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Sample records for antithyroid drugs

  1. Antithyroid drug-induced fetal goitrous hypothyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Sofie; Rasmussen, Ase Krogh; Sundberg, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Maternal overtreatment with antithyroid drugs can induce fetal goitrous hypothyroidism. This condition can have a critical effect on pregnancy outcome, as well as on fetal growth and neurological development. The purpose of this Review is to clarify if and how fetal goitrous hypothyroidism can...... be prevented, and how to react when prevention has failed. Understanding the importance of pregnancy-related changes in maternal thyroid status when treating a pregnant woman is crucial to preventing fetal goitrous hypothyroidism. Maternal levels of free T(4) are the most consistent indication of maternal...... and fetal thyroid status. In patients with fetal goitrous hypothyroidism, intra-amniotic levothyroxine injections improve fetal outcome. The best way to avoid maternal overtreatment with antithyroid drugs is to monitor closely the maternal thyroid status, especially estimates of free T(4) levels....

  2. Thyroid hormone synthesis and anti-thyroid drugs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The inhibition of thyroid hormone synthesis is required for the treatment of hyperthyroidism and this can be achieved by one or more anti-thyroid drugs. The most widely used anti-thyroid drug methimazole (MMI) inhibits the production of thyroid hormones by irreversibly inactivating the enzyme TPO. Our studies show that the ...

  3. Thyroid hormone synthesis and anti-thyroid drugs: A bioinorganic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The inhibition of thyroid hormone synthesis is required for the treatment of hyperthyroidism and this can be achieved by one or more anti-thyroid drugs. The most widely used anti-thyroid drug methimazole (MMI) inhibits the production of thyroid hormones by irreversibly inactivating the enzyme TPO. Our studies show that the ...

  4. Patient knowledge of antithyroid drug-induced agranulocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jonah; Richardson, Max; Hickey, Janis; James, Andy; Pearce, Simon H; Ball, Steve G; Quinton, Richard; Morris, Margaret; Miller, Margaret; Perros, Petros

    2014-12-01

    Agranulocytosis is a serious side effect of antithyroid drugs. To ascertain the knowledge of patients and review the quality of information available on the internet. A questionnaire survey was performed for patients receiving antithyroid drugs. Patients attending endocrine clinics who were receiving antithyroid drug treatment (group A, n = 33) were interviewed. A further national cohort of patients (group B, n = 100) treated with antithyroid drugs, participated in an online survey. 60.9% of responders were not aware of the common symptoms of agranulocytosis. 18.6% had never received any information about side effects. Of the 108 patients who recalled receiving information, 30% rated the quality as 'poor' or 'not good at all'. Structured interviews of group A patients revealed that almost half (45.5%, 15/33) had experienced symptoms that could be indicative of agranulocytosis, but only 53.3% (8/15) had a blood count checked. A review of 20 selected patient information internet sites revealed a significant variation in advice given to patients. Inadequate knowledge about agranulocytosis among patients receiving antithyroid drug treatment is common. The available information on the internet is variable and inconsistent.

  5. Anti-thyroid drugs in pediatric Graves′ disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew John

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Graves′ disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism in children. Most children and adolescents are treated with anti-thyroid drugs as the initial modality. Studies have used Methimazole, Carbimazole and Propylthiouracil (PTU either as titration regimes or as block and replacement regimes. The various studies of anti-thyroid drug (ATD treatment of Graves′ disease in pediatric patients differ in terms of the regimes, remission rate, duration of therapy for adequate remission, follow up and adverse effects of ATD. Various studies show that lower thyroid hormone levels, prolonged duration of treatment, lower levels of TSH receptor antibodies, smaller goiter and increased age of child predicted higher chance of remission after ATD. A variable number of patients experience minor and major adverse effects limiting initial and long term treatment with ATD. The adverse effects of various ATD seem to more in children compared to that of adults. In view of liver injury including hepatocellular failure need of liver transplantation associated with PTU, the use has been restricted in children. The rate of persistent remission with ATD following discontinuation is about 30%. Radioactive iodine therapy is gaining more acceptance in older children with Graves′s disease in view of the limitations of ATD. For individual patients, risk-benefit ratio of ATD should be weighed against benefits of radioactive iodine therapy and patient preferences.

  6. 131I metabolism in the study of antithyroid drug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagliardi, R.P.; Santalla de Pirovano, M. del C.; Kramar de Valmaggia, E.P.; Valsecchi, R.; Pisarev, Mario; Altschuler, Noe

    1977-11-01

    The main purpose of the present report was to study the action of antithyroid drugs on different parameters of thyroid activity utilizing 131 I, in the offsprings of rats treated during pregnancy and the perinatal period. Both PTU and MMI caused alterations in growth and thyroid activity, but they were more dramatic with the former. A significative increase in 131 I thyroid uptake and in circulating radioactivity was observed. When % uptake was expressed as a function of thyroidal and body weights, a significative decrease was noticed. The ratio T/S and the percentage of labelled iodothyronines in pancreatin digests were also decreased. Neuromuscular maturation was evaluated, by means of the test of Schapiro. A group of animals treated with PTU plus T 4 had a significant delay, reaching normal developement later than the controls or those treated with MMI. (author) [es

  7. Fever or a soar throat after start of antithyroidal drugs? A medical emergency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeloffzen, WWH; Verhaegh, JJ; van Poelgeest, AE; Gansevoort, RT

    We describe two patients who developed granulocytopenia (granulocyte count <1.0 x 10(9)/l) after treatment with antithyroid drugs. Although, perhaps, an already known side-effect of these drugs, we present these cases in order to stay alert for this serious complication. The first patient developed

  8. How does fatty acid influence anti-thyroid drugs binding and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    absorbed after oral administration and concentrated in the thyroid gland.7 Our results also highlight that the presence of fatty acids can lead to discernible modi- fications in anti-thyroid drug-HSA binding interaction in terms of binding location, nature and efficiency of binding. This appears to be relevant in rationalizing.

  9. Bioinorganic Chemistry in Thyroid Gland: Effect of Antithyroid Drugs on Peroxidase-Catalyzed Oxidation and Iodination Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    G. Mugesh; Gouriprasanna Roy

    2006-01-01

    Propylthiouracil (PTU) and methimazole (MMI) are the most commonly used antithyroid drugs. The available data suggest that these drugs may block the thyroid hormone synthesis by inhibiting the thyroid peroxidase (TPO) or diverting oxidized iodides away from thyroglobulin. It is also known that PTU inhibits the selenocysteine-containing enzyme ID-1 by reacting with the selenenyl iodide intermediate (E-SeI). In view of the current interest in antithyroid drugs, we have recently carried out biom...

  10. Radiation retinopathy caused by low dose irradiation and antithyroid drug-induced systemic vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonoda, Koh-hei; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2005-01-01

    We report on a patient with Graves' disease with radiation retinopathy caused by low-dose irradiation and antithyroid drug-induced antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-positive vasculitis. A 38-year-old woman with Graves' disease presented with bilateral blurred vision, micro-aneurysms, telangiectasia, and macular edema. The patient was examined by ophthalmoscopy and fluorescein angiography, and radiation retinopathy was diagnosed. The patient had been treated with low-dose irradiation for her Graves' ophthalmopathy a few years earlier. She also had ANCA-positive vasculitis induced by the antithyroid drug (propylthiouracil, PTU) that had been prescribed for her at that time. Because of multiple avascular areas on both retinas, she was treated by intensive retinal photocoagulation to control progressive retinopathy. The radiation doses used to treat Graves' disease ophthalmopathy are low. Nevertheless, there is still a risk of radiation retinopathy developing in patients with PTU-induced ANCA-positive vasculitis. (author)

  11. Outcome of graves' disease after anti-thyroid drug treatment in South West of Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahbazian, H.; Saiedinia, S.; Aleali, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study was conducted to observe the optimal results of long term treatment with antithyroid drugs in patients with graves' disease. Methodology: Total of 268 patients with graves' disease who were referred to endocrinology clinic during 2005 - 2008 and treated with anti-thyroid drugs for a long term were studied. Data about the age, gender, estimated weight of thyroid before and after the treatment, level of thyroid hormones, disease relapse, hypothyroidism and the drug side-effects were collected and analyzed. Results: Eighty two (31%) patients were males, 186 (69%) females, mean age of 35 +- 27 years and follow-up course of 31+- 16 months], were studied. After the discontinuation of long term treatment, 53% were affected with relapse of hyperthyroidism. The mean duration of hyperthyroidism relapse after the treatment was 8.3 +- 7.3 months. The relapse rate was and patients with large thyroid and lower TSH level at the end of treatment, the rate of relapse treatment was about 6%. More decrease of thyroid size during the treatment course, higher level of serum TSH after discontinuation of the treatment, and lower thyroid hormone levels before the treatment were some of the effective factors in hypothyroidism incidence (P=0.005, patients (39%) remained euthyroid in the follow-up course. Conclusion: patients with graves' especially in middle-aged women with smaller goiters. (author)

  12. When antithyroid drugs must be started in patients with hyperemesis gravidarum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farzad, N.; Akbar, A.; Naser, A.; Majid, M.

    2009-01-01

    To find out role of anti-thyroid drugs in patients with Hyperemesis gravidarum and thyroid dysfunction. One hundred thirty five patients with hyperemesis gravidarum who were admitted to obstetric and gynecology hospital were enrolled in this study. Thirty two patients were excluded because of diabetes mellitus and thyroid diseases. Hence, one hundred three patients underwent investigations including thyroid function test and beta-hCG (Human chorionic gonadotropin). Thirty five women were found with abnormal thyroid function test with FT4I (Free Thyroxin Index) 4.74 +- 0.54 and in another group (68 women) was 2.9 +- 0.39 (P<0.0001). B-hCG in first group was 59406 +-14899 miu/ml and in second group was 6750 +- m 3476 miu/mL (P<0.0001). In five patients PTU (propylthiouracil) was started due to severe sign and symptoms of hyperthyroidism. Thyroid function test was rechecked for all of 35 patients after four weeks routine therapy for hyperemesis gravidarum. Thyroid function test was normalized in 11 patients with hyperemesis graridarum but remained abnormal in 22 patients. In our study thyroid dysfunction in hyperemesis gravidarum was 35% and, 20% of patients needed anti-thyroid therapy. Routine assessment of thyroid function is necessary for women with hyperemesis gravidarum especially in patients with clinical features of hyperthyroidism. We must consider PTU (propylthouracil) in hyperemesis gravidarum with severe weight loss, vomiting and biochemical hyperthyroidism. (author)

  13. Treatment of graves' disease with antithyroid drugs in the first trimester of pregnancy and the prevalence of congenital malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Ai; Noh, JaedukYoshimura; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Ohye, Hidemi; Sato, Shiori; Sekiya, Kenichi; Kosuga, Yuka; Suzuki, Miho; Matsumoto, Masako; Kunii, Yo; Watanabe, Natsuko; Mukasa, Koji; Ito, Kunihiko; Ito, Koichi

    2012-07-01

    Several reports have suggested that propylthiouracil (PTU) may be safer than methimazole (MMI) for treating thyrotoxicosis during pregnancy because congenital malformations have been associated with the use of MMI during pregnancy. We investigated whether in utero exposure to antithyroid drugs resulted in a higher rate of major malformations than among the infants born to a control group of pregnant women. We reviewed the cases of women with Graves' disease who became pregnant. The pregnancy outcomes of 6744 women were known, and there were 5967 live births. MMI alone had been used to treat 1426 of the women, and 1578 women had been treated with PTU alone. The 2065 women who had received no medication for the treatment of Graves' disease during the first trimester served as the control group. The remaining women had been treated with potassium iodide, levothyroxine, or more than one drug during the first trimester. The antithyroid drugs were evaluated for associations with congenital malformations. The overall rate of major anomalies in the MMI group was 4.1% (50 of 1231), and it was significantly higher than the 2.1% (40 of 1906) in the control group (P = 0.002), but there was no increase in the overall rate of major anomalies in the PTU group in comparison with the control group (1.9%; 21 of 1399; P = 0.709). Seven of the 1231 newborns in the MMI group had aplasia cutis congenita, six had an omphalocele, seven had a symptomatic omphalomesenteric duct anomaly, and one had esophageal atresia. Hyperthyroidism in the first trimester of pregnancy did not increase the rate of congenital malformation. In utero exposure to MMI during the first trimester of pregnancy increased the rate of congenital malformations, and it significantly increased the rate of aplasia cutis congenita, omphalocele, and a symptomatic omphalomesenteric duct anomaly.

  14. Is administered radioiodine activity appropriate? The effects of pre- treatment antithyroid drugs on the therapy outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanayakkara, D.; Udugama, C.; Perera, K.; Herath, S.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Although radioiodine (RAI) therapy has been used in the treatment of thyrotoxicosis, there are both wide variations in current practice and deficiencies in outcome. There is concern as to decide the optimum activity to achieve better therapeutic outcome and uncertainty over the effects of pretreatment antithyroid drugs (ATD) on the post therapy outcome. Use of ATD (carbimazole) to control the severity of the disease prior to RAI therapy is a common accepted practice. The Royal college of Physicians (RCP) guideline on radioiodine therapy for thyrotoxicosis has recommended activity of 400mBq for Graves' disease (GD) and 15mCi for toxic multi nodular disease (TMND) to achieve euthyroidism with an incidence of hypothyroidism around 15-20% at 2 years. However, in the clinical setting, many patients have become hypothyroid very early than the expected time period. This study was carried out to see the fixed dose RAI therapy outcome of both GD and TMND. Another objective is to assess the effects of pre therapy ATD on the RAI therapy for both GD and TMND at 1 year. Post RAI therapy outcome was analyzed in thyrotoxic patients who received RAI at our institute from 2001-2005. Diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis was made on the basis of biochemical thyroid function tests and thyroid uptake scans. Both GD and TMND patients were selected. Patients who were treated with ATD were advised to stop drugs for at least 4 weeks before administration of RAI therapeutic dose. GD patients received 400mBq and TMND received 550mBq of RAI irrespective of the size of the thyroid gland. Both GD and TMND were further categorized into two groups on the basis of whether they have given ATD prior to RAI therapy. Patients with solitary toxic nodular disease were excluded from the study. Post therapy thyroid functions (free thyroxine and thyroid stimulating hormone) were done at 1, 2, 3, 6 and 12 months intervals. Therapy outcome over time was defined on the basis of thyroid function and

  15. Graves' disease in a 3 year-old patient with agranulocytosis due to anti-thyroid drugs: Radioiodine ablation therapy as an effective alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Muñoz, E; Ramírez-Ocaña, D; Martín-García, A M; Ruiz-García, F J; Puentes-Zarzuela, C

    The case is presented of a 3 year-old girl with mitochondrial disease (subacute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy of Leigh syndrome), v-stage chronic kidney disease of a diffuse mesangial sclerosis, as well as developmental disorders, and diagnosed with hyperthyroidism Graves-Basedow disease. Six weeks after starting the treatment with neo-carbimazole, the patient reported a serious case of agranulocytosis. This led to stopping the anti-thyroid drugs, and was treated successfully with 131 I ablation therapy. The relevance of the article is that Graves' disease is uncommon in the paediatric age range (especially in children younger than 6 years old), and developing complications due to a possible late diagnosis. Agranulocytosis as a potentially serious adverse effect following the use of anti-thyroid drugs, and the few reported cases of ablation therapy with 131 I at this age, makes this case unique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  16. How does fatty acid influence anti-thyroid drugs binding and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to influence the drug binding properties of albumin allosterically8 ,9 and thus underlining the role of FA in modulating ligand binding to HSA. As free fatty acids bind primarily to albumin,8 it would be of particular interest to study how the binding properties of drugs toward albumin are modified due to the presence of fatty.

  17. How does fatty acid influence anti-thyroid drugs binding and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... 2-thiouracil (TU), 6-methyl-2-thiouracil (MTU), 6--propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU) with a model plasma protein Human SerumAlbumin (HSA) in the presence and absence of fatty acid (FA). The drug-protein binding efficiency is characterized in terms of binding free energy and the association constant (Ka, which is estimated as ...

  18. Cost-effectiveness analysis of antithyroid drug therapy, 131I therapy and subtotal thyroidectomy for Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Fuzuki; Watanabe, Sadahiro; Hayashi, Katsumi; Kita, Tamotsu; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Kosuda, Shigeru; Tanaka, Yuji

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of antithyroid drug (ATD) therapy vs. radioiodine therapy (RIT) vs. subtotal thyroidectomy (STT) by calculating expected lifelong cost and utility based on Graves' disease patients' responses to questionnaires using a decision-tree sensitivity analysis and relevant variables. The decision-tree sensitivity analysis to determine expected lifelong cost and utility in Graves' disease patients was designed on the basis of the 4 competing strategies consisting of: (1) ATD therapy plus RIT strategy, (2) ATD therapy plus STT strategy, (3) low-fixed-dose (185 MBq) RIT alone strategy, and (4) high-fixed-dose (370 MBq) RIT alone strategy. One-way sensitivity analysis was designed in the ATD therapy plus RIT strategy, for replacement with RIT in place of ATD, ranging from a 1% incidence of ATD side effects to 30%. The low-fixed-dose RIT alone strategy was least costly, and the high-fixed-dose RIT alone strategy most costly. The lifelong utility of high-fixed-dose RIT alone strategy with a 5% rate of discounting was highest (lifelong utility for 30 years: 15.2/patient), and the utility of the ATD plus RIT strategy with 1% side effects of the ATD was lowest (14.1/patient). The cost-effectiveness ratio was lowest (yen 5 008/utility) in a low-fixed-dose RIT alone strategy. In conclusion, a low-fixed-dose RIT alone strategy is preferred treatments in view of cost-effectiveness ratio, and RIT should be used more widely in Japan. (author)

  19. Radioactive iodine therapy in a case of Graves' disease with allergy to antithyroid drugs (ATD) and propranolol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahri, I.M.; San Luis, T.O.L.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: This is a case of V.C., 56 year old, female, from Las Pinas City, Philippines, diagnosed as a case of Graves' disease. During the course of therapy, the patient had allergy to antithyroid drugs (ATDs) and beta blocker (Propranolol). She developed rashes all over the body, sparing the face the day after taking her ATDs as well as Propranolol, thus all medications were discontinued. Other options, such as RAI therapy and surgery, with their respective advantages and disadvantages were fully explained to the patient who then opted to undergo RAI therapy. In our institution, we usually compute the dose based on the size of the gland and radioactive Iodine-131 uptake measurements (RAIU) rather than using fixed doses. Thyroid scintigraphy and RAIU were done which revealed poorly visualized thyroid gland and markedly diminished 24-hour uptake but normal 4-hour uptake [RAIU 4 hour uptake: 26% (NV= 15-25%); 24 hour uptake: 6% (NV25-45%)]. * Note: Variations in normal uptake values compared to US are due to iodine deficiency still existing in some regions. Because of the very low 24-hour uptake, we reviewed the probable causes which can result in low uptake values. All causes were ruled out and the patient was advised to undergo two weeks of strict low-iodine diet prior to repeat thyroid scintigraphy and RAIU. Thereafter, the result of repeat study showed diffuse thyromegaly with elevated uptake values indicating rapid trapping and organification processes [RAIU 4 hour uptake: 82% (NV= 15-25%); 24 hour uptake: 68% (NV25-45%)]. The day after the study, the patient was given 10 mCi I-131 based on the estimated weight of the gland, rapid thyroid iodine turnover ('small pool') and 24-hour uptake. This was considered to be the highest allowable dose of RAI to decrease the probability of relapse and the need for re-treatment. Approximately 4 weeks after the therapy, the patient is noted to have responded satisfactorily to therapy with resolution of symptoms. (author)

  20. [Antithyroid agents related agranulocytosis: Literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrès, E; Weitten, T; Mourot-Cottet, R; Keller, O; Zulfiqar, A-A; Serraj, K; Vogel, T; Tebacher, M

    2016-08-01

    The antithyroid agents (carbimazole, methimazole, thiamazole, propylthiouracil and benzylthiouracile) are the drug class that is associated with a high risk of agranulocytosis. Acute and profound (<0.5×10(9)/L) isolated neutropenia occurring in a subject treated with antithyroid agents should be considered as a drug-induced agranulocytosis, until proven otherwise. The clinical spectrum ranges from discovery of acute severe but asymptomatic neutropenia, to isolated fever, localized infections (especially ear, nose and throat, or pulmonary) or septicemia. With an optimal management (discontinuation of antithyroid agents, antibiotics in the presence of fever or a documented infection, or use of hematopoietic growth factor) the current mortality is close to 2%. Copyright © 2016 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that you have a higher chance of developing thyroid disease in the future. Antithyroid microsomal antibodies may be ... PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 11. Weiss RE, Refetoff S. Thyroid function testing. In: Jameson JL, De Groot LJ, eds. Endocrinology: Adult and ... Lupus Read more ...

  2. Differences in the Treatment Response to Antithyroid Drugs versus Electroconvulsive Therapy in a Case of Recurrent Catatonia due to Graves’ Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Saito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We reported a case which presented recurrent episodes of catatonia as a result of Graves’ disease with hyperthyroidism. The patient showed different treatment response in each episodes; in the first episode, psychiatric and physical symptoms were resolved by a combination of antithyroid and anxiolytic therapies, while in the second episode, the combination therapy did not ameliorate her symptoms and ECT was indicated. We postulated that decreased CSF level of TTR and the resulting susceptibility to the derangement of peripheral thyroid function might be involved in this different treatment response.

  3. Liver volume, portal vein flow, and clearance of indocyanine green and antipyrine in hyperthyroidism before and after antithyroid treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Sonne, J; Court-Payen, M

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine liver volume, portal vein flow, and indocyanine green (ICG) and antipyrine clearance in hyperthyroidism before and after antithyroid drug treatment.......The aim of the study was to examine liver volume, portal vein flow, and indocyanine green (ICG) and antipyrine clearance in hyperthyroidism before and after antithyroid drug treatment....

  4. Pregnancy outcomes after fetal exposure to antithyroid medications or levothyroxine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schurmann, Lene; Hansen, Anne Vinkel; Garne, Ester

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether fetal exposure to antithyroid drugs (ATD) and levothyroxine affects gestational age (GA), birth weight, birth length, head circumference and prevalence of congenital anomalies. Methods: Cohort of all pregnancies from GA 12 weeks recorded in Danish registries from 1995......–2010. Exposure was having a prescription for ATD or levothyroxine from 91 days before to 91 days after pregnancy start (n = 8318). The reference group was pregnant women without exposure of ATD or levothyroxine (n = 969 303). A subpopulation was linked to the Danish EUROCAT congenital anomaly register. Results......: Overall 0.66% of the pregnant women had a prescription for levothyroxine and 0.19% had a prescription for ATD during the exposure period. There was no difference in proportion of live births compared to non-exposed pregnancies, but infants exposed to ATD were more often born very preterm (1.99% versus 0...

  5. Radioiodine (I-131) therapy and the influence of antithyroid medication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duldulao, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Radioiodine therapy began to play a major role in the management of hyperthyroidism as early as 1941. It later evolved to become what it is today, the treatment of choice for majority of patients who are suffering from Graves' disease and toxic nodular goiter. It is generally considered safe, inexpensive, effective, and devoid of major side effects. Despite the extensive experience with radioactive therapy, the adjunctive role of antithyroid medication remains controversial. Some authors claim that it has a positive influence on the outcome of radioiodine therapy while others insist otherwise. The reasons behind the adjunctive use of antithyroid medication include a more rapid attainment of euthyroid state and a decrease in the rise of developing thyroid crisis. However, a higher treatment failure rate is observed compared to radioiodine alone. This is due to the reputed radioprotective effect of the antithyroid medication. As a result, higher doses of I-131 are needed in order to obtain the desired effect but, unfortunately, that would also increase the radiation exposure to the rest of the body. The majority of clinicians would require discontinuation of the medication a few days before therapy to overcome these undesirable effects but the question is, is this safe? The issue of when antithyroid medication is warranted is a big question to the clinician. For optimal use of radioiodine therapy, appropriate selection criteria and good clinical judgment concerning pretreatment with antithyroid medication are required. Otherwise, we may put some patients into unnecessary increased risk and added cost. (author)

  6. Antithyroid effects in vivo and in vitro of babassu and mandioca: a staple food in goiter areas of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitan, E; Cooksey, R C; Legan, J; Lindsay, R H; Ingbar, S H; Medeiros-Neto, G

    1994-08-01

    Babassu (Orbignya phalerata), a palm-tree coconut fruit, mixed with mandioca (Manihot utilissima) is the staple food of people living in the endemic goiter area of Maranhao in Brazil, where goiter prevalence among schoolchildren was still 38% in 1986 despite an adequate iodine intake in most of the population. Therefore, the question arose as to whether or not the ingestion of babassu alone or mixed with mandioca contributed to the persistence of endemic goiter in this area of Brazil. In this investigation we examined the potential antithyroid effects of babassu and mandioca by means of in vivo studies in Sprague-Dawley rats, in vitro studies in porcine thyroid slices and using a purified porcine thyroid peroxidase (TPO) system. Samples of various edible parts of babassu and mandioca flour were homogenized and extracted in goitrogen-free water (GFW) for in vivo experiments, and in methanol (100 g/l), GFW or 0.06 mol/l phosphate buffer (pH 7.0) for in vitro experiments. The edible parts of babassu produced significant in vivo antithyroid effects (p < 0.05- < 0.001) in rats on a high iodine intake (14 micrograms I- day-1.rat-1), as well as distinct and reproducible antithyroid and anti-TPO activities in both in vitro systems, their action being similar to that of the thionamide-like antithyroid drugs propylthiouracil and methimazole.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Pregnancy outcomes after fetal exposure to antithyroid medications or levothyroxine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurmann, Lene; Hansen, Anne Vinkel; Garne, Ester

    2016-10-01

    To investigate whether fetal exposure to antithyroid drugs (ATD) and levothyroxine affects gestational age (GA), birth weight, birth length, head circumference and prevalence of congenital anomalies. Cohort of all pregnancies from GA 12 weeks recorded in Danish registries from 1995-2010. Exposure was having a prescription for ATD or levothyroxine from 91 days before to 91 days after pregnancy start (n=8318). The reference group was pregnant women without exposure of ATD or levothyroxine (n=969303). A subpopulation was linked to the Danish EUROCAT congenital anomaly register. Overall 0.66% of the pregnant women had a prescription for levothyroxine and 0.19% had a prescription for ATD during the exposure period. There was no difference in proportion of live births compared to non-exposed pregnancies, but infants exposed to ATD were more often born very preterm (1.99% versus 0.94% Odds Ratio 2.04, 95% CI 1.46 - 2.86) and had higher infant mortality (Odds ratio 2.37, 95% CI 1.42 - 3.94). Infants exposed to ATD were more likely to have low birth weight and length for GA (Odds ratios 1.29 (1.12 - 1.50) and 1.40 (1.17 - 1.66). There was no difference in head circumference for the 3 exposure groups. Prevalence of congenital anomalies was the same for exposed and non-exposed pregnancies. Fetal exposure to ATD resulted in lower GA, birth weight, length and higher infant mortality. Treatment for hypothyroidism had no significant impact on these variables. There was no difference in prevalence of congenital anomalies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Antithyroid Antibodies and Thyroid Function in Pediatric Patients with Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derya Kalyoncu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease, persistence of antithyroid antibodies, effect of gluten-free diet, and long-term outcome of thyroid function in pediatric patients with celiac disease (CD. Methods. 67 patients with CD aged from 1 year to 16 years were screened for thyroid antithyroperoxidase, antithyroglobulin and anti-TSH receptor antibodies, serum free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine, and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH at diagnosis and during follow-up. Results. None of the patients had antithyroid antibodies at diagnosis. Antithyroid antibodies became positive in 16.4% of the patients (11/67 2 to 3 years after the diagnosis of CD. Clinical hypothyroidism was observed only in 3 of 11 CD patients with positive antithyroid antibodies (27.2%. The antithyroid antibodies positive and negative patients did not differ significantly according to compliance to GFD (P>0.05. A statistically significant difference was observed only in age, in which the patients with positive antithyroid antibodies were younger than the patients with negative antithyroid antibodies (P=0.004. None of the patients had any change in their thyroid function and antibody profile during their follow-up. Conclusion. Antithyroid antibodies were detected in younger pediatric patients with CD and the prevalence of antithyroid antibodies did not correlate with the duration of gluten intake.

  9. Antithyroid antibodies and thyroid function in pediatric patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyoncu, Derya; Urganci, Nafiye

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease, persistence of antithyroid antibodies, effect of gluten-free diet, and long-term outcome of thyroid function in pediatric patients with celiac disease (CD). Methods. 67 patients with CD aged from 1 year to 16 years were screened for thyroid antithyroperoxidase, antithyroglobulin and anti-TSH receptor antibodies, serum free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine, and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) at diagnosis and during follow-up. Results. None of the patients had antithyroid antibodies at diagnosis. Antithyroid antibodies became positive in 16.4% of the patients (11/67) 2 to 3 years after the diagnosis of CD. Clinical hypothyroidism was observed only in 3 of 11 CD patients with positive antithyroid antibodies (27.2%). The antithyroid antibodies positive and negative patients did not differ significantly according to compliance to GFD (P > 0.05). A statistically significant difference was observed only in age, in which the patients with positive antithyroid antibodies were younger than the patients with negative antithyroid antibodies (P = 0.004). None of the patients had any change in their thyroid function and antibody profile during their follow-up. Conclusion. Antithyroid antibodies were detected in younger pediatric patients with CD and the prevalence of antithyroid antibodies did not correlate with the duration of gluten intake.

