proteinaceous nature of collagen, VSM and TEM studies revealed magnetic saturation as 54.97emu/g and a magnetic nanoparticle with a diameter in the range of 10-30nm and the dimension of nanofiber ranging from 97 to 270nm. A MRI scan has shown a super paramagnetic effect, which reveals that the prepared NBC can be used as a MRI contrast agent. The MTT assay has shown biocompatibility and an apoptotic effect while phase contrast microscopy exhibited receptor mediated uptake of endocytosis. The novelty in the prepared NBC lies in the collagen nanofibers, which have a higher penetrating property without causing much cell damage, biocompatibility and multifunctional properties and is able to carry multifunctional agents. The study has demonstrated the possible use of CFeAb*D as a multifunctional NBC for biomedical applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of novel agents for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: progress in target selection and clinical trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Riordan, Thomas G; Smith, Victoria; Raghu, Ganesh

    2015-10-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive, fatal disease. Until recently, the standard therapy for this disease has been essentially supportive, with the exception of a minority of patients who were eligible for lung transplantation. The development pathway for novel medications for IPF has been complicated. There have been several challenges, including an incomplete understanding of the pathogenesis, unpredictable clinical course, lack of validated biomarkers, the low clinical predictive value of animal models of lung injury, and the need to commit to large clinical trials of long duration to obtain initial evidence of clinical efficacy. Despite these challenges, the combination of recent advances in translational medicine and the unprecedented increase in clinical data accumulated from recent large clinical trials has stimulated an increase in the number of clinical development programs for IPF. Clinical programs are increasingly characterized by rational target selection, preclinical optimization of therapeutic molecules, and an emphasis on efficient clinical trial design. A lower rate of functional decline in patients treated with pirfenidone and nintedanib was demonstrated in large clinical trials. In October 2014, these two drugs became the first agents to be approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of IPF. (Pirfenidone had already been approved in several countries outside the United States.) In November 2014, the European Medicines Agency approved the use of nintedanib for IPF. The landscape for management of IPF has markedly changed with the advent of approved therapeutic options for IPF. In this article, we review the strategies that are being used to increase the likelihood of success in clinical development programs of novel disease-modifying agents in IPF.

  6. Analyzing the multiple-target-multiple-agent scenario using optimal assignment algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok, K.S.; Driessen, B.J.; Phillips, C.A.; Tovey, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    This work considers the problem of maximum utilization of a set of mobile robots with limited sensor-range capabilities and limited travel distances. The robots are initially in random positions. A set of robots properly guards or covers a region if every point within the region is within the effective sensor range of at least one vehicle. The authors wish to move the vehicles into surveillance positions so as to guard or cover a region, while minimizing the maximum distance traveled by any vehicle. This problem can be formulated as an assignment problem, in which they must optimally decide which robot to assign to which slot of a desired matrix of grid points. The cost function is the maximum distance traveled by any robot. Assignment problems can be solved very efficiently. Solutions times for one hundred robots took only seconds on a Silicon Graphics Crimson workstation. The initial positions of all the robots can be sampled by a central base station and their newly assigned positions communicated back to the robots. Alternatively, the robots can establish their own coordinate system with the origin fixed at one of the robots and orientation determined by the compass bearing of another robot relative to this robot. This paper presents example solutions to the multiple-target-multiple-agent scenario using a matching algorithm. Two separate cases with one hundred agents in each were analyzed using this method. They have found these mobile robot problems to be a very interesting application of network optimization methods, and they expect this to be a fruitful area for future research

  7. Analyzing the multiple-target-multiple-agent scenario using optimal assignment algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwok, K.S.; Driessen, B.J.; Phillips, C.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tovey, C.A. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    This work considers the problem of maximum utilization of a set of mobile robots with limited sensor-range capabilities and limited travel distances. The robots are initially in random positions. A set of robots properly guards or covers a region if every point within the region is within the effective sensor range of at least one vehicle. The authors wish to move the vehicles into surveillance positions so as to guard or cover a region, while minimizing the maximum distance traveled by any vehicle. This problem can be formulated as an assignment problem, in which they must optimally decide which robot to assign to which slot of a desired matrix of grid points. The cost function is the maximum distance traveled by any robot. Assignment problems can be solved very efficiently. Solutions times for one hundred robots took only seconds on a Silicon Graphics Crimson workstation. The initial positions of all the robots can be sampled by a central base station and their newly assigned positions communicated back to the robots. Alternatively, the robots can establish their own coordinate system with the origin fixed at one of the robots and orientation determined by the compass bearing of another robot relative to this robot. This paper presents example solutions to the multiple-target-multiple-agent scenario using a matching algorithm. Two separate cases with one hundred agents in each were analyzed using this method. They have found these mobile robot problems to be a very interesting application of network optimization methods, and they expect this to be a fruitful area for future research.

  8. Oncolytic targeting of androgen-sensitive prostate tumor by the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV: consequences of deficient interferon-dependent antiviral defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubbard Gene B

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oncolytic virotherapy for cancer treatment utilizes viruses for selective infection and death of cancer cells without any adverse effect on normal cells. We previously reported that the human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a novel oncolytic virus against androgen-independent PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. The present study extends the result to androgen-dependent prostate cancer, and explores the underlying mechanism that triggers RSV-induced oncolysis of prostate cancer cells. Methods The oncolytic effect of RSV on androgen-sensitive LNCaP human prostate cancer cells and on androgen-independent RM1 murine prostate cancer cells was studied in vitro in culture and in vivo in a xenograft or allograft tumor model. In vitro, cell viability, infectivity and apoptosis were monitored by MTT assay, viral plaque assay and annexin V staining, respectively. In vivo studies involved virus administration to prostate tumors grown in immune compromised nude mice and in syngeneic immune competent C57BL/6J mice. Anti-tumorogenic oncolytic activity was monitored by measuring tumor volume, imaging bioluminescent tumors in live animals and performing histopathological analysis and TUNEL assay with tumors Results We show that RSV imposes a potent oncolytic effect on LNCaP prostate cancer cells. RSV infectivity was markedly higher in LNCaP cells compared to the non-tumorigenic RWPE-1 human prostate cells. The enhanced viral burden led to LNCaP cell apoptosis and growth inhibition of LNCaP xenograft tumors in nude mice. A functional host immune response did not interfere with RSV-induced oncolysis, since growth of xenograft tumors in syngeneic C57BL/6J mice from murine RM1 cells was inhibited upon RSV administration. LNCaP cells failed to activate the type-I interferon (IFNα/β-induced transcription factor STAT-1, which is required for antiviral gene expression, although these cells could produce IFN in response to RSV infection. The

  9. A Cisplatin Derivative Tetra-Pt(bpy) as an Oncotherapeutic Agent for Targeting ALT Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao-Hui; Nie, Xin; Fang, Yiming; Zhang, Zepeng; Xiao, Yingnan; Mao, Zongwan; Liu, Haiying; Ren, Jian; Wang, Feng; Xia, Lixin; Huang, Junjiu; Zhao, Yong

    2017-10-01

    In approximately 15% of human cancers, telomere length is maintained independently of telomerase by the homologous recombination (HR)-mediated alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway. Whether the ALT pathway can be exploited for therapeutic treatment remains unknown. The purpose of this study is to develop oncotherapeutic agent to target ALT cancers. Surface plasmon resonance assay, antibody to G-quadruplex, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were used to discover Tetra-Pt(bpy), a cisplatin derivative that specifically targets telomeric G-quadruplex. We used immunofluorescence, FISH, C-circle assay, and chromosome orientation FISH to evaluate the inhibitory effect of Tetra-Pt(bpy) on ALT activity in human ALT cancers. The shortening of telomere length induced by Tetra-Pt(bpy) was determined by telomere restriction fragment or Q-FISH. Cell destination after Tetra-Pt(bpy) treatment was determined by β-gal staining or apoptosis assay. Nude mice (n = 4 per group) were injected with U2OS cells to evaluate the effects of Tetra-Pt(bpy) on tumor growth. All statistical tests were two-sided. Tetra-Pt(bpy) inhibits the strand invasion/annealing step of telomeric homologous recombination by selectively converting telomeric ssDNA to a G-quadruplex. ALT-cells treated with Tetra-Pt(bpy) show fewer ALT-associated promyelocytic leukemia bodies (untreated: mean±SD = 5.9±0.2 vs treated: mean±SD = 3.1±0.1, P ALT-cell xenograft tumors in mice (untreated: mean±SD = 57.1±3.7 mm 3 vs treated: mean±SD = 19.0±3.2 mm 3 , P ALT cancer cells. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Systemic coagulation parameters in mice after treatment with vascular targeting agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gottstein Claudia

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular targeting of malignant tumors has become a clinically validated new treatment approach with clear patient benefit. However clinical studies have also revealed that some types of vascular targeting agents (VTAs are prone to coagulation system side effects. It is therefore essential to predetermine coagulation parameters in preclinical studies. As of to date, this has rarely been done, predominantly due to technical issues. The goal of this study was to establish and apply a standardized process, whereby systemic coagulation activation can be routinely measured in mice. Results We have evaluated a number of sampling techniques and coagulation tests regarding their suitability for this purpose. We were able to adapt two assays measuring soluble fibrin, a marker for a prethrombotic status. Thus, soluble fibrin could be measured for the first time in mice. All assays were validated in a positive control model for systemic coagulation activation, i.e. lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia. Based on our results, we selected a panel of coagulation tests, which are both feasable and informative for preclinical testing of VTAs: soluble fibrin, thrombin-antithrombin complexes, free antithrombin III, white blood cell counts and platelet counts. The effect of tumor transplants on coagulation parameters was evaluated using this panel. We then applied this set of assays in treatment studies with a VTA developed in our laboratory to investigate a potential systemic coagulation activation. Conclusion We have established a standardized panel of assays that can be used to test murine blood samples for coagulation activation in preclinical studies. All tests are feasible to perform in any research laboratory without specialized equipment. In addition, this is the first report to measure soluble fibrin, an early marker of systemic coagulation activation, in mice. The panel was applied on tumor bearing mice and mice treated with a VTA

  11. Improved tumor-targeting MRI contrast agents: Gd(DOTA) conjugates of a cycloalkane-based RGD peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ji-Ae; Lee, Yong Jin; Ko, In Ok; Kim, Tae-Jeong; Chang, Yongmin; Lim, Sang Moo; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, Jung Young

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Development of improved tumor-targeting MRI contrast agents. • To increase the targeting ability of RGD, we developed cycloalkane-based RGD peptides. • Gd(DOTA) conjugates of cycloalkane-based RGD peptide show improved tumor signal enhancement in vivo MR images. - Abstract: Two new MRI contrast agents, Gd-DOTA-c(RGD-ACP-K) (1) and Gd-DOTA-c(RGD-ACH-K) (2), which were designed by incorporating aminocyclopentane (ACP)- or aminocyclohexane (ACH)-carboxylic acid into Gd-DOTA (gadolinium-tetraazacyclo dodecanetetraacetic acid) and cyclic RGDK peptides, were synthesized and evaluated for tumor-targeting ability in vitro and in vivo. Binding affinity studies showed that both 1 and 2 exhibited higher affinity for integrin receptors than cyclic RGDyK peptides, which were used as a reference. These complexes showed high relaxivity and good stability in human serum and have the potential to improve target-specific signal enhancement in vivo MR images

  12. Improved tumor-targeting MRI contrast agents: Gd(DOTA) conjugates of a cycloalkane-based RGD peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji-Ae, E-mail: jpark@kirams.re.kr [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong Jin; Ko, In Ok [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae-Jeong; Chang, Yongmin [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sang Moo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyeong Min [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Young, E-mail: jykim@kirams.re.kr [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Development of improved tumor-targeting MRI contrast agents. • To increase the targeting ability of RGD, we developed cycloalkane-based RGD peptides. • Gd(DOTA) conjugates of cycloalkane-based RGD peptide show improved tumor signal enhancement in vivo MR images. - Abstract: Two new MRI contrast agents, Gd-DOTA-c(RGD-ACP-K) (1) and Gd-DOTA-c(RGD-ACH-K) (2), which were designed by incorporating aminocyclopentane (ACP)- or aminocyclohexane (ACH)-carboxylic acid into Gd-DOTA (gadolinium-tetraazacyclo dodecanetetraacetic acid) and cyclic RGDK peptides, were synthesized and evaluated for tumor-targeting ability in vitro and in vivo. Binding affinity studies showed that both 1 and 2 exhibited higher affinity for integrin receptors than cyclic RGDyK peptides, which were used as a reference. These complexes showed high relaxivity and good stability in human serum and have the potential to improve target-specific signal enhancement in vivo MR images.

  13. Synthesis of hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives as mitochondria-targeted antioxidants and cytotoxic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyu Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to develop agents with superior chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic properties against hepatocellular carcinomas, mitochondria-targeted hydroxycinnamic acids (MitoHCAs were synthesized by conjugation with a triphenylphosphonium cation. These synthetic compounds were evaluated for their antioxidant activities in hepatic mitochondria, including against OH∙− and ROO∙− induced lipid peroxidation. H2O2 production was decreased significantly by increasing glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities. In addition, cell proliferation data from three cell lines (HepG2, L02 and WI38 indicated that the MitoHCAs were selective for cancer cells. Interestingly, the MitoHCAs both with or without Ca2+ triggered mitochondrial dysfunction by inducing mitochondrial swelling, collapsing the mitochondrial membrane potential and causing cytochrome c release. In particular, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP, cyclosporin A, attenuated mitochondrial damage and cell apoptosis, indicating that mPTP may be involved in the antiproliferative activity of MitoHCAs. Further studies focused on structural optimization of these compounds are onging.

  14. Targeting 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase in the oxidative PPP sensitizes leukemia cells to antimalarial agent dihydroartemisinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elf, S; Lin, R; Xia, S; Pan, Y; Shan, C; Wu, S; Lonial, S; Gaddh, M; Arellano, M L; Khoury, H J; Khuri, F R; Lee, B H; Boggon, T J; Fan, J; Chen, J

    2017-01-12

    The oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is crucial for cancer cell metabolism and tumor growth. We recently reported that targeting a key oxidative PPP enzyme, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD), using our novel small-molecule 6PGD inhibitors Physcion and its derivative S3, shows anticancer effects. Notably, humans with genetic deficiency of either 6PGD or another oxidative PPP enzyme, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, exhibit non-immune hemolytic anemia upon exposure to aspirin and various antimalarial drugs. Inspired by these clinical observations, we examined the anticancer potential of combined treatment with 6PGD inhibitors and antimalarial drugs. We found that stable knockdown of 6PGD sensitizes leukemia cells to antimalarial agent dihydroartemisinin (DHA). Combined treatment with DHA and Physcion activates AMP-activated protein kinase, leading to synergistic inhibition of human leukemia cell viability. Moreover, our combined therapy synergistically attenuates tumor growth in xenograft nude mice injected with human K562 leukemia cells and cell viability of primary leukemia cells from human patients, but shows minimal toxicity to normal hematopoietic cells in mice as well as red blood cells and mononucleocytes from healthy human donors. Our findings reveal the potential for combined therapy using optimized doses of Physcion and DHA as a novel antileukemia treatment without inducing hemolysis.

  15. Optimizing the radiosensitive liquid-core microcapsules for the targeting of chemotherapeutic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, S. [Department of Radiology, Iwate Medical University, 19-1 Uchimaru, Morioka, Iwate 020-8505 (Japan)]. E-mail: sharada@iwate-med.ac.jp; Ehara, S. [Department of Radiology, Iwate Medical University, 19-1 Uchimaru, Morioka, Iwate 020-8505 (Japan); Ishii, K. [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Yamazaki, H. [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Matsuyama, S. [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Kamiya, T. [Takasaki Institute of the Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan); Sakai, T. [Takasaki Institute of the Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan); Arakawa, K. [Takasaki Institute of the Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan); Sato, T. [Takasaki Institute of the Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan); Oikawa, S. [Takasaki Institute of the Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan)

    2007-07-15

    Microcapsules consisting of alginate and hyaluronic acid that can be decomposed by radiation are currently under development. In this study, the composition of the microcapsule material was optimized by changing the amounts of alginate and hyaluronic acid. Solutions of 0.025%, 0.05%, 0.1%, 0.2%, or 0.4% (wt./vol.) hyaluronic acid were mixed into a 0.2% alginate solution. To these mixtures, carboplatin (0.2 mmol) was added and the resulting material was used for the capsule preparation. The capsules were prepared by spraying the material into a CaCl{sub 2} solution (0.34 mol/l) using a microatomizer. These capsules were irradiated by a single dose of 2, 5, or 10 Gy {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray radiation. Immediately after irradiation, the releasing of core content of microcapsule was determined, using a micro particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) camera. The average diameter of the microcapsules was 22.3 {+-} 3.3 {mu}m, and that of the liquid core was 10.2 {+-} 4.3 {mu}m. The maximum radiation-induced content release was observed with liquid-core microcapsules containing 0.1% hyaluronic acid and 0.2% alginate. Our liquid-core microcapsules suggest a new potential use for radiation: the targeted delivery of the chemotherapeutic agents or radiosensitizers. This offers the prospect of increased combined effectiveness of radiation with chemotherapy or radiosensitization and decreased adverse side effects.

  16. Targeting the centriolar replication factor STIL synergizes with DNA damaging agents for treatment of ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowicz, Noa; Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Brown, Kevin R.; Checa-Rodriguez, Cintia; Castiel, Asher; Moskovich, Oren; Zarfati, Giulia; Trakhtenbrot, Luba; Levy-Barda, Adva; Jiang, Dahai; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Pradeep, Sunila; van Praag, Yael; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; David, Ahuvit; Novikov, Ilya; Huertas, Pablo; Rottapel, Robert; Sood, Anil K.; Izraeli, Shai

    2017-01-01

    Advanced ovarian cancer is an incurable disease. Thus, novel therapies are required. We wished to identify new therapeutic targets for ovarian cancer. ShRNA screen performed in 42 ovarian cancer cell lines identified the centriolar replication factor STIL as an essential gene for ovarian cancer cells. This was verified in-vivo in orthotopic human ovarian cancer mouse models. STIL depletion by administration of siRNA in neutral liposomes resulted in robust anti-tumor effect that was further enhanced in combination with cisplatin. Consistent with this finding, STIL depletion enhanced the extent of DNA double strand breaks caused by DNA damaging agents. This was associated with centrosomal depletion, ongoing genomic instability and enhanced formation of micronuclei. Interestingly, the ongoing DNA damage was not associated with reduced DNA repair. Indeed, we observed that depletion of STIL enhanced canonical homologous recombination repair and increased BRCA1 and RAD51 foci in response to DNA double strand breaks. Thus, inhibition of STIL significantly enhances the efficacy of DNA damaging chemotherapeutic drugs in treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:28423708

  17. Therapeutic Effect of Novel Single-Stranded RNAi Agent Targeting Periostin in Eyes with Retinal Neovascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahito Nakama

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Retinal neovascularization (NV due to retinal ischemia remains one of the principal causes of vision impairment in patients with ischemic retinal diseases. We recently reported that periostin (POSTN may play a role in the development of preretinal fibrovascular membranes, but its role in retinal NV has not been determined. The purpose of this study was to examine the expression of POSTN in the ischemic retinas of a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinal NV. We also studied the function of POSTN on retinal NV using Postn KO mice and human retinal endothelial cells (HRECs in culture. In addition, we used a novel RNAi agent, NK0144, which targets POSTN to determine its effect on the development of retinal NV. Our results showed that the expression of POSTN was increased in the vascular endothelial cells, pericytes, and M2 macrophages in ischemic retinas. POSTN promoted the ischemia-induced retinal NV by Akt phosphorylation through integrin αvβ3. NK0144 had a greater inhibitory effect than canonical double-stranded siRNA on preretinal pathological NV in vivo and in vitro. These findings suggest a causal relationship between POSTN and retinal NV, and indicate a potential therapeutic role of intravitreal injection of NK0144 for retinal neovascular diseases.

  18. Defining the risk of toxicity in phase I oncology trials of novel molecularly targeted agents: A single-center experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fehrmann, Rudolf

    2010-01-01

    Background: Phase I oncology trials are designed to define the maximum tolerated dose and toxicity of new drugs. This study aims to define the risk of toxicity in phase I trials of novel molecularly targeted agents (MTA), as this therapeutic approach is becoming increasingly relevant. Methods: We

  19. Defining the risk of toxicity in phase I oncology trials of novel molecularly targeted agents : a single centre experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molife, L R; Alam, S; Olmos, D; Puglisi, M; Shah, K; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Trani, L; Tjokrowidjaja, A; de Bono, J S; Banerji, U; Kaye, S B

    BACKGROUND: This study defined the risk of serious toxicity in phase I trials of molecularly targeted agents (MTA). PATIENTS AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis of toxicity data from patients treated in phase I trials of MTAs was carried out to define the rate of treatment-related grade 3/4 toxic

  20. Enhancing the antiviral potency of ER α-glucosidase inhibitor IHVR-19029 against hemorrhagic fever viruses in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Julia; Zhang, Xuexiang; Soloveva, Veronica; Warren, Travis; Guo, Fang; Wu, Shuo; Lu, Huagang; Guo, Jia; Su, Qing; Shen, Helen; Solon, Eric; Comunale, Mary Ann; Mehta, Anand; Guo, Ju-Tao; Bavari, Sina; Du, Yanming; Block, Timothy M; Chang, Jinhong

    2018-02-01

    Targeting host functions essential for viral replication has been considered as a broad spectrum and resistance-refractory antiviral approach. However, only a few host functions have, thus far, been validated as broad-spectrum antiviral targets in vivo. ER α-glucosidases I and II have been demonstrated to be essential for the morphogenesis of many enveloped viruses, including members from four families of viruses causing hemorrhagic fever. In vivo antiviral efficacy of various iminosugar-based ER α-glucosidase inhibitors has been reported in animals infected with Dengue, Japanese encephalitis, Ebola, Marburg and influenza viruses. Herein, we established Huh7.5-derived cell lines with ER α-glucosidase I or II knockout using CRISPR/Cas9 and demonstrated that the replication of Dengue, Yellow fever and Zika viruses was reduced by only 1-2 logs in the knockout cell lines. The results clearly indicate that only a partial suppression of viral replication can possibly be achieved with a complete inhibition of ER-α-glucosidases I or II by their inhibitors. We therefore explore to improve the antiviral efficacy of a lead iminosugar IHVR-19029 through combination with another broad-spectrum antiviral agent, favipiravir (T-705). Indeed, combination of IHVR-19029 and T-705 synergistically inhibited the replication of Yellow fever and Ebola viruses in cultured cells. Moreover, in a mouse model of Ebola virus infection, combination of sub-optimal doses of IHVR-19029 and T-705 significantly increased the survival rate of infected animals. We have thus proved the concept of combinational therapeutic strategy for the treatment of viral hemorrhagic fevers with broad spectrum host- and viral- targeting antiviral agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessing the relationship between toxicity and economic cost of oncological target agents: A systematic review of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartari, Francesca; Conti, Alessandro; Cerqueti, Roy

    2017-01-01

    Target agents are peculiar oncological drugs which differ from the traditional therapies in their ability of recognizing specific molecules expressed by tumor cells and microenvironment. Thus, their toxicity is generally lower than that associated to chemotherapy, and they represent nowadays a new standard of care in a number of tumors. This paper deals with the relationship between economic costs and toxicity of target agents. At this aim, a cluster analysis-based exploration of the main features of a large collection of them is carried out, with a specific focus on the variables leading to the identification of their toxicity and related costs. The analysis of the toxicity is based on the Severe Adverse Events (SAE) and Discontinuation (D) rates of each target agent considering data published on PubMed from 1965 to 2016 in the phase II and III studies that have led to the approval of these drugs for cancer patients by US Food and Drug Administration. The construction of the dataset represents a key step of the research, and is grounded on the critical analysis of a wide set of clinical studies. In order to capture different evaluation strategies of the toxicity, clustering is performed according to three different criteria (including Voronoi tessellation). Our procedure allows us to identify 5 different groups of target agents pooled by similar SAE and D rates and, at the same time, 3 groups based on target agents' costs for 1 month and for the median whole duration of therapy. Results highlight several specific regularities for toxicity and costs. This study present several limitations, being realized starting from clinical trials and not from individual patients' data. However, a macroscopic perspective suggests that costs are rather heterogeneous, and they do not clearly follow the clustering based on SAE and D rates.

  2. Cobalt Complexes as Antiviral and Antibacterial Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddie L. Chang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Metal ion complexes are playing an increasing role in the development of antimicrobials. We review here the antimicrobial properties of cobalt coordination complexes in oxidation state 3+. In addition to reviewing the cobalt complexes containing polydentate donor ligands, we also focus on the antimicrobial activity of the homoleptic [Co(NH36]3+ ion.

  3. Cobalt Complexes as Antiviral and Antibacterial Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    containing tetradentate N, N, N, S ligand and is a histamine H2-receptor antagonist. In addition to being widely used in the treatment of peptic ... ulcers and reflux esophagitis, famotidine has also been used in the treatment of Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s...to 5 mM of compound in our flow cytometry studies without detecting a significant amount of cell death (Table 1). In these studies, we measured the

  4. Design and preclinical evaluation of melanoma targeting agents for internal radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chezal, J.M.; Papon, J.; Labarre, P.; Denoyer, D.; Bonnet-Duquennoy, M.; Miot-Noirault, E.; Bayle, M.; Chavignon, O.; Teulade, J.C.; Maublant, J.; Madelmont, J.C.; Moins, N. [Centre Jean Perrin, Inserm-Univ. d' Auvergne, UMR 484, 63 - Clermont Ferrand (France)

    2008-02-15

    Targeted internal radionuclide therapy would be an effective alternative to current therapies for disseminated melanoma treatment. N-(2-diethylaminoethyl)-4-iodo benzamide (B.Z.A.) and compounds of this series exhibit a specific affinity for melanoma tissue giving them a potent application for gamma imaging ({sup 123}I) or radionuclide therapy ({sup 131}I or {sup 125}I).With the aim of internal radionuclide therapy, a pharmaco-chemical study has been carried out in order to select new derivatives with a longer retention time in the tumor of melanoma bearing mice and suitable dosimetry. New molecules synthesized are B.Z.A. analogs differing by (1) the aliphatic side chain, (2) aromatic ring. After the design of compounds, the synthesis, and the labelling with {sup 125}I, a study of their biodistribution was performed in B 16 F0 melanoma bearing C.57 B.L.6 mice after i.v. injection. The radioactivity biodistribution was analysed using an A.M.B.I.S.4000 detector on whole body slices of mice obtained by cryo section. The radioactivity was quantified in different organs including tumor and expressed as percentage of injected dose/g of tissue (% I.D./g). Dosimetry parameters for a {sup 131}I utilization were extrapolated using the M.I.R.D. program. The first selected compound has been further evaluated on different models. S.I.M.S. imaging, metabolism and in vivo anti tumoral activity after {sup 131}I labelling were assessed. For number of the studied molecules, a tumor uptake was observed and at least four compounds exhibited an original pharmacokinetic profile: high, specific and durable tumour concentration with a rapid clearance from non-target organs. The tumour concentration after 72 h was increased up to 16- fold compared to B.Z.A. and in term of dosimetry, for a {sup 131}I labelling, the tumor absorbed dose was increased by more than 6-fold. Such profiles made these compounds promising for an application to internal radionuclide therapy. The first selected

  5. Targeting the oxidative stress response system of fungi with safe, redox-potent chemosensitizing agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong H. eKim

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The cellular antioxidation system is a target in the antifungal action of amphotericin B (AMB and itraconazole (ITZ, in filamentous fungi. The sakAΔ mutant of Aspergillus fumigatus, a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK gene deletion mutant in the antioxidation system, was found to be more sensitive to AMB or ITZ than other A. fumigatus strains, a wild type and a mpkCΔ mutant (MAPK gene deletion mutant in polyalcohol sugar utilization system. The sakAΔ mutant showed no growth at 0.5 μg mL-1 of ITZ or reduced growth at 1.0 to 2.0 μg mL-1 of AMB, while the other strains exhibited robust growth. Complete fungal kill (≥ 99.9% by ITZ or AMB was achieved by much lower dosages for the sakAΔ mutant than for the other strains. SakA and MpkC appear to have overlapping roles in marshalling the oxidative stress response under treatment by an organic peroxide, tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BuOOH, or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. The SakA signalling pathway was found to be responsible for fungal tolerance to AMB or ITZ toxicity. It appears msnA, an Aspergillus ortholog to Saccharomyces cerevisiae MSN2 (encoding a stress-responsive C2H2-type zinc-finger regulator and sakA and/or mpkC (upstream MAPKs are in the same stress response network under t-BuOOH-, H2O2- or AMB-triggered toxicity. Of note is that ITZ-sensitive yeast pathogens (Candida krusei and Cryptococcus neoformans were also sensitive to t-BuOOH, showing a connection between ITZ toxicity and oxidative stress response. This was shown by enhanced antifungal activity of AMB or ITZ when co-applied with redox-potent natural compounds, 2,3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, thymol or salicylaldehyde, as chemosensitizing agents. Hence, redox compounds, which target the antioxidation system in fungi, possess a potent chemosensitizing capacity to enhance efficacy of conventional drugs inducing oxidative stress. Such chemosensitization can reduce costs and alleviate negative side effects associated with current

  6. A targeted ultrasound contrast agent carrying gene and cell-penetrating peptide: preparation and gene transfection in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jianli; Zhang, Ping; Tian, Ju; Zhou, Zhiyi; Liu, Xingzhao; Wang, Dong; Wang, Zhigang

    2014-09-01

    Targeted and high efficient gene delivery is a main issue in gene treatment. Taking advantage of ischemic memory target P-selectin and our previous study-synergistic effects of ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) and TAT peptide on gene transfection, which were characterized by targeted aggregation and high efficient gene transfection, we set up a 'smart' gene delivery system-targeted ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) carrying gene and cell-permeable peptides (CPP). Such UCA had a strong binding force with DNA which was protected from being hydrolysed by nuclease. Moreover, synergistic effects of UTMD and TAT peptide increased gene transfection. Specifically, the UCA were reacted with an ischemic memory target P-selectin overexpressed by ischemic issues (including ischemic heart disease) and loaded with gene and CPP, which enabled targeted localization and gene delivery to ischemic cells overexpressing P-selectin. We demonstrated their targeting affinity for hypoxia human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) and gene transfection in vitro. The results of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) showed that gene and CPP were distributed on the shell of UCA. Red fluorescence was observed on the surface of targeted UCA using immunofluorescent microscopy, which demonstrated that the antibody was successfully connected to the UCA. The targeted UCA was specifically and tightly binded to hypoxia HUVEC, while there were no or little non-targeted UCA binding around hypoxia HUVEC. 24h after transfection, gene transfection efficiency detected by FCM was higher in targeted group than non-targeted group. Overall, the targeted UCA carrying gene and CPP was prepared successfully. It had a strong target binding capacity to hypoxia HUVEC and high efficient gene transfection, which maybe provide a novel strategy for gene therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Multi-targeting Andrographolide and its Natural Analogs as Potential Therapeutic Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, V; Yarla, Nagendra Sastry; Bishayee, Anupam; Putta, Swathi; Malla, Ramarao; Neelapu, Nageswara Rao Reddy; Challa, Surekha; Das, Subhasish; Shiralgi, Yallappa; Hegde, Gurumurthy; Dhananjaya, Bhadrapura Lakkappa

    2017-01-01

    Andrographis paniculata (A. paniculata) is a medicinal plant used in the Indian and Chinese traditional medicinal systems for its various beneficial properties of therapeutics. This is due to the presence of a diterpene lactone called 'andrographolide'. Several biological activities like antiinflammatory, antitumour, anti-hyperglycaemic, anti-fertility, antiviral, cardio protective and hepatoprotective properties are attributed to andrographolide and its natural analogs. The studies have shown that not only this diterpene lactone (andrographolide), but also other related terpenoid analogs from A. paniculata could be exploited for disease prevention due to their structural similarity with diverse pharmacological activities. Several scientific groups are trying to unveil the underlying mechanisms involved in these biological actions brough aout by andrographolide and its analogs. This review aims at giving an overview on the therapeutical and/or pharmacological activities of andrographolide and its derivatives and also exemplify the underlying mechanisms involved. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Broad-Spectrum Drugs Against Viral Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan P. Wong

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Development of antivirals has focused primarily on vaccines and on treatments for specific viral agents. Although effective, these approaches may be limited in situations where the etiologic agent is unknown or when the target virus has undergone mutation, recombination or reassortment. Augmentation of the innate immune response may be an effective alternative for disease amelioration. Nonspecific, broad-spectrum immune responses can be induced by double-stranded (dsRNAs such as poly (ICLC, or oligonucleotides (ODNs containing unmethylated deocycytidyl-deoxyguanosinyl (CpG motifs. These may offer protection against various bacterial and viral pathogens regardless of their genetic makeup, zoonotic origin or drug resistance.

  9. Antiviral Perspectives for Chikungunya Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Parashar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a mosquito-borne pathogen that has a major health impact in humans and causes acute febrile illness in humans accompanied by joint pains and, in many cases, persistent arthralgia lasting for weeks to years. CHIKV reemerged in 2005-2006 in several parts of the Indian Ocean islands and India after a gap of 32 years, causing millions of cases. The re-emergence of CHIKV has also resulted in numerous outbreaks in several countries in the eastern hemisphere, with a threat to further expand in the near future. However, there is no vaccine against CHIKV infection licensed for human use, and therapy for CHIKV infection is still mainly limited to supportive care as antiviral agents are yet in different stages of testing or development. In this review we explore the different perspectives for chikungunya treatment and the effectiveness of these treatment regimens and discuss the scope for future directions.

  10. Delivering direct acting antiviral therapy for hepatitis C to highly marginalised and current drug injecting populations in a targeted primary health care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Phillip; Lothian, Rebecca; Chronister, Karen; Gilliver, Rosie; Kearley, John; Dore, Gregory J; van Beek, Ingrid

    2017-09-01

    The Kirketon Road Centre (KRC) is a community-based public health facility in Sydney, Australia, that provides healthcare to people who inject drugs (PWID), including hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment. From March 2016, the Australian Government has provided access to direct-acting antivirals (DAA) for adults with chronic HCV, without liver disease stage or drug and alcohol use restrictions. The aim of this study was to report DAA treatment outcomes among highly marginalised PWID treated at KRC. All individuals initiating DAA treatment at KRC and due for sustained virological response (SVR12) testing by end 2016 were included. Demographic, drug use behaviour, clinical parameters, adherence support and HCV treatment outcomes, including SVR12 were recorded. Factors associated with SVR12, loss-to-follow-up (LTFU) and delayed SVR12 testing (>SVR16) were assessed by multivariate analysis. SVR12 was assessed by intention-to-treat (ITT) and modified ITT, the latter excluding individuals with an end-of-treatment response (ETR) but no SVR12 assessment, or who postponed their SVR12 date due to treatment interruption. A total of 72 individuals commencing DAAs were included, of whom 67% were male, 30% homeless, and 32% Aboriginal. All had a lifetime history of injecting drug use, with 75% having injected within the last six months, and 44% injecting at least weekly; 25% were also enrolled in opioid substitution therapy. Twenty-five (35%) individuals elected to receive an enhanced adherence-support package. Fifty-nine of 72 (82%) individuals due for SVR12 attended for testing, of whom 59/59 (100%) achieved SVR, providing an ITT SVR of 82%. A further six individuals had undetectable HCV RNA at ETR, but no SVR12 assessment, and one interrupted treatment, providing a mITT SVR of 91%. Homelessness was associated with delayed SVR12 testing (OR 24.9 95%CI 2.9-212.8, p=0.003). There was no association between LTFU and frequency of drug injection, last drug injected, or planned

  11. Deciphering molecular properties and docking studies of hepatitis C and non-hepatitis C antiviral inhibitors - A computational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Arthi; Febin Prabhu Dass, J

    2017-04-01

    Hepatitis C is an infectious liver disease with high mortality rate which is caused by Hepatitis C virus. Several treatment methods have been applied to combat this deadly virus including interferons, vaccine and direct acting antivirals (DAAs). However, the later shows promising effects in HCV treatment with lower adverse effect. Specifically, the DAAs target the non-structural proteins (NS3 and NS5B). The objective of the present study is to hypothesize an alternative antiviral inhibitor for HCV from the available other antivirals. Computation of 2D molecular descriptors for the selected antiviral inhibitors followed by clustering the descriptor features. The closely clustered compounds were subjected to the interaction studies against the HCV target protein to validate the cluster result. The clustering result showed that indinavir (HIV inhibitor) and AT130 (HBV inhibitor) molecule are close to the HCV inhibitor. The indinavir complexed with NS3 protein shows -5.33kcal/mol and AT-130 complexed with NS5B protein possess the binding energy of -8.87kcal/mol. The docking interaction study indicated a better binding affinity than other viral inhibitors. From the descriptor based feature similarity analysis and the interaction study, it can be concluded that indinavir and AT-130 could be a potential alternative agent for HCV treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Paramagnetic Gd2O3 Nanoparticle-Based Targeting Theranostic Agent for C6 Rat Glioma Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Pyo Hong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to synthesize theranostic agent targeting C6 rat glioma cell, which was based on the dextran coated paramagnetic gadolinium oxide nanoparticles (D-PGONs conjugated with folic acid (FA or paclitaxel (PTX. The D-PGONs were synthesized by the in situ coprecipitation method, and the average value of the size distribution was 2.9 nm. FTIR spectroscopy was fulfilled to confirm the conjugations of FA or PTX with D-PGONs. The bioprotective effects of dextran coating and chemotherapeutic effect of PTX in the C6 glioma cell were evaluated by the MTT assay. The differences in uptakes between the synthesized theranostic agents into C6 cells were observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. In addition, the magnetic contrast enhancement with different concentration of the synthesized agent was compared by the T1-weighted MRI imaging. It was experimentally shown that the synthesized theranostic agent targets C6 cells due to the ligand-receptor-mediated endocytosis and provides enhancement in MR contrast depending on the concentration due to the paramagnetic property of gadolinium nanoparticle. In addition, it was shown by the results of MTT assay that the synthesized nanocomposites were more effective in reducing cell viability than bare gadolinium nanoparticles. In conclusion, it was shown that FA and PTX conjugated D-PGONs could be used as the theranostic agent with paramagnetism and chemotherapeutic property.

  13. A method for evaluating cognitively informed micro-targeted campaign strategies: An agent-based model proof of principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Jens Koed; Pilditch, Toby D

    2018-01-01

    In political campaigns, perceived candidate credibility influences the persuasiveness of messages. In campaigns aiming to influence people's beliefs, micro-targeted campaigns (MTCs) that target specific voters using their psychological profile have become increasingly prevalent. It remains open how effective MTCs are, notably in comparison to population-targeted campaign strategies. Using an agent-based model, the paper applies recent insights from cognitive models of persuasion, extending them to the societal level in a novel framework for exploring political campaigning. The paper provides an initial treatment of the complex dynamics of population level political campaigning in a psychologically informed manner. Model simulations show that MTCs can take advantage of the psychology of the electorate by targeting voters favourable disposed towards the candidate. Relative to broad campaigning, MTCs allow for efficient and adaptive management of complex campaigns. Findings show that disliked MTC candidates can beat liked population-targeting candidates, pointing to societal questions concerning campaign regulations.

  14. Activity based protein profiling leads to identification of novel protein targets for nerve agent VX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carmany, D.; Walz, A.J.; Hsu, F.L.; Benton, B.; Burnett, D.; Gibbons, J.; Noort, D.; Glaros, T.; Sekowski, J.W.

    2017-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents continue to be a threat at home and abroad during the war against terrorism. Human exposure to nerve agents such as VX results in a cascade of toxic effects relative to the exposure level including ocular miosis, excessive secretions, convulsions, seizures, and

  15. Ultrasonic Analysis of Peptide- and Antibody-Targeted Microbubble Contrast Agents for Molecular Imaging of αvβ3-Expressing Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. Dayton

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of targeted ultrasound contrast agents is to significantly and selectively enhance the detection of a targeted vascular site. In this manuscript, three distinct contrast agents targeted to the αvβ3 integrin are examined. The αvβ3 integrin has been shown to be highly expressed on metastatic tumors and endothelial cells during neovascularization, and its expression has been shown to correlate with tumor grade. Specific adhesion of these contrast agents to αvβ3-expressing cell monolayers is demonstrated in vitro, and compared with that of nontargeted agents. Acoustic studies illustrate a backscatter amplitude increase from monolayers exposed to the targeted contrast agents of up to 13-fold (22 dB relative to enhancement due to control bubbles. A linear dependence between the echo amplitude and bubble concentration was observed for bound agents. The decorrelation of the echo from adherent targeted agents is observed over successive pulses as a function of acoustic pressure and bubble density. Frequency–domain analysis demonstrates that adherent targeted bubbles exhibit high-amplitude narrowband echo components, in contrast to the primarily wideband response from free microbubbles. Results suggest that adherent targeted contrast agents are differentiable from free-floating microbubbles, that targeted contrast agents provide higher sensitivity in the detection of angiogenesis, and that conventional ultrasound imaging techniques such as signal subtraction or decorrelation detection can be used to detect integrin-expressing vasculature with sufficient signal-to-noise.

  16. Biological evaluation and molecular docking of Rhein as a multi-targeted radiotherapy sensitization agent of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhengying; Tian, Wei; Li, Jing; Wang, Chunmiao; Pan, Zhiyu; Li, Danrong; Hou, Huaxin

    2017-11-01

    Radiation resistance of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a joint effect caused by complex molecular mechanisms. The development of multi-target radiotherapy sensitization agents offered a promising method for the treatment of NPC. In this work, the probability of Rhein to be a multi-target radiotherapy sensitization agent was explored through computer aid virtual screening by inverse docking study. In order to validate the accuracy of the computational results, radiotherapy sensitization of Rhein to NPC cells and its effects on the expression of target proteins were evaluated separately by CCK8 assay and Western blotting analysis. Our result demonstrated that Rhein possessed strong binding affinity with RAC1 and HSP90. No cytotoxic concentration of Rhein had radiosensitization effect on nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE1 cells. After treatment with Rhein and 2Gy radiation, the expression of RAC1 upregulated and the expression of HSP90 down-regulated in cells. Based on the above data, Rhein is likely to become an attractive lead compound for the future design of multi-target radiotherapy sensitization agents.

  17. Editor’s Pick: Targeted Agents in Patients with Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma on Dialysis: Myths and Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Guida

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Agents targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF/VEGF receptor (VEGFR pathway, as well as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitors have revolutionised the therapeutic landscape of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC in the past decade, greatly improving the survival rates of these patients. However, translating results of registrative Phase III trials into everyday clinical practice is often troublesome, since real-world patients are completely different from those enrolled in randomised controlled Phase III trials. Prospective data on active oncological treatments in mRCC patients on dialysis are dramatically lacking. This literature review summarises and critically comments on available data relative to mRCC patients on dialysis receiving either VEGF/VEGFR-targeting agents, or mTOR inhibitors. Although prospective studies would definitely be warranted in these specific patient populations, all the available data suggest that mRCC patients on dialysis have the same outcome, both in terms of efficacy and safety, as mRCC patients with normal or marginally impaired kidney function, when treated with VEGF/VEGFR-targeting agents and/or mTOR inhibitors.

  18. Antiviral Drugs: Seasonal Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-09-29

    In this podcast, Dr. Joe Bresee explains the nature of antiviral drugs and how they are used for seasonal flu.  Created: 9/29/2010 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 9/29/2010.

  19. Curcumin Shows Antiviral Properties against Norovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Minji; Lee, GilJae; Si, Jiyeon; Lee, Sung-Joon; You, Hyun Ju; Ko, GwangPyo

    2016-10-20

    Phytochemicals provide environmentally friendly and relatively inexpensive natural products, which could potentially benefit public health by controlling human norovirus (HuNoV) infection. In this study, 18 different phytochemicals were evaluated for antiviral effects against norovirus using murine norovirus (MNV) as a model for norovirus biology. Among these phytochemicals, curcumin (CCM) was the most potent anti-noroviral phytochemical, followed by resveratrol (RVT). In a cell culture infection model, exposure to CCM or RVT for 3 days reduced infectivity of norovirus by 91% and 80%, respectively. To confirm the antiviral capability of CCM, we further evaluated its antiviral efficacy at various doses (0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, and 2 mg/mL) and durations (short-term: 10, 30, 60, and 120 min; long-term: 1, 3, 7, and 14 days). The anti-noroviral effect of CCM was verified to occur in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, we evaluated the inhibitory effect of each phytochemical on the replication of HuNoV using a HuNoV replicon-bearing cell line (HG23). Neither CCM nor RVT had a strong inhibitory effect on HuNoV replication, which suggests that their antiviral mechanism may involve viral entry or other life cycle stages rather than the replication of viral RNA. Our results demonstrated that CCM may be a promising candidate for development as an anti-noroviral agent to prevent outbreaks of foodborne illness.

  20. Estrogen receptor targeted contrast agents for molecular magnetic resonance imaging of breast cancer hormonal status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi ePais

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The estrogen receptor α (ER is over expressed in most breast cancers and its level serves as a major prognostic factor. It is important to develop quantitative molecular imaging methods that specifically detect ER in vivo and assess its function throughout the entire primary breast cancer, as well as in metastatic breast cancer lesions. This study presents the biochemical and molecular features, as well as the magnetic resonance imaging effects of two novel ER- targeted contrast agents (CAs based on pyridine-tetra-acetate-Gd(III chelate conjugated to 17β-estradiol (EPTA-Gd or to tamoxifen (TPTA-Gd. The experiments were conducted in solution, in human breast cancer cells and in severe combined immunodeficient mice implanted with transfected ER-positive and ER-negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts. Binding studies with ER in solution and in human breast cancer cells indicated affinities in the micromolar range of both CAs. Biochemical and molecular studies in breast cancer cell cultures showed that both CAs exhibit estrogen like agonistic activity, enhancing cell proliferation, as well as up-regulating cMyc oncogene and down-regulating ER expression levels. The MRI longitudinal relaxivity was significantly augmented by EPTA-Gd in ER-positive cells as compared to ER-negative cells. Dynamic contrast enhanced studies with EPTA-Gd in vivo indicated specific augmentation of the MRI water signal in the ER-positive versus ER-negative xenografts, confirming EPTA-Gd specific interaction with ER. In contrast, TPTA-Gd did not show increased enhancement in ER-positive tumors and did not appear to interact in vivo with the tumors’ ER. However, TPTA-Gd was found to interact strongly with muscle tissue, enhancing muscle signal intensity in a mechanism independent of the presence of ER. The specificity of EPTA-Gd interaction with ER in vivo was further verified by acute and chronic competition with tamoxifen. The chronic tamoxifen treatment also

  1. Maintenance Therapy in Ovarian Cancer with Targeted Agents Improves PFS and OS: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyu Qian

    Full Text Available Maintenance therapy with targeted agents for prolonging remission for ovarian cancer patients remains controversial. As a result, a meta-analysis was conducted to assess the effectiveness and safety of using maintenance therapy with targeted agents for the treatment of ovarian cancer.From inception to January 2015, we searched for randomized, controlled trials (RCTs using the following databases: PubMed, ScienceDirect, the Cochrane Library, Clinicaltrials.gov and EBSCO. Eligible trials included RCTs that evaluated standard chemotherapy which was either followed or not followed by targeted maintenance in patients with ovarian cancer who had been previously receiving adjunctive treatments, such as cytoreductive surgery and standard chemotherapy. The outcome measures included progression-free survival (PFS, overall survival (OS and incidence of adverse events.A total of 13 RCTs, which were published between 2006 and 2014, were found to be in accordance with our inclusion criteria. The primary meta-analysis indicated that both PFS and OS were statistically and significantly improved in the targeted maintenance therapy group as compared to the control group (PFS: HR = 0.84, 95%CI: 0.75 to 0.95, p = 0.001; OS: HR = 0.91, 95%CI: 0.84 to 0.98, p = 0.02. When taking safety into consideration, the use of targeted agents was significantly correlated with increased risks of fatigue, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and hypertension. However, no significant differences were found in incidence rates of abdominal pain, constipation or joint pain.Our results indicate that targeted maintenance therapy clearly improves the survival of ovarian cancer patients but may also increase the incidence of adverse events. Additional randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter investigations will be required on a larger cohort of patients to verify our findings.

  2. Microtubule-Targeting Agents Enter the Central Nervous System (CNS): Double-edged Swords for Treating CNS Injury and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Eun-Mi; Lee, Byoung Dae

    2014-12-01

    Microtubules have been among the most successful targets in anticancer therapy and a large number of microtubule-targeting agents (MTAs) are in various stages of clinical development for the treatment of several malignancies. Given that injury and diseases in the central nervous system (CNS) are accompanied by acute or chronic disruption of the structural integrity of neurons and that microtubules provide structural support for the nervous system at cellular and intracellular levels, microtubules are emerging as potential therapeutic targets for treating CNS disorders. It has been postulated that exogenous application of MTAs might prevent the breakdown or degradation of microtubules after injury or during neurodegeneration, which will thereby aid in preserving the structural integrity and function of the nervous system. Here we review recent evidence that supports this notion and also discuss potential risks of targeting microtubules as a therapy for treating nerve injury and neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Chemotherapy, targeted agents, antiemetics and growth-factors in human milk: how should we counsel cancer patients about breastfeeding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistilli, Barbara; Bellettini, Giulia; Giovannetti, Elisa; Codacci-Pisanelli, Giovanni; Azim, Hatem A; Benedetti, Giovanni; Sarno, Maria Anna; Peccatori, Fedro A

    2013-05-01

    An increasing number of women are diagnosed with cancer during pregnancy and lactation. Women are usually advised to interrupt breastfeeding during systemic anticancer treatment for fear of serious adverse effects to the nursed infant. However, the issue is poorly addressed in the literature and very few studies have evaluated the safety of breastfeeding during or after cytotoxic drugs or target agents administration. In this review we will analyze the available evidence that addresses the issue of anticancer drugs, targeted agents, antiemetics and growth-factors excretion in human milk. This could serve as a unique resource that may aid physicians in the management of breastfeeding cancer patients interested in maintaining lactation during treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Steroid plus antiviral treatment for Bell's palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, H M; Jung, S Y; Byun, J Y; Park, M S; Yeo, S G

    2015-05-01

    The effectiveness of antiviral agents for the treatment of Bell's palsy is uncertain. We evaluated whether a steroid with an antiviral agent (S + A group) provided better recovery outcomes than a steroid alone (S group) in patients with Bell's palsy. A total of 1342 patients diagnosed with Bell's palsy who visited the Kyung Hee Medical Center in Seoul, Korea, from 2002 to 2012 were included in this study. Patients in the S + A group were treated with prednisolone and antiviral agents (n = 569) and those in the S group with prednisolone alone (n = 773). Outcomes were measured using the House-Brackmann (HB) scale according to age, initial disease severity, electroneurography (ENoG) findings and underlying comorbidities. The rate of recovery (HB grades I and II) with initially severe Bell's palsy (HB grades V and VI) was higher in the S + A than in the S group (P = 0.001). However, the rates of recovery were similar with initially moderate palsy (HB grades II-IV) (P = 0.502). In patients classified according to age and ENoG-determined severity of palsy, the overall recovery rate was higher in the S + A than in the S group, but the differences were not statistically significant (P > 0.05 for both). The recovery rate without diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension (HTN) was higher in the S + A group than in the S group (P = 0.031). But in the patients with HTN and DM, the difference in recovery rates between the S + A and S groups was not statistically significant (P = 0.805). Treatment with a steroid plus antiviral agent resulted in significantly higher recovery rates than steroid therapy alone in patients with initially severe Bell's palsy and without either HTN or DM, and a nonsignificant trend towards higher recovery rates in all patients with Bell's palsy in this study. Antiviral agents may therefore help in the treatment of Bell's palsy. © 2014 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  5. aBiofilm: a resource of anti-biofilm agents and their potential implications in targeting antibiotic drug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Akanksha; Thakur, Anamika; Sharma, Shivangi

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Biofilms play an important role in the antibiotic drug resistance, which is threatening public health globally. Almost, all microbes mimic multicellular lifestyle to form biofilm by undergoing phenotypic changes to adapt adverse environmental conditions. Many anti-biofilm agents have been experimentally validated to disrupt the biofilms during last three decades. To organize this data, we developed the ‘aBiofilm’ resource (http://bioinfo.imtech.res.in/manojk/abiofilm/) that harbors a database, a predictor, and the data visualization modules. The database contains biological, chemical, and structural details of 5027 anti-biofilm agents (1720 unique) reported from 1988–2017. These agents target over 140 organisms including Gram-negative, Gram-positive bacteria, and fungus. They are mainly chemicals, peptides, phages, secondary metabolites, antibodies, nanoparticles and extracts. They show the diverse mode of actions by attacking mainly signaling molecules, biofilm matrix, genes, extracellular polymeric substances, and many more. The QSAR based predictor identifies the anti-biofilm potential of an unknown chemical with an accuracy of ∼80.00%. The data visualization section summarized the biofilm stages targeted (Circos plot); interaction maps (Cytoscape) and chemicals diversification (CheS-Mapper) of the agents. This comprehensive platform would help the researchers to understand the multilevel communication in the microbial consortium. It may aid in developing anti-biofilm therapeutics to deal with antibiotic drug resistance menace. PMID:29156005

  6. aBiofilm: a resource of anti-biofilm agents and their potential implications in targeting antibiotic drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Akanksha; Thakur, Anamika; Sharma, Shivangi; Kumar, Manoj

    2018-01-04

    Biofilms play an important role in the antibiotic drug resistance, which is threatening public health globally. Almost, all microbes mimic multicellular lifestyle to form biofilm by undergoing phenotypic changes to adapt adverse environmental conditions. Many anti-biofilm agents have been experimentally validated to disrupt the biofilms during last three decades. To organize this data, we developed the 'aBiofilm' resource (http://bioinfo.imtech.res.in/manojk/abiofilm/) that harbors a database, a predictor, and the data visualization modules. The database contains biological, chemical, and structural details of 5027 anti-biofilm agents (1720 unique) reported from 1988-2017. These agents target over 140 organisms including Gram-negative, Gram-positive bacteria, and fungus. They are mainly chemicals, peptides, phages, secondary metabolites, antibodies, nanoparticles and extracts. They show the diverse mode of actions by attacking mainly signaling molecules, biofilm matrix, genes, extracellular polymeric substances, and many more. The QSAR based predictor identifies the anti-biofilm potential of an unknown chemical with an accuracy of ∼80.00%. The data visualization section summarized the biofilm stages targeted (Circos plot); interaction maps (Cytoscape) and chemicals diversification (CheS-Mapper) of the agents. This comprehensive platform would help the researchers to understand the multilevel communication in the microbial consortium. It may aid in developing anti-biofilm therapeutics to deal with antibiotic drug resistance menace. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Double-targeting using a TrkC ligand conjugated to dipyrrometheneboron difluoride (BODIPY) based photodynamic therapy (PDT) agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamkaew, Anyanee; Burgess, Kevin

    2013-10-10

    A molecule 1 (IY-IY-PDT) was designed to contain a fragment (IY-IY) that targets the TrkC receptor and a photosensitizer that acts as an agent for photodynamic therapy (PDT). Molecule 1 had submicromolar photocytotoxicities to cells that were engineered to stably express TrkC (NIH3T3-TrkC) or that naturally express high levels of TrkC (SY5Y neuroblastoma lines). Control experiments showed that 1 is not cytotoxic in the dark and has significantly less photocytotoxicity toward cells that do not express TrkC (NIH3T3-WT). Other controls featuring a similar agent 2 (YI-YI-PDT), which is identical and isomeric with 1 except that the targeting region is scrambled (a YI-YI motif, see text), showed that 1 is considerably more photocytotoxic than 2 on TrkC(+) cells. Imaging live TrkC(+) cells after treatment with a fluorescent agent 1 (IY-IY-PDT) proved that 1 permeates into TrkC(+) cells and is localized in the lysosomes. This observation indirectly indicates that agent 1 enters the cells via the TrkC receptor. Consistent with this, the dose-dependent PDT effects of 1 can be competitively reduced by the natural TrkC ligand, neurotrophin NT3.

  8. The Viral and Eukaryotic Distribution of the Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) and its Potential as an Anti-Viral Translation Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-12-16

    dissimilar biochemical requirements of the pathogen. Examples of such targets include inhibitors ofbacteriaJ cell wall synthesis. Nearly aU bacteria ...Garvin, et aI, 1974). Bacteria and fungi arc cells. possessing DNA. RNA. and their own cellular machinery for producing the macromolecules essential for...heterozygous for the gene disruption. Meiosis of the heterozygous diploids will result in four haploid sJXlres, two of which will carry the mutant

  9. Rational design of novel highly potent and selective phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase III-beta (PI4KB) inhibitors as broad-spectrum antiviral agents and tools for chemical biology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mejdrová, Ivana; Humpolíčková, Jana; Nencka, Radim; Bouřa, Evžen

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 284, Suppl 1 (2017), s. 333 ISSN 1742-464X. [FEBS Congress /42./ From Molecules to Cells and Back. 10.09.2017-14.09.2017, Jerusalem] R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ15-21030Y; GA MŠk LO1302 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : PI4KB * antivirals Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  10. Antiviral immunity in marine molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Timothy J; Raftos, David; Speck, Peter; Montagnani, Caroline

    2015-09-01

    Marine molluscs, like all living organisms, are constantly exposed to viruses and have evolved efficient antiviral defences. We review here recent developments in molluscan antiviral immunity against viruses belonging to the order Herpesvirales. Emerging results suggest an interferon-like response and autophagy are involved in the antiviral defence of bivalves to viral infection. Multi-functional plasma proteins from gastropods and bivalves have been identified to have broad-spectrum antiviral activity against mammalian viruses. The antiviral defences present in molluscs can be enhanced by genetic selection, as shown by the presence of oyster strains specifically resistant to ostreid herpesvirus type 1. Whether varying amounts or different isoforms of these antiviral plasma proteins contributes to genetic resistance is worthy of further research. Other evolutionarily conserved antiviral mechanisms, such as RNA interference and apoptosis, still need further characterization.

  11. Targeted delivery of cancer-specific multimodal contrast agents for intraoperative detection of tumor boundaries and therapeutic margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ronald X.; Xu, Jeff S.; Huang, Jiwei; Tweedle, Michael F.; Schmidt, Carl; Povoski, Stephen P.; Martin, Edward W.

    2010-02-01

    Background: Accurate assessment of tumor boundaries and intraoperative detection of therapeutic margins are important oncologic principles for minimal recurrence rates and improved long-term outcomes. However, many existing cancer imaging tools are based on preoperative image acquisition and do not provide real-time intraoperative information that supports critical decision-making in the operating room. Method: Poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microbubbles (MBs) and nanobubbles (NBs) were synthesized by a modified double emulsion method. The MB and NB surfaces were conjugated with CC49 antibody to target TAG-72 antigen, a human glycoprotein complex expressed in many epithelial-derived cancers. Multiple imaging agents were encapsulated in MBs and NBs for multimodal imaging. Both one-step and multi-step cancer targeting strategies were explored. Active MBs/NBs were also fabricated for therapeutic margin assessment in cancer ablation therapies. Results: The multimodal contrast agents and the cancer-targeting strategies were tested on tissue simulating phantoms, LS174 colon cancer cell cultures, and cancer xenograft nude mice. Concurrent multimodal imaging was demonstrated using fluorescence and ultrasound imaging modalities. Technical feasibility of using active MBs and portable imaging tools such as ultrasound for intraoperative therapeutic margin assessment was demonstrated in a biological tissue model. Conclusion: The cancer-specific multimodal contrast agents described in this paper have the potential for intraoperative detection of tumor boundaries and therapeutic margins.

  12. Highlights of the 30th International Conference on Antiviral Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrei, Graciela; Carter, Kara; Janeba, Zlatko; Sampath, Aruna; Schang, Luis M; Tarbet, E Bart; Vere Hodge, R Anthony; Bray, Mike; Esté, José A

    2017-09-01

    The 30th International Conference on Antiviral Research (ICAR) was held in Atlanta, GA, USA from May 18 to 21, 2017. This report provides an account of award lectures, invited keynote addresses and oral presentations during the meeting. The 2017 Gertrude Elion Memorial Lecture Award by Michael Sofia highlighted one of the most important accomplishments in recent drug discovery in antiviral research, the identification of the hepatitis C virus direct-acting antiviral sofosbuvir and new alternatives to combat hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The Antonín Holý Lecture Award by David Chu on medicinal chemistry provided an overview of early developments of nucleoside analogs for the treatment of HIV and varicella zoster virus infection and how this knowledge serves to develop new drugs targeting HBV. Priscilla Yang gave the first ISAR Women in Science lecture. She reported on pharmacological validation of new antiviral targets for dengue, Zika and other flaviviruses. The William Prusoff Young Investigator Lecture Award by Maaike Everts described the Alabama Drug Discovery Alliance and the Antiviral Drug Discovery and Development Consortium, and how they are helping to accelerate the development of new antivirals. The 30th ICAR was a success in promoting new discoveries in antiviral drug development and research. The 31st ICAR will be held in Porto, Portugal, June 11-15, 2018. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A novel SIV gag-specific CD4(+)T-cell clone suppresses SIVmac239 replication in CD4(+)T cells revealing the interplay between antiviral effector cells and their infected targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Victor I; Trivett, Matthew T; Coren, Lori V; Jain, Sumiti; Bohn, Patrick S; Wiseman, Roger W; O'Connor, David H; Ohlen, Claes; Ott, David E

    2016-06-01

    To study CD4(+)T-cell suppression of AIDS virus replication, we isolated nine rhesus macaque SIVGag-specific CD4(+)T-cell clones. One responding clone, Gag68, produced a typical cytotoxic CD8(+)T-cell response: induction of intracellular IFN-γ, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and CD107a degranulation. Gag68 effectively suppressed the spread of SIVmac239 in CD4(+)T cells with a corresponding reduction of infected Gag68 effector cells, suggesting that CD4(+)effectors need to suppress their own infection in addition to their targets to be effective. Gag68 TCR cloning and gene transfer into CD4(+)T cells enabled additional experiments with this unique specificity after the original clone senesced. Our data supports the idea that CD4(+)T cells can directly limit AIDS virus spread in T cells. Furthermore, Gag68 TCR transfer into CD4(+)T-cell clones with differing properties holds promise to better understand the suppressive effector mechanisms used by this important component of the antiviral response using the rhesus macaque model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Prolonged In Vivo Retention of a Cathepsin D Targeted Optical Contrast Agent in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snir, Jonatan A; Suchy, Mojmir; Lawrence, Keith St; Hudson, Robert H E; Pasternak, Stephen H; Bartha, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Cathepsin D (CatD) is a lysosomal protease that is elevated early in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have previously developed a Targeted contrast agent (CA) to detect CatD activity in vivo, consisting of a magnetic resonance imaging/fluorescent moiety linked to a cell penetrating peptide (CPP) by means of a CatD cleavage site and have demonstrated its uptake in the brain of an AD mouse model. The purpose of this study was to characterize the in vivo retention of a near infra-red fluorescent dye labeled version of this CA. Six adult C57Bl/6 wild-type mice and six adult 5XFAD transgenic AD mice were studied using a small animal imaging system at five and twelve months of age using our novel Targeted CA, or two different control CAs; a Non-Targeted (lacking the CatD cleavage site) and a Non-Penetrating (lacking the CPP). Following intravenous CA administration, the optical signal was recorded within the brain and uptake and washout curves were measured and fitted to a one-phase exponential decay curve. In all wild-type and 5XFAD mice, the washout of the Targeted CA that included a CPP domain was significantly slower than the washout of the Non-Penetrating and Non-Targeted CA. Furthermore, the washout of the CatD Targeted CA was significantly slower in the 5XFAD mice compared to the age matched wild-type controls (p CatD targeted CA in 5XFAD mice suggests this agent may be useful for AD detection.

  15. N-Acetylgalactosamino Dendrons as Clearing Agents to Enhance Liver Targeting of Model Antibody-Fusion Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Barney; Cheal, Sarah M.; Torchon, Geralda; Dilhas, Anna; Yang, Guangbin; Pu, Jun; Punzalan, Blesida; Larson, Steven M.; Ouerfelli, Ouathek

    2014-01-01

    Dendrimer clearing agents represent a unique class of compounds for use in multistep targeting (MST) in radioimmunotherapy and imaging. These compounds were developed to facilitate the removal of excess tumor-targeting monoclonal antibody (mAb) prior to administration of the radionuclide to minimize exposure of normal tissue to radiation. Clearing agents are designed to capture the circulating mAb, and target it to the liver for metabolism. Glycodendrons are ideally suited for MST applications as these highly branched compounds are chemically well-defined thus advantageous over heterogeneous macromolecules. Previous studies have described glycodendron 3 as a clearing agent for use in three-step MST protocols, and early in vivo assessment of 3 showed promise. However, synthetic challenges have hampered its availability for further development. In this report we describe a new sequence of chemical steps which enables the straightforward synthesis and analytical characterization of this class of dendrons. With accessibility and analytical identification solved, we sought to evaluate both lower and higher generation dendrons for hepatocyte targeting as well as clearance of a model protein. We prepared a series of clearing agents where a single biotin is connected to glycodendrons displaying four, eight, sixteen or thirty-two α-thio-N-acetylgalactosamine (α–SGalNAc) units, resulting in compounds with molecular weights ranging from 2 to 17 kDa, respectively. These compounds were fully characterized by LCMS and NMR. We then evaluated the capacity of these agents to clear a model 131I-labeled single chain variable fragment antibody-streptavidin (131I-scFv-SAv) fusion protein from blood and tissue in mice, and compared their clearing efficiencies to that of a 500 kDa dextran-biotin conjugate. Glycodendrons and dextran-biotin exhibited enhanced blood clearance of the scFv-SAv construct. Biodistribution analysis showed liver targeting/uptake of the scFv-SAv construct to

  16. Identification of poly(rC) binding protein 2 (PCBP2) as a target protein of immunosuppressive agent 15-deoxyspergualin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murahashi, Masataka; Simizu, Siro; Morioka, Masahiko [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Umezawa, Kazuo, E-mail: umezawa@aichi-med-u.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Target Medicine, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, 1-1 Yazako-Karimata, Nagakute 480-1195 (Japan)

    2016-08-05

    15-Deoxyspergualin (DSG) is an immunosuppressive agent being clinically used. Unlike tacrolimus and cyclosporine A, it does not inhibit the calcineurin pathway, and its mechanism of action and target molecule have not been elucidated. Therefore, we previously prepared biotinylated derivative of DSG (BDSG) to fish up the target protein. In the present research, we identified poly(rC) binding protein 2 (PCBP2) as a DSG-binding protein using this probe. DSG was confirmed to bind to PCBP2 by pull-down assay. Intracellular localization of PCBP2 was changed from the nucleus to the cytoplasm by DSG treatment. DSG inhibited the cell growth, and over-expression of PCBP2 reduced the anti-proliferative activity of DSG. PCBP2 is known to regulate various proteins including STAT1/2. Thus, we found PCBP2 as the first target protein of DSG that can explain the immunosuppressive activity. -- Highlights: •Fifteen-deoxyspergualin (DSG) is an immunosuppressive agent clinically used. •We have identified PCBP2, an RNA-binding protein, as a molecular target of DSG. •Alteration of PCBP2 activity may explain the immunosuppressive activity of DSG.

  17. The status of targeted agents in the setting of neoadjuvant radiation therapy in locally advanced rectal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynne-Jones, Rob; Hadaki, Maher; Harrison, Mark

    2013-09-01

    Radiotherapy has a longstanding and well-defined role in the treatment of resectable rectal cancer to reduce the historically high risk of local recurrence. In more advanced borderline or unresectable cases, where the circumferential resection margin (CRM) is breached or threatened according to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), despite optimized local multimodality treatment and the gains achieved by modern high quality total mesorectal excision (TME), at least half the patients fail to achieve sufficient downstaging with current schedules. Many do not achieve an R0 resection. In less locally advanced cases, even if local control is achieved, this confers only a small impact on distant metastases and a significant proportion of patients (30-40%) still subsequently develop metastatic disease. In fact, distant metastases have now become the predominant cause of failure in rectal cancer. Therefore, increasing the intensity and efficacy of chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy by integrating additional cytotoxics and biologically targetted agents seems an appealing strategy to explore-with the aim of enhancing curative resection rates and improving distant control and survival. However, to date, we lack validated biomarkers for these biological agents apart from wild-type KRAS. For cetuximab, the appearance of an acneiform rash is associated with response, but low levels of magnesium appear more controversial. There are no molecular biomarkers for bevacizumab. Although some less invasive clinical markers have been proposed for bevacizumab, such as circulating endothelial cells (CECS), circulating levels of VEGF and the development of overt hypertension, these biomarkers have not been validated and are observed to emerge only after a trial of the agent. We also lack a simple method of ongoing monitoring of 'on target' effects of these biological agents, which could determine and pre-empt the development of resistance, prior to radiological and clinical assessessments or

  18. Smallpox Antiviral Drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    phogenic proteolysis is crucial for simple RNA viruses such as poliovirus and HIV, and also appears to play a central role in the assembly of more...al particles [14]; unidirectional packaging of bacteriophage T4 DNA [15]; completion of the infectious poliovirus virion in a flexible configuration...effects of an antiviral both in vitro and in vivo. Some viruses have not been adapted to grow in tissue culture cells or due to their genetic makeup are

  19. Targeting and timing promotional activities : An agent-based model for the takeoff of new products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delre, S. A.; Jager, W.; Bijmolt, T. H. A.; Janssen, M. A.

    Many marketing efforts focus on promotional activities that support the launch of new products. Promotional strategies may play a crucial role in the early stages of the product life cycle, and determine to a large extent the diffusion of a new product. This paper proposes an agent-based model to

  20. Emerging protein targets for metal-based pharmaceutical agents : An update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Almeida, Andreia; Oliveira, Bruno L.; Correia, Joao D. G.; Soveral, Graca; Casini, Angela

    2013-01-01

    The peculiar chemical properties of metal-based drugs impart innovative pharmacological profiles to this class of therapeutic and diagnostic agents, most likely in relation to novel molecular mechanisms still poorly understood. However, inorganic drugs have been scarcely considered for medicinal

  1. Evaluation of respiration of mitochondria in cancer cells exposed to mitochondria-targeted agents.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klučková, Katarína; Dong, L. F.; Bajziková, Martina; Rohlena, Jakub; Neužil, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 1265, 07 Oct 2015 (2015), s. 181-194 ISSN 1940-6029 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Animals * Antineoplastic Agents * drug effects * *pharmacology Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  2. Development of a new anti-cancer agent for targeted radionuclide therapy: β- radiolabeled RAFT-RGD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitprin, A.

    2013-01-01

    β-emitters radiolabeled RAFT-RGD as new agents for internal targeted radiotherapy. The αvβ3 integrin is known to play an important role in tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor proliferation, survival and metastasis. Because of its overexpression on neo-endothelial cells such as those present in growing tumors, as well as on tumor cells of various origins, αvβ3 integrin is an attractive molecular target for diagnosis and therapy of the rapidly growing and metastatic tumors. A tetrameric RGD-based peptide, regioselectively addressable functionalized template-(cyclo-[RGDfK])4 (RAFT-RGD), specifically targets integrin αvβ3 in vitro and in vivo. RAFT-RGD has been used for tumor imaging and drug targeting. This study is the first to evaluate the therapeutic potential of the β-emitters radiolabeled tetrameric RGD peptide RAFT-RGD in a Nude mouse model of αvβ3 -expressing tumors. An injection of 37 MBq of 90 Y-RAFT-RGD or 177 Lu-RAFT-RGD in mice with αvβ3 -positive tumors caused a significant growth delay as compared with mice treated with 37 MBq of 90 Y-RAFT-RAD or 177 Lu-RAFT-RAD or untreated mice. In comparison, an injection of 30 MBq of 90 Y-RAFT-RGD had no efficacy for the treatment of αvβ3 -negative tumors. 90 Y-RAFT-RGD and 177 Lu-RAFT-RGD are potent αvβ3 -expressing tumor targeting agents for internal targeted radiotherapy. (author)

  3. Spectroscopic investigation of herpes simplex viruses infected cells and their response to antiviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erukhimovitch, Vitaly; Talyshinsky, Marina; Souprun, Yelena; Huleihel, Mahmoud

    2006-07-01

    In the present study, we used microscopic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to evaluate the antiviral activity of known antiviral agents against herpes viruses. The antiviral activity of Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) (which is an active compound of propolis) against herpes simplex type 1 and 2 was examined in cell culture. The advantage of microscopic FTIR spectroscopy over conventional FTIR spectroscopy is that it facilitates inspection of restricted regions of cell culture or tissue. Our results showed significant spectral differences at early stages of infection between infected and non-infected cells, and between infected cells treated with the used antiviral agent and those not treated. In infected cells, there was a considerable increase in phosphate levels. Our results show that treatment with used antiviral agent considerably abolish the spectral changes induced by the viral infection. In addition, it is possible to track by FTIR microscopy method the deferential effect of various doses of the drug.