  10. Influence of antithyroid medication on effective half-life and uptake of 131 I following radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moka, D.; Voth, E.; Schicha, H.

    1997-01-01

    Aim: A radioiodine therapy (RIT) in thyrotoxic patients receiving antithyroid drugs (ATD) leads in comparison to nonpretreated patients either to higher therapeutic doses or to higher treatment failure rates. Aim of this study was to optimize the effect of RIT in patients pretreated with ATD. Methods: Therefore, the influence of ATD was assessed in 109 patients with shortened effective half-life of 131 I. RIT was performed under stationary conditions. Radioiodine activity of the thyroid gland was stopped three days after RIT. The patients antithyroid medication was stopped three days after RIT. The progress of the first RIT and of a second radioiodine application, which still was necessary in 29 patients, was compared to 32 patients receiving ATD, continuously. Results: Values of effective half-life for 131 I rose significantly from 3.2±0.2 to 5.7±0.2 days (Graves' disease: 3.4 to 5.7 days; toxic goiters' disease: Multifocal autonomy 3.2 to 6.2 days; unifocal autonomy 2.5 auf 5.0 days) 2-3 days after stopping ATD. There was an increase of the 131 I-uptake of a second RIT decreased significantly in patients receiving ATD, continuously. Conclusion: Effective half-life and uptake of 131 I was affected significantly by ATD. The stop taking of ATD after RIT is useful to improve an apparent insufficient RIT in thyrotoxic patients receiving ATD. (orig.) [de

  11. Association of iodine fortification with incident use of antithyroid medication – a Danish nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerqueira, Charlotte; Knudsen, Nils; Ovesen, Lars

    2009-01-01

    iodine fortification program on incidence of hyperthyroidism as measured by the incident use of antithyroid medication. Design: We conducted a register study. Using the unique identification number of all Danes, we linked data from the Register of Medicinal Product Statistics and the Civil Registration......: In the region with moderate iodine deficiency, the number of incident users of antithyroid medication increased 46% in the first 4 yr of iodine fortification. The use increased the most among the youngest age group (younger than 40 yr) and the oldest age group (older than 75 yr). In the mildly iodine......-deficient region, the number of incident users increased only 18%, and only in the youngest age groups (below 40 and 40-59 yr). After 4 yr of fortification, the incidence rates started to fall and reached baseline, for most groups, 6 yr after onset of fortification. Conclusions: This study shows that iodine...

  12. Steroid-Responsive Epilepsia Partialis Continua with Anti-Thyroid Antibodies: A Spectrum of Hashimoto's Encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroki Masuda; Masahiro Mori; Shoichi Ito; Toshiyuki Yagishita; Satoshi Kuwabara

    2014-01-01

    Background: When a neuropsychiatric symptom due to encephalopathy develops in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies, especially when the symptom is steroid-responsive, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of the patient. Although HE is an elusive disease, it is thought to cause various clinical presentations including seizures, myoclonus, and epilepsia partialis continua (EPC). Case Report: We present the case of a 33-year-old Japanese woman who ...

  13. Antithyroid Antibodies and Thyroid Function in Pediatric Patients with Celiac Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kalyoncu, Derya; Urganci, Nafiye

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease, persistence of antithyroid antibodies, effect of gluten-free diet, and long-term outcome of thyroid function in pediatric patients with celiac disease (CD). Methods. 67 patients with CD aged from 1 year to 16 years were screened for thyroid antithyroperoxidase, antithyroglobulin and anti-TSH receptor antibodies, serum free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine, and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) at diagno...

  14. High frequency of positive anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies (ATPO) in adult subjects without known thyroid disease, Santiago de Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanas, Alejandra; Letelier, Carolina; Caamano, Edgardo; Massardo, Teresa; Gonzalez, Patricio; Araya, Veronica

    2010-01-01

    Background: Anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies have a pathogenic role in Hashimoto thyroiditis. Between 10 and 19% of individuals without thyroid disease, have positive titers of these antibodies. Aim: To study the frequency of positive titers of anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies in healthy individuals. Material and Methods: A blood sample, to measure anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) by chemiluminescence assay, was obtained from 67 women and 62 men aged 45 ± 14 years, without a personal or familiar history of thyroid diseases and normal thyroid palpation. The cutoff point of the manufacturer to consider positive a titer of anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies was set at 35 IU/ml. Results: Twenty-eight women and 28 men had positive antibody titers (43% of the sample). Subjects in the upper tercile of anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody titers had a higher TSH than those in the second tercile, although within normal limits (1.73 ± 0.74 and 1.37 ± 0.59 mlU/L, respectively p = 0.02) Conclusions: Forty three percent of the studied subjects without personal or familial history of thyroid diseases had positive titers of anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies. Further prospective studies should evaluate whether this observation discloses an increase in thyroid autoimmune disease in a population with increased iodine intake

  15. Steroid-Responsive Epilepsia Partialis Continua with Anti-Thyroid Antibodies: A Spectrum of Hashimoto's Encephalopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Hiroki; Mori, Masahiro; Ito, Shoichi; Yagishita, Toshiyuki; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2014-05-01

    When a neuropsychiatric symptom due to encephalopathy develops in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies, especially when the symptom is steroid-responsive, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of the patient. Although HE is an elusive disease, it is thought to cause various clinical presentations including seizures, myoclonus, and epilepsia partialis continua (EPC). We present the case of a 33-year-old Japanese woman who acutely developed EPC in the right hand as an isolated manifestation. A thyroid ultrasound showed an enlarged hypoechogenic gland, and a thyroid status assessment showed euthyroid with high titers of thyroid antibodies. A brain MRI revealed a nodular lesion in the left precentral gyrus. Corticosteroid treatment resulted in a cessation of the symptom. A precentral nodular lesion can be responsible for steroid-responsive EPC in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies and may be caused by HE. The serial MRI findings of our case suggest the presence of primary demyelination, with ischemia possibly due to vasculitis around the demyelinating lesion.

  16. Steroid-Responsive Epilepsia Partialis Continua with Anti-Thyroid Antibodies: A Spectrum of Hashimoto's Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Masuda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: When a neuropsychiatric symptom due to encephalopathy develops in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies, especially when the symptom is steroid-responsive, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of the patient. Although HE is an elusive disease, it is thought to cause various clinical presentations including seizures, myoclonus, and epilepsia partialis continua (EPC. Case Report: We present the case of a 33-year-old Japanese woman who acutely developed EPC in the right hand as an isolated manifestation. A thyroid ultrasound showed an enlarged hypoechogenic gland, and a thyroid status assessment showed euthyroid with high titers of thyroid antibodies. A brain MRI revealed a nodular lesion in the left precentral gyrus. Corticosteroid treatment resulted in a cessation of the symptom. Conclusions: A precentral nodular lesion can be responsible for steroid-responsive EPC in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies and may be caused by HE. The serial MRI findings of our case suggest the presence of primary demyelination, with ischemia possibly due to vasculitis around the demyelinating lesion.

  17. Steroid-Responsive Epilepsia Partialis Continua with Anti-Thyroid Antibodies: A Spectrum of Hashimoto's Encephalopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Hiroki; Mori, Masahiro; Ito, Shoichi; Yagishita, Toshiyuki; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Background When a neuropsychiatric symptom due to encephalopathy develops in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies, especially when the symptom is steroid-responsive, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of the patient. Although HE is an elusive disease, it is thought to cause various clinical presentations including seizures, myoclonus, and epilepsia partialis continua (EPC). Case Report We present the case of a 33-year-old Japanese woman who acutely developed EPC in the right hand as an isolated manifestation. A thyroid ultrasound showed an enlarged hypoechogenic gland, and a thyroid status assessment showed euthyroid with high titers of thyroid antibodies. A brain MRI revealed a nodular lesion in the left precentral gyrus. Corticosteroid treatment resulted in a cessation of the symptom. Conclusions A precentral nodular lesion can be responsible for steroid-responsive EPC in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies and may be caused by HE. The serial MRI findings of our case suggest the presence of primary demyelination, with ischemia possibly due to vasculitis around the demyelinating lesion. PMID:24932178

  18. Change in the intrathyroidal kinetics of radioiodine under continued and discontinued antithyroid medication in Graves' disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunkelmann, Simone; Kuenstner, Hubertus; Nabavi, Elham; Rohde, Bettina; Groth, Peter; Schuemichen, Carl [University of Rostock, Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    This study evaluated the thyroidal kinetics of radioiodine in Graves' disease under continued thiamazole medication and after discontinuation of thiamazole for 1-2 days, with a view to keeping the period of discontinuation as short as possible and to exploring the underlying mechanism of a postulated radioprotective effect of antithyroid drugs. In 316 patients, diagnostic and therapeutic radioiodine kinetics were followed up for 2 days by ten uptake measurements each and were defined mathematically by a two-compartment model. Without thiamazole or when thiamazole was discontinued for at least 2 days, all uptake curves could be fitted perfectly by a simple in- and output function; the mean square error (mse) was 0.38 (test) and 0.28 (therapy). Under continued thiamazole medication (11.0{+-}7.0 mg/day), the energy dose delivered to the thyroid was lowered by factor of 2.5. Uptake curves were deformed (mse: 1.06, test and 0.86, therapy) and appeared two peaked, suggesting coexistence of follicles with blocked and follicles with intact hormone synthesis and hence heterogeneous radioiodine uptake in the thyroid. In patients with maximally altered uptake curves, the success rate was as low as 31%. One day after discontinuation of thiamazole, mse was still increased (0.78, test), while 2 days afterwards it had normalised (0.36, test) and 3 days afterwards (mse: 0.24, therapy) the success rate was 87%. Efficacy of radioiodine therapy under continued thiamazole medication is reduced not only by a lower uptake and shorter half-life of radioiodine, but also by a heterogeneous energy dose distribution in the thyroid. Discontinuation of thiamazole (but probably not of propylthiouracil) for at least 2 days is required to restore the efficacy of radioiodine. (orig.)

  19. Thyroid hormone synthesis and anti-thyroid drugs: A bioinorganic chemistry approach

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Gouriprasanna; Mugesh, G

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide, generated by thyroid oxidase enzymes, is a crucial substrate for the thyroid peroxidase (TPO)-catalysed biosynthesis of thyroid hormones, thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) in the thyroid gland. It is believed that the $H_2O_2$ generation is a limiting step in thyroid hormone synthesis. Therefore, the control of hydrogen peroxide concentration is one of the possible mechanisms for the inhibition of thyroid hormone biosynthesis. The inhibition of thyroid hormone synthe...

  20. Antigastric parietal cell and antithyroid autoantibodies in patients with desquamative gingivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Julia Yu-Fong; Chiang, Chun-Pin; Wang, Yi-Ping; Wu, Yang-Che; Chen, Hsin-Ming; Sun, Andy

    2017-04-01

    Desquamative gingivitis (DG) is principally associated with erosive oral lichen planus (EOLP), mucous membrane pemphigoid (MMP), and pemphigus vulgaris (PV). Serum autoantibodies including antigastric parietal cell antibody (GPCA), antithyroglobulin antibody (TGA), and antithyroid microsomal antibody (TMA) were measured in 500 patients with DG, 287 EOLP without DG (EOLP/DG - ) patients, and 100 healthy control subjects. The 500 patients with DG were diagnosed as having EOLP in 455 (91%), PV in 40 (8%), and MMP in five (1%) patients. We found that 37.0%, 43.6%, and 42.6% of 500 patients with DG, 39.6%, 46.4%, and 45.1% of 455 EOLP with DG (EOLP/DG) patients, and 18.5%, 27.5%, and 30.3% of 287 EOLP/DG - patients had the presence of GPCA, TGA, and TMA in their sera, respectively. DG, EOLP/DG, and EOLP/DG - patients all had a significantly higher frequency of GPCA, TGA, or TMA positivity than healthy control subjects (all P-values < 0.001). Moreover, 455 EOLP/DG patients had a significantly higher frequency of GPCA, TGA, or TMA positivity than 287 EOLP/DG - patients (all P-values < 0.001). Of 210 TGA/TMA-positive patients with DG whose serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels were measured, 84.3%, 6.7%, and 9.0% patients had normal, lower, and higher serum TSH levels, respectively. We conclude that 73.4% DG, 77.1% EOLP/DG, and 47.4% EOLP/DG - patients may have GPCA/TGA/TMA positivity in their sera. Because part of GPCA-positive patients may develop pernicious anemia, autoimmune atrophic gastritis, and gastric carcinoma, and part of TGA/TMA-positive patients may have thyroid dysfunction, these patients should be referred to medical department for further management. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Evaluation of Antithyroid Antibodies in Aborting People from Obstetrics Clinic of Mahdieh Hospital at Shaheed Beheshti University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hosseini

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Spontaneous pregnancy loss is the most common complication of pregnancy. However, after a thorough evaluation the potential cause remains unexplained in about half of the cases. Autoimmune disorders appear to play a prominent role among multiple factors implicated in pathogenesis of adverse pregnancy outcome, including thyroid antibodies .The purpose of this study is determination of antithyroid antibodies titer on the outcome of recent pregnancy that aborted or continued until delivery.Materials & Methods: This study was descriptive cross sectional research .The information of 80 pregnant women being between 20 to 40 years old with gestational age of below 20 weeks were gathered for this study. 40 of these women aborted within 20 weeks and others, their pregnancies continued until delivery. All samples with known causes of abortion were waived. With written consents , blood of each pregnant woman was taken for the examination of antithyroid antibodies , FBS and TFT. If the two latters results were normal , the antithyroid antibodies were considered to be valid and the information was registered in prepared questionnaires. The values more than 75 u/ml for anti Tpo and 100 u/ml for anti TG were abnormal. Afterwards , using excel program the data were gathered , and the results were analyzed with t-test , 2 and spss software . Results: 8 out of 80 women , had abnormal antibody results ; 6 women had abnormal anti TG while 3 women had abnormal anti Tpo , and in one case both of them were abnormal . 7 out of 8 women who had abnormal antibody were in the group aborted and one of them was in the group who delivered her baby. The results show that the differences of anti thyroid antibodies between the 2 groups were statistically meaningful.Conclusion: The results show that the differences of antithyroid antibodies between the two groups were statistically significant. Furthermore , significant levels of these antibodies were

  2. Thyroid-stimulating hormone, anti-thyroid antibodies, and pregnancy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plowden, Torie C; Schisterman, Enrique F; Sjaarda, Lindsey A; Perkins, Neil J; Silver, Robert; Radin, Rose; Kim, Keewan; Galai, Noya; DeCherney, Alan H; Mumford, Sunni L

    2017-12-01

    Overt thyroid dysfunction has been associated with adverse obstetric outcomes. However, less is known regarding subclinical hypothyroidism or thyroid autoimmunity and their relationship to pregnancy complications. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between prepregnancy anti-thyroid antibodies and subclinical hypothyroidism and preterm delivery, gestational diabetes mellitus, and preeclampsia. We conducted a secondary analysis of a prospective cohort of 18- to 40-year-old women with 1-2 previous pregnancy losses (n=1193) who participated in a multicenter randomized, placebo-controlled trial of low-dose aspirin. Prepregnancy levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone, free thyroxine, thyroglobulin antibody, and thyroid peroxidase antibody were measured. Relative risks and 95% confidence intervals were estimated with the use of generalized linear models with adjustment for age and body mass index. Among women with an ongoing pregnancy of >20 weeks estimated gestational age, there was no association between prepregnancy thyroid-stimulating hormone level (>2.5 vs ≤2.5 mIU/L) and preterm delivery (adjusted relative risk, 0.77; 95% confidence interval, 0.40-1.47), gestational diabetes mellitus (adjusted relative risk, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 0.54-3.04), or preeclampsia (adjusted relative risk, 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-2.04). Similarly, among women with thyroid antibodies, there was no increase in the likelihood of preterm delivery (relative risk, 1.26; 95% confidence interval, 0.65-2.45), gestational diabetes mellitus (relative risk, 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 0.51-3.49), or preeclampsia (relative risk, 1.02; 95% confidence interval, 0.54-1.92), compared with women without these antibodies. Among women with 1-2 previous pregnancy losses, subclinical hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmunity were not associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery, gestational diabetes mellitus, or preeclampsia. These data support current

  3. Effect of antithyroid drug on chick embryos during the last week of development: delayed hatching and decreased cerebellar acetylcholinesterase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Gen; Nishigori, Hidekazu; Tezuka, Yu; Kagami, Keisuke; Sugiyama, Toru; Nishigori, Hideo

    2011-11-01

    Hypothyroid state during embryogenesis disturbs normal growth and brain development, influencing later life. To evaluate the harmful consequences of the state during embryogenesis using an animal model, we inhibited thyroid hormone biosynthesis in chick embryos by using methimazole (MMI). Typically, embryos were treated with MMI (20 µmol/egg) on day 14, and examined on specific days.  Of the control embryos, 94% hatched on day 21, whereas 0% and 60% of MMI-treated embryos hatched on days 21 and 24, respectively. MMI retarded the rates of bodyweight gain as well as liver and heart development, and delayed hatching. However, the external differences in appearance and differences in the weights of the newly hatched control chicks on day 21 and the MMI-treated chicks on day 24 were less obvious. Embryos treated with MMI exhibited increased mass in their brain parts on day 24. Most notably, the treatment resulted in a 1.35-fold increase in cerebellum weight compared to that of the untreated animals. Acetylcholinesterase activity in the cerebellum on the day of hatching decreased significantly to 0.85-fold that of the untreated controls. Thyroid hormone receptor β mRNA was detected from day 12 and dramatically expressed from day 19 to the day of hatching. The 'fertilized hen's egg-chick embryo-chick system' is an appropriate animal model for investigating the hypothyroid state during embryogenesis. Decreased cerebellar acetylcholinesterase activity after MMI treatment was assumed to relate to a mechanism of motor and cognitive deficits in congenital hypothyroidism. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2011 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  4. Antithyroid drug detection using an enzyme cascade blocking in a nanoparticle-based lab-on-a-chip system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbanoglu, Sevinc; Mayorga-Martinez, Carmen C; Medina-Sánchez, Mariana; Rivas, Lourdes; Ozkan, Sibel A; Merkoçi, Arben

    2015-05-15

    A methimazole (MT) biosensor based on a nanocomposite of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) functionalized with iridium oxide nanoparticles (IrOx NPs) and tyrosinase (Tyr) immobilized onto screen printed electrode (SPE) by using a permanent magnet is presented. This system is evaluated in batch mode via chelating copper at the active site of tyrosinase and in flow mode by thioquinone formation. The MT detection in flow mode is achieved using a hybrid polydimethylsiloxane/polyester amperometric lab-on-a-chip (LOC) microsystem with an integrated SPE. Both systems are very sensitive with low limit of detection (LOD): 0.006 μM and 0.004 μM for batch and flow modes, respectively. Nevertheless, the flow mode has advantages such as its reusability, automation, low sample volume (6 μL), and fast response (20 s). Optimization and validation parameters such as enzyme-substrate amount, flow rate, inhibition conditions, repeatability and reproducibility of the biosensor have been performed. The proposed methods have been applied in MT detection in spiked human serum and pharmaceutical dosage forms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis with positive serum antithyroid antibodies, IgM antibodies against mycoplasma pneumoniae and human herpesvirus 7 PCR in the CSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venâncio, Paulo; Brito, Maria João; Pereira, Gabriela; Vieira, José Pedro

    2014-08-01

    We report the case of a boy with an encephalopathy associated with extrapyramidal and psychiatric symptoms and anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibodies. He had positive serum antithyroid antibodies, IgM antibodies against Mycoplasma pneumoniae and human herpesvirus 7 polymerase chain reaction in the cerebrospinal fluid. He was successfully treated with rituximab, after steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin and plasma exchange. The pathophysiology of this disorder may be post-infectious and autoimmune.

  6. Anti-Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies and Male Gender Are Associated with Diabetes Occurrence in Patients with Beta-Thalassemia Major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni M. Pes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Intensive transfusion schedule and iron-chelating therapy prolonged and improved quality of life in patients with β-thalassemia (β-T major. However, this led to an increased risk of developing impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes. In this study we analyzed variables associated with the occurrence of impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes in patients with β-T major. Methods. 388 Sardinian patients were included. Age, gender, duration of chelation therapy, body mass index, and markers of pancreatic and extrapancreatic autoimmunity were analyzed. Results. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO antibodies (Ab (OR = 3.36; p=0.008 and male gender (OR = 1.98; p=0.025 were significantly associated with glucose impairment, while the other variables were not. Ferritin levels were significantly higher in TPOAb positive compared to TPOAb negative patients (4870 ± 1665 μg/L versus 2922 ± 2773 μg/L; p<0.0001. Conclusions. In patients with β-T major a progressive damage of insulin-producing cells due to secondary hemosiderosis appears to be the most reasonable mechanism associated with glucose metabolism disorders. The findings need to be confirmed with additional well designed studies to address the question of whether TPOAb may have a role in the management of these patients.

  7. The seroprevalence of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies in bipolar families and bipolar twins: results from two longitudinal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, G; de Witte, L; Mesman, E; Kemner, S; Vonk, R; Brouwer, R; Nolen, W A; Drexhage, H A; Hillegers, M H J

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies of our group among bipolar offspring and bipolar twins showed significant higher prevalence's and levels of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPO-Abs) in offspring and co-twins (without a mood disorder) compared to controls, suggesting that TPO-Abs might be considered as vulnerability factor (trait marker) for BD development. Here we elucidate, in the same cohorts, but now after 12- and 6-year follow-up, whether TPO-abs should be considered as a 'trait' marker for BD. The present study aims to investigate whether TPO-Abs (1) are stable over time, (2) are associated with lithium-exposure, (3) share a common genetic background with BD and are related to psychopathology. In bipolar offspring and twins, the prevalence of TPO-Abs is stable over time (r s  = .72 p bipolar offspring (10,4% versus 4%) and higher TPO-abs titers were still present in co-twins of bipolar cases compared to control twins [mean 1.06 IU/ml (SD .82) versus mean .82 IU/ml (SD .67)], although statistical significance was lost. Although our results show a trend toward an increased inherited risk of the co-occurrence of BD and thyroid autoimmunity, large-scale studies can only draw final conclusions. Nationwide epidemiological and GWAS studies reach such numbers and support the view of a possible common (autoimmune) etiology of severe mood disorders and chronic recurrent infections and autoimmunity, including thyroid autoimmunity.

  8. Sertraline and its iodine product: Experimental and theoretical vibrational studies. Potential in vitro anti-thyroid activity of sertraline and iodine product toxicity with respect to male Wistar rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Graciela E.; Ferraresi Curotto, Verónica; Laino, Carlos H.; Pis Diez, Reinaldo; Williams, Patricia A. M.; Ferrer, Evelina G.

    2013-03-01

    Mayor depression, obsessive-compulsive panic, social anxiety disorders are common diseases that are usually treated with sertraline hydrochloride which is the active ingredient of the well known drugs as Zoloft and Lustral. In this work, we presented a more complete vibrational characterization of the solid phase FT-IR spectra of Sertraline hydrochloride and its sertraline-iodine product in which the conformational space of the molecules was investigated performing molecular dynamic simulations within an NVT ensemble. Geometrical, electronic and vibrational properties were calculated with the density functional theory. Comparison of the simulated spectra with the experimental spectra provides important information about the ability of the computational method to describe the vibrational modes of both molecules. In addition, for the first time we present the evaluation of anti-thyroid activity of sertraline hydrochloride by using the Lang's method. Also, with the aim to evaluate the antidepressant effect of its iodine product we demonstrated for this compound the toxic effect towards the male Wistar rats.

  9. Diagnostic Accuracy of Detecting Hashimoto's Thyroiditis in Thyroid Cancer Patients Who Underwent Thyroid Surgery: Comparison of Ultrasonography, Positron Emission Tomography/CT, Contrast Enhanced CT, and Anti-Thyroid Antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Gyun; Lee, Tae Hyun; Park, Dong Hee; Nam, Sang Been [Dept. of Radiology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography (US), F18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT), contrast enhanced CT (CECT), serum anti-thyroid antibody for detecting Hashimoto's thyroiditis in thyroid cancer patients who underwent neck surgery. A total of 150 patients with suspicious for thyroid cancer, who had previously undergone US guided needle aspiration of thyroid, were evaluated with the use of US, PET/CT, CECT and serum anti-thyroid antibody. The four studies were performed within two months before neck surgery. Hashimoto's thyroiditis was confirmed by histopathological results. The diagnostic accuracy of US, PET/CT, CECT and serum anti-thyroid antibody were calculated statistically. Hashimoto's thyroiditis was diagnosed in 51 out of the 150 patients, following neck surgery. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of US were 76.5%, 92.9%, 84.8%, 88.5%, and 87.3%, respectively. The corresponding values of PET/CT were 37.3%, 96.0%, 82.6%, 74.8%, and 76.0%, and CECT were 62.7%, 89.9%, 76.2%, 82.4%, and 80.7%, and serum anti-thyroid antibody level were 90.2%, 93.9%, 88.5%, 94.9%, and 92.7%, respectively. McNemar test revealed significant difference among PET/CT and others, but no significant differences among US, CECT and serum anti-thyroid antibody. Overall, serum anti-thyroid antibody showed most accurate diagnostic performance. In detecting Hashimoto's thyroiditis, serum anti-thyroid antibody showed higher diagnostic accuracy than others. US also showed relatively high diagnostic accuracy.

  10. Influence of antithyroid medication on effective half-life and uptake of {sup 131}I following radioiodine therapy; Einfluss thyreostatischer Medikation beim Morbus Basedow auf die Kinetik von 131-Iod waehrend einer Radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moka, D.; Voth, E.; Schicha, H. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    1997-12-01

    Aim of this study was to assess the influence of antithyroid drugs (ADT) on the kinetics of {sup 131}I. Therefore, 56 patients with Graves` disease and with shortened effective half-life of {sup 131}I were examined under stationary conditionary conditions. In 38 patients ATD was stopped three days after radioiodine therapy (RIT). The progress of the first RIT and of a second RIT, which still was necessary in 12 patients, was compared to 18 patients receiving ATD continuously. Values of effective half-life for {sup 131}I rose significantly from 3.4 to 5.7 days 2-3 days after stopping ATD. There was an increase of the {sup 131}I-uptake of a second RIT after stopping ATD from 29.0 to 38.4%. In contrast, {sup 131}I-uptake of a second RIT decreased significantly in patients receiving ATD continuously. Effective half-life and uptake of {sup 131}I were affected significantly by ATD. Interrupting ATD after RIT is useful to improve an apparantly insufficient RIT in thyrotoxic patients receiving ATD. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel dieser Studie war es, beim M. Basedow die Kinetik von {sup 131}I unter dem Einfluss thyreostatischer Medikation (tM) zu untersuchen. Dazu wurden die 56 Patienten mit immunogener Hyperthyreose M. Basedow (MB) und mit einem erhoehten `turn over` von {sup 131}I unter tM untersucht. Bei 38 Patienten wurde die tM am 3. Tag nach RITh abgesetzt. Der Verlauf der 1. RITh bzw. einer Nachtherapie wurde mit 18 Patienten unter fortlaufender tM verglichen. 2-3 Tage nach Absetzen der tM stieg die effektive Halbwertzeit (HWZ{sub eff.}) von {sup 131}I signifikant von 3,4 auf 5,7 Tage und der {sup 131}I-Uptake bei der Nachtherapie von 29,0 auf 38,4% an, waehrend er unter fortlaufender tM signifikant abfiel. Beide Effekte zeigen, dass tM die {sup 131}I-Kinetik der Schilddruese sehr schnell beeinflussen kann. Gezieltes Absetzen der tM eignet sich deshalb, um bei ausgewaehlten Patienten eine primaer unzureichende RITh noch waehrend des stationaeren Aufenthaltes zu steuern und

  11. High prevalence of antithyroid peroxidase and antiparietal cell antibodies among patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus attending a tertiary diabetes centre in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paruk, Imran M; Ganie, Yasmeen; Maharaj, Sureka; Pirie, Fraser J; Naidoo, Vasudevan G; Nkwanyana, Ntombifikile M; Dinnematin, Hilary L; Ramdial, Pratistadevi K; Motala, Ayesha A

    2017-06-01

    Data on the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and gastric autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in Africa are limited. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of antithyroid peroxidase (TPO-A) and antiparietal cell antibody (PCA) in patients with T1DM at a tertiary diabetes clinic in Durban, South Africa. This was a cross-sectional observational study among subjects attending the adult T1DM clinic at Inkosi Albert Luthuli Hospital. Information about history and clinical examination was collected. Blood tests included glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody (GADA), TPO-A, PCA, vitamin B 12 , folate, ferritin, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine, lipids and HbA1c. A total of 202 (M:F, 90:112) patients were recruited. The ethnic composition was African (black) (56.4%; n=114), Indian (31.7%; n=64), white (4.5%; n=9) and coloured (mixed race) (7.4%; n=15). Mean age and mean duration of diabetes were 26.4±11.4 and 10.7±9.1 years, respectively. Mean body mass index was 21.6±6.3 kg/m 2 . GADA was positive in 63.37% (n=128). The prevalence of TPO-A was 18.9% (n=39) and PCA 8.9% (n=17). The prevalence of overt hypothyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism and Graves' disease was 10.9%, 2.5% and 1.5%, respectively; vitamin B 12 deficiency was noted in 3.5% (n=7) and iron deficiency in 19.3% (n=39). Among patients with T1DM in this study, there was a high prevalence of coexistent AITD and gastric autoimmunity. Screening for hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmunity should be undertaken in all patients at initial presentation. However, to assess the feasibility and optimal timing of subsequent testing in the African setting with limited resources, more collaborative research with longitudinal studies is required. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Anti-Thyroid Peroxidase Reactivity Is Heightened in Pemphigus Vulgaris and Is Driven by Human Leukocyte Antigen Status and the Absence of Desmoglein Reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiffert-Sinha, Kristina; Khan, Shahzaib; Attwood, Kristopher; Gerlach, John A.; Sinha, Animesh A.

    2018-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) belongs to an autoimmune disease cluster that includes autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), suggesting common mechanisms driving autoimmune susceptibility. Our group has shown that PV patients exhibit significant reactivity to AITD-related anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO), and anti-TPO antibodies affect signaling pathways in keratinocytes similar to anti-desmoglein (Dsg) 3 antibodies. To further assess the relevance of anti-TPO reactivity in PV, we analyzed anti-TPO levels in 280 PV and 167 healthy control serum samples across a comprehensive set of variable and static parameters of disease activity and etiopathogenesis. PV patients have significantly higher activity rates (A.R.s) for anti-TPO than healthy controls, but levels do not differ between phases of clinical activity and remission. Patients that carry both the PV-associated human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles DRB1*0402 and DQB1*0503, or DQB1*0503 alone show a low prevalence of anti-TPO (A.R. 9.5 and 4.8%, respectively), while patients that lack expression of these alleles or carry DRB1*0402 alone have a much higher prevalence of anti-TPO (A.R. 23.1 and 15.8%, respectively), suggesting that the absence of DQB1*0503 may predispose patients to the development of anti-TPO antibodies. Similarly, anti-Dsg1−/3− patients have a higher anti-TPO A.R. (26.9%) than anti-Dsg1−/3+ (18.8%), anti-Dsg1+/3− (14.3%), and anti-Dsg1+/3+ (3.9%) patients. Our data suggest that anti-TPO reactivity in PV is driven by genetic markers that may be in linkage disequilibrium with the established PV-susceptibility alleles and that this association drives the selection of a combination of anti-Dsg and anti-TPO antibodies, with anti-TPO filling the gap in active patients that do not carry the established PV-associated autoantibodies and/or are lacking the established PV-HLA-susceptibility alleles. PMID:29675021

  13. Anti-Thyroid Peroxidase Reactivity Is Heightened in Pemphigus Vulgaris and Is Driven by Human Leukocyte Antigen Status and the Absence of Desmoglein Reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Seiffert-Sinha

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Pemphigus vulgaris (PV belongs to an autoimmune disease cluster that includes autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD, suggesting common mechanisms driving autoimmune susceptibility. Our group has shown that PV patients exhibit significant reactivity to AITD-related anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO, and anti-TPO antibodies affect signaling pathways in keratinocytes similar to anti-desmoglein (Dsg 3 antibodies. To further assess the relevance of anti-TPO reactivity in PV, we analyzed anti-TPO levels in 280 PV and 167 healthy control serum samples across a comprehensive set of variable and static parameters of disease activity and etiopathogenesis. PV patients have significantly higher activity rates (A.R.s for anti-TPO than healthy controls, but levels do not differ between phases of clinical activity and remission. Patients that carry both the PV-associated human leukocyte antigen (HLA alleles DRB1*0402 and DQB1*0503, or DQB1*0503 alone show a low prevalence of anti-TPO (A.R. 9.5 and 4.8%, respectively, while patients that lack expression of these alleles or carry DRB1*0402 alone have a much higher prevalence of anti-TPO (A.R. 23.1 and 15.8%, respectively, suggesting that the absence of DQB1*0503 may predispose patients to the development of anti-TPO antibodies. Similarly, anti-Dsg1−/3− patients have a higher anti-TPO A.R. (26.9% than anti-Dsg1−/3+ (18.8%, anti-Dsg1+/3− (14.3%, and anti-Dsg1+/3+ (3.9% patients. Our data suggest that anti-TPO reactivity in PV is driven by genetic markers that may be in linkage disequilibrium with the established PV-susceptibility alleles and that this association drives the selection of a combination of anti-Dsg and anti-TPO antibodies, with anti-TPO filling the gap in active patients that do not carry the established PV-associated autoantibodies and/or are lacking the established PV-HLA-susceptibility alleles.

  14. HLA Association with Drug-Induced Adverse Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Lang Fan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adverse drug reactions (ADRs remain a common and major problem in healthcare. Severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions (SCARs, such as Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS/toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN with mortality rate ranges from 10% to more than 30%, can be life threatening. A number of recent studies demonstrated that ADRs possess strong genetic predisposition. ADRs induced by several drugs have been shown to have significant associations with specific alleles of human leukocyte antigen (HLA genes. For example, hypersensitivity to abacavir, a drug used for treating of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection, has been proposed to be associated with allele 57:01 of HLA-B gene (terms HLA-B∗57:01. The incidences of abacavir hypersensitivity are much higher in Caucasians compared to other populations due to various allele frequencies in different ethnic populations. The antithyroid drug- (ATDs- induced agranulocytosis are strongly associated with two alleles: HLA-B∗38:02 and HLA-DRB1∗08:03. In addition, HLA-B∗15:02 allele was reported to be related to carbamazepine-induced SJS/TEN, and HLA-B∗57:01 in abacavir hypersensitivity and flucloxacillin induced drug-induced liver injury (DILI. In this review, we summarized the alleles of HLA genes which have been proposed to have association with ADRs caused by different drugs.

  15. Drug Facts

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  19. The prevalence of Antithyroglobulin and Antithyroid Microsomal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plasma levels of antithyroglobulin {TG} and microsomal thyroid peroxidase {TPO} autoantibodies were determined using the ELISA methods, in 87 euthyroid women. These were made up of 44 control women which included 8{18%} nulligravidae, 18{41%} non pregnant multiparous and 18{41%}, pregnant subjects.

  20. Drug Addiction

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    ... attempt to stop taking the drug Recognizing unhealthy drug use in family members Sometimes it's difficult to ... sold to support drug use Recognizing signs of drug use or intoxication Signs and symptoms of drug ...

  1. Drug Allergy

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    ... Seizure Loss of consciousness Other conditions resulting from drug allergy Less common drug allergy reactions occur days ... reaction the first time you take the drug. Drugs commonly linked to allergies Although any drug can ...

  2. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... some signs and symptoms of someone with a drug use problem? How Does Drug Use Become an Addiction? What Makes Someone More Likely ... So Hard to Quit Drugs? Effects of Drugs Drug Use and Other People Drug Use and Families Drug ...

  3. Drug allergies

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    Allergic reaction - drug (medication); Drug hypersensitivity; Medication hypersensitivity ... A drug allergy involves an immune response in the body that produces an allergic reaction to a medicine. The ...

  4. [Methodology for Estimating the Risk of Adverse Drug Reactions in Pregnant Women: Analysis of the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report Database].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Takamasa; Ohtsu, Fumiko; Sekiya, Yasuaki; Mori, Chiyo; Sakata, Hiroshi; Goto, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Safety information regarding drug use during pregnancy is insufficient. The present study aimed to establish an optimal signal detection method to identify adverse drug reactions in pregnant women and to evaluate information in the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER) database between April 2004 and November 2014. We identified reports on pregnant women using the Standardised MedDRA Queries. We calculated the proportional reporting ratio (PRR) and reporting odds ratio (ROR) of the risk factors for the two known risks of antithyroid drugs and methimazole (MMI) embryopathy, and ritodrine and fetal/infant cardiovascular events. The PRR and ROR values differed between all reports in the JADER database and those on pregnant women, affecting whether signal detection criteria were met. Therefore we considered that reports on pregnant women should be used when risks associated with pregnancy were determined using signal detection. Analyses of MMI embryopathy revealed MMI signals [PRR, 159.7; ROR, 669.9; 95% confidence interval (CI), 282.4-1588.7] but no propylthiouracil signals (PRR, 1.98; ROR, 2.0; 95%CI, 0.3-15.4). These findings were consistent with those of reported risks. Analyses of fetal/infant cardiovascular events revealed ritodrine signals (PRR, 2.1; ROR, 2.1; 95%CI, 1.4-3.3). These findings were also consistent with reported risks. Mining the JADER database was helpful for analyzing adverse drug reactions in pregnant women.

  5. Drug Facts

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  7. Drug Facts

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  8. Drug Safety

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    ... over-the-counter drug. The FDA evaluates the safety of a drug by looking at Side effects ... clinical trials The FDA also monitors a drug's safety after approval. For you, drug safety means buying ...

  9. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... and symptoms of someone with a drug use problem? How Does Drug Use Become an Addiction? What ... Use Hurts Brains Drug Use and Mental Health Problems Often Happen Together The Link Between Drug Use ...

  10. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... Drug Use Hurts Brains Drug Use and Mental Health Problems Often Happen Together The Link Between Drug Use and HIV/AIDS Treatment & Recovery Why Does a Person Need Treatment? Does Drug Treatment Work? What ... Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) , the principal biomedical and behavioral research agency ...

  11. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... Where Can Someone Find Treatment and Recovery Resources? Prevention Help Children and Teens Stay Drug-Free Talking ... You Used Drugs in the Past Drug Use Prevention Phone Numbers and Websites Search Share Listen English ...

  12. Hazardous Drugs

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    ... and hazardous drugs in the workplace. Pharmacy . OSHA Hospital eTool. Reviews safety and health topics related to hazardous drugs including drug handling, administration, storage, and disposal. OSHA has identified worker exposure ...

  13. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs You can call 1-800-662-HELP (4357) at any time to find drug treatment ...

  14. Drug Reactions

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    ... problem is interactions, which may occur between Two drugs, such as aspirin and blood thinners Drugs and food, such as statins and grapefruit Drugs and supplements, such as ginkgo and blood thinners ...

  15. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... symptoms of someone with a drug use problem? How Does Drug Use Become an Addiction? What Makes Someone More Likely to Get Addicted to Drugs? Does Addiction Run in Families? Why Is It So Hard to ...

  16. Club Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain ... regarding prevention and treatment of MDMA. ( September 2017 ) View all related publications Related NIDA Notes Articles Narrative ...

  17. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... Other Effects on the Body Drug Use Hurts Brains Drug Use and Mental Health Problems Often Happen ... to prescription drugs. The addiction slowly took over his life. I need different people around me. To ...

  18. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... Facts Tobacco and Nicotine Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What is Addiction? What are some signs and symptoms of someone with a drug use problem? How Does Drug Use Become an Addiction? What ...

  19. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... Does a Person Need Treatment? Does Drug Treatment Work? What Are the Treatment Options? What Is Recovery? ... I want my daughter to avoid drugs. "Debbie" has been drug-free for years. She wants her ...

  20. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... Oxy, Vike) Facts Spice (K2) Facts Tobacco and Nicotine Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What is Addiction? What are some signs and symptoms of someone ... to you. This website talks about drug abuse, addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath ... Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs You can call 1-800-662- ...

  1. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... 4357) at any time to find drug treatment centers near you. I want my daughter to avoid drugs. "Debbie" has been drug-free for years. She wants her daughter to stay away from drugs. But she's afraid ...

  2. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... Resources? Prevention Help Children and Teens Stay Drug-Free Talking to Kids About Drugs: What to Say if You Used Drugs in the Past Drug Use ... Information about this page Click on the button that says "Listen" on any page and the computer will read the text to you. This website talks ...

  3. Identifying Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Affect Teens The Negative Health Effects of Marijuana Use State and Federal Drug Laws Treatment and Recovery Federal Student Aid and Consequences of a Drug Conviction School Failure VIDEO: Taking Prescription Drugs to Get High—A Bad Idea Drugged Driving—What You Should Know How ...

  4. Substance use - prescription drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Substance use disorder - prescription drugs; Substance abuse - prescription drugs; Drug abuse - prescription drugs; Drug use - prescription drugs; Narcotics - substance use; Opioid - substance use; Sedative - substance ...

  5. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... Tobacco and Nicotine Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What is Addiction? What are some signs and symptoms of someone with ... problem? How Does Drug Use Become an Addiction? What Makes Someone More Likely to Get Addicted to ...

  6. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... call 1-800-662-HELP (4357) at any time to find drug treatment centers near you. I ... prescription drugs. The addiction slowly took over his life. I need different people around me. To stop ...

  7. Drug Abuse

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    ... and child abuse. Drug abuse can lead to homelessness, crime, and missed work or problems with keeping a job. It harms unborn babies and destroys families. There are different types of treatment for drug ...

  8. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... Numbers and Websites Search Share Listen English Español Information about this page Click on the button that ... about drug abuse, addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana ...

  9. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... Home Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) ... treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice ( ...

  10. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... symptoms of someone with a drug use problem? How Does Drug Use Become an Addiction? What Makes ... Options? What Is Recovery? What Is a Relapse? How Can Friends and Family Help? Where Can Someone ...

  11. Drug Metabolism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Drug metabolism may be defined as the biochemical modifica- tion of one chemical form to another, occurring usually through ..... Endogenous. Enzyme. Drugs. Cofactor. Glucuronidation. UDP glucoronic. UDP-. Chloramphenicol, acid glucuronosyltransferase morphine, paracetamol, salicylic acid, fenoprofen, desipramine,.

  12. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... Search form Search Menu Home Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) ... Facts Tobacco and Nicotine Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What is Addiction? What are some signs and ...

  13. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... Nicotine Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What is Addiction? What are some signs and symptoms of someone ... use problem? How Does Drug Use Become an Addiction? What Makes Someone More Likely to Get Addicted ...

  14. Study Drugs

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    ... What Are Study Drugs? Doctors prescribe medicines like Adderall and Ritalin to treat conditions like attention deficit ... stimulants are used as study drugs: amphetamines like Adderall, Dexedrine, or Vyvanse methylphenidates like Ritalin or Concerta ...

  15. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... abuse, addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs You can ...

  16. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... form Search Menu Home Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts ... addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain ...

  17. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... abuse, addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth ... 662-HELP (4357) at any time to find drug treatment centers near you. I want my daughter ...

  18. Orphan drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Goločorbin-Kon, Svetlana; Vojinović, Aleksandra; Lalić-Popović, Mladena; Pavlović, Nebojša; Mikov, Momir

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Drugs used for treatment of rare diseases are known worldwide under the term of orphan drugs because pharmaceutical companies have not been interested in ”adopting” them, that is in investing in research, developing and producing these drugs. This kind of policy has been justified by the fact that these drugs are targeted for small markets, that only a small number of patients is available for clinical trials, and that large investments are required for the development of ...

  19. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... Makes Someone More Likely to Get Addicted to Drugs? Does Addiction Run in Families? Why Is It So Hard ... the text to you. This website talks about drug abuse, addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol ...

  20. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... Search form Search Menu Home Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts ... text to you. This website talks about drug abuse, addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain ...

  1. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the text to you. This website talks about drug abuse, addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs ... adicción. English Español About the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) | About This Website Tools and Resources | Contact ...

  2. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... to main content Easy-to-Read Drug Facts Search form Search Menu Home Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts ... Past Drug Use Prevention Phone Numbers and Websites Search Share Listen English Español Information about this page ...

  3. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... the computer will read the text to you. This website talks about drug abuse, addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos ... I want my daughter to avoid drugs. "Debbie" has been drug-free for years. She wants her daughter to stay away from ...

  4. Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infected with a drug-resistant strain of HIV. Drug-resistance testing results are used to decide which HIV medicines to include in a person’s first HIV regimen. After treatment is started, drug-resistance testing is repeated if ...

  5. Drug allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warrington Richard

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Drug allergy encompasses a spectrum of immunologically-mediated hypersensitivity reactions with varying mechanisms and clinical presentations. This type of adverse drug reaction (ADR not only affects patient quality of life, but may also lead to delayed treatment, unnecessary investigations, and even mortality. Given the myriad of symptoms associated with the condition, diagnosis is often challenging. Therefore, referral to an allergist experienced in the identification, diagnosis and management of drug allergy is recommended if a drug-induced allergic reaction is suspected. Diagnosis relies on a careful history and physical examination. In some instances, skin testing, graded challenges and induction of drug tolerance procedures may be required. The most effective strategy for the management of drug allergy is avoidance or discontinuation of the offending drug. When available, alternative medications with unrelated chemical structures should be substituted. Cross-reactivity among drugs should be taken into consideration when choosing alternative agents. Additional therapy for drug hypersensitivity reactions is largely supportive and may include topical corticosteroids, oral antihistamines and, in severe cases, systemic corticosteroids. In the event of anaphylaxis, the treatment of choice is injectable epinephrine. If a particular drug to which the patient is allergic is indicated and there is no suitable alternative, induction of drug tolerance procedures may be considered to induce temporary tolerance to the drug. This article provides a backgrounder on drug allergy and strategies for the diagnosis and management of some of the most common drug-induced allergic reactions, such allergies to penicillin, sulfonamides, cephalosporins, radiocontrast media, local anesthetics, general anesthetics, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

  6. WAr on DrugS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-04-12

    Apr 12, 2009 ... tion of drugs, especially hemp (Cannabis. Sativa), became entrenched. Oloruntoba. (2006) explained that the vigour and sus- tained efforts to legislate against drugs in contemporary Nigeria was because of the growing notoriety of the country as a transit point or centre for recruitment of drug couriers, and a ...

  7. [NEPHROTOXIC DRUGS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, B; Šutić, I; Marković, N Bašić

    2016-12-01

    Renal tissue is sensitive to the effect of potentially nephrotoxic drugs and other substances that are available over-the-counter or can be purchased at healthy food stores or elsewhere, and harmful substances from the environment. The harmful effects of these substances lead to the development of recognizable clinical syndromes, including acute or chronic renal failure, tubulopathy, and proteinuria. Risk factors that influence the development of kidney disease induced by drugs are divided into those related to patient characteristics, drug characteristics, and renal function. Drugs that commonly exhibit nephrotoxic effects are analgesics, antimicrobials, chemotherapeutics, contrast agents, immunosuppressants, herbal preparations and substances containing heavy metals. Family physician must carefully observe their patients, nurturing individual approach to drug selection and determining the dose. Renal function can quickly return to normal if the damage is recognized on time. Recent research yields insights into the identification of new biomarkers that will contribute to early detection of drug induced kidney damage.

  8. COPD - control drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - control drugs; Bronchodilators - COPD - control drugs; Beta agonist inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Anticholinergic inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Long-acting inhaler - COPD - control drugs; ...

  9. [Orphan drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golocorbin Kon, Svetlana; Vojinović, Aleksandra; Lalić-Popović, Mladena; Pavlović, Nebojsa; Mikov, Momir

    2013-01-01

    Drugs used for treatment of rare diseases are known worldwide under the term of orphan drugs because pharmaceutical companies have not been interested in "adopting" them, that is in investing in research, developing and producing these drugs. This kind of policy has been justified by the fact that these drugs are targeted for small markets, that only a small number of patients is available for clinical trials, and that large investments are required for the development of drugs meant to treat diseases whose pathogenesis has not yet been clarified in majority of cases. The aim of this paper is to present previous and present status of orphan drugs in Serbia and other countries. THE BEGINNING OF ORPHAN DRUGS DEVELOPMENT: This problem was first recognized by Congress of the United States of America in January 1983, and when the "Orphan Drug Act" was passed, it was a turning point in the development of orphan drugs. This law provides pharmaceutical companies with a series of reliefs, both financial ones that allow them to regain funds invested into the research and development and regulatory ones. Seven years of marketing exclusivity, as a type of patent monopoly, is the most important relief that enables companies to make large profits. There are no sufficient funds and institutions to give financial support to the patients. It is therefore necessary to make health professionals much more aware of rare diseases in order to avoid time loss in making the right diagnosis and thus to gain more time to treat rare diseases. The importance of discovery, development and production of orphan drugs lies in the number of patients whose life quality can be improved significantly by administration of these drugs as well as in the number of potential survivals resulting from the treatment with these drugs.

  10. AIDSinfo Drug Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content Drugs Home Drugs Find information on FDA-approved HIV/ ... infection drugs and investigational HIV/AIDS drugs. Search Drugs Search drug Search Icon What's this? Close Popup ...

  11. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... Oxy, Vike) Facts Spice (K2) Facts Tobacco and Nicotine Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What is Addiction? ... Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs You can call 1-800-662- ...

  12. Antineoplastic Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadée, Wolfgang; El Sayed, Yousry Mahmoud

    The limited scope of therapeutic drug-level monitoring in cancer chemotherapy results from the often complex biochemical mechanisms that contribute to antineoplastic activity and obscure the relationships among drug serum levels and therapeutic benefits. Moreover, new agents for cancer chemotherapy are being introduced at a more rapid rate than for the treatment of other diseases, although the successful application of therapeutic drug-level monitoring may require several years of intensive study of the significance of serum drug levels. However, drug level monitoring can be of considerable value during phase I clinical trials of new antineoplastic agents in order to assess drug metabolism, bioavailability, and intersubject variability; these are important parameters in the interpretation of clinical studies, but have no immediate benefit to the patient. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) probably represents the most versatile and easily adaptable analytical technique for drug metabolite screening (1). HPLC may therefore now be the method of choice during phase I clinical trials of antineoplastic drugs. For example, within a single week we developed an HPLC assay—using a C18 reverse-phase column, UV detection, and direct serum injection after protein precipitation—for the new radiosensitizer, misonidazole (2).

  13. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Say if You Used Drugs in the Past Drug Use Prevention Phone Numbers and Websites Search Share Listen English Español Information about this page Click on the button that says "Listen" on any page and the computer will read the ... Videos Information About ...

  14. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Use and Your Health Other Effects on the Body Drug Use Hurts Brains Drug Use and Mental Health Problems Often ... NIH is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services . PDF documents require the free Adobe Reader . ...

  15. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pain Medicine (Oxy, Vike) Facts Spice (K2) Facts Tobacco and Nicotine Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What ... Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs You can call 1-800- ...

  16. Drug Metabolism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Chemistry of Drug Metabolism. Drug metabolism is a chemical process, where enzymes play a crucial role in the conversion of one chemical species to another. The major family of enzymes associated with these metabolic reactions is the cytochrome P450 family. The structural features and functional activity of these ...

  17. Drugged Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Survey Results Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Unpredictable Danger Drug and Alcohol Use in College-Age Adults in 2016 Monitoring the Future 2016 Survey Results Drug and Alcohol Use in College-Age Adults in 2015 View All NIDA Home ...

  18. Capping Drugs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the process of treatment, drugs are also used for medical diagnosis and for ... ing cells. Since cancer cells grow at a faster rate than the normal .... ity characteristics. After intake, the N-methyl group is cleaved in the liver to release the physiologically active drug. Similarly, membrane transportation characteristics of the neu-.

  19. Drug repurposing based on drug-drug interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bin; Wang, Rong; Wu, Ping; Kong, De-Xin

    2015-02-01

    Given the high risk and lengthy procedure of traditional drug development, drug repurposing is gaining more and more attention. Although many types of drug information have been used to repurpose drugs, drug-drug interaction data, which imply possible physiological effects or targets of drugs, remain unexploited. In this work, similarity of drug interaction was employed to infer similarity of the physiological effects or targets for the drugs. We collected 10,835 drug-drug interactions concerning 1074 drugs, and for 700 of them, drug similarity scores based on drug interaction profiles were computed and rendered using a drug association network with 589 nodes (drugs) and 2375 edges (drug similarity scores). The 589 drugs were clustered into 98 groups with Markov Clustering Algorithm, most of which were significantly correlated with certain drug functions. This indicates that the network can be used to infer the physiological effects of drugs. Furthermore, we evaluated the ability of this drug association network to predict drug targets. The results show that the method is effective for 317 of 561 drugs that have known targets. Comparison of this method with the structure-based approach shows that they are complementary. In summary, this study demonstrates the feasibility of drug repurposing based on drug-drug interaction data. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Drug Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts MDMA (Ecstasy, Molly) Facts Meth (Crank, ... Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine ...

  1. Drug Metabolism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 3. Drug Metabolism: A Fascinating Link Between Chemistry and Biology. Nikhil Taxak Prasad V Bharatam. General Article Volume 19 Issue 3 March 2014 pp 259-282 ...

  2. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts MDMA ( ... Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/ ...

  3. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana ( ... Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) ...

  4. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MDMA (Ecstasy, Molly) Facts Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts Pain Medicine (Oxy, Vike) Facts Spice (K2) Facts Tobacco ... Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs You ...

  5. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts MDMA (Ecstasy, Molly) Facts Meth ( ... Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine ...

  6. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts MDMA (Ecstasy, Molly) Facts Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts Pain ... About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other ...

  7. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... call 1-800-662-HELP (4357) at any time to find drug treatment centers near you. I ... changes in her life. She finds support from family and friends who don't use marijuana. Haga ...

  8. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Together The Link Between Drug Use and HIV/AIDS Treatment & Recovery Why Does a Person Need Treatment? ... of Health (NIH) , the principal biomedical and behavioral research agency of the United States Government. NIH is ...

  9. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... prescription drugs. The addiction slowly took over his life. I need different people around me. To stop ... marijuana, "Cristina" is making positive changes in her life. She finds support from family and friends who ...

  10. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ecstasy, Molly) Facts Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts Pain Medicine (Oxy, Vike) Facts Spice (K2) Facts Tobacco and ... Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs You can ...

  11. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts MDMA (Ecstasy, Molly) Facts Meth (Crank, ... Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine ...

  12. Legal Drugs Are Good Drugs and Illegal Drugs Are Bad Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Indrati, Dina; Prasetyo, Herry

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT : Labelling drugs are important issue nowadays in a modern society. Although it is generally believed that legal drugs are good drugs and illegal drugs are bad drugs, it is evident that some people do not aware about the side effects of drugs used. Therefore, a key contention of this philosophical essay is that explores harms minimisation policy, discuss whether legal drugs are good drugs and illegal drugs are bad drugs and explores relation of drugs misuse in a psychiatric nursing s...

  13. [Drug promiscuity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zong-ru

    2011-04-01

    It is essential for a successful drug to possess two basic characteristics: satisfactory pharmacological action with sufficient potency and selectivity; good druggability with eligible physicochemical, pharmacokinetic and safety profiles, as well as structural novelty. Promiscuity is defined as the property of a drug to act with multiple molecular targets and exhibit distinct pharmacological effects. Promiscuous drugs are the basis of polypharmacology and the causes for side effects and unsuitable DMPK. Drug promiscuity originates from protein promiscuity. In order to accommodate, metabolize and excrete various endo- and exogenous substances, protein acquired the capability during evolution to adapt a wide range of structural diversity, and it is unnecessary to reserve a specific protein for every single ligand. The structures of target proteins are integration of conservativity and diversity. The former is represented by the relatively conservative domains for secondary structures folding, which leads to overlapping in ligand-binding and consequent cross-reactivity of ligands. Diversity, however, embodies the subtle difference in structures. Similar structural domain may demonstrate different functions due to alteration of amino acid sequences. The phenomenon of promiscuity may facilitate the "design in" of multi-target ligands for the treatment of complicated diseases, whereas it should be appropriately handled to improve druggability. Therefore, one of the primary goals in drug design is to scrutinize and manipulate the "merits and faults" of promiscuity. This review discusses the application of promiscuity in drug design for receptors, enzymes, ion channels and cytochrome P450. It also briefly describes the methods to predict ligand promiscuity based on either target or ligand structures.

  14. Drugs@FDA: FDA Approved Drug Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cosmetics Tobacco Products Home Drug Databases Drugs@FDA Drugs@FDA: FDA Approved Drug Products Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Download Drugs@FDA Express for free Search by Drug Name, Active Ingredient, or Application Number Enter at ...

  15. Study Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Stephanie Phuong; Roosta, Natalie; Nielsen, Mikkel Fuhr; Meyer, Maria Holmgaard; Friis, Katrine Birk

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, students around the world, started to use preparations as Ritalin and Modafinil,also known as study drugs, to improve their cognitive abilities1. It is a common use among thestudents in United States of America, but it is a new tendency in Denmark. Our main focus is tolocate whether study drugs needs to be legalized in Denmark or not. To investigate this ourstarting point is to understand central ethical arguments in the debate. We have chosen twoarguments from Nick Bostrom a...

  16. Drug Allergy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    Rasha H. El-Owaidy. Immunology Unit, Department of Pediatrics, Ain Shams University, Cairo. Introduction. Adverse reactions to pharmaceutical and diagnostic products constitute a major hazard in the practice of medicine and are responsible for substantial morbidity and cost. Adverse drug reactions can be divided into ...

  17. Drug resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorter, J.A.; Potschka, H.; Noebels, J.L.; Avoli, M.; Rogawski, M.A.; Olsen, R.W.; Delgado-Escueta, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    Drug resistance remains to be one of the major challenges in epilepsy therapy. Identification of factors that contribute to therapeutic failure is crucial for future development of novel therapeutic strategies for difficult-to-treat epilepsies. Several clinical studies have shown that high seizure

  18. Capping Drugs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is well documented that till recent times drugs derived from plants were used to relieve patients from suffering. But at the turn of the last century, with the improvement in purification meth- ods using chromatographic techniques, single compounds with well-defined structure became available for testing and treat- ment.

  19. Drugs reviews

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Angel_D

    chlorpropamide] and biguanides [e.g. metformin]), steroids and dapsone. The effectiveness of these drugs is likely to be reduced. Side-effects are uncommon but include: ▫ Skin reactions: rash, urticaria, flushing. Fortunately many of these reactions are self-limiting and gradually clear; the patient only needs symptomatic ...

  20. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Prevention Phone Numbers and Websites Search Share Listen English Español Information about this page Click on the ... información sobre el abuso de drogas, y adicción. English Español About the National Institute on Drug Abuse ( ...