  4. Targeted agents for patients with advanced/metastatic pancreatic cancer: A protocol for systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Baoshan; Pan, Bei; Ge, Long; Ma, Jichun; Wu, Yiting; Guo, Tiankang

    2018-03-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a devastating malignant tumor. Although surgical resection may offer a good prognosis and prolong survival, approximately 80% patients with PC are always diagnosed as unresectable tumor. National Comprehensive Cancer Network's (NCCN) recommended gemcitabine-based chemotherapy as efficient treatment. While, according to recent studies, targeted agents might be a better available option for advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer patients. The aim of this systematic review and network meta-analysis will be to examine the differences of different targeted interventions for advanced/metastatic PC patients. We will conduct this systematic review and network meta-analysis using Bayesian method and according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic review and Meta-Analysis Protocols (PRISMA-P) statement. To identify relevant studies, 6 electronic databases including PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Web of science, CNKI (Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure), and CBM (Chinese Biological Medical Database) will be searched. The risk of bias in included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) will be assessed using the Cochrane Handbook version 5.1.0. And we will use GRADE approach to assess the quality of evidence from network meta-analysis. Data will be analyzed using R 3.4.1 software. To the best of our knowledge, this systematic review and network meta-analysis will firstly use both direct and indirect evidence to compare the differences of different targeted agents and targeted agents plus chemotherapy for advanced/metastatic pancreatic cancer patients. This is a protocol of systematic review and meta-analysis, so the ethical approval and patient consent are not required. We will disseminate the results of this review by submitting to a peer-reviewed journal.

  5. Antiviral Lead Compounds from Marine Sponges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth P. Minneman

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Marine sponges are currently one of the richest sources of pharmacologically active compounds found in the marine environment. These bioactive molecules are often secondary metabolites, whose main function is to enable and/or modulate cellular communication and defense. They are usually produced by functional enzyme clusters in sponges and/or their associated symbiotic microorganisms. Natural product lead compounds from sponges have often been found to be promising pharmaceutical agents. Several of them have successfully been approved as antiviral agents for clinical use or have been advanced to the late stages of clinical trials. Most of these drugs are used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and herpes simplex virus (HSV. The most important antiviral lead of marine origin reported thus far is nucleoside Ara-A (vidarabine isolated from sponge Tethya crypta. It inhibits viral DNA polymerase and DNA synthesis of herpes, vaccinica and varicella zoster viruses. However due to the discovery of new types of viruses and emergence of drug resistant strains, it is necessary to develop new antiviral lead compounds continuously. Several sponge derived antiviral lead compounds which are hopedto be developed as future drugs are discussed in this review. Supply problems are usually the major bottleneck to the development of these compounds as drugs during clinical trials. However advances in the field of metagenomics and high throughput microbial cultivation has raised the possibility that these techniques could lead to the cost-effective large scale production of such compounds. Perspectives on biotechnological methods with respect to marine drug development are also discussed.

  6. Antiviral lead compounds from marine sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Sunil; Kaur, Mandeep; Minneman, Kenneth P

    2010-10-11

    Marine sponges are currently one of the richest sources of pharmacologically active compounds found in the marine environment. These bioactive molecules are often secondary metabolites, whose main function is to enable and/or modulate cellular communication and defense. They are usually produced by functional enzyme clusters in sponges and/or their associated symbiotic microorganisms. Natural product lead compounds from sponges have often been found to be promising pharmaceutical agents. Several of them have successfully been approved as antiviral agents for clinical use or have been advanced to the late stages of clinical trials. Most of these drugs are used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV). The most important antiviral lead of marine origin reported thus far is nucleoside Ara-A (vidarabine) isolated from sponge Tethya crypta. It inhibits viral DNA polymerase and DNA synthesis of herpes, vaccinica and varicella zoster viruses. However due to the discovery of new types of viruses and emergence of drug resistant strains, it is necessary to develop new antiviral lead compounds continuously. Several sponge derived antiviral lead compounds which are hoped to be developed as future drugs are discussed in this review. Supply problems are usually the major bottleneck to the development of these compounds as drugs during clinical trials. However advances in the field of metagenomics and high throughput microbial cultivation has raised the possibility that these techniques could lead to the cost-effective large scale production of such compounds. Perspectives on biotechnological methods with respect to marine drug development are also discussed.

  7. Antiviral lead compounds from marine sponges

    KAUST Repository

    Sagar, Sunil

    2010-10-11

    Marine sponges are currently one of the richest sources of pharmacologically active compounds found in the marine environment. These bioactive molecules are often secondary metabolites, whose main function is to enable and/or modulate cellular communication and defense. They are usually produced by functional enzyme clusters in sponges and/or their associated symbiotic microorganisms. Natural product lead compounds from sponges have often been found to be promising pharmaceutical agents. Several of them have successfully been approved as antiviral agents for clinical use or have been advanced to the late stages of clinical trials. Most of these drugs are used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV). The most important antiviral lead of marine origin reported thus far is nucleoside Ara-A (vidarabine) isolated from sponge Tethya crypta. It inhibits viral DNA polymerase and DNA synthesis of herpes, vaccinica and varicella zoster viruses. However due to the discovery of new types of viruses and emergence of drug resistant strains, it is necessary to develop new antiviral lead compounds continuously. Several sponge derived antiviral lead compounds which are hopedto be developed as future drugs are discussed in this review. Supply problems are usually the major bottleneck to the development of these compounds as drugs during clinical trials. However advances in the field of metagenomics and high throughput microbial cultivation has raised the possibility that these techniques could lead to the cost-effective large scale production of such compounds. Perspectives on biotechnological methods with respect to marine drug development are also discussed. 2010 by the authors; licensee MDPI.

  8. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of VEGFR-targeted macromolecular MRI contrast agent based on biotin-avidin-specific binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongjun; Wu, Xiaoyun; Sun, Xiaohe; Wang, Dan; Zhong, Ying; Jiang, Dandan; Wang, Tianqi; Yu, Dexin; Zhang, Na

    2017-01-01

    Developing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents with high relaxivity and specificity was essential to increase MRI diagnostic sensitivity and accuracy. In this study, the MRI contrast agent, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-targeted poly (l-lysine) (PLL)-diethylene triamine pentacetate acid (DTPA)-gadolinium (Gd) (VEGFR-targeted PLL-DTPA-Gd, VPDG), was designed and prepared to enhance the MRI diagnosis capacity of tumor. Biotin-PLL-DTPA-Gd was synthesized first, then, VEGFR antibody was linked to biotin-PLL-DTPA-Gd using biotin-avidin reaction. In vitro cytotoxicity study results showed that VPDG had low toxicity to MCF-7 cells and HepG2 cells at experimental concentrations. In cell uptake experiments, VPDG could significantly increase the internalization rates (61.75%±5.22%) in VEGFR-positive HepG2 cells compared to PLL-DTPA-Gd (PDG) (25.16%±4.71%, P <0.05). In MRI studies in vitro, significantly higher T1 relaxivity (14.184 mM -1 s -1 ) was observed compared to Magnevist ® (4.9 mM -1 s -1 ; P <0.01). Furthermore, in vivo MRI study results showed that VPDG could significantly enhance the tumor signal intensity and prolong the diagnostic time (from <1 h to 2.5 h). These results indicated that macromolecular VPDG was a promising MRI contrast agent and held great potential for molecular diagnosis of tumor.

  9. Mitochondrial complex II, a novel target for anti-cancer agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klučková, Katarína; Bezawork-Geleta, A.; Rohlena, Jakub; Dong, L.; Neužil, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 1827, č. 5 (2013), s. 552-564 ISSN 0005-2728 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/10/1937; GA ČR GAP301/12/1851 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Mitochondrion * Complex II * Anti- cancer agent Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.829, year: 2013

  10. Influence of androgen deprivation therapy on the uptake of PSMA-targeted agents: Emerging opportunities challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakht, Martin K.; Oh, So Won; Youn, Hye Won; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kwak, Cheol; Kang, Keon Wook [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is an attractive target for both diagnosis and therapy because of its high expression in the vast majority of prostate cancers. Development of small molecules for targeting PSMA is important for molecular imaging and radionuclide therapy of prostate cancer. Recent evidence implies that androgen-deprivation therapy increase PSMA-ligand uptake in some cases. The reported upregulations in PSMA-ligand uptake after exposure to second-generation antiandrogens such as enzalutamide and abiraterone might disturb PSMA-targeted imaging for staging and response monitoring of patients undergoing treatment with antiandrogen-based drugs. On the other hand, second-generation antiandrogens are emerging as potential endoradio-/chemosensitizers. Therefore, the enhancement of the therapeutic efficiency of PSMA-targeted theranostic methods can be listed as a new capability of antiandrogens. In this manuscript, we will present what is currently known about the mechanism of increasing PSMA uptake following exposure to antiandrogens. In addition, we will discuss whether these above-mentioned antiandrogens could play the role of endoradio-/chemosensitizers in combination with the well-established PSMA-targeted methods for pre-targeting of prostate cancer.

  11. MRI contrast agent for molecular imaging of the HER2/neu receptor using targeted magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasaneh, Samira; Rajabi, Hossein; Babaei, Mohammad Hossein; Akhlaghpoor, Shahram

    2011-06-01

    In this study, Trastuzumab modified Magnetic Nanoparticles (TMNs) were prepared as a new contrast agent for detecting HER2 (Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2) expression tumors by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). TMNs were prepared based on iron oxide nanoparticles core and Trastuzumab modified dextran coating. The TMNs core and hydrodynamic size were determined by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. TMNs stability and cytotoxicity were investigated. The ability of TMNs for HER2 detection were evaluated in breast carcinoma cell lines (SKBr3 and MCF7 cells) and tumor-bearing mice by MRI and iron uptake determination. The particles core and hydrodynamic size were 9 ± 2.5 and 41 ± 15 nm (size range: 15-87 nm), respectively. The molar antibody/nanoparticle ratio was 3.1-3.5. TMNs were non-toxic to the cells below the 30 μg (Fe)/mL concentration and good stable up to 8 weeks in PBS buffer. TMNs could detect HER2 oncogenes in the cells surface with imagable contrast by MRI. The invivo study in mice bearing tumors indicated that TMNs possessed a good diagnostic ability as HER2 specific contrast agent by MRI. TMNs were demonstrated to be able to selectively accumulate in the tumor cells, with a proper signal enhancement in MRI T2 images. So, the complex may be considered for further investigations as an MRI contrast agent for detection of HER2 expression tumors in human.

  12. MRI contrast agent for molecular imaging of the HER2/neu receptor using targeted magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasaneh, Samira; Rajabi, Hossein, E-mail: hrajabi@modares.ac.ir [Tarbiat Modares University, Department of Medical Physics (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Babaei, Mohammad Hossein [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Department of Radioisotope (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akhlaghpoor, Shahram [Sina Hospital, Tehran Medical University, Noor Medical Imaging Center (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    In this study, Trastuzumab modified Magnetic Nanoparticles (TMNs) were prepared as a new contrast agent for detecting HER2 (Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2) expression tumors by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). TMNs were prepared based on iron oxide nanoparticles core and Trastuzumab modified dextran coating. The TMNs core and hydrodynamic size were determined by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. TMNs stability and cytotoxicity were investigated. The ability of TMNs for HER2 detection were evaluated in breast carcinoma cell lines (SKBr3 and MCF7 cells) and tumor-bearing mice by MRI and iron uptake determination. The particles core and hydrodynamic size were 9 {+-} 2.5 and 41 {+-} 15 nm (size range: 15-87 nm), respectively. The molar antibody/nanoparticle ratio was 3.1-3.5. TMNs were non-toxic to the cells below the 30 {mu}g (Fe)/mL concentration and good stable up to 8 weeks in PBS buffer. TMNs could detect HER2 oncogenes in the cells surface with imagable contrast by MRI. The invivo study in mice bearing tumors indicated that TMNs possessed a good diagnostic ability as HER2 specific contrast agent by MRI. TMNs were demonstrated to be able to selectively accumulate in the tumor cells, with a proper signal enhancement in MRI T2 images. So, the complex may be considered for further investigations as an MRI contrast agent for detection of HER2 expression tumors in human.

  13. [Antiviral properties of basidiomycetes metabolites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avtonomova, A V; Krasnopolskaya, L M

    2014-01-01

    The data on the antiviral action of the Ganoderma lucidum, Lentinus edodes, Grifola frondosa, Agaricus brasiliensis and other basidiomycetes metabolites are summurized. The metabolites of these species of basidiomycetes exhibit a direct antiviral effect on herpes simplex virus types I and II, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, influenza virus, Epstein-Barr virus, and others. Moreover, metabolites of basidiomycetes increased antiviral immunity.

  14. Mitochondria and antiviral innate immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Koshiba, Takumi; Bashiruddin, Nasir; Kawabata, Shunichiro

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria, dynamic organelles that undergo continuous cycles of fusion and fission, are the powerhouses of eukaryotic cells. Recent research indicates that mitochondria also act as platforms for antiviral immunity in vertebrates. Mitochondrial-mediated antiviral immunity depends on activation of the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptors signal transduction pathway and the participation of the mitochondrial outer membrane adaptor protein “mitochondrial antiviral signaling (M...

  15. Mitochondrial targeting of human O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase protects against cell killing by chemotherapeutic alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shanbao; Xu, Yi; Cooper, Ryan J; Ferkowicz, Michael J; Hartwell, Jennifer R; Pollok, Karen E; Kelley, Mark R

    2005-04-15

    DNA repair capacity of eukaryotic cells has been studied extensively in recent years. Mammalian cells have been engineered to overexpress recombinant nuclear DNA repair proteins from ectopic genes to assess the impact of increased DNA repair capacity on genome stability. This approach has been used in this study to specifically target O(6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) to the mitochondria and examine its impact on cell survival after exposure to DNA alkylating agents. Survival of human hematopoietic cell lines and primary hematopoietic CD34(+) committed progenitor cells was monitored because the baseline repair capacity for alkylation-induced DNA damage is typically low due to insufficient expression of MGMT. Increased DNA repair capacity was observed when K562 cells were transfected with nuclear-targeted MGMT (nucl-MGMT) or mitochondrial-targeted MGMT (mito-MGMT). Furthermore, overexpression of mito-MGMT provided greater resistance to cell killing by 1,3-bis (2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) than overexpression of nucl-MGMT. Simultaneous overexpression of mito-MGMT and nucl-MGMT did not enhance the resistance provided by mito-MGMT alone. Overexpression of either mito-MGMT or nucl-MGMT also conferred a similar level of resistance to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and temozolomide (TMZ) but simultaneous overexpression in both cellular compartments was neither additive nor synergistic. When human CD34(+) cells were infected with oncoretroviral vectors that targeted O(6)-benzylguanine (6BG)-resistant MGMT (MGMT(P140K)) to the nucleus or the mitochondria, committed progenitors derived from infected cells were resistant to 6BG/BCNU or 6BG/TMZ. These studies indicate that mitochondrial or nuclear targeting of MGMT protects hematopoietic cells against cell killing by BCNU, TMZ, and MMS, which is consistent with the possibility that mitochondrial DNA damage and nuclear DNA damage contribute equally to alkylating agent-induced cell killing during chemotherapy.

  16. Dual-surface modified virus capsids for targeted delivery of photodynamic agents to cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanopoulos, Nicholas; Tong, Gary J; Hsiao, Sonny C; Francis, Matthew B

    2010-10-26

    Bacteriophage MS2 was used to construct a targeted, multivalent photodynamic therapy vehicle for the treatment of Jurkat leukemia T cells. The self-assembling spherical virus capsid was modified on the interior surface with up to 180 porphyrins capable of generating cytotoxic singlet oxygen upon illumination. The exterior of the capsid was modified with ∼20 copies of a Jurkat-specific aptamer using an oxidative coupling reaction targeting an unnatural amino acid. The capsids were able to target and selectively kill more than 76% of the Jurkat cells after only 20 min of illumination. Capsids modified with a control DNA strand did not target Jurkat cells, and capsids modified with the aptamer were found to be specific for Jurkat cells over U266 cells (a control B cell line). The doubly modified capsids were also able to kill Jurkat cells selectively even when mixed with erythrocytes, suggesting the possibility of using our system to target blood-borne cancers or other pathogens in the blood supply.

  17. From agents to objects: sexist attitudes and neural responses to sexualized targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cikara, Mina; Eberhardt, Jennifer L; Fiske, Susan T

    2011-03-01

    Agency attribution is a hallmark of mind perception; thus, diminished attributions of agency may disrupt social-cognition processes typically elicited by human targets. The current studies examine the effect of perceivers' sexist attitudes on associations of agency with, and neural responses to, images of sexualized and clothed men and women. In Study 1, male (but not female) participants with higher hostile sexism scores more quickly associated sexualized women with first-person action verbs ("handle") and clothed women with third-person action verbs ("handles") than the inverse, as compared to their less sexist peers. In Study 2, hostile sexism correlated negatively with activation of regions associated with mental state attribution-medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate, temporal poles-but only when viewing sexualized women. Heterosexual men best recognized images of sexualized female bodies (but not faces), as compared with other targets' bodies; however, neither face nor body recognition was related to hostile sexism, suggesting that the fMRI findings are not explained by more or less attention to sexualized female targets. Diminished mental state attribution is not unique to targets that people prefer to avoid, as in dehumanization of stigmatized people. The current studies demonstrate that appetitive social targets may elicit a similar response depending on perceivers' attitudes toward them.

  18. Novel Mitochondria-Targeted Furocoumarin Derivatives as Possible Anti-Cancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Mattarei

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Targeting small molecules to appropriate subcellular compartments is a way to increase their selectivity and effectiveness while minimizing side effects. This can be accomplished either by stably incorporating specific “homing” properties into the structure of the active principle, or by attaching to it a targeting moiety via a labile linker, i.e., by producing a “targeting pro-drug.” Mitochondria are a recognized therapeutic target in oncology, and blocking the population of the potassium channel Kv1.3 residing in the inner mitochondrial membrane (mtKv1.3 has been shown to cause apoptosis of cancerous cells expressing it. These concepts have led us to devise novel, mitochondria-targeted, membrane-permeant drug candidates containing the furocoumarin (psoralenic ring system and the triphenylphosphonium (TPP lipophilic cation. The strategy has proven effective in various cancer models, including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, melanoma, and glioblastoma, stimulating us to devise further novel molecules to extend and diversify the range of available drugs of this type. New compounds were synthesized and tested in vitro; one of them—a prodrug in which the coumarinic moiety and the TPP group are linked by a bridge comprising a labile carbonate bond system—proved quite effective in in vitro cytotoxicity assays. Selective death induction is attributed to inhibition of mtKv1.3. This results in oxidative stress, which is fatal for the already-stressed malignant cells. This compound may thus be a candidate drug for the mtKv1.3-targeting therapeutic approach.

  19. WITHDRAWN. Antiviral treatment for Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagyor, Ildiko; Madhok, Vishnu B; Daly, Fergus; Somasundara, Dhruvashree; Sullivan, Michael; Gammie, Fiona; Sullivan, Frank

    2015-05-04

    Corticosteroids are widely used in the treatment of idiopathic facial paralysis (Bell's palsy), but the effectiveness of additional treatment with an antiviral agent is uncertain. Significant morbidity can be associated with severe cases of Bell's palsy. To assess the effects of antiviral treatments alone or in combination with any other therapy for Bell's palsy. On 7 October 2014 we searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, DARE, NHS EED, and HTA. We also reviewed the bibliographies of the identified trials and contacted trial authors and known experts in the field and relevant drug companies to identify additional published or unpublished data. We searched clinical trials registries for ongoing studies. We considered randomised controlled trials or quasi-randomised controlled trials of antivirals with and without corticosteroids versus control therapies for the treatment of Bell's palsy. We excluded trials that had a high risk of bias in several domains. Pairs of authors independently assessed trials for relevance, eligibility, and risk of bias, using standard Cochrane procedures. Eleven trials, including 2883 participants, met the inclusion criteria and are included in the final analysis. We added four studies to the previous review for this update. Some of the trials were small, and a number were at high or unclear risk of bias. Other trials did not meet current best standards in allocation concealment and blinding. Incomplete recoveryWe found no significant benefit from adding antivirals to corticosteroids in comparison with corticosteroids alone for people with Bell's palsy (risk ratio (RR) 0.69, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.47 to 1.02, n = 1715). For people with severe Bell's palsy (House-Brackmann scores of 5 and 6 or the equivalent in other scales), we found a reduction in the rate of incomplete recovery at month six when antivirals plus corticosteroids were used (RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.41 to 0

  20. Progress in the chemistry of chromium(V) doping agents used in polarized target materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumpolc, M.; Hill, D.; Struhrmann, H.B.

    1990-01-01

    We wish to report progress in two areas of the chromium (V)-based doping agents: Two commonly used chromium (V) complexes, I and II, have been synthesized in perdeuterated form (i.e., all hydrogens replaced by deuterium). They are sodium bis(2-ethyl-2-deuteroxy-butyrato)oxochromate(V)monodeuterate, IV, (acronym EDBA-Cr(V)), and sodium bis(2-deuteroxy-2-methylpropionato)oxochromate(V), III, (acronym DMPA-Cr(V)). A synthetic route leading to the preparation of stable, chromium(III)-free solutions of chromium(V) in diols (1,2-ethanediol/ethylene glycol/and 1,2-propanediol/propylene glycol/) has been outlined

  1. Studies in Multifunctional Drug Development: Preparation and Evaluation of 11beta-Substituted Estradiol-Drug Conjugates, Cell Membrane Targeting Imaging Agents, and Target Multifunctional Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, KinhLuan Lenny D.

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death after cardiovascular disease in the United State. Despite extensive research in development of antitumor drugs, most of these therapeutic entities often possess nonspecific toxicity, thus they can only be used to treat tumors in higher doses or more frequently. Because of the cytotoxicity and severe side effects, the drug therapeutic window normally is limited. Beside the toxicity issue, antitumor drug are also not selectively taken up by tumor cells, thus the necessitating concentrations that would eradicate the tumor can often not be used. In addition, tumor cells tend to develop resistance against the anticancer drugs after prolonged treatment. Therefore, alleviating the systemic cytotoxicity and side effects, improving in tumor selectivity, high potency, and therapeutic efficacy are still major obstacles in the area of anticancer drug development. A more promising approach for developing a selective agent for cancer is to conjugate a potent therapeutic drug, or an imaging agent with a targeting group, such as antibody or a high binding-specificity small molecule, that selectively recognize the overexpressed antigens or proteins on tumor cells. My research combines several approaches to describe this strategy via using different targeting molecules to different diseases, as well as different potent cytotoxic drugs for different therapies. Three studies related to the preparation and biological evaluation of new therapeutic agents, such as estradiol-drug hybrids, cell membrane targeted molecular imaging agents, and multifunctional NPs will be discussed. The preliminary results of these studies indicated that our new reagents achieved their initial objectives and can be further improved for optimized synthesis and in vivo experiments. The first study describes the method in which we employed a modular assembly approach to synthesize a novel 11beta-substituted steroidal anti-estrogen. The key intermediate was synthesized

  2. From Agents to Objects: Sexist Attitudes and Neural Responses to Sexualized Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cikara, Mina; Eberhardt, Jennifer L.; Fiske, Susan T.

    2013-01-01

    Agency attribution is a hallmark of mind perception; thus, diminished attributions of agency may disrupt social-cognition processes typically elicited by human targets. The current studies examine the effect of perceivers’ sexist attitudes on associations of agency with, and neural responses to, images of sexualized and clothed men and women. In study 1, male (but not female) participants with higher hostile sexism scores more quickly associated sexualized women with first-person action verbs (“handle”) and clothed women with third-person action verbs (“handles”) than the inverse, as compared to their less sexist peers. In study 2, hostile sexism correlated negatively with activation of regions associated with mental state attribution—mPFC, posterior cingulate, temporal poles—but only when viewing sexualized women. Heterosexual men best recognized images of sexualized female bodies (but not faces), as compared with other targets’ bodies; however, neither face nor body recognition were related to hostile sexism, suggesting the fMRI findings are not explained by more or less attention to sexualized female targets. Diminished mental-state attribution is not unique to targets that people prefer to avoid, as in dehumanization of stigmatized people. The current studies demonstrate that appetitive social targets may elicit a similar response depending on perceivers’ attitudes toward them. PMID:20350187

  3. In-silico Metabolome Target Analysis Towards PanC-based Antimycobacterial Agent Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshkholgh-Sima, Baharak; Sardari, Soroush; Izadi Mobarakeh, Jalal; Khavari-Nejad, Ramezan Ali

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the main cause of tuberculosis (TB), has still remained a global health crisis especially in developing countries. Tuberculosis treatment is a laborious and lengthy process with high risk of noncompliance, cytotoxicity adverse events and drug resistance in patient. Recently, there has been an alarming rise of drug resistant in TB. In this regard, it is an unmet need to develop novel antitubercular medicines that target new or more effective biochemical pathways to prevent drug resistant Mycobacterium. Integrated study of metabolic pathways through in-silico approach played a key role in antimycobacterial design process in this study. Our results suggest that pantothenate synthetase (PanC), anthranilate phosphoribosyl transferase (TrpD) and 3-isopropylmalate dehydratase (LeuD) might be appropriate drug targets. In the next step, in-silico ligand analysis was used for more detailed study of chemical tractability of targets. This was helpful to identify pantothenate synthetase (PanC, Rv3602c) as the best target for antimycobacterial design procedure. Virtual library screening on the best ligand of PanC was then performed for inhibitory ligand design. At the end, five chemical intermediates showed significant inhibition of Mycobacterium bovis with good selectivity indices (SI) ≥10 according to Tuberculosis Antimicrobial Acquisition & Coordinating Facility of US criteria for antimycobacterial screening programs.

  4. A systematic review of targeted agents for non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Hannah H; Christensen, Marcus R; Lassen, Ulrik N

    2018-01-01

    homolog deleted on chromosome 10(PTEN), The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and Mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (MET) were included as well. In general, studies comparing treatment outcomes in EGFR-mutated patients and EML4-ALK (ALK) rearranged patients after use of either TA or standard...

  5. Climate warming increases biological control agent impact on a non-target species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinmin; Siemann, Evan; He, Minyan; Wei, Hui; Shao, Xu; Ding, Jianqing

    2015-01-01

    Climate change may shift interactions of invasive plants, herbivorous insects and native plants, potentially affecting biological control efficacy and non-target effects on native species. Here, we show how climate warming affects impacts of a multivoltine introduced biocontrol beetle on the non-target native plant Alternanthera sessilis in China. In field surveys across a latitudinal gradient covering their full distributions, we found beetle damage on A. sessilis increased with rising temperature and plant life history changed from perennial to annual. Experiments showed that elevated temperature changed plant life history and increased insect overwintering, damage and impacts on seedling recruitment. These results suggest that warming can shift phenologies, increase non-target effect magnitude and increase non-target effect occurrence by beetle range expansion to additional areas where A. sessilis occurs. This study highlights the importance of understanding how climate change affects species interactions for future biological control of invasive species and conservation of native species. © 2014 The Authors. Ecology Letters published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and CNRS.

  6. Targeting ferritin receptors for the selective delivery of imaging and therapeutic agents to breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geninatti Crich, S; Cadenazzi, M; Lanzardo, S; Conti, L; Ruiu, R; Alberti, D; Cavallo, F; Cutrin, J C; Aime, S

    2015-04-21

    In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml(-1) (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation.

  7. CRM1 Inhibitors for Antiviral Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Mathew

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases are a major global concern and despite major advancements in medical research, still cause significant morbidity and mortality. Progress in antiviral therapy is particularly hindered by appearance of mutants capable of overcoming the effects of drugs targeting viral components. Alternatively, development of drugs targeting host proteins essential for completion of viral lifecycle holds potential as a viable strategy for antiviral therapy. Nucleocytoplasmic trafficking pathways in particular are involved in several pathological conditions including cancer and viral infections, where hijacking or alteration of function of key transporter proteins, such as Chromosome Region Maintenance1 (CRM1 is observed. Overexpression of CRM1-mediated nuclear export is evident in several solid and hematological malignancies. Interestingly, CRM1-mediated nuclear export of viral components is crucial in various stages of the viral lifecycle and assembly. This review summarizes the role of CRM1 in cancer and selected viruses. Leptomycin B (LMB is the prototypical inhibitor of CRM1 potent against various cancer cell lines overexpressing CRM1 and in limiting viral infections at nanomolar concentrations in vitro. However, the irreversible shutdown of nuclear export results in high cytotoxicity and limited efficacy in vivo. This has prompted search for synthetic and natural CRM1 inhibitors that can potentially be developed as broadly active antivirals, some of which are summarized in this review.

  8. Natural Products as Source of Potential Dengue Antivirals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Róbson Ricardo Teixeira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is a neglected disease responsible for 22,000 deaths each year in areas where it is endemic. To date, there is no clinically approved dengue vaccine or antiviral for human beings, even though there have been great efforts to accomplish these goals. Several approaches have been used in the search for dengue antivirals such as screening of compounds against dengue virus enzymes and structure-based computational discovery. During the last decades, researchers have turned their attention to nature, trying to identify compounds that can be used as dengue antivirals. Nature represents a vast reservoir of substances that can be explored with the aim of discovering new leads that can be either used directly as pharmaceuticals or can serve as lead structures that can be optimized towards the development of new antiviral agents against dengue. In this review we describe an assortment of natural products that have been reported as possessing dengue antiviral activity. The natural products are organized into classes of substances. When appropriate, structure-activity relationships are outlined. The biological assays used to assess antiviral activity are briefly described.

  9. Current Status of Targeted Radioprotection and Radiation Injury Mitigation and Treatment Agents: A Critical Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalman, Noah S; Zhao, Sherry S; Anscher, Mitchell S; Urdaneta, Alfredo I

    2017-07-01

    As more cancer patients survive their disease, concerns about radiation therapy-induced side effects have increased. The concept of radioprotection and radiation injury mitigation and treatment offers the possibility to enhance the therapeutic ratio of radiation therapy by limiting radiation therapy-induced normal tissue injury without compromising its antitumor effect. Advances in the understanding of the underlying mechanisms of radiation toxicity have stimulated radiation oncologists to target these pathways across different organ systems. These generalized radiation injury mechanisms include production of free radicals such as superoxides, activation of inflammatory pathways, and vascular endothelial dysfunction leading to tissue hypoxia. There is a significant body of literature evaluating the effectiveness of various treatments in preventing, mitigating, or treating radiation-induced normal tissue injury. Whereas some reviews have focused on a specific disease site or agent, this critical review focuses on a mechanistic classification of activity and assesses multiple agents across different disease sites. The classification of agents used herein further offers a useful framework to organize the multitude of treatments that have been studied. Many commonly available treatments have demonstrated benefit in prevention, mitigation, and/or treatment of radiation toxicity and warrant further investigation. These drug-based approaches to radioprotection and radiation injury mitigation and treatment represent an important method of making radiation therapy safer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. La respuesta inmune antiviral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainel Sánchez de la Rosa

    1998-02-01

    Full Text Available Se expone que los virus son parásitos intracelulares obligados, puesto que no tienen metabolismo propio; esto obliga al sistema inmune a poner en marcha sus mecanismos más especializados para reconocer y eliminar, tanto a los virus libres, como a las células infectadas. Se señala que las células presentadoras de antígenos, los linfocitos B y los T unidos al complejo mayor de histocompatibilidad, forman parte de la organización de la respuesta inmune antiviral; la inducción de esta respuesta con proteínas, péptidos y ADN desnudo, son alternativas actuales tanto en la prevención como en el tratamiento de las infecciones viralesIt is explained that viruses are compulsory intracellular parasites, since they don't have their own metabolism, which makes the immune system to start its mest specialized mechanisms to recognize and eliminate the free viruses and the infected cells. It is stated that the cells presenting antigens, and the B and T lymphocytes together with the major histocompatibility complex, are part of the organization of the immune antiviral response. The induction of this response with proteins, peptides and naked DNA are the present alternatives for the prevention and treatment of viral infections

  11. Targeting apoptotic machinery as approach for anticancer therapy: Smac mimetics as anticancer agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevine M.Y. Elsayed

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a chief regulator of cellular homeostasis. Impairment of apoptotic machinery is a main characteristic of several diseases such as cancer, where the evasion of apoptosis is a cardinal hallmark of cancer. Apoptosis is regulated by contribution of pro- and anti- apoptotic proteins, where caspases are the main executioners of the apoptotic machinery. IAP (inhibitors of apoptosis proteins is a family of endogenous inhibitors of apoptosis, which perform their function through interference with the function of caspases. Smac (second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases is endogenous inhibitor of IAPs, thus it is one of the major proapoptotic endogenous proteins. Thus, the development of Smac mimetics has evolved as an approach for anticancer therapy. Several Smac mimetic agents have been introduced to clinical trial such as birinapanet 12. Herein, the history of development of Smac mimetics along with the recent development in this field is briefly discussed.

  12. From Agents to Objects: Sexist Attitudes and Neural Responses to Sexualized Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Cikara, Mina; Eberhardt, Jennifer L.; Fiske, Susan T.

    2010-01-01

    Agency attribution is a hallmark of mind perception; thus, diminished attributions of agency may disrupt social-cognition processes typically elicited by human targets. The current studies examine the effect of perceivers’ sexist attitudes on associations of agency with, and neural responses to, images of sexualized and clothed men and women. In study 1, male (but not female) participants with higher hostile sexism scores more quickly associated sexualized women with first-person action verbs...

  13. Targeting inflammatory pathways by dietary agents for prevention and treatment of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic infections, obesity, alcohol, tobacco, radiation, environmental pollutants and high-calorie diet have been recognized as major risk factors for the most common types of cancer. All these risk factors are linked to cancer through inflammation. While acute inflammation that persists for short-term mediates host defense against infections, chronic inflammation that lasts for long-term can predispose the host to various chronic illnesses, including cancer. Linkage between cancer and inflammation is indicated by numerous lines of evidence; first, transcription factors NF-kB and STAT3, two major pathways for inflammation, are activated by most cancer risk factors; second, an inflammatory condition precedes most cancers; third, NFkB and STAT3 are constitutively active in most cancers; fourth, hypoxia and acidic conditions found in solid tumors activate NF-kB; fifth, chemotherapeutic agents and γ-irradiation activate NF-kB and lead to chemoresistance and radioresistance; sixth, most gene products linked to inflammation, survival, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis are regulated by NF-kB and STAT3; seventh, suppression of NF-kB and STAT3 inhibits the proliferation and invasion of tumors; and eighth, most chemopreventive agents mediate their effects through inhibition of NF-kB and STAT3 activation pathways. Thus, the suppression of these proinflammatory pathways may provide opportunities for both prevention and treatment of cancer. We will discuss the potential of nutraceuticals derived from spices and from traditional Indian medicine in suppression of inflammatory pathways and their role inprevention and therapy of cancer. (author)

  14. Cathepsin D as a Promising Target for the Discovery of Novel Anticancer Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Vijaya; Luqman, Suaib

    2017-01-01

    Cathepsin D (CATD), one of the aspartyl endoproteinase involved in different physiological processes and signaling pathways, is accountable for metabolic breakdown of intracellular proteins, the activation of growth factors, hormones, and precursors of enzyme, the processing of antigens, enzyme inhibitors and activators and the regulation of apoptosis. Implication as a Target: Studies have confirmed the role and significance of CATD in an assortment of pathological conditions like Atherosclerosis, Alzheimer, Cancer, Cardiovascular, Huntington and Parkinson diseases. Amalgamated and veiled as inactive proCATD, it undergoes diverse cleavages to attain a desired conformation in an acidic milieu to act as a functionally active protein. In search of new candidate target (s) for cancer, CATD has attracted a wide group of investigators across the globe and is being recognized as a well-defined marker in cancer especially for breast and hormone-dependent cancer. In this review, PubMed, Sci-finder and other search engines were used to gather information on Cathepsin D. The necessary and relevant information was thoroughly studied to make the article appropriate to highlight all the aspects related to Cathepsin D and its role in cancer. Findings & Conclusion: The present review illustrates structural, functional and regulatory aspects of CATD in cancer, its significant role in angiogenesis, metastasis, invasion, apoptosis, cell proliferation, and therapeutic potential besides the benefits of targeting CATD by the natural products in cancer chemoprevention. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Drugs targeting the mitochondrial pore act as citotoxic and cytostatic agents in temozolomide-resistant glioma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benvenuti Lucia

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High grade gliomas are one of the most difficult cancers to treat and despite surgery, radiotherapy and temozolomide-based chemotherapy, the prognosis of glioma patients is poor. Resistance to temozolomide is the major barrier to effective therapy. Alternative therapeutic approaches have been shown to be ineffective for the treatment of genetically unselected glioma patients. Thus, novel therapies are needed. Mitochondria-directed chemotherapy is an emerging tool to combat cancer, and inner mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT represents a target for the development of cytotoxic drugs. A number of agents are able to induce MPT and some of them target MPT-pore (MPTP components that are selectively up-regulated in cancer, making these agents putative cancer cell-specific drugs. Objective The aim of this paper is to report a comprehensive analysis of the effects produced by selected MPT-inducing drugs (Betulinic Acid, Lonidamine, CD437 in a temozolomide-resistant glioblastoma cell line (ADF cells. Methods EGFRvIII expression has been assayed by RT-PCR. EGFR amplification and PTEN deletion have been assayed by differential-PCR. Drugs effect on cell viability has been tested by crystal violet assay. MPT has been tested by JC1 staining. Drug cytostatic effect has been tested by mitotic index analysis. Drug cytotoxic effect has been tested by calcein AM staining. Apoptosis has been assayed by Hoechst incorporation and Annexine V binding assay. Authophagy has been tested by acridine orange staining. Results We performed a molecular and genetic characterization of ADF cells and demonstrated that this line does not express the EGFRvIII and does not show EGFR amplification. ADF cells do not show PTEN mutation but differential PCR data indicate a hemizygous deletion of PTEN gene. We analyzed the response of ADF cells to Betulinic Acid, Lonidamine, and CD437. Our data demonstrate that MPT-inducing agents produce concentration

  16. Antiviral resistance and the control of pandemic influenza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Lipsitch

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The response to the next influenza pandemic will likely include extensive use of antiviral drugs (mainly oseltamivir, combined with other transmission-reducing measures. Animal and in vitro studies suggest that some strains of influenza may become resistant to oseltamivir while maintaining infectiousness (fitness. Use of antiviral agents on the scale anticipated for the control of pandemic influenza will create an unprecedented selective pressure for the emergence and spread of these strains. Nonetheless, antiviral resistance has received little attention when evaluating these plans.We designed and analyzed a deterministic compartmental model of the transmission of oseltamivir-sensitive and -resistant influenza infections during a pandemic. The model predicts that even if antiviral treatment or prophylaxis leads to the emergence of a transmissible resistant strain in as few as 1 in 50,000 treated persons and 1 in 500,000 prophylaxed persons, widespread use of antivirals may strongly promote the spread of resistant strains at the population level, leading to a prevalence of tens of percent by the end of a pandemic. On the other hand, even in circumstances in which a resistant strain spreads widely, the use of antivirals may significantly delay and/or reduce the total size of the pandemic. If resistant strains carry some fitness cost, then, despite widespread emergence of resistance, antivirals could slow pandemic spread by months or more, and buy time for vaccine development; this delay would be prolonged by nondrug control measures (e.g., social distancing that reduce transmission, or use of a stockpiled suboptimal vaccine. Surprisingly, the model suggests that such nondrug control measures would increase the proportion of the epidemic caused by resistant strains.The benefits of antiviral drug use to control an influenza pandemic may be reduced, although not completely offset, by drug resistance in the virus. Therefore, the risk of resistance

  17. New Pharmacologic Agents That Target Inflammation and Fibrosis in Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis-Related Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Giovanni; De Michieli, Franco; Bongiovanni, Daria; Parente, Renato; Framarin, Luciana; Leone, Nicola; Berrutti, Mara; Gambino, Roberto; Cassader, Maurizio; Cohney, Solomon; Paschetta, Elena

    2017-07-01

    Epidemiologic data show an association between the prevalence and severity of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and the incidence and stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD); furthermore, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)-related cirrhosis has a higher risk of renal failure, a greater necessity for simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation, and a poorer renal outcome than cirrhosis of other etiologies even after simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation. These data suggest that NASH and CKD share common proinflammatory and profibrotic mechanisms of progression, which are targeted incompletely by current treatments. We reviewed therapeutic approaches to late preclinical/early clinical stage of development in NASH and/or CKD, focusing on anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic treatments, which could slow the progression of both disease conditions. Renin inhibitors and angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 activators are new renin-angiotensin axis modulators that showed incremental advantages over angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin-receptor blockers in preclinical models. Novel, potent, and selective agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and of farnesoid X receptor, designed to overcome limitations of older compounds, showed promising results in clinical trials. Epigenetics, heat stress response, and common effectors of redox regulation also were subjected to intensive research, and the gut was targeted by several approaches, including synbiotics, antilipopolysaccharide antibodies, Toll-like receptor-4 antagonists, incretin mimetics, and fibroblast growth factor 19 analogs. Promising anti-inflammatory therapies include inhibitors of NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 inflammasome, of nuclear factor-κB, and of vascular adhesion protein-1, chemokine antagonists, and solithromycin, and approaches targeting common profibrogenic pathways operating in the liver and the kidney include galectin-3 antagonists, and inhibitors of rho

  18. Integration of targeted agents in the neo-adjuvant treatment of gastro-esophageal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, D G; Ilson, D H

    2009-11-01

    Pre- and peri-operative strategies are becoming standard for the management of localized gastro-esophageal cancer. For localized gastric/gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ) cancer there are conflicting data that a peri-operative approach with cisplatin-based chemotherapy improves survival, with the benefits seen in esophageal cancer likely less than a 5-10% incremental improvement. Further trends toward improvement in local control and survival, when combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy are given pre-operatively, are suggested by recent phase III trials. In fit patients, a significant survival benefit with pre-operative chemoradiation is seen in those patients who achieve a pathologic complete response. In esophageal/GEJ cancer, definitive chemoradiation is now considered in medically inoperable patients. In squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus, surgery after primary chemoradiation is not clearly associated with an improved overall survival, however, local control may be better. In localized gastric/GEJ cancer, the integration of bevacizumab with pre-operative chemotherapy is being explored in large randomized studies, and with chemoradiotherapy in pilot trials. The addition of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor and anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 antibody treatment to pre-operative chemoradiation continues to be explored. Early results show the integration of targeted therapy is feasible. Metabolic imaging can predict early response to pre-operative chemotherapy and biomarkers may further predict response to pre-operative chemo-targeted therapy. A multimodality approach to localized gastro-esophageal cancer has resulted in better outcomes. For T3 or node-positive disease, surgery alone is no longer considered appropriate and neo-adjuvant therapy is recommended. The future of neo-adjuvant strategies in this disease will involve the individualization of therapy with the integration of molecular signatures, targeted therapy, metabolic imaging

  19. Evasion of the Interferon-Mediated Antiviral Response by Filoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Washington B. Cárdenas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The members of the filoviruses are recognized as some of the most lethal viruses affecting human and non-human primates. The only two genera of the Filoviridae family, Marburg virus (MARV and Ebola virus (EBOV, comprise the main etiologic agents of severe hemorrhagic fever outbreaks in central Africa, with case fatality rates ranging from 25 to 90%. Fatal outcomes have been associated with a late and dysregulated immune response to infection, very likely due to the virus targeting key host immune cells, such as macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs that are necessary to mediate effective innate and adaptive immune responses. Despite major progress in the development of vaccine candidates for filovirus infections, a licensed vaccine or therapy for human use is still not available. During the last ten years, important progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms of filovirus pathogenesis. Several lines of evidence implicate the impairment of the host interferon (IFN antiviral innate immune response by MARV or EBOV as an important determinant of virulence. In vitro and in vivo experimental infections with recombinant Zaire Ebola virus (ZEBOV, the best characterized filovirus, demonstrated that the viral protein VP35 plays a key role in inhibiting the production of IFN-α/β. Further, the action of VP35 is synergized by the inhibition of cellular responses to IFN-α/β by the minor matrix viral protein VP24. The dual action of these viral proteins may contribute to an efficient initial virus replication and dissemination in the host. Noticeably, the analogous function of these viral proteins in MARV has not been reported. Because the IFN response is a major component of the innate immune response to virus infection, this chapter reviews recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of IFN-mediated antiviral evasion by filovirus infection.

  20. Gold Nanorods Targeted to Delta Opioid Receptor: Plasmon-Resonant Contrast and Photothermal Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kvar C. Black

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecularly targeted gold nanorods were investigated for applications in both diagnostic imaging and disease treatment with cellular resolution. The nanorods were tested in two genetically engineered cell lines derived from the human colon carcinoma HCT-116, a model for studying ligand-receptor interactions. One of these lines was modified to express delta opioid receptor (δOR and green fluorescent protein, whereas the other was receptor free and expressed a red fluorescent protein, to serve as the control. Deltorphin, a high-affinity ligand for δOR, was stably attached to the gold nanorods through a thiol-terminated linker. In a mixed population of cells, we demonstrated selective imaging and destruction of receptor-expressing cells while sparing those cells that did not express the receptor. The molecularly targeted nanorods can be used as an in vitro ligand-binding and cytotoxic treatment assay platform and could potentially be applied in vivo for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes with endoscopic technology.

  1. Non-Cytotoxic Quantum Dot–Chitosan Nanogel Biosensing Probe for Potential Cancer Targeting Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler Maxwell

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dot (Qdot biosensors have consistently provided valuable information to researchers about cellular activity due to their unique fluorescent properties. Many of the most popularly used Qdots contain cadmium, posing the risk of toxicity that could negate their attractive optical properties. The design of a non-cytotoxic probe usually involves multiple components and a complex synthesis process. In this paper, the design and synthesis of a non-cytotoxic Qdot-chitosan nanogel composite using straight-forward cyanogen bromide (CNBr coupling is reported. The probe was characterized by spectroscopy (UV-Vis, fluorescence, microscopy (Fluorescence, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM and Dynamic Light Scattering. This activatable (“OFF”/“ON” probe contains a core–shell Qdot (CdS:Mn/ZnS capped with dopamine, which acts as a fluorescence quencher and a model drug. Dopamine capped “OFF” Qdots can undergo ligand exchange with intercellular glutathione, which turns the Qdots “ON” to restore fluorescence. These Qdots were then coated with chitosan (natural biocompatible polymer functionalized with folic acid (targeting motif and Fluorescein Isothiocyanate (FITC; fluorescent dye. To demonstrate cancer cell targetability, the interaction of the probe with cells that express different folate receptor levels was analyzed, and the cytotoxicity of the probe was evaluated on these cells and was shown to be nontoxic even at concentrations as high as 100 mg/L.

  2. Pathophysiologic effects of vascular-targeting agents and the implications for combination with conventional therapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsman, Michael Robert; Siemann, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    A functional vascular supply is critical for the continued growth and development of solid tumors. It also plays a major role in metastatic spread of tumor cells. This importance has led to the concept of targeting the vasculature of the tumor as a form of cancer therapy. Two major types of vascu...... on the tumor response to more conventional therapies. This review aims to discuss the pathophysiologic changes induced by VTAs and the implications of these effects on the potential use of VTAs in combined modality therapy....... successful in the clinic they will need to be combined with more conventional therapies. However, by affecting the tumor vascular supply, these VTAs should induce pathophysiologic changes in variables, such as blood flow, pH, and oxygenation. Such changes could have negative or positive influences......A functional vascular supply is critical for the continued growth and development of solid tumors. It also plays a major role in metastatic spread of tumor cells. This importance has led to the concept of targeting the vasculature of the tumor as a form of cancer therapy. Two major types...

  3. Glucose-installed, SPIO-loaded PEG- b-PCL micelles as MR contrast agents to target prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theerasilp, Man; Sunintaboon, Panya; Sungkarat, Witaya; Nasongkla, Norased

    2017-11-01

    Polymeric micelles of poly(ethylene glycol)- block-poly(ɛ-caprolactone) bearing glucose analog encapsulated with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Glu-SPIO micelles) were synthesized as an MRI contrast agent to target cancer cells based on high-glucose metabolism. Compared to SPIO micelles (non-targeting SPIO micelles), Glu-SPIO micelles demonstrated higher toxicity to human prostate cancer cell lines (PC-3) at high concentration. Atomic absorption spectroscopy was used to determine the amount of iron in cells. It was found that the iron in cancer cells treated by Glu-SPIO micelles were 27-fold higher than cancer cells treated by SPIO micelles at the iron concentration of 25 ppm and fivefold at the iron concentration of 100 ppm. To implement Glu-SPIO micelles as a MR contrast agent, the 3-T clinical MRI was applied to determine transverse relaxivities ( r 2*) and relaxation rate (1/ T 2*) values. In vitro MRI showed different MRI signal from cancer cells after cellular uptake of SPIO micelles and Glu-SPIO micelles. Glu-SPIO micelles was highly sensitive with the r 2* in agarose gel at 155 mM-1 s-1. Moreover, the higher 1/ T 2* value was found for cancer cells treated with Glu-SPIO micelles. These results supported that glucose ligand increased the cellular uptake of micelles by PC-3 cells with over-expressing glucose transporter on the cell membrane. Thus, glucose can be used as a small molecule ligand for targeting prostate cancer cells overexpressing glucose transporter.

  4. Evasion and subversion of interferon-mediated antiviral immunity by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathish, Narayanan; Yuan, Yan

    2011-11-01

    Viral invasion of a host cell triggers immune responses with both innate and adaptive components. The innate immune response involving the induction of type I interferons (alpha and beta interferons [IFN-α and -β]) constitutes the first line of antiviral defenses. The type I IFNs signal the transcription of a group of antiviral effector proteins, the IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), which target distinct viral components and distinct stages of the viral life cycle, aiming to eliminate invading viruses. In the case of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), a sudden upsurge of type I IFN-mediated innate antiviral signals is seen immediately following both primary de novo infection and viral lytic reactivation from latency. Potent subversion of these responses thus becomes mandatory for the successful establishment of a primary infection following viral entry as well as for efficient viral assembly and egress. This review gives a concise overview of the induction of the type I IFN signaling pathways in response to viral infection and provides a comprehensive understanding of the antagonizing effects exerted by KSHV on type I IFN pathways wielded at various stages of the viral life cycle. Information garnered from this review should result in a better understanding of KSHV biology essential for the development of immunotherapeutic strategies targeted toward KSHV-associated malignancies.

  5. Evasion and Subversion of Interferon-Mediated Antiviral Immunity by Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus: an Overview ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathish, Narayanan; Yuan, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Viral invasion of a host cell triggers immune responses with both innate and adaptive components. The innate immune response involving the induction of type I interferons (alpha and beta interferons [IFN-α and -β]) constitutes the first line of antiviral defenses. The type I IFNs signal the transcription of a group of antiviral effector proteins, the IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), which target distinct viral components and distinct stages of the viral life cycle, aiming to eliminate invading viruses. In the case of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), a sudden upsurge of type I IFN-mediated innate antiviral signals is seen immediately following both primary de novo infection and viral lytic reactivation from latency. Potent subversion of these responses thus becomes mandatory for the successful establishment of a primary infection following viral entry as well as for efficient viral assembly and egress. This review gives a concise overview of the induction of the type I IFN signaling pathways in response to viral infection and provides a comprehensive understanding of the antagonizing effects exerted by KSHV on type I IFN pathways wielded at various stages of the viral life cycle. Information garnered from this review should result in a better understanding of KSHV biology essential for the development of immunotherapeutic strategies targeted toward KSHV-associated malignancies. PMID:21775463

  6. Hybrid ligand-alkylating agents targeting telomeric G-quadruplex structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doria, Filippo; Nadai, Matteo; Folini, Marco; Di Antonio, Marco; Germani, Luca; Percivalle, Claudia; Sissi, Claudia; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Alcaro, Stefano; Artese, Anna; Richter, Sara N; Freccero, Mauro

    2012-04-14

    The synthesis, physico-chemical properties and biological effects of a new class of naphthalene diimides (NDIs) capable of reversibly binding telomeric DNA and alkylate it through an electrophilic quinone methide moiety (QM), are reported. FRET and circular dichroism assays showed a marked stabilization and selectivity towards telomeric G4 DNA folded in a hybrid topology. NDI-QMs' alkylating properties revealed a good reactivity on single nucleosides and selectivity towards telomeric G4. A selected NDI was able to significantly impair the growth of melanoma cells by causing telomere dysfunction and down-regulation of telomerase expression. These findings points to our hybrid ligand-alkylating NDIs as possible tools for the development of novel targeted anticancer therapies. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  7. Naringenin and quercetin--potential anti-HCV agents for NS2 protease targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lulu, S Sajitha; Thabitha, A; Vino, S; Priya, A Mohana; Rout, Madhusmita

    2016-01-01

    Nonstructural proteins of hepatitis C virus had drawn much attention for the scientific fraternity in drug discovery due to its important role in the disease. 3D structure of the protein was predicted using molecular modelling protocol. Docking studies of 10 medicinal plant compounds and three drugs available in the market (control) with NS2 protease were employed by using rigid docking approach of AutoDock 4.2. Among the molecules tested for docking study, naringenin and quercetin revealed minimum binding energy of - 7.97 and - 7.95 kcal/mol with NS2 protease. All the ligands were docked deeply within the binding pocket region of the protein. The docking study results showed that these compounds are potential inhibitors of the target; and also all these docked compounds have good inhibition constant, vdW+Hbond+desolv energy with best RMSD value.

  8. Antiviral immunity in amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guangchun; Robert, Jacques

    2011-11-01

    Although a variety of virus species can infect amphibians, diseases caused by ranaviruses ([RVs]; Iridoviridae) have become prominent, and are a major concern for biodiversity, agriculture and international trade. The relatively recent and rapid increase in prevalence of RV infections, the wide range of host species infected by RVs, the variability in host resistance among population of the same species and among different developmental stages, all suggest an important involvement of the amphibian immune system. Nevertheless, the roles of the immune system in the etiology of viral diseases in amphibians are still poorly investigated. We review here the current knowledge of antiviral immunity in amphibians, focusing on model species such as the frog Xenopus and the salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum), and on recent progress in generating tools to better understand how host immune defenses control RV infections, pathogenicity, and transmission.

  9. From genome to antivirals: SARS as a test tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliger, Yossef; Levanon, Erez Y; Gerber, Doron

    2005-03-01

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic brought into the spotlight the need for rapid development of effective anti-viral drugs against newly emerging viruses. Researchers have leveraged the 20-year battle against AIDS into a variety of possible treatments for SARS. Most prominently, based solely on viral genome information, silencers of viral genes, viral-enzyme blockers and viral-entry inhibitors were suggested as potential therapeutic agents for SARS. In particular, inhibitors of viral entry, comprising therapeutic peptides, were based on the recently launched anti-HIV drug enfuvirtide. This could represent one of the most direct routes from genome sequencing to the discovery of antiviral drugs.

  10. Diacetoxyscirpenol as a new anticancer agent to target hypoxia-inducible factor 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yong-Joon; Shin, Hyun-Woo; Chun, Yang-Sook; Leutou, Alain Simplice; Son, Byeng Wha; Park, Jong-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia activates hypoxia-inducible factor 1, which promotes the progression of malignancy by stimulating angiogenesis and by augmenting the ability of tumors to survive. Thus, HIF-1 is one of the most compelling targets for treating cancers. The aim of this study was to find a small molecule that inhibits HIF-1 under hypoxia in cancer cells. 7,280 compounds in a chemical library were tested in a cancer cell line expressing luciferase HIF-dependently. Through three rounds of screening, we finally picked up a compound that originates from a marine bacterium parasitizing red alga. The antibiotic potently inhibited HIF-1 expression and its transcriptional activity in cancer cells exposed to hypoxia. Through two-step fractionation, diacetoxyscirpenol was purified and identified as a HIF-inhibiting ingredient. Mechanistically, diacetoxyscirpenol inhibits the synthesis of HIF-1α protein and also interferes with the dimerization of HIF-1α and ARNT. It attenuates HIF-mediated gene expression in cancer cells exposed to hypoxia, and by doing so reduces tumorigenic and angiogenic potentials of cancer cells. More importantly, diacetoxyscirpenol retarded tumor growth in mice, and reduced HIF-1α expression and vascular formation in the tumors. Overall, diacetoxyscirpenol is considered a potential drug deregulating the HIF-1 signaling pathway, and it could be beneficially employed for treating malignant tumors with hypoxic microenvironment. PMID:27613833

  11. Peptide derivatized lamellar aggregates as target-specific MRI contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesauro, D.; Accardo, A.; Morelli, G. [Univ Naples Federico II, CIRPeB, Dept Biol Sci, I-80134 Naples, (Italy); Tesauro, D.; Accardo, A.; Morelli, G. [IBB CNR, I-80134 Naples, (Italy); Gianolio, E.; Aime, S. [Univ Turin, IFM, Dept Chem, I-10125 Turin, (Italy); Paduano, L. [Univ Naples Federico II, Dept Chem, I-80126 Naples, (Italy); Teixeira, J. [CEA Saclay, Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, CEA-CNRS, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Schillen, K. [Lund Univ, Ctr Chem and Chem Engn, S-22100 Lund, (Sweden)

    2007-07-01

    The relaxivity behaviour and the structural characterization of new supramolecular aggregates (bilayer structures and micelles) obtained by combining two different amphiphilic monomers are reported. One monomer, (C18){sub 2}DTPAGlu-Gd, contains a very stable gadolinium complex, and the other, DSPE-PEG{sub 2000}-CCK8, contains the bioactive CCK8 peptide. Samples that contained only DSPE-PEG{sub 2000}-CCK8, or up to 50% (C18){sub 2}DTPAGlu-Gd, aggregated as double-layer structures (lamellar aggregates) with a thickness of similar to 80-100 angstroms, as evaluated by SANS measurement and Cryo-TEM imaging. A transition to micelle formation was observed when the amount of (C18){sub 2}DTPAGlu-Gd in the aggregate was increased. These were rod-like micelles similar to 40 angstroms in radius and {>=} 200 angstroms in length. The proton relaxivities for both lamellar aggregates and rod-like micelles were the same (17.2 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1}), although the values were the results of different combinations of local and global contributions. The in vitro target selectivity of aggregates that contained the CCK-8 peptide was demonstrated by using nuclear medicine techniques. (authors)

  12. Physical characterization methods for iron oxide contrast agents encapsulated within a targeted liposome-based delivery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagata, J A; Farkas, N; Dennis, C L; Shull, R D; Hackley, V A [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Yang, C; Pirollo, K F; Chang, E H [Department of Oncology, Georgetown University Medical Center, 2700 Reservoir Road, Washington, DC 20017 (United States)], E-mail: john.dagata@nist.gov

    2008-07-30

    Intact liposome-based targeted nanoparticle delivery systems (NDS) are immobilized by non-selective binding and characterized by scanning probe microscopy (SPM) in a fluid imaging environment. The size, size distribution, functionality, and stability of an NDS with a payload consisting of a super-paramagnetic iron oxide contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging are determined. SPM results are combined with information obtained by more familiar techniques such as superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry, dynamic light scattering, and electron microscopy. By integrating the methods presented in this work into the NDS formulation and manufacturing process, size-dependent statistical properties of the complex can be obtained and the structure-function relationship of individual, multi-component nanoscale entities can be assessed in a reliable and reproducible manner.

  13. Physical characterization methods for iron oxide contrast agents encapsulated within a targeted liposome-based delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagata, J. A.; Farkas, N.; Dennis, C. L.; Shull, R. D.; Hackley, V. A.; Yang, C.; Pirollo, K. F.; Chang, E. H.

    2008-07-01

    Intact liposome-based targeted nanoparticle delivery systems (NDS) are immobilized by non-selective binding and characterized by scanning probe microscopy (SPM) in a fluid imaging environment. The size, size distribution, functionality, and stability of an NDS with a payload consisting of a super-paramagnetic iron oxide contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging are determined. SPM results are combined with information obtained by more familiar techniques such as superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry, dynamic light scattering, and electron microscopy. By integrating the methods presented in this work into the NDS formulation and manufacturing process, size-dependent statistical properties of the complex can be obtained and the structure-function relationship of individual, multi-component nanoscale entities can be assessed in a reliable and reproducible manner.

  14. Discovery of novel curcumin derivatives targeting xanthine oxidase and urate transporter 1 as anti-hyperuricemic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Gui-Zhen; Zhou, Meng-Ze; Li, Yu-Yao; Li, Si-Ning; Wang, Hua-Nian; Wan, Qian-Wen; Li, Huan-Qiu; Hu, Qing-Hua

    2017-01-01

    A series of curcumin derivatives as potent dual inhibitors of xanthine oxidase (XOD) and urate transporter 1 (URAT1) was discovered as anti-hyperuricemic agents. These compounds proved efficient effects on anti-hyperuricemic activity and uricosuric activity in vivo. More importantly, some of them exhibited proved efficient effects on inhibiting XOD activity and suppressing uptake of uric acid via URAT1 in vitro. Especially, the treatment of 4d was demonstrated to improve uric acid over-production and under-excretion in oxonate-induced hyperuricemic mice through regulating XOD activity and URAT1 expression. Docking study was performed to elucidate the potent XOD inhibition of 4d. Compound 4d may serve as a tool compound for further design of anti-hyperuricemic drugs targeting both XOD and URAT1. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. DNA-Destabilizing Agents as an Alternative Approach for Targeting DNA: Mechanisms of Action and Cellular Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëlle Lenglet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA targeting drugs represent a large proportion of the actual anticancer drug pharmacopeia, both in terms of drug brands and prescription volumes. Small DNA-interacting molecules share the ability of certain proteins to change the DNA helix's overall organization and geometrical orientation via tilt, roll, twist, slip, and flip effects. In this ocean of DNA-interacting compounds, most stabilize both DNA strands and very few display helix-destabilizing properties. These types of DNA-destabilizing effect are observed with certain mono- or bis-intercalators and DNA alkylating agents (some of which have been or are being developed as cancer drugs. The formation of locally destabilized DNA portions could interfere with protein/DNA recognition and potentially affect several crucial cellular processes, such as DNA repair, replication, and transcription. The present paper describes the molecular basis of DNA destabilization, the cellular impact on protein recognition, and DNA repair processes and the latter's relationships with antitumour efficacy.

  16. New therapeutic strategy for hepatocellular carcinoma by molecular targeting agents via inhibition of cellular stress defense mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Yuichi; Harada, Masaru

    2014-12-01

    The prognosis of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has remained very poor.It has recently been reported that the molecular targeting agent sorafenib can improve the prognosis of patients with advanced HCC. However, the detailed mechanisms of sorafenib, especially its direct effects on hepatoma and hepatocyte cells, are poorly understood, making a more detailed investigation about the molecular mechanism of sorafenib necessary. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is related to the pathophysiology of various liver diseases, including chronic viral hepatitis, alcoholic and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and HCC. In this regard, our recent data examining the molecular effects of sorafenib focused on the cellular defense mechanisms from ER stress, the unfolded protein response (UPR) and keratin phosphorylation, demonstrated that sorafenib inhibited both important cytoprotective mechanisms, UPR and keratin phosphorylation, and enhances the anti-tumor effect in combination with proteasome inhibitors. This review summarizes the cytoprotective mechanisms from ER stress and our results about the direct effect of sorafenib on the cytoprotective mechanisms.

  17. The double-edged sword of (re)expression of genes by hypomethylating agents: from viral mimicry to exploitation as priming agents for targeted immune checkpoint modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Florian; Leisch, Michael; Greil, Richard; Risch, Angela; Pleyer, Lisa

    2017-03-31

    Hypomethylating agents (HMAs) have been widely used over the last decade, approved for use in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The proposed central mechanism of action of HMAs, is the reversal of aberrant methylation in tumor cells, thus reactivating CpG-island promoters and leading to (re)expression of tumor suppressor genes. Recent investigations into the mode of action of azacitidine (AZA) and decitabine (DAC) have revealed new molecular mechanisms that impinge on tumor immunity via induction of an interferon response, through activation of endogenous retroviral elements (ERVs) that are normally epigenetically silenced. Although the global demethylation of DNA by HMAs can induce anti-tumor effects, it can also upregulate the expression of inhibitory immune checkpoint receptors and their ligands, resulting in secondary resistance to HMAs. Recent studies have, however, suggested that this could be exploited to prime or (re)sensitize tumors to immune checkpoint inhibitor therapies. In recent years, immune checkpoints have been targeted by novel therapies, with the aim of (re)activating the host immune system to specifically eliminate malignant cells. Antibodies blocking checkpoint receptors have been FDA-approved for some solid tumors and a plethora of clinical trials testing these and other checkpoint inhibitors are under way. This review will discuss AZA and DAC novel mechanisms of action resulting from the re-expression of pathologically hypermethylated promoters of gene sets that are related to interferon signaling, antigen presentation and inflammation. We also review new insights into the molecular mechanisms of action of transient, low-dose HMAs on various tumor types and discuss the potential of new treatment options and combinations.

  18. Review on near-infrared heptamethine cyanine dyes as theranostic agents for tumor imaging, targeting, and photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Changhong; Wu, Jason Boyang; Pan, Dongfeng

    2016-05-01

    A class of near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) heptamethine cyanine dyes that are taken up and accumulated specifically in cancer cells without chemical conjugation have recently emerged as promising tools for tumor imaging and targeting. In addition to their fluorescence and nuclear imaging-based tumor-imaging properties, these dyes can be developed as drug carriers to safely deliver chemotherapy drugs to tumors. They can also be used as effective agents for photodynamic therapy with remarkable tumoricidal activity via photodependent cytotoxic activity. The preferential uptake of dyes into cancer but not normal cells is co-operatively mediated by the prevailing activation of a group of organic anion-transporting polypeptides on cancer cell membranes, as well as tumor hypoxia and increased mitochondrial membrane potential in cancer cells. Such mechanistic explorations have greatly advanced the current application and future development of NIRF dyes and their derivatives as anticancer theranostic agents. This review summarizes current knowledge and emerging advances in NIRF dyes, including molecular characterization, photophysical properties, multimodal development and uptake mechanisms, and their growing potential for preclinical and clinical use.

  19. Recent advances in the development of 1,8-naphthalimide based DNA targeting binders, anticancer and fluorescent cellular imaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Swagata; Veale, Emma B; Phelan, Caroline M; Murphy, Samantha A; Tocci, Gillian M; Gillespie, Lisa J; Frimannsson, Daniel O; Kelly, John M; Gunnlaugsson, Thorfinnur

    2013-02-21

    The development of functional 1,8-naphthalimide derivatives as DNA targeting, anticancer and cellular imaging agents is a fast growing area and has resulted in several such derivatives entering into clinical trials. This review gives an overview of the many discoveries and the progression of the use of 1,8-naphthalimides as such agents and their applications to date; focusing mainly on mono-, bis-naphthalimide based structures, and their various derivatives (e.g. amines, polyamine conjugates, heterocyclic, oligonucleotide and peptide based, and those based on metal complexes). Their cytotoxicity, mode of action and cell-selectivity are discussed and compared. The rich photophysical properties of the naphthalimides (which are highly dependent on the nature and the substitution pattern of the aryl ring) make them prime candidates as probes as the changes in spectroscopic properties such as absorption, dichroism, and fluorescence can all be used to monitor their binding to biomolecules. This also makes them useful species for monitoring their uptake and location within cells without the use of co-staining. The photochemical properties of the compounds have also been exploited, for example, for photocleavage of nucleic acids and for the destruction of tumour cells.

  20. Beta carbonic anhydrases: novel targets for pesticides and anti-parasitic agents in agriculture and livestock husbandry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolfaghari Emameh, Reza; Barker, Harlan; Hytönen, Vesa P; Tolvanen, Martti E E; Parkkila, Seppo

    2014-08-29

    -CAs are potential targets for development of small molecule pesticides or anti-parasitic agents with minimal side effects on vertebrates.

  1. Implications of a Reduction in the Hemoglobin Target in Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agent-Treated Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy V. Nguyen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients treated with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs to a hemoglobin (Hb level >12.0 g/dl have increased risk of multiple complications, including death. The optimal Hb target for ESA use has not been established. We hypothesized that reducing the target Hb would prevent levels >12 g/dl and lead to significant cost savings. Methods: Our target Hb range was reduced to 9–11 g/dl from 10–12 g/dl. Thirty-five chronic hemodialysis (HD patients received erythropoietin (EPO and intravenous iron from January to December 2009. Data analysis included: Hb level, EPO dose, transferrin saturation and ferritin levels. EPO was administered via subcutaneous injection weekly or twice weekly. Results: The mean monthly Hb level changed from 11.2 to 10.6 g/dl. The percentages of patients with mean Hb >10.0, 12.0 and 13.0 g/dl were 82 ± 6.5, 10 ± 5.6 and 1.8 ± 1.9%, respectively. Weekly EPO dose decreased from 9,500 to 5,600 units, a 40% reduction per dose per patient and costs. The savings exceeded USD 60,000 per year for 35 patients. More than 80% of patients had transferrin saturation >20% and ferritin >200 ng/ml throughout the entire period. Conclusions: Lowering the target Hb range to 9–11 g/dl in HD patients achieved quality anemia management, avoided values >12.0 g/dl and resulted in cost savings. A minimal reduction in quality of life and no change in cardiovascular morbidity or mortality would be expected. The study has important implications in the new American bundled reimbursement model.

  2. MCPIP1 is a positive regulator of type I interferons antiviral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Liping; Zuo, Yibo; Deng, Wenjun; Miao, Ying; Liu, Jin; Yuan, Yukang; Guo, Tingting; Zhang, Liting; Jin, Jun; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Hui

    2018-04-15

    Type-I interferons (IFN-I) are widely used for antiviral immunotherapy in clinic. Therefore, identification of the regulators of IFN-I antiviral activity is important for developing novel targets for IFN-based antiviral therapy. Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1-induced protein 1 (MCPIP1) is critical for cellular inflammatory responses. However, the roles of MCPIP1 in interferons (IFNs)-mediated antiviral immunity are unexplored. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that MCPIP1 is an important positive regulator of IFNs antiviral activity. We found that MCPIP1 can promote innate antiviral immunity independently of both its RNase and deubiquitinase activity. Furthermore, we reveal that MCPIP1 is an IFN-induced positive feedback signal molecule which promotes IFN-I-mediated antiviral efficacy. Mechanistically, MCPIP1 does not affect the activation of JAK/STAT upstream of IFN-I signaling, but significantly promotes IFN-I signaling by enhancing ISRE promoter activity and expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). And MCPIP1-mediated activation of IFN-I signaling is independently of its RNase and deubiquitinase activity. These findings uncover a novel innate antiviral mechanism mediated by the IFN-MCPIP1 axis, and may provide potential targets for enhancing IFNs antiviral therapy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Interleukin 16- (IL-16-) Targeted Ultrasound Imaging Agent Improves Detection of Ovarian Tumors in Laying Hens, a Preclinical Model of Spontaneous Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barua, Animesh; Yellapa, Aparna; Bahr, Janice M; Adur, Malavika K; Utterback, Chet W; Bitterman, Pincas; Basu, Sanjib; Sharma, Sameer; Abramowicz, Jacques S

    2015-01-01

    Limited resolution of transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS) scanning is a significant barrier to early detection of ovarian cancer (OVCA). Contrast agents have been suggested to improve the resolution of TVUS scanning. Emerging evidence suggests that expression of interleukin 16 (IL-16) by the tumor epithelium and microvessels increases in association with OVCA development and offers a potential target for early OVCA detection. The goal of this study was to examine the feasibility of IL-16-targeted contrast agents in enhancing the intensity of ultrasound imaging from ovarian tumors in hens, a model of spontaneous OVCA. Contrast agents were developed by conjugating biotinylated anti-IL-16 antibodies with streptavidin coated microbubbles. Enhancement of ultrasound signal intensity was determined before and after injection of contrast agents. Following scanning, ovarian tissues were processed for the detection of IL-16 expressing cells and microvessels. Compared with precontrast, contrast imaging enhanced ultrasound signal intensity significantly in OVCA hens at early (P ultrasound signals in OVCA hens were associated with increased frequencies of IL-16 expressing cells and microvessels. These results suggest that IL-16-targeted contrast agents improve the visualization of ovarian tumors. The laying hen may be a suitable model to test new imaging agents and develop targeted anti-OVCA therapeutics.