  1. Misused Drug

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    analgesic effects by antagonising a subset of glutamate receptors ... unpleasant dreams up to 24hrs after the drug has been given.7 ... are intact. The amnesic effect of ketamine, which often persists for up to one hour after recovery of consciousness, cnsuree that there is no recall of surgery or anaesthesia. Effects on the War ...

  2. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Phone Numbers and Websites Search Share Listen English Español Information about this page Click on the button ... sobre el abuso de drogas, y adicción. English Español About the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) | ...

  3. Drugged Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pain Prevention Recovery Substance Use and SUDs in LGBT Populations Treatment Trends & Statistics Women and Drugs Publications ... mind-altering ingredient, in the blood. But the role that marijuana plays in crashes is ... age, gender, race, and presence of alcohol. 9 More research ...

  4. Prescription Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Future survey shows long term decline in illicit drug use, prescription opioid abuse, cigarette and alcohol use among the nation’s youth. View Online Download PDF Monitoring the Future 2013 Survey Results: College and Adults Published: April 30, 2015 In 2013, ...

  5. Drug abuse first aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... use of these drugs is a form of drug abuse. Medicines that are for treating a health problem ... about local resources. Alternative Names Overdose from drugs; Drug abuse first aid References Myck MB. Hallucinogens and drugs ...

  6. Prevalence of Anti-Thyroid Antibodies in Patients with Primary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine prevalence of thyroid antimicrosomal and antithyroglobulin antibodies among patients with primary thyroid disorders. Design: Descriptive cross-sectional study. Setting: Kenyatta National Hospital, July 2003 to August 2004. Results: Antimicrosomal antibodies (anti-TPOAbs) were detected in 51.4% ...

  7. The treatment of Graves' disease in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Sang Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Graves' disease (GD accounts for 10%-15% of thyroid disorders in children and adolescents. The use of antithyroid drugs as the initial treatment option in GD is well accepted. An average two years remission is achieved in about 30% of children treated with antithyroid drugs. However, the optimal treatment duration and the predictive marker of remission after antithyroid drug therapy are still controversial. Additionally, 131I therapy and surgery are considered the option for treatment in children and adolescents with GD. We review the treatment options for pediatric GD and the possible determinants of remission and relapse on antithyroid drug treatment in children and adolescents.

  8. Urine drug screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drug screen - urine ... detect the presence of illegal and some prescription drugs in your urine. Their presence may indicate that you recently used these drugs. Some drugs may remain in your system for ...

  9. National Drug Code Directory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Drug Listing Act of 1972 requires registered drug establishments to provide the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) with a current list of all drugs manufactured,...

  10. Other Drugs of Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... People Abuse » Other Drugs of Abuse Other Drugs of Abuse Listen There are many other drugs of abuse, ... and Rehab Resources About the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) | About This Website Tools and Resources | Contact ...

  11. Drugs Approved for Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for neuroblastoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  12. Drugs Approved for Retinoblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for retinoblastoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  13. CONCEPT OF DRUG INTERACTION

    OpenAIRE

    Singh Nidhi

    2012-01-01

    Drug interaction is an increasingly important cause of adverse reactions (ADR), and is the modification of the effect of one drug (object) by the prior or concomitant administration of another drug (precipitant drug). Drug interaction may either enhance or diminish the intended effect of one or both drugs. For example severe haemorrhage may occur if warfarin and salicylates (asprin) are combined. Precipitant drugs modify the object drug's absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion or act...

  14. Understanding drugs and behaviour

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parrott, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix xi Part I Drugs and Their Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Psychoactive drugs: introduction and overview . . . . . . . . 2 The brain...

  15. Drug abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, T.R.; Seastrunk, J.W.; Malone, G.; Knesevich, M.A.; Hickey, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that this study used SPECT to examine patients who have abused drugs to determine whether SPECT could identify abnormalities and whether these findings have clinical importance. Fifteen patients with a history of substance abuse (eight with cocaine, six with amphetamine, and one with organic solvent) underwent SPECT performed with a triple-headed camera and Tc-99m HMPAO both early for blood flow and later for functional information. These images were then processed into a 3D videotaped display used in group therapy. All 15 patients had multiple areas of decreased tracer uptake peppered throughout the cortex but mainly affecting the parietal lobes, expect for the organic solvent abuser who had a large parietal defect. The videotapes were subjectively described by a therapist as an exceptional tool that countered patient denial of physical damage from substance abuse. Statistical studies of recidivism between groups is under way

  16. Drugs and the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Institutes of Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.

    This booklet explores various aspects of drug addiction, with a special focus on drugs' effects on the brain. A brief introduction presents information on the rampant use of drugs in society and elaborates the distinction between drug abuse and drug addiction. Next, a detailed analysis of the brain and its functions is given. Drugs target the more…

  17. Personality, Drug Preference, Drug Use, and Drug Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Marc; Boyer, Bret; Kumar, V. K.; Prout, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between drug preference, drug use, drug availability, and personality among individuals (n = 100) in treatment for substance abuse in an effort to replicate the results of an earlier study (Feldman, Kumar, Angelini, Pekala, & Porter, 2007) designed to test prediction derived from Eysenck's (1957, 1967)…

  18. Drugs and lactation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelssering, G.; Aguiar, L.F.; Ribeiro, R.M.; Souza, A.Z. de

    1988-01-01

    Different kinds of drugs who can be transferred through the mother's milk to the lactant and its effects are showed in this work. A list of them as below: cardiotonics, diuretics, anti-hypertensives, beta-blockings, anti-arrythmics, drugs with gastrintestinal tract action, hormones, antibiotics and chemotherapeutics, citostatic drugs, central nervous system action drugs and anticoagulants drugs. (L.M.J.) [pt

  19. Drugs Approved for Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for rhabdomyosarcoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries. There may be drugs used in rhabdomyosarcoma that are not listed here.

  20. 99 Films on Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, David O., Ed.

    This catalog describes and evaluates 16-millimeter films about various aspects of drug use. Among the subjects covered by the 99 films are the composition and effects of different drugs, reasons why people use drugs, life in the drug culture, the problem of law enforcement, and various means of dealing with drug users. Each film is synopsized. Two…

  1. Street Drugs and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drugs are bad for you, and they’re bad for your baby. About 1 in 20 women (5 percent) take street drugs during pregnancy. Street drugs include: Cocaine Ecstasy, methamphetamine and other club drugs Heroin Marijuana Prescription drugs that are abused How can street ...

  2. Attitudes towards drug legalization among drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Roberto A; Richard, Alan J

    2002-01-01

    Research shows that support for legalization of drugs varies significantly among different sociodemographic and political groups. Yet there is little research examining the degree of support for legalization of drugs among drug users. This paper examines how frequency and type of drug use affect the support for legalization of drugs after adjusting for the effects of political affiliation and sociodemographic characteristics. A sample of 188 drug users and non-drug users were asked whether they would support the legalization of marijuana, cocaine, and heroin. Respondents reported their use of marijuana, crack, cocaine, heroin, speedball, and/or methamphetamines during the previous 30 days. Support for legalization of drugs was analyzed by estimating three separate logistic regressions. The results showed that the support for the legalization of drugs depended on the definition of "drug user" and the type of drug. In general, however, the results showed that marijuana users were more likely to support legalizing marijuana, but they were less likely to support the legalization of cocaine and heroin. On the other hand, users of crack, cocaine, heroin, speedball, and/or methamphetamines were more likely to support legalizing all drugs including cocaine and heroin.

  3. Drug Development Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Approvals The Drug Development Process The Drug Development Process Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... public. More Information More in The Drug Development Process Step 1: Discovery and Development Step 2: Preclinical ...

  4. Drugs Approved for Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Leukemia This page lists cancer drugs ... used in leukemia that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Abitrexate (Methotrexate) ...

  5. Drug Retention Times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user.

  6. Teenagers and drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teenagers and drugs; Symptoms of drug use in teenagers; Drug abuse - teenagers; Substance abuse - teenagers ... for a specialist who has experience working with teenagers. Do not hesitate, get help right away. The ...

  7. Drug Interaction API

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Interaction API is a web service for accessing drug-drug interactions. No license is needed to use the Interaction API. Currently, the API uses DrugBank for its...

  8. Text mining for drug-drug interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Heng-Yi; Chiang, Chien-Wei; Li, Lang

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand the mechanisms of drug-drug interaction (DDI), the study of pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and pharmacogenetics (PG) data are significant. In recent years, drug PK parameters, drug interaction parameters, and PG data have been unevenly collected in different databases and published extensively in literature. Also the lack of an appropriate PK ontology and a well-annotated PK corpus, which provide the background knowledge and the criteria of determining DDI, respectively, lead to the difficulty of developing DDI text mining tools for PK data collection from the literature and data integration from multiple databases.To conquer the issues, we constructed a comprehensive pharmacokinetics ontology. It includes all aspects of in vitro pharmacokinetics experiments, in vivo pharmacokinetics studies, as well as drug metabolism and transportation enzymes. Using our pharmacokinetics ontology, a PK corpus was constructed to present four classes of pharmacokinetics abstracts: in vivo pharmacokinetics studies, in vivo pharmacogenetic studies, in vivo drug interaction studies, and in vitro drug interaction studies. A novel hierarchical three-level annotation scheme was proposed and implemented to tag key terms, drug interaction sentences, and drug interaction pairs. The utility of the pharmacokinetics ontology was demonstrated by annotating three pharmacokinetics studies; and the utility of the PK corpus was demonstrated by a drug interaction extraction text mining analysis.The pharmacokinetics ontology annotates both in vitro pharmacokinetics experiments and in vivo pharmacokinetics studies. The PK corpus is a highly valuable resource for the text mining of pharmacokinetics parameters and drug interactions.

  9. Fighting the Drug War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Journal of State Government, 1990

    1990-01-01

    All nine articles in this periodical issue focus on the theme of the war against illegal drug use, approaching the topic from a variety of perspectives. The articles are: "The Drug War: Meeting the Challenge" (Stanley E. Morris); "Ways to Fight Drug Abuse" (Bruce A. Feldman); "Treatment Key to Fighting Drugs" (Stan…

  10. Drugs and Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drug abuse is a serious public health problem. It affects almost every community and family in some way. Drug abuse in children and teenagers may pose a ... of young people may be more susceptible to drug abuse and addiction than adult brains. Abused drugs ...

  11. Effect of thione-thiol tautomerism on the inhibition of lactoperoxidase ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The keto-enol type tautomerism in anti-thyroid drugs and their selenium analogues are described. The commonly used anti-thyroid drug methimazole exists predominantly in its thione form, whereas its selenium analogue exists in a zwitterionic form. To understand the effect of thione/thiol and selone/selenol tautomerism on ...

  12. Effect of thione–thiol tautomerism on the inhibition of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Abstract. The keto-enol type tautomerism in anti-thyroid drugs and their selenium analogues are de- scribed. The commonly used anti-thyroid drug methimazole exists predominantly in its thione form, whereas its selenium analogue exists in a zwitterionic form. To understand the effect of thione/thiol and selone/selenol ...

  13. [Designer drugs in Finland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacke, Ulrich; den Hollander, Bjørnar; Simojoki, Kaarlo; Korpi, Esa R; Pihlainen, Katja; Alho, Hannu

    2011-01-01

    Designer drugs are synthetic psychotropic drugs which are marketed as "legal drugs". Their emergence, rapid spreading and unpredictable effects have challenged the health and substance abuse care. The slow process of classification of an abusable drug has provided too many possibilities for spreading the designer drugs. Once a certain substance receives an illegal drugs classification, dealers and users usually move to another, slightly different molecule that is still legal. In Finland, the Narcotics Act has been amended to the effect that the addition of a new substance to the illegal drug list does not require an amendment to the law.

  14. Drug interactions with oral sulphonylurea hypoglycaemic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, J M; Christensen, L K

    1977-01-01

    The effect of the oral sulphonylurea hypoglycaemic drugs may be influenced by a large number of other drugs. Some of these combinations (e.g. phenylbutazone, sulphaphenazole) may result in cases of severe hypoglycaemic collapse. Tolbutamide and chlorpropamide should never be given to a patient without a prior careful check of which medicaments are already being given. Similarly, no drug should be given to a diabetic treated with tolbutamide and chlorpropamide without consideration of the possibility of interaction phenomena.

  15. Drug Products in the Medicaid Drug Rebate Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Active drugs that have been reported by participating drug manufacturers under the Medicaid Drug Rebate Program. All drugs are identified by National Drug Code...

  16. Drug-Target Kinetics in Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonge, Peter J

    2018-01-17

    The development of therapies for the treatment of neurological cancer faces a number of major challenges including the synthesis of small molecule agents that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Given the likelihood that in many cases drug exposure will be lower in the CNS than in systemic circulation, it follows that strategies should be employed that can sustain target engagement at low drug concentration. Time dependent target occupancy is a function of both the drug and target concentration as well as the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters that describe the binding reaction coordinate, and sustained target occupancy can be achieved through structural modifications that increase target (re)binding and/or that decrease the rate of drug dissociation. The discovery and deployment of compounds with optimized kinetic effects requires information on the structure-kinetic relationships that modulate the kinetics of binding, and the molecular factors that control the translation of drug-target kinetics to time-dependent drug activity in the disease state. This Review first introduces the potential benefits of drug-target kinetics, such as the ability to delineate both thermodynamic and kinetic selectivity, and then describes factors, such as target vulnerability, that impact the utility of kinetic selectivity. The Review concludes with a description of a mechanistic PK/PD model that integrates drug-target kinetics into predictions of drug activity.

  17. [Designer drugs in Jutland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, K W; Kaa, E

    2001-04-16

    The aim of this investigation was to examine illegal tablets and capsules seized in Jutland, the western part of Denmark, during the period 1995-1999. The drugs are described according to technical appearance (colour, logo, score, diameter) and content of synthetic drugs. All illegal tablets and capsules received during the period 1995-1999 (109 cases containing 192 different samples) were examined. MDMA was the most common drug and was seen during the entire period. Amphetamine was the second most common drug and has been frequently detected during the the last two years. Drugs like MDE, MBDB, BDB, and 2-CB were rarely seen and they disappeared quickly from the illegal market. MDA appeared on the market at the end of 1999. Only 53% of the tablets contained MDMA as the sole drug. Eighty-one percent of the tablets/capsules contained only one synthetic drug, whereas 13% contained a mixture of two or more synthetic drugs. Six per cent of the samples did not contain a euphoric drug/designer drug. The content of MDMA, MDE, and amphetamine in the tablets varied greatly. MDMA is apparently the drug preferred by the users, but still only half of the tablets contained MDMA as the only drug. The rest of the tablets contained either another synthetic drug or a mixture of drugs. In conclusion, the increasing supply of various drugs with different and unpredictable effects and of miscellaneous quality brings about the risk of serious and complicated intoxications.

  18. Medicaid Drug Rebate Program Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Product Data for Drugs in the Medicaid Drug Rebate Program. The rebate drug product data file contains the active drugs that have been reported by participating drug...

  19. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cigs Other Drugs Related Topics Addiction Science Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain Genetics Global Health Health Consequences of Drug Misuse ...

  20. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain Genetics Global Health Health Consequences of Drug Misuse ... the United States. Drugs can change the way the brain works, disrupting the parts of the brain that ...

  1. Understanding Drug Use and Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain ... factors affect drug use trends, when young people view drug use as harmful, they tend to decrease ...

  2. Food-drug interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lars E; Dalhoff, Kim

    2002-01-01

    Interactions between food and drugs may inadvertently reduce or increase the drug effect. The majority of clinically relevant food-drug interactions are caused by food-induced changes in the bioavailability of the drug. Since the bioavailability and clinical effect of most drugs are correlated......, the bioavailability is an important pharmacokinetic effect parameter. However, in order to evaluate the clinical relevance of a food-drug interaction, the impact of food intake on the clinical effect of the drug has to be quantified as well. As a result of quality review in healthcare systems, healthcare providers...... are increasingly required to develop methods for identifying and preventing adverse food-drug interactions. In this review of original literature, we have tried to provide both pharmacokinetic and clinical effect parameters of clinically relevant food-drug interactions. The most important interactions are those...

  3. Drugs and drug policy in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leuw, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    The Dutch parliament enacted the revised Opium Act in 1976. This penal law is part of the Dutch drug policy framework that includes tolerance for nonconforming lifestyles, risk reduction in regard to the harmful health and social consequences of drug taking, and penal measures directed against

  4. IMPROVING ACCESS TO DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Joseph Herman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Although essentially not all therapies need drug intervention, drugs is still an important components in health sector, either in preventive, curative, rehabilitative or promotion efforts. Hence the access to drugs is a main problem, either in international or national scale even to the smallest unit. The problem on access to drugs is very complicated and cannot be separated especially from pharmacy management problems; moreover in general from the overall lack of policy development and effective of health policy, and also the implementation process. With the policy development and effective health policy, rational drug uses, sufficient health service budget so a country can overcome the health problems. Besides infrastructures, regulations, distribution and cultural influences; the main obstacles for drug access is drugs affordability if the price of drugs is an important part and determined by many factors, especially the drug status whether is still patent orgenerics that significantly decrease cost of health cares and enhance the drugs affordability. The determination of essential drug prices in developing countries should based on equity principal so that poor people pay cheaper and could afford the essential drugs. WHO predicts two third of world population can not afford the essential drugs in which in developing countries, some are because of in efficient budget allocation in consequence of drug distribution management, including incorrect selection and allocation and also irrational uses. In part these could be overcome by enhancing performances on the allocation pharmacy needs, including the management of information system, inventory management, stock management and the distribution. Key words: access, drugs, essential drugs, generic drugs

  5. Drug-drug interactions : from knowledge base to clinical impact

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Marine

    2014-01-01

    Drug usage has increased steadily, and the more drugs used, the higher the risk for adverse effects or loss of effect due to drug-drug interactions. For drug prescribers it is difficult to know what drugs a patient is taking and whether they interact. Computerizing of health care records has made it possible to connect patients’ drug lists to clinical decision support systems giving the prescriber information about e.g. drug-drug interactions, duplicated prescriptions and ...

  6. Drugs@FDA Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Information about FDA-approved brand name and generic prescription and over-the-counter human drugs and biological therapeutic products. Drugs@FDA includes most of...

  7. CMS Drug Spending

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — CMS has released several information products that provide spending information for prescription drugs in the Medicare and Medicaid programs. The CMS Drug Spending...

  8. Prescription Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... what the doctor prescribed, it is called prescription drug abuse. It could be Taking a medicine that ... purpose, such as getting high Abusing some prescription drugs can lead to addiction. These include opioids, sedatives, ...

  9. Prescription Drug Profiles PUF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This release contains the Prescription Drug Profiles Public Use Files (PUFs) drawn from Medicare prescription drug claims for the year of the date on which the...

  10. Drug-induced thrombocytopenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, U; Andersen, M; Hansen, P B

    1997-01-01

    induced by non-cytotoxic drugs is characterised by heterogeneous clinical picture and recovery is generally rapid. Although corticosteroids seem inefficient, we still recommend that severe symptomatic cases of drug-induced thrombocytopenia are treated as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura due...

  11. Drugs to be Discontinued

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Companies are required under Section 506C of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act) (as amended by the Food and Drug Administration Safety and...

  12. Drug AMP Reporting - Quarterly

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drugs that have been reported under the Medicaid Drug Rebate Program along with an indication of whether or not the required Average Manufacturer Price (AMP) was...

  13. National Drug IQ Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Drug IQ Challenge 2017 Reto nacional del coeficiente intelectual (CI) sobre las drogas y el alcohol 2016 National Drug IQ Challenge 2016 Reto nacional del coeficiente intelectual (CI) sobre las drogas y el alcohol 2015 ...

  14. Medication/Drug Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Training Home Conditions Medication/Drug Allergy Medication/Drug Allergy Make an Appointment Find a Doctor Ask a ... risk for adverse reactions to medications. Facts about Allergies The tendency to develop allergies may be inherited. ...

  15. Sociology of Drug Consumption

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    In this article which is a review of sociological ideas and studies of drug abusers in social situation, drug addiction steps (particularly alcohol, heroin and cocaine consumption) are revised and some explanations are made. Also, the role of some sociological ideas in drug addiction is considered in which Anomie Theory reads: "because of such duality, the individuals who are not satisfied with their role are in hurt." According to this theory, drug users choose seclusion and neglecting usual...

  16. Drugs in sport

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, D

    2007-01-01

    This new edition includes fresh information regarding drugs use and abuse in sport and the updated worldwide anti-doping laws, and changes to the prohibited and therapeutic use exemption lists. The objectives of the book are to review/discuss the latest information on drugs in sport by considering i) actions of drugs and hormones, ii) medication and nutritional supplements in sport, iii) the latest doping control regulations of the WADA, iv) the use of banned therapeutic drugs in sport, v) an...

  17. Drugs of Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Donald E., Ed.

    This Drug Enforcement Administration publication delivers clear, scientific information about drugs in a factual, straightforward way, combined with precise photographs shot to scale. The publication is intended to serve as an A to Z guide for drug history, effects, and identification information. Chapters are included on the Controlled Substances…

  18. Drug Enforcement Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet contains information relating to drug abuse and abusers; drug traffic legislation; law enforcement; and descriptions of commonly used narcotics, stimulants, depressants, and hallucinogens. Also included is a short but explicit listing of audiovisual aids, an annotated bibliography, and drug identification pictures. The booklet…

  19. Immediate Drug Hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickner, Paige G; Hong, David

    2016-07-01

    Drug allergy affects a large percentage of the general population. A listed drug allergy can also have broad implications for many aspects of patient care. Here, we will review recent advances in the arena of drug allergies with a focus on antibiotics, monoclonals, NSAIDs, and chemotherapeutics.

  20. Writing Drug Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    The paper juxtaposes the cultural mediation of experience through drugs with that performed with text. As a sample of the currently radically changing relations between professional and lay knowledge in the field of drug interventions, the website of a Copenhagen institution for young drug users...

  1. Drug and Substance Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Basic Facts & Information What does “Drug and Substance Abuse” mean? Most drugs and other chemical substances are helpful when used ... medications, and pain medications. Some older adults also abuse illegal drugs, including marijuana, cocaine, hallucinogens, and injected narcotics. Some ...

  2. Dynamics of Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Joan H.; Holden, Raymond H.

    1977-01-01

    This paper analyzes data from interviews with 167 drug users in the community, including age, sex, birth order, education, family constellation, and circumstances of first drug use. The majority of subjects had tried to stop using drugs, but most had been unsuccessful at the time of the interview. (Author)

  3. Cutaneous adverse drug reactions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    limiting but they can be the initial presentation of more serious reactions such as Stevens-Johnson and drug hypersensitivity syndromes.3 It is thus important for the clinician to distinguish between self-limiting morbilliform drug eruptions that resolve solely with the withdrawal of the offending drug and the life-threatening ...

  4. Drugs in sport

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mottram, D. R. (David R.)

    2005-01-01

    ...-Doping Agency (WADA) Methods and advances in doping control, and the sanctions for testing positive The use of therapeutic drugs banned in sport Evaluation of the status of creatine as a legitimate nutritional supplement Ethical, political and administrative issues in monitoring drug use An assessment of the prevalence of drug taking in sp...

  5. DRUG INTERACTIONS WITH TUBERCULOSIS THERAPY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kurt

    The most important adverse drug-drug interactions occur with drugs that have seri- ous toxicity and a low therapeutic index, where relatively small changes in drug level can have significant adverse consequences. Additionally, drug-drug interac- tions can be clinically important if the disease being controlled with the drug is.

  6. Black Youths and Illegal Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Janice; Pearson, Patricia G.

    2002-01-01

    Examines the effect of drugs on black youths, discussing different types of drug involvement, reasons for drug involvement, extent and nature of involvement, drugs and crime, drugs and health issues, drug control strategies, and prevention. Policy implications include prioritizing drug prevention among black youths, providing alternatives to drug…

  7. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... RSS Menu Home Drugs of Abuse Commonly Abused Drugs Charts Emerging Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Fentanyl Hallucinogens Inhalants Heroin Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/ ...

  8. Drug interactions with sunitinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbao-Meseguer, Idoia; Jose, Begoña San; Lopez-Gimenez, Leocadio R; Gil, Maria A; Serrano, Laura; Castaño, Mikel; Sautua, Saioa; Basagoiti, Amaya De; Belaustegui, Ainhoa; Baza, Beatriz; Baskaran, Zuriñe; Bustinza, Alazne

    2015-02-01

    Sunitinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor indicated for the treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumor, advanced renal cell carcinoma, and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. The aim of this article is to describe the pharmacological interactions between sunitinib and commonly prescribed drugs. We reviewed available information on pharmacological interactions between sunitinib and concomitantly prescribed drugs. Drugs were grouped into different therapeutic groups according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification. Sunitinib interacts with CYP3A4 inducers or inhibitors and with P-glycoprotein and ABCG2 substrates. Pharmacodynamic interactions with drugs have also been found. Current information on drug interactions between sunitinib and other drugs is scarce and most of the times it is difficult to apply to clinical practice. Even so, this difficulty in managing drug interactions should not be a reason to ignore them as they can help to explain intolerances and treatment failures. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  9. Abuse of prescription drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilford, B B

    1990-01-01

    An estimated 3% of the United States population deliberately misuse or abuse psychoactive medications, with severe consequences. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, more than half of patients who sought treatment or died of drug-related medical problems in 1989 were abusing prescription drugs. Physicians who contribute to this problem have been described by the American Medical Association as dishonest--willfully misprescribing for purposes of abuse, usually for profit; disabled by personal problems with drugs or alcohol; dated in their knowledge of current pharmacology or therapeutics; or deceived by various patient-initiated fraudulent approaches. Even physicians who do not meet any of these descriptions must guard against contributing to prescription drug abuse through injudicious prescribing, inadequate safeguarding of prescription forms or drug supplies, or acquiescing to the demands or ruses used to obtain drugs for other than medical purposes. PMID:2349801

  10. Antidepressants and platinum drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, Brigitte J; Ryan, John J; Farrell, Nicholas P

    2014-01-01

    Antidepressants are frequently prescribed concurrently with anti-cancer drugs and may have synergistic, additive or antagonistic effects. The present work investigated the effect of antidepressants on the cytotoxicity of platinum agents cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin. The cytotoxicity of platinum drugs alone or in combination with antidepressants was measured in HCT116 wild-type (wt), HCT116 (p53 -/-), HT-29, SKOV3 and A2780 cells using an apoptosis-based assay. The effect of antidepressants on platinum cytotoxicity is both cell type- and drug dependent. Mostly additive effects were observed. Desipramine and fluoxetine caused the greatest effects, with cisplatin in general being most sensitive to their presence. There is little effect of p53 status on the drug-drug interaction while the calmodulin inhibitor W7 augmented cisplatin cytotoxicity relative to carboplatin and oxaliplatin. The drug-drug interaction between antidepressants and platinum anti-cancer agents requires detailed evaluation for optimization of patient care.

  11. Drug Retention Times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user. Based on anecdotal evidence, most people “party” during extended time away from the work environment. Therefore, the following scenarios were envisioned: (1) a person uses an illicit drug at a party on Saturday night (infrequent user); (2) a person uses a drug one time on Friday night and once again on Saturday night (infrequent user); and (3) a person uses a drug on Friday night, uses a drug twice on Saturday night, and once again on Sunday (frequent user).

  12. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cdc.gov/hiv/risk/age/youth/index.html​ . Resources Publications Drug Facts: Drug Use and Viral Infections : Describes how people who engage in drug use or high-risk behaviors associated with drug use also put ...

  13. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Drugs of Abuse Commonly Abused Drugs Charts Emerging Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Fentanyl Hallucinogens ... Substance Use and SUDs in LGBT Populations Treatment Trends & Statistics Women and Drugs Publications Search Publications Orderable ...

  14. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter 2005 –Ongoing Behaviors associated with drug misuse are among the main ... lead people to engage in impulsive and unsafe behaviors. Injection drug use. People typically associate drug misuse ...

  15. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Addiction Science Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and ... Link campaign. This campaign shows teens and young adults that non-injection drug use and alcohol use ...

  16. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Related Topics Addiction Science Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing ... please visit: http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/risk/age/youth/index.html​ . Resources Publications Drug Facts: Drug ...

  17. Drugs Approved for Vaginal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to prevent vaginal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  18. Drugs Approved for Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for skin cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  19. Generic Drugs: Questions and Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Drugs Home Drugs Resources for You Information for Consumers (Drugs) Questions & Answers Generic Drugs: Questions & Answers Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  20. Drugs Approved for Bone Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bone cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  1. Drugs Approved for Penile Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for penile cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  2. Drugs Approved for Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for esophageal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  3. Drugs Approved for Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for endometrial cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  4. Drugs Approved for Vulvar Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for vulvar cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  5. Drugs Approved for Liver Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for liver cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  6. Drugs Approved for Kaposi Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Kaposi sarcoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  7. Drugs Approved for Malignant Mesothelioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Malignant Mesothelioma This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Malignant Mesothelioma Alimta (Pemetrexed Disodium) Pemetrexed Disodium Drug Combinations Used ...

  8. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... getting HIV or transmitting it to someone else. Biological effects of drugs. Drug misuse and addiction can ... It provides them with useful information on the science behind drug use. NIDA’s Easy-to-Read Drug ...

  9. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Link - Drugs and HIV Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter 2005 –Ongoing Behaviors ... GA: CDC, DHHS. Retrieved November 2017. How are Drug Misuse and HIV Related? Drug misuse and addiction ...