  4. Interleukin 16- (IL-16- Targeted Ultrasound Imaging Agent Improves Detection of Ovarian Tumors in Laying Hens, a Preclinical Model of Spontaneous Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Animesh Barua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Limited resolution of transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS scanning is a significant barrier to early detection of ovarian cancer (OVCA. Contrast agents have been suggested to improve the resolution of TVUS scanning. Emerging evidence suggests that expression of interleukin 16 (IL-16 by the tumor epithelium and microvessels increases in association with OVCA development and offers a potential target for early OVCA detection. The goal of this study was to examine the feasibility of IL-16-targeted contrast agents in enhancing the intensity of ultrasound imaging from ovarian tumors in hens, a model of spontaneous OVCA. Contrast agents were developed by conjugating biotinylated anti-IL-16 antibodies with streptavidin coated microbubbles. Enhancement of ultrasound signal intensity was determined before and after injection of contrast agents. Following scanning, ovarian tissues were processed for the detection of IL-16 expressing cells and microvessels. Compared with precontrast, contrast imaging enhanced ultrasound signal intensity significantly in OVCA hens at early (P<0.05 and late stages (P<0.001. Higher intensities of ultrasound signals in OVCA hens were associated with increased frequencies of IL-16 expressing cells and microvessels. These results suggest that IL-16-targeted contrast agents improve the visualization of ovarian tumors. The laying hen may be a suitable model to test new imaging agents and develop targeted anti-OVCA therapeutics.

  5. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss: Is antiviral treatment really necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Övet, Gültekin; Alataş, Necat; Kocacan, Fatma Nur; Gürcüoğlu, Sermin Selver; Görgülü, Hakan; Güzelkara, Fatih; Övet, Habibe

    2015-01-01

    It was aimed to investigate the necessity of antiviral agents in the ISSHL treatment. In this study, the patients, diagnosed with sudden hearing loss and admitted in the first 7 days of hearing loss were divided into two groups; a combination therapy was administered to one of the groups, and famciclovir was administered to the other group as an antiviral treatment in addition to the combined therapy. Both groups were compared in terms of levels of recovery. No statistically significant difference was found in the recovery rates between the two groups (p=0.7). In this study, the additional antiviral treatment was found to have no effect on the remission rates in patients with ISSHL treated with combined therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. ANTI-VIRAL ACTIVITY OF GLYCIRRHETINIC AND GLYCIRRHIZIC ACIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Zarubaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza is a highly contagious human disease. In the course of use of antiviral drugs drug-resistant strains of the virus are formed, resulting in reduced efficiency of the chemotherapy. The review describes the biological activity of glycirrhetinic (GLA and glycirrhizic (GA acids in terms of their use as a therapeutic agent for viral infections. So, these compounds are against a broad spectrum of viruses, including herpes, corona-, alphaand flaviviruses, human immunodeficiency virus, vaccinia virus, poliovirus type I, vesicular stomatitis virus and influenza A virus. These data indicate that anti-viral effect of these compounds is due to several types of activity — direct antiviral effects, effects on cellular proand anti-viral and immunomodulating pathways, in particular by activation of innate immunity system. GA interferes with early steps of the viral reproductive cycle such as virus binding to its receptor, the absorption of the virus by endocytosis or virus decapsidation in the cytoplasm. This is due to the effect of GA-induced reduction of membrane fluidity. Thus, one mechanism for the antiviral activity of GA is that GA molecule increases the rigidity of cellular and viral membranes after incorporation in there. This results in increasing of energy threshold required for the formation of negative curvature at the fusion zones, as well as difficult lateral migration of the virus-receptor complexes. In addition, glycyrrhizin prevents interaction of viral nucleoprotein with cellular protein HMGB1, which is necessary for the viral life cycle. Glycyrrhizin also inhibits the induction of oxidative stress during influenza infection, exhibiting antioxidant properties, which leads to a reduction of virus-induced production of cytokines/chemokines, without affecting the replication of the virus. A wide spectrum of biological activity and effect on various aspects of the viral pathogenesis substantiate the effect of GA and GLA as a component

  7. Antiviral activity of A771726, the active metabolite of leflunomide, against Junín virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda, Claudia S; García, Cybele C; Damonte, Elsa B

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of A771726, the active metabolite of leflunomide, (CONICET-UBA), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad against the infection with Junín virus (JUNV), agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF). The treatment with non-cytotoxic concentrations of A771726 of Vero and A549 cells infected with JUNV inhibited virus replication in a dose-dependent manner, as determined by virus yield reduction assay. The antiviral effectiveness of A771726 was not importantly affected by the multiplicity of infection and the virus strain. Moreover, the combination of A771726 and ribavirin had a significantly more potent antiviral activity than each single drug treatment. Mechanistic studies showed that the main action of A771726 is exerted before 6 h of JUNV infection. Accordingly, inhibition of viral RNA synthesis was detected in treated infected cells by real time RT-PCR. The exogenous addition of uridine or orotic acid produced a partial reversal of the inhibitory effect of A771726 on infective virus production whereas a total reversion was detected on JUNV RNA synthesis, probably by restoration of the enzymatic activity of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) and the intracellular pyrimidine pools. In conclusion, these results suggest that the antiviral target would be viral RNA synthesis through pyrimidine depletion, but any other effect of the compound on JUNV infection cannot be excluded. This study opens the possibility of the therapeutic application of a wide spectrum host-targeted compound alone or in combination with ribavirin to combat AHF as well as other human pathogenic arenaviruses. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Concanavalin A: A potential anti-neoplastic agent targeting apoptosis, autophagy and anti-angiogenesis for cancer therapeutics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wen-wen; Yu, Jia-ying; Xu, Huai-long [School of Life Sciences and State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Bao, Jin-ku, E-mail: jinkubao@yahoo.com [School of Life Sciences and State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} ConA induces cancer cell death targeting apoptosis and autophagy. {yields} ConA inhibits cancer cell angiogenesis. {yields} ConA is utilized in pre-clinical and clinical trials. -- Abstract: Concanavalin A (ConA), a Ca{sup 2+}/Mn{sup 2+}-dependent and mannose/glucose-binding legume lectin, has drawn a rising attention for its remarkable anti-proliferative and anti-tumor activities to a variety of cancer cells. ConA induces programmed cell death via mitochondria-mediated, P73-Foxo1a-Bim apoptosis and BNIP3-mediated mitochondrial autophagy. Through IKK-NF-{kappa}B-COX-2, SHP-2-MEK-1-ERK, and SHP-2-Ras-ERK anti-angiogenic pathways, ConA would inhibit cancer cell survival. In addition, ConA stimulates cell immunity and generates an immune memory, resisting to the same genotypic tumor. These biological findings shed light on new perspectives of ConA as a potential anti-neoplastic agent targeting apoptosis, autophagy and anti-angiogenesis in pre-clinical or clinical trials for cancer therapeutics.

  9. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of New Substituted Diquinolinyl-Pyridine Ligands as Anticancer Agents by Targeting G-Quadruplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rabindra Nath; Chevret, Edith; Desplat, Vanessa; Rubio, Sandra; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Guillon, Jean

    2017-12-30

    G-quadruplexes (G4) are stacked non-canonical nucleic acid structures found in specific G-rich DNA or RNA sequences in the human genome. G4 structures are liable for various biological functions; transcription, translation, cell aging as well as diseases such as cancer. These structures are therefore considered as important targets for the development of anticancer agents. Small organic heterocyclic molecules are well known to target and stabilize G4 structures. In this article, we have designed and synthesized 2,6-di-(4-carbamoyl-2-quinolyl)pyridine derivatives and their ability to stabilize G4-structures have been determined through the FRET melting assay. It has been established that these ligands are selective for G4 over duplexes and show a preference for the parallel conformation. Next, telomerase inhibition ability has been assessed using three cell lines (K562, MyLa and MV-4-11) and telomerase activity is no longer detected at 0.1 μM concentration for the most potent ligand 1c . The most promising G4 ligands were also tested for antiproliferative activity against the two human myeloid leukaemia cell lines, HL60 and K562.

  10. Cycloxygenase-2(cox-2) - a potential target for screening of small molecules as radiation countermeasure agents: an in silico study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Jayadev; Shrivastava, Nitisha; Dimri, Manali; Ghosh, Subhajit; Mandal, Rahul Shubhra; Prem Kumar, I.; Barik, Tapan Kumar

    2012-01-01

    COX-2 is well established for its role in inflammation and cancer, and has also been reported to play a significant role in radiation induced inflammation and by standard effect. It's already reported to have a role in protection against radiation induced damage suggesting it to be an important target for identifying novel radiation countermeasure agents. Present study aims at identifying novel small molecules from pharmacopoeia using COX-2 as target in-silico. Systematic search of the reported molecules exhibiting radiation protection revealed lat around 29 % (40 in 138) of them have a role in inflammation and a small percentage of these molecules (20 %; 8 in 40) are reported to as non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS). Docking studies performed further clarified that all these 8 radioprotective molecules shows high binding affinity and inhibit COX-2. Further Johns Hopkins clinical compound library (JHCCL), a collection of small molecule clinical compounds, were screened virtually for COX-2 inhibition by docking approach. Docking of around 1400 small molecules against COX-2 lead to identification of a number of previously unreported molecules which are likely to act as radioprotectors. (author)

  11. 3,7-Dideazaneplanocin: Synthesis and antiviral analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xue-Qiang; Schneller, Stewart W

    2017-12-01

    Objective To synthesize 3,7-dideazaneplanocin and evaluate its antiviral potential. Methods The target 3,7-dideazaneplanocin has been prepared in five steps from a readily available cyclopentenol. A thorough in vitro antiviral analysis was conducted versus both DNA and RNA viruses. Results A rational synthesis of 3,7-dideazaneplanocin was conceived and successfully pursued in such a way that it can be adapted to various analogs of 3,7-dideazaneplanocin. Using standard antiviral assays, no activity for 3,7-dideazaneplanocn was found. Conclusion Two structural features are necessary for adenine-based carbocyclic nucleosides (like neplanocin) for potential antiviral properties: (i) inhibition of S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase and/or (ii) C-5' activation via the mono-nucleotide. These two requisite adenine structural features to fit these criteria are not present in in the target 3,7-dideazaneplanocin: (i) an N-7 is necessary for inhibition of the hydrolase and the N-3 is claimed to be essential for phosphorylation at C-5'. Thus, it is not surprising that 3,7-dideazaneplaoncin lacked antiviral properties.

  12. Bioprospecting of Red Sea Sponges for Novel Antiviral Pharmacophores

    KAUST Repository

    O'Rourke, Aubrie

    2015-05-01

    Natural products offer many possibilities for the treatment of disease. More than 70% of the Earth’s surface is ocean, and recent exploration and access has allowed for new additions to this catalog of natural treasures. The Central Red Sea off the coast of Saudi Arabia serves as a newly accessible location, which provides the opportunity to bioprospect marine sponges with the purpose of identifying novel antiviral scaffolds. Antivirals are underrepresented in present day clinical trials, as well as in the academic screens of marine natural product libraries. Here a high-throughput pipeline was initiated by prefacing the antiviral screen with an Image-based High-Content Screening (HCS) technique in order to identify candidates with antiviral potential. Prospective candidates were tested in a biochemical or cell-based assay for the ability to inhibit the NS3 protease of the West Nile Virus (WNV NS protease) as well as replication and reverse transcription of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1). The analytical chemistry techniques of High-Performance Liquid Chromatograpy (HPLC), Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS), and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) where used in order to identify the compounds responsible for the characteristic antiviral activity of the selected sponge fractions. We have identified a 3-alkyl pyridinium from Amphimedon chloros as the causative agent of the observed WNV NS3 protease inhibition in vitro. Additionally, we identified debromohymenialdisine, hymenialdisine, and oroidin from Stylissa carteri as prospective scaffolds capable of HIV-1 inhibition.

  13. Biochemical and biophysical characterization of cell-free synthesized Rift Valley fever virus nucleoprotein capsids enables in vitro screening to identify novel antivirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broce, Sean; Hensley, Lisa; Sato, Tomoharu; Lehrer-Graiwer, Joshua; Essrich, Christian; Edwards, Katie J; Pajda, Jacqueline; Davis, Christopher J; Bhadresh, Rami; Hurt, Clarence R; Freeman, Beverly; Lingappa, Vishwanath R; Kelleher, Colm A; Karpuj, Marcela V

    2016-05-14

    Viral capsid assembly involves the oligomerization of the capsid nucleoprotein (NP), which is an essential step in viral replication and may represent a potential antiviral target. An in vitro transcription-translation reaction using a wheat germ (WG) extract in combination with a sandwich ELISA assay has recently been used to identify small molecules with antiviral activity against the rabies virus. Here, we examined the application of this system to viruses with capsids with a different structure, such as the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), the etiological agent of a severe emerging infectious disease. The biochemical and immunological characterization of the in vitro-generated RVFV NP assembly products enabled the distinction between intermediately and highly ordered capsid structures. This distinction was used to establish a screening method for the identification of potential antiviral drugs for RVFV countermeasures. These results indicated that this unique analytical system, which combines nucleoprotein oligomerization with the specific immune recognition of a highly ordered capsid structure, can be extended to various viral families and used both to study the early stages of NP assembly and to assist in the identification of potential antiviral drugs in a cost-efficient manner. Reviewed by Jeffry Skolnick and Noah Isakov. For the full reviews please go to the Reviewers' comments section.

  14. Combination of Vessel-Targeting Agents and Fractionated Radiation Therapy: The Role of the SDF-1/CXCR4 Pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Fang-Hsin; Fu, Sheng-Yung; Yang, Ying-Chieh; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Chiang, Chi-Shiun; Hong, Ji-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate vascular responses during fractionated radiation therapy (F-RT) and the effects of targeting pericytes or bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) on the efficacy of F-RT. Methods and Materials: Murine prostate TRAMP-C1 tumors were grown in control mice or mice transplanted with green fluorescent protein-tagged bone marrow (GFP-BM), and irradiated with 60 Gy in 15 fractions. Mice were also treated with gefitinib (an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor) or AMD3100 (a CXCR4 antagonist) to examine the effects of combination treatment. The responses of tumor vasculatures to these treatments and changes of tumor microenvironment were assessed. Results: After F-RT, the tumor microvascular density (MVD) was reduced; however, the surviving vessels were dilated, incorporated with GFP-positive cells, tightly adhered to pericytes, and well perfused with Hoechst 33342, suggesting a more mature structure formed primarily via vasculogenesis. Although the gefitinib+F-RT combination affected the vascular structure by dissociating pericytes from the vascular wall, it did not further delay tumor growth. These tumors had higher MVD and better vascular perfusion function, leading to less hypoxia and tumor necrosis. By contrast, the AMD3100+F-RT combination significantly enhanced tumor growth delay more than F-RT alone, and these tumors had lower MVD and poorer vascular perfusion function, resulting in increased hypoxia. These tumor vessels were rarely covered by pericytes and free of GFP-positive cells. Conclusions: Vasculogenesis is a major mechanism for tumor vessel survival during F-RT. Complex interactions occur between vessel-targeting agents and F-RT, and a synergistic effect may not always exist. To enhance F-RT, using CXCR4 inhibitor to block BM cell influx and the vasculogenesis process is a better strategy than targeting pericytes by epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor

  15. Liposomes derivatized with multimeric copies of KCCYSL peptide as targeting agents for HER-2-overexpressing tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ringhieri P

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Paola Ringhieri,1 Silvia Mannucci,2 Giamaica Conti,2 Elena Nicolato,2 Giulio Fracasso,3 Pasquina Marzola,4 Giancarlo Morelli,1 Antonella Accardo1 1Department of Pharmacy and Interuniversity Research Centre on Bioactive Peptides (CIRPeB, University of Naples “Federico II”, Napoli, 2Department of Neurological Biomedical and Movement Sciences, 3Section of Immunology, Department of Medicine, 4Department of Informatics, University of Verona, Verona, Italy Abstract: Mixed liposomes, obtained by coaggregation of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and of the synthetic monomer containing a gadolinium complex ([C18]2DTPA[Gd] have been prepared. Liposomes externally decorated with KCCYSL (P6.1 peptide sequence in its monomeric, dimeric, and tetrameric forms are studied as target-selective delivery systems toward cancer cells overexpressing human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2 receptors. Derivatization of liposomal surface with targeting peptides is achieved using the postmodification method: the alkyne-peptide derivative Pra-KCCYSL reacts, through click chemistry procedures, with a synthetic surfactant modified with 1, 2, or 4 azido moieties previously inserted in liposome formulation. Preliminary in vitro data on MDA-MB-231 and BT-474 cells indicated that liposomes functionalized with P6.1 peptide in its tetrameric form had better binding to and uptake into BT-474 cells compared to liposomes decorated with monomeric or dimeric versions of the P6.1 peptide. BT-474 cells treated with liposomes functionalized with the tetrameric form of P6.1 showed high degree of liposome uptake, which was comparable with the uptake of anti-HER-2 antibodies such as Herceptin. Moreover, magnetic MRI experiments have demonstrated the potential of liposomes to act as MRI contrast agents. Keywords: anti-HER2 liposomes, target peptide, KCCYSL peptide, breast cancer, click chemistry, branched peptides 

  16. Peptide-modified liposomes for selective targeting of bombesin receptors overexpressed by cancer cells: a potential theranostic agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardo, Antonella; Salsano, Giuseppina; Morisco, Anna; Aurilio, Michela; Parisi, Antonio; Maione, Francesco; Cicala, Carla; Tesauro, Diego; Aloj, Luigi; De Rosa, Giuseppe; Morelli, Giancarlo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Drug delivery systems consisting of liposomes displaying a cell surface receptor-targeting peptide are being developed to specifically deliver chemotherapeutic drugs to tumors overexpressing a target receptor. This study addresses novel liposome composition approaches to specifically target tissues overexpressing bombesin (BN) receptors. Methods A new amphiphilic peptide derivative (MonY-BN) containing the BN(7–14) peptide, the DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetate) chelating agent, a hydrophobic moiety with two C18 alkyl chains, and polyethylene glycol spacers, has been synthesized by solid-phase methods. Liposomes have been generated by co-aggregation of MonY-BN with 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC). The structural and biological properties of these new target-selective drug-delivery systems have been characterized. Results Liposomes with a DSPC/MonY-BN (97/3 molar ratio) composition showed a diameter of 145.5 ± 31.5 nm and a polydispersity index of 0.20 ± 0.05. High doxorubicin (Dox) loading was obtained with the remote pH gradient method using citrate as the inner buffer. Specific binding to PC-3 cells of DSPC/MonY-BN liposomes was obtained (2.7% ± 0.3%, at 37°C), compared with peptide-free DSPC liposomes (1.4% ± 0.2% at 37°C). Incubation of cells with DSPC/ MonY-BN/Dox showed significantly lower cell survival compared with DSPC/Dox-treated cells, in the presence of 100 ng/mL and 300 ng/mL drug amounts, in cytotoxicity experiments. Intravenous treatment of PC-3 xenograft-bearing mice with DSPC/MonY-BN/Dox at 10 mg/kg Dox dose produced higher tumour growth inhibition (60%) compared with nonspecific DSPC/ Dox liposomes (36%) relative to control animals. Conclusion The structural and loading properties of DSPC/MonY-BN liposomes along with the observed in-vitro and in-vivo activity are encouraging for further development of this approach for target-specific cancer chemotherapy. PMID:22619538

  17. Highly biocompatible TiO2:Gd3+ nano-contrast agent with enhanced longitudinal relaxivity for targeted cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Parwathy; Sasidharan, Abhilash; Ashokan, Anusha; Menon, Deepthy; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2011-10-01

    We report the development of a novel magnetic nano-contrast agent (nano-CA) based on Gd3+ doped amorphous TiO2 of size ~25 nm, exhibiting enhanced longitudinal relaxivity (r1) and magnetic resonance (MR) contrasting together with excellent biocompatibility. Quantitative T1 mapping of phantom samples using a 1.5 T clinical MR imaging system revealed that the amorphous phase of doped titania has the highest r1 relaxivity which is ~2.5 fold higher than the commercially used CA Magnevist™. The crystalline (anatase) samples formed by air annealing at 250 °C and 500 °C showed significant reduction in r1 values and MR contrast, which is attributed to the loss of proton-exchange contribution from the adsorbed water and atomic re-arrangement of Gd3+ ions in the crystalline host lattice. Nanotoxicity studies including cell viability, plasma membrane integrity, reactive oxygen stress and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, performed on human primary endothelial cells (HUVEC), human blood derived peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and nasopharyngeal epidermoid carcinoma (KB) cell line showed excellent biocompatibility up to relatively higher doses of 200 μg ml-1. The potential of this nano-CA to cause hemolysis, platelet aggregation and plasma coagulation were studied using human peripheral blood samples and found no adverse effects, illustrating the possibility of the safe intravenous administration of these agents for human applications. Furthermore, the ability of these agents to specifically detect cancer cells by targeting molecular receptors on the cell membrane was demonstrated on folate receptor (FR) positive oral carcinoma (KB) cells, where the folic acid conjugated nano-CA showed receptor specific accumulation on cell membrane while leaving the normal fibroblast cells (L929) unstained. This study reveals that the Gd3+ doped amorphous TiO2 nanoparticles having enhanced magnetic resonance contrast and high biocompatibility is a promising candidate for

  18. Non-target trials with Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A, a lethal control agent of dreissenid mussels (Bivalvia: Dreissenidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to develop an efficacious and environmentally safe method for managing zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and quaggamussels (Dreissena rostriformis bugensis, we initiated a research project investigating the potential use of bacteria and their naturalmetabolic products as biocontrol agents. This project resulted in the discovery of an environmental isolate lethal to dreissenid mussels,Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A (Pf-CL145A. In previous published reports we have demonstrated that: 1 Pf-CL145A’s mode ofaction is intoxication (not infection; 2 natural product within ingested bacterial cells lyse digestive tract epithelial cells leading to dreisseniddeath; and 3 high dreissenid kill rates (>90% are achievable following treatment with Pf-CL145A cells, irrespective of whether thebacterial cells are dead or alive. Investigating the environmental safety of Pf-CL145A was also a key element in our research efforts, andherein, we report the results of non-target trials demonstrating Pf-CL145A’s high specificity to dreissenids. These acute toxicity trials weretypically single-dose, short-term (24-72 h exposures to Pf-CL145A cells under aerated conditions at concentrations highly lethal todreissenids (100 or 200 mg/L. These trials produced no evidence of mortality among the ciliate Colpidium colpoda, the cladoceran Daphniamagna, three fish species (Pimephales promelas, Salmo trutta, and Lepomis macrochirus, and seven bivalve species (Mytilus edulis,Pyganodon grandis, Pyganodon cataracta, Lasmigona compressa, Strophitus undulatus, Lampsilis radiata, and Elliptio complanata. Lowmortality (3-27% was recorded in the amphipod Hyalella azteca, but additional trials suggested that most, if not all, of the mortality couldbe attributed to some other unidentified factor (e.g., possibly particle load or a water quality issue rather than Pf-CL145A’s dreissenidkillingnatural product. In terms of potential environmental safety, the results of

  19. Inhibiting avian influenza virus shedding using a novel RNAi antiviral vector technology: proof of concept in an avian cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linke, Lyndsey M; Wilusz, Jeffrey; Pabilonia, Kristy L; Fruehauf, Johannes; Magnuson, Roberta; Olea-Popelka, Francisco; Triantis, Joni; Landolt, Gabriele; Salman, Mo

    2016-03-01

    Influenza A viruses pose significant health and economic threats to humans and animals. Outbreaks of avian influenza virus (AIV) are a liability to the poultry industry and increase the risk for transmission to humans. There are limitations to using the AIV vaccine in poultry, creating barriers to controlling outbreaks and a need for alternative effective control measures. Application of RNA interference (RNAi) techniques hold potential; however, the delivery of RNAi-mediating agents is a well-known obstacle to harnessing its clinical application. We introduce a novel antiviral approach using bacterial vectors that target avian mucosal epithelial cells and deliver (small interfering RNA) siRNAs against two AIV genes, nucleoprotein (NP) and polymerase acidic protein (PA). Using a red fluorescent reporter, we first demonstrated vector delivery and intracellular expression in avian epithelial cells. Subsequently, we demonstrated significant reductions in AIV shedding when applying these anti-AIV vectors prophylactically. These antiviral vectors provided up to a 10,000-fold reduction in viral titers shed, demonstrating in vitro proof-of-concept for using these novel anti-AIV vectors to inhibit AIV shedding. Our results indicate this siRNA vector technology could represent a scalable and clinically applicable antiviral technology for avian and human influenza and a prototype for RNAi-based vectors against other viruses.

  20. Asymptotic bounded consensus tracking of double-integrator multi-agent systems with bounded-jerk target based on sampled-data without velocity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Shuang-Shuang; Wu Zhi-Hai; Peng Li; Xie Lin-Bo

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates asymptotic bounded consensus tracking (ABCT) of double-integrator multi-agent systems (MASs) with an asymptotically-unbounded-acceleration and bounded-jerk target (AUABJT) available to partial agents based on sampled-data without velocity measurements. A sampled-data consensus tracking protocol (CTP) without velocity measurements is proposed to guarantee that double-integrator MASs track an AUABJT available to only partial agents. The eigenvalue analysis method together with the augmented matrix method is used to obtain the necessary and sufficient conditions for ABCT. A numerical example is provided to illustrate the effectiveness of theoretical results. (paper)

  1. Antioxidative and antiviral properties of flowering cherry fruits (Prunus serrulata L. var. spontanea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yook, Hong-Sun; Kim, Kyoung-Hee; Park, Jung-Eun; Shin, Hyun-Jin

    2010-01-01

    The phenolic compounds of many fruits have been known to be efficient cellular protective antioxidants. In this study, antioxidative and antiviral properties of flowering cherry cultivars (Prunus yedoensis, Prunus sargentii, Prunus lannesiana, and Prunus cerasus) in Korea were investigated. The antioxidant property was assayed for specific activities including 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) hydroxy radical scavenging activity, reducing power capacity, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) like activity. In addition, antiviral activity was determined by inhibition studies on the infection cycle of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), measured as minimum concentration of cherry extracts that inhibited 50% of cytopathic effect (CPE) on PEDV. Our results show that the four varieties of cherries contain substantially high antioxidants and antiviral activities. In particular, P. cerasus contains higher antioxidants and antiviral activities as well as polyphenolic content than other varieties. Our data indicate that Korean native cherry cultivars could be beneficial supplements of dietary antioxidants and natural antiviral agents.

  2. Antiviral evaluation of an Hsp90 inhibitor, gedunin, against dengue ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the antiviral potential of a tetranortriterpenoid, gedunin, against dengue virus (DENV) replication by targeting the host chaperone, Hsp90. Methods: The compound, gedunin, was tested against the replication of DENV in vitro using BHK-15 cells transfected with DENV-2 subgenomic replicon. Molecular ...

  3. Antiviral treatment for Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildiko Gagyor

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTBACKGROUND: Corticosteroids are widely used in the treatment of idiopathic facial paralysis (Bell's palsy, but the effectiveness of additional treatment with an antiviral agent is uncertain. Significant morbidity can be associated with severe cases of Bell's palsy.OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of antiviral treatments alone or in combination with any other therapy for Bell's palsy.METHODS:Search methods:On 7 October 2014 we searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, DARE, NHS EED, and HTA. We also reviewed the bibliographies of the identified trials and contacted trial authors and known experts in the field and relevant drug companies to identify additional published or unpublished data. We searched clinical trials registries for ongoing studies.Selection criteria:We considered randomised controlled trials or quasi-randomised controlled trials of antivirals with and without corticosteroids versus control therapies for the treatment of Bell's palsy.We excluded trials that had a high risk of bias in several domains.Data collection and analysis:Pairs of authors independently assessed trials for relevance, eligibility, and risk of bias, using standard Cochrane procedures.MAIN RESULTS: Eleven trials, including 2883 participants, met the inclusion criteria and are included in the final analysis. We added four studies to the previous review for this update. Some of the trials were small, and a number were at high or unclear risk of bias. Other trials did not meet current best standards in allocation concealment and blinding. Incomplete recovery:We found no significant benefit from adding antivirals to corticosteroids in comparison with corticosteroids alone for people with Bell's palsy (risk ratio (RR 0.69, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.47 to 1.02, n = 1715. For people with severe Bell's palsy (House Brackmann scores of 5 and 6 or the equivalent in other scales, we found a

  4. Assessment of the Antiviral Properties of Recombinant Porcine SP-D against Various Influenza A Viruses In Vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillaire, M.L.B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341413933; van Eijk, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/255160216; Trierum, S.E.; van Riel, D.; Saelens, X.; Romijn, R.A.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/26228359X; Hemrika, W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/121631362; Fouchier, R.A.M.; Kuiken, T.; Osterhaus, A.D.M.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074960172; Haagsman, H.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069273278; Rimmelzwaan, G.F.

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of influenza viruses resistant to existing classes of antiviral drugs raises concern and there is a need for novel antiviral agents that could be used therapeutically or prophylacticaly. Surfactant protein D (SP-D) belongs to the family of Ctype lectins which are important effector

  5. Assessment of the antiviral properties of recombinant porcine SP-D against various influenza A viruses in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L.B. Hillaire (Marine); M. van Eijk (Martin); S.E. Trierum (Stella); D.A.J. van Riel (Debby); X. Saelens (Xavier); R.A. Romijn (Roland); W. Hemrika (Wieger); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); T. Kuiken (Thijs); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); H.P. Haagsman (Henk); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe emergence of influenza viruses resistant to existing classes of antiviral drugs raises concern and there is a need for novel antiviral agents that could be used therapeutically or prophylacticaly. Surfactant protein D (SP-D) belongs to the family of C-type lectins which are important

  6. Rapid-releasing of HI-6 via brain-targeted mesoporous silica nanoparticles for nerve agent detoxification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Fan, Lixue; Wang, Feijian; Luo, Yuan; Sui, Xin; Li, Wanhua; Zhang, Xiaohong; Wang, Yongan

    2016-05-01

    The toxic nerve agent (NA) soman is the most toxic artificially synthesized compound that can rapidly penetrate into the brain and irreversibly inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, leading to immediate death. However, there are currently few brain-targeted nanodrugs that can treat acute chemical brain poisoning owing to the limited drug-releasing speed. The present study investigated the effectiveness of a nanodrug against NA toxicity that has high blood-brain barrier penetration and is capable of rapid drug release. Transferrin-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (TF-MSNs) were conjugated with the known AChE reactivator HI-6. This nanodrug rapidly penetrated the blood-brain barrier in zebrafish and mice and restored cerebral AChE activity via the released HI-6, preventing the brain damage caused by soman poisoning and increasing the survival rate in mice. Furthermore, there was no toxicity associated with the MSNs in mice or rats. These results demonstrate that TF-MSNs loaded with HI-6 represent the most effective antidote against NA poisoning by soman reported to date, and suggest that MSNs are a safe alternative to conventional drugs and an optimal nanocarrier for treating brain poisoning, which requires acute pulse cerebral administration.The toxic nerve agent (NA) soman is the most toxic artificially synthesized compound that can rapidly penetrate into the brain and irreversibly inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, leading to immediate death. However, there are currently few brain-targeted nanodrugs that can treat acute chemical brain poisoning owing to the limited drug-releasing speed. The present study investigated the effectiveness of a nanodrug against NA toxicity that has high blood-brain barrier penetration and is capable of rapid drug release. Transferrin-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (TF-MSNs) were conjugated with the known AChE reactivator HI-6. This nanodrug rapidly penetrated the blood-brain barrier in zebrafish and

  7. N-Succinimidyl guanidinomethyl iodobenzoate protein radiohalogenation agents: Influence of isomeric substitution on radiolabeling and target cell residualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jaeyeon; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Koumarianou, Eftychia; McDougald, Darryl; Pruszynski, Marek; Osada, Takuya; Lahoutte, Tony; Lyerly, H. Kim; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: N-succinimidyl 4-guanidinomethyl-3-[ ⁎ I]iodobenzoate ([ ⁎ I]SGMIB) has shown promise for the radioiodination of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and other proteins that undergo extensive internalization after receptor binding, enhancing tumor targeting compared to direct electrophilic radioiodination. However, radiochemical yields for [ 131 I]SGMIB synthesis are low, which we hypothesize is due to steric hindrance from the Boc-protected guanidinomethyl group ortho to the tin moiety. To overcome this, we developed the isomeric compound, N-succinimidyl 3-guanidinomethyl-5-[ 131 I]iodobenzoate (iso-[ 131 I]SGMIB) wherein this bulky group was moved from ortho to meta position. Methods: Boc 2 -iso-SGMIB standard and its tin precursor, N-succinimidyl 3-((1,2-bis(tert-butoxycarbonyl)guanidino)methyl)-5-(trimethylstannyl) benzoate (Boc 2 -iso-SGMTB), were synthesized using two disparate routes, and iso-[*I]SGMIB synthesized from the tin precursor. Two HER2-targeted vectors — trastuzumab (Tras) and a nanobody 5 F7 (Nb) — were labeled using iso-[ ⁎ I]SGMIB and [ ⁎ I]SGMIB. Paired-label internalization assays in vitro with both proteins, and biodistribution in vivo with trastuzumab, labeled using the two isomeric prosthetic agents were performed. Results: When the reactions were performed under identical conditions, radioiodination yields for the synthesis of Boc 2 -iso-[ 131 I]SGMIB were significantly higher than those for Boc 2 -[ 131 I]SGMIB (70.7 ± 2.0% vs 56.5 ± 5.5%). With both Nb and trastuzumab, conjugation efficiency also was higher with iso-[ 131 I]SGMIB than with [ 131 I]SGMIB (Nb, 33.1 ± 7.1% vs 28.9 ± 13.0%; Tras, 45.1 ± 4.5% vs 34.8 ± 10.3%); however, the differences were not statistically significant. Internalization assays performed on BT474 cells with 5 F7 Nb indicated similar residualizing capacity over 6 h; however, at 24 h, radioactivity retained intracellularly for iso-[ 131 I]SGMIB-Nb was lower than for [ 125 I]SGMIB-Nb (46

  8. VEGFR2-Targeted Ultrasound Imaging Agent Enhances the Detection of Ovarian Tumors at Early Stage in Laying Hens, a Preclinical Model of Spontaneous Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barua, Animesh; Yellapa, Aparna; Bahr, Janice M; Machado, Sergio A; Bitterman, Pincas; Basu, Sanjib; Sharma, Sameer; Abramowicz, Jacques S

    2015-07-01

    Tumor-associated neoangiogenesis (TAN) is an early event in ovarian cancer (OVCA) development. Increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) by TAN vessels presents a potential target for early detection by ultrasound imaging. The goal of this study was to examine the suitability of VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound contrast agents in detecting spontaneous OVCA in laying hens. Effects of VEGFR2-targeted contrast agents in enhancing the intensity of ultrasound imaging from spontaneous ovarian tumors in hens were examined in a cross-sectional study. Enhancement in the intensity of ultrasound imaging was determined before and after injection of VEGFR2-targeted contrast agents. All ultrasound images were digitally stored and analyzed off-line. Following scanning, ovarian tissues were collected and processed for histology and detection of VEGFR2-expressing microvessels. Enhancement in visualization of ovarian morphology was detected by gray-scale imaging following injection of VEGFR2-targeted contrast agents. Compared with pre-contrast, contrast imaging enhanced the intensities of ultrasound imaging significantly (p ultrasound imaging was significantly (p ultrasound imaging in hens with OVCA were positively correlated with increased (p therapeutics. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Engineered Modular Recombinant Transporters: Application of New Platform for Targeted Radiotherapeutic Agents to α-Particle Emitting 211At

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenkranz, Andrey A.; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Pozzi, Oscar R.; Lunin, Vladimir G.; Zalutsky, Michael R.; Sobolev, Alexander S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To generate and evaluate a modular recombinant transporter (MRT) for targeting 211 At to cancer cells overexpressing the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Methods and Materials: The MRT was produced with four functional modules: (1) human epidermal growth factor as the internalizable ligand, (2) the optimized nuclear localization sequence of simian vacuolating virus 40 (SV40) large T-antigen, (3) a translocation domain of diphtheria toxin as an endosomolytic module, and (4) the Escherichia coli hemoglobin-like protein (HMP) as a carrier module. MRT was labeled using N-succinimidyl 3-[ 211 At]astato-5-guanidinomethylbenzoate (SAGMB), its 125 I analogue SGMIB, or with 131 I using Iodogen. Binding, internalization, and clonogenic assays were performed with EGFR-expressing A431, D247 MG, and U87MG.wtEGFR human cancer cell lines. Results: The affinity of SGMIB-MRT binding to A431 cells, determined by Scatchard analysis, was 22 nM, comparable to that measured before labeling. The binding of SGMIB-MRT and its internalization by A431 cancer cells was 96% and 99% EGFR specific, respectively. Paired label assays demonstrated that compared with Iodogen-labeled MRT, SGMIB-MRT and SAGMB-MRT exhibited more than threefold greater peak levels and durations of intracellular retention of activity. SAGMB-MRT was 10-20 times more cytotoxic than [ 211 At]astatide for all three cell lines. Conclusion: The results of this study have demonstrated the initial proof of principle for the MRT approach for designing targeted α-particle emitting radiotherapeutic agents. The high cytotoxicity of SAGMB-MRT for cancer cells overexpressing EGFR suggests that this 211 At-labeled conjugate has promise for the treatment of malignancies, such as glioma, which overexpress this receptor

  10. Whole-body multicolor spectrally resolved fluorescence imaging for development of target-specific optical contrast agents using genetically engineered probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hisataka; Hama, Yukihiro; Koyama, Yoshinori; Barrett, Tristan; Urano, Yasuteru; Choyke, Peter L.

    2007-02-01

    Target-specific contrast agents are being developed for the molecular imaging of cancer. Optically detectable target-specific agents are promising for clinical applications because of their high sensitivity and specificity. Pre clinical testing is needed, however, to validate the actual sensitivity and specificity of these agents in animal models, and involves both conventional histology and immunohistochemistry, which requires large numbers of animals and samples with costly handling. However, a superior validation tool takes advantage of genetic engineering technology whereby cell lines are transfected with genes that induce the target cell to produce fluorescent proteins with characteristic emission spectra thus, identifying them as cancer cells. Multicolor fluorescence imaging of these genetically engineered probes can provide rapid validation of newly developed exogenous probes that fluoresce at different wavelengths. For example, the plasmid containing the gene encoding red fluorescent protein (RFP) was transfected into cell lines previously developed to either express or not-express specific cell surface receptors. Various antibody-based or receptor ligand-based optical contrast agents with either green or near infrared fluorophores were developed to concurrently target and validate cancer cells and their positive and negative controls, such as β-D-galactose receptor, HER1 and HER2 in a single animal/organ. Spectrally resolved fluorescence multicolor imaging was used to detect separate fluorescent emission spectra from the exogenous agents and RFP. Therefore, using this in vivo imaging technique, we were able to demonstrate the sensitivity and specificity of the target-specific optical contrast agents, thus reducing the number of animals needed to conduct these experiments.

  11. Targets of curcumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongyu; Beevers, Christopher S.; Huang, Shile

    2010-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), an orange-yellow component of turmeric or curry powder, is a polyphenol natural product isolated from the rhizome of the plant Curcuma longa. For centuries, curcumin has been used in some medicinal preparation or used as a food-coloring agent. In recent years, extensive in vitro and in vivo studies suggested curcumin has anticancer, antiviral, antiarthritic, anti-amyloid, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties. The underlying mechanisms of these effects are diverse and appear to involve the regulation of various molecular targets, including transcription factors (such as nuclear factor-κB), growth factors (such as vascular endothelial cell growth factor), inflammatory cytokines (such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin 1 and interleukin 6), protein kinases (such as mammalian target of rapamycin, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and Akt) and other enzymes (such as cyclooxygenase 2 and 5 lipoxygenase). Thus, due to its efficacy and regulation of multiple targets, as well as its safety for human use, curcumin has received considerable interest as a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention and/or treatment of various malignant diseases, arthritis, allergies, Alzheimer’s disease, and other inflammatory illnesses. This review summarizes various in vitro and in vivo pharmacological aspects of curcumin as well as the underlying action mechanisms. The recently identified molecular targets and signaling pathways modulated by curcumin are also discussed here. PMID:20955148

  12. Tricyclic GyrB/ParE (TriBE) Inhibitors: A New Class of Broad-Spectrum Dual-Targeting Antibacterial Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Tari, Leslie W.; Li, Xiaoming; Trzoss, Michael; Bensen, Daniel C.; Chen, Zhiyong; Lam, Thanh; Zhang, Junhu; Lee, Suk Joong; Hough, Grayson; Phillipson, Doug; Akers-Rodriguez, Suzanne; Cunningham, Mark L.; Kwan, Bryan P.; Nelson, Kirk J.; Castellano, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Increasing resistance to every major class of antibiotics and a dearth of novel classes of antibacterial agents in development pipelines has created a dwindling reservoir of treatment options for serious bacterial infections. The bacterial type IIA topoisomerases, DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, are validated antibacterial drug targets with multiple prospective drug binding sites, including the catalytic site targeted by the fluoroquinolone antibiotics. However, growing resistance to fluoroq...

  13. Antiviral Effect Assay of Aqueous Extract of Echium Amoenum-L against HSV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malihe Farahani

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medicinal plants have been used for different diseases in past. There is an increasing need for substances with antiviral activity since the treatment of viral infections with the available antiviral drugs often leads to the problem of viral resistance. Therefore in the present study Echium amoenum L plant with ethnomedical background was screened for antiviral activity against HSV-1 in different times. Materials and Methods: Flower part of Echium amoenum L plant collected from Iran was extracted with different methods to obtain crude aqueous extract. This extract was screened for its cytotoxicity against Hep II cell line by CPE assay. Antiviral properties of the plant extract were determined by cytopathic effect inhibition assay.Results: Echium amoenum L extract exhibited significant antiviral activity at non toxic concentrations to the cell line used. Findings indicated that plant extract has the most antiviral activity when it used an hour after virus inoculation.Conclusion: Echium amoenum L plant had not toxic effect at highest concentrations to the cell lines used and showed the most antiviral activity when it used an hour after virus inoculation. Further research is needed to elucidate the active constituents of this plant which may be useful in the development of new and effective antiviral agents.

  14. Viral ancestors of antiviral systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Luis P

    2011-10-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the 'Big Bang' theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features.

  15. Viral Ancestors of Antiviral Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis P. Villarreal

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the ‘Big Bang’ theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features.

  16. Options for the management of antiviral resistance during hepatitis B therapy: reflections on battles over a decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Hyung Joon; Hwang, Seong Gyu

    2013-09-01

    Although much advancement has been achieved in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B, antiviral resistance is still a challenging issue. Previous generation antiviral agents have already developed resistance in a number of patients, and it is still being used especially in resource limited countries. Once antiviral resistance occurs, it predisposes to subsequent resistance, resulting in multidrug resistance. Therefore, prevention of initial antiviral resistance is the most important strategy, and appropriate choice and modification of therapy would be the cornerstone in avoiding treatment failures. Until now, management of antiviral resistance has been evolving from sequential therapy to combination therapy. In the era of tenofovir, the paradigm shifts again, and we have to decide when to switch and when to combine on the basis of newly emerging clinical data. We expect future eradication of chronic hepatitis B virus infection by proper prevention and optimal management of antiviral resistance.

  17. Pyrrolo[1,5]benzoxa(thia)zepines as a new class of potent apoptotic agents. Biological studies and identification of an intracellular location of their drug target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Gee, Margaret M; Gemma, Sandra; Butini, Stefania; Ramunno, Anna; Zisterer, Daniela M; Fattorusso, Caterina; Catalanotti, Bruno; Kukreja, Gagan; Fiorini, Isabella; Pisano, Claudio; Cucco, Carla; Novellino, Ettore; Nacci, Vito; Williams, D Clive; Campiani, Giuseppe

    2005-06-30

    We have recently developed five novel pyrrolo-1,5-benzoxazepines as proapoptotic agents. Their JNK-dependent induction of apoptosis in tumor cells suggested their potential as novel anticancer agents. The core structure of the apoptotic agent 6 was investigated, and the SARs were expanded with the design and synthesis of several analogues. To define the apoptotic mechanism of the new compounds and the localization of their drug target, two analogues of 6 were designed and synthesized to delineate events leading to JNK activation. The cell-penetrating compound 16 induced apoptosis in tumor cells, while its nonpenetrating analogue, 17, was incapable of inducing apoptosis or activating JNK. Plasma membrane permeabilization of tumor cells resulted in 17-induced JNK activation, suggesting that the pyrrolo-1,5-benzoxazepine molecular target is intracellular. Interestingly, compound 6 displayed cytotoxic activity against a panel of human tumor cell lines but demonstrated negligible toxicity in vivo with no effect on the animals' hematology parameters.

  18. Antiviral treatment for Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagyor, Ildiko; Madhok, Vishnu B; Daly, Fergus; Somasundara, Dhruvashree; Sullivan, Michael; Gammie, Fiona; Sullivan, Frank

    2015-11-09

    Corticosteroids are widely used in the treatment of idiopathic facial paralysis (Bell's palsy), but the effectiveness of additional treatment with an antiviral agent is uncertain. Significant morbidity can be associated with severe cases of Bell's palsy. This review was first published in 2001 and revised several times, most recently in 2009. This version replaces an update of the review in Issue 7 of the Cochrane Library subsequently withdrawn because of an ongoing investigation into the reliability of data from an included study. To assess the effects of antiviral treatments alone or in combination with any other therapy for Bell's palsy. On 7 October 2014 we searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, DARE, NHS EED, and HTA. We also reviewed the bibliographies of the identified trials and contacted trial authors and known experts in the field and relevant drug companies to identify additional published or unpublished data. We searched clinical trials registries for ongoing studies. We considered randomised controlled trials or quasi-randomised controlled trials of antivirals with and without corticosteroids versus control therapies for the treatment of Bell's palsy. We excluded trials that had a high risk of bias in several domains. Pairs of authors independently assessed trials for relevance, eligibility, and risk of bias, using standard Cochrane procedures. Ten trials, including 2280 participants, met the inclusion criteria and are included in the final analysis. Some of the trials were small, and a number were at high or unclear risk of bias. Other trials did not meet current best standards in allocation concealment and blinding. Incomplete recoveryWe found a significant benefit from adding antivirals to corticosteroids in comparison with corticosteroids alone for people with Bell's palsy (risk ratio (RR) 0.61, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.39 to 0.97, n = 1315). For people with severe Bell

  19. Antiviral Effects of Black Raspberry (Rubus coreanus) Seed and Its Gallic Acid against Influenza Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hye; Oh, Mi; Seok, Jong Hyeon; Kim, Sella; Lee, Dan Bi; Bae, Garam; Bae, Hae-In; Bae, Seon Young; Hong, Young-Min; Kwon, Sang-Oh; Lee, Dong-Hun; Song, Chang-Seon; Mun, Ji Young; Chung, Mi Sook; Kim, Kyung Hyun

    2016-06-06

    Influenza is a serious public health concern worldwide, as it causes significant morbidity and mortality. The emergence of drug-resistant viral strains requires new approaches for the treatment of influenza. In this study, Rubus coreanus seed (RCS) that is left over from the production of wine or juice was found to show antiviral activities against influenza type A and B viruses. Using the time-of-addition plaque assay, viral replication was almost completely abolished by simultaneous treatment with the RCS fraction of less than a 1-kDa molecular weight (RCSF1). One of the polyphenols derived from RCSF1, gallic acid (GA), identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, showed inhibitory effects against both influenza type A and B viruses, albeit at relatively high concentrations. RCSF1 was bound to hemagglutinin protein, inhibited hemagglutination significantly and disrupted viral particles, whereas GA was found to only disrupt the viral particles by using transmission electron microscopy. In BALB/c mice infected with influenza virus, oral administration of RCSF1 significantly improved the survival rate and reduced the viral titers in the lungs. Our results demonstrate that RCSF1 and GA show potent and broad antiviral activity against influenza A and B type viruses and are promising sources of agents that target virus particles.

  20. Development of a Novel Anti-HIV-1 Agent from within: Effect of Chimeric Vpr-Containing Protease Cleavage Site Residues on Virus Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serio, D.; Rizvi, T. A.; Cartas, M.; Kalyanaraman, V. S.; Weber, I. T.; Koprowski, H.; Srinivasan, A.

    1997-04-01

    Effective antiviral agents will be of great value in controlling virus replication and delaying the onset of HIV-1-related disease symptoms. Current therapy involves the use of antiviral agents that target the enzymatic functions of the virus, resulting in the emergence of resistant viruses to these agents, thus lowering their effectiveness. To overcome this problem, we have considered the idea of developing novel agents from within HIV-1 as inhibitors of virus replication. The specificity of the Vpr protein for the HIV-1 virus particle makes it an attractive molecule for the development of antiviral agents targeting the events associated with virus maturation. We have generated chimeric Vpr proteins containing HIV-1-specific sequences added to the C terminus of Vpr. These sequences correspond to nine cleavage sites of the Gag and Gag-Pol precursors of HIV-1. The chimeric Vpr constructs were introduced into HIV-1 proviral DNA to assess their effect on virus infectivity using single- and multiple-round replication assays. The virus particles generated exhibited a variable replication pattern depending on the protease cleavage site used as a fusion partner. Interestingly, the chimeric Vpr containing the cleavage sequences from the junction of p24 and p2, 24/2, completely abolished virus infectivity. These results show that chimeric proteins generated from within HIV-1 have the ability to suppress HIV-1 replication and make ideal agents for gene therapy or intracellular immunization to treat HIV-1 infection.

  1. [Impact of instantaneous uniformity of SonoVue microbubbles on binding characteristics of a new contrast agent targeted to choriocarcinoma cells in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li-Xue; Ding, Hong; Jia, Cai-Xia; Li, Yan; Wei, Qing

    2008-07-01

    At present, the investigation of microbubble contrast agents is a hot spot. Although these contrast agents can increase the ultrasound detection rate of tumor vessels, they lack tissue specificity. This study was to evaluate the impact of instantaneous uniformity of SonoVue microbubbles on binding characteristics, including the adhesion rate and stability, of a new contrast agent targeted to choriocarcinoma cells (JARs) in vitro, in order to establish a foundation to explore targeted ultrasound imaging for localization of tumor cell antigens and increase the early diagnostic rate for tumors. The objects were divided into three groups: the uneven microbubble group (n=10), the uniform microbubble group (n=10) and the tiny microbubble group (n=10). The rosette formation rate was counted. JARs were calculated by flow cytometry (FCM). The shape of the rosette was recorded. The targeted contrast agent was prepared by mixing SonoVue microbubbles of different uniformity with rabbit anti-human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) antibody. The binding rates of the contrast agent to JARs before and after PBS rinse were analyzed. The binding rate was significantlylower in the uneven microbubble group (60.4+/-1.5)% than in the uniform microbubble group (84.3+/-5.5)% and the tiny microbubble group (90.6+/-6.8)% (P0.05). The binding rates of the targeted microbubbles labeled with fluorescence to JARs were 72.9%, 81.03% and 88.5% in the uneven microbubble group, the uniform microbubble group and the tiny microbubble group, respectively (PSonoVue microbubbles to JARs is related to instantaneous uniformity of the microbubble, which is determined by the shaking method before preparation. Improving instantaneous uniformity of SonoVue microbubbles may increase the binding rate and stability of targeted microbubbles to JARs, thus to improve the image of JARs.

  2. Synthesis, Antiviral Potency, in Vitro ADMET, and X-ray Structure of Potent CD4 Mimics as Entry Inhibitors That Target the Phe43 Cavity of HIV-1 gp120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreli, Francesca; Kwon, Young Do; Belov, Dmitry S; Ramesh, Ranjith R; Kurkin, Alexander V; Altieri, Andrea; Kwong, Peter D; Debnath, Asim K

    2017-04-13

    In our attempt to optimize the lead HIV-1 entry antagonist, NBD-11021, we present in this study the rational design and synthesis of 60 new analogues and determination of their antiviral activity in a single-cycle and a multicycle infection assay to derive a comprehensive structure-activity relationship (SAR). Two of these compounds, NBD-14088 and NBD-14107, showed significant improvement in antiviral activity compared to the lead entry antagonist in a single-cycle assay against a large panel of Env-pseudotyped viruses. The X-ray structure of a similar compound, NBD-14010, confirmed the binding mode of the newly designed compounds. The in vitro ADMET profiles of these compounds are comparable to that of the most potent attachment inhibitor BMS-626529, a prodrug of which is currently undergoing phase III clinical trials. The systematic study presented here is expected to pave the way for improving the potency, toxicity, and ADMET profile of this series of compounds with the potential to be moved to the early preclinical development.

  3. Targeted Delivery of Chemotherapeutic Agents Using Improved Radiosensitive Liquid Core Microcapsules and Assessment of Their Antitumor Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Satoshi; Ehara, Shigeru; Ishii, Keizo; Yamazaki, Hiromichi; Matsuyama, Shigeo; Sato, Takahiro; Oikawa, Shyoichi; Kamiya, Tomihiro; Arakawa, Kazuo; Yokota, Wataru; Sera, Koichiro; Ito, Jyun

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation-sensitive microcapsules composed of alginate and hyaluronic acid are being developed. We report the development of improved microcapsules that were prepared using calcium- and yttrium-induced polymerization. We previously reported on the combined antitumor effect of carboplatin-containing microcapsules and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We mixed a 0.1% (wt/vol) solution of hyaluronic acid with a 0.2% alginate solution. Carboplatin (l mg) and indocyanine green (12.5 μg) were added to this mixture, and the resultant material was used for capsule preparation. The capsules were prepared by spraying the material into a mixture containing a 4.34% CaCl 2 solution supplemented with 0-0.01% yttrium. These capsules were irradiated with single doses of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, or 2 Gy 60 Co γ-rays. Immediately after irradiation, the frequency of microcapsule decomposition was determined using a microparticle-induced X-ray emission camera. The amount of core content released was estimated by particle-induced X-ray emission and colorimetric analysis with 0.25% indocyanine green. The antitumor effect of the combined therapy was determined by monitoring its effects on the diameter of an inoculated Meth A fibrosarcoma. Results: Microcapsules that had been polymerized using a 4.34% CaCl 2 solution supplemented with 5.0 x 10 -3 % (10 -3 % meant or 10% -3 ) yttrium exhibited the maximal decomposition, and the optimal release of core content occurred after 2-Gy irradiation. The microcapsules exhibited a synergistic antitumor effect combined with 2-Gy irradiation and were associated with reduced adverse effects. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that our liquid core microcapsules can be used in radiotherapy for targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic agents.

  4. Spectroscopic Photoacoustic Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer using a B7-H3-targeted ICG Contrast Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Katheryne E; Bachawal, Sunitha V; Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Jensen, Kristen; Machtaler, Steven; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Breast cancer imaging methods lack diagnostic accuracy, in particular for patients with dense breast tissue, and improved techniques are critically needed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate antibody-indocyanine green (ICG) conjugates, which undergo dynamic absorption spectrum shifts after cellular endocytosis and degradation, and spectroscopic photoacoustic (sPA) imaging to differentiate normal breast tissue from breast cancer by imaging B7-H3, a novel breast cancer associated molecular target. Methods: Quantitative immunohistochemical staining of endothelial and epithelial B7-H3 expression was assessed in 279 human breast tissue samples, including normal (n=53), benign lesions (11 subtypes, n=129), and breast cancers (4 subtypes, n=97). After absorption spectra of intracellular and degraded B7-H3-ICG and Isotype control-ICG (Iso-ICG) were characterized, sPA imaging in a transgenic murine breast cancer model (FVB/N-Tg(MMTVPyMT)634Mul) was performed and compared to imaging of control conditions [B7-H3-ICG in tumor negative animals (n=60), Iso-ICG (n=30), blocking B7-H3+B7-H3-ICG (n=20), and free ICG (n=20)] and validated with ex vivo histological analysis. Results: Immunostaining showed differential B7-H3 expression on both the endothelium and tumor epithelium in human breast cancer with an area under the ROC curve of 0.93 to differentiate breast cancer vs non-cancer. Combined in vitro/in vivo imaging showed that sPA allowed specific B7-H3-ICG detection down to the 13 nM concentration and differentiation from Iso-ICG. sPA molecular imaging of B7-H3-ICG showed a 3.01-fold (Pbreast cancer. Leveraging antibody-ICG contrast agents and their dynamic optical absorption spectra allows for highly specific sPA imaging of breast cancer.

  5. Evaluation of177Lu-CHX-A″-DTPA-6A10 Fab as a radioimmunotherapy agent targeting carbonic anhydrase XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, L; Kellner, M; Gosewisch, A; Oos, R; Böning, G; Lindner, S; Albert, N; Bartenstein, P; Reulen, H-J; Zeidler, R; Gildehaus, F J

    2018-03-04

    Due to their infiltrative growth behavior, gliomas have, even after surgical resection, a high recurrence tendency. The approach of intracavitary radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is aimed at inhibiting tumor re-growth by directly administering drugs into the resection cavity (RC). Direct application of the radioconjugate into the RC has the advantage of bypassing the blood-brain barrier, which allows the administration of higher radiation doses than systemic application. Carbonic anhydrase XII (CA XII) is highly expressed on glioma cells while being absent from normal brain and thus an attractive target molecule for RIT. We evaluated a CA XII-specific 6A10 Fab (fragment antigen binding) labelled with 177 Lu as an agent for RIT. 6A10 Fab fragment was modified and radiolabelled with 177 Lu and characterized by MALDI-TOF, flow cytometry and radio-TLC. In vitro stability was determined under physiological conditions. Biodistribution studies, autoradiography tumor examinations and planar scintigraphy imaging were performed on SCID-mice bearing human glioma xenografts. The in vitro CA XII binding capacity of the modified Fab was confirmed. Radiochemical purity was determined to be >90% after 72 h of incubation under physiological conditions. Autoradiography experiments proved the specific binding of the Fab to CA XII on tumor cells. Biodistribution studies revealed a tumor uptake of 3.0%ID/g after 6 h and no detectable brain uptake. The tumor-to-contralateral ratio of 10/1 was confirmed by quantitative planar scintigraphy. The radiochemical stability in combination with a successful in vivo tumor uptake shows the potential suitability for future RIT applications with the 6A10 Fab. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Broad-spectrum inhibition of common respiratory RNA viruses by a pyrimidine synthesis inhibitor with involvement of the host antiviral response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Nam Nam; Lai, Kin Kui; Dai, Jun; Kok, Kin Hang; Chen, Honglin; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Kao, Richard Yi Tsun

    2017-05-01

    Our previous screening of 50 240 structurally diverse compounds led to the identification of 39 influenza A virus infection inhibitors (Kao R.Y., Yang D., Lau L.S., Tsui W.H., Hu L. et al. Nat Biotechnol 2010;28:600-605). Further screening of these compounds against common respiratory viruses led to the discovery of compound FA-613. This inhibitor exhibited low micromolar antiviral activity against various influenza A and B virus strains, including the highly pathogenic influenza A strains H5N1 and H7N9, enterovirus A71, respiratory syncytial virus, human rhinovirus A, SARS- and MERS-coronavirus. No significant cellular toxicity was observed at the effective concentrations. Animal studies showed an improved survival rate in BALB/c mice that received intranasal FA-613 treatments against a lethal dose infection of A/HK/415742Md/2009 (H1N1). Further cell-based assays indicated that FA-613 interfer with the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway by targeting the dihydroorotate dehydrogenase. Surprisingly, FA-613 lost its antiviral potency in the interferon-deficient Vero cell line, while maintaining its inhibitory activity in an interferon-competent cell line which showed elevated expression of host antiviral genes when infected in the presence of FA-613. Further investigation of the specific connection between pyrimidine synthesis inhibition and the induction of host innate immunity might aid clinical development of this type of drug in antiviral therapies. Therefore, in acute cases of respiratory tract infections, when rapid diagnostics of the causative agent are not readily available, an antiviral drug with properties like FA-613 could prove to be very valuable.

  7. The future of antiviral immunotoxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiess, K.; Høy Jakobsen, Mette; Kledal, Thomas N

    2016-01-01

    There is a constant need for new therapeutic interventions in a wide range of infectious diseases. Over the past few years, the immunotoxins have entered the stage as promising antiviral treatments. Immunotoxins have been extensively explored in cancer treatment and have achieved FDA approval...

  8. Antiviral activity of glycyrrhizin against hepatitis C virus in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Matsumoto

    Full Text Available Glycyrrhizin (GL has been used in Japan to treat patients with chronic viral hepatitis, as an anti-inflammatory drug to reduce serum alanine aminotransferase levels. GL is also known to exhibit various biological activities, including anti-viral effects, but the anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV effect of GL remains to be clarified. In this study, we demonstrated that GL treatment of HCV-infected Huh7 cells caused a reduction of infectious HCV production using cell culture-produced HCV (HCVcc. To determine the target step in the HCV lifecycle of GL, we used HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp, replicon, and HCVcc systems. Significant suppressions of viral entry and replication steps were not observed. Interestingly, extracellular infectivity was decreased, and intracellular infectivity was increased. By immunofluorescence and electron microscopic analysis of GL treated cells, HCV core antigens and electron-dense particles had accumulated on endoplasmic reticulum attached to lipid droplet (LD, respectively, which is thought to act as platforms for HCV assembly. Furthermore, the amount of HCV core antigen in LD fraction increased. Taken together, these results suggest that GL inhibits release of infectious HCV particles. GL is known to have an inhibitory effect on phospholipase A2 (PLA2. We found that group 1B PLA2 (PLA2G1B inhibitor also decreased HCV release, suggesting that suppression of virus release by GL treatment may be due to its inhibitory effect on PLA2G1B. Finally, we demonstrated that combination treatment with GL augmented IFN-induced reduction of virus in the HCVcc system. GL is identified as a novel anti-HCV agent that targets infectious virus particle release.

  9. Assessment of a novel VEGF targeted agent using patient-derived tumor tissue xenograft models of colon carcinoma with lymphatic and hepatic metastases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketao Jin

    Full Text Available The lack of appropriate tumor models of primary tumors and corresponding metastases that can reliably predict for response to anticancer agents remains a major deficiency in the clinical practice of cancer therapy. It was the aim of our study to establish patient-derived tumor tissue (PDTT xenograft models of colon carcinoma with lymphatic and hepatic metastases useful for testing of novel molecularly targeted agents. PDTT of primary colon carcinoma, lymphatic and hepatic metastases were used to create xenograft models. Hematoxylin and eosin staining, immunohistochemical staining, genome-wide gene expression analysis, pyrosequencing, qRT-PCR, and western blotting were used to determine the biological stability of the xenografts during serial transplantation compared with the original tumor tissues. Early passages of the PDTT xenograft models of primary colon carcinoma, lymphatic and hepatic metastases revealed a high degree of similarity with the original clinical tumor samples with regard to histology, immunohistochemistry, genes expression, and mutation status as well as mRNA expression. After we have ascertained that these xenografts models retained similar histopathological features and molecular signatures as the original tumors, drug sensitivities of the xenografts to a novel VEGF targeted agent, FP3 was evaluated. In this study, PDTT xenograft models of colon carcinoma with lymphatic and hepatic metastasis have been successfully established. They provide appropriate models for testing of novel molecularly targeted agents.

  10. Antiviral activity of maca (Lepidium meyenii) against human influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Valle Mendoza, Juana; Pumarola, Tomàs; Gonzales, Libertad Alzamora; Del Valle, Luis J

    2014-09-01

    To investigate antiviral activity of maca to reduce viral load in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells infected with influenza type A and B viruses (Flu-A and Flu-B, respectively). Maca were extracted with methanol (1:2, v/v). The cell viability and toxicity of the extracts were evaluated on MDCK cells using method MTT assay. Antiviral activity of compounds against Flu-A and Flu-B viruses was assayed using a test for determining the inhibition of the cytopathic effect on cell culture and multiplex RT-PCR. The methanol extract of maca showed low cytotoxicity and inhibited influenza-induced cytopathic effect significantly, while viral load was reduced via inhibition of viral growth in MDCK infected cells. Maca contains potent inhibitors of Flu-A and Flu-B with a selectivity index [cytotoxic concentration 50%/IC50] of 157.4 and 110.5, respectively. In vitro assays demonstrated that maca has antiviral activity not only against Flu-A (like most antiviral agents) but also Flu-B viruses, providing remarkable therapeutic benefits. Copyright © 2014 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Synergistic antiviral activity of gemcitabine and ribavirin against enteroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyunju; Kim, Chonsaeng; Kim, Dong-eun; Song, Jae-Hyoung; Choi, Miri; Choi, Kwangman; Kang, Mingu; Lee, Kyungjin; Kim, Hae Soo; Shin, Jin Soo; Kim, Janghwan; Han, Sang-Bae; Lee, Mi-Young; Lee, Su Ui; Lee, Chong-Kyo; Kim, Meehyein; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Cho, Sungchan

    2015-12-01

    Enteroviruses are major causative agents of various human diseases, and some of them are currently considered to be an enormous threat to public health. However, no effective therapy is currently available for the treatment of these infections. We identified gemcitabine, a nucleoside-analog drug used for cancer treatment, from a screen of bioactive chemicals as a novel inhibitor of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) and enterovirus 71 (EV71). Gemcitabine potently inhibited the proliferation of CVB3 and EV71, as well as the replication of CVB3 and EV71 replicons, in cells with a low micromolar IC50 (1-5 μM). Its strong inhibitory effect was also observed in cells infected with human rhinoviruses, demonstrating broad-spectrum antiviral effects on enteroviruses. Mechanistically, an extensive analysis excluded the involvement of 2C, 3A, IRES-dependent translation, and also that of polyprotein processing in the antiviral effects of gemcitabine. Importantly, gemcitabine in combination with ribavirin, an antiviral drug currently being used against a few RNA viruses, exhibited a synergistic antiviral effect on the replication of CVB3 and EV71 replicons. Consequently, our results clearly demonstrate a new indication for gemcitabine as an effective broad-spectrum inhibitor of enteroviruses and strongly suggest a new therapeutic strategy using gemcitabine alone or in combination with ribavirin for the treatment of various diseases associated with enterovirus infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Agility: Agent - Ility Architecture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thompson, Craig

    2002-01-01

    ...., object and web technologies). The objective of the Agility project is to develop an open agent grid architecture populated with scalable, deployable, industrial strength agent grid components, targeting the theme 'agents for the masses...

  13. Evaluation of glycodendron and synthetically modified dextran clearing agents for multistep targeting of radioisotopes for molecular imaging and radioimmunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheal, Sarah M; Yoo, Barney; Boughdad, Sarah; Punzalan, Blesida; Yang, Guangbin; Dilhas, Anna; Torchon, Geralda; Pu, Jun; Axworthy, Don B; Zanzonico, Pat; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Larson, Steven M

    2014-02-03

    A series of N-acetylgalactosamine-dendrons (NAG-dendrons) and dextrans bearing biotin moieties were compared for their ability to complex with and sequester circulating bispecific antitumor antibody streptavidin fusion protein (scFv4-SA) in vivo, to improve tumor-to-normal tissue concentration ratios for multistep targeted (MST) radioimmunotherapy and diagnosis. Specifically, a total of five NAG-dendrons employing a common synthetic scaffold structure containing 4, 8, 16, or 32 carbohydrate residues and a single biotin moiety were prepared (NAGB), and for comparative purposes, a biotinylated-dextran with an average molecular weight of 500 kD was synthesized from amino-dextran (DEXB). One of the NAGB compounds, CA16, has been investigated in humans; our aim was to determine if other NAGB analogues (e.g., CA8 or CA4) were bioequivalent to CA16 and/or better suited as MST reagents. In vivo studies included dynamic positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging of (124)I-labeled-scFv4-SA clearance and dual-label biodistribution studies following MST directed at subcutaneous (s.c.) human colon adenocarcinoma xenografts in mice. The MST protocol consists of three injections: first, a scFv4-SA specific for an antitumor-associated glycoprotein (TAG-72); second, CA16 or other clearing agent; and third, radiolabeled biotin. We observed using PET imaging of the (124)I-labeled-scFv4-SA clearance that the spatial arrangement of ligands conjugated to NAG (i.e., biotin linked with an extended spacer, referred to herein as long-chain (LC)) can impact the binding to the antibody in circulation and subsequent liver uptake of the NAG-antibody complex. Also, NAGB CA32-LC or CA16-LC can be utilized during MST to achieve comparable tumor-to-blood ratios and absolute tumor uptake seen previously with CA16. Finally, DEXB was equally effective as NAGB CA32-LC at lowering scFv4-SA in circulation, but at the expense of reducing absolute tumor uptake of radiolabeled biotin.

  14. DNA minor groove targeted alkylating agents based on bisbenzimidazole carriers: synthesis, cytotoxicity and sequence-specificity of DNA alkylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaill, J B; Fan, J Y; Denny, W A

    1998-12-01

    A series of bisbenzimidazoles bearing a variety of alkylating agents [ortho- and meta-mustards, imidazolebis(hydroxymethyl), imidazolebis(methylcarbamate) and pyrrolebis(hydroxymethyl)], appended by a propyl linker chain, were prepared and investigated for sequence-specificity of DNA alkylation and their cytotoxicity. Previous work has shown that, for para-aniline mustards, a propyl linker is optimal for cytotoxicity. Alkaline cleavage assays using a variety of different labelled oligonucleotides showed that the preferred sequences for adenine alkylation were 5'-TTTANANAANN and 5'-ATTANANAANN (underlined bases show the drug alkylation sites), with AT-rich sequences required on both the 5' and 3' sides of the alkylated adenine. The different aniline mustards showed little variation in alkylation pattern and similar efficiencies of DNA cross-link formation despite the changes in orientation and positioning of the mustard, suggesting that the propyl linker has some flexibility. The imidazole- and pyrrolebis(hydroxymethyl) alkylators showed no DNA strand cleavage following base treatment, indicating that no guanine or adenine N3 or N7 adducts were formed. Using the PCR-based polymerase stop assay, these alkylators showed PCR blocks at 5'-C*G sites (the * nucleotide indicates the blocked site), particularly at 5'-TAC*GA 5'-AGC*GGA, and 5'-AGCC*GGT sequences, caused by guanine 2-NH2 lesions on the opposite strand. Only the (more reactive) imidazolebis(methylcarbamoyl) and pyrrolebis(hydroxymethyl) alkylators demonstrated interstrand cross-linking ability. All of the bifunctional mustards showed large (approximately 100-fold) increases in cytotoxicity over chlorambucil, with the corresponding monofunctional mustards being 20- to 60-fold less cytotoxic. These results suggest that in the mustards the propyl linker provides sufficient flexibility to achieve delivery of the alkylator to favoured (adenine N3) sites in the minor groove, regardless of its exact geometry with

  15. Ethyl Pyruvate Emerges as a Safe and Fast Acting Agent against Trypanosoma brucei by Targeting Pyruvate Kinase Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Netsanet Worku

    Full Text Available Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT also called sleeping sickness is an infectious disease in humans caused by an extracellular protozoan parasite. The disease, if left untreated, results in 100% mortality. Currently available drugs are full of severe drawbacks and fail to escape the fast development of trypanosoma resistance. Due to similarities in cell metabolism between cancerous tumors and trypanosoma cells, some of the current registered drugs against HAT have also been tested in cancer chemotherapy. Here we demonstrate for the first time that the simple ester, ethyl pyruvate, comprises such properties.The current study covers the efficacy and corresponding target evaluation of ethyl pyruvate on T. brucei cell lines using a combination of biochemical techniques including cell proliferation assays, enzyme kinetics, phasecontrast microscopic video imaging and ex vivo toxicity tests. We have shown that ethyl pyruvate effectively kills trypanosomes most probably by net ATP depletion through inhibition of pyruvate kinase (Ki = 3.0±0.29 mM. The potential of ethyl pyruvate as a trypanocidal compound is also strengthened by its fast acting property, killing cells within three hours post exposure. This has been demonstrated using video imaging of live cells as well as concentration and time dependency experiments. Most importantly, ethyl pyruvate produces minimal side effects in human red cells and is known to easily cross the blood-brain-barrier. This makes it a promising candidate for effective treatment of the two clinical stages of sleeping sickness. Trypanosome drug-resistance tests indicate irreversible cell death and a low incidence of resistance development under experimental conditions.Our results present ethyl pyruvate as a safe and fast acting trypanocidal compound and show that it inhibits the enzyme pyruvate kinase. Competitive inhibition of this enzyme was found to cause ATP depletion and cell death. Due to its ability to easily cross

  16. Antiviral Activity of Graphene Oxide: How Sharp Edged Structure and Charge Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shiyi; Shao, Kang; Li, Zhonghua; Guo, Nan; Zuo, Yunpeng; Li, Qin; Lu, Zhicheng; Chen, Lu; He, Qigai; Han, Heyou

    2015-09-30

    Graphene oxide and its derivatives have been widely explored for their antimicrobial properties due to their high surface-to-volume ratios and unique chemical and physical properties. However, little information is available on their effects on viruses. In this study, we report the broad-spectrum antiviral activity of GO against pseudorabies virus (PRV, a DNA virus) and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV, an RNA virus). Our results showed that GO significantly suppressed the infection of PRV and PEDV for a 2 log reduction in virus titers at noncytotoxic concentrations. The potent antiviral activity of both GO and rGO can be attributed to the unique single-layer structure and negative charge. First, GO exhibited potent antiviral activity when conjugated with PVP, a nonionic polymer, but not when conjugated with PDDA, a cationic polymer. Additionally, the precursors Gt and GtO showed much weaker antiviral activity than monolayer GO and rGO, suggesting that the nanosheet structure is important for antiviral properties. Furthermore, GO inactivated both viruses by structural destruction prior to viral entry. The overall results suggest the potential of graphene oxide as a novel promising antiviral agent with a broad and potent antiviral activity.