  10. Inflammasome in drug abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Enquan; Liu, Jianuo; Wang, Xiaobei; Xiong, Huangui

    2017-01-01

    Drug abuse disorders refer to a set of related negative health implications associated with compulsive drug seeking and use. Because almost all addictive drugs act on the brain, many of them cause neurological impairments after long-term abuse. Neuropathological studies have revealed a widespread impairment of the cellular elements. As the key components to limit the damage of neural cells, CNS immune system is also found affected by these drugs, directly or indirectly. It has been shown that drugs of abuse alter neuroimmune gene expression and signaling. Growing studies on neuroimmune factors further demonstrate their indispensable role in drugs-induced neurotoxicity. As an important proinflammatory intracellular receptor, inflammasome is activated in many neurodegenerative diseases in response to a broad range of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) signals. In the cases of drug abuse, especially in those with comorbid of HIV infection and sustained pain, inflammasome activation significantly promotes the neuroinflammation-associated toxicities. To understand inflammasome in drug-associated neurotoxic activity, we reviewed the role played by inflammasome in drug abuse-induced microglial neurotoxicity and evaluated the potential of imflammasone as a therapeutic target for drug abuse disorders based on recent development of various selective small-molecular inflammasome inhibitors.

  11. Drug-induced hyperkalemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salem, Chaker; Badreddine, Atef; Fathallah, Neila; Slim, Raoudha; Hmouda, Houssem

    2014-09-01

    Hyperkalemia is a common clinical condition that can be defined as a serum potassium concentration exceeding 5.0 mmol/L. Drug-induced hyperkalemia is the most important cause of increased potassium levels in everyday clinical practice. Drug-induced hyperkalemia may be asymptomatic. However, it may be dramatic and life threatening, posing diagnostic and management problems. A wide range of drugs can cause hyperkalemia by a variety of mechanisms. Drugs can interfere with potassium homoeostasis either by promoting transcellular potassium shift or by impairing renal potassium excretion. Drugs may also increase potassium supply. The reduction in renal potassium excretion due to inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system represents the most important mechanism by which drugs are known to cause hyperkalemia. Medications that alter transmembrane potassium movement include amino acids, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, suxamethonium, and mannitol. Drugs that impair renal potassium excretion are mainly represented by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-II receptor blockers, direct renin inhibitors, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, calcineurin inhibitors, heparin and derivatives, aldosterone antagonists, potassium-sparing diuretics, trimethoprim, and pentamidine. Potassium-containing agents represent another group of medications causing hyperkalemia. Increased awareness of drugs that can induce hyperkalemia, and monitoring and prevention are key elements for reducing the number of hospital admissions, morbidity, and mortality related to drug-induced hyperkalemia.

  12. An assessment of psychiatric disturbances in graves disease in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... groups and no difference between the groups. Conclusion: The prevalence of certain psychiatric manifestations in Graves' disease was significantly higher than in the control group. There was no significant difference between therapy with antithyroid drugs and combination of antithyroid with psychotropic medications.

  13. Supersaturating drug delivery systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Riikka; Löbmann, Korbinian; Grohganz, Holger

    2017-01-01

    Amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) are probably the most common and important supersaturating drug delivery systems for the formulation of poorly water-soluble compounds. These delivery systems are able to achieve and maintain a sustained drug supersaturation which enables improvement...... of the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs by increasing the driving force for drug absorption. However, ASDs often require a high weight percentage of carrier (usually a hydrophilic polymer) to ensure molecular mixing of the drug in the carrier and stabilization of the supersaturated state, often leading...... strategy for poorly-soluble drugs. While the current research on co-amorphous formulations is focused on preparation and characterization of these systems, more detailed research on their supersaturation and precipitation behavior and the effect of co-formers on nucleation and crystal growth inhibition...

  14. Recreational drugs of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertson, Timothy E

    2014-02-01

    The use of recreational drugs of abuse continues to expand without limitations to national boundaries, social status, race, or education. Beyond the prevalence of illicit drug use and dependence, their contribution to the global burden of disease and death are large and troubling. All medical providers should be aware of the evolving drugs of abuse and their medical and social consequences. In addition to heroin and stimulants such as cocaine and methamphetamine, new designer stimulants called "bath salts" and cannabinoids called "spice," along with the abuse of prescription drugs and volatile substances, are now widely recognized problems in many societies. The wide variety and continuingly expanding clinical manifestations of toxicity of recreational drugs of abuse is not widely appreciated by clinicians. This edition attempts to summarize six major classes of drugs of abuse and their clinical effects with special emphasis on their immunological and respiratory effects.

  15. Illegal drugs and delinquency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschbaum, Katrin M; Grigoleit, Lisa; Hess, Cornelius; Madea, Burkhard; Musshoff, Frank

    2013-03-10

    An interrelation between consumption of illegal drugs and committing an indictable offence has been repeatedly discussed in literature. In a retrospective study serum concentrations of illegal and legal drugs as well as data originating from police reports and examinations by physicians taking blood from individuals being suspected to be under the influence of drugs were evaluated. Results from 4816 cases were available. Property offences were the most frequent type (36%) as well as consumption of cannabinoids (55%). Psychophysiological conditions of consumers were compared with according serum concentrations. Close correlations between stimulating drugs and violence associated crime could not be found. Stimulated as well as sedated behaviour occurring following the consumption of various drugs might be the reason for no clear correlation between types of offence and consumed illegal or legal drugs in this study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Therapeutic drug monitoring of atypical antipsychotic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grundmann Milan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder often associated with cognitive impairment and affective, mainly depressive, symptoms. Antipsychotic medication is the primary intervention for stabilization of acute psychotic episodes and prevention of recurrences and relapses in patients with schizophrenia. Typical antipsychotics, the older class of antipsychotic agents, are currently used much less frequently than newer atypical antipsychotics. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM of antipsychotic drugs is the specific method of clinical pharmacology, which involves measurement of drug serum concentrations followed by interpretation and good cooperation with the clinician. TDM is a powerful tool that allows tailor-made treatment for the specific needs of individual patients. It can help in monitoring adherence, dose adjustment, minimizing the risk of toxicity and in cost-effectiveness in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. The review provides complex knowledge indispensable to clinical pharmacologists, pharmacists and clinicians for interpretation of TDM results.

  17. Discontinued drugs in 2012: cardiovascular drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong-Ping; Jiang, Hong-Min; Xiang, Bing-Ren

    2013-11-01

    The continued high rate of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality has attracted wide concern and great attention of pharmaceutical industry. In order to reduce the attrition of cardiovascular drug R&D, it might be helpful recapitulating previous failures and identifying the potential factors to success. This perspective mainly analyses the 30 cardiovascular drugs dropped from clinical development in 2012. Reasons causing the termination of the cardiovascular drugs in the past 5 years are also tabulated and analysed. The analysis shows that the attrition is highest in Phase II trials and financial and strategic factors and lack of clinical efficacy are the principal reasons for these disappointments. To solve the four problems (The 'better than the Beatles' problem, the 'cautious regulator' problem, the 'throw money at it' tendency and the 'basic researchbrute force' bias) is recommended as the main measure to increase the number and quality of approvable products.

  18. ANTIMICROBIAL HERBAL DRUGS

    OpenAIRE

    K. Nishteswar

    2011-01-01

    An anti-microbial is a substance that kills or inhibits the growth of microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi, or protozoans. Antimicrobial drugs either kill microbes (microbiocidal) or prevent the growth of microbes (microbiostatic). Sulphonamide drugs were the first antimicrobial drugs, and paved the way for the antibiotic revolution in medicine. The first sulfonamide, trade named Prontosil, was actually a prodrug. However, with the development of antimicrobials, microorganisms have adapted ...

  19. Radiopharmaceutical drug review process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankel, R.

    1985-01-01

    To ensure proper radioactive drug use (such as quality, diagnostic improvement, and minimal radioactive exposure), the Food and Drug Administration evaluates new drugs with respect to safety, effectiveness, and accuracy and adequacy of the labeling. The IND or NDA process is used for this purpose. A brief description of the process, including the Chemical Classification System and the therapeutic potential classification, is presented as it applies to radiopharmaceuticals. Also, the status of the IND or NDA review of radiopharmaceuticals is given

  20. AMDD: Antimicrobial Drug Database

    OpenAIRE

    Danishuddin, Mohd; Kaushal, Lalima; Hassan Baig, Mohd; Khan, Asad U.

    2012-01-01

    Drug resistance is one of the major concerns for antimicrobial chemotherapy against any particular target. Knowledge of the primary structure of antimicrobial agents and their activities is essential for rational drug design. Thus, we developed a comprehensive database, anti microbial drug database (AMDD), of known synthetic antibacterial and antifungal compounds that were extracted from the available literature and other chemical databases, e.g., PubChem, PubChem BioAssay and ZINC, etc. The ...

  1. Abuse of prescription drugs.

    OpenAIRE

    Wilford, B B

    1990-01-01

    An estimated 3% of the United States population deliberately misuse or abuse psychoactive medications, with severe consequences. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, more than half of patients who sought treatment or died of drug-related medical problems in 1989 were abusing prescription drugs. Physicians who contribute to this problem have been described by the American Medical Association as dishonest--willfully misprescribing for purposes of abuse, usually for profit; disable...

  2. Vaccines for Drug Abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Xiaoyun; Orson, Frank M.; Kosten, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Current medications for drug abuse have had only limited success. Anti-addiction vaccines to elicit antibodies that block the pharmacological effects of drugs have great potential for treating drug abuse. We review the status for two vaccines that are undergoing clinical trials (cocaine and nicotine) and two that are still in pre-clinical development (methamphetamine and heroin). We also outline the challenges and ethical concerns for anti-addiction vaccine development and their use as future...

  3. Academic Drug Discovery Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Henriette Schultz; Valentin, Finn

    2014-01-01

    Academic drug discovery centres (ADDCs) are seen as one of the solutions to fill the innovation gap in early drug discovery, which has proven challenging for previous organisational models. Prior studies of ADDCs have identified the need to analyse them from the angle of their economic and organi......Academic drug discovery centres (ADDCs) are seen as one of the solutions to fill the innovation gap in early drug discovery, which has proven challenging for previous organisational models. Prior studies of ADDCs have identified the need to analyse them from the angle of their economic...... their performance....

  4. Microwave Assisted Drug Delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónasson, Sævar Þór; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Johansen, Tom Keinicke

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the microwave radiation is adopted for remote activation of pharmaceutical drug capsules inside the human body in order to release drugs at a pre-determined time and location. An array of controllable transmitting sources is used to produce a constructive interference at a certain...... focus point inside the body, where the drugs are then released from the specially designed capsules. An experimental setup for microwave activation has been developed and tested on a body phantom that emulates the human torso. A design of sensitive receiving structures for integration with a drug...

  5. Metallomics in drug development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Trinh Thi Nhu Tam; Ostergaard, Jesper; Stürup, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    A capillary electrophoresis inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry method for separation of free cisplatin from liposome-encapsulated cisplatin and protein-bound cisplatin was developed. A liposomal formulation of cisplatin based on PEGylated liposomes was used as model drug formulation...... to plasma constituents in plasma samples. It was demonstrated that this approach is suitable for studies of the stability of liposome formulations as leakage of active drug from the liposomes and subsequent binding to biomolecules in plasma can be monitored. This methodology has not been reported before...... and will improve characterization of liposomal drugs during drug development and in studies on kinetics....

  6. ICP and Antihypertensive Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouzaud-Laborde, Charlotte; Lafitte, Pierre; Balardy, Laurent; Czosnyka, Zofia; Schmidt, Eric A

    2018-01-01

     Arterial hypertension is among the leading risks for mortality. This burden requires in hypertensive patients the use of single, double or more antihypertensive drugs. The relationship between intracranial pressure (ICP) and arterial blood pressure is complex and still under debate. The impact of antihypertensive drugs on ICP is unknown. We wanted to understand whether the use of antihypertensive drugs has a significant influence on ICP and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/brain related parameters. In a cohort of 95 patients with suspected normal pressure hydrocephalus, we prospectively collected drug details according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification. Lumbar infusion studies were performed. Using ICM+ software, we calculated at baseline and plateau ICP and pulse amplitude, resistance to CSF outflow, elastance, and pressure in the sagittal sinus and CSF production rate. We studied the influence of the administration of 1, 2, 3 or more antihypertensive drugs on ICP-derived parameters. We compared the data using Student's and Mann-Whitney tests or Chi-squared and Fisher's exact test.  Elastance is significantly higher in patients with at least one antihypertensive drug compared with patients without medication. On the contrary, pressure volume index (PVI) is significantly decreased in patients with antihypertensive drugs compared with patients not on these medications. However, the number of antihypertensive drugs does not seem to influence other ICP parameters.  Patients on antihypertensive drugs seem to have a stiffer brain than those not on them.

  7. Drugs in East Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, J; Müller, E

    1997-09-01

    Germany was divided into two parts after World War II. The closed border and a nonconvertible currency in the Eastern part were the factors that did not allow a drug market to develop. Alcohol and medicaments were used as substitute drugs. Since Germany was reunified 5 years ago, there are now the same conditions prevailing for the procurement and sale of drugs in East Germany as there are in the Western German states. This report describes the current state of drug traffic, especially in Saxony, under the new social conditions.

  8. How to Misuse Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.R. Edwards

    1978-09-01

    Full Text Available Most of us, during our training, are taught about the actions of drugs and their side-effects, but very few of us are taught how to misuse drugs. However, this is an art that seems to be acquired through practice in handling drugs, by various members of the medical and nursing professions, as well as by the general population. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a few of the ways in which drugs can be, and are, misused.

  9. DRUGS IN SPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Mottram

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available This new edition includes fresh information regarding drugs use and abuse in sport and the updated worldwide anti-doping laws, and changes to the prohibited and therapeutic use exemption lists. The objectives of the book are to review/discuss the latest information on drugs in sport by considering i actions of drugs and hormones, ii medication and nutritional supplements in sport, iii the latest doping control regulations of the WADA, iv the use of banned therapeutic drugs in sport, v an assessment of the prevalence of drug taking in sport. FEATURES A common, uniform strategy and evidence-based approach to organizing and interpreting the literature is used in all chapters. This textbook is composed of twelve parts with sub-sections in all of them. The topics of the parts are: i An introduction to drugs and their use in sport, ii Drug use and abuse in sport, iii Central nervous system stimulants, iv WADA regulations in relation to drugs used in the treatment of respiratory tract disorders, v Androgenic anabolic steroids, vi Peptide and glycoprotein hormones and sport, vii Blood boosting and sport, viii Drug treatment of inflammation in sports injuries, ix Alcohol, anti-anxiety drugs and sport, x Creatine, xi Doping control and sport, xii Prevalence of drug misuse in sport. Each specific chapter has been systematically developed from the data available in prospective, retrospective, case-control, and cross-sectional studies. The tables and figures are numerous, helpful and very useful. AUDIENCE The book provides a very useful resource for students on sports related courses, coaches and trainers, researchers, nutritionists, exercise physiologists, pharmacologists, healthcare professionals in the fields of sports medicine and those involved in the management and administration side of sport. The readers are going to discover that this is an excellent reference book. Extensively revised new edition of this book is also a first-rate resource for

  10. Student Drug Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowlis, Helen H.

    This paper discusses the nature and extent of student drug use, its meaning and significance, society's response to it, and some of the problems resulting from efforts to control it. Drugs are any substance which by its chemical nature affects the structure or function of the living organism. Abuse refers to any use of a non-medically approved…

  11. International Drug Control Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-24

    related substances include precursor chemicals used to make narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances—such as ephedrine and pseudoephedrine—which...Department to report the five largest importing and exporting countries of two precursor drugs, ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, commonly used to...UNODC, Alternative Development: A Global Thematic Evaluation, Final Synthesis Report, 2005, at http://www.unodc.org/pdf

  12. [Drugs and light].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tønnesen, H H

    1997-06-30

    The number of drugs that are found to be photochemically unstable or able to induce phototoxic side-effects is steadily increasing. It can be difficult, however, to obtain relevant information on the photoreactivity of drugs or drug products from the commonly used handbooks. This is because of lack of standard methods of evaluation or a requirement for official specifications for a given product. The author points to the main problems connected with interactions between drugs and light in vitro and in vivo. The most obvious result of exposure to light is reduced potency of the drug because of photodecomposition. Adverse effects due to the formation of photodegradation products during storage and use have also been reported. The drug substance can further cause light-induced side-effects after administration to the patient, e.g. phototoxicity and photoallergy. More data on photoreactivity are needed in order to minimize the side-effects of frequently used drugs. The article includes a list of potential photosensitizing drug substances on the Norwegian market.

  13. Drug induced aseptic meningitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2013-09-29

    Sep 29, 2013 ... Abstract. Drug-induced aseptic meningitis (DIAM) is a rare but important and often challenging diagnosis for the physician. Intake of antimicrobials, steroids, anal- gesics amongst others has been implicated. Signs and symptoms generally develop within 24-48 hours of drug ingestion. The pa- tient often ...

  14. Drug Testing. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Karen

    2007-01-01

    In 2002, the United States Supreme Court confirmed that in the school's role of in loco parentis, drug testing of students who were involved in athletics and extracurricular activities was constitutional. In a state of the union address, George W. Bush stated that drug testing in schools had been effective and was part of "our aggressive…

  15. Adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, K; Borshoff, D C

    2018-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions are a cause of significant morbidity and mortality to patients and a source of financial burden to the healthcare system. Of the wide spectrum of adverse drug reactions, the most concerning to the anaesthetist remain anaphylaxis and malignant hyperthermia. Although the incidence of anaphylaxis under anaesthesia is difficult to ascertain, it occurs commonly enough that most anaesthetists will manage at least one case in their career. The wide range of drugs given in the peri-operative period and the variable presentation in the anaesthetised patient can delay diagnosis and treatment, and adversely affect outcome. Furthermore, despite improvements in testing, causative drugs can still be difficult to identify, as adverse reactions may be mediated by mechanisms other than IgE activation. With an increase in the reporting of anaphylaxis to newer anaesthetic drugs such as sugammadex, combined with change over the recent decades in the most likely causative peri-operative agents, it is imperative anaesthetists remain up to date on recent developments. In addition, they should be vigilant to patient characteristics, including pharmacogenetic variations that may predispose to adverse drug reactions, in order to help minimise risks of a reaction. The severity of adverse drug reactions to peri-operative drugs means morbidity and mortality remain high. © 2018 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  16. The Drug War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCrosta, Anthony

    1989-01-01

    The role of teachers in helping fight against drug abuse is discussed stressing the teacher's ability to see changes in the students and the potential for positive influence. A vital school role involves teaching life skills and wellness principles. Information on commonly abused drugs and their effects is presented. (SM)

  17. Antiretroviral therapeutic drug monitoring

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Winnie

    A narrow therapeutic window. □ Good correlation between drug ... Antiretroviral therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is an additional monitoring tool to assist in the management of HIV-infected patients. Antiretroviral TDM is ... Antiretroviral TDM could play an important adjunctive role in our area. Clearly this will be a limited ...

  18. Drug delivery and formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitkreutz, Jörg; Boos, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Paediatric drug delivery is a major challenge in drug development. Because of the heterogeneous nature of the patient group, ranging from newborns to adolescents, there is a need to use appropriate excipients, drug dosage forms and delivery devices for different age groups. So far, there is a lack of suitable and safe drug formulations for children, especially for the very young and seriously ill patients. The new EU legislation will enforce paediatric clinical trials and drug development. Current advances in paediatric drug delivery include interesting new concepts such as fast-dissolving drug formulations, including orodispersible tablets and oral thin strips (buccal wafers), and multiparticulate dosage forms based on mini-tabletting or pelletization technologies. Parenteral administration is likely to remain the first choice for children in the neonatal period and for emergency cases. Alternative routes of administration include transdermal, pulmonary and nasal drug delivery systems. A few products are already available on the market, but others still need further investigations and clinical proof of concept.

  19. Antiretroviral therapeutic drug monitoring

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Winnie

    GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF TDM. The vast majority of drugs used in clinical practice do not require TDM. It is far easier for clinicians to adopt a 'one size fits all' approach to dosing. Alternatively doses may be modified according to response. However, with some drugs this will result in high rates of toxicity, or suboptimal ...

  20. Drug allergy REVIEW ARTICLE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The clinical spectrum ofdisease ranges from mild exanthems to life-threatening serum sickness. Type IV. This type of reaction usually occurs when drug binding to skin protein elicits a cell-mediated immune response." Severe clinical problems are rare. Reactions may complicate frequent skin exposure to drugs and are.

  1. Alternative drugs of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, M E; Chenoweth, J; Albertson, T E

    2014-02-01

    The incidence of drug abuse with alternative agents is increasing. The term "alternative drugs of abuse" is a catch-all term for abused chemicals that do not fit into one of the classic categories of drugs of abuse. The most common age group abusing these agents range from 17 to 25 years old and are often associated with group settings. Due to their diverse pharmacological nature, legislative efforts to classify these chemicals as a schedule I drug have lagged behind the development of new alternative agents. The potential reason for abuse of these agents is their hallucinogenic, dissociative, stimulant, anti-muscarinic, or sedative properties. Some of these drugs are easily obtainable such as Datura stramonium (Jimson Weed) or Lophophora williamsii (Peyote) because they are natural plants indigenous to certain regions. The diverse pharmacology and clinical effects of these agents are so broad that they do not produce a universal constellation of signs and symptoms. Detailed physical exams are essential for identifying clues leading one to suspect an alternative drug of abuse. Testing for the presence of these agents is often limited, and even when available, the results do not return in a timely fashion. Intoxications from these agents pose unique challenges for health care providers. Physician knowledge of the physiological effects of these alternative agents and the local patterns of drug of abuse are important for the accurate diagnosis and optimal care of poisoned patients. This review summarizes the current knowledge of alternative drugs of abuse and highlights their clinical presentations.

  2. Implantable Drug Dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, E. R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs such as insulin are injected as needed directly into bloodstream by compact implantable dispensing unit. Two vapor cavities produce opposing forces on drug-chamber diaphragm. Heaters in cavities allow control of direction and rate of motion of bellows. Dispensing capsule fitted with coil so batteries can be recharged by induction.

  3. Drugs and Addictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. Mae; Miller, Eva

    The effects of drug abuse and dependence vary, depending on the type of drug, polydrug use, and characteristics of the user. The influence of genetic, neurochemical, neuropsyiological, sociocultural, and economic factors suggest that the etiology of substance abuse and dependence is multiply determined. Models explaining the causation of substance…

  4. Drugs, Alcohol & Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Christina

    Expectant parents are introduced to the effects of a variety of drugs on the unborn baby. Material is divided into seven sections. Section 1 deals with the most frequently used recreational drugs, including alcohol, marijuana, narcotics, depressants, stimulants, inhalants, and hallucinogens. Sections 2 and 3 focus on the effects of prescription…

  5. Drugs and Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Victor F.

    1978-01-01

    Millions of people in this country take medications, and millions drink alcohol. Both are drugs and have effects on the organs and systems with which they or their metabolites come in contact. This short article discusses some of the combined effects of prescribed drugs and alcohol on some systems, with special emphasis on the liver. PMID:712865

  6. [Drug-Drug Interactions with Consideration of Pharmacogenetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Shogo

    2018-01-01

     Elderly patients often suffer from a variety of diseases and therefore may be prescribed several kinds of drugs. Interactions between these drugs may cause problems in some patients. Guidelines for drug interactions were released on July 8, 2014 "Drug Interaction Guideline for Drug Development and Labeling Recommendations (Final Draft)". These guidelines include the theoretical basis for evaluating the mechanisms of drug interaction, the possible extent of drug interactions, and take into consideration special populations (e.g., infants, children, elderly patients, patients with hepatic or renal dysfunction, and subjects with minor deficient alleles for drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters). In this symposium article, I discuss this last special population: altered drug metabolism and drug interactions in subjects with minor alleles of genes encoding deficient drug metabolizing enzymes. I further discuss a drug label for eliglustat (Cerdelga) with instructions for patients with ultra-rapid, extensive, intermediate, and poor metabolizer phenotypes that arise from different CYP2D6 gene alleles.

  7. Parents who use drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rhodes, Tim; Bernays, Sarah; Houmøller, Kathrin

    2010-01-01

    Parents who use drugs parent in a context of heightened concern regarding the damaging effects of parental drug use on child welfare and family life. Yet there is little research exploring how parents who use drugs account for such damage and its limitation. We draw here upon analyses of audio......-recorded depth qualitative interviews, conducted in south-east England between 2008 and 2009, with 29 parents who use drugs. Our approach to thematic analysis treated accounts as co-produced and socially situated. An over-arching theme of accounts was 'damage limitation'. Most damage limitation work centred...... on efforts to create a sense of normalcy of family life, involving keeping drug use secret from children, and investing heavily in strategies to maintain ambiguity regarding children's awareness. Our analysis highlights that damage limitation strategies double-up in accounts as resources of child protection...

  8. Drug Pricing Reforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Ulrich; Mendez, Susan J.; Rønde, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Reference price systems for prescription drugs have found widespread use as cost containment tools. Under such regulatory regimes, patients co-pay a fraction of the difference between pharmacy retail price of the drug and a reference price. Reference prices are either externally (based on drug...... prices in other countries) or internally (based on domestic drug prices) determined. In a recent study, we analysed the effects of a change from external to internal reference pricing in Denmark in 2005, finding that the reform led to substantial reductions in prices, producer revenues, and expenditures...... for patients and the health insurance system. We also estimated an increase in consumer welfare but the size effect depends on whether or not perceived quality differences between branded and other drugs are taken into account....

  9. Drug therapy of leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kubanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy (Hansen’s disease is a chronic granulomatous bacterial infection mainly affecting the skin and peripheral nervous system yet also involving other organs and systems as a result of a pathological process. The causative agent of leprosy - Mycobacterium leprae - is an obligate intracellular microorganism. Despite the removal of a threat of a leprosy epidemic, European countries still record outbreaks of the disease mainly among migrants coming from endemic areas. A golden standard of the treatment of leprosy is a WHO-recommended combined drug therapy comprising drugs such as dapsone, clofazimine and rifampicin. The article provides current data on the mechanisms of action, efficacy and safety of these drugs and their combined scheme of treatment obtained as a result of clinical trials. Moreover, it also reviews new regimens of the drug therapy of leprosy including those with the use of drugs from the group of fluoroquinols as well as immunotherapy of the disease.

  10. [Drug induced diarrhea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morard, Isabelle; Hadengue, Antoine

    2008-09-03

    Diarrhea is a frequent adverse event involving the most frequently antibiotics, laxatives and NSAI. Drug induced diarrhea may be acute or chronic. It may be due to expected, dose dependant properties of the drug, to immuno-allergic or bio-genomic mechanisms. Several pathophysiological mechanisms have been described resulting in osmotic, secretory or inflammatory diarrhea, shortened transit time, or malabsorption. Histopathological lesions sometimes associated with drug induced diarrhea are usually non specific and include ulcerations, inflammatory or ischemic lesions, fibrous diaphragms, microscopic colitis and apoptosis. The diagnosis of drug induced diarrhea, sometimes difficult to assess, relies on the absence of other obvious causes and on the rapid disappearance of the symptoms after withdrawal of the suspected drug.

  11. Potential drug-drug interaction in Mexican patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña-Zurita, María Conchita; Juárez-Rojop, Isela E; Genis, Alma; Tovilla-Zárate, Carlos Alfonso; González-Castro, Thelma Beatriz; Lilia López-Narváez, María; de la O de la O, María Elena; Nicolini, Humberto

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to observe potential drug-drug interactions in the medication of Mexican schizophrenic patients. We performed a retrospective and cross-sectional study that was carried out in a psychiatric clinic. Only the prescriptions of patients with schizophrenia whose diagnoses were based on the DSM-IV instrument were included in this study. The Drug Interactions Checker software ( http://www.drugs.com/drug_interactions.html ) was used in this study to analyse potential drug-drug interactions. In total, 86 of 126 patients were at risk of potential drug-drug interactions. Haloperidol and biperiden was the most common drug pair of 232 pairs evaluated. In our study, 13.8% of drug-drug interaction showed a major level of severity, whereas in 83.2%, the interaction was moderate. Finally, central nervous system (CNS) depression and anticholinergic effect were the main possible effects of drug-drug interaction. Our results revealed a high number of patients with schizophrenia receiving two or more drugs. The potential drug-drug interactions observed in the Mexican population are consistent with the concomitant use of antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, and antidepressants prescribed in schizophrenia that could cause central nervous system (CNS) depression and anticholinergic effect. Drug-drug interaction must be considered when the patient with schizophrenia is medicated.

  12. Regional drug information service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, U I; Stoelben, S; Ebert, U; Siepmann, M; Krappweis, J; Kirch, W

    1999-06-01

    Drug information centers (DICs) were established in Europe more than two decades ago. The majority of German DICs were created in the 90s. The regional University hospital-based DIC, which offers services to physicans, is now in operation for three and a half years . To evaluate the types of enquiries received and the profile of the users of a drug information service. The working procedure at a regional center in Dresden, Germany, is described. The topics for consultation (adverse reactions, pharmacokinetics, etc.) are presented, and the types of drugs involved are classified according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification. Users are grouped by medical specialty. Future plans for the DIC are discussed. A total of 516 enquiries were received. Questions concerning therapeutic use (34%), adverse drug reactions (28%), pregnancy/lactation (16%), and pharmacokinetics/dosage (15%) were asked most frequently. Cardiovascular drugs (20%), systemic antiinfectives (19%) as well as drugs targeting the central nervous system (15%) and alimentation/metabolism (9%) were the predominant foci of enquiries. The major users of the DIC were internists (19%), general practitioners (19%), pediatricians (18%), and gynecologists (11%). The types of questions and users of this service were generally similar to those recorded at many other European DICs. The service has begun producing educational bulletins on drug-related topics of clinical relevance.