  17. Amiodarone affects Ebola virus binding and entry into target cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salata, Cristiano; Munegato, Denis; Martelli, Francesco; Parolin, Cristina; Calistri, Arianna; Baritussio, Aldo; Palù, Giorgio

    2018-03-02

    Ebola Virus Disease is one of the most lethal transmissible infections characterized by a high fatality rate. Several research studies have aimed to identify effective antiviral agents. Amiodarone, a drug used for the treatment of arrhythmias, has been shown to inhibit filovirus infection in vitro by acting at the early step of the viral replication cycle. Here we demonstrate that amiodarone reduces virus binding to target cells and slows down the progression of the viral particles along the endocytic pathway. Overall our data support the notion that amiodarone interferes with Ebola virus infection by affecting cellular pathways/targets involved in the viral entry process.

  18. In vitro evaluation of marine-microorganism extracts for anti-viral activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhara-Bell Jarred

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Viral-induced infectious diseases represent a major health threat and their control remains an unachieved goal, due in part to the limited availability of effective anti-viral drugs and measures. The use of natural products in drug manufacturing is an ancient and well-established practice. Marine organisms are known producers of pharmacological and anti-viral agents. In this study, a total of 20 extracts from marine microorganisms were evaluated for their antiviral activity. These extracts were tested against two mammalian viruses, herpes simplex virus (HSV-1 and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, using Vero cells as the cell culture system, and two marine virus counterparts, channel catfish virus (CCV and snakehead rhabdovirus (SHRV, in their respective cell cultures (CCO and EPC. Evaluation of these extracts demonstrated that some possess antiviral potential. In sum, extracts 162M(4, 258M(1, 298M(4, 313(2, 331M(2, 367M(1 and 397(1 appear to be effective broad-spectrum antivirals with potential uses as prophylactic agents to prevent infection, as evident by their highly inhibitive effects against both virus types. Extract 313(2 shows the most potential in that it showed significantly high inhibition across all tested viruses. The samples tested in this study were crude extracts; therefore the development of antiviral application of the few potential extracts is dependent on future studies focused on the isolation of the active elements contained in these extracts.

  19. Antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis B: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2004-03-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a well-recognized risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which is becoming a more prevalent clinical problem, especially in HBV-endemic areas. It is estimated that 1.25 million people in the United States and more than 300 million people worldwide are chronically infected with HBV. Despite the introduction of universal vaccination against hepatitis B in over 100 countries, persistent HBV infection is still a serious problem worldwide, causing an estimated annual death rate of one million. It may take several decades until the effect of vaccination will be translated into reduced transmission and morbidity. Meanwhile, patients with persistent HBV infection require better antiviral therapeutic modalities than are currently available. It is well accepted that antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis B is effective to improve prognosis of patients with HBV by preventing development of hepatitis state and HCC. The therapeutic endpoints for hepatitis B treatment are: 1) sustained suppression of HBV replication, as indicated by HBsAg and HBeAg loss, 2) decrease of serum HBV DNA of an undetectable level by a non-PCR method, 3) remission of disease, as shown by normalization of ALT, 4) improvement in liver histology, and 5) reduction of the acute exacerbation, cirrhosis, and HCC. In the present, the antiviral treatment of hepatitis B consists of either interferon alpha or oral lamivudine alone or in combination with existing therapy. Each major antiviral drug of interferon alpha and lamivudine has pros and cons, and effect of combination therapy of both drugs is also still limited. More powerful and safe new antiviral therapies are required to achieve final goal of these therapeutic endpoints. Management of chronic hepatitis B requires significant knowledge of approved pharmacotherapeutic agents and their limitations. Therapeutic options for managing hepatitis infection after liver transplantation (LT

  20. Melanin-manganese nanoparticles with ultrahigh efficient clearance in vivo for tumor-targeting T1magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wen; Sun, Jinghua; Li, Liping; Peng, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Ruiping; Wang, Binquan

    2017-12-19

    Endogenous biomaterials in organisms, with native biocompatibility and biodegradability, appear more advantageous in the development of nanoscale diagnostic and therapeutic systems for future clinical translation. Herein, a novel tumor-targeting Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast agent was developed based on Mn 2+ -chelating ultrasmall water-soluble melanin nanoparticles (MNP-PEG-Mn). The nanoparticles, with a size of about 5.6 nm, presented high chelation stability and showed negligible cytotoxicity as estimated by MTT assay. Moreover, the r 1 longitudinal relaxivity (20.56 mM -1 s -1 ) of MNP-PEG-Mn was much higher than that of Gadodiamide (6.00 mM -1 s -1 ), which is a clinically approved MRI contrast agent. In vivo MRI experiments revealed excellent tumor-targeting specificity after tumor-bearing mice were intravenously injected with MNP-PEG-Mn. Additionally, MNP-PEG-Mn could be excreted via renal and hepatobiliary pathways with negligible toxicity to body tissues. These preliminary results indicated the clinically translatable potential of MNP-PEG-Mn as a T 1 MRI contrast agent for tumor-targeted imaging.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of Bombesin-superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as a targeted contrast agent for imaging of breast cancer using MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafari, Atefeh; Shayesteh, Saber Farjami; Salouti, Mojtaba; Heidari, Zahra; Rajabi, Ahmad Bitarafan; Boustani, Komail; Nahardani, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The targeted delivery of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as a contrast agent may facilitate their accumulation in cancer cells and enhance the sensitivity of MR imaging. In this study, SPIONs coated with dextran (DSPIONs) were conjugated with bombesin (BBN) to produce a targeting contrast agent for detection of breast cancer using MRI. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer analyses indicated the formation of dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with an average size of 6.0 ± 0.5 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the conjugation of the BBN with the DSPIONs. A stability study proved the high optical stability of DSPION–BBN in human blood serum. DSPION–BBN biocompatibility was confirmed by cytotoxicity evaluation. A binding study showed the targeting ability of DSPION–BBN to bind to T47D breast cancer cells overexpressing gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptors. T 2 -weighted and T 2 *-weighted color map MR images were acquired. The MRI study indicated that the DSPION–BBN possessed good diagnostic ability as a GRP-specific contrast agent, with appropriate signal reduction in T 2 *-weighted color map MR images in mice with breast tumors. (paper)

  2. Synthesis and characterization of Bombesin-superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as a targeted contrast agent for imaging of breast cancer using MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Atefeh; Salouti, Mojtaba; Farjami Shayesteh, Saber; Heidari, Zahra; Bitarafan Rajabi, Ahmad; Boustani, Komail; Nahardani, Ali

    2015-02-01

    The targeted delivery of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as a contrast agent may facilitate their accumulation in cancer cells and enhance the sensitivity of MR imaging. In this study, SPIONs coated with dextran (DSPIONs) were conjugated with bombesin (BBN) to produce a targeting contrast agent for detection of breast cancer using MRI. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer analyses indicated the formation of dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with an average size of 6.0 ± 0.5 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the conjugation of the BBN with the DSPIONs. A stability study proved the high optical stability of DSPION-BBN in human blood serum. DSPION-BBN biocompatibility was confirmed by cytotoxicity evaluation. A binding study showed the targeting ability of DSPION-BBN to bind to T47D breast cancer cells overexpressing gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptors. T2-weighted and T2*-weighted color map MR images were acquired. The MRI study indicated that the DSPION-BBN possessed good diagnostic ability as a GRP-specific contrast agent, with appropriate signal reduction in T2*-weighted color map MR images in mice with breast tumors.

  3. The relative efficacy and safety of targeted agents used in combination with chemotherapy in treating patients with untreated advanced gastric cancer: a network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shuping; Zhang, Huixiang; Wang, Xueyan; Ge, Quanxing; Hu, Junhong

    2017-04-18

    Gastric cancer is one of the leading mortal causes. Targeted therapy is a new type of cancer treatment, which precisely identifies and attacks cancer cells and significantly reduces side effects. In this network meta-analysis, we focused on the efficacy and safety of 12 targeted agents on gastric cancer among a total of 8,405 patients from 24 trials. Hazard ratio (HR) with 95% credible interval (CrI) were calculated for primary outcomes, including overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS), while odds ratio (OR) with 95% CrI were calculated for secondary outcomes. Surface under the cumulative ranking curve (SUCRA) were calculated to illustrate the rank probability of various agents for different outcomes. Compared with other analyzed treatments, ramucirumab is outstanding in survival outcomes. However, higher risk of hematological events should be noted during its application. Lapatinib is also efficacious in progression reduction, while it is always combined with severe gastrointestinal events. Trastuzumab is proposed for its high efficacy in improving survival rate and safety, which is proper for most patients. In conclusion, trastuzumab was recommended as the optimal targeted agent combined with chemotherapy for gastric cancer patients.

  4. α-Linolenic Acid, A Nutraceutical with Pleiotropic Properties That Targets Endogenous Neuroprotective Pathways to Protect against Organophosphate Nerve Agent-Induced Neuropathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsade Piermartiri

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available α-Linolenic acid (ALA is a nutraceutical found in vegetable products such as flax and walnuts. The pleiotropic properties of ALA target endogenous neuroprotective and neurorestorative pathways in brain and involve the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a major neuroprotective protein in brain, and downstream signaling pathways likely mediated via activation of TrkB, the cognate receptor of BDNF. In this review, we discuss possible mechanisms of ALA efficacy against the highly toxic OP nerve agent soman. Organophosphate (OP nerve agents are highly toxic chemical warfare agents and a threat to military and civilian populations. Once considered only for battlefield use, these agents are now used by terrorists to inflict mass casualties. OP nerve agents inhibit the critical enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE that rapidly leads to a cholinergic crisis involving multiple organs. Status epilepticus results from the excessive accumulation of synaptic acetylcholine which in turn leads to the overactivation of muscarinic receptors; prolonged seizures cause the neuropathology and long-term consequences in survivors. Current countermeasures mitigate symptoms and signs as well as reduce brain damage, but must be given within minutes after exposure to OP nerve agents supporting interest in newer and more effective therapies. The pleiotropic properties of ALA result in a coordinated molecular and cellular program to restore neuronal networks and improve cognitive function in soman-exposed animals. Collectively, ALA should be brought to the clinic to treat the long-term consequences of nerve agents in survivors. ALA may be an effective therapy for other acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders.

  5. Can antiviral drugs contain pandemic influenza transmission?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels G Becker

    Full Text Available Antiviral drugs dispensed during the 2009 influenza pandemic generally failed to contain transmission. This poses the question of whether preparedness for a future pandemic should include plans to use antiviral drugs to mitigate transmission.Simulations using a standard transmission model that allows for infected arrivals and delayed vaccination show that attempts to contain transmission require relatively few antiviral doses. In contrast, persistent use of antiviral drugs when the reproduction number remains above 1 use very many doses and are unlikely to reduce the eventual attack rate appreciably unless the stockpile is very large. A second model, in which the community has a household structure, shows that the effectiveness of a strategy of dispensing antiviral drugs to infected households decreases rapidly with time delays in dispensing the antivirals. Using characteristics of past pandemics it is estimated that at least 80% of primary household cases must present upon show of symptoms to have a chance of containing transmission by dispensing antiviral drugs to households. To determine data needs, household outbreaks were simulated with 50% receiving antiviral drugs early and 50% receiving antiviral drugs late. A test to compare the size of household outbreaks indicates that at least 100-200 household outbreaks need to be monitored to find evidence that antiviral drugs can mitigate transmission of the newly emerged virus.Use of antiviral drugs in an early attempt to contain transmission should be part of preparedness plans for a future influenza pandemic. Data on the incidence of the first 350 cases and the eventual attack rates of the first 200 hundred household outbreaks should be used to estimate the initial reproduction number R and the effectiveness of antiviral drugs to mitigate transmission. Use of antiviral drugs to mitigate general transmission should cease if these estimates indicate that containment of transmission is unlikely.

  6. Curcumin Targeted, Polymalic Acid-Based MRI Contrast Agent for the Detection of Aβ Plaques in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Rameshwar; Gangalum, Pallavi R; Wagner, Shawn; Portilla-Arias, Jose; Ding, Hui; Rekechenetskiy, Arthur; Konda, Bindu; Inoue, Satoshi; Black, Keith L; Ljubimova, Julia Y; Holler, Eggehard

    2015-09-01

    Currently, there is no gadolinium-based contrast agent available for conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection of amyloidal beta (Aβ) plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Its timely finding would be vital for patient survival and quality of life. Curcumin (CUR), a common Indian spice effectively binds to Aβ plaques which is a hallmark of AD. To address this binding, we have designed a novel nanoimaging agent (NIA) based on nature-derived poly(β-l-malic acid) (PMLA) containing covalently attached gadolinium-DOTA(Gd-DOTA) and nature-derived CUR. The all-in-one agent recognizes and selectively binds to Aβ plaques and is detected by MRI. It efficiently detected Aβ plaques in human and mouse samples by an ex vivo staining. The method can be useful in clinic for safe and noninvasive diagnosis of AD. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Characterization of d-boroAla as a Novel Broad Spectrum Antibacterial Agent Targeting d-Ala-d-Ala Ligase

    OpenAIRE

    Putty, Sandeep; Rai, Aman; Jamindar, Darshan; Pagano, Paul; Quinn, Cheryl L.; Mima, Takehiko; Schweizer, Herbert P.; Gutheil, William G.

    2011-01-01

    d-boroAla was previously characterized as an inhibitor of bacterial alanine racemase and d-Ala-d-Ala ligase enzymes [Duncan, K., et al Biochemistry 1989, 28:3541–9]. In the present study, d-boroAla was identified and characterized as an antibacterial agent. d-boroAla has activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms, with MICs down to 8 µg/mL. A structure-function study on the alkyl side chain (NH2-CHR-B(OR’)2) revealed that d-boroAla is the most effective agent in a series ...

  8. Puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase: an antiviral prodrug activating enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehler, Ulrika; Nelson, Cara H; Peterson, Larryn W; Provoda, Chester J; Hilfinger, John M; Lee, Kyung-Dall; McKenna, Charles E; Amidon, Gordon L

    2010-03-01

    Cidofovir (HPMPC) is a broad-spectrum antiviral agent, currently used to treat AIDS-related human cytomegalovirus retinitis. Cidofovir has recognized therapeutic potential for orthopox virus infections, although its use is hampered by its inherent low oral bioavailability. Val-Ser-cyclic HPMPC (Val-Ser-cHPMPC) is a promising peptide prodrug which has previously been shown by us to improve the permeability and bioavailability of the parent compound in rodent models (Eriksson et al., 2008. Molecular Pharmaceutics 5, 598-609). Puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase was partially purified from Caco-2 cell homogenates and identified as a prodrug activating enzyme for Val-Ser-cHPMPC. The prodrug activation process initially involves an enzymatic step where the l-Valine residue is removed by puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase, a step that is bestatin-sensitive. Subsequent chemical hydrolysis results in the generation of cHPMPC. A recombinant puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase was generated and its substrate specificity investigated. The k(cat) for Val-pNA was significantly lower than that for Ala-pNA, suggesting that some amino acids are preferred over others. Furthermore, the three-fold higher k(cat) for Val-Ser-cHPMPC as compared to Val-pNA suggests that the leaving group may play an important role in determining hydrolytic activity. In addition to its ability to hydrolyze a variety of substrates, these observations strongly suggest that puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase is an important enzyme for activating Val-Ser-cHPMPC in vivo. Taken together, our data suggest that puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase makes an attractive target for future prodrug design.

  9. Synthesis of Pyrazine-1,3-thiazine Hybrid Analogues as Antiviral Agent Against HIV-1, Influenza A (H1N1), Enterovirus 71 (EV71), and Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong-Min; Zhou, Kuo; Wu, Tao; Cao, Yin-Guang

    2016-09-01

    A novel series of pyrazine-1,3-thiazine hybrid conjugates were synthesized in excellent yield. These derivatives were subsequently tested against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1); hemagglutinin type 1 and neuraminidase type 1-'influenza' A (H1N1) virus; enterovirus 71 (EV71); and coxsackievirus B3. The effect of these conjugates on the key enzymes responsible for the progression of these viral infections was also illustrated via enzyme-based assay, such as HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) and neuraminidase, where entire tested molecules showed considerable inhibition. Particularly, among the tested derivatives, compound 3k was identified as most promising inhibitor of HIV-1 with 94% of inhibition (IC50 3.26 ± 0.2 μm). Moreover, the compound 3d was found to be the most potent analogue to inhibit the H1N1 virus with IC50 of 5.32 ± 0.4 μm together with inhibition of the neuraminidase enzyme (IC50 11.24 ± 1.1 μm). In regard to inhibitory activity against enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), the tested derivatives showed considerable inhibition of infection. Molecular docking studies were also performed for the most promising inhibitors with their corresponding target protein to exemplify the structural requirement for better inhibitory activity. The results of inhibitory assay showed that designed molecules possess considerable inhibitory activity against the virus tested. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Targeting host lipid synthesis and metabolism to inhibit dengue and hepatitis C viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villareal, Valerie A; Rodgers, Mary A; Costello, Deirdre A; Yang, Priscilla L

    2015-12-01

    Lipids are necessary for every step in the replication cycle of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and dengue virus (DENV), members of the family Flaviviridae. Recent studies have demonstrated that discrete steps in the replication cycles of these viruses can be inhibited by pharmacological agents that target host factors mediating lipid synthesis, metabolism, trafficking, and signal transduction. Despite this, targeting host lipid metabolism and trafficking as an antiviral strategy by blockade of entire pathways may be limited due to host toxicity. Knowledge of the molecular details of lipid structure and function in replication and the mechanisms whereby specific lipids are generated and trafficked to the relevant sites may enable more targeted antiviral strategies without global effects on the host cell. In this review, we discuss lipids demonstrated to be critical to the replication cycles of HCV and DENV and highlight potential areas for anti-viral development. This review article forms part of a symposium on flavivirus drug discovery in Antiviral Research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. HEPATIC AND INTRAHEPATIC TARGETING OF AN ANTIINFLAMMATORY AGENT WITH HUMAN SERUM-ALBUMIN AND NEOGLYCOPROTEINS AS CARRIER MOLECULES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FRANSSEN, EJF; JANSEN, RW; VAALBURG, M; MEIJER, DKF

    1993-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory agent naproxen (Nap) was covalently coupled to human serum albumin (HSA) and to the neoglycoproteins, galactose and mannose terminated HSA, to deliver this drug selectively to different cell types of the liver. Disposition of Nap20-HSA was studied in rats and compared to that

  12. Infection of two non-target grasshoppers by the biological control agent Metarhizium anisopliae var. acridum in the Sahel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, E. N.; Eilenberg, J.; Langewald, J.

    2006-01-01

    Fungal isolates from grasshoppers of the family Acrididae are suspected to be less virulent to grasshoppers of the family Pyrgomorphidae. The biological control agent Metarhizium anisopliae var. acridum was isolated from an acridid and is thus hypothesized to be less virulent to pyrgomorphids...

  13. Antiviral Therapy in Steroid-refractory Ulcerative Colitis with Cytomegalovirus: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Tushar; Singh, Siddharth; Loftus, Edward V; Bruining, David H; McCurdy, Jeffrey D

    2015-11-01

    The role of antiviral therapy in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) with cytomegalovirus (CMV) remains unclear. We therefore performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the association between antiviral therapy and the risk of colectomy. Multiple electronic databases were searched systematically through July 2014 for studies reporting the risk of colectomy in patients with UC with CMV stratified by treatment with antiviral agents. Colectomy rates were assessed for the overall cohort and stratified by corticosteroid (CS) refractoriness. We estimated summary odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals, using random-effects model, and used Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation criteria to appraise the quality of evidence. Fifteen observational studies (333 patients with UC with CMV, 43.2% treated with antiviral agents) were identified, of which 8 stratified patients according to CS-refractory disease (55.4% treated with antiviral agents). Antiviral therapy resulted in a significantly lower risk of colectomy in patients with CS-refractory disease (odds ratio, 0.20; 95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.49; I = 0%) but not in the overall population of patients with UC (odds ratio, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.31-2.76; I = 65). The quality evidence was low. The results were stable when restricting the analysis to patients with a tissue diagnosis of CMV and studies that defined CS-refractory disease as a failure to respond to intravenous CS. Antiviral therapy may benefit a subgroup of patients with UC who are refractory to CS. Further prospective trials are required to confirm these findings.

  14. Exploration of the medical periodic table: towards new targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Nicolas P E; Sadler, Peter J

    2013-06-07

    Metallodrugs offer potential for unique mechanisms of drug action based on the choice of the metal, its oxidation state, the types and number of coordinated ligands and the coordination geometry. We discuss recent progress in identifying new target sites and elucidating the mechanisms of action of anti-cancer, anti-bacterial, anti-viral, anti-parasitic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-neurodegenerative agents, as well as in the design of metal-based diagnostic agents. Progress in identifying and defining target sites has been accelerated recently by advances in proteomics, genomics and metal speciation analysis. Examples of metal compounds and chelating agents (enzyme inhibitors) currently in clinical use, clinical trials or preclinical development are highlighted.

  15. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of anti-nucleolin-targeted magnetic PLGA nanoparticles loaded with doxorubicin as a theranostic agent for enhanced targeted cancer imaging and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosafer, Jafar; Abnous, Khalil; Tafaghodi, Mohsen; Mokhtarzadeh, Ahad; Ramezani, Mohammad

    2017-04-01

    A superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs)/doxorubicin (Dox) co-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-based nanoparticles targeted with AS1411 aptamer (Apt) against murine C26 colon carcinoma cells is successfully developed via a modified multiple emulsion solvent evaporation method for theranostic purposes. The mean size of SPIO/Dox-NPs (NPs) was 130nm with a narrow particle size distribution and Dox loading of 3.0%. The SPIO loading of 16.0% and acceptable magnetic properties are obtained and analyzed using thermogravimetric and vibration simple magnetometer analysis, respectively. The best release profile from NPs was observed in PBS at pH 7.4, in which very low burst release was observed. Nucleolin is a targeting ligand to facilitate anti-tumor delivery of AS1411-targeted NPs. The Apt conjugation to NPs (Apt-NPs) enhanced cellular uptake of Dox in C26 cancer cells. Apt-NPs enhance the cytotoxicity effect of Dox followed by a significantly higher tumor inhibition and prolonged animal survival in mice bearing C26 colon carcinoma xenografts. Furthermore, Apt-NPs enhance the contrast of magnetic resonance images in tumor site. Altogether, these Apt-NPs could be considered as a powerful tumor-targeted delivery system for their potential as dual therapeutic and diagnostic applications in cancers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Tricyclic GyrB/ParE (TriBE inhibitors: a new class of broad-spectrum dual-targeting antibacterial agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie W Tari

    Full Text Available Increasing resistance to every major class of antibiotics and a dearth of novel classes of antibacterial agents in development pipelines has created a dwindling reservoir of treatment options for serious bacterial infections. The bacterial type IIA topoisomerases, DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, are validated antibacterial drug targets with multiple prospective drug binding sites, including the catalytic site targeted by the fluoroquinolone antibiotics. However, growing resistance to fluoroquinolones, frequently mediated by mutations in the drug-binding site, is increasingly limiting the utility of this antibiotic class, prompting the search for other inhibitor classes that target different sites on the topoisomerase complexes. The highly conserved ATP-binding subunits of DNA gyrase (GyrB and topoisomerase IV (ParE have long been recognized as excellent candidates for the development of dual-targeting antibacterial agents with broad-spectrum potential. However, to date, no natural product or small molecule inhibitors targeting these sites have succeeded in the clinic, and no inhibitors of these enzymes have yet been reported with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity encompassing the majority of Gram-negative pathogens. Using structure-based drug design (SBDD, we have created a novel dual-targeting pyrimidoindole inhibitor series with exquisite potency against GyrB and ParE enzymes from a broad range of clinically important pathogens. Inhibitors from this series demonstrate potent, broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens of clinical importance, including fluoroquinolone resistant and multidrug resistant strains. Lead compounds have been discovered with clinical potential; they are well tolerated in animals, and efficacious in Gram-negative infection models.

  17. Tricyclic GyrB/ParE (TriBE) inhibitors: a new class of broad-spectrum dual-targeting antibacterial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tari, Leslie W; Li, Xiaoming; Trzoss, Michael; Bensen, Daniel C; Chen, Zhiyong; Lam, Thanh; Zhang, Junhu; Lee, Suk Joong; Hough, Grayson; Phillipson, Doug; Akers-Rodriguez, Suzanne; Cunningham, Mark L; Kwan, Bryan P; Nelson, Kirk J; Castellano, Amanda; Locke, Jeff B; Brown-Driver, Vickie; Murphy, Timothy M; Ong, Voon S; Pillar, Chris M; Shinabarger, Dean L; Nix, Jay; Lightstone, Felice C; Wong, Sergio E; Nguyen, Toan B; Shaw, Karen J; Finn, John

    2013-01-01

    Increasing resistance to every major class of antibiotics and a dearth of novel classes of antibacterial agents in development pipelines has created a dwindling reservoir of treatment options for serious bacterial infections. The bacterial type IIA topoisomerases, DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, are validated antibacterial drug targets with multiple prospective drug binding sites, including the catalytic site targeted by the fluoroquinolone antibiotics. However, growing resistance to fluoroquinolones, frequently mediated by mutations in the drug-binding site, is increasingly limiting the utility of this antibiotic class, prompting the search for other inhibitor classes that target different sites on the topoisomerase complexes. The highly conserved ATP-binding subunits of DNA gyrase (GyrB) and topoisomerase IV (ParE) have long been recognized as excellent candidates for the development of dual-targeting antibacterial agents with broad-spectrum potential. However, to date, no natural product or small molecule inhibitors targeting these sites have succeeded in the clinic, and no inhibitors of these enzymes have yet been reported with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity encompassing the majority of Gram-negative pathogens. Using structure-based drug design (SBDD), we have created a novel dual-targeting pyrimidoindole inhibitor series with exquisite potency against GyrB and ParE enzymes from a broad range of clinically important pathogens. Inhibitors from this series demonstrate potent, broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens of clinical importance, including fluoroquinolone resistant and multidrug resistant strains. Lead compounds have been discovered with clinical potential; they are well tolerated in animals, and efficacious in Gram-negative infection models.

  18. Gold nanorods/mesoporous silica-based nanocomposite as theranostic agents for targeting near-infrared imaging and photothermal therapy induced with laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Xu, Ming; Chen, Qing; Guan, Guannan; Hu, Wen; Zhao, Xiuli; Qiao, Mingxi; Hu, Haiyang; Liang, Ying; Zhu, Heyun; Chen, Dawei

    2015-01-01

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) is widely regarded as a promising technology for cancer treatment. Gold nanorods (GNRs), as excellent PTT agent candidates, have shown high-performance photothermal conversion ability under laser irradiation, yet two major obstacles to their clinical application are the lack of selective accumulation in the target site following systemic administration and the greatly reduced photothermal conversion efficiency caused by self-aggregating in aqueous environment. Herein, we demonstrate that tLyp-1 peptide-functionalized, indocyanine green (ICG)-containing mesoporous silica-coated GNRs (I-TMSG) possessed dual-function as tumor cells-targeting near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probe and PTT agents. The construction of the nanostructure began with synthesis of GNRs by seed-mediated growth method, followed by the coating of mesoporous silica, the chemical conjugation of PEG and tLyp-1 peptide, and the enclosure of ICG as an NIR imaging agent in the mesoporous. The as-prepared nanoparticles could shield the GNRs against their self-aggregation, improve the stability of ICG, and exhibit negligible dark cytotoxicity. More importantly, such a theranostic nanocomposite could realize the combination of GNRs-based photothermal ablation under NIR illumination, ICG-mediated fluorescent imaging, and tLyp-1-enabled more easy endocytosis into breast cancer cells. All in all, I-TMSG nanoparticles, in our opinion, possessed the strong potential to realize the effective diagnosis and PTT treatment of human mammary cancer.

  19. aBiofilm: a resource of anti-biofilm agents and their potential implications in targeting antibiotic drug resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Rajput, Akanksha; Thakur, Anamika; Sharma, Shivangi; Kumar, Manoj

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Biofilms play an important role in the antibiotic drug resistance, which is threatening public health globally. Almost, all microbes mimic multicellular lifestyle to form biofilm by undergoing phenotypic changes to adapt adverse environmental conditions. Many anti-biofilm agents have been experimentally validated to disrupt the biofilms during last three decades. To organize this data, we developed the ‘ aBiofilm ’ resource (http://bioinfo.imtech.res.in/manojk/abiofilm/) that harbors...

  20. Structure of a prereaction complex between the nerve agent sarin, its biological target acetylcholinesterase, and the antidote HI-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgardsson, Anders; Berg, Lotta; Akfur, Christine; Hörnberg, Andreas; Worek, Franz; Linusson, Anna; Ekström, Fredrik J

    2016-05-17

    Organophosphorus nerve agents interfere with cholinergic signaling by covalently binding to the active site of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). This inhibition causes an accumulation of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, potentially leading to overstimulation of the nervous system and death. Current treatments include the use of antidotes that promote the release of functional AChE by an unknown reactivation mechanism. We have used diffusion trap cryocrystallography and density functional theory (DFT) calculations to determine and analyze prereaction conformers of the nerve agent antidote HI-6 in complex with Mus musculus AChE covalently inhibited by the nerve agent sarin. These analyses reveal previously unknown conformations of the system and suggest that the cleavage of the covalent enzyme-sarin bond is preceded by a conformational change in the sarin adduct itself. Together with data from the reactivation kinetics, this alternate conformation suggests a key interaction between Glu202 and the O-isopropyl moiety of sarin. Moreover, solvent kinetic isotope effect experiments using deuterium oxide reveal that the reactivation mechanism features an isotope-sensitive step. These findings provide insights into the reactivation mechanism and provide a starting point for the development of improved antidotes. The work also illustrates how DFT calculations can guide the interpretation, analysis, and validation of crystallographic data for challenging reactive systems with complex conformational dynamics.

  1. Identification of anti-viral activity of the cardenolides, Na+/K+-ATPase inhibitors, against porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Wei; Chang, Hsin-Yu; Hsu, Hsing-Yu; Lee, Yue-Zhi; Chang, Hsun-Shuo; Chen, Ih-Sheng; Lee, Shiow-Ju

    2017-10-01

    A series of naturally occurring cardenolides that exhibit potent anti-transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) activity in swine testicular (ST) cells has been identified. In an immunofluorescence assay, these cardenolides were found to diminish the expressions of TGEV nucleocapsid and spike protein, which was used as an indication for viral replication; block TGEV infection induced apoptosis and cytopathic effects; and impart the same trend of inhibitory activity against Na + /K + -ATPase as for anti-TGEV activity. The viral titer inhibition was found to take place in a dose-dependent manner. Knocking down expression of Na + /K + -ATPase, the cellular receptor of cardenolides, in ST cells was found to significantly impair the susceptibility of ST cells to TGEV infectivity. Thus, we have identified Na + /K + -ATPase as an anti-viral drug target and its antagonists, cardenolides, a novel class of anti- TGEV agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mx Proteins: Antiviral Gatekeepers That Restrain the Uninvited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhelst, Judith; Hulpiau, Paco

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Fifty years after the discovery of the mouse Mx1 gene, researchers are still trying to understand the molecular details of the antiviral mechanisms mediated by Mx proteins. Mx proteins are evolutionarily conserved dynamin-like large GTPases, and GTPase activity is required for their antiviral activity. The expression of Mx genes is controlled by type I and type III interferons. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that Mx genes are present in almost all vertebrates, usually in one to three copies. Mx proteins are best known for inhibiting negative-stranded RNA viruses, but they also inhibit other virus families. Recent structural analyses provide hints about the antiviral mechanisms of Mx proteins, but it is not known how they can suppress such a wide variety of viruses lacking an obvious common molecular pattern. Perhaps they interact with a (partially) symmetrical invading oligomeric structure, such as a viral ribonucleoprotein complex. Such an interaction may be of a fairly low affinity, in line with the broad target specificity of Mx proteins, yet it would be strong enough to instigate Mx oligomerization and ring assembly. Such a model is compatible with the broad “substrate” specificity of Mx proteins: depending on the size of the invading viral ribonucleoprotein complexes that need to be wrapped, the assembly process would consume the necessary amount of Mx precursor molecules. These Mx ring structures might then act as energy-consuming wrenches to disassemble the viral target structure. PMID:24296571

  3. Evaluation of Antiviral Activity ofZanthoxylumSpecies Against Picornaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hwa-Jung

    2016-12-01

    Human rhinoviruses and enteroviruses (family Picornaviridae) infect millions of people worldwide each year, but little is known about effective therapeutical treatment for the infection caused by these viruses. We sought to determine whether or not Zanthoxylum (Rutaceae) species can exhibit antiviral activity against picornaviruses. The leaf parts of four Zanthoxylum species were extracted with methanol, and the extracts were investigated for their antiviral activity against picornaviruses using cytopathic effects by cytopathic effect reduction. Leaf extracts of Zanthoxylum piperitum among four Zanthoxylum species were found to possess only broad-spectrum antipicornavirus activity against human rhninovirus 2 with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) value of 59.48 μg/mL, human rhinovirus 3 with an IC 50 value of 39.94 μg/mL, coxsackie A16 virus with an IC 50 value of 45.80 μg/mL, coxsackie B3 virus with an IC 50 value of 68.53 μg/mL, coxsackie B4 virus with an IC 50 value of 93.58 μg/mL, and enterovirus 71 virus with an IC 50 value of 4.48 μg/mL. However, ribavirin did not possess antiviral activity against human rhinovirus 3 and four enteroviruses. Therefore, leaves of Z. piperitum showed broad-spectrum antipicornavirus activity, and may be useful as a candidate for studying picornavirus agents and development of pharmaceuticals.

  4. Antiviral activity of gemcitabine against human rhinovirus in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jae-Hyoung; Kim, Seong-Ryeol; Heo, Eun-Young; Lee, Jae-Young; Kim, Dong-Eun; Cho, Sungchan; Chang, Sun-Young; Yoon, Byung-Il; Seong, Jeongmin; Ko, Hyun-Jeong

    2017-09-01

    Rhinovirus, a major causative agent of the common cold, is associated with exacerbation of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Currently, there is no antiviral treatment or vaccine for human rhinovirus (HRV). Gemcitabine (2',2'-difluorodeoxycytidine, dFdC) is a deoxycytidine analog with antiviral activity against rhinovirus, as well as enterovirus 71, in vitro. However, the antiviral effects of gemcitabine in vivo have not been investigated. In the current study, we assessed whether gemcitabine mediated antiviral effects in the murine HRV infection model. Intranasal administration of gemcitabine significantly lowered pulmonary viral load and inflammation by decreasing proinflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α and IL-1β, and reduction in the number of lung-infiltrating lymphocytes. Interestingly, we found that the addition of UTP and CTP significantly attenuated the antiviral activity of gemcitabine. Thus the limitation of UTP and CTP by the addition of gemcitabine may inhibit the viral RNA synthesis. These results suggest that gemcitabine, an antineoplastic drug, can be repositioned as an antiviral drug to inhibit HRV infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The efficacy of targeted health agents education to reduce the duration of untreated psychosis in a rural population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Eduardo; Molina, Juan; Kamis, Danielle; Calvo, Maria; Stratton, Lee; Strejilevich, Sergio; Aleman, Gabriela Gonzalez; Guerrero, Gonzalo; Bourdieu, Mercedes; Conesa, Horacio A; Escobar, Javier I; de Erausquin, Gabriel A

    2015-02-01

    The duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) is a key determinant in the severity of symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. DUP is a modifiable factor that if reduced can improve patient outcome and treatment response. We sought to decrease DUP in rural Argentina by instituting annual training of local health agents to better identify signs of mental illness and offer earlier intervention. DUP was estimated using Schedules of Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN). Ongoing training was correlated with a reduction in DUP. Reducing DUP through better screening can decrease the psychosocial burden of disease and improve the trajectory of psychosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The effects of the slug biological control agent, Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita (Nematoda), on non-target aquatic molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, N J; Morritt, D

    2006-06-01

    The nematode Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita is used as a commercial biological control agent of slugs in the UK. Although it is known to affect other terrestrial mollusc species, its effects on freshwater molluscs are not known. The present study investigated the effects of P. hermaphrodita on the survival of juvenile Lymnaea stagnalis and Physa fontinalis, two common freshwater snails, at 'spray tank' concentration and a 50% diluted 'spray tank' concentration over a 14-day period. Survival of L. stagnalis was significantly reduced at both application levels but P. fontinalis suffered no mortalities over the experimental period. The possible differential mechanisms of pathology between the two host species are discussed.