  13. Adverse cutaneous drug reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayak Surajit

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In everyday clinical practice, almost all physicians come across many instances of suspected adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR in different forms. Although such cutaneous reactions are common, comprehensive information regarding their incidence, severity and ultimate health effects are often not available as many cases go unreported. It is also a fact that in the present world, almost everyday a new drug enters market; therefore, a chance of a new drug reaction manifesting somewhere in some form in any corner of world is unknown or unreported. Although many a times, presentation is too trivial and benign, the early identification of the condition and identifying the culprit drug and omit it at earliest holds the keystone in management and prevention of a more severe drug rash. Therefore, not only the dermatologists, but all practicing physicians should be familiar with these conditions to diagnose them early and to be prepared to handle them adequately. However, we all know it is most challenging and practically difficult when patient is on multiple medicines because of myriad clinical symptoms, poorly understood multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction, relative paucity of laboratory testing that is available for any definitive and confirmatory drug-specific testing. Therefore, in practice, the diagnosis of ACDR is purely based on clinical judgment. In this discussion, we will be primarily focusing on pathomechanism and approach to reach a diagnosis, which is the vital pillar to manage any case of ACDR.

  14. Preclinical drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodniewicz, Teresa; Grynkiewicz, Grzegorz

    2010-01-01

    Life sciences provide reasonably sound prognosis for a number and nature of therapeutic targets on which drug design could be based, and search for new chemical entities--future new drugs, is now more than ever based on scientific principles. Nevertheless, current very long and incredibly costly drug discovery and development process is very inefficient, with attrition rate spanning from many thousands of new chemical structures, through a handful of validated drug leads, to single successful new drug launches, achieved in average after 13 years, with compounded cost estimates from hundreds of thousands to over one billion US dollars. Since radical pharmaceutical innovation is critically needed, number of new research projects concerning this area is steeply rising outside of big pharma industry--both in academic environment and in small private companies. Their prospective success will critically depend on project management, which requires combined knowledge of scientific, technical and legal matters, comprising regulations concerning admission of new drug candidates to be subjects of clinical studies. This paper attempts to explain basic rules and requirements of drug development within preclinical study period, in case of new chemical entities of natural or synthetic origin, which belong to low molecular weight category.

  15. Drug abuse in athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reardon CL

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Claudia L Reardon, Shane Creado Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA Abstract: Drug abuse occurs in all sports and at most levels of competition. Athletic life may lead to drug abuse for a number of reasons, including for performance enhancement, to self-treat otherwise untreated mental illness, and to deal with stressors, such as pressure to perform, injuries, physical pain, and retirement from sport. This review examines the history of doping in athletes, the effects of different classes of substances used for doping, side effects of doping, the role of anti-doping organizations, and treatment of affected athletes. Doping goes back to ancient times, prior to the development of organized sports. Performance-enhancing drugs have continued to evolve, with “advances” in doping strategies driven by improved drug testing detection methods and advances in scientific research that can lead to the discovery and use of substances that may later be banned. Many sports organizations have come to ban the use of performance-enhancing drugs and have very strict consequences for people caught using them. There is variable evidence for the performance-enhancing effects and side effects of the various substances that are used for doping. Drug abuse in athletes should be addressed with preventive measures, education, motivational interviewing, and, when indicated, pharmacologic interventions. Keywords: doping, athletes, steroids, drug abuse, mental illness

  16. Drugs, Society, and Human Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Oakley

    The varied aspects of drugs, their source, abuse, chemical composition, and physical, personal, and social effects are explored. Seven units cover the following areas: (1) an overview on drug use, a brief history of drugs and discussion of social implications; (2) the human nervous system and the actions of drugs; (3) "nondrug drugs" such as…

  17. Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for cervical cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  18. Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Hodgkin lymphoma. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  19. Drugs Approved for Multiple Myeloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for multiple myeloma and other plasma cell neoplasms. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  20. Drugs Approved for Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for myeloproliferative neoplasms. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  1. Drugs Approved for Testicular Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for testicular cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  2. The Great Drug Debate: II. Taking Drugs Seriously.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, John

    1988-01-01

    Argues that legalization is not the solution to drug-related problems. Proposes increased emphasis on the small retailers of drugs, and mandatory urinalysis for heroin, cocaine, and PCP for those arrested for typical drug-related crimes. (FMW)

  3. Vaccines against drug abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, X Y; Orson, F M; Kosten, T R

    2012-01-01

    The currently available medications for the treatment of drug abuse have had only limited success. Anti-addiction vaccines, aimed at eliciting antibodies that block the pharmacological effects of drugs, have great potential for treating drug abuse. We review the status of two vaccines that are undergoing clinical trials (for cocaine and nicotine addiction) and two that are still in preclinical development (for methamphetamine and heroin addiction). We also outline the challenges and ethical concerns associated with the development of anti-addiction vaccines and their use as future therapeutics.

  4. Storytelling in drug treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte

    2014-01-01

    Professionals who provide drug treatment to young people regularly encounter what they conceive to be inauthentic client claims, that is, claims not in accordance with reality. Earlier research demonstrates how authenticity remains a key concern within drug treatment, but it has not sufficiently...... of ulterior motives, clients are interpreted as making inauthentic claims because they want to obtain something externally from drug treatment (e.g., avoid prison or work training programs), and (3) the story of disorders explains inauthenticity as a result of pathology. The study illuminates how...

  5. Drug Use in Gyms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Ask Vest

    2015-01-01

    Taking some of the most significant academic works into consideration this chapter describes how the scholarly interest in drug use in gyms rose from studies of competitive bodybuilding to studies of larger segments of the gym population. The challenge of establishing reliable figures for the fre......Taking some of the most significant academic works into consideration this chapter describes how the scholarly interest in drug use in gyms rose from studies of competitive bodybuilding to studies of larger segments of the gym population. The challenge of establishing reliable figures...... of the significant political campaigns and strategies to regulate and counter drug use in gyms....

  6. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... risk for getting HIV. Drug and alcohol intoxication affect judgment and can lead to unsafe sexual practices, ... effects of drugs. Drug misuse and addiction can affect a person's overall health, thereby altering susceptibility to ...

  7. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is partly due to the addictive and intoxicating effects of many drugs, which can alter judgment and ... HIV or transmitting it to someone else. Biological effects of drugs. Drug misuse and addiction can affect ...

  8. State Drug Utilization Data 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  9. State Drug Utilization Data 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  10. State Drug Utilization Data 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  11. State Drug Utilization Data 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  12. State Drug Utilization Data 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  13. State Drug Utilization Data 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  14. State Drug Utilization Data 1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  15. State Drug Utilization Data 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  16. State Drug Utilization Data 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  17. State Drug Utilization Data 1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  18. State Drug Utilization Data 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  19. State Drug Utilization Data 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  20. State Drug Utilization Data 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  1. State Drug Utilization Data 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  2. State Drug Utilization Data 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  3. State Drug Utilization Data 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  4. State Drug Utilization Data 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  5. State Drug Utilization Data 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  6. State Drug Utilization Data 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  7. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain Genetics Global Health Health Consequences of Drug Misuse Hepatitis (Viral) ... the News NIDA Notes Podcasts E-Newsletters Public Education Projects Contact the Press Office Meetings & Events Media ...

  8. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain ... Meetings & Events Media Guide About NIDA Director's Page Organization Legislative Activities Advisory Boards & Groups Working at NIDA ...

  9. State Drug Utilization Data 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  10. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or reduce their drug use and related risk behaviors, including drug injection and unsafe sexual practices. Drug use disorder treatment programs also serve an important role in ...

  11. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... are not listed here. Drugs Approved to Prevent Breast Cancer Evista (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Keoxifene (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Nolvadex (Tamoxifen ...

  12. State Drug Utilization Data 2017

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  13. State Drug Utilization Data 2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  14. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain Genetics Global Health Health Consequences of Drug Misuse Hepatitis (Viral) ... with HIV is a key predictor of the development of AIDS. Because of their compromised immune system, ...

  15. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Projects » Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter ... research findings and news updates. Read on to Learn the Link between drug use and HIV and ...

  16. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain Genetics Global Health Health ... on HIV/AIDS and related diseases, counseling and testing services, and referrals for medical and social services. ...

  17. State Drug Utilization Data 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  18. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Menu Home Drugs of Abuse Commonly Abused Drugs Charts Emerging Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Fentanyl Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana ...

  19. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Science Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain ... Foundation for Women Legislators (NFWL) Educational Institutions: Florida International University Montgomery College Center for the Advancement of ...

  20. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Drug & Alcohol Facts Week NIDA TV PEERx Drugs & Health Blog The NIDA Science Fair Award for Addiction Science USA Science & Engineering Festival Drug & Alcohol Chat Day HBO Addiction Project Learn the Link Videos NIDA ...

  1. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain Genetics Global ... syndrome). AIDS is a disease of the immune system for which there is treatment, but no cure, ...

  2. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Commonly Abused Drugs Charts Emerging Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Fentanyl Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana ... person at risk for getting HIV. Drug and alcohol intoxication affect judgment and can lead to unsafe ...

  3. Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for lung cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  4. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for pancreatic cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  5. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Commonly Abused Drugs Charts Emerging Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Fentanyl Hallucinogens Inhalants Heroin Marijuana ... risk of contracting HIV, and using drugs and alcohol can increase the chances of unsafe behavior by ...

  6. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Menu Home Drugs of Abuse Commonly Abused Drugs Charts Emerging Trends and Alerts ... to HIV and progression of AIDS. Drugs of abuse and HIV both affect the brain. Research has ...

  7. State Drug Utilization Data 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  8. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer Atezolizumab Avelumab Bavencio (Avelumab) Cisplatin Doxorubicin Hydrochloride Durvalumab ...

  9. Drug: D10143 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D10143 Drug Ondelopran (USAN/INN); Odelepran ... C20H24FN3O3 D10143.gif ... Other ... DG01718 ... Drugs... for addictive disorder ... DG01716 ... Drugs for alcohol dependence Chemical group: DG01756 ... opioid

  10. Drug: D00123 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D00123 Drug Cyanamide (JP17); Cyanamide (TN) ... CH2N2 D00123.gif ... Other ... DG01718 ... Drugs... for addictive disorder ... DG01716 ... Drugs for alcohol dependence Same as: C01566 Therapeutic category: 3

  11. Drug: D05157 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D05157 Drug Nicotine polacrilex (USAN); Nicorette (TN) ... Other ... DG01718 ... Drugs... for addictive disorder ... DG01715 ... Drugs for nicotine dependence Cyp substrate ... DG01638 ... CYP2A6 substrate Cy

  12. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Skip to main content En español Researchers Medical & Health Professionals Patients & Families Parents & Educators Children & Teens Search ... Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain Genetics Global Health Health Consequences of Drug Misuse Hepatitis (Viral) HIV/ ...

  13. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... parents and teachers). It provides them with useful information on the science behind drug use. NIDA’s Easy-to-Read Drug Facts Web site describes the dangers of drug misuse and ...

  14. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Notes Podcasts E-Newsletters Public Education Projects National Drug & Alcohol Facts Week NIDA TV PEERx Drugs & Health Blog ... Award for Addiction Science USA Science & Engineering Festival Drug & Alcohol Chat Day HBO Addiction Project Learn the Link ...

  15. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or reduce their drug use and related risk behaviors, including drug injection and unsafe sexual practices. Drug use disorder treatment programs also serve an important role in providing ...

  16. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Commonly Abused Drugs Charts Emerging Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Fentanyl Hallucinogens Inhalants Heroin Marijuana ... person at risk for getting HIV. Drug and alcohol intoxication affect judgment and can lead to unsafe ...

  17. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Science Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the ... AIDS, as well as HIV/AIDS research and policies. AIDS.gov New Media Tools : These new media ...

  18. Medicaid Drug Claims Statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medicaid Drug Claims Statistics CD is a useful tool that conveniently breaks up Medicaid claim counts and separates them by quarter and includes an annual count.

  19. Vitiligo, drug induced (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this person's face have resulted from drug-induced vitiligo. Loss of melanin, the primary skin pigment, occasionally ... is the case with this individual. The typical vitiligo lesion is flat and depigmented, but maintains the ...

  20. Drug therapy smartens up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The submission of the first 'smart pill' for market approval, combined with progress in the European nanomedicine landscape, illustrates the positive outlook for drug therapy and health monitoring, explains Christian Martin.

  1. Drugs: Shatter the Myths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... they totally help a lot of people. It really depends on the who , how , and why of ... Mixing pills with other drugs or with alcohol really increases your risk of death from accidental overdose. ...

  2. MSIS Drug Utilization Datamart

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This page provides background needed to take advantage of the capabilities of the MSIS Drug Utilization Datamart. This mart allows the user to develop high-level...

  3. The drug swindlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, M; Lydecker, M; Lee, P R

    1990-01-01

    In a number of important developing nations--among them Indonesia, India, and Brazil--clinical pharmacologists and other drug experts are revealing mounting concern over the marketing of fraudulent drug products. These are shaped, colored, flavored, marked, and packaged to mimic the real product. They may contain the actual antibiotic or other drug indicated on the label, but so "cut" that the product provides only a small fraction of the labeled amount, or they may contain only useless flour or starch. At best, they are worthless. At the worst, they can kill. In most instances, it is believed that these "drugs" are produced and marketed by local or domestic fly-by-night groups and not by multinational pharmaceutical firms. Blame for these practices is placed on inadequate or unenforced laws, only trivial punishments, bribery and corruption, and the fact that generally "nobody inspects the inspectors."

  4. Bibliography [On Drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, Detroit, MI.

    A bibliography of materials on drugs is presented. The book and paper back entries are annotated. Selected technical references are listed under these major findings: (1) dependency, (2) barbiturates, (3) amphetamines, and (4) general pharmacology. (PS)

  5. Cholesterol - drug treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000314.htm Cholesterol - drug treatment To use the sharing features on ... treatment; Hardening of the arteries - statin Statins for Cholesterol Statins reduce your risk of heart disease, stroke, ...

  6. Information for Consumers (Drugs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Advertising: Questions to Ask Yourself Sample Prescription Drug Advertisements Give Us Feedback Resources for You Report a ... feeds Follow FDA on Twitter Follow FDA on Facebook View FDA videos on YouTube View FDA photos ...

  7. Mucoadhesive drug delivery systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahamatullah Shaikh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucoadhesion is commonly defined as the adhesion between two materials, at least one of which is a mucosal surface. Over the past few decades, mucosal drug delivery has received a great deal of attention. Mucoadhesive dosage forms may be designed to enable prolonged retention at the site of application, providing a controlled rate of drug release for improved therapeutic outcome. Application of dosage forms to mucosal surfaces may be of benefit to drug molecules not amenable to the oral route, such as those that undergo acid degradation or extensive first-pass metabolism. The mucoadhesive ability of a dosage form is dependent upon a variety of factors, including the nature of the mucosal tissue and the physicochemical properties of the polymeric formulation. This review article aims to provide an overview of the various aspects of mucoadhesion, mucoadhesive materials, factors affecting mucoadhesion, evaluating methods, and finally various mucoadhesive drug delivery systems (buccal, nasal, ocular, gastro, vaginal, and rectal.

  8. Asthma - control drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Asthma - children Wheezing Patient Instructions Asthma and school Asthma - child - discharge Asthma - quick-relief drugs Asthma - what to ask the doctor - adult Asthma - what to ask your doctor - child Bronchiolitis - discharge Exercise-induced asthma Exercising and asthma ...

  9. Approved Drugs for Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Directors & Staff Our Accomplishments Annual Reports Our Videos Quick Links Drug Watch Clinical Trials Physician Directory HBV Meeting What Is Hepatitis B? What Is Hepatitis B? The ABCs of Viral Hepatitis Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B Hepatitis Delta ...

  10. Drugs and driving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walsh, J. Michael; De Gier, Johan J.; Christopherson, Asbjørg S.; Verstraete, Alain G.

    The authors present a global overview on the issue of drugs and driving covering four major areas: (1) Epidemiology and Prevalence-which reviews epidemiological research, summarizes available information, discusses the methodological shortcomings of extant studies, and makes recommendations for

  11. Drug use among drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-02-01

    Randomly selected drivers were stopped at times and places of previous fatal crashes in Lincoln, Nebraska, and Dade County (Miami), Florida. Breath, urnine, blood, and lip swab samples were requested, for later analysis for drugs and medications. A c...

  12. Drug-induced diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diarrhea associated with medicines ... Nearly all medicines may cause diarrhea as a side effect. The drugs listed below, however, are more likely to cause diarrhea. Laxatives are meant to cause diarrhea. ...

  13. Medication Interactions: Food, Supplements and Other Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nervousness and hyperactivity. Drugs with Other Drugs Drug-drug interactions occur when two or more drugs react with ... foods, beverages or other products? What are possible drug interaction signs I should know about? How will the ...

  14. Emerging drugs of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michael E; Bryant, Sean M; Aks, Steven E

    2014-02-01

    Many new emerging drugs of abuse are marketed as legal highs despite being labeled "not for human consumption" to avoid regulation. The availability of these substances over the Internet and in "head shops" has lead to a multitude of emergency department visits with severe complications including deaths worldwide. Despite recent media attention, many of the newer drugs of abuse are still largely unknown by health care providers. Slight alterations of the basic chemical structure of substances create an entirely new drug no longer regulated by current laws and an ever-changing landscape of clinical effects. The purity of each substance with exact pharmacokinetic and toxicity profiles is largely unknown. Many of these substances can be grouped by the class of drug and includes synthetic cannabinoids, synthetic cathinones, phenethylamines, as well as piperazine derivatives. Resultant effects generally include psychoactive and sympathomimetic-like symptoms. Additionally, prescription medications, performance enhancing medications, and herbal supplements are also becoming more commonly abused. Most new drugs of abuse have no specific antidote and management largely involves symptom based goal directed supportive care with benzodiazepines as a useful adjunct. This paper will focus on the history, epidemiology, clinical effects, laboratory analysis, and management strategy for many of these emerging drugs of abuse. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. New drugs of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rech, Megan A; Donahey, Elisabeth; Cappiello Dziedzic, Jacqueline M; Oh, Laura; Greenhalgh, Elizabeth

    2015-02-01

    Drug abuse is a common problem and growing concern in the United States, and over the past decade, novel or atypical drugs have emerged and have become increasingly popular. Recognition and treatment of new drugs of abuse pose many challenges for health care providers due to lack of quantitative reporting and routine surveillance, and the difficulty of detection in routine blood and urine analyses. Furthermore, street manufacturers are able to rapidly adapt and develop new synthetic isolates of older drugs as soon as law enforcement agencies render them illegal. In this article, we describe the clinical and adverse effects and purported pharmacology of several new classes of drugs of abuse including synthetic cannabinoids, synthetic cathinones, salvia, desomorphine, and kratom. Because many of these substances can have severe or life-threatening adverse effects, knowledge of general toxicology is key in recognizing acute intoxication and overdose; however, typical toxidromes (e.g., cholinergic, sympathomimetic, opioid, etc.) are not precipitated by many of these agents. Medical management of patients who abuse or overdose on these drugs largely consists of supportive care, although naloxone may be used as an antidote for desomorphine overdose. Symptoms of aggression and psychosis may be treated with sedation (benzodiazepines, propofol) and antipsychotics (haloperidol or atypical agents such as quetiapine or ziprasidone). Other facets of management to consider include treatment for withdrawal or addiction, nutrition support, and potential for transmission of infectious diseases. © 2014 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  16. Sociology of Drug Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article which is a review of sociological ideas and studies of drug abusers in social situation, drug addiction steps (particularly alcohol, heroin and cocaine consumption are revised and some explanations are made. Also, the role of some sociological ideas in drug addiction is considered in which Anomie Theory reads: "because of such duality, the individuals who are not satisfied with their role are in hurt." According to this theory, drug users choose seclusion and neglecting usual social aims as well as competitive situations. Association of Differentiation Theory claims that drug use behavior is a learned behavior and the first learning occurs in a friendly small group (i.e. youngsters. Social Control theory believes that one can predict normal and abnormal behaviors through the rate of individuals' social commitments. Internal and external controls also determine commitment rate. Micro-cultural theory considers drug use as a compatibility with abnormal micro-culture rules. Symbolic Mutual Action Believes that the etiquettes which society attribute to individuals/behaviors determine their acquired social reactions rather than any inherited acquisition.

  17. Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program started in 1966 and conducted epidemiologic research to quantify the potential adverse effects of prescription drugs, utilizing in-hospital monitoring.

  18. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Women and Drugs Publications Search Publications Orderable DrugFacts Research Reports Mind Over Matter Science of Addiction Funding Funding Opportunities Clinical Research Post- ...

  19. Youth, drugs, and biopolitics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcides Jose Sanches Vergara

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we tackle the issue of youth and drugs as something linked to biopower and biopolitics, both concepts developed by Michael Foucault. Youth and drugs are taken and analyzed in situations involving the management of crime linked to the risks and deviations from the law, abuse and dependence. The youth; irreverent, courageous, healthy, idealistic, and that wanted to change the world for the better as we have seen in the past, is now strongly related to violence, dangerous activities, moral and social risks, drug addiction, criminality, and others negative images. To deal with these young people, tolerance and small punishments of yore are not enough anymore. The young people emerge as a segment of the population subject to various actions and programs. The drugs now are seen as matters of security and public health. There is a shifting and repositioning in the discourse about the young - from minor, drugged, and criminal to lawbreaker, user and drug addict. The change is subtle, but represents a modulation in the devices of social control. Beyond the consent of the young to get rid of drugs, there is a search for the creation of a wide area of monitoring of their behavior through the activation of community protection networks. The belief that the young are more impressionable and vulnerable, and that action on the cause of the problem or risk reduction are the most efficient ways of management, taking responsibility away from personal and family sphere and transferring it to the State, contributes to the increasing control of young people nowadays.

  20. Drug Release Mechanism of Slightly Soluble Drug from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    theophylline (THP) as drug in drug to clay ratios of 1:2, 3:4 and 1:1. The formulations were characterized for drug release and loading. Dependent and independent kinetic models were employed to analyze the drug release data. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used for the structural characterization of ...

  1. Identification of clinically significant drug-drug interactions in cardiac ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To identify clinically significant potential drug-drug interactions in cardiac intensive care units of two tertiary care hospitals in Peshawar, Pakistan, and to compare the various potential drug-drug interactions related parameters between the government and private hospitals included in the study. Method: A ...

  2. Drug Release Mechanism of Slightly Soluble Drug from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    theophylline) from nanocomposite of zeolite (ZLT) or hydrotalcite (HTC) used as drug carrier. Methods: Nanocomposite was prepared with dispersion of either ZLT or HTC as drug carrier and theophylline (THP) as drug in drug to clay ratios of 1:2 ...

  3. Influence of drug colour on perceived drug effects and efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Da; Wang, Tieyan; Wang, Tieshan; Qu, Xingda

    2018-02-01

    A drug's physical characteristics, such as colour, could be factors influencing its therapeutic effects. It is not well understood whether people's expectations on drug effects and efficacy are affected by colour, especially among Chinese population. This study was conducted to examine people's expectations on drug effects and efficacy on the basis of drug colour, and to reveal possible gender differences in colour-related drug expectations. Participants (n = 224) were asked to classify seven single-coloured and six two-coloured capsules into one of four categories of drug effects, and to indicate the strength of drug efficacy. It is found that all the coloured capsules yielded non-chance distributions in classifications of drug effects, with six single-coloured and four two-coloured capsules associated with specific drug effects. Colour also conveyed differential strengths of drug efficacy in general and in relation to specific drug effects. There were gender differences in drug expectations for some colours and colour combinations. Practitioner Summary: Drug colour was found to have impacts on perceived drug effects and efficacy. The findings from the present study can be used by ergonomics practitioners to design appropriate drug colours in support of drug differentiation, therapeutic effects and medication adherence.

  4. Nanotechnology and Drug Delivery Part 2: Nanostructures for Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some challenges associated with the technology as it relates to drug effectiveness, toxicity, stability, pharmacokinetics and drug regulatory control are discussed in this review. Clearly, nanotechnology is a welcome development that is set to transform drug delivery and drug supply chain management, if optimally developed ...

  5. Drug hypersensitivity syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Kumari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug hypersensitivity syndrome (DHS is an adverse drug reaction commonly associated with the aromatic antiepileptic drugs (AEDs, viz., phenytoin (PHT, carbamazepine (CBZ, phenobarbital (PB, lamotrigine, primidone, etc. It can also be caused by other drugs, such as sulfonamides, dapsone, minocycline, gold derivatives, cyclosporine, captopril, diltiazem, terbinafine, azathioprine and allopurinol. Diagnosis of DHS may be difficult because of the variety of clinical and laboratory abnormalities and manifestations and because the syndrome may mimic infectious, neoplastic or collagen vascular disorders. The risk for developing hypersensitivity within 60 days of the first or second prescription in new users of PHT or CBZ was estimated to be 2.3-4.5 per 10,000 and 1-4.1 per 10,000, respectively. The syndrome is defined by the fever, skin rash, lymphadenopathy and internal organ involvement within the first 2-8 weeks after initiation of therapy. Internal manifestations include, among others, agranulocytosis, hepatitis, nephritis and myositis. Insufficient detoxification may lead to cell death or contribute to the formation of antigen that triggers an immune reaction. Cross-reactivity among PHT, CBZ and PB is as high as 70%-80%. Management mainly includes immediate withdrawal of the culprit drug, symptomatic treatment and systemic steroids or immunoglobulins.

  6. Psychotropic Drugs and HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Lúcia Moreira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: HIV/AIDS infection is frequently associated with psychiatric disor- ders like psychosis, depression and anxiety. Psychiatric comorbidities may interfere with adherence to antiretroviral treatment. Therefore, diagnosis and treatment of these conditions are essential. However, the administration of a psychotropic drug to HAART therapy can result in drug interactions.Objectives: This review aims to analyze the various psychotropic drugs that can be used in these patients, as well as the interactions and adverse reactions that may occur. Methods: A MEDLINE search on anglo-saxonic literature was conducted, from 1993 until 2011, using the key-words: HIV, AIDS, psychosis, depression, anxiety, secondary mania, antidepressive agents, antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, HAART. Results: We found 100 articles, of which 66 were included and 34 excluded. The articles that showed no specific data on the use of psychotropic drugs in HIV patients were excluded. Discussion: Pharmachologic interactions may occur by occupation of the same metabolic pathways. Further research is needed with indications for best practices. Psychotherapeutic interventions should be considered. Conclusion: The choice of the therapeutic intervention, namely when considering psychotropic drugs with the lowest number of interactions and adverse effects is crucial in order to achieve therapeutic success in the treatment of HIV infected patients.

  7. Drug-induced hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo F. L. Rizzo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The thyroid axis is particularly prone to interactions with a wide variety of drugs, whose list increases year by year. Hypothyroidism is the most frequent consequence of drug-induced thyroid dysfunction. The main mechanisms involved in the development of primary hypothyroidism are: inhibition of the synthesis and/or release of thyroid hormones, immune mechanisms related to the use of interferon and other cytokines, and the induction of thyroiditis associated with the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and drugs blocking the receptors for vascular endothelial growth factor. Central hypothyroidism may be induced by inhibition of thyroid-stimulating hormone (bexarotene or corticosteroids or by immunological mechanisms (anti-CTLA4 or anti-PD-1 antibody drugs. It is also important to recognize those drugs that generate hypothyroidism by interaction in its treatment, either by reducing the absorption or by altering the transport and metabolism of levothyroxine. Thus, it is strongly recommended to evaluate thyroid function prior to the prescription of medications such as amiodarone, lithium, or interferon, and the new biological therapies that show important interaction with thyroid and endocrine function in general.

  8. Magnetic targeted drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Wiedmann

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common cause of death from cancer in both men and women. Treatment by intravenous or oral administration of chemotherapy agents results in serious and often treatment-limiting side effects. Delivery of drugs directly to the lung by inhalation of an aerosol holds the promise of achieving a higher concentration in the lung with lower blood levels. To further enhance the selective lung deposition, it may be possible to target deposition by using external magnetic fields to direct the delivery of drug coupled to magnetic particles. Moreover, alternating magnetic fields can be used to induce particle heating, which in turn controls the drug release rate with the appropriate thermal sensitive material.With this goal, superparamagetic nanoparticles (SPNP were prepared and characterized, and enhanced magnetic deposition was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. SPNPs were also incorporated into a lipid-based/SPNP aerosol formulation, and drug release was shown to be controlled by thermal activation. Because of the inherent imaging potential of SPNPs, this use of nanotechnology offers the possibility of coupling the diagnosis of lung cancer to drug release, which perhaps will ultimately provide the “magic bullet” that Paul Ehrlich originally sought.