  7. Conformationally locked nucleoside analogues based on the bridgehead substituted 7-oxonorbornane and their antiviral properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dejmek, Milan; Hřebabecký, Hubert; Dračínský, Martin; Neyts, J.; Leyssen, P.; Mertlíková-Kaiserová, Helena; Nencka, Radim

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 76, č. 12 (2011), s. 1549-1566 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : 1'-homonucleosides * Diels-Alder reaction * antiviral agents Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.283, year: 2011

  8. New pathogenic viruses and novel antiviral drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, Ben; Eggink, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    The journal Antiviral Research was conceived and born in 1980, and launched in 1981, a time when very few antiviral drugs were around. This 30-year celebration meeting was convened by the publisher Elsevier and chaired by Eric de Clercq (Leuven University), who has acted as editor-in-chief for the

  9. Effect of food and acid-reducing agents on the absorption of oral targeted therapies in solid tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, A.E.C.A.B.; Lubberman, F.J.E.; Tol, J.; Gerritsen, W.R.; Herpen, C.M.L. van; Erp, N. van

    2016-01-01

    Oral targeted therapies represent an increasingly important group of drugs within modern oncology. With the shift from intravenously to orally administered drugs, drug absorption is a newly introduced factor in drug disposition. The process of absorption can have a large effect on inter- and

  10. Nucleic acid polymers: Broad spectrum antiviral activity, antiviral mechanisms and optimization for the treatment of hepatitis B and hepatitis D infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaillant, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Antiviral polymers are a well-studied class of broad spectrum viral attachment/entry inhibitors whose activity increases with polymer length and with increased amphipathic (hydrophobic) character. The newest members of this class of compounds are nucleic acid polymers whose activity is derived from the sequence independent properties of phosphorothioated oligonucleotides as amphipathic polymers. Although the antiviral mechanisms and broad spectrum antiviral activity of nucleic acid polymers mirror the functionality of other members of this class, they exert in addition a unique post entry activity in hepatitis B infection which inhibits the release of HBsAg from infected hepatocytes. This review provides a general overview of the antiviral polymer class with a focus on nucleic acid polymers and their development as therapeutic agents for the treatment of hepatitis B/hepatitis D. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on ''An unfinished story: from the discovery of the Australia antigen to the development of new curative therapies for hepatitis B.''. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Glucose-functionalized gold nanoparticles as a metabolically targeted CT contrast agent for distinguishing tumors from non-malignant metabolically active processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreifuss, Tamar; Motiei, Menachem; Betzer, Oshra; Popovtzer, Aron; Abourbeh, Galith; Mishani, Eyal; Popovtzer, Rachela

    2017-02-01

    The highly used cancer imaging technique, [18F]FDG-PET, is based on the increased glucose metabolic activity in tumors. However, since there are other biological processes that exhibit increased metabolic activity, in particular inflammation, this methodology is prone to non-specificity for cancer. Herein we describe the development of a novel nanoparticle-based approach, utilizes Glucose-Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles (GF-GNPs) as a metabolically targeted CT contrast agent. Our method has demonstrated specific tumor targeting and has successfully differentiated between cancer and inflammation in a combined tumor-inflammation mouse model, due to dissimilarities in vasculatures in different pathologic conditions. This novel approach provides new capabilities in cancer imaging, and can be applicable to a wide range of cancers.

  12. Antiviral lectins: Selective inhibitors of viral entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Carter A; Ramessar, Koreen; O'Keefe, Barry R

    2017-06-01

    Many natural lectins have been reported to have antiviral activity. As some of these have been put forward as potential development candidates for preventing or treating viral infections, we have set out in this review to survey the literature on antiviral lectins. The review groups lectins by structural class and class of source organism we also detail their carbohydrate specificity and their reported antiviral activities. The review concludes with a brief discussion of several of the pertinent hurdles that heterologous proteins must clear to be useful clinical candidates and cites examples where such studies have been reported for antiviral lectins. Though the clearest path currently being followed is the use of antiviral lectins as anti-HIV microbicides via topical mucosal administration, some investigators have also found systemic efficacy against acute infections following subcutaneous administration. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Antiviral therapy in seasonal influenza and 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza: Korean experiences and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Joon Young; Noh, Ji Yun; Choi, Won Suk; Cheong, Hee Jin; Kim, Woo Joo

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is a major cause of substantial morbidity and mortality in humans every year. Vaccination is the main strategy to prevent influenza infection, but antiviral agents also play an important role in the control of both seasonal and pandemic influenza. During the influenza A/H1N1 pandemic in 2009, early prompt antiviral therapy may have reduced the severity of the influenza outcomes including pneumonia, hospitalization and mortality in the Republic of Korea. Since the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, there have been increasing usages of antiviral agents for the treatment of patients with seasonal influenza. Although currently rare, antiviral resistance among influenza viruses may emerge and increase with increased use of neuraminidase inhibitors. New agents with different modes of action are under investigation, including favipiravir, DAS181, nitazoxanide and broad-spectrum neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. Data are limited with respect to high-dose and combination antiviral therapies. So, clinical trials are warranted to evaluate diverse antiviral combinations that may be synergistic and less likely to induce breakthrough resistance.

  14. Dose and Size-Dependent Antiviral Effects of Silver Nanoparticles on Feline Calicivirus, a Human Norovirus Surrogate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekele, Aschalew Z; Gokulan, Kuppan; Williams, Katherine M; Khare, Sangeeta

    2016-05-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as antibacterial agents are incorporated in many consumer products, while the use as antiviral agents is an ongoing area of research. We evaluated the antiviral properties of AgNPs of variable sizes (10, 75, and 110 nm) and doses (25, 50, and 100 μg/mL) at different contact time points against feline calicivirus (FCV), a surrogate for norovirus. Antiviral effects of the AgNPs were determined by comparing the infectivity of FCV, the appearance of cytopathic effects (CPEs), and the integrity of the viral capsid protein in viral suspension treated with AgNPs with the untreated controls. The 10 nm AgNPs at 50 and 100 μg/mL concentrations inactivated the FCV beyond the limit of detection, resulting in a decrease of up to 6.5 log10 viral titer, prevented development of CPEs, and reduction in the western blot band signal of the viral capsid protein. No significant antiviral effect was observed for the 75 and 110 nm AgNPs. Conclusions and Applications: These results demonstrate that the antiviral effects of AgNPs are both size and dose dependent, thus potential applications of AgNPs as antiviral agents to prevent contamination of foodborne viruses need to consider size and dose effects.

  15. Antiviral Goes Viral: Harnessing CRISPR/Cas9 to Combat Viruses in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soppe, Jasper Adriaan; Lebbink, Robert Jan

    2017-10-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) systems are RNA-guided sequence-specific prokaryotic antiviral immune systems. In prokaryotes, small RNA molecules guide Cas effector endonucleases to invading foreign genetic elements in a sequence-dependent manner, resulting in DNA cleavage by the endonuclease upon target binding. A rewired CRISPR/Cas9 system can be used for targeted and precise genome editing in eukaryotic cells. CRISPR/Cas has also been harnessed to target human pathogenic viruses as a potential new antiviral strategy. Here, we review recent CRISPR/Cas9-based approaches to combat specific human viruses in humans and discuss challenges that need to be overcome before CRISPR/Cas9 may be used in the clinic as an antiviral strategy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of a Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Agent with Activity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    72 h; 6 = ACV, 72 h; 7.5 ng/mL H9, 72 h;8.10 ng/mL. H9, 72 h). Anti-HCMV activity. H9 inhibited the production of pp65 in HCMV- infected Helf cell culture supernatant in a dose-dependent manner. EC50 of H9 (0.46 ng/ml) was greater than that of the standard ganciclovir. (GCV) group (0.68 ng/ml). As shown in Fig 3A,.

  17. Antiviral acyclic nucleoside phosphonates: A novel group of immunomodulatroy agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zídek, Zdeněk; Franková, Daniela; Holý, A.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2002), s. 166-167 ISSN 1079-9907. [Cytokines and Interferons 2002. Turin - Italy, 06.10.2002-10.10.2002] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/00/0048 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5008914 Keywords : nucleoside phosphonates Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 1.885, year: 2002

  18. Therapeutic potential of the anti-diabetic agent metformin in targeting the skin cancer stem cell diaspora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddi, Anand; Powers, Matthew A; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2014-05-01

    Type II diabetes is associated with increased prevalence of cancer including both melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin. Emerging evidence from epidemiological studies suggest that diabetic patients on metformin have a lower risk of cancer incidence and mortality in a broad range of neoplasms. In both melanoma and SCC, populations of cancer stem cells (CSC) contribute to tumor initiation and metastasis. We propose that metformin constitutes a new class of targeted therapy that acts on the skin CSC diaspora. We posit that metformin selectively and simultaneously targets CSCs of the primary tumor as well as in metastatic niches thereby disrupting the dynamic dispersal of circulating CSCs between the primary tumor and metastatic site. This hypothesis suggests a new concept in dermato-oncology that treatment of type II diabetes and prevention of skin cancer are two sides of the same coin. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Targeting Phosphatidylinositol 4-Kinase IIIα for Radiosensitization: A Potential Model of Drug Repositioning Using an Anti-Hepatitis C Viral Agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Jeanny [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dan Hyo; Park, Ji Min [Medical Science Research Institute, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Hee [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Yeo Hyun [Medical Science Research Institute, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Wu, Hong-Gyun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyung Hwan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, In Ah, E-mail: inah228@snu.ac.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Medical Science Research Institute, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate which isotype of phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase (PI4K) may affect radiosensitivity and examine whether anti–hepatitis C viral (HCV) agents, some of which have been shown to inhibit PI4K IIIα activity, could be repositioned as a radiosensitizer in human cancer cells. Methods and Materials: U251, BT474, and HepG2 cell lines and normal human astrocyte were used. Ribonucleic acid interference, clonogenic assays, Western blotting, immunofluorescence, annexin V assay, lysotracker staining, and β-galactosidase assay were performed. Results: Of the 4 PI4K isotypes, specific inhibition of IIIα increased radiosensitivity. For pharmacologic inhibition of PI4K IIIα, we screened 9 anti-HCV agents by half-maximal inhibitory concentration assay. Simeprevir was selected, and its inhibition of PI4K IIIα activity was confirmed. Combination of simeprevir treatment and radiation significantly attenuated expression of phospho-phospho-PKC and phospho-Akt and increased radiation-induced cell death in tested cell lines. Pretreatment with simeprevir prolonged γH2AX foci formation and down-regulation of phospho-DNA-PKcs, indicating impairment of nonhomologous end-joining repair. Cells pretreated with simeprevir exhibited mixed modes of cell death, including apoptosis and autophagy. Conclusion: These data demonstrate that targeting PI4K IIIα using an anti-HCV agent is a viable approach to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of radiation therapy in various human cancers, such as glioma, breast, and hepatocellular carcinoma.

  20. Coupling Activity-Based Detection, Target Amplification, Colorimetric and Fluorometric Signal Amplification, for Quantitative Chemosensing of Fluoride Generated from Nerve Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaolong; Reuther, James F; Phillips, Scott T; Anslyn, Eric V

    2017-03-17

    The G-class nerve agents, which include sarin, soman, and cyclosarin, react readily with nucleophilic reagents to produce fluoride. Thus, a chemosensing protocol has been designed for these agents that pairs the nucleophilic reactivity of oximates for generating fluoride with an autoinductive target amplification reaction to amplify the quantity of fluoride for facile colorimetric and fluorescent optical quantification. The chemosensing protocol was demonstrated by using the nerve agent surrogate diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) and benzaldoxime as the nucleophile. Autoinductive fluoride amplification responds to fluoride released from DFP by amplifying the fluoride concentration and a yellow reporter molecule. The reporter is a conjugated oligomer with a nominal repeating unit that originates from 4-aminobenzaldehyde. Exposure of the amplified fluoride to a fluoride-specific ratiometric fluorescent reporter provides a fluorescent readout, in which three fluorophores are generated per fluoride. Both colorimetric and fluorescent readouts enable quantitative assays with low micromolar limits of detection for fluoride resulting from DFP. More importantly, this work demonstrates the successful merging of multiple complex reactions for achieving selective, sensitive, and quantitative chemosensing. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Bone-targeted agents in the treatment of bone metastases: RANK outsider or new kid on the block?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouganim, Nathaniel; Clemons, Mark J

    2011-03-01

    Stopeck AT, Lipton A, Body JJ et al.: Denosumab compared with zoledronic acid for the treatment of bone metastases in patients with advanced breast cancer: a randomized, double-blind study. Clin. Oncol. 28(35), 5132-5139 (2010). Bone is the most common site of recurrence in patients with advanced breast cancer. Bisphosphonates have revolutionized the care for patients with bone metastases by delaying and reducing skeletal complications. The RANK ligand inhibitor denosumab has been developed as a result of our enhanced understanding of bone physiology. In a recent randomized, double-blind trial, denosumab has been shown to be superior to zoledronic acid in delaying the onset of skeletal complications in advanced breast cancer patients. While these results are exciting, the absence of any survival benefit and the considerable cost of this agent mean that further quality-of-life data are needed before it becomes widely used as a new standard of care.

  2. The exoskeleton of bacterial cells (the sacculus): still a highly attractive target for antibacterial agents that will last for a long time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, A L

    2000-01-01

    Most bacteria are entirely surrounded by a strong cell wall held together by covalent bonds of strength similar to those holding the atoms in a diamond together. This exoskeleton is a coat of armor or corset and is usually called a sacculus. It protects the bacterium from the stresses resulting from the higher osmotic pressure of the cytoplasm when compared with its environment. This strategy of constructing an external mechanical support has the weakness that the wall barrier has to be cleaved and new wall material inserted outside of the cell proper in order for the bacterium to grow and divide. Because of the unique chemistry and the necessity of selectively cleaving old stress-bearing wall for growth, the wall of the bacterial cell has been a key target for chemotherapeutic treatment of bacterial diseases. Currently, many infectious organisms are becoming resistant to overused antibiotics. Still the wall is a good target, and there could possibly be several entirely new classes of antibiotics targeted toward other parts of wall metabolism and function. The essential autolysins may be a particularly relevant target. To find chemotherapeutic agents we must use and extend our present understanding of the structural mechanics of bacterial wall and their biophysics, biochemistry, and physiology. Moreover, if we use our knowledge of biophysics/genetics and of the evolution of antibiotic resistance mutations that occurred millions of years ago, as well as our knowledge of ones that have arisen recently, quite novel antibiotics may be designed.

  3. Comparing the Suitability of Autodock, Gold and Glide for the Docking and Predicting the Possible Targets of Ru(II-Based Complexes as Anticancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebayo A. Adeniyi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In cancer chemotherapy, metal-based complexes have been recognized as the most promising means of inhibiting cancer growth due to the successful application of cis-platin and its derivatives above many of the existing organic anticancer agents. The limitations in their rational design can be traced to the complexity of the mechanism of their operations, lack of proper knowledge of their targets and lack of force fields in docking packages to appropriately define the metal centre of the organometallic complexes. In this paper, some of the promising anticancer complexes of Ru(II such as the rapta-based complexes formulated as [Ru(η6-p-cymeneL2(pta] and those with unusual ligands are considered. CatB and kinases which have been experimentally confirmed as possible targets of the complexes are also predicted by the three methods as one of the most targeted receptors while TopII and HDAC7 are predicted by two and one of the methods as best targets. The interesting features of the binding of the complexes show that some of the complexes preferentially target specific macromolecules than the others, which is an indication of their specificity and possibility of their therapeutic combination without severe side effects that may come from competition for the same target. Also, introduction of unusual ligands is found to significantly improve the activities of most of the complexes studied. Strong correlations are observed for the predicted binding sites and the orientation of the complexes within the binding site by the three methods of docking. However there are disparities in the ranking of the complexes by the three method of docking, especially that of Glide.

  4. Antiviral active peptide from oyster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Mingyong; Cui, Wenxuan; Zhao, Yuanhui; Liu, Zunying; Dong, Shiyuan; Guo, Yao

    2008-08-01

    An active peptide against herpes virus was isolated from the enzymic hydrolysate of oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) and purified with the definite direction hydrolysis technique in the order of alcalase and bromelin. The hydrolysate was fractioned into four ranges of molecular weight (>10 kDa, 10 5 kDa, 5 1 kDa and <1 kDa) using ultrafiltration membranes and dialysis. The fraction of 10 5 kDa was purified using consecutive chromatographic methods including DEAE Sephadex A-25 column, Sephadex G-25 column, and high performance liquid chromatogram (HPLC) by activity-guided isolation. The antiviral effect of the obtained peptide on herpetic virus was investigated in Vero cells by observing cytopathic effect (CPE). The result shows that the peptide has high inhibitory activity on herpetic virus.

  5. Tumor Targeting Using Anti–Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (ior egf/r3 Immunoconjugate with a Tetraaza Macrocyclic Agent (DO3A-EA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauri Mishra

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling inhibition represents a highly promising arena for the application of molecularly targeted cancer therapies. EGFR conjugated metal chelates have been proposed as potential imaging agents for cancers that overexpress EGFR receptors. Through improved understanding of EGFR biology in human cancers, there is anticipation that more tumor-selective therapy approaches with diminished collateral normal tissue toxicity can be advanced. We report here on the results with a thermodynamically stable chelate, 1,4,7-tris(carboxymethyl-10-(2-aminoethyl-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (DO3A-EA and anti-EGFr (ior egf/r3 conjugate to develop immunospecifc imaging agent. Conjugation and labelling with anti-EGFr was performed using standard procedure and subjected to purification on size exclusion chromatography. The conjugated antibodies were labeled with a specific activity 20-30 mCi/mg of protein. Labeling efficiencies were measured by ascending paper chromatography on ITLC-SG strips. Radiolabeling of the immunoconjugate was found to be 98.5 ± 0.30%. 99mTc-DO3A-EA-EGFr conjugate was studied in athymic mice bearing U-87MG, MDA-MB-468 tumors following intravenous injection. Pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies confirmed long circulation times (t1/2(fast= 45 min and t1/2(slow=4 hours 40 min and efficient accumulation in tumors. Biodistribution studies in athymic mice grafted with U-87MG human glioblastoma multiforme and Hela human cervical carcinoma tumors revealed significant localization of 99mTc-labeled antibodies conjugate in tumors and reduced accumulation in normal organs. This new chelating agent is promising for immunoscintigraphy since good tumour-to-normal organ contrast could be demonstrated. These properties can be exploited for immunospecifc contrast agents in nuclear medicine and SPECT imaging.

  6. In vitro chondrocyte toxicity following long-term, high-dose exposure to Gd-DTPA and a novel cartilage-targeted MR contrast agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Midura, Sharon; Midura, Ronald J. [Cleveland Clinic, Biomedical Engineering, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OH (United States); Schneider, Erika [Cleveland Clinic, Imaging Institute, A21, Cleveland, OH (United States); NitroSci Pharmaceuticals, New Berlin, WI (United States); Rosen, Gerald M. [University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States); NitroSci Pharmaceuticals, New Berlin, WI (United States); Winalski, Carl S. [Cleveland Clinic, Biomedical Engineering, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OH (United States); Cleveland Clinic, Imaging Institute, A21, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2017-01-15

    To determine the concentrations exhibiting toxicity of a cartilage-targeted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent compared with gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DT-PA) in chondrocyte cultures. A long-term Swarm rat chondrosarcoma chondrocyte-like cell line was exposed for 48 h to 1.0-20 mM concentrations of diaminobutyl-linked nitroxide (DAB4-DLN) citrate, 1.0-20 mM Gd-DTPA, 1.0 μM staurosporine (positive control), or left untreated. Cell appearance, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays of metabolic activity, quantitative PicoGreen assays of DNA content, and calcein-AM viability assays were compared. At 1.0-7.5 mM, minimal decrease in cell proliferation was found for both agents. At all doses of both agents, cell culture appearances were similar after 24 h of treatment. At the higher doses, differences in cell culture appearance were found after 48 h of treatment, with dose-dependent declines in chondrocyte populations for both agents. Concentration-dependent declines in DNA content and calcein fluorescence were found after 48 h of treatment, but beginning at a lower dose of DAB4-DLN citrate than Gd-DTPA. Dose-dependent decreases in MTT staining (cell metabolism) were apparent for both agents, but larger effects were evident at a lower dose for DAB-DLN citrate. Poor MTT staining of cells exposed for 48 h to 20 mM DAB4-DLN citrate probably indicates dead or dying cells. The minimal effect of the long-term exposure of model chondrocyte cell cultures to DAB4-DLN citrate and Gd-DTPA concentrations up to 7.5 mM (3x typical arthrographic administration) is supporting evidence that these doses are acceptable for MR arthrography. The findings are reassuring given that the experimental exposure to the contrast agents at sustained concentrations was much longer than when used clinically. (orig.)

  7. The tick biocontrol agent Metarhizium brunneum (= M. anisopliae) (strain F52) does not reduce non-target arthropods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keesing, Felicia; Ostfeld, Richard S.

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have found that Met52®, which contains the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium brunneum, is effective in reducing the abundance of Ixodes scapularis, the tick vector for the bacterium causing Lyme disease and for other tick-borne pathogens. Given widespread interest in effective, safe methods for controlling ticks, Met52 has the potential to be used at increasing scales. The non-target impacts of Met52, as applied for tick control, have not yet been assessed. A Before-After-Control-Impact experiment was conducted to assess the effects of Met52 on non-target arthropods in lawn and forest habitats typical of residential yards. Ground-dwelling arthropods were collected using bulk sampling of soil and litter, and pitfall sampling. Arthropods were sampled once before and twice after treatment of plots with either Met52 or water (control). Multivariate general linear models were used to jointly model the abundance of arthropod orders. For each sampling method and post-spray sampling occasion, Akaike Information Criterion values were used to compare the fits of two alternative models: one that included effects of period (before vs. after spray), habitat (lawn vs. forest), and treatment (Met52 vs. control), versus a nested null model that included effects of period, and habitat, but no treatment effect. The null model was consistently better supported by the data. Significant effects were found of period and habitat but not treatment. Retrospective power analysis indicated the study had 80% power to detect a 50% reduction in arthropod abundance, as measured by bulk samples taken before versus one week after treatment. The deployment of Met52 in suburban settings is unlikely to cause meaningful reductions in the abundance of non-target arthropods. PMID:29155838

  8. The tick biocontrol agent Metarhizium brunneum (= M. anisopliae (strain F52 does not reduce non-target arthropods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya R Fischhoff

    Full Text Available Previous studies have found that Met52®, which contains the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium brunneum, is effective in reducing the abundance of Ixodes scapularis, the tick vector for the bacterium causing Lyme disease and for other tick-borne pathogens. Given widespread interest in effective, safe methods for controlling ticks, Met52 has the potential to be used at increasing scales. The non-target impacts of Met52, as applied for tick control, have not yet been assessed. A Before-After-Control-Impact experiment was conducted to assess the effects of Met52 on non-target arthropods in lawn and forest habitats typical of residential yards. Ground-dwelling arthropods were collected using bulk sampling of soil and litter, and pitfall sampling. Arthropods were sampled once before and twice after treatment of plots with either Met52 or water (control. Multivariate general linear models were used to jointly model the abundance of arthropod orders. For each sampling method and post-spray sampling occasion, Akaike Information Criterion values were used to compare the fits of two alternative models: one that included effects of period (before vs. after spray, habitat (lawn vs. forest, and treatment (Met52 vs. control, versus a nested null model that included effects of period, and habitat, but no treatment effect. The null model was consistently better supported by the data. Significant effects were found of period and habitat but not treatment. Retrospective power analysis indicated the study had 80% power to detect a 50% reduction in arthropod abundance, as measured by bulk samples taken before versus one week after treatment. The deployment of Met52 in suburban settings is unlikely to cause meaningful reductions in the abundance of non-target arthropods.

  9. The tick biocontrol agent Metarhizium brunneum (= M. anisopliae) (strain F52) does not reduce non-target arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischhoff, Ilya R; Keesing, Felicia; Ostfeld, Richard S

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have found that Met52®, which contains the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium brunneum, is effective in reducing the abundance of Ixodes scapularis, the tick vector for the bacterium causing Lyme disease and for other tick-borne pathogens. Given widespread interest in effective, safe methods for controlling ticks, Met52 has the potential to be used at increasing scales. The non-target impacts of Met52, as applied for tick control, have not yet been assessed. A Before-After-Control-Impact experiment was conducted to assess the effects of Met52 on non-target arthropods in lawn and forest habitats typical of residential yards. Ground-dwelling arthropods were collected using bulk sampling of soil and litter, and pitfall sampling. Arthropods were sampled once before and twice after treatment of plots with either Met52 or water (control). Multivariate general linear models were used to jointly model the abundance of arthropod orders. For each sampling method and post-spray sampling occasion, Akaike Information Criterion values were used to compare the fits of two alternative models: one that included effects of period (before vs. after spray), habitat (lawn vs. forest), and treatment (Met52 vs. control), versus a nested null model that included effects of period, and habitat, but no treatment effect. The null model was consistently better supported by the data. Significant effects were found of period and habitat but not treatment. Retrospective power analysis indicated the study had 80% power to detect a 50% reduction in arthropod abundance, as measured by bulk samples taken before versus one week after treatment. The deployment of Met52 in suburban settings is unlikely to cause meaningful reductions in the abundance of non-target arthropods.

  10. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ Ligands: Potential Pharmacological Agents for Targeting the Angiogenesis Signaling Cascade in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaginis, Costas; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, Anna; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) has currently been considered as molecular target for the treatment of human metabolic disorders. Experimental data from in vitro cultures, animal models, and clinical trials have shown that PPAR-γ ligand activation regulates differentiation and induces cell growth arrest and apoptosis in a variety of cancer types. Tumor angiogenesis constitutes a multifaceted process implicated in complex downstream signaling pathways that triggers tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. In this aspect, accumulating in vitro and in vivo studies have provided extensive evidence that PPAR-γ ligands can function as modulators of the angiogenic signaling cascade. In the current review, the crucial role of PPAR-γ ligands and the underlying mechanisms participating in tumor angiogenesis are summarized. Targeting PPAR-γ may prove to be a potential therapeutic strategy in combined treatments with conventional chemotherapy; however, special attention should be taken as there is also substantial evidence to support that PPAR-γ ligands can enhance angiogenic phenotype in tumoral cells. PMID:18464916

  11. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ Ligands: Potential Pharmacological Agents for Targeting the Angiogenesis Signaling Cascade in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costas Giaginis

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ has currently been considered as molecular target for the treatment of human metabolic disorders. Experimental data from in vitro cultures, animal models, and clinical trials have shown that PPAR-γ ligand activation regulates differentiation and induces cell growth arrest and apoptosis in a variety of cancer types. Tumor angiogenesis constitutes a multifaceted process implicated in complex downstream signaling pathways that triggers tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. In this aspect, accumulating in vitro and in vivo studies have provided extensive evidence that PPAR-γ ligands can function as modulators of the angiogenic signaling cascade. In the current review, the crucial role of PPAR-γ ligands and the underlying mechanisms participating in tumor angiogenesis are summarized. Targeting PPAR-γ may prove to be a potential therapeutic strategy in combined treatments with conventional chemotherapy; however, special attention should be taken as there is also substantial evidence to support that PPAR-γ ligands can enhance angiogenic phenotype in tumoral cells.

  12. Immunotherapeutic Concepts to Target Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Focusing on the Role of Monoclonal Antibodies, Hypomethylating Agents and the Leukemic Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olumide Babajide Gbolahan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Intensive chemotherapeutic protocols and allogeneic stem cell transplantation continue to represent the mainstay of acute myeloid leukemia (AML treatment. Although this approach leads to remissions in the majority of patients, long-term disease control remains unsatisfactory as mirrored by overall survival rates of approximately 30%. The reason for this poor outcome is, in part, due to various toxicities associated with traditional AML therapy and the limited ability of most patients to tolerate such treatment. More effective and less toxic therapies therefore represent an unmet need in the management of AML, a disease for which therapeutic progress has been traditionally slow when compared to other cancers. Several studies have shown that leukemic blasts elicit immune responses that could be exploited for the development of novel treatment concepts. To this end, early phase studies of immune-based therapies in AML have delivered encouraging results and demonstrated safety and feasibility. In this review, we discuss opportunities for immunotherapeutic interventions to enhance the potential to achieve a cure in AML, thereby focusing on the role of monoclonal antibodies, hypomethylating agents and the leukemic microenvironment.

  13. Optimizing tactics for use of the U.S. antiviral strategic national stockpile for pandemic influenza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedialko B Dimitrov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2009, public health agencies across the globe worked to mitigate the impact of the swine-origin influenza A (pH1N1 virus. These efforts included intensified surveillance, social distancing, hygiene measures, and the targeted use of antiviral medications to prevent infection (prophylaxis. In addition, aggressive antiviral treatment was recommended for certain patient subgroups to reduce the severity and duration of symptoms. To assist States and other localities meet these needs, the U.S. Government distributed a quarter of the antiviral medications in the Strategic National Stockpile within weeks of the pandemic's start. However, there are no quantitative models guiding the geo-temporal distribution of the remainder of the Stockpile in relation to pandemic spread or severity. We present a tactical optimization model for distributing this stockpile for treatment of infected cases during the early stages of a pandemic like 2009 pH1N1, prior to the wide availability of a strain-specific vaccine. Our optimization method efficiently searches large sets of intervention strategies applied to a stochastic network model of pandemic influenza transmission within and among U.S. cities. The resulting optimized strategies depend on the transmissability of the virus and postulated rates of antiviral uptake and wastage (through misallocation or loss. Our results suggest that an aggressive community-based antiviral treatment strategy involving early, widespread, pro-rata distribution of antivirals to States can contribute to slowing the transmission of mildly transmissible strains, like pH1N1. For more highly transmissible strains, outcomes of antiviral use are more heavily impacted by choice of distribution intervals, quantities per shipment, and timing of shipments in relation to pandemic spread. This study supports previous modeling results suggesting that appropriate antiviral treatment may be an effective mitigation strategy during the early stages of

  14. Antiviral Natural Products and Herbal Medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-Tzung Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Viral infections play an important role in human diseases, and recent outbreaks in the advent of globalization and ease of travel have underscored their prevention as a critical issue in safeguarding public health. Despite the progress made in immunization and drug development, many viruses lack preventive vaccines and efficient antiviral therapies, which are often beset by the generation of viral escape mutants. Thus, identifying novel antiviral drugs is of critical importance and natural products are an excellent source for such discoveries. In this mini-review, we summarize the antiviral effects reported for several natural products and herbal medicines.

  15. Antiviral therapy for respiratory viral infections in immunocompromised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahani, Lokesh; Ariza-Heredia, Ella J; Chemaly, Roy F

    2017-04-01

    Respiratory viruses (influenza, parainfluenza, respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus, human metapneumovirus, and rhinovirus) represent the most common causes of respiratory viral infections in immunocompromised patients. Also, these infections may be more severe in immunocompromised patients than in the general population. Early diagnosis and treatment of viral infections continue to be of paramount importance in immunocompromised patients; because once viral replication and invasive infections are evident, prognosis can be grave. Areas covered: The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the main antiviral agents used for the treatment of respiratory viral infections in immunocompromised patients and review of the new agents in the pipeline. Expert commentary: Over the past decade, important diagnostic advances, specifically, the use of rapid molecular testing has helped close the gap between clinical scenarios and pathogen identification and enhanced early diagnosis of viral infections and understanding of the role of prolonged shedding and viral loads. Advancements in novel antiviral therapeutics with high resistance thresholds and effective immunization for preventable infections in immunocompromised patients are needed.

  16. Rational development of 4-aminopyridyl-based inhibitors targeting Trypanosoma cruzi CYP51 as anti-chagas agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun Yong; Calvet, Claudia M; Gunatilleke, Shamila S; Ruiz, Claudia; Cameron, Michael D; McKerrow, James H; Podust, Larissa M; Roush, William R

    2013-10-10

    A new series of 4-aminopyridyl-based lead inhibitors targeting Trypanosoma cruzi CYP51 (TcCYP51) has been developed using structure-based drug design as well as structure-property relationship (SPR) analyses. The screening hit starting point, LP10 (KD ≤ 42 nM; EC50 = 0.65 μM), has been optimized to give the potential leads 14t, 27i, 27q, 27r, and 27t, which have low-nanomolar binding affinity to TcCYP51 and significant activity against T. cruzi amastigotes cultured in human myoblasts (EC50 = 14-18 nM for 27i and 27r). Many of the optimized compounds have improved microsome stability, and most are selective against human CYPs 1A2, 2D6, and 3A4 (Trypanosoma brucei CYP51 (TbCYP51) orthologue has been characterized by X-ray structure analysis.

  17. Genetically engineered T cells bearing chimeric nanoconstructed receptors harboring TAG-72-specific camelid single domain antibodies as targeting agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharifzadeh, Zahra; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad A

    2013-01-01

    Despite the preclinical success of adoptive therapy with T cells bearing chimeric nanoconstructed antigen receptors (CARs), certain limitations of this therapeutic approach such as the immunogenicity of the antigen binding domain, the emergence of tumor cell escape variants and the blocking...... expressing tumor cells, the combination of CD3ζ, OX40, CD28 as well as the CH3-CH2-hinge-hinge domains most efficiently triggered T cell activation. Importantly, CAR mediated functions were not blocked by the soluble TAG-72 antigen at a supraphysiological concentration. Our approach may have the potential...... capacity of soluble antigen still remain. Here, we address these issues using a novel CAR binding moiety based on the oligoclonal camelid single domain antibodies. A unique set of 13 single domain antibodies were selected from an immunized camel phage library based on their target specificity and binding...

  18. Cytochrome bd Protects Bacteria against Oxidative and Nitrosative Stress: A Potential Target for Next-Generation Antimicrobial Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, V B; Forte, E; Siletsky, S A; Arese, M; Davletshin, A I; Sarti, P; Giuffrè, A

    2015-05-01

    Cytochrome bd is a terminal quinol oxidase of the bacterial respiratory chain. This tri-heme integral membrane protein generates a proton motive force at lower efficiency than heme-copper oxidases. This notwithstanding, under unfavorable growth conditions bacteria often use cytochrome bd in place of heme-copper enzymes as the main terminal oxidase. This is the case for several pathogenic and opportunistic bacteria during host colonization. This review summarizes recent data on the contribution of cytochrome bd to bacterial resistance to hydrogen peroxide, nitric oxide, and peroxynitrite, harmful species produced by the host as part of the immune response to microbial infections. Growing evidence supports the hypothesis that bd-type oxidases contribute to bacterial virulence by promoting microbial survival under oxidative and nitrosative stress conditions. For these reasons, cytochrome bd represents a protein target for the development of next-generation antimicrobials.

  19. Social scaling of extrapersonal space: target objects are judged as closer when the reference frame is a human agent with available movement potentialities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fini, C; Brass, M; Committeri, G

    2015-01-01

    Space perception depends on our motion potentialities and our intended actions are affected by space perception. Research on peripersonal space (the space in reaching distance) shows that we perceive an object as being closer when we (Witt, Proffitt, & Epstein, 2005; Witt & Proffitt, 2008) or another actor (Costantini, Ambrosini, Sinigaglia, & Gallese, 2011; Bloesch, Davoli, Roth, Brockmole, & Abrams, 2012) can interact with it. Similarly, an object only triggers specific movements when it is placed in our peripersonal space (Costantini, Ambrosini, Tieri, Sinigaglia, & Committeri, 2010) or in the other's peripersonal space (Costantini, Committeri, & Sinigaglia, 2011; Cardellicchio, Sinigaglia, & Costantini, 2013)