  9. Drug Policy in Slovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucek Psenkova, Maria; Visnansky, Martin; Mackovicova, Stanislava; Tomek, Dominik

    2017-09-01

    Slovak law sets clear rules and timelines in the process of approving the price and reimbursement of drugs. During the last decade, the Ministry of Health adopted several cost-containment measures in the price and reimbursement policy. The most effective measures were the implementation of the external referencing of drug prices in 2008 and the reimbursement law in 2011. The new act introduced several regulations such as making stricter rules for the referencing of prices, setting cost per quality-adjusted life-year threshold, and defining new rules for the setting of reimbursements. On one side, implementation of these measures helped to achieve visible cost savings, but, on the other side, cost-containment policies have had some unintended consequences. In recent years, Slovakia has been facing a decreased availability of drugs because of parallel exports. As a result of the government's effort, Slovakia is the only country in the European Union that implemented a legal ban on the re-export of medicines. During the decade before 2011, many innovative drugs were included in the reimbursement system. Because of stricter legal conditions introduced in 2011, there has been a gradual shift in reimbursing innovative drugs from the standard reimbursement system to reimbursement by way of exceptions of health insurance companies. Recently, there has been an ongoing discussion on possible changes to the reimbursement law. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Glutamatergic transmission in drug reward: implications for drug addiction

    OpenAIRE

    D'Souza, Manoranjan S.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals addicted to drugs of abuse such as alcohol, nicotine, cocaine, and heroin are a significant burden on healthcare systems all over the world. The positive reinforcing (rewarding) effects of the above mentioned drugs play a major role in the initiation and maintenance of the drug-taking habit. Thus, understanding the neurochemical mechanisms underlying the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse is critical to reducing the burden of drug addiction in society. Over the last two decades...

  11. Projecting future drug expenditures--2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, James M; Li, Edward; Doloresco, Fred; Matusiak, Linda; Hunkler, Robert J; Shah, Nilay D; Vermeulen, Lee C; Schumock, Glen T

    2012-03-01

    Factors likely to influence drug expenditures, drug expenditure trends in 2010 and 2011, and projected drug expenditures for 2012 are discussed. Data were analyzed to provide drug expenditure trends for total drug expenditures and the hospital and clinic sectors. Data were obtained from the IMS Health National Sales Perspectives database. From 2009 to 2010, total U.S. drug expenditures increased by 2.7%, with total spending rising from $299.2 billion to $307.5 billion. Drug expenditures in clinics grew by 6.0% from 2009 to 2010. Hospital drug expenditures increased at the moderate rate of 1.5% from 2009 to 2010; through the first nine months of 2011, hospital drug expenditures increased by only 0.3% compared with the same period in 2010. The dominant trend over the past several years is substantial moderation in expenditure growth for widely used drugs, primarily due to the ongoing introduction and wide use of generic versions of high-cost, frequently used medications. At the end of 2010, generic drugs accounted for 78% of all retail prescriptions dispensed. Another pattern is substantial increases in expenditures for specialized medications, particularly in the outpatient setting as growth in prescription drug expenditures for clinic-administered drugs consistently outpaces growth in total expenditures. Various factors are likely to influence drug expenditures in 2012, including drugs in development, the diffusion of new drugs, generic drugs, drug shortages, and biosimilars. For 2012, we project a 3-5% increase in total drug expenditures across all settings, a 5-7% increase in expenditures for clinic-administered drugs, and a 0-2% increase in hospital drug expenditures.

  12. Hybrid nanostructured drug carrier with tunable and controlled drug release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depan, D.; Misra, R.D.K.

    2012-01-01

    We describe here a transformative approach to synthesize a hybrid nanostructured drug carrier that exhibits the characteristics of controlled drug release. The synthesis of the nanohybrid architecture involved two steps. The first step involved direct crystallization of biocompatible copolymer along the long axis of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs), followed by the second step of attachment of drug molecule to the polymer via hydrogen bonding. The extraordinary inorganic–organic hybrid architecture exhibited high drug loading ability and is physically stable even under extreme conditions of acidic media and ultrasonic irradiation. The temperature and pH sensitive characteristics of the hybrid drug carrier and high drug loading ability merit its consideration as a promising carrier and utilization of the fundamental aspects used for synthesis of other promising drug carriers. The higher drug release response during the application of ultrasonic frequency is ascribed to a cavitation-type process in which the acoustic bubbles nucleate and collapse releasing the drug. Furthermore, the study underscores the potential of uniquely combining CNTs and biopolymers for drug delivery. - Graphical abstract: Block-copolymer crystallized on carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Nanohybrid drug carrier synthesized by attaching doxorubicin (DOX) to polymer crystallized CNTs. Crystallized polymer on CNTs provide mechanical stability. Triggered release of DOX. Highlights: ► The novel synthesis of a hybrid nanostructured drug carrier is described. ► The drug carrier exhibits high drug loading ability and is physically stable. ► The high drug release is ascribed to a cavitation-type process.

  13. Drug-Path: a database for drug-induced pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hui; Qiu, Chengxiang; Cui, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    Some databases for drug-associated pathways have been built and are publicly available. However, the pathways curated in most of these databases are drug-action or drug-metabolism pathways. In recent years, high-throughput technologies such as microarray and RNA-sequencing have produced lots of drug-induced gene expression profiles. Interestingly, drug-induced gene expression profile frequently show distinct patterns, indicating that drugs normally induce the activation or repression of distinct pathways. Therefore, these pathways contribute to study the mechanisms of drugs and drug-repurposing. Here, we present Drug-Path, a database of drug-induced pathways, which was generated by KEGG pathway enrichment analysis for drug-induced upregulated genes and downregulated genes based on drug-induced gene expression datasets in Connectivity Map. Drug-Path provides user-friendly interfaces to retrieve, visualize and download the drug-induced pathway data in the database. In addition, the genes deregulated by a given drug are highlighted in the pathways. All data were organized using SQLite. The web site was implemented using Django, a Python web framework. Finally, we believe that this database will be useful for related researches. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  14. National Drug Control Strategy. Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of National Drug Control Policy, Washington, DC.

    President Bush's new National Drug Control Strategy for 2003 focuses on three core priorities: stopping drug use before it starts; healing America's drug users; and disrupting the market. The 2003 strategy reports progress toward meeting the President's goals of reducing drug use by 10 percent over 2 years, and 25 percent over 5 years. With regard…

  15. Human drug metabolism: an introduction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coleman, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    ..., both under drug pressure and during inhibition. Factors affecting drug metabolism, such as genetic polymorphisms, age and diet are discussed and how metabolism can lead to toxicity is explained. The book concludes with the role of drug metabolism in the commercial development of therapeutic agents as well as the pharmacology of some illicit drugs.

  16. Neurocognitive Predictors of Drug Relapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Marhe (Reshmi)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWorldwide, about 35 million people, that is 0.8% of the world’s adult population, use heroin and/or cocaine and more than 10-13% of these drug users are or will become drug dependent (UNODC, World Drug Report, 2012). Drug dependency is characterized as a chronic relapsing disorder

  17. Reinforcing stimulus properties of drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ree, J.M. van

    1979-01-01

    The reinforcing efficacy of psychoactive drugs can reliably be studied in experimental animals by using procedures for drug self-administration. This property of drugs is used to predict qualitatively and quantitatively their abuse potential in humans. External factors like the dose of the drug, the

  18. Breakthrough Drugs and Turtle Soup

    OpenAIRE

    Chabner, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) category of Breakthrough Therapy drugs was established in 2012, fostered by collaboration between legislators, researchers, industry representatives, and cancer research advocates. This category allows the FDA to designate certain lifesaving drugs for expedited review, and it has been successful in speeding the approval of several new drugs.

  19. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Menu Home Drugs of Abuse Commonly Abused Drugs Charts Emerging Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs ... from the Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, Dr. Nora D. Volkow. Message from the Director ...

  20. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and permanent liver damage. Poor judgment and risky behavior. Drug misuse by any route (not just injection) can ... People who receive treatment stop or reduce their drug use and related risk behaviors, including drug injection and unsafe sexual practices. Drug ...

  1. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... parents and teachers). It provides them with useful information on the science behind drug use. NIDA’s Easy-to-Read Drug ... between drugs and HIV, as well as other information about the science of drug use is available at NIDA's home ...

  2. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics Addiction Science Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and ... the Link campaign. This campaign shows teens and young adults that non-injection drug use and alcohol use ...

  3. Drug delivery with living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fliervoet, Lies A L; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    The field of drug delivery has grown tremendously in the past few decades by developing a wide range of advanced drug delivery systems. An interesting category is cell-based drug delivery, which includes encapsulation of drugs inside cells or attached to the surface and subsequent transportation

  4. How to Identify Drug Paraphernalia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Affect Teens The Negative Health Effects of Marijuana Use State and Federal Drug Laws Treatment and Recovery Federal Student Aid and Consequences of a Drug Conviction School Failure VIDEO: Taking Prescription Drugs to Get High—A Bad Idea Drugged Driving—What You Should Know How ...

  5. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain ... projects/learn-link-drugs-hiv . 120x90 460x80 486x60 Social Media Send the message to young people and ...

  6. European rating of drug harms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Amsterdam, Jan; Nutt, David; Phillips, Lawrence; van den Brink, Wim

    2015-01-01

    The present paper describes the results of a rating study performed by a group of European Union (EU) drug experts using the multi-criteria decision analysis model for evaluating drug harms. Forty drug experts from throughout the EU scored 20 drugs on 16 harm criteria. The expert group also assessed

  7. Biochemistry of drugs. XXVII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raz, K.; Smolik, S.; Vinarova, M.; Janda, J.; Franc, Z.

    1979-01-01

    The erythro- and threoform of p-hydroxynorephedrine belong to the group of drugs affecting the course of hypertensive disease. For pharmacological studies both forms were labelled with 3 H radionuclide on the benzene ring. 90% of radioactivity was concentrated in the ortho positions with regard to the hydroxyl, 10% in the meta position. After the administration of the labelled drug to rats, rapid absorption occurs and radioactivity is eliminated from the organism, especially in the urine. Three radioactive substances were found in the urine of experimental animals. A substance with properties corresponding to those of the administered drug prevailed. The highest levels of radioactivity in the tissues were found after intravenous administration as early as after 5 minutes after administration, 15 minutes after subcutaneous administration. It was found that p-hydroxynorephedrine significantly restricted the detainment of labelled noradrenaline-7- 3 H in the tissues of premedicated animals. (author)

  8. Potential drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions in dermatological inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Lukas; Kränke, Birger; Aberer, Werner

    2016-11-01

    To present information on the frequency of drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions, and to provide assistance on how to minimize these major problems in the pharmacological treatment of dermatological inpatients. The medications given to 1,099 dermatological inpatients were retrospectively analyzed for drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions using web-based drug interaction software (Diagnosia ® Check). We report an overall frequency of relevant drug-drug interactions of 51.7 %, with an average of 3.2 interactions per affected inpatient. Drug combinations that should have been avoided were found in 5.7 % of the study population. Total drug count was the most important risk factor. Drug groups involved in the majority of interactions were analgesics, cardiovascular and antithrombotic agents, as well as antidepressants. The risk of developing adverse drug reactions was rated as "high" in 53.1 % of inpatients. The top five adverse reactions in this patient group were bleeding, constipation, anticholinergic effects, sedation, and orthostatic effects. Potential drug-drug interactions as well as adverse drug reactions are alarmingly common in dermatological inpatients. Every other patient is at risk of experiencing such interactions or adverse reactions, and every twentieth patient receives a drug combination that should not be administered. Increased alertness is a must in order to identify patients at risk. © 2016 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Drugs for rare disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremers, Serge; Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2017-08-01

    Estimates of the frequencies of rare disorders vary from country to country; the global average defined prevalence is 40 per 100 000 (0.04%). Some occur in only one or a few patients. However, collectively rare disorders are fairly common, affecting 6-8% of the US population, or about 30 million people, and a similar number in the European Union. Most of them affect children and most are genetically determined. Diagnosis can be difficult, partly because of variable presentations and partly because few clinicians have experience of individual rare disorders, although they may be assisted by searching databases. Relatively few rare disorders have specific pharmacological treatments (so-called orphan drugs), partly because of difficulties in designing trials large enough to determine benefits and harms alike. Incentives have been introduced to encourage the development of orphan drugs, including tax credits and research aids, simplification of marketing authorization procedures and exemption from fees, and extended market exclusivity. Consequently, the number of applications for orphan drugs has grown, as have the costs of using them, so much so that treatments may not be cost-effective. It has therefore been suggested that not-for-profit organizations that are socially motivated to reduce those costs should be tasked with producing them. A growing role for patient organizations, improved clinical and translational infrastructures, and developments in genetics have also contributed to successful drug development. The translational discipline of clinical pharmacology is an essential component in drug development, including orphan drugs. Clinical pharmacologists, skilled in basic pharmacology and its links to clinical medicine, can be involved at all stages. They can contribute to the delineation of genetic factors that determine clinical outcomes of pharmacological interventions, develop biomarkers, design and perform clinical trials, assist regulatory decision

  10. Drugs, discrimination and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Frances

    2009-12-01

    Whether addiction to prohibited drugs should be classified as a disability for the purposes of disability discrimination is a controversial question in Australia. The leading Australian case of Marsden v Human Rights Equal Opportunity Commission & Coffs Harbour & District Ex-Servicemen & Women's Memorial Club Ltd (HREOC, No H98/51, 30 August 1999); [2000] FCA 1619 concerned a disability discrimination complaint brought by Mr Marsden as a result of his treatment by the club. The case was brought as a public interest test case by the New South Wales Legal Aid Commission. Mr Marsden was on a methadone program at the time. The reasoning of the decision at the Federal Court opened the way for a finding that dependence on illegal drugs constituted a disability under disability discrimination legislation. The media reaction to the court's decision led to State and federal governments proposing legislation limiting legal protection from discrimination for people addicted to illegal drugs on the basis of their drug use. While the proposed federal legislation lapsed after objections from a coalition of medical, legal and other advocacy groups, the New South Wales legislation still provides that, in employment matters, it is not unlawful to discriminate against a person on the ground of disability if the disability relates to the person's addiction to a prohibited drug and the person is actually addicted to a prohibited drug at the time of the discrimination. The article details the sequence of events in the Marsden case, reflects on the role of public interest litigation in achieving social justice outcomes and suggests that Australia's recent ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities on 17 July 2008 should encourage legislators to review legislation which may have a discriminatory effect on people suffering from addictions.

  11. Drug abuse among the students

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Zaman; Sobia Razzaq; Rabia Hassan; Junaid Qureshi; Hira Ijaz; Muhammad Hanif; Fazal Rahman Chughtai

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT:Drug abuse is the willful misuse of either licit or illicit drugs for the purpose of recreation, perceived necessity or convenience. Drug abuse is a more intense and often willful misuse of drugs often to the point of addiction. In the eastern world the incidence shows a decline or a static pattern but the number of drug addicts is still enormous.. The major drug of abuse are heroin and marijuana but designer drugs are shown to be on the increase. The aim of the study is to determine...

  12. Smart drugs: green shuttle or real drug?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornara, L; Borghesi, B; Canali, C; Andrenacci, M; Basso, M; Federici, S; Labra, M

    2013-11-01

    We have combined morphological, molecular, and chemical techniques in order to identify the plant and chemical composition of some last-generation smart drugs, present on the market under the following names: Jungle Mistic Incense, B-52, Blendz, and Kratom 10x. Micromorphological analyses of botanical fragments allowed identification of epidermal cells, stomata, trichomes, starch, crystals, and pollen. DNA barcoding was carried out by the plastidial gene rbcL and the spacer trnH-psbA as universal markers. The combination of morphological and molecular data revealed a mixture of plants from different families, including aromatic species, viz., Lamiaceae and Turneraceae. GC-MS and LC-MS analyses on ethanol or methanol extracts showed the presence of synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-250 in Jungle, JWH-122 in B-52, and JWH-073 and JWH-018 in Blendz. In Kratom 10x, only the indole alkaloid mitragynine was detected. All the identified synthetic cannabinoids, apart from mitragynine, are under the restriction of law in Italy (TU 309/90). Synthetic cannabinoid crystals were also identified by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, which also detected other foreign organic chemicals, probably preservatives or antimycotics. In Kratom only leaf fragments from Mitragyna speciosa, containing the alkaloid mitragynine, were found. In the remaining products, aromatic plant species have mainly the role of hiding synthetic cannabinoids, thus acting as a "green shuttle" rather than as real drugs. Such a multidisciplinary approach is proposed as a method for the identification of herbal blends of uncertain composition, which are widely marketed in "headshops" and on the Internet, and represent a serious hazard to public health.

  13. Can aging be 'drugged'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera, Celine E; Dillin, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    The engines that drive the complex process of aging are being identified by model-organism research, thereby providing potential targets and rationale for drug studies. Several studies of small molecules have already been completed in animal models with the hope of finding an elixir for aging, with a few compounds showing early promise. What lessons can we learn from drugs currently being tested, and which pitfalls can we avoid in our search for a therapeutic for aging? Finally, we must also ask whether an elixir for aging would be applicable to everyone, or whether we age differently, thus potentially shortening lifespan in some individuals.

  14. Computer aided drug design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, A.

    2017-08-01

    Computer based method can help in discovery of leads and can potentially eliminate chemical synthesis and screening of many irrelevant compounds, and in this way, it save time as well as cost. Molecular modeling systems are powerful tools for building, visualizing, analyzing and storing models of complex molecular structure that can help to interpretate structure activity relationship. The use of various techniques of molecular mechanics and dynamics and software in Computer aided drug design along with statistics analysis is powerful tool for the medicinal chemistry to synthesis therapeutic and effective drugs with minimum side effect.

  15. Dendrimers in drug research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, Ulrik; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2004-01-01

    and in vivo cytotoxicity, as well as biopermeability, biostability and immunogenicity. The review deals with numerous applications of dendrimers as tools for efficient multivalent presentation of biological ligands in biospecific recognition, inhibition and targeting. Dendrimers may be used as drugs...... for antibacterial and antiviral treatment and have found use as antitumor agents. The review highlights the use of dendrimers as drug or gene delivery devices in e.g. anticancer therapy, and the design of different host-guest binding motifs directed towards medical applications is described. Other specific examples...

  16. Kinetically Controlled Drug Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Xin E.; Hansen, Bjarne Gram; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2011-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Penicillium brevicompactum produces the immunosuppressive drug mycophenolic acid (MPA), which is a potent inhibitor of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases (IMPDHs). IMPDH catalyzes the conversion of IMP to XMP via a covalent enzyme intermediate, E-XMP*; MPA inhibits by trapping E...... of resistance is not apparent. Here, we show that, unlike MPA-sensitive IMPDHs, formation of E-XMP* is rate-limiting for both PbIMPDH-A and PbIMPDH-B. Therefore, MPA resistance derives from the failure to accumulate the drug-sensitive intermediate....

  17. Biochemistry of drugs. XXII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franc, Z.; Smolik, S.; Horesovsky, O.; Hradil, F.

    1976-01-01

    The kinetics in rats was studied of the tranquilizer noroxyclothepine (8-chloro-10-(4-hydroxyethyl)piperazino-10,11-dihydrobenzo(b,f)-thiepine). The drug was labelled with carbon 14 and the kinetics of the drug was investigated after oral and i.v. administration. It was found that over 4 days, 88 to 99% of radioactivity was excreted in feces and 5.5 to 6% in the urine, this for both ways of administration. Following oral administration, 50% of radioactivity was eliminated from the organism within 27 hours while following i.v. administration, the elimination took 38 hours. (L.O.)

  18. Ketamine - A Multifaceted Drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingzhong; Li, Jian; Lu, Yi; Sun, Dajin; Tao, Yuan-Xiang; Liu, Renyu; Luo, Jin Jun

    There is a petition for tight control of ketamine from the Chinese government to classify ketamine as a Schedule I drug, which is defined as a drug with no currently accepted medical use but a high potential for abuse. However, ketamine has unique properties that can benefit different patient populations. Scholars from the Translational Perioperative and Pain Medicine and the International Chinese Academy of Anesthesiology WeChat groups had an interactive discussion on ketamine, including its current medical applications, future research priorities, and benefits versus risks. The discussion is summarized in this manuscript with some minor edits.

  19. Drug-induced thrombocytopenic purpura

    OpenAIRE

    Sathiasekar, Anisha Cynthia; Deepthi, D. Angeline; Sathia Sekar, G. Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced thrombocytopenic purpura is a skin condition result from a low platelet count due to drug-induced anti-platelet antibodies caused by drugs. Drug-induced thrombocytopenic purpura should be suspected when a patient, child or adult, has sudden, severe thrombocytopenia. Drug-induced thrombocytopenic purpura is even more strongly suspected when a patient has repeated episodes of sudden, severe thrombocytopenia

  20. Drug use as consumer behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxall, Gordon Robert; Sigurdsson, Valdimar

    2011-12-01

    Seeking integration of drug consumption research by a theory of memory function and emphasizing drug consumption rather than addiction, Müller & Schumann (M&S) treat drug self-administration as part of a general pattern of consumption. This insight is located within a more comprehensive framework for understanding drug use as consumer behavior that explicates the reinforcement contingencies associated with modes of drug consumption.

  1. Role of drug transporters and drug accumulation in the temporal acquisition of drug resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hembruff, Stacey L; Laberge, Monique L; Villeneuve, David J; Guo, Baoqing; Veitch, Zachary; Cecchetto, Melanie; Parissenti, Amadeo M

    2008-01-01

    Anthracyclines and taxanes are commonly used in the treatment of breast cancer. However, tumor resistance to these drugs often develops, possibly due to overexpression of drug transporters. It remains unclear whether drug resistance in vitro occurs at clinically relevant doses of chemotherapy drugs and whether both the onset and magnitude of drug resistance can be temporally and causally correlated with the enhanced expression and activity of specific drug transporters. To address these issues, MCF-7 cells were selected for survival in increasing concentrations of doxorubicin (MCF-7 DOX-2 ), epirubicin (MCF-7 EPI ), paclitaxel (MCF-7 TAX-2 ), or docetaxel (MCF-7 TXT ). During selection cells were assessed for drug sensitivity, drug uptake, and the expression of various drug transporters. In all cases, resistance was only achieved when selection reached a specific threshold dose, which was well within the clinical range. A reduction in drug uptake was temporally correlated with the acquisition of drug resistance for all cell lines, but further increases in drug resistance at doses above threshold were unrelated to changes in cellular drug uptake. Elevated expression of one or more drug transporters was seen at or above the threshold dose, but the identity, number, and temporal pattern of drug transporter induction varied with the drug used as selection agent. The pan drug transporter inhibitor cyclosporin A was able to partially or completely restore drug accumulation in the drug-resistant cell lines, but had only partial to no effect on drug sensitivity. The inability of cyclosporin A to restore drug sensitivity suggests the presence of additional mechanisms of drug resistance. This study indicates that drug resistance is achieved in breast tumour cells only upon exposure to concentrations of drug at or above a specific selection dose. While changes in drug accumulation and the expression of drug transporters does occur at the threshold dose, the magnitude of

  2. Role of drug transporters and drug accumulation in the temporal acquisition of drug resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veitch Zachary

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anthracyclines and taxanes are commonly used in the treatment of breast cancer. However, tumor resistance to these drugs often develops, possibly due to overexpression of drug transporters. It remains unclear whether drug resistance in vitro occurs at clinically relevant doses of chemotherapy drugs and whether both the onset and magnitude of drug resistance can be temporally and causally correlated with the enhanced expression and activity of specific drug transporters. To address these issues, MCF-7 cells were selected for survival in increasing concentrations of doxorubicin (MCF-7DOX-2, epirubicin (MCF-7EPI, paclitaxel (MCF-7TAX-2, or docetaxel (MCF-7TXT. During selection cells were assessed for drug sensitivity, drug uptake, and the expression of various drug transporters. Results In all cases, resistance was only achieved when selection reached a specific threshold dose, which was well within the clinical range. A reduction in drug uptake was temporally correlated with the acquisition of drug resistance for all cell lines, but further increases in drug resistance at doses above threshold were unrelated to changes in cellular drug uptake. Elevated expression of one or more drug transporters was seen at or above the threshold dose, but the identity, number, and temporal pattern of drug transporter induction varied with the drug used as selection agent. The pan drug transporter inhibitor cyclosporin A was able to partially or completely restore drug accumulation in the drug-resistant cell lines, but had only partial to no effect on drug sensitivity. The inability of cyclosporin A to restore drug sensitivity suggests the presence of additional mechanisms of drug resistance. Conclusion This study indicates that drug resistance is achieved in breast tumour cells only upon exposure to concentrations of drug at or above a specific selection dose. While changes in drug accumulation and the expression of drug transporters does

  3. Clinical Drug-Drug Pharmacokinetic Interaction Potential of Sucralfate with Other Drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulochana, Suresh P; Syed, Muzeeb; Chandrasekar, Devaraj V

    2016-01-01

    of drugs. This review covers several category of drugs such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, fluoroquinolones, histamine H2-receptor blockers, macrolides, anti-fungals, anti-diabetics, salicylic acid derivatives, steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and provides pharmacokinetic data summary along...

  4. Drug-resistant tuberculosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The epidemic of drug-resistant tuberculosis. (DR-TB) is a public health emergency that threatens to destabilise global TB control. Although TB incidence and mortality are decreasing in several parts of the world, the overall prevalence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is increasing in many high-burden countries, ...

  5. "Reasonable" Drug Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling-Sendor, Benjamin

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in "Board of Education of Independent School District No. 92 of Pottawatomie County v. Earls," wherein the Court held that random drug testing of students taking part in extracurricular activities is constitutional. (PKP)

  6. Crystallography and Drug Design

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 12. Crystallography and Drug Design. K Suguna. General Article Volume 19 Issue 12 December 2014 pp 1093-1103. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/019/12/1093-1103. Keywords.

  7. Crystallography and Drug Design

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 12. Crystallography and Drug Design. K Suguna. General Article Volume 19 Issue 12 December 2014 pp 1093-1103. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/019/12/1093-1103. Keywords.

  8. Drugs ID Obesity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a new attitude to eating. Adjunctive measures aimed at modifying behaviour, such as psychotherapy and group therapy, may help in individual cases. Psychological factors in response to stress would appear to be the basis of some cases of obesity, but the use of psychotropic drugs is limited and for specific indications only.

  9. Prevention and Drug Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Mark F.; Smith, Brenda

    2009-01-01

    Evidence linking alcohol and other drug abuse with child maltreatment, particularly neglect, is strong. But does substance abuse cause maltreatment? According to Mark Testa and Brenda Smith, such co-occurring risk factors as parental depression, social isolation, homelessness, or domestic violence may be more directly responsible than substance…

  10. Antiviral Drugs: Seasonal Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-09-29

    In this podcast, Dr. Joe Bresee explains the nature of antiviral drugs and how they are used for seasonal flu.  Created: 9/29/2010 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 9/29/2010.

  11. Drug development and manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Benjamin P.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Burrell, Anthony K.

    2015-10-13

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry has been used for detecting binding events and measuring binding selectivities between chemicals and receptors. XRF may also be used for estimating the therapeutic index of a chemical, for estimating the binding selectivity of a chemical versus chemical analogs, for measuring post-translational modifications of proteins, and for drug manufacturing.

  12. Drugs in Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottram, David

    2012-01-01

    Drugs may be used by athletes for a number of reasons, including performance enhancement. The role of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is vital to ensure a winning performance has been achieved by fair means. Substances and methods that are included on the WADA Prohibited List are described. The procedures for testing banned substances are…

  13. Women and Drug Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentich, Mary

    1982-01-01

    Presents a feminist perspective which offers a social structural framework for examining women's problematic behavior in traditional gender roles. Examines implications for treatment of women with drug dependence problems including developing the helping agent's awareness of the pervasiveness of sexism and its potentially negative effects.…

  14. Antiepileptic drugs in neuroprotection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pitkanen, A.; Kubová, Hana

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 4 (2004), s. 777-798 ISSN 1465-6566 R&D Projects: GA MZd NF6474 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : antiepileptic drugs * anticonvulsant * epilepsy Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  15. Drug-radiopharmaceutical interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hladik, W.B.; Ponto, J.A.; Stathis, V.J.

    1985-01-01

    Patients seen in the nuclear medicine department have a wide variety of disorders and, consequently, may be receiving any number of therapeutic drugs. For this reason, nuclear medicine professionals should be aware of the potential effects that these pharmacologic agents may have on the bio-distribution of subsequently administered radiopharmaceuticals, commonly referred to as ''drug-radiopharmaceutical interactions.'' Compared with the quantity of literature written about interactions between various therapeutic drugs, the information available on drug-radiopharmaceutical interactions is scarce. However, there has been increasing interest in this subject, particularly during the past five years. Some of the reported interactions are used intentionally to add a new dimension to the nuclear medicine study and increase its diagnostic capabilities, i.e., pharmacologic intervention. These beneficial ''interactions'' are discussed in detail in several other chapters of this book. Other interactions, however, cause changes in the normal distribution of radiopharmaceuticals, which may interfere with the diagnostic utility of various nuclear medicine procedures. The latter group of interactions is the focus of this chapter

  16. Drug-mineral interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, L.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of drugs such as glucocorticoids and thyroid extract on calcium metabolism is unknown. However, several other medications affect the excretion and intestinal absorption of calcium. A controlled study was carried out to investigate these aspects. Urinary calcium was determined for 3 months during the long-term intake of the antituberculous drug isoniazid (INH) and of the antibiotic tetracycline. The effect of the diuretics furosemide and hydrochlorothiazide, of several aluminum-containing antacids, of thyroid extract and of corticosteroids was also studied. Metabolic balances of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and zinc were determined, as well as the intestinal absorption of calcium using Ca 47. Plasma levels, urinary and fecal excretions of Ca 47 were determined. All drugs tested increased urinary calcium except for the diuretic hydrochlorothiazide. Regarding the effect of corticosteroids: the intestinal absorption of calcium was unchanged after the short-term use and was very high after long-term use. The studies have shown that several commonly used drugs induce an increase in urinary calcium excretion which may contribute to calcium loss, if this increase persists for prolonged periods of time. Urinary excretions of phosphorus, magnesium and zinc increased in some of the studies.

  17. Should Drugs Be Legalized?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambliss, William; Scorza, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    Presents two opposing viewpoints concerning the legalization of drugs. States that control efforts are not cost effective and suggests that legalization with efforts at education is a better course of action (W. Chambliss). The opposing argument contends that the cost in human suffering negates any savings in dollars gained through legalization…

  18. Drug Errors in Anaesthesiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajnish Kumar Jain

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Medication errors are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. The incidence of these drug errors during anaesthesia is not certain. They impose a considerable financial burden to health care systems apart from the patient losses. Common causes of these errors and their prevention is discussed.

  19. Arousal and drug abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, Francisco J; Bisagno, Verónica; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2017-08-30

    The reticular activating system (RAS) is not an amorphous region but distinct nuclei with specific membrane properties that dictate their firing during waking and sleep. The locus coeruleus and raphe nucleus fire during waking and slow wave sleep, with the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) firing during both waking and REM sleep, the states manifesting arousal-related EEG activity. Two important discoveries in the PPN in the last 10 years are, 1) that some PPN cells are electrically coupled, and 2) every PPN cell manifests high threshold calcium channels that allow them to oscillate at beta/gamma band frequencies. The role of arousal in drug abuse is considered here in terms of the effects of drugs of abuse on these two mechanisms. Drug abuse and the perception of withdrawal/relapse are mediated by neurobiological processes that occur only when we are awake, not when we are asleep. These relationships focus on the potential role of arousal, more specifically of RAS electrical coupling and gamma band activity, in the addictive process as well as the relapse to drug use. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Crystallography and Drug Design

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    HIV Drugs. A previously unknown disease which appeared in the early 1980s and was called AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome), was identified to be caused by a virus named later as the human ... Structure investigations of these proteins were ... immense help in designing inhibitors to HIV PR and developing.

  1. Drugs Used in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on drugs used in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first.…

  2. Want Drugs? Use Python

    OpenAIRE

    Nowotka, Michał; Papadatos, George; Davies, Mark; Dedman, Nathan; Hersey, Anne

    2016-01-01

    We describe how Python can be leveraged to streamline the curation, modelling and dissemination of drug discovery data as well as the development of innovative, freely available tools for the related scientific community. We look at various examples, such as chemistry toolkits, machine-learning applications and web frameworks and show how Python can glue it all together to create efficient data science pipelines.

  3. Drugs in Lactation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Faculty. One of his first tasks as Dean was the identification and dismissal of those members of staff considered undesirable by the Nazi regime; according to Erost,! ... reviewed publication gives tips on how to pick the right drug for a lactating mother. It is produced in an easy-to- use, flip-open format, with each page printed ...

  4. Drug-mineral interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, L.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of drugs such as glucocorticoids and thyroid extract on calcium metabolism is unknown. However, several other medications affect the excretion and intestinal absorption of calcium. A controlled study was carried out to investigate these aspects. Urinary calcium was determined for 3 months during the long-term intake of the antituberculous drug isoniazid (INH) and of the antibiotic tetracycline. The effect of the diuretics furosemide and hydrochlorothiazide, of several aluminum-containing antacids, of thyroid extract and of corticosteroids was also studied. Metabolic balances of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and zinc were determined, as well as the intestinal absorption of calcium using Ca 47. Plasma levels, urinary and fecal excretions of Ca 47 were determined. All drugs tested increased urinary calcium except for the diuretic hydrochlorothiazide. Regarding the effect of corticosteroids: the intestinal absorption of calcium was unchanged after the short-term use and was very high after long-term use. The studies have shown that several commonly used drugs induce an increase in urinary calcium excretion which may contribute to calcium loss, if this increase persists for prolonged periods of time. Urinary excretions of phosphorus, magnesium and zinc increased in some of the studies

  5. Pharmacogenetics of psychotropic drugs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lerer, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    ... of pharmacogenetics with substance dependence and brain imaging, and consider the impact of pharmacogenetics on the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries. This book defines the young field of pharmacogenetics as it applies to psychotropic drugs and is, therefore, an essential reference for all clinicians and researchers working in this findings field. Bernard ...

  6. Drug abuse: newly-emerging drugs and trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Gregory G

    2012-09-01

    Drug abusers have access to new, more potent compounds that evade existing laws by virtue of their novel chemical structures. These drugs are available for purchase at stores and over the internet. The drugs are not illegal because they are so new that laws have not yet been passed to ban them. These drugs are leading to emergency department visits for cardiovascular, neurologic, and psychiatric complications. Standard drug screens are not designed to detect these new substances. The internet provides access to drugs for substance abusers but also provides physicians speed of access to the habits of substance abusers.

  7. Drug Information in Space Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayuse, Tina M.

    2009-01-01

    Published drug information is widely available for terrestrial conditions. However, information on dosing, administration, drug interactions, stability, and side effects is scant as it relates to use in Space Medicine. Multinational crews on board the International Space Station present additional challenges for drug information because medication nomenclature, information available for the drug as well as the intended use for the drug is not standard across countries. This presentation will look at unique needs for drug information and how the information is managed in Space Medicine. A review was conducted of the drug information requests submitted to the Johnson Space Center Pharmacy by Space Medicine practitioners, astronaut crewmembers and researchers. The information requested was defined and cataloged. A list of references used was maintained. The wide range of information was identified. Due to the information needs for the medications in the on-board medical kits, the Drug Monograph Project was created. A standard method for answering specific drug information questions was generated and maintained by the Johnson Space Center Pharmacy. The Drug Monograph Project will be presented. Topic-centered requests, including multinational drug information, drug-induced adverse reactions, and medication events due to the environment will be highlighted. Information management of the drug information will be explained. Future considerations for drug information needs will be outlined.

  8. Multifunctional High Drug Loading Nanocarriers for Cancer Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Erlei

    2011-12-01

    Most anticancer drugs have poor water-solubility, rapid blood clearance, low tumor-selectivity and severe systemic toxicity to healthy tissues. Thus, polymeric nanocarriers have been widely explored for anticancer drugs to solve these problems. However, polymer nanocarriers developed to date still suffer drawbacks including low drug loading contents, premature drug release, slow cellular internalization, slow intracellular drug release and thereby low therapeutic efficiency in cancer thermotherapy. Accordingly, in this dissertation, functional nanocapsules and nanoparticles including high drug loading liposome-like nanocapsules, high drug loading phospholipid-mimic nanocapsules with fast intracellular drug release, high drug loading charge-reversal nanocapsules, TAT based long blood circulation nanoparticles and charge-reversal nuclear targeted nanoparticles are designed and synthesized. These functional carriers have advantages such as high drug loading contents without premature drug release, fast cellular internalization and intracellular drug release, nuclear targeted delivery and long blood circulation. As a result, all these drug carriers show much higher in vitro and in vivo anti-cancer activities.

  9. Drugs, prisons, and harm reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Rhidian

    2003-01-01

    The use of drugs in society raises important considerations for health and social policy. Critical health and social care issues arise when drugs are used inside prisons. This paper argues that there is an urgent need for prison drug policies to adopt the principles of harm reduction. However, current policy orthodoxy emphasises the control of drugs and punishment for drug taking. Key components of harm reduction are operationalised in this article by exploring the potential for harm reduction in prison within the context of English drug policy. Whilst the focus is on English policy debates, the discussion will have wider international resonance. Copyright 2003 The Haworth Press, Inc.

  10. DRUG INTERACTIONS WITH DIAZEPAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Bojanić

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Diazepam is a benzodiazepine derivative with anxyolitic, anticonvulsant, hypnotic, sedative, skeletal muscle relaxant, antitremor, and amnestic activity. It is metabolized in the liver by the cytochrome P (CYP 450 enzyme system. Diazepam is N-demethylated by CYP3A4 and CYP2C19 to the active metabolite N-desmethyldiazepam, and is hydroxylated by CYP3A4 to the active metabolite temazepam. N-desmethyl-diazepam and temazepam are both further metabolized to oxazepam. Concomitant intake of inhibitors or inducers of the CYP isozymes involved in the biotransformation of diazepam may alter plasma concentrations of this drug, although this effect is unlikely to be associated with clinically relevant interactions.The goal of this article was to review the current literature on clinically relevant pharmacokinetic drug interactions with diazepam.A search of MEDLINE and EMBASE was conducted for original research and review articles published in English between January 1971. and May 2011. Among the search terms were drug interactions, diazepam, pharmacokinetics, drug metabolism, and cytochrome P450. Only articles published in peer-reviewed journals were included, and meeting abstracts were excluded. The reference lists of relevant articles were hand-searched for additional publications.Diazepam is substantially sorbed by the plastics in flexible containers, volume control set chambers, and tubings of intravenous administration sets. Manufacturers recommend not mixing with any other drug or solution in syringe or solution, although diazepam is compatible in syringe with cimetidine and ranitidine, and in Y-site with cisatracurium, dobutamine, fentanyl, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, nafcillin, quinidine gluconate, remifentanil, and sufentanil. Diazepam is compatible with: dextrose 5% in water, Ringers injection, Ringers injection lactated and sodium chloride 0.9%. Emulsified diazepam is compatible with Intralipid and Nutralipid.Diazepam has low potential

  11. Drug Facts Chat Day: NIH Experts Answer Students' Drug Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stay in contact with the more than 200 schools that participated in the chat by providing them with new materials about drug abuse as they are developed. A full transcript of the Drug Facts Chat Day questions and ...

  12. Successful treatment of Graves disease in pregnancy with Lugol's iodine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, A; Semple, C G

    2000-02-01

    We report a case of Grave's disease in pregnancy complicated by intolerance of standard antithyroid drug therapy. We describe the success of prolonged use of organic iodine as a primary treatment prior to surgical intervention.

  13. Transporters and drug-drug interactions: important determinants of drug disposition and effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Jörg; Müller, Fabian; Fromm, Martin F

    2013-07-01

    Uptake and efflux transporters determine plasma and tissue concentrations of a broad variety of drugs. They are localized in organs such as small intestine, liver, and kidney, which are critical for drug absorption and elimination. Moreover, they can be found in important blood-tissue barriers such as the blood-brain barrier. Inhibition or induction of drug transporters by coadministered drugs can alter pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the victim drugs. This review will summarize in particular clinically observed drug-drug interactions attributable to inhibition or induction of intestinal export transporters [P-glycoprotein (P-gp), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP)], to inhibition of hepatic uptake transporters [organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs)], or to inhibition of transporter-mediated [organic anion transporters (OATs), organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2), multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins (MATEs), P-gp] renal secretion of xenobiotics. Available data on the impact of nutrition on transport processes as well as genotype-dependent, transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions will be discussed. We will also present and discuss data on the variable extent to which information on the impact of transporters on drug disposition is included in summaries of product characteristics of selected countries (SPCs). Further work is required regarding a better understanding of the role of the drug metabolism-drug transport interplay for drug-drug interactions and on the extrapolation of in vitro findings to the in vivo (human) situation.

  14. Insula and drug cravings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavan, Hugh

    2010-06-01

    This paper reviews the role of the insula in drug craving. Evidence is presented that drug craving may be a particular instance of the anterior insula's broader role in interoception and subjective feeling states similar, for example, to thirst and hunger. An important role for the insula in craving is supported by evidence of insular activity changing with satiety and with the top-down cognitive modulation of cravings. Cognitive processes involving the insula's role in awareness of one's own behaviour may also contribute to craving insofar as the avoidance of craving might require subjective awareness of the endogenous and exogenous cues that initiate it. Finally, some consideration is given to sex differences and developmental processes in craving.

  15. Psychedelic Drugs in Biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyzar, Evan J; Nichols, Charles D; Gainetdinov, Raul R; Nichols, David E; Kalueff, Allan V

    2017-11-01

    Psychedelic drugs, such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), mescaline, and psilocybin, exert profound effects on brain and behavior. After decades of difficulties in studying these compounds, psychedelics are again being tested as potential treatments for intractable biomedical disorders. Preclinical research of psychedelics complements human neuroimaging studies and pilot clinical trials, suggesting these compounds as promising treatments for addiction, depression, anxiety, and other conditions. However, many questions regarding the mechanisms of action, safety, and efficacy of psychedelics remain. Here, we summarize recent preclinical and clinical data in this field, discuss their pharmacological mechanisms of action, and outline critical areas for future studies of psychedelic drugs, with the goal of maximizing the potential benefits of translational psychedelic biomedicine to patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Drug induced rhabdomyolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenegger, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a clinical condition of potential life threatening destruction of skeletal muscle caused by diverse mechanisms including drugs and toxins. Given the fact that structurally not related compounds cause an identical phenotype pinpoints to common targets or pathways, responsible for executing rhabdomyolysis. A drop in myoplasmic ATP paralleled with sustained elevations in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration represents a common signature of rhabdomyolysis. Interestingly, cardiac tissue is hardly affected or only secondary, as a consequence of imbalance in electrolytes or acid–base equilibrium. This dogma is now impaired by compounds, which show up with combined toxicity in heart and skeletal muscle. In this review, cases of rhabdomyolysis with novel recently approved drugs will be explored for new target mechanisms in the light of previously described pathomechanisms. PMID:22560920

  17. Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors Drug Resistance Mutations in Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate the extent of HIV-1 drug resistance among drug naïve Kenyan individuals. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Kenya Medical Research Institute HIV laboratory Nairobi, Kenya. Subjects: A total of seventy eight HIV-1 positive drug naïve subjects randomised from five Kenyan provincial hospitals ...

  18. Abuse of antiretroviral drugs combined with addictive drugs by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reports of the use of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) to produce a highly addictive drug called nyaope or whoonga are of major concern as ARVs are easily accessible in sub-Saharan Africa, including to pregnant women. Use of illicit drugs by pregnant women may result in serious adverse effects in their infants. We have ...

  19. Identification of clinically significant drug-drug interactions in cardiac ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drug Saf 2007; 16(6): 641-651. 12. Hamilton RA, Briceland LL, Andritz MH. Frequency of. Hospitalization after Exposure to Known Drug‐Drug. Interactions in a Medicaid Population. Pharmacother. 1998; 18(5): 1112-1120. 13. Micromedex T. Drug-Reax® system. 14. SPSS I. IBM SPSS statistics for Windows, version 20.0.

  20. Evaluation of drug-drug interactions among patients with chronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The risk of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is high in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) necessitating dose adjustments or the avoidance of drug combinations. This study aimed to evaluate DDIs among patients with CKD in the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH), Enugu, South-East Nigeria.

  1. Potential drug-drug interactions on in-patient medication ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are an important cause of adverse drug reactions. The pharmacoepidemiology of such interactions in hospitals in Uganda is not known. Objectives: To determine the prevalence, clinical importance and factors associated with potential DDIs at Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital ...

  2. Psychotropic drugs and bruxism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falisi, Giovanni; Rastelli, Claudio; Panti, Fabrizio; Maglione, Horacio; Quezada Arcega, Raul

    2014-10-01

    Sleep and awake bruxism is defined as 'a parafunctional activity including clenching, bracing, gnashing, and grinding of the teeth'. Some evidence suggests that bruxism may be caused by, or associated with, alterations in the CNS neurotransmission. Several classes of psychotropic drugs interfering with CNS activity may potentially contribute to bruxism. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine relevant peer-reviewed papers to identify and describe the various classes of psychotropic substances that may cause, exacerbate or reduce bruxism as the result of their pharmacological action in CNS neurons. A literature search from 1980 to the present was performed using PubMed database. The term 'bruxism' was used in association with 'psychotropic', 'dopamine (DA)', 'serotonin', 'histamine', 'antipsychotics', 'antidepressants', 'antihistaminergics' and 'stimulants'. Studies on the effects of DA agonists (Levo-DOPA, psychostimulants) and antagonists (antipsychotics) identified a central role of DA in the pathogenesis of pharmacologically induced bruxism. Important information from studies on drugs acting on serotonin neurotransmission (antidepressants) was recognized. Other mechanisms involving different neurotransmitters are emerging. This is the case of antihistaminergic drugs which may induce bruxism as a consequence of their disinhibitory effect on the serotonergic system.

  3. [Intrathecal administration of drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, I A; Levitina, E V; Akimzhanova, A K; Rakhmanina, O A; Shtork, T E

    2016-01-01

    The article summarizes the introduction of drugs into the cerebrospinal fluid. Indications and contraindications for the administration of pharmaceuticals in the cerebrospinal fluid spaces are presented. Main groups of pharmacological agents used for endolumbar introduction and conditions under which they are used, as well as advantages and disadvantages of this treatment are considered. The authors describe a method of administration of antibiotics for bacterial and fungal infections of the central nervous system. The need to assess the intracranial pressure prior to cisternal puncture and exclude blocking of cerebrospinal fluid pathways is emphasized. Information about intrathecal administration of anticancer and cytostatic drugs in primary and metastatic brain lesions as well as data on the significant positive effect of oxygen-ozone mixture in the treatment of victims of traumatic brain injury in its acute period are presented. Of interest are the results of the study, which showed a statistically significant reduction in the severity of neurological deficit after the introduction of cerebrolysin in the lumbar space in the first days after the onset of cerebral infarction. Possible complications of the described method of drug delivery, measures taken against them and methods of preventionare described.

  4. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Use and SUDs in LGBT Populations Treatment Trends & Statistics Women and Drugs Publications Search Publications Orderable DrugFacts ... decrease symptoms of illness. To learn about current statistics of HIV in the United States, please visit: ...

  5. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... drug injection and unsafe sexual practices. Drug use disorder treatment programs also serve ... as a means of communication. The "Text Message" PSA features two young girls ...

  6. Drug Establishments Current Registration Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Drug Establishments Current Registration Site (DECRS) is a database of current information submitted by drug firms to register establishments (facilities) which...

  7. Marine Corps Drug Prevention Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stander, Valerie A; Reed, Cheryl; Olson, Cheryl B; Johnson, Judy; Merrill, Lex L; Clapp, John; Elder, John; Lawson, Gary; Mangual, George; Lowe, Nate

    2003-01-01

    .... Some of the common components were information on the consequences of drug use, decision-making skill training, public pledges not to use drugs, values clarification, goal setting, stress management...

  8. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... HIV infection in the United States. Drugs can change the way the brain works, disrupting the parts ... HIV infection in the United States. Drugs can change the way the brain works, disrupting the parts ...

  9. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... News NIDA Notes Podcasts E-Newsletters Public Education Projects National Drug & Alcohol Facts Week NIDA TV PEERx Drugs & Health Blog The NIDA Science Fair Award for Addiction Science USA Science & Engineering ...

  10. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... Parents & Educators Children & Teens Search Connect with NIDA : Facebook LinkedIn Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Menu Home Drugs of Abuse Commonly Abused Drugs Charts Emerging Trends and Alerts ...

  11. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... Drugs and HIV Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter 2005 –Ongoing Behaviors associated with ... Send the Message . Get the Facts What are HIV and AIDS? HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is the ...

  12. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... cdc.gov/hiv/risk/age/youth/index.html​ . Resources Publications Drug Facts: Drug Use and Viral Infections : ... what to do to counter these trends. Online Resources NIDA for Teens Web site : This Web site ...

  13. Drug involvement in fatal overdoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Ruhm

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Death certificate data from the Multiple Cause of Death (MCOD files were analyzed to better understand the drug categories most responsible for the increase in fatal overdoses occurring between 1999 and 2014. Statistical adjustment methods were used to account for the understatement in reported drug involvement occurring because death certificates frequently do not specify which drugs were involved in the deaths. The frequency of combination drug use introduced additional uncertainty and so a distinction was made between any versus exclusive drug involvement. Many results were sensitive to the starting and ending years chosen for examination. Opioid analgesics played a major role in the increased drug deaths for analysis windows starting in 1999 but other drugs, particularly heroin, became more significant for recent time periods. Combination drug use was important for all time periods and needs to be accounted for when designing policies to slow or reverse the increase in overdose deaths.

  14. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and SUDs in LGBT Populations Treatment Trends & Statistics Women and Drugs Publications Search Publications Orderable DrugFacts Research Reports Mind Over Matter Science of Addiction Funding Funding Opportunities Clinical Research Post- ...

  15. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... associated with drug misuse are among the main factors in the spread of HIV infection in the ... associated with drug misuse are among the main factors in the spread of HIV infection in the ...

  16. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... affect judgment and can lead to unsafe sexual practices, which put people at risk for getting HIV ... risk behaviors, including drug injection and unsafe sexual practices. Drug use disorder treatment programs also serve an ...

  17. Human drug metabolism: an introduction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coleman, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    ... metabolism and its impact on patient welfare. After underlining the relationship between efficacy, toxicity and drug concentration, the book then considers how metabolizing systems operate and how they impact upon drug concentration...

  18. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... the main factors in the spread of HIV infection in the United States. Drugs can change the ... about the link between drug misuse and HIV infection. It contains information for young people, parents and ...

  19. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... HIV patients who do not misuse drugs. In animal studies, methamphetamine has been shown to increase the ... Drugs and HIV" Video How many of us think about HIV/AIDS when we’re at parties ...

  20. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... Prevention Recovery Substance Use and SUDs in LGBT Populations Treatment Trends & Statistics Women and Drugs Publications Search ... the link between drug misuse and HIV/AIDS, populations most at risk, trends in HIV/AIDS, and ...

  1. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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  2. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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  3. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Fentanyl Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Prescription Drugs and ... brain that people use to weigh risks and benefits when making decisions. This page connects you to ...

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    Full Text Available ... Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Fentanyl Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Prescription Drugs and ... young girls texting each other about a mutual friend who got high at a party and made ...

  5. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... drugs, which can alter judgment and inhibition and lead people to engage in impulsive and unsafe behaviors. ... Drug and alcohol intoxication affect judgment and can lead to unsafe sexual practices, which put people at ...

  6. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... HIV or transmitting it to someone else. Biological effects of drugs. Drug misuse and addiction can affect a person's overall health, thereby altering susceptibility to HIV and progression of ...

  7. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... among the main factors in the spread of HIV infection in the United States. Drugs can change the ... information about the link between drug misuse and HIV infection. It contains information for young people, parents and ...

  8. Drug: D09520 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D09520 Crude ... Drug Soft shell turtle carapace (non-JP); Amyda carapace; Amydae ... ... Trionychidae Amyda japonica, Amyda sinensis carapace; Standards for non-pharmacopoeial crude drugs ... PubChem: 96026200 ...

  9. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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  10. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... from the Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, Dr. Nora D. Volkow. Message from the Director ... D. Volkow, M.D. Director National Institute on Drug Abuse Collaborators Thanks to Those Who Have Helped Raise ...

  11. Drugs that may cause impotence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impotence caused by medications; Drug-induced erectile dysfunction; Prescription medicines and impotence ... Many medicines and recreational drugs can affect a man's sexual arousal and sexual performance. What causes impotence in one ...

  12. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... and other tools to send the message to America's youth that using drugs and alcohol even once ... drug use and HIV. Television Networks: MunDos Azteca America Univision Telemundo Galavision Telefutura CW BET NBC ABC ...

  13. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... Plan Search Share ... Behaviors associated with drug misuse are among the main factors in the spread of HIV infection in the United States. Drugs can change the way the brain works, disrupting the parts ...

  14. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... States. Drugs can change the way the brain works, disrupting the parts of the brain that people ... States. Drugs can change the way the brain works, disrupting the parts of the brain that people ...

  15. Visualizing Drug Efficacy In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weisheng Zhang

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Many enzymes are therapeutic targets for drug discovery, whereas other enzymes are important for understanding drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics during compound testing in animals. Testing of drug efficacy and metabolism in an animal model requires the measurement of disease endpoints as well as assays of enzyme activity in specific tissues at selected time points during treatment. This requires the removal of tissue and biochemical assays. Techniques to noninvasively assess drug effects on enzyme activity using imaging technology would facilitate understanding of drug efficacy, pharmacokinetics, and drug metabolism. Using a commercially available cytochrome P−450 3A substrate whose oxidized product is a luciferase substrate, we show for the first time that cytochrome P−450 enzyme activity can be measured in vivo in real time by bioluminescent imaging. This imaging approach could be applicable to study drug effects on therapeutic target enzymes, as well as drug metabolism enzymes.

  16. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... and SUDs in LGBT Populations Treatment Trends & Statistics Women and Drugs Publications Search Publications Orderable DrugFacts Research ... of an uninfected person. In addition, infected pregnant women can pass HIV to their babies during pregnancy, ...

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    Full Text Available ... Drugs and the Brain Genetics Global Health Health Consequences of Drug Misuse Hepatitis (Viral) HIV/AIDS Mental ... and alcohol even once can have serious health consequences. We also work to reach parents and teachers— ...

  1. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... intoxication affect judgment and can lead to unsafe sexual practices, which put people at risk for getting ... related risk behaviors, including drug injection and unsafe sexual practices. Drug use disorder treatment programs also serve ...

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    Full Text Available ... can cause liver disease and permanent liver damage. Poor judgment and risky behavior. Drug misuse by any ... drug use and alcohol use can lead to poor decision making, which can result in risky sexual ...

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    Full Text Available ... who do not misuse drugs. In animal studies, methamphetamine has been shown to increase the amount of HIV in brain cells 1 . Drug use disorder treatment. Since the late 1980s, research has shown that ...

  4. Drug: D02104 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available gesic ... DG01586 ... Opioid receptor antagonist ... DG01587 ... Opioid receptor agonist/antagonist Other ... DG01718 ... Drugs... for addictive disorder ... DG01716 ... Drugs for alcohol dependence ATC code: N07BB05 Chemical group: DG00998 ...

  5. Drug: D10250 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 08249]) ... Other ... DG01718 ... Drugs for addictive disorder ... DG01717 ... Drugs for opioid dependence ATC code: N07BC51 ... Treatment of opioid dependence ... PubChem: 163312281 ...

  6. Drug: D05111 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... DG01586 ... Opioid receptor antagonist ... DG01587 ... Opioid receptor agonist/antagonist Other ... DG01718 ... Drugs for... addictive disorder ... DG01716 ... Drugs for alcohol dependence Same as: C08027 ATC code: N07BB05 Chemical group

  7. Drug: D02102 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available gonist ... DG01563 ... mu-Opioid receptor agonist Analgesic ... DG01984 ... Opioid analgesics Other ... DG01718 ... Drugs for... addictive disorder ... DG01717 ... Drugs for opioid dependence Cyp substrate ... DG01633

  8. Drug: D08141 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available receptor agonist ... DG01655 ... alpha2-adrenergic receptor specific agonist Other ... DG01718 ... Drugs for addicti...ve disorder ... DG01717 ... Drugs for opioid dependence ATC code: N07BC04 Chemical gro

  9. Drug: D07810 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available gonist ... DG01563 ... mu-Opioid receptor agonist Analgesic ... DG01984 ... Opioid analgesics Other ... DG01718 ... Drugs for... addictive disorder ... DG01717 ... Drugs for opioid dependence ATC code: N07BC06 Chem

  10. Drug: D06282 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available C4H6O6 D06282.gif ... Neuropsychiatric agent ... DG01571 ... Nicotinic cholinergic receptor partial agonist Other ... DG01718 ... Drugs... for addictive disorder ... DG01715 ... Drugs for nicotine dependence Therapeutic category: 7990 A

  11. Drug: D02780 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available )2. Ca D02780.gif ... Neuropsychiatric agent ... DG01498 ... NMDA receptor antagonist Other ... DG01718 ... Drugs for add...ictive disorder ... DG01716 ... Drugs for alcohol dependence Therapeutic category: 1190 ATC code: N07BB03 Chemica

  12. Drug: D00836 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D00836.gif ... Analgesic ... DG01984 ... Opioid analgesics ... DG01586 ... Opioid receptor antagonist Other ... DG01718 ... Drugs... for addictive disorder ... DG01717 ... Drugs for opioid dependence Therapeutic category: 1149 ATC code: N02AE0

  13. Drug: D04765 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available agonist ... DG01449 ... alpha2-Adrenergic receptor agonist ... DG01655 ... alpha2-adrenergic receptor specific agonist Other ... DG01718 ... Drugs... for addictive disorder ... DG01717 ... Drugs for opioid depe

  14. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... html ). Atlanta, GA: CDC, DHHS. Retrieved November 2017. How are Drug Misuse and HIV Related? Drug misuse ... Am. J. Pathol. 2010. 177(1):355-361. How are Teens Affected? Young people are at risk ...

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    Full Text Available ... the News NIDA Notes Podcasts E-Newsletters Public Education Projects National Drug & Alcohol Facts Week NIDA TV PEERx Drugs & Health Blog The NIDA Science Fair Award for Addiction Science USA Science & Engineering ...

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    Full Text Available ... Populations Treatment Trends & Statistics Women and Drugs Publications Search Publications Orderable DrugFacts Research Reports Mind Over Matter Science of Addiction Funding Funding Opportunities Clinical Research Post- ...

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    Full Text Available ... can pass HIV to their babies during pregnancy, delivery, and breastfeeding. HIV destroys a certain kind of ... GA: CDC, DHHS. Retrieved November 2017. How are Drug Misuse and HIV Related? Drug misuse and addiction ...

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    Full Text Available ... updates. Read on to Learn the Link between drug use and HIV and to help us Send the ... since the beginning of the epidemic. Although injection drug use is well known in this regard, the role ...

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    Full Text Available ... AIDS. ( https://www.cdc.gov/actagainstaids/basics/whatishiv.html ). Atlanta, GA: CDC, DHHS. Retrieved November 2017. How ... www.cdc.gov/hiv/risk/age/youth/index.html​ . Resources Publications Drug Facts: Drug Use and Viral ...